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Sample records for active force production

  1. Energy cost of isometric force production after active shortening in skinned muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Joumaa, V; Fitzowich, A; Herzog, W

    2017-02-23

    The steady state isometric force after active shortening of a skeletal muscle is lower than the purely isometric force at the corresponding length. This property of skeletal muscle is known as force depression. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the energy cost of force production at the steady state after active shortening was reduced compared to the energy cost of force production for a purely isometric contraction performed at the corresponding length (same length, same activation). Experiments were performed in skinned fibres isolated from rabbit psoas muscle. Skinned fibres were actively shortened from an average sarcomere length of 3.0 µm to an average sarcomere length of 2.4 µm. Purely isometric reference contractions were performed at an average sarcomere length of 2.4 µm. Simultaneously with the force measurements, the ATP cost was measured during the last 30 seconds of isometric contractions using an enzyme-coupled assay. Stiffness was calculated during a quick stretch-release cycle of 0.2% fibre length performed once the steady state had been reached after active shortening and during the purely isometric reference contractions. Force and stiffness following active shortening were decreased by 10.0±1.8% and 11.0±2.2%, respectively compared to the isometric reference contractions. Similarly, ATPase activity per second (not normalized to the force) showed a decrease of 15.6±3.0% in the force depressed state compared to the purely isometric reference state. However, ATPase activity per second per unit of force was similar for the isometric contractions following active shortening (28.7±2.4 mM/mN.s.mm(3)) and the corresponding purely isometric reference contraction (30.9±2.8 mM/mN.s.mm(3)). Furthermore, the reduction in absolute ATPase activity per second was significantly correlated with force depression and stiffness depression. These results are in accordance with the idea that force depression following active shortening is

  2. Role of biomechanics and muscle activation strategy in the production of endpoint force patterns in the cat hindlimb.

    PubMed

    Lemay, Michel A; Bhowmik-Stoker, Manoshi; McConnell, George C; Grill, Warren M

    2007-01-01

    We used a musculoskeletal model of the cat hindlimb to compare the patterns of endpoint forces generated by all possible combination of 12 hindlimb muscles under three different muscle activation rules: homogeneous activation of muscles based on uniform activation levels, homogeneous activation of muscles based on uniform (normalized) force production, and activation based on the topography of spinal motoneuron pools. Force patterns were compared with the patterns obtained experimentally by microstimulation of the lumbar spinal cord in spinal intact cats. Magnitude and orientation of the force patterns were compared, as well as the proportion of the types found, and the proportions of patterns exhibiting points of zero force (equilibrium points). The force patterns obtained with the homogenous activation and motoneuron topography models were quite similar to those measured experimentally, with the differences being larger for the patterns from the normalized endpoint forces model. Differences in the proportions of types of force patterns between the three models and the experimental results were significant for each model. Both homogeneous activation and normalized endpoint force models produced similar proportions of equilibrium points as found experimentally. The results suggest that muscle biomechanics play an important role in limiting the number of endpoint force pattern types, and that muscle combinations activated at similar levels reproduced best the experimental results obtained with intraspinal microstimulation.

  3. PPARδ agonism inhibits skeletal muscle PDC activity, mitochondrial ATP production and force generation during prolonged contraction

    PubMed Central

    Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Baker, David J; Constantin, Despina; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2009-01-01

    We have recently shown that PPARδ agonism, used clinically to treat insulin resistance, increases fat oxidation and up-regulates mitochondrial PDK4 mRNA and protein expression in resting skeletal muscle. We hypothesized that PDK4 up-regulation, which inhibits pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC)-dependent carbohydrate (CHO) oxidation, would negatively affect muscle function during sustained contraction where the demand on CHO is markedly increased. Three groups of eight male Wistar rats each received either vehicle or a PPARδ agonist (GW610742X) at two doses (5 and 100 mg (kg body mass (bm))−1 orally for 6 days. On the seventh day, the gastrocnemius–soleus–plantaris muscle group was isolated and snap frozen, or underwent 30 min of electrically evoked submaximal intensity isometric contraction using a perfused hindlimb model. During contraction, the rate of muscle PDC activation was significantly lower at 100 mg (kg bm)−1 compared with control (P < 0.01). Furthermore, the rates of muscle PCr hydrolysis and lactate accumulation were significantly increased at 100 mg (kg bm)−1 compared with control, reflecting lower mitochondrial ATP generation. Muscle tension development during contraction was significantly lower at 100 mg (kg bm)−1 compared with control (25%; P < 0.05). The present data demonstrate that PPARδ agonism inhibits muscle CHO oxidation at the level of PDC during prolonged contraction, and is paralleled by the activation of anaerobic metabolism, which collectively impair contractile function. PMID:19001043

  4. Filament compliance influences cooperative activation of thin filaments and the dynamics of force production in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Bertrand C W; Daniel, Thomas L; Regnier, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Striated muscle contraction is a highly cooperative process initiated by Ca²⁺ binding to the troponin complex, which leads to tropomyosin movement and myosin cross-bridge (XB) formation along thin filaments. Experimental and computational studies suggest skeletal muscle fiber activation is greatly augmented by cooperative interactions between neighboring thin filament regulatory units (RU-RU cooperativity; 1 RU = 7 actin monomers+1 troponin complex+1 tropomyosin molecule). XB binding can also amplify thin filament activation through interactions with RUs (XB-RU cooperativity). Because these interactions occur with a temporal order, they can be considered kinetic forms of cooperativity. Our previous spatially-explicit models illustrated that mechanical forms of cooperativity also exist, arising from XB-induced XB binding (XB-XB cooperativity). These mechanical and kinetic forms of cooperativity are likely coordinated during muscle contraction, but the relative contribution from each of these mechanisms is difficult to separate experimentally. To investigate these contributions we built a multi-filament model of the half sarcomere, allowing RU activation kinetics to vary with the state of neighboring RUs or XBs. Simulations suggest Ca²⁺ binding to troponin activates a thin filament distance spanning 9 to 11 actins and coupled RU-RU interactions dominate the cooperative force response in skeletal muscle, consistent with measurements from rabbit psoas fibers. XB binding was critical for stabilizing thin filament activation, particularly at submaximal Ca²⁺ levels, even though XB-RU cooperativity amplified force less than RU-RU cooperativity. Similar to previous studies, XB-XB cooperativity scaled inversely with lattice stiffness, leading to slower rates of force development as stiffness decreased. Including RU-RU and XB-RU cooperativity in this model resulted in the novel prediction that the force-[Ca²⁺] relationship can vary due to filament and XB

  5. The effect of swinging the arms on muscle activation and production of leg force during ski skating at different skiing speeds.

    PubMed

    Göpfert, Caroline; Lindinger, Stefan J; Ohtonen, Olli; Rapp, Walter; Müller, Erich; Linnamo, Vesa

    2016-06-01

    The study investigated the effects of arm swing during leg push-off in V2-alternate/G4 skating on neuromuscular activation and force production by the leg muscles. Nine skilled cross-country skiers performed V2-alternate skating without poles at moderate, high, and maximal speeds, both with free (SWING) and restricted arm swing (NOSWING). Maximal speed was 5% greater in SWING (P<0.01), while neuromuscular activation and produced forces did not differ between techniques. At both moderate and high speed the maximal (2% and 5%, respectively) and average (both 5%) vertical force and associated impulse (10% and 14%) were greater with SWING (all P<0.05). At high speed range of motion and angular velocity of knee flexion were 24% greater with SWING (both P<0.05), while average EMG of m. biceps femoris was 31% lower (all P<0.05) in SWING. In a similar manner, the average EMG of m. vastus medialis and m. biceps femoris were lower (17% and 32%, P<0.05) during the following knee extension. Thus, swinging the arms while performing V2-alternate can enhance both maximal speed and skiing economy at moderate and, in particularly, high speeds.

  6. Perceived submaximal force production in young adults.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Allen W; Ludtke, Andrew W; Martin, Scott B; Koziris, L Perry; Dishman, Rod K

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the force production patterns using perceived stimulus cues from 10% to 90% of maximal force. In Experiment 1, 54 men (age: 19-34 years) and 53 women (age: 18-37years) performed leg extensions on a dynamometer at a speed of 60 degrees/s. Participants produced actual forces perceived to be 10-90% of maximal force in 10% increments followed by a maximal force. A 2-min rest interval was maintained between each increment. Participants rested 5 min and repeated the protocol. Desired forces were calculated as the required percentage of the produced maximalforce. In Experiment 2, 40 men (age: 18-30years)followed the protocol ofExperiment 1, but the submaximal stimuli were randomly presented. In Experiment 1, test-retest results indicated consistency between the trials for actual and maximal force (r = .90). The correlations between actual and desired forces were moderately high (r > .76). Actual forces trended above desired forces at 10% of maximal, with median errors ranging 33-40% for men and 60-73% for women. From 30% to 90% of maximal forces, actual trended below desired forces, with median errors ranging from a low of 1.5% to a high of 37%. A power function analysis relating the change in actual force with desired force stimuli produced exponents of 0.68 (.95 CI = 0.62-0.74) for men and 0.5 7 (.95 CI = 0.52-0.62)for women. Findings were similar in Experiment 2, indicating that individuals tended to overshoot and then undershoot desired force production through perceptual force ranges of 10-90% of maximal forces and that force production grew more slowly than perceptual stimulus cues. The results of the present study, along with findings from past research, indicate that production of submaximal force using perceptual cues or stimuli display a great deal of specificity. This specificity is related to type of contraction, amount of muscle mass involved, and number and types of stimuli.

  7. Perceived Submaximal Force Production in Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Allen W.; Ludtke, Andrew W.; Martin, Scott B.; Koziris, L. (Perry); Dishman, Rod K.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the force production patterns using perceived stimulus cues from 10% to 90% of maximal force. In Experiment 1, 54 men (age: 19-34 years) and 53 women (age: 18-37 years) performed leg extensions on a dynamometer at a speed of 60 degrees/s. Participants produced actual forces perceived to be 10-90% of…

  8. The mechanical forces in katydid sound production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Huaping; Chiu, Cheng-Wei; Zhou, Yan; He, Xingliang; Epstein, Ben; Liang, Hong

    2013-10-01

    Katydids and crickets generate their characteristic calling sound by rubbing their wings together. The mechanisms of the rubbing force, however, have not been extensively studied. The change of mechanical force with external parameters (speed and applied load) in the stridulation process has not been reported. Our current study aims to investigate the mechanical forces of katydid stridulation. Four pairs of files and plectrums from a katydid, which are responsible for the katydid's sound production, were examined with a specially designed experimental configuration. Due to the asymmetric nature of the wing motion in their opening and closing, the contact between the plectrum and file resembles that of a ratchet. Multiple frequencies were generated during experimental wing rubbing so that a calling-like sound was produced. Results showed that the morphology of the plectrum/file contact has significant effects on mechanical forces induced on the wings and resulting sound production. The roles of the mechanical forces include sound generation, tone modification, and energy consumption. The findings in this work reveal the variation trend of mechanical force with sliding speed and applied load. The frequency and amplitude of the sound wave produced in tribo-test are close to those in natural condition. By mimicking the microstructure of the plectrum and file teeth, acoustic instruments with high mechanical energy conversion rate can be developed. Our results provide new approaches in the design and improvement of micro-machines for acoustic applications, as well as in hybrid robotic systems.

  9. Predicting hand forces from scalp electroencephalography during isometric force production and object grasping.

    PubMed

    Paek, Andrew Y; Gailey, Alycia; Parikh, Pranav; Santello, Marco; Contreras-Vidal, Jose

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of predicting hand forces from brain activity recorded with scalp electroencephalography (EEG). Ten able-bodied subjects participated in two tasks: an isometric force production task and a grasp-and-lift task using unconstrained and constrained grasps. We found that EEG electrodes spanning central areas of the scalp were highly correlated to force rate trajectories. Moreover, EEG grand averages in central sites resembled force rate trajectories as opposed to force trajectories. The grasp-and-lift task resulted in higher decoding accuracies than the isometric force production task: across nine subjects, median accuracies for the isometric force production task were r=0.35 whereas median accuracies for unconstrained grasping were r=0.51 and for constrained grasping were r=0.50. Such results could lead to an understanding of the neural representation behind the control of hand forces and could be implemented in the neural control of closed-loop hand-based neuroprostheses.

  10. Lactate and force production in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Michael; Albertsen, Janni; Rentsch, Maria; Juel, Carsten

    2005-01-15

    Lactic acid accumulation is generally believed to be involved in muscle fatigue. However, one study reported that in rat soleus muscle (in vitro), with force depressed by high external K(+) concentrations a subsequent incubation with lactic acid restores force and thereby protects against fatigue. However, incubation with 20 mm lactic acid reduces the pH gradient across the sarcolemma, whereas the gradient is increased during muscle activity. Furthermore, unlike active muscle the Na(+)-K(+) pump is not activated. We therefore hypothesized that lactic acid does not protect against fatigue in active muscle. Three incubation solutions were used: 20 mM Na-lactate (which acidifies internal pH), 12 mM Na-lactate +8 mm lactic acid (which mimics the pH changes during muscle activity), and 20 mM lactic acid (which acidifies external pH more than internal pH). All three solutions improved force in K(+)-depressed rat soleus muscle. The pH regulation associated with lactate incubation accelerated the Na(+)-K(+) pump. To study whether the protective effect of lactate/lactic acid is a general mechanism, we stimulated muscles to fatigue with and without pre-incubation. None of the incubation solutions improved force development in repetitively stimulated muscle (Na-lactate had a negative effect). It is concluded that although lactate/lactic acid incubation regains force in K(+)-depressed resting muscle, a similar incubation has no or a negative effect on force development in active muscle. It is suggested that the difference between the two situations is that lactate/lactic acid removes the negative consequences of an unusual large depolarization in the K(+)-treated passive muscle, whereas the depolarization is less pronounced in active muscle.

  11. T cell activation requires force generation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kenneth H.

    2016-01-01

    Triggering of the T cell receptor (TCR) integrates both binding kinetics and mechanical forces. To understand the contribution of the T cell cytoskeleton to these forces, we triggered T cells using a novel application of atomic force microscopy (AFM). We presented antigenic stimulation using the AFM cantilever while simultaneously imaging with optical microscopy and measuring forces on the cantilever. T cells respond forcefully to antigen after calcium flux. All forces and calcium responses were abrogated upon treatment with an F-actin inhibitor. When we emulated the forces of the T cell using the AFM cantilever, even these actin-inhibited T cells became activated. Purely mechanical stimulation was not sufficient; the exogenous forces had to couple through the TCR. These studies suggest a mechanical–chemical feedback loop in which TCR-triggered T cells generate forceful contacts with antigen-presenting cells to improve access to antigen. PMID:27241914

  12. Structural limits on force production and shortening of smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Siegman, Marion J; Davidheiser, Sandra; Mooers, Susan U; Butler, Thomas M

    2013-02-01

    This study determined the factors that limit force production and shortening in two smooth muscles having very different relationships between active and passive force as a function of muscle length. The rat anococcygeus muscle develops active force over the range of lengths 0.2-2.0× the optimum length for force production (Lo). Passive tension due to extension of the resting muscle occurs only at lengths exceeding Lo. In contrast, the rabbit taenia coli develops force in the range of lengths 0.4-1.1 Lo, and passive force which is detectable at 0.56 Lo, increases to ~0.45 maximum active force at Lo, and increases sharply with further extension. The anococcygeus muscle can shorten to 0.2 Lo and the taenia coli to 0.4 Lo. Dynamic stiffness and energy usage at short muscle lengths suggest that the limit of shortening in the taenia coli, in contrast to the anococcygeus muscle, is not due to a failure of cross bridge interaction. Phosphorylation of the regulatory myosin light chains in intact muscles decreased to a small extent at short lengths compared to the decrease in force production. The differences in force production and the extent of shortening in the two muscles was maintained even when, following permeabilization, the myosin light chains were irreversibly phosphorylated with ATPγS, indicating that differences in activation played little, if any role. Ultrastructural studies on resting and activated muscles show that the taenia coli, which is rich in connective tissue (unlike the anococcygeus muscle) undergoes marked cellular twisting and contractile filament misalignment at short lengths with compression of the extracellular matrix. As a result, force is not transmitted in the longitudinal axis of the muscle, but is dissipated against an internal load provided by the compressed extracellular matrix. These observations on two very different normal smooth muscles reveal how differences in the relative contribution of active and passive structural elements

  13. Mechanobiocatalysis: Modulating Enzymatic Activity with Mechanical Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-28

    displayed by enzymes and other materials. It was demonstrated that the application of forces to enzymes properly outfitted with polymers resulted in...intrinsic activities displayed by enzymes and other materials. It was demonstrated that the application of forces to enzymes properly outfitted with polymers ...of eYFP-containing polymer composites via the application of mechanical force, as well as showing that the photophysical properties displayed by

  14. Portfolio theory of optimal isometric force production: Variability predictions and nonequilibrium fluctuation dissipation theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, T. D.; Patanarapeelert, K.; Beek, P. J.

    2008-05-01

    We derive a fundamental relationship between the mean and the variability of isometric force. The relationship arises from an optimal collection of active motor units such that the force variability assumes a minimum (optimal isometric force). The relationship is shown to be independent of the explicit motor unit properties and of the dynamical features of isometric force production. A constant coefficient of variation in the asymptotic regime and a nonequilibrium fluctuation-dissipation theorem for optimal isometric force are predicted.

  15. Force production of a hovering hummingbird

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Haoxiang; Song, Jialei; Hedrick, Tyson

    2013-11-01

    A three-dimensional numerical study is performed for a hovering Ruby-throated hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) based on an immersed-boundary method. To accurately model the unsteady aerodynamics, realistic 3D wing kinematics is reconstructed from high-speed images of the wing motion filmed at 1000 frames per second, resulting in 25 frames per flapping cycle. A high-resolution grid is employed to resolve the vortices shed from the wing. The results are validated by comparing the spanwise vorticity and circulation with the previous PIV data and also by calculating the average lift. The force production shows significant asymmetry with the downstroke producing lift 2.6 times as high as the upstroke, despite a nearly horizontal stroke plane. The total power consumption is around 55 W/kg, which is twice of previous estimate. In this presentation, we will discuss several mechanisms that lead to the force asymmetry, including the drag-based lift and the leading-edge vortex behavior. We will also address the role of wing-wake interaction, which appears to be different for the hummingbird than some of the insects such as fruit flies. Supported by NSF (No. CBET-0954381).

  16. Force production in the rugby union scrum.

    PubMed

    Quarrie, K L; Wilson, B D

    2000-04-01

    In this study, we examined the relationship between anthropometric, strength and power characteristics of rugby forwards, their body position when scrummaging, and their ability to apply force when scrummaging. Force applied to an instrumented scrum machine was measured for 56 players, both individually and as scrum packs. Measurements of body position for individuals were made by digitizing videotape records of the trials. Forty players subsequently had their anthropometry assessed and completed several strength and power tests. Body mass, each component of somatotype, maximal anaerobic power developed on a cycle ergometer, and isokinetic knee extension strength correlated significantly with individual scrummaging force. A regression model (P < 0.001) including body mass, mesomorphy, maximal anaerobic power and hip angle while in the scrummaging position accounted for 45% of the variance in individual scrummaging force. The packs that produced the largest scrummaging forces were, in general, characterized by a greater pack force to sum of individual force ratio than the packs producing lower forces. Our results emphasize the need for a scrum pack to develop technique and coordination as a unit to maximize scrummaging force.

  17. 16 CFR 1211.13 - Inherent force activated secondary door sensors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... sensors. 1211.13 Section 1211.13 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT... § 1211.13 Inherent force activated secondary door sensors. (a) Normal operation test. (1) A force activated door sensor of a door system installed according to the installation instructions shall...

  18. Human capacity for explosive force production: neural and contractile determinants.

    PubMed

    Folland, J P; Buckthorpe, M W; Hannah, R

    2014-12-01

    This study assessed the integrative neural and contractile determinants of human knee extension explosive force production. Forty untrained participants performed voluntary and involuntary (supramaximally evoked twitches and octets - eight pulses at 300 Hz that elicit the maximum possible rate of force development) explosive isometric contractions of the knee extensors. Explosive force (F0-150 ms) and sequential rate of force development (RFD, 50-ms epochs) were measured. Surface electromyography (EMG) amplitude was recorded (superficial quadriceps and hamstrings, 50-ms epochs) and normalized (quadriceps to Mmax, hamstrings to EMGmax). Maximum voluntary force (MVF) was also assessed. Multiple linear regressions assessed the significant neural and contractile determinants of absolute and relative (%MVF) explosive force and sequential RFD. Explosive force production exhibited substantial interindividual variability, particularly during the early phase of contraction [F50, 13-fold (absolute); 7.5-fold (relative)]. Multiple regression explained 59-93% (absolute) and 35-60% (relative) of the variance in explosive force production. The primary determinants of explosive force changed during the contraction (F0-50, quadriceps EMG and Twitch F; RFD50-100, Octet RFD0-50; F100-150, MVF). In conclusion, explosive force production was largely explained by predictor neural and contractile variables, but the specific determinants changed during the phase of contraction.

  19. Reorganization of brain function during force production after stroke: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kokotilo, Kristen J; Eng, Janice J; Boyd, Lara A

    2011-01-01

    Damage to motor areas of the brain, caused by stroke, can produce devastating motor deficits, including aberrant control of force. Reorganization of brain function has been identified as one of the fundamental mechanisms involved in recovery of motor control after stroke, and recent advances in neuroimaging have enabled study of this brain reorganization. This review focuses on neuroimaging studies that have examined reorganization of brain function during force production and force modulation after stroke. Type and extent of reorganization after stroke was characterized via three factors: severity of injury, time after stroke and the impact of therapeutic interventions on brain activation during force production. Twenty-six studies meeting the inclusion criteria could be identified in MEDLINE (1980 to 2007). Relevant characteristics of studies (lesion location, chronicity of stroke, motor task) and mapping techniques varied widely. During force production, increased activation in secondary motor areas occurred in persons with more severe strokes. Also, reduced recruitment of secondary motor areas during force production was found as a function of increased time since stroke. During force modulation, increased activation in motor areas occurred with greater force generation. In addition, persons with more severe stroke showed relatively greater activation with rising force as compared to persons with less severe stroke. Lastly, alteration of brain activation during and after rehabilitative interventions in persons with stroke occurred in some studies. This systematic review establishes that reorganization of brain function during force production and force modulation can occur after stroke. These findings imply that therapeutic strategies that may be able to target brain reorganization to improve force control and functional recovery after stroke. PMID:19265770

  20. Production Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Ann, Ed.

    This production systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, domains and objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 30 modules on the following topics: production…

  1. PRODUCTS OF ACTIVATED LYMPHOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Sorg, Clemens; Bloom, Barry R.

    1973-01-01

    General methods were developed and applied to the biosynthesis and purification of products of activated lymphocytes available in minute quantities. The activity studied here was the migration inhibitory factor (MIF) produced by purified protein derivative (PPD)- or concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated lymphocytes obtained from one guinea pig or less. The methods selected yielded results in terms of two chemical parameters characteristic of the molecules involved, namely Kd on Sephadex G-75 and isoionic point, pI, on isoelectric focusing. When supernatants were fractionated on G-75 columns, there were several areas even in control supernatants which produced migration inhibition relative to medium controls. However, in PPD- and Con A-stimulated supernatants, at least one peak of MIF activity was found solely in the stimulated cultures, with a Kd of 0.15. A double-labeling technique was used to characterize the proteins of this peak. Control, unstimulated cultures were labeled with [14C]leucine and stimulated cultures were labeled with [3H]leucine. After mixing the supernatants and G-75 filtration, a major "ratiolabeled" broad peak. i.e. one with increased 3H/14C ratio, was found. When a narrow portion of this peak about Kd 0.15, containing most of the MIF activity, was subjected to analytical isoelectric focusing, all of the label was associated with proteins of lower net charge than albumin. A unique ratiolabeled peak was found in PPD- and Con A-stimulated fractions with a pI of approx. 5.3. A micropreparative isoelectric focusing technique was developed and yielded MIF activity in the same region as the major ratiolabeled peak. Further study will be required to ascertain whether the ratiolabeled protein is MIF. By following the Kd, pI, and 3H/14C labeling ratio, at least 14 products of activated lymphocytes, synthesized either de novo or in increased amounts, could be distinguished. PMID:4688317

  2. Force production and mechanical accommodation during convergent extension

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jian; Pal, Siladitya; Maiti, Spandan; Davidson, Lance A.

    2015-01-01

    Forces generated within the embryo during convergent extension (CE) must overcome mechanical resistance to push the head away from the rear. As mechanical resistance increases more than eightfold during CE and can vary twofold from individual to individual, we have proposed that developmental programs must include mechanical accommodation in order to maintain robust morphogenesis. To test this idea and investigate the processes that generate forces within early embryos, we developed a novel gel-based sensor to report force production as a tissue changes shape; we find that the mean stress produced by CE is 5.0±1.6 Pascal (Pa). Experiments with the gel-based force sensor resulted in three findings. (1) Force production and mechanical resistance can be coupled through myosin contractility. The coupling of these processes can be hidden unless affected tissues are challenged by physical constraints. (2) CE is mechanically adaptive; dorsal tissues can increase force production up to threefold to overcome a stiffer microenvironment. These findings demonstrate that mechanical accommodation can ensure robust morphogenetic movements against environmental and genetic variation that might otherwise perturb development and growth. (3) Force production is distributed between neural and mesodermal tissues in the dorsal isolate, and the notochord, a central structure involved in patterning vertebrate morphogenesis, is not required for force production during late gastrulation and early neurulation. Our findings suggest that genetic factors that coordinately alter force production and mechanical resistance are common during morphogenesis, and that their cryptic roles can be revealed when tissues are challenged by controlled biophysical constraints. PMID:25670794

  3. On the driving force of PAH production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, Michael

    1989-01-01

    The kinetic factors affecting the production of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in high-temperature pyrolysis and combustion environments are analyzed. A lumped kinetic model representing polymerization-type growth by one irreversible step and two reversible steps is considered. It is shown that at high temperatures, PAH growth is controlled by the superequilibrium of hydrogen atoms; at low temperatures and low H2 concentrations, the PAH growth rate is proportional to the rate of the H-abstraction of a hydrogen atom from aromatic molecules; while at low temperatures and high H2 concentrations, it is controlled by the thermodynamics of the H-abstraction and the kinetics of acetylene addition to aromatic radicals. The presence of oxygen mainly affects the small-molecule reactions during the induction period.

  4. Force-Induced H2S by PDLSCs Modifies Osteoclastic Activity during Tooth Movement.

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Wen, F; He, D; Liu, D; Yang, R; Wang, X; Yan, Y; Liu, Y; Kou, X; Zhou, Y

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a gasotransmitter, has been recently linked to mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) function and bone homeostasis. Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) are the main MSCs in PDL, which respond to mechanical force to induce physiological activities during orthodontic tooth movement (OTM). However, it is unknown whether mechanical force might induce endogenous H2S production by PDLSCs to regulate alveolar bone homeostasis. Here, we used a mouse OTM model to demonstrate that orthodontic force-induced endogenous H2S production in PDL tissue was associated with macrophage accumulation and osteoclastic activity in alveolar bone. Then, we showed that mechanical force application induced cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) expression and endogenous H2S production by PDLSCs. Moreover, blocking endogenous H2S or systemically increasing H2S levels could decrease or enhance force-induced osteoclastic activities to control tooth movement. We further revealed how force-induced H2S production by PDLSCs contributed to the secretion of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand/osteoprotegerin (RANKL/OPG) system by PDLSCs. The secretion and expression of these factors controlled macrophage migration and osteoclast differentiation. This study demonstrated that PDLSCs produced H2S to respond to and transduce force signals. Force-induced gasotransmitter H2S production in PDLSCs therefore regulated osteoclastic activities in alveolar bone and controlled the OTM process through the MCP-1 secretion and RANKL/OPG system.

  5. Segregated and overlapping neural circuits exist for the production of static and dynamic precision grip force.

    PubMed

    Neely, Kristina A; Coombes, Stephen A; Planetta, Peggy J; Vaillancourt, David E

    2013-03-01

    A central topic in sensorimotor neuroscience is the static-dynamic dichotomy that exists throughout the nervous system. Previous work examining motor unit synchronization reports that the activation strategy and timing of motor units differ for static and dynamic tasks. However, it remains unclear whether segregated or overlapping blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) activity exists in the brain for static and dynamic motor control. This study compared the neural circuits associated with the production of static force to those associated with the production of dynamic force pulses. To that end, healthy young adults (n = 17) completed static and dynamic precision grip force tasks during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Both tasks activated core regions within the visuomotor network, including primary and sensory motor cortices, premotor cortices, multiple visual areas, putamen, and cerebellum. Static force was associated with unique activity in a right-lateralized cortical network including inferior parietal lobe, ventral premotor cortex, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. In contrast, dynamic force was associated with unique activity in left-lateralized and midline cortical regions, including supplementary motor area, superior parietal lobe, fusiform gyrus, and visual area V3. These findings provide the first neuroimaging evidence supporting a lateralized pattern of brain activity for the production of static and dynamic precision grip force.

  6. Functional muscle synergies constrain force production during postural tasks.

    PubMed

    McKay, J Lucas; Ting, Lena H

    2008-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that a set of five functional muscle synergies were sufficient to characterize both hindlimb muscle activity and active forces during automatic postural responses in cats standing at multiple postural configurations. This characterization depended critically upon the assumption that the endpoint force vector (synergy force vector) produced by the activation of each muscle synergy rotated with the limb axis as the hindlimb posture varied in the sagittal plane. Here, we used a detailed, 3D static model of the hindlimb to confirm that this assumption is biomechanically plausible: as we varied the model posture, simulated synergy force vectors rotated monotonically with the limb axis in the parasagittal plane (r2=0.94+/-0.08). We then tested whether a neural strategy of using these five functional muscle synergies provides the same force-generating capability as controlling each of the 31 muscles individually. We compared feasible force sets (FFSs) from the model with and without a muscle synergy organization. FFS volumes were significantly reduced with the muscle synergy organization (F=1556.01, p<0.01), and as posture varied, the synergy-limited FFSs changed in shape, consistent with changes in experimentally measured active forces. In contrast, nominal FFS shapes were invariant with posture, reinforcing prior findings that postural forces cannot be predicted by hindlimb biomechanics alone. We propose that an internal model for postural force generation may coordinate functional muscle synergies that are invariant in intrinsic limb coordinates, and this reduced-dimension control scheme reduces the set of forces available for postural control.

  7. The effect of keyboard keyswitch make force on applied force and finger flexor muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Rempel, D; Serina, E; Klinenberg, E; Martin, B J; Armstrong, T J; Foulke, J A; Natarajan, S

    1997-08-01

    The design of the force-displacement characteristics or 'feel' of keyboard keyswitches has been guided by preference and performance data; there has been very little information on how switch 'feel' alters muscle activity or applied force. This is a laboratory-based repeated measures design experiment to evaluate the effect of computer keyboard keyswitch design on applied finger force and muscle activity during a typing task. Ten experienced typists typed on three keyboards which differed in keyswitch make force (0.34, 0.47 and 1.02 N) while applied fingertip force and finger flexor electromyograms were recorded. The keyboard testing order was randomized and subjects typed on each keyboard for three trials, while data was collected for a minimum of 80 keystrokes per trial. No differences in applied fingertip force or finger flexor EMG were observed during typing on keyboards with switch make force of 0.34 or 0.47 N. However, applied fingertip force increased by approximately 40% (p < 0.05) and EMG activity increased by approximately 20% (p < 0.05) when the keyswitch make force was increased from 0.47 to 1.02 N. These results suggest that, in order to minimize the biomechanical loads to forearm tendons and muscles of keyboard users, keyswitches with a make force of 0.47 N or less should be considered over switches with a make force of 1.02 N.

  8. Transient Casimir Forces from Quenches in Thermal and Active Matter.

    PubMed

    Rohwer, Christian M; Kardar, Mehran; Krüger, Matthias

    2017-01-06

    We compute fluctuation-induced (Casimir) forces for classical systems after a temperature quench. Using a generic coarse-grained model for fluctuations of a conserved density, we find that transient forces arise even if the initial and final states are force free. In setups reminiscent of Casimir (planar walls) and van der Waals (small inclusions) interactions, we find comparable exact universal expressions for the force. Dynamical details only scale the time axis of transient force curves. We propose that such quenches can be achieved, for instance, in experiments on active matter, employing tunable activity or interaction protocols.

  9. Transient Casimir Forces from Quenches in Thermal and Active Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohwer, Christian M.; Kardar, Mehran; Krüger, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    We compute fluctuation-induced (Casimir) forces for classical systems after a temperature quench. Using a generic coarse-grained model for fluctuations of a conserved density, we find that transient forces arise even if the initial and final states are force free. In setups reminiscent of Casimir (planar walls) and van der Waals (small inclusions) interactions, we find comparable exact universal expressions for the force. Dynamical details only scale the time axis of transient force curves. We propose that such quenches can be achieved, for instance, in experiments on active matter, employing tunable activity or interaction protocols.

  10. Pathway of Force Production by the Kinesin-Microtubule ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kenneth

    2007-03-01

    Kinesin is the smallest of the molecular motors, consisting of a dimer of motor domains that interact with microtubules and ATP to generate motion towards the plus ends of microtubules for fast axonal transport of membranous organelles. It operates via an alternating site ATPase pathway in which the binding of ATP to one motor domain stimulates the release of ADP from the neighboring domain as the motor walks ``hand over hand'' along the microtubule surface. This alternating site pathway is accomplished in part due to strain that distinguishes the leading from the lagging motor domains when both are bound to the microtubule. This strain leads to a weak nucleotide binding state in the leading motor and a strong nucleotide binding state in the lagging motor. The ATPase activity is linked to alternating weak and strong nucleotide binding states that are coupled to association and dissociation at the microtubule surface to produce a force for forward motion. Strain in the leading motor domain appears to be due to the disruption of the ``neck linker'' in the leading motor. Release of the trailing motor domain from the microtubule surface is the rate-limiting step and, by relaxing the tension, allows the leading domain to bind ATP and continue the cycle and forward motion. Although many of the rate constants for steps in this pathway are known, details regarding the structural and thermodynamic basis for the coupling of ATP hydrolysis to force production remain to be established. I will review our current understanding and describe some of our early attempts to resolve intermediates during movement using single molecule fluorescence methods. In collaboration with Tim Scholz and Bernhard Brenner, Hannover Medical School.

  11. Characterization of protein rheology and delivery forces for combination products.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Nitin; Pranay, Pratik; Bernacki, Joseph; Eu, Bruce; Ji, Wenchang; Walls, Ed

    2012-12-01

    Characterization of a protein-device combination product over a wide range of operating parameters defined by end-user requirements is critical for developing a product presentation that is convenient for patient use. In addition to the device components, several product attributes, such as product rheology and product-container interactions, govern the functionality of a delivery system. This article presents results from a characterization study conducted for a high-concentration antibody product in a prefilled syringe. Analytical models are used to study the rheological behavior and to estimate delivery forces over a broad design space comprising temperature, concentration, and shear stress. Data suggest that high-viscosity products may exhibit significant shear thinning under the shear rates encountered under desired injection times.

  12. Human force discrimination during active arm motion for force feedback design.

    PubMed

    Feyzabadi, Seyedshams; Straube, Sirko; Folgheraiter, Michele; Kirchner, Elsa Andrea; Kim, Su Kyoung; Albiez, Jan Christian

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to analyze the human ability of external force discrimination while actively moving the arm. With the approach presented here, we give an overview for the whole arm of the just-noticeable differences (JNDs) for controlled movements separately executed for the wrist, elbow, and shoulder joints. The work was originally motivated in the design phase of the actuation system of a wearable exoskeleton, which is used in a teleoperation scenario where force feedback should be provided to the subject. The amount of this force feedback has to be calibrated according to the human force discrimination abilities. In the experiments presented here, 10 subjects performed a series of movements facing an opposing force from a commercial haptic interface. Force changes had to be detected in a two-alternative forced choice task. For each of the three joints tested, perceptual thresholds were measured as absolute thresholds (no reference force) and three JNDs corresponding to three reference forces chosen. For this, we used the outcome of the QUEST procedure after 70 trials. Using these four measurements we computed the Weber fraction. Our results demonstrate that different Weber fractions can be measured with respect to the joint. These were 0.11, 0.13, and 0.08 for wrist, elbow, and shoulder, respectively. It is discussed that force perception may be affected by the number of muscles involved and the reproducibility of the movement itself. The minimum perceivable force, on average, was 0.04 N for all three joints.

  13. Grip force and muscle activity differences due to glove type.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Kimberly; Splittstoesser, Riley; Maronitis, Anthony; Marras, William S

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of different types and sizes of gloves on external grip force and muscle activity. Twenty-one male and seven female volunteers served as subjects. Each subject performed two maximum voluntary grip contractions while wearing each of the 10 glove types. Results indicated significant differences in the effects of different glove types on the peak force, ratio of peak force to normalized flexor muscle EMG activity, and the ratio of peak force to coactivity.

  14. Hysteresis in the production of force by larval Dipteran muscle.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Bethany A; Anikin, Ilya Marko; Krans, Jacob L

    2010-07-15

    We describe neuromuscular hysteresis - the dependence of muscle force on recent motoneuron activity - in the body wall muscles of larval Sarcophaga bullata and Drosophila melanogaster. In semi-intact preparations, isometric force produced by a train of nerve impulses at a constant rate was significantly less than that produced by the same train of stimuli with a brief (200 ms) high-frequency burst of impulses interspersed. Elevated force did not decay back to predicted values after the burst but instead remained high throughout the duration of the stimulus train. The increased force was not due to a change in excitatory junction potentials (EJPs); EJP voltage and time course before and after the high-frequency burst were not statistically different. Single muscle and semi-intact preparations exhibited hysteresis similarly, suggesting that connective tissues of the origin or insertion are not crucial to the mechanism of hysteresis. Hysteresis was greatest at low motoneuron rates - yielding a approximately 100% increase over predicted values based on constant-rate stimulation alone - and decreased as impulse rate increased. We modulated motoneuron frequency rhythmically across rates and cycle periods similar to those observed during kinematic analysis of larval crawling. Positive force hysteresis was also evident within these more physiological activation parameters.

  15. Motor equivalence during multi-finger accurate force production

    PubMed Central

    Mattos, Daniela; Schöner, Gregor; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    We explored stability of multi-finger cyclical accurate force production action by analysis of responses to small perturbations applied to one of the fingers and inter-cycle analysis of variance. Healthy subjects performed two versions of the cyclical task, with and without an explicit target. The “inverse piano” apparatus was used to lift/lower a finger by 1 cm over 0.5 s; the subjects were always instructed to perform the task as accurate as they could at all times. Deviations in the spaces of finger forces and modes (hypothetical commands to individual fingers) were quantified in directions that did not change total force (motor equivalent) and in directions that changed the total force (non-motor equivalent). Motor equivalent deviations started immediately with the perturbation and increased progressively with time. After a sequence of lifting-lowering perturbations leading to the initial conditions, motor equivalent deviations were dominating. These phenomena were less pronounced for analysis performed with respect to the total moment of force with respect to an axis parallel to the forearm/hand. Analysis of inter-cycle variance showed consistently higher variance in a subspace that did not change the total force as compared to the variance that affected total force. We interpret the results as reflections of task-specific stability of the redundant multi-finger system. Large motor equivalent deviations suggest that reactions of the neuromotor system to a perturbation involve large changes of neural commands that do not affect salient performance variables, even during actions with the purpose to correct those salient variables. Consistency of the analyses of motor equivalence and variance analysis provides additional support for the idea of task-specific stability ensured at a neural level. PMID:25344311

  16. Observational assessment of forceful exertion and the perceived force demands of daily activities.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Matthew M; Armstrong, Thomas J

    2004-12-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the accuracy and precision with which analysts observe and estimate the force produced as subjects performed exertions on a work simulator. Eight analysts observed 32 subjects and estimated force as a percent of subjects' maximum voluntary contraction (% MVC). Analysts exhibited bias toward the mean, as high force exertions (> 67% MVC) were underestimated (mean: 11.6% MVC) and low force exertions (<34% MVC) were overestimated (mean: 6.7% MVC). Average error for medium force exertions (34-67% MVC) was not statistically different from zero (2.1% MVC). For all force levels, precision of the estimate was very poor (standard deviation range: 16.2-20.7% MVC). Experience of the analyst in performing ergonomic analysis did not affect accuracy. A secondary objective of the study was to conduct a survey in which subjects identified activities of daily living they perceived as equivalent to controlled force levels. A total of 59 different activities ranging from minimal force required to near maximum were listed by at least 5% of the participants. This list may be used to assist health care practitioners and patients convey the force demands required of occupational tasks as well as for evaluating the diminished strength of the patient.

  17. Resistive and reactive force production in actuated elastic swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godoy-Diana, Ramiro; Pineirua, Miguel; Thiria, Benjamin

    2015-11-01

    We study the force production dynamics of undulating elastic plates as a model for fish-like inertial swimmers. Using a beam model coupled with Lighthill's large-amplitude elongated-body theory, we explore different localized actuations at one extremity of the plate (heaving, pitching, and a combination of both) in order to quantify the reactive and resistive contributions to the thrust. The latter has only recently been pointed out as a crucial element in the force balance of large Reynolds number swimmers. We show that this balance is modified as the frequency of excitation changes and the response of the elastic plate shifts between different resonant modes. In the heaving case for instance, higher frequencies and thus higher modes are associated to a stronger resistive contribution to the thrust, while in pitching case, at all frequencies, thrust production comes mostly from the reactive term. We acknowledge support from EADS foundation through project ``Fluids and elasticity in biomimetic propulsion''.

  18. Analysis of sitting forces on stationary chairs for daily activities.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lingling; Tackett, Bob; Tor, Onder; Zhang, Jilei

    2016-04-01

    No literature related to the study of sitting forces on chairs sat on by people who weighed over 136 kg was found. The Business Institutional Furniture Manufactures Association needs force data for development of performance test standards to test chairs for users who weigh up to 181 kg. 20 participants who weighed from 136 to 186 kg completed 6 tasks on an instrumented chair in the sequence of sitting down, remaining seated and rising. Effects of sitting motion, armrest use and seat cushion thickness on vertical sitting forces and centre-of-force were investigated. Results indicated hard sitting down yielded the highest sitting force of 213% in terms of participants' body weights. Armrest use affected sitting forces of normal sitting down, but not of rising and hard sitting down. Cushion thickness affected sitting forces of normal and hard sitting down and shifting, but not of rising, static seating or stretching backward situations. Practitioner Summary: Results of the sitting force and centre-of-force data obtained for this research can help furniture manufacturers develop new product performance test standards for creating reliable engineering design and manufacturing quality and durable products to meet a niche market need.

  19. Commercial Product Activation Using RFID

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedrey, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Radio-frequency identification (RFID) would be used for commercial product activation, according to a proposal. What is new here is the concept of combining RFID with activation - more specifically, using RFID for activating commercial products (principally, electronic ones) and for performing such ancillary functions as tracking individual product units on production lines, tracking shipments, and updating inventories. According to the proposal, an RFID chip would be embedded in each product. The information encoded in the chip would include a unique number for identifying the product. An RFID reader at the point of sale would record the number of the product and would write digital information to the RFID chip for either immediate activation of the product or for later interrogation and processing. To be practical, an RFID product-activation system should satisfy a number of key requirements: the system should be designed to be integrable into the inventory-tracking and the data-processing and -communication infrastructures of businesses along the entire supply chain from manufacture to retail; the system should be resistant to sophisticated hacking; activation codes should be made sufficiently complexity to minimize the probability of activating stolen products; RFID activation equipment at points of sale must be capable to two-way RF communication for the purposes of reading information from, and writing information to, embedded RFID chips; the equipment at points of sale should be easily operable by sales clerks with little or no training; the point-of-sale equipment should verify activation and provide visible and/or audible signals indicating verification or lack thereof; and, the system should be able to handle millions of products per year with minimal human intervention, among other requirements.

  20. YAP is essential for mechanical force production and epithelial cell proliferation during lung branching morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chuwen; Yao, Erica; Zhang, Kuan; Jiang, Xuan; Croll, Stacey; Thompson-Peer, Katherine; Chuang, Pao-Tien

    2017-01-01

    Branching morphogenesis is a fundamental program for tissue patterning. We show that active YAP, a key mediator of Hippo signaling, is distributed throughout the murine lung epithelium and loss of epithelial YAP severely disrupts branching. Failure to branch is restricted to regions where YAP activity is removed. This suggests that YAP controls local epithelial cell properties. In support of this model, mechanical force production is compromised and cell proliferation is reduced in Yap mutant lungs. We propose that defective force generation and insufficient epithelial cell number underlie the branching defects. Through genomic analysis, we also uncovered a feedback control of pMLC levels, which is critical for mechanical force production, likely through the direct induction of multiple regulators by YAP. Our work provides a molecular pathway that could control epithelial cell properties required for proper morphogenetic movement and pattern formation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21130.001 PMID:28323616

  1. Activation Cascading in Sign Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navarrete, Eduardo; Peressotti, Francesca; Lerose, Luigi; Miozzo, Michele

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how activation unfolds in sign production by examining whether signs that are not produced have their representations activated by semantics (cascading of activation). Deaf signers were tested with a picture-picture interference task. Participants were presented with pairs of overlapping pictures and named the green…

  2. Force-activated reactivity switch in a bimolecular chemical reaction.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Liang, Jian; Szoszkiewicz, Robert; Kuo, Tzu-Ling; Fernández, Julio M

    2009-06-01

    The effect of mechanical force on the free-energy surface that governs a chemical reaction is largely unknown. The combination of protein engineering with single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy allows us to study the influence of mechanical force on the rate at which a protein disulfide bond is reduced by nucleophiles in a bimolecular substitution reaction (S(N)2). We found that cleavage of a protein disulfide bond by hydroxide anions exhibits an abrupt reactivity 'switch' at ∼500 pN, after which the accelerating effect of force on the rate of an S(N)2 chemical reaction greatly diminishes. We propose that an abrupt force-induced conformational change of the protein disulfide bond shifts its ground state, drastically changing its reactivity in S(N)2 chemical reactions. Our experiments directly demonstrate the action of a force-activated switch in the chemical reactivity of a single molecule.

  3. Subthalamic nucleus and internal globus pallidus scale with the rate of change of force production in humans.

    PubMed

    Vaillancourt, David E; Mayka, Mary A; Thulborn, Keith R; Corcos, Daniel M

    2004-09-01

    The basal ganglia, motor cortex, and cerebellum have been implicated as a circuit that codes for movement velocity. Since movement velocity covaries with the magnitude of force exerted and previous studies have shown that similar regions scale in activation for velocity and force, the scaling of neuronal activity with movement velocity could be due to the force exerted. The present study implemented a parametric functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) design to determine which brain regions directly scale with the rate of change of force production, independent of the magnitude of force exerted. Nine healthy adults produced force with their right middle finger and thumb at 25% of their maximal voluntary contraction across four conditions: (1) fast pulse, (2) fast hold, (3) medium hold, and (4) slow hold. There were three primary findings: (i) the activation volume in multiple regions increased with the duration of the force contraction, (ii) only the activation volume in the bilateral internal globus pallidus and left subthalamic nucleus parametrically scaled with the rate of change of force production, and (iii) there was an inverse relation between the activation volume in the subthalamic nucleus and internal globus pallidus with the rate of change of force production. The current findings are the first to have used neuroimaging techniques in humans to segregate the functional anatomy of the internal globus pallidus from external globus pallidus, distinguish functional activation in the globus pallidus from the putamen, and demonstrate task-dependent scaling in the subthalamic nucleus and internal globus pallidus. We conclude that fast, ballistic force production is preprogrammed, requiring a small metabolic demand from the basal ganglia. In contrast, movements that require the internal regulation of the rate of change of force are associated with increased metabolic demand from the subthalamic nucleus and internal segment of the globus pallidus.

  4. Effect of lower limb massage on electromyography and force production of the knee extensors

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, A M; Watt, J M; Watt, V; Galloway, S D R

    2006-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of massage on force production and neuromuscular recruitment. Methods Ten healthy male subjects performed isokinetic concentric contractions on the knee extensors at speeds of 60, 120, 180, and 240°/s. These contractions were performed before and after a 30 minute intervention of either rest in the supine position or lower limb massage. Electromyography (EMG) and force data were captured during the contractions. Results The change in isokinetic mean force due to the intervention showed a significant decrease (p<0.05) at 60°/s and a trend for a decrease (p  =  0.08) at 120°/s as a result of massage compared with passive rest. However, there were no corresponding differences in any of the EMG data. A reduction in force production was shown at 60°/s with no corresponding alteration in neuromuscular activity. Conclusions The results suggests that motor unit recruitment and muscle fibre conduction velocity are not responsible for the observed reductions in force. Although experimental confirmation is necessary, a possible explanation is that massage induced force loss by influencing “muscle architecture”. However, it is possible that the differences were only found at 60°/s because it was the first contraction after massage. Therefore muscle tension and architecture after massage and the duration of any massage effect need to be examined. PMID:16431996

  5. Embryo mechanics: balancing force production with elastic resistance during morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Lance A

    2011-01-01

    Morphogenesis requires the spatial and temporal control of embryo mechanics, including force production and mechanical resistance to those forces, to coordinate tissue deformation and large-scale movements. Thus, biomechanical processes play a key role in directly shaping the embryo. Additional roles for embryo mechanics during development may include the patterning of positional information and to provide feedback to ensure the success of morphogenetic movements in shaping the larval body and organs. To understand the multiple roles of mechanics during development requires familiarity with engineering principles of the mechanics of structures, the viscoelastic properties of biomaterials, and the integration of force and stress within embryonic structures as morphogenesis progresses. In this chapter, we review the basic engineering principles of biomechanics as they relate to morphogenesis, introduce methods for quantifying embryo mechanics and the limitations of these methods, and outline a formalism for investigating the role of embryo mechanics in birth defects. We encourage the nascent field of embryo mechanics to adopt standard engineering terms and test methods so that studies of diverse organisms can be compared and universal biomechanical principles can be revealed.

  6. 76 FR 42709 - Submission for OMB Review; Prohibition on Acquisition of Products Produced by Forced or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ...; Prohibition on Acquisition of Products Produced by Forced or Indentured Child Labor AGENCY: Department of... acquisition of products produced by forced or indentured child labor. DATES: Submit comments on or before... on Acquisition of Products Produced by Forced or Indentured Child Labor, by any of the...

  7. Force and torque production in static multifinger prehension: biomechanics and control. I. Biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Gregory, Robert W; Latash, Mark L

    2002-07-01

    We studied the coordinated action of fingers during static tasks involving exertion of force and torque on a handheld object. Subjects were asked to keep a handle with an attachment that allowed for independent change of the suspended load (0.5-2.0 kg) and external torque (0.375-1.5 N m) in a vertical position while applying minimal effort. Normal and shear forces were measured from the thumb; normal forces only were measured from the four fingers. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS: (1) the thumb shear force increased during supination efforts and decreased during pronation efforts; (2) the total moment of the normal finger forces only counterbalanced approximately 50% of the external torque, hence shear forces accounted for approximately one-half of the total torque exerted on the object; (3) the total normal force increased with external torque, and the total force magnitude did not depend on the torque direction; (4) the forces of the 'peripheral' (index and little) fingers depended mainly on the torque while the forces exerted by the 'central' (middle and ring) fingers depended both on the load and torque; (5) there was a monotonic relationship between the mechanical advantage of a finger (i.e., its moment arm during torque production) and the force produced by that finger; and (6) antagonist finger moments acting opposite to the intended direction of the total moment were always observed - at low torques the antagonist moments were as high as 40-60% of the agonist moments. MODELING: A three-zone model of coordinated finger action is suggested. In the first zone of load/torque combinations, activation of antagonist fingers (i.e., fingers that generate antagonist moments) is necessary to prevent slipping. In the second zone, the activity of agonist fingers is sufficient for preventing slips. In the third zone, the performer has freedom to choose between either activating the antagonist fingers or redistributing activities amongst the agonist fingers. The findings of this

  8. Stretch and shortening of skeletal muscles activated along the ascending limb of the force-length relation.

    PubMed

    Rassier, Dilson E; Pun, Clara

    2010-01-01

    There is a history dependence of skeletal muscle contraction. When muscles are activated and subsequently stretched, they produce a long lasting force enhancement. When muscles are activated and subsequently shortened, they produce a long-lasting force depression. The purposes of the studies shown in this chapter were (1) to evaluate if force enhancement and force depression are present along the ascending limb of the force-length (FL) relation, (2) to evaluate if the history-dependent properties of force production are associated with sarcomere length (SL) non-uniformity, and (3) to determine the effects of cross-bridge (de)activation on force depression. Isolated myofibrils were activated by either Ca²(+) or MgADP and were subjected to consecutive stretches or shortenings along the ascending limb of the FL relation, separated by periods (approximately 5 s) of isometric contraction. Force after stretch was higher than force after shortening when the contractions were produced at similar SLs. The difference in force could not be explained by SL non-uniformity. After shortening, MgADP activation produced forces that were higher than Ca²(+) activation. Since MgADP induces the formation of strongly bound cross-bridges, the result suggests that force depression following shortening is associated with cross-bridge deactivation.

  9. Mapping Muscles Activation to Force Perception during Unloading

    PubMed Central

    Toma, Simone; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    It has been largely proved that while judging a force humans mainly rely on the motor commands produced to interact with that force (i.e., sense of effort). Despite of a large bulk of previous investigations interested in understanding the contributions of the descending and ascending signals in force perception, very few attempts have been made to link a measure of neural output (i.e., EMG) to the psychophysical performance. Indeed, the amount of correlation between EMG activity and perceptual decisions can be interpreted as an estimate of the contribution of central signals involved in the sensation of force. In this study we investigated this correlation by measuring the muscular activity of eight arm muscles while participants performed a quasi-isometric force detection task. Here we showed a method to quantitatively describe muscular activity (“muscle-metric function”) that was directly comparable to the description of the participants' psychophysical decisions about the stimulus force. We observed that under our experimental conditions, muscle-metric absolute thresholds and the shape of the muscle-metric curves were closely related to those provided by the psychophysics. In fact a global measure of the muscles considered was able to predict approximately 60% of the perceptual decisions total variance. Moreover the inter-subjects differences in psychophysical sensitivity showed high correlation with both participants' muscles sensitivity and participants' joint torques. Overall, our findings gave insights into both the role played by the corticospinal motor commands while performing a force detection task and the influence of the gravitational muscular torque on the estimation of vertical forces. PMID:27032087

  10. The Dynamics of Voluntary Force Production in Afferented Muscle Influence Involuntary Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Christopher M.; Nagamori, Akira; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Voluntary control of force is always marked by some degree of error and unsteadiness. Both neural and mechanical factors contribute to these fluctuations, but how they interact to produce them is poorly understood. In this study, we identify and characterize a previously undescribed neuromechanical interaction where the dynamics of voluntary force production suffice to generate involuntary tremor. Specifically, participants were asked to produce isometric force with the index finger and use visual feedback to track a sinusoidal target spanning 5–9% of each individual's maximal voluntary force level. Force fluctuations and EMG activity over the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) muscle were recorded and their frequency content was analyzed as a function of target phase. Force variability in either the 1–5 or 6–15 Hz frequency ranges tended to be largest at the peaks and valleys of the target sinusoid. In those same periods, FDS EMG activity was synchronized with force fluctuations. We then constructed a physiologically-realistic computer simulation in which a muscle-tendon complex was set inside of a feedback-driven control loop. Surprisingly, the model sufficed to produce phase-dependent modulation of tremor similar to that observed in humans. Further, the gain of afferent feedback from muscle spindles was critical for appropriately amplifying and shaping this tremor. We suggest that the experimentally-induced tremor may represent the response of a viscoelastic muscle-tendon system to dynamic drive, and therefore does not fall into known categories of tremor generation, such as tremorogenic descending drive, stretch-reflex loop oscillations, motor unit behavior, or mechanical resonance. Our findings motivate future efforts to understand tremor from a perspective that considers neuromechanical coupling within the context of closed-loop control. The strategy of combining experimental recordings with physiologically-sound simulations will enable thorough

  11. Isometric force production during changed-Gz episodes of parabolic flight.

    PubMed

    Mierau, Andreas; Girgenrath, Michaela; Bock, Otmar

    2008-02-01

    Changes of the normal gravitational acceleration are known to affect sensorimotor performance. For example, subjects exposed to three times the normal terrestrial acceleration (+3 Gz) in a centrifuge will produce exaggerated isometric force. The present study compares the effects of high-Gz to that of micro-Gz on isometric force production. Twelve right-handed human subjects were tested during the microgravity (micro-Gz), high gravity (high-Gz) and normal gravity (normal-Gz) episodes of parabolic flight. Holding an isometric joystick in their right hand, they produced forces of 5, 15, or 25 N in different directions, according to visually prescribed vectors. In some parabolas, 70 Hz vibration was applied to the flexor- and extensor-side of the wrist, in order to reduce spinal segmental activity. If compared to normal-Gz, produced forces were higher in high-Gz, and still higher in micro-Gz. Vibration reduced the magnitude of produced forces independent of the Gz-level. We confirm that isometric force increases in high-Gz, and document that it increases in micro-Gz as well. This increase is probably not related to degraded segmental excitability and proprioception, since it was not modified by vibration and manifests before proprioception becomes effective.

  12. The Force on a Boundary in Active Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, John; Yan, Wen

    2015-11-01

    We present a general theory for determining the force (and torque) exerted on a boundary (or body) in active matter. The theory extends the description of passive Brownian colloids to self-propelled active particles and applies for all ratios of the thermal energy kB T to the swimmer's activity ksTs = ζU02τR / 6 , where ζ is the Stokes drag coefficient, U0 is the swim speed and τR is the reorientation time of the active particles. The theory has a natural microscopic length scale over which concentration and orientation distributions are confined near boundaries, but the microscopic length does not appear in the force. The swim pressure emerges naturally and dominates the behavior when the boundary size is large compared to the swimmer's run length l =U0τR . The theory is used to predict the motion of bodies of all sizes immersed in active matter.

  13. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  14. Shaping tissues by balancing active forces and geometric constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foolen, Jasper; Yamashita, Tadahiro; Kollmannsberger, Philip

    2016-02-01

    The self-organization of cells into complex tissues during growth and regeneration is a combination of physical-mechanical events and biochemical signal processing. Cells actively generate forces at all stages in this process, and according to the laws of mechanics, these forces result in stress fields defined by the geometric boundary conditions of the cell and tissue. The unique ability of cells to translate such force patterns into biochemical information and vice versa sets biological tissues apart from any other material. In this topical review, we summarize the current knowledge and open questions of how forces and geometry act together on scales from the single cell to tissues and organisms, and how their interaction determines biological shape and structure. Starting with a planar surface as the simplest type of geometric constraint, we review literature on how forces during cell spreading and adhesion together with geometric constraints impact cell shape, stress patterns, and the resulting biological response. We then move on to include cell-cell interactions and the role of forces in monolayers and in collective cell migration, and introduce curvature at the transition from flat cell sheets to three-dimensional (3D) tissues. Fibrous 3D environments, as cells experience them in the body, introduce new mechanical boundary conditions and change cell behaviour compared to flat surfaces. Starting from early work on force transmission and collagen remodelling, we discuss recent discoveries on the interaction with geometric constraints and the resulting structure formation and network organization in 3D. Recent literature on two physiological scenarios—embryonic development and bone—is reviewed to demonstrate the role of the force-geometry balance in living organisms. Furthermore, the role of mechanics in pathological scenarios such as cancer is discussed. We conclude by highlighting common physical principles guiding cell mechanics, tissue patterning and

  15. House Divided: The Splitting of Active Duty Civil Affairs Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    training of Active Duty Civil Affairs. This will allow the reader to become familiar with the Active branch as a whole and show the different...readers are extremely familiar with the large-scale environment given the nightly news coverage, but the small-scale environment is decidedly different...apparatus and are familiar with operating in conjunction with embassies and country teams. While conventional forces also have their own intelligence

  16. Maximal voluntary fingertip force production is not limited by movement speed in combined motion and force tasks.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Kevin G; Santos, Veronica J; Venkadesan, Madhusudhan; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J

    2009-07-08

    Numerous studies of limbs and fingers propose that force-velocity properties of muscle limit maximal voluntary force production during anisometric tasks, i.e., when muscles are shortening or lengthening. Although this proposition appears logical, our study on the simultaneous production of fingertip motion and force disagrees with this commonly held notion. We asked eight consenting adults to use their dominant index fingertip to maximize voluntary downward force against a horizontal surface at specific postures (static trials), and also during an anisometric "scratching" task of rhythmically moving the fingertip along a 5.8 +/- 0.5 cm target line. The metronome-timed flexion-extension movement speed varied 36-fold from "slow" (1.0 +/- 0.5 cm/s) to "fast" (35.9 +/- 7.8 cm/s). As expected, maximal downward voluntary force diminished (44.8 +/- 15.6%; p = 0.001) when any motion (slow or fast) was added to the task. Surprisingly, however, a 36-fold increase in speed did not affect this reduction in force magnitude. These remarkable results for such an ordinary task challenge the dominant role often attributed to force-velocity properties of muscle and provide insight into neuromechanical interactions. We propose an explanation that the simultaneous enforcement of mechanical constraints for motion and force reduces the set of feasible motor commands sufficiently so that force-velocity properties cease to be the force-limiting factor. While additional work is necessary to reveal the governing mechanisms, the dramatic influence that the simultaneous enforcement of motion and force constraints has on force output begins to explain the vulnerability of dexterous function to development, aging, and even mild neuromuscular pathology.

  17. The Adaptive Range of 1/f Isometric Force Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosnoff, Jacob J.; Valantine, Andrew D.; Newell, Karl M.

    2009-01-01

    The adaptive range of 1/f dynamics in isometric force output was investigated. Participants produced isometric force to targets with predictable demands (constant and sinusoidal) and 1/f noise waveforms (white, pink, brown, and black) that also varied in the frequency bandwidth represented in the force signal (0-4 Hz, 0-8 Hz, and 0-12 Hz). The…

  18. An Improved Force Feedback Control Algorithm for Active Tendons

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tieneng; Liu, Zhifeng; Cai, Ligang

    2012-01-01

    An active tendon, consisting of a displacement actuator and a co-located force sensor, has been adopted by many studies to suppress the vibration of large space flexible structures. The damping, provided by the force feedback control algorithm in these studies, is small and can increase, especially for tendons with low axial stiffness. This study introduces an improved force feedback algorithm, which is based on the idea of velocity feedback. The algorithm provides a large damping ratio for space flexible structures and does not require a structure model. The effectiveness of the algorithm is demonstrated on a structure similar to JPL-MPI. The results show that large damping can be achieved for the vibration control of large space structures. PMID:23112660

  19. Effects of resistance training on tendon mechanical properties and rapid force production in prepubertal children.

    PubMed

    Waugh, C M; Korff, T; Fath, F; Blazevich, A J

    2014-08-01

    Children develop lower levels of muscle force, and at slower rates, than adults. Although strength training in children is expected to reduce this differential, a synchronous adaptation in the tendon must be achieved to ensure forces continue to be transmitted to the skeleton with efficiency while minimizing the risk of strain-related tendon injury. We hypothesized that resistance training (RT) would alter tendon mechanical properties in children concomitantly with changes in force production characteristics. Twenty prepubertal children (age 8.9 ± 0.3 yr) were equally divided into control (nontraining) and experimental (training) groups. The training group completed a 10-wk RT intervention consisting of 2-3 sets of 8-15 plantar flexion contractions performed twice weekly on a recumbent calf-raise machine. Achilles tendon properties (cross-sectional area, elongation, stress, strain, stiffness, and Young's modulus), electromechanical delay (EMD; time between the onset of muscle activity and force), rate of force development (RFD; slope of the force-time curve), and rate of electromyographic (EMG) increase (REI; slope of the EMG time curve) were measured before and after RT. Tendon stiffness and Young's modulus increased significantly after RT in the experimental group only (∼29% and ∼25%, respectively); all other tendon properties were not significantly altered, although there were mean decreases in both peak tendon strain and strain at a given force level (14% and 24%, respectively; not significant) which may have implications for tendon injury risk and muscle fiber mechanics. A decrease of ∼13% in EMD was found after RT for the experimental group, which paralleled the increase in tendon stiffness (r = -0.59); however, RFD and REI were unchanged. The present data show that the Achilles tendon adapts to RT in prepubertal children and is paralleled by a change in EMD, although the magnitude of this change did not appear to be sufficient to influence RFD. These

  20. Knee extension fatigue attenuates repeated force production of the elbow flexors.

    PubMed

    Halperin, Israel; Aboodarda, Saied J; Behm, David G

    2014-01-01

    Non-local muscle fatigue has been demonstrated with unilateral activities, where fatiguing one limb alters opposite limb forces. Fewer studies have examined if non-local fatigue occurs with unrelated muscles. The purpose of this study was to investigate if knee extensors fatigue alters elbow flexors force and electromyography (EMG) activity. Eighteen males completed a control and fatiguing session (randomised). Blood lactate was initially sampled followed by three maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) with the elbow flexors and two with the knee extensors. Thereafter, subjects either sat (control) or performed five sets of bilateral dynamic knee extensions to exhaustion using a load equal to the dominant limb MVC (1-min rest between sets). Immediately afterwards, subjects were assessed for blood lactate and unilateral knee extensors MVC, and after 1 min performed a single unilateral elbow flexor MVC. Two minutes later, subjects performed 12 unilateral elbow flexor MVCs (5 s contraction/10 s rest) followed by a third blood lactate test. Compared to control, knee extensor force dropped by 35% (p < 0.001; ES = 1.6) and blood lactate increased by 18% (p < 0.001; ES = 2.8). Elbow flexor forces were lower after the fatiguing protocol only during the last five MVCs (p < 0.05; ES = ∼ 0.58; ∼ 5%). No changes occurred between conditions in EMG. Elbow flexor forces significantly decreased after knee extensors fatigue. The effect was revealed during the later stages of the repeated MVCs protocol, demonstrating that non-local fatigue may have a stronger effect on repeated rather than on single attempts of maximal force production.

  1. Microglia mechanics: immune activation alters traction forces and durotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Bollmann, Lars; Koser, David E.; Shahapure, Rajesh; Gautier, Hélène O. B.; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Gather, Malte C.; Ulbricht, Elke; Franze, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Microglial cells are key players in the primary immune response of the central nervous system. They are highly active and motile cells that chemically and mechanically interact with their environment. While the impact of chemical signaling on microglia function has been studied in much detail, the current understanding of mechanical signaling is very limited. When cultured on compliant substrates, primary microglial cells adapted their spread area, morphology, and actin cytoskeleton to the stiffness of their environment. Traction force microscopy revealed that forces exerted by microglia increase with substrate stiffness until reaching a plateau at a shear modulus of ~5 kPa. When cultured on substrates incorporating stiffness gradients, microglia preferentially migrated toward stiffer regions, a process termed durotaxis. Lipopolysaccharide-induced immune-activation of microglia led to changes in traction forces, increased migration velocities and an amplification of durotaxis. We finally developed a mathematical model connecting traction forces with the durotactic behavior of migrating microglial cells. Our results demonstrate that microglia are susceptible to mechanical signals, which could be important during central nervous system development and pathologies. Stiffness gradients in tissue surrounding neural implants such as electrodes, for example, could mechanically attract microglial cells, thus facilitating foreign body reactions detrimental to electrode functioning. PMID:26441534

  2. Differences in typing forces, muscle activity, comfort, and typing performance among virtual, notebook, and desktop keyboards.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Ho; Aulck, Lovenoor; Bartha, Michael C; Harper, Christy A; Johnson, Peter W

    2014-11-01

    The present study investigated whether there were physical exposure and typing productivity differences between a virtual keyboard with no tactile feedback and two conventional keyboards where key travel and tactile feedback are provided by mechanical switches under the keys. The key size and layout were same across all the keyboards. Typing forces; finger and shoulder muscle activity; self-reported comfort; and typing productivity were measured from 19 subjects while typing on a virtual (0 mm key travel), notebook (1.8 mm key travel), and desktop keyboard (4 mm key travel). When typing on the virtual keyboard, subjects typed with less force (p's < 0.0001) and had lower finger flexor/extensor muscle activity (p's < 0.05). However, the lower typing forces and finger muscle activity came at the expense of a 60% reduction in typing productivity (p < 0.0001), decreased self-reported comfort (p's < 0.0001), and a trend indicating an increase in shoulder muscle activity (p's < 0.10). Therefore, for long typing sessions or when typing productivity is at a premium, conventional keyboards with tactile feedback may be more suitable interface.

  3. Molecular model for force production and transmission during vertebrate gastrulation

    PubMed Central

    Pfister, Katherine; Shook, David R.; Chang, Chenbei; Keller, Ray; Skoglund, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate embryos undergo dramatic shape changes at gastrulation that require locally produced and anisotropically applied forces, yet how these forces are produced and transmitted across tissues remains unclear. We show that depletion of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) levels in the embryo blocks force generation at gastrulation through two distinct mechanisms: destabilizing the myosin II (MII) hexameric complex and inhibiting MII contractility. Molecular dissection of these two mechanisms demonstrates that normal convergence force generation requires MII contractility and we identify a set of molecular phenotypes correlated with both this failure of convergence force generation in explants and of blastopore closure in whole embryos. These include reduced rates of actin movement, alterations in C-cadherin dynamics and a reduction in the number of polarized lamellipodia on intercalating cells. By examining the spatial relationship between C-cadherin and actomyosin we also find evidence for formation of transcellular linear arrays incorporating these proteins that could transmit mediolaterally oriented tensional forces. These data combine to suggest a multistep model to explain how cell intercalation can occur against a force gradient to generate axial extension forces. First, polarized lamellipodia extend mediolaterally and make new C-cadherin-based contacts with neighboring mesodermal cell bodies. Second, lamellipodial flow of actin coalesces into a tension-bearing, MII-contractility-dependent node-and-cable actin network in the cell body cortex. And third, this actomyosin network contracts to generate mediolateral convergence forces in the context of these transcellular arrays. PMID:26884399

  4. Influence of Emotion on the Control of Low-Level Force Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naugle, Kelly M.; Coombes, Stephen A.; Cauraugh, James H.; Janelle, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    The accuracy and variability of a sustained low-level force contraction (2% of maximum voluntary contraction) was measured while participants viewed unpleasant, pleasant, and neutral images during a feedback occluded force control task. Exposure to pleasant and unpleasant images led to a relative increase in force production but did not alter the…

  5. Motor control hierarchy in joint action that involves bimanual force production

    PubMed Central

    Masumoto, Junya

    2015-01-01

    The concept of hierarchical motor control has been viewed as a means of progressively decreasing the number of variables manipulated by each higher control level. We tested the hypothesis that turning an individual bimanual force-production task into a joint (two-participant) force-production task would lead to positive correlation between forces produced by the two hands of the individual participant (symmetric strategy) to enable negative correlation between forces produced by two participants (complementary strategy). The present study consisted of individual and joint tasks that involved both unimanual and bimanual conditions. In the joint task, 10 pairs of participants produced periodic isometric forces, such that the sum of forces that they produced matched a target force cycling between 5% and 10% of maximum voluntary contraction at 1 Hz. In the individual task, individuals attempted to match the same target force. In the joint bimanual condition, the two hands of each participant adopted a symmetric strategy of force, whereas the two participants adopted a complementary strategy of force, highlighting that the bimanual action behaved as a low level of a hierarchy, whereas the joint action behaved as an upper level. The complementary force production was greater interpersonally than intrapersonally. However, whereas the coherence was highest at 1 Hz in all conditions, the frequency synchrony was stronger intrapersonally than interpersonally. Moreover, whereas the bimanual action exhibited a smaller error and variability of force than the unimanual action, the joint action exhibited a less-variable interval and force than the individual action. PMID:25904710

  6. Motor control hierarchy in joint action that involves bimanual force production.

    PubMed

    Masumoto, Junya; Inui, Nobuyuki

    2015-06-01

    The concept of hierarchical motor control has been viewed as a means of progressively decreasing the number of variables manipulated by each higher control level. We tested the hypothesis that turning an individual bimanual force-production task into a joint (two-participant) force-production task would lead to positive correlation between forces produced by the two hands of the individual participant (symmetric strategy) to enable negative correlation between forces produced by two participants (complementary strategy). The present study consisted of individual and joint tasks that involved both unimanual and bimanual conditions. In the joint task, 10 pairs of participants produced periodic isometric forces, such that the sum of forces that they produced matched a target force cycling between 5% and 10% of maximum voluntary contraction at 1 Hz. In the individual task, individuals attempted to match the same target force. In the joint bimanual condition, the two hands of each participant adopted a symmetric strategy of force, whereas the two participants adopted a complementary strategy of force, highlighting that the bimanual action behaved as a low level of a hierarchy, whereas the joint action behaved as an upper level. The complementary force production was greater interpersonally than intrapersonally. However, whereas the coherence was highest at 1 Hz in all conditions, the frequency synchrony was stronger intrapersonally than interpersonally. Moreover, whereas the bimanual action exhibited a smaller error and variability of force than the unimanual action, the joint action exhibited a less-variable interval and force than the individual action.

  7. CME Productivity of Active Regions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J.; Shen, C.; Ye, P.; Zhang, Q.; Liu, R.; Wang, S.

    2015-12-01

    Solar active regions (ARs) are the major sources of two kinds of the most violent solar eruptions, namely flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Although they are believed to be two phenomena in the same eruptive process, the productivity of them could be quiet different for various ARs. Why is an AR productive? And why is a flare-rich AR CME-poor? To answer these questions, we compared the recent super flare-rich but CME-poor AR 12192, with other four ARs; two were productive in both flares and CMEs and the other two were inert to produce any M-class or intenser flares or CMEs. By investigating the photospheric parameters based on the SDO/HMI vector magnetogram, we find the three productive ARs have larger magnetic flux, current and free magnetic energy than the inert ARs. Furthermore, the two ARs productive in both flares and CMEs contain higher current helicity, concentrating along both sides of the flaring neutral lines, indicating the presence of a seed magnetic structure( that is highly sheared or twisted) of a CME; they also have higher decay index in the low corona, showing weak constraint. The results suggest that productive ARs are always large and have strong current system and sufficient free energy to power flares, and more importantly whether or not a flare is accompanied by a CME is seemingly related to (1) if there is significant sheared or twisted core field serving as the seed of the CME and (2) if the constraint of the overlying arcades is weak enough. Moreover, some productive ARs may frequently produce more than one CME. How does this happen? We do a statistical investigation of waiting times of quasi-homologous CMEs ( CME ssuccessive originating from the same ARs within short intervals) from super ARs in solar cycle 23 to answer this question. The waiting times of quasi-homologous CMEs have a two-component distribution with a separation at about 18 hours, the first component peaks at 7 hours. The correlation analysis among CME waiting times

  8. Sprint Acceleration Mechanics: The Major Role of Hamstrings in Horizontal Force Production

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Jean-Benoît; Gimenez, Philippe; Edouard, Pascal; Arnal, Pierrick; Jiménez-Reyes, Pedro; Samozino, Pierre; Brughelli, Matt; Mendiguchia, Jurdan

    2015-01-01

    Recent literature supports the importance of horizontal ground reaction force (GRF) production for sprint acceleration performance. Modeling and clinical studies have shown that the hip extensors are very likely contributors to sprint acceleration performance. We experimentally tested the role of the hip extensors in horizontal GRF production during short, maximal, treadmill sprint accelerations. Torque capabilities of the knee and hip extensors and flexors were assessed using an isokinetic dynamometer in 14 males familiar with sprint running. Then, during 6-s sprints on an instrumented motorized treadmill, horizontal and vertical GRF were synchronized with electromyographic (EMG) activity of the vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, biceps femoris, and gluteus maximus averaged over the first half of support, entire support, entire swing and end-of-swing phases. No significant correlations were found between isokinetic or EMG variables and horizontal GRF. Multiple linear regression analysis showed a significant relationship (P = 0.024) between horizontal GRF and the combination of biceps femoris EMG activity during the end of the swing and the knee flexors eccentric peak torque. In conclusion, subjects who produced the greatest amount of horizontal force were both able to highly activate their hamstring muscles just before ground contact and present high eccentric hamstring peak torque capability. PMID:26733889

  9. 16 CFR 1211.13 - Inherent force activated secondary door sensors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Inherent force activated secondary door... § 1211.13 Inherent force activated secondary door sensors. (a) Normal operation test. (1) A force... when the door applies a 15 pound (66.7 N) or less force in the down or closing direction and when...

  10. Active shortening protects against stretch-induced force deficits in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Saripalli, Anjali L; Sugg, Kristoffer B; Mendias, Christopher L; Brooks, Susan V; Claflin, Dennis R

    2017-02-23

    Skeletal muscle contraction results from molecular interactions of myosin "crossbridges" with adjacent actin filament binding sites. The binding of myosin to actin can be "weak" or "strong", and only strong binding states contribute to force production. During active shortening, the number of strongly-bound crossbridges declines with increasing shortening velocity. Forcibly stretching a muscle that is actively shortening at high velocity results in no apparent negative consequences whereas stretch of an isometrically (fixed-length) contracting muscle causes ultrastructural damage and a decline in force-generating capability. Our working hypothesis is that stretch-induced damage is uniquely attributable to the population of crossbridges that are strongly-bound. We tested the hypothesis that stretch-induced force deficits decline as the prevailing shortening velocity is increased. Experiments were performed on permeabilized segments of individual skeletal muscle fibers obtained from human subjects. Fibers were maximally activated and either allowed to generate maximum isometric force (Fo), or to shorten at velocities that resulted in force maintenance of ≈50% Fo or ≈2% Fo. For each test condition, a rapid stretch equivalent to 0.1 x optimal fiber length was applied. Relative to pre-stretch Fo, force deficits resulting from stretches applied during force maintenance of 100%, ≈50%, and ≈2% Fo were 23.2 ± 8.6%, 7.8 ± 4.2% and 0.3 ± 3.3%, respectively (mean ± SD, n=20). We conclude that stretch-induced damage declines with increasing shortening velocity, consistent with the working hypothesis that the fraction of strongly-bound crossbridges is a causative factor in the susceptibility of skeletal muscle to stretch-induced damage.

  11. Force-dependent and force-independent heat production in single slow- and fast-twitch muscle fibres from Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Buschman, H P; van der Laarse, W J; Stienen, G J; Elzinga, G

    1996-10-15

    1. The origin of labile heat production, i.e. a heat component which rapidly decays after the onset of stimulation, and of stable (maintenance) heat production was investigated in intact single fast-twitch (type 1) and slow-twitch (type 3) iliofibularis muscle fibres from Xenopus laevis, at 20 degrees C, by varying stimulation frequency and by varying sarcomere length and the concentration of 2,3-butanedione 2-monoxime (BDM) added. 2. The labile heat produced consisted of a force-independent and a force-dependent part. The average parvalbumin (PA) content found in type 1 fibre bundles (0.84 +/- 0.08 mM; mean +/- S.E.M.; n = 5) and in type 3 fibre bundles (0.12 +/- 0.02 mM; n = 5) indicates that the force-independent labile heat is explained by Ca(2+)-Mg2+ exchange on PA, and amounts to a molar enthalpy change of -78 kJ (molPA)-1. 3. Force-dependent labile heat during fused contractions was similar to the calculated heat production resulting from the formation of force-generating cross-bridges, assuming an enthalpy change associated with cross-bridge formation of -30 kJ mol-1. 4. Activation heat, i.e. the part of the total stable heat that is not related to the contractile apparatus, and of which the calcium sequestration by the sarcoplasmic reticulum is the most important contributor, determined by varying sarcomere length or BDM concentration, was identical. For fused contractions the fraction activation heat of the stable maintenance rate of heat production was 34 +/- 4% (mean +/- S.E.M.; n = 13) in type 1 fibres, and 52 +/- 4% (n = 15) in type 3 fibres. In unfused contractions this was 48 +/- 5% (n = 13) in type 1 fibres, and 35 +/- 2% (n = 11) in type 3 fibres. 5. From the force-dependent stable rate of heat production the economy of cross-bridge cycling, expressed as the force-time integral for a single myosin head per ATP molecule hydrolysed, was calculated. It followed that cross-bridge interaction in type 3 fibres is more economical than in type 1 fibres

  12. Nonparametric Model of Smooth Muscle Force Production During Electrical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cole, Marc; Eikenberry, Steffen; Kato, Takahide; Sandler, Roman A; Yamashiro, Stanley M; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z

    2017-03-01

    A nonparametric model of smooth muscle tension response to electrical stimulation was estimated using the Laguerre expansion technique of nonlinear system kernel estimation. The experimental data consisted of force responses of smooth muscle to energy-matched alternating single pulse and burst current stimuli. The burst stimuli led to at least a 10-fold increase in peak force in smooth muscle from Mytilus edulis, despite the constant energy constraint. A linear model did not fit the data. However, a second-order model fit the data accurately, so the higher-order models were not required to fit the data. Results showed that smooth muscle force response is not linearly related to the stimulation power.

  13. The effect of muscle length on force depression after active shortening in soleus muscle of mice.

    PubMed

    Van Noten, Pieter; Van Leemputte, Marc

    2011-07-01

    Isometric muscle force after active shortening is reduced [force depression (FD)]. The mechanism is incompletely understood but work delivered during shortening has been suggested to be the main determinant of FD. However, whether muscle length affects the sensitivity of FD to work is unknown, although this information might add to the understanding of the phenomenon. The aim of this study is to investigate the length dependence of the FD/work ratio (Q). Therefore, isometric force production (ISO) of 10 incubated mouse soleus muscles was compared to isometric force after 0.6, 1.2, and 2.4 mm shortening (IAS) at different end lengths ranging from L(0) - 3 to L(0) + 1.8 mm in steps of 0.6 mm. FD was calculated as the force difference between an ISO and IAS contraction at the same activation time (6 s) and end length. We confirm the strong relation between FD and work at L(0) (R² = 0.92) and found that FD is length dependent with a maximum of 8.8 ± 0.3% at L(0) + 1.2 mm for 0.6 mm shortening amplitude. Q was only constant for short muscle lengths (<85% L(0)) but increased exponentially with increasing muscle length. The observed length dependence of Q indicates that FD is not only determined by work produced during shortening but also by a length-dependent factor, possibly actin compliance, which should be incorporated in any mechanism explaining FD.

  14. US Air Force Space Weather Products Rapid Prototyping Efforts - Solar Radio Background/Burst Effects and Meteor Effects Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quigley, S.; Scro, K.

    2001-12-01

    The Space Vehicles Directorate of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/VSB) has joined efforts with the Technology Applications Division of the Space and Missile Systems Center (SMC Det 11/CIT) to rapidly transition space weather research into prototype, operational, system-impact products. These Rapid Prototyping Center (RPC) products are used to analyze, specify, and forecast the effects of the near-earth space environment on Department of Defense systems and communications. A summary of RPC activity is provided. Emphasis will be placed on current products under development, to include Solar Radio Background/Burst Effects (SoRBE) and Meteor Effects (ME) products. These will be added to real-time operations in the near future. SoRBE specifies the detrimental interference effects of background and event-level solar radio output on radar observations and satellite communications. ME will provide general meteor shower "nowcast" and forecast information, along with more specific meteor and meteor shower impact, radar clutter, and bolide (exploding meteor) effects. A brief overview of recently delivered products: Radar Auroral Clutter, Satellite Scintillation, HF Illumination, and GPS Single-Frequency Error Maps will also be provided.

  15. Influence of bite force on jaw muscle activity ratios in subject-controlled unilateral isometric biting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Pröschel, Peter Alfred; Morneburg, Thomas Riccardo

    2010-10-01

    Ratios of muscle activities in unilateral isometric biting are assumed to provide information on strategies of muscle activation independently from bite force. If valid, this assumption would facilitate experiments as it would justify subject-control instead of transducer-based force control in biting studies. As force independence of ratios is controversial, we tested whether activity ratios are associated with bite force and whether this could affect findings based on subject-controlled force. In 52 subjects, bite force and bilateral masseter and temporalis electromyograms were recorded during unilateral biting on a transducer with varying force levels and with uniform subject-controlled force. Working/balancing and temporalis/masseter ratios of activity peaks were related to bite force peaks. Activity ratios were significantly but weakly correlated with the bite force. The subject-controlled force varied within +/-25% around the prescribed force in 95% of all bites. This scatter could cause a variation of group mean activity ratios of at most +/-6% because of the weak correlation between bite force and ratios. As this small variation is negligible in most cases, subject-control of bite force can be considered an appropriate method to obtain group means of relative muscle activation in particular when force control with transducers is not feasible.

  16. International Reference Ionosphere (IRI): Task Force Activity 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilitza, D.

    2000-01-01

    The annual IRI Task Force Activity was held at the Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics in Trieste, Italy from July 10 to July 14. The participants included J. Adeniyi (University of Ilorin, Nigeria), D. Bilitza (NSSDC/RITSS, USA), D. Buresova (Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Czech Republic), B. Forte (ICTP, Italy), R. Leitinger (University of Graz, Austria), B. Nava (ICTP, Italy), M. Mosert (University National Tucuman, Argentina), S. Pulinets (IZMIRAN, Russia), S. Radicella (ICTP, Italy), and B. Reinisch (University of Mass. Lowell, USA). The main topic of this Task Force Activity was the modeling of the topside ionosphere and the development of strategies for modeling of ionospheric variability. Each day during the workshop week the team debated a specific modeling problem in the morning during informal presentations and round table discussions of all participants. Ways of resolving the specific modeling problem were devised and tested in the afternoon in front of the computers of the ICTP Aeronomy and Radiopropagation Laboratory using ICTP s computer networks and internet access.

  17. Explosive force production during isometric squats correlates with athletic performance in rugby union players.

    PubMed

    Tillin, Neale Anthony; Pain, Matthew Thomas Gerard; Folland, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the association between explosive force production during isometric squats and athletic performance (sprint time and countermovement jump height). Sprint time (5 and 20 m) and jump height were recorded in 18 male elite-standard varsity rugby union players. Participants also completed a series of maximal- and explosive-isometric squats to measure maximal force and explosive force at 50-ms intervals up to 250 ms from force onset. Sprint performance was related to early phase (≤100 ms) explosive force normalised to maximal force (5 m, r = -0.63, P = 0.005; and 20 m, r = -0.54, P = 0.020), but jump height was related to later phase (>100 ms) absolute explosive force (0.51 < r < 0.61; 0.006 < P < 0.035). When participants were separated for 5-m sprint time (< or ≥ 1s), the faster group had greater normalised explosive force in the first 150 ms of explosive-isometric squats (33-67%; 0.001 < P < 0.017). The results suggest that explosive force production during isometric squats was associated with athletic performance. Specifically, sprint performance was most strongly related to the proportion of maximal force achieved in the initial phase of explosive-isometric squats, whilst jump height was most strongly related to absolute force in the later phase of the explosive-isometric squats.

  18. Political Activities by Members of the Armed Forces on Active Duty

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-15

    an election day. 13. Solicit or otherwise engage in fundraising activities in Federal offices or facilities, including military reservations, for a...actively promote, political dinners and similar fundraising events. 18. Attend partisan political events as an official representative of the Armed Forces

  19. Costs, Productivity, and the Utilization of Physicians’s Extenders in Air Force Primary Medicine Clinics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    on ex- tenders to deliver primary medicine. It was prepared as part of the Project AIR FORCE research study effort "Air Force Medical Resources...assistance and review as well as the results of their own research, upon which we draw throughout the report. Richard Buddin initiated the production...Adele Palmer reviewed an earlier version of the report. We are particularly grateful to those in the Air Force who worked with us. The Office of the

  20. Synoptic events force biological productivity in Patagonian fjord ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneri, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The annual cycle of primary productivity of the Patagonian fjords has, to date, been described as a two phase system consisting of a short non productive winter phase (during June and July) and a productive phase extending from late winter (August) to autumn (May). Low levels of primary production, phytoplankton biomass and high concentrations of surface nutrients have been described as characterizing winter conditions while pulsed productivity events typifies the productivity pattern during the extended productive season. Pulsed productivity events characterize coastal waters where inorganic nutrients in surface layers are replenished following periods of intensive utilization by autotrophs. Freshwater input in Patagonian fjords in southern Chile (41-55°S) results in one of the largest estuarine regions worldwide. Here strong haline water column stratification prevents nutrient mixing to the surface layers thus potentially shutting off algal production. Our working hypothesis considered that in order to reconcile the observed pulsed productivity pattern, periodic breaking (associated to surface nutrient replenishment) and re-establishment of estuarine conditions (associated to water column stratification) would be required. Up to now however our understanding of the physical processes that control water column conditions in the Patagonian fjord area has been extremely limited. Here we present evidence linking the passage of synoptic low pressure fronts to pulsed productivity events in the Patagonian fjord area. These front controls and influence local processes of interaction between the fjord and the atmosphere generating a rapid water column response. In the specific case of the Puyuhuapi fjord we have been able to show that such synoptic fronts induce surface flow reversal and water column mixing. Phytoplankton blooming occurs after the passage of the synoptic front once calmer conditions prevail and estuarine conditions are re established. The occurrence of

  1. Refinement of the Air Force Systems Command Production Rate Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    the recommended modified formulations. The relationship between production rate and production ratio has a definite influence on the model’s ability to...1984 7 36 21.954 370.00 1985 8 48 21.017 412.00 A- 3 Table A.2.8 F-15E Cost/Quantity Data Fiscal Year Lot Quntit Recurring Unit Cost LPP 1986 1 60

  2. Air Force Organizational Transformation: Merging the Active and Reserve Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    34Future Total Force." 18 34 Ibid. 35 Ibid. 36 John A. Tirpak, "The Blended Wing Goes to War," Air Force Magazine, October 2003. [ Jounal on-line...Space Power 3 (Fall 2004): 41-53. Tirpak, John A. "The Blended Wing Goes to War," Air Force Magazine, October 2003. Jounal on-line. Available from

  3. Stochastic order parameter equation of isometric force production revealed by drift-diffusion estimates.

    PubMed

    Frank, T D; Friedrich, R; Beek, P J

    2006-11-01

    We address two questions that are central to understanding human motor control variability: what kind of dynamical components contribute to motor control variability (i.e., deterministic and/or random ones), and how are those components structured? To this end, we derive a stochastic order parameter equation for isometric force production from experimental data using drift-diffusion estimates. We show that the force variability increases with the required force output because of a decrease of deterministic stability and an accompanying increase of noise intensity. A structural analysis reveals that the deterministic component consists of a linear control loop, while the random component involves a noise source that scales with force output. In addition, we present evidence for the existence of a subject-independent overall noise level of human isometric force production.

  4. The history dependence of force production in mammalian skeletal muscle following stretch-shortening and shortening-stretch cycles.

    PubMed

    Herzog, W; Leonard, T R

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the history dependence of force production during and following stretch-shortening and shortening-stretch cycles in mammalian skeletal muscle. Thirty-three different isometric, stretch, shortening, stretch-shortening and shortening-stretch experiments were preformed in cat soleus (n=8) using previously established methods. Stretch-shortening and shortening-stretch cycles are not commutative with respect to the isometric forces following the length changes. Whereas force depression following shortening is virtually unaffected by previous stretching of the muscle, force enhancement following stretch depends in a dose-dependent manner on the amount of muscle shortening preceding the stretch. The history dependence of isometric force following shortening-stretch cycles can conveniently be modelled using an elastic (compressive and tensile) element that engages at the length of muscle activation. Such an "elastic" mechanism has been proposed by Edman and Tsuchiya (1996) (Edman, K.A. P., Tsuchiya, T., 1996. Strain of passive elements during force enhancement by stretch in frog mucle fibres. Journal of Physiology 490. 1, 191-205) based on experimental observations, and has been implemented theoretically in a rheological model of muscle (Forcinito et al., 1997) (Forcinito, M., Epstein, M., Herzog, W., 1997. Theoretical considerations on myofibril stiffness. Biophysics Journal 72, 1278-1286). The history dependence of isometric force following stretch-shortening cycles appears independent of the stretch preceding the shortening, except perhaps, if stretching occurs at very high speeds (i.e. 6-10 times fibre length per second). The results of this study are hard to reconcile with the two major mechanisms associated with history dependence of force production: sarcomere length non-uniformity (Edman et al., 1993) and stress-induced cross-bridge inhibition (Maréchal and Plaghki, 1979) (Maréchal, G., Plaghki, L., 1979. The deficit of

  5. Effect of Knee Position on Quadriceps Muscle Force Steadiness and Activation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Chandramouli; Allen, Eric J.; Williams, Glenn N.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction This study investigated the effect of knee position on quadriceps force steadiness and activation strategies. Methods Quadriceps force steadiness was evaluated in twenty-two volunteers at two knee positions by testing their ability to regulate submaximal force. Muscle activation strategies were studied in both time and frequency domains using surface electromyography. Results Quadriceps force fluctuations and the associated agonist and antagonist activity were significantly higher at 90° than at 30° of flexion (P < 0.05). The quadriceps median frequency recorded at 30° was significantly higher than at 90° of flexion (P < 0.05). Regression analyses revealed that force steadiness was related to quadriceps activation and median frequency (P < 0.001), but not to hamstring coactivation (P > 0.05). Discussion The results indicate that knee position significantly affects quadriceps force steadiness and activation strategies. This finding may have important implications for designing a force control testing protocol and interpreting test results. PMID:21404288

  6. Force regulation of ankle extensor muscle activity in freely walking cats.

    PubMed

    Donelan, J M; McVea, D A; Pearson, K G

    2009-01-01

    To gain insight into the relative importance of force feedback to ongoing ankle extensor activity during walking in the conscious cat, we isolated the medial gastrocnemius muscle (MG) by denervating the other ankle extensors and measured the magnitude of its activity at different muscle lengths, velocities, and forces accomplished by having the animals walk up and down a sloped pegway. Mathematical models of proprioceptor dynamics predicted afferent activity and revealed that the changes in muscle activity under our experimental conditions were strongly correlated with Ib activity and not consistently associated with changes in Ia or group II activity. This allowed us to determine the gains within the force feedback pathway using a simple model of the neuromuscular system and the measured relationship between MG activity and force. Loop gain increased with muscle length due to the intrinsic force-length property of muscle. The gain of the pathway that converts muscle force to motoneuron depolarization was independent of length. To better test for a causal relationship between modulation of force feedback and changes in muscle activity, a second set of experiments was performed in which the MG muscle was perturbed during ground contact of the hind foot by dropping or lifting the peg underfoot. Collectively, these investigations support a causal role for force feedback and indicate that about 30% of the total muscle activity is due to force feedback during level walking. Force feedback's role increases during upslope walking and decreases during downslope walking, providing a simple mechanism for compensating for changes in terrain.

  7. Vehicle active suspension system using skyhook adaptive neuro active force control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyandoko, G.; Mailah, M.; Jamaluddin, H.

    2009-04-01

    This paper aims to highlight the practical viability of a new and novel hybrid control technique applied to a vehicle active suspension system of a quarter car model using skyhook and adaptive neuro active force control (SANAFC). The overall control system essentially comprises four feedback control loops, namely the innermost proportional-integral (PI) control loop for the force tracking of the pneumatic actuator, the intermediate skyhook and active force control (AFC) control loops for the compensation of the disturbances and the outermost proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control loop for the computation of the optimum target/commanded force. A neural network (NN) with a modified adaptive Levenberg-Marquardt learning algorithm was used to approximate the estimated mass and inverse dynamics of the pneumatic actuator in the AFC loop. A number of experiments were carried out on a physical test rig using a hardware-in-the-loop configuration that fully incorporates the theoretical elements. The performance of the proposed control method was evaluated and compared to examine the effectiveness of the system in suppressing the vibration effect on the suspension system. It was found that the simulation and experimental results were in good agreement, particularly for the sprung mass displacement and acceleration behaviours in which the proposed SANAFC scheme is found to outperform the PID and passive counterparts.

  8. The senses of active and passive forces at the human ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Savage, G; Allen, T J; Proske, U

    2015-07-01

    The traditional view of the neural basis for the sense of muscle force is that it is generated at least in part within the brain. Recently it has been proposed that force sensations do not arise entirely centrally and that there is a contribution from peripheral receptors within the contracting muscle. Evidence comes from experiments on thumb flexor and elbow flexor muscles. Here we have studied the sense of force in plantar flexor muscles of the human ankle, looking for further evidence for such a mechanism. The active angle-torque curve was measured for muscles of both legs, and for each muscle, ankle angles were identified on the ascending and descending limbs of the curve where active forces were similar. In a plantar flexion force matching task, subjects were asked to match the force in one foot, generated on the ascending limb of the curve, with force in the other foot, generated on the descending limb. It was hypothesised that despite active forces being similar, the sensation generated in the more stretched muscle should be greater because of the contribution from its peripheral stretch receptors, leading to an overestimation of the force in the stretched muscle. It was found that provided that the comparison was between active forces, there was no difference in the forces generated by the two legs, supporting the central hypothesis for the sense of force. When total forces were matched, including a component of passive force due to muscle stretch, subjects seemed to ignore the passive component. Yet subjects had an acute sense of passive force, provided that the muscles remained relaxed. It was concluded that subjects had two senses, a sense of active force, generated centrally, and a sense of passive force, or perhaps muscle stretch, generated within the muscle itself.

  9. Forces Shaping Future U.S. Coal Production and Use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Attanasi, E.D.; Pierce, Brenda S.

    2001-01-01

    More than half of the electricity in the United States is generated by coal-fired powerplants. U.S. coal producers sell almost 90 percent of their product for electricity generation, and so, the future of the U.S. coal industry will be determined by the future of coal-fired electricity-generation plants. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is completing a National Coal Resource Assessment (NCRA) of five major coal-producing regions of the United States (fig. 1): (1) the Appalachian Basin, (2) the Illinois Basin, (3) the Gulf Coast, (4) the Colorado Plateau, and (5) the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains. The Powder River and Williston Basins are the principal producing areas of the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region.

  10. Forced degradation study of thiocolchicoside: characterization of its degradation products.

    PubMed

    Erika, Del Grosso; Silvio, Aprile; Giorgio, Grosa

    2012-03-05

    Thiocolchicoside (TCC, N-[1,2-dimethoxy-10-methylsulphanyl-9-oxo-3-(3,4,5-trihydroxy-6-hydroxymethyl-tetrahydropyran-2-yloxy)-5,6,7,9-tetrahydro-benzo[a]heptalen-7-yl]-acetamide) was subjected to hydrolytic, oxidative, and photolytic stresses. TCC underwent degradation in acidic, basic, and oxidative conditions, while it was stable toward other stress conditions. The degradation products (DPs) were detected and their separation was achieved on a SGE Wakosil C18RS 5μm (250*4.6 mm; SGE) column employing a gradient LC-MS method for a total time of analysis of 18 min. The mass fragmentation pathways of both thiocolchicoside and its degradation products were established using LC-MS experiments assigning the structures to the DPs. In particular, five DPs were identified as: D1SO (N-[1,2-dimethoxy-10-methylsulphoxide-9-oxo-3-(3,4,5-trihydroxy-6-hydroxymethyl-tetrahydropyran-2-yloxy)-5,6,7,9-tetrahydro-benzo[a]heptalen-7-yl]-acetamide), D1SO(2) (N-[1,2-dimethoxy-10-methylsulphone-9-oxo-3-(3,4,5-trihydroxy-6-hydroxymethyl-tetrahydropyran-2-yloxy)-5,6,7,9-tetrahydro-benzo[a]heptalen-7-yl]-acetamide), D2 ([1,2-dimethoxy-10-methylsulphanyl-9-oxo-3-(3,4,5-trihydroxy-6-hydroxymethyl-tetrahydropyran-2-yloxy)-5,6,7,9-tetrahydro-benzo[a]heptalen-7-yl]-amine), D3 (N-[1,2-dimethoxy-3-hydroxy-10-methylsulphanyl-9-oxo-5,6,7,9-tetrahydro-benzo[a]heptalen-7-yl]-acetamide or 3-O-demethylthiocolchicine), D4 ([1,2-dimethoxy-3-hydroxy-10-methylsulphanyl-9-oxo-5,6,7,9-tetrahydro-benzo[a]heptalen-7-yl]-amine or N-deacetyl-3-O-demethylthiocochicine). Moreover, the structures of DPs were confirmed by synthesis of the reference standards which were fully characterized by MS, NMR, IR analyses. Finally a comprehensive degradation scheme of TCC was proposed allowing to outline D1SO and D3 as the indicators of its stability for oxidative and hydrolytic stress conditions.

  11. Force depression and relaxation kinetics after active shortening and deactivation in mouse soleus muscle.

    PubMed

    Van Noten, P; Van Leemputte, M

    2013-03-15

    After active shortening, isometric force production capacity of muscle is reduced (force depression, FD). The mechanism is incompletely understood but increasing cross-bridge detachment and/or decreasing attachment rate might be involved. Therefore we aimed to investigate the relation between work delivered during shortening (W), and change in half-relaxation time (Δ0.5RT) and change in the slow phase of muscle relaxation (Δkslow), considered as a marker for cross-bridge detachment rate, after shortening and after a short (0.7s) interruption of activation (deactivation). We hypothesized that shortening induces an accelerated relaxation related to W which is, similar to FD, largely abolished by a short deactivation. In 10 incubated supra-maximally stimulated mouse soleus muscles, we varied the amount of FD at L0 by varying shortening amplitude (0.6, 1.2 and 2.4mm). We found that W not only induces FD (R(2)=0.92) but also a dose dependent accelerated relaxation (R(2)=0.88 and R(2)=0.77 for respectively Δkslow and Δ0.5RT). In cyclic movements this is of functional significance, because the loss in force generating capacity might be (partially) compensated by faster relaxation. After a short deactivation, both FD and Δkslow were largely abolished but Δ0.5RT remained largely present. Under the assumption that Δkslow reflects a change in cross-bridge detachment rate, these results support the idea that FD is an intrinsic sarcomeric property originating from a work induced reduction of the number of force generating cross-bridges, however not via decreased attachment but via increased detachment rate.

  12. Does raising morning rectal temperature to evening levels offset the diurnal variation in muscle force production?

    PubMed

    Edwards, Ben J; Pullinger, Samuel A; Kerry, Jonathan W; Robinson, William R; Reilly, Tom P; Robertson, Colin M; Waterhouse, James M

    2013-05-01

    Muscle force production and power output in active males, regardless of the site of measurement (hand, leg, or back), are higher in the evening than in the morning. This diurnal variation is attributed to motivational, peripheral and central factors, and higher core and, possibly, muscle temperatures in the evening. This study investigated whether increasing morning rectal temperatures to evening resting values, by active or passive warm-ups, leads to muscle force production and power output becoming equal to evening values in motivated subjects. Ten healthy active males (mean ± SD: age, 21.2 ± 1.9 yrs; body mass, 75.4 ± 8 kg; height, 1.76 ± .06 m) completed the study, which was approved by the University Ethics Committee. The subjects were familiarized with the techniques and protocol and then completed four sessions (separated by at least 48 h): control morning (07:30 h) and evening (17:30 h) sessions (with an active 5-min warm-up) and then two further sessions at 07:30 h but proceeded by an extended active or passive warm-up to raise rectal temperature to evening values. These last two sessions were counterbalanced in order of administration. During each trial, three measures of handgrip strength, isokinetic leg strength measurements (of knee flexion and extension at 1.05 and 4.19 rad.s(-1) through a 90° range of motion), and four measures of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) on an isometric ergometer (utilizing the twitch-interpolation technique) were performed. Rectal and intra-aural temperatures, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and thermal comfort (TC) were measured. Measurements were made after the subjects had reclined for 30 min and after the warm-ups and prior to the measurement of handgrip and isokinetic and isometric ergometry. Muscle temperature was taken after the warm-up and immediately before the isokinetic and MVC measurements. Warm-ups were either active (cycle ergometer at 150 W) or passive (resting in a room at 35 °C, relative

  13. Suomi NPP VIIRS active fire product status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellicott, E. A.; Csiszar, I. A.; Schroeder, W.; Giglio, L.; Wind, B.; Justice, C. O.

    2012-12-01

    We provide an overview of the evaluation and development of the Active Fires product derived from the Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensor on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite during the first year of on-orbit data. Results from the initial evaluation of the standard SNPP Active Fires product, generated by the SNPP Interface Data Processing System (IDPS), supported the stabilization of the VIIRS Sensor Data Record (SDR) product. This activity focused in particular on the processing of the dual-gain 4 micron VIIRS M13 radiometric measurements into 750m aggregated data, which are fundamental for active fire detection. Following the VIIRS SDR product's Beta maturity status in April 2012, correlative analysis between VIIRS and near-simultaneous fire detections from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the NASA Earth Observing System Aqua satellite confirmed the expected relative detection rates driven primarily by sensor differences. The VIIRS Active Fires Product Development and Validation Team also developed a science code that is based on the latest MODIS Collection 6 algorithm and provides a full spatially explicit fire mask to replace the sparse array output of fire locations from a MODIS Collection 4 equivalent algorithm in the current IDPS product. The Algorithm Development Library (ADL) was used to support the planning for the transition of the science code into IDPS operations in the future. Product evaluation and user outreach was facilitated by a product website that provided end user access to fire data in user-friendly format over North America as well as examples of VIIRS-MODIS comparisons. The VIIRS fire team also developed an experimental product based on 375m VIIRS Imagery band measurements and provided high quality imagery of major fire events in US. By August 2012 the IDPS product achieved Beta maturity, with some known and documented shortfalls related to the processing of

  14. Validation and Verification of Operational Land Analysis Activities at the Air Force Weather Agency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Michael; Kumar, Sujay V.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Cetola, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    The NASA developed Land Information System (LIS) is the Air Force Weather Agency's (AFWA) operational Land Data Assimilation System (LDAS) combining real time precipitation observations and analyses, global forecast model data, vegetation, terrain, and soil parameters with the community Noah land surface model, along with other hydrology module options, to generate profile analyses of global soil moisture, soil temperature, and other important land surface characteristics. (1) A range of satellite data products and surface observations used to generate the land analysis products (2) Global, 1/4 deg spatial resolution (3) Model analysis generated at 3 hours. AFWA recognizes the importance of operational benchmarking and uncertainty characterization for land surface modeling and is developing standard methods, software, and metrics to verify and/or validate LIS output products. To facilitate this and other needs for land analysis activities at AFWA, the Model Evaluation Toolkit (MET) -- a joint product of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Developmental Testbed Center (NCAR DTC), AFWA, and the user community -- and the Land surface Verification Toolkit (LVT), developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), have been adapted to operational benchmarking needs of AFWA's land characterization activities.

  15. Biomechanical force induces the growth factor production in human periodontal ligament-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Ichioka, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Toshiro; Yamamoto, Kenta; Honjo, Ken-Ichi; Adachi, Tetsuya; Oseko, Fumishige; Mazda, Osam; Kanamura, Narisato; Kita, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    Although many reports have been published on the functional roles of periodontal ligament (PDL) cells, the mechanisms involved in the maintenance and homeostasis of PDL have not been determined. We investigated the effects of biomechanical force on growth factor production, phosphorylation of MAPKs, and intracellular transduction pathways for growth factor production in human periodontal ligament (hPDL) cells using MAPK inhibitors. hPDL cells were exposed to mechanical force (6 MPa) using a hydrostatic pressure apparatus. The levels of growth factor mRNA and protein were examined by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA. The phosphorylation of MAPKs was measured using BD™ CBA Flex Set. In addition, MAPKs inhibitors were used to identify specific signal transduction pathways. Application of biomechanical force (equivalent to occlusal force) increased the synthesis of VEGF-A, FGF-2, and NGF. The application of biomechanical force increased the expression levels of phosphorylated ERK and p38, but not of JNK. Furthermore, the levels of VEGF-A and NGF expression were suppressed by ERK or p38 inhibitor. The growth factors induced by biomechanical force may play a role in the mechanisms of homeostasis of PDL.

  16. Depletion forces on circular and elliptical obstacles induced by active matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leite, L. R.; Lucena, D.; Potiguar, F. Q.; Ferreira, W. P.

    2016-12-01

    Depletion forces exerted by self-propelled particles on circular and elliptical passive objects are studied using numerical simulations. We show that a bath of active particles can induce repulsive and attractive forces which are sensitive to the shape and orientation of the passive objects (either horizontal or vertical ellipses). The resultant force on the passive objects due to the active particles is studied as a function of the shape and orientation of the passive objects, magnitude of the angular noise, and distance between the passive objects. By increasing the distance between obstacles the magnitude of the repulsive depletion force increases, as long as such a distance is less than one active particle diameter. For longer distances, the magnitude of the force always decreases with increasing distance. We also found that attractive forces may arise for vertical ellipses at high enough area fraction.

  17. Reduced Maximal Force during Acute Anterior Knee Pain Is Associated with Deficits in Voluntary Muscle Activation

    PubMed Central

    Salomoni, Sauro; Tucker, Kylie; Hug, François; McPhee, Megan; Hodges, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Although maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force is reduced during pain, studies using interpolated twitch show no consistent reduction of voluntary muscle drive. The present study aimed to test if the reduction in MVC force during acute experimental pain could be explained by increased activation of antagonist muscles, weak voluntary activation at baseline, or changes in force direction. Twenty-two healthy volunteers performed maximal voluntary isometric knee extensions before, during, and after the effects of hypertonic (pain) and isotonic (control) saline injections into the infrapatellar fat pad. The MVC force, voluntary activation, electromyographic (EMG) activity of agonist, antagonist, and auxiliary (hip) muscles, and pain cognition and anxiety scores were recorded. MVC force was 9.3% lower during pain than baseline (p < 0.001), but there was no systematic change in voluntary activation. Reduced MVC force during pain was variable between participants (SD: 14%), and was correlated with reduced voluntary activation (r = 0.90), baseline voluntary activation (r = − 0.62), and reduced EMG amplitude of agonist and antagonist muscles (all r > 0.52), but not with changes in force direction, pain or anxiety scores. Hence, reduced MVC force during acute pain was mainly explained by deficits in maximal voluntary drive. PMID:27559737

  18. A new model predicting locomotor cost from limb length via force production.

    PubMed

    Pontzer, Herman

    2005-04-01

    Notably absent from the existing literature is an explicit biomechanical model linking limb design to the energy cost of locomotion, COL. Here, I present a simple model that predicts the rate of force production necessary to support the body and swing the limb during walking and running as a function of speed, limb length, limb proportion, excursion angle and stride frequency. The estimated rate of force production is then used to predict COL via this model following previous studies that have linked COL to force production. To test this model, oxygen consumption and kinematics were measured in nine human subjects while walking and running on a treadmill at range of speeds. Following the model, limb length, speed, excursion angle and stride frequency were used to predict the rate of force production both to support the body's center of mass and to swing the limb. Model-predicted COL was significantly correlated with observed COL, performing as well or better than contact time and Froude number as a predictor of COL for running and walking, respectively. Furthermore, the model presented here predicts relationships between COL, kinematic variables and body size that are supported by published reduced-gravity experiments and scaling studies. Results suggest the model is useful for predicting COL from anatomical and kinematic variables, and may be useful in intra- and inter-specific studies of locomotor anatomy and performance.

  19. Muscular activity and physical interaction forces during lower limb exoskeleton use.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Matthew; Rathore, Ashish; Morgado Ramirez, Dafne Zuleima; Loureiro, Rui C V; Carlson, Tom

    2016-12-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) typically manifests with a loss of sensorimotor control of the lower limbs. In order to overcome some of the disadvantages of chronic wheelchair use by such patients, robotic exoskeletons are an emerging technology that has the potential to transform the lives of patients. However, there are a number of points of contact between the robot and the user, which lead to interaction forces. In a recent study, the authors have shown that peak interaction forces are particularly prominent at the anterior aspect of the right leg. This study uses a similar experimental protocol with additional electromyography (EMG) analysis to examine whether such interaction forces are due to the muscular activity of the participant or the movement of the exoskeleton itself. Interestingly, the authors found that peak forces preceded peak EMG activity. This study did not find a significant correlation between EMG activity and force data, which would indicate that the interaction forces can largely be attributed to the movement of the exoskeleton itself. However, we also report significantly higher correlation coefficients in muscle/force pairs located at the anterior aspect of the right leg. In their previous research, the authors have shown peak interaction forces at the same locations, which suggests that muscular activity of the participant makes a more significant contribution to the interaction forces at these locations. The findings of this study are of significance for incomplete SCI patients, for whom EMG activity may provide an important input to an intuitive control schema.

  20. The influence of wing-wake interactions on the production of aerodynamic forces in flapping flight.

    PubMed

    Birch, James M; Dickinson, Michael H

    2003-07-01

    We used two-dimensional digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) to visualize flow patterns around the flapping wing of a dynamically scaled robot for a series of reciprocating strokes starting from rest. The base of the wing was equipped with strain gauges so that the pattern of fluid motion could be directly compared with the time history of force production. The results show that the development and shedding of vortices throughout each stroke are highly stereotyped and influence force generation in subsequent strokes. When a wing starts from rest, it generates a transient force as the leading edge vortex (LEV) grows. This early peak, previously attributed to added-mass acceleration, is not amenable to quasi-steady models but corresponds well to calculations based on the time derivative of the first moment of vorticity within a sectional slice of fluid. Forces decay to a stable level as the LEV reaches a constant size and remains attached throughout most of the stroke. The LEV grows as the wing supinates prior to stroke reversal, accompanied by an increase in total force. At stroke reversal, both the LEV and a rotational starting vortex (RSV) are shed into the wake, forming a counter-rotating pair that directs a jet of fluid towards the underside of the wing at the start of the next stroke. We isolated the aerodynamic influence of the wake by subtracting forces and flow fields generated in the first stroke, when the wake is just developing, from those produced during the fourth stroke, when the pattern of both the forces and wake dynamics has reached a limit cycle. This technique identified two effects of the wake on force production by the wing: an early augmentation followed by a small attenuation. The later decrease in force is consistent with the influence of a decreased aerodynamic angle of attack on translational forces caused by downwash within the wake and is well explained by a quasi-steady model. The early effect of the wake is not well approximated by

  1. Does lowering evening rectal temperature to morning levels offset the diurnal variation in muscle force production?

    PubMed

    Robinson, William R; Pullinger, Samuel A; Kerry, Jonathan W; Giacomoni, Magali; Robertson, Colin M; Burniston, Jatin G; Waterhouse, James M; Edwards, Ben J

    2013-10-01

    Muscle force production and power output in active males, regardless of the site of measurement (hand, leg, or back), are higher in the evening than the morning. This diurnal variation is attributed to motivational, peripheral, and central factors and higher core and, possibly, muscle temperatures in the evening. This study investigated whether decreasing evening resting rectal temperatures to morning values, by immersion in a water tank, leads to muscle force production and power output becoming equal to morning values in motivated subjects. Ten healthy active males (mean ± SD: age, 22.5 ± 1.3 yrs; body mass, 80.1 ± 7.8 kg; height, 1.72 ± 0.05 m) completed the study, which was approved by the local ethics committee of the university. The subjects were familiarized with the techniques and protocol and then completed three sessions (separated by at least 48 h): control morning (07:30 h) and evening (17:30 h) sessions (with an active 5-min warm-up on a cycle ergometer at 150 W) and then a further session at 17:30 h but preceded by an immersion in cold water (~16.5 °C) to lower rectal temperature (Trec) to morning values. During each trial, three measures of grip strength, isokinetic leg strength measurements (of knee flexion and extension at 1.05 and 4.19 rad s(-1) through a 90° range of motion), and three measures of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) on an isometric dynamometer (utilizing the twitch-interpolation technique) were performed. Trec, rating of perceived exertion (RPE), and thermal comfort (TC) were also measured after the subjects had reclined for 30 min at the start of the protocol and prior to the measures for grip, isokinetic, and isometric dynamometry. Muscle temperature was taken after the warm-up or water immersion and immediately before the isokinetic and MVC measurements. Data were analyzed using general linear models with repeated measures. Trec values were higher at rest in the evening (by 0.37 °C; p < 0.05) than the morning, but

  2. Mechanosensitive Channel Activation by Diffusio-Osmotic Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonthuis, Douwe Jan; Golestanian, Ramin

    2014-10-01

    For ion channel gating, the appearance of two distinct conformational states and the discrete transitions between them are essential, and therefore of crucial importance to all living organisms. We show that the physical interplay between two structural elements that are commonly present in bacterial mechanosensitive channels—namely, a charged vestibule and a hydrophobic constriction—creates two distinct conformational states, open and closed, as well as the gating between them. We solve the nonequilibrium Stokes-Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations, extended to include a molecular potential of mean force, and show that a first order transition between the closed and open states arises naturally from the diffusio-osmotic stress caused by the ions and the water inside the channel and the elastic restoring force from the membrane.

  3. Mechanosensitive channel activation by diffusio-osmotic force.

    PubMed

    Bonthuis, Douwe Jan; Golestanian, Ramin

    2014-10-03

    For ion channel gating, the appearance of two distinct conformational states and the discrete transitions between them are essential, and therefore of crucial importance to all living organisms. We show that the physical interplay between two structural elements that are commonly present in bacterial mechanosensitive channels--namely, a charged vestibule and a hydrophobic constriction--creates two distinct conformational states, open and closed, as well as the gating between them. We solve the nonequilibrium Stokes-Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations, extended to include a molecular potential of mean force, and show that a first order transition between the closed and open states arises naturally from the diffusio-osmotic stress caused by the ions and the water inside the channel and the elastic restoring force from the membrane.

  4. Morphological Transformation and Force Generation of Active Cytoskeletal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Maruri, Daniel; Kamm, Roger D.

    2017-01-01

    Cells assemble numerous types of actomyosin bundles that generate contractile forces for biological processes, such as cytokinesis and cell migration. One example of contractile bundles is a transverse arc that forms via actomyosin-driven condensation of actin filaments in the lamellipodia of migrating cells and exerts significant forces on the surrounding environments. Structural reorganization of a network into a bundle facilitated by actomyosin contractility is a physiologically relevant and biophysically interesting process. Nevertheless, it remains elusive how actin filaments are reoriented, buckled, and bundled as well as undergo tension buildup during the structural reorganization. In this study, using an agent-based computational model, we demonstrated how the interplay between the density of myosin motors and cross-linking proteins and the rigidity, initial orientation, and turnover of actin filaments regulates the morphological transformation of a cross-linked actomyosin network into a bundle and the buildup of tension occurring during the transformation. PMID:28114384

  5. Sensitivity of Simulated Global Ocean Carbon Flux Estimates to Forcing by Reanalysis Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson W.; Casey, Nancy W.; Rousseaux, Cecile S.

    2015-01-01

    Reanalysis products from MERRA, NCEP2, NCEP1, and ECMWF were used to force an established ocean biogeochemical model to estimate air-sea carbon fluxes (FCO2) and partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) in the global oceans. Global air-sea carbon fluxes and pCO2 were relatively insensitive to the choice of forcing reanalysis. All global FCO2 estimates from the model forced by the four different reanalyses were within 20% of in situ estimates (MERRA and NCEP1 were within 7%), and all models exhibited statistically significant positive correlations with in situ estimates across the 12 major oceanographic basins. Global pCO2 estimates were within 1% of in situ estimates with ECMWF being the outlier at 0.6%. Basin correlations were similar to FCO2. There were, however, substantial departures among basin estimates from the different reanalysis forcings. The high latitudes and tropics had the largest ranges in estimated fluxes among the reanalyses. Regional pCO2 differences among the reanalysis forcings were muted relative to the FCO2 results. No individual reanalysis was uniformly better or worse in the major oceanographic basins. The results provide information on the characterization of uncertainty in ocean carbon models due to choice of reanalysis forcing.

  6. Validation and Verification of the Operational Land Analysis Activities at the Air Force Weather Agency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, M.; Kumar, S.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Cetola, J.

    2011-12-01

    The importance of operational benchmarking and uncertainty characterization of land surface modeling can be clear upon considering the wide range of performance characteristics of numerical land surface models realizable through various combinations of factors. Such factors might include model physics and numerics, resolution, and forcing datasets used in operational implementation versus those that might have been involved in any prior development benchmarking. Of course, decisions concerning operational implementation may be better informed through more effective benchmarking of performance under various blends of such aforementioned operational factors. To facilitate this and other needs for land analysis activities at the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA), the Model Evaluation Toolkit (MET) - a joint product of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Developmental Testbed Center (NCAR DTC), AFWA, and the user community - and the land information system (LIS) Verification Toolkit (LVT) - developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) - have been adapted to the operational benchmarking needs of AFWA's land characterization activities in order to compare the performance of new land modeling and related activities with that of previous activities as well as observational or analyzed datasets. In this talk, three examples of adaptations of MET and LVT to evaluation of LIS-related operations at AFWA will be presented. One example will include comparisons of new surface rainfall analysis capabilities, towards forcing of AFWA's LIS, with previous capabilities. Comparisons will be relative to retrieval-, model-, and measurement-based precipitation fields. Results generated via MET's grid-stat, neighborhood, wavelet, and object based evaluation (MODE) utilities adapted to AFWA's needs will be discussed. This example will be framed in the context of better informing optimal blends of land surface model (LSM) forcing data sources - namely precipitation data- under

  7. How wing kinematics affect power requirements and aerodynamic force production in a robotic bat wing.

    PubMed

    Bahlman, Joseph W; Swartz, Sharon M; Breuer, Kenneth S

    2014-06-01

    Bats display a wide variety of behaviors that require different amounts of aerodynamic force. To control and modulate aerodynamic force, bats change wing kinematics, which, in turn, may change the power required for wing motion. There are many kinematic mechanisms that bats, and other flapping animals, can use to increase aerodynamic force, e.g. increasing wingbeat frequency or amplitude. However, we do not know if there is a difference in energetic cost between these different kinematic mechanisms. To assess the relationship between mechanical power input and aerodynamic force output across different isolated kinematic parameters, we programmed a robotic bat wing to flap over a range of kinematic parameters and measured aerodynamic force and mechanical power. We systematically varied five kinematic parameters: wingbeat frequency, wingbeat amplitude, stroke plane angle, downstroke ratio, and wing folding. Kinematic values were based on observed values from free flying Cynopterus brachyotis, the species on which the robot was based. We describe how lift, thrust, and power change with increases in each kinematic variable. We compare the power costs associated with generating additional force through the four kinematic mechanisms controlled at the shoulder, and show that all four mechanisms require approximately the same power to generate a given force. This result suggests that no single parameter offers an energetic advantage over the others. Finally, we show that retracting the wing during upstroke reduces power requirements for flapping and increases net lift production, but decreases net thrust production. These results compare well with studies performed on C. brachyotis, offering insight into natural flight kinematics.

  8. Biologically active proteins from natural product extracts.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, B R

    2001-10-01

    The term "biologically active proteins" is almost redundant. All proteins produced by living creatures are, by their very nature, biologically active to some extent in their homologous species. In this review, a subset of these proteins will be discussed that are biologically active in heterologous systems. The isolation and characterization of novel proteins from natural product extracts including those derived from microorganisms, plants, insects, terrestrial vertebrates, and marine organisms will be reviewed and grouped into several distinct classes based on their biological activity and their structure.

  9. Ongoing characterization of the forced electron beam induced arc discharge ion source for the selective production of exotic species facility

    SciTech Connect

    Manzolaro, M. Andrighetto, A.; Monetti, A.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Vasquez, J.; Corradetti, S.; Calderolla, M.; Prete, G.; Meneghetti, G.

    2014-02-15

    An intense research and development activity to finalize the design of the target ion source system for the selective production of exotic species (SPES) facility (operating according to the isotope separation on line technique) is at present ongoing at Legnaro National Laboratories. In particular, the characterization of ion sources in terms of ionization efficiency and transversal emittance is currently in progress, and a preliminary set of data is already available. In this work, the off-line ionization efficiency and emittance measurements for the SPES forced electron beam induced arc discharge ion source in the case of a stable Ar beam are presented in detail.

  10. Microtubule and cortical forces determine platelet size during vascular platelet production.

    PubMed

    Thon, Jonathan N; Macleod, Hannah; Begonja, Antonija Jurak; Zhu, Jie; Lee, Kun-Chun; Mogilner, Alex; Hartwig, John H; Italiano, Joseph E

    2012-05-22

    Megakaryocytes release large preplatelet intermediates into the sinusoidal blood vessels. Preplatelets convert into barbell-shaped proplatelets in vitro to undergo repeated abscissions that yield circulating platelets. These observations predict the presence of circular-preplatelets and barbell-proplatelets in blood, and two fundamental questions in platelet biology are what are the forces that determine barbell-proplatelet formation, and how is the final platelet size established. Here we provide insights into the terminal mechanisms of platelet production. We quantify circular-preplatelets and barbell-proplatelets in human blood in high-resolution fluorescence images, using a laser scanning cytometry assay. We demonstrate that force constraints resulting from cortical microtubule band diameter and thickness determine barbell-proplatelet formation. Finally, we provide a mathematical model for the preplatelet to barbell conversion. We conclude that platelet size is limited by microtubule bundling, elastic bending, and actin-myosin-spectrin cortex forces.

  11. Control of cytoplasmic dynein force production and processivity by its C-terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Matthew P.; Höök, Peter; Brenner, Sibylle; Wynne, Caitlin L.; Vallee, Richard B.; Gennerich, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a microtubule motor involved in cargo transport, nuclear migration and cell division. Despite structural conservation of the dynein motor domain from yeast to higher eukaryotes, the extensively studied S. cerevisiae dynein behaves distinctly from mammalian dyneins, which produce far less force and travel over shorter distances. However, isolated reports of yeast-like force production by mammalian dynein have called interspecies differences into question. We report that functional differences between yeast and mammalian dynein are real and attributable to a C-terminal motor element absent in yeast, which resembles a ‘cap’ over the central pore of the mammalian dynein motor domain. Removal of this cap increases the force generation of rat dynein from 1 pN to a yeast-like 6 pN and greatly increases its travel distance. Our findings identify the CT-cap as a novel regulator of dynein function. PMID:25670086

  12. Control of cytoplasmic dynein force production and processivity by its C-terminal domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, Matthew P.; Höök, Peter; Brenner, Sibylle; Wynne, Caitlin L.; Vallee, Richard B.; Gennerich, Arne

    2015-02-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a microtubule motor involved in cargo transport, nuclear migration and cell division. Despite structural conservation of the dynein motor domain from yeast to higher eukaryotes, the extensively studied S. cerevisiae dynein behaves distinctly from mammalian dyneins, which produce far less force and travel over shorter distances. However, isolated reports of yeast-like force production by mammalian dynein have called interspecies differences into question. We report that functional differences between yeast and mammalian dynein are real and attributable to a C-terminal motor element absent in yeast, which resembles a ‘cap’ over the central pore of the mammalian dynein motor domain. Removal of this cap increases the force generation of rat dynein from 1 pN to a yeast-like 6 pN and greatly increases its travel distance. Our findings identify the CT-cap as a novel regulator of dynein function.

  13. Rupture Forces among Human Blood Platelets at different Degrees of Activation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi-Huong; Palankar, Raghavendra; Bui, Van-Chien; Medvedev, Nikolay; Greinacher, Andreas; Delcea, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about mechanics underlying the interaction among platelets during activation and aggregation. Although the strength of a blood thrombus has likely major biological importance, no previous study has measured directly the adhesion forces of single platelet-platelet interaction at different activation states. Here, we filled this void first, by minimizing surface mediated platelet-activation and second, by generating a strong adhesion force between a single platelet and an AFM cantilever, preventing early platelet detachment. We applied our setup to measure rupture forces between two platelets using different platelet activation states, and blockade of platelet receptors. The rupture force was found to increase proportionally to the degree of platelet activation, but reduced with blockade of specific platelet receptors. Quantification of single platelet-platelet interaction provides major perspectives for testing and improving biocompatibility of new materials; quantifying the effect of drugs on platelet function; and assessing the mechanical characteristics of acquired/inherited platelet defects. PMID:27146004

  14. Catalog of Audiovisual Productions. Volume 3. Air Force and Miscellaneous DoD Productions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    govern for each title. Violation of federal copyright laws by unauthorized reproduction or exhibition may result in judicial or administrative penalties...Administration Services Office, for approval. 9. Prohibition Against Reproduction of DF AV Productions. Copies of DF AV productions are accountable AV...aspects of celestial bodies, their origin and evolution . Includes astronomical spectroscopy and radio astronomy. 03 Atmtpharit Physical and chemical

  15. Carry-Over of Force Production Symmetry in Athletes of Differing Strength Levels.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Christopher A; Sato, Kimitake; Burnett, Angus; Stone, Michael H

    2015-11-01

    This study sought to determine the level of association between bilateral force production symmetry assessment methods (standing weight distribution [WtD], unloaded and lightly loaded jumps, and isometric strength) and to determine whether the amount of symmetry carry-over between these tasks differs for strong and weak athletes. Subjects for this study included male (n = 31) and female (n = 32) athletes from National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I sports. Athletes performed WtD, unloaded and lightly loaded (20 kg) static and countermovement jumps, and isometric midthigh pull (IMTP) assessments on 2 adjacent force plates. Ground reaction force data were used to calculate symmetry variables and performance-related variables. Using Pearson zero order correlations, evaluations of the amount of symmetry carry-over were made. Weight distribution correlated strongly with jump peak force (PF) (r = 0.628-0.664). Strong relationships were also observed between loading conditions for jump variables (r = 0.568-0.957) as were the relationships between jump types for PF, peak power, and net impulse (r = 0.506-0.834). Based on the pooled sample, there was a lack of association between IMTP and WtD for jump symmetry variables. However, when examining strong and weak groups, rate of force development showed moderate to strong symmetry carry-over in the strongest athletes (r = 0.416-0.589). Stronger athletes appear to display similar explosive strength symmetry characteristics in dynamic and isometric assessments, unlike weaker athletes. Strength seems to influence the amount of force production symmetry carry-over between bilateral assessments. There may be optimal loads and variables for symmetry assessment, but these may differ based on population characteristics.

  16. Ion drag force on an absorbing grain in highly collisional plasma in the presence of plasma production and loss processes

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Manis; Khrapak, Sergei A.; Morfill, Gregor E.

    2008-09-07

    The ion drag force acting on a small absorbing spherical grain has been calculated analytically in highly collisional plasma with slowly drifting ions taking into account plasma production and loss mechanisms in the vicinity of the grain. It is shown that both the magnitude and direction of the ion drag force are strongly influenced by the plasma production and loss mechanisms. The parameter regimes for the 'positive' and 'negative' ion drag forces acting on an absorbing grain have been identified.

  17. Bilateral deficit in explosive force production is not caused by changes in agonist neural drive.

    PubMed

    Buckthorpe, Matthew W; Pain, Matthew T G; Folland, Jonathan P

    2013-01-01

    Bilateral deficit (BLD) describes the phenomenon of a reduction in performance during synchronous bilateral (BL) movements when compared to the sum of identical unilateral (UL) movements. Despite a large body of research investigating BLD of maximal voluntary force (MVF) there exist a paucity of research examining the BLD for explosive strength. Therefore, this study investigated the BLD in voluntary and electrically-evoked explosive isometric contractions of the knee extensors and assessed agonist and antagonist neuromuscular activation and measurement artefacts as potential mechanisms. Thirteen healthy untrained males performed a series of maximum and explosive voluntary contractions bilaterally (BL) and unilaterally (UL). UL and BL evoked twitch and octet contractions were also elicited. Two separate load cells were used to measure MVF and explosive force at 50, 100 and 150 ms after force onset. Surface EMG amplitude was measured from three superficial agonists and an antagonist. Rate of force development (RFD) and EMG were reported over consecutive 50 ms periods (0-50, 50-100 and 100-150 ms). Performance during UL contractions was compared to combined BL performance to measure BLD. Single limb performance during the BL contractions was assessed and potential measurement artefacts, including synchronisation of force onset from the two limbs, controlled for. MVF showed no BLD (P = 0.551), but there was a BLD for explosive force at 100 ms (11.2%, P = 0.007). There was a BLD in RFD 50-100 ms (14.9%, P = 0.004), but not for the other periods. Interestingly, there was a BLD in evoked force measures (6.3-9.0%, P<0.001). There was no difference in agonist or antagonist EMG for any condition (P≥0.233). Measurement artefacts contributed minimally to the observed BLD. The BLD in volitional explosive force found here could not be explained by measurement issues, or agonist and antagonist neuromuscular activation. The BLD in voluntary and evoked explosive force might

  18. Mechanisms of force production during linear accelerations in bluegill sunfish Lepomis macrochirus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tytell, Eric D.; Wise, Tyler N.; Boden, Alexandra L.; Sanders, Erin K.; Schwalbe, Margot A. B.

    2016-11-01

    In nature, fish rarely swim steadily. Although unsteady behaviors are common, we know little about how fish change their swimming kinematics for routine accelerations, and how these changes affect the fluid dynamic forces and the wake produced. To study force production during acceleration, particle image velocimetry was used to quantify the wake of bluegill sunfish Lepomis macrochirus and to estimate the pressure field during linear accelerations and steady swimming. We separated "steady" and "unsteady" trials and quantified the forward acceleration using inertial measurement units. Compared to steady sequences, unsteady sequences had larger accelerations and higher body amplitudes. The wake consisted of single vortices shed during each tail movement (a '2S' wake). The structure did not change during acceleration, but the circulation of the vortices increased, resulting in larger forces. A fish swimming unsteadily produced significantly more force than the same fish swimming steadily, even when the accelerations were the same. This increase is likely due to increased added mass during unsteady swimming, as a result of the larger body amplitude. Pressure estimates suggest that the increase in force is correlated with more low pressure regions on the anterior body. This work was supported by ARO W911NF-14-1-0494 and NSF RCN-PLS 1062052.

  19. Limits to vertical force and power production in bumblebees (Hymenoptera: Bombus impatiens).

    PubMed

    Buchwald, R; Dudley, R

    2010-02-01

    Maximum vertical forces produced by flying animals can be difficult to identify unequivocally, but potentially indicate general limits to aerodynamic force and muscle power output. We used two methods (i.e. incremental addition of supplemental mass and asymptotic load lifting) to determine both the intraspecific allometry of and methodological differences in estimates of maximum flight performance for the bumblebee Bombus impatiens. We found that incremental mass addition underestimated maximum lifting capacity by approximately 18% relative to values obtained by asymptotically increasing the applied load during a lifting bout. In asymptotic loading, bumblebees lifted on average 53% of their body weight, and demonstrated a significantly negative allometry of maximum aerodynamic force production relative to thoracic muscle mass. Estimates of maximum body mass-specific mechanical power output increased intraspecifically with body mass to the 0.38-0.50 power, depending on values assumed for the profile drag coefficient. We also found a significant reduction in vertical force production when both hindwings were removed. Limits to load-lifting capacity ultimately co-occur with an upper bound on stroke amplitude (approximately 145 deg.). Although thoracic muscle mass showed positive allometry, overall load-lifting performance exhibited significant size-dependent degradation.

  20. Isometric squat force output and muscle activity in stable and unstable conditions.

    PubMed

    McBride, Jeffrey M; Cormie, Prue; Deane, Russell

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of stable vs. unstable conditions on force output and muscle activity during an isometric squat. Nine men involved in recreational resistance training participated in the investigation by completing a single testing session. Within this session subjects performed isometric squats either while standing directly on the force plate (stable condition, S) or while standing on inflatable balls placed on top of the force plate (unstable condition, U). Electromyography (EMG) was recorded during both conditions from the vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM), biceps femoris (BF), and medial gastrocnemius (G) muscles. Results indicated peak force (PF) and rate of force development (RFD) were significantly lower, 45.6% and 40.5% respectively, in the U vs. S condition (p < or = 0.05). Average integrated EMG values for the VL and VM were significantly higher in the S vs. U condition. VL and VM muscle activity was 37.3% and 34.4% less in U in comparison to S. No significant differences were observed in muscle activity of the BF or G between U and S. The primary finding in this investigation is that isometric squatting in an unstable condition significantly reduces peak force, rate of force development, and agonist muscle activity with no change in antagonist or synergist muscle activity. In terms of providing a stimulus for strength gain no discernable benefit of performing a resistance exercise in an unstable condition was observed in the current study.

  1. Preparing the periphery for a subsequent behavior: motor neuronal activity during biting generates little force but prepares a retractor muscle to generate larger forces during swallowing in Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; McManus, Jeffrey M; Cullins, Miranda J; Chiel, Hillel J

    2015-03-25

    Some behaviors occur in obligatory sequence, such as reaching before grasping an object. Can the earlier behavior serve to prepare the musculature for the later behavior? If it does, what is the underlying neural mechanism of the preparation? To address this question, we examined two feeding behaviors in the marine mollusk Aplysia californica, one of which must precede the second: biting and swallowing. Biting is an attempt to grasp food. When that attempt is successful, the animal immediately switches to swallowing to ingest food. The main muscle responsible for pulling food into the buccal cavity during swallowing is the I3 muscle, whose motor neurons B6, B9, and B3 have been previously identified. By performing recordings from these neurons in vivo in intact, behaving animals or in vitro in a suspended buccal mass preparation, we demonstrated that the frequencies and durations of these motor neurons increased from biting to swallowing. Using the physiological patterns of activation to drive these neurons intracellularly, we further demonstrated that activating them using biting-like frequencies and durations, either alone or in combination, generated little or no force in the I3 muscle. When biting-like patterns preceded swallowing-like patterns, however, the forces during the subsequent swallowing-like patterns were significantly enhanced. Sequences of swallowing-like patterns, either with these neurons alone or in combination, further enhanced forces in the I3 muscle. These results suggest a novel mechanism for enhancing force production in a muscle, and may be relevant to understanding motor control in vertebrates.

  2. Three-nucleon force the {Delta}-mechanism for pion production and pion absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, M.T. |; Sauer, P.U.; Stadler, A. |; Kortemeyer, G.

    1993-05-18

    The description of the three-nucleon system in terms of nucleon and {Delta} degrees of freedom is extended to allow for explicit pion production (absorption) from single dynamic {Delta} de-excitation (excitation) processes. This mechanism yields an energy dependent effective three-body hamiltonean. The Faddeev equations for the trinucleon bound state are solved with a force model that has already been tested in the two-nucleon system above pion-production threshold. The binding energy and other bound state properties are calculated. The contribution to the effective three-nucleon force arising from the pionic degrees of freedom is evaluated. The validity of previous coupled-channel calculations with explicit but stable A isobar components in the wavefunction is studied.

  3. Trunk muscle activation and associated lumbar spine joint shear forces under different levels of external forward force applied to the trunk.

    PubMed

    Kingma, Idsart; Staudenmann, Didier; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2007-02-01

    High anterior intervertebral shear loads could cause low back injuries and therefore the neuromuscular system may actively counteract these forces. This study investigated whether, under constant moment loading relative to L3L4, an increased externally applied forward force on the trunk results in a shift in muscle activation towards the use of muscles with more backward directed lines of action, thereby reducing the increase in total joint shear force. Twelve participants isometrically resisted forward forces, applied at several locations on the trunk, while moments were held constant relative to L3L4. Surface EMG and lumbar curvature were measured, and an EMG-driven muscle model was used to calculate compression and shear forces at all lumbar intervertebral joints. Larger externally applied forward forces resulted in a flattening of the lumbar lordosis and a slightly more backward directed muscle force. Furthermore, the overall muscle activation increased. At the T12L1 to L3L4 joint, resulting joint shear forces remained small (less than 200N) because the average muscle force pulled backward relative to those joints. However, at the L5S1 joint the average muscle force pulled the trunk forward so that the increase in muscle force with increasing externally applied forward force caused a further rise in shear force (by 102.1N, SD=104.0N), resulting in a joint shear force of 1080.1N (SD=150.4N) at 50Nm moment loading. It is concluded that the response of the neuromuscular system to shear force challenges tends to increase rather than reduce the shear loading at the lumbar joint that is subjected to the highest shear forces.

  4. 16 CFR 1211.13 - Inherent force activated secondary door sensors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... sensors. 1211.13 Section 1211.13 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT... components shall withstand a total of 9 cycles of mechanical operation without failure with the force applied... the other end of the door at points one, three, and five feet from the floor. (3) The cycles are...

  5. 16 CFR 1211.13 - Inherent force activated secondary door sensors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... sensors. 1211.13 Section 1211.13 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT... components shall withstand a total of 9 cycles of mechanical operation without failure with the force applied... the other end of the door at points one, three, and five feet from the floor. (3) The cycles are...

  6. Measurement of Productive Capacity: A Methodology for Air Force Enlisted Specialties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    performance times to determine individual PC values, about 320 supervisors in four AFSs (Aircrew Life Support, Aerospace Ground Equipment, Avionic ...analysis purposes. Being able to predict an individual’s performance test score from their ASVAB scores and experience level still leaves the policy...experience to supervisor estimates of productivity in one Air Force electronics specialty (328X0, Avionics Communications). Their objectives were to: (1

  7. Subthalamic nucleus local field potential activity helps encode motor effort rather than force in parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Tan, Huiling; Pogosyan, Alek; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Cheeran, Binith; FitzGerald, James J; Green, Alexander L; Aziz, Tipu; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Brown, Peter

    2015-04-15

    Local field potential (LFP) recordings from patients with deep brain stimulation electrodes in the basal ganglia have suggested that frequency-specific activities correlate with force or effort, but previous studies have not been able to disambiguate the two. Here, we dissociated effort from actual force generated by contrasting the force generation of different fingers while recording LFP activity from the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with Parkinson's disease who had undergone functional surgery. Patients were studied while on their normal dopaminergic medication. We investigated the relationship between frequency-specific oscillatory activity in the STN and voluntary flexion of either the index or little finger at different effort levels. At each tested effort level (10%, 25%, and 40% of the maximal voluntary contraction force of each individual finger), the index finger generated larger force than the little finger. Movement-related suppression of beta-band power in the STN LFP was significantly modulated by effort, but not by which finger was used, suggesting that the beta suppression in the STN LFP during sustained contraction serves as a proxy for effort. The absolute force scaled with beta power suppression, but with the scaling determined by the maximal voluntary contraction force of the motor effector. Our results argue against the hypothesis that the basal ganglia are directly involved in the parameterization of force during movement and support a role of the STN in the control of motor effort to be attributed to a response.

  8. Production Of High Specific Activity Copper-67

    DOEpatents

    Jamriska, Sr., David J.; Taylor, Wayne A.; Ott, Martin A.; Fowler, Malcolm; Heaton, Richard C.

    2003-10-28

    A process for the selective production and isolation of high specific activity Cu.sup.67 from proton-irradiated enriched Zn.sup.70 target comprises target fabrication, target irradiation with low energy (<25 MeV) protons, chemical separation of the Cu.sup.67 product from the target material and radioactive impurities of gallium, cobalt, iron, and stable aluminum via electrochemical methods or ion exchange using both anion and cation organic ion exchangers, chemical recovery of the enriched Zn.sup.70 target material, and fabrication of new targets for re-irradiation is disclosed.

  9. Production Of High Specific Activity Copper-67

    DOEpatents

    Jamriska, Sr., David J.; Taylor, Wayne A.; Ott, Martin A.; Fowler, Malcolm; Heaton, Richard C.

    2002-12-03

    A process for the selective production and isolation of high specific activity cu.sup.67 from proton-irradiated enriched Zn.sup.70 target comprises target fabrication, target irradiation with low energy (<25 MeV) protons, chemical separation of the Cu.sup.67 product from the target material and radioactive impurities of gallium, cobalt, iron, and stable aluminum via electrochemical methods or ion exchange using both anion and cation organic ion exchangers, chemical recovery of the enriched Zn.sup.70 target material, and fabrication of new targets for re-irradiation is disclosed.

  10. A viable non-axisymmetric non-force-free field to represent solar active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, A.; Bhattacharyya, R.

    2016-11-01

    A combination of analytical calculations and vectormagnetogram data is utilized to develop a non-axisymmetric non-force-free magnetic field and assess its viability in describing solar active regions. For that purpose, we construct a local spherical shell where a planar surface, tangential to the inner sphere, represents a Cartesian cutout of an active region. The magnetic field defined on the surface is then correlated with magnetograms. The analysis finds that the non-axisymmetric non-force-free magnetic field, obtained by a superposition of two linear-force-free fields, correlates reasonably well with magnetograms.

  11. Proteolytic activity alterations resulting from force-feeding in Muscovy and Pekin ducks.

    PubMed

    Awde, S; Marty-Gasset, N; Wilkesman, J; Rémignon, H

    2013-11-01

    We investigated liver protease activity in force-fed and non-force-fed ducks using zymography gels to better understand mechanisms underlying liver steatosis in palmipeds. Male Muscovy and Pekin ducks were slaughtered before and after a short period (13 d) while they were conventionally fed or force fed. The force-fed regimen contained a high level of carbohydrates and was delivered in large doses. Main hepatic proteases (matrix metalloprotease-2, calpains, and cathepsins) were extracted from raw liver and specifically activated within electrophoretic gels. Both force-fed Muscovy and Pekin ducks presented higher liver weights and BW associated with lower matrix metalloprotease-2 and m-calpain hepatic activities. On the other hand, hepatic cathepsin activity was not affected by force feeding. It was concluded that Muscovy and Pekin duck hepatic proteases are affected similarly by the force feeding. Thus, this cannot explain differences observed between Muscovy and Pekin ducks regarding their ability to develop hepatic steatosis generally reported in literature.

  12. Residual force depression in single sarcomeres is abolished by MgADP-induced activation.

    PubMed

    Trecarten, Neal; Minozzo, Fabio C; Leite, Felipe S; Rassier, Dilson E

    2015-06-03

    The mechanisms behind the shortening-induced force depression commonly observed in skeletal muscles remain unclear, but have been associated with sarcomere length non-uniformity and/or crossbridge inhibition. The purpose of this study was twofold: (i) to evaluate if force depression is present in isolated single sarcomeres, a preparation that eliminates sarcomere length non-uniformities and (ii) to evaluate if force depression is inhibited when single sarcomeres are activated with MgADP, which biases crossbridges into a strongly-bound state. Single sarcomeres (n = 16) were isolated from rabbit psoas myofibrils using two micro-needles (one compliant, one rigid), piercing the sarcomere externally adjacent to the Z-lines. The sarcomeres were contracted isometrically and subsequently shortened, in both Ca(2+)- and MgADP-activating solutions. Shortening in Ca(2+)-activated samples resulted in a 27.44 ± 9.04% force depression when compared to isometric contractions produced at similar final sarcomere lengths (P < 0.001). There was no force depression in MgADP-activated sarcomeres (force depression = -1.79 ± 9.69%, P =  0.435). These results suggest that force depression is a sarcomeric property, and that is associated with an inhibition of myosin-actin interactions.

  13. Musculoskeletal modelling of muscle activation and applied external forces for the correction of scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study uses biomechanical modelling and computational optimization to investigate muscle activation in combination with applied external forces as a treatment for scoliosis. Bracing, which incorporates applied external forces, is the most popular non surgical treatment for scoliosis. Non surgical treatments which make use of muscle activation include electrical stimulation, postural control, and therapeutic exercises. Electrical stimulation has been largely dismissed as a viable treatment for scoliosis, although previous studies have suggested that it can potentially deliver similarly effective corrective forces to the spine as bracing. Methods The potential of muscle activation for scoliosis correction was investigated over different curvatures both with and without the addition of externally applied forces. The five King’s classifications of scoliosis were investigated over a range of Cobb angles. A biomechanical model of the spine was used to represent various scoliotic curvatures. Optimization was applied to the model to reduce the curves using combinations of both deep and superficial muscle activation and applied external forces. Results Simulating applied external forces in combination with muscle activation at low Cobb angles (< 20 degrees) over the 5 King’s classifications, it was possible to reduce the magnitude of the curve by up to 85% for classification 4, 75% for classifications 3 and 5, 65% for classification 2, and 60% for classification 1. The reduction in curvature was less at larger Cobb angles. For King’s classifications 1 and 2, the serratus, latissimus dorsi, and trapezius muscles were consistently recruited by the optimization algorithm for activation across all Cobb angles. When muscle activation and external forces were applied in combination, lower levels of muscle activation or less external force was required to reduce the curvature of the spine, when compared with either muscle activation or external force applied

  14. Trypanocidal Activity of Marine Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Amy J.; Grkovic, Tanja; Sykes, Melissa L.; Avery, Vicky M.

    2013-01-01

    Marine natural products are a diverse, unique collection of compounds with immense therapeutic potential. This has resulted in these molecules being evaluated for a number of different disease indications including the neglected protozoan diseases, human African trypanosomiasis and Chagas disease, for which very few drugs are currently available. This article will review the marine natural products for which activity against the kinetoplastid parasites; Trypanosoma brucei brucei, T.b. rhodesiense and T. cruzi has been reported. As it is important to know the selectivity of a compound when evaluating its trypanocidal activity, this article will only cover molecules which have simultaneously been tested for cytotoxicity against a mammalian cell line. Compounds have been grouped according to their chemical structure and representative examples from each class were selected for detailed discussion. PMID:24152565

  15. The Potential Radiative Forcing of Global Land Use and Land Cover Change Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, D. S.; Mahowald, N. M.; Kloster, S.

    2014-12-01

    Given the expected increase in pressure on land resources over the next century, there is a need to understand the total impacts of activities associated with land use and land cover change (LULCC). Here we quantify these impacts using the radiative forcing metric, including forcings from changes in long-lived greenhouse gases, tropospheric ozone, aerosol effects, and land surface albedo. We estimate radiative forcings from the different agents for historical LULCC and for six future projections using simulations from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Land Model and Community Atmosphere Models and additional offline analyses. When all forcing agents are considered together we show that 45% (+30%, -20%) of the present-day (2010) anthropogenic radiative forcing can be attributed to LULCC. Changes in the emission of non-CO2 greenhouse gases and aerosols from LULCC enhance the total LULCC radiative forcing by a factor of 2 to 3 with respect to the forcing from CO2 alone. In contrast, the non-CO2 forcings from fossil fuel burning are roughly neutral, due largely to the negative (cooling) impact of aerosols from these sources. We partition the global LULCC radiative forcing into three major sources: direct modification of land cover (e.g. deforestation), agricultural activities, and fire regime changes. Contributions from deforestation and agriculture are roughly equal in the present day, while changes to wildfire activity impose a small negative forcing globally. In 2100, deforestation activities comprise the majority of the LULCC radiative forcing for all projections except one (Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 4.5). This suggests that realistic scenarios of future forest area change are essential for projecting the contribution of LULCC to climate change. However, the commonly used RCP land cover change projections all include decreases in global deforestation rates over the next 85 years. To place an upper bound on the potential

  16. Thermal Noise Reduction of Mechanical Oscillators by Actively Controlled External Dissipative Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Shoudan; Medich, David; Czajkowsky, Daniel M.; Sheng, Sitong; Yuan, Jian-Yang; Shao, Zhifeng

    1999-01-01

    We show that the thermal fluctuations of very soft mechanical oscillators, such as the cantilever in an atomic force microscope (AFM), can be reduced without changing the stiffness of the spring or having to lower the environment temperature. We derive a theoretical relationship between the thermal fluctuations of an oscillator and an actively external-dissipative force. This relationship is verified by experiments with an AFM cantilever where the external active force is coupled through a magnetic field. With simple instrumentation, we have reduced the thermal noise amplitude of the cantilever by a factor of 3.4, achieving an apparent temperature of 25 K with the environment at 295K. This active noise reduction approach can significantly improve the accuracy of static position or static force measurements in a number of practical applications.

  17. Mechanical Allostery: Evidence for a Force Requirement in the Proteolytic Activation of Notch

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Wendy R.; Zimmerman, Brandon; He, Li; Miles, Laura J.; Huang, Jiuhong; Tiyanont, Kittichoat; McArthur, Debbie G.; Aster, Jon C.; Perrimon, Norbert; Loparo, Joseph J.; Blacklow, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Ligands stimulate Notch receptors by inducing regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) to produce a transcriptional effector. Notch activation requires unmasking of a metalloprotease cleavage site remote from the site of ligand binding, raising the question of how proteolytic sensitivity is achieved. Here, we show that application of physiologically relevant forces to the regulatory switch results in sensitivity to metalloprotease cleavage, and that bound ligands induce Notch signal transduction in cells only in the presence of applied mechanical force. Synthetic receptor-ligand systems that remove the native ligand-receptor interaction also activate Notch by inducing proteolysis of the regulatory switch. Together, these studies show that mechanical force exerted by signal-sending cells is required for ligand-induced Notch activation, and establish that force-induced proteolysis can act as a mechanism of cellular mechanotransduction. PMID:26051539

  18. Distribution of the forces produced by motor unit activity in the human flexor digitorum profundus

    PubMed Central

    Kilbreath, S L; Gorman, R B; Raymond, J; Gandevia, S C

    2002-01-01

    In humans, the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP), which is a multi-tendoned muscle, produces forces that flex the four distal interphalangeal joints of the fingers. We determined whether the force associated with activity in a single motor unit in the FDP was confined to a single finger or distributed to more than one finger during a natural grasp. The discharge of single low-threshold motor units (n = 69) was recorded at sites across the muscle during weak voluntary grasping involving all fingers and spike-triggered averaging of the forces under each of the finger pads was used to assess the distribution pattern. Spike-triggered averaging revealed that time-locked changes in force occurred under the ‘test’ finger (that finger on which the unit principally acted) as well as under the ‘non-test’ fingers. However, for the index-, middle- and ring-finger units, the changes in force under non-test fingers were typically small (< 20 % of those under the test finger). For little-finger units, the mean changes in force under the adjacent ring finger were large (>50 % of those under the test finger). The distribution of forces by little-finger units differed significantly from that for each of the other three fingers. Apart from increases in force under non-test fingers, there was occasional unloading of adjacent fingers (22/267 combinations), usually affecting the index finger. The increases in force under the test finger correlated significantly with the background force for units acting on the middle, ring and little fingers. During a functional grasp, the activity of single units in the FDP allows for a relatively selective control of forces at the tips of the index, middle and ring fingers, but this is limited for little-finger units. PMID:12181299

  19. Calcium-activated force of human muscle fibers following a standardized eccentric contraction.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Jun; Widrick, Jeffrey J

    2010-12-01

    Peak Ca(2+)-activated specific force (force/fiber cross-sectional area) of human chemically skinned vastus lateralis muscle fiber segments was determined before and after a fixed-end contraction or an eccentric contraction of standardized magnitude (+0.25 optimal fiber length) and velocity (0.50 unloaded shortening velocity). Fiber myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform content was assayed by SDS-PAGE. Posteccentric force deficit, a marker of damage, was similar for type I and IIa fibers but threefold greater for type IIa/IIx hybrid fibers. A fixed-end contraction had no significant effect on force. Multiple linear regression revealed that posteccentric force was explained by a model consisting of a fiber type-independent and a fiber type-specific component (r(2) = 0.91). Preeccentric specific force was directly associated with a greater posteccentric force deficit. When preeccentric force was held constant, type I and IIa fibers showed identical susceptibility to damage, while type IIa/IIx fibers showed a significantly greater force loss. This heightened sensitivity to damage was directly related to the amount of type IIx MHC in the hybrid fiber. Our model reveals a fiber-type sensitivity of the myofilament lattice or cytoskeleton to mechanical strain that can be described as follows: type IIa/IIx > type IIa = type I. If these properties extend to fibers in vivo, then alterations in the number of type IIa/IIx fibers may modify a muscle's susceptibility to eccentric damage.

  20. Medium-intensity, high-volume "hypertrophic" resistance training did not induce improvements in rapid force production in healthy older men.

    PubMed

    Walker, Simon; Peltonen, Heikki; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether it is possible to improve both maximum and rapid force production using resistance training that is typically used to induce muscle hypertrophy in previously untrained older men. Subjects (60-72 years) performed 20 weeks of "hypertrophic" resistance training twice weekly (n = 27) or control (n = 11). Maximum dynamic and isometric leg press, as well as isometric force over 0-100 ms, and maximum concentric power tests were performed pre- and post-intervention. Muscle activity was assessed during these tests by surface electromyogram of the vastus lateralis and medialis muscles. Muscle hypertrophy was assessed by panoramic ultrasound of the vastus lateralis. The intervention group increased their maximum isometric (from 2268 ± 544 to 2538 ± 701 N) and dynamic force production (from 137 ± 24 to 165 ± 29 kg), and these changes were significantly different to control (isometric 12 ± 16 vs. 1 ± 9 %; dynamic 21 ± 12 vs. 2 ± 4 %). No within- or between-group differences were observed in rapid isometric force or concentric power. Relative increases in vastus lateralis cross-sectional area trended to be statistically greater in the intervention group (10 ± 8 vs. 3 ± 6 %, P = 0.061). It is recommendable that resistance training programs for older individuals integrate protocols emphasizing maximum force/muscle hypertrophy and rapid force production in order to induce comprehensive health-related and functionally important improvements in this population.

  1. Impact of Short-Range Forces on Defect Production from High-Energy Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, R. E.; Tamm, A.; Béland, L. K.; Samolyuk, G. D.; Stocks, G. M.; Caro, A.; Slipchenko, L. V.; Osetsky, Yu. N.; Aabloo, A.; Klintenberg, M.; Wang, Y.

    2016-04-25

    Primary radiation damage formation in solid materials typically involves collisions between atoms that have up to a few hundred keV of kinetic energy. The distance between two colliding atoms can approach 0.05 nm during these collisions. At such small atomic separations, force fields fitted to equilibrium properties tend to significantly underestimate the potential energy of the colliding dimer. To enable molecular dynamics simulations of high-energy collisions, it is common practice to use a screened Coulomb force field to describe the interactions and to smoothly join this to the equilibrium force field at a suitable interatomic spacing. But, there is no accepted standard method for choosing the parameters used in the joining process, and our results prove that defect production is sensitive to how the force fields are linked. A new procedure is presented that involves the use of ab initio calculations to determine the magnitude and spatial dependence of the pair interactions at intermediate distances, along with systematic criteria for choosing the joining parameters. Results are presented for the case of nickel, which demonstrate the use and validity of the procedure.

  2. Impact of Short-Range Forces on Defect Production from High-Energy Collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Stoller, R. E.; Tamm, A.; Béland, L. K.; ...

    2016-04-25

    Primary radiation damage formation in solid materials typically involves collisions between atoms that have up to a few hundred keV of kinetic energy. The distance between two colliding atoms can approach 0.05 nm during these collisions. At such small atomic separations, force fields fitted to equilibrium properties tend to significantly underestimate the potential energy of the colliding dimer. To enable molecular dynamics simulations of high-energy collisions, it is common practice to use a screened Coulomb force field to describe the interactions and to smoothly join this to the equilibrium force field at a suitable interatomic spacing. But, there is nomore » accepted standard method for choosing the parameters used in the joining process, and our results prove that defect production is sensitive to how the force fields are linked. A new procedure is presented that involves the use of ab initio calculations to determine the magnitude and spatial dependence of the pair interactions at intermediate distances, along with systematic criteria for choosing the joining parameters. Results are presented for the case of nickel, which demonstrate the use and validity of the procedure.« less

  3. Coordinated integrin activation by actin-dependent force during T-cell migration.

    PubMed

    Nordenfelt, Pontus; Elliott, Hunter L; Springer, Timothy A

    2016-10-10

    For a cell to move forward it must convert chemical energy into mechanical propulsion. Force produced by actin polymerization can generate traction across the plasma membrane by transmission through integrins to their ligands. However, the role this force plays in integrin activation is unknown. Here we show that integrin activity and cytoskeletal dynamics are reciprocally linked, where actin-dependent force itself appears to regulate integrin activity. We generated fluorescent tension-sensing constructs of integrin αLβ2 (LFA-1) to visualize intramolecular tension during cell migration. Using quantitative imaging of migrating T cells, we correlate tension in the αL or β2 subunit with cell and actin dynamics. We find that actin engagement produces tension within the β2 subunit to induce and stabilize an active integrin conformational state and that this requires intact talin and kindlin motifs. This supports a general mechanism where localized actin polymerization can coordinate activation of the complex machinery required for cell migration.

  4. A study of the formation of magnetically active solid dispersions of phenacetin using atomic and magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Usmanova, Liana Stanislavovna; Ziganshin, Marat Akhmedovich; Gorbatchuk, Valery Vilenovich; Ziganshina, Sufia Askhatovna; Bizyaev, Dmitry Anatolevich; Bukharaev, Anastas Akhmetovich; Mukhametzyanov, Timur Anvarovich; Gerasimov, Alexander Vladimirovich

    2017-01-01

    A lot of pharmaceutical substances have a poor solubility that limits their absorption and distribution to the targeted sites to elicit the desired action without causing untoward effects on healthy cells or tissues. For such drugs, new modes of delivery have to be developed for efficient and effective delivery of the drug to the target site. Formation of magnetically active solid dispersion of such drugs could be a useful approach to addressing this problem because they combine targeted delivery and good solubility. In this work, the distribution of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in the solid dispersion of polyethylene glycol with average molecular weight 950-1050 g/mol and phenacetin was studied using atomic force and magnetic force microscopy. The distribution of nanoparticles was found to be uniform in studied composites. Magnetically active solid dispersions may find application in the production of the capsulated drug delivery systems with enhanced solubility parameters.

  5. A study of the formation of magnetically active solid dispersions of phenacetin using atomic and magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Usmanova, Liana Stanislavovna; Ziganshin, Marat Akhmedovich; Gorbatchuk, Valery Vilenovich; Ziganshina, Sufia Askhatovna; Bizyaev, Dmitry Anatolevich; Bukharaev, Anastas Akhmetovich; Mukhametzyanov, Timur Anvarovich; Gerasimov, Alexander Vladimirovich

    2017-01-01

    A lot of pharmaceutical substances have a poor solubility that limits their absorption and distribution to the targeted sites to elicit the desired action without causing untoward effects on healthy cells or tissues. For such drugs, new modes of delivery have to be developed for efficient and effective delivery of the drug to the target site. Formation of magnetically active solid dispersion of such drugs could be a useful approach to addressing this problem because they combine targeted delivery and good solubility. In this work, the distribution of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in the solid dispersion of polyethylene glycol with average molecular weight 950–1050 g/mol and phenacetin was studied using atomic force and magnetic force microscopy. The distribution of nanoparticles was found to be uniform in studied composites. Magnetically active solid dispersions may find application in the production of the capsulated drug delivery systems with enhanced solubility parameters. PMID:28217547

  6. 77 FR 9267 - Child Labor, Forced Labor, and Forced or Indentured Child Labor in the Production of Goods in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-16

    ..., Forced Labor and Human Trafficking (OCFT) at the email or physical address below by 5 p.m. March 9, 2012... information above). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Section 105(b)(1) of the Trafficking Victims...

  7. 77 FR 70473 - Child Labor, Forced Labor, and Forced or Indentured Child Labor in the Production of Goods in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ... Child Labor, Forced Labor and Human Trafficking (OCFT) at the email or physical address below by 5 p.m... Trafficking Victims ] Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005 (``TVPRA of 2005''), Public Law 109-164...

  8. 78 FR 72714 - Child Labor, Forced Labor, and Forced or Indentured Child Labor in the Production of Goods in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ... Child Labor, Forced Labor and Human Trafficking (OCFT) at the email or physical address below by 5 p.m... information above). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Section 105(b)(1) of the Trafficking Victims...

  9. Advances in research on structural characterisation of agricultural products using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongli; Cheng, Fang

    2011-03-30

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has many unique features compared with other conventional microscopies, such as high magnification with high resolution, minimal sample preparation, acquiring 2D and 3D images at the same time, observing ongoing processes directly, the possibility of manipulating macromolecules, etc. As a nanotechnology tool, AFM has been used to investigate the nanostructure of materials in many fields. This mini-review focuses mainly on its latest application to characterise the macromolecular nanostructure and surface topography of agricultural products. First the fundamentals of AFM are briefly explained. Then the macromolecular nanostructure information on agricultural products from AFM images is introduced by exploring the structure-function relationship in three aspects: agricultural product processing, agricultural product ripening and storage, and genetic and environmental factors. The surface topography characterisation of agricultural products using AFM is also discussed. The results reveal that AFM could be a powerful nanotechnology tool to acquire a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of structure and quality variations of agricultural products, which could be instructive in improving processing and storage technologies, and AFM is also helpful to reveal the essential nature of a product at nanoscale.

  10. Unconventional entropy production in the presence of momentum-dependent forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Chulan; Yeo, Joonhyun; Lee, Hyun Keun; Park, Hyunggyu

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the unconventional nature of entropy production (EP) in nonequilibrium systems with odd-parity variables that change signs under time reversal. We consider the Brownian motion of a particle in contact with a heat reservoir, where the particle's momentum is an odd-parity variable. In the presence of an external momentum-dependent force, the EP transferred to the environment is found to be not equivalent to the usual reservoir entropy change due to heat transfer. An additional unconventional contribution to the EP, which is crucial for maintaining the non-negativity of the (average) total EP enforced by the second law of thermodynamics, appears. A few examples are considered to elucidate the novel nature of the EP. We also discuss detailed balance conditions with a momentum-dependent force.

  11. Analysis of ground reaction force and electromyographic activity of the gastrocnemius muscle during double support.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Andreia S P; Santos, Rubim; Oliveira, Francisco P M; Carvalho, Paulo; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2012-05-01

    Mechanisms associated with energy expenditure during gait have been extensively researched and studied. According to the double-inverted pendulum model energy expenditure is higher during double support, as lower limbs need to work to redirect the centre of mass velocity. This study looks into how the ground reaction force of one limb affects the muscle activity required by the medial gastrocnemius of the contralateral limb during step-to-step transition. Thirty-five subjects were monitored as to the medial gastrocnemius electromyographic activity of one limb and the ground reaction force of the contralateral limb during double support. After determination of the Pearson correlation coefficient (r), a moderate correlation was observed between the medial gastrocnemius electromyographic activity of the dominant leg and the vertical (Fz) and anteroposterior (Fy) components of ground reaction force of the non-dominant leg (r = 0.797, p < 0.000 1; r = -0.807, p < 0.000 1). A weak and moderate correlation was observed between the medial gastrocnemius electromyographic activity of the non-dominant leg and the Fz and Fy of the dominant leg, respectively (r = 0.442, p = 0.018; r = -0.684 p < 0.000 1). The results obtained suggest that during double support, ground reaction force is associated with the electromyographic activity of the contralateral medial gastrocnemius and that there is an increased dependence between the ground reaction force of the non-dominant leg and the electromyographic activity of the dominant medial gastrocnemius.

  12. Human Thymus Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Augment Force Production in Self-Organized Cardiac Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Sondergaard, Claus S.; Hodonsky, Chani J.; Khait, Luda; Shaw, John; Sarkar, Bedabrata; Birla, Ravi; Bove, Edward; Nolta, Jan; Si, Ming-Sing

    2011-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stromal cells have been recently isolated from thymus gland tissue discarded after surgical procedures. The role of this novel cell type in heart regeneration has yet to be defined. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of human thymus-derived mesenchymal stromal cells using self-organized cardiac tissue as an in vitro platform for quantitative assessment. Methods Mesenchymal stromal cells were isolated from discarded thymus tissue from neonates undergoing heart surgery and were incubated in differentiation media to demonstrate multipotency. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes self-organized into cardiac tissue fibers in a custom culture dish either alone or in combination with varying numbers of mesenchymal stromal cells. A transducer measured force generated by spontaneously contracting self-organized cardiac tissue fibers. Work and power outputs were calculated from force tracings. Immunofluorescence was performed to determine the fate of the thymus-derived mesenchymal stromal cells. Results Mesenchymal stromal cells were successfully isolated from discarded thymus tissue. After incubation in differentiation media, mesenchymal stromal cells attained the expected phenotypes. Although mesenchymal stromal cells did not differentiate into mature cardiomyocytes, addition of these cells increased the rate of fiber formation, force production, and work and power outputs. Self-organized cardiac tissue containing mesenchymal stromal cells acquired a defined microscopic architecture. Conclusions Discarded thymus tissue contains mesenchymal stromal cells, which can augment force production and work and power outputs of self-organized cardiac tissue fibers by several-fold. These findings indicate the potential utility of mesenchymal stromal cells in treating heart failure. PMID:20732499

  13. Bioelectric activity of skeletal muscle under conditions of alternating action of g-Forces and weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuganov, Y. M.; Kasyan, I. I.; Asyamolov, B. F.

    1975-01-01

    The bioelectric activity of the musculature of animals and man was studied during alternating g-forces and weightlessness. The appropriate conditions were reproduced in flight along a parabolic curve; in this case, weightlessness lasting 25-30 sec alternated with g-forces of about 2 g magnitude. Quite regular changes in the bioelectric activity of various groups of muscles were disclosed under g-forces and in weightlessness. Thus, muscle biopotential amplitudes of 130-180 microvolt in horizontal flight, increased to 190-330 microvolt under g-forces. In the subsequent weightlessness, an abrupt reduction in oscillation voltage was observed and, in a number of cases, phenomena, similar to the picture of bioelectric silence were noted.

  14. Force interacts with macromolecular structure in activation of TGF-β.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xianchi; Zhao, Bo; Iacob, Roxana E; Zhu, Jianghai; Koksal, Adem C; Lu, Chafen; Engen, John R; Springer, Timothy A

    2017-02-02

    Integrins are adhesion receptors that transmit force across the plasma membrane between extracellular ligands and the actin cytoskeleton. In activation of the transforming growth factor-β1 precursor (pro-TGF-β1), integrins bind to the prodomain, apply force, and release the TGF-β growth factor. However, we know little about how integrins bind macromolecular ligands in the extracellular matrix or transmit force to them. Here we show how integrin αVβ6 binds pro-TGF-β1 in an orientation biologically relevant for force-dependent release of TGF-β from latency. The conformation of the prodomain integrin-binding motif differs in the presence and absence of integrin binding; differences extend well outside the interface and illustrate how integrins can remodel extracellular matrix. Remodelled residues outside the interface stabilize the integrin-bound conformation, adopt a conformation similar to earlier-evolving family members, and show how macromolecular components outside the binding motif contribute to integrin recognition. Regions in and outside the highly interdigitated interface stabilize a specific integrin/pro-TGF-β orientation that defines the pathway through these macromolecules which actin-cytoskeleton-generated tensile force takes when applied through the integrin β-subunit. Simulations of force-dependent activation of TGF-β demonstrate evolutionary specializations for force application through the TGF-β prodomain and through the β- and not α-subunit of the integrin.

  15. Force-activated reactivity switch in a bimolecular chemical reaction at the single molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szoszkiewicz, Robert; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Liang, Jian; Kuo, Tzu-Ling; Fernandez, Julio M.

    2009-10-01

    Mechanical force is a distinct and usually less explored way to activate chemical reaction because it can deform the reacting molecules along a well-defined direction of the reaction coordinate. However, the effect of mechanical force on the free- energy surface that governs a chemical reaction is still largely unknown. The combination of protein engineering with single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy allows us to study the influence of mechanical force on the rate at which a protein disulfide bond is reduced by some reducing agents in a bimolecular substitution reaction (so-called SN2). We found that cleavage of a protein disulfide bond by hydroxide anions exhibits an abrupt reactivity ``switch'' at 500 pN, after which the accelerating effect of force on the rate of an SN2 chemical reaction greatly diminishes. We propose that an abrupt force- induced conformational change of the protein disulfide bond shifts its ground state, drastically changing its reactivity in SN2 chemical reactions. Our experiments directly demonstrate the action of a force-activated switch in the chemical reactivity of a single molecule. References: S. Garcia-Manyes, J. Liang, R. Szoszkiewicz, T-L. Kuo and J. M. Fernandez, Nature Chemistry, 1, 236-242, 2009.

  16. Correlation of fingertip shear force direction with somatosensory cortical activity in monkey

    PubMed Central

    Fortier-Poisson, Pascal; Langlais, Jean-Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    To examine the activity of somatosensory cortex (S1) neurons to self-generated shear forces on the index and thumb, two monkeys were trained to grasp a stationary metal tab with a key grip and exert forces without the fingers slipping in one of four orthogonal directions for 1 s. A majority (∼85%) of slowly adapting and rapidly adapting (RA) S1 neurons had activity modulated with shear force direction. The cells were recorded mainly in areas 1 and 2 of the S1, although some area 3b neurons also responded to shear direction or magnitude. The preferred shear vectors were distributed in every direction, with tuning arcs varying from 50° to 170°. Some RA neurons sensitive to dynamic shear force direction also responded to static shear force but within a narrower range, suggesting that the direction of the shear force may influence the adaptation rate. Other neurons were modulated with shear forces in diametrically opposite directions. The directional sensitivity of S1 cortical neurons is consistent with recordings from cutaneous afferents showing that shear direction, even without slip, is a powerful stimulus to S1 neurons. PMID:26467520

  17. ATP utilization for calcium uptake and force production in skinned muscle fibres of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed Central

    Stienen, G J; Zaremba, R; Elzinga, G

    1995-01-01

    1. A method has been developed to discriminate between the rate of ATP hydrolysis associated with calcium uptake into the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and force development of the contractile apparatus in mechanically or saponin-skinned skeletal muscle fibres. The rate of ATP hydrolysis was determined in fibres of different types from the iliofibularis muscle of Xenopus laevis by enzymatic coupling of ATP re-synthesis to the oxidation of NADH. 2. The ATPase activity was determined before and after exposure of the preparations for 30 min to a solution containing 0.5% Triton X-100, which effectively abolishes the SR ATPase activity. The fibres were activated in a solution containing 5 mM caffeine to ensure that calcium uptake into the SR was maximal. 3. At saturating Ca2+ concentrations the actomyosin (AM) and SR ATPase activities in fast-twitch fibres, at 4.3 degrees C, amounted to 1.52 +/- 0.07 and 0.58 +/- 0.10 mumol s-1 (g dry wt)-1, respectively (means +/- S.E.M.; n = 25). The SR ATPase activity was 25% of the total ATPase activity. At submaximal calcium concentrations the AM ATPase activity varied in proportion to the isometric force. 4. The calcium sensitivity of the SR ATPase was larger than that of the AM ATPase and its dependence on [Ca2+] was less steep. The AM ATPase activity was half-maximal at a pCa of 6.11 (pCa = -log [Ca2+]) whereas the SR ATPase activity was half-maximal at a pCa of 6.62. 5. In Triton X-100-treated fibres, at different 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM) concentrations, the AM ATPase activity and isometric force varied proportionally. The SR ATPase activity determined by extrapolation of the total ATPase activity in mechanically skinned or saponin-treated fibres to zero force, was independent of the BDM concentration in the range studied (0-20 mM). The values obtained for the SR ATPase activity in this way were similar to those obtained with Triton X-100 treatment. 6. The AM ATPase activity in slow-twitch fibres amounted to 0.74 +/- 0

  18. Effects of non-gravitational forces on orbital evolution of active Centaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churyumov, Klim; Kovalenko, Nataliya

    2016-07-01

    Currently there are 26 active Centaurs known among 121 discovered .In the present study we have investigated the influence of cometary activity on their orbital evolution by using orbital evolution integrators. Since there is no information on exact values of non-gravitational forces for these cometary Centaurs, because of their large heliocentric distances, we assumed their non-gravitational forces as the one for comet Halley with coefficient of 1/r^{2}, where r is perihelion distance. As a result we got the differences in perihelion passage dates for active Centaurs and differences in their perihelion distances during one period around the Sun and longer time-span.

  19. Active damping of modal vibrations by force apportioning. [for spacecraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallauer, W. L., Jr.; Barthelemy, J.-F. M.

    1980-01-01

    The theory and numerical simulation of active structural damping is described which requires few discrete control thrusters positioned on the structure. A particular apportioning of coherently phased control forces is applied for each vibration mode which is to be damped; this strongly affects the damped vibration mode, while minimally exciting all other modes. The force apportioning used is that which would tune a target mode if the structure was being shaken in a model vibration test. In contrast to model testing, the forces are varied temporally so as to dampen, rather than excite, the target mode(s).

  20. Active force generation in cross-linked filament bundles without motor proteins.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Sam; Sun, Sean X

    2010-11-01

    Cytoskeletal filaments often interact laterally through cross-linking proteins, contributing to passive cellular viscoelasticity and, perhaps surprisingly, active force generation. We present a theory, based on the formation and rupture of cross-linker bonds, that relates molecular properties of those interactions to the macroscale mechanics of filament bundles. Computing the force-velocity relation for such a bundle, we demonstrate significant contractile forces in the absence of molecular motors. This theory provides insight into cytokinesis, cytoskeletal mechanics, and stress-fiber contraction.

  1. Realistic prediction of solid pharmaceutical oxidation products by using a novel forced oxidation system.

    PubMed

    Ueyama, Eiji; Tamura, Kousuke; Mizukawa, Kousei; Kano, Kenji

    2014-04-01

    This study investigated a novel solid-state-based forced oxidation system to enable a realistic prediction of pharmaceutical product oxidation, a key consideration in drug development and manufacture. Polysorbate 80 and ferric(III) acetylacetonate were used as an organic hydroperoxide source and a transition metal catalyst, respectively. Homogeneous solutions of target compounds and these reagents were prepared in a mixed organic solvent. The organic solvent was removed rapidly under reduced pressure, and the oxidation of the resulting dried solid was investigated. Analysis of the oxidation products generated in test compounds by this proposed forced oxidation system using HPLC showed a high similarity with those generated during more prolonged naturalistic drug oxidation. The proposed system provided a better predictive performance in prediction of realistic oxidative degradants of the drugs tested than did other established methods. Another advantage of this system was that the generation of undesired products of hydrolysis, solvolysis, and thermolysis was prevented because efficient oxidation was achieved under mild conditions. The results of this study suggest that this system is suitable for a realistic prediction of oxidative degradation of solid pharmaceuticals.

  2. Effects of fiber type on force depression after active shortening in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Joumaa, V; Power, G A; Hisey, B; Caicedo, A; Stutz, J; Herzog, W

    2015-07-16

    The aim of this study was to investigate force depression in Type I and Type II muscle fibers. Experiments were performed using skinned fibers from rabbit soleus and psoas muscles. Force depression was quantified after active fiber shortening from an average sarcomere length (SL) of 3.2µ m to an average SL of 2.6 µm at an absolute speed of 0.115f iber length/s and at a relative speed corresponding to 17% of the unloaded shortening velocity (V0) in each type of fibers. Force decay and mechanical work during shortening were also compared between fiber types. After mechanical testing, each fiber was subjected to myosin heavy chain (MHC) analysis in order to confirm its type (Type I expressing MHC I, and Type II expressing MHC IId). Type II fibers showed greater steady-state force depression after active shortening at a speed of 0.115 fiber length/s than Type I fibers (14.5±1.5% versus 7.8±1.7%). Moreover, at this absolute shortening speed, Type I fibers showed a significantly greater rate of force decay during shortening and produced less mechanical work than Type II fibers. When active shortening was performed at the same relative speed (17% V0), the difference in force depression between fiber types was abolished. These results suggest that no intrinsic differences were at the origin of the disparate force depressions observed in Type I and Type II fibers when actively shortened at the same absolute speed, but rather their distinct force-velocity relationships.

  3. Cortical activity differs between position- and force-control knee extension tasks.

    PubMed

    Poortvliet, Peter C; Tucker, Kylie J; Finnigan, Simon; Scott, Dion; Sowman, Paul; Hodges, Paul W

    2015-12-01

    Neural control differs between position- and force-control tasks as evident from divergent effects of fatigue and pain. Unlike force-control tasks, position-control tasks focus on a postural goal to maintain a joint angle. Cortical involvement is suggested to be less during postural control, but whether this differs between position- and force-control paradigms remains unclear. Coherence estimates the functional communication between spatially distinct active regions within the cortex (cortico-cortical coherence; CCC) and between the cortex and muscles (corticomuscular coherence; CMC). We investigated whether cortical involvement differed between force-control and more posturally focused, position-control tasks. Seventeen adults performed position- and force-control knee extensor efforts at a submaximal load (10 % maximum voluntary contraction). Surface electromyography was recorded from the right knee extensor and flexor muscles and brain activity using electroencephalography (EEG). CCC and CMC in the beta (13-30 Hz) and gamma (30-45 Hz) frequency bands were calculated between combinations of intra- and inter-hemispheric pairs of electrodes, and between four EEG electrodes that approximated the left motor cortical area, and right knee extensor EMG, respectively. Differences in EEG power and muscle activity were also calculated. CCC was greater across distributed regions in the force-control task. Beta EEG power in the left hemisphere was higher for the position-control task. Although averaged CMC data differed between tasks, there was no task difference for individual CMC data. Muscle activity and force did not differ between tasks. The results demonstrate differential cortical contributions to control force- versus position-control tasks. This might contribute to differences in performance outcomes of these tasks that have been shown previously.

  4. Regional Quality Assurance Activity in Higher Education in Southeast Asia: Its Characteristics and Driving Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umemiya, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    This article analyses the characteristics and driving forces of regional quality assurance activity in Southeast Asia, which has been actively promoted in recent years by the ASEAN University Network, an organisation for higher education under the auspices of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). There are now more collaborative…

  5. The control of flight force by a flapping wing: lift and drag production.

    PubMed

    Sane, S P; Dickinson, M H

    2001-08-01

    We used a dynamically scaled mechanical model of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to study how changes in wing kinematics influence the production of unsteady aerodynamic forces in insect flight. We examined 191 separate sets of kinematic patterns that differed with respect to stroke amplitude, angle of attack, flip timing, flip duration and the shape and magnitude of stroke deviation. Instantaneous aerodynamic forces were measured using a two-dimensional force sensor mounted at the base of the wing. The influence of unsteady rotational effects was assessed by comparing the time course of measured forces with that of corresponding translational quasi-steady estimates. For each pattern, we also calculated mean stroke-averaged values of the force coefficients and an estimate of profile power. The results of this analysis may be divided into four main points. (i) For a short, symmetrical wing flip, mean lift was optimized by a stroke amplitude of 180 degrees and an angle of attack of 50 degrees. At all stroke amplitudes, mean drag increased monotonically with increasing angle of attack. Translational quasi-steady predictions better matched the measured values at high stroke amplitude than at low stroke amplitude. This discrepancy was due to the increasing importance of rotational mechanisms in kinematic patterns with low stroke amplitude. (ii) For a 180 degrees stroke amplitude and a 45 degrees angle of attack, lift was maximized by short-duration flips occurring just slightly in advance of stroke reversal. Symmetrical rotations produced similarly high performance. Wing rotation that occurred after stroke reversal, however, produced very low mean lift. (iii) The production of aerodynamic forces was sensitive to changes in the magnitude of the wing's deviation from the mean stroke plane (stroke deviation) as well as to the actual shape of the wing tip trajectory. However, in all examples, stroke deviation lowered aerodynamic performance relative to the no

  6. Akt activation prevents the force drop induced by eccentric contractions in dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Blaauw, Bert; Mammucari, Cristina; Toniolo, Luana; Agatea, Lisa; Abraham, Reimar; Sandri, Marco; Reggiani, Carlo; Schiaffino, Stefano

    2008-12-01

    Skeletal muscles of the mdx mouse, a model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, show an excessive reduction in the maximal tetanic force following eccentric contractions. This specific sign of the susceptibility of dystrophin-deficient muscles to mechanical stress can be used as a quantitative test to measure the efficacy of therapeutic interventions. Using inducible transgenesis in mice, we show that when Akt activity is increased the force drop induced by eccentric contractions in mdx mice becomes similar to that of wild-type mice. This effect is not correlated with muscle hypertrophy and is not blocked by rapamycin treatment. The force drop induced by eccentric contractions is similar in skinned muscle fibers from mdx and Akt-mdx mice when stretch is applied directly to skinned fibers. However, skinned fibers isolated from mdx muscles exposed to eccentric contractions in vivo develop less isometric force than wild-type fibers and this force depression is completely prevented by Akt activation. These experiments indicate that the myofibrillar-cytoskeletal system of dystrophin-deficient muscle is highly susceptible to a damage caused by eccentric contraction when elongation is applied in vivo, and this damage can be prevented by Akt activation. Microarray and PCR analyses indicate that Akt activation induces up-regulation of genes coding for proteins associated with Z-disks and costameres, and for proteins with anti-oxidant or chaperone function. The protein levels of utrophin and dysferlin are also increased by Akt activation.

  7. 78 FR 49729 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; U.S. Air Force Launches, Aircraft and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-15

    ... Specified Activities; U.S. Air Force Launches, Aircraft and Helicopter Operations, and Harbor Activities Related to Launch Vehicles From Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB), California AGENCY: National Marine... has received a request from the U.S. Air Force (USAF) for authorization to take marine...

  8. Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on Tritium Production Technology Options

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-05-01

    testing the TPBAR process using a Lead Test Assembly (LTA), and Sequoyah Nuclear Plant Units #1 and/or # 2. To maintain a START I stockpile level, two...underway and the NRC-granted license for the Lead Test Assembly , now underway at Watts Bar, the Task Force did not foresee risks in this area. For the...long-term, production-scale manufacturing services. Thirty-two TPBARs are being demonstrated as the Lead Test Assembly at the Watts Bar reactor to

  9. Kinematics, hydrodynamics and force production of pleopods suggest jet-assisted walking in the American lobster (Homarus americanus).

    PubMed

    Lim, Jeanette L; Demont, M Edwin

    2009-09-01

    The American lobster (Homarus americanus) displays a diverse set of locomotory behaviours that includes tail flips, walking and paddling. Paddling is carried out by the four pairs of paddle-shaped pleopods on the ventral abdomen. Although it is recognized that pleopod-generated fluid flows have some locomotory role in adults, reports on their relative importance in locomotion are inconsistent. This paper integrates experimental kinematics and hydrodynamics of lobster pleopod beating to determine the mechanism and magnitude of pleopod force production. A kinematic analysis of pleopod beating in live lobsters showed that the pleopods execute an adlocomotory metachronal beating pattern. We modelled in vivo pleopod kinematics with a set of simple trigonometric functions, and used these functions to program a mechanical lobster model consisting of motor-driven pleopods on a lobster abdomen exoskeleton. Based on flow visualizations obtained from applying particle image velocimetry to the lobster model, we propose that the unsteady metachronal kinematics of the pleopods can maximize thrust by exploiting forces arising from individual pleopod activity and interactions among adjacent pairs. The pleopods continuously entrain fluid surrounding the lobster and create a caudally directed fluid jet oriented parallel to the substratum. Inputting wake morphology and velocity data into a simplified model for steady jet thrust showed that the pleopods of the lobster model produced 27-54 mN of thrust, which is comparable to the propulsive forces generated by other proficient swimmers. These results suggest that lobster pleopods are capable of producing forces of a magnitude that could assist the walking legs in forward propulsion.

  10. Production of high specific activity silicon-32

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D.R.; Brzezinski, M.A.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project (LDRD) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). There were two primary objectives for the work performed under this project. The first was to take advantage of capabilities and facilities at Los Alamos to produce the radionuclide {sup 32}Si in unusually high specific activity. The second was to combine the radioanalytical expertise at Los Alamos with the expertise at the University of California to develop methods for the application of {sup 32}Si in biological oceanographic research related to global climate modeling. The first objective was met by developing targetry for proton spallation production of {sup 32}Si in KCl targets and chemistry for its recovery in very high specific activity. The second objective was met by developing a validated field-useable, radioanalytical technique, based upon gas-flow proportional counting, to measure the dynamics of silicon uptake by naturally occurring diatoms.

  11. A model of cometary gas and dust production and nongravitational forces with application to P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanale, F. P.; Salvail, J. R.

    1986-04-01

    A gas and production model which includes coma effects and a flux integration procedure is used to calculate the gas and dust production rates for Comet Halley for various values of obliquity and thermal conductivity. An analytic procedure is defined for computing idealized nongravitational force components from first principles, assuming a smooth, spherical, homogeneous nucleus. The nongravitational force is thereby obtained along the radial, transverse and normal directions relative to the orbit plane as a function of the heliocentric distance. The latitude and longitude of the force is also obtained. However, the gas and dust production rates calculated with the model differ greatly from the observed production rates. The inaccuracies are attributed to asymmetric nongravitational forces and accelerations at perihelion. This asymmetry suggests that the dependence of the nongravitational acceleration on heliocentric distance during preperihelion is different than during the postperihelion phase of the orbit.

  12. Ground reaction forces, kinematics, and muscle activations during the windmill softball pitch.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Gretchen D; Plummer, Hillary

    2011-07-01

    The aims of the present study were to examine quantitatively ground reaction forces, kinematics, and muscle activations during the windmill softball pitch, and to determine relationships between knee valgus and muscle activations, ball velocity and muscle activation as well as ball velocity and ground reaction forces. It was hypothesized that there would be an inverse relationship between degree of knee valgus and muscle activation, a direct relationship between ground reaction forces and ball velocity, and non-stride leg muscle activations and ball velocity. Ten female windmill softball pitchers (age 17.6 ± 3.47 years, stature 1.67 ± 0.07 m, weight 67.4 ± 12.2 kg) participated. Dependent variables were ball velocity, surface electromyographic (sEMG), kinematic, and kinetic data while the participant was the independent variable. Stride foot contact reported peak vertical forces of 179% body weight. There were positive relationships between ball velocity and ground reaction force (r = 0.758, n = 10, P = 0.029) as well as ball velocity and non-stride leg gluteus maximus (r = 0.851, n = 10, P = 0.007) and medius (r = 0.760, n = 10, P = 0.029) muscle activity, while there was no notable relationship between knee valgus and muscle activation. As the windmill softball pitcher increased ball velocity, her vertical ground reaction forces also increased. Proper conditioning of the lumbopelvic-hip complex, including the gluteals, is essential for injury prevention. From the data presented, it is evident that bilateral strength and conditioning of the gluteal muscle group is salient in the windmill softball pitch as an attempt to decrease incidence of injury.

  13. Vortexlet models of flapping flexible wings show tuning for force production and control.

    PubMed

    Mountcastle, A M; Daniel, T L

    2010-12-01

    Insect wings are compliant structures that experience deformations during flight. Such deformations have recently been shown to substantially affect induced flows, with appreciable consequences to flight forces. However, there are open questions related to the aerodynamic mechanisms underlying the performance benefits of wing deformation, as well as the extent to which such deformations are determined by the boundary conditions governing wing actuation together with mechanical properties of the wing itself. Here we explore aerodynamic performance parameters of compliant wings under periodic oscillations, subject to changes in phase between wing elevation and pitch, and magnitude and spatial pattern of wing flexural stiffness. We use a combination of computational structural mechanics models and a 2D computational fluid dynamics approach to ask how aerodynamic force production and control potential are affected by pitch/elevation phase and variations in wing flexural stiffness. Our results show that lift and thrust forces are highly sensitive to flexural stiffness distributions, with performance optima that lie in different phase regions. These results suggest a control strategy for both flying animals and engineering applications of micro-air vehicles.

  14. How Force Might Activate Talin's Vinculin Binding Sites: SMD Reveals a Structural Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Hytönen, Vesa P; Vogel, Viola

    2008-01-01

    Upon cell adhesion, talin physically couples the cytoskeleton via integrins to the extracellular matrix, and subsequent vinculin recruitment is enhanced by locally applied tensile force. Since the vinculin binding (VB) sites are buried in the talin rod under equilibrium conditions, the structural mechanism of how vinculin binding to talin is force-activated remains unknown. Taken together with experimental data, a biphasic vinculin binding model, as derived from steered molecular dynamics, provides high resolution structural insights how tensile mechanical force applied to the talin rod fragment (residues 486–889 constituting helices H1–H12) might activate the VB sites. Fragmentation of the rod into three helix subbundles is prerequisite to the sequential exposure of VB helices to water. Finally, unfolding of a VB helix into a completely stretched polypeptide might inhibit further binding of vinculin. The first events in fracturing the H1–H12 rods of talin1 and talin2 in subbundles are similar. The proposed force-activated α-helix swapping mechanism by which vinculin binding sites in talin rods are exposed works distinctly different from that of other force-activated bonds, including catch bonds. PMID:18282082

  15. Muscle force production during bent-knee, bent-hip walking in humans.

    PubMed

    Foster, Adam D; Raichlen, David A; Pontzer, Herman

    2013-09-01

    Researchers have long debated the locomotor posture used by the earliest bipeds. While many agree that by 3-4 Ma (millions of years ago), hominins walked with an extended-limb human style of bipedalism, researchers are still divided over whether the earliest bipeds walked like modern humans, or walked with a more bent-knee, bent-hip (BKBH) ape-like form of locomotion. Since more flexed postures are associated with higher energy costs, reconstructing early bipedal mechanics has implications for the selection pressures that led to upright walking. The purpose of this study is to determine how modern human anatomy functions in BKBH walking to clarify the links between morphology and energy costs in different mechanical regimes. Using inverse dynamics, we calculated muscle force production at the major limb joints in humans walking in two modes, both with extended limbs and BKBH. We found that in BKBH walking, humans must produce large muscle forces at the knee to support body weight, leading to higher estimated energy costs. However, muscle forces at the hip remained similar in BKBH and extended limb walking, suggesting that anatomical adaptations for hip extension in humans do not necessarily diminish the effective mechanical advantage at the hip in more flexed postures. We conclude that the key adaptations for economical walking, regardless of joint posture, seem to center on maintaining low muscle forces at the hip, primarily by keeping low external moments at the hip. We explore the implications of these results for interpreting locomotor energetics in early hominins, including australopithecines and Ardipithecus ramidus.

  16. Force-activated reactivity switch in a bimolecular chemical reaction at the single molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szoszkiewicz, Robert; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Liang, Jian; Kuo, Tzu-Ling; Fernandez, Julio M.

    2010-03-01

    Mechanical force can deform the reacting molecules along a well-defined direction of the reaction coordinate. However, the effect of mechanical force on the free-energy surface that governs a chemical reaction is still largely unknown. The combination of protein engineering with single-molecule AFM force-clamp spectroscopy allows us to study the influence of mechanical force on the rate at which a protein disulfide bond is reduced by some reducing agents in a bimolecular substitution reaction (so-called SN2). We found that cleavage of a protein disulfide bond by hydroxide anions exhibits an abrupt reactivity ``switch'' at 500 pN, after which the accelerating effect of force on the rate of an SN2 chemical reaction greatly diminishes. We propose that an abrupt force-induced conformational change of the protein disulfide bond shifts its ground state, drastically changing its reactivity in SN2 chemical reactions. Our experiments directly demonstrate the action of a force-activated switch in the chemical reactivity of a single molecule. References: Sergi Garcia-Manyes, Jian Liang, Robert Szoszkiewicz, Tzu-Ling Kuo and Julio M. Fernandez, Nature Chemistry, 1, 236-242, 2009.

  17. Increasing physical activity. A report on recommendations of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services.

    PubMed

    2001-10-26

    The Task Force on Community Preventive Services (the Task Force) has conducted systematic reviews of community interventions to increase physical activity. The Task Force either strongly recommends or recommends six interventions: two informational approaches (i.e., communitywide campaigns and point-of-decision prompts to encourage use of stairs); three behavioral and social approaches (i.e., school-based physical education, social support interventions in community settings [e.g., setting up a buddy system or contracting with another person to complete specified levels of physical activity], and individually adapted health behavior change programs); and one intervention to increase physical activity by using environmental and policy approaches (i.e., creation of or enhanced access to places for physical activity, combined with informational outreach activities). The Task Force found insufficient evidence on which to base recommendations for classroom-based health education focused on information provision, behavioral skills, and social support interventions in family settings because of inconsistent findings; mass media campaigns, college-age physical education, and health education because of an insufficient number of studies; and classroom-based health education focusing on reducing television viewing and video game playing because of the lack of a demonstrated link between reduced time spent watching television or playing video games and increased physical activity. This report provides additional information regarding the recommendations, briefly describes how the reviews were conducted, and provides information that can help in applying the interventions locally.

  18. The optimization of force inputs for active structural acoustic control using a neural network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, R. H.; Lester, H. C.; Silcox, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of a neural network to determine which force actuators, of a multi-actuator array, are best activated in order to achieve structural-acoustic control. The concept is demonstrated using a cylinder/cavity model on which the control forces, produced by piezoelectric actuators, are applied with the objective of reducing the interior noise. A two-layer neural network is employed and the back propagation solution is compared with the results calculated by a conventional, least-squares optimization analysis. The ability of the neural network to accurately and efficiently control actuator activation for interior noise reduction is demonstrated.

  19. Active control of low-frequency sound radiation by cylindrical shell with piezoelectric stack force actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yin; Sun, Hongling; An, Fengyan; Li, Xiaodong

    2012-05-01

    A novel active control method of sound radiation from a cylindrical shell under axial excitations is proposed and theoretically analyzed. This control method is based on a pair of piezoelectric stack force actuators which are installed on the shell and parallel to the axial direction. The actuators are driven in phase and generate the same forces to control the vibration and the sound radiation of the cylindrical shell. The model considered is a fluid-loaded finite stiffened cylindrical shell with rigid end-caps and only low-frequency axial vibration modes are involved. Numerical simulations are performed to explore the required control forces and the optimal mounting positions of actuators under different cost functions. The results show that the proposed force actuators can reduce the radiated sound pressure of low-frequency axial modes in all directions.

  20. Developing a musculoskeletal model of the primate skull: predicting muscle activations, bite force, and joint reaction forces using multibody dynamics analysis and advanced optimisation methods.

    PubMed

    Shi, Junfen; Curtis, Neil; Fitton, Laura C; O'Higgins, Paul; Fagan, Michael J

    2012-10-07

    An accurate, dynamic, functional model of the skull that can be used to predict muscle forces, bite forces, and joint reaction forces would have many uses across a broad range of disciplines. One major issue however with musculoskeletal analyses is that of muscle activation pattern indeterminacy. A very large number of possible muscle force combinations will satisfy a particular functional task. This makes predicting physiological muscle recruitment patterns difficult. Here we describe in detail the process of development of a complex multibody computer model of a primate skull (Macaca fascicularis), that aims to predict muscle recruitment patterns during biting. Using optimisation criteria based on minimisation of muscle stress we predict working to balancing side muscle force ratios, peak bite forces, and joint reaction forces during unilateral biting. Validation of such models is problematic; however we have shown comparable working to balancing muscle activity and TMJ reaction ratios during biting to those observed in vivo and that peak predicted bite forces compare well to published experimental data. To our knowledge the complexity of the musculoskeletal model is greater than any previously reported for a primate. This complexity, when compared to more simple representations provides more nuanced insights into the functioning of masticatory muscles. Thus, we have shown muscle activity to vary throughout individual muscle groups, which enables them to function optimally during specific masticatory tasks. This model will be utilised in future studies into the functioning of the masticatory apparatus.

  1. Lift vs. drag based mechanisms for vertical force production in the smallest flying insects.

    PubMed

    Jones, S K; Laurenza, R; Hedrick, T L; Griffith, B E; Miller, L A

    2015-11-07

    We used computational fluid dynamics to determine whether lift- or drag-based mechanisms generate the most vertical force in the flight of the smallest insects. These insects fly at Re on the order of 4-60 where viscous effects are significant. Detailed quantitative data on the wing kinematics of the smallest insects is not available, and as a result both drag- and lift-based strategies have been suggested as the mechanisms by which these insects stay aloft. We used the immersed boundary method to solve the fully-coupled fluid-structure interaction problem of a flexible wing immersed in a two-dimensional viscous fluid to compare three idealized hovering kinematics: a drag-based stroke in the vertical plane, a lift-based stroke in the horizontal plane, and a hybrid stroke on a tilted plane. Our results suggest that at higher Re, a lift-based strategy produces more vertical force than a drag-based strategy. At the Re pertinent to small insect hovering, however, there is little difference in performance between the two strategies. A drag-based mechanism of flight could produce more vertical force than a lift-based mechanism for insects at Re<5; however, we are unaware of active fliers at this scale.

  2. TRADEOFFs in climate effects through aircraft routing: forcing due to radiatively active gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stordal, F.; Gauss, M.; Myhre, G.; Mancini, E.; Hauglustaine, D. A.; Köhler, M. O.; Berntsen, T.; . G Stordal, E. J.; Iachetti, D.; Pitari, G.; Isaksen, I. S. A.

    2006-10-01

    We have estimated impacts of alternative aviation routings on the radiative forcing. Changes in ozone and OH have been estimated in four Chemistry Transport Models (CTMs) participating in the TRADEOFF project. Radiative forcings due to ozone and methane have been calculated accordingly. In addition radiative forcing due to CO2 is estimated based on fuel consumption. Three alternative routing cases are investigated; one scenario assuming additional polar routes and two scenarios assuming aircraft cruising at higher (+2000 ft) and lower (-6000 ft) altitudes. Results from the base case in year 2000 are included as a reference. Taking first a steady state backward looking approach, adding the changes in the forcing from ozone, CO2 and CH4, the ranges of the models used in this work are -0.8 to -1.8 and 0.3 to 0.6 m Wm-2 in the lower (-6000 ft) and higher (+2000 ft) cruise levels, respectively. In relative terms, flying 6000ft lower reduces the forcing by 5-10% compared to the current flight pattern, whereas flying higher, while saving fuel and presumably flying time, increases the forcing by about 2-3%. Taking next a forward looking approach we have estimated the integrated forcing (m Wm-2 yr) over 20 and 100 years time horizons. The relative contributions from each of the three climate gases are somewhat different from the backward looking approach. The differences are moderate adopting 100 year time horizon, whereas under the 20 year horizon CO2 naturally becomes less important relatively. Thus the forcing agents impact climate differently on various time scales. Also, we have found significant differences between the models for ozone and methane. We conclude that we are not yet at a point where we can include non-CO2 effects of aviation in emission trading schemes. Nevertheless, the rerouting cases that have been studied here yield relatively small changes in the radiative forcing due to the radiatively active gases.

  3. Role of amygdala MAPK activation on immobility behavior of forced swim rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tung-Yi; Lin, Chih-Hung

    2006-10-02

    The role of amygdala mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in rats during a forced swim test was investigated. The variation of amygdala MAPK level was studied in control rats and early-life maternally deprived rats. A forced swim test was carried out to estimate the immobility level. The data showed that the immobility time of rats that received maternal deprivation in early life was longer than that of control rats and Western blot analysis also showed that the amygdala phospho-MAPK level in maternally deprived rats was almost two times higher than in control rats. Intra-amygdala infusion of PD098059 or U0126, MEK inhibitors, suppressed immobility behavior during the forced swim test in both rats. Western blot analysis also showed that the amygdala MAPK activities in both rats infused with MEK inhibitors were also suppressed in parallel with expression of immobility behavior. The suppressed MAPK activities as well as the restoration of immobility time returned to the original level 48 h later. These results suggest that amygdala MAPK activation might play a role in the regulation of immobility behavior in rats during the forced swim test. Moreover, it could provide a hint that amygdala MAPK activation might be involved in the formation of depression-like behavior.

  4. Force steadiness, muscle activity, and maximal muscle strength in subjects with subacromial impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bandholm, Thomas; Rasmussen, Lars; Aagaard, Per; Jensen, Bente Rona; Diederichsen, Louise

    2006-11-01

    We investigated the effects of the subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) on shoulder sensory-motor control and maximal shoulder muscle strength. It was hypothesized that both would be impaired due to chronic shoulder pain associated with the syndrome. Nine subjects with unilateral SIS who remained physically active in spite of shoulder pain and nine healthy matched controls were examined to determine isometric and isokinetic submaximal shoulder-abduction force steadiness at target forces corresponding to 20%, 27.5%, and 35% of the maximal shoulder abductor torque, and maximal shoulder muscle strength (MVC). Electromyographic (EMG) activity was assessed using surface and intramuscular recordings from eight shoulder muscles. Force steadiness was impaired in SIS subjects during concentric contractions at the highest target force level only, with muscle activity largely unaffected. No between-group differences in shoulder MVC were observed. The present data suggest that shoulder sensory-motor control is only mildly impaired in subjects with SIS who are able to continue with upper body physical activity in spite of shoulder pain. Thus, physical activity should be continued by patients with SIS, if possible, to avoid the loss in neural and muscle functions associated with inactivity.

  5. Regulating emotions uniquely modifies reaction time, rate of force production, and accuracy of a goal-directed motor action.

    PubMed

    Beatty, Garrett F; Fawver, Bradley; Hancock, Gabriella M; Janelle, Christopher M

    2014-02-01

    We investigated how emotion regulation (ER) strategies influence the execution of a memory guided, ballistic pinch grip. Participants (N=33) employed ER strategies (expressive suppression, emotional expression, and attentional deployment) while viewing emotional stimuli (IAPS images). Upon stimulus offset, participants produced a targeted pinch force aimed at 10% of their maximum voluntary contraction. Performance measures included reaction time (RT), rate of force production, and performance accuracy. As hypothesized, attentional deployment resulted in the slowest RT, largest rate of force production, and poorest performance accuracy. In contrast, expressive suppression reduced the rate of force production and increased performance accuracy relative to emotional expression and attentional deployment. Findings provide evidence that emotion regulation strategies uniquely influence human movement. Future work should further delineate the interacting role that emotion regulation strategies have in modulating both affective experience and motor performance.

  6. Muscle force output and electromyographic activity in squats with various unstable surfaces.

    PubMed

    Saeterbakken, Atle H; Fimland, Marius S

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare force output and muscle activity of leg and trunk muscles in isometric squats executed on stable surface (i.e., floor), power board, BOSU ball, and balance cone. Fifteen healthy men (23.3 ± 2.7 years, mass: 80.5 ± 8.5 kg, height: 1.81 ± 0.09 m) volunteered. The force output and electromyographic (EMG) activities of the rectus femoris, vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, soleus, rectus abdominis, oblique external, and erector spinae were assessed. The order of the surfaces was randomized. One familiarization session was executed before the experimental test. Compared with stable surface (749 ± 222 N), the force output using power board was similar (-7%, p = 0.320) but lower for BOSU ball (-19%, p = 0.003) and balance cone (-24%, p ≤ 0.001). The force output using BOSU ball and balance cone was approximately 13% (p = 0.037) and approximately 18% (p = 0.001) less than the power board. There were similar EMG activities between the surfaces in all muscles except for rectus femoris, in which stable squat provided greater EMG activity than did the other exercises (p = 0.004-0.030). Lower EMG activity was observed in the rectus femoris using balance cone compared with the BOSU ball (p = 0.030). In conclusion, increasing the instability of the surface during maximum effort isometric squats usually maintains the muscle activity of lower-limb and superficial trunk muscles although the force output is reduced. This suggests that unstable surfaces in the squat may be beneficial in rehabilitation and as a part of periodized training programs, because similar muscle activity can be achieved with reduced loads.

  7. Monascus secondary metabolites: production and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Patakova, Petra

    2013-02-01

    The genus Monascus, comprising nine species, can reproduce either vegetatively with filaments and conidia or sexually by the formation of ascospores. The most well-known species of genus Monascus, namely, M. purpureus, M. ruber and M. pilosus, are often used for rice fermentation to produce red yeast rice, a special product used either for food coloring or as a food supplement with positive effects on human health. The colored appearance (red, orange or yellow) of Monascus-fermented substrates is produced by a mixture of oligoketide pigments that are synthesized by a combination of polyketide and fatty acid synthases. The major pigments consist of pairs of yellow (ankaflavin and monascin), orange (rubropunctatin and monascorubrin) and red (rubropunctamine and monascorubramine) compounds; however, more than 20 other colored products have recently been isolated from fermented rice or culture media. In addition to pigments, a group of monacolin substances and the mycotoxin citrinin can be produced by Monascus. Various non-specific biological activities (antimicrobial, antitumor, immunomodulative and others) of these pigmented compounds are, at least partly, ascribed to their reaction with amino group-containing compounds, i.e. amino acids, proteins or nucleic acids. Monacolins, in the form of β-hydroxy acids, inhibit hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis in animals and humans.

  8. Production of high specific activity silicon-32

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.; Brzezinski, Mark A.

    1994-01-01

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provide and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution to from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidization state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  9. Persistence of alprazolam in river water according to forced and non-forced degradation assays: adsorption to sediment and long-term degradation products.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Juan J; Sánchez, María I; Muñoz, Beatriz E; Pardo, Rafael

    2016-12-19

    Alprazolam is a pharmaceutical compound that it is detected in surface waters. Some degradation studies in aqueous solutions and pharmaceutical products are available, but there is no reliable information about its stability in river water. Here, assays have been conducted under forced biological, photochemical, and thermal conditions, and under non-forced conditions, to estimate the fate of alprazolam in river water and know its degradation products. The forced assays indicated that the biological and photochemical degradation of alprazolam was negligible; heating at 70°C for a long time barely affected it. The degradation of alprazolam in river water at 100 μg/L was about 5% after 36 weeks, keeping the water under a natural day-night cycle at room temperature and limiting partially the exposure to sunlight as happens inside a body of water; no change in concentration was observed when the monitoring was performed at 2 μg/L. The results suggest the persistence of alprazolam in surface water and a possible accumulation over time. Residues were monitored by ultra-pressure liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight/mass spectrometry after solid-phase extraction; nine degradation products were found and the structures for most of them were proposed from the molecular formulae and fragmentation observed in high-resolution tandem mass spectra. (5-chloro-2-(3-methyl-4H-1,2,4-triazol-4-yl)phenyl)(phenyl)methanol was the main long-term transformation product in conditions that simulate those in a mass of water. The degradation rate in presence of sediment was equally very low under non-forced conditions; adsorption coefficients of alprazolam and major degradation products were calculated. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Shortening amplitude affects the incomplete force recovery after active shortening in mouse soleus muscle.

    PubMed

    Van Noten, Pieter; Van Leemputte, Marc

    2009-12-11

    Compared to isometric contraction, the force producing capacity of muscle is reduced (force depression, FD) after a work producing shortening phase. It has been suggested that FD results from an inhibition of cross-bridge binding. Because the rate constants of the exponential force (re)development are thought to be primarily determined by cross-bridge attachment/detachment rate, we aimed to investigate the components of force redevelopment (REDEV) after 0.6, 1.2 and 2.4mm shortening, resulting in varying amounts of FD (from about 5% to about 16%), in mouse soleus muscle (n=11). Compared to isometric force development (DEV), the time to reach steady-state during REDEV was about 3 times longer (370 versus 1261ms) increasing with increasing amplitude. Contrary to a single, a double exponential function with one component set equal to the rate constant of DEV (14.3s(-1)), accurately described REDEV (RMS<0.8%). The rate constant of the additional slow component decreased with increasing shortening amplitude and was associated with work delivered during shortening (R(2)=0.75) and FD (R(2)=0.77). We concluded that a work related slow exponential component is induced to the trajectory of incomplete force recovery after shortening, causing FD. These results suggest that after shortening, aside from cross-bridges with normal attachment/detachment rate, cross-bridges with reduced cycling rate are active.

  11. Elasticity-induced force reversal between active spinning particles in dense passive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragones, J. L.; Steimel, J. P.; Alexander-Katz, A.

    2016-04-01

    The self-organization of active particles is governed by their dynamic effective interactions. Such interactions are controlled by the medium in which such active agents reside. Here we study the interactions between active agents in a dense non-active medium. Our system consists of actuated, spinning, active particles embedded in a dense monolayer of passive, or non-active, particles. We demonstrate that the presence of the passive monolayer alters markedly the properties of the system and results in a reversal of the forces between active spinning particles from repulsive to attractive. The origin of such reversal is due to the coupling between the active stresses and elasticity of the system. This discovery provides a mechanism for the interaction between active agents in complex and structured media, opening up opportunities to tune the interaction range and directionality via the mechanical properties of the medium.

  12. Elasticity-induced force reversal between active spinning particles in dense passive media

    PubMed Central

    Aragones, J. L.; Steimel, J. P.; Alexander-Katz, A.

    2016-01-01

    The self-organization of active particles is governed by their dynamic effective interactions. Such interactions are controlled by the medium in which such active agents reside. Here we study the interactions between active agents in a dense non-active medium. Our system consists of actuated, spinning, active particles embedded in a dense monolayer of passive, or non-active, particles. We demonstrate that the presence of the passive monolayer alters markedly the properties of the system and results in a reversal of the forces between active spinning particles from repulsive to attractive. The origin of such reversal is due to the coupling between the active stresses and elasticity of the system. This discovery provides a mechanism for the interaction between active agents in complex and structured media, opening up opportunities to tune the interaction range and directionality via the mechanical properties of the medium. PMID:27112961

  13. Production of activated carbon from TCR char

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, Fabian; Heberlein, Markus; Klinner, Tobias; Hornung, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The utilization of char for adsorptive purposes is known since the 18th century. At that time the char was made of wood or bones and used for decoloration of fluids. In the 20th century the production of activated carbon in an industrial scale was started. The today's raw materials for activated carbon production are hard coal, peat, wood or coconut shells. All these materials entail costs especially the latter. Thus, the utilization of carbon rich residues (biomass) is an interesting economic opportunity because it is available for no costs or even can create income. The char is produced by thermo-catalytic reforming (TCR®). This process is a combination of an intermediate pyrolysis and subsequently a reforming step. During the pyrolysis step the material is decomposed in a vapor and a solid carbon enriched phase. In the second step the vapor and the solid phase get in an intensive contact and the quality of both materials is improved via the reforming process. Subsequently, the condensables are precipitated from the vapor phase and a permanent gas as well as oil is obtained. Both are suitable for heat and power production which is a clear advantage of the TCR® process. The obtained biochar from the TCR® process has special properties. This material has a very low hydrogen and oxygen content. Its stability is comparable to hard coal or anthracite. Therefore it consists almost only of carbon and ash. The latter depends from input material. Furthermore the surface structure and area can be influenced during the reforming step. Depending from temperature and residence time the number of micro pores and the surface area can be increased. Preliminary investigations with methylene blue solution have shown that a TCR® char made of digestate from anaerobic digestion has adsorptive properties. The decoloration of the solution was achieved. A further influencing factor of the adsorption performance is the particle size. Based on the results of the preliminary tests a

  14. Video: Animals; Electric Current; Force; Science Activities. Learning in Science Project. Working Papers 51-54.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Beverley; And Others

    Four papers to be used in conjunction with video-tapes developed by the Learning in Science Project are presented. Topic areas of the papers focus on: (1) animals; (2) electric current; (3) force; and (4) science activities. The first paper presents transcripts of class discussions focusing on the scientific meaning of the word animal. The second…

  15. Variability in Measurement of Swimming Forces: A Meta-Analysis of Passive and Active Drag

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havriluk, Rod

    2007-01-01

    An analysis was conducted to identify sources of true and error variance in measuring swimming drag force to draw valid conclusions about performance factor effects. Passive drag studies were grouped according to methodological differences: tow line in pool, tow line in flume, and carriage in tow tank. Active drag studies were grouped according to…

  16. Pyrazinoic acid decreases the proton motive force, respiratory ATP synthesis activity, and cellular ATP levels.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Haagsma, Anna C; Pham, Hoang; Maaskant, Janneke J; Mol, Selena; Lill, Holger; Bald, Dirk

    2011-11-01

    Pyrazinoic acid, the active form of the first-line antituberculosis drug pyrazinamide, decreased the proton motive force and respiratory ATP synthesis rates in subcellular mycobacterial membrane assays. Pyrazinoic acid also significantly lowered cellular ATP levels in Mycobacterium bovis BCG. These results indicate that the predominant mechanism of killing by this drug may operate by depletion of cellular ATP reserves.

  17. Reliability of EMG activity versus bite-force from human masticatory muscles

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Y.; Iwasaki, L.R.; McCall, W.D.; Ohrbach, R.; Lozier, E.; Nickel, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    The reproducibility of electromyographic (EMG) activity in relation to static bite-force from masticatory muscles for a given biting situation is largely unknown. Our aim was to evaluate the reliability of EMG activity in relation to static bite-force in humans. Eighty-four subjects produced 5 unilateral static bites of different forces at different biting positions on molars and incisors, at two separate sessions, while surface EMG activities were recorded from temporalis, masseter, and suprahyoid muscles bilaterally. Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICCs) were used, where an ICC of ≥ 0.60 indicated good reliability of these slopes. ICCs for jaw closing muscles during molar biting were: temporalis ipsilateral 0.58 to 0.93 and contralateral 0.88 to 0.91, masseter ipsilateral 0.75 to 0.86 and contralateral 0.69 to 0.88; while during incisor biting were: temporalis ipsilateral 0.56 to 0.81 and contralateral 0.34 to 0.86, masseter ipsilateral 0.65 to 0.78 and contralateral 0.59 to 0.80. For the suprahyoid muscles the confidence intervals were mostly wide and most included zero. Slopes of the EMG activity versus bite-force for a given biting situation were reliable for temporalis and masseter muscles. These results support the use of these outcome measurements for the estimation and validation of mechanical models of the masticatory system. PMID:21564316

  18. Muscle-tendon unit stiffness does not independently affect voluntary explosive force production or muscle intrinsic contractile properties.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Ricci; Folland, Jonathan P

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of muscle-tendon unit (MTU) stiffness and explosive force production during voluntary and evoked contractions of the knee extensors. Thirty-four untrained participants performed a series of explosive voluntary and electrically evoked (octets (8 pulses, 300 Hz) via femoral nerve stimulation) isometric contractions. Maximum voluntary force (MVF) was assessed during maximum voluntary contractions. Explosive force production was assessed as the time taken, from force onset (0 N), to achieve specific levels of absolute (25-300 N) and relative force (5%-75% MVF) during the explosive contractions. Ultrasonic images of the vastus lateralis were recorded during 10-s ramp contractions to assess MTU stiffness, which was expressed in absolute (N · mm(-1)) and relative (to MVF and resting tendon-aponeurosis length) terms. Bivariate correlations suggested that absolute MTU stiffness was associated with voluntary explosive force (time to achieve 150-300 N: r = -0.35 to -0.54, P < 0.05). However, no relationships between stiffness and voluntary explosive force were observed when the influence of MVF was removed, either via partial correlations of absolute values (P ≥ 0.49) or considering relative values (P ≥ 0.14). Similarly, absolute MTU stiffness was related to explosive force during evoked octet contractions (r = -0.41 to -0.64, P < 0.05), but these correlations were no longer present when accounting for the influence of MVF (P ≥ 0.15). Therefore, once maximum strength was considered, MTU stiffness had no independent relationship with voluntary explosive force production or the evoked capacity for explosive force.

  19. Using EMG data to constrain optimization procedure improves finger tendon tension estimations during static fingertip force production.

    PubMed

    Vigouroux, Laurent; Quaine, Franck; Labarre-Vila, Annick; Amarantini, David; Moutet, François

    2007-01-01

    Determining tendon tensions of the finger muscles is crucial for the understanding and the rehabilitation of hand pathologies. Since no direct measurement is possible for a large number of finger muscle tendons, biomechanical modelling presents an alternative solution to indirectly evaluate these forces. However, the main problem is that the number of muscles spanning a joint exceeds the number of degrees of freedom of the joint resulting in mathematical under-determinate problems. In the current study, a method using both numerical optimization and the intra-muscular electromyography (EMG) data was developed to estimate the middle finger tendon tensions during static fingertip force production. The method used a numerical optimization procedure with the muscle stress squared criterion to determine a solution while the EMG data of three extrinsic hand muscles serve to enforce additional inequality constraints. The results were compared with those obtained with a classical numerical optimization and a method based on EMG only. The proposed method provides satisfactory results since the tendon tension estimations respected the mechanical equilibrium of the musculoskeletal system and were concordant with the EMG distribution pattern of the subjects. These results were not observed neither with the classical numerical optimization nor with the EMG-based method. This study demonstrates that including the EMG data of the three extrinsic muscles of the middle finger as inequality constraints in an optimization process can yield relevant tendon tensions with regard to individual muscle activation patterns, particularly concerning the antagonist muscles.

  20. Prediction of ground reaction forces and moments during various activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    Fluit, R; Andersen, M S; Kolk, S; Verdonschot, N; Koopman, H F J M

    2014-07-18

    Inverse dynamics based simulations on musculoskeletal models is a commonly used method for the analysis of human movement. Due to inaccuracies in the kinematic and force plate data, and a mismatch between the model and the subject, the equations of motion are violated when solving the inverse dynamics problem. As a result, dynamic inconsistency will exist and lead to residual forces and moments. In this study, we present and evaluate a computational method to perform inverse dynamics-based simulations without force plates, which both improves the dynamic consistency as well as removes the model׳s dependency on measured external forces. Using the equations of motion and a scaled musculoskeletal model, the ground reaction forces and moments (GRF&Ms) are derived from three-dimensional full-body motion. The method entails a dynamic contact model and optimization techniques to solve the indeterminacy problem during a double contact phase and, in contrast to previously proposed techniques, does not require training or empirical data. The method was applied to nine healthy subjects performing several Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) and evaluated with simultaneously measured force plate data. Except for the transverse ground reaction moment, no significant differences (P>0.05) were found between the mean predicted and measured GRF&Ms for almost all ADLs. The mean residual forces and moments, however, were significantly reduced (P>0.05) in almost all ADLs using our method compared to conventional inverse dynamic simulations. Hence, the proposed method may be used instead of raw force plate data in human movement analysis using inverse dynamics.

  1. Dissolution study of active pharmaceutical ingredients using molecular dynamics simulations with classical force fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, Maximilian; Elts, Ekaterina; Schneider, Julian; Reuter, Karsten; Briesen, Heiko

    2014-11-01

    The CHARMM, general Amber and OPLS force fields are evaluated for their suitability in simulating the molecular dynamics of the dissolution of the hydrophobic, small-molecule active pharmaceutical ingredients aspirin, ibuprofen, and paracetamol in aqueous media. The force fields are evaluated by comparison with quantum chemical simulations or experimental references on the basis of the following capabilities: accurately representing intra- and intermolecular interactions, appropriately reproducing crystal lattice parameters, adequately describing thermodynamic properties, and the qualitative description of the dissolution behavior. To make this approach easily accessible for evaluating the dissolution properties of novel drug candidates in the early stage of drug development, the force field parameter files are generated using online resources such as the SWISS PARAM servers, and the software packages ACPYPE and Maestro. All force fields are found to reproduce the intermolecular interactions with a reasonable degree of accuracy, with the general Amber and CHARMM force fields showing the best agreement with quantum mechanical calculations. A stable crystal bulk structure is obtained for all model substances, except for ibuprofen, where the reproductions of the lattice parameters and observed crystal stability are considerably poor for all force fields. The heat of solution used to evaluate the solid-to-solution phase transitions is found to be in qualitative agreement with the experimental data for all combinations tested, with the results being quantitatively optimum for the general Amber and CHARMM force fields. For aspirin and paracetamol, stable crystal-water interfaces were obtained. The (100), (110), (011) and (001) interfaces of aspirin or paracetamol and water were simulated for each force field for 30 ns. Although generally expected as a rare event, in some of the simulations, dissolution is observed at 310 K and ambient pressure conditions.

  2. Using the traditional model to evaluate the active force of the human lateral rectus muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, ZhiPeng; Chen, WeiYi; Jing, Lin; Feng, PengFei; Wu, XiaoGang; Guo, HongMei

    2014-05-01

    The information on the force of extraocular muscles (EOMs) is beneficial for strabismus diagnosis and surgical planning, and a direct and simple method is important for surgeons to obtain these forces. Based on the traditional model, a numerical simulation method was proposed to achieve this aim, and then the active force of the lateral rectus (LR) muscle was successfully simulated when the eye rotated every angle from 0° to 30° in the horizontal plane from the nasal to the temporal side. In order to verify these simulations, the results were compared with the previous experimental data. The comparison shows that the simulation results diverged much more than the experimental data in the range of 0°-10°. The errors were corrected to make the simulation results closer to the experimental data. Finally, a general empirical equation was proposed to evaluate the active force of the LR muscle by fitting these data, which represent the relationship between the simulation forces and the contractive amounts of the LR muscle.

  3. Quantifying surface albedo and other direct biogeophysical climate forcings of forestry activities.

    PubMed

    Bright, Ryan M; Zhao, Kaiguang; Jackson, Robert B; Cherubini, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    By altering fluxes of heat, momentum, and moisture exchanges between the land surface and atmosphere, forestry and other land-use activities affect climate. Although long recognized scientifically as being important, these so-called biogeophysical forcings are rarely included in climate policies for forestry and other land management projects due to the many challenges associated with their quantification. Here, we review the scientific literature in the fields of atmospheric science and terrestrial ecology in light of three main objectives: (i) to elucidate the challenges associated with quantifying biogeophysical climate forcings connected to land use and land management, with a focus on the forestry sector; (ii) to identify and describe scientific approaches and/or metrics facilitating the quantification and interpretation of direct biogeophysical climate forcings; and (iii) to identify and recommend research priorities that can help overcome the challenges of their attribution to specific land-use activities, bridging the knowledge gap between the climate modeling, forest ecology, and resource management communities. We find that ignoring surface biogeophysics may mislead climate mitigation policies, yet existing metrics are unlikely to be sufficient. Successful metrics ought to (i) include both radiative and nonradiative climate forcings; (ii) reconcile disparities between biogeophysical and biogeochemical forcings, and (iii) acknowledge trade-offs between global and local climate benefits. We call for more coordinated research among terrestrial ecologists, resource managers, and coupled climate modelers to harmonize datasets, refine analytical techniques, and corroborate and validate metrics that are more amenable to analyses at the scale of an individual site or region.

  4. Sympathetic activation by the cold pressor test does not increase the muscle force generation capacity.

    PubMed

    Roatta, Silvestro; Farina, Dario

    2011-06-01

    A positive inotropic action by the sympathetic nervous system on skeletal muscles has been observed and investigated in animal and in vitro studies. This action provided a theoretical basis for the putative ergogenic action of catecholamines and adrenergic agonists, although there is no clear evidence of this effect in humans. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of inotropic effects associated to physiological sympathetic activation in healthy subjects. The muscle force capacity was investigated in the tibialis anterior (n = 9 subjects) and in the soleus (n = 9) muscles electrically stimulated with single pulses and double pulses with variable interspike interval (4-1,000 ms) and short pulse trains (frequency: 5-14 Hz) before, during, and after sympathetic activation by the cold pressor test (CPT). CPT significantly decreased by 10.4 ± 7.2 and 10.6 ± 4.4% the force produced by single and double pulse stimulation, respectively, and produced smaller decreases in the force obtained by train stimulation in the tibialis anterior, while no significant changes were observed in either type of contraction in the soleus muscle. CPT failed to induce any increase in the force capacity of the investigated muscles. The prevalent decrease in force evidenced in this study supports the concept that the weakening sympathetic action on type I fiber, already shown to occur in humans, prevails over the putative potentiating action.

  5. Active open boundary forcing using dual relaxation time-scales in downscaled ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzfeld, M.; Gillibrand, P. A.

    2015-05-01

    Regional models actively forced with data from larger scale models at their open boundaries often contain motion at different time-scales (e.g. tidal and low frequency). These motions are not always individually well specified in the forcing data, and one may require a more active boundary forcing while the other exert less influence on the model interior. If a single relaxation time-scale is used to relax toward these data in the boundary equation, then this may be difficult. The method of fractional steps is used to introduce dual relaxation time-scales in an open boundary local flux adjustment scheme. This allows tidal and low frequency oscillations to be relaxed independently, resulting in a better overall solution than if a single relaxation parameter is optimized for tidal (short relaxation) or low frequency (long relaxation) boundary forcing. The dual method is compared to the single relaxation method for an idealized test case where a tidal signal is superimposed on a steady state low frequency solution, and a real application where the low frequency boundary forcing component is derived from a global circulation model for a region extending over the whole Great Barrier Reef, and a tidal signal subsequently superimposed.

  6. Optimization of Active Muscle Force-Length Models Using Least Squares Curve Fitting.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Goran Abdulrahman; Hou, Ming

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to propose an asymmetric Gaussian function as an alternative to the existing active force-length models, and to optimize this model along with several other existing models by using the least squares curve fitting method. The minimal set of coefficients is identified for each of these models to facilitate the least squares curve fitting. Sarcomere simulated data and one set of rabbits extensor digitorum II experimental data are used to illustrate optimal curve fitting of the selected force-length functions. The results shows that all the curves fit reasonably well with the simulated and experimental data, while the Gordon-Huxley-Julian model and asymmetric Gaussian function are better than other functions in terms of statistical test scores root mean squared error and R-squared. However, the differences in RMSE scores are insignificant (0.3-6%) for simulated data and (0.2-5%) for experimental data. The proposed asymmetric Gaussian model and the method of parametrization of this and the other force-length models mentioned above can be used in the studies on active force-length relationships of skeletal muscles that generate forces to cause movements of human and animal bodies.

  7. An 'inherent' biodegradability test for oil products: description and results of an international ring test. CONCAWE Biodegradation Task Force.

    PubMed

    Battersby, N S; Ciccognani, D; Evans, M R; King, D; Painter, H A; Peterson, D R; Starkey, M

    1999-06-01

    Current test guidelines for assessing 'inherent' (potential) biodegradability were designed for water-soluble, organic compounds of low volatility and are unsuitable for most oil products. It was against this background, that CONCAWE (the oil companies' European organisation for environment, health and safety) formed a task force to develop a standard test protocol for assessing the 'inherent' biodegradability of oil products.

  8. A Methodology for Modeling the Flow of Military Personnel Across Air Force Active and Reserve Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    C O R P O R A T I O N Research Report A Methodology for Modeling the Flow of Military Personnel Across Air Force Active and Reserve Components...Lisa M. Harrington, James H . Bigelow, Alexander Rothenberg, James Pita, Paul D. Emslie Limited Print and Electronic Distribution Rights This document...of a particular component—whether active , guard, or reserve. As a result, when personnel policies are implemented in one component, little is known

  9. Varenicline has antidepressant-like activity in the forced swim test and augments sertraline's effect.

    PubMed

    Rollema, Hans; Guanowsky, Victor; Mineur, Yann S; Shrikhande, Alka; Coe, Jotham W; Seymour, Patricia A; Picciotto, Marina R

    2009-03-01

    Varenicline, an alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist developed as a smoking cessation aid, showed antidepressant-like activity in the forced swim test in two mouse strains. In addition, a low varenicline dose significantly enhanced the effects of moderately active doses of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline. These findings are consistent with the notion that reducing alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activity either by antagonists or by partial agonists that can partially activate or desensitize acetylcholine receptors is associated with antidepressant-like properties. These data suggest that varenicline may have antidepressant potential and can, when combined, augment antidepressant responses of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

  10. Forcings of nutrient, oxygen, and primary production interannual variability in the southeast Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachèlery, M.-L.; Illig, S.; Dadou, I.

    2016-08-01

    The recurrent occurrences of interannual warm and cold events along the coast of Africa have been intensively studied because of their striking effects on climate and fisheries. Using sensitivity experimentation based on a coupled physical/biogeochemical model, we show that the oceanic remote equatorial forcing explains more than 85% of coastal interannual nitrate and oxygen fluctuations along the Angolan and Namibian coasts up to the Benguela Upwelling System (BUS). These events, associated with poleward propagations of upwelling and downwelling Coastal Trapped Waves (CTW), are maximum in subsurface and controlled by physical advection processes. Surprisingly, an abrupt change in the CTW biogeochemical signature is observed in the BUS, associated with mixed vertical gradients due to the strong local upwelling dynamics. Coastal modifications of biogeochemical features result in significant primary production variations that may affect fisheries habitats and coastal biodiversity along the southwestern African coasts and in the BUS.

  11. A leader-follower relationship in joint action on a discrete force production task.

    PubMed

    Masumoto, Junya; Inui, Nobuyuki

    2014-11-01

    The present study examined the development of a leader-follower relationship in joint action performed by participants with different skill levels. Two participants were instructed to produce discrete isometric forces such that the sum of the forces was the target force. The task did not prescribe the onset time or share of force each participant contributed to the target force. Although novices with low force variability did not produce an earlier force than those with high force variability in the novice-novice group, experienced participants produced an earlier force than novices in the novice-experienced group. While participants with low force variability always produced a stronger force than those with high force variability in both the groups, there was no significant difference in force distributions between participants with low and high force variabilities. Although a novice-experienced pair produced force more complementarily than a novice-novice pair in the first practice block, the difference between pairs vanished after the first practice block, suggesting that leader-follower relations were not always beneficial to task performance. In addition, practice of the joint action did not transfer to individual action.

  12. Endurance time, muscular activity and the hand/arm tremor for different exertion forces of holding.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzu-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of exertion force on endurance time, muscular activity and hand/arm tremor during holding. Fifteen healthy young males were recruited as participants. The independent variable was exertion force (20%, 40%, 60% and 80% maximum holding capacity). The dependent variables were endurance time, muscular activity and hand/arm tremor. The results showed that endurance time decreased with exertion force while muscular activity and hand/arm tremor increased with exertion force. Hand/arm tremor increased with holding time. Endurance time of 40%, 60% and 80% maximum holding capacity was approximately 22.7%, 12.0% and 5.6% of that of 20% maximum holding capacity, respectively. The rms (root mean square) acceleration of hand/arm tremor of the final phase of holding was 2.27-, 1.33-, 1.20- and 1.73-fold of that of the initial phase of holding for 20%, 40%, 60% and 80% maximum holding capacity, respectively.

  13. Mechanical forces regulate elastase activity and binding site availability in lung elastin.

    PubMed

    Jesudason, Rajiv; Sato, Susumu; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Araujo, Ascanio D; Majumdar, Arnab; Allen, Philip G; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Suki, Béla

    2010-11-03

    Many fundamental cellular and extracellular processes in the body are mediated by enzymes. At the single molecule level, enzyme activity is influenced by mechanical forces. However, the effects of mechanical forces on the kinetics of enzymatic reactions in complex tissues with intact extracellular matrix (ECM) have not been identified. Here we report that physiologically relevant macroscopic mechanical forces modify enzyme activity at the molecular level in the ECM of the lung parenchyma. Porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE), which binds to and digests elastin, was fluorescently conjugated (f-PPE) and fluorescent recovery after photobleach was used to evaluate the binding kinetics of f-PPE in the alveolar walls of normal mouse lungs. Fluorescent recovery after photobleach indicated that the dissociation rate constant (k(off)) for f-PPE was significantly larger in stretched than in relaxed alveolar walls with a linear relation between k(off) and macroscopic strain. Using a network model of the parenchyma, a linear relation was also found between k(off) and microscopic strain on elastin fibers. Further, the binding pattern of f-PPE suggested that binding sites on elastin unfold with strain. The increased overall reaction rate also resulted in stronger structural breakdown at the level of alveolar walls, as well as accelerated decay of stiffness and decreased failure stress of the ECM at the macroscopic scale. These results suggest an important role for the coupling between mechanical forces and enzyme activity in ECM breakdown and remodeling in development, and during diseases such as pulmonary emphysema or vascular aneurysm. Our findings may also have broader implications because in vivo, enzyme activity in nearly all cellular and extracellular processes takes place in the presence of mechanical forces.

  14. Quantification of Cyclic Ground Reaction Force Histories During Daily Activity in Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breit, G. A.; Whalen, R. T.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Theoretical models and experimental studies of bone remodeling suggest that bone density and structure are influenced by local cyclic skeletal tissue stress and strain histories. Estimation of long-term loading histories in humans is usually achieved by assessment of physical activity level by questionnaires, logbooks, and pedometers, since the majority of lower limb cyclic loading occurs during walking and running. These methods provide some indication of the mechanical loading history, but fail to consider the true magnitude of the lower limb skeletal forces generated by various daily activities. These techniques cannot account for individual gait characteristics, gait speed, and unpredictable high loading events that may influence bone mass significantly. We have developed portable instrumentation to measure and record the vertical component of the ground reaction force (GRFz) during normal daily activity. This equipment allows long-term quantitative monitoring of musculoskeletal loads, which in conjunction with bone mineral density assessments, promises to elucidate the relationship between skeletal stresses and bone remodeling.

  15. Active and Progressive Exoskeleton Rehabilitation Using Multisource Information Fusion From EMG and Force-Position EPP.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuanjie; Yin, Yuehong

    2013-12-01

    Although exoskeletons have received enormous attention and have been widely used in gait training and walking assistance in recent years, few reports addressed their application during early poststroke rehabilitation. This paper presents a healthcare technology for active and progressive early rehabilitation using multisource information fusion from surface electromyography and force-position extended physiological proprioception. The active-compliance control based on interaction force between patient and exoskeleton is applied to accelerate the recovery of the neuromuscular function, whereby progressive treatment through timely evaluation contributes to an effective and appropriate physical rehabilitation. Moreover, a clinic-oriented rehabilitation system, wherein a lower extremity exoskeleton with active compliance is mounted on a standing bed, is designed to ensure comfortable and secure rehabilitation according to the structure and control requirements. Preliminary experiments and clinical trial demonstrate valuable information on the feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of the progressive exoskeleton-assisted training.

  16. Induced Voltage Linear Extraction Method Using an Active Kelvin Bridge for Disturbing Force Self-Sensing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Lei; Tan, Jiubin; Zhao, Bo

    2016-05-20

    This paper presents an induced voltage linear extraction method for disturbing force self-sensing in the application of giant magnetostrictive actuators (GMAs). In this method, a Kelvin bridge combined with an active device is constructed instead of a conventional Wheatstone bridge for extraction of the induced voltage, and an additional GMA is adopted as a reference actuator in the self-sensing circuit in order to balance the circuit bridge. The linear fitting of the measurement data is done according to the linear relationship between the disturbing forces and the integral of the induced voltage. The experimental results confirm the good performance of the proposed method, and the self-sensitivity of the disturbing forces is better than 2.0 (mV·s)/N.

  17. Natural history and the formation of the human being: Kant on active forces.

    PubMed

    Waldow, Anik

    2016-08-01

    In his 1785-review of the Ideen zur Philosophie der Geschichte der Menschheit, Kant objects to Herder's conception of nature as being imbued with active forces. This attack is usually evaluated against the background of Kant's critical project and his epistemological concern to caution against the "metaphysical excess" of attributing immanent properties to matter. In this paper I explore a slightly different reading by investigating Kant's pre-critical account of creation and generation. The aim of this is to show that Kant's struggle with the forces of matter has a long history and revolves around one central problem: that of how to distinguish between the non-purposive forces of nature and the intentional powers of the mind. Given this history, the epistemic stricture that Kant's critical project imposes on him no longer appears to be the primary reason for his attack on Herder. It merely aggravates a problem that Kant has been battling with since his earliest writings.

  18. Force-endurance capabilities of extravehicular activity (EVA) gloves at different pressure levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishu, Ram R.; Klute, Glenn K.

    1993-01-01

    The human hand is a very useful multipurpose tool in all environments. However, performance capabilities are compromised considerably when gloves are donned. This is especially true to extravehicular activity (EVA) gloves. The primary intent was to answer the question of how long a person can perform tasks requiring certain levels of exertion. The objective was to develop grip force-endurance relations. Six subjects participated in a factorial experiment involving three hand conditions, three pressure differentials, and four levels of force exertion. The results indicate that, while the force that could be exerted depended on the glove, pressure differential, and the level of exertion, the endurance time at any exertion level depended just on the level of exertion expressed as a percentage of maximum exertion possible at that condition. The impact of these findings for practitioners as well as theoreticians is discussed.

  19. Climatic and oceanic forcing of new, net, and diatom production in the North Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Jean-Eric; Gratton, Yves; Fauchot, Juliette; Price, Neil M.

    New, net, and diatom production in the North Water were estimated during May to July 1998 from in vitro measurements of nitrate uptake and mesoscale temporal changes in the inventories of nitrate, silicate, oxygen, and inorganic carbon (DIC). Sampling stations were divided into two domains according to the position of the dominant water types: the silicate-rich Arctic water (SRAW) and Baffin Bay Water (BBW). BBW dominated in the southeast and was associated with relatively shallow upper mixed layers (UMLs) and weak horizontal advection. A phytoplankton bloom started in late April in BBW and grew slowly over 7 weeks, during which time the build-up of particulate organic nitrogen and carbon accounted for ca. 80% of the nitrate and DIC deficit, respectively. Over half of the new production (1.37 g C m -2 d -1) during this period was attributed to wind-driven replenishment of nitrate in the euphotic zone. The bloom culminated when seasonally declining winds and rising temperatures severed the UML from the deep nutrient reservoir. The same change in weather induced ice melt, stratification, and bloom development in northern SRAW, which had previously been characterized by deep UMLs. Collectively, the results imply that the timing and magnitude of blooms in the North Water are controlled by a succession of oceanic and climatic forcings. New C production in the North Water during April to July (1.11 g C m -2 d -1) was an order of magnitude higher than in adjacent waters and up to 8 times higher than in the Northeast Water polynya. As much as 80% of this production was mediated by diatoms >5 μm, suggesting potentially high and efficient C transfer to the herbivorous food web and deep waters.

  20. Coordinated integrin activation by actin-dependent force during T-cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Nordenfelt, Pontus; Elliott, Hunter L.; Springer, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    For a cell to move forward it must convert chemical energy into mechanical propulsion. Force produced by actin polymerization can generate traction across the plasma membrane by transmission through integrins to their ligands. However, the role this force plays in integrin activation is unknown. Here we show that integrin activity and cytoskeletal dynamics are reciprocally linked, where actin-dependent force itself appears to regulate integrin activity. We generated fluorescent tension-sensing constructs of integrin αLβ2 (LFA-1) to visualize intramolecular tension during cell migration. Using quantitative imaging of migrating T cells, we correlate tension in the αL or β2 subunit with cell and actin dynamics. We find that actin engagement produces tension within the β2 subunit to induce and stabilize an active integrin conformational state and that this requires intact talin and kindlin motifs. This supports a general mechanism where localized actin polymerization can coordinate activation of the complex machinery required for cell migration. PMID:27721490

  1. Validation and Verification of Operational Land Analysis Activities at the Air Force Weather Agency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Michael; Kumar, Sujay V.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Cetola, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    The NASA developed Land Information System (LIS) is the Air Force Weather Agency's (AFWA) operational Land Data Assimilation System (LDAS) combining real time precipitation observations and analyses, global forecast model data, vegetation, terrain, and soil parameters with the community Noah land surface model, along with other hydrology module options, to generate profile analyses of global soil moisture, soil temperature, and other important land surface characteristics. (1) A range of satellite data products and surface observations used to generate the land analysis products (2) Global, 1/4 deg spatial resolution (3) Model analysis generated at 3 hours

  2. Trunk Muscle Activation and Estimating Spinal Compressive Force in Rope and Harness Vertical Dance.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Margaret; Dai, Boyi; Zhu, Qin; Humphrey, Neil

    2015-12-01

    Rope and harness vertical dance takes place off the floor with the dancer suspended from his or her center of mass in a harness attached to a rope from a point overhead. Vertical dance represents a novel environment for training and performing in which expected stresses on the dancer's body are different from those that take place during dance on the floor. Two male and eleven female dancers with training in vertical dance performed six typical vertical dance movements with electromyography (EMG) electrodes placed bilaterally on rectus abdominus, external oblique, erector spinae, and latissimus dorsi. EMG data were expressed as a percentage of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). A simplified musculoskeletal model based on muscle activation for these four muscle groups was used to estimate the compressive force on the spine. The greatest muscle activation for erector spinae and latissimus dorsi and the greatest trunk compressive forces were seen in vertical axis positions where the dancer was moving the trunk into a hyper-extended position. The greatest muscle activation for rectus abdominus and external oblique and the second highest compressive force were seen in a supine position with the arms and legs extended away from the center of mass (COM). The least muscle activation occurred in positions where the limbs were hanging below the torso. These movements also showed relatively low muscle activation compression forces. Post-test survey results revealed that dancers felt comfortable in these positions; however, observation of some positions indicated insufficient muscular control. Computing the relative contribution of muscles, expressed as muscle activation and estimated spinal compression, provided a measure of how much the muscle groups were working to support the spine and the rest of the dancer's body in the different movements tested. Additionally, identifying typical muscle recruitment patterns in each movement will help identify key exercises

  3. Taurine supplementation increases skeletal muscle force production and protects muscle function during and after high-frequency in vitro stimulation.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Craig A; Horvath, Deanna; Stathis, Christos; Mori, Trevor; Croft, Kevin; Murphy, Robyn M; Hayes, Alan

    2009-07-01

    Recent studies report that depletion and repletion of muscle taurine (Tau) to endogenous levels affects skeletal muscle contractility in vitro. In this study, muscle Tau content was raised above endogenous levels by supplementing male Sprague-Dawley rats with 2.5% (wt/vol) Tau in drinking water for 2 wk, after which extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles were examined for in vitro contractile properties, fatigue resistance, and recovery from fatigue after two different high-frequency stimulation bouts. Tau supplementation increased muscle Tau content by approximately 40% and isometric twitch force by 19%, shifted the force-frequency relationship upward and to the left, increased specific force by 4.2%, and increased muscle calsequestrin protein content by 49%. Force at the end of a 10-s (100 Hz) continuous tetanic stimulation was 6% greater than controls, while force at the end of the 3-min intermittent high-frequency stimulation bout was significantly higher than controls, with a 12% greater area under the force curve. For 1 h after the 10-s continuous stimulation, tetanic force in Tau-supplemented muscles remained relatively stable while control muscle force gradually deteriorated. After the 3-min intermittent bout, tetanic force continued to slowly recover over the next 1 h, while control muscle force again began to decline. Tau supplementation attenuated F(2)-isoprostane production (a sensitive indicator of reactive oxygen species-induced lipid peroxidation) during the 3-min intermittent stimulation bout. Finally, Tau transporter protein expression was not altered by the Tau supplementation. Our results demonstrate that raising Tau content above endogenous levels increases twitch and subtetanic and specific force in rat fast-twitch skeletal muscle. Also, we demonstrate that raising Tau protects muscle function during high-frequency in vitro stimulation and the ensuing recovery period and helps reduce oxidative stress during prolonged stimulation.

  4. Dystrophin Deficiency Compromises Force Production of the Extensor Carpi Ulnaris Muscle in the Canine Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Chady H.; Pan, Xiufang; Terjung, Ronald L.; Duan, Dongsheng

    2012-01-01

    Loss of muscle force is a salient feature of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a fatal disease caused by dystrophin deficiency. Assessment of force production from a single intact muscle has been considered as the gold standard for studying physiological consequences in murine models of DMD. Unfortunately, equivalent assays have not been established in dystrophic dogs. To fill the gap, we developed a novel in situ protocol to measure force generated by the extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) muscle of a dog. We also determined the muscle length to fiber length ratio and the pennation angle of the ECU muscle. Muscle pathology and contractility were compared between normal and affected dogs. Absence of dystrophin resulted in marked histological damage in the ECU muscle of affected dogs. Central nucleation was significantly increased and myofiber size distribution was altered in the dystrophic ECU muscle. Muscle weight and physiological cross sectional area (PCSA) showed a trend of reduction in affected dogs although the difference did not reach statistical significance. Force measurement revealed a significant decrease of absolute force, and the PCSA or muscle weight normalized specific forces. To further characterize the physiological defect in affected dog muscle, we conducted eccentric contraction. Dystrophin-null dogs showed a significantly greater force loss following eccentric contraction damage. To our knowledge, this is the first convincing demonstration of force deficit in a single intact muscle in the canine DMD model. The method described here will be of great value to study physiological outcomes following innovative gene and/or cell therapies. PMID:22973449

  5. Active Path Selection of Fluid Microcapsules in Artificial Blood Vessel by Acoustic Radiation Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Kohji; Muramatsu, Yusuke; Ueda, Sawami; Nakamoto, Ryusuke; Nakayashiki, Yusuke; Ishihara, Ken

    2009-07-01

    Micrometer-sized microcapsules collapse upon exposure to ultrasound. Use of this phenomenon for a drug delivery system (DDS), not only for local delivery of medication but also for gene therapy, should be possible. However, enhancing the efficiency of medication is limited because capsules in suspension diffuse in the human body after injection, since the motion of capsules in blood flow cannot be controlled. To control the behavior of microcapsules, acoustic radiation force was introduced. We detected local changes in microcapsule density by producing acoustic radiation force in an artificial blood vessel. Furthermore, we theoretically estimated the conditions required for active path selection of capsules at a bifurcation point in the artificial blood vessel. We observed the difference in capsule density at both in the bifurcation point and in alternative paths downstream of the bifurcation point for different acoustic radiation forces. Comparing the experimental results with those obtained theoretically, the conditions for active path selection were calculated from the acoustic radiation force and fluid resistance of the capsules. The possibility of controlling capsule flow towards a specific point in a blood vessel was demonstrated.

  6. Single-molecule kinetics under force: probing protein folding and enzymatic activity with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wesley

    2010-03-01

    Weak non-covalent bonds between and within single molecules govern many aspects of biological structure and function (e.g. DNA base-paring, receptor-ligand binding, protein folding, etc.) In living systems, these interactions are often subject to mechanical forces, which can greatly alter their kinetics and activity. My group develops and applies novel single-molecule manipulation techniques to explore and quantify these force-dependent kinetics. Using optical tweezers, we have quantified the force-dependent unfolding and refolding kinetics of different proteins, including the cytoskeletal protein spectrin in collaboration with E. Evans's group [1], and the A2 domain of the von Willebrand factor blood clotting protein in collaboration with T. Springer's group [2]. Furthermore, we have studied the kinetics of the ADAMTS13 enzyme acting on a single A2 domain, and have shown that physiolgical forces in the circulation can act as a cofactor for enzymatic cleavage, regulating hemostatic activity [2]. References: 1. E. Evans, K. Halvorsen, K. Kinoshita, and W.P. Wong, Handbook of Single Molecule Biophysics, P. Hinterdorfer, ed., Springer (2009). 2. X. Zhang, K. Halvorsen, C.-Z. Zhang, W.P. Wong, and T.A. Springer, Science 324 (5932), 1330-1334 (2009).

  7. Circadian force and EMG activity in hindlimb muscles of rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgson, J. A.; Wichayanuparp, S.; Recktenwald, M. R.; Roy, R. R.; McCall, G.; Day, M. K.; Washburn, D.; Fanton, J. W.; Kozlovskaya, I.; Edgerton, V. R.; Rumbaugh, D. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Continuous intramuscular electromyograms (EMGs) were recorded from the soleus (Sol), medial gastrocnemius (MG), tibialis anterior (TA), and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles of Rhesus during normal cage activity throughout 24-h periods and also during treadmill locomotion. Daily levels of MG tendon force and EMG activity were obtained from five monkeys with partial datasets from three other animals. Activity levels correlated with the light-dark cycle with peak activities in most muscles occurring between 08:00 and 10:00. The lowest levels of activity generally occurred between 22:00 and 02:00. Daily EMG integrals ranged from 19 mV/s in one TA muscle to 3339 mV/s in one Sol muscle: average values were 1245 (Sol), 90 (MG), 65 (TA), and 209 (VL) mV/s. The average Sol EMG amplitude per 24-h period was 14 microV, compared with 246 microV for a short burst of locomotion. Mean EMG amplitudes for the Sol, MG, TA, and VL during active periods were 102, 18, 20, and 33 microV, respectively. EMG amplitudes that approximated recruitment of all fibers within a muscle occurred for 5-40 s/day in all muscles. The duration of daily activation was greatest in the Sol [151 +/- 45 (SE) min] and shortest in the TA (61 +/- 19 min). The results show that even a "postural" muscle such as the Sol was active for only approximately 9% of the day, whereas less active muscles were active for approximately 4% of the day. MG tendon forces were generally very low, consistent with the MG EMG data but occasionally reached levels close to estimates of the maximum force generating potential of the muscle. The Sol and TA activities were mutually exclusive, except at very low levels, suggesting very little coactivation of these antagonistic muscles. In contrast, the MG activity usually accompanied Sol activity suggesting that the MG was rarely used in the absence of Sol activation. The results clearly demonstrate a wide range of activation levels among muscles of the same animal as well as among different

  8. Increase in Mechanical Resistance to Force in a Shear-Activated Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botello, Eric; Harris, Nolan; Choi, Huiwan; Zhou, Zhou; Bergeron, Angela; Dong, Jing-Fei; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2009-03-01

    von Willebrand factor (VWF) is the largest multimeric adhesion ligand found in human blood. Plasma VWF (pVWF) must be exposed to shear stress, like at sites of vascular injury, to be activated to bind platelets to induce blood clotting. In addition, adhesion activity of VWF is related to its polymer size, with the ultra-large form of VWF (ULVWF) being hyper-active, and forming fibers even without exposure to shear stress. We used the AFM to stretch pVWF, sheared VWF (sVWF) and ULVWF, and monitor the forces as a function of molecular extension. We showed a similar increase in force resistance to unfolding for sVWF and ULVWF when compared to pVWF. The increase in force is reduced when other molecules that are known to disrupt their fibril formation are present. Our results provide evidence that the common higher order structure of sVWF and ULVWF may affect the domain structure that causes difference in their adhesion activity compared to pVWF.

  9. The Symbiotic Relationship between the Air Force’s Active and Reserve Components: Ensuring the Health of the Total Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    inefficiencies drive higher costs and may ultimately imperil our ability to perform the national defense mission. If we properly address the symbiotic...thresholds and tipping points to draw a line beyond which the health of the total force finds itself at risk. Maintaining higher RC experience levels is...schedule, and other performance goals.45 Moreover, the matrix incorporates qualitative factors such as leader- ship, total force education , the triad

  10. Aerosol Radiative Forcing Estimates from South Asian Clay Brick Production Based on Direct Emission Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyant, C.; Athalye, V.; Ragavan, S.; Rajarathnam, U.; Kr, B.; Lalchandani, D.; Maithel, S.; Malhotra, G.; Bhanware, P.; Thoa, V.; Phuong, N.; Baum, E.; Bond, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    About 150-200 billion clay bricks are produced in India every year. Most of these bricks are fired in small-scale traditional kilns that burn coal or biomass without pollution controls. Reddy and Venkataraman (2001) estimated that 8% of fossil fuel related PM2.5 emissions and 23% of black carbon emissions in India are released from brick production. Few direct emissions measurements have been done in this industry and black carbon emissions, in particular, have not been previously measured. In this study, 9 kilns representing five common brick kiln technologies were tested for aerosol properties and gaseous pollutant emissions, including optical scattering and absorption and thermal-optical OC/EC. Simple relationships are then used to estimate the radiative-forcing impact. Kiln design and fuel quality greatly affect the overall emission profiles and relative climate warming. Batch production kilns, such as the Downdraft kiln, produce the most PM2.5 (0.97 gPM2.5/fired brick) with an OC/EC fraction of 0.3. Vertical Shaft Brick kilns using internally mixed fuels produce the least PM (0.09 gPM2.5/kg fired brick) with the least EC (OC/EC = 16.5), but these kilns are expensive to implement and their use throughout Southern Asia is minimal. The most popular kiln in India, the Bull's Trench kiln, had fewer emissions per brick than the Downdraft kiln, but an even higher EC fraction (OC/EC = 0.05). The Zig-zag kiln is similar in structure to the Bull's Trench kiln, but the emission factors are significantly lower: 50% reduction for CO, 17% for PM2.5 and 60% for black carbon. This difference in emissions suggests that converting traditional Bull's Trench kilns into less polluting Zig-zag kilns would result in reduced atmospheric warming from brick production.

  11. Analysis of Handling Qualities Design Criteria for Active Inceptor Force-Feel Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malpica, Carlos A.; Lusardi, Jeff A.

    2013-01-01

    The force-feel system characteristics of the cyclic inceptors of most helicopters are set based on the characteristics of the mechanical components in the control system (mass, springs, friction dampers, etc.). For these helicopters, the force-feel characteristics typically remain constant over the entire flight envelope, with perhaps a trim release to minimize control forces while maneuvering. With the advent of fly-by-wire control systems and active inceptors in helicopters, the force-feel characteristics are now determined by the closed-loop response of the active inceptor itself as defined by the inertia, force/displacement gradient, damping, breakout force and detent shape configuration parameters in the inceptor control laws. These systems give the flexibility to dynamically prescribe different feel characteristics for different control modes or flight conditions, and the ability to provide tactile cueing to the pilot through the actively controlled side-stick or center-stick cyclic inceptor. For rotorcraft, a few studies have been conducted to assess the effects of cyclic force-feel characteristics on handling qualities in flight. An early study provided valuable insight into the static force-deflection characteristics (force gradient) and the number of axes controlled by the side-stick controller for the U.S. Army's Advanced Digital/Optical Control System (ADOCS) demonstrator aircraft [1]. The first of a series of studies providing insight on the inceptor dynamic force-feel characteristics was conducted on the NASA/Army CH-47B variable-stability helicopter [2]. This work led to a proposed requirement that set boundaries based on the cyclic natural frequency and inertia, with the stipulation of a lower damping ratio limit of 0.3 [3]. A second study was conducted by the Canadian Institute for Aerospace Research using their variable-stability Bell 205A helicopter [4]. This research suggested boundaries for stick dynamics based on natural frequency and damping

  12. [Unpredictable chronic mild stress effects on antidepressants activities in forced swim test].

    PubMed

    Kudryashov, N V; Kalinina, T S; Voronina, T A

    2015-02-01

    The experiments has been designed to study unpredictable chronic mild stress effect on anti-depressive activities of amitriptyline (10 mg/kg) and fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) in forced swim test in male outbred mice. It is shown that acute treatment with fluoxetine does not produce any antidepressant effects in mice following stress of 14 days while the sub-chronic injections of fluoxetine result in more deep depressive-like behavior. In 28 daily stressed mice, antidepressant effect of fluoxetine is observed independently of the injection rates. Amitriptyline demonstrates the antidepressant activity regardless of the duration of stress or administration scheduling, but at the same time the severity of anti-immobilization effect of amitriptyline in stressed mice is weaker in compare to non-stressed trails. Thus, the injection rates and duration of unpredictable mild chronic stress are the parameters that determine the efficiency of antidepressants in the mouse forced swimming test.

  13. Productive activity and life satisfaction in Korean elderly women.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explain the effect of participation in productive activities on life satisfaction and its implications for social evaluation of productive aging. This study uses data collected from 1,250 elderly women living in urban areas. The regression model was used to examine the influence of elderly women's participation in productive activities on their life satisfaction. Elderly women who participate in volunteer work, learning, and social group activities commonly recognized their activities as meaningful, feeling like worthwhile members of society, and evaluated such activities as very positive. In contrast, elderly women who participated in household chores and family care activities expressed a negative life satisfaction. The difference in life satisfaction regarding productive activities stems not only from the physical and environmental differences but also from the gap between the official social value underpinned by the recognition of surrounding people, their support, and the value of productive activities.

  14. Encoding of forelimb forces by corticospinal tract activity in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yi; Foulds, Richard A.; Adamovich, Sergei V.; Sahin, Mesut

    2014-01-01

    In search of a solution to the long standing problems encountered in traditional brain computer interfaces (BCI), the lateral descending tracts of the spinal cord present an alternative site for taping into the volitional motor signals. Due to the convergence of the cortical outputs into a final common pathway in the descending tracts of the spinal cord, neural interfaces with the spinal cord can potentially acquire signals richer with volitional information in a smaller anatomical region. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of extracting motor control signals from the corticospinal tract (CST) of the rat spinal cord. Flexible substrate, multi-electrode arrays (MEA) were implanted in the CST of rats trained for a lever pressing task. This novel use of flexible substrate MEAs allowed recording of CST activity in behaving animals for up to three weeks with the current implantation technique. Time-frequency and principal component analyses (PCA) were applied to the neural signals to reconstruct isometric forelimb forces. Computed regression coefficients were then used to predict isometric forces in additional trials. The correlation between measured and predicted forces in the vertical direction averaged across six animals was 0.67 and R2 value was 0.44. Force regression in the horizontal directions was less successful, possibly due to the small amplitude of forces. Neural signals above and near the high gamma band made the largest contributions to prediction of forces. The results of this study support the feasibility of a spinal cord computer interface (SCCI) for generation of command signals in paralyzed individuals. PMID:24847198

  15. Research, test, and development activities performed by junction box bypass diode task force # 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gade, Vivek; Shiradkar, Narendra; Robusto, Paul; Whitfield, Kent; Wohlgemuth, John; Uchida, Yasunori; Dhere, Neelkanth G.

    2014-10-01

    The paper provides latest update on the activities performed by the group #4-diodes, shading and reverse bias of the PV Module Quality Assurance Task Force (PVQAT) in the areas such as electrostatic discharge testing and standards, thermal runaway testing, diode junction temperature measurement techniques, thermal endurance tests and analysis of field failures. Philosophy, motivation and future direction for the group #4 is also discussed.

  16. The acute effects of static stretching on peak force, peak rate of force development and muscle activity during single- and multiple-joint actions in older women.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Raquel; Gurjão, André Luiz Demantova; Jambassi Filho, José Claudio; Farinatti, Paulo De Tarso Veras; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa Bucken; Gobbi, Sebastião

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the acute effects of static stretching on peak force, peak rate of force development and integrated electromyography (iEMG) in 27 older women (65 ± 4 years; 69 ± 9 kg; 157 ± 1 cm; 28 ± 4 kg · m(-2)). The participants were tested during two exercises (leg press and knee extension) after two conditions: stretching and control. The data were collected on four days (counterbalanced with a 24-hour rest period). In the stretching condition, the quadriceps muscle was stretched (knee flexion) for three sets of 30 s with 30 s rest intervals. No significant difference was detected for peak force and peak rate of force development during the single- and multiple-joint exercises, regardless of the following interactions: condition (stretching and control) vs. time (pre x post x 10 x 20 x 30 minutes post; P > 0.05) and exercise vs. time (P > 0.05). Additionally, no significant interaction was found for the iEMG activity (condition vs. time; P > 0.05) in the single- and multiple-joint exercises. In conclusion, a small amount of stretching of an agonist muscle (quadriceps) did not affect the peak force, peak rate of force development and EMG activity in older women during single- and multiple-joint exercises.

  17. Iterative weighted average diffusion as a novel external force in the active contour model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirov, Ilya S.; Nakhmani, Arie

    2016-03-01

    The active contour model has good performance in boundary extraction for medical images; particularly, Gradient Vector Flow (GVF) active contour model shows good performance at concavity convergence and insensitivity to initialization, yet it is susceptible to edge leaking, deep and narrow concavities, and has some issues handling noisy images. This paper proposes a novel external force, called Iterative Weighted Average Diffusion (IWAD), which used in tandem with parametric active contours, provides superior performance in images with high values of concavity. The image gradient is first turned into an edge image, smoothed, and modified with enhanced corner detection, then the IWAD algorithm diffuses the force at a given pixel based on its 3x3 pixel neighborhood. A forgetting factor, φ, is employed to ensure that forces being spread away from the boundary of the image will attenuate. The experimental results show better behavior in high curvature regions, faster convergence, and less edge leaking than GVF when both are compared to expert manual segmentation of the images.

  18. Effect of extensor muscle activation on the response to lumbar posteroanterior forces.

    PubMed

    Lee, M; Esler, M A; Mildren, J; Herbert, R

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the responses of normal subjects to the application of cyclical lumbar posteroanterior forces which simulated a manipulative therapy technique known as mobilization. The specific aim was to determine whether increases in spinal extensor muscle activity could modify the stiffness of lumbar posteroanterior movements. The lumbar posteroanterior stiffness was measured in eleven asymptomatic subjects in the prone position, both in the relaxed condition and during maximal voluntary isometric muscle contractions. The electromyographic activity of lumbar extensor muscles was measured in the relaxed and maximal contraction conditions during the application of mobilization. The posteroanterior stiffness was found to be significantly greater during maximum activation of the extensor muscles. The results indicate that muscle activity can significantly alter lumbar posteroanterior stiffness. Clinicians often apply posteroanterior forces over a spinous process of a vertebra to assess the resistance to movement. Information about the degree and nature of perceived resistance to posteroanterior movement is used to help make a diagnosis and select treatment techniques. This study has shown that increased activity of the spinal extensor muscles can increase the stiffness of lumbar posteroanterior movements, compared with the case where the subject is relaxed. When interpreting the posteroanterior responses of patients, clinicians should be aware that spinal extensor mucle activity can influence resistance to posteroanterior movement.

  19. Importance of anisotropy in detachment rates for force production and cargo transport by a team of motor proteins.

    PubMed

    Takshak, Anjneya; Kunwar, Ambarish

    2016-05-01

    Many cellular processes are driven by collective forces generated by a team consisting of multiple molecular motor proteins. One aspect that has received less attention is the detachment rate of molecular motors under mechanical force/load. While detachment rate of kinesin motors measured under backward force increases rapidly for forces beyond stall-force; this scenario is just reversed for non-yeast dynein motors where detachment rate from microtubule decreases, exhibiting a catch-bond type behavior. It has been shown recently that yeast dynein responds anisotropically to applied load, i.e. detachment rates are different under forward and backward pulling. Here, we use computational modeling to show that these anisotropic detachment rates might help yeast dynein motors to improve their collective force generation in the absence of catch-bond behavior. We further show that the travel distance of cargos would be longer if detachment rates are anisotropic. Our results suggest that anisotropic detachment rates could be an alternative strategy for motors to improve the transport properties and force production by the team.

  20. Defence force activities in marine protected areas: environmental management of Shoalwater Bay Training Area, Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wen; Wang, Xiaohua; Paull, David; Kesby, Julie

    2010-05-01

    Environmental management of military activities is of growing global concern by defence forces. As one of the largest landholders in Australia, the Australian Defence Force (ADF) is increasingly concerned with sustainable environmental management. This paper focuses on how the ADF is maintaining effective environmental management, especially in environmentally sensitive marine protected areas. It uses Shoalwater Bay Training Area (SWBTA) as a research example to examine environmental management strategies conducted by the ADF. SWBTA is one of the most significant Defence training areas in Australia, with a large number of single, joint and combined military exercises conducted in the area. With its maritime component contained in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBRMP), the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area (GBRWHA), and abutting Queensland’s State Marine Parks, it has high protection values. It is therefore vital for the ADF to adopt environmentally responsible management while they are conducting military activities. As to various tools employed to manage environmental performance, the ISO 14001 Environmental Management System (EMS) is widely used by the ADF. This paper examines military activities and marine environmental management within SWBTA, using the Talisman Saber (TS) exercise series as an example. These are extensive joint exercises conducted by the ADF and the United States defence forces. The paper outlines relevant legislative framework and environmental policies, analyses how the EMS operates in environmental management of military activities, and how military activities comply with these regulations. It discusses the implementation of the ADF EMS, including risk reduction measures, environmental awareness training, consultation and communication with stakeholders. A number of environmental management actions used in the TS exercises are presented to demonstrate the EMS application. Our investigations to this point indicate that the ADF is

  1. Soleus Fiber Force and Maximal Shortening Velocity After Non-Weight Bearing with Intermittent Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widrick, Jeffrey J.; Bangart, Jill J.; Karhanek, Miloslav; Fitts, Robert H.

    1996-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of intermittent weight bearing (IWB) as a countermeasure to non-weight-bearing (NWB)-induced alterations in soleus type 1 fiber force (in mN), tension (P(sub o); force per fiber cross-sectional area in kN/sq m), and maximal unloaded shortening velocity (V(sub o), in fiber lengths/s). Adult rats were assigned to one of the following groups: normal weight bearing (WB), 14 days of hindlimb NWB (NWB group), and 14 days of hindlimb NWB with IWB treatments (IWB group). The IWB treatment consisted of four 10-min periods of standing WB each day. Single, chemically permeabilized soleus fiber segments were mounted between a force transducer and position motor and were studied at maximal Ca(2+) activation, after which type 1 fiber myosin heavy-chain composition was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. NWB resulted in a loss in relative soleus mass (-45%), with type 1 fibers displaying reductions in diameter (-28%) and peak isometric force (-55%) and an increase in V(sub o) (+33%). In addition, NWB induced a 16% reduction in type 1 fiber P., a 41% reduction in type 1 fiber peak elastic modulus [E(sub o), defined as ((delta)force/(delta)length x (fiber length/fiber cross-sectional area] and a significant increase in the P(sub o)/E(sub o) ratio. In contrast to NWB, IWB reduced the loss of relative soleus mass (by 22%) and attenuated alterations in type 1 fiber diameter (by 36%), peak force (by 29%), and V(sub o)(by 48%) but had no significant effect on P(sub o), E(sub o) or P(sub o)/E(sub o). These results indicate that a modest restoration of WB activity during 14 days of NWB is sufficient to attenuate type 1 fiber atrophy and to partially restore type 1 peak isometric force and V(sub o) to WB levels. However, the NWB-induced reductions in P(sub o) and E(sub o) which we hypothesize to be due to a decline in the number and stiffness of cross bridges, respectively, are considerably less responsive to this

  2. Evaluation of EMG, force and joystick as control interfaces for active arm supports

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The performance capabilities and limitations of control interfaces for the operation of active movement-assistive devices remain unclear. Selecting an optimal interface for an application requires a thorough understanding of the performance of multiple control interfaces. Methods In this study the performance of EMG-, force- and joystick-based control interfaces were assessed in healthy volunteers with a screen-based one-dimensional position-tracking task. The participants had to track a target that was moving according to a multisine signal with a bandwidth of 3 Hz. The velocity of the cursor was proportional to the interface signal. The performance of the control interfaces were evaluated in terms of tracking error, gain margin crossover frequency, information transmission rate and effort. Results None of the evaluated interfaces was superior in all four performance descriptors. The EMG-based interface was superior in tracking error and gain margin crossover frequency compared to the force- and the joystick-based interfaces. The force-based interface provided higher information transmission rate and lower effort than the EMG-based interface. The joystick-based interface did not present any significant difference with the force-based interface for any of the four performance descriptors. We found that significant differences in terms of tracking error and information transmission rate were present beyond 0.9 and 1.4 Hz respectively. Conclusions Despite the fact that the EMG-based interface is far from the natural way of interacting with the environment, while the force-based interface is closer, the EMG-based interface presented very similar and for some descriptors even a better performance than the force-based interface for frequencies below 1.4 Hz. The classical joystick presented a similar performance to the force-based interface and holds the advantage of being a well established interface for the control of many assistive devices. From these

  3. Maximal force, voluntary activation and muscle soreness after eccentric damage to human elbow flexor muscles.

    PubMed

    Prasartwuth, O; Taylor, J L; Gandevia, S C

    2005-08-15

    Muscle damage reduces voluntary force after eccentric exercise but impaired neural drive to the muscle may also contribute. To determine whether the delayed-onset muscle soreness, which develops approximately 1 day after exercise, reduces voluntary activation and to identify the possible site for any reduction, voluntary activation of elbow flexor muscles was examined with both motor cortex and motor nerve stimulation. We measured maximal voluntary isometric torque (MVC), twitch torque, muscle soreness and voluntary activation in eight subjects before, immediately after, 2 h after, 1, 2, 4 and 8 days after eccentric exercise. Motor nerve stimulation and motor cortex stimulation were used to derive twitch torques and measures of voluntary activation. Eccentric exercise immediately reduced the MVC by 38 +/- 3% (mean +/- s.d., n = 8). The resting twitch produced by motor nerve stimulation fell by 82 +/- 6%, and the estimated resting twitch by cortical stimulation fell by 47 +/- 15%. While voluntary torque recovered after 8 days, both measures of the resting twitch remained depressed. Muscle tenderness occurred 1-2 days after exercise, and pain during contractions on days 1-4, but changes in voluntary activation did not follow this time course. Voluntary activation assessed with nerve stimulation fell 19 +/- 6% immediately after exercise but was not different from control values after 2 days. Voluntary activation assessed by motor cortex stimulation was unchanged by eccentric exercise. During MVCs, absolute increments in torque evoked by nerve and cortical stimulation behaved differently. Those to cortical stimulation decreased whereas those to nerve stimulation tended to increase. These findings suggest that reduced voluntary activation contributes to the early force loss after eccentric exercise, but that it is not due to muscle soreness. The impairment of voluntary activation to nerve stimulation but not motor cortical stimulation suggests that the activation

  4. Maximal force, voluntary activation and muscle soreness after eccentric damage to human elbow flexor muscles

    PubMed Central

    Prasartwuth, O; Taylor, JL; Gandevia, SC

    2005-01-01

    Muscle damage reduces voluntary force after eccentric exercise but impaired neural drive to the muscle may also contribute. To determine whether the delayed-onset muscle soreness, which develops ∼1 day after exercise, reduces voluntary activation and to identify the possible site for any reduction, voluntary activation of elbow flexor muscles was examined with both motor cortex and motor nerve stimulation. We measured maximal voluntary isometric torque (MVC), twitch torque, muscle soreness and voluntary activation in eight subjects before, immediately after, 2 h after, 1, 2, 4 and 8 days after eccentric exercise. Motor nerve stimulation and motor cortex stimulation were used to derive twitch torques and measures of voluntary activation. Eccentric exercise immediately reduced the MVC by 38 ± 3% (mean ±s.d., n = 8). The resting twitch produced by motor nerve stimulation fell by 82 ± 6%, and the estimated resting twitch by cortical stimulation fell by 47 ± 15%. While voluntary torque recovered after 8 days, both measures of the resting twitch remained depressed. Muscle tenderness occurred 1–2 days after exercise, and pain during contractions on days 1–4, but changes in voluntary activation did not follow this time course. Voluntary activation assessed with nerve stimulation fell 19 ± 6% immediately after exercise but was not different from control values after 2 days. Voluntary activation assessed by motor cortex stimulation was unchanged by eccentric exercise. During MVCs, absolute increments in torque evoked by nerve and cortical stimulation behaved differently. Those to cortical stimulation decreased whereas those to nerve stimulation tended to increase. These findings suggest that reduced voluntary activation contributes to the early force loss after eccentric exercise, but that it is not due to muscle soreness. The impairment of voluntary activation to nerve stimulation but not motor cortical stimulation suggests that the activation deficit lies in the

  5. Estimation of muscle forces in gait using a simulation of the electromyographic activity and numerical optimization.

    PubMed

    Ravera, Emiliano Pablo; Crespo, Marcos José; Braidot, Ariel Andrés Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Clinical gait analysis provides great contributions to the understanding of gait patterns. However, a complete distribution of muscle forces throughout the gait cycle is a current challenge for many researchers. Two techniques are often used to estimate muscle forces: inverse dynamics with static optimization and computer muscle control that uses forward dynamics to minimize tracking. The first method often involves limitations due to changing muscle dynamics and possible signal artefacts that depend on day-to-day variation in the position of electromyographic (EMG) electrodes. Nevertheless, in clinical gait analysis, the method of inverse dynamics is a fundamental and commonly used computational procedure to calculate the force and torque reactions at various body joints. Our aim was to develop a generic musculoskeletal model that could be able to be applied in the clinical setting. The musculoskeletal model of the lower limb presents a simulation for the EMG data to address the common limitations of these techniques. This model presents a new point of view from the inverse dynamics used on clinical gait analysis, including the EMG information, and shows a similar performance to another model available in the OpenSim software. The main problem of these methods to achieve a correct muscle coordination is the lack of complete EMG data for all muscles modelled. We present a technique that simulates the EMG activity and presents a good correlation with the muscle forces throughout the gait cycle. Also, this method showed great similarities whit the real EMG data recorded from the subjects doing the same movement.

  6. Impurities in Drug Products and Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients.

    PubMed

    Kątny, M; Frankowski, M

    2016-09-29

    Analytical methods should be selective and fast. In modern times, scientists strive to meet the criteria of green chemistry, so they choose analytical procedures that are as short as possible and use the least toxic solvents. It is quite obvious that the products intended for human consumption should be characterized as completely as possible. The safety of a drug is dependent mainly on the impurities that it contains. High pressure liquid chromatography and ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography have been proposed as the main techniques for forced degradation and impurity profiling. The aim of this article was to characterize the relevant classification of drug impurities and to review the methods of impurities determination for atorvastatin (ATV) and duloxetine (DLX) (both in active pharmaceutical ingredients and in different dosage forms). These drugs have an impact on two systems of the human body: cardiac and nervous. Simple characteristics of ATV and DLX, their properties and specificity of action on the human body, are also included in this review. The analyzed pharmaceuticals-ATV (brand name Lipiron) and DLX (brand name Cymbalta)-were selected for this study based on annual rankings prepared by Information Medical Statistics.

  7. Cancer cachexia: physical activity and muscle force in tumour-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Míriam; Busquets, Sílvia; Sirisi, Sònia; Serpe, Roberto; Orpí, Marcel; Coutinho, Joana; Martínez, Raquel; López-Soriano, Francisco J; Argilés, Josep M

    2011-01-01

    Rats bearing the Yoshida AH-130 ascites hepatoma are subjected to substantial weight loss, which is accompanied by anorexia at the end of the tumour cycle. Total physical activity (measured using the IR Actimeter system and Actitrack software) was determined during 11 days in control and tumour-bearing animals, skeletal muscle strength being also by the grip-strength test. The results presented clearly show that the presence of the tumour induces an earlier decrease in physical performance, which affects both skeletal muscle force and physical activity (both locomotor movements and stereotyped movements and distance travelled, among others parameters).

  8. Production and destruction of eddy kinetic energy in forced submesoscale eddy-resolving simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sonaljit; Ramachandran, Sanjiv; Tandon, Amit; Mahadevan, Amala

    2016-09-01

    We study the production and dissipation of the eddy kinetic energy (EKE) in a submesoscale eddy field forced with downfront winds using the Process Study Ocean Model (PSOM) with a horizontal grid resolution of 0.5 km. We simulate an idealized 100 m deep mixed-layer front initially in geostrophic balance with a jet in a domain that permits eddies within a range of O(1 km-100 km). The vertical eddy viscosities and the dissipation are parameterized using four different subgrid vertical mixing parameterizations: the k - ɛ , the KPP, and two different constant eddy viscosity and diffusivity profiles with a magnitude of O(10-2m2s-1) in the mixed layer. Our study shows that strong vertical eddy viscosities near the surface reduce the parameterized dissipation, whereas strong vertical eddy diffusivities reduce the lateral buoyancy gradients and consequently the rate of restratification by mixed-layer instabilities (MLI). Our simulations show that near the surface, the spatial variability of the dissipation along the periphery of the eddies depends on the relative alignment of the ageostrophic and geostrophic shear. Analysis of the resolved EKE budgets in the frontal region from the simulations show important similarities between the vertical structure of the EKE budget produced by the k - ɛ and KPP parameterizations, and earlier LES studies. Such an agreement is absent in the simulations using constant eddy-viscosity parameterizations.

  9. Force production during squats performed with a rotational resistance device under stable versus unstable conditions

    PubMed Central

    Moras, Gerard; Vázquez-Guerrero, Jairo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Force production during a squat action on a rotational resistance device (RRD) under stable and unstable conditions. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one healthy males were asked to perform six sets of six repetitions of squats on an RRD on either stable or unstable surfaces. The stable and unstable sets were performed on different days. Muscular outputs were obtained from a linear encoder and a strain gauge fixed to a vest. [Results] Overall, the results showed no significant differences for any of the dependent variables across exercise modes. Forcemean outputs were higher in the concentric phase than in the eccentric phase for each condition, but there were no differences in velocity, time or displacement. The forcepeak was similar in the eccentric and concentric phases of movement under both stable and unstable conditions. There were no significant differences in forcemean between sets per condition or between conditions. [Conclusion] These results suggest that performing squats with a RRD achieves similar forcemean and forcepeak under stable and unstable conditions. The forcepeak produced is also similar in concentric and eccentric phases. PMID:26696707

  10. The back compressive forces during maximal push-pull activities in the sagittal plane.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S

    1994-12-01

    Ten normal young male and ten normal young female subjects (each group with a mean age of 21.1 years) performed isometric and isokinetic (50 cm per second) push and pull activity at 35 cm, 100 cm and 150 cm heights. The subjects were placed on a specially designed subject-stabilizing-platform to stabilize their lower extremities. Horizontal push-pull forces were exerted through a friction-reduced rod and sleeve assembly attached to the modified Static Dynamic Strength Tester. The strength measured by a SM 500 load cell was fed to an IBM XT through an A to D converter. The postural records were made on a videotape. The posture and strength were synchronized through an external light signal. The strength for pull activities was higher than the corresponding push activities (p < 0.01). The isometric strengths were significantly higher than the isokinetic strengths (p < 0.01). Though the push strengths were significantly lower than the pull strength, the low-back compressive forces for the push activities were 129% to 627% of the corresponding pull conditions. It is concluded that the push activities are more hazardous due to the higher magnitude of compressive load and their faster contribution to the threshold level of cumulative load leading to the precipitation of injuries.

  11. The development and validation of equations to predict grip force in the workplace: contributions of muscle activity and posture.

    PubMed

    Keir, Peter J; Mogk, Jeremy P M

    2005-08-15

    The inherent difficulty of measuring forces on the hand in ergonomic workplace assessments has led to the need for equations to predict grip force. A family of equations was developed, and validated, for the prediction of grip force using forearm electromyography (six finger and wrist muscles) as well as posture of the wrist (flexed, neutral and extended) and forearm (pronated, neutral, supinated). Inclusion of muscle activity was necessary to explain over 85% of the grip force variance and was further improved with wrist posture but not forearm posture. Posture itself had little predictive power without muscle activity (<1%). Nominal wrist posture improved predictive power more than the measured wrist angle. Inclusion of baseline muscle activity, the activity required to simply hold the grip dynamometer, greatly improved grip force predictions, especially at low force levels. While the complete model using six muscles and posture was the most accurate, the detailed validation and error analysis revealed that equations based on fewer components often resulted in a negligible reduction in predictive strength. Error was typically less than 10% under 50% of maximal grip force and around 15% over 50% of maximal grip force. This study presents detailed error analyses to both improve upon previous studies and to allow an educated decision to be made on which muscles to monitor depending on expected force levels, costs and error deemed acceptable by the potential user.

  12. The Relationship between Physical Activity and Productivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    CONTINUED Aerobic exercises were the primary type of physical activity considered. The research focused on two specific objectives: (1) to review and... physical fitness and exercise activities . One of the priority objectives is to increase the proportion of adults (aged 18 to 65) participating in... physical activity will be used to encompass both aerobic fitness and exercise . This will allow consideration of the impact of varying levels of exercise

  13. The QBO and weak external forcing by solar activity: A three dimensional model study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dameris, M.; Ebel, A.

    1989-01-01

    A better understanding is attempted of the physical mechanisms leading to significant correlations between oscillations in the lower and middle stratosphere and solar variability associated with the sun's rotation. A global 3-d mechanistic model of the middle atmosphere is employed to investigate the effects of minor artificially induced perturbations. The aim is to explore the physical mechanisms of the dynamical response especially of the stratosphere to weak external forcing as it may result from UV flux changes due to solar rotation. First results of numerical experiments dealing about the external forcing of the middle atmosphere by solar activity were presented elsewhere. Different numerical studies regarding the excitation and propagation of weak perturbations have been continued since then. The model calculations presented are made to investigate the influence of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) on the dynamical response of the middle atmosphere to weak perturbations by employing different initial wind fields which represent the west and east phase of the QBO.

  14. Acoustic manipulation of active spherical carriers: Generation of negative radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, Majid; Mojahed, Alireza

    2016-09-01

    This paper examines theoretically a novel mechanism of generating negative (pulling) radiation force for acoustic manipulation of spherical carriers equipped with piezoelectric actuators in its inner surface. In this mechanism, the spherical particle is handled by common plane progressive monochromatic acoustic waves instead of zero-/higher- order Bessel beams or standing waves field. The handling strategy is based on applying a spatially uniform harmonic electrical voltage at the piezoelectric actuator with the same frequency of handling acoustic waves, in order to change the radiation force effect from repulsive (away from source) to attractive (toward source). This study may be considered as a start point for development of contact-free precise handling and entrapment technology of active carriers which are essential in many engineering and medicine applications.

  15. Force-Based Puncture Detection and Active Position Holding for Assisted Retinal Vein Cannulation*

    PubMed Central

    Gonenc, Berk; Tran, Nhat; Riviere, Cameron N.; Gehlbach, Peter; Taylor, Russell H.; Iordachita, Iulian

    2016-01-01

    Retinal vein cannulation is a demanding procedure proposed to treat retinal vein occlusion by direct therapeutic agent delivery methods. Challenges in identifying the moment of venous puncture, achieving cannulation and maintaining cannulation during drug delivery currently limit the feasibility of the procedure. In this study, we respond to these problems with an assistive system combining a handheld micromanipulator, Micron, with a force-sensing microneedle. The integrated system senses the instant of vein puncture based on measured forces and the position of the needle tip. The system actively holds the cannulation device securely in the vein following cannulation and during drug delivery. Preliminary testing of the system in a dry phantom, stretched vinyl membranes, demonstrates a significant improvement in the total time the needle could be maintained stably inside of the vein. This was especially evident in smaller veins and is attributed to decreased movement of the positioned cannula following venous cannulation. PMID:27127804

  16. Force-Based Puncture Detection and Active Position Holding for Assisted Retinal Vein Cannulation.

    PubMed

    Gonenc, Berk; Tran, Nhat; Riviere, Cameron N; Gehlbach, Peter; Taylor, Russell H; Iordachita, Iulian

    2015-09-01

    Retinal vein cannulation is a demanding procedure proposed to treat retinal vein occlusion by direct therapeutic agent delivery methods. Challenges in identifying the moment of venous puncture, achieving cannulation and maintaining cannulation during drug delivery currently limit the feasibility of the procedure. In this study, we respond to these problems with an assistive system combining a handheld micromanipulator, Micron, with a force-sensing microneedle. The integrated system senses the instant of vein puncture based on measured forces and the position of the needle tip. The system actively holds the cannulation device securely in the vein following cannulation and during drug delivery. Preliminary testing of the system in a dry phantom, stretched vinyl membranes, demonstrates a significant improvement in the total time the needle could be maintained stably inside of the vein. This was especially evident in smaller veins and is attributed to decreased movement of the positioned cannula following venous cannulation.

  17. Three-dimensional analysis of optical forces generated by an active tractor beam using radial polarization.

    PubMed

    Carretero, Luis; Acebal, Pablo; Blaya, Salvador

    2014-02-10

    We theoretically study the three-dimensional behavior of nanoparticles in an active optical conveyor. To do this, we solved the Langevin equation when the forces are generated by a focusing system at the near field. Analytical expressions for the optical forces generated by the optical conveyor were obtained by solving the Richards and Wolf vectorial diffraction integrals in an approximated form when a mask of two annular pupils is illuminated by a radially polarized Hermite-Gauss beam. Trajectories, in both the transverse plane and the longitudinal direction, are analyzed showing that the behavior of the optical conveyor can be optimized by conveniently choosing the configuration of the mask of the two annular pupils (inner and outer radius of the two rings) in order to trap and transport all particles at the focal plane.

  18. Do Golgi tendon organs really inhibit muscle activity at high force levels to save muscles from injury, and adapt with strength training?

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Gordon

    2002-07-01

    Introductory textbooks commonly state that Golgi tendon organs (GTOs) are responsible for a reflex response that inhibits a muscle producing dangerously high tension (autogenic inhibition). Review of the relevant data from animal studies demonstrates that there is wide variability in the magnitude of, and even the presence of, GTO autogenic effects among locomotor hindlimb muscles, and that data on GTO effects under conditions of voluntary maximal muscle activation are lacking. A single available study on GTO function in humans, during a moderate contraction, surprisingly shows a reduction in autogenic inhibition during muscle-force production. Further, it is not possible to find experimental evidence supporting the idea that strength training may produce a decrease in GTO mediated autogenic inhibition, allowing greater muscle activation levels and hence greater force production.

  19. Collagenase Production by Endotoxin-Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Larry M.; Wahl, Sharon M.; Mergenhagen, Stephan E.; Martin, George R.

    1974-01-01

    Peritoneal exudate macrophages, when exposed to bacterial lipopolysaccharide in culture, were found to produce collagenase (EC 3.4.24.3). This enzyme was not detected in extracts of the macrophages or in media from nonstimulated macrophage cultures. Lipidcontaining fractions of the lipopolysaccharide, including a glycolipid from the rough mutant of Salmonella minnesota (R595) and lipid A, were potent stimulators of collagenase production. The lipid-free polysaccharide fraction had no effect. Cycloheximide prevented the production of collagenase by endotoxin-treated macrophages, suggesting that it was newly synthesized. Images PMID:4372628

  20. Comparison of TOPEX/Poseidon Sea Level and Linear Model Results forced by Various Wind Products for the Tropical Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackert, Eric C.; Busalacchi, Antonio J.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to compare TOPEX/Posaidon (T/P) sea level with sea level results from linear ocean model experiments forced by several different wind products for the tropical Pacific. During the period of this study (October 1992 - October 1995), available wind products include satellite winds from the ERS-1 scatterometer product of [HALP 97] and the passive microwave analysis of SSMI winds produced using the variational analysis method (VAM) of [ATLA 91]. In addition, atmospheric GCM winds from the NCEP reanalysis [KALN 96], ECMWF analysis [ECMW94], and the Goddard EOS-1 (GEOS-1) reanalysis experiment [SCHU 93] are available for comparison. The observed ship wind analysis of FSU [STRI 92] is also included in this study. The linear model of [CANE 84] is used as a transfer function to test the quality of each of these wind products for the tropical Pacific. The various wind products are judged by comparing the wind-forced model sea level results against the T/P sea level anomalies. Correlation and RMS difference maps show how well each wind product does in reproducing the T/P sea level signal. These results are summarized in a table showing area average correlations and RMS differences. The large-scale low-frequency temporal signal is reproduced by all of the wind products, However, significant differences exist in both amplitude and phase on regional scales. In general, the model results forced by satellite winds do a better job reproducing the T/P signal (i.e. have a higher average correlation and lower RMS difference) than the results forced by atmospheric model winds.

  1. Localization and diffusion of tracer particles in viscoelastic media with active force dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Kento; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Komura, Shigeyuki; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2017-02-01

    Optical tracking in vivo experiments reveal that diffusion of particles in biological cells is strongly enhanced in the presence of ATP and the experimental data for animal cells could previously be reproduced within a phenomenological model of a gel with myosin motors acting within it (Fodor É. et al., EPL, 110 (2015) 48005). Here, the two-fluid model of a gel is considered where active macromolecules, described as force dipoles, cyclically operate both in the elastic and the fluid components. Through coarse-graining, effective equations of motions for idealized tracer particles displaying local deformations and local fluid flows are derived. The equation for deformation tracers coincides with the earlier phenomenological model and thus confirms it. For flow tracers, diffusion enhancement caused by active force dipoles in the fluid component, and thus due to metabolic activity, is found. The latter effect may explain why ATP-dependent diffusion enhancement could also be observed in bacteria that lack molecular motors in their skeleton or when the activity of myosin motors was chemically inhibited in eukaryotic cells.

  2. Antidepressant activity of some Hypericum reflexum L. fil. extracts in the forced swimming test in mice.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Mateo, C C; Bonkanka, C X; Prado, B; Rabanal, R M

    2007-05-30

    We previously reported that oral administration of the methanol extract obtained from the aerial part in blossom of Hypericum reflexum L. fil. was active in the tetrabenazine and forced swimming test. In the present study, the effect of the aqueous, butanol and chloroform fractions obtained from the methanol extract of this species on the central nervous system was investigated in mice, particularly in animal models of depression. Antidepressant activity was detected in the butanol and chloroform fractions of this species using the forced swimming test since both fractions induced a significant reduction of the immobility time, producing no effects or only a slight depression on spontaneous motor activity when assessed in a photocell activity meter. Moreover, these fractions did not alter significantly the pentobarbital-induced sleeping time. On the other hand, the chloroform fraction produced a slight but significant hypothermia and was also effective in antagonizing the ptosis induced by tetrabenazine. Furthermore, the butanol fraction produced a slight potentiation of the head twitches and syndrome induced by 5-HTP. Taken together, these data indicate that the butanol and chloroform fractions from Hypericum reflexum possess antidepressant-like effects in mice, providing further support for the traditional use of these plants in the Canary Islands folk medicine against central nervous disorders.

  3. Single-molecule imaging of DNA polymerase I (Klenow fragment) activity by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, J.; Zhang, P.; Wang, Q.; Wu, N.; Zhang, F.; Hu, J.; Fan, C. H.; Li, B.

    2016-03-01

    We report a DNA origami-facilitated single-molecule platform that exploits atomic force microscopy to study DNA replication. We imaged several functional activities of the Klenow fragment of E. coli DNA polymerase I (KF) including binding, moving, and dissociation from the template DNA. Upon completion of these actions, a double-stranded DNA molecule was formed. Furthermore, the direction of KF activities was captured and then confirmed by shifting the KF binding sites on the template DNA.We report a DNA origami-facilitated single-molecule platform that exploits atomic force microscopy to study DNA replication. We imaged several functional activities of the Klenow fragment of E. coli DNA polymerase I (KF) including binding, moving, and dissociation from the template DNA. Upon completion of these actions, a double-stranded DNA molecule was formed. Furthermore, the direction of KF activities was captured and then confirmed by shifting the KF binding sites on the template DNA. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06544e

  4. Time Estimation in Young Children: An Initial Force Rule Governing Time Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Droit-Volet, Sylvie

    1998-01-01

    Studied time estimation for a button-pressing response in 3- and 5.5-year-olds under "minimal,""temporal," and "force" instructions. Found that force--but not temporal--instructions improved 3-year-olds' timing accuracy. When instructed to press harder, they pressed longer. Older children were more accurate with…

  5. Polyphenols as active ingredients for cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Zillich, O V; Schweiggert-Weisz, U; Eisner, P; Kerscher, M

    2015-10-01

    Polyphenols are secondary plant metabolites with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial activity. They are ubiquitously distributed in the plant kingdom; high amounts contain, for example, green tea and grape seeds. Polyphenolic extracts are attractive ingredients for cosmetics and pharmacy due to their beneficial biological properties. This review summarizes the effects of polyphenols in the context of anti-ageing activity. We have explored in vitro studies, which investigate antioxidant activity, inhibition of dermal proteases and photoprotective activity, mostly studied using dermal fibroblasts or epidermal keratinocytes cell lines. Possible negative effects of polyphenols were also discussed. Further, some physicochemical aspects, namely the possible interactions with emulsifiers and the influence of the cosmetic formulation on the skin delivery, were reported. Finally, few clinical studies, which cover the anti-ageing action of polyphenols on the skin after topical application, were reviewed.

  6. Microbial production of sensory-active miraculin.

    PubMed

    Ito, Keisuke; Asakura, Tomiko; Morita, Yuji; Nakajima, Ken-ichiro; Koizumi, Ayako; Shimizu-Ibuka, Akiko; Masuda, Katsuyoshi; Ishiguro, Masaji; Terada, Tohru; Maruyama, Jun-ichi; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko; Misaka, Takumi; Abe, Keiko

    2007-08-24

    Miraculin (MCL), a tropical fruit protein, is unique in that it has taste-modifying activity to convert sourness to sweetness, though flat in taste at neutral pH. To obtain a sufficient amount of MCL to examine the mechanism involved in this sensory event at the molecular level, we transformed Aspergillus oryzae by introducing the MCL gene. Transformants were expressed and secreted a sensory-active form of MCL yielding 2 mg/L. Recombinant MCL resembled native MCL in the secondary structure and the taste-modifying activity to generate sweetness at acidic pH. Since the observed pH-sweetness relation seemed to reflect the imidazole titration curve, suggesting that histidine residues might be involved in the taste-modifying activity. H30A and H30,60A mutants were generated using the A. oryzae-mediated expression system. Both mutants found to have lost the taste-modifying activity. The result suggests that the histidine-30 residue is important for the taste-modifying activity of MCL.

  7. Effects of daily schedules of forced activity on free-running rhythms in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mistlberger, R E

    1991-01-01

    Circadian rhythms of hamsters can be phase-shifted or entrained by single or daily sessions of induced wheel running. In contrast, observations of rats under restricted-feeding schedules suggest that their free-running rhythms are not readily entrainable by a daily bout of intense activity. A formal test of this idea was made by subjecting rats to daily 2-hr or 3-hr sessions of forced treadmill activity. None of 18 rats entrained to a daily treadmill schedule when tested in constant dim light, but 1 of 16 did entrain when tested after blinding, when the period of its free-running activity rhythm was very close to the period of the treadmill schedule and when the onset of its daily active phase overlapped with the treadmill sessions. These conditions were recreated in a final group of eight rats; the rats were trained in a light-dark cycle, blinded, and subjected to a treadmill schedule with a period of 23.91 hr that was initiated at the onset of the rats' active phase on day 1. Six of these rats entrained. The mechanism for entrainment by activity schedules clearly exists in rats, but the conditions under which this occurs are highly constrained, suggesting that activity is a very weak zeitgeber in this species. It is argued that the evolution of functionally separable food- and light-entrainable oscillators in the rat demands a very low sensitivity to feedback effects of activity.

  8. Exaggerated force production in altered Gz-levels during parabolic flight: the role of computational resources allocation.

    PubMed

    Mierau, Andreas; Girgenrath, Michaela

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of the present experiment was to examine whether the previously observed exaggerated isometric force production in changed-Gz during parabolic flight (Mierau et al. 2008) can be explained by a higher computational demand and, thus, inadequate allocation of the brain's computational resources to the task. Subjects (n = 12) were tested during the micro-Gz, high-Gz and normal-Gz episodes of parabolic flight. They produced isometric forces of different magnitudes and directions, according to visually prescribed vectors with their right, dominant hand and performed a choice reaction-time task with their left hand. Tasks were performed either separately (single-task) or simultaneously (dual-task). Dual-task interference was present for both tasks, indicating that each task was resources-demanding. However, this interference remained unaffected by the Gz-level. It was concluded that exaggerated force production in changed-Gz is probably not related to inadequate allocation of the brain's computational resources to the force production task. Statement of Relevance: The present study shows that deficient motor performance in changed-Gz environments (both micro-Gz and high-Gz) is not necessarily related to inadequate computational resources allocation, as was suggested in some previous studies. This finding is of great relevance not only for fundamental research, but also for the training and safety of humans operating in changed-Gz environments, such as astronauts and jet pilots.

  9. What Geological, Economic, or Policy Forces Might Limit Fossil Fuel Production?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinberg, R.

    2015-12-01

    In order to ensure a 50% chance of keeping global temperatures from exceeding 2°C above pre-industrial levels, it has been estimated that total carbon dioxide emissions between 2011-2050 must be capped at roughly 1,100 gigatons.[1] However, some estimates calculate that global fossil fuel reserves—including unconventional oil and gas—hold at least three times this amount of potential greenhouse gas emissions.[2]What socio-political, technological, or economic forces are most likely to keep these energy resources from being burned? While it is difficult to predict with specificity what combination of technological, geological, or human factors will significantly minimize global fossil fuel production, there are at least four key potential drivers: 1. Under-investment and the economics of unconventional oil and natural gas; 2. International policy, driven by citizen demand and leadership from key nations; 3. Massive deployment of renewable energy sources and other technological solutions; and 4. Large-scale energy curtailment resulting from global economic contraction. We will explore the implications, viability, and consequences of each of these potential factors. [1] [1]United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCC) Report of the Conference of the Parties on its Fifteenth Session, held in Copenhagen from 7 to 19 December 2009. Part Two: Action taken by the Conference of the Parties at its Fifteenth Session. United Nations Climate Change Conf. Report 43 http://unfccc.int/resource/docs/2009/cop15/eng/11a01.pdf (UNFCC, 2009) [2] Raupach, M. R. et al. Sharing a quota on cumulative carbon emissions. Nature Clim. Chang. 4, 873-879 (2014)

  10. Mutagenic activity of disinfection by-products.

    PubMed Central

    Cognet, L; Courtois, Y; Mallevialle, J

    1986-01-01

    Data on raw water quality, disinfection treatment practices, and the resulting mutagenic properties of the treated water were compiled from pilot- and full-scale treatment experiments to evaluate that parameter which might produce variability in the results of a mutagenic study. Analysis of the data and comparison of treatment practices indicated that the measured mutagenic activity is strongly related to the characteristics of the organic matter in the raw water, the methodology used to sample and detect mutagens, the scale of the study both in terms of treatment flow and period of study, and the point at which and the conditions under which oxidants are added during treatment. Conclusions regarding disinfection systems in full-scale water treatment plants include the following: When raw water is pretreated and high concentrations of organics are present in the raw water, both ozonation and chlorination increased mutagenic activity. However, no significant difference in mutagenicity was found between the two oxidants. Both in the case of a nitrified groundwater and a clarified surface water, the mutagenic activity of the water after ozonation was related to its mutagenic activity before ozonation. With ozonation, mutagenic activity decreased after granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration. Thus, when GAC filtration follows ozone disinfection, early addition of oxidants may not be deleterious to the finished water quality. When chlorine or chlorine dioxide is added after GAC filtration, chlorine dioxide was found to produce a less mutagenic water than chlorine. Although these conclusions suggest means of controlling mutagenic activity during treatment, it must be stressed that the measurement of mutagenicity is a presumptive index of contamination level. PMID:3816721

  11. Mutagenic activity of disinfection by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Cognet, L.; Courtois, Y.; Mallevialle, J.

    1986-11-01

    Data on raw water quality, disinfection treatment practices, and the resulting mutagenic properties of the treated water were compiled from pilot- and full-scale treatment experiments to evaluate that parameter which might produce variability in the results of a mutagenic study. Analysis of the data and comparison of treatment practices indicated that the measured mutagenic activity is strongly related to the characteristics of the organic matter in the raw water, the methodology used to sample and detect mutagens, the scale of the study both in terms of treatment flow and period of study, and the point at which and the conditions under which oxidants are added during treatment. Conclusions regarding disinfection systems in full-scale water treatment plants include the following: When raw water is pretreated and high concentrations of organics are present in the raw water, both ozonation and chlorination increased mutagenic activity. However, no significant difference in mutagenicity was found between the two oxidants. Both in the case of a nitrified groundwater and a clarified surface water, the mutagenic activity of the water after ozonation was related to its mutagenic activity before ozonation. With ozonation, mutagenic activity decreased after granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration. Thus, when GAC filtration follows ozone disinfection, early addition of oxidants may not be deleterious to the finished water quality. When chlorine or chlorine dioxide is added after GAC filtration, chlorine dioxide was found to produce a less mutagenic water than chlorine. Although these conclusions suggest means of controlling mutagenic activity during treatment, it must be stressed that the measurement of mutagenicity is a presumptive index of contamination level.

  12. Atomic force microscope imaging and force measurements at electrified and actively corroding interfaces: Challenges and novel cell design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valtiner, Markus; Ankah, Genesis Ngwa; Bashir, Asif; Renner, Frank Uwe

    2011-02-01

    We report the design of an improved electrochemical cell for atomic force microscope measurements in corrosive electrochemical environments. Our design improvements are guided by experimental requirements for studying corrosive reactions such as selective dissolution, dealloying, pitting corrosion, and/or surface and interface forces at electrified interfaces. Our aim is to examine some of the limitations of typical electrochemical scanning probe microscopy (SPM) experiments and in particular to outline precautions and cell-design elements, which must necessarily be taken into account in order to obtain reliable experimental results. In particular, we discuss electrochemical requirements for typical electrochemical SPM experiments and introduce novel design features to avoid common issues such as crevice formations; we discuss the choice of electrodes and contaminations from ions of reference electrodes. We optimize the cell geometry and introduce standard samples for electrochemical AFM experiments. We have tested the novel design by performing force-distance spectroscopy as a function of the applied electrochemical potential between a bare gold electrode surface and a SAM-coated AFM tip. Topography imaging was tested by studying the well-known dealloying process of a Cu3Au(111) surface up to the critical potential. Our design improvements should be equally applicable to in situ electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope cells.

  13. The influence of the breathing action on net drag force production in front crawl swimming.

    PubMed

    Formosa, D; Sayers, M G L; Burkett, B

    2014-12-01

    20 elite swimmers completed a total of 6 randomized net drag force trials in 2 conditions (i) 3 breathing and (ii) 3 non-breathing. Net drag force was measured using an assisted motorized dynamometer device mounted upon a Kistler force-platform. The male participants demonstrated no statistical differences in stroke rates between breathing and non-breathing trials. Female participants, however, demonstrated a statistical difference stroke rate. The male participants demonstrated that the breathing action caused a greater (26%) net drag force compared to the females (16%). To further understand the influence of breathing on swimming technique, each stroke was analyzed and comparisons were made between the breathing and non-breathing conditions. The male participants demonstrated a similar minimum net drag force when comparing the breathing and non-breathing conditions. Analysis showed that minimum net drag force and maximum net drag force for the males changed when integrating the breathing action, while female participants demonstrated similar swimming technique, regardless of condition or stroke.

  14. Fractal dimensions of pacing and grip force in drawing and handwriting production.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, David N; Chau, Tom

    2008-01-01

    We performed a repeated measures experiment to show that the pacing of a cyclic, ballistic drawing task has a fractal dimension. We also estimated the dimensionality of the force used to grip the drawing implement. Finally, we present an analysis of pediatric data to show that grip force has a fractal dimension in an actual handwriting task. In our experiment, subjects drew circles of varying sizes and at varying rates on a digitizing tablet, using a pen instrumented to measure radial force applied to its barrel. Subjects also drew circles in synchrony with a metronome. We found strong evidence for fractal scaling of both drawing period and grip force in the circle-drawing study. The dimensionality ranged from fractal Gaussian noise (fGn) to fractal Brownian motion, with Hurst coefficients clustering around the value for 1/f noise. When the subjects were required to synchronize their drawing with a metronome, the Hurst coefficient for the drawing period decreased, while the coefficient for grip force did not. This result indicates that independent processes control the variations in pacing and grip force. Grip force in the handwriting study also displayed fractal properties, with Hurst coefficients in the range of correlated fGn. We draw parallels between our handwriting measurements and studies of human gait.

  15. Effects of replica running shoes upon external forces and muscle activity during running.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Ana Paula Da Silva; Brandina, Kátia; Bianco, Roberto; Oliveira, Vitor Henrique De; Souza, Juliana Roque De; Mezencio, Bruno; Amadio, Alberto Carlos; Serrão, Júlio Cerca

    2012-05-01

    Twelve participants ran (9 km · h(-1)) to test two types of running shoes: replica and original shoes. Ground reaction force, plantar pressure and electromyographic activity were recorded. The shoes were tested randomly and on different days. Comparisons between the two experimental conditions were made by analysis of variance (ANOVA) test (P ≤ 0.05). The time to first peak, loading rate of the first peak and impulse of the first 75 ms of stance were significantly different between the shoes (P ≤ 0.05), revealing an increase of impact forces for the replica shoes. The peak plantar pressure values were significantly higher (P ≤ 0.05) when wearing replica shoes. During running, the contact area was significantly smaller (P ≤ 0.05) for the replica shoe. The electromyographic activity of the analysed muscles did not show changes between the two shoes in running. These findings suggest that the use of replica running shoes can increase the external load applied to the human body, but may not change the muscle activity pattern during locomotion. This new mechanical situation may increase the risk of injuries in these movements.

  16. Force-sharing between cat soleus and gastrocnemius muscles during walking: explanations based on electrical activity, properties, and kinematics.

    PubMed

    Prilutsky, B I; Herzog, W; Allinger, T L

    1994-10-01

    Studying force sharing between synergistic muscles can be useful for understanding the functional significance of musculoskeletal redundancy and the mechanisms underlying the control of synergistic muscles. The purpose of this study was to quantify and explain force sharing between cat soleus (SO) and gastrocnemius (GA) muscles, and changes in force sharing, as a function of integrated electrical activity (IEMG), contractile and mechanical properties, and kinematics of the muscles for a variety of locomotor conditions. Forces in SO and GA were measured using standard tendon force transducers of the 'buckle' type, and EMGs were recorded using bipolar, indwelling fine wire electrodes. Muscle tendon and fiber lengths, as well as the corresponding velocities, were derived from the hindlimb kinematics, anthropometric measurements, and a muscle model. In order to describe force- and IEMG-sharing between SO and GA, SO force vs GA force and SO IEMG vs GA IEMG plots were constructed. Force- and IEMG-sharing curves had a loop-like shape. Direction of formation of the loop was typically counterclockwise for forces and clockwise for IEMG; that is, forces of GA reached the maximum and then decreased faster relative to forces of SO, and IEMG of SO reached the maximum and then decreased faster relative to IEMG of GA. With increasing speeds of locomotion, the width of the force-sharing loops tended to decrease, and the width of the IEMG-sharing loops increased. Peak forces in GA muscle and peak IEMGs in SO and GA muscles tended to increase with increasing speeds of locomotion, whereas peak SO forces remained nearly constant for all activities. Because of these changes in the peak forces and IEMGs of SO and GA, the slope of the force-sharing loop decreased, and the slope of the IEMG-sharing loop did not change significantly with increasing speeds of locomotion. Length changes and velocities of SO and GA increased with the speed of locomotion and were similar in absolute magnitude

  17. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people ages 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or the institutionalized population, such as prison inmates. Determining the size of the labor force is a way of determining how big the economy can get. The size of the labor force depends on two…

  18. Viral hepatitis A, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    2011-08-01

    From 2000 to 2010, there were 214 incident diagnoses of acute hepatitis A among active component members of the U.S. Armed Forces; the crude overall incidence rate during the period was 1.37 per 100,000 person-years. Rates of incident diagnoses of acute hepatitis A were relatively low throughout the period and much lower than during the pre-vaccine era (1990-1996). There were disproportionate numbers of diagnoses of acute hepatitis A among service members born in countries endemic for the infection. The low rates of acute hepatitis A among U.S. military members overall reflect the widespread use of hepatitis A virus vaccine.

  19. Population studies should reflect the criterion of productive forces and the viewpoint of a market-oriented economy.

    PubMed

    Peng, X

    1989-01-01

    This commentary is on the role of population studies in a market oriented economy which reflects Marxist theories on productive forces. Population development must not be viewed unidimensionally. Prior thinking focused on the mode of social production determining population development and vice versa. The assumption prevalent prior to 1978 was that there was no common pattern among different societies. This view was openly challenged in the 2nd national population science symposium in Chengdu, Sichuan Province. It was stated that population development is affected by production techniques in either capitalist or socialist countries. Further understanding of this relationship based on quantitative and qualitative research was required. Public ownership is the basis of a socialist economy. Marxist views were that populations in market or nonmarket economies are different, and population scholars need to study these relationships. There was a mistaken belief that a socialist economy was nonmarket oriented. Correcting the mistake meant taking into consideration migration, urbanization, employment, expenditure, and the relationship to reproduction, as well as rethinking the development patterns. When the price of the labor force differs from its value, the investment in population and population quality will be affected. This has led to rampant commercialization and higher school dropout rates. Short term interests predominate. The trend does not benefit the quality of the population or the promotion of social productive forces. Further examination is needed of the effects of urbanization on a planned market oriented economy with socialist public ownership.

  20. Statistics of Infima and Stopping Times of Entropy Production and Applications to Active Molecular Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, Izaak; Roldán, Édgar; Jülicher, Frank

    2017-01-01

    We study the statistics of infima, stopping times, and passage probabilities of entropy production in nonequilibrium steady states, and we show that they are universal. We consider two examples of stopping times: first-passage times of entropy production and waiting times of stochastic processes, which are the times when a system reaches a given state for the first time. Our main results are as follows: (i) The distribution of the global infimum of entropy production is exponential with mean equal to minus Boltzmann's constant; (ii) we find exact expressions for the passage probabilities of entropy production; (iii) we derive a fluctuation theorem for stopping-time distributions of entropy production. These results have interesting implications for stochastic processes that can be discussed in simple colloidal systems and in active molecular processes. In particular, we show that the timing and statistics of discrete chemical transitions of molecular processes, such as the steps of molecular motors, are governed by the statistics of entropy production. We also show that the extreme-value statistics of active molecular processes are governed by entropy production; for example, we derive a relation between the maximal excursion of a molecular motor against the direction of an external force and the infimum of the corresponding entropy-production fluctuations. Using this relation, we make predictions for the distribution of the maximum backtrack depth of RNA polymerases, which follow from our universal results for entropy-production infima.

  1. Effects of dopamine replacement therapy on lower extremity kinetics and kinematics during a rapid force production task in persons with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Foreman, K Bo; Singer, Madeline L; Addison, Odessa; Marcus, Robin L; LaStayo, Paul C; Dibble, Leland E

    2014-01-01

    Postural instability appears to be a dopamine resistance motor deficit in persons with Parkinson disease (PD); however, little is known about the effects of dopamine replacement on the relative biomechanical contributions of individual lower extremity joints during postural control tasks. To gain insight, we examined persons with PD using both clinical and laboratory measures. For a clinical measure of motor severity we utilized the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale motor subsection during both OFF and ON medication conditions. For the laboratory measure we utilized data gathered during a rapid lower extremity force production task. Kinematic and kinetic variables at the hip, knee, and ankle were gathered during a counter movement jump during both OFF and ON medication conditions. Sixteen persons with PD with a median Hoehn and Yahr severity of 2.5 completed the study. Medication resulted in significant improvements of angular displacement for the hip, knee, and ankle. Furthermore, significant improvements were revealed only at the hip for peak net moments and average angular velocity compared to the OFF medication condition. These results suggest that dopamine replacement medication result in decreased clinical motor disease severity and have a greater influence on kinetics and kinematics proximally. This proximally focused improvement may be due to active recruitment of muscle force and reductions in passive restraint during lower extremity rapid force production.

  2. Active PZT fibers: a commercial production process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strock, Harold B.; Pascucci, Marina R.; Parish, Mark V.; Bent, Aaron A.; Shrout, Thomas R.

    1999-07-01

    Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) active fibers, from 80 to 250 micrometers in diameter, are produced for the AFOSR/DARPA funded Active Fiber Composites Consortium (AFCC) Program and commercial customers. CeraNova has developed a proprietary ceramics-based technology to produce PZT mono-filaments of the required purity, composition, straightness, and piezoelectric properties for use in active fiber composite structures. CeraNova's process begins with the extrusion of continuous lengths of mono-filament precursor fiber from a plasticized mix of PZT-5A powder. The care that must be taken to avoid mix contamination is described using illustrations form problems experiences with extruder wear and metallic contamination. Corrective actions are described and example microstructures are shown. The consequences of inadequate lead control are also shown. Sintered mono- filament mechanical strength and piezoelectric properties data approach bulk values but the validity of such a benchmark is questioned based on variable correlation with composite performance measures. Comb-like ceramic preform structures are shown that are being developed to minimize process and handling costs while maintaining the required mono-filament straightness necessary for composite fabrication. Lastly, actuation performance data are presented for composite structures fabricated and tested by Continuum Control Corporation. Free strain actuation in excess of 2000 microstrain are observed.

  3. Separable solutions of force-free spheres and applications to solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, A.; Mangalam, A.; Ravindra, B. E-mail: mangalam@iiap.res.in

    2014-05-10

    We present a systematic study of the force-free field equation for simple axisymmetric configurations in spherical geometry and apply it to the solar active regions. The condition of separability of solutions in the radial and angular variables leads to two classes of solutions: linear and nonlinear force-free fields (NLFF). We have studied these linear solutions and extended the nonlinear solutions for the radial power law index to the irreducible rational form n = p/q, which is allowed for all cases of odd p and cases of q > p for even p, where the poloidal flux ψ∝1/r{sup n} and the field B∝1/r {sup n+2}. We apply these solutions to simulate photospheric vector magnetograms obtained using the spectropolarimeter on board Hinode. The effectiveness of our search strategy is first demonstrated on test inputs of dipolar, axisymmetric, and nonaxisymmetric linear force-free fields. Using the best fit, we build three-dimensional axisymmetric field configurations and calculate the energy and relative helicity with two independent methods, which are in agreement. We have analyzed five magnetograms for AR 10930 spanning a period of three days during which two X-class flares occurred and found the free energy and relative helicity of the active region before and after the flare; our analysis indicates a peak in these quantities before the flare events, which is consistent with the other results. We also analyzed single-polarity regions AR 10923 and 10933, which showed very good fits to potential fields. This method provides useful reconstruction of NLFF and input fields for other numerical techniques.

  4. Phoretic drag reduction of chemically active homogeneous spheres under force fields and shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yariv, Ehud; Kaynan, Uri

    2017-01-01

    Surrounded by a spherically symmetric solute cloud, chemically active homogeneous spheres do not undergo conventional autophoresis when suspended in an unbounded liquid domain. When exposed to external flows, solute advection deforms that cloud, resulting in a generally asymmetric distribution of diffusio-osmotic slip which, in turn, modifies particle motion. Inspired by classical forced-convection analyses [Acrivos and Taylor, Phys. Fluids 5, 387 (1962), 10.1063/1.1706630; Frankel and Acrivos, Phys. Fluids 11, 1913 (1968), 10.1063/1.1692218] we illustrate this phoretic phenomenon using two prototypic configurations, one where the particle sediments under a uniform force field and one where it is subject to a simple shear flow. In addition to the Péclet number Pe associated with the imposed flow, the governing nonlinear problem also depends upon α , the intrinsic Péclet number associated with the chemical activity of the particle. As in the forced-convection problems, the small-Péclet-number limit is nonuniform, breaking down at large distances away from the particle. Calculation of the leading-order autophoretic effects thus requires use of matched asymptotic expansions, the outer region being at distances that scale inversely with Pe and Pe1 /2 in the respective sedimentation and shear problems. In the sedimentation problem we find an effective drag reduction of fractional amount α /8 ; in the shear problem we find that the magnitude of the stresslet is decreased by a fractional amount α /4 . For a dilute particle suspension the latter result is manifested by a reduction of the effective viscosity.

  5. Regionalizing muscle activity causes changes to the magnitude and direction of the force from whole muscles—a modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Rahemi, Hadi; Nigam, Nilima; Wakeling, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle can contain neuromuscular compartments that are spatially distinct regions that can receive relatively independent levels of activation. This study tested how the magnitude and direction of the force developed by a whole muscle would change when the muscle activity was regionalized within the muscle. A 3D finite element model of a muscle with its bounding aponeurosis was developed for the lateral gastrocnemius, and isometric contractions were simulated for a series of conditions with either a uniform activation pattern, or regionally distinct activation patterns: in all cases the mean activation from all fibers within the muscle reached 10%. The models showed emergent features of the fiber geometry that matched physiological characteristics: with fibers shortening, rotating to greater pennation, adopting curved trajectories in 3D and changes in the thickness and width of the muscle belly. Simulations were repeated for muscle with compliant, normal and stiff aponeurosis and the aponeurosis stiffness affected the changes to the fiber geometry and the resultant muscle force. Changing the regionalization of the activity resulted to changes in the magnitude, direction and center of the force vector from the whole muscle. Regionalizing the muscle activity resulted in greater muscle force than the simulation with uniform activity across the muscle belly. The study shows how the force from a muscle depends on the complex interactions between the muscle fibers and connective tissues and the region of muscle that is active. PMID:25232341

  6. Regionalizing muscle activity causes changes to the magnitude and direction of the force from whole muscles-a modeling study.

    PubMed

    Rahemi, Hadi; Nigam, Nilima; Wakeling, James M

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle can contain neuromuscular compartments that are spatially distinct regions that can receive relatively independent levels of activation. This study tested how the magnitude and direction of the force developed by a whole muscle would change when the muscle activity was regionalized within the muscle. A 3D finite element model of a muscle with its bounding aponeurosis was developed for the lateral gastrocnemius, and isometric contractions were simulated for a series of conditions with either a uniform activation pattern, or regionally distinct activation patterns: in all cases the mean activation from all fibers within the muscle reached 10%. The models showed emergent features of the fiber geometry that matched physiological characteristics: with fibers shortening, rotating to greater pennation, adopting curved trajectories in 3D and changes in the thickness and width of the muscle belly. Simulations were repeated for muscle with compliant, normal and stiff aponeurosis and the aponeurosis stiffness affected the changes to the fiber geometry and the resultant muscle force. Changing the regionalization of the activity resulted to changes in the magnitude, direction and center of the force vector from the whole muscle. Regionalizing the muscle activity resulted in greater muscle force than the simulation with uniform activity across the muscle belly. The study shows how the force from a muscle depends on the complex interactions between the muscle fibers and connective tissues and the region of muscle that is active.

  7. Rewiring host activities for synthetic circuit production: a translation view.

    PubMed

    Avcilar-Kucukgoze, Irem; Ignatova, Zoya

    2017-01-01

    The expression of synthetic circuits in host organisms, or chassis, is a key aspect of synthetic biology. Design adjustments made for maximal production may negatively affect the central metabolism and biosynthetic activities of the chassis host. Here, we review recent attempts to modulate synthetic circuit design for optimal production and present models that precisely capture the trade-off between circuit production and chassis growth. We also present emerging concepts for full orthogonalization of synthetic productivity and its decoupling from the endogenous biosynthetic activities of the cell, opening new routes towards robust synthetic circuit expression.

  8. The influence of attention on learning and performance: pre-movement time and accuracy in an isometric force production task.

    PubMed

    Lohse, Keith R

    2012-02-01

    Lohse, Sherwood, and Healy (2010) found that an external focus of attention (FOA) improved performance in a dart-throwing task and reduced the time taken between throws, but using the time between trials as a measure of preparation time is relatively crude. Thus, the current experiment analyzed how FOA affects accuracy and pre-movement time in an isometric force production task, to study how FOA affected motor planning. In the current experiment, training with an external focus improved the accuracy of the isometric force production task during training and during retention and transfer testing. During training, an external FOA also significantly reduced pre-movement time in early trials. These findings are interpreted as reduced explicit control of movement as a function of an external FOA, and help to integrate FOA research with other motor control phenomena and neuropsychological theories of motor control.

  9. RBSE: Product development team research activity deliverables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The GHG Functions and Extensions to be added to the NASA Electronic Library System (NELS) 1.1 product are described. These functions will implement the 'output request' capability within the Object Browser. The functions will be implemented in two parts. The first part is a code to be added to the Object Browser (X version) to implement menus allowing the user to request that objects be copied to specific media, or that objects be downloaded to the user's system following a specific protocol, or that the object be printed to one of the printers attached to the host system. The second part is shell scripts which support the various menu selections. Additional scripts to support functions within the GHG shell (X version) will also be created along with the X version of the GHG Shell as initial capability for the 27 Mar. prototype. The scripts will be composed of C shell routines that will accept parameters (primary file pathways). Certain limitations in functionality will invoke Mail instead of Oracle Mail since that has yet to be delivered and the NELS invocation will default to the X-Windows version instead of the ASCII version.

  10. Introducing a new semi-active engine mount using force controlled variable stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azadi, Mojtaba; Behzadipour, Saeed; Faulkner, Gary

    2013-05-01

    This work introduces a new concept in designing semi-active engine mounts. Engine mounts are under continuous development to provide better and more cost-effective engine vibration control. Passive engine mounts do not provide satisfactory solution. Available semi-active and active mounts provide better solutions but they are more complex and expensive. The variable stiffness engine mount (VSEM) is a semi-active engine mount with a simple ON-OFF control strategy. However, unlike available semi-active engine mounts that work based on damping change, the VSEM works based on the static stiffness change by using a new fast response force controlled variable spring. The VSEM is an improved version of the vibration mount introduced by the authors in their previous work. The results showed significant performance improvements over a passive rubber mount. The VSEM also provides better vibration control than a hydromount at idle speed. Low hysteresis and the ability to be modelled by a linear model in low-frequency are the advantages of the VSEM over the vibration isolator introduced earlier and available hydromounts. These specifications facilitate the use of VSEM in the automotive industry, however, further evaluation and developments are needed for this purpose.

  11. A forced damped oscillation framework for undulatory swimming provides new insights into how propulsion arises in active and passive swimming.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Griffith, Boyce E; Patankar, Neelesh A

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental issue in locomotion is to understand how muscle forcing produces apparently complex deformation kinematics leading to movement of animals like undulatory swimmers. The question of whether complicated muscle forcing is required to create the observed deformation kinematics is central to the understanding of how animals control movement. In this work, a forced damped oscillation framework is applied to a chain-link model for undulatory swimming to understand how forcing leads to deformation and movement. A unified understanding of swimming, caused by muscle contractions ("active" swimming) or by forces imparted by the surrounding fluid ("passive" swimming), is obtained. We show that the forcing triggers the first few deformation modes of the body, which in turn cause the translational motion. We show that relatively simple forcing patterns can trigger seemingly complex deformation kinematics that lead to movement. For given muscle activation, the forcing frequency relative to the natural frequency of the damped oscillator is important for the emergent deformation characteristics of the body. The proposed approach also leads to a qualitative understanding of optimal deformation kinematics for fast swimming. These results, based on a chain-link model of swimming, are confirmed by fully resolved computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Prior results from the literature on the optimal value of stiffness for maximum speed are explained.

  12. Air-sea exchange from bubble-induced jetting: How viscous forces suppress droplet production from small bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Elena; Walls, Peter; Bird, James

    2016-11-01

    When a bubble ruptures in the ocean, it frequently produces a jet that releases aerosols into the atmosphere. The number of jet drops ejected is important because droplets may contain sea salt and other cloud condensation nuclei. It is generally accepted that the smallest bubbles produce the largest number of jet drops. However, if the bubble is sufficiently small, viscosity prevents droplet production altogether. Here we investigate the number of jet drops produced by small bubbles. Using a combination of high-speed microscopy, similitude, and numerical simulations, we quantify the extent that viscous forces inhibit this droplet production. We acknowledge support from NSF under Grant No. 1351466.

  13. A novel technique for active fibre production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner-Erny, Ruth; Di Labio, Loredana; Lüthy, Willy

    2007-04-01

    Active fibre devices are conventionally manufactured using MCVD technique. Recently it has been shown that nearly equivalent results can also be obtained with sol-gel technology. Now we present a novel technique allowing simplification of the manufacturing process even more. The required constituents are mixed in the form of dry micro- and nano-sized particles. A silica glass tube forming the future core region of a fibre preform is filled with a powder mix of SiO 2, 1% Nd (as Nd 2O 3) and 10% Al (as Al 2O 3). This tube is mounted in the centre of a larger tube forming the future cladding. The empty space between the two tubes is filled with SiO 2 powder. After preheating, the evacuated preform is drawn to a fibre. A length of 45 cm, cladding-pumped with a diode laser at 808 nm as well as a core-pumped fibre of 5.1 cm length showed laser action between 1.05 and 1.1 μm.

  14. The Effects of Height and Distance on the Force Production and Acceleration in Martial Arts Strikes

    PubMed Central

    Bolander, Richard P.; Neto, Osmar Pinto; Bir, Cynthia A.

    2009-01-01

    Almost all cultures have roots in some sort of self defence system and yet there is relatively little research in this area, outside of a sports related environment. This project investigated different applications of strikes from Kung Fu practitioners that have not been addressed before in the literature. Punch and palm strikes were directly compared from different heights and distances, with the use of a load cell, accelerometers, and high speed video. The data indicated that the arm accelerations of both strikes were similar, although the force and resulting acceleration of the target were significantly greater for the palm strikes. Additionally, the relative height at which the strike was delivered was also investigated. The overall conclusion is that the palm strike is a more effective strike for transferring force to an object. It can also be concluded that an attack to the chest would be ideal for maximizing impact force and moving an opponent off balance. Key Points It has been determined that the palm strike is more effective than the punch for developing force and for transferring momentum, most likely the result of a reduced number of rigid links and joints. A strike at head level is less effective than a strike at chest level for developing force and transferring momentum. Distance plays an effect on the overall force and momentum changes, and most likely is dependent on the velocity of the limb and alignment of the bones prior to impact. The teaching of self defence for novices and law enforcement would benefit from including the palm strike as a high priority technique. PMID:24474886

  15. Elemental analysis of combustion products by neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Heft, R.E.; Koszykowski, R.F.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives a brief description of the neutron activation analysis method, which is being used to determine the elemental profile of combustion products from coal-fired power plants, oil shale retorting, and underground coal gasification. (DLC)

  16. Isocoumarins, miraculous natural products blessed with diverse pharmacological activities.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Aamer

    2016-06-30

    Isocoumarins are lactonic natural products abundant in microbes and higher plants. These are considered an amazing scaffold consecrated with more or less all types of pharmacological applications. This review is complementary to the earlier reviews and aims to focus the overlooked aspects of their fascinating chemistry with special emphasis on their classification and diverse biological activities with some SAR conclusions. The most recent available literature on the structural diversity and biological activity of these natural products has been reviewed.

  17. 70 microM caffeine treatment enhances in vitro force and power output during cyclic activities in mouse extensor digitorum longus muscle.

    PubMed

    James, Rob S; Kohlsdorf, Tiana; Cox, Val M; Navas, Carlos A

    2005-09-01

    Caffeine ingestion by human athletes has been found to improve endurance performance primarily acting via the central nervous system as an adenosine receptor antagonist. However, a few studies have implied that the resultant micromolar levels of caffeine in blood plasma (70 microM maximum for humans) may directly affect skeletal muscle causing enhanced force production. In the present study, the effects of 70 microM caffeine on force and power output in isolated mouse extensor digitorum longus muscle were investigated in vitro at 35 degrees C. Muscle preparations were subjected to cyclical sinusoidal length changes with electrical stimulation conditions optimised to produce maximal work. 70 microM caffeine caused a small but significant increase (2-3%) in peak force and net work produced during work loops (where net work represents the work input required to lengthen the muscle subtracted from the work produced during shortening). However, these micromolar caffeine levels did not affect the overall pattern of fatigue or the pattern of recovery from fatigue. Our results suggest that the plasma concentrations found when caffeine is used to enhance athletic performance in human athletes might directly enhance force and power during brief but not prolonged activities. These findings potentially confirm previous in vivo studies, using humans, which implied caffeine ingestion may cause acute improvements in muscle force and power output but would not enhance endurance.

  18. Using DOE-ARM and Space-Based Assets to Assess the Quality of Air Force Weather 3D Cloud Analysis and Forecast Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobis, T. E.

    2015-12-01

    Air Force Weather (AFW) has documented requirements for global cloud analysis and forecasting to support DoD missions around the world. To meet these needs, AFW utilizes a number of cloud products. Cloud analyses are constructed using 17 different near real time satellite sources. Products include analysis of the individual satellite transmissions at native satellite resolution and an hourly global merge of all 17 sources on a 24km grid. AFW has also recently started creation of a time delayed global cloud reanalysis to produce a 'best possible' analysis for climatology and verification purposes. Forecasted cloud products include global short-range cloud forecasts created using advection techniques as well as statistically post processed cloud forecast products derived from various global and regional numerical weather forecast models. All of these cloud products cover different spatial and temporal resolutions and are produced on a number of different grid projections. The longer term vision of AFW is to consolidate these various approaches into uniform global numerical weather modeling (NWM) system using advanced cloudy-data assimilation processes to construct the analysis and a licensed version of UKMO's Unified Model to produce the various cloud forecast products. In preparation for this evolution in cloud modeling support, AFW has started to aggressively benchmark the performance of their current capabilities. Cloud information collected from so called 'active' sensors on the ground at the DOE-ARM sites and from space by such instruments as CloudSat, CALIPSO and CATS are being utilized to characterize the performance of AFW products derived largely by passive means. The goal is to understand the performance of the 3D cloud analysis and forecast products of today to help shape the requirements and standards for the future NWM driven system.This presentation will present selected results from these benchmarking efforts and highlight insights and observations

  19. Auditory Feedback: Effects on Vertical Force Production during Standing Up Following Stroke.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, V.; Carr, J.

    1996-01-01

    Twelve individuals recovering from stroke were given a three-week period of rehabilitative training with or without auditory feedback. The purpose was to investigate weight distribution on the pattern of vertical force through the affected leg during standing up. Results indicated the training improved subjects' strength and muscle control, though…

  20. Active disturbance rejection control for output force creep characteristics of ionic polymer metal composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yan; Chen, Yang; Sun, Zhiyong; Hao, Lina; Dong, Jie

    2014-07-01

    Ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs) are a type of electroactive polymer (EAP) that can be used as both sensors and actuators. An IPMC has enormous potential application in the field of biomimetic robotics, medical devices, and so on. However, an IPMC actuator has a great number of disadvantages, such as creep and time-variation, making it vulnerable to external disturbances. In addition, the complex actuation mechanism makes it difficult to model and the demand of the control algorithm is laborious to implement. In this paper, we obtain a creep model of the IPMC by means of model identification based on the method of creep operator linear superposition. Although the mathematical model is not approximate to the IPMC accurate model, it is accurate enough to be used in MATLAB to prove the control algorithm. A controller based on the active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) method is designed to solve the drawbacks previously given. Because the ADRC controller is separate from the mathematical model of the controlled plant, the control algorithm has the ability to complete disturbance estimation and compensation. Some factors, such as all external disturbances, uncertainty factors, the inaccuracy of the identification model and different kinds of IPMCs, have little effect on controlling the output block force of the IPMC. Furthermore, we use the particle swarm optimization algorithm to adjust ADRC parameters so that the IPMC actuator can approach the desired block force with unknown external disturbances. Simulations and experimental examples validate the effectiveness of the ADRC controller.

  1. Active-Region Twist Derived from Magnetic Tongues and Linear Force-Free Extrapolations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisson, Mariano; López Fuentes, Marcelo; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Démoulin, Pascal

    2015-11-01

    The main aim of this study is to compare the amount of twist present in emerging active regions (ARs) from photospheric and coronal data. We use linear force-free field models of the observed coronal structure of ARs to determine the global twist. The coronal twist is derived, on one hand, from the force-free parameter [α] of the model and, on the other, from the computed coronal magnetic helicity normalized by the magnetic flux squared. We compare our results, for the same set of ARs, with those of Poisson et al. ( Solar Phys. 290, 727, 2015), in which the twist was estimated using the so-called magnetic tongues observed in line-of-sight magnetograms during AR emergence. We corroborate the agreement between the photospheric and coronal twist-sign and the presence of magnetic tongues as an early proxy of the AR non-potentiality. We find a globally linear relationship between the coronal twist and the one previously deduced for the emerging AR flux rope at the photospheric level. The coronal-twist value is typically lower by a factor of six than the one deduced for the emerging flux rope. We interpret this result as due to the partial emergence of the flux rope that forms the region.

  2. New Product Development. Engineering and Commerce Students Join Forces with a Corporate Sponsor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Audet, Josee; Pegna, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    Mechanical engineering and business student teams developed new products using a corporate sponsor's technology in a simulated business setting. Students learned about product development and venture start-up, and the sponsor gained new applications for its patented technology. (SK)

  3. Is the thumb a fifth finger? A study of digit interaction during force production tasks

    PubMed Central

    Olafsdottir, Halla; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    We studied indices of digit interaction in single- and multi-digit maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) tests when the thumb acted either in parallel or in opposition to the fingers. The peak force produced by the thumb was much higher when the thumb acted in opposition to the fingers and its share of the total force in the five-digit MVC test increased dramatically. The fingers showed relatively similar peak forces and unchanged sharing patterns in the four-finger MVC task when the thumb acted in parallel and in opposition to the fingers. Enslaving during one-digit tasks showed relatively mild differences between the two conditions, while the differences became large when enslaving was quantified for multi-digit tasks. Force deficit was pronounced when the thumb acted in parallel to the fingers; it showed a monotonic increase with the number of explicitly involved digits up to four digits and then a drop when all five digits were involved. Force deficit all but disappeared when the thumb acted in opposition to the fingers. However, for both thumb positions, indices of digit interaction were similar for groups of digits that did or did not include the thumb. These results suggest that, given a certain hand configuration, the central nervous system treats the thumb as a fifth finger. They provide strong support for the hypothesis that indices of digit interaction reflect neural factors, not the peripheral design of the hand. An earlier formal model was able to account for the data when the thumb acted in parallel to the fingers. However, it failed for the data with the thumb acting in opposition to the fingers. PMID:15322785

  4. Synchronous fire activity in the tropical high Andes: an indication of regional climate forcing.

    PubMed

    Román-Cuesta, R M; Carmona-Moreno, C; Lizcano, G; New, M; Silman, M; Knoke, T; Malhi, Y; Oliveras, I; Asbjornsen, H; Vuille, M

    2014-06-01

    Global climate models suggest enhanced warming of the tropical mid and upper troposphere, with larger temperature rise rates at higher elevations. Changes in fire activity are amongst the most significant ecological consequences of rising temperatures and changing hydrological properties in mountainous ecosystems, and there is a global evidence of increased fire activity with elevation. Whilst fire research has become popular in the tropical lowlands, much less is known of the tropical high Andean region (>2000 masl, from Colombia to Bolivia). This study examines fire trends in the high Andes for three ecosystems, the Puna, the Paramo and the Yungas, for the period 1982-2006. We pose three questions: (i) is there an increased fire response with elevation? (ii) does the El Niño- Southern Oscillation control fire activity in this region? (iii) are the observed fire trends human driven (e.g., human practices and their effects on fuel build-up) or climate driven? We did not find evidence of increased fire activity with elevation but, instead, a quasicyclic and synchronous fire response in Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia, suggesting the influence of high-frequency climate forcing on fire responses on a subcontinental scale, in the high Andes. ENSO variability did not show a significant relation to fire activity for these three countries, partly because ENSO variability did not significantly relate to precipitation extremes, although it strongly did to temperature extremes. Whilst ENSO did not individually lead the observed regional fire trends, our results suggest a climate influence on fire activity, mainly through a sawtooth pattern of precipitation (increased rainfall before fire-peak seasons (t-1) followed by drought spells and unusual low temperatures (t0), which is particularly common where fire is carried by low fuel loads (e.g., grasslands and fine fuel). This climatic sawtooth appeared as the main driver of fire trends, above local human influences and fuel build

  5. Functional Brain Activity Relates to 0-3 and 3-8 Hz Force Oscillations in Essential Tremor.

    PubMed

    Neely, Kristina A; Kurani, Ajay S; Shukla, Priyank; Planetta, Peggy J; Wagle Shukla, Aparna; Goldman, Jennifer G; Corcos, Daniel M; Okun, Michael S; Vaillancourt, David E

    2015-11-01

    It is well-established that during goal-directed motor tasks, patients with essential tremor have increased oscillations in the 0-3 and 3-8 Hz bands. It remains unclear if these increased oscillations relate to activity in specific brain regions. This study used task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging to compare the brain activity associated with oscillations in grip force output between patients with essential tremor, patients with Parkinson's disease who had clinically evident tremor, and healthy controls. The findings demonstrate that patients with essential tremor have increased brain activity in the motor cortex and supplementary motor area compared with controls, and this activity correlated positively with 3-8 Hz force oscillations. Brain activity in cerebellar lobules I-V was reduced in essential tremor compared with controls and correlated negatively with 0-3 Hz force oscillations. Widespread differences in brain activity were observed between essential tremor and Parkinson's disease. Using functional connectivity analyses during the task evidenced reduced cerebellar-cortical functional connectivity in patients with essential tremor compared with controls and Parkinson's disease. This study provides new evidence that in essential tremor 3-8 Hz force oscillations relate to hyperactivity in motor cortex, 0-3 Hz force oscillations relate to the hypoactivity in the cerebellum, and cerebellar-cortical functional connectivity is impaired.

  6. Active diffusion and microtubule-based transport oppose myosin forces to position organelles in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Congping; Schuster, Martin; Guimaraes, Sofia Cunha; Ashwin, Peter; Schrader, Michael; Metz, Jeremy; Hacker, Christian; Gurr, Sarah Jane; Steinberg, Gero

    2016-06-01

    Even distribution of peroxisomes (POs) and lipid droplets (LDs) is critical to their role in lipid and reactive oxygen species homeostasis. How even distribution is achieved remains elusive, but diffusive motion and directed motility may play a role. Here we show that in the fungus Ustilago maydis ~95% of POs and LDs undergo diffusive motions. These movements require ATP and involve bidirectional early endosome motility, indicating that microtubule-associated membrane trafficking enhances diffusion of organelles. When early endosome transport is abolished, POs and LDs drift slowly towards the growing cell end. This pole-ward drift is facilitated by anterograde delivery of secretory cargo to the cell tip by myosin-5. Modelling reveals that microtubule-based directed transport and active diffusion support distribution, mobility and mixing of POs. In mammalian COS-7 cells, microtubules and F-actin also counteract each other to distribute POs. This highlights the importance of opposing cytoskeletal forces in organelle positioning in eukaryotes.

  7. An intelligent active force control algorithm to control an upper extremity exoskeleton for motor recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasbullah Mohd Isa, Wan; Taha, Zahari; Mohd Khairuddin, Ismail; Majeed, Anwar P. P. Abdul; Fikri Muhammad, Khairul; Abdo Hashem, Mohammed; Mahmud, Jamaluddin; Mohamed, Zulkifli

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the modelling and control of a two degree of freedom upper extremity exoskeleton by means of an intelligent active force control (AFC) mechanism. The Newton-Euler formulation was used in deriving the dynamic modelling of both the anthropometry based human upper extremity as well as the exoskeleton that consists of the upper arm and the forearm. A proportional-derivative (PD) architecture is employed in this study to investigate its efficacy performing joint-space control objectives. An intelligent AFC algorithm is also incorporated into the PD to investigate the effectiveness of this hybrid system in compensating disturbances. The Mamdani Fuzzy based rule is employed to approximate the estimated inertial properties of the system to ensure the AFC loop responds efficiently. It is found that the IAFC-PD performed well against the disturbances introduced into the system as compared to the conventional PD control architecture in performing the desired trajectory tracking.

  8. Incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2005-2014.

    PubMed

    Daniele, Denise O; Oh, Gi-Taik; O'Donnell, Francis L; Clark, Leslie L

    2015-07-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common condition among adults that can cause symptoms such as frequent heartburn, substernal chest pain, and regurgitation of food. During 2005-2014, a total of 137,081 active component service members had an incident (first-ever) diagnosis of GERD (incidence rate: 101.3 per 10,000 person-years). Incidence rates were higher than their respective counterparts among females, black and white non-Hispanics, service members in the Coast Guard and Air Force, officers, and those in healthcare occupations. Rates increased monotonically with increasing age groups. Most GERD cases (79.2%) were uncomplicated GERD; however, 20.8% were identified as having a symptom or complication linked to their GERD diagnosis. Lifestyle changes, medication, and prevention of serious complications should be emphasized among individuals diagnosed with GERD, particularly those at risk for severe disease.

  9. Haptic device development based on electro static force of cellulose electro active paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Gyu-young; Kim, Sang-Youn; Jang, Sang-Dong; Kim, Dong-Gu; Kim, Jaehwan

    2011-04-01

    Haptic is one of well-considered device which is suitable for demanding virtual reality applications such as medical equipment, mobile devices, the online marketing and so on. Nowadays, many of concepts for haptic devices have been suggested to meet the demand of industries. Cellulose has received much attention as an emerging smart material, named as electro-active paper (EAPap). The EAPap is attractive for mobile haptic devices due to its unique characteristics in terms of low actuation power, suitability for thin devices and transparency. In this paper, we suggest a new concept of haptic actuator with the use of cellulose EAPap. Its performance is evaluated depending on various actuation conditions. As a result, cellulose electrostatic force actuator shows a large output displacement and fast response, which is suitable for mobile haptic devices.

  10. Satellite cascade attitude control via fuzzy PD controller with active force control under momentum dumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Z.; Varatharajoo, R.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, fuzzy proportional-derivative (PD) controller with active force control (AFC) scheme is studied and employed in the satellite attitude control system equipped with reaction wheels. The momentum dumping is enabled via proportional integral (PI) controller as the system is impractical without momentum dumping control. The attitude controllers are developed together with their governing equations and evaluated through numerical treatment with respect to a reference satellite mission. From the results, it is evident that the three axis attitudes accuracies can be improved up to ±0.001 degree through the fuzzy PD controller with AFC scheme for the attitude control. In addition, the three-axis wheel angular momentums are well maintained during the attitude control tasks.

  11. Active diffusion and microtubule-based transport oppose myosin forces to position organelles in cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Congping; Schuster, Martin; Guimaraes, Sofia Cunha; Ashwin, Peter; Schrader, Michael; Metz, Jeremy; Hacker, Christian; Gurr, Sarah Jane; Steinberg, Gero

    2016-01-01

    Even distribution of peroxisomes (POs) and lipid droplets (LDs) is critical to their role in lipid and reactive oxygen species homeostasis. How even distribution is achieved remains elusive, but diffusive motion and directed motility may play a role. Here we show that in the fungus Ustilago maydis ∼95% of POs and LDs undergo diffusive motions. These movements require ATP and involve bidirectional early endosome motility, indicating that microtubule-associated membrane trafficking enhances diffusion of organelles. When early endosome transport is abolished, POs and LDs drift slowly towards the growing cell end. This pole-ward drift is facilitated by anterograde delivery of secretory cargo to the cell tip by myosin-5. Modelling reveals that microtubule-based directed transport and active diffusion support distribution, mobility and mixing of POs. In mammalian COS-7 cells, microtubules and F-actin also counteract each other to distribute POs. This highlights the importance of opposing cytoskeletal forces in organelle positioning in eukaryotes. PMID:27251117

  12. Active control of structurally-coupled sound fields in elastic cylinders by vibrational force inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. D.; Fuller, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Active control of structurally-coupled sound fields in elastic cylinders is analytically and experimentally studied. The primary (noise) field in the cylinder model is generated by the coupled dynamic response of the shell under loading by a single exterior acoustic source. Control of the interior sound field is achieved by applying vibrational force inputs directly to the shell wall. Action of the point controllers serve to increase the input impedance of select structural modes of the shell which are well-coupled to the interior acoustic cavity, thus substantially reducing sound transmission into the cavity. Spatially-averaged noise reductions in excess of 30 dB are demonstrated for acoustic resonant conditions within the cavity. Twin controller configurations are presented which demonstrate the ability to independently control orthogonal modes of the interior acoustic space. Benefits and drawbacks of this new methodology for noise control are discussed and clearly demonstrated.

  13. Bubble mass center and fluid feedback force fluctuations activated by constant lateral impulse with variable thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Long, Y. T.

    1995-01-01

    Sloshing dynamics within a partially filled rotating dewar of superfluid helium 2 are investigated in response to constant lateral impulse with variable thrust. The study, including how the rotating bubble of superfluid helium 2 reacts to the constant impulse with variable time period of thrust action in microgravity, how amplitudes of bubble mass center fluctuates with growth and decay of disturbances, and how fluid feedback forces fluctuates in activating on the rotating dewar through the dynamics of sloshing waves are investigated. The numerical computation of sloshing dynamics is based on the non-inertial frame spacecraft bound coordinate with lateral impulses actuating on the rotating dewar in both inertial and non-inertial frames of thrust. Results of the simulations are illustrated.

  14. Which Words Are Activated during Bilingual Word Production?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colome, Angels; Miozzo, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Whether words are or are not activated within the lexicon of the nonused language is an important question for accounts of bilingual word production. Prior studies have not led to conclusive results, either because alternative accounts could be proposed for their findings or because activation could have been artificially induced by the…

  15. [Cytogenetic activity of the butylcaptax defoliant transformation product].

    PubMed

    Vesmanova, O Ia; Semykina, E E; Koblov, R K; Ergashev

    1989-01-01

    Cytogenetical activity of the product of metabolitic butylcaptax transformations in cells of cotton plants G. barbadense has been studied. It is shown that butylcaptax, with a significant mutagenicity, looses its mutagenic activity, metabolizing in low mutagenic 2-oxyamylthiobenzthiazole. Low water solubility prevents its concentration to exceed 0.005% in tissue liquids and to exert a mutagenic action on cotton plants.

  16. From Forced Tolerance to Forced Busing: Wartime Intercultural Education and the Rise of Black Educational Activism in Boston

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkholder, Zoe

    2010-01-01

    In this article, Zoe Burkholder explores the historical interplay of the emergence of tolerance education in the United States and the rise of black educational activism in Boston. By uncovering a pointed lack of tolerance education in Boston and a widespread promotion of tolerance education in other cities in the early half of the twentieth…

  17. Assessment of activation products in the Savannah River Site environment

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, W.H.; Denham, M.

    1996-07-01

    This document assesses the impact of radioactive activation products released from SRS facilities since the first reactor became operational late in 1953. The isotopes reported here are those whose release resulted in the highest dose to people living near SRS: {sup 32}P, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 60}C, and {sup 65}Zn. Release pathways, emission control features, and annual releases to the aqueous and atmospheric environments are discussed. No single incident has resulted in a major acute release of activation products to the environment. The releases were the result of normal operations of the reactors and separations facilities. Releases declined over the years as better controls were established and production was reduced. The overall radiological impact of SRS activation product atmospheric releases from 1954 through 1994 on the offsite maximally exposed individual can be characterized by a total dose of 0.76 mrem. During the same period, such an individual received a total dose of 14,400 mrem from non-SRS sources of ionizing radiation present in the environment. SRS activation product aqueous releases between 1954 and 1994 resulted in a total dose of 54 mrem to the offsite maximally exposed individual. The impact of SRS activation product releases on offsite populations also has been evaluated.

  18. One-dimensional potential of mean force underestimates activation barrier for transport across flexible lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopelevich, Dmitry I.

    2013-10-01

    Transport of a fullerene-like nanoparticle across a lipid bilayer is investigated by coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Potentials of mean force (PMF) acting on the nanoparticle in a flexible bilayer suspended in water and a bilayer restrained to a flat surface are computed by constrained MD simulations. The rate of the nanoparticle transport into the bilayer interior is predicted using one-dimensional Langevin models based on these PMFs. The predictions are compared with the transport rates obtained from a series of direct (unconstrained) MD simulations of the solute transport into the flexible bilayer. It is observed that the PMF acting on the solute in the flexible membrane underestimates the transport rate by more than an order of magnitude while the PMF acting on the solute in the restrained membrane yields an accurate estimate of the activation energy for transport into the flexible membrane. This paradox is explained by a coexistence of metastable membrane configurations for a range of the solute positions inside and near the flexible membrane. This leads to a significant reduction of the contribution of the transition state to the mean force acting on the solute. Restraining the membrane shape ensures that there is only one stable membrane configuration corresponding to each solute position and thus the transition state is adequately represented in the PMF. This mechanism is quite general and thus this phenomenon is expected to occur in a wide range of interfacial systems. A simple model for the free energy landscape of the coupled solute-membrane system is proposed and validated. This model explicitly accounts for effects of the membrane deformations on the solute transport and yields an accurate prediction of the activation energy for the solute transport.

  19. One-dimensional potential of mean force underestimates activation barrier for transport across flexible lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Kopelevich, Dmitry I

    2013-10-07

    Transport of a fullerene-like nanoparticle across a lipid bilayer is investigated by coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Potentials of mean force (PMF) acting on the nanoparticle in a flexible bilayer suspended in water and a bilayer restrained to a flat surface are computed by constrained MD simulations. The rate of the nanoparticle transport into the bilayer interior is predicted using one-dimensional Langevin models based on these PMFs. The predictions are compared with the transport rates obtained from a series of direct (unconstrained) MD simulations of the solute transport into the flexible bilayer. It is observed that the PMF acting on the solute in the flexible membrane underestimates the transport rate by more than an order of magnitude while the PMF acting on the solute in the restrained membrane yields an accurate estimate of the activation energy for transport into the flexible membrane. This paradox is explained by a coexistence of metastable membrane configurations for a range of the solute positions inside and near the flexible membrane. This leads to a significant reduction of the contribution of the transition state to the mean force acting on the solute. Restraining the membrane shape ensures that there is only one stable membrane configuration corresponding to each solute position and thus the transition state is adequately represented in the PMF. This mechanism is quite general and thus this phenomenon is expected to occur in a wide range of interfacial systems. A simple model for the free energy landscape of the coupled solute-membrane system is proposed and validated. This model explicitly accounts for effects of the membrane deformations on the solute transport and yields an accurate prediction of the activation energy for the solute transport.

  20. Load-induced enhancement of Dynein force production by LIS1–NudE in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Babu J. N.; Mattson, Michelle; Wynne, Caitlin L.; Vadpey, Omid; Durra, Abdo; Chapman, Dail; Vallee, Richard B.; Gross, Steven P.

    2016-01-01

    Most sub-cellular cargos are transported along microtubules by kinesin and dynein molecular motors, but how transport is regulated is not well understood. It is unknown whether local control is possible, for example, by changes in specific cargo-associated motor behaviour to react to impediments. Here we discover that microtubule-associated lipid droplets (LDs) in COS1 cells respond to an optical trap with a remarkable enhancement in sustained force production. This effect is observed only for microtubule minus-end-moving LDs. It is specifically blocked by RNAi for the cytoplasmic dynein regulators LIS1 and NudE/L (Nde1/Ndel1), but not for the dynactin p150Glued subunit. It can be completely replicated using cell-free preparations of purified LDs, where duration of LD force production is more than doubled. These results identify a novel, intrinsic, cargo-associated mechanism for dynein-mediated force adaptation, which should markedly improve the ability of motor-driven cargoes to overcome subcellular obstacles. PMID:27489054

  1. Comparative Effects of Different Balance-Training–Progression Styles on Postural Control and Ankle Force Production: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cuğ, Mutlu; Duncan, Ashley; Wikstrom, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Context:  Despite the effectiveness of balance training, the exact parameters needed to maximize the benefits of such programs remain unknown. One such factor is how individuals should progress to higher levels of task difficulty within a balance-training program. Yet no investigators have directly compared different balance-training–progression styles. Objective:  To compare an error-based progression (ie, advance when proficient at a task) with a repetition-based progression (ie, advance after a set amount of repetitions) style during a balance-training program in healthy individuals. Design:  Randomized controlled trial. Setting:  Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants:  A total of 28 (16 women, 12 men) physically healthy young adults (age = 21.57 ± 3.95 years, height = 171.60 ± 11.03 cm, weight = 72.96 ± 16.18 kg, body mass index = 24.53 ± 3.7). Intervention(s):  All participants completed 12 supervised balance-training sessions over 4 weeks. Each session consisted of a combination of dynamic unstable-surface tasks that incorporated a BOSU ball and lasted about 30 minutes. Main Outcome Measure(s):  Static balance from an instrumented force plate, dynamic balance as measured via the Star Excursion Balance Test, and ankle force production in all 4 cardinal planes of motion as measured with a handheld dynamometer before and after the intervention. Results:  Selected static postural-control outcomes, dynamic postural control, and ankle force production in all planes of motion improved (P < .05). However, no differences between the progression styles were observed (P > .05) for any of the outcome measures. Conclusions:  A 4-week balance-training program consisting of dynamic unstable-surface exercises on a BOSU ball improved dynamic postural control and ankle force production in healthy young adults. These results suggest that an error-based balance-training program is comparable with but not superior to a repetition

  2. Milk kefir: composition, microbial cultures, biological activities, and related products

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Maria R.; Blandón, Lina Marcela; Vandenberghe, Luciana P. S.; Rodrigues, Cristine; Castro, Guillermo R.; Thomaz-Soccol, Vanete; Soccol, Carlos R.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a strong focus on beneficial foods with probiotic microorganisms and functional organic substances. In this context, there is an increasing interest in the commercial use of kefir, since it can be marketed as a natural beverage that has health promoting bacteria. There are numerous commercially available kefir based-products. Kefir may act as a matrix in the effective delivery of probiotic microorganisms in different types of products. Also, the presence of kefir’s exopolysaccharides, known as kefiran, which has biological activity, certainly adds value to products. Kefiran can also be used separately in other food products and as a coating film for various food and pharmaceutical products. This article aims to update the information about kefir and its microbiological composition, biological activity of the kefir’s microflora and the importance of kefiran as a beneficial health substance. PMID:26579086

  3. Activity in the premotor area related to bite force control--a functional near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Tomotaka; Shibusawa, Mami; Sudal, Osamu; Nakajima, Kazunori; Ishigami, Keiichi; Sakatani, Kaoru

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the influence of bite force control on oxygenated hemoglobin (OxyHb) levels in regional cerebral blood flow as an indicator of brain activity in the premotor area. Healthy right-handed volunteers with no subjective or objective symptoms of problems of the stomatognathic system or cervicofacial region were included. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) was used to determine OxyHb levels in the premotor area during bite force control. A bite block equipped with an occlusal force sensor was prepared to measure clenching at the position where the right upper and lower canine cusps come into contact. Intensity of clenching was shown on a display and feedback was provided to the subjects. Intensity was set at 20, 50 and 80% of maximum voluntary teeth clenching force. To minimize the effect of the temporal muscle on the working side of the jaw, the fNIRS probes were positioned contralaterally, in the left region. The findings of this study are: activation of the premotor area with bite force control was noted in all subjects, and in the group analysis OxyHb in the premotor cortex was significantly increased as the clenching strengthened at 20, 50 and 80% of maximum voluntary clenching force. These results suggest there is a possibility that the premotor area is involved in bite force control.

  4. Active Design Method for the Static Characteristics of a Piezoelectric Six-Axis Force/Torque Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Li, Min; Qin, Lan; Liu, Jingcheng

    2014-01-01

    To address the bottleneck issues of an elastic-style six-axis force/torque sensor (six-axis force sensor), this work proposes a no-elastic piezoelectric six-axis force sensor. The operating principle of the piezoelectric six-axis force sensor is analyzed, and a structural model is constructed. The static-active design theory of the piezoelectric six-axis force sensor is established, including a static analytical/mathematical model and numerical simulation model (finite element model). A piezoelectric six-axis force sensor experimental prototype is developed according to the analytical mathematical model and numerical simulation model, and selected static characteristic parameters (including sensitivity, isotropic degree and cross-coupling) are tested using this model with three approaches. The measured results are in agreement with the analytical results from the static-active design method. Therefore, this study has successfully established a foundation for further research into the piezoelectric multi-axis force sensor and an overall design approach based on static characteristics. PMID:24451460

  5. Changes in cervical muscle activity according to the traction force of an air-inflatable neck traction device

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jong Ho; Park, Tae-Sung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to analyze cervical muscle activity at different traction forces of an air-inflatable neck traction device. [Subjects] Eighteen males participated in this study. [Methods] The subjects put on an air-inflatable neck traction device and the traction forces administered were 40, 80, and 120 mmHg. The electromyography (EMG) signals of the splenius capitis, and upper trapezius were measured to assess the muscle activity. [Results] The muscle activity of the splenius capitis was significantly higher at 80, and 120 mmHg compared to 40 mmHg. The muscle activity of the upper trapezius did not show significant differences among the traction forces. [Conclusion] Our research result showed that the air-inflatable home neck traction device did not meet the condition of muscle relaxation. PMID:26504278

  6. Changes in cervical muscle activity according to the traction force of an air-inflatable neck traction device.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jong Ho; Park, Tae-Sung

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to analyze cervical muscle activity at different traction forces of an air-inflatable neck traction device. [Subjects] Eighteen males participated in this study. [Methods] The subjects put on an air-inflatable neck traction device and the traction forces administered were 40, 80, and 120 mmHg. The electromyography (EMG) signals of the splenius capitis, and upper trapezius were measured to assess the muscle activity. [Results] The muscle activity of the splenius capitis was significantly higher at 80, and 120 mmHg compared to 40 mmHg. The muscle activity of the upper trapezius did not show significant differences among the traction forces. [Conclusion] Our research result showed that the air-inflatable home neck traction device did not meet the condition of muscle relaxation.

  7. Force and twist dependence of RepC nicking activity on torsionally-constrained DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Pastrana, Cesar L.; Carrasco, Carolina; Akhtar, Parvez; Leuba, Sanford H.; Khan, Saleem A.; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Many bacterial plasmids replicate by an asymmetric rolling-circle mechanism that requires sequence-specific recognition for initiation, nicking of one of the template DNA strands and unwinding of the duplex prior to subsequent leading strand DNA synthesis. Nicking is performed by a replication-initiation protein (Rep) that directly binds to the plasmid double-stranded origin and remains covalently bound to its substrate 5′-end via a phosphotyrosine linkage. It has been proposed that the inverted DNA sequences at the nick site form a cruciform structure that facilitates DNA cleavage. However, the role of Rep proteins in the formation of this cruciform and the implication for its nicking and religation functions is unclear. Here, we have used magnetic tweezers to directly measure the DNA nicking and religation activities of RepC, the replication initiator protein of plasmid pT181, in plasmid sized and torsionally-constrained linear DNA molecules. Nicking by RepC occurred only in negatively supercoiled DNA and was force- and twist-dependent. Comparison with a type IB topoisomerase in similar experiments highlighted a relatively inefficient religation activity of RepC. Based on the structural modeling of RepC and on our experimental evidence, we propose a model where RepC nicking activity is passive and dependent upon the supercoiling degree of the DNA substrate. PMID:27488190

  8. Update: Exertional hyponatremia, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 1999-2013.

    PubMed

    2014-03-01

    From 1999 through 2013, there were 1,406 incident diagnoses of exertional hyponatremia among active component members of the U.S. Armed Forces. Annual incidence rates rose sharply from 2008 to 2010 but decreased by 59 percent from 2010 to 2013. In 2013, there were fewer incident cases (n=73) than in any of the previous 9 years. The recent decrease in overall rates reflects sharply declining rates in the Marine Corps and slight decreases in the other Services. Relative to their respective counterparts, crude incidence rates of exertional hyponatremia for the entire 15-year surveillance period were higher among females, those in the youngest age group, Marines, recruit trainees, and "other" military occupations. Service members (particularly recruit trainees) and their supervisors must be vigilant for early signs of heat-related illnesses and must be knowledgeable of the dangers of excessive water consumption and the prescribed limits for water intake during prolonged physical activity (e.g., field training exercises, personal fitness training, recreational activities) in hot, humid weather.

  9. A comparison of assessment methods of hand activity and force for use in calculating the ACGIH(R) hand activity level (HAL) TLV(R).

    PubMed

    Wurzelbacher, Steve; Burt, Susan; Crombie, Ken; Ramsey, Jessica; Luo, Lian; Allee, Steve; Jin, Yan

    2010-07-01

    This article compares several methods that were used for determining hand activity level and force in a large prospective ergonomics study. The first goal of this analysis was to determine the degree of correlation between hand activity/ force ratings using different assessment methods. The second goal was to determine if the hand activity/force methods were functionally equivalent for the purpose of calculating the ACGIH(R) hand activity level (HAL) threshold limit value (TLV(R)). A final goal was to investigate reasons for potential differences between methods. More than 700 task analyses were conducted on 484 workers at three study locations. Hand activity was assessed by two methods, including a trained observer on site using a 10-point visual analog scale for hand activity level and by offsite video analysis of the same task to calculate the frequency of exertions and the work/recovery ratio. Hand force was assessed by two on-site methods: ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) using a modified Borg CR-10 scale by a trained observer and RPE by the worker performing the task. The two methods for assessing hand activity level were correlated (Spearman rank = 0.49) and produced main TLV result categories (below Action Limit, Action Limit, TLV) with percent of exact agreement ranging from 71 to 91% and weighted Kappa ranging from 0.61 to 0.75. The two RPE methods for assessing hand force were correlated (Spearman rank ranging from 0.47 to 0.69) and produced TLVs with percent of exact agreement ranging from 64 to 83% and weighted Kappa ranging from 0.52 to 0.62. Differences between methods may be explained by a number of task and subject variables that were significantly associated with higher levels of hand activity and force. In summary, this study found substantial agreement between two methods for assessing hand activity level and moderate agreement between two methods for assessing hand force.

  10. North Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Activity over the last 2000 years: Patterns, Consequences and Potential Climatic Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, J. P.; Lane, P.; Hawkes, A.; van Hengstum, P. J.; Ranasinghe, P. N.; Toomey, M.; MacDonald, D.

    2011-12-01

    1300 years ago. A reconstruction of intense hurricane landfalls from the Gulf coast documents some similar patterns that likely point to large scale climate forcing; however, some significant differences are evident. For example, the Gulf frequently experienced intense hurricanes during the 13th and 14th centuries, but a subsequent decline in activity has persisted through the historic period. This antiphasing of intense hurricane activity between the East and Gulf coasts may point to basin-wide changes in hurricane tracks, but regional controls on the frequency of intense hurricanes (e.g., loop current penetration in the Gulf of Mexico) may also have driven spatial variability in Atlantic paleohurricane records.

  11. Effects of contraction path and velocity on the coordination of hand muscles during a three-digit force production task.

    PubMed

    Jiayuan He; Xinjun Sheng; Dingguo Zhang; Xiangyang Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Though many studies indicated that the behavior of single muscle was different between contraction and relaxation, the effect of contraction history profile on multiple muscles has not been investigated. In this study, we analyzed the influence of contraction history on the coordination patterns of hand muscles during a three-digit force production task. The effects of the contraction and relaxation paths with two contraction velocities (5% and 10% maximum voluntary contraction per second) were investigated. The results showed that the force-independent characteristic of muscle coordination patterns still held regardless of the contraction history profiles. In addition, the effect of contraction path was more significant than that of velocity. The study provides a potential way to overcome the impact of contraction disturbance for improving the robustness of the human-machine interface (HMI) based on electromyographic (EMG) pattern recognition.

  12. Changes in force associated with the amount of aligner activation and lingual bodily movement of the maxillary central incisor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaowei; Ren, Chaochao; Wang, Zheyao; Zhao, Pai; Wang, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purposes of this study were to measure the orthodontic forces generated by thermoplastic aligners and investigate the possible influences of different activations for lingual bodily movements on orthodontic forces, and their attenuation. Methods Thermoplastic material of 1.0-mm in thickness was used to manufacture aligners for 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, and 0.6 mm activations for lingual bodily movements of the maxillary central incisor. The orthodontic force in the lingual direction delivered by the thermoplastic aligners was measured using a micro-stress sensor system for the invisible orthodontic technique, and was monitored for 2 weeks. Results Orthodontic force increased with the amount of activation of the aligner in the initial measurements. The attenuation speed in the 0.6 mm group was faster than that of the other groups (p < 0.05). All aligners demonstrated rapid relaxation in the first 8 hours, which then decreased slowly and plateaued on day 4 or 5. Conclusions The amount of activation had a substantial influence on the orthodontic force imparted by the aligners. The results suggest that the activation of lingual bodily movement of the maxillary central incisor should not exceed 0.5 mm. The initial 4 or 5 days is important with respect to orthodontic treatment incorporating an aligner. PMID:27019820

  13. Talin1 is critical for force-dependent reinforcement of initial integrin–cytoskeleton bonds but not tyrosine kinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Giannone, Grégory; Jiang, Guoying; Sutton, Deborah H.; Critchley, David R.; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2003-01-01

    Cells rapidly transduce forces exerted on extracellular matrix contacts into tyrosine kinase activation and recruitment of cytoskeletal proteins to reinforce integrin–cytoskeleton connections and initiate adhesion site formation. The relationship between these two processes has not been defined, particularly at the submicrometer level. Using talin1-deficient cells, it appears that talin1 is critical for building early mechanical linkages. Deletion of talin1 blocked laser tweezers, force-dependent reinforcement of submicrometer fibronectin-coated beads and early formation of adhesion sites in response to force, even though Src family kinases, focal adhesion kinase, and spreading were activated normally. Recruitment of vinculin and paxillin to sites of force application also required talin1. FilaminA had a secondary role in strengthening fibronectin–integrin–cytoskeleton connections and no role in stretch-dependent adhesion site assembly. Thus, force-dependent activation of tyrosine kinases is independent of early force-dependent structural changes that require talin1 as part of a critical scaffold. PMID:14581461

  14. Talin1 is critical for force-dependent reinforcement of initial integrin-cytoskeleton bonds but not tyrosine kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Giannone, Grégory; Jiang, Guoying; Sutton, Deborah H; Critchley, David R; Sheetz, Michael P

    2003-10-27

    Cells rapidly transduce forces exerted on extracellular matrix contacts into tyrosine kinase activation and recruitment of cytoskeletal proteins to reinforce integrin-cytoskeleton connections and initiate adhesion site formation. The relationship between these two processes has not been defined, particularly at the submicrometer level. Using talin1-deficient cells, it appears that talin1 is critical for building early mechanical linkages. Deletion of talin1 blocked laser tweezers, force-dependent reinforcement of submicrometer fibronectin-coated beads and early formation of adhesion sites in response to force, even though Src family kinases, focal adhesion kinase, and spreading were activated normally. Recruitment of vinculin and paxillin to sites of force application also required talin1. FilaminA had a secondary role in strengthening fibronectin-integrin-cytoskeleton connections and no role in stretch-dependent adhesion site assembly. Thus, force-dependent activation of tyrosine kinases is independent of early force-dependent structural changes that require talin1 as part of a critical scaffold.

  15. 26 CFR 31.3401(a)(1)-1 - Remuneration of members of the Armed Forces of the United States for active service in combat...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Remuneration of members of the Armed Forces of... members of the Armed Forces of the United States for active service in combat zone or while hospitalized as a result of such service. Remuneration paid for active service as a member of the Armed Forces...

  16. 26 CFR 31.3401(a)(1)-1 - Remuneration of members of the Armed Forces of the United States for active service in combat...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Remuneration of members of the Armed Forces of... members of the Armed Forces of the United States for active service in combat zone or while hospitalized as a result of such service. Remuneration paid for active service as a member of the Armed Forces...

  17. 26 CFR 31.3401(a)(1)-1 - Remuneration of members of the Armed Forces of the United States for active service in combat...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Remuneration of members of the Armed Forces of... members of the Armed Forces of the United States for active service in combat zone or while hospitalized as a result of such service. Remuneration paid for active service as a member of the Armed Forces...

  18. 26 CFR 31.3401(a)(1)-1 - Remuneration of members of the Armed Forces of the United States for active service in combat...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Remuneration of members of the Armed Forces of... members of the Armed Forces of the United States for active service in combat zone or while hospitalized as a result of such service. Remuneration paid for active service as a member of the Armed Forces...

  19. 26 CFR 31.3401(a)(1)-1 - Remuneration of members of the Armed Forces of the United States for active service in combat...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Remuneration of members of the Armed Forces of... members of the Armed Forces of the United States for active service in combat zone or while hospitalized as a result of such service. Remuneration paid for active service as a member of the Armed Forces...

  20. Joining Forces: Fermentation and Organic Synthesis for the Production of Complex Heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Gober, Claire M; Joullié, Madeleine M

    2016-11-04

    Commercial application of many promising heterocyclic natural products is limited by their natural abundance. While organic synthesis provides access to many natural products, total synthesis of numerous complex molecules is not economically feasible. In recent years, the combination of fermentation and organic synthesis has provided a new route for the production of complex heterocycles that are inaccessible by typical synthetic methods. This JOCSynopsis will review examples of how this union of disciplines has overcome obstacles in both academia and industry.

  1. Joining Forces: Fermentation and Organic Synthesis for the Production of Complex Heterocycles

    PubMed Central

    Gober, Claire M.; Joullié, Madeleine M.

    2016-01-01

    Commercial application of many promising heterocyclic natural products is limited by their natural abundance. While organic synthesis provides access to many natural products, total synthesis of numerous complex molecules is not economically feasible. In recent years, the combination of fermentation and organic synthesis has provided a new route for the production of complex heterocycles that are inaccessible by typical synthetic methods. This JOCSynopsis will review examples of how this union of disciplines has overcome obstacles in both academia and industry. PMID:27427903

  2. Superoxide anion production by human neutrophils activated by Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun-Ouk; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2013-08-01

    Neutrophils are the predominant inflammatory cells found in vaginal discharges of patients infected with Trichomonas vaginalis. In this study, we examined superoxide anion (O2 (.-)) production by neutrophils activated by T. vaginalis. Human neutrophils produced superoxide anions when stimulated with either a lysate of T. vaginalis, its membrane component (MC), or excretory-secretory product (ESP). To assess the role of trichomonad protease in production of superoxide anions by neutrophils, T. vaginalis lysate, ESP, and MC were each pretreated with a protease inhibitor cocktail before incubation with neutrophils. Superoxide anion production was significantly decreased by this treatment. Trichomonad growth was inhibited by preincubation with supernatants of neutrophils incubated for 3 hr with T. vaginalis lysate. Furthermore, myeloperoxidase (MPO) production by neutrophils was stimulated by live trichomonads. These results indicate that the production of superoxide anions and MPO by neutrophils stimulated with T. vaginalis may be a part of defense mechanisms of neutrophils in trichomoniasis.

  3. Enriching step-based product information models to support product life-cycle activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarigecili, Mehmet Ilteris

    The representation and management of product information in its life-cycle requires standardized data exchange protocols. Standard for Exchange of Product Model Data (STEP) is such a standard that has been used widely by the industries. Even though STEP-based product models are well defined and syntactically correct, populating product data according to these models is not easy because they are too big and disorganized. Data exchange specifications (DEXs) and templates provide re-organized information models required in data exchange of specific activities for various businesses. DEXs show us it would be possible to organize STEP-based product models in order to support different engineering activities at various stages of product life-cycle. In this study, STEP-based models are enriched and organized to support two engineering activities: materials information declaration and tolerance analysis. Due to new environmental regulations, the substance and materials information in products have to be screened closely by manufacturing industries. This requires a fast, unambiguous and complete product information exchange between the members of a supply chain. Tolerance analysis activity, on the other hand, is used to verify the functional requirements of an assembly considering the worst case (i.e., maximum and minimum) conditions for the part/assembly dimensions. Another issue with STEP-based product models is that the semantics of product data are represented implicitly. Hence, it is difficult to interpret the semantics of data for different product life-cycle phases for various application domains. OntoSTEP, developed at NIST, provides semantically enriched product models in OWL. In this thesis, we would like to present how to interpret the GD & T specifications in STEP for tolerance analysis by utilizing OntoSTEP.

  4. Bacterial cinnamoyl esterase activity screening for the production of a novel functional food product.

    PubMed

    Guglielmetti, Simone; De Noni, Ivano; Caracciolo, Federica; Molinari, Francesco; Parini, Carlo; Mora, Diego

    2008-02-01

    Lactobacillus helveticus MIMLh5 was selected for its strong cinnamoyl esterase activity on chlorogenic acid and employed for the preparation of a food product containing a high concentration of free caffeic acid. The novel food product was demonstrated to display high total antioxidant power and potential probiotic properties.

  5. Novel condensation products having high activity to insolubilize proteins and protein-insolubilized products

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnobajew, V.; Boeniger, R.

    1980-01-01

    According to the invention a substantially more active product with respect to the fixing or insolubilization pf proteins, including enzymes, is obtained when 1,3 phenylenediamine is condensed with glutardialdehyde. One application of the process is the enzymatic hydrolysis of lactose in milk products by lactase.

  6. Charged fusion product loss measurements using nuclear activation

    SciTech Connect

    Bonheure, G.; Hult, M.; Gonzalez de Orduna, R.; Wieslander, E.; Arnold, D.; Dombrowski, H.; Laubenstein, M.; Murari, A.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2010-10-15

    In ITER, {alpha} particle loss measurements will be required in order to understand the alpha particle physics. Techniques capable of operating in a fusion reactor environment need further development. Recent experimental studies on JET demonstrated the potential of nuclear activation to measure the flux of escaping MeV ions. New results from MeV ion induced activation of metallic, ceramic, and crystal samples placed near the plasma edge are reported. Activation products were measured as function of orientation with respect to the magnetic field as well as function of the distance to the plasma. Sample activity was measured using ultralow-level gamma-ray spectrometry. Distribution of 14.68 MeV fusion proton induced activation products is strongly anisotropic in agreement with simulations and falls off sharply with increasing distance to the plasma. Prospects for using the technique in ITER are discussed.

  7. Enhanced production of prostaglandins and plasminogen activator during activation of human articular chondrocytes by products of mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Meats, J E; McGuire, M K; Ebsworth, N M; Englis, D J; Russell, R G

    1984-01-01

    We have examined the way in which products of cultured human blood mononuclear cells activate human articular chondrocytes. Conditioned medium from mononuclear cells enhanced the production of prostaglandin E by cultured human chondrocytes and also stimulated fibrinolytic activity in these cultures. These two effects may be interrelated, since the increased fibrinolysis in response to products of mononuclear cells was partially inhibited by indomethacin, an inhibitor of prostaglandin biosynthesis. The increased fibrinolysis is probably attributable to plasminogen activator, since it was strongly dependent on the presence of plasminogen. Increased amounts of PGE and chondroitin sulphate were also released from intact fragments of cartilage exposed to medium from cultured mononuclear cells. The time course and dose dependence of these effects were studied. The addition of exogenous arachidonic acid markedly enhanced production of PGE2. Ultrogel AcA54 was used to fractionate medium from cultured mononuclear cells and the chondrocyte-stimulating activity eluted with an apparent molecular weight between 12 000 and 25 000 daltons. Adherent and non-adherent mononuclear blood cells were also partially separated and conditioned medium from each was assayed for chondrocyte-stimulating factors. Both populations released factor(s) which increased the production of prostaglandin E by chondrocytes, but more activity came from the adherent mononuclear cells. The possible interrelationship between the chondrocyte activating factor studied here and others described in the literature is discussed.

  8. Production of activated carbon from rice husk Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobochkin, V. V.; Tu, N. V.; Hieu, N. M.

    2016-09-01

    This work is dedicated to the production of activated carbon from rice husk from Delta of the Red River in Viet Nam. At the first stage, carbonization of a rice husk was carried out to obtain material containing 43.1% carbon and 25 % silica with a specific surface area of 51.5 m2/g. After separating of silica (the second stage), the specific surface area of the product increased to 204 m2/g and the silica content decreased to 1.23% by weight as well. The most important stage in the formation of the porous structure of the material is the activation. The products with the high specific surface area in the range of 800-1345 m2/g were obtained by activation of carbonized product with water vapour or carbon dioxide at temperatures of 700 °C and 850 °C, with varying the flow rate of the activating agent and activation time. The best results were achieved by activation of carbon material with water vapour at the flow rate of 0.08 dm3/min per 500 g of material and the temperature of 850 °C.

  9. CHARMM Force Field Parameterization of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Mottin, Melina; Souza, Paulo C. T.; Ricci, Clarisse G.; Skaf, Munir S.

    2016-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) ligands are important therapeutic drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular diseases. In particular, partial agonists and non-agonists are interesting targets to reduce glucose levels, presenting few side effects in comparison to full agonists. In this work, we present a set of CHARMM-based parameters of a molecular mechanics force field for two PPARγ ligands, GQ16 and SR1664. GQ16 belongs to the thiazolidinedione class of drugs and it is a PPARγ partial agonist that has been shown to promote the “browning” of white adipose tissue. SR1664 is the precursor of the PPARγ non-agonist class of ligands that activates PPARγ in a non-classical manner. Here, we use quantum chemical calculations consistent with the CHARMM protocol to obtain bonded and non-bonded parameters, including partial atomic charges and effective torsion potentials for both molecules. The newly parameterized models were evaluated by examining the behavior of GQ16 and SR1664 free in water and bound to the ligand binding pocket of PPARγ using molecular dynamics simulations. The potential parameters derived here are readily transferable to a variety of pharmaceutical compounds and similar PPARγ ligands. PMID:28025495

  10. Tuberculosis trends in the U.S. Armed Forces, active component, 1998-2012.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, James D; Aaron, Christopher L

    2013-05-01

    Members of the Armed Forces represent a segment of the U.S. population that may be at increased risk for tuberculosis (TB) infection, disease, and transmission due to overseas service in endemic areas and residence in congregate settings. The purpose of this study was to examine recent surveillance trends and risk factors associated with TB disease in the active component U.S. military. The rate of TB in the U.S. military -0.6 per 100,000 population (n=128) over the interval from 1998 to 2012 - was lower than the age-adjusted rate among the U.S. population (adjusted rate ratio=0.20) over the same time interval. During the last five years of the surveillance period, the most common factor associated with the diagnosis of TB disease during military service was latent infection at time of accession; also, as many as nine (24%) cases of TB were associated with deployment to Iraq or other military exposures. TB control activities should continue to mitigate unique military exposures such as crowding during recruit training and deployments to TB endemic areas.

  11. Dynamic myosin activation promotes collective morphology and migration by locally balancing oppositional forces from surrounding tissue.

    PubMed

    Aranjuez, George; Burtscher, Ashley; Sawant, Ketki; Majumder, Pralay; McDonald, Jocelyn A

    2016-06-15

    Migrating cells need to overcome physical constraints from the local microenvironment to navigate their way through tissues. Cells that move collectively have the additional challenge of negotiating complex environments in vivo while maintaining cohesion of the group as a whole. The mechanisms by which collectives maintain a migratory morphology while resisting physical constraints from the surrounding tissue are poorly understood. Drosophila border cells represent a genetic model of collective migration within a cell-dense tissue. Border cells move as a cohesive group of 6-10 cells, traversing a network of large germ line-derived nurse cells within the ovary. Here we show that the border cell cluster is compact and round throughout their entire migration, a shape that is maintained despite the mechanical pressure imposed by the surrounding nurse cells. Nonmuscle myosin II (Myo-II) activity at the cluster periphery becomes elevated in response to increased constriction by nurse cells. Furthermore, the distinctive border cell collective morphology requires highly dynamic and localized enrichment of Myo-II. Thus, activated Myo-II promotes cortical tension at the outer edge of the migrating border cell cluster to resist compressive forces from nurse cells. We propose that dynamic actomyosin tension at the periphery of collectives facilitates their movement through restrictive tissues.

  12. Review of the anticancer activities of bee products

    PubMed Central

    Premratanachai, Pongsathon; Chanchao, Chanpen

    2014-01-01

    Bee products have long been used in traditional medicine. The raw materials, crude extracts and purified active compounds from them have been found to exhibit interesting bioactivities, such as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. In addition, they have been widely used in the treatment of many immune-related diseases, as well as in recent times in the treatment of tumors. Bee product peptides induce apoptotic cell death in vitro in several transformed (cancer) human cell lines, including those derived from renal, lung, liver, prostate, bladder and lymphoid cancers. These bioactive natural products may, therefore, prove to be useful as part of a novel targeted therapy for some types of cancer, such as prostate and breast cancer. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding the in vivo and in vitro potential of selective bee products against tumor cells. PMID:25182716

  13. Force generation and work production by covalently cross-linked actin-myosin cross-bridges in rabbit muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Bershitsky, S Y; Tsaturyan, A K

    1995-01-01

    To separate a fraction of the myosin cross-bridges that are attached to the thin filaments and that participate in the mechanical responses, muscle fibers were cross-linked with 1-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-3-ethylcarbodiimide and then immersed in high-salt relaxing solution (HSRS) of 0.6 M ionic strength for detaching the unlinked myosin heads. The mechanical properties and force-generating ability of the cross-linked cross-bridges were tested with step length changes (L-steps) and temperature jumps (T-jumps) from 6-10 degrees C to 30-40 degrees C. After partial cross-linking, when instantaneous stiffness in HSRS was 25-40% of that in rigor, the mechanical behavior of the fibers was similar to that during active contraction. The kinetics of the T-jump-induced tension transients as well as the rate of the fast phase of tension recovery after length steps were close to those in unlinked fibers during activation. Under feedback force control, the T-jump initiated fiber shortening by up to 4 nm/half-sarcomere. Work produced by a cross-linked myosin head after the T-jump was up to 30 x 10(-21) J. When the extent of cross-linking was increased and fiber stiffness in HSRS approached that in rigor, the fibers lost their viscoelastic properties and ability to generate force with a rise in temperature. PMID:8519956

  14. A drag-based mechanism for vertical force production in the smallest flying insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Shannon; Laurenza, Ryan; Miller, Laura

    2013-11-01

    Previous work has shown that the flight kinematics and aerodynamics of the smallest flying insects may be significantly different than that of their larger counterparts. These small insects, such as thrips and parasitoid wasps, are on the order of 1 mm in length and operate at a Reynolds number less than 10. Due to their small size and high wing beat frequency, quantitative data on the wing kinematics of the smallest insects is not available. As a result, there has been much debate and speculation about the flight strategies employed by these insects. With the challenges associated with generating lift at low Reynolds numbers, it could be beneficial for the smallest insects to use a drag-based motion to generate some or all of its vertical force, however this has not been rigorously investigated. We used computational fluid dynamics to investigate the feasibility of drag-based propulsion in the tiniest insects. We investigated the vertical force generated by an idealized drag-based vertical stroke over a range of Reynolds numbers from 1 to 150. We also compared this stroke to more conventional hovering stroke kinematics such as that of a fruit fly and dragonfly.

  15. The Characteristics of Force Production of Kinesin-5 on MCF7 Microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojania Feizabadi, Mitra

    Unlike neural mammalian microtubules with class II of beta tubulin as the major beta tubulin in their compositions, MCF7 microtubules composed of 0% class II beta tubulin isotype, 39.1% class I beta tubulin isotype, 2.5% class III beta tubulin isotype and 58.4% class IV beta tubulin isotype. Recent studies have revealed that function of some of motor proteins can be affected by the structural composition of microtubules. In this work, we will show how the function of mitotic kinesin (Kin-5) under external load changed when moving along bovine versus MCF7 microtubules. Along MCF7 microtubules, the detachment force was reduced and the force-velocity curve was different as compared to those related to bovine brain. We will also show that the elimination of the C-terminal tails made the transport almost similar to the two sets of microtubules. This suggests that the C-terminal tails of tubulin plays a regulatory role in Kinesin-5's function.

  16. Production of Enzymatically Active Human Acetylcholinesterase in E. Coli

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    AD-A282 703 lE1l1lm11I AD( CONTRACT NO: DAMD17-90-C-0107 TITLE: PRODUCTION OF ENZYMATICALLY ACTIVE HUMAN ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE IN E . COLI PRINCIPAL...FUNDING NUMBERS Production of Enzymatically Active Human Contract No. Acetylcholinesterase in E . coli DAMD17-90-C-0107 6. AUTHOR(S) M. Gorecki, Ph.D. and M...S493pMFL-52Ser - Run #1 37 Table 8: Summary of reconstitution and purification of rhAChE derived from E . coli S493pMFL-52Ser - Run #2 38 Table 9

  17. Co-activation of syntax in bilingual language production.

    PubMed

    Hatzidaki, Anna; Branigan, Holly P; Pickering, Martin J

    2011-03-01

    We report four experiments that examined whether bilinguals' production of one language is affected by the syntactic properties of their other language. Greek-English and English-Greek highly proficient fluent bilinguals produced sentence completions following subject nouns whose translation had either the same or different number. We manipulated whether participants produced completions in the same language as the subject (the source language; one-language production) or the other language (the non-source language; two-language production), and whether they used only one language or both languages within the experimental session. The results demonstrated that the grammar systems of both languages were activated during both one-language and two-language production. The effects of the non-source language were particularly enhanced in two-language utterances, when both languages were used in the experiment, and when it was the bilinguals' native language. We interpret our results in terms of a model of bilingual sentence production.

  18. Suppression of Active-Region CME Production by the Presence of Other Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David; Moore, Ron; Barghouty, Abdulnasser; Khazanov, Igor

    2009-01-01

    From the SOHO mission s data base of MDI full-disk magnetograms spanning solar cycle 23, we have obtained a set of 40,000 magnetograms of 1,300 active regions, tracking each active region across the 30 degree central solar disk. Each active region magnetogram is cropped from the full-disk magnetogram by an automated code. The cadence is 96 minutes. From each active-region magnetogram, we have measured two whole-active-region magnetic quantities: (1) the magnetic size of the active region (the active region s total magnetic flux), and (2) a gauge of the active region s free magnetic energy (part of the free energy is released in the production of a flare and/or CME eruption). From NOAA Flare/CME catalogs, we have obtained the event (Flare/CME/SEP event) production history of each active region. Using all these data, we find that for each type of eruptive event, an active region s expected rate of event production increases as a power law of our gauge of active-region free magnetic energy. We have also found that, among active regions having nearly the same free energy, the rate of the CME production is less when there are many other active regions on the disk than when there are few or none, but there is no significant discernible suppression of the rate of flare production. This indicates that the presence of other active regions somehow tends to inhibit an active region s flare-producing magnetic explosions from becoming CMEs, contrary to the expectation from the breakout model for the production of CMEs.

  19. Polyhydroxyalkanoate production potential of heterotrophic bacteria in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Daisuke; Suzuki, Yuta; Uchida, Takahiro; Morohoshi, Jota; Sei, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production potential of cultivable heterotrophic bacteria in activated sludge by genotypic and phenotypic characterizations. A total of 114 bacterial strains were isolated from four activated sludge samples taken from a lab-scale sequencing batch reactor and three wastewater treatment processes of two municipal wastewater treatment plants. PCR detection of the phaC genes encoding class I and II PHA synthase revealed that 15% of the total isolates possessed phaC genes, all of which had the closest similarities to known phaC genes of α- and β-Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria. PHA production experiments under aerobic and nitrogen-limited conditions showed that 68% of the total isolates were capable of producing PHA from at least one of the six substrates used (acetate, propionate, lactate, butyrate, glucose and glycerol). Genotypic and phenotypic characterizations revealed that 75% of the activated sludge bacteria had PHA production potential. Our results also indicated that short-chain fatty acids would be the preferable substrates for PHA production by activated sludge bacteria, and that there might be a variety of unidentified phaC genes in activated sludge.

  20. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people aged 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or institutionalized people, such as prison inmates. Quantifying this total supply of labor is a way of determining how big the economy can get. Labor force participation rates vary significantly…

  1. An attempt to monitor tectonic forces in the Vrancea active geodynamic zone: The Baspunar experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besutiu, Lucian; Zlagnean, Luminita; Plopeanu, Marin

    2013-04-01

    An alternative model attempting to explain the unusual sub-crustal seismicity occurring in the bending zone of East Carpathians within full intra-continental environment (the so-called Vrancea zone) has assumed the presence of a FFT unstable triple junction between the three lithospheric compartments joining the area: East European Plate (EEP), Intra-Alpine Microplate (IaP) and the Moesian Microplate (MoP). Geophysical imprints (e.g. EM data, potential fields, seismic tomography), and indirect geological evidence (e.g. absence of the volcanism associated to subduction zones, the unusual high Neogene tectonic subsidence, symmetry and normal faulting within compressional environment of Focsani basin) support the hypothesis. The above-mentioned model considers the intermediate-depth seismicity as the result of the thermo-baric-accommodation phenomena generated within the colder lithosphere collapsed into the hotter upper mantle. Therefore, the amount of seismic energy thus released should be related to the volume of the lithosphere brought into thermo-baric disequilibrium by sinking into the upper mantle. Vertical dynamics of the Vrancea unstable triple junction (VTJ) seems to be controlled by the both tangential tectonic forces driving the neighbouring plates and the gravitational pull created by the eclogitization of VTJ lower crust. But, while eclogitization provides a relatively constant force, acceleration of sinking is expected to be provided by changes in the tectonic forces acting on VTJ. As changes in tectonic forces should reflect in changes of the dynamics of lithospheric compartments, geodetic means were considered for helping in their monitoring. The Peceneaga-Camena Fault (PCF) is a major lithospheric contact separating MoP and EEP, starting from the W Black Sea basin to the Vrancea zone. Geological evidence advocate for its variable geodynamic behaviour during the time, both as left-lateral or right-lateral fault. Unfortunately, GPS campaigns, so far

  2. Effect of stretching on agonist-antagonist muscle activity and muscle force output during single and multiple joint isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    McBride, J M; Deane, R; Nimphius, S

    2007-02-01

    Eight moderately active male subjects where tested for peak force in an isometric knee extension test and peak force and rate of force development in an isometric squat test. Both tests where performed at a 100 degrees knee angle and average integrated electromyography (IEMG) was measured from the vastus medialis (VM), vastus lateralis (VL) and biceps femoris (BF) muscles. Subjects performed the two conditions, stretching (S) or control (C) in a randomized order. Subjects where tested for baseline strength measures in both the isometric knee extension and isometric squat and then either stretched or sat quietly for 10 min. Following S or C subjects where then tested at six time points. Following S peak force in the isometric knee extension was significantly (P < or = 0.05) less than C at 1, 2, 8 and 16 min post. No significant difference in peak force was found between S and C in the isometric squat. However, following S the rate of force development in the isometric squat was significantly less than C at immediately post. No significant differences where observed in IEMG of the VM or VL between S and C in either the isometric knee extension or isometric squat. However, IEMG significantly decreased in the BF at 1 min post after S in comparison with C in both the isometric knee extension and isometric squat. Stretching appears to decrease muscle force output in a single joint isometric contraction and rate of force development in a multiple joint isometric contraction. Possible changes in agonist-antagonist muscle activity patterns need to be further examined.

  3. Activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force, December 1990--February 1991; Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, April--June 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Tiedemann, H.A. )

    1991-03-01

    The Oil Implementation Task Force was appointed to implement the US DOE's new oil research program directed toward increasing domestic oil production by expanded research on near- or mid-term enhanced oil recovery methods. An added priority is to preserve access to reservoirs that have the largest potential for oil recovery, but that are threatened by the large number of wells abandoned each year. This report describes the progress of research activities in the following areas: chemical flooding; gas displacement; thermal recovery; resource assessment; microbial technology; geoscience technology; and environmental technology. (CK)

  4. Interplay of drought and tropical cyclone activity in SE U.S. gross primary productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowman, Lauren E. L.; Barros, Ana P.

    2016-06-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs), often associated with massive flooding and landslides in the Southeast U.S. (SE U.S.), provide a significant input of freshwater to the hydrologic system, and their timing and trajectory significantly impact drought severity and persistence. This manuscript investigates the sensitivity of gross primary productivity (GPP) in the SE U.S. to TC activity using the 1-D column implementation of the Duke Coupled Hydrology Model with Vegetation (DCHM-V) including coupled water and energy cycles and a biochemical representation of photosynthesis. Decadal-scale simulations of water, energy, and carbon fluxes were conducted at high temporal (30 min) and spatial (4 km) resolution over the period 2002-2012. At local scales, model results without calibration compare well against AmeriFlux tower data. At regional scales, differences between the DCHM-V estimates and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer GPP product reflect the spatial organization of soil hydraulic properties and soil moisture dynamics by physiographic region, highlighting the links between the water and carbon cycles. To isolate the contribution of TC precipitation to SE U.S. productivity, control forcing simulations are contrasted with simulations where periods of TC activity in the atmospheric forcing data were replaced with climatology. During wet years, TC activity impacts productivity in 40-50% of the SE U.S. domain and explains a regional GPP increase of 3-5 Mg C/m2 that is 9% of the warm season total. In dry years, 23-34% of the domain exhibits a smaller positive response that corresponds to 4-8% of the seasonal carbon uptake, depending on TC timing and trajectory.

  5. Review: Production and functionality of active peptides from milk.

    PubMed

    Muro Urista, C; Álvarez Fernández, R; Riera Rodriguez, F; Arana Cuenca, A; Téllez Jurado, A

    2011-08-01

    In recent years, research on the production of active peptides obtained from milk and their potential functionality has grown, to a great extent. Bioactive peptides have been defined as specific protein fragments that have a positive impact on body functions or conditions, and they may ultimately have an influence on health. Individual proteins of casein or milk-derived products such as cheese and yogurt have been used as a protein source to study the isolation and activity of peptides with several applications. Currently, the milk whey waste obtained in the production of cheese also represents a protein source from which active peptides could be isolated with potential industrial applications. The active properties of milk peptides and the results found with regard to their physiological effects have led to the classification of peptides as belonging to the group of ingredients of protein nature, appropriate for use in functional foods or pharmaceutical formulations. In this study, the main peptides obtained from milk protein and the past research studies about its production and biological activities will be explained. Second, an analysis will be made on the methods to determinate the biological activities, the separation of bioactive peptides and its structure identification. All of these form the base required to obtain synthetic peptides. Finally, we explain the experimental animal and human trials done in the past years. Nevertheless, more research is required on the design and implementation of equipment for the industrial production and separation of peptides. In addition, different authors suggest that more emphasis should therefore be given to preclinical studies, proving that results are consistent and that effects are demonstrated repeatedly by several research human groups.

  6. Kelvin probe force microscopy for local characterisation of active nanoelectronic devices

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Hannes; Reissner, Patrick; Mensch, Philipp; Riel, Heike; Gotsmann, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Summary Frequency modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy (FM-KFM) is the method of choice for high resolution measurements of local surface potentials, yet on coarse topographic structures most researchers revert to amplitude modulated lift-mode techniques for better stability. This approach inevitably translates into lower lateral resolution and pronounced capacitive averaging of the locally measured contact potential difference. Furthermore, local changes in the strength of the electrostatic interaction between tip and surface easily lead to topography crosstalk seen in the surface potential. To take full advantage of the superior resolution of FM-KFM while maintaining robust topography feedback and minimal crosstalk, we introduce a novel FM-KFM controller based on a Kalman filter and direct demodulation of sidebands. We discuss the origin of sidebands in FM-KFM irrespective of the cantilever quality factor and how direct sideband demodulation enables robust amplitude modulated topography feedback. Finally, we demonstrate our single-scan FM-KFM technique on an active nanoelectronic device consisting of a 70 nm diameter InAs nanowire contacted by a pair of 120 nm thick electrodes. PMID:26734511

  7. Active control of the forced and transient response of a finite beam. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, John T.

    1990-01-01

    Structural vibrations from a point force are modelled on a finite beam. This research explores the theoretical limit on controlling beam vibrations utilizing another point source as an active controller. Three different types of excitation are considered, harmonic, random, and transient. For harmonic excitation, control over the entire beam length is possible only when the excitation frequency is near a resonant frequency of the beam. Control over a subregion may be obtained even between resonant frequencies at the cost of increasing the vibration outside of the control region. For random excitation, integrating the expected value of the displacement squared over the required interval, is shown to yield the identical cost function as obtained by integrating the cost function for harmonic excitation over all excitation frequencies. As a result, it is always possible to reduce the cost function for random excitation whether controlling the entire beam or just a subregion, without ever increasing the vibration outside the region in which control is desired. The last type of excitation considered is a single, transient pulse. The form of the controller is specified as either one or two delayed pulses, thus constraining the controller to be casual. The best possible control is examined while varying the region of control and the controller location. It is found that control is always possible using either one or two control pulses.

  8. Bacterial skin infections, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2000-2012.

    PubMed

    2013-12-01

    From 2000 through 2012, health care records of the Military Health System documented 998,671 incident cases of bacterial skin infections among active component members of the U.S. Armed Forces. Most cases (97.3%) were identified from records of outpatient medical encounters rather than hospitalizations. Cellulitis accounted for half (50.9%) of all cases of bacterial skin infection but 96 percent of associated hospital bed days. Of all cases, 42.3 percent were "other" skin infections (i.e., folliculitis, impetigo, pyoderma, pyogenic granuloma, other and unspecified infections). The remainder were attributable to carbuncles/furuncles (6.6%) and erysipelas (0.1%). Rates of infection were higher among female service members except for "other" skin infections. In general, the highest rates were associated with youth, recruit trainee status, and junior enlisted rank; however, rates of erysipelas were highest among those 50 years and older. Annual incidence rates of all bacterial skin infections have increased greatly since 2000. During the entire period, such infections required more than 1.4 million health care encounters and 94,000 hospital bed-days (equivalent to 257 years of lost duty time). The prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment of bacterial skin infections, particularly in high risk settings, deserve continued emphasis.

  9. Gastrointestinal infections, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2002-2012.

    PubMed

    2013-10-01

    Acute gastroenteritis and other infectious disorders of the gastrointestinal system are common in civilian and military populations. During the years 2002 through 2012, there were 286,305 cases of gastrointestinal infection (GI) diagnosed among members of the active component of the U.S. Armed Forces. The distribution of presumed causes of these illnesses (as reported in administrative medical records) was bacterial (29%), viral (68%), and parasitic (3%). Most recorded diagnoses did not specify an etiologic agent. In addition, there were 379,509 other healthcare encounters in which the recorded diagnosis was simply "diarrhea." During the period, rates of hospitalization for Clostridium difficile and "ill-defined intestinal infection" increased greatly. In the outpatient setting, rates of GI diagnoses remained stable or declined, but rates of non-specific "diarrhea" increased steadily. Among reportable infectious causes of GI, rates of both campylobacteriosis and norovirus diagnoses increased steadily since 2009. Among deployed service members with GI during the period 2005 through 2012, viral agents were most often recorded as the underlying etiology (60%). Salmonellosis was the most frequent specific bacterial etiology diagnosed among deployed service members. Countermeasures against GI among service member should be emphasized in military education programs at all levels, during field training exercises, and particularly in deployment settings.

  10. Arm and shoulder conditions, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2003-2012.

    PubMed

    2013-06-01

    This analysis estimated the incidence and health care burden of acute and chronic conditions of the arm and shoulder among active component service members of the Armed Forces from 1 January 2003 through 31 December 2012. There were 196,789 diagnosed incident cases of acute arm and shoulder conditions for a rate of 13.7 cases per 1,000 person-years. The annual incidence rates of sprains, the most common acute condition, nearly doubled during the period. Diagnoses of chronic conditions (overall rate of 28.8 per 1,000 person-years) increased 25 percent during the period, mainly associated with a doubling of the incidence of diagnoses of joint pain. Incidence rates of chronic disorders were progressively higher among successively older age groups of service members. The health care burden of all arm and shoulder conditions together steadily increased during the period, as indicated by numbers of health care encounters, individuals affected, and lost work time. The most commonly documented causes associated with acute and chronic conditions are described.

  11. Incident diagnoses of leishmaniasis, active and reserve components, U.S. Armed Forces, 2001-2016.

    PubMed

    Stahlman, Shauna; Williams, Valerie F; Taubman, Stephen B

    2017-02-01

    During the surveillance period, there were 2,040 incident diagnoses/reports of leishmaniasis among members of the U.S. Armed Forces. Cutaneous leishmaniasis accounted for more than three-fifths (61.0%) of the total diagnoses/ reports among active component service members and for less than half (48.0%) of the total cases among reserve component members. The visceral form of leishmaniasis represented 1.2% of the total cases. Approximately two-fifths (40.6%) of the total diagnoses/reports were classified as "unspecified" with respect to the type of leishmaniasis. The lowest annual numbers of diagnoses/reports in the past decade were seen in 2011-2016 and reached a nadir of 11 cases in 2015. During the entire surveillance period, 71.7% of the total leishmaniasis cases were diagnosed or reported during the 7 months from early autumn to the beginning of spring (September-March) in the northern hemisphere. The majority of cases acquired in the Middle East (73.6%), South/Central America (87.5%), and other or unknown locations (64.5%) were diagnosed or reported during this 7-month interval.

  12. Biological Activity of Recently Discovered Halogenated Marine Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Gordon W.

    2015-01-01

    This review presents the biological activity—antibacterial, antifungal, anti-parasitic, antiviral, antitumor, antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and enzymatic activity—of halogenated marine natural products discovered in the past five years. Newly discovered examples that do not report biological activity are not included. PMID:26133553

  13. Eliciting Production of L2 Target Structures through Priming Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonough, Kim; Trofimovich, Pavel; Neumann, Heike

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the pedagogical applications of structural priming research in an English for academic purposes (EAP) context, investigating whether priming activities are an effective tool for eliciting production of target grammatical structures. University students across four EAP classes carried out a total of 6 information-exchange…

  14. Shelfal sediment transport by undercurrents forces turbidity current activity during high sea level, Chile continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, Anne; Hebbeln, Dierk; Regenberg, Marcus; Lückge, Andreas; Strecker, Manfred. R.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the links between terrigenous sediment supply and marine transport and depositional processes along tectonically active margins is essential to decipher turbidite successions as potential archives of climatic and seismic forcings and to comprehend timing and quantity of marine clastic deposition. Sequence stratigraphic models predict coarse-grained terrigenous sediment delivery to deep-marine sites mainly during sea-level fall and lowstand. Marine clastic deposition during periods of transgression and highstand has been attributed to the continued geomorphic connectivity between terrestrial sediment sources and marine sinks (e.g., rivers connected to submarine canyons) often facilitated by narrow shelves, high sediment supply causing delta migration to the shelf edge, and/or abrupt increases in sediment supply due to climatic variability or catastrophic events. To decipher the controls on Holocene highstand turbidite deposition, we analyzed twelve sediment cores of spatially disparate, coeval Holocene turbidite systems along the Chile margin (29-40°S) with changing climatic and geomorphic characteristics but uniform changes of sea level. Intraslope basins in north-central Chile (29-33°S) offshore a narrow to absent shelf record a shut-off of turbidite activity during the Holocene. In contrast, core sites in south-central Chile (36-40°S) offshore a wide continental shelf have repeatedly experienced turbidite deposition during sea-level highstand conditions, even though most of the depocenters are not connected via canyons to sediment sources. The interplay of stable high sediment supply related to strong onshore precipitation in combination with a wide shelf, over which undercurrents move sediment towards the shelf edge, appears to control Holocene turbidite sedimentation and sediment export to the deep sea.

  15. Itawamba Community College and Tecumseh Products Company, Inc.: A High Performance Work Force Development Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Itawamba Community Coll., Tupelo, MS.

    Since 1976, Mississippi's Itawamba Community College (ICC) and Tecumseh Products Company (TPC) have maintained a cooperative relationship providing the firm with support and services stemming from ICC's Skill/Tech One-Stop Career Center. The support offered to TPC has included the following: (1) since 1976, 105 pre-employment classes have been…

  16. LC-MS/MS method for the characterization of the forced degradation products of Entecavir.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Thippani; Rao, Pothuraju Nageswara; Rao, Ramisetti Nageswara

    2014-02-01

    A rapid, specific, and reliable isocratic LC-MS/MS method has been developed and validated for the identification and characterization of the stressed degradation products of Entecavir (ETV). ETV, an antiviral drug, was subjected to hydrolysis (acidic, alkaline, and neutral), oxidation, photolysis and thermal stress, as per the international conference on harmonization specified conditions. The drug showed extensive degradation under oxidative and acid hydrolysis stress conditions. However, it was stable to thermal, acidic, neutral, and photolysis stress conditions. A total of five degradation products were observed and the chromatographic separation of the drug and its degradation products were achieved on a Waters Symmetry C18 (250 mm × 4.6 mm, id, 5 μm) column using 20 mM ammonium acetate (pH 3)/acetonitrile (50:50, v/v) as a mobile phase. The degradation products were characterized by LC-MS/MS and its fragmentation pathways were proposed. The LC-MS method was validated with respect to specificity, linearity, accuracy, and precision. No previous reports were found in the literature regarding the degradation behavior of ETV.

  17. An Examination of the Technical Product Knowledge of Contracting Professionals at Air Force System Program Offices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-12

    8217 D Ruponu ~till R .. pocae COUll I s 14 10. Briefly idantffy tn• product! sel ’\\flcce for whieh you contract; for example GPS aatemte, F . 22. or...ORGANIZATION .................................................................10  F .  METHODOLOGY...EXPECTATIONS ..........................................................................................34  F .  SUMMARY

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF ACTIVATED CARBONS FROM COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Harold H. Schobert; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Zhe Lu

    2003-09-30

    The increasing role of coal as a source of energy in the 21st century will demand environmental and cost-effective strategies for the use of coal combustion by-products (CCBPs), mainly unburned carbon in fly ash. Unburned carbon is nowadays regarded as a waste product and its fate is mainly disposal, due to the present lack of efficient routes for its utilization. However, unburned carbon is a potential precursor for the production of adsorbent carbons, since it has gone through a devolatilization process while in the combustor, and therefore, only requires to be activated. Accordingly, the principal objective of this work was to characterize and utilize the unburned carbon in fly ash for the production of activated carbons. The unburned carbon samples were collected from different combustion systems, including pulverized utility boilers, a utility cyclone, a stoker, and a fluidized bed combustor. LOI (loss-on-ignition), proximate, ultimate, and petrographic analyses were conducted, and the surface areas of the samples were characterized by N2 adsorption isotherms at 77K. The LOIs of the unburned carbon samples varied between 21.79-84.52%. The proximate analyses showed that all the samples had very low moisture contents (0.17 to 3.39 wt %), while the volatile matter contents varied between 0.45 to 24.82 wt%. The elemental analyses show that all the unburned carbon samples consist mainly of carbon with very little hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur and oxygen In addition, the potential use of unburned carbon as precursor for activated carbon (AC) was investigated. Activated carbons with specific surface area up to 1075m{sup 2}/g were produced from the unburned carbon. The porosity of the resultant activated carbons was related to the properties of the unburned carbon feedstock and the activation conditions used. It was found that not all the unburned carbon samples are equally suited for activation, and furthermore, their potential as activated carbons precursors could be

  19. Considerations for higher efficiency and productivity in research activities.

    PubMed

    Forero, Diego A; Moore, Jason H

    2016-01-01

    There are several factors that are known to affect research productivity; some of them imply the need for large financial investments and others are related to work styles. There are some articles that provide suggestions for early career scientists (PhD students and postdocs) but few publications are oriented to professors about scientific leadership. As academic mentoring might be useful at all levels of experience, in this note we suggest several key considerations for higher efficiency and productivity in academic and research activities. More research is needed into the main work style features that differentiate highly productive scientists and research groups, as some of them could be innate and others could be transferable. As funding agencies, universities and research centers invest large amounts of money in order to have a better scientific productivity, a deeper understanding of these factors will be of high academic and societal impact.

  20. Prediction of Active-Region CME Productivity from Magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Gary, G. A.

    2004-01-01

    We report results of an expanded evaluation of whole-active-region magnetic measures as predictors of active-region coronal mass ejection (CME) productivity. Previously, in a sample of 17 vector magnetograms of 12 bipolar active regions observed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) vector magnetograph, from each magnetogram we extracted a measure of the size of the active region (the active region s total magnetic flux a) and four measures of the nonpotentiality of the active region: the strong-shear length L(sub SS), the strong-gradient length L(sub SG), the net vertical electric current I(sub N), and the net-current magnetic twist parameter alpha (sub IN). This sample size allowed us to show that each of the four nonpotentiality measures was statistically significantly correlated with active-region CME productivity in time windows of a few days centered on the day of the magnetogram. We have now added a fifth measure of active-region nonpotentiality (the best-constant-alpha magnetic twist parameter (alpha sub BC)), and have expanded the sample to 36 MSFC vector magnetograms of 31 bipolar active regions. This larger sample allows us to demonstrate statistically significant correlations of each of the five nonpotentiality measures with future CME productivity, in time windows of a few days starting from the day of the magnetogram. The two magnetic twist parameters (alpha (sub 1N) and alpha (sub BC)) are normalized measures of an active region s nonpotentially in that they do not depend directly on the size of the active region, while the other three nonpotentiality measures (L(sub SS), L(sub SG), and I(sub N)) are non-normalized measures in that they do depend directly on active-region size. We find (1) Each of the five nonpotentiality measures is statistically significantly correlated (correlation confidence level greater than 95%) with future CME productivity and has a CME prediction success rate of approximately 80%. (2) None of the nonpotentiality

  1. Learning about Modes in Atomic Force Microscopy by Means of Hands-On Activities Based on a Simple Apparatus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phuapaiboon, Unchada; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Osotchan, Tanakorn

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the results of using a low-cost hands-on setup in combination with accompanying activities to promote understanding of the contact mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM). This contact mode setup enabled learners to study how AFM works by hand scanning using probing cantilevers with different characteristics on…

  2. A Hands-On Activity to Build Mastery of Intermolecular Forces and Its Impacts on Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruck, Laura B.

    2016-01-01

    The intermolecular forces activity presented in this article is designed to foster concept-building through students' use of concrete, manipulative objects, and it was developed to be pedagogically sound. Data analysis via pre- and posttesting and subsequent exam questions indicated that students who had the opportunity to participate in the…

  3. Natural Product Anacardic Acid from Cashew Nut Shells Stimulates Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Production and Bactericidal Activity.

    PubMed

    Hollands, Andrew; Corriden, Ross; Gysler, Gabriela; Dahesh, Samira; Olson, Joshua; Raza Ali, Syed; Kunkel, Maya T; Lin, Ann E; Forli, Stefano; Newton, Alexandra C; Kumar, Geetha B; Nair, Bipin G; Perry, J Jefferson P; Nizet, Victor

    2016-07-01

    Emerging antibiotic resistance among pathogenic bacteria is an issue of great clinical importance, and new approaches to therapy are urgently needed. Anacardic acid, the primary active component of cashew nut shell extract, is a natural product used in the treatment of a variety of medical conditions, including infectious abscesses. Here, we investigate the effects of this natural product on the function of human neutrophils. We find that anacardic acid stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species and neutrophil extracellular traps, two mechanisms utilized by neutrophils to kill invading bacteria. Molecular modeling and pharmacological inhibitor studies suggest anacardic acid stimulation of neutrophils occurs in a PI3K-dependent manner through activation of surface-expressed G protein-coupled sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors. Neutrophil extracellular traps produced in response to anacardic acid are bactericidal and complement select direct antimicrobial activities of the compound.

  4. JV Task 90 - Activated Carbon Production from North Dakota Lignite

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Benson; Charlene Crocker; Rokan Zaman; Mark Musich; Edwin Olson

    2008-03-31

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has pursued a research program for producing activated carbon from North Dakota lignite that can be competitive with commercial-grade activated carbon. As part of this effort, small-scale production of activated carbon was produced from Fort Union lignite. A conceptual design of a commercial activated carbon production plant was drawn, and a market assessment was performed to determine likely revenue streams for the produced carbon. Activated carbon was produced from lignite coal in both laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactors and in a small pilot-scale rotary kiln. The EERC was successfully able to upgrade the laboratory-scale activated carbon production system to a pilot-scale rotary kiln system. The activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite was superior to commercial grade DARCO{reg_sign} FGD and Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product with respect to iodine number. The iodine number of North Dakota lignite-derived activated carbon was between 600 and 800 mg I{sub 2}/g, whereas the iodine number of DARCO FGD was between 500 and 600 mg I{sub 2}/g, and the iodine number of Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product was around 275 mg I{sub 2}/g. The EERC performed both bench-scale and pilot-scale mercury capture tests using the activated carbon made under various optimization process conditions. For comparison, the mercury capture capability of commercial DARCO FGD was also tested. The lab-scale apparatus is a thin fixed-bed mercury-screening system, which has been used by the EERC for many mercury capture screen tests. The pilot-scale systems included two combustion units, both equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Activated carbons were also tested in a slipstream baghouse at a Texas power plant. The results indicated that the activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite coal is capable of removing mercury from flue gas. The tests showed that activated carbon with the greatest iodine number

  5. Activation processes in a medical linear accelerator and spatial distribution of activation products.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Helmut W; Tabot, Ben E; Poppe, Björn

    2006-12-21

    Activation products have been identified by in situ gamma spectroscopy at the isocentre of a medical linear accelerator shortly after termination of a high energy photon beam irradiation with 15 x 15 cm field size. Spectra have been recorded either with an open or with a closed collimator. Whilst some activation products disappear from the spectrum with closed collimator or exhibit reduced count rates, others remain with identical intensity. The former isotopes are neutron-deficient and mostly decay by positron emission or electron capture; the latter have neutron excess and decay by beta(-) emission. This new finding is consistent with the assumption that photons in the primary beam produce activation products by (gamma, n) reactions in the treatment head and subsequently the neutrons created in these processes undergo (n, gamma) reactions creating activation products in a much larger area. These findings are expected to be generally applicable to all medical high energy linear accelerators.

  6. Control of forces applied by individual fingers engaged in restraint of an active object.

    PubMed

    Burstedt, M K; Birznieks, I; Edin, B B; Johansson, R S

    1997-07-01

    We investigated the coordination of fingertip forces in subjects who used the tips of two fingers to restrain an instrumented manipulandum with horizontally oriented grip surfaces. The grip surfaces were subjected to tangential pulling forces in the distal direction in relation to the fingers. The subjects used either the right index and middle fingers (unimanual grasp) or both index fingers (bimanual grasp) to restrain the manipulandum. To change the frictional condition at the digit-object interfaces, either both grip surfaces were covered with sandpaper or one was covered with sandpaper and the other with rayon. The forces applied normally and tangentially to the grip surfaces were measured separately at each plate along with the position of the plates. Subjects could have performed the present task successfully with many different force distributions between the digits. However, they partitioned the load in a manner that reflected the frictional condition at the local digit-object interfaces. When both digits contacted sandpaper, they typically partitioned the load symmetrically, but when one digit made contact with rayon and the other with sandpaper, the digit contacting the less slippery material (sandpaper) took up a larger part of the load. The normal forces were also influenced by the frictional condition, but they reflected the average friction at the two contact sites rather than the local friction. That is, when friction was low at one of the digit-object interfaces, only the applied normal forces increased at both digits. Thus sensory information related to the local frictional condition at the respective digit-object interfaces controlled the normal force at both digits. The normal:tangential force ratio at each digit appeared to be a controlled variable. It was adjusted independently at each digit to the minimum ratio required to prevent frictional slippage, keeping an adequate safety margin against slippage. This was accomplished by the scaling of

  7. Aerobic activated sludge transformation of methotrexate: identification of biotransformation products.

    PubMed

    Kosjek, Tina; Negreira, Noelia; de Alda, Miren López; Barceló, Damià

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the biotransformation of cytostatic and immunosuppressive pharmaceutical methotrexate. Its susceptibility to microbiological breakdown was studied in a batch biotransformation system, in presence or absence of carbon source and at two activated sludge concentrations. The primary focus of the present study are methotrexate biotransformation products, which were tentatively identified by the ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole--Orbitrap-MS. Data-dependent experiments, combining full-scan MS data with product ion spectra were acquired, in order to identify the molecular ions of methotrexate transformation products, to propose the molecular formulae and to elucidate their chemical structures. Among the identified transformation products 2,4-diamino-N10-methyl-pteroic acid is most abundant and persistent. Other biotransformation reactions involve demethylation, oxidative cleavage of amine, cleavage of C-N bond, aldehyde to carboxylate transformation and hydroxylation. Finally, a breakdown pathway is proposed, which shows that most of methotrexate breakdown products retain the diaminopteridine structural segment. In total we propose nine transformation products, among them eight are described as methotrexate transformation products for the first time.

  8. Production and characterization of lignocellulosic biomass-derived activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Namazi, A B; Jia, C Q; Allen, D G

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this work is to establish the technical feasibility of producing activated carbon from pulp mill sludges. KOH chemical activation of four lignocellulosic biomass materials, two sludges from pulp mills, one sludge for a linerboard mill, and cow manure, were investigated experimentally, with a focus on the effects of KOH/biomass ratio (1/1, 1.5/1 and 2/1), activation temperature (400-600 °C) and activation time (1 to 2 h) on the development of porosity. The activation products were characterized for their physical and chemical properties using a surface area analyzer, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Experiments were carried out to establish the effectiveness of the lignocellulosic biomass-derived activated carbon in removing methylene blue (MB), a surrogate of large organic molecules. The results show that the activated carbon are highly porous with specific surface area greater than 500 m²/g. The yield of activated carbon was greater than the percent of fixed carbon in the dry sludge, suggesting that the activation process was able to capture a substantial amount of carbon from the organic matter in the sludge. While 400 °C was too low, 600 °C was high enough to sustain a substantial rate of activation for linerboard sludge. The KOH/biomass ratio, activation temperature and time all play important roles in pore development and yield control, allowing optimization of the activation process. MB adsorption followed a Langmuir isotherm for all four activated carbon, although the adsorption capacity of NK-primary sludge-derived activated carbon was considerably lower than the rest, consistent with its lower specific surface area.

  9. Stability-Indicating Method and LC-MS-MS Characterization of Forced Degradation Products of Sofosbuvir.

    PubMed

    Nebsen, M; Elzanfaly, Eman S

    2016-07-19

    Sofosbuvir is a novel direct acting antiviral agent against hepatitis C virus. In the present work, a rapid, specific and reproducible isocratic reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method has been developed and validated for the determination of sofosbuvir in the presence of its stressed degradation products. Sobosbuvir was subjected to hydrolysis (acidic, alkaline and neutral), oxidation, photolysis and thermal stress, as per international conference on harmonization (ICH) conditions. The drug showed degradation under oxidative, photolysis, acid and base hydrolysis stress conditions. However, it was stable under thermal and neutral hydrolysis stress conditions. Chromatographic separation of the drug from its degradation products was performed on Inertsil ODS-3 C18 (250 mm × 4.6 mm i.d., 5 µm) column using a green mobile phase of methanol:water 70:30 (v/v). The degradation products were characterized by LC-MS-MS and the fragmentation pathways were proposed. The developed method was validated as per ICH guidelines. No previous method was reported regarding the degradation behavior of sofosbuvir.

  10. Evaluation of force-torque displays for use with space station telerobotic activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrich, Robert C.; Bierschwale, John M.; Manahan, Meera K.; Stuart, Mark A.; Legendre, A. Jay

    1992-01-01

    Recent experiments which addressed Space Station remote manipulation tasks found that tactile force feedback (reflecting forces and torques encountered at the end-effector through the manipulator hand controller) does not improve performance significantly. Subjective response from astronaut and non-astronaut test subjects indicated that force information, provided visually, could be useful. No research exists which specifically investigates methods of presenting force-torque information visually. This experiment was designed to evaluate seven different visual force-torque displays which were found in an informal telephone survey. The displays were prototyped in the HyperCard programming environment. In a within-subjects experiment, 14 subjects nullified forces and torques presented statically, using response buttons located at the bottom of the screen. Dependent measures included questionnaire data, errors, and response time. Subjective data generally demonstrate that subjects rated variations of pseudo-perspective displays consistently better than bar graph and digital displays. Subjects commented that the bar graph and digital displays could be used, but were not compatible with using hand controllers. Quantitative data show similar trends to the subjective data, except that the bar graph and digital displays both provided good performance, perhaps do to the mapping of response buttons to display elements. Results indicate that for this set of displays, the pseudo-perspective displays generally represent a more intuitive format for presenting force-torque information.

  11. Active Traction Force Response to Long-Term Cyclic Stretch Is Dependent on Cell Pre-stress.

    PubMed

    Cirka, Heather; Monterosso, Melissa; Diamantides, Nicole; Favreau, John; Wen, Qi; Billiar, Kristen

    2016-04-26

    Mechanical stimulation is recognized as a potent modulator of cellular behaviors such as proliferation, differentiation, and extracellular matrix assembly. However, the study of how cell-generated traction force changes in response to stretch is generally limited to short-term stimulation. The goal of this work is to determine how cells actively alter their traction force in response to long-term physiological cyclic stretch as a function of cell pre-stress. We have developed, to our knowledge, a novel method to assess traction force after long-term (24 h) uniaxial or biaxial cyclic stretch under conditions of high cell pre-stress with culture on stiff (7.5 kPa) polyacrylamide gels (with or without transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1)) and low pre-stress by treating with blebbistatin or culture on soft gels (0.6 kPa). In response to equibiaxial stretch, valvular interstitial cells on stiff substrates decreased their traction force (from 300 nN to 100 nN) and spread area (from 3000 to 2100 μm(2)). With uniaxial stretch, the cells had similar decreases in traction force and area and reoriented perpendicular to the stretch. TGF-β1-treated valvular interstitial cells had higher pre-stress (1100 nN) and exhibited a larger drop in traction force with uniaxial stretch, but the percentage changes in force and area with stretch were similar to the non-TGF-β1-treated group. Cells with inhibited myosin II motors increased traction force (from 41 nN to 63 nN) and slightly reoriented toward the stretch direction. In contrast, cells cultured on soft gels increased their traction force significantly, from 15 nN to 45 nN, doubled their spread area, elongated from an initially rounded morphology, and reoriented perpendicular to the uniaxial stretch. Contractile-moment measurements provided results consistent with total traction force measurements. The combined results indicate that the change in traction force in response to external cyclic stretch is dependent upon the

  12. A CRITICAL ASSESSMENT OF NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELD MODELING OF THE SOLAR CORONA FOR ACTIVE REGION 10953

    SciTech Connect

    DeRosa, Marc L.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Cheung, Mark C. M.; Lites, Bruce W.; Amari, Tahar; Canou, Aurelien; McTiernan, James M.; Regnier, Stephane; Thalmann, Julia K.; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Inhester, Bernd; Tadesse, Tilaye; Valori, Gherardo; Wheatland, Michael S.; Conlon, Paul A.; Fuhrmann, Marcel

    2009-05-10

    Nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) models are thought to be viable tools for investigating the structure, dynamics, and evolution of the coronae of solar active regions. In a series of NLFFF modeling studies, we have found that NLFFF models are successful in application to analytic test cases, and relatively successful when applied to numerically constructed Sun-like test cases, but they are less successful in application to real solar data. Different NLFFF models have been found to have markedly different field line configurations and to provide widely varying estimates of the magnetic free energy in the coronal volume, when applied to solar data. NLFFF models require consistent, force-free vector magnetic boundary data. However, vector magnetogram observations sampling the photosphere, which is dynamic and contains significant Lorentz and buoyancy forces, do not satisfy this requirement, thus creating several major problems for force-free coronal modeling efforts. In this paper, we discuss NLFFF modeling of NOAA Active Region 10953 using Hinode/SOT-SP, Hinode/XRT, STEREO/SECCHI-EUVI, and SOHO/MDI observations, and in the process illustrate three such issues we judge to be critical to the success of NLFFF modeling: (1) vector magnetic field data covering larger areas are needed so that more electric currents associated with the full active regions of interest are measured, (2) the modeling algorithms need a way to accommodate the various uncertainties in the boundary data, and (3) a more realistic physical model is needed to approximate the photosphere-to-corona interface in order to better transform the forced photospheric magnetograms into adequate approximations of nearly force-free fields at the base of the corona. We make recommendations for future modeling efforts to overcome these as yet unsolved problems.

  13. ACTIVITY OF NATURAL PRODUCTS AGAINST SOME PHYTOPATHOGENIC FUNGI.

    PubMed

    La Torre, A; Caradonia, F; Gianferro, M; Molinu, M G; Battaglia, V

    2014-01-01

    The requirement of environmental protection and food safety is perceived with always major interest by public opinion and it is consistent with European Union legislation on the sustainable use of pesticides (Directive 2009/128/EC). This directive requires member states to promote low pesticide-input, giving priority to non-chemical methods and low risk plant protection products. In order to contribute to the achievement of these objectives antifungal activity of natural substances, characterized by a good toxicological and ecotoxicological profile, was tested. Essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia, essential oil of Syzygium aromaticum and extract from Mimosa tenuiflora were tested against Alternaria alternata, Botrytis cinerea and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (races 1 and 2). In vitro tests involved determination of radial growth of the colonies of fungi in the presence of varying concentrations of tested products in agar media and determination of germination percentage in the presence of tested product at various concentrations. The products based on essential oil of M. alternifolia were also tested in vivo on tomato fruits wounded and artificially inoculated with A. alternata or with B. cinerea. The in vitro tests showed the antifungal activity of both essential oils instead the extract from M. tenuiflora exhibited poor antifungal activity and only against A. alternata and B. cinerea. The results on tomato fruits showed inhibition of grey mould and black mould by essential oil of M. alternifolia. The antifungal activity increased with increasing concentrations. In conclusion, the obtained results in the present study showed promising prospects for the utilisation of investigated products to reduce the using of antifungal chemicals and to achieve a more sustainable use of pesticides.

  14. UV microbeam irradiations of the mitotic spindle. II. Spindle fiber dynamics and force production

    SciTech Connect

    Spurck, T.P.; Stonington, O.G.; Snyder, J.A.; Pickett-Heaps, J.D.; Bajer, A.; Mole-Bajer, J. )

    1990-10-01

    Metaphase and anaphase spindles in cultured newt and PtK1 cells were irradiated with a UV microbeam (285 nM), creating areas of reduced birefringence (ARBs) in 3 s that selectively either severed a few fibers or cut across the half spindle. In either case, the birefringence at the polewards edge of the ARB rapidly faded polewards, while it remained fairly constant at the other, kinetochore edge. Shorter astral fibers, however, remained present in the enlarged ARB; presumably these had not been cut by the irradiation. After this enlargement of the ARB, metaphase spindles recovered rapidly as the detached pole moved back towards the chromosomes, reestablishing spindle fibers as the ARB closed; this happened when the ARB cut a few fibers or across the entire half spindle. We never detected elongation of the cut kinetochore fibers. Rather, astral fibers growing from the pole appeared to bridge and then close the ARB, just before the movement of the pole toward the chromosomes. When a second irradiation was directed into the closing ARB, the polewards movement again stopped before it restarted. In all metaphase cells, once the pole had reestablished connection with the chromosomes, the unirradiated half spindle then also shortened to create a smaller symmetrical spindle capable of normal anaphase later. Anaphase cells did not recover this way; the severed pole remained detached but the chromosomes continued a modified form of movement, clumping into a telophase-like group. The results are discussed in terms of controls operating on spindle microtubule stability and mechanisms of mitotic force generation.

  15. Development of the method of an electrohydrodynamic force effect on a boundary layer for active control of aerodynamic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleshin, B. S.; Khomich, V. Yu.; Chernyshev, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    The results of investigations on the possibility of an electrohydrodynamic force effect on a gas flow implemented with the help of a barrier discharge are presented. A new method of controlling the laminar flow around a base with suppression of instabilities of the incoming flow due to electrohydrodynamic force action on the boundary layer near the forward edge of a swept wing is proposed. An efficient multidischarge actuator system is developed and created for active control of aerodynamic flows with induced-air-flow characteristics exceeding the world analogues.

  16. Does living and working in a hot environment induce clinically relevant changes in immune function and voluntary force production capacity?

    PubMed

    Knez, Wade; Girard, Olivier; Racinais, Sebastien; Walsh, Andrew; Gaoua, Nadia; Grantham, Justin

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of living (summer vs. winter) and working (morning vs. afternoon) in a hot environment on markers of immune function and forearm strength. Thirty-one healthy male gas field employees were screened before (between 05:30 and 07:00) and after their working day (between 15:30 and 17:00) during both seasons. Body core temperature and physical activity were recorded throughout the working days. The hot condition (i.e. summer) led a higher (p≤0.05) average body core temperature (~37.2 vs. ~37.4 °C) but reduced physical activity (-14.8%) during the work-shift. Our data showed an increase (p≤0.05) in lymphocyte and monocyte counts in the summer. Additionally, work-shift resulted in significant (p≤0.001) changes in leukocytes, lymphocytes and monocytes independently of the environment. Handgrip (p=0.069) and pinch (p=0.077) forces tended to be reduced from pre-to post-work, while only force produced during handgrip manoeuvres was significantly reduced (p≤0.05) during the hot compared to the temperate season. No interactions were observed between the environment and work-shift for any marker of immune function or forearm strength. In summary, working and living in hot conditions impact on markers of immune function and work capacity; however by self-regulating energy expenditure, immune markers remained in a healthy reference range.

  17. Regulation of endothelium-derived vasoactive autacoid production by hemodynamic forces.

    PubMed

    Busse, Rudi; Fleming, Ingrid

    2003-01-01

    Endothelial cells, which are situated at the interface between blood and the vessel wall, have a crucial role in controlling vascular tone and homeostasis, particularly in determining the expression of pro-atherosclerotic and anti-atherosclerotic genes. Many of these effects are mediated by changes in the generation and release of endothelium-derived autacoids [from the Greek autos (self) and akos (remedy)], which are generally short-lived and locally acting. In vivo, endothelial cells are constantly subjected to mechanical stimulation, which in turn determines the acute production of autacoids and the levels of autacoid-producing enzymes.

  18. Fast skeletal muscle troponin activation increases force of mouse fast skeletal muscle and ameliorates weakness due to nebulin-deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Jeong; De Winter, Josine M; Buck, Danielle; Jasper, Jeffrey R; Malik, Fady I; Labeit, Siegfried; Ottenheijm, Coen A; Granzier, Henk

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the fast skeletal muscle troponin activator, CK-2066260, on calcium-induced force development was studied in skinned fast skeletal muscle fibers from wildtype (WT) and nebulin deficient (NEB KO) mice. Nebulin is a sarcomeric protein that when absent (NEB KO mouse) or present at low levels (nemaline myopathy (NM) patients with NEB mutations) causes muscle weakness. We studied the effect of fast skeletal troponin activation on WT muscle and tested whether it might be a therapeutic mechanism to increase muscle strength in nebulin deficient muscle. We measured tension-pCa relations with and without added CK-2066260. Maximal active tension in NEB KO tibialis cranialis fibers in the absence of CK-2066260 was ∼60% less than in WT fibers, consistent with earlier work. CK-2066260 shifted the tension-calcium relationship leftwards, with the largest relative increase (up to 8-fold) at low to intermediate calcium levels. This was a general effect that was present in both WT and NEB KO fiber bundles. At pCa levels above ∼6.0 (i.e., calcium concentrations <1 µM), CK-2066260 increased tension of NEB KO fibers to beyond that of WT fibers. Crossbridge cycling kinetics were studied by measuring k(tr) (rate constant of force redevelopment following a rapid shortening/restretch). CK-2066260 greatly increased k(tr) at submaximal activation levels in both WT and NEB KO fiber bundles. We also studied the sarcomere length (SL) dependence of the CK-2066260 effect (SL 2.1 µm and 2.6 µm) and found that in the NEB KO fibers, CK-2066260 had a larger effect on calcium sensitivity at the long SL. We conclude that fast skeletal muscle troponin activation increases force at submaximal activation in both wildtype and NEB KO fiber bundles and, importantly, that this troponin activation is a potential therapeutic mechanism for increasing force in NM and other skeletal muscle diseases with loss of muscle strength.

  19. Non-covalent forces tune the electron transfer complex between ferredoxin and sulfite reductase to optimize enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju Yaen; Kinoshita, Misaki; Kume, Satoshi; Gt, Hanke; Sugiki, Toshihiko; Ladbury, John E; Kojima, Chojiro; Ikegami, Takahisa; Kurisu, Genji; Goto, Yuji; Hase, Toshiharu; Lee, Young-Ho

    2016-11-01

    Although electrostatic interactions between negatively charged ferredoxin (Fd) and positively charged sulfite reductase (SiR) have been predominantly highlighted to characterize complex formation, the detailed nature of intermolecular forces remains to be fully elucidated. We investigated interprotein forces for the formation of an electron transfer complex between Fd and SiR and their relationship to SiR activity using various approaches over NaCl concentrations between 0 and 400 mM. Fd-dependent SiR activity assays revealed a bell-shaped activity curve with a maximum ∼40-70 mM NaCl and a reverse bell-shaped dependence of interprotein affinity. Meanwhile, intrinsic SiR activity, as measured in a methyl viologen-dependent assay, exhibited saturation above 100 mM NaCl. Thus, two assays suggested that interprotein interaction is crucial in controlling Fd-dependent SiR activity. Calorimetric analyses showed the monotonic decrease in interprotein affinity on increasing NaCl concentrations, distinguished from a reverse bell-shaped interprotein affinity observed from Fd-dependent SiR activity assay. Furthermore, Fd:SiR complex formation and interprotein affinity were thermodynamically adjusted by both enthalpy and entropy through electrostatic and non-electrostatic interactions. A residue-based NMR investigation on the addition of SiR to (15)N-labeled Fd at the various NaCl concentrations also demonstrated that a combination of electrostatic and non-electrostatic forces stabilized the complex with similar interfaces and modulated the binding affinity and mode. Our findings elucidate that non-electrostatic forces are also essential for the formation and modulation of the Fd:SiR complex. We suggest that a complex configuration optimized for maximum enzymatic activity near physiological salt conditions is achieved by structural rearrangement through controlled non-covalent interprotein interactions.

  20. Hydrogenase activity and proton-motive force generation by Escherichia coli during glycerol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Trchounian, Karen; Blbulyan, Syuzanna; Trchounian, Armen

    2013-06-01

    Proton motive force (Δp) generation by Escherichia coli wild type cells during glycerol fermentation was first studied. Its two components, electrical-the membrane potential (∆φ) and chemical-the pH transmembrane gradient (ΔpH), were established and the effects of external pH (pHex) were determined. Intracellular pH was 7.0 and 6.0 and lower than pHex at pH 7.5 and 6.5, respectively; and it was higher than pHex at pH 5.5. At high pHex, the increase of ∆φ (-130 mV) was only partially compensated by a reversed ΔpH, resulting in a low Δp. At low pHex ∆φ and consequently Δp were decreased. The generation of Δp during glycerol fermentation was compared with glucose fermentation, and the difference in Δp might be due to distinguished mechanisms for H(+) transport through the membrane, especially to hydrogenase (Hyd) enzymes besides the F0F1-ATPase. H(+) efflux was determined to depend on pHex; overall and N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD)-inhibitory H(+) efflux was maximal at pH 6.5. Moreover, ΔpH was changed at pH 6.5 and Δp was different at pH 6.5 and 5.5 with the hypF mutant lacking all Hyd enzymes. DCCD-inhibited ATPase activity of membrane vesicles was maximal at pH 7.5 and decreased with the hypF mutant. Thus, Δp generation by E. coli during glycerol fermentation is different than that during glucose fermentation. Δp is dependent on pHex, and a role of Hyd enzymes in its generation is suggested.

  1. Maximal Voluntary Static Force Production Characteristics of Skeletal Muscle in Children 8-11 Years of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Going, Scott B.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A study of maximal voluntary isometric muscle contraction force-time curves among 32 normal, healthy 8- to 11-year-olds performing tasks involving separate muscle groups found that force and maximal rate of force increase were quite reproducible, but time to selected force levels reflected considerable variations. (Author/CB)

  2. Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Unintentional Nonfatal Injury Among the United States Air Force Active Duty

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    physiological co- conditions; geographic morbidities; nutritional status; location of AFB; time of fatigue ; psychosocial & cultural day/week; assigned...from cycle ergometry fitness evaluations for the duration of the pregnancy and six months postpartum . All confirmed cases of any injury-related...Air Force Special Operations Command AFSPC Air Force Space Command ASIS Abbreviated Severity of Injury Scale AMC Air Mobility Command AMSA Army

  3. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1993-05-11

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components is described. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  4. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1993-01-01

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  5. Integrated Analysis of Contractile Kinetics, Force Generation, and Electrical Activity in Single Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Kijlstra, Jan David; Hu, Dongjian; Mittal, Nikhil; Kausel, Eduardo; van der Meer, Peter; Garakani, Arman; Domian, Ibrahim J

    2015-12-08

    The quantitative analysis of cardiomyocyte function is essential for stem cell-based approaches for the in vitro study of human cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. We present a method to comprehensively assess the function of single human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte (hPSC-CMs) through simultaneous quantitative analysis of contraction kinetics, force generation, and electrical activity. We demonstrate that statistical analysis of movies of contracting hPSC-CMs can be used to quantify changes in cellular morphology over time and compute contractile kinetics. Using a biomechanical model that incorporates substrate stiffness, we calculate cardiomyocyte force generation at single-cell resolution and validate this approach with conventional traction force microscopy. The addition of fluorescent calcium indicators or membrane potential dyes allows the simultaneous analysis of contractility and calcium handling or action potential morphology. Accordingly, our approach has the potential for broad application in the study of cardiac disease, drug discovery, and cardiotoxicity screening.

  6. Integrated Analysis of Contractile Kinetics, Force Generation, and Electrical Activity in Single Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kijlstra, Jan David; Hu, Dongjian; Mittal, Nikhil; Kausel, Eduardo; van der Meer, Peter; Garakani, Arman; Domian, Ibrahim J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The quantitative analysis of cardiomyocyte function is essential for stem cell-based approaches for the in vitro study of human cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. We present a method to comprehensively assess the function of single human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte (hPSC-CMs) through simultaneous quantitative analysis of contraction kinetics, force generation, and electrical activity. We demonstrate that statistical analysis of movies of contracting hPSC-CMs can be used to quantify changes in cellular morphology over time and compute contractile kinetics. Using a biomechanical model that incorporates substrate stiffness, we calculate cardiomyocyte force generation at single-cell resolution and validate this approach with conventional traction force microscopy. The addition of fluorescent calcium indicators or membrane potential dyes allows the simultaneous analysis of contractility and calcium handling or action potential morphology. Accordingly, our approach has the potential for broad application in the study of cardiac disease, drug discovery, and cardiotoxicity screening. PMID:26626178

  7. 78 FR 39254 - Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Subzone 7G; Schering-Plough Products, L.L.C...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-01

    ... Proposed Production Activity; Subzone 7G; Schering-Plough Products, L.L.C. (Pharmaceutical Products); Las... certain pharmaceutical products and their intermediates within Subzone 7G. The current request would add the production of suvorexant pharmaceutical tablets for the treatment of insomnia using a...

  8. NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELD MODELING OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION USING SDO/HMI AND SOLIS/VSM DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Thalmann, J. K.; Wiegelmann, T.; Pietarila, A.; Sun, X.

    2012-08-15

    We use SDO/HMI and SOLIS/VSM photospheric magnetic field measurements to model the force-free coronal field above a solar active region, assuming magnetic forces dominate. We take measurement uncertainties caused by, e.g., noise and the particular inversion technique, into account. After searching for the optimum modeling parameters for the particular data sets, we compare the resulting nonlinear force-free model fields. We show the degree of agreement of the coronal field reconstructions from the different data sources by comparing the relative free energy content, the vertical distribution of the magnetic pressure, and the vertically integrated current density. Though the longitudinal and transverse magnetic flux measured by the VSM and HMI is clearly different, we find considerable similarities in the modeled fields. This indicates the robustness of the algorithm we use to calculate the nonlinear force-free fields against differences and deficiencies of the photospheric vector maps used as an input. We also depict how much the absolute values of the total force-free, virial, and the free magnetic energy differ and how the orientation of the longitudinal and transverse components of the HMI- and VSM-based model volumes compare to each other.

  9. Accelerator Production and Separations for High Specific Activity Rhenium-186

    SciTech Connect

    Jurisson, Silvia S.; Wilbur, D. Scott

    2016-04-01

    Tungsten and osmium targets were evaluated for the production of high specific activity rhenium-186. Rhenium-186 has potential applications in radiotherapy for the treatment of a variety of diseases, including targeting with monoclonal antibodies and peptides. Methods were evaluated using tungsten metal, tungsten dioxide, tungsten disulfide and osmium disulfide. Separation of the rhenium-186 produced and recycling of the enriched tungsten-186 and osmium-189 enriched targets were developed.

  10. Active Desiccant-Based Preconditioning Market Analysis and Product Development

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J.

    2001-01-11

    The Phase 1 report (ORNL/Sub/94-SVO44/1), completed earlier in this program, involved a comprehensive field survey and market analysis comparing various specialized outdoor air handling units. This initial investigation included conventional cooling and reheat, conventional cooling with sensible recovery, total energy recovery systems (passive desiccant technology) and various active desiccant systems. The report concluded that several markets do promise a significant sales opportunity for a Climate Changer-based active desiccant system offering. (Climate Changer is a registered trademark of Trane Company.) This initial market analysis defined the wants and needs of the end customers (design engineers and building owners), which, along with subsequent information included in this report, have been used to guide the determination of the most promising active desiccant system configurations. This Phase 2 report begins with a summary of a more thorough investigation of those specific markets identified as most promising for active desiccant systems. Table 1 estimates the annual sales potential for a cost-effective product line of active desiccant systems, such as that built from Climate Changer modules. The Product Development Strategy section describes the active desiccant system configurations chosen to best fit the needs of the marketplace while minimizing system options. Key design objectives based on market research are listed in this report for these active desiccant systems. Corresponding performance goals for the dehumidification wheel required to meet the overall system design objectives are also defined. The Performance Modeling section describes the strategy used by SEMCO to design the dehumidification wheels integrated into the prototype systems currently being tested as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Desiccant Technology Program. Actual performance data from wheel testing was used to revise the system performance and energy analysis

  11. Isoleukotrienes are biologically active free radical products of lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Harrison, K A; Murphy, R C

    1995-07-21

    The free radical oxidation of arachidonic acid esterified to glycerophospholipids is known to generate complex metabolites, termed isoprostanes, that share structural features of prostaglandins derived from prostaglandin H2 synthase. Furthermore, certain isoprostanes have been found to exert biological activity through endogenous receptors on cell surfaces. Using mass spectrometry and ancillary techniques, the free radical oxidation of 1-hexadecanoyl-2-arachidonoyl-glycerophosphocholine was studied in the search for products of arachidonic acid isomeric to the leukotrienes that are derived from 5-lipoxygenase-catalyzed metabolism of arachidonic acid. Several conjugated triene metabolites were chromatographically separated from known 5-lipoxygenase products and structures characterized as 5,12-dihydroxy-6,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic acid esterified to the glycerophosphocholine backbone. We have termed these products as B4-isoleukotrienes. Following saponification some, but not all, B4-isoleukotrienes were found to exert biological activity in elevating intracellular calcium in Indo-1-loaded human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. This activity could be blocked by a leukotriene B4 receptor antagonist. An EC50 of approximately 30 nM was determined for one unique B4-isoleukotriene with a relative retention index of 2.54. We have shown that free radical processes can lead to the formation of biologically active isoleukotrienes in glycerophosphocholine liposomes, and we propose that B4-isoleukotrienes may also be formed in membrane glycerophospholipids as a result of lipid peroxidation during tissue injury. Such B4-isoleukotrienes could then mediate events of tissue damage through activation of leukotriene B4 receptors on target cells.

  12. Ethylene production and peroxidase activity in aphid-infested barley.

    PubMed

    Argandoña, V H; Chaman, M; Cardemil, L; Muñoz, O; Zúñiga, G E; Corcuera, L J

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate whether ethylene is involved in the oxidative and defensive responses of barley to the aphids Schizaphis graminum (biotype C) and Rhopalophum padi. The effect of aphid infestation on ethylene production was measured in two barley cultivars (Frontera and Aramir) that differ in their susceptibility to aphids. Ethylene evolution was higher in plants infested for 16 hr than in plants infested for 4 hr in both cultivars. Under aphid infestation, the production of ethylene was higher in cv. Frontera than in Aramir, the more aphid susceptible cultivar. Ethylene production also increases with the degree of infestation. Maximum ethylene evolution was detected after 16 hr when plants were infested with 10 or more aphids. Comparing the two species of aphids, Schizaphis graminum induced more ethylene evolution than Rhopalosiphum padi. Infestation with S. graminum increased hydrogen peroxide content and total soluble peroxidase activity in cv. Frontera, with a maximum level of H2O2 observed after 20 min of infestation and the maximum in soluble peroxidase activity after 30 min of infestation. When noninfested barley seedlings from cv. Frontera were exposed to ethylene, an increase in hydrogen peroxide and in total peroxidase activity was detected at levels similar to those of infested plants from cv. Frontera. When noninfested plants were treated with 40 ppm of ethylene, the maximum levels of H2O2 and soluble peroxidase activity were at 10 and 40 min, respectively. Ethylene also increased the activity of both cell-wall-bound peroxidases types (ionically and covalently bound), comparable with infestation. These results suggest that ethylene is involved in the oxidative responses of barley plants induced by infestation.

  13. 77 FR 71167 - Foreign-Trade Zone 59-Lincoln, Nebraska, Authorization of Production Activity, Novartis Consumer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 59--Lincoln, Nebraska, Authorization of Production Activity, Novartis Consumer Health, Inc. (Pharmaceutical and Related Preparations Production), Lincoln, Nebraska Novartis Consumer Health, Inc. submitted a notification of proposed production activity for the...

  14. Joint positioning sense, perceived force level and two-point discrimination tests of young and active elderly adults

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Priscila G.; Santos, Karini B.; Rodacki, André L. F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Changes in the proprioceptive system are associated with aging. Proprioception is important to maintaining and/or recovering balance and to reducing the risk of falls. Objective: To compare the performance of young and active elderly adults in three proprioceptive tests. Method: Twenty-one active elderly participants (66.9±5.5 years) and 21 healthy young participants (24.6±3.9 years) were evaluated in the following tests: perception of position of the ankle and hip joints, perceived force level of the ankle joint, and two-point discrimination of the sole of the foot. Results: No differences (p>0.05) were found between groups for the joint position and perceived force level. On the other hand, the elderly participants showed lower sensitivity in the two-point discrimination (higher threshold) when compared to the young participants (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Except for the cutaneous plantar sensitivity, the active elderly participants had maintained proprioception. Their physical activity status may explain similarities between groups for the joint position sense and perceived force level, however it may not be sufficient to prevent sensory degeneration with aging. PMID:26443978

  15. Modeling of Geomechanical Performance of Sloping Oceanic Hydrate Deposits Subjected Production Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutqvist, J.; Moridis, G. J.

    2012-12-01

    Oceanic Hydrate-Bearing Sediments (HBS) subjected to production activities can induced strongly coupled fluid flow and geomechanical changes that may have adverse consequences on wellbore integrity, the HBS, and the bounding formations. For a sloping hydrate bearing system, the geomechanical changes could potentially be catastrophic if triggering large slides of the seafloor. Marine sediments adjacent to the seafloor as well as hydrate deposits that are suitable target for production often involves unconsolidated sediments of relatively high porosity that are usually characterized by limited shear strength. The dissociation of the solid hydrates (a strong cementing agent) during gas production can degrade the structural strength of the HBS and thereby undermine the stability of the seafloor. In this study we investigate two cases of coupled hydraulic, thermodynamic and geomechanical behavior of sloping oceanic HBS: 1) hydrate heating as warm fluids from deeper conventional reservoirs ascend to the ocean floor through uninsulated pipes intersecting an HBS adjacent to the seafloor, 2) system response during gas production from a hydrate deposit located 400 m below the seafloor. In the first case we consider a situation when a hydraulically confined hydrate layer near the ocean floor is dissociated by heating from the well with associated gas release and forced pressure increase, which could undermine the stability of the slope. In the second case, depressurization leads to hydrate dissociation over a large lateral distance that may provide a weakening potential slip surface along the sloping hydrate system. The results of our analysis indicate that although these production activities induces strongly coupled geomechanical responses that may adversely impact the production itself, they are unlikely to trigger large scale slides of the seafloor.

  16. Production and characterization of activated carbons from cereal grains

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatraman, A.; Walawender, W.P.; Fan, L.T.

    1996-12-31

    The term, activated carbon, is a generic name for a family of carbonaceous materials with well-developed porosities and consequently, large adsorptive capacities. Activated carbons are increasingly being consumed worldwide for environmental applications such as separation of volatiles from bulk gases and purification of water and waste-water streams. The global annual production is estimated to be around 300 million kilograms, with a rate of increase of 7% each year. Activated carbons can be prepared from a variety of raw materials. Approximately, 60% of the activated carbons generated in the United States is produced from coal; 20%, from coconut shells; and the remaining 20% from wood and other sources of biomass. The pore structure and properties of activated carbons are influenced by the nature of the starting material and the initial physical and chemical conditioning as well as the process conditions involved in its manufacture. The porous structures of charcoals and activated carbons obtained by the carbonization of kernels have been characterized.

  17. EMG activities of two heads of the human lateral pterygoid muscle in relation to mandibular condyle movement and biting force.

    PubMed

    Hiraba, K; Hibino, K; Hiranuma, K; Negoro, T

    2000-04-01

    Electromyographic (EMG) activities of the superior (SUP) and inferior heads (INF) of the lateral pterygoid muscle (LPT) were recorded in humans during voluntary stepwise changes in biting force and jaw position that were adopted to exclude the effects of acceleration and velocity of jaw movements on the muscle activity. The SUP behaved like a jaw-closing muscle and showed characteristic activity in relation to the biting force. It showed a considerable amount of background activity (5-32% of the maximum) even in the intercuspal position without teeth clenching and reached a nearly maximum activity at relatively lower biting-force levels than the jaw-closing muscles during increment of the biting force. Stretch reflexes were found in the SUP, the function of which could be to stabilize the condyle against the biting force that pulls the condyle posteriorly. This notion was verified by examining the biomechanics on the temporomandibular joint. The complex movements of the mandibular condyle in a sagittal plane were decomposed into displacement in the anteroposterior direction (Ac) and angle of rotation (RAc) around a kinesiological specific point on the condyle. In relation to Ac, each head of the LPT showed quite a similar behavior to each other in all types of jaw movements across all subjects. Working ranges of the muscle activities were almost constant (Ac <3 mm for the SUP and Ac >3 mm for the INF). The amount of EMG activity of the SUP changed in inverse proportion to Ac showing a hyperbola-like relation, whereas that of the INF changed rather linearly. The EMG amplitude of the SUP showed a quasilinear inverse relation with RAc in the hinge movement during which the condyle rotated with no movement in the anteroposterior direction. This finding suggests that the SUP controls the angular relationship between the articular disk and the condyle. On the other hand, the position of the disk in relation to the maxilla, not to the condyle, is controlled indirectly by

  18. Simulating the Activation of Voltage Sensing Domain for a Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Using Polarizable Force Field.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rui-Ning; Gong, Haipeng

    2017-03-02

    Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels play vital roles in the signal transduction of excitable cells. Upon activation of a NaV channel, the change of transmembrane voltage triggers conformational change of the voltage sensing domain, which then elicits opening of the pore domain and thus allows an influx of Na(+) ions. Description of this process with atomistic details is in urgent demand. In this work, we simulated the partial activation process of the voltage sensing domain of a prokaryotic NaV channel using a polarizable force field. We not only observed the conformational change of the voltage sensing domain from resting to preactive state, but also rigorously estimated the free energy profile along the identified reaction pathway. Comparison with the control simulation using an additive force field indicates that voltage-gating thermodynamics of NaV channels may be inaccurately described without considering the electrostatic polarization effect.

  19. Theoretical Model of Drag Force Impact on a Model International Space Station (ISS) Satellite due to Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwankwo, Victor U. J.; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    The International Space Station (ISS) is the single largest and most complex scientific and engineering space structure in human history. Its orbital parameters make it extremely vulnerable to severe atmospheric drag force. Complex interactions between solar energetic particles, ultraviolet (UV) radiation with atmosphere and geomagnetic field cause heating and subsequent expansion of the upper atmosphere. This condition increases drag on low Earth orbit satellites (LEOSs) and varies with current space weather conditions. In this work, we apply the NRLMSISE-00 empirical atmospheric density model, as a function of space environmental parameters, to model drag force impact on a model LEOS during variation of solar activity. Applying the resulting drag model on a model ISS satellite we observe that depending on the severity and/or stage of solar activity or cycle, a massive artificial satellite could experience orbit decay rate of up to 2.95km/month during solar maximum and up to 1km/month during solar minimum.

  20. [Medical support of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation: results of activity and tasks for 2016].

    PubMed

    Fisun, A Ya

    2016-01-01

    The author gives an analysis of activity of the medical service of the Armed Forces in 2015 concerning development of normative legal basis for the military health care, improvement of the level of operational and mobilization readiness of subunits of army group, and military-medical institutions, improvement of effectiveness of treatment and evacuation measures, health resort treatment, medical stuff training optimization, sanitary-and-epidemiologic support, material and technical support improvement, adoption of advanced scientific achievements focusing on medical care delivery to army group, active development and increase in medical information systems, telehealth. system. The author gives data characterizing state and level of development of medical service of the Armed Forces and its dynamics. Main tasks and parameters of development of the service in 2016 and up to 2020 are formulated.

  1. Fractionating soluble microbial products in the activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Zeng, Raymond J; Fang, Fang; Xie, Wen-Ming; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing

    2010-04-01

    Soluble microbial products (SMP) are the pool of organic compounds originating from microbial growth and decay, and are usually the major component of the soluble organic matters in effluents from biological treatment processes. In this work, SMP in activated sludge were characterized, fractionized, and quantified using integrated chemical analysis and mathematical approach. The utilization-associated products (UAP) in SMP, produced in the substrate-utilization process, were found to be carbonaceous compounds with a molecular weight (MW) lower than 290 kDa which were quantified separately from biomass-associated products (BAP). The BAP were mainly cellular macromolecules with an MW in a range of 290-5000 kDa, and for the first time were further classified into the growth-associated BAP (GBAP) with an MW of 1000 kDa, which were produced in the microbial growth phase, and the endogeny-associated BAP (EBAP) with an MW of 4500 kDa, which were generated in the endogenous phase. Experimental and modeling results reveal that the UAP could be utilized by the activated sludge and that the BAP would accumulate in the system. The GBAP and EBAP had different formation rates from the hydrolysis of extracellular polymeric substances and distinct biodegradation kinetics. This study provides better understanding of SMP formation mechanisms and becomes useful for subsequent effluent treatment.

  2. Production of charcoal and activated carbon at elevated pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Xiangfeng; Norberg, N.; Antal, M.J. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    With its wide range of properties, charcoal finds many commercial applications for domestic cooking, refining of metals (steel, copper, bronze, nickel, aluminum and electro-manganese), production of chemicals (carbon disulfide, calcium carbide, silicon carbide, sodium cyanide, carbon black, fireworks, gaseous chemicals, absorbents, soil conditioners and pharmaceuticals), as well as production of activated carbon and synthesis gas. In 1991, the world production of charcoal was 22.8 million cubic meters (3.8 million metric tons) as shown in Table 1. Brazil is the world`s largest charcoal producer --- 5.9 million cubic meters or one million metric tons was produced in 1991, most of which is used in steel and iron industry. African countries produced 45% of the world total amount of charcoal, where 86% of the wood-based energy is for domestic use, most of which is inefficiently used. Charcoal is produced commercially in kilns with a 25% to 30% yield by mass on a 7 to 12 day operating cycle. Until recently, the highest yield of good quality charcoal reported in the literature was 38%. In this paper, and ASME code rated experimental system is presented for producing charcoal and activated carbon from biomass.

  3. In Flight Evaluation of Active Inceptor Force-Feel Characteristics and Handling Qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lusardi, Jeff A.; Blanken, Chris L.; Ott, Carl Raymond; Malpica, Carlos A.; von Gruenhagen, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The effect of inceptor feel-system characteristics on piloted handling qualities has been a research topic of interest for many years. Most of the research efforts have focused on advanced fly-by-wire fixed-wing aircraft with only a few studies investigating the effects on rotorcraft. Consequently, only limited guidance is available on how cyclic force-feel characteristics should be set to obtain optimal handling qualities for rotorcraft. To study this effect, the U.S. Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate working with the DLR Institute of Flight Systems in Germany under Task X of the U.S. German Memorandum of Understanding have been conducting flight test evaluations. In the U.S., five experimental test pilots have completed evaluations of two Mission Task Elements (MTEs) from ADS-33E-PRF and two command/response types for a matrix of center-stick cyclic force-feel characteristics at Moffett Field. In Germany, three experimental test Pilots have conducted initial evaluations of the two MTEs with two command/response types for a parallel matrix of side-stick cyclic force-feel characteristics at WTD-61 in Manching. The resulting data set is used to correlate the effect of changes in natural frequency and damping ratio of the cyclic inceptor on the piloted handling qualities. Existing criteria in ADS-33E and a proposed Handling Qualities Sensitivity Function that includes the effects of the cyclic force-feel characteristics are also evaluated against the data set and discussed.

  4. Effects of in vivo-like activation frequency on the length-dependent force generation of skeletal muscle fibre bundles.

    PubMed

    Zuurbier, C J; Lee-de Groot, M B; Van der Laarse, W J; Huijing, P A

    1998-05-01

    It is known that a range of firing frequencies can be observed during in vivo muscle activity, yet information is lacking as to how different in vivo-like frequencies may affect force generation of skeletal muscle. This study examined the effects of constant (CSF, constant within one contraction) and decreasing stimulation frequencies (DSF) on mean sarcomere length-force characteristics of rat gastrocnemius medialis fibre bundles. The CSF resulted in an optimal mean sarcomere length (lso) of 2.30 (SEM 0.02), 2.46 (SEM 0.03), 2.76 (SEM 0.03) and more than 2.99 (SEM 0.07) lm, for 100, 50, 30 and 15 Hz, respectively. Compared to 100-Hz stimulation, both lso and the ascending limb of the relationship significantly shifted to higher lengths with lower frequencies. No shift was encountered for the initial part of the descending limb. The DSF reduced the frequency-induced shift to higher mean lengths [lso 2.33 (SEM 0.02), 2.52 (SEM 0.08) and more than 2.92 (SEM 0.10) microm, respectively, for 50, 30 and 15 Hz]. No effect of activation time on length-force characteristics was observed. It was concluded from these studies that the frequency and history of stimulation is a major determinant of the length-force characteristics of muscle fibre bundles, and should be taken into account when analysing animal and human locomotion. The previously observed frequency-induced shift in whole muscle length-force relationship resides mainly at the level of fibre bundles.

  5. Termination and activation of store-operated cyclic AMP production

    PubMed Central

    Maiellaro, Isabella; Lefkimmiatis, Konstantinos; Moyer, Mary Pat; Curci, Silvana; Hofer, Aldebaran M

    2012-01-01

    Diverse pathophysiological processes (e.g. obesity, lifespan determination, addiction and male fertility) have been linked to the expression of specific isoforms of the adenylyl cyclases (AC1-AC10), the enzymes that generate cyclic AMP (cAMP). Our laboratory recently discovered a new mode of cAMP production, prominent in certain cell types, that is stimulated by any manoeuvre causing reduction of free [Ca2+] within the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium store. Activation of this ‘store-operated’ pathway requires the ER Ca2+ sensor, STIM1, but the identity of the enzymes responsible for cAMP production and how this process is regulated is unknown. Here, we used sensitive FRET-based sensors for cAMP in single cells combined with silencing and overexpression approaches to show that store-operated cAMP production occurred preferentially via the isoform AC3 in NCM460 colonic epithelial cells. Ca2+ entry via the plasma membrane Ca2+ channel, Orai1, suppressed cAMP production, independent of store refilling. These findings are an important first step towards defining the functional significance and to identify the protein composition of this novel Ca2+/cAMP crosstalk system. PMID:22681560

  6. CRH stimulates POMC activity and corticosterone production in dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Slominski, Andrzej; Zbytek, Blazej; Semak, Igor; Sweatman, Trevor; Wortsman, Jacobo

    2005-05-01

    It has been previously documented that human skin cells including epidermal keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts produce and process proopiomelanocortin (POMC), corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH), and express functional CRH receptors type-1 (CRH-R1). The skin also has corticosteroidogenic activity, suggesting a functional connection between these elements. In the current study, we found that human dermal fibroblasts (but not normal epidermal keratinocytes) respond to CRH with stimulation of cAMP, with POMC gene and protein expression, and ACTH production and release. Furthermore, CRH and ACTH stimulate production of corticosterone in fibroblasts, with ACTH being more potent. Although cortisol-immunoreactivity accumulation/production in fibroblasts has been detected by ELISA, it appears to be constitutive (not affected by CRH or ACTH). These effects are absent in keratinocytes. Therefore, we propose that fibroblasts but not keratinocytes display a functional CRH-POMC-corticosteroid axis organized similarly to the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. However, it diverges from the HPA organization in its distal step, where CRH and ACTH stimulate production of corticosterone, instead of cortisol.

  7. Slowed muscle force production and sensory organization deficits contribute to altered postural control strategies in children with developmental coordination disorder.

    PubMed

    Fong, Shirley S M; Ng, Shamay S M; Yiu, Beverley P H L

    2013-09-01

    This study aimed to (1) compare the postural control strategies, sensory organization of balance control, and lower limb muscle performance of children with and without developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and (2) determine the association between postural control strategies, sensory organization parameters and knee muscle performance indices among children with DCD. Fifty-eight DCD-affected children and 46 typically developing children participated in the study. Postural control strategies and sensory organization were evaluated with the sensory organization test (SOT). Knee muscle strength and time to produce maximum muscle torque (at 180°/s) were assessed using an isokinetic machine. Analysis of variance was used to compare the outcome variables between groups, and multiple regression analysis was used to examine the relationships between postural control strategies, sensory organization parameters, and isokinetic indices in children with DCD. The DCD group had significantly lower strategy scores (SOT conditions 5 and 6), lower visual and vestibular ratios, and took a longer time to reach peak torque in the knee flexor muscles than the control group (p>0.05). After accounting for age, sex, and body mass index, the vestibular ratio explained 35.8% of the variance in the strategy score of SOT condition 5 (p<0.05). Moreover, the visual ratio, vestibular ratio, and time to peak torque of the knee flexors were all significant predictors (p<0.05) of the strategy score during SOT condition 6, accounting for 14, 19.7, and 19.8% of its variance, respectively. The children with DCD demonstrated deficits in postural control strategy, sensory organization and prolonged duration of muscle force development. Slowed knee muscle force production combined with poor visual and vestibular functioning may result in greater use of hip strategy by children with DCD in sensory challenging environments.

  8. Land processes distributed active archive center product lifecycle plan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daucsavage, John C.; Bennett, Stacie D.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Science Data System Program worked together to establish, develop, and operate the Land Processes (LP) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) to provide stewardship for NASA’s land processes science data. These data are critical science assets that serve the land processes science community with potential value beyond any immediate research use, and therefore need to be accounted for and properly managed throughout their lifecycle. A fundamental LP DAAC objective is to enable permanent preservation of these data and information products. The LP DAAC accomplishes this by bridging data producers and permanent archival resources while providing intermediate archive services for data and information products.

  9. Viscous Product from Activated Sludge by Methanol Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Edwin N.; Wallen, Lowell L.

    1976-01-01

    Aeration of activated sludge with 3 to 4% added methanol for 5 to 7 days yields an odorless, highly viscous (5,000 to 10,000 centipoise), black, pudding-like product containing glycan(s) linked other than α-1-4 or β-1-3. Backseeding gives maximum thickening in 3 to 4 days. Incomplete acid hydrolysis of the black product gives a 0.27% solution of reducing sugars (75% glucose) which is an 11.4% yield from the added methanol. Backseeding into either centrifuge supernatant or 0.1% yeast extract in tap water gives a light-colored polymer. Viscosity decreases during extended sterile cold storage. A 5% salt addition lowers viscosity one-half. From 6 to 12 colony types appear on plating backseeded media, but none of these isolates is a reliable polymer former. PMID:16345172

  10. Production of carboxylates from high rate activated sludge through fermentation.

    PubMed

    Cagnetta, C; Coma, M; Vlaeminck, S E; Rabaey, K

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this work was to study the key parameters affecting fermentation of high rate activated A-sludge to carboxylates, including pH, temperature, inoculum, sludge composition and iron content. The maximum volatile fatty acids production was 141mgCg(-1) VSSfed, at pH 7. Subsequently the potential for carboxylate and methane production for A-sludge from four different plants at pH 7 and 35°C were compared. Initial BOD of the sludge appeared to be key determining carboxylate yield from A-sludge. Whereas methanogenesis could be correlated linearly to the quantity of ferric used for coagulation, fermentation did not show a dependency on iron presence. This difference may enable a strategy whereby A-stage sludge is separated to achieve fermentation, and iron dosing for phosphate removal is only implemented at the B-stage.

  11. Turbokon scientific and production implementation company—25 years of activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favorskii, O. N.; Leont'ev, A. I.; Milman, O. O.

    2016-05-01

    The main results of studies performed at ZAO Turbokon NPVP in cooperation with leading Russian scientific organizations during 25 years of its activity in the field of development of unique ecologically clean electric power and heat production technologies are described. They include the development and experimental verification using prototypes and full-scale models of highly efficient air-cooled condensers for steam turbines, a high temperature gas steam turbine for stationary and transport power engineering, a nonfuel technology of electric power production using steam turbine installations with a unit power of 4-20 MW at gas-main pipelines and industrial boiler houses and heat stations. The results of efforts in the field of reducing vibroactivity of power equipment for transport installations are given. Basic directions of further research for increasing the efficiency and ecological safety of home power engineering are discussed.

  12. Natural Product Compounds with Aromatase Inhibitory Activity: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Balunas, Marcy J.; Kinghorn, A. Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Several synthetic aromatase inhibitors are currently in clinical use for the treatment of postmenopausal women with hormone-receptor positive breast cancer. However, these treatments may lead to untoward side effects and so a search for new aromatase inhibitors continues, especially those for which the activity is promoter-specific, targeting the breast-specific promoters I.3 and II. Recently, numerous natural product compounds have been found to inhibit aromatase in non-cellular, cellular, and in vivo studies. These investigations, covering the last two years, as well as additional studies that have focused on the evaluation of natural product compounds as promoter-specific aromatase inhibitors or as aromatase inducers, are described in this review. PMID:20635310

  13. Presence and biological activity of antibiotics used in fuel ethanol and corn co-product production.

    PubMed

    Compart, D M Paulus; Carlson, A M; Crawford, G I; Fink, R C; Diez-Gonzalez, F; Dicostanzo, A; Shurson, G C

    2013-05-01

    Antibiotics are used in ethanol production to control bacteria from competing with yeast for nutrients during starch fermentation. However, there is no published scientific information on whether antibiotic residues are present in distillers grains (DG), co-products from ethanol production, or whether they retain their biological activity. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to quantify concentrations of various antibiotic residues in DG and determine whether residues were biologically active. Twenty distillers wet grains and 20 distillers dried grains samples were collected quarterly from 9 states and 43 ethanol plants in the United States. Samples were analyzed for DM, CP, NDF, crude fat, S, P, and pH to describe the nutritional characteristics of the samples evaluated. Samples were also analyzed for the presence of erythromycin, penicillin G, tetracycline, tylosin, and virginiamycin M1, using liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Additionally, virginiamycin residues were determined, using a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved bioassay method. Samples were extracted and further analyzed for biological activity by exposing the sample extracts to 10(4) to 10(7) CFU/mL concentrations of sentinel bacterial strains Escherichia coli ATCC 8739 and Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19115. Extracts that inhibited bacterial growth were considered to have biological activity. Physiochemical characteristics varied among samples but were consistent with previous findings. Thirteen percent of all samples contained low (≤1.12 mg/kg) antibiotic concentrations. Only 1 sample extract inhibited growth of Escherichia coli at 10(4) CFU/mL, but this sample contained no detectable concentrations of antibiotic residues. No extracts inhibited Listeria monocytogenes growth. These data indicate that the likelihood of detectable concentrations of antibiotic residues in DG is low; and if detected, they are found in very low concentrations. The inhibition in only 1 DG

  14. Thigh Muscle Activity, Knee Motion, and Impact Force During Side-Step Pivoting in Agility-Trained Female Basketball Players

    PubMed Central

    Wilderman, Danielle R; Ross, Scott E; Padua, Darin A

    2009-01-01

    Context: Improving neuromuscular control of hamstrings muscles might have implications for decreasing anterior cruciate ligament injuries in females. Objective: To examine the effects of a 6-week agility training program on quadriceps and hamstrings muscle activation, knee flexion angles, and peak vertical ground reaction force. Design: Prospective, randomized clinical research trial. Setting: Sports medicine research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty female intramural basketball players with no history of knee injury (age  =  21.07 ± 2.82 years, height  =  171.27 ± 4.66 cm, mass  =  66.36 ± 7.41 kg). Intervention(s): Participants were assigned to an agility training group or a control group that did not participate in agility training. Participants in the agility training group trained 4 times per week for 6 weeks. Main Outcome Measure(s): We used surface electromyography to assess muscle activation for the rectus femoris, vastus medialis oblique, medial hamstrings, and lateral hamstrings for 50 milliseconds before initial ground contact and while the foot was in contact with the ground during a side-step pivot maneuver. Knee flexion angles (at initial ground contact, maximum knee flexion, knee flexion displacement) and peak vertical ground reaction force also were assessed during this maneuver. Results: Participants in the training group increased medial hamstrings activation during ground contact after the 6-week agility training program. Both groups decreased their vastus medialis oblique muscle activation during ground contact. Knee flexion angles and peak vertical ground reaction force did not change for either group. Conclusions: Agility training improved medial hamstrings activity in female intramural basketball players during a side-step pivot maneuver. Agility training that improves hamstrings activity might have implications for reducing anterior cruciate ligament sprain injury associated with side-step pivots. PMID

  15. Calcium-activated force responses in fast- and slow-twitch skinned muscle fibres of the rat at different temperatures.

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, D G; Williams, D A

    1981-01-01

    1. Force responses from mechanically skinned fibres of rat skeletal muscles (extensor digitorum longus and soleus) were measured at different temperatures in the range 3-35 degrees C following sudden changes in Ca2+ concentration in the preparations. 2. At all temperatures there were characteristic differences between the slow- and fast-twitch muscle fibres with respect to the relative steady-state force-[Ca2+] relation: such as a lower [Ca2+] threshold for activation and a less steep force-pCa curve in slow-twitch muscle fibres. 3. At 3-5 degrees C the force changes in both types of muscle fibres lagged considerably behind the estimated changes in [Ca2+] within the preparations and this enabled us to perform a comparative analysis of the Ca2+ kinetics in the process of force development in both muscle fibre types. This analysis suggest that two and six Ca2+ ions are involved in the regulatory unit for contraction of slow- and fast-twitch muscle fibres respectively. 4. The rate of relaxation following a sudden decrease in [Ca2+] was much lower in the slow-twitch than in the fast-twitch muscle at 5 degrees C, suggesting that properties of the contractile apparatus could play an essential role in determining the rate of relaxation in vivo. 5. There was substantial variation in Ca2+ sensitivity between muscle fibres of the same type from different animals at each temperature. However the steepness of the force-[Ca2+] relation was essentially the same for all fibres of the same type. 6. A change in temperature from 5 to 25 degrees C had a statistically significant effect on the sensitivity of the fast-twitch muscle fibres, rendering them less sensitive to Ca2+ by a factor of 2. However a further increase in temperature from 25 to 35 degrees C did not have any statistically significant effect on the force-[Ca2+] relation in fast-twitch muscle fibres. 7. The effect of temperature on the Ca2+ sensitivity of slow-twitch muscle fibres was not statistically significant

  16. Elimination of Harmonic Force and Torque in Active Magnetic Bearing Systems with Repetitive Control and Notch Filters.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangbo; Chen, Shao; Liu, Jinhao

    2017-04-04

    Harmonic force and torque, which are caused by rotor imbalance and sensor runout, are the dominant disturbances in active magnetic bearing (AMB) systems. To eliminate the harmonic force and torque, a novel control method based on repetitive control and notch filters is proposed. Firstly, the dynamics of a four radial degrees of freedom AMB system is described, and the AMB model can be described in terms of the translational and rotational motions, respectively. Next, a closed-loop generalized notch filter is utilized to identify the synchronous displacement resulting from the rotor imbalance, and a feed-forward compensation of the synchronous force and torque related to the AMB displacement stiffness is formulated by using the identified synchronous displacement. Then, a plug-in repetitive controller is designed to track the synchronous feed-forward compensation adaptively and to suppress the harmonic vibrations due to the sensor runout. Finally, the proposed control method is verified by simulations and experiments. The control algorithm is insensitive to the parameter variations of the power amplifiers and can precisely suppress the harmonic force and torque. Its practicality stems from its low computational load.

  17. Force Sensing Resistor (FSR): a brief overview and the low-cost sensor for active compliance control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadun, A. S.; Jalani, J.; Sukor, J. A.

    2016-07-01

    Force Sensing Resistors (FSR) sensors are devices that allow measuring static and dynamic forces applied to a contact surface. Their range of responses is basically depending on the variation of its electric resistance. In general, Flexiforce and Interlink are two common types of FSR sensors that are available, cheap and easily found in the market. Studies have shown that the FSR sensors are usually applied for robotic grippers and for biomechanical fields. This paper provides a brief overview of the application of the FSR sensors. Subsequently, two different set of experiments are carried out to test the effectiveness of the Flexiforce and Interlink sensors. First, the hardness detector system (Case Study A) and second, the force-position control system (Case Study B). The hardware used for the experiment was developed from low-cost materials. The results revealed that both FSR sensors are sufficient and reliable to provide a good sensing modality particularly for measuring force. Apart from the low-cost sensors, essentially, the FSR sensors are very useful devices that able to provide a good active compliance control, particularly for the grasping robotic hand.

  18. A prediction of accelerator-produced activation products.

    PubMed

    Culp, Todd

    2007-02-01

    The operational radiation protection issues associated with the Z-Machine accelerator located at Sandia National Laboratories are large: a variety of materials can be placed into the machine; these materials can be subjected to a variety of nuclear reactions, producing a variety of activation products. Without full understanding of the most likely contaminants, a realistic identification of the radiological hazards and appropriate controls is not possible. This paper presents a process developed to provide a realistic prediction of the accelerator-produced radionuclides of interest.

  19. Digital Wave Processor Products in the Cluster Active Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yearby, K. H.; Alleyne, H. St. C.; Walker, S. N.; Bates, I.; Gough, M. P.; Buckley, A.; Carozzi, T. D.

    The Digital Wave Processor (DWP) is the central control and data processing instrument for the Cluster Wave Experiment Consortium. DWP products in the Cluster Active Archive (CAA) provide a mainly supporting function for the rest of the consortium. This includes a time correction dataset which allows the standard timing accuracy of 2 ms to be improved to around 20 μs, and experiment command and status datasets which show what commands have been sent to the experiments, and the resulting status. DWP also contains a particle correlator experiment that computes the auto-correlation of electron counts received by the PEACE electron experiment via an inter-experiment link.

  20. Production of fission and activation product isotopes at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Coats, R.L.

    1997-08-01

    The mission of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) and the Hot Cell Facility (HCF) has recently changed from support of Defense and other programs to support of the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production and Distribution Program (IPDP). SNL`s primary role, in support of IPDP, is ensuring a reliable supply of {sup 99}Mo to the US health care system. SNL will also play a role of complementing the isotope production of other DOE Reactor facilities such as High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven, New York, ad Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in Idaho. The unique characteristics that the SNL facilities offer to the IPDP facility capability are simplicity, multiple irradiation locations, ready irradiation space access and co-located hot cell facilities capable of processing a short decay fission product stream. The SNL {sup 99}Mo effort is characterized elsewhere and this paper is intended to describe the production of additional isotopes for that can be produced medical and other uses planned to start soon after the {sup 99}Mo capability has been established. Isotope production in the SNL facilities is through fission or by neutron activation.

  1. Statistical study of free magnetic energy and flare productivity of solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Su, J. T.; Jing, J.; Wang, S.; Wang, H. M.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2014-06-20

    Photospheric vector magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory are utilized as the boundary conditions to extrapolate both nonlinear force-free and potential magnetic fields in solar corona. Based on the extrapolations, we are able to determine the free magnetic energy (FME) stored in active regions (ARs). Over 3000 vector magnetograms in 61 ARs were analyzed. We compare FME with the ARs' flare index (FI) and find that there is a weak correlation (<60%) between FME and FI. FME shows slightly improved flare predictability relative to the total unsigned magnetic flux of ARs in the following two aspects: (1) the flare productivity predicted by FME is higher than that predicted by magnetic flux and (2) the correlation between FI and FME is higher than that between FI and magnetic flux. However, this improvement is not significant enough to make a substantial difference in time-accumulated FI, rather than individual flare, predictions.

  2. 78 FR 79391 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 22-Chicago, Illinois, Notification of Proposed Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ... Production Activity, Electrolux Home Care Products Inc., (Kitting of Home Care Products), Minooka, Illinois... production activity to the FTZ Board on behalf of Electrolux Home Care Products Inc. (Electrolux), located in... FTZ 22. The facility is used for the distribution and kitting of floor care and other small...

  3. Operation Ghost Dancer: The Use of Active Duty Army Forces in Marijuana Eradication.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-11

    National Forest Boundaries Indian Reservation Boundaries se Appendix 8: Task Force Task Organization 1Overafl Task Pomp, Strtjcture- IDLIVI LAI ADCS...one domestic issue confronting the Nation today. Since the 1980’s, the Department of Defense (DOD) has played a role in the "War on Drugs," although...reluctantly. In 1990, there was an increased emphasis on the part of the Depart- ment of Defense to perform its fair share of the national effort. This

  4. Contact force control of an active pantograph for high speed trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, M. T.; Yokoyama, M.; Yamashita, Y.; Kobayashi, S.; Usuda, T.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a mathematical model of the pantograph with flexibility is developed based on experiments, and then an optimal controller together with a sliding observer is proposed to regulate the contact force in the presence of variation with respect to the equivalent stiffness of the catenary system. Furthermore, some physical interpretations of the closed-loop dynamics and pole-zero cancelations are given by analysis from a viewpoint of the output zeroing.

  5. The swim force as a body force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wen; Brady, John

    2015-11-01

    Net (as opposed to random) motion of active matter results from an average swim (or propulsive) force. It is shown that the average swim force acts like a body force - an internal body force [Yan and Brady, Soft Matter, DOI:10.1039/C5SM01318F]. As a result, the particle-pressure exerted on a container wall is the sum of the swim pressure [Takatori et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2014, 113, 028103] and the `weight' of the active particles. A continuum mechanical description is possible when variations occur on scales larger than the run length of the active particles and gives a Boltzmann-like distribution from a balance of the swim force and the swim pressure. Active particles may also display `action at a distance' and accumulate adjacent to (or be depleted from) a boundary without any external forces. In the momentum balance for the suspension - the mixture of active particles plus fluid - only external body forces appear.

  6. Dynamic control of aerodynamic forces on a moving platform using active flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzozowski, Daniel P.

    The unsteady interaction between trailing edge aerodynamic flow control and airfoil motion in pitch and plunge is investigated in wind tunnel experiments using a two degree-of-freedom traverse which enables application of time-dependent external torque and forces by servo motors. The global aerodynamic forces and moments are regulated by controlling vorticity generation and accumulation near the trailing edge of the airfoil using hybrid synthetic jet actuators. The dynamic coupling between the actuation and the time-dependent flow field is characterized using simultaneous force and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements that are taken phase-locked to the commanded actuation waveform. The effect of the unsteady motion on the model-embedded flow control is assessed in both trajectory tracking and disturbance rejection maneuvers. The time-varying aerodynamic lift and pitching moment are estimated from a PIV wake survey using a reduced order model based on classical unsteady aerodynamic theory. These measurements suggest that the entire flow over the airfoil readjusts within 2--3 convective time scales, which is about two orders of magnitude shorter than the characteristic time associated with the controlled maneuver of the wind tunnel model. This illustrates that flow-control actuation can be typically effected on time scales that are commensurate with the flow's convective time scale, and that the maneuver response is primarily limited by the inertia of the platform.

  7. Chocolate consumption, fecal water antioxidant activity, and hydroxyl radical production.

    PubMed

    Record, Ian R; McInerney, Jennifer K; Noakes, Manny; Bird, Anthony R

    2003-01-01

    As part of a larger study into the effects of polyphenols derived from chocolate on bowel health we have compared the effects of consumption of chocolate containing either 200 mg of flavanols and related procyanidins or a similar chocolate containing less than 10 mg of polyphenols on fecal free radical production and antioxidant activity in 18 volunteers. In a double-blind crossover trail volunteers consumed chocolate for two 4-wk periods separated by a 4-wk washout period. During the time the volunteers consumed the chocolate they also consumed a low-polyphenol diet. Free radical production in the fecal water was lowered from 122 +/- 10 micromol/l/h to 94 +/- 9 micromol/l/h (P = 0.009) when the high procyanidin chocolate diet was consumed and from 117 +/- 14 micromol/l/h to 86 +/- 12 micromol/l/h when the low procyanidin chocolate was consumed (P = 0.014). Fecal water antioxidant capacity measured by either the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity or ferric reducing ability of plasma procedure was not significantly affected. Consumption of either chocolate reduced the production of free radicals in fecal water. This suggests that some component of the chocolate other than the flavanols and related procyanidins may have been effective.

  8. Sustainable production of biologically active molecules of marine based origin.

    PubMed

    Murray, Patrick M; Moane, Siobhan; Collins, Catherine; Beletskaya, Tanya; Thomas, Olivier P; Duarte, Alysson W F; Nobre, Fernando S; Owoyemi, Ifeloju O; Pagnocca, Fernando C; Sette, L D; McHugh, Edward; Causse, Eric; Pérez-López, Paula; Feijoo, Gumersindo; Moreira, Ma T; Rubiolo, Juan; Leirós, Marta; Botana, Luis M; Pinteus, Susete; Alves, Celso; Horta, André; Pedrosa, Rui; Jeffryes, Clayton; Agathos, Spiros N; Allewaert, Celine; Verween, Annick; Vyverman, Wim; Laptev, Ivan; Sineoky, Sergei; Bisio, Angela; Manconi, Renata; Ledda, Fabio; Marchi, Mario; Pronzato, Roberto; Walsh, Daniel J

    2013-09-25

    The marine environment offers both economic and scientific potential which are relatively untapped from a biotechnological point of view. These environments whilst harsh are ironically fragile and dependent on a harmonious life form balance. Exploitation of natural resources by exhaustive wild harvesting has obvious negative environmental consequences. From a European industry perspective marine organisms are a largely underutilised resource. This is not due to lack of interest but due to a lack of choice the industry faces for cost competitive, sustainable and environmentally conscientious product alternatives. Knowledge of the biotechnological potential of marine organisms together with the development of sustainable systems for their cultivation, processing and utilisation are essential. In 2010, the European Commission recognised this need and funded a collaborative RTD/SME project under the Framework 7-Knowledge Based Bio-Economy (KBBE) Theme 2 Programme 'Sustainable culture of marine microorganisms, algae and/or invertebrates for high value added products'. The scope of that project entitled 'Sustainable Production of Biologically Active Molecules of Marine Based Origin' (BAMMBO) is outlined. Although the Union is a global leader in many technologies, it faces increasing competition from traditional rivals and emerging economies alike and must therefore improve its innovation performance. For this reason innovation is placed at the heart of a European Horizon 2020 Strategy wherein the challenge is to connect economic performance to eco performance. This article provides a synopsis of the research activities of the BAMMBO project as they fit within the wider scope of sustainable environmentally conscientious marine resource exploitation for high-value biomolecules.

  9. Asthma and exposure to cleaning products - a European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology task force consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Siracusa, A; De Blay, F; Folletti, I; Moscato, G; Olivieri, M; Quirce, S; Raulf-Heimsoth, M; Sastre, J; Tarlo, S M; Walusiak-Skorupa, J; Zock, J-P

    2013-12-01

    Professional and domestic cleaning is associated with work-related asthma (WRA). This position paper reviews the literature linking exposure to cleaning products and the risk of asthma and focuses on prevention. Increased risk of asthma has been shown in many epidemiological and surveillance studies, and several case reports describe the relationship between exposure to one or more cleaning agents and WRA. Cleaning sprays, bleach, ammonia, disinfectants, mixing products, and specific job tasks have been identified as specific causes and/or triggers of asthma. Because research conclusions and policy suggestions have remained unheeded by manufactures, vendors, and commercial cleaning companies, it is time for a multifaceted intervention. Possible preventive measures encompass the following: substitution of cleaning sprays, bleach, and ammonia; minimizing the use of disinfectants; avoidance of mixing products; use of respiratory protective devices; and worker education. Moreover, we suggest the education of unions, consumer, and public interest groups to encourage safer products. In addition, information activities for the general population with the purpose of improving the knowledge of professional and domestic cleaners regarding risks and available preventive measures and to promote strict collaboration between scientific communities and safety and health agencies are urgently needed.

  10. Effects of various Eleutherococcus senticosus cortex on swimming time, natural killer activity and corticosterone level in forced swimming stressed mice.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yoshiyuki; Sumiyoshi, Maho

    2004-12-01

    The cortex of Eleutherococcus senticosus (Rupr. & Maxim.) Maxim. has been used extensively in Russia, China, Korea and Japan as an adaptogen whose properties are the ability to increase as non-specific body resistance to stress and fatigue. Although it has been reported that Eleutherococcus senticosus has anti-fatigue and anti-stress actions, their actions are still unclear on the relationship between immune system, especially natural killer (NK) activity and endocrine system (corticosterone level). We compared the effects of the water extracts (A, B, C, D and E) of five Eleutherococcus senticosus cortex on the swimming time, NK activity and blood corticosterone level using forced swimming stressed mice. Among five kinds, C, D and E extracts significantly prolonged the swimming time. C and D extracts inhibited the reduction of NK activity and the corticosterone elevation induced by forced swimming. The contents of eleutheroside E, isoflaxidin and eleutherosides B plus E were in the order C > D > E > B > A and C > E > D > A > B extracts, respectively. Therefore, it is suggested that eleutheroside E may be contributed to the anti-fatigue action, the recovery of the reduction of NK activity and the inhibition of corticosterone elevation induced by swimming stress.

  11. 16 Weeks of Progressive Barefoot Running Training Changes Impact Force and Muscle Activation in Habitual Shod Runners.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Ana Paula da Silva; Mezêncio, Bruno; Amadio, Alberto Carlos; Serrão, Julio Cerca

    2016-01-01

    Short-term effects of barefoot and simulated barefoot running have been widely discussed in recent years. Consequences of adopting barefoot running for a long period, including as a training approach, still remain unknown. The present study evaluated the influence of 16 weeks of progressive barefoot running training on impact force and muscle activation in habitual shod runners. Six habitual shod runners (3 men and 3 women, 29.5 ± 7.3 years) were tested barefoot (BF) and shod (SH), before and after 16 weeks of progressive barefoot running training. Tests consisted of running on instrumented treadmill at 9 km/h, for 10 minutes in each experimental condition. Nine data acquisitions (10 s) of vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) and electromyographic (EMG) signal were conducted in each experimental condition for each test. BF training was effective to alter VGRF and EMG parameters of running in habitual shod runners, regardless of footwear condition (SH or BF). The magnitude of first peak of VGRF (Fy1) and the impulse of the first 50 ms decreased after training for BF and SH (p<0.01). The activation reduced from PRE to POST training for four muscles in BF running (p<0.001), whereas only muscle gastrocnemius lateralis decreased significantly its activation (p<0.01) in SH running. A 16-week progressive barefoot running training seems to be an effective training strategy to reduce impact force, improve shock attenuation and to decrease muscle activation intensity, not only in BF running, but also in SH running, although BF condition seems to be more influenced by BF training.

  12. 16 Weeks of Progressive Barefoot Running Training Changes Impact Force and Muscle Activation in Habitual Shod Runners

    PubMed Central

    Mezêncio, Bruno; Amadio, Alberto Carlos; Serrão, Julio Cerca

    2016-01-01

    Short-term effects of barefoot and simulated barefoot running have been widely discussed in recent years. Consequences of adopting barefoot running for a long period, including as a training approach, still remain unknown. The present study evaluated the influence of 16 weeks of progressive barefoot running training on impact force and muscle activation in habitual shod runners. Six habitual shod runners (3 men and 3 women, 29.5 ± 7.3 years) were tested barefoot (BF) and shod (SH), before and after 16 weeks of progressive barefoot running training. Tests consisted of running on instrumented treadmill at 9 km/h, for 10 minutes in each experimental condition. Nine data acquisitions (10 s) of vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) and electromyographic (EMG) signal were conducted in each experimental condition for each test. BF training was effective to alter VGRF and EMG parameters of running in habitual shod runners, regardless of footwear condition (SH or BF). The magnitude of first peak of VGRF (Fy1) and the impulse of the first 50 ms decreased after training for BF and SH (p<0.01). The activation reduced from PRE to POST training for four muscles in BF running (p<0.001), whereas only muscle gastrocnemius lateralis decreased significantly its activation (p<0.01) in SH running. A 16-week progressive barefoot running training seems to be an effective training strategy to reduce impact force, improve shock attenuation and to decrease muscle activation intensity, not only in BF running, but also in SH running, although BF condition seems to be more influenced by BF training. PMID:27907069

  13. Move with Science: Energy, Force, & Motion. An Activities-Based Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beven, Roy Q.

    The secondary school level activities contained in this book use the subject of transportation to teach the basic concepts of physics and several areas of human biology. The material is organized into sections including curriculum design, activities, background readings, and resources. Activities focus on such topics as notions of motion stability…

  14. Measurement of Contractile Activity in Small Animal's Digestive Organ by Carbon Nanotube-Based Force Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Takamichi; Takeda, Naoki; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Koike, Kanako; Shimatani, Yuichi; Sakai, Takafumi; Akiya, Masahiro; Taguchi, Akira

    2011-03-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT)-based force transducer designed to be embedded in the body of a live animal was fabricated and implanted into the stomach of a rat omit to measure contractile movement. The transducer comprised dispersed poly(ethylene glycol)-grafted multiwalled CNTs applied to a comb-like Au-electrode formed on a poly(dimethylsiloxane) sheet. The implanted rat was injected with acetylcholine to induce muscular contractions and changes in the resistance of the transducer were measured. Such changes arise owing to strain in the CNT network upon distortion. The measured resistance change was found to be proportional to the concentration of injected acetylcholine.

  15. Antidepressant-like activity of liposomal formulation containing nimodipine treatment in the tail suspension test, forced swim test and MAOB activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Lina Clara Gayoso E Almendra Ibiapina; Rolim, Hercília Maria Lins; Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes; Santos-Magalhães, Nereide Stela

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that intracellular calcium ion dysfunction may be an etiological factor in affective illness. Nimodipine (NMD) is a Ca(2+) channel blocker that has been extensively investigated for therapy of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. In this work, we have evaluated the antidepressant-like activity of nimodipine encapsulated into liposomes (NMD-Lipo) in mice through tail suspension and forced swim assays, as well as MAOB activity. During the tail suspension test, the administration of NMD-Lipo at 0.1, 1 and 10mg/kg was able to promote a reduction in the immobility time of animals greater than the positive control (imipramine). In the forced swim test, the immobility time of mice treated with NMD-Lipo was reduced. This reduction was significantly greater than that found in the animals treated with imipramine and paroxetine. This may suggest that NMD-Lipo provides more antidepressant-like activity than in positive controls. The groups that received a combination of liposomal NMD and antidepressant drugs showed lower immobility time than the groups, which were treated only with imipramine or paroxetine. The mice treated with the combination of NMD-Lipo and reserpine presented an increase in the time of immobility compared with animals treated only with NMD-Lipo. There was a significant decrease in MAOB activity in animals treated with NMD-Lipo compared with untreated animals. The results of the tail suspension test, forced swim test and MAOB activity suggested that the antidepressant activity of NMD-Lipo may be related to an increase in the cerebral monoamine concentrations.

  16. Effects of heavy resistance training on maximal and explosive force production, endurance and serum hormones in adolescent handball players.

    PubMed

    Gorostiaga, E M; Izquierdo, M; Iturralde, P; Ruesta, M; Ibáñez, J

    1999-10-01

    To determine the effects of 6-weeks of heavy-resistance training on physical fitness and serum hormone status in adolescents (range 14-16 years old) 19 male handball players were divided into two different groups: a handball training group (NST, n = 10), and a handball and heavy-resistance strength training group (ST, n = 9). A third group of 4 handball goalkeepers of similar age served as a control group (C, n = 4). After the 6-week training period, the ST group showed an improvement in maximal dynamic strength of the leg extensors (12.2%; P < 0.01) and the upper extremity muscles (23%; P < 0.01), while no changes were observed in the NST and C groups. Similar differences were observed in the maximal isometric unilateral leg extension forces. The height of the vertical jump increased in the NST group from 29.5 (SD 4) cm to 31.4 (SD 5) cm (P < 0.05) while no changes were observed in the ST and C groups. A significant increase was observed in the ST group in the velocity of the throwing test [from 71.7 (SD 7) km x h(-1) to 74.0 (SD 7) km x h(-1); P < 0.001] during the 6-week period while no changes were observed in the NST and C groups. During a submaximal endurance test running at 11 km x h(-1), a significant decrease in blood lactate concentration occurred in the NST group [from 3.3 (SD 0.9) mmol x l(-1) to 2.4 (SD 0.8) mmol x l(-1); P < 0.01] during the experiment, while no change was observed in the ST or C groups. Finally, a significant increase (P < 0.01) was noted in the testosterone:cortisol ratio in the C group, while the increase in the NST group approached statistical significance (P < 0.08) and no changes in this ratio occurred in the ST group. The present findings suggested that the addition of 6-weeks of heavy resistance training to the handball training resulted in gains in maximal strength and throwing velocity but it compromised gains in leg explosive force production and endurance running. The tendency for a compromised testosterone:cortisol ratio

  17. Calibration of an interfacial force microscope for MEMS metrology : FY08-09 activities.

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, Jack E.; Baker, Michael Sean; Crowson, Douglas A.; Mitchell, John Anthony; Moore, Nathan W.

    2009-10-01

    Progress in MEMS fabrication has enabled a wide variety of force and displacement sensing devices to be constructed. One device under intense development at Sandia is a passive shock switch, described elsewhere (Mitchell 2008). A goal of all MEMS devices, including the shock switch, is to achieve a high degree of reliability. This, in turn, requires systematic methods for validating device performance during each iteration of design. Once a design is finalized, suitable tools are needed to provide quality assurance for manufactured devices. To ensure device performance, measurements on these devices must be traceable to NIST standards. In addition, accurate metrology of MEMS components is needed to validate mechanical models that are used to design devices to accelerate development and meet emerging needs. Progress towards a NIST-traceable calibration method is described for a next-generation, 2D Interfacial Force Microscope (IFM) for applications in MEMS metrology and qualification. Discussed are the results of screening several suitable calibration methods and the known sources of uncertainty in each method.

  18. Quantifying Force and Viscoelasticity Inside Living Cells Using an Active-Passive Calibrated Optical Trap.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Christine M; Mas, Josep; Oddershede, Lene; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine

    2017-01-01

    As described in the previous chapters, optical tweezers have become a tool of precision for in vitro single-molecule investigations, where the single molecule of interest most often is studied in purified form in an experimental assay with a well-controlled fluidic environment. A well-controlled fluidic environment implies that the physical properties of the liquid, most notably the viscosity, are known and the fluidic environment can, for calibrational purposes, be treated as a simple liquid.In vivo, however, optical tweezers have primarily been used as a tool of manipulation and not so often for precise quantitative force measurements, due to the unknown value of the spring constant of the optical trap formed within the cell's viscoelastic cytoplasm. Here, we describe a method for utilizing optical tweezers for quantitative in vivo force measurements. The experimental protocol and the protocol for data analysis rely on two types of experiments, passive observation of the thermal motion of a trapped object inside a living cell, followed by observations of the response of the trapped object when subject to controlled oscillations of the optical trap. One advantage of this calibration method is that the size and refractive properties of the trapped object and the viscoelastic properties of its environment need not be known. We explain the protocol and demonstrate its use with experiments of trapped granules inside live S. pombe cells.

  19. Disaster relief activities of the Japan self-defense force following the Great East Japan Earthquake.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Yasumasa

    2014-06-01

    Cooperation between civilian and military forces, including the Japan Self-Defense Force (JSDF), enabled wide-ranging disaster relief after the Great East Japan Earthquake. Nevertheless, many preventable fatalities occurred, particularly related to an inability to treat chronic disease, indicating the need to plan for the provision of long-term medical aid after natural disasters in stricken areas and evacuation shelters. To assist in this effort, this report (1) provides an overview of the consequences of the medical response to the Great East Japan Earthquake, the largest natural disaster ever to hit Japan, focusing on the role and actions of the JSDF; (2) discusses the lessons learned regarding the provision of medical aid and management by the JSDF after this disaster, looking at the special challenges of meeting the needs of a rapidly aging population in a disaster situation; and (3) provides recommendations for the development of strategies for the long-term medical aid and support after natural disasters, especially with regard to the demographics of the Japanese population.

  20. Evaluation of uncertainty in experimental active buckling control of a slender beam-column with disturbance forces using Weibull analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enss, Georg C.; Platz, Roland

    2016-10-01

    Buckling of slender load-bearing beam-columns is a crucial failure scenario in light-weight structures as it may result in the collapse of the entire structure. If axial load and load capacity are unknown, stability becomes uncertain. To compensate this uncertainty, the authors successfully developed and evaluated an approach for active buckling control for a slender beam-column, clamped at the base and pinned at the upper end. Active lateral forces are applied with two piezoelectric stack actuators in opposing directions near the beam-column' clamped base to prevent buckling. A Linear Quadratic Regulator is designed and implemented on the experimental demonstrator and statistical tests are conducted to prove effectivity of the active approach. The load capacity of the beam-column could be increased by 40% and scatter of buckling occurrences for increasing axial loads is reduced. Weibull analysis is used to evaluate the increase of the load capacity and its related uncertainty compensation.

  1. Chitinase activity on amorphous chitin thin films: a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring and atomic force microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Kittle, Joshua D; Qian, Chen; Roman, Maren; Esker, Alan R

    2013-08-12

    Chitinases are widely distributed in nature and have wide-ranging pharmaceutical and biotechnological applications. This work highlights a real-time and label-free method to assay Chitinase activity via a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The chitin substrate was prepared by spincoating a trimethylsilyl chitin solution onto a silica substrate, followed by regeneration to amorphous chitin (RChi). The QCM-D and AFM results clearly showed that the hydrolysis rate of RChi films increased as Chitinase (from Streptomyces griseus) concentrations increased, and the optimal temperature and pH for Chitinase activity were around 37 °C and 6-8, respectively. The Chitinase showed greater activity on chitin substrates, having a high degree of acetylation, than on chitosan substrates, having a low degree of acetylation.

  2. Dehydro-α-lapachone, a plant product with antivascular activity

    PubMed Central

    Garkavtsev, Igor; Chauhan, Vikash P.; Wong, Hon Kit; Mukhopadhyay, Arpita; Glicksman, Marcie A.; Peterson, Randall T.; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2011-01-01

    Antivascular agents have become a standard of treatment for many malignancies. However, most of them target the VEGF pathway and lead to refractoriness. To improve the diversity of options for antivascular therapy, we applied a high-throughput screen for small molecules targeting cell adhesion. We then assayed the resulting antiadhesion hits in a transgenic zebrafish line with endothelial expression of EGFP (Tg(fli1:EGFP)y1) to identify nontoxic molecules with antivascular activity selective to neovasculature. This screen identified dehydro-α-lapachone (DAL), a natural plant product. We found that DAL inhibits vessel regeneration, interferes with vessel anastomosis, and limits plexus formation in zebrafish. Furthermore, DAL induces vascular pruning and growth delay in orthotopic mammary tumors in mice. We show that DAL targets cell adhesion by promoting ubiquitination of the Rho-GTPase Rac1, which is frequently up-regulated in many different cancers. PMID:21709229

  3. Production and biological activities of yellow pigments from Monascus fungi.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gong; Wu, Zhenqiang

    2016-08-01

    Monascus yellow pigments (MYPs), are azaphilone compounds and one of the three main components of total Monascus pigments (MPs). Thirty-five hydrophilic or hydrophobic MYPs have been identified, with the majority being hydrophobic. Apart from screening special Monascus strains, some advanced approaches, such as extractive and high-cell-density fermentations, have been applied for developing or producing new MYPs, especially extracellular hydrophilic MYPs. The outstanding performance of MYPs in terms of resistance to photodegradation, as well as tolerance for temperature and pH, give natural MYPs reasonable prospects, compared with the orange and red MPs, for practical use in the present and future. Meanwhile, MYPs have shown promising potential for applications in the food and pharmaceutical industries based on their described bioactivities. This review briefly summarizes the reports to date on chemical structures, biological activities, biosynthetic pathways, production technologies, and physicochemical performances of MYPs. The existing problems for MYPs are discussed and research prospects proposed.

  4. Isometric force development, isotonic shortening, and elasticity measurements from Ca(2+)-activated ventricular muscle of the guinea pig

    PubMed Central

    Maughan, DW; Low, ES; Alpert, NR

    1978-01-01

    Isometric tension and isotonic shortening were measured at constant levels of calcium activation of varying magnitude in mechanically disrupted EGTA-treated ventricular bundles from guinea pigs. The results were as follows: (a) The effect of creatine phosphate (CP) on peak tension and rate of shortening saturated at a CP concentration more than 10 mM; below that level tension was increased and shortening velocity decreased. We interpreted this to mean that CP above 10 mM was sufficient to buffer MgATP(2-) intracellularly. (b) The activated bundles exhibited an exponential stress-strain relationship and the series elastic properties did not vary appreciably with degree of activation or creatine phosphate level. (c) At a muscle length 20 percent beyond just taut, peak tension increased with Ca(2+) concentration over the range slightly below 10(-6) to slightly above 10(-4)M. (d) By releasing the muscle length-active tension curves were constructed. Force declined to 20 percent peak tension with a decrease in muscle length (after the recoil) of only 11 percent at 10(-4)M Ca(2+) and 6 percent at 4x10(-6)M Ca(2+). (e) The rate of shortening after a release was greater at lower loads. At identical loads (relative to maximum force at a given Ca(2+) level), velocity at a given time after the release was less at lower Ca(2+) concentrations; at 10 M(-5), velocity was 72 percent of that at 10(-4)M, and at 4x10(-6)M, active shortening was usually delayed and was 40 percent of the velocity at 10(-4) M. Thus, under the conditions of these experiments, both velocity and peak tension depend on the level of Ca(2+) activation over a similar range of Ca(2+) concentration. PMID:149182

  5. 78 FR 75343 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications for New Active Ingredients

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications for New Active Ingredients AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: EPA has received several applications to register pesticide products containing active ingredients not included in any currently registered pesticide...

  6. Force engages vinculin and promotes tumor progression by enhancing PI3-kinase activation of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Rubashkin, MG; Cassereau, L; Bainer, R; DuFort, CC; Yui, Y; Ou, G; Paszek, MJ; Davidson, MW; Chen, YY; Weaver, VM

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix stiffness induces focal adhesion assembly to drive malignant transformation and tumor metastasis. Nevertheless, how force alters focal adhesions to promote tumor progression remains unclear. Here, we explored the role of the focal adhesion protein vinculin, a force-activated mechano-transducer, in mammary epithelial tissue transformation and invasion. We found that extracellular matrix stiffness stabilizes the assembly of a vinculin-talin-actin scaffolding complex that facilitates PI3-kinase mediated phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate phosphorylation. Using defined two and three dimensional matrices, a mouse model of mammary tumorigenesis with vinculin mutants and a novel super resolution imaging approach, we established that ECM stiffness, per se, promotes the malignant progression of a mammary epithelium by activating and stabilizing vinculin and enhancing Akt signaling at focal adhesions. Our studies also revealed that vinculin strongly co-localizes with activated Akt at the invasive border of human breast tumors, where the ECM is stiffest and we detected elevated mechano-signaling. Thus, extracellular matrix stiffness could induce tumor progression by promoting the assembly of signaling scaffolds; a conclusion underscored by the significant association we observed between highly expressed focal adhesion plaque proteins and malignant transformation across multiple types of solid cancer. PMID:25183785

  7. Design considerations in an active medical product safety monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Gagne, Joshua J; Fireman, Bruce; Ryan, Patrick B; Maclure, Malcolm; Gerhard, Tobias; Toh, Sengwee; Rassen, Jeremy A; Nelson, Jennifer C; Schneeweiss, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Active medical product monitoring systems, such as the Sentinel System, will utilize electronic healthcare data captured during routine health care. Safety signals that arise from these data may be spurious because of chance or bias, particularly confounding bias, given the observational nature of the data. Applying appropriate monitoring designs can filter out many false-positive and false-negative associations from the outset. Designs can be classified by whether they produce estimates based on between-person or within-person comparisons. In deciding which approach is more suitable for a given monitoring scenario, stakeholders must consider the characteristics of the monitored product, characteristics of the health outcome of interest (HOI), and characteristics of the potential link between these. Specifically, three factors drive design decisions: (i) strength of within-person and between-person confounding; (ii) whether circumstances exist that may predispose to misclassification of exposure or misclassification of the timing of the HOI; and (iii) whether the exposure of interest is predominantly transient or sustained. Additional design considerations include whether to focus on new users, the availability of appropriate active comparators, the presence of an exposure time trend, and the measure of association of interest. When the key assumptions of self-controlled designs are fulfilled (i.e., lack of within-person, time-varying confounding; abrupt HOI onset; and transient exposure), within-person comparisons are preferred because they inherently avoid confounding by fixed factors. The cohort approach generally is preferred in other situations and particularly when timing of exposure or outcome is uncertain because cohort approaches are less vulnerable to biases resulting from misclassification.

  8. Centennial Scale Variations in Lake Productivity Linked to Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englebrecht, A.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Guilderson, T. P.; Ingram, L.; Byrne, R.

    2012-12-01

    Solar variations on both decadal and centennial timescales have been associated with climate phenomena (van Loon et al., 2004; Hodell et al., 2001; White et al., 1997). The energy received by the Earth at the peak of the solar cycle increases by <0.1%; so the question has remained of how this could be amplified to produce an observable climate response. Recent modeling shows that the response of the Earth's climate system to the 11-year solar cycle may be amplified through stratosphere and ocean feedbacks and has the potential to impact climate variability on a multidecadal to centennial timescales (Meehl et al., 2009). Here, we report a 1000-year record of changes in the stratigraphy and carbon isotope composition of varved lake sediment from Isla Isabela (22°N, 106°W) in the subtropical northeast Pacific. Stable carbon isotopes and carbonate stratigraphy can be used to infer surface productivity in the lake. Our analysis shows variations in primary productivity on centennial timescales and suggests that solar activity may be an important component of Pacific climate variability. A possible response during solar maxima acts to keep the eastern equatorial Pacific cooler and drier than usual, producing conditions similar to a La Niña event. In the region around Isla Isabela peak solar years were characterized by decreased surface temperatures and suppressed precipitation (Meehl et al., 2009), which enhance productivity at Isabela (Kienel et al. 2011). In the future, we plan to analyze the data using advanced time series analysis techniques like the wavelets together with techniques to handle irregularly spaced time series data. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-571672

  9. Plans for the Sentinel-3 SLSTR Active Fire Product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooster, Martin; Xu, Weidong

    2010-05-01

    The Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR) will fly on the ESA Sentinel-3 satellites as a follow-on to the highly successful ERS/ENVISAR (A)ATSR series of imaging radiometers. SLSTR has been designed to offer a series of new capabilities over and above those of the forunner instruments (including an increased number of spectral channels, a much wider swath width, and an increased revisit frequency) whist still maintaining the key characteristics of dual-view, high accuracy and high precision radiometry. Included in the SLSTR-design are two dedicated "fire channels" that will allow unsaturated thermal spectral radiance observations over even high intensity and/or large open vegetation fires. Data from these and the other spectral channels will be used to generate an operational near real-time SLSTR active fire detection and fire radiative power product, to be used for both scientific studies on wildfire causes, behaviour and effects, and also operational applications involved with forecasting the short-term atmospheric impact of wildfire smoke. This work will present the plans for the SLSTR fire product, including details of the algorithm design and performance analysis, and an evaluation of the ver1 algorithm using MODIS data of global fire events.

  10. Magnetic force driven six degree-of-freedom active vibration isolation system using a phase compensated velocity sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yongdae; Park, Kyihwan; Kim, Sangyoo

    2009-04-15

    A six-axis active vibration isolation system (AVIS) is developed using voice coil actuators. Point contact configuration is employed to have an easy assembly of eight voice coil actuators to an upper and a base plates. The velocity sensor, using an electromagnetic principle that is commonly used in the vibration control, is investigated since its phase lead characteristic causes an instability problem for a low frequency vibration. The performances of the AVIS are investigated in the frequency domain and finally validated by comparing with the passive isolation system using the atomic force microscope images.

  11. Electrochemical reduction of carbon fluorine bond in 4-fluorobenzonitrile Mechanistic analysis employing Marcus Hush quadratic activation-driving force relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukrishnan, A.; Sangaranarayanan, M. V.

    2007-10-01

    The reduction of carbon-fluorine bond in 4-fluorobenzonitrile in acetonitrile as the solvent, is analyzed using convolution potential sweep voltammetry and the dependence of the transfer coefficient on potential is investigated within the framework of Marcus-Hush quadratic activation-driving force theory. The validity of stepwise mechanism is inferred from solvent reorganization energy estimates as well as bond length calculations using B3LYP/6-31g(d) method. A novel method of estimating the standard reduction potential of the 4-fluorobenzonitrile in acetonitrile is proposed.

  12. Characteristics of receptor- and transducer-coupled activation of the intracellular signalling in sensory neuron revealed by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalisov, M. M.; Penniyaynen, V. A.; Esikova, N. A.; Ankudinov, A. V.; Krylov, B. V.

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical properties of sensory neurons upon activation of intracellular cascade processes by comenic acid binding to a membrane opioid-like receptor (receptor-coupled), as well as a very low (endogenous) concentration of ouabain (transducer-coupled), have been investigated. Using atomic force microscopy, it is established that exposure to ouabain, in contrast to the impact of comenic acid, leads to a hardening of the neuron soma. This suggests that the receptor-coupled signal transmission to the cell genome is carried out through mechanisms that are different from the transducer-coupled signal pathways.

  13. Force- and length-dependent catastrophe activities explain interphase microtubule organization in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Foethke, Dietrich; Makushok, Tatyana; Brunner, Damian; Nédélec, François

    2009-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is essential for the maintenance of cell morphology in eukaryotes. In fission yeast, for example, polarized growth sites are organized by actin, whereas microtubules (MTs) acting upstream control where growth occurs. Growth is limited to the cell poles when MTs undergo catastrophes there and not elsewhere on the cortex. Here, we report that the modulation of MT dynamics by forces as observed in vitro can quantitatively explain the localization of MT catastrophes in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. However, we found that it is necessary to add length-dependent catastrophe rates to make the model fully consistent with other previously measured traits of MTs. We explain the measured statistical distribution of MT-cortex contact times and re-examine the curling behavior of MTs in unbranched straight tea1Delta cells. Importantly, the model demonstrates that MTs together with associated proteins such as depolymerizing kinesins are, in principle, sufficient to mark the cell poles.

  14. An Energetic Perspective on Aerosol Radiative Forcing and Interactions with Atmospheric Wave Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinpour, F.; Wilcox, E. M.; Colarco, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosols have the capability to alter regional-scale atmospheric circulations. A better understanding of the contribution of aerosols to multi-scale atmospheric phenomena and their transient changes is crucial for efforts to evaluate climate predictions using next generation climate models. In this study we address the following questions: (1) Is there a mechanistic relationship between variability of oceanic dust aerosol forcing and transient changes in the African easterly jet- African easterly wave (AEJ-AEW) system? (2) What are the long-term impacts of possible aerosol-wave interactions on climate dynamics of eastern tropical Atlantic Ocean and western African monsoon (WAM) region during boreal summer seasons? Our hypothesis is that aerosol radiative forcing may act as additional energy source to fuel the development of African easterly waves on the northern and southern sides of the AEJ. Evidence in support of this hypothesis is presented based on analysis of an ensemble of NASA satellite data sets, including aerosol optical thickness (AOT) observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) and the Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS), as well as an atmospheric reanalysis from the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and a simulation of global aerosol distributions made with the Goddard Earth Observing System Model version 5 (GEOS-5) Earth system model with meteorology constrained by MERRA and an assimilation of MODIS AOT (MERRAero). We propose that the impacts of Saharan aerosols on the regional climate dynamics occur through contributions to the eddy energy of waves with 2—7-day and 7—11-day variability.

  15. THE ENHANCEMENT OF MACROPHAGE BACTERIOSTASIS BY PRODUCTS OF ACTIVATED LYMPHOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Fowles, Robert E.; Fajardo, Ileana M.; Leibowitch, Jacques L.; David, John R.

    1973-01-01

    It was reported previously that the incubation of normal guinea pig macrophages with partially purified products of activated lymphocytes resulted in altered macrophage function including increased cell adherence to culture vessels, spreading, phagocytosis, and glucose carbon-1 oxidation. Studies reported here demonstrate that such macrophages also exhibit enhanced bacteriostasis. Lymphocytes were stimulated with concanavalin A, the culture supernatant was chromatographed over Sephadex G-100 and the fraction of mol wt 25,000–55,000, rich in lymphocyte mediators, was cultured with normal guinea pig macrophages for 1–3 days. Macrophages incubated with fractions from unstimulated lymphocyte cultures served as controls. The resulting macrophage monolayers were infected with Listeria monocytogenes. Macrophages incubated with mediator-rich fractions exhibited 2- to 10-fold enhanced bacteriostasis compared to controls. Further studies indicate that this enhancement was attributable to intrinsic changes in the macrophages and not simply a consequence of the number of macrophages on the monolayers. The studies support the concept that macrophage bacteriostasis can be enhanced by lymphocyte mediators. However, macrophages, which have been preincubated directly with sensitive lymphocytes and antigen exhibit even greater bacteriostasis and sometimes bactericidal capacity, suggesting that either a labile lymphocyte factor or direct lymphocyte macrophage interaction may also be involved in bactericidal activity. PMID:4200649

  16. Natural products as a resource for biologically active compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Hanke, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate various sources of biologically active natural products in an effort to identify the active pesticidal compounds involved. The study is divided into several parts. Chapter 1 contains a discussion of several new compounds from plant and animal sources. Chapter 2 introduces a new NMR technique. In section 2.1 a new technique for better utilizing the lanthanide relaxation agent Gd(fod)/sub 3/ is presented which allows the predictable removal of resonances without line broadening. Section 2.2 discusses a variation of this technique for use in an aqueous solvent by applying this technique towards identifying the binding sites of metals of biological interest. Section 2.3 presents an unambiguous /sup 13/C NMR assignment of melibiose. Chapter 3 deals with work relating to the molting hormone of most arthropods, 20-hydroxyecdysone. Section 3.1 discusses the use of two-dimensional NMR (2D NMR) to assign the /sup 1/H NMR spectrum of this biologically important compound. Section 3.2 presents a new application for Droplet countercurrent chromatography (DCCC). Chapter 4 presents a basic improvement to the commercial DCCC instrument that is currently being applied to future commercial instruments. Chapter 5 discusses a curious observation of the effects that two previously known compounds, nagilactone C and (-)-epicatechin, have on lettuce and rice and suggest a possible new role for the ubiquitous flavanol (-)-epicatechin in plants.

  17. Productive Activities and Subjective Well-Being among Older Adults: The Influence of Number of Activities and Time Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Lindsey A.; Cahalin, Lawrence P.; Gerst, Kerstin; Burr, Jeffrey A.

    2005-01-01

    This study examines relationships among three measures of subjective well-being (life satisfaction, happiness and depressive symptoms), and two global measures of productive activity (number of activities and time commitment). We argue that participation in multiple productive activities should increase subjective well-being because these…

  18. Modulation of the Relationship Between External Knee Adduction Moments and Medial Joint Contact Forces Across Subjects and Activities

    PubMed Central

    Trepczynski, Adam; Kutzner, Ines; Bergmann, Georg; Taylor, William R; Heller, Markus O

    2014-01-01

    Objective The external knee adduction moment (EAM) is often considered a surrogate measure of the distribution of loads across the tibiofemoral joint during walking. This study was undertaken to quantify the relationship between the EAM and directly measured medial tibiofemoral contact forces (Fmed) in a sample of subjects across a spectrum of activities. Methods The EAM for 9 patients who underwent total knee replacement was calculated using inverse dynamics analysis, while telemetric implants provided Fmed for multiple repetitions of 10 activities, including walking, stair negotiation, sit-to-stand activities, and squatting. The effects of the factors “subject” and “activity” on the relationships between Fmed and EAM were quantified using mixed-effects regression analyses in terms of the root mean square error (RMSE) and the slope of the regression. Results Across subjects and activities a good co