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Sample records for active gas mag

  1. MAG4 Versus Alternative Techniques for Forecasting Active-Region Flare Productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David A.; Moore, Ronald L.; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F.; Khazanov, Igor

    2014-01-01

    MAG4 is a technique of forecasting an active region's rate of production of major flares in the coming few days from a free-magnetic-energy proxy. We present a statistical method of measuring the difference in performance between MAG4 and comparable alternative techniques that forecast an active region's major-flare productivity from alternative observed aspects of the active region. We demonstrate the method by measuring the difference in performance between the "Present MAG4" technique and each of three alternative techniques, called "McIntosh Active-Region Class," "Total Magnetic Flux," and "Next MAG4." We do this by using (1) the MAG4 database of magnetograms and major-flare histories of sunspot active regions, (2) the NOAA table of the major-flare productivity of each of 60 McIntosh active-region classes of sunspot active regions, and (3) five technique-performance metrics (Heidke Skill Score, True Skill Score, Percent Correct, Probability of Detection, and False Alarm Rate) evaluated from 2000 random two-by-two contingency tables obtained from the databases. We find that (1) Present MAG4 far outperforms both McIntosh Active-Region Class and Total Magnetic Flux, (2) Next MAG4 significantly outperforms Present MAG4, (3) the performance of Next MAG4 is insensitive to the forward and backward temporal windows used, in the range of one to a few days, and (4) forecasting from the free-energy proxy in combination with either any broad category of McIntosh active-region classes or any Mount Wilson active-region class gives no significant performance improvement over forecasting from the free-energy proxy alone (Present MAG4).

  2. MAG4 versus alternative techniques for forecasting active region flare productivity

    PubMed Central

    Falconer, David A; Moore, Ronald L; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F; Khazanov, Igor

    2014-01-01

    MAG4 is a technique of forecasting an active region's rate of production of major flares in the coming few days from a free magnetic energy proxy. We present a statistical method of measuring the difference in performance between MAG4 and comparable alternative techniques that forecast an active region's major-flare productivity from alternative observed aspects of the active region. We demonstrate the method by measuring the difference in performance between the “Present MAG4” technique and each of three alternative techniques, called “McIntosh Active-Region Class,” “Total Magnetic Flux,” and “Next MAG4.” We do this by using (1) the MAG4 database of magnetograms and major flare histories of sunspot active regions, (2) the NOAA table of the major-flare productivity of each of 60 McIntosh active-region classes of sunspot active regions, and (3) five technique performance metrics (Heidke Skill Score, True Skill Score, Percent Correct, Probability of Detection, and False Alarm Rate) evaluated from 2000 random two-by-two contingency tables obtained from the databases. We find that (1) Present MAG4 far outperforms both McIntosh Active-Region Class and Total Magnetic Flux, (2) Next MAG4 significantly outperforms Present MAG4, (3) the performance of Next MAG4 is insensitive to the forward and backward temporal windows used, in the range of one to a few days, and (4) forecasting from the free-energy proxy in combination with either any broad category of McIntosh active-region classes or any Mount Wilson active-region class gives no significant performance improvement over forecasting from the free-energy proxy alone (Present MAG4). Key Points Quantitative comparison of performance of pairs of forecasting techniques Next MAG4 forecasts major flares more accurately than Present MAG4 Present MAG4 forecast outperforms McIntosh AR Class and total magnetic flux PMID:26213517

  3. Substrate specificity and sequence-dependent activity of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase (Mag).

    PubMed

    Lingaraju, Gondichatnahalli M; Kartalou, Maria; Meira, Lisiane B; Samson, Leona D

    2008-06-01

    DNA glycosylases initiate base excision repair by first binding, then excising aberrant DNA bases. Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a 3-methyladenine (3MeA) DNA glycosylase, Mag, that recognizes 3MeA and various other DNA lesions including 1,N6-ethenoadenine (epsilon A), hypoxanthine (Hx) and abasic (AP) sites. In the present study, we explore the relative substrate specificity of Mag for these lesions and in addition, show that Mag also recognizes cisplatin cross-linked adducts, but does not catalyze their excision. Through competition binding and activity studies, we show that in the context of a random DNA sequence Mag binds epsilon A and AP-sites the most tightly, followed by the cross-linked 1,2-d(ApG) cisplatin adduct. While epsilon A binding and excision by Mag was robust in this sequence context, binding and excision of Hx was extremely poor. We further studied the recognition of epsilon A and Hx by Mag, when these lesions are present at different positions within A:T and G:C tracts. Overall, epsilon A was slightly less well excised from each position within the A:T and G:C tracts compared to excision from the random sequence, whereas Hx excision was greatly increased in these sequence contexts (by up to 7-fold) compared to the random sequence. However, given most sequence contexts, Mag had a clear preference for epsilon A relative to Hx, except in the TTXTT (X=epsilon A or Hx) sequence context from which Mag removed both lesions with almost equal efficiency. We discuss how DNA sequence context affects base excision by various 3MeA DNA glycosylases.

  4. Demystifying Mag-Lev.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Ernest; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Presented are classroom activities in which students explore the potential use of magnetic levitation for transportation purposes. The advantages of using a MagLev transportation system instead of conventional trains are discussed. Directions for designing and building a MagLev track and circuit are provided. (KR)

  5. Laser propagation through full-scale, high-gain MagLIF gas pipes using the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Bradley; Sefkow, Adam; Goyon, Clement; Strozzi, David; Khan, Shahab; Rosen, Mordy; Campbell, Mike; Logan, Grant; Peterson, Kyle; Moody, John

    2016-10-01

    The first relevant measurements of laser propagation through surrogate high-gain MagLIF gas pipe targets at full scale have been performed at the NIF, using 30 kJ of laser drive from one quad in a 10 ns pulse at an intensity of 2e14 W/cm2. The unmagnetized pipe is filled with 1 atm of 99%/1% neopentane/Ar, and uses an entrance window of 0.75 um polyimide and an exit window of 0.3 um of Ta backed with 5 um of polyimide. Side-on x-ray emission from the plasma is imaged through the 100 um-thick epoxy wall onto a framing camera at four times during the drive, and is in excellent agreement with pre-shot HYDRA radiation-hydrodynamics modeling. X-ray emission from the Ta exit plane is imaged onto a streak camera to determine the timing and intensity of the laser burning through the pipe, and the Ar emission from the center of the pipe is spectrally- and temporally-resolved to determine the plasma electron temperature. Backscatter is measured throughout the laser drive, and is found to be of significance only when the laser reaches the Ta exit plane and produces SBS. These first results in unmagnetized surrogate gas fills are encouraging since they demonstrate sufficient laser energy absorption and low LPI losses within high-density long-scale-length plasmas for proposed high-gain MagLIF target designs. We will discuss plans to magnetize targets filled with high-density DT gas in future experiments. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. MAG4 Versus Alternative Techniques for Forecasting Active-Region Flare Productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David A.; Moore, Ronald L.; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F.; Khazanov, Igor

    2014-01-01

    MAG4 (Magnetogram Forecast), developed originally for NASA/SRAG (Space Radiation Analysis Group), is an automated program that analyzes magnetograms from the HMI (Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager) instrument on NASA SDO (Solar Dynamics Observatory), and automatically converts the rate (or probability) of major flares (M- and X-class), Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), and Solar Energetic Particle Events. MAG4 does not forecast that a flare will occur at a particular time in the next 24 or 48 hours; rather the probability of one occurring.

  7. First Results from Laser-Driven MagLIF Experiments on OMEGA: Time Evolution of Laser Gas Heating Using Soft X-Ray Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnak, D. H.; Betti, R.; Chang, P.-Y.; Davies, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    Magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) is a promising inertial confinement fusion scheme comprised of three stages: axial magnetization, laser heating of the deuterium -tritium gas fill, and compression of the gas by the liner. To study the physics of MagLIF, a scaled-down version has been designed and implemented on the OMEGA-60 laser. This talk will focus primarily on the heating process of a MagLIF target using a 351-nm laser. A neon-doped deuterium gas capsule was heated using a 2.5-ns square pulse delivering 200 J of laser energy. Spectral analysis of the x-ray emission from the side and the laser entrance hole of the capsule is used to infer the time evolution of the gas temperature. The x-ray spectra for a grid of possible gas temperatures and densities are simulated using Spect3D atomic modeling software. The simulation results are then used to deconvolve the raw signals and obtain density and temperature estimations. A gas temperature lower bound of 100 eV at 1.3 ns after the start of the laser pulse can be inferred from these estimations. The estimations are then compared to 2-D hydrocode modeling. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and by DE-FG02-04ER54786 and DE-FC02-04ER54789 (Fusion Science Center).

  8. The Toxoplasma MAG1 peptides induce sex-based humoral immune response in mice and distinguish active from chronic human infection

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianchun; Viscidi, Raphael P.; Kannan, Geetha; Pletnikov, Mikhail V.; Li, Ye; Severance, Emily G.; Yolken, Robert H.; Delhaes, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    To distinguish active from inactive/chronic infection in Toxoplasma gondii-seropositive individuals, we have developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using specific peptides derived from Toxoplasma matrix antigen MAG1. We used this assay to measure matrix specific antibodies and pilot studies with infected mice established the validity of two peptides. The immune response against MAG1 occurs in about 12 days postinfection and displays a sex difference later on in mouse model, with males producing higher antibody titers than females. Serum samples from 22 patients with clinical toxoplasmosis and from 26 patients with serological evidence of past exposure to Toxoplasma (more than one year infection history) were analyzed. Both MAG1 peptides detected antibodies significant frequently and robustly from active stage than from the chronic stage of toxoplasmosis. The results indicate that both MAG1 peptides may be used as a tool to differentiate active from inactive infection. It also may be considered in the design of potential vaccines in humans. PMID:23142034

  9. [A case of IgM paraproteinemic neuropathy associated with anti-sulfated glucuronic paragloboside (SGPG) IgG antibody without anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) activity].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Haruko; Endo, Masanao; Sugawara, Eriko; Kuwahara, Motoi; Kusunoki, Susumu; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Takahashi, Tatsuya

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of IgM paraproteinemic neuropathy associated with anti-sulfated glucuronic paragloboside (SGPG) IgG antibody. An 84-year old man complained of numbness on the left side of the face and in the distal portions of the limbs. Neurological examination showed mild sensory ataxia. The laboratory tests revealed the presence of IgM lambda paraproteinemia and anti-SGPG IgG antibody without anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) activity and anti-MAG/SGPG IgM antibody. Results of nerve conduction study showed decreased sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) amplitude, indicating the presence of sensory-dominant axonal polyneuropathy, and the prolongation of distal latency was not observed. Treatment with corticosteroids resulted in a rapid improvement in neurological abnormalities. In IgM paraproteinemic neuropathy associated with anti-MAG/SGPG antibody, distal acquired demyelinating sensory neuropathy and resistance to immunological treatments are the characteristic pathologic and clinical features, respectively. On the other hand our rare case of IgM paraproteinemic neuropathy positive for anti-SGPG IgG antibody presented with axonal sensory polyneuropathy and a good responsiveness to corticosteroids.

  10. THOR Fluxgate Magnetometer (MAG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Rumi; Eastwood, Jonathan; Magnes, Werner; Valavanoglou, Aris; Carr, Christopher M.; O'Brien, Helen L.; Narita, Yasuhito; Delva, Magda; Chen, Christopher H. K.; Plaschke, Ferdinand; Soucek, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) is the first mission ever flown in space dedicated to plasma turbulence. The goal of the Fluxgate Magnetometer (MAG) is to measure the DC to low frequency ambient magnetic field. The design of the magnetometer consists of two tri-axial sensors and the related magnetometer electronics; the electronics are hosted on printed circuit boards in the common electronics box of the fields and wave processor (FWP). A fully redundant two sensor system mounted on a common boom and the new miniaturized low noise design based on MMS and Solar Orbiter instruments enable accurate measurement throughout the region of interest for THOR science. The usage of the common electronics hosted by FWP guarantees to fulfill the required timing accuracy with other fields measurements. These improvements are important to obtain precise measurements of magnetic field, which is essential to estimate basic plasma parameters and correctly identify the spatial and temporal scales of the turbulence. Furthermore, THOR MAG provides high quality data with sufficient overlap with the Search Coil Magnetometer (SCM) in frequency space to obtain full coverage of the wave forms over all the frequencies necessary to obtain the full solar wind turbulence spectrum from MHD to kinetic range with sufficient accuracy.

  11. Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) protects neurons from acute toxicity using a ganglioside-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Niraj R; Nguyen, Thien; Bullen, John W; Griffin, John W; Schnaar, Ronald L

    2010-03-17

    Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), a protein expressed on the innermost wrap of myelin, contributes to long-term axon stability as evidenced by progressive axon degeneration in Mag-null mice. Recently, MAG was also found to protect axons from acute toxic insults. In the current study, rat dorsal root ganglion neurons were cultured on control substrata and substrata adsorbed with myelin proteins. Neurons on myelin-adsorbed surfaces were resistant to acute degeneration of neurites induced by vincristine, a cancer chemotherapeutic agent with neuropathic side effects. Myelin-mediated protection was reversed by anti-MAG antibody and was absent when cells were cultured on extracts from Mag-null mouse myelin, confirming the protective role of MAG. Gangliosides (sialylated glycosphingolipids) are one functional class of axonal receptors for MAG. In the current studies, a direct role for gangliosides in mediating the acute protective effects of MAG was established. Treatment of neurons with sialidase, an enzyme that cleaves the terminal sialic acids required for MAG binding, reversed MAG's protective effect, as did treatment with (1R,2R)-1-phenyl-2-hexadecanoylamino-3-pyrrolidino-1-propanol, an inhibitor of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis. In contrast, treatment with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, an enzyme that cleaves Nogo receptors (NgR, another class of MAG receptor), or with a peptide inhibitor of an NgR-associated signaling molecule p75(NTR), failed to diminish MAG-mediated protection. Inhibiting the Rho-associated protein kinase ROCK reversed protection. We conclude that MAG protects neurites from acute toxic insult via a ganglioside-mediated signaling pathway that involves activation of RhoA. Understanding MAG-mediated protection may provide opportunities to reduce axonal damage and loss.

  12. MagR Alone Is Insufficient to Confer Cellular Calcium Responses to Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Keliang; You, He; Chen, Yanbo; Chu, Pengcheng; Hu, Meiqin; Shen, Jianying; Guo, Wei; Xie, Can; Lu, Bai

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic manipulation of cell activity offers advantages over optical manipulation but an ideal tool remains elusive. The MagR protein was found through its interaction with cryptochrome (Cry) and the protein in solution appeared to respond to magnetic stimulation (MS). After we initiated an investigation on the specific role of MagR in cellular response to MS, a subsequent study claimed that MagR expression alone could achieve cellular activation by MS. Here we report that despite systematically testing different ways of measuring intracellular calcium and different MS protocols, it was not possible to detect any cellular or neuronal responses to MS in MagR-expressing HEK cells or primary neurons from the dorsal root ganglion and the hippocampus. By contrast, in neurons co-expressing MagR and channelrhodopin, optical but not MS increased calcium influx in hippocampal neurons. Our results indicate that MagR alone is not sufficient to confer cellular magnetic responses. PMID:28360843

  13. Microstructure of Laser-MAG Hybrid Welds of Sintered P/M Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuangyu; Zhang, Hong; Hu, Jiandong; Shi, Yan

    2013-01-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of iron-based powder metallurgical steels jointed by CO2 laser-metal active gas (MAG) hybrid welding were investigated. The cross-sectional morphology of hybrid weld bead consisted of arc zone and laser zone. The microstructure of arc zone consisted of columnar dendrite and fine acicular dendrite between the columnar dendrites, but that of laser zone was composed of fine equiaxed dendrite. The MAG weld had obvious heat-affected zone (HAZ) zone, while hybrid weld had very narrow HAZ zone because of the rapid cooling rate. The phase constitutions of the joint determined by x-ray diffraction were α-Fe (ferrite) and Cu. The 2θ value of α-Fe (200) peaks of hybrid weld was smaller than that of sintering compact. Compared to MAG weld, hybrid weld had finer grain size, higher micro-hardness, and higher micro-strain, which was caused by the difference of cooling rate and crystallizing.

  14. Fractal Analysis of Metal Transfer in Mig/mag Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, A. P.; Vasconcelos, H. H. M.; Gonçalves, L. L.; de Miranda, H. C.

    2009-03-01

    We apply techniques of fractal analysis in order to classify metal-transfer mode in MIG/MAG (metal inert/active gas) welding, which are among the most commonly employed arc-fusion processes for industrial applications. We work with voltage and current time series obtained during welding, and evaluate statistical fluctuations present in those series by Hurst, detrended-fluctuation, and detrended-cross-correlation analyses, for each of three different metal-transfer modes: short-circuiting, globular, and spray. For a given total timespan of each series, curves of fluctuation as a funtion of the time-window size are processed by using pattern-classification techniques, such as principal-component analysis and Karhunen-Loève expansions. We obtain near 100% success rate for the classification, with timespans as small as 100 miliseconds, with a processing time of the same order. This suggests that our set of tools can be incorporated into an industrial welding apparatus in order to guarantee automatic correction of a process requiring a single metal-transfer mode.

  15. A National MagLev Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    The case for a national high-speed magnetic-levitation (MagLev) transportation system is presented. Focus is on current issues facing the country, such as national security, the economy, transportation, technology, and the environment. NASA s research into MagLev technology for launch assist is also highlighted. Further, current socio-cultural norms regarding motor-vehicle-based transportation systems are questioned in light of the problems currently facing the U.S. The multidisciplinary benefits of a long-distance MagLev system support the idea that such a system would be an important element of a truly multimodal U.S. transportation infrastructure.

  16. Analysis of substrate specificity of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Mag1 alkylpurine DNA glycosylase

    SciTech Connect

    Adhikary, Suraj; Eichman, Brandt F.

    2014-10-02

    DNA glycosylases specialized for the repair of alkylation damage must identify, with fine specificity, a diverse array of subtle modifications within DNA. The current mechanism involves damage sensing through interrogation of the DNA duplex, followed by more specific recognition of the target base inside the active site pocket. To better understand the physical basis for alkylpurine detection, we determined the crystal structure of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Mag1 (spMag1) in complex with DNA and performed a mutational analysis of spMag1 and the close homologue from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (scMag). Despite strong homology, spMag1 and scMag differ in substrate specificity and cellular alkylation sensitivity, although the enzymological basis for their functional differences is unknown. We show that Mag preference for 1,N{sup 6}-ethenoadenine ({var_epsilon}A) is influenced by a minor groove-interrogating residue more than the composition of the nucleobase-binding pocket. Exchanging this residue between Mag proteins swapped their {var_epsilon}A activities, providing evidence that residues outside the extrahelical base-binding pocket have a role in identification of a particular modification in addition to sensing damage.

  17. An investigation of the weld region on the SAE 1020 joined with metal active gas and determination of the mismatch factor

    SciTech Connect

    Meric, C.; Tokdemir, M.

    1999-10-01

    In this study, the joining process of SAE 1020 low carbon steel, generally used in the industry, has been completed using the metal active gas (MAG) weld method. The goal of this study was to examine the mismatch between base and weld metal. After the joining process, mechanical properties of the samples of the base metal (BM), the heat affected zone (HAZ), and the weld metal (WM) were investigated, and the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) test was performed.

  18. MAG-EPA reduces severity of DSS-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Morin, Caroline; Blier, Pierre U; Fortin, Samuel

    2016-05-15

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic disease characterized by diffuse inflammation of the intestinal mucosa of the large bowel. Omega-3 (ω3) fatty acid supplementation has been associated with a decreased production of inflammatory cytokines involved in UC pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to determine the preventive and therapeutic potential of eicosapentaenoic acid monoglyceride (MAG-EPA) in an in vivo rats model of UC induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). DSS rats were untreated or treated per os with MAG-EPA. Morphological, histological, and biochemical analyses were performed following MAG-EPA administrations. Morphological and histological analyses revealed that MAG-EPA pretreatment (12 days pre-DSS) and treatment (6 days post-DSS) exhibited strong activity in reducing severity of disease in DSS rats. Following MAG-EPA administrations, tissue levels of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were markedly lower compared with rats treated only with DSS. MAG-EPA per os administration decrease neutrophil infiltration in colon tissues, as depicted by myelohyperoxidase activity. Results also revealed a reduced activation of NF-κB pathways correlated with a decreased expression of COX-2 in colon homogenates derived from MAG-EPA-pretreated and treated rats. Tension measurements performed on colon tissues revealed that contractile responses to methacholine and relaxing effect induced by sodium nitroprusside were largely increased following MAG-EPA treatment. The combined treatment of MAG-EPA and vitamin E displayed an antagonistic effect on anti-inflammatory properties of MAG-EPA in DSS rats.

  19. Glomerular filtration and tubular secretion of MAG-3 in the rat kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller-Suur, R.M.; Mueller-Suur, C. )

    1989-12-01

    Technetium-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG-3) has recently been introduced as a new radiopharmaceutical for dynamic renal scintigraphy. To elucidate the mechanism of renal excretion, micropuncture experiments were performed in rat kidneys for direct measurements of glomerular filtration and tubular secretory capacity. Fluid of Bowman space was collected from superficial glomeruli and analyzed for its contents of (99mTc)MAG-3, (125I)hippurate and (3H)inulin during constant infusion of these compounds. The ratio of activity of ultrafiltrate to that of arterial plasma was 0.23 for MAG-3, 0.68 for hippurate and 1.04 for inulin which demonstrates that the filtrated amount of MAG-3 is only 23% of that of inulin, presumably because of higher plasma protein binding which was also measured in vitro and found to be 80 +/- 1.5% for MAG-3 and 32 +/- 2% for (125I)hippurate. Proximal and distal tubules were also micropunctured and their tubular fluid as well as the final urine analyzed for the activity of hippurate and MAG-3. The tubular fluid to plasma ratio values along the nephron and in the final urine were all lower for MAG-3 than for hippurate, indicating a lower secretory capacity. From measurements of whole renal clearance, GFR and plasma protein binding the filtered amount of MAG-3 was 0.26 and of hippurate 0.87 ml/min.g kidney weight (p less than 0.001) and the secreted amount 2.01 and 2.38 ml/min.g kidney weight (p less than 0.05), respectively. We conclude that MAG-3 is predominantly excreted by tubular secretion and that the lower renal clearance of MAG-3 as compared with that of hippurate is a result both of a substantially decreased glomerular filtration and of a lower tubular secretion.

  20. MagAO: status and science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morzinski, Katie M.; Close, Laird M.; Males, Jared R.; Hinz, Phil M.; Esposito, Simone; Riccardi, Armando; Briguglio, Runa; Follette, Katherine B.; Pinna, Enrico; Puglisi, Alfio; Vezilj, Jennifer; Xompero, Marco; Wu, Ya-Lin

    2016-07-01

    "MagAO" is the adaptive optics instrument at the Magellan Clay telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. MagAO has a 585-actuator adaptive secondary mirror and 1000-Hz pyramid wavefront sensor, operating on natural guide stars from R-magnitudes of -1 to 15. MagAO has been in on-sky operation for 166 nights since installation in 2012. MagAO's unique capabilities are simultaneous imaging in the visible and infrared with VisAO and Clio, excellent performance at an excellent site, and a lean operations model. Science results from MagAO include the first ground-based CCD image of an exoplanet, demonstration of the first accreting protoplanets, discovery of a new wide-orbit exoplanet, and the first empirical bolometric luminosity of an exoplanet. We describe the status, report the AO performance, and summarize the science results. New developments reported here include color corrections on red guide stars for the wavefront sensor; a new field stop stage to facilitate VisAO imaging of extended sources; and eyepiece observing at the visible-light diffraction limit of a 6.5-m telescope. We also discuss a recent hose failure that led to a glycol coolant leak, and the recovery of the adaptive secondary mirror (ASM) after this recent (Feb. 2016) incident.

  1. Analysis of hybrid Nd:Yag laser-MAG arc welding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Guen, E.; Fabbro, R.; Carin, M.; Coste, F.; Le Masson, P.

    2011-10-01

    In the hybrid laser-arc welding process, a laser beam and an electric arc are coupled in order to combine the advantages of both processes: high welding speed, low thermal load and high depth penetration thanks to the laser; less demanding on joint preparation/fit-up, typical of arc welding. Thus the hybrid laser-MIG/MAG (Metal Inert or Active Gas) arc welding has very interesting properties: the improvement of productivity results in higher welding speeds, thicker welded materials, joint fit-up allowance, better stability of molten pool and improvement of joint metallurgical quality. The understanding of the main relevant involved physical processes are therefore necessary if one wants for example elaborate adequate simulations of this process. Also, for an efficient use of this process, it is necessary to precisely understand the complex physical phenomena that govern this welding technique. This paper investigates the analysis of the effect of the main operating parameters for the laser alone, MAG alone and hybrid Laser/MAG welding processes. The use of a high speed video camera allows us to precisely characterize the melt pool 3D geometry such as the measurements of its depression and its length and the phenomena occurring inside the melt pool through keyhole-melt pool-droplet interaction. These experimental results will form a database that is used for the validation of a three-dimensional thermal model of the hybrid welding process for a rather wide range of operating parameters where the 3-D geometry of the melt pool is taken into account.

  2. The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C.; Constable, C.; Tauxe, L.; Koppers, A.; Banerjee, S.; Jackson, M.; Solheid, P.

    2003-12-01

    The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) is a multi-user facility to establish and maintain a state-of-the-art relational database and digital archive for rock and paleomagnetic data. The goal of MagIC is to make such data generally available and to provide an information technology infrastructure for these and other research-oriented databases run by the international community. As its name implies, MagIC will not be restricted to paleomagnetic or rock magnetic data only, although MagIC will focus on these kinds of information during its setup phase. MagIC will be hosted under EarthRef.org at http://earthref.org/MAGIC/ where two "integrated" web portals will be developed, one for paleomagnetism (currently functional as a prototype that can be explored via the http://earthref.org/databases/PMAG/ link) and one for rock magnetism. The MagIC database will store all measurements and their derived properties for studies of paleomagnetic directions (inclination, declination) and their intensities, and for rock magnetic experiments (hysteresis, remanence, susceptibility, anisotropy). Ultimately, this database will allow researchers to study "on the internet" and to download important data sets that display paleo-secular variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field over geological time, or that display magnetic data in typical Zijderveld, hysteresis/FORC and various magnetization/remanence diagrams. The MagIC database is completely integrated in the EarthRef.org relational database structure and thus benefits significantly from already-existing common database components, such as the EarthRef Reference Database (ERR) and Address Book (ERAB). The ERR allows researchers to find complete sets of literature resources as used in GERM (Geochemical Earth Reference Model), REM (Reference Earth Model) and MagIC. The ERAB contains addresses for all contributors to the EarthRef.org databases, and also for those who participated in data collection, archiving and

  3. Activated Carbon Fibers For Gas Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C

    2017-01-01

    The advantages of Activated Carbon Fibers (ACF) over Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) are reviewed and their relationship to ACF structure and texture are discussed. These advantages make ACF very attractive for gas storage applications. Both adsorbed natural gas (ANG) and hydrogen gas adsorption performance are discussed. The predicted and actual structure and performance of lignin-derived ACF is reviewed. The manufacture and performance of ACF derived monolith for potential automotive natural gas (NG) storage applications is reported Future trends for ACF for gas storage are considered to be positive. The recent improvements in NG extraction coupled with the widespread availability of NG wells means a relatively inexpensive and abundant NG supply in the foreseeable future. This has rekindled interest in NG powered vehicles. The advantages and benefit of ANG compared to compressed NG offer the promise of accelerated use of ANG as a commuter vehicle fuel. It is to be hoped the current cost hurdle of ACF can be overcome opening ANG applications that take advantage of the favorable properties of ACF versus GAC. Lastly, suggestions are made regarding the direction of future work.

  4. Adsorbed natural gas storage with activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jian; Brady, T.A.; Rood, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Despite technical advances to reduce air pollution emissions, motor vehicles still account for 30 to 70% emissions of all urban air pollutants. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 require 100 cities in the United States to reduce the amount of their smog within 5 to 15 years. Hence, auto emissions, the major cause of smog, must be reduced 30 to 60% by 1998. Natural gas con be combusted with less pollutant emissions. Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) uses adsorbents and operates with a low storage pressure which results in lower capital costs and maintenance. This paper describes the production of an activated carbon adsorbent produced from an Illinois coal for ANG.

  5. Quantitation of renal function with technetium-99m MAG3

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, C.D.; Thorstad, B.L.; Yester, M.V.; Stutzman, M.; Dubovsky, E.V.

    1988-12-01

    The technetium-labeled hippuran analog (/sup 99m/Tc)MAG3 was compared with ( T I)hippuran in 50 patients using a quantitative renal function protocol that includes: (a) estimation of effective renal plasma flow by a single-injection, single-sample plasma clearance method, (b) determination of relative function of right and left kidney from the initial count rate over each kidney, and (c) comparison of recovered urine activity with plasma disappearance. This protocol is suitable for routine clinical use, and, in fact, has been used heavily at our clinic for a number of years. By slight modification of the formulas, the results obtained with (/sup 99m/Tc)MAG3 agreed well with those using ( T I)hippuran. We conclude that (/sup 99m/Tc)MAG3 can be substituted for ( T I)hippuran in the quantitative protocol, with the better image quality and lower radiation dose (in abnormals) of a technetium-labeled agent.

  6. Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG): past, present and beyond.

    PubMed

    Quarles, Richard H

    2007-03-01

    The myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein localized in periaxonal Schwann cell and oligodendroglial membranes of myelin sheaths where it functions in glia-axon interactions. It contains five immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains and is in the sialic acid-binding subgroup of the Ig superfamily. It appears to function both as a ligand for an axonal receptor that is needed for the maintenance of myelinated axons and as a receptor for an axonal signal that promotes the differentiation, maintenance and survival of oligodendrocytes. Its function in the maintenance of myelinated axons may be related to its role as one of the white matter inhibitors of neurite outgrowth acting through a receptor complex involving the Nogo receptor and/or gangliosides containing 2,3-linked sialic acid. MAG is expressed as two developmentally regulated isoforms with different cytoplasmic domains that may activate different signal transduction pathways in myelin-forming cells. MAG contains a carbohydrate epitope shared with other glycoconjugates that is a target antigen in autoimmune peripheral neuropathy associated with IgM gammopathy and has been implicated in a dying back oligodendrogliopathy in multiple sclerosis.

  7. The SuperMAG data processing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjerloev, J. W.

    2012-09-01

    In this paper I outline the data processing technique which is used in the SuperMAG initiative. SuperMAG is a worldwide collaboration of organizations and national agencies that currently operate more than 300 ground based magnetometers. SuperMAG provides easy access to validated ground magnetic field perturbations in the same coordinate system, identical time resolution and with a common baseline removal approach. The purpose of SuperMAG is to provide scientists, teachers, students and the general public easy access to measurements of the magnetic field at the surface of the Earth. Easy access to data, plots and derived products maximizes the utilization of this unique data set. It is outlined how SuperMAG processes the observations obtained by the individual data provider. Data are rotated into a local magnetic coordinate system by determining a time dependent declination angle. This angle displays a slow gradual change and a yearly periodic variation attributed to changes in the Earth main field and season temperature variations. The baseline is determined from the data itself in a three step process: (1) a daily baseline, (2) a yearly trend, and (3) a residual offset. This technique does not require so-called quiet days and thus it avoids all the well-known problems associated with their identification. The residual offset for the N- and Z-components shows a distinct latitudinal dependence while the E-component is independent of the latitude. This result is interpreted as being due to a weak ring current (likely asymmetric) which is present even during official quiet days. For the purpose of M-I research using 1-min data I find no difference between observatories and variometers. I finally argue that there is no correct baseline determination technique since we do not have a set of ground-truth observations required to make an objective evaluation. Instead, the user must keep in mind the assumptions on which the baseline was determined and draw conclusions

  8. Making Activated Carbon for Storing Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtowicz, Marek A.; Serio, Michael A.; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2005-01-01

    Solid disks of microporous activated carbon, produced by a method that enables optimization of pore structure, have been investigated as means of storing gas (especially hydrogen for use as a fuel) at relatively low pressure through adsorption on pore surfaces. For hydrogen and other gases of practical interest, a narrow distribution of pore sizes <2 nm is preferable. The present method is a variant of a previously patented method of cyclic chemisorption and desorption in which a piece of carbon is alternately (1) heated to the lower of two elevated temperatures in air or other oxidizing gas, causing the formation of stable carbon/oxygen surface complexes; then (2) heated to the higher of the two elevated temperatures in flowing helium or other inert gas, causing the desorption of the surface complexes in the form of carbon monoxide. In the present method, pore structure is optimized partly by heating to a temperature of 1,100 C during carbonization. Another aspect of the method exploits the finding that for each gas-storage pressure, gas-storage capacity can be maximized by burning off a specific proportion (typically between 10 and 20 weight percent) of the carbon during the cyclic chemisorption/desorption process.

  9. (99m)Tc-MAG3: Image Wisely.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Andrew T; Folks, Russell D; Rahman, A K M Fazlur; Polsani, Aruna; Dubovsky, Eva V; Halkar, Raghuveer; Manatunga, Amita

    2017-02-17

    Purpose To determine if commonly administered doses of technetium 99m ((99m)Tc) mertiatide (MAG3) in the range of 300-370 MBq (approximately 8-10 mCi) contribute to image interpretation and justify the resulting radiation exposure. Materials and Methods The respective institutional review boards approved this HIPAA-compliant study and waived informed consent. Baseline and furosemide (99m)Tc-MAG3 imaging examinations in 50 patients suspected of having renal obstruction and 48 patients suspected of having renovascular hypertension (RVH) were randomly selected from archived databases and were independently scored by three experienced readers without access to 2-second flow images. Readers were blinded to their original scores, and then they rescored each examination with access to high-activity 2-second flow images. Relative renal function was determined after a low activity (62.9 MBq ± 40.7) baseline acquisition for RVH and a high activity (303.4 MBq ± 48.1) acquisition after administration of enalaprilat. Data were analyzed by using random effects analysis of variance and mean and standard error of the mean for the difference between sets of scores and the difference between relative function measurements. Results There was no significant difference in the scores without flow images compared with blinded scores with high-activity flow images for patients suspected of having obstruction (P = .80) or RVH (P = .24). Moreover, there was no significant difference in the relative uptake measurements after administration of low and high activities (P > .99). Conclusion Administered doses of (99m)Tc-MAG3 in the range of 300-370 MBq (approximately 8-10 mCi) do not affect the relative function measurements or contribute to interpretation of images in patients suspected of having RVH or obstruction compared with administration of lower doses; unnecessary radiation exposure can be avoided by administering doses in the range of 37-185 MBq as recommended incurrent guidelines

  10. SIGLEC-4 (MAG) Antagonists: From the Natural Carbohydrate Epitope to Glycomimetics.

    PubMed

    Schwardt, Oliver; Kelm, Soerge; Ernst, Beat

    2015-01-01

    Siglec-4, also known as myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), is a member of the siglec (sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins) family. MAG binds with high preference to sialic acids α(2-3)-linked to D-galactose. Although the involvement and relevance of its sialic acid binding activity is still controversial, it could be demonstrated that interactions of MAG with sialylated gangliosides play an important role in axon stability and regeneration. In this article we describe in detail our current understanding of the biological role and the carbohydrate specificity of siglec-4. Furthermore, this review compiles the intensive research efforts leading from the identification of the minimal oligosaccharide binding epitope in gangliosides via micromolar oligosaccharide mimics to the development of small molecular weight and more drug-like sialic acid derivatives binding with low nanomolar affinities. Such compounds will be useful to elucidate MAG's biological functions, which are currently not fully understood.

  11. Implementation of cargo MagLev in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Chris R; Peterson, Dean E; Leung, Eddie M

    2008-01-01

    Numerous studies have been completed in the United States, but no commercial MagLev systems have been deployed. Outside the U.S., MagLev continues to attract funding for research, development and implementation. A brief review of recent global developments in MagLev technology is given followed by the status of MagLev in the U.S. The paper compares the cost of existing MagLev systems with other modes of transport, notes that the near-term focus of MagLev development in the U.S. should be for cargo, and suggests that future MagLev systems should be for very high speed cargo. The Los Angeles to Port of Los Angeles corridor is suggested as a first site for implementation. The benefits of MagLev are described along with suggestions on how to obtain funding.

  12. Calibrating the Prominence Magnetometer (ProMag)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Lewis; Casini, R.

    2013-07-01

    The Prominence Magnetometer (ProMag) is a dual-channel, dual-beam, slit-scanning, full Stokes spectro-polarimeter designed by the High Altitude Observatory at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (HAO/NCAR) for the study of the magnetism of solar prominences and filaments. It was deployed in August 2009 at the 40 cm coronagraph of the Evans Solar Facility (ESF) of the National Solar Observatory on Sacramento Peak (NSO/SP). In its standard mode of operation it acquires spectro-polarimetric maps of solar targets simultaneously in the two chromospheric lines of He I at 587.6 nm and 1083.0 nm. Since August 2011 ProMag has operated in “patrol mode” with a dedicated observer. We aim to routinely measure the vector magnetic field in prominences. The electro-optic modulator and polarization analyzer are integrated into a single mechanical unit located at the coude feed of the telescope. This location was necessary for proper co-alignment of the dual beams, but complicates the precise polarimeter calibration necessary to achieve the sensitivity required for prominence measurements (< 10^-3). At this sensitivity, small variations in optical alignment can become significant. We present a calibration method for ProMag, using a polarizer and retarder at coronagraph prime focus. Calibrations are recorded before and after observations. We discuss the success of this method and its limitations.

  13. Neutron Measurements in Small MagLIF Experiments on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebov, V. Yu.; Barnak, D. H.; Davies, J. R.; Knauer, J. P.; Betti, R.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Campbell, E. M.

    2016-10-01

    The Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) is participating in laser-driven magnetized linear inertial fusion (MagLIF) research on the OMEGA Laser System in partnership with Sandia as part of ARPA-E's ALPHA Program. In the current OMEGA setup, a CH cylindrical tube filled with D2 gas is compressed by 40 laser beams, preheated by one of the beams, and an axial magnetic field is applied to limit electron heat loss. Two copper coils provide 10-T magnetic fields. A neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector has been designed, fabricated, and calibrated to diagnose primary D-D fusion neutron yield in the range of 1 ×107 to 5 ×109 and ion temperature from 2 to 8 keV. The design details and calibration results of these nTOF detectors will be presented together with neutron measurement results from recent laser-driven MagLIF experiments on OMEGA. The information, data, or work presented herein was funded in part by the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), U.S. Department of Energy, under Award Number DE-AR0000568, and the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  14. Immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibody against myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG): A comparison of methods.

    PubMed

    Jaskowski, T D; Martins, T B; Litwin, C M; Hill, H R

    2004-01-01

    The presence of immunoglobulin (Ig)M antibody against myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) has been associated with autoimmune demyelinating, sensorimotor neuropathies. Approximately 50% of patients with IgM paraproteinemia and associated peripheral neuropathy possess antibodies against MAG. These autoantibodies are thought to interfere with the process of myelination, myelin maintenance, or axon-Schwann cell interaction. The detection of these autoantibodies is useful to the clinician and is suggestive of active demyelination in a peripheral neuropathy. Our objective in this study was to compare the results obtained using three different methods (dual enzyme immunoassay [EIA], immunofluorescent antibody [IFA] and Western blot [WB]) for detecting IgM antibody against MAG in patients suspected of having autoimmune demyelinating neuropathies. Since the dual EIA utilized two different antigens, results from this assay were separated into two groups: MAG and sulfate-3-glucuronyl paragloboside (SGPG). When compared to WB (gold standard), percent agreement, sensitivity, and specificity for EIA and IFA are as follows: MAG EIA (68.3, 100.0, and 60.6); SGPG EIA (95.1, 100.0, and 93.9); and myelin IFA (97.6, 100.0, and 97.0). The authors conclude that the SGPG EIA and myelin IFA compared well with the standard WB method when detecting IgM antibody against MAG (100 kD). Many sera demonstrated reactivity on the MAG EIA that were negative by WB (100 kD glycoprotein). The authors recommend screening for MAG IgM in suspected patient sera by SGPG EIA or myelin IFA and utilizing these same methods to titer sera confirmed positive by WB.

  15. MAG-DPA curbs inflammatory biomarkers and pharmacological reactivity in cytokine-triggered hyperresponsive airway models.

    PubMed

    Khaddaj-Mallat, Rayan; Hiram, Roddy; Sirois, Chantal; Sirois, Marco; Rizcallah, Edmond; Marouan, Sofia; Morin, Caroline; Rousseau, Éric

    2016-12-01

    Bronchial inflammation contributes to a sustained elevation of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in asthma. Conversely, omega-3 fatty acid derivatives have been shown to resolve inflammation in various tissues. Thus, the effects of docosapentaenoic acid monoacylglyceride (MAG-DPA) were assessed on inflammatory markers and reactivity of human distal bronchi as well as in a cultured model of guinea pig tracheal rings. Human bronchi were dissected and cultured for 48 h with 10 ng/mL TNF-α or IL-13. Guinea pig tracheas were maintained in organ culture for 72 h which was previously shown to trigger spontaneous AHR. All tissues were treated with increasing concentrations of MAG-DPA (0.1, 0.3, and 1 μmol/L). Pharmacomechanical reactivity, Ca(2+) sensitivity, and western blot analysis for specific phosphoproteins and transcription factors were performed to assess the effects of both cytokines, alone or in combination with MAG-DPA, on human and guinea pig airway preparations. Although 0.1 μmol/L MAG-DPA did not significantly reduce inflammatory biomarkers, the higher concentrations of MAG-DPA (0.3 and 1 μmol/L) blunted the activation of the TNF-α/NF κB pathway and abolished COX-2 expression in human and guinea pig tissues. Moreover, 0.3 and 1 μmol/L MAG-DPA consistently decreased the Ca(2+) sensitivity and pharmacological reactivity of cultured bronchial explants. Furthermore, in human bronchi, IL-13-stimulated phosphorylation of CPI-17 was reversed by 1 μmol/L MAG-DPA. This effect was further amplified in the presence of 100 μmol/L aspirin. MAG-DPA mediates antiphlogistic effects by increasing the resolution of inflammation, while resetting Ca(2+) sensitivity and contractile reactivity.

  16. Metastasis-associated gene, mag-1 improves tumour microenvironmental adaptation and potentiates tumour metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Jia, Haiquan; Lin, Huiyun; Tan, Xiaogang; Du, Zhiyan; Chen, Huihua; Xu, Yuanji; Han, Xiaoxi; Zhang, Jiakai; Zhao, Siyang; Yu, Xiaodan; Lu, Yinglin

    2012-12-01

    Metastasis is a major cause of death from malignant diseases, and the underlying mechanisms are still largely not known. A detailed probe into the factors which may regulate tumour invasion and metastasis contributes to novel anti-metastatic therapies. We previously identified a novel metastasis-associated gene 1 (mag-1) by means of metastatic phenotype cloning. Then we characterized the gene expression profile of mag-1 and showed that it promoted cell migration, adhesion and invasion in vitro. Importantly, the disruption of mag-1 via RNA interference not only inhibited cellular metastatic behaviours but also significantly reduced tumour weight and restrained mouse breast cancer cells to metastasize to lungs in spontaneous metastatic assay in vivo. Furthermore, we proved that mag-1 integrates dual regulating mechanisms through the stabilization of HIF-1α and the activation of mTOR signalling pathway. We also found that mag-1-induced metastatic promotion could be abrogated by mTOR specific inhibitor, rapamycin. Taken together, the findings identified a direct role that mag-1 played in metastasis and implicated its function in cellular adaptation to tumour microenvironment.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of cells overexpressing MagA, an endogenous contrast agent for live cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Goldhawk, Donna E; Lemaire, Claude; McCreary, Cheryl R; McGirr, Rebecca; Dhanvantari, Savita; Thompson, R Terry; Figueredo, Rene; Koropatnick, Jim; Foster, Paula; Prato, Frank S

    2009-01-01

    Molecular imaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may benefit from the ferrimagnetic properties of magnetosomes, membrane-enclosed iron biominerals whose formation in magnetotactic bacteria is encoded by multiple genes. One such gene is MagA, a putative iron transporter. We have examined expression of MagA in mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells and characterized their response to iron loading and cellular imaging by MRI. MagA expression augmented both Prussian blue staining and the elemental iron content of N2A cells, without altering cell proliferation, in cultures grown in the presence of iron supplements. Despite evidence for iron incorporation in both MagA and a variant, MagAE137V, only MagA expression produced intracellular contrast detectable by MRI at 11 Tesla. We used this stable expression system to model a new sequence for cellular imaging with MRI, using the difference between gradient and spin echo images to distinguish cells from artifacts in the field of view. Our results show that MagA activity in mammalian cells responds to iron supplementation and functions as a contrast agent that can be deactivated by a single point mutation. We conclude that MagA is a candidate MRI reporter gene that can exploit more fully the superior resolution of MRI in noninvasive medical imaging.

  18. How MAG4 Improves Space Weather Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David; Khazanov, Igor; Barghouty, Nasser

    2013-01-01

    Dangerous space weather is driven by solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejection (CMEs). Forecasting flares and CMEs is the first step to forecasting either dangerous space weather or All Clear. MAG4 (Magnetogram Forecast), developed originally for NASA/SRAG (Space Radiation Analysis Group), is an automated program that analyzes magnetograms from the HMI (Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager) instrument on NASA SDO (Solar Dynamics Observatory), and automatically converts the rate (or probability) of major flares (M- and X-class), Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), and Solar Energetic Particle Events.

  19. Peri-aortofemoral prosthesis urinoma: diagnosis by Tc-99m MAG3 SPECT/CT and differentiation from simultaneous hepatobiliary excretion.

    PubMed

    Ngai, Stanley; Stuckey, Stephen L

    2008-05-01

    A 75-year-old woman developed renal failure 1 week after elective aortobifemoral bypass surgery. Postoperative computed tomography showed right hydronephrosis. Tc-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycerine (MAG3) scintigraphy was performed to exclude renal obstruction or acute tubular necrosis. Planar MAG3 images demonstrated right hydronephrosis and unusual accumulation of tracer between the kidneys and the right upper quadrant of abdomen, with new areas of activity in the right lower quadrant on delayed images. SPECT/CT demonstrated MAG3 activity within fluid collections adjacent to the aorta and right iliac/inguinal arteries, consistent with a urine leak. The right upper quadrant activity represented MAG3 accumulation within the gallbladder.

  20. Investigation of shallow gas hydrate occurrence and gas seep activity on the Sakhalin continental slope, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Young Keun; Baranov, Boris; Obzhirov, Anatoly; Salomatin, Alexander; Derkachev, Alexander; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Minami, Hrotsugu; Kuk Hong, Jong

    2016-04-01

    The Sakhalin continental slope has been a well-known gas hydrate area since the first finding of gas hydrate in 1980's. This area belongs to the southernmost glacial sea in the northern hemisphere where most of the area sea is covered by sea ice the winter season. Very high organic carbon content in the sediment, cold sea environment, and active tectonic regime in the Sakhalin slope provide a very favorable condition for occurring shallow gas hydrate accumulation and gas emission phenomena. Research expeditions under the framework of a Korean-Russian-Japanese long-term international collaboration projects (CHAOS, SSGH-I, SSGH-II projects) have been conducted to investigate gas hydrate occurrence and gas seepage activities on the Sakhalin continental slope, Russia from 2003 to 2015. During the expeditions, near-surface gas hydrate samples at more than 30 sites have been retrieved and hundreds of active gas seepage structures on the seafloor were newly registered by multidisciplinary surveys. The gas hydrates occurrence at the various water depths from about 300 m to 1000 m in the study area were accompanied by active gas seepage-related phenomena in the sub-bottom, on the seafloor, and in the water column: well-defined upward gas migration structures (gas chimney) imaged by high-resolution seismic, hydroacoustic anomalies of gas emissions (gas flares) detected by echosounders, seafloor high backscatter intensities (seepage structures) imaged by side-scan sonar and bathymetric structures (pockmarks and mounds) mapped by single/multi-beam surveys, and very shallow SMTZ (sulphate-methane transition zone) depths, strong microbial activities and high methane concentrations measured in sediment/seawater samples. The highlights of the expeditions are shallow gas hydrate occurrences around 300 m in the water depth which is nearly closed to the upper boundary of gas hydrate stability zone in the area and a 2,000 m-high gas flare emitted from the deep seafloor.

  1. Lipid rafts mediate the interaction between myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) on myelin and MAG-receptors on neurons.

    PubMed

    Vinson, Mary; Rausch, Oliver; Maycox, Peter R; Prinjha, Rab K; Chapman, Debra; Morrow, Rachel; Harper, Alex J; Dingwall, Colin; Walsh, Frank S; Burbidge, Stephen A; Riddell, David R

    2003-03-01

    The interaction between myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), expressed at the periaxonal membrane of myelin, and receptors on neurons initiates a bidirectional signalling system that results in inhibition of neurite outgrowth and maintenance of myelin integrity. We show that this involves a lipid-raft to lipid-raft interaction on opposing cell membranes. MAG is exclusively located in low buoyancy Lubrol WX-insoluble membrane fractions isolated from whole brain, primary oligodendrocytes, or MAG-expressing CHO cells. Localisation within these domains is dependent on cellular cholesterol and occurs following terminal glycosylation in the trans-Golgi network, characteristics of association with lipid rafts. Furthermore, a recombinant form of MAG interacts specifically with lipid-raft fractions from whole brain and cultured cerebellar granule cells, containing functional MAG receptors GT1b and Nogo-66 receptor and molecules required for transduction of signal from MAG into neurons. The localisation of both MAG and MAG receptors within lipid rafts on the surface of opposing cells may create discrete areas of high avidity multivalent interaction, known to be critical for signalling into both cell types. Localisation within lipid rafts may provide a molecular environment that facilitates the interaction between MAG and multiple receptors and also between MAG ligands and molecules involved in signal transduction.

  2. The first complete Mag family retrotransposons discovered in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Glukhov, I A; Kotnova, A P; Stefanov, Y E; Ilyin, Y V

    2016-01-01

    A retrotransposon of the Mag family was found in the Drosophila simulans genome for the first time. We also identified novel transposable elements representing the Mag family in seven Drosophila species. The high similarity between the 3' and 5' long terminal repeats in the found copies of transposable elements indicates that their retrotransposition has occurred relatively recently. Thus, the Mag family of retrotransposons is quite common for the genus Drosophila.

  3. Mycoplasma agalactiae MAG_5040 is a Mg2+-dependent, sugar-nonspecific SNase recognised by the host humoral response during natural infection.

    PubMed

    Cacciotto, Carla; Addis, Maria Filippa; Coradduzza, Elisabetta; Carcangiu, Laura; Nuvoli, Anna Maria; Tore, Gessica; Dore, Gian Mario; Pagnozzi, Daniela; Uzzau, Sergio; Chessa, Bernardo; Pittau, Marco; Alberti, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In this study the enzymatic activity of Mycoplasma agalactiae MAG_5040, a magnesium-dependent nuclease homologue to the staphylococcal SNase was characterized and its antigenicity during natural infections was established. A UGA corrected version of MAG_5040, lacking the region encoding the signal peptide, was expressed in Escherichia coli as a GST fusion protein. Recombinant GST-MAG_5040 exhibits nuclease activity similar to typical sugar-nonspecific endo- and exonucleases, with DNA as the preferred substrate and optimal activity in the presence of 20 mM MgCl2 at temperatures ranging from 37 to 45°C. According to in silico analyses, the position of the gene encoding MAG_5040 is consistently located upstream an ABC transporter, in most sequenced mycoplasmas belonging to the Mycoplasma hominis group. In M. agalactiae, MAG_5040 is transcribed in a polycistronic RNA together with the ABC transporter components and with MAG_5030, which is predicted to be a sugar solute binding protein by 3D modeling and homology search. In a natural model of sheep and goats infection, anti-MAG_5040 antibodies were detected up to 9 months post infection. Taking into account its enzymatic activity, MAG_5040 could play a key role in Mycoplasma agalactiae survival into the host, contributing to host pathogenicity. The identification of MAG_5040 opens new perspectives for the development of suitable tools for the control of contagious agalactia in small ruminants.

  4. MAG-GATE System for Molten metal Flow Control

    SciTech Connect

    Richard D. Nathenson, P.E.

    2004-05-15

    The need for improved active flow control has been recognized as part of the Steel Industry Technology Roadmap. Under TRP 9808 for the American Iron and Steel Institute and the Department of Energy, Concept Engineering Group Inc. has developed MAG-GATE{trademark}, an electromagnetic system for active molten metal flow control. Two hot steel tests were successfully conducted in 2003 at the Whemco Foundry Division, Midland, PA. Approximately 110,000 pounds of 0.2% carbon steel were poured through the device subject to electromagnetic flow control. Excellent agreement between predicted and actual flow control was found. A survey of the molten metal flow control practices at 100 continuous casters in North America was also conducted in 2003. This report summarizes the results of the development program to date. Preliminary designs are described for the next step of a beta test at an operating billet/bloom or slab caster.

  5. An incidental detection of aortic aneurysm on Tc-99m MAG3 renal scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Sadic, Murat; Demirel, Koray; Koca, Gökhan; Atilgan, Hasan Ikbal; Korkmaz, Meliha

    2013-01-01

    A 71-year-old man with newly diagnosed hypertension was referred for Technetium-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine (Tc-99m MAG3) renal scintigraphy to evaluate the recent onset of impairment in renal functions. Dynamic imaging revealed activity flow which was suspicious for aortic aneurysm (AA) with a concurrent decrease in left renal blood flow. CT angiography of the thoracoabdominal aorta confirmed that this area corresponded to AA. The purpose of this report was to present the first case of incidental detection of AA on Tc-99m MAG3 scintigraphy and highlight the importance of correlative imaging for the diagnosis of abnormal radioactivity accumulation in the region of vascular structures.

  6. The renal parenchyma evaluation: MAG3 vs. DMSA.

    PubMed

    Smokvina, Aleksandar; Grbac-Ivanković, Svjetlana; Girotto, Neva; Dezulović, Mirna Subat; Saina, Giordano; Barković, Marina Miletić

    2005-12-01

    Scintigraphy with Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) is considered a reference method for assessment of parenchymal lesions and estimation of differential kidney function. The aim of study was to evaluate Tc-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3) dynamic renal scintigraphy for the same purpose. 188 patients, submitted to both studies within three months, were divided in two groups. In the first, 83 DMSA images were compared to parenchymal phase of MAG3 scintigraphy. Kidney morphology was independently evaluated by four observers. In the second group (N = 105), differential function was calculated in MAG3 and DMSA studies and the respective results were compared. Findings corresponded completely in 85% of patients. There were no statistically significant differences between calculated differential function on DMSA and MAG3 images. The results showed that most of parenchymal lesions detected on DMSA scans can be identified on MAG3 parenchymal scans. Both studies can be equally used for the calculation of differential kidney function.

  7. 78 FR 59650 - Subzone 9F, Authorization of Production Activity, The Gas Company, LLC dba Hawai'i Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-27

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Subzone 9F, Authorization of Production Activity, The Gas Company, LLC dba Hawai'i Gas, (Synthetic Natural Gas), Kapolei, Hawaii On May 22, 2013, The Gas Company, LLC dba Hawai'i Gas submitted a notification of proposed production activity to the Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ)...

  8. CrowdMag - Crowdsourcing magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, M. C.; Boneh, N.; Chulliat, A.

    2014-12-01

    In the CrowdMag project, we explore whether digital magnetometers built in modern mobile phones can be used as scientific instruments to measure Earth's magnetic field. Most modern mobile phones have digital magnetometers to orient themselves. A phone's magnetometer measures three components of the local magnetic field with a typical sensitivity of about 150 to 600 nanotesla (nT). By combining data from vector magnetometers and accelerometers, phone's orientation is determined. Using phone's Internet connection, magnetic data and location are sent to a central server. At the server, we check quality of the magnetic data from all users and make the data available to the public as aggregate maps. We have two long-term goals. 1) Develop near-real-time models of Earth's time changing magnetic field by reducing man-made noise from crowdsourced data and combining it with geomagnetic data from other sources. 2) Improving accuracy of magnetic navigation by mapping magnetic noise sources (for e.g. power transformer and iron pipes). Key challenges to this endeavor are the low sensitivity of the phone's magnetometer and the noisy environment within and surrounding the phone. URL : http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/geomag/crowdmag.shtml

  9. Activation of catalysts for synthesizing methanol from synthesis gas

    DOEpatents

    Blum, David B.; Gelbein, Abraham P.

    1985-01-01

    A method for activating a methanol synthesis catalyst is disclosed. In this method, the catalyst is slurried in an inert liquid and is activated by a reducing gas stream. The activation step occurs in-situ. That is, it is conducted in the same reactor as is the subsequent step of synthesizing methanol from a methanol gas stream catalyzed by the activated catalyst still dispersed in a slurry.

  10. Detecting De-gelation through Tissue Using Magnetically Modulated Optical Nanoprobes (MagMOONs).

    PubMed

    Nguyen, KhanhVan T; Anker, Jeffrey N

    2014-12-15

    Alginate gels are widely used for drug delivery and implanted devices. The rate at which these gels break down is important for controlling drug release. Since the de-gelation may be different in vivo, monitoring this process in situ is essential. However, it is challenging to monitor the gel through tissue due to optical scattering and tissue autofluorescence. Herein we describe a method to detect through tissue the chemically-induced changes in viscosity and de-gelation process of alginate gels using magnetically modulated optical nanoprobes (MagMOONs). The MagMOONs are fluorescent magnetic microspheres coated with a thin layer of opaque metal on one hemisphere. The metal layer prevents excitation and emission light from passing through one side of the MagMOONs, which creates orientation-dependent fluorescence intensity. The magnetic particles also align in an external magnetic field and give blinking signals when they rotate to follow an external modulated magnetic field. The blinking signals from these MagMOONs are distinguished from background autofluorescence and can be tracked on a single particle level in the absence of tissue, or for an ensemble average of particles blinking through tissue. When these MagMOONs are dispersed in calcium alginate gel, they become sensors for detecting gel degradation upon addition of either ammonium ion or alginate lyase. Our results show MagMOONs start blinking approximately 10 minutes after 2 mg/mL alginate lyase addition and this blinking is clearly detected even through up to 4 mm chicken breast. This approach can potentially be employed to detect bacterial biofilm formation on medical implants by sensing specific proteases that either activate a related function or regulate biofilm formation. It can also be applied to other biosensors and drug delivery systems based on enzyme-catalyzed breakdown of gel components.

  11. Improving the labeling of S-acetyl NHS-MAG(3)-conjugated morpholino oligomers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guozheng; Zhang, Surong; He, Jiang; Zhu, Zhihong; Rusckowski, Mary; Hnatowich, Donald J

    2002-01-01

    S-Acetyl MAG(3) (S-acetylmercaptoacetyltriglycine) has been used as a chelator for the (99m)Tc labeling of a variety of biomolecules. The objective of this study was to improve upon the labeling of morpholino (MORF), a DNA analogue, as a model biomolecule. A 15mer MORF with a primary amine was conjugated with NHS-MAG(3) in the usual manner, and the MORF-MAG(3) was purified over a P4 column as before. The conjugate was radiolabeled using stannous ion as usual, and the impurities were identified using size exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography (SE HPLC). Various methods were then investigated to remove the impurities. With tartrate as the transchelator, two impurities were identified as labeled MAG(3) and labeled tartrate. The labeled MAG(3) could not be removed by simply repurifying the conjugate using the usual pH 5.2 NH(4)OAc buffer before labeling. However, this impurity could be completely removed if the conjugate was adjusted to pH 7.6 and heated before repurification. The labeled tartrate impurity was removed by heating during labeling. On the basis of these observations, the following procedure for purification of the conjugation mixture and subsequent labeling was adopted. After MORF was conjugated with NHS-MAG(3) and purified over P4 with pH 5.2 NH(4)OAc eluant, the oligomer fractions were combined, adjusted to pH 7.6, and heated in a boiling water bath for 20 min. The conjugated oligomer was then repurified over P4 for storage at refrigerator temperatures. Labeling is achieved simply by adding fresh stannous ion to a solution of the MORF-MAG(3) in pH 7.6 containing tartrate followed by (99m)Tc-pertechnetate. After the mixture is heated for 20 min in boiling water, the labeling efficiency is always over 90% as determined by size exclusion HPLC and paper chromatography and the specific activities can exceed 7 mCi/microg. By making several relatively simple changes to the routine procedure used to conjugate and radiolabel biomolecules with (99m

  12. Window decompression in laser-heated MagLIF targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodbury, Daniel; Peterson, Kyle; Sefkow, Adam

    2015-11-01

    The Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) concept requires pre-magnetized fuel to be pre-heated with a laser before undergoing compression by a thick solid liner. Recent experiments and simulations suggest that yield has been limited to date by poor laser preheat and laser-induced mix in the fuel region. In order to assess laser energy transmission through the pressure-holding window, as well as resultant mix, we modeled window disassembly under different conditions using 1D and 2D simulations in both Helios and HYDRA. We present results tracking energy absorption, time needed for decompression, risk of laser-plasma interaction (LPI) that may scatter laser light, and potential for mix from various window thicknesses, laser spot sizes and gas fill densities. These results indicate that using thinner windows (0.5-1 μm windows) and relatively large laser spot radii (600 μm and above) can avoid deleterious effects and improve coupling with the fuel. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the National Nuclear Security Administration under DE-AC04- 94AL85000.

  13. [Improvement in nuclear medicine diagnosis of kidney function using 99m technetium mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3)].

    PubMed

    Erpenbach, K; Ebert, A; Wieler, H

    1991-03-01

    Renal scintigraphy and clearance measurement are indispensable in nephro-urologic disorders. A continuous series of 103 sequential scintigraphies and clearance measurements were performed with the new technetium-labelled agent MAG3 (Gamma-kamera, Phillips Tomo Diagnost) and 131I-orthohippuric acid (OIH) using the Oberhausen method (Nucleopan, Siemens). The time-activity curves obtained with the two radionuclides agreed exactly. Reaching a tubular excretion rate of nearly 90%, the clearance of MAG3 differed by no more than 6% from the OIH clearance in 95% of the cases. The factor between clearances of the two radionuclides was determined by means of a commercially available software according to the Oberhausen method and amounted to 0.59 +/- 0.09. The favorable physical properties and high activity of MAG3 permit exact examination of tubular function and better assessment of renal morphology than hippuran-labelled radionuclides. The low radiation dose combined with a better spatial resolution, especially, the constant availability in a nuclear medicine department should give the preference to MAG3.

  14. A common element involved in transcriptional regulation of two DNA alkylation repair genes (MAG and MGT1) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, W; Singh, K K; Chen, B; Samson, L

    1993-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae MAG gene encodes a 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase that protects cells from killing by alkylating agents. MAG mRNA levels are induced not only by alkylating agents but also by DNA-damaging agents that do not produce alkylated DNA. We constructed a MAG-lacZ gene fusion to help identify the cis-acting promoter elements involved in regulating MAG expression. Deletion analysis defined the presence of one upstream activating sequence and one upstream repressing sequence (URS) and suggested the presence of a second URS. One of the MAG URS elements matches a decamer consensus sequence present in the promoters of 11 other S. cerevisiae DNA repair and metabolism genes, including the MGT1 gene, which encodes an O6-methylguanine DNA repair methyltransferase. Two proteins of 26 and 39 kDa bind specifically to the MAG and MGT1 URS elements. We suggest that the URS-binding proteins may play an important role in the coordinate regulation of these S. cerevisiae DNA repair genes. Images PMID:8246943

  15. Native MAG-1 antibody almost destroys human breast cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    North, William G; Pang, Roy H L; Gao, Guohong; Memoli, Vincent A; Cole, Bernard F

    2011-06-01

    A native form of mouse monoclonal IgG1 antibody called MAG-1, which recognizes an epitope on provasopressin, has been found to shrink and produce extensive necrosis of human breast tumor xenografts in nu/nu mice. We examined the ability of (90)Yttrium-labeled and native MAG-1 to affect the growth in nu/nu mice of cancer xenografts that were estrogen-responsive (from MCF-7 cells) and triple-negative (from MDA-MB231 cells). The growth rates of treated cells were compared to those receiving saline vehicle and those receiving (90)Yttrium-labeled and native forms of the ubiquitous antibody, MOPC21. Short-term treatments (4 doses over 6 days) not only with (90)Yttrium-MAG-1 but also native MAG-1 produced large reductions in size of rapidly growing tumors of both types, while both (90)Yttrium- MOPC21 and native MOPC21 had no effect. Native and (90)Yttrium-MAG-1 effects were similar, and arrested tumors recommenced growing soon after treatments stopped. Increasing native MAG-1 treatment to single dosing for 16 consecutive days shrank tumors of both types with no regrowth apparent over a 20-day post-treatment period of observation. Pathological examination of such tumors revealed they had undergone very extensive (>66%) necrosis.

  16. Antibodies to myelin-associated glycoprotein (anti-Mag) in IgM amyloidosis may influence expression of neuropathy in rare patients.

    PubMed

    Garces-Sanchez, Mercedes; Dyck, Peter J; Kyle, Robert A; Zeldenrust, Steven; Wu, Yanhong; Ladha, Shafeeq S; Klein, Christopher J

    2008-04-01

    We have examined whether antibodies to myelin-associated glycoprotein (anti-MAG) influence neuropathy occurrence and phenotype in primary (AL IgM) amyloidosis. Anti-MAG and the cross-reacted sulfoglucuronyl paragloboside antibodies (SGPG) were studied in 46 patients with IgM amyloidosis (21 with polyneuropathy), and 21 matched IgM MGUS (monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance) controls without neuropathy. We assessed the occurrence, phenotype of neuropathy, and attributes of nerve conduction and their relation to antibody activity. Twenty of 46 patients with IgM amyloidosis (7 with and 13 without polyneuropathy) had elevation of anti-MAG or SGPG by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Two of the polyneuropathy patients with IgM amyloidosis had antibodies to MAG based on Western blot (WB) positivity. One of these patients, with the highest anti-MAG titer, had a painful sensory ataxia, with prominent demyelination, and amyloid deposition in sural nerve. The other anti-MAG WB-positive amyloid patient had an axonal neuropathy and dysautonomia. Low levels of anti-MAG antibodies were found in 12 of 21 IgM MGUS controls without neuropathy (mean follow-up, 11 years). We conclude that finding serum anti-MAG antibodies does not exclude the diagnosis of primary amyloidosis. They do not appear to affect the occurrence or expression of polyneuropathy, except possibly in occasional cases with WB positivity.

  17. Development of an improved active gas target design for ANASEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schill, Sabina; Blackmon, J. C.; Deibel, C. M.; Macon, K. T.; Rasco, B. C.; Wiedenhoever, I.

    2014-09-01

    The Array for Nuclear Astrophysics and Structure with Exotic Nuclei (ANASEN) is a charged particle detector array with an active gas target-detector capability for sensitive measurements using radioactive ion beams. One of the main goals is to improve our understanding of nuclear reactions important in stellar explosions. Following initial experimental campaigns with ANASEN, we have been developing an improved active gas target design for ANASEN that incorporates an innovative cylindrical gas ionization detector for heavy ions surrounding the beam axis inside of the other ANASEN charged particle detectors. The detection of heavy ions in coincidence with lighter ions in a redesigned proportional counter will provide greater discriminating power. The new active gas target design will be presented, and its simulated performance will be compared with test data. The Array for Nuclear Astrophysics and Structure with Exotic Nuclei (ANASEN) is a charged particle detector array with an active gas target-detector capability for sensitive measurements using radioactive ion beams. One of the main goals is to improve our understanding of nuclear reactions important in stellar explosions. Following initial experimental campaigns with ANASEN, we have been developing an improved active gas target design for ANASEN that incorporates an innovative cylindrical gas ionization detector for heavy ions surrounding the beam axis inside of the other ANASEN charged particle detectors. The detection of heavy ions in coincidence with lighter ions in a redesigned proportional counter will provide greater discriminating power. The new active gas target design will be presented, and its simulated performance will be compared with test data. This work was supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation and the Dept of Energy's Office of Science.

  18. The path to visible extreme adaptive optics with MagAO-2K and MagAO-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Males, Jared R.; Close, Laird M.; Guyon, Olivier; Morzinski, Katie M.; Hinz, Philip; Esposito, Simone; Pinna, Enrico; Xompero, Marco; Briguglio, Runa; Riccardi, Armando; Puglisi, Alfio; Mazin, Ben; Ireland, Michael J.; Weinberger, Alycia; Conrad, Al; Kenworthy, Matthew; Snik, Frans; Otten, Gilles; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Lozi, Julien

    2016-07-01

    The next generation of extremely large telescopes (ELTs) have the potential to image habitable rocky planets, if suitably optimized. This will require the development of fast high order "extreme" adaptive optics systems for the ELTs. Located near the excellent site of the future GMT, the Magellan AO system (MagAO) is an ideal on-sky testbed for high contrast imaging development. Here we discuss planned upgrades to MagAO. These include improvements in WFS sampling (enabling correction of more modes) and an increase in speed to 2000 Hz, as well as an H2RG detector upgrade for the Clio infrared camera. This NSF funded project, MagAO-2K, is planned to be on-sky in November 2016 and will significantly improve the performance of MagAO at short wavelengths. Finally, we describe MagAO-X, a visible-wavelength extreme-AO "afterburner" system under development. MagAO-X will deliver Strehl ratios of over 80% in the optical and is optimized for visible light coronagraphy.

  19. Gas and Chemical Activation of Charcoal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1945-06-29

    supplemented ’ by runs in the laboratory has shown that zinc chloride is by far the most suitable activating agent. 1. In the dehydration mixing of...istics with time of dehydration . 3. The physical appearance of the mixture during the impregnation pperation provides sufficient significant information...to enable the operator to predict .mechanical characteristics of the briquet. CONFIDENTIAL " • ’< i£: • CONFIDENTIAL -4- 4* In the dehydration

  20. H-alpha as a Probe of Very Low-mass Planets: The GAPplanetS Survey With the MagAO System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, L.; MagAO Team

    2014-03-01

    We utilized the new high-order 585 actuator Magellan Adaptive Optics system (MagAO) to obtain very high-resolution visible light images of young Transitional Disk with MagAO's VisAO science camera. In the median seeing conditions of the 6.5m Magellan telescope (0.5 - 0.7''), we find MagAO delivers 24-19% Strehl at Ha (0.656 mm). We detect a faint companion embedded in this young transitional disk system at just 86.3±1.9 mas (~12 AU) from the star. The companion is detected in both Ha and a continuum filter (Dmag=6.33±0.20 mag at Ha and 7.50±0.25 mag in the continuum filter). The Ha emission from the ~0.25 solar mass companion (EW=180 Angstroms) implies a mass accretion rate of ~5.9x10-10 Msun/yr, and a total accretion luminosity of 1.2% Lsun. Assuming a similar accretion rate, we estimate that a 1 Jupiter mass gas giant could have considerably better (50-1,000x) planet/star contrasts at Ha than at H band (COND models) for a range of optical extinctions (3.4-0 mag). We suggest that ~0.5-5 Mjup extrasolar planets in their gas accretion phase could be much more luminous at Ha than in the NIR. This is the motivation for our new MagAO GAPplanetS survey for directly imaging lowmass exoplanets in the gaps of transitional disks in the light of H-alpha with MagAO's unique SDI AO camera.

  1. Production of MAG via enzymatic glycerolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamlus, Norul Naziraa Ahmad; Derawi, Darfizzi; Salimon, Jumat

    2015-09-01

    Enzymatic glycerolysis of a medium chain methyl ester, methyl laurate was performed using lipase Candida antarctica (Novozyme 435) for 6 hours at 55°C. The percentage of components mixture of product were determined by using gas chromatography technique. The enzymatic reaction was successfully produced monolaurin (45.9 %), dilaurin (47.1 %) and trilaurin (7.0 %) respectively. Thin layer chromatography (TLC) plate also showed a good separation of component spots. Fourier transformation infra-red (FTIR) spectrum showed the presence of ester carbonyl at wavenumber 1739.99 cm-1 and hydrogen bonded O-H at 3512.03 cm-1. The product is potentially to be used as emulsifier and additive in food industry, pharmaceutical, as well as antibacterial.

  2. 77 FR 58616 - Pipeline Safety: Information Collection Activities, Revision to Gas Transmission and Gathering...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... Safety: Information Collection Activities, Revision to Gas Transmission and Gathering Pipeline Systems... TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Pipeline Safety: Information Collection Activities, Revision to Gas Transmission and Gathering Pipeline Systems Annual Report, Gas Transmission...

  3. [Cloning, expression and characterization of a new hybrid AMP gene of Hex-Mag].

    PubMed

    Li, Gui-ping; Chen, Yi-ben

    2007-02-01

    To enhance the antibacterial ability of Magaininl-12, its N side was joined with an alkaline peptide named Hexapeptide( RRWQWR), which would make Magaininl-12 cling to the membrane of bacterial cells even tighter. According to the partiality codon of Pichia pastoris, a new hybrid antibacterial peptide Hex-Mag was designed based on the sequence of Hexapeptide and Magainin( 1-12). Synthesized through gene splicing by overlap extension, the hybrid gene was cloned into pPIC9 to construct the expression vector pPIC9-HM. After restriction enzyme analysis and purification, the pPIC9-HM was transformed into Pichia pastoris GS115. And the positive clones screened by the phenotype were induced by methanol. After optimized the requirements for the flask-shaking culture fermentation, the hybrid antibacterial peptide was expressed on high level. The new peptide, which has a weight of 2.3kDa, could remain its inhibition activity after treating for more than 3 hours in boiled water. Detected by agrose diffusion assay, Hex-Mag showed its broad-spectrum antibacterial abilities not only to Gram-negative bacteria but also to Gram-positive bacteria. The function of additive positive charges were testified by the antibacterial experiments, and the results showed the activity of Hex-Mag was stronger than that of Magainin1-12 obviously.

  4. T-cell epitope analysis of Mag 3, an important allergen from the house dust mite, Dermatophagoides farinae.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, S; Ohno, K; Tategaki, A; Aki, T; Shigeta, S; Jyo, T; Suzuki, O; Ono, K

    2000-04-03

    Here we describe the detection of T-cell epitope region on the house dust mite allergen Mag 3, which has been shown to trigger T-cell proliferation in mite-allergic asthmatic patients. We first examined murine T-cell epitope using T-cell fraction prepared from recombinant Mag 3 (r-Mag 3)-primed H-2k mice. Initial proliferation assay with truncated r-Mag 3 indicated that N-terminal 113 amino acid region was required for triggering T-cell activation. Subsequent epitope scanning with synthetic overlapping peptides revealed that T-cell reactive region was assigned within amino acid range 56-75. We also explored human T-cell determinant using specific T-cells from mite-allergic patients. Intriguingly, we found that amino acid range 56-85, a portion partially overlapping with that identified in r-Mag 3-primed mice, was exclusively recognized by T-cells from different patients. Further investigation of unique T-cell epitope region found in this study would provide insight into the development of animal therapeutic model and/or peptide vaccine for asthma.

  5. Technology Of MIG-MAG Welds Strength Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodskiy, S. A.; Saraev, Yu N.; Malchik, A. G.; Korotkov, S. E.

    2016-08-01

    A new technology of MIG MAG welding control is developed. Authors introduce use of power AC and pulse feed of welding wire in the arc zone, that downsizes the heat affected zone, stabilizes formation of electrode metal droplets, as external magnetic field's effect on the arc is reduced. Principal criteria for electrode metal transfer control, when powered by AC sources, are specified.

  6. MagLIF scaling on Z and future machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slutz, Stephen; Stygar, William; Gomez, Matthew; Campbell, Edward; Peterson, Kyle; Sefkow, Adam; Sinars, Daniel; Vesey, Roger

    2015-11-01

    The MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion) concept [S.A. Slutz et al Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303, 2010] has demonstrated [M.R. Gomez et al., PRL 113, 155003, 2014] fusion-relevant plasma conditions on the Z machine. We present 2D numerical simulations of the scaling of MagLIF on Z indicating that deuterium/tritium (DT) fusion yields greater than 100 kJ could be possible on Z when operated at a peak current of 25 MA. Much higher yields are predicted for MagLIF driven with larger peak currents. Two high performance pulsed-power machines (Z300 and Z800) have been designed based on Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) technology. The Z300 design would provide approximately 48 MA to a MagLIF load, while Z800 would provide about 66 MA. We used a parameterized Thevenin equivalent circuit to drive a series of 1D and 2D numerical simulations with currents between and beyond these two designs. Our simulations indicate that 5-10 MJ yields may be possible with Z300, while yields of about 1 GJ may be possible with Z800. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Mechanism of formation of silver nanoparticles in MAG-DMAEMA copolymer aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvedchenko, Dmitry O.; Nekrasova, Tatiana N.; Nazarova, Olga V.; Buffat, Philippe A.; Suvorova, Elena I.

    2015-06-01

    Dispersed Ag nanoparticles were prepared in aqueous solutions in the presence of pure poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (poly-DMAEMA), poly[2-deoxy-2-methacrylamido- d-glucose] (poly-MAG), and their copolymers of poly[MAG-DMAEMA] with different mole fractions. Polymers contributed to the silver reduction, formation of nanoparticles, and stabilization of suspensions. No agglomerations of nanoparticles are formed. For each sample, more than one thousand silver particles were measured by transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy to determine their number vs diameter and volume versus diameter distributions. The samples with the smallest nanoparticle mode diameter of 2.3 nm were formed in DMAEMA homopolymer suspension, while the mode diameter increased up to 13.3 nm in copolymers depending on the mole fraction of DMAEMA. A model of Ag nanoparticles' growth taking into account the structure of the copolymers and the amount of reducing centers per monomer is proposed. The volume fraction of large Ag particles (>15-20 nm) in the tail of distributions was determined to estimate the part of less efficient nanoparticles assuming that only surface atoms are active. The largest volume occupied by big particles is measured in the solution with pure poly-MAG. Figures of merit, as the ratio of particle area to total volume of particles, were compared for five systems of Ag NPs/polymer. They can be understood from an economical point of view as the total silver investment compared to efficiency.

  8. Magnetic Microbead Affinity Selection Screening (MagMASS) of Botanical Extracts for Inhibitors of 15-Lipoxygenase.

    PubMed

    Rush, Michael D; Walker, Elisabeth M; Burton, Tristesse; van Breemen, Richard B

    2016-11-23

    To expedite the identification of active natural products in complex mixtures such as botanical extracts, a magnetic microbead affinity selection screening (MagMASS) procedure was developed. This technique utilizes target proteins immobilized on magnetic beads for rapid bioaffinity isolation of ligands from complex mixtures. A MagMASS method was developed and validated for 15-lipoxygenase. As a proof of concept, several North American prairie plants used medicinally by Native Americans were extracted with MeOH and screened. A hit from an extract of Proserpinaca palustris, also known as mermaid weed, was flagged for further characterization using high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry, dereplication, and identification using XCMS online. Through the application of high-resolution product ion tandem mass spectrometry, comparison with natural product databases, and confirmation using standards, the hit was identified as quercitrin, which is a known inhibitor of 15-lipoxygenase. The overall workflow of MagMASS is faster and more amendable to automation than alternative methods designed for screening botanical extracts or complex mixtures of combinatorial libraries.

  9. Grain-based activated carbons for natural gas storage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tengyan; Walawender, Walter P; Fan, L T

    2010-03-01

    Natural gas has emerged as a potential alternative to gasoline due to the increase in global energy demand and environmental concerns. An investigation was undertaken to explore the technical feasibility of implementing the adsorbed natural gas (ANG) storage in the fuel tanks of motor vehicles with activated carbons from biomass, e.g., sorghum and wheat. The grain-based activated carbons were prepared by chemical activation; the experimental parameters were varied to identify the optimum conditions. The porosity of the resultant activated carbons was evaluated through nitrogen adsorption; and the storage capacity, through methane adsorption. A comparative study was also carried out with commercial activated carbons from charcoal. The highest storage factor attained was 89 for compacted grain-based activated carbons from grain sorghum with a bulk density of 0.65 g/cm(3), and the highest storage factor attained is 106 for compacted commercial activated carbons (Calgon) with a bulk density of 0.70 g/cm(3). The storage factor was found to increase approximately linearly with increasing bulk density and to be independent of the extent of compaction. This implies that the grain-based activated carbons are the ideal candidates for the ANG storage.

  10. A renal protocol for all ages and all indications: mercapto-acetyl-triglycine (MAG3) with simultaneous injection of furosemide (MAG3-F0): a 17-year experience.

    PubMed

    Sfakianakis, George N; Sfakianaki, Efrosyni; Georgiou, Mike; Serafini, Aldo; Ezuddin, Shabbir; Kuker, Russ; Zilleruelo, Gaston; Strauss, Jose; Abitbol, Carolyn; Chandar, Jayanthi; Seeherunvong, Wacharee; Bourgoignie, Jacque; Roth, David; Leveillee, Raymond; Bird, Vincent G; Block, Norman; Gosalbez, Rafael; Labbie, Andrew; Guerra, Jorge J; Yrizarry, Jose

    2009-05-01

    Current clinical requirements mandate the existence of a renal diuretic protocol, which is fast and easy, applicable in all ages and for all indications, convenient for both the patient and the technologist, and provides diagnostic as well as prognostic information. Seventeen years ago a 25-minute protocol, after oral hydration, with no bladder catheterization, and simultaneous injection of mercapto-acetyl-triglycine (MAG(3)) and furosemide (MAG(3)-F(0)), was initiated. It initially was used for the evaluation of drainage and emerged as a protocol to also evaluate the renal parenchyma. Results of this protocol have been published individually, per clinical application. MAG(3)-F(0) was instrumental in the evaluation and prognosis of congenital disorders. For obstruction, in the newborn, an increasing renogram mandates intervention, whereas a downsloping one predicts spontaneous resolution. In children or adults, preoperatively or postoperatively, when the cortex was visualized and drained normally, there was no obstruction, even if urine was retained within a dilated collecting system or an extrarenal pelvis. For diseases of the renal parenchyma, the protocol enabled the diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis (APN) revealing the "regional parenchymal dysfunction," diagnostic of APN. Diffuse parenchymal diseases were characterized by increased residual cortical activity (RCA), and their progression was manifested as a deterioration of RCA. End-stage renal disease was characterized by lack of accumulation and retention. Trauma and leaks were identified with specific patterns. In renovascular hypertension (RVH), an increase in RCA after angiotension-converting enzyme inhibitors is diagnostic of RVH and prognostic of the beneficial effect of angioplasty on hypertension. In renal colic, stratification was possible into (1) complete or severe obstruction requiring immediate intervention, (2) mild obstruction allowing waiting, (3) spontaneous decompression (stunned kidney), and

  11. Diagnosis of kidney transplant obstruction using Mag3 diuretic renography.

    PubMed

    Nankivell, B J; Cohn, D A; Spicer, S T; Evans, S G; Chapman, J R; Gruenewald, S M

    2001-02-01

    Kidney transplant obstruction (KTO) following renal transplantation remains an important reversible cause of allograft dysfunction, requiring prompt diagnosis to prevent long-term graft damage. Although ultrasound can accurately diagnose renal transplant hydronephrosis, it cannot be used to assess its functional significance. We prospectively assessed the utility of technetium-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine (Tc99m MAG3) diuretic renography for the diagnosis of allograft KTO, using standard visual and quantitative parameters, as well as calculated renal output efficiency (OE), which has been postulated to improve diagnostic yield. From a cohort of 45 renal transplant patients, two subgroups were formed. The first group of transplant recipients (n = 21) with stable function and no obstruction was used to derive normal values for Tc99m MAG3 scans. A second group of transplant recipients with acute renal dysfunction in whom KTO was clinically suspected was used to test the diagnostic utility of these derived values (n = 43 scans). KTO was diagnosed independently of the MAG3 scans by a fall in the serum creatinine in response to renal pelvis urinary drainage. OE in 12 renal allografts with KTO was significantly reduced compared with 31 Tc99m MAG3 scans without KTO (59.6 +/- 18.9 vs. 81.6 +/- 5.4%, p < 0.001). In KTO, the mean time of isotope appearance in the bladder (time to bladder [TTB]) was extended compared with unobstructed allografts (7.9 +/- 4.1 vs. 3.6 +/- 1.5 min, p < 0.001). Measurement of OE significantly improved the accuracy of diuretic MAG3 renography in the diagnosis of renal allograft KTO, especially when supplemented by the TTB, parenchymal transit time and shape of the renogram curve. Ureteric obstruction of the kidney transplant can be diagnosed with an OE reduced to < 75% (sensitivity 92%, specificity 87%) and confirmed by isotope hold-up in the pelvicalyceal system. A normal or slowly declining renogram curve effectively excluded KTO (sensitivity of

  12. Validation of alternative methods of preparing 99mTc-MAG3.

    PubMed

    Seetharaman, Shankar; Sosabowski, Michael H; Ballinger, James R

    2007-11-01

    Parameters in the preparation of 99mTc-mertiatide (99mTc-MAG3) were investigated to determine the importance of total activity, activity concentration, boiling time, and delay before boiling for the radiochemical purity (RCP) and stability of the product. Satisfactory RCP results (>90%) were obtained over a range of concentrations including a dilute preparation for paediatric use. RCP was not affected by the time between the addition of pertechnetate and boiling, but low RCP (<60%) resulted when the kit was boiled for less than 10 min.

  13. Endocytic depletion of L-MAG from CNS myelin in quaking mice

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Quaking is an autosomal recessive hypo/dysmyelinating mutant mouse which has a 1-Mbp deletion on chromosome 17. The mutation exhibits pleiotrophy and does not include genes encoding characterized myelin proteins. The levels of the 67-kD isoform of the myelin-associated glycoprotein (S-MAG) relative to those of the 72-kD isoform (L-MAG) are increased in the quaking CNS, but not in other dysmyelinating mutants. Abnormal expression of MAG isoforms in quaking may result from altered transcription of the MAG gene or from abnormal sorting, transport, or targeting of L-MAG or S-MAG. To test these hypotheses, we have determined the distribution of L-MAG and S-MAG in cervical spinal cord of 7-, 14-, 21-, 28-, and 35-d-old quaking mice. In 7-d-old quaking and control spinal cord, L- and S-MAG was detectable in periaxonal regions of myelinated fibers and in the perinuclear cytoplasm of oligodendrocytes. Between 7 and 35 d, L-MAG was removed from the periaxonal membrane of quaking but not control mice. Compared to control mice, a significant increase in MAG labeling of endosomes occurred within oligodendrocyte cytoplasm of 35-d-old quaking mice. S- MAG remained in periaxonal membranes of both quaking and control mice. Analysis of the cytoplasmic domain of L-MAG identifies amino acid motifs at tyrosine 35 and tyrosine 65 which meet the criteria for "tyrosine internalization signals" that direct transmembrane glycoproteins into the endocytic pathway. These results establish that L-MAG is selectively removed from the periaxonal membrane of CNS- myelinated fibers by receptor-mediated endocytosis. The loss of L-MAG from quaking periaxonal membranes results from increased endocytosis of L-MAG and possibly a decrease in L-MAG production. PMID:8557747

  14. Active Combustion Control for Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.; Breisacher, Kevin J.; Saus, Joseph R.; Paxson, Daniel E.

    2000-01-01

    Lean-burning combustors are susceptible to combustion instabilities. Additionally, due to non-uniformities in the fuel-air mixing and in the combustion process, there typically exist hot areas in the combustor exit plane. These hot areas limit the operating temperature at the turbine inlet and thus constrain performance and efficiency. Finally, it is necessary to optimize the fuel-air ratio and flame temperature throughout the combustor to minimize the production of pollutants. In recent years, there has been considerable activity addressing Active Combustion Control. NASA Glenn Research Center's Active Combustion Control Technology effort aims to demonstrate active control in a realistic environment relevant to aircraft engines. Analysis and experiments are tied to aircraft gas turbine combustors. Considerable progress has been shown in demonstrating technologies for Combustion Instability Control, Pattern Factor Control, and Emissions Minimizing Control. Future plans are to advance the maturity of active combustion control technology to eventual demonstration in an engine environment.

  15. Study on 99mTc-MAG3 and 99mTc-DMSA renal accumulation using in vitro cellular model.

    PubMed

    Nový, Zbynĕk; Mandíková, Jana; Trejtnar, Frantisek

    2011-02-01

    Mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3) and dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) labelled with technetium-99m belongs to standard renal radiodiagnostics. However, the renal transport mechanisms responsible for their high renal uptake have not been fully explained. In addition, no in vitro experimental study comparing the renal uptake of these radiopharmaceuticals at the cellular level has not been performed. The investigation compared the 99mTc-MAG3 and 99mTc-DMSA renal uptake using primary rat renal cells and evaluated contribution of active and passive transport processes to the renal accumulation. The renal cells were isolated from the rat kidneys by means of the two-phase collagenase perfusion method. The used experimental model showed to be useful tool for such type of investigation. The results documented significant quantitative and qualitative differences in the accumulation of 99mTc-DMSA and 99mTc-MAG3 in the rat isolated cells. The found experimental data indicated several times higher uptake of 99mTc-MAG3 than that found in 99mTc-DMSA. 99mTc-MAG3 cellular uptake was substantially decreased when active, energy-dependent processes were inhibited. However, 99mTc-DMSA accumulation in the renal cells demonstrated only a minor dependency on energy. These findings demonstrate a very different character of the membrane transport determining 99mTc-DMSA and 99mTc-MAG3 renal accumulation.

  16. MAG ONE novel energy storage for high tech sports car

    SciTech Connect

    Siuru, B.

    1993-03-01

    A solar-powered car, the MAG ONE, is discussed. Photovoltaic cells would cover 100 square feet of the car`s body. Solar cells would cover the entire vehicle to intake as much solar energy as possible. By using computerized series-parallel switching of the solar cell system should yield 2-3 horsepower per-hour on a sunny day. An important concept is the proprietary continuously variable hydrostatic transmission capable of 90 percent efficiency.

  17. Mag-5: a magnificent approach to upper and midfacial "magic".

    PubMed

    Flowers, Robert S; Ceydeli, Adil

    2008-10-01

    MAG-5 is an operation with five surgical components: (1) a lateral emphasis frontal lift with (2) corrugator resection, (3) lower blepharoplasty, (4) extended two-layered canthopexy, and (5) a full (or partial) subperiosteal malar release and midcheek lift assisted by an absorbable suture securing the malar tuft periosteum and fibrous tissue to the orbital rim. The procedure rejuvenates and restores the face or transforms it when, and if, transformation is the desire.

  18. Microstructure and Phase Composition of a Low-Power YAG Laser-MAG Welded Stainless Steel Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R. S.; Kang, L.; Ma, X.

    2008-12-01

    This article presents multipass hybrid welding of austenitic stainless steel (ASS) structure by using the low-power Nd:YAG laser-metal active gas (MAG) arc hybrid welding method. The purpose of this work is to investigate and qualify the effects of multipass hybrid welding of ASS structure on the microstructure, phase composition, weld postheat influence, and weld bead (WB) precipitated phase. The results demonstrated that sound welded joints without any solidification and shrinkage defects could be obtained after welding. The top and the bottom portions of the workpieces were joined completely. At room temperature, the microstructures of different regions in WB were different and the WB microstructures were composed of columnar γ-austenite and δ-ferrite phases. The fraction of δ-ferrite decreased from 20% to 10%, and its morphology changed orderly from lath, skeleton, vermicular to reticular with an increase in the number of welding cycles. Because of the influence of postweld heat, the weld metal phase chemistry at 3 mm distance from the top of the WB surface underwent a notable modification that corresponded to an evolution of the partition coefficients toward the parent metal values. This indicated corrosion resistance of the microstructure is equivalent to that of the parent metal.

  19. Fuel magnetization without external field coils (AutoMag)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slutz, Stephen; Jennings, Christopher; Awe, Thomas; Shipley, Gabe; Lamppa, Derek; McBride, Ryan

    2016-10-01

    Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) has produced fusion-relevant plasma conditions on the Z accelerator where the fuel was magnetized using external field coils. We present a novel concept that does not need external field coils. This concept (AutoMag) magnetizes the fuel during the early part of the drive current by using a composite liner with helical conduction paths separated by insulating material. The drive is designed so the current rises slowly enough to avoid electrical breakdown of the insulators until a sufficiently strong magnetic field is established. Then the current rises more quickly, which causes the insulators to break down allowing the drive current to follow an axial path and implode the liner. Low inductance magnetically insulated power feeds can be used with AutoMag to increase the drive current without interfering with diagnostic access. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Investigating the laser heating of underdense plasmas at conditions relevant to MagLIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey-Thompson, Adam

    2015-11-01

    The magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) scheme has achieved thermonuclear fusion yields on Sandia's Z Facility by imploding a cylindrical liner filled with D2 fuel that is preheated with a multi-kJ laser and pre-magnetized with an axial field Bz = 10 T. The challenge of fuel preheating in MagLIF is to deposit several kJ's of energy into an underdense (ne/ncrit<0.1) fusion fuel over ~ 10 mm target length efficiently and without introducing contaminants that could contribute to unacceptable radiative losses during the implosion. Very little experimental work has previously been done to investigate laser heating of gas at densities, scale lengths, modest intensities (Iλ2 ~ 1014 watts- μm2 /cm2) and magnetization parameters (ωceτe ~ 10) necessary for MagLIF. In particular, magnetization of the preheated plasma suppresses electron thermal conduction, which can modify laser energy coupling. Providing an experimental dataset in this regime is essential to not only understand the dynamics of a MagLIF implosion and stagnation, but also to validate magnetized transport models and better understand the physics of laser propagation in magnetized plasmas. In this talk, we present data and analysis of several experiments conducted at OMEGA-EP and at Z to investigate laser propagation and plasma heating in underdense D2 plasmas under a range of conditions, including densities (ne = 0.05-0.1 nc) and magnetization parmaters (ωceτe ~ 0-10). The results show differences in the electron temperature of the heated plasma and the velocity of the laser burn wave with and without an applied magnetic field. We will show comparisons of these experimental results to 2D and 3D HYDRA simulations, which show that the effect of the magnetic field on the electron thermal conduction needs to be taken into account when modeling laser preheat. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the National Nuclear Security Administration

  1. 75 FR 76962 - Application To Export Electric Energy; MAG Energy Solutions, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Application To Export Electric Energy; MAG Energy Solutions, Inc. AGENCY: Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, DOE. ACTION: Notice of Application. SUMMARY: MAG Energy Solutions, Inc. (MAG...

  2. Dust and ionized gas in active radio elliptical galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, D. A.; Sparks, W. B.; Macchetto, F. D.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present broad and narrow bandwidth imaging of three southern elliptical galaxies which have flat-spectrum active radio cores (NGC 1052, IC 1459 and NGC 6958). All three contain dust and extended low excitation optical line emission, particularly extensive in the case of NGC 1052 which has a large H alpha + (NII) luminosity. Both NGC 1052 and IC 1459 have a spiral morphology in emission-line images. All three display independent strong evidence that a merger or infall event has recently occurred, i.e., extensive and infalling HI gas in NGC 1052, a counter-rotating core in IC 1459 and Malin-Carter shells in NGC 6958. This infall event is the most likely origin for the emission-line gas and dust, and the authors are currently investigating possible excitation mechanisms (Sparks et al. 1990).

  3. Discovery of radioactive silver ((110m)Ag) in spiders and other fauna in the terrestrial environment after the meltdown of Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Hiromi; Mori, Atsushi; Takeda, Kouki; Tanaka, Houdo; Kobayashi, Natsuko; Tanoi, Keitaro; Yamakawa, Takashi; Mori, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Six months after the explosion of TEPCO's Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, radioactive silver ((110m)Ag), was detected in concentrations of 3754 Bq/kg in Nephila clavata (the orb-web spider; Joro-gumo in Japanese) collected at Nimaibashi, Iitate village in Fukushima Prefecture, whereas (110m)Ag in the soil was 43.1 Bq/kg. A survey of 35 faunal species in the terrestrial environment during the 3.5 years after the accident showed that most of Anthropoda had two orders higher (110m)Ag in their tissues than soils, although silver is not an essential element for their life. However, tracing of the activity of (110m)Ag detected in spider Atypus karschi collected regularly at a fixed location showed that it declined much faster than the physical half-life. These results suggest that (110m)Ag was at once biologically concentrated by faunal species, especially Arthropoda, through food chain. The factors affecting the subsequent rapid decline of (110m)Ag concentration in faunal species are discussed.

  4. Discovery of radioactive silver (110mAg) in spiders and other fauna in the terrestrial environment after the meltdown of Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant

    PubMed Central

    NAKANISHI, Hiromi; MORI, Atsushi; TAKEDA, Kouki; TANAKA, Houdo; KOBAYASHI, Natsuko; TANOI, Keitaro; YAMAKAWA, Takashi; MORI, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Six months after the explosion of TEPCO’s Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, radioactive silver (110mAg), was detected in concentrations of 3754 Bq/kg in Nephila clavata (the orb-web spider; Joro-gumo in Japanese) collected at Nimaibashi, Iitate village in Fukushima Prefecture, whereas 110mAg in the soil was 43.1 Bq/kg. A survey of 35 faunal species in the terrestrial environment during the 3.5 years after the accident showed that most of Anthropoda had two orders higher 110mAg in their tissues than soils, although silver is not an essential element for their life. However, tracing of the activity of 110mAg detected in spider Atypus karschi collected regularly at a fixed location showed that it declined much faster than the physical half-life. These results suggest that 110mAg was at once biologically concentrated by faunal species, especially Arthropoda, through food chain. The factors affecting the subsequent rapid decline of 110mAg concentration in faunal species are discussed. PMID:25864469

  5. Synthesis and secretory expression of hybrid antimicrobial peptide CecA-mag and its mutants in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuqing; Zhu, Mingxing; Zhang, Aijun; Yang, Fengqin; Chen, Puyan

    2012-03-01

    The hybrid peptide CA(1-7)-M(2-12) gene was designed according to the N-terminal 1-7 amino acid sequence of the antimicrobial peptide cecropin A (CA) and the N-terminal 2-12 amino acid sequence of maganin (M) and synthesized using Pichia pastoris preferred codons. The gene was cloned into pPICZαA and transformed into the P. pastoris recipient bacterium SMD1168, regulated by the alcohol oxidase (AOX). Expression of the cecA-mag hybrid antimicrobial peptide (MW, 1.9 kDa) revealed broad-spectrum antibiotic activity and to the ability to inhibit growth of most G(-) and G(+) bacteria. Three mutants of cecA-mag were designed and synthesized by recombination polymerase chain reaction site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the relationship between the structure and function of this antimicrobial peptide. The inhibition titers of these mutants against Staphylococcus aureus were evaluated using the agar diffusion method. Under the conditions of the same concentration and volume, the bacteriostatic diameters of three cecA-mag mutants were 1.2, 1.2 and 1.5 times, respectively, compared with the diameters of wild-type cecA-mag.

  6. A phase I and pharmacokinetic study of MAG-CPT, a water-soluble polymer conjugate of camptothecin.

    PubMed

    Schoemaker, N E; van Kesteren, C; Rosing, H; Jansen, S; Swart, M; Lieverst, J; Fraier, D; Breda, M; Pellizzoni, C; Spinelli, R; Grazia Porro, M; Beijnen, J H; Schellens, J H M; ten Bokkel Huinink, W W

    2002-09-09

    Polymeric drug conjugates are a new and experimental class of drug delivery systems with pharmacokinetic promises. The antineoplastic drug camptothecin was linked to a water-soluble polymeric backbone (MAG-CPT) and administrated as a 30 min infusion over 3 consecutive days every 4 weeks to patients with malignant solid tumours. The objectives of our study were to determine the maximal tolerated dose, the dose-limiting toxicities, and the plasma and urine pharmacokinetics of MAG-CPT, and to document anti-tumour activity. The starting dose was 17 mg m(-2) day(-1). Sixteen patients received 39 courses at seven dose levels. Maximal tolerated dose was at 68 mg m(-2) day(-1) and dose-limiting toxicities consisted of cumulative bladder toxicity. MAG-CPT and free camptothecin were accumulated during days 1-3 and considerable amounts of MAG-CPT could still be retrieved in plasma and urine after 4-5 weeks. The half-lives of bound and free camptothecin were equal indicating that the kinetics of free camptothecin were release rate dependent. In summary, the pharmacokinetics of camptothecin were dramatically changed, showing controlled prolonged exposure of camptothecin. Haematological toxicity was relatively mild, but serious bladder toxicity was encountered which is typical for camptothecin and was found dose limiting.

  7. Natural gas storage with activated carbon from a bituminous coal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Jielun; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Lizzio, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    Granular activated carbons ( -20 + 100 mesh; 0.149-0.84 mm) were produced by physical activation and chemical activation with KOH from an Illinois bituminous coal (IBC-106) for natural gas storage. The products were characterized by BET surface area, micropore volume, bulk density, and methane adsorption capacities. Volumetric methane adsorption capacities (Vm/Vs) of some of the granular carbons produced by physical activation are about 70 cm3/cm3 which is comparable to that of BPL, a commercial activated carbon. Vm/Vs values above 100 cm3/cm3 are obtainable by grinding the granular products to - 325 mesh (<0.044 mm). The increase in Vm/Vs is due to the increase in bulk density of the carbons. Volumetric methane adsorption capacity increases with increasing pore surface area and micropore volume when normalizing with respect to sample bulk volume. Compared with steam-activated carbons, granular carbons produced by KOH activation have higher micropore volume and higher methane adsorption capacities (g/g). Their volumetric methane adsorption capacities are lower due to their lower bulk densities. Copyright ?? 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  8. Optical Breath Gas Sensor for Extravehicular Activity Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William R.; Casias, Miguel E.; Vakhtin, Andrei B.; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Chullen, Cinda; Falconi, Eric A.; McMillin, Summer

    2013-01-01

    The function of the infrared gas transducer used during extravehicular activity in the current space suit is to measure and report the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the ventilation loop. The next generation portable life support system (PLSS) requires next generation CO2 sensing technology with performance beyond that presently in use on the Space Shuttle/International Space Station extravehicular mobility unit (EMU). Accommodation within space suits demands that optical sensors meet stringent size, weight, and power requirements. A laser diode spectrometer based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy is being developed for this purpose by Vista Photonics, Inc. Two prototype devices were delivered to NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) in September 2011. The sensors incorporate a laser diode-based CO2 channel that also includes an incidental water vapor (humidity) measurement and a separate oxygen channel using a vertical cavity surface emitting laser. Both prototypes are controlled digitally with a field-programmable gate array/microcontroller architecture. The present development extends and upgrades the earlier hardware to the Advanced PLSS 2.0 test article being constructed and tested at JSC. Various improvements to the electronics and gas sampling are being advanced by this project. The combination of low power electronics with the performance of a long wavelength laser spectrometer enables multi-gas sensors with significantly increased performance over that presently offered in the EMU.

  9. Selection and preparation of activated carbon for fuel gas storage

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, James A.; Noh, Joong S.; Agarwal, Rajiv K.

    1990-10-02

    Increasing the surface acidity of active carbons can lead to an increase in capacity for hydrogen adsorption. Increasing the surface basicity can facilitate methane adsorption. The treatment of carbons is most effective when the carbon source material is selected to have a low ash content i.e., below about 3%, and where the ash consists predominantly of alkali metals alkali earth, with only minimal amounts of transition metals and silicon. The carbon is washed in water or acid and then oxidized, e.g. in a stream of oxygen and an inert gas at an elevated temperature.

  10. San Diego Gas and Electric Company Imperial Valley geothermal activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinrichs, T. C.

    1974-01-01

    San Diego Gas and Electric and its wholly owned subsidiary New Albion Resources Co. have been affiliated with Magma Power Company, Magma Energy Inc. and Chevron Oil Company for the last 2-1/2 years in carrying out geothermal research and development in the private lands of the Imperial Valley. The steps undertaken in the program are reviewed and the sequence that must be considered by companies considering geothermal research and development is emphasized. Activities at the south end of the Salton Sea and in the Heber area of Imperial Valley are leading toward development of demonstration facilities within the near future. The current status of the project is reported.

  11. International oil and gas exploration and development activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-29

    This report is part of an ongoing series of quarterly publications that monitors discoveries of oil and natural gas in foreign countries and provides an analysis of the reserve additions that result. The report is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Foreign Energy Supply Assessment Program (FESAP). It presents a summary of discoveries and reserve additions that result from recent international exploration and development activities. It is intended for use by petroleum industry analysts, various government agencies, and political leaders in the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy plans, policy, and legislation. 25 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. 78 FR 10261 - Pipeline Safety: Information Collection Activities, Revision to Gas Distribution Annual Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... Activities, Revision to Gas Distribution Annual Report AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... Office of Management and Budget (OMB) approval for the revision of the gas distribution annual report... Report PHMSA intends to revise the gas distribution annual report (PHMSA F 7100.1-1, gas...

  13. Russian auroral and polar ionospheric disturbance magnetometers (RapidMag)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, K.; Meng, C. I.; Barnes, R. J.; Zetzer, J.; Troshichev, O.; Janzhura, A.; Kunitake, M.; Watari, S.; Iyemori, T.; Nosé, M.; Keiling, A.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2007-12-01

    Since their introduction by Davis and Sugiura in 1966, the auroral electrojet indices AE, AU, and AL have been widely used to study ionospheric and magnetospheric phenomena associated with substorms as well as input to magnetospheric and ionospheric models. While rapid delivery of the indices is highly desirable in the context of both ongoing scientific observations and space weather applications, production of near-real-time AE indices remains a difficult task. A major challenge is acquisition of near-real-time magnetometer data from Russian auroral zone stations, some of which are at remote locations with harsh natural environment and without well- established infrastructure for data transmission. The stations cover approximately 6 time zones, and missing data from the stations means a serious degradation of the AE indices. The Russian auroral and polar ionospheric disturbance Magnetometer (RapidMag) project is an international collaboration to enable rapid and stable acquisition of ground magnetometer data from Russian stations in the auroral zone for production of near- real-time AE indices as well as for distribution of data from individual stations to the science community. The six RapidMag stations are Amderma (65.1N, 138.1E, degrees, geomagnetic), Dikson Island (68.5N, 156.2E), Norilsk (64.6N, 161.9E), Cape Chelyuskin (71.8N, 175.6E), Tixie (65.9°N, 196.9°E), and Pebek (65.3°N, 228.8E). The RapidMag project is entering a new phase with recent funding from NSF and NASA. We present the current status of the project and our plan for the next 5 years.

  14. Adsorption of perchlorate and other oxyanions onto magnetic permanently confined micelle arrays (Mag-PCMAs).

    PubMed

    Clark, Kristin K; Keller, Arturo A

    2012-03-01

    The removal of oxyanions found in drinking water sources -perchlorate, nitrate, phosphate, and sulfate- onto magnetic permanently confined micelle arrays (Mag-PCMAs) was studied. We determined the removal efficiency in both competitive and non-competitive environments, as many of these anions are present in these sources. Mag-PCMA removed over 98% of the aqueous perchlorate anions across a concentration range of 60-500 μg/L. Nitrate was absorbed 100% over a concentration range of 10-35 mg/L as nitrate. Removal of phosphate was 95.7% for 0.2-2.45 mg/L as phosphate. Sulfate was 100% absorbed across a concentration range of 5-20 mg/L and an average 75.7% for 5-50 mg/L. The sorption isotherms followed a Freundlich relationship with K(f) values of 2.00, 2.05, 1.9, and 3.86 mg/g for nitrate, perchlorate, phosphate, and sulfate respectively. Perchlorate and nitrate did not compete significantly for binding on Mag-PCMAs, with almost equal sorption, greater than 90%, for both anions in elevated concentrations. This is a distinguishing feature from ion exchange resins or activated carbon with cationic surfactants, where these anions have been shown to compete for sorption sites. At the concentrations studied, phosphate and sulfate also do not exhibit significant competition. Desorption for reuse was successful at pH 10. This reusable magnetic sorbent can thus be used to rapidly remove target anions such as perchlorate from water in the presence or absence of other oxyanions.

  15. MagAl: A new tool to analyse galaxies photometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenell, W.; Benítez, N.; Cid Fernandes, R.

    2014-10-01

    On galaxy spectra, one can find mainly two features: emission lines, which tell us about the ionised gas content, and the continuum plus absorption lines, which tell us about the stellar content. They thus allow us to derive gas-phase abundances, the main radiation sources, chemical enrichment and star formation histories. Braad-band photometry, on the other hand, is much more limited and hinders our ability to recover a galaxy's physical properties to such a degree of detail. However, with the recent development of redshift surveys using the technology of ultra-narrow filters (≍ 100 Å), such as ALHAMBRA, J-PAS and DES, it will be invaluable to be able to retrieve information on physical properties of galaxies from photometric data. Motivated by this data avalanche (which goes up to the petabyte scale), we decided to build our own SED-fitting code: Magnitudes Analyser (MagAl), which has three modules. 1) A template library generation module: generates empirical and theoretical template libraries. 2) Bayesian fitting module: calculates probability distribution functions (PDFs) for given observed and library template data. This is similar to the method to measure photometric redshifts by Benitez (2000). 3) A result-analyser module: streamlines data analysis from the large output PDFs files. A fourth module to manage 3D data is being developed and a few preliminary tests are also shown. To investigate the reliability of results obtained by MagAl, we have created a mock galaxy sample for the ALHAMBRA survey filter system (http://alhambrasurvey.com) and tried to recover their physical properties. We show that for our sample of simulated galaxies we can measure stellar ages, metallicities and extinctions with a precision of less than 0.3 dex. Also, we apply the code to the ALHAMBRA survey catalog and show that we can measure stellar masses with an accuracy of 0.2 dex when comparing to previous results like COSMOS masses measured by Bundy et al. (2006).

  16. Assessing Radium Activity in Shale Gas Produced Brine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, W.; Hayes, K. F.; Ellis, B. R.

    2015-12-01

    The high volumes and salinity associated with shale gas produced water can make finding suitable storage or disposal options a challenge, especially when deep well brine disposal or recycling for additional well completions is not an option. In such cases, recovery of commodity salts from the high total dissolved solids (TDS) of the brine wastewater may be desirable, yet the elevated concentrations of the naturally occurring radionuclides such as Ra-226 and Ra-228 in produced waters (sometimes substantially greater than the EPA limit of 5 pCi/L) may concentrate during these steps and limit salt recovery options. Therefore, assessing the potential presence of these Ra radionuclides in produced water from shale gas reservoir properties is desirable. In this study, we seek to link U and Th content within a given shale reservoir to the expected Ra content of produced brine by accounting for secular equilibrium within the rock and subsequent release to Ra to native brines. Produced brine from a series of Antrim shale wells and flowback from a single Utica-Collingwood shale well in Michigan were sampled and analyzed via ICP-MS to measure Ra content. Gamma spectroscopy was used to verify the robustness of this new Ra analytical method. Ra concentrations were observed to be up to an order of magnitude higher in the Antrim flowback water samples compared to those collected from the Utica-Collingwood well. The higher Ra content in Antrim produced brines correlates well with higher U content in the Antrim (19 ppm) relative to the Utica-Collingwood (3.5 ppm). We also observed an increase in Ra activity with increasing TDS in the Antrim samples. This Ra-TDS relationship demonstrates the influence of competing divalent cations in controlling Ra mobility in these clay-rich reservoirs. In addition, we will present a survey of geochemical data from other shale gas plays in the U.S. correlating shale U, Th content with produced brine Ra content. A goal of this study is to develop a

  17. Managing Rock and Paleomagnetic Data Flow with the MagIC Database: from Measurement and Analysis to Comprehensive Archive and Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, A. A.; Minnett, R. C.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.; Donadini, F.

    2008-12-01

    The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) is commissioned to implement and maintain an online portal to a relational database populated by rock and paleomagnetic data. The goal of MagIC is to archive all measurements and derived properties for studies of paleomagnetic directions (inclination, declination) and intensities, and for rock magnetic experiments (hysteresis, remanence, susceptibility, anisotropy). Organizing data for presentation in peer-reviewed publications or for ingestion into databases is a time-consuming task, and to facilitate these activities, three tightly integrated tools have been developed: MagIC-PY, the MagIC Console Software, and the MagIC Online Database. A suite of Python scripts is available to help users port their data into the MagIC data format. They allow the user to add important metadata, perform basic interpretations, and average results at the specimen, sample and site levels. These scripts have been validated for use as Open Source software under the UNIX, Linux, PC and Macintosh© operating systems. We have also developed the MagIC Console Software program to assist in collating rock and paleomagnetic data for upload to the MagIC database. The program runs in Microsoft Excel© on both Macintosh© computers and PCs. It performs routine consistency checks on data entries, and assists users in preparing data for uploading into the online MagIC database. The MagIC website is hosted under EarthRef.org at http://earthref.org/MAGIC/ and has two search nodes, one for paleomagnetism and one for rock magnetism. Both nodes provide query building based on location, reference, methods applied, material type and geological age, as well as a visual FlashMap interface to browse and select locations. Users can also browse the database by data type (inclination, intensity, VGP, hysteresis, susceptibility) or by data compilation to view all contributions associated with previous databases, such as PINT, GMPDB or TAFI or other user

  18. Optical Breath Gas Sensor for Extravehicular Activity Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William R.; Casias, Miguel E.; Vakhtin, Andrei B.; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S> ; Chullen, Cinda; Falconi, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    The function of the infrared gas transducer used during extravehicular activity (EVA) in the current space suit is to measure and report the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the ventilation loop. The next generation Portable Life Support System (PLSS) requires next generation CO2 sensing technology with performance beyond that presently in use on the Shuttle/International Space Station extravehicular mobility unit (EMU). Accommodation within space suits demands that optical sensors meet stringent size, weight, and power requirements. A laser diode (LD) spectrometer based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) is being developed for this purpose by Vista Photonics, Inc. Two prototype devices were delivered to NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) in September 2011. The sensors incorporate a laser diode based CO2 channel that also includes an incidental water vapor (humidity) measurement and a separate oxygen (O2) channel using a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL). Both prototypes are controlled digitally with a field-programmable gate array (FPGA)/microcontroller architecture. Based on the results of the initial instrument development, further prototype development and testing of instruments leveraging the lessons learned were desired. The present development extends and upgrades the earlier hardware to the Advanced PLSS 2.0 test article being constructed and tested at JSC. Various improvements to the electronics and gas sampling are being advanced by this project. The combination of low power electronics with the performance of a long wavelength laser spectrometer enables multi-gas sensors with significantly increased performance over that presently offered in the EMU. .

  19. GoldMag nanoparticles with core/shell structure: characterization and application in MR molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Song; Zou, Liguang; Zhang, Dong; Pang, Xin; Yang, Hua; Xu, Ying

    2011-09-01

    GoldMag is a kind of bi-functional nanoparticle, composed of a gold nanoshell and an iron oxide core. GoldMag combines the antibody immobilization property of gold nanoshell with the superparamagnetic feature of the iron oxide core. Rabbit anti-mouse IgG was immobilized on the surface of GoldMag to synthesize GoldMag-IgG in a single-step process. Transmission electron microscopy, UV/Vis spectrophotometry, zeta potential analysis, dynamic light scattering, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were employed to characterize the nanostructures and the spectroscopic and magnetic properties of GoldMag and GoldMag-IgG. The antibody encapsulation efficiency of GoldMag was measured as 58.7%, and the antibody loading capacity was 88 μg IgG per milligram of GoldMag. The immunoactivity of GoldMag-IgG was estimated to be 43.3% of that of the original IgG. The cytotoxicity of GoldMag was assessed by MTT assay, which showed that it has only little influence on human dermal lymphatic endothelial cells. MR imaging of different concentrations of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide, GoldMag, and GoldMag-IgG showed that 3 μg/mL of nanoparticles could significantly affect the MRI signal intensity of GRE T2*WI. The results demonstrate that GoldMag nanoparticles can be effectively conjugated with biomacromolecules and possess great potential for MR molecular imaging.

  20. 77 FR 22387 - Pipeline Safety: Information Collection Activities, Revision to Gas Transmission and Gathering...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Pipeline Safety: Information Collection Activities, Revision to Gas Transmission and Gathering Pipeline Systems Annual Report, Gas Transmission and Gathering Pipeline Systems Incident Report, and Hazardous Liquid Pipeline Systems Accident Report AGENCY:...

  1. Cost leveling continues; planned activity drops sharply in US gas pipeline cnstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, J.M.

    1986-02-01

    Natural gas pipeline construction costs, as measured by the OGJ-Morgan Pipeline cost index for US gas-pipeline construction, barely crept up in the second quarter 1985. Construction activity for lines and compressor stations was down.

  2. Fugitive greenhouse gas emissions from shale gas activities - a case study of Dish, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, A.; Roscoe, B.; Lary, D.; Schaefer, D.; Tao, L.; Sun, K.; Brian, A.; DiGangi, J.; Miller, D. J.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    We evaluate new findings on aerial (horizontal and vertical) mapping of methane emissions in the atmospheric boundary layer region to help study fugitive methane emissions from extraction, transmission, and storage of natural gas and oil in Dish, Texas. Dish is located in the Barnett Shale which has seen explosive development of hydraulic fracking activities in recent years. The aerial measurements were performed with a new laser-based methane sensor developed specifically for an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) methane sensor, with a mass of 2.5 kg and a precision of < 20 ppbv methane at 1 Hz, was flown on the UT-Dallas ARC Payload Master electronic aircraft at two sites in Texas: one representative of urban emissions of the Dallas-Fort Worth area in Richardson, Texas and another in Dish, Texas, closer to gas and oil activities. Methane mixing ratios at Dish were ubiquitously in the 3.5 - 4 ppmv range which was 1.5 - 2 ppmv higher than methane levels immediately downwind of Dallas. During the flight measurements at Dish, narrow methane plumes exceeding 20 ppmv were frequently observed at altitudes from the surface to 130 m above the ground. Based on the wind speed at the sampling location, the horizontal widths of large methane plumes were of the order of 100 m. The locations of the large methane plumes were variable in space and time over a ~ 1 km2 area sampled from the UAV. Spatial mapping over larger scales (10 km) by ground-based measurements showed similar methane levels as the UAV measurements. To corroborate our measurements, alkane and other hydrocarbon mixing ratios from an on-site TCEQ environmental monitoring station were analyzed and correlated with methane measurements to fingerprint the methane source. We show that fugitive methane emissions at Dish are a significant cause of the large and ubiquitous methane levels on the 1-10 km scale.

  3. Development of MAG3 p-nitrophenyl ester for technetium-99m and rhenium-188 labeling of amines and peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Guhlke, S.; Diekmann, D.; Biersack, H.J.; Zamora, P.O.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1994-09-01

    Conjugate labeling by active ester chemistry is a well-established method for labeling peptides and proteins with technetium and rhenium. The easy preparation and high conjugations yields presented in this paper show that both {sup 188}Re and {sup 99m}Tc-MAG{sub 3} p-nitrophenyl esters are promising agents for labeling a wide range of biomolecules for radio therapy or diagnostic imaging.

  4. 26 CFR 1.263A-13 - Oil and gas activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oil and gas activities. 1.263A-13 Section 1.263A... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Items Not Deductible § 1.263A-13 Oil and gas activities. (a) In general. This... 263A(g)) of oil or gas property. For this purpose, oil or gas property consists of each...

  5. 26 CFR 1.263A-13 - Oil and gas activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oil and gas activities. 1.263A-13 Section 1.263A... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Not Deductible § 1.263A-13 Oil and gas activities. (a) In general... section 263A(g)) of oil or gas property. For this purpose, oil or gas property consists of each...

  6. 26 CFR 1.263A-13 - Oil and gas activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oil and gas activities. 1.263A-13 Section 1.263A... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Not Deductible § 1.263A-13 Oil and gas activities. (a) In general... section 263A(g)) of oil or gas property. For this purpose, oil or gas property consists of each...

  7. 26 CFR 1.263A-13 - Oil and gas activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oil and gas activities. 1.263A-13 Section 1.263A... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Not Deductible § 1.263A-13 Oil and gas activities. (a) In general... section 263A(g)) of oil or gas property. For this purpose, oil or gas property consists of each...

  8. Apparatus and method for gas turbine active combustion control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umeh, Chukwueloka (Inventor); Kammer, Leonardo C. (Inventor); Shah, Minesh (Inventor); Fortin, Jeffrey B. (Inventor); Knobloch, Aaron (Inventor); Myers, William J. (Inventor); Mancini, Alfred Albert (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An Active Combustion Control System and method provides for monitoring combustor pressure and modulating fuel to a gas turbine combustor to prevent combustion dynamics and/or flame extinguishments. The system includes an actuator, wherein the actuator periodically injects pulsed fuel into the combustor. The apparatus also includes a sensor connected to the combustion chamber down stream from an inlet, where the sensor generates a signal detecting the pressure oscillations in the combustor. The apparatus controls the actuator in response to the sensor. The apparatus prompts the actuator to periodically inject pulsed fuel into the combustor at a predetermined sympathetic frequency and magnitude, thereby controlling the amplitude of the pressure oscillations in the combustor by modulating the natural oscillations.

  9. "Lights on at the end of the party": are lads' mags mainstreaming dangerous sexism?

    PubMed

    Horvath, Miranda A H; Hegarty, Peter; Tyler, Suzannah; Mansfield, Sophie

    2012-11-01

    Research has suggested that some magazines targeted at young men - lads' mags - are normalizing extreme sexist views by presenting those views in a mainstream context. Consistent with this view, young men in Study 1 (n = 90) identified more with derogatory quotes about women drawn from recent lads' mags, and from interviews with convicted rapists, when those quotes were attributed to lads' mags, than when they were attributed to convicted rapists. In Study 2, 40 young women and men could not reliably judge the source of those same quotes. While these participants sometimes voiced the belief that the content of lads' mags was 'normal' while rapists' talk was 'extreme', they categorized quotes from both sources as derogatory with equal frequency. Jointly, the two studies show an overlap in the content of convicted rapists' talk and the contents of contemporary lads' mags, and suggest that the framing of such content within lads' mags may normalize it for young men.

  10. Blood trauma testing of CentriMag and RotaFlow centrifugal flow devices: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sobieski, Michael A; Giridharan, Guruprasad A; Ising, Mickey; Koenig, Steven C; Slaughter, Mark S

    2012-08-01

    Mechanical circulatory assist devices that provide temporary support in heart failure patients are needed to enable recovery or provide a bridge to decision. Minimizing risk of blood damage (i.e., hemolysis) with these devices is critical, especially if the length of support needs to be extended. Hematologic responses of the RotaFlow (Maquet) and CentriMag (Thoratec) temporary support devices were characterized in an in vitro feasibility study. Paired static mock flow loops primed with fresh bovine blood (700 mL, hematocrit [Hct] = 25 ± 3%, heparin titrated for activated clotting time >300 s) pooled from a single-source donor were used to test hematologic responses to RotaFlow (n = 2) and CentriMag (n = 2) simultaneously. Pump differential pressures, temperature, and flow were maintained at 250 ± 10 mm Hg, 25 ± 2°C, and 4.2 ± 0.25 L/min, respectively. Blood samples (3 mL) were collected at 0, 60, 120, 180, 240, 300, and 360 min after starting pumps in accordance with recommended Food and Drug Administration and American Society for Testing and Materials guidelines. The CentriMag operated at a higher average pump speed (3425 rpm) than the RotaFlow (3000 rpm) while maintaining similar constant flow rates (4.2 L/min). Hematologic indicators of blood trauma (hemoglobin, Hct, platelet count, plasma free hemoglobin, and white blood cell) for all measured time points as well as normalized and modified indices of hemolysis were similar (RotaFlow: normalized index of hemolysis [NIH] =  0.021 ± 0.003 g/100 L, modified index of hemolysis [MIH] = 3.28 ± 0.52 mg/mg compared to CentriMag: NIH =  0.041 ± 0.010 g/100 L, MIH = 6.08 ± 1.45 mg/mg). In this feasibility study, the blood trauma performance of the RotaFlow was similar or better than the CentriMag device under clinically equivalent, worst-case test conditions. The RotaFlow device may be a more cost-effective alternative to

  11. Investigating the Relationship between Transverse Relaxation Rate (R2) and Interecho Time in MagA-Expressing, Iron-Labeled Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Casey Y; Thompson, R Terry; Prato, Frank S; Goldhawk, Donna E; Gelman, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Reporter gene-based labeling of cells with iron is an emerging method of providing magnetic resonance imaging contrast for long-term cell tracking and monitoring cellular activities. This report investigates 9.4 T nuclear magnetic resonance properties of mammalian cells overexpressing MagA, a putative iron transport protein from magnetotactic bacteria. MagA-expressing MDA-MB-435 cells were cultured in the presence and absence of iron supplementation and compared to the untransfected control. The relationship between the transverse relaxation rate (R2) and interecho time was investigated using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill sequence. This relationship was analyzed using a model based on water diffusion in weak magnetic field inhomogeneities (Jensen-Chandra model) as well as a fast-exchange model (Luz-Meiboom model). Increases in R2 with increasing interecho time were larger in the iron-supplemented, MagA-expressing cells compared to other cells. The dependence of R2 on interecho time in these iron-supplemented, MagA-expressing cells was better represented by the Jensen-Chandra model compared to the Luz-Meiboom model, whereas the Luz-Meiboom model performed better for the remaining cell types. Our findings provide an estimate of the distance scale of microscopic magnetic field variations in MagA-expressing cells, which is thought to be related to the size of iron-containing vesicles.

  12. 78 FR 34703 - Pipeline Safety: Information Collection Activities, Revision to Gas Distribution Annual Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-10

    ... Activities, Revision to Gas Distribution Annual Report AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety...) published a notice in the Federal Register of its intent to revise the gas distribution annual report (PHMSA... information collection is titled: ``Annual Report for Gas Distribution Pipeline Operators.'' Summary of...

  13. 78 FR 68079 - Information Collection Activities: Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations; Submitted for Office...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ...; 134E1700D2 EEEE500000 ET1SF0000.DAQ000] Information Collection Activities: Oil and Gas Well-Completion... requirements in the regulations under Subpart E, Oil and Gas Well Completion Operations. This notice also... INFORMATION: Title: 30 CFR 250, Subpart E, Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations. OMB Control Number:...

  14. 78 FR 13657 - Southwest Gas Storage Company; Prior Notice of Activity Under Blanket Certificate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-28

    .... Southwest seeks authorization to construct, modify and abandon certain natural gas storage facilities at the... Energy Regulatory Commission Southwest Gas Storage Company; Prior Notice of Activity Under Blanket Certificate On February 8, 2013, Southwest Gas Storage Company (Southwest) filed a prior notice...

  15. Analysis of laser preconditioning experiments on Z Beamlet Laser for MagLIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glinsky, Michael; Weis, Matthew; Harvey-Thompson, Adam; Geissel, Matthias; Jennings, Christopher; Nagayama, Taisuke; Peterson, Kyle

    2016-10-01

    Presented is an analysis of a series of laser preconditioning experiments on the Z Beamlet Laser (ZBL). These experiments examine the penetration of the laser through the plastic window (a few microns thick), the energy deposition into a gas behind the window, and the resulting density variations in the gas. The ZBL is a glass laser, frequency doubled to 527 μm, capable of delivering up to 4 kJ on target with a pulse length of a few ns. This is the same laser that is used to preheat the fuel in the MagLIF scheme before it is magnetically imploded on the Z generator. The design space for the laser pulse is explored in a series of experiments. Diagnostics include transmitted energy, backscattered energy, x-ray self emission images, and density shadowgrams at several times. These results are matched against HYDRA simulations using the uncertainty quantification engine Dakota. The potential for SBS, SRS, and filamentation are evaluated. Estimates of the energy deposition profile and disposition of the window (important because of potential mix with the fuel) are obtained with uncertainty. Work was performed by Sandia National Laboratories for USDoE under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND NO. 2016-6689C.

  16. Pdr3 is required for DNA damage induction of MAG1 and DDI1 via a bi-directional promoter element

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yu; Xiao, Wei

    2004-01-01

    In order to understand how gene regulation is achieved in eukaryotes in response to DNA damage, we used budding yeast as a model lower eukaryotic organism and investigated the molecular events leading to the expression of two closely clustered damage-inducible genes, MAG1 and DDI1. MAG1 and DDI1 are co-activated by a shared 8 bp repeat sequence, UASDM. In this study, we screened a yeast genomic library, identified Pdr3 as the transcriptional activator and demonstrated in vivo and in vitro that Pdr3 binds UASDM. Pdr3 is required for the activation of a number of genes encoding membrane efflux pumps and deletion of PDR3 results in reduced basal-level expression and loss of DNA damage induction of MAG1 and DDI1. Interestingly, Pdr1, another transcriptional activator homologous to Pdr3 that is also required for the activation of multidrug-resistance genes, is not involved in the regulation of MAG1 and DDI1 expression, although it may also bind to UASDM. Deletion of PDR3 does not affect the expression of other well-documented DNA damage-inducible genes; hence, yeast DNA damage-inducible genes appear to have distinct effectors although to a certain extent they share a common regulatory pathway mediated by DNA damage checkpoints. PMID:15452273

  17. Neurotrophins elevate cAMP to reach a threshold required to overcome inhibition by MAG through extracellular signal-regulated kinase-dependent inhibition of phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Nikulina, Elena; Mellado, Wilfredo; Filbin, Marie T

    2003-12-17

    Inhibitors of regeneration in myelin, such as myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), play an important role in preventing regeneration after CNS injury. Elevation of cAMP, either with dibutyryl-cAMP (db-cAMP) or by priming with a variety of neurotrophins, overcomes inhibition by MAG and myelin. However, activation of cAMP is not generally regarded as a signaling pathway for neurotrophins. Here we show that the NGF-like neurotrophins overcome inhibition by MAG by activating tyrosine kinase receptors. We also show that activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) by BDNF is required to overcome inhibition by MAG, and that activated Erk transiently inhibits phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4), the enzyme that hydrolyzes cAMP. Inhibition of PDE4 then allows cAMP to increase and so initiates the pathway to overcome inhibition. Furthermore, we also show that basal levels of Erk activation and basal cAMP levels contribute to the effects of db-cAMP by pushing the combined levels of cAMP above a threshold required to overcome inhibition. Together, these results not only show how NGF-like neurotrophins can elevate cAMP and overcome inhibition but also point to a novel mechanism of cross talk in neurons from the Erk to the cAMP signaling pathways.

  18. Absolute activity measurement of radon gas at IRA-METAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spring, Philippe; Nedjadi, Youcef; Bailat, Claude; Triscone, Gilles; Bochud, François

    2006-12-01

    This paper describes the system of the Swiss national metrological institute (IRA-METAS) for the absolute standardisation of radon gas. This method relies on condensing radon under vacuum conditions within a specified cold area using a cryogenerator, and detecting its alpha particles with an ion-implanted silicon detector, through a very accurately defined solid angle. The accuracy of this defined solid angle standardisation technique was corroborated by another primary measurement method involving 4 πγ NaI(Tl) integral counting and Monte Carlo efficiency calculations. The 222Rn standard submitted by IRA-METAS to the Système International de Référence (SIR) at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) has also been found to be consistent with an analogous standard submitted by the German national metrological institute (PTB). IRA-METAS is able to deliver radon standards, with activities ranging from a few kBq to 350 kBq, in NIST-Type ampoules, and glass or steel containers usable for calibrating radon-measuring instruments.

  19. Data inconsistencies from states with unconventional oil and gas activity.

    PubMed

    Malone, Samantha; Kelso, Matthew; Auch, Ted; Edelstein, Karen; Ferrar, Kyle; Jalbert, Kirk

    2015-01-01

    The quality and availability of unconventional oil and gas (O&G) data in the United States have never been compared methodically state-to-state. By conducting such an assessment, this study seeks to better understand private and publicly sourced data variability and to identify data availability gaps. We developed an exploratory data-grading tool - Data Accessibility and Usability Index (DAUI) - to guide the review of O&G data quality. Between July and October 2013, we requested, collected, and assessed 5 categories of unconventional O&G data (wells drilled, violations, production, waste, and Class II disposal wells) from 10 states with active drilling activity. We based our assessment on eight data quality parameters (accessibility, usability, point location, completeness, metadata, agency responsiveness, accuracy, and cost). Using the DAUI, two authors graded the 10 states and then averaged their scores. The average score received across all states, data categories, and parameters was 67.1 out of 100, largely insufficient for proper data transparency. By state, Pennsylvania received the highest average ( = 93.5) and ranked first in all but one data category. The lowest scoring state was Texas ( = 44) largely due to its policy of charging for certain data. This article discusses the various reasons for scores received, as well as methodological limitations of the assessment metrics. We argue that the significant variability of unconventional O&G data-and its availability to the public-is a barrier to regulatory and industry transparency. The lack of transparency also impacts public education and broader participation in industry governance. This study supports the need to develop a set of data best management practices (BMPs) for state regulatory agencies and the O&G industry, and suggests potential BMPs for this purpose.

  20. Nonlinear Propagation of Mag Waves Through the Transition Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jatenco-Pereira, V.; Steinolfson, R. S.; Mahajan, S.; Tajima, T.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Una onda de gravitaci5n magneto acustica (GMA), se inicia en el regimen de alta beta cerca de la basa de fot5sfera solar y es segui- da, usando simulaciones numericas, mientras viaja radialmente a traves de la cromosfera, la regi5n de transici6n y dentro de la corona. Se ha' seleccionado parametros iniciales de manera que la beta resulte menor que uno cerca de la parte alta de la regi6n de transici6n. Nuestro interes maximo se concentra en la cantidad y forma del flujo de energia que puede ser llevada por la onda hasta la corona dados una atm6sfera inicial y amplitud de onda especificas. Segun los estudios a la fecha, el flujo de energ1a termico domina, aumentando linealmente con la ampli tud deonda y resulta de aproximadamente i05 ergs/cm2-s en una amplitud de 0.5. El flujo de energia cinetica siempre permanece despreciable, mientras que el flujo de energia magnetica depende de la orientaci5n inicial del campo. Un modo GMA rapido y casi paralelo, el cual es esen- cialmente un modo MHD en la corona se convierte a un modo rapido modificado y a uno lento, cuando la beta atmosferica disminuye a uno. ABSTRACT: A magneto-acoustic-gravity (MAG) wave is initiated in the high-beta regime near the base of the solar photosphere and followed, using numerical siriiulations, as it travels radially through the chromosphere, the transition region, and into the corona. Initial parameters are selected such that beta becomes less than one near the top of the transition region. Our primary interest is in the amount and form of energy flux that can be carried by the wave train into the corona for a specified initial atmosphere and wave amplitude. For the studies conducted to date, the thermal energy flux dominates, it about linearly with wave amplitude and becomes approximately 10 ergs/cm2-s at an amplitude of 0.5. The kinetic energy flux always remains negligible, while the magnetic energy flux depends on the inLtial field orientation. A nearly parallel fast MAG mode, which

  1. Effects of Activation Energy to Transient Response of Semiconductor Gas Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Akira; Ohtani, Tatsuki

    The smell classifiable gas sensor will be desired for many applications such as gas detection alarms, process controls for food production and so on. We have tried to realize the sensor using transient responses of semiconductor gas sensor consisting of tin dioxide and pointed out that the sensor gave us different transient responses for kinds of gas. Results of model calculation showed the activation energy of chemical reaction on the sensor surface strongly depended on the transient response. We tried to estimate the activation energies by molecular orbital calculation with SnO2 Cluster. The results show that there is a liner relationship between the gradient of the transient responses and activation energies for carboxylic and alcoholic gases. Transient response will be predicted from activation energy in the same kind of gas and the smell discrimination by single semiconductor gas sensor will be realized by this relationship.

  2. In Favour of Mature-Aged Graduates (MAGs)--Tapping the Potential for Real Educational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uusimaki, Liisa

    2011-01-01

    Mature-aged graduates (MAGs) are characterised by significant life experience, including career change and an altruistic desire to benefit their prospective students. They are particularly well suited to the middle school environment with its focus on transition and its often complex student needs. Despite this, MAGs are currently underserviced by…

  3. Solar Probe Plus MAG Sensor Thermal Design for Low Heater Power and Extreme Thermal Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    The heater power available for the Solar Probe Plus FIELDS MAG sensor is less than half of the heritage value for other missions. Nominally the MAG sensors are in the spacecraft's umbra. In the worst hot case, approximately 200 spacecraft communication downlinks, up to 10 hours each, are required at 0.7 AU. These downlinks require the spacecraft to slew 45 deg. about the Y-axis, exposing the MAG sensors and boom to sunlight. This paper presents the thermal design to meet the MAG sensor thermal requirements in the extreme thermal environment and with low heater power. A thermal balance test on the MAG sensor engineering model has verified the thermal design and correlated the thermal model for flight temperature predictions.

  4. Effects of gas periodic stimulation on key enzyme activity in gas double-dynamic solid state fermentation (GDD-SSF).

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongzhang; Shao, Meixue; Li, Hongqiang

    2014-03-05

    The heat and mass transfer have been proved to be the important factors in air pressure pulsation for cellulase production. However, as process of enzyme secretion, the cellulase formation has not been studied in the view of microorganism metabolism and metabolic key enzyme activity under air pressure pulsation condition. Two fermentation methods in ATPase activity, cellulase productivity, weight lose rate and membrane permeability were systematically compared. Results indicated that gas double-dynamic solid state fermentation had no obviously effect on cell membrane permeability. However, the relation between ATPase activity and weight loss rate was linearly dependent with r=0.9784. Meanwhile, the results also implied that gas periodic stimulation had apparently strengthened microbial metabolism through increasing ATPase activity during gas double-dynamic solid state fermentation, resulting in motivating the production of cellulase by Trichoderma reesei YG3. Therefore, the increase of ATPase activity would be another crucial factor to strengthen fermentation process for cellulase production under gas double-dynamic solid state fermentation.

  5. Low-Altitude Magnetic Topology with MAVEN SWEA and MAG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, David; Xu, Shaosui; Mazelle, Christian; Luhmann, Janet; McFadden, James; Connerney, John; Liemohn, Michael; Dong, Chuanfei; Bougher, Stephen; Fillingim, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    The Solar Wind Electron Analyzer (SWEA) and Magnetometer (MAG) onboard the MAVEN spacecraft measure electron pitch angle and energy distributions at 2-second resolution (~8 km along the orbit track) to determine the topology of magnetic fields from both external and crustal sources. Electrons from different regions of the Mars environment can be distinguished by their energy distributions. Thus, pitch angle resolved energy spectra can be used to determine the plasma source regions sampled by a field line at large distances from the spacecraft. From 12/1/2014 to 2/15/2015, when periapsis was at high northern latitudes, SWEA observed ionospheric photoelectrons at low altitudes (140-200 km) and high solar zenith angles (120-145 degrees) on ~35% of the orbits. Since this electron population is unambiguously produced in the dayside ionosphere, these observations demonstrate that the deep Martian nightside is at times magnetically connected to the sunlit hemisphere. The BATS-R-US Mars multi-fluid MHD model suggests the presence of closed crustal magnetic field lines over the northern hemisphere that straddle the terminator and extend to high SZA. Simulations with the SuperThermal Electron Transport (STET) model show that photoelectron transport along such field lines can take place without significant attenuation. Precipitation of photoelectrons onto the night-side atmosphere should cause ionization and possibly auroral emissions in localized regions. On one orbit, the O2+ energy flux measured by STATIC correlates well with precipitating photoelectron fluxes.

  6. MagLifter Site Investigation and Implementation Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Pamela; Slaughter, Maynard; Beer, C. Neil

    1995-01-01

    MagLifter, as defined here, is an advanced, earth-bound catapult system to provide the initial lift for earth orbiting vehicles to reduce or eliminate the need for multistage propulsion, thus reducing the cost of orbital space flight. It is presumed that magnetic levitation will catapult the vehicle to a desired initial velocity sufficient for reaching orbit with the vehicles own engines. Of necessity, the system must be located on and around a mountain with sufficient relief to allow the catapult to accelerate the launch vehicle to a sufficient speed in the desired direction to allow it to reach orbit. Such a mountain site must meet criteria consistent with current and future space launch needs and conditions. It is the purpose of this report to set forth preliminary criteria for choosing a suitable maglifter site. The report is divided into four major sections: (1) Assumed Launch System and Flight Vehicle Characteristics; (2) Task 1.A - Initial Site Selection Criteria; (3) Conclusions; and (4) Appendix - Phases of the Site Selection Process.

  7. Active Geophysical Monitoring in Oil and Gas Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakulin, A.; Calvert, R.

    2005-12-01

    Effective reservoir management is a Holy Grail of the oil and gas industry. Quest for new technologies is never ending but most often they increase effectiveness and decrease the costs. None of the newcomers proved to be a silver bullet in such a key metric of the industry as average oil recovery factor. This factor is still around 30 %, meaning that 70 % of hydrocarbon reserves are left in the ground in places where we already have expensive infrastructure (platforms, wells) to extract them. Main reason for this inefficiency is our inability to address realistic reservoir complexity. Most of the time we fail to properly characterize our reservoirs before production. As a matter of fact, one of the most important parameters -- permeability -- can not be mapped from remote geophysical methods. Therefore we always start production blind even though reservoir state before production is the simplest one. Once first oil is produced, we greatly complicate the things and quickly become unable to estimate the state and condition of the reservoir (fluid, pressures, faults etc) or oilfield hardware (wells, platforms, pumps) to make a sound next decision in the chain of reservoir management. Our modeling capabilities are such that if we know true state of the things - we can make incredibly accurate predictions and make extremely efficient decisions. Thus the bottleneck is our inability to properly describe the state of the reservoirs in real time. Industry is starting to recognize active monitoring as an answer to this critical issue. We will highlight industry strides in active geophysical monitoring from well to reservoir scale. It is worth noting that when one says ``monitoring" production technologists think of measuring pressures at the wellhead or at the pump, reservoir engineers think of measuring extracted volumes and pressures, while geophysicist may think of change in elastic properties. We prefer to think of monitoring as to measuring those parameters of the

  8. GAS HYDRATES AT TWO SITES OF AN ACTIVE CONTINENTAL MARGIN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    Sediment containing gas hydrates from two distant Deep Sea Drilling Project sites (565 and 568), located about 670 km apart on the landward flank of the Middle America Trench, was studied to determine the geochemical conditions that characterize the occurrence of gas hydrates. Site 565 was located in the Pacific Ocean offshore the Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica in 3,111 m of water. The depth of the hole at this site was 328 m, and gas hydrates were recovered from 285 and 319 m. Site 568 was located about 670 km to the northwest offshore Guatemala in 2,031 m of water. At this site the hole penetrated to 418 m, and gas hydrates were encountered at 404 m.

  9. Managing oil and gas activities in coastal environments: refuge manual

    SciTech Connect

    Longley, W.L.; Jackson, R.; Snyder, B.

    1981-09-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the impacts of all aspects of oil and gas development upon coastal ecological systems and to assess the safeguards used in protecting refuge lands. Wildlife refuges along the coasts of Texas and Louisiana were selected for intensive study. These refuges were characterized by (1) a diversity of ecosystems, (2) oil exploration, extraction, and transport, and (3) oil and gas development periods of varying durations.

  10. Preparation of activated carbon from waste plastics polyethylene terephthalate as adsorbent in natural gas storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuliusman; Nasruddin; Sanal, A.; Bernama, A.; Haris, F.; Ramadhan, I. T.

    2017-02-01

    The main problem is the process of natural gas storage and distribution, because in normal conditions of natural gas in the gas phase causes the storage capacity be small and efficient to use. The technology is commonly used Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) and Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG). The weakness of this technology safety level is low because the requirement for high-pressure CNG (250 bar) and LNG requires a low temperature (-161°C). It takes innovation in the storage of natural gas using the technology ANG (Adsorbed Natural Gas) with activated carbon as an adsorbent, causing natural gas can be stored in a low pressure of about 34.5. In this research, preparation of activated carbon using waste plastic polyethylene terephthalate (PET). PET plastic waste is a good raw material for making activated carbon because of its availability and the price is a lot cheaper. Besides plastic PET has the appropriate characteristics as activated carbon raw material required for the storage of natural gas because the material is hard and has a high carbon content of about 62.5% wt. The process of making activated carbon done is carbonized at a temperature of 400 ° C and physical activation using CO2 gas at a temperature of 975 ° C. The parameters varied in the activation process is the flow rate of carbon dioxide and activation time. The results obtained in the carbonization process yield of 21.47%, while the yield on the activation process by 62%. At the optimum process conditions, the CO2 flow rate of 200 ml/min and the activation time of 240 minutes, the value % burn off amounted to 86.69% and a surface area of 1591.72 m2/g.

  11. Low pressure storage of natural gas on activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegrzyn, J.; Wiesmann, H.; Lee, T.

    The introduction of natural gas to the transportation energy sector offers the possibility of displacing imported oil with an indigenous fuel. The barrier to the acceptance of natural gas vehicles (NGV) is the limited driving range due to the technical difficulties of on-board storage of a gaseous fuel. In spite of this barrier, compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles are today being successfully introduced into the market place. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate an adsorbent natural gas (ANG) storage system as a viable alternative to CNG storage. It can be argued that low pressure ANG has reached near parity with CNG, since the storage capacity of CNG (2400 psi) is rated at 190 V/V, while low pressure ANG (500 psi) has reached storage capacities of 180 V/V in the laboratory. A program, which extends laboratory results to a full-scale vehicle test, is necessary before ANG technology will receive widespread acceptance. The objective of this program is to field test a 150 V/V ANG vehicle in FY 1994. As a start towards this goal, carbon adsorbents have been screened by Brookhaven for their potential use in a natural gas storage system. This paper reports on one such carbon, trade name Maxsorb, manufactured by Kansai Coke under an Amoco license.

  12. Synthesis and biological evaluation of technetium-99m MAG3 as a hippuran replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzberg, A.R.; Kasina, S.; Eshima, D.; Johnson, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    A new technetium-chelating agent based on a triamide monomercaptide tetradentate set of donor groups, mercaptoacetylglycylglycylglycine (MAG3), was synthesized and evaluated. Chelation with /sup 99m/Tc resulted in a single radiochemical product as expected. Studies in mice of (/sup 99m/Tc)MAG3 indicated excretion rates faster than omicron-iodohippurate (OIH) both in normal and in probenecid treated animals. Specificity for renal excretion was essentially complete. Clearance studies in rats resulted in 2.84 ml/min/100 g for (/sup 99m/Tc)MAG3, 2.17 for OIH, and 1.29 for (125I)iothalamate. Extraction efficiencies were 85% for (/sup 99m/Tc)MAG3, 69% for OIH and 39% for (125I)iothalamate. Probenicid depressed the clearance both of (/sup 99m/Tc)MAG3 and OIH at 25 and 50 mg/kg/hr, but to a greater extent with (/sup 99m/Tc)MAG3. The greater effect is offset, however, by the larger fraction secreted by the renal tubular cells. The animal results suggest that (/sup 99m/Tc)MAG3 may be a useful alternative to (131I)OIH.

  13. The MagA Protein of Magnetospirilla Is Not Involved in Bacterial Magnetite Biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Uebe, René; Henn, Verena

    2012-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria have the ability to orient along geomagnetic field lines based on the formation of magnetosomes, which are intracellular nanometer-sized, membrane-enclosed magnetic iron minerals. The formation of these unique bacterial organelles involves several processes, such as cytoplasmic membrane invagination and magnetosome vesicle formation, the accumulation of iron in the vesicles, and the crystallization of magnetite. Previous studies suggested that the magA gene encodes a magnetosome-directed ferrous iron transporter with a supposedly essential function for magnetosome formation in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 that may cause magnetite biomineralization if expressed in mammalian cells. However, more recent studies failed to detect the MagA protein among polypeptides associated with the magnetosome membrane and did not identify magA within the magnetosome island, a conserved genomic region that is essential for magnetosome formation in magnetotactic bacteria. This raised increasing doubts about the presumptive role of magA in bacterial magnetosome formation, which prompted us to reassess MagA function by targeted deletion in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 and Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1. Contrary to previous reports, magA mutants of both strains still were able to form wild-type-like magnetosomes and had no obvious growth defects. This unambiguously shows that magA is not involved in magnetosome formation in magnetotactic bacteria. PMID:22194451

  14. Multiple MAG peptides are recognized by circulating T and B lymphocytes in polyneuropathy and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Andersson, M; Yu, M; Söderström, M; Weerth, S; Baig, S; Solders, G; Link, H

    2002-05-01

    Abnormal immune responses to myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG), a component of myelin of the central and peripheral nervous system, have been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) and certain types of inflammatory polyneuropathy. To identify possible immunodominant MAG peptides in neuroinflammation, we examined T and B cell responses to five selected synthetic MAG peptides and myelin proteins in 21 patients with non-inflammatory polyneuropathy, 26 patients with MS, 10 optic neuritis patients and 17 healthy subjects. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot-forming cell assays were adopted, allowing the detection and enumeration of individual antigen responsive T and B cells in body fluids. Patients with polyneuropathy as well as those with MS had elevated levels of T and B cells recognizing MAG and its peptides. Any of the five MAG peptides under study functioned as immunodominant T and/or B cell epitope in individual subjects. None of the MAG peptides elicited a specific disease-associated T or B cell response. The enhanced T and B cell response to myelin components like MAG may play some role in initiation and/or progression of these diseases, but they could also represent secondary responses associated with myelin damage and indicate tolerization rather than autoaggressive immunity.

  15. The accuracy of quantitative parameters in (99m) Tc-MAG3 dynamic renography: a national audit based on virtual image data.

    PubMed

    Brolin, Gustav; Edenbrandt, Lars; Granerus, Göran; Olsson, Anna; Afzelius, David; Gustafsson, Agneta; Jonsson, Cathrine; Hagerman, Jessica; Johansson, Lena; Riklund, Katrine; Ljungberg, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Assessment of image analysis methods and computer software used in (99m) Tc-MAG3 dynamic renography is important to ensure reliable study results and ultimately the best possible care for patients. In this work, we present a national multicentre study of the quantification accuracy in (99m) Tc-MAG3 renography, utilizing virtual dynamic scintigraphic data obtained by Monte Carlo-simulated scintillation camera imaging of digital phantoms with time-varying activity distributions. Three digital phantom studies were distributed to the participating departments, and quantitative evaluation was performed with standard clinical software according to local routines. The differential renal function (DRF) and time to maximum renal activity (Tmax ) were reported by 21 of the 28 Swedish departments performing (99m) Tc-MAG3 studies as of 2012. The reported DRF estimates showed a significantly lower precision for the phantom with impaired renal uptake than for the phantom with normal uptake. The Tmax estimates showed a similar trend, but the difference was only significant for the right kidney. There was a significant bias in the measured DRF for all phantoms caused by different positions of the left and right kidney in the anterior-posterior direction. In conclusion, this study shows that virtual scintigraphic studies are applicable for quality assurance and that there is a considerable uncertainty associated with standard quantitative parameters in dynamic (99m) Tc-MAG3 renography, especially for patients with impaired renal function.

  16. Is distal motor and/or sensory demyelination a distinctive feature of anti-MAG neuropathy?

    PubMed

    Lozeron, Pierre; Ribrag, Vincent; Adams, David; Brisset, Marion; Vignon, Marguerite; Baron, Marine; Malphettes, Marion; Theaudin, Marie; Arnulf, Bertrand; Kubis, Nathalie

    2016-09-01

    To report the frequency of the different patterns of sensory and motor electrophysiological demyelination distribution in patients with anti-MAG neuropathy in comparison with patients with IgM neuropathy without MAG reactivity (IgM-NP). Thirty-five anti-MAG patients at early disease stage (20.1 months) were compared to 23 patients with IgM-NP; 21 CIDP patients and 13 patients with CMT1a neuropathy were used as gold standard neuropathies with multifocal and homogeneous demyelination, respectively. In all groups, standard motor and sensory electrophysiological parameters, terminal latency index and modified F ratio were investigated. Motor electrophysiological demyelination was divided in four profiles: distal, homogeneous, proximal, and proximo-distal. Distal sensory and sensorimotor demyelination were evaluated. Anti-MAG neuropathy is a demyelinating neuropathy in 91 % of cases. In the upper limbs, reduced TLI is more frequent in anti-MAG neuropathy, compared to IgM-NP. But, predominant distal demyelination of the median nerve is encountered in only 43 % of anti-MAG neuropathy and is also common in IgM-NP (35 %). Homogeneous demyelination was the second most frequent pattern (31 %). Concordance of electrophysiological profiles across motor nerves trunks is low and median nerve is the main site of distal motor conduction slowing. Reduced sensory conduction velocities occurs in 14 % of patients without evidence of predominant distal slowing. Simultaneous sensory and motor distal slowing was more common in the median nerve of anti-MAG neuropathy than IgM-NP. Electrophysiological distal motor demyelination and sensory demyelination are not a distinctive feature of anti-MAG reactivity. In anti-MAG neuropathy it is mainly found in the median nerve suggesting a frequent nerve compression at wrist.

  17. Technetium-99m MAG-3 clearances after captopril in experimental renovascular hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.B.; Blaufox, M.D.

    1989-05-01

    Rats with one kidney clamped (2K1C), both kidneys clamped (2K2C), unilaterally nephrectomized with remaining kidney clamped (1K1C), and normals, were studied using /sup 99m/Tc mercaptoacetyltriglycine ((/sup 99m/Tc)MAG-3) and /sup 131/I orthoiodohippurate ((/sup 131/I)OIH). Clearances of (/sup 99m/Tc)MAG-3 and (/sup 131/I)OIH were performed after constricted rats became hypertensive. Clearances were repeated after i.v. Captopril. Clearances of (/sup 99m/Tc)MAG-3 and (/sup 131/I)OIH in normals didn't change significantly after Captopril. Clearances of (/sup 99m/Tc)MAG-3 and (/sup 131/I)OIH decreased insignificantly after Captopril in the 2K2C model. in the 2K1C group, normal kidney clearance increased ((/sup 99m/Tc)MAG-3 p less than 0.01 and (/sup 131/I)OIH p less than 0.025) and clamped kidney clearance decreased after inhibition ((/sup 99m/Tc)MAG-3, p less than 0.01, (/sup 131/I)OIH p less than 0.02). Clearances increased in the 1K1C group after Captopril ((/sup 99m/Tc)MAG-3 p less than 0.0025 and (/sup 131/I)OIH, p less than 0.001). The ratio of (/sup 99m/Tc)MAG-3 to (/sup 131/I)OIH before Captopril was 0.81 and 0.84 after Captopril. Changes in renal function after Captopril depend on the model of renovascular hypertension and possibly the dose administered. Technetium-99m MAG-3 clearance parallels (/sup 131/I)orthoiodohippurate in renovascular hypertension.

  18. Effects of Globally Waste Disturbing Activities on Gas Generation, Retention, and Release in Hanford Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Charles W.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Huckaby, James L.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Wells, Beric E.

    2005-08-02

    Various operations are authorized in Hanford single- and double-shell tanks that disturb all or a large fraction of the waste. These globally waste-disturbing activities have the potential to release a large fraction of the retained flammable gas and to affect future gas generation, retention, and release behavior. This report presents analyses of the expected flammable gas release mechanisms and the potential release rates and volumes resulting from these activities. The background of the flammable gas safety issue at Hanford is summarized, as is the current understanding of gas generation, retention, and release phenomena. Considerations for gas monitoring and assessment of the potential for changes in tank classification and steady-state flammability are given.

  19. Mag-muBots: Magnetic micro-robots capable of mobility, manipulation, and modularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawashe, Chytra Shashikant

    Micro-robots are mobile devices that operate in micro-scale environments, and have future applications, such as being used to manipulate or construct micro-devices, and being used as diagnostic and analysis tools in biological systems. Being sub-millimeter in size, micro-robots require very different approaches to fabricating, powering, and controlling them. As opposed to conventional large-scale robots, it is infeasible to integrate conventional-style motors, actuators, and power sources into micro-scale devices. In this work, the Magnetic Micro-Robot (Mag-muBot) is presented, which is a versatile permanent magnet-based mobile robot under 1 mm in all dimensions. External magnetic fields are employed to successfully deliver power and control to the Mag-muBot, which is mobile and can operate in both gases and liquids, and on unstructured surfaces. Its motion is achieved by oscillating magnetic fields, which induces a stick-slip walking behavior; these dynamics are modeled into a simulation that compares favorably to experiments. The mechanisms for the manipulation of micro-objects are also explored, where the Mag-muBot can directly push micro-objects by contact-manipulation, or generate fluid boundary layers to manipulate micro-objects without direct contact. Examples of micro-object manipulation are also provided, where objects from 50 mum to 900 mum are shown to be manipulated. Additionally, control topics are explored such as addressing multiple Mag-muBots on a surface, which is accomplished by utilizing electrostatic forces generated by a specialized surface that selectively immobilizes individual Mag-muBots, allowing for decoupled serial locomotion of multiple Mag-muBots. Furthermore, autonomous control algorithms are developed such that the Mag-muBot can autonomously be positioned in the workspace, plan around obstacles, and efficiently manipulate micro-objects in the environment. Finally, a micro-scale reconfigurable modular robotic system is developed, based

  20. Anti-MAG/SGPG associated neuropathy does not commonly cause distal nerve temporal dispersion.

    PubMed

    Gondim, F A A; De Sousa, E A; Latov, N; Sander, H W; Chin, R L; Brannagan, T H

    2007-08-01

    Patients with anti-myelin associated glycoprotein (anti-MAG) neuropathy have uniform slowing without temporal dispersion, but do usually have disproportionately distal slowing. We evaluated distal compound muscle action potential (CMAP) dispersion in 29 patients with anti-MAG/sulphated glucuronyl paragloboside (SGPG) neuropathy (titres > or = 12,800). Among 138 motor responses, 15% (tibial), 7.3% (peroneal), 10.7% (median) and 13.8% (ulnar) had distal CMAP duration > 9 ms. Disproportionate distal slowing with normal distal CMAP duration in the arms may be useful to differentiate chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy from anti-MAG/SGPG associated neuropathy.

  1. Gas cleaning and hydrogen sulfide removal for COREX coal gas by sorption enhanced catalytic oxidation over recyclable activated carbon desulfurizer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tonghua; Shen, Yafei; Jia, Jinping

    2014-02-18

    This paper proposes a novel self-developed JTS-01 desulfurizer and JZC-80 alkaline adsorbent for H2S removal and gas cleaning of the COREX coal gas in small-scale and commercial desulfurizing devices. JTS-01 desulfurizer was loaded with metal oxide (i.e., ferric oxides) catalysts on the surface of activated carbons (AC), and the catalyst capacity was improved dramatically by means of ultrasonically assisted impregnation. Consequently, the sulfur saturation capacity and sulfur capacity breakthrough increased by 30.3% and 27.9%, respectively. The whole desulfurizing process combined selective adsorption with catalytic oxidation. Moreover, JZC-80 adsorbent can effectively remove impurities such as HCl, HF, HCN, and ash in the COREX coal gas, stabilizing the system pressure drop. The JTS-01 desulfurizer and JZC-80 adsorbent have been successfully applied for the COREX coal gas cleaning in the commercial plant at Baosteel, Shanghai. The sulfur capacity of JTS-01 desulfurizer can reach more than 50% in industrial applications. Compared with the conventional dry desulfurization process, the modified AC desulfurizers have more merit, especially in terms of the JTS-01 desulfurizer with higher sulfur capacity and low pressure drop. Thus, this sorption enhanced catalytic desulfurization has promising prospects for H2S removal and other gas cleaning.

  2. Moving in extreme environments: inert gas narcosis and underwater activities.

    PubMed

    Clark, James E

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to the underwater environment for pleasure or work poses many challenges on the human body including thermal stress, barotraumas, decompression sickness as well as the acute effects of breathing gases under pressure. With the popularity of recreational self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) diving on the increase and deep inland dive sites becoming more accessible, it is important that we understand the effects of breathing pressurised gas at depth can have on the body. One of the common consequences of hyperbaric gas is the narcotic effect of inert gas. Nitrogen (a major component of air) under pressure can impede mental function and physical performance at depths of as little as 10 m underwater. With increased depth, symptoms can worsen to include confusion, disturbed coordination, lack of concentration, hallucinations and unconsciousness. Narcosis has been shown to contribute directly to up to 6% of deaths in divers and is likely to be indirectly associated with other diving incidents at depth. This article explores inert gas narcosis, the effect on divers' movement and function underwater and the proposed physiological mechanisms. Also discussed are some of the factors that affect the susceptibility of divers to the condition. In conclusion, understanding the cause of this potentially debilitating problem is important to ensure that safe diving practices continue.

  3. 75 FR 70021 - Environmental Documents Prepared in Support of Oil and Gas Activities on the Alaska Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... of Oil and Gas Activities on the Alaska Outer Continental Shelf AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy... (FONSI) prepared for two oil and gas activities proposed on the Alaska Outer Continental Shelf (OCS)...

  4. Implementing an Inexpensive and Accurate Introductory Gas Density Activity with High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, W. Patrick; Joseph, Christopher; Morey, Samantha; Santos Romo, Ana; Shope, Cullen; Strang, Jonathan; Yang, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    A simplified activity examined gas density while employing cost-efficient syringes in place of traditional glass bulbs. The exercise measured the density of methane, with very good accuracy and precision, in both first-year high school and AP chemistry settings. The participating students were tasked with finding the density of a gas. The…

  5. 78 FR 76827 - Midwestern Gas Transmission Company; Prior Notice of Activity Under Blanket Certificate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Midwestern Gas Transmission Company; Prior Notice of Activity Under Blanket Certificate On December 4, 2013, Midwestern Gas Transmission Company (Midwestern) filed with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission...

  6. GAS PHASE SELECTIVE PHOTOXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TITANIUM DIOXIDE AND MOLECULAR OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas Phase Selective Oxidation of Alcohols Using Light-Activated Titanium Dioxide and Molecular Oxygen

    Gas phase selective oxidations of various primary and secondary alcohols are studied in an indigenously built stainless steel up-flow photochemical reactor using ultravi...

  7. Neurologic syndrome associated with homozygous mutation at MAG sialic acid binding site.

    PubMed

    Roda, Ricardo H; FitzGibbon, Edmond J; Boucekkine, Houda; Schindler, Alice B; Blackstone, Craig

    2016-08-01

    The MAG gene encodes myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), an abundant protein involved in axon-glial interactions and myelination during nerve regeneration. Several members of a consanguineous family with a clinical syndrome reminiscent of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease and demyelinating leukodystrophy on brain MRI were recently found to harbor a homozygous missense p.Ser133Arg MAG mutation. Here, we report two brothers from a nonconsanguineous family afflicted with progressive cognitive impairment, neuropathy, ataxia, nystagmus, and gait disorder. Exome sequencing revealed the homozygous missense mutation p.Arg118His in MAG. This Arg118 residue in immunoglobulin domain 1 is critical for sialic acid binding, providing a compelling mechanistic basis for disease pathogenesis.

  8. A direct method for regiospecific analysis of TAG using alpha-MAG.

    PubMed

    Turon, F; Bachain, P; Caro, Y; Pina, M; Graille, J

    2002-08-01

    An analytical procedure was developed for regiodistribution analysis of TAG using alpha-MAG prepared by an ethyl magnesium bromide deacylation. In the present communication, the deacylation procedure is shown to lead to representative alpha-MAG, allowing the composition of the native TAG in the alpha-position to be determined directly. The composition in the beta-position can then be estimated from the composition of the alpha-MAG and TAG according to the formula 3 x TAG - 2 x alpha-MAG. The estimates are superior to those obtained using the alpha,beta-DAG and Brockerhoff calculations as they come closer to the theoretical value and have smaller SD. The present procedure, first demonstrated on a synthetic TAG, was then successfully applied to the analysis of borage oil, milkfat, and tuna oil.

  9. IgM MGUS anti-MAG neuropathy with predominant muscle weakness and extensive muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Kawagashira, Yuichi; Kondo, Naohide; Atsuta, Naoki; Iijima, Masahiro; Koike, Haruki; Katsuno, Masahisa; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Kusunoki, Susumu; Sobue, Gen

    2010-09-01

    We report a patient with anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) neuropathy, predominantly exhibiting severe motor symptoms, accompanied by extensive muscle atrophy mimicking Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Nerve conduction studies revealed mild retardation of motor conduction velocities and significant prolongation of distal latency. Sural nerve biopsy revealed widely spaced myelin and positive staining of myelinated fibers with an IgM antibody. Predominant motor symptoms with muscle atrophy can be one of the clinical manifestations of anti-MAG neuropathy.

  10. A single-nanoparticle NO2 gas sensor constructed using active molecular plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lichan; Wu, Bo; Guo, Longhua; Tey, Ruiwen; Huang, Youju; Kim, Dong-Hwan

    2015-01-25

    A single-nanoparticle plasmonic sensor for the sensitive detection of gas molecules (NO2) has been constructed. Taking advantage of active molecular plasmonics, the analyte selectively triggers a measurable spectral shift of ferrocene-modified single gold nanorods.

  11. Small molecule inhibitors block Gas6-inducible TAM activation and tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Kimani, Stanley G.; Kumar, Sushil; Bansal, Nitu; Singh, Kamalendra; Kholodovych, Vladyslav; Comollo, Thomas; Peng, Youyi; Kotenko, Sergei V.; Sarafianos, Stefan G.; Bertino, Joseph R.; Welsh, William J.; Birge, Raymond B.

    2017-01-01

    TAM receptors (Tyro-3, Axl, and Mertk) are a family of three homologous type I receptor tyrosine kinases that are implicated in several human malignancies. Overexpression of TAMs and their major ligand Growth arrest-specific factor 6 (Gas6) is associated with more aggressive staging of cancers, poorer predicted patient survival, acquired drug resistance and metastasis. Here we describe small molecule inhibitors (RU-301 and RU-302) that target the extracellular domain of Axl at the interface of the Ig-1 ectodomain of Axl and the Lg-1 of Gas6. These inhibitors effectively block Gas6-inducible Axl receptor activation with low micromolar IC50s in cell-based reporter assays, inhibit Gas6-inducible motility in Axl-expressing cell lines, and suppress H1299 lung cancer tumor growth in a mouse xenograft NOD-SCIDγ model. Furthermore, using homology models and biochemical verifications, we show that RU301 and 302 also inhibit Gas6 inducible activation of Mertk and Tyro3 suggesting they can act as pan-TAM inhibitors that block the interface between the TAM Ig1 ectodomain and the Gas6 Lg domain. Together, these observations establish that small molecules that bind to the interface between TAM Ig1 domain and Gas6 Lg1 domain can inhibit TAM activation, and support the further development of small molecule Gas6-TAM interaction inhibitors as a novel class of cancer therapeutics. PMID:28272423

  12. First Scaled-Down Integrated MagLIF Experiments on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. R.; Barnak, D. H.; Betti, R.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Knauer, J. P.; Regan, S. P.

    2016-10-01

    Magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) is an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) scheme that relies on compression of a cylindrical, magnetized, preheated plasma to achieve fusion conditions with a lower implosion velocity and a lower convergence ratio than conventional ICF. MagLIF research to date has been centered on the Z pulsed-power machine at Sandia National Laboratories-the only facility capable of carrying out such experiments. A laser-driven version of MagLIF has now been implemented on the OMEGA laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, using targets roughly ten times smaller in linear dimensions than Z targets. Laser-driven MagLIF on OMEGA will test the scaling of MagLIF and provide a higher shot rate with better diagnostic access than Z. Preliminary results from integrated MagLIF experiments on OMEGA will be presented for the first time. The information, data, or work presented herein was funded in part by the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), U.S. Department of Energy, under Award Number DE-AR0000568, and the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  13. A New Interface for the Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) Paleo and Rock Magnetic Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarboe, N.; Minnett, R.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.; Shaar, R.; Jonestrask, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Magnetic Information Consortium (MagIC) database (http://earthref.org/MagIC/) continues to improve the ease of uploading data, the creation of complex searches, data visualization, and data downloads for the paleomagnetic, geomagnetic, and rock magnetic communities. Data uploading has been simplified and no longer requires the use of the Excel SmartBook interface. Instead, properly formatted MagIC text files can be dragged-and-dropped onto an HTML 5 web interface. Data can be uploaded one table at a time to facilitate ease of uploading and data error checking is done online on the whole dataset at once instead of incrementally in an Excel Console. Searching the database has improved with the addition of more sophisticated search parameters and with the ability to use them in complex combinations. Searches may also be saved as permanent URLs for easy reference or for use as a citation in a publication. Data visualization plots (ARAI, equal area, demagnetization, Zijderveld, etc.) are presented with the data when appropriate to aid the user in understanding the dataset. Data from the MagIC database may be downloaded from individual contributions or from online searches for offline use and analysis in the tab delimited MagIC text file format. With input from the paleomagnetic, geomagnetic, and rock magnetic communities, the MagIC database will continue to improve as a data warehouse and resource.

  14. Self-Activated Transparent All-Graphene Gas Sensor with Endurance to Humidity and Mechanical Bending.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon Hoo; Kim, Sang Jin; Kim, Yong-Jin; Shim, Yeong-Seok; Kim, Soo Young; Hong, Byung Hee; Jang, Ho Won

    2015-10-27

    Graphene is considered as one of leading candidates for gas sensor applications in the Internet of Things owing to its unique properties such as high sensitivity to gas adsorption, transparency, and flexibility. We present self-activated operation of all graphene gas sensors with high transparency and flexibility. The all-graphene gas sensors which consist of graphene for both sensor electrodes and active sensing area exhibit highly sensitive, selective, and reversible responses to NO2 without external heating. The sensors show reliable operation under high humidity conditions and bending strain. In addition to these remarkable device performances, the significantly facile fabrication process enlarges the potential of the all-graphene gas sensors for use in the Internet of Things and wearable electronics.

  15. Applications for activated carbons from waste tires: Natural gas storage and air pollution control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brady, T.A.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Rood, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Natural gas storage for natural gas vehicles and the separation and removal of gaseous contaminants from gas streams represent two emerging applications for carbon adsorbents. A possible precursor for such adsorbents is waste tires. In this study, activated carbon has been developed from waste tires and tested for its methane storage capacity and SO2 removal from a simulated flue-gas. Tire-derived carbons exhibit methane adsorption capacities (g/g) within 10% of a relatively expensive commercial activated carbon; however, their methane storage capacities (Vm/Vs) are almost 60% lower. The unactivated tire char exhibits SO2 adsorption kinetics similar to a commercial carbon used for flue-gas clean-up. Copyright ?? 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  16. Differential expression of L- and S-MAG upon cAMP stimulated differentiation in oligodendroglial cells.

    PubMed

    Erb, M; Steck, A J; Nave, K A; Schaeren-Wiemers, N

    2003-02-01

    Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), an immunoglobulin-like cell signaling protein involved in axon-glial interactions, displays two intracellular C-termini as a result of alternative mRNA splicing. During brain development, the two MAG mRNAs that encode L-MAG and S-MAG differ in their relative abundance. We have investigated the differential expression of L- and S-MAG upon cAMP treatment in the oligodendroglial cell line Oli-neu, a cell line able to differentiate in vitro. We have engineered GFP and VSVG fusions by small insertions into the alternatively spliced exons of the cloned MAG gene and reintroduced them into Oli-neu cells. The individually tagged MAG isoforms were expressed under the control of the MAG promoter and regulatory region. In this system, L-MAG was the predominant isoform before the stimulation of cells with cAMP, whereas upon cAMP treatment the S-MAG isoform was predominantly expressed in cells with a high degree of morphological differentiation. We suggest that the regulation of the MAG alternative splicing and the morphological differentiation in oligodendrocytes are controlled both by the same cAMP-responsive differentiation step.

  17. The CentriMag centrifugal blood pump as a benchmark for in vitro testing of hemocompatibility in implantable ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chris H H; Pieper, Ina Laura; Hambly, Rebecca; Radley, Gemma; Jones, Alyssa; Friedmann, Yasmin; Hawkins, Karl M; Westaby, Stephen; Foster, Graham; Thornton, Catherine A

    2015-02-01

    Implantable ventricular assist devices (VADs) have proven efficient in advanced heart failure patients as a bridge-to-transplant or destination therapy. However, VAD usage often leads to infection, bleeding, and thrombosis, side effects attributable to the damage to blood cells and plasma proteins. Measuring hemolysis alone does not provide sufficient information to understand total blood damage, and research exploring the impact of currently available pumps on a wider range of blood cell types and plasma proteins such as von Willebrand factor (vWF) is required to further our understanding of safer pump design. The extracorporeal CentriMag (Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, CA, USA) has a hemolysis profile within published standards of normalized index of hemolysis levels of less than 0.01 g/100 L at 100 mm Hg but the effect on leukocytes, vWF multimers, and platelets is unknown. Here, the CentriMag was tested using bovine blood (n = 15) under constant hemodynamic conditions in comparison with a static control for total blood cell counts, hemolysis, leukocyte death, vWF multimers, microparticles, platelet activation, and apoptosis. The CentriMag decreased the levels of healthy leukocytes (P < 0.006), induced leukocyte microparticles (P < 10(-5) ), and the level of high molecular weight of vWF multimers was significantly reduced in the CentriMag (P < 10(-5) ) all compared with the static treatment after 6 h in vitro testing. Despite the leukocyte damage, microparticle formation, and cleavage of vWF multimers, these results show that the CentriMag is a hemocompatible pump which could be used as a standard in blood damage assays to inform the design of new implantable blood pumps.

  18. Advanced Gas Sensors Using SERS-Activated Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascola, Robert; McWhorter, Scott; Murph, Simona Hunyadi

    2010-08-01

    This contribution describes progress towards the development and testing of a functionalized capillary that will provide detection of low-concentration gas-phase analytes through SERS. Measurement inside a waveguide allows interrogation of a large surface area, potentially overcoming the short distance dependence of the SERS effect. The possible use of Raman spectroscopy for gas detection is attractive for IR-inactive molecules or scenarios where infrared technology is inconvenient. However, the weakness of Raman scattering limits the use of the technique to situations where low detection limits are not required or large gas pressures are present. With surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), signal enhancements of 106 are often claimed, and higher values are seen in specific instances. However, most of the examples of SERS analysis are on liquid-phase samples, where the molecular density is high, usually combined with some sort of sample concentration at the surface. Neither of these factors is present in gas-phase samples. Because the laser is focused to a small point in the typical experimental setup, and the spatial extent of the effect above the surface is small (microns), the excitation volume is miniscule. Thus, exceptionally large enhancements are required to generate a signal comparable to that obtained by conventional Raman measurements. A reflective waveguide offers a way to increase the interaction volume of the laser with a SERS-modified surface. The use of a waveguide to enhance classical Raman measurements was recently demonstrated by S.M. Angel and coworkers, who obtained 12- to 30-fold sensitivity improvements for nonabsorbing gases (CO2, CH4) with a silvered capillary (no SERS enhancement). Shi et al.. demonstrated 10-to 100-fold enhancement of aqueous Rhodamine 6G in a capillary coated with silver nanoparticles. They observed enhancements of 10- to 100-fold compared to direct sampling, but this relied on a "double substrate", which required

  19. Comparison of iodine-131 OIH and technetium-99m MAG3 renal imaging in volunteers

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A. Jr.; Eshima, D.; Fritzberg, A.R.; Christian, P.E.; Kasina, S.

    1986-06-01

    Animal studies have suggested that the nonisomeric N3S triamide mercaptide ligand, /sup 99m/Tc mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3), may provide a satisfactory /sup 99m/Tc-labeled replacement for /sup 131/I hippurate (OIH). Sequential 30-min (/sup 99m/Tc)MAG3 (5-10 mCi) and (/sup 131/I)OIH (300 microCi) imaging studies were performed in ten normal volunteers in order to compare the image quality, renal excretion, blood clearance, and time to peak height of the renogram curve. In addition, (/sup 99m/Tc) MAG3 (5 mCi) and (/sup 131/I)OIH (150 microCi) were administered simultaneously in eight volunteers for comparison of 180-min blood and plasma clearances and urine excretion. In the sequential imaging studies, the blood clearance of (/sup 99m/Tc)MAG3 was more rapid than (/sup 131/I)OIH with a mean clearance of 1.30 l/min compared with 0.88 l/min for (/sup 131/I)OIH (p less than 0.05). Seventy-three percent of the injected dose of the MAG3 was excreted by 30 min compared with 66.8% for (/sup 131/I)OIH. Whole kidney and cortical renogram curves showed no significant difference in the time to peak height for MAG3 and (/sup 131/I)OIH. In all subjects, the quality of the (/sup 99m/Tc)MAG3 images were clearly superior to (/sup 131/I)OIH. Following simultaneous injection, blood and plasma clearances for (/sup 131/I)OIH were more rapid than MAG3 when determined for multiple time intervals from 0-30 to 0-180 min (p less than or equal to 0.05). The 0-30-min clearances of MAG3 and (/sup 131/I)OIH were only slightly greater than the 0-180-min clearances and can be used to obtain valid comparisons of the two agents. As in the sequential study, 30-min urine excretion was greater for MAG3 than (/sup 131/I)OIH (73.1 compared with 69.6%) but the difference was not statistically significant.

  20. High temperature hydrogen sulfide adsorption on activated carbon - I. Effects of gas composition and metal addition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cal, M.P.; Strickler, B.W.; Lizzio, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Various types of activated carbon sorbents were evaluated for their ability to remove H2S from a simulated coal gas stream at a temperature of 550 ??C. The ability of activated carbon to remove H2S at elevated temperature was examined as a function of carbon surface chemistry (oxidation, thermal desorption, and metal addition), and gas composition. A sorbent prepared by steam activation, HNO3 oxidation and impregnated with Zn, and tested in a gas stream containing 0.5% H2S, 50% CO2 and 49.5% N2, had the greatest H2S adsorption capacity. Addition of H2, CO, and H2O to the inlet gas stream reduced H2S breakthrough time and H2S adsorption capacity. A Zn impregnated activated carbon, when tested using a simulated coal gas containing 0.5% H2S, 49.5% N2, 13% H2, 8.5% H2O, 21% CO, and 7.5% CO2, had a breakthrough time of 75 min, which was less than 25 percent of the length of breakthrough for screening experiments performed with a simplified gas mixture of 0.5% H2S, 50% CO2, and 49.5% N2.

  1. Development of an Absolute Gas-Counting Capability for Low to Medium Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Richard M.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Ely, James H.; Day, Anthony R.; Hayes, James C.; Hoppe, Eric W.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; Mace, Emily K.; Merriman, Jason H.; Overman, Cory T.; Seifert, Allen

    2013-11-01

    ABSTRACT Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a capability to measure the absolute activity concentration of various gaseous radionuclides using length-compensated proportional-counting methods. This capability will enable the validation and use of low-level, gaseous radionuclide calibration standards for use in PNNL’s shallow underground laboratory. Two sets of unequal length proportional counters have been fabricated. These detector assemblies operate on a static gas-fill principle, in contrast to continuous, flow-through configurations. One set of three counters has been fabricated using ultra-low background (ULB) electroformed copper and low-background fabrication methods. Once fully operational, these ULB counters will be used in PNNL’s shallow underground counting laboratory for analysis of gases with low activity concentrations < 1 Bq/cc. A second set of four unequal length counters has been fabricated from Oxygen-Free High-Conductivity Copper (OFHC) using similar low-background cleaning and assembly methods. These OFHC counters will be operated above ground in the analysis of gases with activity concentrations in the range of 1-10 Bq/cc. A gas delivery system is being developed to actively mix the analyte gas with an appropriate amount of count-gas and uniformly deliver it to the counters with high accuracy and repeatability. A description of both detector assemblies and gas delivery system will be given along with a preliminary uncertainty analysis of a simulated 0.05 Bq/cm3 gas measurement.

  2. Coexistence of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and anti-MAG neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Salsano, Ettore; Ciano, Claudia; Palamara, Luisa; Morbin, Michela; Pareyson, Davide

    2013-06-01

    At age 35, a man with a genetic diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) but no family history of neuropathy and no clinical symptoms developed rapidly progressive loss of balance, distal limb numbness, loss of manual dexterity, and hand tremor. Five years later, he walked with support and had mild pes cavus, marked sensory ataxia, severe leg and hand weakness, absent deep tendon reflexes (DTRs), severe sensory loss, and hand tremor. He had dramatically reduced motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV), strikingly prolonged motor distal latencies, absent sensory action potentials and lower limb compound muscle action potentials. CMT1A duplication was reconfirmed but the dramatic change in his clinical course suggested a superimposed acquired neuropathy. An IgM-kappa monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance (MGUS) with high titer anti-myelin associated glycoprotein (anti-MAG) activity was found. Nerve biopsy showed severe loss of myelinated fibers with onion bulbs, no evidence of uncompacted myelin, and few IgM deposits. Rituximab was given and he improved. It is very likely that this is a chance association of two rare and slowly progressive neuropathies; rapidly worsening course may have been due to a "double hit". Interestingly, there are reports of possible superimposition of dysimmune neuropathies on hereditary ones, and the influence of the immune system on inherited neuropathies is matter for debate.

  3. Van Allen Probes ECT/MagEIS Background Corrected Electron Flux Measurements: Methods and Initial Findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudepierre, S. G.; O'Brien, T. P., III; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J.; Looper, M. D.; Clemmons, J. H.; Roeder, J. L.; Mazur, J. E.; Mulligan, T. L.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instrument, part ofthe Energetic Composition and Thermal Plasma (ECT) Suite, onboard the NASA Van AllenProbes spacecraft. The ECT/MagEIS instrument measures radiation belt electrons in the ~20-4000 keV energy range and protons in the ~60-1000 keV energy range, with high resolution inboth energy and pitch-angle. In addition, the MagEIS electron measurement technique allowsfor a full quantification of the source(s) of background contamination in the measurement.MagEIS is thus able to make clean, reliable electron flux observations in the presence of strongpenetrating backgrounds, for example, contamination from relativistic protons in the inner zoneand inner slot region. We summarize our background correction algorithm, describe the varioussources of background contamination, and present an overview of our initial findings using thebackground corrected data set. Understanding the causes and effects of backgroundcontamination in the MagEIS electron data set is crucial for the interpretation and proper use ofsuch data. The techniques described will facilitate new investigations into the dynamics of theEarth's electron radiation belts, which have thus far not been possible.

  4. [Cloning, expression and analysis of Der f Mag 29 allergen of Dermatophagoides farinae].

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin-Xia; Yu, Li-Li; Zhou, Ying; Bian, Yong-Hua; Yang, Li; Wang, Nan; Cui, Yu-Bao

    2013-12-01

    The full-length Mag 29 gene of Dermatophagoides farinae was amplified by RT-PCR with a pair of specific primers. The PCR product was cloned into pCold TF DNA vector. The constructed plasmid pCold TF-Mag 29 was transformed into E. coli BL21 and followed by expression of the protein induced by IPTG. The recombinant protein was analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The full-length Mag 29 gene was 429 bp. A specific band (Mr 63,000) were detected in the whole cells, the supernatant, and the precipitate. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that Mag 29 protein was composed with 142 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular weight of Mr 15,100, and its secondary structure was composed of alpha helix (55.63%), extended strand (3.52%), and random coil (40.85%). The Mag 29 allergen was a hydrophilic and cytoplasmic protein, and shared a high degree homology with the heat shock protein 70 family.

  5. Interdisciplinary Collaboration amongst Colleagues and between Initiatives with the Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minnett, R.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Jarboe, N.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.; Jonestrask, L.; Shaar, R.

    2014-12-01

    Earth science grand challenges often require interdisciplinary and geographically distributed scientific collaboration to make significant progress. However, this organic collaboration between researchers, educators, and students only flourishes with the reduction or elimination of technological barriers. The Magnetics Information Consortium (http://earthref.org/MagIC/) is a grass-roots cyberinfrastructure effort envisioned by the geo-, paleo-, and rock magnetic scientific community to archive their wealth of peer-reviewed raw data and interpretations from studies on natural and synthetic samples. MagIC is dedicated to facilitating scientific progress towards several highly multidisciplinary grand challenges and the MagIC Database team is currently beta testing a new MagIC Search Interface and API designed to be flexible enough for the incorporation of large heterogeneous datasets and for horizontal scalability to tens of millions of records and hundreds of requests per second. In an effort to reduce the barriers to effective collaboration, the search interface includes a simplified data model and upload procedure, support for online editing of datasets amongst team members, commenting by reviewers and colleagues, and automated contribution workflows and data retrieval through the API. This web application has been designed to generalize to other databases in MagIC's umbrella website (EarthRef.org) so the Geochemical Earth Reference Model (http://earthref.org/GERM/) portal, Seamount Biogeosciences Network (http://earthref.org/SBN/), EarthRef Digital Archive (http://earthref.org/ERDA/) and EarthRef Reference Database (http://earthref.org/ERR/) will benefit from its development.

  6. Magnetically separable polymer (Mag-MIP) for selective analysis of biotin in food samples.

    PubMed

    Uzuriaga-Sánchez, Rosario Josefina; Khan, Sabir; Wong, Ademar; Picasso, Gino; Pividori, Maria Isabel; Sotomayor, Maria Del Pilar Taboada

    2016-01-01

    This work presents an efficient method for the preparation of magnetic nanoparticles modified with molecularly imprinted polymers (Mag-MIP) through core-shell method for the determination of biotin in milk food samples. The functional monomer acrylic acid was selected from molecular modeling, EGDMA was used as cross-linking monomer and AIBN as radical initiator. The Mag-MIP and Mag-NIP were characterized by FTIR, magnetic hysteresis, XRD, SEM and N2-sorption measurements. The capacity of Mag-MIP for biotin adsorption, its kinetics and selectivity were studied in detail. The adsorption data was well described by Freundlich isotherm model with adsorption equilibrium constant (KF) of 1.46 mL g(-1). The selectivity experiments revealed that prepared Mag-MIP had higher selectivity toward biotin compared to other molecules with different chemical structure. The material was successfully applied for the determination of biotin in diverse milk samples using HPLC for quantification of the analyte, obtaining the mean value of 87.4% recovery.

  7. A background correction algorithm for Van Allen Probes MagEIS electron flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Claudepierre, S. G.; O'Brien, T. P.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Roeder, J. L.; Clemmons, J. H.; Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; Mulligan, T. M.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Friedel, R. H. W.; Henderson, M. G.; Larsen, B. A.

    2015-07-14

    We describe an automated computer algorithm designed to remove background contamination from the Van Allen Probes Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) electron flux measurements. We provide a detailed description of the algorithm with illustrative examples from on-orbit data. We find two primary sources of background contamination in the MagEIS electron data: inner zone protons and bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by energetic electrons interacting with the spacecraft material. Bremsstrahlung X-rays primarily produce contamination in the lower energy MagEIS electron channels (~30–500 keV) and in regions of geospace where multi-M eV electrons are present. Inner zone protons produce contamination in all MagEIS energy channels at roughly L < 2.5. The background-corrected MagEIS electron data produce a more accurate measurement of the electron radiation belts, as most earlier measurements suffer from unquantifiable and uncorrectable contamination in this harsh region of the near-Earth space environment. These background-corrected data will also be useful for spacecraft engineering purposes, providing ground truth for the near-Earth electron environment and informing the next generation of spacecraft design models (e.g., AE9).

  8. A background correction algorithm for Van Allen Probes MagEIS electron flux measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Claudepierre, S. G.; O'Brien, T. P.; Blake, J. B.; ...

    2015-07-14

    We describe an automated computer algorithm designed to remove background contamination from the Van Allen Probes Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) electron flux measurements. We provide a detailed description of the algorithm with illustrative examples from on-orbit data. We find two primary sources of background contamination in the MagEIS electron data: inner zone protons and bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by energetic electrons interacting with the spacecraft material. Bremsstrahlung X-rays primarily produce contamination in the lower energy MagEIS electron channels (~30–500 keV) and in regions of geospace where multi-M eV electrons are present. Inner zone protons produce contamination in all MagEIS energymore » channels at roughly L < 2.5. The background-corrected MagEIS electron data produce a more accurate measurement of the electron radiation belts, as most earlier measurements suffer from unquantifiable and uncorrectable contamination in this harsh region of the near-Earth space environment. These background-corrected data will also be useful for spacecraft engineering purposes, providing ground truth for the near-Earth electron environment and informing the next generation of spacecraft design models (e.g., AE9).« less

  9. Improvements to the Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) Paleo and Rock Magnetic Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarboe, N.; Minnett, R.; Tauxe, L.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Constable, C.; Jonestrask, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Magnetic Information Consortium (MagIC) database (http://earthref.org/MagIC/) continues to improve the ease of data uploading and editing, the creation of complex searches, data visualization, and data downloads for the paleomagnetic, geomagnetic, and rock magnetic communities. Online data editing is now available and the need for proprietary spreadsheet software is therefore entirely negated. The data owner can change values in the database or delete entries through an HTML 5 web interface that resembles typical spreadsheets in behavior and uses. Additive uploading now allows for additions to data sets to be uploaded with a simple drag and drop interface. Searching the database has improved with the addition of more sophisticated search parameters and with the facility to use them in complex combinations. A comprehensive summary view of a search result has been added for increased quick data comprehension while a raw data view is available if one desires to see all data columns as stored in the database. Data visualization plots (ARAI, equal area, demagnetization, Zijderveld, etc.) are presented with the data when appropriate to aid the user in understanding the dataset. MagIC data associated with individual contributions or from online searches may be downloaded in the tab delimited MagIC text file format for susbsequent offline use and analysis. With input from the paleomagnetic, geomagnetic, and rock magnetic communities, the MagIC database will continue to improve as a data warehouse and resource.

  10. The importance of binder moisture content in Metformin HCL high-dose formulations prepared by moist aqueous granulation (MAG)

    PubMed Central

    Takasaki, Hiroshi; Yonemochi, Etsuo; Ito, Masanori; Wada, Koichi; Terada, Katsuhide

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate binders to improve the flowability of granulates and compactibility of Metformin HCL (Met) using the moist aqueous granulation (MAG) process. The effect of the binder moisture content on granulate and tablet quality was also evaluated. Vinylpyrrolidone–vinyl acetate copolymer (Kollidon VA64 fine: VA64), polyvidone (Povidone K12: PVP), hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC SSL SF: HPC) and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (Methocel E5 LV: HPMC) were evaluated as binders. These granulates, except for HPMC, had a lower yield pressure than Met active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). HPMC Met was not sufficiently granulated with low water volume. No problems were observed with the VA64 Met granulates during the tableting process. However, HPC Met granulates had a bowl-forming tendency, and PVP Met granulates had the tendency to stick during the tableting process. These bowl-forming and sticking tendencies may have been due to the low moisture absorbency of HPC and the high volume of bound water of PVP, respectively. VA64 Met granulates had the highest ambient moisture content (bulk water, bound water) and moisture absorbency. It was concluded that the type of binder used for the Met MAG process has an impact on granulate flow and compactibility, as well as moisture absorbency and maintenance of moisture balance. PMID:26779418

  11. The importance of binder moisture content in Metformin HCL high-dose formulations prepared by moist aqueous granulation (MAG).

    PubMed

    Takasaki, Hiroshi; Yonemochi, Etsuo; Ito, Masanori; Wada, Koichi; Terada, Katsuhide

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate binders to improve the flowability of granulates and compactibility of Metformin HCL (Met) using the moist aqueous granulation (MAG) process. The effect of the binder moisture content on granulate and tablet quality was also evaluated. Vinylpyrrolidone-vinyl acetate copolymer (Kollidon VA64 fine: VA64), polyvidone (Povidone K12: PVP), hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC SSL SF: HPC) and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (Methocel E5 LV: HPMC) were evaluated as binders. These granulates, except for HPMC, had a lower yield pressure than Met active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). HPMC Met was not sufficiently granulated with low water volume. No problems were observed with the VA64 Met granulates during the tableting process. However, HPC Met granulates had a bowl-forming tendency, and PVP Met granulates had the tendency to stick during the tableting process. These bowl-forming and sticking tendencies may have been due to the low moisture absorbency of HPC and the high volume of bound water of PVP, respectively. VA64 Met granulates had the highest ambient moisture content (bulk water, bound water) and moisture absorbency. It was concluded that the type of binder used for the Met MAG process has an impact on granulate flow and compactibility, as well as moisture absorbency and maintenance of moisture balance.

  12. Geodatabase of Wyoming statewide oil and gas drilling activity to 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biewick, Laura R.H.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) compiled a geographic information system (GIS) of Wyoming statewide historical oil and gas drilling activity for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI). The WLCI is representative of the partnerships being formed by the USGS with other Department of the Interior bureaus, State and local agencies, industry, academia, and private landowners that are committed to maintaining healthy landscapes, sustaining wildlife, and preserving recreational and grazing uses as energy resources development progresses in southwestern Wyoming. This product complements the 2009 USGS publication on oil and gas development in southwestern Wyoming http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/437/) by approximating, based on database attributes, the time frame of drilling activity for each well (start and stop dates). This GIS product also adds current oil and gas drilling activity not only in the area encompassing the WLCI, but also statewide. Oil and gas data, documentation, and spatial data processing capabilities are available and can be downloaded from the USGS website. These data originated from the Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (WOGCC), represent decades of oil and gas drilling (1900 to 2010), and will facilitate a landscape-level approach to integrated science-based assessments, resource management and land-use decision making.

  13. Activated carbon from vetiver roots: gas and liquid adsorption studies.

    PubMed

    Gaspard, S; Altenor, S; Dawson, E A; Barnes, P A; Ouensanga, A

    2007-06-01

    Large quantities of lignocellulosic residues result from the industrial production of essential oil from vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides) roots. These residues could be used for the production of activated carbon. The yield of char obtained after vetiver roots pyrolysis follows an equation recently developed [A. Ouensanga, L. Largitte, M.A. Arsene, The dependence of char yield on the amounts of components in precursors for pyrolysed tropical fruit stones and seeds, Micropor. Mesopor. Mater. 59 (2003) 85-91]. The N(2) adsorption isotherm follows either the Freundlich law K(F)P(alpha) which is the small alpha equation limit of a Weibull shaped isotherm or the classical BET isotherm. The surface area of the activated carbons are determined using the BET method. The K(F) value is proportional to the BET surface area. The alpha value increases slightly when the burn-off increases and also when there is a clear increase in the micropore distribution width.

  14. Activated carbon treatment of municipal solid waste incineration flue gas.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shengyong; Ji, Ya; Buekens, Alfons; Ma, Zengyi; Jin, Yuqi; Li, Xiaodong; Yan, Jianhua

    2013-02-01

    Activated carbon injection is widely used to control dioxins and mercury emissions. Surprisingly little attention has been paid to its modelling. This paper proposes an expansion of the classical Everaerts-Baeyens model, introducing the expression of fraction of free adsorption sites, f (s), and asserting the significant contribution of fly ash to dioxins removal. Moreover, the model monitors dioxins partitioning between vapour and particulate phase, as well as removal efficiency for each congener separately. The effects of the principal parameters affecting adsorption are analysed according to a semi-analytical, semi-empirical model. These parameters include temperature, contact time during entrained-flow, characteristics (grain-size, pore structure, specific surface area) and dosage of activated carbon, lignite cokes or mineral adsorbent, fly ash characteristics and concentration, and type of incinerator plant.

  15. Magnetic Fields on the National Ignition Facility (MagNIF)

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, D.; Folta, J.

    2016-08-12

    A magnetized target capability on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been investigated. Stakeholders’ needs and project feasibility analysis were considered in order to down-select from a wide variety of different potential magnetic field magnitudes and volumes. From the large range of different target platforms, laser configurations, and diagnostics configurations of interest to the stakeholders, the gas-pipe platform has been selected for the first round of magnetized target experiments. Gas pipe targets are routinely shot on the NIF and provide unique value for external collaborators. High-level project goals have been established including an experimentally relevant 20Tesla magnetic field magnitude. The field will be achieved using pulsed power-driven coils. A system architecture has been proposed. The pulsed power drive system will be located in the NIF target bay. This decision provides improved maintainability and mitigates equipment safety risks associated with explosive failure of the drive capacitor. High-level and first-level subsystem requirements have been established. Requirements have been included for two distinct coil designs – full solenoid and quasi-Helmholtz. A Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) has been performed and documented. Additional requirements have been derived from the mitigations included in the FMEA document. A project plan is proposed. The plan includes a first phase of electromagnetic simulations to assess whether the design will meet performance requirements, then a second phase of risk mitigation projects to address the areas of highest technical risk. The duration from project kickoff to the first magnetized target shot is approximately 29 months.

  16. Methods for MAG3 conjugation and 99mTc radiolabeling of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Liu, Guozheng; Hnatowich, Donald J

    2006-01-01

    The chelator mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3) forms a single stable chelate with technetium-99m (99mTc) oxotechnetate. The bifunctional N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester of mercaptoacetyltriglycine with S-acetyl protection of the sulfhydryl group may be used to conjugate MAG3 to primary amine functionalized biomolecules for the purpose of radiolabeling with 99mTc for gamma detection or single photon emission computed tomography imaging (SPECT). We report here an improved MAG3 conjugation and 99mTc radiolabeling method capable of generating high radiochemical yield and high specific radioactivity. Post-labeling purification will not be needed if the protocol is followed as presented. Apart from the preparation of reagents, the conjugation and purification requires about 4 h, while the labeling with 99mTc requires about an additional 30 min.

  17. Dynamic behavior of {sup 110m}Ag in sheep tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Beresford, N.A.; Howard, B.J.; Mayes, R.W.

    1994-04-01

    The transfer coefficient of {sup 110m}Ag to a range of sheep tissues and its biological half-life in these tissues has been determined. Liver was shown to be the major site of {sup 110m}Ag deposition and retention, with a transfer coefficient of F{sub f} 7.1 d kg{sup -1} and a biological half-life of 79 d. These results also suggests that previous estimates of the transfer of silver to muscle were too high, although further work would be required to confirm this. There is a need for accurate data which can be used to predict the transfer of {sup 110m}Ag to food-producing animals.

  18. An Autopsy Case of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis with Waldenström Macroglobulinemia and Anti-MAG Gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Jurici, Snejana; Laquerrière, Annie; Bedat-Millet, Anne-Laure; Jardin, Fabrice; Musset, Lucile; Vallat, Jean-Michel; Hannequin, Didier; Martinaud, Olivier

    2011-09-01

    We report the case of a 71-year-old woman with typical signs of bulbar amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) associated with immunoglobulin M (IgM) monoclonal gammopathy and anti-MAG (myelin-associated glycoprotein) antibodies. This unusual association between ALS and anti-MAG antibodies has previously been reported in a single case. Our present case, at neuropathological examination, demonstrated no causative link between anti-MAG antibodies and ALS.

  19. 78 FR 33051 - Notification of Proposed Production Activity, The Gas Company, LLC dba Hawai'i Gas, Subzone 9F...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    ... currently has authority to produce synthetic natural gas, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, hydrocarbon gas mixtures... natural gas, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, hydrocarbon gas mixtures and zinc sulfide (duty rate ranges from... abroad include: mixtures of light petroleum derivative hydrocarbons, including medium to light...

  20. Hydrogen Gas Emissions from Active Faults and Identification of Flow Pathway in a Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimaru, T.; Niwa, M.; Kurosawa, H.; Shimada, K.

    2010-12-01

    It has been observed that hydrogen gas emissions from the subsurface along active faults exceed atmospheric concentrations (e.g. Sugisaki et. al., 1983). Experimental studies have shown that hydrogen gas is generated in a radical reaction of water with fractured silicate minerals due to rock fracturing caused by fault movement (e.g. Kita et al., 1982). Based on such research, we are studying an investigation method for an assessment of fault activity using hydrogen gas emissions from fracture zones. To start, we have devised portable equipment for rapid and simple in situ measurement of hydrogen gas emissions (Shimada et al., 2008). The key component of this equipment is a commercially available and compact hydrogen gas sensor with an integral data logger operable at atmospheric pressure. In the field, we have drilled shallow boreholes into incohesive fault rocks to depths ranging from 15 to 45 cm using a hand-operated drill with a 9mm drill-bit. Then, we have measured the hydrogen gas concentrations in emissions from active faults such as: the western part of the Atotsugawa fault zone, the Atera fault zone and the Neodani fault in central Japan; the Yamasaki fault zone in southwest Japan; and the Yamagata fault zone in northeast Japan. In addition, we have investigated the hydrogen gas concentrations in emissions from other major geological features such as tectonic lines: the Butsuzo Tectonic Line in the eastern Kii Peninsula and the Atokura Nappe in the Northeastern Kanto Mountains. As a result of the investigations, hydrogen gas concentration in emissions from the active faults was measured to be in the approximate range from 6,000 ppm to 26,000 ppm in two to three hours after drilling. A tendency for high concentrations of hydrogen gas in active faults was recognized, in contrast with low concentrations in emissions from tectonic lines that were observed to be in the range from 730 ppm to 2,000 ppm. It is inferred that the hydrogen gas migrates to ground

  1. Production of activated char from Illinois coal for flue gas cleanup

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lizzio, A.A.; DeBarr, J.A.; Kruse, C.W.

    1997-01-01

    Activated chars were produced from Illinois coal and tested in several flue gas cleanup applications. High-activity chars that showed excellent potential for both SO2 and NOx removal were prepared from an Illinois No. 2 bituminous coal. The SO2 (120 ??C) and NOx (25 ??C) removal performance of one char compared favorably with that of a commercial activated carbon (Calgon Centaur). The NOx removal performance of the same char at 120 ??C exceeded that of the Centaur carbon by more than 1 order of magnitude. Novel char preparation methods were developed including oxidation/thermal desorption and hydrogen treatments, which increased and preserved, respectively, the active sites for SO2 and NOx adsorption. The results of combined SO2/NOx removal tests, however, suggest that SO2 and NOx compete for similar adsorption sites and SO2 seems to be more strongly adsorbed than NO. A low-activity, low-cost char was also developed for cleanup of incinerator flue gas. A three-step method involving coal preoxidation, pyrolysis, and CO2 activation was used to produce the char from Illinois coal. Five hundred pounds of the char was tested on a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial incinerator in Germany. The char was effective in removing >97% of the dioxins and furans present in the flue gas; mercury levels were below detectable limits.

  2. Vesicocolic fistula detected by (99m)Tc-MAG3 renogram.

    PubMed

    Mannelli, Lorenzo; Monti, Serena; Bastawrous, Sarah; Lomabardo, Ivano; Behnia, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    A 55-year-old man presented with 60-lb weight loss in 6 months. An abdominal CT demonstrated a large mass in the pelvis arising from the sigmoid colon and invading the urinary bladder. His elevated serum creatinine (1.25 mg/dL) triggered a request for a Tc-MAG3. Tc-MAG3 renogram demonstrated communication of the urinary bladder with the descending colon but no evidence of obstruction to drainage from the kidneys to the bladder. A retrograde cystogram confirmed a vesicocolic fistula. After multiple rounds of chemotherapy, the patient died 7 months later.

  3. Intraperitoneal urine leak after prostatectomy confirmed by 99mTc-MAG3 renogram.

    PubMed

    Pogatchnik, Brian; Monti, Serena; Lewis, David H; Heinrich, Demetra A; Mannelli, Lorenzo

    2014-08-01

    A 67-year-old patient presented with abdominal pain and distension 2 days after robotic radical prostatectomy for prostate carcinoma. He became anuric, and his serum creatinine level doubled, making IV contrast contraindicated. Abdominal CT without contrast demonstrated hypodense fluid in the peritoneum. Tc-MAG3 renogram detected extravasation of radiotracer from the bladder. Follow-up retrograde cystogram revealed a posterior anastomotic leak. The patient underwent uneventful surgical repair and made a full recovery. This case demonstrated that Tc-MAG3 can prove leak from the urinary tract, particularly helpful in the setting of poor renal function and contraindication to IV contrast.

  4. Illuminating the Depths of the MagIC (Magnetics Information Consortium) Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, A. A. P.; Minnett, R.; Jarboe, N.; Jonestrask, L.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Magnetics Information Consortium (http://earthref.org/MagIC/) is a grass-roots cyberinfrastructure effort envisioned by the paleo-, geo-, and rock magnetic scientific community. Its mission is to archive their wealth of peer-reviewed raw data and interpretations from magnetics studies on natural and synthetic samples. Many of these valuable data are legacy datasets that were never published in their entirety, some resided in other databases that are no longer maintained, and others were never digitized from the field notebooks and lab work. Due to the volume of data collected, most studies, modern and legacy, only publish the interpreted results and, occasionally, a subset of the raw data. MagIC is making an extraordinary effort to archive these data in a single data model, including the raw instrument measurements if possible. This facilitates the reproducibility of the interpretations, the re-interpretation of the raw data as the community introduces new techniques, and the compilation of heterogeneous datasets that are otherwise distributed across multiple formats and physical locations. MagIC has developed tools to assist the scientific community in many stages of their workflow. Contributors easily share studies (in a private mode if so desired) in the MagIC Database with colleagues and reviewers prior to publication, publish the data online after the study is peer reviewed, and visualize their data in the context of the rest of the contributions to the MagIC Database. From organizing their data in the MagIC Data Model with an online editable spreadsheet, to validating the integrity of the dataset with automated plots and statistics, MagIC is continually lowering the barriers to transforming dark data into transparent and reproducible datasets. Additionally, this web application generalizes to other databases in MagIC's umbrella website (EarthRef.org) so that the Geochemical Earth Reference Model (http://earthref.org/GERM/) portal, Seamount Biogeosciences

  5. Multiplex detection of plant pathogens through the Luminex MagPlex bead system.

    PubMed

    van der Vlugt, René A A; van Raaij, Henry; de Weerdt, Marjanne; Bergervoet, Jan H W

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a versatile multiplex method for both the serological and molecular detection of plant pathogens. The Luminex MagPlex bead system uses small paramagnetic microspheres ("beads"), either coated with specific antibodies or oligonucleotides, which capture respectively viruses and/or bacteria or PCR products obtained from their genetic material. The Luminex MagPlex bead system allows true multiplex detection of up to 500 targets in a single sample on a routine basis. The liquid suspension nature of the method significantly improves (1) assay speed, (2) detection limits and (3) dynamic range. It can also considerably reduce labor and consumables costs.

  6. Disposable MagLev centrifugal blood pump utilizing a cone-shaped impeller.

    PubMed

    Hijikata, Wataru; Sobajima, Hideo; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Nagamine, Yasuyuki; Wada, Suguru; Takatani, Setsuo; Shimokohbe, Akira

    2010-08-01

    To enhance the durability and reduce the blood trauma of a conventional blood pump with a cone-shaped impeller, a magnetically levitated (MagLev) technology has been applied to the BioPump BPX-80 (Medtronic Biomedicus, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA), whose impeller is supported by a mechanical bearing. The MagLev BioPump (MagLev BP), which we have developed, has a cone-shaped impeller, the same as that used in the BPX-80. The suspension and driving system, which is comprised of two degrees of freedom, radial-controlled magnetic bearing, and a simply structured magnetic coupling, eliminates any physical contact between the impeller and the housing. To reduce both oscillation of the impeller and current in the coils, the magnetic bearing system utilizes repetitive and zero-power compensators. In this article, we present the design of the MagLev mechanism, measure the levitational accuracy of the impeller and pressure-flow curves (head-quantity [HQ] characteristics), and describe in vitro experiments designed to measure hemolysis. For the flow-induced hemolysis of the initial design to be reduced, the blood damage index was estimated by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Stable rotation of the impeller in a prototype MagLev BP from 0 to 2750 rpm was obtained, yielding a flow rate of 5 L/min against a head pressure in excess of 250 mm Hg. Because the impeller of the prototype MagLev BP is levitated without contact, the normalized index of hemolysis was 10% less than the equivalent value with the BPX-80. The results of the CFD analysis showed that the shape of the outlet and the width of the fluid clearances have a large effect on blood damage. The prototype MagLev BP satisfied the required HQ characteristics (5 L/min, 250 mm Hg) for extracorporeal circulation support with stable levitation of the impeller and showed an acceptable level of hemolysis. The simulation results of the CFD analysis indicated the possibility of further reducing the blood damage of

  7. Nonlinear-Based MEMS Sensors and Active Switches for Gas Detection

    PubMed Central

    Bouchaala, Adam; Jaber, Nizar; Yassine, Omar; Shekhah, Osama; Chernikova, Valeriya; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the integration of a MOF thin film on electrostatically actuated microstructures to realize a switch triggered by gas and a sensing algorithm based on amplitude tracking. The devices are based on the nonlinear response of micromachined clamped-clamped beams. The microbeams are coated with a metal-organic framework (MOF), namely HKUST-1, to achieve high sensitivity. The softening and hardening nonlinear behaviors of the microbeams are exploited to demonstrate the ideas. For gas sensing, an amplitude-based tracking algorithm is developed to quantify the captured quantity of gas. Then, a MEMS switch triggered by gas using the nonlinear response of the microbeam is demonstrated. Noise analysis is conducted, which shows that the switch has high stability against thermal noise. The proposed switch is promising for delivering binary sensing information, and also can be used directly to activate useful functionalities, such as alarming. PMID:27231914

  8. Statistical evaluation of the impact of shale gas activities on ozone pollution in North Texas.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Mahdi; John, Kuruvilla

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade, substantial growth in shale gas exploration and production across the US has changed the country's energy outlook. Beyond its economic benefits, the negative impacts of shale gas development on air and water are less well known. In this study the relationship between shale gas activities and ground-level ozone pollution was statistically evaluated. The Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) area in north-central Texas was selected as the study region. The Barnett Shale, which is one the most productive and fastest growing shale gas fields in the US, is located in the western half of DFW. Hourly meteorological and ozone data were acquired for fourteen years from monitoring stations established and operated by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ). The area was divided into two regions, the shale gas region (SGR) and the non-shale gas (NSGR) region, according to the number of gas wells in close proximity to each monitoring site. The study period was also divided into 2000-2006 and 2007-2013 because the western half of DFW has experienced significant growth in shale gas activities since 2007. An evaluation of the raw ozone data showed that, while the overall trend in the ozone concentration was down over the entire region, the monitoring sites in the NSGR showed an additional reduction of 4% in the annual number of ozone exceedance days than those in the SGR. Directional analysis of ozone showed that the winds blowing from areas with high shale gas activities contributed to higher ozone downwind. KZ-filtering method and linear regression techniques were used to remove the effects of meteorological variations on ozone and to construct long-term and short-term meteorologically adjusted (M.A.) ozone time series. The mean value of all M.A. ozone components was 8% higher in the sites located within the SGR than in the NSGR. These findings may be useful for understanding the overall impact of shale gas activities on the local and regional ozone

  9. 75 FR 10301 - MMS Information Collection Activity: 1010-0006, Leasing of Sulphur or Oil and Gas in the Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

    ...-0013] MMS Information Collection Activity: 1010-0006, Leasing of Sulphur or Oil and Gas in the Outer Continental Shelf and Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing, Extension of a Collection; Submitted for... 30 CFR 256, ``Leasing of Sulphur or Oil and Gas in the Outer Continental Shelf,'' and 30 CFR...

  10. 75 FR 13570 - MMS Information Collection Activity: 1010-0043, Oil and Gas Well-Workover Operations, Renewal of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... Minerals Management Service MMS Information Collection Activity: 1010-0043, Oil and Gas Well- Workover... (ICR) concerns the paperwork requirements in the regulations under 30 CFR 250, Subpart F, ``Oil and Gas... return address. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: 30 CFR 250, Subpart F, Oil and Gas...

  11. 78 FR 68082 - Information Collection Activities: Oil and Gas Well-Workover Operations; Submitted for Office of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ...; 134E1700D2 EEEE500000 ET1SF0000.DAQ000] Information Collection Activities: Oil and Gas Well-Workover... requirements in the regulations under Subpart F, Oil and Gas Well- Workover Operations. This notice also... INFORMATION: Title: 30 CFR Part 250, Subpart F, Oil and Gas Well-Workover Operations. OMB Control Number:...

  12. 75 FR 7474 - CenterPoint Energy Gas Transmission Company; Prior Notice of Activity Under Blanket Certificate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission CenterPoint Energy Gas Transmission Company; Prior Notice of Activity Under Blanket Certificate February 3, 2010. On January 26, 2010 CenterPoint Energy Gas Transmission Company... Energy Regulatory Commission's (Commission) regulations under the Natural Gas Act, and CEGT's...

  13. Survey of oil and gas activities on federal wildlife refuges and waterfowl production areas

    SciTech Connect

    Ethridge, M.; Guerrieri, U.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis of survey data provides empirical evidence of the effects of oil and gas activities on federal wildlife refuges. The paper reports the results of a systematic survey of units of the National Wildlife Refuge System by the American Petroleum Institute in the form of questionnaires sent to refuge managers. The data suggest that oil and gas operations have had little or no adverse effect on wildlife on most refuges and Waterfowl Protection Areas, that oil and gas activities have detracted little from and have often enhanced other economic and recreational uses which occur on the refuges, and that appropriate regulations, stipulations, and restrictions are a key government management tool for protecting wildlife and other refuge resources. 3 figures, 44 tables.

  14. Next Generation HeliMag UXO Mapping Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    for deployment of seven total-field magnetometers on a Kevlar reinforced boom mounted on a Bell 206L helicopter. The objectives of this...aircraft, thereby increasing productivity (less weight provides an opportunity for more fuel and longer flight duration), expanding applicability (less...weight provides a greater operational altitude range at existing fuel load conditions), and reducing risk (any aviation activity has an element of

  15. mag-1, a homolog of Drosophila mago nashi, regulates hermaphrodite germ-line sex determination in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Boswell, R; Wood, W B

    2000-02-15

    The Caenorhabditis elegans gene mag-1 can substitute functionally for its homolog mago nashi in Drosophila and is predicted to encode a protein that exhibits 80% identity and 88% similarity to Mago nashi (P. A. Newmark et al., 1997, Development 120, 3197-3207). We have used RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) to analyze the phenotypic consequences of impairing mag-1 function in C. elegans. We show here that mag-1(RNAi) causes masculinization of the germ line (Mog phenotype) in RNA-injected hermaphrodites, suggesting that mag-1 is involved in hermaphrodite germ-line sex determination. Epistasis analysis shows that ectopic sperm production caused by mag-1(RNAi) is prevented by loss-of-function (lf) mutations in fog-2, gld-1, fem-1, fem-2, fem-3, and fog-1, all of which cause germ-line feminization in XX hermaphrodites, but not by a her-1(lf) mutation which causes germ-line feminization only in XO males. These results suggest that mag-1 interacts with the fog, fem, and gld genes and acts independently of her-1. We propose that mag-1 normally allows oogenesis by inhibiting function of one or more of these masculinizing genes, which act during the fourth larval stage to promote transient sperm production in the hermaphrodite germ line. When the Mog phenotype is suppressed by a fog-2(lf) mutation, mag-1(RNAi) also causes lethality in the progeny embryos of RNA-injected, mated hermaphrodites, suggesting an essential role for mag-1 during embryogenesis. The defective embryos arrest during morphogenesis with an apparent elongation defect. The distribution pattern of a JAM-1::GFP reporter, which is localized to boundaries of hypodermal cells, shows that hypodermis is disorganized in these embryos. The temporal expression pattern of the mag-1 gene prior to and during morphogenesis appears to be consistent with an essential role of mag-1 in embryonic hypodermal organization and elongation.

  16. The Development of a New Practical Activity: Using Microorganisms to Model Gas Cycling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redfern, James; Burdass, Dariel; Verran, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    For many in the school science classroom, the term "microbiology" has become synonymous with "bacteriology". By overlooking other microbes, teachers may miss out on powerful practical tools. This article describes the development of an activity that uses algae and yeast to demonstrate gas cycling, and presents full instructions…

  17. GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) MITIGATION AND MONITORING TECHNOLOGY PERFORMANCE: ACTIVITIES OF THE GHG TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation and monitoring technology performance activities of the GHG Technology Verification Center. The Center is a public/private partnership between Southern Research Institute and the U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development. It...

  18. T & I--Gas Welding. Kit No. 68. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanford, Frank

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on gas welding are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the occupational cluster of trade and industry. (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture, home…

  19. 26 CFR 1.263A-13 - Oil and gas activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... is a well drilled solely to determine the location and delineation of offshore hydrocarbon deposits..., drilling ship, or an offshore drilling platform). (ii) Improvement unit. To the extent section 614 costs... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Oil and gas activities. 1.263A-13 Section...

  20. Atlantic update, July 1986--June 1990: Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities

    SciTech Connect

    Karpas, R.M.; Gould, G.J.

    1990-10-01

    This report describes outer continental shelf oil and gas activities in the Atlantic Region. This edition of the Atlantic Update includes an overview of the Mid-Atlantic Planning Area and a summary of the Manteo Prospect off-shore North Carolina. 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  1. What do galaxies look like beyond 31 mag/arcsec2?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebrián, María; Trujillo, Ignacio; Fliri, Juergen

    2017-03-01

    Detection of optical surface brightness structures with magnitudes fainter than 30 mag/arcsec2 has remained elusive in current photometric deep surveys. We are conducting a new imaging strategy to cross that frontier and address the study of outskirts of galaxies and theories of galaxy formation.

  2. Growth Impairment of Small-Cell Cancer by Targeting Pro-Vasopressin with MAG-1 Antibody.

    PubMed

    North, William G; Cole, Bernard; Akerman, Bonnie; Pang, Roy H L

    2014-01-01

    Previously we demonstrated that human small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) seems to universally express the vasopressin gene, and this leads to the presence of a cell surface marker representing the entire pro-hormone precursor. In this study, we show this marker can be targeted with MAG-1, a mouse monoclonal antibody against a C-terminal moiety on pro-vasopressin. In vitro targeting of cell lines derived from primary and recurrent disease demonstrates attachment of antibody to the cell surface followed by internalization. In vivo targeting with (99)Tc-labeled Fab fragments of MAG-1 shows selective attachment to xenografts. In vivo treatment of tumors from classical cell line, NCI H345, with either ~1.65 mCi (~1.65 mg)/kg body weight (BW) of (90)Yttrium-labeled MAG-1, or ~1.65 mg/kg BW native MAG-1, delivered every second day for 6 days produced similar reductions in the growth rate to ~50% (p < 0.03). When dosing with native MAG-1 was escalated to daily amounts of ~3.3 mg/kg BW over 16 days, tumor growth rates fell to ~33% of saline controls (p < 0.005). Examination of tumors treated with this higher dosing demonstrated the presence in several of extensive apoptosis. Normal tissues seemed to be unaffected. A larger dosage of MAG-1 (~6.6 mg/kg BW) given daily for 14 days was used to treat xenografts of the variant cell line NCI H82 representing recurrent disease. This treatment decreased the rate of increase in tumor size by half, and doubling time ~3-fold. Increases in cleaved PARP supported increased apoptosis with antibody treatment. We believe these data provide evidence that the growth rate of SCLC tumors can be extensively reduced by treatment with MAG-1 antibody, and that a humanized form of this antibody could, in future, be potentially used for targeting therapy onto recurrent SCLC in patients.

  3. Assessment and Design of Water Quality Monitoring Networks with respect to Shale Gas Activities in Pennsylvania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjmand, S.; Abad, J. D.; Brantley, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past few years, hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling techniques have been extensively used to extract shale gas from the Marcellus Shale. Likewise, several environmental violations that have been repeatedly reported in drilling sites have created greater awareness on potentially adverse environmental impacts of shale gas. Long-term monitoring in the Marcellus Shale is the key to maintain and improve the quality of water supplies in future. Currently, the absence of an efficient water quality monitoring network prevents the detection and source identification of contaminants associated with shale gas activities. Evaluation and re-design of monitoring networks from time to time is a major step towards efficient water resources planning and management. In this study, we assessed the performance of the current water quality monitoring network with respect to the shale gas development in Pennsylvania. For better evaluation, the Oil and Gas Compliance Report by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection between January 2005 and May 2013 was compiled. Using statistical and GIS methods each violation item was examined against the number and location of sensors in the current monitoring network. The results helped identify the adequacy of the number of sensors to detect the potential contamination. Moreover, to improve the performance and to lower the long-term monitoring costs, we re-designed the network using optimization methods. This optimal system maximizes the understanding of the aquifer condition and investigates the shale gas industry impacts on shallow aquifers, and it is applicable to other watersheds with shale oil and gas drilling activities.

  4. Tracking Dissolved Methane Concentrations near Active Seeps and Gas Hydrates: Sea of Japan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, G. T.; Aoki, S.; Matsumoto, R.; Tomaru, H.; Owari, S.; Nakajima, R.; Doolittle, D. F.; Brant, B.

    2015-12-01

    A number of regions in the Sea of Japan are known for active gas venting and for gas hydrate exposures on the sea floor. In this investigation we employed several gas sensors mounted on a ROV in order to determine the concentrations of dissolved methane in the water near these sites. Methane concentrations were determined during two-second intervals throughout each ROV deployment during the cruise. The methane sensor deployments were coupled with seawater sampling using Niskin bottles. Dissolved gas concentrations were later measured using gas chromatography in order to compare with the sensor results taken at the same time. The observed maximum dissolved methane concentrations were much lower than saturation values, even when the ROV manipulators were in contact with gas hydrate. Nonetheless, dissolved concentrations did reach several thousands of nmol/L near gas hydrate exposures and gas bubbles, more than two orders of magnitude over the instrumental detection limits. Most of the sensors tested were able to detect dissolved methane concentrations as low as 10 nmol/L which permitted detection when the ROV approached methane plume sites, even from several tens of meters above the sea floor. Despite the low detection limits, the methane sensors showed variable response times when returning to low-background seawater (~5nM). For some of the sensors, the response time necessary to return to background values occurred in a matter of minutes, while for others it took several hours. Response time, as well as detection limit, should be an important consideration when selecting methane sensors for ROV or AUV investigations. This research was made possible, in part, through funding provided by the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI).

  5. Alteration of natural (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface by gas transport and water infiltration.

    PubMed

    Guillon, Sophie; Sun, Yunwei; Purtschert, Roland; Raghoo, Lauren; Pili, Eric; Carrigan, Charles R

    2016-05-01

    High (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas is proposed as a key evidence for the detection of underground nuclear explosion by the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. However, such a detection is challenged by the natural background of (37)Ar in the subsurface, mainly due to Ca activation by cosmic rays. A better understanding and improved capability to predict (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface and its spatial and temporal variability is thus required. A numerical model integrating (37)Ar production and transport in the subsurface is developed, including variable soil water content and water infiltration at the surface. A parameterized equation for (37)Ar production in the first 15 m below the surface is studied, taking into account the major production reactions and the moderation effect of soil water content. Using sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification, a realistic and comprehensive probability distribution of natural (37)Ar activity concentrations in soil gas is proposed, including the effects of water infiltration. Site location and soil composition are identified as the parameters allowing for a most effective reduction of the possible range of (37)Ar activity concentrations. The influence of soil water content on (37)Ar production is shown to be negligible to first order, while (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas and its temporal variability appear to be strongly influenced by transient water infiltration events. These results will be used as a basis for practical CTBTO concepts of operation during an OSI.

  6. A new contrast media for functional MR urography: Gd-MAG3.

    PubMed

    Algin, Oktay

    2011-07-01

    Tc-99m-MAG3 (tubular agent) provides high imaging quality and extraction efficiency; and has become one of the most widely used agent for scintigraphic examinations of urinary system pathologies and renal transplants. Recently, it was reported that functional magnetic resonance urography (FMRU) can be sufficient in detection of urinary tract obstruction, renal artery stenosis, calculation of kidney functions and evaluation of renal transplants. However the pharmacokinetics of magnetic resonance (MR) contrast-media used in FMRU and Tc-99m-MAG3 differs from each other. This may cause discordant results between the FMRU and most of the scintigraphic studies. To our knowledge, there is no contrast-media which is specific for FMRU. A kidney specific contrast material can be developed for FMRU studies as well. MAG3 is a good candidate for this chelation. In conclusion, MR imaging (MRI) will be the most useful and important technique for morphologic-functional evaluation of urinary system. FMRU examinations performed with MAG3 chelated gadolinium can be sufficient for the complete evaluation of urinary tract even in patients with impaired renal functions ("all in one MRI"). MRI has some important advantages including no risk for radiation exposure, high temporal and spatial resolution, no need for nephrotoxic contrast agent; besides being a fast and feasible technique. Gadolinium-containing contrast agents may cause a life-threatening adverse reaction known as nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with severe renal impairment, but Gd-MAG3 may reduce the risk of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis due to its higher extraction capacity and other features.

  7. MAG-EPA and 17,18-EpETE target cytoplasmic signalling pathways to reduce short-term airway hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Khaddaj-Mallat, Rayan; Rousseau, Éric

    2015-07-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the role of eicosapentaenoic acid monoacylglyceride (MAG-EPA) and 17,18-epoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (17,18-EpETE) on the regulation of contractile reactivity and nuclear protein expression in 72-h-cultured and TNF-α-treated guinea pig tracheal rings. Tension measurements performed on native tissues demonstrated that the cytochrome P-450 epoxygenase (CYP450)-dependent EPA metabolite, 17,18-EpETE, displayed a higher potency than MAG-EPA in inhibiting U-46619-induced tone. Calphostin C (a PKC inhibitor), whether in association or not with MAG-EPA or 17,18-EpETE, had no further effect, while 17,18-EpETE and Y-27632 (a Rho kinase inhibitor) yielded additive effects. Of note, MAG-EPA and 17,18-EpETE pre-treatments normalized the contractile responses to broncho-constrictive agents in 72-h-cultured trachea. The enhanced expression of TNF-α, P-p65-nuclear factor kappaB (NF)-κB, c-fos and c-Jun in 72-h-cultured tissues likely contributed to the hyperresponsiveness. β-Escin-permeabilized preparations demonstrated that 17,18-EpETE abolished Ca(2+) hypersensitivity, suggesting a blunting of PKC and/or Rho kinase activation. Lastly, activation of NF-κB and activating protein-1 (AP-1) signalling by exogenous TNF-α markedly increased the contractile response to MCh, through an increase in 17-kDa PKC-potentiated inhibitory protein of PP1 (CPI-17) phosphorylation and IκBα degradation. Dual incubation of 17,18-EpETE with calphostin C or Y-27632 induced cumulative inhibitory effects on MCh responses in TNF-α-incubated tracheal rings. 17,18-EpETE also reduced the detection level of P-p65-NF-κB and AP-1 subunits. The present data provide evidence that MAG-EPA, through its bioactive metabolite, represents a prospective pharmacological target in respiratory diseases.

  8. Synthesis and biological evaluation of technetium-labeled D-glucose-MAG3 derivative as agent for tumor diagnosis.

    PubMed

    de Barros, André Luís Branco; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento; Mota, Luciene das Graças; Leite, Elaine Amaral; Oliveira, Mônica Cristina de; Alves, Ricardo José

    2009-05-01

    A d-glucose-MAG(3) derivative was successfully synthesized and radiolabeled in high labeling yield. Biodistribution studies in Ehrlich tumor-bearing mice were performed. This compound showed high accumulation in tumor tissue with high tumor-to-muscle ratio and moderate tumor-to-blood ratio. Thus, d-glucose-MAG(3) is a potential agent for tumor diagnosis.

  9. 76 FR 46330 - NUREG-1934, Nuclear Power Plant Fire Modeling Application Guide (NPP FIRE MAG); Second Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ... COMMISSION NUREG-1934, Nuclear Power Plant Fire Modeling Application Guide (NPP FIRE MAG); Second Draft... for public comment a document entitled, NUREG-1934 (EPRI 1023259), ``Nuclear Power Plant Fire Modeling Application Guide (NPP FIRE MAG), Second Draft Report for Comment.'' DATES: Please submit comments by...

  10. Influence of solid supports on acyl migration in 2-Monoacylglycerols: Purification of 2-MAG via flash chromatography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean oil 2-MAG was synthesized via the Novozym 435 catalyzed ethanolysis of TAG and purified by conventional liquid-liquid extraction. The 2-MAG was subjected to incubation at 20 and 40 °C in the presence of five solid commercial support materials, Lewatit, Silica Gel 60, Alumina-Neutral Brockman...

  11. Resonance Energy Transfer Relates the Gas-Phase Structure and Pharmacological Activity of Opioid Peptides.

    PubMed

    Kopysov, Vladimir; Boyarkin, Oleg V

    2016-01-11

    Enkephalins are efficient pain-relief drugs that bind to transmembrane opioid receptors. One key structural parameter that governs the pharmacological activity of these opioid peptides and is typically determined from condensed-phase structures is the distance between the aromatic rings of their Tyr and Phe residues. We use resonance energy transfer, detected by a combination of cold ion spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, to estimate the Tyr-Phe spacing for enkephalins in the gas phase. In contrast to the condensed-phase structures, these distances appear to differ substantially in enkephalins with different pharmacological efficiencies, suggesting that gas-phase structures might be a better pharmacophoric metric for ligand peptides.

  12. Increased radon-222 in soil gas because of cumulative seismicity at active faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Katsuaki; Yoshinaga, Tohru; Ueyama, Takayoshi; Asaue, Hisafumi

    2014-12-01

    This study demonstrates how the radon-222 (222Rn) concentration of soil gas at an active fault is sensitive to cumulative recent seismicity by examining seven active faults in western Japan. The 222Rn concentration was found to correlate well with the total earthquake energy within a 100-km radius of each fault. This phenomenon can probably be ascribed to the increase of pore pressure around the source depth of 222Rn in shallow soil caused by frequently induced strain. This increase in pore pressure can enhance the ascent velocity of 222Rn carrier gas as governed by Darcy's law. Anomalous 222Rn concentrations are likely to originate from high gas velocities, rather than increased accumulations of parent nuclides. The high velocities also can yield unusual young gas under the radioactive nonequilibrium condition of short elapsed time since 222Rn generation. The results suggest that ongoing seismicity in the vicinity of an active fault can cause accumulation of strain in shallow fault soils. Therefore, the 222Rn concentration is a possible gauge for the degree of strain accumulation.

  13. Improved Gas Response at Room Temperature of Activated Nanocrystalline WO3 Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, L. F.; Saukko, S.; Hoel, A.; Lantto, V.; Granqvist, C. G.; Lappalainen, J.

    2004-01-01

    Advanced reactive gas deposition was used to produce pure and Auactivated nanocrystalline WO3 films for gas-sensing studies. Many different methods such as X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy were used to characterize structural properties of the films. The WO3 particles in the films had the high-temperature tetragonal crystal structure after deposition, and the average crystallite size was about 10nm. The effect of sintering on structural, electrical, and gassensing properties of both pure and Au-activated WO3 films was also studied. Gas response experiments with films on alumina substrate were done at different operation temperatures, from room temperature up to about 450°C, at exposure to different concentrations of H2S and H2 in dry synthetic air.

  14. Diatomaceous earth and activated bauxite used as granular sorbents for the removal of sodium chloride vapor from hot flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Swift, W.M.; Johnson, I.

    1980-01-01

    Diatomaceous earth and activated bauxite were tested as granular sorbents for use as filter media in granular-bed filters for the removal of gaseous alkali metal compounds from the hot (800/sup 0/C) flue gas of PFBC. Tests were performed at atmospheric pressure, using NaCl vapor transported in relatively dry simulated flue gas of PFBC. Either a fixed-bed combustor or a high-temperature sorption test rig was used. The effects of sorbent bed temperature, superficial gas velocity, gas hourly space velocity, and NaCl-vapor concentration in flue gas on the sorption behavior of these two sorbents and their ultimate sorption capacities were determined. Both diatomaceous earth and activated bauxite were found to be very effective in removing NaCl vapor from flue gas. Preliminary cost evaluations showed that they are economically attractive as granular sorbents for cleaning alkali vapor from simulated flue gas.

  15. 78 FR 21347 - Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Effects of Oil and Gas Activities in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... Statement for Effects of Oil and Gas Activities in the Arctic Ocean AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries... of Oil and Gas Activities in the Arctic Ocean.'' Based on a written request received by NMFS, the... available for review online at http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/pr/permits/eis/arctic.htm . You may submit...

  16. 77 FR 2513 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Effects of Oil and Gas Activities in the Arctic Ocean

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-18

    ... Effects of Oil and Gas Activities in the Arctic Ocean AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... the Effects of Oil and Gas Activities in the Arctic Ocean.'' Based on several written requests.../pr/permits/eis/arctic.htm . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Candace Nachman, Jolie Harrison,...

  17. 76 FR 11811 - Environmental Document Prepared in Support of Oil and Gas Activities on the Alaska Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... of Oil and Gas Activities on the Alaska Outer Continental Shelf AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy... activities proposed on the Alaska Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  18. Optimization of microporous palm shell activated carbon production for flue gas desulphurization: experimental and statistical studies.

    PubMed

    Sumathi, S; Bhatia, S; Lee, K T; Mohamed, A R

    2009-02-01

    Optimizing the production of microporous activated carbon from waste palm shell was done by applying experimental design methodology. The product, palm shell activated carbon was tested for removal of SO2 gas from flue gas. The activated carbon production was mathematically described as a function of parameters such as flow rate, activation time and activation temperature of carbonization. These parameters were modeled using response surface methodology. The experiments were carried out as a central composite design consisting of 32 experiments. Quadratic models were developed for surface area, total pore volume, and microporosity in term of micropore fraction. The models were used to obtain the optimum process condition for the production of microporous palm shell activated carbon useful for SO2 removal. The optimized palm shell activated carbon with surface area of 973 m(2)/g, total pore volume of 0.78 cc/g and micropore fraction of 70.5% showed an excellent agreement with the amount predicted by the statistical analysis. Palm shell activated carbon with higher surface area and microporosity fraction showed good adsorption affinity for SO2 removal.

  19. Syringe test screening of microbial gas production activity: Cases denitrification and biogas formation.

    PubMed

    Østgaard, Kjetill; Kowarz, Viktoria; Shuai, Wang; Henry, Ingrid A; Sposob, Michal; Haugen, Hildegunn Hegna; Bakke, Rune

    2017-01-01

    Mass produced plastic syringes may be applied as vessels for cheap, simple and large scale batch culture testing. As illustrated for the cases of denitrification and of biogas formation, metabolic activity was monitored by direct reading of the piston movement due to the gas volume formed. Pressure buildup due to friction was shown to be moderate. A piston pull and slide back routine can be applied before recording gas volume to minimize experimental errors due to friction. Inoculum handling and activity may be conveniently standardized as illustrated by applying biofilm carriers. A robust set of positive as well as negative controls ("blanks") should be included to ensure quality of the actual testing. The denitrification test showed saturation response at increasing amounts of inoculum in the form of adapted moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) carriers, with well correlated nitrate consumption vs. gas volume formed. As shown, the denitrification test efficiently screened different inocula at standardized substrates. Also, different substrates were successfully screened and compared at standardized inocula. The biogas potential test showed efficient screening of different substrates with effects of relative amounts of carbohydrate, protein, fat. A second case with CO2 capture reclaimer waste as substrate demonstrated successful use of co-feeding to support waste treatment and how temperature effects on kinetics and stoichiometry can be observed. In total, syringe test screening of microbial gas production seems highly efficient at a low cost when properly applied.

  20. Feasibility of mercury removal from simulated flue gas by activated chars made from poultry manures.

    PubMed

    Klasson, K Thomas; Lima, Isabel M; Boihem, Larry L; Wartelle, Lynda H

    2010-12-01

    Increased emphasis on reduction of mercury emissions from coal fired electric power plants has resulted in environmental regulations that may in the future require application of activated carbons as mercury sorbents for mercury removal. At the same time, the quantity of poultry manure generated each year is large and technologies that take advantage of the material should be explored. The purpose of the work was to obtain preliminary data to investigate if activated chars made from different poultry manures could adsorb mercury from simulated flue gas. In laboratory experiments, activated chars made from chicken cake and litter removed mercury from the gas as well as a commercial alternative. It was also found that acid-washing these chars after activation may improve pore structure but does not influence the mercury removal efficiency. Activated chars were also made from turkey cake and litter. These raw materials produced activated chars with similar pore structure as those made from chicken manure, but they did not adsorb mercury as well. Acid-washing the turkey manure-based chars improved their performance, but this step would add to the cost of production. Preliminary evaluations suggest that unwashed activated chars may cost as little as $0.95/kg to produce.

  1. The line-emitting gas in active galaxies - A probe of the nuclear engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veilleux, Sylvain

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the basic questions regarding the structure of the engine powering active galactic nuclei (AGN), the nature of the interaction between the AGN and the host galaxy, and the origin and evolution of AGN. The study of the dynamics and physical characteristics of the line-emitting gas in these objects has proven fruitful in addressing many of these issues. Recent advances in optical and infrared detector technology combined with the development of superior ground-based instruments have produced efficient new tools for the study of the line-emitting gas on nuclear and Galactic scales. Programs which take advantage of two of these new techniques, Fabry-Perot imaging spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy, are described in this paper. The origin of nuclear activity in galaxies is also addressed in a third project which aims at determining the nature of luminous infrared galaxies.

  2. Water maser emission from X-ray-heated circumnuclear gas in active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Maloney, Philip R.; Conger, Sarah

    1994-01-01

    We have modeled the physical and chemical conditions present within dense circumnuclear gas that is irradiated by X-rays from an active galactic nucleus. Over a wide range of X-ray fluxes and gas pressures, the effects of X-ray heating give rise to a molecular layer at temperatures of 400-1000 K within which the water abundance is large. The physical conditions within this molecular layer naturally give rise to collisionally pumped maser emission in the 6(sub 16) - 5(sub 23) 22 GHz transition of ortho-water, with predicted maser luminosities of 10(exp 2 +/- 0.5) solar luminosity per sq. pc of illuminated area. Given plausible assumptions about the geometry of the source and about the degree to which the maser emission is anisotropic, such surface luminosities are sufficient to explain the large apparent luminosities observed in water maser sources that are associated with active galactic nuclei.

  3. Active bypass flow control for a seal in a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Ebert, Todd A.; Kimmel, Keith D.

    2017-03-14

    An active bypass flow control system for controlling bypass compressed air based upon leakage flow of compressed air flowing past an outer balance seal between a stator and rotor of a first stage of a gas turbine in a gas turbine engine is disclosed. The active bypass flow control system is an adjustable system in which one or more metering devices may be used to control the flow of bypass compressed air as the flow of compressed air past the outer balance seal changes over time as the outer balance seal between the rim cavity and the cooling cavity wears In at least one embodiment, the metering device may include an annular ring having at least one metering orifice extending therethrough, whereby alignment of the metering orifice with the outlet may be adjustable to change a cross-sectional area of an opening of aligned portions of the outlet and the metering orifice.

  4. Active bypass flow control for a seal in a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Ebert, Todd A.; Kimmel, Keith D.

    2017-01-10

    An active bypass flow control system for controlling bypass compressed air based upon leakage flow of compressed air flowing past an outer balance seal between a stator and rotor of a first stage of a gas turbine in a gas turbine engine is disclosed. The active bypass flow control system is an adjustable system in which one or more metering devices may be used to control the flow of bypass compressed air as the flow of compressed air past the outer balance seal changes over time as the outer balance seal between the rim cavity and the cooling cavity wears. In at least one embodiment, the metering device may include a valve formed from one or more pins movable between open and closed positions in which the one pin at least partially bisects the bypass channel to regulate flow.

  5. Biotin avidin amplified magnetic immunoassay for hepatitis B surface antigen detection using GoldMag nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, An; Geng, Tingting; Fu, Qiang; Chen, Chao; Cui, Yali

    2007-04-01

    Using GoldMag (Fe3O4/Au) nanoparticles as a carrier, a biotin-avidin amplified ELISA was developed to detect hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). A specific antibody was labeled with biotin and then used to detect the antigen with an antibody coated on GoldMag nanoparticles by a sandwich ELISA assay. The results showed that 5 mol of biotin were surface bound per mole of antibody. The biotin-avidin amplified ELISA assay has a higher sensitivity than that of the direct ELISA assay. There is 5-fold difference between HBsAg positive and negative serum even at dilution of 1:10000, and the relative standard deviation of the parallel positive serum at dilution of 1:4000 is 5.98% (n=11).

  6. Passive and active soil gas sampling at the Mixed Waste Landfill, Technical Area III, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    McVey, M.D.; Goering, T.J.; Peace, J.L.

    1996-02-01

    The Environmental Restoration Project at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico is tasked with assessing and remediating the Mixed Waste Landfill in Technical Area III. The Mixed Waste Landfill is a 2.6 acre, inactive radioactive and mixed waste disposal site. In 1993 and 1994, an extensive passive and active soil gas sampling program was undertaken to identify and quantify volatile organic compounds in the subsurface at the landfill. Passive soil gas surveys identified levels of PCE, TCE, 1,1, 1-TCA, toluene, 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane, dichloroethyne, and acetone above background. Verification by active soil gas sampling confirmed concentrations of PCE, TCE, 1,1,1-TCA, and 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane at depths of 10 and 30 feet below ground surface. In addition, dichlorodifluoroethane and trichlorofluoromethane were detected during active soil gas sampling. All of the volatile organic compounds detected during the active soil gas survey were present in the low ppb range.

  7. An analysis of flaring and venting activity in the Alberta upstream oil and gas industry.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew R; Coderre, Adam R

    2011-02-01

    Alberta, Canada, is an important global producer of petroleum resources. In association with this production, large amounts of gas (1.14 billion m3 in 2008) are flared or vented. Although the amount of flaring and venting has been measurably reduced since 2002, data from 2005 reveal sharp increases in venting, which have important implications in terms of resource conservation and greenhouse gas emissions (which exceeded 8 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent in 2008). With use of extensive monthly production data for 18,203 active batteries spanning the years 2002-2008 obtained in close cooperation with the Alberta Energy Resources Conservation Board, a detailed analysis has been completed to examine activity patterns of flaring and venting and reasons behind these trends in the Alberta upstream oil and gas industry. In any given year, approximately 6000 batteries reported flaring and/or venting, but the distribution of volumes flared and vented at individual sites was highly skewed, such that small numbers of sites handled large fractions of the total gas flaring and venting in the Province. Examination of month-to-month volume variability at individual sites, cast in terms of a nominal turndown ratio that would be required for a compressor to capture that gas and direct it into a pipeline, further revealed that volumes at a majority of sites were reasonably stable and there was no evidence that larger or more stable sites had been preferentially reduced, leaving potential barriers to future mitigation. Through linking of geospatial data with production data coupled with additional statistical analysis, the 31.2% increase in venting volumes since 2005 was revealed to be predominantly associated with increased production of heavier oils and bitumen in the Lloydminster region of the Province. Overall, the data suggest that quite significant reductions in flaring and venting could be realized by seeking mitigation solutions for only the largest batteries in

  8. In vitro controllability of the MagScrew total artificial heart system.

    PubMed

    Weber, Stephan; Doi, Kazuyoshi; Massiello, Alex L; Byerman, Bryan P; Takagaki, Masami; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Donahue, Arthur; Chapman, Peter; Hirschman, Gordon; Vitale, Nicolas; Smith, William A

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in vitro responses to preload and afterload of our total artificial heart (TAH), the MagScrew TAH. The TAH consists of two blood pumps and a control logic, developed at the Cleveland Clinic, OH, and the MagScrew actuator and its electronic control system, developed by Foster-Miller Technologies, Inc., Albany, NY. Tests were performed on a mock circulatory loop, using water as a test fluid. Preload sensitivity of the Mag-Screw TAH demonstrated a Frank-Starling response to preload in automatic mode. A peak flow of 10 L/min was obtained, with a left atrial pressure of 13 mm Hg. The relationship between right atrial pressure and left atrial pressure was well balanced when tested with a left bronchial shunt flow of 5% and a range of pulmonary artery and aortic pressures. With respect to afterload response, the left pump showed a relatively low sensitivity, which allowed the pump to maintain perfusion over a wide range of aortic pressures. The right pump, on the other hand, was much more sensitive to pulmonary artery pressure, which provided a measure of protection against pulmonary congestion. The very effective physiologic response of the MagScrew TAH is believed to result from employment of a left master, alternating ejection control logic, high inherent sensitivity of the blood pumps to atrial pressure, a lower effective stroke volume for the right pump, and a scaling of right side motor ejection voltage to 80% of that used for the left side ejection.

  9. Technetium-99m MAG3 renal scintigraphy with demonstration of aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ba D

    2005-08-01

    Demonstration of type B aortic dissection is rare during renal scintigraphy. The discordant radionuclide pattern of asymmetric renal flow with equivalent renal function and excretion has been previously reported in aortic dissection. However, delayed scintigraphic features of the false lumen have not been described. The author presents such a case with persistent technetium-99m MAG3 accumulation in the posterior mediastinum on postvoid planar imaging.

  10. Biophysical features of MagA expression in mammalian cells: implications for MRI contrast

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Anindita; Quiaoit, Karina; Thompson, R. Terry; Prato, Frank S.; Gelman, Neil; Goldhawk, Donna E.

    2014-01-01

    We compared overexpression of the magnetotactic bacterial gene MagA with the modified mammalian ferritin genes HF + LF, in which both heavy and light subunits lack iron response elements. Whereas both expression systems have been proposed for use in non-invasive, magnetic resonance (MR) reporter gene expression, limited information is available regarding their relative potential for providing gene-based contrast. Measurements of MR relaxation rates in these expression systems are important for optimizing cell detection and specificity, for developing quantification methods, and for refinement of gene-based iron contrast using magnetosome associated genes. We measured the total transverse relaxation rate (R2*), its irreversible and reversible components (R2 and R2′, respectively) and the longitudinal relaxation rate (R1) in MDA-MB-435 tumor cells. Clonal lines overexpressing MagA and HF + LF were cultured in the presence and absence of iron supplementation, and mounted in a spherical phantom for relaxation mapping at 3 Tesla. In addition to MR measures, cellular changes in iron and zinc were evaluated by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, in ATP by luciferase bioluminescence and in transferrin receptor by Western blot. Only transverse relaxation rates were significantly higher in iron-supplemented, MagA- and HF + LF-expressing cells compared to non-supplemented cells and the parental control. R2* provided the greatest absolute difference and R2′ showed the greatest relative difference, consistent with the notion that R2′ may be a more specific indicator of iron-based contrast than R2, as observed in brain tissue. Iron supplementation of MagA- and HF + LF-expressing cells increased the iron/zinc ratio approximately 20-fold, while transferrin receptor expression decreased approximately 10-fold. Level of ATP was similar across all cell types and culture conditions. These results highlight the potential of magnetotactic bacterial gene expression for

  11. Biophysical features of MagA expression in mammalian cells: implications for MRI contrast.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Anindita; Quiaoit, Karina; Thompson, R Terry; Prato, Frank S; Gelman, Neil; Goldhawk, Donna E

    2014-01-01

    We compared overexpression of the magnetotactic bacterial gene MagA with the modified mammalian ferritin genes HF + LF, in which both heavy and light subunits lack iron response elements. Whereas both expression systems have been proposed for use in non-invasive, magnetic resonance (MR) reporter gene expression, limited information is available regarding their relative potential for providing gene-based contrast. Measurements of MR relaxation rates in these expression systems are important for optimizing cell detection and specificity, for developing quantification methods, and for refinement of gene-based iron contrast using magnetosome associated genes. We measured the total transverse relaxation rate (R2*), its irreversible and reversible components (R2 and R2', respectively) and the longitudinal relaxation rate (R1) in MDA-MB-435 tumor cells. Clonal lines overexpressing MagA and HF + LF were cultured in the presence and absence of iron supplementation, and mounted in a spherical phantom for relaxation mapping at 3 Tesla. In addition to MR measures, cellular changes in iron and zinc were evaluated by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, in ATP by luciferase bioluminescence and in transferrin receptor by Western blot. Only transverse relaxation rates were significantly higher in iron-supplemented, MagA- and HF + LF-expressing cells compared to non-supplemented cells and the parental control. R2* provided the greatest absolute difference and R2' showed the greatest relative difference, consistent with the notion that R2' may be a more specific indicator of iron-based contrast than R2, as observed in brain tissue. Iron supplementation of MagA- and HF + LF-expressing cells increased the iron/zinc ratio approximately 20-fold, while transferrin receptor expression decreased approximately 10-fold. Level of ATP was similar across all cell types and culture conditions. These results highlight the potential of magnetotactic bacterial gene expression for improving

  12. Apolipoprotein E genotyping using PCR-GoldMag lateral flow assay and its clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Ting; Hui, Wenli; Li, Xianying; Zhang, Chao; Zhu, Juanli; Li, Rui; Wan, Yinsheng; Cui, Yali

    2016-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction-gold magnetic nanoparticles lateral flow assay (PCR-GoldMag LFA) has been developed via integrating multiplex amplification refractory mutation system PCR (multi-ARMS-PCR) with GoldMag-based LFA for the visual detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). This assay was applied to genotype Apolipoprotein E (ApoE). ApoE genotyping is important due to the predictive value for the development of coronary artery disease and Alzheimer's disease. The method requires two steps: i) Simultaneous amplifications of the two polymorphic codons (ApoE 158 and 112), performed in separated reactions using multi-ARMS-PCR; and ii) detection of the wild-type and mutant PCR products via dual immunoreactions, which can be performed in ~5 min. Within two LFAs, anti-digoxin antibody-conjugated GoldMag probes bind digoxin-labeled wild-type PCR products, and anti-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) antibody-conjugated GoldMag probes bind FITC-labeled mutant PCR products. All PCR products are biotin labeled and are detected by streptavidin-coated regions on the LFA strip, resulting in a red color. The current approach is capable of detecting the SNPs of ApoE in ~1.5 h, with a broad detection range from 10–1,000 ng of genomic DNA. Thus, the present protocol may facilitate simple, fast and cost-effective screening for important SNPs, as demonstrated by the evaluation of the prevalence of ApoE variants in a Han Chinese cohort. PMID:27665864

  13. The Impact of Oil and Natural Gas Activity on Ozone Formation in the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornbrook, R. S.; Apel, E. C.; Hills, A. J.; Blake, D. R.; Blake, N. J.; Schroeder, J.; Fried, A.; Weibring, P.; Richter, D.; Walega, J.; Mauldin, L.; Cantrell, C. A.; Hall, S. R.; Ullmann, K.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Montzka, D.; Orlando, J. J.; Tyndall, G. S.; Campos, T. L.; Stell, M. H.; Heikes, B.; Treadaway, V.; O'Sullivan, D. W.; Huey, L. G.; Tanner, D.; Cohen, R. C.; Flocke, F. M.; Pfister, G.; Knote, C. J.; Emmons, L. K.

    2015-12-01

    The 2014 Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE) was a ground-based and airborne field study designed to characterize and understand air quality in the Colorado Front Range, where National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) ozone levels are frequently exceeded during summertime. A primary goal of the study was to determine the factors controlling surface ozone in the Front Range. As part of the project, measurements of many trace gases were observed on board the NSF/NCAR C-130 by a suite of instrumentation, including the NCAR Trace Organic Gas Analyzer (TOGA), which made measurements of a set of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are crucial for characterizing emissions and photochemical processing in the Front Range, as well as the air transported into the region. During recent years, oil and natural gas (O&NG) activity in the Front Range has been growing rapidly. Ratios of observed aromatic hydrocarbons, butanes and pentanes demonstrate distinct fingerprinting that can be used to distinguish both between different types of O&NG activities and between O&NG extraction regions in the FRAPPE study region and beyond. Using the observed hydrocarbon data along with other trace gas observations, we will compare contributions of O&NG emissions to OH reactivities in different regions in the Front Range, and present box model results demonstrating the impact of O&NG activities on ozone formation.

  14. Activation of cGAS-dependent antiviral responses by DNA intercalating agents

    PubMed Central

    Pépin, Geneviève; Nejad, Charlotte; Thomas, Belinda J.; Ferrand, Jonathan; McArthur, Kate; Bardin, Philip G.; Williams, Bryan R.G.; Gantier, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    Acridine dyes, including proflavine and acriflavine, were commonly used as antiseptics before the advent of penicillins in the mid-1940s. While their mode of action on pathogens was originally attributed to their DNA intercalating activity, work in the early 1970s suggested involvement of the host immune responses, characterized by induction of interferon (IFN)-like activities through an unknown mechanism. We demonstrate here that sub-toxic concentrations of a mixture of acriflavine and proflavine instigate a cyclic-GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS)-dependent type-I IFN antiviral response. This pertains to the capacity of these compounds to induce low level DNA damage and cytoplasmic DNA leakage, resulting in cGAS-dependent cGAMP-like activity. Critically, acriflavine:proflavine pre-treatment of human primary bronchial epithelial cells significantly reduced rhinovirus infection. Collectively, our findings constitute the first evidence that non-toxic DNA binding agents have the capacity to act as indirect agonists of cGAS, to exert potent antiviral effects in mammalian cells. PMID:27694309

  15. Adsorption of iodine from COIL waste gas on soaked coal-based activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Junbo; Hao, Shan; Gao, Liping

    2014-04-01

    The chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) has wide application prospects in military, industrial and medical treatment fields as a second generation gas chemical laser to follow the first HF/DF chemical laser. However, a COIL releases large amounts of gas, such as helium, oxygen, chlorine and iodine. Chlorides have a serious corrosive effect on the system, especially iodine vapor crystallization, which seriously endangers the normal use of vacuum systems, and radioactive methyl iodide, which is hazardous to operators and pollutes the environment. The use of soaked coal-based activated carbon as an adsorbent for removing methyl iodine is proposed, while it is proposed that coal-based activated carbon is an effective adsorbent for removing stable iodine. The research conducted in this work shows that iodine residues are less than 0.5 μg ml-1 after the adsorption treatment and the decontamination factor of the coal-based activated carbon for removing stable iodine is more than 1000. Using this method can achieve the purpose of removing harmful iodine, satisfy the requirements for engineering applications, and also be applied to other nuclear power plant flue gas treatments.

  16. TetraMag: a compact magnetizing device based on eight rotating permanent magnets.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, M; Mertins, H-Ch; Tesch, M; Berges, O; Feilbach, Herbert; Schneider, C M

    2012-02-01

    In this paper we describe a novel magnetizing device based on eight rotatable permanent magnets arranged in a quadrupolar configuration, which is termed the TetraMag. TetraMag creates stable and homogeneous magnetic fields at the sample position with a resolution of 0.02 mT tunable between -570 mT and +570 mT. The field direction is continuously rotatable between 0° and 360° within the sample plane, while the field strength is maintained. A simplified mathematical description of TetraMag is developed leading to magnetic field calculations which are in good agreement with the experimental results. This versatile device avoids electrical energy dissipation, cooling mechanisms, and hysteresis effects known from classical electromagnets. It is ultrahigh vacuum compatible and it offers a completely free optical path over 180° for magneto-optical experiments. It is suitable for scattering experiments with synchrotron radiation and neutrons and may be employed in a large class of magnetization experiments.

  17. A Novel MagPipe Pipeline transportation system using linear motor drives

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, J.R.; Montgomery, D.B.; Roderick, L.

    2009-11-15

    A novel capsule pipeline transportation system using linear motor drives, called Magplane MagPipe, is under development with the intention to replace trucks and railways for hauling materials from the mine to the rail head, power plant, or processing plant with reduced operating cost and energy consumption. The initial demonstration of a MagPipe line in Inner Mongolia will be a 500-m-long double-pipe coal transport system with the design transportation capacity of 3 Mega-Mg per year. The pipeline consists of 6-m-long plastic pipe modules with an I-beam suspension system inside the pipe to carry sets of five coupled capsules. The pipe will also contain noncontinuous motor winding modules spaced at 50-m intervals. A set of Halbach-arrayed permanent magnets on the bottom of the capsules interact with the linear motor windings to provide propulsion. The motor is driven by variable frequency drives outside the pipe to control the speed. This paper briefly describes the overall MagPipe pipeline transportation system, including the preliminary conclusions of the linear synchronous motor analysis.

  18. Reduction of dioxin emission by a multi-layer reactor with bead-shaped activated carbon in simulated gas stream and real flue gas of a sinter plant.

    PubMed

    Hung, Pao Chen; Lo, Wei Chiao; Chi, Kai Hsien; Chang, Shu Hao; Chang, Moo Been

    2011-01-01

    A laboratory-scale multi-layer system was developed for the adsorption of PCDD/Fs from gas streams at various operating conditions, including gas flow rate, operating temperature and water vapor content. Excellent PCDD/F removal efficiency (>99.99%) was achieved with the multi-layer design with bead-shaped activated carbons (BACs). The PCDD/F removal efficiency achieved with the first layer adsorption bed decreased as the gas flow rate was increased due to the decrease of the gas retention time. The PCDD/F concentrations measured at the outlet of the third layer adsorption bed were all lower than 0.1 ng I-TEQ Nm⁻³. The PCDD/Fs desorbed from BAC were mainly lowly chlorinated congeners and the PCDD/F outlet concentrations increased as the operating temperature was increased. In addition, the results of pilot-scale experiment (real flue gases of an iron ore sintering plant) indicated that as the gas flow rate was controlled at 15 slpm, the removal efficiencies of PCDD/F congeners achieved with the multi-layer reactor with BAC were better than that in higher gas flow rate condition (20 slpm). Overall, the lab-scale and pilot-scale experiments indicated that PCDD/F removal achieved by multi-layer reactor with BAC strongly depended on the flow rate of the gas stream to be treated.

  19. Measurements of volcanic gas emissions during the first phase of 2010 eruptive activity of Eyjafallajokull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, M. R.; Salerno, G. G.; La Spina, A.; Stefansson, A.; Kaasalainen, H. S.

    2010-12-01

    The March-April 2010 alkali-basalt eruption of Eyjafallajokull immediately preceded the vigorous, ash-rich April-May 2010 trachyandesitic eruption. We performed open-path FTIR, mini-DOAS and UV camera measurements on the erupted gases emitted from the first phase of the eruption at Fimmvörduháls on 1st and 2nd April, followed by downwind SO2 flux measurements on the following days. The SO2 gas flux produced by the eruption was ~3000 tonnes per day. Approximately 70% of the SO2 flux was produced by the fissure which opened on 31st March, with ~30% emitted from the 21st March fissure. The flux of HF from the eruption was ~30 tonnes per day. Gas compositions emitted from the two eruption fissures were broadly similar, being very rich in H2O (>80% by mole), <15 % CO2 and <3% SO2. Strong variations between 5 and 25 in the SO2/HCl ratio were observed at the 31st March fissure on the two measurement days, with higher values observed on 1st April when the activity was apparently more intense than 2nd April. In this work we interpret the gas emission data in terms of the eruption dynamics and CO2 contribution to the atmosphere. We also examine the implications of the observed gas fluxes for the erupted magma volume.

  20. Removal of VOCs from humidified gas streams using activated carbon cloth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cal, M.P.; Rood, M.J.; Larson, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    This research investigates the effects of relative humidity (RH) on the adsorption of soluble (acetone) and insoluble (benzene) volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with activated carbon cloths (ACC). A gravimetric balance was used in conjunction with a gas chromatograph/mass spectrophotometer to determine the individual amounts of water and VOC adsorbed on an ACC sample. RH values from 0 to 90% and organic concentrations from 350 to 1000 ppmv were examined. The presence of water vapor in the gas-stream along with acetone (350 and 500 ppmv) had little effect on the adsorption capacity of acetone even at 90% RH. Water vapor in the gas stream had little effect on the adsorption capacity of benzene (500 ppmv) until about 65% RH, when a rapid decrease resulted in the adsorption capacity of benzene with increasing RH. This RH was also about where capillary condensation of water vapor occurs within ACC pores. Water vapor condenses within the ACC pores, making them unavailable for benzene adsorption. Increasing benzene concentration can have a significant effect on the amount of water vapor adsorbed. At 86% RH and 500 ppmv, 284 mg/g water was adsorbed, while at 86% RH and 1000 ppmv, only 165 mg/g water was adsorbed. Water vapor was more inhibitory for benzene adsorption as benzene concentration in the gas stream decreased. Copyright ?? 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  1. Active seafloor gas vents on the Shelf and upper Slope in Canadian Beaufort Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paull, C. K.; Dallimore, S. R.; Hughes Clarke, J. E.; Blasco, S.; Taylor, A. E.; Melling, H.; Vagle, S.; Conway, K.; Riedel, M.; Lundsten, E.; Gwiazda, R.

    2012-12-01

    seafloor topographic features on the continental slope suggests these are also active vent sites. Vigorous degassing of methane and pore water freshening in cores from features suggest the presence of near seafloor gas hydrate accumulations. If correct, a feature at 290m depth hosts the shallowest known marine gas hydrate occurrence. Here a layer of very cold ocean waters (-1.7°C) extends to ~200m depths, below which the temperature increases slowly with depth. A consequence of the exceptionally low upper water column temperatures is that the top of the methane hydrate stability zone is only slightly shallower that the 290m seafloor feature. Thus, gas hydrate harbored within seafloor sediments at 290m is vulnerable to decomposition with even subtle climatically-induced warming of the overlying water. Further geoscience studies are planned for 2012 and 2013 to study geological processes, geohazards and the sensitivity of the shelf / slope setting to climate change in the Arctic.

  2. A Possible Mechanism for the Formation of Magnetic Field Dropouts Observed by RPC-MAG in the Inner Coma of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhenguang; Toth, Gabor; Gombosi, T. I.; Bieler, Andre; Combi, Michael R.; Hansen, Kenneth C.; Jia, Xianzhe; Fougere, Nicolas; Shou, Yinsi; Cravens, Thomas; Tenishev, Valeriy; Rubin, Martin; altwegg, kathrin

    2016-10-01

    The Rosetta Plasma Consortium MAGnetometer (RPC-MAG) has detected signatures of a diamagnetic cavity associated with the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko at a distance of 170 km, which is two to three times larger than what has been predicted by numerical simulations of the cometary plasma environment. It remains unclear how this extended diamagnetic cavity forms. In the present work, we investigate this problem with our newly developed multi-fluid plasma-neutral interaction model (Huang et al., 2016). The multi-fluid model solves the governing multifluid MHD equations (for the cometary ions, the solar wind protons and the electrons) and the Euler equations for the neutral gas fluid. We find that a strong increase of electron pressure along a magnetic flux tube is capable of generating similar features of the diamagnetic cavity as those observed by the RPC-MAG. Direct comparison of our model results with the RPC observations shows reasonable agreement in terms of key characteristics of the cavity crossings, such as the duration and the magnetic field variations, suggesting that the mechanism proposed here based on localized enhancement of electron pressure may provide a possible explanation for the unusually large distance of the observed cavity.This work was supported by contracts JPL#1266313 and JPL#1266314 from the US Rosetta Project and NASA grant NNX14AG84G from the Planetary Atmospheres Program.

  3. Oil and Gas 101: An Overview of Oil and Gas Upstream Activities and Using EPA's Nonpoint Oil and Gas Emission Estimation Tool for the 2014 NEI (2015 EIC)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    provide a general overview of the upstream oil and gas exploration and production processes and emissions covered by the tool; a discussion of EPA’s plans for the 2014 NEI pertaining to oil and gas; use of the tool to compile emissions estimates

  4. Simulation and Fabrication of SAW-Based Gas Sensor with Modified Surface State of Active Layer and Electrode Orientation for Enhanced H2 Gas Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Md. Nazibul; Maity, Santanu; Sarkar, Argha; Bhunia, Chandan Tilak; Acharjee, Debabrata; Joseph, Aneesh M.

    2017-02-01

    The design, analysis, optimization, and fabrication of layered and nanostructure-based surface acoustic wave (SAW) gas sensors are presented. A lithium niobate and zinc oxide (ZnO) nano multilayer structure is proposed to enhance the sensitivity of the SAW-based gas sensor. Different materials are considered for the intermediate layer in the design for optimization purposes. The sensitivity of the sensor could be improved due to increased active surface area obtained by varying the aspect ratio of the nanorods, the thickness of the intermediate layer, and the gap between the electrodes. The total displacement and frequency shift of the device were significantly improved. Overall, the mechanically engineered surface-based (nanorod) SAW gas sensor offered better sensing response than the layered SAW gas sensor in terms of sensitivity performance.

  5. Unabated Adenovirus Replication following Activation of the cGAS/STING-Dependent Antiviral Response in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Eric

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cGAS/STING DNA sensing complex has recently been established as a predominant pathogen recognition receptor (PRR) for DNA-directed type I interferon (IFN) innate immune activation. Using replication-defective adenovirus vectors and replication-competent wild-type adenovirus, we have modeled the influence of the cGAS/STING cascade in permissive human cell lines (A549, HeLa, ARPE19, and THP1). Wild-type adenovirus induced efficient early activation of the cGAS/STING cascade in a cell-specific manner. In all responsive cell lines, cGAS/STING short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown resulted in a loss of TBK1 and interferon response factor 3 (IRF3) activation, a lack of beta interferon transcript induction, loss of interferon-dependent STAT1 activation, and diminished induction of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Adenoviruses that infect through the coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) (Ad2 and Ad5) and the CD46 (Ad35) and desmoglein-2 (Ad7) viral receptors all induce the cGAS/STING/TBK1/IRF3 cascade. The magnitude of the IRF3/IFN/ISG antiviral response was strongly influenced by serotype, with Ad35>Ad7>Ad2. For each serotype, no enhancement of viral DNA replication or virus production occurred in cGAS or STING shRNA-targeted cell line pools. We found no replication advantage in permissive cell lines that do not trigger the cGAS/STING cascade following infection. The cGAS/STING/TBK1/IRF3 cascade was not a direct target of viral antihost strategies, and we found no evidence that Ad stimulation of the cGAS/STING DNA response had an impact on viral replication efficiency. IMPORTANCE This study shows for the first time that the cGAS DNA sensor directs a dominant IRF3/IFN/ISG antiviral response to adenovirus in human cell lines. Activation of cGAS occurs with viruses that infect through different high-affinity receptors (CAR, CD46, and desmoglein-2), and the magnitude of the cGAS/STING DNA response cascade is influenced by serotype-specific functions

  6. Gas-phase activation of methane by ligated transition-metal cations

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Detlef; Schwarz, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Motivated by the search for ways of a more efficient usage of the large, unexploited resources of methane, recent progress in the gas-phase activation of methane by ligated transition-metal ions is discussed. Mass spectrometric experiments demonstrate that the ligands can crucially influence both reactivity and selectivity of transition-metal cations in bond-activation processes, and the most reactive species derive from combinations of transition metals with the electronegative elements fluorine, oxygen, and chlorine. Furthermore, the collected knowledge about intramolecular kinetic isotope effects associated with the activation of C–H(D) bonds of methane can be used to distinguish the nature of the bond activation as a mere hydrogen-abstraction, a metal-assisted mechanism or more complex reactions such as formation of insertion intermediates or σ-bond metathesis. PMID:18955709

  7. Relationship between fumarole gas composition and eruptive activity at Galeras Volcano, Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, T.P.; Williams, S.N.; Arehart, G.B.; Sturchio, N.C.

    1996-06-01

    Forecasting volcanic eruptions is critical to the mitigation of hazards for the millions of people living dangerously close to active volcanoes. Volcanic gases collected over five years from Galeras Volcano, Colombia, and analyzed for chemical and isotopic composition show the effects of long-term degassing of the magma body and a gradual decline in sulfur content of the gases. In contrast, short-term (weeks), sharp variations are the precursors to explosive eruptions. Selective absorption of magmatic SO{sub 2} and HCl due to interaction with low-temperature geothermal waters allows the gas emissions to become dominated by CO{sub 2}. Absorption appears to precede an eruption because magmatic volatiles are slowed or retained by a sealing carapace, reducing the total flux of volatiles and allowing the hydrothermal volatiles to dominate gas emissions. Temporal changes in gas compositions were correlated with eruptive activity and provide new evidence bearing on the mechanism of this type of `pneumatic` explosive eruptions. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Reversible Storage of Hydrogen and Natural Gas in Nanospace-Engineered Activated Carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanos, Jimmy; Beckner, Matt; Rash, Tyler; Yu, Ping; Suppes, Galen; Pfeifer, Peter

    2012-02-01

    An overview is given of the development of advanced nanoporous carbons as storage materials for natural gas (methane) and molecular hydrogen in on-board fuel tanks for next-generation clean automobiles. High specific surface areas, porosities, and sub-nm/supra-nm pore volumes are quantitatively selected by controlling the degree of carbon consumption and metallic potassium intercalation into the carbon lattice during the activation process. Tunable bimodal pore-size distributions of sub-nm and supra-nm pores are established by subcritical nitrogen adsorption. Optimal pore structures for gravimetric and volumetric gas storage, respectively, are presented. Methane and hydrogen adsorption isotherms up to 250 bar on monolithic and powdered activated carbons are reported and validated, using several gravimetric and volumetric instruments. Current best gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities are: 256 g CH4/kg carbon and 132 g CH4/liter carbon at 293 K and 35 bar; 26, 44, and 107 g H2/kg carbon at 303, 194, and 77 K respectively and 100 bar. Adsorbed film density, specific surface area, and binding energy are analyzed separately using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation, Langmuir model, and lattice gas models.

  9. Striatal dopamine release and biphasic pattern of locomotor and motor activity under gas narcosis.

    PubMed

    Balon, Norbert; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Blanc, François; Rostain, Jean-Claude; Weiss, Michel

    2003-05-02

    Inert gas narcosis is a neurological syndrome appearing when humans or animals are exposed to hyperbaric inert gases (nitrogen, argon) composed by motor and cognitive impairments. Inert gas narcosis induces a decrease of the dopamine release at the striatum level, structure involved in the regulation of the extrapyramidal motricity. We have investigated, in freely moving rats exposed to different narcotic conditions, the relationship between the locomotor and motor activity and the striatal dopamine release, using respectively a computerized device that enables a quantitative analysis of this behavioural disturbance and voltammetry. The use of 3 MPa of nitrogen, 2 MPa of argon and 0.1 MPa of nitrous oxide, revealed after a transient phase of hyperactivity, a lower level of the locomotor and motor activity, in relation with the decrease of the striatal dopamine release. It is concluded that the striatal dopamine decrease could be related to the decrease of the locomotor and motor hyperactivity, but that other(s) neurotransmitter(s) could be primarily involved in the behavioural motor disturbances induced by narcotics. This biphasic effect could be of major importance for future pharmacological investigations, and motor categorization, on the basic mechanisms of inert gas at pressure.

  10. Correlation between active layer thickness and ambient gas stability in IGZO thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xu; Lin, Meng-Fang; Mao, Bao-Hua; Shimizu, Maki; Mitoma, Nobuhiko; Kizu, Takio; Ou-Yang, Wei; Nabatame, Toshihide; Liu, Zhi; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Wang, Sui-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Decreasing the active layer thickness has been recently reported as an alternative way to achieve fully depleted oxide thin-film transistors for the realization of low-voltage operations. However, the correlation between the active layer thickness and device resistivity to environmental changes is still unclear, which is important for the optimized design of oxide thin-film transistors. In this work, the ambient gas stability of IGZO thin-film transistors is found to be strongly correlated to the IGZO thickness. The TFT with the thinnest IGZO layer shows the highest intrinsic electron mobility in a vacuum, which is greatly reduced after exposure to O2/air. The device with a thick IGZO layer shows similar electron mobility in O2/air, whereas the mobility variation measured in the vacuum is absent. The thickness dependent ambient gas stability is attributed to a high-mobility region in the IGZO surface vicinity with less sputtering-induced damage, which will become electron depleted in O2/air due to the electron transfer to adsorbed gas molecules. The O2 adsorption and deduced IGZO surface band bending is demonstrated by the ambient-pressure x-ray photoemission spectroscopy results.

  11. Wideband transfer function identification using magVF (Magnitude Vector Fitting) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswamy, Naveen

    Vector Fitting (VF), when employed with the Universal Line Model (ULM), can be used for approximating system equations of multi-conductor power transmission lines and cables, by helping to identify the propagation matrices and characteristic admittances. However, one of the challenges posed by this technique is the additional computational logic required to estimate the time-delays associated with the modal propagation transfer functions in the frequency domain, prior to arriving at a suitable estimation for poles and residues. This thesis examines Magnitude Vector Fitting (magVF) as an alternative to VF for the fitting of propagation modes. The ULM employs frequency domain decomposition of n-conductor transmission lines or cables into n-propagation modal propagation functions, each of which has an associated delay. This model proposes that the decoupled modal propagation functions are time-delayed minimum-phase systems in the frequency domain. The VF method is used to fit the individual modal equations in residues-poles form using two sequential linear least-squares problems, but an iterative approach must be employed in order to first establish a suitable time delay while minimizing error in the fitter. Alternatively, magVF is an algorithm based on VF that uses symmetric basis functions to perform least-squares fitting based on a given squared-magnitude response. Any effect from the delays on the phase is cancelled during the construction of the magnitude-squared response used as input for the fitter. Naturally, the effect of the delays disappears during the construction of the magnitude-squared response. Using magVF does not, therefore, require estimation of time-delays before getting a successful magnitude-squared fit. The time delay of a modal propagation function can then be directly identified by comparing the phase of the resulting fit with that of the desired response. Once all modal propagation functions have been fit within a suitable margin of error

  12. Airborne Measurements of Emissions from Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Activities in the Norwegian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Roiger, A.; Raut, J.; Rose, M.; Weinzierl, B.; Reiter, A.; Thomas, J. L.; Marelle, L.; Law, K.; Schlager, H.

    2013-12-01

    A rapid decline of Arctic sea ice is expected to promote hydrocarbon extraction in the Arctic, which in turn will increase emissions of atmospheric pollutants. To investigate impacts of different pollution sources on the Arctic atmosphere, an aircraft campaign based in northern Norway was conducted in July 2012, as a part of the EU ACCESS (Arctic Climate Change Economy and Society) project. One of the flights focused on measuring emissions from various oil/gas exploration and production facilities ~110 km south of the Arctic Circle in the Norwegian Sea. Fresh and aged (from 5 minutes to 2.5 hours old) exhaust plumes from oil/gas production platforms, drilling rigs and tankers were probed with extensive aerosol and trace gas instrumentations. It was found that different types of facilities emit plumes with distinct chemical compositions. For example, tanker plumes were characterized by high SO2 concentration and high fraction of non-volatile particles while plumes from oil/gas production platforms showed significant increase in the nucleation mode particle concentration. Drilling rigs were found to be high black carbon emitters. In addition to the fresh plumes, relatively aged plumes (1.5 - 2.5 hours old) from a facility under development were measured. Even in these aged plumes, total particle concentrations were more than 6 times higher than the background concentration. Therefore, emissions from oil and gas activities are expected to have a significant impact on local air quality and atmospheric composition. With the aid of FLEXPART-WRF (a Lagrangian dispersion model) simulations, the results of this study will be used to validate and improve current emission inventories. In the future, these improved emission inventories can be used in regional and global chemical transport models to more accurately predict future Arctic air pollution.

  13. 75 FR 18545 - MMS Information Collection Activity: 1010-0067, Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations, Extension...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ... Minerals Management Service MMS Information Collection Activity: 1010-0067, Oil and Gas Well- Completion... request (ICR) concerns the paperwork requirements in the regulations under 30 CFR 250, Subpart E, ``Oil..., subpart E, Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations. OMB Control Number: 1010-0067. Abstract: The...

  14. Gas chromatographic analysis of polyhydroxybutyrate in activated sludge: a round-robin test.

    PubMed

    Baetens, D; Aurola, A M; Foglia, A; Dionisi, D; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2002-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) and poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) in particular have become compounds which is routinely investigated in wastewater research. The PHB analysis method has only recently been applied to activated sludge samples where PHA contents might be relatively low. This urges the need to investigate the reproducibility of the gas chromatographic method for PHB analysis. This was evaluated in a round-robin test in 5 European laboratories with samples from lab-scale and full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems. It was shown that the standard deviation of measurements in each lab and the reproducibility between the labs was very good. Experimental results obtained by different laboratories using this analysis method can be compared. Sludge samples with PHB contents varying between 0.3 and 22.5 mg PHB/mg sludge were analysed. The gas chromatographic method allows for PHV, PH2MB and PH2MV analysis as well.

  15. An Electric Propulsion "Shepherd" for Active Debris Removal that Utilizes Ambient Gas as Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing consensus among the space debris technical community that limiting the long ]term growth of debris in Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) requires that space users limit the accumulation of mass in orbit. This is partially accomplished by mitigation measures for current and future LEO systems, but there is now interest in removing mass that has already accumulated in LEO from more than 50 years of space activity (termed "Active Debris Removal", or ADR). Many ADR proposals face complex technical issues of how to grapple with uncooperative targets. Some researchers have suggested the use of conventional ion thrusters to gently "blow" on objects to gradually change their orbits, without ever having to come into physical contact with the target. The chief drawback with these methods is the cost per object removed. Typically, a space "tug" or an ion-drive "shepherd" can only remove a few objects per mission due to limited propellant. Unless a costeffective way that removes tens of objects per mission can be found, it is not clear that any of the ideas so far proposed will be economically viable. In this paper, a modified version of the ion-drive "shepherd" is proposed that uses ambient atmospheric gases in LEO as propellant for the ion drives. This method has the potential to greatly extend the operational lifetime of an ADR mission, as the only mission limit is the lifetime of the components of the satellite itself, not on its fuel supply. An ambient-gas ion-drive "shepherd" would the local atmospheric drag on an object by ionizing and accelerating the ambient gas the target would have encountered anyway, thereby hastening its decay. Also, the "shepherd" satellite itself has a great deal of flexibility to maneuver back to high altitude and rendezvous with its next target using the ion drive not limited by fuel supply. However, the amount of available ambient gas is closely tied to the altitude of the spacecraft. It may be possible to use a "hybrid" approach that

  16. Seismic Source Mechanism of Gas-Piston Activity at Kilauea Inferred from Inversion of Broadband Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouet, B. A.; Dawson, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    Among the broad range of magmatic processes observed in the Overlook pit crater in Kilauea Caldera are recurring episodes of gas-piston activity. This activity is accompanied by repetitive seismic signals recorded by a broadband network deployed in the summit caldera. We use the seismic data to model the source mechanism of representative gas-piston events in a sequence that occurred on 20-25 August 2011 during a gentle inflation of the Kilauea summit. We apply a new waveform inversion method that accounts for the contributions from both translation and tilt in horizontal seismograms through the use of Green's functions representing the seismometer response to translation and tilt ground motions. This method enables a robust description of the source mechanism over the period range of 1 - 10,000 s. Most of the seismic wave field produced by gas-pistoning originates in a source region ~1 km below the eastern perimeter of Halema'uma'u pit crater. The observed waveforms are well explained by a simple volumetric source with geometry composed of two intersecting cracks featuring an east-striking crack (dike) dipping 80° to the north, intersecting a north-striking crack (inclined sheet) dipping 65° to the east. Each gas-piston event is characterized by a rapid inflation lasting a few minutes trailed by a slower deflation ramp extending up to 15 minutes, attributed to the efficient coupling at the source centroid location of the pressure and momentum changes accompanying the growth and collapse of a layer of foam at the top of the magma column. Assuming a simple lumped parameter representation of the shallow magmatic system, the observed pressure and volume variations can be modeled with the following attributes: foam thickness (10 - 50 m), foam cell diameter (0.04 - 0.10 m), and gas-injection velocity (0.01 - 0.06 m s-1). Based on the change in the period of very-long-period oscillations accompanying the onset of the gas-piston signal and tilt evidence, the height of

  17. An Electric Propulsion "Shepherd" for Active Debris Removal that Utilizes Ambient Gas as Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing consensus among the space debris technical community that limiting the long-term growth of debris in Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) requires that space users limit the accumulation of mass in orbit. This is partially accomplished by mitigation measures for current and future LEO systems, but there is now interest in removing mass that has already accumulated in LEO from more than 50 years of space activity (termed "Active Debris Removal", or ADR). Many ADR proposals face complex technical issues of how to grapple with uncooperative targets. Some researchers have suggested the use of conventional ion thrusters to gently "blow" on objects to gradually change their orbits, without ever having to come into physical contact with the target. The chief drawback with these methods is the cost per object removed. Typically, a space "tug" or an ion-drive "shepherd" can only remove a few objects per mission due to limited propellant. Unless a cost-effective way that removes tens of objects per mission can be found, it is not clear that any of the ideas so far proposed will be economically viable. In this paper, a modified version of the ion-drive "shepherd" is proposed that uses ambient atmospheric gases in LEO as propellant for the ion drives. This method has the potential to greatly extend the operational lifetime of an ADR mission, as the only mission limit is the lifetime of the components of the satellite itself, not on its fuel supply. An ambient-gas ion-drive "shepherd" would enhance the local atmospheric drag on an object by ionizing and accelerating the ambient gas the target would have encountered anyway, thereby hastening its decay. Also, the "shepherd" satellite itself has a great deal of flexibility to maneuver back to high altitude and rendezvous with its next target using the ion drive not limited by fuel supply. However, the amount of available ambient gas is closely tied to the altitude of the spacecraft. It may be possible to use a "hybrid

  18. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon from sugarcane bagasse by physical activation with CO2 gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachrun, Sutrisno; AyuRizka, Noni; Annisa, SolichaHidayat; Arif, Hidayat

    2016-01-01

    A series of experiments have been conducted to study the effects of different carbonization temperatures (400, 600, and 800oC) on characteristics of porosity in activated carbon derived from carbonized sugarcane bagassechar at activation temperature of 800oC. The results showed that the activated carbon derived from high carbonized temperature of sugarcane bagassechars had higher BET surface area, total volume, micropore volume and yield as compared to the activated carbon derived from low carbonized temperature. The BET surface area, total volume and micropore volume of activated carbon prepared from sugarcane bagassechars obtained at 800oC of carbonized temperature and activation time of 120 min were 661.46m2/g, 0.2455cm3/g and 0.1989cm3/g, respectively. The high carbonization temperature (800oC) generated a highly microporous carbonwith a Type-I nitrogen adsorption isotherm, while the low carbonization temperature (400 and 600oC) generated a mesoporous one with an intermediate between types I and IInitrogen adsorption isotherm.

  19. Poor Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid uptake, re-evaluation with Tc-99m MAG3 scintigraphy in Lowe syndrome.

    PubMed

    Koca, Gokhan; Atilgan, Hasan Ikbal; Demirel, Koray; Diri, Akif; Korkmaz, Meliha

    2011-10-01

    Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) is filtered through the glomeruli and reabsorbed by the proximal tubules as low molecular weight proteins. In Lowe syndrome this mechanism is impaired and so poor DMSA uptake is seen. Poor DMSA uptake was shown in very few studies, but none mentioned normal Tc-99m MAG3 uptake. In this case, the patient had poor DMSA uptake, normal MAG3 uptake and a neurogenic bladder in anterior to the left kidney that attenuates left kidney.

  20. Vesicoureteral Reflux Detected on Post-void Image of (99m)Tc MAG3 Renal Scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Nizar, Naureen; Ahmed, Akhtar

    2013-05-01

    (99m)Tc MAG3 scintigraphic scan is sensitive at depicting focal parenchymal abnormalities and can be used for the measurement of overall renal function. We experienced a 5-year-old boy presenting with bilateral flank fain, intermittent urinary stream and dysuria. On the post-void delayed image of (99m)Tc MAG3 scintigraphic scan vesicoureteral reflux was detected in left non-functioning kidney, which was missed on voiding cystourethrography.

  1. Violent Gas Venting on the Heng-Chun Mud Volcano, South China Sea Active Continental Margin offshore SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, S.; Cheng, W. Y.; Tseng, Y. T.; Chen, N. C.; Hsieh, I. C.; Yang, T. F.

    2014-12-01

    Accumulation of methane as gas hydrate under the sea floor has been considered a major trap for both thermal and biogenic gas in marine environment. Aided by rapid AOM process near the sea floor, fraction of methane escaping the sea floor has been considered at minuscule. However, most studies focused mainly on deepwater gas hydrate systems where gas hydrate remain relatively stable. We have studied methane seeps on the active margin offshore Taiwan, where rapid tectonic activities occur. Our intention is to evaluate the scale and condition of gas seeps in the tectonic active region. Towcam, coring, heat probe, chirp, multibeam bathymetric mapping and echo sounding were conducted at the study areas. Our results showed that gas is violently venting at the active margin, not only through sediments, but also through overlying sea water, directly into the atmosphere. Similar ventings, but, not in this scale, have also been identified previously in the nearby region. High concentrations of methane as well as traces of propane were found in sediments and in waters with flares. In conjunction, abundant chemosynthetic community, life mussel, clams, tube worms, bacterial mats together with high concentrations of dissolve sulfide, large authigenic carbonate buildups were also found. Our results indicate that methane could be another major green house gas in the shallow water active margin region.

  2. SENP7 Potentiates cGAS Activation by Relieving SUMO-Mediated Inhibition of Cytosolic DNA Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ye; Yu, Huansha; Zheng, Xin; Peng, Rui; Wang, Qiang; Zhou, Yi; Wang, Rui; Wang, Jiehua; Qu, Bo; Shen, Nan; Guo, Qiang; Liu, Xing; Wang, Chen

    2017-01-01

    Cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS, a.k.a. MB21D1), a cytosolic DNA sensor, catalyzes formation of the second messenger 2’3’-cGAMP that activates the stimulator of interferon genes (STING) signaling. How the cGAS activity is modulated remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that sentrin/SUMO-specific protease 7 (SENP7) interacted with and potentiated cGAS activation. The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) was conjugated onto the lysine residues 335, 372 and 382 of cGAS, which suppressed its DNA-binding, oligomerization and nucleotidyl-transferase activities. SENP7 reversed this inhibition via catalyzing the cGAS de-SUMOylation. Consistently, silencing of SENP7 markedly impaired the IRF3-responsive gene expression induced by cGAS-STING axis. SENP7-knockdown mice were more susceptible to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection. SENP7 was significantly up-regulated in patients with SLE. Our study highlights the temporal modulation of the cGAS activity via dynamic SUMOylation, uncovering a novel mechanism for fine-tuning the STING signaling in innate immunity. PMID:28095500

  3. Characterization of aroma-active compounds in three Chinese Moutai liquors by gas chromatography-olfactometry, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and sensory evaluation.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yunwei; Chen, Xiaomei; Xiao, Zuobing; Ma, Ning; Zhu, Jiancai

    2017-04-01

    The aroma-active compounds in three Chinese Moutai liquors, aged 1 year, 15 years and 30 years were investigated in this study. The aroma compounds were analysed by gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A total of 79 aroma compounds were identified. Aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA) was further employed to identify the aroma-active compounds. A total of 35 aroma-active compounds with flavour dilution (FD) values ≧ 64 simultaneously in three Chinese Moutai liquors were quantitated. Among them, ethyl acetate, ethyl lactate and acetic acid appeared with the highest concentrations. They were all >1000 mg/L. Then, the relationships between the aroma-active compounds and seven sensory attributes were studied.

  4. Activation of Methane by the Pyridine Radical Cation and its Substituted Forms in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guohua; Stewart, Hamish; Liu, Zeyu; Wang, Yongcheng; Stace, Anthony J.

    2015-08-01

    We present an experimental study of methane activation by pyridine cation and its substituents in the gas phase. Mass spectrometric experiments in an ion trap demonstrate that pyridine cation and some of its substituent cations are able to react with methane. The deuterated methane experiment has confirmed that the hydrogen atom in the ionic product of reaction does come from methane. The collected information about kinetic isotope effects has been used to distinguish the nature of the bond activation as a hydrogen abstraction. Furthermore, experimental results demonstrated that the substituent groups on the pyridine ring can crucially influence their reactivity in methane bond activation processes. Density functional calculation (DFT) was employed to study the electronic structures of the complex and reaction mechanism of CH4+C5H5N+. The calculations confirmed the hypothesis from the experimental observation, namely, the reaction is rapid with no energy barrier.

  5. Gangliosides are functional nerve cell ligands for myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), an inhibitor of nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Alka A; Patel, Himatkumar V; Fromholt, Susan E; Heffer-Lauc, Marija; Vyas, Kavita A; Dang, Jiyoung; Schachner, Melitta; Schnaar, Ronald L

    2002-06-11

    Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) binds to the nerve cell surface and inhibits nerve regeneration. The nerve cell surface ligand(s) for MAG are not established, although sialic acid-bearing glycans have been implicated. We identify the nerve cell surface gangliosides GD1a and GT1b as specific functional ligands for MAG-mediated inhibition of neurite outgrowth from primary rat cerebellar granule neurons. MAG-mediated neurite outgrowth inhibition is attenuated by (i) neuraminidase treatment of the neurons; (ii) blocking neuronal ganglioside biosynthesis; (iii) genetically modifying the terminal structures of nerve cell surface gangliosides; and (iv) adding highly specific IgG-class antiganglioside mAbs. Furthermore, neurite outgrowth inhibition is mimicked by highly multivalent clustering of GD1a or GT1b by using precomplexed antiganglioside Abs. These data implicate the nerve cell surface gangliosides GD1a and GT1b as functional MAG ligands and suggest that the first step in MAG inhibition is multivalent ganglioside clustering.

  6. An essential role of MAG in mediating axon-myelin attachment in Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A disease

    PubMed Central

    Kinter, Jochen; Lazzati, Thomas; Schmid, Daniela; Zeis, Thomas; Erne, Beat; Lützelschwab, Roland; Steck, Andreas J.; Pareyson, Davide; Peles, Elior; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is a hereditary demyelinating peripheral neuropathy caused by the duplication of the PMP22 gene. Demyelination precedes the occurrence of clinical symptoms that correlate with axonal degeneration. It was postulated that a disturbed axon-glia interface contribute to altered myelination consequently leading to axonal degeneration. In this study, we examined the expression of MAG and Necl4, two critical adhesion molecules that are present at the axon-glia interface, in sural nerve biopsies of CMT1A patients and in peripheral nerves of mice overexpressing human PMP22, an animal model for CMT1A. We show an increase in the expression of MAG and a strong decrease of Necl4 in biopsies of CMT1A patients as well as in CMT1A mice. Expression analysis revealed that MAG is strongly upregulated during peripheral nerve maturation, whereas Necl4 expression remains very low. Ablating MAG in CMT1A mice results in separation of axons from their myelin sheath. Our data show that MAG is important for axon-glia contact in a model for CMT1A, and suggest that its increased expression in CMT1A disease has a compensatory role in the pathology of the disease. Thus, we demonstrate that MAG together with other adhesion molecules such as Necl4 is important in sustaining axonal integrity. PMID:22940629

  7. Mag-seeding of rat bone marrow stromal cells into porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kazunori; Ito, Akira; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2007-09-01

    Bone tissue engineering has been investigated as an alternative strategy for autograft transplantation. In the process of tissue engineering, cell seeding into three-dimensional (3-D) scaffolds is the first step for constructing 3-D tissues. We have proposed a methodology of cell seeding into 3-D porous scaffolds using magnetic force and magnetite nanoparticles, which we term Mag-seeding. In this study, we applied this Mag-seeding technique to bone tissue engineering using bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and 3-D hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds. BMSCs were magnetically labeled with our original magnetite cationic liposomes (MCLs) having a positive surface charge to improve adsorption to cell surface. Magnetically labeled BMSCs were seeded onto a scaffold, and a 1-T magnet was placed under the scaffold. By using Mag-seeding, the cells were successfully seeded into the internal space of scaffolds with a high cell density. The cell seeding efficiency into HA scaffolds by Mag-seeding was approximately threefold larger than that by static-seeding (conventional method, without a magnet). After a 14-d cultivation period using the osteogenic induction medium by Mag-seeding, the level of two representative osteogenic markers (alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin) were significantly higher than those by static-seeding. These results indicated that Mag-seeding of BMSCs into HA scaffolds is an effective approach to bone tissue engineering.

  8. Dynamic 99mTc-MAG3 renography: images for quality control obtained by combining pharmacokinetic modelling, an anthropomorphic computer phantom and Monte Carlo simulated scintillation camera imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brolin, Gustav; Sjögreen Gleisner, Katarina; Ljungberg, Michael

    2013-05-01

    In dynamic renal scintigraphy, the main interest is the radiopharmaceutical redistribution as a function of time. Quality control (QC) of renal procedures often relies on phantom experiments to compare image-based results with the measurement setup. A phantom with a realistic anatomy and time-varying activity distribution is therefore desirable. This work describes a pharmacokinetic (PK) compartment model for 99mTc-MAG3, used for defining a dynamic whole-body activity distribution within a digital phantom (XCAT) for accurate Monte Carlo (MC)-based images for QC. Each phantom structure is assigned a time-activity curve provided by the PK model, employing parameter values consistent with MAG3 pharmacokinetics. This approach ensures that the total amount of tracer in the phantom is preserved between time points, and it allows for modifications of the pharmacokinetics in a controlled fashion. By adjusting parameter values in the PK model, different clinically realistic scenarios can be mimicked, regarding, e.g., the relative renal uptake and renal transit time. Using the MC code SIMIND, a complete set of renography images including effects of photon attenuation, scattering, limited spatial resolution and noise, are simulated. The obtained image data can be used to evaluate quantitative techniques and computer software in clinical renography.

  9. Dynamic (99m)Tc-MAG3 renography: images for quality control obtained by combining pharmacokinetic modelling, an anthropomorphic computer phantom and Monte Carlo simulated scintillation camera imaging.

    PubMed

    Brolin, Gustav; Gleisner, Katarina Sjögreen; Ljungberg, Michael

    2013-05-21

    In dynamic renal scintigraphy, the main interest is the radiopharmaceutical redistribution as a function of time. Quality control (QC) of renal procedures often relies on phantom experiments to compare image-based results with the measurement setup. A phantom with a realistic anatomy and time-varying activity distribution is therefore desirable. This work describes a pharmacokinetic (PK) compartment model for (99m)Tc-MAG3, used for defining a dynamic whole-body activity distribution within a digital phantom (XCAT) for accurate Monte Carlo (MC)-based images for QC. Each phantom structure is assigned a time-activity curve provided by the PK model, employing parameter values consistent with MAG3 pharmacokinetics. This approach ensures that the total amount of tracer in the phantom is preserved between time points, and it allows for modifications of the pharmacokinetics in a controlled fashion. By adjusting parameter values in the PK model, different clinically realistic scenarios can be mimicked, regarding, e.g., the relative renal uptake and renal transit time. Using the MC code SIMIND, a complete set of renography images including effects of photon attenuation, scattering, limited spatial resolution and noise, are simulated. The obtained image data can be used to evaluate quantitative techniques and computer software in clinical renography.

  10. Oil and gas technology transfer activities and potential in eight major producing states. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    In 1990, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (the Compact) performed a study that identified the structure and deficiencies of the system by which oil and gas producers receive information about the potential of new technologies and communicate their problems and technology needs back to the research community. The conclusions of that work were that major integrated companies have significantly more and better sources of technology information than independent producers. The majors also have significantly better mechanisms for communicating problems to the research and development (R&D) community. As a consequence, the Compact recommended analyzing potential mechanisms to improve technology transfer channels for independents and to accelerate independents acceptance and use of existing and emerging technologies. Building on this work, the Compact, with a grant from the US Department Energy, has reviewed specific technology transfer organizations in each of eight major oil producing states to identify specific R&D and technology transfer organizations, characterize their existing activities, and identify potential future activities that could be performed to enhance technology transfer to oil and gas producers. The profiles were developed based on information received from organizations,follow-up interviews, site visit and conversations, and participation in their sponsored technology transfer activities. The results of this effort are reported in this volume. In addition, the Compact has also developed a framework for the development of evaluation methodologies to determine the effectiveness of technology transfer programs in performing their intended functions and in achieving desired impacts impacts in the producing community. The results of that work are provided in a separate volume.

  11. Gas6/Axl pathway is activated in chronic liver disease and its targeting reduces fibrosis via hepatic stellate cell inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Bárcena, Cristina; Stefanovic, Milica; Tutusaus, Anna; Joannas, Leonel; Menéndez, Anghara; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Sancho-Bru, Pau; Marí, Montserrat; Caballeria, Joan; Rothlin, Carla V.; Fernández-Checa, José C.; de Frutos, Pablo García; Morales, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Liver fibrosis, an important health concern associated to chronic liver injury that provides a permissive environment for cancer development, is characterized by accumulation of extracellular matrix components mainly derived from activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Axl, a receptor tyrosine kinase, and its ligand Gas6 are involved in cell differentiation, immune response and carcinogenesis. Methods HSCs were obtained from wild type and Axl−/− mice, treated with recombinant Gas6 protein (rGas6), Axl siRNAs or the Axl inhibitor BGB324, and analyzed by western blot and real-time PCR. Experimental fibrosis was studied in CCl4-treated wild type and Axl−/− mice, and in combination with Axl inhibitor. Gas6 and Axl serum levels were measured in alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients. Results In primary mouse HSCs, Gas6 and Axl levels paralleled HSC activation. rGas6 phosphorylated Axl and AKT prior to HSC phenotypic changes, while Axl siRNA silencing reduced HSC activation. Moreover, BGB324 blocked Axl/AKT phosphorylation and diminished HSC activation. In addition, Axl KO mice displayed decreased HSC activation in vitro and liver fibrogenesis after chronic damage by CCl4 administration. Similarly, BGB324 reduced collagen deposition and CCl4-induced liver fibrosis in mice. Importantly, Gas6 and Axl serum levels increased in ALD and HCV patients, inversely correlating with liver functionality. Conclusions: The Gas6/Axl axis is required for full HSC activation. Gas6 and Axl serum levels increase in parallel to chronic liver disease progression. Axl targeting may be a therapeutic strategy for liver fibrosis management. PMID:25908269

  12. Optimization and Prediction of Ultimate Tensile Strength in Metal Active Gas Welding

    PubMed Central

    Ampaiboon, Anusit; Lasunon, On-Uma; Bubphachot, Bopit

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of welding parameters on ultimate tensile strength of structural steel, ST37-2, welded by Metal Active Gas welding. A fractional factorial design was used for determining the significance of six parameters: wire feed rate, welding voltage, welding speed, travel angle, tip-to-work distance, and shielded gas flow rate. A regression model to predict ultimate tensile strength was developed. Finally, we verified optimization of the process parameters experimentally. We achieved an optimum tensile strength (558 MPa) and wire feed rate, 19 m/min, had the greatest effect, followed by tip-to-work distance, 7 mm, welding speed, 200 mm/min, welding voltage, 30 V, and travel angle, 60°. Shield gas flow rate, 10 L/min, was slightly better but had little effect in the 10–20 L/min range. Tests showed that our regression model was able to predict the ultimate tensile strength within 4%. PMID:26491719

  13. The influence of variations in biophysical conditions on hemolysis near ultrasonically activated gas-filled micropores

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.L.; Thomas, R.M. )

    1990-05-01

    Hemolysis induced by 1.9-MHz ultrasound in 0.5% suspensions of canine erythrocytes with 3.7-{mu}m-diam micropore-trapped gas bodies was investigated for a variety of biophysical conditions. For isotonic media, hemolysis increased with exposure duration but did not greatly change with exposure temperature, or prior heat treatment. The temperature results were especially interesting because increased temperatures might have been expected to increase the sensitivity of the cells to the ultrasonically activated gas bodies. Variations in osmolarity had little influence on the results. Increasing the viscosity of the medium decreased the effect, and this did not seem to depend on the molecular weight of the dextran additive. A medium with elevated mass density seemed to increase the effectiveness of the exposures. This condition eliminated the density difference between the cells and the medium, and might have been expected to reduce the effectiveness of the exposures, because the radiation force, which theoretically gathers cells to the gas bodies, is minimized for such conditions. This information should aid in developing refinements to the theoretical understanding of low-intensity ultrasonic bioeffects.

  14. Innovative high pressure gas MEM's based neutron detector for ICF and active SNM detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Shawn Bryan; Derzon, Mark Steven; Renzi, Ronald F.; Chandler, Gordon Andrew

    2007-12-01

    An innovative helium3 high pressure gas detection system, made possible by utilizing Sandia's expertise in Micro-electrical Mechanical fluidic systems, is proposed which appears to have many beneficial performance characteristics with regards to making these neutron measurements in the high bremsstrahlung and electrical noise environments found in High Energy Density Physics experiments and especially on the very high noise environment generated on the fast pulsed power experiments performed here at Sandia. This same system may dramatically improve active WMD and contraband detection as well when employed with ultrafast (10-50 ns) pulsed neutron sources.

  15. Vagal nerve activity contributes to improve the efficiency of pulmonary gas exchange in hypoxic humans.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shoji; Sasano, Hiroshi; Sasano, Nobuko; Hayano, Junichiro; Fisher, Joseph A; Katsuya, Hirotada

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this study was to test our hypothesis that both phasic cardiac vagal activity and tonic pulmonary vagal activity, estimated as respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and anatomical dead space volume, respectively, contribute to improve the efficiency of pulmonary gas exchange in humans. We examined the effect of blocking vagal nerve activity with atropine on pulmonary gas exchange. Ten healthy volunteers inhaled hypoxic gas with constant tidal volume and respiratory frequency through a respiratory circuit with a respiratory analyser. Arterial partial pressure of O(2) (P(aO(2))) and arterial oxygen saturation (S(pO(2))) were measured, and alveolar-to-arterial P(O(2)) difference (D(A-aO(2))) was calculated. Anatomical dead space (V(D,an)), alveolar dead space (V(D,alv)) and the ratio of physiological dead space to tidal volume (V(D,phys)/V(T)) were measured. Electrocardiogram was recorded, and the amplitude of R-R interval variability in the high-frequency component (RRIHF) was utilized as an index of RSA magnitude. These parameters of pulmonary function were measured before and after administration of atropine (0.02 mg kg(-1)). Decreased RRIHF (P < 0.01) was accompanied by decreases in P(aO(2)) and S(pO(2)) (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively) and an increase in D(A-aO(2)) (P < 0.05). Anatomical dead space, V(D,alv) and V(D,phys)/V(T) increased (P < 0.01, P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively) after atropine administration. The blockade of the vagal nerve with atropine resulted in an increase in V(D,an) and V(D,alv) and a deterioration of pulmonary oxygenation, accompanied by attenuation of RSA. Our findings suggest that both phasic cardiac and tonic pulmonary vagal nerve activity contribute to improve the efficiency of pulmonary gas exchange in hypoxic conscious humans.

  16. MagRad: A code to optimize the operation of superconducting magnets in a radiation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Yeaw, Christopher T.

    1995-01-01

    A powerful computational tool, called MagRad, has been developed which optimizes magnet design for operation in radiation fields. Specifically, MagRad has been used for the analysis and design modification of the cable-in-conduit conductors of the TF magnet systems in fusion reactor designs. Since the TF magnets must operate in a radiation environment which damages the material components of the conductor and degrades their performance, the optimization of conductor design must account not only for start-up magnet performance, but also shut-down performance. The degradation in performance consists primarily of three effects: reduced stability margin of the conductor; a transition out of the well-cooled operating regime; and an increased maximum quench temperature attained in the conductor. Full analysis of the magnet performance over the lifetime of the reactor includes: radiation damage to the conductor, stability, protection, steady state heat removal, shielding effectiveness, optimal annealing schedules, and finally costing of the magnet and reactor. Free variables include primary and secondary conductor geometric and compositional parameters, as well as fusion reactor parameters. A means of dealing with the radiation damage to the conductor, namely high temperature superconductor anneals, is proposed, examined, and demonstrated to be both technically feasible and cost effective. Additionally, two relevant reactor designs (ITER CDA and ARIES-II/IV) have been analyzed. Upon addition of pure copper strands to the cable, the ITER CDA TF magnet design was found to be marginally acceptable, although much room for both performance improvement and cost reduction exists. A cost reduction of 10-15% of the capital cost of the reactor can be achieved by adopting a suitable superconductor annealing schedule. In both of these reactor analyses, the performance predictive capability of MagRad and its associated costing techniques have been demonstrated.

  17. Birotor dipole model for Saturn's inner magnetic field from CASSINI RPWS measurements and MAG data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galopeau, Patrick H. M.

    2016-10-01

    The radio and plasma wave science (RPWS) experiment on board the Cassini spacecraft, orbiting around Saturn since July 2004, revealed the presence of two distinct and variable rotation periods in the Saturnian kilometric radiation (SKR). These two periods were attributed to the northern and southern hemispheres respectively. The existence of a double period makes the study of the planetary magnetic field much more complicated and the building of a field model, based on the direct measurements of the MAG experiment from the magnetometers embarked on board Cassini, turns out to be uncertain. The first reason is the difficulty for defining a longitude system linked to the variable period, because the internal magnetic field measurements from MAG are not continuous. The second reason is the existence itself of two distinct periods which could imply the existence of a double rotation magnetic structure generated by Saturn's dynamo. However, the radio observations from the RPWS experiment allow a continuous and accurate follow-up of the rotation phase of the variable two periods, since the SKR emission is permanently observable and produced very close to the planetary surface. A wavelet transform analysis of the intensity of the SKR signal received at 290 kHz was performed in order to calculate the rotation phase of each Saturnian hemisphere. A dipole model was proposed for Saturn's inner magnetic field: this dipole presents the particularity to rotate around Saturn's axis at two different angular velocities; it is tilted and not centered. Then it is possible to fit the MAG data for each Cassini's revolution around the planet the periapsis of which is less than 5 Saturnian radii. This study suggests that Saturn's inner magnetic field is neither stationary nor fully axisymmetric. Such a result can be used as a boundary condition for modelling and constraining the planetary dynamo.

  18. Hanford Low-Activity Waste Processing: Demonstration of the Off-Gas Recycle Flowsheet - 13443

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, William G.; Esparza, Brian P.

    2013-07-01

    Vitrification of Hanford Low-Activity Waste (LAW) is nominally the thermal conversion and incorporation of sodium salts and radionuclides into borosilicate glass. One key radionuclide present in LAW is technetium-99. Technetium-99 is a low energy, long-lived beta emitting radionuclide present in the waste feed in concentrations on the order of 1-10 ppm. The long half-life combined with a high solubility in groundwater results in technetium-99 having considerable impact on performance modeling (as potential release to the environment) of both the waste glass and associated secondary waste products. The current Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process flowsheet calls for the recycle of vitrification process off-gas condensates to maximize the portion of technetium ultimately immobilized in the waste glass. This is required as technetium acts as a semi-volatile specie, i.e. considerable loss of the radionuclide to the process off-gas stream can occur during the vitrification process. To test the process flowsheet assumptions, a prototypic off-gas system with recycle capability was added to a laboratory melter (on the order of 1/200 scale) and testing performed. Key test goals included determination of the process mass balance for technetium, a non-radioactive surrogate (rhenium), and other soluble species (sulfate, halides, etc.) which are concentrated by recycling off-gas condensates. The studies performed are the initial demonstrations of process recycle for this type of liquid-fed melter system. This paper describes the process recycle system, the waste feeds processed, and experimental results. Comparisons between data gathered using process recycle and previous single pass melter testing as well as mathematical modeling simulations are also provided. (authors)

  19. Qualitative analysis of the magnetic data collected by the Embrace MagNet in comparison to absolute measurements made by Intermagnet in Vassouras-RJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sony Su; Moro, Juliano; Araujo Resende, Laysa Cristina; Denardini, Clezio Marcos

    2016-07-01

    The Embrace Magnetometer Network (Embrace MagNet) is a network of three-axis fluxgate magnetometers using single bars with high level of magnetic saturation, covered with two copper coils, one for the excitation and the second for sensing the external field. It is planned to cover most of the Easter Southern American longitudinal sector in order to fulfill the gap for magnetic measurement available on-line. The availability of fast internet, reliable energy supply and easy access were the key point for deciding the location of the magnetometer stations of the network. Up to now, the main characteristic of this network is the severe sensibility matching process among all the magnetometers composing it. Now, in order to validate the magnetic data collected by the elements of the Embrace MagNet in comparison to absolute measurements, we performed a study about the correlation between the data collected by the fluxgate magnetometer provided by Embrace MagNet and an absolute magnetometer installed by Intermagnet in the same observatory. For this study, we have used data collected in Vassouras-RJ, in Brazil, covering the period from June to December 2015. The analysis consist of: (a) selecting the 5 quietest days and the 5 most disturbed days of each month based on the Kp index; (b) deducing the local midnight value from the data collected by both instruments; (c) correlating the data collected by the variometer with the absolute measurement day-by-day; (d) grouping the results as Winter (June, July, and August), Equinox (September and October) and Summer (November and December); (e) obtaining the linear correlations factor for each group. The averaged correlation factors and the daily variations of the magnetic data are presented and discussed in terms of the magnetic activity and the season variation.

  20. Model-based comparison of maternal and foetal organ doses from (99m)Tc pertechnetate, DMSA, DTPA, HDP, MAA and MAG(3) diagnostic intakes during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Margaret; Palmer, Maria; Preece, Alan; Millard, Roger

    2002-10-01

    Organ residence times were calculated for diagnostic intakes of (99m)Tc pertechnetate, 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA), hydroxymethylene diphosphonate (HDP), macroaggregated albumin (MAA) and mercapto-acetyltriglycine (MAG(3)) during the 1st and 3rd stages of pregnancy and used with the MIRDOSE3 pregnant female phantoms for generation of dose estimates. At stage 3 individual foetal organ doses were estimated via a surrogate phantom based on that for the new-born but with mean dose/cumulated activity ( S) values scaled for compatibility with foetal whole body S. Stage 1 or 3 whole foetus doses ranged from 5.2 to 0.77 microGy MBq(-1) respectively, analogous to current ICRP estimates for these agents using similar in vivo biodistribution model databases. Most stage 3 maternal and foetal organ doses were similar within a factor of 3, being higher in the foetus than the mother with pertechnetate, DTPA and MAG(3), and lower with DMSA, HDP and MAA. Doses were more uniformly distributed among foetal organs than in the mother. Placental transfer was greatest with pertechnetate, where dose to the stage 3 foetal thyroid was 60-140 microGy MBq(-1). With each agent there was more placental transfer in stage 3 than in stage 1, but doses to stage 1 whole foetus were always higher, with the contribution from the mother dominant. For DMSA, HDP and MAG(3) the maternal contribution to total foetal body dose exceeded 93% for both stages.

  1. Vibrations in MagAO: resonance sources identification and first approaches for modeling and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcés, Javier; Zúñiga, Sebastián.; Close, Laird; Males, Jared; Morzinski, Katie; Escárate, Pedro; Castro, Mario; Marchioni, José; Rojas, Diego

    2016-07-01

    The Magellan Telescope Adaptive Optics System (MagAO) is subject to resonance effects induced by elements within the system instrumentation, such as fans and cooling pumps. Normalized PSDs are obtained through frequency-based analysis of closed-loop on-sky data, detecting and measuring vibration effects. Subsequently, a space-state model for the AO loop is obtained, using a standard AO loop scheme with an integrator-based controller and including the vibration effects as disturbances. Finally, a new control alternative is proposed, focusing on residual phase variance minimization through the design and simulation of an optimal LQG control approach.

  2. A SiO 2-1 SURVEY TOWARD GAS-RICH ACTIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Junzhi; Zhang, Jiangshui; Shi, Yong; Zhang, Zhiyu

    2013-12-01

    In order to study the feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs), we performed a survey of SiO J = 2-1 (v = 0) transition toward ten gas-rich active galaxies with the IRAM 30 m telescope. As the first survey of SiO in such galaxies, we detected SiO J = 2-1 (v = 0) emission in six galaxies above the 3σ level and one galaxy (NGC 3690) at the 2.7σ level. The detection rate is not related to the AGN type or to star formation activity. In comparison with M82, which is a pure star-forming galaxy without nuclear activity, our SiO detections could not be completely ascribed to being due to star formation activity. This suggests that the AGN feedback may be efficient in producing SiO molecules in such galaxies. Further surveys with large single-dish millimeter telescopes and interferometers are necessary for understanding the origin of SiO in galaxies with nuclear activity.

  3. Tumor-selective mitochondrial network collapse induced by atmospheric gas plasma-activated medium.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kosuke; Asai, Tomohiko; Fujiwara, Kyoko; Sahara, Junki; Koguchi, Haruhisa; Fukuda, Noboru; Suzuki-Karasaki, Miki; Soma, Masayoshi; Suzuki-Karasaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-04-12

    Non-thermal atmospheric gas plasma (AGP) exhibits cytotoxicity against malignant cells with minimal cytotoxicity toward normal cells. However, the mechanisms of its tumor-selective cytotoxicity remain unclear. Here we report that AGP-activated medium increases caspase-independent cell death and mitochondrial network collapse in a panel of human cancer cells, but not in non-transformed cells. AGP irradiation stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in AGP-activated medium, and in turn the resulting stable ROS, most likely hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), activated intracellular ROS generation and mitochondrial ROS (mROS) accumulation. Culture in AGP-activated medium resulted in cell death and excessive mitochondrial fragmentation and clustering, and these responses were inhibited by ROS scavengers. AGP-activated medium also increased dynamin-related protein 1-dependent mitochondrial fission in a tumor-specific manner, and H2O2 administration showed similar effects. Moreover, the vulnerability of tumor cells to mitochondrial network collapse appeared to result from their higher sensitivity to mROS accumulation induced by AGP-activated medium or H2O2. The present findings expand our previous observations on death receptor-mediated tumor-selective cell killing and reinforce the importance of mitochondrial network remodeling as a powerful target for tumor-selective cancer treatment.

  4. Influence of altered precipitation pattern on greenhouse gas emissions and soil enzyme activities in Pannonian soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forstner, Stefan Johannes; Michel, Kerstin; Berthold, Helene; Baumgarten, Andreas; Wanek, Wolfgang; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Kitzler, Barbara

    2013-04-01

    Precipitation patterns are likely to be altered due to climate change. Recent models predict a reduction of mean precipitation during summer accompanied by a change in short-term precipitation variability for central Europe. Correspondingly, the risk for summer drought is likely to increase. This may especially be valid for regions which already have the potential for rare, but strong precipitation events like eastern Austria. Given that these projections hold true, soils in this area will receive water irregularly in few, heavy rainfall events and be subjected to long-lasting dry periods in between. This pattern of drying/rewetting can alter soil greenhouse gas fluxes, creating a potential feedback mechanism for climate change. Microorganisms are the key players in most soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) transformation processes including greenhouse gas exchange. A conceptual model proposed by Schimel and colleagues (2007) links microbial stress-response physiology to ecosystem-scale biogeochemical processes: In order to cope with decreasing soil water potential, microbes modify resource allocation patterns from growth to survival. However, it remains unclear how microbial resource acquisition via extracellular enzymes and microbial-controlled greenhouse gas fluxes respond to water stress induced by soil drying/rewetting. We designed a laboratory experiment to test for effects of multiple drying/rewetting cycles on soil greenhouse gas fluxes (CO2, CH4, N2O, NO), microbial biomass and extracellular enzyme activity. Three soils representing the main soil types of eastern Austria were collected in June 2012 at the Lysimeter Research Station of the Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety (AGES) in Vienna. Soils were sieved to 2mm, filled in steel cylinders and equilibrated for one week at 50% water holding capacity (WHC) for each soil. Then soils were separated into two groups: One group received water several times per week (C=control), the other group received

  5. Satellite observation of pollutant emissions from gas flaring activities near the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Can; Hsu, N. Christina; Sayer, Andrew M.; Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Fu, Joshua S.; Lamsal, Lok N.; Lee, Jaehwa; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2016-05-01

    Gas flaring is a common practice in the oil industry that can have significant environmental impacts, but has until recently been largely overlooked in terms of relevance to climate change. We utilize data from various satellite sensors to examine pollutant emissions from oil exploitation activities in four areas near the Arctic. Despite the remoteness of these sparsely populated areas, tropospheric NO2 retrieved from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) is substantial at ˜1 × 1015 molecules cm-2, suggesting sizeable emissions from these industrial activities. Statistically significant (at the 95% confidence level, corresponding uncertainties in parentheses) increasing trends of 0.017 (±0.01) × 1015 and 0.015 (±0.006) × 1015 molecules cm-2 year-1 over 2004-2015 were found for Bakken (USA) and Athabasca (Canada), two areas having recently experienced fast expansion in the oil industry. This rapid change has implications for emission inventories, which are updated less frequently. No significant trend was found for the North Sea (Europe), where oil production has been declining since the 1990s. For northern Russia, the trend was just under the 95% significance threshold at 0.0057 (±0.006) × 1015 molecules cm-2 year-1. This raises an interesting inconsistency as prior studies have suggested that, in contrast to the continued, albeit slow, expansion of Russian oil/gas production, gas flaring in Russia has decreased in recent years. However, only a fraction of oil fields in Russia were covered in our analysis. Satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) data revealed similar tendencies, albeit at a weaker level of statistical significance, due to the longer lifetime of aerosols and contributions from other sources. This study demonstrates that synergetic use of data from multiple satellite sensors can provide valuable information on pollutant emission sources that is otherwise difficult to acquire.

  6. Gas Strut Separation Alternative for Ares I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Floyd, Brian; Owens, James

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a design alternative and the rationale for a stage separation system based on Metering Adiabatic Gas Struts (MAG Struts) for the Ares 1 launch vehicle. The MAG Strut separation system was proposed as an alternative to the current Ares 1 separation system, which relies on small solid rocket motors to provide the main separation force. This paper will describe technical issues that were addressed during the trade study and present a conceptual design of the strut system that best resolved the issues. Needed development testing and programmatic considerations will be addressed as part of the paper.

  7. Simulation of mercury capture by activated carbon injection in incinerator flue gas. 2. Fabric filter removal.

    PubMed

    Scala, F

    2001-11-01

    Following a companion paper focused on the in-duct mercury capture in incinerator flue gas by powdered activated carbon injection, this paper is concerned with the additional mercury capture on the fabric filter cake, relevant to baghouse equipped facilities. A detailed model is presented for this process, based on material balances on mercury in both gaseous and adsorbed phases along the growing filter cake and inside the activated carbon particles,taking into account mass transfer resistances and adsorption kinetics. Several sorbents of practical interest have been considered, whose parameters have been evaluated from available literature data. The values and range of the operating variables have been chosen in order to simulate typical incinerators operating conditions. Results of simulations indicate that, contrary to the in-duct removal process, high mercury removal efficiencies can be obtained with moderate sorbent consumption, as a consequence of the effective gas/sorbent contacting on the filter. Satisfactory utilization of the sorbents is predicted, especially at long filtration times. The sorbent feed rate can be minimized by using a reactive sorbent and by lowering the filter temperature as much as possible. Minor benefits can be obtained also by decreasing the sorbent particle size and by increasing the cleaning cycle time of the baghouse compartments. Reverse-flow baghouses were more efficient than pulse-jet baghouses, while smoother operation can be obtained by increasing the number of baghouse compartments. Model results are compared with available relevant full scale data.

  8. A census of gas outflows in type 2 active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Hyun-Jin; Woo, Jong-Hak E-mail: woo@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2014-11-01

    We perform a census of ionized gas outflows using a sample of ∼23,000 type 2 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) out to z ∼ 0.1. By measuring the velocity offset of narrow emission lines, i.e., [O III] λ5007 and Hα, with respect to the systemic velocity measured from the stellar absorption lines, we find that 47% of AGNs display an [O III] line-of-sight velocity offset ≥ 20 km s{sup –1}. The fraction of the [O III] velocity offset in type 2 AGNs is comparable to that in type 1 AGNs after considering the projection effect. AGNs with a large [O III] velocity offset preferentially have a high Eddington ratio, implying that the detected velocity offsets are related to black hole activity. The distribution of the host galaxy inclination is clearly different between the AGNs with blueshifted [O III] and the AGNs with redshifted [O III], supporting the combined model of the biconical outflow and dust obscuration. In addition, for ∼3% of AGNs, [O III] and Hα show comparable large velocity offsets, indicating a more complex gas kinematics than decelerating outflows in a stratified narrow-line region.

  9. ENERGY EFFICIENT THERMAL MANAGEMENT FOR NATURAL GAS ENGINE AFTERTREATMENT VIA ACTIVE FLOW CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    David K. Irick; Ke Nguyen

    2004-04-01

    The project is focused on the development of an energy efficient aftertreatment system capable of reducing NOx and methane by 90% from lean-burn natural gas engines by applying active exhaust flow control. Compared to conventional passive flow-through reactors, the proposed scheme cuts supplemental energy by 50%-70%. The system consists of a Lean NOx Trap (LNT) system and an oxidation catalyst. Through alternating flow control, a major amount of engine exhaust flows through a large portion of the LNT system in the absorption mode, while a small amount of exhaust goes through a small portion of the LNT system in the regeneration or desulfurization mode. By periodically reversing the exhaust gas flow through the oxidation catalyst, a higher temperature profile is maintained in the catalyst bed resulting in greater efficiency of the oxidation catalyst at lower exhaust temperatures. The project involves conceptual design, theoretical analysis, computer simulation, prototype fabrication, and empirical studies. This report details the progress during the first twelve months of the project. The primary activities have been to develop the bench flow reactor system, develop the computer simulation and modeling of the reverse-flow oxidation catalyst, install the engine into the test cell, and begin design of the LNT system.

  10. Energy Efficient Thermal Management for Natural Gas Engine Aftertreatment via Active Flow Control

    SciTech Connect

    David K. Irick; Ke Nguyen; Vitacheslav Naoumov; Doug Ferguson

    2006-04-01

    The project is focused on the development of an energy efficient aftertreatment system capable of reducing NOx and methane by 90% from lean-burn natural gas engines by applying active exhaust flow control. Compared to conventional passive flow-through reactors, the proposed scheme cuts supplemental energy by 50%-70%. The system consists of a Lean NOx Trap (LNT) system and an oxidation catalyst. Through alternating flow control, a major amount of engine exhaust flows through a large portion of the LNT system in the absorption mode, while a small amount of exhaust goes through a small portion of the LNT system in the regeneration or desulfurization mode. By periodically reversing the exhaust gas flow through the oxidation catalyst, a higher temperature profile is maintained in the catalyst bed resulting in greater efficiency of the oxidation catalyst at lower exhaust temperatures. The project involves conceptual design, theoretical analysis, computer simulation, prototype fabrication, and empirical studies. This report details the progress during the first twelve months of the project. The primary activities have been to develop the bench flow reactor system, develop the computer simulation and modeling of the reverse-flow oxidation catalyst, install the engine into the test cell, and begin design of the LNT system.

  11. Energy Efficient Thermal Management for Natural Gas Engine Aftertreatment via Active Flow Control

    SciTech Connect

    David K. Irick; Ke Nguyen; Vitacheslav Naoumov; Doug Ferguson

    2005-04-01

    The project is focused on the development of an energy efficient aftertreatment system capable of reducing NOx and methane by 90% from lean-burn natural gas engines by applying active exhaust flow control. Compared to conventional passive flow-through reactors, the proposed scheme cuts supplemental energy by 50%-70%. The system consists of a Lean NOx Trap (LNT) system and an oxidation catalyst. Through alternating flow control, a major amount of engine exhaust flows through a large portion of the LNT system in the absorption mode, while a small amount of exhaust goes through a small portion of the LNT system in the regeneration or desulfurization mode. By periodically reversing the exhaust gas flow through the oxidation catalyst, a higher temperature profile is maintained in the catalyst bed resulting in greater efficiency of the oxidation catalyst at lower exhaust temperatures. The project involves conceptual design, theoretical analysis, computer simulation, prototype fabrication, and empirical studies. This report details the progress during the first twelve months of the project. The primary activities have been to develop the bench flow reactor system, develop the computer simulation and modeling of the reverse-flow oxidation catalyst, install the engine into the test cell, and begin design of the LNT system.

  12. Risk assessment of oil and gas well drilling activities in Iran - a case study: human factors.

    PubMed

    Amir-Heidari, Payam; Farahani, Hadi; Ebrahemzadih, Mehrzad

    2015-01-01

    Oil and gas well drilling activities are associated with numerous hazards which have the potential to cause injury or harm for people, property and the environment. These hazards are also a threat for the reputation of drilling companies. To prevent accidents and undesired events in drilling operations it is essential to identify, evaluate, assess and control the attendant risks. In this work, a structured methodology is proposed for risk assessment of drilling activities. A case study is performed to identify, analyze and assess the risks arising from human factors in one of the on shore drilling sites in southern Iran. A total of 17 major hazards were identified and analyzed using the proposed methodology. The results showed that the residual risks of 100% of these hazards were in the acceptable or transitional zone, and their levels were expected to be lowered further by proper controls. This structured methodology may also be used in other drilling sites and companies for assessing the risks.

  13. Toluene vapor capture by activated carbon particles in a dual gas-solid cyclone system.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yun Hui; Ngo, Khanh Quoc; Park, Young Koo; Jo, Young Min

    2012-08-01

    Capturing of odorous compounds such as toluene vapor by a particulate-activated carbon adsorbent was investigated in a gas-solid cyclone, which is one type of mobile beds. The test cyclone was early modified with the post cyclone (PoC) and a spiral flow guide to the vortex finder. The proposed process may contribute to the reduction of gases and dust from industrial exhausts, especially when dealing with a low concentration of odorous elements and a large volume ofdust flow. In this device, the toluene capturing efficiency at a 400 ppm concentration rose up to 77.4% when using activated carbon (AC) particles with a median size of 27.03 microm. A maximum 96% of AC particles could be collected for reuse depending on the size and flow rate. The AC regenerated via thermal treatment showed an adsorption potential up to 66.7% throughout repeated tests.

  14. Active control of combustion instabilities in low NO{sub x} gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Zinn, B.T.; Neumeier, Y.

    1995-10-01

    This 3-year research program was initiated in September, 1995, to investigate active control of detrimental combustion instabilities in low NO{sub x} gas turbines (LNGT), which burn natural gas in a lean premixed mode to reduce NO{sub x} emissions. The program will investigate the mechanisms that drive these instabilities. Furthermore, it will study active control systems (ACS) that can effectively prevent the onset of such instabilities and/or reduce their amplitudes to acceptable levels. An understanding of the driving mechanisms will not only guide the development of effective ACS for LNGT but may also lead to combustor design changes (i.e., passive control) that will fully or partially resolve the problem. Initial attempts to stabilize combustors (i.e., chemical rockets) by ACS were reported more than 40 years ago, but were unsuccessful due to lack of adequate sensors, electronics, and actuators for performing the needed control actions. Progress made in recent years in sensor and actuator technology, electronics, and control theory has rekindled interest in developing ACS for unstable combustors. While initial efforts in this area, which focused on active control of instabilities in air breathing combustors, have demonstrated the considerable potential of active control, they have also indicated that more effective observers, controllers, and actuators are needed for practical applications. Considerable progress has been made in the observer and actuator areas by the principal investigators of this program during the past 2 years under an AFOSR program. The developed observer is based upon wavelets theory, and can identify the amplitudes, frequencies, and phases of the five most dominant combustor modes in (virtually) real time. The developed actuator is a fuel injector that uses a novel magneto-strictive material to modulate the fuel flow rate into the combustor.

  15. Predicting mixed-gas adsorption equilibria on activated carbon for precombustion CO2 capture.

    PubMed

    García, S; Pis, J J; Rubiera, F; Pevida, C

    2013-05-21

    We present experimentally measured adsorption isotherms of CO2, H2, and N2 on a phenol-formaldehyde resin-based activated carbon, which had been previously synthesized for the separation of CO2 in a precombustion capture process. The single component adsorption isotherms were measured in a magnetic suspension balance at three different temperatures (298, 318, and 338 K) and over a large range of pressures (from 0 to 3000-4000 kPa). These values cover the temperature and pressure conditions likely to be found in a precombustion capture scenario, where CO2 needs to be separated from a CO2/H2/N2 gas stream at high pressure (~1000-1500 kPa) and with a high CO2 concentration (~20-40 vol %). Data on the pure component isotherms were correlated using the Langmuir, Sips, and dual-site Langmuir (DSL) models, i.e., a two-, three-, and four-parameter model, respectively. By using the pure component isotherm fitting parameters, adsorption equilibrium was then predicted for multicomponent gas mixtures by the extended models. The DSL model was formulated considering the energetic site-matching concept, recently addressed in the literature. Experimental gas-mixture adsorption equilibrium data were calculated from breakthrough experiments conducted in a lab-scale fixed-bed reactor and compared with the predictions from the models. Breakthrough experiments were carried out at a temperature of 318 K and five different pressures (300, 500, 1000, 1500, and 2000 kPa) where two different CO2/H2/N2 gas mixtures were used as the feed gas in the adsorption step. The DSL model was found to be the one that most accurately predicted the CO2 adsorption equilibrium in the multicomponent mixture. The results presented in this work highlight the importance of performing experimental measurements of mixture adsorption equilibria, as they are of utmost importance to discriminate between models and to correctly select the one that most closely reflects the actual process.

  16. Modeling hot gas flow in the low-luminosity active galactic nucleus of NGC 3115

    SciTech Connect

    Shcherbakov, Roman V.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Wong, Ka-Wah; Irwin, Jimmy A.

    2014-02-20

    Based on the dynamical black hole (BH) mass estimates, NGC 3115 hosts the closest billion solar mass BH. Deep studies of the center revealed a very underluminous active galactic nucleus (AGN) immersed in an old massive nuclear star cluster. Recent 1 Ms Chandra X-ray visionary project observations of the NGC 3115 nucleus resolved hot tenuous gas, which fuels the AGN. In this paper we connect the processes in the nuclear star cluster with the feeding of the supermassive BH. We model the hot gas flow sustained by the injection of matter and energy from the stars and supernova explosions. We incorporate electron heat conduction as the small-scale feedback mechanism, the gravitational pull of the stellar mass, cooling, and Coulomb collisions. Fitting simulated X-ray emission to the spatially and spectrally resolved observed data, we find the best-fitting solutions with χ{sup 2}/dof = 1.00 for dof = 236 both with and without conduction. The radial modeling favors a low BH mass <1.3 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}. The best-fitting supernova rate and the best-fitting mass injection rate are consistent with their expected values. The stagnation point is at r {sub st} ≲ 1'', so that most of the gas, including the gas at a Bondi radius r{sub B} = 2''-4'', outflows from the region. We put an upper limit on the accretion rate at 2 × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. We find a shallow density profile n∝r {sup –β} with β ≈ 1 over a large dynamic range. This density profile is determined in the feeding region 0.''5-10'' as an interplay of four processes and effects: (1) the radius-dependent mass injection, (2) the effect of the galactic gravitational potential, (3) the accretion flow onset at r ≲ 1'', and (4) the outflow at r ≳ 1''. The gas temperature is close to the virial temperature T{sub v} at any radius.

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of 99mTc/99Tc-MAG3-biotin conjugates for antibody pretargeting strategies.

    PubMed

    van Gog, F B; Visser, G W; Gowrising, R W; Snow, G B; van Dongen, G A

    1998-10-01

    Four 99mTc-MAG3-biotin conjugates were synthesized to determine their potential use in antibody pretargeting strategies for radioimmunoscintigraphy (RIS). To use these 99mTc-MAG3-biotin conjugates as model compounds for 186Re-MAG3-biotin conjugates for radioimmunotherapy (RIT), nanomolar amounts of 99Tc were added as carrier to 99mTc. The biotin derivatives used for the preparation of the conjugates-biocytin, biotin hydrazide, biotinyl-piperazine, and biotinyl-diaminosuccinic acid-differed at the site that is regarded to be susceptible to hydrolysis by biotinidase present in human plasma. All four conjugates were produced with high radiochemical purity, were stable in PBS, and demonstrated full binding capacity to streptavidin. The 99mTc/99Tc-MAG3-labeled biotinyl-piperazine and biotinyl-diaminosuccinic acid conjugates were stable in mouse as well as human plasma, whereas the corresponding biocytin and biotin hydrazide conjugates were rapidly degraded. The biodistribution in nude mice at 30 min after injection was similar for all conjugates, and a rapid blood clearance and high intestinal excretion were both observed. It is concluded that the metabolic routing of a conjugate containing biotin and MAG3 is dominated by these two moieties. For this reason, MAG3-biotin conjugates do not seem suited for pretargeted RIT, for which quantitative and fast renal excretion is a prerequisite to minimize radiation toxicity. However, in a pretargeted RIS approach the 99mTc-MAG3-biotin conjugates might have potential.

  18. 78 FR 12772 - Information Collection Activities: Oil and Gas Production Requirements; Submitted for Office of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-25

    ... the information to: Evaluate requests to burn liquid hydrocarbons and vent and flare gas to ensure... replacement of gas meters to measure the amount of gas flared or vented. This is a non-hour cost burden. 1163... per month. 1163(b); Report to ONRR hydrocarbons produced, including measured gas flared/vented...

  19. Preliminary results of systematic sampling of gas manifestations in geodynamically active areas of Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskalopoulou, Kyriaki; D'Alessandro, Walter; Calabrese, Sergio; Kyriakopoulos, Konstantinos

    2016-04-01

    Greece is located on a convergent plate boundary comprising the subduction of the African Plate beneath the Eurasian, while the Arabian plate approaches the Eurasian in a northwestward motion. It is considered to be one of the most tectonically active regions of Earth with a complex geodynamic setting, deriving from a long and complicated geological history. Due to this specific geological background, conditions for the formation of many thermal springs are favoured. In the past years, almost all the already known sites of degassing (fumaroles, soil gases, mofettes, gas bubbling in cold and thermal waters) located in the Hellenic area were sampled at least one time. Collected samples were analysed for their chemical (He, Ne, Ar, O2, N2, H2, H2S, CO, CH4 and CO2) and isotopic composition (He, C and N). Some of these sites have been selected for systematic sampling. Four of them have records longer than 10 years with tens of samplings also considering some literature data. Two of the sites are located in active volcanic areas (Santorini and Nisyros) while the other two are close to actively spreading graben structures with intense seismic activity (Gulf of Korinth and Sperchios basin). Results allowed to define long term background values and also some interesting variation related to seismic or volcanic activity.

  20. Operational field evaluation of the PAC-MAG man-portable magnetometer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keranen, Joe; Topolosky, Zeke; Schultz, Gregory; Miller, Jonathan

    2013-06-01

    Detection and discrimination of unexploded ordnance (UXO) in areas of prior conflict is of high importance to the international community and the United States government. For humanitarian applications, sensors and processing methods need to be robust, reliable, and easy to train and implement using indigenous UXO removal personnel. This paper describes system characterization, system testing, and a continental United States (CONUS) Operational Field Evaluations (OFE) of the PAC-MAG man-portable UXO detection system. System testing occurred at a government test facility in June, 2010 and December, 2011 and the OFE occurred at the same location in June, 2012. NVESD and White River Technologies personnel were present for all testing and evaluation. The PAC-MAG system is a manportable magnetometer array for the detection and characterization of ferrous UXO. System hardware includes four Cesium vapor magnetometers for detection, a Real-time Kinematic Global Position System (RTK-GPS) for sensor positioning, an electronics module for merging array data and WiFi communications and a tablet computer for transmitting and logging data. An odometer, or "hipchain" encoder, provides position information in GPS-denied areas. System software elements include data logging software and post-processing software for detection and characterization of ferrous anomalies. The output of the post-processing software is a dig list containing locations of potential UXO(s), formatted for import into the system GPS equipment for reacquisition of anomalies. Results from system characterization and the OFE will be described.

  1. Operational Tests of a Full Scale Superconducting MagLevehicle Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotelo, G. G.; Dias, D. H. N.; Motta, E. S.; Sass, F.; Ferreira, A. C.; de Andrade, R.; Stephan, R. M.

    This work presents new results of the Brazilian transportation vehicle MagLev-Cobra. This technology proposes a magnetically levitated vehicle composed of small units of 1.5 m length, allowing curves with minimal radius of 50 m, ramps of 10% and velocities up to 70km/h. When these short units are connected, the vehicle resembles a snake or rsquo;cobra' in Portuguese. Since there is no contact between the vehicle and the magnetic rail, the noise level is low. Also, the load is distributed along the vehicle and not concentrated on single points of contact as in a conventional wheel and rail transportation system, which results in lower mechanical moment and lighter civil engineering constructions. These factors make MagLev-Cobra ideal to run on elevated structures inside cities. The estimated construction costs are 1/3 of that necessary for subways. The levitation technology is based on the flux pinning property of Y-Ba-Cu-O blocks and the magnetic field of Nd-Fe-B magnets. The present paper gives some construction details and describes new measurements of a full scale prototype. The rail of permanent magnets was reached based on optimization algorithms and several quasi-static measurements are reported here.

  2. Three Dimensional modeling of instability development in MagLIF loads on the Z Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, C. A.; Harding, E. C.; Gomez, M. R.; Hansen, S. B.; Awe, T. J.; McBride, R. D.; Martin, M. R.; Peterson, K. J.; Chittenden, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    Liners imploded by a fast rising (<100ns) current to compress a magnetized, preheated fuel offer the potential to efficiently reach fusion conditions. Experiments with these Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) loads have demonstrated success. Performance may be limited by poor laser coupling in preheating the fuel to be imploded. However time integrated imaging also shows structure in the final fuel assembly indicating potential disruption from instabilities which may also limit neutron yield. We simulate the implosion and stagnation of MagLIF targets using the 3D MHD code GORGON. Generating synthetic diagnostics for comparison with data we discuss how implosion instabilities comparable to those diagnosed with radiography affect fuel compression and confinement. By further comparison of calculation results with PCD traces, time integrated spectra and crystal imaging we discuss how fuel conditions vary in response to feedthrough of implosion instabilities, and how structures formed may affect diagnostic interpretation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. X-ray Imaging of MagLIF Experiments Using a Spherically-Bent Crystal Optic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, E. C.; Gomez, M. R.; Jennings, C. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Awe, T. J.; Hansen, S. B.; Peterson, K. J.; Hahn, K. D.; McBride, R. D.; Rochau, G. A.; Sinars, D. B.; Golovkin, I.

    2015-11-01

    The recent Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments performed on Sandia's Z-machine produced significant thermonuclear DD fusion yields that were accompanied by observable x-ray emission [M.R. Gomez et. al., PRL (2014)]. The MagLIF experiments relied on a spherically-bent crystal optic to image portions of the x-ray continuum that were generated by the hot stagnation plasma. The images of stagnation show a long (6 to 8 mm) and narrow (~100 micron) column of x-ray emission with structure in both directions. This structure may be caused by variations in the electron temperature (Te) and density (ne) , as well as opacity variations in the surrounding Be pusher. Here we investigate the possible contributions from each of these effects. We will also discuss the development of a diagnostic technique in which Te and ne of the DD fuel are inferred from spectra emitted by Fe impurities that become ionized to a He-like charge state. Sandia National Labs is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DoE NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. Pressures generated within the chambers of the MagScrew TAH: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Flick, Christine R; Weber, Stephan; Luangphakdy, Viviane; Klatte, Ryan S; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Smith, William A

    2008-01-01

    Incompetent inflow valves have been reported with clinical pulsatile left ventricular assist devices that use bioprosthetic valves. Suspected as the cause of premature valve failure within these devices, absolute pressures and instantaneous pressure changes were evaluated in the MagScrew total artificial heart (TAH). The MagScrew TAH is a passively filling pulsatile pump which uses a reciprocating magnetic actuating mechanism under various control modes to propel blood into circulation. Both right and left ejection speeds were modulated and optimized at the onset of hydraulic eject. These various speed profiles were evaluated in vitro at 220 beats per minute (bpm), 100% pump fill, mean aortic pressure of 100 mm Hg and mean pulmonary artery pressure of 20 mm Hg. The pressure inside the left and right pump chambers was measured with Millar Mikro-Tip catheter and captured using Power Lab at a rate of 40 kHz. The pump chamber peak pressure, operating with unmodified eject speeds, measured on average 183 mm Hg for the left and 133 mm Hg for the right. Eject speed profiling for both pumps reduced the peak pressure by 10% and 28% for the left and right pump, respectively. Future studies will assess software controlled optimization of the eject speed profiles under any operating condition and how effective it is in vivo.

  5. Experimental system to search for induced depletion of 108mAg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Isaac; Harle, Thomas; Trees, Geoffrey; Carroll, James

    2008-10-01

    Nuclear isomers may provide high density energy storage media for specialized batteries. The key would be to identify a way to release the stored energy when desired, by depleting the isomer population. Existing nuclear data [1] suggest that an induced depletion of the 418 year isomer ^108mAg may be possible, caused by providing an input of 255 keV or 413 keV. The result would be production of additional ground state nuclei with a half-life of 2.37 minutes, leading to beta decay. An experiment has been designed to measure beta decay of ^108mAg after exposure of an isomeric sample to 450 keV bremsstrahlung. Because beta particles are attenuated by air, a clean vacuum chamber was assembled with which to use a Si(Li) detector. The aim of this experiment is to observe an increased rate of beta decay after several minutes of direct exposure to bremsstrahlung radiation. [1] F. R. Espinoza-Quinones, et al., Phys. Rev. C 52, 104 (1995).

  6. VISAR Unfold Analysis of Load Current in MagLIF Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Mark; McBride, Ryan; Martin, Matthew

    2013-10-01

    An accurate prediction of the load current is essential in the performance of MagLIF experiments on the Z-Machine at Sandia. At present, the most accurate diagnostic for measuring load current on the Z-machine is the well-established VISAR technique. The VISAR diagnostic measures the velocity of a thin aluminum foil placed near the load, which is subject to the magnetic pressure produced by the load current, using a laser interferometer. The load current unfold analysis is highly nonlinear due to the equation of state/conductivity models, along with the MHD equations governing the foil. Nevertheless, an accurate load current unfold from the VISAR measurement is possible using an MHD code, in conjunction with an optimization algorithm. We will review the VISAR unfold analysis, and show recent current unfolds of MagLIF experiments in comparison to load current measurements using B-dot probes. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. In vitro thrombolytic efficacy of echogenic liposomes loaded with tissue plasminogen activator and octafluoropropane gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhar, Himanshu; Bader, Kenneth B.; Huang, Shenwen; Peng, Tao; Huang, Shaoling; McPherson, David D.; Holland, Christy K.

    2017-01-01

    Echogenic liposomes loaded with the thrombolytic recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) are under development for the treatment of ischemic stroke. These agents are designed to co-encapsulate cavitation nuclei to promote bubble activity in response to ultrasound exposure, and to enable localized delivery of thrombolytic. Stable cavitation improves the efficacy of the thrombolytic through enhanced fluid mixing. Echogenic liposomes that encapsulate air-filled microbubbles nucleate scant stable cavitation activity in response to 120 kHz intermittent ultrasound exposure, and have demonstrated thrombolytic efficacy equivalent to rt-PA alone. It was hypothesized that encapsulating octafluoropropane (OFP) gas within rt-PA-loaded liposomes instead of air will enhance ultrasound-mediated stable cavitation activity and increase thrombolytic efficacy compared to previous studies. The thrombolytic efficacy and cavitation activity nucleated from liposomes that encapsulate OFP microbubbles and rt-PA (OFP t-ELIP) was evaluated in vitro. Human whole blood clots were exposed to human fresh-frozen plasma alone, rt-PA (0, 0.32, 1.58, and 3.15 µg ml-1), or OFP t-ELIP at equivalent enzymatic activity, with and without exposure to intermittent ultrasound. Further, numerical simulations were performed to gain insight into the mechanisms of cavitation nucleation. Sustained ultraharmonic activity was nucleated from OFP t-ELIP when exposed to ultrasound. Furthermore, the thrombolytic efficacy was enhanced compared to rt-PA alone at concentrations of 1.58 µg ml-1 and 3.15 µg ml-1 (p  <  0.05). These results indicate that OFP t-ELIP can nucleate sustained stable cavitation activity and enhance the efficacy of thrombolysis.

  8. Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico: Applications for Safe Exploration and Production Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Bent, Jimmy

    2014-05-31

    In 2000 Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deep water portion of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Chevron is an active explorer and operator in the Gulf of Mexico and is aware that natural gas hydrates need to be understood to operate safely in deep water. In August 2000 Chevron worked closely with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and held a workshop in Houston, Texas to define issues concerning the characterization of natural gas hydrate deposits. Specifically, the workshop was meant to clearly show where research, the development of new technologies, and new information sources would be of benefit to the DOE and to the oil and gas industry in defining issues and solving gas hydrate problems in deep water.

  9. Adsorption of low concentration phosphine in yellow phosphorus off-gas by impregnated activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueqian; Ning, Ping; Shi, Yan; Jiang, Ming

    2009-11-15

    In order to utilize high concentration CO comprehensively, impregnated activated carbon sorbent and the catalytic oxidation reaction for PH(3) were investigated in this study. Carbon was impregnated with HCl, KNO(3), or hexanediol. The activated carbon modified by 7% (mass fraction) HCl could enhance the adsorption purification ability significantly. Raising the reaction temperature or increasing the oxygen content of the gas can improve the purification efficiency. The structure of the materials after modification was determined using nitrogen adsorption. The modification decreased the volume of pores smaller than 2 nm in diameter with the most noticeable change occurring in the micropores ranging from 0.3 nm to 1.5 nm in diameter. Decreases in micropore volume accounted for 87% of the total pore volume change. After the adsorption, the surface areas decreased 28%, 29% of which was due to decreased micropore surface. HCl significantly increased the performance of carbon as a PH(3) adsorbent when HCl impregnation was applied whereas the effects of other materials used in this study were much less pronounced. HCl present in the small pores probably acted as a catalyst for oxygen activation that caused PH(3) oxidation. As a result of this process, H(3)PO(4) and P(4)O(10) were formed, strongly adsorbed, and present in the small pores ranging from 0.3 nm to 1.5 nm. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that CO from industrial off-gas can be purified and used as the raw material for a broader range of products.

  10. Key factor in rice husk ash/CaO sorbent for high flue gas desulfurization activity

    SciTech Connect

    Irvan Dahlan; Keat Teong Lee; Azlina Harun Kamaruddin; Abdul Rahman Mohamed

    2006-10-01

    Siliceous materials such as rice husk ash (RHA) have potential to be utilized as high performance sorbents for the flue gas desulfurization process in small-scale industrial boilers. This study presents findings on identifying the key factor for high desulfurization activity in sorbents prepared from RHA. Initially, a systematic approach using central composite rotatable design was used to develop a mathematical model that correlates the sorbent preparation variables to the desulfurization activity of the sorbent. The sorbent preparation variables studied are hydration period, x{sub 1} (6-16 h), amount of RHA, x{sub 2} (5-15 g), amount of CaO, x{sub 3} (2-6 g), amount of water, x{sub 4} (90-110 mL), and hydration temperature, x{sub 5} (150-250{sup o}C). The mathematical model developed was subjected to statistical tests and the model is adequate for predicting the SO{sub 2} desulfurization activity of the sorbent within the range of the sorbent preparation variables studied. Based on the model, the amount of RHA, amount of CaO, and hydration period used in the preparation step significantly influenced the desulfurization activity of the sorbent. The ratio of RHA and CaO used in the preparation mixture was also a significant factor that influenced the desulfurization activity of the sorbent. A RHA to CaO ratio of 2.5 leads to the formation of specific reactive species in the sorbent that are believed to be the key factor responsible for high desulfurization activity in the sorbent. Other physical properties of the sorbent such as pore size distribution and surface morphology were found to have insignificant influence on the desulfurization activity of the sorbent. 31 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. The Online MagIC Database: Data Archiving, Compilation, and Visualization for the Geomagnetic, Paleomagnetic and Rock Magnetic Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarboe, N. A.; Koppers, A. A.; Tauxe, L.; Minnett, R.; Constable, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) is dedicated to supporting the geomagnetic, paleomagnetic, and rock magnetic communities through the development and maintenance of an online database (http://earthref.org/MAGIC/), data upload and quality control, filtered searches, data downloads, and visualization tools. MagIC continues to import updated versions of the IAGA paleomagnetic databases (TRANS, PINT, PSVRL, GPMDB, ARCHEO, MAGST and SECVR) into the MagIC database, but data uploading from individuals in the community is now essential for the MagIC database project to succeed. The highly diverse datasets stored in the database require an extensive data model of over thirty tables and 1000 columns. However, any individual dataset generally requires only a small fraction of these. To promote data uploading from the community, entering data into the MagIC database is facilitated by using Excel on the Mac or PC and the data format is checked by the MagIC console software before uploading. Many data entry errors can be caught and corrected at this stage. After uploading, datasets can be flagged as either public or private, and private datasets can be shared with others using a group name and password. Over 4,000 archived datasets can be queried on-line (http://earthref.org/MAGIC/search/) using an advanced filtering and sorting-type search. A hierarchical system is in place for searching over contributions, locations, sites, samples, specimens or measurements. The Excel spreadsheet and MagIC text format file from each contribution can be accessed and data recovered from searches can be downloaded in the MagIC text format. Searches themselves (reproducing the state of the database at a specific time) can be saved as a permanent URL, if desired, and cited in publications. Where appropriate, plots (equal area, Zijderveld, ARAI, demagnetization, etc.) are associated with the data to give the user a quicker understanding of the underlying dataset and improved browsing

  12. Study on removal of elemental mercury from simulated flue gas over activated coke treated by acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jinfeng; Li, Caiting; Zhao, Lingkui; Zhang, Jie; Song, Jingke; Zeng, Guangming; Zhang, Xunan; Xie, Yine

    2015-02-01

    This work addressed the investigation of activated coke (AC) treated by acids. Effects of AC samples, modified by ether different acids (H2SO4, HNO3 and HClO4) or HClO4 of varied concentrations, on Hg0 removal were studied under simulated flue gas conditions. In addition, effects of reaction temperature and individual flue gas components including O2, NO, SO2 and H2O were discussed. In the experiments, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were applied to explore the surface properties of sorbents and possible mechanism of Hg0 oxidation. Results showed that AC sample treated by HClO4 of 4.5 mol/L exhibited maximum promotion of efficiency on Hg0 removal at 160 °C. NO was proved to be positive in the removal of Hg0. And SO2 displayed varied impact in capturing Hg0 due to the integrated reactions between SO2 and modified AC. The addition of O2 could improve the advancement further to some extent. Besides, the Hg0 removal capacity had a slight declination when H2O was added in gas flow. Based on the analysis of XPS and FTIR, the selected sample absorbed Hg0 mostly in chemical way. The reaction mechanism, deduced from results of characterization and performance of AC samples, indicated that Hg0 could firstly be absorbed on sorbent and then react with oxygen-containing (Csbnd O) or chlorine-containing groups (Csbnd Cl) on the surface of sorbent. And the products were mainly in forms of mercuric chloride (HgCl2) and mercuric oxide (HgO).

  13. Optical Breath Gas Extravehicular Activity Sensor for the Advanced Portable Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William R.; Casias, Miguel E.; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Chullen, Cinda; Campbell, Colin

    2016-01-01

    The function of the infrared gas transducer used during extravehicular activity (EVA) in the current space suit is to measure and report the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the ventilation loop. The next generation portable life support system (PLSS) requires highly accurate CO2 sensing technology with performance beyond that presently in use on the International Space Station extravehicular mobility unit (EMU). Further, that accuracy needs to be provided over the full operating pressure range of the suit (3 to 25 psia). Accommodation within space suits demands that optical sensors meet stringent size, weight, and power requirements. A laser diode (LD) sensor based on infrared absorption spectroscopy is being developed for this purpose by Vista Photonics, Inc. Version 1.0 prototype devices were delivered to NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) in September 2011. The prototypes were upgraded with more sophisticated communications and faster response times to version 2.0 and delivered to JSC in July 2012. The sensors incorporate a laser diode based CO2 channel that also includes an incidental water vapor (humidity) measurement. The prototypes are controlled digitally with an field-programmable gate array microcontroller architecture. Based on the results of the iterative instrument development, further prototype development and testing of instruments were performed leveraging the lessons learned where feasible. The present development extends and upgrades the earlier hardware for the advanced PLSS 2.5 prototypes for testing at JSC. The prototypes provide significantly enhanced accuracy for water vapor measurement and eliminate wavelength drift affecting the earlier versions. Various improvements to the electronics and gas sampling are currently being advanced including the companion development of engineering development units that will ultimately be capable of radiation tolerance. The combination of low power electronics with the performance of a long wavelength

  14. Managing oil and gas activities in coastal environments. Volume I: comprehensive report. Report for 1977-81

    SciTech Connect

    Longley, W.L.; Jackson, R.; Snyder, B.

    1982-03-01

    This report documents the management of oil and gas development on national wildlife refuges on the Louisiana and Texas coasts. It explains the nature of ownership, leasing rights, and legal considerations related to oil and gas extraction on refuges. The report describes five federal refuges selected for analysis and the different marsh and estuarine ecosystems found on the refuges and in the coastal zone. It explains oil and gas extraction and transport methods used in coastal systems, and examines how each habitat is affected by these activities. Existing regulations and guidelines are analyzed and new ones proposed. The report is a planning tool for refuge personnel to aid them in assessing impacts, issuing permits, and generally managing oil and gas activities.

  15. PmagPy: Software Package for Paleomagnetic Data Analysis and Gateway to the Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonestrask, L.; Tauxe, L.; Shaar, R.; Jarboe, N.; Minnett, R.; Koppers, A. A. P.

    2014-12-01

    There are many data types and methods of analysis in rock and paleomagnetic investigations. The MagIC database (http://earthref.org/MAGIC) was designed to accommodate the vast majority of data used in such investigations. Yet getting data from the laboratory into the database, and visualizing and re-analyzing data downloaded from the database, makes special demands on data formatting. There are several recently published programming packages that deal with single types of data: demagnetization experiments (e.g., Lurcock et al., 2012), paleointensity experiments (e.g., Leonhardt et al., 2004), and FORC diagrams (e.g., Harrison et al., 2008). However, there is a need for a unified set of open source, cross-platform software that deals with the great variety of data types in a consistent way and facilitates importing data into the MagIC format, analyzing them and uploading them into the MagIC database. The PmagPy software package (http://earthref.org/PmagPy/cookbook/) comprises a such a comprehensive set of tools. It facilitates conversion of many laboratory formats into the common MagIC format and allows interpretation of demagnetization and Thellier-type experimental data. With some 175 programs and over 250 functions, it can be used to create a wide variety of plots and allows manipulation of downloaded data sets as well as preparation of new contributions for uploading to the MagIC database.

  16. Results from the magnetic electron ion spectrometer (MagEIS) instruments aboard the Van Allen Probes spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fennell, Joseph; O'Brien, Paul; Roeder, James; Reeves, Geoffrey; Claudepierre, Seth; Clemmons, James; Spence, Harlan; Blake, Bernard

    The Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instruments aboard the Van Allen Probes Spacecraft (formerly RBSP) measure electrons and ions in the Earth's inner and outer radiation belts. The MagEIS instruments are part of the Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma Suite (ECT), which also includes the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) and the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) analyzer. MagEIS consists of four magnetic electron spectrometers aboard each of the two Van Allen Probes spacecraft that measure the differential fluxes, energies, and angular distributions of electrons from 20 keV to 4 MeV. The MagEIS suite also contains a silicon-detector telescope that measures the differential fluxes, energies, and angular distributions of protons from 60 keV to 20 MeV, and helium and oxygen ions above a hundred keV/AMU. We briefly describe the instrument design and measurement technique and present a set of results from the MagEIS observations, including ultra-low frequency (ULF) modulations of energetic electron flux, and observations of electron flux enhancements associated with the recent BARREL x-ray observations.

  17. Low-Temperature Photochemically Activated Amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc Oxide for Highly Stable Room-Temperature Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Jaisutti, Rawat; Kim, Jaeyoung; Park, Sung Kyu; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2016-08-10

    We report on highly stable amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) gas sensors for ultraviolet (UV)-activated room-temperature detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The IGZO sensors fabricated by a low-temperature photochemical activation process and exhibiting two orders higher photocurrent compared to conventional zinc oxide sensors, allowed high gas sensitivity against various VOCs even at room temperature. From a systematic analysis, it was found that by increasing the UV intensity, the gas sensitivity, response time, and recovery behavior of an IGZO sensor were strongly enhanced. In particular, under an UV intensity of 30 mW cm(-2), the IGZO sensor exhibited gas sensitivity, response time and recovery time of 37%, 37 and 53 s, respectively, against 750 ppm concentration of acetone gas. Moreover, the IGZO gas sensor had an excellent long-term stability showing around 6% variation in gas sensitivity over 70 days. These results strongly support a conclusion that a low-temperature solution-processed amorphous IGZO film can serve as a good candidate for room-temperature VOCs sensors for emerging wearable electronics.

  18. MedTech Mag-Lev, single-use, extracorporeal magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump for mid-term circulatory support.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Eiki; Fujiwara, Tatsuki; Kitao, Takashi; Sakota, Daisuke; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Arai, Hirokuni; Takatani, Setsuo

    2013-01-01

    Short- to mid-term extracorporeal ventricular assist devices (VADs) are recommended for critical cardiogenic shock patients. We have designed a preclinical, single-use MedTech Mag-Lev VAD for one-month extracorporeal use. The impeller-rotor of the pump was suspended by a two degree-of-freedom active magnetic bearing in a 300 μm fluid gap, where the computational fluid dynamics analysis predicted a secondary flow of about 400-500 ml/min at a pump speed of 1800-2200 rpm. Three eddy current sensors were employed to implement noise- and drift-free magnetic levitation. The pump components were injection molded using polycarbonate for smooth surfaces as well as improved reproducibility, followed by coating with a biocompatible 2-methacryloyl-oxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymer. Chronic animal experiments were performed in nine calves. Three of the nine calves were excluded from analysis for problems with the circuit. Five of the six (83.3%) completed the 60 day duration of the study, while one prematurely died of massive bleeding due to inflow port detachment. The pump did not stop due to magnetic-levitation malfunction. Neither pump thrombosis nor major organ infarction was observed at autopsy. In comparison to machined surfaces, the injection-molded pump surfaces were thrombus-free after 60 day implantation. This study demonstrates the feasibility of MedTech Mag-Lev VAD for 60 day circulatory support.

  19. Managing oil and gas activities in coastal environments. Volume II: comprehensive report. Report for 1977-81

    SciTech Connect

    Longley, W.L.; Jackson, R.; Snyder, B.

    1982-03-01

    This report documents the management of oil and gas development on national wildlife refuges on the Louisiana and Texas coasts. It explains the nature of ownership, leasing rights, and legal considerations related to oil and gas extraction on refuges. The report describes five federal refuges selected for analysis and the different marsh and estuarine ecosystems found on the refuges and in the coastal zone. It explains oil and gas extraction and transport methods used in coastal systems, and examines how each habitat is affected by these activities.

  20. 17 CFR 210.4-10 - Financial accounting and reporting for oil and gas producing activities pursuant to the Federal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... reporting for oil and gas producing activities pursuant to the Federal securities laws and the Energy Policy... COMPANY ACT OF 1940, INVESTMENT ADVISERS ACT OF 1940, AND ENERGY POLICY AND CONSERVATION ACT OF 1975 Rules... activities pursuant to the Federal securities laws and the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975....

  1. Coalbed natural gas exploration, drilling activities, and geologic test results, 2007-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Arthur C.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in partnership with the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, the North Slope Borough, and the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation conducted a four-year study designed to identify, define, and delineate a shallow coalbed natural gas (CBNG) resource with the potential to provide locally produced, affordable power to the community of Wainwright, Alaska. From 2007 through 2010, drilling and testing activities conducted at three sites in or near Wainwright, identified and evaluated an approximately 7.5-ft-thick, laterally continuous coalbed that contained significant quantities of CBNG. This coalbed, subsequently named the Wainwright coalbed, was penetrated at depths ranging from 1,167 ft to 1,300 ft below land surface. Core samples were collected from the Wainwright coalbed at all three drill locations and desorbed-gas measurements were taken from seventeen 1-ft-thick sections of the core. These measurements indicate that the Wainwright coalbed contains enough CBNG to serve as a long-term energy supply for the community. Although attempts to produce viable quantities of CBNG from the Wainwright coalbed proved unsuccessful, it seems likely that with proper well-field design and by utilizing currently available drilling and reservoir stimulation techniques, this CBNG resource could be developed as a long-term economically viable energy source for Wainwright.

  2. Optimal placement of piezoelectric plates for active vibration control of gas turbine blades: experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, F.; Marx, N.; Gentili, S.; Schwingshackl, C. W.; Di Mare, L.; Cerri, G.; Dini, D.

    2012-04-01

    It is well known that the gas turbine blade vibrations can give rise to catastrophic failures and a reduction of the blades life because of fatigue related phenomena[1]-[3] . In last two decades, the adoption of piezoelectric elements, has received considerable attention by many researcher for its potential applicability to different areas of mechanical, aerospace, aeronautical and civil engineering. Recently, a number of studies of blades vibration control via piezoelectric plates and patches have been reported[4]-[6] . It was reported that the use of piezoelectric elements can be very effective in actively controlling vibrations. In one of their previous contributions[7] , the authors of the present manuscript studied a model to control the blade vibrations by piezoelectric elements and validated their results using a multi-physics finite elements package (COMSOL) and results from the literature. An optimal placement method of piezoelectric plate has been developed and applied to different loading scenarios for realistic configurations encountered in gas turbine blades. It has been demonstrated that the optimal placement depends on the spectrum of the load, so that segmented piezoelectric patches have been considered and, for different loads, an optimal combination of sequential and/or parallel actuation and control of the segments has been studied. In this paper, an experimental investigation carried out by the authors using a simplified beam configuration is reported and discussed. The test results obtained by the investigators are then compared with the numerical predictions [7] .

  3. Degradation of dyes by active species injected from a gas phase surface discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Wang, Tiecheng; Lu, Na; Zhang, Dandan; Wu, Yan; Wang, Tianwei; Sato, Masayuki

    2011-06-01

    A reactor, based on the traditional gas phase surface discharge (GPSD), is designed for degradation of dye wastewater in this study. The reactor is characterized by using the dye wastewater as a ground electrode. A spiral discharge electrode of stainless steel wire attached on the inside wall of a cylindrical insulating medium and the wastewater surrounding the insulating medium for simultaneous cooling of the discharge electrode constitute the reactor. The active chemical radicals generated by the discharge of the spiral electrode are injected into the water with the carrier gas. The removal of three organic dyes (including methyl red (MR), reactive brilliant blue (RBB) and cationic red (CR)) in aqueous solution is investigated. The effects of electrode configuration, discharge voltage and solution pH value on the decoloration efficiency of MR are discussed. The experimental results show that over 95% of decoloration efficiencies for all the dyes are obtained after several minutes of plasma treatment. 40% of chemical oxygen demand removal of MR is obtained after 8 min of discharge treatment. Furthermore, it is found that ozone mainly affects the removal of dyes and several aliphatic compounds are identified as the oxidation products of MR. The possible degradation pathways of MR by GPSD are proposed.

  4. Characterization of airborne particles generated from metal active gas welding process.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, C; Gomes, J F; Carvalho, P; Santos, T J G; Miranda, R M; Albuquerque, P

    2014-05-01

    This study is focused on the characterization of particles emitted in the metal active gas welding of carbon steel using mixture of Ar + CO2, and intends to analyze which are the main process parameters that influence the emission itself. It was found that the amount of emitted particles (measured by particle number and alveolar deposited surface area) are clearly dependent on the distance to the welding front and also on the main welding parameters, namely the current intensity and heat input in the welding process. The emission of airborne fine particles seems to increase with the current intensity as fume-formation rate does. When comparing the tested gas mixtures, higher emissions are observed for more oxidant mixtures, that is, mixtures with higher CO2 content, which result in higher arc stability. These mixtures originate higher concentrations of fine particles (as measured by number of particles by cm(3) of air) and higher values of alveolar deposited surface area of particles, thus resulting in a more severe worker's exposure.

  5. Light-activated NO2 gas sensing of the networked CuO-decorated ZnS nanowire gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sunghoon; Sun, Gun-Joo; Kheel, Hyejoon; Ko, Taegyung; Kim, Hyoun Woo; Lee, Chongmu

    2016-05-01

    CuO-decorated ZnS nanowires were synthesized by the thermal evaporation of ZnS powders followed by a solvothermal process for CuO decoration. The NO2 gas sensing properties of multiple-networked pristine and CuO-decorated ZnS nanowire sensors were then examined. The diameters of the CuO nanoparticles ranged from 20 to 60 nm. The multiple-networked pristine and CuO-decorated ZnS nanowire sensors showed the responses of 394 and 1055 %, respectively, to 5 ppm of NO2 at room temperature under UV illumination at 2.2 mW/cm2. The response and recovery times of the ZnS nanowire sensor to 5 ppm of NO2 were also reduced by decoration with the CuO nanoparticles. The responses of the sensors to NO2 at room temperature increased significantly with increasing UV illumination intensity. The underlying mechanisms for the enhanced response of the ZnS nanowire sensor to NO2 gas by CuO decoration and UV irradiation are discussed.

  6. Gas sensing properties of Al-doped ZnO for UV-activated CO detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhahri, R.; Hjiri, M.; El Mir, L.; Bonavita, A.; Iannazzo, D.; Latino, M.; Donato, N.; Leonardi, S. G.; Neri, G.

    2016-04-01

    Al-doped ZnO (AZO) samples were prepared using a modified sol-gel route and charaterized by means of trasmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and photoluminescence analysis. Resistive planar devices based on thick films of AZO deposited on interdigitated alumina substrates were fabricated and investigated as UV light activated CO sensors. CO sensing tests were performed in both dark and illumination condition by exposing the samples to UV radiation (λ  =  400 nm).Under UV light, Al-doped ZnO gas sensors operated at lower temperature than in dark. Furthermore, by photoactivation we also promoted CO sensitivity and made signal recovery of AZO sensors faster. Results demonstrate that Al-doped ZnO might be a promising sensing material for the detection of CO under UV illumination.

  7. Novel sensors to enable closed-loop active clearance control in gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisheimer, Jonathan; Holst, Tom

    2014-06-01

    Active clearance control within the turbine section of gas turbine engines presents and opportunity within aerospace and industrial applications to improve operating efficiencies and the life of downstream components. Open loop clearance control is currently employed during the development of all new large core aerospace engines; however, the ability to measure the gap between the blades and the case and close down the clearance further presents as opportunity to gain even greater efficiencies. The turbine area is one of the harshest environments for long term placement of a sensor in addition to the extreme accuracy requirements required to enable closed loop clearance control. This paper gives an overview of the challenges of clearance measurements within the turbine as well as discusses the latest developments of a microwave sensor designed for this application.

  8. Rapid quantification of dimethyl methylphosphonate from activated carbon particles by static headspace gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Brendan L; Billingsley, Brit G; Logue, Brian A

    2013-06-07

    Activated carbon (AC) particles are utilized as an adsorbent for binding hazardous vapors in protective equipment. The binding affinity and utilization of these AC particles should be known to ensure effective and efficient use. Therefore, a simple and effective method was developed for the quantification of the chemical warfare agent simulant, dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), from AC particles. Static headspace gas chromatography mass-spectrometry with internal standard, DMMP-d6, was used to perform the analysis. The method produced a linear dynamic range of 2.48-620g DMMP/kg carbon and a detection limit of 1.24g DMMP/kg carbon. Furthermore, the method produced a coefficient of variation of less than 16% for all intra- and inter-assay analyses. The method provided a simple and effective procedure for quantifying DMMP from AC particles and was applied to the analysis of a DMMP-exposed AC protective respirator filter.

  9. Outflowing Diffuse Gas in the Active Galactic Nucleus of NGC 1068

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geballe, T. R.; Mason, R. E.; Oka, T.

    2015-10-01

    Spectra of the archetypal Type II Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068 in a narrow wavelength interval near 3.7 μm have revealed a weak absorption feature due to two lines of the molecular ion {{{H}}}3+. The observed wavelength of the feature corresponds to a velocity of -70 km s-1 relative to the systemic velocity of the galaxy, implying an outward flow from the nucleus along the line of sight. The absorption by H{}3+ along with the previously known broad hydrocarbon absorption at 3.4μm are probably formed in diffuse gas that is in close proximity to the continuum source, i.e., within a few tens of parsecs of the central engine. Based on that conclusion and the measured H{}3+ absorption velocity and with the assumption of a spherically symmetric wind we estimate a rate of mass outflow from the active galactic nucleus of ˜1 M⊙ yr-1.

  10. The Dense Molecular Gas and Nuclear Activity in the ULIRG IRAS 13120–5453

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privon, G. C.; Aalto, S.; Falstad, N.; Muller, S.; González-Alfonso, E.; Sliwa, K.; Treister, E.; Costagliola, F.; Armus, L.; Evans, A. S.; Garcia-Burillo, S.; Izumi, T.; Sakamoto, K.; van der Werf, P.; Chu, J. K.

    2017-02-01

    We present new Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array Band 7 (∼340 GHz) observations of the dense gas tracers HCN, HCO+, and CS in the local, single-nucleus, ultraluminous infrared galaxy IRAS 13120–5453. We find centrally enhanced HCN (4–3) emission, relative to HCO+ (4–3), but do not find evidence for radiative pumping of HCN. Considering the size of the starburst (0.5 kpc) and the estimated supernovae rate of ∼1.2 yr‑1, the high HCN/HCO+ ratio can be explained by an enhanced HCN abundance as a result of mechanical heating by the supernovae, though the active galactic nucleus and winds may also contribute additional mechanical heating. The starburst size implies a high ΣIR of 4.7 × 1012 L⊙ kpc‑2, slightly below predictions of radiation-pressure limited starbursts. The HCN line profile has low-level wings, which we tentatively interpret as evidence for outflowing dense molecular gas. However, the dense molecular outflow seen in the HCN line wings is unlikely to escape the Galaxy and is destined to return to the nucleus and fuel future star formation. We also present modeling of Herschel observations of the H2O lines and find a nuclear dust temperature of ∼40 K. IRAS 13120–5453 has a lower dust temperature and ΣIR than is inferred for the systems termed “compact obscured nuclei (CONs)” (such as Arp 220 and Mrk 231). If IRAS 13120–5453 has undergone a CON phase, we are likely witnessing it at a time when the feedback has already inflated the nuclear ISM and diluted star formation in the starburst/active galactic nucleus core.

  11. MagIC: a textile system for vital signs monitoring. Advancement in design and embedded intelligence for daily life applications.

    PubMed

    Di Rienzo, Marco; Rizzo, Francesco; Meriggi, Paolo; Castiglioni, Paolo; Mazzoleni, Paolo; Ferrarin, Maurizio; Ferratini, Maurizio

    2007-01-01

    We recently developed a textile-based system for the unobtrusive assessment of vital signs. The system, named MagIC, was originally designed to collect data in elderly people and cardiac patients while living in a confined environment. Extending the area of application of MagIC from clinics to daily life meant to pay particular attention to the garment design and to the amount of intelligence embedded into the system. In this paper we addressed both these issues by illustrating 1) a new methodology we are developing to help the design of smart garments for daily life applications and 2) an example of embedded intelligence developed for an application of MagIC in ergonomics.

  12. MagArray Biochips for Protein and DNA Detection with Magnetic Nanotags: Design, Experiment, and Signal-to-Noise Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterfeld, Sebastian J.; Wang, Shan X.

    MagArray™ chips contain arrays of magnetic sensors, which can be used to detect surface binding reactions of biological molecules that have been labeled with 10 to 100 nm sized magnetic particles. Although MagArray chips are in some ways similar to fluorescence-based DNA array chips, the use of magnetic labeling tags leads to many distinct advantages, such as better background rejection, no label bleaching, inexpensive chip readers, potentially higher sensitivity, ability to measure multiple binding reactions in homogeneous assays simultaneously and in real-time, and seamless integration with magnetic separation techniques. So far, the technology of MagArray chips has been successfully used to perform quantitative analytic bioassays of both protein and nucleic acid targets. The potential of this technology, especially for point-of-care testing (POCT) and portable molecular diagnostics, appears promising, and it is likely that this technology will see significant further performance gains in the near future.

  13. Gas Phase Uranyl Activation: Formation of a Uranium Nitrosyl Complex from Uranyl Azide

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Yu; De Jong, Wibe A.; Gibson, John K.

    2015-05-13

    Activation of the oxo bond of uranyl, UO22+, was achieved by collision induced dissociation (CID) of UO2(N3)Cl2– in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The gas phase complex UO2(N3)Cl2– was produced by electrospray ionization of solutions of UO2Cl2 and NaN3. CID of UO2(N3)Cl2– resulted in the loss of N2 to form UO(NO)Cl2–, in which the “inert” uranyl oxo bond has been activated. Formation of UO2Cl2– via N3 loss was also observed. Density functional theory computations predict that the UO(NO)Cl2– complex has nonplanar Cs symmetry and a singlet ground state. Analysis of the bonding of the UO(NO)Cl2– complex shows that the side-on bonded NO moiety can be considered as NO3–, suggesting a formal oxidation state of U(VI). Activation of the uranyl oxo bond in UO2(N3)Cl2– to form UO(NO)Cl2– and N2 was computed to be endothermic by 169 kJ/mol, which is energetically more favorable than formation of NUOCl2– and UO2Cl2–. The observation of UO2Cl2– during CID is most likely due to the absence of an energy barrier for neutral ligand loss.

  14. The evolution of protected species studies to determine effects of offshore oil and gas activities

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, W.; Fairfield, C. )

    1990-01-09

    The Minerals Management Service (MMS) Environmental Studies Program (ESP) was initiated in 1973 to help ensure that the environmental information on which Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil and gas development decisions are based is the most definitive that can be assembled at the time. The majority of ESP studies are designed to provide information on the status of the environment, and to identify the extent of potential impact of OCS development activities. Federal OCS activities must comply with several environmental' acts, including the Marine Mammal Protection Act and the Endangered Species Act. In response to these acts, MMS has funded a significant amount of research on protected species. The basic intent of these studies is to determine if proposed OCS activities will affect protected species and whether means exist to mitigate any effects found. Over the 15 years of the ESP, protected species studies have evolved from literature syntheses and relatively simple survey efforts, to more complex studies attempting to understand complicated behavioral and physiological responses to OCS effects (e.g. noise, spilled oil), and to evaluate protected species within the context of habitat characterization. This last goal has produced a need for multidisciplinary field research. Two major field efforts have been undertaken in the Beaufort Sea and Georges Bank areas. The question of if' protected species are present has generally been answered for key OCS regions; the next step for effective environmental decision making is to understand why' protected species are present.

  15. Gas phase uranyl activation: formation of a uranium nitrosyl complex from uranyl azide.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu; de Jong, Wibe A; Gibson, John K

    2015-05-13

    Activation of the oxo bond of uranyl, UO2(2+), was achieved by collision induced dissociation (CID) of UO2(N3)Cl2(-) in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The gas phase complex UO2(N3)Cl2(-) was produced by electrospray ionization of solutions of UO2Cl2 and NaN3. CID of UO2(N3)Cl2(-) resulted in the loss of N2 to form UO(NO)Cl2(-), in which the "inert" uranyl oxo bond has been activated. Formation of UO2Cl2(-) via N3 loss was also observed. Density functional theory computations predict that the UO(NO)Cl2(-) complex has nonplanar Cs symmetry and a singlet ground state. Analysis of the bonding of the UO(NO)Cl2(-) complex shows that the side-on bonded NO moiety can be considered as NO(3-), suggesting a formal oxidation state of U(VI). Activation of the uranyl oxo bond in UO2(N3)Cl2(-) to form UO(NO)Cl2(-) and N2 was computed to be endothermic by 169 kJ/mol, which is energetically more favorable than formation of NUOCl2(-) and UO2Cl2(-). The observation of UO2Cl2(-) during CID is most likely due to the absence of an energy barrier for neutral ligand loss.

  16. Substrate lability and plant activity controls greenhouse gas release from Neotropical peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjogersten, Sofie; Hoyos, Jorge; Lomax, Barry; Turner, Ben; Wright, Emma

    2014-05-01

    Almost one third of global CO2 emissions resulting from land use change and substantial CH4 emissions originate from tropical peatlands. However, our understanding of the controls of CO2 and CH4 release from tropical peatlands are limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of peat lability and the activity of the vegetation on gas release using a combination of field and laboratory experiments. We demonstrated that peat lability constrained CH4 production to the surface peat under anaerobic conditions. The presence of plants shifted the C balance from a C source to a C sink with respect to CO2 while the activity of the root system strongly influenced CH4 emissions through its impact on soil O2 inputs. Both field and laboratory data suggest a coupling between the photosynthetic activity of the vegetation and the release of both CO2 and CH4 following the circadian rhythm of the dominant plant functional types. Forest clearance for agriculture resulted in elevated CH4 release, which we attribute in part to the cessation of root O2 inputs to the peat. We conclude that high emissions of CO2 and CH4 from forested tropical peatlands are likely driven by labile C inputs from the vegetation but that root O2 release may limit CH4 emissions.

  17. Enhanced pulmonary and active skeletal muscle gas exchange during intense exercise after sprint training in men.

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, M J; Heigenhauser, G J; McKelvie, R S; Obminski, G; MacDougall, J D; Jones, N L

    1997-01-01

    1. This study investigated the effects of 7 weeks of sprint training on gas exchange across the lungs and active skeletal muscle during and following maximal cycling exercise in eight healthy males. 2. Pulmonary oxygen uptake (VO2) and carbon dioxide output (VCO2) were measured before and after training during incremental exercise (n = 8) and during and in recovery from a maximal 30 s sprint exercise bout by breath-by-breath analysis (n = 6). To determine gas exchange by the exercising leg muscles, brachial arterial and femoral venous blood O2 and CO2 contents and lactate concentration were measured at rest, during the final 10 s of exercise and during 10 min of recovery. 3. Training increased (P < 0.05) the maximal incremental exercise values of ventilation (VE, by 15.7 +/- 7.1%), VCO2 (by 9.3 +/- 2.1%) and VO2 (by 15.0 +/- 4.2%). Sprint exercise peak power (3.9 +/- 1.0% increase) and cumulative 30 s work (11.7 +/- 2.8% increase) were increased and fatigue index was reduced (by -9.2 +/- 1.5%) after training (P < 0.05). The highest VE, VCO2 and VO2 values attained during sprint exercise were not significantly changed after training, but a significant (P < 0.05) training effect indicated increased VE (by 19.2 +/- 7.9%), VCO2 (by 9.3 +/- 2.1%) and VO2 (by 12.7 +/- 6.5%), primarily reflecting elevated post-exercise values after training. 4. Arterial O2 and CO2 contents were lower after training, by respective mean differences of 3.4 and 21.9 ml l-1 (P < 0.05), whereas the arteriovenous O2 and CO2 content differences and the respiratory exchange ratio across the leg were unchanged by training. 5. Arterial whole blood lactate concentration and the net lactate release by exercising muscle were unchanged by training. 6. The greater peak pulmonary VO2 and VCO2 with sprint exercise, the increased maximal incremental values, unchanged arterial blood lactate concentration and greater sprint performance all point strongly towards enhanced gas exchange across the lungs and in

  18. Capillary pressure – saturation relationships for gas shales measured using a water activity meter

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, B.; Perfect, E.; McKay, L. D.; Lemiszki, P. J.; DiStefano, V. H.; Anovitz, L. M.; McFarlane, J.; Hale, R. E.; Cheng, C. -L.

    2016-05-10

    Hydraulic fracturing of gas shale formations involves pumping a large volume of fracking fluid into a hydrocarbon reservoir to fracture the rock and thus increase its permeability. The majority of the fracking fluid introduced is never recovered and the fate of this lost fluid, often called “leak off,” has become the source of much debate. Information on the capillary pressure – saturation relationship for each wetting phase is needed to simulate leak off using numerical reservoir models. The petroleum industry commonly employs air – water capillary pressure – saturation curves to predict these relationships for mixed wet reservoirs. Traditional methods of measuring this curve are unsuitable for gas shales due to high capillary pressures associated with the small pores present. Still, a possible alternative method is the water activity meter which is used widely in the soil sciences for such measurements. However, its application to lithified material has been limited. Here, this study utilized a water activity meter to measure air – water capillary pressures (ranging from 1.3 to 219.6 MPa) at several water saturation levels in both the wetting and drying directions. Water contents were measured gravimetrically. Seven types of gas producing shale with different porosities (2.5–13.6%) and total organic carbon contents (0.4–13.5%) were investigated. Nonlinear regression was used to fit the resulting capillary pressure – water saturation data pairs for each shale type to the Brooks and Corey equation. Data for six of the seven shale types investigated were successfully fitted (median R2 = 0.93), indicating this may be a viable method for parameterizing capillary pressure – saturation relationships for inclusion in numerical reservoir models. As expected, the different shale types had statistically different Brooks and Corey parameters. However, there were no significant differences between the Brooks and Corey parameters for the wetting

  19. Enhanced pulmonary and active skeletal muscle gas exchange during intense exercise after sprint training in men.

    PubMed

    McKenna, M J; Heigenhauser, G J; McKelvie, R S; Obminski, G; MacDougall, J D; Jones, N L

    1997-06-15

    1. This study investigated the effects of 7 weeks of sprint training on gas exchange across the lungs and active skeletal muscle during and following maximal cycling exercise in eight healthy males. 2. Pulmonary oxygen uptake (VO2) and carbon dioxide output (VCO2) were measured before and after training during incremental exercise (n = 8) and during and in recovery from a maximal 30 s sprint exercise bout by breath-by-breath analysis (n = 6). To determine gas exchange by the exercising leg muscles, brachial arterial and femoral venous blood O2 and CO2 contents and lactate concentration were measured at rest, during the final 10 s of exercise and during 10 min of recovery. 3. Training increased (P < 0.05) the maximal incremental exercise values of ventilation (VE, by 15.7 +/- 7.1%), VCO2 (by 9.3 +/- 2.1%) and VO2 (by 15.0 +/- 4.2%). Sprint exercise peak power (3.9 +/- 1.0% increase) and cumulative 30 s work (11.7 +/- 2.8% increase) were increased and fatigue index was reduced (by -9.2 +/- 1.5%) after training (P < 0.05). The highest VE, VCO2 and VO2 values attained during sprint exercise were not significantly changed after training, but a significant (P < 0.05) training effect indicated increased VE (by 19.2 +/- 7.9%), VCO2 (by 9.3 +/- 2.1%) and VO2 (by 12.7 +/- 6.5%), primarily reflecting elevated post-exercise values after training. 4. Arterial O2 and CO2 contents were lower after training, by respective mean differences of 3.4 and 21.9 ml l-1 (P < 0.05), whereas the arteriovenous O2 and CO2 content differences and the respiratory exchange ratio across the leg were unchanged by training. 5. Arterial whole blood lactate concentration and the net lactate release by exercising muscle were unchanged by training. 6. The greater peak pulmonary VO2 and VCO2 with sprint exercise, the increased maximal incremental values, unchanged arterial blood lactate concentration and greater sprint performance all point strongly towards enhanced gas exchange across the lungs and in

  20. Capillary pressure – saturation relationships for gas shales measured using a water activity meter

    DOE PAGES

    Donnelly, B.; Perfect, E.; McKay, L. D.; ...

    2016-05-10

    Hydraulic fracturing of gas shale formations involves pumping a large volume of fracking fluid into a hydrocarbon reservoir to fracture the rock and thus increase its permeability. The majority of the fracking fluid introduced is never recovered and the fate of this lost fluid, often called “leak off,” has become the source of much debate. Information on the capillary pressure – saturation relationship for each wetting phase is needed to simulate leak off using numerical reservoir models. The petroleum industry commonly employs air – water capillary pressure – saturation curves to predict these relationships for mixed wet reservoirs. Traditional methodsmore » of measuring this curve are unsuitable for gas shales due to high capillary pressures associated with the small pores present. Still, a possible alternative method is the water activity meter which is used widely in the soil sciences for such measurements. However, its application to lithified material has been limited. Here, this study utilized a water activity meter to measure air – water capillary pressures (ranging from 1.3 to 219.6 MPa) at several water saturation levels in both the wetting and drying directions. Water contents were measured gravimetrically. Seven types of gas producing shale with different porosities (2.5–13.6%) and total organic carbon contents (0.4–13.5%) were investigated. Nonlinear regression was used to fit the resulting capillary pressure – water saturation data pairs for each shale type to the Brooks and Corey equation. Data for six of the seven shale types investigated were successfully fitted (median R2 = 0.93), indicating this may be a viable method for parameterizing capillary pressure – saturation relationships for inclusion in numerical reservoir models. As expected, the different shale types had statistically different Brooks and Corey parameters. However, there were no significant differences between the Brooks and Corey parameters for the wetting and

  1. Measurement of atmospheric pollutants associated with oil and natural gas exploration and production activity in Pennsylvania's Allegheny National Forest.

    PubMed

    Pekney, Natalie J; Veloski, Garret; Reeder, Matthew; Tamilia, Joseph; Rupp, Erik; Wetzel, Alan

    2014-09-01

    Oil and natural gas exploration and production (E&P) activities generate emissions from diesel engines, compressor stations, condensate tanks, leaks and venting of natural gas, construction of well pads, and well access roads that can negatively impact air quality on both local and regional scales. A mobile, autonomous air quality monitoring laboratory was constructed to collect measurements of ambient concentrations of pollutants associated with oil and natural gas E&P activities. This air-monitoring laboratory was deployed to the Allegheny National Forest (ANF) in northwestern Pennsylvania for a campaign that resulted in the collection of approximately 7 months of data split between three monitoring locations between July 2010 and June 2011. The three monitoring locations were the Kane Experimental Forest (KEF) area in Elk County, which is downwind of the Sackett oilfield; the Bradford Ranger Station (BRS) in McKean County, which is downwind of a large area of historic oil and gas productivity; and the U.S. Forest Service Hearts Content campground (HC) in Warren County, which is in an area relatively unimpacted by oil and gas development and which therefore yielded background pollutant concentrations in the ANF. Concentrations of criteria pollutants ozone and NO2 did not vary significantly from site to site; averages were below National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) associated with oil and natural gas (ethane, propane, butane, pentane) were highly correlated. Applying the conditional probability function (CPF) to the ethane data yielded most probable directions of the sources that were coincident with known location of existing wells and activity. Differences between the two impacted and one background site were difficult to discern, suggesting the that the monitoring laboratory was a great enough distance downwind of active areas to allow for sufficient dispersion with background air such that the localized

  2. Development of a rhenium-186-labeled MAG3-conjugated bisphosphonate for the palliation of metastatic bone pain based on the concept of bifunctional radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Mukai, Takahiro; Arano, Yasushi; Ono, Masahiro; Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Ishino, Seigo; Hashimoto, Kazuyuki; Nishimura, Hiroshi; Saji, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    Rhenium-186-1-hydroxyethylidene-1,1-diphosphonate (186Re-HEDP) has been used for the palliation of metastatic bone pain. Delayed blood clearance and high gastric uptake of radioactivity have been observed upon injection, due to the instability of (186)Re-HEDP in vivo. In this study, on the basis of the concept of bifunctional radiopharmaceuticals, we designed a stable 186Re-mercaptoacetylglycylglycylglycine (MAG3) complex-conjugated bisphosphonate, [[[[(4-hydroxy-4,4-diphosphonobutyl)carbamoylmethyl]carbamoylmethyl]carbamoylmethyl]carbamoylmethanethiolate]oxorhenium(V) (186Re-MAG3-HBP). As a precursor, [1-hydroxy-1-phosphono-4-[2-[2-[2-(2-tritylmercaptoacetylamino)acetylamino]acetylamino]acetylamino]butyl]phosphonic acid (Tr-MAG3-HBP) was synthesized by the conjugation of N-[(tritylmercapto)acetyl]glycylglycylglycine (Tr-MAG3) with the bisphosphonate analogue. After deprotection of the trityl group of Tr-MAG3-HBP, 186Re-labeling was performed by reacting 186ReO4- with SnCl2 in citrate buffer. After purification by HPLC, 186Re-MAG3-HBP showed a radiochemical purity of over 95%. To compare the stability of 186Re-MAG3-HBP and 186Re-HEDP, these (186)Re complexes were incubated in phosphate buffer. No measurable decomposition of 186Re-MAG3-HBP occurred over a 24-h period, while only approximately 30% of 186Re-HEDP remained intact 24 h postincubation. In biodistribution experiments, the radioactivity level of 186Re-MAG3-HBP in bone was significantly higher than that of (186)Re-HEDP. Blood clearance of 186Re-MAG3-HBP was faster than that of 186Re-HEDP. In addition, the gastric accumulation of 186Re-MAG3-HBP radioactivity was lower than that of 186Re-HEDP. In conclusion, 186Re-MAG3-HBP is expected to be a useful radiopharmaceutical for the palliation of metastatic bone pain.

  3. Global distribution of crustal magnetization discovered by the mars global surveyor MAG/ER experiment

    PubMed

    Acuna; Connerney; Ness; Lin; Mitchell; Carlson; McFadden; Anderson; Reme; Mazelle; Vignes; Wasilewski; Cloutier

    1999-04-30

    Vector magnetic field observations of the martian crust were acquired by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) magnetic field experiment/electron reflectometer (MAG/ER) during the aerobraking and science phasing orbits, at altitudes between approximately 100 and 200 kilometers. Magnetic field sources of multiple scales, strength, and geometry were observed. There is a correlation between the location of the sources and the ancient cratered terrain of the martian highlands. The absence of crustal magnetism near large impact basins such as Hellas and Argyre implies cessation of internal dynamo action during the early Naochian epoch ( approximately 4 billion years ago). Sources with equivalent magnetic moments as large as 1.3 x 10(17) ampere-meter2 in the Terra Sirenum region contribute to the development of an asymmetrical, time-variable obstacle to solar wind flow around Mars.

  4. Preparation of Magnetic Carbon Nanotubes (Mag-CNTs) for Biomedical and Biotechnological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Masotti, Andrea; Caporali, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely studied for their potential applications in many fields from nanotechnology to biomedicine. The preparation of magnetic CNTs (Mag-CNTs) opens new avenues in nanobiotechnology and biomedical applications as a consequence of their multiple properties embedded within the same moiety. Several preparation techniques have been developed during the last few years to obtain magnetic CNTs: grafting or filling nanotubes with magnetic ferrofluids or attachment of magnetic nanoparticles to CNTs or their polymeric coating. These strategies allow the generation of novel versatile systems that can be employed in many biotechnological or biomedical fields. Here, we review and discuss the most recent papers dealing with the preparation of magnetic CNTs and their application in biomedical and biotechnological fields. PMID:24351838

  5. Preparation of magnetic carbon nanotubes (Mag-CNTs) for biomedical and biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Masotti, Andrea; Caporali, Andrea

    2013-12-18

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely studied for their potential applications in many fields from nanotechnology to biomedicine. The preparation of magnetic CNTs (Mag-CNTs) opens new avenues in nanobiotechnology and biomedical applications as a consequence of their multiple properties embedded within the same moiety. Several preparation techniques have been developed during the last few years to obtain magnetic CNTs: grafting or filling nanotubes with magnetic ferrofluids or attachment of magnetic nanoparticles to CNTs or their polymeric coating. These strategies allow the generation of novel versatile systems that can be employed in many biotechnological or biomedical fields. Here, we review and discuss the most recent papers dealing with the preparation of magnetic CNTs and their application in biomedical and biotechnological fields.

  6. From the ganglioside GQ1balpha to glycomimetic antagonists of the myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG).

    PubMed

    Ernst, Beat; Schwardt, Oliver; Mesch, Stefanie; Wittwer, Matthias; Rossato, Gianluca; Vedani, Angelo

    2010-01-01

    The tetrasaccharide 4, a substructure of ganglioside GQ1balpha, shows a remarkable affinity for the myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) and was therefore selected as starting point for a lead optimization program. In our search for structurally simplified and pharmacokinetically improved mimics of 4, antagonists with modifications of the core disaccharide Galbeta(1-3)GalNAc, as well as the terminal alpha(2-3)- and the internal alpha(2-6)-linked neuraminic acid were synthesized and tested in target-based binding assays. Compared to the reference tetrasaccharide 4, the most potent antagonist 17 exhibits a 360-fold improved affinity. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic parameters such as stability in the cerebrospinal fluid, logD and permeation through the BBB indicate the drug-like properties of antagonist 17.

  7. Integrative Analysis of Hot Spot Conditions in MagLIF Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Patrick; Gomez, Matthew; Harding, Eric; Hansen, Stephanie; Hahn, Kelly; Geissel, Matthias; Chandler, Gordon; Smith, Ian; Slutz, Steve; Jennings, Chris; Martin, Matthew; Schmit, Paul; Peterson, Kyle; Rochau, Gregory; McBride, Ryan; Sinars, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    A large data set incorporating all available neutron and x-ray data is used to analyze a broad range of Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments conducted on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories over the past two years. Electron and ion temperatures, electron density, mix fraction, burn volume and duration, and neutron and x-ray yields are all measured on each experiment; several through multiple independent methods. Complementary methods are used to infer the hot spot energy and pressure, and trends are analyzed. The results are placed in the context of accepted performance metrics for Magneto-Inertial Fusion. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE.

  8. [Mental health of gas and gas-transport industry workers as an indispensable condition of their efficient occupational activity].

    PubMed

    Polozhiĭ, B S

    2013-01-01

    Mental health workers in industry is a major health and social resource of any developed country. Unfortunately, Russia's level of mental health workers is unfavorable level. We have conducted a survey of employees psychoprophylactic mass of the gas industry, which occupies a leading position in the economy. Found that the prevalence of mental disorders in this professional group is 187 per 1,000 workers. In this case, 99.3% of employees with mental health problems of mentally ill for a long time, they do not receive appropriate treatment. Leading position in the structure occupy disorder with anxious and depressive symptoms, about 75% of all cases. In the treatment of these patients showed the highest efficiency Luvox, which is one of the most appropriate products in a production environment.

  9. Conical Magnetic Bearings Developed for Active Stall Control in Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trudell, Jeffrey J.; Kascak, Albert F.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Buccieri, Carl J.

    2004-01-01

    Active stall control is a current research area at the NASA Glenn Research Center that offers a great benefit in specific fuel consumption by allowing the gas turbine to operate beyond the onset of stall. Magnetic bearings are being investigated as a new method to perform active stall control. This enabling global aviation safety technology would result in improved fuel efficiency and decreased carbon dioxide emissions, as well as improve safety and reliability by eliminating oil-related delays and failures of engine components, which account for 40 percent of the commercial aircraft departure delays. Active stall control works by perturbing the flow in front of the compressor stage such that it cancels the pressure wave, which causes the compressor to go into stall. Radial magnetic bearings are able to whirl the shaft so that variations in blade tip leakage would flow upstream causing a perturbation wave that could cancel the rotating stall cell. Axial or thrust magnetic bearings cannot be used to cancel the surge mode in the compressor because they have a very low bandwidth and thus cannot modulate at a high enough frequency. Frequency response is limited because the thrust runner cannot be laminated. To improve the bandwidth of magnetic thrust bearings, researchers must use laminations to suppress the eddy currents. A conical magnetic bearing can be laminated, resulting in increased bandwidth in the axial direction. In addition, this design can produce both radial and thrust force in a single bearing, simplifying the installation. The proposed solution combines the radial and thrust bearing into one design that can be laminated--a conical magnetic bearing. The new conical magnetic bearing test rig, funded by a Glenn fiscal year 2002 Director's Discretionary Fund, was needed because none of the existing rigs has an axial degree of freedom. The rotor bearing configuration will simulate that of the main shaft on a gas turbine engine. One conical magnetic bearing

  10. Remediation of hydrophobic, persistent pollutants using a magnetic permanently confined micelle array (Mag-PCMA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, K. K.; Keller, A. A.

    2009-12-01

    Natural and anthropogenic factors have resulted in the deposition of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) like PAHs and PCBs in elevated levels in soils and sediments. Currently there are 150 Superfund sites in the United States with contaminated sediments. Dredging is the most common practice for restoring Superfund sites to their preexisting conditions; this requires the transport of large volumes of material off-site for additional storage or processing. Our lab has designed a nano-hybrid material that can be used on-site; it combines a magnetic nanoscale iron oxide core coated with a cationic surfactant and is encased in a mesoporous silica matrix, called magnetic permanently confined micelle arrays, (Mag-PCMAs). This sorbent has been designed to remove HOCs from such scenarios. Surfactants are important in the enhancement of transport from binding sites in nature, such as organic matter, onto sorbents and other recoverable materials. The sorbent’s magnetic core allows for rapid separation by applying a magnetic field. It has also been shown to be reusable and maintain a removal efficiency of 95% over five cycles of reuse. Preliminary sorption studies show that the sorbent is capable of removing up to 98% of hydrophobic compounds from aqueous media. Current sorption studies are being done to test the efficiency of removing PAHs and PCBs from sediments, soils, and suspended sediments. Physicochemical properties that will influence the desorption/sorption hysteresis are being characterized to determine which properties enhance desorption from the contaminated media onto the Mag-PCMAs. Relevant applications are diverse as this material has the potential to recover a variety of HOCs in both ex situ and in situ remediation scenarios. Magnetic Permanently Confined Micelle Arrays

  11. Diagnosing the Stagnation Conditions of MagLIF Implosions Using High-Resolution Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Eric

    2016-10-01

    An inertial fusion concept known as Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) is currently being pursued on the Z-machine at Sandia National Laboratory. Electrical current from the Z-machine is directly coupled onto the outside surface of a beryllium tube known as a ``liner'' causing it to implode. The liner contains gaseous deuterium (D2) fuel, which is pre-magnetized, pre-heated, and then compressed by the imploding walls of the liner. Target implosions of this type have produced thermonuclear plasmas that generated 2e12 DD neutrons [M.R. Gomez et al., PRL 113, 155003 (2014)]. For the first time we have accurately measured the space-dependent, fuel conditions at the time of stagnation. In addition, the state of the compressed Be liner was determined. This was accomplished by the simultaneous use of high-resolution, x-ray spectroscopic and imaging diagnostics. These new measurements relied on the observation of K-shell spectra emitted by microscopic iron and nickel impurities that naturally occur in the Be. The measurements currently indicate that the non-uniformity of the x-ray emission from the fuel is due to variations in the fuel conditions. Ultimately, the data provides critical insight into the performance of the MagLIF target and will further enable us to enhance the target design. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Transport of cosmic rays in magnetosphere and heliosphere: GeoMag and HelMod webmodels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobik, P.; Boschini, M. J.; Della Torre, S.; Gervasi, M.; Grandi, D.; Kudela, K.; La Vacca, G.; Mallamaci, M.; Pensotti, S.; Putis, M.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rozza, D.; Tacconi, M.

    2014-06-01

    Our codes to evaluate the solar modulation of Galactic Cosmic Rays (HelMod) and to trace the the charged particles inside the Earth magnetosphere (GeoMag) have been implemented as webmodels in the two websites, helmod.org and geomagsphere.org. HelMod model uses a 2D Monte Carlo approach to solves the Parker transport equation, obtaining a modulated flux of Cosmic Rays for a period starting from 1990. We implemented a web interface to get a catalog of: 1) proton energy spectra at a fixed time, and 2) time modulated flux at a fixed energy. A beta-version of HelMod for more complex simulations of protons, antiprotons, electrons and positrons, at any distance from the Sun is also available to the users. The GeoMag back-tracing code reconstructs the charged particle trajectories in the Earth Magnetosphere back in time. We use the last models of internal (IGRF-11) and external (Tsyganenko 1996 -T96- and 2005 -T05-) field components valid up to 2015. The user can get the vertical rigidity cutoff estimation obtained with the backtracing technique and the asymptotic coordinates and directions for several rigidities at a fixed position and date, starting from Jan. 1st, 1968 (for T96) and Jan. 1st, 1995 (for T05) respectively till 31st Dec 2012. The website geomagsphere.org reports, in addition, a list of the most intense solar flares registered by several observatories in space, starting from January 2011, together with the evaluation of the dynamic pressure of solar energetic particles, related to the major solar events occurred in the same period.

  13. Functional aspects of silent ureteral stones investigated with MAG-3 renal scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To investigate functional aspects of silent ureteral stones with special focus on obstruction and its relationship to renal anatomy. The present study is the first investigation of renal excretory function in patients with silent ureteral stones. Methods Patients with primarily asymptomatic ureteral stones underwent a mercapto-acetyltriglycine (MAG-3) renal scintigraphy prior to treatment, in addition to anatomic evaluation of renal units and serum creatinine levels. The primary outcome measure was the presence or absence of obstruction. Secondary outcome measures were kidney anatomy, grade of hydronephrosis, location of stones, stone size, and serum creatinine levels. Results During a ten-year period, 14 patients (median age 52.6 years; range 37.3 to 80.7 years) were included in the study. The relative frequency of primarily asymptomatic ureteral stones among all patients treated for ureteral stones in the study period was 0.7%. Eleven renal units showed some degree of hydronephrosis while 3 kidneys were not dilated. On the MAG-3 scan, 7 patients had an obstruction of the ureter, 5 had no obstruction, and 2 had dysfunction of the kidney. A statistically significant correlation was established between the grade of obstruction and stone size (p = 0.02). Conclusions At the time of presentation, only 64.3% of the patients revealed an obstruction in the stone-bearing renal unit. The degree of hydronephrosis and renal function were very diverse in this subgroup of patients with ureteral stones. The onset of ureterolithiasis and the chronological sequence of obstruction remain unclear in patients who have never experienced symptoms due to their stones. PMID:24397735

  14. MAG2D: Interactive 2-1/2-dimensional magnetic modeling program (User's Guide and Documentation for Rev. 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Nutter, C.

    1981-04-01

    MAG2D is an interactive computer program used for modeling 2-1/2-dimensional magnetic data. A forward algorithm is used to give the theoretical attraction of magnetic intensity at a station due to a perturbing body given by the initial model. The resultant model can then be adjusted for a better fit by a combination of manual adjustment, one-dimensional automatic search, and Marquardt inversion. MAG2D has an interactive data management system for data manipulation and display built around subroutines to do a forward problem, a one-dimensional direct search and an inversion. These subroutines were originally separate batch-mode programs.

  15. CHARACTERIZING NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEP WATER GULF OF MEXICO: APPLICATIONS FOR SAFE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ACTIVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Holditch; Emrys Jones

    2003-01-01

    In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deep water Gulf of Mexico (GOM). These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. During the first six months of operation, the primary activities of the JIP were to conduct and plan Workshops, which were as follows: (1) Data Collection Workshop--March 2002 (2) Drilling, Coring and Core Analyses Workshop--May 2002 (3) Modeling, Measurement and Sensors Workshop--May 2002.

  16. Activity, distribution, and abundance of methane-oxidizing bacteria in the near surface soils of onshore oil and gas fields.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kewei; Tang, Yuping; Ren, Chun; Zhao, Kebin; Wang, Wanmeng; Sun, Yongge

    2013-09-01

    Methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) have long been used as an important biological indicator for oil and gas prospecting, but the ecological characteristics of MOB in hydrocarbon microseep systems are still poorly understood. In this study, the activity, distribution, and abundance of aerobic methanotrophic communities in the surface soils underlying an oil and gas field were investigated using biogeochemical and molecular ecological techniques. Measurements of potential methane oxidation rates and pmoA gene copy numbers showed that soils inside an oil and gas field are hot spots of methane oxidation and MOB abundance. Correspondingly, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses in combination with cloning and sequencing of pmoA genes also revealed considerable differences in the methanotrophic community composition between oil and gas fields and the surrounding soils. Principal component analysis ordination furthermore indicated a coincidence between elevated CH4 oxidation activity and the methanotrophic community structure with type I methanotrophic Methylococcus and Methylobacter, in particular, as indicator species of oil and gas fields. Collectively, our results show that trace methane migrated from oil and gas reservoirs can considerably influence not only the quantity but also the structure of the methanotrophic community.

  17. Greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation technology performance: Activities of the GHG Technology Verification Center. Report for November 1997--September 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Piccot, S.D.; Kirchgessner, D.A.

    1998-12-31

    The paper describes the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Technology Verification Center`s mission, operational characteristics, and current activities in the natural gas industry, solid waste landfill industry, energy industries, and microelectronics industry. It also outlines the Center`s future plans and gives results of a recent phosphoric acid fuel cell verification at two landflls in the US. It describes how technology vendors, developers, users, and others can utilize the Center`s testing, analysis, and outreach activities and outlines the types of technologies planned for testing over the next 3 to 5 years.

  18. Radon-gas extraction and counting system for analyzing radon and radium in groundwater in seismically active areas

    SciTech Connect

    Knauss, K.

    1980-12-08

    A high concentration of radon in groundwater has attracted recent attention as a precursor of seismic activity. We have constructed a system that extracts and counts radon gas from solid, liquid, and gas samples. The radon is extracted in a closed system onto activated charcoal. The desorbed radon is then measured in a phosphored acrylic cell by scintillation counting of gross alpha radiation. The efficiency of the total system (extraction plus counting) is 90 +- 3% or better. Compact design and sturdy construction make the system completely portable and well suited to field operations in remote loations. Results are given for radon and radium in groundwaters in the Livermore area.

  19. Adsorbed natural gas storage with activated carbons made from Illinois coals and scrap tires

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Jielun; Brady, T.A.; Rood, M.J.; Lehmann, C.M.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Lizzio, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    Activated carbons for natural gas storage were produced from Illinois bituminous coals (IBC-102 and IBC-106) and scrap tires by physical activation with steam or CO2 and by chemical activation with KOH, H3PO4, or ZnCl2. The products were characterized for N2-BET area, micropore volume, bulk density, pore size distribution, and volumetric methane storage capacity (Vm/Vs). Vm/Vs values for Illinois coal-derived carbons ranged from 54 to 83 cm3/cm3, which are 35-55% of a target value of 150 cm3/cm3. Both granular and pelletized carbons made with preoxidized Illinois coal gave higher micropore volumes and larger Vm/Vs values than those made without preoxidation. This confirmed that preoxidation is a desirable step in the production of carbons from caking materials. Pelletization of preoxidized IBC-106 coal, followed by steam activation, resulted in the highest Vm/Vs value. With roughly the same micropore volume, pelletization alone increased Vm/Vs of coal carbon by 10%. Tire-derived carbons had Vm/Vs values ranging from 44 to 53 cm3/cm3, lower than those of coal carbons due to their lower bulk densities. Pelletization of the tire carbons increased bulk density up to 160%. However, this increase was offset by a decrease in micropore volume of the pelletized materials, presumably due to the pellet binder. As a result, Vm/Vs values were about the same for granular and pelletized tire carbons. Compared with coal carbons, tire carbons had a higher percentage of mesopores and macropores.

  20. Soil-gas radon concentration monitoring in an active granite quarry from Central Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Luís.; Barbosa, Susana; Pereira, Alcides; Aumento, Fabrizio

    2010-05-01

    This study was carried out in an active quarry located nearby the town of Nelas (Central Portugal), with the primary objective of assessing the effect of regular explosions on soil-gas radon concentrations. Here, a late-orogenic Hercynian porphyritic biotite granite occurs and is exploited for the production of high quality aggregates for different building purposes. This granite is part of the Beiras batholiths, being a geochemically moderately evolved rock, slightly peraluminous, and widely known by the frequent occurrence of associated uranium mineralizations. In fact, more than 4000t of U3O8 was produced from 60 mines of the Beiras region in the last century, over a wide area of more than 10.000 km2, and thousands of anomalies related with the local accumulation of uranium in fault filling materials, metasedimentary enclaves and doleritic veins were recognized during prospecting works. The heterogeneity of uranium distribution in this rock is reflected at the test site; indeed, a gamma ray survey shows that some of the faults that occur in the quarry are slightly mineralized. A total of 7 radon monitoring stations were implemented in the quarry, at a typical depth comprised between 1 and 2 meters, in holes drilled for the purpose. Aware RM-70 pancake GM detectors were used, sensitive to alpha, beta and gamma/X-rays above 10 keV, connected to palmtop computers for data registration (1 minute interval) and power supplied by batteries. Monitoring was carried out during 6 months, in Spring/Summer conditions and the exact time of each explosion was registered manually. Several problems of data loss and power supply affected the stations during the experiment, leading to discontinuities in the records. Still the available data showed important differences in the soil-gas radon concentrations between stations, which can be explained by the heterogeneity of uranium distribution in the rock and increased local permeability. Furthermore, all stations showed a clear daily

  1. Origin and distribution of thiophenes and furans in gas discharges from active volcanoes and geothermal systems.

    PubMed

    Tassi, Franco; Montegrossi, Giordano; Capecchiacci, Francesco; Vaselli, Orlando

    2010-03-31

    The composition of non-methane organic volatile compounds (VOCs) determined in 139 thermal gas discharges from 18 different geothermal and volcanic systems in Italy and Latin America, consists of C(2)-C(20) species pertaining to the alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and O-, S- and N-bearing classes of compounds. Thiophenes and mono-aromatics, especially the methylated species, are strongly enriched in fluids emissions related to hydrothermal systems. Addition of hydrogen sulphide to dienes and electrophilic methylation involving halogenated radicals may be invoked for the formation of these species. On the contrary, the formation of furans, with the only exception of C(4)H(8)O, seems to be favoured at oxidizing conditions and relatively high temperatures, although mechanisms similar to those hypothesized for the production of thiophenes can be suggested. Such thermodynamic features are typical of fluid reservoirs feeding high-temperature thermal discharges of volcanoes characterised by strong degassing activity, which are likely affected by conspicuous contribution from a magmatic source. The composition of heteroaromatics in fluids naturally discharged from active volcanoes and geothermal areas can then be considered largely dependent on the interplay between hydrothermal vs. magmatic contributions. This implies that they can be used as useful geochemical tools to be successfully applied in both volcanic monitoring and geothermal prospection.

  2. Origin and Distribution of Thiophenes and Furans in Gas Discharges from Active Volcanoes and Geothermal Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tassi, Franco; Montegrossi, Giordano; Capecchiacci, Francesco; Vaselli, Orlando

    2010-01-01

    The composition of non-methane organic volatile compounds (VOCs) determined in 139 thermal gas discharges from 18 different geothermal and volcanic systems in Italy and Latin America, consists of C2–C20 species pertaining to the alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and O-, S- and N-bearing classes of compounds. Thiophenes and mono-aromatics, especially the methylated species, are strongly enriched in fluids emissions related to hydrothermal systems. Addition of hydrogen sulphide to dienes and electrophilic methylation involving halogenated radicals may be invoked for the formation of these species. On the contrary, the formation of furans, with the only exception of C4H8O, seems to be favoured at oxidizing conditions and relatively high temperatures, although mechanisms similar to those hypothesized for the production of thiophenes can be suggested. Such thermodynamic features are typical of fluid reservoirs feeding high-temperature thermal discharges of volcanoes characterised by strong degassing activity, which are likely affected by conspicuous contribution from a magmatic source. The composition of heteroaromatics in fluids naturally discharged from active volcanoes and geothermal areas can then be considered largely dependent on the interplay between hydrothermal vs. magmatic contributions. This implies that they can be used as useful geochemical tools to be successfully applied in both volcanic monitoring and geothermal prospection. PMID:20480029

  3. Modulation by the noble gas argon of the catalytic and thrombolytic efficiency of tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    David, Hélène N; Haelewyn, Benoît; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Abraini, Jacques H

    2013-01-01

    Argon has been shown to provide cortical as well as, under certain conditions, subcortical neuroprotection in all models so far (middle cerebral artery occlusion, trauma, neonatal asphyxia, etc.). This has led to the suggestion that argon could be a cost-efficient alternative to xenon, a metabolically inert gas thought to be gold standard in gas pharmacology but whose clinical development suffers its little availability and excessive cost of production. However, whether argon interacts with the thrombolytic agent tissue plasminogen activator, which is the only approved therapy of acute ischemic stroke to date, still remains unknown. This latter point is not trivial since previous data have clearly demonstrated the inhibiting effect of xenon on tPA enzymatic and thrombolytic efficiency and the critical importance of the time at which xenon is administered, during or after ischemia, in order not to block thrombolysis and to obtain neuroprotection. Here, we investigated the effect of argon on tPA enzymatic and thrombolytic efficiency using in vitro methods shown to provide reliable prediction of the in vivo effects of both oxygen and the noble inert gases on tPA-induced thrombolysis. We found that argon has a concentration-dependent dual effect on tPA enzymatic and thrombolytic efficiency. Low and high concentrations of argon of 25 and 75 vol% respectively block and increase tPA enzymatic and thrombolytic efficiency. The possible use of argon at low and high concentrations in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke if given during ischemia or after tPA-induced reperfusion is discussed as regards to its neuroprotectant action and its inhibiting and facilitating effects on tPA-induced thrombolysis. The mechanisms of argon-tPA interactions are also discussed.

  4. IFI16 and cGAS cooperate in the activation of STING during DNA sensing in human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Almine, Jessica F.; O'Hare, Craig A. J.; Dunphy, Gillian; Haga, Ismar R.; Naik, Rangeetha J.; Atrih, Abdelmadjid; Connolly, Dympna J.; Taylor, Jordan; Kelsall, Ian R.; Bowie, Andrew G.; Beard, Philippa M.; Unterholzner, Leonie

    2017-01-01

    Many human cells can sense the presence of exogenous DNA during infection though the cytosolic DNA receptor cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), which produces the second messenger cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP). Other putative DNA receptors have been described, but whether their functions are redundant, tissue-specific or integrated in the cGAS-cGAMP pathway is unclear. Here we show that interferon-γ inducible protein 16 (IFI16) cooperates with cGAS during DNA sensing in human keratinocytes, as both cGAS and IFI16 are required for the full activation of an innate immune response to exogenous DNA and DNA viruses. IFI16 is also required for the cGAMP-induced activation of STING, and interacts with STING to promote STING phosphorylation and translocation. We propose that the two DNA sensors IFI16 and cGAS cooperate to prevent the spurious activation of the type I interferon response. PMID:28194029

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Differentially Activates cGAS- and Inflammasome-Dependent Intracellular Immune Responses through ESX-1.

    PubMed

    Wassermann, Ruth; Gulen, Muhammet F; Sala, Claudia; Perin, Sonia Garcia; Lou, Ye; Rybniker, Jan; Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan L; Schmidt, Tobias; Hornung, Veit; Cole, Stewart T; Ablasser, Andrea

    2015-06-10

    Cytosolic detection of microbial products is essential for the initiation of an innate immune response against intracellular pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). During Mtb infection of macrophages, activation of cytosolic surveillance pathways is dependent on the mycobacterial ESX-1 secretion system and leads to type I interferon (IFN) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production. Whereas the inflammasome regulates IL-1β secretion, the receptor(s) responsible for the activation of type I IFNs has remained elusive. We demonstrate that the cytosolic DNA sensor cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) is essential for initiating an IFN response to Mtb infection. cGAS associates with Mtb DNA in the cytosol to stimulate cyclic GAMP (cGAMP) synthesis. Notably, activation of cGAS-dependent cytosolic host responses can be uncoupled from inflammasome activation by modulating the secretion of ESX-1 substrates. Our findings identify cGAS as an innate sensor of Mtb and provide insight into how ESX-1 controls the activation of specific intracellular recognition pathways.

  6. Active gas replenishment and sensing of the wetting state in a submerged superhydrophobic surface.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Ben P; Bartlett, Philip N; Wood, Robert J K

    2017-02-15

    Previously superhydrophobic surfaces have demonstrated effective drag reduction by trapping a lubricious gas layer on the surface with micron-sized hydrophobic features. However, prolonged reduction of drag is hindered by the dissolution of the gas into the surrounding water. This paper demonstrates a novel combination of superhydrophobic surface design and electrochemical control methods which allow quick determination of the wetted area and a gas replenishment mechanism to maintain the desirable gas filled state. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy is used to measure the capacitance of the surface which is shown to be proportional to the solid/liquid interface area. To maintain a full gas coverage for prolonged periods the surface is held at an electrical potential which leads to hydrogen evolution. In the desired gas filled state the water does not touch the metallic area of the surface, however after gas has dissolved the water touches the metal which closes the electrochemical circuit causing hydrogen to be produced replenishing the gas in the surface and returning to the gas filled state; in this way the system is self-actuating. This type of surface and electrochemical control shows promise for applications where the gas filled state of superhydrophobic surfaces must be maintained when submerged for long periods of time.

  7. Bond Activation by Metal-Carbene Complexes in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shaodong; Li, Jilai; Schlangen, Maria; Schwarz, Helmut

    2016-03-15

    "Bare" metal-carbene complexes, when generated in the gas phase and exposed to thermal reactions under (near) single-collision conditions, exhibit rather unique reactivities in addition to the well-known metathesis and cyclopropanation processes. For example, at room temperature the unligated [AuCH2](+) complex brings about efficient C-C coupling with methane to produce C2Hx (x = 4, 6), and the couple [TaCH2](+)/CO2 gives rise to the generation of the acetic acid equivalent CH2═C═O. Entirely unprecedented is the thermal extrusion of a carbon atom from halobenzenes (X = F, Cl, Br, I) by [MCH2](+) (M = La, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os) and its coupling with the methylene ligand to deliver C2H2 and [M(X)(C5H5)](+). Among the many noteworthy C-N bond-forming processes, the formation of CH3NH2 from [RhCH2](+)/NH3, the generation of CH2═NH2(+) from [MCH2](+)/NH3 (M = Pt, Au), and the production of [PtCH═NH2](+) from [PtCH2](+)/NH3 are of particular interest. The latter species are likely to be involved as intermediates in the platinum-mediated large-scale production of HCN from CH4/NH3 (the DEGUSSA process). In this context, a few examples are presented that point to the operation of co-operative effects even at a molecular level. For instance, in the coupling of CH4 with NH3 by the heteronuclear clusters [MPt](+) (M = coinage metal), platinum is crucial for the activation of methane, while the coinage metal M controls the branching ratio between the C-N bond-forming step and unwanted soot formation. For most of the gas-phase reactions described in this Account, detailed mechanistic insight has been derived from extensive computational work in conjunction with time-honored labeling and advanced mass-spectrometry-based experiments, and often a coherent description of the experimental findings has been achieved. As for some transition metals, in particular those from the third row, the metal-carbene complexes can be formed directly from methane, coupling of the so

  8. The origin of the selectivity and activity of ruthenium-cluster catalysts for fuel-cell feed-gas purification: a gas-phase approach.

    PubMed

    Lang, Sandra M; Bernhardt, Thorsten M; Krstić, Marjan; Bonačić-Koutecký, Vlasta

    2014-05-19

    Gas-phase ruthenium clusters Ru(n)(+) (n=2-6) are employed as model systems to discover the origin of the outstanding performance of supported sub-nanometer ruthenium particles in the catalytic CO methanation reaction with relevance to the hydrogen feed-gas purification for advanced fuel-cell applications. Using ion-trap mass spectrometry in conjunction with first-principles density functional theory calculations three fundamental properties of these clusters are identified which determine the selectivity and catalytic activity: high reactivity toward CO in contrast to inertness in the reaction with CO2; promotion of cooperatively enhanced H2 coadsorption and dissociation on pre-formed ruthenium carbonyl clusters, that is, no CO poisoning occurs; and the presence of Ru-atom sites with a low number of metal-metal bonds, which are particularly active for H2 coadsorption and activation. Furthermore, comprehensive theoretical investigations provide mechanistic insight into the CO methanation reaction and discover a reaction route involving the formation of a formyl-type intermediate.

  9. [A comparison on radiochemical behavior and biological property of antisense oligonucleotide labeled with technetium-99m by two methods: NHS-MAG3 versus SHNHP].

    PubMed

    Li, Yunchun; Tan, Tianzhi; Zheng, Jianguo; Zhang, Chun

    2008-08-01

    This study was undertaken to explore and compare the radiochemical behavior and biological property of antisense oligonucleotide (ASON) labeled with Technetium-99m using two methods: N-hydroxysuccinimidyl S-acetylmercaptoacetyltriglycline (NHS-MAG3) versus hydrazino nicotinamide derivative (SHNH). After SHNH and NHS-MAG3 were synthesized, ASON was labeled with Technetium-99m using SHNH and NHS-MAG3 as a bifunctional chelator, separately. The stability in vivo and in vitro, the combination with plasma albumen of rabbit, the biodistribution in BALB/ C mice and the HT29 cellular uptake were compared between labeled compound 99mTc-SHNH-ASON, using SHNH as a bifunctional complex reagent, and 99mTc-MAG3-ASON, using NHS-MAG3 as a bifunctional chelator. The results revealed that the labeling rate and the stability of 99mTc-MAG3-ASON were evidently higher than that of 99mTc-SHNH-ASON (P < 0.05), the combination rate of 99mTc-MAG3-ASON with plasma albumen was markedly lower than that of 99mTc-SHNH-ASON (P < 0.05); the biodistribution of 99mTc-MAG3-ASON was markedly lower than that of 99mTc-SHNH-ASON in blood, heart, stomach and intestines (P < 0.05), slightly lower than that of 99mTc-SHNH-ASON in liver and spleen (P > 0.05), and markedly higher than that of 99mTc-SHNH-ASON in kidney (P < 0.05); the HT29 cellular uptake rates of 99mTc-MAG3-ASON was markedly higher than that of 99mTc-SHNH-ASON (P < 0.05). Therefore, the radiochemical behavior and biological property of 99mTc-MAG3-ASON labeled using NHS-MAG3 is better than that of 99mTc-SHNH-ASON labeled using SHNH.

  10. Test plan for measuring ventilation rates and combustible gas levels in RPP active catch tanks

    SciTech Connect

    NGUYEN, D.M.

    1999-06-03

    The purpose of this test is to provide an initial screening of combustible gas concentrations in catch tanks that currently are operated by River Protection Project (RPP). The data will be used to determine whether or not additional data will be needed for closure of the flammable gas unreviewed safety question for these facilities. This test will involve field measurements of ammonia, organic vapor, and total combustible gas levels in the headspace of the catch tanks. If combustible gas level in a tank exceeds an established threshold, gas samples will be collected in SUMMA canisters for more extensive laboratory analysis. In addition, ventilation rates of some catch tanks will be measured to evaluate removal of flammable gas by air flow through the tanks.

  11. GoldMag nanocomposite-functionalized graphene sensing platform for one-step electrochemical immunoassay of alpha-fetoprotein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; Tang, Dianping; Liu, Bingqian; Chen, Huafeng; Cui, Yuling; Chen, Guonan

    2011-10-15

    A new flow-through electrochemical immunosensor was designed for sensitive detection of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) in human serum by using nanogold-functionalized magnetic graphene nanosheets as immunosensing probes. Initially, amino functionalized magnetic beads were covalently immobilized on the surface of graphene oxide nanosheets (MGPs), then nanogold particles were adsorbed on the amino groups of the MGPs to construct GoldMag nanocomposites functionalized graphene nanosheets (GMGPs), and then horseradish peroxidase-anti-AFP conjugates (HRP-anti-AFP) were assembled onto the surface of nanogold particles (bio-GMGP). With the aid of an external magnet, the formed bio-GMGPs were attached onto the base electrode in the flow system. With a non-competitive immunoassay format, the injected sample containing AFP antigens was produced transparent immunoaffinity reaction with the immobilized HRP-anti-AFP on the bio-GMGPs. The formed immunocomplex inhibited partly the active center of HRP, and decreased the labeled HRP toward the reduction of H(2)O(2). The performance and factors influencing the performance of the immunosensor were investigated in detail. Under optimal conditions, the electrochemical immunosensor displayed a wide working range of 0.01-200 ng mL(-1) with a low detection limit (LOD) of 1.0 pg mL(-1) AFP (at 3s(B)). Intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation (CV) were below 10%. In addition, the methodology was validated with real serum samples, receiving a good correlation with the results obtained from commercially available electrochemiluminescence automated analyzer.

  12. Exercise acutely increases renal transit time of Tc-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3) in a post-liver transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Rajan; Chahal, Manisha; Appel, Gerald; Bergmann, Steven; Tikofsky, Ronald; Fawwaz, Rashid; Van Heertum, Ronald

    2006-12-01

    This case demonstrates the effect of exercise on the clearance of Tc-99m MAG3 in a patient with renal insufficiency status post-liver transplant. Even after furosemide administration, the tracer was retained in the kidneys after exercise. This is in contrast to normal clearance demonstrated on a baseline study performed 3 days previously.

  13. 75 FR 3253 - Lamb Assembly and Test, LLC, Subsidiary of Mag Industrial Automation Systems, Machesney Park, IL...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ... Employment and Training Administration Lamb Assembly and Test, LLC, Subsidiary of Mag Industrial Automation..., based on the finding that imports of automation equipment and machine tools did not contribute to worker... automation equipment and machine tools by declining customers during the relevant period. The subject...

  14. Beyond 31 mag arcsec-2: The Frontier of Low Surface Brightness Imaging with the Largest Optical Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Ignacio; Fliri, Jüergen

    2016-06-01

    The detection of structures in the sky with optical surface brightnesses fainter than 30 mag arcsec-2 (3σ in 10 × 10 arcsec boxes; r-band) has remained elusive in current photometric deep surveys. Here we show how present-day telescopes of 10 m class can provide broadband imaging 1.5-2 mag deeper than most previous results within a reasonable amount of time (i.e., <10 hr on-source integration). In particular, we illustrate the ability of the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio de Canarias telescope to produce imaging with a limiting surface brightness of 31.5 mag arcsec-2 (3σ in 10 × 10 arcsec boxes; r-band) using 8.1 hr on source. We apply this power to explore the stellar halo of the galaxy UGC 00180, a galaxy analogous to M31 located at ˜150 Mpc, by obtaining a radial profile of surface brightness down to μ r ˜ 33 mag arcsec-2. This depth is similar to that obtained using the star-counts techniques for Local Group galaxies, but is achieved at a distance where this technique is unfeasible. We find that the mass of the stellar halo of this galaxy is ˜4 × 109 M ⊙, i.e., (3 ± 1)% of the total stellar mass of the whole system. This amount of mass in the stellar halo is in agreement with current theoretical expectations for galaxies of this kind.

  15. 75 FR 67963 - Availability of Draft NPDES General Permits MAG580000 and NHG580000 for Discharges From Publicly...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... NPDES General Permits MAG580000 and NHG580000 for Discharges From Publicly Owned Treatment Works Treatment Plants (POTW Treatment Plants) and Other Treatment Works Treating Domestic Sewage in the... System (NPDES) general permits for certain Publicly Owned Treatment Works Treatment Plants...

  16. An Evaluation of Gas Law Webquest Based on Active Learning Style in a Secondary School in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alias, Norlidah; DeWitt, Dorothy; Siraj, Saedah

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the PTEchLS WebQuest on Gas Laws was evaluated. It was designed for Form Four students with active learning styles. The focus of the evaluation was on the usability and effectiveness of the PTechLS WebQuest. Data were collected from interviews and students' achievement scores. Two teachers and eight students volunteered to…

  17. 77 FR 40354 - Permitting Guidance for Oil and Gas Hydraulic Fracturing Activities Using Diesel Fuels-Draft

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-09

    ...EPA published on May 10, 2012, Permitting Guidance for Oil and Gas Hydraulic Fracturing Activities Using Diesel Fuels--Draft. The initial public comment period for this proposal was 60 days, ending on July 9, 2012. In response to requests from several stakeholders, this action extends the public comment period for an additional 45...

  18. Research activity of the greenhouse gas measurements using optical remote sensing in Japan (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, K.

    2009-12-01

    Japan might be one of the most active countries dedicating themselves to studying the greenhouse gas (GHG) measurements using optical remote sensing not only on the ground but also from space. There are two reasons; one of them ascends to the Kyoto Protocol, agreed in December 1997 in Kyoto, an ancient city of Japan until 19th centuries, was designed to address the international response to serious climate change due to greenhouse gases. The other reason is due to a revision of the Basic Environment Law of Japan in order to meet the Kyoto Protocol in 1998. The State makes efforts to ensure international collaboration so as to effectively promote the monitoring, observation and measurement of the environmental situation with regard to global warming. Main activities are listed in a Table1. They are divided into two categories, i.e. the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT), launched on Jan.23, 2009 and active remote sensing using lidar technology. In case of GOSAT, an initial analysis of carbon dioxide and methane concentrations was obtained for clear-sky scenes over land. In the future, after further calibration and validation of the data, observation data and corresponding analyzed products will be made available. On the other hand, studies of the laser remote sensing for measuring GHG have been actively carrying out to achieve reliable data with a higher accuracy at wavelengths of 1.6micron meter (Tokyo Metropolitan University, JAXA, Mitsubishi Electric Co.) and 2 micron meter (National Institute of Information and Communications Technology). As well-known, one of the most interests regarding atmospheric CO2 measurements is that carbon dioxide molecule measured are due to anthropological emission from fossil fuel burning or due to natural one from forest fires etc. We proposed a newly advanced CO2/CO DIAL using a hybrid of pulsed Tm,Ho:YLF and pulsed OPO pumped by it for better understanding them. Now, our effort is directed to find out the most suitable

  19. The non-proliferation experiment and gas sampling as an on-site inspection activity: A progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, C.R.

    1994-03-01

    The Non-proliferation Experiment (NPE) is contributing to the development of gas sampling methods and models that may be incorporated into future on-site inspection (OSI) activities. Surface gas sampling and analysis, motivated by nuclear test containment studies, have already demonstrated the tendency for the gaseous products of an underground nuclear test to flow hundreds of meters to the surface over periods ranging from days to months. Even in the presence of a uniform sinusoidal pressure variation, there will be a net flow of cavity gas toward the surface. To test this barometric pumping effect at Rainier Mesa, gas bottles containing sulfur hexaflouride and {sup 3}He were added to the pre-detonation cavity for the 1 kt chemical explosives test. Pre-detonation measurements of the background levels of both gases were obtained at selected sites on top of the mesa. The background levels of both tracers were found to be at or below mass spectrographic/gas chromatographic sensitivity thresholds in the parts-per-trillion range. Post-detonation, gas chromatographic analyses of samples taken during barometric pressure lows from the sampling sites on the mesa indicate the presence of significant levels (300--600 ppt) of sulfur hexaflouride. However, mass spectrographic analyses of gas samples taken to date do not show the presence of {sup 3}He. To explain these observations, several possibilities are being explored through additional sampling/analysis and numerical modeling. For the NPE, the detonation point was approximately 400 m beneath the surface of Rainier Mesa and the event did not produce significant fracturing or subsidence on the surface of the mesa. Thus, the NPE may ultimately represent an extreme, but useful example for the application and tuning of cavity gas detection techniques.

  20. Introducing a New Interface for the Online MagIC Database by Integrating Data Uploading, Searching, and Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarboe, N.; Minnett, R.; Constable, C.; Koppers, A. A.; Tauxe, L.

    2013-12-01

    The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) is dedicated to supporting the paleomagnetic, geomagnetic, and rock magnetic communities through the development and maintenance of an online database (http://earthref.org/MAGIC/), data upload and quality control, searches, data downloads, and visualization tools. While MagIC has completed importing some of the IAGA paleomagnetic databases (TRANS, PINT, PSVRL, GPMDB) and continues to import others (ARCHEO, MAGST and SECVR), further individual data uploading from the community contributes a wealth of easily-accessible rich datasets. Previously uploading of data to the MagIC database required the use of an Excel spreadsheet using either a Mac or PC. The new method of uploading data utilizes an HTML 5 web interface where the only computer requirement is a modern browser. This web interface will highlight all errors discovered in the dataset at once instead of the iterative error checking process found in the previous Excel spreadsheet data checker. As a web service, the community will always have easy access to the most up-to-date and bug free version of the data upload software. The filtering search mechanism of the MagIC database has been changed to a more intuitive system where the data from each contribution is displayed in tables similar to how the data is uploaded (http://earthref.org/MAGIC/search/). Searches themselves can be saved as a permanent URL, if desired. The saved search URL could then be used as a citation in a publication. When appropriate, plots (equal area, Zijderveld, ARAI, demagnetization, etc.) are associated with the data to give the user a quicker understanding of the underlying dataset. The MagIC database will continue to evolve to meet the needs of the paleomagnetic, geomagnetic, and rock magnetic communities.

  1. Impacts of Oil and Gas Exploration Activities on SOA formation in the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahreini, R.; Vu, K. K. T.; Dingle, J. H.; Apel, E. C.; Blake, N. J.; Campos, T. L.; Cantrell, C. A.; Flocke, F. M.; Fried, A.; Herndon, S. C.; Hills, A. J.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Huey, L. G.; Kaser, L.; Mauldin, L.; Meinardi, S.; Montzka, D.; Nowak, J. B.; Richter, D.; Roscioli, J. R.; Schroeder, J.; Shertz, S.; Stell, M. H.; Tanner, D.; Tyndall, G. S.; Walega, J.; Weibring, P.; Weinheimer, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Oil and gas exploration activities (O&G) in Wattenberg Field, located north of the Denver Metropolitan area, have expanded in the last few years. Although VOC emissions and the potential for ozone formation in the area from these sources have been studied previously, no information is available on the impact on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. During the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE), airborne measurements of trace gases and aerosol composition were made in the northern Front Range during July-August 2014. We present analyses on evolution of organic aerosol (OA) and their precursors in order to assess the impact of urban vs. O&G emissions on SOA formation. Significant contribution of SOA to total OA was observed in pure urban and urban plumes mixed with O&G emissions. Under an OH-exposure of 2.8×1011 molecule cm-3 s, enhancement ratios of OA relative to carbon monoxide (ΔOA/ΔCO) increased by factors of ~3.6-5.4; however, (ΔSOA/ΔCO)urban+O&G was 87% higher than (ΔSOA/ΔCO)urban. Predicted ΔSOA/ΔCO values from the oxidation of C7-C11 alkanes, C6-C9 aromatics, and biogenics were about a factor of 10-15 too small compared to the measurements. Predicated alkane-derived SOA contributed to 38% (16%) of anthropogenic ΔSOA/ΔCO values in urban+O&G- (urban-) influenced air masses.

  2. Photocatalytic Activity of Nanostructured Anatase Coatings Obtained by Cold Gas Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardon, M.; Fernández-Rodríguez, C.; Garzón Sousa, D.; Doña-Rodríguez, J. M.; Dosta, S.; Cano, I. G.; Guilemany, J. M.

    2014-10-01

    This article describes a photocatalytic nanostructured anatase coating deposited by cold gas spray (CGS) supported on titanium sub-oxide (TiO2- x ) coatings obtained by atmospheric plasma spray (APS) onto stainless steel cylinders. The photocatalytic coating was homogeneous and preserved the composition and nanostructure of the starting powder. The inner titanium sub-oxide coating favored the deposition of anatase particles in the solid state. Agglomerated nano-TiO2 particles fragmented when impacting onto the hard surface of the APS TiO2- x bond coat. The rough surface provided by APS provided an ideal scenario for entrapping the nanostructured particles, which may be adhered onto the bond coat due to chemical bonding; a possible bonding mechanism is described. Photocatalytic experiments showed that CGS nano-TiO2 coating was active for photodegrading phenol and formic acid under aqueous conditions. The results were similar to the performance obtained by competitor technologies and materials such as dip-coating P25® photocatalysts. Disparity in the final performance of the photoactive materials may have been caused by differences in grain size and the crystalline composition of titanium dioxide.

  3. Bactericidal and Fungicidal Activity in the Gas Phase of Sodium Dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC).

    PubMed

    Proto, Antonio; Zarrella, Ilaria; Cucciniello, Raffaele; Pironti, Concetta; De Caro, Francesco; Motta, Oriana

    2016-08-01

    Sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) is usually employed as a disinfectant for the treatment of water, environmental surfaces and medical equipment principally for its effectiveness as a microbicide agent. In this study, we explore the possibility of a new use for NaDCC by investigating the microbicidal activity of chlorine, which derives from the hydrolysis of NaDCC mediated by air humidity, and by testing its effect on the neutralization of microbes present in domestic waste. NaDCC was inserted in a plastic garbage can where LB agar plates, with different dilutions of a known title of four different microorganisms (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Debaryomyces hansenii and Aspergillus brasiliensis), were weakly inserted. The molecular chlorine (Cl2) levels present in the garbage can were quantified using an iodometric titration. The gas emitted in the garbage can presented a strong microbicide effect, inhibiting the proliferation of all four microorganisms and for four consecutive weeks, thus showing that NaDCC hydrolysis, mediated by air humidity, is able to ensure the decontamination of restricted environments, avoiding the proliferation of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as fungi.

  4. Bifurcating fragmentation behavior of gas-phase tryptic peptide dications in collisional activation.

    PubMed

    Savitski, Mikhail M; Fälth, Maria; Fung, Y M Eva; Adams, Christopher M; Zubarev, Roman A

    2008-12-01

    Collision-activated dissociation (CAD) of tryptic peptides is a cornerstone of mass spectrometry-based proteomics research. Principal component analysis of a database containing 15,000 high-resolution CAD mass spectra of gas-phase tryptic peptide dications revealed that they fall into two classes with a good separation between the classes. The main factor determining the class identity is the relative abundance of the peptide bond cleavage after the first two N-terminal residues. A possible scenario explaining this bifurcation involves trans- to cis-isomerization of the N-terminal peptide bond, which facilitates solvation of the N-terminal charge on the second backbone amide and formation of stable b(2) ions in the form of protonated diketopiperazines. Evidence supporting this scenario is derived from statistical analysis of the high-resolution CAD MS/MS database. It includes the observation of the strong deficit of a(3) ions and anomalous amino acid preferences for b(2) ion formation.

  5. Development of engine activity cycles for the prime movers of unconventional natural gas well development.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Derek; Heltzel, Robert; Nix, Andrew; Barrow, Rebekah

    2017-03-01

    With the advent of unconventional natural gas resources, new research focuses on the efficiency and emissions of the prime movers powering these fleets. These prime movers also play important roles in emissions inventories for this sector. Industry seeks to reduce operating costs by decreasing the required fuel demands of these high horsepower engines but conducting in-field or full-scale research on new technologies is cost prohibitive. As such, this research completed extensive in-use data collection efforts for the engines powering over-the-road trucks, drilling engines, and hydraulic stimulation pump engines. These engine activity data were processed in order to make representative test cycles using a Markov Chain, Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation method. Such cycles can be applied under controlled environments on scaled engines for future research. In addition to MCMC, genetic algorithms were used to improve the overall performance values for the test cycles and smoothing was applied to ensure regression criteria were met during implementation on a test engine and dynamometer. The variations in cycle and in-use statistics are presented along with comparisons to conventional test cycles used for emissions compliance.

  6. Experiments in active control of stall on an aeroengine gas turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, C.; Wilson, A.G.; Day, I.J.; Swinbanks, M.A.

    1998-10-01

    This paper describes work carried out between 1989 and 1994 to investigate the application of Active Stall Control to a Rolls-Royce Viper turbojet. The results demonstrate that stall control is feasible and can increase the stable operating range by up to 25 percent of pressure rise. Stall disturbances were detected using rings of high response pressure transducers positioned at different axial planes along the compressor, and processed using a PC-based data acquisition and control system. Actuation was provided by six hydraulically operated sleeve valves positioned to recirculate air over all or part of the compressor. Stall was artificially induced using combinations of in-bleed into the combustor outer casing, fuel spiking, hot gas ingestion, and inlet pressure spoiling, thus replicating many of the transient conditions commonly observed to make a compressor prone to stall. Results are compared from a number of stall control strategies including those demonstrated at low speed by Paduano et al. (1993) and Day (1993). Best results were obtained with detection of nonaxisymmetric disturbances coupled with axisymmetric control action. A control system of this type is demonstrated to be capable of extending the stable engine operating range at all speeds and with each method of inducing stall.

  7. Laboratory Evaporation Testing Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, Duane J.; Nash, Charles A.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Wilmarth, William R.

    2014-01-27

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream, LAW Off-Gas Condensate, from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of canistered glass waste forms. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to be within acceptable concentration ranges in the LAW glass. Diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task examines the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and investigates auxiliary evaporation to enable another disposition path. Unless an auxiliary evaporator is used, returning the stream to the tank farms would require evaporation in the 242-A evaporator. This stream is expected to be unusual because it will be very high in corrosive species that are volatile in the melter

  8. Mag-indo1 affinity for Ca(2+), compartmentalization and binding to proteins: the challenge of measuring Mg(2+) concentrations in living cells.

    PubMed

    Pesco, J; Salmon, J M; Vigo, J; Viallet, P

    2001-03-01

    A physicochemical study of the Mag-indo1 binding to Ca(2+) in solution showed that: (i) the characteristic fluorescence spectra of Ca(2+)-bound and Mg(2+)-bound Mag-indo1 are identical; (ii) two successive equilibria occur for increasing Ca(2+) concentrations; and (iii) the value of the dissociation constant of the first one, as determined by using a probe dilution protocol, amounts to 780 nM. In order to investigate the fluorescence level of Mag-indo1 trapped in cell organelles, fluorescence spectra of Mag-indo1-loaded fibroblasts were recorded before and after a digitonin permeabilization. Their resolution into cation-bound, protein-bound, and free Mag-indo1 characteristic spectra allowed measurement of the fluorescence intensities of these species. The intensities emitted from whole cells were compared to those emitted from organelles (assumed to be endoplasmic reticulum according to a DiOC(6) loading). The cation-bound Mag-indo1 fluorescence resulted partially (20 to 50%) from the cytosol for 30% of the cells, and totally from compartments for 70% of the cells. We found a concentration value of 500 nM for compartmentalized Ca(2+) and concluded that the Mag-indo1 binding to Ca(2+) is likely to affect drastically the Mg(2+) concentration measurements in cells. Moreover, we showed that the amount variation of protein-bound Mag-indo1 also affects Mg(2+) measurements when using the two-wavelength ratio method.

  9. 3D motion adapted gating (3D MAG): a new navigator technique for accelerated acquisition of free breathing navigator gated 3D coronary MR-angiography.

    PubMed

    Hackenbroch, M; Nehrke, K; Gieseke, J; Meyer, C; Tiemann, K; Litt, H; Dewald, O; Naehle, C P; Schild, H; Sommer, T

    2005-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the influence of a new navigator technique (3D MAG) on navigator efficiency, total acquisition time, image quality and diagnostic accuracy. Fifty-six patients with suspected coronary artery disease underwent free breathing navigator gated coronary MRA (Intera, Philips Medical Systems, 1.5 T, spatial resolution 0.9x0.9x3 mm3) with and without 3D MAG. Evaluation of both sequences included: 1) navigator scan efficiency, 2) total acquisition time, 3) assessment of image quality and 4) detection of stenoses >50%. Average navigator efficiencies of the LCA and RCA were 43+/-12% and 42+/-12% with and 36+/-16% and 35+/-16% without 3D MAG (P<0.01). Scan time was reduced from 12 min 7 s without to 8 min 55 s with 3D MAG for the LCA and from 12 min 19 s to 9 min 7 s with 3D MAG for the RCA (P<0.01). The average scores of image quality of the coronary MRAs with and without 3D MAG were 3.5+/-0.79 and 3.46+/-0.84 (P>0.05). There was no significant difference in the sensitivity and specificity in the detection of coronary artery stenoses between coronary MRAs with and without 3D MAG (P>0.05). 3D MAG provides accelerated acquisition of navigator gated coronary MRA by about 19% while maintaining image quality and diagnostic accuracy.

  10. MAG-2 promotes invasion, mobility and adherence capability of lung cancer cells by MMP-2, CD44 and intracellular calcium in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinqiang; Liu, Gang; Meng, Yuhong; Lin, Huiyun; Lu, Yinglin

    2009-03-01

    Tumor metastasis, the important characteristic of malignant tumors, is closely associated with a series of changes in the expressions of genes and proteins. A novel gene MAG-2, which may have close correlation with lung cancer metastasis, was identified in our laboratory through an approach of suppressed subtractive hybridization using lung cancer cell strains with the same origin but different metastatic potential as models. The relations between MAG-2 gene and aspects of cancer metastasis including invasion, mobility, anchorage-independent growth capability and adherence to ECM, were investigated in our experiment models. MAG-2 gene was proved to be genuine and have mRNA and deduced proteins from itself by methods of expression profile analysis and fluorescence staining. Cytological experiments had demonstrated that hyper- or hypo-expressing of MAG-2 by gene transfection or RNAi leads to significant increase or decrease in the metastatic ability of cancer cells. In addition, CD44, MMP-2 and free calcium ion concentration intracellularly, were proved to be metastasis promoting factors, and found to be regulated by MAG-2 in lung cancer cells, this might be the mechanism of the metastasis promoting function of MAG-2 gene. The positive rate of MAG-2 mRNA was found to be significantly higher in tumor tissue from patients with metastatic lung cancer than tissues from patients with non-metastatic lung cancer. These data suggest that MAG-2 may be a novel causal gene for lung cancer invasion and metastasis.

  11. Temperature and moisture effects on greenhouse gas emissions from deep active-layer boreal soils

    SciTech Connect

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Smith, Ashly P.; Bailey, Vanessa L.

    2016-12-21

    Rapid climatic changes, rising air temperatures, and increased fires are expected to drive permafrost degradation and alter soil carbon (C) cycling in many high-latitude ecosystems. How these soils will respond to changes in their temperature, moisture, and overlying vegetation is highly uncertain, but critical to understand given the large soil C stocks in these regions. We used a laboratory experiment to examine how temperature and moisture control CO2 and CH4 emissions from mineral soils sampled from the bottom of the annual active layer, i.e. directly above permafrost, in an Alaskan boreal forest. Gas emissions from thirty cores, subjected to two temperatures and either field moisture conditions or experimental drought, were tracked over a 100-day incubation; we also measured a variety of physical and chemical characteristics of the cores. Gravimetric water content was 0.31 ± 0.12 (unitless) at the beginning of the incubation; cores at field moisture were unchanged at the end, but drought cores had declined to 0.06 ± 0.04. Carbon dioxide fluxes were strongly influenced by incubation chamber temperature, core water content, and percent soil nitrogen, and had a temperature sensitivity (i.e. Q10) of 1.3 and 1.9 for the field moisture and drought treatments, respectively. Methane emissions were most strongly correlated with percent nitrogen, but neither temperature nor water content was a significant first-order predictor of CH4 fluxes. The cumulative production of C from CO2 was over six orders of magnitudes higher than that from CH4. These results suggest that deep active-layer soils may be much more sensitive to changes in moisture than to temperature, a critical factor as discontinuous permafrost melts in interior Alaska. Deep but unfrozen high-latitude soils have been shown to be strongly affected by long-term experimental warming, and these results provide insight into their future dynamics and feedback potential with future climate change.

  12. Diversity and activity of methanotrophs in landfill cover soils with and without landfill gas recovery systems.

    PubMed

    Su, Yao; Zhang, Xuan; Xia, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Qi-Qi; Kong, Jiao-Yan; Wang, Jing; He, Ruo

    2014-05-01

    Aerobic CH4 oxidation plays an important role in mitigating CH4 release from landfills to the atmosphere. Therefore, in this study, oxidation activity and community of methanotrophs were investigated in a subtropical landfill. Among the three sites investigated, the highest CH4 concentration was detected in the landfill cover soil of the site (A) without a landfill gas (LFG) recovery system, although the refuse in the site had been deposited for a longer time (∼14-15 years) compared to the other two sites (∼6-11 years) where a LFG recovery system was applied. In April and September, the higher CH4 flux was detected in site A with 72.4 and 51.7gm(-2)d(-1), respectively, compared to the other sites. The abundance of methanotrophs assessed by quantification of pmoA varied with location and season. A linear relationship was observed between the abundance of methanotrophs and CH4 concentrations in the landfill cover soils (R=0.827, P<0.001). The key factors influencing the methanotrophic diversity in the landfill cover soils were pH, the water content and the CH4 concentration in the soil, of which pH was the most important factor. Type I methanotrophs, including Methylococcus, Methylosarcina, Methylomicrobium and Methylobacter, and type II methanotrophs (Methylocystis) were all detected in the landfill cover soils, with Methylocystis and Methylosarcina being the dominant genera. Methylocystis was abundant in the slightly acidic landfill cover soil, especially in September, and represented more than 89% of the total terminal-restriction fragment abundance. These findings indicated that the LFG recovery system, as well as physical and chemical parameters, affected the diversity and activity of methanotrophs in landfill cover soils.

  13. Gas-Phase Ambient Air Contaminants Exhibit Significant Dioxin-like and Estrogen-like Activity in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Gail P.; Hodge, Erin M.; Diamond, Miriam L.; Yip, Amelia; Dann, Tom; Stern, Gary; Denison, Michael S.; Harper, Patricia A.

    2006-01-01

    Several adverse health effects, such as respiratory and cardiovascular morbidity, have been linked to exposure to particulate matter in ambient air; however, the biologic activity of gas-phase ambient organic air contaminants has not been examined as thoroughly. Using aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)–based and estrogen receptor (ER)–based cell bioassay systems, we assessed the dioxin-like and estrogenic activities of gas-phase organic ambient air contaminants compared with those of particulate-phase contaminants using samples collected between seasons over 2 years from an urban and a rural location in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada. The concentration of the sum (∑) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which was highest in the gas phase, was 10–100 times more abundant than that of ∑polychlorinated biphenyls, ∑nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and ∑organochlorine pesticides, and 103 to 104 times more abundant than ∑polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans. Gas-phase samples induced significant AHR- and ER-dependent gene expression. The activity of the gas-phase samples was greater than that of the particulate-phase samples in the estrogen assay and, in one case, in the AHR assay. We found no strong associations between either summer or winter seasons or urban or rural locations in the relative efficacy of the extracts in either the ER or AHR assay despite differences in chemical composition, concentrations, and abundance. Our results suggest that mechanistic studies of the health effects of ambient air must consider gas and particulate phases because chemicals present in both phases can affect AHR and ER signaling pathways. PMID:16675423

  14. Measurement of alkali vapor in PFBC flue gas and its control by a fixed granular bed of activated bauxite

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Myles, K.M.

    1985-01-01

    A fixed granular-bed sorber, with regenerable activated bauxite as the sorbent, for the control of the alkali vapor in the flue gas produced during pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) of coal is being developed. In a gas stream closely simulating the actual PFBC flue gas, activated bauxite is shown to capture NaCl vapor by (1) chemical fixation of the vapor with the intrinsic clay minerals, probably to form thermally stable, water-insoluble sodium aluminosilicates and (2) chemical conversion of NaCl vapor into a condensed-phase sodium sulfate, which has a much lower vapor pressure than does NaCl. The latter predominates the capture process, and the captured sodium sulfate can be easily removed by simple water-leaching to restore the porosity of activated bauxite for reuse. A high-temperature (less than or equal to 900/sup 0/C) and high-pressure (less than or equal to 10 atm) laboratory-scale, fixed, granular-bed alkali sorber has been operated with the Argonne National Laboratory PFBC combustor to (1) measure the alkali vapor concentration in the PFBC flue gas on a real-time, on-line basis, and (2) demonstrate the alkali sorber for the control of alkali vapor from an actual PFBC flue gas. The alkali (Na + K) vapor concentration in particulate filtered hot flue gas was measured to be <10 ppbW with the Ames analyzer. The same measurement with the APST was higher between 90 to 170 ppbW. Therefore, the possibility of sink for sodium vapor in the PFBC/alkali sorber system must be considered. 32 refs.

  15. Laboratory optimization tests of technetium decontamination of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant low activity waste melter off-gas condensate simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.L.; McCabe, Daniel J.

    2015-11-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable simplified operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste.

  16. Modeling high-pressure adsorption of gas mixtures on activated carbon and coal using a simplified local-density model.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, James E; Robinson, Robert L; Gasem, Khaled A M

    2006-11-07

    The simplified local-density (SLD) theory was investigated regarding its ability to provide accurate representations and predictions of high-pressure supercritical adsorption isotherms encountered in coalbed methane (CBM) recovery and CO2 sequestration. Attention was focused on the ability of the SLD theory to predict mixed-gas adsorption solely on the basis of information from pure gas isotherms using a modified Peng-Robinson (PR) equation of state (EOS). An extensive set of high-pressure adsorption measurements was used in this evaluation. These measurements included pure and binary mixture adsorption measurements for several gas compositions up to 14 MPa for Calgon F-400 activated carbon and three water-moistened coals. Also included were ternary measurements for the activated carbon and one coal. For the adsorption of methane, nitrogen, and CO2 on dry activated carbon, the SLD-PR can predict the component mixture adsorption within about 2.2 times the experimental uncertainty on average solely on the basis of pure-component adsorption isotherms. For the adsorption of methane, nitrogen, and CO2 on two of the three wet coals, the SLD-PR model can predict the component adsorption within the experimental uncertainties on average for all feed fractions (nominally molar compositions of 20/80, 40/60, 60/40, and 80/20) of the three binary gas mixture combinations, although predictions for some specific feed fractions are outside of their experimental uncertainties.

  17. Testing different storage conditions for (99m)Tc-MAG3 kit: can hot fractioning reduce the cost per unit dose?

    PubMed

    Kiratli, Pinar Ozgen; Salanci, Bilge Volkan

    2003-06-01

    Since its release for routine clinical use, (99m)Tc-mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3) has become an important alternative to (131)I-labeled orthoiodohippuran. The cold kit for MAG3 is expensive, especially in developing countries. Therefore, unique storage conditions should be provided for cost reduction. Cold fractioning is a well-known procedure but has special requirements, such as a nitrogen tank and a laminar flow hood. The aim of this study was to prolong the shelf life of (99m)Tc-labeled MAG3 by a hot fractioning method, which separates the patient doses after (99m)Tc labeling. The radiochemical purity of the (99m)Tc-labeled MAG3 kit was tested under different storage conditions. Hot fractioning of the (99m)Tc-labeled MAG3 kit was found to be a possible alternative to cold fractioning for routine clinical studies.

  18. magHD: a new approach to multi-dimensional data storage, analysis, display and exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angleraud, Christophe

    2014-06-01

    The ever increasing amount of data and processing capabilities - following the well- known Moore's law - is challenging the way scientists and engineers are currently exploiting large datasets. The scientific visualization tools, although quite powerful, are often too generic and provide abstract views of phenomena, thus preventing cross disciplines fertilization. On the other end, Geographic information Systems allow nice and visually appealing maps to be built but they often get very confused as more layers are added. Moreover, the introduction of time as a fourth analysis dimension to allow analysis of time dependent phenomena such as meteorological or climate models, is encouraging real-time data exploration techniques that allow spatial-temporal points of interests to be detected by integration of moving images by the human brain. Magellium is involved in high performance image processing chains for satellite image processing as well as scientific signal analysis and geographic information management since its creation (2003). We believe that recent work on big data, GPU and peer-to-peer collaborative processing can open a new breakthrough in data analysis and display that will serve many new applications in collaborative scientific computing, environment mapping and understanding. The magHD (for Magellium Hyper-Dimension) project aims at developing software solutions that will bring highly interactive tools for complex datasets analysis and exploration commodity hardware, targeting small to medium scale clusters with expansion capabilities to large cloud based clusters.

  19. Developing a Pre-Heat Platform for MagLIF with Z-Beamlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissel, Matthias; Harvey-Thompson, Adam J.; Awe, T. J.; Bliss, D. E.; Glinsky, M. E.; Campbell, E. M.; Gomez, M. R.; Harding, E.; Hansen, S. B.; Jennings, C. A.; Kimmel, M. W.; Knapp, P. F.; Lewis, S. M.; McBride, R. D.; Peterson, K.; Schollmeier, M.; Scoglietti, D. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Shores, J. E.; Sinars, D. B.; Rochau, G. A.; Slutz, S. A.; Smith, I. C.; Weiss, M. R.; Porter, J. L.

    2016-10-01

    Sandia's Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion Program has put one of the main objectives towards developing standard platform for a `preconditioned' target, providing a scenario that reproducibly delivers pre-heated fuel. The majority of this effort has been done at the ``Pecos'' Target Area using Sandia's Z-Beamlet laser to provide the pre-heat energy, just like for fully integrated MagLIF experiments. The nature and magnitude of Laser-Plasma-Instabilities during this process are particularly important, since they can lead to less energy in the fuel (backscatter processes) or to energy deposition in less desirable areas (filamentation/scatter). We present results for Stimulated Brillouin Backscatter and forward scatter, and show the effect of the laser pulse shape to laser-entrance-hole transmission and blast wave propagation in the fuel. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the U.S. DOE's Nat'l Nucl. Sec. Admin. under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Differentiating Different Modeling Assumptions in Simulations of MagLIF loads on the Z Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, C. A.; Gomez, M. R.; Harding, E. C.; Knapp, P. F.; Ampleford, D. J.; Hansen, S. B.; Weis, M. R.; Glinsky, M. E.; Peterson, K.; Chittenden, J. P.

    2016-10-01

    Metal liners imploded by a fast rising (<100ns) current to compress a magnetized, preheated fuel offer the potential to efficiently reach fusion conditions. These MagLIF experiments have had some success. While experiments are increasingly well diagnosed, many of the measurements (particularly during stagnation) are time integrated, limited in spatial resolution or require additional assumptions to interpret in the context of a structured, rapidly evolving system. As such, in validating MHD calculations, there is the potential for the same observables in the experimental data to be reproduced under different modeling assumptions. Using synthetic diagnostics of the results of different pre-heat, implosion and stagnation simulations run with the Gorgon MHD code, we discuss how the interpretation of typical Z diagnostics relate to more fundamental simulation parameters. We then explore the extent to which different assumptions on instability development, current delivery, high-Z mix into the fuel and initial laser deposition can be differentiated in our existing measurements. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DoE's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. A comparative study of renal scintigraphy and clearance with technetium-99m-MAG3 and iodine-123-hippurate in patients with renal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller-Suur, R.B.; Bois-Svensson, I.; Mesko, L. )

    1990-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare kit prepared technetium-99m-mercaptoacetyltriglycine (99mTc-MAG3) with our routine radiopharmaceutical, iodine-123-hippurate our routine radiopharmaceutical, iodine-123-hippurate ((123I)OIH) for renal dynamic scintigraphy. Seventeen patients with different nephrologic disorders or hypertension were first studied with OIH and then reinvestigated with MAG3 2-8 days later. Renal MAG3 gamma camera images were almost identical with those of OIH except for higher (p less than 0.01) liver-to-background ratios at 20 min postinjection, irrespective of kidney function. Urinary peristalsis was visible longer and more clearly in the MAG3 studies. MAG3 and OIH renograms showed identical relative kidney uptake (r = 0.99), but elimination of MAG3 from the kidneys was slower (p less than 0.01). The plasma clearance of MAG3 was lower than that of OIH, but correlated (r = 0.92) significantly. The plasma distribution volume and content in blood cells was lower (p less than 0.01), but the binding of MAG3 to plasma proteins was higher, 90%, as compared with 74% for OIH, p less than 0.01. Urinary excretion expressed as a percent of the given dose 60 min after injection was the same for the two substances. Thus, there are some significant differences in the renal handling, plasma distribution, and cell penetration between MAG3 and (123I)OIH. MAG3, however, seems to have particular qualifications as a radionuclide for dynamic renal scintigraphy, especially in patients who require acute investigations or in those with low renal function.

  2. Differential expression of the L- and S-isoforms of myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) in oligodendrocyte unit phenotypes in the adult rat anterior medullary velum.

    PubMed

    Butt, A M; Ibrahim, M; Gregson, N; Berry, M

    1998-04-01

    We have previously demonstrated differences in the expression of carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) in oligodendrocyte units myelinating small and large diameter fibres in the anterior medullary velum (AMV) of the adult rat (each unit comprises the cell body, processes and myelin sheaths). Others have indicated that myelin composition may also vary with respect to myelin basic protein (MBP) and proteolipid protein (PLP), and the small (S)- and large (L)-isoforms of myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG). In this study, we have determined the expression of myelin proteins in oligodendrocyte unit phenotypes I-IV, which myelinate fibres ranging in diameter from 0.3-12 microns diameter in the AMV, by using double immunolabelling for Rip, which labels entire units, and MBP, PLP, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), L-MAG and S-MAG. We show differences in the expression of L- and S-MAG in units which myelinate different diameter fibres: (1) type I/II units myelinating small diameter fibres had a L-MAG+/S-MAG-/CAII+ phenotype; (2) type II/III units myelinating different diameter fibres had a L-MAG+/S-MAG+/CAII+ phenotype; (3) type III/IV units myelinated large diameter fibres had a L-MAG+/S-MAG+/CAII- phenotype. All units, irrespective of fibre diameter, expressed Rip, MBP, PLP and MOG. The results indicate that type I-IV units may be variants of a single oligodendrocyte population and that phenotypic differences are determined by the diameter of fibres within the unit. The possible significance of metabolic and biochemical differences between oligodendrocytes myelinating small and large diameter axons are discussed with reference to the pathology of demyelination.

  3. A Diffraction-limited Survey for Direct Detection of Halpha Emitting/Accreting ExtraSolar Planets with the 6.5m Magellan Telescope and the MagAO Visible AO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Laird

    TECHNICAL BACKGROUND: An advanced adaptive secondary mirror (ASM) with 585 actuators was commissioned at the 6.5-m Magellan Telescope at one of the world’s best sites (Las Campanas Observatory; LCO) in Chile. By the end of the commissioning run (April 2013) the MagAO system was regularly producing the highest spatial resolution deep images to date (0.023” deep images at Halpha (0.656 microns); Close et al. 2013). This is due to its 378 corrective modes at 1kHz on a 6.5-m telescope. Strehl ratis>20% at Halpha were obtained in 75% of the seeing statistics at the site. We propose here to utilize MagAO’s absolutely unique ability to take Halpha, continuum (0.643 microns), and L’ (3.8 microns) thermal images (all simultaneously) to carry out a novel survey to: Discover a population of the lowest mass young accreting extrasolar planets imaged to date. to characterize the spatial distribution, and estimate accretion rates, of young extrasolar planets >5AU, to understand the influence of planets on transitional disk gaps. THEORY BACKGROUND: Extrasolar planets are very difficult to image directly since planets become very faint below ~8 Mjup (Jupiter masses) for ages >1 Myr and such massive planets are rare. There is a class of young stars that are still accreting yet have SED (and often imaging) evidence of a lack of dust and gas inside a r=5-140 AU “gap”. These “transitional disks” are believed to be transitioning into “disk free” stars. These gaps are believed to be maintained by planets that continuously clear (though scattering or accretion) the optically thin gaps. Indeed large >10 AU gaps (>few Hill spheres) must be maintained by multiple ~1 Mjup planets (Dodson-Robinson & Salyk 2011). Since gas must pass through each of these gaps to continuously supply the accreting star, simulations suggest that these “gap planets” are also crossing points for these gas streamers on their way to the star. These streamers “force-feed” these planets a

  4. Survey of state regulatory activities on least cost planning for gas utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, C.A. National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, Washington, DC ); Hopkins, M.E. )

    1991-04-01

    Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers' short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. Incorporating the concept of meeting customer energy service needs entails a recognition that customers' costs must be considered along with the utility's costs in the economic analysis of energy options. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. All state commissions were surveyed to assess the current status of gas planning and demand-side management and to identify significant regulatory issues faced by commissions during the next several years. The survey was to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least-cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: (1) status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; (2) type and scope ofnatural gas DSM programs in effect, includeing fuel substitution; (3) economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; (4) relationship between prudence reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; and (5) key regulatory issues facing gas utilities during the next five years. 34 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. Simultaneous removal of sulfur dioxide and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from incineration flue gas using activated carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen-Shu; Li, Wen-Kai; Hung, Ming-Jui

    2014-09-01

    Incineration flue gas contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). The effects of SO2 concentration (0, 350, 750, and 1000 ppm), reaction temperature (160, 200, and 280 degrees C), and the type of activated carbon fibers (ACFs) on the removal of SO2 and PAHs by ACFs were examined in this study. A fluidized bed incinerator was used to simulate practical incineration flue gas. It was found that the presence of SO2 in the incineration flue gas could drastically decrease removal of PAHs because of competitive adsorption. The effect of rise in the reaction temperature from 160 to 280 degrees C on removal of PAHs was greater than that on SO2 removal at an SO2 concentration of 750 ppm. Among the three ACFs studied, ACF-B, with the highest microporous volume, highest O content, and the tightest structure, was the best adsorbent for removing SO2 and PAHs when these gases coexisted in the incineration flue gas. Implications: Simultaneous adsorption of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted from incineration flue gas onto activated carbon fibers (ACFs) meant to devise a new technique showed that the presence of SO2 in the incineration flue gas leads to a drastic decrease in removal of PAHs because of competitive adsorption. Reaction temperature had a greater influence on PAHs removal than on SO2 removal. ACF-B, with the highest microporous volume, highest O content, and tightest structure among the three studied ACFs, was found to be the best adsorbent for removing SO2 and PAHs.

  6. New generation extracorporeal membrane oxygenation with MedTech Mag-Lev, a single-use, magnetically levitated, centrifugal blood pump: preclinical evaluation in calves.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Tatsuki; Nagaoka, Eiki; Watanabe, Taiju; Miyagi, Naoto; Kitao, Takashi; Sakota, Daisuke; Mamiya, Taichi; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Arai, Hirokuni; Takatani, Setsuo

    2013-05-01

    We have evaluated the feasibility of a newly developed single-use, magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump, MedTech Mag-Lev, in a 3-week extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) study in calves against a Medtronic Bio-Pump BPX-80. A heparin- and silicone-coated polypropylene membrane oxygenator MERA NHP Excelung NSH-R was employed as an oxygenator. Six healthy male Holstein calves with body weights of about 100 kg were divided into two groups, four in the MedTech group and two in the Bio-Pump group. Under general anesthesia, the blood pump and oxygenator were inserted extracorporeally between the main pulmonary artery and the descending aorta via a fifth left thoracotomy. Postoperatively, both the pump and oxygen flow rates were controlled at 3 L/min. Heparin was continuously infused to maintain the activated clotting time at 200-240 s. All the MedTech ECMO calves completed the study duration. However, the Bio-Pump ECMO calves were terminated on postoperative days 7 and 10 because of severe hemolysis and thrombus formation. At the start of the MedTech ECMO, the pressure drop across the oxygenator was about 25 mm Hg with the pump operated at 2800 rpm and delivering 3 L/min flow. The PO2 of the oxygenator outlet was higher than 400 mm Hg with the PCO2 below 45 mm Hg. Hemolysis and thrombus were not seen in the MedTech ECMO circuits (plasma-free hemoglobin [PFH] < 5 mg/dL), while severe hemolysis (PFH > 20 mg/dL) and large thrombus were observed in the Bio-Pump ECMO circuits. Plasma leakage from the oxygenator did not occur in any ECMO circuits. Three-week cardiopulmonary support was performed successfully with the MedTech ECMO without circuit exchanges. The MedTech Mag-Lev could help extend the durability of ECMO circuits by the improved biocompatible performances.

  7. The plasma interaction of Enceladus: 3D hybrid simulations and comparison with Cassini MAG data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriegel, H.; Simon, S.; Müller, J.; Motschmann, U.; Saur, J.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2009-12-01

    We study the interaction of Saturn's small, icy moon Enceladus and its plume with the corotating magnetospheric plasma by means of a 3D hybrid simulation model, which treats the ions as individual particles and the electrons as a massless, charge-neutralizing fluid. We analyze systematically how Enceladus' internal conductivity and plasma absorption at the surface as well as charge exchange and pick-up in the plume contribute to the overall structure of the interaction region. Furthermore, we provide a comparison of our simulation results to data obtained by the Cassini magnetometer instrument. The major findings of this study are: (1) the magnetic field diffuses through the solid body of Enceladus almost unaffected, whereas plasma absorption gives rise to a symmetric depletion wake downstream of the moon; (2) due to the small gyroradii of the newly generated plume ions, the pick-up tail possesses a 2D structure; (3) the magnetic field lines drape around the plume, which triggers an Alfvén wing system that dominates the structure of Enceladus' plasma environment. Inside the plume itself, a magnetic cavity is formed; (4) besides the reproduction of the key features of the observed magnetic field signatures, evidence for variability in the locations of the active jets and in the total gas content of the plume are shown.

  8. Enhancing a service life of torch components for MIG/MAG welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filonov, A. V.; Kryukov, A. V.; Galimov, M. I.

    2016-08-01

    The paper analyzes the main vulnerable elements of torches used in mechanized gas-shielded welding. Particular attention is given to the gas nozzle designs, materials they are made of, and other welding torch elements exposed to increased electrical and thermal stresses during the welding process.

  9. Natural Gas Monthly

    EIA Publications

    2017-01-01

    Highlights activities, events, and analyses associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer related activities and underground storage data are also reported.

  10. Eruptive activity at Mount St Helens, Washington, USA, 1984-1988: a gas geochemistry perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, K.A.; Sutton, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    The results from two different types of gas measurement, telemetered in situ monitoring of reducing gases on the dome and airborne measurements of sulfur dioxide emission rates in the plume by correlation spectrometry, suggest that the combination of these two methods is particularly effective in detecting periods of enhanced degassing that intermittently punctuate the normal background leakage of gaseous effluent from Mount St Helens to the atmosphere. Gas events were recorded before lava extrusion for each of the four dome-building episodes at Mount St Helens since mid-1984. For two of the episodes, precursory reducing gas peaks were detected, whereas during three of the episodes, COSPEC measurements recorded precursory degassing of sulfur dioxide. During one episode (October 1986), both reducing gas monitoring and SO2 emission rate measurements simultaneously detected a large gas release several hours before lava extrusion. Had both types of gas measurements been operational during each of the dome-building episodes, it is thought that both would have recorded precursory signals for all four episodes. Evidence from the data presented herein suggests that increased degassing at Mount St Helens becomes detectable when fresh upward-moving magma is between 2 km and a few hundred meters below the base of the dome and between about 60 and 12 hours before the surface extrusion of lava. ?? 1994 Springer-Verlag.

  11. Unbundling the retail gas market: Current activities and guidance for serving residential and small customers

    SciTech Connect

    Costello, K.W.; Lemon, J.R.

    1996-05-01

    The restructuring of retail gas services has followed a typical pattern for previously heavily regulated industries: large customers are initially given rights to purchase unbundled services from different entities, with the same rights dispersed over time to smaller customers. For about ten years now industrial customers in most states have been able to {open_quotes}play the market{close_quotes}. Since the passage of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Order 636 in 1992, interest has centered on expanding service unbundling to small retail customers, including residential customers. Importantly, the Order prohibited pipelines from providing bundled sales service. This is not surprising - in the telecommunications industry, for example, the unbundling of wholesale services was a strong stimulant for developing competition in the local exchange market. The push for small-customer service unbundling has derived from the basic but politically attractive idea that all retail customers should directly benefit from competitive forces in the natural gas industry. When one looks at the movement of prices since 1985, it is easy to see that large retail customers have enjoyed more favorable prices than other retail customers. For example, over the period 1985 to 1994 gas prices to industrial customers and electric utilities fell around 23 percent and 36 percent, respectively. In comparison, gas prices to residential customers increased by around 5 percent while gas prices to commercial customers decreased slightly by about 1 percent. This report examines various aspects of unbundling to small retail gas customers, with special emphasis on residential customers.

  12. Temperature and moisture effects on greenhouse gas emissions from deep active-layer boreal soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond-Lamberty, Ben; Smith, A. Peyton; Bailey, Vanessa

    2016-12-01

    Rapid climatic changes, rising air temperatures, and increased fires are expected to drive permafrost degradation and alter soil carbon (C) cycling in many high-latitude ecosystems. How these soils will respond to changes in their temperature, moisture, and overlying vegetation is uncertain but critical to understand given the large soil C stocks in these regions. We used a laboratory experiment to examine how temperature and moisture control CO2 and CH4 emissions from mineral soils sampled from the bottom of the annual active layer, i.e., directly above permafrost, in an Alaskan boreal forest. Gas emissions from 30 cores, subjected to two temperatures and either field moisture conditions or experimental drought, were tracked over a 100-day incubation; we also measured a variety of physical and chemical characteristics of the cores. Gravimetric water content was 0.31 ± 0.12 (unitless) at the beginning of the incubation; cores at field moisture were unchanged at the end, but drought cores had declined to 0.06 ± 0.04. Daily CO2 fluxes were positively correlated with incubation chamber temperature, core water content, and percent soil nitrogen. They also had a temperature sensitivity (Q10) of 1.3 and 1.9 for the field moisture and drought treatments, respectively. Daily CH4 emissions were most strongly correlated with percent nitrogen, but neither temperature nor water content was a significant first-order predictor of CH4 fluxes. The cumulative production of C from CO2 was over 6 orders of magnitude higher than that from CH4; cumulative CO2 was correlated with incubation temperature and moisture treatment, with drought cores producing 52-73 % lower C. Cumulative CH4 production was unaffected by any treatment. These results suggest that deep active-layer soils may be sensitive to changes in soil moisture under aerobic conditions, a critical factor as discontinuous permafrost thaws in interior Alaska. Deep but unfrozen high-latitude soils have been shown to be

  13. Temperature and moisture effects on greenhouse gas emissions from deep active-layer boreal soils

    DOE PAGES

    Bond-Lamberty, Ben; Smith, A. Peyton; Bailey, Vanessa

    2016-12-21

    Rapid climatic changes, rising air temperatures, and increased fires are expected to drive permafrost degradation and alter soil carbon (C) cycling in many high-latitude ecosystems. How these soils will respond to changes in their temperature, moisture, and overlying vegetation is uncertain but critical to understand given the large soil C stocks in these regions. We used a laboratory experiment to examine how temperature and moisture control CO2 and CH4 emissions from mineral soils sampled from the bottom of the annual active layer, i.e., directly above permafrost, in an Alaskan boreal forest. Gas emissions from 30 cores, subjected to two temperaturesmore » and either field moisture conditions or experimental drought, were tracked over a 100-day incubation; we also measured a variety of physical and chemical characteristics of the cores. Gravimetric water content was 0.31 ± 0.12 (unitless) at the beginning of the incubation; cores at field moisture were unchanged at the end, but drought cores had declined to 0.06 ± 0.04. Daily CO2 fluxes were positively correlated with incubation chamber temperature, core water content, and percent soil nitrogen. They also had a temperature sensitivity (Q10) of 1.3 and 1.9 for the field moisture and drought treatments, respectively. Daily CH4 emissions were most strongly correlated with percent nitrogen, but neither temperature nor water content was a significant first-order predictor of CH4 fluxes. The cumulative production of C from CO2 was over 6 orders of magnitude higher than that from CH4; cumulative CO2 was correlated with incubation temperature and moisture treatment, with drought cores producing 52–73 % lower C. Cumulative CH4 production was unaffected by any treatment. These results suggest that deep active-layer soils may be sensitive to changes in soil moisture under aerobic conditions, a critical factor as discontinuous permafrost thaws in interior Alaska. Deep but unfrozen high-latitude soils have

  14. Resolving M-dwarf Binaries in Young Moving Groups (YMGs) with MagAO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Yutong; Yee, Jennifer C.; Bowler, Brendan P.

    2017-01-01

    With relatively well-determined ages and uniform histories, YMGs are sparse ensembles of stars that serve as benchmarks for the transition of stellar populations from their birth clusters to the field. We present data and analysis from our Magellan Adaptive Optics (MagAO) campaign to image more than 100 K- and M-dwarf members of several YMGs in the southern sky, revealing ~30 previously unresolved visual stellar companions at separations of ~3 — 300 AU. Knowledge of their binarity is instrumental to interpreting their measured properties for a variety of applications. The tighter of these systems also represent opportunities for future monitoring and dynamical mass inference.Due to faintness and lack of clarity in their YMG memberships (until recently), the multiplicity of PMS M-dwarfs in young associations is hitherto unconstrained. Our study provides statistics for such young M-dwarf multiples in an intermediate regime of orbital distance (across the hard-soft boundary) to populate this little-explored region in the parameter space of multiple star systems. Among the ensemble properties of interest are distributions in physical separations and mass ratios for the binary components. When combined with the SACY survey (Elliott et al. 2015), whose focus is on YMG systems with earlier type primaries, we are able to provide an updated measurement of young-star multiplicity as a function of stellar mass, age, and environment, with significantly more statistical power at lower masses. We discuss implications for the universality and scalability of star formation and evolution processes, as well as comparison to measurements in related populations (e.g. cluster, field, young, old, FGK stars) which form a storyline that theory must explain.

  15. Cassini's CAPS and MAG measurements during Titan flyby T15 compared to HYB model results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillanpää, I.; Young, D.; Wilson, R.; Crary, F.; Bertucci, C.; Dougherty, M.; Wellbrock, A.; Coates, A.; Kallio, E.; Jarvinen, R.; Janhunen, P.

    2008-12-01

    Titan's ionosphere and exosphere interact with the rotating plasma flow of the Saturn's magnetosphere. The plasma flow is magnetized by Saturn's magnetic field but also disturbed by the dynamics of the outer magnetosphere; e.g. the location of the plasma sheet and the motion of the magnetopause due to varying solar wind pressure. These cause changes in the density and velocity of the plasma flow as well as in the direction of the ambient magnetic field. Furthermore, near the magnetospheric current sheet (i.e. in the magnetodisk) oxygen and water-group ions have often higher density than hydrogen ions whereas outside the magnetodisk these heavy ion components are not detected and consequently H+ dominates. Cassini's T15 flyby of Titan's close wake on July 2, 2006 is studied using CAPS ion spectrometer (IMS) and magnetometer (MAG) data. The plasma flow was composed of water-group ions (0.09±0.05 cm-3) and H+ (0.07±0.03 cm-3) with the flow speed roughly 80 km/s. For T15 the magnetic field a one- lobe structure was observed similar to that seen in the wake further down Titan's tail during T9[1]. The data are compared with simulation results from a global hybrid plasma model HYB. [1] Sillanpää, I., Hybrid Modelling of Titan's Interaction with the Magnetosphere of Saturn, Ph.D. dissertation, Yliopistopaino, Helsinki, 2008. (Freely available at permalink http://urn.fi/URN:ISBN:978-951- 697-660-3)

  16. An improved synthesis of NHS-MAG3 for conjugation and radiolabeling of biomolecules with (99m)Tc at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Liu, Xinrong; Hnatowich, Donald J

    2007-01-01

    The mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3) chelator has been shown to stably complex technetium-99m (99mTc) for nuclear imaging and radiorhenium (186/188Re) for tumor radiation therapy studies. The bifunctional N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester of MAG3 with S-acetyl protection (N-hydroxysuccinimidyl S-acetylmercaptoacetyltriglycinate (NHS-MAG3)) has been successfully used to covalently conjugate a MAG3 chelator to primary amine functionalized biomolecules. We describe herein a simplified synthesis of NHS-MAG3 that begins with the preparation of the N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester of S-acetylmercaptoacetic acid (N-succinimidyl S-acetylmercaptoacetate (SATA)) from mercaptoacetic acid and is followed by the synthesis of S-acetylmercaptoacetyltriglycine from SATA, together requiring about 14 days. Finally, the synthesis of NHS-MAG3 from S-acetylmercaptoacetyltriglycine requires a further 5 days. We had earlier described a method for the preparation of MAG3-conjugated and 99mTc-radiolabeled biomolecules that required elevated temperatures during postconjugation purification. We now report a modified method for the preparation that is accomplished at room temperature and therefore applicable to temperature-sensitive biomolecules. The conjugation and radiolabeling of bovine serum albumin is used as an example. The conjugation and purification requires about 2-3 h and the radiolabeling and postlabeling purification requires about an additional 2 h.

  17. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides targeted to MAG mRNA profoundly alter BP and PLP mRNA expression in differentiating oligodendrocytes: a caution.

    PubMed

    Laszkiewicz, I; Wiggins, R C; Konat, G W

    1999-09-01

    The applicability of antisense technology to suppress the expression of myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) in cultured oligodendrocytes was evaluated. Differentiating oligodendrocyte precursor cells obtained by the shake-off method were exposed to nine unmodified antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) targeted to the first seven exons of MAG mRNA. After four days, steady-state levels of MAG, proteolipid protein (PLP) and basic protein (BP) mRNAs were determined by Northern blot analysis. Only ODN annealing to 599-618 nt of the MAG mRNA (the junction of exon 5 and 6) resulted in a significant, 75% decrease in the MAG mRNA level. Unexpectedly, six other anti-MAG ODNs which had no significant effect on the MAG message, greatly increased the level of BP mRNA. The highest upregulation of approximately 12 fold was observed with ODN annealing to 139-168 nt (junction of exon 3 and 4). On the other hand, the 997-1016 ODN decreased the levels of BP and PLP messages by 70-80%. The 599-618 ODN also decreased the PLP mRNA by 85%. The results demonstrate that antisense ODNs targeted to one gene may profoundly alter the expression of other genes, and hence, complicate functional analysis of the targeted protein.

  18. Gold catalysts for pure hydrogen production in the water-gas shift reaction: activity, structure and reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Burch, Robbie

    2006-12-21

    The production of hydrogen containing very low levels of carbon monoxide for use in polymer electrolyte fuel cells requires the development of catalysts that show very high activity at low temperatures where the equilibrium for the removal of carbon monoxide using the water-gas shift reaction is favourable. It has been claimed that oxide-supported gold catalysts have the required high activity but there is considerable uncertainty in the literature about the feasibility of using these catalysts under real conditions. By comparing the activity of gold catalysts with that of platinum catalysts it is shown that well-prepared gold catalysts are significantly more active than the corresponding platinum catalysts. However, the method of preparation and pre-treatment of the gold catalysts is critical and activity variations of several orders of magnitude can be observed depending on the methods chosen. It is shown that an intimate contact between gold and the oxide support is important and any preparative procedure that does not generate such an interaction, or any subsequent treatment that can destroy such an interaction, may result in catalysts with low activity. The oxidation state and structure of active gold catalysts for the water-gas shift reaction is shown to comprise gold primarily in a zerovalent metallic state but in intimate contact with the support. This close contact between small metallic gold particles and the support may result in the "atoms" at the point of contact having a net charge (most probably cationic) but the high activity is associated with the presence of metallic gold. Both in situ XPS and XANES appear unequivocal on this point and this conclusion is consistent with similar measurements on gold catalysts even when used for CO oxidation. In situ EXAFS measurements under water gas shift conditions show that the active form of gold is a small gold cluster in intimate contact with the oxide support. The importance of the gold/oxide interface is

  19. Unit with Fluidized Bed for Gas-Vapor Activation of Different Carbonaceous Materials for Various Purposes: Design, Computation, Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strativnov, Eugene

    2017-02-01

    We propose the technology of obtaining the promising material with wide specter of application-activated nanostructured carbon. In terms of technical indicators, it will stand next to the materials produced by complex regulations with the use of costly chemical operations. It can be used for the following needs: as a sorbent for hemosorption and enterosorption, for creation of the newest source of electric current (lithium and zinc air batteries, supercapacitors), and for processes of short-cycle adsorption gas separation.

  20. Simultaneous technetium-99 MAG(3), iodine-131-orthoiodohippurate and iodine-125 iothalamate clearance and biodistribution after bolus injection in rats.

    PubMed

    Casadevall, G; Turull, A; Piera, C; Queralt, J

    2000-07-01

    A bolus injection multiple blood sampling method was developed for the simultaneous measurement of blood and plasma clearance of three radiopharmaceuticals in rats. Technetium-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine ([(99m)Tc]MAG(3)) and iodine-131-orthoiodohippurate ([(131)I]OIH) were used as makers of effective renal blood flow (ERBF), and iodine-125 iothalamate ([(125)I]IOT) was used as a marker of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). These methods can be easily performed in rats without arterial catheterization. Tissue biodistribution was studied in four groups of rats subjected to the following: group A, renal pedicle isolation (sham-operated); group B, ligature of one kidney pedicle; group C, ligature of both renal pedicles; and group D, ligature of both kidney pedicles and the bile duct. Renal clearance of [(99m)Tc]MAG(3) was greater than [(131)I]OIH and both agents were cleared faster than ([(125)I]-IOT). Either of the two markers of ERBF may be used in experimental studies, but it should be borne in mind that these are relative measurements of kidney performance. [(99m)Tc]MAG(3) and [(125)I]-IOT showed bile excretion in healthy rats, so they cannot completely fulfill the requirements for use as markers of ERBF. When renal function was impaired experimentally, [(99m)Tc]MAG(3) and [(125)I]-IOT were excreted in bile and [(131)I]OIH was secreted in the intestine. Thus, while the markers of ERBF and GFR may be reliable under normal physiological conditions, they may give progressively more erroneous values as renal function deteriorates.

  1. Using the Novel Method of Nonthermal Plasma To Add Cl Active Sites on Activated Carbon for Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bi; Zeng, Xiaobo; Xu, Ping; Chen, Juan; Xu, Yang; Luo, Guangqian; Xu, Minghou; Yao, Hong

    2016-11-01

    A new method using nonthermal plasma to add Cl active sites on activated carbon was proposed to improve the efficiency of activated carbon (AC) for removal of mercury from flue gas. The experiments were conducted via a lab-scale dielectric barrier discharge nonthermal plasma system and a vertical adsorption reactor. The results showed that the nonthermal plasma treatment with a small amount of Cl2 successfully added Cl active sites on AC and greatly increased the mercury removal efficiency of AC by chemisorption in a very short treatment time. The increase in Cl2 concentration for AC treatment promoted the efficiency of AC. The capacity of mercury adsorption positively correlated with the content of Cl2 for AC treatment, which depends on the number of Cl active sites on activated carbon. The treated AC maintained a high mercury removal efficiency within a temperature range of 30-210 °C. SO2 and H2O in flue gas inhibited the removal of mercury by AC, while HCl had a promotional effect. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicated the chemisorption of mercury was attributed to the C-Cl groups generated on AC surfaces during Cl2 nonthermal plasma treatment. The C-Cl groups as active sites had strong adsorption energy for mercury, which converted elemental mercury to HgCl2.

  2. Cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids activate the cGAS-STING axis.

    PubMed

    Mankan, Arun K; Schmidt, Tobias; Chauhan, Dhruv; Goldeck, Marion; Höning, Klara; Gaidt, Moritz; Kubarenko, Andrew V; Andreeva, Liudmila; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Hornung, Veit

    2014-12-17

    Intracellular recognition of non-self and also self-nucleic acids can result in the initiation of potent pro-inflammatory and antiviral cytokine responses. Most recently, cGAS was shown to be critical for the recognition of cytoplasmic dsDNA. Binding of dsDNA to cGAS results in the synthesis of cGAMP(2'-5'), which then binds to the endoplasmic reticulum resident protein STING. This initiates a signaling cascade that triggers the induction of an antiviral immune response. While most studies on intracellular nucleic acids have focused on dsRNA or dsDNA, it has remained unexplored whether cytosolic RNA:DNA hybrids are also sensed by the innate immune system. Studying synthetic RNA:DNA hybrids, we indeed observed a strong type I interferon response upon cytosolic delivery of this class of molecule. Studies in THP-1 knockout cells revealed that the recognition of RNA:DNA hybrids is completely attributable to the cGAS-STING pathway. Moreover, in vitro studies showed that recombinant cGAS produced cGAMP upon RNA:DNA hybrid recognition. Altogether, our results introduce RNA:DNA hybrids as a novel class of intracellular PAMP molecules and describe an alternative cGAS ligand next to dsDNA.

  3. Regional Air Quality Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing and Natural Gas Activity: Evidence from Ambient VOC Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinciguerra, T.; Ehrman, S.; Yao, S.; Dadzie, J.; Chittams, A.; Dickerson, R. R.

    2014-12-01

    Over the past decade, many anthropogenic pollutants have been successfully reduced, providing improved air quality. However, a new influx of emissions associated with hydraulic fracturing and natural gas operations could be counteracting some of these benefits. Using hourly measurements from Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations (PAMS) in the Baltimore, MD and Washington, D.C. areas, we observed that following a period of decline, daytime ethane concentrations have increased significantly since 2010. This trend appears to be linked with the rapid natural gas production in upwind, neighboring states, especially Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Furthermore, ethane concentrations failed to display this trend at a PAMS site outside of Atlanta, GA, a region without widespread natural gas operations. Year-to-year changes in VOCs were further evaluated by using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) to perform source apportionment on hourly observations in Essex, MD from 2005-2013. This process takes ambient measurements and attributes them to sources such as biogenic, natural gas, industrial, gasoline, and vehicle exhaust by using tracer species as identifiers. Preliminary PMF results also indicate an increasing influence of natural gas sources for this area.

  4. High-ionization Gas in Active Galactic Nuclei: Line Profiles and Physical Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodíguez-Ardila, A.; Riffel, R.; Mazzalay, X.; Portilla, J. G.

    2012-08-01

    SOAR/Goodman spectroscopy is employed to detect the coronal lines [Fe VII] 3759, 5159, and 6087 Å, [Ne V] 3423 Å and [Fe X] 6083 Å, the former three suitable to determine the temperature and density of the high-ionization gas. The spectra allow us to fully characterize the profiles of the most conspicuous lines (asymmetries, shifts from the centroid position and line width). The combined results allow us to detect signatures of outflows in the coronal gas and thus set up constrains on the origin of the CLs in AGNs. In addition, AO GEMINI/NIFS IFU spectroscopy is used to study the coronal gas morphology at spatial scales of a few parsecs in the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068. We found that the gas distribution is rather inhomogeneous and asymmetric. From the comparison of the CL [Mg VIII] with the VLA 6 cm radio emission we found evidence that the CL gas kinematics and morphology is strongly related to the radio jet morphology. All above results allow us to confirm the role that coronal lines have to trace outflows at the inner tens of parsecs of AGNs.

  5. The Cytosolic Sensor cGAS Detects Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA to Induce Type I Interferons and Activate Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Watson, Robert O; Bell, Samantha L; MacDuff, Donna A; Kimmey, Jacqueline M; Diner, Elie J; Olivas, Joanna; Vance, Russell E; Stallings, Christina L; Virgin, Herbert W; Cox, Jeffery S

    2015-06-10

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are critical mediators of antiviral defense, but their elicitation by bacterial pathogens can be detrimental to hosts. Many intracellular bacterial pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, induce type I IFNs following phagosomal membrane perturbations. Cytosolic M. tuberculosis DNA has been implicated as a trigger for IFN production, but the mechanisms remain obscure. We report that the cytosolic DNA sensor, cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), is required for activating IFN production via the STING/TBK1/IRF3 pathway during M. tuberculosis and L. pneumophila infection of macrophages, whereas L. monocytogenes short-circuits this pathway by producing the STING agonist, c-di-AMP. Upon sensing cytosolic DNA, cGAS also activates cell-intrinsic antibacterial defenses, promoting autophagic targeting of M. tuberculosis. Importantly, we show that cGAS binds M. tuberculosis DNA during infection, providing direct evidence that this unique host-pathogen interaction occurs in vivo. These data uncover a mechanism by which IFN is likely elicited during active human infections.

  6. Views of Growing Methane Emissions near Oil and Natural Gas Activity: Satellite, Aircraft, and Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollonige, D. E.; Thompson, A. M.; Diskin, G. S.; Hannigan, J. W.; Nussbaumer, E.

    2015-12-01

    To better understand the discrepancies between current top-down and bottom-up estimates, additional methane (CH4) measurements are necessary for regions surrounding growing oil and natural gas (ONG) development. We have evaluated satellite measurements of CH4 in US regions with ONG operations for their application as "top-down" constraints (part of the NASA Air Quality Applied Sciences Team (AQAST) project). For validation of the satellite instruments' sensitivities to emitted gases, we focus on regions where the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) campaign deployed ground and aircraft measurements in Maryland (2011), California and Texas (2013), and Colorado (2014). The largest CH4 signals were observed in the Greater Green River and Powder River Basins using Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) Representative Tropospheric Volume Mixing Ratio (RTVMR) measurements. A long-term comparison between a ground remote-sensing Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) at Boulder and TES for 2010-2013 shows good correlation and differences ranging 2.5-5% for their yearly distribution of total column CH4. To determine any correlation between lower/mid-tropospheric CH4 (where a thermal IR sensor, such as TES, is most sensitive) and near-surface/boundary CH4 (where sources emit), we analyze the variability of DISCOVER-AQ aircraft profiles using principal component analysis and assess the correlation between near-surface (0-2 km) and mid-tropospheric (>2 km) CH4 concentrations. Using these relationships, we estimate near-surface CH4 using mid-tropospheric satellite measurements based on the partial column amounts within vertical layers with a linear regression. From this analysis, we will demonstrate whether the uncertainties of satellite-estimated near-surface CH4 are comparable to observed variability near ONG activity. These results will assist validation of satellite instrument

  7. Nanoparticle cluster gas sensor: Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticles for NH3 detection with ultrahigh sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Chen, Nan; Han, Bingqian; Xiao, Xuechun; Chen, Gang; Djerdj, Igor; Wang, Yude

    2015-09-28

    Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticle clusters were synthesized by a simple solvothermal method. The structure, morphology, chemical state and specific surface area were analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and N2-sorption studies, respectively. The SnO2 nanoparticle cluster matrix consists of tens of thousands of SnO2 nanoparticles with an ultra-small grain size estimated to be 3.0 nm. And there are abundant random-packed wormhole-like pores, caused by the inter-connection of the SnO2 nanoparticles, throughout each cluster. The platinum element is present in two forms including metal (Pt) and tetravalent metal oxide (PtO2) in the Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticle clusters. The as-synthesized pure and Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticle clusters were used to fabricate gas sensor devices. It was found that the gas response toward 500 ppm of ammonia was improved from 6.48 to 203.44 through the activation by Pt. And the results indicate that the sensor based on Pt activated SnO2 not only has ultrahigh sensitivity but also possesses good response-recovery properties, linear dependence, repeatability, selectivity and long-term stability, demonstrating the potential to use Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticle clusters as ammonia gas sensors. At the same time, the formation mechanisms of the unique nanoparticle clusters and highly enhanced sensitivity are also discussed.

  8. Endocrine disrupting activities of surface water associated with a West Virginia oil and gas industry wastewater disposal site.

    PubMed

    Kassotis, Christopher D; Iwanowicz, Luke R; Akob, Denise M; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M; Mumford, Adam C; Orem, William H; Nagel, Susan C

    2016-07-01

    Currently, >95% of end disposal of hydraulic fracturing wastewater from unconventional oil and gas operations in the US occurs via injection wells. Key data gaps exist in understanding the potential impact of underground injection on surface water quality and environmental health. The goal of this study was to assess endocrine disrupting activity in surface water at a West Virginia injection well disposal site. Water samples were collected from a background site in the area and upstream, on, and downstream of the disposal facility. Samples were solid-phase extracted, and extracts assessed for agonist and antagonist hormonal activities for five hormone receptors in mammalian and yeast reporter gene assays. Compared to reference water extracts upstream and distal to the disposal well, samples collected adjacent and downstream exhibited considerably higher antagonist activity for the estrogen, androgen, progesterone, glucocorticoid and thyroid hormone receptors. In contrast, low levels of agonist activity were measured in upstream/distal sites, and were inhibited or absent at downstream sites with significant antagonism. Concurrent analyses by partner laboratories (published separately) describe the analytical and geochemical profiling of the water; elevated conductivity as well as high sodium, chloride, strontium, and barium concentrations indicate impacts due to handling of unconventional oil and gas wastewater. Notably, antagonist activities in downstream samples were at equivalent authentic standard concentrations known to disrupt reproduction and/or development in aquatic animals. Given the widespread use of injection wells for end-disposal of hydraulic fracturing wastewater, these data raise concerns for human and animal health nearby.

  9. Endocrine disrupting activities of surface water associated with a West Virginia oil and gas industry wastewater disposal site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kassotis, Christopher D.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Akob, Denise M.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Mumford, Adam; Orem, William H.; Nagel, Susan C.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, >95% of end disposal of hydraulic fracturing wastewater from unconventional oil and gas operations in the US occurs via injection wells. Key data gaps exist in understanding the potential impact of underground injection on surface water quality and environmental health. The goal of this study was to assess endocrine disrupting activity in surface water at a West Virginia injection well disposal site. Water samples were collected from a background site in the area and upstream, on, and downstream of the disposal facility. Samples were solid-phase extracted, and extracts assessed for agonist and antagonist hormonal activities for five hormone receptors in mammalian and yeast reporter gene assays. Compared to reference water extracts upstream and distal to the disposal well, samples collected adjacent and downstream exhibited considerably higher antagonist activity for the estrogen, androgen, progesterone, glucocorticoid and thyroid hormone receptors. In contrast, low levels of agonist activity were measured in upstream/distal sites, and were inhibited or absent at downstream sites with significant antagonism. Concurrent analyses by partner laboratories (published separately) describe the analytical and geochemical profiling of the water; elevated conductivity as well as high sodium, chloride, strontium, and barium concentrations indicate impacts due to handling of unconventional oil and gas wastewater. Notably, antagonist activities in downstream samples were at equivalent authentic standard concentrations known to disrupt reproduction and/or development in aquatic animals. Given the widespread use of injection wells for end-disposal of hydraulic fracturing wastewater, these data raise concerns for human and animal health nearby.

  10. Biomass-based palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve as gas separation adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Sethupathi, Sumathi; Bashir, Mohammed Jk; Akbar, Zinatizadeh Ali; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2015-04-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass has been widely recognised as a potential low-cost source for the production of high added value materials and proved to be a good precursor for the production of activated carbons. One of such valuable biomasses used for the production of activated carbons is palm shell. Palm shell (endocarp) is an abundant by-product produced from the palm oil industries throughout tropical countries. Palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve has been widely applied in various environmental pollution control technologies, mainly owing to its high adsorption performance, well-developed porosity and low cost, leading to potential applications in gas-phase separation using adsorption processes. This mini-review represents a comprehensive overview of the palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve preparation method, physicochemical properties and feasibility of palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve in gas separation processes. Some of the limitations are outlined and suggestions for future improvements are pointed out.

  11. Overview of U.S. Legislation and Regulations Affecting Offshore Natural Gas and Oil Activity

    EIA Publications

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a summary of the legislative and regulatory regime that affects natural gas and oil exploration and production in offshore regions of the United States. It discusses the role and importance of these areas as well as the competing interests surrounding ownership, production, exploration and conservation.

  12. SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS IN GAS PHASE USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TITANIUM DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Selective oxidations of various primary and secondary alcohols were studied in a gas phase photochemical reactor using immobilized TiO2 catalyst. An annular photoreactor was used at 463K with an average contact time of 32sec. The system was found to be specifically suited for the...

  13. Activities for Students: Predicting Future Gas Prices Using the Standards for Mathematical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bismarck, Stephen F.; Zelkowski, Jeremy; Gleason, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Like many commodities, the price of gasoline continues to rise, and these price changes are readily observed in gas stations' signage. Moreover, algebraic methods are well suited to model price change and answer the student's question. Over the course of one ninety-minute block or two forty-five-minute classes, students build functions…

  14. 77 FR 68144 - Information Collection Activities: Oil and Gas Production Measurement, Surface Commingling, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-15

    ... Production Measurement, Surface Commingling, and Security; Proposed Collection; Comment Request ACTION: 60... requirements in the regulations under Subpart L, Oil and Gas Production Measurement, Surface Commingling, and... Measurement, Surface Commingling, and Security. OMB Control Number: 1014-0002. Abstract: The Outer...

  15. METHANE EMISSIONS FROM THE NATURAL GAS INDUSTRY VOLUME 5: ACTIVITY FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 15-volume report summarizes the results of a comprehensive program to quantify methane (CH4) emissions from the U.S. natural gas industry for the base year. The objective was to determine CH4 emissions from the wellhead and ending downstream at the customer's meter. The accur...

  16. Antimicrobial activity of controlled-release chlorine dioxide gas on fresh blueberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) on the safety and quality of blueberries was studied. In vitro studies revealed that both ClO2 gas fumigation and ClO2 water direct contact killed food pathogen bacterium, Escherichia coli and fruit decay pathogen fungus, Colletotrichum acutatum. In vivo studies...

  17. Investigations of Air Perfusion through Porous Media and Super-Hydrophobic Surface Active Gas Replenishment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlin, Marc; Gose, James W.; Golovin, Kevin; Ceccio, Steven L.; Tuteja, Anish

    2015-11-01

    Super-hydrophobic (SH) materials have been used successfully to generate reduced skin-friction in laminar flows. Success in the laminar regime has led researchers to try SH materials in turbulent flows. More often than not, this has been unsuccessful at providing meaningful skin-friction drag reduction, and has even generated increased drag. This failure is frequently attributed to the wetting of an SH surface or equivalently the transition from the Cassie-Baxter to the Wenzel state. The result is fluid flow over an essentially roughened surface. In this investigation the researchers aim to perfuse small amounts of gas through porous media, including sintered and foam metals, to attain skin-friction drag reduction in a fully-developed turbulent channel flow. As air is perfused through porous media, the solid - liquid interaction at the interface transitions to a solid - liquid - gas interaction. This can result in an interface that functions similarly to SH materials. Controlled air perfusion that provides the necessary replenishment of lost gas at the interface might prevent wetting, and thus eliminate or reduce the effect of the roughness on the flow. This latter possibility is investigated by perfusing small amounts of gas through porous media with and without SH coatings. To quantify the effectiveness of this method, pressure drop is used to infer friction drag along the surface in a fully-developed turbulent channel flow. The authors recognize the support of ONR.

  18. 77 FR 59209 - Information Collection Activities: Oil and Gas Production Requirements; Proposed Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-26

    ...: Evaluate requests to burn liquid hydrocarbons and vent and flare gas to ensure that these requests are... reservoirs are being depleted in a manner that will lead to the greatest ultimate recovery of hydrocarbons. This information is collected to determine the capability of hydrocarbon wells and to evaluate...

  19. Outer continental shelf oil and gas activities. Pacific update: August 1987 - November 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Slitor, Douglas L.; Wiese, Jeffrey D.; Karpas, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    This Pacific Update focuses on the geology and petroleum potential of the Central California and Washington-Oregon OCS Planning Areas. This report discusses the following topics: offshore oil and gas resources of the Pacific region; project-specific developments and status; and magnitude and timing of offshore developments. (CBS)

  20. METHANE EMISSIONS FROM THE NATURAL GAS INDUSTRY VOLUME 7: BLOW AND PURGE ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 15-volume report summarizes the results of a comprehensive program to quantify methane (CH4) emissions from the U.S. natural gas industry for the base year. The objective was to determine CH4 emissions from the wellhead and ending downstream at the customer's meter. The accur...

  1. The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) Online Database: Uploading, Searching and Visualizing Paleomagnetic and Rock Magnetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minnett, R.; Koppers, A.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.; Pisarevsky, S. A.; Jackson, M.; Solheid, P.; Banerjee, S.; Johnson, C.

    2006-12-01

    The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) is commissioned to implement and maintain an online portal to a relational database populated by both rock and paleomagnetic data. The goal of MagIC is to archive all measurements and the derived properties for studies of paleomagnetic directions (inclination, declination) and intensities, and for rock magnetic experiments (hysteresis, remanence, susceptibility, anisotropy). MagIC is hosted under EarthRef.org at http://earthref.org/MAGIC/ and has two search nodes, one for paleomagnetism and one for rock magnetism. Both nodes provide query building based on location, reference, methods applied, material type and geological age, as well as a visual map interface to browse and select locations. The query result set is displayed in a digestible tabular format allowing the user to descend through hierarchical levels such as from locations to sites, samples, specimens, and measurements. At each stage, the result set can be saved and, if supported by the data, can be visualized by plotting global location maps, equal area plots, or typical Zijderveld, hysteresis, and various magnetization and remanence diagrams. User contributions to the MagIC database are critical to achieving a useful research tool. We have developed a standard data and metadata template (Version 2.1) that can be used to format and upload all data at the time of publication in Earth Science journals. Software tools are provided to facilitate population of these templates within Microsoft Excel. These tools allow for the import/export of text files and provide advanced functionality to manage and edit the data, and to perform various internal checks to maintain data integrity and prepare for uploading. The MagIC Contribution Wizard at http://earthref.org/MAGIC/upload.htm executes the upload and takes only a few minutes to process several thousand data records. The standardized MagIC template files are stored in the digital archives of EarthRef.org where they

  2. The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) Online Database: Uploading, Searching and Visualizing Paleomagnetic and Rock Magnetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, A.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.; Pisarevsky, S.; Jackson, M.; Solheid, P.; Banerjee, S.; Johnson, C.; Genevey, A.; Delaney, R.; Baker, P.; Sbarbori, E.

    2005-12-01

    The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) operates an online relational database including both rock and paleomagnetic data. The goal of MagIC is to store all measurements and their derived properties for studies of paleomagnetic directions (inclination, declination) and their intensities, and for rock magnetic experiments (hysteresis, remanence, susceptibility, anisotropy). MagIC is hosted under EarthRef.org at http://earthref.org/MAGIC/ and has two search nodes, one for paleomagnetism and one for rock magnetism. These nodes provide basic search capabilities based on location, reference, methods applied, material type and geological age, while allowing the user to drill down from sites all the way to the measurements. At each stage, the data can be saved and, if the available data supports it, the data can be visualized by plotting equal area plots, VGP location maps or typical Zijderveld, hysteresis, FORC, and various magnetization and remanence diagrams. All plots are made in SVG (scalable vector graphics) and thus can be saved and easily read into the user's favorite graphics programs without loss of resolution. User contributions to the MagIC database are critical to achieve a useful research tool. We have developed a standard data and metadata template (version 1.6) that can be used to format and upload all data at the time of publication in Earth Science journals. Software tools are provided to facilitate easy population of these templates within Microsoft Excel. These tools allow for the import/export of text files and they provide advanced functionality to manage/edit the data, and to perform various internal checks to high grade the data and to make them ready for uploading. The uploading is all done online by using the MagIC Contribution Wizard at http://earthref.org/MAGIC/upload.htm that takes only a few minutes to process a contribution of approximately 5,000 data records. After uploading these standardized MagIC template files will be stored in the

  3. Automated Assistance for Designing Active Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imlach, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    MagBear12 is a computer code that assists in the design of radial, heteropolar active magnetic bearings (AMBs). MagBear12 was developed to help in designing the system described in "Advanced Active-Magnetic-Bearing Thrust-Measurement System". Beyond this initial application, MagBear12 is expected to be useful for designing AMBs for a variety of rotating machinery. This program incorporates design rules and governing equations that are also implemented in other, proprietary design software used by AMB manufacturers. In addition, this program incorporates an advanced unpublished fringing-magnetic-field model that increases accuracy beyond that offered by the other AMB-design software.

  4. Identification of Aroma-active Compounds in Essential Oil from Uncaria Hook by Gas Chromatography- Mass Spectrometry and Gas Chromatography-Olfactometry.

    PubMed

    Iwasa, Megumi; Nakaya, Satoshi; Maki, Yusuke; Marumoto, Shinsuke; Usami, Atsushi; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    The chemical composition of essential oil extracted from Uncaria Hook ("Chotoko" in Japanese), the branch with curved hook of the herbal medicine Uncaria rhynchophylla has been investigated by GC and GC-MS analyses. Eighty-four compounds, representing 90.8% of the total content was identified in oil obtained from Uncaria Hook. The main components i were (E)-cinnamaldehyde (13.4%), α-copaene (8.0%), methyl eugenol (6.8%), δ-cadinene (5.3%), and curcumene (3.6%). The important key aroma-active compounds in the oil were detected by gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) and aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA), using the flavor dilution (FD) factor to express the odor potency of each compounds. Furthermore, the odor activity value (OAV) has been used as a measure of the relative contribution of each compound to the aroma of the Uncaria Hook oil. The GC-O and AEDA results showed that α-copaene (FD = 4, OAV = 4376), (E)-linalool oxide (FD = 64, OAV = 9.1), and methyl eugenol (FD = 64, OAV = 29) contributed to the woody and spicy odor of Uncaria Hook oil, whereas furfural (FD = 8, OAV = 4808) contributed to its sweet odor. These results warrant further investigations of the application of essential oil from Uncaria Hook in the phytochemical and medicinal fields.

  5. Lateral vibration control of a flexible overcritical rotor via an active gas bearing - Theoretical and experimental comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierart, Fabian G.; Santos, Ilmar F.

    2016-11-01

    The lack of damping of radial gas bearings leads to high vibration levels of a rotor supported by this type of bearing when crossing resonant areas. This is even more relevant for flexible rotors, as studied in this work. In order to reduce these high vibration levels, an active gas bearing is proposed. The control action of this active bearing is selected based on two different strategies: a simple proportional integral derivative controller and an optimal controller. Both controllers are designed based on a theoretical model previously presented. The dynamics of the flexible rotor are modelled aided by the finite element method and the rotor-fluid interaction in the gas bearing is included using the solution of a modified version of the Reynolds equation for compressible fluids, taking into account the piezoelectrically controlled jet action. Performance and accuracy of both model-based controllers are compared against experimental results, showing good agreement. Theoretical and experimental results show a significant increase in the damping ratio of the system, enabling the flexible rotor to run safely across the critical speeds and up to 12,000 rev/min, i.e. 50 percent over the second critical speed without any instability problems.

  6. MAVEN MAG Observations of Magnetic Field Enhancements and Decreases in the Induced Magnetosphere of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soobiah, Y. I. J.; Espley, J. R.; Connerney, J. E. P.; DiBraccio, G. A.; Gruesbeck, J.; Halekas, J. S.; Mitchell, D. L.; McFadden, J. P.; Brain, D. A.; Jakosky, B. M.; Schneider, N. M.; Mazelle, C. X.; Andersson, L.; Ergun, R. E.; Jain, S.; Deighan, J.; McClintock, W. E.

    2015-12-01

    Recent results have shown the occurrence of a large-scale flux rope (enhancement in magnetic field strength and rotation in magnetic field vectors) on the dayside of Mars as associated with a dayside current sheet region forming at the proximity of strong crustal magnetic fields. This dayside current sheet region including the example of the large-scale flux rope occurred when the draped solar wind magnetic field showed a +By component in the MSO frame. All events involved similar anisotropic pitch angle distribution of electrons with low-energy field aligned electrons and higher-energy trapped electrons, indicating either the mixing of trapped magnetosheath electrons with low energy field aligned ionospheric electrons and/or the pitch angle diffusion of ionospheric electrons. During a time of weak draped field, the current sheet region became highly extended and was observed alongside a decrease in magnetic field strength and highly anisotropic plasma indicative of a mirror mode structure or magnetic hole. The occurrence of magnetic decreases or magnetic holes are an established feature of the solar wind and are often found in the terrestrial magnetosheath, and have also been observed near Jupiter, Venus and comets. More recently, mirror mode structures have been reported within the Earth's magnetosphere. The occurrence of the mirror mode instability could result in the excitation of ULF waves and has also been related to Alfvén waves that could cause heating of the local plasma. Hence, both the large-scale flux ropes and mirror mode structures of current sheet regions on the dayside of Mars may have an important role in ionospheric heating and atmospheric escape at Mars. Therefore, using an automated routine we will attempt to search for the occurrence of magnetic field enhancements and magnetic field decreases in measurements of magnetic field by the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) satellite Magnetometer (MAG) instrument whilst comparing to the

  7. Pulsed nanosecond discharge in air at high specific deposited energy: fast gas heating and active particle production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, N. A.

    2016-08-01

    The results of a numerical study on kinetic processes initiated by a pulsed nanosecond discharge in air at high specific deposited energy, when the dissociation degree of oxygen molecules is high, are presented. The calculations of the temporal dynamics of the electron concentration, density of atomic oxygen, vibrational distribution function of nitrogen molecules, and gas temperature agree with the experimental data. It is shown that quenching of electronically excited states of nitrogen N2(B3Πg), N2(C3Πu), N2(a‧1 Σ \\text{u}- ) by oxygen molecules leads to the dissociation of O2. This conclusion is based on the comparison of calculated dynamics of atomic oxygen in air, excited by a pulsed nanosecond discharge, with experimental data. In air plasma at a high dissociation degree of oxygen molecules ([O]/[O2] > 10%), relaxation of the electronic energy of atoms and molecules in reactions with O atoms becomes extremely important. Active production of NO molecules and fast gas heating in the discharge plasma due to the quenching of electronically excited N2(B3Πg, C3Πu, a‧1 Σ \\text{u}- ) molecules by oxygen atoms is notable. Owing to the high O atom density, electrons are effectively detached from negative ions in the discharge afterglow. As a result, the decay of plasma in the afterglow is determined by electron-ion recombination, and the electron density remains relatively high between the pulses. An increase in the vibrational temperature of nitrogen molecules at the periphery of the plasma channel at time delay t = 1-30 μs after the discharge is obtained. This is due to intense gas heating and, as a result, gas-dynamic expansion of a hot gas channel. Vibrationally excited N2(v) molecules produced near the discharge axis move from the axial region to the periphery. Consequently, at the periphery the vibrational temperature of nitrogen molecules is increased.

  8. Use of manganese oxide and activated carbon fibers for removing a particle, volatile organic compound or ozone from a gas

    SciTech Connect

    Sidheswaran, Meera A.; Destaillats, Hugo; Fisk, William J.

    2016-08-30

    The present invention provides for a device for reducing a volatile organic compound (VOC) content of a gas comprising a manganese oxide (MnO.sub.x) catalyst. The manganese oxide (MnO.sub.x) catalyst is capable of catalyzing formaldehyde at room temperature, with complete conversion, to CO.sub.2 and water vapor. The manganese oxide (MnO.sub.x) catalyst itself is not consumed by the reaction of formaldehyde into CO.sub.2 and water vapor. The present invention also provides for a device for reducing or removing a particle, a VOC and/or ozone from a gas comprising an activated carbon filter (ACF) on a media that is capable of being periodically regenerated.

  9. Ultrahigh gas storage both at low and high pressures in KOH-activated carbonized porous aromatic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanqiang; Ben, Teng; Zhang, Bingyao; Fu, Yao; Qiu, Shilun

    2013-01-01

    The carbonized PAF-1 derivatives formed by high-temperature KOH activation showed a unique bimodal microporous structure located at 0.6 nm and 1.2 nm and high surface area. These robust micropores were confirmed by nitrogen sorption experiment and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Carbon dioxide, methane and hydrogen sorption experiments indicated that these novel porous carbon materials have significant gas sorption abilities in both low-pressure and high-pressure environments. Moreover the methane storage ability of K-PAF-1-750 is among the best at 35 bars, and its low-pressure gas adsorption abilities are also comparable to the best porous materials in the world. Combined with excellent physicochemical stability, these materials are very promising for industrial applications such as carbon dioxide capture and high-density clean energy storage.

  10. Decomposition of organochlorine compounds in flue gas from municipal solid waste incinerators using natural and activated acid clays.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In-Hee; Takahashi, Shigetoshi; Matsuo, Takayuki; Matsuto, Toshihiko

    2014-09-01

    High-temperature particle control (HTPC) using a ceramic filter is a dust collection method without inefficient cooling and reheating of flue gas treatment; thus, its use is expected to improve the energy recovery efficiency of municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs). However there are concerns regarding de novo synthesis and a decrease in the adsorptive removal efficiency of dioxins (DXNs) at approximately 300 degrees C. In this study, the effect of natural and activated acid clays on the decomposition of monochlorobenzene (MCB), one of the organochlorine compounds in MSW flue gas, was investigated. From the results of MCB removal tests at 30-300 degrees C, the clays were classified as adsorption, decomposition, and low removal types. More than half of the clays (four kinds of natural acid clays and two kinds of activated acid clays) were of the decomposition type. In addition, the presence of Cl atoms detached from MCB was confirmed by washing the clay used in the MCB removal test at 300 degrees C. Activated acid clay was expected to have high dechlorination performance because of its proton-rich-composition, but only two clays were classed as decomposition type. Conversely, all the natural acid clays used in this work were of the decomposition type, which contained relatively higher di- and trivalent metal oxides such as Al2O3, Fe2O3, MgO, and CaO. These metal oxides might contribute to the catalytic dechlorination of MCB at 300 degrees C. Therefore, natural and activated acid clays can be used as alternatives for activated carbon at 300 degrees C to remove organochloride compounds such as DXNs. Their utilization is expected to mitigate the latent risks related to the adoption of HTPC, and also to contribute to the improvement of energy recovery efficiency of MSWI. Implications: The effect of natural and activated acid clays on MCB decomposition was investigated to evaluate their suitability as materials for the removal of organochlorine compounds, such as

  11. 4D seismic study of active gas seepage systems on the Vestnesa Ridge, offshore W-Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünz, Stefan; Plaza-Faverola, Andreia; Hurter, Sandra; Mienert, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    Active gas venting occurs on the Vestnesa Ridge, an elongated sediment drift north of the Molloy Transform and just east of the Molloy Ridge, one of the shortest segments of the slow spreading North-Atlantic Ridge system. The crest of the Vestnesa Ridge at water depth between 1200-1300 m is pierced with fluid-flow features. Seafloor pockmarks vary in size up to 1 km in diameter. High-resolution P-Cable 3D seismic data acquired in 2012 show vertical focused fluid flow features beneath the seafloor pockmarks. These co-called chimneys extend down to the free-gas zone underneath a bottom-simulating reflection. Here, they link up with small fault systems that might provide pathways to the deeper subsurface. The chimney features show a high variability in their acoustic characteristics with alternating blanked or masked zones and high-amplitude anomalies scattered through the whole vertical extent of the chimneys. The amplitude anomalies indicate high-impedance contrasts due to the likely presence of gas or a high-velocity material like gas hydrates or carbonates. We re-acquired the 3D seismic survey in 2013 for time-lapse seismic studies in order to better understand the origin of the amplitude anomalies and in order to track potentially migrating gas fronts up along the chimney structure. Here, we will present the preliminary results of this time-lapse analysis, which will allow us to better understand gas migration and seafloor plumbing systems in continental margins. This work is part of CAGE - Centre of Excellence for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Environment and Climate. Details on the CAGE research plan and organization can be found on www.cage.uit.no to foster opportunities for cross-disciplinary collaboration. Based in Tromsø, at the world's northernmost University, CAGE establishes the intellectual and infrastructure resources for studying the amount of methane hydrate and magnitude of methane release in Arctic Ocean environments on time scales from the Neogene to the

  12. Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources in Texas and Other Mining Activities: the Water Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicot, J.

    2011-12-01

    A recent study, sponsored by the Texas Water Development Board, considered current and projected water use in the mining industry. It looked at the upstream segment of the oil and gas industry (that is, water used to extract the commodity until it leaves the wellhead), the aggregate, and coal industry, and other substances (industrial sand, lime, etc.). We obtained data through state databases, data collection from private vendors, and direct surveys of the various sectors of the industry. Overall, in 2008, we estimated that the state consumed ~160 thousand acre-feet (AF) in the mining industry, including 35.8 thousand AF for fracing wells (mostly in the Barnett Shale/Fort Worth area) and ~21.0 thousand AF for other purposes in the oil and gas industry, although more spread out across the state, with a higher demand in the Permian Basin area in West Texas. The coal industry used 20.0 thousand AF along the lignite belt from Central to East Texas. The 71.6 thousand AF used by the aggregate industry is distributed over most of the state, but with a clear concentration around major metropolitan areas. The remainder amounts to 11.0 thousand AF and is dominated by industrial sand production (~80% of total). Water is used mostly for drilling wells, stimulating/fracing wells, and secondary and tertiary recovery processes (oil and gas industry); for dewatering and depressurizing pits, with a small amount used for dust control (coal industry); and for dust control and washing (aggregate industry and industrial sand). Reuse/recycling has already been accounted for in water-use values, as well as opportunity usages, such as stormwater collection (aggregates). The split between surface water and groundwater is difficult to assess but it is estimated at ~56% groundwater in 2008. Projections for future use were done by extrapolating current trends, mainly for coal (same energy mix) and aggregates (following population growth). Projections for the oil and gas industry (Barnett

  13. Experimental study on Hg0 removal from flue gas over columnar MnOx-CeO2/activated coke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yine; Li, Caiting; Zhao, Lingkui; Zhang, Jie; Zeng, Guangming; Zhang, Xunan; Zhang, Wei; Tao, Shasha

    2015-04-01

    Mn-Ce mixed oxides supported on commercial columnar activated coke (MnCe/AC) were employed to remove elemental mercury (Hg0) at low temperatures (100-250 °C) without the assistance of HCl in flue gas. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). Effects of some factors, including Mn-Ce loading values, active component, reaction temperatures and flue gas components (O2, SO2, NO, H2O), on Hg0 removal efficiency were investigated. Results indicated that the optimal Mn-Ce loading value and reaction temperature were 6% and 190 °C, respectively. Considerable high Hg0 removal efficiency (>90%) can be obtained over MnCe6/AC under both N2/O2 atmosphere and simulated flue gas atmosphere at 190 °C. Besides, it was observed that O2 and NO exerted a promotional effect on Hg0 removal, H2O exhibited a suppressive effect, and SO2 hindered Hg0 removal seriously when in the absence of O2. Furthermore, the XPS spectra of Hg 4f and Hg-TPD results showed that the captured mercury were existed as Hg0 and HgO on the MnCe6/AC, and HgO was the major species, which illustrated that adsorption and catalytic oxidation process were included for Hg0 removal over MnCe6/AC, and catalytic oxidation played the critical role. What's more, both lattice oxygen and chemisorbed oxygen or OH groups on MnCe6/AC contributed to Hg0 oxidation. MnCe6/AC, which exhibited excellent performance on Hg0 removal in the absence of HCl, appeared to be promising in industrial application, especially for low-rank coal fired flue gas.

  14. Evaluation of Drag Reduction via Superhydrophobic Surfaces and Active Gas Replenishment in a Fully-developed Turbulent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gose, James W.; Golovin, Kevin; Ceccio, Steven L.; Perlin, Marc; Tuteja, Anish

    2014-11-01

    The development of superhydrophobic surfaces (SHS) for skin-friction drag reduction in the laminar regime has shown great promise. A team led by the University of Michigan is examining the potential of similar SHS in high-speed naval applications. Specifically, we have developed a recirculating facility to investigate the reduction of drag along robustly engineered SHS in a fully-developed turbulent boundary layer flow. The facility can accommodate both small and large SHS samples in a test section 7 mm (depth) × 100 mm (span) × 1200 mm (length). Coupled with an 11.2 kilowatt pump and a 30:1 contraction, the facility is capable of producing an average flow velocity of 20 m/s, yielding a height based (7 mm) Reynolds number of 140,000. The SHS tested were designed for large-scale application. The present investigation shows skin-friction drag reduction for various sprayable and chemically developed SHS that were applied over a 100 mm (span) × 1100 mm (length) area. The drag measurement methods include pressure drop across the test specimen and PIV measured boundary layers. Additional SHS investigations include the implementation of active gas replenishment, providing an opportunity to replace gas-pockets that would otherwise be disrupted in traditional passive SHS due to high shear stress and turbulent pressure fluctuations. Gas is evenly distributed through a 90 mm (span) × 600 mm (length) sintered porous media with pore sizes of 10 to 100 microns. The impact of the active gas replenishment is being evaluated with and without SHS.

  15. Pd/activated carbon sorbents for mid-temperature capture of mercury from coal-derived fuel gas.

    PubMed

    Li, Dekui; Han, Jieru; Han, Lina; Wang, Jiancheng; Chang, Liping

    2014-07-01

    Higher concentrations of Hg can be emitted from coal pyrolysis or gasification than from coal combustion, especially elemental Hg. Highly efficient Hg removal technology from coal-derived fuel gas is thus of great importance. Based on the very excellent Hg removal ability of Pd and the high adsorption abilities of activated carbon (AC) for H₂S and Hg, a series of Pd/AC sorbents was prepared by using pore volume impregnation, and their performance in capturing Hg and H₂S from coal-derived fuel gas was investigated using a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor. The effects of loading amount, reaction temperature and reaction atmosphere on Hg removal from coal-derived fuel gas were studied. The sorbents were characterized by N₂ adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicated that the efficiency of Hg removal increased with the increasing of Pd loading amount, but the effective utilization rate of the active component Pd decreased significantly at the same time. High temperature had a negative influence on the Hg removal. The efficiency of Hg removal in the N₂-H₂S-H₂-CO-Hg atmosphere (simulated coal gas) was higher than that in N₂-H₂S-Hg and N₂-Hg atmospheres, which showed that H₂ and CO, with their reducing capacity, could benefit promote the removal of Hg. The XPS results suggested that there were two different ways of capturing Hg over sorbents in N₂-H₂S-Hg and N₂-Hg atmospheres.

  16. Impact of gas injection on the apparent viscosity and viscoelastic property of waste activated sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Bobade, Veena; Baudez, Jean Christophe; Evans, Geoffery; Eshtiaghi, Nicky

    2017-05-01

    Gas injection is known to play a major role on the particle size of the sludge, the oxygen transfer rate, as well as the mixing efficiency of membrane bioreactors and aeration basins in the waste water treatment plants. The rheological characteristics of sludge are closely related to the particle size of the sludge floc. However, particle size of sludge floc depends partly on the shear induced in the sludge and partly on physico-chemical nature of the sludge. The objective of this work is to determine the impact of gas injection on both the apparent viscosity and viscoelastic property of sludge. The apparent viscosity of sludge was investigated by two methods: in-situ and after sparging. Viscosity curves obtained by in-situ measurement showed that the apparent viscosity decreases significantly from 4000 Pa s to 10 Pa s at low shear rate range (below 10 s(-1)) with an increase in gas flow rate (0.5LPM to 3LPM); however the after sparging flow curve analysis showed that the reduction in apparent viscosity throughout the shear rate range is negligible to be displayed. Torque and displacement data at low shear rate range revealed that the obtained lower apparent viscosity in the in-situ method is not the material characteristics, but the slippage effect due to a preferred location of the bubbles close to the bob, causing an inconsistent decrease of torque and increase of displacement at low shear rate range. In linear viscoelastic regime, the elastic and viscous modulus of sludge was reduced by 33% & 25%, respectively, due to gas injection because of induced shear. The amount of induced shear measured through two different tests (creep and time sweep) were the same. The impact of this induced shear on sludge structure was also verified by microscopic images.

  17. Simulation of the impact of thunderstorm activity on atmospheric gas composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyshlyaev, S. P.; Mareev, E. A.; Galin, V. Ya.

    2010-08-01

    A chemistry-climate model of the lower and middle atmosphere has been used to estimate the sensitivity of the atmospheric gas composition to the rate of thunderstorm production of nitrogen oxides at upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric altitudes. The impact that nitrogen oxides produced by lightning have on the atmospheric gas composition is treated as a subgrid-scale process and included in the model parametrically. The natural uncertainty in the global production rate of nitrogen oxides in lightning flashes was specified within limits from 2 to 20 Tg N/year. Results of the model experiments have shown that, due to the variability of thunderstorm-produced nitrogen oxides, their concentration in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere can vary by a factor of 2 or 3, which, given the influence of nitrogen oxides on ozone and other gases, creates the potential for a strong perturbation of the atmospheric gas composition and thermal regime. Model calculations have shown the strong sensitivity of ozone and the OH hydroxyl to the amount of lightning nitrogen oxides at different atmospheric altitudes. These calculations demonstrate the importance of nitrogen oxides of thunderstorm origin for the balance of atmospheric odd ozone and gases linked to it, such as ozone and hydroxyl radicals. Our results demonstrate that one important task is to raise the accuracy of estimates of the rate of nitrogen oxide production by lightning discharges and to use physical parametrizations that take into account the local lightning effects and feedbacks arising in this case rather than climatological data in models of the gas composition and general circulation of the atmosphere.

  18. Mantle to surface gas triggers of magmatic activity at Erebus volcano, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheimer, C.; Moretti, R.; Kyle, P.

    2009-04-01

    Intraplate volcanoes are associated with extensional tectonics, mantle upwelling and high heat flow. Erupted magmas have an alkaline nature and are rich in volatiles, especially CO2, that are inherited from fluid-rich magmatic sources in the mantle. Localized alkaline centers emit gas fluxes that exceed what can be sustained by the rates of magma erupted. At Mount Erebus this dichotomy is evidenced by open-path Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy of gases released from the lava lake. Different gas signatures are associated with explosive and non-explosive gas emissions, representative of volatile contents and redox conditions that identify the overlap between shallow and deep degassing sources. We show that this multiple signature of magma degassing provides a unique probe for magma differentiation and transfer of CO2-rich oxidized fluids from lithospheric roots up to the surface, and show how these processes operate in time and space. Magma deeper than 4 km equilibrates under vapour buffered conditions, whereas shallower magmas allow deep, CO2-rich fluids to accumulate and prior to release either via open-system degassing conditions and reduced oxidation states, or as volatile-enriched, phonolitic blobs that preserve the deep oxidized signature, and ascend as a closed-system to explode at the surface during Strombolian phases.

  19. Analysis of an activated-carbon sorption compressor operating with gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzabar, N.; Grossman, G.

    2012-10-01

    Sorption compressors elevate the pressure of gases and can provide a more or less continuous mass flow. Unlike mechanical compressors, sorption compressors have no moving parts, and therefore do not emit vibrations and are highly reliable. There exist different sorption compressors for different operating conditions and various gases. However, there are no published reports of sorption compressors for mixed gases. Such compressors, among other applications, may drive mixed-refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocoolers. The adsorption of mixed gases is usually investigated under steady conditions, mainly for storage and separation processes. However, the sorption process in a compressor goes through varying states and mass changes; therefore, it differs from the common mixed gases adsorption applications. In this research a numerical analysis for mixed gas sorption compressors is developed, based on pure gas adsorption characteristics and the ideal adsorbed solution theory. Two pure gas adsorption models are used for calculating the conditions of the adsorbed phase: Langmuir and Sips; and the Peng-Robinson equation of state is used to calculate the conditions of the vapor phase. Two mixtures are investigated; nitrogen-methane and nitrogen-ethane. Finally, the analysis is verified against experimental results. This research provides initiatory observation for mixed gases sorption compressor in which each component is differently adsorbed.

  20. Understanding Methane Emission from Natural Gas Activities Using Inverse Modeling Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdioskouei, M.; Carmichael, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    Natural gas (NG) has been promoted as a bridge fuel that can smooth the transition from fossil fuels to zero carbon energy sources by having lower carbon dioxide emission and lower global warming impacts in comparison to other fossil fuels. However, the uncertainty around the estimations of methane emissions from NG systems can lead to underestimation of climate and environmental impacts of using NG as a replacement for coal. Accurate estimates of methane emissions from NG operations is crucial for evaluation of environmental impacts of NG extraction and at larger scale, adoption of NG as transitional fuel. However there is a great inconsistency within the current estimates. Forward simulation of methane from oil and gas operation sites for the US is carried out based on NEI-2011 using the WRF-Chem model. Simulated values are compared against measurements of observations from different platforms such as airborne (FRAPPÉ field campaign) and ground-based measurements (NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory). A novel inverse modeling technique is used in this work to improve the model fit to the observation values and to constrain methane emission from oil and gas extraction sites.

  1. Kinematics and ionization of extended gas in active galaxies. III. The extranuclear properties of NGC 1068

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, J.A.; Wilson, A.S.; Whittle, M.

    1987-08-01

    The kinematic and ionization structure of the extranuclear gas of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 has been investigated using a grid of 28 high- and seven low-dispersion long-slit spectra. The velocity field of most of the gas more than 15 arcsec from the nucleus is well described by a rotating disk with an approximately flat rotation curve. The kinematic line of nodes coincides with the major axis of the outermost continuum light, and the disk inclination derived from the axial ratio of the outer isophotes and the kinematic fit are broadly consistent. The progressive change of the position angle of the major axes of the brighter isophotes are evidently due to a superposition of oval or barlike distortions in the galactic plane. The observed ionization structure of the gas can be understood as a mixture of two disk components projected on top of each other. Much of the ionization pattern in the other disk may result from partial beaming of the ionizing continuum radiation as it escapes from the nucleus. 60 references.

  2. The Dense Molecular Gas and Nuclear Activity in the Local ULIRG IRAS 13120-5453

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privon, George C.; Aalto, Susanne; Falstad, Niklas; Muller, Sebastien; González-Alfonso, Eduardo; Sliwa, Kazimierz; Treister, Ezequiel; Costagliola, Francesco; Armus, Lee; Evans, Aaron S.; Garcia-Burillo, Santiago; Izumi, Takuma; Sakamoto, Kazushi; van der Werf, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) are the most luminous and concentrated star-forming galaxies in the local Universe. With a galaxy's worth of gas in the central kiloparsec and star formation rates in excess of 100 solar masses per year, these systems can have infrared surface densities that approach predictions for radiation pressure-limited starbursts. We will present a case study of a local ULIRG, IRAS 13120-5453, using ALMA observations of dense gas tracers HCN and HCO+, and the 330 GHz continuum emission. We find the HCN/HCO+ ratio to be elevated above typical values for star-forming galaxies and suggest the enhancement can be explained by increased HCN abundance driven by mechanical heating from supernovae in the starburst. The 330 GHz continuum size is resolved, with a size of ~500 pc. Using this as a measure of the starburst size, we show the IR luminosity surface density is below that for a radiation pressure-limited starburst. We also find tentative evidence for non-virial motions of HCN, suggesting dense molecular gas may be entrained the molecular wind (previously detected in OH).

  3. Active microbial community in gas reservoirs in the North German Plain and the effects of high CO2 concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frerichs, Janin; Gniese, Claudia; Mühling, Martin; Krüger, Martin

    2010-05-01

    From the IPCC report on global warming, it is clear that large-scale solutions are needed immediately to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases. The CO2 capture and storage offers one option for reducing the greenhouse gas emissions. Favourable CO2 storage sites are depleted gas and oil fields and thus, are currently investigated by the BMBF-Geotechnologien RECOBIO-2 project. Our study is focussing on the direct influence of high CO2 concentrations on the autochthonous microbial population and environmental parameters (e.g. availability of nutrients). The gas fields Schneeren in the 'North German Plain' is operated by Gaz de France SUEZ E&V Deutschland GmbH. The conditions in the reservoir formation waters of two bore wells differ in various geochemical parameters (pH, salinity and temperature). In previous studies the community of this gas field was described by Ehinger et al. 2009. Based on these results our study included cultivation and molecular biological approaches. Our results showed significant differences of the community structure in regional distinctions of the gas reservoir. The activity profiles of two wells differed clearly in the inducible activity after substrate addition. The fluids of well A showed a high methane production rate after the addition of methanol or acetate. Well B showed a high sulphide production after the addition of sulphate and hydrogen. The molecular biological analysis of the original fluids supports the activity profile for both sites. The community analysis via real-time PCR showed for the production well head A a higher abundances for Archaea than for B. The community at site B in contrast was dominated by Bacteria. Fluids of both wells were also incubated with high CO2 concentrations in the headspace. These enrichments showed a significant decrease of methane and sulphide production with increasing CO2 levels. Currently, the community composition is analysed to identify changes connected to increased CO2 concentrations. This

  4. Seismic source dynamics of gas-piston activity at Kı¯lauea Volcano, Hawai`i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouet, Bernard; Dawson, Phillip

    2015-04-01

    Since 2008, eruptive activity at the summit of Kı¯lauea Volcano, Hawai`i has been confined to the new Overlook pit crater within the Halema`uma`u Crater. Among the broad range of magmatic processes observed in the new pit are recurring episodes of gas pistoning. The gas-piston activity is accompanied by seismic signals that are recorded by a broadband network deployed in the summit caldera. We use raw data recorded with this network to model the source mechanism of representative gas-piston events in a sequence that occurred on 20-25 August 2011 during a gentle inflation of the Kı¯lauea summit. To determine the source centroid location and source mechanism, we minimize the residual error between data and synthetics calculated by the finite difference method for a point source embedded in a homogeneous medium that takes topography into account. We apply a new waveform inversion method that accounts for the contributions from both translation and tilt in horizontal seismograms through the use of Green's functions representing the seismometer response to translation and tilt ground motions. This method enables a robust description of the source mechanism over the period range 1-10,000 s. Most of the seismic wavefield produced by gas-pistoning originates in a source region ˜1 km below the eastern perimeter of the Halema`uma`u pit crater. The observed waveforms are well explained by a simple volumetric source with geometry composed of two intersecting cracks featuring an east striking crack (dike) dipping 80°to the north, intersecting a north striking crack (another dike) dipping 65° to the east. Each gas-piston event is marked by a similar rapid inflation lasting a few minutes, trailed by a slower deflation ramp extending up to 15 min, attributed to the efficient coupling at the source centroid location of the pressure and momentum changes accompanying the growth and collapse of a layer of foam at the top of the lava column. Assuming a simple lumped parameter

  5. Seismic source dynamics of gas-piston activity at Kı̄lauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chouet, Bernard A.; Dawson, Phillip B.

    2015-01-01

    Since 2008, eruptive activity at the summit of Kı̄lauea Volcano, Hawai‘i has been confined to the new Overlook pit crater within the Halema‘uma‘u Crater. Among the broad range of magmatic processes observed in the new pit are recurring episodes of gas pistoning. The gas-piston activity is accompanied by seismic signals that are recorded by a broadband network deployed in the summit caldera. We use raw data recorded with this network to model the source mechanism of representative gas-piston events in a sequence that occurred on 20–25 August 2011 during a gentle inflation of the Kı̄lauea summit. To determine the source centroid location and source mechanism, we minimize the residual error between data and synthetics calculated by the finite difference method for a point source embedded in a homogeneous medium that takes topography into account. We apply a new waveform inversion method that accounts for the contributions from both translation and tilt in horizontal seismograms through the use of Green's functions representing the seismometer response to translation and tilt ground motions. This method enables a robust description of the source mechanism over the period range 1–10,000 s. Most of the seismic wavefield produced by gas-pistoning originates in a source region ∼1 km below the eastern perimeter of the Halema‘uma‘u pit crater. The observed waveforms are well explained by a simple volumetric source with geometry composed of two intersecting cracks featuring an east striking crack (dike) dipping 80°to the north, intersecting a north striking crack (another dike) dipping 65° to the east. Each gas-piston event is marked by a similar rapid inflation lasting a few minutes, trailed by a slower deflation ramp extending up to 15 min, attributed to the efficient coupling at the source centroid location of the pressure and momentum changes accompanying the growth and collapse of a layer of foam at the top of the lava column. Assuming a

  6. Analysis of expression and amino acid sequence of the allergen Mag 3 in two species of house dust mites-Dermatophagoides farinae and D. pteronyssinus (Acari: Astigmata: Pyroglyphidae).

    PubMed

    Asman, Marek; Solarz, Krzysztof; Szilman, Ewa; Szilman, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    In the 90's of the XX century, 2 new and important allergens of house dust mites mites were cloned and sequenced: Mag 1 and Mag 3. However, the second allergen has been identified to date only in extracts of Dermatophagoides farinae [DF ]. In this work, we aimed to detect expression of this important allergen and for the first time analyze to the amino acid sequence in other species of house dust mite - Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus [DP ]. We were able to confirm the expression of allergen Mag 3 in DF and to exclude it in DP . By sequencing the products of DNA amplification, we revealed the nucleotide sequence encoding allergen Mag 3 in DF . This analysis enabled detection of 9 single base changes. An analysis of encoded amino acid sequence by triplets with substituted nucleotides revealed that 8 changes were polymorphic, and 1 was a mutation substituting GTG (valine) for ATG (methionine) at 236 position. However, the presence of amino acid sequence difference in this allergen might suggest that there exist other isoforms which can make difficult both diagnosis as well as immunotherapy in persons who produce allergic response to this allergen. The variants of allergen Mag 3 (group 14) are still not known beside the very good known allergen variants of the other main groups 1, 2, 4, 5 or 7. Thus, the identification and definition of allergic properties of allergen Mag 3 variants needs to be further investigated.

  7. Removal of elemental mercury from flue gas by thermally activated ammonium persulfate in a bubble column reactor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangxian; Wang, Qian

    2014-10-21

    In this article, a novel technique on removal of elemental mercury (Hg(0)) from flue gas by thermally activated ammonium persulfate ((NH4)(2)S(2)O(8)) has been developed for the first time. Some experiments were carried out in a bubble column reactor to evaluate the effects of process parameters on Hg(0) removal. The mechanism and kinetics of Hg(0) removal are also studied. The results show that the parameters, (NH4)(2)S(2)O(8) concentration, activation temperature and solution pH, have significant impacts on Hg(0) removal. The parameters, Hg(0), SO2 and NO concentration, only have small effects on Hg(0) removal. Hg(0) is removed by oxidations of (NH4)(2)S(2)O(8), sulfate and hydroxyl free radicals. When (NH4)(2)S(2)O(8) concentration is more than 0.1 mol/L and solution pH is lower than 9.71, Hg(0) removal by thermally activated (NH4)(2)S(2)O(8) meets a pseudo-first-order fast reaction with respect to Hg(0). However, when (NH4)(2)S(2)O(8) concentration is less than 0.1 mol/L or solution pH is higher than 9.71, the removal process meets a moderate speed reaction with respect to Hg(0). The above results indicate that this technique is a feasible method for emission control of Hg(0) from flue gas.

  8. Elevated levels of diesel range organic compounds in groundwater near Marcellus gas operations are derived from surface activities.

    PubMed

    Drollette, Brian D; Hoelzer, Kathrin; Warner, Nathaniel R; Darrah, Thomas H; Karatum, Osman; O'Connor, Megan P; Nelson, Robert K; Fernandez, Loretta A; Reddy, Christopher M; Vengosh, Avner; Jackson, Robert B; Elsner, Martin; Plata, Desiree L

    2015-10-27

    Hundreds of organic chemicals are used during natural gas extraction via high-volume hydraulic fracturing (HVHF). However, it is unclear whether these chemicals, injected into deep shale horizons, reach shallow groundwater aquifers and affect local water quality, either from those deep HVHF injection sites or from the surface or shallow subsurface. Here, we report detectable levels of organic compounds in shallow groundwater samples from private residential wells overlying the Marcellus Shale in northeastern Pennsylvania. Analyses of purgeable and extractable organic compounds from 64 groundwater samples revealed trace levels of volatile organic compounds, well below the Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant levels, and low levels of both gasoline range (0-8 ppb) and diesel range organic compounds (DRO; 0-157 ppb). A compound-specific analysis revealed the presence of bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, which is a disclosed HVHF additive, that was notably absent in a representative geogenic water sample and field blanks. Pairing these analyses with (i) inorganic chemical fingerprinting of deep saline groundwater, (ii) characteristic noble gas isotopes, and (iii) spatial relationships between active shale gas extraction wells and wells with disclosed environmental health and safety violations, we differentiate between a chemical signature associated with naturally occurring saline groundwater and one associated with alternative anthropogenic routes from the surface (e.g., accidental spills or leaks). The data support a transport mechanism of DRO to groundwater via accidental release of fracturing fluid chemicals derived from the surface rather than subsurface flow of these fluids from the underlying shale formation.

  9. Determination of boiling point of petrochemicals by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and multivariate regression analysis of structural activity relationship.

    PubMed

    Fakayode, Sayo O; Mitchell, Breanna S; Pollard, David A

    2014-08-01

    Accurate understanding of analyte boiling points (BP) is of critical importance in gas chromatographic (GC) separation and crude oil refinery operation in petrochemical industries. This study reported the first combined use of GC separation and partial-least-square (PLS1) multivariate regression analysis of petrochemical structural activity relationship (SAR) for accurate BP determination of two commercially available (D3710 and MA VHP) calibration gas mix samples. The results of the BP determination using PLS1 multivariate regression were further compared with the results of traditional simulated distillation method of BP determination. The developed PLS1 regression was able to correctly predict analytes BP in D3710 and MA VHP calibration gas mix samples, with a root-mean-square-%-relative-error (RMS%RE) of 6.4%, and 10.8% respectively. In contrast, the overall RMS%RE of 32.9% and 40.4%, respectively obtained for BP determination in D3710 and MA VHP using a traditional simulated distillation method were approximately four times larger than the corresponding RMS%RE of BP prediction using MRA, demonstrating the better predictive ability of MRA. The reported method is rapid, robust, and promising, and can be potentially used routinely for fast analysis, pattern recognition, and analyte BP determination in petrochemical industries.

  10. Regional Influences of Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Activity: Back-trajectory Analysis of Baltimore/Washington Ethane Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinciguerra, T.; Chittams, A.; Dadzie, J.; Deskins, T.; Goncalves, V.; M'Bagui Matsanga, C.; Zakaria, R.; Ehrman, S.; Dickerson, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past several years, the combined utilization of hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling has led to a rapid increase in natural gas production, especially from the Marcellus Shale. To explore the impact of this activity downwind on regions with no natural gas production, the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) Model was used to generate 48-hour back-trajectories for summer, daytime hours from the years 2007-2014 in the Baltimore, MD and Washington, D.C. areas where hourly ethane measurements are available from Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations (PAMS). For each of the years investigated, unconventional well counts were obtained for counties in the surrounding states of Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia, and counties exceeding a threshold of 0.05 wells/km2 were designated as counties with a high density of wells. The back-trajectories for each year were separated into two groups: those which passed through counties containing a high density of wells, and those which did not. Back-trajectories passing through high-density counties were further screened by applying a height criterion where trajectories beyond 10% above the mixing layer were excluded. Preliminary results indicate that air parcels with back-trajectories passing within the boundary layer of counties with a high density of unconventional natural gas wells correspond to significantly greater concentrations of observed ethane at these downwind monitors.

  11. NOVA AQUILAE 1918 (V603 Aql) FADED BY 0.44 MAG PER CENTURY FROM 1938 TO 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Christopher B.; Schaefer, Bradley E.; Kroll, Peter; Henden, Arne A.

    2014-01-10

    We present the light curve of the old nova V603 Aql (Nova Aql 1918) from 1898-1918 and 1934-2013 using 22,721 archival magnitudes. All of our magnitudes are either in, or accurately transformed into, the Johnson B and V magnitude systems. This is vital because offsets in old sequences and the visual-to-V transformation can cause errors of 0.1-1.0 mag if not corrected. Our V603 Aql light curve is the first time that this has been done for any nova. Our goal was to see the evolution of the mass accretion rate on a century timescale, and to test the long-standing prediction of the Hibernation model that old novae should be fading significantly in the century after their eruption is over. The 1918 nova eruption was completely finished by 1938 when the nova decline stopped, and when the star had faded to fainter than its pre-nova brightness of B = 11.43 ± 0.03 mag. We find that the nova light from 1938 to 2013 was significantly fading, with this being seen consistently in three independent data sets (the Sonneberg plates in B, the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) V light curve, and the non-AAVSO V light curve). We find that V603 Aql has been declining in brightness at an average rate of 0.44 ± 0.04 mag per century since 1938. This work provides remarkable confirmation of an important prediction of the Hibernation model.

  12. Nova Aquilae 1918 (V603 Aql) Faded by 0.44 MAG Per Century from 1938 to 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Christopher B.; Schaefer, Bradley E.; Kroll, Peter; Henden, Arne A.

    2014-01-01

    We present the light curve of the old nova V603 Aql (Nova Aql 1918) from 1898-1918 and 1934-2013 using 22,721 archival magnitudes. All of our magnitudes are either in, or accurately transformed into, the Johnson B and V magnitude systems. This is vital because offsets in old sequences and the visual-to-V transformation can cause errors of 0.1-1.0 mag if not corrected. Our V603 Aql light curve is the first time that this has been done for any nova. Our goal was to see the evolution of the mass accretion rate on a century timescale, and to test the long-standing prediction of the Hibernation model that old novae should be fading significantly in the century after their eruption is over. The 1918 nova eruption was completely finished by 1938 when the nova decline stopped, and when the star had faded to fainter than its pre-nova brightness of B = 11.43 ± 0.03 mag. We find that the nova light from 1938 to 2013 was significantly fading, with this being seen consistently in three independent data sets (the Sonneberg plates in B, the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) V light curve, and the non-AAVSO V light curve). We find that V603 Aql has been declining in brightness at an average rate of 0.44 ± 0.04 mag per century since 1938. This work provides remarkable confirmation of an important prediction of the Hibernation model.

  13. On-sky Performance Analysis of the Vector Apodizing Phase Plate Coronagraph on MagAO/Clio2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otten, Gilles P. P. L.; Snik, Frans; Kenworthy, Matthew A.; Keller, Christoph U.; Males, Jared R.; Morzinski, Katie M.; Close, Laird M.; Codona, Johanan L.; Hinz, Philip M.; Hornburg, Kathryn J.; Brickson, Leandra L.; Escuti, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the performance of a vector apodizing phase plate coronagraph that operates over a wavelength range of 2–5 μm and is installed in MagAO/Clio2 at the 6.5 m Magellan Clay telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. The coronagraph manipulates the phase in the pupil to produce three beams yielding two coronagraphic point-spread functions (PSFs) and one faint leakage PSF. The phase pattern is imposed through the inherently achromatic geometric phase, enabled by liquid crystal technology and polarization techniques. The coronagraphic optic is manufactured using a direct-write technique for precise control of the liquid crystal pattern and multitwist retarders for achromatization. By integrating a linear phase ramp to the coronagraphic phase pattern, two separated coronagraphic PSFs are created with a single pupil-plane optic, which makes it robust and easy to install in existing telescopes. The two coronagraphic PSFs contain a 180° dark hole on each side of a star, and these complementary copies of the star are used to correct the seeing halo close to the star. To characterize the coronagraph, we collected a data set of a bright (mL = 0–1) nearby star with ∼1.5 hr of observing time. By rotating and optimally scaling one PSF and subtracting it from the other PSF, we see a contrast improvement by 1.46 magnitudes at 3.5 λ /D. With regular angular differential imaging at 3.9 μm, the MagAO vector apodizing phase plate coronagraph delivers a 5σ {{Δ }}{mag} contrast of 8.3 (={10}-3.3) at 2 λ /D and 12.2 (={10}-4.8) at 3.5 λ /D.

  14. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells differentially expressing Nogo-A but not MAG are more permissive to neurite outgrowth than mature oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhengwen; Cao, Qilin; Zhang, Liqun; Hu, Jianguo; Howard, Russell M; Lu, Peihua; Whittemore, Scott R; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2009-05-01

    Grafting oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) has been used as a strategy to repair demyelination of the central nervous system (CNS). Whether OPCs can promote CNS axonal regeneration remains to be tested. If so, they should be permissive to axonal growth and may express less inhibitory molecules on their surface. Here we examined the expression of two oligodendrocyte-associated myelin inhibitors Nogo-A and myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) during oligodendrogliogenesis and tested their abilities to promote neurite outgrowth in vitro. Whereas the intracellular domain of Nogo-A was consistently expressed throughout oligodendrocyte differentiation, MAG was expressed only at later stages. Furthermore, the membrane-associated extracellular domain of Nogo-A was not expressed in OPCs but expressed in mature oligodendrocytes. In a dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and OPC/oligodendrocyte co-culture model, significantly greater DRG neurite outgrowth onto OPC monolayer than mature oligodendrocyte was found (1042+/-123 vs. 717+/-342 micrometer; p=0.011). Moreover, DRG neurites elongated as fasciculated fiber tracts and contacted directly on OPCs (133+/-37 cells/fascicle). In contrast, few, if any, direct contacts were found between DRG neurites and mature oligodendrocytes (5+/-3 cells/fascicle, p<0.001). In fact, acellular spaces were found between neurites and surrounding mature oligodendrocytes in contrast to the lack of such spaces in OPC/DRG coculture (51.1+/-16.5 vs. 2.4+/-3.9 micrometer; p<0.001). Thus, OPCs expressing neither extracellular domain of Nogo-A nor MAG are significantly more permissive than mature oligodendrocytes expressing both. Grafting OPCs may thus represent a feasible strategy to foster CNS axonal regeneration.

  15. The Cosmic History of Hot Gas Cooling and Radio AGN Activity in Massive Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, A. L. R.; Lehmer, B. D.; Alexander, D. M.; Brandt, W. M.; Luo, B.; Miller, N.; Xue, Y. Q.; Stott, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    We study the X-ray properties of 393 optically selected early-type galaxies (ETGs) over the redshift range of z approx equals 0.0-1.2 in the Chandra Deep Fields. To measure the average X-ray properties of the ETG population, we use X-ray stacking analyses with a subset of 158 passive ETGs (148 of which were individually undetected in X-ray). This ETG subset was constructed to span the redshift ranges of z = 0.1-1.2 in the approx equals 4 Ms CDF-S and approx equals 2 Ms CDF-N and z = 0.1-0.6 in the approx equals 250 ks E-CDF-S where the contribution from individually undetected AGNs is expected to be negligible in our stacking. We find that 55 of the ETGs are detected individually in the X-rays, and 12 of these galaxies have properties consistent with being passive hot-gas dominated systems (i.e., systems not dominated by an X-ray bright Active Galactic Nucleus; AGN). On the basis of our analyses, we find little evolution in the mean 0.5-2 keY to B-band luminosity ratio (L(sub x) /L(sub Beta) varies as [1 +z]) since z approx equals 1.2, implying that some heating mechanism prevents the gas from cooling in these systems. We consider that feedback from radio-mode AGN activity could be responsible for heating the gas. We select radio AGNs in the ETG population using their far-infrared/radio flux ratio. Our radio observations allow us to constrain the duty cycle history of radio AGN activity in our ETG sample. We estimate that if scaling relations between radio and mechanical power hold out to z approx equals 1.2 for the ETG population being studied here, the average mechanical power from AGN activity is a factor of approx equals1.4 -- 2.6 times larger than the average radiative cooling power from hot gas over the redshift range z approx equals 0-1.2. The excess of inferred AGN mechanical power from these ETGs is consistent with that found in the local Universe for similar types of galaxies.

  16. Regional and Detailed Survey for Radon Activities in Soil-Gas and Groundwater in the Okchon Zone, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Je, H.-K.; Chon, H.-T.

    2012-04-01

    The Okchon zone in Korea provides a typical example of natural geological materials enriched in potentially toxic elements including uranium which is parent nuclide for radon gas. For the purpose of radon radioactivity risk assessment, making the map of radon risk grade from Okchon zone, regional and detailed field surveys were carried out during 3 years. The study area is located in the central part of Korea, called the Okchon zone (about 5,100 km2), which occur in a 80km wide, northeast-trending belt that extends across the Korean Peninsula. The Okchon zone is underlain by metasedimentary rocks of unknown age that are composed mainly of black slate, phyllite, shale, and limestone. The three research areas (defined as Boeun, Chungju, and Nonsan) for detailed survey were selected from the results of regional survey. Results of detailed radon survey indicated a wide range of radon activities for soil-gases (148-1,843 pCi/L) and ground waters (23-5,540 pCi/L). About 15 percent of soil-gas samples exceeded 1,000 pCi/L and 84 percent of ground water samples exceeded the MCL (maximum contaminant level) of drinking water, 300 pCi/L, which proposed by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 1999. For detailed survey, radon activities of soil-gas and ground water were classified as bedrock geology, based on 1/50,000 geological map and field research. For soil-gas measurements, mean values of radon activity from black slate-shale (789 pCi/L) were highest among the other base rocks. And for groundwater measurements, mean value of radon activities were decreased in the order of granite (1,345 pCi/L) > black shale-slate (915 pCi/L) > metasediments (617 pCi/L). Result of indoor radon measurement from detailed survey areas showed that about 50% of houses exceeded the indoor guideline, 4 pCi/L. For the radon risk assessment in indoor environment showed that probability of lung cancer risk from the houses located on the granite base rock (3.0×10-2) was highest among the other

  17. Antimicrobial activity of controlled-release chlorine dioxide gas on fresh blueberries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiuxiu; Bai, Jinhe; Ference, Christopher; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Yifan; Narciso, Jan; Zhou, Kequan

    2014-07-01

    The effect of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas on the safety and quality of blueberries was studied. In vitro studies revealed that both ClO2 gas fumigation and ClO2 direct contact in water killed food pathogen bacterium Escherichia coli and fruit decay pathogen fungus Colletotrichum acutatum. In vivo studies were conducted using noninoculated berries and berries inoculated with postharvest decay and foodborne pathogens. Berries were inoculated with either E. coli (5.2 log CFU/g) or C. acutatum (3.9 log CFU/g). Inoculated fruit were dried for 2 h at room temperature in a climate-controlled laboratory and packed in perforated commercial clamshells, with or without ClO2 pads, and stored at 10°C for up to 9 days. The effects of ClO2 on microbial populations and fruit firmness were monitored during storage. In the inoculation experiment, treatment with ClO2 reduced populations of E. coli and C. acutatum by 2.2 to 3.3 and 1.3 to 2.0 log CFU/g, respectively. For the noninoculated blueberries, the initial total aerobic bacteria count and the yeast and mold count were 4.2 and 4.1 log CFU/g, respectively. ClO2 treatment reduced total aerobic bacteria count and yeast and mold count by 1.5 to 1.8 and 1.3 to 1.7 log CFU/g, respectively. The firmness of both inoculated and noninoculated blueberries was maintained by ClO2 treatment. Thus, controlled-release ClO2 gas fumigation technology shows promise as an effective and practical antimicrobial agent in commercial clamshell packaging of blueberry and other fruits.

  18. Classification of Magnetic Nanoparticle Systems—Synthesis, Standardization and Analysis Methods in the NanoMag Project

    PubMed Central

    Bogren, Sara; Fornara, Andrea; Ludwig, Frank; del Puerto Morales, Maria; Steinhoff, Uwe; Fougt Hansen, Mikkel; Kazakova, Olga; Johansson, Christer

    2015-01-01

    This study presents classification of different magnetic single- and multi-core particle systems using their measured dynamic magnetic properties together with their nanocrystal and particle sizes. The dynamic magnetic properties are measured with AC (dynamical) susceptometry and magnetorelaxometry and the size parameters are determined from electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Using these methods, we also show that the nanocrystal size and particle morphology determines the dynamic magnetic properties for both single- and multi-core particles. The presented results are obtained from the four year EU NMP FP7 project, NanoMag, which is focused on standardization of analysis methods for magnetic nanoparticles. PMID:26343639

  19. Serial Tc-99m MAG3 renography evaluating the recovery of acute kidney injury associated with minimal change nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Hidenori; Kotoda, Atsushi; Akimoto, Tetsu; Shinozaki, Takeshi; Inoue, Makoto; Sugimoto, Hideharu; Kusano, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a well-recognized complication of minimal change nephrotic syndrome (MCNS). Previous reports support the concept that AKI associated with MCNS is reversible; however, information regarding the hemodynamic basis of AKI in MCNS is insufficient. We herein describe a case of AKI in a man with MCNS. In this case, monitoring the longitudinal changes in renal perfusion using serial Tc-99m-MAG3 renal scanning was beneficial for evaluating the pathophysiological background associated with the development of AKI. The potential impact of serial renal scanning in MCNS patients with AKI will also be discussed.

  20. The cytosolic DNA sensor cGAS forms an oligomeric complex with DNA and undergoes switch-like conformational changes in the activation loop.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Wu, Jiaxi; Du, Fenghe; Xu, Hui; Sun, Lijun; Chen, Zhe; Brautigam, Chad A; Zhang, Xuewu; Chen, Zhijian J

    2014-02-13

    The presence of DNA in the cytoplasm is a danger signal that triggers immune and inflammatory responses. Cytosolic DNA binds to and activates cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS), which produces the second messenger cGAMP. cGAMP binds to the adaptor protein STING and activates a signaling cascade that leads to the production of type I interferons and other cytokines. Here, we report the crystal structures of human cGAS in its apo form, representing its autoinhibited conformation as well as in its cGAMP- and sulfate-bound forms. These structures reveal switch-like conformational changes of an activation loop that result in the rearrangement of the catalytic site. The structure of DNA-bound cGAS reveals a complex composed of dimeric cGAS bound to two molecules of DNA. Functional analyses of cGAS mutants demonstrate that both the protein-protein interface and the two DNA binding surfaces are critical for cGAS activation. These results provide insights into the mechanism of DNA sensing by cGAS.

  1. Volcanic gas composition changes during the gradual decrease of the gigantic degassing activity of Miyakejima volcano, Japan, 2000-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Hiroshi; Geshi, Nobuo; Matsushima, Nobuo; Saito, Genji; Kazahaya, Ryunosuke

    2017-02-01

    The composition of volcanic gases discharged from Miyakejima volcano has been monitored during the intensive degassing activity that began after the eruption in 2000. During the 15 years from 2000 to 2015, Miyakejima volcano discharged 25.5 Mt of SO2, which required degassing of 3 km3 of basaltic magma. The SO2 emission rate peaked at 50 kt/day at the end of 2000 and quickly decreased to 5 kt/day by 2003. During the early degassing period, the volcanic gas composition was constant with the CO2/SO2 = 0.8 (mol ratio), H2O/SO2 = 35, HCl/SO2 = 0.08, and SO2/H2S = 15. The SO2 emission rate decreased gradually to 0.5 kt/day by 2012, and the gas composition also changed gradually to CO2/SO2 = 1.5, H2O/SO2 = 150, HCl/SO2 = 0.15, and SO2/H2S = 6. The compositional changes are not likely caused by changes in degassing pressure or volatile heterogeneity of a magma chamber but are likely attributed to an increase of hydrothermal scrubbing caused by large decrease of the volcanic gas emission rate, suggesting a supply of gases with constant composition during the 15 years. The intensive degassing was modeled based on degassing of a convecting magma conduit. The gradual SO2 emission rate that decrease without changes in volcanic gas composition is attributed to a reduction of diameter of the convecting magma conduit.

  2. Bering Sea summary report: Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the Bering Sea and their onshore impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Deis, J.; Pierson, R.; Kurz, F.

    1983-09-01

    Two federal offshore oil-and-gas lease sales have been held in the Bering Sea Subregion. Lease Sale 57, Norton Basin, was held on March 15, 1983. Lease Sale 70, St. George Basin, was held on April 12, 1983. The sale offered 479 tracts, of which 97 received bids. The Department of the Interior has indicated that it will accept 96 of the 97 high bids; however, to date, leases have not been awarded. The Department of the Interior was enjoined from issuing leases by the US District Court of Alaska because of possible impacts from postlease preliminary seismic activities on gray and right whales. In accordance with the Court's ruling, leases cannot be issued until the completion of a supplemental environmental impact statement, which is anticipated to occur in November 1983. Six lease offerings in the Bering Sea Subregion are scheduled through 1987. Six deep stratigraphic test wells are the only wells drilled to date in the Bering Sea Subregion. To date, oil companies have not submitted exploration plans for the Norton Basin Planning Area. Exploration in Norton Basin could begin in the summer of 1984, at the earliest. Exploration plans cannot be submitted for the St. George Basin Planning Area until the leases are awarded. At this time, various onshore areas are being considered as possible support bases for offshore oil-and-gas exploration. At this stage, before exploratory drilling has occurred and in the absence of a commercial discovery, plans for transporting petroleum from the Bering Sea to markets in the United States are unclear. The current estimates of risked resources for lands leased in Lease Sale 57, Norton Basin, are 33 million barrels of oil and 110 billion cubic feet of gas. Lease Sale 70, St. George Basin, estimates of risked resources for leased lands are 27 million barrels of oil and 310 billion cubic feet of gas. 55 references, 10 figures, 3 tables.

  3. Radiation asymmetry and MHD activity in gas jet rapid shutdowns on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olynyk, Geoffrey; Granetz, Robert; Whyte, Dennis; Alcator C-Mod Team

    2013-10-01

    Radiative rapid shutdown via massive noble gas injection (MGI) is an integral part of the ITER disruption mitigation system (DMS). However, observations have shown that the radiation during MGI rapid shutdowns may be spatially asymmetric, particularly during the initial phase when the plasma's thermal energy is converted to radiation. ITER requires the radiation peaking factor (PF) to be less than approximately 2.0 to 2.5 in this thermal quench (TQ) phase in order to prevent melting of the beryllium wall even in the case of a successful MGI rapid shutdown. We report on observations of rotating MHD modes in single- and multiple-gas-jet rapid shutdowns on Alcator C-Mod, and discuss the role of mode rotation during the TQ in setting the radiation peaking factor. The implications for the ITER DMS are discussed. This work was supported by the United States Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FC02-99ER54512 and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada PGS D program.

  4. Highly active and stable iron Fischer-Tropsch catalyst for synthesis gas conversion to liquid fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Bukur, D.B.; Lang, X.

    1999-09-01

    A precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst (100 Fe/3 Cu/4 K/16 SiO{sub 2} on mass basis) was tested in a stirred tank slurry reactor under reaction conditions representative of industrial practice using CO-rich synthesis gas (260 C, 1.5--2.2 MPa, H{sub 2}/CO = 2/3). Repeatability of performance and reproducibility of catalyst preparation procedure were successfully demonstrated on a laboratory scale. Catalyst productivity was increased by operating at higher synthesis pressure while maintaining a constant contact time in the reactor and through the use of different catalyst pretreatment procedures. In one of the tests (run SA-2186), the catalyst productivity was 0.86 (g hydrocarbons/g Fe/h) at syngas conversion of 79%, methane selectivity of 3% (weight percent of total hydrocarbons produced), and C{sub 5}+ hydrocarbon selectivity of 83 wt %. This represents a substantial improvement in productivity in comparison to state-of-the-art iron F-T catalysts. This catalyst is ideally suited for production of high-quality diesel fuels and C{sub 2}-c{sub 4} olefins from a coal-derived synthesis gas.

  5. Volcanic gas emissions during active dome growth at Mount Cleveland, Alaska, August 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Cynthia; Kern, Christoph; Lyons, John; Kelly, Peter; Schneider, David; Wallace, Kristi; Wessels, Rick

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic gas emissions and chemistry data were measured for the first time at Mount Cleveland (1730 m) in the Central Aleutian arc, Alaska, on August 14-15, 2015 as part of the NSF-GeoPRISMS initiative, and co-funded by the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) and the USGS Alaska Volcano Observatory. The measurements were made in the month following two explosive events (July 21 and August 7, 2015) that destroyed a small dome (˜50x85 m), which had experienced episodic growth in the crater since November, 2014. These explosions resulted in the elevation of the aviation color code and alert level from Yellow/Advisory to Orange/Watch on July 21, 2015. Between the November, 2014 and July, 2015 dome-destroying explosions, the volcano experienced: (1) frequent periods of elevated surface temperatures in the summit region (based on Mid-IR satellite observations), (2) limited volcano-seismic tremor, (3) visible degassing as recorded in webcam images with occasionally robust plumes, and (4) at least one aseismic volcanic event that deposited small amounts of ash on the upper flanks of the volcano (detected by infrasound, observed visually and in Landsat 8 images). Intermittent plumes were also sometimes detectable up to 60 km downwind in Mid-IR satellite images, but this was not typical. Lava extrusion resumed following the explosion as indicated in satellite data by highly elevated Mid-IR surface temperatures, but was not identifiable in seismic data. By early-mid August, 2015, a new dome growing in the summit crater had reached 80 m across with temperatures of 550-600 C as measured on August 4 with a helicopter-borne thermal IR camera. A semitransparent plume extended several kilometers downwind of the volcano during the field campaign. A helicopter instrumented with an upward-looking UV spectrometer (mini DOAS) and a Multi-GAS was used to measure SO2 emission rates and in situ mixing ratios of H2O, CO2, SO2, and H2S in the plume. On August 14 and 15, 2015, a total of 14

  6. Novel nano coordination polymer based synthesis of porous ZnO hexagonal nanodisk for higher gas sorption and photocatalytic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakibuddin, M.; Ananthakrishnan, Rajakumar

    2016-01-01

    Zinc(II)-based nano co-ordination polymers (NCPs) are first prepared at room temperature from three different isomers of dihydroxysalophen (DHS) ligand with Zn(OAc)2·2H2O and 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid (BDC) in DMF solvent. Facile calcinations of [Zn (DHS) (BDC)]·nH2O (shortly denoted as Zn(II)-based NCP) at ambient conditions produces porous ZnO hexagonal nanodisks. Moreover, a novel approach has been introduced to observe the effect of ligand of the NCP on the physico-chemical properties of the as-synthesized ZnO. The porous ZnO nanodisks are characterized by FT-IR, PXRD, TEM, FESEM, EDX and BET analysis, and the results exhibit that they possess different sizes, surface areas and porosities. Nitrogen gas sorption capacity and photocatalytic activities of the as-prepared ZnO nanodisks are also checked, and it is noticed that they differ in these physico-chemical properties due to having different porosities and surface areas. A comparative study is also done with commercially available ZnO; interestingly, the commercial ZnO exhibited lower surface area, gas sorption and photocatalytic activity compared to the ZnO nanodisks. Hence, preparation of the ZnO through the NCP route and tuning their physico-chemical properties would offer new directions in synthesis of various nano metal oxides of unique properties.

  7. Flare-Shaped Acoustic Anomalies in the Water Column Along the Ecuadorian Margin: Relationship with Active Tectonics and Gas Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud, Francois; Proust, Jean-Noël; Dano, Alexandre; Collot, Jean-Yves; Guiyeligou, Grâce Daniella; Hernández Salazar, María José; Ratzov, Gueorgui; Martillo, Carlos; Pouderoux, Hugo; Schenini, Laure; Lebrun, Jean-Frederic; Loayza, Glenda

    2016-10-01

    With hull-mounted multibeam echosounder data, we report for the first time along the active Ecuadorian margin, acoustic signatures of water column fluid emissions and seep-related structures on the seafloor. In total 17 flare-shaped acoustic anomalies were detected from the upper slope (1250 m) to the shelf break (140 m). Nearly half of the flare-shaped acoustic anomalies rise 200-500 m above the seafloor. The base of the flares is generally associated with high-reflectivity backscatter patches contrasting with the neighboring seafloor. We interpret these flares as caused by fluid escape in the water column, most likely gases. High-resolution seismic profiles show that most flares occur close to the surface expression of active faults, deformed areas, slope instabilities or diapiric structures. In two areas tectonic deformation disrupts a Bottom Simulating Reflector (BSR), suggesting that buried frozen gas hydrates are destabilized, thus supplying free gas emissions and related flares. This discovery is important as it opens the way to determine the nature and origin of the emitted fluids and their potential link with the hydrocarbon system of the forearc basins along the Ecuadorian margin.

  8. Experiment on large scale plume interaction with a stratified gas environment resembling the thermal