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Sample records for active gastritis peptic

  1. [Peptic activity of gastric juice in chronic gastritis. Morpho-functional aspects].

    PubMed

    Perasso, A; Testino, G; Cornaggia, M; Melloni, E

    1993-02-01

    The aim of this study has been to evaluate peptic activity in gastric juice and gastric peptic cell mass in chronic gastritis. As regard peptic activity, there is a close correlation between it and the peptic gastric cell mass considered globally and expressed as Peptic Gastric Index (PGI), resulting from the individual average between fundic peptic index (chief cells + fundic muco-peptic cells) and antral peptic index (antral muco-peptic cells), both obtained by multiplying the number of peptic cells per mm2 by the thickness of respectively fundic and antral gland layer). In particular fundic and antral superficiale gastritis does not involve changes in peptic activity in gastric juice. On the contrary, in case of fundic pre-atrophic or atrophic there is a significant drop of peptic activity in gastric juice, regardless of the histological condition of the antrum. The lowest value of peptic activity may be noticed in case of atrophic pan-gastritis. Pre-atrophic and atrophic gastritis limited to the antrum--with superficial fundic gastritis--does not involve significant decreases of peptic activity in gastric juice. In this experiences Helicobacter pylori seem to influence peptic secretion: in fact, there is an increases of peptic activity in gastric juice in case of chronic pre-atrophic gastritis HP+.

  2. Surgical perspectives in peptic ulcer disease and gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Lipof, Tamar; Shapiro, David; Kozol, Robert A

    2006-01-01

    For much of the twentieth century, surgery was frequently the solution for peptic ulcer disease. Our understanding of the pathophysiology of ulcers paralleled the development of potent pharmaceutical therapy. As the surgical world developed parietal cell vagotomy which would minimize the complications of surgery, patients failing medical therapy became rare. Emergent surgery for complicated peptic ulcers has not declined however. The development of proton pump inhibitors and the full understanding of the impact of H pylori has led to a trend towards minimalism in surgical therapy for complicated peptic ulcer disease. In addition to the changes in patient care, these developments have had an impact on the training of surgeons. This article outlines these trends and developments. PMID:16718847

  3. Peptic activity and gastroduodenal mucosal damage.

    PubMed Central

    Raufman, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    This contribution reviews briefly the history of the discovery and characterization of peptic activity; secretory models and current concepts regarding the regulation of pepsinogen secretion; and evidence that pepsin is a necessary co-factor for gastroduodenal mucosal injury. Several animal studies indicate that peptic activity is required for acid- and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastroduodenal ulceration. A more vigorous approach to the development of anti-peptic drugs for the treatment of peptic ulcer disease is encouraged. Images Figure 1 PMID:9041694

  4. How host regulation of Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis protects against peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Poshmaal; Ng, Garrett Z; Sutton, Philip

    2016-09-01

    The bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori is the etiological agent of a range of gastrointestinal pathologies including peptic ulcer disease and the major killer, gastric adenocarcinoma. Infection with this bacterium induces a chronic inflammatory response in the gastric mucosa (gastritis). It is this gastritis that, over decades, eventually drives the development of H. pylori-associated disease in some individuals. The majority of studies investigating H. pylori pathogenesis have focused on factors that promote disease development in infected individuals. However, an estimated 85% of those infected with H. pylori remain completely asymptomatic, despite the presence of pathogenic bacteria that drive a chronic gastritis that lasts many decades. This indicates the presence of highly effective regulatory processes in the host that, in most cases, keeps a check on inflammation and protect against disease. In this minireview we discuss such known host factors and how they prevent the development of H. pylori-associated pathologies.

  5. Gastritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause the stomach lining to wear away, causing erosions—shallow breaks in the stomach lining—or ulcers— ... gastritis causes inflammation in the stomach lining; however, erosions or ulcers do not accompany nonerosive gastritis. The ...

  6. Gastritis.

    PubMed

    Glickman, J N; Antonioli, D A

    2001-10-01

    A wide variety of infectious, inflammatory, and other disorders affect the gastric mucosa in pediatric patients. The most common cause of gastritis in children is Helicobacter pylori infection, which is also responsible for the majority of duodenal ulcers. Acute erosive gastritis is most commonly the result of metabolic stress or drug or corrosive injury. Other major causes of gastritis include celiac disease, allergic disorders, and Crohn's disease. The distinctive clinical, endoscopic, and histologic features of these disorders are discussed.

  7. Helicobacter pylori heterogeneity in patients with gastritis and peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Armitano, Rita Inés; Matteo, Mario José; Goldman, Cinthia; Wonaga, Andrés; Viola, Luis Alberto; De Palma, Gerardo Zerbetto; Catalano, Mariana

    2013-06-01

    Genetic diversification allows Helicobacter pylori to persist during chronic colonization/infection. We investigated the intra-host variation of several markers that suggested microevolution in patients with chonic gastritis (CG) and peptic ulcer disease (PUD). One-hundred twenty-six isolates recovered from 14 patients with CG and 13 patients with PUD were analysed. cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI), oipA, vacA, bab gene status and the presence of jhp0926, jhp0945, jhp0947, jhp0949 and jhp0940 genes from the genomic Plasticity Zone (PZ) were taken into accout to investigate intra-host variation. lspA-glmM-RFLP was performed to identify mixed infections. Only one patient was colonised/infected by two ancestrally unrelated strains. Among the 126 isolates, a significant association among cagPAI genotypes, oipA status and vacA alleles was indicated. Complete cagPAI, oipA "on", and vacA s1-m1 variants were significantly found in patients with PUD, without intra-host variations. Isolates from 7/14 patients with CG lacked babA in all chromosomal loci. In contrast, isolates from all or several biopsies of PUD patients carried babA, but in one patient only, the isolates showed positive Lewis b (Leb) binding assay. Considering cagPAI, vacA, oipA, bab genotypes, intra-host variation was also significantly higher in patients with CG. Conversely, a similarly high intra-host variation in almost PZ genes was observed in isolates from patients with CG and PUD. In conclusion, the lowest intra-host variation in cagPAI, oipA, vacA, and bab genes found in patients with PUD suggests the selection of a particular variant along the bacteria-host environment interplay during ulceration development. However, the predominance of this variant may be a refletion of the multifactorial etiology of the disease rather than the cause, as it was also found in patients with CG. The intra-host variation in PZ genes may predict that this genomic region and the other markers of microevolution studied

  8. Helicobacter pylori heterogeneity in patients with gastritis and peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Armitano, Rita Inés; Matteo, Mario José; Goldman, Cinthia; Wonaga, Andrés; Viola, Luis Alberto; De Palma, Gerardo Zerbetto; Catalano, Mariana

    2013-06-01

    Genetic diversification allows Helicobacter pylori to persist during chronic colonization/infection. We investigated the intra-host variation of several markers that suggested microevolution in patients with chonic gastritis (CG) and peptic ulcer disease (PUD). One-hundred twenty-six isolates recovered from 14 patients with CG and 13 patients with PUD were analysed. cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI), oipA, vacA, bab gene status and the presence of jhp0926, jhp0945, jhp0947, jhp0949 and jhp0940 genes from the genomic Plasticity Zone (PZ) were taken into accout to investigate intra-host variation. lspA-glmM-RFLP was performed to identify mixed infections. Only one patient was colonised/infected by two ancestrally unrelated strains. Among the 126 isolates, a significant association among cagPAI genotypes, oipA status and vacA alleles was indicated. Complete cagPAI, oipA "on", and vacA s1-m1 variants were significantly found in patients with PUD, without intra-host variations. Isolates from 7/14 patients with CG lacked babA in all chromosomal loci. In contrast, isolates from all or several biopsies of PUD patients carried babA, but in one patient only, the isolates showed positive Lewis b (Leb) binding assay. Considering cagPAI, vacA, oipA, bab genotypes, intra-host variation was also significantly higher in patients with CG. Conversely, a similarly high intra-host variation in almost PZ genes was observed in isolates from patients with CG and PUD. In conclusion, the lowest intra-host variation in cagPAI, oipA, vacA, and bab genes found in patients with PUD suggests the selection of a particular variant along the bacteria-host environment interplay during ulceration development. However, the predominance of this variant may be a refletion of the multifactorial etiology of the disease rather than the cause, as it was also found in patients with CG. The intra-host variation in PZ genes may predict that this genomic region and the other markers of microevolution studied

  9. Gastritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infection of the stomach with a bacteria called Helicobacter pylori Less common causes are: Autoimmune disorders (such as ... to treat chronic gastritis caused by infection with Helicobacter pylori bacteria.

  10. Chronic gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Sipponen, Pentti; Maaroos, Heidi-Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Prevalence of chronic gastritis has markedly declined in developed populations during the past decades. However, chronic gastritis is still one of the most common serious pandemic infections with such severe killing sequelae as peptic ulcer or gastric cancer. Globally, on average, even more than half of people may have a chronic gastritis at present. Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood is the main cause of chronic gastritis, which microbial origin is the key for the understanding of the bizarre epidemiology and course of the disease. A life-long and aggressive inflammation in gastritis results in destruction (atrophic gastritis) of stomach mucosa with time (years and decades). The progressive worsening of atrophic gastritis results subsequently in dysfunctions of stomach mucosa. Atrophic gastritis will finally end up in a permanently acid-free stomach in the most extreme cases. Severe atrophic gastritis and acid-free stomach are the highest independent risk conditions for gastric cancer known so far. In addition to the risks of malignancy and peptic ulcer, acid-free stomach and severe forms of atrophic gastritis may associate with failures in absorption of essential vitamins, like vitamin B12, micronutrients (like iron, calcium, magnesium and zinc), diet and medicines. PMID:25901896

  11. Peptic ulcer

    MedlinePlus

    ... I. bleed - peptic ulcer; H. pylori - peptic ulcer; Helicobacter pylori - peptic ulcer ... is infection of the stomach by bacteria called Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori ). Most people with peptic ulcers have ...

  12. Collagenous gastritis.

    PubMed

    Colletti, R B; Trainer, T D

    1989-12-01

    Subepithelial fibrosis has previously been reported in the small intestine (collagenous sprue) and colon (collagenous colitis). We report a 15-yr-old girl with chronic gastritis and subepithelial fibrosis of the gastric corpus who presented with recurrent abdominal pain and acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Nodularity and erythema of the gastric corpus were persistent endoscopic findings. Biopsies revealed patchy chronic active gastritis with a striking focal thick band of collagen immediately beneath the surface epithelial cells that did not extend to deeper portions of the lamina propria. Contrast radiography demonstrated an abnormal mucosa of the gastric corpus with a mosaiclike surface pattern. Numerous studies have failed to elucidate the etiology. Despite treatment with ranitidine, sucralfate, and furazolidone, there has been no clinical or pathologic improvement. The pathogenesis and prognosis of collagenous gastritis, and its relationship to collagenous sprue and collagenous colitis, remain to be defined. PMID:2583419

  13. Anti-gastritis and wound healing effects of Momordicae Semen extract and its active component.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kiwon; Chin, Young-Won; Chung, Yoon Hee; Park, Yang Hae; Yoo, Hunseung; Min, Dong Sun; Lee, Bongyong; Kim, Jinwoong

    2013-02-01

    Momordicae Semen, Momordica cochinchinensis Springer (Cucurbitaceae), has long been known to effectively relieve boils, rheumatic pain, and hemorrhoids. In this study, we investigated whether Momordicae Semen extract (MSE) has anti-gastritis effects in various rodent models and also explored possible mechanisms for the gastroprotective effects of MSE. MSE provided remarkable protective effects, comparable to those of rebamipide, in ethanol- and diclofenac-induced acute gastritis. In addition, it has demonstrated protective effect in a Helicobacter pylori-insulted chronic gastritis model. MSE also showed wound healing effect on cutaneous injury of mice and stimulated calcitonin gene-related peptide and somatostatin receptors, which may be related to its anti-gastritis effects. In a single oral dose toxicity study, the approximate lethal dose of MSE was determined at >2000 mg/kg/day. The NOAEL was set to be 2000 mg/kg/day from the repeated oral dose toxicity study. Moreover, momordica saponin I, a major ingredient of MSE, treatment decreased gastric mucosa damage indices in the ethanol- and diclofenac-induced acute gastritis models. The results suggest that MSE could be a promising gastroprotective herbal medicine and momordica saponin I might be used as an active marker compound for MSE. PMID:22889079

  14. Anti-gastritis and wound healing effects of Momordicae Semen extract and its active component.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kiwon; Chin, Young-Won; Chung, Yoon Hee; Park, Yang Hae; Yoo, Hunseung; Min, Dong Sun; Lee, Bongyong; Kim, Jinwoong

    2013-02-01

    Momordicae Semen, Momordica cochinchinensis Springer (Cucurbitaceae), has long been known to effectively relieve boils, rheumatic pain, and hemorrhoids. In this study, we investigated whether Momordicae Semen extract (MSE) has anti-gastritis effects in various rodent models and also explored possible mechanisms for the gastroprotective effects of MSE. MSE provided remarkable protective effects, comparable to those of rebamipide, in ethanol- and diclofenac-induced acute gastritis. In addition, it has demonstrated protective effect in a Helicobacter pylori-insulted chronic gastritis model. MSE also showed wound healing effect on cutaneous injury of mice and stimulated calcitonin gene-related peptide and somatostatin receptors, which may be related to its anti-gastritis effects. In a single oral dose toxicity study, the approximate lethal dose of MSE was determined at >2000 mg/kg/day. The NOAEL was set to be 2000 mg/kg/day from the repeated oral dose toxicity study. Moreover, momordica saponin I, a major ingredient of MSE, treatment decreased gastric mucosa damage indices in the ethanol- and diclofenac-induced acute gastritis models. The results suggest that MSE could be a promising gastroprotective herbal medicine and momordica saponin I might be used as an active marker compound for MSE.

  15. Primary resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole and amoxicillin of Helicobacter pylori isolated from Tunisian patients with peptic ulcers and gastritis: a prospective multicentre study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The frequency of primary resistance to antibiotics in H. pylori isolates is increasing worldwide. In Tunisia, there are limited data regarding the pattern of H. pylori antibiotic primary resistance. Aim To evaluate the primary resistance of H. pylori to clarithromycin, metronidazole and amoxicillin and to detect the mutations involved in clarithromycin resistance. Materials and methods 273 strains isolated from adults and children were enrolled. The primary resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole and amoxicillin was evaluated by means of E-test minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC). The real-time PCR using Scorpion primers was performed in all cases to assess clarithromycin primary resistance and point mutations involved. Results No resistance to amoxicillin was detected. For adults, resistance to clarithromycin and metronidazole was found respectively in 14.6% and 56.8%, and respectively in 18.8% and 25% in children. Overall, the rates of global primary resistance to clarithromycin and metronidazole in Tunisia were respectively determined in 15.4% and 51.3%. By the use of Scorpion PCR, the A2143G was the most frequent point mutation observed (88.1%), followed by the A2142G (11.9%); the A2142C was not found and 18 of 42 patients (42.8%) were infected by both the resistant and the susceptible genotype. The association of clarithromycin resistance with gender was not statistically significant, but metronidazole resistant strains were isolated more frequently in females (67.8%) than in males (32.2%) and the difference was significant. As for gastroduodenal diseases, the difference between strains isolated from patients with peptic ulceration and those with non peptic ulceration was not statistically significant. When about the distribution of resistant strains to clarithromycin and metronidazole between the three Tunisian cities (Tunis, Menzel Bourguiba and Mahdia), the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion Local data regarding the

  16. Peptic Ulcer

    MedlinePlus

    A peptic ulcer is a sore in the lining of your stomach or your duodenum, the first part of your ... Comes and goes for several days or weeks Peptic ulcers happen when the acids that help you digest ...

  17. Collagenous gastritis.

    PubMed

    Jain, Richa; Chetty, Runjan

    2010-12-01

    A 25-year-old patient presented with epigastric pain, which on gastric biopsy revealed the characteristic appearance of collagenous gastritis. There was a thick prominent subepithelial band that was confirmed to be collagen with a Masson's trichrome stain. There was associated Helicobacter pylori gastritis but no evidence of a lymphocytic gastritis. The patient did not have watery diarrhea. Collagenous gastritis can occur in young patients, be restricted to the stomach, and can be associated with celiac disease. PMID:19103610

  18. Young onset peptic ulcer disease and non-ulcer dyspepsia are separate entities.

    PubMed

    Cederberg, A; Varis, K; Salmi, H A; Sipponen, P; Härkönen, M; Sarna, S

    1991-01-01

    The characteristics of peptic ulcer and non-ulcer dyspepsia in young men were studied in 202 consecutive conscripts who attended Central Military Hospital in Helsinki because of long-standing upper abdominal complaints. Active peptic ulceration (APU) was found in 48 patients, inactive peptic ulcer disease (IPU) was diagnosed in 77 patients, non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) was diagnosed in 52 patients. In 25 cases the reason for symptoms was another disease, and these patients were excluded from the study. A control series (CON) consisted of 30 symptomless healthy young male volunteers. The likelihood of discriminating between peptic ulcer disease and non-ulcer dyspepsia in a young male patient with dyspepsia are indicated by odds ratios (OR) and its 95% confidence limits (CL 95). Active peptic ulcer disease differs from NUD, e.g., by 1) presence of antrum gastritis, OR 41.5 (CL 95: 10.1-171), 2) Helicobacter pylori in the gastric mucosa, OR 31.0 (7.4-130), 3) Lewisa+ phenotype, OR 8.9 (1.7-45.4), 4) serum pepsinogen I (S-PGI) greater than 100 micrograms/l, OR 4.6 (1.7-12.4), 5) non-secretor status, OR 4.3 (1.6-11.6), and 6) O-blood group, OR 3.0 (1.2-7.7). In conclusion, the status of gastroduodenal mucosa, gastric secretion pattern and distribution of some genetic markers in patient series indicate that young onset peptic ulcer and non-ulcer dyspepsia are two separate entities. Helicobacter-positive antrum gastritis is the best determinant of ulcer risk, but also high S-PGI, Lewisa+ phenotype, non-secretor status and O-blood group are signs of increased risk of peptic ulcer.

  19. Gastrospirillum Hominis associated chronic active gastritis: the first report from Italy.

    PubMed

    Ierardi, E; Monno, R; Mongelli, A; Allegretta, L; Milone, E; Rizzi, S; Panza, P; Coppolecchia, P; Francavilla, A

    1991-02-01

    Recently a spiral bacterium different from Helicobacter Pylori (HP) was observed in the human stomach and the name of Gastrospirillum Hominis (GH) was proposed for this organism. GH presence is reported to be not associated to HP but related to chronic active gastritis. We describe the case of a 31 year old male suffering from upper abdominal symptoms, who underwent oesophagogastroduodenoscopy, which revealed a picture of duodenal hyperemia. Gastric body showed a normal mucosa and absence of HP, while active chronic gastritis associated with HP was found in the antrum. In addition few spiral bacteria showing 4-5 spirals, larger than HP were observed within the gastric crypts and beneath the mucus layer in this site. This case represents the first report from our geographic area (Southern Italy) of the possibility of finding bacteria different from HP in the human stomach. The simultaneous HP presence does not allow us to relate the chronic active gastritis of the patient with the GH like bacteria. Our finding, however, suggests the possibility that HP and GH may be simultaneously present in the course of type B antral chronic inflammation. This association was not observed in previous investigations.

  20. [Peptic ulcer and Helicobacter pylori. Comments on the authors' cases].

    PubMed

    Dallera, F; Gendarini, A; Scanzi, G

    1993-01-01

    The presence of Helicobacter was tested on a group with antral or duodenal ulcer with or without gastritis, versus a group without gastric or duodenal pathology. Furthermore an open trial was performed between omeprazole and colloidal bismuth subcitrate (CBS) on patients similarly affected by peptic disease. Although CBS did eliminate Helicobacter in more than a half of patients, what was not obtained by omeprazole, this result did not mean a better control of peptic disease: in fact the omeprazole was remarkably more active in our series on clinical and endoscopic ground, whether the Helicobacter was present or not, and further studies are required to assess the real significance of Helicobacter pylori in the above conditions.

  1. [Enzymatic activity and therapeutic action of pepsin K in chronic gastritis with secretory failure].

    PubMed

    Kharitonin, V V; Chernenko, G T; Sdobnova, E A; Khliabich, A G

    2003-01-01

    Pepsin K (chicken pepsin) in the test for hemoglobin proteolysis is 1.7 times superior to abomin (porcine pepsin) in the medium pH 2 and 44 times more potent in the medium pH 3. Even in pH 4 chicken pepsin retains its enzymatic activity while porcine pepsin in pH 4 looses its activity. These biochemical findings show that pepsin K is more effective in the treatment of enzymatic insufficiency of the stomach. Intake of 1-3 pepsin K tablets after meal for 4 weeks by 82 patients having chronic gastritis with secretory insufficiency was effective in 75% of patients.

  2. [Influence of Helicobacter pylori on gastric secretion. Study on variously associated gastric body, fundus and antrum chronic gastritis].

    PubMed

    Testino, G; Cheli, R

    1995-10-01

    Among the various themes related to Helicobacter pylori (HP) which is still a subject of discussion, there is the possible influence of this bacterium on gastric secretory physiology. In the present study, an evaluation has been carried out of stimulated gastrinemia, stimulated acid secretion and total peptic activity in gastric juice in the course of a paradigmatic condition, as autonomous chronic gastritis, in order to reveal possible modifications induced by the HP infection. In cases of HP positive chronic superficial antral gastritis associated either with normal body-fundic mucosa or with superficial gastritis, there is a significant increase of stimulated gastrinemia in comparison to HP negative groups and controls. In the course of body-fundic atrophic and preatrophic chronic gastritis associated either with antral superficial chronic gastritis or with antral atrophic gastritis, there are no statistically significant differences between HP positive and HP negative subjects. As regards acid and pepsin secretion no significant differences emerge in any group between HP positive and HP negative subjects. In the HP positive subjects with antral superficial gastritis and higher gastrin values the study of acid and pepsin secretion has yielded no significant variations. From the results of this study it emerges how gastric secretory parameters vary exclusively according to the histologic state of gastric mucosa. Therefore, the lesion action of HP may mainly be attributed to a direct action, rather than to substantial gastric secretory changes.

  3. Effect of the oral intake of probiotic Pediococcus acidilactici BA28 on Helicobacter pylori causing peptic ulcer in C57BL/6 mice models.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Baljinder; Garg, Neena; Sachdev, Atul; Kumar, Balvir

    2014-01-01

    Probiotic lactic acid bacteria are being proposed to cure peptic ulcers by reducing colonization of Helicobacter pylori within the stomach mucosa and by eradicating already established infection. In lieu of that, in vitro inhibitory activity of pediocin-producing probiotic Pediococcus acidilactici BA28 was evaluated against H. pylori by growth inhibition assays. Further, chronic gastritis was first induced in two groups of C57BL/6 mice by orogastric inoculation with H. pylori with polyethylene catheter, and probiotic P. acidilactici BA28 was orally administered to study the eradication and cure of peptic ulcer disease. H. pylori and P. acidilactici BA28 were detected in gastric biopsy and fecal samples of mice, respectively. A probiotic treatment with P. acidilactici BA28, which is able to eliminate H. pylori infection and could reverse peptic ulcer disease, is being suggested as a co-adjustment with conventional antibiotic treatment. The study provided an evidence of controlling peptic ulcer disease, by diet mod

  4. Chronic active gastritis due to Helicobacter pylori in immunized gnotobiotic piglets.

    PubMed

    Eaton, K A; Krakowka, S

    1992-11-01

    In gnotobiotic piglets, parenteral vaccination with formalin-killed Helicobacter pylori and oral vaccination with live bacteria induced H. pylori-specific serum immunoglobulins G, M, and A. Vaccination reduced but did not prevent infection by subsequent challenge with viable H. pylori. Oral vaccination with killed bacteria was less effective in inducing serum antibody and had no effect on bacterial colonization. Immunization status influenced the histologic response of piglets to challenge by H. pylori. Lymphoplasmacytic gastritis was more severe in parenterally vaccinated piglets than in the other groups. In addition, neutrophilic infiltrates and neutrophilic gland abscesses in the gastric mucosa were present in 5 of 7 parenterally immunized piglets, none of the orally immunized piglets, and only 1 of 8 infected nonimmune control piglets. Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between immunoglobulin G, M, and A titer at challenge and severity of both neutrophilic and lymphocytic inflammation. These results suggest that although vaccination does not prevent infection by H. pylori, infection of an immune host leads to increased severity and activity of gastritis.

  5. Gastritis, nitrosamines, and gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stemmermann, G.N.; Mower, H.

    1981-01-01

    Gastritis is associated with peptic ulcer, gastroenterostomy, pernicious anemia, and exposure to nitrosamines. Once established, the process may be self-perpetuating, resulting in atrophy, metaplasia, dysplasia, and neoplasia. This can be explained by the process of endogenous nitrosation of amines in the inflamed gastric mucosa. Evidence is presented to support this hypothesis. Several drugs given parenterally have been identified as mutagenic nitroso compounds in homogenates of human and canine antral mucosa. Nitrite for this process is apparently derived from the inflamed mucosa. Different amines appear to be nitrosated at different places in the antrum, suggesting the presence of site-specific enzymes that control these reactions.

  6. Collagenous gastritis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaoyi; Koike, Tomoyuki; Chiba, Takashi; Kondo, Yutaka; Ara, Nobuyuki; Uno, Kaname; Asano, Naoki; Iijima, Katsunori; Imatani, Akira; Watanabe, Mika; Shirane, Akio; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-09-01

    In the present paper, we report a case of rare collagenous gastritis. The patient was a 25-year-old man who had experienced nausea, abdominal distention and epigastralgia since 2005. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) carried out at initial examination by the patient's local doctor revealed an extensively discolored depression from the upper gastric body to the lower gastric body, mainly including the greater curvature, accompanied by residual mucosa with multiple islands and nodularity with a cobblestone appearance. Initial biopsies sampled from the nodules and accompanying atrophic mucosa were diagnosed as chronic gastritis. In August, 2011, the patient was referred to Tohoku University Hospital for observation and treatment. EGD at our hospital showed the same findings as those by the patient's local doctor. Pathological findings included a membranous collagen band in the superficial layer area of the gastric mucosa, which led to a diagnosis of collagenous gastritis. Collagenous gastritis is an extremely rare disease, but it is important to recognize its characteristic endoscopic findings to make a diagnosis. PMID:23363075

  7. Peptic Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a good alternative to NSAIDs for most childhood conditions. Signs and Symptoms Although peptic ulcers are rare in kids, if your child has any of these signs and symptoms, call your doctor: burning pain in the abdomen between the breastbone and the belly button (the ...

  8. [Total peptic activity in gastric juice in patients with duodenal ulcer. Variations in relation to age and role of Helicobacter pylori].

    PubMed

    Testino, G; Bastardini, R; Sumberaz, A

    1994-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate total peptic activity in gastric juice in duodenal ulcer patients in relation to age and Helicobacter pylori infection. In duodenal ulcer patients peptic activity increases significantly in comparison to normal subjects. In relation to age there is no variation. Therefore, gastric secretion has an autonomous behaviour independently of any physiological variation in healthy subjects. Helicobacter pylori infection is present in 89.4% of duodenal ulcer patients. The bacterium infection does not imply a significant increase of peptic activity in gastric juice. Its lesive action is therefore not attributable to a modification of peptic activity, but it is due to its direct action on gastric metaplasia in the duodenum.

  9. Investigation of Pharmacological Activity of Caralluma penicillata: Anti-Inflammatory Properties and Gastritis Protection against Indomethacin in Adult Guinea Pigs.

    PubMed

    Albaser, Nabil; Ghanem, Najeeb; Shehab, Mohanad; Al-Adhal, Adnan; Amood Al-Kamarany, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Caralluma is a plant that possessing a great therapeutic potential in folk medicine in Yemen, namely, Caralluma penicillata (C. penicillata) as antiulcer. The study aims to evaluate the anti-inflammatory properties and gastritis protection activity of C. penicillata against indomethacin in adult guinea pigs. The study was divided into four parts: firstly, the optimum dose of extract as anti-inflammatory effect was determined. Secondly, the acute anti-inflammatory effect of extract were estimated. Thirdly, the repeated doses of extract against chronic inflammation was estimated. The anti-inflammatory activity of extract was compared with indomethacin as a prototype of drug against inflammation. Fourthly, the gastritis protection properties of extract with/without indomethacin were performed. The results showed that a 400 mg/kg of 10% ethanol extract produced the maximum of anti-inflammatory effect. Also, the single dose of extract was equipotent for indomethacin (10 mg/kg), but shorter in duration with regard to acute anti-inflammatory effect. In addition, the repeated doses of extract against chronic inflammation were less potent than indomethacin with regard to ulcerogenic effect. On the other hand, extract-indomethacin combination reduced the gastritis effect of indomethacin based on ulcer index and histological study.

  10. Cancer development based on chronic active gastritis and resulting gastric atrophy as assessed by serum levels of pepsinogen and Helicobacter pylori antibody titer.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takeichi; Kato, Jun; Inoue, Izumi; Yoshimura, Noriko; Deguchi, Hisanobu; Mukoubayashi, Chizu; Oka, Masashi; Watanabe, Mika; Enomoto, Shotaro; Niwa, Toru; Maekita, Takao; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Tamai, Hideyuki; Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Iwane, Masataka; Takeshita, Tatsuya; Ushijima, Toshikazu; Ichinose, Masao

    2014-03-15

    Our study investigated the relationship between gastric cancer development and activity of Helicobacter pylori-associated chronic gastritis or the resulting chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG). A cohort of 4,655 healthy asymptomatic subjects, in whom serum pepsinogen (PG) and H. pylori antibody titer had been measured to assess the activity and stage of H. pylori-associated chronic gastritis, was followed for up to 16 years, and cancer development was investigated. In subjects with a serologically diagnosed healthy stomach (H. pylori-negative/CAG-negative), cancer incidence rate was low, at 16/100,000 person-years. With the establishment of H. pylori infection and progression of chronic gastritis, significant stepwise cancer risk elevations were seen from CAG-free subjects (H. pylori-positive/CAG-negative) [hazard ratio (HR) = 8.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.7-54.7] to subjects with CAG (H. pylori-positive/CAG-positive) (HR = 17.7, 95% CI = 5.4-108.6) and finally to subjects with metaplastic gastritis (H. pylori-negative/CAG-positive) (HR = 69.7, 95% CI = 13.6-502.9). In H. pylori-infected CAG-free subjects, significantly elevated cancer risk was observed in the subgroup with active inflammation-based high PG II level or potent immune response-based high H. pylori antibody titer; the former was associated with a particularly high risk of diffuse-type cancer, and both subgroups showed high cancer incidence rates of around 250/100,000 person-years, comparable to that in subjects with CAG. No such risk elevation was observed in H. pylori-infected subjects with CAG. These results clearly indicate that gastric cancer develops mainly from the gastritis-atrophy-metaplasia-cancer sequence and partly from active inflammation-based direct carcinogenesis, and that serum levels of PG and H. pylori antibody titer provide indices of cancer development in H. pylori-infected subjects.

  11. Vitamin C, Gastritis, and Gastric Disease: a historical review and update

    PubMed Central

    Aditi, Anupam; Graham, David Y.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of Helicobacter pylori as the cause of gastritis and peptic ulcers ushered in the modern era of research into gastritis and into acid-peptic diseases and rekindled interest in the role of ascorbic acid in the pathophysiology and treatment of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease. Here, we review historic and modern studies on ascorbic acid and gastric diseases with an emphasis on H. pylori gastritis and its sequelae. The relationship of ascorbic acid and gastritis and peptic ulcer and its complications was extensively studied during the 1930’s through the 1950’s. Much of this extensive literature has been effectively “lost”. Ascorbic acid deficiency was associated with all forms of gastritis (e.g., autoimmune, chemical, and infectious) due in varying degrees to insufficient intake, increased metabolic requirements, and destruction within the GI tract. Importantly, gastritis-associated abnormalities in gastric ascorbic acid metabolism are reversed by H. pylori eradication and potentially worsened by proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. Diets rich in naturally occuring ascorbic acid are associated with protection of the gastric corpus from atrophy and a reduction in the incidence of gastric cancer possibly through the ability of ascorbic acid to reduce oxidative damage to the gastric mucosa by scavenging carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds and free radicals and attenuating the H. pylori-induced inflammatory cascade. Ascorbic acid supplementation was possibly associated with a decreased incidence of bleeding from peptic ulcer disease. Pharmacologic doses of ascorbic acid also may improve the effectiveness of H. pylori eradication therapy. Occasionally, looking back can help plot the way forward. PMID:22543844

  12. Evaluation of Anti-Secretory and Anti-Ulcerogenic Activities of Avipattikar Churna on The Peptic Ulcers in Experimental Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gyawali, Sudesh; Khan, Gulam Muhammad; Lamichane, Shreekrishna; Gautam, Jaya; Ghimire, Saurav; Adhikari, Rashmi; Lamsal, Reshma

    2013-01-01

    Background: Avipattikar churna, a poly-herbal formulation, is one of the popular ayurvedic formulations which is used for peptic ulcer diseases but the scientific documentation with regards to its effect for the indication is lacking. Aims: This study was carried out to evaluate the anti-secretory and the anti-ulcerogenic activities of the churna and to compare its activity with that of ranitidine in a pyloric ligated model of rats. Material and methods: Four groups of rats with 6 animals in each served as the ulcer controls, churna low dose (500 mg/kg), churna high dose (750mg/kg) and ranitidine (25mg/kg). The control group rats received only vehicle (2% (v/v) gum acacia), while the rats of the other groups received the respective dose of the churna or ranitidine which was suspended in the vehicle. The treatments were given twice a day, orally, for two days. After 1 hour of the last dose, pyloric ligations were performed and the rats were sacrificed for evaluation after four hours of the ligations. The gastric contents were collected and its volume, pH and acidity were measured. The numbers of ulcers and their lengths were measured which were used to calculate the gastric irritancy index and the curative ratio. The histological examinations of the gastric tissues were also performed. Results: The churna, in both doses, significantly decreased the volumes of the gastric contents, the ulcer score, the length of the ulcer, the gastric irritancy index and pH increased as compared to those in the control group. The effects of the churna were comparable to that of ranitidine. The histopathological evaluation of the gastric tissue also supported the results. Conclusion: Avipattikar churna has anti-secretory and anti-ulcerogenic effects which are comparable to those of ranitidine in peptic ulcer diseases. PMID:23905120

  13. Gastritis: the histology report.

    PubMed

    Rugge, Massimo; Pennelli, Gianmaria; Pilozzi, Emanuela; Fassan, Matteo; Ingravallo, Giuseppe; Russo, Valentina M; Di Mario, Francesco

    2011-03-01

    Gastritis is defined as inflammation of the gastric mucosa. In histological terms, it is distinguishable into two main categories, i.e. non-atrophic and atrophic. In the gastric mucosa, atrophy is defined as the loss of appropriate glands. There are several etiological types of gastritis, their different etiology being related to different clinical manifestations and pathological features. Atrophic gastritis (resulting mainly from long-standing Helicobacter pylori infection) is a major risk factor for the onset of (intestinal type) gastric cancer. The extent and site of the atrophic changes correlate significantly with the cancer risk. The current format for histology reporting in cases of gastritis fails to establish an immediate link between gastritis phenotype and risk of malignancy. Building on current knowledge of the biology of gastritis, an international group of pathologists [Operative Link for Gastritis Assessment (OLGA)] has proposed a system for reporting gastritis in terms of its stage (the OLGA Staging System): this system places the histological phenotypes of gastritis on a scale of progressively increasing gastric cancer risk, from the lowest (Stage 0) to the highest (Stage IV). The aim of this tutorial is to provide unequivocal information on how to standardize histology reports on gastritis in diagnostic practice.

  14. Superoxide dismutases in chronic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Švagelj, Dražen; Terzić, Velimir; Dovhanj, Jasna; Švagelj, Marija; Cvrković, Mirta; Švagelj, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    Human gastric diseases have shown significant changes in the activity and expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD) isoforms. The aim of this study was to detect Mn-SOD activity and expression in the tissue of gastric mucosa, primarily in chronic gastritis (immunohistochemical Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis, without other pathohistological changes) and to evaluate their possible connection with pathohistological diagnosis. We examined 51 consecutive outpatients undergoing endoscopy for upper gastrointestinal symptoms. Patients were classified based on their histopathological examinations and divided into three groups: 51 patients (archive samples between 2004-2009) with chronic immunohistochemical Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis (mononuclear cells infiltration were graded as absent, moderate, severe) divided into three groups. Severity of gastritis was graded according to the updated Sydney system. Gastric tissue samples were used to determine the expression of Mn-SOD with anti-Mn-SOD Ab immunohistochemically. The Mn-SOD expression was more frequently present in specimens with severe and moderate inflammation of gastric mucosa than in those with normal mucosa. In patients with normal histological finding, positive immunoreactivity of Mn-SOD was not found. Our results determine the changes in Mn-SOD expression occurring in the normal gastric mucosa that had undergone changes in the intensity of chronic inflammatory infiltrates in the lamina propria. PMID:26765960

  15. Plasma obestatin levels in men with chronic atrophic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin-Yuan; Kuang, Hong-Yu; Liu, Xiao-Min; Ma, Zhi-Bin; Nie, Hao-Jie; Guo, Hong

    2008-10-01

    Obestatin is a recently discovered active peptide isolated from the stomach. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the modification of plasma obestatin levels in men with chronic atrophic gastritis. Men older than 65 years undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were included. All patients with chronic atrophic gastritis underwent multiple biopsies. Fasting plasma obestatin and ghrelin levels were examined in 50 men with chronic atrophic gastritis and 50 healthy men. Plasma obestatin levels were significantly lower in patients with chronic atrophic gastritis than in healthy subjects. Plasma ghrelin levels and ghrelin to obestatin ratio was decreased in men with chronic atrophic gastritis. There was a significant relationship between atrophy and decreased obestatin. A negative correlation was found between circulating obestatin levels and body mass index (BMI) in healthy subjects, but not in patients with chronic atrophic gastritis. The data indicated that chronic atrophic gastritis influenced plasma obestatin levels as well as ghrelin to obestatin ratio in elderly men.

  16. Chronic gastritis - an update.

    PubMed

    Varbanova, Mariya; Frauenschläger, Katrin; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the main aetiologic factor for chronic gastritis worldwide. The degree of inflammation and the evolution of this form of chronic gastritis can vary largely depending on bacterial virulence factors, host susceptibility factors and environmental conditions. Autoimmune gastritis is another cause of chronic inflammation in the stomach, which can occur in all age groups. This disease presents typically with vitamin B12 deficiency and pernicious anaemia. The presence of anti-parietal cell antibodies is highly specific for the diagnosis. The role of H. pylori as a trigger for autoimmune gastritis remains uncertain. Other rare conditions for chronic gastritis are chronic inflammatory conditions such as Crohn's disease or on the background of lymphocytic or collagenous gastroenteropathies. PMID:25439069

  17. Ulcer and gastritis.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, H

    2007-02-01

    Five papers, discussing important topics related to ulcer and gastritis, have been selected for review here. The papers, which include some excellent systematic reviews and meta-analyses, were published between July 2005 and August 2006.

  18. [Clinical use of flavonoid enriched biologically active food supplements in patients with chronic atrophic gastritis in combination with chronic cholecystitis or bile ducts dyskinesia].

    PubMed

    Tutel'ian, V A; Vasil'ev, A V; Kochetkov, A M; Pogozheva, A V; Lysikova, S L; Akol'zina, S E; Vorob'eva, L Sh

    2003-01-01

    60 patients with chronic atrophic gastritis and secretory insufficiency allied with chelicobacterial infection in combination with chronic unlithic cholecystitis or diskinesia of choledoch ways were explored with a view to study the efficiency of dietary cure including biologically active food supplements--flavonoids source. Fortification of the patients food intake with flavonoids-containing biologically active food supplements benefits mucous membrane of gastroduodenal zone that is evidenced in decrease of activity of pyloric chelicobacteriosis and resolvent and reparative effect, it also contributes to normalization of hepatobiliaric system condition and antioxidant status.

  19. Role of zinc in chronic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Marjanović, Ksenija; Dovhanj, Jasna; Kljaić, Ksenija; Sakić, Katarina; Kondza, Goran; Tadzić, Refmir; Vcev, Aleksandar

    2010-06-01

    Oxidative stress occurs in inflammation of gastric mucosa. The role of zinc in modulating oxidative stress has recently been recognized. Zn deficiency results in an increased sensitivity to oxidative stress and have a higher risk of musoca damage in inflammation. The aim of this study was to determine wheather chronic inflammation affects on the concentration of Zn2+ ions in gastric mucosa of patients with chronic gastritis. Forthy-three patients with chronic gastitis were enrolled. Patients were endoscoped. Histology and scoring of gastritis was performed following the guidelines of the updated Sydney system. Endoscopic finding of mucosa were scored according to a Lanza scoring system. The diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, histopathologic changes, intensity of inflammation and zinc concentration were determined from biopsies of gastric mucosa. The atomic absorption spectrophotometer was used to determine tissue concentrations of zinc. Twenty of 43 patients with chronic gastritis were uninfected by H. pylori. There was no statistically significant difference in tissue concentrations of zinc between H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative patients. From those infected patients 53.3% had chronic active gastritis. There was no statistically significant difference in tissue concentrations of zinc between patients with chronic active gastritis and patients with chronic inactive gastritis (p = 0.966). Zn in antrum showed positive correlation with density of H. pylori in antrum (Spearman' rho = 0.481, p = 0.020), negative correlation with density of H. pylori in corpus (Spearman' rho = -0.492, p = 0.017) and with zinc in corpus (Spearman' rho = 0.631, p =0.001). Tissue concentration of zinc was not affected by chronic inflammation of gastric mucosa in patients with chronic gastritis.

  20. Immunoproteomics of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with atrophic body gastritis, a predisposing condition for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Lahner, Edith; Bernardini, Giulia; Possenti, Silvia; Renzone, Giovanni; Scaloni, Andrea; Santucci, Annalisa; Annibale, Bruno

    2011-02-01

    Atrophic body gastritis is considered an outcome of H. pylori infection at high risk for gastric cancer. Immunoproteomics has been used to detect H. pylori antigens, which may act as potential markers for neoplastic disease and may be used in specific serological tests. We used immunoproteome technology to identify H. pylori antigens, recognized by sera from patients with atrophic body gastritis. Here, we performed 2DE protein maps of H. pylori strain 10K, probed against single sera from 3 groups of H. pylori-positive patients (atrophic body gastritis; intestinal-type gastric cancer; peptic ulcer) and negative controls. Immunoreactive spots were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS. A total of 155 immunoreactive spots were detected corresponding to 14.1% of total spots detected in our reference map of H. pylori strain 10K. Sera from atrophic body gastritis (40.5±2%) and gastric cancer patients (25.9±1.8%) showed a significantly higher and stronger mean immunoreactivity versus H. pylori antigens compared to peptic ulcer patients (11.2±1.3%). The average intensity of immunoreactivity of sera from atrophic body gastritis and gastric cancer patients was significantly stronger compared to peptic ulcer patients. Sera from atrophic body gastritis and gastric cancer patients differentially recognized 17 H. pylori spots. Immunoproteome technology may discriminate between different H. pylori-related disease phenotypes showing a serological immunorecognition pattern common to patients with gastric cancer and atrophic body gastritis, its precursor condition. This tool may be promising for developing specific serological tests to identify patients with gastritis at high risk for gastric cancer, to be evaluated in prospective investigations.

  1. Collagenous gastritis: Review

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Kenya; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Sato, Yuichi; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Terai, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare disease characterized by the subepithelial deposition of collagen bands thicker than 10 μm and the infiltration of inflammatory mononuclear cells in the lamina propria. Collagenous colitis and collagenous sprue have similar histological characteristics to collagenous gastritis and are thought to be part of the same disease entity. However, while collagenous colitis has become more common in the field of gastroenterology, presenting with clinical symptoms of chronic diarrhea in older patients, collagenous gastritis is rare. Since the disease was first reported in 1989, only 60 cases have been documented in the English literature. No safe and effective treatments have been identified from randomized, controlled trials. Therefore, better understanding of the disease and the reporting of more cases will help to establish diagnostic criteria and to develop therapeutic strategies. Therefore, here we review the clinical characteristics, endoscopic and histological findings, treatment, and clinical outcomes from case reports and case series published to date, and provide a summary of the latest information on the disease. This information will contribute to improved knowledge of collagenous gastritis so physicians can recognize and correctly diagnose the disease, and will help to develop a standard therapeutic strategy for future clinical trials. PMID:25789098

  2. Collagenous gastritis: Review.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Kenya; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Sato, Yuichi; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Terai, Shuji

    2015-03-16

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare disease characterized by the subepithelial deposition of collagen bands thicker than 10 μm and the infiltration of inflammatory mononuclear cells in the lamina propria. Collagenous colitis and collagenous sprue have similar histological characteristics to collagenous gastritis and are thought to be part of the same disease entity. However, while collagenous colitis has become more common in the field of gastroenterology, presenting with clinical symptoms of chronic diarrhea in older patients, collagenous gastritis is rare. Since the disease was first reported in 1989, only 60 cases have been documented in the English literature. No safe and effective treatments have been identified from randomized, controlled trials. Therefore, better understanding of the disease and the reporting of more cases will help to establish diagnostic criteria and to develop therapeutic strategies. Therefore, here we review the clinical characteristics, endoscopic and histological findings, treatment, and clinical outcomes from case reports and case series published to date, and provide a summary of the latest information on the disease. This information will contribute to improved knowledge of collagenous gastritis so physicians can recognize and correctly diagnose the disease, and will help to develop a standard therapeutic strategy for future clinical trials. PMID:25789098

  3. PEPTIC ULCER DISEASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is an ulcerative condition of the stomach or duodenum that may be accompanied by mucosal inflammation. PUD is classified as primary when it occurs in healthy children and as secondary when underlying disorders associated with injury, illness, or drug therapy co-exists. Pri...

  4. Peptic ulcer in hospital

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, H. Daintree

    1962-01-01

    This study corresponds to an estimated 142,250 admissions for peptic ulcer to the wards of National Health Service hospitals in England and Wales during the two years 1956 and 1957. It presents a picture of the incidence and mortality of complications and surgical treatment throughout England and Wales. PMID:14036965

  5. [Peptic ulcer disease and stress].

    PubMed

    Herszényi, László; Juhász, Márk; Mihály, Emese; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2015-08-30

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori infection is the major cause of peptic ulcer disease revolutionised our views on the etiology and treatment of the disease. This discovery has tempted many experts to conclude that psychological factors and, specifically, stress are unimportant. However, Helicobacter pylori infection alone does not explain fully the incidence and prevalence of peptic ulcer disease. It has been demonstrated that stress can cause peptic ulcer disease even in the absence of Helicobacter pylori infection, supporting a multicausal model of peptic ulcer etiology. Psychological stress among other risk factors can function as a cofactor with Helicobacter pylori infection.

  6. Eosinophil infiltration, gastric juice and serum eosinophil cationic protein levels in Helicobacter pylori-associated chronic gastritis and gastric ulcer.

    PubMed Central

    Aydemir, Selim A; Tekin, Isak Ozel; Numanoglu, Gamze; Borazan, Ali; Ustundag, Yucel

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Helicobacter pylori is one of the main causes of gastroduodenal diseases, such as chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer. It has been shown that eosinophils increase in the stomach in H. pylori infection. Eosinophilic cationic protein (ECP) is a cytotoxic molecule secreted by the activated eosinophils. However, there are no sufficient data about the role of ECP in H. pylori infection and its effect on ulcer development. In this study we investigated the gastric eosinophilic infiltration, gastric juice and serum ECP levels in patients with chronic gastritis and gastric ulcer associated with H. pylori. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-four H. pylori-positive and 20 H. pylori-negative patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy after admitting with dyspeptic complaints were enrolled in the study. Twenty-one of the H. pylori-positive patients had gastric ulcer while 23 patients had none. During endoscopy, multiple gastric biopsies and juices were taken. In gastric biopsies, H. pylori and eosinophilic infiltration were assessed. Additionally, gastric juice and serum ECP levels were measured. RESULTS: Eosinophil infiltration, gastric juice ECP levels, and gastric juice/serum ECP ratios in the H. pylori-positive group were greater than in the H. pylori-negative group (p < 0.01). There was no statistically significant difference regarding serum ECP levels between the two groups (p > 0.05). When H. pylori-positive patients were compared with regard to gastric ulcer presence, however, there was no significant difference in gastric eosinophil infiltration, gastric juice ECP levels, serum ECP levels, and gastric juice/serum ECP ratios (p > 0.05). CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that eosinophils and eosinophil-released ECP may contribute to inflammatory changes seen in chronic gastritis, whereas there is no proof that they play a role in ulcer development. PMID:15770055

  7. [Bleeding peptic ulcers--how can recurrent bleeding be prevented?].

    PubMed

    Labenz, J; Tillenburg, B; Peitz, U; Stolte, M; Börsch, G

    1995-01-01

    Bleeding is the most frequent complication of peptic ulcer disease. Patients with a previous ulcer hemorrhage have a high risk for future bleeding episodes. Therefore, treatment aiming at ulcer prophylaxis is mandatory. Helicobacter pylori infection, acid/pepsin and intake of Aspirin or NSAIDs are the main causal factors involved in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease. Ulcers induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can be cured by gastric acid suppression (e.g. omeprazole) and prevented by withdrawal of the ulcerogenic substances or co-medication with omeprazole or misoprostol. Acid and Helicobacter pylori are necessary, albeit by themselves not sufficient factors in the causal web of the formerly idiopathic, gastritis-associated peptic ulcer disease of the stomach and the duodenum. Maintenance therapy with antisecretory drugs results in a marked decrease of ulcer recurrences and probably further ulcer complications after an index bleeding, but a definite cure of the ulcer disease is not feasible in the majority of patients. The proportion of patients remaining in remission is dependent on the degree of gastric acid suppression. Therefore, potent antisecretory drugs such as the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole should be used if a physician decides to initiate a long-term maintenance therapy. Several studies have demonstrated beyond doubt that cure of Helicobacter pylori eradication resulted in a stable remission of gastric and duodenal ulcer disease. In addition, a true reinfection after apparent eradication of the bacteria has been rarely observed in adults.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. [Peptic ulcer: late complications of the surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Pinatel Lopasso, F

    1995-01-01

    The incidence of surgical treatment of peptic ulcer decreased in the last two decades. The majority of procedures for surgical management of peptic disease impairs the ability of the stomach to receive and to store food. The intake of high protein-caloric content diets can improve some nutritional deficits expressed by loss of body weight and anemia. The mechanism responsible for diarrhea is unknown, but truncal vagotomy has the highest incidence. It is usually episodic, lessens over the first year after operation and rarely remains a severe problem. The decreasing levels of colecistokinin response after meal in gastrectomy and the division of hepatic branch of anterior vagus can cause gallbladder sludge and stone formation. Alkaline reflux explains gastritis and esophagitis after partial gastric resection. Surgical duodenal diversion, like a Roux-en-Y limb, have been successful in its control. The mechanism that leads to the dumping syndrome are loss of gastric reservoir function and rapid emptying of hyperosmolar meals into small intestine. Somatostatin analogues improve the symptoms caused by abnormal release of neurohormonal agents responsible of the behaviour of the gastrointestinal tract after meals. Cancer of gastric remanent may be due to increased bacterial overgrowth and nitrosation formation. The endoscopic follow-up is essential for early diagnosis of the stump cancer. In spite of all complications, the surgeon cannot have hesitations by carrying out radical approach meanly during catastrophic emergencies of peptic disease i.e. in elderly aged patients. Nowadays, the control of chronic sequelas is easy with conservative therapeutic.

  9. Iron deficiency, Helicobacter infection and gastritis.

    PubMed

    Hershko, Chaim; Ronson, Aharon

    2009-01-01

    Despite elegant regulatory mechanisms, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) remains one of the most common nutritional deficiencies of mankind. Iron deficiency is the result of an interplay between increased host requirements, limited external supply, and increased blood loss. When related to increased physiologic needs associated with normal development, iron deficiency is designated physiologic or nutritional. By contrast, pathological iron deficiency, with the exception of gross menorrhagia, is most often the result of gastrointestinal disease associated with abnormal blood loss or malabsorption. If gastroenterologic evaluation fails to disclose a likely cause of IDA, or in patients refractory to oral iron treatment, screening for celiac disease (anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies), autoimmune gastritis (gastrin, anti-parietal or anti-intrinsic factor antibodies), and Helicobacter pylori (IgG antibodies and urease breath test) is recommended. Recent studies indicate that 20-27% of patients with unexplained IDA have autoimmune gastritis, about 50% have evidence of active H. pylori infection, and 4-6% have celiac disease. The implications for abnormal iron absorption of celiac disease or autoimmune gastritis are obvious. In patients with unexplained IDA and H. pylori infection, cure of refractory IDA by H. pylori eradication offers strong evidence for a cause-and-effect relation between H. pylori infection and unexplained IDA. Stratification by age cohorts in autoimmune gastritis implies a disease presenting as IDA many years before the establishment of clinical cobalamin deficiency. It is likely caused by an autoimmune process triggered by antigenic mimicry between H. pylori epitopes and major autoantigens of the gastric mucosa. Recognition of the respective roles of H. pylori and autoimmune gastritis in the pathogenesis of iron deficiency may have a strong impact on the diagnostic workup and management of unexplained, or refractory IDA.

  10. Peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Kalyanakrishnan; Salinas, Robert C

    2007-10-01

    Peptic ulcer disease usually occurs in the stomach and proximal duodenum. The predominant causes in the United States are infection with Helicobacter pylori and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Symptoms of peptic ulcer disease include epigastric discomfort (specifically, pain relieved by food intake or antacids and pain that causes awakening at night or that occurs between meals), loss of appetite, and weight loss. Older patients and patients with alarm symptoms indicating a complication or malignancy should have prompt endoscopy. Patients taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs should discontinue their use. For younger patients with no alarm symptoms, a test-and-treat strategy based on the results of H. pylori testing is recommended. If H. pylori infection is diagnosed, the infection should be eradicated and antisecretory therapy (preferably with a proton pump inhibitor) given for four weeks. Patients with persistent symptoms should be referred for endoscopy. Surgery is indicated if complications develop or if the ulcer is unresponsive to medications. Bleeding is the most common indication for surgery. Administration of proton pump inhibitors and endoscopic therapy control most bleeds. Perforation and gastric outlet obstruction are rare but serious complications. Peritonitis is a surgical emergency requiring patient resuscitation; laparotomy and peritoneal toilet; omental patch placement; and, in selected patients, surgery for ulcer control.

  11. Perforated peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Søreide, Kjetil; Thorsen, Kenneth; Harrison, Ewen M; Bingener, Juliane; Møller, Morten H; Ohene-Yeboah, Michael; Søreide, Jon Arne

    2015-09-26

    Perforated peptic ulcer is a common emergency condition worldwide, with associated mortality rates of up to 30%. A scarcity of high-quality studies about the condition limits the knowledge base for clinical decision making, but a few published randomised trials are available. Although Helicobacter pylori and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are common causes, demographic differences in age, sex, perforation location, and underlying causes exist between countries, and mortality rates also vary. Clinical prediction rules are used, but accuracy varies with study population. Early surgery, either by laparoscopic or open repair, and proper sepsis management are essential for good outcome. Selected patients can be managed non-operatively or with novel endoscopic approaches, but validation of such methods in trials is needed. Quality of care, sepsis care bundles, and postoperative monitoring need further assessment. Adequate trials with low risk of bias are urgently needed to provide better evidence. We summarise the evidence for perforated peptic ulcer management and identify directions for future clinical research.

  12. Helicobacter heilmannii gastritis: a case study with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Anuradha V; Sepulveda, Antonia R

    2005-11-01

    H. heilmannii belongs to the Helicobacter family and is found in a small number of gastric biopsies. This bacterium is generally found in primates, cats, pigs, and carnivorous mammals. About 0.5% to 6% of human gastric infections have been attributed to H. heilmannii. The bacterium usually induces mild chronic gastritis but may be associated with peptic ulceration, and rare cases were reported in association with gastric carcinoma and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. We report a case of H. heilmannii chronic gastritis in a 44-year-old man with a history of chronic heartburn, found to have erythema and granularity in the antrum. Antral biopsy showed mild chronic gastritis with prominent lymphoid aggregates, and rare long, thin, spiral bacilli were present adjacent to the surface epithelium. The long tightly coiled morphology suggestive of H. heilmannii was obvious at 1000 x magnification. The lack of information in the literature regarding cross-reactivity of H. heilmannii to commercially available antibodies used for immunohistochemical detection of H. pylori prompted us to evaluate whether commercially available polyclonal anti-H. pylori antibodies show cross-reactivity between the two organisms. The H. pylori immunostain highlighted H. heilmannii organisms and their characteristic morphology, confirming cross-reactivity with the anti-H. pylori polyclonal antibody. This case illustrates the potential contribution of commercially available polyclonal antibodies against H. pylori to help confirm a diagnosis of H. heilmannii gastritis. The use of immunohistochemical stain to identify H. heilmannii may be useful in cases with a paucity of organisms, with suggestive but not diagnostic forms on routine hematoxylin and eosin stain.

  13. Endoscopic gastritis, serum pepsinogen assay, and Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Young

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic findings of the background gastric mucosa are important in the Helicobacter pylori-seroprevalent population. It is strongly correlated not only with the risk of gastric cancer, but also with the excretion ability of gastric mucosa cells. In noninfected subjects, common endoscopic findings are regular arrangement of collecting venules, chronic superficial gastritis, and erosive gastritis. In cases of active H. pylori infection, nodularity on the antrum, hemorrhagic spots on the fundus, and thickened gastric folds are common endoscopic findings. The secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells is usually intact in both noninfected and actively infected stomachs, and the intragastric condition becomes hyperacidic upon inflammation. Increased serum pepsinogen II concentration correlates well with active H. pylori infection, and also indicates an increased risk of diffuse-type gastric cancer. In chronic inactive H. pylori infection, metaplastic gastritis and atrophic gastritis extending from the antrum (closed-type chronic atrophic gastritis) toward the corpus (open-type chronic atrophic gastritis) are common endoscopic findings. The intragastric environment is hypoacidic and the risk of intestinal-type gastric cancer is increased in such conditions. Furthermore, there is a decrease in serum pepsinogen I concentration when the secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells is damaged. Serologic and endoscopic changes that occur upon H. pylori infection are important findings for estimating the secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells, and could be applied for the secondary prevention of gastric cancer. PMID:27604795

  14. Endoscopic gastritis, serum pepsinogen assay, and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Young

    2016-09-01

    Endoscopic findings of the background gastric mucosa are important in the Helicobacter pylori-seroprevalent population. It is strongly correlated not only with the risk of gastric cancer, but also with the excretion ability of gastric mucosa cells. In noninfected subjects, common endoscopic findings are regular arrangement of collecting venules, chronic superficial gastritis, and erosive gastritis. In cases of active H. pylori infection, nodularity on the antrum, hemorrhagic spots on the fundus, and thickened gastric folds are common endoscopic findings. The secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells is usually intact in both noninfected and actively infected stomachs, and the intragastric condition becomes hyperacidic upon inflammation. Increased serum pepsinogen II concentration correlates well with active H. pylori infection, and also indicates an increased risk of diffuse-type gastric cancer. In chronic inactive H. pylori infection, metaplastic gastritis and atrophic gastritis extending from the antrum (closed-type chronic atrophic gastritis) toward the corpus (open-type chronic atrophic gastritis) are common endoscopic findings. The intragastric environment is hypoacidic and the risk of intestinal-type gastric cancer is increased in such conditions. Furthermore, there is a decrease in serum pepsinogen I concentration when the secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells is damaged. Serologic and endoscopic changes that occur upon H. pylori infection are important findings for estimating the secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells, and could be applied for the secondary prevention of gastric cancer. PMID:27604795

  15. Collagenous gastritis revealed by severe anemia in a child.

    PubMed

    Côté, J F; Hankard, G F; Faure, C; Mougenot, J F; Holvoet, L; Cézard, J P; Navarro, J; Peuchmaur, M

    1998-08-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare histopathological disorder of unknown origin, characterized by a subepithelial collagen deposit greater than 10 microm thick, associated with an inflammatory infiltrate of the gastric mucosa. This report describes a second pediatric case of collagenous gastritis, revealed by severe anemia caused by gastric bleeding, as was the first case. Unlike the adult cases of collagenous gastritis, lesions were limited to the stomach, and remained unchanged on six series of biopsies taken during a 30 month follow-up, despite treatment with omeprazole, sucralfate and corticosteroids. An immunohistochemical study showed signs of local immune activation on all biopsy specimens, including overexpression of HLA-DR by epithelial cells, increased numbers of CD3+ intraepithelial lymphocytes, and CD25+ cells in the lamina propria. Although the cause of the disease remains unclear, our findings suggest that the histopathological lesions of collagenous gastritis may result from a local immune process. PMID:9712433

  16. Collagenous gastritis associated with lymphocytic gastritis and celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Stancu, M; De Petris, G; Palumbo, T P; Lev, R

    2001-12-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare disorder, with only 8 cases reported in the literature, 2 in children and 6 in adults. We report an additional case of collagenous gastritis in a 42-year-old man with celiac disease. A thickened (>10 microm) subepithelial collagen band with entrapped capillaries, fibroblasts, and inflammatory cells was seen in the stomach, associated with lymphocytic gastritis. The duodenal mucosa showed severe villous atrophy but no subepithelial collagen deposition. No evidence of lymphocytic or collagenous colitis was found in the colon. The patient became symptom-free on a gluten exclusion diet and showed partial improvement of histopathologic findings after 3 months. Collagenous gastritis is a rare disease, but a wider recognition of its histopathologic features and clinical associations may bring more cases to light and provide additional clues in determining its etiology and pathogenesis. PMID:11735694

  17. Collagenous gastritis: a case report, morphologic evaluation, and review.

    PubMed

    Vesoulis, Z; Lozanski, G; Ravichandran, P; Esber, E

    2000-05-01

    Collagenous gastritis is rare; there are only four previous case reports. Histologic features seem to overlap with the other "collagenous enterocolitides"; however, pathologic criteria are not yet established for the diagnosis of collagenous gastritis. We describe an additional case of ostensible collagenous gastritis in a patient who initially presented with celiac sprue and subsequently developed colonic manifestations of mucosal ulcerative colitis. Endoscopic biopsies of the stomach revealed deposition of patchy, very thick bandlike subepithelial collagen in gastric antral mucosa, focal superficial epithelial degeneration, numerous intraepithelial lymphocytes, and a dense lamina propria lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. Image analysis evaluation of gastric antral biopsies demonstrated a mean thickness of subepithelial collagen of 27.07 micron. Morphologic comparison was made with age-matched control groups of 10 patients who had normal gastric mucosal biopsies and 10 patients who had "chronic" gastritis, which revealed mean subepithelial collagen measures of 1.37 micron and 1.19 micron, respectively. We compared these morphologic findings with those of all previous case reports of collagenous gastritis and propose a pathologic definition based on the limited combined data. It seems that subepithelial collagen is dramatically thickened in reported cases of collagenous gastritis, with a cumulative mean measure of 36.9 micron. It is also apparent from this and previous reports that the thickened subepithelial collagen is accompanied by a chronic or chronic active gastritis and sometimes intraepithelial lymphocytes and surface epithelial damage. Recently described associations of lymphocytic gastritis, sprue, and lymphocytic colitis as well as collagenous and lymphocytic colitis suggest a common pathogenesis that empirically may include collagenous gastritis in the same disease spectrum. We propose that collagenous gastritis can be confidently identified by using

  18. Perforated peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Søreide, Kjetil; Thorsen, Kenneth; Harrison, Ewen M.; Bingener, Juliane; Møller, Morten H.; Ohene-Yeboah, Michael; Søreide, Jon Arne

    2015-01-01

    Summary Perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) is a frequent emergency condition worldwide with associated mortality up to 30%. A paucity of studies on PPU limits the knowledge base for clinical decision-making, but a few randomised trials are available. While Helicobacter pylori and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are frequent causes of PPU, demographic differences in age, gender, perforation location and aetiology exist between countries, as do mortality rates. Clinical prediction rules are used, but accuracy varies with study population. Early surgery, either by laparoscopic or open repair, and proper sepsis management are essential for good outcome. Selected patients can perhaps be managed non-operatively or with novel endoscopic approaches, but validation in trials is needed. Quality of care, sepsis care-bundles and postoperative monitoring need further evaluation. Adequate trials with low risk of bias are urgently needed for better evidence. Here we summarize the evidence for PPU management and identify directions for future clinical research. PMID:26460663

  19. Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Peptic Ulcer URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  20. Nutritional care in peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    VOMERO, Nathália Dalcin; COLPO, Elisângela

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Peptic ulcer is a lesion of the mucosal lining of the upper gastrointestinal tract characterized by an imbalance between aggressive and protective factors of the mucosa, having H. pylori as the main etiologic factor. Dietotherapy is important in the prevention and treatment of this disease. Aim To update nutritional therapy in adults' peptic ulcer. Methods Exploratory review without restrictions with primary sources indexed in Scielo, PubMed, Medline, ISI, and Scopus databases. Results Dietotherapy, as well as caloric distribution, should be adjusted to the patient's needs aiming to normalize the nutritional status and promote healing. Recommended nutrients can be different in the acute phase and in the recovery phase, and there is a greater need of protein and some micronutrients, such as vitamin A, zinc, selenium, and vitamin C in the recovery phase. In addition, some studies have shown that vitamin C has a beneficial effect in eradication of H. pylori. Fibers and probiotics also play a important role in the treatment of peptic ulcer, because they reduce the side effects of antibiotics and help reduce treatment time. Conclusion A balanced diet is vital in the treatment of peptic ulcer, once food can prevent, treat or even alleviate the symptoms involving this pathology. However, there are few papers that innovate dietotherapy; so additional studies addressing more specifically the dietotherapy for treatment of peptic ulcer are necessary. PMID:25626944

  1. Peptic ulcer disease in endogenous hypercortisolism: myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Hatipoglu, Esra; Caglar, Asli Sezgin; Caglar, Erkan; Ugurlu, Serdal; Tuncer, Murat; Kadioglu, Pinar

    2015-11-01

    Many clinicians believe hypercortisolism is ulcerogenic. However, data from clinical studies show that prophylaxis for peptic ulcer disease is no longer recommended in patients receiving corticosteroid treatment. This has not yet been verified in endogenous hypercortisolism by controlled clinical studies. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the relationship between endogenous Cushing's syndrome (CS) and peptic ulcer disease and Helicobacter pylori infection. The study group contained 20 cases with CS resulting from ACTH-dependent endogenous hypercortisolism. The control groups consisted of 14 age- and gender-matched cases receiving exogenous corticosteroid therapy and 100 cases of dyspepsia with non-cushingoid features. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed on all cases. Biopsies were taken from five different points: two samples from the antrum, two samples from the corpus, and one sample from the fundus. A histological diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection was also obtained from evaluation of biopsy specimens. The frequency of stomach and duodenal ulcers did not vary between the groups (p = 0.5 and p = 0.7). Antral gastritis was less frequent and pangastritis was more common in cases with CS compared to the healthy controls (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001). The incidence of Candida esophagitis was more frequent in cases with CS compared to cases with corticosteroid treatment and healthy controls (p = 0.03). Histopathological findings and frequency of Helicobacter pylori based on pathology results did not vary between the three groups. It is possible that neither exogenous nor endogenous corticosteroid excess directly causes peptic ulcer or Helicobacter pylori infection. Prophylactic use of proton pump inhibitors is not compulsory for hypercortisolism of any type.

  2. Topographic mapping of collagenous gastritis.

    PubMed

    Freeman, H J

    2001-07-01

    A 74-year-old woman was investigated for abdominal pain and diarrhea. Endoscopic examinations including biopsies of the stomach and colon demonstrated the typical subepithelial deposits characteristic of collagenous gastritis and collagenous colitis. Histochemical and ultrastructural methods confirmed the presence of collagen in the subepithelial deposits. The topographic distribution of these collagen deposits and their relationship to the inflammatory process in the stomach were then defined by endoscopic mapping and multiple site biopsies of the mucosa in the gastric body and antrum. These studies indicate that collagenous gastritis not only is distinctive, but also is a far more extensive and diffuse inflammatory process than has previously been appreciated. PMID:11493952

  3. Further study of mucosal repair by sofalcone in experimental gastritis.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, S; Kobuke, K; Kobayashi, H; Kajiyama, G; Miyoshi, A; Kohno, Y; Tanikawa, K; Ohta, K; Suwa, T

    1990-01-01

    The effect of sofalcone on the glandular structure and cell proliferation in the gastric mucosa of rats with gastritis induced by the administration of sodium taurocholate (TCA) for 6 months was examined by histoquantitative analysis and [3H]thymidine autoradiography. Morphometric observation revealed that, with TCA treatment, mucosal thickness, parietal cell mass, and the ratios of the length of the glandular portion/total length of the gastric gland were decreased in both the fundic and pyloric glands. Inflammatory cell infiltration and collagenous fiber proliferation were present in the gastric mucosa following TCA and indicated the presence of atrophic gastritis. These atrophic changes and inflammatory cell infiltration were reversed by a 3 week administration of sofalcone. Cellular proliferative activity assessed by the labeling indices of the gastric mucosa increased in TCA-induced gastritis in rats. The administration of sofalcone to rats with TCA-induced gastritis significantly increased labeling indices, particularly in the pyloric glands. From these results, it appears that sofalcone stimulates the compensatory increase in proliferative activity of generative cells, which then may become available to heal the gastritis. PMID:2212544

  4. Endoscopic Management of Peptic Ulcer Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min

    2015-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods. PMID:25844337

  5. Endoscopic management of peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min; Kim, Byung-Wook

    2015-03-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods.

  6. Childhood chronic gastritis and duodenitis: Role of altered sensory neuromediators

    PubMed Central

    Islek, Ali; Yilmaz, Aygen; Elpek, Gulsum Ozlem; Erin, Nuray

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the roles of the neuropeptides vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), substance P (SP), and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in chronic gastritis and duodenitis in children. METHODS Biopsy samples from the gastric and duodenal mucosa of 52 patients and 30 control subjects were obtained. Samples were taken for pathological examination, immunohistochemical staining, enzyme activity measurements and quantitative measurements of tissue peptide levels. RESULTS We observed differential effects of the disease on peptide levels, which were somewhat different from previously reported changes in chronic gastritis in adults. Specifically, SP was increased and CGRP and VIP were decreased in patients with gastritis. The changes were more prominent at sites where gastritis was severe, but significant changes were also observed in neighboring areas where gastritis was less severe. Furthermore, the degree of changes was correlated with the pathological grade of the disease. The expression of CD10, the enzyme primarily involved in SP hydrolysis, was also decreased in patients with duodenitis. CONCLUSION Based on these findings, we propose that decreased levels of VIP and CGRP and increased levels of SP contribute to pathological changes in gastric mucosa. Hence, new treatments targeting these molecules may have therapeutic and preventive effects. PMID:27729741

  7. [Gastroprotective action of the nettle extract in experimental peptic ulcer].

    PubMed

    Burkova, V N; Boev, S G; Vengerovskiĭ, A I; Iudina, N V; Arbuzov, A G

    2011-01-01

    Nettle extract produced from leaves crushed to 40-70 nm fragments protects the stomach mucous membrane, and does it better than the extract derived from same leaves crushed to 1 mm fragments, on the models of peptic ulcers caused by acetylsalicylic acid, histamine, prednisolone, and immobilized stress. The antiulcer activity of the nettle extract from 40-70 nm fragments is comparable with the effect of buckthorn oil. Nettle extracts also hinder the excess acid secretion and diminish the acidity of stomach juice in experimental peptic ulcer caused by pylorus ligation. PMID:21476271

  8. Peptic ulcers: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R

    1991-01-01

    This study analyzes data on peptic ulcer disease based on deaths for 1951-1988 and hospital separations for 1969-1988. The source of the data are mortality and morbidity statistics provided to Statistics Canada by the provinces. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for peptic ulcer disease decreased from 1951 to 1988 by 69.4% for men (8.5 to 2.6 per 100,000 population), and 31.8% for women (2.2 to 1.5). Separation rates from hospitals during 1969-1988 for peptic ulcer disease also decreased by 59.8% for men (242.7 to 97.6 per 100,000 population) and 35.6% for women (103.2 to 66.5). Age-specific rates for both mortality and hospital separations increased with age. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of peptic ulcer disease is declining in the general population. The downward trends in mortality and hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease reflect this change in incidence, but additional factors probably contribute as well to this decline. Male rates for both mortality and hospital separations were much higher than female rates at the beginning of the study period; but toward the end, the gap between the sexes narrowed considerably, mainly because the male rates declined substantially while the female rates decline moderately. The slower decline in the rates for women may be related to such factors as the increasing labour force participation among women and the slower decline in the population of female smokers. PMID:1801957

  9. Peptic ulcers: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R

    1991-01-01

    This study analyzes data on peptic ulcer disease based on deaths for 1951-1988 and hospital separations for 1969-1988. The source of the data are mortality and morbidity statistics provided to Statistics Canada by the provinces. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for peptic ulcer disease decreased from 1951 to 1988 by 69.4% for men (8.5 to 2.6 per 100,000 population), and 31.8% for women (2.2 to 1.5). Separation rates from hospitals during 1969-1988 for peptic ulcer disease also decreased by 59.8% for men (242.7 to 97.6 per 100,000 population) and 35.6% for women (103.2 to 66.5). Age-specific rates for both mortality and hospital separations increased with age. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of peptic ulcer disease is declining in the general population. The downward trends in mortality and hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease reflect this change in incidence, but additional factors probably contribute as well to this decline. Male rates for both mortality and hospital separations were much higher than female rates at the beginning of the study period; but toward the end, the gap between the sexes narrowed considerably, mainly because the male rates declined substantially while the female rates decline moderately. The slower decline in the rates for women may be related to such factors as the increasing labour force participation among women and the slower decline in the population of female smokers.

  10. A case of collagenous gastritis resembling nodular gastritis in endoscopic appearance.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Jun; Yasumaru, Masakazu; Tsujimoto, Masahiko; Iijima, Hideki; Hiyama, Satoshi; Nishio, Akira; Sasayama, Yoshiaki; Kawai, Naoki; Oshita, Masahide; Abe, Takashi; Kawano, Sunao

    2013-12-01

    A 25-year-old Japanese female was referred to our clinic for the investigation of moderate iron-deficiency anemia and epigastralgia. Endoscopic examination showed diffuse mucosal nodules in the gastric body resembling nodular gastritis, but this pattern was not observed in the antrum. Histology of the gastric biopsies taken from the gastric body showed mild atrophic mucosa with chronic active inflammation. Some of the biopsy specimens showed deposition of patchy, band-like subepithelial collagen. Four years later, the patient showed no clinical symptoms and signs. A follow-up endoscopic examination showed similar findings, which mimicked pseudopolyposis or a cobblestone-like appearance. The biopsy specimens from the depressed mucosa between the nodules revealed a thickened subepithelial collagen band with no improvement, which led to a diagnosis of collagenous gastritis. Treatment with oral administration of proton-pump inhibitors and histamine-2-receptor antagonists had proved ineffective. To make a correct diagnosis of collagenous gastritis, we should determine the characteristic endoscopic findings and take biopsies from the depressed mucosa between the nodules. PMID:26182135

  11. [Classification of gastroesophageal reflux disease and gastritis].

    PubMed

    Vukobrat-Bijedic, Zora

    2002-01-01

    The gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is frequent and causes by retrograde flow of the gastric content through incompetent gastroesophageal junction. Epidemiological studies have proved that GORD is associated with hearburn in high prevalence. In western countries several studies reported that 20-40% of adult population experience heartburn symptoms at least once in the year, approximately 10% have symptoms weekly and 5% daily. Esophagitis was objectively defined as a mucosal damage and it was endoscopically verificated in 25% of patients. Indeed, GORD symptoms and esophagitis are in poor correlation and less than half of patients with heartburn symptoms had esophagitis on endoscopy. From 1989, Savary Monniér and Metaplasia-Ulcer-Stricture-Erosion (MUSE) endoscopically classification is in use. From 1994, LA (Los Angeles) classification of reflux disease is also in use by endoscopists. During its life cycle, gastric mucosa is exposed to different harmful agents and its response is restitution "ad integrum" on the beginning and at the end of process. First line defence is mucuse barrier which prevent contact between epithelial cell and possible irritant. Important role in mucuse layer plays prostaglandins. After several classification systems previously used, in 1991 Price introduced Sydney system gradation and gastritis classification. Pointing out importance of topographical differences in gastritis distribution, system has introduced 5 histological variations in its Morphological section: chronic inflammation, neutrophylic activity, glandular atrophy, intestinal metaplasy and H. pylori colonisation, with 4 points grading. PMID:12055715

  12. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems for therapeutic management of peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Garg, Tarun; Kumar, Animesh; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit K

    2014-01-01

    A peptic ulcer, stomach ulcer, or gastric ulcer, also known as peptic ulcer disease (PUD), is a very common chronic disorder of the stomach which is mainly caused by damage or impairment of the stomach lining. Various factors such as pepsin, gastric acid, H. pylori, NSAIDs, prostaglandins, mucus, bicarbonate, and blood flow to mucosa play an important role in causing peptic ulcers. In this review article, our main focus is on some important gastroretentive drug delivery systems (GRDDS) (floating, bioadhesive, high density, swellable, raft forming, superporous hydrogel, and magnetic systems) which will be helpful in gastroretention of different dosage forms for treatment of peptic ulcer. GRDDS provides a mean for controlled release of compounds that are absorbed by active transport in the upper intestine. It also enables controlled delivery for paracellularly absorbed drugs without a decrease in bioavailability. The above approaches are specific for targeting and leading to a marked improvement in the quality of life for a large number of patients. In the future, it is expected that they will become of growing significance, finally leading to improved efficiencies of various types of pharmacotherapies.

  13. What are the clinical implications of nodular gastritis? Clues from histopathology.

    PubMed

    Sokmensuer, Cenk; Onal, Ibrahim Koral; Yeniova, Ozgur; Ersoy, Osman; Aydinli, Musa; Yonem, Ozlem; Harmanci, Ozgur; Onal, Eda Demir; Altinok, Gulcin; Batman, Figen; Bayraktar, Yusuf

    2009-10-01

    There is no widely accepted histopathological definition for nodular gastritis. In this study we aim to uncover the pathologic entity responsible for the nodular appearance and to find clues about the clinical implications of nodular gastritis. Antral biopsy specimens of 160 patients with nodular gastritis and 133 patients without nodular gastritis were examined by an experienced pathologist for dysplasia, foveolar hyperplasia, inflammatory activity, intraepithelial lymphocytosis, intestinal metaplasia, and lymphoid follicle/aggregate formation, and comparative analysis was performed between the two groups of patients. The presence of intraepithelial lymphocytosis was more frequent in patients with nodular gastritis (P < 0.05). There was no difference between the two groups regarding the other pathological features such as presence of dysplasia, inflammatory activity, intestinal metaplasia, lymphoid hyperplasia, and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Increase of intraepithelial lymphocytes may contribute to formation of macroscopical nodules in this peculiar type of gastritis. Nodular gastritis would not indicate a new therapeutic approach in addition to the current measures for Helicobacter pylori infection.

  14. Role of dietary polyphenols in the management of peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Farzaei, Mohammad Hosein; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Rahimi, Roja

    2015-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease is a multifactorial and complex disease involving gastric and duodenal ulcers. Despite medical advances, the management of peptic ulcer and its complications remains a challenge, with high morbidity and death rates for the disease. An accumulating body of evidence suggests that, among a broad reach of natural molecules, dietary polyphenols with multiple biological mechanisms of action play a pivotal part in the management of gastric and duodenal ulcers. The current review confirmed that dietary polyphenols possess protective and therapeutic potential in peptic ulcer mediated by: improving cytoprotection, re-epithelialization, neovascularization, and angiogenesis; up-regulating tissue growth factors and prostaglandins; down-regulating anti-angiogenic factors; enhancing endothelial nitric oxide synthase-derived NO; suppressing oxidative mucosal damage; amplifying antioxidant performance, antacid, and anti-secretory activity; increasing endogenous mucosal defensive agents; and blocking Helicobacter pylori colonization associated gastric morphological changes and gastroduodenal inflammation and ulceration. In addition, anti-inflammatory activity due to down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines and cellular and intercellular adhesion agents, suppressing leukocyte-endothelium interaction, inhibiting nuclear signaling pathways of inflammatory process, and modulating intracellular transduction and transcription pathways have key roles in the anti-ulcer action of dietary polyphenols. In conclusion, administration of a significant amount of dietary polyphenols in the human diet or as part of dietary supplementation along with conventional treatment can result in perfect security and treatment of peptic ulcer. Further well-designed preclinical and clinical tests are recommended in order to recognize higher levels of evidence for the confirmation of bioefficacy and safety of dietary polyphenols in the management of peptic ulcer. PMID:26074689

  15. Role of dietary polyphenols in the management of peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Farzaei, Mohammad Hosein; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Rahimi, Roja

    2015-06-01

    Peptic ulcer disease is a multifactorial and complex disease involving gastric and duodenal ulcers. Despite medical advances, the management of peptic ulcer and its complications remains a challenge, with high morbidity and death rates for the disease. An accumulating body of evidence suggests that, among a broad reach of natural molecules, dietary polyphenols with multiple biological mechanisms of action play a pivotal part in the management of gastric and duodenal ulcers. The current review confirmed that dietary polyphenols possess protective and therapeutic potential in peptic ulcer mediated by: improving cytoprotection, re-epithelialization, neovascularization, and angiogenesis; up-regulating tissue growth factors and prostaglandins; down-regulating anti-angiogenic factors; enhancing endothelial nitric oxide synthase-derived NO; suppressing oxidative mucosal damage; amplifying antioxidant performance, antacid, and anti-secretory activity; increasing endogenous mucosal defensive agents; and blocking Helicobacter pylori colonization associated gastric morphological changes and gastroduodenal inflammation and ulceration. In addition, anti-inflammatory activity due to down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines and cellular and intercellular adhesion agents, suppressing leukocyte-endothelium interaction, inhibiting nuclear signaling pathways of inflammatory process, and modulating intracellular transduction and transcription pathways have key roles in the anti-ulcer action of dietary polyphenols. In conclusion, administration of a significant amount of dietary polyphenols in the human diet or as part of dietary supplementation along with conventional treatment can result in perfect security and treatment of peptic ulcer. Further well-designed preclinical and clinical tests are recommended in order to recognize higher levels of evidence for the confirmation of bioefficacy and safety of dietary polyphenols in the management of peptic ulcer.

  16. Helicobacter pylori and gastritis: Untangling a complex relationship 27 years on.

    PubMed

    Tan, Victoria P Y; Wong, Benjamin C Y

    2011-01-01

    Since its' introduction by Warren and Marshall 27 years ago, Helicobacter pylori (HP) has become the linchpin in our understanding of important gastric conditions including gastritis, intestinal metaplasia (IM), gastric/duodenal ulcers (GU/DU), Mucosal Associated Lymphoid Tumour (MALToma) and gastric cancer. Initially named Campylobacter pyloridis, it was re-named HP when biochemical and genetic characterization of the organism showed that it was not a member of the Campylobacter genus. The finding in 1983 was seminal. It is now recognized that HP is the most common chronic human bacterial infection and it is the most common cause of gastritis. It is strongly implicated in the development of peptic ulcer disease and gastric neoplasms. In the years since its' discovery, much headway has been made in the understanding of this ubiquitous organism that had remained elusive, with much work focused on eradication, in part driven by pharmaceutical research and development. Standard triple therapy emerged to eradicate HP. However, with the emergence of HP resistance, newer regimes have been put forth that include quadruple therapy, sequential therapy and a dizzying array of other combinations bent on eradicating HP. Much less is known about the natural history of HP, the different faces of HP internationally, HP eradication and its effect on gastritis, IM, GU/DU and gastric cancer. This review will address the changing face of HP in 2011.

  17. [Peptic ulcer disease and helicobacter pylori: How we know what we know].

    PubMed

    Scholl, Raphael

    2015-07-01

    The bacterium Helicobacter pylori is one of the main causes of peptic ulcers. But how was this causal relationship demonstrated? A historical and philosophical analysis of a series of studies conducted during the 1980s can elucidate the question. In the beginning, a mere correlation between the newly discovered bacterium and peptic ulcers was found in gastric biopsies. It remained an open question whether the bacterium caused the disease, or whether it constituted merely an opportunistic infection. Yet determining the direction of causality was difficult in the absence of an animal model: Even though gastritis was observed in a courageous self-experiment involving a swallowed bacterial culture, tf!e significance of the individual case was small. The failings of the self-experiment could only be rectified by a randomised, placebo-controlled trial which met the requirements of Koch's third postulate. Moreover, it was necessary to gain an initial understanding of the mechanism by which the causal relationship between H. pylori and peptic ulcers is mediated: How, forexample, does the bacterium survive in the acid environment of the stomach? The study of the case from the perspective of the history and philosophy of science illustrates how medical knowledge is established incrementally.

  18. Computed tomographic findings in penetrating peptic ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Madrazo, B.L.; Halpert, R.D.; Sandler, M.A.; Pearlberg, J.L.

    1984-12-01

    Four cases of peptic ulcer penetrating the head of the pancreas were diagnosed by computed tomography (CT). Findings common to 3 cases included (a) an ulcer crater, (b) a sinus tract, and (c) enlargement of the head of the pancreas. Unlike other modalities, the inherent spatial resolution of CT allows a convenient diagnosis of this important complication of peptic ulcer disease.

  19. A pilot study of Helicobacter pylori genotypes and cytokine gene polymorphisms in reflux oesophagitis and peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Akdogan, R A; Ozgur, O; Gucuyeter, S; Kaklikkaya, N; Cobanoglu, U; Aydin, F

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori causes various diseases such as chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. While majority of the people infected with H. pylori is asymptomatic, 15-20 % of them develop such diseases. The main factors, which determine the development of H. pylori related diseases might be bacterial virulence, host genetic and environmental factors.The aim of this study was to reveal the factors that play a role in the disease development in patients with reflux esophagitis and peptic ulcer, infected with Helicobacter pylori. Environmental factors such as medical agents, smoking and body mass index were evaluated. The factors specific to bacteria such as vacA, CagA, babA and iceA virulence genotypes and the host factors such as IL-1, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, interferon-γ, TNF-α, ve TGF-β1 gene polymorphisms were compared between the two groups.H. pylori infected twenty five patients with reflux esophagitis and peptic ulcer were enrolled in the study. There was no statistical difference between the two groups regarding environmental factors. IL-2 -330T +166T (p=0.037) and IL10 -1082A; -819C (p=0.049) gene polymorphisms were significantly more common in the group of patients with peptic ulcer compared to the group with reflux esophagitis. In both groups of patients, either with reflux esophagitis or peptic ulcer, multiple H. pylori virulence genotypes (cagA, vacA, babA) (mean values 74 %, 78 %, 54 % respectively) were observed.In this study, we revealed that cytokine gene polymorphisms may play a role in the development peptic ulcer while H. pylori virulence genotypes seem to be crucial for the development of associated diseases (Tab. 4, Ref. 51).

  20. Triple gastric peptic ulcer perforation.

    PubMed

    Radojkovic, Milan; Mihajlovic, Suncica; Stojanovic, Miroslav; Stanojevic, Goran; Damnjanovic, Zoran

    2016-03-01

    Patients with advanced or metastatic cancer have compromised nutritional, metabolic, and immune conditions. Nevertheless, little is known about gastroduodenal perforation in cancer patients. Described in the present report is the case of a 41-year old woman with stage IV recurrent laryngeal cancer, who used homeopathic anticancer therapy and who had triple peptic ulcer perforation (PUP) that required surgical repair. Triple gastric PUP is a rare complication. Self-administration of homeopathic anticancer medication should be strongly discouraged when evidence-based data regarding efficacy and toxicity is lacking.

  1. Pediatric non-Helicobacter pylori atrophic gastritis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Pogoriler, Jennifer; Kamin, Daniel; Goldsmith, Jeffrey D

    2015-06-01

    Although autoimmune atrophic gastritis is classically a disease of elderly adults, recent studies have described the disease in younger adults, particularly in those with other autoimmune diseases and iron-deficiency anemia. Atrophic gastritis in pediatrics is a rare and possibly underdiagnosed entity that has been primarily reported as single-case reports. This retrospective study of atrophic gastritis not associated with Helicobacter pylori infection was performed to further expand the knowledge of clinical presentation, pathologic findings, and natural history of this disease in the pediatric population. Twelve patients with a histologic diagnosis of atrophic gastritis were identified, with an age range of 8 months to 18 years. Seven had other autoimmune diseases and/or immunodeficiency. Atrophy was confined to the oxyntic mucosa in 10 patients, with intramucosal inflammation in a diffuse or basal-predominant pattern. Active inflammation was present in 7 patients. Pseudopyloric, intestinal, or squamous/mucinous metaplasia was seen at initial biopsy or on follow-up in 8 patients, and enterochromaffin-like cell hyperplasia was seen in 5. One patient developed an adenocarcinoma during the follow-up period of 10 years. Two false-negative diagnoses were retrospectively identified. In the majority of cases, the possibility of atrophic gastritis was not raised by the submitting physician, and the endoscopic findings were not specific. Therefore, accurate diagnosis requires a high degree of suspicion on the part of the pathologist, and the diagnosis should be considered particularly in patients with a clinical history of other autoimmune diseases or iron-deficiency anemia.

  2. Structure-Based Inhibitors Exhibit Differential Activities against Helicobacter pylori and Escherichia coli Undecaprenyl Pyrophosphate Synthases

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chih-Jung; Guo, Rey-Ting; Lu, I-Lin; Liu, Hun-Ge; Wu, Su-Ying; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Liang, Po-Huang

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human gastric epithelium and causes diseases such as gastritis, peptic ulcers, and stomach cancer. Undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase (UPPS), which catalyzes consecutive condensation reactions of farnesyl pyrophosphate with eight isopentenyl pyrophosphate to form lipid carrier for bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis, represents a potential target for developing new antibiotics. In this study, we solved the crystal structure of H. pylori UPPS and performed virtual screening of inhibitors from a library of 58,635 compounds. Two hits were found to exhibit differential activities against Helicobacter pylori and Escherichia coli UPPS, giving the possibility of developing antibiotics specially targeting pathogenic H. pylori without killing the intestinal E. coli. PMID:18382620

  3. [Efficacy of antacids in the treatment of chronic gastritis].

    PubMed

    Maev, I V; Dicheva, D T; Lebedeva, E G

    2010-01-01

    This article presents main principles of chronic gastritis treatment. Therapeutic abilities and possible side-effects due to components of antacids are analyzed. Special attention is paid to antisecretory and cytoprotective activity of Pepsan-R, which contains haiasulen (the main active component of chamomilla) and dimeticon. The authors of the article emphasize opportunity of using Pepsan-R in case of heartburn, gastric pain, abdominal distention during pregnancy and lactation.

  4. [Efficacy of antacids in the treatment of chronic gastritis].

    PubMed

    Maev, I V; Dicheva, D T; Lebedeva, E G

    2010-01-01

    This article presents main principles of chronic gastritis treatment. Therapeutic abilities and possible side-effects due to components of antacids are analyzed. Special attention is paid to antisecretory and cytoprotective activity of Pepsan-R, which contains haiasulen (the main active component of chamomilla) and dimeticon. The authors of the article emphasize opportunity of using Pepsan-R in case of heartburn, gastric pain, abdominal distention during pregnancy and lactation. PMID:21434380

  5. Complications of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Milosavljevic, Tomica; Kostić-Milosavljević, Mirjana; Jovanović, Ivan; Krstić, Miodrag

    2011-01-01

    There are four major complications of peptic ulcer disease (PUD): bleeding, perforation, penetration, and obstruction. Complications can occur in patients with peptic ulcer of any etiology. Despite improvements in the medical management and the lower overall incidence of PUD, there are conflicting data about the incidence of potentially life-threatening ulcer complications. There are important time trends embedded within this stable overall rate of complications: the dramatic decline in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (comparing the cohort born from 1900 to 1920 to cohorts born after 1940); an increased use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and an increased rate of ulcer complications related to such drug use, especially in the elderly. As a result of these trends, ulcer complications are on the rise in older patients but on the decline in younger individuals. Hemorrhage is the most frequent PUD complication and its incidence is increasing in comparison to perforation and stenosis. Therapeutic endoscopy is considered the treatment of choice for bleeding ulcers, reducing the need for emergent surgical procedures to 10-20% of the cases. In recent years, besides the success of angiographic embolization, the containment of massive hemorrhage must also be taken into account. Transcatheter arterial embolization is also an effective and safe treatment in patients with duodenal ulcers re-bleeding after therapeutic endoscopy or surgery.

  6. The prevalence of lymphoid follicles in Helicobacter pylori associated gastritis in patients with ulcers and non-ulcer dyspepsia.

    PubMed Central

    Zaitoun, A M

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To determine the prevalence of lymphoid follicles in Helicobacter pylori positive and negative gastritis in antral and body type gastric mucosa in patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD), duodenal ulcer, or gastric ulcer; to correlate follicle presence with patient age; to evaluate the correlation between the prevalence of lymphoid follicles and active and inactive gastritis and its severity; and to assess the positive predictive value of lymphoid follicle prevalence with respect to H pylori infection. METHODS--Gastric biopsy specimens, graded according to the Sydney system, from 337 patients were studied. RESULTS--Lymphoid follicles occurred more often in antral mucosa (78%) than in body type mucosa (41%) and were observed in 85% of patients with H pylori positive gastritis. There was no significant difference between NUD and gastric and duodenal ulcer disease with regard to the presence of lymphoid follicles. The positive predictive value of the presence of lymphoid follicles in H pylori infection was 96%. Lymphoid follicles were more commonly observed in patients aged between 10 and 29 years. Lymphoid follicles were more frequently found in pangastritis of all subtypes than in antral gastritis and also in active gastritis than in inactive gastritis. The presence of lymphoid follicles correlated strongly with the degree and severity of gastritis. CONCLUSION--Lymphoid follicles are a constant morphological feature of H pylori associated gastritis. Images PMID:7615851

  7. Detection of Helicobacter spp. in the saliva of dogs with gastritis.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, M; Spużak, J; Kubiak, K; Glińska-Suchocka, K; Biernat, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the species and determine the prevalence of gastric Helicobacter in the saliva of dogs with gastritis. The study was carried out on 30 dogs of different breeds, genders and ages, which were diagnosed with gastritis. The nested-PCR method was used to detect Helicobacter spp. in saliva. Helicobacter bacteria were found in the saliva samples of 23 (76.6%) dogs. Helicobacter heilmannii was the most commonly detected species of gastric Helicobacter spp. in canine saliva, and was found in 22 (73.3%) cases. The results indicate that gastric Helicobacter spp. occurs relatively frequently in dogs with gastritis. Moreover, the saliva of dogs with gastritis may be a source of Helicobacter spp. infection for humans and other animals. However, further studies are needed to confirm this finding as the PCR method does not distinguish active from inactive infections. PMID:27096797

  8. Detection of Helicobacter spp. in the saliva of dogs with gastritis.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, M; Spużak, J; Kubiak, K; Glińska-Suchocka, K; Biernat, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the species and determine the prevalence of gastric Helicobacter in the saliva of dogs with gastritis. The study was carried out on 30 dogs of different breeds, genders and ages, which were diagnosed with gastritis. The nested-PCR method was used to detect Helicobacter spp. in saliva. Helicobacter bacteria were found in the saliva samples of 23 (76.6%) dogs. Helicobacter heilmannii was the most commonly detected species of gastric Helicobacter spp. in canine saliva, and was found in 22 (73.3%) cases. The results indicate that gastric Helicobacter spp. occurs relatively frequently in dogs with gastritis. Moreover, the saliva of dogs with gastritis may be a source of Helicobacter spp. infection for humans and other animals. However, further studies are needed to confirm this finding as the PCR method does not distinguish active from inactive infections.

  9. Laparoscopic Peptic Ulcer Perforation Closure: the Preferred Choice.

    PubMed

    Shah, Franal H; Mehta, Sudhir G; Gandhi, Mona D; Saraj

    2015-12-01

    Peptic ulcer perforation is a common life-threatening emergency needing immediate intervention. Laparoscopic closure of perforation is now widely practiced over conventional open closure. This study aimed to compare laparoscopic peptic ulcer perforation closure with conventional open closure in terms of operative time, postoperative analgesia, complications, hospital stay, and return to routine activities. This unicentric, nonblinded, prospective, randomized study was carried out in 50 patients with peptic ulcer perforation who were randomly allocated to undergo either laparoscopic closure or open closure surgery with 25 patients in each group. The mean operative time (60 vs 90 min) was less in the laparoscopic group (p < 0.05). Postoperative analgesia requirements (1 vs 6 days) were also less in laparoscopic patients (p < 0.05). Complications (nil vs 6; p < 0.05) and hospital stay (3 vs 8 days) were less in laparoscopic patients (p < 0.05). Patients return to normal activities (5 vs 10 days; p < 0.05) earlier in laparoscopic perforation closure than in open closure. Our study has shown better outcomes and lesser morbidities with laparoscopic approach in terms of shorter operative time, shorter hospital stay, less analgesic requirements, and less wound infections. Patients also return to routine activities earlier with the laparoscopic approach. It is a safe alternative to open surgery and should be a preferred choice when there are no contraindications to laparoscopy.

  10. Photocoagulation in the treatment of bleeding peptic ulcer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Wlodzimierz; Paczkowski, Pawel M.

    1996-03-01

    The authors present their experience in the endoscopic laser photocoagulation of bleeding peptic ulcer. From 1991 to June 1995, 203 patients admitted for UGI bleeding from peptic ulcer have been treated by this method. The source of bleeding was confirmed by endoscopy. The patients were divided into two groups: actively bleeding peptic ulcer (group IA and IB according to Forrest's classification) and ulcer with stigmata of recent bleeding (group IIA/IIB). The former group consisted of 106 patients, among whom over 40 percent (45 patients) presented signs of hypovolemic shock on admission. Nd:YAG laser (Surgical Laser Technologies) was used in a continuous mode with a contact (8 - 20 watts) or non-contact (over 50 watts) method of coagulation. In actively bleeding patients photocoagulation resulted in stopping the hemorrhage in 95 (90%). Recurrent bleeding occurred in 16 cases; in 9 of them it was stopped by repeated photocoagulation. In this group 18 patients required surgical intervention. The mortality was of 10.3% (11 patients). In 97 patients with recent bleeding stigmata photocoagulation provoked heavy hemorrhage in 3 (in 2 cases stopped by prolonged coagulation). In 9 of the remaining 94 patients recurrent bleeding occurred. Nine patients required surgical intervention. Mortality in this group was of 6%.

  11. Prostaglandins, H2-receptor antagonists and peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Bright-Asare, P; Habte, T; Yirgou, B; Benjamin, J

    1988-01-01

    Peptic ulcer develops when offensive factors overwhelm defensive processes in the gastroduodenal mucosa. Offensive factors include NSAIDs, hydrochloric acid-peptic activity, bile reflux, and some products of the lipoxygenase pathway such as leukotriene B4; whereas defensive processes are largely mediated by prostaglandins through poorly understood mechanisms uniformly termed cytoprotection. Cytoprotection, a physiological process working through the products of arachidonic acid metabolism, may result from the net effect of the protective actions of prostaglandins versus the damaging actions of leukotrienes. Some prostaglandins also have antisecretory effects. Therefore the peptic ulcer healing effects of prostaglandin analogues, all of which have significant antisecretory activity, may be more due to their antisecretory effects than primarily to their effects on mucosal defences. Certain drug-induced gastroduodenal lesions, e.g. NSAID-induced ulcers, which are often unresponsive to H2-receptor antagonists, have been healed and their recurrence prevented by the use of PGE1 and PGE2 analogues. All the prostaglandin analogues investigated to date in humans have the potential for inducing abortion, an important side effect which may limit their worldwide use. The optimal prostaglandin analogue for ulcer healing should not induce abortion and should be potently cytoprotective. The predominant damaging agent in the development of peptic ulcer disease is gastric hydrochloric acid. Thus, the worldwide established efficacy and safety of H2-receptor antagonists such as cimetidine, ranitidine, famotidine and most recently of roxatidine acetate suggest that these agents have become the standard by which other forms of anti-ulcer therapy should be judged. PMID:2905237

  12. Collagenous gastritis associated with lymphocytic colitis.

    PubMed

    Groisman, G M; Meyers, S; Harpaz, N

    1996-03-01

    Collagenous sprue and collagenous colitis are two well-recognized idiopathic enteritides whose defining histologic attribute is fibrous thickening of the subepithelial basement membrane. Analogous changes in gastric mucosa seem to be quite rare. The term "collagenous gastritis" was recently applied for the first time to an isolated case of refractory gastritis in which distinctive subepithelial gastric fibrosis was noted. We report an additional case of this entity in a 35-year-old woman with refractory dyspepsia. In contrast to the earlier case of collagenous gastritis, our patient also had lymphocytic colitis, a type of colitis associated with watery diarrhea. Collagenous gastritis appears to be a distinct clinicopathologic entity, the histologic changes of which should be sought in patients with unexplained dyspepsia. Increased awareness of this condition and its possible clinical correlates may provide clues to its etiology and pathogenesis. PMID:8742654

  13. Treatment of gastritis in cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus).

    PubMed

    Wack, R F; Eaton, K A; Kramer, L W

    1997-09-01

    Three cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) had a clinical history of chronic spiral bacteria-associated gastritis and three cheetahs had no clinical history of gastritis. Gastric biopsies were obtained from all six cheetahs prior to treatment for gastritis and 3 wk and 1 yr posttreatment. The cheetahs were treated with tetracycline hydrochloride 500 mg p.o. q.i.d., metronidazole 250 mg p.o. q.i.d., and bismuth subsalicylate 300 mg p.o. q.i.d. Each drug was administered concurrently for 7 days. Following this treatment, each cheetah was maintained on 300 mg bismuth subsalicylate p.o. s.i.d. for 1 yr. The three cheetahs with a history of gastritis were culture positive for Helicobacter acinonyx and remained positive during the entire study. The three cheetahs with no clinical history of gastritis were culture negative for H. acinonyx, but gastric biopsies revealed Gastrospirillum-like bacteria (tentatively named Helicobacter heilmannii) pretreatment. Gastric biopsies were negative for H. heilmannii on subsequent examinations. Although the treatment did not eradicate H. acinonyx, it did provide symptomatic relief from the vomiting, anorexia, and weight loss associated with clinical gastritis. The use of endoscopically guided gastric mucosal biopsies for urease testing and histopathologic examination of Warthin-Starry-stained sections is a sensitive and specific method of diagnosing spiral bacteria-associated gastritis. Treatment of spiral bacteria-associated gastritis in cheetahs should include the rational use of antibiotics (tetracycline or amoxicillin and metronidazole), bismuth compounds, and omeprazole and evaluation of husbandry methods to reduce stress.

  14. Carbon-14 urea breath test for the diagnosis of Campylobacter pylori associated gastritis

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, B.J.; Surveyor, I.

    1988-01-01

    Urease in the human gastric mucosa is a marker for infection with Campylobacter pylori (CP), an organism suspected of causing chronic gastritis and peptic ulceration. To detect gastric urease, we examined 32 patients who were being evaluated for possible peptic ulcer disease. Fasting patients were given 10 microCi (370 kBq) of /sup 14/C-labeled urea. Breath samples were collected in hyamine at intervals between 1 and 30 min. The amount of /sup 14/C collected at these times was expressed as: body weight X (% of administered dose of /sup 14/C in sample)/(mmol of CO/sub 2/ collected). The presence of C. pylori colonization was also determined by examination of multiple endoscopic gastric biopsy specimens. On average, patients who were proven to have C. pylori infection exhaled 20 times more labeled CO/sub 2/ than patients who were not infected. The difference between infected patients and C. pylori negative control patients was highly significant at all time points between 2 and 30 min after ingestion of the radionuclide (p less than 0.0001). The noninvasive urea breath is less expensive than endoscopic biopsy of the stomach and more accurate than serology as a means of detecting Campylobacter pylori infection. Because the test detects actual viable CP organisms, it can be used to confirm eradication of the bacterium after antibacterial therapy.

  15. Collagenous gastritis: a report of six cases.

    PubMed

    Lagorce-Pages, C; Fabiani, B; Bouvier, R; Scoazec, J Y; Durand, L; Flejou, J F

    2001-09-01

    Collagenous gastritis is an exceptional entity with eight cases documented to date characterized by the presence of a thick subepithelial collagen band associated with an inflammatory infiltrate of the gastric mucosa. The aim of our study was to describe the clinical and histologic characteristics of six new cases of collagenous gastritis. All cases showed a subepithelial collagen band that averaged 30 microm but often measured up to 120 microm. This finding was almost always accompanied by mixed chronic inflammation in the lamina propria and by surface epithelial damage of varying severity. Our study seems to delineate two subsets in patients with collagenous gastritis: 1) collagenous gastritis occurring in children and young adults presenting with severe anemia, a nodular pattern on endoscopy, and a disease limited to the gastric mucosa without evidence of colonic involvement, and 2) collagenous gastritis associated with collagenous colitis occurring in adult patients presenting with chronic watery diarrhea. These findings highlight the fact that subepithelial collagen deposition may be a generalized disease affecting the entire gastrointestinal tract. PMID:11688577

  16. Phlegmonous Gastritis with Early Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Hee; Kim, Young-Woo; Moon, Hae; Choi, Jee Eun; Cho, Soo-Jeong; Lee, Jong Yeul; Choi, Il Ju

    2016-01-01

    Phlegmonous gastritis is a rare and rapidly progressive bacterial infection of the stomach wall, with a high mortality rate. Antibiotics with or without surgical treatment are required for treatment. We present a case in which phlegmonous gastritis occurred during the diagnostic evaluation of early gastric cancer. The patient showed improvement after antibiotic treatment, but attempted endoscopic submucosal dissection failed because of submucosal pus. We immediately applied argon plasma coagulation since surgical resection was also considered a high-risk procedure because of the submucosal pus and multiple comorbidities. However, there was local recurrence two years later, and the patient underwent subtotal gastrectomy with lymph node dissection. Considering the risk of incomplete treatment immediately after recovery from phlegmonous gastritis and that recurrent disease can be more difficult to manage, delaying treatment and evaluation until after complete recovery of PG might be a better option in this particular clinical situation. PMID:27752398

  17. [Severe hemorrhagic gastritis of radiation origin].

    PubMed

    Flobert, C; Cellier, C; Landi, B; Berger, A; Durdux, C; Palazzo, L; Carnot, F; Cugnenc, P H; Barbier, J P

    1998-02-01

    Severe gastric complications due to radiotherapy are uncommon, in particular hemorrhagic gastritis. A high total dose and, above all, high daily fraction appear to be the main risk factors in gastric injuries. A case of hemorrhagic gastritis induced by radiotherapy requesting a total gastrectomy is reported. The patient was treated for a primary gastric non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Hemorrhagic gastritis occurred despite a low total dose (40 Gy) and 2 Gy daily fractions. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and repeated biopsies are usually insufficient to exclude a tumor recurrence. Endoscopic ultrasonography may argue for a recurrence or for radiation lesions. As the conservative treatment is usually ineffective, these gastrointestinal radiation injuries ought to be treated surgically. Besides it allows to ascertain the benign nature of radiation lesions. PMID:9762196

  18. Characterization of the gastric immune response in cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) with Helicobacter-associated gastritis.

    PubMed

    Terio, K A; Munson, L; Moore, P F

    2012-09-01

    Captive cheetahs have an unusually severe progressive gastritis that is not present in wild cheetahs infected with the same strains of Helicobacter. This gastritis, when severe, has florid lymphocyte and plasma cell infiltrates in the epithelium and lamina propria with gland destruction, parietal cell loss, and, in some cases, lymphoid follicles. The local gastric immune response was characterized by immunohistochemistry in 21 cheetahs with varying degrees of gastritis. The character of the response was similar among types of gastritis except that cheetahs with severe gastritis had increased numbers (up to 70%) of lamina proprial CD79a+CD21- B cells. CD3+CD4+ T cells were present in the lamina propria, and CD3+CD8α+ T cells were within the glandular epithelium. Lymphoid aggregates had follicular differentiation with a central core of CD79a+/CD45R+ B cells and with an outer zone of CD3+ T cells that expressed both CD4 and CD8 antigens. MHC II antigens were diffusely expressed throughout the glandular and superficial epithelium. No cheetah had evidence of autoantibodies against the gastric mucosa when gastric samples from 30 cheetahs with different degrees of gastritis were incubated with autologous and heterologous serum. These findings indicate that T-cell distribution in cheetahs is qualitatively similar to that in other species infected with Helicobacter but that large numbers of lamina propria activated B cells and plasma cells did distinguish cheetahs with severe gastritis. Further research is needed to determine whether alterations in the Th1:Th2 balance are the cause of this more plasmacytic response in some cheetahs.

  19. Therapeutic effects of sofalcone on experimental gastritis.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, S; Okamoto, K; Kambara, A; Kajiyama, G; Miyoshi, A; Suwa, T

    1987-08-01

    A study was made on the therapeutic effects of sofalcone (SU-88), an antiulcer agent, on erosive and atrophic gastritis induced experimentally by 6-month administration of 5 mmol/l of sodium taurocholate (TCA) in rats. A standard meal including sofalcone of 0.25% and 1.0% shortened the total length of erosions, normalized the mucosal thickness, and reduced collagenous fibers in the gastric mucosa in one month. The doses administered were 116.3 mg and 486.1 mg/kg/week for one month. Sofalcone, thus, had a good therapeutic effect on experimental erosive and atrophic gastritis in rats. PMID:3675690

  20. Endoscopic management of acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yidan; Chen, Yen-I; Barkun, Alan

    2014-12-01

    This review discusses the indications, technical aspects, and comparative effectiveness of the endoscopic treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by peptic ulcer. Pre-endoscopic considerations, such as the use of prokinetics and timing of endoscopy, are reviewed. In addition, this article examines aspects of postendoscopic care such as the effectiveness, dosing, and duration of postendoscopic proton-pump inhibitors, Helicobacter pylori testing, and benefits of treatment in terms of preventing rebleeding; and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiplatelet agents, and oral anticoagulants, including direct thrombin and Xa inhibitors, following acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

  1. [Peptic ulcer surgery in the aged].

    PubMed

    Michel, D

    1981-04-01

    Particular problems are discussed in 257 patients over 75 years of age, who were treated for peptic ulcer disease between 1960 and 1979. In elderly patients the peptic ulcer is complicated, often requiring emergency surgery. A special problem in the aged is simultaneous appearance of various sicknesses, which produces further complications. The chosen method of surgery is described and the post-operative period and its general and surgical problems are discussed. The result is a concept of indication for surgery, particularly for the elective operation of chronic ulcers not responding to therapy, before the ulcer becomes complicated. PMID:7227008

  2. Autoimmune gastritis: Pathologist’s viewpoint

    PubMed Central

    Coati, Irene; Fassan, Matteo; Farinati, Fabio; Graham, David Y; Genta, Robert M; Rugge, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Western countries are seeing a constant decline in the incidence of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis, coupled with a rising epidemiological and clinical impact of autoimmune gastritis. This latter gastropathy is due to autoimmune aggression targeting parietal cells through a complex interaction of auto-antibodies against the parietal cell proton pump and intrinsic factor, and sensitized T cells. Given the specific target of this aggression, autoimmune gastritis is typically restricted to the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa. In advanced cases, the oxyntic epithelia are replaced by atrophic (and metaplastic) mucosa, creating the phenotypic background in which both gastric neuroendocrine tumors and (intestinal-type) adenocarcinomas may develop. Despite improvements in our understanding of the phenotypic changes or cascades occurring in this autoimmune setting, no reliable biomarkers are available for identifying patients at higher risk of developing a gastric neoplasm. The standardization of autoimmune gastritis histology reports and classifications in diagnostic practice is a prerequisite for implementing definitive secondary prevention strategies based on multidisciplinary diagnostic approaches integrating endoscopy, serology, histology and molecular profiling. PMID:26576102

  3. Collagenous gastritis: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Ravikumara, Madhur; Ramani, Pramila; Spray, Christine H

    2007-08-01

    In this article, we report a case of collagenous gastritis in a child and review the paediatric cases reported to date. Collagenous gastritis is a rare entity, with only less than 30 cases reported so far, including 12 children, since the first description of this entity by Colletti and Trainer in 1989. This is a histological diagnosis characterised by a dramatically thickened subepithelial collagen band in the gastric mucosa associated with an inflammatory infiltrate. Children with this condition often present with epigastric pain and severe anaemia, with no evidence of extragastric involvement, in contrast to the adult patients, where chronic watery diarrhoea is the main presentation due to associated collagenous colitis. A macroscopic pattern of gastritis with nodularity of gastric mucosa, erythema and erosions are characteristic endoscopic findings in paediatric patients. Specific therapy has not been established and resolution of the abnormalities, either endoscopic or histological, has not been documented. In conclusion, collagenous gastritis is a rare entity of unknown aetiology, pathogenesis and prognosis. Gastroenterologists and pathologists need to be aware of this condition when evaluating a child with epigastric pain, anaemia and upper gastrointestinal bleeding, particularly when endoscopy reveals the nodularity of gastric mucosa. The identification, reporting and long-term follow-up of cases will shed more light on this puzzling condition. PMID:17453238

  4. Vagotomy and double pyloroplasty for peptic ulcer.

    PubMed Central

    Hines, J R; Geurkink, R E; Kornmesser, T A; Wikholm, L; Davis, R P

    1975-01-01

    Seventy patients with peptic ulcers (55 duodenal and 15 gastric) were treated by truncal vagotomy and doulbe pyloroplasty during the past four years. Clinical and experimental data as presented lead us to believe that transecting the pylorus twice produces an incontinent pyloric sphincter and a larger gastric outlet than is found in other methods of pyloroplasty. This decreases gastric stasis and has led to a lower ulcer recurrence rate (1.5%). In addition the untoward postoperative sequelae are minimal. The 70 patients treated (for the most pare consecutive cases) exhibited the usual complications of peptic ulcer disease. Thirty-three had intractable pain, 23 bleeding (15 massive), 13 obstruction, and one acute perforation. There were no operative or postoperative deaths and the only serious postoperative complication was unrelated to the double pyloroplasty. During the followup period four patients have died of unrelated diseases. Of the remaining 66 patients one developed a probable recurrent peptic ulcer which has responded to medical management. Four patients have intermittent dumping, three have mild diarrhea and one has failed to gain weight, Constipation and weight gain are more common complaints. It would appear that vagotomy with double pyloroplasty is a safe and effective operation for peptic ulcers and that further clinical trials are warranted. PMID:1119866

  5. Symptoms and Causes of Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ulcer Disease Next: Diagnosis of Peptic Ulcer Disease Digestive Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients and medical professionals. View the full list of Digestive Disease Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ NIH...Turning Discovery ...

  6. Definition and Facts for Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next: Symptoms and Causes of Peptic Ulcer Disease Digestive Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients and medical professionals. View the full list of Digestive Disease Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ NIH...Turning Discovery ...

  7. Acid peptic diseases: pharmacological approach to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mejia, Alex; Kraft, Walter K

    2011-01-01

    Acid peptic disorders are the result of distinctive, but overlapping pathogenic mechanisms leading to either excessive acid secretion or diminished mucosal defense. They are common entities present in daily clinical practice that, owing to their chronicity, represent a significant cost to healthcare. Key elements in the success of controlling these entities have been the development of potent and safe drugs based on physiological targets. The histamine-2 receptor antagonists revolutionized the treatment of acid peptic disorders owing to their safety and efficacy profile. The proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) represent a further therapeutic advance due to more potent inhibition of acid secretion. Ample data from clinical trials and observational experience have confirmed the utility of these agents in the treatment of acid peptic diseases, with differential efficacy and safety characteristics between and within drug classes. Paradigms in their speed and duration of action have underscored the need for new chemical entities that, from a single dose, would provide reliable duration of acid control, particularly at night. Moreover, PPIs reduce, but do not eliminate, the risk of ulcers in patients taking NSAIDs, reflecting untargeted physiopathologic pathways and a breach in the ability to sustain an intragastric pH of more than 4. This review provides an assessment of the current understanding of the physiology of acid production, a discussion of medications targeting gastric acid production and a review of efficacy in specific acid peptic diseases, as well as current challenges and future directions in the treatment of acid-mediated diseases. PMID:21822447

  8. Perforated peptic ulcer: how to improve outcome?

    PubMed

    Møller, Morten Hylander; Adamsen, Sven; Wøjdemann, Morten; Møller, Ann Merete

    2009-01-01

    Despite the introduction of histamine H2-receptor antagonists, proton-pump inhibitors and the discovery of Helicobacter pylori, both the incidence of emergency surgery for perforated peptic ulcer and the mortality rate for patients undergoing surgery for peptic ulcer perforation have increased. This increase has occurred despite improvements in perioperative treatment and monitoring. To improve the outcome of these patients, it is necessary to investigate the reasons behind this high mortality rate. In this review we evaluate the existing evidence in order to identify significant risk factors with an emphasis on risks that are preventable. A systematic review including randomized studies was carried out. There are a limited number of studies of patients with peptic ulcer perforation. Most of these studies are of low evident status. Only a few randomized, controlled trials have been published. The mortality rate and the extent of postoperative complications are fairly high but the reasons for this have not been thoroughly explained, even though a number of risk factors have been identified. Some of these risk factors can be explained by the septic state of the patient on admission. In order to improve the outcome of patients with peptic ulcer perforation, sepsis needs to be factored into the existing knowledge and treatment.

  9. Experimental gastritis in mice enhances anxiety in a gender-related manner.

    PubMed

    Painsipp, E; Wultsch, T; Shahbazian, A; Edelsbrunner, M; Kreissl, M C; Schirbel, A; Bock, E; Pabst, M A; Thoeringer, C K; Huber, H P; Holzer, P

    2007-12-12

    There is a gender-related comorbidity of pain-related and inflammatory bowel diseases with psychiatric diseases. Since the impact of experimental gastrointestinal inflammation on the emotional-affective behavior is little known, we examined whether experimental gastritis modifies anxiety, stress coping and circulating corticosterone in male and female Him:OF1 mice. Gastritis was induced by adding iodoacetamide (0.1%) to the drinking water for at least 7 days. Inflammation was assessed by gastric histology and myeloperoxidase activity, circulating corticosterone determined by enzyme immunoassay, anxiety-related behavior evaluated with the elevated plus maze and stress-induced hyperthermia tests, and depression-like behavior estimated with the tail suspension test. Iodoacetamide-induced gastritis was associated with gastric mucosal surface damage and an increase in gastric myeloperoxidase activity, this increase being significantly larger in female mice than in male mice. The rectal temperature of male mice treated with iodoacetamide was enhanced, whereas that of female mice was diminished. The circulating levels of corticosterone were reduced by 65% in female mice treated with iodoacetamide but did not significantly change in male mice. On the behavioral level, iodoacetamide treatment caused a decrease in nocturnal home-cage activity, drinking and feeding. While depression-related behavior remained unaltered following induction of gastritis, behavioral indices of anxiety were significantly enhanced in female but not male mice. There was no correlation between the estrous cycle and anxiety as well as circulating corticosterone. Radiotracer experiments revealed that iodoacetamide did not readily enter the brain, the blood-brain ratio being 20:1. Collectively, these data show that iodoacetamide treatment causes gastritis in a gender-related manner, its severity being significantly greater in female than in male mice. The induction of gastritis in female mice is

  10. [Aggressive factors in the physiopathology of peptic ulcer. Recent findings].

    PubMed

    Testino, G

    1996-06-01

    The peptic ulcer (PU) is characterized by definite gastric cyto-secretory profiles. In case of duodenal ulcer (DU) and pre-pyloric gastric ulcer (PPGU), there is a prevalence of hyperparietalism with hyperchloridria, while in ulcer with body-fundic localization (BFGU) normo-hypoparietalism with normo-hypochloridria prevails. As well, the total peptic activity follows a superimposable course: it increases in cases of DU and PPGU, while it remains in the normal range in case of BFGU. With reference to the qualitative variations of pepsin, in course of PU the amount of pepsin 1 increases significantly. Such pepsin has a powerful proteolytic action even at high pH: which explains the possible onset of PU even in hypochloridria conditions. Helicobacter pylori (HP) has revolutionized the pathogenetic approach towards the gastric pathology: in 75% of cases there are alterations of the mucosae superficial profile, micropapillary changes, erosions, vacuolations with cellular degeneration. In 90% of cases is present chronic active inflammation in correspondence of the glandular neck of the gastric epithelium. In 70% of cases of BFGU there are qualitative alterations of the superficial epithelium. The gastric anatomic-functional behaviour, however, has an autonomous course and it is not influenced by the presence of infection. It results, therefore, that the bacterium is an important cofactor in PU pathogenesis by means of a direct cytotoxic-enzymatic action, without influencing a secretory behaviour which, in PU, is substantially conditioned by the genetic characteristics of the patient.

  11. Collagenous gastritis: histopathologic features and association with other gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Leung, Stanley T; Chandan, Vishal S; Murray, Joseph A; Wu, Tsung-Teh

    2009-05-01

    Collagenous gastritis (CG) characterized by the deposition of a subepithelial collagen band and accompanying inflammatory infiltrate is a rare disorder. The natural history and pathogenesis of CG remain unclear. We describe the histologic features (23 gastric, 18 duodenal, and 4 colonic biopsies) and clinical findings of an additional 12 cases. Histologic features including active or chronic inflammation, surface epithelial injury, intraepithelial lymphocytosis, intestinal metaplasia, and Helicobacter pylori, and measurement of thickness of subepithelial collagenous band were evaluated in gastric biopsies. The clinical features, endoscopic findings, and follow-up were obtained and correlated with histologic features. There was an even number of males (n=6) and females (n=6). Four patients were children/young adults, 3 of whom (75%) presented with anemia and gastric nodularity. Eight patients were adults, 6 of whom (75%) had an associated autoimmune disease (1 with Hashimoto thyroiditis and polymyositis) or other intestinal disease (3 with celiac sprue, 1 with collagenous colitis, 1 with collagenous sprue), in contrast to none in the 4 children/young adults, P=0.06. The range of subepithelial collagen thickness was 15 to 120 microm in CG. The collagenous layer showed surface epithelial injury and entrapped inflammatory cells. On presentation, the thickened collagen distribution in the antrum and body was variably patchy and diffuse. Four (33%) patients showed lymphocytic gastritis (3 within the same biopsy); one of these patients also had celiac sprue and another had collagenous sprue. Three (25%) patients had celiac sprue (2 had duodenal biopsy proven and 1 had a clinical diagnosis of celiac sprue). An additional patient had duodenal biopsies showing collagenous sprue. Four patients had follow-up biopsies during a 3 to 119-month period after the diagnosis of CG. CG persisted on the follow-up gastric biopsies in 3 (75%) of the 4 patients, and the other patient had

  12. Spontaneous enterogastric reflux gastritis and esophagitis.

    PubMed Central

    Gowen, G F

    1985-01-01

    Enterogastric reflux gastritis and esophagitis is best known after gastric resections and pyloroplasty but it also occurs spontaneously in the nonoperated patient. Forty-two patients are presented who meet the criteria for the diagnosis: constant burning epigastric pain, worse after meals, unrelieved by antacids and diet; endoscopic demonstration of a gastric bile pool; endoscopic biopsy proof of gastritis and esophagitis; and hypochlorhydria. Patients with mild and moderate stages of the disease can benefit from metoclopramide therapy which improves the gastric emptying mechanism. Of the surgical patients with intractable symptoms, 90% were women, 90% had marked hypochlorhydria, 83% had biliary disease, current or remote, and 50% had anemia. With vagotomy, antrectomy, and Roux-Y anastomosis 45-60 cm downstream, the clinical response has been most encouraging. PMID:3970596

  13. Animal model of human disease: lymphocytic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Rubio, C A; Jarlnäs, M; Johnson, L

    1993-01-01

    Gastric specimens from 102 belonging to 11 different species were reviewed. Of the 11 species, only the gastric mucosa of pigs contained a large number of lymphocytes in the surface and in the foveolar epithelium (mean 82 lymphocytes/1000 epithelial cells, range 62-128 lymphocytes. The gastric specimens of the remaining 10 species revealed none or occasional lymphocytes in the surface or the foveolar epithelium. The occurrence of intraepithelial lymphocytes in the gastric mucosa of pigs mimics the human disease known as "lymphocytic gastritis". Since the etiology of this disease remains unknown, the apparently endemic nature of lymphocytic gastritis in pigs offer an alternative to investigate the possible cause(s), as well as the mechanism of, this disease.

  14. Collagenous gastritis in a young Japanese woman.

    PubMed

    Kajino, Yuri; Kushima, Ryoji; Koyama, Shigeki; Fujiyama, Yoshihide; Okabe, Hidetoshi

    2003-03-01

    Collagenous gastritis, a counterpart of collagenous colitis, is a rare disorder with less than 20 cases reported in the literature. A case of collagenous gastritis in a Japanese woman in her early 20s who had been receiving treatment for atopic dermatitis and bronchial asthma is reported. The patient complained of repeated epigastric pain, and endoscopy revealed multifocal atrophic areas and scars in the gastric body. Biopsy specimens showed a thickened eosinophilic band-like structure with entrapped capillaries approximately 30-70 micro m thick beneath the surface epithelium. It was regarded as a collagen band because it was positive on Azan staining but negative on amyloid staining. This finding was accompanied by marked infiltration of mononuclear cells and eosinophils in the lamina propria; however, no evidence of lymphocytic gastritis was found. Helicobacter pylori infection was not detected and inflammatory cell infiltration was minimal in the mucosa without the collagen band. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the band was positive for type III and type VI collagen. The size of the collagen band did not change for 2 years. These findings suggest that subepithelial collagen deposition was due to an abnormal local immune response based on generalized allergic disorder. PMID:12608899

  15. Collagenous gastritis: reports and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Brain, Oliver; Rajaguru, Chandima; Warren, Bryan; Booth, Jonathan; Travis, Simon

    2009-12-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare disorder first described in 1989. After encountering two cases, we decided to review the literature and evaluate the collagen band. A systematic review of PubMed and EMBASE databases was performed. Twenty-eight cases have been previously described and two patterns of presentations are identifiable: children or young adults (median age 12 years, range 2-22 years) presenting with symptoms attributable to the gastritis (anaemia and pain); and older adults (median age 52 years, range 35-77 years) presenting with loose stools, often associated with collagenous colitis or coeliac disease. Our two cases (one child and one adult) matched this pattern. Immunostaining of the collagen band for collagens II, III, IV and VI, and tenascin showed that the band in our cases was predominantly tenascin. In conclusion, collagenous gastritis is a rare entity whose presentation depends on the age of the patient. An autoimmune aetiology seems possible given its associations. Treatment is empirical. The 30 cases now reported show that the disorder can relapse or persist for years. PMID:19730387

  16. Chronic atrophic gastritis in association with hair mercury level.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zeyun; Xue, Huiping; Jiang, Jianlan; Lin, Bing; Zeng, Si; Huang, Xiaoyun; An, Jianfu

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to explore hair mercury level in association with chronic atrophic gastritis, a precancerous stage of gastric cancer (GC), and thus provide a brand new angle of view on the timely intervention of precancerous stage of GC. We recruited 149 healthy volunteers as controls and 152 patients suffering from chronic gastritis as cases. The controls denied upper gastrointestinal discomforts, and the cases were diagnosed as chronic superficial gastritis (n=68) or chronic atrophic gastritis (n=84). We utilized Mercury Automated Analyzer (NIC MA-3000) to detect hair mercury level of both healthy controls and cases of chronic gastritis. The statistic of measurement data was expressed as mean ± standard deviation, which was analyzed using Levene variance equality test and t test. Pearson correlation analysis was employed to determine associated factors affecting hair mercury levels, and multiple stepwise regression analysis was performed to deduce regression equations. Statistical significance is considered if p value is less than 0.05. The overall hair mercury level was 0.908949 ± 0.8844490 ng/g [mean ± standard deviation (SD)] in gastritis cases and 0.460198 ± 0.2712187 ng/g (mean±SD) in healthy controls; the former level was significantly higher than the latter one (p=0.000<0.01). The hair mercury level in chronic atrophic gastritis subgroup was 1.155220 ± 0.9470246 ng/g (mean ± SD) and that in chronic superficial gastritis subgroup was 0.604732 ± 0.6942509 ng/g (mean ± SD); the former level was significantly higher than the latter level (p<0.01). The hair mercury level in chronic superficial gastritis cases was significantly higher than that in healthy controls (p<0.05). The hair mercury level in chronic atrophic gastritis cases was significantly higher than that in healthy controls (p<0.01). Stratified analysis indicated that the hair mercury level in healthy controls with eating seafood was significantly higher than that in healthy

  17. Chronic atrophic gastritis in association with hair mercury level.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zeyun; Xue, Huiping; Jiang, Jianlan; Lin, Bing; Zeng, Si; Huang, Xiaoyun; An, Jianfu

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to explore hair mercury level in association with chronic atrophic gastritis, a precancerous stage of gastric cancer (GC), and thus provide a brand new angle of view on the timely intervention of precancerous stage of GC. We recruited 149 healthy volunteers as controls and 152 patients suffering from chronic gastritis as cases. The controls denied upper gastrointestinal discomforts, and the cases were diagnosed as chronic superficial gastritis (n=68) or chronic atrophic gastritis (n=84). We utilized Mercury Automated Analyzer (NIC MA-3000) to detect hair mercury level of both healthy controls and cases of chronic gastritis. The statistic of measurement data was expressed as mean ± standard deviation, which was analyzed using Levene variance equality test and t test. Pearson correlation analysis was employed to determine associated factors affecting hair mercury levels, and multiple stepwise regression analysis was performed to deduce regression equations. Statistical significance is considered if p value is less than 0.05. The overall hair mercury level was 0.908949 ± 0.8844490 ng/g [mean ± standard deviation (SD)] in gastritis cases and 0.460198 ± 0.2712187 ng/g (mean±SD) in healthy controls; the former level was significantly higher than the latter one (p=0.000<0.01). The hair mercury level in chronic atrophic gastritis subgroup was 1.155220 ± 0.9470246 ng/g (mean ± SD) and that in chronic superficial gastritis subgroup was 0.604732 ± 0.6942509 ng/g (mean ± SD); the former level was significantly higher than the latter level (p<0.01). The hair mercury level in chronic superficial gastritis cases was significantly higher than that in healthy controls (p<0.05). The hair mercury level in chronic atrophic gastritis cases was significantly higher than that in healthy controls (p<0.01). Stratified analysis indicated that the hair mercury level in healthy controls with eating seafood was significantly higher than that in healthy

  18. Phlegmonous gastritis secondary to superior mesenteric artery syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kosuke; Iizuka, Toshiro; Yamashita, Satoshi; Kuribayashi, Yasutaka; Toba, Takahito; Yamada, Akihiro; Furuhata, Tsukasa; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Matsui, Akira; Mitani, Toshifumi; Ogawa, Osamu; Hoteya, Shu; Inoshita, Naoko; Kaise, Mitsuru

    2015-01-01

    We herein report a case of phlegmonous gastritis secondary to superior mesenteric artery syndrome. An 80-year-old woman visited the hospital emergency department with the chief complaints of epigastric pain and vomiting. She was hospitalized urgently following the diagnosis of superior mesenteric artery syndrome based on abdominal computed tomography findings. Conservative therapy was not effective, and phlegmonous gastritis was diagnosed based on the findings of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and biopsy performed on the 12th day of the disease. Undernutrition and reduced physical activity were observed on hospital admission, and proactive nutritional therapy with enteral nutrition was started. An upper gastrointestinal series, performed approximately 1 month later, confirmed the persistence of strictures and impaired gastric emptying. Because conservative therapy was unlikely to improve oral food intake, open total gastrectomy was performed on the 94th day of the disease. Examination of surgically resected specimens revealed marked inflammation and fibrosis, especially in the body of the stomach. Following a good postoperative recovery, the patient was able to commence oral intake and left our hospital on foot approximately 1 month after surgery.

  19. Prevalence of helicobacteriosis and gastritis in semicaptive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus).

    PubMed

    Lobetti, R; Picard, J; Kriek, N; Rogers, P

    1999-12-01

    Endoscopic biopsy specimens were obtained from the cardiac, fundic, and pyloric stomach regions of 28 semicaptive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) to look for signs of helicobacteriosis and gastritis. Impression smear cytology and urease tests were positive in 23 and 26 of the cheetahs, respectively. Histopathology showed mild or no lesions in 27 cheetahs; only one cheetah had moderate gastritis. Gastritis was uncommon in these semicaptive cheetahs, and stress could play a major role in the development of helicobacteriosis-associated gastritis in the captive cheetah.

  20. How to assess the severity of atrophic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yan-Cheng; Tang, Zhi-Peng; Zhang, Ya-Li

    2011-04-01

    Atrophic gastritis, is the main consequence of long-standing Helicobacter pylori infection, and is linked to the development of gastric cancer. The severity of atrophic gastritis is related to the lifetime risk of gastric cancer development, especially in terms of its degree and extent of mucosal damage. Therefore, it is important for clinicians to assess the severity of atrophic gastritis, interfere with the disease progress, and reverse gastric mucosal atrophy. In the article, we demonstrated some methods (conventional endoscopy, modern endoscopic technology and noninvasive methods) that may help assess the severity of atrophic gastritis and select the reasonable treatment protocols.

  1. Therapeutic effects of oral rebamipide and in combination with cimetidine on experimental gastritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, S; Fujimura, J; Machino, H; Shimamoto, T; Kobayashi, H; Shimizu, S; Haruma, K; Kajiyama, G; Sakurai, K; Yamasaki, K

    1992-12-01

    The present study evaluated the therapeutic effects of rebamipide alone and in combination with cimetidine on experimental gastritis established by the administration of 5 mM sodium taurocholate (TCA) for 6 months in rats. Morphological and biochemical analyses were performed to determine the effects of rebamipide, administered alone or in combination with cimetidine, on chronic, atrophic and erosive gastritis. Rebamipide and cimetidine were administered to rats as a dietary admixture for 4 weeks after withdrawal of TCA. Rebamipide dose-dependently reduced the total length of the erosion, normalized the mucosal thickness and increased the number of parietal and total cells, and tended to reduce interstitial infiltration of inflammatory cells and proliferation of collagenous fibers. Moreover, histochemical and biochemical studies also showed rebamipide to be effective. Rebamipide increased the PAS-positive mucus and normalized the reduced gastric mucosal SOD activity. The therapeutic effect of rebamipide on the experimental gastritis was enhanced by the combined use of cimetidine. These results suggest that rebamipide has a therapeutic effect on chronic atrophic erosive gastritis induced by TCA, and that the mechanism of the therapeutic effect is partially due to the increase in PAS-positive mucus and gastric mucosal SOD activity. Furthermore, the enhanced effect of the combination therapy of rebamipide with cimetidine was considered to be due to the actions of both cimetidine and rebamipide. PMID:1335596

  2. [Abdominal pain and gastritis in children].

    PubMed

    Gottrand, Frédéric

    2011-05-01

    Gastritis, as gastric and duodenal ulcer, is associated with epigastric abdominal pain, influenced by meals, associated with nausea and vomiting and weight loss. Diagnosis s based upon upper gastrointestinal fibre endoscopy that allows direct visualisation of gastric lesions and realization of antral and fundic biopsies for anatomopathology and culture. Main etiologies are drug induced, stress and H. pylori infection. Looking for H. pylori is only justified in those children presenting with digestive symptoms requiring upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Therefore non invasive test are only indicated for control of eradication. Treatment of H. pylori infection associates proton pump inhibitors and two antibiotics for 7 to 10 days.

  3. Gastritis, Enteritis, and Colitis in Horses.

    PubMed

    Uzal, Francisco A; Diab, Santiago S

    2015-08-01

    The gastrointestinal system of horses is affected by a large variety of inflammatory infectious and noninfectious conditions. The most prevalent form of gastritis is associated with ulceration of the pars esophagea. Although the diagnostic techniques for alimentary diseases of horses have improved significantly over the past few years, difficulties still exist in establishing the causes of a significant number of enteric diseases in this species. This problem is compounded by several agents of enteric disease also being found in the intestine of clinically normal horses, which questions the validity of the mere detection of these agents in the intestine.

  4. Atrophic gastritis is associated with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Senmaru, Takafumi; Fukui, Michiaki; Tanaka, Muhei; Kuroda, Masaaki; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Oda, Yohei; Naito, Yuji; Hasegawa, Goji; Toda, Hitoshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Nakamura, Naoto

    2012-07-01

    Atrophic gastritis is characterized by chronic inflammation of gastric mucosa by Helicobacter pylori infection and other factors. Helicobacter pylori infection has been linked to coronary artery disease. To our knowledge, however, no reports are available on the relationship between atrophic gastritis and coronary artery disease. In this study, we investigated the relationship between atrophic gastritis, which is diagnosed based on serum pepsinogen levels (pepsinogen I ≤ 70 ng/mL and pepsinogen I/II ratio ≤ 3.0), and the prevalence of coronary artery disease in general Japanese population. Among 2,633 study subjects, 531 subjects (20.2%) were diagnosed as atrophic gastritis. The prevalence of coronary artery disease was higher in the atrophic gastritis-positive group than that in the atrophic gastritis-negative group (5.8% vs 2.8%, p = 0.0005). Multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that atrophic gastritis was independently associated with coronary artery disease (odds ratio, 1.67; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-2.72), after adjustment for age, sex, obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, hyperuricemia, and habits of smoking and drinking. These results suggest that atrophic gastritis is an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease. Chronic inflammation of gastric mucosa may be associated with the prevalence of coronary artery disease.

  5. Spontaneous Gastric Perforation in a Case of Collagenous Gastritis.

    PubMed

    Appelman, Marly H; de Meij, Tim G J; Neefjes-Borst, E Andra; Kneepkens, C M F

    2016-01-01

    Collagenous gastritis is an extremely rare disease, both in children and adults. Symptoms vary depending on the extent of collagenous changes in the bowel. In most of the children, iron deficiency anemia and abdominal pain are the presenting symptoms. We present a 15-year-old boy with acute abdomen due to gastric perforation the cause of which was collagenous gastritis. PMID:26816680

  6. In vivo expression of Helicobacter pylori virulence genes in patients with gastritis, ulcer, and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Avilés-Jiménez, Francisco; Reyes-Leon, Adriana; Nieto-Patlán, Erik; Hansen, Lori M; Burgueño, Juan; Ramos, Irma P; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Bermúdez, Hector; Blancas, Juan M; Cabrera, Lourdes; Ribas-Aparicio, Rosa María; Solnick, Jay V; Torres-López, Javier

    2012-02-01

    The best-studied Helicobacter pylori virulence factor associated with development of peptic ulcer disease or gastric cancer (GC) rather than asymptomatic nonatrophic gastritis (NAG) is the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI), which encodes a type IV secretion system (T4SS) that injects the CagA oncoprotein into host epithelial cells. Here we used real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) to measure the in vivo expression of genes on the cagPAI and of other virulence genes in patients with NAG, duodenal ulcer (DU), or GC. In vivo expression of H. pylori virulence genes was greater overall in gastric biopsy specimens of patients with GC than in those of patients with NAG or DU. However, since in vitro expression of cagA was not greater in H. pylori strains from patients with GC than in those from patients with NAG or DU, increased expression in GC in vivo is likely a result of environmental conditions in the gastric mucosa, though it may in turn cause more severe pathology. Increased expression of virulence genes in GC may represent a stress response to elevated pH or other environmental conditions in the stomach of patients with GC, which may be less hospitable to H. pylori colonization than the acidic environment in patients with NAG or DU.

  7. [Reasoning of the usage of multimicroelement drugs and monophytodrugs in complex treatment of patients with chronic atrophic gastritis].

    PubMed

    Molodovets', O B; Pozur, N Z; Havrysh, T Iu; Chaplyns'ka, N V; Zozuliak, N V; Iurak, M Z; Kulaiets', V M

    2014-01-01

    It was investigeted 126 patients with chronic atrophic gastritis, aged 19-73 years. Chronic inflammatory and degenerative processes of the gastric mucosa contributed to the destabilization of cell membranes. We found that patients with chronicatrophic gastritis have disturbances of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant defense, which is manifested by the accumulation of products of peroxidation and decreased activity of enzymes of antioxidant defense. Activation of lipid peroxidation, accompanied by increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines and deficiency of essential trace elements imbalance contributes antioxidant defense. After using basic therapy, it was no certain normalization of lipid peroxidation, antioxidant defense and restoration of microelement homeostasis in patients with chronic atrophic gastritis, which served as the justification for the development and testing of methods of treatment with the purpose of regulation of these processes.

  8. Peptic ulcer in childhood. Psychological factors.

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, G N; Gargoulas, A; Papaloukas, A; Marinopoulou, A; Rabavilas, A D

    1979-01-01

    Thirty children (20 girls and 10 boys, aged 6-16 years) with primary peptic ulcers, matched in paris for age, sex and socio-economic standard to a group of 30 ulcer-free controls, were submitted to a structured psychiatric interview, a structured 'present psychiatric state' examination and to personality and intelligence tests. With one exception all patients suffered from duodenal ulcer; 3 male patients had personalities with psychopathic elements, 7 patients had nicknames, 5 suffered from psychiatric disorders, 3 had attempted suicide in the past, and 3 had had homosexual experiences. These parameters were negative in all controls. The patients had lower mean IQ, worse scholastic adaptation, more anxious and overprotective parents, higher frequency of faddiness in food and lower frequency of nail-biting than the controls. Psychotraumatic events had preceded the onset of ulcer symptomatology in 11 cases. The findings are discussed and the contribution of psychological factors in the pathogenesis of childhood peptic ulcer is stressed. PMID:550183

  9. Urease Inhibitory Activities of some Commonly Consumed Herbal Medicines.

    PubMed

    Mahernia, Shabnam; Bagherzadeh, Kowsar; Mojab, Faraz; Amanlou, Massoud

    2015-01-01

    Urease enzyme has a crucial role in the persistent habitation of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) that induces gastrointestinal diseases, in particular gastritis, duodenal, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. Plants have long been utilized as the biggest source of substances with medicinal properties from natural origin and therefore result in less toxicity and adverse side effects upon usage. 15 medicinal plant extracts were examined against Jack bean urease activity by Berthelot reaction. Each herb was extracted using 80% aqueous methanol. The more effective extracts were further tested and their IC50 values were determined. Three plant extracts including Ginkgo biloba, Rhus coriaria, and Matricaria inodora were found to be the most effective ones with IC50 values of 36.17, 80.29, and 100.6 μg/mL, respectively. PMID:26330884

  10. Urease Inhibitory Activities of some Commonly Consumed Herbal Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Mahernia, Shabnam; Bagherzadeh, Kowsar; Mojab, Faraz; Amanlou, Massoud

    2015-01-01

    Urease enzyme has a crucial role in the persistent habitation of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) that induces gastrointestinal diseases, in particular gastritis, duodenal, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. Plants have long been utilized as the biggest source of substances with medicinal properties from natural origin and therefore result in less toxicity and adverse side effects upon usage. 15 medicinal plant extracts were examined against Jack bean urease activity by Berthelot reaction. Each herb was extracted using 80% aqueous methanol. The more effective extracts were further tested and their IC50 values were determined. Three plant extracts including Ginkgo biloba, Rhus coriaria, and Matricaria inodora were found to be the most effective ones with IC50 values of 36.17, 80.29, and 100.6 μg/mL, respectively. PMID:26330884

  11. [Chronic atrophic gastritis and the risk of cancer].

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, F; Nemeth, A

    1990-10-15

    Chronic gastritis, which is frequent in subjects over 50 years old, is caused by the concurrence of predisposing and congenital conditions and exogenous harmful factors, in particular foods. In etiopathogenetic terms it is worth considering autoimmune diseases and duodenogastric back-flow separately. Lesions develop progressively from superficial gastritis to atrophic gastritis and finally to gastric atrophy; they are frequently found together with intestinal metaplasia, formed by areas of the epithelium with the morphological and histochemical characteristics of intestinal mucosa, which are the expression of a modified regeneration of the gastric wall. It is acknowledged that chronic atrophic gastritis is a precancerous phenomenon which is the majority of cases leads to the onset of intestinal cancer, passing through the stages of chronic gastritis, metaplasia and dysplasia. Identification of this lesion may therefore help to prevent cancer: diagnosis is essentially performed using endoscopy (together with histocytological tests and bioptic staining) and laboratory tests (enzyme and CEA assays in the gastric juices). Rather than prescribing generic medical therapy or surgical treatment, which is only possible in selected cases of alkaline gastritis, attention is focused on curing unhealthy habits and on an endoscopic follow-up (every 2 years in cases of gastritis, and more frequently in cases of metaplasia or dysplasia).

  12. Autoimmune gastritis: historical antecedents, outstanding discoveries, and unresolved problems.

    PubMed

    Whittingham, Senga; Mackay, Ian R

    2005-01-01

    The earliest recorded history of autoimmune gastritis can be traced to 1849 in London, when Thomas Addison described "a very remarkable form of anemia" later called pernicious (fatal) anemia (PA). This was followed by the recognition of a gastric mucosal defect suspected to have a nutritional basis, the discovery of the megaloblast that characterized the anemia, the insufficiency of a dietary extrinsic factor characterized as vitamin B12 (cobalamin), and a gastric-secreted intrinsic factor. Treatment with vitamin B12 proved curative. The link between PA and gastritis and atrophy was first confirmed histologically after immediate fixation of the stomach postmortem and later, in the 1940s, by peroral tube biopsy. The causes of gastritis remained enigmatic until the era of autoimmunity, when autoantibodies were detected first to gastric intrinsic factor and then to gastric parietal cells. Hints of a dichotomy in pathogenesis of gastritis were crystallized by the description in 1973 of Type A (Autoimmune) and Type B (later, Bacterial) gastritis. Clarification was enhanced by identification in Type A gastritis of the autoantigen of the parietal cell antibody, by the alpha and beta subunits of gastric H+/K+ ATPase, and by the highly informative experimental murine model of postneonatal thymectomy autoimmune gastritis, and in Type B of the causative role of gastric infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). A denouement will require a full understanding of (1) the origin and pathogenetic contribution of antibody to intrinsic factor; (2) the connection, if any, between H. pylori infection and Type A autoimmune gastritis; and (3) the genetic contributions to gastritis, whether due to autoimmunity or to H. pylori infection.

  13. [Immune phenomena in chronic gastritis, coincidental or pathogenetic? (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Fixa, B; Komárková, O

    1975-08-01

    The role of autoimmune processes in the pathogenesis of atrophic gastritis, be it with or without pernicious anemia, is described on the basis of literature data. Various findings in cases of atrophic gastritis favor such a role, e.g. histological findings, the high incidence of autoantibodies against gastric mucosa, a high specificity of gastric antigens in cellular immune reactions, the concomitant occurrence of other auto-immune diseases, the favorable effect of immunosuppressive therapy. On an experimental basis transfer of autoimmune gastritis by lymphocytes from the ductus thoracicus lymph of sick animals to non-immunized animals does support this hypothesis.

  14. Gastritis and Gastric Ulcers in Working Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Michael S.; Williamson, Katherine K.

    2016-01-01

    Gastritis and gastric ulcers are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in canine athletes. Although the majority of scientific work on this condition has been performed in ultraendurance racing sled dogs, this condition has been identified in other canine athletes, including sled dogs competing in shorter events and dogs performing off-leash explosive detection duties. The cause of the syndrome is unknown, but current hypotheses propose a link between exercise-induced hyperthermia and loss of gastric mucosal barrier function as an early event in the pathogenesis. Treatment is focused on prevention of clinical disease using acid secretion inhibitors, such as omeprazole, which has excellent efficacy in controlled clinical studies. PMID:27092307

  15. Gastritis and Gastric Ulcers in Working Dogs.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael S; Williamson, Katherine K

    2016-01-01

    Gastritis and gastric ulcers are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in canine athletes. Although the majority of scientific work on this condition has been performed in ultraendurance racing sled dogs, this condition has been identified in other canine athletes, including sled dogs competing in shorter events and dogs performing off-leash explosive detection duties. The cause of the syndrome is unknown, but current hypotheses propose a link between exercise-induced hyperthermia and loss of gastric mucosal barrier function as an early event in the pathogenesis. Treatment is focused on prevention of clinical disease using acid secretion inhibitors, such as omeprazole, which has excellent efficacy in controlled clinical studies. PMID:27092307

  16. Collagenous gastritis in the pediatric age.

    PubMed

    Rosell-Camps, Antonio; Riera-Llodrá, Joana María; Colom-Segui, Marina; Zibetti, Sara; Amengual-Antich, Isabel

    2015-05-01

    Collagenous gastritis (CG) is an uncommon condition known in the pediatric age. It is characterized by the presence of subepithelial collagen bands (> 10 microm) associated with lymphoplasmacytic infiltration of the stomach's lamina propria. Symptoms manifested by patients with CG may be common with many other disorders. It typically manifests with epigastralgia, vomiting, and iron deficiency during pre-adolescence. This condition's pathophysiology remains unclear. In contrast to adults, where association with collagenous colitis and other autoimmune conditions is more common, pediatric involvement is usually confined to the stomach. Drugs of choice include proton pump inhibitors and corticoids. A case is reported of a 12-year-old girl with abdominal pain and ferritin deficiency who was diagnosed with CG based on gastric biopsy and experienced a favorable outcome. PMID:25952808

  17. Pathogenicity island cag, vacA and IS605 genotypes in Mexican strains of Helicobacter pylori associated with peptic ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancer. Two major virulence factors of H. pylori have been described: the pathogenicity island cag (cag PAI) and the vacuolating cytotoxin gene (vacA). Virtually all strains have a copy of vacA, but its genotype varies. The cag PAI is a region of 32 genes in which the insertion of IS605 elements in its middle region has been associated with partial or total deletions of it that have generated strains with varying virulence. Accordingly, the aim of this work was to determine the cag PAI integrity, vacA genotype and IS605 status in groups of isolates from Mexican patients with non-peptic ulcers (NPU), non-bleeding peptic ulcers (NBPU), and bleeding peptic ulcers (BPU). Methods The cag PAI integrity was performed by detection of eleven targeted genes along this locus using dot blot hybridization and PCR assays. The vacA allelic, cag PAI genotype 1 and IS605 status were determined by PCR analysis. Results Groups of 16-17 isolates (n = 50) from two patients with NPU, NBPU, and BPU, respectively, were studied. 90% (45/50) of the isolates harbored a complete cag PAI. Three BPU isolates lacked the cag PAI, and two of the NBPU had an incomplete cag PAI: the first isolate was negative for three of its genes, including deletion of the cagA gene, whereas the second did not have the cagM gene. Most of the strains (76%) had the vacA s1b/m1 genotype; meanwhile the IS605 was not present within the cag PAI of any strain but was detected elsewhere in the genome of 8% (4/50). Conclusion The patients had highly virulent strains since the most of them possessed a complete cag PAI and had a vacA s1b/m1 genotype. All the isolates presented the cag PAI without any IS605 insertion (genotype 1). Combined vacA genotypes showed that 1 NPU, 2 NBPU, and 1 BPU patients (66.6%) had a mixed infection; coexistence of H. pylori strains with different cag PAI status was observed in 1 NBPU and 2 BPU (50

  18. Duodenoportal fistula caused by peptic ulcer after extended right hepatectomy for hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Takifuji, Katsunari; Nakatani, Yoshihiro; Tani, Masaji; Uchiyama, Kazuhisa; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2006-01-01

    Background A fistula between the duodenum and the main portal vein near a peptic ulcer is extremely rare, and only two cases of duodenal ulcers have been reported in the past. Case presentation We report a 68-year-old man with a diagnosis of anemia who had a history of extended right hepatectomy for hilar cholangiocarcinoma 20 months previously. The first endoscopic examination revealed a giant peptic ulcer with active bleeding at the posterior wall of the duodenal bulbs, and hemostasis was performed. Endoscopic treatment and transarterial embolization were performed repeatedly because of uncontrollable bleeding from the duodenal ulcer. Nevertheless, he died of sudden massive hematemesis on the 20th hospital day. At autopsy, communication with the main portal vein and duodenal ulcer was observed. Conclusion It should be borne in mind that the main portal vein is exposed at the front of the hepatoduodenal ligament in cases with previous extrahepatic bile duct resection. PMID:17123451

  19. Collagenous gastritis and collagenous colitis: a report with sequential histological and ultrastructural findings.

    PubMed

    Pulimood, A B; Ramakrishna, B S; Mathan, M M

    1999-06-01

    The case is reported of a young adult man with collagenous gastritis, an extremely rare disorder with only three case reports in the English literature, who subsequently presented with collagenous colitis. Sequential gastric biopsies showed a notable increase in thickness of the subepithelial collagen band. Ultrastructural study of gastric and rectal mucosa showed the characteristic subepithelial band composed of haphazardly arranged collagen fibres, prominent degranulating eosinophils, and activated pericryptal fibroblasts. PMID:10323893

  20. Endoscopic Obliteration for Bleeding Peptic Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Zawadzki, J.J. J.; Gajda, A.G. G.; Kamiński, P. Ł.; Lembas, L.; Bielecki, K.

    1997-01-01

    A group of 133 patients treated for bleeding peptic ulcer in our Department, is reviewed. Within several hours of admission, all patients underwent upper gastrointestinal tract gastroscopy and obliteration of the bleeding ulcer. Bleeding gastric ulcers were found in 41 patients, and duodenal ulcers in 92 patients. Patients were classified according to the Forrest scale: IA – 11 patients, IB – 49 patients, IIA – 35 patients, lIB – 40 patients. In 126 (94.7%) patients the bleeding was stopped, and 7 required urgent surgery: 3 patients with gastric ulcer underwent gastrectomy, and 4 with duodenal ulcer – truncal vagotomy with pyloroplasty and had the bleeding site underpinned. Fifty-five patients underwent elective surgery: gastrectomy and vagotomy (18 patients with gastric ulcer), highly selective vagotomy (25 patients with duodenal ulcer) and truncal vagotomy and pyloroplasty (12 patients with duodenal ulcer). None of the patients was observed to have recurrent bleeding. PMID:18493453

  1. Indium-111 WBC detection of emphysematous gastritis in pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Caruana, V.; Swayne, L.C.; Salaki, J.S. )

    1990-01-01

    We present a case of emphysematous gastritis initially detected with 111In oxine-labeled white blood cell scintigraphy and subsequently confirmed by computed tomography. Early aggressive antibiotic and supportive therapy resulted in a successful clinical outcome.

  2. [Scarlet fever with multisystem organ failure and hypertrophic gastritis].

    PubMed

    Sandrini, J; Beucher, A-B; Kouatchet, A; Lavigne, C

    2009-05-01

    Scarlet fever is a rare disease in adult patients. We report a patient in whom scarlet fever was associated with hypertrophic gastritis and multiple organ failure. A 62-year-old woman presented with septic shock and multiple organ failure. Bacteriological survey was negative. Abdominal tomodensitometry showed an hypertrophic gastritis. Histological analysis demonstrated a non specific gastritis without any tumoral sign. Cefotaxime and amoxicillin led to improvement and hypertrophic gastritis progressively resolved. A sandpaper rash over the body with finger desquamation, elevation of antistreptolysin O and a recent contact with an infected grandson led to the diagnosis of scarlet fever. Due to antibiotic prescription, scarlet fever is now uncommon. Although classical, ENT or gastroenteritis presentations may be puzzling for the diagnosis of scarlet fever. As 150 years ago, diagnosis of scarlet fever is still a clinical challenge.

  3. [Morphogenesis of gastric mucosal atrophy as a basis of a phenotype of chronic gastritis].

    PubMed

    Kononov, A V; Mosgovoĭ, S I; Markelova, M V; Shimanskaia, A G

    2011-01-01

    Atrophic antral gastritis was found to show an absolute decrease in gland volume with higher expression of the gastric transcription factor Shh, i.e. absolute atrophy and that concurrent with the replacement of the specialized gastric epithelium by the intestinal MUC2-producing one, i.e. metaplastic atrophy. In atrophic multifocal gastritis along absolute and metaplastic atrophy, there are foci of the proliferative metaplastic epithelium, i.e. hyperproliferative metaplastic atrophy that is prevalent in atrophic pangastritis. The molecular characteristics of hyperproliferative metaplastic atrophy are varying: in some foci of metaplasia, the high proliferative activity of the epithelium is concomitant with the hyperexpression of P53, a marker of DNA damage, the lower expression of the intestinal transcription factor CDX-2, and the low level of Cpp32, an indicator of apoptosis. Whether such structures can be identified at the launching pad for tumor growth in atrophic pangastritis is discussed.

  4. Collagenous gastritis: an unusual association with profound weight loss.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hanlin L; Shah, Amit G; Yerian, Lisa M; Cohen, Russell D; Hart, John

    2004-02-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a distinctive disorder characterized by thickening of the subepithelial collagen layer in the gastric mucosa. Although this entity was recognized in 1989, its etiology, pathogenesis, and clinicopathologic features remain poorly understood because of its rarity. An unusual case of collagenous gastritis was observed in a 37-year-old man who presented with profound weight loss, a feature that has not previously been emphasized. PMID:14736276

  5. [Coexistence of infection of the oral cavity and stomach and duodenal mucosa with Helicobacter pylori in patients with ulcer and chronic gastritis].

    PubMed

    Kopaánski, Z; Cienciala, A; Banaś, J; Kamiński, B; Witkowska, B; Zastepa, P; Brandys, J; Micherdziński, J

    1995-01-01

    In a group of 260 patients with a peptic ulcer of the stomach or the duodenum and/or chronic gastritis, bacteriological tests were conducted aiming at the detection of Helicobacter pylori in the mucosa of the stomach and the duodenum and in the gingival pockets. The presence of the infection of the mucosa of the stomach and/or of the duodenum was confirmed in 197 patients (75.8%). In this group of patients the bacteria occurred simultaneously in the oral cavity in 77 (39.1%) patients. It was found that the frequency of coexistence of Helicobacter pylori infection in the gingival pockets with an infected gastric or duodenal ulcer was not statistically significant. However, there was a statistically significant correlation between the frequency of Helicobacter pylori infection in the oral cavity (83.3%) and the simultaneous occurrence of extensive infection of the gastric mucosa. PMID:7754615

  6. [Study on the efficacy of famotidine (Quamatel) in the complex treatment of erosive gastroduodenitis, stress stomach ulcer and peptic duodenal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Korukov, B; Ognianov, S; Kostadinova, R; Gerzilov, P; Ivanov, A; Iarŭmov, N

    2004-01-01

    The haemorrhage of upper gastrointestinal tract is one of the serious problem in urgent surgery. Clinical effect of treatment with Quamatel purposely research was holded comparison of results in two groups patients. In group A with general medical treatment was included Quamatel--2 x 20 mg i.v. a day. In group B the patients was treated without H2 blocker. In cases of erosive gastritis was reported favorable effect in 76.47% at second day. The patients with stress stomach ulcer same effect was observed in third day--83.3%. In cases with peptic duodenal ulcer in I B--Forest group the bleeding was taken possession of 61.9%, in group II--79.31% and III--90.91% of patients.

  7. Expression of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 in human gastric cancer and superficial gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Sampieri, Clara Luz; de la Peña, Sol; Ochoa-Lara, Mariana; Zenteno-Cuevas, Roberto; León-Córdoba, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To assess expression of matrix metalloproteinases 2 (MMP2) and MMP9 in gastric cancer, superficial gastritis and normal mucosa, and to measure metalloproteinase activity. METHODS: MMP2 and MMP9 mRNA expression was determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Normalization was carried out using three different factors. Proteins were analyzed by quantitative gelatin zymography (qGZ). RESULTS: 18S ribosomal RNA (18SRNA) was very highly expressed, while hypoxanthine ribosyltransferase-1 (HPRT-1) was moderately expressed. MMP2 was highly expressed, while MMP9 was not detected or lowly expressed in normal tissues, moderately or highly expressed in gastritis and highly expressed in cancer. Relative expression of 18SRNA and HPRT-1 showed no significant differences. Significant differences in MMP2 and MMP9 were found between cancer and normal tissue, but not between gastritis and normal tissue. Absolute quantification of MMP9 echoed this pattern, but differential expression of MMP2 proved conflictive. Analysis by qGZ indicated significant differences between cancer and normal tissue in MMP-2, total MMP-9, 250 and 110 kDa bands. CONCLUSION: MMP9 expression is enhanced in gastric cancer compared to normal mucosa; interpretation of differential expression of MMP2 is difficult to establish. PMID:20333791

  8. Acute phlegmonous gastritis complicated by delayed perforation.

    PubMed

    Min, Sun Young; Kim, Yong Ho; Park, Won Seo

    2014-03-28

    Here, we report on a case of acute phlegmonous gastritis (PG) complicated by delayed perforation. A 51-year-old woman presented with severe abdominal pain and septic shock symptoms. A computed tomography scan showed diffuse thickening of the gastric wall and distention with peritoneal fluid. Although we did not find definite evidence of free air on the computed tomography (CT) scan, the patient's clinical condition suggested diffuse peritonitis requiring surgical intervention. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a thickened gastric wall with suppurative intraperitoneal fluid in which Streptococcus pyogenes grew. There was no evidence of gastric or duodenal perforation. No further operation was performed at that time. The patient was conservatively treated with antibiotics and proton pump inhibitor, and her condition improved. However, she experienced abdominal and flank pain again on postoperative day 10. CT and esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed a large gastric ulcer with perforation. Unfortunately, although the CT showed further improvement in the thickening of the stomach and the mucosal defect, the patient's condition did not recover until a week later, and an esophagogastroduodenoscopy taken on postoperative day 30 showed suspected gastric submucosal dissection. We performed total gastrectomy as a second operation, and the patient recovered without major complications. A pathological examination revealed a multifocal ulceration and necrosis from the mucosa to the serosa with perforation.

  9. Optimal management of peptic ulcer disease in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Pilotto, Alberto; Franceschi, Marilisa; Maggi, Stefania; Addante, Filomena; Sancarlo, Daniele

    2010-07-01

    Recent data report that the incidence of peptic ulcer is decreasing in the general population; conversely, the rates of gastric and duodenal ulcer hospitalization and mortality remain very high in older patients. Two major factors that might explain this epidemiological feature in the elderly population are the high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and the increasing prescriptions of gastroduodenal damaging drugs, including NSAIDs and/or aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid). The main goals for treating peptic ulcer disease in old age are to reduce recurrence of the disease and to prevent complications, especially bleeding and perforation. The available treatments for peptic ulcer are essentially based on gastric acid suppression with antisecretory drugs and the eradication of H. pylori infection. The aim of this article is to report the available data on clinical efficacy and tolerability of peptic ulcer treatments in elderly patients and provide recommendations for their optimal use in this special population. Proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-based triple therapies for 7 days are highly effective for the cure of H. pylori-positive peptic ulcers as well as for reducing ulcer recurrence. Antisecretory drugs are also the treatment of choice for NSAID- or aspirin-related peptic ulcers and are useful as preventive therapy in chronic users of NSAIDs and low-dose aspirin as antiplatelet therapy. Antisecretory PPI therapy has a favourable tolerability profile in geriatric patients; however, monitoring is suggested in older patients with frequent pulmonary infections, gastrointestinal malabsorption, unexplained chronic diarrhoea, osteoporosis or those taking concomitant cytochrome P450 2C19-metabolized medications. The overall approach to the geriatric patient should include a comprehensive geriatric assessment that ensures multidimensional evaluation of the patient in order to better define the clinical risk of adverse outcomes in the older patient with peptic ulcer and

  10. Helicobacter Pylori Gastritis, a Presequeale to Coronary Plaque

    PubMed Central

    Raut, Shrikant C.; Patil, Vinayak W.; Dalvi, Shubhangi M.; Bakhshi, Girish D.

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori are considered the most common human pathogen colonizing gastric mucosa. Gastritis with or without H. pylori infection is associated with increase in levels of homocysteine and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) but a more pronounced increase is noted in gastritis with H. pylori infection. Increasing level of homocysteine, due to decreased absorption of vitamin B12 and folic acid, together with increased CRP levels in gastritis with H. pylori infection may be the earliest event in the process of atherosclerosis and plaque formation. Retrospective study conducted at tertiary care hospital in Mumbai by Department of Biochemistry in association with Department of Surgery. Eighty patients who underwent gastroscopy in view of gastritis were subjected to rapid urease test for diagnosis of H. pylori infection. Vitamin B12, folic acid, homocysteine and hs-CRP were analyzed using chemiluminescence immuno assay. Student’s t-test, Pearson’s correlation and linear regression used for statistical analysis. Patients with H. pylori gastritis had significantly lower levels of vitamin B12 (271.6±101.3 vs 390.6±176.7 pg/mL; P=0.0005), as well as higher levels of homocysteine (17.4±7.4 vs 13.8±7.8 µmol/L; P=0.037) and hs-CRP (2.5±2.9 vs 1.2±1.1 mg/L; P=0.017), than in patients without H. pylori gastritis. However, folic acid showed (8.9±3.2 vs 10.0±3.6 ng/mL; P=0.171) no significant difference. Elevated homocysteine and hs-CRP in H. pylori gastritis may independently induce endothelial dysfunction, leading to cardiovascular pathology. PMID:25918633

  11. Kyoto global consensus report on Helicobacter pylori gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Sugano, Kentaro; Tack, Jan; Kuipers, Ernst J; Graham, David Y; El-Omar, Emad M; Miura, Soichiro; Haruma, Ken; Asaka, Masahiro; Uemura, Naomi; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objective To present results of the Kyoto Global Consensus Meeting, which was convened to develop global consensus on (1) classification of chronic gastritis and duodenitis, (2) clinical distinction of dyspepsia caused by Helicobacter pylori from functional dyspepsia, (3) appropriate diagnostic assessment of gastritis and (4) when, whom and how to treat H. pylori gastritis. Design Twenty-three clinical questions addressing the above-mentioned four domains were drafted for which expert panels were asked to formulate relevant statements. A Delphi method using an anonymous electronic system was adopted to develop the consensus, the level of which was predefined as ≥80%. Final modifications of clinical questions and consensus were achieved at the face-to-face meeting in Kyoto. Results All 24 statements for 22 clinical questions after extensive modifications and omission of one clinical question were achieved with a consensus level of >80%. To better organise classification of gastritis and duodenitis based on aetiology, a new classification of gastritis and duodenitis is recommended for the 11th international classification. A new category of H. pylori-associated dyspepsia together with a diagnostic algorithm was proposed. The adoption of grading systems for gastric cancer risk stratification, and modern image-enhancing endoscopy for the diagnosis of gastritis, were recommended. Treatment to eradicate H. pylori infection before preneoplastic changes develop, if feasible, was recommended to minimise the risk of more serious complications of the infection. Conclusions A global consensus for gastritis was developed for the first time, which will be the basis for an international classification system and for further research on the subject. PMID:26187502

  12. Increased Risk of Peptic Ulcers Following a Cholecystectomy for Gallstones.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Huang, Chung-Chien; Kao, Li-Ting; Lin, Herng-Ching; Lee, Cha-Ze

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective cohort study examined the relationship between a cholecystectomy and the subsequent risk of peptic ulcers using a population-based database. Data for this study were retrieved from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005. This study included 5209 patients who had undergone a cholecystectomy for gallstones and 15,627 sex- and age-matched comparison patients. We individually tracked each patient for a 5-year period to identify those who subsequently received a diagnosis of peptic ulcers. We found that of the 20,836 sampled patients, 2033 patients (9.76%) received a diagnosis of peptic ulcers during the 5-year follow-up period: 674 from the study group (12.94% of the patients who underwent a cholecystectomy) and 1359 from the comparison group (8.70% of the comparison patients). The stratified Cox proportional hazard regressions showed that the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for peptic ulcers during the 5-year follow-up period was 1.48 (95% CI = 1.34~1.64) for patients who underwent a cholecystectomy than comparison patients. Furthermore, the adjusted HRs of gastric ulcers and duodenal ulcers during the 5-year follow-up period were 1.70 and 1.71, respectively, for patients who underwent a cholecystectomy compared to comparison patients. This study demonstrated a relationship between a cholecystectomy and a subsequent diagnosis of peptic ulcers. PMID:27469240

  13. Increased Risk of Peptic Ulcers Following a Cholecystectomy for Gallstones

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Huang, Chung-Chien; Kao, Li-Ting; Lin, Herng-Ching; Lee, Cha-Ze

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective cohort study examined the relationship between a cholecystectomy and the subsequent risk of peptic ulcers using a population-based database. Data for this study were retrieved from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005. This study included 5209 patients who had undergone a cholecystectomy for gallstones and 15,627 sex- and age-matched comparison patients. We individually tracked each patient for a 5-year period to identify those who subsequently received a diagnosis of peptic ulcers. We found that of the 20,836 sampled patients, 2033 patients (9.76%) received a diagnosis of peptic ulcers during the 5-year follow-up period: 674 from the study group (12.94% of the patients who underwent a cholecystectomy) and 1359 from the comparison group (8.70% of the comparison patients). The stratified Cox proportional hazard regressions showed that the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for peptic ulcers during the 5-year follow-up period was 1.48 (95% CI = 1.34~1.64) for patients who underwent a cholecystectomy than comparison patients. Furthermore, the adjusted HRs of gastric ulcers and duodenal ulcers during the 5-year follow-up period were 1.70 and 1.71, respectively, for patients who underwent a cholecystectomy compared to comparison patients. This study demonstrated a relationship between a cholecystectomy and a subsequent diagnosis of peptic ulcers. PMID:27469240

  14. Association of tightly spiraled bacterial infection and gastritis in pigs.

    PubMed

    Park, J H; Lee, B J; Lee, Y S; Park, J H

    2000-07-01

    Tightly spiral bacteria were observed only in the pyloric mucosa of 4 (8.0%) of 50 swine stomachs, mainly in the surface of epithelia, the gastric pits and the lumen of gastric glands. The presence of the spiral bacteria was significantly associated with chronic pyloric gastritis (p<0.05). Mean gastritis score of the bacteria-positive pyloric mucosa was 3.25 +/- 0.25, whereas that of the bacteria-negative pyloric mucosa was 2.37 +/- 0.12. Parakeratosis and hyperkeratosis were spontaneously seen in the mucosa layer of pars oesophagea, regardless of the bacterial infection. Marked infiltration of mononuclear cells and granulocytes were seen in the cardiac mucosa, regardless of the bacterial infection. Mean gastritis score of the bacteria-positive cardiac mucosa was 3.27 +/- 0.32, whereas that of the bacteria-negative cardiac mucosa was 2.84 +/- 0.13. There was no significant difference between the bacteria-positive and negative cardiac mucosa (p>0.05). Inflammatory response in the fundic mucosa was rare (gastritis score=0.75 +/- 0.08). The tightly spiraled bactera were not cultured with various culture media. These results suggest that the presence of tightly spiraled bacteria is associated with only the pyloric gastritis in pigs.

  15. Diagnostic and Treatment Approaches for Refractory Peptic Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Refractory peptic ulcers are defined as ulcers that do not heal completely after 8 to 12 weeks of standard anti-secretory drug treatment. The most common causes of refractory ulcers are persistent Helicobacter pylori infection and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Simultaneous use of two or more H. pylori diagnostic methods are recommended for increased sensitivity. Serologic tests may be useful for patients currently taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) or for suspected false negative results, as they are not affected by PPI use. NSAID use should be discontinued when possible. Platelet cyclooxygenase activity tests can confirm surreptitious use of NSAIDs or aspirin. Cigarette smoking can delay ulcer healing. Therefore, patients who smoke should be encouraged to quit. Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) is a rare but important cause of refractory gastroduodenal ulcers. Fasting plasma gastrin levels should be checked if ZES is suspected. If an ulcer is refractory despite a full course of standard PPI treatment, the dose should be doubled and administration of another type of PPI considered. PMID:26240800

  16. Gastritis in Alaskan racing sled dogs.

    PubMed

    Ritchey, J W; Davis, M S; Breshears, M A; Willard, M D; Williamson, K K; Royer, C M; Payton, M E; Cragun, A S

    2011-07-01

    Alaskan racing sled dogs are a well-established model of exercise-induced gastric disease. The aim of this study was to define the temporal development of microscopical gastric lesions during long distance racing. Two groups of dogs were examined: group I comprised conditioned dogs that were exercising and group II were conditioned dogs not exercising. The gastric mucosa was examined endoscopically and sampled for routine histopathology and microscopical scoring, immunohistochemistry (IHC) and detection of apoptotic epithelial cells. Overall, group I dogs exhibited more significant epithelial lesions, including ulcers, compared with dogs in group II. Group II dogs exhibited the most severe mucosal inflammatory infiltrates. Although the intensity of inflammation differed, the nature of the inflammation was similar between groups, consisting of diffuse lymphocytic infiltration and a unique interface-type infiltrate that obscured the basement membrane zone and was accompanied by intraepithelial infiltration of lymphocytes. IHC confirmed the presence of CD3(+) T and CD79(+) B lymphocytes within the mucosal infiltrates; however, most of the intraepithelial and interface infiltrates were CD3(+) T cells. Spiral-shaped bacterial organisms were seen in the gastric tissues; however, their presence did not correlate with either the severity of epithelial lesions, inflammation or the pattern of interface inflammation. The number of apoptotic epithelial cells was widely variable and not significantly different between groups. These findings confirm previous observations that gastric ulcers develop in conditioned dogs under racing stress. The unique nature of the interface-type gastric inflammation is similar to that of human lymphocytic gastritis and may suggest an immune-mediated mechanism for the changes seen in Alaskan racing sled dogs.

  17. Nodule Regression in Adults With Nodular Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Wan; Lee, Sun-Young; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Sung, In-Kyung; Park, Hyung Seok; Shim, Chan-Sup; Han, Hye Seung

    2015-01-01

    Background Nodular gastritis (NG) is associated with the presence of Helicobacter pylori infection, but there are controversies on nodule regression in adults. The aim of this study was to analyze the factors that are related to the nodule regression in adults diagnosed as NG. Methods Adult population who were diagnosed as NG with H. pylori infection during esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) at our center were included. Changes in the size and location of the nodules, status of H. pylori infection, upper gastrointestinal (UGI) symptom, EGD and pathology findings were analyzed between the initial and follow-up tests. Results Of the 117 NG patients, 66.7% (12/18) of the eradicated NG patients showed nodule regression after H. pylori eradication, whereas 9.9% (9/99) of the non-eradicated NG patients showed spontaneous nodule regression without H. pylori eradication (P < 0.001). Nodule regression was more frequent in NG patients with antral nodule location (P = 0.010), small-sized nodules (P = 0.029), H. pylori eradication (P < 0.001), UGI symptom (P = 0.007), and a long-term follow-up period (P = 0.030). On the logistic regression analysis, nodule regression was inversely correlated with the persistent H. pylori infection on the follow-up test (odds ratio (OR): 0.020, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.003 - 0.137, P < 0.001) and short-term follow-up period < 30.5 months (OR: 0.140, 95% CI: 0.028 - 0.700, P = 0.017). Conclusions In adults with NG, H. pylori eradication is the most significant factor associated with nodule regression. Long-term follow-up period is also correlated with nodule regression, but is less significant than H. pylori eradication. Our findings suggest that H. pylori eradication should be considered to promote nodule regression in NG patients with H. pylori infection.

  18. Psychosocial factors in peptic ulcer and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Levenstein, Susan

    2002-06-01

    Over the past decade, while gastroenterologists' interest in mind-body interactions in organic disorders dwindled, stronger evidence has linked psychosocial factors with the incidence and recurrence of peptic ulcer and with the course of inflammatory bowel disease. Psychological-behavioral approaches to treatment continue to be disappointing. Psychosocial factors may affect ulcer by increasing duodenal acid load, altering local circulation or motility, intensifying Helicobacter pylori infection, stimulating corticosteroid secretion, and affecting health risk behaviors; possible mechanisms for inflammatory bowel disease include immune deregulation, gut permeability changes, and poor medication adherence. Both belong to the growing category of diseases thought to have an infectious component: for peptic ulcer the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, for inflammatory bowel disease an exaggerated immune response to gut bacteria. Peptic ulcer and inflammatory bowel disease, which present unique interactions among psychological, immunologic, endocrine, infectious, and behavioral factors, are splendid paradigms of the biopsychosocial model.

  19. Helicobacter pylori Associated Lymphocytic Gastritis in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Jeong; Eom, Dae Woon

    2014-01-01

    Lymphocytic gastritis (LG) is a rare subtype of chronic gastritis. It is defined as dense proliferation of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) more than 25 lymphocytes per 100 epithelial cells. The known major causes of LG are celiac disease and Helicobacter pylori infection. H. pylori associated LG (HpLG) has more enhanced cytotoxic and apoptotic tendencies than chronic H. pylori gastritis. A 12-year-old girl with postprandial epigastric pain was diagnosed HpLG on endoscopic biopsy. After the 1st eradication therapy, H. pylori bacilli were still found, and urea breathing test was positive. Although the endoscopic finding was partially improved, clinical symptoms and histologic finding were persisted. We could achieve the improvement of clinical symptoms and disappearance of IELs after the 2nd eradication. The discordant of histopathologic and endoscopic improvement occurred after the 1st eradication therapy of HpLG. Therefore the clinical and histopathologic evaluation should be considered as well as endoscopic findings. PMID:25349835

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus pyogenes Strain JMUB1235 Isolated from an Acute Phlegmonous Gastritis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shinya; Sasahara, Teppei; Arai, Naoshi; Sasaki, Kazumasa; Aiba, Yoshifumi; Sato’o, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Acute phlegmonous gastritis is an uncommon endogenous bacterial gastritis presenting with a high mortality rate. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of an emm89 Streptococcus pyogenes strain, JMUB1235, which is the causative agent of acute phlegmonous gastritis. PMID:27795272

  1. Helicobacter pylori and precancerous conditions of the stomach: the frequency of infection in a cross-sectional study of 79 consecutive patients with chronic antral gastritis in Yaoundé, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Ankouane, Firmin; Noah, Dominique Noah; Enyime, Félicien Ntoné; Ndjollé, Carole Menzy; Djapa, Roger Nsenga; Nonga, Bernadette Ngo; Njoya, Oudou; Ndam, Elie Claude Ndjitoyap

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The study aimed at determining the different types of precancerous conditions of the stomach and searches the frequency of Helicobacter pylori in these lesions in patients with chronic antral gastritis in Yaounde, Cameroon. Methods Five gastric biopsies were performed during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for pathology and fixed in formol 10% before being coated in paraffin. Both the modified Giemsa and Periodic acid of Shift – Alkaline blue stains were used for the histological diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. Hematoxylyn and eosin stain was used to determine the activity of gastritis, atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia in accordance to the Sydney's classification of gastritis. Data were analysed using both the Epi info 6.04 and Excel 2007 softwares. Means and their standard deviations, medians and their interquartiles (IQR) were calculated. Proportions were established for qualitative variables and chi square analysis done in this study with a p value set at 0.05. Results Seventy-nine patients with chronic antral gastritis were enrolled, of which 43 (54.4%) were male, median age: 43 years (range from 21 to 70 years). The rate of atrophic gastritis was 74.7% (59/79). The activity of atrophic gastritis was mild in 47.5% (28/59) of cases, moderate in 47.5% (28/59) and severe in 5% (5/59). Intestinal metaplasia and follicular gastritis were present in 6.3% (5/79), and 10.1% (8/79), respectively. Concerning Helicobacter pylori infection, 71.2% (42/59) of patients with atrophic gastritis tested positive against 28.8% (17/59) who tested negative (p = 0.00003). Helicobacter pylori infection was related to the severity of gastric atrophy (p = 0.0001). Among patients with intestinal metaplasia and follicular gastritis, the proportion of those who tested positive for Helicobacter pylori infection was 80% (4/5), and 75% (6/8), respectively. There were no significant differences in the occurrence of atrophic gastritis according to age

  2. [Diagnosis and Treatment of Peptic Ulcer Disease: Present and Future Perspective].

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Wook

    2016-06-25

    Peptic ulcer disease is one of the most commonly encountered diseases in gastroenterology clinics. After the discovery of Helicobacter pylori by Warren and Marshall, it has been identified as the most important cause of peptic ulcer. Eradication of H. pylori markedly reduces the post-treatment recurrence rate of peptic ulcer. However, as human populations age, the incidence of cardiovascular and musculoskeletal diseases increases and consequent use of aspirin and non-steroidal anti-in-flammatory drugs increases. Thus causes and presenting patterns of peptic ulcer have changed. In this review, I describe new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for peptic ulcer disease and explore future perspectives.

  3. Gardenia jasminoides Ellis ethanol extract and its constituents reduce the risks of gastritis and reverse gastric lesions in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Je-Hyuk; Lee, Dong-Ung; Jeong, Choon-Sik

    2009-06-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis (GJE) extract and its constituents, such as ursolic acid and genipin, on gastritis in rats and the growth of human gastric cancer cells. The GJE extract, ursolic acid and genipin showed the acid-neutralizing capacities, the antioxidant activities, and the inhibitory effects on the growth of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), which are almost equivalent to positive control compounds. In addition, the GJE extract and ursolic acid had cytotoxic activity against AGS and SUN638 gastric cancer cells. The genipin and ursolic acid inhibited significant HCl/ethanol-induced gastric lesions. Taken together, GJE extract and its constituents might have antigastritic activities, associated with the antioxidant activities, acid-neutralizing capacities, and anti-H. pylori action. Also, we could suggest that genipin and ursolic acid may be useful for the treatment and/or protection of gastritis. PMID:19425231

  4. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity and immunostimulatory effect of extracts from Byrsonima crassa Nied. (Malpighiaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Bonacorsi, Cibele; Raddi, Maria Stella G; Carlos, Iracilda Z; Sannomiya, Miriam; Vilegas, Wagner

    2009-01-01

    Background Several in vitro studies have looked at the effect of medicinal plant extracts against Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). Regardless of the popular use of Byrsonima crassa (B. crassa) as antiemetic, diuretic, febrifuge, to treat diarrhea, gastritis and ulcers, there is no data on its effects against H. pylori. In this study, we evaluated the anti-H. pylori of B. crassa leaves extracts and its effects on reactive oxygen/nitrogen intermediates induction by murine peritoneal macrophages. Methods The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by broth microdilution method and the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) by the horseradish peroxidase-dependent oxidation of phenol red and Griess reaction, respectively. Results The methanolic (MeOH) and chloroformic (CHCl3) extracts inhibit, in vitro, the growth of H. pylori with MIC value of 1024 μg/ml. The MeOH extract induced the production H2O2 and NO, but CHCl3 extract only NO. Conclusion Based in our results, B. crassa can be considered a source of compounds with anti-H. pylori activity, but its use should be done with caution in treatment of the gastritis and peptic ulcers, since the reactive oxygen/nitrogen intermediates are involved in the pathogenesis of gastric mucosal injury induced by ulcerogenic agents and H. pylori infections. PMID:19149866

  5. Phase II clinical trial on effect of the long turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn) on healing of peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Prucksunand, C; Indrasukhsri, B; Leethochawalit, M; Hungspreugs, K

    2001-03-01

    The study examined patients who had symptoms indicating peptic ulcer. Forty-five patients, 24 males and 21 females, aged between 16-60 years were included in the study. Twenty-five patients, 18 males and 7 females, were endoscoped, their ulcers located in the duodenal bulb and gastric (angulus). The ulcer sizes varied between 0.5 to 1.5 cm in diameter. Capsule-filled turmeric was given orally in the dose of 2 capsules (300 mg each) five times daily, one half to an hour before meals, at 16.00 hours and at bedtime continuously. The result after 4 weeks of treatment showed that ulcers were absent in 48% or 12 cases (DU 9 and GU 3). Eighteen cases (DU 13 and GU 5) had absence of ulcer after 8 weeks of treatment. Nineteen cases (76%) (DU 14 and GU 5) did not have ulcers after 12 weeks of treatment. The rest, 20 cases were not found to have ulcers and some were not endoscoped. They appeared to have erosions, gastritis and dyspepsia. They received turmeric capsules for 4 weeks of treatment. The abdominal pain and discomfort satisfactorily subsided in the first and second week. They could take normal foods instead of soft meals. Blood chemistry and hematology of all 54 patients had no significant changes in hematological system, liver and renal functions both before and after treatment. PMID:11485087

  6. Antral atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and preneoplastic markers in Mexican children with Helicobacter pylori-positive and Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis.

    PubMed

    Villarreal-Calderon, Rodolfo; Luévano-González, Arturo; Aragón-Flores, Mariana; Zhu, Hongtu; Yuan, Ying; Xiang, Qun; Yan, Benjamin; Stoll, Kathryn Anne; Cross, Janet V; Iczkowski, Kenneth A; Mackinnon, Alexander Craig

    2014-06-01

    Chronic inflammation and infection are major risk factors for gastric carcinogenesis in adults. As chronic gastritis is common in Mexican children, diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori and other causes of gastritis are critical for the identification of children who would benefit from closer surveillance. Antral biopsies from 82 Mexican children (mean age, 8.3 ± 4.8 years) with chronic gastritis (36 H pylori+, 46 H pylori-) were examined for gastritis activity, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia (IM), and immunohistochemical expression of gastric carcinogenesis biomarkers caudal type homeobox 2 (CDX2), ephrin type-B receptor 4 (EphB4), matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3), macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), p53, β-catenin, and E-cadherin. Atrophy was diagnosed in 7 (9%) of 82, and IM, in 5 (6%) of 82 by routine histology, whereas 6 additional children (7%) (3 H pylori+) exhibited aberrant CDX2 expression without IM. Significant positive correlations were seen between EphB4, MMP3, and MIF (P<.0001). Atrophy and follicular pathology were more frequent in H pylori+ biopsies (P<.0001), whereas IM and CDX2 expression showed no significant correlation with H pylori status. Antral biopsies demonstrating atrophy, IM, and/or aberrant CDX2 expression were seen in 21.95% (18/82) of the children, potentially identifying those who would benefit from closer surveillance and preventive dietary strategies. Biomarkers CDX2, EphB4, MMP3, and MIF may be useful in the workup of pediatric gastritis.

  7. Collagenous gastritis, a new spectrum of disease in pediatric patients: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Suskind, David; Wahbeh, Ghassan; Murray, Karen; Christie, Dennis; Kapur, Raj P

    2009-01-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare gastrointestinal disorder characterized in pediatrics by abdominal pain and anemia. The literature divides collagenous gastritis into distinct pediatric-onset and adult-onset phenotypes. As opposed to pediatric form, the adult form is associated with collagenous colitis and presents clinically with voluminous non-bloody diarrhea. There are over 25 case reports of collagenous gastritis of which 10 are pediatric cases. We present two cases of pediatric onset collagenous gastritis: one with a classic pediatric presentation, the other with findings typical of adult-onset disease. This is the first report of the adult-onset phenotype collagenous gastritis in a pediatric patient. PMID:19829984

  8. Sarcomas arising after radiotherapy for peptic ulcer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lieber, M.R.; Winans, C.S.; Griem, M.L.; Moossa, R.; Elner, V.M.; Franklin, W.A.

    1985-06-01

    Therapeutic gastric irradiation has been used to reduce peptic juice secretion in patients with peptic ulcer disease. Between 1937 and 1968 a total of 2049 patients received such therapy at the University of Chicago. Three of these patients are known to have developed sarcomas in the field of radiation. Two gastric leiomyosarcomas of the stomach were diagnosed 26 and 14 years after treatment and a malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the anterior chest wall was removed six years after gastric irradiation. Of 743 peptic ulcer patients treated without irradiation and constituted as a control group for the study of therapeutic gastric radiation, none is known to have developed sarcoma. As the incidence of sarcoma in these patient groups is known only from the tumor registry of the University of Chicago, other cases of sarcoma may exist in the groups. While an increased incidence of sarcoma has not been proven to occur in patients who received therapeutic gastric irradiation for peptic ulcer disease, the possibility of such a risk should be borne in mind by physicians caring for such patients.

  9. Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis in experimentally infected conventional piglets.

    PubMed

    Poutahidis, T; Tsangaris, T; Kanakoudis, G; Vlemmas, I; Iliadis, N; Sofianou, D

    2001-11-01

    A conventional nonmutant animal that could be experimentally infected with Helicobacter pylori isolates would be a useful animal model for human H. pylori-associated gastritis. Gnotobiotic and barrier-born pigs are susceptible to H. pylori infection, but attempts to infect conventional pigs with this bacterium have been unsuccessful. In the present study, a litter of eight 20-day-old crossbreed piglets were purchased from a commercial farm. Six of them were orally challenged two to five times at different ages, between 29 and 49 days, with doses of H. pylori inoculum containing approximately 10(9) bacterial cells. Two animals served as controls. The inoculation program began 2 days postweaning when the piglets were 29 days of age. Prior to every inoculation, the piglets were fasted and pretreated with cimetidine, and prior to the first and second inoculation each piglet also was pretreated with dexamethasone. The challenged piglets were euthanasized between 36 and 76 days of age. H. pylori colonized all six inoculated piglets. The pathology of the experimentally induced gastritis was examined macroscopically and by light and electron microscopy. H. pylori induced a severe lymphocytic gastritis in the conventional piglets and reproduced the large majority of the pathologic features of the human disease. Therefore, the conventional piglet represents a promising new model for study of the various pathogenic mechanisms involved in the development of lesions of the human H. pylori-associated gastritis.

  10. Leucocyte migration inhibition test with two gastric antigens in pernicious anaemia and in simple atrophic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Fixa, B; Komárková, O; Nozicka, Z

    1979-02-01

    Leucocyte migration inhibition test was used for evaluation of cell-mediated immunity in patients with pernicious anaemia (PA) and simple atrophic gastritis (SAG). As antigens microsomal antigen from gastric mucosa of swine foetus and relatively pure hog intrinsic factor (IF) were used. Significant differences were found between PA and SAG with microsomal antigen, but not with IF. It was concluded, that the microsomal antigen might be more active than IF. This observation could contribute to explane the higher incidence of parietal cell antibody than that of IF antibody in PA patients.

  11. Correlations Among Endoscopic, Histologic and Serologic Diagnoses for the Assessment of Atrophic Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Yup; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Hye Seung; Oh, Jane C.; Kwon, Yong Hwan; Choi, Yoon Jin; Yoon, Ki Chul; Hwang, Jae Jin; Lee, Hyun Joo; Lee, AeRa; Jeong, Yeonsang; Jo, Hyun Jin; Yoon, Hyuk; Shin, Cheol Min; Park, Young Soo; Lee, Dong Ho

    2014-01-01

    Background: Atrophic gastritis is a precancerous condition, which can be diagnosed by several methods. However, there is no consensus for the standard method. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlations among endoscopic, histologic, and serologic findings for the diagnosis of atrophic gastritis. Methods: From March 2003 to August 2013, a total of 2,558 subjects were enrolled. Endoscopic atrophic gastritis was graded by Kimura-Takemoto classification and histological atrophic gastritis was assessed by updated Sydney system. Serological assessment of atrophic gastritis was based on serum pepsinogen test. Results: The serum pepsinogen I/II ratio showed a significant decreasing nature when the extent of atrophy increased (R2=0.837, P<0.001) and the cut-off value for distinguishing between presence and absence of endoscopic atrophic gastritis was 3.2. The serum pepsinogen I and pepsinogen I/II ratio were significantly lower when the histological atrophic gastritis progressed and the cut-off value was 3.0 for a diagnosis of histological atrophic gastritis. A significant correlation between endoscopic and histological atrophic gastritis was noted and the sensitivity and specificity of endoscopic diagnosis were 65.9% and 58.0% for antrum, 71.3% and 53.7% for corpus, respectively. Conclusions: The endoscopic, histological, and serological atrophic gastritis showed relatively good correlations. However, as these three methods have a limitation, a multifactorial assessment might be needed to ameliorate the diagnostic accuracy of atrophic gastritis. PMID:25337572

  12. Estimation of salient regions related to chronic gastritis using gastric X-ray images.

    PubMed

    Togo, Ren; Ishihara, Kenta; Ogawa, Takahiro; Haseyama, Miki

    2016-10-01

    Since technical knowledge and a high degree of experience are necessary for diagnosis of chronic gastritis, computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems that analyze gastric X-ray images are desirable in the field of medicine. Therefore, a new method that estimates salient regions related to chronic gastritis/non-gastritis for supporting diagnosis is presented in this paper. In order to estimate salient regions related to chronic gastritis/non-gastritis, the proposed method monitors the distance between a target image feature and Support Vector Machine (SVM)-based hyperplane for its classification. Furthermore, our method realizes removal of the influence of regions outside the stomach by using positional relationships between the stomach and other organs. Consequently, since the proposed method successfully estimates salient regions of gastric X-ray images for which chronic gastritis and non-gastritis are unknown, visual support for inexperienced clinicians becomes feasible. PMID:27494090

  13. Collagenous gastritis: a long-term follow-up with the development of endocrine cell hyperplasia, intestinal metaplasia, and epithelial changes indeterminate for dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Winslow, J L; Trainer, T D; Colletti, R B

    2001-11-01

    This report reviews the literature pertaining to collagenous gastritis and describes the clinicopathologic evolution of this disease in a patient during a 12-year period. We examined 109 biopsy specimens of gastric mucosa from 19 different endoscopic procedures for the severity and distribution of collagenous gastritis in a single patient. Assessments were undertaken for the presence of endocrine and gastrin cell hyperplasias and dysplastic epithelial changes. Relative to biopsy specimens from age- and sex-matched control subjects, the patient's biopsy specimens showed a significantly lower number of antral gastrin cells, along with a significant corpus endocrine cell hyperplasia, suggesting an increased risk of endocrine neoplasia. Gastric corpus biopsy specimens revealed an active, chronic gastritis, subepithelial collagen deposition, smooth muscle hyperplasia, and mild to moderate glandular atrophy. Additional findings of intestinal metaplasia and reactive epithelial changes indeterminate for dysplasia raise concerns about the potential for adenocarcinoma. PMID:11710694

  14. Helicobacter felis-induced gastritis was suppressed in mice overexpressing thioredoxin-1.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Kimio; Nishio, Akiyoshi; Nakamura, Hajime; Uchida, Kazushige; Fukui, Toshiro; Ohana, Masaya; Yoshizawa, Hazuki; Ohashi, Shinya; Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Matsuura, Minoru; Asada, Masanori; Nishi, Toshiki; Nakase, Hiroshi; Toyokuni, Shinya; Liu, Wenrui; Yodoi, Junji; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Chiba, Tsutomu

    2005-09-01

    Thioredoxin-1 (TRX-1) is a redox-active protein involved in scavenging reactive oxygen species and regulating redox-sensitive transcription factors. TRX-1 is induced in various inflammatory conditions and shows cytoprotective action. We investigated the roles of TRX-1 in the host defense mechanism against Helicobacter felis (H. felis) infection. Transgenic (TG) mice overexpressing human TRX-1 and wild-type (WT) mice were orally inoculated with H. felis. After 2 months, histology, oxidative damage, and gene expression of several cytokines, including macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2), a murine equivalent to interleukin (IL)-8, in the gastric mucosa were investigated. Furthermore, the effects of TRX-1 on oxidative stress and neutrophil migration were studied both in vivo and in vitro. The gastric mucosa was thickened in H. felis-infected WT mice, but not in infected TRX-1-TG mice. Histologically, all H. felis-infected WT mice developed moderate-to-severe gastritis, whereas the development of gastritis was significantly suppressed in infected TRX-1-TG mice. Oxidative damage markers, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and malondialdehyde, increased in the stomach of infected WT mice, but not TRX-1-TG mice. Upregulation of IL-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha gene expression in H. felis-infected TRX-1-TG mice was significantly lower than in WT mice. However, upregulation of MIP-2 and IL-7 was not different between the two groups. TRX-1 suppressed oxidative cytotoxicity and DNA damage, and inhibited neutrophil migration both in vivo and in vitro. The present study suggests that overexpression of TRX-1 suppresses H. felis-induced gastritis by inhibiting chemotaxis of neutrophils and reducing oxidative stress.

  15. Medicinal plant activity on Helicobacter pylori related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan-Chuen

    2014-01-01

    More than 50% of the world population is infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). The bacterium highly links to peptic ulcer diseases and duodenal ulcer, which was classified as a group I carcinogen in 1994 by the WHO. The pathogenesis of H. pylori is contributed by its virulence factors including urease, flagella, vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA), cytotoxin-associated gene antigen (Cag A), and others. Of those virulence factors, VacA and CagA play the key roles. Infection with H. pylori vacA-positive strains can lead to vacuolation and apoptosis, whereas infection with cagA-positive strains might result in severe gastric inflammation and gastric cancer. Numerous medicinal plants have been reported for their anti-H. pylori activity, and the relevant active compounds including polyphenols, flavonoids, quinones, coumarins, terpenoids, and alkaloids have been studied. The anti-H. pylori action mechanisms, including inhibition of enzymatic (urease, DNA gyrase, dihydrofolate reductase, N-acetyltransferase, and myeloperoxidase) and adhesive activities, high redox potential, and hydrophilic/hydrophobic natures of compounds, have also been discussed in detail. H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation may progress to superficial gastritis, atrophic gastritis, and finally gastric cancer. Many natural products have anti-H. pylori-induced inflammation activity and the relevant mechanisms include suppression of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation and inhibition of oxidative stress. Anti-H. pylori induced gastric inflammatory effects of plant products, including quercetin, apigenin, carotenoids-rich algae, tea product, garlic extract, apple peel polyphenol, and finger-root extract, have been documented. In conclusion, many medicinal plant products possess anti-H. pylori activity as well as an anti-H. pylori-induced gastric inflammatory effect. Those plant products have showed great potential as pharmaceutical candidates for H. pylori

  16. Medicinal plant activity on Helicobacter pylori related diseases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan-Chuen

    2014-08-14

    More than 50% of the world population is infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). The bacterium highly links to peptic ulcer diseases and duodenal ulcer, which was classified as a group I carcinogen in 1994 by the WHO. The pathogenesis of H. pylori is contributed by its virulence factors including urease, flagella, vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA), cytotoxin-associated gene antigen (Cag A), and others. Of those virulence factors, VacA and CagA play the key roles. Infection with H. pylori vacA-positive strains can lead to vacuolation and apoptosis, whereas infection with cagA-positive strains might result in severe gastric inflammation and gastric cancer. Numerous medicinal plants have been reported for their anti-H. pylori activity, and the relevant active compounds including polyphenols, flavonoids, quinones, coumarins, terpenoids, and alkaloids have been studied. The anti-H. pylori action mechanisms, including inhibition of enzymatic (urease, DNA gyrase, dihydrofolate reductase, N-acetyltransferase, and myeloperoxidase) and adhesive activities, high redox potential, and hydrophilic/hydrophobic natures of compounds, have also been discussed in detail. H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation may progress to superficial gastritis, atrophic gastritis, and finally gastric cancer. Many natural products have anti-H. pylori-induced inflammation activity and the relevant mechanisms include suppression of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation and inhibition of oxidative stress. Anti-H. pylori induced gastric inflammatory effects of plant products, including quercetin, apigenin, carotenoids-rich algae, tea product, garlic extract, apple peel polyphenol, and finger-root extract, have been documented. In conclusion, many medicinal plant products possess anti-H. pylori activity as well as an anti-H. pylori-induced gastric inflammatory effect. Those plant products have showed great potential as pharmaceutical candidates for H. pylori

  17. Historical impact to drive research in peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Banić, M; Malfertheiner, P; Babić, Z; Ostojić, R; Kujundzic, M; Fatović-Ferenčić, S; Plesko, S; Petričušić, L

    2011-01-01

    The story of gastric acid secretion began with early ideas on gastric secretion (Spallanzani and de Réaumur, 17th century) and with first descriptions of food digestion (Dupuytren and Bichat, Beaumont, early 18th century), followed by proof that gastric juice contained acid (Prout, early 18th century). The research continued with first descriptions of gastric glands as the source of gastric acid and its changes upon digestive stimulus (Purkinje and Golgi, mid and late 19th century). The theory of 'nervism' - the neuro-reflex stimulation of gastric secretion by vagal nerve (Pavlov, early 20th century) was contrasted by a histamine-mediated concept of gastric secretion (Popielski and Code, mid 20th century). Thus, gastric acid and pepsin (Schwann, early 19th century) were found to be essential for food digestion and studies also pointed to histamine, being the most potent final common chemostimulator of oxyntic cells. The discoveries in etiopathogenesis of mucosal injury were marked by the famous dictum: 'No acid, no ulcer' ('Ohne saueren Magensaft kein peptisches Geschwür', Schwarz, 1910) that later induced the term of 'mucosal defense' and the notion that the breaking of 'gastric mucosal barrier' represents the initial step in the process of mucosal injury (Davenport, Code and Scholer, mid 20th century). The prostaglandins were shown to influence all major components of gastric mucosal barrier, described with the term 'cytoprotection' (Vane, Robert and Jacobson, 1970s). Beginning in the latter half of 19th century, the studies on gastric bacteriology that followed enabled the discovery of association between Campylobacter (Helicobacter) pylori and peptic ulcers (Warren and Marshall, 1980s) that led to worldwide major interventions in treating peptic ulcer disease. The surgical approach to peptic ulcer had been outlined by resection procedures (Billroth, Pean, Moynihan, late 19 century) and vagotomy, with or without drainage procedures (Jaboulay, Latarjet

  18. Molecular hydrogen in human breath: a new strategy for selectively diagnosing peptic ulcer disease, non-ulcerous dyspepsia and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Maity, Abhijit; Pal, Mithun; Maithani, Sanchi; Ghosh, Barnali; Chaudhuri, Sujit; Pradhan, Manik

    2016-07-22

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori utilizes molecular hydrogen (H2) as a respiratory substrate during colonization in the gastric mucosa. However, the link between molecular H2 and the pathogenesis of peptic-ulcer disease (PUD) and non-ulcerous dyspepsia (NUD) by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori still remains mostly unknown. Here we provide evidence that breath H2 excretion profiles are distinctly altered by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori for individuals with NUD and PUD. We subsequently unravelled the potential molecular mechanisms responsible for the alteration of H2 in exhaled breath in association with peptic ulcers, encompassing both gastric and duodenal ulcers, along with NUD. We also established that carbon-isotopic fractionations in the acid-mediated bacterial environment regulated by bacterial urease activity cannot discriminate the actual disease state i.e. whether it is peptic ulcer or NUD. However, our findings illuminate the unusual molecular H2 in breath that can track the precise evolution of PUD and NUD, even after the eradication of H. pylori infection. This deepens our understanding of the pathophysiology of PUD and NUD, reveals non-invasively the actual disease state in real-time and thus offers a novel and robust new-generation strategy for treating peptic-ulcer disease together with non-ulcer related complications even when the existing (13)C-urea breath test ((13)C-UBT) fails to diagnose.

  19. Molecular hydrogen in human breath: a new strategy for selectively diagnosing peptic ulcer disease, non-ulcerous dyspepsia and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Maity, Abhijit; Pal, Mithun; Maithani, Sanchi; Ghosh, Barnali; Chaudhuri, Sujit; Pradhan, Manik

    2016-01-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori utilizes molecular hydrogen (H2) as a respiratory substrate during colonization in the gastric mucosa. However, the link between molecular H2 and the pathogenesis of peptic-ulcer disease (PUD) and non-ulcerous dyspepsia (NUD) by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori still remains mostly unknown. Here we provide evidence that breath H2 excretion profiles are distinctly altered by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori for individuals with NUD and PUD. We subsequently unravelled the potential molecular mechanisms responsible for the alteration of H2 in exhaled breath in association with peptic ulcers, encompassing both gastric and duodenal ulcers, along with NUD. We also established that carbon-isotopic fractionations in the acid-mediated bacterial environment regulated by bacterial urease activity cannot discriminate the actual disease state i.e. whether it is peptic ulcer or NUD. However, our findings illuminate the unusual molecular H2 in breath that can track the precise evolution of PUD and NUD, even after the eradication of H. pylori infection. This deepens our understanding of the pathophysiology of PUD and NUD, reveals non-invasively the actual disease state in real-time and thus offers a novel and robust new-generation strategy for treating peptic-ulcer disease together with non-ulcer related complications even when the existing (13)C-urea breath test ((13)C-UBT) fails to diagnose. PMID:27448107

  20. Quantification of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastritis and ulcer disease using a simple and rapid carbon-14-urea breath test

    SciTech Connect

    Debongnie, J.C.; Pauwels, S.; Raat, A.; de Meeus, Y.; Haot, J.; Mainguet, P. )

    1991-06-01

    Gastric urease was studied isotopically in 230 patients with biopsy-proven normal mucosa or chronic gastritis, including 59 patients with ulcer disease. Carbon-14-urea was given in 25 ml of water without substrate carrier or nutrient-dense meal, and breath samples were collected over a 60-min period. The amount of 14CO2 excreted at 10 min was independent of the rate of gastric emptying and was not quantitatively influenced by the buccal urease activity. The 10-min 14CO2 values discriminated well between Helicobacter pylori positive and negative patients (94% sensitivity, 89% specificity) and correlated with the number of organisms assessed by histology. The test was a good predictor of chronic gastritis (95% sensitivity and 96% specificity), and a quantitative relationship was observed between 14CO2 values and the severity and activity of the gastritis. In H. pylori positive patients, breath 14CO2 was found to be similar in patients with and without ulcer disease, suggesting that the number of bacteria is not a determining factor for the onset of ulceration.

  1. Recent Developments in the Endoscopic Treatment of Patients with Peptic Ulcer Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jae-Young

    2016-01-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is an internal medical emergency. Endoscopic hemostasis has been shown to improve the survival rate of patients with peptic ulcer bleeding. Although the established hemostatic modalities, including injection, thermal therapy, and mechanical therapy, are effective in controlling peptic ulcer bleeding, hemostasis can be difficult to achieve in some cases. As a result, recent, new endoscopic hemostatic modalities, including over-the-scope clips, topical hemostatic sprays, and endoscopic ultrasonography-guided angiotherapy, have been developed. PMID:27744666

  2. Collagenous gastritis: a morphologic and immunohistochemical study of 40 patients.

    PubMed

    Arnason, Thomas; Brown, Ian S; Goldsmith, Jeffrey D; Anderson, William; O'Brien, Blake H; Wilson, Claire; Winter, Harland; Lauwers, Gregory Y

    2015-04-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare condition defined histologically by a superficial subepithelial collagen layer. This study further characterizes the morphologic spectrum of collagenous gastritis by evaluating a multi-institutional series of 40 patients (26 female and 14 male). The median age at onset was 16 years (range 3-89 years), including 24 patients (60%) under age 18. Twelve patients (30%) had associated celiac disease, collagenous sprue, or collagenous colitis. Hematoxylin and eosin slides were reviewed in biopsies from all patients and tenascin, gastrin, eotaxin, and IgG4/IgG immunohistochemical stains were applied to a subset. The distribution of subepithelial collagen favored the body/fundus in pediatric patients and the antrum in adults. There were increased surface intraepithelial lymphocytes (>25 lymphocytes/100 epithelial cells) in five patients. Three of these patients had associated celiac and/or collagenous sprue/colitis, while the remaining two had increased duodenal lymphocytosis without specific etiology. An eosinophil-rich pattern (>30 eosinophils/high power field) was seen in 21/40 (52%) patients. Seven patients' biopsies demonstrated atrophy of the gastric corpus mucosa. Tenascin immunohistochemistry highlighted the subepithelial collagen in all 21 specimens evaluated and was a more sensitive method of collagen detection in biopsies from two patients with subtle subepithelial collagen. No increased eotaxin expression was identified in 16 specimens evaluated. One of the twenty-three biopsies tested had increased IgG4-positive cells (100/high power field) with an IgG4/IgG ratio of 55%. In summary, collagenous gastritis presents three distinct histologic patterns including a lymphocytic gastritis-like pattern, an eosinophil-rich pattern, and an atrophic pattern. Eotaxin and IgG4 were not elevated enough to implicate these pathways in the pathogenesis. Tenascin immunohistochemistry can be used as a sensitive method of collagen detection. PMID

  3. Predictors for frequent esophageal dilations of benign peptic strictures.

    PubMed

    Agnew, S R; Pandya, S P; Reynolds, R P; Preiksaitis, H G

    1996-05-01

    Recurrence of esophageal peptic stricture necessitating repeated dilation treatments remains a problem for many patients despite optimal acid suppressive therapy. The factors associated with frequent relapses are poorly understood. We studied retrospectively a population of 58 patients with benign peptic strictures and dysphagia treated by esophageal dilation and followed for 66.5 +/- 6.7 months. Data was collected for age, sex, heartburn, weight loss, esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus, number of dilation treatments during the first year of follow-up, frequency and number of subsequent dilation treatments, type of dilator used, and history of other concurrent treatments. Patients who lacked heartburn (P = 0.007) or who reported a history of weight loss (P = 0.006) at the time of their initial presentation required more frequent dilations during the first year of follow-up. The mean number of dilations in year 1 was 6.2 +/- 0.9 for patients lacking heartburn versus 3.2 +/- 0.5 for patients with heartburn (P = 0.004), and 9.0 +/- 1.8 for patients who reported weight loss versus 4.1 +/- 0.5 (P = 0.006) for those who did not. The patients requiring frequent treatment during their first year also required frequent subsequent dilations because of stricture recurrence (P < 0.0001). We did not demonstrate any relationship between the other factors studied and treatment frequency. These observations suggest that patients who require frequent retreatment for recurrent peptic stricture are more likely to provide a history of weight loss and less likely to complain of heartburn at initial presentation. The pattern of frequent repeat dilation for recurrent peptic strictures is established during the first year of follow-up.

  4. ABCG2 in peptic ulcer: gene expression and mutation analysis.

    PubMed

    Salagacka-Kubiak, Aleksandra; Żebrowska, Marta; Wosiak, Agnieszka; Balcerczak, Mariusz; Mirowski, Marek; Balcerczak, Ewa

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the participation of polymorphism at position C421A and mRNA expression of the ABCG2 gene in the development of peptic ulcers, which is a very common and severe disease. ABCG2, encoded by the ABCG2 gene, has been found inter alia in the gastrointestinal tract, where it plays a protective role eliminating xenobiotics from cells into the extracellular environment. The materials for the study were biopsies of gastric mucosa taken during a routine endoscopy. For genotyping by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) at position C421A, DNA was isolated from 201 samples, while for the mRNA expression level by real-time PCR, RNA was isolated from 60 patients. The control group of healthy individuals consisted of 97 blood donors. The dominant genotype in the group of peptic ulcer patients and healthy individuals was homozygous CC. No statistically significant differences between healthy individuals and the whole group of peptic ulcer patients and, likewise, between the subgroups of peptic ulcer patients (infected and uninfected with Helicobacter pylori) were found. ABCG2 expression relative to GAPDH expression was found in 38 of the 60 gastric mucosa samples. The expression level of the gene varies greatly among cases. The statistically significant differences between the intensity (p = 0.0375) of H. pylori infection and ABCG2 gene expression have been shown. It was observed that the more intense the infection, the higher the level of ABCG2 expression.

  5. Caveolin-1 Protects B6129 Mice against Helicobacter pylori Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Hitkova, Ivana; Yuan, Gang; Anderl, Florian; Gerhard, Markus; Kirchner, Thomas; Reu, Simone; Röcken, Christoph; Schäfer, Claus; Schmid, Roland M.; Vogelmann, Roger; Ebert, Matthias P. A.; Burgermeister, Elke

    2013-01-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav1) is a scaffold protein and pathogen receptor in the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract. Chronic infection of gastric epithelial cells by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major risk factor for human gastric cancer (GC) where Cav1 is frequently down-regulated. However, the function of Cav1 in H. pylori infection and pathogenesis of GC remained unknown. We show here that Cav1-deficient mice, infected for 11 months with the CagA-delivery deficient H. pylori strain SS1, developed more severe gastritis and tissue damage, including loss of parietal cells and foveolar hyperplasia, and displayed lower colonisation of the gastric mucosa than wild-type B6129 littermates. Cav1-null mice showed enhanced infiltration of macrophages and B-cells and secretion of chemokines (RANTES) but had reduced levels of CD25+ regulatory T-cells. Cav1-deficient human GC cells (AGS), infected with the CagA-delivery proficient H. pylori strain G27, were more sensitive to CagA-related cytoskeletal stress morphologies (“humming bird”) compared to AGS cells stably transfected with Cav1 (AGS/Cav1). Infection of AGS/Cav1 cells triggered the recruitment of p120 RhoGTPase-activating protein/deleted in liver cancer-1 (p120RhoGAP/DLC1) to Cav1 and counteracted CagA-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements. In human GC cell lines (MKN45, N87) and mouse stomach tissue, H. pylori down-regulated endogenous expression of Cav1 independently of CagA. Mechanistically, H. pylori activated sterol-responsive element-binding protein-1 (SREBP1) to repress transcription of the human Cav1 gene from sterol-responsive elements (SREs) in the proximal Cav1 promoter. These data suggested a protective role of Cav1 against H. pylori-induced inflammation and tissue damage. We propose that H. pylori exploits down-regulation of Cav1 to subvert the host's immune response and to promote signalling of its virulence factors in host cells. PMID:23592983

  6. Caveolin-1 protects B6129 mice against Helicobacter pylori gastritis.

    PubMed

    Hitkova, Ivana; Yuan, Gang; Anderl, Florian; Gerhard, Markus; Kirchner, Thomas; Reu, Simone; Röcken, Christoph; Schäfer, Claus; Schmid, Roland M; Vogelmann, Roger; Ebert, Matthias P A; Burgermeister, Elke

    2013-01-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav1) is a scaffold protein and pathogen receptor in the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract. Chronic infection of gastric epithelial cells by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major risk factor for human gastric cancer (GC) where Cav1 is frequently down-regulated. However, the function of Cav1 in H. pylori infection and pathogenesis of GC remained unknown. We show here that Cav1-deficient mice, infected for 11 months with the CagA-delivery deficient H. pylori strain SS1, developed more severe gastritis and tissue damage, including loss of parietal cells and foveolar hyperplasia, and displayed lower colonisation of the gastric mucosa than wild-type B6129 littermates. Cav1-null mice showed enhanced infiltration of macrophages and B-cells and secretion of chemokines (RANTES) but had reduced levels of CD25+ regulatory T-cells. Cav1-deficient human GC cells (AGS), infected with the CagA-delivery proficient H. pylori strain G27, were more sensitive to CagA-related cytoskeletal stress morphologies ("humming bird") compared to AGS cells stably transfected with Cav1 (AGS/Cav1). Infection of AGS/Cav1 cells triggered the recruitment of p120 RhoGTPase-activating protein/deleted in liver cancer-1 (p120RhoGAP/DLC1) to Cav1 and counteracted CagA-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements. In human GC cell lines (MKN45, N87) and mouse stomach tissue, H. pylori down-regulated endogenous expression of Cav1 independently of CagA. Mechanistically, H. pylori activated sterol-responsive element-binding protein-1 (SREBP1) to repress transcription of the human Cav1 gene from sterol-responsive elements (SREs) in the proximal Cav1 promoter. These data suggested a protective role of Cav1 against H. pylori-induced inflammation and tissue damage. We propose that H. pylori exploits down-regulation of Cav1 to subvert the host's immune response and to promote signalling of its virulence factors in host cells.

  7. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis--pathogenesis, pathology and management.

    PubMed

    Neumann, William L; Coss, Elizabeth; Rugge, Massimo; Genta, Robert M

    2013-09-01

    Autoimmune gastritis is a chronic progressive inflammatory condition that results in the replacement of the parietal cell mass by atrophic and metaplastic mucosa. A complex interaction of autoantibodies against the parietal cell proton pump and sensitized T cells progressively destroy the parietal cells, inducing hypochlorhydria and then achlorhydria, while autoantibodies against the intrinsic factor impair the absorption of vitamin B₁₂. The resulting cobalamin deficiency manifests with megaloblastic anaemia and neurological and systemic signs and symptoms collectively known as pernicious anaemia. Previously believed to be predominantly a disease of elderly women of Northern European ancestry, autoimmune gastritis has now been recognized in all populations and ethnic groups, but because of the complexity of the diagnosis no reliable prevalence data are available. For similar reasons, as well as the frequent and often unknown overlap with Helicobacter pylori infection, the risk of gastric cancer has not been adequately assessed in these patients. This Review summarizes the epidemiology, pathogenesis and pathological aspects of autoimmune metaplastic atrophic gastritis. We also provide practical advice for the diagnosis and management of patients with this disease. PMID:23774773

  8. Gastritis and gastric blood flow in hyperdynamic septic pigs.

    PubMed

    Lucas, C E; Ravikant, T; Walt, A J

    1976-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the gastric hemodynamics in a septic model that causes both a hyperdynamic state and acute erosive gastritis. Sepsis was established in twelve pigs by the intramuscular shank injection of Pastuerella multocida (42 X 10(8) colonies) in triptose phosphate broth; four pigs received sterile broth injections (shams) and eight received sterile saline injections (controls). After 18 hours, cardiac output was measured by both the cardiogreen dilution technic and the radioactive microsphere dilution technic; cardiac output was then compared to total and regional gastric blood flow measured by the raioactive microsphere entrapment technic. Acute erosive gastritis developed in septic pigs in the fundus and body of the stomach; the antrum was spared. Cardiac output was significantly increased in septic pigs compared with sham and control pigs. Total gastric blood flow and regional blood flow to the fundus, body, and antrum were also increased in direct proportion to the increase in cardiac output. These data suggest that acute erosive gastritis is primarily due to an end-organ cellular insult from sepsis and is not primarily due to a decrease or redistribution in gastric blood flow.

  9. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis--pathogenesis, pathology and management.

    PubMed

    Neumann, William L; Coss, Elizabeth; Rugge, Massimo; Genta, Robert M

    2013-09-01

    Autoimmune gastritis is a chronic progressive inflammatory condition that results in the replacement of the parietal cell mass by atrophic and metaplastic mucosa. A complex interaction of autoantibodies against the parietal cell proton pump and sensitized T cells progressively destroy the parietal cells, inducing hypochlorhydria and then achlorhydria, while autoantibodies against the intrinsic factor impair the absorption of vitamin B₁₂. The resulting cobalamin deficiency manifests with megaloblastic anaemia and neurological and systemic signs and symptoms collectively known as pernicious anaemia. Previously believed to be predominantly a disease of elderly women of Northern European ancestry, autoimmune gastritis has now been recognized in all populations and ethnic groups, but because of the complexity of the diagnosis no reliable prevalence data are available. For similar reasons, as well as the frequent and often unknown overlap with Helicobacter pylori infection, the risk of gastric cancer has not been adequately assessed in these patients. This Review summarizes the epidemiology, pathogenesis and pathological aspects of autoimmune metaplastic atrophic gastritis. We also provide practical advice for the diagnosis and management of patients with this disease.

  10. Perforated peptic ulcer following gastric bypass for obesity.

    PubMed

    Macgregor, A M; Pickens, N E; Thoburn, E K

    1999-03-01

    Peptic ulcer in the excluded segment of a gastric bypass performed in the management of morbid obesity has only rarely been reported in the literature. The purpose of this study is to review our experience with the condition in a series of 4300 patients who underwent gastric-restrictive surgery between 1978 and 1997. Eleven patients presented with acute perforation of a peptic ulcer in the excluded gastric segment. Nine ulcers were duodenal, one was gastric, and one patient had both gastric and duodenal perforations. The time between primary gastric-restrictive surgery and ulcer perforation varied from 20 days to 12 years. All patients presented with upper abdominal pain. The classical radiological sign of perforated peptic ulcer, free air under the diaphragm, did not occur in any patient. Nine patients were initially treated by primary closure of the perforation with subsequent definitive ulcer therapy by vagotomy, pyloroplasty, or gastrectomy. One case, initially treated elsewhere, was managed by placement of a Malecot catheter through the duodenal perforation, gastrostomy, and peritoneal drainage. One recent case remains symptom-free on H2 blockers after simple closure. There was no mortality. Six cases were previously reported in the literature with a 33 per cent mortality rate.

  11. [Drug therapy of peptic ulcer. What is coming up?].

    PubMed

    Müller, P; Dammann, H G; Simon, B; Kommerell, B

    1987-02-01

    Prostaglandin-E analogues inhibit gastric acid secretion after oral administration. Therefore, these drugs are tested in clinical trials and one of them--Misoprostol--has recently been registered. With regard to healing rate of peptic ulcers and improvement of clinical signs and symptoms the prostaglandin analogues are superior to placebo but only equally effective or even slightly inferior to H2-receptor blockers. Side effects such as diarrhea or uterotropic actions will probably limit their broad application. The exact therapeutic effectiveness of prostaglandin analogues in treatment of peptic ulcer remains to be evaluated in greater detail. The substituted benzimidazole omeprazole is the first drug which exerts a long lasting and almost complete suppressive effect on gastric acid secretion in humans. This unique inhibition leads to a significant and more rapid healing rate of duodenal ulcers compared to treatment with H2-blockers. Additionally, peptic ulcers resistant to H2-blocker therapy can be treated effectively with omeprazole. In spite of these promising results the exact therapeutic effectiveness of this drug requires further evaluation.

  12. Argon plasma coagulation therapy for a hemorrhagic radiation-induced gastritis in patient with pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Shukuwa, Kazutaka; Kume, Keiichiro; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Otsuki, Makoto

    2007-01-01

    Radiation-induced gastritis is a serious complication of radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer which is difficult to manage. A 79-year-old man had been diagnosed as having inoperable pancreatic cancer (stage IVa). We encountered this patient with hemorrhagic gastritis induced by external radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer that was well-treated using argon plasma coagulation (APC). After endoscopic treatment using APC, anemia associated with hemorrhagic radiation gastritis improved and required no further blood transfusion. PMID:17603236

  13. [The differentiated phytotherapy of patients with duodenal peptic ulcer].

    PubMed

    Chernomorets, N N; Seleznev, A V; Revutskiĭ, B I; Alifanova, R E; Kravchenko, Z V; Cherkasskaia, E P

    1992-02-01

    Resulted are analysed of complex treatment of 103 patients with duodenal ulcer. Infusions and concoctions of medicinal plants were used. The regimen of administration and composition of the cocktail from herbs depended on the character of gastric secretion and dyskinesia of the gastroduodenal zone as well as on the presence of concomitant diseases; cholecystitis, gastritis, hepatitis, pancreatitis, enterocolitis. Intragastric drip administration of the concoctions and infusions of medicinal plants favour scarring of duodenal ulcers and reduction of the number and duration of recurrences.

  14. Irregular Meal Timing Is Associated with Helicobacter pylori Infection and Gastritis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Su-Lin; Canavarro, Claudia; Zaw, Min-Htet; Zhu, Feng; Loke, Wai-Chiong; Chan, Yiong-Huak; Yeoh, Khay-Guan

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) is associated with chronic gastritis and gastric cancer, and more than half of the world's population is chronically infected. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate whether an irregular meal pattern is associated with increased risk of gastritis and HP infection. The study involved 323 subjects, divided into three groups as follows: subjects with HP infection and gastritis, subjects with gastritis, and a control group. Subjects were interviewed on eating habits and meal timing. Multivariate logistic regression was used to compare groups. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) were derived controlling for gender, age, stress, and probiotic consumption. Subjects who deviated from their regular meals by 2 hours or more had a significantly higher incidence of HP infection with gastritis (adjusted OR = 13.3; 95% CI 5.3-33.3; P < 0.001) and gastritis (adjusted OR = 6.1; 95% CI 2.5-15.0; P < 0.001). Subjects who deviated their meals by 2 hours or more, twice or more per week, had an adjusted OR of 6.3 and 3.5 of acquiring HP infection with gastritis (95% CI 2.6-15.2; P < 0.001) and gastritis (95% CI 1.5-8.5; P < 0.001), respectively. Frequent deviation in meal timing over a prolonged period appears associated with increased risk of developing HP infection and gastritis.

  15. Perforated peptic ulcer in Tikur Anbessa Hospital: a review of 74 cases.

    PubMed

    Ersumo, Tessema; W/Meskel, Yidnekachew; Kotisso, Berhanu

    2005-01-01

    Little is known on the pattern of perforated peptic ulcer in Ethiopia. To evaluate the early, outcome of management, a five-year retrospective analysis of 74 operated cases of perforated peptic ulcer was undertaken. Perforated peptic ulcer accounted for 3.4% of the adult emergency surgical procedures. The mean age was 32.6 years, with a male to female ratio of 7.2 to 1.0. Fifty-six percent of the cases were unmarried. In nearly 22.0% of the patients, no previous history of peptic ulcer disease was documented. Delay in diagnosis was noted in 95% of the cases. Most patients had duodenal ulcer perforation, and about 78% had purulent peritonitis at laparotomy. Fourteen died in hospital. Early presentation of patients to surgical care facilities may reduce morbidity and mortality in cases of peptic ulcer perforation.

  16. Deep Learning Based Syndrome Diagnosis of Chronic Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guo-Ping; Wang, Yi-Qin; Zheng, Wu; Zhong, Tao; Lu, Xiong; Qian, Peng

    2014-01-01

    In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), most of the algorithms used to solve problems of syndrome diagnosis are superficial structure algorithms and not considering the cognitive perspective from the brain. However, in clinical practice, there is complex and nonlinear relationship between symptoms (signs) and syndrome. So we employed deep leaning and multilabel learning to construct the syndrome diagnostic model for chronic gastritis (CG) in TCM. The results showed that deep learning could improve the accuracy of syndrome recognition. Moreover, the studies will provide a reference for constructing syndrome diagnostic models and guide clinical practice. PMID:24734118

  17. Gastritis induced by Helicobacter pylori in gnotobiotic piglets.

    PubMed

    Krakowka, S; Eaton, K A; Rings, D M; Morgan, D R

    1991-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori has recently been recognized as a gastric pathogen in humans. Experimental oral inoculation of gnotobiotic piglets with this organism results in gastritis that exhibits many features of the corresponding disease in humans. In piglets the organism is restricted to the gastric microenvironment and persists in that location despite prompt humoral and cellular responses to antigens of H. pylori. The gnotobiotic piglet model is useful for delineation of the role of suspected bacterial virulence factors (i.e., motility and urease production) in gastric colonization and for preclinical determination of the efficacy of various antimicrobial substances.

  18. Role of vacuolating cytotoxin in gastritis due to Helicobacter pylori in gnotobiotic piglets.

    PubMed

    Eaton, K A; Cover, T L; Tummuru, M K; Blaser, M J; Krakowka, S

    1997-08-01

    To investigate the role of the Helicobacter pylori cytotoxin in the pathogenesis of gastritis, gnotobiotic piglets were colonized with either toxigenic H. pylori or a nontoxigenic isogenic mutant. Only piglets given the toxigenic strain developed toxin-neutralizing antibodies (indicating that toxin is expressed in vivo), but there was no difference in bacterial colonization, epithelial vacuolation, or gastritis between the two groups of piglets.

  19. Successful Treatment of Collagenous Gastritis in a Child With a Gluten-Free Diet.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, Raza U; Joshi, Aditya; Heikenen, Janice B

    2015-12-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rarely encountered disease entity first described in 1989, and it is very rarely reported in children. We report the case of a 13-year-old boy with clinical, endoscopic, and histological findings of collagenous gastritis who reported rapid and sustained symptom resolution on a gluten-free diet. PMID:26854316

  20. [Peptic Ulcer Disease Associated with Helicobacter pylori Infection].

    PubMed

    Yeo, Se-Hwan; Yang, Chang-Hun

    2016-06-25

    Although the global prevalence of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is decreasing, PUD is still one of the most common upper gastrointestinal diseases in the world due to Helicobacter pylori infection and increased use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In Korea, the prevalence of H. pylori infection is also declining, but it is still the major cause of PUD. The outcomes of H. pylori infection are caused by imbalances between bacterial virulence factors, host factors, and environmental influences. In this review, we describe the prevalence trends of H. pylori infection in Korea, the mechanism of H. pylori infection-related PUD, and treatment strategies.

  1. [Prevalence of erosive esophagitis and peptic esophageal strictures].

    PubMed

    Vasilevskiĭ, D I; Skurikhin, S S; Luft, A V; Mednikov, S N; Silant'ev, D S; Kulagin, V I; Dvoretskiĭ, S Iu; Bagnenko, S F

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a widespread among population in economically developed countries including Russia. It was analyzed the results of 34 903 endoscopic examinations of upper gastrointestinal tract in ethnically and socially homogeneous population of Leningrad region with symptoms of gastric dispepsia. Procedures were performed for the period 2007-2013. Prevalence of erosive esophagitis was 4.9%. Peptic esophageal strictures due to chronic reflux-associated inflammation were revealed in 0.2% of examined patients (3.7% of patients with erosive esophagitis). Obtained data allow to considergastroesophageal reflux disease as a socially significant problem in Russia requiring close attention and further study.

  2. Lessons for atherosclerosis research from tuberculosis and peptic ulcer.

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, M C

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of the causes of a disease is essential to the effective alteration of factors affecting the disease's incidence. The history of the medical understanding of tuberculosis and peptic ulcer shows that we may neglect to consider the contribution of microorganisms to long-term or recurring diseases. The author presents evidence that we may similarly be overlooking the role of microorganisms in atherosclerosis. A collaborative, comprehensive investigation of the role of microorganisms in atherosclerosis is needed to understand the cause of this disease. PMID:7882229

  3. Tannins, Peptic Ulcers and Related Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Neyres Zinia Taveira; de Souza Falcão, Heloina; Gomes, Isis Fernandes; de Almeida Leite, Thiago Jose; de Morais Lima, Gedson Rodrigues; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria; Tavares, Josean Fechine; da Silva, Marcelo Sobral; de Athayde-Filho, Petrônio Filgueiras; Batista, Leonia Maria

    2012-01-01

    This review of the current literature aims to study correlations between the chemical structure and gastric anti-ulcer activity of tannins. Tannins are used in medicine primarily because of their astringent properties. These properties are due to the fact that tannins react with the tissue proteins with which they come into contact. In gastric ulcers, this tannin-protein complex layer protects the stomach by promoting greater resistance to chemical and mechanical injury or irritation. Moreover, in several experimental models of gastric ulcer, tannins have been shown to present antioxidant activity, promote tissue repair, exhibit anti Helicobacter pylori effects, and they are involved in gastrointestinal tract anti-inflammatory processes. The presence of tannins explains the anti-ulcer effects of many natural products. PMID:22489149

  4. Association of endothelial progenitor cells and peptic ulcer treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    NIE, ZHIHONG; XU, LIMIN; LI, CHUANYUAN; TIAN, TAO; XIE, PINGPING; CHEN, XIA; LI, BOJING

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the association between endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and peptic ulcers in patients with or without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), in association with the efficiency of peptic ulcer treatment. The study recruited healthy subjects and peptic ulcer patients with or without T2DM. All the ulcer patients, including those with and without T2DM, were administered omeprazole for 8 weeks. Peptic ulcer patients with T2DM were additionally treated with glipizide and novolin. Blood samples were then obtained from the three groups following ulcer treatment. CD133+ cells were isolated from the blood samples using magnetic bead selection, and cultured in complete medium 199. Morphological and quantity changes in EPCs were observed by light and fluorescence microscopy. In addition, flow cytometric analysis was used to quantify the number of vascular endothelial cells. The treatment was partially effective in 7 of the 32 peptic ulcer patients without T2DM and 12 of the 32 peptic ulcer patients with T2DM. However, this treatment was ineffective in 20 of the 32 peptic ulcer patients with T2DM. Notably, 25 peptic ulcer patients without T2DM were defined as completely recovered following treatment. In addition, the number of circulating EPCs as well as their colony forming ability was significantly reduced (P<0.05) in the peptic ulcer patients with T2DM following ulcer treatment, compared with the other groups. Circulating EPC counts were significantly increased in peptic ulcer patients without T2DM, as compared with the healthy controls. With regards to colony formation, peptic ulcer patients without T2DM did not exhibit improved colony formation ability. In conclusion, the number of circulating EPCs and their colony-forming ability was significantly reduced in peptic ulcer patients with T2DM following ulcer treatment when compared with the other groups. This suggests that the poor curative effect of peptic ulcer treatment in these

  5. Collagenous Gastritis in A Korean Child : A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sanghui; Kim, Dong Hoon; Choe, Youn Ho

    2005-01-01

    Collagenous gastritis, a counterpart of collagenous colitis, is an extremely rare disorder. The first case of collagenous gastritis in a Korean boy in his pre-teens who had been receiving treatment for refractory iron deficiency anemia has been reported. The patient had been suffering from intermittent abdominal pain, recurrent blood-tinged vomiting and poor oral intake. The gastric endoscopy revealed diffuse cobble-stone appearance of the mucosa with easy touch bleeding throughout the stomach but no abnormalities in the esophagus, duodenum, and colon. Pathologic examination of the gastric biopsies from the antrum, body and cardia showed a subepithelial collagen deposition with entrapped dilated capillaries, moderate infiltrates of lymphoplasma cells and eosinophils of the lamina propria, and marked hypertrophy of the muscularis mucosa. The collagen deposition appeared as discontinuous bands with focally irregular extension into the deeper part of the antral mucosa. It measured up to 150 µm. Helicobacter pylori infection was not detected. The biopsies from the duodenum, esophagus and colon revealed no pathologic abnormalities. PMID:15716621

  6. Severe gastritis in guinea-pigs infected with Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Sturegård, E; Sjunnesson, H; Ho, B; Willén, R; Aleljung, P; Ng, H C; Wadström, T

    1998-12-01

    An appropriate animal model is essential to study Helicobacter pylori infection. The aim of this study was to investigate if H. pylori can colonise the guinea-pig stomach and whether the infection causes gastritis and a serological response similar to that observed in man. Guinea-pigs were infected either with fresh H. pylori isolates from human gastric biopsies or with a guinea-pig passaged strain. When the animals were killed, 3 and 7 weeks after inoculation, samples were taken for culture, histopathology and serology. H. pylori was cultured from 22 of 29 challenged animals. All culture-positive animals exhibited a specific immune response against H. pylori antigens in Western blotting and gastritis in histopathological examination. Antibody titres in enzyme immunoassay were elevated among animals challenged with H. pylori. The inflammatory response was graded as severe in most animals and consisted of both polymorphonuclear leucocytes and lymphocytes. Erosion of the gastric epithelium was found in infected animals. These results suggest that the guinea-pig is suitable for studying H. pylori-associated diseases. Moreover, guinea-pigs are probably more similar to man than any other small laboratory animal as regards gastric anatomy and physiology.

  7. Collagenous Gastritis a Rare Disorder in Search of a Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mandaliya, Rohan; DiMarino, Anthony J.; Abraham, Sheeja; Burkart, Ashlie; Cohen, Sidney

    2013-01-01

    A 19-year-old young male presented with abdominal pain and constipation. Subsequent EGD showed nodular gastric mucosa with simple gastric aspirate demonstrating acidic pH of 2.0. The gastric biopsy showed thick subepithelial band of about 15 microns that was confirmed to be collagen on Masson’s trichrome stain along with inflammatory infiltrate. Colonoscopy and capsule endoscopy findings were unremarkable as well as the biopsy of the colon. Collagenous gastritis is a rare histopathological entity characterized by the presence of thick subepithelial collagen band of thickness greater than 10 microns along with intraepithelial lymphocytes and lamina propria lymphoplasmacytic and eosinophilic infitrates. Clinical presentation varies and depends more on the age of the patient with anemia or epigastric pain with nodular gastric mucosa being more common in children while diarrhea being more common in adults due to its increased association with collagenous colitis. The purpose of this case report is; (A) To define the endoscopic and histopathological features and progression of collagenous gastritis in this patient; (B) To compare these findings to those of collagenous sprue and collagenous colitis.

  8. Collagenous gastritis in a Korean child: a case report.

    PubMed

    Park, Sanghui; Kim, Dong Hoon; Choe, Youn Ho; Suh, Yeon-Lim

    2005-02-01

    Collagenous gastritis, a counterpart of collagenous colitis, is an extremely rare disorder. The first case of collagenous gastritis in a Korean boy in his pre-teens who had been receiving treatment for refractory iron deficiency anemia has been reported. The patient had been suffering from intermittent abdominal pain, recurrent blood-tinged vomiting and poor oral intake. The gastric endoscopy revealed diffuse cobblestone appearance of the mucosa with easy touch bleeding throughout the stomach but no abnormalities in the esophagus, duodenum, and colon. Pathologic examination of the gastric biopsies from the antrum, body and cardia showed a subepithelial collagen deposition with entrapped dilated capillaries, moderate infiltrates of lympho-plasma cells and eosinophils of the lamina propria, and marked hypertrophy of the muscularis mucosa. The collagen deposition appeared as discontinuous bands with focally irregular extension into the deeper part of the antral mucosa. It measured up to 150 microm. Helicobacter pylori infection was not detected. The biopsies from the duodenum, esophagus and colon revealed no pathologic abnormalities. PMID:15716621

  9. Repressed TGF-β signaling through CagA-Smad3 interaction as pathogenic mechanisms of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Kim, Seong-Jin; Park, Jong Min; Hahm, Ki Baik; Lee, Ho-Jae

    2015-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection causes chronic gastric inflammation, peptic ulceration, and gastric carcinogenesis, in which H. pylori cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) plays major pathogenic action. Since transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and its signaling also are principally implicated in either modulating gastric mucosal inflammatory responses or causing carcinogenesis and are attenuated after H. pylori infection, we hypothesized that dysregulated Smad signaling and repressed TGF-β might be core pathogenic mechanism for H. pylori-associated gastritis or carcinogenesis. Until now, no precise underlying mechanism how deranged TGF-β signaling developed after H. pylori infection relevant to various clinical manifestations remains unclear. In this study, we examined the molecular mechanism about the inhibition of TGF-β signaling by H. pylori CagA protein. H. pylori CagA significantly suppressed TGF-β/Smad transcriptional responses through critical inhibition of Smad3, though CagA interacted constitutively with Smad2, Smad3, and Smad4. CagA inhibited TGF-β-induced suppression of proinflammatory chemokines, such as IL-8, CXCL1 and CXCL3, as well as TGF-β-induced transcription of target genes. In conclusion, repressed TGF-β signaling associated with CagA-positive H. pylori infection could be an important determinant for the outcome of H. pylori infection. Therefore, TGF-β signaling is one of the important determinants to avoid from H. pylori CagA pathogenicity.

  10. Prophylactic aspirin and risk of peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Weil, J.; Colin-Jones, D.; Langman, M.; Lawson, D.; Logan, R.; Murphy, M.; Rawlins, M.; Vessey, M.; Wainwright, P.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the risks of hospitalisation for bleeding peptic ulcer with the current prophylactic aspirin regimens of 300 mg daily or less. DESIGN--A case-control study with hospital and community controls. SETTING--Hospitals in Glasgow, Newcastle, Nottingham, Oxford, and Portsmouth. SUBJECTS--1121 patients with gastric or duodenal ulcer bleeding matched with hospital and community controls. RESULTS--144 (12.8%) cases had been regular users of aspirin (taken at least five days a week for at least the previous month) compared with 101 (9.0%) hospital and 77 (7.8%) community controls. Odds ratios were raised for all doses of aspirin taken, whether compared with hospital or community controls (compared with combined controls: 75 mg, 2.3 (95% confidence interval 1.2 to 4.4); 150 mg, 3.2 (1.7 to 6.5); 300 mg, 3.9 (2.5 to 6.3)). Results were not explained by confounding influences of age, sex, prior ulcer history or dyspepsia, or concurrent non-aspirin non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use. Risks seemed particularly high in patients who took non-aspirin non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs concurrently. CONCLUSION--No conventionally used prophylactic aspirin regimen seems free of the risk of peptic ulcer complications. PMID:7711618

  11. BH3-only protein Bim is associated with the degree of Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis and is localized to the mitochondria of inflammatory cells in the gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Akazawa, Yuko; Matsuda, Katsuya; Isomoto, Hajime; Matsushima, Kayoko; Kido, Yoko; Urabe, Shigetoshi; Yamaghchi, Naoyuki; Ohnita, Ken; Takeshima, Fuminao; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Tsugawa, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Moss, Joel; Nakao, Kazuhiko; Nakashima, Masahiro

    2015-09-01

    BH3-only protein, Bim, is a pro-apoptotic protein that mediates mitochondria-dependent cell death. However, the role of Bim in Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis remains unclear. This study aimed to assess the cellular localization of Bim and its possible role in H. pylori-induced gastritis. The study was conducted on biopsy specimens obtained from 80 patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (H. pylori-negative: n=30, positive: n=50). Association between Bim mRNA expression and severity of gastritis was evaluated and the localization of Bim was examined by immunofluorescence. Bim mRNA expression was positively correlated with the degree of gastritis, as defined by the Sydney system. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed increased Bim expression in H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa compared with uninfected mucosa in both humans and mice. Bim localized in myeloperoxidase- and CD138-positive cells of H. pylori-infected lamina propria and submucosa of the gastric tract, indicating that this protein is predominantly expressed in neutrophils and plasma cells. In contrast, Bim did not localize in CD20-, CD3-, or CD68-positive cells. Bim was expressed in the mitochondria, where it was partially co-localized with activated Bax and cleaved-PARP. In conclusion, Bim is expressed in neutrophils and plasma cells in H. pylori-associated gastritis, where it may participate in the termination of inflammatory response by causing mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in specific leucocytes.

  12. A study of cell-mediated immunity to gastric antigens in patients with atrophic type A and B gastritis.

    PubMed

    Kountouras, J; Raptopoulou-Gigi, M; Goulis, G

    1982-05-01

    The leucocyte migration in the presence of gastric antigens was studied in 10 patients with type A gastritis, 38 patients with type B gastritis (28 with atrophic and 10 with superficial gastritis) and 10 healthy controls. A positive leucocyte migration was found in a significant proportion of patients with both types of gastritis, whereas no difference between the two types was observed. These results indicate that cellular immunity is implicated in the aetiology of both types of gastritis, is of greater importance than auto-antibody production and is associated with the severity of the atrophic lesion.

  13. The Immunohistochemistry and Toluidine Blue Roles for Helicobacter pylori Detection in Patients with Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Tajalli, Raziye; Nobakht, Maliheh; Mohammadi-Barzelighi, Hajar; Agah, Shahram; Rastegar-Lari, Abdolaziz; Sadeghipour, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori, which is associated with many upper gastrointestinal diseases, is found in half of the population of the world. Several special stains and immunohistochemistry stain for H. pylori are available. The need for and usefulness of immunohistochemical (IHC) technique has been debated for years. Toluidine blue is a simple stain for microbiological studies and is easily available in laboratories. Therefore, this study was conducted to compare hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), Giemsa and toluidine blue staining with immunehistochemistry for detection of H. pylori in patients with gastritis and also to correlate the results of these staining methods with pathological grading. Methods: We reviewed 54 consecutive gastric biopsy specimens stained by H&E and Giemsa as well as by toluidine blue and immunohistochemistry stains for H. pylori. Results: H. pylori was positively identified by IHC in 43 (79.63%) patients, while positive samples were found in 18 (33.33%), 24 (44.44%) and 33 (61.11%) patients using H&E, Giemsa and toluidine blue staining methods. Our results showed that classical histological staining methods are not sensitive enough to identify low numbers or coccoid forms of organism, while toluidine blue and immunohistochemistry play an important role in detection of H. pylori infection. Conclusion: Toluidine blue has been proved to be much more reliable than H&E and Giemsa in detection of H. pylori. In addition, in post treatment biopsies and in biopsies with unexplained chronic active gastritis without histological evidence of H. pylori should have immunohistochemistry done to detect possible low density or coccoid form of organisms. PMID:23279833

  14. Dietary Intake Assessment and Biochemical Characteristics of Blood and Urine in Patients with Chronic Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Myung-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Chronic gastritis is a prevalent gastroentestinal disease in Korea. The purpose of this study was to investigate status of foods and nutrients intake and health related biochemical indicators in the patients with chronic gastritis. Daily food and nutrient intake, blood lipids, and antioxidant indicators in the urine, were compared between a group of 19 patients diagnosed with chronic gastritis and a control group of 27 subjects having normal gastroscopy. No significant differences were found in age, height, weight, body mass index, and blood pressure between the two groups. Daily energy intakes were 1900.6 kcal for the chronic gastritis patient group, and 1931.8 kcal for the normal control group without significant difference. No significant difference was found between the two groups in all nutrient intakes except for cholesterol. The chronic gastritis patients consumed lower amount of sugars and sweeteners but greater amount of starchy food groups such as potatoes and legumes than subjects of control group consumed. Also the chronic gastritis patients showed higher serum triglyceride concentration than the normal subjects. These results indicate that the dietary pattern of chronic gastritis patients may have relation to a change in the serum lipid level; however, more systematic research with a larger samples size is required. PMID:25954729

  15. [Potentialities of transabdominal ultrasound study in the diagnosis of gastric peptic ulcer].

    PubMed

    Gorshkov, A N

    2002-01-01

    The results of examination in 44 patients with gastric peptic ulcer were used to consider the potentialities of a transabdominal ultrasound study in the diagnosis and monitoring of gastric ulcerations. The ultrasound semiotics of gastric ulcers is described in the paper. A role of transabdominal ultrasound study in the algorithm of radiation and instrumental studies of gastric ulcer is defined. The inclusion of this study into the algorithm of diagnosis and monitoring of gastric peptic ulcer will make it possible not only to diagnose gastric ulcerations better, but to follow up their cicatrization. It is expedient to include a transabdominal ultrasound study as one of the diagnostic techniques for gastric peptic ulcer.

  16. CXC chemokine CXCL12 tissue expression and circulating levels in peptic ulcer patients with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Vahid; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossein; Mirzaee, Vahid; Khorramdelazad, Hossein

    2016-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is among the most prevalent human infections. CXCL12 is a well-known CXC chemokine involved in inflammation and play major roles in angiogenesis. There is currently very limited data on the role of CXCL12 in peptic ulcer disease. Hence, we aimed to explore whether CXCL12 is involved in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer induced by H. pylori. In this study, we enrolled 102 H. pylori-infected patients, including 51 with active ulcer (GA) and 51 with healing ulcer (GH). We also recruited 50 healthy subjects as control, which did not show any sign or symptoms of chronic inflammatory diseases, infection, or immune-related disorders. Endoscopy was performed to determine the stage of the disease. ELISA was used for detection of H. pylori infection and CXCL12 measurement. We also employed western blotting to detect CXCL12 in ulcerative lesions of H. pylori. Demographic data were also collected by questionnaire. Our results demonstrated that CXCL12 serum levels in GA group (151.8±18.31pg/mL) were significantly higher than those in GH (36.89±6.78pg/mL) and control groups (33.77±9.12pg/mL) (P<0.0001). However, we did not observe a significant difference between GH and control groups. Moreover, overexpression of CXCL12 in gastric lesions of patients in GA group was confirmed by Western blot analysis. According to the result of the present study, it could be concluded that CXCL12 is involved in the pathogenesis and healing of H. pylori-induced peptic ulcer. CXCL12 serum levels may also be used to distinguish between GA and GH phases of the disease.

  17. [NONINVASIVE DIAGNOSTICS OF THE PHENOTYPE OF GASTRITIS: ANALISIS OF THE FIRST THOUSAND OF CASES].

    PubMed

    Belkovets, A V; Kurilovich, S A; Reshetnikov, O; Ragino, Yu I; Scherbakova, L V

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of noninvasive diagnostics of a phenotype of gastritis among 1050 people aged from 18 till 80 years which consistently addressed to policlinic is presented in the article. The instrument of diagnostics was a , including a complex of biomarkers - so-called (pepsinogen I, pepsinogen II, gastrin-17 and IgG- antibodies to Helicobacter Pylori). High frequency of different variants of atrophic gastritis (25%) with a gastric cancer risk and conditions with a risk of erosive and ulcer damages of the stomach mucous (26 %) was shown. Clinical and economical expediency of noninvasive screening of a phenotype of gastritis is postulated.

  18. [Simultaneous occurrence of lymphocytic gastritis and lymphocytic colitis with transition to collagenous colitis].

    PubMed

    Christ, A D; Meier, R; Bauerfeind, P; Wegmann, W; Gyr, K

    1993-07-31

    Lymphocytic gastritis and lymphocytic colitis are two rare disorders of unknown etiology, only diagnosable by histology. Simultaneous occurrence of lymphocytic colitis and lymphocytic gastritis has not been described up to now. A 69-year-old female patient was examined because of crampy abdominal pain and watery diarrhea. Laboratory tests did not reveal an etiology and in colonoscopy the colon and terminal ileum were normal. Histology disclosed lymphocytic colitis. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed erosive bulbitis. Biopsies of the stomach revealed lymphocytic gastritis. A second colonoscopy one year later showed the development of collagenous colitis. PMID:8367708

  19. Gastric devascularization: a useful salvage procedure for massive hemorrhagic gastritis.

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, J D; Aust, J B

    1977-01-01

    Due to poor results with conventional operative therapy for diffuse hemorrhagic gastritis (DHG), a prospective evaluation of gastric devascularization was performed on 21 patients. Sepsis, alcoholism, and steroid abuse were the common etiologic factors. In spite of the fact that these were all critically ill patients, all stopped bleeding with this operation and only two rebled (9%). The average operating time was 84 minutes. There were two operative complications and gastric necrosis did not occur. The mortality was high (38%) due to the primary disease. Gastric devascularization is a useful salvage procedure for the patient with DHG because it can be accomplished rapidly, with few complications, has a low rebleed rate, and causes no permanent sequelae. Since this procedure causes severe gastric mucosal ischemia, it casts doubt only on the importance of this mechanism alone as the cause of "stress ulceration." Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:301014

  20. Helicobacter pylori infection and chronic gastritis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Sipponen, P.; Kosunen, T. U.; Valle, J.; Riihelä, M.; Seppälä, K.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori associated chronic gastritis in patients with gastric cancer. METHODS: Serum IgG antibodies for H pylori were determined in 54 consecutive patients with gastric carcinoma. The prevalence of H pylori in gastric mucosa was also examined histologically (modified Giemsa) in 32 patients from whom adequate biopsy specimens of the antrum and corpus were available. Thirty five patients with gastrointestinal tumours outside the stomach and 48 with non-gastrointestinal malignancies served as controls. RESULTS: Of the 54 patients, 38 (70%) had H pylori antibodies (IgG) in their serum (three additional patients had H pylori antibodies IgA, class specific but not IgG specific). This prevalence was significantly higher (p less than 0.05) than that (49%) in the 35 controls. No differences in prevalence of H pylori antibodies were found between gastric cancer cases of intestinal (IGCA) or diffuse (DGCA) type, both these types showing H pylori antibodies (IgG) in 71% of the patients. In the subgroup of 32 subjects, five patients had normal gastric mucosa and four showed corpus limited atrophy ("pernicious anaemia type" atrophy of type A). All of these nine patients had no evidence of current or previous H pylori infection in serum (no IgG antibodies) or in tissue sections (negative Giemsa staining). The remaining 23 patients had antral or pangastritis, and all had evidence of current or previous H pylori infection. CONCLUSIONS: H pylori associated chronic gastritis was the associated disease in 75% of the patients with gastric cancer occurring equally often in both IGCA and DGCA groups. About 25% of cases seem to have a normal stomach or severe corpus limited atrophy, neither of which showed evidence of concomitant H pylori infection. PMID:1577969

  1. Assessment of some Herbal Drugs for Prophylaxis of Peptic Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Gohar, Ahmed A; Zaki, Ahmed A

    2014-01-01

    Aqueous (hydrophilic) and chloroform (Lipophilic) extracts of nine medicinal plants currently used in Egyptian traditional medicine to treat some gastrointestinal tract (GIT) disorders were tested for their gastro-protective effect against the incidence of peptic ulcer. Indomethacin-induced ulcer in a rat model was used for this testing. Mentha microphylla, Brassica oleracea Capitata (Cabbage), B. oleracea Botrytis (cauliflower) aqueous fraction, Portolaca oleracea polysaccharide fraction, Oreganum marjoranum, Matricaria recutita, Solanum nigrum hydrophilic and lipophilic fractions, in addition to the chloroform fraction of Portolaca oleracea and Cicorium intybus afforded high protection against the incidence of gastric ulcer (~95%). O. syriacum hydrophilic and lipophilic fractions and gum arabic afforded moderate prophylactic effect. L. sicerarea, C. intybus hydrophilic fractions and M. microphylla lipophilic fraction were inactive. Herbs represent excellent resources for cost-effective and readily available gastro-protective remedies without side effects. PMID:25276211

  2. Assessment of some Herbal Drugs for Prophylaxis of Peptic Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Gohar, Ahmed A; Zaki, Ahmed A

    2014-01-01

    Aqueous (hydrophilic) and chloroform (Lipophilic) extracts of nine medicinal plants currently used in Egyptian traditional medicine to treat some gastrointestinal tract (GIT) disorders were tested for their gastro-protective effect against the incidence of peptic ulcer. Indomethacin-induced ulcer in a rat model was used for this testing. Mentha microphylla, Brassica oleracea Capitata (Cabbage), B. oleracea Botrytis (cauliflower) aqueous fraction, Portolaca oleracea polysaccharide fraction, Oreganum marjoranum, Matricaria recutita, Solanum nigrum hydrophilic and lipophilic fractions, in addition to the chloroform fraction of Portolaca oleracea and Cicorium intybus afforded high protection against the incidence of gastric ulcer (~95%). O. syriacum hydrophilic and lipophilic fractions and gum arabic afforded moderate prophylactic effect. L. sicerarea, C. intybus hydrophilic fractions and M. microphylla lipophilic fraction were inactive. Herbs represent excellent resources for cost-effective and readily available gastro-protective remedies without side effects. PMID:25276211

  3. Peptic ulcer disease and other complications in patients receiving dexamethasone palliation for brain metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Penzner, R.D.; Lipsett, J.A.

    1982-11-01

    A retrospective analysis was done of 106 patients who received radiation therapy for brain metastasis. Dexamethasone therapy was instituted in 97 patients. Peptic ulcer disease developed in 5 of 89 patients (5.6 percent) who received a dosage of at least 12 mg a day, but did not occur in patients who received a lower dose or in those who did not receive steroids. The interval between institution of dexamethasone therapy and the development of peptic ulcer disease ranged from three to nine weeks. Two patients had perforated ulcers, one of whom required surgical resection. Peptic ulcer disease contributed to the general deterioration and death of three of the five patients. Overall, in 14 of the 89 patients (15.7 percent) a complication of steroid therapy developed in the form of peptic ulcer disease, steroid myopathy or diabetes mellitus (or a combination of these).

  4. Management of recurrent peptic ulcer perforation: problem-focused or definitive surgery?

    PubMed

    Yazici, Pinar; Kaya, Cemal

    2014-01-01

    The combination of modern antisecretory drugs and eradication of Helicobacter pylori has changed the treatment options for peptic ulcer patients in favour of conservative therapy. Surgical approach which is used to be main treatment option has become now exceptional for uncomplicated gastroduodenal ulcers. However, it includes fixing the problem leaving the origin of the problem. We presented a peptic ulcer patient with recurrent attacks of ulcer perforation and discussed the surgical approach to these complicated cases.

  5. Xanthogranulomatous pseudotumor of stomach induced by perforated peptic ulcer mimicking a stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Chen, Chi-Kuan; Chen, Yung-Fang; Ho, Yung-Jen; Yang, Mei-Due; Shen, Wu-Chung

    2006-10-01

    Perforation is a serious complication of peptic ulcer disease occurring in 5% of such patients. Occasionally, the perforation may be sealed off by the omentum or the adjacent organs. Sealed perforated ulcer with pseudotumor formation is very rarely encountered. Here we present a case of gastric pseudotumor induced by perforation of a peptic ulcer. The imaging features in a barium sulfate study and computed tomography mimic an intramural tumor of the stomach.

  6. Topographic distribution of gastritis in heavy pigs investigated by a geographic information system approach.

    PubMed

    Pascotto, Ernesto; Capraro, Diego; Tomè, Paolo; Spanghero, Mauro

    2016-05-31

    The aim of this paper was to determine the topographic distribution of gastritis lesions in pigs through an open source geographic information system (GIS) software analysis. The stomachs of 146 Italian heavy pigs were collected at slaughter and subjected to macroscopic pathological examination of the internal mucosa. A total of 623 lesions were either classified as hyperplastic or follicular (97%) with the remaining minority of lesions categorised as atrophic and simple. The hyperplastic gastritis lesions had an average surface of 77.8 cm2 and were mainly located in an oval shaped area of the fundus region of the stomach near the Curvatura ventriculi major. The follicular gastritis lesions had generally a smaller surface (40.3 cm2) and were concentrated in two distinct small areas of the pyloric region. The GIS analysis provided the opportunity to produce useful maps showing the distribution and characteristics of gastritis in pigs.

  7. Determination of whether screening tests for chronic atrophic gastritis really has a positive predictive value.

    PubMed

    Di Paola, Flaviano; D'Angelo, Valentina; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Barchiesi, Vittoria; Rizzo, Marianna; Cantile, Monica; Botti, Gerardo; Cavalcanti, Ernesta

    2015-09-01

    Intestinal‑type gastric adenocarcinomas are preceded by precancerous lesions, which begin with chronic atrophic gastritis. Over the last few years, multiple serological screening techniques have been performed and commercialized for the diagnosis of chronic atrophic gastritis. In the present study, 123 patients were recruited at the International Cancer Institute 'G. Pascale' Foundation (Naples, Italy) to test commercial kits for the serological determination of chronic atrophic gastritis, supported by histological analysis, according to the International Group of Gastroenterologists 'Operative Link for Gastritis Assessment Staging System'. The results revealed a significant discrepancy between serological screening and histological evaluation in 10.6% of patients, which highlighted the dubious positive predictive value of commercial serological screening kits.

  8. [Anatlysis of HSPA1B A1267G gene polymorphism in peptic ulcer].

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, M J; Salehi, Z; Sabet, E E; Ejtehadi, F

    2014-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease is a common illness, affecting a considerable number of people worldwide, and its occurrence can be influenced by environmental and genetic factors. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) function mostly as molecular chaperones, and are induced by various stresses. The A to G transition at position 1267 of the HSPA1B gene was shown to correlate with changes in the level of HSPA mRNA expression. Here, the relation between A1267G polymorphism of the HSPAIB gene and risk of peptic ulcer in the Iranian population was evaluated. One hundred subjects, who underwent gastroscopy, took part in the study. DNA samples extracted from the biopsy tissues were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). After gastroscopy, peptic ulcer was diagnosed for 50 patients; among them the distribution of AA/AB/BB genotypes was 10, 88 and 2%, respectively. As for the other 50 subjects (without peptic ulcer) included in the control group, the AA/AB/BB genotypes were identified as 40, 52 and 8%, respectively. A significant association was found between the HSPA1B genotype and peptic ulcer (6.76 OR; 95% CI, 2.26-20.2; p = 0.0006). Thus, the HSPA1B A1267G polymorphism may be a marker of susceptibility to peptic ulcer.

  9. Acute Appendicitis Is Associated with Peptic Ulcers: A Population-based Study.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Kao, Li-Ting; Lin, Herng-Ching; Chung, Shiu-Dong; Lee, Cha-Ze

    2015-12-08

    Despite some studies having indicated a possible association between appendicitis and duodenal ulcers, this association was mainly based on regional samples or limited clinician experiences, and as such, did not permit unequivocal conclusions. In this case-control study, we examined the association of acute appendicitis with peptic ulcers using a population-based database. We included 3574 patients with acute appendicitis as cases and 3574 sex- and age-matched controls. A Chi-squared test showed that there was a significant difference in the prevalences of prior peptic ulcers between cases and controls (21.7% vs. 16.8%, p < 0.001). The adjusted odds ratio (OR) of prior peptic ulcers for cases was 1.40 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24~1.54, p < 0.001) compared to controls. The results further revealed that younger groups demonstrated higher ORs for prior peptic ulcers among cases than controls. In particular, the adjusted OR for cases < 30 years old was as high as 1.65 (95% CI = 1.25~2.19; p < 0.001) compared to controls. However, we failed to observe an association of acute appendicitis with peptic ulcers in the ≥ 60-year age group (OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 0.93~1.52). We concluded that there is an association between acute appendicitis and a previous diagnosis of peptic ulcers.

  10. [A rare cause of peripheral edema: exudative lymphocytic gastritis induced hypoprotidemia].

    PubMed

    Montagnac, Richard; Blaison, Dominique; Ciupea, Adrian; Für, Alain; Pradel, Jean; Schillinger, Francis

    2007-06-01

    Diagnosis of edema secondary to hypoprotidemia but without nutritional, renal, hepatic or cardiac cause, must consider exudative digestive disease, of which the lymphocytic gastritis, as the authors report here a new observation diagnosed in a 73 year-old woman. Gastroscopy reveals varioliform gastritis and biopsy demonstrates diffuse infiltration of the gastric epithelium by lymphocytes, making of it a real histopathologic entity among the gastropathies. Etiology and pathogeny remain still unknown but proton pump gastric inhibitors are an effective treatment.

  11. [Defining groups of patients with atrophic gastritis for endoscopic mucosal resection using mathematical modeling].

    PubMed

    Blashentseva, S A; Tiumikov, D K; Savchenkov, N N

    2014-01-01

    The article is devoted to the problem of diagnostics of atrophic gastritis. The main principles of morphological diagnostics are presented. The endoscopic findings are discussed. The authors had used the mathematical regression model to reveal groups of patients with some specific signs of atrophic gastritis, such as endoscopic sings, morphological and clinical signs. This model can be used to put a diagnosis and to look after the patients with metaplasia, dysplasia and early cancer.

  12. Does acid suppression by antacids and H2 receptor antagonists increase the incidence of atrophic gastritis in patients with or without H. pylori gastritis?

    PubMed

    Carter, M; Katz, D L; Haque, S; DeLuca, V A

    1999-09-01

    Currently there is controversial evidence that suggests that the accepted incidence of atrophic gastritis of 1.2 to 3.3% in patients with Helicobacter pylori gastritis may be increased by the long-term suppression of acid by a proton pump inhibitor (omeprazole). The purpose of this study is to show whether lesser forms of acid suppression by antacids or H2 receptor antagonists may have an influence on the development of atrophic gastritis. The authors recently reported a study in which a cohort of 36 patients with symptoms of dyspepsia were followed clinically for a period of 7 to 19 years. In that report all subjects underwent upper endoscopy with two biopsy specimens each from the antrum and fundus, on at least two occasions, 7 to 19 years apart. A diagnosis of atrophic gastritis was based on the interpretation of these biopsies by two gastrointestinal pathologists. The presence of H. pylori colonization was determined by tissue sampling and by a campylobacter-like organisms test of the antrum. Of the 36 patients in the authors' previous report, 33 had adequate baseline and follow-up data on medications consumed throughout the period of the study. In their current report they now present the findings of a retrospective review in which they correlate the presence of atrophic gastritis with the sole use of antacids and H2 receptor antagonists throughout the period of the study. In the cohort of 33 patients evaluated from the previous report, the authors found that atrophic gastritis had developed in all 28 patients positive for H. pylori, and in none of the 5 patients negative for H. pylori (p < 0.0001). A retrospective analysis of this previously studied cohort of 33 patients revealed that the use of antacids and H2 receptor antagonists did not predict the development of atrophic gastritis in either H. pylori-negative or -positive subjects. In a retrospective analysis of a cohort of 33 patients followed for an average of 11.7 years, atrophic gastritis developed in

  13. Estimation of TiO₂ nanoparticle-induced genotoxicity persistence and possible chronic gastritis-induction in mice.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Hanan Ramadan Hamad

    2015-09-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are widely used as a food additive and coloring agent in many consumer products however limited data is available on the nano-TiO2 induced genotoxicity persistence. Thus, this study investigated the persistence of nano-TiO2 induced genotoxicity and possible induction of chronic gastritis in mice. The mice were orally administered 5, 50 or 500 mg/kg body weight nano-TiO2 for five consecutive days, and then mice from each dosage group were sacrificed 24 h or one or two weeks after the last treatment. The administration of nano-TiO2 resulted in persistent apoptotic DNA fragmentation and mutations in p53 exons (5-8) as well as significant persistent elevations in malondialdehyde and nitric oxide levels and decreases in the reduced glutathione level and catalase activity compared with the control mice in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Necrosis and inflammation were evident upon histological examination. These findings could be attributed to the persistent accumulation of nano-TiO2 at the tested doses at all three time points. Based on these findings, we conclude that the administration of nano-TiO2, even at low doses, leads to persistent accumulation of nano-TiO2 in mice, resulting in persistent inflammation, apoptosis and oxidative stress, ultimately leading to the induction of chronic gastritis.

  14. BE-18591 as a new H(+)/Cl(-) symport ionophore that inhibits immunoproliferation and gastritis.

    PubMed

    Tanigaki, Keiji; Sato, Tomohiko; Tanaka, Yasufumi; Ochi, Takahiro; Nishikawa, Asako; Nagai, Kazuo; Kawashima, Hiroyuki; Ohkuma, Shoji

    2002-07-31

    In our previous papers [e.g. Sato et al., J. Biol. Chem. 273 (1998) 21455-21462], we have shown that prodigiosins can uncouple various H(+)-ATPases through their H(+)/Cl(-) symport activity. BE-18591 is an enamine of 4-methoxy-2,2'-bipyrrole-5-carboxyaldehyde (tambjamine group antibiotics) which resembles the prodigiosins. We found that BE-18591 was a new group of antibiotics that uncouples various H(+)-ATPases: it inhibited proton pump activities with IC(50)s of about 1-2 nM (about 20 pmol/mg protein) for submitochondrial particles as well as gastric vesicles and of 230 nM (about 230 pmol/mg protein) for lysosomes, but it had little effect on their ATP hydrolyses (up to 10 microM), a property of H(+)/Cl(-) symport activity. At low concentrations (<1 microM), BE-18591 inhibited immunoproliferation, the IC(50) of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mouse splenocytes was 38 nM, that of Concanavalin A-stimulated cells was 230 nM. Gastritis of rabbits was also inhibited. At higher concentrations (>1 microM), BE-18591 induced neurite outgrowth (15% induction in 48 h at 4 microM), inhibited bone resorption (approximately 35% in 48 h at 10 microM) and caused cell death (approximately 30% in 48 h at 4 microM) but with little apoptosis.

  15. Measures of Adiposity Are Associated with Increased Risk of Peptic Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Boylan, Matthew R.; Khalili, Hamed; Huang, Edward S.; Chan, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Obesity is associated with systemic inflammation, alterations in the intestinal microbiome, and decreased epithelial integrity. The association between obesity and peptic ulcer has not been thoroughly investigated. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of 47,120 men enrolled in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (mean age of 54 years at baseline). Biennially, we updated information on body mass index (BMI), physical activity, smoking, and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) or aspirin. Self-reported waist and hip measurements were validated among a subsample of participants. Self-reported cases of gastric and duodenal ulcers were confirmed by medical record review. Helicobacter pylori status was determined from endoscopic biopsies, serum antibody measurements, and/or stool antigen assays documented in the medical record. We used Cox proportional hazards modeling to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results We documented 272 gastric and 320 duodenal ulcers over 24 years of follow up. The multivariate-adjusted HR for gastric ulcer was 1.83 (95% CI, 1.20–2.78; Ptrend<.01) for obese men (BMI ≥30.0 kg/m2), compared to men with BMIs of 23.0–24.9 kg/m2, and 1.88 (95% CI, 1.06–3.33; Ptrend=.04) for men with waist-to-hip ratios (WHR) ≥1.00, compared to men with WHR of 0.85–0.89. Risk of duodenal ulcer was not associated with BMI (Ptrend=.24) or WHR (Ptrend=.68). In secondary analyses, increased BMI and WHR were each associated with increased risk of H pylori-negative, but not H pylori-positive, ulcers. The effect of BMI on ulcer risk did not change with use of aspirin or NSAID, alcohol consumption, physical activity, or smoking. Conclusions In a large prospective cohort of male health professionals, central and total obesity were associated with increased risk of peptic ulcer—particularly gastric and H pylori-negative ulcers. PMID:24681076

  16. Erosive gastritis, Armanni-Ebstein phenomenon and diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Byard, Roger W; Zhou, Chong

    2010-12-01

    The Armanni-Ebstein phenomenon, which is found in the kidneys in diabetic ketoacidosis, has also been proposed as an independent diagnostic postmortem marker for hypothermia. A case is reported to demonstrate the possibility of a more complex inter-related etiology in certain instances. A 44-year-old man with a past history of hospital admission for hypothermia, alcoholism and insulin dependent diabetes mellitus was found dead at his home address. At autopsy there were prominent superficial erosive gastritis (Wischnewsky spots) in keeping with terminal hypothermia. In addition there was also marked cortical pallor of the kidneys due to subnuclear renal tubular epithelial vacuolization (Armanni-Ebstein phenomenon). Thus there was evidence for both hypothermia and Armanni-Ebstein phenomenon, suggesting a relationship. Subsequent biochemical testing of vitreous humor, however, demonstrated markedly elevated levels of glucose (36.5 mmol/l; N = 3.6-6.0 mmol/l), β-hydroxybutyrate (23.2 mmol/l; N < 0.3 mmol/l), and lactate (29.4 mmol/l; N = 0.2-2.0 mmol/l). Death was, therefore, due to diabetic ketoacidosis complicated by hypothermia. Diabetes mellitus has a known association with both hypothermia and Armanni-Ebstein phenomenon, thus, before renal tubular vacuolization can be taken as a marker of hypothermia in isolation, it is important to consider the possibility that in certain cases underlying diabetic ketoacidosis may be present.

  17. Association between Pattern of Gastritis and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Patients with Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nobakht, Hossein; Boghratian, Amirhossein; Sohrabi, Masoudreza; Panahian, Mohammad; Rakhshani, Naser; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Ajdarkosh, Hossein; Hemmasi, Gholamreza; Khonsari, Mahmoodreza; Gholami, Ali; Rabiei, Neda; Zamani, Farhad

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Reflux disease is a common gastrointestinal problem. The association between reflux disease and gastritis pattern is controversial. AIM: To determine the association between reflux disease and gastritis pattern in patients with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. METHODS 470 patients with dyspepsia and reflux disease were enrolled in this study. The inclusion criteria were willing to participate in the study, age over 40 years, and having the criteria of ROME III for at least 3 months. Patients with history of H. pylori eradication therapy during the 3 months before the study, a history of gastric surgery, and gastric cancer were excluded. All of the participants underwent upper endoscopy and two biopsy samples were taken from antrum, body, and fundal areas. RESULTS H. pylori infection rate was 367 (78.1%) with mean age of 59.8 ± 11.4 years. Of them 131 patients (35.7%) were male. Reflux disease was detected in 273 (74.4%) patients. 216 (58.9%) and 102 (27.8%) patients had non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), respectively. Corpus predominant and antral predominant gastritis were seen in 72 (19.6%) and 129 (35.2%) patients, respectively. Antral gastritis was significantly associated with GERD (p<0.01). In regression analysis, antral predominant gastritis had a significant association with GERD (OR=1.92; 95%CI: 1.22- 3.12). The same result was observed in mild to moderate antral and greater curvature gastritis (OR= 1.26; 95%CI: 0.25-6.40 and OR= 3.0; 95%CI: 0.63-14.17, respectively). CONCLUSION According to these finding ,we could suggest that the pattern of gastritis could be associated with reflux disease and GERD.

  18. Association between Pattern of Gastritis and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Patients with Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nobakht, Hossein; Boghratian, Amirhossein; Sohrabi, Masoudreza; Panahian, Mohammad; Rakhshani, Naser; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Ajdarkosh, Hossein; Hemmasi, Gholamreza; Khonsari, Mahmoodreza; Gholami, Ali; Rabiei, Neda; Zamani, Farhad

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Reflux disease is a common gastrointestinal problem. The association between reflux disease and gastritis pattern is controversial. AIM: To determine the association between reflux disease and gastritis pattern in patients with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. METHODS 470 patients with dyspepsia and reflux disease were enrolled in this study. The inclusion criteria were willing to participate in the study, age over 40 years, and having the criteria of ROME III for at least 3 months. Patients with history of H. pylori eradication therapy during the 3 months before the study, a history of gastric surgery, and gastric cancer were excluded. All of the participants underwent upper endoscopy and two biopsy samples were taken from antrum, body, and fundal areas. RESULTS H. pylori infection rate was 367 (78.1%) with mean age of 59.8 ± 11.4 years. Of them 131 patients (35.7%) were male. Reflux disease was detected in 273 (74.4%) patients. 216 (58.9%) and 102 (27.8%) patients had non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), respectively. Corpus predominant and antral predominant gastritis were seen in 72 (19.6%) and 129 (35.2%) patients, respectively. Antral gastritis was significantly associated with GERD (p<0.01). In regression analysis, antral predominant gastritis had a significant association with GERD (OR=1.92; 95%CI: 1.22- 3.12). The same result was observed in mild to moderate antral and greater curvature gastritis (OR= 1.26; 95%CI: 0.25-6.40 and OR= 3.0; 95%CI: 0.63-14.17, respectively). CONCLUSION According to these finding ,we could suggest that the pattern of gastritis could be associated with reflux disease and GERD. PMID:27698970

  19. BET Inhibition Attenuates Helicobacter pylori-Induced Inflammatory Response by Suppressing Inflammatory Gene Transcription and Enhancer Activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinjing; Wang, Zhen; Hu, Xiangming; Chen, Ruichuan; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Peek, Richard M; Chen, Lin-Feng

    2016-05-15

    Helicobacter pylori infection causes chronic gastritis and peptic ulceration. H. pylori-initiated chronic gastritis is characterized by enhanced expression of many NF-κB-regulated inflammatory cytokines. Brd4 has emerged as an important NF-κB regulator and regulates the expression of many NF-κB-dependent inflammatory genes. In this study, we demonstrated that Brd4 was not only actively involved in H. pylori-induced inflammatory gene mRNA transcription but also H. pylori-induced inflammatory gene enhancer RNA (eRNA) synthesis. Suppression of H. pylori-induced eRNA synthesis impaired H. pylori-induced mRNA synthesis. Furthermore, H. pylori stimulated NF-κB-dependent recruitment of Brd4 to the promoters and enhancers of inflammatory genes to facilitate the RNA polymerase II-mediated eRNA and mRNA synthesis. Inhibition of Brd4 by JQ1 attenuated H. pylori-induced eRNA and mRNA synthesis for a subset of NF-κB-dependent inflammatory genes. JQ1 also inhibited H. pylori-induced interaction between Brd4 and RelA and the recruitment of Brd4 and RNA polymerase II to the promoters and enhancers of inflammatory genes. Finally, we demonstrated that JQ1 suppressed inflammatory gene expression, inflammation, and cell proliferation in H. pylori-infected mice. These studies highlight the importance of Brd4 in H. pylori-induced inflammatory gene expression and suggest that Brd4 could be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of H. pylori-triggered inflammatory diseases and cancer. PMID:27084101

  20. Epstein-Barr virus association with peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Mondragón, María G; Torres, Javier; Flores-Luna, Lourdes; Carreón-Talavera, Ricardo; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M

    2015-01-01

    Background. Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) use are considered the main risk to develop peptic ulcer disease (PUD). However, PUD also occurs in the absence of HP infection and/or NSAID use. Recently, we have found evidence that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation increases the risk to develop premalignant and malignant gastric lesions. Objective. To study a possible association between EBV and PUD. Methods. Antibodies against an EBV reactivation antigen, HP, and the HP virulence factor CagA were measured in sera from 207 Mexican subjects, controls (healthy individuals, n = 129), and PUD patients (n = 78, 58 duodenal and 20 gastric ulcers). Statistical associations were estimated. Results. Duodenal PUD was significantly associated with high anti-EBV IgG titers (p = 0.022, OR = 2.5), while anti-EBV IgA was positively associated with gastric PUD (p = 0.002, OR = 10.1). Conclusions. Our study suggests that EBV reactivation in gastric and duodenal epithelium increases the risk to develop PUD.

  1. Cisapride for gastro-oesophageal reflux and peptic oesophagitis.

    PubMed Central

    Cucchiara, S; Staiano, A; Capozzi, C; Di Lorenzo, C; Boccieri, A; Auricchio, S

    1987-01-01

    Twenty children (age range 75 days-47 months) with reflux oesophagitis entered a random double blind trial in which they received either Cisapride (Janssen Pharmaceutical Ltd), a new prokinetic agent, or an identical placebo syrup. Diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux was made by measurement of intraluminal oesophageal pH combined with manometry. Oesophagitis was assessed in all patients by histological examination of mucosal specimens taken during oesophagogastroduodenoscopy. Manometry, pH test, and endoscopy with biopsy examination were repeated at the end of the treatment period. Seventeen patients completed the trial, eight of whom were taking the drug and nine the placebo. Mean total clinical score and post-prandial reflux time (% of reflux) significantly improved in patients in the group given Cisapride but not in the group given placebo. Furthermore, there was a significant improvement of the histological oesophagitis score only in the children in the group given Cisapride, whereas placebo was ineffective. It is concluded that Cisapride is a useful agent both for the relief of symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux and for the healing of peptic oesophagitis in infancy. PMID:3300570

  2. Stimuli of pepsinogen secretion from frog isolated peptic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, H.; Komiyama, K.; Shirakawa, T.; Heldman, A.; Anderson, W.; Hirschowitz, B.I.

    1986-03-05

    The authors have previously studied pepsinogen (Pg) secretion from isolated intact esophageal mucosa of the bullfrog R. catesbeiana. By stimulus-response studies using agonists and antagonists they characterized specific stimulation of cholinergic, adrenergic and peptidergic receptors and interaction of cAMP and Ca/sup 2 +/ dependent pathways. To understand cell mechanisms more definitively and to relate these to morphology it was necessary to isolate peptic cells. Esophageal mucosa was digested with 0.1% collagenase for 80-100 min and sieved through teflon mesh. One esophagus yielded approximately 10/sup 7/ cells, 70% pure and 89 +/- 5% viable. Basal secretion was 3% of Pg content/hr. The cells responded to graded concentrations of bombesin, bethanechol, IBMX, 8Br-cAMP, forskolin, TPA (12-0-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13 acetate) and A23187. The response to (TPA + A23187) was double the additive single output values; (TPA + A23187 + forskolin) stimulated secretion of more than double the sum of the 3 component stimuli. In calcium and magnesium-free medium, the A23187 response and the synergistic response of combinations were both lost. They have identified 3 messengers for Pg cell stimulation - cAMP, Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization and protein kinase C - each of which can be separately stimulated, and when combined are strongly synergistic.

  3. Investigations into the antibacterial activities of phytotherapeutics against Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Cwikla, C; Schmidt, K; Matthias, A; Bone, K M; Lehmann, R; Tiralongo, E

    2010-05-01

    The prevalence of gastric diseases is increasing with H. pylori, the causative agent of acute and chronic gastritis, being a major predisposing factor for peptic ulcer disease and gastric carcinoma. C. jejuni is the most common cause of enteric infections, particularly among children, resulting in severe diarrhoea. Increasing drug resistance of these bacteria against standard antibiotics, and the more widespread use of herbal medicines, favours investigations into additional anti-Helicobacter and anti-Campylobacter effects of phytotherapeutics that are already used for their beneficial effects on bowel and digestive functions. Twenty-one hydroethanol herbal extracts and four essential oils were screened for antibacterial activity using a modification of a previously described micro-dilution assay and compared with the inhibitory effects of antibiotics. The herbal extracts showing the highest growth inhibition of C. jejuni were Calendula officinalis, Matricaria recutita, Zingiber officinale, Salvia officinalis, Foeniculum vulgare and Silybum marianum. Agrimonia eupatoria, Hydrastis canadensis, Filipendula ulmaria and Salvia officinalis were the most active herbal extracts in inhibiting the growth of H. pylori. This study provides evidence for additional beneficial effects of phytotherapeutics marketed for their gastrointestinal effects and identifies new beneficial antibacterial effects for some herbal medicines not currently recommended for gastrointestinal problems. PMID:19653313

  4. Anti-Helicobacter Pylori Activities of Shoya Powder and Essential Oils of Thymus Vulgaris and Eucalyptus Globulus

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeili, D; Mobarez, A Mohabati; Tohidpour, A

    2012-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori, an infective agent of more than 50% of the world population is prominent to be the main causative factor in the etiologies of chronic, active or type B gastritis, peptic and duodenal ulcer, gastric carcinoma, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tumors. A high prevalence of this bacterium in dental plaque is always reported. Pharmacological treatment of H. pylori infections includes administration of 3-fold therapeutic regimens which are typically used to suppress H. pylori activity. However, antibiotic resistance frequently develops as a consequence of such treatment. Thus, searching for alternative therapies for H. pylori infections is of special interest. Materials and Methods: In this study, anti H. pylori activities of a traditional antimicrobial drug so-called Shoya and also essential oils of Thymus vulgaris and Eucalyptus globulus were investigated using antimicrobial analysis and serological screening methods. Results: The agar dilution method results revealed the Shoya with the highest inhibitory effect against H. pylori. Also serological screening on tested mice showed a significant effect of this drug in lowering the sera amount of anti H. pylori specific IgA and IgG titers. Both of the essential oils showed different degrees of antibacterial effect against H. pylori. Conclusion: The obtained results showed the antibacterial effect of Shoya powder and Essential oils from Thymus vulgaris and Eucalyptus globulus and purposes new therapeutical alternatives to control the H. pylori infection. Additional studies and clinical trials are necessary to approve the use of these data in health care and pharmacopeia systems. PMID:22927892

  5. The use of carprofen, a non-steroidal antiinflammatory agent, in peptic ulcer diseases.

    PubMed

    Konturek, S J; Kwiecień, N; Obtulowicz, W; Zmuda, A; Polański, M; Kopp, B; Sito, E; Oleksy, J

    1983-12-01

    The effects of carprofen (Roche), a nonsteroid antiinflammatory agent, on gastric secretion, serum gastrin level, electropotential difference (PD), gastric microbleeding, DNA loss, and the generation of mucosal prostaglandins (PGs) were examined in 20 duodenal ulcer patients with active ulcer (15 patients) or in remission (5 patients). Carprofen administered for one-week period at a therapeutic dose (300 mg/day) was well tolerated by all ulcer patients and no adverse effects were observed during or after treatment. Endoscopy performed after carprofen treatment showed complete ulcer healing in 9 out of 15 patients and no exacerbations were observed in the rest of patients. No significant changes were observed in basal or pentagastrin-induced secretion, PD, gastric microbleeding and DNA loss. The generation of PGE2, 6-keto-PGF1 alpha and thromboxane B2 was not affected by the treatment with carprofen. This study indicates that carprofen shows excellent gastrointestinal tolerance in ulcer patients, and it might be useful in the treatment of arthritic patients with peptic ulcer disease.

  6. Protective effects of ginger and marshmallow extracts on indomethacin-induced peptic ulcer in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zaghlool, Sameh S.; Shehata, Basim A.; Abo-Seif, Ali A.; Abd El-Latif, Hekma A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gastric ulcer is one of the most serious diseases. Most classic treatment lines produce adverse drug reactions. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the protective effects of two natural extracts, namely ginger and marshmallow extracts, on indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer in rats. Materials and Methods: Animals were divided into five groups; a normal control group, an ulcer control group, and three treatment groups receiving famotidine (20 mg/kg), ginger (100 mg/kg), and marshmallow (100 mg/kg). Treatments were given orally on a daily basis for 14 days prior to a single intra-peritoneal administration of indomethacin (20 mg/kg). Results: Indomethacin administration resulted in significant ulcerogenic effect evidenced by significant elevations in ulcer number, ulcer index, and blood superoxide dismutase activity accompanied by significant decreases in gastric mucosal nitric oxide and glutathione levels. In addition, elevations in gastric mucosal lipid peroxides and histamine content were observed. Alternatively, pretreatment with famotidine, ginger or marshmallow significantly corrected macroscopic and biochemical findings, supported microscopically by results of histopathological study. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that administration of either ginger or marshmallow extract could protect against indomethacin-induced peptic ulcer in rats presumably via their antioxidant properties and inhibition of histamine release. PMID:26283843

  7. Immunization with gastric H+/K(+)-ATPase induces a reversible autoimmune gastritis.

    PubMed

    Scarff, K J; Pettitt, J M; Van Driel, I R; Gleeson, P A; Toh, B H

    1997-09-01

    The gastric H+/K(+)-ATPase has been implicated as a major autoantigen in pernicious anaemia in humans and in thymectomy-induced autoimmune gastritis in mice. Here we have shown that autoimmune gastritis can be generated by direct immunization of non-thymectomized BALB/c mice with mouse gastric H+/K(+)-ATPase in complete Freund's adjuvant. The gastritis was characterized by infiltration of the gastric submucosa and mucosa with macrophages, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and B cells and by circulating autoantibodies to the H+/K(+)-ATPase. The mononuclear infiltrate within the gastric mucosa was accompanied by loss of parietal and zymogenic cells and accumulation of small immature epithelial cells. Splenocytes from gastritic mice adoptively transferred gastritis to naive recipients. Cessation of immunization resulted in decrease in autoantibody titre and regeneration of parietal and zymogenic cells. The results directly confirm that the gastric H+/K(+)-ATPase is the causative autoantigen in the genesis of autoimmune gastritis. Recovery of the lesion following cessation of immunization suggests that homeostatic mechanisms can reverse a destructive autoimmune process.

  8. Autoimmune gastritis and parietal cell reactivity in two children with abnormal intestinal permeability.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Deanne L V; Crock, Patricia; Braye, Stephen; Davidson, Patricia; Sentry, John W

    2008-08-01

    Autoimmune gastritis is characterised by lymphocytic infiltration of the gastric submucosa, with loss of parietal and chief cells and achlorhydria. Often, gastritis is expressed clinically as cobalamin deficiency with megaloblastic anaemia, which is generally described as a disease of the elderly. Here, we report on two prepubertal children who developed autoimmune gastritis. One child developed autoimmune gastritis as part of a polyglandular autoimmune disease from a family with polyglandular autoimmune disease type II (PGA type II) and the other as part of a classic "thyro-gastric cluster," which may have been triggered by emotional trauma. Both children presented with normal small bowel biopsies, with abnormal gut permeability, which subsequently resolved. These patients are among the youngest reported to date. The immune systems targetted the gastric parietal cell autoantigens (ATP4A and ATP4B) in both children, similar to the elderly. The study of children with autoimmune gastritis and their families may provide additional insights into the disease's pathogenesis and may also lead to the identification of inheritable factors influencing susceptibility. This report underlines the necessity to screen paediatric patients with organ-specific autoimmune diseases for co-existent conditions. Children with polyglandular autoimmune disease are at particularly high risk.

  9. The dangers of gastritis: a case of clarithromycin-associated brief psychotic episode.

    PubMed

    Dinca, Eduard B; Skinner, Alex; Dinca, Ramona V; Tudose, Catalina

    2015-02-01

    We present a rare occurrence of brief psychotic episode associated with clarithromycin treatment. This 49-year-old lady with no psychiatric history commenced "triple therapy" for gastritis with Helicobacter pylori infection. After 1 week, a dispensing error became obvious; she was advised to start taking the drug missing for the first week-clarithromycin. Twenty-four hours later, she started acting irrationally and became increasingly disorganized, irritable, and delusional and wrote a 16-page letter to her employer, incoherent but focused on persecutory delusions. She developed auditory and visual hallucinations linked to the death of a neighbor's child. After 6 days, she deteriorated to the point where family sought professional help, and voluntary admission was arranged. The only pharmacological intervention needed was one dose of lorazepam and haloperidol for acute agitation. Twenty-four hours after last clarithromycin dose, she had improved dramatically. In 48 hours, she was "unrecognizable" (her "old self") and was discharged. Follow-up at 1 week showed no active psychosis. For the next 6 months, she did not come again to the attention of mental health services. Clarithromycin-induced psychosis is an extremely rare but recognized side effect with yet unclear pathogenesis. Raising awareness is important in both psychiatric and general practice.

  10. Preventive effects of geranylgeranylacetone on rat ethanol-induced gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Jian-Wen; Lin, Guan-Bin; Ji, Feng; Xu, Jia; Sharify, Najeeb

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To establish a rat ethanol gastritis model, we evaluated the effects of ethanol on gastric mucosa and studied the preventive effects of geranylgeranylacetone on ethanol-induced chronic gastritis. METHODS: One hundred male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 equal groups: normal control group, undergoing gastric perfusion of normal saline (NS) by gastrogavage; model control group and 2 model therapy groups that underwent gastric perfusion with ethanol (distillate spirits with 56% ethanol content) by gastrogavage for 4 wk. Low or high doses of geranylgeranylacetone were added 1 h before ethanol perfusion in the 2 model therapy groups, while the same amount of NS, instead of geranylgeranylacetone was used in that model control group. The rats were then sacrificed and stomachs were removed. The injury level of the gastric mucosa was observed by light and electron microscopy, and the levels of prostaglandin 2 (PGE2), endothelin-1 (ET-1) and nitric oxide (NO) were measured by radioimmunoassay and the Griess method. RESULTS: The gastric mucosal epidermal damage score (EDS; 4.5) and ulcer index (UI; 12.0) of the model control group were significantly higher than that of the normal control group (0 and 0 respectively, all P = 0.000). The gastric mucosal EDS and UI of the 2 model therapy groups (EDS: 2.5 and 2.0; UI: 3.5 and 3.0) were significantly lower than that of the model control group (all P < 0.01). There was no statistically significant difference between the low-dose and high-dose model therapy groups. The expression value of plasma ET-1 of the model control group was higher than that of the normal control group (P < 0.01) and the 2 model therapy groups (all P < 0.01). The expression values of gastric mucosal PGE2 and serum NO of the model control group were lower than those of the normal control group (all P < 0.05) and the 2 model therapy groups (all P < 0.05). The thickness of the gastric mucous layerand the hexosamine content in the model

  11. Differential Proteomics of Helicobacter pylori Associated with Autoimmune Atrophic Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Repetto, Ombretta; Zanussi, Stefania; Casarotto, Mariateresa; Canzonieri, Vincenzo; De Paoli, Paolo; Cannizzaro, Renato; De Re, Valli

    2014-01-01

    Atrophic autoimmune gastritis (AAG) is a condition of chronic inflammation and atrophy of stomach mucosa, for which development can be partially triggered by the bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori (HP). HP can cause a variety of gastric diseases, such as duodenal ulcer (DU) or gastric cancer (GC). In this study, a comparative proteomic approach was used by two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) to identify differentially expressed proteins of HP strains isolated from patients with AAG, to identify markers of HP strain associated with AAG. Proteome profiles of HP isolated from GC or DU were used as a reference to compare proteomic levels. Proteomics analyses revealed 27 differentially expressed spots in AAG-associated HP in comparison with GC, whereas only 9 differential spots were found in AAG-associated HP profiles compared with DU. Proteins were identified after matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)-TOF and peptide mass fingerprinting. Some AAG-HP differential proteins were common between DU- and GC-HP (peroxiredoxin, heat shock protein 70 [HSP70], adenosine 5′-triphosphate [ATP] synthase subunit α, flagellin A). Our results presented here may suggest that comparative proteomes of HP isolated from AAG and DU share more common protein expression than GC and provide subsets of putative AAG-specific upregulated or downregulated proteins that could be proposed as putative markers of AAG-associated HP. Other comparative studies by two-dimensional maps integrated with functional genomics of candidate proteins will undoubtedly contribute to better decipher the biology of AAG-associated HP strains. PMID:24395566

  12. Diagnosis, treatment, and outcome in patients with bleeding peptic ulcers and Helicobacter pylori infections.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ting-Chun; Lee, Chia-Long

    2014-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding is the most frequently encountered complication of peptic ulcer disease. Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) administration are two independent risk factors for UGI bleeding. Therefore, testing for and diagnosing Hp infection are essential for every patient with UGI hemorrhage. The presence of the infection is usually underestimated in cases of bleeding peptic ulcers. A rapid urease test (RUT), with or without histology, is usually the first test performed during endoscopy. If the initial diagnostic test is negative, a delayed (13)C-urea breath test (UBT) or serology should be performed. Once an infection is diagnosed, antibiotic treatment is advocated. Sufficient evidence supports the concept that Hp infection eradication can heal the ulcer and reduce the likelihood of rebleeding. With increased awareness of the effects of Hp infection, the etiologies of bleeding peptic ulcers have shifted to NSAID use, old age, and disease comorbidity.

  13. Perforation of the Peptic Ulcer Localized in the Proximal Jejunum - Case Report.

    PubMed

    Żyluk, Andrzej Ż; Szlosser, Zbigniew

    2016-09-01

    Non-traumatic perforation of the digestive tract occurs most often in the duodenum and stomach (peptic ulcer), as well as the colon (diverticulitis, cancer or ischemic lesions). Perforation of the small bowel is very rare. The Authors of the study presented a case of proximal jejunum perforation, which occurred in a patient with a history of duodenal peptic ulcer disease. Diagnosis posed no difficulties, and treatment included the excision of the ulceration and suturing of the bowel. The patient recovered without complications and the histological examination failed to reveal the nature of the ulcer. However, based on the medical history, one may suppose that it might be of peptic etiology, which makes this case exceptional. PMID:27648623

  14. Perforation of the Peptic Ulcer Localized in the Proximal Jejunum - Case Report.

    PubMed

    Żyluk, Andrzej Ż; Szlosser, Zbigniew

    2016-09-01

    Non-traumatic perforation of the digestive tract occurs most often in the duodenum and stomach (peptic ulcer), as well as the colon (diverticulitis, cancer or ischemic lesions). Perforation of the small bowel is very rare. The Authors of the study presented a case of proximal jejunum perforation, which occurred in a patient with a history of duodenal peptic ulcer disease. Diagnosis posed no difficulties, and treatment included the excision of the ulceration and suturing of the bowel. The patient recovered without complications and the histological examination failed to reveal the nature of the ulcer. However, based on the medical history, one may suppose that it might be of peptic etiology, which makes this case exceptional.

  15. A systematic approach for the diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic peptic ulcers.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chen-Shuan; Chiang, Tsung-Hsien; Lee, Yi-Chia

    2015-09-01

    An idiopathic peptic ulcer is defined as an ulcer with unknown cause or an ulcer that appears to arise spontaneously. The first step in treatment is to exclude common possible causes, including Helicobacter pylori infection, infection with other pathogens, ulcerogenic drugs, and uncommon diseases with upper gastrointestinal manifestations. When all known causes are excluded, a diagnosis of idiopathic peptic ulcer can be made. A patient whose peptic ulcer is idiopathic may have a higher risk for complicated ulcer disease, a poorer response to gastric acid suppressants, and a higher recurrence rate after treatment. Risk factors associated with this disease may include genetic predisposition, older age, chronic mesenteric ischemia, smoking, concomitant diseases, a higher American Society of Anesthesiologists score, and higher stress. Therefore, the diagnosis and management of emerging disease should systematically explore all known causes and treat underlying disease, while including regular endoscopic surveillance to confirm ulcer healing and the use of proton-pump inhibitors on a case-by-case basis.

  16. Increased Risk of Osteoporosis in Patients With Peptic Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chieh-Hsin; Tung, Yi-Ching; Chai, Chee-Yin; Lu, Ying-Yi; Su, Yu-Feng; Tsai, Tai-Hsin; Kuo, Keng-Liang; Lin, Chih-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate osteoporosis risk in patients with peptic ulcer disease (PUD) using a nationwide population-based dataset. This Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) analysis included 27,132 patients aged 18 years and older who had been diagnosed with PUD (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] codes 531–534) during 1996 to 2010. The control group consisted of 27,132 randomly selected (age- and gender)-matched patients without PUD. The association between PUD and the risk of developing osteoporosis was estimated using a Cox proportional hazard regression model. During the follow-up period, osteoporosis was diagnosed in 2538 (9.35 %) patients in the PUD group and in 2259 (8.33 %) participants in the non-PUD group. After adjusting for covariates, osteoporosis risk was 1.85 times greater in the PUD group compared to the non-PUD group (13.99 vs 5.80 per 1000 person-years, respectively). Osteoporosis developed 1 year after PUD diagnosis. The 1-year follow-up period exhibited the highest significance between the 2 groups (hazard ratio [HR] = 63.44, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 28.19–142.74, P < 0.001). Osteoporosis risk was significantly higher in PUD patients with proton-pump-inhibitors (PPIs) use (HR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.03–1.34) compared to PUD patients without PPIs use. This study revealed a significant association between PUD and subsequent risk of osteoporosis. Therefore, PUD patients, especially those treated with PPIs, should be evaluated for subsequent risk of osteoporosis to minimize the occurrence of adverse events. PMID:27100415

  17. The Association Between Peptic Ulcer Disease and Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tain-Junn; Guo, How-Ran; Chang, Chia-Yu; Weng, Shih-Feng; Li, Pi-I; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Wu, Wen-Shiann

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stroke is a common cause of death worldwide, but about 30% of ischemic stroke (IS) patients have no identifiable contributing risk factors. Because peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and vascular events share some common risk factors, we conducted a population-based study to evaluate the association between PUD and IS. We followed up a representative sample of 1 million residents of Taiwan using the National Health Insurance Research Database from 1997 to 2011. We defined patients who received medications for PUD and had related diagnosis codes as the PUD group, and a reference group matched by age and sex was sampled from those who did not have PUD. We also collected data on medical history and monthly income. The events of IS occurred after enrollment were compared between the 2 groups. The data were analyzed using Cox proportional hazard models at the 2-tailed significant level of 0.05. The PUD group had higher income and prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), heart disease, and hyperlipidemia. They also had a higher risk of developing IS with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.31 (95% confidence interval: 1.20–1.41). Other independent risk factors included male sex, older age, lower income, and co-morbidity of hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), and heart disease. PUD is a risk factor for IS, independent of conventional risk factors such as male sex, older age, lower income, and co-morbidity of hypertension, DM, and heart disease. Prevention strategies taking into account PUD should be developed and evaluated. PMID:27258514

  18. Peptic ulcer as a risk factor for postherpetic neuralgia in adult patients with herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jen-Yin; Lan, Kuo-Mao; Sheu, Ming-Jen; Tseng, Su-Feng; Weng, Shih-Feng; Hu, Miao-Lin

    2015-02-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia is the most common complication of herpes zoster. Identifying predictors for postherpetic neuralgia may help physicians screen herpes zoster patients at risk of postherpetic neuralgia and undertake preventive strategies. Peptic ulcer has been linked to immunological dysfunctions and malnutrition, both of which are predictors of postherpetic neuralgia. The aim of this retrospective case-control study was to determine whether adult herpes zoster patients with peptic ulcer were at greater risk of postherpetic neuralgia. Adult zoster patients without postherpetic neuralgia and postherpetic neuralgia patients were automatically selected from a medical center's electronic database using herpes zoster/postherpetic neuralgia ICD-9 codes supported with inclusion and exclusion criteria. Consequently, medical record review was performed to validate the diagnostic codes and all pertaining data including peptic ulcer, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and ulcerogenic medications. Because no standard pain intensity measurement exists, opioid usage was used as a proxy measurement for moderate to severe pain. In total, 410 zoster patients without postherpetic neuralgia and 115 postherpetic neuralgia patients were included. Multivariate logistic regressions identified 60 years of age and older, peptic ulcer and greater acute herpetic pain as independent predictors for postherpetic neuralgia. Among etiologies of peptic ulcer, H. pylori infection and usage of non-selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were significantly associated with the increased risk of postherpetic neuralgia; conversely, other etiologies were not significantly associated with the postherpetic neuralgia risk. In conclusion, 60 years of age and older, peptic ulcer and greater acute herpetic pain are independent predictors for postherpetic neuralgia in adult herpes zoster patients.

  19. Historic changes of occupational work load and mortality from peptic ulcer in Germany.

    PubMed

    Sonnenberg, A; Sonnenberg, G S; Wirths, W

    1987-09-01

    The occurrence of peptic ulcer disease appears to be associated with the amount of occupational work load. Worldwide the number of hospital admissions, surgical operations, and death rates from gastric and duodenal ulcer have declined during recent decades. This communication examines the probability of a correlation between the time trends of gastric and duodenal ulcer mortality in Germany and changes in the occupational work load between 1870 and 1984. Lifetime cumulative hours of work declined for all consecutive cohorts of the population born between 1840 and 1955. The fall occurred similarly in all age groups. However, lifetime cumulative energy expenditure originating from industrial blue collar work showed a peak for the cohorts born during the last quarter of the 19th century. A marked decline occurred in all cohorts born after 1905. A similar birth-cohort pattern was found for mortality from peptic ulcer disease, with those born at the turn of the century showing a higher risk of dying from peptic ulcer disease than any previous or subsequent generation. The coincidence of the birth-cohort patterns of both mortality from peptic ulcer and occupational energy expenditure suggests that birth-cohort pattern of peptic ulcer may be related to the trends of occupational work load that occurred during the industrial revolution. The amount of work hours appears to be a less sensitive measure for the occupational work load. The superimposition of two counteracting historic changes, namely the increased industrial work force and the decreased occupational work load due to legislative regulations, industrial automation, and mechanization may have shaped the rise and fall in the occurrence of peptic ulcer disease.

  20. Inducible nitric oxide synthase, anti-oxidant enzymes and Helicobacter pylori infection in gastritis and gastric precancerous lesions in humans.

    PubMed

    Pignatelli, B; Bancel, B; Estève, J; Malaveille, C; Calmels, S; Correa, P; Patricot, L M; Laval, M; Lyandrat, N; Ohshima, H

    1998-12-01

    Chronic inflammation induced by Helicobacter pylori infection has been associated with an increased risk of stomach cancer. We have analysed 167 stomach biopsies from 99 patients for H. pylori infection and immunohistochemically for the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), catalase and superoxide dismutases (SODs) as markers of oxidative stress. Biopsies were graded as follows on the basis of histology: normal, superficial gastritis, variable severity of atrophic gastritis with or without intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia. iNOS was detected in inflammatory cells in all types of gastritis with or without H. pylori infection and independently of its severity. In foveolar cells, iNOS was observed in approximately 25% of all biopsies showing any type of gastritis, but in a markedly higher proportion of dysplastic samples. Catalase and Mn-type SOD in inflammatory cells and catalase in foveolar cells were more frequently observed in marked atrophic gastritis biopsies than in less severe gastritis. Individual differences were found in the expression of these enzymes within groups with the same severity of gastritis. Prolonged oxidative stress in severe gastritis and dysplasia may play an important role in gastric carcinogenesis, through increased damage of DNA and tissue by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

  1. Antimicrobial activity of curcumin against Helicobacter pylori isolates from India and during infections in mice.

    PubMed

    De, Ronita; Kundu, Parag; Swarnakar, Snehasikta; Ramamurthy, T; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Nair, G Balakrish; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K

    2009-04-01

    Treatment failure is a major cause of concern for the Helicobacter pylori-related gastroduodenal diseases like gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. Curcumin, diferuloylmethane from turmeric, has recently been shown to arrest H. pylori growth. The antibacterial activity of curcumin against 65 clinical isolates of H. pylori in vitro and during protection against H. pylori infection in vivo was examined. The MIC of curcumin ranges from 5 microg/ml to 50 microg/ml, showing its effectiveness in inhibiting H. pylori growth in vitro irrespective of the genetic makeup of the strains. The nucleotide sequences of the aroE genes, encoding shikimate dehydrogenase, against which curcumin seems to act as a noncompetitive inhibitor, from H. pylori strains presenting differential curcumin MICs showed that curcumin-mediated growth inhibition of Indian H. pylori strains may not be always dependent on the shikimate pathway. The antimicrobial effect of curcumin in H. pylori-infected C57BL/6 mice and its efficacy in reducing the gastric damage due to infection were examined histologically. Curcumin showed immense therapeutic potential against H. pylori infection as it was highly effective in eradication of H. pylori from infected mice as well as in restoration of H. pylori-induced gastric damage. This study provides novel insights into the therapeutic effect of curcumin against H. pylori infection, suggesting its potential as an alternative therapy, and opens the way for further studies on identification of novel antimicrobial targets of curcumin. PMID:19204190

  2. [Hyperhomocysteinemia and cardiovascular risk profile in ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease comorbidity patients].

    PubMed

    Zharkova, A V; Orlovs'kyĭ, V F

    2014-01-01

    Present article is devoted to the study of the clinic features of ischemic heart desease associated with acid peptic disease. It was shown the more evident increase of myocardial infarction risk in associated pathology patients. Such results have to be caused by the special risk factor. As such factor we desided to study the hyperhomosysteinemia. During research there were discovered that the lowest vitamin B12 serum level and the highest homocysteine serum level have been registrated in associated pathology (ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease according to long-term proton pump inhibitor use) patients. It was shown evident correlation between that changes and dyslipidemia. PMID:24908957

  3. Assessment of Risk Factors of Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Peptic Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mhaskar, Rahul S; Ricardo, Izurieta; Azliyati, Azizan; Laxminarayan, Rajaram; Amol, Bapaye; Santosh, Walujkar; Boo, Kwa

    2013-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a risk factor for peptic ulcer. There have been no studies addressing environmental and dietary risk factors in western India. We conducted a case control study enrolling peptic ulcer patients in Pune, India. Materials and Methods: Risk factors for peptic ulcer and H. pylori infection were assessed in a participant interview. H. pylori status was assessed from stool by monoclonal antigen detection. Results: We enrolled 190 peptic ulcer, 35 stomach cancer patients, and 125 controls. Fifty-one percent (180/350) of the participants were infected with H. pylori. Lower socioeconomic status (SES) [odds ratio (OR): 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02–1.39], meat consumption (OR: 2.35, 95% CI: 1.30–4.23), smoking (OR: 2.23, 95% CI: 1.24–4.02), eating restaurant food (OR: 3.77, 95% CI: 1.39–10.23), and drinking nonfiltered or nonboiled water (OR: 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01–1.23) were risk factors for H. pylori infection. H. pylori infection (OR: 1.70, 95% CI: 1.03–2.89), meat (OR: 1.10, 95% CI: 1.02-1.75), fish (OR: 1.05, 95% CI: 1.02–1.89) consumption, and a family history of ulcer (OR: 1.20, 95% CI: 1.08–1.60) were risk factors for peptic ulcer. Consumption of chili peppers (OR: 0.20, 95% CI: 0.10–0.37) and parasite infestation (OR: 0.44, 95% CI: 0.24–0.80) were protective against H. pylori infection. Conclusion: H. pylori infection is associated with peptic ulcer. Lower SES, consumption of restaurant food, meat, nonfiltered water, and smoking are risk factors for H. pylori. Consumption of meat, fish, and a family history of peptic ulcer are risk factors for peptic ulcer. Consumption of chili peppers and concurrent parasite infestation appear to be protective against H. pylori. PMID:23853433

  4. [Hyperhomocysteinemia and cardiovascular risk profile in ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease comorbidity patients].

    PubMed

    Zharkova, A V; Orlovs'kyĭ, V F

    2014-01-01

    Present article is devoted to the study of the clinic features of ischemic heart desease associated with acid peptic disease. It was shown the more evident increase of myocardial infarction risk in associated pathology patients. Such results have to be caused by the special risk factor. As such factor we desided to study the hyperhomosysteinemia. During research there were discovered that the lowest vitamin B12 serum level and the highest homocysteine serum level have been registrated in associated pathology (ischemic heart disease and acid peptic disease according to long-term proton pump inhibitor use) patients. It was shown evident correlation between that changes and dyslipidemia.

  5. Statistical evaluation of the role of Helicobacter pylori in stress gastritis: applications of splines and bootstrapping to the logistic model.

    PubMed

    Riester, K A; Peduzzi, P; Holford, T R; Ellison, R T; Donta, S T

    1997-11-01

    Stress gastritis is a serious problem in the intensive care unit population. The recent discovery of the causal nature of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in the development of gastric ulcers led us to examine its relationship with stress gastritis. We investigated this relationship in 874 veterans admitted to intensive care units who were tested for the presence of H. pylori and followed for 6 weeks for the development of stress gastritis. We fit spline models to assess functional relationships and used the logistic model to determine the association between H. pylori and stress gastritis. The predictive ability of the model was assessed with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis and validated with the bootstrapping technique. Increased anti-H. pylori immunoglobulin A concentrations were found to be an important predictor of stress gastritis independent of other known risk factors.

  6. Detection of gastric Helicobacter spp. in stool samples of dogs with gastritis.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, M; Spużak, J; Kubiak, K; Glińska-Suchocka, K; Biernat, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and identify the species of gastric Helicobacter in the stool of dogs with gastritis. The study was carried out on thirty dogs of different breeds, of both genders and of various ages, diagnosed with gastritis. Helicobacter spp. was detected in stool samples using the nested-PCR method. Helicobacter bacteria were identified in stool samples from seven (23.3%) dogs. Helicobacter heilmannii was found to be the most common species of gastric Helicobacter. Helicobacter salomonis was identified much less frequently, while Helicobacter felis, Helicobacter pylori and Helicobacter bizzozeronii were not detected in any of the samples. PMID:27487496

  7. Association of presence/absence and on/off patterns of Helicobacter pylori oipA gene with peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer risks: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There are increasing studies examining the relationship between the status of H. pylori oipA gene and peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and gastric cancer (GC) but the results turn out to be controversial. We attempted to clarify whether oipA gene status is linked with PUD and/or GC risks. Methods A systematically literature search was performed through four electronic databases. According to the specific inclusion and exclusion criteria, seven articles were ultimately available for the meta-analysis of oipA presence/absence with PUD and GC, and eleven articles were included for the meta-analysis of oipA on/off status with PUD and GC. Results For the on/off functional status analysis of oipA gene, the “on” status showed significant associations with increased risks of PUD (OR = 3.97, 95% CI: 2.89, 5.45; P < 0.001) and GC (OR = 2.43, 95% CI: 1.45, 4.07; P = 0.001) compared with gastritis and functional dyspepsia controls. Results of the homogeneity test indicated different effects of oipA “on” status on PUD risk between children and adult subgroups and on GC risk between PCR-sequencing and immunoblot subgroups. For the presence/absence analysis of oipA gene, we found null association of the presence of oipA gene with the risks of PUD (OR = 1.93, 95% CI: 0.60, 6.25; P = 0.278) and GC (OR = 2.09, 95% CI: 0.51, 8.66; P = 0.308) compared with gastritis and functional dyspepsia controls. Conclusions To be concluded, when oipA exists, the functional “on” status of this gene showed association with increased risks for PUD and GC compared with gastritis and FD controls. However, merely investigating the presence/absence of oipA would overlook the importance of its functional on/off status and would not be reliable to predict risks of PUD and GC. Further large-scale and well-designed studies concerning on/off status of oipA are required to confirm our meta-analysis results. PMID:24256489

  8. Green Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles: Structural Features and In Vivo and In Vitro Therapeutic Effects against Helicobacter pylori Induced Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, Sadaf; Ali, Asghar; Anwar, Farooq; Shahid, Shaukat Ali; Shakir, Imran; Yaqoob, Aqdas; Hasan, Sara; Khan, Safyan Akram; Sajjad-ur-Rahman

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates in vivo and in vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) efficacy of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) prepared via a cost-effective green chemistry route wherein Peganum harmala L. seeds extract was used as a reducing and capping agent. The structural features, as elucidated by surface plasmon resonance spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, revealed the Ag-NPs synthesized to be polydispersed in nature and spherical in shape with 5–40 nm size. A typical Ag-NPs suspension (S5), with size being 15 nm, when tested in vitro against forty-two local isolates and two reference strains, showed a considerable anti-H. pylori activity. In case of in vivo trial against H. pylori induced gastritis, after oral administration of 16 mg/kg body weight of S5 for seven days, a complete clearance was recorded in male albino rates. In comparative time-killing kinetics, S5 exhibited dose- and time-dependent anti-H. pylori activity that was almost similar to tetracycline and clarithromycin, less than amoxicillin, but higher than metronidazole. Furthermore, S5 was found to be an equally effective anti-H. pylori agent at low (≤4) and high pH with no drug resistance observed even up to 10 repeated exposures while a significant drug resistance was recorded for most of the standard drugs employed. The present results revealed the potential of the synthesized Ag-NPs as safer bactericidal agents for the treatment of H. pylori induced gastritis. PMID:25214825

  9. Evaluation of combined famotidine with quercetin for the treatment of peptic ulcer: in vivo animal study.

    PubMed

    Abourehab, Mohammed A S; Khaled, Khaled A; Sarhan, Hatem A A; Ahmed, Osama A A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to prepare a combined drug dosage form of famotidine (FAM) and quercetin (QRT) to augment treatment of gastric ulcer. FAM was prepared as freeze-dried floating alginate beads using ion gelation method and then coated with Eudragit RL100 to sustain FAM release. QRT was prepared as solid dispersion with polyvinyl pyrrolidone K30 to improve its solubility. Photo images and scanning electron microscope images of the prepared beads were carried out to detect floating behavior and to reveal surface and core shape of the prepared beads. Anti-ulcerogenic effect and histopathological examination of gastric tissues were carried out to investigate the effect of the combined drug formulation compared with commercial FAM tablets and FAM beads. Gastric glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase, catalase, tissue myeloperoxidase, and lipid peroxidation enzyme activities and levels in rat stomach tissues were also determined. Results revealed that spherical beads were formed with an average diameter of 1.64±0.33 mm. They floated immediately with no lag time before floating, and remained buoyant throughout the test period. Treatment with a combination of FAM beads plus QRT showed the absence of any signs of inflammation or hemorrhage, and significantly prevented the indomethacin-induced decrease in GSH levels (P<0.05) with regain of normal GSH gastric tissue levels. Also, there was a significant difference in the decrease of malondialdehyde level compared to FAM commercial tablets or beads alone (P<0.05). The combined formula significantly improved the myeloperoxidase level compared to both the disease control group and commercial FAM tablet-treated group (P<0.05). Formulation of FAM as floating beads in combination with solid dispersion of QRT improved the anti-ulcer activity compared to commercially available tablets, which reveals a promising application for treatment of peptic ulcer. PMID:25926722

  10. Structures and metal-binding properties of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein with a di-nuclear ferroxidase center.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Hideshi; Fujii, Satoshi

    2014-06-26

    Helicobacter pylori causes severe diseases, such as chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and stomach cancers. H. pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) is an iron storage protein that forms a dodecameric shell, promotes the adhesion of neutrophils to endothelial cells, and induces the production of reactive oxygen radicals. HP-NAP belongs to the DNA-protecting proteins under starved conditions (Dps) family, which has significant structural similarities to the dodecameric ferritin family. The crystal structures of the apo form and metal-ion bound forms, such as iron, zinc, and cadmium, of HP-NAP have been determined. This review focused on the structures and metal-binding properties of HP-NAP. These metal ions bind at the di-nuclear ferroxidase center (FOC) by different coordinating patterns. In comparison with the apo structure, metal loading causes a series of conformational changes in conserved residues among HP-NAP and Dps proteins (Trp26, Asp52, and Glu56) at the FOC. HP-NAP forms a spherical dodecamer with 23 symmetry including two kinds of pores. Metal ions have been identified around one of the pores; therefore, the negatively-charged pore is suitable for the passage of metal ions.

  11. Risk factors influencing morbidity and mortality in perforated peptic ulcer disease

    PubMed Central

    Taş, İlhan; Ülger, Burak Veli; Önder, Akın; Kapan, Murat; Bozdağ, Zübeyir

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Peptic ulcer perforation continues to be a major surgical problem. In this study, risk factors that influence morbidity and mortality in perforated peptic ulcer disease were examined. Material and Methods: Files of 148 patients who were included in the study due to peptic ulcer perforation between January 2006 and December 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. Data regarding age, gender, complaints, time elapsed between onset of symptoms and hospital admission, physical examination findings, co-morbid diseases, laboratory and imaging findings, length of hospital stay, morbidity and mortality were recorded. Results: The study group included 129 (87.2%) male and 19 (12.8%) female patients. The mean age was 51.7±20 (15-88) years. Forty five patients (30.4%) had at least one co-morbid disease. In the postoperative period, 30 patients (20.3%) had complications. The most common complication was wound infection. Mortality was observed in 27 patients (18.2%). The most common cause of mortality was sepsis. Multivariate analysis revealed age over 60 years, presence of co-morbidities and Mannheim peritonitis index as independent risk factors for morbidity. Age over 60 years, time to admission and Mannheim peritonitis index were detected as independent risk factors for mortality. Conclusion: Early diagnosis and proper treatment are important in patients presenting with peptic ulcer perforation. PMID:25931940

  12. Perforation of a gastric tube peptic ulcer into the thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Katsoulis, I E; Veloudis, G; Exarchos, D; Yannopoulos, P

    2001-01-01

    We present a case of a 52-year-old male patient who died from massive hematemesis as a result of perforation of a benign peptic ulcer into the descending thoracic aorta, 1 year after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer and gastric tube interposition. We also review the literature for mechanisms of ulceration in intrathoracic gastric grafts and for complications of such ulcers.

  13. Prognostic factors in peptic ulcer perforations: a retrospective 14-year study.

    PubMed

    Unver, Mutlu; Fırat, Özgür; Ünalp, Ömer Vedat; Uğuz, Alper; Gümüş, Tufan; Sezer, Taylan Özgür; Öztürk, Şafak; Yoldaş, Tayfun; Ersin, Sinan; Güler, Adem

    2015-05-01

    Regarding the complications of peptic ulcer, a perforation remains the most important fatal complication. The aim of our retrospective study was to determine relations between postoperative morbidity and comorbid disease or perioperative risk factors in perforated peptic ulcer. In total, 239 patients who underwent emergency surgery for perforated peptic ulcer in Ege University General Surgery Department, between June 1999 and May 2013 were included in this study. The clinical data concerning the patient characteristics, operative methods, and complications were collected retrospectively. One hundred seventy-five of the 239 patients were male (73.2%) and 64 were female (26.8%). Mean American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score was 1 in the patients without morbidity, but mean ASA score was 3 in the morbidity and mortality groups. Primary suture and omentoplasty was the selected procedure in 228 of the patients. Eleven patients underwent resection. In total, 105 patients (43.9%) had comorbidities. Thirty-seven patients (67.3%) in the morbidity group had comorbid diseases. Thirteen (92.9%) patients in the mortality group had comorbid diseases. Perforation as a complication of peptic ulcer disease still remains among the frequent indications of urgent abdominal surgery. Among the analyzed parameters, age, ASA score, and having comorbid disease were found to have an effect on both mortality and morbidity. The controversial subject in the present study is regarding the duration of symptoms. The duration of symptoms had no effect on mortality nor morbidity in our study.

  14. Prognostic Factors in Peptic Ulcer Perforations: A Retrospective 14-Year Study

    PubMed Central

    Unver, Mutlu; Fırat, Özgür; Ünalp, Ömer Vedat; Uğuz, Alper; Gümüş, Tufan; Sezer, Taylan Özgür; Öztürk, Şafak; Yoldaş, Tayfun; Ersin, Sinan; Güler, Adem

    2015-01-01

    Regarding the complications of peptic ulcer, a perforation remains the most important fatal complication. The aim of our retrospective study was to determine relations between postoperative morbidity and comorbid disease or perioperative risk factors in perforated peptic ulcer. In total, 239 patients who underwent emergency surgery for perforated peptic ulcer in Ege University General Surgery Department, between June 1999 and May 2013 were included in this study. The clinical data concerning the patient characteristics, operative methods, and complications were collected retrospectively. One hundred seventy-five of the 239 patients were male (73.2%) and 64 were female (26.8%). Mean American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score was 1 in the patients without morbidity, but mean ASA score was 3 in the morbidity and mortality groups. Primary suture and omentoplasty was the selected procedure in 228 of the patients. Eleven patients underwent resection. In total, 105 patients (43.9%) had comorbidities. Thirty-seven patients (67.3%) in the morbidity group had comorbid diseases. Thirteen (92.9%) patients in the mortality group had comorbid diseases. Perforation as a complication of peptic ulcer disease still remains among the frequent indications of urgent abdominal surgery. Among the analyzed parameters, age, ASA score, and having comorbid disease were found to have an effect on both mortality and morbidity. The controversial subject in the present study is regarding the duration of symptoms. The duration of symptoms had no effect on mortality nor morbidity in our study. PMID:26011220

  15. Pneumonia and gastritis in a cat caused by feline herpesvirus-1

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Glenna F.; Sheehan, Karen; Simko, Elemir

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of fatal respiratory and gastric herpesvirus infection in a vaccinated, adult cat with no known immunosuppression or debilitation. The disease was characterized by severe necrotizing bronchopneumonia, fibrinonecrotic laryngotracheitis, and multifocal necrotizing gastritis associated with eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies and a large amount of feline herpesvirus-1 antigen detected with immunohistochemistry. PMID:26834264

  16. Pneumonia and gastritis in a cat caused by feline herpesvirus-1.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Glenna F; Sheehan, Karen; Simko, Elemir

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of fatal respiratory and gastric herpesvirus infection in a vaccinated, adult cat with no known immunosuppression or debilitation. The disease was characterized by severe necrotizing bronchopneumonia, fibrinonecrotic laryngotracheitis, and multifocal necrotizing gastritis associated with eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies and a large amount of feline herpesvirus-1 antigen detected with immunohistochemistry. PMID:26834264

  17. Erosive gastritis with special reference to the role of aspirin and bile.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, K W

    1974-11-01

    The high mortality associated with the surgical treatment of erosive gastritis is related to the postoperative continuing haemorrhage rate. Immediate gastroscopy has significantly improved preoperative diagnosis, and in 30 cases treated by the Billroth I operation continuing haemorrhage was seen on only one occasion.The frequent association of chronic gastritis and drug-associated erosive gastritis suggests that the gastritic mucosa is unusually susceptible to aspirin. Experiments designed to investigate the effect of biliary diversion on aspirin-induced gastric mucosal damage demonstrated a significant increase in such damage.Intestinal metaplasia and chronic gastritis of the gastric mucosa develop when upper intestinal secretions are diverted into the stomach either surgically or by pyloric regurgitation. Postoperative gastric aspiration indicates that the Billroth I operation is associated with far less regurgitation of upper intestinal secretions postoperatively than either the Polya operation or vagotomy and drainage. It is suggested that the efficacy of the Billroth I operation in controlling haemorrhage in the immediate postoperative period is related to this. In the long term the reduced incidence of intestinal metaplasia in the Billroth I gastric remnant reflects a minimal tendency to biliary reflux.

  18. Pneumonia and gastritis in a cat caused by feline herpesvirus-1.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Glenna F; Sheehan, Karen; Simko, Elemir

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of fatal respiratory and gastric herpesvirus infection in a vaccinated, adult cat with no known immunosuppression or debilitation. The disease was characterized by severe necrotizing bronchopneumonia, fibrinonecrotic laryngotracheitis, and multifocal necrotizing gastritis associated with eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies and a large amount of feline herpesvirus-1 antigen detected with immunohistochemistry.

  19. [Atrophic gastritis as a pre-cancer gastric condition: a new view of the old problem].

    PubMed

    Kreĭmer, V D; Tiurin, V P; Kogan, E A; Khomiakova, I A

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the work was to study the relationship between structural changes in gastric mucosa affected by atrophic gastritis and inflammation associated with Hp infection. Endoscopic examination and NBI-visualization were used to assess distribution and severity of inflammation in 500 patients with different gastric pathologies. Histological material was studied to detect Hp. Structural changes of metaplastic type most frequently occurred in patients with atrophic gastritis (72 of 81, 88.9%), surface and erosive gastritis (13 or 3.5% and 16 or 14.3% respectively), p < 0.001. Hp infection and inflammatory-destructive changes showed no apparent trends. Mucosal changes characteristic of atrophy were only rarely accompanied by marked inflammation (14.8%) and were either mild (21%) or moderately severe (64.2%). It suggests that atrophy of gastric mucosa should be regarded as independent condition while the term atrophic gastritis should be used only in case of association between atrophy and inflammation confirmed by microscopic studies.

  20. Marked enhancement by fish meal of Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis in Mongolian gerbils.

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, T; Kawamori, T; Iimuro, M; Ohta, T; Higuchi, K; Arakawa, T; Sugimura, T; Wakabayashi, K

    2000-08-01

    In a search for dietary factors influencing Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis, the effects of fish meal in the diet were examined in Mongolian gerbils. When a conventional diet containing 10% fish meal was given to Mongolian gerbils for 4 weeks after inoculation of H. pylori, edematous thickening with severe neutrophil and mononuclear cell infiltration in both the mucosa and submucosa was observed in the glandular stomach of 19 out of the 20 animals, and hemorrhagic spots were evident in 11 cases. These gastric lesions were enhanced by a 20% fish meal supplement, and edema and hemorrhage in the gastric mucosa were observed in 19 and 17 out of 20 animals, respectively. Although almost the same levels of viable bacteria were detected independent of the diet, edema and hemorrhage were seen in only 2 and 1 of 20 gerbils fed a diet containing 10% casein, instead of 10% fish meal, respectively. Neither edema nor hemorrhage was observed in 10% beef diet animals. These results suggest that fish meal contains factors which greatly enhance H. pylori-induced gastritis in Mongolian gerbils. Since the incidences of gastritis and gastric cancer are very high throughout the world, it is very important to identify these gastritis-enhancing factors. PMID:10965015

  1. [Peculiarities of relationship between atrophic gastritis and stomach cancer in the population of Eastern Siberia].

    PubMed

    Tsukanov, V V; Butorin, N N; Maady, A S; Shtygasheva, O V; Amel'chugova, O S; Tonkikh, Iu L; Bronnikova, E P

    2011-01-01

    The authors studied the prevalence of atrophic gastritis, H.pylori strains carrying the CagA gene, seeding and apoptosis indices of gastric mucosa in indigenous and newcomer residents of Evenkia. A total of 136 Evenks and 159 newcomers were examined using fibrogastroscopy and biopsy of antral gastric mucosa. Morphological study included light microscopy of hematoxylin and eosin-stained biopsies and their analysis using a visual-analog scale to reveal signs of inflammation, apoptosis, intestinal metaplasia and the degree of insemination by P. pylori. Urease and morphological tests were used to identify H. pylori and the TUNEL technique (Mebstain Apoptosis kit direct, France) to determine apoptosis index; serum anti-Helicobacter and CagA antibodies were detected by an immunoenzyme assay in 22 Evenks and 24 newcomers with chronic H. pylori-associated gastritis. The prevalence of atrophic gastritis in these groups was estimated at 13.2 and 23.9% respectively, seeding density 45.37 +/- 2.01 and 214 +/- 8.75 (p < 0.001). H. pylori strains carrying the CagA gene were identified in 59.6 and 43.6% of the newcomers and Evenks (p = 0.01), total apoptosis index in greater curvature mucosa was 4.99 +/- 0.23 and 3.19 +/- 0.28 (p < 0.01) respectively. These ethnic difference in the prevalence of atrophic gastritis appear to be attributable to different intensity of apoptosis in greater curvature mucosa.

  2. Changing prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and peptic ulcer among dyspeptic Sardinian patients.

    PubMed

    Dore, Maria Pina; Marras, Giuseppina; Rocchi, Chiara; Soro, Sara; Loria, Maria Francesca; Bassotti, Gabrio; Graham, David Y; Malaty, Hoda M; Pes, Giovanni M

    2015-10-01

    Over the past 50 years, the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection has fallen as standards of living improved. The changes in the prevalence of infection and its manifestations (peptic ulcer disease and gastric mucosal lesions) were investigated in a large cohort of Sardinians undergoing upper endoscopy for dyspepsia. A retrospective observational study was conducted involving patients undergoing endoscopy for dyspepsia from 1995 to 2013. H. pylori status was assessed by histology plus the rapid urease test or 13C-UBT. Gastric mucosal lesions were evaluated histologically. Data including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) use and the presence of peptic ulcers were collected. The prevalence of H. pylori was calculated for each quartile and for each birth cohort from 1910 to 2000. 11,202 records were retrieved for the analysis (62.9% women). The overall prevalence of H. pylori infection was 43.8% (M: 46.6% vs. F: 42.0%; P = 0.0001). A dramatic decrease in the prevalence of infection occurred over the 19-year observation period. The birth cohort effect was evident in each category (quartile) reflecting the continuous decline in H. pylori acquisition. Over time, the prevalence of peptic ulcers also declined, resulting in an increase in the proportion of H. pylori negative/NSAID positive and H. pylori negative/NSAID negative peptic ulcers. The prevalence of gastric mucosal changes also declined despite aging. The decline in H. pylori prevalence over time likely reflects the improvement in socioeconomic conditions in Sardinia such that H. pylori infection and its clinical outcomes including peptic ulcer are becoming less frequent even among dyspeptic patients.

  3. Helicobacter pylori and gastritis: the role of extracellular matrix metalloproteases, their inhibitors, and the disintegrins and metalloproteases--a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Clara L

    2013-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the etiologic agent of gastritis; it has been estimated that 50 % of the world's population could be infected by this bacteria. Gastritis may progress to chronic atrophic gastritis, a condition associated with the development of gastric cancer (GC). Several matrix metalloproteases (MMP) and tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMP) as well as disintegrins and metalloproteases (ADAM) have been reported as being involved in gastritis. Among other processes, these protein families participate in remodeling the extracellular matrix, cell signaling, immune response, angiogenesis, inflammation and epithelial mesenchymal transition. This systematic review analyzes the scientific evidence surrounding the relationship between members of the MMP, TIMP and ADAM families and infection by H. pylori in gastritis, considering both in vitro and in vivo studies. Given the potential clinical value of certain members of the MMP, TIMP and ADAM families as molecular markers in gastritis and the association of gastritis with GC, the need for further study is highlighted.

  4. Autoimmune Metaplastic Atrophic Gastritis: Recognizing Precursor Lesions for Appropriate Patient Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Meredith E; Voltaggio, Lysandra; Bhaijee, Feriyl; Robertson, Scott A; Montgomery, Elizabeth A

    2015-12-01

    Autoimmune metaplastic atrophic gastritis (AMAG) is a significant risk factor for pernicious anemia and gastric neoplasia. Still, the histologic features of AMAG are frequently overlooked, especially in the early stages of the disease. The purpose of our study, therefore, was to catalogue the progression of histologic changes that precede the development of AMAG in affected individuals. Over a 2-year period (2012 to 2014), the diagnosis of AMAG was rendered on material from 113 patients seen at Johns Hopkins Hospital (∼1.8% of "in house" gastric biopsies). Prior gastric body biopsies had been performed on 54 (48%) patients in the cohort, and the majority of these specimens had also shown AMAG. Eighteen of the previous biopsies, however, carried a diagnosis other than AMAG: 13 inactive chronic gastritis, 2 acute Helicobacter pylori gastritis, and 1 each of eosinophilic gastritis, iron pill gastritis, and proton-pump inhibitor-like effect. Upon review of these 18 biopsies, the most common histologic findings were heavy full-thickness or deep lamina propria chronic inflammation (12), inflammatory destruction of oxyntic glands (12), metaplasia (intestinal, pyloric, or pancreatic acinar) (10), prominent lamina propria eosinophils (8), and parietal cell pseudohypertrophy (4). At least 2 of these features were present in the majority (13, 72%) of the biopsies. In addition, 7 (58%) of these patients were also found to have another autoimmune or inflammatory disorder before the diagnosis of AMAG. Although subtle, histologic features of developing AMAG are identifiable in routine gastric body biopsies. When metaplasia, full-thickness chronic inflammation, and/or oxyntic destruction are seen, a note suggesting laboratory testing and/or close clinical follow-up in this subset of patients may be warranted.

  5. Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Gastritis by H. pylori Associated With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Culquichicón-Sánchez, Carlos; Correa, Ricardo; Flores-Guevara, Igor; Espinoza Morales, Frank; Mejia, Christian R

    2016-01-01

    We present the 15th case reported worldwide and 3rd case reported in Latin America of immune thrombocytopenic purpura associated with Type 1 diabetes mellitus in Scopus, MEDLINE, and SciELO. An 11-year-old male patient of mixed ethnicity with immune thrombocytopenic purpura, Type 1 diabetes mellitus, and gastritis due to H. pylori presented to the emergency room with petechiae, ecchymosis, and gingival and conjunctival bleeding that had been worsening for the past three months. The patient had a body mass index of 18.85 kg/m(2) (P75). A biochemical analysis showed 1×10(9) platelets/L, increased prothrombin time, increased partial thromboplastin time, and an HbA1C of 7.84% on admission. He was prescribed a single dose of intravenous methylprednisolone 750 mg in 100 mL of NaCl and daily oral 50 mg prednisolone, with intravenous 250 mg tranexamic acid every eight hours. The patient's glycemic control was continued with the administration of insulin glargine (30 units every 24 hours) and prandial insulin glulisine (five to eight units per meal). Before admission, the patient was on a prescribed treatment of sitagliptin 50 mg and metformin 850 mg, but this was suspended in the emergency room. For the eradication of H. pylori he was prescribed amoxicillin 500 mg every eight hours, oral clarithromycin 335 mg every 12 hours, and IV omeprazole 40 mg. After 15 days, he showed disease resolution and he was discharged to his home with orders to follow-up with pediatrics, hematology, and endocrinology services. The first-line treatment for immune thrombocytopenic purpura patients with active bleeding and a platelet count < 30,000 platelets/μl is the administration of corticosteroids and inmunoglobulin. PMID:27026836

  6. [The characteristics of treating gastric and duodenal peptic ulcer in workers in an oil-refining enterprise].

    PubMed

    Murzanov, M M; Iskakov, M N

    1995-01-01

    The article covers a topical problem--study of transitory disablement in oil-processing workers suffering from peptic ulcer. The authors demonstrate data on increased occurrence of peptic ulcer among those workers engaged mostly into the main industrial process and stress the great economic detriment caused by the disease. Application of endoscopy treatment and therapy within the local prophylactic department appeared to dramatically decrease the transitory disablement. The article could be interesting for gastroenterologists, industrial medicine officers.

  7. Characterisation of proton pump antibodies and stomach pathology in gastritis induced by neonatal immunisation without adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, D L; Sentry, J W; Toh, B H

    2001-01-01

    It has previously been reported that neonatal BALB.D2 mice injected with native proton pump antigens without adjuvant develop an irreversible gastritis (Claeys et al, 1997). The ease of inititating gastritis in the neonate stands in contrast with the difficulty in initiating gastritis in adult mice that require repeated immunisation in adjuvant that is reversible following cessation of immunisation (Scarff et al, 1997). In view of these contrasting observations, we set out to ascertain whether we could confirm the observations in neonatal mice as well as further characterise the pathology and the autoantibody response. We found that neonatal gastritis-susceptible BALB/c mice (n=12), immunised with either pig or mouse gastric membranes in the absence of adjuvant, develop gastritis without circulating antibody to parietal cells detected by immunofluorescence, a hallmark of murine and human gastritis (Toh et al, 1997). However, mice immunized with pig gastric membranes (n=6) had circulating antibodies reactive by immunofluorescence to recombinant alpha and/or beta subunit of gastric H+/K+-ATPase expressed by insect cells (Sfalpha and Sfbeta). Four mice from this cohort with antibodies to Sfbeta also had reactivity to gastric H+/K+-ATPase by ELISA, and 3 immunoblotted the beta but not the alpha subunit of the ATPase. In the cohort of mice immunised with mouse gastric membranes (n=6), four produced antibodies reactive by immunofluorescence to Sfalpha, two of which were also reactive to Sfbeta and one developed antibodies detected by ELISA to gastric H+/K+-ATPase. However, no members of this cohort had antibodies reactive by immunoblotting to either the beta or alpha subunit of the ATPase. In all cases gastritic stomachs were characterised by areas deficient in ribosome-rich zymogenic cells and marked reductions in H+/K+-ATPase-positive parietal cells. Metaplasia detected by Maxwell stain, as clusters of mucus-producing cells throughout gastric units, were non

  8. Serum and plasma concentration of oxidant and antioxidants in patients of Helicobacter pylori gastritis and its correlation with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Khanzode, Shruti S; Khanzode, Suchet D; Dakhale, Ganesh N

    2003-05-30

    Serum superoxide dismutase, plasma ascorbic acid and lipid peroxidation in H. pylori gastritis and gastric cancer patients were compared with values for age matched healthy subjects. Serum superoxide dismutase and serum malondialdehyde were analyzed spectrophotometrically whereas plasma ascorbic acid was determined by colorimetric method. Significant increase in serum superoxide dismutase and serum malondialdehyde and significant decrease in plasma ascorbic acid were observed in H. pylori gastritis and gastric cancer patients compared to control subjects. The concentration of serum superoxide dismutase and serum malondialdehyde was significantly higher and plasma ascorbic acid was significantly lower in gastric cancer as compared to H. pylori gastritis patients. Our results demonstrate that a correlation existed between the concentration of serum superoxide dismutase, plasma ascorbic acid and lipid peroxidation in H. pylori gastritis and gastric cancer patients.

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Helicobacter pylori Strain 7C Isolated from a Mexican Patient with Chronic Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Mucito-Varela, Eduardo; Castillo-Rojas, Gonzalo; Cevallos, Miguel A.; Lozano, Luis; Merino, Enrique; López-Leal, Gamaliel

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis is a risk factor for developing gastric pathologies. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a multidrug-resistant H. pylori strain isolated from a chronic gastritis patient in Mexico City, Mexico. Nonvirulent VacA and cag-pathogenicity island (PAI) genotypes were found, but the presence of a potential mobilizable plasmid carrying an IS605 element is of outstanding interest. PMID:26744372

  10. Evaluation of the Pattern of EPIYA Motifs in the Helicobacter pylori cagA Gene of Patients with Gastritis and Gastric Adenocarcinoma from the Brazilian Amazon Region

    PubMed Central

    Vilar e Silva, Adenielson; Junior, Mario Ribeiro da Silva; Vinagre, Ruth Maria Dias Ferreira; Santos, Kemper Nunes; da Costa, Renata Aparecida Andrade; Fecury, Amanda Alves; Quaresma, Juarez Antônio Simões; Martins, Luisa Caricio

    2014-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori is associated with the development of different diseases. The clinical outcome of infection may be associated with the cagA bacterial genotype. The aim of this study was to determine the EPIYA patterns of strains isolated from patients with gastritis and gastric adenocarcinoma and correlate these patterns with the histopathological features. Gastric biopsy samples were selected from 384 patients infected with H. pylori, including 194 with chronic gastritis and 190 with gastric adenocarcinoma. The presence of the cagA gene and the EPIYA motif was determined by PCR. The cagA gene was more prevalent in patients with gastric cancer and was associated with a higher degree of inflammation, neutrophil activity, and development of intestinal metaplasia. The number of EPIYA-C repeats showed a significant association with an increased risk of gastric carcinoma (OR = 3.79, 95% CI = 1.92–7.46, and P = 0.002). A larger number of EPIYA-C motifs were also associated with intestinal metaplasia. In the present study, infection with H. pylori strains harboring more than one EPIYA-C motif in the cagA gene was associated with the development of intestinal metaplasia and gastric adenocarcinoma but not with neutrophil activity or degree of inflammation. PMID:26904732

  11. Evaluation of the Pattern of EPIYA Motifs in the Helicobacter pylori cagA Gene of Patients with Gastritis and Gastric Adenocarcinoma from the Brazilian Amazon Region.

    PubMed

    Vilar E Silva, Adenielson; Junior, Mario Ribeiro da Silva; Vinagre, Ruth Maria Dias Ferreira; Santos, Kemper Nunes; da Costa, Renata Aparecida Andrade; Fecury, Amanda Alves; Quaresma, Juarez Antônio Simões; Martins, Luisa Caricio

    2014-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori is associated with the development of different diseases. The clinical outcome of infection may be associated with the cagA bacterial genotype. The aim of this study was to determine the EPIYA patterns of strains isolated from patients with gastritis and gastric adenocarcinoma and correlate these patterns with the histopathological features. Gastric biopsy samples were selected from 384 patients infected with H. pylori, including 194 with chronic gastritis and 190 with gastric adenocarcinoma. The presence of the cagA gene and the EPIYA motif was determined by PCR. The cagA gene was more prevalent in patients with gastric cancer and was associated with a higher degree of inflammation, neutrophil activity, and development of intestinal metaplasia. The number of EPIYA-C repeats showed a significant association with an increased risk of gastric carcinoma (OR = 3.79, 95% CI = 1.92-7.46, and P = 0.002). A larger number of EPIYA-C motifs were also associated with intestinal metaplasia. In the present study, infection with H. pylori strains harboring more than one EPIYA-C motif in the cagA gene was associated with the development of intestinal metaplasia and gastric adenocarcinoma but not with neutrophil activity or degree of inflammation. PMID:26904732

  12. Ginsenoside Rc from Korean Red Ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer) Attenuates Inflammatory Symptoms of Gastritis, Hepatitis and Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tao; Rhee, Man Hee; Lee, Jongsung; Kim, Seung Hyung; Yang, Yanyan; Kim, Han Gyung; Kim, Yong; Kim, Chaekyun; Kwak, Yi-Seong; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2016-01-01

    Korean Red Ginseng (KRG) is an herbal medicine prescribed worldwide that is prepared from Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (Araliaceae). Out of ginseng's various components, ginsenosides are regarded as the major ingredients, exhibiting anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities. Although recent studies have focused on understanding the anti-inflammatory activities of KRG, compounds that are major anti-inflammatory components, precisely how these can suppress various inflammatory processes has not been fully elucidated yet. In this study, we aimed to identify inhibitory saponins, to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of the saponins, and to understand the inhibitory mechanisms. To do this, we employed in vitro lipopolysaccharide-treated macrophages and in vivo inflammatory mouse conditions, such as collagen (type II)-induced arthritis (CIA), EtOH/HCl-induced gastritis, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/D-galactosamine (D-GalN)-triggered hepatitis. Molecular mechanisms were also verified by real-time PCR, immunoblotting analysis, and reporter gene assays. Out of all the ginsenosides, ginsenoside Rc (G-Rc) showed the highest inhibitory activity against the expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-[Formula: see text], interleukin (IL)-1[Formula: see text], and interferons (IFNs). Similarly, this compound attenuated inflammatory symptoms in CIA, EtOH/HCl-mediated gastritis, and LPS/D-galactosamine (D-GalN)-triggered hepatitis without altering toxicological parameters, and without inducing gastric irritation. These anti-inflammatory effects were accompanied by the suppression of TNF-[Formula: see text] and IL-6 production and the induction of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in mice with CIA. G-Rc also attenuated the increased levels of luciferase activity by IRF-3 and AP-1 but not NF-[Formula: see text]B. In support of this phenomenon, G-Rc reduced TBK1, IRF-3, and ATF2 phosphorylation in the joint and liver tissues of mice with hepatitis. Therefore, our results strongly suggest that

  13. Is there any role of acid reducing gastric surgery in peptic ulcer perforation?

    PubMed

    Nivatvongs, Supanit

    2005-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is known to be the prime factor of peptic ulcer disease as well as NSAID usage. Although medical treatment of the bacteria can eliminate the problem for more than 90% of the infected people but the cost of treatment is high then acid reducing gastric surgery still has a definite role. The prevalence of H. pylori in peptic ulcer perferation is still unknown also whether vagotomy and gastrectomy could eradicate H. pylori. Now laparoscopic surgery especially the simple repair of the perforation has became routinely used in many part of the world. So acid reducing gastric surgery is a good choice in chronic user of NSAID and also an option for people who have H. pylori infection.

  14. [Relationship between location of stress erosive gastritis and brain damage in resuscitated patients].

    PubMed

    Suzaki, Fumio; Suzuki, Ryoichi; Sugiyama, Mitsugi

    2002-03-01

    Patients after resuscitation from cardiopulmonary arrest often show stress erosive gastritis. This study investigated the relationship between the location of gastric mucosal injury and the degree of brain damage. Forty-five resuscitated patients with gastrointestinal bleeding complications were enrolled and were examined by esophagogastric fiberscope after 72 hours of hospitalization. Their brainstem and cerebral functions were evaluated brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) and electrical encephalogram (EEG), respectively. Thirty patients showed complications with acute gastric lesions. Ten patients had gastric mucosal injury in the antrum and they all showed a good response for BAEP (I, III and V waves were positive). In contrast, patients without antral gastric mucosal lesions showed poor response for ABR (defect of III and V waves) and EGG (Hockerday Grade III or IV). These results indicate that fair brainstem function is necessary for stress erosive gastritis in gastric antrum.

  15. Laparoscopic Repair of Perforated Peptic Ulcer: Outcome and Associated Morbidity and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Alemrajabi, Mahdi; Safari, Saeed; Tizmaghz, Adnan; Alemrajabi, Fatemeh; Shabestanipour, Ghazaal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The mainstay of treatment for perforated peptic ulcer is Omental patch closure. With the advent of laparoscopic surgery, this approach is being used for the treatment of perforated peptic ulcer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of laparoscopy in Firoozgar general hospital over a period of 18 months. The outcome of the laparoscopic approach and the associated morbidity and mortality, operation time, conversion rate and hospital stay were assessed. Methods A prospective analysis of 29 consecutive patients (mean age 37.5 years; 23 men) with perforated peptic ulcers and who had undergone laparoscopic surgery was carried over a period of 18 months from March 2014 until September 2015. Pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative clinical data were collectively analyzed by SPSS 19 for Windows. Results Seventeen patients had a history of cigarette smoking, 11 patients had a history of opium consumption, 19 were chronic NSAID users, 26 had Helicobacter pylori infections, and six had a co-morbid condition. Previous surgical history included laparotomy for pancreatic cancer in two patients, for sigmoid colon cancer in one patient, and for acute appendicitis in four patients. The average operating time for all cases was 47.5 + 20 min. The mean lag time between onset of symptoms and surgery was 20.4 hours. All patients underwent laparoscopic closure of the perforation with Omental patch closure. No morbidity was observed, and none of the patients needed conversion to open surgery. One patient died after 11 months of follow-up due to the progression of underlying pancreatic cancer. The mean postoperative hospital stay was 4.2 days. Conclusions The results of the laparoscopic approach for perforated peptic ulcer were promising, with no conversion to open surgery, no morbidity, and mortality. PMID:27504170

  16. [A study on the pattern of pain expression of peptic ulcer patients].

    PubMed

    Kim, J S; Choi, Y H

    1991-08-01

    Pain is a subjective and multidimensional concept. Therefore the patient's expression of pain have been referred to the best believable indicator of pain condition but the support data obtained from the patient considered cultural difference is a deficient condition in determined on the precise nursing diagnosis. The purpose of this research was to understand multiple pain responses in cultural difference and sensitivity, to encourage communication between medical teams, and to provide the foundation data of on data of precise nursing assessment for the patient in pain. The research problem was to grasp pain express pattern of Korean peptic ulcer patients. The subjects were 20 peptic ulcer patients in medical unit or OPD of twp university hospitals in Seoul. Data were collected from September 7th to 22nd, 1990 by intensive interviews. Interviews were done by the researcher and all were tape-recorded. The Data analysis was done by Phenomenological method from Van Kaam. Validity assured by confirmation of the internal consistency of the statements and category by nursing colleague in educational and clinicians in medical care. From the emic data, 96 descriptive statements were organized in 18 theme cluster. The results of study were summarized as follows. 1. Pain Express Pattern cluster of Peptic Ulcer Patients were "pain as clogging", "shallow pain", "pain as pressing", "nauseateing pain", "pain as smarting", "pain as pulling", "pain as pricking", "pain as bursting", "wrenching pain", "excising pain", "uncontrollable pain for mind and body", "awakening pain", "pain as hollowing" and the other cluster. As above mentioned, Pain Express Pattern of Peptic Ulcer Patient appeared diversely in verbal and they were propered to Korean culture. Therefore they will provide for the foundation data of precise nursing assessment.

  17. Intramural hematoma of duodenum: An unusual complication after endoscopic therapy for a bleeding peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ramesh; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Bhatia, Vikram; Garg, Hitendra Kumar; Sundar, Shyam

    2011-01-01

    Intramural hematoma of duodenum (IDH) is a relatively unusual complication associated with endoscopic treatment of bleeding peptic ulcer. This unusual condition is usually seen in children following blunt trauma to the abdomen. We describe here a case of IDH occurring following endoscopic therapy for bleeding duodenal ulcer in an adult patient with end-stage renal disease. The hematomas appeared on the second day of endoscopic intervention, caused transient duodenal obstruction and resolved spontaneously with conservative treatment in a week. PMID:21814382

  18. Iron deficiency anemia in an athlete associated with Campylobacter pylori-negative chronic gastritis

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, D.; Sherman, P. )

    1989-08-01

    A 14-year-old athletic boy with a 1-year history of decreased exercise tolerance presented with unexplained iron deficiency anemia. Panendoscopy, colonoscopy, and barium contrast studies of the gastrointestinal tract were normal. However, persistent uptake of radionuclide using a {sup 99m}technetium-sucralfate scan suggested inflammation localized to the stomach. Mucosal biopsies demonstrated acute and chronic gastritis that was not associated with the presence of Campylobacter pylori.

  19. Experimental gastritis leads to anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in female but not male rats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jia; Wang, Tao; Liang, Shan; Hu, Xu; Li, Wei; Jin, Feng

    2013-12-17

    Human and animals studies support the idea that there is a gender-related co-morbidity of pain-related and inflammatory gastrointestinal (GI) diseases with psychological disorders. This co-morbidity is the evidence for the existence of GI-brain axis which consists of immune (cytokines), neural (vagus nerve) and neuroendocrine (HPA axis) pathways. Psychological stress causes disturbances in GI physiology, such as altered GI barrier function, changes in motility and secretion, development of visceral hypersensitivity, and dysfunction of inflammatory responses. Whether GI inflammation would exert impact on psychological behavior is not well established. We examined the effect of experimental gastritis on anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats, and evaluated potential mechanisms of action. Gastritis was induced by adding 0.1% (w/v) iodoacetamide (IAA) to the sterile drinking water for 7 days. Sucrose preference test assessed the depression-like behavior, open field test and elevated plus maze evaluated the anxiety-like behavior. IAA treatment induced gastric inflammation in rats of either gender. No behavioral abnormality or dysfunction of GI-brain axis was observed in male rats with IAA-induced gastritis. Anxiety- and depression-like behaviors were apparent and the HPA axis was hyperactive in female rats with IAA-induced gastritis. Our results show that gastric inflammation leads to anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in female but not male rats via the neuroendocrine (HPA axis) pathway, suggesting that the GI inflammation can impair normal brain function and induce changes in psychological behavior in a gender-related manner through the GI-to-brain signaling.

  20. Evidence of Epstein-Barr Virus Association with Gastric Cancer and Non-Atrophic Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-López, Juan L.E.; Torres, Javier; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Mantilla, Alejandra; Leal, Yelda A.; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2014-01-01

    Different lines of evidence support an association between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and gastric cancer (GC). The main understood risk factor to develop GC is infection by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), which triggers a local inflammatory response critical for progression from gastritis to GC. The role of EBV in early inflammatory gastric lesions has been poorly studied. A recent study proposed a cutoff value of 2000 EBV particles to identify patients with increased chances of infection of the gastric epithelium, which may favor the inflammatory process. To better understand the role of EBV in cancer progression, we analyzed 75 samples of GC, 147 control samples of non-tumor gastric tissue derived from GC patients and 75 biopsies from patients with non-atrophic gastritis (NAG). A first-round PCR was used for EBV detection in tumor and non-tumor controls and a more sensitive nested PCR for gastritis samples; both PCRs had lower detection limits above the proposed cutoff value. With this strategy 10.67% of GC, 1.3% of non-tumor controls and 8% of gastritis samples were found positive. An EBER1 in situ hybridization showed EBV infection of epithelial cells in GC and in a third of NAG samples, while in the other NAGs infection was restricted to the mononuclear cell infiltrate. EBV-positive GCs were enriched in lace and cribriform patterns, while these rare patterns were not observed in EBV negative samples. Our results support a role for EBV in GC and early precursor lesions, either as directly oncogenic infecting epithelial cells or indirectly as an inflammatory trigger. PMID:24448220

  1. Evidence of Epstein-Barr virus association with gastric cancer and non-atrophic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-López, Juan L E; Torres, Javier; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Mantilla, Alejandra; Leal, Yelda A; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M

    2014-01-20

    Different lines of evidence support an association between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and gastric cancer (GC). The main understood risk factor to develop GC is infection by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), which triggers a local inflammatory response critical for progression from gastritis to GC. The role of EBV in early inflammatory gastric lesions has been poorly studied. A recent study proposed a cutoff value of 2000 EBV particles to identify patients with increased chances of infection of the gastric epithelium, which may favor the inflammatory process. To better understand the role of EBV in cancer progression, we analyzed 75 samples of GC, 147 control samples of non-tumor gastric tissue derived from GC patients and 75 biopsies from patients with non-atrophic gastritis (NAG). A first-round PCR was used for EBV detection in tumor and non-tumor controls and a more sensitive nested PCR for gastritis samples; both PCRs had lower detection limits above the proposed cutoff value. With this strategy 10.67% of GC, 1.3% of non-tumor controls and 8% of gastritis samples were found positive. An EBER1 in situ hybridization showed EBV infection of epithelial cells in GC and in a third of NAG samples, while in the other NAGs infection was restricted to the mononuclear cell infiltrate. EBV-positive GCs were enriched in lace and cribriform patterns, while these rare patterns were not observed in EBV negative samples. Our results support a role for EBV in GC and early precursor lesions, either as directly oncogenic infecting epithelial cells or indirectly as an inflammatory trigger.

  2. [Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug and Aspirin-induced Peptic Ulcer Disease].

    PubMed

    Shim, Young Kwang; Kim, Nayoung

    2016-06-25

    Despite decreasing Helicobacter pylori prevalence, the prevalence of peptic ulcer disease is increasing in the aged population, mainly due to increasing use of NSAIDs to manage pain and inflammation. In addition, low dose aspirin is employed as an anti-coagulant for those who have suffered or are at high risk of ischemic stroke and cardiovascular disease. However, NSAIDs and aspirin are injurious to mucosa of stomach and duodenum. NSAID-induced inhibition of mucosal prostaglandin synthesis is thought to be a major mechanism of gastrointestinal mucosal injury. The proportion of elderly has increased rapidly in Korea, with the proportion over 65 years old expected to be 24.3% in 2030. In this higher-risk population, the strategy to reduce the incidence of NSAID-related peptic ulcers and complications such as bleeding, obstruction and perforation is very important. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor can be used for reducing the risk of NSAID-related ulcers and upper gastrointestinal (GI) complications. However, continuous use of PPI has several problems. In addition, NSAID-related problems in the lower GI tract have increased, in contrast to the decrease of NSAID-related upper GI disease. The aim of this review is to provide an evidence-based knowledge regarding the mechanism, complications of treatment, and prevention strategies for NSAID- or aspirin-related peptic ulcer disease in Korea.

  3. Time trends in peptic ulcer surgery, 1956 to 1986. A nation-wide survey in Sweden.

    PubMed Central

    Gustavsson, S; Nyrén, O

    1989-01-01

    To establish time trends in surgical rates for peptic ulcer disease, all surgical departments in Sweden were requested to complete a questionnaire regarding elective operations for gastric and duodenal ulcers and emergency operations for ulcer perforations performed in 1956, 1966, 1976, and 1986. A total of 8558 operations were reported for these years. The incidence of elective surgery declined steadily, the rates being 72.1, 45.0, 31.9, and 10.7 per 100,000 inhabitants. The male:female ratio fell from 4.2 to 1.5:1, while the duodenal/gastric ulcer ratio remained virtually unchanged. The operation rate for perforation decreased by 50%, from 12.8 to 6.4 per 100,000 inhabitants. We conclude that there has been a dramatic decline in elective peptic ulcer surgery in Sweden that began long before the advent of fiberoptic endoscopy, highly selective vagotomy, or H2-receptor antagonists. The comparable decline in emergency procedures suggests that true changes in the incidence or severity of the disease have occurred. In the future the few patients still needing elective surgery for peptic ulcer may have to be served by a small number of specialized centers. PMID:2589883

  4. An Unusual Presentation of Pseudothrombotic Microangiopathy in a Patient with Autoimmune Atrophic Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Nasnas, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. We hereby describe the case of a young female patient who presented with pseudothrombotic microangiopathy, as well as pancytopenia accompanied by autoimmune atrophic gastritis. Case Presentation. A 36-year-old Caucasian woman presented to the emergency department with fatigue and dyspnea on minimal exertion. Physical examination was unremarkable except for pallor and noninjected conjunctiva. Laboratory tests revealed high LDH and low hemoglobin, white blood cells, platelets, and haptoglobin. The peripheral blood smear showed schistocytes suggestive of pseudothrombotic microangiopathy. Low cobalamin level and hyperhomocysteinemia were also detected. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis was confirmed by gastric biopsy and positive anti-intrinsic factor antibodies. Vitamin B12 supplements were given which led to rapid recovery and normalization of blood parameters. Conclusion. This case highlights the importance and serves as a reminder to clinicians to rule out cobalamin deficiency and autoimmune atrophic gastritis in patients presenting with a picture suggestive of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and pancytopenia, which was completely reversible after appropriate replacement therapy without recurring to unnecessary and invasive procedures such as plasma exchange. PMID:27018160

  5. Huangqi Jianzhong Tang for Treatment of Chronic Gastritis: A Systematic Review of Randomized Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yue; Ma, Li-Xin; Yin, Sheng-Jun; An, Jing; Wei, Qi; Yang, Jin-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    To assess the clinical effects and safety of Huangqi Jianzhong Tang (HQJZ) for the treatment of chronic gastritis (CG), three English databases and four Chinese databases were searched through the inception to January 2015. In randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing HQJZ with placebo, no intervention and western medicine were included. A total of 9 RCTs involving 979 participants were identified. The methodological quality of the included trials was generally poor. Meta-analyses demonstrated that HQJZ plus conventional medicine was more effective in improving overall gastroscopy outcome than western medicine alone for treatment of chronic superficial gastritis with the pooling result of overall improvement [OR 3.78 (1.29,11.06), P = 0.02]. In addition, the combination of HQJZ with antibiotics has higher overall effect rate than antibiotics alone for the treatment of CG [OR 2.60 (1.49,4.54), P = 0.0007]. There were no serious adverse events reported in both the intervention and controlled groups. HQJZ has the potential of improvement of the patients' gastroscopy outcomes, Helicobacter pylori clearance rate, traditional Chinese Medicine syndromes, and overall effect rate alone or in combination use with conventional western medicine for chronic atrophic gastritis. However, due to poor methodological quality, the beneficial effect and safeties of HQJZ for CG could not be confirmed. PMID:26819622

  6. An experimental Helicobacter suis infection causes gastritis and reduced daily weight gain in pigs.

    PubMed

    De Bruyne, Ellen; Flahou, Bram; Chiers, Koen; Meyns, Tom; Kumar, Smitha; Vermoote, Miet; Pasmans, Frank; Millet, Sam; Dewulf, Jeroen; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard

    2012-12-01

    Helicobacter suis is a zoonotically important bacterium, that has been associated with gastritis and ulcerative lesions of the pars oesophagea of the stomach in pigs. Its exact role in these pathologies, however, still remains controversial. Therefore, a total of 29 medicated early weaned piglets were inoculated intragastrically or orally, with a total of 2 × 10(9) viable H. suis bacteria and the effect on gastric pathology and weight gain was determined. Twenty-three medicated early weaned piglets were inoculated with a sterile culture medium and used as sham-inoculated controls. The animals were euthanized between 28 and 42 days after inoculation. Infected animals showed a more severe gastritis compared to the control group. There was also a significant reduction of approximately 60 g per day (10%) in weight gain in H. suis inoculated animals compared to the sham-inoculated control animals. In conclusion, this study demonstrates for the first time that a pure in vitro culture of H. suis not only causes gastritis but also a marked decrease of the daily weight gain in experimentally infected pigs.

  7. Preventive effect of cimetidine on chronic erosive gastritis induced by taurocholate in rats.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, S; Kobuke, K; Kobayashi, H; Kajiyama, G; Miyoshi, A; Daitoku, K

    1991-01-01

    We studied the preventive effect of cimetidine at the microscopic level on chronic erosive gastritis induced experimentally by 6-months of administration of drinking water containing 5 mmol/l of the sodium salt of taurocholic acid (TCA) in rats. The chronic erosive gastritis was characterized by mucosal erosions, reduction of mucosal thickness and reduction in the number of parietal cells per unit area, infiltration of inflammatory cells which were mainly lymphocytes and plasmocytes, and proliferation of collagenous fibers in the gastric mucosa. A standard meal including cimetidine 0.4 and 0.8%, which was administered ad libitum with TCA, reduced the total length of erosions, normalized the mucosal thickness and the number of parietal cells, and reduced inflammatory cell infiltration in the gastric mucosa. However, cimetidine did not show any effect on the proliferation of collagenous fibers in the interstitial space of the mucosa. The doses administered were 400 mg/kg/day and 800 mg/kg/day for 6 months. Cimetidine, thus, had a preventive effect on experimental chronic erosive gastritis in rats. PMID:2024066

  8. The effect of luteolin-7-O-beta-D-glucuronopyranoside on gastritis and esophagitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Min, Young Sil; Bai, Ki Lyong; Yim, Sung Hyuk; Lee, Young Joo; Song, Hyun Ju; Kim, Jin Hak; Ham, Inhye; Whang, Wan Kyun; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2006-06-01

    This study evaluated the inhibitory action of luteolin-7-O-beta-D-glucuronopyranoside, luteolin which was isolated from Salix gilgiana leaves, and omeprazole on reflux esophagitis and gastritis in rats. Reflux esophagitis and gastritis were induced surgically and by the administration of indomethacin, respectively. The intraduodenal administration of luteolin-7-O-beta-D-glucuronopyranoside decreased the ulcer index, injury area, gastric volume and acid output, and increased the gastric pH compared with luteolin. Luteolin-7-O-beta-D-glucuronopyranoside significantly decreased the size of the gastric lesions that had been induced by exposing the gastric mucosa to indomethacin. The malondialdehyde content, which is the end product of lipid peroxidation, was increased significantly after inducing of reflux esophagitis. The malondialdehyde content was decreased by Luteolin-7-O-beta-D-glucuronopyranoside but not luteolin or omeprazole. Luteolin-7-O-beta-D-glucuronopyranoside has a more potent antioxidative effect than luteolin. Luteolin-7-O-beta-D-glucuronopyranoside is a promising drug for the treatment of reflux esophagitis and gastritis. PMID:16833016

  9. Small bowel ulcerative lesions are common in elderly NSAIDs users with peptic ulcer bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tsibouris, Panagiotis; Kalantzis, Chissostomos; Apostolopoulos, Periklis; Zalonis, Antonios; Isaacs, Peter Edward Thomas; Hendrickse, Mark; Alexandrakis, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the frequency of small bowel ulcerative lesions in patients with peptic ulcer and define the significance of those lesions. METHODS: In our prospective study, 60 consecutive elderly patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding from a peptic ulceration (cases) and 60 matched patients with a non-bleeding peptic ulcer (controls) underwent small bowel capsule endoscopy, after a negative colonoscopy (compulsory in our institution). Controls were evaluated for non-bleeding indications. Known or suspected chronic inflammatory conditions and medication that could harm the gut were excluded. During capsule endoscopy, small bowel ulcerative lesions were counted thoroughly and classified according to Graham classification. Other small bowel lesions were also recorded. Peptic ulcer bleeding was controlled endoscopically, when adequate, proton pump inhibitors were started in both cases and controls, and Helicobacter pylori eradicated whenever present. Both cases and controls were followed up for a year. In case of bleeding recurrence upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was repeated and whenever it remained unexplained it was followed by repeat colonoscopy and capsule endoscopy. RESULTS: Forty (67%) cases and 18 (30%) controls presented small bowel erosions (P = 0.0001), while 22 (37%) cases and 4 (8%) controls presented small bowel ulcers (P < 0.0001). Among non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) consumers, 39 (95%) cases and 17 (33%) controls presented small bowel erosions (P < 0.0001), while 22 (55%) cases and 4 (10%) controls presented small bowel ulcers (P < 0.0001). Small bowel ulcerative lesions were infrequent among patients not consuming NSAIDs. Mean entry hemoglobin was 9.3 (SD = 1.4) g/dL in cases with small bowel ulcerative lesions and 10.5 (SD = 1.3) g/dL in those without (P = 0.002). Cases with small bowel ulcers necessitate more units of packed red blood cells. During their hospitalization, 6 (27%) cases with small bowel ulcers presented

  10. Scientific Evaluation of Edible Fruits and Spices Used for the Treatment of Peptic Ulcer in Traditional Iranian Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Farzaei, Mohammad Hosein; Shams-Ardekani, Mohammad Reza; Abbasabadi, Zahra; Rahimi, Roja

    2013-01-01

    In traditional Iranian medicine (TIM), several edible fruits and spices are thought to have protective and healing effects on peptic ulcer (PU). The present study was conducted to verify anti-PU activity of these remedies. For this purpose, edible fruits and spices proposed for the management of PU in TIM were collected from TIM sources, and they were searched in modern medical databases to find studies that confirmed their efficacy. Findings from modern investigations support the claims of TIM about the efficacy of many fruits and spices in PU. The fruit of Phyllanthus emblica as a beneficial remedy for PU in TIM has been demonstrated to have antioxidant, wound healing, angiogenic, anti-H. pylori, cytoprotective, antisecretory, and anti-inflammatory properties. The fruit of Vitis vinifera has been found to be anti-H. pylori, anti-inflammatory, wound healing, angiogenic, cytoprotective, and antioxidant. The fruit and aril of seed from Myristica fragrans exert their beneficial effects in PU by increasing prostaglandin, modulation of nitric oxide and inflammatory mediators, wound healing, antisecretory, antacid, antioxidant, and anti-H. pylori activities, and improving angiogenesis. Pharmacological and clinical studies for evaluation of efficacy of all TIM fruits and spices in PU and their possible mechanisms of action are recommended. PMID:24066235

  11. Scientific evaluation of edible fruits and spices used for the treatment of peptic ulcer in traditional Iranian medicine.

    PubMed

    Farzaei, Mohammad Hosein; Shams-Ardekani, Mohammad Reza; Abbasabadi, Zahra; Rahimi, Roja

    2013-01-01

    In traditional Iranian medicine (TIM), several edible fruits and spices are thought to have protective and healing effects on peptic ulcer (PU). The present study was conducted to verify anti-PU activity of these remedies. For this purpose, edible fruits and spices proposed for the management of PU in TIM were collected from TIM sources, and they were searched in modern medical databases to find studies that confirmed their efficacy. Findings from modern investigations support the claims of TIM about the efficacy of many fruits and spices in PU. The fruit of Phyllanthus emblica as a beneficial remedy for PU in TIM has been demonstrated to have antioxidant, wound healing, angiogenic, anti-H. pylori, cytoprotective, antisecretory, and anti-inflammatory properties. The fruit of Vitis vinifera has been found to be anti-H. pylori, anti-inflammatory, wound healing, angiogenic, cytoprotective, and antioxidant. The fruit and aril of seed from Myristica fragrans exert their beneficial effects in PU by increasing prostaglandin, modulation of nitric oxide and inflammatory mediators, wound healing, antisecretory, antacid, antioxidant, and anti-H. pylori activities, and improving angiogenesis. Pharmacological and clinical studies for evaluation of efficacy of all TIM fruits and spices in PU and their possible mechanisms of action are recommended. PMID:24066235

  12. Association between early Helicobacter pylori eradication and a lower risk of recurrent complicated peptic ulcers in end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shen-Shong; Hu, Hsiao-Yun

    2015-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients exhibit an increased incidence of peptic ulcer disease. Helicobacter pylori plays a central role in the development of peptic ulcers. The effect of early H pylori eradication on the recurrence of complicated peptic ulcer disease in ESRD patients remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to explore whether early H pylori eradication therapy in ESRD patients can reduce the risk of recurrent complicated peptic ulcers.We conducted a population-based cohort study and recruited patients with ESRD who had developed peptic ulcers. We categorized patients into early (time lag ≦120 days after peptic ulcer diagnosis) and late H pylori eradication therapy groups. The Cox proportional hazards model was used. The endpoint was based on hospitalization for complicated recurrent peptic ulcers.The early and late H pylori eradication therapy groups consisted of 2406 and 1356 ESRD patients, respectively, in a time lag of 120 days. After adjusting for possible confounders, the early eradication group exhibited a lower rate of complicated recurrent peptic ulcer disease (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.76, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.64-0.91, P = 0.003) in a time lag of ≦120 days, but a similar rate of complicated recurrent peptic ulcer disease in time lags of ≦1 year (HR = 0.97, 95% CI 0.79-1.19, P = 0.758) and 2 years (HR = 1.11, 95% CI 0.86-1.44, P = 0.433) compared with the late eradication group.We recommend administering H pylori eradication within 120 days after peptic ulcer diagnosis to H pylori infected ESRD patients who have developed peptic ulcers.

  13. Seroepidemiology of gastritis in Japanese and Dutch working populations: evidence for the development of atrophic gastritis that is not related to Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Schlemper, R J; van der Werf, S D; Vandenbroucke, J P; Biemond, I; Lamers, C B

    1995-01-01

    Serological markers of gastritis, like pepsinogen A, pepsinogen C, gastrin, and Helicobacter pylori antibodies, can be used to explore the state of the gastric mucosa in populations with contrasting cancer risks. A decreasing pepsinogen A:C ratio and an increasing serum gastrin are known to reflect an increasing severity of atrophic corpus gastritis, which is a precursor of gastric cancer. In 723 subjects (without gastroduodenal surgery) from Japanese (n = 225) and Dutch (n = 498) working populations, which had a similar composition of age (mean 48 years), sex (male to female ratio 6:1), and type of occupation, fasting serum samples were analysed for IgG antibodies to H pylori, pepsinogen A, pepsinogen C, and gastrin in the same laboratory. H pylori infection was significantly more prevalent in the Japanese than in the Dutch (74.7% and 31.3%); as was a very low pepsinogen A, indicative of severe mucosal atrophy (4.4% and 1.6%). Among subjects with and without severe mucosal atrophy the H pylori seropositivity rate was similar. Between the Japanese and the Dutch there were significant differences in mean gastrin (31.8 and 13.4 pmol/l) and pepsinogen A:C ratio (1.7 and 2.9). These intercountry differences were as great for H pylori negative subjects (gastrin: 23.7 and 10.3 pmol/l, pepsinogen A:C ratio: 2.4 and 3.2) as for H pylori positive subjects (gastrin: 34.6 and 20.1 pmol/l, pepsinogen A:C ratio: 1.5 and 2.5). The intercountry difference in gastrin nearly disappeared after stratification into categories of pepsinogen A:C ratio. In conclusion, the intercountry differences in pepsinogen A:C ratio and gastrin reflect a higher prevalence of mild and severe mucosal atrophy of the corpus in the Japanese than in the Dutch, both among H pylori positive and negative subjects. Thus, these findings suggest that in the Japanese the development of atrophic gastritis is in part unrelated to H pylori. PMID:7557568

  14. Protective effect of silymarin against ethanol-induced gastritis in rats: role of sulfhydryls, nitric oxide and gastric sensory afferents.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jung Hyu; Lee, Chang Woo; Oh, Soo Jin; Yun, Jieun; Lee, Kiho; Park, Song-Kyu; Kim, Hwan Mook; Han, Sang-Bae; Kim, Youngsoo; Kim, Hyoung-Chin; Kang, Jong Soon

    2013-05-01

    Silymarin has been known to exert antioxidant, anti-carcinogenic and anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we examined the effect of silymarin on gastritis in rats. Oral administration of silymarin dose-dependently decreased gastric lesions in ethanol-induced gastritis model. Silymarin also significantly suppressed the development of gastric lesions in aspirin- or water immersion-restraint stress-induced gastritis models. Further study demonstrated that the gastroprotective effect of silymarin was blocked by nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor l-NAME, SH blocker N-ethylmaleimide or TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine in ethanol-induced gastritis model. In addition, ex vivo analysis revealed that ethanol-induced decrease in gastric mucus and non-protein sulfhydryl (NPSH) groups was significantly reversed by silymarin treatment and lipid peroxidation was also suppressed by silymarin in ethanol-induced gastritis model. Taken together, these results suggest that silymarin exerts gastroprotective effects and the gastroprotective effects of silymarin might be related to the protection of gastric mucosal NO and NP-SH and the modulation of capsaicin-sensitive gastric sensory afferents.

  15. Collagenous colitis and collagenous gastritis in a 9 year old girl: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Camarero Salces, C; Enes Romero, P; Redondo, C; Rizo Pascual, J M; Roy Ariño, G

    2011-09-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare disease in the general population and collagenous colitis has seldom been reported in children. We report a girl with both diseases and review the literature on this association afetr a systematic search of Pubmed, Medline and Embase databases.. The girl, diagnosed of collagenous colitis at the age of 2 years, started with abdominal pain and anaemia at the age of 9 years and was diagnosed of collagenous gastritis in the gastric biopsies. After review of the literature, we found 66 reported cases (33 children, 33 adults, 68% females), 56 patients with collagenous gastritis and 16 children with collagenous colitis. Both disorders coexisted in 20 patients. The main presenting symptoms are abdominal pain and anaemia in patients with collagenous gastritis and diarrhoea and weight loss in patients with both disorders. Hypoalbuminemia was found in 9 patients with both diseases and protein losing enteropathy was demonstrated in 3 cases. Deposits of collagen in the duodenum were observed in 13 of 19 patients with both diseases. Seventeen of 66 patients had associated autoimmune disorders, particularly in patients with both diseases (35%). These conditions have a chronic course but gastric or colonic malignancies have not been communicated to date. In conclusion, collagenous gastritis and collagenous colitis mainly affects women and can occur at any age. Their association is exceptional. These disorders, although rare, should be considered in patients with anaemia and epigastric pain, watery diarrhoea or protein losing enteropathy. PMID:22103057

  16. Effect of diet on the incidence of and mortality owing to gastritis and renal disease in captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Lane, E P; Miller, S; Lobetti, R; Caldwell, P; Bertschinger, H J; Burroughs, R; Kotze, A; van Dyk, A

    2012-01-01

    Seventy-two adult cheetahs were evaluated for the degree of gastritis by endoscopic biopsy and for renal disease by serum creatinine. Cheetahs free of Grade 3 gastritis and renal disease were placed on Trial A; remaining cheetahs were placed on Trial B, which ran concurrently. All cheetahs were monitored for 4 years. Cheetahs exited Trial A and entered Trial B if they developed Grade 3 gastritis or renal disease. Cheetahs exited Trial B if they developed clinical gastritis or renal disease that required a dietary change or aggressive medical therapy or died owing to either disease. Cheetahs on Trial A were fed either a supplemented meat diet (N = 26) or commercial cat food (N = 22). Cheetahs on Trial B were fed either the same meat diet (N = 28) or a commercial dry cat food formulated for renal disease (N = 16). Cheetahs fed meat on Trial A had a daily hazard of developing Grade 3 gastritis 2.21 times higher (95% CI 0.95-5.15) than cheetahs fed commercial cat food. This hazard was not statistically significant (P = 0.07). Mean gastritis scores were not significantly different between the two groups. Cheetahs fed commercial cat food in both Trials had lower serum urea levels and higher creatinine levels than those fed meat. Evidence for the effect of diet in cheetahs with gastritis and/or renal disease (Trial B) was inconclusive. The number of cheetahs dying of gastritis or renal disease at the facility has dropped markedly since the study began. These results indicate that diet may play an important role in the incidence of Grade 3 gastritis and that dietary and/or therapeutic management of gastritis may reduce mortality owing to gastritis and renal disease in captive cheetahs.

  17. Campylobacter pylori-associated gastritis: attempts to eradicate the bacteria by various antibiotics and anti-ulcer regimens.

    PubMed

    Glupczynski, Y; Burette, A; Nyst, J F; De Prez, C; De Koster, E; Deltenre, M

    1988-01-01

    The efficacy of various antimicrobial and anti-ulcer agents on the eradication of Campylobacter pylori in patients with antral gastritis or duodenal ulcers was investigated by several open studies or double-blind, placebo-controlled protocols. Among the anti-ulcer agents, ranitidine, cimetidine or sucraflate had no effect on C. pylori. Colloidal bismuth subcitrate achieved clearance of C. pylori in 40% of treated patients at the end of therapy but a high relapse rate (14/16 patients) was observed after a 6-month follow-up period. The antibacterial agents doxycycline, minocycline, ofloxacin, clindamycin, paromomycin and nifuroxazide failed to eradicate C. pylori in most patients. By contrast, short term elimination of C. pylori could be achieved in more than 90% of patients treated with amoxycillin. However, relapse occurred as a rule in all amoxycillin-treated patients within one month after therapy. Overall, we observed no correlation between the in-vitro activity of the different antibacterial agents and their in vivo efficacy. Development of resistance during therapy does not seem to account for this discrepancy since it occurred only with ofloxacin. On the basis of these results, we conclude that long term eradication of C. pylori from the gastric antrum cannot be achieved after monotherapy either with antibiotics or with bismuth salts. PMID:2979039

  18. Postmarketing surveillance of rabeprazole in upper gastrointestinal peptic lesions in Japanese patients with coexisting hepatic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Isao; Nakamura, Kimihide; Sato, Yoichi; Sato, Yuzuru; Sezai, Shuichi; Ikeda, Yusei; Shinmura, Wahei; Watahiki, Hajime; Yamamoto, Hideaki; Hioki, Yayuki; Suzuki, Masao; Kumada, Takashi; Honda, Takashi; Rikitoku, Tomoo; Hisanaga, Yasuhiro; Fukui, Hiroshi; Yamao, Junichi; Kawasaki, Hironaka; Hosoda, Akihide; Onji, Morikazu; Matsui, Hidetaka; Sata, Michio; Torimura, Takuji; Oho, Kazuhiko; Maekawa, Ryuichiro; Takagi, Yoshiyuki; Shakado, Satoshi; Nakayama, Masafumi; Gondo, Kazuhisa; Fukushima, Hirofumi; Kusaba, Taku; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Hori, Takeshi; Iida, Yozo; Yutoku, Kouki; Maetani, Noboru; Kubo, Yoshitsugu; Miyata, Yoshifumi

    2006-01-01

    Background: Many Japanese patients with hepatic disorders confirmed on diagnostic imaging and coexisting upper gastrointestinal (GI) peptic lesions receive treatment with proton pump inhibitors. Some pharmacotherapies used to treat peptic ulcers have been associated with adverse drug reactions (ADRs), including elevated liver enzyme levels. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the tolerability and effectiveness of rabeprazole sodium in treating peptic lesions in patients with coexisting hepatic disorders. Methods: This open-label, practice-based, postmarketing surveillance investigation was conducted at 15 centers across Japan. Male and female patients aged ≥18 years with peptic lesions confirmed on upper GI endoscopy and with underlying hepatic disease were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to receive rabeprazole 10 or 20 mg PO (tablet) QD after a meal for up to 8 weeks. Tolerability was assessed using monitoring of the incidence of ADRs determined by direct patient questioning, spontaneous reporting, and laboratory assessment. All patients who received at least 1 dose of study drug were included in the tolerability assessment. Effectiveness was assessed at baseline and study end using the rates of achievement of improvement on endoscopy, relief of subjective/objective symptoms (rates of improvement in epigastric pain and heartburn), and global improvement. The effectiveness analysis included all patients with complete data before and after treatment. Subanalyses were conducted to determine the effectiveness of drug by identification of the proportion of patients with coexisting hepatic disorders (cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis, and other hepatic diseases [eg, alcoholic hepatitis, fatty liver]) and by peptic lesion (gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, stomal ulcer, and reflux esophagitis) who achieved improvement. Results: A total of 114 patients were enrolled; 108 patients were included in the tolerability analysis (81 men, 27 women; mean age, 59

  19. Does Helicobacter pylori infection eradication modify peptic ulcer prevalence? A 10 years' endoscopical survey

    PubMed Central

    Nervi, Giorgio; Liatopoulou, Stefania; Cavallaro, Lucas Giovanni; Gnocchi, Alessandro; Bò, Nadia Dal; Rugge, Massimo; Iori, Veronica; Cavestro, Giulia Martina; Maino, Marta; Colla, Giancarlo; Franzè, Angelo; Mario, Francesco Di

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To compare peptic ulcer prevalence in patients referred for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in two Italian hospitals in pre-Helicobacter era and ten years after the progressive diffusion of eradication therapy. METHODS: We checked all the endoscopic examinations consecutively performed in the Gastroenterology Unit of Padova during 1986-1987 and 1995-1996, and in the Gastroenterology Unit of Parma during 1992 and 2002. Chi Square test was used for statistic analysis. RESULTS: Data from both the endoscopic centers showed a statistically significant decrease in the prevalence of ulcers: from 12.7% to 6.3% (P < 0.001) in Padova and from 15.6% to 12% (P < 0.001) in Parma. The decrease was significant both for duodenal (from 8.8% to 4.8%, P < 0.001) and gastric ulcer (3.9% to 1.5%, P < 0.001) in Padova, and only for duodenal ulcer in Parma (9.2% to 6.1%, P < 0.001; gastric ulcer: 6.3% to 5.8%, NS). CONCLUSION: Ten years of extensive Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) eradication in symptomatic patients led to a significant reduction in peptic ulcer prevalence. This reduction was particularly evident in Padova, where a project for the sensibilization of H pylori eradication among general practioners was carried out between 1990 and 1992. Should our hypothesis be true, H pylori eradication might in the future lead to peptic ulcer as a rare endoscopic finding. PMID:16688832

  20. Role of Helicobacter pylori cag region genes in colonization and gastritis in two animal models.

    PubMed

    Eaton, K A; Kersulyte, D; Mefford, M; Danon, S J; Krakowka, S; Berg, D E

    2001-05-01

    The Helicobacter pylori chromosomal region known as the cytotoxin-gene associated pathogenicity island (cag PAI) is associated with severe disease and encodes proteins that are believed to induce interleukin (IL-8) secretion by cultured epithelial cells. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the cag PAI, induction of IL-8, and induction of neutrophilic gastric inflammation. Germ-free neonatal piglets and conventional C57BL/6 mice were given wild-type or cag deficient mutant derivatives of H. pylori strain 26695 or SS1. Bacterial colonization was determined by plate count, gastritis and neutrophilic inflammation were quantified, and IL-8 induction in AGS cells was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Deletion of the entire cag region or interruption of the virB10 or virB11 homolog had no effect on bacterial colonization, gastritis, or neutrophilic inflammation. In contrast, these mutations had variable effects on IL-8 induction, depending on the H. pylori strain. In the piglet-adapated strain 26695, which induced IL-8 secretion by AGS cells, deletion of the cag PAI decreased induction. In the mouse-adapted strain SS1, which did not induce IL-8 secretion, deletion of the cagII region or interruption of any of three cag region genes increased IL-8 induction. These results indicate that in mice and piglets (i) neither the cag PAI nor the ability to induce IL-8 in vitro is essential for colonization or neutrophilic inflammation and (ii) there is no direct relationship between the presence of the cag PAI, IL-8 induction, and neutrophilic gastritis.

  1. SUBTOTAL GASTRIC RESECTION FOR PEPTIC ULCER—Preliminary Report of a Variation in Technique

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Gunther W.

    1953-01-01

    Internists as well as surgeons agree that subtotal gastric resection is a satisfactory method of treatment for a selected group of patients with intractable or complicated peptic ulcer. A short historical review of the development of the operation is given. The importance of removing a large portion of the acid pepsin-secreting area of the stomach is stressed. A variation from the usual method of resection accomplishes this and at the same time leaves a satisfactory gastric pouch and lessens the incidence of the dumping syndrome. PMID:13032792

  2. Are higher doses of proton pump inhibitors better in acute peptic bleeding?

    PubMed

    Villalón, Alejandro; Olmos, Roberto; Rada, Gabriel

    2016-06-24

    Although there is broad consensus about the benefits of proton pump inhibitors in acute upper peptic bleeding, there is still controversy over their optimal dosing. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified six systematic reviews including 27 randomized trials addressing this question. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded high-dose proton pump inhibitors probably result in little or no difference in re-bleeding rate or mortality. The risk/benefit and cost/benefit balance probably favor use of low-doses.

  3. [Lipid peroxidation in patients with multiple peptic ulcers in the stomach and duodenum].

    PubMed

    Ioffe, I V

    2004-08-01

    Under the observation there were 62 patients with multiple ulcers of a stomach and duodenum from 23 till 65 years old, randomized under the sex, age and character of pathological process (sizes and localization of peptical ulcers). In all patients the parameters of lipids peroxidation were studied. The increase of intensity the peroxidation of lipids were revealed, at the expense of augmentation in a peripheric blood of the patients of concentration of a final metabolite peroxidation of lipids--malon's dialdehyde and intermediate products--dien's conjugates. The rising of a parameter hemolysis peroxidation of erythrocytes is marked also.

  4. Are higher doses of proton pump inhibitors better in acute peptic bleeding?

    PubMed

    Villalón, Alejandro; Olmos, Roberto; Rada, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Although there is broad consensus about the benefits of proton pump inhibitors in acute upper peptic bleeding, there is still controversy over their optimal dosing. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified six systematic reviews including 27 randomized trials addressing this question. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded high-dose proton pump inhibitors probably result in little or no difference in re-bleeding rate or mortality. The risk/benefit and cost/benefit balance probably favor use of low-doses. PMID:27390875

  5. First ultrastructural observations on gastritis caused by Physaloptera clausa (Spirurida: Physalopteridae) in hedgehogs (Erinaceus europeaus).

    PubMed

    Gorgani-Firouzjaee, T; Farshid, A A; Naem, S

    2015-10-01

    Ultrastructural changes of gastritis due to infection with Physaloptera clausa in 12 fresh carcasses of euthanized European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) collected from different part of Urmia, Iran, in which they were highly populated with this animal, six females and six males were subjected to detail necropsy with special reference to the stomach. Macroscopic changes of stomach were recorded and some of the worms collected. Based on number of parasites present in the stomach, they were divided into light infection, mild infection, and severe infection. Parasites were collected, and worms identification of the species was confirmed on the basis of light microscope examination with reference to keys. Tissues fixed in 3% glutaraldehyde, post-fixed in 1% osmium tetroxide and processed and plastic embedded; ultrathin sections of 60-70 nm were cut and stained with uranyl acetate and lead citrate; electron microscopic observations showed that, in light infection some changes were observed in gastric cells such as dilatation and vesiculation of the endoplasmic reticulum, large numbers of lipid granules, mitochondrial swelling, nuclear chromatin margination, and some nucleus showed washed out appearance. Other cells showed some alterations in mitochondria, dilatation of smooth endoplasmic reticulum, loss of both free and bound ribosomes, vesiculation in cytoplasm, and increase Golgi apparatus and secretory vesicles. The inflammatory cells including lymphocytes, macrophages, mast cells, and predominantly eosinophils were identified. In moderate infection, the cellular pattern of gastric mucosa replaced with inflammatory cells. The marked increase of macrophages and other inflammatory cell was observed. A particular finding in our study was the presence of globule leukocyte in the moderate stage. Moreover, scant formation and distribution of collagen fibers as well as fibroblasts were also noted. In severe infection, the most obvious observation was marked distribution

  6. Co-existence of Sarcina Organisms and Helicobacter pylori Gastritis/Duodenitis in Pediatric Siblings

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, Jennifer L.; Nayar, Suresh K.; Anders, Paige D.; D’Amico, Michael; Butnor, Kelly J.; Wilcox, Rebecca L.

    2015-01-01

    Sarcina are gram-positive anaerobic bacteria found to be associated with delayed gastric emptying and gastric outlet obstruction. We describe two cases of Sarcina co-existing with Helicobacter pylori organisms in pediatric siblings presenting within four months of each other with pyloric obstruction secondary to severe gastritis/duodenitis. The co-existence of Sarcina and Helicobacter pylori has not, to our knowledge, been previously reported. Its characteristic tetrad packeted morphology permits Sarcina to be readily identified on routine sections. Detection of these organisms in gastric biopsies should prompt consideration of gastric outlet obstruction and/or delayed gastric emptying as a possible etiologic factor. PMID:25664331

  7. Comparison between therapeutic regimes in erosive chronic gastritis associated with Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Lippa, M; Tonni, M P; Postiglione, V; Balducci, D; Morandi, O; Pancaldi, R; Bruni, G C

    1996-12-01

    Following numerous reports confirming the role of erosive chronic gastritis and ulcer, several treatment protocols have been used with the aim of eradicating this microorganism. Elimination was initially achieved using polychemotherapeutic associationsbismuth salts+metronidazole+amoxycillin and/or tetracyclineswhich proved relatively efficacious in therapeutic terms, but often led to side effects, the onset of bacterial resistance and scarse patient compliance. The authors consider that these limits can be overcome by using a new association of homeprazole+azithromycin, whose effica-cy in the eradication of Helicobacter pylo-ri has been shown to be of about 85% of cases treated for a relatively short period (4 weeks).

  8. Bile reflux gastritis and Barrett's oesophagus: further evidence of a role for duodenogastro-oesophageal reflux?

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, M; Neville, P; Mapstone, N; Moayyedi, P; Axon, A

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—There is increasing evidence that reflux of bile plays a part in the pathogenesis of Barrett's oesophagus. Bile injury to the gastric mucosa results in a "chemical" gastritis in which oedema and intestinal metaplasia are prominent.
AIM—To determine if patients with Barrett's oesophagus have more bile related changes in antral mucosa than patients with uncomplicated gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) or non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD).
PATIENTS AND METHODS—Patients were identified by a retrospective search of pathology records and those with a clinically confirmed diagnosis of either Barrett's oesophagus or reflux oesophagitis who had oesophageal and gastric biopsies taken at the same endoscopy and had no evidence of Helicobacter pylori infection entered the study. Control biopsies were taken from H pylori negative NUD patients. Antral biopsies were examined "blind" to clinical group and graded for a series of histological features from which the "reflux gastritis score" (RGS) and "bile reflux index" (BRI) could be calculated. The reproducibility of these histological scores was tested by a second pathologist.
RESULTS—There were 100 patients with Barrett's, 61 with GORD, and 50 with NUD. The RGSs did not differ between groups. BRI values in the Barrett's group were significantly higher than those in GORD subjects (p=0.014) which in turn were higher than those in NUD patients (p=0.037). Similarly, the frequency of high BRI values (>14) was significantly greater in the Barrett's group (29/100; 29%) than in the GORD (9/61; 14.8%) or NUD (4/50; 8%) group. However, agreement on BRI values was "poor", indicating limited applicability of this approach.
CONCLUSION—Patients with Barrett's oesophagus have more evidence of bile related gastritis than subjects with uncomplicated GORD or NUD. The presence of bile in the refluxate could be a factor in both the development of "specialised" intestinal metaplasia and malignancy in the oesophagus

  9. [Relapse of bleeding ulcer in a 15 year-old boy with collagenous gastritis].

    PubMed

    Haase, Anne-Mette; Kelsen, Jens

    2012-06-18

    Collagenous gastritis (CG) is a rare disorder. Two patient groups are known: 1) Children and young adults, presenting with anaemia and abdominal pain, and 2) adults presenting with watery diarrhoea. In the latter group, CG is frequently associated with collagenous colitis and/or coeliac disease. This case concerns a 15-year-old boy with a bleeding ulcer. The biopsies from corpus ventriculi showed a thickened subepithelial collagen band (> 10 micrometres), and the patient was diagnosed with CG. Ulcers are rarely linked to CG. CG should be considered when ulcers are found in children and young adults. PMID:22713227

  10. [Collagenous colitis, IgA deficiency, Basedow's disease and atrophic gastritis].

    PubMed

    Pariente, E A; Chaumette, M T; Maître, F; Delchier, J C; Soulé, J C; Bader, J P

    1985-10-01

    In a 37-year-old woman with chronic watery diarrhea of three years duration, the diagnostic of collagenous colitis was established by optical and ultrastructural examination of rectal and colonic biopsies. No other cause of diarrhea could be found. Moreover, this patient had also selective IgA deficiency, Grave's disease and chronic atrophic gastritis of auto-immune type. Sequential treatments with loperamide, cholestyramine and antibiotics did not modified diarrhea which improved with salazosulfapyridine and betamethasone enemas. These observations suggest that collagenous colitis might be a part of the spectrum of enteropathies associated with immunoglobulin deficiencies. PMID:3840757

  11. Successful Treatment of Intractable Bleeding Caused by Radiation-Induced Hemorrhagic Gastritis Using Oral Prednisolone: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Hyong Geun; Kim, Hong Yong; Kim, Do Yeun; Lim, Yun Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced hemorrhagic gastritis is an intractable and dangerous condition. We describe a 59-year-old female patient with radiation-induced hemorrhagic gastritis. The patient underwent postoperative radiation therapy with a dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions after a radical operation for a Klatskin tumor. Radiation volume included the gastric antrum. Approximately three months after radiation therapy, she was admitted for melena and anemia. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed an area of bleeding in the gastric antrum that was so diffuse that effective laser coagulation was not feasible. After failure of various treatments and transfusion of 7,040 mL of packed red blood cells, we successfully stopped the hemorrhage using oral prednisolone treatment. Based on this case, we think that oral prednisolone treatment can be tried as a first treatment for potentially life-threatening radiation-induced hemorrhagic gastritis. PMID:25327495

  12. [Collagenous gastritis and ileo-colitis occurred in autoimmune context: report of a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Macaigne, Gilles; Boivin, Jean-François; Harnois, Florence; Chayette, Claude; Dikov, Dorian; Cheaib, Sadek; Auriault, Marie-Luce

    2010-09-01

    Collagenous colitis belongs to the group of microscopic colitis. The aetiology and pathogenesis are unknown but different pathogenic hypothesis, autoimmune, infectious, alimentary and medicinal being are advanced, the last one being the most frequent aetiology. The collagenous gastritis is a rare entity and its association with collagenous colitis was exceptionally reported, only six cases being published. We report the seventh case of collagenous gastritis, ileitis and colitis in a 75-year-old woman with chronic diarrhea and important weight loss. This thickened subepithelial collagen band was appeared in an autoimmune injury context with antecedent of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and probably chronic atrophic Biermer's gastritis. The clinical and histological evolution was favourable with budesonide. PMID:20637552

  13. Age-related trends of gastritis and intestinal metaplasia in gastric carcinoma patients and in controls representing the population at large.

    PubMed Central

    Sipponen, P.; Kekki, M.; Siurala, M.

    1984-01-01

    Age-related trends of gastritis and intestinal metaplasia (IM) were studied in 476 endoscopically examined and bioptically proved cases of gastric carcinoma (GC), 263 of which were of intestinal (IGC) and 213 of diffuse (DGC) types. Endoscopic biopsy specimens from the area around the tumour were available in all cases, and from the antrum and/or body distant from the tumour area in 238 cases. A representative sample of an endoscopically and bioptically examined Finnish population consisting of 431 subjects was used as control material. In patients with IGC the prevalence of atrophic gastritis in the gastric area affected by the tumour was higher and that of superficial gastritis lower than expected, and the age-group scores of gastritis and IM were situated above the age-dependent line of gastritis scores of controls in all age groups studied. This was seen to indicate a more rapid progression of gastritis in IGC patients than in the population at large. In the opposite area of the stomach, i.e. in the tumour-free area, the progression of gastritis and IM was virtually similar to that in controls. No such differences were seen with regard to DGC. It is concluded that IGC is dynamically closely linked to gastritis and IM, while in DGC no such relationship is demonstrable. PMID:6608953

  14. Mechanism of Antibacterial Activity of Liposomal Linolenic Acid against Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sung Woo; Thamphiwatana, Soracha; Zhang, Liangfang; Obonyo, Marygorret

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects approximately half of the world population and is a major cause of gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. Moreover, this bacterium has quickly developed resistance to all major antibiotics. Recently, we developed a novel liposomal linolenic acid (LipoLLA) formulation, which showed potent bactericidal activity against several clinical isolated antibiotic-resistant strains of H. pylori including both the spiral and coccoid form. In addition, LipoLLA had superior in vivo efficacy compared to the standard triple therapy. Our data showed that LipoLLA associated with H. pylori cell membrane. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the possible antibacterial mechanism of LipoLLA against H. pylori. The antibacterial activity of LipoLLA (C18:3) was compared to that of liposomal stearic acid (LipoSA, C18:0) and oleic acid (LipoOA, C18:1). LipoLLA showed the most potent bactericidal effect and completely killed H. pylori within 5 min. The permeability of the outer membrane of H. pylori increased when treated with LipoOA and LipoLLA. Moreover, by detecting released adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from bacteria, we found that bacterial plasma membrane of H. pylori treated with LipoLLA exhibited significantly higher permeability than those treated with LipoOA, resulting in bacteria cell death. Furthermore, LipoLLA caused structural changes in the bacterial membrane within 5 min affecting membrane integrity and leading to leakage of cytoplasmic contents, observed by both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Our findings showing rapid bactericidal effect of LipoLLA suggest it is a very promising new, effective anti-H. pylori agent. PMID:25793403

  15. Acute gastritis with hypochlorhydria: report of 35 cases with long term follow up

    PubMed Central

    Harford, W; Barnett, C; Lee, E; Perez-Perez, G; Blaser, M; Peterson, W

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Between 1976 and 1987, 35 cases of acute gastritis with hypochlorhydria (AGH) were seen in our research laboratory. The aims of this study were to determine the natural history of AGH and the role of Helicobacter pylori in its pathogenesis.
METHODS—Archived serum and gastric biopsy samples obtained from AGH subjects were examined for evidence of H pylori colonisation. Twenty eight of 33 (85%) surviving AGH subjects returned a mean of 12 years after AGH for follow up studies, including determination of H pylori antibodies, basal and peak acid output, endoscopy, and gastric biopsies. A matched control group underwent the same studies.
RESULTS—Archived material provided strong evidence of new H pylori acquisition in a total of 14 subjects within two months, in 18 within four months, and in 22 within 12 months of recognition of AGH. Prevalence of H pylori colonisation at follow up was 82% (23 of 28) in AGH subjects, significantly (p<0.05) higher than in matched controls (29%). Basal and peak acid output returned to pre-AGH levels in all but two subjects.
CONCLUSIONS—One of several possible initial manifestations of H pylori acquisition in adults may be AGH. While H pylori colonisation usually persists, hypochlorhydria resolves in most subjects.


Keywords: Helicobacter pylori; acute gastritis; gastric acid secretion; hypochlorhydria PMID:10986205

  16. Risk for gastric neoplasias in patients with chronic atrophic gastritis: A critical reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Vannella, Lucy; Lahner, Edith; Annibale, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) is an inflammatory condition characterized by the loss of gastric glandular structures which are replaced by connective tissue (non-metaplastic atrophy) or by glandular structures inappropriate for location (metaplastic atrophy). Epidemiological data suggest that CAG is associated with two different types of tumors: Intestinal-type gastric cancer (GC) and type I gastric carcinoid (TIGC). The pathophysiological mechanisms which lead to the development of these gastric tumors are different. It is accepted that a multistep process initiating from Helicobacter pylori-related chronic inflammation of the gastric mucosa progresses to CAG, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia and, finally, leads to the development of GC. The TIGC is a gastrin-dependent tumor and the chronic elevation of gastrin, which is associated with CAG, stimulates the growth of enterochromaffin-like cells with their hyperplasia leading to the development of TIGC. Thus, several events occur in the gastric mucosa before the development of intestinal-type GC and/or TIGC and these take several years. Knowledge of CAG incidence from superficial gastritis, its prevalence in different clinical settings and possible risk factors associated with the progression of this condition to gastric neoplasias are important issues. This editorial intends to provide a brief review of the main studies regarding incidence and prevalence of CAG and risk factors for the development of gastric neoplasias. PMID:22493541

  17. Gastroprotective effects of Nigella Sativa oil on the formation of stress gastritis in hypothyroidal rats.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Sater, Khaled A

    2009-03-10

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of hypothyroidism on the development of acute cold restraint stress gastritis in rats and protective effect of Nigella sativa at the beginning of the acute cold restraint stress. 60 rats were randomly divided into six groups; the control (groups I), surgically thyroidectomized group (group II), acute cold restraint stressed group (group III), surgically thyroidectomized plus stressed group (group IV), Nigella sativa oil group (group V) and surgically thyroidectomized plus stressed plus Nigella sativa oil group (group VI). Volume of gastric juice, number and size of ulcer, gastric malonaldehyde, gastric glutathione, gastric protein and serum thyroxine (T4) were measured. Significant increases both of number of gastric ulcer and malonaldehyde while decreases both of glutathione and protein levels in rats in groups III and IV in comparison with control group. While, insignificant increase were observed between control and both of groups II and VI. In rats, low thyroid hormone level increase stress gastritis, and this effect can be decreased by treatment with Nigella sativa.

  18. The Metabonomic Studies of Tongue Coating in H. pylori Positive Chronic Gastritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuan; Sun, Zhu-Mei; Liu, Yan-Na; Ji, Qing; Sui, Hua; Zhou, Li-Hong; Li, Fu-Feng; Li, Qi

    2015-01-01

    In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), tongue diagnosis (TD) has been an important diagnostic method for the last 3000 years. Tongue coating can be used as a very sensitive marker to determine the progress of chronic gastritis. Therefore, the scientific, qualitative, and quantitative study for the pathophysiologic basis of tongue coating (TC) emerged as a major direction for the objective research of TD. In our current report, we used GC/MS technology to determine the potential changes of metabolites and identify special metabolic biomarkers in the TC of H. pylori infected chronic gastritis patients. Four discriminative metabolites were identified by GC/MS between the TC of H. pylori infection (G + H) and without H. pylori infection (G − H) patients: ethylene, cephaloridine, γ-aminobutyric acid, and 5-pyroglutamic acid, indicating that changes in amino acid metabolism are possibly involved in the formation of TC, and the amino acid metabolites are part of the material components of TC in G + H patients. PMID:26557866

  19. Risk for gastric neoplasias in patients with chronic atrophic gastritis: a critical reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Vannella, Lucy; Lahner, Edith; Annibale, Bruno

    2012-03-28

    Chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) is an inflammatory condition characterized by the loss of gastric glandular structures which are replaced by connective tissue (non-metaplastic atrophy) or by glandular structures inappropriate for location (metaplastic atrophy). Epidemiological data suggest that CAG is associated with two different types of tumors: Intestinal-type gastric cancer (GC) and type I gastric carcinoid (TIGC). The pathophysiological mechanisms which lead to the development of these gastric tumors are different. It is accepted that a multistep process initiating from Helicobacter pylori-related chronic inflammation of the gastric mucosa progresses to CAG, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia and, finally, leads to the development of GC. The TIGC is a gastrin-dependent tumor and the chronic elevation of gastrin, which is associated with CAG, stimulates the growth of enterochromaffin-like cells with their hyperplasia leading to the development of TIGC. Thus, several events occur in the gastric mucosa before the development of intestinal-type GC and/or TIGC and these take several years. Knowledge of CAG incidence from superficial gastritis, its prevalence in different clinical settings and possible risk factors associated with the progression of this condition to gastric neoplasias are important issues. This editorial intends to provide a brief review of the main studies regarding incidence and prevalence of CAG and risk factors for the development of gastric neoplasias.

  20. [Collagenous gastritis and colitis in a 10-year-old girl].

    PubMed

    Hangard, P; Lasfargue, M; Rubio, A

    2016-07-01

    There are few data in the literature on microscopic gastritis and colitis in the pediatric population. The diagnosis is often made after the occurrence of complications. We report the case of a 10.5 year-old girl for whom the diagnosis was made several years after the initial symptoms. Test for infections, inflammation, and auto-immunity yielded normal results. Upper endoscopy and colonoscopy revealed an abnormal mucosa. However, histology showed microscopic inflammation and fibrotic lesions in the lamina propria, and a thick subepithelial collagenous band. This led to the diagnosis of collagenous gastritis and colitis. Budesonide treatment resulted in the cessation of diarrhea and significant weight gain. Treatment by oral budesonide indeed seems to be highly effective but relapses are frequent when the treatment is stopped. This case shows the importance of being vigilant regarding transit disorders with impact on growth kinetics. Upper endoscopy and colonoscopy need to be carried out when children have organic diarrhea with normal blood tests. PMID:27266639

  1. The prevalence of self-reported peptic ulcer in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Sonnenberg, A; Everhart, J E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to draw a current picture of the sociodemographic characteristics of peptic ulcer in the United States. METHODS. During the National Health Interview Survey of 1989, a special questionnaire on digestive diseases was administered to 41,457 randomly selected individuals. Data were retrieved from public use tapes provided by the National Center for Health Statistics. Odds ratios were calculated by logistic regression after adjustment for sample weights in the survey. RESULTS. Of adult US residents, 10% reported having physician-diagnosed ulcer disease, and one third of these individuals reported having an ulcer in the past year. Old age, short education, low family income, being a veteran, and smoking acted as significant and independent risk factors. Gastric and duodenal ulcer occurred in both sexes equally often. Duodenal ulcer was more common in Whites than non-Whites, while gastric ulcer was more common in non-Whites. CONCLUSIONS. The age-related rise and socioeconomic gradients of peptic ulcer represent the historic scars of previous infection rates with Helicobacter pylori. The racial variations reflect different ages at the time of first infection; younger and older age at the acquisition of H. pylori appear to be associated with gastric and duodenal ulcer, respectively. PMID:8633736

  2. Peptic ulcer at the end of the 20th century: biological and psychological risk factors.

    PubMed

    Levenstein, S

    1999-11-01

    The prevailing concept of peptic ulcer etiology has swung over entirely in just a few years from the psychological to the infectious, yet the rich literature documenting an association between psychosocial factors and ulcer is not invalidated by the discovery of Helicobacter pylori. Physical and psychological stressors interact to induce ulcers in animal models, concrete life difficulties and subjective distress predict the development of ulcers in prospective cohorts, shared catastrophes such as war and earthquakes lead to surges in hospitalizations for complicated ulcers, and stress or anxiety can worsen ulcer course. Many known ulcer risk factors, including smoking, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, heavy drinking, loss of sleep and skipping breakfast, can increase under stress; the association of low socioeconomic status with ulcer is also accounted for in part by psychosocial factors. Among possible physiological mechanisms, stress may induce gastric hypersecretion, reduce acid buffering in the stomach and the duodenum, impair gastroduodenal blood flow, and affect healing or inflammation through psychoneuroimmunological mechanisms. Psychosocial factors seem to be particularly prominent among idiopathic or complicated ulcers, but they are probably operative in run of the mill H pylori disease as well, either through additive effects or by facilitating the spread of the organism across the pylorus, while gastrointestinal damage by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can also be potentiated by stress. Although the clinical importance of peptic ulcer is fading along with the millennium, due to secular trends and new therapies, it remains worthy of study as a splendid example of the biopsychosocial model.

  3. Amylase clearance in differentiating acute pancreatitis from peptic ulcer with hyperamylasemia.

    PubMed

    Warshaw, A L; Lesser, P B

    1975-03-01

    Thirty-four patients with abdominal pain, tenderness, and hyperamylasemia suggesting acute pancreatitis were studied prospectively to elucidate the relationship between peptic ulcer disease and pancreatitis. Confirming evidence of pancreatitis and/or ulcer was obtained either at laparotomy of by upper gastrointestinal roentgenograms. The presence or absence of pancreatitis was substantiated by measurement of the amylase/creatinine clearance ratio, which is significantly higher (p less than 0.001) in patients with acute pancreatitis (9.3 plus or minus 0.9), than in patients without pancreatitis (3.1 plus or minus 0.2). Nine of the 34 patients were found to have gastric or duodenal ulcers. However, seven of the nine, despite an elevated serum amylase, had no sign of pancreatitis at surgery, on radiological examination, or by elevation of the amylase/creatinine clearance ratio (3.1 plus or minus 0.4). It is suggested that hyperamylasemia associated with peptic ulcer disease is most often not indicative of acute pancreatitis and that treatment is most appropriately directed at the ulcer.

  4. Clinical profile and outcome of surgical treatment of perforated peptic ulcers in Northwestern Tanzania: A tertiary hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Perforated peptic ulcer is a serious complication of peptic ulcers with potential risk of grave complications. There is paucity of published reports on perforated peptic ulcer disease in our local environment. This study was conducted to evaluate the clinical presentation, management and outcome of patients with peptic ulcer perforation in our setting and to identify predictors of outcome of these patients. Methods This was a combined retrospective and prospective study of patients who were operated for perforated peptic ulcers at Bugando Medical Centre between April 2006 and March 2011. Data were collected using a pre-tested and coded questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS computer software version 15.0. Ethical approval to conduct the study was obtained from relevant authority before the commencement of the study. Results A total of 84 patients were studied. Males outnumbered females by a ratio of 1.3: 1. Their median age was 28 years and the modal age group was 21-30 years. The median duration of illness was 5.8 days. The majority of patients (69.0%) had no previous history of treatment for peptic ulcer disease. The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, alcohol and smoking was reported in 10.7%, 85.7% and 64.3% respectively. Eight (9.5%) patients were HIV positive with a median CD4 count of 220 cells/μl. Most perforations were located on the duodenum {90.4%) with the duodenal to gastric ulcers ratio of 12.7: 1. Graham's omental patch (Graham's omentopexy) of the perforations was performed in 83.3% of cases. Complication and mortality rates were 29.8% and 10.7% respectively. The factors significantly related to complications were premorbid illness, HIV status, CD 4 count < 200 cells/μl, treatment delay and acute perforation (P < 0.001). Mortality rate was high in patients who had age ≥ 40 years, delayed presentation (>24 hrs), shock at admission (systolic BP < 90 mmHg), HIV positivity, low CD4 count (<200 cells/μl), gastric ulcers

  5. Are Mucosa CD4+/CD8+ T-Cells Expressions Correlated with the Endoscopic Appearance of Chronic Gastritis Related with Helicobacter pylori Infection?

    PubMed

    Ratnasari, Neneng; Bayupurnama, Putut; Maduseno, Sutanto; Indrarti, Fahmi; Triwikatmani, Catharina; Harijadi, Achmad; Nurdjanah, Siti

    2016-06-01

    Local inflammatory processes in the gastric mucosa are followed by extensive immune cell infiltration, resulting in chronic active gastritis characterized by a marked infiltration of T(h)1 cytokine-producing CD4+ and CD8+T-cells Objective. To investigate the correlation between CD4+/CD8+ T-cells in gastric mucosa with endoscopic appearance in chronic gastritis with or without H.pylori infection. Prospective, cross sectional study is performed in a chronic dyspepsia population in July-November 2009 at Dr. Sardjito General Hospital Yogyakarta, Indonesia. The update Sydney system was used to analyze the gastroscopy appearance. Biopsy specimens were stained with HE-stain and IHC-stain. Data were analyzed by t-test, Mann-Whitney and Spearman correlation test. Number of 88 consecutive subjects are enrolled the study (50% male; 50% female), age 46±15 years; 25% H.pylori positive. The expression of CD4+ and CD8+ were higher in H.pylori negative subjects, but only the CD4+ was significant (P=0.011). A significant correlation was found between CD4+ and CD8+ in both subjects (r(Hp+)=0.62 and r(Hp-)=0.68; P<0.05). The expression of CD4+ and CD8+ in H.pylori positive showed a significant correlation with gastric lesions (r(CD4+)=-0.60; r(CD8+)=-0.42 ; P<0.05), only erosion showed a significant difference in both subjects. A positive correlation was found between CD4+ and CD8+ infiltration in both subjects with or without H.pylori infection, and a negative correlation was only found between gastric lesion with CD4+ and CD8+ infiltration in H.pylori subject. PMID:27306341

  6. Are Mucosa CD4+/CD8+ T-Cells Expressions Correlated with the Endoscopic Appearance of Chronic Gastritis Related with Helicobacter pylori Infection?

    PubMed

    Ratnasari, Neneng; Bayupurnama, Putut; Maduseno, Sutanto; Indrarti, Fahmi; Triwikatmani, Catharina; Harijadi, Achmad; Nurdjanah, Siti

    2016-06-01

    Local inflammatory processes in the gastric mucosa are followed by extensive immune cell infiltration, resulting in chronic active gastritis characterized by a marked infiltration of T(h)1 cytokine-producing CD4+ and CD8+T-cells Objective. To investigate the correlation between CD4+/CD8+ T-cells in gastric mucosa with endoscopic appearance in chronic gastritis with or without H.pylori infection. Prospective, cross sectional study is performed in a chronic dyspepsia population in July-November 2009 at Dr. Sardjito General Hospital Yogyakarta, Indonesia. The update Sydney system was used to analyze the gastroscopy appearance. Biopsy specimens were stained with HE-stain and IHC-stain. Data were analyzed by t-test, Mann-Whitney and Spearman correlation test. Number of 88 consecutive subjects are enrolled the study (50% male; 50% female), age 46±15 years; 25% H.pylori positive. The expression of CD4+ and CD8+ were higher in H.pylori negative subjects, but only the CD4+ was significant (P=0.011). A significant correlation was found between CD4+ and CD8+ in both subjects (r(Hp+)=0.62 and r(Hp-)=0.68; P<0.05). The expression of CD4+ and CD8+ in H.pylori positive showed a significant correlation with gastric lesions (r(CD4+)=-0.60; r(CD8+)=-0.42 ; P<0.05), only erosion showed a significant difference in both subjects. A positive correlation was found between CD4+ and CD8+ infiltration in both subjects with or without H.pylori infection, and a negative correlation was only found between gastric lesion with CD4+ and CD8+ infiltration in H.pylori subject.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Helicobacter suis Strain SNTW101, Isolated from a Japanese Patient with Nodular Gastritis.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Hidenori; Takahashi, Tetsufumi; Murayama, Somay Y; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Yamaguchi, Katsushi; Shigenobu, Shuji; Suzuki, Masato; Rimbara, Emiko; Shibayama, Keigo; Øverby, Anders; Nakamura, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    We present here the draft whole-genome shotgun sequence of an uncultivated strain SNTW101 of Helicobacter suis, which has been maintained in the stomachs of mice. This strain was originally isolated from gastric biopsy specimens of a urea breath test-negative Japanese patient suffering from nodular gastritis. PMID:27609915

  8. Role of the HLA-DQ locus in the development of chronic gastritis and gastric carcinoma in Mexican patients

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Goepfert, Roberto; Yamamoto-Furusho, Jesús K; Oñate-Ocaña, Luis F; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Muñoz, Leopoldo; Ruiz-Morales, Jorge A; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Granados, Julio

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine the HLA-DQ locus in Mexican patients with Chronic gastritis and gastric adenocarcinoma. METHODS: Oligotyping for HLA-DQ locus was performed in 45 Mexican patients with chronic gastritis and 13 Mexican patients with diffuse-type gastric adenocarcinoma, and was then compared with 99 clinically healthy unrelated individuals. H pylori infection and CagA status were assessed in patients by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. RESULTS: We found a significant increased frequency of HLA-DQB1*0401 allele in H pylori-positive patients with chronic gastritis when compared with healthy subjects [19 vs 0%, P = 1 × 10-7, odds ratio (OR) = 4.96; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 3.87-6.35]. We also found a significant increased frequency of HLA-DQB1*0501 in patients with diffuse-type gastric carcinoma in comparison with healthy individuals (P = 1 × 10-6, OR = 13.07; 95% CI, 2.82-85.14). CONCLUSION: HLA-DQ locus may play a different role in the development of H pylori-related chronic gastritis and diffuse-type gastric adenocarcinoma in the Mexican Mestizo population. PMID:17203517

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Helicobacter suis Strain SNTW101, Isolated from a Japanese Patient with Nodular Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Tetsufumi; Murayama, Somay Y.; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Yamaguchi, Katsushi; Shigenobu, Shuji; Suzuki, Masato; Rimbara, Emiko; Shibayama, Keigo; Øverby, Anders; Nakamura, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    We present here the draft whole-genome shotgun sequence of an uncultivated strain SNTW101 of Helicobacter suis, which has been maintained in the stomachs of mice. This strain was originally isolated from gastric biopsy specimens of a urea breath test-negative Japanese patient suffering from nodular gastritis. PMID:27609915

  10. Validity of peptic ulcer disease and upper gastrointestinal bleeding diagnoses in administrative databases: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Montedori, Alessandro; Abraha, Iosief; Chiatti, Carlos; Cozzolino, Francesco; Orso, Massimiliano; Luchetta, Maria Laura; Rimland, Joseph M; Ambrosio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Administrative healthcare databases are useful to investigate the epidemiology, health outcomes, quality indicators and healthcare utilisation concerning peptic ulcers and gastrointestinal bleeding, but the databases need to be validated in order to be a reliable source for research. The aim of this protocol is to perform the first systematic review of studies reporting the validation of International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision and 10th version (ICD-9 and ICD-10) codes for peptic ulcer and upper gastrointestinal bleeding diagnoses. Methods and analysis MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library databases will be searched, using appropriate search strategies. We will include validation studies that used administrative data to identify peptic ulcer disease and upper gastrointestinal bleeding diagnoses or studies that evaluated the validity of peptic ulcer and upper gastrointestinal bleeding codes in administrative data. The following inclusion criteria will be used: (a) the presence of a reference standard case definition for the diseases of interest; (b) the presence of at least one test measure (eg, sensitivity, etc) and (c) the use of an administrative database as a source of data. Pairs of reviewers will independently abstract data using standardised forms and will evaluate quality using the checklist of the Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy (STARD) criteria. This systematic review protocol has been produced in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis Protocol (PRISMA-P) 2015 statement. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval is not required given that this is a protocol for a systematic review. We will submit results of this study to a peer-reviewed journal for publication. The results will serve as a guide for researchers validating administrative healthcare databases to determine appropriate case definitions for peptic ulcer disease and upper gastrointestinal

  11. Emphysematous gastritis in a patient with coxsackie B3 myocarditis and cardiogenic shock requiring veno-arterial extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Ashfaq, Awais; Chapital, Alyssa B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Emphysematous gastritis is a rare condition in which gas accumulates in the stomach lining usually due to an infectious source. Case presentation We present a 16 year old female with viral myocarditis and cardiogenic shock transferred to our hospital on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) who developed emphysematous gastritis. After listing the patient for heart transplant, patient underwent Bi-VAD placement requiring veno-venous ECMO support. Subsequently, she developed worsening abdominal distention. CT of abdomen/pelvis showed the stomach to be diffusely edematous, thick-walled, containing intramural gas collections, consistent with emphysematous gastritis. Patient underwent nonoperative management and two weeks later had complete resolution of the gastritis. Unfortunately, her overall condition deteriorated in the subsequent days and support was withdrawn. Discussion Management of emphysematous gastritis usually revolves around supportive care, broad spectrum antibiotics and bowel rest. Our patients’ gastritis resolved with non-operative management, albeit, she succumbed to multiorgan failure due to other causes. Conclusion We believe, this is a unique case of a veno-arterial ECMO causing emphysematous gastritis. PMID:26263451

  12. Serum OPN Expression for Identification of Gastric Cancer and Atrophic Gastritis and Its Influencing Factors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tiejun; Sun, Liping; He, Caiyun; Gong, Yuehua; Xu, Qian; Yuan, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Background Most studies have found that osteopontin (OPN) expression level is related to the poor prognosis of gastric cancer. However, few studies have examined the relationship between OPN expression and gastric precancerous diseases, and the potential role of OPN in the formation and development of GC. We investigated the relationships between serum OPN levels and the risks of gastric cancer (GC) and its precancerous disease, to explore the diagnostic efficacy of serum OPN level for GC and atrophic gastritis and its influencing factors. Methods A total of 1,452 patients were enrolled, including 609 with mild superficial gastritis (SG), 594 with atrophic gastritis (AG) and 249 with GC. The levels of serum OPN and serum Helicobacter pylori IgG antibody were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Serum OPN levels increased from mild SG (1.99±1.91 ng/ml) to AG (2.37±2.27 ng/ml) to GC (5.94±4.52 ng/ml) (P≤0.002), along with increasing severity of gastric disease. OPN levels were significantly higher in patients with GC compared with the non-cancer population (2.17±2.10, P<0.0001). Serum OPN level was positively correlated with age and was higher in men than women, but was not correlated with H. pylori infection status. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.805, the optimal cutoff was 2.56 ng/ml and the sensitivity and specificity were 74.3% and 71.8%, respectively, for the ability of serum OPN to discriminate GC. Conclusions Serum OPN expression was closely related to the risks of GC and AG, and it might be a useful marker for the discrimination of GC. OPN level was positively correlated with age and male sex, but was not affected by H. pylori infection, and it was promoted by smoking and drinking, in patients with mild SG. PMID:25479069

  13. Efficacy of Zinc Sulfate in Peptic Ulcer Disease: A Randomized Double-Blind Clinical Trial Study

    PubMed Central

    Parhizkar, Baran; Sheikhesmaeili, Farshad; Roshani, Mohammad; Nayebi, Morteza; Gharibi, Fardin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Peptic ulcer is a common disease that affects millions of people worldwide. Considering its global prevalence finding new approach for treating is important. Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of zinc sulfate on gastric and duodenal ulcer treatment. Materials and Methods This double-blind clinical trial study was done on 90 patients who were admitted to the gastrointestinal endoscopy clinic of Tohid hospital in Sanandaj, Iran. All patients were diagnosed with gastric and duodenal ulcers. They were randomly divided into two-intervention and control groups, using block randomization with block sizes of 4. Patients and researcher were unaware of the grouping. To assess the level of zinc, blood samples were taken. In case of positive Rapid Urease Test (RUT), triple therapy regimen including amoxicillin, clarithromycin and omeprazole was administered for two weeks. For intervention group in addition to "triple therapy", an oral dose of Zinc Sulfate 220mg capsules were administered daily, while the control group received placebo capsules. Results A total of 54.5% and 57% of the patients in the intervention and control groups had gastric ulcer respectively. The Rapid Urease Test (RUT) result of 72.7% of intervention group and 83.3% of control group was positive (p = 0.24). Serum zinc level of 20.9% of intervention group and 35.7% of control group was lower than the normal level (p = 0.13). The mean of serum zinc level of intervention group and control group were 81.9 and 78.9 mg dL respectively (p = 0.4). After intervention, peptic ulcer in 81.8% of the intervention group and 83.3% of the control groups were improved (p= 0.85). Response to treatment were higher in patients with normal zinc levels compared to patients with abnormal levels (77.5% vs. 22.5%, p=0.019). Conclusion A daily dose of 220mg zinc sulfate was not significantly effective on peptic ulcer. However, patients with normal zinc levels had better ulcer treatment. PMID

  14. Scoring systems for outcome prediction in patients with perforated peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) often present with acute, severe illness that carries a high risk for morbidity and mortality. Mortality ranges from 3-40% and several prognostic scoring systems have been suggested. The aim of this study was to review the available scoring systems for PPU patients, and to assert if there is evidence to prefer one to the other. Material and methods We searched PubMed for the mesh terms “perforated peptic ulcer”, “scoring systems”, “risk factors”, ”outcome prediction”, “mortality”, ”morbidity” and the combinations of these terms. In addition to relevant scores introduced in the past (e.g. Boey score), we included recent studies published between January 2000 and December 2012) that reported on scoring systems for prediction of morbidity and mortality in PPU patients. Results A total of ten different scoring systems used to predict outcome in PPU patients were identified; the Boey score, the Hacettepe score, the Jabalpur score the peptic ulcer perforation (PULP) score, the ASA score, the Charlson comorbidity index, the sepsis score, the Mannheim Peritonitis Index (MPI), the Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II), the simplified acute physiology score II (SAPS II), the Mortality probability models II (MPM II), the Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the enumeration of Mortality and Morbidity physical sub-score (POSSUM-phys score). Only four of the scores were specifically constructed for PPU patients. In five studies the accuracy of outcome prediction of different scoring systems was evaluated by receiver operating characteristics curve (ROC) analysis, and the corresponding area under the curve (AUC) among studies compared. Considerable variation in performance both between different scores and between different studies was found, with the lowest and highest AUC reported between 0.63 and 0.98, respectively. Conclusion While the Boey score and the ASA score

  15. Basis of decreased risk of gastric cancer in severe atrophic gastritis with eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Tari, Akira; Kitadai, Yasuhiko; Sumii, Masaharu; Sasaki, Atsunori; Tani, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Sinji; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2007-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection induces chronic gastritis and lowers gastric juice ascorbic acid concentrations. We investigated how H. pylori eradication affected multiple variables that could prevent or delay development of new or occult gastric cancer in patients with early gastric cancer treated by endoscopic mucosal resection. Gastric juice pH, nitrite concentrations, and total vitamin C concentrations, serum concentrations of vitamin C and specific H. pylori antibody, and intensity of neutrophil infiltration in gastric mucosa were determined before and after successful H. pylori eradication. Successful eradication increased acid output and ascorbic acid secretion into gastric juice, accompanied by disappearance of polymorphonuclear infiltration from the surface epithelium and decreased gastric juice nitrite concentrations. Our data suggest that H. pylori eradication decreases the nitrosation rate as the ratio of vitamin C to nitrite increases. This decreases reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide, eliminating their damaging effect on DNA and reducing cell turnover. PMID:17151803

  16. Basis of decreased risk of gastric cancer in severe atrophic gastritis with eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Tari, Akira; Kitadai, Yasuhiko; Sumii, Masaharu; Sasaki, Atsunori; Tani, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Sinji; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2007-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection induces chronic gastritis and lowers gastric juice ascorbic acid concentrations. We investigated how H. pylori eradication affected multiple variables that could prevent or delay development of new or occult gastric cancer in patients with early gastric cancer treated by endoscopic mucosal resection. Gastric juice pH, nitrite concentrations, and total vitamin C concentrations, serum concentrations of vitamin C and specific H. pylori antibody, and intensity of neutrophil infiltration in gastric mucosa were determined before and after successful H. pylori eradication. Successful eradication increased acid output and ascorbic acid secretion into gastric juice, accompanied by disappearance of polymorphonuclear infiltration from the surface epithelium and decreased gastric juice nitrite concentrations. Our data suggest that H. pylori eradication decreases the nitrosation rate as the ratio of vitamin C to nitrite increases. This decreases reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide, eliminating their damaging effect on DNA and reducing cell turnover.

  17. Dissociative disorder induced by clarithromycin combined with rabeprazole in a patient with gastritis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhixian; Huang, Jinwen; Xu, Yi; Zhang, Minming; Hu, Shaohua

    2013-02-01

    Clarithromycin and rabeprazole are both valued for their safety profile. Very few cases of adverse side-effects related to these drugs, when given individually, have been reported; serious side-effects of clarithromycin in combination with rabeprazole have never been reported. The present case reports on a 51-year-old woman with gastritis who received clarithromycin combined with rabeprazole for Helicobacter pylori infection. After taking 500 mg clarithromycin and 10 mg rabeprazole orally she displayed acute psychotic symptoms of dissociative disorder, including: impairment of orientation and attention; the feeling of dreaming; disintegration of thinking; stereotyped speech; flattened emotion; amnesia. Routine blood investigations, computed tomography scans and electroencephalography showed no abnormalities. All symptoms disappeared without antipsychotic treatment ≈ 48 h after she had taken the two drugs. Combining clarithromycin with rabeprazole might increase the risk of neurotoxicity, particularly in susceptible individuals. This should be a concern in clinical practice.

  18. Two Cases of Chronic Gastritis with non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacter Infection.

    PubMed

    Shiratori, Satoka; Mabe, Katsuhiro; Yoshii, Shinji; Takakuwa, Yasunari; Sato, Masaaki; Nakamura, Masahiko; Kudo, Takahiko; Kato, Mototsugu; Asaka, Masahiro; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Two men, 48 and 54 years of age, were referred for medical checkups without any particular symptoms. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed a normal gastric body, but white marbled appearance in the lesser curvature of the gastric angle and antrum. Biopsy specimens revealed relatively long and tightly coiled organisms. The two patients were diagnosed as having non-Helicobacter pylori helicobacter (NHPH) infection according to the findings of pathological and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analyses. After triple therapy (amoxicillin, clarithromycin, and rabeprazole), endoscopy showed an improvement of the white marbled lesions and biopsy specimens showed no NHPH. The white marbled appearance limited to the gastric angle and antrum may be a potential characteristic finding of NHPH-infected gastritis. PMID:27432094

  19. The role of psychosocial factors in peptic ulcer disease: beyond Helicobacter pylori and NSAIDs.

    PubMed

    Jones, Michael P

    2006-04-01

    A variety of organic etiologies are associated with peptic ulcer disease, and the most relevant of these are infection with Helicobacter pylori and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Between 5% and 20% of patients with gastric or duodenal ulcer, however, lack an identifiable organic etiology. In these patients particularly and in all ulcer patients in general, psychosocial factors may play a significant role. At present, there is no definitive study proving a causal relationship between psychological stress and the development of ulcer disease. Studies to date suffer from significant methodological limitations and have not effectively addressed the poor correlation between ulcer craters and ulcer symptoms. A conservative application of available data would suggest that psychosocial factors play a significant role in symptom perception and reporting in patients with dyspeptic symptoms and may play a role in ulcer formation. PMID:16581366

  20. [Non-Helicobacter pylori, Non-nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Peptic Ulcer Disease].

    PubMed

    Chang, Young Woon

    2016-06-25

    Non-Helicobacter pylori, non-NSAID peptic ulcer disease (PUD), termed idiopathic PUD, is increasing in Korea. Diagnosis is based on exclusion of common causes such as H. pylori infection, infection with other pathogens, surreptitious ulcerogenic drugs, malignancy, and uncommon systemic diseases with upper gastrointestinal manifestations. The clinical course of idiopathic PUD is delayed ulcer healing, higher recurrence, higher re-bleeding after initial ulcer healing, and higher mortality than the other types of PUD. Genetic predisposition, older age, chronic mesenteric ischemia, cigarette smoking, concomitant systemic diseases, and psychological stress are considered risk factors for idiopathic PUD. Diagnosis of idiopathic PUD should systematically explore all possible causes. Management of this disease is to treat underlying disease followed by regular endoscopic surveillance to confirm ulcer healing. Continuous proton pump inhibitor therapy is an option for patients who respond poorly to the standard ulcer regimen.

  1. Helicobacter pylori virulence genes and host genetic polymorphisms as risk factors for peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection plays an important role in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease (PUD). Several factors have been proposed as possible H. pylori virulence determinants; for example, bacterial adhesins and gastric inflammation factors are associated with an increased risk of PUD. However, differences in bacterial virulence factors alone cannot explain the opposite ends of the PUD disease spectrum, that is duodenal and gastric ulcers; presumably, both bacterial and host factors contribute to the differential response. Carriers of the high-producer alleles of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1B, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α who also carry low-producer allele of anti-inflammatory cytokines have severe gastric mucosal inflammation, whereas carriers of the alternative alleles have mild inflammation. Recent reports have suggested that the PSCA and CYP2C19 ultra-rapid metabolizer genotypes are also associated with PUD.

  2. Helicobacter pylori virulence genes and host genetic polymorphisms as risk factors for peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection plays an important role in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease (PUD). Several factors have been proposed as possible H. pylori virulence determinants; for example, bacterial adhesins and gastric inflammation factors are associated with an increased risk of PUD. However, differences in bacterial virulence factors alone cannot explain the opposite ends of the PUD disease spectrum, that is duodenal and gastric ulcers; presumably, both bacterial and host factors contribute to the differential response. Carriers of the high-producer alleles of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1B, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α who also carry low-producer allele of anti-inflammatory cytokines have severe gastric mucosal inflammation, whereas carriers of the alternative alleles have mild inflammation. Recent reports have suggested that the PSCA and CYP2C19 ultra-rapid metabolizer genotypes are also associated with PUD. PMID:26470920

  3. [Non-Helicobacter pylori, Non-nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Peptic Ulcer Disease].

    PubMed

    Chang, Young Woon

    2016-06-25

    Non-Helicobacter pylori, non-NSAID peptic ulcer disease (PUD), termed idiopathic PUD, is increasing in Korea. Diagnosis is based on exclusion of common causes such as H. pylori infection, infection with other pathogens, surreptitious ulcerogenic drugs, malignancy, and uncommon systemic diseases with upper gastrointestinal manifestations. The clinical course of idiopathic PUD is delayed ulcer healing, higher recurrence, higher re-bleeding after initial ulcer healing, and higher mortality than the other types of PUD. Genetic predisposition, older age, chronic mesenteric ischemia, cigarette smoking, concomitant systemic diseases, and psychological stress are considered risk factors for idiopathic PUD. Diagnosis of idiopathic PUD should systematically explore all possible causes. Management of this disease is to treat underlying disease followed by regular endoscopic surveillance to confirm ulcer healing. Continuous proton pump inhibitor therapy is an option for patients who respond poorly to the standard ulcer regimen. PMID:27312831

  4. A Challenging Case of a Large Gastroduodenal Artery Pseudoaneurysm after Surgery of a Peptic Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Rancaño, Rocio; Antona, Esteban Martín; Montero, José Vicente Méndez

    2015-01-01

    We report a 48-year-old man in whom a chronic postbulbar duodenal ulcer destroyed much of the back wall of the duodenum and gastroduodenal artery causing pseudoaneurysm. The lesion was found and evaluated by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (that revealed a large pseudoaneurysm of 83 mm × 75 mm in diameter) and by angiography and then treated with transcatheter embolization leading to a complete resolution of the lesion. The case is rare and important for several reasons. First, we demonstrate that pseudoaneurysm of the gastroduodenal artery caused by a duodenal ulcer can occur and present a diagnostic challenge (as far as we know, only three cases have been reported previously in the literature). Second, this case report focuses on the importance of ligation of the gastroduodenal artery when bleeding of peptic ulcers occurs. Additionally, we present an overview of the relevant literature. PMID:25648587

  5. Technetium-99m colloidal bismuth subcitrate: A novel method for the evaluation of peptic ulcer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez, T.E.; Lyons, K.P.; Raiszadeh, M.; Fardi, M.; Snider, P.

    1984-01-01

    The therapeutic agent colloidal bismuth subcitrate (CBS) selectively binds to peptic ulcers. The authors have developed a method for labeling this agent with Tc-99m. Chromatographic quality control studies of the agent on silica gel coated strips (ITLC-SG) showed that more than 97% of Tc-99m was bound to CBS. During in-vitro stability testing, the radio-label was stable for a minimum of 6 hours. The chromatographic findings are in agreement with the in-vivo distribution of the agent which showed no significant radioactivity in thyroid, kidneys, liver, or bladder. The resulting Tc-99m-CBS solution is administered orally in drinking water. Preliminary animal studies have been conducted on 5 adult 3 kg New Zealand rabbits sedated with 50 mg Ketamine I.M. The rabbits were intubated with I.V. tubing advanced to the stomach. They were given a gastric erosive suspension of 600-1000 mg/kg of pulverized ASA in 10 cc tap water. Four hours later they were given 3-4 mCi of the radiotracer in a 5 cc volume of water. Serial in-vivo images were obtained for 2 hours which included thyroid, abdomen, and urinary bladder. Next the stomachs were excised, opened along the greater curvature, imaged, vigorously washed and reimaged. All 5 rabbits showed avid localized binding of radiotracer which remained fixed even with vigorous washing. Areas of normal appearing mucosa were relatively devoid of radiotracer. This new compound may have significant clinical usefulness in the detection of peptic ulcer disease. In addition, such a non-invasive technique, carrying none of the risks or discomfort of endoscopy could also find application in the evaluation of the response to therapy.

  6. A Comparative Clinicopathologic Study of Collagenous Gastritis in Children and Adults: The Same Disorder With Associated Immune-mediated Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ma, Changqing; Park, Jason Y; Montgomery, Elizabeth A; Arnold, Christina A; McDonald, Oliver G; Liu, Ta-Chiang; Salaria, Safia N; Limketkai, Berkeley N; McGrath, Kevin M; Musahl, Tina; Singhi, Aatur D

    2015-06-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare condition characterized by surface epithelial damage, subepithelial collagen deposition, and a lamina propria inflammatory infiltrate. Previous studies have proposed 2 clinicopathologic subtypes: (1) children (18 y of age or younger) presenting with severe anemia, nodular gastric mucosa, and isolated gastric disease; and (2) adults with chronic watery diarrhea that is associated with diffuse collagenous involvement of the gastrointestinal tract. However, notable exceptions exist. In fact, broad variability in clinical presentation, etiology, treatment and disease course has been reported. To better define the clinicopathologic features of collagenous gastritis, we have collected 10 pediatric and 21 adult cases and describe their clinical, endoscopic, pathologic, and follow-up findings. Both children and adults presented with similar clinical symptoms such as anemia (50%, 35%, respectively), epigastric/abdominal pain (50%, 45%), and diarrhea (40%, 55%). Concomitant immune disorders were identified in 2 (20%) children and 3 (14%) adults. Further, 7 of 17 (41%) adults were taking medications associated with other immune-related gastrointestinal diseases including olmesartan and antidepressants. Histologically, there were no differences between children and adults with collagenous gastritis in the location of gastric involvement, mean collagenous layer thickness, and prominence of eosinophils (P>0.05). Extragastric collagenous involvement was also seen with comparable frequencies in each cohort (44%, 59%). Follow-up information was available for 22 of 31 (71%) patients and ranged from 2 to 122 months (mean, 33.6 mo). Despite medical management in most cases, persistence of symptoms or collagenous gastritis on subsequent biopsies was seen in 100% of children and 82% of adults. Of note, treatment for 1 adult patient involved cessation of olmesartan resulting in resolution of both symptoms and subepithelial collagen deposition on subsequent

  7. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori-Negative, Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Related Peptic Ulcer Disease in Patients Referred to Afzalipour Hospital.

    PubMed

    Seyed Mirzaei, Seyed Mahdi; Zahedi, Mohammad Javad; Shafiei Pour, Sara

    2015-10-01

    BACKGROUND Although Helicobacter pylori and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the main causes of peptic ulcers disease (PUD), recently the prevalence of idiopathic peptic ulcer (IPU) is increasing in most parts of the world. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of IPU in Kerman, the center of largest province in south-east Iran. METHODS We included 215 patients with peptic ulcer in our study. Combined methods rapid urease test (RUT), histology, and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed on endoscopic samples of peptic ulcers. NSAID use was determined by medical history. SPSS software version 16 was used for data analysis. p value<0.05 was considered as statistically significant. RESULTS Of 215 consecutive patients with peptic ulcer, four (1.8%) had H.pylorinegative and NSAID-negative PUD. There were not significant differences between patients with IPU and patients with peptic ulcer associated with H.pylori or NSAIDs regarding the sex, age, cigarette smoking, and opioid abuse. CONCLUSION Our study showed that in contrast to other reports from western and some Asian countries, the prevalence of IPU is low in Kerman and H.pylori infection is still the major cause of PUD. We recommend a large and multi-central study to determine the prevalence of IPU in Iran.

  8. [Role of Allelic Genes of Matrix Metalloproteinases and Their Tissue Inhibitors in the Peptic Ulcer Disease Development].

    PubMed

    Shaymardanova, E Kh; Nurgalieva, A Kh; Khidiyatova, I M; Gabbasova, L V; Kuramshina, O A; Kryukova, A Ya; Sagitov, R B; Munasipov, F R; Khusnutdinova, E Kh

    2016-03-01

    Peptic ulcer disease is a chronic disease of the gastrointestinal tract, mainly manifesting itself in the formation of the fairly persistent ulcer defect of the mucous membrane of the stomach and/or duodenum. Association analysis of common polymorphisms of matrix metalloproteinases genes MMP-1 (rs1799750, rs494379), MMP-2 (rs2285052), MMP-3 (rs3025058), MMP-9 (rs3918242, rs17576), and MMP-12 (rs2276109) and their tissue inhibitors TIMP-2 (rs8179090) and TIMP-3 (rs9619311) was carried out in 353 patients with a gastric ulcer or duodenal ulcer and in 325 unrelated healthy individuals from the Republic of Bashkortostan. Associations of polymorphic variants rs1799750 and rs494379 of gene MMP-1, rs3025058 of gene MMP-3, rs3918242 and rs17576 of gene MMP-9, and rs9619311 of gene TIMP-3 with the risk of peptic ulcer disease in Russians and Tatars were revealed.

  9. Marshall and Warren Lecture 2009: peptic ulcer bleeding: an expedition of 20 years from 1989-2009.

    PubMed

    Sung, Joseph J Y

    2010-02-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is one of the most common medical emergencies leading to substantial mortality and morbidity. The last two decades has witnessed some important advances in the management of this condition, and some of these are results from clinical trials conducted in the Asia Pacific region. The optimal use of combined endoscopic hemostasis and the use of pharmacologic control of acid secretion in the stomach have significantly improved clinical outcome. The role of surgery has been redefined. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection and prophylactic treatment in non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and anti-platelet users have made progress in preventing recurrence of peptic ulcer and bleeding. Instead of merely focusing on safety in the gastrointestinal tract, striking a balance between risk and benefit of continuing anti-platelet agents should be a top agenda.

  10. Complete and incomplete intestinal metaplasia at the oesophagogastric junction: prevalences and associations with endoscopic erosive oesophagitis and gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Voutilainen, M; Farkkila, M; Juhola, M; Mecklin, J; Sipponen, P; The, C

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Intestinal metaplasia (IM) is a common finding at the oesophagogastric junction, but the aetiopathogenesis of the different IM subtypes—that is, incomplete IM (specialised columnar epithelium, SCE) and complete IM— and their associations with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and Helicobacter pylori gastritis are unclear.
METHODS—1058 consecutive dyspeptic patients undergoing gastroscopy were enrolled. The gastric, oesophagogastric junctional, and oesophageal biopsy specimens obtained were stained with haematoxylin and eosin, alcian blue (pH 2.5)-periodic acid Schiff, and modified Giemsa.
RESULTS—Complete junctional IM was detected in 196 (19%) of the 1058 subjects, and in 134 (13%) was the sole IM subtype. Incomplete junctional IM (SCE) was detected in 101 (10%) subjects, of whom 62 (61%) also had the complete IM subtype. Of patients with normal gastric histology (n = 426), 6% had complete IM and 7% junctional SCE. The prevalence of both types of IM increased with age in patients with either normal gastric histology or chronic gastritis (n = 611). Epithelial dysplasia was not detected in any patients with junctional IM. In multivariate analysis, independent risk factors for incomplete junctional IM were age (odds ratio (OR) 1.3 per decade, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2 to 1.6), endoscopic erosive oesophagitis (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1 to 3.2), and chronic cardia inflammation (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.3 to 6.2), but not gastric H pylori infection (OR 1.0, 95% CI 0.6 to 1.7). In univariate analysis, junctional incomplete IM was not associated with cardia H pylori infection. Independent risk factors for "pure" complete junctional IM (n = 134) were age (OR 1.2 per decade, 95% CI 1.0 to 1.4), antral predominant non-atrophic gastritis (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.3 to 5.2), antral predominant atrophic gastritis (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1 to 5.2), and multifocal atrophic gastritis (OR 7.1, 95% CI 2.5 to 19.8). In univariate analysis

  11. Does Helicobacter pylori Eradication Reduce the Risk of Open Angle Glaucoma in Patients With Peptic Ulcer Disease?

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Wen-Chi; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-09-01

    To investigate whether Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) eradication would influence the risk of primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) in patients with peptic ulcer disease. From the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000, 6061 patients with peptic ulcer and receiving H pylori eradication therapy were recruited. The study cohort was subdivided into early (within 1 year) and late (after 1 year) eradication cohorts. The 24,244 control cohort subjects were those who without peptic ulcer and without receiving H pylori eradication therapy and were frequency-matched with the H pylori eradication cohort by age, sex, and the year of receiving H pylori eradication therapy. The higher incidence of POAG was observed in late H pylori eradication cohort and in early H pylori eradication cohort than in control cohort (1.57, 1.32, and 0.95, per 1000 person-year, respectively). However, overall risk of glaucoma was not significantly higher in the late eradication than in the early eradication (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.85, 95% confidence interval = 0.48-1.53). The POAG incidence was greater in the late H pylori eradication cohort when follow-up duration ≤ 5 years (1.59, per 1000 person-years). However, when follow-up duration >5 years, the incidence of POAG was greater in the early H pylori eradication cohort (1.68, per 1000 person-years). These relationships were not associated with a significantly increased or decreased risk of POAG in multivariable analyses. Either early or late H pylori eradication does not significantly reduce the risk of glaucoma in patients with peptic ulcer disease compared with normal control.

  12. Association of Helicobacter pylori cagA Gene with Gastric Cancer and Peptic Ulcer in Saudi Patients.

    PubMed

    Saber, Taisir; Ghonaim, Mabrouk M; Yousef, Amany R; Khalifa, Amany; Al Qurashi, Hesham; Shaqhan, Mohammad; Samaha, Mohammad

    2015-07-01

    This study was conducted to assess the relationship between occurrence of gastric cancer and peptic ulcer, and the presence of H. pylori cagA gene and anti-CagA IgG, and to estimate the value of these antibodies in detecting infection by cagA gene-positive H. pylori strains in Saudi patients. The study included 180 patients who were subjected to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in Taif province and Western region of Saudi Arabia (60 gastric cancer, 60 peptic ulcer, and 60 with non-ulcer dyspepsia). Gastric biopsy specimens were obtained and tested for H. pylori infection by rapid urease test and culture. PCR was performed on the isolated strains and biopsy specimens for detection of the cagA gene. Blood samples were collected and tested for CagA IgG by ELISA. H. pylori infection was detected among 72.8% of patients. The cagA gene and anti-CagA IgG were found in 63.4% and 61.8% of H. pylori-infected patients, respectively. They were significantly (p < 0.01) higher in patients with gastric cancer and peptic ulcer compared with those with non-ulcer dyspepsia. Detection of the CagA IgG was 91.6% sensitive, 89.6% specific, and 90.8% accurate compared with detection of the cagA gene. Its positive and negative predictive values were 93.8% and 86%, respectively. The study showed a significant association between the presence of the cagA gene and gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease, and between anti-CagA IgG and the cagA gene in Saudi patients. However, a further larger study is required to confirm this finding.

  13. Does Helicobacter pylori Eradication Reduce the Risk of Open Angle Glaucoma in Patients With Peptic Ulcer Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Wen-Chi; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To investigate whether Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) eradication would influence the risk of primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) in patients with peptic ulcer disease. From the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000, 6061 patients with peptic ulcer and receiving H pylori eradication therapy were recruited. The study cohort was subdivided into early (within 1 year) and late (after 1 year) eradication cohorts. The 24,244 control cohort subjects were those who without peptic ulcer and without receiving H pylori eradication therapy and were frequency-matched with the H pylori eradication cohort by age, sex, and the year of receiving H pylori eradication therapy. The higher incidence of POAG was observed in late H pylori eradication cohort and in early H pylori eradication cohort than in control cohort (1.57, 1.32, and 0.95, per 1000 person-year, respectively). However, overall risk of glaucoma was not significantly higher in the late eradication than in the early eradication (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.85, 95% confidence interval = 0.48–1.53). The POAG incidence was greater in the late H pylori eradication cohort when follow-up duration ≤5 years (1.59, per 1000 person-years). However, when follow-up duration >5 years, the incidence of POAG was greater in the early H pylori eradication cohort (1.68, per 1000 person-years). These relationships were not associated with a significantly increased or decreased risk of POAG in multivariable analyses. Either early or late H pylori eradication does not significantly reduce the risk of glaucoma in patients with peptic ulcer disease compared with normal control. PMID:26426633

  14. Penetration of the left ventricular myocardium by benign peptic ulceration: two cases and a review of the published work.

    PubMed Central

    Porteous, C; Williams, D; Foulis, A; Sugden, B A

    1984-01-01

    Two cases of penetration of the left ventricular myocardium by benign peptic ulcer are reported. Twenty five similar cases in the world published work are reviewed. The condition is only possible when there are fibrous adhesions between the stomach and diaphragm and the pericardium. In addition, the left lobe of the liver may be small. Alternatively, an ulcer within a hiatus hernia may erode into the left ventricle. Images PMID:6501586

  15. Artificial neural networks in the recognition of the presence of thyroid disease in patients with atrophic body gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Lahner, Edith; Intraligi, Marco; Buscema, Massimo; Centanni, Marco; Vannella, Lucy; Grossi, Enzo; Annibale, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of artificial neural networks in predicting the presence of thyroid disease in atrophic body gastritis patients. METHODS: A dataset of 29 input variables of 253 atrophic body gastritis patients was applied to artificial neural networks (ANNs) using a data optimisation procedure (standard ANNs, T&T-IS protocol, TWIST protocol). The target variable was the presence of thyroid disease. RESULTS: Standard ANNs obtained a mean accuracy of 64.4% with a sensitivity of 69% and a specificity of 59.8% in recognizing atrophic body gastritis patients with thyroid disease. The optimization procedures (T&T-IS and TWIST protocol) improved the performance of the recognition task yielding a mean accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of 74.7% and 75.8%, 78.8% and 81.8%, and 70.5% and 69.9%, respectively. The increase of sensitivity of the TWIST protocol was statistically significant compared to T&T-IS. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that artificial neural networks may be taken into consideration as a potential clinical decision-support tool for identifying ABG patients at risk for harbouring an unknown thyroid disease and thus requiring diagnostic work-up of their thyroid status. PMID:18203288

  16. H. pylori-Eradication Therapy Increases RUNX3 Expression in the Glandular Epithelial Cells in Enlarged-Fold Gastritis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masayuki; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Minegishi, Yuriko; Ito, Kosei; Nishizawa, Toshihiro; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2010-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP)-eradication therapy increases Runt domain transcription factor 3 (RUNX3) expression in the glandular epithelial cells in enlarged-fold gastritis. The aim of this study is to evaluate expression of the RUNX3 protein, the product of a gastric tumor suppression gene, and mutagenic oxidative stress in human gastric mucosal specimens obtained from patients with HP-induced enlarged-fold gastritis. Methods. RUNX3 expression was immunohistochemically scored and the degree of the mucosal oxidative stress was directly measured by the chemiluminescense (ChL) assay in the biopsy specimens. Results. RUNX3 expression was detected in the gastric epithelial cells. HP-eradication significantly increased RUNX3 expression in the glandular epithelium of the corpus, however, no change was observed in those of the antrum. A fourfold higher mucosal ChL value was observed in the corpus as compared with that in the antrum. HP-eradication significantly decreased the mucosal ChL values in both portions of the stomach to nearly undetectable levels. Conclusion. The glandular epithelium is exposed to a high level of carcinogenic oxidative stress and shows low levels of expression of the tumor suppressive molecule, RUNX3; however, this expression was restored after HP-eradication, suggesting the high risk of carcinogenesis associated with HP-induced enlarged-fold gastritis of the corpus.

  17. Serum IL-10, MMP-7, MMP-9 Levels in Helicobacter pylori Infection and Correlation with Degree of Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Siregar, Gontar; Halim, Sahat; Sitepu, Ricky

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Helicobacter pylori causes gastric mucosal inflammation and immune reaction. However, the increase of IL-10, MMP-7, and MMP-7 levels in the serum is still controversial. The objective of this study was to investigate the serum levels of IL-10, MMP-7 & MMP-9 in gastritis patients with H. pylori infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was done on seventy gastritis patients that consecutive admitted to endoscopy units. The diagnosis of gastritis was made based on histopathology and diagnosis of H. pylori infection was based on rapid urease test. Serum samples were obtained to determine to circulate IL-10, MMP-7, and MMP-9 level. Univariate and bivariate analysis were done by SPSS version 22. RESULTS: Forthy percentages of the patients were infected with H. pylori. The IL-10 level was significantly higher in H. pylori-infected patients compared to non-infected patients. However, there were no differences between serum levels of MMP-7 and MMP-9 in infected and non-infected H. pylori patients. CONCLUSIONS: The immune response to H. pylori promotes systemic inflammation, which was reflected by the increased levels of serum IL-10. However, there were no significant differences in MMP-7 and MMP-9 serum levels between positive and negative infected H. pylori patients. PMID:27703556

  18. Epithelial cell proliferation in human fundic and antral mucosae. Influence of superselective vagotomy and relationship with gastritis

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, O.; Lehy, T.; Rene, E.; Gres, L.; Bonfils, S.

    1985-11-01

    Epithelial cell proliferation in the fundic and antral mucosae was studied in 19 duodenal ulcer patients, 11 patients having undergone fundic superselective vagotomy for duodenal ulcer, and 10 controls. This was achieved through in vitro incorporation of tritiated thymidine in mucosal biopsies and radioautography. Except for increased fundic mucosal height, duodenal ulcer patients did not differ from controls for all parameters studied. In vagotomized patients, as compared to the other two groups, the labeling index was significantly enhanced in the innervated antral mucosa where atrophic gastritis developed, but there was no change in the labeling index and no worsening of mucosal inflammation in the denervated fundic mucosa. The only abnormality in the latter was a striking expansion, towards the surface, of the proliferative area within the fundic pit. The labeling indices and the degree of gastritis in gastric mucosae are significantly correlated in control and duodenal ulcer patients. If findings in antral mucosa, after superselective vagotomy, seemed related to gastritis lesions, those in fundic mucosa were not and may indicate an alteration due to the vagotomy per se.

  19. A novel approach for stress-induced gastritis based on paradoxical anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory action of exogenous 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine.

    PubMed

    Ock, Chan Young; Hong, Kyung Sook; Choi, Ki-Seok; Chung, Myung-Hee; Kim, Yun soo; Kim, Ju Hyun; Hahm, Ki-Baik

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) attack guanine bases in DNA and form 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), which has been regarded simply as an oxidative mutagenic by-product. On the other hand, our previous report showed paradoxically ROS attenuating action of generated 8-OHdG. In the current study, both in vitro and in vivo experiments were executed in order to document anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory actions of 8-OHdG in cell model and to elucidate the therapeutic efficacy against water immersion restraint stress (WIRS)-induced gastritis animal model. Electron spin resonance measurements showed that 8-OHdG at >5μg/ml completely scavenged OH(-) radicals, which was further confirmed by checking 2'-7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) spectroscopy. On molecular assay, 8-OHdG antagonized the action of GTP on Rac, a small GTP binding protein, without affecting Rac-guanosine exchange factor (GEF) or phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K) activity. In Raw264.7 cells, 8-OHdG was found to be associated with marked attenuations of NOX1, NOXO1, and NOXA1 accompanied with the decreased expressions of LPS-induced inflammatory mediators including COX-2, iNOS, IL-1β, and IL-6. Similarly, 8-OHdG attenuated hypoxia-induced angiogenesis and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1), COX-2, iNOS, IL-8, and VEGF expressions in HUVEC cells. At transcriptional level, 8-OHdG inhibited the nuclear translocation of NF-κB, inhibitory κB kinase (IKK) β kinase activation, and decreased phospho-IκBα levels. 8-OHdG efficiently ameliorated WIRS-induced gastric mucosal injury as evidenced with improvement of gross lesion index and attenuation of engaging mediators. Taken together, exogenous 8-OHdG can be a functional molecule regulating oxidative stress-induced gastritis through either antagonizing Rac-GTP binding or blocking the signals responsible for gastric inflammatory cascade.

  20. Localised Skin Hyperpigmentation as a Presenting Symptom of Vitamin B12 Deficiency Complicating Chronic Atrophic Gastritis.

    PubMed

    El-Shafie, Kawther; Samir, Nafisa; Lakhtakia, Ritu; Davidson, Robin; Al-Waili, Ahmed; Al-Mamary, Muna; Al-Shafee, Mohammed

    2015-08-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is common in developing countries and should be suspected in patients with unexplained anaemia or neurological symptoms. Dermatological manifestations associated with this deficiency include skin hyper- or hypopigmentation, angular stomatitis and hair changes. We report a case of a 28-year-old man who presented to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in November 2013 with localised hyperpigmentation of the palmar and dorsal aspects of both hands of two months' duration. Other symptoms included numbness of the hands, anorexia, weight loss, dizziness, fatigability and a sore mouth and tongue. There was no evidence of hypocortisolaemia and a literature search revealed a possible B12 deficiency. The patient had low serum B12 levels and megaloblastic anaemia. An intrinsic factor antibody test was negative. A gastric biopsy revealed chronic gastritis. After B12 supplementation, the patient's symptoms resolved. Family physicians should familiarise themselves with atypical presentations of B12 deficiency. Many symptoms of this deficiency are reversible if detected and treated early. PMID:26357561

  1. The Diagnostic Value of Gastrin-17 Detection in Atrophic Gastritis: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Ling, Li; Li, Shanshan; Qin, Guiping; Cui, Wei; Li, Xiang; Ni, Hong

    2016-05-01

    A meta-analysis was performed to assess the diagnostic value of gastrin-17 (G-17) for the early detection of chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG).An extensive literature search was performed, with the aim of selecting publications that reported the accuracy of G-17 in predicting CAG, in the following databases: PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Science, Chinese Biological Medicine, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang, and VIP. To assess the diagnostic value of G-17, the following statistics were estimated and described: sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratios (DOR), summary receiver operating characteristic curves, area under the curve (AUC), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).Thirteen studies that met the inclusion criteria were included in this meta-analysis, comprising 894 patients and 1950 controls. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of these studies were 0.48 (95% CI: 0.45-0.51) and 0.79 (95% CI: 0.77-0.81), respectively. The DOR was 5.93 (95% CI: 2.93-11.99), and the AUC was 0.82.G-17 may have potential diagnostic value because it has good specificity and a moderate DOR and AUC for CAG. However, more studies are needed to improve the sensitivity of this diagnostic tool in the future.

  2. Review of Atrophic Gastritis and Intestinal Metaplasia as a Premalignant Lesion of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yo Han; Kim, Nayoung

    2015-01-01

    Atrophic gastritis (AG) and intestinal metaplasia (IM) are the main precursor lesions of gastric cancer as the incidence of gastric cancer increases in the gastric mucosa involved with AG and IM. The prevalence of AG and IM vary depending on countries, even it represents diverse results in the same nation. Usually AG is antecedent of IM but the etiologies of AG and IM are not always the same. The sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic methods to detect AG and IM are different. Furthermore, the management strategy of AG and IM has not been established, yet. Helicobacter pylori infection has been proved as the most important cause of AG and IM. Thus the eradication of H. pylori is very important to prevent the progression to gastric cancer which is still placed in the high rank in morbidity and mortality among cancers. However, the reversibility of AG and IM by eradication of H. pylori which was assumed to be certain by meta-analysis is; however, controversial now. Therefore, the understanding and early diagnosis of AG and IM are very important, especially, in high incidence area of gastric cancer such as Republic of Korea. PMID:25853101

  3. [Multifocal gastric carcinoid associated with chronic type A atrophic gastritis. Analysis of 2 clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Moneghini, D; Fontana, M G; Villanacci, V; Salerni, B

    2001-01-01

    Gastric carcinoid is a rare disease, representing less than 1% of gastric tumours and 11-41% of all gastrointestinal carcinoids. The recent Solcia's classification distinguishes three subtypes of these neoplasms, which show specific clinical and pathological features. Type one arises in patients with chronic atrophic gastritis (CGA), achlorhydria, hypergastrinemia and consequent enterochromaffin-like cell hyperplasia and dysplasia. Type two is related to Zollinger Ellison syndrome and type three represents the sporadic kind. We report two cases of multifocal gastric carcinoid associated to CGA, one of them with pernicious anemia. Both patients had aspecific abdominal symptoms; the diagnosis was suspected by upper endoscopy and confirmed by histological examination. Patients were submitted to total gastrectomy. They are still alive six years after surgery, without signs or symptoms of recurrences. Treatment of these tumours is controversial, because of their uncertain biological and clinical behaviour. Some Authors propose a conservative strategy (only endoscopic surveillance or removal); others stress importance of surgery (antrectomy or gastric resection). We discuss and underline the role of surgical therapy and the relevance of radical approach.

  4. Application of Multilabel Learning Using the Relevant Feature for Each Label in Chronic Gastritis Syndrome Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guo-Ping; Yan, Jian-Jun; Wang, Yi-Qin; Fu, Jing-Jing; Xu, Zhao-Xia; Guo, Rui; Qian, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Background. In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), most of the algorithms are used to solve problems of syndrome diagnosis that only focus on one syndrome, that is, single label learning. However, in clinical practice, patients may simultaneously have more than one syndrome, which has its own symptoms (signs). Methods. We employed a multilabel learning using the relevant feature for each label (REAL) algorithm to construct a syndrome diagnostic model for chronic gastritis (CG) in TCM. REAL combines feature selection methods to select the significant symptoms (signs) of CG. The method was tested on 919 patients using the standard scale. Results. The highest prediction accuracy was achieved when 20 features were selected. The features selected with the information gain were more consistent with the TCM theory. The lowest average accuracy was 54% using multi-label neural networks (BP-MLL), whereas the highest was 82% using REAL for constructing the diagnostic model. For coverage, hamming loss, and ranking loss, the values obtained using the REAL algorithm were the lowest at 0.160, 0.142, and 0.177, respectively. Conclusion. REAL extracts the relevant symptoms (signs) for each syndrome and improves its recognition accuracy. Moreover, the studies will provide a reference for constructing syndrome diagnostic models and guide clinical practice. PMID:22719781

  5. Functional renal failure and haemorrhagic gastritis associated with endotoxaemia in cirrhosis.

    PubMed Central

    Clemente, C; Bosch, J; Rodés, J; Arroyo, V; Mas, A; Maragall, S

    1977-01-01

    Forty-three patients with cirrhosis and ascites, 21 with normal renal function, 10 with a progressive functional renal failure (FRF), and 12 with a steady FRF, were investigated for the presence of endotoxaemia by the Limulus lysate test. Endotoxaemia was found in nine patients with FRF and in none of the 21 with normal renal function (P less than 0-01). A positive Limulus test was almost exclusively associated with a progressive FRF (eight of 10 patients) and all but one of them died. Renal function improved as endotoxaemia disappeared in the survivor. Endotoxaemia was also associated with haemorrhage due to acute erosions of the gastric mucosa, being present in six of the seven patients who had this complication. Intravascular coagulation was not found in any patient. The Limulus test was positive in the ascitic fluid in 18 of 21 patients tested, although only two of them had peritonitis. These results suggest that endotoxaemia may play a critical role in the development of progressive renal failure and haemorrhagic gastritis in cirrhosis, and emphasise the potential risk of procedures involving reinfusion of ascitic fluid. PMID:301485

  6. Fermented Foods: Are They Tasty Medicines for Helicobacter pylori Associated Peptic Ulcer and Gastric Cancer?

    PubMed

    Nair, Mydhily R B; Chouhan, Deepak; Sen Gupta, Sourav; Chattopadhyay, Santanu

    2016-01-01

    More than a million people die every year due to gastric cancer and peptic ulcer. Helicobacter pylori infection in stomach is the most important reason for these diseases. Interestingly, only 10-20% of the H. pylori infected individuals suffer from these gastric diseases and rest of the infected individuals remain asymptomatic. The genotypes of H. pylori, host genetic background, lifestyle including smoking and diet may determine clinical outcomes. People from different geographical regions have different food habits, which also include several unique fermented products of plant and animal origins. When consumed raw, the fermented foods bring in fresh inocula of microbes to gastrointestinal tract and several strains of these microbes, like Lactobacillus and Saccharomyces are known probiotics. In vitro and in vivo experiments as well as clinical trials suggest that several probiotics have anti-H. pylori effects. Here we discuss the possibility of using natural probiotics present in traditional fermented food and beverages to obtain protection against H. pylori induced gastric diseases. PMID:27504109

  7. Long-Term Recurrence Rates of Peptic Ulcers without Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jae Hyun; Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Kim, Byung-Wook; Jee, Sam Ryong; Chung, Woo Chul; Shim, Ki-Nam; Baik, Gwang Ho; Kim, Sung Soo; Kim, Sang Gyun; Kim, Jin Il

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The purpose of this study is to investigate the recurrence rate of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) over a long follow-up period with PUD patients without Helicobacter pylori. Methods We retrospectively reviewed patients diagnosed with PUD on endoscopy and divided them into two groups: a H. pylori-negative group (HP-negative group), and a group of patients with untreated H. pylori (HP noneradicated group). We compared the recurrence rates of PUD in these two groups and analyzed the factors that affected ulcer recurrence. Results Total of nine hospitals in Korea participated, and a total of 1,761 patients were retrospectively reviewed. The HP-negative group included 553 patients, and the HP noneradicated group included 372 patients. The 5-year cumulative probabilities of PUD recurrence were 36.4% in the HP-negative group and 43.8% in the HP noneradicated group (p=0.113). The factors that were found to affect recurrence in the HP-negative group were elder, male, and comorbid chronic kidney disease. Conclusions The 5-year cumulative probability of PUD recurrence without H. pylori infection after a long-term follow-up was 36.4% and the factors that affected recurrence were elder, male, and comorbid chronic kidney disease. PMID:27114412

  8. Helicobacter pylori is not the predominant etiology for peptic ulcers requiring operation.

    PubMed

    Zelickson, Marc S; Bronder, Cathy M; Johnson, Brent L; Camunas, Joseph A; Smith, Dane E; Rawlinson, Dustin; Von, Stephen; Stone, H Harlan; Taylor, Spence M

    2011-08-01

    As the number of patients requiring operation for peptic ulcer disease (PUD) declines, presumed contemporary ulcer etiology has largely been derived from medically treated patients not subjected to surgery. The purpose of this study was to examine the specific causes of PUD in patients requiring surgery. Our Acute Care Surgical Service registry was reviewed for patients operated on for complications of PUD from 2004 to 2009. Emphasis was placed on individual etiologic factors for PUD. There were 128 patients (52% male, 81% white) who underwent emergency operation including: simple patch closure (n = 61, 48%); gastric resection (n = 22, 17%); gastric resection with vagotomy (n = 21, 16%); vagotomy and pyloroplasty (n = 18, 14%); or other procedures (n = 6, 5%). Complications necessitating operation were perforation (n = 79, 62%); bleeding (n = 29, 23%); obstruction (n = 12, 9%); and intractability (n = 8, 6%). Perioperative mortality was 12.5 per cent. Risk factors for PUD included tobacco use (50%), alcohol abuse (34%), and steroids (21%). Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory use was confirmed in 68 (53%) patients. Of the 128 patients, 82 (64%) were tested for Helicobacter pylori, 33 (40%) of which were positive and 49 (60%) negative. Helicobacter pylori, thus, was the confirmed ulcer etiology in only 26 per cent of cases. Unlike contemporary series of medically treated PUD, Helicobacter pylori may not be the predominant etiologic factor in patients who experience complications requiring surgery. A "traditional" surgical approach with liberal use of vagotomy, not antibiotic triple therapy, may well be the preferred treatment consideration in such cases. PMID:21944523

  9. Diagnosis and Treatment of Peptic Ulcer Disease and H. pylori Infection.

    PubMed

    Fashner, Julia; Gitu, Alfred C

    2015-02-15

    The most common causes of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) are Helicobacter pylori infection and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The test-and-treat strategy for detecting H. pylori is appropriate in situations where the risk of gastric cancer is low based on age younger than 55 years and the absence of alarm symptoms. Most other patients should undergo upper endoscopy to rule out malignancy and other serious causes of dyspepsia. Urea breath tests and stool antigen tests are most accurate for identifying H. pylori infection and can be used to confirm cure; serologic tests are a convenient but less accurate alternative and cannot be used to confirm cure. Treatment choices include standard triple therapy, sequential therapy, quadruple therapy, and levofloxacin-based triple therapy. Standard triple therapy is only recommended when resistance to clarithromycin is low. Chronic use of NSAIDs in patients with H. pylori infection increases the risk of PUD. Recommended therapies for preventing PUD in these patients include misoprostol and proton pump inhibitors. Complications of PUD include bleeding, perforation, gastric outlet obstruction, and gastric cancer. Older persons are at higher risk of PUD because of high-risk medication use, including antiplatelet drugs, warfarin, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and bisphosphonates.

  10. Proximal gastric vagotomy: does it have a place in the future management of peptic ulcer?

    PubMed

    Johnson, A G

    2000-03-01

    Proximal gastric vagotomy (PGV) is a modification of truncal vagotomy, which was introduced by Dragstedt for the treatment of duodenal ulcer (DU) in 1943. It is a technically demanding operation; but when performed by an experienced surgeon, it is safe and gives a cure rate for DU of more than 90%, with minimal side effects. The operation permanently alters the natural history of the disease and may be used for gastric ulcer (GU), with ulcer excision; but it is not as effective. Further adaptations, such as posterior truncal vagotomy with anterior seromyotomy, were introduced to simplify and shorten the operation, but they did not receive wide acceptance. Recently, with the identification of Helicobacter, it was found that DU can also be cured by eliminating the infection. PGV is therefore used electively in patients with persistent DU that is not Helicobacter-positive or in the few in whom Helicobacter cannot be eliminated. In patients with bleeding or perforated DUs, PGV may be used in conjunction with underrunning the vessel or patching the perforation. However, few surgeons doing emergency peptic ulcer surgery have experience with PGV, so simple suture followed by medical treatment is the safest option. Because elective PGV is now a rare procedure, patients should be referred to a center with special expertise. If Helicobacter becomes resistant to antibiotics in the future, surgery may be needed regularly again, but the technical nuances would have to be learned.

  11. Increased Subsequent Risk of Peptic Ulcer Diseases in Patients With Bipolar Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yi-Chao; Hsu, Chih-Chao; Chang, Kuang-Hsi; Lee, Chang-Yin; Chong, Lee-Won; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies have reported that patients with bipolar disorders (BDs) exhibit increased physical comorbidity and psychological distress. Studies have shown that schizophrenia and anxiety increase the risk of peptic ulcer diseases (PUDs). Therefore, we conducted this study to determine the association between these 2 diseases and examine the possible risk factors. We used patients diagnosed with BDs from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A comparison cohort comprising patients without BDs was frequency matched by age, sex, and comorbidities, and the occurrence of PUDs was evaluated in both the cohorts. The BD and non-BD cohort consisted of 21,060 patients with BDs and 84,240 frequency-matched patients without BDs, respectively. The incidence of PUDs (hazard ratio, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 1.43–1.59; P < 0.001) was higher among the patients with BDs than the control patients. Cox models showed that irrespective of comorbidities, BDs were an independent risk factor for PUDs. Patients with BDs exhibit a substantially higher risk for developing PUDs. According to our data, we suggest that, following a diagnosis of BD, practitioners could notice the occurrence of PUD and associated prevention. Further prospective clinical studies investigating the relationship between BDs and PUDs are warranted. PMID:26200637

  12. Fermented Foods: Are They Tasty Medicines for Helicobacter pylori Associated Peptic Ulcer and Gastric Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Mydhily R. B.; Chouhan, Deepak; Sen Gupta, Sourav; Chattopadhyay, Santanu

    2016-01-01

    More than a million people die every year due to gastric cancer and peptic ulcer. Helicobacter pylori infection in stomach is the most important reason for these diseases. Interestingly, only 10–20% of the H. pylori infected individuals suffer from these gastric diseases and rest of the infected individuals remain asymptomatic. The genotypes of H. pylori, host genetic background, lifestyle including smoking and diet may determine clinical outcomes. People from different geographical regions have different food habits, which also include several unique fermented products of plant and animal origins. When consumed raw, the fermented foods bring in fresh inocula of microbes to gastrointestinal tract and several strains of these microbes, like Lactobacillus and Saccharomyces are known probiotics. In vitro and in vivo experiments as well as clinical trials suggest that several probiotics have anti-H. pylori effects. Here we discuss the possibility of using natural probiotics present in traditional fermented food and beverages to obtain protection against H. pylori induced gastric diseases. PMID:27504109

  13. Early methyl donor deficiency produces severe gastritis in mothers and offspring through N-homocysteinylation of cytoskeleton proteins, cellular stress, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bossenmeyer-Pourié, Carine; Pourié, Grégory; Koziel, Violette; Helle, Deborah; Jeannesson, Elise; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Beck, Bernard

    2013-06-01

    We examined the gastric mucosa structure and inflammatory status in control well-nourished Wistar dams and in Wistar dams deprived of choline, folate, and vitamin B12 during gestation and suckling periods, and in their offspring just before birth and at weaning. In this model of methyl donor deficiency (MDD), structural protein (E-cadherin and actin) N-homocysteinylation was measured through immunoprecipitation and proximity ligation assays. Cellular stress, inflammation, and apoptosis were estimated by the analysis of the NF-κB pathway, and the expression of superoxide dismutase, cyclooxygenase-2, tumor necrosis factor α, caspases 3 and 9, and TUNEL assay. Aberrant gastric mucosa formation and signs of surface layer erosion were detected in MDD fetuses and weanlings. E-cadherin and actin were N-homocysteinylated (+215 and +249% vs. controls, respectively; P<0.001). Expression of β-catenin staining drastically decreased (-98%; P<0.01). NF-κB pathway was activated (+124%; P<0.01). Expressions of all inflammatory factors (+70%; P<0.01), superoxide dismutase (+55%; P<0.01), and caspases (+104%; P<0.01) were markedly increased. These changes were also observed in dams, to a lesser extent. Early MDD induced gastric mucosa injury similar to atrophic gastritis through structural protein N-homocysteinylation, marked inflammation, and apoptosis, despite activation of repair machinery.

  14. One-week triple therapy with lansoprazole, clarithromycin, and metronidazole to cure Helicobacter pylori infection in peptic ulcer disease in Korea.

    PubMed

    Perng, C L; Kim, J G; El-Zimaity, H M; Osato, M S; Graham, D Y

    1998-03-01

    The efficacy and acceptability of classical bismuth triple therapy may be limited by poor patient compliance and adverse effects. It is widely agreed that improved, simpler, and reliable therapies are needed to cure Helicobacter pylori infection and foster patient compliance. We evaluated the efficacy and side effects of a Bazzoli triple therapy substituting lansoprazole for omeprazole for H. pylori infection in active peptic ulcer in Korea (30 mg of lansoprazole, 250 mg of clarithromycin, and 400 mg of metronidazole, all twice daily). H. pylori status was evaluated by rapid urease test, histology, and culture at entry and four or more weeks after ending antimicrobial therapy. Fifty-eight patients (mean age: 43 years) with gastric (N = 30) or duodenal ulcer (N = 28) and H. pylori infection were studied. H. pylori was cured in 47 (81%, 95% CI = 69-90%). Mild side effects, including vomiting, diarrhea, and itching, were observed in four patients (7%). Compliance averaged 95%. Fifty-five ulcers (95%) were healed. Pretreatment pylorobulbar deformity was observed in 49 patients (85%), and in 43 (88%) the deformity disappeared after treatment. Pretreatment metronidazole and clarithromycin resistance was observed in 87% and 2% of patients, respectively. The cure rate of H. pylori infection was significantly higher in patients >50 years of age than those <50. Treatment with low-dose one-week lansoprazole, clarithromycin, and metronidazole resulted in a relatively low cure rate, but was well tolerated. Studies to define the optimal duration, dose, and dosing interval of this combination therapy in Korea are needed.

  15. Stomach specific polymeric low density microballoons as a vector for extended delivery of rabeprazole and amoxicillin for treatment of peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Sandeep; Jain, Ashay; Amin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal Mohd; Mishra, Vijay; Agrawal, Govind P; Kesharwani, Prashant

    2016-05-01

    The study was intended to develop a new intra-gastric floating in situ microballoons system for controlled delivery of rabeprazole sodium and amoxicillin trihydrate for the treatment of peptic ulcer disease. Eudragit S-100 and hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose based low density microballoons systems were fabricated by employing varying concentrations of Eudragit S-100 and hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose, to which varying concentrations of drug was added, and formulated by stirring at various speed and time to optimize the process and formulation variable. The formulation variables like concentration and ratio of polymers significantly affected the in vitro drug release from the prepared floating device. The validation of the gastro-retentive potential of the prepared microballoons was carried out in rabbits by orally administration of microballoons formulation containing radio opaque material. The developed formulations showed improved buoyancy and lower ulcer index as compared to that seen with plain drugs. Ulcer protective efficacies were confirmed in ulcer-bearing mouse model. In conclusion, greater compatibility, higher gastro-retention and higher anti-ulcer activity of the presently fabricated formulations to improve potential of formulation for redefining ulcer treatment are presented here. These learning exposed a targeted and sustained drug delivery potential of prepared microballoons in gastric region for ulcer therapeutic intervention as corroborated by in vitro and in vivo findings and, thus, deserves further attention for improved ulcer treatment. PMID:26859118

  16. Stomach specific polymeric low density microballoons as a vector for extended delivery of rabeprazole and amoxicillin for treatment of peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Sandeep; Jain, Ashay; Amin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal Mohd; Mishra, Vijay; Agrawal, Govind P; Kesharwani, Prashant

    2016-05-01

    The study was intended to develop a new intra-gastric floating in situ microballoons system for controlled delivery of rabeprazole sodium and amoxicillin trihydrate for the treatment of peptic ulcer disease. Eudragit S-100 and hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose based low density microballoons systems were fabricated by employing varying concentrations of Eudragit S-100 and hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose, to which varying concentrations of drug was added, and formulated by stirring at various speed and time to optimize the process and formulation variable. The formulation variables like concentration and ratio of polymers significantly affected the in vitro drug release from the prepared floating device. The validation of the gastro-retentive potential of the prepared microballoons was carried out in rabbits by orally administration of microballoons formulation containing radio opaque material. The developed formulations showed improved buoyancy and lower ulcer index as compared to that seen with plain drugs. Ulcer protective efficacies were confirmed in ulcer-bearing mouse model. In conclusion, greater compatibility, higher gastro-retention and higher anti-ulcer activity of the presently fabricated formulations to improve potential of formulation for redefining ulcer treatment are presented here. These learning exposed a targeted and sustained drug delivery potential of prepared microballoons in gastric region for ulcer therapeutic intervention as corroborated by in vitro and in vivo findings and, thus, deserves further attention for improved ulcer treatment.

  17. Gedunin and photogedunin of Xylocarpus granatum show significant anti-secretory effects and protect the gastric mucosa of peptic ulcer in rats.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, V; Singh, N; Shrivastva, S; Mishra, S K; Dharmani, P; Mishra, V; Palit, G

    2010-07-01

    In the present study, the gastroprotective mechanism of Xylocarpus granatum fruit and its active constituents gedunin and photogedunin was investigated. Chloroform fraction (Fr-CHCl(3)) of X. granatum fruit was evaluated against cold restraint (CRU), aspirin (AS), alcohol (AL) and pyloric ligation (PL) induced gastric ulcer models in rats and histamine (HA) induced duodenal ulcer model in guinea pigs. Potential anti-ulcer activity of Fr-CHCl(3) was observed against CRU (58.28%), AS (67.81%), AL (84.38%), PL (65.66%) and HA (61.93%) induced ulcer models. The standard drug omeprazole (10mg/kg, p.o.) showed 68.25% protection against CRU, 57.08% against AS and 69.42% against PL model and 70.79% against HA induced duodenal ulcer. Sucralfate, another standard drug (500 mg/kg, p.o.) showed 62.72% protection in AL induced ulcer model. Fr-CHCl(3) significantly reduced free acidity (51.42%), total acidity (30.76%) and upregulated mucin secretion by 58.37% respectively. Phytochemical investigations of Fr-CHCl(3) yielded gedunin (36%), photogedunin (2%). Further, Fr-CHCl(3) and its compounds gedunin and photogedunin significantly inhibited H(+) K(+)-ATPase activity in vitro with IC(50) of 89.37, 56.86 and 66.54 microg/ml respectively as compared to the IC(50) value of omeprazole (30.24 microg/ml) confirming their anti-secretory activity. Conclusively, Fr-CHCl(3) of Xylocarpus granatum was found to possess anti-ulcerogenic activity which might be due to its anti-secretory activity and subsequent strengthening of the defensive mechanism. This study is the first of its kind to show significant anti-secretory effect of gedunin and photogedunin. Therefore it could act as a potent therapeutic agent against peptic ulcer disease. PMID:19962286

  18. Therapeutic effect of egualen sodium (KT1-32), a new antiulcer agent, on chronic gastritis induced by sodium taurocholate in rats.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, S; Matsumoto, M; Wakabayashi, S; Kosakai, K; Tomiyama, A; Kishimoto, S

    1996-12-01

    We investigated the therapeutic effects of egualen sodium (KT1-32), a new antiulcer agent, on chronic erosive and atrophic gastritis induced by 5 months' administration of sodium taurocholate (TCA; 5 mM) in rats. The chronic gastritis was manifested by mucosal surface injuries (erosions), reduced mucosal thickness, reduction of the number of parietal cells, infiltration of inflammatory cells, and proliferation of collagenous fiber. Egualen sodium, (10-100 mg/kg, t.i.d.) administered orally to the rats for 2 weeks after the withdrawal of TCA, dose-dependently and significantly decreased the total length of erosions. The indicators of atrophic gastritis, i.e., reduced mucosal thickness and reduction in the number of parietal cells, were improved dose-dependently by the administration of this agent. Egualen sodium also reduced the inflammatory cell infiltration and the proliferation of collagenous fiber in the gastric mucosa in a dose-dependent manner. The reduced staining of neutral gastric mucus was improved by a high dose (100 mg/kg) of egualen sodium. The therapeutic effects of egualen sodium on experimental gastritis were superior to those of sofalcone and sodium guaiazulene 3-sulfonate. These results suggest that egualen sodium may be a promising agent for the treatment of erosive and atrophic gastritis. PMID:9027640

  19. Helicobacter pylori Infection with Atrophic Gastritis Is an Independent Risk Factor for Advanced Colonic Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Young; Park, Hye Won; Choi, Ji Young; Lee, Jong-Soo; Koo, Ja Eun; Chung, Eun Ju; Chang, Hye-Sook; Choe, Jaewon; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Myung, Seung-Jae; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Byeon, Jeong-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Helicobacter pylori is a major risk factor for atrophic gastritis (AG) and gastric cancer. The correlation between H. pylori, AG and colorectal neoplasm (CRN) has only been examined in a limited number of studies, and findings have been inconclusive. We aimed to investigate the association between H. pylori infection status, AG and advanced CRN. Methods This cross-sectional study investigated the relationship between the presence of serum anti-H. pylori IgG antibodies, AG, and advanced CRN in 6,351 consecutive asymptomatic subjects who underwent a screening colonoscopy. Results A total of 316 participants (5.0%) had advanced CRN. H. pylori seropositivity was 61.3%. In a univariate analysis, the presence of H. pylori infection was associated with advanced CRN (odds ratio [OR], 1.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.17 to 1.91; p=0.001). H. pylori infection was associated with an increased risk of advanced CRN after adjusting for clinically relevant confounders (OR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.72; p=0.023). H. pylori-related AG was significantly associated with the risk of advanced CRN (OR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.91; p=0.030), whereas H. pylori infection without AG was not. Conclusions H. pylori infection increased the risk of advanced CRN, especially when it was combined with AG. Strict colonoscopy screening and surveillance may be warranted in those with H. pylori-positive AG. PMID:27458180

  20. Accuracy of GastroPanel for the diagnosis of atrophic gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Forné, Montserrat; Barrio, Jesus; De la Coba, Cristobal; González, Begoña; Rivera, Robin; Esteve, Maria; Fernandez-Bañares, Fernando; Madrigal, Beatriz; Gras-Miralles, Beatriz; Perez-Aisa, Angeles; Viver-Pi-Sunyer, Jose M.; Bory, Felipe; Rosinach, Merce; Loras, Carmen; Esteban, Carlos; Santolaria, Santos; Gomollon, Fernando; Valle, Julio; Gisbert, Javier P.

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that GastroPanel might be a useful tool for the diagnosis of chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) measuring four biomarkers in blood: basal gastrin-17 (G17), pepsinogen I and II (PGI and PGII), and Helicobacter pylori antibodies. Aim To determine the accuracy of GastroPanel for the diagnosis of CAG. Methods This was a prospective, blinded, multicenter study that included dyspeptic patients. G17, PGI, and PGII were determined by enzyme immunoassays. Three antrum and two corpus biopsies were obtained for standard histological analysis and rapid urease test. Biopsies were analyzed by a single blinded expert pathologist. Results Ninety-one patients were included (77% women, mean age 44 years, 51% H. pylori positive, 17% with CAG). G17 was reduced in patients with antrum CAG (5.4 vs. 13.4 pmol/l; P<0.01) and increased in patients with corpus CAG (11 vs. 24 pmol/l; P<0.05), but its accuracy was only acceptable in the case of corpus localization [area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), 74%]; PGII difference was almost statistically significant only when testing for corpus atrophy (33 vs. 21 μg/l; P=0.05; AUC=72%). The PGI and PGI/PGII ratio showed no significant differences (AUCs were all unacceptably low). Helicobacter pylori antibody levels were higher in H. pylori-infected patients (251 vs. 109 EIU, P=0.01; AUC=70). The accuracy of GastroPanel for the diagnosis of CAG was as follows: sensitivity 50%; specificity 80%; positive 25% and negative 92% predictive values; and positive 2.4 and negative 0.6 likelihood ratios. Conclusion GastroPanel is not accurate enough for the diagnosis of CAG; thus, its systematic use in clinical practice cannot be recommended. PMID:25014624

  1. On-the-fly detection of images with gastritis aspects in magnetically guided capsule endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewes, P. W.; Neumann, D.; Juloski, A. L.; Angelopoulou, E.; Hornegger, J.

    2011-03-01

    Capsule Endoscopy (CE) was introduced in 2000 and has since become an established diagnostic procedure for the small bowel, colon and esophagus. For the CE examination the patient swallows the capsule, which then travels through the gastrointestinal tract under the influence of the peristaltic movements. CE is not indicated for stomach examination, as the capsule movements can not be controlled from the outside and the entire surface of the stomach can not be reliably covered. Magnetically-guided capsule endoscopy (MGCE) was introduced in 2010. For the MGCE procedure the stomach is filled with water and the capsule is navigated from the outside using an external magnetic field. During the examination the operator can control the motion of the capsule in order to obtain a sufficient number of stomach-surface images with diagnostic value. The quality of the examination depends on the skill of the operator and his ability to detect aspects of interest in real time. We present a novel computer-assisted diagnostic-procedure (CADP) algorithm for indicating gastritis pathologies in the stomach during the examination. Our algorithm is based on pre-processing methods and feature vectors that are suitably chosen for the challenges of the MGCE imaging (suspended particles, bubbles, lighting). An image is classified using an ada-boost trained classifier. For the classifier training, a number of possible features were investigated. Statistical evaluation was conducted to identify relevant features with discriminative potential. The proposed algorithm was tested on 12 video sequences stemming from 6 volunteers. A mean detection rate of 91.17% was achieved during leave-one out cross-validation.

  2. Prognostic Factors and Complications in Patients With Operational Peptic Ulcer Perforation in Northern Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Suriya, Chutikarn; Kasatpibal, Nongyao; Kunaviktikul, Wipada; Kayee, Toranee

    2014-01-01

    Background Peptic ulcer perforation (PUP) is a very serious condition that leads to excessive complications and mortality. This study aimed to explore the possible prognostic factors and complications in patients with perforated peptic ulcer operation. Methods A 6-year retrospective cohort study in Nakornping Hospital between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2010 was conducted. The study included 912 patients who underwent PUP surgery. Patient characteristics were analyzed by using frequency, percentage, mean (standard deviation) and median (range). A comparison between groups was made. The Pearson’s Chi-squared or Fisher’s exact test was used for categorical variables, as appropriate. The Student’s t test was used for continuous variables with normal distribution, and Wilcoxon rank sum test was performed for continuous variables with non-normal distributions. Exponential risk regression analysis was performed to estimate the relative risk (RR) for the prognostic factors with a probability value of < 0.05 as a statistically significant value. Post-operative length of stay was computed graphically based on Kaplan-Meier estimates. Results During the study period, 912 post-operative PUP patients were observed. The median age of patients was 78.5 (15 - 92) years, and 77.74% of the patients were male gender. Multivariate analysis showed that five prognostic indicators: underlying illnesses; liver disease (RR: 5.41; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.36 - 21.56) and kidney disease (RR: 4.72; 95% CI: 1.05 - 21.11); duration of operation > 3 h (RR: 9.83; 95% CI: 1.61-59.66); unplanned admission to ICU (RR: 9.22; 95% CI: 1.55 - 54.68); and prolonged ventilation > 24 h (RR: 9.02; 95% CI: 0.42 - 9.98) were associated with post-operative PUP complications. Post-operative complications developed in 87 (9.54%) patients with 135 complications: 11 (1.21%) patients underwent re-operation, 32 (3.51%) patients suffered with surgical site infection, 74 (8.11%) patients encountered

  3. The Association of Helicobacter pylori Eradication with the Occurrences of Chronic Kidney Diseases in Patients with Peptic Ulcer Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiunn-Wei; Hsu, Chien-Ning; Tai, Wei-Chen; Ku, Ming-Kun; Hung, Tsung-Hsing; Tseng, Kuo-Lun; Yuan, Lan-Ting; Nguang, Seng-Howe; Liang, Chih-Ming; Yang, Shih-Cheng; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Hsu, Pin-I; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2016-01-01

    The association of Helicobacter pylori eradication with the occurrence of renal dysfunction in patients with peptic ulcer diseases is still unclear. This study aimed to clarify the relevance of H. pylori eradication to the occurrence of chronic kidney diseases in patients with peptic ulcer diseases. Data that were available from 2000–2011 were extracted from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan, and all patients with peptic ulcer diseases (n = 208 196) were screened for eligibility. We divided randomly selected patients into an H. pylori eradication cohort (cohort A, n = 3593) and matched them by age and sex to a without H. pylori eradication cohort (cohort B, n = 3593). Subgroup analysis was further performed for H. pylori eradication within ≤ 90 days of the diagnosis date (early eradication, n = 2837) and within 91–365 days (non-early eradication, n = 756). Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to estimate the association of H. pylori eradication with the risk of developing chronic kidney diseases and mortality. We observed that there were more patients suffering from chronic kidney disease in cohort B than in the early eradication subgroup of cohort A (8.49% vs. 6.70%, respectively, p = 0.0075); the mortality rate was also higher in cohort B (4.76% vs. 3.70%, respectively, p = 0.0376). Old age, pulmonary disease, connective tissue disorders, and diabetes were risk factors for chronic kidney diseases but early H. pylori eradication was a protective factor against chronic kidney diseases (hazard ratio: 0.68, 95% confidence interval: 0.52–0.88, p = 0.0030), and death (hazard ratio: 0.69, 95% confidence interval: 0.49–0.96, p = 0.0297). In conclusion, our findings have important implications suggesting that early H. pylori eradication is mandatory since it is associated with a protective role against the occurrence of chronic kidney diseases. PMID:27764171

  4. Peptic ulcer disease with related drug treatment in pregnant women and congenital abnormalities in their offspring.

    PubMed

    Bánhidy, Ferenc; Dakhlaoui, Abdallah; Puhó, Erzsébet H; Czeizel, Andrew E

    2011-03-01

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is a common disease which can also occur in pregnant women. However, the possible association of PUD and related drug treatments in pregnant women with the risk of structural birth defects (i.e. congenital abnormalities [CA]) in their offspring has not been estimated in controlled population-based epidemiological studies. Thus, the prevalence of PUD in pregnant women who later delivered babies (cases) with different CA and in pregnant women who delivered newborns without CA (controls) was compared in the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities. Controls were matched to cases. Of 22,843 cases with congenital abnormalities, 182 (0.80%) had mothers with reported/recorded PUD, while of 38,151 controls, 261 (0.68%) were born to mothers with reported/recorded PUD. However, PUD(?) based on maternal information and/or unspecified diagnostic criteria, and PUD(!) based on endoscopic diagnosis showed different variables of mothers and newborn infants. Thus, finally, 20 case mothers and 58 control mothers with PUD(!) and related drugs were evaluated in detail. There was no higher risk for total CA group in the offspring of mothers with PUD during pregnancy (adjusted OR with 95% CI: 0.6, 0.3-0.9). Specific CA groups in cases were also assessed versus controls, but specified CA had no higher risk in the offspring of pregnant women with PUD and related drug treatments. In conclusion, a higher rate of CA was not found in the offspring of mothers with PUD.

  5. Peptic Ulcer Disease in Healthcare Workers: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong-Yue; Weng, Shih-Feng; Lin, Hung-Jung; Hsu, Chien-Chin; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Su, Shih-Bin; Guo, How-Ran; Huang, Chien-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Health care workers (HCWs) in Taiwan have heavy, stressful workloads, are on-call, and have rotating nightshifts, all of which might contribute to peptic ulcer disease (PUD). We wanted to evaluate the PUD risk in HCWs, which is not clear. Using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database, we identified 50,226 physicians, 122,357 nurses, 20,677 pharmacists, and 25,059 other HCWs (dieticians, technicians, rehabilitation therapists, and social workers) as the study cohort, and randomly selected an identical number of non-HCW patients (i.e., general population) as the comparison cohort. Conditional logistical regression analysis was used to compare the PUD risk between them. Subgroup analysis for physician specialties was also done. Nurses and other HCWs had a significantly higher PUD risk than did the general population (odds ratio [OR]: 1.477; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.433-1.521 and OR: 1.328; 95% CI: 1.245-1.418, respectively); pharmacists had a lower risk (OR: 0.884; 95% CI: 0.828-0.945); physicians had a nonsignificantly different risk (OR: 1.029; 95% CI: 0.987-1.072). In the physician specialty subgroup analysis, internal medicine, surgery, Ob/Gyn, and family medicine specialists had a higher PUD risk than other physicians (OR: 1.579; 95% CI: 1.441-1.731, OR: 1.734; 95% CI: 1.565-1.922, OR: 1.336; 95% CI: 1.151-1.550, and OR: 1.615; 95% CI: 1.425-1.831, respectively). In contrast, emergency physicians had a lower risk (OR: 0.544; 95% CI: 0.359-0.822). Heavy workloads, long working hours, workplace stress, rotating nightshifts, and coping skills may explain our epidemiological findings of higher risks for PUD in some HCWs, which might help us improve our health policies for HCWs. PMID:26301861

  6. Alteration of the Tongue Manifestation Reflects Clinical Outcomes of Peptic Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hwang-Huei; Pan, Chun-Hsu; Wu, Ping-Ping; Luo, Shu-Fang; Lin, Hung-Jen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objectives This study investigated whether the tongue inspection technique in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) can be used as a noninvasive auxiliary diagnostic tool to differentiate the subtypes of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and as an indicator of therapeutic efficacy. Subjects and methods A total of 198 outpatients from the China Medical University Hospital were recruited. The control group comprised 50 healthy adults. The remaining 148 patients were diagnosed with gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, or Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection using upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, biopsy, and Campylobacter-like organism test. Tongue appearance was evaluated by a physician experienced in clinical Chinese medicine. Images of the tongue were immediately recorded using a high-resolution digital camera system. Results The affected group of 148 patients received an 8-week course of ulcer therapy. Of these, 108 patients infected with Hp were subjected to triple therapy in the first week. Forty-nine of these 108 cases infected with Hp completed secondary examination of upper GI endoscopy and tongue inspection. Forty-one of 49 cases (83.7%) were fully cured of Hp infection. These results showed that the color of the tongue body did not change in the cured patients; however, tongue fur was markedly thinner with a color change to white (p<0.05), while sublingual veins with engorgement (p<0.05) and blood stasis (p<0.01) improved after the ulcer healed and Hp was eradicated. Conclusions TCM tongue inspection can be potentially used as a noninvasive auxiliary diagnostic method and as an indicator for clinical outcomes for patients with PUD. PMID:23153037

  7. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for peptic ulcer disease 2015.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Kiichi; Yoshino, Junji; Akamatsu, Taiji; Itoh, Toshiyuki; Kato, Mototsugu; Kamada, Tomoari; Takagi, Atsushi; Chiba, Toshimi; Nomura, Sachiyo; Mizokami, Yuji; Murakami, Kazunari; Sakamoto, Choitsu; Hiraishi, Hideyuki; Ichinose, Masao; Uemura, Naomi; Goto, Hidemi; Joh, Takashi; Miwa, Hiroto; Sugano, Kentaro; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-03-01

    The Japanese Society of Gastroenterology (JSGE) revised the evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for peptic ulcer disease in 2014 and has created an English version. The revised guidelines consist of seven items: bleeding gastric and duodenal ulcers, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication therapy, non-eradication therapy, drug-induced ulcer, non-H. pylori, non-nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) ulcer, surgical treatment, and conservative therapy for perforation and stenosis. Ninety clinical questions (CQs) were developed, and a literature search was performed for the CQs using the Medline, Cochrane, and Igaku Chuo Zasshi databases between 1983 and June 2012. The guideline was developed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. Therapy is initially provided for ulcer complications. Perforation or stenosis is treated with surgery or conservatively. Ulcer bleeding is first treated by endoscopic hemostasis. If it fails, surgery or interventional radiology is chosen. Second, medical therapy is provided. In cases of NSAID-related ulcers, use of NSAIDs is stopped, and anti-ulcer therapy is provided. If NSAID use must continue, the ulcer is treated with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) or prostaglandin analog. In cases with no NSAID use, H. pylori-positive patients receive eradication and anti-ulcer therapy. If first-line eradication therapy fails, second-line therapy is given. In cases of non-H. pylori, non-NSAID ulcers or H. pylori-positive patients with no indication for eradication therapy, non-eradication therapy is provided. The first choice is PPI therapy, and the second choice is histamine 2-receptor antagonist therapy. After initial therapy, maintenance therapy is provided to prevent ulcer relapse.

  8. Increased Risk of Osteoporosis in Patients With Peptic Ulcer Disease: A Nationwide Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chieh-Hsin; Tung, Yi-Ching; Chai, Chee-Yin; Lu, Ying-Yi; Su, Yu-Feng; Tsai, Tai-Hsin; Kuo, Keng-Liang; Lin, Chih-Lung

    2016-04-01

    To investigate osteoporosis risk in patients with peptic ulcer disease (PUD) using a nationwide population-based dataset. This Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) analysis included 27,132 patients aged 18 years and older who had been diagnosed with PUD (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] codes 531-534) during 1996 to 2010. The control group consisted of 27,132 randomly selected (age- and gender)-matched patients without PUD. The association between PUD and the risk of developing osteoporosis was estimated using a Cox proportional hazard regression model. During the follow-up period, osteoporosis was diagnosed in 2538 (9.35 %) patients in the PUD group and in 2259 (8.33 %) participants in the non-PUD group. After adjusting for covariates, osteoporosis risk was 1.85 times greater in the PUD group compared to the non-PUD group (13.99 vs 5.80 per 1000 person-years, respectively). Osteoporosis developed 1 year after PUD diagnosis. The 1-year follow-up period exhibited the highest significance between the 2 groups (hazard ratio [HR] = 63.44, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 28.19-142.74, P < 0.001). Osteoporosis risk was significantly higher in PUD patients with proton-pump-inhibitors (PPIs) use (HR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.03-1.34) compared to PUD patients without PPIs use. This study revealed a significant association between PUD and subsequent risk of osteoporosis. Therefore, PUD patients, especially those treated with PPIs, should be evaluated for subsequent risk of osteoporosis to minimize the occurrence of adverse events.

  9. The Association Between Peptic Ulcer Disease and Ischemic Stroke: A Population-Based Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tain-Junn; Guo, How-Ran; Chang, Chia-Yu; Weng, Shih-Feng; Li, Pi-I; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Wu, Wen-Shiann

    2016-05-01

    Stroke is a common cause of death worldwide, but about 30% of ischemic stroke (IS) patients have no identifiable contributing risk factors. Because peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and vascular events share some common risk factors, we conducted a population-based study to evaluate the association between PUD and IS.We followed up a representative sample of 1 million residents of Taiwan using the National Health Insurance Research Database from 1997 to 2011. We defined patients who received medications for PUD and had related diagnosis codes as the PUD group, and a reference group matched by age and sex was sampled from those who did not have PUD. We also collected data on medical history and monthly income. The events of IS occurred after enrollment were compared between the 2 groups. The data were analyzed using Cox proportional hazard models at the 2-tailed significant level of 0.05.The PUD group had higher income and prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), heart disease, and hyperlipidemia. They also had a higher risk of developing IS with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.31 (95% confidence interval: 1.20-1.41). Other independent risk factors included male sex, older age, lower income, and co-morbidity of hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), and heart disease.PUD is a risk factor for IS, independent of conventional risk factors such as male sex, older age, lower income, and co-morbidity of hypertension, DM, and heart disease. Prevention strategies taking into account PUD should be developed and evaluated. PMID:27258514

  10. Risk Factors Associated with Uncomplicated Peptic Ulcer and Changes in Medication Use after Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    González-Pérez, Antonio; Sáez, María E.; Johansson, Saga; Nagy, Péter; García Rodríguez, Luis A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Few epidemiologic studies have investigated predictors of uncomplicated peptic ulcer disease (PUD) separately from predictors of complicated PUD. Objective To analyze risk factors associated with uncomplicated PUD and medication use after diagnosis. Methods Patients diagnosed with uncomplicated PUD (n = 3,914) were identified from The Health Improvement Network database among individuals aged 40–84 years during 1997–2005, with no previous history of PUD. Prescription records for the year after the date of diagnosis were reviewed and a nested case–control analysis was performed to calculate the odds ratios for the association of potential risk factors with PUD. Results Medications associated with developing uncomplicated PUD included current use of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), paracetamol, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, antidepressants, antihypertensives or acid suppressants. Uncomplicated PUD was significantly associated with being a current or former smoker and having had a score of at least 3 on the Townsend deprivation index. Approximately 50% of patients who were users of ASA (19% of patients) or chronic users of NSAIDs (7% of patients) at diagnosis did not receive another prescription of the medication in the 60 days after diagnosis, and 30% were not represcribed therapy within a year. Among patients who were current users of ASA or chronic NSAIDs at the time of the PUD diagnosis and received a subsequent prescription for their ASA or NSAID during the following year, the vast majority (80–90%) also received a proton pump inhibitor coprescription. Conclusions Our results indicate that several risk factors for upper gastrointestinal bleeding are also predictors of uncomplicated PUD, and that some patients do not restart therapy with ASA or NSAIDs after a diagnosis of uncomplicated PUD. Further investigation is needed regarding the consequences for these patients in terms of increased

  11. Vitamin C supplementation in relation to inflammation in individuals with atrophic gastritis: a randomised controlled trial in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ma, Enbo; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Sasaki, Satoshi; Tsubono, Yoshitaka; Okubo, Shunji; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2013-03-28

    Evidence has shown that both C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid component A (SAA) are increased in individuals with gastritis and stomach cancer. Controlling the level of these biomarkers by inhibiting the gastric infection with high doses of ascorbic acid may reduce the risk of carcinogenesis. A population-based double-blind randomised controlled trial in a Japanese population with atrophic gastritis in an area of high stomach cancer incidence was conducted between 1995 and 2000. Daily doses of 50 or 500 mg vitamin C were given, and 120 and 124 participants completed the 5-year study, respectively. Although serum ascorbic acid was higher in the high-dosage group (1.73 (SD 0.46) μg/l) than in the low-dosage group (1.49 (SD 0.29) μg/l, P< 0.001), at the end of the study, no significant difference was observed for CRP between the low- and high-dosage groups (0.39 (95 % CI 0.04, 4.19) mg/l and 0.38 (95 % CI 0.03, 4.31) mg/l, respectively; P= 0.63) or for SAA between the low- and high-dosage groups (3.94 (95 % CI 1.04, 14.84) μg/ml and 3.85 (95 % CI 0.99, 14.92) μg/ml, respectively; P= 0.61). Vitamin C supplementation may not have a strong effect on reducing infections in individuals with atrophic gastritis.

  12. A Review on Antiulcer Activity of Few Indian Medicinal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Vimala, G.; Gricilda Shoba, F.

    2014-01-01

    Ulcer is a common gastrointestinal disorder which is seen among many people. It is basically an inflamed break in the skin or the mucus membrane lining the alimentary tract. Ulceration occurs when there is a disturbance of the normal equilibrium caused by either enhanced aggression or diminished mucosal resistance. It may be due to the regular usage of drugs, irregular food habits, stress, and so forth. Peptic ulcers are a broad term that includes ulcers of digestive tract in the stomach or the duodenum. The formation of peptic ulcers depends on the presence of acid and peptic activity in gastric juice plus a breakdown in mucosal defenses. A number of synthetic drugs are available to treat ulcers. But these drugs are expensive and are likely to produce more side effects when compared to herbal medicines. The literature revealed that many medicinal plants and polyherbal formulations are used for the treatment of ulcer by various ayurvedic doctors and traditional medicinal practitioners. The ideal aims of treatment of peptic ulcer disease are to relieve pain, heal the ulcer, and delay ulcer recurrence. In this review attempts have been made to know about some medicinal plants which may be used in ayurvedic as well as modern science for the treatment or prevention of peptic ulcer. PMID:24971094

  13. New strategies and paradigm for drug target discovery: a special focus on infectious diseases tuberculosis, malaria, leishmaniasis, trypanosomiasis and gastritis.

    PubMed

    Neelapu, Nageswara R R; Srimath-Tirumala-Peddinti, Ravi C P K; Nammi, Deepthi; Pasupuleti, Amita C M

    2013-10-01

    The discovery and exploitation of new drug targets is a key focus for both the pharmaceutical industry and academic research. To provide an insight into trends in the exploitation of new drug targets, we have analysed different methods during the past six decades and advances made in drug target discovery. A special focus remains on different methods used for drug target discovery on infectious diseases such as Tuberculosis, Gastritis, Malaria, Trypanosomiasis and Leishmaniasis. We herewith provide a paradigm that is can be used for drug target discovery in the near future.

  14. [Studies on the clinical significance concerning the changes in serum pepsinogen-I and gastrin levels in aged patients with chronic gastritis].

    PubMed

    Hamada, Y; Kamiya, K; Koyama, M; Asaka, M; Matsushima, T; Myazaki, T; Kamiya, T

    1988-03-01

    Of 86 cases of aged patients with chronic gastritis treated with Trimebutine or Flutazolam, we evaluated the changes of serum pepsinogen-I and gastrin levels in their clinical courses from the points of the correlation with severity of chronic gastritis, aging phenomenon and the changes of symptom and endoscopic findings. In order to elucidate the multidimensional interrelation among these items, we used Hayashi's quantification theory II as a conventional analysis method. In aged patients, generally, although the serum gastrin levels were rather high compared with younger generation, the serum pepsinogen-I levels were consistently low throughout their clinical courses. There were some correlation between the levels of serum gastrin and the severity of chronic gastritis. When the drugs were effective on improving the condition of the disease, the level of gastrin revealed gradual decrease. These changes of gastrin were more typical in patients treated with Trimebutine. PMID:2898425

  15. Association of nucleotide excision repair pathway gene polymorphisms with gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis risks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingwei; Sun, Liping; Xu, Qian; Tu, Huakang; He, Caiyun; Xing, Chengzhong; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-02-01

    Polymorphisms of NER genes could change NER ability, thereby altering individual susceptibility to GC. We systematically analyzed 39 SNPs of 8 key genes of NER pathway in 2686 subjects including 898 gastric cancer (GC), 851 atrophic gastritis (AG) and 937 controls (CON) in northern Chinese. SNP genotyping were performed using Sequenom MassARRAY platform. The results demonstrated that DDB2 rs830083 GG genotype was significantly associated with increased GC risk compared with wild-type CC (OR=2.32, P= 6.62 × 10-9); XPC rs2607775 CG genotype conferred a 1.73 increased odds of GC risk than non-cancer subjects compared with wild-type CC (OR=1.73, P= 3.04 × 10-4). The combined detection of these two polymorphisms demonstrated even higher GC risk (OR=3.05). Haplotype analysis suggested that DDB2 rs2029298-rs326222-rs3781619-rs830083 GTAG haplotype was significantly associated with disease risk in each step of CON→AG→GC development (AG vs. CON: OR=2.88, P= 7.51 × 10-7; GC vs. AG: OR=2.90, P=5.68 × 10-15; GC vs. CON: OR=8.42, P=2.22 × 10-15); DDB2 GTAC haplotype was associated with reduced risk of GC compared with CON (OR=0.63, P= 8.31 × 10-12). XPC rs1870134-rs2228000-rs2228001-rs2470352-rs2607775 GCAAG haplotype conferred increased risk of GC compared with AG (OR=1.88, P= 6.98 × 10-4). XPA rs2808668 and drinking, DDB2 rs326222, rs3781619, rs830083 and smoking demonstrated significant interactions in AG; XPC rs2607775 had significant interaction with smoking in GC. In conclusion, NER pathway polymorphisms especially in "damage incision" step were significantly associated with GC risk and had interactions with environment factors. The detection of NER pathway polymorphisms such as DDB2 and XPC might be applied in the prediction of GC risk and personalized prevention in the future. NER pathway polymorphisms especially in "damage incision" step were significantly associated with GC risk and had interactions with environment factors, which might be applied in the

  16. Operative link on gastritis assessment stage is an appropriate predictor of early gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ying; Li, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Jing-Jing; Chen, Xiao-Yu; Ge, Zhi-Zheng; Li, Xiao-Bo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess the predictive value of Operative Link on Gastritis Assessment (OLGA) and Operative Link on Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia Assessment (OLGIM) stages in gastric cancer. METHODS: A prospective study was conducted with 71 patients with early gastric cancer (EGC) and 156 patients with non-EGC. All patients underwent endoscopic examination and systematic biopsy. Outcome measures were assessed and compared, including the Japanese endoscopic gastric atrophy (EGA) classification method and the modified OLGA method as well as the modified OLGIM method. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) status was determined for all study participants. Stepwise logistic regression modeling was performed to analyze correlations between EGC and the EGA, OLGA and OLGIM methods. RESULTS: For patients with EGC and patients with non-EGC, the proportions of moderate-to-severe EGA cases were 64.8% and 44.9%, respectively (P = 0.005), the proportions of OLGA stages III-IV cases were 52.1% and 22.4%, respectively (P < 0.001), and the proportions of OLGIM stages III-IV cases were 42.3% and 19.9%, respectively (P < 0.001). OLGA stage and OLGIM stage were significantly related to EGA classification; specifically, logistic regression modeling showed significant correlations between EGC and moderate-to-severe EGA (OR = 1.95, 95% CI: 1.06-3.58, P = 0.031) and OLGA stages III-IV (OR = 3.14, 95%CI: 1.71-5.81, P < 0.001), but no significant correlation between EGC and OLGIM stages III-IV (P = 0.781). H. pylori infection rate was significantly higher in patients with moderate-to-severe EGA (75.0% vs 54.1%, P = 0.001) or OLGA/OLGIM stages III-IV (OLGA: 83.6% vs 55.8%, P < 0.001; OLGIM: 83.6% vs 57.8%, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: OLGA classification is optimal for EGC screening. A surveillance program including OLGA stage and H. pylori infection status may facilitate early detection of gastric cancer. PMID:27053859

  17. Atrophic gastritis: Risk factor for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in a Latin-American population

    PubMed Central

    Almodova, Emiliano de Carvalho; de Oliveira, Walmar Kerche; Machado, Lucas Faria Abrahão; Grejo, Juliana Rigotto; da Cunha, Thiago Rabelo; Colaiacovo, Wagner; Ortolan, Erika Veruska Paiva

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To study the association between atrophic gastritis (AG) and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in a Latin-America population. METHODS: A case-control study was performed at two reference Brazilian hospitals including patients diagnosed with advanced ESCC and dyspeptic patients who had been subjected to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, with biopsies of the gastric antrum and body. All cases with ESCC were reviewed by a single pathologist, who applied standard criteria for the diagnosis of mucosal atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia, all classified as AG. The data on the patients’ age, sex, smoking status, and alcohol consumption were collected from clinical records, and any missing information was completed by telephone interview. The association between AG and ESCC was assessed by means of univariate and multiple conditional logistic regressions. RESULTS: Most patients were male, and the median age was 59 years (range: 37-79 years) in both the ESCC and control groups. Univariate analysis showed that an intake of ethanol greater than 32 g/d was an independent risk factor that increased the odds of ESCC 7.57 times (P = 0.014); upon multiple analysis, alcohol intake of ethanol greater than 32 g/d exhibited a risk of 4.54 (P = 0.081), as adjusted for AG and smoking. Smoking was shown to be an independent risk factor that increased the odds of ESCC 14.55 times (P = 0.011) for individuals who smoked 0 to 51 packs/year and 21.40 times (P = 0.006) for those who smoked more than 51 packs/year. Upon multiple analyses, those who smoked up to 51 packs/year exhibited a risk of 7.85 (P = 0.058), and those who smoked more than 51 packs/ year had a risk 11.57 times higher (P = 0.04), as adjusted for AG and alcohol consumption. AG proved to be a risk factor that increased the odds of ESCC 5.33 times (95%CI: 1.55-18.30, P = 0.008) according to the results of univariate conditional logistic regression. CONCLUSION: There was an association by univariate

  18. Clinical outcome of pediatric collagenous gastritis: case series and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Hijaz, Nadia Mazen; Septer, Seth Steven; Degaetano, James; Attard, Thomas Mario

    2013-03-01

    Collagenous gastritis (CG) is characterized by patchy subepithelial collagen bands. Effective treatment and the clinical and histological outcome of CG in children are poorly defined. The aim of this study is to summarize the published literature on the clinical outcome and response to therapy of pediatric CG including two new cases. We performed a search in Pubmed, OVID for related terms; articles including management and clinical and/or endo-histologic follow up information were included and abstracted. Reported findings were pooled in a dedicated database including the corresponding data extracted from chart review in our patients with CG. Twenty-four patients were included (17 females) with a mean age of 11.7 years. The clinical presentation included iron deficiency anemia and dyspepsia. The reported duration of follow up (in 18 patients) ranged between 0.2-14 years. Despite most subjects presenting with anemia including one requiring blood transfusion, oral iron therapy was only documented in 12 patients. Other treatment modalities were antisecretory measures in 13 patients; proton pump inhibitors (12), or histamine-2 blockers (3), sucralfate (5), prednisolone (6), oral budesonide in 3 patients where one received it in fish oil and triple therapy (3). Three (13%) patients showed no clinical improvement despite therapy; conversely 19 out of 22 were reported with improved symptoms including 8 with complete symptom resolution. Spontaneous clinical resolution without antisecretory, anti-inflammatory or gastroprotective agents was noted in 5 patients (4 received only supplemental iron). Follow up endo-histopathologic data (17 patients) included persistent collagen band and stable Mononuclear cell infiltrate in 12 patients with histopathologic improvement in 5 patients. Neither collagen band thickness nor mononuclear cell infiltrate correlated with clinical course. Intestinal metaplasia and endocrine cell hyperplasia were reported (1) raising the concern of long

  19. Inoculation of barrier-born pigs with Helicobacter pylori: a useful animal model for gastritis type B.

    PubMed

    Engstrand, L; Gustavsson, S; Jörgensen, A; Schwan, A; Scheynius, A

    1990-06-01

    At the age of 8 weeks, 15 barrier-born pigs, specific pathogen free, were inoculated intragastrically with suspensions of 10(7) to 10(10) CFU of Helicobacter pylori after pretreatment with omeprazole. The pigs were observed for up to 12 weeks, endoscopic biopsy specimens were taken, and serum samples were drawn. H. pylori was identified by routine culturing and by staining with an H. pylori-specific monoclonal antibody on cryostat sections of gastric biopsy specimens. In 11 of 15 inoculated pigs, H. pylori was detected throughout the observation period. In these infected pigs, there was an antibody response to H. pylori, as determined in serum by an enzyme immunoassay. Furthermore, the development of superficial, focal gastritis with infiltrates of mononuclear class II antigen-expressing lymphocytes was observed immunohistologically. H. pylori was never detected and an antibody response to H. pylori was not observed in two control pigs. The development of gastritis and the systemic antibody response to H. pylori support the usefulness of this animal model for studies of H. pylori-related human diseases.

  20. Probiotics in the treatment of peptic ulcer infected by helicobacter pylory and its safety.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fengzhen; Zhou, Chao; Wang, Jian; Liu, Tonggang; Liu, Jiyong

    2015-05-01

    This paper aimed to study the curative effect of probiotics in the treatment of peptic ulcer (PU) infected with Helicobacter Pylory (H. Pylory). A total of 132 cases of patients with PU infected by H. Pylory who were received and treated by department of gastroenterology from Binjiang Hospital, Guangxi from May 2013 to 2014 were recruited in the study. They were divided into observation group and control group based on random number table, 66 cases in each group. Patients in observation group were given probiotics combined with triple therapy while patients in control group were treated by traditional triple therapy. After one-month treatment, all the patients were examined by (14)C urea breath test for checking the treatment condition of H. Pylory and reviewed by gastroscope for checking union of ulcer. In addition, clinical effect and improvement of digestive tract symptom were compared between two groups. It was found that, the content of (14)C urea detected by breath test was 95.15 dpm/mmol ± 8.34 dpm/mmol in observation group after treatment; eradication rate of H. Pylory was 87.9%; symptom remission rate was 97%; adverse reaction rate was 4.5%; total effective rate of clinical treatment was 97%; while in control group, the content of (14)C urea was 100.3 dpm/mmol ± 10.34 dpm/mmol, eradication rate was 63.6%, symptom remission rate was 93.9%, adverse reaction rate was 18.2%, and total effective rate was 83.3%. These results demonstrated that, the symptom remission rate of the observation group and the control group was not obvious, but the content of (14)C urine, eradication rate of H. Pylory, incidence of adverse reaction and total effective rate were of significant significance in two groups (P<0.05). In conclusion, probiotics combined with triple therapy for treating PU infected by H. Pylory can greatly improve the eradication rate of H. Pylory and increase recovery rate of patients, with less adverse reaction. Therefore, the method is worth for promotion.

  1. Peptic Ulcer Disease in Healthcare Workers: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hong-Yue; Weng, Shih-Feng; Lin, Hung-Jung; Hsu, Chien-Chin; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Su, Shih-Bin; Guo, How-Ran; Huang, Chien-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Health care workers (HCWs) in Taiwan have heavy, stressful workloads, are on-call, and have rotating nightshifts, all of which might contribute to peptic ulcer disease (PUD). We wanted to evaluate the PUD risk in HCWs, which is not clear. Using Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database, we identified 50,226 physicians, 122,357 nurses, 20,677 pharmacists, and 25,059 other HCWs (dieticians, technicians, rehabilitation therapists, and social workers) as the study cohort, and randomly selected an identical number of non-HCW patients (i.e., general population) as the comparison cohort. Conditional logistical regression analysis was used to compare the PUD risk between them. Subgroup analysis for physician specialties was also done. Nurses and other HCWs had a significantly higher PUD risk than did the general population (odds ratio [OR]: 1.477; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.433–1.521 and OR: 1.328; 95% CI: 1.245–1.418, respectively); pharmacists had a lower risk (OR: 0.884; 95% CI: 0.828–0.945); physicians had a nonsignificantly different risk (OR: 1.029; 95% CI: 0.987–1.072). In the physician specialty subgroup analysis, internal medicine, surgery, Ob/Gyn, and family medicine specialists had a higher PUD risk than other physicians (OR: 1.579; 95% CI: 1.441–1.731, OR: 1.734; 95% CI: 1.565–1.922, OR: 1.336; 95% CI: 1.151–1.550, and OR: 1.615; 95% CI: 1.425–1.831, respectively). In contrast, emergency physicians had a lower risk (OR: 0.544; 95% CI: 0.359–0.822). Heavy workloads, long working hours, workplace stress, rotating nightshifts, and coping skills may explain our epidemiological findings of higher risks for PUD in some HCWs, which might help us improve our health policies for HCWs. PMID:26301861

  2. Gastric emptying and plasma levels of gastrointestinal hormones in patients with peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Li, Jun-Man; Li, Xue-Hui; Hao, Hong-Sheng; Fu, Shu-Hua

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To study the plasma level of gastrointestinal hormones and the time of gastric emptying in patients with peptic ulcer. METHODS: Thirty patients with gastric ulcer (GU), 29 patients with duodenal ulcer (DU), and 12 healthy controls were studied. Plasma levels of somatostatin (SS), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and substance P (SP) were measured by radioimmunoassay. Gastric emptying half-time (GET1/2) was measured by the TC-99m resin/solid meal method. RESULTS: GET1/2 was significantly longer in the GU patients than that in the healthy controls (65.9 ± 14.8 min vs 53.3 ± 4.3 min, P < 0.01) and plasma VIP levels were significantly higher (37.5 ± 10.7 ng/L vs 18.4 ± 5.9 ng/L, P < 0.05).There was a significant positive correlation between GET1/2 and plasma VIP levels (r = 0.55, P < 0.01). No significant differences were found in SS and SP levels when GU patients were compared with healthy controls (P > 0.05). GET1/2 was markedly shorter in the DU patients than in the healthy controls (41.7 ± 10.2 min vs 53.3 ± 4.3 min, P < 0.01) and plasma SS levels were significantly lower (6.4 ± 2.5 ng/L vs 11.9 ± 3.4 ng/L, P < 0.01). There was a significant positive correlation between GET1/2 and SS levels (r = 0.56, P < 0.01). Plasma SP levels in the DU patients were significantly higher than those in the healthy controls (54.4 ± 12.7 ng/L vs 41.6 ± 5.8 ng/L, P < 0.01). There was a significant negative correlation between GET1/2 and SP levels (r = -0.68, P < 0.01). No significant differences were found in the plasma VIP levels when DU patient were compared to healthy controls (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Elevation in VIP may contribute to occurrence of GU and its associated delay in GET1/2. Increased SP and reduced SS may play important roles in GET1/2 acceleration and in the pathogensis of DU. PMID:27053894

  3. Is peptic ulcer disease a risk factor of postherpetic neuralgia in patients with herpes zoster?

    PubMed

    Chen, Jen-Yin; Chang, Chia-Yu; Lan, Kuo-Mao; Sheu, Ming-Jen; Lu, Chin-Li; Hu, Miao-Lin

    2013-11-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia is the most common complication of herpes zoster which is caused by a reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus. The pathogenesis of postherpetic neuralgia may involve peripheral and central mechanisms. Reported risk factors for postherpetic neuralgia include female gender, old age, diminished cell-mediated immunity and nutritional deficiencies. Based on our clinical observation which revealed that peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is one of the common comorbidities in patients with postherpetic neuralgia, we hypothesize that herpes zoster patients with PUD may be at a greater risk for the development of postherpetic neuralgia due to their impaired cellular immunity and depressed nutritional status. Major causes of PUD include Helicobacter pylori infection and usage of ulcerogenic medications. Patients with H. pylori infection may develop T cell dysfunctions and nutritional deficiencies including vitamin C, iron, cobalamin, carotenes and alpha-tocopherol. Ulcerogenic medications such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and steroids have been found not only to be ulcerogenic but also immunosuppressive to T cells. In addition, usage of steroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may cause deficiencies of alpha-tocopherol, carotenes, cobalamin, iron, zinc and vitamin C. Vitamin C, carotenes and alpha-tocopherol are anti-inflammatory and the major oxidant scavengers in the aqua phase and biomembranes. Deficiencies of these nutrients may induce dysregulated inflammation and oxidative damage leading to neuropathic pain in patients with herpes zoster. Furthermore, nutrient deficiencies including zinc, iron, cobalamin and vitamin C are associated with dysregulation of Ca(v)3.2 T-channels and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, upregulation of nitric oxide synthase, the increase of nitric oxide formation and dysfunction of central norepinephrine inhibitory pain pathway. Prospective cohort studies are suggested to test the hypothesis. We further

  4. [THE EFFECTIVENESS OF ERADICATION IN PATIENTS WITH PEPTIC ULCER DISEASE ASSOCIATED WITH HELICOBACTER PYLORI, DEPENDING ON THE GENOTYPE OF THE DRUGMETABOLISM OF PROTON PUMP INHIBITORS].

    PubMed

    Elokhina, E V; Kostenko, M B; Livzan, M A; Scalskiy, S V

    2015-01-01

    One of the most likely causes of the lack of effectiveness of eradication therapy of peptic ulcer associated with Helicobacter pylori, is a feature of omeprazole metabolism by cytochrome CYP2C19. The paper work presents evidence that the rate of reduction of the clinical picture and the likelihood of scarring ulcers and eradication rates higher in patients slow metabolizers of omeprazole.

  5. Vitamin C supplementation does not protect L-gulono-gamma-lactone oxidase-deficient mice from Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis and gastric premalignancy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In human studies, low vitamin C intake has been associated with more severe Helicobacter pylori gastritis and a higher incidence of gastric cancer. However, vitamin C supplementation has not been definitively shown to protect against gastric cancer. Using vitamin C-deficient B6.129P2-Gulo tm1Umc/mmc...

  6. Telomere length in non-neoplastic gastric mucosa and its relationship to H. pylori infection, degree of gastritis, and NSAID use.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Tomomitsu; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Kawamura, Tomohiko; Ishizuka, Takamitsu; Okubo, Masaaki; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Arisawa, Tomiyasu; Ohmiya, Naoki; Hirata, Ichiro

    2016-02-01

    Telomere shortening occurs with human aging in many organs and tissues and is accelerated by rapid cell turnover and oxidative injury. We measured average telomere length using quantitative real-time PCR in non-neoplastic gastric mucosa and assessed its relationship to H. pylori-related gastritis, DNA methylation, ulcer disease, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) usage. Gastric biopsies were obtained from 151 cancer-free subjects including 49 chronic NSAID users and 102 nonusers. Relative telomere length in genomic DNA was measured by real-time PCR. H. pylori infection status, histological severity of gastritis, and serum pepsinogens (PGs) were also investigated. E-cadherin (CDH1) methylation status was determined by methylation-specific PCR (MSP). Average relative telomere length of H. pylori-infected subjects was significantly shortened when compared to H. pylori-negative subjects (p = 0.002) and was closely associated with all histological parameter of gastritis (all p values <0.01) and CDH1 methylation (p = 0.0002). In H. pylori-negative subjects, NSAID users presented significantly shorter telomere length than nonusers (p = 0.028). Shorter telomere length was observed in duodenal and gastric ulcer patients compared with non-ulcer subjects among NSAID users. Telomere shortening is closely associated with severity of H. pylori-induced gastritis and CDH1 methylation status. Also, telomere shortening is accelerated by NSAID usage especially in H. pylori-negative subjects.

  7. Influence of inhomogeneous static magnetic field-exposure on patients with erosive gastritis: a randomized, self- and placebo-controlled, double-blind, single centre, pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Juhász, Márk; Nagy, Viktor L.; Székely, Hajnal; Kocsis, Dorottya; Tulassay, Zsolt; László, János F.

    2014-01-01

    This pilot study was devoted to the effect of static magnetic field (SMF)-exposure on erosive gastritis. The randomized, self- and placebo-controlled, double-blind, pilot study included 16 patients of the 2nd Department of Internal Medicine, Semmelweis University diagnosed with erosive gastritis. The instrumental analysis followed a qualitative (pre-intervention) assessment of the symptoms by the patient: lower heartburn (in the ventricle), upper heartburn (in the oesophagus), epigastric pain, regurgitation, bloating and dry cough. Medical diagnosis included a double-line upper panendoscopy followed by 30 min local inhomogeneous SMF-exposure intervention at the lower sternal region over the stomach with peak-to-peak magnetic induction of 3 mT and 30 mT m−1 gradient at the target site. A qualitative (post-intervention) assessment of the same symptoms closed the examination. Sham- or SMF-exposure was used in a double-blind manner. The authors succeeded in justifying the clinically and statistically significant beneficial effect of the SMF- over sham-exposure on the symptoms of erosive gastritis, the average effect of inhibition was 56% by p = 0.001, n = 42 + 96. This pilot study was aimed to encourage gastroenterologists to test local, inhomogeneous SMF-exposure on erosive gastritis patients, so this intervention may become an evidence-based alternative or complementary method in the clinical use especially in cases when conventional therapy options are contraindicated. PMID:25008086

  8. Association of IL1B -511C/-31T haplotype and Helicobacter pylori vacA genotypes with gastric ulcer and chronic gastritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The association between proinflammatory cytokine gene polymorphisms and gastric diseases related to Helicobacter pylori varies by population and geographic area. Our objective was to determine if the IL-1B -511 T>C and -31 C>T polymorphisms and H. pylori vacA genotypes are associated with risk of chronic gastritis and gastric ulcer in a Mexican population. Methods We conducted endoscopic studies in 128 patients with symptoms of dyspepsia. We took two biopsies from the body, antrum, or ulcer edge from each patient, and classified our histopathological findings according to the Sydney System. H. pylori infection and vacA genotyping were accomplished via PCR from total DNA of the gastric biopsies. We confirmed the presence of anti-H. pylori serum IgG and IgM in 102 control subjects. In both case subjects and control subjects, the IL-1B -511 T>C polymorphism was genotyped by PCR-RFLPs and the IL-1B -31 C>T polymorphism was genotyped by pyrosequencing. Results Sixty-two point seven (62.7%) of the 102 control subjects were H. pylori-seropositive. Among the case subjects, 100 were diagnosed with chronic gastritis and 28 with gastric ulcer. We found that 77% of the patients with chronic gastritis and 85.7% of the patients with gastric ulcer were H. pylori-positive. The predominant H. pylori genotype was vacA s1m1 (58.4%) and the most frequent subtype was vacA s1. The -511 TC, (rs16944 -511 T>C) genotype and the -511C allele were associated with chronic gastritis (OR = 3.1, 95% CI = 1.4-6.8 and OR = 3.0, 95% CI = 1.4-6.0, respectively). The subjects carrying -31T (rs1143627 -31 C>T) were found to be at a higher risk of having chronic gastritis (OR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.3-5.8). The IL-1B -511C/-31T haplotype was associated with chronic gastritis (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.2-3.8) but not with gastric ulcer. Conclusions The H. pylori vacA genotypes identified herein were similar to those reported for other regions of Mexico. The vacA s1m1 genotype was not associated with

  9. Clarithromycin resistance and prevalence of Helicobacter pylori virulent genotypes in patients from Southern México with chronic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Alarcón-Millán, Judit; Fernández-Tilapa, Gloria; Cortés-Malagón, Enoc Mariano; Castañón-Sánchez, Carlos Alberto; De Sampedro-Reyes, José; Cruz-Del Carmen, Iván; Betancourt-Linares, Reyes; Román-Román, Adolfo

    2016-10-01

    In developing countries, clarithromycin resistance and frequency of re-infection are factors that contribute to high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection. The aim of this research was determine the prevalence of clarithromycin resistance and its relation with A2142G, A2142C and A2143G mutations in the domain V of the 23S rRNA gene of H. pylori isolates in patients from Southern Mexico with chronic gastritis. Another purpose of this work was to study the prevalence of virulent genotypes and distribution of resistant strains according to the vacA/cagA/babA2 H. pylori genotypes. One hundred forty-four patients with chronic gastritis were studied. Forty-five H. pylori strains were isolated and clarithromycin susceptibility was determined by the disk-diffusion method. The 82.2% of the strains had the combination of alleles vacA s1 m1 and the cagA gene was detected in 77.8% and 40% of the strains were babA2 positive. The vacA s1 m1 genotype was detected more frequently in cagA(+) strains, vacA s1m1/cagA(+)/babA2(-) genotype was more frequent than vacA s1m1/cagA(+)/babA2(+), 37.8% and 33.3%, respectively. Eight strains were clarithromycin resistant, in three of these, point mutations were identified, but only in one strain the A2143G mutation associated with clarithromycin resistance was found. Other point mutations (A1821G, G1826A, T1830C, A2089G, T1600C, C1601T, C1602T, T1610C, A1611C and T1633G) that have not been associated with clarithromycin resistance were identified. The highest proportion of resistant strains was vacA s1m1/cagA(+) (62.5%). In patients from southern Mexico with chronic gastritis, the prevalence of clarithromycin resistance is within internationally accepted range (17.8%) and allows continued use of triple therapy for H. pylori eradication. However, it is necessary to monitor the evolution of clarithromycin resistance in this area. The largest proportion of resistant H. pylori strains is not harboring the A2142G, A2142C and A2143G mutations

  10. Reverse immunoaffinity chromatography: application to the purification of the 60- to 90-kDa gastric parietal cell autoantigen associated with autoimmune gastritis.

    PubMed

    Goldkorn, I; Gleeson, P A; Toh, B H

    1991-05-01

    Previous attempts to purify autoantigens by affinity chromatography using the total IgG from autoantibody-positive sera have not been very successful. We describe here a novel method using parietal cell autoantibodies, isolated on a crude autoantigen immunoabsorbent column, for the purification of the 60- to 90-kDa gastric parietal cell antigen targeted in autoimmune gastritis. The 60- to 90-kDa parietal cell antigen was first enriched 2.5-fold from a 0.5% Triton X-100 extract of total pig gastric mucosal membranes by DEAE-Sepharose 4B chromatography. The fraction containing the 60- to 90-kDa antigen was directly coupled to CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B to produce an immunoadsorbent column for the "reverse" purification of the specific parietal cell autoantibodies from pooled gastric parietal cell autoantibody-positive human sera. A 0.5% Triton X-100 extract of pig gastric mucosal membranes was initially precleared by sequential passage through Protein A-Sepharose 4B and normal human Ig-Sepharose 4B columns. The 60- to 90-kDa gastric parietal cell antigen (approximately 10 micrograms) was then purified from this precleared Triton X-100 membrane extract by affinity chromatography on a 1-ml column of purified autoantibody-Sepharose 4B, followed by preparative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophonesis. This method, incorporating a "reverse" immunoaffinity chromatography step, has general applicability for the purification of tissue autoantigens using highly specific autoantibodies present in the sera of humans and experimental animals with a variety of other autoimmune diseases.

  11. Gastric dilatation syndrome associated with chronic nephropathy, hypergastrinemia, and gastritis in mice exposed to high levels of environmental antigens.

    PubMed

    García, A; Erdman, S; Sheppard, B J; Murphy, J C; Fox, J G

    2001-06-01

    Gastric dilatation (GD) has been observed in Tac:(SW)fBR surveillance mice, with mean age of 10 months, that are exposed to high levels of environmental antigens during routine exposure to dirty bedding. The aim of the study reported here was to determine whether GD was associated with other systemic conditions affecting mice. Three groups of nine animals including-surveillance mice not exposed to dirty bedding (control), surveillance mice with out GD (NGD), and surveillance mice with GD (group GD)-had mean stomach weight with ingesta of 0.5 +/- 0.02 g, 1.09 +/- 0.07 g (P < 0.0001), and 2.54 +/- 0.4 g (P < 0.0001), respectively. Mean serum creatinine concentration was significantly higher in GD (1.6 +/- 0.25 mg/dl), compared with NGD (0.17 +/- 0.22 mg/dl, P < 0.0001) and control (0.2 +/- 0.16 mg/ dl, P < 0.0001) mice. In addition, lesions consistent with severe chronic nephropathy and mild gastritis were common in GD, compared with NGD and control mice. Finally, serum amidated gastrin concentration was significantly high in GD (179.37 +/- 53.86 pM, P < 0.03) and NGD (264.89 +/- 115.89 pM, P < 0.009), compared with control (60.77 +/- 8.39 pM) mice. Gastric dilatation syndrome is associated with chronic nephropathy, hypergastrinemia, and gastritis in surveillance mice exposed to high levels of environmental antigens. PMID:11924783

  12. Effects of constituents of Amomum xanthioides on gastritis in rats and on growth of gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Soo; Kang, Min Hee; Cho, So Yean; Jeong, Choon Sik

    2007-04-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of constituents of Amomum xanthioides (AX) on gastritis in rats and on the growth of human gastric cancer cells. The ethanol extract of Amomum xanthioides significantly inhibited HCl ethanol-induced gastric lesions and the growth of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylon). The ethanol extract of AX was further fractionated with hexane, chloroform, butanol and H20. Among these fractions, oral treatment with the butanol fraction at a dose of 350 mg/kg was the most effective at preventing HCl* ethanol-induced gastric lesions. In pylorus ligated rats, the butanol fraction also decreased the volume of gastric secretion and gastric acid output. We isolated six subfractions of the butanol fraction using open column chromatography. Subfraction 4 (150 mg/kg) significantly inhibited HCl* ethanol-induced gastric lesions and gastric secretion in pylorus ligated rats. Using GC-MS we identified the constituents of subfraction 4 to be five aliphatic compounds, 1-hexadecene, 1-nonadecene, cycloeicosane, 1-octadecene and cyclotetracosane. In addition, subfraction 4 reduced cell viability in a dose-dependent manner in human gastric cancer cells (AGS, KATOIII and SNU638). It also increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration in SNU638 cells, an effect that was significantly inhibited by dantrolene, a Ca2+ release blocker. Moreover, dantrolene significantly inhibited subfraction 4-induced cytotoxicity. Taken together, these results suggest that subfraction 4 of the butanol extract of AX has an anti-gastritic effect in rats and is cytotoxic to human gastric cancer cells. The mechanism of its anti-gastritic action may be associated with the inhibition of secretion of gastric acid and anti-H. pylori action. Its cytotoxicity against human gastric cancer cells may be, at least in part, mediated by intracellular Ca2+ dyshomeostasis. From these results, we suggest that AX may be useful for the treatment of gastritis and gastric cancer. PMID:17489359

  13. Feasibility of NOTES Omental Plug Repair of Perforated Peptic Ulcers – Results from a Clinical Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bingener, Juliane; Loomis, Erica A.; Gostout, Christopher J.; Zielinski, Martin D.; Buttar, Navtej S.; Wong Kee Song, Louis M.; Baron, Todd H.; Ghahfarokhi, Leili Shahgholi; Rajan, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Background Ulcer perforation carries up to a 30% 1-year mortality rate. Intervention-related adverse events are among statistically significant predictors of 1-year mortality. A Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgical (NOTES) approach may be less invasive and may decrease procedure-related adverse events by diminishing the "second hit", thus leading to decreased morbidity and mortality. Aim To assess the feasibility of an endoscopic transluminal omental plug technique in patients with perforated gastroduodenal ulcers under laparoscopic guidance. Methods Patients with suspected acute gastroduodenal ulcer perforations were offered participation in this prospective pilot study. Closure of the perforation was attempted using NOTES omental plug technique. Demographic, clinical, endoscopic and radiographic data were abstracted, as well as morbidity, mortality and pilot data regarding quality of life (QOL). Results From February 2010 through Feb 2012, 17 patients presented to a tertiary care center with clinically suspected perforated ulcer. Of seven patients (mean age 79, range 64–89) who consented to the study, three underwent the study procedure. All patients had multiple comorbidities. Two patients presented with 4–6 mm perforated peptic ulcers and underwent successful laparoscopic-assisted NOTES omental and falciform ligament patch closure, respectively. Postoperative radiographic contrast studies showed no leak and patients were discharged home on postoperative days 3 and 4. The third patient had undergone enterocutaneous fistula repair with herniorrhaphy 6 weeks prior; a transluminal endoscopic approach was feasible; however, the omentum was under too much tension to be secured. This procedure was converted to an open omental patch repair. For all but one consented patient, obtaining QOL data was feasible. Conclusion Initial results from a laparoscopic-assisted NOTES approach for closure of perforated peptic ulcers appear promising and enable swift

  14. In-practice evaluation of whole-blood Helicobacter pylori test: its usefulness in detecting peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Quartero, A O; Numans, M E; de Melker, R A; de Wit, N J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Approximately 10% of patients presenting with dyspepsia to the general practitioner have peptic ulcers; the large majority of which are related to infection with Helicobactor pylori. Office-based tests for H. pylori detection are generally validated and evaluated in selected patient groups. AIM: To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of a whole-blood serology test for infection with Helicobacter pylori in detecting peptic ulcer disease (PUD) in daily general practice. METHOD: A descriptive study of 171 primary care dyspepsia patients selected for open-access endoscopy in primary care and aged between 18 and 75 years, in 92 general practices in central, southern, and eastern parts of the Netherlands. H. pylori status was assessed using the BM-test Helicobacter pylori, which is identical to the Helisal test. Dyspepsia severity score was measured using a validated symptom score. Symptom characteristics and probability of relevant disease were assessed by the general practitioner. Endoscopy was carried out in local hospitals. Diagnostic outcome of both endoscopy and H. pylori reference test was supplied by local specialists. The BM-test was evaluated against endoscopic results. RESULTS: A high number (61.8%) of false-negative BM-tests resulted in a low sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI] = 48-75%) for detection of H. pylori infection. Only 12 out of 32 patients with PUD had a positive BM-test, resulting in a positive likelihood ratio (LR) for PUD of 1.41 and a negative LR of 0.85. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms the relatively poor performance of the BM-test in daily general practice, and shows the limited diagnostic value of H. pylori office-tests for detecting PUD in primary care. The discriminative value of the test result is too small to support either a 'test-and-endoscope' of a 'test-and-treat' strategy in general practice. PMID:10695060

  15. Effect of ERCC8 tagSNPs and their association with H. pylori infection, smoking, and alcohol consumption on gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis risk.

    PubMed

    Jing, Jing-Jing; Sun, Li-Ping; Xu, Qian; Yuan, Yuan

    2015-12-01

    Excision repair cross-complementing group 8 (ERCC8) plays a critical role in DNA repair. Genetic polymorphisms in ERCC8 may contribute to the risk of cancer development. We selected tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (tagSNPs) in Chinese patients from the HapMap database to investigate associations with gastric cancer and its precursors. Genomic DNA was extracted from 394 controls, 394 atrophic gastritis, and 394 gastric cancer cases in northern Chinese patients, and genotypes were identified using the Sequenom MassARRAY system. We found that the ERCC8 rs158572 GG+GA genotype showed a 1.651-fold (95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.109-2.457, P = 0.013) increased risk of gastric cancer compared with the AA genotype, especially in diffuse type. Stratified analysis comparing the common genotype revealed significantly increased gastric cancer risk in males and individuals older than 50 years with rs158572 GA/GG/GG+GA genotypes, while individuals older than 50 years with rs158916 CT/CC+CT genotypes were less susceptible to atrophic gastritis. Haplotype analysis showed that the G-T haplotype was associated with increased risk of gastric cancer. Statistically significant interactions between the two ERCC8 tagSNPs and Helicobacter pylori infection were observed for gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis risk (P < 0.05). Smokers and drinkers with ERCC8 rs158572 GG+GA genotype were more susceptible to gastric cancer compared with non-smokers and non-drinkers homozygous for AA. Our findings suggested that ERCC8 rs158572 and rs158916, alone or together with environmental factors, might be associated with gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis susceptibility. Further validation of our results in larger populations along with additional studies evaluating the underlying molecular function is required.

  16. [Mining analysis and experience summary for chronic atrophic gastritis cases treated by Professor LIU Feng-bin].

    PubMed

    Hou, Zheng-kun; Liu, Feng-bin; Li, Pei-wu; Zhuang, Kun-hai

    2015-06-01

    To summarize Professor LIU Feng-bin's clinical experience and theoretical thoughts on chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG), the study group designed a retrospective study on his case series and expert interview. First of all, the data of CAG patients treated in the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine between 2009 and 2013, e. g. herbs, diseases, syndrome type, prescription amount and number of herbs, was collected and processed. The statistical description and binary logistic regression were used to determined the syndrome type, initial basic remedy and modification. During the statistics, a complete and sub-group analysis was performed simultaneously. After the expert interview, the syndrome type and medication were finalized. As a result, a total of 228 CAG patients aged at (50.30 ± 10.18) were collected, including 151 males (66.23%). Of them, the TCM diagnosis and syndrome type were extracted from the information of 157 patients, including 115 cases with gastric stuffiness, 23 cases with gastric pain, 19 missing cases, 2 cases with spleen-stomach weakness syndrome, 57 cases with spleen deficiency and dampness-heat syndrome, 18 cases with spleen-stomach disharmony syndrome, 23 cases with syndrome of liver depression syndrome, 21 cases with liver qi invading stomach syndrome and 26 qi and yin deficiency syndrome, respectively. All of the 228 patients used totally 104 herbs, while the subgroups with 157 patients used 94 herbs. The most frequently used 15 herbs used in each groups were analyzed to determine the initial basic remedy and modification. Subsequently, based on the information of the sub-groups with 157 patients, with the syndrome type as the dependent variable, the logistic regression analysis was made on the most frequently used 32 herbs, in order to determined the modification in herbs for different syndrome types. After experts reviewed and modified, they believed the main causes of CAG were dietary irregularities

  17. Long-term efficacy and safety of rabeprazole in patients taking low-dose aspirin with a history of peptic ulcers: a phase 2/3, randomized, parallel-group, multicenter, extension clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Kato, Mototsugu; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Iwakiri, Ryuichi; Watanabe, Toshio; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Sugisaki, Nobuyuki; Okada, Yasushi; Ogawa, Hisao; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Fujimoto, Kazuma

    2015-01-01

    A 24-week, double-blind, clinical trial of rabeprazole for the prevention of recurrent peptic ulcers caused by low-dose aspirin (LDA) has been reported, but trials for longer than 24 weeks have not been reported. The aim of this study is to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of rabeprazole for preventing peptic ulcer recurrence on LDA therapy. Eligible patients had a history of peptic ulcers on long-term LDA (81 or 100 mg/day) therapy. Patients with no recurrence of peptic ulcers at the end of the 24-week double-blind phase with rabeprazole (10- or 5-mg once daily) or teprenone (50 mg three times daily) entered the extension phase. Rabeprazole doses were maintained for a maximum of 76 weeks, including the double-blind 24-week period and the extension phase period (long-term rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups). Teprenone was randomly switched to rabeprazole 10 or 5 mg for a maximum of 52 weeks in the extension phase (newly-initiated rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups). The full analysis set consisted of 151 and 150 subjects in the long-term rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups, respectively, and the cumulative recurrence rates of peptic ulcers were 2.2 and 3.7%, respectively. Recurrent peptic ulcers were not observed in the newly-initiated rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg groups. No bleeding ulcers were reported. No clinically significant safety findings, including cardiovascular events, emerged. The use of long-term rabeprazole 10- and 5-mg once daily prevents the recurrence of peptic ulcers in subjects on low-dose aspirin therapy, and both were well-tolerated. PMID:26060354

  18. [Relation between Helicobacter pylori and pathogenesis of chronic atrophic gastritis and the research of its prevention and treatment].

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Yang, L W; Yang, L J

    1992-09-01

    The total detectable rate of Helicobacter pylori (HP) of 485 patients suffering from gastric diseases was 59.6%. The HP in gastric mucosa of chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) patients was separated from the cell culture in vitro and transferred successively. The mice were perfused with exciccate alum, and the rabbits with aspirin to injure their gastric mucosa, then HP was perfused. Result showed that the change of experimental animals was identical with that of CAG patients by means of bacteriological and pathological examination. It revealed that HP was in agreement with Robert Koch's three principles about pathogenic bacteria. According to the bacterial infectious hypothesis of CAG, 53 Chinese medicinal herbs and prescriptions were investigated with bacteriostatic test. Panax notogenseng and Magnolia officinalis were discovered to be sensitive, Prunus mume and Corydalis yanhusuo were moderate sensitive, and Coptis chinensis and Rheum palmatum highly sensitive to HP. Decoction of Clearing up the Heat and Relieving the Blood Stasis and No.2 recipe of Huowei were used to treat 70 CAG patients with Stomach Heat Syndrome. The effective rate of gastroscopic examination was 85.7%, that of pathological study was 80%. In comparing with the group of Shanjiu Weitai, there was significant difference between the traditional Chinese medicine treated group and Shanjiu Weitai control group, the former being markedly better. PMID:1298465

  19. Collagenous gastroduodenitis coexisting repeated Dieulafoy ulcer: A case report and review of collagenous gastritis and gastroduodenitis without colonic involvement.

    PubMed

    Soeda, Atsuko; Mamiya, Takashi; Hiroshima, Yoshinori; Sugiyama, Hiroaki; Shidara, Sayoko; Dai, Yuichi; Nakahara, Akira; Ikezawa, Kazuto

    2014-10-01

    Collagenous gastritis (CG) is a rare disorder characterized by the thick collagenous subepithelial bands associated with mucosal inflammation. There have been approximately fifty reports in the literature since it was first described in 1989. According to previous reports, CG is heterogeneous and classified into two groups-(1) cases limited to the gastric mucosa in children or young adults, and (2) CG associated with collagenous colitis in elderly adults presenting with chronic watery diarrhea. In Japan, only nine previous cases were reported, and all of them were young adults. We report a case of CG with collagenous duodenitis in a 22-year-old female. She had repeated upper gastrointestinal bleeding from a Dieulafoy lesion of the fornix, but had no symptoms of malabsorption or diarrhea. Endoscopic findings revealed striking nodularity with a smooth islet-shaped normal area in the antrum and the body. The pathological findings of nodular mucosa showed the deposition of collagen bands just under the mucoepithelial lesion. In addition, she had collagenous duodenitis in part of the bulbs, and a colonoscopy showed no abnormalities. We provide a literature review of CG and collagenous gastroduodenitis without colonic involvement.

  20. Experimental Helicobacter pylori infection induces antral gastritis and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Shomer, N H; Dangler, C A; Whary, M T; Fox, J G

    1998-06-01

    Humans infected with Helicobacter pylori have abnormally low levels of the antioxidant vitamin C, which protects against the formation of carcinogenic nitrosamines, in gastric juice. Guinea pigs, like humans and nonhuman primates, have a dietary requirement for vitamin C. As such, these species have gastrointestinal vitamin C transport systems not found in other animals. We have developed and characterized a guinea pig model of chronic gastric H. pylori infection with the rodent-adapted Sydney strain of H. pylori. At 4 weeks postinfection, five of six animals of the infected group and zero of two animals of the control group were positive for H. pylori as determined by culture or PCR. At 15 weeks, six of six animals of the infected group and zero of two animals of the control group were positive. H. pylori-specific seroconversion was observed among infected animals. There were no histologic abnormalities in the gastric antra or fundi of control guinea pigs. In contrast, there was multifocal, mild to moderate lymphohistiocytic antral gastritis and formation of antral lymphoid follicles in H. pylori-infected animals. The lesion distribution in the gastric antra paralleled that observed in H. pylori-infected humans. The H. pylori-infected guinea pig should prove useful in modeling the interaction of helicobacter and vitamin C in gastric carcinogenesis.

  1. Ménétrier's disease-like hypertrophic gastritis in two red-capped mangabeys (Cercocebus torquatus).

    PubMed

    Emerson, Jessica A; Adkesson, Michael J; Colegrove, Kathleen M; Burdick, Stacy K; Langan, Jennifer N

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lymphoplasmacytic gastritis in two red-capped mangabeys (Cercocebus torquatus) at a zoological facility progressed to severe hypertrophic gastropathy similar to Ménétrier's disease that affects humans. Clinical signs included emesis, diarrhea, hunched posture consistent with abdominal pain, anemia, and hypoproteinemia. Large gastric masses were present and in one case created a gastric outflow obstruction. Both cases were positive for simian immunodeficiency virus and Helicobacter spp. were variably isolated, although the association with the hypertrophic gastropathy is unclear. Medical treatment had varying success and included sucralfate, H2 receptor antagonists, proton pump inhibitors, diet manipulations, and antibiotic therapies targeting Helicobacter spp. Surgical resection of a large portion of the stomach resulted in some palliative improvement in one case. Overall, this disease presented many challenges regarding identification, confirmation of diagnosis, and clinical management. Both aggressive medical and surgical treatments were unrewarding for long-term management of hypertrophic gastropathy in this pair of red-capped mangabeys and resulted in a poor prognosis in these cases. PMID:24625015

  2. Collagenous gastroduodenitis coexisting repeated Dieulafoy ulcer: A case report and review of collagenous gastritis and gastroduodenitis without colonic involvement.

    PubMed

    Soeda, Atsuko; Mamiya, Takashi; Hiroshima, Yoshinori; Sugiyama, Hiroaki; Shidara, Sayoko; Dai, Yuichi; Nakahara, Akira; Ikezawa, Kazuto

    2014-10-01

    Collagenous gastritis (CG) is a rare disorder characterized by the thick collagenous subepithelial bands associated with mucosal inflammation. There have been approximately fifty reports in the literature since it was first described in 1989. According to previous reports, CG is heterogeneous and classified into two groups-(1) cases limited to the gastric mucosa in children or young adults, and (2) CG associated with collagenous colitis in elderly adults presenting with chronic watery diarrhea. In Japan, only nine previous cases were reported, and all of them were young adults. We report a case of CG with collagenous duodenitis in a 22-year-old female. She had repeated upper gastrointestinal bleeding from a Dieulafoy lesion of the fornix, but had no symptoms of malabsorption or diarrhea. Endoscopic findings revealed striking nodularity with a smooth islet-shaped normal area in the antrum and the body. The pathological findings of nodular mucosa showed the deposition of collagen bands just under the mucoepithelial lesion. In addition, she had collagenous duodenitis in part of the bulbs, and a colonoscopy showed no abnormalities. We provide a literature review of CG and collagenous gastroduodenitis without colonic involvement. PMID:26184019

  3. Therapeutic and cost effectiveness of proton pump inhibitor regimens for idiopathic or drug-induced peptic ulcer complication.

    PubMed

    Nam, Doo Hyun; Park, So Young; Park, Jong Min; Kim, Sung Chull

    2011-03-01

    Peptic ulcer (PU) disease has a high rate of occurrence and recurrence in Korean and the selection of drug for treatment is diverse. In this study, the therapeutical effectiveness of regimens including proton pump inhibitors (PPI) was compared with the single PPI therapy. The clinical data were collected from 1,658 patients having idiopathic or drug-induced PU complication from a Medical Center in Daegu, Korea, and analyzed retrospectively based on the results of endoscopic examination, the drug history and the therapeutic cost depending on drugs used. The comparison of complete healing rate and recurrence rate showed no significant differences between the single PPI groups and the combination group with antacids, prokinetic agent or mucosa protectants. However, the combination therapy of PPI with mucosa protectants gave a slightly better therapeutic outcome than single PPI treatment in gastric ulcer patients. Comparatively, the combination of PPI with antacids significantly reduced the therapeutic effectiveness in duodenal ulcer patients. The analysis of cost-based therapeutic effectiveness reveals that any economic benefits in PU treatment were not gained by the combination of other class of ulcer drugs. Even though the rapidity of healing rate was not considered, it can be concluded that the PPI combination therapy might be not desirable in PU treatment. Particularly triplet or quartet combination therapy in PPI regimen was absolutely economically ineffective therapy in spite of the increase of medication costs.

  4. How to achieve a near 100% cure rate for H. pylori infection in peptic ulcer patients. A personal viewpoint.

    PubMed

    de Boer, W A

    1996-06-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori is the main etiological factor in duodenal and gastric ulcer disease, and eradication of the organism cures peptic ulcer disease. Cure of the infection therefore has become the ultimate treatment goal in ulcer patients. Only therapies that achieve a > 90% cure rate should be used in clinical practice and, as in any other disease, the therapy with the highest cure rates should be used. Bismuth-based triple therapy is considered the gold standard; it has been used successfully in many studies, usually with good tolerability on the part of patients. Many physicians have been hesitant to prescribe this therapy. The regimen is complex, and it is thought to have many side effects. Several groups have shown that concomitant therapy with a proton pump inhibitor increases efficacy and lessens side effects. Moreover, it has become clear that the duration of treatment can be decreased to just 7 days. With this adjustment it now seems sensible to use this short 7-day quadruple therapy, which at present has superior cure rates when compared with any other anti-Helicobacter therapy. This article is a plea for the use of this regimen and gives practical advice about how to employ therapy in general practice. Suggestions are made about how to motivate a patient to comply with the therapy prescribed. If these suggestions are followed, good compliance seems possible, and a near 100% cure rate will be within reach.

  5. Laparoscopic versus Open Omental Patch Repair for Early Presentation of Perforated Peptic Ulcer: Matched Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Keith Haozhe; Koura, Aaryan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes between laparoscopic and open omental patch repair (LOPR versus OR) in patients with similar presentation of perforated peptic ulcer (PPU). The secondary aim was to evaluate the outcomes according to the severity of peritonitis. Methods. All patients who underwent omental patch repair at two university-affiliated institutes between January 2010 and December 2014 were reviewed. Matched cohort between LOPR and OR groups was achieved by only including patients that had ulcer perforation <2 cm in size and symptoms occurring <48 hours. Outcome measures were defined in accordance with length of stay (LOS), postoperative complications, and mortality. Results. 148 patients met the predefined inclusion criteria with LOPR performed in 40 patients. Outcome measures consistently support laparoscopic approach but only length of hospital stay (LOS) achieved statistical significance (LOPR 4 days versus OR 5 days, p < 0.01). In a subgroup analysis of patients with MPI score >21, LOPR is also shown to benefit, particularly resulting in significant shorter LOS (4 days versus 11 days, p < 0.01). Conclusion. LOPR offers improved short-term outcomes in patients who present within 48 hours and with perforation size <2 cm. LOPR also proved to be more beneficial in high MPI cases. PMID:27722200

  6. Predicting the amount of intraperitoneal fluid accumulation by computed tomography and its clinical use in patients with perforated peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Toru; Kumagai, Youichi; Baba, Hiroyuki; Tajima, Yusuke; Imaizumi, Hideko; Suzuki, Okihide; Kuwabara, Koki; Matsuzawa, Takeaki; Sobajima, Jun; Fukuchi, Minoru; Ishibashi, Keiichiro; Mochiki, Erito; Ishida, Hideyuki

    2014-01-01

    The correlation between the amount of peritoneal fluid and clinical parameters in patients with perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) has not been investigated. The authors' objective was to derive a reliable formula for determining the amount of peritoneal fluid in patients with PPU before surgery, and to evaluate the correlation between the estimated amount of peritoneal fluid and clinical parameters. We investigated 62 consecutive patients who underwent emergency surgery for PPU, and in whom prediction of the amount of accumulated intraperitoneal fluid was possible by computed tomography (CT) using the methods described by Oriuchi et al. We examined the relationship between the predicted amount of accumulated intraperitoneal fluid and that measured during surgery, and the relationship between the amount of fluid predicted preoperatively or measured during surgery and several clinical parameters. There was a significant positive correlation between the amount of fluid predicted by CT scan and that measured during surgery. When patients with gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer were analyzed collectively, the predicted amount of intraperitoneal fluid and the amount measured during surgery were each associated with the period from onset until CT scan, perforation size, the Mannheim peritoneal index, and the severity of postoperative complications according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Our present results suggest that the method of Oriuchi et al is useful for predicting the amount of accumulated intraperitoneal fluid in patients with PPU, and that this would be potentially helpful for treatment decision-making and estimating the severity of postoperative complications. PMID:25437594

  7. Resveratrol Protects against Helicobacter pylori-Associated Gastritis by Combating Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolin; Jiang, Anmin; Qi, Banghua; Ma, Zhongyou; Xiong, Youyi; Dou, Jinfeng; Wang, Jianfei

    2015-11-20

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-induced oxidative stress has been shown to play a very important role in the inflammation of the gastric mucosa and increases the risk of developing gastric cancer. Resveratrol has many biological functions and activities, including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect. The purpose of this study was to probe whether resveratrol inhibits H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of any effect in mice. A mouse model of H. pylori infection was established via oral inoculation with H. pylori. After one week, mice were administered resveratrol (100 mg/kg body weight/day) orally for six weeks. The mRNA and protein levels of iNOS and IL-8 were assessed using RT-PCR, Western blot and ELISA. The expression levels of IκBα and phosphorylated IκBα (which embodies the level and activation of NF-κB), Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1; a potent antioxidant enzyme) and nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) were determined using Western blot, and lipid peroxide (LPO) level and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were examined using an MPO colorimetric activity assay, thiobarbituric acid reaction, and histological-grade using HE staining of the gastric mucosa. The results showed that resveratrol improved the histological infiltration score and decreased LPO level and MPO activity in the gastric mucosa. Resveratrol down-regulated the H. pylori-induced mRNA transcription and protein expression levels of IL-8 and iNOS, suppressed H. pylori-induced phosphorylation of IκBα, and increased the levels of HO-1 and Nrf2. In conclusion, resveratrol treatment exerted significant effects against oxidative stress and inflammation in H. pylori-infected mucosa through the suppression of IL-8, iNOS, and NF-κB, and moreover through the activation of the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway.

  8. An Observational Study on Aberrant Methylation of Runx3 With the Prognosis in Chronic Atrophic Gastritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chunna; Li, Ping; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Bei; Xiao, Lili; Guo, Feng; Wei, Yueguang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to discuss whether the methylation levels of Runx3 could be used as the early biomarker for predicting the prognosis in chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) patients. A total of 200 subjects including 60 controls without CAG (Group 1), 70 patients with mild CAG (Group 2), and 70 patients with moderate and severe CAG (Group 3) were recruited for this cross-sectional investigation in the Department of Gastroenterology in Daqing Oilfield General Hospital from July 2013 to May 2014. The MlALDI-TOF-MS was used to measure the methylation levels of Runx3 in all of the subjects. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were chosen to determine the expression levels of Runx3. The correlations between methylation levels of Runx3 among these CAG patients and their prognosis were shown by logistic regression models. The results demonstrated that the methylation levels of CpG13, CpG14, and CpG15 in Runx3 were higher in Group 3 than those in Groups 1 and 2 (P <0.05), whereas the mRNA and protein expression levels of Runx3 were lower in Group 3 than those in Groups 1 and 2 (P <0.05). There were significantly negative correlations between the methylation levels of Runx3 with its expression and the healing prognosis of CAG patients. In brief, this study proved that the hypermethylation modifications of CpG13, CpG14, and CpG15 in the promoter region of Runx3 could result in the down regulation of Runx3 expression to affect the prognosis of CAG. So the methylation levels of these CpG sites in Runx3 in the peripheral blood can be used as the biomarker for predicting the healing prognosis of CAG patients. PMID:27196446

  9. Progressive genomic convergence of two Helicobacter pylori strains during mixed infection of a patient with chronic gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Qizhi; Didelot, Xavier; Wu, Zhongbiao; Li, Zongwei; He, Lihua; Li, Yunsheng; Ni, Ming; You, Yuanhai; Lin, Xi; Li, Zhen; Gong, Yanan; Zheng, Minqiao; Zhang, Minli; Liu, Jie; Wang, Weijun; Bo, Xiaochen; Falush, Daniel; Wang, Shengqi; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the detailed nature of genomic microevolution during mixed infection with multiple Helicobacter pylori strains in an individual. Design We sampled 18 isolates from a single biopsy from a patient with chronic gastritis and nephritis. Whole-genome sequencing was applied to these isolates, and statistical genetic tools were used to investigate their evolutionary history. Results The genomes fall into two clades, reflecting colonisation of the stomach by two distinct strains, and these lineages have accumulated diversity during an estimated 2.8 and 4.2 years of evolution. We detected about 150 clear recombination events between the two clades. Recombination between the lineages is a continuous ongoing process and was detected on both clades, but the effect of recombination in one clade was nearly an order of magnitude higher than in the other. Imputed ancestral sequences also showed evidence of recombination between the two strains prior to their diversification, and we estimate that they have both been infecting the same host for at least 12 years. Recombination tracts between the lineages were, on average, 895 bp in length, and showed evidence for the interspersion of recipient sequences that has been observed in in vitro experiments. The complex evolutionary history of a phage-related protein provided evidence for frequent reinfection of both clades by a single phage lineage during the past 4 years. Conclusions Whole genome sequencing can be used to make detailed conclusions about the mechanisms of genetic change of H. pylori based on sampling bacteria from a single gastric biopsy. PMID:25007814

  10. An Observational Study on Aberrant Methylation of Runx3 With the Prognosis in Chronic Atrophic Gastritis Patients.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunna; Li, Ping; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Bei; Xiao, Lili; Guo, Feng; Wei, Yueguang

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study is to discuss whether the methylation levels of Runx3 could be used as the early biomarker for predicting the prognosis in chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) patients. A total of 200 subjects including 60 controls without CAG (Group 1), 70 patients with mild CAG (Group 2), and 70 patients with moderate and severe CAG (Group 3) were recruited for this cross-sectional investigation in the Department of Gastroenterology in Daqing Oilfield General Hospital from July 2013 to May 2014. The MlALDI-TOF-MS was used to measure the methylation levels of Runx3 in all of the subjects. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were chosen to determine the expression levels of Runx3. The correlations between methylation levels of Runx3 among these CAG patients and their prognosis were shown by logistic regression models. The results demonstrated that the methylation levels of CpG13, CpG14, and CpG15 in Runx3 were higher in Group 3 than those in Groups 1 and 2 (P <0.05), whereas the mRNA and protein expression levels of Runx3 were lower in Group 3 than those in Groups 1 and 2 (P <0.05). There were significantly negative correlations between the methylation levels of Runx3 with its expression and the healing prognosis of CAG patients. In brief, this study proved that the hypermethylation modifications of CpG13, CpG14, and CpG15 in the promoter region of Runx3 could result in the down regulation of Runx3 expression to affect the prognosis of CAG. So the methylation levels of these CpG sites in Runx3 in the peripheral blood can be used as the biomarker for predicting the healing prognosis of CAG patients. PMID:27196446

  11. Risk factors influencing the outcome of peptic ulcer bleeding in chronic kidney disease after initial endoscopic hemostasis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chih-Ming; Hsu, Chien-Ning; Tai, Wei-Chen; Yang, Shih-Cheng; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Shih, Chih-Wei; Ku, Ming-Kun; Yuan, Lan-Ting; Wang, Jiunn-Wei; Tseng, Kuo-Lun; Sun, Wei-Chih; Hung, Tsung-Hsing; Nguang, Seng-Howe; Hsu, Pin-I; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) who had peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) may have more adverse outcomes. This population-based cohort study aimed to identify risk factors that may influence the outcomes of patients with CKD and PUB after initial endoscopic hemostasis. Data from 1997 to 2008 were extracted from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We included a cohort dataset of 1 million randomly selected individuals and a dataset of patients with CKD who were alive in 2008. A total of 18,646 patients with PUB were screened, and 1229 patients admitted for PUB after endoscopic hemostasis were recruited. The subjects were divided into non-CKD (n = 1045) and CKD groups (n = 184). We analyzed the risks of peptic ulcer rebleeding, sepsis events, and mortality among in-hospital patients, and after discharge. Results showed that the rebleeding rates associated with repeat endoscopic therapy (11.96% vs 6.32%, P = 0.0062), death rates (8.7%, vs 2.3%, P < 0.0001), hospitalization cost (US$ 5595±7200 vs US$2408 ± 4703, P < 0.0001), and length of hospital stay (19.6 ± 18.3 vs 11.2 ± 13.1, P < 0.0001) in the CKD group were higher than those in the non-CKD group. The death rate in the CKD group was also higher than that in the non-CKD group after discharge. The independent risk factor for rebleeding during hospitalization was age (odds ratio [OR], 1.02; P = 0.0063), whereas risk factors for death were CKD (OR, 2.37; P = 0.0222), shock (OR, 2.99; P = 0.0098), and endotracheal intubation (OR, 5.31; P < 0.0001). The hazard ratio of rebleeding risk for aspirin users after discharge over a 10-year follow-up period was 0.68 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.45–0.95, P = 0.0223). On the other hand, old age (P < 0.0001), CKD (P = 0.0090), diabetes (P = 0.0470), and congestive heart failure (P = 0.0013) were the independent risk factors for death after discharge. In-hospital patients with CKD and PUB after

  12. Distribution of Prostaglandin E2 in Gastric and Duodenal Mucosa: Possible Role in the Pathogenesis of Peptic Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sill Moo; Yoo, Byung Chul; Lee, Hyo Rang; Chung, Hyuk; Lee, Young Soon

    1992-01-01

    Background Prostaglandin E which is present abundantly in the gastric mucosa is a powerful inhibitor of gastric acid secretion and a stimulus to gastric mucus production. In addition, prostaglandin E2 inhibits ulcer formation in animals, and the synthetic analogues of prostaglandin E have successfully been used in the treatment of patients with gastric and duodenal ulcer disease. To evaluate the role of endogenous prostaglandin E2 in the pathogenesis of the peptic ulcer disease, we measured mucosal prostaglandin E2 levels in patients with gastric and duodenal ulcer disease and compared with that of non-ulcer control persons. Methods The study population was made up of 44 non-ulcer persons, 36 patients with a benign gastric ulcer, and 48 with a duodenal ulcer. Every mucosai specimen, taken from the antrum and from the duodenal bulb, were homogenized, mixed with 1 M HCI, and centrifuged. After removal of the supernatant, precipitate was eluted with ethyl acetate in the Amprep C18 minicolumn. Then the extracted prostaglandin E2 in the ethyl acetate fractions was converted into its methyl oximate derivatives, and the prostaglandin E2 level was measured by radioimmunoassay. During the procedure any homogenized specimen which was looking grossly bloody was removed from the assay in order to avoid any possible contamination or prostaglandin E2 in blood. Results In non-ulcer persons, the mean values was 258.17±127.03 pg/mg. tissue in antrum and 121.07±67.46 pg/mg. tissue in duodenal bulb. The corresponding values were 186.42±70.51 pg/mg. tissue, 79.44±39.04 pg/mg. tissue in gastric ulcer patients and 204. 94 92.03 pg/mg. tissue, 99.66±56.10 pg/mgl. tissue in duodenal ulcer patients respectively. Gastric ulcer patients have the significantly lower level of the antral and duodenal prostaglandin E2 (p<0.005). Those levels of duodenal ulcer patients were also significantly lower than those of non-ulcer persons (p<0.025 & 0.05). Antral prostaglandin E2 level increased to

  13. Associations between DSM-IV mental disorders and onset of self-reported peptic ulcer in the World Mental Health Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Kate M.; Alonso, Jordi; de Jonge, Peter; Viana, Maria Carmen; Liu, Zhaorui; O’Neill, Siobhan; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Caldas-de-Almeida, Jose Miguel; Stein, Dan J.; Angermeyer, Matthias; Benjet, Corina; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Firuleasa, Ingrid-Laura; Hu, Chiyi; Kiejna, Andrzej; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Levinson, Daphna; Nakane, Yoshibumi; Piazza, Marina; Posada-Villa, José A.; Khalaf, Mohammad Salih; Lim, Carmen C. W.; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Recent research demonstrating concurrent associations between mental disorders and peptic ulcers has renewed interest in links between psychological factors and ulcers. However, little is known about associations between temporally prior mental disorders and subsequent ulcer onset. Nor has the potentially confounding role of childhood adversities been explored. The objective of this study was to examine associations between a wide range of temporally prior DSM-IV mental disorders and subsequent onset of ulcer, without and with adjustment for mental disorder comorbidity and childhood adversities. Methods Face-to-face household surveys conducted in 19 countries (n=52,095; person years=2,096,486).The Composite International Diagnostic Interview retrospectively assessed lifetime prevalence and age at onset of 16 DSM-IV mental disorders. Peptic ulcer onset was assessed in the same interview by self-report of physician’s diagnosis and year of diagnosis. Survival analyses estimated associations between first onset of mental disorders and subsequent ulcer onset. Results After comorbidity and sociodemographic adjustment, depression, social phobia, specific phobia, post-traumatic stress disorder, intermittent explosive disorder, alcohol and drug abuse disorders were significantly associated with ulcer onset (ORs 1.3-1.6). Increasing number of lifetime mental disorders was associated with ulcer onset in a dose-response fashion. These associations were only slightly attenuated by adjustment for childhood adversities. Conclusions A wide range of mental disorders were linked with the self-report of subsequent peptic ulcer onset. These associations require confirmation in prospective designs, but are suggestive of a role for mental disorders in contributing to ulcer vulnerability, possibly through abnormalities in the physiological stress response associated with mental disorders. PMID:23915767

  14. STROBE-Long-Term Exposure to Ambient Fine Particulate Air Pollution and Hospitalization Due to Peptic Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chit-Ming; Tsang, Hilda; Lai, Hak-Kan; Thach, Thuan-Quoc; Thomas, G. Neil; Chan, King-Pan; Lee, Siu-Yin; Ayres, Jon G.; Lam, Tai-Hing; Leung, Wai K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Little is known about the effect of air pollution on the gastrointestinal (GI) system. We investigated the association between long-term exposures to outdoor fine particles (PM2.5) and hospitalization for peptic ulcer diseases (PUDs) in a large cohort of Hong Kong Chinese elderly. A total of 66,820 subjects aged ≥65 years who were enrolled in all 18 Government Elderly Health Service centers of Hong Kong participated in the study voluntarily between 1998 and 2001. They were prospectively followed up for more than 10 years. Annual mean exposures to PM2.5 at residence of individuals were estimated by satellite data through linkage with address details including floor level. All hospital admission records of the subjects up to December 31, 2010 were retrieved from the central database of Hospital Authority. We used Cox regression to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) for PUD hospitalization associated with PM2.5 exposure after adjustment for individual and ecological covariates. A total of 60,273 subjects had completed baseline information including medical, socio-demographic, lifestyle, and anthropometric data at recruitment. During the follow-up period, 1991 (3.3%) subjects had been hospitalized for PUD. The adjusted HR for PUD hospitalization per 10 μg/m3 of PM2.5 was 1.18 (95% confidence interval: 1.02–1.36, P = 0.02). Further analysis showed that the associations with PM2.5 were significant for gastric ulcers (HR 1.29; 1.09–1.53, P = 0.003) but not for duodenal ulcers (HR 0.98; 0.78 to 1.22, P = 0.81). Long-term exposures to PM2.5 were associated with PUD hospitalization in elder population. The mechanism underlying the PM2.5 in the development of gastric ulcers warrants further research. PMID:27149464

  15. Strict Selection Criteria During Surgical Training Ensures Good Outcomes in Laparoscopic Omental Patch Repair (LOPR) for Perforated Peptic Ulcer (PPU).

    PubMed

    Shelat, Vishal G; Ahmed, Saleem; Chia, Clement L K; Cheah, Yee Lee

    2015-02-01

    Application of minimal access surgery in acute care surgery is limited due to various reasons. Laparoscopic omental patch repair (LOPR) for perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) surgery is safe and feasible but not widely implemented. We report our early experience of LOPR with emphasis on strict selection criteria. This is a descriptive study of all patients operated on for PPU at academic university-affiliated institutes from December 2010 to February 2012. All the patients who were operated on for LOPR were included as the study population and their records were studied. Perioperative outcomes, Boey score, Mannheim Peritonitis Index (MPI), and physiologic and operative severity scores for enumeration of mortality and morbidity (POSSUM) scores were calculated. All the data were tabulated in a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet and analyzed using Stata Version 8.x. (StataCorp, College Station, TX, USA). Fourteen patients had LOPR out of a total of 45 patients operated for the PPU. Mean age was 46 years (range 22-87 years). Twelve patients (86%) had a Boey score of 0 and all patients had MPI < 21 (mean MPI = 14). The predicted POSSUM morbidity and mortality were 36% and 7%, respectively. Mean ulcer size was 5 mm (range 2-10 mm), mean operating time was 100 minutes (range 70-123 minutes) and mean length of hospital stay was 4 days (range 3-6 days). There was no morbidity or mortality pertaining to LOPR. LOPR should be offered by acute care surgical teams when local expertise is available. This can optimize patient outcomes when strict selection criteria are applied.

  16. Promoter methylation of RNF180 is associated with H.pylori infection and serves as a marker for gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuang; Xu, Qian; Liang, Qiao-yi; Zhang, Zhe; Cao, Hai-chao; Yu, Jun; Fan, Dai-ming; Nie, Yong-zhan; Wu, Kai-chun; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Promoter methylation (PM) of RING-finger protein (RNF) 180 affects gastric cancer (GC) prognosis, but its association with risk of GC or atrophic gastritis (AG) is unclear. We investigated relationships between RNF180 PM and GC or AG, and the effects of Helicobactor pylori (H.pylori) infection on RNF180 PM. This study included 513 subjects (159 with GC, 186 with AG, and 168 healthy controls [CON]) for RNF180 PM analysis, and another 55 GC patients for RNF180 gene expression analysis. Methylation was quantified using average methylation rates (AMR), methylated CpG site counts (MSC) and hypermethylated CpG site counts (HSC). RNF180 promoter AMR and MSC increased with disease severity. Optimal cut-offs were GC + AG: AMR > 0.153, MSC > 4 or HSC > 1; GC: AMR > 0.316, MSC > 15 and HSC > 6. Hypermethylation at 5 CpG sites differed significantly between GC/AG and CON groups, and was more common in GC patients than AG and CON groups for 2 other CpG sites. The expression of RNF180 mRNA levels in tumor were significantly lower than those in non-tumor, with the same as in hypermethylation than hypomethylation group. H.pylori infection increased methylation in normal tissue or mild gastritis, and increased hypermethylation risk at 3 CpG sites in AG. In conclusion, higher AMR, MSC and HSC levels could identify AG + GC or GC. Some RNF180 promoter CpG sites could identify precancerous or early-stage GC. H.pylori affects RNF180 PM in normal tissue or mild gastritis, and increases hypermethylation in 3 CpG sites in AG. PMID:27050149

  17. Histologic changes in type A chronic atrophic gastritis indicating increased risk of neuroendocrine tumor development: the predictive role of dysplastic and severely hyperplastic enterochromaffin-like cell lesions.

    PubMed

    Vanoli, Alessandro; La Rosa, Stefano; Luinetti, Ombretta; Klersy, Catherine; Manca, Rachele; Alvisi, Costanza; Rossi, Sandro; Trespi, Erminio; Zangrandi, Adriano; Sessa, Fausto; Capella, Carlo; Solcia, Enrico

    2013-09-01

    The role of putative preneoplastic enterochromaffin-like cell lesions, either hyperplastic or dysplastic, in the genesis of type 1 enterochromaffin-like cell neuroendocrine tumors associated with type A chronic atrophic gastritis, their actual neoplastic risk, and their precise histogenetic mechanism deserve further clarification by specific histopathologic studies coupled with patient follow-up. A total of 100 patients with severe type A chronic atrophic gastritis, enterochromaffin-like cell hyperplasia, and antral G-cell hyperplasia were endoscopically and histologically followed up for a median of 90.1 months (total of 9118 person-months). Preneoplastic enterochromaffin-like cell lesions and newly developed neuroendocrine tumors were investigated histologically and histochemically, in parallel with enterochromaffin-like cell lesions found in nontumor mucosa of another 32 well-characterized and previously reported type 1 neuroendocrine tumors. Both neuroendocrine and nonneuroendocrine mucosa changes were analyzed and statistically evaluated. During follow-up, 7 of 100 patients developed neuroendocrine tumors: 5 were in a group of 20 cases with previous enterochromaffin-like cell dysplasia and 2 were among 80 cases showing only enterochromaffin-like cell hyperplasia throughout the study (hazard ratio, 20.7; P < .001). The severity of enterochromaffin-like cell hyperplasia at first biopsy, with special reference to linear hyperplasia with 6 chains or more per linear millimeter, also increased the risk of neuroendocrine tumor development during follow-up (hazard ratio, 13.0; P < .001). Enterochromaffin-like cell microinvasive dysplastic lesions arising at the epithelial renewal zone level, in connection with immature proliferating mucous-neck cells, were found to be linked to early intramucosal neuroendocrine tumor histogenesis. Both enterochromaffin-like cell dysplasia and severe hyperplasia indicate increased risk of neuroendocrine tumor development in type A

  18. Glucagonoma, chronic recurrent peptic ulcer disease, and enhanced amylase-creatinine clearance ratio. Report of a case with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pitchumoni, C S; Thelmo, W; Ahmed, K S; Kumar, A; Davidian, M; Einhorn, R; Adler, J; McCarthy, J

    1979-09-01

    A 53-year-old white woman developed diabetes mellitus, migratory erythema, and anemia, clinical features suggesting the presence of a "glucagonoma." Ten years earlier, after laparotomy and pancreatic biopsy, she had been told that she had an inoperable pancreatic carcinoma. Review of that biopsy together with current hormonal assay now confirms the diagnosis of glucagonoma. The recurrent peptic ulcer in this patient despite high levels of glucagon, a gastric inhibitory agent, is noted but not explained. An enhanced amylase-creatinine clearance ratio supports the notion that glucagon increases the clearances of amylase.

  19. The m2 form of the Helicobacter pylori cytotoxin has cell type-specific vacuolating activity

    PubMed Central

    Pagliaccia, Cristina; de Bernard, Marina; Lupetti, Pietro; Ji, Xuhuai; Burroni, Daniela; Cover, Timothy L.; Papini, Emanuele; Rappuoli, Rino; Telford, John L.; Reyrat, Jean-Marc

    1998-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori toxin VacA causes vacuolar degeneration in mammalian cell lines in vitro and plays a key role in peptic ulcer disease. Two alleles, m1 and m2, of the mid-region of the vacA gene have been described, and the m2 cytotoxin always has been described as inactive in the in vitro HeLa cell assay. However, the m2 allele is associated with peptic ulcer and is prevalent in populations in which peptic ulcer and gastric cancer have high incidence. In this paper, we show that, despite the absence of toxicity on HeLa cells, the m2 cytotoxin is able to induce vacuolization in primary gastric cells and in other cell lines such as RK-13. The absence of Hela cell activity is due to an inability to interact with the cell surface, suggesting a receptor-mediated interaction. This result is consistent with the observation that the m2 allele is found in a population that has a high prevalence of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. VacA is the first bacterial toxin described for which the same active subunit can be delivered by different receptor binding domains. PMID:9707626

  20. [Overview of clinical study on traditional Chinese medicine invigorating spleen and stomach, promoting blood circulation and remove blood stasis in treatment of chronic atrophic gastritis].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming; Liu, Zhen

    2012-11-01

    In recent years, traditional Chinese medicines invigorating spleen and stomach, promoting blood circulation and removing blood stasis have made fruitful achievements in the treatment of chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) and remarkable curative effects in eliminating clinical signs, enhancing the mucosal barrier, improving submucosal microcirculation, prompting submucosal atrophic glands and atypical hyperplasia reversal. This essay summarizes reports and literatures for clinical studies on CAG in recent years, and discusses its etiology, pathogenesis and clinical administration of traditional Chinese medicine and western medicine, in order to provide ideas and methods for CAG treatment with traditional Chinese medicines.

  1. Promoter polymorphisms in trefoil factor 2 and trefoil factor 3 genes and susceptibility to gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis among Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qian; Chen, Mo-Ye; He, Cai-Yun; Sun, Li-Ping; Yuan, Yuan

    2013-10-15

    The polymorphisms in trefoil factor (TFF) gene family that protect gastrointestinal epithelium might influence individual vulnerability to gastric cancer (GC) and atrophic gastritis. We used the Sequenom MassARRAY platform to identify the genotypes of TFF2 rs3814896 and TFF3 rs9981660 polymorphisms in 478 GC patients, 652 atrophic gastritis patients, and 724 controls. For the TFF2 rs3814896 polymorphism, in the subgroup aged ≤ 50 years, we found that AG+GG genotypes were associated with a 0.746-fold decreased risk of atrophic gastritis [p=0.023, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.580-0.960], a 0.626-fold decreased risk of GC (p=0.005, 95% CI=0.451-0.868), and a 0.663-fold decreased risk of diffuse-type GC (p=0.034, 95% CI=0.452-0.970) compared with the common AA genotype. For the TFF3 rs9981660 polymorphism, in the male subgroup, individuals with variant AG+AA genotype were associated with a 0.761-fold decreased risk of diffuse-type GC compared with the common GG genotype (p=0.043, 95% CI=0.584-0.992). Additionally, we found that in subjects aged ≤ 50 years compared with common AA genotype, TFF2 rs3814896 AG+GG genotypes were associated with increased TFF2 mRNA levels in the total gastric cancer specimens and in the diffuse-type gastric cancer specimens; and in males aged ≤ 50 years compared with common GG genotype, TFF3 rs9981660 AA+AG genotypes were associated with TFF3 mRNA levels in diffuse-type gastric cancer tissues and their corresponding non-cancerous tissues. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an association between the TFF2 rs3814896 AG+GG genotypes and decreased risks of GC, diffuse-type GC, and atrophic gastritis in younger people aged ≤ 50 years, and an association between TFF3 rs9981660 AG+AA genotype and decreased risk of diffuse-type GC in men. Moreover, we found that TFF2 rs3814896 AG+GG genotypes in people aged ≤ 50 years and TFF3 rs9981660 AG+AA genotypes in younger males with diffuse-type GC were associated with higher levels of

  2. [Autotransfusions of sorbent blood in treating peptic ulcer patients with an unfavorable course].

    PubMed

    Uspenskiĭ, V M; Zhidkov, K P; Malygin, A M; Shevchenko, E V

    1990-08-01

    Autotransfusion of sorbent blood was used in the complex treatment of 62 patients with gastric ulcer characterized by an unfavourable course. The course of autotransfusions favoured scarring of the gastric ulcer in 70.9% of patients, normalized the helper/suppressor relations of regulatory subpopulations of T-lymphocytes, normalized the indices of natural killer activity.

  3. Chronic active interstitial pancreatitis as a cause of transverse colonic obstruction and colic in a horse

    PubMed Central

    Lohmann, Katharina L.; Allen, Andrew L.

    2015-01-01

    A mature Quarter horse was euthanized following colic of 3 days duration. Postmortem, the large intestine, except the descending colon, was diffusely distended and associated with adhesion of the transverse colon to the pancreas, which had changes consistent with chronic active interstitial pancreatitis. Other lesions included hepatic fibrosis, erosive gastritis, and bilateral adrenal cortical hyperplasia. PMID:26538675

  4. Morphological and Cellular Features of Innate Immune Reaction in Helicobacter pylori Gastritis: A Brief Review.

    PubMed

    Ieni, Antonio; Barresi, Valeria; Rigoli, Luciana; Fedele, Francesco; Tuccari, Giovanni; Caruso, Rosario Alberto

    2016-01-15

    Innate and adaptive immunity are both involved in acute and chronic inflammatory processes. The main cellular players in the innate immune system are macrophages, mast cells, dendritic cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, and natural killer (NK), which offer antigen-independent defense against infection. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection presents peculiar characteristics in gastric mucosa infrequently occurring in other organs; its gastric colonization determines a causal role in both gastric carcinomas and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. In contrast, an active role for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been identified only in 9% of gastric carcinomas. The aim of the present review is to discuss the role of cellular morphological effectors in innate immunity during H. pylori infection and gastric carcinogenesis.

  5. Gastritis associated with infection by Helicobacter pylori: comparative pathology in humans and swine.

    PubMed

    Bertram, T A; Krakowka, S; Morgan, D R

    1991-01-01

    Infection of humans with Helicobacter pylori elicits a multifocal, active, chronic inflammatory response and moderate to severe atrophy of the gastric mucosa. Currently, piglets are the only reported animal model of H. pylori infection. Our objective was to compare the inflammatory response induced in humans with that induced in piglets by H. pylori infection. Samples of gastric mucosa were obtained from H. pylori-infected and uninfected piglets and humans. The composition of the inflammatory cell infiltrate and mucosal atrophy were evaluated by histomorphometric analysis of the biopsied gastric tissue. Infection with H. pylori resulted in a three-fold increase in the volume of inflammatory cells in the gastric mucosa of both humans and piglets. In H. pylori-infected humans, neutrophils composed the bulk of the cellular infiltrate; in piglets, the primary inflammatory cell was the lymphocyte. Both humans and piglets had severe epithelial cell vacuolation and significant reduction of the gastric mucosal surface area. We concluded that pathologic processes induced by infection with H. pylori, which include relatively severe mucosal inflammation, mucosal atrophy, and epithelial vacuolation, are similar in piglets and humans but that the primary inflammatory cell types are distinctly different in the two species.

  6. Absence of Helicobacter pylori is not protective against peptic ulcer bleeding in elderly on offending agents: lessons from an exceptionally low prevalence population.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeong Yeh; Noridah, Nordin; Syed Hassan, Syed Abdul Aziz; Menon, Jayaram

    2014-01-01

    Aim. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is exceptionally rare in population from the north-eastern region of Peninsular Malaysia. This provides us an opportunity to contemplate the future without H. pylori in acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Methods. All cases in the GI registry with GI bleeding between 2003 and 2006 were reviewed. Cases with confirmed non-variceal aetiology were analysed. Rockall score > 5 was considered high risk for bleeding and primary outcomes studied were in-hospital mortality, recurrent bleeding and need for surgery. Results. The incidence of non-variceal upper GI bleeding was 2.2/100,000 person-years. Peptic ulcer bleeding was the most common aetiology (1.8/100,000 person-years). In-hospital mortality (3.6%), recurrent bleeding (9.6%) and need for surgery (4.0%) were uncommon in this population with a largely low risk score (85.2% with score ≤5). Elderly were at greater risk for bleeding (mean 68.5 years, P = 0.01) especially in the presence of duodenal ulcers (P = 0.04) despite gastric ulcers being more common. NSAIDs, aspirin and co-morbidities were the main risk factors. Conclusions. The absence of H. pylori infection may not reduce the risk of peptic ulcer bleeding in the presence of risk factors especially offending drugs in the elderly.

  7. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Wild Type Homozygozity of Polymorphisms +896 and +1196 Is Associated with High Gastrin Serum Levels and Peptic Ulcer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Pohjanen, Vesa-Matti; Koivurova, Olli-Pekka; Huhta, Heikki; Helminen, Olli; Mäkinen, Johanna M.; Karhukorpi, Jari M.; Joensuu, Tapio; Koistinen, Pentti O.; Valtonen, Jarno M.; Niemelä, Seppo E.; Karttunen, Riitta A.; Karttunen, Tuomo J.

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 is a part of the innate immune system and recognizes Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide. The goal of this study was to analyze the role of Toll-like receptor 4 polymorphisms +896 (rs4986790) and +1196 (rs4986791) in the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori related gastroduodenal diseases in relation to gastric secretion and inflammation. Toll-like receptor 4 polymorphisms, serum gastrin-17 and pepsinogen I and II concentrations were determined, and gastroscopies with histopathological analyses were performed to 216 dyspeptic patients. As genotype controls, 179 controls and 61 gastric cancer patients were studied. In our study, the Toll-like receptor 4 +896 and +1196 polymorphisms were in total linkage disequilibrium. The homozygous wild types displayed higher gastrin-17 serum concentrations than the mutants (p = 0.001) and this effect was independent of Helicobacter pylori. The homozygous wild types also displayed an increased risk for peptic ulcers (OR: 4.390). Toll-like receptor 4 genotypes did not show any association with Helicobacter pylori positivity or the features of gastric inflammation. Toll-like receptor 4 expression was seen in gastrin and somatostatin expressing cells of antral mucosa by immunohistochemistry. Our results suggest a role for Toll-like receptor 4 in gastric acid regulation and that the Toll-like receptor 4 +896 and +1196 wild type homozygozity increases peptic ulcer risk via gastrin secretion. PMID:26161647

  8. Coenzyme Q10 in combination with triple therapy regimens ameliorates oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation in chronic gastritis associated with H. pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Asghar; Abangah, Ghobad; Moradkhani, Atefeh; Hafezi Ahmadi, Mohammad Reza; Asadollahi, Khairollah

    2015-08-01

    Chronic gastritis associated with H. pylori infection causes oxidative stress in the stomach. This study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic effects of coenzyme q10 among gastric patients infected by H. pylori. By a clinical trial, chronic gastric patients infected by H. pylori were randomly divided into 2 groups: intervention and placebo. The placebo group received a standard triple therapy regimen, and the intervention group received the triple regimen + coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). Mean inflammation score; serum levels of 3 serum markers were then compared. A total of 100 participants of whom 67% were female were evaluated. The mean age of participants was 59.4 ± 11.4 years. The mean inflammation score was considerably decreased at the end of the study, in the intervention group. The mean levels of total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) at the end of the study were reduced among the triple therapy group (P < .05, P =.03 respectively). The mean levels of TAC and GPx were significantly higher among the intervention group at the end of the study compared with those at the start of the study. The combination of triple therapy with CoQ10 demonstrated an effective outcome on the mucosal inflammation, and stress oxidative in patients with chronic gastritis.

  9. Subtotal Gastrectomy With Billroth II Anastomosis Is Associated With a Low Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Peptic Ulcer Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Hua; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Duodenal diversion can ameliorate lipid and glucose metabolism. We assessed the risk of stroke after subtotal gastrectomy with Billroth II anastomosis (SGBIIA) in peptic ulcer disease (PUD). We identified 6425 patients who received SGBIIA for PUD between 1998 and 2010 from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database as the study cohort; we frequency-matched them with 25,602 randomly selected controls from the PUD population who did not receive SGBIIA according to age, sex, index year, and comorbidities including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, chronic kidney disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and obesity. All patients were followed until the end of 2011 to determine the incidence of stroke. The incidence of stroke was lower in patients in the SGBIIA cohort than in those in the non-SGBIIA cohort (18.9 vs 22.9 per 1000 person-years, adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 0.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.72–0.89, P < 0.001). The risk of ischemic stroke (aHR 0.77, 95% CI 0.69–0.86, P < 0.001), rather than hemorrhagic stroke (aHR 1.00, 95% CI 0.78–1.28), was lower for the SGBIIA cohort than for the non-SGBIIA cohort according to the multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. The relative risk of ischemic stroke after SGBIIA was lower in men (aHR 0.77, 95% CI 0.69–0.86) than in women (aHR 0.80, 95% CI 0.65–0.99) and in patients aged ≥65 years (aHR 0.72, 95% CI 0.63–0.81) than in those of other age groups (≤49 years, aHR 0.82, 95% CI 0.48–1.39; 50–64 years, aHR 1.01, 95% CI 0.79–1.28). The relative risk of ischemic stroke after SGBIIA was also reduced in patients with comorbidities (aHR 0.84, 5% CI 0.75–0.95) rather than in those without comorbidities (aHR 0.81, 95% CI 0.59–1.12). SGBIIA is associated with a low risk of ischemic stroke for PUD patients, and its protective effect is prominent in men, patients aged ≥65

  10. Risk factors determining the need for second-look endoscopy for peptic ulcer bleeding after endoscopic hemostasis and proton pump inhibitor infusion

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hsiu-Chi; Wu, Chung-Tai; Chen, Wei-Ying; Yang, Er-Hsiang; Chen, Po-Jun; Sheu, Bor-Shyang

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: The need for routine second-look endoscopy in cases of peptic ulcer bleeding remains uncertain. We investigated risk factors related to the need for second-look endoscopy after endoscopic hemostasis and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) infusion. Patients and methods: We prospectively enrolled 316 patients with peptic ulcer bleeding after endoscopic hemostasis. Second-look endoscopy was scheduled after 72-hour PPI infusion (Day-3 subgroup) or one day early (Day-2 subgroup). If early rebleeding developed within 3 days, emergent second-look endoscopy was conducted. Risk factors for early rebleeding (use of E2nd score to predict the need for early second-look endoscopy) and persistent major stigmata in the Day-3 subgroup (use of R2nd score to predict the need for routine second-look endoscopy) were analyzed using univariable and multivariable regression. Results: Excluding 10 of 316 patients with early rebleeding, the rate of persistent major stigmata was lower in the Day-3 subgroup than in the Day-2 subgroup (4.8 % vs. 15.4 %, P  = 0.002). Endoscopic epinephrine-injection monotherapy and hypoalbuminemia < 3.0 g/dL were two independent risk factors for early rebleeding (P  ≤ 0.05). The Forrest Ia-Ib type and hypoalbuminemia < 3.5 g/dL were two independent risk factors for persistent major stigmata on the day-3 second-look endoscopy (P  < 0.05). The E2nd score was highly accurate for prediction of early rebleeding (AUROC 0.86; 95 % CI, 0.73~0.99), and the R2nd score could predict persistent major stigmata at second-look endoscopy (AUROC 0.84; 95 % CI, 0.69~0.99). Conclusions: For patients with peptic ulcer bleeding, E2nd and R2nd scores can indicate the need for early and routine second-look endoscopy, respectively (Trial registration identifier: NCT02197039). PMID:27004241

  11. Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... stomach and duodenum to diagnose or treat disease. Erosion – a very shallow sore, similar to an abrasion ... Ulcer – an open sore. Ulcers are deeper than erosions. Author(s) and Publication Date(s) Sean P. Caufield, MD, ...

  12. Peptic ulcer disease - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... will take two types of antibiotics and a proton pump inhibitor (PPI). These medicines may cause nausea, ... NSAIDs, you will likely need to take a proton pump inhibitor for 8 weeks. Taking antacids as ...

  13. Fuentes de variabilidad en el diagnóstico de gastritis atrófica multifocal asociada con la infección por Helicobacter pylori1

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Luis Eduardo; Bravo, Juan Carlos; Realpe, José Luis; Zarama, Guillermo; Piazuelo, MarÍa Blanca; Correa, Pelayo

    2014-01-01

    RESUMEN Introducción El mapeo de las diferentes regiones del estómago y el número de fragmentos de mucosa gástrica disponibles para evaluación histopatológica son fuentes importantes de variación en el momento de clasificar y hacer la gradación de la gastritis crónica. Objetivos Estimar la sensibilidad del número de fragmentos de mucosa gástrica necesarios para establecer los diagnósticos de gastritis atrófica con metaplasia intestinal (MI), displasia y estado de infección por Helicobacter pylori. Además evaluar la variabilidad intra-observador en la clasificación de estas lesiones precursoras del cáncer gástrico. Materiales y métodos En una cohorte de 6 años de seguimiento se evaluaron 1,958 procedimientos de endoscopia realizados por dos gastroenterólogos. En cada procedimiento y de cada participante se obtuvieron 5 biopsias de mucosa gástrica que representaban antro, incisura angularis y cuerpo. Un único patólogo hizo la interpretación histológica de las 5 biopsias y proporcionó un diagnóstico definitivo global que se utilizó como patrón de referencia. Cada fragmento de mucosa gástrica examinado condujo a un diagnóstico individual para cada biopsia que se comparó con el patrón de referencia. La variabilidad intra-observador se evaluó en 127 personas que corresponden a una muestra aleatoria de 20% del total de endoscopias hechas a los 72 meses de seguimiento. Resultados La sensibilidad del diagnóstico de MI y displasia gástrica aumentó de manera significativa con el número de fragmentos de mucosa gástrica evaluados El sitio anatómico de mayor sensibilidad para el diagnóstico de MI y displasia fue la incisura angularis. Para descubrir H. pylori se logró alta sensibilidad con el estudio de un solo fragmento de mucosa gástrica (95.9%) y fue independiente del sitio de obtención de la biopsia. El acuerdo intra-observador para el diagnóstico de gastritis crónica fue 86.1% con valor kappa de 0.79 IC 95% (0.76-0.85). Las

  14. Improvement of Short-Term Outcomes for High-Risk Bleeding Peptic Ulcers With Addition of Argon Plasma Coagulation Following Endoscopic Injection Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huay-Min; Tsai, Wei-Lun; Yu, Hsien-Chung; Chan, Hoi-Hung; Chen, Wen-Chi; Lin, Kung-Hung; Tsai, Tzung-Jiun; Kao, Sung-Shuo; Sun, Wei-Chih; Hsu, Ping-I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A second endoscopic method together with injection therapy is recommended to treat high-risk bleeding peptic ulcers. This study investigated whether additional argon plasma coagulation (APC) treatment could influence hemostatic efficacy following endoscopic injection therapy to treat high-risk bleeding ulcers. From October 2010 to January 2012, eligible patients with high-risk bleeding ulcers were admitted to our hospital. They prospectively randomly underwent either APC therapy along with distilled water injection or distilled water injection alone. Episodes of rebleeding were retreated with endoscopic combination therapy. Patients in whom retreatment was ineffective underwent emergency surgery or transarterial embolization (TAE). A total of 116 enrolled patients were analyzed. The hemostatic efficacy in 58 patients treated with APC along with distilled water injection was compared with that in 58 patients treated with distilled water injection alone. The 2 treatment groups were similar with respect to all baseline characteristics. Initial hemostasis was accomplished in 56 patients treated with combined therapy, and 55 patients treated with distilled water injection therapy (97% vs 95%, P = 0.648). Bleeding recurred in 2 patients treated with combined therapy, and 9 patients treated with distilled water injection (3.6% vs 16%, P = 0.029). Treatment method was the only independent prognostic factor for recurrent bleeding (odds ratio 0.17; 95% confidence interval 0.03–0.84; P = 0.029). The 2 groups did not differ significantly in hospital stay, TAE, surgery, and mortality. Endoscopic therapy with APC following distilled water injection is more effective than distilled water injection alone for preventing rebleeding of peptic ulcer. PMID:26266385

  15. Structure of the TCR expressed on a gastritogenic T cell clone, II-6, and frequent appearance of similar clonotypes in mice bearing autoimmune gastritis.

    PubMed

    Katakai, T; Agata, Y; Shimizu, A; Ohshima, C; Nishio, A; Inaba, M; Kasakura, S; Mori, K J; Masuda, T

    1997-12-01

    A parietal cell-specific Th1 clone, II-6, which was established from a BALB/c mouse bearing post-thymectomy autoimmune gastritis (AIG), recognizes a peptide of the alpha subunit (alpha891-905) of H+/K+-ATPase and induces gastritis in nu/nu BALB/c mice by adoptive cell transfer. In the present study, the primary structure of the TCR of II-6 was determined as Valpha10-Jalpha c5a-Calpha and Vbeta14-Jbeta2.3-Cbeta2 by cDNA cloning. Using PCR with specific primers, we defined the use of this II-6 TCR in nu/nu mice with transferred II-6 cells and in mice that spontaneously developed AIG by thymectomy on day 3 after birth (d3-Tx). II-6 TCR mRNAs were detected in the gastric mucosa of all of the nu/nu mice, suggesting that II-6 cells indeed home to the gastric mucosa and thereby were directly involved in the destruction of target parietal cells. TCR beta chain mRNAs encoding CDR3 region sequences almost identical with that of II-6 were also found in the gastric mucosa in 43% (six of 14 mice tested) of the d3-Tx AIG mice at 4-12 weeks old by nested RT-PCR. Such a frequent appearance of similar clonotypes in independent individuals suggests that T cells bearing II-6-like TCR including the II-6 itself might be directly involved in, although not essential for, the pathogenesis of AIG in 3d-Tx mice.

  16. The histopathology of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug induced gastroduodenal damage: correlation with Helicobacter pylori, ulcers, and haemorrhagic events

    PubMed Central

    Frezza, M; Gorji, N; Melato, M

    2001-01-01

    Aims—The spectrum of microscopic lesions resulting from the chronic use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), known as chemical gastritis, remains unclear, and the variable prevalence reported in different studies makes this issue a matter of lively debate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and importance of chemical gastritis in patients regularly taking NSAIDs. Owing to the high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection, particularly in subjects over 60 years of age, and in view of a possible association with damage, the presence of H pylori infection in the same tissue sample was also determined in all patients. Methods—One hundred and ninety seven subjects were enrolled, 118 of whom were receiving chronic treatment with NSAIDs and 79 of whom were controls, pair matched for age, sex, and clinical symptoms (ulcer-like dyspepsia or upper digestive tract haemorrhage). Antral biopsies taken during upper gastroduodenal endoscopy were assessed for chemical gastritis according to a modified version of Dixon's score, and for helicobacter correlated chronic active gastritis, according to the updated Sydney system. Results—Chemical gastritis was identified in 11 patients taking NSAIDs (9%) and in four controls (5%) (p < 0.05). Helicobacter pylori was detected in 53 patients taking NSAIDs (45%) and in 34 controls (43%). Patients taking NSAIDs had a significantly higher number of erosions and ulcers and worse endoscores than controls. The presence of H pylori did not appear to increase histological damage, ulcer prevalence, or haemorrhagic events. Conclusions—Chemical gastritis is present in a limited number of patients regularly taking NSAIDs, and is not strongly correlated with NSAID induced damage. In many cases of peptic ulcer or upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients taking NSAIDs, the presence of chemical gastritis or H pylori infection cannot solely account for the development of mucosal damage. Key Words: chemical

  17. Serum zinc status and Helicobacter pylori infection in gastric disease patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Hua; Wu, Xiao-Jing; Niu, Jing-Xiu; Yan, Hao; Wang, Xin-Zhuo; Yin, Xiao-Dong; Pang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    The role of Helicobacter pylori status and serum zinc value in gastric disease patients and healthy controls were investigated. Cases used in this work were 45 gastric cancer patients, 44 with peptic ulcers, 52 suffering gastritis and 64 healthy controls, all diagnosed histologically with the controls undergoing medical checkups. Helicobacter pylori status and serum levels of Zn were determined by 13C-urea breath test and flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer, respectively. Our study showed that Helicobacter pylori infection has no change in gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer group, on the contrast, serum levels of Zn were significantly reduced in gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer group, compared with healthy controls, and the higher the Zn levels are, the more increased risk of gastric cancer. Helicobacter pylori infection is a cause of gastritis, peptic ulcers and even gastric cancer, while serum zinc level is an indicator of protection of gastric membranes against damage. PMID:23244107

  18. Clinical and radionuclide evaluation of bile diversion by Braun enteroenterostomy: prevention and treatment of alkaline reflux gastritis. An alternative to Roux-en-Y diversion.

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, S B; Drane, W E; Woodward, E R

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE AND SUMMARY BACKGROUND: Symptomatic, medically resistant postgastrectomy patients with alkaline reflux gastritis (ARG) have increased enterogastric reflux (EGR) documented by quantitative radionuclide biliary scanning. Even asymptomatic patients after gastrectomy have increased EGR compared with nonoperated control patients. Roux-en-Y biliary diversion, although successfully treats the clinical syndrome of ARG, has a high incidence of early and late postoperative severe gastroparesis, Roux limb retention (the Roux syndrome), or both, which often requires further remedial surgery. As an alternative to Roux-en-Y diversion, this review evaluates the efficacy of the Braun enteroenterostomy (BEE) in diverting bile away from the stomach in patients having gastric operations. Based on previous pilot studies, the BEE is positioned 30 cm from the gastroenterostomy. METHODS: Thirty patients had the following operations and were evaluated: standard pancreatoduodenectomy (8), vagotomy and Billroth II (BII) gastrectomy (6), BII gastrectomy only (10), and palliative gastroenterostomy to an intact stomach (6). All anastomoses were antecolic BII with a long afferent limb and a 30-cm BEE. Four symptomatic patients with medically intractable ARG and chronic gastroparesis had subtotal BII gastric resection with BEE rather than Roux-en-Y diversion. Eight control symptomatic patients and six asymptomatic patients with previous BII gastrectomy and no BEE were evaluated. Radionuclide biliary scanning was performed within 30 days in all patients and at 4 to 6 months in 14 patients. Bile reflux was expressed as an EGR index (%). RESULTS: After operation, 18 of 34 patients (53%) had no demonstrable EGR while in the fasting state for as long as 90 minutes. The range of demonstrable bile reflux (EGR) in the remaining 16 patients was from 2% to 17% (mean, 4.5%). Enterogastric reflux in the 14 control patients (with no BEE) ranged from 5% to 82% (mean, 42%). The four patients with ARG

  19. The Influence of Prolonged Acetylsalicylic Acid Supplementation-Induced Gastritis on the Neurochemistry of the Sympathetic Neurons Supplying Prepyloric Region of the Porcine Stomach.

    PubMed

    Palus, Katarzyna; Całka, Jarosław

    2015-01-01

    This experiment was designed to establish the localization and neurochemical phenotyping of sympathetic neurons supplying prepyloric area of the porcine stomach in a physiological state and during acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) induced gastritis. In order to localize the sympathetic perikarya the stomachs of both control and acetylsalicylic acid treated (ASA group) animals were injected with neuronal retrograde tracer Fast Blue (FB). Seven days post FB injection, animals were divided into a control and ASA supplementation group. The ASA group was given 100 mg/kg of b.w. ASA orally for 21 days. On the 28th day all pigs were euthanized with gradual overdose of anesthetic. Then fourteen-micrometer-thick cryostat sections were processed for routine double-labeling immunofluorescence, using primary antisera directed towards tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine β-hydroxylase (DβH), neuropeptide Y (NPY), galanin (GAL), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), leu 5-enkephalin (LENK), cocaine- and amphetamine- regulated transcript peptide (CART), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). The data obtained in this study indicate that postganglionic sympathetic nerve fibers supplying prepyloric area of the porcine stomach originate from the coeliac-cranial mesenteric ganglion complex (CCMG). In control animals, the FB-labelled neurons expressed TH (94.85 ± 1.01%), DβH (97.10 ± 0.97%), NPY (46.88 ± 2.53%) and GAL (8.40 ± 0.53%). In ASA group, TH- and DβH- positive nerve cells were reduced (85.78 ± 2.65% and 88.82 ± 1.63% respectively). Moreover, ASA- induced gastritis resulted in increased expression of NPY (76.59 ± 3.02%) and GAL (26.45 ± 2.75%) as well as the novo-synthesis of nNOS (6.13 ± 1.11%) and LENK (4.77 ± 0.42%) in traced CCMG neurons. Additionally, a network of CART-, CGRP-, SP-, VIP-, LENK-, nNOS- immunoreactive (IR) nerve fibers encircling the FB-positive perikarya were observed in both intact and ASA

  20. Mast cell gastritis: Children complaining of chronic abdominal pain with histologically normal gastric mucosal biopsies except for increase in mast cells, proposing a new entity

    PubMed Central

    Mahjoub, Fatemeh E; Farahmand, Fatemeh; Pourpak, Zahra; Asefi, Hoda; Amini, Zahra

    2009-01-01

    Background Mast cells reside within the connective tissue of a variety of tissues and all vascularized organs. Since 1996, few studies have been performed on mast cell density in gastrointestinal biopsies, mainly in adult age group. We recently studied mast cell density in pediatric age group on rather larger number of cases in a referral children hospital. Mast cell density was 12.6 ± 0.87 in 0.25 mm2 (range: 0-81) in our study. Since we frequently encounter cases with rather normal gastric biopsies with no H.pylori, which mainly complain of chronic abdominal pain, we gathered those cases with mast cell density more than 30/0.25 mm2. from 895 gastric biopsies and wanted to study their clinical and endoscopic findings and propose a new entity. Methods Between April 2005 and May 2008, 895 children (< 14 years old), with gastrointestinal complaints who underwent endoscopy were selected and antral biopsies were obtained for histological examination. Among these children, those who had normal or erythematous (but not nodular or ulcerative) gastric mucosa on endoscopic view, plus pathologic report of normal mucosa or mild gastritis in addition to mast cell count more than 30/25 mm2, were chosen and a questionnaire was filled for each patient including clinical, endoscopic and pathologic findings. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS, version 13 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Results Over a 3 year period of study, of 895 selected children, 86 patients fulfilled the entrance criteria. The major complaint of patients was recurrent abdominal pain. The mean mast cell density was 45.59 ± 13.81 in 0.25 mm2 (range: 30-93). Among our cases, about 67.4% (n = 58) had 30 to 49, 23.3% (n = 20) had 50 to 69, 8.1% (n = 7) had 70 to 89 and 1.2% (n = 1) had 93 mast cells/0.25 mm2 in their specimens Discussion In 29% of our cases, neither endoscopic nor pathologic change was detected and only increase in mast cell number was reported and in others endoscopic and

  1. Risk factors influencing the outcome of peptic ulcer bleeding in chronic kidney disease after initial endoscopic hemostasis: A nationwide cohort study.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chih-Ming; Hsu, Chien-Ning; Tai, Wei-Chen; Yang, Shih-Cheng; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Shih, Chih-Wei; Ku, Ming-Kun; Yuan, Lan-Ting; Wang, Jiunn-Wei; Tseng, Kuo-Lun; Sun, Wei-Chih; Hung, Tsung-Hsing; Nguang, Seng-Howe; Hsu, Pin-I; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2016-09-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) who had peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) may have more adverse outcomes. This population-based cohort study aimed to identify risk factors that may influence the outcomes of patients with CKD and PUB after initial endoscopic hemostasis. Data from 1997 to 2008 were extracted from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We included a cohort dataset of 1 million randomly selected individuals and a dataset of patients with CKD who were alive in 2008. A total of 18,646 patients with PUB were screened, and 1229 patients admitted for PUB after endoscopic hemostasis were recruited. The subjects were divided into non-CKD (n = 1045) and CKD groups (n = 184). We analyzed the risks of peptic ulcer rebleeding, sepsis events, and mortality among in-hospital patients, and after discharge. Results showed that the rebleeding rates associated with repeat endoscopic therapy (11.96% vs 6.32%, P = 0.0062), death rates (8.7%, vs 2.3%, P < 0.0001), hospitalization cost (US$ 5595±7200 vs US$2408 ± 4703, P < 0.0001), and length of hospital stay (19.6 ± 18.3 vs 11.2 ± 13.1, P < 0.0001) in the CKD group were higher than those in the non-CKD group. The death rate in the CKD group was also higher than that in the non-CKD group after discharge. The independent risk factor for rebleeding during hospitalization was age (odds ratio [OR], 1.02; P = 0.0063), whereas risk factors for death were CKD (OR, 2.37; P = 0.0222), shock (OR, 2.99; P = 0.0098), and endotracheal intubation (OR, 5.31; P < 0.0001). The hazard ratio of rebleeding risk for aspirin users after discharge over a 10-year follow-up period was 0.68 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.45-0.95, P = 0.0223). On the other hand, old age (P < 0.0001), CKD (P = 0.0090), diabetes (P = 0.0470), and congestive heart failure (P = 0.0013) were the independent risk factors for death after discharge. In-hospital patients with CKD and PUB after endoscopic therapy

  2. Experimental production of peptic ulcer, gastric damage and cancer models and their use in pathophysiological studies and pharmacological treatment--Polish achievements.

    PubMed

    Brzozowski, T

    2003-12-01

    The common acid related diseases of the upper GI tract could be considered as primarily due to the defect in barrier function either of the gastric mucosal or duodenal epithelium leading to the formation of gastric or duodenal ulcers. An attempt was made in this chapter to discuss the history of peptic ulcer disease in humans and methods for the production of acute gastric lesions and ulcers in experimental animals with the special attention focused to the contribution of Polish scientists and investigators into this field. Early surgical advances in the management of peptic ulcers were emphasized that were then subsequently replaced by pharmacological treatment (histamine H(2)-receptor antagonists, proton pump inhibitors) and considered as the major strategy against the acid disorders. This included the immense body of work performed by numerous group of investigators, including Polish researchers, to identify the effects of acid, bile salts, aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), stress, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, prostaglandins (PG) and nitric oxide (NO) on the integrity of the gastrointestinal mucosa, which all were discussed in this chapter. The concept of major defensive mechanism in the stomach called "cytoprotection", originally proposed by Andre Robert is recalled in the relevance to the great contribution of Polish scientist working at the Jagiellonian University in Cracow. These experimental studies gave a new insight into the mechanism of action of arachidonate cascade products such as PGs, tromboxanes and leukotrienes and had opened the new therapeutic avenues for the gastroprotective treatment of the acute gastric mucosal damage. Detailed studies revealed, however, that PG-induced cytoprotection offers a short-term protection against gastric lesions induced by corrosive agents but unfortunately this phenomenon gives a little, if any, impact to the process of ulcer healing. The experimental studies on healing

  3. The 60- to 90-kDa parietal cell autoantigen associated with autoimmune gastritis is a beta subunit of the gastric H+/K(+)-ATPase (proton pump).

    PubMed

    Toh, B H; Gleeson, P A; Simpson, R J; Moritz, R L; Callaghan, J M; Goldkorn, I; Jones, C M; Martinelli, T M; Mu, F T; Humphris, D C

    1990-08-01

    Autoantibodies in the sera of patients with pernicious anemia recognize, in addition to the alpha subunit of the gastric H+/(+)-ATPase, an abundant gastric microsomal glycoprotein of apparent Mr 60,000-90,000. Herein we have colocalized the glycoprotein and the alpha subunit of the gastric H+/K(+)-ATPase to the tubulovesicular membranes of the parietal cell by immunogold electron microscopy. Moreover, the glycoprotein and the alpha subunit were coimmunoprecipitated, and copurified by immunoaffinity chromatography, with an anti-glycoprotein monoclonal antibody. The pig glycoprotein was purified by chromatography on tomato lectin-Sepharose, and five tryptic peptides from the purified glycoprotein were partially sequenced. The complete amino acid sequence, deduced from the nucleotide sequence of overlapping cDNA clones, showed 33% similarity to the sequence of the beta subunit of the pig kidney Na+/K(+)-ATPase. We therefore propose that the 60- to 90-kDa glycoprotein autoantigen is the beta subunit of the gastric H+/K(+)-ATPase and that the alpha and beta subunits of the proton pump are major targets for autoimmunization in autoimmune gastritis.

  4. North vs south differences in acute peptic ulcer hemorrhage in Croatia: hospitalization incidence trends, clinical features, and 30-day case fatality

    PubMed Central

    Ljubičić, Neven; Pavić, Tajana; Budimir, Ivan; Puljiz, Željko; Bišćanin, Alen; Bratanić, Andre; Nikolić, Marko; Hrabar, Davor; Troskot, Branko

    2014-01-01

    Aim To assess the seven-year trends of hospitalization incidence due to acute peptic ulcer hemorrhage (APUH) and associated risk factors, and examine the differences in these trends between two regions in Croatia. Methods The study collected sociodemographic, clinical, and endoscopic data on 2204 patients with endoscopically confirmed APUH who were admitted to the Clinical Hospital Center “Sestre Milosrdnice,” Zagreb and Clinical Hospital Center Split between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2011. We determined hospitalization incidence rates, 30-day case fatality rate, clinical outcomes, and incidence-associated factors. Results No differences were observed in APUH hospitalization incidence rates between the regions. Age-standardized one-year cumulative APUH hospitalization incidence rate calculated using the European Standard Population was significantly higher in Zagreb than in Split region (43.2/100 000 vs 29.2/100,000). A significantly higher APUH hospitalization incidence rates were observed in the above 65 years age group. Overall 30-day case fatality rate was 4.9%. Conclusion The hospitalization incidence of APUH in two populations did not change over the observational period and it was significantly higher in the Zagreb region. The incidence of acute duodenal ulcer hemorrhage also remained unchanged, whereas the incidence of acute gastric ulcer hemorrhage increased. The results of this study allow us to monitor epidemiological indicators of APUH and compare data with other countries. PMID:25559836

  5. Fasting and food-stimulated serum gastrin concentrations in relation to the antral G-cell population. A study in patients with peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Stave, R; Gedde-Dahl, D; Gjone, E

    1978-01-01

    The fasting serum concentration and the first-hour serum gastric response to a protein-rich meal were related to the antral G-cell population in 14 patients with peptic ulcer. They were divided into a uremic (n=5) and non-uremic group (n=9). Fasting serum gastrin correlated significantly with the total antral G-cell mass only in the non-uremic patients who showed a relatively narrow transitional body-antrum zone. Conversely, the integrated serum gastric response was inversely related to the size of this zone in both groups of patients. A presumptive endocrine G-cell mass was estimated by subtracting the G cells in the transitional zone from the total antral G-cell population. Total gastrin output correlated positively with this estimated mass in the non-uremic group and in the material as a whole. Also, the integrated gastrin response was positively correlated with the presumptive endocrine G-cell mass in the whole material. It was concluded that G cells in the transitional body-antrum zone, where also parietal cells are present, do not release gastrin into the circulation during meal stimulation like G cells in the remaining part of the pyloric antrum. On the basis of these results and our previous morphological observations (19), we propose that the G cells in the transitional zone are involved in a paracrine interrelationship with the surrounding parietal cells rather than contributing to the circulating pool of gastrin.

  6. The relationship between the Five-Factor Model personality traits and peptic ulcer disease in a large population-based adult sample.

    PubMed

    Realo, Anu; Teras, Andero; Kööts-Ausmees, Liisi; Esko, Tõnu; Metspalu, Andres; Allik, Jüri

    2015-12-01

    The current study examined the relationship between the Five-Factor Model personality traits and physician-confirmed peptic ulcer disease (PUD) diagnosis in a large population-based adult sample, controlling for the relevant behavioral and sociodemographic factors. Personality traits were assessed by participants themselves and by knowledgeable informants using the NEO Personality Inventory-3 (NEO PI-3). When controlling for age, sex, education, and cigarette smoking, only one of the five NEO PI-3 domain scales - higher Neuroticism - and two facet scales - lower A1: Trust and higher C1: Competence - made a small, yet significant contribution (p < 0.01) to predicting PUD in logistic regression analyses. In the light of these relatively modest associations, our findings imply that it is certain behavior (such as smoking) and sociodemographic variables (such as age, gender, and education) rather than personality traits that are associated with the diagnosis of PUD at a particular point in time. Further prospective studies with a longitudinal design and multiple assessments would be needed to fully understand if the FFM personality traits serve as risk factors for the development of PUD.

  7. [Participation of pineal gland in antistressor activity of adaptogenic drugs].

    PubMed

    Arushanian, É B; Beĭer, É V

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress produces some morphological changes in rats, including thymus weight reduction, adrenal hypertrophy, and peptic ulcers in stomach. Repeated administration of phytoadaptogenic drugs (ginseng and bilobil) decreased these stress-induced disorders. The antistressor activity of drugs was attenuated upon by removal of the pineal gland. Histochemical and morphometric investigation of pineal tissues in stressed animals showed that that the pharmacological effect was accompanied by increasing functional activity of the pineal gland. It is suggested that pineal mobilization may participate in antistressor activity of phytoadaptogenic drugs.

  8. [Participation of pineal gland in antistressor activity of adaptogenic drugs].

    PubMed

    Arushanian, É B; Beĭer, É V

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress produces some morphological changes in rats, including thymus weight reduction, adrenal hypertrophy, and peptic ulcers in stomach. Repeated administration of phytoadaptogenic drugs (ginseng and bilobil) decreased these stress-induced disorders. The antistressor activity of drugs was attenuated upon by removal of the pineal gland. Histochemical and morphometric investigation of pineal tissues in stressed animals showed that that the pharmacological effect was accompanied by increasing functional activity of the pineal gland. It is suggested that pineal mobilization may participate in antistressor activity of phytoadaptogenic drugs. PMID:25826867

  9. Profiling cellular bioenergetics, glutathione levels, and caspase activities in stomach biopsies of patients with upper gastrointestinal symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Alfazari, Ali S; Al-Dabbagh, Bayan; Al-Dhaheri, Wafa; Taha, Mazen S; Chebli, Ahmad A; Fontagnier, Eva M; Koutoubi, Zaher; Kochiyi, Jose; Karam, Sherif M; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To measure biochemical parameters in stomach biopsies and test their suitability as diagnostic biomarkers for gastritis and precancerous lesions. METHODS: Biopsies were obtained from the stomachs of two groups of patients (n = 40) undergoing fiber-optic endoscopy due to upper gastrointestinal symptoms. In the first group (n = 17), only the corpus region was examined. Biopsies were processed for microscopic examination and measurement of mitochondrial O2 consumption (cellular respiration), cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP), glutathione (GSH), and caspase activity. In the second group of patients (n = 23), both corpus and antral regions were studied. Some biopsies were processed for microscopic examination, while the others were used for measurements of cellular respiration and GSH level. RESULTS: Microscopic examinations of gastric corpus biopsies from 17 patients revealed normal mucosae in 8 patients, superficial gastritis in 7 patients, and chronic atrophic gastritis in 1 patient. In patients with normal histology, the rate (mean ± SD) of cellular respiration was 0.17 ± 0.02 μmol/L O2 min-1 mg-1, ATP content was 487 ± 493 pmol/mg, and GSH was 469 ± 98 pmol/mg. Caspase activity was detected in 3 out of 8 specimens. The values of ATP and caspase activity were highly variable. The presence of superficial gastritis had insignificant effects on the measured biomarkers. In the patient with atrophic gastritis, cellular respiration was high and ATP was relatively low, suggesting uncoupling oxidative phosphorylation. In the second cohort of patients, the examined biopsies showed either normal or superficial gastritis. The rate of cellular respiration (O2. μmol/L min-1 mg-1) was slightly higher in the corpus than the antrum (0.18 ± 0.05 vs 0.15 ± 0.04, P = 0.019). The value of GSH was about the same in both tissues (310 ± 135 vs 322 ± 155, P = 0.692). CONCLUSION: The corpus mucosa was metabolically more active than the antrum tissue. The data in this

  10. Distinctive aspects of peptic ulcer disease, Dieulafoy's lesion, and Mallory-Weiss syndrome in patients with advanced alcoholic liver disease or cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Nojkov, Borko; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To systematically review the data on distinctive aspects of peptic ulcer disease (PUD), Dieulafoy’s lesion (DL), and Mallory-Weiss syndrome (MWS) in patients with advanced alcoholic liver disease (aALD), including alcoholic hepatitis or alcoholic cirrhosis. METHODS: Computerized literature search performed via PubMed using the following medical subject heading terms and keywords: “alcoholic liver disease”, “alcoholic hepatitis”,“ alcoholic cirrhosis”, “cirrhosis”, “liver disease”, “upper gastrointestinal bleeding”, “non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding”, “PUD”, ‘‘DL’’, ‘‘Mallory-Weiss tear”, and “MWS’’. RESULTS: While the majority of acute gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding with aALD is related to portal hypertension, about 30%-40% of acute GI bleeding in patients with aALD is unrelated to portal hypertension. Such bleeding constitutes an important complication of aALD because of its frequency, severity, and associated mortality. Patients with cirrhosis have a markedly increased risk of PUD, which further increases with the progression of cirrhosis. Patients with cirrhosis or aALD and peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) have worse clinical outcomes than other patients with PUB, including uncontrolled bleeding, rebleeding, and mortality. Alcohol consumption, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, and portal hypertension may have a pathogenic role in the development of PUD in patients with aALD. Limited data suggest that Helicobacter pylori does not play a significant role in the pathogenesis of PUD in most cirrhotic patients. The frequency of bleeding from DL appears to be increased in patients with aALD. DL may be associated with an especially high mortality in these patients. MWS is strongly associated with heavy alcohol consumption from binge drinking or chronic alcoholism, and is associated with aALD. Patients with aALD have more severe MWS bleeding and are more likely to rebleed when compared to non

  11. Risk Factors of Atrophic Gastritis and Intestinal Metaplasia in First-Degree Relatives of Gastric Cancer Patients Compared with Age-Sex Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sooyeon; Kim, Nayoung; Yoon, Hyuk; Choi, Yun Jin; Lee, Ju Yup; Park, Kyoung Jun; Kim, Hee Jin; Kang, Kyu Keun; Oh, Dong Hyun; Seo, A Young; Lee, Jae Woo; Shin, Cheol Min; Park, Young Soo; Oh, Jane C.; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2013-01-01

    Background: To identify whether first-degree relatives (FDRs) of gastric cancer (GC) patients have increased risk for atrophic gastritis (AG) and intestinal metaplasia (IM) in relation to other risk factors of GC. Methods: The study cohort consisted of 224 pairs of age-sex matched controls and FDRs. AG and IM in the gastric mucosa were scored histologically using the updated Sydney classification. Risk of having AG and IM was studied by comparing FDRs to controls. Impacts of age, H. pylori infection, smoking, dietary and socioeconomic factors on the presence of AG and IM were studied. Results: In multivariate regression analysis, FDRs had adjusted OR of 2.69 (95% CI 1.06–6.80, P=0.037) for antral IM in male population. Adjusted OR for antral AG and IM were 9.28 (95% CI 4.73–18.18, P<0.001) and 7.81 (95% CI 3.72–16.40, P<0.001) for the H. pylori infected subjects in total population. Getting old by 5 years increased the ORs of having AG and IM by approximately 1.25 fold (P<0.001). Spicy food increased the OR of antral IM by 2.28 fold (95% CI 1.36–3.84, P=0.002). Conclusions: Family history of GC was an independent risk factor for antral IM in male in our study, which could be one reason for the increase of gastric cancer in the family member of gastric cancer. It could be an evidence for the necessity of frequent endoscopy in the presence of family history of GC compared to general population in male. PMID:25337541

  12. Somatic DNA Hypomethylation in H. pylori-Associated High-Risk Gastritis and Gastric Cancer: Enhanced Somatic Hypomethylation Associates with Advanced Stage Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leodolter, Andreas; Alonso, Sergio; González, Beatriz; Ebert, Matthias P; Vieth, Michael; Röcken, Christoph; Wex, Thomas; Peitz, Ullrich; Malfertheiner, Peter; Perucho, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Helicobacter pylori-related high-risk gastritis (HRG) is a severe risk factor for gastric cancer (GC). The link between HRG and long-term risk for GC may involve genetic and epigenetic alterations underlying a field defect, i.e. a region of the mucosa prone to cancer development. Global DNA hypomethylation is a pervasive alteration in GC that associates with chromosomal instability and poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to determine the chronology of this alteration along the progression of HRG to GC, to test the hypothesis that it occurs early in the chronology of this pathway and plays a mechanistic role in the long-term cancer risk. Methods: We comparatively measured the genomic methylation level in gastric biopsies from 94 GC patients and 16 of their cancer-free relatives, 38 HRG patients, and 17 GERD patients, using a quantitative enzymatic method. Results: GC biopsies were hypomethylated compared to their matching non-tumor mucosa (P=9.4 × 10−12), irrespective of the tumor location or patients' country of origin. Genome-wide hypomethylation was also found in gastric mucosa of GC (P=1.5 × 10−5) and HRG (P=0.004) patients compared with healthy donors and GC relatives, regardless of the biopsy location within the stomach or previous H. pylori eradication therapy. An enhanced hypomethylation, distinguished by a bi-slope distribution of the differences in methylation between tumor and normal tissues, associated with a more invasive (P=0.005) and advanced stage (P=0.017) type of GC. Conclusions: Universal DNA demethylation in normal gastric mucosa in GC patients appears sporadic rather than familial. Genomic hypomethylation in HRG possibly contributes to a field defect for cancerization that is not reversed by bacterial eradication. Enhanced somatic hypomethylation may stratify GC for prognostic purposes. PMID:25928808

  13. The history and rationale of using carbonic anhydrase inhibitors in the treatment of peptic ulcers. In memoriam Ioan Puşcaş (1932-2015).

    PubMed

    Buzás, György M; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-08-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitors (CAIs) started to be used in the treatment of peptic ulcers in the 1970s, and for more than two decades, a group led by Ioan Puşcaş used them for this purpose, assuming that by inhibiting the gastric mucosa CA isoforms, hydrochloric acid secretion is decreased. Although acetazolamide and other sulfonamide CAIs are indeed effective in healing ulcers, the inhibition of CA isoforms in other organs than the stomach led to a number of serious side effects which made this treatment obsolete when the histamine H2 receptor antagonists and the proton pump inhibitors became available. Decades later, in 2002, it has been discovered that Helicobacter pylori, the bacterial pathogen responsible for gastric ulcers and cancers, encodes for two CAs, one belonging to the α-class and the other one to the β-class of these enzymes. These enzymes are crucial for the life cycle of the bacterium and its acclimation within the highly acidic environment of the stomach. Inhibition of the two bacterial CAs with sulfonamides such as acetazolamide, a low-nanomolar H. pylori CAI, is lethal for the pathogen, which explains why these compounds were clinically efficient as anti-ulcer drugs. Thus, the approach promoted by Ioan Puşcaş for treating this disease was a good one although the rationale behind it was wrong. In this review, we present a historical overview of the sulfonamide CAIs as anti-ulcer agents, in memoriam of the scientist who was in the first line of this research trend.

  14. Postoperative Morbidity and Mortality of Perforated Peptic Ulcer: Retrospective Cohort Study of Risk Factors among Black Africans in Côte d'Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    Gona, Soro Kountele; Marcellin, Koffi Gnangoran; Adama, Coulibaly; Toussaint, Assohoun; Manuela, Ehua Adjoba; Sylvain, Seu Gagon; Anthony, Afum-Adjei Awuah; Francis, Ehua Somian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Surgical treatment of perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) is a challenge for surgeons in Africa. Aim. To determine risk factors of postoperative complications or mortality among black Ivoirian patients with PPU. Methods. All 161 patients (median age = 34 years, 90.7 male) operated on for PPU in the visceral and general surgery unit were enrolled in a retrospective cohort study. Variables were studied with Kaplan Meier and Cox proportional hazard models. Results. Among 161 patients operated on for PPU, 36 (27.5%) experienced complications and 31 (19.3%) died. Follow-up results were the incidence of complications and mortality of 6.4 (95% CI: 4.9–8.0) per 100 person-days and 3.0 (95% CI: 1.9–4.0) per 100 person-days for incidence of mortality. In multivariate analysis, risk factors of postoperative complications or mortality were comorbidities (HR = 2.1, P = 0.03), tachycardia (pulse rate > 100/minutes) (HR = 2.4, P = 0.02), purulent intra-abdominal fluid collection (HR = 2.1, P = 0.04), hyponatremia (median value ≤ 134 mEq/L) (HR = 2.3, P = 0.01), delayed time of hospital admission > 72 hours (HR = 2.6, P < 0.0001), and delayed time of surgical intervention between 24 and 48 hours (HR = 3.8, P < 0.0001). Conclusion. The delayed hospital admission or surgical intervention and hyponatremia may be considered as additional risk of postoperative complications or mortality in Black African patients with PPU. PMID:26925099

  15. The history and rationale of using carbonic anhydrase inhibitors in the treatment of peptic ulcers. In memoriam Ioan Puşcaş (1932-2015).

    PubMed

    Buzás, György M; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-08-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitors (CAIs) started to be used in the treatment of peptic ulcers in the 1970s, and for more than two decades, a group led by Ioan Puşcaş used them for this purpose, assuming that by inhibiting the gastric mucosa CA isoforms, hydrochloric acid secretion is decreased. Although acetazolamide and other sulfonamide CAIs are indeed effective in healing ulcers, the inhibition of CA isoforms in other organs than the stomach led to a number of serious side effects which made this treatment obsolete when the histamine H2 receptor antagonists and the proton pump inhibitors became available. Decades later, in 2002, it has been discovered that Helicobacter pylori, the bacterial pathogen responsible for gastric ulcers and cancers, encodes for two CAs, one belonging to the α-class and the other one to the β-class of these enzymes. These enzymes are crucial for the life cycle of the bacterium and its acclimation within the highly acidic environment of the stomach. Inhibition of the two bacterial CAs with sulfonamides such as acetazolamide, a low-nanomolar H. pylori CAI, is lethal for the pathogen, which explains why these compounds were clinically efficient as anti-ulcer drugs. Thus, the approach promoted by Ioan Puşcaş for treating this disease was a good one although the rationale behind it was wrong. In this review, we present a historical overview of the sulfonamide CAIs as anti-ulcer agents, in memoriam of the scientist who was in the first line of this research trend. PMID:26108882

  16. Helicobacter pylori-associated idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Vescovi, Pier Paolo; Garofano, Massimo; Veneri, Dino

    2012-07-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori has a well-demonstrated role in several gastroduodenal diseases, including peptic ulcer disease, chronic active gastritis, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, and gastric adenocarcinoma. In addition, more recently, several studies have focused on the possible causal role of H. pylori in various extragastric disorders, such as cardiovascular, respiratory, neurological, skin, and autoimmune conditions. The current status of the research on the pathogenesis, clinical and therapeutic aspects of H. pylori-associated idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in adults and children will be addressed in this narrative review.

  17. Caveolin-1 is a modulator of fibroblast activation and a potential biomarker for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Hao; Tang, Gu-Sheng; Wang, Xu-Dong; Zheng, Rui; Wang, Yang; Zhu, Yan; Xue, Xu-Chao; Bi, Jian-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Stromal fibroblasts play an important role in chronic cancer-related inflammation and the development as well as progression of malignant diseases. However, the difference and relationship between inflammation-associated fibroblasts (IAFs) and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are poorly understood. In this study, gastric cancer-associated fibroblasts (GCAFs) and their corresponding inflammation-associated fibroblasts (GIAFs) were isolated from gastric cancer (GC) with chronic gastritis and cultured in vitro. These activated fibroblasts exhibited distinct secretion and tumor-promoting behaviors in vitro. Using proteomics and bioinformatics techniques, caveolin-1 (Cav-1) was identified as a major network-centric protein of a sub-network consisting of 121 differentially expressed proteins between GIAFs and GCAFs. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry in a GC cohort showed significant difference in Cav-1 expression score between GIAFs and GCAFs and among patients with different grades of chronic gastritis. Moreover, silencing of Cav-1 in GIAFs and GCAFs using small interfering RNA increased the production of pro-inflammatory and tumor-enhancing cytokines and chemokines in conditioned mediums that elevated cell proliferation and migration when added to GC cell lines AGS and MKN45 in vitro. In addition, Cav-1 status in GIAFs and GCAFs independently predicted the prognosis of GC. Our findings indicate that Cav-1 loss contributes to the distinct activation statuses of fibroblasts in GC microenvironment and gastritis mucosa, and Cav-1 expression in both GCAFs and GIAFs may serve as a potential biomarker for GC progression. PMID:25798057

  18. Helicobacter pylori-induced chronic inflammation causes telomere shortening of gastric mucosa by promoting PARP-1-mediated non-homologous end joining of DNA.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Ping; Hou, Ming-Chih; Lan, Keng-Hsin; Li, Chung-Pin; Chao, Yee; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2016-09-15

    Helicobacter pylori infection leads to chronic gastritis and increased risk of gastric cancer. The mechanism involves chronic inflammation. We aimed to determine the mechanism by which H. pylori infection causes telomere shortening in inflammatory gastric mucosa. Gastric biopsy specimens were obtained from 20 patients with chronic gastritis or peptic ulcer caused by H. pylori infection. The specimens showed increased NF-κB and superoxide dismutase activities and elevated expressions of PARP-1 and γ-H2AX, all of which returned to normal levels after anti-H. pylori treatment, suggesting that oxidative DNA damage and PARP-1 overexpression might cause telomere shortening. In this report, we adopted DNA end joining assay and showed that H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa had increased alternative NHEJ (non-homologous end joining), implicating that telomere shortening was caused by inflammation-mediated overproduction of reactive oxygen species and PARP-1, leading to telomere shortening. PMID:27450718

  19. Diet and Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Imiela, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection has accompanied man for thousands of years. In some infected patients, a complex and dynamic pathogen-host reaction triggers pathogenic pathways resulting in development, inter alia, of atrophic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease (both gastric and duodenal), gastric adenocarcinoma, and MALT lymphoma. Large-scale eradication therapy is associated with a rapid increase in antibiotic resistance, gut flora composition disturbances, and increased risk of development, inter alia, of paediatric infectious diarrhoeas, atopic diseases, and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Our diet contains many substances with potent antibacterial activity against H. pylori. Dietary interventions enable a decrease in H. pylori colonisation and result in a decrease in gastritis prevalence, thus potentially lowering the risk of gastric adenocarcinoma development. PMID:27713775

  20. Down-regulated Th17 Responses Are Associated with Reduced Gastritis in Helicobacter pylori-infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Bimczok, Diane; Shaffer, Carrie L.; Cover, Timothy L.; Venegas, Alejandro; Salazar, Maria G.; Smythies, Lesley E.; Harris, Paul R.; Smith, Phillip D.

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori induces less gastric inflammation in children than adults. Here we investigated whether this reduced inflammation involves dysregulated Th17 responses. H. pylori-infected children and adults in Santiago, Chile had similar levels of H. pylori colonization, proportions of bacteria containing cagA and s1/s2 vacA markers of virulence and strain genotypes (predominantly hpEurope), but the children had significantly reduced levels of gastric inflammation and neutrophil infiltration. The reduced neutrophil accumulation in infected children was accompanied by significantly fewer gastric Th17 cells and significantly lower levels of IL-17-specific mRNA and protein compared to infected adults. The gastric mucosa of H. pylori-infected children also contained higher numbers of IL-10+ cells and increased levels of both IL-10 and Foxp3 mRNA compared to that of infected adults. Thus, reduced gastric inflammation, including diminished neutrophil accumulation, in H. pylori-infected children compared with infected adults is likely due to down-regulated gastric Th17/IL-17 responses as a consequence of enhanced mucosal regulatory T cell activity in the children. PMID:23299619