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Sample records for active geodetic network

  1. VERA Geodetic Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jike, Takaaki; Tamura, Yoshiaki; Shizugami, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    This report briefly describes the geodetic activities of VERA in the year 2012. The regular geodetic observations are carried out both in K- and S/X-bands. The frequency of regular observations is three times a month-twice for the VERA internal observations in K-band. The networks of the S/X sessions are JADE of GSI and IVS-T2. The raw data of the T2 and JADE sessions are electronically transferred to the Bonn, Haystack, and GSI correlators via Internet. Gravimetric observations are carried out at the VERA stations. An SG was installed at Mizusawa and placed in the vicinity of the VERA antenna in order to monitor vertical displacement at the end of 2008, and the observations continued throughout the year. Also at the VERA-Ishigakijima station, continuous operation of the SG started in 2012. The crustal movements generated by the 2011 earthquake off the Pacific coast of Tohoku continued during 2012, and displacement of the VERA-Mizusawa position by post-seismic creeping continued.

  2. Geodetic Network Design and Optimization on the Active Tuzla Fault (Izmir, Turkey) for Disaster Management

    PubMed Central

    Halicioglu, Kerem; Ozener, Haluk

    2008-01-01

    Both seismological and geodynamic research emphasize that the Aegean Region, which comprises the Hellenic Arc, the Greek mainland and Western Turkey is the most seismically active region in Western Eurasia. The convergence of the Eurasian and African lithospheric plates forces a westward motion on the Anatolian plate relative to the Eurasian one. Western Anatolia is a valuable laboratory for Earth Science research because of its complex geological structure. Izmir is a large city in Turkey with a population of about 2.5 million that is at great risk from big earthquakes. Unfortunately, previous geodynamics studies performed in this region are insufficient or cover large areas instead of specific faults. The Tuzla Fault, which is aligned trending NE–SW between the town of Menderes and Cape Doganbey, is an important fault in terms of seismic activity and its proximity to the city of Izmir. This study aims to perform a large scale investigation focusing on the Tuzla Fault and its vicinity for better understanding of the region's tectonics. In order to investigate the crustal deformation along the Tuzla Fault and Izmir Bay, a geodetic network has been designed and optimizations were performed. This paper suggests a schedule for a crustal deformation monitoring study which includes research on the tectonics of the region, network design and optimization strategies, theory and practice of processing. The study is also open for extension in terms of monitoring different types of fault characteristics. A one-dimensional fault model with two parameters – standard strike-slip model of dislocation theory in an elastic half-space – is formulated in order to determine which sites are suitable for the campaign based geodetic GPS measurements. Geodetic results can be used as a background data for disaster management systems.

  3. Geodetic VLBI Activities at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzaki, Yoshihiro

    2001-03-01

    The Geographical Survey Institute (GSI) has been performing geodetic VLBI observations to correct the positions of geodetic control points in Japan and to detect plate motion and crustal deformation around Japan. In 1981, GSI began development of a mobile VLBI system in cooperation with the Communications Research Laboratory, and used this system from 1986 to 1993 in the VLBI Experiment for Geodetic Application (VEGA) project. The most remarkable achievement of the VEGA project was the first detection of motion of the Philippine Sea plate. The GSI also carried out VLBI observations between Japan and Korea in 1995 by transporting a mobile system with a 3.8-m antenna to Korea. In 1994, ownership of the Kashima 26-m antenna was transferred from CRL to GSI, and with this antenna, GSI started to participate in international global observations, The coordinates of the Kashima 26-m antenna in the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) have become the primary point of a new Japanese Geodetic Datum, At present, GSI's VLBI network in Japan consists of five stations that are used to perform regular VLBI observations. More than 30 years have passed, however, since the construction of the Kashima 26-m antenna, and its role has been passed on to the Tsukuba station, which will now participate in international global observations and act as the key station of the Japanese VLBI network.

  4. Observing active deformation of volcanoes in North America: Geodetic data from the Plate Boundary Observatory and associated networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puskas, C. M.; Phillips, D. A.; Mattioli, G. S.; Meertens, C. M.; Hodgkinson, K. M.; Crosby, C. J.; Enders, M.; Feaux, K.; Mencin, D.; Baker, S.; Lisowski, M.; Smith, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), operated by UNAVCO, records deformation of the geologically diverse North America western plate boundary, with subnetworks of instruments concentrated at selected active and potentially active volcanoes. These sensors record deformation and earthquakes and allow monitoring agencies and researchers to analyze changes in ground motion and seismicity. The intraplate volcanoes at Yellowstone and Long Valley are characterized by uplift/subsidence cycles, high seismicity, and hydrothermal activity but there have been no historic eruptions at either volcano. PBO maintains dense GPS networks of 20-25 stations at each of these volcanoes, with an additional 5 boreholes at Yellowstone containing tensor strainmeters, short-period seismometers, and borehole tiltmeters. Subduction zone volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc have had multiple historic eruptions, and PBO maintains equipment at Augustine (8 GPS), Akutan (8 GPS, 4 tiltmeters), and Unimak Island (14 GPS, 8 tiltmeters). The Unimak stations are at the active Westdahl and Shishaldin edifices and the nearby, inactive Isanotski volcano. In the Cascade Arc, PBO maintains networks at Mount St. Helens (15 GPS, 4 borehole strainmeters and seismometers, 8 borehole tiltmeters), Shasta (7 GPS, 1 borehole strainmeter and seismometer), and Lassen Peak (8 GPS). Data from many of these stations in the Pacific Northwest and California are also provided as realtime streams of raw and processed data. Real-time GPS data, along with high-rate GPS data, will be an important new resource for detecting and studying future rapid volcanic deformation events and earthquakes. UNAVCO works closely with the USGS Volcano Hazards Program, archiving data from USGS GPS stations in Alaska, Cascadia, and Long Valley. The PBO and USGS networks combined provide more comprehensive coverage than PBO alone, particularly of the Cascade Arc, where the USGS maintains a multiple instruments near each volcano. Ground

  5. Three-dimensional stochastic adjustment of volcano geodetic network in Arenal volcano, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, C.; van der Laat, R.; Cattin, P.-H.; Del Potro, R.

    2009-04-01

    Volcano geodetic networks are a key instrument to understanding magmatic processes and, thus, forecasting potentially hazardous activity. These networks are extensively used on volcanoes worldwide and generally comprise a number of different traditional and modern geodetic surveying techniques such as levelling, distances, triangulation and GNSS. However, in most cases, data from the different methodologies are surveyed, adjusted and analysed independently. Experience shows that the problem with this procedure is the mismatch between the excellent correlation of position values within a single technique and the low cross-correlation of such values within different techniques or when the same network is surveyed shortly after using the same technique. Moreover one different independent network for each geodetic surveying technique strongly increase logistics and thus the cost of each measurement campaign. It is therefore important to develop geodetic networks which combine the different geodetic surveying technique, and to adjust geodetic data together in order to better quantify the uncertainties associated to the measured displacements. In order to overcome the lack of inter-methodology data integration, the Geomatic Institute of the University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland (HEIG-VD) has developed a methodology which uses a 3D stochastic adjustment software of redundant geodetic networks, TRINET+. The methodology consists of using each geodetic measurement technique for its strengths relative to other methodologies. Also, the combination of the measurements in a single network allows more cost-effective surveying. The geodetic data are thereafter adjusted and analysed in the same referential frame. The adjustment methodology is based on the least mean square method and links the data with the geometry. Trinet+ also allows to run a priori simulations of the network, hence testing the quality and resolution to be expected for a determined network even

  6. Free geometric adjustment of the DOC/DOD cooperative worldwide geodetic satellite (BC-4) network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reilly, J. P.; Kumar, M.; Mueller, I. I.; Saxena, N.

    1973-01-01

    The application of observations from the ANNA satellite to solve geodetic problems is discussed. The establishment of a worldwide network of optical observing stations by the National Geodetic Survey is reported. The geodetic network is composed of 49 observing stations, more or less evenly distributed throughout the world. A method for using correlated satellite observations for the accurate recovery of ground station positions and applying the result to the adjustment of the National Geodetic Survey worldwide network was developed.

  7. LIBRA: An inexpensive geodetic network densification system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fliegel, H. F.; Gantsweg, M.; Callahan, P. S.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of the Libra (Locations Interposed by Ranging Aircraft) system, by which geodesy and earth strain measurements can be performed rapidly and inexpensively to several hundred auxiliary points with respect to a few fundamental control points established by any other technique, such as radio interferometry or satellite ranging. This low-cost means of extending the accuracy of space age geodesy to local surveys provides speed and spatial resolution useful, for example, for earthquake hazards estimation. Libra may be combined with an existing system, Aries (Astronomical Radio Interferometric Earth Surveying) to provide a balanced system adequate to meet the geophysical needs, and applicable to conventional surveying. The basic hardware design was outlined and specifications were defined. Then need for network densification was described. The following activities required to implement the proposed Libra system are also described: hardware development, data reduction, tropospheric calibrations, schedule of development and estimated costs.

  8. Reference networks (Control surveys). [Geodetic systems for earth crustal movement monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Strange, W.E.; Zilkoski, D.B. )

    1991-01-01

    Control surveying activities of the National Geodetic Survey are reported for the 1987-1990 time period. The report is divided into two parts: horizontal control and vertical control. Particular attention is given to the North American Datum of 1983, high accuracy reference networks, the Global Positioning System and vertical control, vertical field surveys, and special survey projects. 44 refs.

  9. Optimal Design of Geodetic Network Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajedian, Sanaz; Bagheri, Hosein

    2010-05-01

    A geodetic network is a network which is measured exactly by techniques of terrestrial surveying based on measurement of angles and distances and can control stability of dams, towers and their around lands and can monitor deformation of surfaces. The main goals of an optimal geodetic network design process include finding proper location of control station (First order Design) as well as proper weight of observations (second order observation) in a way that satisfy all the criteria considered for quality of the network with itself is evaluated by the network's accuracy, reliability (internal and external), sensitivity and cost. The first-order design problem, can be dealt with as a numeric optimization problem. In this designing finding unknown coordinates of network stations is an important issue. For finding these unknown values, network geodetic observations that are angle and distance measurements must be entered in an adjustment method. In this regard, using inverse problem algorithms is needed. Inverse problem algorithms are methods to find optimal solutions for given problems and include classical and evolutionary computations. The classical approaches are analytical methods and are useful in finding the optimum solution of a continuous and differentiable function. Least squares (LS) method is one of the classical techniques that derive estimates for stochastic variables and their distribution parameters from observed samples. The evolutionary algorithms are adaptive procedures of optimization and search that find solutions to problems inspired by the mechanisms of natural evolution. These methods generate new points in the search space by applying operators to current points and statistically moving toward more optimal places in the search space. Genetic algorithm (GA) is an evolutionary algorithm considered in this paper. This algorithm starts with definition of initial population, and then the operators of selection, replication and variation are applied

  10. Data-adaptive detection of transient deformation in geodetic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walwer, Damian; Calais, Eric; Ghil, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The recent development of dense and continuously operating Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) networks worldwide has led to a significant increase in geodetic data sets that sometimes capture transient-deformation signals. It is challenging, however, to extract such transients of geophysical origin from the background noise inherent to GNSS time series and, even more so, to separate them from other signals, such as seasonal redistributions of geophysical fluid mass loads. In addition, because of the very large number of continuously recording GNSS stations now available, it has become impossible to systematically inspect each time series and visually compare them at all neighboring sites. Here we show that Multichannel Singular Spectrum Analysis (M-SSA), a method derived from the analysis of dynamical systems, can be used to extract transient deformations, seasonal oscillations, and background noise present in GNSS time series. M-SSA is a multivariate, nonparametric, statistical method that simultaneously exploits the spatial and temporal correlations of geophysical fields. The method allows for the extraction of common modes of variability, such as trends with nonconstant slopes and oscillations shared across time series, without a priori hypotheses about their spatiotemporal structure or their noise characteristics. We illustrate this method using synthetic examples and show applications to actual GPS data from Alaska to detect seasonal signals and microdeformation at the Akutan active volcano. The geophysically coherent spatiotemporal patterns of uplift and subsidence thus detected are compared to the results of an idealized model of such processes in the presence of a magma chamber source.

  11. Designing a Global Geodetic Network to Support GGOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlis, E. C.; Ries, J. C.; MacMillan, D. S.; Kuzmicz-Cieslak, M.; Ma, C.; Rowlands, D. D.

    2007-12-01

    Space geodesy is entrusted with the establishment and maintenance of reference frames that are widely used by the scientific and other user communities. Over the past decade, the burden of this task was primarily carried by the services of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG), led by IERS--the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service. The new IAG initiative, the Global Geodetic Observing System--GGOS, places the utmost importance on the development, maintenance and wide distribution of an International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) of high accuracy and stability. At present, the goal is the definition of the origin accurate to 1 mm or better (at epoch) and a temporal stability on the order of 0.1 mm/y, with similar numbers for the scale and orientation components. The stability, integrity and applicability of the ITRF are directly related to how accurately we can account for mass redistribution during the analysis and reduction process of the data used for its development. Long wavelength variations of the gravity field driven by these mass redistributions produce geometric effects that are manifested as changes in the origin and orientation between the instantaneous and the mean reference frame. An uneven distribution of the stations that realize the ITRF on the globe generates biases and distortions in the combined product due to the dissimilarity of the combined networks and the de facto lopsided overlap of the combined networks. The poor geometry of the constituent networks results in increased correlations between the similarity transformation parameters, and they thus lead to biased and unstable results. The currently existing networks do not support high accuracy products and it is widely accepted that they are urgently in need of serious modernization and resource redistribution. Using simulations of geodetic data that we expect to collect with the future geodetic networks (SLR and VLBI), we provide preliminary options for

  12. Scandinavia studies of recent crustal movements and the space geodetic baseline network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    A brief review of crustal movements within the Fenno-Scandia shield is given. Results from postglacial studies, projects for measuring active fault regions, and dynamic ocean loading experiments are presented. The 1979 Scandinavian Doppler Campaign Network is discussed. This network includes Doppler translocation baseline determination of future very long baseline interferometry baselines to be measured in Scandinavia. Intercomparison of earlier Doppler translocation measurements with a high precision terrestrial geodetic baseline in Scandinavia has yielded internal agreement of 6 cm over 887 km. This is a precision of better than 1 part in to the 7th power.

  13. Empirical methods of reducing the observations in geodetic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadaj, Roman

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents empirical methodology of reducing various kinds of observations in geodetic network. A special case of reducing the observation concerns cartographic mapping. For numerical illustration and comparison of methods an application of the conformal Gauss-Krüger mapping was used. Empirical methods are an alternative to the classic differential and multi-stages methods. Numerical benefits concern in particular very long geodesics, created for example by GNSS vectors. In conventional methods the numerical errors of reduction values are significantly dependent on the length of the geodesic. The proposed empirical methods do not have this unfavorable characteristics. Reduction value is determined as a difference (or especially scaled difference) of the corresponding measures of geometric elements (distances, angles), wherein these measures are approximated independently in two spaces based on the known and corresponding approximate coordinates of the network points. Since in the iterative process of the network adjustment, coordinates of the points are systematically improved, approximated reductions also converge to certain optimal values.

  14. Enhanced three-dimensional stochastic adjustment for combined volcano geodetic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Potro, R.; Muller, C.

    2009-12-01

    work we present a first effort to apply this technique to a new volcano geodetic network on Arenal volcano in Costa Rica, using triangulation, EDM and GNSS data from four campaigns. An a priori simulation, later confirmed by field measurements, of the movement detection capacity of different benchmarks within the network, shows how the network design is optimised to detect smaller displacement at the points where these are expected. Data from the four campaigns also proves the repeatability and consistency of the statistical indicators. A preliminary interpretation of the geodetic data relative to Arenal’s volcanic activity could indicate a correlation between displacement velocity and direction with the location and thickness of the recent lava flow field. This then suggests that a deflation caused by the weight of the lava field could be obscuring the effects of possible deep magmatic sources. Although this study is specific to Arenal volcano and its regional tectonic setting, we suggest that the cost-effective, high-quality results we present, prove the methodology’s potential to be incorporated into the design and analysis of volcano geodetic networks worldwide.

  15. The GIS of the Central Apennines Geodetic Network (CA-GeoNet): Database Description and Application for Crustal Deformation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristofoletti, P.; Esposito, A.; Anzidei, M.; Galvani, A.; Baldi, P.; Pesci, A.; Casula, G.; Serpelloni, E.; Basili, R.

    2002-12-01

    During the last few years we set up and surveyed a GPS geodetic network to investigate the active tectonic areas of the Central Apennine, using a combination of permanent and not-permanent geodetic stations. The final goal is to evaluate the geodetic strain rate and the coseismic deformations of this seismically active area. For an optimal management and mapping of the CA-GeoNet (Central Apennine Geodetic Network) a Geographical Information System (GIS) has been developed. The GIS is used to analyze geodetic sources and improve the analysis of crustal deformations and has been realized on PC platform using MapInfo 6.0 and ArcGIS8.1 software. The GIS manages an SQL database consisting of different classes (Geodesy, Topography, Geography, Seismicity and Geology) administrated according to Thematic Layers. A GIS is required for the multidisciplinary approach and management of large multi-scaled data set, geographically referenced and with continuos or discrete coverage; it is particularly designed to analyze GPS sources and to improve crustal deformation analysis related with tectonic structures and seismicity. Through GIS we can display site displacements, strain rate maps and create new layers gained by numerical and spatial analysis. A tailor-made application to support co-seismic deformation scenarios related with historical and instrumental earthquakes and seismic sources, has been created. Our procedures can be successfully applied to design new geodetic networks in seismically active areas with respect to the known seismotectonic features. This dynamic approach in planning and managing GPS networks for geodynamic applications provides a useful tool for geophysical research, earthquake impact and civil protection management.

  16. Geodetic activities of the Department of Defense under IGY programs

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, O.W.; Daugherty, K.I.

    1983-10-16

    Attention is given to the U.S. Department of Defence (DOD) activities that contributed to the International Geophysical Year's active, passive, and cooperative satellite programs. The DOD continues to support the deployment, enhancement, and application of novel technology in such areas as satellite altimetry, gravity radiometry, inertial surveying, interferometry, airborne gravimetry, inertial surveying, and CCD and laser methods for geodetic astronomy. Also noted are such major department initiatives as the Global Positioning System, which will become operational toward the end of this decade.

  17. The Gis of The Central Apennines Geodetic Network (ca-geonet): Database Description and Application For Crustal Deformation Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristofoletti, P.; Esposito, A.; Anzidei, M.; Baldi, P.; Basili, R.; Casula, G.; Galvani, A.; Pesci, A.; Serpelloni, E.

    During the last few years we set up and surveyed a GPS geodetic network to inves- tigate the active tectonic areas of the Central Apennine, using a combination of per- manent and not-permanent geodetic stations. The final goal is to evaluate the geodetic strain rate and the coseismic deformations of this seismically active area. For an op- timal management and mapping of the CA-GeoNet (Central Apennine Geodetic Net- work) a Geographical Information System (GIS) has been developed. It has been real- ized on PC platform using MapInfo 6.0 and ArcGIS8.1 software. The GIS manages a database consisting of different classes (Geodesy, Topography, Geography, Seismicity and Geology) administrated according to Thematic Layers. A GIS is required for the multidisciplinary approach and management of large multi-scaled data set, geographi- cally referenced and with continuos or discrete coverage; it is particularly designed to analyze GPS sources and to improve crustal deformation analysis related with tectonic structures and seismicity. Through GIS we can display site displacements, strain rate maps and create new layers gained by numerical and spatial analysis. A tailor-made application to support co-seismic deformation scenarios related with historical and instrumental earthquakes and seismic sources, has been created. Our procedures can be successfully applied to design new geodetic networks in seismically active areas with respect to the known seismotectonic features. This dynamic approach in plan- ning and managing GPS networks for geodynamic applications provides a useful tool for geophysical research, earthquake impact and civil protection management.

  18. Statistical analysis of geodetic networks for detecting regional events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granat, Robert

    2004-01-01

    We present an application of hidden Markov models (HMMs) to analysis of geodetic time series in Southern California. Our model fitting method uses a regularized version of the deterministic annealing expectation-maximization algorithm to ensure that model solutions are both robust and of high quality.

  19. GeoNetGIS: a Geodetic Network Geographical Information System to manage GPS networks in seismic and volcanic areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristofoletti, P.; Esposito, A.; Anzidei, M.

    2003-04-01

    This paper presents the methodologies and issues involved in the use of GIS techniques to manage geodetic information derived from networks in seismic and volcanic areas. Organization and manipulation of different geodetical, geological and seismic database, give us a new challenge in interpretation of information that has several dimensions, including spatial and temporal variations, also the flexibility and brand range of tools available in GeoNetGIS, make it an attractive platform for earthquake risk assessment. During the last decade the use of geodetic networks based on the Global Positioning System, devoted to geophysical applications, especially for crustal deformation monitoring in seismic and volcanic areas, increased dramatically. The large amount of data provided by these networks, combined with different and independent observations, such as epicentre distribution of recent and historical earthquakes, geological and structural data, photo interpretation of aerial and satellite images, can aid for the detection and parameterization of seismogenic sources. In particular we applied our geodetic oriented GIS to a new GPS network recently set up and surveyed in the Central Apennine region: the CA-GeoNet. GeoNetGIS is designed to analyze in three and four dimensions GPS sources and to improve crustal deformation analysis and interpretation related with tectonic structures and seismicity. It manages many database (DBMS) consisting of different classes, such as Geodesy, Topography, Seismicity, Geology, Geography and Raster Images, administrated according to Thematic Layers. GeoNetGIS represents a powerful research tool allowing to join the analysis of all data layers to integrate the different data base which aid for the identification of the activity of known faults or structures and suggesting the new evidences of active tectonics. A new approach to data integration given by GeoNetGIS capabilities, allow us to create and deliver a wide range of maps, digital

  20. Improving the Global Geodetic Observing System network by applying the Most Remote Point method to the selection of new sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, H.

    2013-12-01

    The Global Geodetic Observing System shall consist of globally well distributed geodetic observatories. The GGOS network will be based on a number of technique specific observatories which contribute their observation data to the international services like the IVS, ILRS, IGS, IGFS. The distribution of reference points in these global geodetic networks is not optimal. In order to establish the Global Geodetic Observing System the current distribution of observatory sites must be reviewed with a global perspective. We developed the most remote point (mrp) method to identify gaps in the geometry of global networks. This method is applied to the individual space geodetic VLBI and SLR network. In each iteration step the identified most remote point is assumed to become a new observatory site improving such the homogeneity of the global network. As a result possible new locations for GGOS observatories can be evaluated and suggested.

  1. Recent Seismic and Geodetic Activity at Multiple Volcanoes in the Ecuadorean Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, S.; Ruiz, M. C.; McCausland, W. A.; Prejean, S. G.; Mothes, P. A.; Bell, A. F.; Hidalgo, S.; Barrington, C.; Yepez, M.; Aguaiza, S.; Plain, M.

    2015-12-01

    The state of volcanic activity often fluctuates between periods of repose and unrest. The transition time between a period of repose and unrest, or vice versa for an open system, can occur within a matter of hours or days. Because of this short time scale, real-time seismic and geodetic (e.g. tiltmeter, GPS) monitoring networks are crucial for characterizing the state of activity of a volcano. In the Ecuadorean Andes, 5 volcanoes demonstrate long-term (Tungurahua, Reventador, and Guagua Pichincha) or recently reactivated (Cotopaxi, Chiles-Cerro Negro) seismic and geodetic activity. The Instituto Geofisico regularly characterizes volcano seismicity into long period, very long period, volcano-tectonic, and tremor events. Significant recent changes at these volcanoes include: rigorous reactivation of glacier-capped Cotopaxi, drumbeat seismicity absent a dome extrusion at Tungurahua, and regularly reoccurring (~7 day recurrence interval), shallow seismic swarms at Guagua Pichincha. These volcanoes locate along both the Western and Eastern Cordillera of the Ecuadorean Andes and, where data are available, manifest important variations in chemical composition, daily gas flux, and surficial deformation. We summarize the long-term geophysical parameters measured at each volcano and place recent changes in each parameter in a larger magmatic and hydrothermal context. All of the studied volcanoes present significant societal hazards to local and regional communities.

  2. Recent surface displacements in the Upper Rhine Graben — Preliminary results from geodetic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, Thomas; Heck, Bernhard; Knöpfler, Andreas; Masson, Frédéric; Mayer, Michael; Ulrich, Patrice; Westerhaus, Malte; Zippelt, Karl

    2013-08-01

    Datasets of the GNSS Upper Rhine Graben Network (GURN) and the national levelling networks in Germany, France and Switzerland are investigated with respect to current surface displacements in the Upper Rhine Graben (URG) area. GURN consists of about 80 permanent GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems) stations. The terrestrial levelling network comprises 1st and 2nd order levelling lines that have been remeasured at intervals of roughly 25 years, starting in 1922. Compared to earlier studies national institutions and private companies made available raw data, allowing for consistent solutions for the URG region. We focussed on the southern and eastern parts of the investigation area. Our preliminary results show that the levelling and GNSS datasets are sensitive to resolve small surface displacement rates down to an order of magnitude of 0.2 mm/a and 0.4 mm/a, respectively. The observed horizontal velocity components for a test region south of Strasbourg, obtained from GNSS coordinate time series, vary around 0.5 mm/a. The results are in general agreement with interseismic strain built-up in a sinistral strike-slip regime. Since the accuracy of the GNSS derived vertical component is insufficient, data of precise levelling networks is used to determine vertical displacement rates. More than 75% of the vertical rates obtained from a kinematic adjustment of 1st order levelling lines in the eastern part of URG vary between - 0.2 mm/a and + 0.2 mm/a, indicating that this region behaves stable. Higher rates up to 0.5 mm/a in a limited region south of Freiburg are in general agreement with active faulting. We conclude that both networks deliver stable results that reflect real surface movements in the URG area. We note, however, that geodetically observed surface displacements generally result from a superposition of different effects, and that a separation in tectonic and non-tectonic processes needs additional information and expertise.

  3. Datum maintenance of the main Egyptian geodetic control networks by utilizing Precise Point Positioning "PPP" technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabah, Mostafa; Elmewafey, Mahmoud; Farahan, Magda H.

    2016-06-01

    A geodetic control network is the wire-frame or the skeleton on which continuous and consistent mapping, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and surveys are based. Traditionally, geodetic control points are established as permanent physical monuments placed in the ground and precisely marked, located, and documented. With the development of satellite surveying methods and their availability and high degree of accuracy, a geodetic control network could be established by using GNSS and referred to an international terrestrial reference frame used as a three-dimensional geocentric reference system for a country. Based on this concept, in 1992, the Egypt Survey Authority (ESA) established two networks, namely High Accuracy Reference Network (HARN) and the National Agricultural Cadastral Network (NACN). To transfer the International Terrestrial Reference Frame to the HARN, the HARN was connected with four IGS stations. The processing results were 1:10,000,000 (Order A) for HARN and 1:1,000,000 (Order B) for NACN relative network accuracy standard between stations defined in ITRF1994 Epoch1996. Since 1996, ESA did not perform any updating or maintaining works for these networks. To see how non-performing maintenance degrading the values of the HARN and NACN, the available HARN and NACN stations in the Nile Delta were observed. The Processing of the tested part was done by CSRS-PPP Service based on utilizing Precise Point Positioning "PPP" and Trimble Business Center "TBC". The study shows the feasibility of Precise Point Positioning in updating the absolute positioning of the HARN network and its role in updating the reference frame (ITRF). The study also confirmed the necessity of the absent role of datum maintenance of Egypt networks.

  4. The Global Geodetic Observing System: Space Geodesy Networks for the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Michael; Pavlis, Erricos; Ma, Chopo; Altamini, Zuheir; Noll, Carey; Stowers, David

    2011-01-01

    Ground-based networks of co-located space geodetic techniques (VLBI, SLR, GNSS. and DORIS) are the basis for the development and maintenance of the International Terrestrial Reference frame (ITRF), which is our metric of reference for measurements of global change, The Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) has established a task to develop a strategy to design, integrate and maintain the fundamental geodetic network and supporting infrastructure in a sustainable way to satisfy the long-term requirements for the reference frame. The GGOS goal is an origin definition at 1 mm or better and a temporal stability on the order of 0.1 mm/y, with similar numbers for the scale and orientation components. These goals are based on scientific requirements to address sea level rise with confidence, but other applications are not far behind. Recent studies including one by the US National Research Council has strongly stated the need and the urgency for the fundamental space geodesy network. Simulations are underway to examining accuracies for origin, scale and orientation of the resulting ITRF based on various network designs and system performance to determine the optimal global network to achieve this goal. To date these simulations indicate that 24 - 32 co-located stations are adequate to define the reference frame and a more dense GNSS and DORIS network will be required to distribute the reference frame to users anywhere on Earth. Stations in the new global network will require geologically stable sites with good weather, established infrastructure, and local support and personnel. GGOS wil seek groups that are interested in participation. GGOS intends to issues a Call for Participation of groups that would like to contribute in the network implementation and operation. Some examples of integrated stations currently in operation or under development will be presented. We will examine necessary conditions and challenges in

  5. Feasibility of Construction of the Continuously Operating Geodetic GPS Network of Sinaloa, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, G. E.; Jacobo, C.

    2011-12-01

    This research is based on the study and analysis of feasibility for the construction of the geodetic network for GPS continuous operation for Sinaloa, hereafter called (RGOCSIN). A GPS network of continuous operation is defined as that materialized structure physically through permanent monuments where measurements to the systems of Global Positioning (GPS) is performed continuously throughout a region. The GPS measurements in this network are measurements of accuracy according to international standards to define its coordinates, thus constituting the basic structure of geodetic referencing for a country. In this context is that in the near future the RGOCSIN constitutes a system state only accurate and reliable georeferencing in real-time (continuous and permanent operation) and will be used for different purposes; i.e., in addition to being fundamental basis for any lifting topographic or geodetic survey, and other areas such as: (1) Different construction processes (control and monitoring of engineering works); (2) Studies of deformation of the Earth's crust (before and after a seismic event); (3) GPS meteorology (weather forecasting); (4) Demarcation projects (natural and political); (5) Establishment of bases to generate mapping (necessary for the economic and social development of the state); (6) Precision agriculture (optimization of economic resources to the various crops); (7) Geographic information systems (Organization and planning activities associated with the design and construction of public services); (8) Urban growth (possible settlements in the appropriate form and taking care of the environmental aspect), among others. However there are criteria and regulations according to the INEGI (Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía, http://www.inegi.org.mx/) that must be met; even for this stage of feasibility of construction that sees this project as a first phase. The fundamental criterion to be taken into account according to INEGI is a

  6. Contribution of Geodetic Datum in GNSS Networks to Monitored Displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdemir, Alpay; Dogan, Ugur; Aydin, Cuneyt

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of datum definition on the monitored displacements of GNSS networks. The datum definition is a significant problem in terms of reliable deformation analysis and interpretation on determining the deformation in GNSS networks. The observations have been analyzed to show the reliability analysis of a group of station in the network and the influence of datum definition on the deformations of GNSS monitoring networks. For this purpose, we studied GPS observations in the CORS-TR network collected on a set of 13 station to detect co-seismic deformation of the 23 October 2011 (Mw=7.2) Van earthquake in the eastern of Turkey. The GPS observations were processed in the ITRF 2008 reference frame using the Bernese 5.2 GNSS software. Seven datum configuration modes which depend on the number of datum stations, which are selected from 9 IGS stations, were defined to determine co-seismic deformation of the Van earthquake and the deformations of GPS stations were computed for every datum definition. Our results indicate that each station showed different temporal behavior and significant relative motions with respect to datum definition. On the other hand, the distribution of the datum stations around the monitored region seems to be very important factor for determining the displacements. To show the effect of datum station distribution, we compare the displacements obtained from two different datum configuration modes (mode 1: 4 datum station "BUCU, GRAZ, MATE, SOFI" located at Eurasian plate, which are far away from the region, and mode 2: 9 datum station "BUCU, GRAZ, MATE, SOFI, TUBI, CRAO, ZECK, NICO, DRAG" located around the region). For instance, co-seismic displacements for station MURA, which is the closest station to the earthquake epicenter (˜43 km), amounted to -82.24 ± 0.60 mm for the north component, 12.01 ± 0.76 mm for the east component and -25.19 ± 2.49 mm for the up component with respect to mode 1, -89

  7. A geodetic network in the Novarupta area, Katmai National Park, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kleinman, J.W.; Iwatsubo, E.Y.

    1991-01-01

    A small geodetic network was established in 1989 and 1990 to monitor ground deformation in the Novarupta area, Katmai National Park, Alaska. Slope distances and zenith angles for three lines were repeated in 1990. A comparison of the two surveys indicates changes that are within the error of the measurements. Mean mark-to-mark slope distance changes are 1.17 ?? 1.46 ppm. Two benchmarks were added to the network in 1990 to configure a five-endpoint braced quadrilateral centered about the Novarupta dome. -Authors

  8. Anatomy of minimum constraints in geodetic network adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsakis, Ch.

    2013-01-01

    The scope of this paper is to investigate the influence of the minimum constraints (MCs) on the reference frame parameters in a free-net solution. The non-estimable part of these parameters is analyzed in terms of its stability under a numerical perturbation of the constrained datum functionals. In practice, such a perturbation can be ascribed either to hidden errors in the known coordinates/velocities participating in the MCs, or to a simple change of their a priori values due to a datum switch on a different fiducial dataset. In addition, a perturbation of this type may cause a nonlinear variation to the estimable part of the reference frame parameters, since it theoretically affects the adjusted observations that are implied by the network's nonlinear observational model. The aforementioned effects have an impact on the quality of a terrestrial reference frame that is established via a minimum-constrained adjustment, and our study shows that they are both controlled through a characteristic matrix which is inherently linked to the MC system.

  9. Strain Analysis in Horizontal Geodetic Network of Dams for Control of Stability and Monitoring Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roohi, S.; Ardalan, A. A.; Khodakarami, M.

    2009-04-01

    Dams as one of the engineering structures play very important role in human life. Because, from primary human needs such as providing drinking water to professional needs such as water powerhouse creation in order to provide power for industrial centers, hospitals, manufactures and agriculture, have considerable dependent on dams. In addition destruction of a dam can be as dangerous as earthquake. Therefore maintenance, stability control and monitoring deformation of them is indispensable. In order to control stability of dams and their around lands and monitoring deformation a network is created by surveyor, geologist and dam experts on crest and body of dam or on land near the dam. Geodetic observations are done in this network by precise surveying instrument in deferent time then by using linear least square parametric adjustment method, adjusted coordinates with their variance- covariance matrix and error ellipses, redundancy numbers for observation, blunders and … are estimated in each epoch. Then displacement vectors are computed in each point of network, After that by use of Lagrangeian deformation idea and constitution of deformation equations movement, displacement model is determined and strain tensor is computed. we can induce deformation information from strain tensor in different ways such as strain ellipse then interpret deformation that happen in each point of network. Also we can compute rigid rotation from anti-symmetric part of displacement gradient tensor. After processing tow consequence epochs observations of horzontal geodetic network of Hnna dam in southwest of Esfahan, the most semi-major axis of error ellipse is estimated about 0.9mm for point D10, largest displacement is 1.4mm for point C3 that it's semimajor axis of displacement error ellipse is 1.3mm and there is different shear in all of network points exceptional points D2,C3 and C2. There is different dilatation in most of points. These amount of maximum shear and dilatation are

  10. Integration of the Plate Boundary Observatory and Existing GPS Networks in Southern California: A Multi Use Geodetic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, C.; Blume, F.; Meertens, C.; Arnitz, E.; Lawrence, S.; Miller, S.; Bradley, W.; Jackson, M.; Feaux, K.

    2007-12-01

    The ultra-stable GPS monument design developed by Southern California Geodetic Network (SCIGN) in the late 1990s demonstrates sub-millimeter errors on long time series where there are a high percentage of observations and low multipath. Following SCIGN, other networks such as PANGA and BARGEN have adopted the monument design for both deep drilled braced monuments (DDBM = 5 legs grouted 10.7 meters into bedrock/stratigraphy) and short drilled braced monuments (SDBM = 4 legs epoxied 2 meters into bedrock). A Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) GPS station consists of a "SCIGN" style monument and state of the art NetRS receiver and IP based communications. Between the years 2003-2008 875 permanent PBO GPS stations are being built throughout the United States. Concomitant with construction of the PBO the majority of pre-existing GPS stations that meet stability specifications are being upgraded with Trimble NetRS and IP based communications to PBO standards under the EarthScope PBO Nucleus project. In 2008, with completed construction of the Plate Boundary Observatory, more than 1100 GPS stations will share common design specifications and have identical receivers with common communications making it the most homogenous geodetic network in the World. Of the 875 total Plate Boundary Observatory GPS stations, 211 proposed sites are distributed throughout the Southern California region. As of August 2007 the production status is: 174 stations built (81 short braced monuments, 93 deep drilled braced monuments), 181 permits signed, 211 permits submitted and 211 station reconnaissance reports. The balance of 37 stations (19 SDBM and 18 DDBM) will be built over the next year from Long Valley to the Mexico border in order of priority as recommended by the PBO Transform, Extension and Magmatic working groups. Fifteen second data is archived for each station and 1 Hz as well as 5 Hz data is buffered to be triggered for download in the event of an earthquake. Communications

  11. Optimization of observation plan based on the stochastic characteristics of the geodetic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachelski, Wojciech; Postek, Paweł

    2016-06-01

    Optimal design of geodetic network is a basic subject of many engineering projects. An observation plan is a concluding part of the process. Any particular observation within the network has through adjustment a different contribution and impact on values and accuracy characteristics of unknowns. The problem of optimal design can be solved by means of computer simulation. This paper presents a new method of simulation based on sequential estimation of individual observations in a step-by-step manner, by means of the so-called filtering equations. The algorithm aims at satisfying different criteria of accuracy according to various interpretations of the covariance matrix. Apart of them, the optimization criterion is also amount of effort, defined as the minimum number of observations required. A numerical example of a 2-D network is illustrated to view the effectiveness of presented method. The results show decrease of the number of observations by 66% with respect to the not optimized observation plan, which still satisfy the assumed accuracy.

  12. How well can online GPS PPP post-processing services be used to establish geodetic survey control networks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebner, R.; Featherstone, W. E.

    2008-09-01

    Establishing geodetic control networks for subsequent surveys can be a costly business, even when using GPS. Multiple stations should be occupied simultaneously and post-processed with scientific software. However, the free availability of online GPS precise point positioning (PPP) post-processing services offer the opportunity to establish a whole geodetic control network with just one dual-frequency receiver and one field crew. To test this idea, we compared coordinates from a moderate-sized (~550 km by ~440 km) geodetic network of 46 points over part of south-western Western Australia, which were processed both with the Bernese v5 scientific software and with the CSRS (Canadian Spatial Reference System) PPP free online service. After rejection of five stations where the antenna type was not recognised by CSRS, the PPP solutions agreed on average with the Bernese solutions to 3.3 mm in east, 4.8 mm in north and 11.8 mm in height. The average standard deviations of the Bernese solutions were 1.0 mm in east, 1.2 mm in north and 6.2 mm in height, whereas for CSRS they were 3.9 mm in east, 1.9 mm in north and 7.8 mm in height, reflecting the inherently lower precision of PPP. However, at the 99% confidence level, only one CSRS solution was statistically different to the Bernese solution in the north component, due to a data interruption at that site. Nevertheless, PPP can still be used to establish geodetic survey control, albeit with a slightly lower quality because of the larger standard deviations. This approach may be of particular benefit in developing countries or remote regions, where geodetic infrastructure is sparse and would not normally be established without this approach.

  13. Installation of a seafloor geodetic network offshore northern Chile (GeoSEA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Heidrun; Lange, Dietrich; Hannemann, Katrin; Petersen, Florian; Contreras-Reyes, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    The seafloor stores crucial information on sub-seafloor processes, including stress, elastic strain, and earthquake and tsunami generation. This information may be extracted through the nascent scientific field of seafloor geodesy. The target of the recently installed GeoSEA array (Geodetic Earthquake Observatory on the SEAfloor) is to measure crustal deformation in mm-scale on the marine forearc and outer rise of the South American subduction system around 21°S. This segment of the Nazca-South American plate boundary has last ruptured in an earthquake in 1877 and was identified as a seismic gap prior to the 2014 Iquique/Pisagua earthquake (Mw=8.1). The southern portion of the segment remains unbroken by a recent earthquake. Seafloor geodetic measurements provide a way to monitor crustal deformation at high resolution comparable to the satellite-based GPS technique upon which terrestrial geodesy is largely based. The GeoSEA Network consists of autonomous seafloor transponders installed on 4 m high tripods, which were lowered to the seabed on the deep-sea cable of RV SONNE in December 2015. The transponders within an array intercommunicate via acoustic signals for a period of up to 3.5 years and measure acoustic distance, tilt and pressure. An additional component of the network is GeoSURF, a self-steering autonomous surface vehicle (Wave Glider), which monitors system health and is capable to upload the seafloor data to the sea surface and to transfer it via satellite. We have chosen three areas on the middle and lower slope and the outer rise for the set-up of three sub-arrays. The array in Area 1 on the middle continental slope consists of 8 transponders located in pairs on four topographic ridges, which are surface expressions of faults at depth. Area 2 is located on the outer rise seaward of the trench where 5 stations monitor extension across plate-bending related normal faults. The third area is located at water depth >5000 m on the lower continental slope

  14. Geodetic networks in Al-Hoceima, Fez-Meknes and Ouarzazate regions (Morocco) to monitor local deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, A. J.; Ruiz, A. M.; Lacy, M. C.; Galindo-Zaldívar, J.; Anahnah, F.; Ruano, P.; Álvarez-Lobato, P. Ayarza, F.; Arboleya, A. Teixel, M. L.; Azzouz, O.; Ahmamou, A. Chalouan, M.; Kchikach, A.

    2009-04-01

    In the framework of some interdisciplinary research projects, several geodetic studies have been initiated aiming to quantify ground deformation in some areas of Morocco: the Al-Hoceima region (Rif cordillera), the Fez-Meknes region and the Ouarzazate region (Atlas Mountains). The Al-Hoceima region, located in the central part of the Rif Cordilleras, has undergone an intense seismic activity, in which the most significant events occurred in 1994 and 2004 (M= 6.3). Although seismicity data support the presence of transcurrent faults, and available radar interferometry researches evidence surface deformations, geological data suggest that main seismogentic fault zone has not a surface expression. Anyway, a set of N-S oriented normal faults (Rouadi, Al-Hoceima, Trougout) determines the present-day geomorphology and seems to continue to be active in surface. In this area, a new non-permanent GPS network consisting of 6 sites has been installed and surveyed in June 2007 and September 2008. The repeated measurements of this network may allow to exactly determine the surface expression of deep tectonic deformations in this region, and to quantify the creep and the coseismic motions in the area, that will contribute to better understand the seismic hazard. The Prerif Ridges located in the Fez-Meknes region, constitute the active mountain front of the Rif cordillera that accommodates most of the recent convergence between Eurasia and African plates. South of the ridges, the Saïss foreland basin overlies the foreland rocks corresponding to the Middle Atlas. There are evidences of Quaternary uplift of the Prerif Ridges and deformation of recent sediments as consequence of the southwards propagation of reverse faults along the mountain front. In addition, the foreland basin undergoes a roughly N-S extensional regime. The region undergoes a moderate seismic activity, with catastrophic events like that occurred in 1755 which damaged Fez and Meknes. On September 2007, a non

  15. Development of GPS/A Seafloor Geodetic Network Along Japan Trench and Onset of Its Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kido, M.; Fujimoto, H.; Osada, Y.; Ohta, Y.; Yamamoto, J.; Tadokoro, K.; Okuda, T.; Watanabe, T.; Nagai, S.; Kenji, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The Tohoku-oki earthquake in 2011 revealed that an M9-class giant earthquake could occur even in the old subduction zone and that coseismic slip can reach its frontal wedge, where we considered no significant stress had been accumulated in. One of the leading figure of such finding is in situ seafloor geodetic measurement, such as GPS/A technique for horizontal displacement and pressure gauge for vertical displacement. Japan Coast Guard and Japanese university group had developed several GPS/A sites near the source region of the Tohoku-oki earthquake and detected quite large coseismic movements over 20 m in there. Displacement vectors observed these sites showed systematic variation, i.e., mainly confined in the off-Miyagi area and getting larger near the trench. However, subsequent post-seismic deformation shows inexplicable distribution. In order to elucidate this complex feature, MEXT Japan has decided to construct dense and widely-extended GPS/A network along Japan trench, including deep area (~6000m). We, Tohoku and Nagoya universities, have firstly developed high-powered seafloor transponders with an omnidirectional acoustic unit that works at 6000 m deep ocean and enable acoustic ranging over 13 km slant length. In addition, using high-energy density battery, its lifetime is expected 10 years with normal operation. Secondly, we examined the optimal distribution of GPS/A sites forming a network, taken pre-existing sites into consideration. The new network consists of 20 sites (roughly four transponders at a single site and 86 transponders in total). The distribution is dense near the area of complex post-seismic deformation and extended over 400 km to cover the adjacent area of the source region, in where induced earthquake may be expected. The largest obstacle to draw network plan is seafloor topography. Because a GPS/A site is a seafloor benchmark, its installation must be on flat and locally stable spot. Since a single GPS/A site consists of three or more

  16. Geodetic component of the monitoring of tectonic and hydrogeological activities in Kopacki Rit Nature Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dapo, Almin; Pribicevic, Bosko

    2013-04-01

    Based on the European and global experience, the amplitude change in the structural arrangement caused by recent tectonic movements, can be most accurately determined by repeated precise GPS measurements on specially stabilized geodetic and geodynamic points. Because of these reasons, the GPS method to determine the movements on specially stabilized points in the Nature park Kopacki rit is also applied in this project. Kopacki rit Nature Park is the biggest preserved natural flooded area on the Danube. It is spread over 23 000 hectares between the rivers Danube and Drava and is one of the biggest fluvial wetland valleys in Europe. In 1993 it was listed as one of internationally valuable wetlands according to the Ramsar Convention. By now in Kopacki rit there have been sights of about 295 bird species, more than 400 species of invertebrates and 44 types of fish. Many of them are globally endangered species like, white tailed eagle, black stork and prairie hawk. It's not rare to come across some deer herds, wild boars or others. Today's geological and geomorphological relations in the Nature park Kopacki rit are largely the result of climate, sedimentary, tectonic and anthropogenic activity in the last 10,000 years. Unfortunately the phenomenon of the Kopacki rit Nature park is in danger to be over in the near future due to those and of course man made activities on the Danube river. It is trough scientific investigations of tectonic and hydrogeological activities that scientist from University of Zagreb are trying to contribute to wider knowledge and possible solutions to this problem. In the year 2009 the first GPS campaign was conducted, and the first set of coordinates of stabilized points was determined which can be considered zero-series measurements. In 2010 a second GPS campaign was conducted and the first set of movements on the Geodynamic Network of Kopacki Rit Nature Park was determined. Processing GPS measurements from 2009 and 2010 was carried out in a

  17. Current deformation of the Betic Cordillera from a new GPS observation of the southern sector of the IBERIA95 Zero-Order Geodetic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Antonio J.; Galindo, Jesús; Alfaro, Pedro; de Lacy, María. Clara; Jesús Borque, María.; Franco, Juan A. Armenteros (1), Oscar; Ruano, Patricia; García Tortosa, Francisco Juan; López Garrido, Angel Carlos; Pedrera, Antonio

    2010-05-01

    The Betic Cordillera, located at the convergent plate boundary between Africa and Eurasia, is subjected to an average NNW-SSE compression and an associated orthogonal extension. In order to quantify this deformation a GPS campaign in the Southern Sector of IBERIA95 Zero-Order Geodetic Network was done in December 2008. This network was observed in 1995 by the Spanish National Geographical Institute (IGNE) and the Portuguese Institute of Cartography and Cadastre (IPCC) for the establishment of a Three-dimensional Geodetic Network in Spain and Portugal. The comparison of results in 1995 and 2009 provides one of the first geodetic results of the short-term deformation in the Betic Cordillera.

  18. Least squares adjustment of large-scale geodetic networks by orthogonal decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    George, J.A.; Golub, G.H.; Heath, M.T.; Plemmons, R.J.

    1981-11-01

    This article reviews some recent developments in the solution of large sparse least squares problems typical of those arising in geodetic adjustment problems. The new methods are distinguished by their use of orthogonal transformations which tend to improve numerical accuracy over the conventional approach based on the use of the normal equations. The adaptation of these new schemes to allow for the use of auxiliary storage and their extension to rank deficient problems are also described.

  19. Spatio-temporal variability of ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) over the Indian subcontinent derived from geodetic GPS network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayan, M.; Kannoth, S.; Varghese, G.; Earnest, A.; Jade, S.; Bhatt, B. C.; Gupta, S. S.

    2013-12-01

    We present, for the first time, Ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) computed from dual frequency GPS data observed by Indian geodetic GPS network and neighboring IGS stations for more than a decade (2001-2012) (figure 1). Indian geodetic GPS network has more than 30 stations well spread across the Indian subcontinent, primarily, to study the tectonics of the Indian plate. Each station has geodetic grade dual frequency GPS receiver which are operated in continuous mode by making observations at every 30s since 2001. The ionospheric TEC presented here is computed from the code and phase GPS measurements using the software IONODETECT developed at CSIR 4PI. This decadal scale ionospheric data set covers from maxima of 23rd to maxima of 24th solar cycle with a broad spatial coverage from 35S to 56N and 38E to 134E (figure1). The GPS TEC computed at every 30 seconds over each sub-ionospheric point correlates well with International Reference Ionosphere(IRI) 2012 model in longer time scale, however, a strong spatio-temporal dependence in correlation is clearly observed. In addition a site specific, nearly systematic night time bias between GPS TEC and IRI-12 is noted. The advantage of using the systematic bias for correcting Differential Code Bias (DCB) in computing GPS TEC is discussed. We also discuss in detail the equatorial ionospheric processes and regional characteristics of Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA) through latitudinal, diurnal, seasonal, and inter-annual variability of decadal scale GPS TEC computed over Indian subcontinent. EIA anomaly crust maxima during local noon on 30th November 2004 is clearly visible in the figure 1. The TEC variations associated with solar flares and solar maxima and minima during the solar cycles are also discussed to understand the impact of space weather on equatorial and mid latitude ionosphere as well as on navigation. Vertical TEC (VTEC) at each sub ionospheric pierce points (SIP) on 30th November 2004 from 0UTC to

  20. Korean Geodetic VLBI Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, T.; Kim, T.; Han, S.; Kwak, Y.; Oh, H.; Yi, S.; Bae, M.; Kim, K.; Moon, J.; Park, J.

    2009-04-01

    A permanent geodetic VLBI station with a 22-m diameter antenna will be newly constructed in Korea by the National Geographic Information Institute, Korea (NGII) for the project named Korea VLBI system for Geodesy (KVG) that aims at maintaining the Korean geodetic datum accurately. The KVG has started officially since October, 2008. The construction of all system will be completed by the end of 2011. In Korea, the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) has already promoted Korean VLBI Network (KVN) project dedicated to radio astronomy since 2001, and three 21-m diameter antennas have been constructed at Seoul, Ulsan, and Jeju Island. Although their receivers have not yet been fully installed, the antenna is designed to be able to receive 22, 43, 86, and 129 GHz bands simultaneously. In parallel with the KVN project, the National Geographic Information Institute, Korea (NGII) has been planning to construct their own VLBI antenna dedicated to geodetic measurements since 2001 to maintain the Korean Geodetic Datum accurately on the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). It also aims at a fundamental station in East Asia and will contribute to the better determination of the ITRF there. A grand design for KVG project realizing NGII's plan has been proposed by the Ajou University under the collaborations with the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Japan (NICT), National Astronomical Observatory, Japan (NAO), and the Geographical Survey Institute, Japan (GSI). The design of KVG antenna follows the VLBI2010 except for receiving frequencies and the diameter; VLBI2010 is the guideline for next generation's geodetic VLBI system compiled by the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS). The antenna is designed to be able to receive 2, 8, 22, and 43 GHz bands simultaneously in order to carry out geodetic VLBI observations not only with current geodetic VLBI stations equipped with 2/8 GHz receivers but also

  1. Ionospheric perturbations associated with 26th December 2004 Indian ocean tsunami: A detailed investigation through Indian Geodetic GNSS network observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannoth, S.; Vijayan, M.; Earnest, A.; Jade, S.

    2013-12-01

    Ionospheric perturbations associated with Indian ocean tsunami triggered by the 26th December 2004 was reported by Liu et el. (2006), Lognonne (2006), Das gupta et al. (2006) and many authors numerically modelled this ionospheric perturbations [e.g. Occhipinti et al. (2006)]. All those previous reports and observations are from few IGS stations in this region other than Das gupta et al. (2006). Das gupta et al.(2006) reported the TEC enhancement associated with the earthquake from observations of few Indian GPS stations. However, no detailed analysis using Indian GPS stations segregating the ionospheric perturbations associated with tsunami is reported so far. Observations from the regional network and detailed analysis will help to to refine the numerical models as well as to understand the physics of tsunamigenic ionospheri perturbations. In this paper, We present a detailed investigation on perturbations in the ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) induced by the gravity waves generated by open ocean Tsunami triggered by the 26th December 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake using observations from Indian Geodetic GNSS network. Indian geodetic GNSS network consists of more than twenty continuous mode geodetic GNSS stations spread across Indian subcontinent. GPS code and phase observations from all these stations and IGS stations in this region have been used to estimate TEC and geometry-free differential TEC (dTEC) representing ionospheric perturbation using the software IONODETECT developed at CSIR 4PI. The non-tsunamigenic perturbations have been filtered out from the geometry-free dTEC using a bandpass filter ranging 0.3 to 3.3mHz following Lognonne et al (2006). We also show the applicability of data from low elevation observations which are usually discarded to avoid noise due to multi-paths (multipath-free perturbation signals are ensured through multi-PRN multi-receiver combination). Using low elevation observations, for the first time, we present

  2. High-frequency non-linear motions induced by non-tidal ocean loading and their effect on estimating the geocenter motion from a geodetic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memin, A.; Watson, C. S.; Tregoning, P.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the influence of high-frequency non-tidal ocean loading on the displacement induced at a global set of geodetic stations and on estimating the geocenter motion from a geodetic network. Ground displacements of each geodetic site induced by atmospheric and ocean loading are computed by convolving surface mass or pressure variations with Green functions for the vertical and horizontal displacement. The displacements resulting from atmospheric loading are computed using the surface pressure variations provided by the European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasts model (1.5° space and 3h time sampling). The ocean response is taken into account assuming an inverted barometer and a non-inverted barometer response of the ocean to changes in the atmosphere. The first one is derived from the atmospheric model. The latter is computed using the sea height variations from the global barotropic ocean model named Toulouse Unstructured Grid Ocean model (0.25° grid and 3h time sampling). To examine the spatial and temporal effects of the high-frequency non-tidal atmospheric and ocean deformations spanning the network, made of 157 stations, from 2002 to 2011, we remove a seasonal component from the loading and geodetic time series. We find that high-frequency non-tidal ocean loading induces a larger long term variability (mean increase of 25% and up to 80%) in the vertical displacement than the non-tidal atmospheric loading at 131 stations. A similar conclusion holds for the induced sub-daily scatter at 127 stations (mean increase of 37% and up to 90%). Using the dynamic ocean's response, when correcting the geodetic time series for non-tidal ocean loading, reduces the weighted variance of the geodetic time series at 118 sites, the largest reductions (> 11%) are obtained along the Baltic sea. We compute the deformation in a center of mass and center of figure reference frame and estimate the time series of the translation of the geocenter. Comparing the

  3. a Libration Model for Enceladus Based on Geodetic Control Point Network Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadezhdina, I. E.; Zubarev, A. E.; Brusnikin, E. S.; Oberst, J.

    2016-06-01

    A new global control point network was derived for Enceladus, based on Cassini and Voyager-2 image data. Cassini images were taken from 2005 to 2014, for Voyager we have only one flyby in the middle of 1981. We have derived 3D Cartesian coordinates for 1128 control points as well as improved pointing data for 12 Voyager and 193 Cassini images in the Enceladus-fixed coordinate system. The point accuracies vary from 55 m to 2900 m (average point accuracy - 221 m). From tracking of the control points we detect a librational motion described by a model which includes 3 different periods and amplitudes (Rambaux et al., 2011). We determine the amplitudes for each term. Our new control point network has a higher number of point measurements and a higher accuracy than previous data (Giese et al., 2014).

  4. Operational aspects of CASA UNO '88-The first large scale international GPS geodetic network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neilan, Ruth E.; Dixon, T. H.; Meehan, Thomas K.; Melbourne, William G.; Scheid, John A.; Kellogg, J. N.; Stowell, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    For three weeks, from January 18 to February 5, 1988, scientists and engineers from 13 countries and 30 international agencies and institutions cooperated in the most extensive GPS (Global Positioning System) field campaign, and the largest geodynamics experiment, in the world to date. This collaborative eperiment concentrated GPS receivers in Central and South America. The predicted rates of motions are on the order of 5-10 cm/yr. Global coverage of GPS observations spanned 220 deg of longitude and 125 deg of latitude using a total of 43 GPS receivers. The experiment was the first civilian effort at implementing an extended international GPS satellite tracking network. Covariance analyses incorporating the extended tracking network predicted significant improvement in precise orbit determination, allowing accurate long-baseline geodesy in the science areas.

  5. A System to Produce Precise Global GPS Network Solutions for all Geodetic GPS Stations in the World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blewitt, G.; Kreemer, C. W.

    2010-12-01

    We have developed an end-to-end system that automatically seeks and routinely retrieves geodetic GPS data from ~5000 stations (currently) around the globe, reduces the data into unique, daily global network solutions, and produces high precision time series for station coordinates ready for time-series analysis, geophysical modeling and interpretation. Moreover, “carrier range” data are produced for all stations, enabling epoch-by-epoch tracking of individual station motions by precise point positioning for investigation of sub-daily processes, such as post-seismic after-slip and ocean tidal loading. Solutions are computed in a global reference frame aligned to ITRF, and optionally in user-specified continental-scale reference frames that can filter out common-mode signals to enhance regional strain anomalies. We describe the elements of this system, the underlying signal processing theory, the products, operational statistics, and scientific applications of our system. The system is fundamentally based on precise point positioning using JPL's GIPSY OASIS II software, coupled with ambiguity resolution and a global network adjustment of ~300,000 parameters per day using our newly developed Ambizap3 software. The system is designed to easily and efficiently absorb stations that deliver data very late, by recycling prior computations in the network adjustment, such that the resulting network solution is identical to starting from scratch. Thus, it becomes possible to trawl continuously the Internet for late arriving data, or for newly discovered data, and seamlessly update all GPS station time series using the new information content. As new stations are added to the processing archive, automated e-mail requests are made to H.-G. Scherneck's server at Chalmers University to compute ocean loading coefficients used by the station motion model. Rinex file headers are parsed and compared with alias tables in order to infer the correct receiver type and antenna

  6. Analysis of the horizontal structure of a measurement and control geodetic network based on entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrówczyńska, Maria

    2013-06-01

    The paper attempts to determine an optimum structure of a directional measurement and control network intended for investigating horizontal displacements. For this purpose it uses the notion of entropy as a logarithmical measure of probability of the state of a particular observation system. An optimum number of observations results from the difference of the entropy of the vector of parameters ΔHX̂ (x)corresponding to one extra observation. An increment of entropy interpreted as an increment of the amount of information about the state of the system determines the adoption or rejection of another extra observation to be carried out. W pracy podjęto próbę określenia optymalnej struktury sieci kierunkowej pomiarowo-kontrolnej przeznaczonej do badań przemieszczeń poziomych. W tym celu wykorzystano pojęcie entropii jako logarytmicznej miary prawdopodobieństwa stanu określonego układu obserwacyjnego. Optymalna liczba realizowanych obserwacji wynika z różnicy entropii wektora parametrów ΔHX̂ (x) odpowiadającej jednej obserwacji nadliczbowej. Przyrost entropii interpretowany jako przyrost objętości informacji na temat stanu układu decyduje o przyjęciu względnie odrzuceniu do realizacji kolejnej obserwacji nadliczbowej.

  7. Dataworks for GNSS: Software for Supporting Data Sharing and Federation of Geodetic Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boler, F. M.; Meertens, C. M.; Miller, M. M.; Wier, S.; Rost, M.; Matykiewicz, J.

    2015-12-01

    Continuously-operating Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) networks are increasingly being installed globally for a wide variety of science and societal applications. GNSS enables Earth science research in areas including tectonic plate interactions, crustal deformation in response to loading by tectonics, magmatism, water and ice, and the dynamics of water - and thereby energy transfer - in the atmosphere at regional scale. The many individual scientists and organizations that set up GNSS stations globally are often open to sharing data, but lack the resources or expertise to deploy systems and software to manage and curate data and metadata and provide user tools that would support data sharing. UNAVCO previously gained experience in facilitating data sharing through the NASA-supported development of the Geodesy Seamless Archive Centers (GSAC) open source software. GSAC provides web interfaces and simple web services for data and metadata discovery and access, supports federation of multiple data centers, and simplifies transfer of data and metadata to long-term archives. The NSF supported the dissemination of GSAC to multiple European data centers forming the European Plate Observing System. To expand upon GSAC to provide end-to-end, instrument-to-distribution capability, UNAVCO developed Dataworks for GNSS with NSF funding to the COCONet project, and deployed this software on systems that are now operating as Regional GNSS Data Centers as part of the NSF-funded TLALOCNet and COCONet projects. Dataworks consists of software modules written in Python and Java for data acquisition, management and sharing. There are modules for GNSS receiver control and data download, a database schema for metadata, tools for metadata handling, ingest software to manage file metadata, data file management scripts, GSAC, scripts for mirroring station data and metadata from partner GSACs, and extensive software and operator documentation. UNAVCO plans to provide a cloud VM

  8. Global geodetic observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, Claude; Pearlman, Mike; Sarti, Pierguido

    2015-01-01

    Global geodetic observatories (GGO) play an increasingly important role both for scientific and societal applications, in particular for the maintenance and evolution of the reference frame and those applications that rely on the reference frame for their viability. The International Association of Geodesy (IAG), through the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS), is fully involved in coordinating the development of these systems and ensuring their quality, perenniality and accessibility. This paper reviews the current role, basic concepts, and some of the critical issues associated with the GGOs, and advocates for their expansion to enhance co-location with other observing techniques (gravity, meteorology, etc). The historical perspective starts with the MERIT campaign, followed by the creation of international services (IERS, IGS, ILRS, IVS, IDS, etc). It provides a basic definition of observing systems and observatories and the build up of the international networks and the role of co-locations in geodesy and geosciences and multi-technique processing and data products. This paper gives special attention to the critical topic of local surveys and tie vectors among co-located systems in sites; the agreement of space geodetic solutions and the tie vectors now place one of the most significant limitations on the quality of integrated data products, most notably the ITRF. This topic focuses on survey techniques, extrapolation to instrument reference points, computation techniques, systematic biases, and alignment of the individual technique reference frames into ITRF. The paper also discusses the design, layout and implementation of network infrastructure, including the role of GGOS and the benefit that would be achieved with better standardization and international governance.

  9. Transient shortening strain across an active extensional fault, Basin and Range Province, north-central Nevada, USA, based on geodetic and paleoseismologic data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, A.; Wernicke, B.; Lee, J.; Sieh, K.

    2003-04-01

    The northern Basin and Range province is one of the largest continental extensional regions on earth. At 40 degrees N latitude, the province is 800 km wide and consists of 15 and 20 N-S striking normal faults. These faults accommodated mainly east-west directed extension of tens of kilometers since Mid-Miocene time and recent geodetic surveys show that extension is still active today at a rate of ~1.5 cm/yr across the province (e.g., Bennett et al. 2000; Thatcher et al. 1999). The distribution of this geodetically measurable strain accumulation within the province, however, contradicts geologic observations across some of the active normal faults. For example, coordinated geologic and geodetic measurements across the Crescent Valley fault (CVF), north-central Nevada, reveal a profound mismatch in deformation rates. Since 1996, the two ranges on either side of the CVF have been moving toward each other at ca. 2 mm/yr, indicating shortening. In contrast, new reconnaissance mapping and paleoseismological analyses along the CVF also indicate that this fault is one of the more active normal faults of the Basin and Range province. The 50 km long Cortez Mountains range front is characterized by relief of up to 1.3 km, steep (up to 36 degrees) triangular facets, and young (late Pleistocene to late Holocene) alluvial fans cut by normal fault scarps. Vertical displacement across the CVF is ca. 3 km; since 15 Ma the average long-term vertical displacement rate is ca. 0.2 mm/yr. Topographic profiling shows that fault scarps, 2-7 m high, are the result of a single rupture event and cut late Holocene alluvial fans. A trench across a faulted alluvial fan at Fourmile Canyon reveals a vertical displacement of 4.5 m distributed across two normal faults. 14C analyses on charcoal from a buried offset surface in the hanging wall of the trench and from the base of the overlying colluvial wedge tightly bracket the age of the most recent earthquake to between 2.8 +- 0.1 and 2.7 +- 0.1 ka

  10. COCONet (Continuously Operating Caribbean GPS Observational Network) - A multihazard GPS/Met observatory: Enhancing geodetic infrastructure and the scientific community in the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feaux, K.; Braun, J. J.; Calais, E.; Mattioli, G. S.; Miller, M. M.; Normandeau, J.; Sandru, J.; Wang, G.

    2013-05-01

    The COCONet (Continuously Operating Caribbean GPS Observational Network) project was funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) with the aim of developing a large-scale geodetic and atmospheric infrastructure in the Caribbean that will form the backbone for a broad range of geoscience, atmospheric, and sea-level investigations and enable research on process-oriented science questions with direct relevance to geohazards. The current COCONet network construction plan consists of the installation of 47 new GPS and meteorological stations throughout the Caribbean region, 21 existing stations refurbished with new receivers, antennas, and meteorological instruments, and will also incorporate data from at least 61 existing operational GPS stations. COCONet engineers will also install 2 new collocated GPS and tide gauge sites and GPS instruments at two existing tide gauge sites in the Caribbean region. In October 2012, the third COCONet workshop was held in Tulum, Mexico in which a number of recommendations were made concerning capacity building in the region, network sustainability, high-rate data, and developing a data center in the Caribbean region. We present the status of the construction phase of the project to date, as well as the status of some of the recommendations from the third COCONet workshop focusing on capacity building and outreach elements of the project.

  11. Seismic and geodetic studies of the Imperial Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D.D.

    1981-05-01

    The Imperial Valley exhibits perhaps the most active current tectonism in the United States; patterns of gravitational and thermal anomalies, along with geodetic measurements, strike-slip faulting, and recent volcanism suggest that the continental crust may still be spreading (Elders et al., 1972). In recent years, the United States Geological Survey and Caltech have added new seismic stations into a dense network in the Imperial Valley to study in detail the relationship between geothermal areas and earthquakes, and to understand the tectonic processes taking place there. The purposes of this study are to: (1) examine crustal structure using recently available data on P-wave arrival times of local earthquakes; (2) examine the leveling data for evidence of tectonic subsidence or uplift; and (3) study correlations between seismicity, seismic velocity, geodetic motion, geothermal activity, and local geology to provide a more consistent picture of the tectonics of the Imperial Valley.

  12. The 3-D strain patterns in Turkey using geodetic velocity fields from the RTK-CORS (TR) network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutoglu, Hakan Senol; Toker, Mustafa; Mekik, Cetin

    2016-03-01

    This study presents our use of GPS data to obtain and quantify the full continuous strain tensor using a 3-D velocity field in Turkey. In this study, GPS velocities improve the estimation of short-term strain tensor fields for determining the seismic hazard of Turkey. The tensorial analysis presents different aspects of deformation, such as the normal and shear strains, including their directions, the compressional and extensional strains. This analysis is appropriate for the characterizing the state of the current seismic deformation. GPS velocity data from continuous measurements (2009-2012) to estimate deformations were processed using the GAMIT/GLOBK software. Using high-rate GPS data from permanent 146 GNSS stations (RTK-CORS-TR network), the strain distribution was determined and interpolated using a biharmonic spline technique. We show the strain field patterns within axial and plane form at several critical locations, and discuss these results within the context of the seismic and tectonic deformation of Turkey. We conclude that the knowledge of the crustal strain patterns provides important information on the location of the main faults and strain accumulation for the hazard assessment. The results show an agreement between the seismic and tectonic strains confirming that there are active crustal deformations in Turkey.

  13. Meteor detections at the Metsähovi Fundamental Geodetic Research Station (Finland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja-Halli, A.; Gritsevich, M.; Näränen, J.; Moreno-Ibáñez, M.; Lyytinen, E.; Virtanen, J.; Zubko, N.; Peltoniemi, J.; Poutanen, M.

    2016-01-01

    We provide an overview and present some spectacular examples of the recent meteor observations at the Metsähovi Geodetic Research Station. In conjunction with the Finnish Fireball Network the all-sky images are used to reconstruct atmospheric trajectories and to calculate the pre-impact meteor orbits in the Solar System. In addition, intensive collaborative work is pursued with the meteor research groups worldwide. We foresee great potential of this activity also for educational and outreach purposes.

  14. Volcano-tectonic deformation in the Kivu Region, Central Africa: Results from multi-year InSAR time series analysis and continuous GNSS observations of the Kivu Geodetic Network (KivuGNet)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geirsson, Halldor; D'Oreye, Nicolas; Smets, Benoît; Nobile, Adriano; Samsonov, Sergey; De Rauw, Dominique; Mashagiro, Niche; Kervyn, Francois

    2016-04-01

    The Kivu Region in Central Africa is a topographic dome cut by the depression of the western branch of the East African Rift, where the Nubia plate and the Victoria micro-plate are diverging by approximately 2-3 mm/yr (Stamps et al. 2008). Two closely spaced and frequently active volcanoes, Nyiragongo and Nyamulagira, are located at the plate boundary. Here, deformation signals from transient deformation events (i.e. earthquakes, eruptions, rifting episodes, intrusions or other subsurface mass movements) are intertwined with the more perpetual nature of inter-seismic strain accumulation and gradual magma accumulation. Here, we present deformation results from six years of operation of the 15- station KivuGNet (Kivu Geodetic Network) in the Kivu Region and multi-year InSAR time series of the region using the MSBAS approach (Samsonov & d'Oreye, 2012). Since 2009, KivuGNet has captured transient deformation from a) the 2010 eruption of Nyamulagira, b) the 2011-2012 eruption of Nyamulagira c) the Mw5.8 August 7, 2015 Katana earthquake at the western border of Lake Kivu. Importantly, the GPS data also show an ongoing deformation signal, which is most readily explained by long-term magma accumulation under the volcanic region. We use the GPS and InSAR deformation signals to constrain and compare source parameters of simplistic elastic models for the different time periods. Although not well constrained, most of the time periods indicate the presence of a deep (~15-30 km) magmatic source centered approximately under Nyamulagira or to the southeast of Nyamulagira, that inflates between eruptions and deflates during eruptions.

  15. The 1995 Mw 7.2 Gulf of Aqaba Earthquake revisited: Identifying active fault segments by joint inversion of geodetic and teleseismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bathke, H.; Feng, G.; Heimann, S.; Jonsson, S.; Mai, P. M.; Nikkhoo, M.

    2015-12-01

    The largest earthquakes in Saudi Arabia occur at the northwestern boundary of the Arabian plate on a system of left-lateral transform faults extending from the Red Sea in the South and North through the Gulf of Aqaba. The last major earthquake along this boundary occurred in November 1995 and in a complex tectonic setting offshore in the Gulf of Aqaba, consisting of several transform faults and pull-apart basins. Various authors have studied this earthquake in the past, either by using geodetic radar (InSAR) or teleseismic (P and S waves) data, and several source models of the earthquake rupture and the active fault segments have been proposed. However, these source models differ significantly from each other and it still remains unclear which fault segments within the Gulf were activated during the event. There are various reasons for these differences. Teleseismic data alone cannot locate the event well, whereas the lack of near field co-seismic displacement data (due to the event's offshore location) and the quasi north-south oriented strike-slip faulting of the earthquake result in a low SNR in the radar data. Consequently, the uncertainties of inferred model parameters are large and have not been properly estimated so far. In this work, we use radar data from two additional tracks that have not been used before, which provides a more complete displacement field of the earthquake. By using multiple aperture radar interferometry it is possible to better constrain the south-north oriented strike-slip component. In addition, we include both the geodetic data and the teleseismic data in a joint inversion setup allowing combining the strengths of each dataset to constrain the model parameters. By including the full data-variance covariance-matrixes in Bayesian inference sampling, we estimate the model-uncertainties and the related range of likely source models. Consequently, we re-evaluate, which fault segments were activated during the earthquake in the Gulf of

  16. GPS orbit determination at the National Geodetic Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenewerk, Mark S.

    1992-01-01

    The National Geodetic Survey (NGS) independently generates precise ephemerides for all available Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites. Beginning in 1991, these ephemerides were produced from double-differenced phase observations solely from the Cooperative International GPS Network (CIGNET) tracking sites. The double-difference technique combines simultaneous observations of two satellites from two ground stations effectively eliminating satellite and ground receiver clock errors, and the Selective Availability (S/A) signal degradation currently in effect. CIGNET is a global GPS tracking network whose primary purpose is to provide data for orbit production. The CIGNET data are collected daily at NGS and are available to the public. Each ephemeris covers a single week and is available within one month after the data were taken. Verification is by baseline repeatability and direct comparison with other ephemerides. Typically, an ephemeris is accurate at a few parts in 10(exp 7). This corresponds to a 10 meter error in the reported satellite positions. NGS is actively investigating methods to improve the accuracy of its orbits, the ultimate goal being one part in 10(exp 8) or better. The ephemerides are generally available to the public through the Coast Guard GPS Information Center or directly from NGS through the Geodetic Information Service. An overview of the techniques and software used in orbit generation will be given, the current status of CIGNET will be described, and a summary of the ephemeris verification results will be presented.

  17. Fiber networks amplify active stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Martin; Ronceray, Pierre; Broedersz, Chase

    Large-scale force generation is essential for biological functions such as cell motility, embryonic development, and muscle contraction. In these processes, forces generated at the molecular level by motor proteins are transmitted by disordered fiber networks, resulting in large-scale active stresses. While fiber networks are well characterized macroscopically, this stress generation by microscopic active units is not well understood. I will present a comprehensive theoretical study of force transmission in these networks. I will show that the linear, small-force response of the networks is remarkably simple, as the macroscopic active stress depends only on the geometry of the force-exerting unit. In contrast, as non-linear buckling occurs around these units, local active forces are rectified towards isotropic contraction and strongly amplified. This stress amplification is reinforced by the networks' disordered nature, but saturates for high densities of active units. I will show that our predictions are quantitatively consistent with experiments on reconstituted tissues and actomyosin networks, and that they shed light on the role of the network microstructure in shaping active stresses in cells and tissue.

  18. Geodetic contributions to IWRM-projects in middle Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Günter

    2010-12-01

    The district of Gunung Kidul in middle Java is one of the poorest regions in Indonesia. The essential reason is the acute water scarcity in this karst region during the months of the dry season. As a consequence of the poor living conditions many people have migrated away and therefore the development of the region is stagnating. During the last few years two projects have been initiated under the theme “Integrated Water Resources Management” in order to improve the water supply situation, both funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, and realized essentially by institutes of the University of Karlsruhe. Geodetic sub-projects are integrated into both projects. Special surveying activities had been, and have still to be, carried out to realise the geometrical basis for several other sub-projects. The particular contributions are 3D cave measurements for visualisation and planning, staking out of drilling points and construction axes, the definition of a common reference system, the surveying of the water distribution network and its technical facilities, the setting up and the management of a geographical information system (GIS), as well as special measurements such as dam monitoring or controlling of a vertical drilling machine. The paper reviews these projects and describes the geodetic activities.

  19. A preliminary geodetic data model for geographic information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, K. M.

    2009-12-01

    Our ability to gather and assimilate integrated data collections from multiple disciplines is important for earth system studies. Moreover, geosciences data collection has increased dramatically, with pervasive networks of observational stations on the ground, in the oceans, in the atmosphere and in space. Contemporary geodetic observations from several space and terrestrial technologies contribute to our knowledge of earth system processes and thus are a valuable source of high accuracy information for many global change studies. Assimilation of these geodetic observations and numerical models into models of weather, climate, oceans, hydrology, ice, and solid Earth processes is an important contribution geodesists can make to the earth science community. Clearly, the geodetic observations and models are fundamental to these contributions. ESRI wishes to provide leadership in the geodetic community to collaboratively build an open, freely available content specification that can be used by anyone to structure and manage geodetic data. This Geodetic Data Model will provide important context for all geographic information. The production of a task-specific geodetic data model involves several steps. The goal of the data model is to provide useful data structures and best practices for each step, making it easier for geodesists to organize their data and metadata in a way that will be useful in their data analyses and to their customers. Built on concepts from the successful Arc Marine data model, we introduce common geodetic data types and summarize the main thematic layers of the Geodetic Data Model. These provide a general framework for envisioning the core feature classes required to represent geodetic data in a geographic information system. Like Arc Marine, the framework is generic to allow users to build workflow or product specific geodetic data models tailored to the specific task(s) at hand. This approach allows integration of the data with other existing

  20. Considerations for improved Integration of Geodetic Techiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, K. U.

    2012-04-01

    The most demanding goal for the GGOS initiative is the definition of station positions to an accuracy of 1 mm and the corresponding velocities to 0.1 mm/year. Fundamental stations are corner stones for the geodetic reference frames because they are collocating and combining the relevant measurement techniques. However, this requires unprecedented control over local ties, intra- and inter- technique biases. The unperturbed distribution of frequency is an important requirement for all the space geodetic techniques. The distribution of time without jitter has importance for laser time transfer applications such as T2L2 and in the future ELT with ACES on the ISS. The timing system of the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell is based on a radio frequency (5 MHz) distribution scheme and a grid of coaxial cables. Uncontrolable fluctuations in the electrical ground potential and variations in the dielectric properties of these transmission lines give rise to jitter and most likely even small systematic measurement errors. Modern frequency transfer concepts differ from these earlier methods by employing active delay compensation by utilizing control loops in tight (high bandwidth) feedback systems. Furthermore they work on much higher frequencies from hundreds of megahertz up to the optical regime. The definition of a new timing system for Wettzell based on compensated signal transmission lines and the evaluation of the end to end properties of such concepts is work in progress for the coming years with the aim to create a truly common clock for all space geodetic techniques on the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell. This talk will introduce the important aspects and the potential of this next generation of timing systems.

  1. Theorizing Network-Centric Activity in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HaLevi, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Networks and network-centric activity are increasingly prevalent in schools and school districts. In addition to ubiquitous social network tools like Facebook and Twitter, educational leaders deal with a wide variety of network organizational forms that include professional development, advocacy, informational networks and network-centric reforms.…

  2. Active Contraction of Microtubule Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Peter; Fürthauer, Sebastian; Shelley, Michael; Needleman, Daniel

    Many cellular processes are driven by cytoskeletal assemblies. It remains unclear how cytoskeletal filaments and motor proteins organize into cellular scale structures and how molecular properties of cytoskeletal components affect the large scale behaviors of these systems. Here we investigate the self-organization of stabilized microtubules in Xenopus oocyte extracts and find that they can form macroscopic networks that spontaneously contract. We propose that these contractions are driven by the clustering of microtubule minus ends by dynein. Based on this idea, we construct an active fluid theory of network contractions which predicts a dependence of the timescale of contraction on initial network geometry, a development of density inhomogeneities during contraction, a constant final network density, and a strong influence of dynein inhibition on the rate of contraction, all in quantitative agreement with experiments. These results demonstrate that the motor-driven clustering of filament ends is a generic mechanism leading to contraction.

  3. Study of the Northern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau Permafrost Active Layer Depth Rate Using Satellite Geodetic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y.; Su, X.; Shum, C. K.; Kim, J. W.; Kuo, C. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Tibetan Plateau is the world's largest and the highest plateau with distinct and competing surface and subsurface processes. It is the Third Pole and the World Water Tower, owing to its vast ice reservoir with the largest number of glaciers in the world, and covered by a large (1.3 to 1.6 million km2) layer of discontinuous and sporadic alpine permafrost. The thawing over Tibetan Plateau permafrost regions is thought to be more severe compared with other high latitude permafrost regions by the fact that the permafrost is warm. During the past few decades, 82% of Tibetan Plateau glaciers have retreated and 10% permafrost has degraded. The overall mean active layer depth (ALD) rate increase over the Plateau is 1.4 cm yr-1, 1980-2001, based on model studies and comparison with in situ borehole data. Here we report on the work in progress to quantify ALD rate increase in the northern Tibetan Plateau near the Tibetan national highway, using multi-band SAR/InSAR for improved the thermokarst surface classification, Envisat radar altimetry and ALOS-1 InSAR observed land subsidence, ALD modeling for the various thermokarst surface to relate to subsidence measurements, and the associated validations using available in situ borehole subsidence measurements.

  4. LAGEOS geodetic analysis-SL7.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Kolenkiewicz, R.; Dunn, P. J.; Klosko, S. M.; Robbins, J. W.; Torrence, M. H.; Williamson, R. G.; Pavlis, E. C.; Douglas, N. B.; Fricke, S. K.

    1991-01-01

    Laser ranging measurements to the LAGEOS satellite from 1976 through 1989 are related via geodetic and orbital theories to a variety of geodetic and geodynamic parameters. The SL7.1 analyses are explained of this data set including the estimation process for geodetic parameters such as Earth's gravitational constant (GM), those describing the Earth's elasticity properties (Love numbers), and the temporally varying geodetic parameters such as Earth's orientation (polar motion and Delta UT1) and tracking site horizontal tectonic motions. Descriptions of the reference systems, tectonic models, and adopted geodetic constants are provided; these are the framework within which the SL7.1 solution takes place. Estimates of temporal variations in non-conservative force parameters are included in these SL7.1 analyses as well as parameters describing the orbital states at monthly epochs. This information is useful in further refining models used to describe close-Earth satellite behavior. Estimates of intersite motions and individual tracking site motions computed through the network adjustment scheme are given. Tabulations of tracking site eccentricities, data summaries, estimated monthly orbital and force model parameters, polar motion, Earth rotation, and tracking station coordinate results are also provided.

  5. Activity cliff networks for medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Stumpfe, Dagmar; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-08-01

    Network representations are widely used in bioinformatics but have only been little explored in chemistry. Thus far, only a few attempts have been made to generate and analyze compound networks. Among these are the first activity cliff networks. In medicinal chemistry, activity cliffs are focal points of structure-activity relationships (SAR) analysis. Activity cliffs have generally been defined as pairs of structurally similar or analogous active compounds that have a large difference in potency against their target. However, most activity cliffs are not formed in isolation but in a coordinated manner involving multiple highly and weakly potent compounds. Recently, a comprehensive activity cliff network has been generated for current public domain bioactive compounds, hence providing a first global view of activity cliff formation. The design of activity cliff networks is discussed herein. From the global activity cliff network, local networks can be extracted for individual compound activity classes that provide graphical access to high-level SAR information for compound optimization efforts.

  6. Seafloor geodetic constraints on interplate coupling of the Nankai Trough megathrust zone.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Yusuke; Ishikawa, Tadashi; Watanabe, Shun-ichi; Tashiro, Toshiharu; Asada, Akira

    2016-05-23

    Interplate megathrust earthquakes have inflicted catastrophic damage on human society. Such an earthquake is predicted to occur in the near future along the Nankai Trough off southwestern Japan--an economically active and densely populated area in which megathrust earthquakes have already occurred. Megathrust earthquakes are the result of a plate-subduction mechanism and occur at slip-deficit regions (also known as 'coupling' regions), where friction prevents plates from slipping against each other and the accumulated energy is eventually released forcefully. Many studies have attempted to capture distributions of slip-deficit rates (SDRs) in order to predict earthquakes. However, these studies could not obtain a complete view of the earthquake source region, because they had no seafloor geodetic data. The Hydrographic and Oceanographic Department of the Japan Coast Guard (JHOD) has been developing a precise and sustainable seafloor geodetic observation network in this subduction zone to obtain information related to offshore SDRs. Here, we present seafloor geodetic observation data and an offshore interplate SDR-distribution model. Our data suggest that most offshore regions in this subduction zone have positive SDRs. Specifically, our observations indicate previously unknown regions of high SDR that will be important for tsunami disaster mitigation, and regions of low SDR that are consistent with distributions of shallow slow earthquakes and subducting seamounts. This is the first direct evidence that coupling conditions might be related to these seismological and geological phenomena. Our findings provide information for inferring megathrust earthquake scenarios and interpreting research on the Nankai Trough subduction zone.

  7. The Global Space Geodesy Network: Activities Underway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, Michael R.; Ipatov, Alexander; Long, James; Ma, Chopo; Merkowitz, Stephen; Neilan, Ruth; Noll, Carey; Pavlis, Erricos; Shargorodsky, Victor; Stowers, David; Wetzel, Scott

    2014-05-01

    Several initiatives are underway that should make substantial improvement over the next decade to the international space geodesy network as the international community works toward the GGOS 2020 goal of 32 globally distributed Core Sites with co-located VLBI, SLR, GNSS and DORIS. The Russian Space Agency and the Russian Academy of Sciences are moving forward with an implementation of six additional SLR systems and a number of GNSS receivers to sites outside Russia to expand GNSS tracking and support GGOS. The NASA Space Geodesy program has completed its prototype development phase and is now embarking on an implementation phase that is planning for deployment of 6 - 10 core sites in key geographic locations to support the global network. Additional sites are in the process of implementation in Europe and Asia. Site evaluation studies are in progress, looking at some new potential sites and there are ongoing discussions for partnership arrangements with interested agencies for new sites in South America and Africa. Work continues on the site layout design to avoid RF interference issues among co-located instruments and with external communications and media system. The placement of new and upgraded sites is guided by appropriate Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) conducted under the support of the interested international agencies. The results will help optimize the global distribution of core geodetic observatories and they will lead to the improvement of the data products from the future network. During this effort it is also recognized that co-located sites with less than the full core complement will continue to play an important and critical role in filling out the global network and strengthening the connection among the techniques. This talk will give an update on the current state of expansion of the global network and the projection for the network configuration that we forecast over the next 10 years.

  8. Mobile radio interferometric geodetic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdoran, P. F.; Niell, A. E.; Ong, K. M.; Resch, G. M.; Morabito, D. D.; Claflin, E. S.; Lockhart, T. G.

    1978-01-01

    Operation of the Astronomical Radio Interferometric Earth Surveying (ARIES) in a proof of concept mode is discussed. Accuracy demonstrations over a short baseline, a 180 km baseline, and a 380 km baseline are documented. Use of ARIES in the Sea Slope Experiment of the National Geodetic Survey to study the apparent differences between oceanographic and geodetic leveling determinations of the sea surface along the Pacific Coast is described. Intergration of the NAVSTAR Global Positioning System and a concept called SERIES (Satellite Emission Radio Interferometric Earth Surveying) is briefly reviewed.

  9. Active contraction of microtubule networks

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Peter J; Fürthauer, Sebastian; Shelley, Michael J; Needleman, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Many cellular processes are driven by cytoskeletal assemblies. It remains unclear how cytoskeletal filaments and motor proteins organize into cellular scale structures and how molecular properties of cytoskeletal components affect the large-scale behaviors of these systems. Here, we investigate the self-organization of stabilized microtubules in Xenopus oocyte extracts and find that they can form macroscopic networks that spontaneously contract. We propose that these contractions are driven by the clustering of microtubule minus ends by dynein. Based on this idea, we construct an active fluid theory of network contractions, which predicts a dependence of the timescale of contraction on initial network geometry, a development of density inhomogeneities during contraction, a constant final network density, and a strong influence of dynein inhibition on the rate of contraction, all in quantitative agreement with experiments. These results demonstrate that the motor-driven clustering of filament ends is a generic mechanism leading to contraction. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10837.001 PMID:26701905

  10. How Sleep Activates Epileptic Networks?

    PubMed Central

    Halász, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background. The relationship between sleep and epilepsy has been long ago studied, and several excellent reviews are available. However, recent development in sleep research, the network concept in epilepsy, and the recognition of high frequency oscillations in epilepsy and more new results may put this matter in a new light. Aim. The review address the multifold interrelationships between sleep and epilepsy networks and with networks of cognitive functions. Material and Methods. The work is a conceptual update of the available clinical data and relevant studies. Results and Conclusions. Studies exploring dynamic microstructure of sleep have found important gating mechanisms for epileptic activation. As a general rule interictal epileptic manifestations seem to be linked to the slow oscillations of sleep and especially to the reactive delta bouts characterized by A1 subtype in the CAP system. Important link between epilepsy and sleep is the interference of epileptiform discharges with the plastic functions in NREM sleep. This is the main reason of cognitive impairment in different forms of early epileptic encephalopathies affecting the brain in a special developmental window. The impairment of cognitive functions via sleep is present especially in epileptic networks involving the thalamocortical system and the hippocampocortical memory encoding system. PMID:24159386

  11. How sleep activates epileptic networks?

    PubMed

    Halász, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background. The relationship between sleep and epilepsy has been long ago studied, and several excellent reviews are available. However, recent development in sleep research, the network concept in epilepsy, and the recognition of high frequency oscillations in epilepsy and more new results may put this matter in a new light. Aim. The review address the multifold interrelationships between sleep and epilepsy networks and with networks of cognitive functions. Material and Methods. The work is a conceptual update of the available clinical data and relevant studies. Results and Conclusions. Studies exploring dynamic microstructure of sleep have found important gating mechanisms for epileptic activation. As a general rule interictal epileptic manifestations seem to be linked to the slow oscillations of sleep and especially to the reactive delta bouts characterized by A1 subtype in the CAP system. Important link between epilepsy and sleep is the interference of epileptiform discharges with the plastic functions in NREM sleep. This is the main reason of cognitive impairment in different forms of early epileptic encephalopathies affecting the brain in a special developmental window. The impairment of cognitive functions via sleep is present especially in epileptic networks involving the thalamocortical system and the hippocampocortical memory encoding system.

  12. Plate motions and deformations from geologic and geodetic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Thomas H.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of geodetic data in the vicinity of the Crustal Dynamics Program (CDP) site at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VNDN) is presented. The utility of space-geodetic data in the monitoring of transient strains associated with earthquakes in tectonically active areas like California is investigated. Particular interest is in the possibility that space-geodetic methods may be able to provide critical new data on deformations precursory to large seismic events. Although earthquake precursory phenomena are not well understood, the monitoring of small strains in the vicinity of active faults is a promising technique for studying the mechanisms that nucleate large earthquakes and, ultimately, for earthquake prediction. Space-geodetic techniques are now capable of measuring baselines of tens to hundreds of kilometers with a precision of a few parts in 108. Within the next few years, it will be possible to record and analyze large-scale strain variations with this precision continuously in real time. Thus, space-geodetic techniques may become tools for earthquake prediction. In anticipation of this capability, several questions related to the temporal and spatial scales associated with subseismic deformation transients are examined.

  13. Geodetic Measurements of Slow Slip and Tremor in Parkfield, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delbridge, B. G.; Burgmann, R.; Nadeau, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    It has been proposed that large bursts of deep tremor ( >20km depth) near Parkfield, CA are associated with quasi-periodic shear dislocations on the deep extent of the San Andreas Fault. Geodetic studies have shown that slow slip accompanies tremor in several subduction zones [e.g. Rogers and Dragert, 2003; Ide et al 2008]. However, prior to this study deformation associated with tremor in a transform fault environment had not been observed despite the ubiquitous presence of tremor and LFEs [Shelly et al, 2007; Nadeau et al 2005] and targeted attempts to observe this deformation [Smith 2009]. In this study we report geodetic measurements of surface strains associated with large tremor swarms that are inferred to be concurrent with slow-slip events with moment magnitudes exceeding 5 [Guilhem et al 2012]. The strain rates associated with these events are below the detection level of GPS networks, thus in order to observe this deformation we have utilized two long-baseline laser strainmeters (LSM) located in Cholame, CA. In order to overcome a small signal-to noise-ratio in the strainmeter data, we have stacked the strain records associated with more than 50 large tremor-burst events, each approximately 10 days in duration. The average surface strains associated with these events are on the order of several nanometers and correspond to fault slip on the order of 5 millimeters per event (assuming a fault patch extending ~25 km along-strike and ~15km in depth). The measured moment associated with these events is a factor of two smaller than previously proposed based on theoretical estimates [Guilhem et al 2012]. In this study we also explore the deformation associated with a large increase in tremor activity following the August 24, 2014 M6.0 Napa earthquake, the largest observed burst in the Parkfield-Cholame area since the large tremor rate increase associated with the 2004 Parkfield M6 earthquake.

  14. Workshop targets development of geodetic transient detection methods: 2009 SCEC Annual Meeting: Workshop on transient anomalous strain detection; Palm Springs, California, 12-13 September 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murray-Moraleda, Jessica R.; Lohman, Rowena

    2010-01-01

    The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) is a community of researchers at institutions worldwide working to improve understanding of earthquakes and mitigate earthquake risk. One of SCEC's priority objectives is to “develop a geodetic network processing system that will detect anomalous strain transients.” Given the growing number of continuously recording geodetic networks consisting of hundreds of stations, an automated means for systematically searching data for transient signals, especially in near real time, is critical for network operations, hazard monitoring, and event response. The SCEC Transient Detection Test Exercise began in 2008 to foster an active community of researchers working on this problem, explore promising methods, and combine effective approaches in novel ways. A workshop was held in California to assess what has been learned thus far and discuss areas of focus as the project moves forward.

  15. Joint Seismological and Geodetic Observations on David Glacier, South Victoria Land, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danesi, S.; Dubbini, M.; Morelli, A.; Vittuari, L.; Bannister, S.

    2006-12-01

    Ice streams play a major role in the ice mass balance and in the reckoning of the global sea level; they have therefore been the object of wide scientific interest in the last three decades. During the 21st Italian Antarctic Expedition, in the austral summer 2005-06, we deployed a joint seismographic and geodetic network in the area of the David Glacier, Southern Victoria Land. This followed a similar experiment carried out in the same area during the austral summer 2003-04 (19th Expedition) which involved the deployment of a seismographic network which recorded significant microseismicity beneath the David Glacier, primarily occurring as a few small clusters. In the latest 2006-06 deployment 7 seismographic stations and 3 GPS geodetic receivers operated continuously for a period of 3 months (November 2006-early February 2006) in an area of about 100x50 square km around the David Glacier. The seismic stations were sited on rocky outcrops around the ice flow, and were all equipped with a broad-band seismometer and a digitizer. Contemporaneous geodetic GPS measurements were made on two points located on the glacial body: the first site close to the 2003-04 epicentres and to the David Glacier ice fall, the second site on the floating Drygalski Ice Tongue. A primary master GPS receiver for the kinematic processing was installed on a benchmark located on the Hughes Bluff rock outcrop. Several analyses are planned utilising the combined data sets. These include examining the temporal evolution in earthquake magnitude and locations and also the contemporaneous observation of both seismic activity and surface kinematics of the ice stream to possibly correlate the registered microseismicity with potential surges of the glacier, eventually affected by the Ross Sea tides. Here we present some details of the two temporary networks and preliminary results and implications.

  16. The Australian Geodetic Observing Program. Current Status and Future Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, G.; Dawson, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last decade, the Australian government has through programs like AuScope, the Asia Pacific Reference Frame (APREF), and the Pacific Sea Level Monitoring (PSLM) Project made a significant contribution to the Global Geodetic Observing Program. In addition to supporting the national research priorities, this contribution is justified by Australia's growing economic dependence on precise positioning to underpin efficient transportation, geospatial data management, and industrial automation (e.g., robotic mining and precision agriculture) and the consequent need for the government to guarantee provision of precise positioning products to the Australian community. It is also well recognised within Australia that there is an opportunity to exploit our near unique position as being one of the few regions in the world to see all new and emerging satellite navigation systems including Galileo (Europe), GPS III (USA), GLONASS (Russia), Beidou (China), QZSS (Japan) and IRNSS (India). It is in this context that the Australian geodetic program will build on earlier efforts and further develop its key geodetic capabilities. This will include the creation of an independent GNSS analysis capability that will enable Australia to contribute to the International GNSS Service (IGS) and an upgrade of key geodetic infrastructure including the national VLBI and GNSS arrays. This presentation will overview the significant geodetic activities undertaken by the Australian government and highlight its future plans.

  17. Complex networks in brain electrical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, C.; Ruffini, G.; Marco-Pallarés, J.; Fuentemilla, L.; Grau, C.

    2007-08-01

    This letter reports a method to extract a functional network of the human brain from electroencephalogram measurements. A network analysis was performed on the resultant network and the statistics of the cluster coefficient, node degree, path length, and physical distance of the links, were studied. Even given the low electrode count of the experimental data the method was able to extract networks with network parameters that clearly depend on the type of stimulus presented to the subject. This type of analysis opens a door to studying the cerebral networks underlying brain electrical activity, and links the fields of complex networks and cognitive neuroscience.

  18. Update on the activities of the GGOS Bureau of Networks and Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Michael R.; Pavlis, Erricos C.; Ma, Chopo; Noll, Carey; Thaller, Daniela; Richter, Bernd; Gross, Richard; Neilan, Ruth; Mueller, Juergen; Barzaghi, Ricardo; Bergstrand, Sten; Saunier, Jerome; Tamisiea, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The recently reorganized GGOS Bureau of Networks and Observations has many elements that are associated with building and sustaining the infrastructure that supports the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) through the development and maintenance of the International Terrestrial and Celestial Reference Frames, improved gravity field models and their incorporation into the reference frame, the production of precision orbits for missions of interest to GGOS, and many other applications. The affiliated Service Networks (IVS, ILRS, IGS, IDS, and now the IGFS and the PSMSL) continue to grow geographically and to improve core and co-location site performance with newer technologies. Efforts are underway to expand GGOS participation and outreach. Several groups are undertaking initiatives and seeking partnerships to update existing sites and expand the networks in geographic areas void of coverage. New satellites are being launched by the Space Agencies in disciplines relevant to GGOS. Working groups now constitute an integral part of the Bureau, providing key service to GGOS. Their activities include: projecting future network capability and examining trade-off options for station deployment and technology upgrades, developing metadata collection and online availability strategies; improving coordination and information exchange with the missions for better ground-based network response and space-segment adequacy for the realization of GGOS goals; and standardizing site-tie measurement, archiving, and analysis procedures. This poster will present the progress in the Bureau's activities and its efforts to expand the networks and make them more effective in supporting GGOS.

  19. New Developments in Geodetic Data Management Systems for Fostering International Collaborations in the Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meertens, Charles; Boler, Fran; Miller, M. Meghan

    2015-04-01

    UNAVCO community investigators are actively engaged in using space and terrestrial geodetic techniques to study earthquake processes, mantle properties, active magmatic systems, plate tectonics, plate boundary zone deformation, intraplate deformation, glacial isostatic adjustment, and hydrologic and atmospheric processes. The first GPS field projects were conducted over thirty years ago, and from the beginning these science investigations and the UNAVCO constituency as a whole have been international and collaborative in scope and participation. Collaborations were driven by the nature of the scientific problems being addressed, the capability of the technology to make precise measurements over global scales, and inherent technical necessity for sharing of GPS tracking data across national boundaries. The International GNSS Service (IGS) was formed twenty years ago as a voluntary federation to share GPS data from now hundreds of locations around the globe to facilitate realization of global reference frames, ties to regional surveys, precise orbits, and to establish and improve best practices in analysis and infrastructure. Recently, however, numbers of regional stations have grown to the tens of thousands, often with data that are difficult to access. UNAVCO has been working to help remove technical barriers by providing open source tools such as the Geodetic Seamless Archive Centers software to facilitate cross-project data sharing and discovery and by developing Dataworks software to manage network data. Data web services also provide the framework for UNAVCO contributions to multi-technique, inter-disciplinary, and integrative activities such as CoopEUS, GEO Supersites, EarthScope, and EarthCube. Within the geodetic community, metadata standards and data exchange formats have been developed and evolved collaboratively through the efforts of global organizations such as the IGS. A new generation of metadata and data exchange formats, as well as the software

  20. Stochastic cycle selection in active flow networks.

    PubMed

    Woodhouse, Francis G; Forrow, Aden; Fawcett, Joanna B; Dunkel, Jörn

    2016-07-19

    Active biological flow networks pervade nature and span a wide range of scales, from arterial blood vessels and bronchial mucus transport in humans to bacterial flow through porous media or plasmodial shuttle streaming in slime molds. Despite their ubiquity, little is known about the self-organization principles that govern flow statistics in such nonequilibrium networks. Here we connect concepts from lattice field theory, graph theory, and transition rate theory to understand how topology controls dynamics in a generic model for actively driven flow on a network. Our combined theoretical and numerical analysis identifies symmetry-based rules that make it possible to classify and predict the selection statistics of complex flow cycles from the network topology. The conceptual framework developed here is applicable to a broad class of biological and nonbiological far-from-equilibrium networks, including actively controlled information flows, and establishes a correspondence between active flow networks and generalized ice-type models. PMID:27382186

  1. Damage and restoration of geodetic infrastructure caused by the 1994 Northridge, California, earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodgkinson, Kathleen M.; Stein, Ross S.; Hudnut, Kenneth W.; Satalich, Jay; Richards, John H.

    1996-01-01

    We seek to restore the integrity of the geodetic network in the San Fernando, Simi, Santa Clarita Valleys and in the northern Los Angeles Basin by remeasurement of the network and identification of BMs which experienced non-tectonic displacements associated with the Northridge earthquake. We then use the observed displacement of BMs in the network to portray or predict the permanent vertical and horizontal deformation associated with the 1994 Northridge earthquake throughout the area, including sites where we lack geodetic measurements. To accomplish this, we find the fault geometry and earthquake slip that are most compatible with the geodetic and independent seismic observations of the earthquake. We then use that fault model to predict the deformation everywhere at the earth's surface, both at locations where geodetic observations exist and also where they are absent. We compare displacements predicted for a large number of numerical models of the earthquake faulting to the coseismic displacements, treating the earthquake fault as a cut or discontinuity embedded in a stiff elastic solid. This comparison is made after non-tectonic deformation has been removed from the measured elevation changes. The fault slip produces strain in the medium and deforms the ground surface. The model compatible with seismic observations that best fits the geodetic data within their uncertainties is selected. The acceptable model fault bisects the mainshock focus, and the earthquake size , magnitude, is compatible with the earthquake size measured seismically. Our fault model was used to identify geodetic monuments on engineered structures that were anomalously displaced by the earthquake.

  2. The Contribution of the Geodetic Community (WG4) to EPOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, R. M. S.; Bastos, L. C.; Bruyninx, C.; D'Agostino, N.; Dousa, J.; Ganas, A.; Lidberg, M.; Nocquet, J.-M.

    2012-04-01

    WG4 - "EPOS Geodetic Data and Infrastructure" is the Working Group of the EPOS project responsible to define and prepare the integration of the existing Pan-European Geodetic Infrastructures into a unique future consistent infrastructure that supports the European Geosciences, which is the ultimate goal of the EPOS project. The WG4 is formed by representatives of the participating EPOS countries and from EUREF (European Reference Frame), which also ensures the inclusion and the contact with countries that formally are not part of the current phase of EPOS. In reality, the fact that Europe is formed by many countries (having different laws and policies) lacking an infrastructure similar to UNAVCO (which concentrates the effort of the local geo-science community) raises the difficulties to create a common geodetic infrastructure serving not only the entire geo-science community, but also many other areas of great social-economic impact. The benefits of the creation of such infrastructure (shared and easily accessed by all) are evident in order to optimize the existing and future geodetic resources. This presentation intends to detail the work being produced within the working group WG4 related with the definition of strategies towards the implementation of the best solutions that will permit to the end-users, and in particular geo-scientists, to access the geodetic data, derived solutions, and associated metadata using transparent and uniform processes. Discussed issues include the access to high-rate data in near real-time, storage and backup of historical and future data, the sustainability of the networks in order to achieve long-term stability in the observation infrastructure, seamless access to the data, open data policies, and processing tools.

  3. Monitoring Malware Activity on the LAN Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrzewski, Mirosław

    Many security related organizations periodically publish current network and systems security information, with the lists of top malware programs. These lists raises the question how these threats spreads out, if the worms (the only threat with own communication abilities) are low or missing on these lists. The paper discuss the research on malware network activity, aimed to deliver the answer to the question, what is the main infection channel of modern malware, done with the usage of virtual honeypot systems on dedicated, unprotected network. Systems setup, network and systems monitoring solutions, results of over three months of network traffic and malware monitoring are presented, along with the proposed answer to our research question.

  4. Geodetic strain measurements in Washington.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.; Lisowski, M.; Prescott, W.H.

    1981-01-01

    Two new geodetic measurements of strain accumulation in the state of Washington for the interval 1972-1979 are reported. Near Seattle the average principal strain rates are 0.07 + or - 0.03 mu strain/yr N19oW and -0.13 + or - 0.02 mu strain/yr N71oE, and near Richland (south central Washington) the average principal strain rates are -0.02 + or - 0.01 mu strain/yr N36oW and -0.04 + or - 0.01 mu strain/yr N54oE. Extension is taken as positive, and the uncertainties quoted are standard deviations. A measurement of shear strain accumulation (dilation not determined) in the epoch 1914- 1966 along the north coast of Vancouver Island by the Geodetic Survey of Canada indicates a marginally significant accumulation of right-lateral shear (0.06 + or - 0.03 mu rad/yr) across the plate boundary (N40oW strike). Although there are significant differences in detail, these strain measurements are roughly consistent with a crude dislocation model that represents subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate. The observed accumulation of strain implies that large, shallow, thrust earthquakes should be expected off the coast of Washington and British Columbia. However, this conclusion is not easily reconciled with either observations of elevation change along the Washington coast or the focal mechanism solutions for shallow earthquakes in Washington. -Authors

  5. Geodetic aspects of seismological phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Peter; Denis, Carlo

    2010-02-01

    Seismology is related to many problems of geodesy. The energy production of our planet is rather close to energy consumption of the Earth so that the energy balance can be disturbed significantly by minor processes acting on global scale. From this point of view the effect of tidal triggering of earthquakes is discussed by the study of tidal stress tensor components expressed in spherical system of coordinates. Tidal friction influences through the despinning of the axial rotation the geometrical flattening. This flattening variation causes stresses along the longitude and this phenomenon is closely related to the seismic energy release. Until now there is no unambiguous success to relate changes of the Earth orientation parameters with seismicity. Present-day accuracy of the length of day variations is not sufficient yet to detect spin variation generated by the greatest earthquakes. The polar motion is probably more sensitive to earthquakes and then there is a chance to detect the polar displacements generated by seismic events. In the last section of the present contribution, the strain rates derived from the static seismic moments and from space geodetic observations are compared. Future geodetic strain rate data will be useful in earthquake prediction.

  6. Plate motions and deformations from geologic and geodetic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Thomas H.

    1989-01-01

    The very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) measurements made in the western U.S. since 1979 provide discrete samples of the temporal and spatial deformation field. The interpretation of the VLBI derived rates of deformation requires an examination of geologic information and more densely sampled ground based geodetic data. Triangulation and trilateration data measured on two regional networks, one in the central Mojave Desert and one in the Coast Ranges east of the San Andreas fault, were processed. At the spatial scales spanned by these local geodetic networks, auxiliary geologic and geophysical data were utilized to examine the relation between measured incremental strain and the accommodation of strain seen in local geologic structures, strain release in earthquakes, and principal stress directions inferred from in situ measurements. VLBI data was also processed from stations distributed across the Pacific-North America plate boundary zone in the western U.S. The VLBI data were used to constrain the integrated rate of deformation across portions of the continental plate boundary in California and to provide a tectonic framework to interpret regional geodetic and geologic studies.

  7. Geodetic measurement of deformation in California. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauber, Jeanne Marie

    1988-01-01

    The very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) measurements made in the western U.S. since 1979 as part of the NASA Crustal Dynamics Project provide discrete samples of the temporal and spatial deformation field. The interpretation of the VLBI-derived rates of deformation requires an examination of geologic information and more densely sampled ground-based geodetic data. In the first two of three related studies embodying this thesis triangulation and trilateration data measured on two regional networks are processed, one in the central Mojave Desert and one in the Coast Ranges east of the San Andreas fault. At the spatial scales spanned by these local geodetic networks, auxiliary geologic and geophysical data have been utilized to examine the relation between measured incremental strain and the accommodation of strain seen in local geological structures, strain release in earthquakes, and principal stress directions inferred from in situ measurements. In the third study, VLBI data from stations distributed across the Pacific - North American plate boundary zone in the western United States are processed. The VLBI data have been used to constrain the integrated rate of deformation across portions of the continental plate boundary in California and to provide a tectonic framework to interpret regional geodetic and geologic studies.

  8. Permanent GPS Geodetic Array in Southern California (PGGA) and GPS observations in Indonesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, Yehuds

    1994-01-01

    The Permanent GPS Geodetic Array (PGGA) is a network of permanent monitoring GPS stations in southern California devoted to the continuous measurement of crustal deformation in near real-time. The PGGA plays a unique role in studies of the kinematics of crustal deformation and the earthquake cycle in southern California because it is also providing temporally dense geodetic measurements of crustal motion over periods of minutes to variations in regional crustal strain. As it expands and matures the PGGA will play an increasingly important role in the study of active tectonics of southern California by bridging the frequency range between seismology, observatory geodesy, paleoseismology, and geology. In Indonesia GPS data is used for measurement of a large scale crustal deformation, extending from north China to the Indonesian archipelago. Indonesia offers a tremendous laboratory to study some of the processes that build continents, and mountains are active there. We began GPS observations in August 1989 on mainland Sumatra and the Mentawai Islands to study the phenomena of oblique plate convergence. We have analyzed the Indonesian data in conjunction with data collected on Christmas and Cocos Islands and at Darwin, Australia, and with the triangulation data in Sumatra.

  9. Seafloor geodetic constraints on interplate coupling of the Nankai Trough megathrust zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokota, Yusuke; Ishikawa, Tadashi; Watanabe, Shun-Ichi; Tashiro, Toshiharu; Asada, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Interplate megathrust earthquakes have inflicted catastrophic damage on human society. Such an earthquake is predicted to occur in the near future along the Nankai Trough off southwestern Japan—an economically active and densely populated area in which megathrust earthquakes have already occurred. Megathrust earthquakes are the result of a plate-subduction mechanism and occur at slip-deficit regions (also known as ‘coupling’ regions), where friction prevents plates from slipping against each other and the accumulated energy is eventually released forcefully. Many studies have attempted to capture distributions of slip-deficit rates (SDRs) in order to predict earthquakes. However, these studies could not obtain a complete view of the earthquake source region, because they had no seafloor geodetic data. The Hydrographic and Oceanographic Department of the Japan Coast Guard (JHOD) has been developing a precise and sustainable seafloor geodetic observation network in this subduction zone to obtain information related to offshore SDRs. Here, we present seafloor geodetic observation data and an offshore interplate SDR-distribution model. Our data suggest that most offshore regions in this subduction zone have positive SDRs. Specifically, our observations indicate previously unknown regions of high SDR that will be important for tsunami disaster mitigation, and regions of low SDR that are consistent with distributions of shallow slow earthquakes and subducting seamounts. This is the first direct evidence that coupling conditions might be related to these seismological and geological phenomena. Our findings provide information for inferring megathrust earthquake scenarios and interpreting research on the Nankai Trough subduction zone.

  10. Seafloor geodetic constraints on interplate coupling of the Nankai Trough megathrust zone.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Yusuke; Ishikawa, Tadashi; Watanabe, Shun-ichi; Tashiro, Toshiharu; Asada, Akira

    2016-06-16

    Interplate megathrust earthquakes have inflicted catastrophic damage on human society. Such an earthquake is predicted to occur in the near future along the Nankai Trough off southwestern Japan--an economically active and densely populated area in which megathrust earthquakes have already occurred. Megathrust earthquakes are the result of a plate-subduction mechanism and occur at slip-deficit regions (also known as 'coupling' regions), where friction prevents plates from slipping against each other and the accumulated energy is eventually released forcefully. Many studies have attempted to capture distributions of slip-deficit rates (SDRs) in order to predict earthquakes. However, these studies could not obtain a complete view of the earthquake source region, because they had no seafloor geodetic data. The Hydrographic and Oceanographic Department of the Japan Coast Guard (JHOD) has been developing a precise and sustainable seafloor geodetic observation network in this subduction zone to obtain information related to offshore SDRs. Here, we present seafloor geodetic observation data and an offshore interplate SDR-distribution model. Our data suggest that most offshore regions in this subduction zone have positive SDRs. Specifically, our observations indicate previously unknown regions of high SDR that will be important for tsunami disaster mitigation, and regions of low SDR that are consistent with distributions of shallow slow earthquakes and subducting seamounts. This is the first direct evidence that coupling conditions might be related to these seismological and geological phenomena. Our findings provide information for inferring megathrust earthquake scenarios and interpreting research on the Nankai Trough subduction zone. PMID:27281197

  11. INEGI's Network of GPS permanent stations in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez Franco, G. A.

    2013-05-01

    The Active National Geodetic Network administered by INEGI (Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía) is a set of 24 GPS permanent stations in Mexico that was established in 1993 for a national rural cadastral project, its has been mainly used for geodetic surveys through Mexico including international borders, and has been progressing to contribute to national, regional and international reference frames through the delivering of GPS data or coordinate solutions from INEGI Processing Center to SIRGAS and NAREF. Recently GAMIT/GLOBK Processing of permanent stations in Mexico was realized from 2007-2011 to determine station's velocity. Related to natural hazards, a subset of INEGI network contributes to the project Real Time Integrated Atmosferic Water Wapor and TEC from GPS. The GPS network planned evolution consider changing to a GNSS network, adding stations to IGS, maintain the services of the present, and contribute to multidisciplinary geodetic studies through data publicly available.

  12. Global Positioning System (GPS) survey of Augustine Volcano, Alaska, August 3-8, 2000: data processing, geodetic coordinates and comparison with prior geodetic surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pauk, Benjamin A.; Power, John A.; Lisowski, Mike; Dzurisin, Daniel; Iwatsubo, Eugene Y.; Melbourne, Tim

    2001-01-01

    Between August 3 and 8,2000,the Alaska Volcano Observatory completed a Global Positioning System (GPS) survey at Augustine Volcano, Alaska. Augustine is a frequently active calcalkaline volcano located in the lower portion of Cook Inlet (fig. 1), with reported eruptions in 1812, 1882, 1909?, 1935, 1964, 1976, and 1986 (Miller et al., 1998). Geodetic measurements using electronic and optical surveying techniques (EDM and theodolite) were begun at Augustine Volcano in 1986. In 1988 and 1989, an island-wide trilateration network comprising 19 benchmarks was completed and measured in its entirety (Power and Iwatsubo, 1998). Partial GPS surveys of the Augustine Island geodetic network were completed in 1992 and 1995; however, neither of these surveys included all marks on the island.Additional GPS measurements of benchmarks A5 and A15 (fig. 2) were made during the summers of 1992, 1993, 1994, and 1996. The goals of the 2000 GPS survey were to:1) re-measure all existing benchmarks on Augustine Island using a homogeneous set of GPS equipment operated in a consistent manner, 2) add measurements at benchmarks on the western shore of Cook Inlet at distances of 15 to 25 km, 3) add measurements at an existing benchmark (BURR) on Augustine Island that was not previously surveyed, and 4) add additional marks in areas of the island thought to be actively deforming. The entire survey resulted in collection of GPS data at a total of 24 sites (fig. 1 and 2). In this report we describe the methods of GPS data collection and processing used at Augustine during the 2000 survey. We use this data to calculate coordinates and elevations for all 24 sites surveyed. Data from the 2000 survey is then compared toelectronic and optical measurements made in 1988 and 1989. This report also contains a general description of all marks surveyed in 2000 and photographs of all new marks established during the 2000 survey (Appendix A).

  13. Construction of a New Geodetic VLBI Station in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, T.; Kim, T.; Sasao, T.; Kwak, Y.; Oh, H.; Yi, S.; Hyun, D.; Bae, M.

    2008-12-01

    In Korea, KVN (Korean VLBI Network) project dedicated to radio astronomy is being promoted by Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), and three 21-m diameter antennas equipped with 22/43/86/129 GHz receivers have been already constructed at Seoul, Ulsan, and Jeju. On the other hand NGII (National Geographic Information Institute, Korea) has planned to construct their own antenna dedicated to geodetic VLBI measurements to maintain the Korean Geodetic Datum accurately. It also aims at a fundamental station in East Asia and will contribute to the better definition of the ITRF there. Grand design named KVG (Korea VLBI project for Geodesy) realizing NGII's plan has been proposed by Ajou University with collaborations from NICT (National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Japan) and GSI (Geographical Survey Institute, Japan). KVG project got a national budget for construction formally this year (2008), and it has entered the three-year term of construction and development phase since October, 2008. A VLBI antenna will be constructed in Sejong city (about 120km south-southeast from Seoul) and its construction will be completed in 2011. The antenna is designed based on the VLBI2010 except for receiving frequencies and the diameter where VLBI2010 is the guideline for next generation's geodetic VLBI system compiled by IVS (International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry). Newly constructed antenna can receive 2/8/22/43 GHz band simultaneously in order to carry out geodetic VLBI observations not only with current geodetic VLBI stations equipped with 2/8 GHz receivers but also with KVN stations equipped with 22/43 GHz receivers. The antenna is also designed to be able to introduce a broadband feed and receivers in the future according to VLBI2010's suggestion. The diameter of antenna is chosen to be 22-m, which is larger than the VLBI2010's recommendation (13-m), to make astronomical VLBI observations of weak radio sources with KVN

  14. Detection of crustal deformation from the Landers earthquake sequence using continuous geodetic measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bock, Y.; Agnew, D.C.; Fang, P.; Genrich, J.F.; Hager, B.H.; Herring, T.A.; Hudnut, K.W.; King, R.W.; Larsen, S.; Minster, J.-B.; Stark, K.; Wdowinski, S.; Wyatt, F.K.

    1993-01-01

    The measurement of crustal motions in technically active regions is being performed increasingly by the satellite-based Global Positioning System (GPS)1,2, which offers considerable advantages over conventional geodetic techniques3,4. Continuously operating GPS arrays with ground-based receivers spaced tens of kilometres apart have been established in central Japan5,6 and southern California to monitor the spatial and temporal details of crustal deformation. Here we report the first measurements for a major earthquake by a continuously operating GPS network, the Permanent GPS Geodetic Array (PGGA)7,9 in southern California. The Landers (magnitude Mw of 7.3) and Big Bear (Mw 6.2) earthquakes of 28 June 1992 were monitored by daily observations. Ten weeks of measurements, centred on the earthquake events, indicate significant coseismic motion at all PGGA sites, significant post-seismic motion at one site for two weeks after the earthquakes, and no significant preseismic motion. These measurements demonstrate the potential of GPS monitoring for precise detection of precursory and aftershock seismic deformation in the near and far field.

  15. Korea Geodetic VLBI Station, Sejong

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donghyun, Baek; Sangoh, Yi; Hongjong, Oh; Sangchul, Han

    2013-01-01

    The Sejong VLBI station officially joined the IVS as a new Network Station in 2012. This report summarizes the activities of the Sejong station during 2012. The following are the activities at the station: 1) VLBI test observations were carried out with the Tsukuba 34-m antenna of the GSI in Japan. As a result, the Sejong antenna needs to improve its efficiency, which is currently in progress, 2) A survey to connect the VLBI reference point to GNSS and ground marks was conducted, and 3) To see the indirect effects of RFI (Radio Frequency Interference) at this place, we checked the omni-direction (AZ 0? to 360?, EL fixed at 7?) for RFI influence.

  16. A dissipative network model with neighboring activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Fei; Liu, Yun; Zhu, Jiang; Jiang Zhang, Zhen; Chao Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Ying

    2011-11-01

    We propose a network model with dissipative structure taking into consideration the effect of neighboring activation and individual dissipation. Nodes may feel tired of interactions with new nodes step by step, and drop out of the network evolution. However, these dormant nodes can become active again following neighbors. During the whole evolution only active nodes have opportunities to receive new links. We analyze user behavior of a real Internet forum, and the statistical characteristics of this forum are analogous to our model. Under the influence of motivation and dissipation, the degree distribution of our network model decays as a power law with a diversity of tunable power exponents. Furthermore, the network has high clustering, small average path length and positive assortativity coefficients.

  17. First Results with the Next Generation Geodetic VLBI System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niell, A. E.

    2012-12-01

    The next generation geodetic VLBI instrument is being developed with a goal of 1 mm position uncertainty in twenty-four hours. The broadband signal chain, which is essential for obtaining the required delay accuracy from a network of relatively small antennas, has been implemented on the 12 meter antenna at Goddard Space Flight Center, Maryland, USA, and on the 18 meter Westford antenna at Haystack Observatory, Massachusetts, USA. The first geodetic-style observing session has been completed. Data were recorded from four 512 MHz bands spanning the range 3.2 to 9.9 GHz at a total rate of 8 Gigabits/second. The signal chain was composed of commercially available broadband feeds, low noise amplifiers, digital back ends, and recorders. The six hour session demonstrated that the broadband hardware performs as expected, achieving delay precisions of a few picoseconds. The position uncertainties for the 12m antenna of ~9mm in vertical and 2mm in horizontal, obtained in a preliminary analysis from only 100 30-second observations, are probably dominated by incomplete modeling of the atmosphere. A potentially serious conflict of the broadband VLBI frequency coverage with the SLR aircraft-avoidance radars, which transmit at 9.4 GHz, and with the DORIS transmission near 2 GHz has become apparent during the implementation and testing of the VLBI2010 system. Mitigation efforts are being studied, but for this initial geodetic session, 20 percent of scheduled observations had to be dropped to avoid potential damage from the SLR radar.

  18. Integrated velocity field from ground and satellite geodetic techniques: application to Arenal volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Cyril; del Potro, Rodrigo; Biggs, Juliet; Gottsmann, Joachim; Ebmeier, Susanna K.; Guillaume, Sébastien; Cattin, Paul-Henri; Van der Laat, Rodolfo

    2015-02-01

    Measurements of ground deformation can be used to identify and interpret geophysical processes occurring at volcanoes. Most studies rely on a single geodetic technique, or fit a geophysical model to the results of multiple geodetic techniques. Here we present a methodology that combines GPS, Total Station measurements and InSAR into a single reference frame to produce an integrated 3-D geodetic velocity surface without any prior geophysical assumptions. The methodology consists of five steps: design of the network, acquisition and processing of the data, spatial integration of the measurements, time series computation and finally the integration of spatial and temporal measurements. The most significant improvements of this method are (1) the reduction of the required field time, (2) the unambiguous detection of outliers, (3) an increased measurement accuracy and (4) the construction of a 3-D geodetic velocity field. We apply this methodology to ongoing motion on Arenal's western flank. Integration of multiple measurement techniques at Arenal volcano revealed a deformation field that is more complex than that described by individual geodetic techniques, yet remains consistent with previous studies. This approach can be applied to volcano monitoring worldwide and has the potential to be extended to incorporate other geodetic techniques and to study transient deformation.

  19. Temporal percolation in activity-driven networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starnini, Michele; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

    2014-03-01

    We study the temporal percolation properties of temporal networks by taking as a representative example the recently proposed activity-driven-network model [N. Perra et al., Sci. Rep. 2, 469 (2012), 10.1038/srep00469]. Building upon an analytical framework based on a mapping to hidden variables networks, we provide expressions for the percolation time Tp marking the onset of a giant connected component in the integrated network. In particular, we consider both the generating function formalism, valid for degree-uncorrelated networks, and the general case of networks with degree correlations. We discuss the different limits of the two approaches, indicating the parameter regions where the correlated threshold collapses onto the uncorrelated case. Our analytical predictions are confirmed by numerical simulations of the model. The temporal percolation concept can be fruitfully applied to study epidemic spreading on temporal networks. We show in particular how the susceptible-infected-removed model on an activity-driven network can be mapped to the percolation problem up to a time given by the spreading rate of the epidemic process. This mapping allows us to obtain additional information on this process, not available for previous approaches.

  20. Permanent GPS Geodetic Array in Southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Cecil H.; Green, Ida M.

    1998-01-01

    The southern California Permanent GPS Geodetic Array (PGGA) was established in the spring of 1990 to evaluate continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements as a new too] for monitoring crustal deformation. Southern California is an ideal location because of the relatively high rate of tectonic deformation, the high probability of intense seismicity, the long history of conventional and space geodetic measurements, and the availability of a well developed infrastructure to support continuous operations. Within several months of the start of regular operations, the PGGA recorded far-field coseismic displacements induced by the June 28, 1992 (M(sub w)=7.3), Landers earthquake, the largest magnitude earthquake in California in the past 40 years and the first one to be recorded by a continuous GPS array. Only nineteen months later, on 17 January 1994, the PGGA recorded coseismic displacements for the strongest earthquake to strike the Los Angeles basin in two decades, the (M(sub e)=6.7) Northridge earthquake. At the time of the Landers earthquake, only seven continuous GPS sites were operating in southern California; by the beginning of 1994, three more sites had been added to the array. However, only a pair of sites were situated in the Los Angeles basin. The destruction caused by the Northridge earthquake spurred a fourfold increase in the number of continuous GPS sites in southern California within 2 years of this event. The PGGA is now the regional component of the Southern California Integrated GPS Network (SCIGN), a major ongoing densification of continuous GPS sites, with a concentration in the Los Angeles metropolitan region. Continuous GPS provides temporally dense measurements of surface displacements induced by crustal deformation processes including interseismic, coseismic, postseismic, and aseismic deformation and the potential for detecting anomalous events such as preseismic deformation and interseismic strain variations. Although strain meters

  1. Spontaneous network activity and synaptic development

    PubMed Central

    Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Throughout development, the nervous system produces patterned spontaneous activity. Research over the last two decades has revealed a core group of mechanisms that mediate spontaneous activity in diverse circuits. Many circuits engage several of these mechanisms sequentially to accommodate developmental changes in connectivity. In addition to shared mechanisms, activity propagates through developing circuits and neuronal pathways (i.e. linked circuits in different brain areas) in stereotypic patterns. Increasing evidence suggests that spontaneous network activity shapes synaptic development in vivo. Variations in activity-dependent plasticity may explain how similar mechanisms and patterns of activity can be employed to establish diverse circuits. Here, I will review common mechanisms and patterns of spontaneous activity in emerging neural networks and discuss recent insights into their contribution to synaptic development. PMID:24280071

  2. Subsidence Detection Using InSAR and Geodetic Measurements in the North-West of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, Morteza

    2010-05-01

    The subsidence of the Earth surface is a phenomenon that occurs in some places in the world which overuse underground sources of water. As Iran has semi-arid and arid climate and the rate of rainfall is lower than the mean rate in the world then nowadays we are encountered by over-exploitation of groundwater in agricultural areas and also for extending the cities and industrial areas. Geodetic measurements i.e., repeated leveling measurements of first order leveling network of Iran and continuous GPS measurements of Iranian Permanent GPS Network of Iran (IPGN), showed that there are subsidence areas in the north-west of Iran. In this paper we try to find the area and rate of subsidence in the north-west of Iran using InSAR and geodetic techniques. The result of InSAR technique shows a better understanding on this phenomenon in these areas and has a good consistency with accurate geodetic measurements.

  3. Local Geoid Modelling using Astro-geodetic Camera System and GNSS/Leveling Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halicioglu, Kerem; Deniz, Rasim; Ozener, Haluk; Tevfik Ozludemir, M.; Albayrak, Muge

    2016-04-01

    Geodetic astronomy provides regional and local interpretations of the gravity field of the earth with deflections of the vertical components. Recently astro-geodetic data is used with combination of leveling, GNSS, and gravity (aerial, terrestrial) observations for validation purposes. Modern tools were developed in Europe and Asia as digital zenith camera systems (DZCS) and now it is possible to determine precise deflections of the vertical data with an accuracy of ±0.1 - 0.3 arc seconds. GNSS/Leveling geoid of Istanbul was modeled in 2005 with an accuracy of ±3.5 cm and needs to be improved using additional data such as astro-geodetic deflections of the vertical. This study presents the recent observations performed using DZCS of Turkey. The accuracy of the system was tested with GNSS/Leveling geoid model and the results were compared with geoid height differences and global geopotential models. We also introduce a new project that includes modernization of current astro-geodetic camera system, and the observations that are planned on a larger test network. In this respect, new observations are going to be performed on a test network with 25 points using astro-geodetic data, and the geoid height differences will be obtained in order to improve local geoid model of Istanbul.

  4. An Overview of Geodetic Volcano Research in the Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, José; González, Pablo J.; Camacho, Antonio G.; Prieto, Juan F.; Brú, Guadalupe

    2015-11-01

    The Canary Islands are mostly characterized by diffuse and scattered volcanism affecting a large area, with only one active stratovolcano, the Teide-Pico Viejo complex (Tenerife). More than 2 million people live and work in the 7,447 km2 of the archipelago, resulting in an average population density three times greater than the rest of Spain. This fact, together with the growth of exposure during the past 40 years, increases volcanic risk with respect previous eruptions, as witnessed during the recent 2011-2012 El Hierro submarine eruption. Therefore, in addition to purely scientific reasons there are economic and population-security reasons for developing and maintaining an efficient volcano monitoring system. In this scenario geodetic monitoring represents an important part of the monitoring system. We describe volcano geodetic monitoring research carried out in the Canary Islands and the results obtained. We consider for each epoch the two main existing constraints: the level of volcanic activity in the archipelago, and the limitations of the techniques available at the time. Theoretical and observational aspects are considered, as well as the implications for operational volcano surveillance. Current challenges of and future perspectives in geodetic volcano monitoring in the Canaries are also presented.

  5. Reconstructing Causal Biological Networks through Active Learning

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyunghoon; Berger, Bonnie; Peng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Reverse-engineering of biological networks is a central problem in systems biology. The use of intervention data, such as gene knockouts or knockdowns, is typically used for teasing apart causal relationships among genes. Under time or resource constraints, one needs to carefully choose which intervention experiments to carry out. Previous approaches for selecting most informative interventions have largely been focused on discrete Bayesian networks. However, continuous Bayesian networks are of great practical interest, especially in the study of complex biological systems and their quantitative properties. In this work, we present an efficient, information-theoretic active learning algorithm for Gaussian Bayesian networks (GBNs), which serve as important models for gene regulatory networks. In addition to providing linear-algebraic insights unique to GBNs, leading to significant runtime improvements, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our method on data simulated with GBNs and the DREAM4 network inference challenge data sets. Our method generally leads to faster recovery of underlying network structure and faster convergence to final distribution of confidence scores over candidate graph structures using the full data, in comparison to random selection of intervention experiments. PMID:26930205

  6. Reconstructing Causal Biological Networks through Active Learning.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyunghoon; Berger, Bonnie; Peng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Reverse-engineering of biological networks is a central problem in systems biology. The use of intervention data, such as gene knockouts or knockdowns, is typically used for teasing apart causal relationships among genes. Under time or resource constraints, one needs to carefully choose which intervention experiments to carry out. Previous approaches for selecting most informative interventions have largely been focused on discrete Bayesian networks. However, continuous Bayesian networks are of great practical interest, especially in the study of complex biological systems and their quantitative properties. In this work, we present an efficient, information-theoretic active learning algorithm for Gaussian Bayesian networks (GBNs), which serve as important models for gene regulatory networks. In addition to providing linear-algebraic insights unique to GBNs, leading to significant runtime improvements, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our method on data simulated with GBNs and the DREAM4 network inference challenge data sets. Our method generally leads to faster recovery of underlying network structure and faster convergence to final distribution of confidence scores over candidate graph structures using the full data, in comparison to random selection of intervention experiments. PMID:26930205

  7. Detection of precursory slips on a fault by the quiescence and activation of seismicity relative to the ETAS model and by the anomalous trend of the geodetic time series of distances between GPS stations around the fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Y.

    2006-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the detection of precursory slip on a rupturing fault, supported by both seismic and geodetic records. Basically, the detection relies on the principle that, assuming precursory slip on the rupturing fault, the seismic activity around the fault should be enhanced or reduced in the zones where increment of the Coulomb failure stress (CFS) is positive or negative, respectively. However, any occurring event also affects the stress changes in neighboring regions, which can trigger further aftershock clusters. Whereas such stress transfers are too difficult to be computed precisely, due to the unknown complex fault system, the ordinary short-term occurrence rate of earthquakes in a region is easily predicted using the ETAS model of triggering seismicity; and any anomalous seismic activity, such as quiescence and activation, can be quantified by identifying a significant deviation from the predicted rate. Such anomalies are revealed to have occurred during several years leading up to the 2004 Chuetsu Earthquake of M6.8, central Honshu, and also the 2005 Western Fukuoka-Ken-Oki Earthquake of M7.0, Kyushu, Japan. Quiescence and activation in the regions coincided with negative and positive increments of the CFS, respectively, and were probably transferred from possible aseismic slips on the focal fault plane. Such slips are further supported by transient crustal movement around the source preceding the rupture. Time series records of the baseline distances between the permanent GPS stations deviated from the predicted trends, with the deviations consistent with the coseismic horizontal displacements of the stations due to these earthquakes. References Ogata, Y. (2006) Report of the Coordinating Committee for Earthquake Prediction, 76 (to appear, in Japanese).

  8. Coordinated network activity in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Draguhn, Andreas; Keller, Martin; Reichinnek, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus expresses a variety of highly organized network states which bind its individual neurons into collective modes of activity. These patterns go along with characteristic oscillations of extracellular potential known as theta, gamma, and ripple oscillations. Such network oscillations share some important features throughout the entire central nervous system of higher animals: they are restricted to a defined behavioral state, they are mostly generated by subthreshold synaptic activity, and they entrain active neurons to fire action potentials at strictly defined phases of the oscillation cycle, thereby providing a unifying 'zeitgeber' for coordinated multineuronal activity. Recent work from the hippocampus of rodents and humans has revealed how the resulting spatiotemporal patterns support the formation of neuronal assemblies which, in our present understanding, form the neuronal correlate of spatial, declarative, or episodic memories. In this review, we introduce the major types of spatiotemporal activity patterns in the hippocampus, describe the underlying neuronal mechanisms, and illustrate the concept of memory formation within oscillating networks. Research on hippocampus-dependent memory has become a key model system at the interface between cellular and cognitive neurosciences. The next step will be to translate our increasing insight into the mechanisms and systemic functions of neuronal networks into urgently needed new therapeutic strategies. PMID:24777128

  9. Coordinated network activity in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Draguhn, Andreas; Keller, Martin; Reichinnek, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus expresses a variety of highly organized network states which bind its individual neurons into collective modes of activity. These patterns go along with characteristic oscillations of extracellular potential known as theta, gamma, and ripple oscillations. Such network oscillations share some important features throughout the entire central nervous system of higher animals: they are restricted to a defined behavioral state, they are mostly generated by subthreshold synaptic activity, and they entrain active neurons to fire action potentials at strictly defined phases of the oscillation cycle, thereby providing a unifying 'zeitgeber' for coordinated multineuronal activity. Recent work from the hippocampus of rodents and humans has revealed how the resulting spatiotemporal patterns support the formation of neuronal assemblies which, in our present understanding, form the neuronal correlate of spatial, declarative, or episodic memories. In this review, we introduce the major types of spatiotemporal activity patterns in the hippocampus, describe the underlying neuronal mechanisms, and illustrate the concept of memory formation within oscillating networks. Research on hippocampus-dependent memory has become a key model system at the interface between cellular and cognitive neurosciences. The next step will be to translate our increasing insight into the mechanisms and systemic functions of neuronal networks into urgently needed new therapeutic strategies.

  10. The feeder system for the 2014 fissure eruption at Holuhraun, Bárðarbunga volcanic system, Iceland: Geodetic and seismic constraints on subsurface activity in the area north of the Vatnajökull ice cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, Stéphanie; Parks, Michelle; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Hooper, Andy; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrun; Ófeigsson, Benedikt; Spaans, Karsten; Vogfjörd, Kristin; Jónsdóttir, Kristín; Hensch, Martin; Gudmundsson, Gunnar; Rafn Heimisson, Elias; Drouin, Vincent; Árnadóttir, Thóra; Pedersen, Rikke; Rut Hjartardóttir, Ásta; Magnússon, Eyjólfur

    2015-04-01

    An intense earthquake swarm began on 16 August 2014 at Bárðarbunga volcano under the Vatnajökull ice cap in Central Iceland. It marked the beginning of an intrusive activity, with a dyke propagating over 45 km northward. Such major magmatic activity has not been observed for the last three decades in Iceland, since the Krafla rifting episode 1975-1984. The dyke propagation stopped 15 days after the onset of the seismic activity, with the dyke distal end in the Holuhraun plain north of the Vatnajökull ice cap. A small 4 hour eruption marked the beginning of extrusive activity. A new fissure eruption opened up on 31 August at the northern dyke tip, with lava fountaining and feeding extensive lava flows. In January 2014 the surface covered by the lava had exceeded 80 km2, and the eruption activity does not show significant decline. We have carried out interferometric analysis of SAR data (InSAR) since the onset of the unrest. X-band satellite images from COSMO-SkyMed and TerraSAR-X satellites were acquired and analyzed to map ground surface deformation associated with the dyke emplacement. Despite most of the dyke propagation occurring under several hundreds meters of ice, the last 10 km were outside the ice cap, allowing better characterisation of the dyke-induced deformation. Here we focus on the deformation in the Holuhraun plain, in order to better understand the link between the surface deformation detected in the vicinity of the dyke by InSAR as well as GPS measurements, and the eruptive activity. The regular SAR acquisitions made over the Holuhraun area since the beginning of the unrest offer a unique opportunity to better understand the evolution of the intrusion feeding the fissure eruption. For that purpose, we focus on the faults and fissures forming the graben borders on the glacier as well as in the Holuhraun plain, initially mapped using high-resolution radar images, acquired by airborne radar. We extract movement along and perpendicular to these

  11. The Global Geodetic Infrastructure for Accurate Monitoring of Earth Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, Neil; Blackwell, Juliana; Wang, Yan; Willis, Zdenka

    2014-05-01

    The National Geodetic Survey (NGS) and the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS), two Program Offices within the National Ocean Service, NOAA, routinely collect, analyze and disseminate observations and products from several of the 17 critical systems identified by the U.S. Group on Earth Observations. Gravity, sea level monitoring, coastal zone and ecosystem management, geo-hazards and deformation monitoring and ocean surface vector winds are the primary Earth systems that have active research and operational programs in NGS and IOOS. These Earth systems collect terrestrial data but most rely heavily on satellite-based sensors for analyzing impacts and monitoring global change. One fundamental component necessary for monitoring via satellites is having a stable, global geodetic infrastructure where an accurate reference frame is essential for consistent data collection and geo-referencing. This contribution will focus primarily on system monitoring, coastal zone management and global reference frames and how the scientific contributions from NGS and IOOS continue to advance our understanding of the Earth and the Global Geodetic Observing System.

  12. Seafloor seismological/geodetic observations in the rupture area of the 2011 Tohoku-oki Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, Ryota; Shinohara, Masanao; Ito, Yoshihiro

    2016-04-01

    A number of important aspects of the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake (Mw 9.0) were clarified by the seafloor seismological and geodetic observation above the rupture area of the earthquake. Besides the extraordinarily large coseismic displacements, various kinds of slow slip phenomena associated with intensive micro-seismicity on the plate boundary fault were identified by near field ocean bottom seismographs and seafloor geodetic observation networks. The Tohoku-oki earthquake was preceded by evident foreshock activity with a spatial expansion of this seismicity. The activity became significantly intense after the occurrence of the largest foreshock two days before the mainshock rupture. During the period, clear continuous seafloor deformation was identified caused by the aseismic slip following the largest foreshock. Another different type of aseismic slip event had occurred before this pre-imminent activity had started about a month before the largest foreshock happened. The observed increased seismicity associated with aseismic slip suggests that there must have been some chain reaction like interplay of seismic and interseismic slips before the large earthquake broke out. However, no evident deformation signals were observed indicating acceleration of fault slip immediately before the mainshock. Seafloor geodetic measurements reveals that the postseismic deformation around the rupture area of the Tohoku-oki earthquake shows complex spatial pattern and the complexity is mostly due to significant viscoelastic relaxation induced by the huge coseismic slip. The effects of viscoelastic deformation makes it difficult to identify the deformation associated with the after slip or regaining of interplate coupling and requires us to enhance the abilities of seafloor monitoring to detect the slip activities on the fault. We started an array of seismometer arrays observation including broad-band seismographs to detect and locate slow-slip events and low-frequency tremors

  13. The SCEC geodetic transient detection validation exercise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lohman, Rowena B.; Murray, Jessica R.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade the number and size of continuously operating Global Positioning System (GPS) networks has grown substantially worldwide. A steadily increasing volume of freely available GPS measurements, combined with the application of new approaches for mining these data for signals of interest, has led to the identification of a large and diverse collection of time‐varying Earth processes. One phenomenon that has been observed is transient fault slip (also termed slow slip events or silent earthquakes) occurring over time spans of days to years (e.g., Linde et al., 1996; Hirose et al., 1999; Dragert et al., 2001; Miller et al., 2002; Kostoglodov et al., 2003; Douglas et al., 2005; Shelly et al., 2006; Ide et al., 2007; Lohman and McGuire, 2007; Schwartz and Rokosky, 2007; Szeliga et al., 2008). Such events have been widely observed in subduction zones but are also found in other tectonic settings (Linde et al., 1996; Cervelli et al., 2002; Murray and Segall, 2005; Lohman and McGuire, 2007; Montgomery‐Brown et al., 2009; Shelly, 2010; and references therein). Although retrospective study of slow‐slip events using geodetic observations is driving the formulation of new models for fault‐zone behavior and constitutive laws (e.g., Lapusta et al., 2000; Liu and Rice, 2007; Lapusta and Liu, 2009; Segall and Bradley, 2012a), much of the research on near‐real‐time detection and characterization of anomalous behaviors along fault zones has focused solely on the use of seismic tremor (e.g., Rogers and Dragert, 2003; Shelly et al., 2006; Ito et al., 2007).

  14. Sloppiness in spontaneously active neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Panas, Dagmara; Amin, Hayder; Maccione, Alessandro; Muthmann, Oliver; van Rossum, Mark; Berdondini, Luca; Hennig, Matthias H

    2015-06-01

    Various plasticity mechanisms, including experience-dependent, spontaneous, as well as homeostatic ones, continuously remodel neural circuits. Yet, despite fluctuations in the properties of single neurons and synapses, the behavior and function of neuronal assemblies are generally found to be very stable over time. This raises the important question of how plasticity is coordinated across the network. To address this, we investigated the stability of network activity in cultured rat hippocampal neurons recorded with high-density multielectrode arrays over several days. We used parametric models to characterize multineuron activity patterns and analyzed their sensitivity to changes. We found that the models exhibited sloppiness, a property where the model behavior is insensitive to changes in many parameter combinations, but very sensitive to a few. The activity of neurons with sloppy parameters showed faster and larger fluctuations than the activity of a small subset of neurons associated with sensitive parameters. Furthermore, parameter sensitivity was highly correlated with firing rates. Finally, we tested our observations from cell cultures on an in vivo recording from monkey visual cortex and we confirm that spontaneous cortical activity also shows hallmarks of sloppy behavior and firing rate dependence. Our findings suggest that a small subnetwork of highly active and stable neurons supports group stability, and that this endows neuronal networks with the flexibility to continuously remodel without compromising stability and function.

  15. Position paper on active countermeasures for computer networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Randwyk, Jamie A.

    2003-07-01

    Computer security professionals have used passive network countermeasures for several years in order to secure computer networks. Passive countermeasures such as firewalls and intrusion detection systems are effective but their use alone is not enough to protect a network. Active countermeasures offer new ways of protecting a computer network. Corporations and government entities should adopt active network countermeasures as a means of protecting their computer networks.

  16. Choosing Geodetic Monuments Based on Noise in New Zealand GPS Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beavan, J.

    2004-12-01

    Geodetic signals of tectonic or volcanological interest recorded by geodetic instrumentation may be degraded or obscured by the presence of noise in the geodetic data. Limiting the noise is therefore important for the detection and interpretation of such signals. One source of noise is random motion occurring within the connection of the geodetic instrument to the ground. In the case of surface instruments such as GPS, the connection to the ground is through a geodetic monument. The motion of this monument, with respect to a representative volume of the Earth's near surface in its vicinity, is termed monument noise. Monument noise results from processes such as soil swelling in response to rainfall, and general rock and soil weathering effects. In this paper we investigate the noise levels within time series of continuous GPS (CGPS) positions collected on concrete pillar monuments in New Zealand. We compare these noise levels with those from drilled, braced monuments in several U.S. CGPS networks. We investigate under what conditions monument noise is the limiting noise source in the CGPS data, and attempt to provide a basis for decisions on what type of monument to deploy under certain scenarios.

  17. The Online Positioning User Service: a Web Utility for Precise Geodetic Positioning in the Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, W. A.

    2014-12-01

    Geoscientists often require precise positioning capability to support research. Accurate Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) positioning is a specialized skill involving expertise and fraught with accuracy-compromising nuances. With the goal of providing a robust and high accuracy positioning tool and enhanced access to the United States' National Spatial Reference System (NSRS), the nation's fundamental positioning infrastructure, NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS) developed the Online Positioning User Service (OPUS). OPUS is a free Web utility for processing user-submitted GNSS observations and producing geodetic coordinates referenced to both NSRS and a global reference frame. Relying on NGS' national network of GNSS Continuously Operating Reference Stations (CORS), OPUS is a powerful and user-friendly tool for production and scientific research. OPUS is widely used in geomatics professions and holds great, yet not fully tapped, potential for research geoscientists requiring accurate positional information. OPUS became operational in 2002 as a single point processing tool for multi-hour GPS occupations (OPUS-Static). Its capability has since evolved, adding the ability to process short (15 minutes) sessions (OPUS-RapidStatic) and to provide a solution sharing option. All OPUS variations have proven to be popular, with typical monthly submissions now numbering 40,000. In 2014, NGS released a network version of OPUS, OPUS-Projects, the focus of this discussion. Although other versions of OPUS process a single GNSS occupation per submission, OPUS-Projects offers rigorous geodetic network analysis and processing capability by assembling and processing GNSS observations collected over time and at multiple locations. Least squares geodetic network adjustment of included observations results in an optimal set of station coordinates, including their uncertainties and graphical statistical plots, derived from user-submitted observation data, CORS observation

  18. Intruder Activity Analysis under Unreliable Sensor Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Tae-Sic Yoo; Humberto E. Garcia

    2007-09-01

    This paper addresses the problem of counting intruder activities within a monitored domain by a sensor network. The deployed sensors are unreliable. We characterize imperfect sensors with misdetection and false-alarm probabilities. We model intruder activities with Markov Chains. A set of Hidden Markov Models (HMM) models the imperfect sensors and intruder activities to be monitored. A novel sequential change detection/isolation algorithm is developed to detect and isolate a change from an HMM representing no intruder activity to another HMM representing some intruder activities. Procedures for estimating the entry time and the trace of intruder activities are developed. A domain monitoring example is given to illustrate the presented concepts and computational procedures.

  19. GEODYN- ORBITAL AND GEODETIC PARAMETER ESTIMATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putney, B.

    1994-01-01

    The Orbital and Geodetic Parameter Estimation program, GEODYN, possesses the capability to estimate that set of orbital elements, station positions, measurement biases, and a set of force model parameters such that the orbital tracking data from multiple arcs of multiple satellites best fits the entire set of estimation parameters. The estimation problem can be divided into two parts: the orbit prediction problem, and the parameter estimation problem. GEODYN solves these two problems by employing Cowell's method for integrating the orbit and a Bayesian least squares statistical estimation procedure for parameter estimation. GEODYN has found a wide range of applications including determination of definitive orbits, tracking instrumentation calibration, satellite operational predictions, and geodetic parameter estimation, such as the estimations for global networks of tracking stations. The orbit prediction problem may be briefly described as calculating for some later epoch the new conditions of state for the satellite, given a set of initial conditions of state for some epoch, and the disturbing forces affecting the motion of the satellite. The user is required to supply only the initial conditions of state and GEODYN will provide the forcing function and integrate the equations of motion of the satellite. Additionally, GEODYN performs time and coordinate transformations to insure the continuity of operations. Cowell's method of numerical integration is used to solve the satellite equations of motion and the variational partials for force model parameters which are to be adjusted. This method uses predictor-corrector formulas for the equations of motion and corrector formulas only for the variational partials. The parameter estimation problem is divided into three separate parts: 1) instrument measurement modeling and partial derivative computation, 2) data error correction, and 3) statistical estimation of the parameters. Since all of the measurements modeled by

  20. The activation of interactive attentional networks.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Bin; Mackie, Melissa-Ann; Spagna, Alfredo; Wu, Tingting; Tian, Yanghua; Hof, Patrick R; Fan, Jin

    2016-04-01

    Attention can be conceptualized as comprising the functions of alerting, orienting, and executive control. Although the independence of these functions has been demonstrated, the neural mechanisms underlying their interactions remain unclear. Using the revised attention network test and functional magnetic resonance imaging, we examined cortical and subcortical activity related to these attentional functions and their interactions. Results showed that areas in the extended frontoparietal network (FPN), including dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, frontal eye fields (FEF), areas near and along the intraparietal sulcus, anterior cingulate and anterior insular cortices, basal ganglia, and thalamus were activated across multiple attentional functions. Specifically, the alerting function was associated with activation in the locus coeruleus (LC) in addition to regions in the FPN. The orienting functions were associated with activation in the superior colliculus (SC) and the FEF. The executive control function was mainly associated with activation of the FPN and cerebellum. The interaction effect of alerting by executive control was also associated with activation of the FPN, while the interaction effect of orienting validity by executive control was mainly associated with the activation in the pulvinar. The current findings demonstrate that cortical and specific subcortical areas play a pivotal role in the implementation of attentional functions and underlie their dynamic interactions.

  1. GeoSEA: Geodetic Earthquake Observatory on the Seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Heidrun; Lange, Dietrich; Flueh, Ernst R.; Petersen, Florian; Behrmann, Jan-Hinrich; Devey, Colin

    2014-05-01

    Space geodetic observations of crustal deformation have contributed greatly to our understanding of plate tectonic processes in general, and plate subduction in particular. Measurements of interseismic strain have documented the active accumulation of strain, and subsequent strain release during earthquakes. However, techniques such as GPS cannot be applied below the water surface because the electromagnetic energy is strongly attenuated in the water column. Evidence suggests that much of the elastic strain build up and release (and particularly that responsible for both tsunami generation and giant earthquakes) occurs offshore. To quantify strain accumulation and assess the resultant hazard potential we urgently need systems to resolve seafloor crustal deformation. Here we report on first results of sea trials of a newly implemented seafloor geodesy array. The GeoSEA (Geodetic Earthquake Observatory on the Seafloor) array consists of a seafloor transponder network comprising 35 units and a wave glider acting as a surface unit (GeoSURF) to ensure satellite correspondence, data transfer and monitor system health. Seafloor displacement occurs in the horizontal (x,y) and vertical direction (z). The vertical displacement is measured by monitoring pressure variations at the seafloor. Horizontal seafloor displacement can be measured either using an acoustic/GPS combination to provide absolute positioning (requiring a suitably equipped vessel to perform repeated cruises to provide the GPS fixes) or by long-term acoustic telemetry between different beacons fixed on the seafloor to determine relative distances by using the travel time observations to each other, which is the technique tested during our short sea trials. For horizontal direct path measurements, the system utilizes acoustic ranging techniques with a ranging precision better than 15 mm and long term stability over 2 km distances. Vertical motion is obtained from pressure gauges. Integrated inclinometers

  2. Basic research and data analysis for the national geodetic satellite program and for the earth and ocean physics applications program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Activities related to the National Geodetic Satellite Program are reported and include a discussion of Ohio State University's OSU275 set of tracking station coordinates and transformation parameters, determination of network distortions, and plans for data acquisition and processing. The problems encountered in the development of the LAGEOS satellite are reported in an account of activities related to the Earth and Ocean Physics Applications Program. The LAGEOS problem involves transmission and reception of the laser pulse designed to make accurate determinations of the earth's crustal and rotational motions. Pulse motion, ephemeris, arc range measurements, and accuracy estimates are discussed in view of the problem. Personnel involved in the two programs are also listed, along with travel activities and reports published to date.

  3. [Legal aspects of networking of medical activities].

    PubMed

    Preissler, Reinhold

    2005-04-01

    Medical networks lack a legal definition. From the viewpoint of social law, this term means a form of organization of joint-service providers in a non-specified composition for the undertaking of medical care activities; from the point of view of occupational law, this consists of a loose form of joint practice. Such medical network can conclude treatment contracts with the patients and exchange patients' medical records. A practice network can take over services as contract partner of hospitals or other institutions, in the interest of improved competition chances within the integrated care system. The joining of a third partner is basically left open by the MBO, however according to SGB V this is possible only after approval by all contract partners. In advance of a planned medical care center, is it recommended to found a physician network as starting model. Before single practices fuse into a single enterprise, management-, tax-, legal-, as well as psychological aspects must be considered. PMID:15957655

  4. A study program for geodetic satellite applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, M. R.

    1972-01-01

    The work is reported on support of the GEOS-C Program, National Geodetic Satellite program, and the Earth Physics Program. The statement of work, and a description of the GEOS-C are presented along with the trip reports, and the Earth and Ocean Physics Application program.

  5. National Geodetic Satellite Program, Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, S. W. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    The work performed by individual contributors to the National Geodetic Satellite Program is presented. The purpose of the organization, the instruments used in obtaining the data, a description of the data itself, the theory used in processing the data, and evaluation of the results are detailed for the participating organizations.

  6. Error modeling for GPS geodetic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rim, Hyung Jin; Schutz, Bob E.; Tapley, Byron D.

    1993-01-01

    An extensive investigation was conducted to provide realistic error models for Global Positioning System (GPS) related numerical simulation. This study considers most of the important error sources for measurement and dynamic models which are currently being used for GPS geodetic applications. These error models were evaluated by comparing with real GPS data.

  7. The Southern California Dense GPS Geodetic Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, F.

    1994-01-01

    The Southern California Earthquake Center is coordinating a effort by scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the U.S. Geological Survey, and various academic institutions to establish a dense 250 station, continuously recording GPS geodetic array in southern California for measuring crustal deformation associated with slip on the numerous faults that underlie the major metropolitan areas of southern california.

  8. Geodetic Glacier Mass Balance of Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreassen, L. M.; Elvehøy, H.; Kjøllmoen, B.

    2014-12-01

    Glaciers in mainland Norway cover 2692 km2and span a large range from south to north. Glacier surface mass balance is monitored by the direct (also called glaciological, traditional or conventional) method and indirectly assessed by the geodetic (or cartographic) method. The current glacier monitoring programme includes direct surface mass-balance investigations on 14 glaciers. Since measurements started at Storbreen in 1949, mass balance has been measured on a total of 43 glaciers. The accuracy of the direct measurements depends on both the accuracy of the point observations and inter- and extrapolation of point values to spatially distributed values. Long series of measurements can be inhomogeneous because of changes in personnel, methods, and glacier topography. Reanalysing glacier mass balance series is recommended as standard procedure for every mass balance monitoring programme with increasing importance for long time series. Repeated, detailed glacier mapping by aerial photography and photogrammetric methods, and recently by laser scanning (LIDAR), have been performed to calculate geodetic mass balance. The geodetic results are used as an independent check of the direct method as well as to monitor volume, area and mass changes of glaciers that lack direct measurements. Since 2007, LIDAR campaigns have been conducted on a 1/3 of the glacier area in Norway including all current mass balance glaciers. The objectives of the surveys are to produce high quality digital elevation models (DEMs) and orthophotos to document the present state of the glaciers and assess glacier changes since previous surveys. Furthermore, the DEMs and orthophotos provide an accurate baseline for future repeated mapping and glacier change detection. Here we present geodetic mass balance results for Norway over the last 50 years and compare the results with the direct in-situ measurements where available. We also show examples of how glacier mass balance data are being reanalyzed

  9. Ny-Alesund Geodetic Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sieber, Moritz

    2013-01-01

    In 2012 the 20-m telescope at Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, operated by the Norwegian Mapping Authority (NMA), took part in 163 out of 168 scheduled sessions of the IVS program. Since spring, all data was transferred by network, and the receiver monitoring computer was replaced by a bus-coupler. In autumn, the NMA received building permission for a new observatory from the Governor of Svalbard. The bidding process and first construction work for the infrastructure will start in 2013.

  10. Mercury's interior from MESSENGER geodetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, Antonio; Mazarico, Erwan; Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Frank G.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-04-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft completed more than 4 years of operations in orbit about Mercury. One of the main mission goals was the determination of the interior structure of Mercury enabled by geodetic observations of the topography, gravity field, rotation, and tides by the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) and radio science system. MLA acquired over 25 million individual measurements of Mercury's shape that are mostly limited to the northern hemisphere because of MESSENGER's eccentric orbit. However, the lack of laser altimetry in the southern hemisphere has been partly compensated by ˜400 occultations of spacecraft radio signals. X-band radio tracking data collected by the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) allowed the determination of Mercury's gravity field to spherical harmonic degree and order 100, the planet's obliquity, and the Love number k2. The combination of altimetry and radio measurements provides a powerful tool for the investigation of Mercury's orientation and tides, which enable a better understanding of the interior structure of the planet. The MLA measurements have been assembled into a digital elevation model (DEM) of the northern hemisphere. We then used individual altimetric measurements from the spacecraft for orbit determination, together with the radio tracking, over a continuous span of time using a batch least-squares filter. All observations were combined to recover directly the gravity field coefficients, obliquity, librations, and tides by minimizing the discrepancies between the computed observables and actual measurements. We will present the estimated 100×100 gravity field model, the obliquity, the Love number k2, and, for the first time, the tidal phase lag φ and the amplitude of the longitudinal libration from radio and altimetry data. The k2 phase provides information on Mercury's dissipation and mantle viscosity and allows a determination of the Q factor. A refinement of

  11. Mechanics of light-activated network polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Kevin Nicholas

    Mechanically responsive, environmentally activated polymers can undergo large, complex deformation in response to external stimuli such as thermal, luminous, and chemical changes to the environment. Light as a stimulus provides unique application potential because it allows for remote, rapid, and isothermal activation of the material with precise spatial control via existing optical technologies. While certain systems have received considerable attention, the state of the art of most light-activated polymers is limited to basic characterization and demonstrations. To make such materials available to the engineering and scientific communities, physically based theoretical and computational tools are required to guide experimental and design efforts that capitalize on their complex photo-mechanical couplings. The central objective of this thesis is to develop a multi-physics constitutive modeling framework to simulate the continuum scale, photo mechanical behavior of light-activated polymers and implement it into a finite element analysis setting. This framework is independent of specific underlying photo-stimulation mechanisms and is discussed in the context of photo-activated shape memory polymers and network rearranging polymers. Next, the framework is applied to the light-activated network rearranging polymer system, which is relaxed of stress upon irradiation with UV light, and a suite of characterization and application oriented experiments are carried out to calibrate and validate the model's predictive capabilities. The calibrated model is used to investigate several applications such as photo-activated stress relaxation of notched specimens, bending actuation, creep, the buckling of equi-biaxially deformed and irradiated films, and photomechanically formed 1D channels and ridges. Modeling creep involves additional complexity through simultaneous deformation and irradiation, and so the model framework is extended to cover such scenarios. Experiments, finite

  12. Historical Review of Astro-Geodetic Observations in Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogrizovic, V.; Delcev, S.; Vasilic, V.; Gucevic, J.

    2008-10-01

    Astro-geodetic determinations of vertical deflections in Serbia began during the first years of 20th century. The first field works were led by S. Bo\\vsković. After the 2nd World War, Military Geographic Institute, Department of Geodesy from the Faculty of Civil Engineering, and Federal Geodetic Directorate continued the determinations, needed for reductions of terrestrial geodetic measurements and the astro-geodetic geoid determination. Last years improvements of the astro-geodetic methods are carried out in the area of implementing modern measurement equipment and technologies.

  13. Seismic active control by neutral networks

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yu

    1995-12-31

    A study on the application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to active structural control under seismic loads is carried out. The structure considered is a single-degree-of-freedom (SDF) system with an active bracing device. The control force is computed by a trained neural network. The feedforward neural network architecture and an adaptive backpropagation training algorithm is used in the study. The neural net is trained to reproduce the function that represents the response-excitation relationship of the SDF system under seismic loads. The input-output training patterns are generated randomly. In the backpropagation training algorithm, the learning rate is determined by ensuring the decrease of the error function at each epoch. The computer program implemented is validated by solving the classification of the XOR problem. Then, the trained ANN is used to compute the control force according to the control strategy. If the control force exceeds the actuator`s capacity limit, it is set equal to that limit. The concept of the control strategy employed herein is to apply the control force at every time step to cancel the system velocity induced at the preceding time step so that the gradual rhythmic buildup of the response is destroyed. The ground motions considered in the numerical example are the 1940 El Centro earthquake and the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake in California. The system responses with and without the control are calculated and compared. The feasibility and potential of applying ANNs to seismic active control is asserted by the promising results obtained from the numerical examples studied.

  14. Stiff substrates enhance cultured neuronal network activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Quan-You; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Xie, Jing; Li, Chen-Xu; Chen, Wei-Yi; Liu, Bai-Lin; Wu, Xiao-an; Li, Shu-Na; Huo, Bo; Jiang, Lin-Hua; Zhao, Hu-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical property of extracellular matrix and cell-supporting substrates is known to modulate neuronal growth, differentiation, extension and branching. Here we show that substrate stiffness is an important microenvironmental cue, to which mouse hippocampal neurons respond and integrate into synapse formation and transmission in cultured neuronal network. Hippocampal neurons were cultured on polydimethylsiloxane substrates fabricated to have similar surface properties but a 10-fold difference in Young's modulus. Voltage-gated Ca2+ channel currents determined by patch-clamp recording were greater in neurons on stiff substrates than on soft substrates. Ca2+ oscillations in cultured neuronal network monitored using time-lapse single cell imaging increased in both amplitude and frequency among neurons on stiff substrates. Consistently, synaptic connectivity recorded by paired recording was enhanced between neurons on stiff substrates. Furthermore, spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic activity became greater and more frequent in neurons on stiff substrates. Evoked excitatory transmitter release and excitatory postsynaptic currents also were heightened at synapses between neurons on stiff substrates. Taken together, our results provide compelling evidence to show that substrate stiffness is an important biophysical factor modulating synapse connectivity and transmission in cultured hippocampal neuronal network. Such information is useful in designing instructive scaffolds or supporting substrates for neural tissue engineering. PMID:25163607

  15. Breadth of Scientific Activities and Network Station Specifications in the IGS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, A. W.; Springer, T. A.; Reigber, Ch.

    1999-01-01

    This presentation provides a brief overview of the scientific activities of the International GPS Service (IGS). This was an approved activity of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) with official start of service on 1 Jan 1994. The mission of the IGS is "To provide a service to support geodetic and geophysical research activities, through GPS data and data products." The presentation explains the concept of the IGS working group, and pilot projects, and reviews the current working groups and pilot projects.

  16. Dry tilt network at Mount Rainier, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, Daniel; Johnson, Daniel J.; Symonds, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    In addition to its primary responsibility of monitoring active Mount St. Helens, the David A. Johnston Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO) has been charged with obtaining baseline geodetic and geochemical information at each of the other potentially active Cascade volcanoes. Dry tilt and/or trilateration networks were established during 1975-82 at Mount Baker, Mount St. Helens, Mount Hood, Mount Shasta, Lassen Peak, Crater Lake, and Long Valley caldera; coverage was extended during September 1982 to include Mount Rainier.

  17. Distribution of deformation on an active normal fault network, NW Corinth Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Mary; Meyer, Nicolas; Boiselet, Aurélien; Lambotte, Sophie; Scotti, Oona; Lyon-Caen, Hélène; Briole, Pierre; Caumon, Guillaume; Bernard, Pascal

    2013-04-01

    Over the last 20-25 years, geodetic measurements across the Gulf of Corinth have recorded high extension rates varying from 1.1 cm/a in the east to a maximum of 1.6 cm/a in the west. Geodetic studies also show that current deformation is confined between two relatively rigid blocks defined as Central Greece (to the north) and the Peloponnesus to the south. Active north dipping faults (<1 Ma) define the south coast of the subsiding Gulf, while high seismicity (major earthquakes and micro-seismicity) is concentrated at depth below and to the north of the westernmost Gulf. How is this intense deformation distributed in the upper crust? Our objectives here are (1) to propose two models for the distribution of deformation in the upper crust in the westernmost rift since 1 Ma, and (2) to place the tectonic behaviour of the western Gulf in the context of longer term rift evolution. Over 20 major active normal faults have been identified in the CRL area based specific characteristics (capable of generating earthquakes M> 5.5, active in the last 1 M yrs, slip rate >0.5 mm/a). Because of the uncertainty related to fault geometry at depth two models for 3D fault network geometry in the western rift down to 10 km were constructed using all available geophysical and geological data. The first model assumes planar fault geometries while the second uses listric geometries for major faults. A model for the distribution of geodetically-defined extension on faults is constructed along five NNE-SSW cross sections using a variety of data and timescales. We assume that the role of smaller faults in accommodating deformation is negligible so that extension is fully accommodated on the identified major faults. Uncertainties and implications are discussed. These models provide estimates of slip rate for each fault that can be used in seismic hazard models. A compilation of onshore and offshore data shows that the western Gulf is the youngest part of the Corinth rift having initiated

  18. Deep Neural Networks with Multistate Activation Functions

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Chenghao; Xu, Yanyan; Ke, Dengfeng; Su, Kaile

    2015-01-01

    We propose multistate activation functions (MSAFs) for deep neural networks (DNNs). These MSAFs are new kinds of activation functions which are capable of representing more than two states, including the N-order MSAFs and the symmetrical MSAF. DNNs with these MSAFs can be trained via conventional Stochastic Gradient Descent (SGD) as well as mean-normalised SGD. We also discuss how these MSAFs perform when used to resolve classification problems. Experimental results on the TIMIT corpus reveal that, on speech recognition tasks, DNNs with MSAFs perform better than the conventional DNNs, getting a relative improvement of 5.60% on phoneme error rates. Further experiments also reveal that mean-normalised SGD facilitates the training processes of DNNs with MSAFs, especially when being with large training sets. The models can also be directly trained without pretraining when the training set is sufficiently large, which results in a considerable relative improvement of 5.82% on word error rates. PMID:26448739

  19. Analysis of variance of an underdetermined geodetic displacement problem

    SciTech Connect

    Darby, D.

    1982-06-01

    It has been suggested recently that point displacements in a free geodetic network traversing a strike-slip fault may be estimated from repeated surveys by minimizing only those displacement components normal to the strike. It is desirable to justify this procedure. We construct, from estimable quantities, a deformation parameter which is an F-statistic of the type occurring in the analysis of variance of linear models not of full rank. A test of its significance provides the criterion to justify the displacement solution. It is also interesting to study its behaviour as one varies the supposed strike of the fault. Justification of a displacement solution using data from a strike-slip fault is found, but not for data from a rift valley. The technique can be generalized to more complex patterns of deformation such as those expected near the end-zone of a fault in a dislocation model.

  20. Default network activity, coupled with the frontoparietal control network, supports goal-directed cognition.

    PubMed

    Spreng, R Nathan; Stevens, W Dale; Chamberlain, Jon P; Gilmore, Adrian W; Schacter, Daniel L

    2010-10-15

    Tasks that demand externalized attention reliably suppress default network activity while activating the dorsal attention network. These networks have an intrinsic competitive relationship; activation of one suppresses activity of the other. Consequently, many assume that default network activity is suppressed during goal-directed cognition. We challenge this assumption in an fMRI study of planning. Recent studies link default network activity with internally focused cognition, such as imagining personal future events, suggesting a role in autobiographical planning. However, it is unclear how goal-directed cognition with an internal focus is mediated by these opposing networks. A third anatomically interposed 'frontoparietal control network' might mediate planning across domains, flexibly coupling with either the default or dorsal attention network in support of internally versus externally focused goal-directed cognition, respectively. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing brain activity during autobiographical versus visuospatial planning. Autobiographical planning engaged the default network, whereas visuospatial planning engaged the dorsal attention network, consistent with the anti-correlated domains of internalized and externalized cognition. Critically, both planning tasks engaged the frontoparietal control network. Task-related activation of these three networks was anatomically consistent with independently defined resting-state functional connectivity MRI maps. Task-related functional connectivity analyses demonstrate that the default network can be involved in goal-directed cognition when its activity is coupled with the frontoparietal control network. Additionally, the frontoparietal control network may flexibly couple with the default and dorsal attention networks according to task domain, serving as a cortical mediator linking the two networks in support of goal-directed cognitive processes.

  1. Geodetic precession or dragging of inertial frames

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, N. ); Shahid-Saless, B. )

    1990-08-15

    In metric theories of gravity the principle of general covariance allows one to describe phenomena by means of any convenient choice of coordinate system. In this paper it is shown that in an appropriately chosen coordinate system, geodetic precession of a gyroscope orbiting a spherically symmetric, spinning mass can be recast as a Lense-Thirring frame-dragging effect without invoking spatial curvature. The origin of this reference frame moves around the source but the frame axes point in fixed directions. The drag can be interpreted to arise from the orbital angular momentum of the source around the origin of the reference frame. In this reference frame the effects of geodetic precession and Lense-Thirring drag due to intrinsic angular momentum of the source have the same origin, namely, gravitomagnetism.

  2. Absolute Antenna Calibration at the US National Geodetic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, G. L.; Bilich, A. L.

    2012-12-01

    Geodetic GNSS applications routinely demand millimeter precision and extremely high levels of accuracy. To achieve these accuracies, measurement and instrument biases at the centimeter to millimeter level must be understood. One of these biases is the antenna phase center, the apparent point of signal reception for a GNSS antenna. It has been well established that phase center patterns differ between antenna models and manufacturers; additional research suggests that the addition of a radome or the choice of antenna mount can significantly alter those a priori phase center patterns. For the more demanding GNSS positioning applications and especially in cases of mixed-antenna networks, it is all the more important to know antenna phase center variations as a function of both elevation and azimuth in the antenna reference frame and incorporate these models into analysis software. Determination of antenna phase center behavior is known as "antenna calibration". Since 1994, NGS has computed relative antenna calibrations for more than 350 antennas. In recent years, the geodetic community has moved to absolute calibrations - the IGS adopted absolute antenna phase center calibrations in 2006 for use in their orbit and clock products, and NGS's CORS group began using absolute antenna calibration upon the release of the new CORS coordinates in IGS08 epoch 2005.00 and NAD 83(2011,MA11,PA11) epoch 2010.00. Although NGS relative calibrations can be and have been converted to absolute, it is considered best practice to independently measure phase center characteristics in an absolute sense. Consequently, NGS has developed and operates an absolute calibration system. These absolute antenna calibrations accommodate the demand for greater accuracy and for 2-dimensional (elevation and azimuth) parameterization. NGS will continue to provide calibration values via the NGS web site www.ngs.noaa.gov/ANTCAL, and will publish calibrations in the ANTEX format as well as the legacy ANTINFO

  3. Sum Product Networks for Activity Recognition.

    PubMed

    Amer, Mohamed R; Todorovic, Sinisa

    2016-04-01

    This paper addresses detection and localization of human activities in videos. We focus on activities that may have variable spatiotemporal arrangements of parts, and numbers of actors. Such activities are represented by a sum-product network (SPN). A product node in SPN represents a particular arrangement of parts, and a sum node represents alternative arrangements. The sums and products are hierarchically organized, and grounded onto space-time windows covering the video. The windows provide evidence about the activity classes based on the Counting Grid (CG) model of visual words. This evidence is propagated bottom-up and top-down to parse the SPN graph for the explanation of the video. The node connectivity and model parameters of SPN and CG are jointly learned under two settings, weakly supervised, and supervised. For evaluation, we use our new Volleyball dataset, along with the benchmark datasets VIRAT, UT-Interactions, KTH, and TRECVID MED 2011. Our video classification and activity localization are superior to those of the state of the art on these datasets.

  4. Geodetic infrastructure at the Barcelona harbour for sea level monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Benjamin, Juan Jose; Gili, Josep; Lopez, Rogelio; Tapia, Ana; Pros, Francesc; Palau, Vicenc; Perez, Begona

    2015-04-01

    The presentation is directed to the description of the actual geodetic infrastructure of Barcelona harbour with three tide gauges of different technologies for sea level determination and contribution to regional sea level rise and understanding past and present sea level rise in the Barcelona harbour. It is intended that the overall system will constitute a CGPS Station of the ESEAS (European Sea Level) and TIGA (GPS Tide Gauge Benchmark Monitoring) networks. At Barcelona harbour there is a MIROS radar tide gauge belonging to Puertos del Estado (Spanish Harbours).The radar sensor is over the water surface, on a L-shaped structure which elevates it a few meters above the quay shelf. 1-min data are transmitted to the ENAGAS Control Center by cable and then sent each 1 min to Puertos del Estado by e-mail. The information includes wave forescast (mean period, significant wave height, sea level, etc.This sensor also measures agitation and sends wave parameters each 20 min. There is a GPS station Leica Geosystems GRX1200 GG Pro and antenna AX 1202 GG. The Control Tower of the Port of Barcelona is situated in the North dike of the so-called Energy Pier in the Barcelona harbor (Spain). This tower has different kind of antennas for navigation monitoring and a GNSS permanent station. As the tower is founded in reclaimed land, and because its metallic structure, the 50 m building is subjected to diverse movements, including periodic fluctuations due to temperature changes. In this contribution the 2009, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014 the necessary monitoring campaigns are described. In the framework of a Spanish Space Project, the instrumentation of sea level measurements has been improved by providing the Barcelona site with a radar tide gauge Datamar 2000C from Geonica S.L. in June 2014 near an acoustic tide gauge from the Barcelona Harbour installed in 2013. Precision levelling has been made several times in the last two years because the tower is founded in reclaimed land and

  5. Volcano deformation--Geodetic monitoring techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, Daniel; Lu, Zhong

    2007-01-01

    This book describes the techniques used by volcanologists to successfully predict several recent volcanic eruptions by combining information from various scientific disciplines, including geodetic techniques. Many recent developments in the use of state-of-the-art and emerging techniques, including Global Positioning System and Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry, mean that most books on volcanology are out of date, and this book includes chapters devoted entirely to these two techniques.

  6. Geodetic precession or dragging of inertial frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, Neil; Shahid-Saless, Bahman

    1989-01-01

    In General Relativity, the Principle of General Covariance allows one to describe phenomena by means of any convenient choice of coordinate system. Here, it is shown that the geodetic precession of a gyroscope orbiting a spherically symmetric, nonrotating mass can be recast as a Lense-Thirring frame-dragging effect, in an appropriately chosen coordinate frame whose origin falls freely along with the gyroscope and whose spatial coordinate axes point in fixed directions.

  7. A Possible Contribution of an Integrated Geodetic Infrastructure to EPOS: Case Study the Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simek, Jaroslav; Filler, Vratislav; Kostelecky, Jan; Kostelecky, Jakub; Novak, Pavel; Palinkas, Vojtech; Plicka, Vladimir; Valko, Milos

    2010-05-01

    The Earth is subject to a multitude of dynamic processes that cover a broad variety of spatial and temporal scales and are driven by large interior and exterior forces. The need for a global monitoring of the Earth has been recognized by the UN which resulted in initiating several global observing systems. None of these systems explicitly includes a geodetic component nor it is directly connected to the Global Geodetic Observing System. Nevertheless, only geodetic techniques can provide both the reference frame for Earth system observations as well as observations of crucial parameters related to changes in the Earth's geometry, rotation and gravity field. To ensure a long-term stability of the terrestrial reference system on the accuracy level of 1E-9 in the global and continental scale, the interactions between different time-dependent influences of the system Earth to the terrestrial reference system have to be considered. Therefore, necessary observations of different observation techniques must be available. To achieve reliable results, observations must be completed with meteorological parameters and environmental data of different kinds (ground water level, soil moisture etc.). A possible contribution of a regional geodetic infrastructure is illustrated by an example of the Geodetic Observatory Pecný, the Czech Republic, which continuously provides time series of GNSS, gravity (based on the absolute and superconducting gravimeters), seismic, environmental, climatological and meteorological (including radiometric atmosphere profiling) observations. Parallel to it, several data and analysis centers of the IAG international scientific services and of international geodynamical and meteorological projects are running at the observatory. The observatory is also a reference station for the scientific and experimental GNSS network operated in the Czech Republic and a part of the regional seismic network. Some time series of observations are presented and

  8. Development of AN Open-Source Automatic Deformation Monitoring System for Geodetical and Geotechnical Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, P.; Schweimler, B.

    2016-04-01

    The deformation monitoring of structures and buildings is an important task field of modern engineering surveying, ensuring the standing and reliability of supervised objects over a long period. Several commercial hardware and software solutions for the realization of such monitoring measurements are available on the market. In addition to them, a research team at the Neubrandenburg University of Applied Sciences (NUAS) is actively developing a software package for monitoring purposes in geodesy and geotechnics, which is distributed under an open source licence and free of charge. The task of managing an open source project is well-known in computer science, but it is fairly new in a geodetic context. This paper contributes to that issue by detailing applications, frameworks, and interfaces for the design and implementation of open hardware and software solutions for sensor control, sensor networks, and data management in automatic deformation monitoring. It will be discussed how the development effort of networked applications can be reduced by using free programming tools, cloud computing technologies, and rapid prototyping methods.

  9. Evaluation of geodetic and geologic datasets in the Northern Walker Lane-Summary and recommendations of the Workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Briggs, Richard W.; Hammond, William C.

    2010-01-01

    The Northern Walker Lane comprises a complex network of active faults in northwestern Nevada and northeastern California bound on the west by the Sierra Nevada and on the east by the extensional Basin and Range Province. Because deformation is distributed across sets of discontinuous faults, it is particularly challenging to integrate geologic and geodetic data in the NWL to assess the region's seismic hazard. Recent GPS measurements show that roughly one centimeter per year of relative displacement is accumulating across a zone about 100 km wide at the latitude of Reno, Nevada, but it is not clear where or how much of this strain might ultimately be released in damaging earthquakes. Despite decades of work in the region, the sum of documented late Pleistocene to recent slip rates is distinctly less than the GPS-measured relative displacement.

  10. Precision gravity networks at Lassen Peak and Mount Shasta, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jachens, Robert C.; Dzurisin, Daniel; Elder, W.P.; Saltus, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    Reoccupiable precision gravity networks for the purpose of monitoring volcanic activity were established in the vicinity of Lassen Peak and Mt. Shasta. Base-line measurements were made during the summer of 1981, nearly coincident in time with other base-line geodetic measurements. The gravity surveys yielded gravity values at network stations relative to local bases with typical uncertainties of 0.007 mGal (1 computed standard error).

  11. A New Geodetic Research Data Management System at the Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coetzer, G. L.; Botha, R. C.; Combrinck, L.; Fourie, S. C.

    2015-04-01

    The Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (HartRAO) hosts two research programmes: radio astronomy and space geodesy. The Space Geodesy programme has four main co-located space geodetic techniques, making HartRAO a true fiducial site. The HartRAO Space Geodesy Programme is expanding its geodetic techniques to include Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) as well as a network of seismometers, accelerometers, tide gauges, and gravimeters. These instruments will be installed across the southern African region and will generate large volumes of data that will be streamed to and stored at HartRAO. Our objective is to implement a complete Geodetic Research Data Management System (GRDMS) to handle all HartRAO's geodetic data on-site in terms of archiving, indexing, processing, and extraction. These datasets and subsequent data products will be accessible to both the scientific community and general public through an intuitive and easy to use web-based front-end. As the first step in this process, we are currently working on establishing a new data centre. This opens up the possibility for the librarian to provide data services and support by working together with researchers and information technology staff. We discuss the rationale, role players and top-level system design of this GRDMS, as well as the current status and planned products thereof.

  12. Seismic and Geodetic Observations of Recent Unrest at Mauna Loa Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thelen, W. A.; Poland, M. P.; Miklius, A.

    2014-12-01

    Mauna Loa, the largest active volcano on Earth, has exhibited signs of unrest consisting of increased seismicity beginning in March 2013 and slow inflation starting in early 2014. A previous episode of unrest occurred during 2002-2009, with swarms of deep long-period (DLP) earthquakes at >30 km depth and inflationary deformation. Mauna Loa is currently in the longest period of repose in the last 200 years, its last eruption having occurred in 1984. Seismic precursors to eruptions of Mauna Loa eruptions in 1975 and 1984 included episodic volcano-tectonic (VT) events centered northwest of the summit at depths of ~7 km and to the south of the caldera at <5 km depth. Current seismic activity, which has also been episodic, has also consisted of VT events occurring in similar locations, but with much lower energy release than the 1975 and 1984 seismic activity. Beginning in late May 2014, there was also an increase in the occurrence of DLP events. While approaching the numbers of earthquakes seen during the 2002 swarm (31 events) the current number of DLPs thus far pales in comparison to the 2004-2005 swarm (2000 events). As of July 2014, subtle inflationary deformation is apparent in both InSAR and GPS data, although inflation rates are much less than those observed in the several years preceding and following the 1984 eruption, and also far less than during the height of the 2002-2009 unrest. The inflation is consistent with pressurization of the known 3-5-km-deep magma storage area beneath Mauna Loa's caldera. Seismic event rates and deformation, though smaller in magnitude, are similar to the precursory activity seen in 1975 and 1984. Careful tracking of the current unrest by recently upgraded seismic and geodetic monitoring, regardless of whether or not it culminates in eruption, offers excellent prospects for unraveling Mauna Loa's magma plumbing system and structure. In this presentation we will give a synoptic view of unrest associated with Mauna Loa as recorded

  13. GNSS Absolute Antenna Calibration at the National Geodetic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, G. L.; Bilich, A. L.; Geoghegan, C.

    2011-12-01

    Geodetic GNSS applications routinely demand millimeter precision and extremely high levels of accuracy. To achieve these accuracies, measurement and instrument biases at the centimeter to millimeter level must be understood. One of these biases is the antenna phase center, the apparent point of signal reception for a GNSS antenna. It has been well established that phase center patterns differ between antenna models and manufacturers; additional research suggests that the addition of a radome or the choice of antenna mount can significantly alter those a priori phase center patterns. For the more demanding GNSS positioning applications and especially in cases of mixed-antenna networks, it is all the more important to know antenna phase center variations as a function of both elevation and azimuth in the antenna reference frame and incorporate these models into analysis software. To help meet the needs of the high-precision GNSS community, the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) now operates an absolute antenna calibration facility. Located in Corbin, Virginia, this facility uses field measurements and actual GNSS satellite signals to quantitatively determine the carrier phase advance/delay introduced by the antenna element. The NGS facility was built to serve traditional NGS constituents such as the surveying and geodesy communities, however calibration services are open and available to all GNSS users as the calibration schedule permits. All phase center patterns computed by this facility will be publicly available and disseminated in both the ANTEX and NGS formats. We describe the NGS calibration facility, and discuss the observation models and strategy currently used to generate NGS absolute calibrations. We demonstrate that NGS absolute phase center variation (PCV) patterns are consistent with published values determined by other absolute antenna calibration facilities, and compare absolute calibrations to the traditional NGS relative calibrations.

  14. Absolute GNSS Antenna Calibration at the National Geodetic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, G.; Bilich, A.; Geoghegan, C.

    2012-04-01

    Geodetic GNSS applications routinely demand millimeter precision and extremely high levels of accuracy. To achieve these accuracies, measurement and instrument biases at the centimeter to millimeter level must be understood. One of these biases is the antenna phase center, the apparent point of signal reception for a GNSS antenna. It has been well established that phase center patterns differ between antenna models and manufacturers; additional research suggests that the addition of a radome or the choice of antenna mount can significantly alter those a priori phase center patterns. For the more demanding GNSS positioning applications and especially in cases of mixed-antenna networks, it is all the more important to know antenna phase center variations as a function of both elevation and azimuth in the antenna reference frame and incorporate these models into analysis software. To help meet the needs of the high-precision GNSS community, the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) now operates an absolute antenna calibration facility. Located in Corbin, Virginia, this facility uses field measurements and actual GNSS satellite signals to quantitatively determine the carrier phase advance/delay introduced by the antenna element. The NGS facility was built to serve traditional NGS constituents such as the surveying and geodesy communities, however calibration services are open and available to all GNSS users as the calibration schedule permits. All phase center patterns computed by this facility will be publicly available and disseminated in both the ANTEX and NGS formats. We describe the NGS calibration facility, and discuss the observation models and strategy currently used to generate NGS absolute calibrations. We demonstrate that NGS absolute phase center variation (PCV) patterns are consistent with published values determined by other absolute antenna calibration facilities, and outline future planned refinements to the system.

  15. The September 16, 2015 Illapel (Mw 8.3) Earthquake: Comprehensive Analysis from Seismic and Geodetic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comte, D.; Carrizo, D.; Peyrat, S.; Russo, R. M.; Roecker, S. W.; Opazo, T.; Peña, G.; Baeza, S.; Arriaza, R.; Ortega-Culaciati, F.; Ruiz, J. A.; Contreras-Reyes, E.; Becerra, V.

    2015-12-01

    On September 16th, 2015 an Mw=8.3 struck the Illapel zone between 30°- 32.5°S along an area between the trench and the coastline, including the activation of outer-rise seismicity. The rupture area of this earthquake covers the 1943 previous large earthquake, and also seems to overlap with the northern end of the rupture of the 1971 and 1985 earthquakes. Immediately after the occurrence of the 2015 earthquake, we deployed 18 3-components short period continuous recording seismic stations to complement the coverage of the University of Chile National Seismological Center (CSN) permanent broad band seismic network and four temporary seismic stations deployed by the CSN. The short period stations will be replaced by IRIS PASCAL broad band stations through the NSF RAPID Collaborative Proposal (U. of Florida, RPI, and U. of Chile), generating an open-access data set that, along with the seismological and geodetic observations from CSN permanent networks, provide the best quality data that can be utilized immediately by a wide range of PIs and institutions around the world. Such datasets able us to pursue these main goals: 1) aftershock monitoring, focal mechanism and analysis related with the interplate rupture zone; 2) imaging the seismic structure of the 2015 Illapel rupture area; 3) characterization of the mechanical behavior of the subduction interface from geodetic observations before, during and after the earthquake, 4) identification and characterization of low frequency and/or slow slip aftershocks; characterization of seismic amplification effects and the consequent hazard determination.

  16. Network Patch Cables Demystified: A Super Activity for Computer Networking Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Douglas L.

    2004-01-01

    This article de-mystifies network patch cable secrets so that people can connect their computers and transfer those pesky files--without screaming at the cables. It describes a network cabling activity that can offer students a great hands-on opportunity for working with the tools, techniques, and media used in computer networking. Since the…

  17. Ostrogradski Hamiltonian approach for geodetic brane gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Cordero, Ruben; Molgado, Alberto

    2010-12-07

    We present an alternative Hamiltonian description of a branelike universe immersed in a flat background spacetime. This model is named geodetic brane gravity. We set up the Regge-Teitelboim model to describe our Universe where such field theory is originally thought as a second order derivative theory. We refer to an Ostrogradski Hamiltonian formalism to prepare the system to its quantization. This approach comprize the manage of both first- and second-class constraints and the counting of degrees of freedom follows accordingly.

  18. Absolute Geodetic Rotation Measurement Using Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Stockton, J. K.; Takase, K.; Kasevich, M. A.

    2011-09-23

    We demonstrate a cold-atom interferometer gyroscope which overcomes accuracy and dynamic range limitations of previous atom interferometer gyroscopes. We show how the instrument can be used for precise determination of latitude, azimuth (true north), and Earth's rotation rate. Spurious noise terms related to multiple-path interferences are suppressed by employing a novel time-skewed pulse sequence. Extended versions of this instrument appear capable of meeting the stringent requirements for inertial navigation, geodetic applications of Earth's rotation rate determination, and tests of general relativity.

  19. Studies of Error Sources in Geodetic VLBI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, A. E. E.; Niell, A. E.; Corey, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    Achieving the goal of millimeter uncertainty in three dimensional geodetic positioning on a global scale requires significant improvement in the precision and accuracy of both random and systematic error sources. For this investigation we proposed to study errors due to instrumentation in Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) and due to the atmosphere. After the inception of this work we expanded the scope to include assessment of error sources in GPS measurements, especially as they affect the vertical component of site position and the measurement of water vapor in the atmosphere. The atmosphere correction 'improvements described below are of benefit to both GPS and VLBI.

  20. Baseline mathematics and geodetics for tracking operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, R.

    1981-01-01

    Various geodetic and mapping algorithms are analyzed as they apply to radar tracking systems and tested in extended BASIC computer language for real time computer applications. Closed-form approaches to the solution of converting Earth centered coordinates to latitude, longitude, and altitude are compared with classical approximations. A simplified approach to atmospheric refractivity called gradient refraction is compared with conventional ray tracing processes. An extremely detailed set of documentation which provides the theory, derivations, and application of algorithms used in the programs is included. Validation methods are also presented for testing the accuracy of the algorithms.

  1. Constructive feedforward neural networks using hermite polynomial activation functions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liying; Khorasani, K

    2005-07-01

    In this paper, a constructive one-hidden-layer network is introduced where each hidden unit employs a polynomial function for its activation function that is different from other units. Specifically, both a structure level as well as a function level adaptation methodologies are utilized in constructing the network. The functional level adaptation scheme ensures that the "growing" or constructive network has different activation functions for each neuron such that the network may be able to capture the underlying input-output map more effectively. The activation functions considered consist of orthonormal Hermite polynomials. It is shown through extensive simulations that the proposed network yields improved performance when compared to networks having identical sigmoidal activation functions.

  2. Topological evolution of virtual social networks by modeling social activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xin; Dong, Junyu; Tang, Ruichun; Xu, Mantao; Qi, Lin; Cai, Yang

    2015-09-01

    With the development of Internet and wireless communication, virtual social networks are becoming increasingly important in the formation of nowadays' social communities. Topological evolution model is foundational and critical for social network related researches. Up to present most of the related research experiments are carried out on artificial networks, however, a study of incorporating the actual social activities into the network topology model is ignored. This paper first formalizes two mathematical abstract concepts of hobbies search and friend recommendation to model the social actions people exhibit. Then a social activities based topology evolution simulation model is developed to satisfy some well-known properties that have been discovered in real-world social networks. Empirical results show that the proposed topology evolution model has embraced several key network topological properties of concern, which can be envisioned as signatures of real social networks.

  3. Geodetic control of neotectonics in Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henneberg, Heinz G.

    1983-09-01

    Net installations for measurements of movement started in 1973 along the Bocono Fault, which is the main fault in the Venezuelan Andes. Investigations of horizontal movements are made on three locations along this fault: Mucubaji at 3700 m height, Mitisus at 1700 m and Yacambu at 700 m. At Mucubaji there are two nets with 8 stations each and at Mitisus we have three nets represented by 29 stations. Each station has a concrete pillar with a forced centering device on top and has a 1-4 m 3 concrete plaform. These nets were measured several times, giving resulting difference vectors of a range of several cm. One of these nets is also a control net of a hydroelectrical Power Dam, installed near the fault trace. At Yacambu we have a 26 km extended tunnel net which is crossing the fault. This net was measured twice with difference vectors up to 6 cm. In the Maracaibo Basin Area the vertical component of subsidence due to oil extraction reaches 5 m as a result of continuous movements since 1925. Gravimetric research is also carried out over all the mentioned locations. In cooperation with the Universities of Hannover and Stuttgart and the German Geodetic Research Institute a programme was started to determine the geoid and deflections of the vertical in the high Andes mountains, especially around the Mucubaji fault site. Parallel to and in combination with these geodetic investigations seismological studies are carried out by a geophysical group from Merida University, Venezuela.

  4. New-generation seafloor geodetic observation system based on technology of underwater robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, M.; Asada, A.; Ura, T.; Fujita, M.; Colombo, O. L.

    2006-12-01

    Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo (IIS) and Hydrographic and Oceanographic Department, Japan Coast Guard have been constructing the geodetic observation network on the seafloor around Japan. The observation network, which consists of eighteen seafloor geodetic reference stations, has been built along the ocean trench regions. The observations have been conducted repeatedly; we visit the seafloor geodetic reference points by research vessels in order to take measurements. The current observational method using research vessel cannot help being subject to cruise schedule of research vessel. Annual cruise schedule of research vessel makes it difficult to change the daily schedule of the research vessel to meet our demands such as to avoid bad sea conditions while conducting observations and to have suitable GPS satellite conditions. We launched a project supported by the Japan Society for the Science Promotion as the Grants in Aid for Scientific Research. In this project, we are aiming at developing new-generation seafloor geodetic observation system that conquers difficulties inherent with the current system. Central idea of this project is to utilize techniques of underwater robot (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle) and seafloor platform to make measurements in place of using the research vessels. Combination of underwater robot and seafloor platform make it possible to conduct the observation with selecting favorable condition of sea and GPS satellite distributions, to make much more frequent observations and to enable flexible planning of observation in response to sudden geodetic events. Trial model of the on-board and the seafloor units were finished. We started performance evaluation tests for the new system as of this year. The AUV that we assume to utilize is one named "r2D4". The r2D4 is an intelligent AUV developed by Prof. Tamaki Ura, the Underwater Technology Research Center, IIS. First trial of this new system with the r2D4 was conducted

  5. Competing dynamic phases of active polymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Simon; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Dinner, Aaron R.

    Recent experiments on in-vitro reconstituted assemblies of F-actin, myosin-II motors, and cross-linking proteins show that tuning local network properties can changes the fundamental biomechanical behavior of the system. For example, by varying cross-linker density and actin bundle rigidity, one can switch between contractile networks useful for reshaping cells, polarity sorted networks ideal for directed molecular transport, and frustrated networks with robust structural properties. To efficiently investigate the dynamic phases of actomyosin networks, we developed a coarse grained non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of model semiflexible filaments, molecular motors, and cross-linkers with phenomenologically defined interactions. The simulation's accuracy was verified by benchmarking the mechanical properties of its individual components and collective behavior against experimental results at the molecular and network scales. By adjusting the model's parameters, we can reproduce the qualitative phases observed in experiment and predict the protein characteristics where phase crossovers could occur in collective network dynamics. Our model provides a framework for understanding cells' multiple uses of actomyosin networks and their applicability in materials research. Supported by the Department of Defense (DoD) through the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program.

  6. Designing a new Geodetic Research Data Management System for the Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coetzer, Glend Lorraine

    2015-08-01

    The Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (HartRAO) participates in astronomic, astrometric and geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations using both 26- and 15-m diameter radio telescopes. Geodetic data from a Satellite Laser Ranger (SLR), Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), Met4 weather stations and a new seismic vault network must be stored at HartRAO and made available to the scientific community. Some data are e-transferred to correlators, analysis centres and space geodesy data providers, while some data are processed locally to produce basic data products. The new South African co-located seismology network of seismic and GNSS instrumentation will generate large volumes of raw data to be stored and archived at HartRAO. The current data storage systems are distributed and outdated, and management systems currently being used will also not be able to handle the additional large volumes of data. This necessitates the design and implementation of a new, modern research data management system which combines all the datasets into one database, as well as cater for current and future data volume requirements. The librarian’s expertise and knowledge will be used in the design and implementation of the new HartRAO Geodetic Research Data Management System (GRDMS). The librarian’s role and involvement in the design and implementation of the new GRDMS are presented here. Progress to date will also be discussed.

  7. Outlining a strategic vision for terrestrial geodetic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, David A.; Oldow, John S.; Walker, J. Douglas

    2012-03-01

    Charting the Future of Terrestrial Laser Scanning in the Earth Sciences and Related Fields; Boulder, Colorado, 17-19 October 2011 A workshop hosted by UNAVCO and funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) brought together 80 participants representing a spectrum of research fields with the objective of outlining a strategic vision for the future of terrestrial geodetic imaging as applied to a broad range of research activities at all levels of the community. Earth science investigations increasingly require accurate representation of the Earth surface using three-dimensional data capture, display, and analysis at a centimeter scale to quantitatively characterize and model complex processes. Recognizing this community need, researchers at several universities and UNAVCO established the NSF-funded Interdisciplinary Alliance for Digital Field Data Acquisition and Exploration (INTERFACE) project to support a terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) instrument pool and data collection expertise now based at UNAVCO

  8. Brain network activity in monolingual and bilingual older adults.

    PubMed

    Grady, Cheryl L; Luk, Gigi; Craik, Fergus I M; Bialystok, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Bilingual older adults typically have better performance on tasks of executive control (EC) than do their monolingual peers, but differences in brain activity due to language experience are not well understood. Based on studies showing a relation between the dynamic range of brain network activity and performance on EC tasks, we hypothesized that life-long bilingual older adults would show increased functional connectivity relative to monolinguals in networks related to EC. We assessed intrinsic functional connectivity and modulation of activity in task vs. fixation periods in two brain networks that are active when EC is engaged, the frontoparietal control network (FPC) and the salience network (SLN). We also examined the default mode network (DMN), which influences behavior through reduced activity during tasks. We found stronger intrinsic functional connectivity in the FPC and DMN in bilinguals than in monolinguals. Although there were no group differences in the modulation of activity across tasks and fixation, bilinguals showed stronger correlations than monolinguals between intrinsic connectivity in the FPC and task-related increases of activity in prefrontal and parietal regions. This bilingual difference in network connectivity suggests that language experience begun in childhood and continued throughout adulthood influences brain networks in ways that may provide benefits in later life.

  9. Brain network activity in monolingual and bilingual older adults.

    PubMed

    Grady, Cheryl L; Luk, Gigi; Craik, Fergus I M; Bialystok, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Bilingual older adults typically have better performance on tasks of executive control (EC) than do their monolingual peers, but differences in brain activity due to language experience are not well understood. Based on studies showing a relation between the dynamic range of brain network activity and performance on EC tasks, we hypothesized that life-long bilingual older adults would show increased functional connectivity relative to monolinguals in networks related to EC. We assessed intrinsic functional connectivity and modulation of activity in task vs. fixation periods in two brain networks that are active when EC is engaged, the frontoparietal control network (FPC) and the salience network (SLN). We also examined the default mode network (DMN), which influences behavior through reduced activity during tasks. We found stronger intrinsic functional connectivity in the FPC and DMN in bilinguals than in monolinguals. Although there were no group differences in the modulation of activity across tasks and fixation, bilinguals showed stronger correlations than monolinguals between intrinsic connectivity in the FPC and task-related increases of activity in prefrontal and parietal regions. This bilingual difference in network connectivity suggests that language experience begun in childhood and continued throughout adulthood influences brain networks in ways that may provide benefits in later life. PMID:25445783

  10. Brain Network Activity in Monolingual and Bilingual Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Grady, Cheryl L.; Luk, Gigi; Craik, Fergus I.M.; Bialystok, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Bilingual older adults typically have better performance on tasks of executive control (EC) than do their monolingual peers, but differences in brain activity due to language experience are not well understood. Based on studies showing a relation between the dynamic range of brain network activity and performance on EC tasks, we hypothesized that life-long bilingual older adults would show increased functional connectivity relative to monolinguals in networks related to EC. We assessed intrinsic functional connectivity and modulation of activity in task vs. fixation periods in two brain networks that are active when EC is engaged, the frontoparietal control network (FPC) and the salience network (SLN). We also examined the default mode network (DMN), which influences behavior through reduced activity during tasks. We found stronger intrinsic functional connectivity in the FPC and DMN in bilinguals than in monolinguals. Although there were no group differences in the modulation of activity across tasks and fixation, bilinguals showed stronger correlations than monolinguals between intrinsic connectivity in the FPC and task-related increases of activity in prefrontal and parietal regions. This bilingual difference in network connectivity suggests that language experience begun in childhood and continued throughout adulthood influences brain networks in ways that may provide benefits in later life. PMID:25445783

  11. Geodetic Measurements and Modelling at Neapolitan Volcanoes(Southern Italy): Somma-Vesuvius and Campi Flegrei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Natale, G.; Troise, C.; Pingue, F.; Obrizzo, F.

    2004-12-01

    We show the recent results about geodetic observations and modelling at two very explosive and densely populated volcanoes in Southern Italy, namely Somma-Vesuvius and Campi Flegrei caldera. The two areas, characterised by the highest volcanic risk in the World because of the density of population and exposed value, are among the best monitored ones in the World. Geodetic monitoring at these areas started more than 30 years ago, and was progressively improved in the last decade, including dense networks making use of both terrestrial and space techniques. The monitored period includes two strong unrests at Campi Flegrei caldera, not followed by eruptions, characterised by uplift of up to 3 m in few years, with rates up to 1 m/year, and intercurring subsidence with rates up to .08 m/year. Somma Vesuvius is on the contrary characterised, in the last 30 years, by a marked stability, except for a very localised subsidence at the young active center (Vesuvius) and a peculiar ring-like subsidence all around the volcanic edifice. The fast uplift and subsidence at Campi Flegrei has been modelled as due to shallow inflation sources and a dominant effect of passive slip along the ring faults bordering the collapsed area. Numerical modelling taking carefully into account the geometry of ring faults gives an accurate description of observed displacements. At Somma-Vesuvius, subsidence of Vesuvius cone is modelled in terms of gravitationally-induced slip along the contact limits between the older caldera and the younger active edifice. The ring-like subsidence around the whole edifice is modelled in terms of normal fault-like behaviour of the contacts among the loaded basement and the superimposed volcanic edifice, subject to the extensional tectonic stress of the area. Both models of ground deformations at the two areas appear very consistent with the behaviour of local volcano-tectonic seismicity, and enlighten the very important role played by volcano-tectonic structures in

  12. Using geodetic VLBI to test Standard-Model Extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hees, Aurélien; Lambert, Sébastien; Le Poncin-Lafitte, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    The modeling of the relativistic delay in geodetic techniques is primordial to get accurate geodetic products. And geodetic techniques can also be used to measure the relativistic delay and get constraints on parameters describing the relativity theory. The effective field theory framework called the Standard-Model Extension (SME) has been developed in order to systematically parametrize hypothetical violations of Lorentz symmetry (in the Standard Model and in the gravitational sector). In terms of light deflexion by a massive body like the Sun, one can expect a dependence in the elongation angle different from GR. In this communication, we use geodetic VLBI observations of quasars made in the frame of the permanent geodetic VLBI monitoring program to constrain the first SME coefficient. Our results do not show any deviation from GR and they improve current constraints on both GR and SME parameters.

  13. Neural network with formed dynamics of activity

    SciTech Connect

    Dunin-Barkovskii, V.L.; Osovets, N.B.

    1995-03-01

    The problem of developing a neural network with a given pattern of the state sequence is considered. A neural network structure and an algorithm, of forming its bond matrix which lead to an approximate but robust solution of the problem are proposed and discussed. Limiting characteristics of the serviceability of the proposed structure are studied. Various methods of visualizing dynamic processes in a neural network are compared. Possible applications of the results obtained for interpretation of neurophysiological data and in neuroinformatics systems are discussed.

  14. Analysis of the geodetic residuals as differences between geodetic and sum of the atmospheric and ocean excitation of polar motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolaczek, B.; Pasnicka, M.; Nastula, J.

    2012-12-01

    Up to now studies of geophysical excitation of polar motion containing AAM (Atmospheric Angular Momentum), OAM (Oceanic Angular Momentum) and HAM (Hydrological Angular Momentum) excitation functions of polar motion have not achieved the total agreement between geophysical and determined geodetic excitation (GAM, Geodetic AngularMomentum) functions of polar motion...

  15. Generating Coherent Patterns of Activity from Chaotic Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Sussillo, David; Abbott, L. F.

    2009-01-01

    Neural circuits display complex activity patterns both spontaneously and when responding to a stimulus or generating a motor output. How are these two forms of activity related? We develop a procedure called FORCE learning for modifying synaptic strengths either external to or within a model neural network to change chaotic spontaneous activity into a wide variety of desired activity patterns. FORCE learning works even though the networks we train are spontaneously chaotic and we leave feedback loops intact and unclamped during learning. Using this approach, we construct networks that produce a wide variety of complex output patterns, input-output transformations that require memory, multiple outputs that can be switched by control inputs, and motor patterns matching human motion capture data. Our results reproduce data on pre-movement activity in motor and premotor cortex, and suggest that synaptic plasticity may be a more rapid and powerful modulator of network activity than generally appreciated. PMID:19709635

  16. Google matrix of the world network of economic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandiah, Vivek; Escaith, Hubert; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2015-07-01

    Using the new data from the OECD-WTO world network of economic activities we construct the Google matrix G of this directed network and perform its detailed analysis. The network contains 58 countries and 37 activity sectors for years 1995 and 2008. The construction of G, based on Markov chain transitions, treats all countries on equal democratic grounds while the contribution of activity sectors is proportional to their exchange monetary volume. The Google matrix analysis allows to obtain reliable ranking of countries and activity sectors and to determine the sensitivity of CheiRank-PageRank commercial balance of countries in respect to price variations and labor cost in various countries. We demonstrate that the developed approach takes into account multiplicity of network links with economy interactions between countries and activity sectors thus being more efficient compared to the usual export-import analysis. The spectrum and eigenstates of G are also analyzed being related to specific activity communities of countries.

  17. Impact of Network Activity Levels on the Performance of Passive Network Service Dependency Discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Thomas E.; Chikkagoudar, Satish; Arthur-Durett, Kristine M.

    2015-11-02

    Network services often do not operate alone, but instead, depend on other services distributed throughout a network to correctly function. If a service fails, is disrupted, or degraded, it is likely to impair other services. The web of dependencies can be surprisingly complex---especially within a large enterprise network---and evolve with time. Acquiring, maintaining, and understanding dependency knowledge is critical for many network management and cyber defense activities. While automation can improve situation awareness for network operators and cyber practitioners, poor detection accuracy reduces their confidence and can complicate their roles. In this paper we rigorously study the effects of network activity levels on the detection accuracy of passive network-based service dependency discovery methods. The accuracy of all except for one method was inversely proportional to network activity levels. Our proposed cross correlation method was particularly robust to the influence of network activity. The proposed experimental treatment will further advance a more scientific evaluation of methods and provide the ability to determine their operational boundaries.

  18. Temporal dynamics of a homeostatic pathway controlling neural network activity

    PubMed Central

    Bateup, Helen S.; Denefrio, Cassandra L.; Johnson, Caroline A.; Saulnier, Jessica L.; Sabatini, Bernardo L.

    2013-01-01

    Neurons use a variety of mechanisms to homeostatically regulate neural network activity in order to maintain firing in a bounded range. One such process involves the bi-directional modulation of excitatory synaptic drive in response to chronic changes in network activity. Down-scaling of excitatory synapses in response to high activity requires Arc-dependent endocytosis of glutamate receptors. However, the temporal dynamics and signaling pathways regulating Arc during homeostatic plasticity are not well understood. Here we determine the relative contribution of transcriptional and translational control in the regulation of Arc, the signaling pathways responsible for the activity-dependent production of Arc, and the time course of these signaling events as they relate to the homeostatic adjustment of network activity in hippocampal neurons. We find that an ERK1/2-dependent transcriptional pathway active within 1–2 h of up-regulated network activity induces Arc leading to a restoration of network spiking rates within 12 h. Under basal and low activity conditions, specialized mechanisms are in place to rapidly degrade Arc mRNA and protein such that they have half-lives of less than 1 h. In addition, we find that while mTOR signaling is regulated by network activity on a similar time scale, mTOR-dependent translational control is not a major regulator of Arc production or degradation suggesting that the signaling pathways underlying homeostatic plasticity are distinct from those mediating synapse-specific forms of synaptic depression. PMID:24065881

  19. Geodetic slip-rates from block-modeling of a dense GPS velocity field in Italy: comparison with geological slip-rates and seismic moment release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serpelloni, E.; Anderlini, L.; Mastrolembo, B.; Cavaliere, A.; Baldi, P.; Belardinelli, M. E.

    2012-04-01

    The growing number of continuously operating GPS stations in Italy highlights local scale details of the velocity gradients across active seismogenic faults. The regional scale pattern of the velocity strain-rate field has been already constrained by several authors, adopting different algorithms of interpolation of sparse velocities and showing consistency with seismotectonics data. Nevertheless an estimate of the geodetic slip-rates from kinematically consistent elastic models is still missing. In this work we use velocities from >1000 cGPS stations, obtained from the analysis of position time-series realized in the IGS08 reference-frame. Raw data have been analyzed with the GAMIT/GLOBK software, and regional solutions from 60 sub-networks have been combined with global solutions from SOPAC. We use a principal component analysis (PCA) technique to estimate the pattern of spatially correlated common mode error (CME) at the Euro-Mediterranean scale. Filtering of the CME from raw time-series significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratio and provides smaller velocity uncertainties. We estimate the velocity uncertainties adopting a flicker+white noise error model, resulting from the spectral-index analysis of residual time-series. We use an elastic block-modeling approach to model interseismic fault slip-rates while accounting for rotations of crustal blocks and micro-plates in the study area. We use available catalogues of active faults to define the fault geometries, parameterized as uniformly slipping rectangular fault planes. The model provides a good fit to the horizontal velocities and fault kinematics that are largely consistent with other geological and seismotectonics information, despite the known structural complexity of the Italian region. We compare the geodetically estimated fault-slip rates with available databases of geologically determined slip-rates, and found a general agreement in both the kinematics and slip-rates values, considering the large

  20. Radio source stability and geodetic VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattano, César; Lambert, Sébastien

    2016-04-01

    The observation of the Earth's rotation by VLBI is conditioned by the celestial reference frame that should be as stable as possible. The selection of the most stable sources therefore constitutes a major step in the construction of a celestial reference frame since their stability prevents time deformation of the axes with time. The assessment of astrometric stability, i.e., the time stability the radiocenter location as detected by the VLBI, is one of the methods that were used in previous ICRF realizations (works of M. Feissel-Vernier and ICRF2). We think the same method should be addressed for the construction of the ICRF3. We analyzed the radio source time series obtained from the analysis of the data from the permanent geodetic VLBI monitoring program of the IVS. We used several utils based on basic statistics and more advanced methods (Allan variance) in order to provide a preliminary classification of sources.

  1. Estimating Runoff Using Hydro-Geodetic Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneeuw, Nico; Lorenz, Christof; Devaraju, Balaji; Tourian, Mohammad J.; Riegger, Johannes; Kunstmann, Harald; Bárdossy, András

    2014-11-01

    Given the continuous decline in global runoff data availability over the past decades, alternative approaches for runoff determination are gaining importance. When aiming for global scale runoff at a sufficient temporal resolution and with homogeneous accuracy, the choice to use spaceborne sensors is only a logical step. In this respect, we take water storage changes from Gravity Recovery And Climate Explorer ( grace) results and water level measurements from satellite altimetry, and present a comprehensive assessment of five different approaches for river runoff estimation: hydrological balance equation, hydro-meteorological balance equation, satellite altimetry with quantile function-based stage-discharge relationships, a rudimentary instantaneous runoff-precipitation relationship, and a runoff-storage relationship that takes time lag into account. As a common property, these approaches do not rely on hydrological modeling; they are either purely data driven or make additional use of atmospheric reanalyses. Further, these methods, except runoff-precipitation ratio, use geodetic observables as one of their inputs and, therefore, they are termed hydro-geodetic approaches. The runoff prediction skill of these approaches is validated against in situ runoff and compared to hydrological model predictions. Our results show that catchment-specific methods (altimetry and runoff-storage relationship) clearly outperform the global methods (hydrological and hydro-meteorological approaches) in the six study regions we considered. The global methods have the potential to provide runoff over all landmasses, which implies gauged and ungauged basins alike, but are still limited due to inconsistencies in the global hydrological and hydro-meteorological datasets that they use.

  2. Estimating Runoff Using Hydro-Geodetic Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneeuw, Nico; Lorenz, Christof; Devaraju, Balaji; Tourian, Mohammad J.; Riegger, Johannes; Kunstmann, Harald; Bárdossy, András

    2014-09-01

    Given the continuous decline in global runoff data availability over the past decades, alternative approaches for runoff determination are gaining importance. When aiming for global scale runoff at a sufficient temporal resolution and with homogeneous accuracy, the choice to use spaceborne sensors is only a logical step. In this respect, we take water storage changes from Gravity Recovery And Climate Explorer (uc(grace)) results and water level measurements from satellite altimetry, and present a comprehensive assessment of five different approaches for river runoff estimation: hydrological balance equation, hydro-meteorological balance equation, satellite altimetry with quantile function-based stage-discharge relationships, a rudimentary instantaneous runoff-precipitation relationship, and a runoff-storage relationship that takes time lag into account. As a common property, these approaches do not rely on hydrological modeling; they are either purely data driven or make additional use of atmospheric reanalyses. Further, these methods, except runoff-precipitation ratio, use geodetic observables as one of their inputs and, therefore, they are termed hydro-geodetic approaches. The runoff prediction skill of these approaches is validated against in situ runoff and compared to hydrological model predictions. Our results show that catchment-specific methods (altimetry and runoff-storage relationship) clearly outperform the global methods (hydrological and hydro-meteorological approaches) in the six study regions we considered. The global methods have the potential to provide runoff over all landmasses, which implies gauged and ungauged basins alike, but are still limited due to inconsistencies in the global hydrological and hydro-meteorological datasets that they use.

  3. Detecting eavesdropping activity in fiber optic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Gregory G.

    The secure transmission of data is critical to governments, military organizations, financial institutions, health care providers and other enterprises. The primary method of securing in-transit data is though data encryption. A number of encryption methods exist but the fundamental approach is to assume an eavesdropper has access to the encrypted message but does not have the computing capability to decrypt the message in a timely fashion. Essentially, the strength of security depends on the complexity of the encryption method and the resources available to the eavesdropper. The development of future technologies, most notably quantum computers and quantum computing, is often cited as a direct threat to traditional encryption schemes. It seems reasonable that additional effort should be placed on prohibiting the eavesdropper from coming into possession of the encrypted message in the first place. One strategy for denying possession of the encrypted message is to secure the physical layer of the communications path. Because the majority of transmitted information is over fiber-optic networks, it seems appropriate to consider ways of enhancing the integrity and security of the fiber-based physical layer. The purpose of this research is to investigate the properties of light, as they are manifested in single mode fiber, as a means of insuring the integrity and security of the physical layer of a fiber-optic based communication link. Specifically, the approach focuses on the behavior of polarization in single mode fiber, as it is shown to be especially sensitive to fiber geometry. Fiber geometry is necessarily modified during the placement of optical taps. The problem of detecting activity associated with the placement of an optical tap is herein approached as a supervised machine learning anomaly identification task. The inputs include raw polarization measurements along with additional features derived from various visualizations of the raw data (the inputs are

  4. The G-FAST Geodetic Earthquake Early Warning System: Operational Performance and Synthetic Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowell, B. W.; Schmidt, D. A.; Bodin, P.; Vidale, J. E.; Melbourne, T. I.; Santillan, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    The G-FAST (Geodetic First Approximation of Size and TIming) earthquake early warning module is part of a joint seismic and geodetic earthquake early warning system currently under development at the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network (PNSN). Our two-stage approach to earthquake early warning includes: (1) initial detection and characterization from PNSN strong-motion and broadband data with the ElarmS package within ShakeAlert, and then (2) modeling of GPS data from the Pacific Northwest Geodetic Array (PANGA). The two geodetic modeling modules are (1) a fast peak-ground-displacement magnitude and depth estimate and (2) a CMT-based finite fault inversion that utilizes coseismic offsets to compute earthquake extent, slip and magnitude. The seismic and geodetic source estimates are then combined in a decision module currently under development. In this presentation, we first report on the operational performance during the first several months that G-FAST has been live with respect to magnitude estimates, timing information, and stability. Secondly, we report on the performance of the G-FAST test system using simulated displacements from plausible Cascadian earthquake scenarios. The test system permits us to: (1) replay segments of actual seismic waveform data recorded from the PNSN and neighboring networks to investigate both earthquakes and noise conditions, and (2) broadcast synthetic data into the system to simulate signals we anticipate from earthquakes for which we have no actual ground motion recordings. The test system lets us also simulate various error conditions (latent and/or out-of-sequence data, telemetry drop-outs, etc.) in order to explore how best to mitigate them. For example, we show for a replay of the 2001 M6.8 Nisqually earthquake that telemetry drop-outs create the largest variability and biases in magnitude and depth estimates whereas latency only causes some variability towards the beginning of the recordings before quickly stabilizing

  5. Investigations with the Sentinel-1 Interferometric Wide Swath mode: first results and comparison with in-situ geodetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgstrom, Sven; Del Gaudio, Carlo; De Martino, Prospero; Ricciardi, Giovanni P.; Ricco, Ciro; Siniscalchi, Valeria; Prats-Iraola, Pau; Nannini, Matteo; Costantini, Mario; Minati, Federico; Walter, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The contribution focuses on the current status of the ESA study entitled "INSARAP: Sentinel-1 InSAR Performance study with TOPS Data". The study investigates the performance of the interferometric wide swath (IW) mode of Sentinel-1, which is implemented using the terrain observation by progressive scans (TOPS) mode. In this regard, first analyses with Sentinel-1 time series will be shown, with a comparison with in-situ geodetic measurements on different test sites identified in the framework of the study, namely, Campi Flegrei/Vesuvius area in Italy, Istanbul city in Turkey, and Mexico City. The evaluation of the results will be performed by exploiting mainly continuous GPS stations located on the different sites, besides leveling measurements when also available. Also in a recent past, the comparison between InSAR and continuous GPS data, the latter projected into the radar LOS, has proven to be very effective for a cross comparison, besides InSAR Cal/Val activities, as it was for instance in the case of the recent inflation events occurred in Campi Flegrei area, marked by the well know bradyseismic phenomenon. Although continuous GPS networks are characterized by a poor space coverage in comparison with InSAR results, continuous GPS data recording allows to complement the geodetic information from InSAR sensors, limited by their revisiting time. The issue to be faced in this study is the possibility to deal with very low deformation rates in comparison with the Sentinel-1 C-band data, although the Sentinel-1 time series we expect to get from October 2014 to date should allow the identification of ground deformation in the areas of interest.

  6. Observations on Electronic Networks: Appropriate Activities for Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, James A.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Discussion of the use of electronic networks for learning activities highlights the Noon Observation Project in which students in various locations measured the length of a noontime shadow to determine the earth's circumference. Electronic pen pals are discussed, and the roles of the network and of the class are described. (LRW)

  7. On the Impact of GPS phase centre corrections on geodetic parameters: analytical formulation and empirical evaluation by PPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiemer, Leonard; Kersten, Tobias; Schön, Steffen

    2015-04-01

    Several contributions and papers in geodesy intensively discuss the impact of the variability of GPS/GNSS absolute phase centre corrections (PCCs) directly on the positioning domain, neglecting any studies on the observation domain. Furthermore, it is very complex to evaluate in a general way the impact of several PCCs in geodetic positioning due to the different positioning concepts (e.g. PPP, relative positioning in networks) as well as implementation philosophy. Up to know, it is not clear how accurate different PCCs have to be for an individual geodetic grade antenna, in order to assume no significant and negative impact on the geodetic parameter estimation. Currently, individual calibrations have to be comparable of at least below 1mm. The poster will cover this topic by studying the observation domain as well as the geodetic position domain. The used approach is based on a pragmatic method, investigated by Geiger (1988), using generic PCC pattern. The contribution is divided into an analytical approach and an empirical approach. The analytical step discusses in detail the mathematical model and the propagation of error functions, classified by several antenna models. The empirical step evaluates these findings by practical experiments carried out with pre-defined errors on PCCs within a geodetic positioning estimation (PPP) using different software packages. We will show on the one side that some symmetrical error contributions of typical geodetic antenna designs can be described very well by this simple and pragmatic approach. The theoretical findings are compared to PPP solutions, revealing differences between the used software packages. On the other side, we show that asymmetrical error contributions are highly correlated with the satellite constellation and the geographical location. References: Geiger A. (1988): Modeling of Phase Centre Variation and its Influence on GPS-Positioning, In GPS-Techniques Applied to Geodesy and Surveying, Lecture Notes in

  8. Multiplex networks with heterogeneous activities of the nodes.

    PubMed

    Cellai, Davide; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2016-03-01

    In multiplex networks with a large number of layers, the nodes can have different activities, indicating the total number of layers in which the nodes are present. Here we model multiplex networks with heterogeneous activity of the nodes and we study their robustness properties. We introduce a percolation model where nodes need to belong to the giant component only on the layers where they are active (i.e., their degree on that layer is larger than zero). We show that when there are enough nodes active only in one layer, the multiplex becomes more resilient and the transition becomes continuous. We find that multiplex networks with a power-law distribution of node activities are more fragile if the distribution of activity is broader. We also show that while positive correlations between node activity and degree can enhance the robustness of the system, the phase transition may become discontinuous, making the system highly unpredictable. PMID:27078361

  9. Dome/Conduit inflation-deflation at Volcan de Fuego, Colima: evidence from seismic and geodetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Castaneda, E.; Salazar-Tlaczani, L.; DeMets, C.; Marquez-Azua, B.

    2013-12-01

    Volcan de Fuego is a strato-volcano (3860 m high) in Colima Mexico, which has been presenting high explosive activity from small to large explosive events, occasionally accompanied by pyroclastic flows, periodic dome growth and destructive phases, intense fumarole activity and degassing, during the last decade. Since June 2011 a broadband seismic and geodetic network has been operating at radial distances ranging between 1.5 and 4 km from the crater. Five stations are equipped with a Nanometrics 120 s Trillium seismometer and Trimble NetR9 GPS receiver, from which three of them include a MiniDOAS gas detection system. During the period of study eruptive activity of Volcan de Fuego has been dominated by dome growth, degassing and occasional large explosions. These events are associated with the partial dome destruction and frequent ash emissions. Preliminary analyses of two-year continuous records of broadband seismic and geodesy data have revealed dome/conduit inflation-deflation phases related to conspicuous VLP tremor in the 1-20 s period band. VLP tremor has been detected in several periods since 2011 in all stations of the network. VLP tremor may be spasmodic or a persistent signal that fluctuates both in amplitude and time. Since in volcanic areas microseismicity may cover a period range of 5 to 20 s, we analyze and characterize the noise levels considering the relative amplitude with respect to the average amplitude of microseismic noise at each station. We evaluate temporal and frequency variations of volcanic activity with respect the microseismic levels. Our results indicate that the energy of the wave field in the 1-20 s period band is dominated by volcanic activity, especially in cases associated with large eruptive events. The presence of VLP tremor correlates well with inflation-deflation phases observed in the GPS time series, with total vertical displacements of 20-40 mm. This behavior is most evident in the COPN, COPE and COLW stations, which are

  10. Active Sampling in Evolving Neural Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parisi, Domenico

    1997-01-01

    Comments on Raftopoulos article (PS 528 649) on facilitative effect of cognitive limitation in development and connectionist models. Argues that the use of neural networks within an "Artificial Life" perspective can more effectively contribute to the study of the role of cognitive limitations in development and their genetic basis than can using…

  11. Geodetic Measurements and Numerical Modeling of the Deformation Cycle for Okmok Volcano, Alaska: 1993-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlendorf, S. J.; Feigl, K.; Thurber, C. H.; Lu, Z.; Masterlark, T.

    2011-12-01

    Okmok Volcano is an active caldera located on Umnak Island in the Aleutian Island arc. Okmok, having recently erupted in 1997 and 2008, is well suited for multidisciplinary studies of magma migration and storage because it hosts a good seismic network and has been the subject of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images that span the recent eruption cycle. Interferometric SAR can characterize surface deformation in space and time, while data from the seismic network provides important information about the interior processes and structure of the volcano. We conduct a complete time series analysis of deformation of Okmok with images collected by the ERS and Envisat satellites on more than 100 distinct epochs between 1993 and 2008. We look for changes in inter-eruption inflation rates, which may indicate inelastic rheologic effects. For the time series analysis, we analyze the gradient of phase directly, without unwrapping, using the General Inversion of Phase Technique (GIPhT) [Feigl and Thurber, 2009]. This approach accounts for orbital and atmospheric effects and provides realistic estimates of the uncertainties of the model parameters. We consider several models for the source, including the prolate spheroid model and the Mogi model, to explain the observed deformation. Using a medium that is a homogeneous half space, we estimate the source depth to be centered at about 4 km below sea level, consistent with the findings of Masterlark et al. [2010]. As in several other geodetic studies, we find the source to be approximately centered beneath the caldera. To account for rheologic complexity, we next apply the Finite Element Method to simulate a pressurized cavity embedded in a medium with material properties derived from body wave seismic tomography. This approach allows us to address the problem of unreasonably large pressure values implied by a Mogi source with a radius of about 1 km by experimenting with larger sources. We also compare the time dependence of the

  12. Seafloor Geodetic Monitoring of the Central Andean Subduction Zone: The Geosea Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, H.; Lange, D.; Contreras Reyes, E.; Behrmann, J. H.; McGuire, J. J.; Flueh, E. R.

    2014-12-01

    Seafloor geodesy has been identified as one of the central tools in marine geosciences to monitor seafloor deformation at high resolution. To quantify strain accumulation and assess the resultant hazard potential we urgently need systems to resolve seafloor crustal deformation. The GeoSEA (Geodetic Earthquake Observatory on the Seafloor) array consists of a seafloor transponder network comprising a total of 35 units and a wave glider acting as a surface unit (GeoSURF) to ensure satellite correspondence, data transfer and monitor system health. For horizontal direct path measurements, the system utilizes acoustic ranging techniques with a ranging precision better than 15 mm and long term stability over 2 km distance. Vertical motion is obtained from pressure gauges. Integrated inclinometers monitor station settlement in two horizontal directions. Travel time between instruments and the local water sound velocity will be recorded autonomously subsea without system or human intervention for up to 3.5 years. Data from the autonomous network on the seafloor can be retrieved via the integrated high-speed acoustic telemetry link without recovering the seafloor units. In late 2015 GeoSEA will be installed on the Iquique segment of the South America - Nazca convergent plate boundary to monitor crustal deformation. The Iquique seismic gap experienced the 2014 Mw 8.1 Pisagua earthquake, which apparently occurred within a local locking minimum. It is thus crucial to better resolve resolve strain in the forearc between the mainland and the trench in order to improve our understanding of forearc deformation required for hazard assessment. Mobile autonomous seafloor arrays for continuous measurement of active seafloor deformation in hazard zones have the potential to lead to transformative discoveries of plate boundary/fault zone tectonic processes and address a novel element of marine geophysical research.

  13. COLD MAGICS - Continuous Local Deformation Monitoring of an Arctic Geodetic Fundamental Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Ruediger; Bergstrand, Sten

    2010-01-01

    We describe the experience gained in a project to continuously monitor the local tie at the Geodetic Observatory Ny-Alesund. A PC-controlled robotic total station was used to monitor survey prisms that were attached to survey pillars of the local network and the monuments used for geodetic VLBI and GNSS measurements. The monitoring lasted for seven days and had a temporal resolution of six minutes. The raw angle and distance measurements show clear sinusoidal signatures with a daily period, most strongly for a four-day period with 24 hours of sunshine. The derived topocentric coordinates of the survey prisms attached to the GNSS monument and the VLBI radio telescope act as approximation for the local tie. We detect clear signatures at the mm-level. With the current approach we cannot distinguish between real motion of the prisms and potential thermal influences on the instrument used for the observations. However, the project shows that continuous local tie monitoring is feasible today and in the future can and should be used for all geodetic co-location stations.

  14. Height bias and scale effect induced by antenna gravitational deformations in geodetic VLBI data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarti, Pierguido; Abbondanza, Claudio; Petrov, Leonid; Negusini, Monia

    2011-01-01

    The impact of signal path variations (SPVs) caused by antenna gravitational deformations on geodetic very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) results is evaluated for the first time. Elevation-dependent models of SPV for Medicina and Noto (Italy) telescopes were derived from a combination of terrestrial surveying methods to account for gravitational deformations. After applying these models in geodetic VLBI data analysis, estimates of the antenna reference point positions are shifted upward by 8.9 and 6.7 mm, respectively. The impact on other parameters is negligible. To simulate the impact of antenna gravitational deformations on the entire VLBI network, lacking measurements for other telescopes, we rescaled the SPV models of Medicina and Noto for other antennas according to their size. The effects of the simulations are changes in VLBI heights in the range [-3, 73] mm and a net scale increase of 0.3-0.8 ppb. The height bias is larger than random errors of VLBI position estimates, implying the possibility of significant scale distortions related to antenna gravitational deformations. This demonstrates the need to precisely measure gravitational deformations of other VLBI telescopes, to derive their precise SPV models and to apply them in routine geodetic data analysis.

  15. Impact of atmospheric turbulence on geodetic very long baseline interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, T.; Haas, R.

    2010-03-01

    We assess the impact of atmospheric turbulence on geodetic very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) through simulations of atmospheric delays. VLBI observations are simulated for the two best existing VLBI data sets: The continuous VLBI campaigns CONT05 and CONT08. We test different methods to determine the magnitude of the turbulence above each VLBI station, i.e., the refractive index structure constant Cn2. The results from the analysis of the simulated data and the actually observed VLBI data are compared. We find that atmospheric turbulence today is the largest error source for geodetic VLBI. Accurate modeling of atmospheric turbulence is necessary to reach the highest accuracy with geodetic VLBI.

  16. Estimability of geodetic parameters from space VLBI observables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adam, Jozsef

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of space very long base interferometry (VLBI) observables for geodesy and geodynamics is investigated. A brief review of space VLBI systems from the point of view of potential geodetic application is given. A selected notational convention is used to jointly treat the VLBI observables of different types of baselines within a combined ground/space VLBI network. The basic equations of the space VLBI observables appropriate for convariance analysis are derived and included. The corresponding equations for the ground-to-ground baseline VLBI observables are also given for a comparison. The simplified expression of the mathematical models for both space VLBI observables (time delay and delay rate) include the ground station coordinates, the satellite orbital elements, the earth rotation parameters, the radio source coordinates, and clock parameters. The observation equations with these parameters were examined in order to determine which of them are separable or nonseparable. Singularity problems arising from coordinate system definition and critical configuration are studied. Linear dependencies between partials are analytically derived. The mathematical models for ground-space baseline VLBI observables were tested with simulation data in the frame of some numerical experiments. Singularity due to datum defect is confirmed.

  17. Epidemic spreading and immunization in node-activity networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qingchu; Chen, Shufang

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we study the epidemic spreading in node-activity networks, where an individual participates in social networks with a certain rate h. There are two cases for h: the state-independent case and the state-dependent case. We investigate the epidemic threshold as a function of h compared to the static network. Our results suggest the epidemic threshold cannot be exactly predicted by using the analysis approach in the static network. In addition, we further propose a local information-based immunization protocol on node-activity networks. Simulation analysis shows that the immunization can not only eliminate the infectious disease, but also change the epidemic threshold via increasing the immunization parameter.

  18. Robust state estimation for neural networks with discontinuous activations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Cao, Jinde

    2010-12-01

    Discontinuous dynamical systems, particularly neural networks with discontinuous activation functions, arise in a number of applications and have received considerable research attention in recent years. In this paper, the robust state estimation problem is investigated for uncertain neural networks with discontinuous activations and time-varying delays, where the neuron-dependent nonlinear disturbance on the network outputs are only assumed to satisfy the local Lipschitz condition. Based on the theory of differential inclusions and nonsmooth analysis, several criteria are presented to guarantee the existence of the desired robust state estimator for the discontinuous neural networks. It is shown that the design of the state estimator for such networks can be achieved by solving some linear matrix inequalities, which are dependent on the size of the time derivative of the time-varying delays. Finally, numerical examples are given to illustrate the theoretical results.

  19. Network Interventions on Physical Activity in an Afterschool Program: An Agent-Based Social Network Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Shoham, David A.; Tesdahl, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We studied simulated interventions that leveraged social networks to increase physical activity in children. Methods. We studied a real-world social network of 81 children (average age = 7.96 years) who lived in low socioeconomic status neighborhoods, and attended public schools and 1 of 2 structured afterschool programs. The sample was ethnically diverse, and 44% were overweight or obese. We used social network analysis and agent-based modeling simulations to test whether implementing a network intervention would increase children’s physical activity. We tested 3 intervention strategies. Results. The intervention that targeted opinion leaders was effective in increasing the average level of physical activity across the entire network. However, the intervention that targeted the most sedentary children was the best at increasing their physical activity levels. Conclusions. Which network intervention to implement depends on whether the goal is to shift the entire distribution of physical activity or to influence those most adversely affected by low physical activity. Agent-based modeling could be an important complement to traditional project planning tools, analogous to sample size and power analyses, to help researchers design more effective interventions for increasing children’s physical activity. PMID:25689202

  20. On the Dynamics of the Spontaneous Activity in Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bonifazi, Paolo; Ruaro, Maria Elisabetta; Torre, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    Most neuronal networks, even in the absence of external stimuli, produce spontaneous bursts of spikes separated by periods of reduced activity. The origin and functional role of these neuronal events are still unclear. The present work shows that the spontaneous activity of two very different networks, intact leech ganglia and dissociated cultures of rat hippocampal neurons, share several features. Indeed, in both networks: i) the inter-spike intervals distribution of the spontaneous firing of single neurons is either regular or periodic or bursting, with the fraction of bursting neurons depending on the network activity; ii) bursts of spontaneous spikes have the same broad distributions of size and duration; iii) the degree of correlated activity increases with the bin width, and the power spectrum of the network firing rate has a 1/f behavior at low frequencies, indicating the existence of long-range temporal correlations; iv) the activity of excitatory synaptic pathways mediated by NMDA receptors is necessary for the onset of the long-range correlations and for the presence of large bursts; v) blockage of inhibitory synaptic pathways mediated by GABAA receptors causes instead an increase in the correlation among neurons and leads to a burst distribution composed only of very small and very large bursts. These results suggest that the spontaneous electrical activity in neuronal networks with different architectures and functions can have very similar properties and common dynamics. PMID:17502919

  1. Active system area networks for data intensive computations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    2002-04-01

    The goal of the Active System Area Networks (ASAN) project is to develop hardware and software technologies for the implementation of active system area networks (ASANs). The use of the term ''active'' refers to the ability of the network interfaces to perform application-specific as well as system level computations in addition to their traditional role of data transfer. This project adopts the view that the network infrastructure should be an active computational entity capable of supporting certain classes of computations that would otherwise be performed on the host CPUs. The result is a unique network-wide programming model where computations are dynamically placed within the host CPUs or the NIs depending upon the quality of service demands and network/CPU resource availability. The projects seeks to demonstrate that such an approach is a better match for data intensive network-based applications and that the advent of low-cost powerful embedded processors and configurable hardware makes such an approach economically viable and desirable.

  2. Global satellite triangulation and trilateration for the National Geodetic Satellite Program (solutions WN 12, 14 and 16). [study and analysis of data from artificial satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, I. I.; Kumar, M.; Reilly, J. P.; Saxena, N.; Soler, T.

    1973-01-01

    A multi-year study and analysis of data from satellites launched specifically for geodetic purposes and from other satellites useful in geodetic studies was conducted. The program of work included theoretical studies and analysis for the geometric determination of station positions derived from photographic observations of both passive and active satellites and from range observations. The current status of data analysis, processing and results are examined.

  3. Synchronization of Geodetic Observatories thanks to Time Transfer by Laser Link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belli, Alexandre; Exertier, Pierre; Samain, Etienne; Vernotte, François

    2015-08-01

    Since 2008, the Time Transfer by Laser Link experiment (T2L2) onboard Jason-2 at 1336 km allows the clock synchronization by an optical link between ground clocks (generally H-maser) and the space instrument. The space segment includes roughly a detector, a timer, a frequency reference (Ultra Stable Oscillator, USO, provided by the DORIS system) and a Laser Reflector Array. Taking into account the current precision and accuracy of the laser ranging technology and the specifications of the space instrument, the stability of the ground to space time transfer is established at a few picoseconds (ps) over 100 seconds. The combination of any two ground stations (from the International Laser Ranging network) referred to their H-maser clock provides, in common view, a very stable ground to ground time transfer of 10 ps over the common pass (around 10 minutes). The accuracy, of around 100 ps between two time calibrated observatories, is demonstrated thanks to several experiments and a rigourous error budget. However, several geodetic observatories reveal to have a time shift of hundreds of nanoseconds, between their local time reference system and UTC. In order to provide geodetic observatories with a unique time reference frame we used the T2L2 instrument to transfer time in the non-common view mode, all around the international laser network.We show that T2L2 is able to provide accurate frequencies, which are deduced from the ground to space time transfers over each laser station at a few 10-13. Thanks to this monitoring of the frequency variations of the onboard oscillator, we established a physical model to be integrated over 10,000 seconds (around one orbital revolution). This model is built by considering all observatories, weighted by the accuracy of their ground clock. The Grasse geodetic observatory is used to calibrate the model because it is bring back to UTC thanks to a permanent GPS link calibrated tothe Paris Observatory (UTC(OP)). By applying this model, we

  4. AUV-aided Seafloor Geodetic Observation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, M.; Asada, A.; Ura, T.; Fujita, M.; Colombo, O. L.; Sato, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Zheng, H.; Nagahashi, K.

    2007-12-01

    We launched a project supported by the Japan Society for the Science Promotion as the Grants in Aid for Scientific Research. In this project, we are aiming at developing new-generation seafloor geodetic observation system that conquers difficulties inherent with the current system. Central idea of this project is to utilize techniques of underwater robot (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle) and seafloor platform to make measurements in place of using the research vessels. Combination of underwater robot and seafloor platform make it possible to conduct the observation with selecting favorable condition of sea and GPS satellite distributions, to make much more frequent observations and to enable flexible planning of observation in response to sudden geodetic events. Trial model of the on-board and the seafloor units were finished. Space-saving design for the on-board unit, which controls both acoustic ranging system and GPS, was one of big issues to be overcome. We reviewed the current system configuration and made it simple. It was miniaturized, and then it was put into two cylinders. The cylinder No.1 contains the PHINS (IXSEA), an inertial navigation system based on fiber optic gyroscope technology. Another one, the cylinder No.2, contains the SF-2050M (NAVCOM Technology) GPS receiver and the acoustic ranging units. The original chassis of the SF-2050M was removed to minimize the volume of the unit and then only the electrical boards of the GPS receiver was installed into the cylinder No.2. There is no commercialized GPS antenna that can receive both L1 and L2 signals and has pressure capability of 2,000 m depth in the sea. Then we developed the pressure housing for the GPS antenna. The small size antenna corresponding to the L1 and L2 signals was installed in it. The transducer, for underwater acoustic ranging, employed on both the on-board and the seafloor units has been newly developed by Dr. Tom Ensign, Engineering acoustic Inc.. This transducer has a spherical

  5. Activator-inhibitor systems on heterogeneous ecological networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaides, C.; Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Juanes, R.

    2012-12-01

    The consideration of activator-inhibitor systems as complex networks has broadened our knowledge of non-equilibrium reaction-diffusion processes in heterogeneous systems. For example, the Turing mechanism represents a classical model for the formation of self-organized spatial structures in non-equilibrium activator-inhibitor systems. The study of Turing patterns in networks with heterogeneous connectivity has revealed that, contrary to other models and systems, the segregation process takes place mainly in vertices of low degree. In this paper, we study the formation of vegetation patterns in semiarid ecosystems from the perspective of a heterogeneous interacting ecological network. The structure of ecological networks yields fundamental insight into the ecosystem self-organization. Using simple rules for the short-range activation and global inhibition, we reconstruct the observed power-law distribution of vegetation patch size that has been observed in semiarid ecosystems like the Kalahari transect.

  6. Update on High-Resolution Geodetically Controlled LROC Polar Mosaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archinal, B.; Lee, E.; Weller, L.; Richie, J.; Edmundson, K.; Laura, J.; Robinson, M.; Speyerer, E.; Boyd, A.; Bowman-Cisneros, E.; Wagner, R.; Nefian, A.

    2015-10-01

    We describe progress on high-resolution (1 m/pixel) geodetically controlled LROC mosaics of the lunar poles, which can be used for locating illumination resources (for solar power or cold traps) or landing site and surface operations planning.

  7. Integration of space geodesy: a US National Geodetic Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunck, Thomas P.; Neilan, Ruth

    2003-01-01

    In the interest of improving the performance and efficiency of space geodesy a diverse group in the U.S., in collaboration with IGGOS, has begun to establish a unified National Geodetic Observatory (NGO).

  8. Decorrelation of Neural-Network Activity by Inhibitory Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Einevoll, Gaute T.; Diesmann, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Correlations in spike-train ensembles can seriously impair the encoding of information by their spatio-temporal structure. An inevitable source of correlation in finite neural networks is common presynaptic input to pairs of neurons. Recent studies demonstrate that spike correlations in recurrent neural networks are considerably smaller than expected based on the amount of shared presynaptic input. Here, we explain this observation by means of a linear network model and simulations of networks of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons. We show that inhibitory feedback efficiently suppresses pairwise correlations and, hence, population-rate fluctuations, thereby assigning inhibitory neurons the new role of active decorrelation. We quantify this decorrelation by comparing the responses of the intact recurrent network (feedback system) and systems where the statistics of the feedback channel is perturbed (feedforward system). Manipulations of the feedback statistics can lead to a significant increase in the power and coherence of the population response. In particular, neglecting correlations within the ensemble of feedback channels or between the external stimulus and the feedback amplifies population-rate fluctuations by orders of magnitude. The fluctuation suppression in homogeneous inhibitory networks is explained by a negative feedback loop in the one-dimensional dynamics of the compound activity. Similarly, a change of coordinates exposes an effective negative feedback loop in the compound dynamics of stable excitatory-inhibitory networks. The suppression of input correlations in finite networks is explained by the population averaged correlations in the linear network model: In purely inhibitory networks, shared-input correlations are canceled by negative spike-train correlations. In excitatory-inhibitory networks, spike-train correlations are typically positive. Here, the suppression of input correlations is not a result of the mere existence of correlations between

  9. Use of the particle swarm optimization algorithm for second order design of levelling networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yetkin, Mevlut; Inal, Cevat; Yigit, Cemal Ozer

    2009-08-01

    The weight problem in geodetic networks can be dealt with as an optimization procedure. This classic problem of geodetic network optimization is also known as second-order design. The basic principles of geodetic network optimization are reviewed. Then the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is applied to a geodetic levelling network in order to solve the second-order design problem. PSO, which is an iterative-stochastic search algorithm in swarm intelligence, emulates the collective behaviour of bird flocking, fish schooling or bee swarming, to converge probabilistically to the global optimum. Furthermore, it is a powerful method because it is easy to implement and computationally efficient. Second-order design of a geodetic levelling network using PSO yields a practically realizable solution. It is also suitable for non-linear matrix functions that are very often encountered in geodetic network optimization. The fundamentals of the method and a numeric example are given.

  10. Efficient transformations from geodetic to UTM coordinate systems

    SciTech Connect

    Toms, R.M.

    1996-08-07

    The problem of efficiently performing transformations from geocentric to geodetic coordinates has been addressed at previous DIS (Distributed Interactive Simulation) workshops. This paper extends the work presented at the 14th DIS Workshop. As a consequence of the new algorithm for geocentric to geodetic coordinate conversion, a subsequent conversion to Universal Transverse Mercator coordinates is made considerably more efficient. No additional trigonometric or square root evaluations are required and accuracy is not degraded.

  11. ICA model order selection of task co-activation networks

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Kimberly L.; McKay, D. Reese; Fox, Peter M.; Riedel, Michael C.; Uecker, Angela M.; Beckmann, Christian F.; Smith, Stephen M.; Fox, Peter T.; Laird, Angela R.

    2013-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) has become a widely used method for extracting functional networks in the brain during rest and task. Historically, preferred ICA dimensionality has widely varied within the neuroimaging community, but typically varies between 20 and 100 components. This can be problematic when comparing results across multiple studies because of the impact ICA dimensionality has on the topology of its resultant components. Recent studies have demonstrated that ICA can be applied to peak activation coordinates archived in a large neuroimaging database (i.e., BrainMap Database) to yield whole-brain task-based co-activation networks. A strength of applying ICA to BrainMap data is that the vast amount of metadata in BrainMap can be used to quantitatively assess tasks and cognitive processes contributing to each component. In this study, we investigated the effect of model order on the distribution of functional properties across networks as a method for identifying the most informative decompositions of BrainMap-based ICA components. Our findings suggest dimensionality of 20 for low model order ICA to examine large-scale brain networks, and dimensionality of 70 to provide insight into how large-scale networks fractionate into sub-networks. We also provide a functional and organizational assessment of visual, motor, emotion, and interoceptive task co-activation networks as they fractionate from low to high model-orders. PMID:24339802

  12. Turing patterns in network-organized activator-inhibitor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, Hiroya; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2010-07-01

    Turing instability in activator-inhibitor systems provides a paradigm of non-equilibrium self-organization; it has been extensively investigated for biological and chemical processes. Turing instability should also be possible in networks, and general mathematical methods for its treatment have been formulated previously. However, only examples of regular lattices and small networks were explicitly considered. Here we study Turing patterns in large random networks, which reveal striking differences from the classical behaviour. The initial linear instability leads to spontaneous differentiation of the network nodes into activator-rich and activator-poor groups. The emerging Turing patterns become furthermore strongly reshaped at the subsequent nonlinear stage. Multiple coexisting stationary states and hysteresis effects are observed. This peculiar behaviour can be understood in the framework of a mean-field theory. Our results offer a new perspective on self-organization phenomena in systems organized as complex networks. Potential applications include ecological metapopulations, synthetic ecosystems, cellular networks of early biological morphogenesis, and networks of coupled chemical nanoreactors.

  13. Connectivity, excitability and activity patterns in neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    le Feber, Joost; Stoyanova, Irina I.; Chiappalone, Michela

    2014-06-01

    Extremely synchronized firing patterns such as those observed in brain diseases like epilepsy may result from excessive network excitability. Although network excitability is closely related to (excitatory) connectivity, a direct measure for network excitability remains unavailable. Several methods currently exist for estimating network connectivity, most of which are related to cross-correlation. An example is the conditional firing probability (CFP) analysis which calculates the pairwise probability (CFPi,j) that electrode j records an action potential at time t = τ, given that electrode i recorded a spike at t = 0. However, electrode i often records multiple spikes within the analysis interval, and CFP values are biased by the on-going dynamic state of the network. Here we show that in a linear approximation this bias may be removed by deconvoluting CFPi,j with the autocorrelation of i (i.e. CFPi,i), to obtain the single pulse response (SPRi,j)—the average response at electrode j to a single spike at electrode i. Thus, in a linear system SPRs would be independent of the dynamic network state. Nonlinear components of synaptic transmission, such as facilitation and short term depression, will however still affect SPRs. Therefore SPRs provide a clean measure of network excitability. We used carbachol and ghrelin to moderately activate cultured cortical networks to affect their dynamic state. Both neuromodulators transformed the bursting firing patterns of the isolated networks into more dispersed firing. We show that the influence of the dynamic state on SPRs is much smaller than the effect on CFPs, but not zero. The remaining difference reflects the alteration in network excitability. We conclude that SPRs are less contaminated by the dynamic network state and that mild excitation may decrease network excitability, possibly through short term synaptic depression.

  14. Global, Regional and National Geodetic Reference Frames for Geodesy and Geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosy, Jaroslaw

    2014-06-01

    In July 2003 the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) established the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS). The GGOS is integrating the three basic components: geometry, the earth rotation and gravity. The backbone of this integration is the existing global ground network, based on the geodetic space techniques: very long baseline interferometry, satellite laser ranging, global navigation satellite systems and Doppler orbitography and radiopositioning integrated by satellite. These techniques have to operate as one global entity and in one global reference frame. The global reference frame in the GGOS is a realization of the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRS). The ITRS is a world spatial reference system co-rotating with the Earth in its diurnal motion in the space. The IAG Subcommision for the European Reference Frame (EUREF) in 1991 recommended that the terrestrial reference system for Europe should be coincident with ITRS at the epoch t 0 = 1989.0 and fixed to the stable part of the Eurasian Plate. It was named the European Terrestrial Reference System 89 (ETRS89). On the 2nd of June 2008, the Head Office of Geodesy and Cartography in Poland commenced operating the ASG-EUPOS multifunctional precise satellite positioning system. The ASG-EUPOS network defines the European Terrestrial Reference System ETRS89 in Poland. A close connection between the ASG-EUPOS stations and 15 out of 18 Polish EUREF permanent network stations controls the realization of the ETRS89 on Polish territory. This paper is a review of the global ITRS, as well as a regional and a national geodetic reference systems ETRS89.

  15. Stimulus information stored in lasting active and hidden network states is destroyed by network bursts.

    PubMed

    Dranias, Mark R; Westover, M Brandon; Cash, Sidney; VanDongen, Antonius M J

    2015-01-01

    In both humans and animals brief synchronizing bursts of epileptiform activity known as interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) can, even in the absence of overt seizures, cause transient cognitive impairments (TCI) that include problems with perception or short-term memory. While no evidence from single units is available, it has been assumed that IEDs destroy information represented in neuronal networks. Cultured neuronal networks are a model for generic cortical microcircuits, and their spontaneous activity is characterized by the presence of synchronized network bursts (SNBs), which share a number of properties with IEDs, including the high degree of synchronization and their spontaneous occurrence in the absence of an external stimulus. As a model approach to understanding the processes underlying IEDs, optogenetic stimulation and multielectrode array (MEA) recordings of cultured neuronal networks were used to study whether stimulus information represented in these networks survives SNBs. When such networks are optically stimulated they encode and maintain stimulus information for as long as one second. Experiments involved recording the network response to a single stimulus and trials where two different stimuli were presented sequentially, akin to a paired pulse trial. We broke the sequential stimulus trials into encoding, delay and readout phases and found that regardless of which phase the SNB occurs, stimulus-specific information was impaired. SNBs were observed to increase the mean network firing rate, but this did not translate monotonically into increases in network entropy. It was found that the more excitable a network, the more stereotyped its response was during a network burst. These measurements speak to whether SNBs are capable of transmitting information in addition to blocking it. These results are consistent with previous reports and provide baseline predictions concerning the neural mechanisms by which IEDs might cause TCI.

  16. A neural networks study of quinone compounds with trypanocidal activity.

    PubMed

    de Molfetta, Fábio Alberto; Angelotti, Wagner Fernando Delfino; Romero, Roseli Aparecida Francelin; Montanari, Carlos Alberto; da Silva, Albérico Borges Ferreira

    2008-10-01

    This work investigates neural network models for predicting the trypanocidal activity of 28 quinone compounds. Artificial neural networks (ANN), such as multilayer perceptrons (MLP) and Kohonen models, were employed with the aim of modeling the nonlinear relationship between quantum and molecular descriptors and trypanocidal activity. The calculated descriptors and the principal components were used as input to train neural network models to verify the behavior of the nets. The best model for both network models (MLP and Kohonen) was obtained with four descriptors as input. The descriptors were T5 (torsion angle), QTS1 (sum of absolute values of the atomic charges), VOLS2 (volume of the substituent at region B) and HOMO-1 (energy of the molecular orbital below HOMO). These descriptors provide information on the kind of interaction that occurs between the compounds and the biological receptor. Both neural network models used here can predict the trypanocidal activity of the quinone compounds with good agreement, with low errors in the testing set and a high correctness rate. Thanks to the nonlinear model obtained from the neural network models, we can conclude that electronic and structural properties are important factors in the interaction between quinone compounds that exhibit trypanocidal activity and their biological receptors. The final ANN models should be useful in the design of novel trypanocidal quinones having improved potency.

  17. TeleScience Activities: Educational Uses of Electronic Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waugh, Michael L.; Levin, James A.

    1989-01-01

    Described are successful science activities which have been conducted on an international telecommunications network which links schools in the United States, Mexico, Japan, and Israel. Examined are several activities currently being developed. Reports an innovative way to involve a wide range of students in the scientific process. (MVL)

  18. Percolation transition in active neural networks with adaptive geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iudin, F. D.; Iudin, D. I.; Kazantsev, V. B.

    2015-02-01

    A mathematical model has been proposed for a neural network whose morphological structure varies dynamically depending on activity. This is the property of the so-called structural plasticity typical of developed neural systems of a brain. It has been shown that the spontaneous generation and propagation of a signal in such networks correspond to a percolation transition and the appearance of the connectivity component covering the entire system. Furthermore, adaptive change in the geometric structure of a network results in the clustering of cells and in the reduction of the effective percolation threshold, which corresponds to experimental neurobiological observations.

  19. Pattern Formation on Networks: from Localised Activity to Turing Patterns

    PubMed Central

    McCullen, Nick; Wagenknecht, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Networks of interactions between competing species are used to model many complex systems, such as in genetics, evolutionary biology or sociology and knowledge of the patterns of activity they can exhibit is important for understanding their behaviour. The emergence of patterns on complex networks with reaction-diffusion dynamics is studied here, where node dynamics interact via diffusion via the network edges. Through the application of a generalisation of dynamical systems analysis this work reveals a fundamental connection between small-scale modes of activity on networks and localised pattern formation seen throughout science, such as solitons, breathers and localised buckling. The connection between solutions with a single and small numbers of activated nodes and the fully developed system-scale patterns are investigated computationally using numerical continuation methods. These techniques are also used to help reveal a much larger portion of of the full number of solutions that exist in the system at different parameter values. The importance of network structure is also highlighted, with a key role being played by nodes with a certain so-called optimal degree, on which the interaction between the reaction kinetics and the network structure organise the behaviour of the system. PMID:27273339

  20. Pattern Formation on Networks: from Localised Activity to Turing Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullen, Nick; Wagenknecht, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Networks of interactions between competing species are used to model many complex systems, such as in genetics, evolutionary biology or sociology and knowledge of the patterns of activity they can exhibit is important for understanding their behaviour. The emergence of patterns on complex networks with reaction-diffusion dynamics is studied here, where node dynamics interact via diffusion via the network edges. Through the application of a generalisation of dynamical systems analysis this work reveals a fundamental connection between small-scale modes of activity on networks and localised pattern formation seen throughout science, such as solitons, breathers and localised buckling. The connection between solutions with a single and small numbers of activated nodes and the fully developed system-scale patterns are investigated computationally using numerical continuation methods. These techniques are also used to help reveal a much larger portion of of the full number of solutions that exist in the system at different parameter values. The importance of network structure is also highlighted, with a key role being played by nodes with a certain so-called optimal degree, on which the interaction between the reaction kinetics and the network structure organise the behaviour of the system.

  1. Pattern Formation on Networks: from Localised Activity to Turing Patterns.

    PubMed

    McCullen, Nick; Wagenknecht, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Networks of interactions between competing species are used to model many complex systems, such as in genetics, evolutionary biology or sociology and knowledge of the patterns of activity they can exhibit is important for understanding their behaviour. The emergence of patterns on complex networks with reaction-diffusion dynamics is studied here, where node dynamics interact via diffusion via the network edges. Through the application of a generalisation of dynamical systems analysis this work reveals a fundamental connection between small-scale modes of activity on networks and localised pattern formation seen throughout science, such as solitons, breathers and localised buckling. The connection between solutions with a single and small numbers of activated nodes and the fully developed system-scale patterns are investigated computationally using numerical continuation methods. These techniques are also used to help reveal a much larger portion of of the full number of solutions that exist in the system at different parameter values. The importance of network structure is also highlighted, with a key role being played by nodes with a certain so-called optimal degree, on which the interaction between the reaction kinetics and the network structure organise the behaviour of the system. PMID:27273339

  2. Next-Generation Real-Time Geodetic Station Sensor Web for Natural Hazards Research and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Y.; Clayton, R. W.; Fang, P.; Geng, J.; Gutman, S. I.; Kedar, S.; Laber, J. L.; Moore, A. W.; Owen, S. E.; Small, I.; Squibb, M. B.; Webb, F.; Yu, E.

    2012-12-01

    We report on a NASA AIST project focused on better forecasting, assessing, and mitigating natural hazards, including earthquakes, tsunamis, and extreme storms and flooding through development and implementation of a modular technology for the next-generation in-situ geodetic station, and a Geodetic Sensor Web to support the flow of information from multiple stations to scientists, mission planners, decision makers, and first responders. Meaningful warnings save lives when issued within 1-2 minutes for destructive earthquakes, several tens of minutes for tsunamis, and up to several hours for extreme storms and flooding, and can be provided by on-site fusion of multiple data types and generation of higher-order data products: GPS and accelerometer measurements to estimate point displacements, and GPS and meteorological measurements to estimate moisture variability in the free atmosphere. By operating semi-autonomously, each station can provide low-latency, high-fidelity and compact data products within the constraints of narrow communications bandwidth that often accompanies natural disasters. The project encompasses the following tasks, including hardware and software components: (1) Development of a power-efficient, low-cost, plug-in Geodetic Module for fusion of data from in situ sensors including GPS, a MEMS accelerometer package, and a MEMS meteorological sensor package, for deployment at 26 existing continuous GPS stations in southern California. The low-cost modular design is scalable to the many existing continuous GPS stations worldwide. (2) Estimation of new on-the-fly data products with 1 mm precision and accuracy, including three-dimensional broadband displacements and precipitable water, by new software embedded in the Geodetic Module's processor, rather than at a central processing facility. (3) Development of a Geodetic Sensor Web to allow the semi-autonomous sensors to transmit and receive information in real time by means of redundant sensor proxy

  3. Geodetic Imaging of Glacio-Seismotectonic Processes in Southern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauber, J.; Bruhn, R.; Forster, R.; Hofton, M.

    2008-12-01

    Across southern Alaska the northwest directed motion of the Pacific plate is accompanied by migration and collision of the Yakutat terrane. The Yakutat terrane is a fragment of the North American plate margin that is partly subducted beneath and partly accreted to the continental margin. Over the last couple of decades the rate of ongoing deformation associated with subduction and a locked main thrust zone has been estimated by geodetic measurements. In the last five years more extensive geodetic measurements, structural and tectonic field studies, thermochronolgy, and high-resolution lidar have been acquired and analyzed as part of the STEEP project [Pavlis et al., 2006]. The nature and magnitude of accretion and translation on upper crustal faults and folds remains uncertain, however, due to complex variations in the style of tectonic deformation, pervasive and changing glaciation, and the logistical challenges of conducting field studies in formidable topography. In this study, we analyze new high-resolution lidar data to extract locations, geometry, and heights of seismogenic faults and zones of active folding across the Malaspina-Seward-Bagley region of the southern Alaska plate boundary that is hypothesized to accommodate upper crustal shortening and right-lateral slip. Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) lidar swath data acquired by Krabill et al. in the summer of 2005 and ICESat data (1993-present) cross a number of proposed faults and folds partially masked by glaciation, including the Malaspina thrust, Esker Creek, Chugach-St.Elias thrust, and Contact. Focal mechanisms from this region indicate mostly shallow (0-30 km) thrust and oblique strike-slip faulting. Similarly, rupture in the 1979 St. Elias earthquake (M=7.4) started as a shallow, north-dipping thrust that later changed to more steeply NE dipping with a large right-lateral strike-slip component. Additionally, we are using the morphology and dynamics of glaciers derived from L-Band SAR ice

  4. Collective versus hub activation of epidemic phases on networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Silvio C.; Sander, Renan S.; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

    2016-03-01

    We consider a general criterion to discern the nature of the threshold in epidemic models on scale-free (SF) networks. Comparing the epidemic lifespan of the nodes with largest degrees with the infection time between them, we propose a general dual scenario, in which the epidemic transition is either ruled by a hub activation process, leading to a null threshold in the thermodynamic limit, or given by a collective activation process, corresponding to a standard phase transition with a finite threshold. We validate the proposed criterion applying it to different epidemic models, with waning immunity or heterogeneous infection rates in both synthetic and real SF networks. In particular, a waning immunity, irrespective of its strength, leads to collective activation with finite threshold in scale-free networks with large degree exponent, at odds with canonical theoretical approaches.

  5. Heterogeneous interplate coupling along the Nankai Trough, Japan, detected by GPS-acoustic seafloor geodetic observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokota, Yusuke; Ishikawa, Tadashi; Sato, Mariko; Watanabe, Shun-ichi; Saito, Hiroaki; Ujihara, Naoto; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Toyama, Shin-ichi; Fujita, Masayuki; Yabuki, Tetsuichiro; Mochizuki, Masashi; Asada, Akira

    2015-12-01

    The recurring devastating earthquake that occurs in the Nankai Trough subduction zone between the Philippine Sea plate and the Eurasian plate has the potential to cause an extremely dangerous natural disaster in the foreseeable future. Many previous studies have assumed interplate-coupling ratios for this region along the trench axis using onshore geodetic data in order to understand this recursive event. However, the offshore region that has the potential to drive a devastating tsunami cannot be resolved sufficiently because the observation network is biased to the land area. Therefore, the Hydrographic and Oceanographic Department of Japan constructed a geodetic observation network on the seafloor along the Nankai Trough using a GPS-acoustic combination technique and has used it to observe seafloor crustal movements directly above the Nankai Trough subduction zone. We have set six seafloor sites and cumulated enough data to determine the displacement rate from 2006 to January 2011. Our seafloor geodetic observations at these sites revealed a heterogeneous interplate coupling that has three particular features. The fast displacement rates observed in the easternmost area indicate strong interplate coupling (>75%) around not only the future Tokai earthquake source region but also the Paleo-Zenisu ridge. The slow displacement rates near the trench axis in the Kumano-nada Sea, a shallow part of the 1944 Tonankai earthquake source region, show a lower coupling ratio (50% to 75%). The slow displacement rate observed in the area shallower than the 1946 Nankaido earthquake source region off Cape Muroto-zaki reflects weakening interplate coupling (about 50%) probably due to a subducting seamount. Our observations above the subducting ridge and seamount indicate that the effect of a subducting seamount on an interplate-coupling region depends on various conditions such as the geometry of the seamount and the friction parameters on the plate boundary.

  6. Geodetic Investigation of Compliant Fault Zones on the San Francisco Peninsula segment of the San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materna, K.; Burgmann, R.

    2015-12-01

    At many places along the San Andreas Fault, geodetic and seismic studies have suggested the presence of near-field compliant fault zones (CFZs). These zones of damaged rock display reduced elastic moduli compared to intact rock, resulting in both higher geodetic strain rates and lower seismic velocities within the fault zones. In this study, we investigate the CFZ surrounding the San Andreas Fault in the San Francisco Peninsula by examining interseismic deformation over the past several decades. We use new and existing survey GPS measurements, as well as older electronic distance measurements, to characterize the deformation of the CFZ. The data come from networks at Black Mountain and Lake San Andreas, both small-aperture geodetic networks on the San Francisco Peninsula with survey GPS occupations spanning at least 15 years. We compare the inferred fault zone properties between the two networks, which are separated by less than 40 kilometers but which represent different geologic boundaries and show different fault ages. We also compare patterns in seismicity between the two regions. The differences in inferred fault parameters between these two regions may be related to differences in fault age and development, giving clues into how CFZs develop over time.

  7. Coordinating Computing, Network and Archiving activities within INAF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasian, F.; Bodo, G.; Fini, L.; Garilli, B.; Longo, G.; Massimino, P.; Nanni, M.; Smareglia, R.

    When INAF was reformed, it was decided to create a `Computing, Network and Archives Service' within the Projects Department, in order to coordinate all computer-related activities and to properly harmonize management and development policies in the field. A `Computing, Network and Archives Committee' was immediately nominated for the duration of one year to cope with the immediate needs. The Committee has the task of identifying and making operational strategies to coordinate activities in the areas of interest, improving service to all users, implementing synergies and economies, while guaranteeing a single INAF contact point for all external institutions working in the field.

  8. Fast transient networks in spontaneous human brain activity

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Adam P; Brookes, Matthew J; Rezek, Iead A; Smith, Stephen M; Behrens, Timothy; Probert Smith, Penny J; Woolrich, Mark

    2014-01-01

    To provide an effective substrate for cognitive processes, functional brain networks should be able to reorganize and coordinate on a sub-second temporal scale. We used magnetoencephalography recordings of spontaneous activity to characterize whole-brain functional connectivity dynamics at high temporal resolution. Using a novel approach that identifies the points in time at which unique patterns of activity recur, we reveal transient (100–200 ms) brain states with spatial topographies similar to those of well-known resting state networks. By assessing temporal changes in the occurrence of these states, we demonstrate that within-network functional connectivity is underpinned by coordinated neuronal dynamics that fluctuate much more rapidly than has previously been shown. We further evaluate cross-network interactions, and show that anticorrelation between the default mode network and parietal regions of the dorsal attention network is consistent with an inability of the system to transition directly between two transient brain states. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01867.001 PMID:24668169

  9. Fast transient networks in spontaneous human brain activity.

    PubMed

    Baker, Adam P; Brookes, Matthew J; Rezek, Iead A; Smith, Stephen M; Behrens, Timothy; Probert Smith, Penny J; Woolrich, Mark

    2014-03-25

    To provide an effective substrate for cognitive processes, functional brain networks should be able to reorganize and coordinate on a sub-second temporal scale. We used magnetoencephalography recordings of spontaneous activity to characterize whole-brain functional connectivity dynamics at high temporal resolution. Using a novel approach that identifies the points in time at which unique patterns of activity recur, we reveal transient (100-200 ms) brain states with spatial topographies similar to those of well-known resting state networks. By assessing temporal changes in the occurrence of these states, we demonstrate that within-network functional connectivity is underpinned by coordinated neuronal dynamics that fluctuate much more rapidly than has previously been shown. We further evaluate cross-network interactions, and show that anticorrelation between the default mode network and parietal regions of the dorsal attention network is consistent with an inability of the system to transition directly between two transient brain states. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01867.001.

  10. Renewed Geodetic Unrest at Santorini Caldera, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, A. V.; Stiros, S. C.; Moschas, F.; Saltogianni, V.; Feng, L.; Farmer, G. T.; Psimoulis, P.; Jiang, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Santorini Caldera, in the southern Aegean, is part of a well-developed, and very active volcanic system fueled by subduction along the Hellenic arc that is responsible for the largest volcanic eruption in human history (~1650 B.C.). After approximately 50 years of relative seismic quiescence within the caldera and an episode of minor inflation, the volcano has recently reawakened with an exponentially increasing inflation signal, beginning in January 2011. The GPS network, including 3 continuous stations and biennial surveys of 19 campaign stations, showed essentially no deformation between 2006 and 2010. Following a cluster of microseismicity within the caldera two surveys in June and August 2011 were made, while two additional permanent GPS stations were installed. From this data, we found uplift and nearly-radial expansion up to 1 cm/month. This deformation is well-explained by a Mogi-source at the northern part of the caldera, with an approximately 6-10 million m3 volumetric growth at approximately 4 km depth, and tendency for development of a new dome offshore. It is likely that stresses from this magma source are responsible for a cluster of microseismity that began in January 2011 along a radial lineament of young volcanics, called the 'Kameni Line'.

  11. BRAIN NETWORKS. Correlated gene expression supports synchronous activity in brain networks.

    PubMed

    Richiardi, Jonas; Altmann, Andre; Milazzo, Anna-Clare; Chang, Catie; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Bokde, Arun L W; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Lemaître, Hervé; Mann, Karl F; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomáš; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor W; Smolka, Michael N; Spanagel, Rainer; Ströhle, Andreas; Schumann, Gunter; Hawrylycz, Mike; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Greicius, Michael D

    2015-06-12

    During rest, brain activity is synchronized between different regions widely distributed throughout the brain, forming functional networks. However, the molecular mechanisms supporting functional connectivity remain undefined. We show that functional brain networks defined with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging can be recapitulated by using measures of correlated gene expression in a post mortem brain tissue data set. The set of 136 genes we identify is significantly enriched for ion channels. Polymorphisms in this set of genes significantly affect resting-state functional connectivity in a large sample of healthy adolescents. Expression levels of these genes are also significantly associated with axonal connectivity in the mouse. The results provide convergent, multimodal evidence that resting-state functional networks correlate with the orchestrated activity of dozens of genes linked to ion channel activity and synaptic function.

  12. BRAIN NETWORKS. Correlated gene expression supports synchronous activity in brain networks.

    PubMed

    Richiardi, Jonas; Altmann, Andre; Milazzo, Anna-Clare; Chang, Catie; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Bokde, Arun L W; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Lemaître, Hervé; Mann, Karl F; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomáš; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor W; Smolka, Michael N; Spanagel, Rainer; Ströhle, Andreas; Schumann, Gunter; Hawrylycz, Mike; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Greicius, Michael D

    2015-06-12

    During rest, brain activity is synchronized between different regions widely distributed throughout the brain, forming functional networks. However, the molecular mechanisms supporting functional connectivity remain undefined. We show that functional brain networks defined with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging can be recapitulated by using measures of correlated gene expression in a post mortem brain tissue data set. The set of 136 genes we identify is significantly enriched for ion channels. Polymorphisms in this set of genes significantly affect resting-state functional connectivity in a large sample of healthy adolescents. Expression levels of these genes are also significantly associated with axonal connectivity in the mouse. The results provide convergent, multimodal evidence that resting-state functional networks correlate with the orchestrated activity of dozens of genes linked to ion channel activity and synaptic function. PMID:26068849

  13. Creation of a global geodetic network using Mark III VLBI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Chopo; Clark, Thomas A.; Ryan, James W.

    1986-01-01

    The positions of 15 permanent VLBI stations have been determined using Mark III with one-sigma uncertainties of less than 5 cm except for three stations in the Pacific. 46070 delay/delay rate observations acquired by the Crustal Dynamics Project and Polaris/IRIS from 1980-84 were included in a least squares solution to estimate the station positions, 44 radio source positions, and earth orientation parameters.

  14. Network effect of knowledge spillover: Scale-free networks stimulate R&D activities and accelerate economic growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Tomohiko

    2016-09-01

    We study how knowledge spillover networks affect research and development (R&D) activities and economic growth. For this purpose, we extend a Schumpeterian growth model to the one on networks that depict the knowledge spillover relationships of R&D. We show that scale-free networks stimulate R&D activities and accelerate economic growth.

  15. Next-Generation Geodetic Station for Natural Hazards Research and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Y.; Melgar-Moctezuma, D.; Crowell, B. W.; Webb, F.; Moore, A. W.; Kedar, S.; Owen, S. E.; Clayton, R. W.

    2011-12-01

    The last few years have seen an apparent increase in natural disasters worldwide and certainly an increase in disaster-related loss of life and property due to earthquakes, tsunamis, severe storms, and flooding. The latest example is the March 11, 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake and ensuing tsunami and nuclear meltdown, whose devastating humanitarian and socio-economic effects still ripple throughout Japan and the world. Enhanced in situ geodetic monitoring has been shown to be a critical element in mitigating the effects of these types of natural disasters. For example, it took Japanese authorities relying solely on seismic instruments about 20 minutes to determine that a great earthquake had occurred on March 11. Initial estimates by the Japan Meteorological Agency were of a magnitude 6.8 earthquake after 3 minutes, and a magnitude 7.9 after 10-20 minutes. Using the existing real-time high-rate GPS network in Japan (GEONET) in a simulated real-time mode, we demonstrate that it would have taken only 2-3 minutes to determine that the magnitude was 9.0. Early detection of this great earthquake was of the essence, since the first tsunami waves hit the coastline after only 30 minutes. We describe the components of a next-generation in situ geodetic observatory, one of whose primary applications is to forecast, assess, and mitigate these types of natural hazards as part of an information system for scientists, mission planners, decision makers, and first responders. To provide meaningful early warnings for earthquakes (up to several minutes in advance), for tsunamis (several tens of minutes), and for major storms and flooding (up to 24 hours), future geodetic observatories will require continuous displacement and precipitable water estimates, with mm-level precision and accuracy. To achieve this in an efficient manner will require on-site fusion of multiple data types and generation of higher-order data products: Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and

  16. Near Real-Time Determination of Earthquake Source Parameters for Tsunami Early Warning from Geodetic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manneela, Sunanda; Srinivasa Kumar, T.; Nayak, Shailesh R.

    2016-06-01

    Exemplifying the tsunami source immediately after an earthquake is the most critical component of tsunami early warning, as not every earthquake generates a tsunami. After a major under sea earthquake, it is very important to determine whether or not it has actually triggered the deadly wave. The near real-time observations from near field networks such as strong motion and Global Positioning System (GPS) allows rapid determination of fault geometry. Here we present a complete processing chain of Indian Tsunami Early Warning System (ITEWS), starting from acquisition of geodetic raw data, processing, inversion and simulating the situation as it would be at warning center during any major earthquake. We determine the earthquake moment magnitude and generate the centroid moment tensor solution using a novel approach which are the key elements for tsunami early warning. Though the well established seismic monitoring network, numerical modeling and dissemination system are currently capable to provide tsunami warnings to most of the countries in and around the Indian Ocean, the study highlights the critical role of geodetic observations in determination of tsunami source for high-quality forecasting.

  17. Geodetic measurement of deformation in California. Ph.D. Thesis - Massachusetts Inst. of Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauber, Jeanne

    1989-01-01

    The very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) measurements made in the western U.S. since 1979 as part of the NASA Crustal Dynamics Project provide discrete samples of the temporal and spatial deformation field. The interpretation of the VLBI-derived rates of deformation requires an examination of geologic information and more densely sampled ground-based geodetic data. In the first two of three related studies, triangulation and trilateration data measured on two regional networks, one in the central Mojave Desert and one in the Coast Ranges east of the San Andreas fault, have been processed. At the spatial scales spanned by these local geodetic networks, auxiliary geologic and geophysical data have been utilized to examine the relation between measured incremental strain and the accommodation of strain seen in local geological structures, strain release in earthquakes, and principal stress directions inferred from in situ measurements. In a third study, the geocentric position vectors from a set of 77 VLBI experiments beginning in October 1982 have been used to estimate the tangential rate of change of station positions in the western U.S. in a North-America-Fixed reference frame.

  18. Homeostatic Activity-Dependent Tuning of Recurrent Networks for Robust Propagation of Activity

    PubMed Central

    Evers, Jan Felix; Eglen, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Developing neuronal networks display spontaneous bursts of action potentials that are necessary for circuit organization and tuning. While spontaneous activity has been shown to instruct map formation in sensory circuits, it is unknown whether it plays a role in the organization of motor networks that produce rhythmic output. Using computational modeling, we investigate how recurrent networks of excitatory and inhibitory neuronal populations assemble to produce robust patterns of unidirectional and precisely timed propagating activity during organism locomotion. One example is provided by the motor network in Drosophila larvae, which generates propagating peristaltic waves of muscle contractions during crawling. We examine two activity-dependent models, which tune weak network connectivity based on spontaneous activity patterns: a Hebbian model, where coincident activity in neighboring populations strengthens connections between them; and a homeostatic model, where connections are homeostatically regulated to maintain a constant level of excitatory activity based on spontaneous input. The homeostatic model successfully tunes network connectivity to generate robust activity patterns with appropriate timing relationships between neighboring populations. These timing relationships can be modulated by the properties of spontaneous activity, suggesting its instructive role for generating functional variability in network output. In contrast, the Hebbian model fails to produce the tight timing relationships between neighboring populations required for unidirectional activity propagation, even when additional assumptions are imposed to constrain synaptic growth. These results argue that homeostatic mechanisms are more likely than Hebbian mechanisms to tune weak connectivity based on spontaneous input in a recurrent network for rhythm generation and robust activity propagation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT How are neural circuits organized and tuned to maintain stable function

  19. Geodetic VLBI Observations of EGRET Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piner, Brian Glenn

    1998-12-01

    This thesis presents VLBI observations of six blazars detected by the EGRET telescope on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory: 0202+149 (4C+15.05), 0235+164, CTA 26 (0336-019), 1156+295 (4C+29.45), 1606+106 (4C+10.45), and 1611+343 (DA 406). The primary motivation for this thesis was to study the characteristics of the parsec-scale jets in EGRET blazars, in part to determine if there are any significant differences between the EGRET and non-EGRET blazars. The VLBI data were taken from the Washington VLBI correlator's geodetic database. A total of 108 new VLBI images are presented of these six sources at two frequencies (8 and 2 GWz) and many epochs. Through measurements of the proper motions of the jet components in these sources, three new superluminal sources (CTA 26, 1606+106, and 1611+343) were discovered, and a previously measured very high superluminal speed for 1156+295 (McHardy et al. 1993, 1990) was corrected. The components in 0202+149 were stationary; this, along with other properties, identified this source as a compact F double (Conway et al. 1994). These sources all have apparently bent jets. Non-radial motion of components was detected in CTPI 26 and 1156+295. No correlation was found between VLBI component ejections and γ-ray flares, and upper limits were derived for the speeds of any possible components correlated with the γ-ray flares in CTA 26, 1156+295, and 1606+106. A comparison of the misalignment angle distribution of the EGRET sources to the distribution for blazars as a whole (Xu et al. 1994) showed that EGRET sources do not preferentially belong to the aligned or the misaligned population. Twenty new VLBI component speeds are presented is this thesis, approximately doubling the available sample size for studies of EGRET source superluminal motions. A lower limit to the Doppler beaming factor for each of these sources was also estimated, and a comparison of the average values of these apparent velocities and Doppler beaming factors for the

  20. Impact of Network Activity on the Spread of Infectious Diseases through the German Pig Trade Network

    PubMed Central

    Lebl, Karin; Lentz, Hartmut H. K.; Pinior, Beate; Selhorst, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The trade of livestock is an important and growing economic sector, but it is also a major factor in the spread of diseases. The spreading of diseases in a trade network is likely to be influenced by how often existing trade connections are active. The activity α is defined as the mean frequency of occurrences of existing trade links, thus 0 < α ≤ 1. The observed German pig trade network had an activity of α = 0.11, thus each existing trade connection between two farms was, on average, active at about 10% of the time during the observation period 2008–2009. The aim of this study is to analyze how changes in the activity level of the German pig trade network influence the probability of disease outbreaks, size, and duration of epidemics for different disease transmission probabilities. Thus, we want to investigate the question, whether it makes a difference for a hypothetical spread of an animal disease to transport many animals at the same time or few animals at many times. A SIR model was used to simulate the spread of a disease within the German pig trade network. Our results show that for transmission probabilities <1, the outbreak probability increases in the case of a decreased frequency of animal transports, peaking range of α from 0.05 to 0.1. However, for the final outbreak size, we find that a threshold exists such that finite outbreaks occur only above a critical value of α, which is ~0.1, and therefore in proximity of the observed activity level. Thus, although the outbreak probability increased when decreasing α, these outbreaks affect only a small number of farms. The duration of the epidemic peaks at an activity level in the range of α = 0.2–0.3. Additionally, the results of our simulations show that even small changes in the activity level of the German pig trade network would have dramatic effects on outbreak probability, outbreak size, and epidemic duration. Thus, we can conclude and recommend that the network activity

  1. California Health Services/Educational Activities. Consortium Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Charles H.

    Profiles are presented of each of the 10 consortia that make up the California Health Services/Education Activities (HS/EA) network (new relationships between educational facilities where health care manpower is trained in the community settings where they practice). The first part of the booklet is a comparative analysis of (1) Area Health…

  2. Correlated errors in geodetic time series: Implications for time-dependent deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langbein, J.; Johnson, H.

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of frequent trilateration observations from the two-color electronic distance measuring networks in California demonstrate that the noise power spectra are dominated by white noise at higher frequencies and power law behavior at lower frequencies. In contrast, Earth scientists typically have assumed that only white noise is present in a geodetic time series, since a combination of infrequent measurements and low precision usually preclude identifying the time-correlated signature in such data. After removing a linear trend from the two-color data, it becomes evident that there are primarily two recognizable types of time-correlated noise present in the residuals. The first type is a seasonal variation in displacement which is probably a result of measuring to shallow surface monuments installed in clayey soil which responds to seasonally occurring rainfall; this noise is significant only for a small fraction of the sites analyzed. The second type of correlated noise becomes evident only after spectral analysis of line length changes and shows a functional relation at long periods between power and frequency of and where f is frequency and ?? ??? 2. With ?? = 2, this type of correlated noise is termed random-walk noise, and its source is mainly thought to be small random motions of geodetic monuments with respect to the Earth's crust, though other sources are possible. Because the line length changes in the two-color networks are measured at irregular intervals, power spectral techniques cannot reliably estimate the level of I//" noise. Rather, we also use here a maximum likelihood estimation technique which assumes that there are only two sources of noise in the residual time series (white noise and randomwalk noise) and estimates the amount of each. From this analysis we find that the random-walk noise level averages about 1.3 mm/Vyr and that our estimates of the white noise component confirm theoretical limitations of the measurement technique. In

  3. Photonic network R and D activities in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitayama, Ken-ichi; Miki, Tetsuya; Morioka, Toshio; Tsushima, Hideaki; Koga, Masafumi; Mori, Kazuyuki; Araki, Soichiro; Sato, Ken-ichi; Onaka, Hiroshi; Namiki, Shu; Aovama, Tomonori

    2005-11-01

    R and D activities on photonic networks in Japan are presented. First, milestones in current, ongoing R and D programs supported by Japanese government agencies are introduced, including long-distance and WDM fiber transmission, wavelength routing, optical burst switching, and control plane technology for IP backbone networks. Their goal was set to evolve a legacy telecommunications network to IP over WDM networks by introducing technologies for WDM and wavelength routing. We then discuss the perspectives of so-called PHASE II R and D programs for photonic networks over the next five years until 2010, by focusing on the report which has been recently issued by the Photonic Internet Forum (PIF), a consortium that has major carriers, telecom vendors, and Japanese academics as members. The PHASE II R and D programs should serve to establish a photonic platform to provide abundant bandwidth on demand, at any time on a real-time basis through the customer's initiative, to promote bandwidth-rich applications, such as grid computing, real-time digital-cinema streaming, medical and educational applications, and network storage in e-commerce.

  4. Tracking and activity recognition through consensus in distributed camera networks.

    PubMed

    Song, Bi; Kamal, Ahmed T; Soto, Cristian; Ding, Chong; Farrell, Jay A; Roy-Chowdhury, Amit K

    2010-10-01

    Camera networks are being deployed for various applications like security and surveillance, disaster response and environmental modeling. However, there is little automated processing of the data. Moreover, most methods for multicamera analysis are centralized schemes that require the data to be present at a central server. In many applications, this is prohibitively expensive, both technically and economically. In this paper, we investigate distributed scene analysis algorithms by leveraging upon concepts of consensus that have been studied in the context of multiagent systems, but have had little applications in video analysis. Each camera estimates certain parameters based upon its own sensed data which is then shared locally with the neighboring cameras in an iterative fashion, and a final estimate is arrived at in the network using consensus algorithms. We specifically focus on two basic problems-tracking and activity recognition. For multitarget tracking in a distributed camera network, we show how the Kalman-Consensus algorithm can be adapted to take into account the directional nature of video sensors and the network topology. For the activity recognition problem, we derive a probabilistic consensus scheme that combines the similarity scores of neighboring cameras to come up with a probability for each action at the network level. Thorough experimental results are shown on real data along with a quantitative analysis.

  5. GGOS and the combination of space geodetic techniques (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothacher, M.

    2009-09-01

    The Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) is the contribution of geodesy to a global Earth monitoring system. In particular, it provides the metrological basis and the reference systems and frames, which are crucial nowadays for all Earth observing systems. GGOS is built on the IAG Services (IGS, IVS, ILRS, IDS, IERS, IGFS, . . . ) and the products they derive on an operational basis for Earth monitoring, making use of a large variety of space and ground-based geodetic techniques such as VLBI, SLR/LLR, GNSS, DORIS, altimetry, InSAR and gravity satellite missions, gravimetry, etc. All these observation techniques are considered integral parts of GGOS, allowing the monitoring of the Earth's shape and deformation (including water surface), the Earth's orientation and rotation and the Earth's gravity field and its temporal variations with an unprecedented accuracy. GGOS, already now, is more than just an observing system. Its future vision and goal is the de- velopment of a complete chain from the acquisition, transfer and processing of a tremendous amount of observational data over the consistent combination and integration of all space geodetic techniques to the assimilation of the resulting geodetic and geophysical parameters into complex numerical models of the Earth system. This presentation will concentrate on just one part of this chain, namely the issue of a rigorous combination and integration of the various space geodetic techniques in order to obtain unique highly accurate reference frames and consistent long time series of geodetic and geophysical parameters crucial for the assessment and prediction of global change phenomena. In future, this integration should not only include geometry, but also gravimetry and, in the more distant future, even observation techniques like altimetry, InSAR and seismology. The challenges on the way to such a combination will be discussed and examples will be given for the results already achieved.

  6. Geodetic measurement of tectonic deformation in the Santa Maria Fold and Thrust Belt, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigl, Kurt L.; King, Robert W.; Jordan, Thomas H.

    1990-01-01

    Geodetic observations taken over the last 100 years were analyzed to quantify active tectonic deformations in the Santa Maria Fold and Thrust Belt (SMFTB), California. Three different types of data were combined to estimate two-dimensioanl station positions and strain rate parameters simultaneously: (1) historical triangulation from the 1880s, 1920s, and 1950s; (2) electronic distance measurement trilateration from 1971 and 1985; and (3) GPS observations from 1986 and 1987. Results imply that the SMFTB is the primary active element in transforming motion from the Coast Ranges to the western Transverse Ranges and the Santa Barbara Channel.

  7. Kinematics of the Southwestern Caribbean from New Geodetic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, G.; La Femina, P. C.; Tapia, A.; Camacho, E.; Chichaco, E.; Mora-Paez, H.; Geirsson, H.

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of the Caribbean, Cocos, Nazca, and South American plates has resulted in a complex plate boundary zone and the formation of second order tectonic blocks (e.g., the North Andean, Choco and Central America Fore Arc blocks). The Panama Region [PR], which is bounded by these plates and blocks, has been interpreted and modeled as a single tectonic block or deformed plate boundary. Previous research has defined the main boundaries: 1) The Caribbean plate subducts beneath the isthmus along the North Panama Deformed Belt, 2) The Nazca plate converges at very high obliquity with the PR and motion is assumed along a left lateral transform fault and the South Panama Deformed Belt, 3) The collision of PR with NW South America (i.e., the N. Andean and Choco blocks) has resulted in the Eastern Panama Deformed Belt, and 4) collision of the Cocos Ridge in the west is accommodated by crustal shortening, Central American Fore Arc translation and deformation across the Central Costa Rican Deformed Belt. In addition, there are several models that suggest internal deformation of this region by cross-isthmus strike-slip faults. Recent GPS observations for the PR indicates movement to the northeast relative to a stable Caribbean plate at rates of 6.9±4.0 - 7.8±4.8 mm a-1 from southern Costa Rica to eastern Panama, respectively (Kobayashi et al., 2014 and references therein). However, the GPS network did not have enough spatial density to estimate elastic strain accumulation across these faults. Recent installation and expansion of geodetic networks in southwestern Caribbean (i.e., Costa Rica, Panama, and Colombia) combined with geological and geophysical observations provide a new input to investigate crustal deformation processes in this complex tectonic setting, specifically related to the PR. We use new and existing GPS data to calculate a new velocity field for the region and to investigate the kinematics of the PR, including elastic strain accumulation on the

  8. A study of tectonic activity in the Basin-Range Province and on the San Andreas Fault. No. 3: Kinematics of Great Basin intraplate extension from earthquake, geodetic and geologic information. Final Technical Report, 15 Apr. 1981 - 31 Jan. 1986 M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eddington, P. K.

    1986-01-01

    Strain rates assessed from brittle fracture, associated with earthquakes, and total brittle-ductile deformation measured from geodetic data were compared to paleostrain from Quaternary geology for the intraplate Great Basin of the western United States. These data provide an assessment of the kinematics and mode of lithospheric extension that the western U.S. Cordillera has experienced in the last 5 to 10 million years. Strain and deformation rates were determined by the seismic moment tensor method using historic seismicity and fault plane solutions. Contemporary deformation of the Great Basin occurs principally along the active seismic zones. The earthquake related strain shows that the Great Basin is characterized by regional E-W extension at 8.4 mm/a in the north that diminishes to NW-SE extension of 3.5 mm/a in the south. Zones of maximum extension correspond to belts of shallow crust, high heat flow, and Quaternary basaltic volcanism, suggesting that these parameters are related through an effect such as a stress relaxation allowing bouyant uplift and ascension of magmas.

  9. Meditation leads to reduced default mode network activity beyond an active task.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Kathleen A; Zeffiro, Thomas A; Scheinost, Dustin; Constable, R Todd; Brewer, Judson A

    2015-09-01

    Meditation has been associated with relatively reduced activity in the default mode network, a brain network implicated in self-related thinking and mind wandering. However, previous imaging studies have typically compared meditation to rest, despite other studies having reported differences in brain activation patterns between meditators and controls at rest. Moreover, rest is associated with a range of brain activation patterns across individuals that has only recently begun to be better characterized. Therefore, in this study we compared meditation to another active cognitive task, both to replicate the findings that meditation is associated with relatively reduced default mode network activity and to extend these findings by testing whether default mode activity was reduced during meditation, beyond the typical reductions observed during effortful tasks. In addition, prior studies had used small groups, whereas in the present study we tested these hypotheses in a larger group. The results indicated that meditation is associated with reduced activations in the default mode network, relative to an active task, for meditators as compared to controls. Regions of the default mode network showing a Group × Task interaction included the posterior cingulate/precuneus and anterior cingulate cortex. These findings replicate and extend prior work indicating that the suppression of default mode processing may represent a central neural process in long-term meditation, and they suggest that meditation leads to relatively reduced default mode processing beyond that observed during another active cognitive task.

  10. Using an atmospheric turbulence model for the stochastic model of geodetic VLBI data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halsig, Sebastian; Artz, Thomas; Iddink, Andreas; Nothnagel, Axel

    2016-06-01

    Space-geodetic techniques at radio wavelength, such as global navigation satellite systems and very long baseline interferometry (VLBI), suffer from refractivity of the Earth's atmosphere. These highly dynamic processes, particularly refractivity variations in the neutral atmosphere, contribute considerably to the error budget of these space-geodetic techniques. Here, microscale fluctuations in refractivity lead to elevation-dependent uncertainties and induce physical correlations between the observations. However, up to now such correlations are not considered routinely in the stochastic model of space-geodetic observations, which leads to very optimistic standard deviations of the derived target parameters, such as Earth orientation parameters and station positions. In this study, the standard stochastic model of VLBI observations, which only includes, almost exclusively, the uncertainties from the VLBI correlation process, is now augmented by a variance-covariance matrix derived from an atmospheric turbulence model. Thus, atmospheric refractivity fluctuations in space and time can be quantified. One of the main objectives is to realize a suitable stochastic model of VLBI observations in an operational way. In order to validate the new approach, the turbulence model is applied to several VLBI observation campaigns consisting of different network geometries leading the path for the next-generation VLBI campaigns. It is shown that the stochastic model of VLBI observations can be improved by using high-frequency atmospheric variations and, thus, refining the stochastic model leads to far more realistic standard deviations of the target parameters. The baseline length repeatabilities as a general measure of accuracy of baseline length determinations improve for the turbulence-based solution. Further, this method is well suited for routine VLBI data analysis with limited computational costs.

  11. RESIF-SI : an information system to collect, archive and distribute French seismological and geodetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debayle, E. D.; Barra, P. B.; Pedersen, H. P.; Resif Working Group

    2012-04-01

    The RESIF (Réseau Sismologique Français) project aims to completely renovate the French permanent and temporary seismic and geodetic networks together with the distribution of associated data. The project has just been funded through a French EQUIPEX grant for a period of 10 years. RESIF will be a significant contribution to EPOS (European Plate Observing System) that has recently integrated into the ESFRI Roadmap. A first goal of RESIF is to build a single antenna for the observation of Earth deformation at all time scales. This presentation focus on the second task of RESIF, the information system (RESIF-SI). RESIF-SI is in charge of the validation, distribution and archiving of all French seismic and geodetic data. RESIF-SI is starting with the integration of seismic data. Integration of geodesy data should start in about three years, based on ongoing EPOS developments and the definition of new international standards. RESIF is expected to produce 20TB of seismic data per year. These data will be integrated into RESIF-SI through a distributed system which will collect, distribute and archive, French seismological and geodetic data to provide researchers with high quality data for analysis and interpretation. The RESIF-SI architecture is organized in two levels based on existing resources provided by the RESIF partners Four observatories/research laboratories (Paris, Strasbourg, Nice and Grenoble) and the CEA.will be in charge of collecting and validating seismic data. A national center, hosted by the University of Grenoble, will be in charge of archiving and distributing the data. Data from the permanent RESIF antenna will be freely available via standard request tools in real-time or near real-time via a unified French data portal and integrated into European and Worldwide data exchange systems. Data from field experiments using the RESIF portable equipment will also be freely available, with a standard distribution delay.

  12. New Geodetic Infrastructure for Australia: The NCRIS / AuScope Geospatial Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tregoning, P.; Watson, C. S.; Coleman, R.; Johnston, G.; Lovell, J.; Dickey, J.; Featherstone, W. E.; Rizos, C.; Higgins, M.; Priebbenow, R.

    2009-12-01

    In November 2006, the Australian Federal Government announced AUS15.8M in funding for geospatial research infrastructure through the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS). Funded within a broader capability area titled ‘Structure and Evolution of the Australian Continent’, NCRIS has provided a significant investment across Earth imaging, geochemistry, numerical simulation and modelling, the development of a virtual core library, and geospatial infrastructure. Known collectively as AuScope (www.auscope.org.au), this capability area has brought together Australian’s leading Earth scientists to decide upon the most pressing scientific issues and infrastructure needs for studying Earth systems and their impact on the Australian continent. Importantly and at the same time, the investment in geospatial infrastructure offers the opportunity to raise Australian geodetic science capability to the highest international level into the future. The geospatial component of AuScope builds onto the AUS15.8M of direct funding through the NCRIS process with significant in-kind and co-investment from universities and State/Territory and Federal government departments. The infrastructure to be acquired includes an FG5 absolute gravimeter, three gPhone relative gravimeters, three 12.1 m radio telescopes for geodetic VLBI, a continent-wide network of continuously operating geodetic quality GNSS receivers, a trial of a mobile SLR system and access to updated cluster computing facilities. We present an overview of the AuScope geospatial capability, review the current status of the infrastructure procurement and discuss some examples of the scientific research that will utilise the new geospatial infrastructure.

  13. Geodetic measurement of horizontal deformation across the Rio Grande rift near Socorro, New Mexico.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.; Lisowski, M.; Prescott, W.H.; Sanford, A.R.

    1980-01-01

    Trilateration surveys of a geodetic network across the Rio Grande rift near Socorro, New Mexico, in 1972, 73, 76 and 79 have failed to detect any significant strain accumulation. The surveys place an upper bound (95% confidence limit) of 1 mm/a (a = years) on EW spreading across the rift in 1972-79. There is marginal evidence from triangulation for an episode of EW spreading across the rift within the interval 1954-72. The trilateration network lies on the S flank of an uplift caused by magma intrusion into a midcrustal sill during this century according to Reilinger and Oliver. The horizontal deformation induced by sill inflation is sufficiently small that continued uplift during 1972-79 cannot be excluded by the observed absence of significant horizontal deformation.-Authors

  14. Reanalysis of CORS and Global GPS Data at the National Geodetic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohde, J. R.; Ngs Gps Reanalysis Team

    2010-12-01

    The National Geodetic Survey (NGS) has reprocessed the full history of Global Positioning System (GPS) data colledted from 1994.0 to 2010.5 for a subset of stations of the International GNSS Service (IGS) global tracking network and for stations of the U.S. Continuously Operating Reference Stations (CORS) network managed by NGS. This reprocessing effort focused on using the latest models and methodologies to accurately determine regularized positions and secular velocities for CORS relative to the International Reference Frame of 2008 (ITRF2008) and the North American Datum of 1983 (NAD83). We present a summary of the strategy for determining the stations' positions and velocities relative to ITRF2008, a discussion of the issues involved in transforming the stations' positions and velocities from ITRF2008 to NAD83, and a general discussion of the updated CORS velocity field.

  15. Network activity of mirror neurons depends on experience.

    PubMed

    Ushakov, Vadim L; Kartashov, Sergey I; Zavyalova, Victoria V; Bezverhiy, Denis D; Posichanyuk, Vladimir I; Terentev, Vasliliy N; Anokhin, Konstantin V

    2013-03-01

    In this work, the investigation of network activity of mirror neurons systems in animal brains depending on experience (existence or absence performance of the shown actions) was carried out. It carried out the research of mirror neurons network in the C57/BL6 line mice in the supervision task of swimming mice-demonstrators in Morris water maze. It showed the presence of mirror neurons systems in the motor cortex M1, M2, cingular cortex, hippocampus in mice groups, having experience of the swimming and without it. The conclusion is drawn about the possibility of the new functional network systems formation by means of mirror neurons systems and the acquisition of new knowledge through supervision by the animals in non-specific tasks.

  16. Actin network architecture can determine myosin motor activity.

    PubMed

    Reymann, Anne-Cécile; Boujemaa-Paterski, Rajaa; Martiel, Jean-Louis; Guérin, Christophe; Cao, Wenxiang; Chin, Harvey F; De La Cruz, Enrique M; Théry, Manuel; Blanchoin, Laurent

    2012-06-01

    The organization of actin filaments into higher-ordered structures governs eukaryotic cell shape and movement. Global actin network size and architecture are maintained in a dynamic steady state through regulated assembly and disassembly. Here, we used experimentally defined actin structures in vitro to investigate how the activity of myosin motors depends on network architecture. Direct visualization of filaments revealed myosin-induced actin network deformation. During this reorganization, myosins selectively contracted and disassembled antiparallel actin structures, while parallel actin bundles remained unaffected. The local distribution of nucleation sites and the resulting orientation of actin filaments appeared to regulate the scalability of the contraction process. This "orientation selection" mechanism for selective contraction and disassembly suggests how the dynamics of the cellular actin cytoskeleton can be spatially controlled by actomyosin contractility.

  17. GEODETIC ACCURACY OF LANDSAT 4 MULTISPECTRAL SCANNER AND THEMATIC MAPPER DATA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thormodsgard, June M.; DeVries, D.J.; ,

    1985-01-01

    EROS Data Center is evaluating the geodetic accuracy of Landsat-4 data from both the Multispectral Scanner (MSS) and Thematic Mapper (TM) processing systems. Geodetic accuracy is a measure of the precision of Landsat data registration to the Earth's figure. This paper describes a geodetic accuracy assessment of several MSS and TM scenes, based on the geodetic referencing information supplied on a standard Landsat 4 computer compatible tape.

  18. Dynamical state of the network determines the efficacy of single neuron properties in shaping the network activity

    PubMed Central

    Sahasranamam, Ajith; Vlachos, Ioannis; Aertsen, Ad; Kumar, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Spike patterns are among the most common electrophysiological descriptors of neuron types. Surprisingly, it is not clear how the diversity in firing patterns of the neurons in a network affects its activity dynamics. Here, we introduce the state-dependent stochastic bursting neuron model allowing for a change in its firing patterns independent of changes in its input-output firing rate relationship. Using this model, we show that the effect of single neuron spiking on the network dynamics is contingent on the network activity state. While spike bursting can both generate and disrupt oscillations, these patterns are ineffective in large regions of the network state space in changing the network activity qualitatively. Finally, we show that when single-neuron properties are made dependent on the population activity, a hysteresis like dynamics emerges. This novel phenomenon has important implications for determining the network response to time-varying inputs and for the network sensitivity at different operating points. PMID:27212008

  19. 3D Filament Network Segmentation with Multiple Active Contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ting; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Huang, Xiaolei

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is frequently used to study two and three dimensional network structures formed by cytoskeletal polymer fibers such as actin filaments and microtubules. While these cytoskeletal structures are often dilute enough to allow imaging of individual filaments or bundles of them, quantitative analysis of these images is challenging. To facilitate quantitative, reproducible and objective analysis of the image data, we developed a semi-automated method to extract actin networks and retrieve their topology in 3D. Our method uses multiple Stretching Open Active Contours (SOACs) that are automatically initialized at image intensity ridges and then evolve along the centerlines of filaments in the network. SOACs can merge, stop at junctions, and reconfigure with others to allow smooth crossing at junctions of filaments. The proposed approach is generally applicable to images of curvilinear networks with low SNR. We demonstrate its potential by extracting the centerlines of synthetic meshwork images, actin networks in 2D TIRF Microscopy images, and 3D actin cable meshworks of live fission yeast cells imaged by spinning disk confocal microscopy.

  20. Optimal stimulus scheduling for active estimation of evoked brain networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafashan, MohammadMehdi; Ching, ShiNung

    2015-12-01

    Objective. We consider the problem of optimal probing to learn connections in an evoked dynamic network. Such a network, in which each edge measures an input-output relationship between sites in sensor/actuator-space, is relevant to emerging applications in neural mapping and neural connectivity estimation. Approach. We show that the problem of scheduling nodes to a probe (i.e., stimulate) amounts to a problem of optimal sensor scheduling. Main results. By formulating the evoked network in state-space, we show that the solution to the greedy probing strategy has a convenient form and, under certain conditions, is optimal over a finite horizon. We adopt an expectation maximization technique to update the state-space parameters in an online fashion and demonstrate the efficacy of the overall approach in a series of detailed numerical examples. Significance. The proposed method provides a principled means to actively probe time-varying connections in neuronal networks. The overall method can be implemented in real time and is particularly well-suited to applications in stimulation-based cortical mapping in which the underlying network dynamics are changing over time.

  1. 3D Actin Network Centerline Extraction with Multiple Active Contours

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ting; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Huang, Xiaolei

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is frequently used to study two and three dimensional network structures formed by cytoskeletal polymer fibers such as actin filaments and actin cables. While these cytoskeletal structures are often dilute enough to allow imaging of individual filaments or bundles of them, quantitative analysis of these images is challenging. To facilitate quantitative, reproducible and objective analysis of the image data, we propose a semi-automated method to extract actin networks and retrieve their topology in 3D. Our method uses multiple Stretching Open Active Contours (SOACs) that are automatically initialized at image intensity ridges and then evolve along the centerlines of filaments in the network. SOACs can merge, stop at junctions, and reconfigure with others to allow smooth crossing at junctions of filaments. The proposed approach is generally applicable to images of curvilinear networks with low SNR. We demonstrate its potential by extracting the centerlines of synthetic meshwork images, actin networks in 2D Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy images, and 3D actin cable meshworks of live fission yeast cells imaged by spinning disk confocal microscopy. Quantitative evaluation of the method using synthetic images shows that for images with SNR above 5.0, the average vertex error measured by the distance between our result and ground truth is 1 voxel, and the average Hausdorff distance is below 10 voxels. PMID:24316442

  2. The Seismic Broad Band Western Mediterranean (wm) Network and the Obs Fomar Pool: Current state and Obs activities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazos, Antonio; Davila, Jose Martin; Buforn, Elisa; Bezzeghoud, Mourad; Harnafi, Mimoun; Mattesini, Mauricio; Caldeira, Bento; Hanka, Winfried; El Moudnib, Lahcen; Strollo, Angelo; Roca, Antoni; Lopez de Mesa, Mireya; Dahm, Torsten; Cabieces, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The Western Mediterranean (WM) seismic network started in 1996 as an initiative of the Royal Spanish Navy Observatory (ROA) and the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), with the collaboration of the GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ) of Potsdam. A first broad band seismic station (SFUC) was installed close to Cádiz (South Spain). Since then, additional stations have been installed in the Ibero-Moghrebian region. In 2005, the "WM" code was assigned by the FDSN and new partners were jointed: Evora University (UEVO, Portugal), the Scientifique Institute of Rabat (ISRABAT, Morocco), and GFZ. Now days, the WM network is composed by 15 BB stations, all of them with Streckaisen STS-2 or STS-2.5 sensors, Quanterra or Earthdata digitizers and SeiscomP. Most them have co-installed a permanent geodetic GPS stations, and some them also have an accelerometer. There are 10 stations deployed in Spanish territory (5 in the Iberian peninsula, 1 in Balearic islands and 4 in North Africa Spanish places) with VSAT or Internet communications, 2 in Portugal (one of them without real time), and 3 in Morocco (2 VSAT and 1 ADSL). Additionally, 2 more stations (one in South Spain and one in Morocco) will be installed along this year. Additionally ROA has deployed a permanent real time VBB (CMG-3T: 360s) station at the Alboran Island. Due to the fact that part of the seismic activity is located at marine areas, and also because of the poor geographic azimuthal coverage at some zones provided by the land stations (specially in the SW of the San Vicente Cape area), ROA and UCM have acquired six broad band "LOBSTERN" OBS, manufactured by KUM (Kiel, Germany), conforming the OBS FOMAR pool. Three of them with CMG-40T sensor and the other with Trillium 120. These OBS were deployed along the Gibraltar strait since January to November 2014 to study the microseismicity in the Gibraltar strait area. In September 2015 FOMAR network has been deployed in SW of the San Vicente Cape for 8 months as a part of

  3. Strategies for Space-Geodetic Monitoring of Infraseismic and Subseismic Transient Deformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Thomas H.

    1996-01-01

    The utility of space-geodetic data in elucidating infraseismic and subseismic phenomena is assessed. Existing seismological, geodetic, and other data to characterize the distribution of infraseismic and subseismic transients are used. Strategies for space-geodetic monitoring of infraseismic and subseismic transients along major plate boundaries are developed.

  4. Amyloid beta modulation of neuronal network activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Charkhkar, Hamid; Meyyappan, Susheela; Matveeva, Evgenia; Moll, Jonathan R; McHail, Daniel G; Peixoto, Nathalia; Cliff, Richard O; Pancrazio, Joseph J

    2015-12-10

    In vitro assays offer a means of screening potential therapeutics and accelerating the drug development process. Here, we utilized neuronal cultures on planar microelectrode arrays (MEA) as a functional assay to assess the neurotoxicity of amyloid-β 1-42 (Aβ42), a biomolecule implicated in the Alzheimer׳s disease (AD). In this approach, neurons harvested from embryonic mice were seeded on the substrate-integrated microelectrode arrays. The cultured neurons form a spontaneously active network, and the spiking activity as a functional endpoint could be detected via the MEA. Aβ42 oligomer, but not monomer, significantly reduced network spike rate. In addition, we demonstrated that the ionotropic glutamate receptors, NMDA and AMPA/kainate, play a role in the effects of Aβ42 on neuronal activity in vitro. To examine the utility of the MEA-based assay for AD drug discovery, we tested two model therapeutics for AD, methylene blue (MB) and memantine. Our results show an almost full recovery in the activity within 24h after administration of Aβ42 in the cultures pre-treated with either MB or memantine. Our findings suggest that cultured neuronal networks may be a useful platform in screening potential therapeutics for Aβ induced changes in neurological function.

  5. Amyloid beta modulation of neuronal network activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Charkhkar, Hamid; Meyyappan, Susheela; Matveeva, Evgenia; Moll, Jonathan R; McHail, Daniel G; Peixoto, Nathalia; Cliff, Richard O; Pancrazio, Joseph J

    2015-12-10

    In vitro assays offer a means of screening potential therapeutics and accelerating the drug development process. Here, we utilized neuronal cultures on planar microelectrode arrays (MEA) as a functional assay to assess the neurotoxicity of amyloid-β 1-42 (Aβ42), a biomolecule implicated in the Alzheimer׳s disease (AD). In this approach, neurons harvested from embryonic mice were seeded on the substrate-integrated microelectrode arrays. The cultured neurons form a spontaneously active network, and the spiking activity as a functional endpoint could be detected via the MEA. Aβ42 oligomer, but not monomer, significantly reduced network spike rate. In addition, we demonstrated that the ionotropic glutamate receptors, NMDA and AMPA/kainate, play a role in the effects of Aβ42 on neuronal activity in vitro. To examine the utility of the MEA-based assay for AD drug discovery, we tested two model therapeutics for AD, methylene blue (MB) and memantine. Our results show an almost full recovery in the activity within 24h after administration of Aβ42 in the cultures pre-treated with either MB or memantine. Our findings suggest that cultured neuronal networks may be a useful platform in screening potential therapeutics for Aβ induced changes in neurological function. PMID:26453830

  6. COMMUNICATION: Neuron network activity scales exponentially with synapse density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, G. J.; Boehler, M. D.; Pearson, R. A.; DeMaris, A. A.; Ide, A. N.; Wheeler, B. C.

    2009-02-01

    Neuronal network output in the cortex as a function of synapse density during development has not been explicitly determined. Synaptic scaling in cortical brain networks seems to alter excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs to produce a representative rate of synaptic output. Here, we cultured rat hippocampal neurons over a three-week period to correlate synapse density with the increase in spontaneous spiking activity. We followed the network development as synapse formation and spike rate in two serum-free media optimized for either (a) neuron survival (Neurobasal/B27) or (b) spike rate (NbActiv4). We found that while synaptophysin synapse density increased linearly with development, spike rates increased exponentially in developing neuronal networks. Synaptic receptor components NR1, GluR1 and GABA-A also increase linearly but with more excitatory receptors than inhibitory. These results suggest that the brain's information processing capability gains more from increasing connectivity of the processing units than increasing processing units, much as Internet information flow increases much faster than the linear number of nodes and connections.

  7. Neuron network activity scales exponentially with synapse density.

    PubMed

    Brewer, G J; Boehler, M D; Pearson, R A; DeMaris, A A; Ide, A N; Wheeler, B C

    2009-02-01

    Neuronal network output in the cortex as a function of synapse density during development has not been explicitly determined. Synaptic scaling in cortical brain networks seems to alter excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs to produce a representative rate of synaptic output. Here, we cultured rat hippocampal neurons over a three-week period to correlate synapse density with the increase in spontaneous spiking activity. We followed the network development as synapse formation and spike rate in two serum-free media optimized for either (a) neuron survival (Neurobasal/B27) or (b) spike rate (NbActiv4). We found that while synaptophysin synapse density increased linearly with development, spike rates increased exponentially in developing neuronal networks. Synaptic receptor components NR1, GluR1 and GABA-A also increase linearly but with more excitatory receptors than inhibitory. These results suggest that the brain's information processing capability gains more from increasing connectivity of the processing units than increasing processing units, much as Internet information flow increases much faster than the linear number of nodes and connections. PMID:19104141

  8. Lunar Resource Mapper/Lunar Geodetic Scout program status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, Mike

    1992-01-01

    Information is given in viewgraph form on the Lunar Resource Mapper/Lunar Geodetic Scout (LRM/LGS) program status. Topics covered include the LEXWG Lunar Observer science measurement priorities, space exploration initiative priorities, the question of why a lunar orbiting mission is attractive to the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), instrument selection, major milestones, and the organization of the LRM/LGS Program Office.

  9. Coastal sea level measurements using a single geodetic GPS receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Kristine M.; Löfgren, Johan S.; Haas, Rüdiger

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a method to derive local sea level variations using data from a single geodetic-quality Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receiver using GPS (Global Positioning System) signals. This method is based on multipath theory for specular reflections and the use of Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) data. The technique could be valuable for altimeter calibration and validation. Data from two test sites, a dedicated GPS tide gauge at the Onsala Space Observatory (OSO) in Sweden and the Friday Harbor GPS site of the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) in USA, are analyzed. The sea level results are compared to independently observed sea level data from nearby and in situ tide gauges. For OSO, the Root-Mean-Square (RMS) agreement is better than 5 cm, while it is in the order of 10 cm for Friday Harbor. The correlation coefficients are better than 0.97 for both sites. For OSO, the SNR-based results are also compared with results from a geodetic analysis of GPS data of a two receivers/antennae tide gauge installation. The SNR-based analysis results in a slightly worse RMS agreement with respect to the independent tide gauge data than the geodetic analysis (4.8 cm and 4.0 cm, respectively). However, it provides results even for rough sea surface conditions when the two receivers/antennae installation no longer records the necessary data for a geodetic analysis.

  10. A 3-D Multilateration: A Precision Geodetic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escobal, P. R.; Fliegel, H. F.; Jaffe, R. M.; Muller, P. M.; Ong, K. M.; Vonroos, O. H.

    1972-01-01

    A system was designed with the capability of determining 1-cm accuracy station positions in three dimensions using pulsed laser earth satellite tracking stations coupled with strictly geometric data reduction. With this high accuracy, several crucial geodetic applications become possible, including earthquake hazards assessment, precision surveying, plate tectonics, and orbital determination.

  11. Geodetic monitoring of tectonic deformation: Toward a strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Issues of interest and importance to society and science are presented. The problems considered are of national concern; their solutions may contribute to a better understanding of tectonic deformation and earthquake hazards. The need for additional field data, the role of geodetic measurements, the importance of both ground and space techniques, and the need for advanced instrumentation development are discussed.

  12. G-larmS: An Infrastructure for Geodetic Earthquake Early Warning, applied to Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johanson, I. A.; Grapenthin, R.; Allen, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Integrating geodetic data into seismic earthquake early warning (EEW) is critical for accurately resolving magnitude and finite fault dimensions in the very largest earthquakes (M>7). We have developed G-larmS, the Geodetic alarm System, as part of our efforts to incorporate geodetic data into EEW for Northern California. G-larmS is an extensible geodetic EEW infrastructure that analyzes positioning time series from real-time GPS processors, such as TrackRT or RTNET. It is currently running in an operational mode at the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory (BSL) where we use TrackRT to produce high sample rate displacement time series for 62 GPS stations in the greater San Francisco Bay Area with 3-4 second latency. We employ a fully triangulated network scheme, which provides resiliency against an outage or telemetry loss at any individual station, for a total of 165 basestation-rover pairs. G-larmS is tightly integrated into seismic alarm systems (CISN ShakeAlert, ElarmS) as it uses their P-wave detection alarms to trigger its own processing and sends warning messages back to the ShakeAlert decision module. Once triggered, G-larmS estimates the static offset at each station pair and inputs these into an inversion for fault slip, which is updated once per second. The software architecture and clear interface definitions of this Python implementation enable straightforward extensibility and exchange of specific algorithms that operate in the individual modules. For example, multiple modeling instances can be called in parallel, each of which applying a different strategy to infer fault and magnitude information (e.g., pre-defined fault planes, full grid search, least squares inversion, etc.). This design enables, for example, quick tests, expansion and algorithm comparisons. Here, we present the setup and report results of the first months of operation in Northern California. This includes analysis of system latencies, noise, and G-larmS' response to actual events. We

  13. Estimation of rod scale errors in geodetic leveling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Craymer, Michael R.; Vaníček, Petr; Castle, Robert O.

    1995-01-01

    Comparisons among repeated geodetic levelings have often been used for detecting and estimating residual rod scale errors in leveled heights. Individual rod-pair scale errors are estimated by a two-step procedure using a model based on either differences in heights, differences in section height differences, or differences in section tilts. It is shown that the estimated rod-pair scale errors derived from each model are identical only when the data are correctly weighted, and the mathematical correlations are accounted for in the model based on heights. Analyses based on simple regressions of changes in height versus height can easily lead to incorrect conclusions. We also show that the statistically estimated scale errors are not a simple function of height, height difference, or tilt. The models are valid only when terrain slope is constant over adjacent pairs of setups (i.e., smoothly varying terrain). In order to discriminate between rod scale errors and vertical displacements due to crustal motion, the individual rod-pairs should be used in more than one leveling, preferably in areas of contrasting tectonic activity. From an analysis of 37 separately calibrated rod-pairs used in 55 levelings in southern California, we found eight statistically significant coefficients that could be reasonably attributed to rod scale errors, only one of which was larger than the expected random error in the applied calibration-based scale correction. However, significant differences with other independent checks indicate that caution should be exercised before accepting these results as evidence of scale error. Further refinements of the technique are clearly needed if the results are to be routinely applied in practice.

  14. Active transport and cluster formation on 2D networks.

    PubMed

    Greulich, P; Santen, L

    2010-06-01

    We introduce a model for active transport on inhomogeneous networks embedded in a diffusive environment which is motivated by vesicular transport on actin filaments. In the presence of a hard-core interaction, particle clusters are observed that exhibit an algebraically decaying distribution in a large parameter regime, indicating the existence of clusters on all scales. The scale-free behavior can be understood by a mechanism promoting preferential attachment of particles to large clusters. The results are compared with a diffusion-limited aggregation model and active transport on a regular network. For both models we observe aggregation of particles to clusters which are characterized by a finite size scale if the relevant time scales and particle densities are considered. PMID:20556462

  15. Broken Detailed Balance of Filament Dynamics in Active Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladrow, J.; Fakhri, N.; MacKintosh, F. C.; Schmidt, C. F.; Broedersz, C. P.

    2016-06-01

    Myosin motor proteins drive vigorous steady-state fluctuations in the actin cytoskeleton of cells. Endogenous embedded semiflexible filaments such as microtubules, or added filaments such as single-walled carbon nanotubes are used as novel tools to noninvasively track equilibrium and nonequilibrium fluctuations in such biopolymer networks. Here, we analytically calculate shape fluctuations of semiflexible probe filaments in a viscoelastic environment, driven out of equilibrium by motor activity. Transverse bending fluctuations of the probe filaments can be decomposed into dynamic normal modes. We find that these modes no longer evolve independently under nonequilibrium driving. This effective mode coupling results in nonzero circulatory currents in a conformational phase space, reflecting a violation of detailed balance. We present predictions for the characteristic frequencies associated with these currents and investigate how the temporal signatures of motor activity determine mode correlations, which we find to be consistent with recent experiments on microtubules embedded in cytoskeletal networks.

  16. Time-resolved microrheology of actively remodeling actomyosin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Marina Soares e.; Stuhrmann, Björn; Betz, Timo; Koenderink, Gijsje H.

    2014-07-01

    Living cells constitute an extraordinary state of matter since they are inherently out of thermal equilibrium due to internal metabolic processes. Indeed, measurements of particle motion in the cytoplasm of animal cells have revealed clear signatures of nonthermal fluctuations superposed on passive thermal motion. However, it has been difficult to pinpoint the exact molecular origin of this activity. Here, we employ time-resolved microrheology based on particle tracking to measure nonequilibrium fluctuations produced by myosin motor proteins in a minimal model system composed of purified actin filaments and myosin motors. We show that the motors generate spatially heterogeneous contractile fluctuations, which become less frequent with time as a consequence of motor-driven network remodeling. We analyze the particle tracking data on different length scales, combining particle image velocimetry, an ensemble analysis of the particle trajectories, and finally a kymograph analysis of individual particle trajectories to quantify the length and time scales associated with active particle displacements. All analyses show clear signatures of nonequilibrium activity: the particles exhibit random motion with an enhanced amplitude compared to passive samples, and they exhibit sporadic contractile fluctuations with ballistic motion over large (up to 30 μm) distances. This nonequilibrium activity diminishes with sample age, even though the adenosine triphosphate level is held constant. We propose that network coarsening concentrates motors in large clusters and depletes them from the network, thus reducing the occurrence of contractile fluctuations. Our data provide valuable insight into the physical processes underlying stress generation within motor-driven actin networks and the analysis framework may prove useful for future microrheology studies in cells and model organisms.

  17. First geodetic VLBI sessions with the Chinese Deep Space Stations Jiamusi and Kashi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dezhen; Dong, Guangliang; Wang, Guangli; Li, Haitao; Jiang, Wu

    2016-11-01

    The first three 24-h S/X dual-band geodetic VLBI sessions using two new Chinese Deep Space Stations (CDSSs), Jiamusi and Kashi, and four Chinese VLBI Stations (CVSs), Beijing, Kunming, Seshan, and Urumqi were conducted with the goal of improving the two CDSSs' positions, which were previously known to a few decimeters. Due to the limited frequency ranges of Jiamusi and Kashi, different but compatible frequencies for bandwidth synthesis were set at the CDSS and CVS stations. This paper presents the scheduling, correlation and fringe fit, and geodetic analysis of the observations. Final estimates of the station positions are obtained from the global solution using 5365 international VLBI sessions from August 3, 1979 through September 29, 2015. Position estimates for Jiamusi are accurate to 23, 35, and 41 mm in the X, Y, and Z directions, respectively, and for Kashi are accurate to 10, 20, and 16 mm. Precisions of the two CDSSs' positions are improved by a factor of 5-10 over previous values, which fully satisfies the requirements of the experiments and makes the first step towards the foundation and maintenance of the time-space reference frame based on the Chinese Deep Space Network (CDSN).

  18. Initial Results Obtained with the First TWIN VLBI Radio Telescope at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell.

    PubMed

    Schüler, Torben; Kronschnabl, Gerhard; Plötz, Christian; Neidhardt, Alexander; Bertarini, Alessandra; Bernhart, Simone; la Porta, Laura; Halsig, Sebastian; Nothnagel, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) uses radio telescopes as sensor networks to determine Earth orientation parameters and baseline vectors between the telescopes. The TWIN Telescope Wettzell 1 (TTW1), the first of the new 13.2 m diameter telescope pair at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell, Germany, is currently in its commissioning phase. The technology behind this radio telescope including the receiving system and the tri-band feed horn is depicted. Since VLBI telescopes must operate at least in pairs, the existing 20 m diameter Radio Telescope Wettzell (RTW) is used together with TTW1 for practical tests. In addition, selected long baseline setups are investigated. Correlation results portraying the data quality achieved during first initial experiments are discussed. Finally, the local 123 m baseline between the old RTW telescope and the new TTW1 is analyzed and compared with an existing high-precision local survey. Our initial results are very satisfactory for X-band group delays featuring a 3D distance agreement between VLBI data analysis and local ties of 1 to 2 mm in the majority of the experiments. However, S-band data, which suffer much from local radio interference due to WiFi and mobile communications, are about 10 times less precise than X-band data and require further analysis, but evidence is provided that S-band data are well-usable over long baselines where local radio interference patterns decorrelate. PMID:26263991

  19. Initial Results Obtained with the First TWIN VLBI Radio Telescope at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell

    PubMed Central

    Schüler, Torben; Kronschnabl, Gerhard; Plötz, Christian; Neidhardt, Alexander; Bertarini, Alessandra; Bernhart, Simone; la Porta, Laura; Halsig, Sebastian; Nothnagel, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) uses radio telescopes as sensor networks to determine Earth orientation parameters and baseline vectors between the telescopes. The TWIN Telescope Wettzell 1 (TTW1), the first of the new 13.2 m diameter telescope pair at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell, Germany, is currently in its commissioning phase. The technology behind this radio telescope including the receiving system and the tri-band feed horn is depicted. Since VLBI telescopes must operate at least in pairs, the existing 20 m diameter Radio Telescope Wettzell (RTW) is used together with TTW1 for practical tests. In addition, selected long baseline setups are investigated. Correlation results portraying the data quality achieved during first initial experiments are discussed. Finally, the local 123 m baseline between the old RTW telescope and the new TTW1 is analyzed and compared with an existing high-precision local survey. Our initial results are very satisfactory for X-band group delays featuring a 3D distance agreement between VLBI data analysis and local ties of 1 to 2 mm in the majority of the experiments. However, S-band data, which suffer much from local radio interference due to WiFi and mobile communications, are about 10 times less precise than X-band data and require further analysis, but evidence is provided that S-band data are well-usable over long baselines where local radio interference patterns decorrelate. PMID:26263991

  20. Initial Results Obtained with the First TWIN VLBI Radio Telescope at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell.

    PubMed

    Schüler, Torben; Kronschnabl, Gerhard; Plötz, Christian; Neidhardt, Alexander; Bertarini, Alessandra; Bernhart, Simone; la Porta, Laura; Halsig, Sebastian; Nothnagel, Axel

    2015-07-30

    Geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) uses radio telescopes as sensor networks to determine Earth orientation parameters and baseline vectors between the telescopes. The TWIN Telescope Wettzell 1 (TTW1), the first of the new 13.2 m diameter telescope pair at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell, Germany, is currently in its commissioning phase. The technology behind this radio telescope including the receiving system and the tri-band feed horn is depicted. Since VLBI telescopes must operate at least in pairs, the existing 20 m diameter Radio Telescope Wettzell (RTW) is used together with TTW1 for practical tests. In addition, selected long baseline setups are investigated. Correlation results portraying the data quality achieved during first initial experiments are discussed. Finally, the local 123 m baseline between the old RTW telescope and the new TTW1 is analyzed and compared with an existing high-precision local survey. Our initial results are very satisfactory for X-band group delays featuring a 3D distance agreement between VLBI data analysis and local ties of 1 to 2 mm in the majority of the experiments. However, S-band data, which suffer much from local radio interference due to WiFi and mobile communications, are about 10 times less precise than X-band data and require further analysis, but evidence is provided that S-band data are well-usable over long baselines where local radio interference patterns decorrelate.

  1. Geodetic leveling data used to define historical height changes between Tonopah Junction and Las Vegas, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, T.D.

    1992-12-31

    This report documents geodetic leveling data for a survey route following US Highway 95 from Tonopah Junction, approximately 50 km west of Tonopah, Nevada, to Las Vegas, Nevada. The survey route passes immediately south of the potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada. Comparisons among the results of the several repeated levelings along this survey route provide a partial basis for evaluating contemporary crustal deformation patterns in the vicinity of the Yucca Mountain site and the relation between any such deformation and geologic structures known or suspected to have been active during Quaternary time.

  2. Meditation leads to reduced default mode network activity beyond an active task

    PubMed Central

    Garrison, Kathleen A.; Zeffiro, Thomas A.; Scheinost, Dustin; Constable, R. Todd; Brewer, Judson A.

    2015-01-01

    Meditation has been associated with relatively reduced activity in the default mode network, a brain network implicated in self-related thinking and mind wandering. However, previous imaging studies have typically compared meditation to rest despite other studies reporting differences in brain activation patterns between meditators and controls at rest. Moreover, rest is associated with a range of brain activation patterns across individuals that has only recently begun to be better characterized. Therefore, this study compared meditation to another active cognitive task, both to replicate findings that meditation is associated with relatively reduced default mode network activity, and to extend these findings by testing whether default mode activity was reduced during meditation beyond the typical reductions observed during effortful tasks. In addition, prior studies have used small groups, whereas the current study tested these hypotheses in a larger group. Results indicate that meditation is associated with reduced activations in the default mode network relative to an active task in meditators compared to controls. Regions of the default mode showing a group by task interaction include the posterior cingulate/precuneus and anterior cingulate cortex. These findings replicate and extend prior work indicating that suppression of default mode processing may represent a central neural process in long-term meditation, and suggest that meditation leads to relatively reduced default mode processing beyond that observed during another active cognitive task. PMID:25904238

  3. Energy-aware Activity Classification using Wearable Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bo; Montoye, Alexander; Moore, Rebecca; Pfeiffer, Karin; Biswas, Subir

    2013-05-29

    This paper presents implementation details, system characterization, and the performance of a wearable sensor network that was designed for human activity analysis. Specific machine learning mechanisms are implemented for recognizing a target set of activities with both out-of-body and on-body processing arrangements. Impacts of energy consumption by the on-body sensors are analyzed in terms of activity detection accuracy for out-of-body processing. Impacts of limited processing abilities for the on-body scenario are also characterized in terms of detection accuracy, by varying the background processing load in the sensor units. Impacts of varying number of sensors in terms of activity classification accuracy are also evaluated. Through a rigorous systems study, it is shown that an efficient human activity analytics system can be designed and operated even under energy and processing constraints of tiny on-body wearable sensors.

  4. Ultrananocrystalline diamond thin films functionalized with therapeutically active collagen networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Chen, M.; Bruno, P.; Lam, R.; Robinson, E.; Gruen, D.; Ho, D.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ.

    2009-01-01

    The fabrication of biologically amenable interfaces in medicine bridges translational technologies with their surrounding biological environment. Functionalized nanomaterials catalyze this coalescence through the creation of biomimetic and active substrates upon which a spectrum of therapeutic elements can be delivered to adherent cells to address biomolecular processes in cancer, inflammation, etc. Here, we demonstrate the robust functionalization of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) with type I collagen and dexamethasone (Dex), an anti-inflammatory drug, to fabricate a hybrid therapeutically active substrate for localized drug delivery. UNCD oxidation coupled with a pH-mediated collagen adsorption process generated a comprehensive interface between the two materials, and subsequent Dex integration, activity, and elution were confirmed through inflammatory gene expression assays. These studies confer a translational relevance to the biofunctionalized UNCD in its role as an active therapeutic network for potent regulation of cellular activity toward applications in nanomedicine.

  5. An Autonomous, Low Cost Platform for Seafloor Geodetic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ericksen, T.; Foster, J. H.; Bingham, B. S.; Oshiro, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Pacific GPS Facility and the Field Robotics Laboratory at the University of Hawaii have developed an approach to significantly reduce costs below ship based methods of accurately measuring short-term vertical motions of the seafloor and maintaining a continuous long-term record of seafloor pressure. Our goal has been to reduce the primary barrier preventing us from acquiring the observations we need to understand geodetic processes, and the hazards they present, at subduction zones, submarine volcanoes, and subsea landslides. To this end, we have designed a payload package for one of the University of Hawaii Wave Gliders which incorporates an acoustic telemetry package, a dual frequency geodetic-grade Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, meteorological sensors, processing computer, and cellular communications. The Wave Glider will interrogate high accuracy pressure sensors on the seafloor to maintain a near-continuous stream of pressure and temperature data. The seafloor geodetic monument seats a sensor capable of recording pressure, temperature, and sound velocity for a deployment duration of over 5 years with an acoustic modem for communications, and an integral acoustic release for recovery and replacement of batteries. The design of the geodetic monument allows for precise repositioning of the sensor to extend the pressure record beyond a single 5+ year deployment, and includes the capability to install a mobile pressure recorder for calibration of the linear drift of the continuous pressure sensor. We will present the design of the Wave Glider payload and seafloor geodetic monument, as well as a discussion of nearshore and offshore field tests and operational procedures. An assessment of our ability to determine cm-scale vertical seafloor motions will be made by integrating the seafloor pressure measurements recovered during field testing with independent measurements of sea surface pressure and sea surface height made by the sea surface payload.

  6. Comparison of Geodetic and Late Pleistocene Slip Rates for the Southern Dead Sea Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, W. J.; Gomez, F.; Abu Rajab, J. S.; Al-Tarazi, E.

    2012-12-01

    Comparisons of short-term (geodetic) and Late Quaternary slip rates have been used to assess time-variable fault kinematics along various active faults, globally. Differences between such types slip rates may have implications for crustal rheology and/or temporal variations in plate motion. This research aims to compare the geodetically-derived slip rates with slip rates based on Late Pleistocene landforms along the southern Dead Sea fault system (DSFS). The DSFS is an active, left-lateral transform that accommodates differential movement between the Arabian and Sinai plates. A number of slip rates have been previously reported ranging from 2 to 6mm/yr. However, comparison of various slip rates requires ensuring that associated uncertainties are assessed using a standard. New GPS velocities from Jordan are combined with other available GPS data, and are used to model slip rates using elastic block models. Resulting slip rates are 4.3 to 5.3 mm/yr with fault locking depths of 8 - 15 km. Late Pleistocene rates are assessed from published observations, as well as new data. New mapping of offset alluvial fans in the southern Wadi Araba was facilitated by multi-spectral imagery and high-resolution digital elevation model. These fans correlate with regional aggradation events, with the resulting Late Pleistocene slip rates ranging from 4.2 to 5.1 mm/yr. Statistically, the geodetic and neotectonic slip rates are identical. Additionally, a 3-dimensional slip vector for the last earthquake in the northern Wadi Araba is constructed using close-range photogrammetry of a faulted Byzantine aqueduct that indicates both horizontal and vertical displacements. Previous studies suggested characteristic earthquake slip, so slip rates and this slip vector provide a means of assessing mean EQ recurrence interval, as well as the role of earthquakes in constructing the long-term topography along this part of the transform.

  7. A study of epidemic spreading on activity-driven networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yijiang; Deng, Weibing; Li, Wei; Cai, Xu

    2016-03-01

    The epidemic spreading was explored on activity-driven networks (ADNs), accounting for the study of dynamics both on and of the ADN. By employing the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) model, two aspects were considered: (1) the infection rate of susceptible agent (depending on the number of its infected neighbors) evolves due to the temporal structure of ADN, rather than being a constant number; (2) the susceptible and infected agents generate unequal links while being activated, namely, the susceptible agent gets few contacts with others in order to protect itself. Results show that, in both cases, the larger epidemic threshold and smaller outbreak size were obtained.

  8. A neural network model for olfactory glomerular activity prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, Zu; Tsuji, Toshio; Takiguchi, Noboru; Ohtake, Hisao

    2012-12-01

    Recently, the importance of odors and methods for their evaluation have seen increased emphasis, especially in the fragrance and food industries. Although odors can be characterized by their odorant components, their chemical information cannot be directly related to the flavors we perceive. Biological research has revealed that neuronal activity related to glomeruli (which form part of the olfactory system) is closely connected to odor qualities. Here we report on a neural network model of the olfactory system that can predict glomerular activity from odorant molecule structures. We also report on the learning and prediction ability of the proposed model.

  9. Tera-node Network Technology (TASK 4) Network Infrastructure Activities (NIA) final report

    SciTech Connect

    Postel, John; Bannister, Joe

    2000-03-15

    The TNT project developed software technologies in scalable personal telecommunications (SPT), Reservation Protocol 2 (RSVP2), Scalable Computing Infrastructure (SCOPE), and Network Infrastructure Activities (NIA). SPT = developed many innovative protocols to support the use of videoconferencing applications on the Internet. RSVP2 = developed a new reference model and further standardization of RSVP. SCOPE = developed dynamic resource discovery techniques and distributed directory services in support of resource allocation for large distributed systems and computations. NIA = provided policy, operational, and support to the transitioning Internet.

  10. Geodetic slip rate estimates for the Alhama de Murcia and Carboneras faults in the SE Betics, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazaradze, Giorgi; Echeverria, Anna; Masana, Eulàlia

    2016-04-01

    The Alhama de Murcia and the Carboneras faults are the most prominent geologic structures within the Eastern Betic Shear Zone (EBSZ), located in SE Spain. Using continuous and campaign GPS observations conducted during the last decade, we were able to confirm the continuing tectonic activity of these faults by quantifying their geodetic slip-rates and comparing the estimated values with the geological (including paleoseismological) observations. We find that the bulk of the observed deformation is concentrated around the Alhama de Murcia (AMF) and the Palomares (PF) faults. The geodetic horizontal slip rate (reverse-sinistral) of 1.5±0.3 mm/yr calculated for the AMF and PF fault system is in good agreement with geological observations at the AMF, as well as, the focal mechanism of the 2011 Lorca earthquake, suggesting a main role of the AMF. We also find that the geodetic slip rate of the Carboneras fault zone (CFZ) is almost purely sinistral strike-slip with a rate of 1.3±0.2 mm/yr along N48° direction, very similar to 1.1 mm/yr geologic slip-rate, estimated from recent onshore and offshore paleoseismic and geomorphologic studies. The fact the geodetic and the geologic slip-rates are similar at the AMF and CF faults, suggests that both faults have been tectonically active since Quaternary, slipping at approximately at constant rate of 1.1 to 1.8 mm/yr. Since the existing GPS data cannot discern whether the CFZ is slipping seismically or aseismically, we have intended to relate the on-going seismic activity to the slip-rates estimated using GPS. For this reason we compared seismic and geodetic strain rates, where the latter are larger than seismic strain rates, suggesting the presence of aseismic processes in the area. Nevertheless, due to the large earthquake recurrence intervals, we may be underestimating the seismic strain rates. The direction of the P and T average stress axes are in good agreement with geodetic principal strain rate axes. To summarize, in

  11. PersonA: Persuasive social network for physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Ayubi, Soleh U; Parmanto, Bambang

    2012-01-01

    Advances in physical activity (PA) monitoring devices provide ample opportunities for innovations in the way the information produced by these devices is used to encourage people to have more active lifestyles. One such innovation is expanding the current use of the information from self-management to social support. We developed a Persuasive social network for physical Activity (PersonA) that combines automatic input of physical activity data, a smartphone, and a social networking system (SNS). This paper describes the motivation for and overarching design of the PersonA and its functional and non-functional features. PersonA is designed to intelligently and automatically receive raw PA data from the sensors in the smartphone, calculate the data into meaningful PA information, store the information on a secure server, and show the information to the users as persuasive and real-time feedbacks or publish the information to the SNS to generate social support. The implementation of self-monitoring, social support, and persuasive concepts using currently available technologies has the potential for promoting healthy lifestyle, greater community participation, and higher quality of life. We also expect that PersonA will enable health professionals to collect in situ data related to physical activity. The platform is currently being used and tested to improve PA level of three groups of users in Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

  12. Taurine activates GABAergic networks in the neocortex of immature mice

    PubMed Central

    Sava, Bogdan A.; Chen, Rongqing; Sun, Haiyan; Luhmann, Heiko J.; Kilb, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Although it has been suggested that taurine is the main endogenous neurotransmitter acting on glycine receptors, the implications of glycine receptor-mediated taurine actions on immature neocortical networks have not been addressed yet. To investigate the influence of taurine on the excitability of neuronal networks in the immature neocortex, we performed whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from visually identified pyramidal neurons and interneurons in coronal slices from C57Bl/6 and GAD67-green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice (postnatal days 2–4). In 46% of the pyramidal neurons bath-application of taurine at concentrations ≥ 300 μM significantly enhanced the frequency of postsynaptic currents (PSCs) by 744.3 ± 93.8% (n = 120 cells). This taurine-induced increase of PSC frequency was abolished by 0.2 μM tetrodotoxin (TTX), 1 μM strychnine or 3 μM gabazine, but was unaffected by the glutamatergic antagonists 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) and (±) R(-)-3-(2-carboxypiperazine-4-yl)-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP), suggesting that taurine specifically activates GABAergic network activity projecting to pyramidal neurons. Cell-attached recordings revealed that taurine enhanced the frequency of action potentials (APs) in pyramidal neurons, indicating an excitatory action of the GABAergic PSCs. In order to identify the presynaptic targets of taurine we demonstrate that bath application of taurine induced in GAD67-GFP labeled interneurons an inward current that is mainly mediated by glycine receptors and can generate APs in these cells. We conclude from these results that taurine can enhance network excitability in the immature neocortex by selectively activating GABAergic interneurons via interactions with glycine receptors. PMID:24550782

  13. The Contribution of Raised Intraneuronal Chloride to Epileptic Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Alfonsa, Hannah; Merricks, Edward M.; Codadu, Neela K.; Cunningham, Mark O.; Deisseroth, Karl; Racca, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Altered inhibitory function is an important facet of epileptic pathology. A key concept is that GABAergic activity can become excitatory if intraneuronal chloride rises. However, it has proved difficult to separate the role of raised chloride from other contributory factors in complex network phenomena, such as epileptic pathology. Therefore, we asked what patterns of activity are associated with chloride dysregulation by making novel use of Halorhodopsin to load clusters of mouse pyramidal cells artificially with Cl−. Brief (1–10 s) activation of Halorhodopsin caused substantial positive shifts in the GABAergic reversal potential that were proportional to the charge transfer during the illumination and in adult neocortical pyramidal neurons decayed with a time constant of τ = 8.0 ± 2.8s. At the network level, these positive shifts in EGABA produced a transient rise in network excitability, with many distinctive features of epileptic foci, including high-frequency oscillations with evidence of out-of-phase firing (Ibarz et al., 2010). We show how such firing patterns can arise from quite small shifts in the mean intracellular Cl− level, within heterogeneous neuronal populations. Notably, however, chloride loading by itself did not trigger full ictal events, even with additional electrical stimulation to the underlying white matter. In contrast, when performed in combination with low, subepileptic levels of 4-aminopyridine, Halorhodopsin activation rapidly induced full ictal activity. These results suggest that chloride loading has at most an adjunctive role in ictogenesis. Our simulations also show how chloride loading can affect the jitter of action potential timing associated with imminent recruitment to an ictal event (Netoff and Schiff, 2002). PMID:25995461

  14. A Comparative Study of the Applied Methods for Estimating Deflection of the Vertical in Terrestrial Geodetic Measurements.

    PubMed

    Vittuari, Luca; Tini, Maria Alessandra; Sarti, Pierguido; Serantoni, Eugenio; Borghi, Alessandra; Negusini, Monia; Guillaume, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    This paper compares three different methods capable of estimating the deflection of the vertical (DoV): one is based on the joint use of high precision spirit leveling and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), a second uses astro-geodetic measurements and the third gravimetric geoid models. The working data sets refer to the geodetic International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) co-location sites of Medicina (Northern, Italy) and Noto (Sicily), these latter being excellent test beds for our investigations. The measurements were planned and realized to estimate the DoV with a level of precision comparable to the angular accuracy achievable in high precision network measured by modern high-end total stations. The three methods are in excellent agreement, with an operational supremacy of the astro-geodetic method, being faster and more precise than the others. The method that combines leveling and GNSS has slightly larger standard deviations; although well within the 1 arcsec level, which was assumed as threshold. Finally, the geoid model based method, whose 2.5 arcsec standard deviations exceed this threshold, is also statistically consistent with the others and should be used to determine the DoV components where local ad hoc measurements are lacking. PMID:27104544

  15. A Comparative Study of the Applied Methods for Estimating Deflection of the Vertical in Terrestrial Geodetic Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Vittuari, Luca; Tini, Maria Alessandra; Sarti, Pierguido; Serantoni, Eugenio; Borghi, Alessandra; Negusini, Monia; Guillaume, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    This paper compares three different methods capable of estimating the deflection of the vertical (DoV): one is based on the joint use of high precision spirit leveling and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), a second uses astro-geodetic measurements and the third gravimetric geoid models. The working data sets refer to the geodetic International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) co-location sites of Medicina (Northern, Italy) and Noto (Sicily), these latter being excellent test beds for our investigations. The measurements were planned and realized to estimate the DoV with a level of precision comparable to the angular accuracy achievable in high precision network measured by modern high-end total stations. The three methods are in excellent agreement, with an operational supremacy of the astro-geodetic method, being faster and more precise than the others. The method that combines leveling and GNSS has slightly larger standard deviations; although well within the 1 arcsec level, which was assumed as threshold. Finally, the geoid model based method, whose 2.5 arcsec standard deviations exceed this threshold, is also statistically consistent with the others and should be used to determine the DoV components where local ad hoc measurements are lacking. PMID:27104544

  16. Extraction of Multilayered Social Networks from Activity Data

    PubMed Central

    Bródka, Piotr; Kazienko, Przemysław; Gaworecki, Jarosław

    2014-01-01

    The data gathered in all kinds of web-based systems, which enable users to interact with each other, provides an opportunity to extract social networks that consist of people and relationships between them. The emerging structures are very complex due to the number and type of discovered connections. In web-based systems, the characteristic element of each interaction between users is that there is always an object that serves as a communication medium. This can be, for example, an e-mail sent from one user to another or post at the forum authored by one user and commented on by others. Based on these objects and activities that users perform towards them, different kinds of relationships can be identified and extracted. Additional challenge arises from the fact that hierarchies can exist between objects; for example, a forum consists of one or more groups of topics, and each of them contains topics that finally include posts. In this paper, we propose a new method for creation of multilayered social network based on the data about users activities towards different types of objects between which the hierarchy exists. Due to the flattening, preprocessing procedure of new layers and new relationships in the multilayered social network can be identified and analysed. PMID:25105159

  17. Innovation diffusion on time-varying activity driven networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Alessandro; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Since its introduction in the 1960s, the theory of innovation diffusion has contributed to the advancement of several research fields, such as marketing management and consumer behavior. The 1969 seminal paper by Bass [F.M. Bass, Manag. Sci. 15, 215 (1969)] introduced a model of product growth for consumer durables, which has been extensively used to predict innovation diffusion across a range of applications. Here, we propose a novel approach to study innovation diffusion, where interactions among individuals are mediated by the dynamics of a time-varying network. Our approach is based on the Bass' model, and overcomes key limitations of previous studies, which assumed timescale separation between the individual dynamics and the evolution of the connectivity patterns. Thus, we do not hypothesize homogeneous mixing among individuals or the existence of a fixed interaction network. We formulate our approach in the framework of activity driven networks to enable the analysis of the concurrent evolution of the interaction and individual dynamics. Numerical simulations offer a systematic analysis of the model behavior and highlight the role of individual activity on market penetration when targeted advertisement campaigns are designed, or a competition between two different products takes place.

  18. Active multi-point microrheology of cytoskeletal networks

    PubMed Central

    Paust, Tobias; Mertens, Lina Katinka; Martin, Ines; Beil, Michael; Walther, Paul; Schimmel, Thomas; Marti, Othmar

    2016-01-01

    Summary Active microrheology is a valuable tool to determine viscoelastic properties of polymer networks. Observing the response of the beads to the excitation of a reference leads to dynamic and morphological information of the material. In this work we present an expansion of the well-known active two-point microrheology. By measuring the response of multiple particles in a viscoelastic medium in response to the excitation of a reference particle, we are able to determine the force propagation in the polymer network. For this purpose a lock-in technique is established that allows for extraction of the periodical motion of embedded beads. To exert a sinusoidal motion onto the reference bead an optical tweezers setup in combination with a microscope is used to investigate the motion of the response beads. From the lock-in data the so called transfer tensor can be calculated, which is a direct measure for the ability of the network to transmit mechanical forces. We also take a closer look at the influence of noise on lock-in measurements and state some simple rules for improving the signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:27335739

  19. Extraction of multilayered social networks from activity data.

    PubMed

    Musial, Katarzyna; Bródka, Piotr; Kazienko, Przemysław; Gaworecki, Jarosław

    2014-01-01

    The data gathered in all kinds of web-based systems, which enable users to interact with each other, provides an opportunity to extract social networks that consist of people and relationships between them. The emerging structures are very complex due to the number and type of discovered connections. In web-based systems, the characteristic element of each interaction between users is that there is always an object that serves as a communication medium. This can be, for example, an e-mail sent from one user to another or post at the forum authored by one user and commented on by others. Based on these objects and activities that users perform towards them, different kinds of relationships can be identified and extracted. Additional challenge arises from the fact that hierarchies can exist between objects; for example, a forum consists of one or more groups of topics, and each of them contains topics that finally include posts. In this paper, we propose a new method for creation of multilayered social network based on the data about users activities towards different types of objects between which the hierarchy exists. Due to the flattening, preprocessing procedure of new layers and new relationships in the multilayered social network can be identified and analysed. PMID:25105159

  20. Unconscious activation of the prefrontal no-go network.

    PubMed

    van Gaal, Simon; Ridderinkhof, K Richard; Scholte, H Steven; Lamme, Victor A F

    2010-03-17

    Cognitive control processes involving prefrontal cortex allow humans to overrule and inhibit habitual responses to optimize performance in new and challenging situations, and traditional views hold that cognitive control is tightly linked with consciousness. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate to what extent unconscious "no-go" stimuli are capable of reaching cortical areas involved in inhibitory control, particularly the inferior frontal cortex (IFC) and the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA). Participants performed a go/no-go task that included conscious (weakly masked) no-go trials, unconscious (strongly masked) no-go trials, as well as go trials. Replicating typical neuroimaging findings, response inhibition on conscious no-go stimuli was associated with a (mostly right-lateralized) frontoparietal "inhibition network." Here, we demonstrate, however, that an unconscious no-go stimulus also can activate prefrontal control networks, most prominently the IFC and the pre-SMA. Moreover, if it does so, it brings about a substantial slowdown in the speed of responding, as if participants attempted to inhibit their response but just failed to withhold it completely. Interestingly, overall activation in this "unconscious inhibition network" correlated positively with the amount of slowdown triggered by unconscious no-go stimuli. In addition, neural differences between conscious and unconscious control are revealed. These results expand our understanding of the limits and depths of unconscious information processing in the human brain and demonstrate that prefrontal cognitive control functions are not exclusively influenced by conscious information. PMID:20237284

  1. A proposed concept for a crustal dynamics information management network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohman, G. M.; Renfrow, J. T.

    1980-01-01

    The findings of a requirements and feasibility analysis of the present and potential producers, users, and repositories of space-derived geodetic information are summarized. A proposed concept is presented for a crustal dynamics information management network that would apply state of the art concepts of information management technology to meet the expanding needs of the producers, users, and archivists of this geodetic information.

  2. Social status modulates neural activity in the mentalizing network

    PubMed Central

    Muscatell, Keely A.; Morelli, Sylvia A.; Falk, Emily B.; Way, Baldwin M.; Pfeifer, Jennifer H.; Galinsky, Adam D.; Lieberman, Matthew D.; Dapretto, Mirella; Eisenberger, Naomi I.

    2013-01-01

    The current research explored the neural mechanisms linking social status to perceptions of the social world. Two fMRI studies provide converging evidence that individuals lower in social status are more likely to engage neural circuitry often involved in ‘mentalizing’ or thinking about others' thoughts and feelings. Study 1 found that college students' perception of their social status in the university community was related to neural activity in the mentalizing network (e.g., DMPFC, MPFC, precuneus/PCC) while encoding social information, with lower social status predicting greater neural activity in this network. Study 2 demonstrated that socioeconomic status, an objective indicator of global standing, predicted adolescents' neural activity during the processing of threatening faces, with individuals lower in social status displaying greater activity in the DMPFC, previously associated with mentalizing, and the amygdala, previously associated with emotion/salience processing. These studies demonstrate that social status is fundamentally and neurocognitively linked to how people process and navigate their social worlds. PMID:22289808

  3. Platelet Serotonin Transporter Function Predicts Default-Mode Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kasess, Christian H.; Meyer, Bernhard M.; Hofmaier, Tina; Diers, Kersten; Bartova, Lucie; Pail, Gerald; Huf, Wolfgang; Uzelac, Zeljko; Hartinger, Beate; Kalcher, Klaudius; Perkmann, Thomas; Haslacher, Helmuth; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Kasper, Siegfried; Freissmuth, Michael; Windischberger, Christian; Willeit, Matthäus; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Esterbauer, Harald; Brocke, Burkhard; Moser, Ewald; Sitte, Harald H.; Pezawas, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Background The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is abundantly expressed in humans by the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4 and removes serotonin (5-HT) from extracellular space. A blood-brain relationship between platelet and synaptosomal 5-HT reuptake has been suggested, but it is unknown today, if platelet 5-HT uptake can predict neural activation of human brain networks that are known to be under serotonergic influence. Methods A functional magnetic resonance study was performed in 48 healthy subjects and maximal 5-HT uptake velocity (Vmax) was assessed in blood platelets. We used a mixed-effects multilevel analysis technique (MEMA) to test for linear relationships between whole-brain, blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) activity and platelet Vmax. Results The present study demonstrates that increases in platelet Vmax significantly predict default-mode network (DMN) suppression in healthy subjects independent of genetic variation within SLC6A4. Furthermore, functional connectivity analyses indicate that platelet Vmax is related to global DMN activation and not intrinsic DMN connectivity. Conclusion This study provides evidence that platelet Vmax predicts global DMN activation changes in healthy subjects. Given previous reports on platelet-synaptosomal Vmax coupling, results further suggest an important role of neuronal 5-HT reuptake in DMN regulation. PMID:24667541

  4. An Autonomous, Low Cost Platform for Seafloor Geodetic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ericksen, T.; Foster, J. H.; Bingham, B. S.; Oshiro, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Pacific GPS Facility and the Field Robotics Laboratory at the University of Hawaii have developed an approach to significantly reduce the costs of accurately measuring short-term vertical motions of the seafloor and maintaining a continuous long-term record of seafloor pressure. Traditional ship-based methods of acquiring these measurements are often prohibitively expensive. Our goal has been to reduce the primary barrier preventing us from acquiring the observations we need to understand geodetic processes, and the hazards they present, at subduction zones, submarine volcanoes, and subsea landslides. To this end, we have designed a payload package for the University of Hawaii Wave Glider which incorporates an acoustic telemetry package, a dual frequency geodetic-grade Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, meteorological sensors, processing computer, and cellular communications. The Wave Glider is able to interrogate high accuracy pressure sensors on the seafloor to maintain a near-continuous stream of ocean bottom pressure and temperature data. The Wave Glider also functions as an integral part of the seafloor geodetic observing system, recording accurate sea surface elevations and barometric pressure; direct measurements of two of the primary sources of seafloor pressure change. The seafloor geodetic monument seats a sensor capable of recording pressure, temperature, and sound velocity for a deployment duration of over 5 years with an acoustic modem for communications, and an integral acoustic release for recovery and replacement of batteries. The design of the geodetic monument allows for precise repositioning of the sensor to extend the pressure record beyond a single 5+ year deployment, and includes the capability to install a mobile pressure recorder for calibration of the linear drift of the continuous pressure sensor. We will present the results of our field tests and an assessment of our ability to determine cm-scale vertical seafloor motions by

  5. Temporary seismic networks on active volcanoes of Kamchatka (Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakovlev, Andrey; Koulakov, Ivan; Abkadyrov, Ilyas; Shapiro, Nikolay; Kuznetsov, Pavel; Deev, Evgeny; Gordeev, Evgeny; Chebrov, Viktor

    2016-04-01

    We present details of four field campaigns carried out on different volcanoes of Kamchatka in 2012-2015. Each campaign was performed in three main steps: (i) installation of the temporary network of seismic stations; (ii) autonomous continuous registration of three component seismic signal; (III) taking off the network and downloading the registered data. During the first campaign started in September 2012, 11 temporary stations were installed over the Avacha group of volcanoes located 30 km north to Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky in addition to the seven permanent stations operated by the Kamchatkan Branch of the Geophysical Survey (KBGS). Unfortunately, with this temporary network we faced with two obstacles. The first problem was the small amount of local earthquakes, which were detected during operation time. The second problem was an unexpected stop of several stations only 40 days after deployment. Nevertheless, after taking off the network in August 2013, the collected data appeared to be suitable for analysis using ambient noise. The second campaign was conducted in period from August 2013 to August 2014. In framework of the campaign, 21 temporary stations were installed over Gorely volcano, located 70 km south to Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky. Just in time of the network deployment, Gorely Volcano became very seismically active - every day occurred more than 100 events. Therefore, we obtain very good dataset with information about thousands of local events, which could be used for any type of seismological analysis. The third campaign started in August 2014. Within this campaign, we have installed 19 temporary seismic stations over Tolbachik volcano, located on the south side of the Klyuchevskoy volcano group. In the same time on Tolbachik volcano were installed four temporary stations and several permanent stations operated by the KBGS. All stations were taking off in July 2015. As result, we have collected a large dataset, which is now under preliminary analysis

  6. Default-mode-like network activation in awake rodents.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Jaymin; Baker, Scott J; Chandran, Prasant; Miller, Loan; Lee, Younglim; Marek, Gerard J; Sakoglu, Unal; Chin, Chih-Liang; Luo, Feng; Fox, Gerard B; Day, Mark

    2011-01-01

    During wakefulness and in absence of performing tasks or sensory processing, the default-mode network (DMN), an intrinsic central nervous system (CNS) network, is in an active state. Non-human primate and human CNS imaging studies have identified the DMN in these two species. Clinical imaging studies have shown that the pattern of activity within the DMN is often modulated in various disease states (e.g., Alzheimer's, schizophrenia or chronic pain). However, whether the DMN exists in awake rodents has not been characterized. The current data provides evidence that awake rodents also possess 'DMN-like' functional connectivity, but only subsequent to habituation to what is initially a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment as well as physical restraint. Specifically, the habituation process spanned across four separate scanning sessions (Day 2, 4, 6 and 8). At Day 8, significant (p<0.05) functional connectivity was observed amongst structures such as the anterior cingulate (seed region), retrosplenial, parietal, and hippocampal cortices. Prior to habituation (Day 2), functional connectivity was only detected (p<0.05) amongst CNS structures known to mediate anxiety (i.e., anterior cingulate (seed region), posterior hypothalamic area, amygdala and parabracial nucleus). In relating functional connectivity between cingulate-default-mode and cingulate-anxiety structures across Days 2-8, a significant inverse relationship (r = -0.65, p = 0.0004) was observed between these two functional interactions such that increased cingulate-DMN connectivity corresponded to decreased cingulate anxiety network connectivity. This investigation demonstrates that the cingulate is an important component of both the rodent DMN-like and anxiety networks.

  7. Remote sensing of the coastal ocean with standard geodetic GNSS-equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löfgren, J. S.; Haas, R.; Larson, K. M.; Scherneck, H.-G.

    2012-04-01

    We use standard geodetic Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) equipment to perform remote sensing measurements of the coastal ocean. This is done by a so-called GNSS-based tide gauge that uses both direct GNSS-signals and GNSS-signals that are reflected off the sea surface. Our installation is located at the Onsala Space Observatory (OSO) at the west coast of Sweden and consists of a zenith-looking Right Hand Circularly Polarized (RHCP) and a nadir-looking Left Hand Circularly Polarized (LHCP) antenna. Each antenna is connected to a standard geodetic-type GNSS-receiver. We applied two different analysis strategies to our GNSS data set. The first strategy is based on a traditional geodetic differential analysis [Löfgren et al., 2011] and makes use of the data from both receivers; connected to the zenith and the nadir looking antennae. This approach results in local sea level that is automatically corrected for land motion, meaning that the GNSS-based tide gauge can provide reliable sea-level estimates even in tectonic active regions. The second strategy focuses on the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) recorded with the receiver connected to the zenith-looking antenna [Larson et al., 2011]. The SNR is affected by multipath originating from the sea surface reflections. Analysis of the SNR data allows to determine the distance between the antenna and the reflecting surface, and thus to measure sea surface height. Results from both analysis strategies are compared to independently observed sea-level data from two stilling-well gauges operated by the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI), which lie in a distance of several km from OSO. The root-mean-square agreement between the different time series of several month's length is on the order of 5 cm and better. These results indicate the large potential for using coastal GNSS-sites for the monitoring of the coastal ocean.

  8. Multiscale Transient Signal Detection: Localizing Transients in Geodetic Data Through Wavelet Transforms and Sparse Estimation Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riel, B.; Simons, M.; Agram, P.

    2012-12-01

    Transients are a class of deformation signals on the Earth's surface that can be described as non-periodic accumulation of strain in the crust. Over seismically and volcanically active regions, these signals are often challenging to detect due to noise and other modes of deformation. Geodetic datasets that provide precise measurements of surface displacement over wide areas are ideal for exploiting both the spatial and temporal coherence of transient signals. We present an extension to the Multiscale InSAR Time Series (MInTS) approach for analyzing geodetic data by combining the localization benefits of wavelet transforms (localizing signals in space) with sparse optimization techniques (localizing signals in time). Our time parameterization approach allows us to reduce geodetic time series to sparse, compressible signals with very few non-zero coefficients corresponding to transient events. We first demonstrate the temporal transient detection by analyzing GPS data over the Long Valley caldera in California and along the San Andreas fault near Parkfield, CA. For Long Valley, we are able to resolve the documented 2002-2003 uplift event with greater temporal precision. Similarly for Parkfield, we model the postseismic deformation by specific integrated basis splines characterized by timescales that are largely consistent with postseismic relaxation times. We then apply our method to ERS and Envisat InSAR datasets consisting of over 200 interferograms for Long Valley and over 100 interferograms for Parkfield. The wavelet transforms reduce the impact of spatially correlated atmospheric noise common in InSAR data since the wavelet coefficients themselves are essentially uncorrelated. The spatial density and extended temporal coverage of the InSAR data allows us to effectively localize ground deformation events in both space and time with greater precision than has been previously accomplished.

  9. Transform Faults and Lithospheric Structure: Insights from Numerical Models and Shipboard and Geodetic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Christopher S.

    In this dissertation, I study the influence of transform faults on the structure and deformation of the lithosphere, using shipboard and geodetic observations as well as numerical experiments. I use marine topography, gravity, and magnetics to examine the effects of the large age-offset Andrew Bain transform fault on accretionary processes within two adjacent segments of the Southwest Indian Ridge. I infer from morphology, high gravity, and low magnetization that the extremely cold and thick lithosphere associated with the Andrew Bain strongly suppresses melt production and crustal emplacement to the west of the transform fault. These effects are counteracted by enhanced temperature and melt production near the Marion Hotspot, east of the transform fault. I use numerical models to study the development of lithospheric shear zones underneath continental transform faults (e.g. the San Andreas Fault in California), with a particular focus on thermomechanical coupling and shear heating produced by long-term fault slip. I find that these processes may give rise to long-lived localized shear zones, and that such shear zones may in part control the magnitude of stress in the lithosphere. Localized ductile shear participates in both interseismic loading and postseismic relaxation, and predictions of models including shear zones are within observational constraints provided by geodetic and surface heat flow data. I numerically investigate the effects of shear zones on three-dimensional postseismic deformation. I conclude that the presence of a thermally-activated shear zone minimally impacts postseismic deformation, and that thermomechanical coupling alone is unable to generate sufficient localization for postseismic relaxation within a ductile shear zone to kinematically resemble that by aseismic fault creep (afterslip). I find that the current record geodetic observations of postseismic deformation do not provide robust discriminating power between candidate linear and

  10. NOS/NGS activities to support development of radio interferometric surveying techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, W. E.; Dracup, J. F.; Hothem, L. D.; Robertson, D. S.; Strange, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    National Geodetic Survey activities towards the development of operational geodetic survey systems based on radio interferometry are reviewed. Information about the field procedures, data reduction and analysis, and the results obtained to date is presented.

  11. Monitoring of stability of ASG-EUPOS network coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figurski, M.; Szafranek, K.; Wrona, M.

    2009-04-01

    ASG-EUPOS (Active Geodetic Network - European Position Determination System) is the national system of precise satellite positioning in Poland, which increases a density of regional and global GNSS networks and is widely used by public administration, national institutions, entrepreneurs and citizens (especially surveyors). In near future ASG-EUPOS is to take role of main national network. Control of proper activity of stations and realization of ETRS'89 is a necessity. User of the system needs to be sure that observations quality and coordinates accuracy are high enough. Coordinates of IGS (International GNSS Service) and EPN (European Permanent Network) stations are precisely determined and any changes are monitored all the time. Observations are verified before they are archived in regional and global databases. The same applies to ASG-EUPOS. This paper concerns standardization of GNSS observations from different stations (uniform adjustment), examination of solutions correctness according to IGS and EPN standards and stability of solutions and sites activity

  12. Pre-stimulus BOLD-network activation modulates EEG spectral activity during working memory retention.

    PubMed

    Kottlow, Mara; Schlaepfer, Anthony; Baenninger, Anja; Michels, Lars; Brandeis, Daniel; Koenig, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Working memory (WM) processes depend on our momentary mental state and therefore exhibit considerable fluctuations. Here, we investigate the interplay of task-preparatory and task-related brain activity as represented by pre-stimulus BOLD-fluctuations and spectral EEG from the retention periods of a visual WM task. Visual WM is used to maintain sensory information in the brain enabling the performance of cognitive operations and is associated with mental health. We tested 22 subjects simultaneously with EEG and fMRI while performing a visuo-verbal Sternberg task with two different loads, allowing for the temporal separation of preparation, encoding, retention and retrieval periods. Four temporally coherent networks (TCNs)-the default mode network (DMN), the dorsal attention, the right and the left WM network-were extracted from the continuous BOLD data by means of a group ICA. Subsequently, the modulatory effect of these networks' pre-stimulus activation upon retention-related EEG activity in the theta, alpha, and beta frequencies was analyzed. The obtained results are informative in the context of state-dependent information processing. We were able to replicate two well-known load-dependent effects: the frontal-midline theta increase during the task and the decrease of pre-stimulus DMN activity. As our main finding, these two measures seem to depend on each other as the significant negative correlations at frontal-midline channels suggested. Thus, suppressed pre-stimulus DMN levels facilitated later task related frontal midline theta increases. In general, based on previous findings that neuronal coupling in different frequency bands may underlie distinct functions in WM retention, our results suggest that processes reflected by spectral oscillations during retention seem not only to be "online" synchronized with activity in different attention-related networks but are also modulated by activity in these networks during preparation intervals. PMID:25999828

  13. Wireless sensor networks for active vibration control in automobile structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mieyeville, Fabien; Ichchou, Mohamed; Scorletti, Gérard; Navarro, David; Du, Wan

    2012-07-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are nowadays widely used in monitoring and tracking applications. This paper presents the feasibility of using WSNs in active vibration control strategies. The method employed here involves active-structural acoustic control using piezoelectric sensors distributed on a car structure. This system aims at being merged with a WSN whose head node collects data and processes control laws so as to command piezoelectric actuators wisely placed on the structure. We will study the feasibility of implementing WSNs in active vibration control and introduce a complete design methodology to optimize hardware/software and control law synergy in mechatronic systems. A design space exploration will be conducted so as to identify the best WSN platform and the resulting impact on control.

  14. Geodetic measurement of deformation east of the San Andreas Fault in Central California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauber, Jeanne; Solomon, Sean C.; Lisowski, Michael

    1988-01-01

    The shear strain rates in the Diablo Range of California have been calculated, and the slip rate along the Calaveras and Paicines faults in Central California have been estimated, on the basis of triangulation and trilateration data from two geodetic networks located between the western edge of the Great Valley and the San Andreas Fault. The orientation of the principal compressive strain predicted from the azimuth of the major structures in the region is N 25 deg E, leading to an average shear strain value that corresponds to a relative shortening rate of 4.5 + or - 2.4 mm/yr. It is inferred that the measured strain is due to compression across the fold of this area. The hypothesized uniform, fault-normal compression within the Coast Ranges is not supported by these results.

  15. Geodetic measurement of deformation in the Ventura basin region, southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Donnellan, A.; Hager, B.H.; King, R.W.; Herring, T.A. |

    1993-12-01

    We have measured the deformation in the Ventura basin region, southern California, with Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements carried out over 4.6 years between 1987 and 1992. The deformation within our network is spatically variable on scales of tens of kilometers, with strain rates reaching 0.6 +/- 1 micro-rad/yr in the east-central basin. Blocklike rotations are observed south and northwest of the basin where the maximum shear strain rates are an order of magnitude lower (0.06 +/- 1 micro-rad/yr to the south). We also observed clockwise rotations of 1 deg - 7 deg/m.y. Shear strain rates determined by comparing angle changes from historical triangulation spanning several decades and GPS measurements give consistent, though less precise, results. The geodetic rates of shortening across the basin and Western Transverse Ranges are lower than those estimated from geological observations, but the patterns of deformation from the two methods agree qualitatively.

  16. Principal component analysis of geodetically measured deformation in Long Valley caldera, eastern California, 1983-1987

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Geodetic measurements of deformation at Long Valley caldera provide two examples of the application of principal component analysis. A 40-line trilateration network surrounding the caldera was surveyed in midsummer 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, and 1987. Principal component analysis indicates that the observed deformation can be represented by a single coherent source. The time dependence for that source displays a rapid rate of deformation in 1983-1984 followed by less rapid but uniform rate in the 1984-1987 interval. The spatial factor seems consistent with expansion of a magma chamber beneath the caldera plus some shallow right-lateral slip on a vertical fault in the south moat of the caldera. An independent principal component analysis of the 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, and 1987 leveling across the caldera requires two self-coherent sources to explain the deformation. -from Author

  17. Geodetic measurement of deformation in the Ventura basin region, southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnellan, Andrea; Hager, Bradford H.; King, Robert W.; Herring, Thomas A.

    1993-01-01

    We have measured the deformation in the Ventura basin region, southern California, with Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements carried out over 4.6 years between 1987 and 1992. The deformation within our network is spatically variable on scales of tens of kilometers, with strain rates reaching 0.6 +/- 1 micro-rad/yr in the east-central basin. Blocklike rotations are observed south and northwest of the basin where the maximum shear strain rates are an order of magnitude lower (0.06 +/- 1 micro-rad/yr to the south). We also observed clockwise rotations of 1 deg - 7 deg/m.y. Shear strain rates determined by comparing angle changes from historical triangulation spanning several decades and GPS measurements give consistent, though less precise, results. The geodetic rates of shortening across the basin and Western Transverse Ranges are lower than those estimated from geological observations, but the patterns of deformation from the two methods agree qualitatively.

  18. Artificial neural network prediction of antisense oligodeoxynucleotide activity.

    PubMed

    Giddings, Michael C; Shah, Atul A; Freier, Sue; Atkins, John F; Gesteland, Raymond F; Matveeva, Olga V

    2002-10-01

    An mRNA transcript contains many potential antisense oligodeoxynucleotide target sites. Identification of the most efficacious targets remains an important and challenging problem. Building on separate work that revealed a strong correlation between the inclusion of short sequence motifs and the activity level of an oligo, we have developed a predictive artificial neural network system for mapping tetranucleotide motif content to antisense oligo activity. Trained for high-specificity prediction, the system has been cross-validated against a database of 348 oligos from the literature and a larger proprietary database of 908 oligos. In cross- validation tests the system identified effective oligos (i.e. oligos capable of reducing target mRNA expression to <25% that of the control) with 53% accuracy, in contrast to the <10% success rates commonly reported for trial-and-error oligo selection, suggesting a possible 5-fold reduction in the in vivo screening required to find an active oligo. We have implemented a web interface to a trained neural network. Given an RNA transcript as input, the system identifies the most likely oligo targets and provides estimates of the probabilities that oligos targeted against these sites will be effective. PMID:12364609

  19. Geodetic positioning using a global positioning system of satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fell, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    Geodetic positioning using range, integrated Doppler, and interferometric observations from a constellation of twenty-four Global Positioning System satellites is analyzed. A summary of the proposals for geodetic positioning and baseline determination is given which includes a description of measurement techniques and comments on rank deficiency and error sources. An analysis of variance comparison of range, Doppler, and interferometric time delay to determine their relative geometric strength for baseline determination is included. An analytic examination to the effect of a priori constraints on positioning using simultaneous observations from two stations is presented. Dynamic point positioning and baseline determination using range and Doppler is examined in detail. Models for the error sources influencing dynamic positioning are developed. Included is a discussion of atomic clock stability, and range and Doppler observation error statistics based on random correlated atomic clock error are derived.

  20. Cartografical And Geodetical Aspects Of The Krakus Mound In Cracow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banasik, Piotr

    2015-12-01

    In this work the fate of the Krakus Mound, the oldest of all existing Krakow's mounds, has been presented. The work was carried out based on selected iconographic, cartographic and geodetic documents. Using as an example old views, panoramas of the city and maps, various functions that the Krakus Mound was fulfilling over its long history were shown. An attempt was made to document the military significance of this mound and the surrounding hills. The particular astro-geodetic importance of the Krakus Mound on the scale of the city and southern Poland region was widely discussed. The Krakus Mound also inscribed itself in the history of the use of GPS technology as well as research on the local determination of the geoid in the area of Krakow.

  1. Environmental Monitoring Networks Optimization Using Advanced Active Learning Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanevski, Mikhail; Volpi, Michele; Copa, Loris

    2010-05-01

    The problem of environmental monitoring networks optimization (MNO) belongs to one of the basic and fundamental tasks in spatio-temporal data collection, analysis, and modeling. There are several approaches to this problem, which can be considered as a design or redesign of monitoring network by applying some optimization criteria. The most developed and widespread methods are based on geostatistics (family of kriging models, conditional stochastic simulations). In geostatistics the variance is mainly used as an optimization criterion which has some advantages and drawbacks. In the present research we study an application of advanced techniques following from the statistical learning theory (SLT) - support vector machines (SVM) and the optimization of monitoring networks when dealing with a classification problem (data are discrete values/classes: hydrogeological units, soil types, pollution decision levels, etc.) is considered. SVM is a universal nonlinear modeling tool for classification problems in high dimensional spaces. The SVM solution is maximizing the decision boundary between classes and has a good generalization property for noisy data. The sparse solution of SVM is based on support vectors - data which contribute to the solution with nonzero weights. Fundamentally the MNO for classification problems can be considered as a task of selecting new measurement points which increase the quality of spatial classification and reduce the testing error (error on new independent measurements). In SLT this is a typical problem of active learning - a selection of the new unlabelled points which efficiently reduce the testing error. A classical approach (margin sampling) to active learning is to sample the points closest to the classification boundary. This solution is suboptimal when points (or generally the dataset) are redundant for the same class. In the present research we propose and study two new advanced methods of active learning adapted to the solution of

  2. Antituberculosis activity of the molecular libraries screening center network library.

    PubMed

    Maddry, Joseph A; Ananthan, Subramaniam; Goldman, Robert C; Hobrath, Judith V; Kwong, Cecil D; Maddox, Clinton; Rasmussen, Lynn; Reynolds, Robert C; Secrist, John A; Sosa, Melinda I; White, E Lucile; Zhang, Wei

    2009-09-01

    There is an urgent need for the discovery and development of new antitubercular agents that target novel biochemical pathways and treat drug-resistant forms of the disease. One approach to addressing this need is through high-throughput screening of drug-like small molecule libraries against the whole bacterium in order to identify a variety of new, active scaffolds that will stimulate additional biological research and drug discovery. Through the Molecular Libraries Screening Center Network, the NIAID Tuberculosis Antimicrobial Acquisition and Coordinating Facility tested a 215,110-compound library against Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv. A medicinal chemistry survey of the results from the screening campaign is reported herein.

  3. Geodetic antenna calibration test in the Antarctic environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grejner-Brzezinska, A.; Vazquez, E.; Hothem, L.

    2006-01-01

    TransAntarctic Mountain DEFormation (TAMDEF) Monitoring Network is the NSF-sponsored OSU and USGS project, aimed at measuring crustal motion in the Transantarctic Mountains of Victoria Land using GPS carrier phase measurements. Station monumentation, antenna mounts, antenna types, and data processing strategies were optimized to achieve mm-level estimates for the rates of motion. These data contributes also to regional Antarctic frame definition. Significant amount of data collected over several years allow the investigation of unique aspects of GPS geodesy in Antarctica, to determine how the error spectrum compares to the mid-latitude regions, and to identify the optimum measurement and data processing schemes for Antarctic conditions, in order to test the predicted rates of motion (mm-level w.r.t. time). The data collection for the TAMDEF project was initiated in 1996. The primary antenna used has been the Ashtech L1/L2 Dorne Margolin (D/M) choke ring. A few occupations involved the use of a Trimble D/M choke ring. The data were processed using the antenna calibration data available from the National Geodetic Survey (NGS). The recent developments in new antenna designs that are lighter in weight and lower in cost are being considered as a possible alternative to the bulkier and more expensive D/M choke ring design. In November 2003, in situ testing of three alternative models of L1/L2 antennas was conducted at a site located in the vicinity of McMurdo Station, Antarctica (S77.87, E166.56). The antenna models used in this test were: Ashtech D/M choke ring, Trimble D/M choke ring, Trimble Zephyr, and the NovAtel GPS-702. Two stations, spaced within 30 meters, were used in the test. Both had the characteristics similar to the stations of the TAMDEF network, i.e., the UNAVCO fixed-height, force-centered level mounts with a constant antenna offset were used, ensuring extreme stability of the antenna/ mount/pin set up. During each of the four 3-day test data collection

  4. Active traffic management on road networks: a macroscopic approach.

    PubMed

    Kurzhanskiy, Alex A; Varaiya, Pravin

    2010-10-13

    Active traffic management (ATM) is the ability to dynamically manage recurrent and non-recurrent congestion based on prevailing traffic conditions in order to maximize the effectiveness and efficiency of road networks. It is a continuous process of (i) obtaining and analysing traffic measurement data, (ii) operations planning, i.e. simulating various scenarios and control strategies, (iii) implementing the most promising control strategies in the field, and (iv) maintaining a real-time decision support system that filters current traffic measurements to predict the traffic state in the near future, and to suggest the best available control strategy for the predicted situation. ATM relies on a fast and trusted traffic simulator for the rapid quantitative assessment of a large number of control strategies for the road network under various scenarios, in a matter of minutes. The open-source macrosimulation tool Aurora ROAD NETWORK MODELER is a good candidate for this purpose. The paper describes the underlying dynamical traffic model and what it takes to prepare the model for simulation; covers the traffic performance measures and evaluation of scenarios as part of operations planning; introduces the framework within which the control strategies are modelled and evaluated; and presents the algorithm for real-time traffic state estimation and short-term prediction.

  5. Mapping Epileptic Activity: Sources or Networks for the Clinicians?

    PubMed Central

    Pittau, Francesca; Mégevand, Pierre; Sheybani, Laurent; Abela, Eugenio; Grouiller, Frédéric; Spinelli, Laurent; Michel, Christoph M.; Seeck, Margitta; Vulliemoz, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Epileptic seizures of focal origin are classically considered to arise from a focal epileptogenic zone and then spread to other brain regions. This is a key concept for semiological electro-clinical correlations, localization of relevant structural lesions, and selection of patients for epilepsy surgery. Recent development in neuro-imaging and electro-physiology and combinations, thereof, have been validated as contributory tools for focus localization. In parallel, these techniques have revealed that widespread networks of brain regions, rather than a single epileptogenic region, are implicated in focal epileptic activity. Sophisticated multimodal imaging and analysis strategies of brain connectivity patterns have been developed to characterize the spatio-temporal relationships within these networks by combining the strength of both techniques to optimize spatial and temporal resolution with whole-brain coverage and directional connectivity. In this paper, we review the potential clinical contribution of these functional mapping techniques as well as invasive electrophysiology in human beings and animal models for characterizing network connectivity. PMID:25414692

  6. Temporal dynamics of spontaneous MEG activity in brain networks.

    PubMed

    de Pasquale, Francesco; Della Penna, Stefania; Snyder, Abraham Z; Lewis, Christopher; Mantini, Dante; Marzetti, Laura; Belardinelli, Paolo; Ciancetta, Luca; Pizzella, Vittorio; Romani, Gian Luca; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2010-03-30

    Functional MRI (fMRI) studies have shown that low-frequency (<0.1 Hz) spontaneous fluctuations of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal during restful wakefulness are coherent within distributed large-scale cortical and subcortical networks (resting state networks, RSNs). The neuronal mechanisms underlying RSNs remain poorly understood. Here, we describe magnetoencephalographic correspondents of two well-characterized RSNs: the dorsal attention and the default mode networks. Seed-based correlation mapping was performed using time-dependent MEG power reconstructed at each voxel within the brain. The topography of RSNs computed on the basis of extended (5 min) epochs was similar to that observed with fMRI but confined to the same hemisphere as the seed region. Analyses taking into account the nonstationarity of MEG activity showed transient formation of more complete RSNs, including nodes in the contralateral hemisphere. Spectral analysis indicated that RSNs manifest in MEG as synchronous modulation of band-limited power primarily within the theta, alpha, and beta bands-that is, in frequencies slower than those associated with the local electrophysiological correlates of event-related BOLD responses. PMID:20304792

  7. Geodetic Observatory Wettzell - 20-m Radio Telescope and Twin Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neidhardt, Alexander; Kronschnabl, Gerhard; Schatz, Raimund

    2013-01-01

    In the year 2012, the 20-m radio telescope at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell, Germany again contributed very successfully to the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry observing program. Technical changes, developments, improvements, and upgrades were made to increase the reliability of the entire VLBI observing system. In parallel, the new Twin radio telescope Wettzell (TTW) got the first feedhorn, while the construction of the HF-receiving and the controlling system was continued.

  8. Crowdsourced Contributions to the Nation's Geodetic Elevation Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, W. A.

    2014-12-01

    NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS), a United States Department of Commerce agency, is engaged in providing the nation's fundamental positioning infrastructure - the National Spatial Reference System (NSRS) - which includes the framework for latitude, longitude, and elevation determination as well as various geodetic models, tools, and data. Capitalizing on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) technology for improved access to the nation's precise geodetic elevation infrastructure requires use of a geoid model, which relates GNSS-derived heights (ellipsoid heights) with traditional elevations (orthometric heights). NGS is facilitating the use of crowdsourced GNSS observations collected at published elevation control stations by the professional surveying, geospatial, and scientific communities to help improve NGS' geoid modeling capability. This collocation of published elevation data and newly collected GNSS data integrates together the two height systems. This effort in turn supports enhanced access to accurate elevation information across the nation, thereby benefiting all users of geospatial data. By partnering with the public in this collaborative effort, NGS is not only helping facilitate improvements to the elevation infrastructure for all users but also empowering users of NSRS with the capability to do their own high-accuracy positioning. The educational outreach facet of this effort helps inform the public, including the scientific community, about the utility of various NGS tools, including the widely used Online Positioning User Service (OPUS). OPUS plays a key role in providing user-friendly and high accuracy access to NSRS, with optional sharing of results with NGS and the public. All who are interested in helping evolve and improve the nationwide elevation determination capability are invited to participate in this nationwide partnership and to learn more about the geodetic infrastructure which is a vital component of viable spatial data for

  9. Extracting Independent Local Oscillatory Geophysical Signals by Geodetic Tropospheric Delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botai, O. J.; Combrinck, L.; Sivakumar, V.; Schuh, H.; Bohm, J.

    2010-01-01

    Zenith Tropospheric Delay (ZTD) due to water vapor derived from space geodetic techniques and numerical weather prediction simulated-reanalysis data exhibits non-linear and non-stationary properties akin to those in the crucial geophysical signals of interest to the research community. These time series, once decomposed into additive (and stochastic) components, have information about the long term global change (the trend) and other interpretable (quasi-) periodic components such as seasonal cycles and noise. Such stochastic component(s) could be a function that exhibits at most one extremum within a data span or a monotonic function within a certain temporal span. In this contribution, we examine the use of the combined Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA): the EEMD-ICA algorithm to extract the independent local oscillatory stochastic components in the tropospheric delay derived from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) over six geodetic sites (HartRAO, Hobart26, Wettzell, Gilcreek, Westford, and Tsukub32). The proposed methodology allows independent geophysical processes to be extracted and assessed. Analysis of the quality index of the Independent Components (ICs) derived for each cluster of local oscillatory components (also called the Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs)) for all the geodetic stations considered in the study demonstrate that they are strongly site dependent. Such strong dependency seems to suggest that the localized geophysical signals embedded in the ZTD over the geodetic sites are not correlated. Further, from the viewpoint of non-linear dynamical systems, four geophysical signals the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) index derived from the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis, the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) anomaly from NCEP, the SIDC monthly Sun Spot Number (SSN), and the Length of Day (LoD) are linked to the extracted signal components from ZTD. Results from the synchronization

  10. Plate motions and deformations from geologic and geodetic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, T. H.

    1986-01-01

    A satellite laser ranging experiment conducted by NASA since 1972 has measured the relative motion between the North America and Pacific plates in California. Based on these measurements, the 896-km distance between San Diego and Quincy, California, is shortening at 62 + or - 9 mm/yr. This geodetic estimate is consistent with the rate of motion between the two plates, calculated from geological data to be 53 + or - 3 mm/yr averaged over the past few million years.

  11. Astronomical VLBI: Comparison and Contrast with Geodetic/Astrometric VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, R. Craig

    2000-05-01

    The VLBI technique can be used for both high precision geometric measurements in geodetic and astrometric observations, and to study astronomical sources with high resolution. The equipment required for both types of observations is essentially the same and many telescopes and correlators are used for both. This synergy gives both the geodesy and astronomy communities access to more resources than either could support alone. The IVS membership is familiar with geodetic/astrometric VLBI, but perhaps less so with astronomical VLBI. Therefore, this presentation will begin with an introduction to the existing astronomical VLBI instruments. That will be followed by a number of examples of astronomical VLBI results to give a flavor for the science. Then some direct comparisons between geodetic and astronomical VLBI will be made with emphasis on observing modes and on the importance of various aspects of the data. Finally, the interaction between the groups will be discussed, both in terms of how they are interdependent and how differences in style have created some complications.

  12. Origin of thoracic spinal network activity during locomotor-like activity in the neonatal rat.

    PubMed

    Beliez, Lauriane; Barrière, Grégory; Bertrand, Sandrine S; Cazalets, Jean-René

    2015-04-15

    Effective quadrupedal locomotor behaviors require the coordination of many muscles in the limbs, back, neck, and tail. Because of the spinal motoneuronal somatotopic organization, motor coordination implies interactions among distant spinal networks. Here, we investigated some of the interactions between the lumbar locomotor networks that control limb movements and the thoracic networks that control the axial muscles involved in trunk movement. For this purpose, we used an in vitro isolated newborn rat spinal cord (from T2 to sacrococcygeal) preparation. Using extracellular ventral root recordings, we showed that, while the thoracic cord possesses an intrinsic rhythmogenic capacity, the lumbar circuits, if they are rhythmically active, will entrain the rhythmicity of the thoracic circuitry. However, if the lumbar circuits are rhythmically active, these latter circuits will entrain the rhythmicity of the thoracic circuitry. Blocking the synaptic transmission in some thoracic areas revealed that the lumbar locomotor network could trigger locomotor bursting in distant thoracic segments through short and long propriospinal pathways. Patch-clamp recordings revealed that 72% of the thoracic motoneurons (locomotor-driven motoneurons) expressed membrane potential oscillations and spiking activity coordinated with the locomotor activity expressed by the lumbar cord. A biphasic excitatory (glutamatergic)/inhibitory (glycinergic) synaptic drive was recorded in thoracic locomotor-driven motoneurons. Finally, we found evidence that part of this locomotor drive involved a monosynaptic component coming directly from the lumbar locomotor network. We conclude that the lumbar locomotor network plays a central role in the generation of locomotor outputs in the thoracic cord by acting at both the premotoneuronal and motoneuronal levels. PMID:25878284

  13. Photonic Network R&D Activities in Japan-Current Activities and Future Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitayama, Ken-Ichi; Miki, Tetsuya; Morioka, Toshio; Tsushima, Hideaki; Koga, Masafumi; Mori, Kazuyuki; Araki, Soichiro; Sato, Ken-Ichi; Onaka, Hiroshi; Namiki, Shu; Aoyama, Tomonori

    2005-10-01

    R&D activities on photonic networks in Japan are presented. First, milestones in current ongoing R&D programs supported by Japanese government agencies are introduced, including long-distance and wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) fiber transmission, wavelength routing, optical burst switching (OBS), and control-plane technology for IP backbone networks. Their goal was set to evolve a legacy telecommunications network to IP-over-WDM networks by introducing technologies for WDM and wavelength routing. We then discuss the perspectives of so-called PHASE II R&D programs for photonic networks over the next 5 years until 2010, by focusing on the report that has been recently issued by the Photonic Internet Forum (PIF), a consortium that has major carriers, telecom vendors, and Japanese academics as members. The PHASE II R&D programs should serve to establish a photonic platform to provide abundant bandwidth on demand, at any time on a real-time basis, through the customer's initiative to promote bandwidth-rich applications, such as grid computing, real-time digital-cinema streaming, medical and educational applications, and network storage in e-commerce.

  14. Stock price change rate prediction by utilizing social network activities.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shangkun; Mitsubuchi, Takashi; Sakurai, Akito

    2014-01-01

    Predicting stock price change rates for providing valuable information to investors is a challenging task. Individual participants may express their opinions in social network service (SNS) before or after their transactions in the market; we hypothesize that stock price change rate is better predicted by a function of social network service activities and technical indicators than by a function of just stock market activities. The hypothesis is tested by accuracy of predictions as well as performance of simulated trading because success or failure of prediction is better measured by profits or losses the investors gain or suffer. In this paper, we propose a hybrid model that combines multiple kernel learning (MKL) and genetic algorithm (GA). MKL is adopted to optimize the stock price change rate prediction models that are expressed in a multiple kernel linear function of different types of features extracted from different sources. GA is used to optimize the trading rules used in the simulated trading by fusing the return predictions and values of three well-known overbought and oversold technical indicators. Accumulated return and Sharpe ratio were used to test the goodness of performance of the simulated trading. Experimental results show that our proposed model performed better than other models including ones using state of the art techniques.

  15. Stock Price Change Rate Prediction by Utilizing Social Network Activities

    PubMed Central

    Mitsubuchi, Takashi; Sakurai, Akito

    2014-01-01

    Predicting stock price change rates for providing valuable information to investors is a challenging task. Individual participants may express their opinions in social network service (SNS) before or after their transactions in the market; we hypothesize that stock price change rate is better predicted by a function of social network service activities and technical indicators than by a function of just stock market activities. The hypothesis is tested by accuracy of predictions as well as performance of simulated trading because success or failure of prediction is better measured by profits or losses the investors gain or suffer. In this paper, we propose a hybrid model that combines multiple kernel learning (MKL) and genetic algorithm (GA). MKL is adopted to optimize the stock price change rate prediction models that are expressed in a multiple kernel linear function of different types of features extracted from different sources. GA is used to optimize the trading rules used in the simulated trading by fusing the return predictions and values of three well-known overbought and oversold technical indicators. Accumulated return and Sharpe ratio were used to test the goodness of performance of the simulated trading. Experimental results show that our proposed model performed better than other models including ones using state of the art techniques. PMID:24790586

  16. In vitro neuronal network activity in NMDA receptor encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anti-NMDA-encephalitis is caused by antibodies against the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and characterized by a severe encephalopathy with psychosis, epileptic seizures and autonomic disturbances. It predominantly occurs in young women and is associated in 59% with an ovarian teratoma. Results We describe effects of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from an anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis patient on in vitro neuronal network activity (ivNNA). In vitro NNA of dissociated primary rat cortical populations was recorded by the microelectrode array (MEA) system. The 23-year old patient was severely affected but showed an excellent recovery following multimodal immunomodulatory therapy and removal of an ovarian teratoma. Patient CSF (pCSF) taken during the initial weeks after disease onset suppressed global spike- and burst rates of ivNNA in contrast to pCSF sampled after clinical recovery and decrease of NMDAR antibody titers. The synchrony of pCSF-affected ivNNA remained unaltered during the course of the disease. Conclusion Patient CSF directly suppresses global activity of neuronal networks recorded by the MEA system. In contrast, pCSF did not regulate the synchrony of ivNNA suggesting that NMDAR antibodies selectively regulate distinct parameters of ivNNA while sparing their functional connectivity. Thus, assessing ivNNA could represent a new technique to evaluate functional consequences of autoimmune encephalitis-related CSF changes. PMID:23379293

  17. Stock price change rate prediction by utilizing social network activities.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shangkun; Mitsubuchi, Takashi; Sakurai, Akito

    2014-01-01

    Predicting stock price change rates for providing valuable information to investors is a challenging task. Individual participants may express their opinions in social network service (SNS) before or after their transactions in the market; we hypothesize that stock price change rate is better predicted by a function of social network service activities and technical indicators than by a function of just stock market activities. The hypothesis is tested by accuracy of predictions as well as performance of simulated trading because success or failure of prediction is better measured by profits or losses the investors gain or suffer. In this paper, we propose a hybrid model that combines multiple kernel learning (MKL) and genetic algorithm (GA). MKL is adopted to optimize the stock price change rate prediction models that are expressed in a multiple kernel linear function of different types of features extracted from different sources. GA is used to optimize the trading rules used in the simulated trading by fusing the return predictions and values of three well-known overbought and oversold technical indicators. Accumulated return and Sharpe ratio were used to test the goodness of performance of the simulated trading. Experimental results show that our proposed model performed better than other models including ones using state of the art techniques. PMID:24790586

  18. Dynamic Control of Synchronous Activity in Networks of Spiking Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hutt, Axel; Mierau, Andreas; Lefebvre, Jérémie

    2016-01-01

    Oscillatory brain activity is believed to play a central role in neural coding. Accumulating evidence shows that features of these oscillations are highly dynamic: power, frequency and phase fluctuate alongside changes in behavior and task demands. The role and mechanism supporting this variability is however poorly understood. We here analyze a network of recurrently connected spiking neurons with time delay displaying stable synchronous dynamics. Using mean-field and stability analyses, we investigate the influence of dynamic inputs on the frequency of firing rate oscillations. We show that afferent noise, mimicking inputs to the neurons, causes smoothing of the system’s response function, displacing equilibria and altering the stability of oscillatory states. Our analysis further shows that these noise-induced changes cause a shift of the peak frequency of synchronous oscillations that scales with input intensity, leading the network towards critical states. We lastly discuss the extension of these principles to periodic stimulation, in which externally applied driving signals can trigger analogous phenomena. Our results reveal one possible mechanism involved in shaping oscillatory activity in the brain and associated control principles. PMID:27669018

  19. 77 FR 43063 - Affirmation of Vertical Datum for Surveying and Mapping Activities for the Territory of Puerto Rico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... Activities for the Territory of Puerto Rico AGENCY: National Geodetic Survey (NGS), National Ocean Service... National Ocean Service (NOS), National Geodetic Survey (NGS), has completed the definition and... control monuments is available in digital form, from the NGS Web site:...

  20. Preliminary results from GPS geodetic observations after the January 12, 2010, Mw 7.0 earthquake in Haiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calais, Eric; Mattioli, Glen S.; Freed, Andrew M.; Jansma, Pamela; Macly, Jeannette; Stamps, Sarah; Chaussard, Estelle; Saint Preux, Frantz; Macly, Jeannitte; Mildor, Saint Louis

    2010-05-01

    We have been collecting Global Positioning System (GPS) data along the North American-Caribbean plate boundary to assess slip partitioning, block behavior, and elastic strain accumulation since 1986 when six stations were installed in the northeastern Caribbean. The network was expanded significantly each year from 1994 onward with the addition of Haiti in 2003. Several reoccupations have been completed in Haiti since that time, permitting characterization of the GPS-derived interseismic velocity field. The January 12, 2010 Haiti (Mw=7.0) earthquake traversed the GPS geodetic network and likely occurred on a segment of the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault, one of the major structures of the North American-Caribbean plate boundary, which likely last ruptured in 1751. Modeling of the interseismic GPS-derived velocity field in the northeastern Caribbean by Manaker et al. (2008) was consistent with full locking of this segment of the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault and the potential of an earthquake with Mw=7.2 at any time should all strain be released during a single event. The Mw 7.0 Haiti earthquake, therefore, was not unexpected. To constrain co-seismic deformation and stress loading of adjacent fault segments, we collected data on the existing GPS geodetic network in Haiti in February 2010. Preliminary results indicate significant transpression associated with the recent events.

  1. Logistical aspects of large telemedicine networks. 2: Measurement of network activity.

    PubMed

    Wootton, Richard; Smith, Anthony C; Gormley, Sinead; Patterson, Jessica

    2002-01-01

    We carried out a retrospective review of the videoconference activity records in a university-run hospital telemedicine studio. Usage records describing videoconferencing activity in the telemedicine studio were compared with the billing records provided by the telecommunications company. During a seven-month period there were 211 entries in the studio log: 108 calls made from the studio and 103 calls made from a far-end location. We found that 103 calls from a total of 195 calls reported by the telecommunications company were recorded in the usage log. The remaining 92 calls were not recorded, probably for one of several reasons, including: failed calls--a large number of unrecorded calls (57%) lasted for less than 2 min (median 1.6 min); origin of videoconference calls--calls may have been recorded incorrectly in the usage diary (i.e. as being initiated from the far end, when actually initiated from the studio); and human error. Our study showed that manual recording of videoconference activity may not accurately reflect the actual activity taking place. Those responsible for recording and analysing videoconference activity, particularly in large telemedicine networks, should do so with care.

  2. Self-organization of synchronous activity propagation in neuronal networks driven by local excitation.

    PubMed

    Bayati, Mehdi; Valizadeh, Alireza; Abbassian, Abdolhossein; Cheng, Sen

    2015-01-01

    Many experimental and theoretical studies have suggested that the reliable propagation of synchronous neural activity is crucial for neural information processing. The propagation of synchronous firing activity in so-called synfire chains has been studied extensively in feed-forward networks of spiking neurons. However, it remains unclear how such neural activity could emerge in recurrent neuronal networks through synaptic plasticity. In this study, we investigate whether local excitation, i.e., neurons that fire at a higher frequency than the other, spontaneously active neurons in the network, can shape a network to allow for synchronous activity propagation. We use two-dimensional, locally connected and heterogeneous neuronal networks with spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP). We find that, in our model, local excitation drives profound network changes within seconds. In the emergent network, neural activity propagates synchronously through the network. This activity originates from the site of the local excitation and propagates through the network. The synchronous activity propagation persists, even when the local excitation is removed, since it derives from the synaptic weight matrix. Importantly, once this connectivity is established it remains stable even in the presence of spontaneous activity. Our results suggest that synfire-chain-like activity can emerge in a relatively simple way in realistic neural networks by locally exciting the desired origin of the neuronal sequence.

  3. Estimation of spatiotemporal neural activity using radial basis function networks.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R W; Das, S; Keller, E L

    1998-12-01

    We report a method using radial basis function (RBF) networks to estimate the time evolution of population activity in topologically organized neural structures from single-neuron recordings. This is an important problem in neuroscience research, as such estimates may provide insights into systems-level function of these structures. Since single-unit neural data tends to be unevenly sampled and highly variable under similar behavioral conditions, obtaining such estimates is a difficult task. In particular, a class of cells in the superior colliculus called buildup neurons can have very narrow regions of saccade vectors for which they discharge at high rates but very large surround regions over which they discharge at low, but not zero, levels. Estimating the dynamic movement fields for these cells for two spatial dimensions at closely spaced timed intervals is a difficult problem, and no general method has been described that can be applied to all buildup cells. Estimation of individual collicular cells' spatiotemporal movement fields is a prerequisite for obtaining reliable two-dimensional estimates of the population activity on the collicular motor map during saccades. Therefore, we have developed several computational-geometry-based algorithms that regularize the data before computing a surface estimation using RBF networks. The method is then expanded to the problem of estimating simultaneous spatiotemporal activity occurring across the superior colliculus during a single movement (the inverse problem). In principle, this methodology could be applied to any neural structure with a regular, two-dimensional organization, provided a sufficient spatial distribution of sampled neurons is available.

  4. GNSS geodetic techniques for time and frequency transfer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahaye, François; Cerretto, Giancarlo; Tavella, Patrizia

    2011-01-01

    We performed an initial analysis of the pseudorange data of the GIOVE-B satellite, one of the two experimental Galileo satellites currently in operation, for time transfer.The time transfer technique specified herein does not refer to the definition of Galileo Common View as set up by the European Space Agency, the Royal Observatory of Belgium and Timing Expert, nor the Common View GPS standard practice for BIPM.1 For this specific aim, software was developed to process the GIOVE-B raw pseudoranges and broadcast navigation messages collected by the Galileo Experimental Sensor Stations (GESS) tracking network, yielding station clock phase errors with respect to the Experimental Galileo System Time (EGST). The software also allows processing the Global Positioning System (GPS) P1 and P2 pseudorange data with broadcast navigation message collected at the same stations to obtain the station clock phase errors with respect to the GPS system time (GPST). Differencing these solutions between stations provides two independent means of GNSS time transfer. We compared these time transfer results with Precise Point Positioning (PPP) method applied to GPS data in combined carrier-phase and pseudorange mode as well as in pseudorange-only mode to show their relative merits. The PPP solutions in combined carrier-phase and pseudorange mode showed the least instability of the methods tested herein at all scales, at few parts in 1015 at 1 day for the stations processed, following a tau-½ interval dependency. Conversely, the PPP solutions in pseudorange-only mode are an order of magnitude worst (few parts in 1014 at 1 day for the stations processed) following a tau-1 power-law, but slightly better than the single-satellite raw GPS time transfer solutions obtained using the developed software, since the PPP least-squares solution effectively averages the pseudorange noise. The pseudorange noise levels estimated from PPP pseudorange residuals and from clock solution comparisons are

  5. A Wolf Pack Algorithm for Active and Reactive Power Coordinated Optimization in Active Distribution Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, H. M.; Jiang, X. J.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents an active and reactive power dynamic optimization model for active distribution network (ADN), whose control variables include the output of distributed generations (DGs), charge or discharge power of energy storage system (ESS) and reactive power from capacitor banks. To solve the high-dimension nonlinear optimization model, a new heuristic swarm intelligent method, namely wolf pack algorithm (WPA) with better global convergence and computational robustness, is adapted so that the network loss minimization can be achieved. In this paper, the IEEE33-bus system is used to show the effectiveness of WPA technique compared with other techniques. Numerical tests on the modified IEEE 33-bus system show that WPA for active and reactive multi-period optimization of ADN is exact and effective.

  6. Experiment S-213 selenocentric geodetic reference system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, F. J.; Elassal, A. A.; Lucas, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Development and implementation of a photogrammetric system was undertaken to provide accurate selenodetic positions and topographic mapping of all areas overflown by orbital spacecraft. The system was installed in the scientific instrument module (SIM) bay of the Apollo command service module (CSM). In theory, this system provided everything a photogrammetrist could want: the position of each exposure station would be obtained from Earth-based tracking; the orientation of each photograph could be computed from the synchronized stellar exposure and the lock-angles determined by preflight calibration; and the scale of each stereomodel would be obtained directly from the altimeter data. Operationally, the data acquisition was adequate, but less than optimum. Systematic errors are believed to be the result of the primitive orbit determination procedures in use at the time of the Apollo 15 mission, inadequate models of the lunar gravity field, and spacecraft oscillations induced by uncoupled thrusting and various activities of the astronauts.

  7. Boscovich: his geodetic and cartographic studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crippa, B.; Forcella, V.; Mussio, L.

    The name of Ruggero Giuseppe Boscovich has many spellings: the Croatian Boscovič, linked to his Dalmatian origin, becomes Boscowich in German. Ruggero Giuseppe Boscovich lived and worked in many cities: Rome, Pavia, Venice, Paris, London, Warsaw, Saint Petersburg and Constantinople, where he carried out diplomatic missions. He was a Jesuit and studied mathematics, physics, astronomy, geodesy, and cartography. His studies in geodesy and cartography were developed in Italy: he measured the meridian between Rome and Rimini, he worked on the new map of the Papal State and he designed the Brera Observatory. In the first part of the present work, we present Boscovich's activities from a chronological point of view. In the second part, we focus on two specific arguments, related to geodesy and cartography: the new map of the Papal State and an attempt to rebuild the associated triangulation.

  8. Modeling mechanophore activation within a viscous rubbery network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silberstein, Meredith N.; Cremar, Lee D.; Beiermann, Brett A.; Kramer, Sharlotte B.; Martinez, Todd J.; White, Scott R.; Sottos, Nancy R.

    2014-02-01

    Mechanically induced chemical reactivity is a promising means for designing self-sensing and autonomous materials. Force sensitive chemical groups called mechanophores can be covalently linked into polymers in order to trigger specific chemical reactions upon mechanical loading. A model framework is developed to describe the response of these mechanophores to mechanical loading within an elastomeric matrix. A multiscale modeling scheme is used to couple mechanophore kinetics with rubbery elasticity. In particular, transition state theory for the population of mechanophores is modified to account for the stress-induced changes in kinetics within the solid state. The model is specified to the case of spiropyran covalently linked into a polymethacrylate (PMA) backbone. This optically trackable mechanophore (optically active through absorption and fluorescence when triggered) allows the model to be assessed in comparison to observed experimental behavior. The activation predicted by the ideal viscous elastomer model is reasonable, but consistently occurs at a larger strain than in the experiments. The glassy portion of the PMA response accounts for part of the difference in the onset of activation between experiments and the ideal elastomer model. The glassy stress response is therefore included as an additional empirically determined driving force for activation in the model. The remainder of the discrepancy between the experimental and simulation results is attributed to force inhomogeneity within the rubbery network, highlighting that the mechanophore response is correlated with local force history rather than with macroscopic stress.

  9. A Principle of Forming and Developing Geodetic Bases in the Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staňková, Hana; Černota, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    The development of satellite geodesy and creation of geocentric and geodetic bases have become an impulse for the integration and modernization of national geodesic bases into the global continental frame. In the area of cadastral practice classic planar coordinate systems and established figures have been used for a long time. Nowadays, searching for the relationship between standard (classic) geodetic systems and the newly existing geocentric system is still the current issue of geodetic practice.

  10. Rapid Assessment of Earthquakes with Radar and Optical Geodetic Imaging and Finite Fault Models (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, E. J.; Sladen, A.; Simons, M.; Rosen, P. A.; Yun, S.; Li, Z.; Avouac, J.; Leprince, S.

    2010-12-01

    Earthquake responders need to know where the earthquake has caused damage and what is the likely intensity of damage. The earliest information comes from global and regional seismic networks, which provide the magnitude and locations of the main earthquake hypocenter and moment tensor centroid and also the locations of aftershocks. Location accuracy depends on the availability of seismic data close to the earthquake source. Finite fault models of the earthquake slip can be derived from analysis of seismic waveforms alone, but the results can have large errors in the location of the fault ruptures and spatial distribution of slip, which are critical for estimating the distribution of shaking and damage. Geodetic measurements of ground displacements with GPS, LiDAR, or radar and optical imagery provide key spatial constraints on the location of the fault ruptures and distribution of slip. Here we describe the analysis of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) and sub-pixel correlation (or pixel offset tracking) of radar and optical imagery to measure ground coseismic displacements for recent large earthquakes, and lessons learned for rapid assessment of future events. These geodetic imaging techniques have been applied to the 2010 Leogane, Haiti; 2010 Maule, Chile; 2010 Baja California, Mexico; 2008 Wenchuan, China; 2007 Tocopilla, Chile; 2007 Pisco, Peru; 2005 Kashmir; and 2003 Bam, Iran earthquakes, using data from ESA Envisat ASAR, JAXA ALOS PALSAR, NASA Terra ASTER and CNES SPOT5 satellite instruments and the NASA/JPL UAVSAR airborne system. For these events, the geodetic data provided unique information on the location of the fault or faults that ruptured and the distribution of slip that was not available from the seismic data and allowed the creation of accurate finite fault source models. In many of these cases, the fault ruptures were on previously unknown faults or faults not believed to be at high risk of earthquakes, so the area and degree of

  11. A future geodetic monitoring system for vertical land motion in the Perth basin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filmer, Mick; Featherstone, Will; Morgan, Linda; Schenk, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Vertical land movement (VLM) affects many regions around the world and can have various causes, such as tectonics, glacial isostatic adjustment and resource extraction. Geodetic monitoring systems are employed in different configurations to identify VLM to provide knowledge for hazard mapping, risk assessment and land planning. We describe results from historical geodetic observations, and efforts to establish a monitoring system in the Western Australian city of Perth, which is subject to VLM, most probably caused by groundwater extraction over the past ~100 years. The most direct evidence of VLM in Perth is provided by two continuously operating GNSS (CGNSS) stations HIL1 (from 1997) and PERT (from 1992). However, these stations provide estimates only at discrete locations. In addition, the data from HIL1 is subject to frequent equipment changes and PERT ceased operation in early 2012. The CGNSS VLM rates reach ~-6 mm/yr, but are not linear over time and appear to be highly correlated with the rates of groundwater extraction. Limited sequences of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) images are available over short periods between 1992-2009, and although these suggest spatially variable VLM rates reaching -5 mm/yr at some locations, the uncertainty from the small number of images suggest that these results should be treated cautiously. If it remains necessary to extract groundwater for Perth (possibly at increased rates), an ongoing monitoring programme is needed. This should be based on combined GNSS, InSAR and levelling observation programmes. Historical levelling data from the early 1970s is currently being extracted from hardcopy archives into digital file format for analysis and adjustment. These data will be used to establish an original reference network for later geodetic observations comprising repeat levelling campaigns connected to periodic GNSS campaigns and CGNSS stations, but most importantly, a regular and structured acquisition of In

  12. The influence of cooling, crystallisation and re-melting on the interpretation of geodetic signals in volcanic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caricchi, Luca; Biggs, Juliet; Annen, Catherine; Ebmeier, Susanna

    2014-02-01

    Deformation of volcanic edifices is typically attributed to the movement of magma within the volcanic plumbing system, but a wide range of magmatic processes are capable of producing significant volume variations and may also produce deformation. In order to understand the evolution of magmatic systems prior to eruption and correctly interpret monitoring signals, it is necessary to quantify the patterns and timescales of surface deformation that processes such as crystallisation, degassing and expansion of the hydrothermal system can produce. We show how the combination of petrology and thermal modelling can be applied to geodetic observations to identify the processes occurring in a magmatic reservoir during volcanic unrest. Thermal modelling and petrology were used to determine the timescales and volumetric variations associated with cooling, crystallisation and gas exsolution. These calculations can be performed rapidly and highlight the most likely processes responsible for the variation of a set of monitoring parameters. We then consider the magnitude and timescales of deformation produced by other processes occurring within the vicinity of an active magma system. We apply these models to a time series of geodetic data spanning the period between the 1997 and 2008 eruptions of Okmok volcano, Aleutians, examining scenarios involving crystallisation, degassing and remelting of the crystallising shallow magmatic body and including a viscoelastic shell or hydrothermal system. The geodetic observations are consistent with the injection of a water-saturated basalt, followed by minor crystallisation and degassing. Other scenarios are not compatible either with the magnitude or rate of the deformation signals.

  13. Enzymatic activity preservation through entrapment within degradable hydrogel networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, Angela Marie

    This dissertation aimed to design and develop a "biogel;" a reproducible, abiotic, and biocompatible polymer hydrogel matrix, that prolongs enzymatic stability allowing for rapid production of biomolecules. The researched entrapment method preserves enzyme activity within an amicable environment while resisting activity reduction in the presence of increased pH environmental challenges. These biogels can be used in a number of applications including repeated production of small molecules and in biosensors. Five main objectives were accomplished: 1) Biogels capable of maintaining enzymatic functionality post-entrapment procedures were fabricated; 2) Biogel activity dependence on crosslinker type and crosslink density was determined; 3) Biogel composition effects on sustained activity after storage were compared; 4) Biogel activity dependence on charged monomer moieties was evaluated, and 5) Combined optimization knowledge gained from the first four objectives was utilized to determine the protection of enzymes within hydrogels when challenged with an increased pH above 8. Biogels were fabricated by entrapping β-galactosidase (lactase) enzyme within acrylamide (ACR) gels crosslinked with poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA, degradable through hydrolysis) or N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (BIS, non-degradable). Initial hydrogel entrapment reduced activity to 40% in ACR/PEGDA gels, compared to a 75% reduction in initial activity of ACR/BIS biogels. Once entrapped, these enzymes resist activity reduction in the presence of environmental challenges, such as altering the pH from 7 to above 8. When biogels were challenged at a pH of 8, activity retention positively correlated to PEGDA crosslinker density; increasing from 48% to 91% retention in 30 to 40 mole % PEGDA biogels as compared to solution based control which retained only 23%. Retention of activity when perturbed from pH 7 is advantageous for biogel applications including the repeated production of desired small

  14. Seafloor Geodetic Investigation of Shallow Slow Slip Events at the Hikurangi Subduction Margin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Spahr C.; Wallace, Laura M.; Ito, Yoshihiro; Mochizuki, Kimihiro; Hino, Ryota; Henrys, Stuart; Schwartz, Susan; Sheehan, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Shallow slow slip events (<10-15 km depth) are well-documented at the northern Hikurangi subduction margin, New Zealand. During the Hikurangi Ocean Bottom Investigation of Tremor and Slow Slip (HOBITSS) project, we deployed and successfully recovered a dense network (<10 km spacing) of 24 Absolute Pressure Gauges (APG) and 15 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) to investigate vertical seafloor deformation and seismicity related to shallow slow slip. The HOBITSS network was deployed for one year from May 2014 to June 2015, in a region directly above an area of large, shallow slow slip events offshore Gisborne, New Zealand. A large slow slip event occurred directly beneath the HOBITSS network in September/October of 2014. The APG data reveal the detailed distribution of seafloor deformation above a shallow (< 10 km depth) offshore subduction thrust for the first time ever. We show evidence that slow slip events can occur very close to the trench and within 2km of the seafloor, where very low pressures and temperatures exist. APGs are a viable tool to detect detailed vertical deformation (on the order of 1-4 cm) of the seafloor and thus enable geodetic investigations of shallow SSEs and other similar-sized transient deformation events at offshore plate boundaries.

  15. Natural lecithin promotes neural network complexity and activity.

    PubMed

    Latifi, Shahrzad; Tamayol, Ali; Habibey, Rouhollah; Sabzevari, Reza; Kahn, Cyril; Geny, David; Eftekharpour, Eftekhar; Annabi, Nasim; Blau, Axel; Linder, Michel; Arab-Tehrany, Elmira

    2016-05-27

    Phospholipids in the brain cell membranes contain different polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), which are critical to nervous system function and structure. In particular, brain function critically depends on the uptake of the so-called "essential" fatty acids such as omega-3 (n-3) and omega-6 (n-6) PUFAs that cannot be readily synthesized by the human body. We extracted natural lecithin rich in various PUFAs from a marine source and transformed it into nanoliposomes. These nanoliposomes increased neurite outgrowth, network complexity and neural activity of cortical rat neurons in vitro. We also observed an upregulation of synapsin I (SYN1), which supports the positive role of lecithin in synaptogenesis, synaptic development and maturation. These findings suggest that lecithin nanoliposomes enhance neuronal development, which may have an impact on devising new lecithin delivery strategies for therapeutic applications.

  16. Epidemic process on activity-driven modular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dun; Sun, Mei; Li, Dandan

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we propose two novel models of epidemic spreading by considering the activity-driven and the network modular. Firstly, we consider the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) contagion model and derive analytically the epidemic threshold. The results indicate that the epidemic threshold only involves with the value of the spread rate and the recovery rate. In addition, the asymptotic refractory density of infected nodes in the different communities exhibits different trends with the change of the modularity-factor. Then, the infected-driven vaccination model is presented. Simulation results illustrate that the final density of vaccination will increase with the increase of the response strength of vaccination. Moreover, the final infected density in the original-infected-community shows different trends with the change of the response strength of vaccination and the spreading rate. The infected-driven vaccination is a good way to control the epidemic spreading.

  17. Natural lecithin promotes neural network complexity and activity

    PubMed Central

    Latifi, Shahrzad; Tamayol, Ali; Habibey, Rouhollah; Sabzevari, Reza; Kahn, Cyril; Geny, David; Eftekharpour, Eftekhar; Annabi, Nasim; Blau, Axel; Linder, Michel; Arab-Tehrany, Elmira

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipids in the brain cell membranes contain different polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), which are critical to nervous system function and structure. In particular, brain function critically depends on the uptake of the so-called “essential” fatty acids such as omega-3 (n-3) and omega-6 (n-6) PUFAs that cannot be readily synthesized by the human body. We extracted natural lecithin rich in various PUFAs from a marine source and transformed it into nanoliposomes. These nanoliposomes increased neurite outgrowth, network complexity and neural activity of cortical rat neurons in vitro. We also observed an upregulation of synapsin I (SYN1), which supports the positive role of lecithin in synaptogenesis, synaptic development and maturation. These findings suggest that lecithin nanoliposomes enhance neuronal development, which may have an impact on devising new lecithin delivery strategies for therapeutic applications. PMID:27228907

  18. Antituberculosis Activity of the Molecular Libraries Screening Center Network Library

    PubMed Central

    MADDRY, JOSEPH A.; ANANTHAN, SUBRAMANIAM; GOLDMAN, ROBERT C.; HOBRATH, JUDITH V.; KWONG, CECIL D.; MADDOX, CLINTON; RASMUSSEN, LYNN; REYNOLDS, ROBERT C.; SECRIST, JOHN A.; SOSA, MELINDA I.; WHITE, E. LUCILE; ZHANG, WEI

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY There is an urgent need for the discovery and development of new antitubercular agents that target novel biochemical pathways and treat drug-resistant forms of the disease. One approach to addressing this need is through high-throughput screening of drug-like small molecule libraries against the whole bacterium in order to identify a variety of new, active scaffolds that will stimulate additional biological research and drug discovery. Through the Molecular Libraries Screening Center Network, the NIAID Tuberculosis Antimicrobial Acquisition and Coordinating Facility tested a 215,110-compound library against M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv. A medicinal chemistry survey of the results from the screening campaign is reported herein. PMID:19783214

  19. Incorporating GPS geodetic data into the undergraduate classroom to improve data and information literacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansma, P. E.; Mattioli, G. S.

    2002-12-01

    As part of an NSF-funded project, we are incorporating Global Positioning System (GPS) geodesy into the classroom to improve data and information literacy among undergraduate students. Our objectives are: to introduce statistical concepts essential for the interpretation of large datasets; to promote communication skills; to enhance critical thinking; and to build teamwork. GPS geodesy is ideal for illustrating data literacy concepts. Data precision and accuracy depend upon several factors, including type of equipment, environmental conditions, length of occupations, monument design, site location, configuration of the geodetic network, and processing strategies. All of these can be varied, allowing the students to learn the trade-offs among cost, time, and quality and to determine the most efficient methodology for specific problems. In addition, precision, accuracy, and errors govern the interpretations that can be made and the potential to distinguish among competing models. Our focus is a semester-long course that uses GPS geodesy in real-world applications and also requires integration of GPS data into oral presentations and written reports. Students work in teams on "cases" that pose hypotheses for testing. The cases are derived from our on-going research projects and take advantage of on-line continuous GPS (CGPS) data as well as our archived campaign data. The case studies are: 1) Microplate tectonics in the northeastern Caribbean; 2) Inflation/deflation cycles of the Soufriere Hills volcano, Montserrat; and 3) Contribution of monument instability to the overall error in geodetic data from the New Madrid Seismic Zone. All course materials will be on-line and available for the community.

  20. How networks communicate: propagation patterns in spontaneous brain activity.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Anish; Raichle, Marcus E

    2016-10-01

    Initially regarded as 'noise', spontaneous (intrinsic) activity accounts for a large portion of the brain's metabolic cost. Moreover, it is now widely known that infra-slow (less than 0.1 Hz) spontaneous activity, measured using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging of the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal, is correlated within functionally defined resting state networks (RSNs). However, despite these advances, the temporal organization of spontaneous BOLD fluctuations has remained elusive. By studying temporal lags in the resting state BOLD signal, we have recently shown that spontaneous BOLD fluctuations consist of remarkably reproducible patterns of whole brain propagation. Embedded in these propagation patterns are unidirectional 'motifs' which, in turn, give rise to RSNs. Additionally, propagation patterns are markedly altered as a function of state, whether physiological or pathological. Understanding such propagation patterns will likely yield deeper insights into the role of spontaneous activity in brain function in health and disease.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting blood oxygen level-dependent: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'. PMID:27574315

  1. An Autonomous, Low Cost Platform for Seafloor Geodetic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ericksen, T.; Foster, J. H.; Bingham, B. S.

    2013-12-01

    The high cost of acquiring geodetic data from the sea floor has limited the observations available to help us understand and model the behavior of seafloor geodetic processes. To address this problem, the Pacific GPS Facility at the University of Hawaii is developing a cost effective approach for accurately measuring short-term vertical motions of the seafloor and maintaining a continuous long-term record of seafloor pressure without the requirement for costly ship time. There is a recognized need to vastly increase our underwater geodetic observing capacity. Most of the largest recorded earthquakes and most devastating tsunamis are generated at subduction zones underwater. Similarly, many volcanoes are partly (e.g. Santorini) or completely (e.g. Loihi) submerged, and are not well observed and understood. Furthermore, landslide features ring many ocean basins, and huge debris deposits surround many volcanic oceanic islands. Our approach will lower the cost of collecting sea-floor geodetic data, reducing the barriers preventing us from acquiring the information we need to observe and understand these types of structures and provide a direct societal benefit in improving hazard assessment. The capability is being developed by equipping one of the University of Hawaii Wave Gliders with an integrated acoustic telemetry package, a dual frequency geodetic-grade Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, processing unit, and cellular communications. The Wave Glider will interrogate high accuracy pressure sensors on the sea floor to maintain a near-continuous stream of pressure and temperature data, but seafloor pressure data includes contribution from a variety of sources and on its own may not provide the accuracy required for geodetic investigations. Independent measurements of sea surface pressure and sea surface height can be used to remove these contributions from the observed sea floor pressure timeseries. We will integrate our seafloor pressure measurements with air

  2. Size-dependent regulation of synchronized activity in living neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Hideaki; Kubota, Shigeru; Chida, Yudai; Morita, Mayu; Moriya, Satoshi; Akima, Hisanao; Sato, Shigeo; Hirano-Iwata, Ayumi; Tanii, Takashi; Niwano, Michio

    2016-07-01

    We study the effect of network size on synchronized activity in living neuronal networks. Dissociated cortical neurons form synaptic connections in culture and generate synchronized spontaneous activity within 10 days in vitro. Using micropatterned surfaces to extrinsically control the size of neuronal networks, we show that synchronized activity can emerge in a network as small as 12 cells. Furthermore, a detailed comparison of small (˜20 cells), medium (˜100 cells), and large (˜400 cells) networks reveal that synchronized activity becomes destabilized in the small networks. A computational modeling of neural activity is then employed to explore the underlying mechanism responsible for the size effect. We find that the generation and maintenance of the synchronized activity can be minimally described by: (1) the stochastic firing of each neuron in the network, (2) enhancement in the network activity in a positive feedback loop of excitatory synapses, and (3) Ca-dependent suppression of bursting activity. The model further shows that the decrease in total synaptic input to a neuron that drives the positive feedback amplification of correlated activity is a key factor underlying the destabilization of synchrony in smaller networks. Spontaneous neural activity plays a critical role in cortical information processing, and our work constructively clarifies an aspect of the structural basis behind this.

  3. Size-dependent regulation of synchronized activity in living neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hideaki; Kubota, Shigeru; Chida, Yudai; Morita, Mayu; Moriya, Satoshi; Akima, Hisanao; Sato, Shigeo; Hirano-Iwata, Ayumi; Tanii, Takashi; Niwano, Michio

    2016-07-01

    We study the effect of network size on synchronized activity in living neuronal networks. Dissociated cortical neurons form synaptic connections in culture and generate synchronized spontaneous activity within 10 days in vitro. Using micropatterned surfaces to extrinsically control the size of neuronal networks, we show that synchronized activity can emerge in a network as small as 12 cells. Furthermore, a detailed comparison of small (∼20 cells), medium (∼100 cells), and large (∼400 cells) networks reveal that synchronized activity becomes destabilized in the small networks. A computational modeling of neural activity is then employed to explore the underlying mechanism responsible for the size effect. We find that the generation and maintenance of the synchronized activity can be minimally described by: (1) the stochastic firing of each neuron in the network, (2) enhancement in the network activity in a positive feedback loop of excitatory synapses, and (3) Ca-dependent suppression of bursting activity. The model further shows that the decrease in total synaptic input to a neuron that drives the positive feedback amplification of correlated activity is a key factor underlying the destabilization of synchrony in smaller networks. Spontaneous neural activity plays a critical role in cortical information processing, and our work constructively clarifies an aspect of the structural basis behind this. PMID:27575164

  4. Size-dependent regulation of synchronized activity in living neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hideaki; Kubota, Shigeru; Chida, Yudai; Morita, Mayu; Moriya, Satoshi; Akima, Hisanao; Sato, Shigeo; Hirano-Iwata, Ayumi; Tanii, Takashi; Niwano, Michio

    2016-07-01

    We study the effect of network size on synchronized activity in living neuronal networks. Dissociated cortical neurons form synaptic connections in culture and generate synchronized spontaneous activity within 10 days in vitro. Using micropatterned surfaces to extrinsically control the size of neuronal networks, we show that synchronized activity can emerge in a network as small as 12 cells. Furthermore, a detailed comparison of small (∼20 cells), medium (∼100 cells), and large (∼400 cells) networks reveal that synchronized activity becomes destabilized in the small networks. A computational modeling of neural activity is then employed to explore the underlying mechanism responsible for the size effect. We find that the generation and maintenance of the synchronized activity can be minimally described by: (1) the stochastic firing of each neuron in the network, (2) enhancement in the network activity in a positive feedback loop of excitatory synapses, and (3) Ca-dependent suppression of bursting activity. The model further shows that the decrease in total synaptic input to a neuron that drives the positive feedback amplification of correlated activity is a key factor underlying the destabilization of synchrony in smaller networks. Spontaneous neural activity plays a critical role in cortical information processing, and our work constructively clarifies an aspect of the structural basis behind this.

  5. A geodetic laser radar rangefinder with 10(exp -7) resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizushima, Y.; Takeichi, M.; Warashima, Y.; Takeshima, A.; Ogawa, I.; Ichie, K.; Schiller, N. H.

    1992-01-01

    A novel geodetic laser radar rangefinder (GLRR) unit utilizing a pair of synchronized 10-psec streak camera systems was developed for displacement measurements of the earth's plates. In order to achieve minimum computing error and assure extremely high spatial resolution, an optical pulse registration clock was developed and used to register a fiducial mark on the time scale of the system. Conventional optical rangefinders have been limited to a relative resolution of 10(exp -6) even for short distances. The system to be reported on today has the capability of measuring a 50km range with an accuracy of 4mm corresponding to a relative resolution of 10(exp -7). With a gain of greater than 3 x 10(exp 3), the system has the capability of detecting extremely weak signals on the order of photon counting. This combined with temporal gating makes daytime measurements comparable in signal-to-noise ratio to nighttime viewing. This is useful for measuring faint signals returning over a range of several tens of kilometers. The present ranging system was designed to observe the mutual displacement of geodetic plates and was employed to measure the boundary between the Philippine and Asian geodetic plates that pass beneath the Suruga Bay near Hamamatsu City, Japan. The system has been in operation for over 3 years. In addition, the system has the ability of producing and detecting optical ranging pulses of several wavelengths simultaneously, making this a complete multicolor system. The basic GLRR system consists of a frequency stabilizing crystal, optical clock, YAG laser, KDP doubling crystal, DK*P tripling crystal, two matched streak cameras (A and B), a control computer, and an output/input periscope system.

  6. Geodetic strain of Greece in the interval 1892-1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, R.; England, P.; Parsons, B.; Billiris, H.; Paradissis, D.; Veis, G.

    1997-11-01

    A first-order triangulation of Greece was carried out in the 1890s. Reoccupation, using Global Positioning System receivers, of 46 of the 93 original markers yielded estimates of the deformation of the region over the intervening interval. Broad regions have similar geodetic strain over the 100-year time span. Strain north of the Gulf of Korinthos is predominantly north-south extension, though with a significant east-west component. The central Peloponnisos is relatively stable, whereas the gulfs of the southern Peloponnisos are all characterized by uniaxial east-west extension. The seismic expression of strain for the entire region, calculated from the seismic moment tensors of earthquakes of MS≥5.8 during the past 100 years, accounts for only 20-50% of the geodetically determined strain. At a scale of 50-100 km, the fraction of the strain that is expressed seismically varies much more than this range. In particular, whereas seismic strain in the eastern Gulf of Korinthos over the past 100 years is commensurate with the geodetic strain, there is rapid extension across the western Gulf of Korinthos (˜0.3 μstrain yr-1), with negligible seismic strain for the 100 year period prior to 1992. The Egion earthquake of June 1995 in the western Gulf of Korinthos released only a small proportion (≤20%) of the elastic strain that had accumulated in that region. The observed distribution of displacements can be explained by the relative rotation of two plates with a broad accommodation zone between them, but it is equally consistent with the deformation that would be expected of a sheet of fluid moving toward a low-pressure boundary at the Hellenic Trench. A simple calculation implies that if the region does behave as a fluid, then its effective viscosity is ˜1022-1023 Pa s. Such viscosities are consistent with the deformation of a lithosphere obeying a rheological law similar to that obtained for olivine in the laboratory.

  7. Simulating Ground Motions from Geodetic Data for ShakeMaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreger, D.; Rhie, J.; Murray, M. H.

    2004-12-01

    Over the past several years, we have developed an automated finite-source analysis procedure making use of data recorded by regional distance broadband stations. The method determines the best fault plane by testing the two possible nodal planes of the regional distance moment tensor. Both line-source and plane-source inversions are performed, and the source parameters from these inversions are used to characterize rupture finiteness and directivity. Near-fault ground motions obtained by integrating the derived slip distribution with near-fault Green's functions can be used to augment ShakeMap. For example, source finiteness information significantly improved the initial ShakeMaps of the 2003 Mw6.5 San Simeon, California, earthquake. Our present work has two primary thrusts: 1) development of a method for the near-realtime inversion of GPS data to independently determine finite-fault geometry and orientation, and slip distribution, and 2) investigation of methods to simulate high-frequency ground motions from the geodetic slip models. In this study, we will present a method for converting slip models obtained from GPS data into kinematic models whose rupture process is governed by the rupture and slip velocities. Preliminary results show that simply assuming a rupture-to-shear velocity ratio of 0.8 and a slip velocity derived from a constant stress drop model performs well. We will demonstrate the approach for the 1994 Northridge earthquake by simulating motions using the Wald et al. (1996) kinematic model, a uniform slip model, and the geodetic slip model of Hudnut et al. (1996). The simulated motions for the geodetic model will be compared to both the kinematic model reference and the data in both the time domain and the spectral acceleration domain. We will also compare the simulations in terms of peak ground velocity ShakeMaps. Finally the results will be characterized in terms of the uncertainty due to the unknown rupture velocity and stress drop.

  8. Current Situation of AFREF and First Results from GNSS Networks in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Salah; Farah, Hussein; Wonnacott, Richard

    2016-07-01

    The African Geodetic Reference Frame (AFREF) is conceived as a unified geodetic reference frame for Africa. It will be the fundamental basis for the national three-dimensional reference networks fully consistent and homogeneous with the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). When fully implemented, its backbone will consist of a network of continuous, permanent GPS stations such that a user anywhere in Africa would have free access to, and would be at most 1000km from, such stations. Full implementation will include a unified vertical datum and support for efforts to establish a precise African geoid, in concert with the African Geoid project activities. The realization of AFREF has vast potentials for geodesy, mapping, surveying, geoinformation, natural hazards mitigation, earth sciences, etc. Its implementation will provide a major springboard for the transfer and enhancement of skills in surveying and geodesy and especially GPS technology and applications. AFREF is, therefore, an African initiative to unify the geodetic reference frames of Africa based on the ITRF through a network of GNSS base stations at a spacing such users will be at most within ~1000 km of a base station. First Reference Frame Solution of about 80 geodetic GPS stations in Africa has been started in February 2013 at some processing centers in Europe and Africa. Results of independent solutions being developed by various African scientific teams: Hart RAO, South Africa; Ardhi University, Tanzania and SEGAL, University of Beria Interior, Portugal, show an accuracy of aligned ITRF 2008 using 42 IGS stations in E and N components with 3.0 mm and in U component 7.5 mm.

  9. Refraction effects of atmosphere on geodetic measurements to celestial bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, C. S.

    1973-01-01

    The problem is considered of obtaining accurate values of refraction corrections for geodetic measurements of celestial bodies. The basic principles of optics governing the phenomenon of refraction are defined, and differential equations are derived for the refraction corrections. The corrections fall into two main categories: (1) refraction effects due to change in the direction of propagation, and (2) refraction effects mainly due to change in the velocity of propagation. The various assumptions made by earlier investigators are reviewed along with the basic principles of improved models designed by investigators of the twentieth century. The accuracy problem for various quantities is discussed, and the conclusions and recommendations are summarized.

  10. Proceedings of the International Symposium Management of Geodetic Data, 1981

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, L. E.

    Data management has become a major issue in many phases of geodesy. This is true because many geodetic projects involve very large data sets that must be managed and manipulated by computers. Data received from a variety of sources and often in disparate formats and quality must be sorted, validated, and selected, and then put into a form that can be read and processed by the host computer. Data packages have to be produced in forms required by customers. For some final products, tables, maps, and other visual data presentation graphics need to be constructed from the processed data by automated methods.

  11. Seafloor geodetic reference station branched from submarine cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, M.; Asada, A.; Ura, T.; Asakawa, K.; Yokobiki, T.; Iwase, R.; Goto, T.; Sato, M.; Nagahashi, K.; Tanaka, T.

    2008-12-01

    We launched a project supported by the Japan Society for the Science Promotion as the Grants in Aid for Scientific Research. In this project, we are aiming at developing new-generation seafloor geodetic observation system that conquers difficulties inherent with the current system. Central idea of this project is to utilize techniques of underwater robot (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle) and submarine cable to make measurements in place of using the research vessels. Combination of underwater robot and submarine cable make it possible to provide permanent seafloor reference point, to conduct the observation with selecting favorable condition of sea and GPS satellite distributions, to make much more frequent observations and to enable flexible planning of observation in response to sudden geodetic events. Prototype of the on-board system which should be installed on an AUV was finished. Several trials had been done with the system in the sea. The results from them showed that the new on-board system will reach to the higher level in performance than the current system in the near future. And then we started to dedicate ourselves mainly to developing new seafloor transponder. The current seafloor transponder system is stand-alone one which runs on internal batteries. We expect five to ten years for the lifetime of the current seafloor transponder, even though it depends on how often we perform measurements with the transponder. Replacement of the seafloor transponder will be needed when we target seafloor crustal deformation that has long time cycle more than several decades. Continuity of seafloor geodetic observation will be stopped. New seafloor transponder which we have been developing is one which can be connected to a submarine cable by wet-mate connectors. Power is supplied through submarine cable and then the new seafloor transponder will be a permanent reference station for seafloor geodetic survey. Submarine cable can supply accurate GPS time (1pps) and clock

  12. On differential transformations between Cartesian and curvilinear (geodetic) coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soler, T.

    1976-01-01

    Differential transformations are developed between Cartesian and curvilinear orthogonal coordinates. Only matrix algebra is used for the presentation of the basic concepts. After defining the reference systems used the rotation (R), metric (H), and Jacobian (J) matrices of the transformations between cartesian and curvilinear coordinate systems are introduced. A value of R as a function of H and J is presented. Likewise an analytical expression for J(-1) as a function of H(-2) and R is obtained. Emphasis is placed on showing that differential equations are equivalent to conventional similarity transformations. Scaling methods are discussed along with ellipsoidal coordinates. Differential transformations between elipsoidal and geodetic coordinates are established.

  13. Who Can You Turn to? Tie Activation within Core Business Discussion Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renzulli, Linda A.; Aldrich, Howard

    2005-01-01

    We examine the connection between personal network characteristics and the activation of ties for access to resources during routine times. We focus on factors affecting business owners' use of their core network ties to obtain legal, loan, financial and expert advice. Owners rely more on core business ties when their core networks contain a high…

  14. Both novelty and expertise increase action observation network activity.

    PubMed

    Liew, Sook-Lei; Sheng, Tong; Margetis, John L; Aziz-Zadeh, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Our experiences with others affect how we perceive their actions. In particular, activity in bilateral premotor and parietal cortices during action observation, collectively known as the action observation network (AON), is modulated by one's expertise with the observed actions or individuals. However, conflicting reports suggest that AON activity is greatest both for familiar and unfamiliar actions. The current study examines the effects of different types and amounts of experience (e.g., visual, interpersonal, personal) on AON activation. fMRI was used to scan 16 healthy participants without prior experience with individuals with amputations (novices), 11 experienced occupational therapists (OTs) who had varying amounts of experience with individuals with amputations, and one individual born with below-elbow residual limbs (participant CJ), as they viewed video clips of goal-matched actions performed by an individual with residual limbs and by an individual with hands. Participants were given increased visual exposure to actions performed by both effectors midway through the scanning procedure. Novices demonstrated a large AON response to the initial viewing of an individual with residual limbs compared to one with hands, but this signal was attenuated after they received visual exposure to both effectors. In contrast, OTs, who had moderate familiarity with residual limbs, demonstrated a lower AON response upon initial viewing-similar to novices after they received visual exposure. At the other extreme, CJ, who has extreme familiarity with residual limbs both visually and motorically, shows a largely increased left-lateralized AON response, exceeding that of novices and experienced OTs, when viewing the residual limb compared to hand actions. These results suggest that a nuanced model of AON engagement is needed to explain how cases of both extreme experience (CJ) and extreme novelty (novices) can result in the greatest AON activity.

  15. Current status of the EPOS WG4 - GNSS and Other Geodetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Rui; Bastos, Luisa; Bruyninx, Carine; D'Agostino, Nicola; Dousa, Jan; Ganas, Athanassios; Lidberg, Martin; Nocquet, Jean-Mathieu

    2014-05-01

    WG4 - "EPOS Geodetic Data and Other Geodetic Data" is the Working Group of the EPOS project in charge of defining and preparing the integration of the existing Pan-European Geodetic Infrastructures that will support European Geosciences, which is the ultimate goal of the EPOS project. The WG4 is formed by representatives of the participating EPOS countries (23) but it is also open to the entire geodetic community. In fact, WG4 also already includes members from countries that formally are not integrating EPOS in this first step. The geodetic component of EPOS (WG4) is dealing essentially with Research Infrastructures focused on continuous operating GNSS (cGNSS) in the current phase. The option of concentrating the efforts on the presently most generalized geodetic tool supporting research on Solid Earth was decided in order to optimize the existing resources. Nevertheless, WG4 will continue to pursue the development of tools and methodologies that permit the access of the EPOS community to other geodetic information (e.g., gravimetry). Furthermore, although the focus is on Solid Earth applications, other research and technical applications (e.g., reference frames, meteorology, space weather) can also benefit from the efforts of WG4 EPOS towards the optimization of the geodetic resources in Europe. We will present and discuss the plans for the implementation of the thematic and core services (TCS) for geodetic data within EPOS and the related business plan. We will focus on strategies towards the implementation of the best solutions that will permit to the end-users, and in particular geo-scientists, to access the geodetic data, derived solutions, and associated metadata using transparent and uniform processes. Five pillars have been defined proposed for the TCS: Dissemination, Preservation, Monitoring, and Analysis of geodetic data plus the Support and Governance Infrastructure. Current proposals and remaining open questions will be discussed.

  16. Recent Progress in Some Active Topics on Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Guo, L.; Jiang, J.; Chi, L.; Li, W.; Wang, Q. A.; Cai, X.

    2015-04-01

    Complex networks have been extensively studied across many fields, especially in interdisciplinary areas. It has since long been recognized that topological structures and dynamics are important aspects for capturing the essence of complex networks. The recent years have also witnessed the emergence of several new elements which play important roles in network study. By combining the results of different research orientations in our group, we provide here a review of the recent advances in regards to spectral graph theory, opinion dynamics, interdependent networks, graph energy theory and temporal networks. We hope this will be helpful for the newcomers of those fields to discover new intriguing topics.

  17. Persistent Observation of Dynamic Scenes in an Active Camera Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bi; Ding, Chong; Roy-Chowdhury, Amit; Farrell, Jay

    This chapter deals with the problem of persistent observation of a wide area scene through decentralized, cooperative control of an active camera network. We focus on applications where events unfold over a large geographic area and need to be analyzed by multiple cameras. There is no central unit accumulating and analyzing all the data. The overall goal is to observe all objects (i.e., targets) in the region of deployment of the cameras, while selectively focusing at a high resolution on some particular target features based on application requirements. Efficient usage of resources in such a scenario requires that the cameras be active. However, this control cannot be based on separate analysis of the sensed video in each camera. They must act collaboratively to be able to acquire multiple targets at different resolutions. Our research focuses on developing accurate and efficient target acquisition and camera control algorithms in such scenarios using game theory. We show real-life experimental results of the approach.

  18. Active Low Intrusion Hybrid Monitor for Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Navia, Marlon; Campelo, Jose C.; Bonastre, Alberto; Ors, Rafael; Capella, Juan V.; Serrano, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    Several systems have been proposed to monitor wireless sensor networks (WSN). These systems may be active (causing a high degree of intrusion) or passive (low observability inside the nodes). This paper presents the implementation of an active hybrid (hardware and software) monitor with low intrusion. It is based on the addition to the sensor node of a monitor node (hardware part) which, through a standard interface, is able to receive the monitoring information sent by a piece of software executed in the sensor node. The intrusion on time, code, and energy caused in the sensor nodes by the monitor is evaluated as a function of data size and the interface used. Then different interfaces, commonly available in sensor nodes, are evaluated: serial transmission (USART), serial peripheral interface (SPI), and parallel. The proposed hybrid monitor provides highly detailed information, barely disturbed by the measurement tool (interference), about the behavior of the WSN that may be used to evaluate many properties such as performance, dependability, security, etc. Monitor nodes are self-powered and may be removed after the monitoring campaign to be reused in other campaigns and/or WSNs. No other hardware-independent monitoring platforms with such low interference have been found in the literature. PMID:26393604

  19. Monitoring deep geodynamic processes within Vrancea intermediate-depth seismic zone by geodetic means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besutiu, Lucian; Zlagnean, Luminita

    2015-04-01

    Background Located in the bending zone of East Carpathians, the so-called Vrancea zone is one of the most active seismic regions in Europe. Despite many years of international research, its intermediate-depth seismicity within full intra-continental environment still represents a challenge of the 21st century. Infrastructure In the attempt to join the above-mentioned efforts, the Solid Earth Dynamics Department (SEDD) in the Institute of Geodynamics of the Romanian Academy has developed a special research infrastructure, mainly devoted to gravity and space geodesy observations. A geodetic network covering the epicentre area of the intermediate-depth earthquakes has been designed and implemented for monitoring deep geodynamic processes and their surface echoes. Within each base-station of the above-mentioned network, a still-reinforced concrete pillar allows for high accuracy repeated gravity and GPS determinations. Results Starting from some results of the previously run CERGOP and UNIGRACE European programmes, to which additional SEDD repeated field campaigns were added, an unusual geodynamic behaviour has been revealed in the area. 1) Crust deformation: unlike the overall uprising of East Carpathians, as a result of denudation followed by erosion, their SE bending zone, with Vrancea epicentre area exhibits a slight subsidence. 2) Gravity change: more than 200 microgals non-tidal gravity decrease over a 20 years time-span has been noticed within the subsiding area. Extended observations showed the gravity lowering as a nowadays continuing process. Interpretation This strange combination of topography subsidence and gravity lowering has been interpreted in terms of crust stretching in the Vrancea epicentre zone due to the gravity pull created by densification of the lower crust as a result of phase-transform processes taking place in the lithospheric compartment sunken into the upper mantle. The occurrence of crust earthquakes with vertical-extension focal

  20. SR calculation of the geodetic precession of gpb.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Russell

    2003-03-01

    The gpb satellite, see http://www.nas.edu/ssb/gpb.html, should enter a low circular polar orbit about earth July 2003. Its near-perfect gyroscopes will probe the metric of space near the earth. An in-plane precession is expected, termed the geodetic effect, because measured distance is not Euclidean in the presence of gravity. The circumference of a circle tangent to the outside of the gyroscope is, by SR, shortened slightly more than a circle tangent to the inside. The gyroscope axis is slowly tilted backward (counter to the orbital direction) by this geodetic effect, ΔΘ = -3π GM/r c^2 = -3π v^2/c^2 rad/rev = -6.55467 arcsec/year. This is identical to the GR result, arXiv:gr-qc/9909054 v2 21 Sep 1999, except for the sign. After including small perturbations due to the sun and the earth's oblateness, GR expects +6.58048 and SR expects - 6.56124 arcsec/yr. The predicted precision of the experiment is 0.00045 arcsec/yr. Let the experiment decide.

  1. An improved algorithm for geocentric to geodetic coordinate conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Toms, R.

    1996-02-01

    The problem of performing transformations from geocentric to geodetic coordinates has received an inordinate amount of attention in the literature. Numerous approximate methods have been published. Almost none of the publications address the issue of efficiency and in most cases there is a paucity of error analysis. Recently there has been a surge of interest in this problem aimed at developing more efficient methods for real time applications such as DIS. Iterative algorithms have been proposed that are not of optimal efficiency, address only one error component and require a small but uncertain number of relatively expensive iterations for convergence. In a recent paper published by the author a new algorithm was proposed for the transformation of geocentric to geodetic coordinates. The new algorithm was tested at the Visual Systems Laboratory at the Institute for Simulation and Training, the University of Central Florida, and found to be 30 percent faster than the best previously published algorithm. In this paper further improvements are made in terms of efficiency. For completeness and to make this paper more readable, it was decided to revise the previous paper and to publish it as a new report. The introduction describes the improvements in more detail.

  2. Transforming geocentric cartesian coordinates to geodetic coordinates by using differential search algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civicioglu, Pinar

    2012-09-01

    In order to solve numerous practical navigational, geodetic and astro-geodetic problems, it is necessary to transform geocentric cartesian coordinates into geodetic coordinates or vice versa. It is very easy to solve the problem of transforming geodetic coordinates into geocentric cartesian coordinates. On the other hand, it is rather difficult to solve the problem of transforming geocentric cartesian coordinates into geodetic coordinates as it is very hard to define a mathematical relationship between the geodetic latitude (φ) and the geocentric cartesian coordinates (X, Y, Z). In this paper, a new algorithm, the Differential Search Algorithm (DS), is presented to solve the problem of transforming the geocentric cartesian coordinates into geodetic coordinates and its performance is compared with the performances of the classical methods (i.e., Borkowski, 1989; Bowring, 1976; Fukushima, 2006; Heikkinen, 1982; Jones, 2002; Zhang, 2005; Borkowski, 1987; Shu, 2010 and Lin, 1995) and Computational-Intelligence algorithms (i.e., ABC, JDE, JADE, SADE, EPSDE, GSA, PSO2011, and CMA-ES). The statistical tests realized for the comparison of performances indicate that the problem-solving success of DS algorithm in transforming the geocentric cartesian coordinates into geodetic coordinates is higher than those of all classical methods and Computational-Intelligence algorithms used in this paper.

  3. c5++ - Multi-Technique Analysis Software for Next Generation Geodetic Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobiger, Thomas; Gotoh, Tadahiro; Otsubo, toshimichi; Kubooka, Toshihiro; Sekido, Mamoru; Takiguchi, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Processing of space geodetic techniques should be carried out with consistent and utmost up-todate physical models. Therefore, c5++ is being developed, which will act as a framework under which dedicated space geodetic applications can be created. Due to its nature, combination of different techniques as well as automated processing of VLBI experiments will become possible with c5++.

  4. How yawning switches the default-mode network to the attentional network by activating the cerebrospinal fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2014-03-01

    Yawning is a behavior to which little research has been devoted. However, its purpose has not yet been demonstrated and remains controversial. In this article, we propose a new theory involving the brain network that is functional during the resting state, that is, the default mode network. When this network is active, yawning manifests a process of switching to the attentional system through its capacity to increase circulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), thereby increasing clearance of somnogenic factors (prostaglandin D(2), adenosine, and others) accumulating in the cerebrospinal fluid.

  5. Muscle networks: Connectivity analysis of EMG activity during postural control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonstra, Tjeerd W.; Danna-Dos-Santos, Alessander; Xie, Hong-Bo; Roerdink, Melvyn; Stins, John F.; Breakspear, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that reduce the many degrees of freedom in the musculoskeletal system remains an outstanding challenge. Muscle synergies reduce the dimensionality and hence simplify the control problem. How this is achieved is not yet known. Here we use network theory to assess the coordination between multiple muscles and to elucidate the neural implementation of muscle synergies. We performed connectivity analysis of surface EMG from ten leg muscles to extract the muscle networks while human participants were standing upright in four different conditions. We observed widespread connectivity between muscles at multiple distinct frequency bands. The network topology differed significantly between frequencies and between conditions. These findings demonstrate how muscle networks can be used to investigate the neural circuitry of motor coordination. The presence of disparate muscle networks across frequencies suggests that the neuromuscular system is organized into a multiplex network allowing for parallel and hierarchical control structures.

  6. Muscle networks: Connectivity analysis of EMG activity during postural control

    PubMed Central

    Boonstra, Tjeerd W.; Danna-Dos-Santos, Alessander; Xie, Hong-Bo; Roerdink, Melvyn; Stins, John F.; Breakspear, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that reduce the many degrees of freedom in the musculoskeletal system remains an outstanding challenge. Muscle synergies reduce the dimensionality and hence simplify the control problem. How this is achieved is not yet known. Here we use network theory to assess the coordination between multiple muscles and to elucidate the neural implementation of muscle synergies. We performed connectivity analysis of surface EMG from ten leg muscles to extract the muscle networks while human participants were standing upright in four different conditions. We observed widespread connectivity between muscles at multiple distinct frequency bands. The network topology differed significantly between frequencies and between conditions. These findings demonstrate how muscle networks can be used to investigate the neural circuitry of motor coordination. The presence of disparate muscle networks across frequencies suggests that the neuromuscular system is organized into a multiplex network allowing for parallel and hierarchical control structures. PMID:26634293

  7. On the geodetic applications of simultaneous range-differencing to LAGEOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pablis, E. C.

    1982-01-01

    The possibility of improving the accuracy of geodetic results by use of simultaneously observed ranges to Lageos, in a differencing mode, from pairs of stations was studied. Simulation tests show that model errors can be effectively minimized by simultaneous range differencing (SRD) for a rather broad class of network satellite pass configurations. The methods of least squares approximation are compared with monomials and Chebyshev polynomials and the cubic spline interpolation. Analysis of three types of orbital biases (radial, along- and across track) shows that radial biases are the ones most efficiently minimized in the SRC mode. The degree to which the other two can be minimized depends on the type of parameters under estimation and the geometry of the problem. Sensitivity analyses of the SRD observation show that for baseline length estimations the most useful data are those collected in a direction parallel to the baseline and at a low elevation. Estimating individual baseline lengths with respect to an assumed but fixed orbit not only decreases the cost, but it further reduces the effects of model biases on the results as opposed to a network solution. Analogous results and conclusions are obtained for the estimates of the coordinates of the pole.

  8. Observing plate motions in S.E. Asia: Geodetic results of the GEODYSSEA Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, W. J. F.; Ambrosius, B. A. C.; Noomen, R.; Angermann, D.; Wilson, P.; Becker, M.; Reinhart, E.; Walpersdorf, A.; Vigny, C.

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents the final geodetic results of the GEODYSSEA project. The GPS data from a 42 station network observed during two field campaigns (1994/1996) were analyzed by four groups using different software packages and analysis strategies. The precision of both campaign coordinate solutions was found to be 4-7 mm for the horizontal, and 1 cm for the vertical component. The campaign solutions were merged into one unique solution, which was accurately mapped into the ITRF-96 reference frame. The global accuracy of this solution with respect to ITRF-96 is ±1 cm, while the resolution of the relative horizontal velocities is estimated to be at the level of 2-3 mm/yr. This solution was used as the basis for all scientific interpretations, which are published in separate papers. The velocity estimates of a part of the network provided the first direct measurement of a relative motion of the Sundaland block with respect to Eurasian plate.

  9. Airborne Geodetic Imaging Using the L-band UAVSAR Instrument (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, S.; Zebker, H. A.; Jones, C. E.; Michel, T.; Chapman, B. D.; Muellerschoen, R.; Fore, A.; Simard, M.

    2009-12-01

    Radar interferometry using both airborne and spaceborne platforms has become an integral tool in geodetics sciences over the past 3 decades for both fine resolution topographic mapping and for measuring surface deformation from a variety of both natural and anthropogenic sources. The UAVSAR instrument, employing an L-band actively electronically scanned antenna, had its genesis in the ESTO Instrument Incubator Program and after 3 years of development has begun the regular collection of science data in support of various geodetic applications. System design was motivated by solid Earth applications where repeat pass radar interferometry can be used to measure subtle deformation of the surface, however flexibility and extensibility to support other applications were also major design drivers. Initial testing and deployments are being carried out with the NASA Gulfstream III aircraft, which has been modified to accommodate the radar pod and has been equipped with precision autopilot capability developed by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. With this the aircraft can fly within a 10 m diameter tube on any specified trajectory necessary for repeat-pass radar interferometric applications. To maintain the required pointing for repeat-pass interferometric applications we have employed an actively scanned antenna steered using INU measurement data. This talk will present some early deformation results made by the UAVSAR instrument over volcanoes (Mt St Helens), landslides near Parkfield CA, ice sheet motion in Greenland and Iceland, anthropogenic induced surface deformation from oil pumping near Lost Hills, CA and changes in agricultural surfaces in California’s San Joaquin Valley. This research was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  10. Geodetic insights on the post-seismic transients from the Andaman Nicobar region: 2005-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earnest, A.; Vijayan, M.; Jade, S.; Krishnan, R.; Sringeri, S. T.

    2013-12-01

    The 2004 Mw 9.2 Sumatra-Andaman mega-thrust rupture broke the whole 1300 km long fore-arc sliver boundary of the Indo- Burmese collision. Earlier events of 1679 (M~7.5), 1941 (M 7.7), 1881 (M~7.9) and 2002 (Mw 7.3) generated spatially restricted ruptures along this margin. GPS based geodetic measurements of post-seismic deformation following the 2004 M9.2 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake gives insights on the spatio-temporal evolution of transient tectonic deformation happening at the Suda-Andaman margin. This work encompasses the near-field geodetic data collected from the Andaman-Nicobar Islands and far-field CGPS site data available from SUGAR, UNAVCO and IGS from 2005-2013. Precise geodetic data analysis shows that the GPS benchmarks in the Andaman-Nicobar region moved immediately after 2004 event towards the sea-ward trench in the SW direction, following very much the co-seismic offset directions. This can be possibly because of the continued predominant after-slip occurrence around the 2004 rupture zone due to the velocity-strengthening behavior at the downdip segments of the rupture zone. Lately a progressive reversal of motion direction away from the oceanic trench (and the co-seismic offset direction) of the coastal and inland GPS sites of Andaman-Nicobar Islands are observed. The site displacement transients shows a rotation of the displacement vector moving from south-west to north. Spatio-temporal analysis of the earthquakes show dense shallow seismicity in the back-arc region, normal and thrust faulting activity towards the trench. The hypo-central distribution highlights the shallow subduction at the northern segment, which becomes steeper and deeper to the south. The stress distribution, inferred from the P and T-axes of earthquake faulting mechanisms, represents the compressional fore-arc and extensional back-arc stress regimes. Our analysis results will be discussed in detail by integrating the kinematics and seismo-tectonic evolution of this subducting

  11. The State and Development Direction of the Geodetic VLBI Station in Korea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ju, Hyunhee; Kim, Myungho; Kim, Suchul; Park, Jinsik; Kondo, Tetsuro; Kim, Tuhwan; Oh, Hongjong; Yi, Sangoh

    2010-01-01

    A permanent geodetic VLBI station with a 22-m diameter antenna will be newly constructed in Korea by the National Geographic Information Institute (NGII) under the project Korea VLBI system for Geodesy (KVG) that aims at maintaining the Korean geodetic datum accurately on the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). KVG can receive 2, 8, 22, and 43 GHz bands simultaneously in order to conduct geodetic and astronomical VLBI observations with Korea astronomical VLBI stations along with geodetic observations with IVS stations. This simultaneous four-band receiving capability is a unique feature of the KVG system. The KVG has started officially in October 2008. A new geodetic VLBI station will be constructed at Sejong city (about 120 km south of Seoul and about 20 km north-northwest of Daejeon) and construction of all systems will be completed in 2011.

  12. New step toward geodetic range observations at the sea floor with the BBOBS system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiobara, H.; Shinohara, M.; Isse, T.

    2011-12-01

    Since 1999, we had developed the broadband ocean bottom seismometer (BBOBS) and its new generation model (BBOBS-NX), and performed several practical observations with them in these ten years to create a category of the ocean floor broadband seismology. Now, the BBOBS data is proved to be acceptable for broadband seismic analyses. In these studies, the period range of the data used is about 10 - 200 s, but in longer period range, i.e. geodetic range, is an unknown region in observations at the sea floor. The acoustic GPS link observation is one of successful methods to know horizontal movement of the sea floor, but it is difficult to obtain continuous data in time. The borehole tilt-meter system is ideal in observational conditions, but it is impossible to expand spatially dense observation network. On the other hand, high mobility of our BBOBS and BBOBS-NX can be a breakthrough for this kind of observation network. So that, based on our BBOBS technology, two kinds of attempts to expand observation range toward the geodetic one have been started since 2009. Our aim in these attempts is to extend observation periods more than one week long for detecting slow slip events, as a first step. Finally, we would like to build the observation network by using them. The first attempt is a precise pressure measurement to detect vertical displacement at the sea floor by attaching an absolute pressure gauge and a parasitic data logger to the original OBS data recorder. The stable frequency oscillator (MCXO) in the data recorder is useful for precise pressure measurement of the gauge with frequency outputs. Although the final resolution of the pressure becomes smaller than 1 Pa, we still have problems due to the drift of the gauge and some scale of sea level change in practical observations. The total precision of the pressure value is also affected by the shift and drift of the frequency standard to measure frequency output signals of the gauge. In our measurements, this effect

  13. Cooperative wireless network control based health and activity monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Prakash, R; Ganesh, A Balaji; Girish, Siva V

    2016-10-01

    A real-time cooperative communication based wireless network is presented for monitoring health and activity of an end-user in their environment. The cooperative communication offers better energy consumption and also an opportunity to aware the current location of a user non-intrusively. The link between mobile sensor node and relay node is dynamically established by using Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) and Link Quality Indicator (LQI) based on adaptive relay selection scheme. The study proposes a Linear Acceleration based Transmission Power Decision Control (LA-TPDC) algorithm to further enhance the energy efficiency of cooperative communication. Further, the occurrences of false alarms are carefully prevented by introducing three stages of sequential warning system. The real-time experiments are carried-out by using the nodes, namely mobile sensor node, relay nodes and a destination node which are indigenously developed by using a CC430 microcontroller integrated with an in-built transceiver at 868 MHz. The wireless node performance characteristics, such as energy consumption, Signal-Noise ratio (SNR), Bit Error Rate (BER), Packet Delivery Ratio (PDR) and transmission offset are evaluated for all the participated nodes. The experimental results observed that the proposed linear acceleration based transmission power decision control algorithm almost doubles the battery life time than energy efficient conventional cooperative communication. PMID:27562484

  14. Cooperative wireless network control based health and activity monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Prakash, R; Ganesh, A Balaji; Girish, Siva V

    2016-10-01

    A real-time cooperative communication based wireless network is presented for monitoring health and activity of an end-user in their environment. The cooperative communication offers better energy consumption and also an opportunity to aware the current location of a user non-intrusively. The link between mobile sensor node and relay node is dynamically established by using Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) and Link Quality Indicator (LQI) based on adaptive relay selection scheme. The study proposes a Linear Acceleration based Transmission Power Decision Control (LA-TPDC) algorithm to further enhance the energy efficiency of cooperative communication. Further, the occurrences of false alarms are carefully prevented by introducing three stages of sequential warning system. The real-time experiments are carried-out by using the nodes, namely mobile sensor node, relay nodes and a destination node which are indigenously developed by using a CC430 microcontroller integrated with an in-built transceiver at 868 MHz. The wireless node performance characteristics, such as energy consumption, Signal-Noise ratio (SNR), Bit Error Rate (BER), Packet Delivery Ratio (PDR) and transmission offset are evaluated for all the participated nodes. The experimental results observed that the proposed linear acceleration based transmission power decision control algorithm almost doubles the battery life time than energy efficient conventional cooperative communication.

  15. Blogs and Social Network Sites as Activity Systems: Exploring Adult Informal Learning Process through Activity Theory Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heo, Gyeong Mi; Lee, Romee

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses an Activity Theory framework to explore adult user activities and informal learning processes as reflected in their blogs and social network sites (SNS). Using the assumption that a web-based space is an activity system in which learning occurs, typical features of the components were investigated and each activity system then…

  16. Finding Influential Spreaders from Human Activity beyond Network Location.

    PubMed

    Min, Byungjoon; Liljeros, Fredrik; Makse, Hernán A

    2015-01-01

    Most centralities proposed for identifying influential spreaders on social networks to either spread a message or to stop an epidemic require the full topological information of the network on which spreading occurs. In practice, however, collecting all connections between agents in social networks can be hardly achieved. As a result, such metrics could be difficult to apply to real social networks. Consequently, a new approach for identifying influential people without the explicit network information is demanded in order to provide an efficient immunization or spreading strategy, in a practical sense. In this study, we seek a possible way for finding influential spreaders by using the social mechanisms of how social connections are formed in real networks. We find that a reliable immunization scheme can be achieved by asking people how they interact with each other. From these surveys we find that the probabilistic tendency to connect to a hub has the strongest predictive power for influential spreaders among tested social mechanisms. Our observation also suggests that people who connect different communities is more likely to be an influential spreader when a network has a strong modular structure. Our finding implies that not only the effect of network location but also the behavior of individuals is important to design optimal immunization or spreading schemes. PMID:26323015

  17. Finding Influential Spreaders from Human Activity beyond Network Location

    PubMed Central

    Min, Byungjoon; Liljeros, Fredrik; Makse, Hernán A.

    2015-01-01

    Most centralities proposed for identifying influential spreaders on social networks to either spread a message or to stop an epidemic require the full topological information of the network on which spreading occurs. In practice, however, collecting all connections between agents in social networks can be hardly achieved. As a result, such metrics could be difficult to apply to real social networks. Consequently, a new approach for identifying influential people without the explicit network information is demanded in order to provide an efficient immunization or spreading strategy, in a practical sense. In this study, we seek a possible way for finding influential spreaders by using the social mechanisms of how social connections are formed in real networks. We find that a reliable immunization scheme can be achieved by asking people how they interact with each other. From these surveys we find that the probabilistic tendency to connect to a hub has the strongest predictive power for influential spreaders among tested social mechanisms. Our observation also suggests that people who connect different communities is more likely to be an influential spreader when a network has a strong modular structure. Our finding implies that not only the effect of network location but also the behavior of individuals is important to design optimal immunization or spreading schemes. PMID:26323015

  18. Reducing the draconitic errors in GNSS geodetic products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Solano, C. J.; Hugentobler, U.; Steigenberger, P.; Bloßfeld, M.; Fritsche, M.

    2014-06-01

    Systematic errors at harmonics of the GPS draconitic year have been found in diverse GPS-derived geodetic products like the geocenter -component, station coordinates, -pole rate and orbits (i.e. orbit overlaps). The GPS draconitic year is the repeat period of the GPS constellation w.r.t. the Sun which is about 351 days. Different error sources have been proposed which could generate these spurious signals at the draconitic harmonics. In this study, we focus on one of these error sources, namely the radiation pressure orbit modeling deficiencies. For this purpose, three GPS+GLONASS solutions of 8 years (2004-2011) were computed which differ only in the solar radiation pressure (SRP) and satellite attitude models. The models employed in the solutions are: (1) the CODE (5-parameter) radiation pressure model widely used within the International GNSS Service community, (2) the adjustable box-wing model for SRP impacting GPS (and GLONASS) satellites, and (3) the adjustable box-wing model upgraded to use non-nominal yaw attitude, specially for satellites in eclipse seasons. When comparing the first solution with the third one we achieved the following in the GNSS geodetic products. Orbits: the draconitic errors in the orbit overlaps are reduced for the GPS satellites in all the harmonics on average 46, 38 and 57 % for the radial, along-track and cross-track components, while for GLONASS satellites they are mainly reduced in the cross-track component by 39 %. Geocenter -component: all the odd draconitic harmonics found when the CODE model is used show a very important reduction (almost disappearing with a 92 % average reduction) with the new radiation pressure models. Earth orientation parameters: the draconitic errors are reduced for the -pole rate and especially for the -pole rate by 24 and 50 % respectively. Station coordinates: all the draconitic harmonics (except the 2nd harmonic in the North component) are reduced in the North, East and Height components, with

  19. Plate motions and deformations from geologic and geodetic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, T. H.

    1986-01-01

    Research effort on behalf of the Crustal Dynamics Project focused on the development of methodologies suitable for the analysis of space-geodetic data sets for the estimation of crustal motions, in conjunction with results derived from land-based geodetic data, neo-tectonic studies, and other geophysical data. These methodologies were used to provide estimates of both global plate motions and intraplate deformation in the western U.S. Results from the satellite ranging experiment for the rate of change of the baseline length between San Diego and Quincy, California indicated that relative motion between the North American and Pacific plates over the course of the observing period during 1972 to 1982 were consistent with estimates calculated from geologic data averaged over the past few million years. This result, when combined with other kinematic constraints on western U.S. deformation derived from land-based geodesy, neo-tectonic studies, and other geophysical data, places limits on the possible extension of the Basin and Range province, and implies significant deformation is occurring west of the San Andreas fault. A new methodology was developed to analyze vector-position space-geodetic data to provide estimates of relative vector motions of the observing sites. The algorithm is suitable for the reduction of large, inhomogeneous data sets, and takes into account the full position covariances, errors due to poorly resolved Earth orientation parameters and vertical positions, and reduces baises due to inhomogeneous sampling of the data. This methodology was applied to the problem of estimating the rate-scaling parameter of a global plate tectonic model using satellite laser ranging observations over a five-year interval. The results indicate that the mean rate of global plate motions for that interval are consistent with those averaged over several million years, and are not consistent with quiescent or greatly accelerated plate motions. This methodology was also

  20. Studying modulation on simultaneously activated SSVEP neural networks by a cognitive task.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenghua

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of steady-state visually evoked potential (SSVEP), it has been used in many fields. Numerous studies suggest that there exist three SSVEP neural networks in different frequency bands. An obvious phenomenon has been observed, that the amplitude and phase of SSVEP can be modulated by a cognitive task. Previous works have studied this modulation on separately activated SSVEP neural networks by a cognitive task. If two or more SSVEP neural networks are activated simultaneously in the process of a cognitive task, is the modulation on different SSVEP neural networks the same? In this study, two different SSVEP neural networks were activated simultaneously by two different frequency flickers, with a working memory task irrelevant to the flickers being conducted at the same time. The modulated SSVEP waves were compared with each other and to those only under one flicker in previous studies. The comparison results show that the cognitive task can modulate different SSVEP neural networks with a similar style.

  1. Social networks of experientially similar others: Formation, activation, and consequences of network ties on the health care experience

    PubMed Central

    Gage, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Research documents that interactions among experientially similar others (individuals facing a common stressor) shape health care behavior and ultimately health outcomes. However, we have little understanding of how ties among experientially similar others are formed, what resources and information flows through these networks, and how network embeddedness shapes health care behavior. This paper uses in-depth interviews with 76 parents of pediatric cancer patients to examine network ties among experientially similar others after a serious medical diagnosis. Interviews were conducted between August 2009 and May 2011. Findings demonstrate that many parents formed ties with other families experiencing pediatric cancer, and that information and resources were exchanged during the everyday activities associated with their child’s care. Network flows contained emotional support, caregiving strategies, information about second opinions, health-related knowledge, and strategies for navigating the health care system. Diffusion of information, resources, and support occurred through explicit processes (direct information and support exchanges) and implicit processes (parents learning through observing other families). Network flows among parents shaped parents’ perceptions of the health care experience and their role in their child’s care. These findings contribute to the social networks and social support literatures by elucidating the mechanisms through which network ties among experientially similar others influence health care behavior and experiences. PMID:22999229

  2. Social networks of experientially similar others: formation, activation, and consequences of network ties on the health care experience.

    PubMed

    Gage, Elizabeth A

    2013-10-01

    Research documents that interactions among experientially similar others (individuals facing a common stressor) shape health care behavior and ultimately health outcomes. However, we have little understanding of how ties among experientially similar others are formed, what resources and information flows through these networks, and how network embeddedness shapes health care behavior. This paper uses in-depth interviews with 76 parents of pediatric cancer patients to examine network ties among experientially similar others after a serious medical diagnosis. Interviews were conducted between August 2009 and May 2011. Findings demonstrate that many parents formed ties with other families experiencing pediatric cancer, and that information and resources were exchanged during the everyday activities associated with their child's care. Network flows contained emotional support, caregiving strategies, information about second opinions, health-related knowledge, and strategies for navigating the health care system. Diffusion of information, resources, and support occurred through explicit processes (direct information and support exchanges) and implicit processes (parents learning through observing other families). Network flows among parents shaped parents' perceptions of the health care experience and their role in their child's care. These findings contribute to the social networks and social support literatures by elucidating the mechanisms through which network ties among experientially similar others influence health care behavior and experiences.

  3. Enhancement of visual responsiveness by spontaneous local network activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Haider, Bilal; Duque, Alvaro; Hasenstaub, Andrea R; Yu, Yuguo; McCormick, David A

    2007-06-01

    Spontaneous activity within local circuits affects the integrative properties of neurons and networks. We have previously shown that neocortical network activity exhibits a balance between excitatory and inhibitory synaptic potentials, and such activity has significant effects on synaptic transmission, action potential generation, and spike timing. However, whether such activity facilitates or reduces sensory responses has yet to be clearly determined. We examined this hypothesis in the primary visual cortex in vivo during slow oscillations in ketamine-xylazine anesthetized cats. We measured network activity (Up states) with extracellular recording, while simultaneously recording postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) and action potentials in nearby cells. Stimulating the receptive field revealed that spiking responses of both simple and complex cells were significantly enhanced (>2-fold) during network activity, as were spiking responses to intracellular injection of varying amplitude artificial conductance stimuli. Visually evoked PSPs were not significantly different in amplitude during network activity or quiescence; instead, spontaneous depolarization caused by network activity brought these evoked PSPs closer to firing threshold. Further examination revealed that visual responsiveness was gradually enhanced by progressive membrane potential depolarization. These spontaneous depolarizations enhanced responsiveness to stimuli of varying contrasts, resulting in an upward (multiplicative) scaling of the contrast response function. Our results suggest that small increases in ongoing balanced network activity that result in depolarization may provide a rapid and generalized mechanism to control the responsiveness (gain) of cortical neurons, such as occurs during shifts in spatial attention.

  4. Investigating the long-term geodetic response to magmatic intrusions at volcanoes in northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, A. L.; Biggs, J.; Annen, C.; Houseman, G. A.; Yamasaki, T.; Wright, T. J.; Walters, R. J.; Lu, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Ratios of intrusive to extrusive activity at volcanic arcs are thought to be high, with estimates ranging between 5:1 and 30:1. Understanding the geodetic response to magmatic intrusion is therefore fundamental to large-scale studies of volcano deformation, providing insight into the dynamics of the inter-eruptive period of the volcano cycle and the building of continental crust. In northern California, we identify two volcanoes - Medicine Lake Volcano (MLV) and Lassen Volcanic Center (LaVC) - that exhibit long-term (multi-decadal) subsidence. We test the hypothesis that deformation at these volcanoes results from processes associated with magmatic intrusions. We first constrain the spatial and temporal characteristics of the deformation fields, establishing the first time-series of deformation at LaVC using InSAR data, multi-temporal analysis techniques and global weather models. Although the rates of deformation at the two volcanoes are similar (~1 cm/yr), our results show that the ratio of vertical to horizontal displacements is significantly different, suggesting contrasting source geometries. To test the origin of deformation, we develop modeling strategies to investigate thermal and viscoelastic processes associated with magmatic intrusions. The first model we develop couples analytical geodetic models to a numerical model of volume loss due to cooling and crystallization based upon temperature-melt fraction relationships from petrological experiments. This model provides evidence that magmatic intrusion at MLV has occurred more recently than the last eruption ~1 ka. The second model we test uses a finite element approach to simulate the time-dependent viscoelastic response of the crust to magmatic intrusion. We assess the magnitude and timescales of ground deformation that may result from these processes, exploring the model parameter space before applying the models to our InSAR observations of subsidence in northern California.

  5. Social network activation: the role of health discussion partners in recovery from mental illness.

    PubMed

    Perry, Brea L; Pescosolido, Bernice A

    2015-01-01

    In response to health problems, individuals may strategically activate their social network ties to help manage crisis and uncertainty. While it is well-established that social relationships provide a crucial safety net, little is known about who is chosen to help during an episode of illness. Guided by the Network Episode Model, two aspects of consulting others in the face of mental illness are considered. First, we ask who activates ties, and what kinds of ties and networks they attempt to leverage for discussing health matters. Second, we ask about the utility of activating health-focused network ties. Specifically, we examine the consequences of network activation at time of entry into treatment for individuals' quality of life, social satisfaction, ability to perform social roles, and mental health functioning nearly one year later. Using interview data from the longitudinal Indianapolis Network Mental Health Study (INMHS, N = 171), we focus on a sample of new patients with serious mental illness and a group with less severe disorders who are experiencing their first contact with the mental health treatment system. Three findings stand out. First, our results reveal the nature of agency in illness response. Whether under a rational choice or habitus logic, individuals appear to evaluate support needs, identifying the best possible matches among a larger group of potential health discussants. These include members of the core network and those with prior mental health experiences. Second, selective activation processes have implications for recovery. Those who secure adequate network resources report better outcomes than those who injudiciously activate network ties. Individuals who activate weaker relationships and those who are unsupportive of medical care experience poorer functioning, limited success in fulfilling social roles, and lower social satisfaction and quality of life later on. Third, the evidence suggests that social networks matter above and

  6. Social network activation: the role of health discussion partners in recovery from mental illness.

    PubMed

    Perry, Brea L; Pescosolido, Bernice A

    2015-01-01

    In response to health problems, individuals may strategically activate their social network ties to help manage crisis and uncertainty. While it is well-established that social relationships provide a crucial safety net, little is known about who is chosen to help during an episode of illness. Guided by the Network Episode Model, two aspects of consulting others in the face of mental illness are considered. First, we ask who activates ties, and what kinds of ties and networks they attempt to leverage for discussing health matters. Second, we ask about the utility of activating health-focused network ties. Specifically, we examine the consequences of network activation at time of entry into treatment for individuals' quality of life, social satisfaction, ability to perform social roles, and mental health functioning nearly one year later. Using interview data from the longitudinal Indianapolis Network Mental Health Study (INMHS, N = 171), we focus on a sample of new patients with serious mental illness and a group with less severe disorders who are experiencing their first contact with the mental health treatment system. Three findings stand out. First, our results reveal the nature of agency in illness response. Whether under a rational choice or habitus logic, individuals appear to evaluate support needs, identifying the best possible matches among a larger group of potential health discussants. These include members of the core network and those with prior mental health experiences. Second, selective activation processes have implications for recovery. Those who secure adequate network resources report better outcomes than those who injudiciously activate network ties. Individuals who activate weaker relationships and those who are unsupportive of medical care experience poorer functioning, limited success in fulfilling social roles, and lower social satisfaction and quality of life later on. Third, the evidence suggests that social networks matter above and

  7. Detection of Coastline Deformation Using Remote Sensing and Geodetic Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabuncu, A.; Dogru, A.; Ozener, H.; Turgut, B.

    2016-06-01

    The coastal areas are being destroyed due to the usage that effect the natural balance. Unconsciously sand mining from the sea for nearshore nourishment and construction uses are the main ones. Physical interferences for mining of sand cause an ecologic threat to the coastal environment. However, use of marine sand is inevitable because of economic reasons or unobtainable land-based sand resources. The most convenient solution in such a protection-usage dilemma is to reduce negative impacts of sand production from marine. This depends on the accurate determination of criteriaon production place, style, and amount of sand. With this motivation, nearshore geodedic surveying studies performed on Kilyos Campus of Bogazici University located on the Black Sea coast, north of Istanbul, Turkey between 2001-2002. The study area extends 1 km in the longshore. Geodetic survey was carried out in the summer of 2001 to detect the initial condition for the shoreline. Long-term seasonal changes in shoreline positions were determined biannually. The coast was measured with post-processed kinematic GPS. Besides, shoreline change has studied using Landsat imagery between the years 1986-2015. The data set of Landsat 5 imageries were dated 05.08.1986 and 31.08.2007 and Landsat 7 imageries were dated 21.07.2001 and 28.07.2015. Landcover types in the study area were analyzed on the basis of pixel based classification method. Firstly, unsupervised classification based on ISODATA (Iterative Self Organizing Data Analysis Technique) has been applied and spectral clusters have been determined that gives prior knowledge about the study area. In the second step, supervised classification was carried out by using the three different approaches which are minimum-distance, parallelepiped and maximum-likelihood. All pixel based classification processes were performed with ENVI 4.8 image processing software. Results of geodetic studies and classification outputs will be presented in this paper.

  8. A Regional Geodetic Reference Frame for Asia and the Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, J.; Hu, G.; Jia, M.

    2009-04-01

    In 1994, the United Nations Regional Cartographic Conference for Asia and the Pacific resolved to establish a Permanent Committee comprising of national surveying and mapping agencies to address the concept of establishing a common geographic information infrastructure for the region. This resolution subsequently led to the establishment of the Permanent Committee for GIS Infrastructure for the Asia and Pacific (PCGIAP). One of the goals of the PCGIAP was to establish and maintain a precise understanding of the relationship between permanent geodetic stations across the region. To this end, campaign-style geodetic-GPS observations, coordinated by Geoscience Australia, have been undertaken throughout the region since 1997. In this presentation, we discuss the development of an Asia Pacific regional reference frame based on the PCGIAP GPS campaign data, which now includes data from 417 non-IGS GPS stations and provides long term crustal deformation estimates for over 200 GPS stations throughout the region. We overview and evaluate: our combination strategy with particular emphasis on the alignment of the solution onto the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF); the sensitivity of the solution to reference frame site selection; the treatment of regional co-seismic and post-seismic deformation; and the Asia-Pacific contribution to the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) Working Group on "Regional Dense Velocity Fields". The level of consistency of the coordinate estimates with respect to ITRF2005 is 6, 5, 15 mm, in the east, north and up components, respectively, while the velocity estimates are consistent at 2, 2, 6 mm/yr in the east, north and up components, respectively.

  9. Geodetic measurement of deformation east of the San Andreas fault in central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauber, Jeanne; Lisowski, Michael; Solomon, Sean C.

    Triangulation and trilateration data from two geodetic networks located between the San Andreas fault and the Great Valley have been used to calculate shear strain rates in the Diablo Range and to estimate the slip rate along the Calaveras and Paicines faults in central California. The shear strain rates, γ1 and γ2, were estimated independently from angle changes using Prescott's method and from the simultaneous reduction for station position and strain parameters using the DYNAP method with corrections to reduce the triangulation and trilateration data to a common reference surface. On the basis of Prescott's method, the average shear strain rate across the Diablo Range for the time period between 1962 and 1982 is 0.15±0.08 μrad/yr, with the orientation of the most compressive strain (β) at N16°E±14°. Utilizing corrections for the deflection of the vertical and the geoid reference ellipsoid separation computed on the basis of local gravity observations, γ = 0.19±0.09 μrad/yr and β = N16°E±13°. Although γ is not significantly greater than zero, at the 95% confidence level the orientation of β is similar to the direction of maximum compressive strain indicated by the orientation of major fold structures in the region (N25°E). We infer that the measured strain is due to compression across the folds of this area; the average shear straining corresponds to a relative shortening rate of 5.7±2.7 mm/yr. In contrast to the situation throughout most of the Coast Ranges where fold axes have orientations approximately parallel to the San Andreas fault, within the Diablo Range between Hollister and Coalinga the trends of the fold axes are different and are thought to be controlled by reactivation of older structures. From trilateration measurements made between 1972 and 1987 on lines that are within 10 km of the San Andreas fault, a slip rate of 10-12 mm/yr was calculated for the Calaveras-Paicines fault south of Hollister. The slip rate on the Paicines

  10. Self-organising continuous attractor networks with multiple activity packets, and the representation of space.

    PubMed

    Stringer, S M; Rolls, E T; Trappenberg, T P

    2004-01-01

    'Continuous attractor' neural networks can maintain a localised packet of neuronal activity representing the current state of an agent in a continuous space without external sensory input. In applications such as the representation of head direction or location in the environment, only one packet of activity is needed. For some spatial computations a number of different locations, each with its own features, must be held in memory. We extend previous approaches to continuous attractor networks (in which one packet of activity is maintained active) by showing that a single continuous attractor network can maintain multiple packets of activity simultaneously, if each packet is in a different state space or map. We also show how such a network could by learning self-organise to enable the packets in each space to be moved continuously in that space by idiothetic (motion) inputs. We show how such multi-packet continuous attractor networks could be used to maintain different types of feature (such as form vs colour) simultaneously active in the correct location in a spatial representation. We also show how high-order synapses can improve the performance of these networks, and how the location of a packet could be read by motor networks. The multiple packet continuous attractor networks described here may be used for spatial representations in brain areas such as the parietal cortex and hippocampus.

  11. Evaluation of Techniques to Detect Significant Network Performance Problems using End-to-End Active Network Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Cottrell, R.Les; Logg, Connie; Chhaparia, Mahesh; Grigoriev, Maxim; Haro, Felipe; Nazir, Fawad; Sandford, Mark

    2006-01-25

    End-to-End fault and performance problems detection in wide area production networks is becoming increasingly hard as the complexity of the paths, the diversity of the performance, and dependency on the network increase. Several monitoring infrastructures are built to monitor different network metrics and collect monitoring information from thousands of hosts around the globe. Typically there are hundreds to thousands of time-series plots of network metrics which need to be looked at to identify network performance problems or anomalous variations in the traffic. Furthermore, most commercial products rely on a comparison with user configured static thresholds and often require access to SNMP-MIB information, to which a typical end-user does not usually have access. In our paper we propose new techniques to detect network performance problems proactively in close to realtime and we do not rely on static thresholds and SNMP-MIB information. We describe and compare the use of several different algorithms that we have implemented to detect persistent network problems using anomalous variations analysis in real end-to-end Internet performance measurements. We also provide methods and/or guidance for how to set the user settable parameters. The measurements are based on active probes running on 40 production network paths with bottlenecks varying from 0.5Mbits/s to 1000Mbit/s. For well behaved data (no missed measurements and no very large outliers) with small seasonal changes most algorithms identify similar events. We compare the algorithms' robustness with respect to false positives and missed events especially when there are large seasonal effects in the data. Our proposed techniques cover a wide variety of network paths and traffic patterns. We also discuss the applicability of the algorithms in terms of their intuitiveness, their speed of execution as implemented, and areas of applicability. Our encouraging results compare and evaluate the accuracy of our detection

  12. Geodetic constraints on volcanic plume height at Grímsvötn volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hreinsdóttir, Sigrún; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Roberts, Matthew; Björnsson, Halldór; Grapenthin, Ronni; Arason, Pórdur; Árnadóttir, Thóra; Hólmjárn, Jósef; Geirsson, Halldór; Bennett, Richard; Gudmundsson, Magnús; Oddsson, Björn; Ófeigsson, Benedikt; Villemin, Thierry; Jónsson, Torsteinn; Sturkell, Erik; Höskuldsson, Ármann; Larsen, Gudrún; Thordarson, Thor; Óladóttir, Bergrún

    2014-05-01

    In 2011 a VEI 4 explosive eruption took place at Grímsvötn volcano, Iceland. Grímsvötn is a subglacial basaltic volcano beneath the Vatnajökull ice cap. It is Iceland's most frequently erupting volcano, with recent eruptions in 1983, 1998, 2004, and 2011. The volcano has a low seismic velocity anomaly down to about 3 km depth, interpreted as a magma chamber. A continuous GPS station and a tiltmeter are located on a nunatak, Mount Grímsfjall, which protrudes from the ice at the southern rim of the caldera. The 21-28 May 2011 eruption was Grímsvötn's largest since 1873, resulting in airspace closure in northern Europe and the cancellation of about 900 passenger flights. The eruption was preceded by gradual inflation following the 2004 eruption and progressive increase in seismicity. Kinematic 1 Hz solutions were derived for the position of the GPS station in the hours immediately before and during the 2011 eruption. The onset of deformation preceded the eruption by one hour and reached maximum of 0.57 m within 48 hours. Throughout the eruption the GPS station moved consistently in direction N38.4+/-0.5W, opposite to the direction of movements during the 2004-2011 inter eruptive phase. The deformation characteristics suggest that the signal was mostly due to pressure change in a source at 1.7 +/- 0.2 km depth. We use the geodetic measurements to infer co-eruptive pressure change in the magma chamber using the Mogi model. The rate of pressure drop is then used to estimate the magma flow rate from the chamber. Numerous studies have shown that plume height in explosive eruptions can be related to magma discharge. Using an empirical relationship between the volcanic plume height and magma flow rate (Mastin et al., 2009) we estimate the evolution of the plume height from the geodetic data. Two weather radars monitored the height of the volcanic plume during the eruption. A strong initial plume with peaks at 20-25 km was followed by a declining, pulsating activity

  13. Relationship between inter-stimulus-intervals and intervals of autonomous activities in a neuronal network.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hidekatsu; Minoshima, Wataru; Kudoh, Suguru N

    2015-08-01

    To investigate relationships between neuronal network activity and electrical stimulus, we analyzed autonomous activity before and after electrical stimulus. Recordings of autonomous activity were performed using dissociated culture of rat hippocampal neurons on a multi-electrodes array (MEA) dish. Single stimulus and pared stimuli were applied to a cultured neuronal network. Single stimulus was applied every 1 min, and paired stimuli was performed by two sequential stimuli every 1 min. As a result, the patterns of synchronized activities of a neuronal network were changed after stimulus. Especially, long range synchronous activities were induced by paired stimuli. When 1 s inter-stimulus-intervals (ISI) and 1.5 s ISI paired stimuli are applied to a neuronal network, relatively long range synchronous activities expressed in case of 1.5 s ISI. Temporal synchronous activity of neuronal network is changed according to inter-stimulus-intervals (ISI) of electrical stimulus. In other words, dissociated neuronal network can maintain given information in temporal pattern and a certain type of an information maintenance mechanism was considered to be implemented in a semi-artificial dissociated neuronal network. The result is useful toward manipulation technology of neuronal activity in a brain system.

  14. Long-Term Relationships between Synaptic Tenacity, Synaptic Remodeling, and Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Minerbi, Amir; Kahana, Roni; Goldfeld, Larissa; Kaufman, Maya; Marom, Shimon; Ziv, Noam E.

    2009-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is widely believed to constitute a key mechanism for modifying functional properties of neuronal networks. This belief implicitly implies, however, that synapses, when not driven to change their characteristics by physiologically relevant stimuli, will maintain these characteristics over time. How tenacious are synapses over behaviorally relevant time scales? To begin to address this question, we developed a system for continuously imaging the structural dynamics of individual synapses over many days, while recording network activity in the same preparations. We found that in spontaneously active networks, distributions of synaptic sizes were generally stable over days. Following individual synapses revealed, however, that the apparently static distributions were actually steady states of synapses exhibiting continual and extensive remodeling. In active networks, large synapses tended to grow smaller, whereas small synapses tended to grow larger, mainly during periods of particularly synchronous activity. Suppression of network activity only mildly affected the magnitude of synaptic remodeling, but dependence on synaptic size was lost, leading to the broadening of synaptic size distributions and increases in mean synaptic size. From the perspective of individual neurons, activity drove changes in the relative sizes of their excitatory inputs, but such changes continued, albeit at lower rates, even when network activity was blocked. Our findings show that activity strongly drives synaptic remodeling, but they also show that significant remodeling occurs spontaneously. Whereas such spontaneous remodeling provides an explanation for “synaptic homeostasis” like processes, it also raises significant questions concerning the reliability of individual synapses as sites for persistently modifying network function. PMID:19554080

  15. Low attentional engagement makes attention network activity susceptible to emotional interference.

    PubMed

    Mäki-Marttunen, Verónica; Pickard, Natasha; Solbakk, Anne-Kristin; Ogawa, Keith H; Knight, Robert T; Hartikainen, Kaisa M

    2014-09-10

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether emotion-attention interaction depends on attentional engagement. To investigate emotional modulation of attention network activation, we used a functional MRI paradigm consisting of a visuospatial attention task with either frequent (high-engagement) or infrequent (low-engagement) targets and intermittent emotional or neutral distractors. The attention task recruited a bilateral frontoparietal network with no emotional interference on network activation when the attentional engagement was high. In contrast, when the attentional engagement was low, the unpleasant stimuli interfered with the activation of the frontoparietal attention network, especially in the right hemisphere. This study provides novel evidence for low attentional engagement making attention control network activation susceptible to emotional interference.

  16. Characterization of Ground Displacement Sources from Variational Bayesian Independent Component Analysis of Space Geodetic Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualandi, Adriano; Serpelloni, Enrico; Elina Belardinelli, Maria; Bonafede, Maurizio; Pezzo, Giuseppe; Tolomei, Cristiano

    2015-04-01

    , giving a more reliable estimate of them. Here we introduce the vbICA technique and present its application on synthetic data that simulate a GPS network recording ground deformation in a tectonically active region, with synthetic time-series containing interseismic, coseismic, and postseismic deformation, plus seasonal deformation, and white and coloured noise. We study the ability of the algorithm to recover the original (known) sources of deformation, and then apply it to a real scenario: the Emilia seismic sequence (2012, northern Italy), which is an example of seismic sequence occurred in a slowly converging tectonic setting, characterized by several local to regional anthropogenic or natural sources of deformation, mainly subsidence due to fluid withdrawal and sediments compaction. We apply both PCA and vbICA to displacement time-series recorded by continuous GPS and InSAR (Pezzo et al., EGU2015-8950).

  17. Coherent periodic activity in excitatory Erdös-Renyi neural networks: the role of network connectivity.

    PubMed

    Tattini, Lorenzo; Olmi, Simona; Torcini, Alessandro

    2012-06-01

    In this article, we investigate the role of connectivity in promoting coherent activity in excitatory neural networks. In particular, we would like to understand if the onset of collective oscillations can be related to a minimal average connectivity and how this critical connectivity depends on the number of neurons in the networks. For these purposes, we consider an excitatory random network of leaky integrate-and-fire pulse coupled neurons. The neurons are connected as in a directed Erdös-Renyi graph with average connectivity scaling as a power law with the number of neurons in the network. The scaling is controlled by a parameter γ, which allows to pass from massively connected to sparse networks and therefore to modify the topology of the system. At a macroscopic level, we observe two distinct dynamical phases: an asynchronous state corresponding to a desynchronized dynamics of the neurons and a regime of partial synchronization (PS) associated with a coherent periodic activity of the network. At low connectivity, the system is in an asynchronous state, while PS emerges above a certain critical average connectivity (c). For sufficiently large networks, (c) saturates to a constant value suggesting that a minimal average connectivity is sufficient to observe coherent activity in systems of any size irrespectively of the kind of considered network: sparse or massively connected. However, this value depends on the nature of the synapses: reliable or unreliable. For unreliable synapses, the critical value required to observe the onset of macroscopic behaviors is noticeably smaller than for reliable synaptic transmission. Due to the disorder present in the system, for finite number of neurons we have inhomogeneities in the neuronal behaviors, inducing a weak form of chaos, which vanishes in the thermodynamic limit. In such a limit, the disordered systems exhibit regular (non chaotic) dynamics and their properties correspond to that of a homogeneous

  18. Sensing network for electromagnetic fields generated by seismic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershenzon, Naum I.; Bambakidis, Gust; Ternovskiy, Igor V.

    2014-06-01

    The sensors network is becoming prolific and play now increasingly more important role in acquiring and processing information. Cyber-Physical Systems are focusing on investigation of integrated systems that includes sensing, networking, and computations. The physics of the seismic measurement and electromagnetic field measurement requires special consideration how to design electromagnetic field measurement networks for both research and detection earthquakes and explosions along with the seismic measurement networks. In addition, the electromagnetic sensor network itself could be designed and deployed, as a research tool with great deal of flexibility, the placement of the measuring nodes must be design based on systematic analysis of the seismic-electromagnetic interaction. In this article, we review the observations of the co-seismic electromagnetic field generated by earthquakes and man-made sources such as vibrations and explosions. The theoretical investigation allows the distribution of sensor nodes to be optimized and could be used to support existing geological networks. The placement of sensor nodes have to be determined based on physics of electromagnetic field distribution above the ground level. The results of theoretical investigations of seismo-electromagnetic phenomena are considered in Section I. First, we compare the relative contribution of various types of mechano-electromagnetic mechanisms and then analyze in detail the calculation of electromagnetic fields generated by piezomagnetic and electrokinetic effects.

  19. Comparison of direct and geodetic mass balances on a multi-annual time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, A.

    2010-07-01

    Glacier mass balance is measured with the direct or the geodetic method. In this study, the geodetic mass balances of six Austrian glaciers in 19 periods between 1953 and 2006 are compared to the direct mass balances in the same periods. The mean annual geodetic mass balance for all periods is -0.5 m w.e./year. The mean difference between the geodetic and the direct data is -0.7 m w.e., the minimum -7.3 m w.e. and the maximum 5.6 m w.e. The accuracy of geodetic mass balance resulting from the accuracy of the DEMs ranges from 2 m w.e. for photogrammetric data to 0.002 m w.e. for LIDAR data. Basal melt, seasonal snow cover and density changes of the surface layer contribute up to 0.7 m w.e. for the period of 10 years to the difference to the direct method. The characteristics of published data of Griesgletscher, Gulkana Glacier, Lemon Creek glacier, South Cascade, Storbreen, Storglaciären, and Zongo Glacier is similar to these Austrian glaciers. For 26 analyzed periods with an average length of 18 years the mean difference between the geodetic and the direct data is -0.4 m w.e., the minimum -7.2 m w.e. and the maximum 3.6 m w.e. Longer periods between the acquisition of the DEMs do not necessarily result in a higher accuracy of the geodetic mass balance. Specific glaciers show specific trends of the difference between the direct and the geodetic data according to their type and state. In conclusion, geodetic and direct mass balance data are complementary, but differ systematically.

  20. Signal transduction in the activation of spermatozoa compared to other signalling pathways: a biological networks study.

    PubMed

    Bernabò, Nicola; Mattioli, Mauro; Barboni, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we represented Spermatozoa Activation (SA) the process that leads male gametes to reach their fertilising ability of sea urchin, Caenorhabditis elegans and human as biological networks, i.e. as networks of nodes (molecules) linked by edges (their interactions). Then, we compared them with networks representing ten pathways of relevant physio-pathological importance and with a computer-generated network. We have found that the number of nodes and edges composing each network is not related with the amount of published papers on each specific topic and that all the topological parameters examined are similar in all the networks, thus conferring them a scale free topology and small world behaviour. In conclusion, SA topology, independently from the reproductive biology of considered organism, as others signalling networks is characterised by robustness against random failure, controllability and efficiency in signal transmission. PMID:26489142

  1. An Activation Force-based Affinity Measure for Analyzing Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jun; Guo, Hanliang; Wang, Zhanyi

    2011-01-01

    Affinity measure is a key factor that determines the quality of the analysis of a complex network. Here, we introduce a type of statistics, activation forces, to weight the links of a complex network and thereby develop a desired affinity measure. We show that the approach is superior in facilitating the analysis through experiments on a large-scale word network and a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network consisting of ∼5,000 human proteins. The experiment on the word network verifies that the measured word affinities are highly consistent with human knowledge. Further, the experiment on the PPI network verifies the measure and presents a general method for the identification of functionally similar proteins based on PPIs. Most strikingly, we find an affinity network that compactly connects the cancer-associated proteins to each other, which may reveal novel information for cancer study; this includes likely protein interactions and key proteins in cancer-related signal transduction pathways. PMID:22355630

  2. Hyperpolarization-activated cation current contributes to spontaneous network activity in developing neocortical cultures.

    PubMed

    Klueva, Julia; Lima, Ana D de; Meis, Susanne; Voigt, Thomas; Munsch, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying spontaneous burst activity (SBA), appearing in networks of embryonic cortical neurons at the end of the first week in vitro, remain elusive. Here we investigated the contribution of the hyperpolarization-activated cation current (I(h)) to SBA in cortical cultures of GAD67-GFP mice. I(h) current could be detected in GFP-positive large GABAergic interneurons (L-INs) and glutamatergic principal neurons (PNs) as early as DIV 5. Under current-clamp conditions, blockers of I(h) current, ZD7288 and Cs⁺, abolished the voltage sag and rebound depolarization. ZD7288 induced a hyperpolarization concomitant with an increase in the membrane input resistance in L-INs and PNs. Voltage-clamp recordings revealed I(h) as slowly activating inward current with a reversal potential close to -50 mV and a mid-activation point around -90 mV. Both, ZD7288 (1-10 μM) and Cs⁺ (1-2 mM) reduced SBA, spontaneous activity-driven Ca²⁺ transients, and frequency as well as amplitude of miniature GABAergic postsynaptic currents. Immunocytochemistry and Western blot demonstrated that HCN1 and HCN2 were the prevalent isoforms of HCN channels expressed in L-INs and PNs. These results suggest an important contribution of HCN channels to the maintenance of SBA in embryonic cortical cultures. PMID:22094222

  3. Simulating ensembles of nonlinear continuous time dynamical systems via active ultra wideband wireless network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Alexander S.; Yemelyanov, Ruslan Yu.; Gerasimov, Mark Yu.; Itskov, Vadim V.

    2016-06-01

    The paper deals with a new multi-element processor platform assigned for modelling the behaviour of interacting dynamical systems, i.e., active wireless network. Experimentally, this ensemble is implemented in an active network, the active nodes of which include direct chaotic transceivers and special actuator boards containing microcontrollers for modelling the dynamical systems and an information display unit (colored LEDs). The modelling technique and experimental results are described and analyzed.

  4. Young Adolescents’ Perceived Activity Space Risk, Peer Networks, and Substance use

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Michael; Mennis, Jeremy; Way, Thomas; Light, John; Rusby, Julie; Westling, Erika; Crewe, Stephanie; Flay, Brian; Campbell, Leah; Zaharakis, Nikola; McHenry, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Adolescent substance use is a developmentally contingent social practice that is constituted within the routine social-environment of adolescents’ lives. Few studies have examined peer networks, perceived activity space risk (risk of substance use at routine locations), and substance use. We examined the moderating influence of peer network characteristics on the relationship between perceived activity space risk and substance use among a sample of 250 urban adolescents. Significant interactions were found between peer networks and perceived activity space risk on tobacco and marijuana use, such that protective peer networks reduced the effect of activity place risk on substance use. A significant 3-way interaction was found on marijuana use indicating that gender moderated peer network's effect on activity space risk. Conditional effect analysis found that boys' peer networks moderated the effect of perceived activity space risk on marijuana use, whereas for girls, the effect of perceived activity space risk on marijuana use was not moderated by their peer networks. These findings could advance theoretical models to inform social-environmental research among adolescents. PMID:26026598

  5. Young adolescents' perceived activity space risk, peer networks, and substance use.

    PubMed

    Mason, Michael; Mennis, Jeremy; Way, Thomas; Light, John; Rusby, Julie; Westling, Erika; Crewe, Stephanie; Flay, Brian; Campbell, Leah; Zaharakis, Nikola; McHenry, Chantal

    2015-07-01

    Adolescent substance use is a developmentally contingent social practice that is constituted within the routine social-environment of adolescents' lives. Few studies have examined peer networks, perceived activity space risk (risk of substance use at routine locations), and substance use. We examined the moderating influence of peer network characteristics on the relationship between perceived activity space risk and substance use among a sample of 250 urban adolescents. Significant interactions were found between peer networks and perceived activity space risk on tobacco and marijuana use, such that protective peer networks reduced the effect of activity place risk on substance use. A significant 3-way interaction was found on marijuana use indicating that gender moderated peer network's effect on activity space risk. Conditional effect analysis found that boys' peer networks moderated the effect of perceived activity space risk on marijuana use, whereas for girls, the effect of perceived activity space risk on marijuana use was not moderated by their peer networks. These findings could advance theoretical models to inform social-environmental research among adolescents.

  6. Identifying repeating motifs in the activation of synchronized bursts in cultured neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Raichman, Nadav; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2008-05-15

    Cultured neuronal networks cultivated on micro-electrode arrays are a widely used tool for the investigation of network mechanisms, providing structural framework for long-term recordings of network electrical activity, as well as the network reaction to electrical or chemical stimulations. The typical activity pattern of the culture takes the form of synchronized bursting events (SBEs), in which a large fraction of the recorded neurons simultaneously fire trains of action potentials in short bursts of several hundreds of a millisecond. We developed a method that identifies clusters of bursts that share a similar activation motif throughout the culture based on the fact that the culture morphology remains relatively unchanged for an extended time interval and that neurons fire in a recognizable and precise manner during a burst initiation. Our method compares accuracies in time delays that occurred between the activation of spike-trains of different neurons. Three culture architectures were studied and analyzed: a large network of 2 million cells, a smaller network limited in size of 100,000 cells, and a large network divided into 4 clusters. In each of the morphologies we identified cultures that showed more than one activation motif. Clustered networks showed more motifs on average than uniform cultures. The algorithm was able to show high fidelity to artificial noise. We also compare the results of our method with another method based on a correlation measure.

  7. GGOS working group on ground networks and communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, M.; Altamimi, Z.; Beck, N.; Forsberg, R.; Gurtner, W.; Kenyon, S.; Behrend, D.; Lemoine, F. G.; Ma, C.; Noll, C. E.; Pavlis, E. C.; Malkin, Z.; Moore, A.; Webb, F. H.; Neilan, R.; Ries, J. C.; Rothacher, M.; Willis, P.

    2005-01-01

    Activities of this Working Group include the investigation of the status quo and the development of a plan for full network integration to support improvements in terrestrial reference frame establishment and maintenance, Earth orientation and gravity field monitoring, precision orbit determination, and other geodetic and gravimetric applications required for the long-term observation of global change. This integration process includes the development of a network of fundamental stations with as many co-located techniques as possible, with precisely determined intersystem vectors. This network would exploit the strengths of each technique and minimize the weaknesses where possible. This paper discusses the organization of the working group, the work done to date, and future tasks.

  8. Node interference and robustness: performing virtual knock-out experiments on biological networks: the case of leukocyte integrin activation network.

    PubMed

    Scardoni, Giovanni; Montresor, Alessio; Tosadori, Gabriele; Laudanna, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    The increasing availability of large network datasets derived from high-throughput experiments requires the development of tools to extract relevant information from biological networks, and the development of computational methods capable of detecting qualitative and quantitative changes in the topological properties of biological networks is of critical relevance. We introduce the notions of node interference and robustness as measures of the reciprocal influence between nodes within a network. We examine the theoretical significance of these new, centrality-based, measures by characterizing the topological relationships between nodes and groups of nodes. Node interference analysis allows topologically determining the context of functional influence of single nodes. Conversely, the node robustness analysis allows topologically identifying the nodes having the highest functional influence on a specific node. A new Cytoscape plug-in calculating these measures was developed and applied to a protein-protein interaction network specifically regulating integrin activation in human primary leukocytes. Notably, the functional effects of compounds inhibiting important protein kinases, such as SRC, HCK, FGR and JAK2, are predicted by the interference and robustness analysis, are in agreement with previous studies and are confirmed by laboratory experiments. The interference and robustness notions can be applied to a variety of different contexts, including, for instance, the identification of potential side effects of drugs or the characterization of the consequences of genes deletion, duplication or of proteins degradation, opening new perspectives in biological network analysis.

  9. Development of a composite geodetic structure for space construction, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Primary physical and mechanical properties were defined for pultruded hybrid HMS/E-glass P1700 rod material used for the fabrication of geodetic beams. Key properties established were used in the analysis, design, fabrication, instrumentation, and testing of a geodetic parameter cylinder and a lattice cone closeout joined to a short cylindrical geodetic beam segment. Requirements of structural techniques were accomplished. Analytical procedures were refined and extended to include the effect of rod dimensions for the helical and longitudinal members on local buckling, and the effect of different flexural and extensional moduli on general instability buckling.

  10. GEODYN system description, volume 1. [computer program for estimation of orbit and geodetic parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, M. M.; Goad, C. C.; Martin, T. V.

    1972-01-01

    A computer program for the estimation of orbit and geodetic parameters is presented. The areas in which the program is operational are defined. The specific uses of the program are given as: (1) determination of definitive orbits, (2) tracking instrument calibration, (3) satellite operational predictions, and (4) geodetic parameter estimation. The relationship between the various elements in the solution of the orbit and geodetic parameter estimation problem is analyzed. The solution of the problems corresponds to the orbit generation mode in the first case and to the data reduction mode in the second case.

  11. Epidemic variability in hierarchical geographical networks with human activity patterns.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Liu, Ying; Tang, Ming

    2012-06-01

    Recently, some studies have revealed that non-Poissonian statistics of human behaviors stem from the hierarchical geographical network structure. On this view, we focus on epidemic spreading in the hierarchical geographical networks and study how two distinct contact patterns (i.e., homogeneous time delay (HOTD) and heterogeneous time delay (HETD) associated with geographical distance) influence the spreading speed and the variability of outbreaks. We find that, compared with HOTD and null model, correlations between time delay and network hierarchy in HETD remarkably slow down epidemic spreading and result in an upward cascading multi-modal phenomenon. Proportionately, the variability of outbreaks in HETD has the lower value, but several comparable peaks for a long time, which makes the long-term prediction of epidemic spreading hard. When a seed (i.e., the initial infected node) is from the high layers of networks, epidemic spreading is remarkably promoted. Interestingly, distinct trends of variabilities in two contact patterns emerge: high-layer seeds in HOTD result in the lower variabilities, the case of HETD is opposite. More importantly, the variabilities of high-layer seeds in HETD are much greater than that in HOTD, which implies the unpredictability of epidemic spreading in hierarchical geographical networks.

  12. Active patterning and asymmetric transport in a model actomyosin network

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shenshen; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2013-12-21

    Cytoskeletal networks, which are essentially motor-filament assemblies, play a major role in many developmental processes involving structural remodeling and shape changes. These are achieved by nonequilibrium self-organization processes that generate functional patterns and drive intracellular transport. We construct a minimal physical model that incorporates the coupling between nonlinear elastic responses of individual filaments and force-dependent motor action. By performing stochastic simulations we show that the interplay of motor processes, described as driving anti-correlated motion of the network vertices, and the network connectivity, which determines the percolation character of the structure, can indeed capture the dynamical and structural cooperativity which gives rise to diverse patterns observed experimentally. The buckling instability of individual filaments is found to play a key role in localizing collapse events due to local force imbalance. Motor-driven buckling-induced node aggregation provides a dynamic mechanism that stabilizes the two-dimensional patterns below the apparent static percolation limit. Coordinated motor action is also shown to suppress random thermal noise on large time scales, the two-dimensional configuration that the system starts with thus remaining planar during the structural development. By carrying out similar simulations on a three-dimensional anchored network, we find that the myosin-driven isotropic contraction of a well-connected actin network, when combined with mechanical anchoring that confers directionality to the collective motion, may represent a novel mechanism of intracellular transport, as revealed by chromosome translocation in the starfish oocyte.

  13. Modelling temporal networks of human face-to-face contacts with public activity and individual reachability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi-Qing; Cui, Jing; Zhang, Shu-Min; Zhang, Qi; Li, Xiang

    2016-02-01

    Modelling temporal networks of human face-to-face contacts is vital both for understanding the spread of airborne pathogens and word-of-mouth spreading of information. Although many efforts have been devoted to model these temporal networks, there are still two important social features, public activity and individual reachability, have been ignored in these models. Here we present a simple model that captures these two features and other typical properties of empirical face-to-face contact networks. The model describes agents which are characterized by an attractiveness to slow down the motion of nearby people, have event-triggered active probability and perform an activity-dependent biased random walk in a square box with periodic boundary. The model quantitatively reproduces two empirical temporal networks of human face-to-face contacts which are testified by their network properties and the epidemic spread dynamics on them.

  14. 2011-2012 Campaign GPS Geodetic Monitoring of Surface Deformation, Dominica, Lesser Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. A.; Mattioli, G. S.; James, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Over the last decade, ongoing campaign style geodetic surveys have been conducted on the volcanic island of Dominica in central portion of the Lesser Antilles island arc. An increase in shallow seismicity on the island, the first concentrated in the south from 1998-2000 and the second in the north in 2003, motivated initial measurements in 2001 at 9 sites distributed across Dominica. Subsequent GPS campaigns were conducted in 2003, 2004 and 2007, during which 18 new sites were added to the original network. In 2007, a total of 27 sites were occupied. The most recent data were collected from 13 sites in 2011 and 9 sites in 2012. Out of the 27 sites on the Island, 5 were not occupied during the 2011/2012 field seasons due to accessibility issues. All GPS data have been reprocessed using GIPSY-OASIS II (v. 6) with final, precise IGS08 orbits, clocks, and earth orientation parameters using an absolute point positioning strategy. The purpose of our study is to examine spatial and temporal changes in surface deformation, constrained by GPS, and to investigate the relationship between the recent seismic swarms and shallow volcanic processes.

  15. Position Corrections due to Uncalibrated GNSS Antenna Radomes at IGS Co-located Geodetic Observing Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, I.; Rebischung, P.; Ray, J.; Schmid, R.; Fisher, S.; Griffiths, J.

    2013-12-01

    The International GNSS Service (IGS) through the Infrastructure Committee, the Analysis Center Coordinator, the Antenna Working Group, the Reference Frame Working Group and the Central Bureau have organized a campaign from 2011 to 2013 to analyze the unknown bias in the estimated position for co-located stations due to an uncalibrated radome over the GNSS antenna. Co-located stations have more than one geodetic technique present (GNSS, VLBI, SLR, etc.) and they are a critical element for the realisation of the ITRF. Due to the use of uncalibrated radomes over the GNSS antennas at these important sites the "local ties' between techniques do not have the expected accuracy, and therefore a campaign to analyze the different radome effects was planned and executed at many of the affected IGS stations. The proposed approach is an expedient way to mitigate empirically an unwanted situation with these uncalibrated radomes in the IGS station network so as to try to improve the historic position time series of these stations for the next ITRF realisation. The process has involved removing the uncalibrated radome for a significant number of weeks and then putting the radome back on in the exact same position. The investigation proceeds with dedicated PPP analyses from different sources plus a detailed analysis of the weekly IGS station position combinations. This poster presents the campaign approach, the participating stations and the results. Co-located IGS GNSS sites with uncalibrated radomes

  16. Fitness, but not physical activity, is related to functional integrity of brain networks associated with aging.

    PubMed

    Voss, Michelle W; Weng, Timothy B; Burzynska, Agnieszka Z; Wong, Chelsea N; Cooke, Gillian E; Clark, Rachel; Fanning, Jason; Awick, Elizabeth; Gothe, Neha P; Olson, Erin A; McAuley, Edward; Kramer, Arthur F

    2016-05-01

    Greater physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness are associated with reduced age-related cognitive decline and lower risk for dementia. However, significant gaps remain in the understanding of how physical activity and fitness protect the brain from adverse effects of brain aging. The primary goal of the current study was to empirically evaluate the independent relationships between physical activity and fitness with functional brain health among healthy older adults, as measured by the functional connectivity of cognitively and clinically relevant resting state networks. To build context for fitness and physical activity associations in older adults, we first demonstrate that young adults have greater within-network functional connectivity across a broad range of cortical association networks. Based on these results and previous research, we predicted that individual differences in fitness and physical activity would be most strongly associated with functional integrity of the networks most sensitive to aging. Consistent with this prediction, and extending on previous research, we showed that cardiorespiratory fitness has a positive relationship with functional connectivity of several cortical networks associated with age-related decline, and effects were strongest in the default mode network (DMN). Furthermore, our results suggest that the positive association of fitness with brain function can occur independent of habitual physical activity. Overall, our findings provide further support that cardiorespiratory fitness is an important factor in moderating the adverse effects of aging on cognitively and clinically relevant functional brain networks.

  17. Structural plasticity of GABAergic axons is regulated by network activity and GABAA receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Schuemann, Anne; Klawiter, Agnieszka; Bonhoeffer, Tobias; Wierenga, Corette J.

    2013-01-01

    Coordinated changes at excitatory and inhibitory synapses are essential for normal brain development and function. It is well established that excitatory neurons undergo structural changes, but our knowledge about inhibitory structural plasticity is rather scarce. Here we present a quantitative analysis of the dynamics of GABAergic boutons in the dendritic region of the hippocampal CA1 area using time-lapse two-photon imaging in organotypic hippocampal cultures from GAD65-GFP mice. We show that ~20% of inhibitory boutons are not stable. They are appearing, disappearing and reappearing at specific locations along the inhibitory axon and reflect immature or incomplete synapses. Furthermore, we observed that persistent boutons show large volume fluctuations over several hours, suggesting that presynaptic content of inhibitory synapses is not constant. Our data show that inhibitory boutons are highly dynamic structures and suggest that inhibitory axons are continuously probing potential locations for inhibitory synapse formation by redistributing presynaptic material along the axon. In addition, we found that neuronal activity affects the exploratory dynamics of inhibitory axons. Blocking network activity rapidly reduces the number of transient boutons, whereas enhancing activity reduces the number of persistent inhibitory boutons, possibly reflecting enhanced competition between boutons along the axon. The latter effect requires signaling through GABAA receptors. We propose that activity-dependent regulation of bouton dynamics contributes to inhibitory synaptic plasticity. PMID:23805077

  18. Enzymatically activated emulsions stabilised by interfacial nanofibre networks.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Inês P; Sasselli, Ivan Ramos; Cannon, Daniel A; Hughes, Meghan; Lamprou, Dimitrios A; Tuttle, Tell; Ulijn, Rein V

    2016-03-01

    We report on-demand formation of emulsions stabilised by interfacial nanoscale networks. These are formed through biocatalytic dephosphorylation and self-assembly of Fmoc(9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl)dipeptide amphiphiles in aqueous/organic mixtures. This is achieved by using alkaline phosphatase which transforms surfactant-like phosphorylated precursors into self-assembling aromatic peptide amphiphiles (Fmoc-tyrosine-leucine, Fmoc-YL) that form nanofibrous networks. In biphasic organic/aqueous systems, these networks form preferentially at the interface thus providing a means of emulsion stabilisation. We demonstrate on-demand emulsification by enzyme addition, even after storage of the biphasic mixture for several weeks. Experimental (Fluorescence, FTIR spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy) and computational techniques (atomistic molecular dynamics) are used to characterise the interfacial self-assembly process. PMID:26905042

  19. AST: Activity-Security-Trust driven modeling of time varying networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Xu, Jiake; Liu, Yanheng; Deng, Weiwen

    2016-02-18

    Network modeling is a flexible mathematical structure that enables to identify statistical regularities and structural principles hidden in complex systems. The majority of recent driving forces in modeling complex networks are originated from activity, in which an activity potential of a time invariant function is introduced to identify agents' interactions and to construct an activity-driven model. However, the new-emerging network evolutions are already deeply coupled with not only the explicit factors (e.g. activity) but also the implicit considerations (e.g. security and trust), so more intrinsic driving forces behind should be integrated into the modeling of time varying networks. The agents undoubtedly seek to build a time-dependent trade-off among activity, security, and trust in generating a new connection to another. Thus, we reasonably propose the Activity-Security-Trust (AST) driven model through synthetically considering the explicit and implicit driving forces (e.g. activity, security, and trust) underlying the decision process. AST-driven model facilitates to more accurately capture highly dynamical network behaviors and figure out the complex evolution process, allowing a profound understanding of the effects of security and trust in driving network evolution, and improving the biases induced by only involving activity representations in analyzing the dynamical processes.

  20. AST: Activity-Security-Trust driven modeling of time varying networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Xu, Jiake; Liu, Yanheng; Deng, Weiwen

    2016-01-01

    Network modeling is a flexible mathematical structure that enables to identify statistical regularities and structural principles hidden in complex systems. The majority of recent driving forces in modeling complex networks are originated from activity, in which an activity potential of a time invariant function is introduced to identify agents’ interactions and to construct an activity-driven model. However, the new-emerging network evolutions are already deeply coupled with not only the explicit factors (e.g. activity) but also the implicit considerations (e.g. security and trust), so more intrinsic driving forces behind should be integrated into the modeling of time varying networks. The agents undoubtedly seek to build a time-dependent trade-off among activity, security, and trust in generating a new connection to another. Thus, we reasonably propose the Activity-Security-Trust (AST) driven model through synthetically considering the explicit and implicit driving forces (e.g. activity, security, and trust) underlying the decision process. AST-driven model facilitates to more accurately capture highly dynamical network behaviors and figure out the complex evolution process, allowing a profound understanding of the effects of security and trust in driving network evolution, and improving the biases induced by only involving activity representations in analyzing the dynamical processes. PMID:26888717

  1. AST: Activity-Security-Trust driven modeling of time varying networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Xu, Jiake; Liu, Yanheng; Deng, Weiwen

    2016-01-01

    Network modeling is a flexible mathematical structure that enables to identify statistical regularities and structural principles hidden in complex systems. The majority of recent driving forces in modeling complex networks are originated from activity, in which an activity potential of a time invariant function is introduced to identify agents' interactions and to construct an activity-driven model. However, the new-emerging network evolutions are already deeply coupled with not only the explicit factors (e.g. activity) but also the implicit considerations (e.g. security and trust), so more intrinsic driving forces behind should be integrated into the modeling of time varying networks. The agents undoubtedly seek to build a time-dependent trade-off among activity, security, and trust in generating a new connection to another. Thus, we reasonably propose the Activity-Security-Trust (AST) driven model through synthetically considering the explicit and implicit driving forces (e.g. activity, security, and trust) underlying the decision process. AST-driven model facilitates to more accurately capture highly dynamical network behaviors and figure out the complex evolution process, allowing a profound understanding of the effects of security and trust in driving network evolution, and improving the biases induced by only involving activity representations in analyzing the dynamical processes. PMID:26888717

  2. Students' Network Project Activities in the Context of the Information Educational Medium of Higher Education Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samerkhanova, Elvira K.; Krupoderova, Elena P.; Krupoderova, Klimentina R.; Bahtiyarova, Lyudmila N.; Ponachugin, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the research is justifying didactic possibilities of the use of network services for the organization of information for the learning environment of college, where students carry out their project activities, and where effective networking between students and teachers takes place. The authors consider didactic possibilities of…

  3. DELTAMETHRIN AND ESFENVALERATE INHIBIT SPONTANEOUS NETWORK ACTIVITY IN RAT CORTICAL NEURONS IN VITRO.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding pyrethroid actions on neuronal networks will help to establish a mode of action for these compounds, which is needed for cumulative risk decisions under the Food Quality Protection Act of 1996. However, pyrethroid effects on spontaneous activity in networks of inter...

  4. "Who Do You Talk to about Your Teaching?": Networking Activities among University Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pataraia, Nino; Falconer, Isobel; Margaryan, Anoush; Littlejohn, Allison; Fincher, Sally

    2014-01-01

    As the higher education environment changes, there are calls for university teachers to change and enhance their teaching practices to match. Networking practices are known to be deeply implicated in studies of change and diffusion of innovation, yet academics' networking activities in relation to teaching have been little studied. This paper…

  5. Noise influence on spike activation in a Hindmarsh-Rose small-world neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhe, Sun; Micheletto, Ruggero

    2016-07-01

    We studied the role of noise in neural networks, especially focusing on its relation to the propagation of spike activity in a small sized system. We set up a source of information using a single neuron that is constantly spiking. This element called initiator x o feeds spikes to the rest of the network that is initially quiescent and subsequently reacts with vigorous spiking after a transitional period of time. We found that noise quickly suppresses the initiator’s influence and favors spontaneous spike activity and, using a decibel representation of noise intensity, we established a linear relationship between noise amplitude and the interval from the initiator’s first spike and the rest of the network activation. We studied the same process with networks of different sizes (number of neurons) and found that the initiator x o has a measurable influence on small networks, but as the network grows in size, spontaneous spiking emerges disrupting its effects on networks of more than about N = 100 neurons. This suggests that the mechanism of internal noise generation allows information transmission within a small neural neighborhood, but decays for bigger network domains. We also analyzed the Fourier spectrum of the whole network membrane potential and verified that noise provokes the reduction of main θ and α peaks before transitioning into chaotic spiking. However, network size does not reproduce a similar phenomena; instead we recorded a reduction in peaks’ amplitude, a better sharpness and definition of Fourier peaks, but not the evident degeneration to chaos observed with increasing external noise. This work aims to contribute to the understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of propagation of spontaneous spiking in neural networks and gives a quantitative assessment of how noise can be used to control and modulate this phenomenon in Hindmarsh-Rose (H-R) neural networks.

  6. Noise influence on spike activation in a Hindmarsh–Rose small-world neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhe, Sun; Micheletto, Ruggero

    2016-07-01

    We studied the role of noise in neural networks, especially focusing on its relation to the propagation of spike activity in a small sized system. We set up a source of information using a single neuron that is constantly spiking. This element called initiator x o feeds spikes to the rest of the network that is initially quiescent and subsequently reacts with vigorous spiking after a transitional period of time. We found that noise quickly suppresses the initiator’s influence and favors spontaneous spike activity and, using a decibel representation of noise intensity, we established a linear relationship between noise amplitude and the interval from the initiator’s first spike and the rest of the network activation. We studied the same process with networks of different sizes (number of neurons) and found that the initiator x o has a measurable influence on small networks, but as the network grows in size, spontaneous spiking emerges disrupting its effects on networks of more than about N = 100 neurons. This suggests that the mechanism of internal noise generation allows information transmission within a small neural neighborhood, but decays for bigger network domains. We also analyzed the Fourier spectrum of the whole network membrane potential and verified that noise provokes the reduction of main θ and α peaks before transitioning into chaotic spiking. However, network size does not reproduce a similar phenomena; instead we recorded a reduction in peaks’ amplitude, a better sharpness and definition of Fourier peaks, but not the evident degeneration to chaos observed with increasing external noise. This work aims to contribute to the understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of propagation of spontaneous spiking in neural networks and gives a quantitative assessment of how noise can be used to control and modulate this phenomenon in Hindmarsh‑Rose (H‑R) neural networks.

  7. The potential role of real-time geodetic observations in tsunami early warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinti, Stefano; Armigliato, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    experimental or testing stage and haven't been implemented yet in any standard TWS operations. Nonetheless, this is seen to be the future and the natural TWS evolving enhancement. In this context, improvement of the real-time estimates of tsunamigenic earthquake focal mechanism is of fundamental importance to trigger the appropriate computational chain. Quick discrimination between strike-slip and thrust-fault earthquakes, and equally relevant, quick assessment of co-seismic on-fault slip distribution, are exemplary cases to which a real-time geodetic monitoring system can contribute significantly. Robust inversion of geodetic data can help to reconstruct the sea floor deformation pattern especially if two conditions are met: the source is not too far from network stations and is well covered azimuthally. These two conditions are sometimes hard to satisfy fully, but in certain regions, like the Mediterranean and the Caribbean sea, this is quite possible due to the limited size of the ocean basins. Close cooperation between the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) community, seismologists, tsunami scientists and TWS operators is highly recommended to obtain significant progresses in the quick determination of the earthquake source, which can trigger a timely estimation of the ensuing tsunami and a more reliable and detailed assessment of the tsunami size at the coast.

  8. Synaptic depression and slow oscillatory activity in a biophysical network model of the cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Benita, Jose M.; Guillamon, Antoni; Deco, Gustavo; Sanchez-Vives, Maria V.

    2012-01-01

    Short-term synaptic depression (STD) is a form of synaptic plasticity that has a large impact on network computations. Experimental results suggest that STD is modulated by cortical activity, decreasing with activity in the network and increasing during silent states. Here, we explored different activity-modulation protocols in a biophysical network model for which the model displayed less STD when the network was active than when it was silent, in agreement with experimental results. Furthermore, we studied how trains of synaptic potentials had lesser decay during periods of activity (UP states) than during silent periods (DOWN states), providing new experimental predictions. We next tackled the inverse question of what is the impact of modifying STD parameters on the emergent activity of the network, a question difficult to answer experimentally. We found that synaptic depression of cortical connections had a critical role to determine the regime of rhythmic cortical activity. While low STD resulted in an emergent rhythmic activity with short UP states and long DOWN states, increasing STD resulted in longer and more frequent UP states interleaved with short silent periods. A still higher synaptic depression set the network into a non-oscillatory firing regime where DOWN states no longer occurred. The speed of propagation of UP states along the network was not found to be modulated by STD during the oscillatory regime; it remained relatively stable over a range of values of STD. Overall, we found that the mutual interactions between synaptic depression and ongoing network activity are critical to determine the mechanisms that modulate cortical emergent patterns. PMID:22973221

  9. Human embryonic stem cell-derived neuronal cells form spontaneously active neuronal networks in vitro.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, Teemu J; Ylä-Outinen, Laura; Tanskanen, Jarno M A; Lappalainen, Riikka S; Skottman, Heli; Suuronen, Riitta; Mikkonen, Jarno E; Hyttinen, Jari A K; Narkilahti, Susanna

    2009-07-01

    The production of functional human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived neuronal cells is critical for the application of hESCs in treating neurodegenerative disorders. To study the potential functionality of hESC-derived neurons, we cultured and monitored the development of hESC-derived neuronal networks on microelectrode arrays. Immunocytochemical studies revealed that these networks were positive for the neuronal marker proteins beta-tubulin(III) and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2). The hESC-derived neuronal networks were spontaneously active and exhibited a multitude of electrical impulse firing patterns. Synchronous bursts of electrical activity similar to those reported for hippocampal neurons and rodent embryonic stem cell-derived neuronal networks were recorded from the differentiated cultures until up to 4 months. The dependence of the observed neuronal network activity on sodium ion channels was examined using tetrodotoxin (TTX). Antagonists for the glutamate receptors NMDA [D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid] and AMPA/kainate [6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione], and for GABAA receptors [(-)-bicuculline methiodide] modulated the spontaneous electrical activity, indicating that pharmacologically susceptible neuronal networks with functional synapses had been generated. The findings indicate that hESC-derived neuronal cells can generate spontaneously active networks with synchronous communication in vitro, and are therefore suitable for use in developmental and drug screening studies, as well as for regenerative medicine.

  10. Development of a composite geodetic structure for space construction, phase 1A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The development of a geodetic beam and beam builder for on orbit construction of large truss type space structures is discussed. The geodetic beam is a lightweight, open lattice structure composed of an equilateral gridwork of crisscrossing rods. The beam provides a high degree of stiffness and minimizes structural distortion, due to temperature gradients, through the incorporation of a new graphite and glass reinforced thermoplastic composite material with a low coefficient of thermal expansion. A low power consuming, high production rate, beam builder automatically fabricates the geodetic beams in space using rods preprocessed on Earth. Three areas of the development are focused upon; (1) geodetic beam designs for local attachment of equipment or beam to beam joining in a parallel or crossing configurations, (2) evaluation of long life pultruded rods capable of service temperatures higher than possible with the HMS/P1700 rod material, and (3) evalaution of high temperature joint encapsulant materials.

  11. Improvement of a geodetic triangulation through control points established by means of satellite or precision traversing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, N. K.

    1972-01-01

    Whether any significant increment to accuracy could be transferred from a super-control continental net (continental satellite net or super-transcontinental traverse) to the fundamental geodetic net (first-order triangulation) is discussed. This objective was accomplished by evaluating the positional accuracy improvement for a triangulation station, which is near the middle of the investigated geodetic triangulation net, by using various station constraints over its geodetic position. This investigation on a 1858 kilometer long triangulation chain shows that the super-control net can provide a useful constraint to the investigated geodetic triangulation net, and thus can improve it only when the accuracy of super-control net is at least 1 part in 500,000.

  12. 3D Copper Tetrathiafulvalene Redox-Active Network with 8-Fold Interpenetrating Diamond-like Topology.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhong-Nan; Li, Yan-Hong; Sun, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ting; Xu, Jing; Zhu, Qin-Yu; Dai, Jie

    2016-09-19

    A tetrathiafulvalene derivative has been incorporated into a diamond-like structure for the first time. The coordination network shows highly unusual 8-fold interpenetration with redox-active and photoelectric properties. PMID:27603504

  13. Topic-Aware Physical Activity Propagation in a Health Social Network

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Nhathai; Ebrahimi, Javid; Kil, Dave; Piniewski, Brigitte; Dou, Dejing

    2016-01-01

    Modeling physical activity propagation, such as physical exercise level and intensity, is the key to preventing the conduct that can lead to obesity; it can also help spread wellness behavior in a social network. PMID:27087794

  14. SAN-RL: combining spreading activation networks and reinforcement learning to learn configurable behaviors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, J.; Gaines, D. M.; Wilkes, M.; Kusumalnukool, K.; Thongchai, S.; Kawamura, K.

    2001-01-01

    This approach provides the agent with a causal structure, the spreading activation network, relating goals to the actions that can achieve those goals. This enables the agent to select actions relative to the goal priorities.

  15. Gold nanowire networks: synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Chirea, Mariana; Freitas, Andreia; Vasile, Bogdan S; Ghitulica, Cristina; Pereira, Carlos M; Silva, Fernando

    2011-04-01

    Gold nanowire networks (AuNWNs) with average widths of 17.74 nm (AuNWN(1)) or 23.54 nm (AuNWN(2)) were synthesized by direct reduction of HAuCl(4) with sodium borohydride powder in deep eutectic solvents, such as ethaline or reline, at 40 °C. Their width and length were dependent on the type of solvent and the NaBH(4)/HAuCl(4) molar ratio (32 in ethaline and 5.2 in reline). High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) analysis of the gold nanowire networks showed clear lattice fringes of polycrystalline nanopowder of d = 2.36, 2.04, 1.44, and 1.23 Å corresponding to the (111), (200), (220), or (311) crystallographic planes of face centered cubic gold. The purified AuNWNs were used as catalysts for the chemical reduction of p-nitroaniline to diaminophenylene with sodium borohydride in aqueous solution. The reaction was monitored in real time by UV-vis spectroscopy. The results show that the reduction process is six times faster in the presence of gold nanowire networks stabilized by urea from the reline (AuNWN(2)) than in the presence of gold nanowire networks stabilized by ethylene glycol from ethaline (AuNWN(1)). This is due to a higher number of corners and edges on the gold nanowires synthesized in reline than on those synthesized in ethaline as proven by X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns recorded for both types of gold nanowire networks. Nevertheless, both types of nanomaterials determined short times of reaction and high conversion of p-nitroaniline to diaminophenylene. These gold nanomaterials represent a new addition to a new generation of catalysts: gold based catalysts. PMID:21348463

  16. The active enhancer network operated by liganded RXR supports angiogenic activity in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Bence; Hah, Nasun; Horvath, Attila; Czimmerer, Zsolt; Poliska, Szilard; Gyuris, Tibor; Keirsse, Jiri; Gysemans, Conny; Van Ginderachter, Jo A.; Balint, Balint L.; Evans, Ronald M.; Barta, Endre; Nagy, Laszlo

    2014-01-01

    RXR signaling is predicted to have a major impact in macrophages, but neither the biological consequence nor the genomic basis of its ligand activation is known. Comprehensive genome-wide studies were carried out to map liganded RXR-mediated transcriptional changes, active binding sites, and cistromic interactions in the context of the macrophage genome architecture. The macrophage RXR cistrome has 5200 genomic binding sites, which are not impacted by ligand. Active enhancers are characterized by PU.1 binding, an increase of enhancer RNA, and P300 recruitment. Using these features, 387 liganded RXR-bound enhancers were linked to 226 genes, which predominantly reside in CTCF/cohesin-limited functional domains. These findings were molecularly validated using chromosome conformation capture (3C) and 3C combined with sequencing (3C-seq), and we show that selected long-range enhancers communicate with promoters via stable or RXR-induced loops and that some of the enhancers interact with each other, forming an interchromosomal network. A set of angiogenic genes, including Vegfa, has liganded RXR-controlled enhancers and provides the macrophage with a novel inducible program. PMID:25030696

  17. Magma-tectonic interactions in Kīlauea's Southwest Rift Zone in 2006 through coupled geodetic/seismological analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wauthier, C.; Roman, D. C.; Poland, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    For much of the first 20 years of Kīlauea's 1983-present Pu'u 'Ō'ō eruption, deformation was characterized by subsidence at the volcano's summit and along both the East Rift Zone (ERZ) and Southwest Rift Zone (SWRZ). At the end of 2003, however, Kīlauea's summit began a 4-year period of inflation due to a surge in magma supply to the volcano. In 2006, the SWRZ also experienced atypical inflation, which was last observed in 1981-82 during a series of dike intrusions. To investigate the active magma sources and their interactions with faulting in the SWRZ during 2006, we integrate contemporary geodetic data from InSAR and GPS with double-couple fault-plane solutions for volcano-tectonic earthquakes and Coulomb stress modeling. According to the rate of deformation measured in daily GPS data, two distinct periods can be defined, spanning January to 15 March 2006 (period 1) and 16 March to 30 September 2006 (period 2). Geodetic models suggest that, during period 1, deformation, due to pressurization of magma in a vertical prolate-spheroidal conduit, in the south caldera area. In addition, a major seismic swarm occurred in both the SWRZ and ERZ. Our preliminary results also suggest that, during period 2, magma was still overpressurizing the same prolate-spheroid but a subhorizontal sill also intruded further to the southwest in the seismic SWRZ (SSWRZ). The beginning of period 2 also corresponds to a switch from subsidence to inflation of the SWRZ. Faulting in the upper ERZ is primarily strike-slip, with no obvious change in FPS orientation between periods 1 and 2. In contrast, faulting in the upper SSWRZ occurs as dip-slip motion on near-vertical faults. SSWRZ FPS show a mix of orientations including NW- and NE-striking faults, which along with relative earthquake locations, suggest a series of right-stepping fault segments, particularly during period 2. Calculated Coulomb stress changes indicate that faulting in the upper SSWRZ may result from stresses produced by

  18. NetDecoder: a network biology platform that decodes context-specific biological networks and gene activities.

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Edroaldo Lummertz; Ung, Choong Yong; McGehee, Cordelia D; Correia, Cristina; Li, Hu

    2016-06-01

    The sequential chain of interactions altering the binary state of a biomolecule represents the 'information flow' within a cellular network that determines phenotypic properties. Given the lack of computational tools to dissect context-dependent networks and gene activities, we developed NetDecoder, a network biology platform that models context-dependent information flows using pairwise phenotypic comparative analyses of protein-protein interactions. Using breast cancer, dyslipidemia and Alzheimer's disease as case studies, we demonstrate NetDecoder dissects subnetworks to identify key players significantly impacting cell behaviour specific to a given disease context. We further show genes residing in disease-specific subnetworks are enriched in disease-related signalling pathways and information flow profiles, which drive the resulting disease phenotypes. We also devise a novel scoring scheme to quantify key genes-network routers, which influence many genes, key targets, which are influenced by many genes, and high impact genes, which experience a significant change in regulation. We show the robustness of our results against parameter changes. Our network biology platform includes freely available source code (http://www.NetDecoder.org) for researchers to explore genome-wide context-dependent information flow profiles and key genes, given a set of genes of particular interest and transcriptome data. More importantly, NetDecoder will enable researchers to uncover context-dependent drug targets. PMID:26975659

  19. Spontaneous Neuronal Activity in Developing Neocortical Networks: From Single Cells to Large-Scale Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Luhmann, Heiko J.; Sinning, Anne; Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Stüttgen, Maik C.; Kirischuk, Sergei; Kilb, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal activity has been shown to be essential for the proper formation of neuronal circuits, affecting developmental processes like neurogenesis, migration, programmed cell death, cellular differentiation, formation of local and long-range axonal connections, synaptic plasticity or myelination. Accordingly, neocortical areas reveal distinct spontaneous and sensory-driven neuronal activity patterns already at early phases of development. At embryonic stages, when immature neurons start to develop voltage-dependent channels, spontaneous activity is highly synchronized within small neuronal networks and governed by electrical synaptic transmission. Subsequently, spontaneous activity patterns become more complex, involve larger networks and propagate over several neocortical areas. The developmental shift from local to large-scale network activity is accompanied by a gradual shift from electrical to chemical synaptic transmission with an initial excitatory action of chloride-gated channels activated by GABA, glycine and taurine. Transient neuronal populations in the subplate (SP) support temporary circuits that play an important role in tuning early neocortical activity and the formation of mature neuronal networks. Thus, early spontaneous activity patterns control the formation of developing networks in sensory cortices, and disturbances of these activity patterns may lead to long-lasting neuronal deficits. PMID:27252626

  20. Spontaneous Neuronal Activity in Developing Neocortical Networks: From Single Cells to Large-Scale Interactions.

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Heiko J; Sinning, Anne; Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Stüttgen, Maik C; Kirischuk, Sergei; Kilb, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal activity has been shown to be essential for the proper formation of neuronal circuits, affecting developmental processes like neurogenesis, migration, programmed cell death, cellular differentiation, formation of local and long-range axonal connections, synaptic plasticity or myelination. Accordingly, neocortical areas reveal distinct spontaneous and sensory-driven neuronal activity patterns already at early phases of development. At embryonic stages, when immature neurons start to develop voltage-dependent channels, spontaneous activity is highly synchronized within small neuronal networks and governed by electrical synaptic transmission. Subsequently, spontaneous activity patterns become more complex, involve larger networks and propagate over several neocortical areas. The developmental shift from local to large-scale network activity is accompanied by a gradual shift from electrical to chemical synaptic transmission with an initial excitatory action of chloride-gated channels activated by GABA, glycine and taurine. Transient neuronal populations in the subplate (SP) support temporary circuits that play an important role in tuning early neocortical activity and the formation of mature neuronal networks. Thus, early spontaneous activity patterns control the formation of developing networks in sensory cortices, and disturbances of these activity patterns may lead to long-lasting neuronal deficits.

  1. Spontaneous Neuronal Activity in Developing Neocortical Networks: From Single Cells to Large-Scale Interactions.

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Heiko J; Sinning, Anne; Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Stüttgen, Maik C; Kirischuk, Sergei; Kilb, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal activity has been shown to be essential for the proper formation of neuronal circuits, affecting developmental processes like neurogenesis, migration, programmed cell death, cellular differentiation, formation of local and long-range axonal connections, synaptic plasticity or myelination. Accordingly, neocortical areas reveal distinct spontaneous and sensory-driven neuronal activity patterns already at early phases of development. At embryonic stages, when immature neurons start to develop voltage-dependent channels, spontaneous activity is highly synchronized within small neuronal networks and governed by electrical synaptic transmission. Subsequently, spontaneous activity patterns become more complex, involve larger networks and propagate over several neocortical areas. The developmental shift from local to large-scale network activity is accompanied by a gradual shift from electrical to chemical synaptic transmission with an initial excitatory action of chloride-gated channels activated by GABA, glycine and taurine. Transient neuronal populations in the subplate (SP) support temporary circuits that play an important role in tuning early neocortical activity and the formation of mature neuronal networks. Thus, early spontaneous activity patterns control the formation of developing networks in sensory cortices, and disturbances of these activity patterns may lead to long-lasting neuronal deficits. PMID:27252626

  2. Geodetic constraints to the source mechanism of the 2011-2013 unrest at Campi Flegrei (Italy) caldera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trasatti, Elisa; Polcari, Marco; Bonafede, Maurizio; Stramondo, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    Campi Flegrei (Italy) is a nested caldera and together with Vesuvius is one of the Italian GEO Geohazard Supersites (GSNL). The area is characterized by one of the highest volcanic hazard of the world, due to the very high density of inhabitants (1800/km²), the persistent activity of the system and the explosive character of volcanism. A major unrest episode took place in 1982-84, when the town of Pozzuoli, located at the caldera center, was uplifted by 1.80 m. Minor uplifts of few centimeters, seismic swarms and degassing episodes took place in 1989, 2000 and 2004-06. Since 2005 Campi Flegrei is uplifting, reaching a ground velocity of 9 cm/yr in 2012, showing that the caldera is in a critical state on the verge of instability. In this work, we present results from SAR Interferometry and geodetic data modelling at Campi Flegrei in the framework of the EU's FP7 MED-SUV Project. We exploit two COSMO-SkyMed data sets to map the deformation field during 2011-2013. The spatial distributions of the cumulative displacement from COSMO-SkyMed ascending/descending orbits show similar behaviors, confirming the bell-shaped pattern of the deformation at least within the inner rim of the caldera. The resulting data, together with GPS data from the Neapolitan Volcanoes Continuous GPS network (NeVoCGPS) is fitted through a geophysical inversion process using finite element forward models to account for the 3D heterogeneous medium. The best fit model is a north dipping mixed-mode dislocation source lying at ~5 km depth. The driving mechanism is ascribable to magma input into the source of the large 1982-1984 unrest (since similar source characteristics were inferred) that generates initial inflation followed by additional shear slip accompanying the extension of crack tips. The history and the current state of the system indicate that Campi Flegrei is able to erupt again. Constraining the defomation source may have important implications in terms of civil protection and the

  3. An Optimal CDS Construction Algorithm with Activity Scheduling in Ad Hoc Networks.

    PubMed

    Penumalli, Chakradhar; Palanichamy, Yogesh

    2015-01-01

    A new energy efficient optimal Connected Dominating Set (CDS) algorithm with activity scheduling for mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) is proposed. This algorithm achieves energy efficiency by minimizing the Broadcast Storm Problem [BSP] and at the same time considering the node's remaining energy. The Connected Dominating Set is widely used as a virtual backbone or spine in mobile ad hoc networks [MANETs] or Wireless Sensor Networks [WSN]. The CDS of a graph representing a network has a significant impact on an efficient design of routing protocol in wireless networks. Here the CDS is a distributed algorithm with activity scheduling based on unit disk graph [UDG]. The node's mobility and residual energy (RE) are considered as parameters in the construction of stable optimal energy efficient CDS. The performance is evaluated at various node densities, various transmission ranges, and mobility rates. The theoretical analysis and simulation results of this algorithm are also presented which yield better results.

  4. Friendship networks and physical activity and sedentary behavior among youth: a systematized review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Low levels of physical activity and increased participation in sedentary leisure-time activities are two important obesity-risk behaviors that impact the health of today’s youth. Friend’s health behaviors have been shown to influence individual health behaviors; however, current evidence on the specific role of friendship networks in relation to levels of physical activity and sedentary behavior is limited. The purpose of this review was to summarize evidence on friendship networks and both physical activity and sedentary behavior among children and adolescents. Method After a search of seven scientific databases and reference scans, a total of thirteen articles were eligible for inclusion. All assessed the association between friendship networks and physical activity, while three also assessed sedentary behavior. Results Overall, higher levels of physical activity among friends are associated with higher levels of physical activity of the individual. Longitudinal studies reveal that an individual’s level of physical activity changes to reflect his/her friends’ higher level of physical activity. Boys tend to be influenced by their friendship network to a greater extent than girls. There is mixed evidence surrounding a friend’s sedentary behavior and individual sedentary behavior. Conclusion Friends’ physical activity level appears to have a significant influence on individual’s physical activity level. Evidence surrounding sedentary behavior is limited and mixed. Results from this review could inform effective public health interventions that harness the influence of friends to increase physical activity levels among children and adolescents. PMID:24289113

  5. Temporal Sequence of Hemispheric Network Activation during Semantic Processing: A Functional Network Connectivity Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Assaf, Michal; Jagannathan, Kanchana; Calhoun, Vince; Kraut, Michael; Hart, John, Jr.; Pearlson, Godfrey

    2009-01-01

    To explore the temporal sequence of, and the relationship between, the left and right hemispheres (LH and RH) during semantic memory (SM) processing we identified the neural networks involved in the performance of functional MRI semantic object retrieval task (SORT) using group independent component analysis (ICA) in 47 healthy individuals. SORT…

  6. Real-time Neural Network predictions of geomagnetic activity indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala, R.; Reiff, P. H.

    2009-12-01

    The Boyle potential or the Boyle Index (BI), Φ (kV)=10-4 (V/(km/s))2 + 11.7 (B/nT) sin3(θ/2), is an empirically-derived formula that can characterize the Earth's polar cap potential, which is readily derivable in real time using the solar wind data from ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer). The BI has a simplistic form that utilizes a non-magnetic "viscous" and a magnetic "merging" component to characterize the magnetospheric behavior in response to the solar wind. We have investigated its correlation with two of conventional geomagnetic activity indices in Kp and the AE index. We have shown that the logarithms of both 3-hr and 1-hr averages of the BI correlate well with the subsequent Kp: Kp = 8.93 log10(BI) - 12.55 along with 1-hr BI correlating with the subsequent log10(AE): log10(AE) = 1.78 log10(BI) - 3.6. We have developed a new set of algorithms based on Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) suitable for short term space weather forecasts with an enhanced lead-time and better accuracy in predicting Kp and AE over some leading models; the algorithms omit the time history of its targets to utilize only the solar wind data. Inputs to our ANN models benefit from the BI and its proven record as a forecasting parameter since its initiation in October, 2003. We have also performed time-sensitivity tests using cross-correlation analysis to demonstrate that our models are as efficient as those that incorporates the time history of the target indices in their inputs. Our algorithms can predict the upcoming full 3-hr Kp, purely from the solar wind data and achieve a linear correlation coefficient of 0.840, which means that it predicts the upcoming Kp value on average to within 1.3 step, which is approximately the resolution of the real-time Kp estimate. Our success in predicting Kp during a recent unexpected event (22 July ’09) is shown in the figure. Also, when predicting an equivalent "one hour Kp'', the correlation coefficient is 0.86, meaning on average a prediction

  7. Geodetic integration of Sentinel-1A IW data using PSInSAR in Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, Péter; Hevér, Renáta; Grenerczy, Gyula

    2015-04-01

    ESA's latest Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) mission Sentinel-1 is a huge step forward in SAR interferometry. With its default acquisition mode called the Interferometric Wide Swath Mode (IW) areas through all scales can be mapped with an excellent return time of 12 days (while only the Sentinel-1A is in orbit). Its operational data policy is also a novelty, it allows scientific users free and unlimited access to data. It implements a new type of ScanSAR mode called Terrain Observation with Progressive Scan (TOPS) SAR. It has the same resolution as ScanSAR but with better signal-to-noise ratio distribution. The bigger coverage is achieved by rotation of the antenna in the azimuth direction, therefore it requires very precise co-registration because even errors under a pixel accuracy can introduce azimuth phase variations caused by differences in Doppler-centroids. In our work we will summarize the benefits and the drawbacks of the IW mode. We would like to implement the processing chain of GAMMA Remote Sensing of such data for mapping surface motion with special attention to the co-registration step. Not only traditional InSAR but the advanced method of Persistent Scatterer InSAR (PSInSAR) will be performed and presented as well. PS coverage, along with coherence, is expected to be good due to the small perpendicular and temporal baselines. We would also like to integrate these measurements into national geodetic networks using common reference points. We have installed trihedral corner reflectors at some selected sites to aid precise collocation. Thus, we aim to demonstrate that Sentinel-1 can be effectively used for surface movement detection and monitoring and it can also provide valuable information for the improvement of our networks.

  8. Future planning: default network activity couples with frontoparietal control network and reward-processing regions during process and outcome simulations.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Kathy D; Spreng, R Nathan; Madore, Kevin P; Schacter, Daniel L

    2014-12-01

    We spend much of our daily lives imagining how we can reach future goals and what will happen when we attain them. Despite the prevalence of such goal-directed simulations, neuroimaging studies on planning have mainly focused on executive processes in the frontal lobe. This experiment examined the neural basis of process simulations, during which participants imagined themselves going through steps toward attaining a goal, and outcome simulations, during which participants imagined events they associated with achieving a goal. In the scanner, participants engaged in these simulation tasks and an odd/even control task. We hypothesized that process simulations would recruit default and frontoparietal control network regions, and that outcome simulations, which allow us to anticipate the affective consequences of achieving goals, would recruit default and reward-processing regions. Our analysis of brain activity that covaried with process and outcome simulations confirmed these hypotheses. A functional connectivity analysis with posterior cingulate, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and anterior inferior parietal lobule seeds showed that their activity was correlated during process simulations and associated with a distributed network of default and frontoparietal control network regions. During outcome simulations, medial prefrontal cortex and amygdala seeds covaried together and formed a functional network with default and reward-processing regions.

  9. Iranian Permanent GPS Network for Geodynamics (IPGN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, F.; Nankali, H. R.; Sedighi, M.; Djamour, Y.; Mosavi, Z.

    2009-04-01

    Iran is one of the most tectonically active zone in Alpine-Himalayan seismic belt where has been shaken by largely destroying historical and instrumental earthquakes. Iran is located in the convergence zone between Arabia and Eurasia with a velocity of 22 mm/yr nearly to the North. The shortening between Arabian and Eurasian plates in Iran is mainly distributed on Zagros and Alborz belts. Despite the historical and scientific awareness of seismic hazard in Iran, unfortunately this country lacked a Continuous GPS network to study geodynamic and tectonic movements. Such geodetic measurement can play an important role to understand the tectonic deformation then to evaluate the seismic hazard on Iran. Since early 2005 National Cartographic Center of Iran (NCC) is establishing a continuous GPS network named Iranian Permanent GPS Network for Geodynamics (IPGN). Taking into account the number of provided GPS receivers, (108) we made a priority based on two factors of seismicity and population. At the first, in order to study general tectonic behavior in Iran 41 stations, globally distributed in whole of Iran, were been considered. Three other areas in the priority list were: Centeral Alborz, North-West of Iran and North-East of Iran. The rest of receivers, i.e. ~60, were considered for these areas as local networks. These four networks are daily processed and give us a continuous monitoring of any surface deformation. In this paper we try to present the results obtained from the network

  10. Information content of neural networks with self-control and variable activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollé, D.; Amari, S. I.; Dominguez Carreta, D. R. C.; Massolo, G.

    2001-02-01

    A self-control mechanism for the dynamics of neural networks with variable activity is discussed using a recursive scheme for the time evolution of the local field. It is based upon the introduction of a self-adapting time-dependent threshold as a function of both the neural and pattern activity in the network. This mechanism leads to an improvement of the information content of the network as well as an increase of the storage capacity and the basins of attraction. Different architectures are considered and the results are compared with numerical simulations.

  11. Neuronal avalanches of a self-organized neural network with active-neuron-dominant structure.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiumin; Small, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Neuronal avalanche is a spontaneous neuronal activity which obeys a power-law distribution of population event sizes with an exponent of -3/2. It has been observed in the superficial layers of cortex both in vivo and in vitro. In this paper, we analyze the information transmission of a novel self-organized neural network with active-neuron-dominant structure. Neuronal avalanches can be observed in this network with appropriate input intensity. We find that the process of network learning via spike-timing dependent plasticity dramatically increases the complexity of network structure, which is finally self-organized to be active-neuron-dominant connectivity. Both the entropy of activity patterns and the complexity of their resulting post-synaptic inputs are maximized when the network dynamics are propagated as neuronal avalanches. This emergent topology is beneficial for information transmission with high efficiency and also could be responsible for the large information capacity of this network compared with alternative archetypal networks with different neural connectivity.

  12. The geodetic requirements for commercial data base management systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Charles R.

    1982-06-01

    There are many data base management systems now available as commercially marketed software packages. Although most of these packages were initially aimed at bussiness or administrative data processing applications, they may frequently also be the right tool for a scientific data processing task. This becomes more apparent as we notice that scientific computer programmers are spending more and more time on data management requirements rather than the coding of mathematical algorithms. In a scientific environment, a generalized data base management package is best viewed as a tool for programmers, rather than as a tool for direct, independent use by end users or by agency management. To the end user, the most attractive feature of a commerical DBMS is usually the interactive retrieval and update language. To the programmer, the most attractive feature is more likely to be the strong support for various types of keyed access. All of the manipulations necessary to build and maintain indices and other tables can be treated as procedural abstractions. Coupled with a procedural language, a DBMS offers the programmer a higher level (in the sense of more abstract) language. The most important geodetic requirement on a commercial DBMS is therefore that the package contain a strong Data Manipulation Language, with strong support for the algorithmic language used for scientific processing.

  13. Tidal investigations at Borowa Gora Geodetic-Geophysical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykowski, Przemyslaw; Sekowski, Marcin

    2014-05-01

    In 2009 three LaCoste&Romberg model G gravimeters owed by the Institute of Geodesy and Cartography (IGiK) were equipped with a modern type of feedback system (LRFB-300) which gives a wide range of possibilities for gravimetric measurements. One of the modified LCR gravimeters (G1036) is used for continuous tidal recordings in Borowa Gora Geodetic - Geophysical Observatory of IGiK, is situated north of Warsaw. Good quality data is now collected from February of 2012. A set of Linux shell scripts have been developed to provide reliable readout recordings (via bluetooth) as well as automatic handling of any exceptional situations. The system runs with the LCR-G1036 from the beginning of February 2012, and since then the completeness of the recording visibly improved compared to previous recordings reaching nearly 98%. The tidal observation have been calibrated several times during the course of recordings, four times with the A10-020 and once with the FG5-230. Also some results concerning the calibration of the tidal recordings with relative meters is presented. A special period (end of 2013) is emphasized where the A10-020 performs measurements every hour for a two weeks alongside three LCR meters. The local tidal model is developed and presented with comparison to the model used in absolute gravity determinations with the A10-020 at Borowa Gora and on the stations of the gravity control.

  14. Treatment of Geodetic Survey Data as Fuzzy Vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navratil, G.; Heer, E.; Hahn, J.

    2015-08-01

    Geodetic survey data are typically analysed using the assumption that measurement errors can be modelled as noise. The least squares method models noise with the normal distribution and is based on the assumption that it selects measurements with the highest probability value (Ghilani, 2010, p. 179f). There are environment situations where no clear maximum for a measurement can be detected. This can happen, for example, if surveys take place in foggy conditions causing diffusion of light signals. This presents a problem for automated systems because the standard assumption of the least squares method does not hold. A measurement system trying to return a crisp value will produce an arbitrary value that lies within the area of maximum value. However repeating the measurement is unlikely to create a value following a normal distribution, which happens if measurement errors can be modelled as noise. In this article we describe a laboratory experiment that reproduces conditions similar to a foggy situation and present measurement data gathered from this setup. Furthermore we propose methods based on fuzzy set theory to evaluate the data from our measurement.

  15. An efficient algorithm for geocentric to geodetic coordinate conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Toms, R.M.

    1995-09-01

    The problem of performing transformations from geocentric to geodetic coordinates has received an inordinate amount of attention in the literature. Numerous approximate methods have been published. Almost none of the publications address the issue of efficiency and in most cases there is a paucity of error analysis. Recently there has been a surge of interest in this problem aimed at developing more efficient methods for real time applications such as DIS. Iterative algorithms have been proposed that are not of optimal efficiency, address only one error component and require a small but uncertain number of relatively expensive iterations for convergence. In this paper a well known rapidly convergent iterative approach is modified to eliminate intervening trigonometric function evaluations. A total error metric is defined that accounts for both angular and altitude errors. The initial guess is optimized to minimize the error for one iteration. The resulting algorithm yields transformations correct to one centimeter for altitudes out to one million kilometers. Due to the rapid convergence only one iteration is used and no stopping test is needed. This algorithm is discussed in the context of machines that have FPUs and legacy machines that utilize mathematical subroutine packages.

  16. Geodetic secular velocity errors due to interannual surface loading deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamaría-Gómez, Alvaro; Mémin, Anthony

    2015-08-01

    Geodetic vertical velocities derived from data as short as 3 yr are often assumed to be representative of linear deformation over past decades to millennia. We use two decades of surface loading deformation predictions due to variations of atmospheric, oceanic and continental water mass to assess the effect on secular velocities estimated from short time-series. The interannual deformation is time-correlated at most locations over the globe, with the level of correlation depending mostly on the chosen continental water model. Using the most conservative loading model and 5-yr-long time-series, we found median vertical velocity errors of 0.5 mm yr-1 over the continents (0.3 mm yr-1 globally), exceeding 1 mm yr-1 in regions around the southern Tropic. Horizontal velocity errors were seven times smaller. Unless an accurate loading model is available, a decade of continuous data is required in these regions to mitigate the impact of the interannual loading deformation on secular velocities.

  17. Tidal Love and Shida numbers estimated by geodetic VLBI☆

    PubMed Central

    Krásná, Hana; Böhm, Johannes; Schuh, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Frequency-dependent Love and Shida numbers, which characterize the Earth response to the tidal forces, were estimated in a global adjustment of all suitable geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) sessions from 1984.0 to 2011.0. Several solutions were carried out to determine the Love and Shida numbers for the tidal constituents at periods in the diurnal band and in the long-period band in addition to values of the Love and Shida numbers common for all tides of degree two. Adding up all twelve diurnal tidal waves that were estimated, the total differences in displacement with respect to the theoretical conventional values of the Love and Shida numbers calculated from an Earth model reach 1.73 ± 0.29 mm in radial direction and 1.15 ± 0.15 mm in the transverse plane. The difference in the radial deformation following from the estimates of the zonal Love numbers is largest for the semi-annual tide Ssa with 1.07 ± 0.19 mm. PMID:26523082

  18. Mathematical analysis techniques for modeling the space network activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Lisa M.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to explore and identify mathematical analysis techniques, and in particular, the use of linear programming. This topic was then applied to the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) in order to understand the space network better. Finally, a small scale version of the system was modeled, variables were identified, data was gathered, and comparisons were made between actual and theoretical data.

  19. Hierarchical Brain Networks Active in Approach and Avoidance Goal Pursuit

    PubMed Central

    Spielberg, Jeffrey M.; Heller, Wendy; Miller, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    Effective approach/avoidance goal pursuit is critical for attaining long-term health and well-being. Research on the neural correlates of key goal-pursuit processes (e.g., motivation) has long been of interest, with lateralization in prefrontal cortex being a particularly fruitful target of investigation. However, this literature has often been limited by a lack of spatial specificity and has not delineated the precise aspects of approach/avoidance motivation involved. Additionally, the relationships among brain regions (i.e., network connectivity) vital to goal-pursuit remain largely unexplored. Specificity in location, process, and network relationship is vital for moving beyond gross characterizations of function and identifying the precise cortical mechanisms involved in motivation. The present paper integrates research using more spatially specific methodologies (e.g., functional magnetic resonance imaging) with the rich psychological literature on approach/avoidance to propose an integrative network model that takes advantage of the strengths of each of these literatures. PMID:23785328

  20. A Novel Wearable Sensor-Based Human Activity Recognition Approach Using Artificial Hydrocarbon Networks.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Hiram; Martínez-Villaseñor, María de Lourdes; Miralles-Pechuán, Luis

    2016-07-05

    Human activity recognition has gained more interest in several research communities given that understanding user activities and behavior helps to deliver proactive and personalized services. There are many examples of health systems improved by human activity recognition. Nevertheless, the human activity recognition classification process is not an easy task. Different types of noise in wearable sensors data frequently hamper the human activity recognition classification pr