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Sample records for active glp-1 7-36

  1. Ingestion of coffee polyphenols increases postprandial release of the active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1(7-36)) amide in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yoshie; Osaki, Noriko; Hase, Tadashi; Shimotoyodome, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The widespread prevalence of diabetes, caused by impaired insulin secretion and insulin resistance, is now a worldwide health problem. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a major intestinal hormone that stimulates glucose-induced insulin secretion from β cells. Prolonged activation of the GLP-1 signal has been shown to attenuate diabetes in animals and human subjects. Therefore, GLP-1 secretagogues are attractive targets for the treatment of diabetes. Recent epidemiological studies have reported that an increase in daily coffee consumption lowers diabetes risk. The present study examined the hypothesis that the reduction in diabetes risk associated with coffee consumption may be mediated by the stimulation of GLP-1 release by coffee polyphenol extract (CPE). GLP-1 secretion by human enteroendocrine NCI-H716 cells was augmented in a dose-dependent manner by the addition of CPE, and was compatible with the increase in observed active GLP-1(7-36) amide levels in the portal blood after administration with CPE alone in mice. CPE increased intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels in a dose-dependent manner, but this was not mediated by G protein-coupled receptor 119 (GPR119). The oral administration of CPE increased diet (starch and glyceryl trioleate)-induced active GLP-1 secretion and decreased glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide release. Although CPE administration did not affect diet-induced insulin secretion, it decreased postprandial hyperglycaemia, which indicates that higher GLP-1 levels after the ingestion of CPE may improve insulin sensitivity. We conclude that dietary coffee polyphenols augment gut-derived active GLP-1 secretion via the cAMP-dependent pathway, which may contribute to the reduced risk of type 2 diabetes associated with daily coffee consumption.

  2. Protective effect of rhGLP-1 (7-36) on brain ischemia/reperfusion damage in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Libo; Xu, Jia; Wang, Qian; Qian, Zhonglian; Feng, Wanyu; Yin, Xiaoxing; Fang, Yi

    2015-03-30

    In recent years, GLP-1 and its analogs have been developed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. It has been reported that stimulating the GLP-1 receptor can protect neurons against metabolic and oxidative insults, and therefore can be used in the treatment of stroke and Parkinson׳s disease. The present study aimed to examine the neuroprotective effects of rhGLP-1 (7-36) and its possible mechanisms against acute ischemia/reperfusion injuries induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in diabetic rats. The type 2 diabetic rat model was established by a combination of a high-fat diet and low-dose streptozotocin (STZ). RhGLP-1 (7-36) (20, 40, 80μg/kg) was given intraperitoneally before reperfusion. The neuroprotective effects of rhGLP-1 (7-36) were evaluated by changes in neurological deficit scores and 2,3,5-Triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. Changes in blood glucose were used to assess hypoglycemic effects. The content of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX), inducible nitric oxide syntheses (iNOS) and endothelial nitric oxide syntheses (eNOS) after MCAO/R administration (2h and 46h) were examined to investigate the possible mechanisms of RhGLP-1 (7-36). Haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining was used for histopathological observation. Compared with the control group, rhGLP-1 (7-36)-treated groups decreased nerve function deficiency scores; significantly reduced infarction volume percentage, MDA, iNOS and blood glucose; and significantly increased SOD, GSH-PX and eNOS. In addition, rhGLP-1 (7-36) groups enhanced the density of surviving neurons and increased vascular proliferation. The current study suggests a neuroprotective effect of rhGLP-1 (7-36) in diabetic MCAO/R rats since anti-oxidative and anti-nitrosative stress effects can contribute to beneficial effects against ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  3. GLP-1(7-36)amide binding in skeletal muscle membranes from streptozotocin diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L; Delgado, E; Vicent, D; Mérida, E; Alcántara, A I; Valverde, I

    1995-09-01

    A higher specific binding of GLP-1(7-36)amide is found in skeletal muscle plasma membranes from adult streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rats (insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus model) and from neonatal STZ-treated rats (non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus model), as compared to that in normal controls; no apparent change in the affinity was observed, that indicating the presence in both diabetic models of an increased number of high affinity binding sites for the peptide. The maximal specific GLP-1(7-16)amide binding in the non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus model was found to be significantly higher than that in the insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus model. As GLP-1(7-36)amide exerts a glycogenic effect in the rat skeletal muscle, the present data suggest that the action of the peptide in the muscle glucose metabolism may be increased in states of insulin deficiency accompanied or not by insulin resistance.

  4. Exendin-4 agonist and exendin(9-39)amide antagonist of the GLP-1(7-36)amide effects in liver and muscle.

    PubMed

    Alcántara, A I; Morales, M; Delgado, E; López-Delgado, M I; Clemente, F; Luque, M A; Malaisse, W J; Valverde, I; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L

    1997-05-01

    The GLP-1 structurally related peptides exendin-4 and exendin(9-39)amide were found to act, in rat liver and skeletal muscle, as agonist and antagonist, respectively, of the GLP-1(7-36)amide effects on glucose metabolism. Thus, like GLP-1(7-36)amide, exendin-4 increased glycogen synthase a activity and glucose incorporation into glycogen in both tissues and also stimulated exogenous D-glucose utilization and oxidation in muscle. These effects of GLP-1(7-36)amide and exendin-4 were inhibited by exendin(9-39)amide. Our findings provide further support to the proposed use of GLP-1, or exendin-4, as a tool in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Thus, in addition to the well-known insulinotropic action of the peptides, they act both in liver and in muscle in a manner most suitable for restoration of glucose homeostasis, with emphasis on their positive effects upon glycogen synthesis in the two tissues and on the stimulation of exogenous glucose catabolism in muscle.

  5. Plasma and intestinal concentrations of GIP and GLP-1 (7-36) amide during suckling and after weaning in pigs.

    PubMed

    Knapper, J M; Morgan, L M; Fletcher, J M; Marks, V

    1995-11-01

    Plasma concentrations of glucose dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)amide (GLP-1[7-36]amide) were measured after milk ingestion in 15-18 day old piglets and after weaning diet ingestion in 33 day old piglets weaned at 21 days. Intestinal concentrations of these two hormones were also measured in unsuckled piglets of less than 24 h of age, and piglets whose ages corresponded with those used for plasma measurements. Suckling piglets showed a moderate glycaemic and insulinaemic response to milk ingestion. Plasma GIP and GLP-1(7-36)amide levels were significantly elevated at 1 and 3-h post-prandially. Weaned piglets showed a much more marked glucose and insulin response to meal ingestion. Plasma GIP and GLP-1(7-36)amide levels were again significantly elevated at 1 and 3 h in these animals. The mean plasma GIP response was greater in the weaned animals compared with the suckling animals at the time points investigated. The plasma GLP-1(7-36)amide response in contrast was significantly greater at 1 h in the suckling animals. In comparison, GIP concentrations in acid ethanol extracts of the small intestine were significantly higher during suckling and GLP-1(7-36)amide concentrations significantly higher after weaning. The circulating levels of both hormones seen during suckling and after weaning were far higher than those previously reported in humans. We conclude that both milk ingestion and the weaning diet are capable of stimulating GIP and GLP-1(7-36)amide in piglets and suggest that the levels of both hormones seen in this study may be important in adipose tissue metabolism at this time.

  6. Comparative Effects of the Endogenous Agonist Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1)-(7-36) Amide and the Small-Molecule Ago-Allosteric Agent “Compound 2” at the GLP-1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Coopman, Karen; Huang, Yan; Johnston, Neil; Bradley, Sophie J.; Wilkinson, Graeme F.

    2010-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mediates antidiabetogenic effects through the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R), which is targeted for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Small-molecule GLP-1R agonists have been sought due to difficulties with peptide therapeutics. Recently, 6,7-dichloro-2-methylsulfonyl-3-N-tert-butylaminoquinoxaline (compound 2) has been described as a GLP-1R allosteric modulator and agonist. Using human embryonic kidney-293 cells expressing human GLP-1Rs, we extended this work to consider the impact of compound 2 on G protein activation, Ca2+ signaling and receptor internalization and particularly to compare compound 2 and GLP-1 across a range of functional assays in intact cells. GLP-1 and compound 2 activated Gαs in cell membranes and increased cellular cAMP in intact cells, with compound 2 being a partial and almost full agonist, respectively. GLP-1 increased intracellular [Ca2+] by release from intracellular stores, which was mimicked by compound 2, with slower kinetics. In either intact cells or membranes, the orthosteric antagonist exendin-(9-39), inhibited GLP-1 cAMP generation but increased the efficacy of compound 2. GLP-1 internalized enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged GLP-1Rs, but the speed and magnitude evoked by compound 2 were less. Exendin-(9-39) inhibited internalization by GLP-1 and also surprisingly that by compound 2. Compound 2 displays GLP-1R agonism consistent with action at an allosteric site, although an orthosteric antagonist increased its efficacy on cAMP and blocked compound 2-mediated receptor internalization. Full assessment of the properties of compound 2 was potentially hampered by damaging effects that were particularly manifest in either longer term assays with intact cells or in acute assays with membranes. PMID:20507928

  7. Inositolphosphoglycans and diacyglycerol are possible mediators in the glycogenic effect of GLP-1(7-36)amide in BC3H-1 myocytes.

    PubMed

    Galera, C; Clemente, F; Alcantara, A; Trapote, M A; Perea, A; Lopez-Delgado, M I; Villanueva-Penacarrillo, M L; Valverde, I

    1996-03-01

    A potent glycogenic effect of GLP-1(7-36)amide has been found in rat hepatocytes and skeletal muscle, and specific receptors for this peptide, which do not seem to be associated with the adenylate cyclase-cAMP system, have been detected in these tissue membranes. On the other hand, inositolphosphoglycan molecules (IPGs) have been implicated as second messengers of the action of insulin. In this work, we have found, in differentiated BC3H-1 myocytes, specific binding of [125I]GLP-1(7-36)amide, and a stimulatory effect of the peptide on glycogen synthesis, confirming the findings in rat skeletal muscle. Also, GLP-1(7-36)amide modulates the cell content of radiolabelled glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs) and increases the production of diacylglycerol (DAG), in the same manner as insulin acts, indicating hydrolysis of GPIs and an immediate and short-lived generation of IPGs. Thus, IPGs and DAG could be mediators in the glycogenic action of GLP-1(7-36)amide in skeletal muscle.

  8. Pancreatic GLP-1 receptor activation is sufficient for incretin control of glucose metabolism in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, Benjamin J.; Li, Yazhou; Kwan, Edwin; Brown, Theodore J.; Gaisano, Herbert; Drucker, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) circulates at low levels and acts as an incretin hormone, potentiating glucose-dependent insulin secretion from islet β cells. GLP-1 also modulates gastric emptying and engages neural circuits in the portal region and CNS that contribute to GLP-1 receptor–dependent (GLP-1R–dependent) regulation of glucose homeostasis. To elucidate the importance of pancreatic GLP-1R signaling for glucose homeostasis, we generated transgenic mice that expressed the human GLP-1R in islets and pancreatic ductal cells (Pdx1-hGLP1R:Glp1r–/– mice). Transgene expression restored GLP-1R–dependent stimulation of cAMP and Akt phosphorylation in isolated islets, conferred GLP-1R–dependent stimulation of β cell proliferation, and was sufficient for restoration of GLP-1–stimulated insulin secretion in perifused islets. Systemic GLP-1R activation with the GLP-1R agonist exendin-4 had no effect on food intake, hindbrain c-fos expression, or gastric emptying but improved glucose tolerance and stimulated insulin secretion in Pdx1-hGLP1R:Glp1r–/– mice. i.c.v. GLP-1R blockade with the antagonist exendin(9–39) impaired glucose tolerance in WT mice but had no effect in Pdx1-hGLP1R:Glp1r–/– mice. Nevertheless, transgenic expression of the pancreatic GLP-1R was sufficient to normalize both oral and i.p. glucose tolerance in Glp1r–/– mice. These findings illustrate that low levels of endogenous GLP-1 secreted from gut endocrine cells are capable of augmenting glucoregulatory activity via pancreatic GLP-1Rs independent of communication with neural pathways. PMID:22182839

  9. Analysis of Germline Stem Cell Differentiation Following Loss of GLP-1 Notch Activity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Paul M.; Schedl, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells generate the differentiated progeny cells of adult tissues. Stem cells in the Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodite germline are maintained within a proliferative zone of ∼230 cells, ∼20 cell diameters in length, through GLP-1 Notch signaling. The distal tip cell caps the germline and supplies GLP-1-activating ligand, and the distal-most germ cells that occupy this niche are likely self-renewing stem cells with active GLP-1 signaling. As germ cells are displaced from the niche, GLP-1 activity likely decreases, yet mitotically cycling germ cells are found throughout the proliferative zone prior to overt meiotic differentiation. Following loss of GLP-1 activity, it remains unclear whether stem cells undergo transit-amplifying (TA) divisions or more directly enter meiosis. To distinguish between these possibilities we employed a temperature-sensitive (ts) glp-1 mutant to manipulate GLP-1 activity. We characterized proliferative zone dynamics in glp-1(ts) mutants at permissive temperature and then analyzed the kinetics of meiotic entry of proliferative zone cells after loss of GLP-1. We found that entry of proliferative zone cells into meiosis following loss of GLP-1 activity is largely synchronous and independent of their distal-proximal position. Furthermore, the majority of cells complete only a single mitotic division before entering meiosis, independent of their distal-proximal position. We conclude that germ cells do not undergo TA divisions following loss of GLP-1 activity. We present a model for the dynamics of the proliferative zone that utilizes cell cycle rate and proliferative zone size and output and incorporates the more direct meiotic differentiation of germ cells following loss of GLP-1 activity. PMID:26158953

  10. Analysis of Germline Stem Cell Differentiation Following Loss of GLP-1 Notch Activity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Fox, Paul M; Schedl, Tim

    2015-09-01

    Stem cells generate the differentiated progeny cells of adult tissues. Stem cells in the Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodite germline are maintained within a proliferative zone of ∼230 cells, ∼20 cell diameters in length, through GLP-1 Notch signaling. The distal tip cell caps the germline and supplies GLP-1-activating ligand, and the distal-most germ cells that occupy this niche are likely self-renewing stem cells with active GLP-1 signaling. As germ cells are displaced from the niche, GLP-1 activity likely decreases, yet mitotically cycling germ cells are found throughout the proliferative zone prior to overt meiotic differentiation. Following loss of GLP-1 activity, it remains unclear whether stem cells undergo transit-amplifying (TA) divisions or more directly enter meiosis. To distinguish between these possibilities we employed a temperature-sensitive (ts) glp-1 mutant to manipulate GLP-1 activity. We characterized proliferative zone dynamics in glp-1(ts) mutants at permissive temperature and then analyzed the kinetics of meiotic entry of proliferative zone cells after loss of GLP-1. We found that entry of proliferative zone cells into meiosis following loss of GLP-1 activity is largely synchronous and independent of their distal-proximal position. Furthermore, the majority of cells complete only a single mitotic division before entering meiosis, independent of their distal-proximal position. We conclude that germ cells do not undergo TA divisions following loss of GLP-1 activity. We present a model for the dynamics of the proliferative zone that utilizes cell cycle rate and proliferative zone size and output and incorporates the more direct meiotic differentiation of germ cells following loss of GLP-1 activity.

  11. Activation of GLP-1 Receptor Promotes Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Osteogenic Differentiation through β-Catenin

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jingru; Ma, Xue; Wang, Ning; Jia, Min; Bi, Long; Wang, Yunying; Li, Mingkai; Zhang, Huinan; Xue, Xiaoyan; Hou, Zheng; Zhou, Ying; Yu, Zhibin; He, Gonghao; Luo, Xiaoxing

    2016-01-01

    Summary Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) plays an important role in regulating bone remodeling, and GLP-1 receptor agonist shows a positive relationship with osteoblast activity. However, GLP-1 receptor is not found in osteoblast, and the mechanism of GLP-1 receptor agonist on regulating bone remodeling is unclear. Here, we show that the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin-4 (Ex-4) promoted bone formation and increased bone mass and quality in a rat unloading-induced bone loss model. These functions were accompanied by an increase in osteoblast number and serum bone formation markers, while the adipocyte number was decreased. Furthermore, GLP-1 receptor was detected in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), but not in osteoblast. Activation of GLP-1 receptor by Ex-4 promoted the osteogenic differentiation and inhibited BMSC adipogenic differentiation through regulating PKA/β-catenin and PKA/PI3K/AKT/GSK3β signaling. These findings reveal that GLP-1 receptor regulates BMSC osteogenic differentiation and provide a molecular basis for therapeutic potential of GLP-1 against osteoporosis. PMID:26947974

  12. GLP-1 receptor activation modulates appetite- and reward-related brain areas in humans.

    PubMed

    van Bloemendaal, Liselotte; IJzerman, Richard G; Ten Kulve, Jennifer S; Barkhof, Frederik; Konrad, Robert J; Drent, Madeleine L; Veltman, Dick J; Diamant, Michaela

    2014-12-01

    Gut-derived hormones, such as GLP-1, have been proposed to relay information to the brain to regulate appetite. GLP-1 receptor agonists, currently used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2DM), improve glycemic control and stimulate satiety, leading to decreases in food intake and body weight. We hypothesized that food intake reduction after GLP-1 receptor activation is mediated through appetite- and reward-related brain areas. Obese T2DM patients and normoglycemic obese and lean individuals (n = 48) were studied in a randomized, crossover, placebo-controlled trial. Using functional MRI, we determined the acute effects of intravenous administration of the GLP-1 receptor agonist exenatide, with or without prior GLP-1 receptor blockade using exendin 9-39, on brain responses to food pictures during a somatostatin pancreatic-pituitary clamp. Obese T2DM patients and normoglycemic obese versus lean subjects showed increased brain responses to food pictures in appetite- and reward-related brain regions (insula and amygdala). Exenatide versus placebo decreased food intake and food-related brain responses in T2DM patients and obese subjects (in insula, amygdala, putamen, and orbitofrontal cortex). These effects were largely blocked by prior GLP-1 receptor blockade using exendin 9-39. Our findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms by which GLP-1 regulates food intake and how GLP-1 receptor agonists cause weight loss. PMID:25071023

  13. Berberine induces GLP-1 secretion through activation of bitter taste receptor pathways.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yunli; Hao, Gang; Zhang, Quanying; Hua, Wenyan; Wang, Meng; Zhou, Wenjia; Zong, Shunlin; Huang, Ming; Wen, Xiaozhou

    2015-09-15

    Our previous studies revealed that berberine-mediated GLP-1 secretion was a possible mechanism for berberine exerting good effects on hyperglycemia. This study was designed to ascertain whether berberine-induced secretion of GLP-1 was related with activation of bitter taste receptors expressed in gastrointestinal tract. Western blotting results showed that TAS2R38, a subtype of bitter taste receptor, was expressed on human enteroendocrine NCI-H716 cells. GLP-1 secretion induced by berberine from NCI-H716 cells was inhibited by incubation with anti-TAS2R38 antibody. We further performed gene silencing using siRNA to knockdown TAS2R38 from NCI-H716 cells, which showed that siRNA knockdown of the TAS2R38 reduced berberine-mediated GLP-1 secretion. We adopted inhibitors of PLC and TRPM5 known to be involved in bitter taste transduction to investigate the underlying pathways mediated in berberine-induced GLP-1 secretion. It was found that PLC inhibitor U73122 inhibited berberine-induced GLP-1 release in NCI-H716 cells, while TRPM5 blocker quinine failed to attenuate berberine-induced secretion of GLP-1. The present results demonstrated that berberine stimulated GLP-1 secretion via activation of gut-expressed bitter taste receptors in a PLC-dependent manner. Because berberine was found to be a ligand of bitter taste receptor, the results of present study may provide an explanation for some bitter taste substance obtain hypoglycemic effect.

  14. PPG neurons of the lower brain stem and their role in brain GLP-1 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Stefan; Cork, Simon C

    2015-10-15

    Within the brain, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) affects central autonomic neurons, including those controlling the cardiovascular system, thermogenesis, and energy balance. Additionally, GLP-1 influences the mesolimbic reward system to modulate the rewarding properties of palatable food. GLP-1 is produced in the gut and by hindbrain preproglucagon (PPG) neurons, located mainly in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) and medullary intermediate reticular nucleus. Transgenic mice expressing glucagon promoter-driven yellow fluorescent protein revealed that PPG neurons not only project to central autonomic control regions and mesolimbic reward centers, but also strongly innervate spinal autonomic neurons. Therefore, these brain stem PPG neurons could directly modulate sympathetic outflow through their spinal inputs to sympathetic preganglionic neurons. Electrical recordings from PPG neurons in vitro have revealed that they receive synaptic inputs from vagal afferents entering via the solitary tract. Vagal afferents convey satiation to the brain from signals like postprandial gastric distention or activation of peripheral GLP-1 receptors. CCK and leptin, short- and long-term satiety peptides, respectively, increased the electrical activity of PPG neurons, while ghrelin, an orexigenic peptide, had no effect. These findings indicate that satiation is a main driver of PPG neuronal activation. They also show that PPG neurons are in a prime position to respond to both immediate and long-term indicators of energy and feeding status, enabling regulation of both energy balance and general autonomic homeostasis. This review discusses the question of whether PPG neurons, rather than gut-derived GLP-1, are providing the physiological substrate for the effects elicited by central nervous system GLP-1 receptor activation.

  15. Endogenous GLP-1 acts on paraventricular nucleus to suppress feeding: projection from nucleus tractus solitarius and activation of corticotropin-releasing hormone, nesfatin-1 and oxytocin neurons.

    PubMed

    Katsurada, Kenichi; Maejima, Yuko; Nakata, Masanori; Kodaira, Misato; Suyama, Shigetomo; Iwasaki, Yusaku; Kario, Kazuomi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2014-08-22

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have been used to treat type 2 diabetic patients and shown to reduce food intake and body weight. The anorexigenic effects of GLP-1 and GLP-1 receptor agonists are thought to be mediated primarily via the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). GLP-1, an intestinal hormone, is also localized in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) of the brain stem. However, the role of endogenous GLP-1, particularly that in the NTS neurons, in feeding regulation remains to be established. The present study examined whether the NTS GLP-1 neurons project to PVN and whether the endogenous GLP-1 acts on PVN to restrict feeding. Intra-PVN injection of GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin (9-39) increased food intake. Injection of retrograde tracer into PVN combined with immunohistochemistry for GLP-1 in NTS revealed direct projection of NTS GLP-1 neurons to PVN. Moreover, GLP-1 evoked Ca(2+) signaling in single neurons isolated from PVN. The majority of GLP-1-responsive neurons were immunoreactive predominantly to corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and nesfatin-1, and less frequently to oxytocin. These results indicate that endogenous GLP-1 targets PVN to restrict feeding behavior, in which the projection from NTS GLP-1 neurons and activation of CRH and nesfatin-1 neurons might be implicated. This study reveals a neuronal basis for the anorexigenic effect of endogenous GLP-1 in the brain.

  16. Vascular, but not luminal, activation of FFAR1 (GPR40) stimulates GLP-1 secretion from isolated perfused rat small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Louise W; Kuhre, Rune E; Janus, Charlotte; Svendsen, Berit; Holst, Jens J

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) plays a central role in modern treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in the form of GLP-1 enhancers and GLP-1 mimetics. An alternative treatment strategy is to stimulate endogenous GLP-1 secretion from enteroendocrine L cells using a targeted approach. The G-protein-coupled receptor, FFAR1 (previously GPR40), expressed on L cells and activated by long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) is a potential target. A link between FFAR1 activation and GLP-1 secretion has been demonstrated in cellular models and small-molecule FFAR1 agonists have been developed. In this study, we examined the effect of FFAR1 activation on GLP-1 secretion using isolated, perfused small intestines from rats, a physiologically relevant model allowing distinction between direct and indirect effects of FFAR1 activation. The endogenous FFAR1 ligand, linoleic acid (LA), and four synthetic FFAR1 agonists (TAK-875, AMG 837, AM-1638, and AM-5262) were administered through intraluminal and intra-arterial routes, respectively, and dynamic changes in GLP-1 secretion were evaluated. Vascular administration of 10 μmol/L TAK-875, 10 μmol/L AMG 837, 1 μmol/L and 0.1 μmol/L AM-1638, 1 μmol/L AM-6252, and 1 mmol/L LA, all significantly increased GLP-1 secretion compared to basal levels (P < 0.05), whereas luminal administration of LA and FFAR1 agonists was ineffective. Thus, both natural and small-molecule agonists of the FFAR1 receptor appear to require absorption prior to stimulating GLP-1 secretion, indicating that therapies based on activation of nutrient sensing may be more complex than hitherto expected. PMID:26381015

  17. Vascular, but not luminal, activation of FFAR1 (GPR40) stimulates GLP-1 secretion from isolated perfused rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Louise W; Kuhre, Rune E; Janus, Charlotte; Svendsen, Berit; Holst, Jens J

    2015-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) plays a central role in modern treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in the form of GLP-1 enhancers and GLP-1 mimetics. An alternative treatment strategy is to stimulate endogenous GLP-1 secretion from enteroendocrine L cells using a targeted approach. The G-protein-coupled receptor, FFAR1 (previously GPR40), expressed on L cells and activated by long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) is a potential target. A link between FFAR1 activation and GLP-1 secretion has been demonstrated in cellular models and small-molecule FFAR1 agonists have been developed. In this study, we examined the effect of FFAR1 activation on GLP-1 secretion using isolated, perfused small intestines from rats, a physiologically relevant model allowing distinction between direct and indirect effects of FFAR1 activation. The endogenous FFAR1 ligand, linoleic acid (LA), and four synthetic FFAR1 agonists (TAK-875, AMG 837, AM-1638, and AM-5262) were administered through intraluminal and intra-arterial routes, respectively, and dynamic changes in GLP-1 secretion were evaluated. Vascular administration of 10 μmol/L TAK-875, 10 μmol/L AMG 837, 1 μmol/L and 0.1 μmol/L AM-1638, 1 μmol/L AM-6252, and 1 mmol/L LA, all significantly increased GLP-1 secretion compared to basal levels (P < 0.05), whereas luminal administration of LA and FFAR1 agonists was ineffective. Thus, both natural and small-molecule agonists of the FFAR1 receptor appear to require absorption prior to stimulating GLP-1 secretion, indicating that therapies based on activation of nutrient sensing may be more complex than hitherto expected.

  18. REVIEWMolecular mechanisms underlying physiological and receptor pleiotropic effects mediated by GLP-1R activation

    PubMed Central

    Pabreja, K; Mohd, M A; Koole, C; Wootten, D; Furness, S G B

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes in developed countries is increasing yearly with a significant negative impact on patient quality of life and an enormous burden on the healthcare system. Current biguanide and thiazolidinedione treatments for type 2 diabetes have a number of clinical limitations, the most serious long-term limitation being the eventual need for insulin replacement therapy (Table 1). Since 2007, drugs targeting the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor have been marketed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. These drugs have enjoyed a great deal of success even though our underlying understanding of the mechanisms for their pleiotropic effects remain poorly characterized even while major pharmaceutical companies actively pursue small molecule alternatives. Coupling of the GLP-1 receptor to more than one signalling pathway (pleiotropic signalling) can result in ligand-dependent signalling bias and for a peptide receptor such as the GLP-1 receptor this can be exaggerated with the use of small molecule agonists. Better consideration of receptor signalling pleiotropy will be necessary for future drug development. This is particularly important given the recent failure of taspoglutide, the report of increased risk of pancreatitis associated with GLP-1 mimetics and the observed clinical differences between liraglutide, exenatide and the newly developed long-acting exenatide long acting release, albiglutide and dulaglutide. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of GPCRs. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-5 PMID:23889512

  19. An Orally Active Allosteric GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Is Neuroprotective in Cellular and Rodent Models of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Di; Wang, Ling; Wang, Xinshang; Li, Xubo; Zhou, Shimeng; Zhou, Ying; Wang, Ning; Meng, Jingru; Ma, Xue

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a major risk factor for the development of stroke. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists have been in clinical use for the treatment of diabetes and also been reported to be neuroprotective in ischemic stroke. The quinoxaline 6,7-dichloro-2-methylsulfonyl-3-N-tert- butylaminoquinoxaline (DMB) is an agonist and allosteric modulator of the GLP-1R with the potential to increase the affinity of GLP-1 for its receptor. The aim of this study was to evaluate the neuroprotective effects of DMB on transient focal cerebral ischemia. In cultured cortical neurons, DMB activated the GLP-1R, leading to increased intracellular cAMP levels with an EC50 value about 100 fold that of exendin-4. Pretreatment of neurons with DMB protected against necrotic and apoptotic cell death was induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). The neuroprotective effects of DMB were blocked by GLP-1R knockdown with shRNA but not by GLP-1R antagonism. In C57BL/6 mice, DMB was orally administered 30 min prior to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) surgery. DMB markedly reduced the cerebral infarct size and neurological deficits caused by MCAO and reperfusion. The neuroprotective effects were mediated by activation of the GLP-1R through the cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling pathway. DMB exhibited anti-apoptotic effects by modulating Bcl-2 family members. These results provide evidence that DMB, a small molecular GLP-1R agonist, attenuates transient focal cerebral ischemia injury and inhibits neuronal apoptosis induced by MCAO. Taken together, these data suggest that DMB is a potential neuroprotective agent against cerebral ischemia. PMID:26863436

  20. GPR119 Agonist AS1269574 Activates TRPA1 Cation Channels to Stimulate GLP-1 Secretion.

    PubMed

    Chepurny, Oleg G; Holz, George G; Roe, Michael W; Leech, Colin A

    2016-06-01

    GPR119 is a G protein-coupled receptor expressed on intestinal L cells that synthesize and secrete the blood glucose-lowering hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). GPR119 agonists stimulate the release of GLP-1 from L cells, and for this reason there is interest in their potential use as a new treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus. AS1269574 is one such GPR119 agonist, and it is the prototype of a series of 2,4,6 trisubstituted pyrimidines that exert positive glucoregulatory actions in mice. Here we report the unexpected finding that AS1269574 stimulates GLP-1 release from the STC-1 intestinal cell line by directly promoting Ca(2+) influx through transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) cation channels. These GPR119-independent actions of AS1269574 are inhibited by TRPA1 channel blockers (AP-18, A967079, HC030031) and are not secondary to intracellular Ca(2+) release or cAMP production. Patch clamp studies reveal that AS1269574 activates an outwardly rectifying membrane current with properties expected of TRPA1 channels. However, the TRPA1 channel-mediated action of AS1269574 to increase intracellular free calcium concentration is not replicated by GPR119 agonists (AR231453, oleoylethanolamide) unrelated in structure to AS1269574. Using human embryonic kidney-293 cells expressing recombinant rat TRPA1 channels but not GPR119, direct TRPA1 channel activating properties of AS1269574 are validated. Because we find that AS1269574 also acts in a conventional GPR119-mediated manner to stimulate proglucagon gene promoter activity in the GLUTag intestinal L cell line, new findings reported here reveal the surprising capacity of AS1269574 to act as a dual agonist at two molecular targets (GPR119/TRPA1) important to the control of L-cell function and type 2 diabetes mellitus drug discovery research. PMID:27082897

  1. Activation of GLP-1 receptors on vascular smooth muscle cells reduces the autoregulatory response in afferent arterioles and increases renal blood flow.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Elisa P; Poulsen, Steen S; Kissow, Hannelouise; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Deacon, Carolyn F; Jensen, Boye L; Holst, Jens J; Sorensen, Charlotte M

    2015-04-15

    Glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 has a range of extrapancreatic effects, including renal effects. The mechanisms are poorly understood, but GLP-1 receptors have been identified in the kidney. However, the exact cellular localization of the renal receptors is poorly described. The aim of the present study was to localize renal GLP-1 receptors and describe GLP-1-mediated effects on the renal vasculature. We hypothesized that renal GLP-1 receptors are located in the renal microcirculation and that activation of these affects renal autoregulation and increases renal blood flow. In vivo autoradiography using (125)I-labeled GLP-1, (125)I-labeled exendin-4 (GLP-1 analog), and (125)I-labeled exendin 9-39 (GLP-1 receptor antagonist) was performed in rodents to localize specific GLP-1 receptor binding. GLP-1-mediated effects on blood pressure, renal blood flow (RBF), heart rate, renin secretion, urinary flow rate, and Na(+) and K(+) excretion were investigated in anesthetized rats. Effects of GLP-1 on afferent arterioles were investigated in isolated mouse kidneys. Specific binding of (125)I-labeled GLP-1, (125)I-labeled exendin-4, and (125)I-labeled exendin 9-39 was observed in the renal vasculature, including afferent arterioles. Infusion of GLP-1 increased blood pressure, RBF, and urinary flow rate significantly in rats. Heart rate and plasma renin concentrations were unchanged. Exendin 9-39 inhibited the increase in RBF. In isolated murine kidneys, GLP-1 and exendin-4 significantly reduced the autoregulatory response of afferent arterioles in response to stepwise increases in pressure. We conclude that GLP-1 receptors are located in the renal vasculature, including afferent arterioles. Activation of these receptors reduces the autoregulatory response of afferent arterioles to acute pressure increases and increases RBF in normotensive rats.

  2. Activation of the GLP-1 Receptors in the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract Reduces Food Reward Behavior and Targets the Mesolimbic System

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Jennifer E.; Anderberg, Rozita H.; Göteson, Andreas; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank; Skibicka, Karolina P.

    2015-01-01

    The gut/brain peptide, glucagon like peptide 1 (GLP-1), suppresses food intake by acting on receptors located in key energy balance regulating CNS areas, the hypothalamus or the hindbrain. Moreover, GLP-1 can reduce reward derived from food and motivation to obtain food by acting on its mesolimbic receptors. Together these data suggest a neuroanatomical segregation between homeostatic and reward effects of GLP-1. Here we aim to challenge this view and hypothesize that GLP-1 can regulate food reward behavior by acting directly on the hindbrain, the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1R). Using two models of food reward, sucrose progressive ratio operant conditioning and conditioned place preference for food in rats, we show that intra-NTS microinjections of GLP-1 or Exendin-4, a stable analogue of GLP-1, inhibit food reward behavior. When the rats were given a choice between palatable food and chow, intra-NTS Exendin-4 treatment preferentially reduced intake of palatable food but not chow. However, chow intake and body weight were reduced by the NTS GLP-1R activation if chow was offered alone. The NTS GLP-1 activation did not alter general locomotor activity and did not induce nausea, measured by PICA. We further show that GLP-1 fibers are in close apposition to the NTS noradrenergic neurons, which were previously shown to provide a monosynaptic connection between the NTS and the mesolimbic system. Central GLP-1R activation also increased NTS expression of dopamine-β-hydroxylase, a key enzyme in noradrenaline synthesis, indicating a biological link between these two systems. Moreover, NTS GLP-1R activation altered the expression of dopamine-related genes in the ventral tegmental area. These data reveal a food reward-suppressing role of the NTS GLP-1R and indicate that the neurobiological targets underlying food reward control are not limited to the mesolimbic system, instead they are distributed throughout the CNS. PMID:25793511

  3. Activation of the GLP-1 receptors in the nucleus of the solitary tract reduces food reward behavior and targets the mesolimbic system.

    PubMed

    Richard, Jennifer E; Anderberg, Rozita H; Göteson, Andreas; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank; Skibicka, Karolina P

    2015-01-01

    The gut/brain peptide, glucagon like peptide 1 (GLP-1), suppresses food intake by acting on receptors located in key energy balance regulating CNS areas, the hypothalamus or the hindbrain. Moreover, GLP-1 can reduce reward derived from food and motivation to obtain food by acting on its mesolimbic receptors. Together these data suggest a neuroanatomical segregation between homeostatic and reward effects of GLP-1. Here we aim to challenge this view and hypothesize that GLP-1 can regulate food reward behavior by acting directly on the hindbrain, the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1R). Using two models of food reward, sucrose progressive ratio operant conditioning and conditioned place preference for food in rats, we show that intra-NTS microinjections of GLP-1 or Exendin-4, a stable analogue of GLP-1, inhibit food reward behavior. When the rats were given a choice between palatable food and chow, intra-NTS Exendin-4 treatment preferentially reduced intake of palatable food but not chow. However, chow intake and body weight were reduced by the NTS GLP-1R activation if chow was offered alone. The NTS GLP-1 activation did not alter general locomotor activity and did not induce nausea, measured by PICA. We further show that GLP-1 fibers are in close apposition to the NTS noradrenergic neurons, which were previously shown to provide a monosynaptic connection between the NTS and the mesolimbic system. Central GLP-1R activation also increased NTS expression of dopamine-β-hydroxylase, a key enzyme in noradrenaline synthesis, indicating a biological link between these two systems. Moreover, NTS GLP-1R activation altered the expression of dopamine-related genes in the ventral tegmental area. These data reveal a food reward-suppressing role of the NTS GLP-1R and indicate that the neurobiological targets underlying food reward control are not limited to the mesolimbic system, instead they are distributed throughout the CNS.

  4. Cyclic alpha-conotoxin peptidomimetic chimeras as potent GLP-1R agonists.

    PubMed

    Swedberg, Joakim E; Schroeder, Christina I; Mitchell, Justin M; Durek, Thomas; Fairlie, David P; Edmonds, David J; Griffith, David A; Ruggeri, Roger B; Derksen, David R; Loria, Paula M; Liras, Spiros; Price, David A; Craik, David J

    2015-10-20

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) results from compromised pancreatic β-cell function, reduced insulin production, and lowered insulin sensitivity in target organs resulting in hyperglycemia. The GLP-1 hormone has two biologically active forms, GLP-1-(7-37) and GLP-1-(7-36)amide, which are equipotent at the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R). These peptides are central both to normal glucose metabolism and dysregulation in T2DM. Several structurally modified GLP-1 analogues are now approved drugs, and a number of other analogues are in clinical trials. None of these compounds is orally bioavailable and all require parenteral delivery. Recently, a number of smaller peptidomimetics containing 11-12 natural and unnatural amino acids have been identified that have similar insulin regulating profiles as GLP-1. The α-conotoxins are a class of disulfide rich peptide venoms isolated from cone snails, and are known for their highly constrained structures and resistance to enzymatic degradation. In this study, we examined whether 11-residue peptidomimetics incorporated into α-conotoxin scaffolds, forming monocyclic or bicyclic compounds constrained by disulfide bonds and/or backbone cyclization, could activate the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R). Several compounds showed potent (nanomolar) agonist activity at GLP-1R, as evaluated via cAMP signaling. In addition, HPLC retention times and in silico calculations suggested that mono- and bicyclic compounds had more favorable n-octanol/water partition coefficients according to the virtual partition coefficient model (vLogP), while maintaining a smaller radius of gyration compared to corresponding uncyclized peptidomimetics. Our findings suggest that cyclic peptidomimetics provide a potential avenue for future design of potent, compact ligands targeting GLP-1R and possessing improved physicochemical properties. PMID:26352676

  5. Regulation of Glucose Homeostasis by GLP-1

    PubMed Central

    Nadkarni, Prashant; Chepurny, Oleg G.; Holz, George G.

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1(7–36)amide (GLP-1) is a secreted peptide that acts as a key determinant of blood glucose homeostasis by virtue of its abilities to slow gastric emptying, to enhance pancreatic insulin secretion, and to suppress pancreatic glucagon secretion. GLP-1 is secreted from L cells of the gastrointestinal mucosa in response to a meal, and the blood glucose-lowering action of GLP-1 is terminated due to its enzymatic degradation by dipeptidyl-peptidase-IV (DPP-IV). Released GLP-1 activates enteric and autonomic reflexes while also circulating as an incretin hormone to control endocrine pancreas function. The GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a G protein-coupled receptor that is activated directly or indirectly by blood glucose-lowering agents currently in use for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). These therapeutic agents include GLP-1R agonists (exenatide, liraglutide, lixisenatide, albiglutide, dulaglutide, and langlenatide) and DPP-IV inhibitors (sitagliptin, vildagliptin, saxagliptin, linagliptin, and alogliptin). Investigational agents for use in the treatment of T2DM include GPR119 and GPR40 receptor agonists that stimulate the release of GLP-1 from L cells. Summarized here is the role of GLP-1 to control blood glucose homeo-stasis, with special emphasis on the advantages and limitations of GLP-1-based therapeutics. PMID:24373234

  6. Activation of GLP-1 Receptor Enhances Neuronal Base Excision Repair via PI3K-AKT-Induced Expression of Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease 1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jenq-Lin; Chen, Wei-Yu; Chen, Yin-Ping; Kuo, Chao-Ying; Chen, Shang-Der

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an intestinal-secreted incretin that increases cellular glucose up-take to decrease blood sugar. Recent studies, however, suggest that the function of GLP-1 is not only to decrease blood sugar, but also acts as a neurotrophic factor that plays a role in neuronal survival, neurite outgrowth, and protects synaptic plasticity and memory formation from effects of β-amyloid. Oxidative DNA damage occurs during normal neuron-activity and in many neurological diseases. Our study describes how GLP-1 affected the ability of neurons to ameliorate oxidative DNA damage. We show that activation of GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) protect cortical neurons from menadione induced oxidative DNA damage via a signaling pathway involving enhanced DNA repair. GLP-1 stimulates DNA repair by activating the cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) which, consequently, induces the expression of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), a key enzyme in the base excision DNA repair (BER) pathway. In this study, APE1 expression was down-regulated as a consequence phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) suppression by the inhibitor LY294002, but not by the suppression of MEK activity. Ischemic stroke is typically caused by overwhelming oxidative-stress in brain cells. Administration of exentin-4, an analogue of GLP-1, efficiently enhanced DNA repair in brain cells of ischemic stroke rats. Our study suggests that a new function of GLP-1 is to elevate DNA repair by inducing the expression of the DNA repair protein APE1. PMID:27698937

  7. Activation of GLP-1 Receptor Enhances Neuronal Base Excision Repair via PI3K-AKT-Induced Expression of Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease 1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jenq-Lin; Chen, Wei-Yu; Chen, Yin-Ping; Kuo, Chao-Ying; Chen, Shang-Der

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an intestinal-secreted incretin that increases cellular glucose up-take to decrease blood sugar. Recent studies, however, suggest that the function of GLP-1 is not only to decrease blood sugar, but also acts as a neurotrophic factor that plays a role in neuronal survival, neurite outgrowth, and protects synaptic plasticity and memory formation from effects of β-amyloid. Oxidative DNA damage occurs during normal neuron-activity and in many neurological diseases. Our study describes how GLP-1 affected the ability of neurons to ameliorate oxidative DNA damage. We show that activation of GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) protect cortical neurons from menadione induced oxidative DNA damage via a signaling pathway involving enhanced DNA repair. GLP-1 stimulates DNA repair by activating the cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) which, consequently, induces the expression of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), a key enzyme in the base excision DNA repair (BER) pathway. In this study, APE1 expression was down-regulated as a consequence phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) suppression by the inhibitor LY294002, but not by the suppression of MEK activity. Ischemic stroke is typically caused by overwhelming oxidative-stress in brain cells. Administration of exentin-4, an analogue of GLP-1, efficiently enhanced DNA repair in brain cells of ischemic stroke rats. Our study suggests that a new function of GLP-1 is to elevate DNA repair by inducing the expression of the DNA repair protein APE1.

  8. Split Ssp DnaB mini-intein-mediated production of recombinant human glucagon-like peptide-1/7-36.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Aiqin; Jin, Wenbo; Zhao, Feng; Tang, Yanchun; Sun, Ziyong; Liu, Jian-Ning

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) plays an important role in the regulation of postprandial insulin release. Here, we used the split DnaB mini-intein system to produce recombinant human GLP-1/7-36 (rhGLP-1) in Escherichia coli. The C-terminal domain of DnaB mini-intein (IntC) was genetically fused at the N-terminus of rhGLP-1 to produce IntC-GLP-1. IntC-GLP-1 and N-terminal domain of DnaB mini-intein (IntN) protein were prepared in a denatured buffer of pH 8.0. IntC-GLP-1 was diluted 1:8 into the phosphate buffer of pH 6.6. IntN was added into the diluted solution of IntC-GLP-1 at the molar ratio of 1:2. Then, rhGLP-1 was released from IntC-GLP-1 via inducible C-terminal peptide-bond cleavage by shifting pH from 8.0 to 6.6 at 25 °C for 24-H incubation. Then, the supernatant was applied to a Ni-Sepharose column, and the pass through fraction was collected. About 5.34 mg of rhGLP-1 with the purity of 97% was obtained from 1 L of culture medium. Mass spectrometry showed the molecular weight of 3,300.45 Da, which was equal to the theoretical value of GLP-1/7-36. The glucose-lowering activity of rhGLP-1 was confirmed by the glucose tolerance test in mice. In conclusion, the reported method was an efficient strategy to produce rhGLP-1 without using enzyme or chemical reagents, which could also be used for other similar peptides.

  9. The acute anorexic effect of liraglutide, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, does not require functional leptin receptor, serotonin, and hypothalamic POMC and CART activities in mice.

    PubMed

    Nonogaki, Katsunori; Kaji, Takao

    2016-10-01

    The acute anorexic effect of liraglutide, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, did not require functional leptin receptor, serotonin, and hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin and cocaine amphetamine regulated transcript activities in mice, although decrease in functional hypothalamic orexin activity might be involved in the acute anorexic effect of liraglutide. PMID:27585115

  10. Heterobivalent GLP-1/Glibenclamide for Targeting Pancreatic β-cells

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Nathaniel J.; Chung, Woo Jin; Weber, Craig; Ananthakrishnan, Kameswari; Anderson, Miranda; Patek, Renata; Zhang, Zhanyu; Limesand, Sean W.; Vagner, Josef; Lynch, Ronald M.

    2014-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide (G)-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) linked cell signaling cascades are initiated upon binding of a specific agonist ligand to its cell surface receptor. Linking multiple heterologous ligands that simultaneously bind and potentially cross-link different receptors on the cell surface is a unique approach to modulate cell responses. Moreover, if the target receptors are pre-selected, based on analysis of cell specific expression of a receptor combination, then the linked binding elements may provide enhanced specificity of targeting to the cell type of interest; i.e., only to cells that express the complementary receptors. Two receptors whose expression is relatively specific, as a combination, to the insulin secreting β-cell of the pancreas, are the sulfonylurea-1 (SUR1) and the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors. A heterobivalent ligand was assembled of the active fragment of GLP-1 ([Phe12, Arg36] 7-36 GLP-1) and glibenclamide,a small organic ligand to the SUR1. The synthetic construct was labelled with Cy5 or Europium chelated in DTPA to evaluate binding to β-cell lines using fluorescence microscopy or time-resolved saturation and competition binding assays, respectively. Once the ligand binds to β-cells, it is rapidly capped and presumably removed from the cell surface via endocytosis. The bivalent ligand had an affinity ~3 fold higher than monomeric Europium labelled GLP-1, likely due to cooperative binding to the complimentary receptors on the βTC3 cells. The high affinity binding was lost in the presence of either unlabelled monomer demonstrating that interaction with both receptors is required for the enhanced binding at low concentrations. Importantly, bivalent enhancement was accomplished in a cell system with physiological levels of expression of the complementary receptors, indicating that this approach may be applicable for β-cell targeting in vivo. PMID:24259278

  11. In vitro metabolism of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-derived metabolites GLP-1(9-36)amide and GLP-1(28-36)amide in mouse and human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Raman; McDonald, Thomas S; Eng, Heather; Limberakis, Chris; Stevens, Benjamin D; Patel, Sheena; Kalgutkar, Amit S

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have revealed that the glucoincretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)(7-36)amide is metabolized by dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) and neutral endopeptidase 24.11 (NEP) to yield GLP-1(9-36)amide and GLP-1(28-36)amide, respectively, as the principal metabolites. Contrary to the previous notion that GLP-1(7-36)amide metabolites are pharmacologically inactive, recent studies have demonstrated cardioprotective and insulinomimetic effects with both GLP-1(9-36)amide and GLP-1(28-36)amide in animals and humans. In the present work, we examined the metabolic stability of the two GLP-1(7-36)amide metabolites in cryopreserved hepatocytes, which have been used to demonstrate the in vitro insulin-like effects of GLP-1(9-36)amide and GLP-1(28-36)amide on gluconeogenesis. To examine the metabolic stability of the GLP-1(7-36)amide metabolites, a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay was developed for the quantitation of the intact peptides in hepatocyte incubations. GLP-1(9-36)amide and GLP-1(28-36)amide were rapidly metabolized in mouse [GLP-1(9-36)amide: t(1/2) = 52 minutes; GLP-1(28-36)amide: t(1/2) = 13 minutes] and human hepatocytes [GLP-1(9-36)amide: t(1/2) = 180 minutes; GLP-1(28-36)amide: t(1/2) = 24 minutes), yielding a variety of N-terminal cleavage products that were characterized using mass spectrometry. Metabolism at the C terminus was not observed for either peptides. The DPP-IV and NEP inhibitors diprotin A and phosphoramidon, respectively, did not induce resistance in the two peptides toward proteolytic cleavage. Overall, our in vitro findings raise the intriguing possibility that the insulinomimetic effects of GLP-1(9-36)amide and GLP-1(28-36)amide on gluconeogenesis and oxidative stress might be due, at least in part, to the actions of additional downstream metabolites, which are obtained from the enzymatic cleavage of the peptide backbone in the parent compounds.

  12. Brain GLP-1 and insulin sensitivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Type 2 diabetes is often treated with a class of drugs referred to as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogs. GLP-1 is a peptide secreted by the gut that acts through only one known receptor, the GLP-1 receptor. The primary function of GLP-1 is thought to be lowering of postprandial glucose levels....

  13. Release of GLP-1 and PYY in response to the activation of G protein-coupled bile acid receptor TGR5 is mediated by Epac/PLC-ε pathway and modulated by endogenous H2S.

    PubMed

    Bala, Vanitha; Rajagopal, Senthilkumar; Kumar, Divya P; Nalli, Ancy D; Mahavadi, Sunila; Sanyal, Arun J; Grider, John R; Murthy, Karnam S

    2014-01-01

    Activation of plasma membrane TGR5 receptors in enteroendocrine cells by bile acids is known to regulate gastrointestinal secretion and motility and glucose homeostasis. The endocrine functions of the gut are modulated by microenvironment of the distal gut predominantly by sulfur-reducing bacteria of the microbiota that produce H2S. However, the mechanisms involved in the release of peptide hormones, GLP-1 and PYY in response to TGR5 activation by bile acids and the effect of H2S on bile acid-induced release of GLP-1 and PYY are unclear. In the present study, we have identified the signaling pathways activated by the bile acid receptor TGR5 to mediate GLP-1 and PYY release and the mechanism of inhibition of their release by H2S in enteroendocrine cells. The TGR5 ligand oleanolic acid (OA) stimulated Gαs and cAMP formation, and caused GLP-1 and PYY release. OA-induced cAMP formation and peptide release were blocked by TGR5 siRNA. OA also caused an increase in PI hydrolysis and intracellular Ca(2+). Increase in PI hydrolysis was abolished in cells transfected with PLC-ε siRNA. 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP, a selective activator of Epac, stimulated PI hydrolysis, and GLP-1 and PYY release. L-Cysteine, which activates endogenous H2S producing enzymes cystathionine-γ-lyase and cystathionine-β-synthase, and NaHS and GYY4137, which generate H2S, inhibited PI hydrolysis and GLP-1 and PYY release in response to OA or 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP. Propargylglycine, an inhibitor of CSE, reversed the effect of L-cysteine on PI hydrolysis and GLP-1 and PYY release. We conclude: (i) activation of Gαs-coupled TGR5 receptors causes stimulation of PI hydrolysis, and release of GLP-1 and PYY via a PKA-independent, cAMP-dependent mechanism involving Epac/PLC-ε/Ca(2+) pathway, and (ii) H2S has potent inhibitory effects on GLP-1 and PYY release in response to TGR5 activation, and the mechanism involves inhibition of PLC-ε/Ca(2+) pathway.

  14. GLP-1 is both anxiogenic and antidepressant; divergent effects of acute and chronic GLP-1 on emotionality.

    PubMed

    Anderberg, Rozita H; Richard, Jennifer E; Hansson, Caroline; Nissbrandt, Hans; Bergquist, Filip; Skibicka, Karolina P

    2016-03-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), produced in the intestine and hindbrain, is known for its glucoregulatory and appetite suppressing effects. GLP-1 agonists are in clinical use for treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. GLP-1, however, may also affect brain areas associated with emotionality regulation. Here we aimed to characterize acute and chronic impact of GLP-1 on anxiety and depression-like behavior. Rats were subjected to anxiety and depression behavior tests following acute or chronic intracerebroventricular or intra-dorsal raphe (DR) application of GLP-1 receptor agonists. Serotonin or serotonin-related genes were also measured in the amygdala, DR and the hippocampus. We demonstrate that both GLP-1 and its long lasting analog, Exendin-4, induce anxiety-like behavior in three rodent tests of this behavior: black and white box, elevated plus maze and open field test when acutely administered intraperitoneally, into the lateral ventricle, or directly into the DR. Acute central GLP-1 receptor stimulation also altered serotonin signaling in the amygdala. In contrast, chronic central administration of Exendin-4 did not alter anxiety-like behavior but significantly reduced depression-like behavior in the forced swim test. Importantly, this positive effect of Exendin-4 was not due to significant body weight loss and reduced food intake, since rats pair-fed to Exendin-4 rats did not show altered mood. Collectively we show a striking impact of central GLP-1 on emotionality and the amygdala serotonin signaling that is divergent under acute versus chronic GLP-1 activation conditions. We also find a novel role for the DR GLP-1 receptors in regulation of behavior. These results may have direct relevance to the clinic, and indicate that Exendin-4 may be especially useful for obese patients manifesting with comorbid depression. PMID:26724568

  15. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) can reverse AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and S6 kinase (P70S6K) activities induced by fluctuations in glucose levels in hypothalamic areas involved in feeding behaviour.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Carneiro, Verónica; Sanz, Carmen; Roncero, Isabel; Vazquez, Patricia; Blazquez, Enrique; Alvarez, Elvira

    2012-04-01

    The anorexigenic peptide, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), reduces glucose metabolism in the human hypothalamus and brain stem. The brain activity of metabolic sensors such as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) responds to changes in glucose levels. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and its downstream target, p70S6 kinase (p70S6K), integrate nutrient and hormonal signals. The hypothalamic mTOR/p70S6K pathway has been implicated in the control of feeding and the regulation of energy balances. Therefore, we investigated the coordinated effects of glucose and GLP-1 on the expression and activity of AMPK and p70S6K in the areas involved in the control of feeding. The effect of GLP-1 on the expression and activities of AMPK and p70S6K was studied in hypothalamic slice explants exposed to low- and high-glucose concentrations by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and by the quantification of active-phosphorylated protein levels by immunoblot. In vivo, the effects of exendin-4 on hypothalamic AMPK and p70S6K activation were analysed in male obese Zucker and lean controls 1 h after exendin-4 injection to rats fasted for 48 h or after re-feeding for 2-4 h. High-glucose levels decreased the expression of Ampk in the lateral hypothalamus and treatment with GLP-1 reversed this effect. GLP-1 treatment inhibited the activities of AMPK and p70S6K when the activation of these protein kinases was maximum in both the ventromedial and lateral hypothalamic areas. Furthermore, in vivo s.c. administration of exendin-4 modulated AMPK and p70S6K activities in those areas, in both fasted and re-fed obese Zucker and lean control rats.

  16. [Preparation and the biological effect of fusion protein GLP-1-exendin-4/ IgG4(Fc) fusion protein as long acting GLP-1 receptor agonist].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yun-cheng

    2015-12-01

    GLP-1 has a variety of anti-diabetic effects. However, native GLP-1 is not suitable for treatment of diabetes due to its short half-life (t½, 2-5 min). Exendin-4 is a polypeptide isolated from lizard saliva, which can bind to GLP-1 receptor, produce physiological effects similar to GLP-1, t½ up to 2.5 h, therefore, we developed a long-lasting GLP-1 receptor agonists and GLP-1-exendin-4 fusion IgG4 Fc [GLP-1-exendin-4/ IgG4(Fc)]. We constructed the eukaryotic expression vector of human GLP-1-exendin-4/IgG4(Fc)-pOptiVEC- TOPO by gene recombination technique and expressed the fusion protein human GLP-1-IgG4 (Fc) in CHO/DG44 cells. The fusion protein stimulated the INS-1 cells secretion of insulin, GLP-1, exendin-4 and fusion protein in CD1 mice pharmacokinetic experiments, as well as GLP-1, exendin-4 and fusion protein did anti-diabetic effect on streptozotocin induced mice. Results demonstrated that the GLP-1-exendin-4/IgG4(Fc) positive CHO/DG44 clones were chosen and the media from these positive clones. Western blotting showed that one protein band was found to match well with the predicted relative molecular mass of human GLP-1-exendin-4/IgG4(Fc). Insulin RIA showed that GLP-1-exendin-4/IgG4(Fc) dose-dependently stimulated insulin secretion from INS-1 cells. Pharmacokinetic studies in CD1 mice showed that with intraperitoneal injection (ip), the fusion protein peaked at 30 min in circulation and maintained a plateau for 200 h. Natural biological half-life of exendin-4 was (1.39 ± 0.28) h, GLP-1 in vivo t½ 4 min, indicating that fusion protein has long-lasting effects on the modulation of glucose homeostasis. GLP-1-exendin-4/IgG4(Fc) was found to be effective in reducing the incidence of diabetes in multiple-low-dose streptozotocin-induced diabetes in mice, longer duration of the biological activity of the fusion protein. The biological activity was significantly higher than that of GLP-1 and exendin-4. GLP-1-exendin-4/IgG4(Fc) has good anti-diabetic activity

  17. Extending residence time and stability of peptides by Protected Graft Copolymer (PGC) excipient: GLP-1 example

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Gerardo M.; Reichstetter, Sandra; Bolotin, Elijah M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to determine whether a Protected Graft Copolymer (PGC) containing fatty acid can be used as a stabilizing excipient for GLP-1 and whether PGC/GLP-1 given once a week can be an effective treatment for diabetes. Methods To create a PGC excipient, polylysine was grafted with methoxypolyethyleneglycol and fatty acid at the epsilon amino groups. We performed evaluation of 1) the binding of excipient to GLP-1, 2) the DPP IV sensitivity of GLP-1 formulated with PGC as the excipient, 3) the in vitro bio-activity of excipient-formulated GLP-1, 4) the in vivo pharmacokinetics of excipient-formulated GLP-1, and 5) the efficacy of the excipient-formulated GLP-1 in diabetic rats. Results We showed reproducible synthesis of PGC excipient, showed high affinity binding of PGC to GLP-1, slowed protease degradation of excipient-formulated GLP-1, and showed that excipient-formulated GLP-1 induced calcium influx in INS cells. Excipient-formulated GLP-1 stays in the blood for at least 4 days. When excipient-formulated GLP-1 was given subcutaneously once a week to diabetic ZDF rats, a significant reduction of HbA1c compared to control was observed. The reduction is similar to diabetic ZDF rats given exendin twice a day. Conclusions PGC can be an ideal in vivo stabilizing excipient for biologically labile peptides. PMID:21830140

  18. Pharmacokinetics and metabolism studies on the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-derived metabolite GLP-1(9-36)amide in male Beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Eng, Heather; Sharma, Raman; McDonald, Thomas S; Landis, Margaret S; Stevens, Benjamin D; Kalgutkar, Amit S

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)(7-36)amide is a 30-amino acid peptide hormone that is secreted from intestinal enteroendocrine L-cells in response to nutrients. GLP-1(7-36)amide possesses potent insulinotropic actions in the augmentation of glucose-dependent insulin secretion. GLP-1(7-36)amide is rapidly metabolized by dipeptidyl peptidase-IV to yield GLP-1(9-36)amide as the principal metabolite. Contrary to the earlier notion that peptide cleavage products of native GLP-1(7-36)amide [including GLP-1(9-36)amide] are pharmacologically inactive, recent studies have demonstrated cardioprotective and insulinomimetic effects with GLP-1(9-36)amide in mice, dogs and humans. In the present work, in vitro metabolism and pharmacokinetic properties of GLP-1(9-36)amide have been characterized in dogs, since this preclinical species has been used as an animal model to demonstrate the in vivo vasodilatory and cardioprotective effects of GLP-1(9-36)amide. A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry assay was developed for the quantitation of the intact peptide in hepatocyte incubations as opposed to a previously reported enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Although GLP-1(9-36)amide was resistant to proteolytic cleavage in dog plasma and bovine serum albumin (t1/2>240 min), the peptide was rapidly metabolized in dog hepatocytes with a t1/2 of 110 min. Metabolite identification studies in dog hepatocytes revealed a variety of N-terminus cleavage products, most of which, have also been observed in human and mouse hepatocytes. Proteolysis at the C-terminus was not observed in GLP-1(9-36)amide. Following the administration of a single intravenous bolus dose (20 µg/kg) to male Beagle dogs, GLP-1(9-36)amide exhibited a mean plasma clearance of 15 ml/min/kg and a low steady state distribution volume of 0.05 l/kg, which translated into a short elimination half life of 0.05 h. Following subcutaneous administration of GLP-1(9-36)amide at 50 µg/kg, systemic exposure of

  19. Inositolphosphoglycans possibly mediate the effects of glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)amide on rat liver and adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Márquez, L; Trapote, M A; Luque, M A; Valverde, I; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L

    1998-03-01

    Insulin-like effects of glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)amide (GLP-1) in rat liver, skeletal muscle and fat, and also the presence of GLP-1 receptors in these extrapancreatic tissues, have been documented. In skeletal muscle and liver, the action of GLP-1 is not associated with an activation of adenylate cyclase, and in cultured murine myocytes and hepatoma cell lines, it was found that GLP-1 provokes the generation of inositolphosphoglycan molecules (IPGs), which are considered second messengers of insulin action. In the present work, we document in isolated normal rat adipocytes and hepatocytes that GLP-1 exerts a rapid decrease of the radiolabelled glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs)--precursors of IPGs--in the same manner as insulin, indicating their hydrolysis and the immediate short-lived generation of IPGs. Thus, IPGs could be mediators in the GLP-1 actions in adipose tissue and liver, as well as in skeletal muscle, through GLP-1 receptors which are, at least functionally, different from that of the pancreatic B-cell.

  20. A bitter pill for type 2 diabetes? The activation of bitter taste receptor TAS2R38 can stimulate GLP-1 release from enteroendocrine L-cells

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Hung; Hui, Hongxiang; Morvaridi, Susan; Cai, Jiena; Zhang, Sanqi; Tan, Jun; Wu, Vincent; Levin, Nancy; Knudsen, Beatrice; Goddard, William A.; Pandol, Stephen J.; Abrol, Ravinder

    2016-01-01

    The bitter taste receptor TAS2R38 is a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that has been found in many extra-oral locations like the gastrointestinal (GI) system, respiratory system, and brain, though its function at these locations is only beginning to be understood. To probe the receptor’s potential metabolic role, immunohistochemistry of human ileum tissues was performed, which showed that the receptor was co-localized with glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) in L-cells. In a previous study, we had modeled the structure of this receptor for its many taste-variant haplotypes (Tan et al. 2011), including the taster haplotype PAV. The structure of this haplotype was then used in a virtual ligand screening pipeline using a collection of ~2.5 million purchasable molecules from the ZINC database. Three compounds (Z7, Z3, Z1) were purchased from the top hits and tested along with PTU (known TAS2R38 agonist) in in vitro and in vivo assays. The dose-response study of the effect of PTU and Z7 on GLP-1 release using wild-type and TAS2R38 knockout HuTu-80 cells showed that the receptor TAS2R38 plays a major role in GLP-1 release due to these molecules. In vivo studies of PTU and the three compounds showed that they each increase GLP-1 release. PTU was also chemical linked to cellulose to slow its absorption and when tested in vivo, it showed an enhanced and prolonged GLP-1 release. These results suggest that the GI lumen location of TAS2R38 on the L-cell makes it a relatively safe drug target as systemic absorption is not needed for a TAS2R38 agonist drug to effect GLP-1 release. PMID:27208775

  1. A bitter pill for type 2 diabetes? The activation of bitter taste receptor TAS2R38 can stimulate GLP-1 release from enteroendocrine L-cells.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hung; Hui, Hongxiang; Morvaridi, Susan; Cai, Jiena; Zhang, Sanqi; Tan, Jun; Wu, Vincent; Levin, Nancy; Knudsen, Beatrice; Goddard, William A; Pandol, Stephen J; Abrol, Ravinder

    2016-07-01

    The bitter taste receptor TAS2R38 is a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that has been found in many extra-oral locations like the gastrointestinal (GI) system, respiratory system, and brain, though its function at these locations is only beginning to be understood. To probe the receptor's potential metabolic role, immunohistochemistry of human ileum tissues was performed, which showed that the receptor was co-localized with glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) in L-cells. In a previous study, we had modeled the structure of this receptor for its many taste-variant haplotypes (Tan et al. 2011), including the taster haplotype PAV. The structure of this haplotype was then used in a virtual ligand screening pipeline using a collection of ∼2.5 million purchasable molecules from the ZINC database. Three compounds (Z7, Z3, Z1) were purchased from the top hits and tested along with PTU (known TAS2R38 agonist) in in vitro and in vivo assays. The dose-response study of the effect of PTU and Z7 on GLP-1 release using wild-type and TAS2R38 knockout HuTu-80 cells showed that the receptor TAS2R38 plays a major role in GLP-1 release due to these molecules. In vivo studies of PTU and the three compounds showed that they each increase GLP-1 release. PTU was also chemical linked to cellulose to slow its absorption and when tested in vivo, it showed an enhanced and prolonged GLP-1 release. These results suggest that the GI lumen location of TAS2R38 on the L-cell makes it a relatively safe drug target as systemic absorption is not needed for a TAS2R38 agonist drug to effect GLP-1 release. PMID:27208775

  2. Genetic analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans glp-1 mutants suggests receptor interaction or competition.

    PubMed Central

    Pepper, Anita S-R; Killian, Darrell J; Hubbard, E Jane Albert

    2003-01-01

    glp-1 encodes a member of the highly conserved LIN-12/Notch family of receptors that mediates the mitosis/meiosis decision in the C. elegans germline. We have characterized three mutations that represent a new genetic and phenotypic class of glp-1 mutants, glp-1(Pro). The glp-1(Pro) mutants display gain-of-function germline pattern defects, most notably a proximal proliferation (Pro) phenotype. Each of three glp-1(Pro) alleles encodes a single amino acid change in the extracellular part of the receptor: two in the LIN-12/Notch repeats (LNRs) and one between the LNRs and the transmembrane domain. Unlike other previously described gain-of-function mutations that affect this region of LIN-12/Notch family receptors, the genetic behavior of glp-1(Pro) alleles is not consistent with simple hypermorphic activity. Instead, the mutant phenotype is suppressed by wild-type doses of glp-1. Moreover, a trans-heterozygous combination of two highly penetrant glp-1(Pro) mutations is mutually suppressing. These results lend support to a model for a higher-order receptor complex and/or competition among receptor proteins for limiting factors that are required for proper regulation of receptor activity. Double-mutant analysis with suppressors and enhancers of lin-12 and glp-1 further suggests that the functional defect in glp-1(Pro) mutants occurs prior to or at the level of ligand interaction. PMID:12586701

  3. C. elegans GLP-1/Notch activates transcription in a probability gradient across the germline stem cell pool

    PubMed Central

    Lee, ChangHwan; Sorensen, Erika B; Lynch, Tina R; Kimble, Judith

    2016-01-01

    C. elegans Notch signaling maintains a pool of germline stem cells within their single-celled mesenchymal niche. Here we investigate the Notch transcriptional response in germline stem cells using single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization coupled with automated, high-throughput quantitation. This approach allows us to distinguish Notch-dependent nascent transcripts in the nucleus from mature mRNAs in the cytoplasm. We find that Notch-dependent active transcription sites occur in a probabilistic fashion and, unexpectedly, do so in a steep gradient across the stem cell pool. Yet these graded nuclear sites create a nearly uniform field of mRNAs that extends beyond the region of transcriptional activation. Therefore, active transcription sites provide a precise view of where the Notch-dependent transcriptional complex is productively engaged. Our findings offer a new window into the Notch transcriptional response and demonstrate the importance of assaying nascent transcripts at active transcription sites as a readout for canonical signaling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18370.001 PMID:27705743

  4. Liraglutide, a long-acting GLP-1 mimetic, and its metabolite attenuate inflammation after intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jack; Manaenko, Anatol; Hakon, Jakob; Hansen-Schwartz, Jacob; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2012-01-01

    The inflammatory response plays a pivotal role in propagating injury of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a hormone with antidiabetic effect and may also have antiinflammatory properties. Despite consensus that the glucoregulatory action is mediated by the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R), mechanisms in the brain remain unclear. We investigated the effect of a long-acting GLP-1 analog, liraglutide, and its truncated metabolite, GLP-1(9-36)a from dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) cleavage in ICH-induced brain injury. Primary outcomes were cerebral edema formation, neurobehavior, and inflammatory parameters. GLP-1(9-36)a, GLP-1R inhibitor, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation inhibitor and DPP-4 inhibitor were administered to examine the mechanisms of action. Liraglutide suppressed neuroinflammation, prevented brain edema and neurologic deficit following ICH, which were partially reversed by GLP-1R inhibitor and AMPK phosphorylation inhibitor. Liraglutide-mediated AMPK phosphorylation was unaffected by GLP-1R inhibitor, and was found to be induced by GLP-1(9-36)a. GLP-1(9-36)a showed salutary effects on primary outcomes that were reversed by AMPK phosphorylation inhibitor but not by GLP-1R inhibitor. Liraglutide and DPP-4 inhibitor co-administration reversed liraglutide-mediated AMPK phosphorylation and antiinflammatory effects. Liraglutide exerted duals actions and the antiinflammatory effects are partially mediated by its metabolite in a phosphorylated AMPK-dependent manner. Therapies that inhibit GLP-1 degradation may weaken the metabolite-mediated effects. PMID:22968320

  5. The DPP-IV inhibitor linagliptin and GLP-1 induce synergistic effects on body weight loss and appetite suppression in the diet-induced obese rat.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik H; Hansen, Gitte; Paulsen, Sarah; Vrang, Niels; Mark, Michael; Jelsing, Jacob; Klein, Thomas

    2014-10-15

    Linagliptin is a dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-IV inhibitor approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. DPP-IV inhibitors are considered weight neutral, suggesting that elevation of endogenous incretin levels is not sufficient to promote weight loss per se. Here we evaluated the effect of linagliptin in combination with subcutaneous treatment of GLP-1(7-36) on body weight regulation in diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. Linagliptin administered perorally (1.5mg/kg, b.i.d.), but not subcutaneously (0.5mg/kg, b.i.d.), evoked a very modest body weight loss (2.2%) after 28 days of treatment. GLP-1 (0.5mg/kg, s.c.) treatment alone induced a body weight loss of 4.1%. In contrast, combined linagliptin (1.5mg/kg, p.o., or 0.5mg/kg, s.c.) and GLP-1 (0.5mg/kg) treatment evoked a marked anorectic response with both routes of linagliptin administration being equally effective on final body weight loss (7.5-8.0%). In comparison, liraglutide monotherapy (0.2mg/kg, s.c., b.i.d.) reduced body weight by 10.1%. Interestingly, the weight lowering effect of combined linagliptin and GLP-1 treatment was associated with a marked increase in chow preference, being more pronounced as compared to liraglutide treatment. In addition, linagliptin and GLP-1 co-treatment, but not liraglutide, specifically increased prepro-dynorphin mRNA levels in the caudate-putamen, an effect not obtained with administration of the compounds individually. In conclusion, co-treatment with linagliptin and GLP-1 synergistically reduces body weight in obese rats. The anti-obesity effect was caused by appetite suppression with a concomitant change in diet preference, which may potentially be associated with increased dynorphin activity in forebrain regions involved in reward anticipation and habit learning.

  6. Mechanisms of Action of GLP-1 in the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Máire E.; Egan, Josephine M.

    2007-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 is a hormone that is encoded in the proglucagon gene. It is mainly produced in enteroendocrine L cells of the gut and is secreted into the blood stream when food containing fat, protein hydrolysate and/or glucose enters the duodenum. Its particular effects on insulin and glucagon secretion have generated a flurry of research activity over the past twenty years culminating in a naturally occurring GLP-1 receptor agonist, exendin-4, now being used to treat type 2 diabetes. GLP-1 engages a specific G-protein coupled receptor that is present in tissues other than the pancreas (brain, kidney, lung, heart, major blood vessels). The most widely studied cell activated by GLP-1 is the insulin-secreting beta cell where its defining action is augmentation of glucose-induced insulin secretion. Upon GLP-1 receptor activation, adenylyl cyclase is activated and cAMP generated, leading, in turn, to cAMP-dependent activation of second messenger pathways, such as the PKA and Epac pathways. As well as short-term effects of enhancing glucose-induced insulin secretion, continuous GLP-1 receptor activation also increases insulin synthesis, and beta cell proliferation and neogenesis. Although these latter effects cannot be currently monitored in humans, there are substantial improvements in glucose tolerance and increases in both first phase and plateau phase insulin secretory responses in type 2 diabetic patients treated with exendin-4. This review we will focus on the effects resulting from GLP-1 receptor activation in islets of Langerhans PMID:17306374

  7. Inositolphosphoglycans are possible mediators of the glucagon-like peptide 1 (7-36)amide action in the liver.

    PubMed

    Trapote, M A; Clemente, F; Galera, C; Morales, M; Alcántara, A I; López-Delgado, M I; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L; Valverde, I

    1996-02-01

    A potent glycogenic effect for GLP-1(7-36)amide has been found in rat hepatocytes and skeletal muscle, and the specific receptors detected for GLP-1(7-36)amide in these tissue membranes do not seem to be associated to adenylate cyclase. On the other hand, inositolphosphoglycan molecules (IPGs) have been implicated as second messengers in the action of insulin. In a human hepatoma cell line (HEP G-2), we have observed the presence of [125I]GLP-1(7-36)amide specific binding, and a stimulatory effect of the peptide upon glycogen synthesis, confirming the findings in isolated rat hepatocytes. Also, GLP-1(7-36)amide modulates the cell content of radiolabelled glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs), in the same manner as insulin, indicating hydrolysis of GPIs and an immediate and short-lived generation of IPGs. Thus, IPGs could be mediators in the GLP-1(7-36)amide glycogenic action in the liver.

  8. TGR5 potentiates GLP-1 secretion in response to anionic exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Harach, Taoufiq; Pols, Thijs W H; Nomura, Mitsunori; Maida, Adriano; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro; Auwerx, Johan; Schoonjans, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    Anionic exchange resins are bona fide cholesterol-lowering agents with glycemia lowering actions in diabetic patients. Potentiation of intestinal GLP-1 secretion has been proposed to contribute to the glycemia lowering effect of these non-systemic drugs. Here, we show that resin exposure enhances GLP-1 secretion and improves glycemic control in diet-induced animal models of "diabesity", effects which are critically dependent on TGR5, a G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by bile acids. We identified the colon as a major source of GLP-1 secretion after resin treatment. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the boost in GLP-1 release by resins is due to both enhanced TGR5-dependent production of the precursor transcript of GLP-1 as well as to the local enrichment of TGR5 agonists in the colon. Thus, TGR5 represents an essential component in the pathway mediating the enhanced GLP-1 release in response to anionic exchange resins. PMID:22666533

  9. Hippocampal GLP-1 receptors influence food intake, meal size, and effort-based responding for food through volume transmission.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ted M; Hahn, Joel D; Konanur, Vaibhav R; Lam, Ashley; Kanoski, Scott E

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is produced in the small intestines and in nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) neurons. Activation of central GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) reduces feeding and body weight. The neural circuits mediating these effects are only partially understood. Here we investigate the inhibition of food intake and motivated responding for food in rats following GLP-1R activation in the ventral hippocampal formation (HPFv), a region only recently highlighted in food intake control. Increased HPFv GLP-1R activity following exendin-4 administration potently reduced food intake (both chow and Western diet) and body weight, whereas HPFv GLP-1R blockade increased food intake. These hypophagic effects were based on reduced meal size, and likely do not involve nausea as HPFv exendin-4 did not induce a conditioned flavor avoidance. HPFv GLP-1R activation also reduced effort-based responding for food under an operant progressive ratio reinforcement schedule, but did not affect food conditioned place preference expression. To investigate possible routes of HPFv GLP-1 signaling, immunohistochemical analysis revealed the absence of GLP-1 axon terminals in the HPFv, suggesting volume transmission as a mechanism of action. Consistent with this, the presence of active GLP-1 was detected in both the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the HPFv. The source of CSF GLP-1 may be NTS GLP-1-producing neurons, as, (1) ∼30% of NTS GLP-1 neurons colocalized with the retrograde tracer fluorogold (FG) following lateral ventricle FG injection, and (2) GLP-1-immunoreactive axon terminals were observed adjacent to the ventricular ependymal layer. Collectively these findings illuminate novel neuronal and behavioral mechanisms mediating food intake reduction by GLP-1. PMID:25035078

  10. Topical Administration of GLP-1 Receptor Agonists Prevents Retinal Neurodegeneration in Experimental Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Cristina; Bogdanov, Patricia; Corraliza, Lidia; García-Ramírez, Marta; Solà-Adell, Cristina; Arranz, José A; Arroba, Ana I; Valverde, Angela M; Simó, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Retinal neurodegeneration is an early event in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Since glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) exerts neuroprotective effects in the central nervous system and the retina is ontogenically a brain-derived tissue, the aims of the current study were as follows: 1) to examine the expression and content of GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) in human and db/db mice retinas; 2) to determine the retinal neuroprotective effects of systemic and topical administration (eye drops) of GLP-1R agonists in db/db mice; and 3) to examine the underlying neuroprotective mechanisms. We have found abundant expression of GLP-1R in the human retina and retinas from db/db mice. Moreover, we have demonstrated that systemic administration of a GLP-1R agonist (liraglutide) prevents retinal neurodegeneration (glial activation, neural apoptosis, and electroretinographical abnormalities). This effect can be attributed to a significant reduction of extracellular glutamate and an increase of prosurvival signaling pathways. We have found a similar neuroprotective effect using topical administration of native GLP-1 and several GLP-1R agonists (liraglutide, lixisenatide, and exenatide). Notably, this neuroprotective action was observed without any reduction in blood glucose levels. These results suggest that GLP-1R activation itself prevents retinal neurodegeneration. Our results should open up a new approach in the treatment of the early stages of DR.

  11. Pancreatic and extrapancreatic effects of GLP-1.

    PubMed

    Valverde, I; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L; Malaisse, W J

    2002-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), an incretin hormone which helps to regulate plasma glucose levels, is considered a potential agent for the treatment of type-2 diabetes mellitus, because of its insulinotropic capacity and insulinomimetic actions. In normal conditions, the beta-cell secretory response to GLP-1 is modulated by the extracellular concentration of D-glucose; however, the recognition of D-glucose by the beta-cell is often impaired in type-2 diabetes, and this could impede the full GLP-1 insulinotropic action. Non-glucidic substrates, such as the dimethyl ester of succinic acid, restore the effect of GLP-1 in the isolated perfused rat pancreas of normal or diabetic rats, in the absence of any other exogenous nutrient; likewise, the dimethyl ester of succinic or L-glutamic acid, and the monomethyl ester of pyruvic acid, potentiate the in vivo beta-cell secretory response to GLP-1 in normal and diabetic rats. Therefore, it was proposed that nutrients susceptible to bypass the site-specific defects of the diabetic beta-cell, could be used to potentiate and/or prolong the insulinotropic action of antidiabetic agents such as GLP-1. In vitro, GLP-1 insulin-like effects on glucose metabolism have been documented in normal and diabetic rat liver, and in rat and human skeletal muscle. In rat and human adipocytes, GLP-1 is lipolytic and/or lipogenic, and also stimulates parameters involved in the glucose metabolism. In liver, muscle and fat, GLP-1 seems to act through specific receptors, apparently different--at least in liver and muscle--in structure or signaling pathway from the pancreatic one. It is proposed that an inositolphosphoglycan might be a second messenger of GLP-1 action in extrapancreatic tissues.

  12. Pancreatic beta-cells expressing GLP-1 are resistant to the toxic effects of immunosuppressive drugs.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Eugenio; Hui, Hongxiang; Khoury, Nasif; Di Mario, Umberto; Perfetti, Riccardo

    2005-04-01

    Glucose intolerance is often observed after pancreatic islet cell transplantation. The administration of immunosuppressive agents (ISD), necessary to avoid tissue rejection, is in part responsible for hyperglycemia. To investigate whether mouse insulinoma (MIN6) cells transfected with the glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) fragment of the proglucagon gene (RIP/GLP-1 MIN6 cells) are resistant to the toxicity derived from the administration of ISD. RIP/GLP-1 MIN6 cells, as well as parental MIN6 cells, were exposed to a cocktail of ISD. The secretion of insulin and the expression of apoptosis-related proteins were investigated by RIA and western blot analysis. Cell apoptosis was quantified by FACS analysis. Finally, to study whether the antiapoptotic action of GLP-1 was a function of its effect on insulin secretion, or rather it was a direct effect of GLP-1, cells were cultured with or without diazoxide or exendin-9. GLP-1 improved the functional activity and the viability of cells exposed to ISD. The insulin secretion of RIP/GLP-1 MIN6 cells after exposure to ISD was preserved. The expression of GLP-1 by beta-cells reduced the number of apoptotic cells and increased the expression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2. GLP-1 also decreased the abundance of the proapoptotic markers PARP-p85 and Smac/Diablo. Treatment of cells with the diazoxide did not abolish the protective advantage that cells transfected with GLP-1 had; conversely the exposure of cells to exendin-9 was associated with a restored susceptibility to apoptosis. This report demonstrates that GLP-1 is capable of preserving beta-cell function and protecting cells from apoptotic cell death.

  13. The physiological role of the brain GLP-1 system in stress

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Marie K.; Trapp, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) within the brain is a potent regulator of food intake and most studies have investigated the anorexic effects of central GLP-1. A range of brain regions have now been found to be involved in GLP-1 mediated anorexia, including some which are not traditionally associated with appetite regulation. However, a change in food intake can be indicative of not only reduced energy demand, but also changes in the organism’s motivation to eat following stressful stimuli. In fact, acute stress is well-known to reduce food intake. Recently, more research has focused on the role of GLP-1 in stress and the central GLP-1 system has been found to be activated in response to stressful stimuli. The source of GLP-1 within the brain, the preproglucagon (PPG) neurons, are ideally situated in the brainstem to receive and relay signals of stress and our recent data on the projection pattern of the PPG neurons to the spinal cord suggest a potential strong link with the sympathetic nervous system. We review here the role of central GLP-1 in the regulation of stress responses and discuss the potential involvement of the endogenous source of GLP-1 within the brain, the PPG neurons. PMID:27722184

  14. The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist exendin-4 reduces cocaine self-administration in mice.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Gunnar; Reddy, India A; Weikop, Pia; Graham, Devon L; Stanwood, Gregg D; Wortwein, Gitta; Galli, Aurelio; Fink-Jensen, Anders

    2015-10-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogues are used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The ability of the GLP-1 system to decrease food intake in rodents has been well described and parallels results from clinical trials. GLP-1 receptors are expressed in the brain, including within the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Dopaminergic neurons in the VTA project to the NAc, and these neurons play a pivotal role in the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. Based on the anatomical distribution of GLP-1 receptors in the brain and the well-established effects of GLP-1 on food reward, we decided to investigate the effect of the GLP-1 analogue exendin-4 on cocaine- and dopamine D1-receptor agonist-induced hyperlocomotion, on acute and chronic cocaine self-administration, on cocaine-induced striatal dopamine release in mice and on cocaine-induced c-fos activation. Here, we report that GLP-1 receptor stimulation reduces acute and chronic cocaine self-administration and attenuates cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion. In addition, we show that peripheral administration of exendin-4 reduces cocaine-induced elevation of striatal dopamine levels and striatal c-fos expression implicating central GLP-1 receptors in these responses. The present results demonstrate that the GLP-1 system modulates cocaine's effects on behavior and dopamine homeostasis, indicating that the GLP-1 receptor may be a novel target for the pharmacological treatment of drug addiction.

  15. Geniposide and its iridoid analogs exhibit antinociception by acting at the spinal GLP-1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Gong, Nian; Fan, Hui; Ma, Ai-Niu; Xiao, Qi; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2014-09-01

    We recently discovered that the activation of the spinal glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) by the peptidic agonist exenatide produced antinociception in chronic pain. We suggested that the spinal GLP-1Rs are a potential target molecule for the management of chronic pain. This study evaluated the antinociceptive activities of geniposide, a presumed small molecule GLP-1R agonist. Geniposide produced concentration-dependent, complete protection against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage in PC12 and HEK293 cells expressing rat and human GLP-1Rs, but not in HEK293T cells that do not express GLP-1Rs. The orthosteric GLP-1R antagonist exendin(9-39) right-shifted the concentration-response curve of geniposide without changing the maximal protection, with identical pA2 values in both cell lines. Subcutaneous and oral geniposide dose-dependently blocked the formalin-induced tonic response but not the acute flinching response. Subcutaneous and oral geniposide had maximum inhibition of 72% and 68%, and ED50s of 13.1 and 52.7 mg/kg, respectively. Seven days of multidaily subcutaneous geniposide and exenatide injections did not induce antinociceptive tolerance. Intrathecal geniposide induced dose-dependent antinociception, which was completely prevented by spinal exendin(9-39), siRNA/GLP-1R and cyclic AMP/PKA pathway inhibitors. The geniposide iridoid analogs geniposidic acid, genipin methyl ether, 1,10-anhydrogenipin, loganin and catalpol effectively inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage and formalin pain in an exendin(9-39)-reversible manner. Our results suggest that geniposide and its iridoid analogs produce antinociception during persistent pain by activating the spinal GLP-1Rs and that the iridoids represented by geniposide are orthosteric agonists of GLP-1Rs that function similarly in humans and rats and presumably act at the same binding site as exendin(9-39).

  16. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose metabolism in human myocytes.

    PubMed

    Luque, M A; González, N; Márquez, L; Acitores, A; Redondo, A; Morales, M; Valverde, I; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L

    2002-06-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has been shown to have insulin-like effects upon the metabolism of glucose in rat liver, muscle and fat, and on that of lipids in rat and human adipocytes. These actions seem to be exerted through specific receptors which, unlike that of the pancreas, are not - at least in liver and muscle - cAMP-associated. Here we have investigated the effect, its characteristics, and possible second messengers of GLP-1 on the glucose metabolism of human skeletal muscle, in tissue strips and primary cultured myocytes. In muscle strips, GLP-1, like insulin, stimulated glycogen synthesis, glycogen synthase a activity, and glucose oxidation and utilization, and inhibited glycogen phosphorylase a activity, all of this at physiological concentrations of the peptide. In cultured myotubes, GLP-1 exerted, from 10(-13) mol/l, a dose-related increase of the D-[U-(14)C]glucose incorporation into glycogen, with the same potency as insulin, together with an activation of glycogen synthase a; the effect of 10(-11) mol/l GLP-1 on both parameters was additive to that induced by the equimolar amount of insulin. Synthase a was still activated in cells after 2 days of exposure to GLP-1, as compared with myotubes maintained in the absence of peptide. In human muscle cells, exendin-4 and its truncated form 9-39 amide (Ex-9) are both agonists of the GLP-1 effect on glycogen synthesis and synthase a activity; but while neither GLP-1 nor exendin-4 affected the cellular cAMP content after 5-min incubation in the absence of 3-isobutyl-1-methylxantine (IBMX), an increase was detected with Ex-9. GLP-1, exendin-4, Ex-9 and insulin all induced the prompt hydrolysis of glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs). This work shows a potent stimulatory effect of GLP-1 on the glucose metabolism of human skeletal muscle, and supports the long-term therapeutic value of the peptide. Further evidence for a GLP-1 receptor in this tissue, different from that of the pancreas, is also illustrated

  17. GLP-1 promotes mitochondrial metabolism in vascular smooth muscle cells by enhancing endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria coupling.

    PubMed

    Morales, Pablo E; Torres, Gloria; Sotomayor-Flores, Cristian; Peña-Oyarzún, Daniel; Rivera-Mejías, Pablo; Paredes, Felipe; Chiong, Mario

    2014-03-28

    Incretin GLP-1 has important metabolic effects on several tissues, mainly through the regulation of glucose uptake and usage. One mechanism for increasing cell metabolism is modulating endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria communication, as it allows for a more efficient transfer of Ca(2+) into the mitochondria, thereby increasing activity. Control of glucose metabolism is essential for proper vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) function. GLP-1 has been shown to produce varied metabolic actions, but whether it regulates glucose metabolism in VSMC remains unknown. In this report, we show that GLP-1 increases mitochondrial activity in the aortic cell line A7r5 by increasing ER-mitochondria coupling. GLP-1 increases intracellular glucose and diminishes glucose uptake without altering glycogen content. ATP, mitochondrial potential and oxygen consumption increase at 3h of GLP-1 treatment, paralleled by increased Ca(2+) transfer from the ER to the mitochondria. Furthermore, GLP-1 increases levels of Mitofusin-2 (Mfn2), an ER-mitochondria tethering protein, via a PKA-dependent mechanism. Accordingly, PKA inhibition and Mfn2 down-regulation prevented mitochondrial Ca(2+) increases in GLP-1 treated cells. Inhibiting both Ca(2+) release from the ER and Ca(2+) entry into mitochondria as well as diminishing Mfn2 levels blunted the increase in mitochondrial activity in response to GLP-1. Altogether, these results strongly suggest that GLP-1 increases ER-mitochondria communication in VSMC, resulting in higher mitochondrial activity.

  18. GLP-1 promotes mitochondrial metabolism in vascular smooth muscle cells by enhancing endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria coupling.

    PubMed

    Morales, Pablo E; Torres, Gloria; Sotomayor-Flores, Cristian; Peña-Oyarzún, Daniel; Rivera-Mejías, Pablo; Paredes, Felipe; Chiong, Mario

    2014-03-28

    Incretin GLP-1 has important metabolic effects on several tissues, mainly through the regulation of glucose uptake and usage. One mechanism for increasing cell metabolism is modulating endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria communication, as it allows for a more efficient transfer of Ca(2+) into the mitochondria, thereby increasing activity. Control of glucose metabolism is essential for proper vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) function. GLP-1 has been shown to produce varied metabolic actions, but whether it regulates glucose metabolism in VSMC remains unknown. In this report, we show that GLP-1 increases mitochondrial activity in the aortic cell line A7r5 by increasing ER-mitochondria coupling. GLP-1 increases intracellular glucose and diminishes glucose uptake without altering glycogen content. ATP, mitochondrial potential and oxygen consumption increase at 3h of GLP-1 treatment, paralleled by increased Ca(2+) transfer from the ER to the mitochondria. Furthermore, GLP-1 increases levels of Mitofusin-2 (Mfn2), an ER-mitochondria tethering protein, via a PKA-dependent mechanism. Accordingly, PKA inhibition and Mfn2 down-regulation prevented mitochondrial Ca(2+) increases in GLP-1 treated cells. Inhibiting both Ca(2+) release from the ER and Ca(2+) entry into mitochondria as well as diminishing Mfn2 levels blunted the increase in mitochondrial activity in response to GLP-1. Altogether, these results strongly suggest that GLP-1 increases ER-mitochondria communication in VSMC, resulting in higher mitochondrial activity. PMID:24613839

  19. GLP-1 agonism stimulates brown adipose tissue thermogenesis and browning through hypothalamic AMPK.

    PubMed

    Beiroa, Daniel; Imbernon, Monica; Gallego, Rosalía; Senra, Ana; Herranz, Daniel; Villarroya, Francesc; Serrano, Manuel; Fernø, Johan; Salvador, Javier; Escalada, Javier; Dieguez, Carlos; Lopez, Miguel; Frühbeck, Gema; Nogueiras, Ruben

    2014-10-01

    GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is widely located throughout the brain, but the precise molecular mechanisms mediating the actions of GLP-1 and its long-acting analogs on adipose tissue as well as the brain areas responsible for these interactions remain largely unknown. We found that central injection of a clinically used GLP-1R agonist, liraglutide, in mice stimulates brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis and adipocyte browning independent of nutrient intake. The mechanism controlling these actions is located in the hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus (VMH), and the activation of AMPK in this area is sufficient to blunt both central liraglutide-induced thermogenesis and adipocyte browning. The decreased body weight caused by the central injection of liraglutide in other hypothalamic sites was sufficiently explained by the suppression of food intake. In a longitudinal study involving obese type 2 diabetic patients treated for 1 year with GLP-1R agonists, both exenatide and liraglutide increased energy expenditure. Although the results do not exclude the possibility that extrahypothalamic areas are also modulating the effects of GLP-1R agonists, the data indicate that long-acting GLP-1R agonists influence body weight by regulating either food intake or energy expenditure through various hypothalamic sites and that these mechanisms might be clinically relevant.

  20. Hindbrain GLP-1 receptor mediation of cisplatin-induced anorexia and nausea.

    PubMed

    De Jonghe, Bart C; Holland, Ruby A; Olivos, Diana R; Rupprecht, Laura E; Kanoski, Scott E; Hayes, Matthew R

    2016-01-01

    While chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting are clinically controlled in the acute (<24 h) phase following treatment, the anorexia, nausea, fatigue, and other illness-type behaviors during the delayed phase (>24 h) of chemotherapy are largely uncontrolled. As the hindbrain glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) system contributes to energy balance and mediates aversive and stressful stimuli, here we examine the hypothesis that hindbrain GLP-1 signaling mediates aspects of chemotherapy-induced nausea and reductions in feeding behavior in rats. Specifically, hindbrain GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) blockade, via 4th intracerebroventricular (ICV) exendin-(9-39) injections, attenuates the anorexia, body weight reduction, and pica (nausea-induced ingestion of kaolin clay) elicited by cisplatin chemotherapy during the delayed phase (48 h) of chemotherapy-induced nausea. Additionally, the present data provide evidence that the central GLP-1-producing preproglucagon neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) of the caudal brainstem are activated by cisplatin during the delayed phase of chemotherapy-induced nausea, as cisplatin led to a significant increase in c-Fos immunoreactivity in NTS GLP-1-immunoreactive neurons. These data support a growing body of literature suggesting that the central GLP-1 system may be a potential pharmaceutical target for adjunct anti-emetics used to treat the delayed-phase of nausea and emesis, anorexia, and body weight loss that accompany chemotherapy treatments.

  1. p24 proteins and quality control of LIN-12 and GLP-1 trafficking in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wen, C; Greenwald, I

    1999-06-14

    Mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans sel-9 gene elevate the activity of lin-12 and glp-1, which encode members of the LIN-12/NOTCH family of receptors. Sequence analysis indicates SEL-9 is one of several C. elegans p24 proteins. Allele-specific genetic interactions suggest that reducing sel-9 activity increases the activity of mutations altering the extracellular domains of LIN-12 or GLP-1. Reducing sel-9 activity restores the trafficking to the plasma membrane of a mutant GLP-1 protein that would otherwise accumulate within the cell. Our results suggest a role for SEL-9 and other p24 proteins in the negative regulation of transport of LIN-12 and GLP-1 to the cell surface, and favor a role for p24 proteins in a quality control mechanism for endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi transport. PMID:10366590

  2. Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 is a functional part of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor complex in pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Robitaille, Mélanie; Showalter, Aaron D; Huang, Xinyi; Liu, Ying; Bhattacharjee, Alpana; Willard, Francis S; Han, Junfeng; Froese, Sean; Wei, Li; Gaisano, Herbert Y; Angers, Stéphane; Sloop, Kyle W; Dai, Feihan F; Wheeler, Michael B

    2014-11-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that regulates glucose homeostasis. Because of their direct stimulation of insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells, GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists are now important therapeutic options for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. To better understand the mechanisms that control the insulinotropic actions of GLP-1, affinity purification and mass spectrometry (AP-MS) were employed to uncover potential proteins that functionally interact with the GLP-1R. AP-MS performed on Chinese hamster ovary cells or MIN6 β cells, both expressing the human GLP-1R, revealed 99 proteins potentially associated with the GLP-1R. Three novel GLP-1R interactors (PGRMC1, Rab5b, and Rab5c) were further validated through co-immunoprecipitation/immunoblotting, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and immunofluorescence. Functional studies revealed that overexpression of PGRMC1, a novel cell surface receptor that associated with liganded GLP-1R, enhanced GLP-1-induced insulin secretion (GIIS) with the most robust effect. Knockdown of PGRMC1 in β cells decreased GIIS, indicative of positive interaction with GLP-1R. To gain insight mechanistically, we demonstrated that the cell surface PGRMC1 ligand P4-BSA increased GIIS, whereas its antagonist AG-205 decreased GIIS. It was then found that PGRMC1 increased GLP-1-induced cAMP accumulation. PGRMC1 activation and GIIS induced by P4-BSA could be blocked by inhibition of adenylyl cyclase/EPAC signaling or the EGF receptor-PI3K signal transduction pathway. These data reveal a dual mechanism for PGRMC1-increased GIIS mediated through cAMP and EGF receptor signaling. In conclusion, we identified several novel GLP-1R interacting proteins. PGRMC1 expressed on the cell surface of β cells was shown to interact with the activated GLP-1R to enhance the insulinotropic actions of GLP-1.

  3. Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 Is a Functional Part of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Receptor Complex in Pancreatic β Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming; Robitaille, Mélanie; Showalter, Aaron D.; Huang, Xinyi; Liu, Ying; Bhattacharjee, Alpana; Willard, Francis S.; Han, Junfeng; Froese, Sean; Wei, Li; Gaisano, Herbert Y.; Angers, Stéphane; Sloop, Kyle W.; Dai, Feihan F.; Wheeler, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that regulates glucose homeostasis. Because of their direct stimulation of insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells, GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists are now important therapeutic options for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. To better understand the mechanisms that control the insulinotropic actions of GLP-1, affinity purification and mass spectrometry (AP-MS) were employed to uncover potential proteins that functionally interact with the GLP-1R. AP-MS performed on Chinese hamster ovary cells or MIN6 β cells, both expressing the human GLP-1R, revealed 99 proteins potentially associated with the GLP-1R. Three novel GLP-1R interactors (PGRMC1, Rab5b, and Rab5c) were further validated through co-immunoprecipitation/immunoblotting, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and immunofluorescence. Functional studies revealed that overexpression of PGRMC1, a novel cell surface receptor that associated with liganded GLP-1R, enhanced GLP-1-induced insulin secretion (GIIS) with the most robust effect. Knockdown of PGRMC1 in β cells decreased GIIS, indicative of positive interaction with GLP-1R. To gain insight mechanistically, we demonstrated that the cell surface PGRMC1 ligand P4-BSA increased GIIS, whereas its antagonist AG-205 decreased GIIS. It was then found that PGRMC1 increased GLP-1-induced cAMP accumulation. PGRMC1 activation and GIIS induced by P4-BSA could be blocked by inhibition of adenylyl cyclase/EPAC signaling or the EGF receptor–PI3K signal transduction pathway. These data reveal a dual mechanism for PGRMC1-increased GIIS mediated through cAMP and EGF receptor signaling. In conclusion, we identified several novel GLP-1R interacting proteins. PGRMC1 expressed on the cell surface of β cells was shown to interact with the activated GLP-1R to enhance the insulinotropic actions of GLP-1. PMID:25044020

  4. Oral Administration of Collagen Hydrolysates Improves Glucose Tolerance in Normal Mice Through GLP-1-Dependent and GLP-1-Independent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Iba, Yoshinori; Yokoi, Koji; Eitoku, Itsuka; Goto, Masaki; Koizumi, Seiko; Sugihara, Fumihito; Oyama, Hiroshi; Yoshimoto, Tadashi

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antidiabetic properties of collagen hydrolysates (CHs). CHs exhibited dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitory activity and stimulated glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion in vitro. We also determined whether CHs improve glucose tolerance in normal mice. Oral administration of CHs suppressed the glycemic response during the oral and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests (OGTT and IPGTT), but the effects were weaker in IPGTT than in OGTT. CHs had no effect on the gastric emptying rate. A pretreatment with the GLP-1 receptor antagonist, exendin 9-39 (Ex9), partially reversed the glucose-lowering effects of CHs, but only when coadministered with glucose. CHs administered 45 min before the glucose load potentiated the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. This potentiating effect on insulin secretion was not reversed by the pretreatment with Ex9, it appeared to be enhanced. These results suggest that CHs improve glucose tolerance by inhibiting intestinal glucose uptake and enhancing insulin secretion, and also demonstrated that GLP-1 was partially involved in the inhibition of glucose uptake, but not essential for the enhancement of insulin secretion. PMID:27540823

  5. GLP1 protects cardiomyocytes from palmitate-induced apoptosis via Akt/GSK3b/b-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Ying, Ying; Zhu, Huazhang; Liang, Zhen; Ma, Xiaosong; Li, Shiwei

    2015-12-01

    Activation of apoptosis in cardiomyocytes by saturated palmitic acids contributes to cardiac dysfunction in diabetic cardiomyopathy. Beta-catenin (b-catenin) is a transcriptional regulator of several genes involved in survival/anti-apoptosis. However, its role in palmitate-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis remains unclear. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) has been shown to exhibit potential cardioprotective properties. This study was designed to evaluate the role of b-catenin signalling in palmitate-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis and the molecular mechanism underlying the protective effects of GLP1 on palmitate-stressed cardiomyocytes. Exposure of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes to palmitate increased the fatty acid transporter CD36-mediated intracellular lipid accumulation and cardiomyocyte apoptosis, decreased accumulation and nuclear translocation of active b-catenin, and reduced expression of b-catenin target protein survivin and BCL2. These detrimental effects of palmitate were significantly attenuated by GLP1 co-treatment. However, the anti-apoptotic effects of GLP1 were markedly abolished when b-catenin was silenced with a specific short hairpin RNA. Furthermore, analysis of the upstream molecules and mechanisms responsible for GLP1-associated cardiac protection revealed that GLP1 restored the decreased phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt) and glycogen synthase kinase-3b (GSK3b) in palmitate-stimulated cardiomyocytes. In contrast, inhibition of Akt with an Akt-specific inhibitor MK2206 or blockade of GLP1 receptor (GLP1R) with a competitive antagonist exendin-(9-39) significantly abrogated the GLP1-mediated activation of GSK3b/b-catenin signalling, leading to increased apoptosis in palmitate-stressed cardiomyocytes. Collectively, our results demonstrated for the first time that the attenuated b-catenin signalling may contribute to palmitate-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis, while GLP1 can protect cardiomyocytes from palmitate-induced apoptosis through

  6. GLP1 protects cardiomyocytes from palmitate-induced apoptosis via Akt/GSK3b/b-catenin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Ying; Zhu, Huazhang; Liang, Zhen; Ma, Xiaosong; Li, Shiwei

    2015-01-01

    Activation of apoptosis in cardiomyocytes by saturated palmitic acids contributes to cardiac dysfunction in diabetic cardiomyopathy. Beta-catenin (b-catenin) is a transcriptional regulator of several genes involved in survival/anti-apoptosis. However, its role in palmitate-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis remains unclear. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) has been shown to exhibit potential cardioprotective properties. This study was designed to evaluate the role of b-catenin signalling in palmitate-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis and the molecular mechanism underlying the protective effects of GLP1 on palmitate-stressed cardiomyocytes. Exposure of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes to palmitate increased the fatty acid transporter CD36-mediated intracellular lipid accumulation and cardiomyocyte apoptosis, decreased accumulation and nuclear translocation of active b-catenin, and reduced expression of b-catenin target protein survivin and BCL2. These detrimental effects of palmitate were significantly attenuated by GLP1 co-treatment. However, the anti-apoptotic effects of GLP1 were markedly abolished when b-catenin was silenced with a specific short hairpin RNA. Furthermore, analysis of the upstream molecules and mechanisms responsible for GLP1-associated cardiac protection revealed that GLP1 restored the decreased phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt) and glycogen synthase kinase-3b (GSK3b) in palmitate-stimulated cardiomyocytes. In contrast, inhibition of Akt with an Akt-specific inhibitor MK2206 or blockade of GLP1 receptor (GLP1R) with a competitive antagonist exendin-(9–39) significantly abrogated the GLP1-mediated activation of GSK3b/b-catenin signalling, leading to increased apoptosis in palmitate-stressed cardiomyocytes. Collectively, our results demonstrated for the first time that the attenuated b-catenin signalling may contribute to palmitate-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis, while GLP1 can protect cardiomyocytes from palmitate-induced apoptosis through

  7. Myocardial regeneration in adriamycin cardiomyopathy by nuclear expression of GLP1 using ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shuyuan; Chen, Jiaxi; Huang, Pintong; Meng, Xing-Li; Clayton, Sandra; Shen, Jin-Song; Grayburn, Paul A.

    2015-03-20

    Recently GLP-1 was found to have cardioprotective effects independent of those attributable to tight glycemic control. Methods and results: We employed ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) to deliver piggybac transposon plasmids encoding the GLP-1 gene with a nuclear localizing signal to rat hearts with adriamycin cardiomyopathy. After a single UTMD treatment, overexpression of transgenic GLP-1 was found in nuclei of rat heart cells with evidence that transfected cardiac cells had undergone proliferation. UTMD-GLP-1 gene therapy restored LV mass, fractional shortening index, and LV posterior wall diameter to nearly normal. Nuclear overexpression of GLP-1 by inducing phosphorylation of FoxO1-S256 and translocation of FoxO1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm significantly inactivated FoxO1 and activated the expression of cyclin D1 in nuclei of cardiac muscle cells. Reversal of adriamycin cardiomyopathy appeared to be mediated by dedifferentiation and proliferation of nuclear FoxO1-positive cardiac muscle cells with evidence of embryonic stem cell markers (OCT4, Nanog, SOX2 and c-kit), cardiac early differentiation markers (NKX2.5 and ISL-1) and cellular proliferation markers (BrdU and PHH3) after UTMD with GLP-1 gene therapy. Conclusions: Intranuclear myocardial delivery of the GLP-1gene can reverse established adriamycin cardiomyopathy by stimulating myocardial regeneration. - Highlights: • The activation of nuclear FoxO1 in cardiac muscle cells associated with adriamycin cardiomyopathy. • Myocardial nuclear GLP-1 stimulates myocardial regeneration and reverses adriamycin cardiomyopathy. • The process of myocardial regeneration associated with dedifferentiation and proliferation.

  8. GLP-1(32-36)amide Pentapeptide Increases Basal Energy Expenditure and Inhibits Weight Gain in Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Tomas, Eva; Stanojevic, Violeta; McManus, Karen; Khatri, Ashok; Everill, Paul; Bachovchin, William W; Habener, Joel F

    2015-07-01

    The prevalence of obesity-related diabetes is increasing worldwide. Here we report the identification of a pentapeptide, GLP-1(32-36)amide (LVKGRamide), derived from the glucoincretin hormone GLP-1, that increases basal energy expenditure and curtails the development of obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes, and hepatic steatosis in diet-induced obese mice. The pentapeptide inhibited weight gain, reduced fat mass without change in energy intake, and increased basal energy expenditure independent of physical activity. Analyses of tissues from peptide-treated mice reveal increased expression of UCP-1 and UCP-3 in brown adipose tissue and increased UCP-3 and inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase in skeletal muscle, findings consistent with increased fatty acid oxidation and thermogenesis. In palmitate-treated C2C12 skeletal myotubes, GLP-1(32-36)amide activated AMPK and inhibited acetyl-CoA carboxylase, suggesting activation of fat metabolism in response to energy depletion. By mass spectroscopy, the pentapeptide is rapidly formed from GLP-1(9-36)amide, the major form of GLP-1 in the circulation of mice. These findings suggest that the reported insulin-like actions of GLP-1 receptor agonists that occur independently of the GLP-1 receptor might be mediated by the pentapeptide, and the previously reported nonapeptide (FIAWLVKGRamide). We propose that by increasing basal energy expenditure, GLP-1(32-36)amide might be a useful treatment for human obesity and associated metabolic disorders.

  9. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) in the gastrointestinal tract of the pheasant (Phasianus colchicus).

    PubMed

    Pirone, Andrea; Ding, Bao An; Giannessi, Elisabetta; Coli, Alessandra; Stornelli, Maria Rita; di Cossato, Margherita Marzoni Fecia; Piano, Ilaria; Lenzi, Carla

    2012-10-01

    The distribution of Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) was investigated in the gastrointestinal tract of the pheasant using immunohistochemistry. GLP-1 immunoreactive cells were common in the small intestine, in the proventriculus and in the pancreas. Immunostained cells were not seen in the crop, in the gizzard and in the large intestine. Double labelling demonstrated that GLP-1 and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) were occasionally co-localized only in the duodenal villi. In contrast to what was previously described in the chicken and ostrich, we noted GLP-1 positive cells in the duodenum. These data were consistent with the presence of proglucagon mRNA in the chicken duodenum. Our findings indicate that GLP-1 might have an inhibitory effect on gastric and crop emptying and on acid secretion also in the pheasant. Moreover, the results of the present research regarding the initial region of the small intestine suggest a further direct mechanism of the GLP-1 release during the early digestion phase and an enhancement of its incretin role.

  10. Molecular mechanisms of glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion from perfused rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Kuhre, Rune E; Frost, Charlotte R; Svendsen, Berit; Holst, Jens J

    2015-02-01

    Glucose is an important stimulus for glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) secretion, but the mechanisms of secretion have not been investigated in integrated physiological models. We studied glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion from isolated perfused rat small intestine. Luminal glucose (5% and 20% w/v) stimulated the secretion dose dependently, but vascular glucose was without significant effect at 5, 10, 15, and 25 mmol/L. GLP-1 stimulation by luminal glucose (20%) secretion was blocked by the voltage-gated Ca channel inhibitor, nifedipine, or by hyperpolarization with diazoxide. Luminal administration (20%) of the nonmetabolizable sodium-glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1) substrate, methyl-α-D-glucopyranoside (α-MGP), stimulated release, whereas the SGLT1 inhibitor phloridzin (luminally) abolished responses to α-MGP and glucose. Furthermore, in the absence of luminal NaCl, luminal glucose (20%) did not stimulate a response. Luminal glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion was also sensitive to luminal GLUT2 inhibition (phloretin), but in contrast to SGLT1 inhibition, phloretin did not eliminate the response, and luminal glucose (20%) stimulated larger GLP-1 responses than luminal α-MGP in matched concentrations. Glucose transported by GLUT2 may act after metabolization, closing KATP channels similar to sulfonylureas, which also stimulated secretion. Our data indicate that SGLT1 activity is the driving force for glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion and that KATP-channel closure is required to stimulate a full-blown glucose-induced response.

  11. Exenatide exerts a PKA-dependent positive inotropic effect in human atrial myocardium: GLP-1R mediated effects in human myocardium.

    PubMed

    Wallner, Markus; Kolesnik, Ewald; Ablasser, Klemens; Khafaga, Mounir; Wakula, Paulina; Ljubojevic, Senka; Thon-Gutschi, Eva Maria; Sourij, Harald; Kapl, Martin; Edmunds, Nicholas J; Kuzmiski, J Brent; Griffith, David A; Knez, Igor; Pieske, Burkert; von Lewinski, Dirk

    2015-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists are a rapidly growing class of drugs developed for treating type-2 diabetes mellitus. Patients with diabetes carry an up to 5-fold greater mortality risk compared to non-diabetic patients, mainly as a result of cardiovascular diseases. Although beneficial cardiovascular effects have been reported, exact mechanisms of GLP-1R-agonist action in the heart, especially in human myocardium, are poorly understood. The effects of GLP-1R-agonists (exenatide, GLP-1(7-36)NH2, PF-06446009, PF-06446667) on cardiac contractility were tested in non-failing atrial and ventricular trabeculae from 72 patients. The GLP-1(7-36)NH2 metabolite, GLP-1(9-36)NH2, was also examined. In electrically stimulated trabeculae, the effects of compounds on isometric force were measured in the absence and presence of pharmacological inhibitors of signal transduction pathways. The role of β-arrestin signaling was examined using a β-arrestin partial agonist, PF-06446667. Expression levels were tested by immunoblots. Translocation of GLP-1R downstream molecular targets, Epac2, GLUT-1 and GLUT-4, were assessed by fluorescence microscopy. All tested GLP-1R-agonists significantly increased developed force in human atrial trabeculae, whereas GLP-1(9-36)NH2 had no effect. Exendin(9-39)NH2, a GLP-1R-antagonist, and H-89 blunted the inotropic effect of exenatide. In addition, exenatide increased PKA-dependent phosphorylation of phospholamban (PLB), GLUT-1 and Epac2 translocation, but not GLUT-4 translocation. Exenatide failed to enhance contractility in ventricular myocardium. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed a significant higher GLP-1R expression in the atrium compared to ventricle. Exenatide increased contractility in a dose-dependent manner via GLP-1R/cAMP/PKA pathway and induced GLUT-1 and Epac2 translocation in human atrial myocardium, but had no effect in ventricular myocardium. Therapeutic use of GLP-1R-agonists may therefore impart

  12. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) but not (9-36) augments cardiac output during myocardial ischemia via a Frank-Starling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Adam G; Tune, Johnathan D; Noblet, Jillian N; Conteh, Abass M; Sassoon, Daniel; Casalini, Eli D; Mather, Kieren J

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the cardiovascular effects of GLP-1 (7-36) or (9-36) on myocardial oxygen consumption, function and systemic hemodynamics in vivo during normal perfusion and during acute, regional myocardial ischemia. Lean Ossabaw swine received systemic infusions of saline vehicle or GLP-1 (7-36 or 9-36) at 1.5, 3.0, and 10.0 pmol/kg/min in sequence for 30 min at each dose, followed by ligation of the left circumflex artery during continued infusion at 10.0 pmol/kg/min. Systemic GLP-1 (9-36) had no effect on coronary flow, blood pressure, heart rate or indices of cardiac function before or during regional myocardial ischemia. Systemic GLP-1 (7-36) exerted no cardiometabolic or hemodynamic effects prior to ischemia. During ischemia, GLP-1 (7-36) increased cardiac output by approximately 2 L/min relative to vehicle-controls (p = 0.003). This response was not diminished by treatment with the non-depolarizing ganglionic blocker hexamethonium. Left ventricular pressure-volume loops measured during steady-state conditions with graded occlusion of the inferior vena cava to assess load-independent contractility revealed that GLP-1 (7-36) produced marked increases in end-diastolic volume (74 ± 1 to 92 ± 5 ml; p = 0.03) and volume axis intercept (8 ± 2 to 26 ± 8; p = 0.05), without any change in the slope of the end-systolic pressure-volume relationship vs. vehicle during regional ischemia. GLP-1 (9-36) produced no changes in any of these parameters compared to vehicle. These findings indicate that short-term systemic treatment with GLP-1 (7-36) but not GLP-1 (9-36) significantly augments cardiac output during regional myocardial ischemia, via increases in ventricular preload without changes in cardiac inotropy.

  13. Presence and characterization of glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36) amide receptors in solubilized membranes of rat adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Valverde, I; Mérida, E; Delgado, E; Trapote, M A; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L

    1993-01-01

    Specific binding of [125I]glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)amide ([125I]GLP-1(7-36)amide) to solubilized rat adipose tissue membranes was found to be dependent on temperature, time, and membrane protein concentration and readily dissociated. GLP-1(1-36)amide, GLP-2, or glucagon (10(-6) M) did not compete with [125I]GLP-1(7-36)amide binding. Half-maximal binding was achieved with 8 x 10(-10) M unlabeled GLP-1(7-36)amide, and the Scatchard plot revealed the presence of high and low affinity binding sites with Kd values of approximately 0.6 and 20 nM, respectively. The binding capacity of [125I]GLP-1(7-36)amide was about 3 times higher than that of [125I]glucagon, while the high affinity Kd and the half-maximal binding of the two peptides were similar. The presence and abundance of GLP-1(7-36)amide receptors in fat tissue together with the previous findings that the peptide stimulates glycerol and cAMP production in rat adipocytes and stimulates fatty acid synthesis in explants of rat adipose tissue open the possibility that this insulinotropic intestinal peptide may also be involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism in health and disease.

  14. A GLP-1 receptor agonist conjugated to an albumin-binding domain for extended half-life.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Joel; Refai, Essam; Zaitsev, Sergei V; Abrahmsén, Lars; Berggren, Per-Olof; Karlström, Amelie Eriksson

    2014-05-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and related peptide agonists have been extensively investigated for glycaemic control in Type 2 diabetes, and may also have therapeutic applications for other diseases. Due to the short half-life (t1/2  < 2 min) of the endogenous peptide, caused by proteolytic degradation and renal clearance, different strategies for half-life extension and sustained release have been explored. In the present study, conjugates between a GLP-1 analogue and a 5 kDa albumin-binding domain (ABD) derived from streptococcal protein G have been chemically synthesized and evaluated. ABD binds with high affinity to human serum albumin, which is highly abundant in plasma and functions as a drug carrier in the circulation. Three different GLP-1-ABD conjugates, with the two peptides connected by linkers of two, four, and six PEG units, respectively, were synthesized and tested in mouse pancreatic islets at high (11 mM) and low (3 mM) glucose concentration. Insulin release upon stimulation was shown to be glucose-dependent, showing no significant difference between the three different GLP-1-ABD conjugates and unconjugated GLP-1 analogue. The biological activity, in combination with the high affinity binding to albumin, make the GLP-1-ABD conjugates promising GLP-1 receptor agonists expected to show extended in vivo half-life.

  15. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling of GLP-1 in Healthy Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yanguang; Gao, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To provide a mechanism-based model to quantitatively describe GLP-1 pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) in rats. Methods Intravenous (IV), infusion (IF), subcutaneous (SC), and intraperitoneal (IP) doses of GLP-1 were administered after glucose challenge in healthy Sprague–Dawley rats. Blood was analyzed for GLP-1, glucose, and insulin. The PK-PD modeling was performed with ADAPT 5. The concentration-response curve was generated and analyzed in comparison with other incretin-related therapeutics. Results The PK of GLP-1 was described using a two-compartment model with a zero-order input accounting for endogenous GLP-1 synthesis. For SC and IP dosing, sequential zero-order and first-order absorption models reasonably described the rapid absorption process and flip-flop kinetics. In dynamics, GLP-1 showed insulinotropic effects (3-fold increase) after IV glucose challenge in a dose-dependent manner. The concentration-response curve was bell-shaped, which was captured using a biphasic two-binding site Adair model. Receptor binding of GLP-1 exhibited high capacity and low affinity kinetics for both binding sites (KD=09.94×103 pM, K2=1.56×10−4 pM−1). Conclusions The PK of GLP-1 was linear and bi-exponential and its PD showed glucose-dependent insulinotropic effects. All profiles were captured by the present mechanistic model and the dynamic analysis yields several implications for incretin-related therapies. PMID:22179928

  16. GLP-1 agonist treatment: implications for diabetic retinopathy screening.

    PubMed

    Varadhan, Lakshminarayanan; Humphreys, Tracy; Hariman, Christian; Walker, Adrian B; Varughese, George I

    2011-12-01

    Rapid improvement in glycaemic control induced by GLP-1 agonist therapy could be yet another illustration of transient or permanent progression of diabetic retinopathy, similar to documented examples such as pregnancy and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. Specific guidelines would be needed to monitor this paradoxical phenomenon during treatment with GLP-1 agonists. PMID:21906831

  17. Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Analogs: Recent Advances, New Possibilities, and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin that plays important physiological roles in glucose homeostasis. Produced from intestine upon food intake, it stimulates insulin secretion and keeps pancreatic β-cells healthy and proliferating. Because of these beneficial effects, it has attracted a great deal of attention in the past decade, and an entirely new line of diabetic therapeutics has emerged based on the peptide. In addition to the therapeutic applications, GLP-1 analogs have demonstrated a potential in molecular imaging of pancreatic β-cells; this may be useful in early detection of the disease and evaluation of therapeutic interventions, including islet transplantation. In this Perspective, we focus on GLP-1 analogs for their studies on improvement of biological activities, enhancement of metabolic stability, investigation of receptor interaction, and visualization of the pancreatic islets. PMID:25349901

  18. GLP-1(28-36)amide, the Glucagon-like peptide-1 metabolite: friend, foe, or pharmacological folly?

    PubMed

    Taing, Meng-Wong; Rose, Felicity J; Whitehead, Jonathan P

    2014-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) axis has emerged as a major therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. GLP-1 mediates its key insulinotropic effects via a G-protein coupled receptor expressed on β-cells and other pancreatic cell types. The insulinotropic activity of GLP-1 is terminated via enzymatic cleavage by dipeptidyl peptidase-4. Until recently, GLP-1-derived metabolites were generally considered metabolically inactive; however, accumulating evidence indicates some have biological activity that may contribute to the pleiotropic effects of GLP-1 independent of the GLP-1 receptor. Recent reports describing the putative effects of one such metabolite, the GLP-1-derived nonapeptide GLP-1(28-36) amide, are the focus of this review. Administration of the nonapeptide elevates cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and activates protein kinase A, β-catenin, and cAMP response-element binding protein in pancreatic β-cells and hepatocytes. In stressed cells, the nonapeptide targets the mitochondria and, via poorly defined mechanisms, helps to maintain mitochondrial membrane potential and cellular adenosine triphosphate levels and to reduce cytotoxicity and apoptosis. In mouse models of diet-induced obesity, treatment with the nonapeptide reduces weight gain and ameliorates associated pathophysiology, including hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and hepatic steatosis. Nonapeptide administration in a streptozotocin-induced model of type 1 diabetes also improves glucose disposal concomitant with elevated insulin levels and increased β-cell mass and proliferation. Collectively, these results suggest some of the beneficial effects of GLP-1 receptor analogs may be mediated by the nonapeptide. However, the concentrations required to elicit some of these effects are in the micromolar range, leading to reservations about potentially related therapeutic benefits. Moreover, although controversial, concerns have been raised about the potential for incretin

  19. Peptidic exenatide and herbal catalpol mediate neuroprotection via the hippocampal GLP-1 receptor/β-endorphin pathway.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yu; Gong, Nian; Li, Teng-Fei; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2015-12-01

    Both peptidic agonist exenatide and herbal agonist catalpol of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) are neuroprotective. We have previously shown that activation of spinal GLP-1Rs expresses β-endorphin in microglia to produce antinociception. The aim of this study was to explore whether exenatide and catalpol exert neuroprotection via activation of the hippocampal GLP-1R/β-endorphin pathway. The rat middle cerebral artery occlusion model was employed, and the GLP-1R immunofluorescence staining and β-endorphin measurement were assayed in the hippocampus and primary cultures of microglia, neurons and astrocytes. The immunoreactivity of GLP-1Rs on microglia in the hippocampus was upregulated after ischemia reperfusion. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of exenatide and catalpol produced neuroprotection in the rat transient ischemia/reperfusion model, reflected by a marked reduction in brain infarction size and a mild recovery in neurobehavioral deficits. In addition, i.c.v. injection of exenatide and catalpol significantly stimulated β-endorphin expression in the hippocampus and cultured primary microglia (but not primary neurons or astrocytes). Furthermore, exenatide and catalpol neuroprotection was completely blocked by i.c.v. injection of the GLP-1R orthosteric antagonist exendin (9-39), specific β-endorphin antiserum, and selective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. Our results indicate, for the first time, that the neuroprotective effects of catalpol and exenatide are GLP-1R-specific, and that these effects are mediated by β-endorphin expression probably in hippocampal microglia. We postulate that in contrast to the peripheral tissue, where the activation of GLP-1Rs in pancreas islet β-cells causes secretion of insulin to perform glucoregulation, it leads to β-endorphin expression in microglial cells to produce neuroprotection and analgesia in the central nervous system. PMID:26546042

  20. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and eating.

    PubMed

    Gutzwiller, Jean-Pierre; Degen, Lukas; Heuss, Ludwig; Beglinger, Christoph

    2004-08-01

    New information regarding gastrointestinal mechanisms that participate in the control of food intake has extended our understanding of appetite control. Although each new signaling pathway discovered in the gut is a potential target for drug development in the treatment of obesity, the growing number of such signaling molecules indicates that a highly complex process controls food intake. The present summary focuses on the role of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) in this regulatory process. The different biological effects of GLP-1 (glucose-lowering properties, inhibition of appetite and food intake) provide a powerful impetus for development of GLP-1-based new drugs.

  1. Bile Acids Trigger GLP-1 Release Predominantly by Accessing Basolaterally Located G Protein–Coupled Bile Acid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Brighton, Cheryl A.; Rievaj, Juraj; Kuhre, Rune E.; Glass, Leslie L.; Schoonjans, Kristina; Holst, Jens J.

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are well-recognized stimuli of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. This action has been attributed to activation of the G protein–coupled bile acid receptor GPBAR1 (TGR5), although other potential bile acid sensors include the nuclear farnesoid receptor and the apical sodium-coupled bile acid transporter ASBT. The aim of this study was to identify pathways important for GLP-1 release and to determine whether bile acids target their receptors on GLP-1–secreting L-cells from the apical or basolateral compartment. Using transgenic mice expressing fluorescent sensors specifically in L-cells, we observed that taurodeoxycholate (TDCA) and taurolithocholate (TLCA) increased intracellular cAMP and Ca2+. In primary intestinal cultures, TDCA was a more potent GLP-1 secretagogue than taurocholate (TCA) and TLCA, correlating with a stronger Ca2+ response to TDCA. Using small-volume Ussing chambers optimized for measuring GLP-1 secretion, we found that both a GPBAR1 agonist and TDCA stimulated GLP-1 release better when applied from the basolateral than from the luminal direction and that luminal TDCA was ineffective when intestinal tissue was pretreated with an ASBT inhibitor. ASBT inhibition had no significant effect in nonpolarized primary cultures. Studies in the perfused rat gut confirmed that vascularly administered TDCA was more effective than luminal TDCA. Intestinal primary cultures and Ussing chamber–mounted tissues from GPBAR1-knockout mice did not secrete GLP-1 in response to either TLCA or TDCA. We conclude that the action of bile acids on GLP-1 secretion is predominantly mediated by GPBAR1 located on the basolateral L-cell membrane, suggesting that stimulation of gut hormone secretion may include postabsorptive mechanisms. PMID:26280129

  2. Bile Acids Trigger GLP-1 Release Predominantly by Accessing Basolaterally Located G Protein-Coupled Bile Acid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Brighton, Cheryl A; Rievaj, Juraj; Kuhre, Rune E; Glass, Leslie L; Schoonjans, Kristina; Holst, Jens J; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank

    2015-11-01

    Bile acids are well-recognized stimuli of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. This action has been attributed to activation of the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor GPBAR1 (TGR5), although other potential bile acid sensors include the nuclear farnesoid receptor and the apical sodium-coupled bile acid transporter ASBT. The aim of this study was to identify pathways important for GLP-1 release and to determine whether bile acids target their receptors on GLP-1-secreting L-cells from the apical or basolateral compartment. Using transgenic mice expressing fluorescent sensors specifically in L-cells, we observed that taurodeoxycholate (TDCA) and taurolithocholate (TLCA) increased intracellular cAMP and Ca(2+). In primary intestinal cultures, TDCA was a more potent GLP-1 secretagogue than taurocholate (TCA) and TLCA, correlating with a stronger Ca(2+) response to TDCA. Using small-volume Ussing chambers optimized for measuring GLP-1 secretion, we found that both a GPBAR1 agonist and TDCA stimulated GLP-1 release better when applied from the basolateral than from the luminal direction and that luminal TDCA was ineffective when intestinal tissue was pretreated with an ASBT inhibitor. ASBT inhibition had no significant effect in nonpolarized primary cultures. Studies in the perfused rat gut confirmed that vascularly administered TDCA was more effective than luminal TDCA. Intestinal primary cultures and Ussing chamber-mounted tissues from GPBAR1-knockout mice did not secrete GLP-1 in response to either TLCA or TDCA. We conclude that the action of bile acids on GLP-1 secretion is predominantly mediated by GPBAR1 located on the basolateral L-cell membrane, suggesting that stimulation of gut hormone secretion may include postabsorptive mechanisms.

  3. [Safety and tolerability of GLP-1 receptor agonists].

    PubMed

    Soldevila, Berta; Puig-Domingo, Manel

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1ra) are a new group of drugs with a glucose-lowering action due to their incretin effect. The GLP-1 receptor is expressed in various human tissues, which could be related to the pleiotropic effects of human GLP-1, as well as to the adverse effects described in patients treated with GLP-1ra. The risk of hypoglycaemia is low, which is one of the main considerations in the safety of this family of compounds and is also important to patients with diabetes. The most frequent adverse effect is nausea, which usually occurs at the start of treatment and is transient in 20-60% of affected patients. This article also reviews the information available on antibody formation, the potential effect on the thyroid gland, and the controversial association between this group of drugs with pancreatitis and cancer.

  4. [Safety and tolerability of GLP-1 receptor agonists].

    PubMed

    Soldevila, Berta; Puig-Domingo, Manel

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1ra) are a new group of drugs with a glucose-lowering action due to their incretin effect. The GLP-1 receptor is expressed in various human tissues, which could be related to the pleiotropic effects of human GLP-1, as well as to the adverse effects described in patients treated with GLP-1ra. The risk of hypoglycaemia is low, which is one of the main considerations in the safety of this family of compounds and is also important to patients with diabetes. The most frequent adverse effect is nausea, which usually occurs at the start of treatment and is transient in 20-60% of affected patients. This article also reviews the information available on antibody formation, the potential effect on the thyroid gland, and the controversial association between this group of drugs with pancreatitis and cancer.

  5. GLP-1 and Amylin in the Treatment of Obesity.

    PubMed

    Jorsal, T; Rungby, J; Knop, F K; Vilsbøll, T

    2016-01-01

    For decades, extensive research has aimed to clarify the role of pancreas and gut-derived peptide hormones in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and feeding behavior. Among these are the beta-cell hormone amylin and the intestinal L cell hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). They exhibit distinct and yet several similar physiological actions including suppression of food intake, postprandial glucagon secretion, and gastric emptying-altogether lowering plasma glucose and body weight. These actions have been clinically exploited by the development of amylin and GLP-1 hormone analogs now used for treatment of diabetes and obesity. This review will outline the physiology and pharmacological potential of amylin and GLP-1, respectively, and focus on innovative peptide drug development leading to drugs acting on two or more distinct receptors, such as an amylin and GLP-1 peptide hybrid, potentially producing a more effective treatment strategy to combat the rapidly increasing global obesity.

  6. The influence of restricted feeding on glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-containing cells in the chicken small intestine.

    PubMed

    Monir, M M; Hiramatsu, K; Yamasaki, A; Nishimura, K; Watanabe, T

    2014-04-01

    The influence of restricted feeding on the distribution of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-containing endocrine cells in the chicken small intestine was investigated using immunohistochemical and morphometrical techniques. This study demonstrated that the restricted feeding had an influence on the activity of GLP-1-immunoreactive cells in the chicken small intestine. There were differences in the localization and the frequency of occurrence of GLP-1-immunoreactive cells in the small intestine between control and restricted groups, especially 25% feed supply group provided with 25% of the intake during the adapting period. GLP-1-immunoreactive cells in the control chickens were mainly located in epithelium from crypts to the lower part of intestinal villi. Those in restricted groups, however, tended to be located from crypts to the middle part of intestinal villi. The frequency of occurrence of GLP-1-immunoreactive cells was lowest in the control group, medium in 50% feed supply group and highest in 25% feed supply group at each intestinal region examined in this study, that is, increased with the advancement of restricting the amount of feed supply. These data show that the quantity of food intake is one of signals that have an influence on the secretion of GLP-1 from L cells in the chicken small intestine.

  7. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs.

  8. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs.

  9. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs. PMID:25437461

  10. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs. PMID:25326839

  11. Renoprotective effect of sitagliptin against hypertensive nephropathy induced by chronic administration of L-NAME in rats: role of GLP-1 and GLP-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Abd El Motteleb, Dalia M; Elshazly, Shimaa M

    2013-11-15

    The present study was undertaken to assess the possible protective effects of sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase 4-inhibitor (DPP4), against Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) induced hypertensive nephropathy in rats. Hypertension was induced in adult rats by administration of L-NAME for 6 weeks. Rats were treated with sitagliptin (10mg/kg/day or 30 mg/kg/day) for six weeks. Chronic L-NAME administration resulted in depletion of serum nitric oxide (NO) associated with elevation in the mean arterial pressure. When compared with the control group; serum urea, serum creatinine, albuminuria, urinary N-acetyl-ß-d-glucosaminidase (NAG) level and renal tissue malondialdhyde (MDA) content were significantly elevated, while creatinine clearance, serum level of glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) as well as renal tissue superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities were signifcantly decreased in L-NAME treated group. Renal expression of mRNA for eNOS and GLP-1 receptors were reduced in the L-NAME treated group as compared with the control group. Treatment with sitagliptin (10mg/kg or 30 mg/kg) successfully ameliorated the deleterious effects of L-NAME on the all tested parameters. Our study indicates a novel protective effect of sitagliptin against L-NAME induced hypertensive nephropathy. An effect which is mediated through, increasing serum level of GLP-1, upregulation of GLP-1 receptors, which in turn, lead to induction of expression eNOS, increased serum NO level, tandem with decreased lipid perodixation and restore the antioxidant defense mechanisms. It is worth mentioning that the effects produced by sitaglipin (30 mg/kg) were superior to the effects obtained by the lower dose.

  12. Altered expression of uncoupling protein 2 in GLP-1-producing cells after chronic high glucose exposure: implications for the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Francesca; Filippello, Agnese; Di Pino, Antonino; Barbagallo, Davide; Di Mauro, Stefania; Pappalardo, Alessandro; Rabuazzo, Agata Maria; Purrello, Michele; Purrello, Francesco; Piro, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a gut L-cell hormone that enhances glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Several approaches that prevent GLP-1 degradation or activate the GLP-1 receptor are being used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. In T2DM, GLP-1 secretion has been suggested to be impaired, and this defect appears to be a consequence rather than a cause of impaired glucose homeostasis. However, although defective GLP-1 secretion has been correlated with insulin resistance, little is known about the direct effects of chronic high glucose concentrations, which are typical in diabetes patients, on GLP-1-secreting cell function. In the present study, we demonstrate that glucotoxicity directly affects GLP-1 secretion in GLUTag cells chronically exposed to high glucose. Our results indicate that this abnormality is associated with a decrease in ATP production due to the elevated expression of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2). Furthermore, UCP2 inhibition using small interfering RNA (siRNA) and the application of glibenclamide, an ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP(+)) channel blocker, reverse the GLP-1 secretion defect induced by chronic high-glucose treatment. These results show that glucotoxicity diminishes the secretory responsiveness of GLP-1-secreting cells to acute glucose stimulation. We conclude that the loss of the incretin effect, as observed in T2DM patients, could at least partially depend on hyperglycemia, which is typical in diabetes patients. Such an understanding may not only provide new insight into diabetes complications but also ultimately contribute to the identification of novel molecular targets within intestinal L-cells for controlling and improving endogenous GLP-1 secretion.

  13. GLP-1 based therapeutics: simultaneously combating T2DM and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Heppner, Kristy M.; Perez-Tilve, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) enhances meal-related insulin secretion, which lowers blood glucose excursions. In addition to its incretin action, GLP-1 acts on the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) in the brain to suppress feeding. These combined actions of GLP-1R signaling cause improvements in glycemic control as well as weight loss in type II diabetes (T2DM) patients treated with GLP-1R agonists. This is a superior advantage of GLP-1R pharmaceuticals as many other drugs used to treat T2DM are weight neutral or actual cause weight gain. This review summarizes GLP-1R action on energy and glucose metabolism, the effectiveness of current GLP-1R agonists on weight loss in T2DM patients, as well as GLP-1R combination therapies. PMID:25852463

  14. Exenatide Protects Against Glucose- and Lipid-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction: Evidence for Direct Vasodilation Effect of GLP-1 Receptor Agonists in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Michelle; Burciu, Camelia; D’Souza, Karen M.; Raravikar, Kalyani; Liu, James; Truran, Seth; Franco, Daniel A.; Schwartz, Eric A.; Schwenke, Dawn C.; D’Alessio, David; Migrino, Raymond Q.; Reaven, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists may improve endothelial function (EF) via metabolic improvement and direct vascular action. The current study determined the effect of GLP-1R agonist exenatide on postprandial EF in type 2 diabetes and the mechanisms underlying GLP-1R agonist–mediated vasodilation. Two crossover studies were conducted: 36 participants with type 2 diabetes received subcutaneous exenatide or placebo for 11 days and EF, and glucose and lipid responses to breakfast and lunch were determined; and 32 participants with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or diet-controlled type 2 diabetes had EF measured before and after intravenous exenatide, with or without the GLP-1R antagonist exendin-9. Mechanisms of GLP-1R agonist action were studied ex vivo on human subcutaneous adipose tissue arterioles and endothelial cells. Subcutaneous exenatide increased postprandial EF independent of reductions in plasma glucose and triglycerides. Intravenous exenatide increased fasting EF, and exendin-9 abolished this effect. Exenatide elicited eNOS activation and NO production in endothelial cells, and induced dose-dependent vasorelaxation and reduced high-glucose or lipid-induced endothelial dysfunction in arterioles ex vivo. These effects were reduced with AMPK inhibition. In conclusion, exenatide augmented postprandial EF in subjects with diabetes and prevented high-glucose and lipid-induced endothelial dysfunction in human arterioles. These effects were largely direct, via GLP-1R and AMPK activation. PMID:25720388

  15. Stimulation of GLP-1 secretion downstream of the ligand-gated ion channel TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Emery, Edward C; Diakogiannaki, Eleftheria; Gentry, Clive; Psichas, Arianna; Habib, Abdella M; Bevan, Stuart; Fischer, Michael J M; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M

    2015-04-01

    Stimulus-coupled incretin secretion from enteroendocrine cells plays a fundamental role in glucose homeostasis and could be targeted for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Here, we investigated the expression and function of transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels in enteroendocrine L cells producing GLP-1. By microarray and quantitative PCR analysis, we identified trpa1 as an L cell-enriched transcript in the small intestine. Calcium imaging of primary L cells and the model cell line GLUTag revealed responses triggered by the TRPA1 agonists allyl-isothiocyanate (mustard oil), carvacrol, and polyunsaturated fatty acids, which were blocked by TRPA1 antagonists. Electrophysiology in GLUTag cells showed that carvacrol induced a current with characteristics typical of TRPA1 and triggered the firing of action potentials. TRPA1 activation caused an increase in GLP-1 secretion from primary murine intestinal cultures and GLUTag cells, an effect that was abolished in cultures from trpa1(-/-) mice or by pharmacological TRPA1 inhibition. These findings present TRPA1 as a novel sensory mechanism in enteroendocrine L cells, coupled to the facilitation of GLP-1 release, which may be exploitable as a target for treating diabetes.

  16. GLP-1 receptor agonism ameliorates hepatic VLDL overproduction and de novo lipogenesis in insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Taher, Jennifer; Baker, Christopher L.; Cuizon, Carmelle; Masoudpour, Hassan; Zhang, Rianna; Farr, Sarah; Naples, Mark; Bourdon, Celine; Pausova, Zdenka; Adeli, Khosrow

    2014-01-01

    Background/objectives Fasting dyslipidemia is commonly observed in insulin resistant states and mechanistically linked to hepatic overproduction of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL). Recently, the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has been implicated in ameliorating dyslipidemia associated with insulin resistance and reducing hepatic lipid stores. Given that hepatic VLDL production is a key determinant of circulating lipid levels, we investigated the role of both peripheral and central GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonism in regulation of VLDL production. Methods The fructose-fed Syrian golden hamster was employed as a model of diet-induced insulin resistance and VLDL overproduction. Hamsters were treated with the GLP-1R agonist exendin-4 by intraperitoneal (ip) injection for peripheral studies or by intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration into the 3rd ventricle for central studies. Peripheral studies were repeated in vagotomised hamsters. Results Short term (7–10 day) peripheral exendin-4 enhanced satiety and also prevented fructose-induced fasting dyslipidemia and hyperinsulinemia. These changes were accompanied by decreased fasting plasma glucose levels, reduced hepatic lipid content and decreased levels of VLDL-TG and -apoB100 in plasma. The observed changes in fasting dyslipidemia could be partially explained by reduced respiratory exchange ratio (RER) thereby indicating a switch in energy utilization from carbohydrate to lipid. Additionally, exendin-4 reduced mRNA markers associated with hepatic de novo lipogenesis and inflammation. Despite these observations, GLP-1R activity could not be detected in primary hamster hepatocytes, thus leading to the investigation of a potential brain–liver axis functioning to regulate lipid metabolism. Short term (4 day) central administration of exendin-4 decreased body weight and food consumption and further prevented fructose-induced hypertriglyceridemia. Additionally, the peripheral lipid

  17. Effects of the glucagon-like polypeptide-1 analogue (Val8)GLP-1 on learning, progenitor cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the C57B/16 mouse brain.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Stephen F J; Hunter, Kerry; Hölscher, Christian

    2012-09-14

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) has been identified as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. Here, we tested the properties of the glucagon-like polypetide-1 (GLP-1) analogue (Val8)GLP-1, a drug originally developed as a treatment for T2DM at a range of doses (2.5 nmol; 25 nmol; 100 nmol; or 250 nmol/kg bw ip.) in an acute memory study in wild type C57B/l6 mice. We also tested (Val8)GLP-1 and the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin (9-39) in a chronic study (3 weeks at 25 nmol/kg bw ip. once-daily). We found that (Val8)GLP-1 crossed the blood brain barrier readily and that peripheral injection increased levels in the brain 30 min post-injection ip. but not 2h post-injection in rats. In the acute study, the low dose of 2.5 nmol/kg ip. enhanced motor activity in the open field task, while total distance travelled, exploratory behaviour and anxiety was not affected at any dose. Learning an object recognition task was not affected either. In the chronic study, no effect was observed in the open field assessment. The antagonist exendin (9-39) impaired object recognition learning and spatial learning in a water maze task, demonstrating the importance of GLP-1 signalling in memory formation. Locomotor activity was also affected in some cases. Blood sugar levels and insulin sensitivity was not affected in chronically treated mice. Neuronal stem cells and neurogenesis was enhanced by (Val8)GLP-1 in the dentate gyrus of wild type mice. The results demonstrate that (Val8)GLP-1 is safe in a range of doses, crosses the BBB and has potentially beneficial effects in the CNS by enhancing neurogenesis. PMID:22867941

  18. Effect of GLP-1 treatment on GLUT2 and GLUT4 expression in type 1 and type 2 rat diabetic models.

    PubMed

    Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L; Puente, J; Redondo, A; Clemente, F; Valverde, I

    2001-07-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (G LP-1) is an incretin with glucose-dependent insulinotropic and insulin-independent antidiabetic properties that exerts insulin-like effects on glucose metabolism in rat liver, skeletal muscle, and fat. This study aimed to search for the effect of a prolonged treatment, 3 ds, with GLP-1 on glucotransporter GLUT2 expression in liver, and on that of GLUT4 in skeletal muscle and fat, in rats. Normal rats and streptozotocin-induced type 1 and type 2 diabetic models were used; diabetic rats were also treated with insulin for comparison. In normal rats, GLP-1 treatment reduced in the three tissues the corresponding glucotransporter protein level, without modifying their mRNA. In the type 2 diabetic model, GLP-1, like insulin, stimulated in liver and fat only the glucotransporter translational process, while in the muscle an effect at the GLUT4 transcriptional level was also observed. In the type 1 diabetic model, GLP-1 apparently exerted in the liver only a posttranslational effect on GLUT2 expression; in muscle and fat, while insulin was shown to have an action on GLUT4 at both transcriptional and translational levels, the effect of GLP-1 was restricted to glucotransporter translation. In normal and diabetic rats, exogenous GLP-1 controlled the glucotransporter expression in extrapancreatic tissues participating in the overall glucose homeostasis-liver, muscle, and fat-where the effect of the peptide seems to be exerted only at the translational and/or posttranslational level; in muscle and fat, the presence of insulin seems to be required for GLP-1 to activate the transcriptional process. The stimulating action of GLP-1 on GLUT2 and GLUT4 expression, mRNA or protein, could be a mechanism by which, at least in part, the peptide exerts its lowering effect on blood glucose.

  19. Expression of BvGLP-1 encoding a germin-like protein from sugar beet in Arabidopsis thaliana leads to resistance against phytopathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Katrin; Seyffarth, Monique; Desel, Christine; Thurau, Tim; Sherameti, Irena; Lou, Binggan; Oelmüller, Ralf; Cai, Daguang

    2010-04-01

    Nematode (Heterodera schachtii) resistance in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) is controlled by a single dominant resistance gene, Hs1(pro-1). BvGLP-1 was cloned from resistant sugar beet. The BvGLP-1 messenger (m)RNA is highly upregulated in the resistant plants after nematode infection, suggesting its role in the Hs1(pro-1) mediated resistance. BvGLP-1 exhibits sequence homology to a set of plant germin-like proteins (GLP), from which several have proved to be functional in plant basal or defense resistance against fungal pathogens. To test whether BvGLP-1 is also involved in the plant-fungus interaction, we transferred BvGLP-1 into Arabidopsis and challenged the transgenic plants with the pathogenic fungi Verticillium longisporum and Rhizoctonia solani as well as with the beneficial endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica. The expression of BvGLP-1 in Arabidopsis elevated the H(2)O(2) content and conferred significant resistance to V. longisporum and R. solani but did not affect the beneficial interaction with P. indica in seedlings. Microscopic observations revealed a dramatic reduction in the amount of hyphae of the pathogenic fungi on the root surface as well as of fungal mycelium developed inside the roots of transgenic Arabidopsis compared with wild-type plants. Molecular analysis demonstrated that the BvGLP-1 expression in Arabidopsis constitutively activates the expression of a subset of plant defense-related proteins such as PR-1 to PR-4 and PDF1.2 but not PDF2.1 and PDF2.3. In contrast, the PDF2.1 mRNA level was downregulated. These data suggest an important role of BvGLP-1 in establishment of plant defense responses, which follow specific signaling routes that diverge from those induced by the beneficial fungus. PMID:20192832

  20. Expression of BvGLP-1 encoding a germin-like protein from sugar beet in Arabidopsis thaliana leads to resistance against phytopathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Katrin; Seyffarth, Monique; Desel, Christine; Thurau, Tim; Sherameti, Irena; Lou, Binggan; Oelmüller, Ralf; Cai, Daguang

    2010-04-01

    Nematode (Heterodera schachtii) resistance in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) is controlled by a single dominant resistance gene, Hs1(pro-1). BvGLP-1 was cloned from resistant sugar beet. The BvGLP-1 messenger (m)RNA is highly upregulated in the resistant plants after nematode infection, suggesting its role in the Hs1(pro-1) mediated resistance. BvGLP-1 exhibits sequence homology to a set of plant germin-like proteins (GLP), from which several have proved to be functional in plant basal or defense resistance against fungal pathogens. To test whether BvGLP-1 is also involved in the plant-fungus interaction, we transferred BvGLP-1 into Arabidopsis and challenged the transgenic plants with the pathogenic fungi Verticillium longisporum and Rhizoctonia solani as well as with the beneficial endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica. The expression of BvGLP-1 in Arabidopsis elevated the H(2)O(2) content and conferred significant resistance to V. longisporum and R. solani but did not affect the beneficial interaction with P. indica in seedlings. Microscopic observations revealed a dramatic reduction in the amount of hyphae of the pathogenic fungi on the root surface as well as of fungal mycelium developed inside the roots of transgenic Arabidopsis compared with wild-type plants. Molecular analysis demonstrated that the BvGLP-1 expression in Arabidopsis constitutively activates the expression of a subset of plant defense-related proteins such as PR-1 to PR-4 and PDF1.2 but not PDF2.1 and PDF2.3. In contrast, the PDF2.1 mRNA level was downregulated. These data suggest an important role of BvGLP-1 in establishment of plant defense responses, which follow specific signaling routes that diverge from those induced by the beneficial fungus.

  1. GLP-1 plays a limited role in improved glycemia shortly after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: a comparison with intensive lifestyle modification.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Marion L; Wadden, Thomas A; Teff, Karen L; Khan, Zahra F; Carvajal, Raymond; Ritter, Scott; Moore, Reneé H; Chittams, Jesse L; Iagnocco, Alex; Murayama, Kenric; Korus, Gary; Williams, Noel N; Rickels, Michael R

    2015-02-01

    Rapid glycemic improvements following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) are frequently attributed to the enhanced GLP-1 response, but causality remains unclear. To determine the role of GLP-1 in improved glucose tolerance after surgery, we compared glucose and hormonal responses to a liquid meal test in 20 obese participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus who underwent RYGB or nonsurgical intensive lifestyle modification (ILM) (n = 10 per group) before and after equivalent short-term weight reduction. The GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39)-amide (Ex-9) was administered, in random order and in double-blinded fashion, with saline during two separate visits after equivalent weight loss. Despite the markedly exaggerated GLP-1 response after RYGB, changes in postprandial glucose and insulin responses did not significantly differ between groups, and glucagon secretion was paradoxically augmented after RYGB. Hepatic insulin sensitivity also increased significantly after RYGB. With Ex-9, glucose tolerance deteriorated similarly from the saline condition in both groups, but postprandial insulin release was markedly attenuated after RYGB compared with ILM. GLP-1 exerts important insulinotropic effects after RYGB and ILM, but the enhanced incretin response plays a limited role in improved glycemia shortly after surgery. Instead, enhanced hepatic metabolism, independent of GLP-1 receptor activation, may be more important for early postsurgical glycemic improvements.

  2. Expression and Characterization of a Potent Long-Acting GLP-1 Receptor Agonist, GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Chen, Fang; Wan, Deyou; Liu, Yunhui; Yang, Li; Feng, Hongru; Cui, Xinling; Gao, Xin; Song, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    Human GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1) can produce a remarkable improvement in glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, its clinical benefits are limited by its short half-life, which is less than 2 min because of its small size and rapid enzymatic inactivation by dipeptidyl peptidase IV. We engineered GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc, a 68-kDa fusion protein linking a variant human GLP-1 (A8G/G26E/R36G) to a human IgG2σ constant heavy-chain. A stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary cell line was obtained using electroporation. Western blotting showed that the expressed protein was immunoreactive to both GLP-1 and IgG antibodies. GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc stimulated insulin secretion from INS-1 cells in a dose- and glucose-dependent manner and increased insulin mRNA expression. The half-life of GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc in cynomolgus monkeys was approximately 57.1 ± 4.5 h. In the KKAy mouse model of diabetes, one intraperitoneal injection of GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc (1 mg/kg) reduced blood glucose levels for 5 days. A 4-week repeat-administration study identified sustained effects on blood glucose levels. Oral glucose tolerance tests conducted at the beginning and end of this 4-week period showed that GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc produced a stable glucose lowering effect. In addition, KKAy mice treated with GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc showed statistically significant weight loss from day 23. In conclusion, these properties of GLP-1-IgG2σ-Fc demonstrated that it represented a potential long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonist for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27232339

  3. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of GLP-1-Based Therapies beyond Glucose Control

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Sun; Jun, Hee-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone mainly secreted from intestinal L cells in response to nutrient ingestion. GLP-1 has beneficial effects for glucose homeostasis by stimulating insulin secretion from pancreatic beta-cells, delaying gastric emptying, decreasing plasma glucagon, reducing food intake, and stimulating glucose disposal. Therefore, GLP-1-based therapies such as GLP-1 receptor agonists and inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase-4, which is a GLP-1 inactivating enzyme, have been developed for treatment of type 2 diabetes. In addition to glucose-lowering effects, emerging data suggests that GLP-1-based therapies also show anti-inflammatory effects in chronic inflammatory diseases including type 1 and 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative disorders, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, diabetic nephropathy, asthma, and psoriasis. This review outlines the anti-inflammatory actions of GLP-1-based therapies on diseases associated with chronic inflammation in vivo and in vitro, and their molecular mechanisms of anti-inflammatory action. PMID:27110066

  4. Inflammation Meets Metabolic Disease: Gut Feeling Mediated by GLP-1.

    PubMed

    Zietek, Tamara; Rath, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Chronic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes, cardiovascular, and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) share common features in their pathology. Metabolic disorders exhibit strong inflammatory underpinnings and vice versa, inflammation is associated with metabolic alterations. Next to cytokines and cellular stress pathways, such as the unfolded protein response (UPR), alterations in the enteroendocrine system are intersections of various pathologies. Enteroendocrine cells (EEC) have been studied extensively for their ability to regulate gastrointestinal motility, secretion, and insulin release by release of peptide hormones. In particular, the L-cell-derived incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) has gained enormous attention due to its insulinotropic action and relevance in the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Yet, accumulating data indicate a critical role for EEC and in particular for GLP-1 in metabolic adaptation and in orchestrating immune responses beyond blood glucose control. EEC sense the lamina propria and luminal environment, including the microbiota via receptors and transporters. Subsequently, mediating signals by secreting hormones and cytokines, EEC can be considered as integrators of metabolic and inflammatory signaling. This review focuses on L cell and GLP-1 functions in the context of metabolic and inflammatory diseases. The effects of incretin-based therapies on metabolism and immune system are discussed and the interrelation and common features of metabolic and immune-mediated disorders are highlighted. Moreover, it presents data on the impact of inflammation, in particular of IBD on EEC and discusses the potential role of the microbiota as link between nutrients, metabolism, immunity, and disease. PMID:27148273

  5. Inflammation Meets Metabolic Disease: Gut Feeling Mediated by GLP-1

    PubMed Central

    Zietek, Tamara; Rath, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Chronic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes, cardiovascular, and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) share common features in their pathology. Metabolic disorders exhibit strong inflammatory underpinnings and vice versa, inflammation is associated with metabolic alterations. Next to cytokines and cellular stress pathways, such as the unfolded protein response (UPR), alterations in the enteroendocrine system are intersections of various pathologies. Enteroendocrine cells (EEC) have been studied extensively for their ability to regulate gastrointestinal motility, secretion, and insulin release by release of peptide hormones. In particular, the L-cell-derived incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) has gained enormous attention due to its insulinotropic action and relevance in the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Yet, accumulating data indicate a critical role for EEC and in particular for GLP-1 in metabolic adaptation and in orchestrating immune responses beyond blood glucose control. EEC sense the lamina propria and luminal environment, including the microbiota via receptors and transporters. Subsequently, mediating signals by secreting hormones and cytokines, EEC can be considered as integrators of metabolic and inflammatory signaling. This review focuses on L cell and GLP-1 functions in the context of metabolic and inflammatory diseases. The effects of incretin-based therapies on metabolism and immune system are discussed and the interrelation and common features of metabolic and immune-mediated disorders are highlighted. Moreover, it presents data on the impact of inflammation, in particular of IBD on EEC and discusses the potential role of the microbiota as link between nutrients, metabolism, immunity, and disease. PMID:27148273

  6. Use of CRISPR/Cas9-engineered INS-1 pancreatic β cells to define the pharmacology of dual GIPR/GLP-1R agonists.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Jacqueline; Suckow, Arthur T; Seth, Asha; Baker, David J; Sermadiras, Isabelle; Ravn, Peter; Howes, Rob; Li, Jianliang; Snaith, Mike R; Coghlan, Matthew P; Hornigold, David C

    2016-09-15

    Dual-agonist molecules combining glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) activity represent an exciting therapeutic strategy for diabetes treatment. Although challenging due to shared downstream signalling pathways, determining the relative activity of dual agonists at each receptor is essential when developing potential novel therapeutics. The challenge is exacerbated in physiologically relevant cell systems expressing both receptors. To this end, either GIP receptors (GIPR) or GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1R) were ablated via RNA-guided clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 endonucleases in the INS-1 pancreatic β-cell line. Multiple clonal cell lines harbouring gene disruptions for each receptor were isolated and assayed for receptor activity to identify functional knockouts (KOs). cAMP production in response to GIPR or GLP-1R activation was abolished and GIP- or GLP-1-induced potentiation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) was attenuated in the cognate KO cell lines. The contributions of individual receptors derived from cAMP and GSIS assays were confirmed in vivo using GLP-1R KO mice in combination with a monoclonal antibody antagonist of GIPR. We have successfully applied CRISPR/Cas9-engineered cell lines to determining selectivity and relative potency contributions of dual-agonist molecules targeting receptors with overlapping native expression profiles and downstream signalling pathways. Specifically, we have characterised molecules as biased towards GIPR or GLP-1R, or with relatively balanced potency in a physiologically relevant β-cell system. This demonstrates the broad utility of CRISPR/Cas9 when applied to native expression systems for the development of drugs that target multiple receptors, particularly where the balance of receptor activity is critical.

  7. The peptide agonist-binding site of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor based on site-directed mutagenesis and knowledge-based modelling

    PubMed Central

    Dods, Rachel L.; Donnelly, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7–36)amide (GLP-1) plays a central role in regulating blood sugar levels and its receptor, GLP-1R, is a target for anti-diabetic agents such as the peptide agonist drugs exenatide and liraglutide. In order to understand the molecular nature of the peptide–receptor interaction, we used site-directed mutagenesis and pharmacological profiling to highlight nine sites as being important for peptide agonist binding and/or activation. Using a knowledge-based approach, we constructed a 3D model of agonist-bound GLP-1R, basing the conformation of the N-terminal region on that of the receptor-bound NMR structure of the related peptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating protein (PACAP21). The relative position of the extracellular to the transmembrane (TM) domain, as well as the molecular details of the agonist-binding site itself, were found to be different from the model that was published alongside the crystal structure of the TM domain of the glucagon receptor, but were nevertheless more compatible with published mutagenesis data. Furthermore, the NMR-determined structure of a high-potency cyclic conformationally-constrained 11-residue analogue of GLP-1 was also docked into the receptor-binding site. Despite having a different main chain conformation to that seen in the PACAP21 structure, four conserved residues (equivalent to His-7, Glu-9, Ser-14 and Asp-15 in GLP-1) could be structurally aligned and made similar interactions with the receptor as their equivalents in the GLP-1-docked model, suggesting the basis of a pharmacophore for GLP-1R peptide agonists. In this way, the model not only explains current mutagenesis and molecular pharmacological data but also provides a basis for further experimental design. PMID:26598711

  8. GSK2374697, a long duration glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, reduces postprandial circulating endogenous total GLP-1 and peptide YY in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Lin, J; Hodge, R J; O'Connor-Semmes, R L; Nunez, D J

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the effects of a long-duration glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, GSK2374697, on postprandial endogenous total GLP-1 and peptide YY (PYY). Two cohorts of healthy subjects, one normal/overweight and one obese, were randomized to receive GSK2374697 2 mg (n = 8 each) or placebo (n = 4 and n = 2) subcutaneously on days 1, 4 and 7. Samples for plasma endogenous GLP-1 and PYY were collected after breakfast on days -1 and 12. Weighted mean area under the curve (0-4 h) of total GLP-1 and PYY in treated subjects was reduced compared with placebo. The least squares mean difference for change from baseline was -1.24 pmol/l [95% confidence interval (CI) -2.33, -0.16] and -4.47 pmol/l (95% CI -8.74, -0.20) for total GLP-1 and PYY, respectively, in normal/overweight subjects (p < 0.05 for both), and -1.56 (95% CI -2.95, -0.16) and -3.02 (95% CI -8.58, 2.55), respectively, in obese subjects (p < 0.05 for GLP-1). In healthy subjects, GSK2374697 reduced postprandial total GLP-1 and PYY levels, suggesting feedback suppression of enteroendocrine L-cell secretion of these peptides.

  9. Increasing GLP-1 Circulating Levels by Bariatric Surgery or by GLP-1 Receptor Agonists Therapy: Why Are the Clinical Consequences so Different?

    PubMed Central

    Amouyal, Chloé; Andreelli, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    The “incretin effect” is used to describe the observation that more insulin is secreted after the oral administration of glucose compared to that after the intravenous administration of the same amount of glucose. During the absorption of meals, the gut is thought to regulate insulin secretion by secreting a specific factor that targets pancreatic beta cells. Additional research confirmed this hypothesis with the discovery of two hormones called incretins: gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). During meals, specific cells in the gut (L and K enteroendocrine cells) secrete incretins, causing an increase in the blood concentrations of, respectively, GLP-1 and GIP. Bariatric surgery is now proposed during the therapeutic management of type 2 diabetes in obese or overweight populations. It has been hypothesized that restoration of endogenous GLP-1 secretion after the surgery may contribute to the postsurgical resolution of diabetes. In 2005, the commercialization of GLP-1 receptor agonists gave the possibility to test this hypothesis. A few years later, it is now accepted that GLP-1 receptor agonists and bariatric surgery differently improve type 2 diabetes. These differences between endogenous and exogenous GLP-1 on glucose homeostasis emphasized the dual properties of GLP-1 as a peptide hormone and as a neurotransmitter. PMID:27382574

  10. [Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mimetics: a new treatment for Alzheimer's disease?].

    PubMed

    García-Casares, Natalia; García-Arnés, Juan Antonio; Gómez-Huelgas, Ricardo; Valdivielso-Felices, Pedro; García-Arias, Carlota; González-Santos, Pedro

    2014-12-01

    Introduccion. Los analogos del glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) son una opcion terapeutica establecida en los pacientes con diabetes tipo 2. Sin embargo, las propiedades de los analogos del GLP-1 van mas alla del control estrictamente metabolico del paciente diabetico. Los efectos neuroprotectores de los analogos del GLP-1 se han puesto de manifiesto en estudios recientes y han abierto nuevos campos de investigacion en trastornos neurodegenerativos como la enfermedad de Alzheimer (EA), entre otros. Objetivo. Revision sistematica de los estudios experimentales y ensayos clinicos en humanos que demuestran las propiedades neuroprotectoras de los analogos del GLP-1 en la EA. Desarrollo. Los estudios experimentales que se han llevado a cabo en modelos de roedores con EA demuestran las propiedades neuroprotectoras de los analogos del GLP-1 sobre el sistema nervioso central que reducen las placas de beta-amiloide, el estres oxidativo y la respuesta inflamatoria cerebral. Recientemente se han puesto en marcha estudios con analogos del GLP-1 en humanos con deterioro cognitivo y EA. Conclusiones. Los analogos del GLP-1 presentan propiedades neuroprotectoras. Al considerarse la diabetes tipo 2 un factor de riesgo para el deterioro cognitivo y la demencia, deben considerarse los beneficios de los analogos del GLP-1 sobre la cognicion. Del mismo modo, los analogos del GLP-1 suponen un tratamiento prometedor en la EA.

  11. The GLP-1 agonist, liraglutide, as a pharmacotherapy for obesity.

    PubMed

    Crane, James; McGowan, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    There is a global obesity epidemic that will continue to be a financial burden on healthcare systems around the world. Tackling obesity through diet and exercise should always be the first intervention, but this has not proved to be effective for a large number of patients. Pharmacotherapeutic options have been limited and many previously available drugs have been withdrawn due to safety concerns. Currently, only bariatric surgery has the capability to induce both substantial and durable weight loss. This article briefly reviews the history of pharmacotherapy for obesity before focusing on the clinical trial evidence for the use of the GLP-1 agonist liraglutide as a weight loss agent and comparing its efficacy with other emerging drug therapies for obesity. PMID:26977279

  12. The GLP-1 agonist, liraglutide, as a pharmacotherapy for obesity

    PubMed Central

    Crane, James; McGowan, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    There is a global obesity epidemic that will continue to be a financial burden on healthcare systems around the world. Tackling obesity through diet and exercise should always be the first intervention, but this has not proved to be effective for a large number of patients. Pharmacotherapeutic options have been limited and many previously available drugs have been withdrawn due to safety concerns. Currently, only bariatric surgery has the capability to induce both substantial and durable weight loss. This article briefly reviews the history of pharmacotherapy for obesity before focusing on the clinical trial evidence for the use of the GLP-1 agonist liraglutide as a weight loss agent and comparing its efficacy with other emerging drug therapies for obesity. PMID:26977279

  13. GLP-1 Cleavage Product Reverses Persistent ROS Generation After Transient Hyperglycemia by Disrupting an ROS-Generating Feedback Loop.

    PubMed

    Giacco, Ferdinando; Du, Xueliang; Carratú, Anna; Gerfen, Gary J; D'Apolito, Maria; Giardino, Ida; Rasola, Andrea; Marin, Oriano; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Murphy, Anne N; Shah, Manasi S; Brownlee, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The assumption underlying current diabetes treatment is that lowering the level of time-averaged glucose concentrations, measured as HbA1c, prevents microvascular complications. However, 89% of variation in risk of retinopathy, microalbuminuria, or albuminuria is due to elements of glycemia not captured by mean HbA1c values. We show that transient exposure to high glucose activates a multicomponent feedback loop that causes a stable left shift of the glucose concentration-reactive oxygen species (ROS) dose-response curve. Feedback loop disruption by the GLP-1 cleavage product GLP-1(9-36)(amide) reverses the persistent left shift, thereby normalizing persistent overproduction of ROS and its pathophysiologic consequences. These data suggest that hyperglycemic spikes high enough to activate persistent ROS production during subsequent periods of normal glycemia but too brief to affect the HbA1c value are a major determinant of the 89% of diabetes complications risk not captured by HbA1c. The phenomenon and mechanism described in this study provide a basis for the development of both new biomarkers to complement HbA1c and novel therapeutic agents, including GLP-1(9-36)(amide), for the prevention and treatment of diabetes complications.

  14. GLP-1 increases microvascular recruitment but not glucose uptake in human and rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sjøberg, Kim A.; Holst, Jens J.; Rattigan, Stephen; Richter, Erik A.

    2013-01-01

    The insulinotropic gut hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has been proposed to have effects on vascular function and glucose disposal. However, whether GLP-1 is able to increase microvascular recruitment (MVR) in humans has not been investigated. GLP-1 was infused in the femoral artery in overnight-fasted, healthy young men. Microvascular recruitment was measured with real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound and leg glucose uptake by the leg balance technique with and without inhibition of the insulinotropic response of GLP-1 by coinfusion of octreotide. As a positive control, MVR and leg glucose uptake were measured during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Infusion of GLP-1 caused a rapid increase (P < 0.05) of 20 ± 12% (mean ± SE) in MVR in the vastus lateralis muscle of the infused leg after 5 min, and MVR further increased to 60 ± 8% above preinfusion levels by 60 min infusion. The effect was slightly slower but similar in magnitude in the noninfused contralateral leg, in which GLP-1 concentration was within the physiological range. Octreotide infusion did not prevent the GLP-1-induced increase in MVR. GLP-1 infusion did not increase leg glucose uptake with or without octreotide coinfusion. GLP-1 infusion in rats increased MVR by 28% (P < 0.05) but did not increase muscle glucose uptake. During the hyperinsulinemic clamp, MVR increased ∼40%, and leg glucose uptake increased 35-fold. It is concluded that GLP-1 in physiological concentrations causes a rapid insulin-independent increase in muscle MVR but does not affect muscle glucose uptake. PMID:24302010

  15. Exenatide exerts direct protective effects on endothelial cells through the AMPK/Akt/eNOS pathway in a GLP-1 receptor-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Wei, Rui; Ma, Shifeng; Wang, Chen; Ke, Jing; Yang, Jin; Li, Weihong; Liu, Ye; Hou, Wenfang; Feng, Xinheng; Wang, Guang; Hong, Tianpei

    2016-06-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) may have direct favorable effects on cardiovascular system. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the GLP-1 analog exenatide on improving coronary endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. The newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic subjects were enrolled and given either lifestyle intervention or lifestyle intervention plus exenatide treatment. After 12-wk treatment, coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR), an important indicator of coronary endothelial function, was improved significantly, and serum levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) were remarkably decreased in the exenatide treatment group compared with the baseline and the control group. Notably, CFVR was correlated inversely with hemoglobin A1c (Hb A1c) and positively with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). In human umbilical vein endothelial cells, exendin-4 (a form of exenatide) significantly increased NO production, endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation, and GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GTPCH1) level in a dose-dependent manner. The GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) antagonist exendin (9-39) or GLP-1R siRNA, adenylyl cyclase inhibitor SQ-22536, AMPK inhibitor compound C, and PI3K inhibitor LY-294002 abolished the effects of exendin-4. Furthermore, exendin-4 reversed homocysteine-induced endothelial dysfunction by decreasing sICAM-1 and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and upregulating NO production and eNOS phosphorylation. Likewise, exendin (9-39) diminished the protective effects of exendin-4 on the homocysteine-induced endothelial dysfunction. In conclusion, exenatide significantly improves coronary endothelial function in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. The effect may be mediated through activation of AMPK/PI3K-Akt/eNOS pathway via a GLP-1R/cAMP-dependent mechanism. PMID:27072494

  16. 7 CFR 7.36 - Implementation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Implementation. 7.36 Section 7.36 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture SELECTION AND FUNCTIONS OF AGRICULTURAL STABILIZATION AND CONSERVATION STATE, COUNTY AND COMMUNITY COMMITTEES § 7.36 Implementation. Unless specifically provided in...

  17. GLP-1 Receptor Agonists: Nonglycemic Clinical Effects in Weight Loss and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Donna; Acosta, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Obective Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are indicated for treatment of type 2 diabetes since they mimic the actions of native GLP-1 on pancreatic islet cells, stimulating insulin release, while inhibiting glucagon release, in a glucose-dependent manner. The observation of weight loss has led to exploration of their potential as antiobesity agents, with liraglutide 3.0 mg day−1 approved for weight management in the US on December 23, 2014, and in the EU on March 23, 2015. This review examines the potential nonglycemic effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists. Methods A literature search was conducted to identify preclinical and clinical evidence on nonglycemic effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists. Results GLP-1 receptors are distributed widely in a number of tissues in humans, and their effects are not limited to the well-recognized effects on glycemia. Nonglycemic effects include weight loss, which is perhaps the most widely recognized nonglycemic effect. In addition, effects on the cardiovascular, neurologic, and renal systems and on taste perception may occur independently of weight loss. Conclusions GLP-1 receptor agonists may provide other nonglycemic clinical effects besides weight loss. Understanding these effects is important for prescribers in using GLP-1 receptor agonists for diabetic patients, but also if approved for chronic weight management. PMID:25959380

  18. POS-1 and GLD-1 repress glp-1 translation through a conserved binding-site cluster.

    PubMed

    Farley, Brian M; Ryder, Sean P

    2012-12-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) coordinate cell fate specification and differentiation in a variety of systems. RNA regulation is critical during oocyte development and early embryogenesis, in which RBPs control expression from maternal mRNAs encoding key cell fate determinants. The Caenorhabditis elegans Notch homologue glp-1 coordinates germline progenitor cell proliferation and anterior fate specification in embryos. A network of sequence-specific RBPs is required to pattern GLP-1 translation. Here, we map the cis-regulatory elements that guide glp-1 regulation by the CCCH-type tandem zinc finger protein POS-1 and the STAR-domain protein GLD-1. Our results demonstrate that both proteins recognize the glp-1 3' untranslated region (UTR) through adjacent, overlapping binding sites and that POS-1 binding excludes GLD-1 binding. Both factors are required to repress glp-1 translation in the embryo, suggesting that they function in parallel regulatory pathways. It is intriguing that two equivalent POS-1-binding sites are present in the glp-1 3' UTR, but only one, which overlaps with a translational derepression element, is functional in vivo. We propose that POS-1 regulates glp-1 mRNA translation by blocking access of other RBPs to a key regulatory sequence.

  19. [Characteristics and types of GLP-1 receptor agonists. An opportunity for individualized therapy].

    PubMed

    Jódar, Esteban

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is secreted from enteroendocrine L-cells in response to oral nutrient intake and elicits glucose-stimulated insulin secretion while suppressing glucagon secretion. Moreover slows gastric emptying -reducing postprandial glycemic excursions-, reduces body weight, systolic blood pressure and has beneficial effects in the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. Since the 1990s, the efficacy of GLP-1 in reducing blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetes (DM2) was well known. However, GLP-1 should be administered by chronic subcutaneous infusion because of the rapid cleavage by the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4). Hence, DPP-4 inhibitors -which increase pseudo-physiologically endogenous GLP-1 levels- were developed. In addition, several GLP-1 receptor agonists have been designed to avoid DPP-4-breakdown and/or rapid renal elimination and, therefore, induce a pharmacologic effect in the GLP-1 receptor: short-acting, long-acting, and prolonged-acting GLP-1 analogs. Each class has different structural, pharmacodynamic and clinical properties and could be administered in different therapeutical regimens giving us the opportunity to individualize the therapy of DM2.

  20. [Characteristics and types of GLP-1 receptor agonists. An opportunity for individualized therapy].

    PubMed

    Jódar, Esteban

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is secreted from enteroendocrine L-cells in response to oral nutrient intake and elicits glucose-stimulated insulin secretion while suppressing glucagon secretion. Moreover slows gastric emptying -reducing postprandial glycemic excursions-, reduces body weight, systolic blood pressure and has beneficial effects in the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. Since the 1990s, the efficacy of GLP-1 in reducing blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetes (DM2) was well known. However, GLP-1 should be administered by chronic subcutaneous infusion because of the rapid cleavage by the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4). Hence, DPP-4 inhibitors -which increase pseudo-physiologically endogenous GLP-1 levels- were developed. In addition, several GLP-1 receptor agonists have been designed to avoid DPP-4-breakdown and/or rapid renal elimination and, therefore, induce a pharmacologic effect in the GLP-1 receptor: short-acting, long-acting, and prolonged-acting GLP-1 analogs. Each class has different structural, pharmacodynamic and clinical properties and could be administered in different therapeutical regimens giving us the opportunity to individualize the therapy of DM2.

  1. GLP-1 receptor agonists or DPP-4 inhibitors: how to guide the clinician?

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2013-12-01

    Pharmacological treatment of type 2 diabetes has been enriched during recent years, with the launch of incretin therapies targeting glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Such medications comprise either GLP-1 receptor agonists, with short (one or two daily injections: exenatide, liraglutide, lixisenatide) or long duration (one injection once weekly: extended-released exenatide, albiglutide, dulaglutide, taspoglutide); or oral compounds inhibiting dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4), the enzyme that inactives GLP-1, also called gliptins (sitagliptin, vildagliptin, saxagliptin, linagliptin, alogliptin). Although both pharmacological approaches target GLP-1, important differences exist concerning the mode of administration (subcutaneous injection versus oral ingestion), the efficacy (better with GLP-1 agonists), the effects on body weight and systolic blood pressure (diminution with agonists versus neutrality with gliptins), the tolerance profile (nausea and possibly vomiting with agonists) and the cost (higher with GLP-1 receptor agonists). Both agents may exert favourable cardiovascular effects. Gliptins may represent a valuable alternative to a sulfonylurea or a glitazone after failure of monotherapy with metformin while GLP-1 receptor agonists may be considered as a good alternative to insulin (especially in obese patients) after failure of a dual oral therapy. However, this scheme is probably too restrictive and modalities of using incretins are numerous, in almost all stages of type 2 diabetes. Physicians may guide the pharmacological choice based on clinical characteristics, therapeutic goals and patient's preference.

  2. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36)amide and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide secretion in response to nutrient ingestion in man: acute post-prandial and 24-h secretion patterns.

    PubMed

    Elliott, R M; Morgan, L M; Tredger, J A; Deacon, S; Wright, J; Marks, V

    1993-07-01

    The acute effects of different macronutrients on the secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)amide (GLP-1(7-36)amide) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) were compared in healthy human subjects. Circulating levels of the two hormones were measured over a 24-h period during which subjects consumed a mixed diet. In the first study, eight subjects consumed three equicaloric (375 kcal) test meals of carbohydrate, fat and protein. Small increases in plasma GLP-1(7-36) amide were found after all meals. Levels reached a maximum 30 min after the carbohydrate and 150 min after the fat load. Ingestion of both carbohydrate and fat induced substantial rises in GIP secretion, but the protein meal had no effect. In a second study, eight subjects consumed 75 g glucose or the equivalent portion of complex carbohydrate as boiled brown rice or barley. Plasma GIP, insulin and glucose levels increased after all three meals, the largest increase being observed following glucose and the smallest following the barley meal. Plasma GLP-1(7-36)amide levels rose only following the glucose meal. In the 24-h study, plasma GLP-1(7-36)amide and GIP concentrations were increased following every meal and remained elevated throughout the day, only falling to fasting levels at night. The increases in circulating GLP-1(7-36)amide and GIP levels following carbohydrate or a mixed meal are consistent with their role as incretins. The more sustained rises observed in the daytime during the 24-h study are consistent with an anabolic role in lipid metabolism.

  3. GLP-1(32-36)amide, a novel pentapeptide cleavage product of GLP-1, modulates whole body glucose metabolism in dogs.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Dariush; Angeli, Franca S; Vakilipour, Amin; Carlson, Olga D; Tomas, Eva; Egan, Josephine M; Habener, Joel F; Shannon, Richard P

    2014-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated in human subjects who under euglycemic clamp conditions GLP-1(9-36)amide infusions inhibit endogenous glucose production without substantial insulinotropic effects. An earlier report indicates that GLP-1(9-36)amide is cleaved to a nonapeptide, GLP-1(28-36)amide and a pentapeptide GLP-1(32-36)amide (LVKGR amide). Here we study the effects of the pentapeptide on whole body glucose disposal during hyperglycemic clamp studies. Five dogs underwent indwelling catheterizations. Following recovery, the dogs underwent a 180 min hyperglycemic clamp (basal glucose +98 mg/dl) in a cross-over design. Saline or pentapeptide (30 pmol kg(-1) min(-1)) was infused during the last 120 min after commencement of the hyperglycemic clamp in a primed continuous manner. During the last 30 min of the pentapeptide infusion, glucose utilization (M) significantly increased to 21.4±2.9 mg kg(-1) min(-1)compared to M of 14.3±1.1 mg kg(-1)min(-1) during the saline infusion (P=0.026, paired t-test; P=0.062, Mann-Whitney U test). During this interval, no significant differences in insulin (26.6±3.2 vs. 23.7±2.5 μU/ml, P=NS) or glucagon secretion (34.0±2.1 vs. 31.7±1.8 pg/ml, P=NS) were observed. These findings demonstrate that under hyperglycemic clamp studies the pentapeptide modulates glucose metabolism by a stimulation of whole-body glucose disposal. Further, the findings suggest that the metabolic benefits previously observed during GLP-1(9-36)amide infusions in humans might be due, at least in part, to the metabolic effects of the pentapeptide that is cleaved from the pro-peptide, GLP-1(9-36)amide in the circulation.

  4. Sustained expression of GLP-1 receptor differentially modulates β-cell functions in diabetic and nondiabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Fumiyo; Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Sasaki, Shugo; Takahara, Mitsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Yuichi; Shimo, Naoki; Watada, Hirotaka; Kaneto, Hideaki; Gannon, Maureen; Matsuoka, Taka-aki; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2016-02-26

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) has been shown to play important roles in maintaining β-cell functions, such as insulin secretion and proliferation. While expression levels of GLP-1 receptor (Glp1r) are compromised in the islets of diabetic rodents, it remains unclear when and to what degree Glp1r mRNA levels are decreased during the progression of diabetes. In this study, we performed real-time PCR with the islets of db/db diabetic mice at different ages, and found that the expression levels of Glp1r were comparable to those of the islets of nondiabetic db/misty controls at the age of four weeks, and were significantly decreased at the age of eight and 12 weeks. To investigate whether restored expression of Glp1r affects the diabetic phenotypes, we generated the transgenic mouse model Pdx1(PB)-CreER(TM); CAG-CAT-Glp1r (βGlp1r) that allows for induction of Glp1r expression specifically in β cells. Whereas the expression of exogenous Glp1r had no measurable effect on glucose tolerance in nondiabetic βGlp1r;db/misty mice, βGlp1r;db/db mice exhibited higher glucose and lower insulin levels in blood on glucose challenge test than control db/db littermates. In contrast, four weeks of treatment with exendin-4 improved the glucose profiles and increased serum insulin levels in βGlp1r;db/db mice, to significantly higher levels than those in control db/db mice. These differential effects of exogenous Glp1r in nondiabetic and diabetic mice suggest that downregulation of Glp1r might be required to slow the progression of β-cell failure under diabetic conditions. PMID:26854076

  5. Density distribution of free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFA2)-expressing and GLP-1-producing enteroendocrine L cells in human and rat lower intestine, and increased cell numbers after ingestion of fructo-oligosaccharide.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Izumi; Karaki, Shin-Ichiro; Tanaka, Ryo; Kuwahara, Atsukazu

    2011-02-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a multifunctional hormone in glucose metabolism and intestinal function released by enteroendocrine L-cells. The plasma concentration of GLP-1 is increased by indigestible carbohydrates and luminal infusion of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). However, the triggers and modulators of the GLP-1 release remain unclear. We hypothesized that SCFAs produced by bacterial fermentation are involved in enteroendocrine cell proliferation and hormone release through free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFA2, also known as FFAR2 or GPR43) in the large intestine. Fructo-oligosaccharide (Fructo-OS), fermentable indigestible carbohydrate, was used as a source of SCFAs. Rats were fed an indigestible-carbohydrate-free diet (control) or a 5% Fructo-OS-containing diet for 28 days. FFA2-, GLP-1-, and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-positive enteroendocrine cells were quantified immunohistochemically in the colon, cecum, and terminal ileum. The same analysis was performed in surgical specimens from human lower intestine. The coexpression of FFA2 with GLP-1 was investigated both in rats and humans. Fructo-OS supplementation in rats increased the densities of FFA2-positive enteroendocrine cells in rat proximal colon, by over two-fold, relative to control, in parallel with GLP-1-containing L-cells. The segmental distributions of these cells in human were similar to rats fed the control diet. The FFA2-positive enteroendocrine cells were GLP-1-containing L-cells, but not 5-HT-containing EC cells, in both human and rat colon and terminal ileum. Fermentable indigestible carbohydrate increases the number of FFA2-positive L-cells in the proximal colon. FFA2 activation by SCFAs might be an important trigger for produce and release GLP-1 by enteroendocrine L-cells in the lower intestine.

  6. GLP-1 at physiological concentrations recruits skeletal and cardiac muscle microvasculature in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    SUBARAN, Sharmila C.; SAUDER, Matthew A.; CHAI, Weidong; JAHN, Linda A.; FOWLER, Dale E.; AYLOR, Kevin W.; BASU, Ananda; LIU, Zhenqi

    2015-01-01

    Muscle microvascular surface area determines substrate and hormonal exchanges between plasma and muscle interstitium. GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1) regulates glucose-dependent insulin secretion and has numerous extrapancreatic effects, including a salutary vascular action. To examine whether GLP-1 recruits skeletal and cardiac muscle microvasculature in healthy humans, 26 overnight-fasted healthy adults received a systemic infusion of GLP-1 (1.2 pmol/kg of body mass per min) for 150 min. Skeletal and cardiac muscle MBV (microvascular blood volume), MFV (microvascular flow velocity) and MBF (microvascular blood flow) were determined at baseline and after 30 and 150 min. Brachial artery diameter and mean flow velocity were measured and total blood flow was calculated before and at the end of the GLP-1 infusion. GLP-1 infusion raised plasma GLP-1 concentrations to the postprandial levels and suppressed plasma glucagon concentrations with a transient increase in plasma insulin concentrations. Skeletal and cardiac muscle MBV and MBF increased significantly at both 30 and 150 min (P < 0.05). MFV did not change in skeletal muscle, but decreased slightly in cardiac muscle. GLP-1 infusion significantly increased brachial artery diameter (P < 0.005) and flow velocity (P = 0.05) at 150 min, resulting in a significant increase in total brachial artery blood flow (P < 0.005). We conclude that acute GLP-1 infusion significantly recruits skeletal and cardiac muscle microvasculature in addition to relaxing the conduit artery in healthy humans. This could contribute to increased tissue oxygen, nutrient and insulin delivery and exchange and therefore better prandial glycaemic control and tissue function in humans. PMID:24552454

  7. GLP-1 at physiological concentrations recruits skeletal and cardiac muscle microvasculature in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Subaran, Sharmila C; Sauder, Matthew A; Chai, Weidong; Jahn, Linda A; Fowler, Dale E; Aylor, Kevin W; Basu, Ananda; Liu, Zhenqi

    2014-08-01

    Muscle microvascular surface area determines substrate and hormonal exchanges between plasma and muscle interstitium. GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1) regulates glucose-dependent insulin secretion and has numerous extrapancreatic effects, including a salutary vascular action. To examine whether GLP-1 recruits skeletal and cardiac muscle microvasculature in healthy humans, 26 overnight-fasted healthy adults received a systemic infusion of GLP-1 (1.2 pmol/kg of body mass per min) for 150 min. Skeletal and cardiac muscle MBV (microvascular blood volume), MFV (microvascular flow velocity) and MBF (microvascular blood flow) were determined at baseline and after 30 and 150 min. Brachial artery diameter and mean flow velocity were measured and total blood flow was calculated before and at the end of the GLP-1 infusion. GLP-1 infusion raised plasma GLP-1 concentrations to the postprandial levels and suppressed plasma glucagon concentrations with a transient increase in plasma insulin concentrations. Skeletal and cardiac muscle MBV and MBF increased significantly at both 30 and 150 min (P<0.05). MFV did not change in skeletal muscle, but decreased slightly in cardiac muscle. GLP-1 infusion significantly increased brachial artery diameter (P<0.005) and flow velocity (P=0.05) at 150 min, resulting in a significant increase in total brachial artery blood flow (P<0.005). We conclude that acute GLP-1 infusion significantly recruits skeletal and cardiac muscle microvasculature in addition to relaxing the conduit artery in healthy humans. This could contribute to increased tissue oxygen, nutrient and insulin delivery and exchange and therefore better prandial glycaemic control and tissue function in humans.

  8. Interaction between GLP-1 and CCK-33 in inhibiting food intake and appetite in men.

    PubMed

    Gutzwiller, Jean-Pierre; Degen, Lukas; Matzinger, Daniel; Prestin, Sven; Beglinger, Christoph

    2004-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and CCK-33 were intravenously infused alone or in combination into normal weight men for 60 min before they were served a lunch of ham sandwiches, chocolate mousse, and orange juice. Infusion of GLP-1 (dose: 0.9 pmol x kg(-1) x min(-1)) or CCK-33 (dose: 0.2 pmol x kg(-1) x min(-1)) each reduced calorie intake of the test meal. However, simultaneous infusion of these peptide doses reduced calorie intake less than the sum of the peptides' individual effects. Infusions of the same doses of GLP-1 plus CCK-33 had neither individual nor interactive effects on meal size or calorie consumption. The combination of GLP-1 plus CCK-33 induced, however, a significant reduction in hunger feelings in the premeal period (P = 0.036 vs. all other treatments). In summary, intravenous infusion of near physiological doses of CCK-33 and GLP-1 produced specific inhibitions of hunger feeling in men; the simultaneous infusion resulted in an infra-additive reduction in calorie consumption, rejecting thereby the hypothesis that the two peptides exert a positive synergistic effect on food intake compared with the effects observed with infusion of individual peptides. In conclusion, CCK and GLP-1 are meal-related satiety signals that are released from the gastrointestinal tract during food intake.

  9. GLP-1 is not the key mediator of the health benefits of metabolic surgery.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Josep; de Hollanda, Ana; Jiménez, Amanda

    2016-07-01

    The identification of key factors accounting for the health benefits of metabolic surgery is a research priority, as it may help design a medical therapy mimicking this powerful surgical tool. Because of its well-known effects on glucose metabolism and appetite, amongst the several proposed factors, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has been the most extensively evaluated. A large number of association studies have been reported suggesting that the striking changes in GLP-1 after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy play a role in the metabolic benefits associated with these surgical techniques. In this review article, we challenge this view. Studies in humans using the specific GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin 9-39 or the nonspecific inhibitor of GLP-1 secretion octreotide, as well as data derived from genetically engineered mouse models, provide strong evidence that although GLP-1 retains its physiologic role, it is not the cause of the amelioration of glucose tolerance or sustained weight loss after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or sleeve gastrectomy. It is unlikely that "medical metabolic surgery" will be based on a single component. Importantly, the scrutiny of GLP-1 as candidate has taught us studies beyond association are required to thoroughly assess whether any of the additionally proposed mediators should be part of the cocktail of factors that could medically mimic metabolic surgery. PMID:27313195

  10. Autocrine selection of a GLP-1R G-protein biased agonist with potent antidiabetic effects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongkai; Sturchler, Emmanuel; Zhu, Jiang; Nieto, Ainhoa; Cistrone, Philip A.; Xie, Jia; He, LinLing; Yea, Kyungmoo; Jones, Teresa; Turn, Rachel; Di Stefano, Peter S.; Griffin, Patrick R.; Dawson, Philip E.; McDonald, Patricia H.; Lerner, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP-1R) agonists have emerged as treatment options for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). GLP-1R signals through G-protein-dependent, and G-protein-independent pathways by engaging the scaffold protein β-arrestin; preferential signalling of ligands through one or the other of these branches is known as ‘ligand bias'. Here we report the discovery of the potent and selective GLP-1R G-protein-biased agonist, P5. We identified P5 in a high-throughput autocrine-based screening of large combinatorial peptide libraries, and show that P5 promotes G-protein signalling comparable to GLP-1 and Exendin-4, but exhibited a significantly reduced β-arrestin response. Preclinical studies using different mouse models of T2DM demonstrate that P5 is a weak insulin secretagogue. Nevertheless, chronic treatment of diabetic mice with P5 increased adipogenesis, reduced adipose tissue inflammation as well as hepatic steatosis and was more effective at correcting hyperglycaemia and lowering haemoglobin A1c levels than Exendin-4, suggesting that GLP-1R G-protein-biased agonists may provide a novel therapeutic approach to T2DM. PMID:26621478

  11. [Cardiovascular effects of GLP-1 receptor agonist treatment: focus on liraglutide].

    PubMed

    Haluzík, Martin; Trachta, Pavel; Mráz, Miloš

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular risk reduction is the major aim of type 2 diabetes mellitus treatment. The effects of various antidiabetics on the cardiovascular complications are currently under careful scrutiny. Incretin-based therapy that utilizes the effects of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) or stimulation of its receptor by GLP-1 receptor agonists represents one of the most promising approaches from the potential cardiovascular risk reduction point of view. Experimental studies have shown that the GLP-1 and GLP-1 agonists treatment improves endothelial function, decrease blood pressure and protects myocardium during experimentally-induced ischemia. Clinical studies with GLP-1 receptor agonists consistently show that, in addition to good antidiabetic efficacy, its long-term administration decreases blood pressure, body weight and improves circulating lipid levels while slightly increasing heart rate. In this paper, we focus on the cardiovascular effects of GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide. Preliminary analyses of cardiovascular complications in phase III trials with liraglutide indicate its good cardiovascular safety. A possibility of cardioprotective effects of liraglutide remains still open and is currently studied within a prospective cardiovascular trial LEADER. PMID:26375689

  12. GLP-1/glucagon coagonism restores leptin responsiveness in obese mice chronically maintained on an obesogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Clemmensen, Christoffer; Chabenne, Joseph; Finan, Brian; Sullivan, Lorraine; Fischer, Katrin; Küchler, Daniela; Sehrer, Laura; Ograjsek, Teja; Hofmann, Susanna M; Schriever, Sonja C; Pfluger, Paul T; Pinkstaff, Jason; Tschöp, Matthias H; Dimarchi, Richard; Müller, Timo D

    2014-04-01

    We recently reported restoration of leptin responsiveness in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice using a pharmacologically optimized, polyethylene-glycolated (PEG)-leptin analog in combination with exendin-4 or FGF21. However, the return of leptin action required discontinuation of high-fat diet (HFD) exposure. Here we assess whether a single peptide possessing balanced coagonism at the glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucagon receptors can restore leptin responsiveness in DIO mice maintained on a HFD. DIO mice were treated with PEG-GLP-1/glucagon (30 nmol/kg every fourth day) to induce an ∼15% body weight loss, upon which they were randomized to continue PEG-GLP-1/glucagon therapy or reassigned to receive supplemental daily PEG-leptin (185 nmol/kg/day). The addition of PEG-leptin to PEG-GLP-1/glucagon resulted in an ∼18% greater weight loss as compared with PEG-GLP-1/glucagon alone and was accompanied by further decreases in food intake and improved glucose and lipid metabolism. The beneficial effect of PEG-leptin supplementation occurred after an initial body weight loss similar to what we previously reported following reduced dietary fat along with PEG-leptin and exendin-4 or FGF21 cotreatment. In summary, we report that GLP-1/glucagon coagonism restores leptin responsiveness in mice maintained on a HFD, thus emphasizing the translational value of this polypharmacotherapy for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. PMID:24379349

  13. [Cardiovascular effects of GLP-1 receptor agonist treatment: focus on liraglutide].

    PubMed

    Haluzík, Martin; Trachta, Pavel; Mráz, Miloš

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular risk reduction is the major aim of type 2 diabetes mellitus treatment. The effects of various antidiabetics on the cardiovascular complications are currently under careful scrutiny. Incretin-based therapy that utilizes the effects of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) or stimulation of its receptor by GLP-1 receptor agonists represents one of the most promising approaches from the potential cardiovascular risk reduction point of view. Experimental studies have shown that the GLP-1 and GLP-1 agonists treatment improves endothelial function, decrease blood pressure and protects myocardium during experimentally-induced ischemia. Clinical studies with GLP-1 receptor agonists consistently show that, in addition to good antidiabetic efficacy, its long-term administration decreases blood pressure, body weight and improves circulating lipid levels while slightly increasing heart rate. In this paper, we focus on the cardiovascular effects of GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide. Preliminary analyses of cardiovascular complications in phase III trials with liraglutide indicate its good cardiovascular safety. A possibility of cardioprotective effects of liraglutide remains still open and is currently studied within a prospective cardiovascular trial LEADER.

  14. Influence of GLP-1 on Myocardial Glucose Metabolism in Healthy Men during Normo- or Hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Gejl, Michael; Lerche, Susanne; Mengel, Annette; Møller, Niels; Bibby, Bo Martin; Smidt, Kamille; Brock, Birgitte; Søndergaard, Hanne; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Gjedde, Albert; Holst, Jens Juul; Hansen, Søren Baarsgaard; Rungby, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) may provide beneficial cardiovascular effects, possibly due to enhanced myocardial energetic efficiency by increasing myocardial glucose uptake (MGU). We assessed the effects of GLP-1 on MGU in healthy subjects during normo- and hypoglycemia. Materials and Methods We included eighteen healthy men in two randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled cross-over studies. MGU was assessed with GLP-1 or saline infusion during pituitary-pancreatic normo- (plasma glucose (PG): 4.5 mM, n = 10) and hypoglycemic clamps (PG: 3.0 mM, n = 8) by positron emission tomography with 18fluoro-deoxy-glucose (18F-FDG) as tracer. Results In the normoglycemia study mean (± SD) age was 25±3 years, and BMI was 22.6±0.6 kg/m2 and in the hypoglycemia study the mean age was 23±2 years with a mean body mass index of 23±2 kg/m2. GLP-1 did not change MGU during normoglycemia (mean (+/− SD) 0.15+/−0.04 and 0.16+/−0.03 µmol/g/min, P = 0.46) or during hypoglycemia (0.16+/−0.03 and 0.13+/−0.04 µmol/g/min, P = 0.14). However, the effect of GLP-1 on MGU was negatively correlated to baseline MGU both during normo- and hypoglycemia, (P = 0.006, r2 = 0.64 and P = 0.018, r2 = 0.64, respectively) and changes in MGU correlated positively with the level of insulin resistance (HOMA 2IR) during hypoglycemia, P = 0.04, r2 = 0.54. GLP-1 mediated an increase in circulating glucagon levels at PG levels below 3.5 mM and increased glucose infusion rates during the hypoglycemia study. No differences in other circulating hormones or metabolites were found. Conclusions While GLP-1 does not affect overall MGU, GLP-1 induces changes in MGU dependent on baseline MGU such that GLP-1 increases MGU in subjects with low baseline MGU and decreases MGU in subjects with high baseline MGU. GLP-1 preserves MGU during hypoglycemia in insulin resistant subjects. ClinicalTrials.gov registration numbers: NCT00418288

  15. Basal-Supported Oral Therapy with Sitagliptin Counteracts Rebound Hyperglycemia Caused by GLP-1 Tachyphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Meguro, Shu; Kawai, Toshihide; Matsuhashi, Tomohiro; Sano, Motoaki; Fukuda, Keiichi; Itoh, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Treatment with a glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) analog fails in some patients due to rebound hyperglycemia caused by tachyphylaxis (GLP-1 tachyphylaxis). We investigated the efficacy of basal-supported oral therapy (BOT) with insulin glargine and sitagliptin for counteracting GLP-1 tachyphylaxis. Materials and Methods. The subjects were 12 men and 3 women aged 59.9 ± 10.0 years who had been treated with GLP-1 analogs. All of them had developed rebound hyperglycemia caused by GLP-1 tachyphylaxis. Their GLP-1 analog-based therapy was switched to BOT with insulin glargine plus sitagliptin and other medications. The primary outcomes were whether switching of therapy was associated with a change of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and whether weight gain occurred. Results. Baseline HbA1c was 8.0 ± 0.9%. It decreased to 7.3 ± 0.9% at 3 months after switching (P < 0.01) and to 7.2 ± 0.9% at 4 months (P < 0.05). Weight gain was 1.1 kg after 1 month (P < 0.01) and 2.3 kg after 5 months (P < 0.01). Conclusion. Switching to BOT with insulin glargine and sitagliptin improved glycemic control. The significant decrease of HbA1c demonstrated that this combination can counteract deterioration of glycemic control due to rebound hyperglycemia secondary to GLP-1 tachyphylaxis. However, weight gain remains a problem.

  16. Combination therapy with GLP-1 receptor agonists and basal insulin: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Balena, R; Hensley, I E; Miller, S; Barnett, A H

    2013-01-01

    Treatment algorithms for type 2 diabetes call for intensification of therapy over time as the disease progresses and glycaemic control worsens. If diet, exercise and oral antihyperglycaemic medications (OAMs) fail to maintain glycaemic control then basal insulin is added and ultimately prandial insulin may be required. However, such an intensification strategy carries risk of increased hypoglycaemia and weight gain, both of which are associated with worse long-term outcomes. An alternative strategy is to intensify therapy by the addition of a short-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist (GLP-1 RA) rather than prandial insulin. Short-acting GLP-1 RAs such as exenatide twice daily are particularly effective at reducing postprandial glucose while basal insulin has a greater effect on fasting glucose, providing a physiological rationale for this complementary approach. This review analyzes the latest randomized controlled clinical trials of insulin/GLP-1 RA combination therapy and examines results from ‘real-world’ use of the combinations as reported through observational and clinical practice studies. The most common finding across all types of studies was that combination therapy improved glycaemic control without weight gain or an increased risk of hypoglycaemia. Many studies reported weight loss and a reduction in insulin use when a GLP-1 RA was added to existing insulin therapy. Overall, the relative degree of benefit to glycaemic control and weight was influenced by the insulin titration employed in conjunction with the GLP-1 RA. The greatest glycaemic benefits were observed in studies with structured titration of insulin to glycaemic targets while the greatest weight benefits were observed in studies with a protocol-specified focus on insulin sparing. The adverse event profile of GLP-1 RAs in the reviewed trials was similar to that reported with GLP-1 RAs as monotherapy or in combination with OAMs with gastrointestinal events being the most commonly

  17. Metformin ameliorates lipotoxicity-induced mesangial cell apoptosis partly via upregulation of glucagon like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R).

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-il; Park, Min-jung; Heo, Young-ran; Park, Soo-hyun

    2015-10-15

    Glucagon like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R), known to be expressed in pancreatic beta cells, is also expressed in glomerular mesangial cells and its agonist has protective effects in diabetic nephropathy. However, its regulatory mechanisms by lipotoxicity in glomerular mesangial cells are not understood. We found that palmitate-mediated lipotoxicity increased apoptosis and decreased GLP-1R expression in a rat mesangial cell line. Silencing GLP-1R expression also increased mesangial cell apoptosis. Interestingly, metformin, one of the biguanide drugs that has anti-diabetic effects, attenuated lipotoxicity-induced mesangial cell apoptosis and restored GLP-1R expression. Moreover, this treatment alleviated GLP-1R knockdown-induced mesangial cell apoptosis. To further evaluate in vivo, diabetic obese db/db mice were administered metformin. Glomerular GLP-1R expression was diminished in db/db mice, as compared with db/m control mice. However, this decrease significantly recovered on metformin administration. Together, these data provide novel evidence that lipotoxicity decreases the mesangial GLP-1R expression in intact cells and in vivo. The decrease induced mesangial cell apoptosis. Furthermore, we provided the evidence that metformin treatment has a renal protective effect partly via increased mesangial GLP-1R expression. Our data suggested that regulation of GLP-1R expression could be a promising approach to treat diabetic nephropathy and the novel mechanism of metformin mediated GLP-1R regulation.

  18. Proglucagon Promoter Cre-Mediated AMPK Deletion in Mice Increases Circulating GLP-1 Levels and Oral Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Sayers, Sophie R.; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M.; Parker, Helen; Zac-Varghese, Sagen; Bloom, Stephen R.; Foretz, Marc; Viollet, Benoit; Rutter, Guy A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Enteroendocrine L-cells synthesise and release the gut hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) in response to food transit. Deletion of the tumour suppressor kinase LKB1 from proglucagon-expressing cells leads to the generation of intestinal polyps but no change in circulating GLP-1 levels. Here, we explore the role of the downstream kinase AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in these cells. Method Loss of AMPK from proglucagon-expressing cells was achieved using a preproglucagon promoter-driven Cre (iGluCre) to catalyse recombination of floxed alleles of AMPKα1 and α2. Oral and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance were measured using standard protocols. L-cell mass was measured by immunocytochemistry. Hormone and peptide levels were measured by electrochemical-based luminescence detection or radioimmunoassay. Results Recombination with iGluCre led to efficient deletion of AMPK from intestinal L- and pancreatic alpha-cells. In contrast to mice rendered null for LKB1 using the same strategy, mice deleted for AMPK displayed an increase (WT: 0.05 ± 0.01, KO: 0.09±0.02%, p<0.01) in L-cell mass and elevated plasma fasting (WT: 5.62 ± 0.800 pg/ml, KO: 14.5 ± 1.870, p<0.01) and fed (WT: 15.7 ± 1.48pg/ml, KO: 22.0 ± 6.62, p<0.01) GLP-1 levels. Oral, but not intraperitoneal, glucose tolerance was significantly improved by AMPK deletion, whilst insulin and glucagon levels were unchanged despite an increase in alpha to beta cell ratio (WT: 0.23 ± 0.02, KO: 0.33 ± 0.03, p<0.01). Conclusion AMPK restricts L-cell growth and GLP-1 secretion to suppress glucose tolerance. Targeted inhibition of AMPK in L-cells may thus provide a new therapeutic strategy in some forms of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27010458

  19. Minor Contribution of Endogenous GLP-1 and GLP-2 to Postprandial Lipemia in Obese Men

    PubMed Central

    Matikainen, Niina; Björnson, Elias; Söderlund, Sanni; Borén, Christofer; Eliasson, Björn; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Bogl, Leonie H.; Hakkarainen, Antti; Lundbom, Nina; Rivellese, Angela; Riccardi, Gabriele; Després, Jean-Pierre; Alméras, Natalie; Holst, Jens Juul; Deacon, Carolyn F.; Borén, Jan; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta

    2016-01-01

    Context Glucose and lipids stimulate the gut-hormones glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1, GLP-2 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) but the effect of these on human postprandial lipid metabolism is not fully clarified. Objective To explore the responses of GLP-1, GLP-2 and GIP after a fat-rich meal compared to the same responses after an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and to investigate possible relationships between incretin response and triglyceride-rich lipoprotein (TRL) response to a fat-rich meal. Design Glucose, insulin, GLP-1, GLP-2 and GIP were measured after an OGTT and after a fat-rich meal in 65 healthy obese (BMI 26.5–40.2 kg/m2) male subjects. Triglycerides (TG), apoB48 and apoB100 in TG-rich lipoproteins (chylomicrons, VLDL1 and VLDL2) were measured after the fat-rich meal. Main Outcome Measures Postprandial responses (area under the curve, AUC) for glucose, insulin, GLP-1, GLP-2, GIP in plasma, and TG, apoB48 and apoB100 in plasma and TG-rich lipoproteins. Results The GLP-1, GLP-2 and GIP responses after the fat-rich meal and after the OGTT correlated strongly (r = 0.73, p<0.0001; r = 0.46, p<0.001 and r = 0.69, p<0.001, respectively). Glucose and insulin AUCs were lower, but the AUCs for GLP-1, GLP-2 and GIP were significantly higher after the fat-rich meal than after the OGTT. The peak value for all hormones appeared at 120 minutes after the fat-rich meal, compared to 30 minutes after the OGTT. After the fat-rich meal, the AUCs for GLP-1, GLP-2 and GIP correlated significantly with plasma TG- and apoB48 AUCs but the contribution was very modest. Conclusions In obese males, GLP-1, GLP-2 and GIP responses to a fat-rich meal are greater than following an OGTT. However, the most important explanatory variable for postprandial TG excursion was fasting triglycerides. The contribution of endogenous GLP-1, GLP-2 and GIP to explaining the variance in postprandial TG excursion was minor. PMID:26752550

  20. A clinical review of GLP-1 receptor agonists: efficacy and safety in diabetes and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Prasad-Reddy, Lalita; Isaacs, Diana

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing at an astounding rate. Many of the agents used to treat type 2 diabetes have undesirable adverse effects of hypoglycemia and weight gain. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists represent a unique approach to the treatment of diabetes, with benefits extending outside glucose control, including positive effects on weight, blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and beta-cell function. They mimic the effects of the incretin hormone GLP-1, which is released from the intestine in response to food intake. Their effects include increasing insulin secretion, decreasing glucagon release, increasing satiety, and slowing gastric emptying. There are currently four approved GLP-1 receptor agonists in the United States: exenatide, liraglutide, albiglutide, and dulaglutide. A fifth agent, lixisenatide, is available in Europe. There are important pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic, and clinical differences of each agent. The most common adverse effects seen with GLP-1 therapy include nausea, vomiting, and injection-site reactions. Other warnings and precautions include pancreatitis and thyroid cell carcinomas. GLP-1 receptor agonists are an innovative and effective option to improve blood glucose control, with other potential benefits of preserving beta-cell function, weight loss, and increasing insulin sensitivity. Once-weekly formulations may also improve patient adherence. Overall, these are effective agents for patients with type 2 diabetes, who are either uncontrolled on metformin or intolerant to metformin. PMID:26213556

  1. Effects of the GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Dulaglutide on the Structure of the Exocrine Pancreas of Cynomolgus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Vahle, John L; Byrd, Richard A; Blackbourne, Jamie L; Martin, Jennifer A; Sorden, Steven D; Ryan, Thomas; Pienkowski, Thomas; Rosol, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Klöppel, Günter

    2015-10-01

    Clinical and nonclinical studies have implicated glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist therapy as a risk factor for acute pancreatitis in patients with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, it is critical to understand the effect that dulaglutide, an approved GLP-1 receptor agonist, has on the exocrine pancreas. Dulaglutide 8.15 mg/kg (approximately 500 times the maximum recommended human dose based on plasma exposure) was administered twice weekly for 12 months to cynomolgus monkeys. Serum amylase and lipase activities were measured and 6 sections of each pancreas were examined microscopically. Ductal epithelial cell proliferation was estimated using Ki67 labeling. Dulaglutide administration did not alter serum amylase or lipase activities measured at the end of treatment compared to control values. An extensive histologic evaluation of the pancreas revealed no changes in the acinar or endocrine portions and no evidence of pancreatitis, necrosis, or pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia. An increase in goblet cells noted in 4 of the 19 treated monkeys was considered an effect of dulaglutide but was not associated with dilation, blockage, or accumulation of mucin in the pancreatic duct. There was no difference in cell proliferation in ductal epithelium between control and dulaglutide-treated monkeys. These data reveal that chronic dosing of nondiabetic primates with dulaglutide does not induce inflammatory or preneoplastic changes in exocrine pancreas.

  2. The extra-pancreatic effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists: a focus on the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and central nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Seufert, J; Gallwitz, B

    2014-08-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) exenatide, liraglutide and lixisenatide have been shown to improve glycaemic control and beta-cell function with a low risk of hypoglycaemia in people with type 2 diabetes. GLP-1 receptors are also expressed in extra-pancreatic tissues and trial data suggest that GLP-1RAs also have effects beyond their glycaemic actions. Preclinical studies using native GLP-1 or GLP-1RAs provide substantial evidence for cardioprotective effects, while clinical trial data have shown beneficial actions on hypertension and dyslipidaemia in people with type 2 diabetes. Significant weight loss has been reported with GLP-1RAs in both people with type 2 diabetes and obese people without diabetes. GLP-1RAs also slow down gastric emptying, but preclinical data suggest that the main mechanism behind GLP-1RA-induced weight loss is more likely to involve their effects on appetite signalling in the brain. GLP-1RAs have also been shown to exert a neuroprotective role in rodent models of stroke, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. These extra-pancreatic effects of GLP-1RAs could provide multi-factorial benefits to people with type 2 diabetes. Potential adverse effects of GLP-1RA treatment are usually manageable but may include gastrointestinal effects, increased heart rate and renal injury. While extensive further research is still required, early data suggest that GLP-1RAs may also have the potential to favourably impact cardiovascular disease, obesity or neurological disorders in people without diabetes in the future.

  3. Mechanisms of surgical control of type 2 diabetes: GLP-1 is the key factor-Maybe.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Marzieh; D'Alessio, David A

    2016-07-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for obesity and diabetes. The 2 most commonly performed weight-loss procedures, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and sleeve gastrectomy, improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes independent of weight loss. One of the early hypotheses raised to explain the immediate antidiabetic effect of RYGB was that rapid delivery of nutrients from the stomach pouch into the distal small intestine enhances enteroinsular signaling to promote insulin signaling. Given the tenfold increase in postmeal glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) response compared to unchanged integrated levels of postprandial glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide after RYGB, enhanced meal-induced insulin secretion after this procedure was thought to be the result of elevated glucose and GLP-1 levels. In this contribution to the larger point-counterpoint debate about the role of GLP-1 after bariatric surgery, most of the focus will be on RYGB. PMID:27568473

  4. Intestinal GLP-1 and satiation: from man to rodents and back.

    PubMed

    Steinert, R E; Beglinger, C; Langhans, W

    2016-02-01

    In response to luminal food stimuli during meals, enteroendocrine cells release gastrointestinal (GI) peptides that have long been known to control secretory and motor functions of the gut, pancreas and liver. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has emerged as one of the most important GI peptides because of a combination of functions not previously ascribed to any other molecule. GLP-1 potentiates glucose-induced insulin secretion, suppresses glucagon release, slows gastric emptying and may serve as a satiation signal, although the physiological status of the latter function has not been fully established yet. Here we review the available evidence for intestinal GLP-1 to fulfill a number of established empirical criteria for assessing whether a hormone inhibits eating by eliciting physiological satiation in man and rodents.

  5. Insulin and GLP-1 infusions demonstrate the onset of adipose-specific insulin resistance in a large fasting mammal: potential glucogenic role for GLP-1.

    PubMed

    Viscarra, Jose A; Rodriguez, Ruben; Vazquez-Medina, Jose Pablo; Lee, Andrew; Tift, Michael S; Tavoni, Stephen K; Crocker, Daniel E; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2013-08-01

    Prolonged food deprivation increases lipid oxidation and utilization, which may contribute to the onset of the insulin resistance associated with fasting. Because insulin resistance promotes the preservation of glucose and oxidation of fat, it has been suggested to be an adaptive response to food deprivation. However, fasting mammals exhibit hypoinsulinemia, suggesting that the insulin resistance-like conditions they experience may actually result from reduced pancreatic sensitivity to glucose/capacity to secrete insulin. To determine whether fasting results in insulin resistance or in pancreatic dysfunction, we infused early- and late-fasted seals (naturally adapted to prolonged fasting) with insulin (0.065 U/kg), and a separate group of late-fasted seals with low (10 pM/kg) or high (100 pM/kg) dosages of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) immediately following a glucose bolus (0.5g/kg), and measured the systemic and cellular responses. Because GLP-1 facilitates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, these infusions provide a method to assess pancreatic insulin-secreting capacity. Insulin infusions increased the phosphorylation of insulin receptor and Akt in adipose and muscle of early and late fasted seals; however the timing of the signaling response was blunted in adipose of late fasted seals. Despite the dose-dependent increases in insulin and increased glucose clearance (high dose), both GLP-1 dosages produced increases in plasma cortisol and glucagon, which may have contributed to the glucogenic role of GLP-1. Results suggest that fasting induces adipose-specific insulin resistance in elephant seal pups, while maintaining skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity, and therefore suggests that the onset of insulin resistance in fasting mammals is an evolved response to cope with prolonged food deprivation. PMID:23997935

  6. Effects of endogenous GLP-1 and GIP on glucose tolerance after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Svane, Maria S; Bojsen-Møller, Kirstine N; Nielsen, Signe; Jørgensen, Nils B; Dirksen, Carsten; Bendtsen, Flemming; Kristiansen, Viggo B; Hartmann, Bolette; Holst, Jens J; Madsbad, Sten

    2016-04-01

    Exaggerated secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is important for postprandial glucose tolerance after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), whereas the role of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) remains to be resolved. We aimed to explore the relative importance of endogenously secreted GLP-1 and GIP on glucose tolerance and β-cell function after RYGB. We used DPP-4 inhibition to enhance concentrations of intact GIP and GLP-1 and the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin-(9-39) (Ex-9) for specific blockage of GLP-1 actions. Twelve glucose-tolerant patients were studied after RYGB in a randomized, placebo-controlled, 4-day crossover study with standard mixed-meal tests and concurrent administration of placebo, oral sitagliptin, Ex-9 infusion, or combined Ex-9-sitagliptin. GLP-1 receptor antagonism increased glucose excursions, clearly attenuated β-cell function, and aggravated postprandial hyperglucagonemia compared with placebo, whereas sitagliptin had no effect despite two- to threefold increased concentrations of intact GLP-1 and GIP. Similarly, sitagliptin did not affect glucose tolerance or β-cell function during GLP-1R blockage. This study confirms the importance of GLP-1 for glucose tolerance after RYGB via increased insulin and attenuated glucagon secretion in the postprandial state, whereas amplification of the GIP signal (or other DPP-4-sensitive glucose-lowering mechanisms) did not appear to contribute to the improved glucose tolerance seen after RYGB. PMID:26786780

  7. High fat diet and GLP-1 drugs induce pancreatic injury in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Rouse, Rodney Xu, Lin; Stewart, Sharron; Zhang, Jun

    2014-04-15

    Glucagon Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) drugs are currently used to treat type-2 diabetes. Safety concerns for increased risk of pancreatitis and pancreatic ductal metaplasia have accompanied these drugs. High fat diet (HFD) is a type-2 diabetes risk factor that may affect the response to GLP-1 drug treatment. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of diet and GLP-1 based drugs on the exocrine pancreas in mice. Experiments were designed in a mouse model of insulin resistance created by feeding a HFD or standard diet (STD) for 6 weeks. The GLP-1 drugs, sitagliptin (SIT) and exenatide (EXE) were administered once daily for additional 6 weeks in both mice fed HFD or STD. The results showed that body weight, blood glucose levels, and serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, IL-1β, and KC) were significantly greater in HFD mice than in STD mice regardless of GLP-1 drug treatment. The semi-quantitative grading showed that pancreatic changes were significantly greater in EXE and SIT-treated mice compared to control and that HFD exacerbated spontaneous exocrine pancreatic changes seen in saline-treated mice on a standard diet. Exocrine pancreatic changes identified in this study included acinar cell injury (hypertrophy, autophagy, apoptosis, necrosis, and atrophy), vascular injury, interstitial edema and inflammation, fat necrosis, and duct changes. These findings support HFD as a risk factor to increased susceptibility/severity for acute pancreatitis and indicate that GLP-1 drugs cause pancreatic injury that can be exacerbated in a HFD environment.

  8. The Improvement of Hyperglycemia after RYGB Surgery in Diabetic Rats Is Related to Elevated Hypothalamus GLP-1 Receptor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zynat, Jazyra; Guo, Yuyu; Lu, Yingli

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to explore the expression of GLP-1 receptor in hypothalamus and gastrointestinal tissues after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery in diabetic rats. Methods. Male 12-week-old Wistar rats (control) and Goto-Kakizaki rats (diabetic) were randomly divided into two groups, respectively: control sham surgery group (C), control RYGB group (C + R), diabetic sham surgery group (D), and diabetic RYGB group (D + R). Body weight and blood glucose were monitored before and after surgery every week. Eight weeks after surgery, all rats were sacrificed and the serum fasting GLP-1 concentrations were measured by ELISA. GLP-1R and DPP-4 expression in hypothalamus and ileum were measured by RT-PCR. Results. The body weight and fasting/random blood glucose in the D + R group decreased significantly compared with the D group (P < 0.05). Serum GLP-1 levels in diabetic rats treated with RYGB were higher than the corresponding sham surgery rats. The expression of GLP-1R of hypothalamus in RYGB-treated diabetic rats was significantly higher than those of the sham surgery diabetic rats and both control group rats (P < 0.05). We found a negative correlation between hypothalamus GLP-1R mRNA and blood glucose level. No significant difference was seen in ileum GLP-1R and DPP-4 expression among all groups. Conclusions. RYGB efficiently promoted serum GLP-1 levels and the expression of GLP-1 receptor in the hypothalamus in diabetic rats. These data suggest that the hypothalamus GLP-1R may play an important role in the GLP-1 system for improving glucose homeostasis after reconstruction of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27648071

  9. The Improvement of Hyperglycemia after RYGB Surgery in Diabetic Rats Is Related to Elevated Hypothalamus GLP-1 Receptor Expression.

    PubMed

    Zynat, Jazyra; Guo, Yuyu; Lu, Yingli; Lin, Dongping

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to explore the expression of GLP-1 receptor in hypothalamus and gastrointestinal tissues after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery in diabetic rats. Methods. Male 12-week-old Wistar rats (control) and Goto-Kakizaki rats (diabetic) were randomly divided into two groups, respectively: control sham surgery group (C), control RYGB group (C + R), diabetic sham surgery group (D), and diabetic RYGB group (D + R). Body weight and blood glucose were monitored before and after surgery every week. Eight weeks after surgery, all rats were sacrificed and the serum fasting GLP-1 concentrations were measured by ELISA. GLP-1R and DPP-4 expression in hypothalamus and ileum were measured by RT-PCR. Results. The body weight and fasting/random blood glucose in the D + R group decreased significantly compared with the D group (P < 0.05). Serum GLP-1 levels in diabetic rats treated with RYGB were higher than the corresponding sham surgery rats. The expression of GLP-1R of hypothalamus in RYGB-treated diabetic rats was significantly higher than those of the sham surgery diabetic rats and both control group rats (P < 0.05). We found a negative correlation between hypothalamus GLP-1R mRNA and blood glucose level. No significant difference was seen in ileum GLP-1R and DPP-4 expression among all groups. Conclusions. RYGB efficiently promoted serum GLP-1 levels and the expression of GLP-1 receptor in the hypothalamus in diabetic rats. These data suggest that the hypothalamus GLP-1R may play an important role in the GLP-1 system for improving glucose homeostasis after reconstruction of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27648071

  10. The Improvement of Hyperglycemia after RYGB Surgery in Diabetic Rats Is Related to Elevated Hypothalamus GLP-1 Receptor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zynat, Jazyra; Guo, Yuyu; Lu, Yingli

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to explore the expression of GLP-1 receptor in hypothalamus and gastrointestinal tissues after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery in diabetic rats. Methods. Male 12-week-old Wistar rats (control) and Goto-Kakizaki rats (diabetic) were randomly divided into two groups, respectively: control sham surgery group (C), control RYGB group (C + R), diabetic sham surgery group (D), and diabetic RYGB group (D + R). Body weight and blood glucose were monitored before and after surgery every week. Eight weeks after surgery, all rats were sacrificed and the serum fasting GLP-1 concentrations were measured by ELISA. GLP-1R and DPP-4 expression in hypothalamus and ileum were measured by RT-PCR. Results. The body weight and fasting/random blood glucose in the D + R group decreased significantly compared with the D group (P < 0.05). Serum GLP-1 levels in diabetic rats treated with RYGB were higher than the corresponding sham surgery rats. The expression of GLP-1R of hypothalamus in RYGB-treated diabetic rats was significantly higher than those of the sham surgery diabetic rats and both control group rats (P < 0.05). We found a negative correlation between hypothalamus GLP-1R mRNA and blood glucose level. No significant difference was seen in ileum GLP-1R and DPP-4 expression among all groups. Conclusions. RYGB efficiently promoted serum GLP-1 levels and the expression of GLP-1 receptor in the hypothalamus in diabetic rats. These data suggest that the hypothalamus GLP-1R may play an important role in the GLP-1 system for improving glucose homeostasis after reconstruction of the gastrointestinal tract.

  11. Dual elimination of the glucagon and GLP-1 receptors in mice reveals plasticity in the incretin axis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Safina; Lamont, Benjamin J; Charron, Maureen J; Drucker, Daniel J

    2011-05-01

    Disordered glucagon secretion contributes to the symptoms of diabetes, and reduced glucagon action is known to improve glucose homeostasis. In mice, genetic deletion of the glucagon receptor (Gcgr) results in increased levels of the insulinotropic hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), which may contribute to the alterations in glucose homeostasis observed in Gcgr-/- mice. Here, we assessed the contribution of GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) signaling to the phenotype of Gcgr-/- mice by generating Gcgr-/-Glp1r-/- mice. Although insulin sensitivity was similar in all genotypes, fasting glucose was increased in Gcgr-/-Glp1r-/- mice. Elimination of the Glp1r normalized gastric emptying and impaired intraperitoneal glucose tolerance in Gcgr-/- mice. Unexpectedly, deletion of Glp1r in Gcgr-/- mice did not alter the improved oral glucose tolerance and increased insulin secretion characteristic of that genotype. Although Gcgr-/-Glp1r-/- islets exhibited increased sensitivity to the incretin glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), mice lacking both Glp1r and the GIP receptor (Gipr) maintained preservation of the enteroinsular axis following reduction of Gcgr signaling. Moreover, Gcgr-/-Glp1r-/- islets expressed increased levels of the cholecystokinin A receptor (Cckar) and G protein-coupled receptor 119 (Gpr119) mRNA transcripts, and Gcgr-/-Glp1r-/- mice exhibited increased sensitivity to exogenous CCK and the GPR119 agonist AR231453. Our data reveal extensive functional plasticity in the enteroinsular axis via induction of compensatory mechanisms that control nutrient-dependent regulation of insulin secretion. PMID:21540554

  12. Choosing between GLP-1 Receptor Agonists and DPP-4 Inhibitors: A Pharmacological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Dominique Xavier; Evans, Marc

    2012-01-01

    In recent years the incretin therapies have provided a new treatment option for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The incretin therapies focus on the increasing levels of the two incretin hormones, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP). This results in increased glucose dependent insulin synthesis and release. GLP-1 receptor agonists such as liraglutide and exenatide exert an intrinsic biological effect on GLP-1 receptors directly stimulating the release of insulin from pancreatic beta cells. DPP-4 inhibitors such as sitagliptin and linagliptin prevent the inactivation of endogenous GLP-1 and GIP through competitive inhibition of the DPP-4 enzyme. Both incretin therapies have good safety and tolerability profiles and interact minimally with a number of medications commonly prescribed in T2DM. This paper focuses on the pharmacological basis by which the incretin therapies function and how this knowledge can inform and benefit clinical decisions. Each individual incretin agent has benefits and pitfalls relating to aspects such as glycaemic and nonglycaemic efficacy, safety and tolerability, ease of administration, and cost. Overall, a personalized medicine approach has been found to be favourable, tailoring the incretin agent to benefit and suit patient's needs such as renal impairment (RI) or hepatic impairment (HI). PMID:23125920

  13. Preproglucagon derived peptides GLP-1, GLP-2 and oxyntomodulin in the CNS: role of peripherally secreted and centrally produced peptides.

    PubMed

    Vrang, Niels; Larsen, Philip Just

    2010-11-01

    The scientific understanding of preproglucagon derived peptides has provided people with type 2 diabetes with two novel classes of glucose lowering agents, the dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitors and GLP-1 receptor agonists. For the scientists, the novel GLP-1 agonists, and DPP-IV inhibitors have evolved as useful tools to understand the role of the preproglucagon derived peptides in normal physiology and disease. However, the overwhelming interest attracted by GLP-1 analogues as potent incretins has somewhat clouded the efforts to understand the importance of preproglucagon derived peptides in other physiological contexts. In particular, our neurobiological understanding of the preproglucagon expressing neuronal pathways in the central nervous system as well as the degree to which central GLP-1 receptors are targeted by peripherally administered GLP-1 receptor agonists is still fairly limited. The role of GLP-1 as an anorectic neurotransmitter is well recognized, but clarification of the neuronal targets and physiological basis of this response is further warranted, as is the mapping of GLP-1 sensitive neurons involved in a variety of neuroendocrine and behavioral responses. Further recent evidence points to GLP-1 as a central neuropeptide with neuroprotective capabilities potentially mitigating a wide array of neurodegenerative conditions. It is the aim of the present review to summarize our current understanding of preproglucagon derived peptides as neurotransmitters in the central nervous system.

  14. Functional domains of LAG-2, a putative signaling ligand for LIN-12 and GLP-1 receptors in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, S T; Gao, D; Christensen, S; Kimble, J

    1997-01-01

    The LAG-2 membrane protein is a putative signaling ligand for the LIN-12 and GLP-1 receptors of Caenorhabditis elegans. LAG-2, like its Drosophila homologues Delta and Serrate, acts in a conserved signal transduction pathway to regulate cell fates during development. In this article, we investigate the functional domains of LAG-2. For the most part, mutants were constructed in vitro and assayed for activity in transgenic animals. We find a functional role for all major regions except one. Within the extracellular domain, the N-terminal region, which bears no known motif, and the DSL domain are both required. By contrast, the region bearing epidermal growth factor-like repeats can be deleted with no apparent reduction in rescuing activity. The intracellular region is not required for activity but instead plays a role in down-regulating LAG-2 function. Finally, membrane association is critical for mutant rescue. Images PMID:9307971

  15. β-Cell Sensitivity to GLP-1 in Healthy Humans Is Variable and Proportional to Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Aulinger, Benedikt A.; Vahl, Torsten P.; Wilson-Pérez, Hilary E.; Prigeon, Ron L.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an insulinotropic factor made in the gastrointestinal tract that is essential for normal glucose tolerance. Infusion of GLP-1 increases insulin secretion in both diabetic and nondiabetic humans. However, the degree to which people vary in their β-cell sensitivity to GLP-1 and the factors contributing to this variability have not been reported. Objective: The objective was to measure the sensitivity of insulin secretion to GLP-1 in cohorts of lean and obese subjects across a broad range of insulin sensitivity. Methods: Insulin secretion was measured during clamped hyperglycemia (7.2 mmol/L) and graded GLP-1 infusion in young, healthy subjects, and GLP-1 sensitivity was computed from the insulin secretion rate (ISR) during progressive increases in plasma GLP-1. Results: All subjects had fasting glucose values <5.2 mm. The obese subjects were insulin resistant compared to the lean group (homeostasis model of assessment 2 for insulin resistance: obese, 2.6 ± 0.5; lean, 0.8 ± 0.1; P < .001). ISR increased linearly in both cohorts with escalating doses of GLP-1, but the slope of ISR in response to GLP-1 was greater in the obese than in the lean subjects (obese, 0.17 ± 0.03 nmol/min/pm; lean, 0.05 ± 0.01 nmol/min/pm; P < .001). There was a significant association of β-cell GLP-1 sensitivity and insulin resistance (r = 0.83; P < .001), and after correction for homeostasis model of assessment 2 for insulin resistance, the slopes of ISR vs GLP-1 concentration did not differ in the two cohorts (obese, 0.08 ± 0.01; lean, 0.08 ± 0.01; P = .98). However, within the entire study group, β-cell GLP-1 sensitivity corrected for insulin resistance varied nearly 10-fold. Conclusions: Insulin secretion in response to GLP-1 is proportional to insulin resistance in healthy subjects. However, there is considerable variability in the sensitivity of the β-cell to GLP-1 that is independent of insulin sensitivity. PMID:25825945

  16. Cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist treatment induces glucagon release and shows an additive therapeutic effect with GLP-1 agonist in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kartikkumar Navinchandra; Joharapurkar, Amit Arvind; Patel, Vishal; Kshirsagar, Samadhan Govind; Bahekar, Rajesh; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Jain, Mukul R

    2014-12-01

    Cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor antagonists reduce body weight and improve insulin sensitivity. Preclinical data indicates that an acute dose of CB1 antagonist rimonabant causes an increase in blood glucose. A stable analog of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), exendin-4 improves glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreas, and reduces appetite through activation of GLP-1 receptors in the central nervous system and liver. We hypothesized that the insulin secretagogue effect of GLP-1 agonist exendin-4 may synergize with the insulin-sensitizing action of rimonabant. Intraperitoneal as well as intracerebroventricular administration of rimonabant increased serum glucose upon glucose challenge in overnight fasted, diet-induced obese C57 mice, with concomitant rise in serum glucagon levels. Exendin-4 reversed the acute hyperglycemia induced by rimonabant. The combination of exendin-4 and rimonabant showed an additive effect in the food intake, and sustained body weight reduction upon repeated dosing. The acute efficacy of both the compounds was additive for inducing nausea-like symptoms in conditioned aversion test in mice, whereas exendin-4 treatment antagonized the effect of rimonabant on forced swim test upon chronic dosing. Thus, the addition of exendin-4 to rimonabant produces greater reduction in food intake owing to increased aversion, but reduces the other central nervous system side effects of rimonabant. The hyperglucagonemia induced by rimonabant is partially responsible for enhancing the antiobesity effect of exendin-4. PMID:25361428

  17. Neuroprotective role of (Val8)GLP-1-Glu-PAL in an in vitro model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Liu, Ke; Zhao, Juan; Holscher, Christian; Li, Guang-lai; Liu, Yue-ze

    2016-01-01

    The growth factor glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is neuroprotective in several animal models of neurodegeneration. Here, we analyzed the neuroprotective effects of a novel protease-resistant GLP-1 analogue, (Val8)GLP-1-Glu-PAL, which has advantages over older analogues, such as improvement of hippocampal neurogenesis, glucose homeostasis, and insulin secretion. We established an in vitro model of Parkinson's disease using the mitochondrial stressor rotenone in primary cultured mouse neurons pretreated with (Val8)GLP-1-Glu-PAL. (Val8)GLP-1-Glu-PAL alone did not affect neuronal viability, but prevented the rotenone-induced reduction in cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, (Val8)GLP-1-Glu-PAL pretreatment prevented rotenone-induced proapoptotic changes manifesting as downregulation of procaspase-3 and Bcl-2 and upregulation of cleaved caspase-3. These results demonstrate that the novel agent (Val8)GLP-1-Glu-PAL shows promise as a drug treatment for Parkinson's disease. PMID:27073388

  18. GLP-1 and estrogen conjugate acts in the supramammillary nucleus to reduce food-reward and body weight.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Heike; Wolf, Stefanie; Rabasa, Cristina; Rodriguez-Pacheco, Francisca; Babaei, Carina S; Stöber, Franziska; Goldschmidt, Jürgen; DiMarchi, Richard D; Finan, Brian; Tschöp, Matthias H; Dickson, Suzanne L; Schürmann, Annette; Skibicka, Karolina P

    2016-11-01

    The obesity epidemic continues unabated and currently available pharmacological treatments are not sufficiently effective. Combining gut/brain peptide, GLP-1, with estrogen into a conjugate may represent a novel, safe and potent, strategy to treat diabesity. Here we demonstrate that the central administration of GLP-1-estrogen conjugate reduced food reward, food intake, and body weight in rats. In order to determine the brain location of the interaction of GLP-1 with estrogen, we avail of single-photon emission computed tomography imaging of regional cerebral blood flow and pinpoint a brain site unexplored for its role in feeding and reward, the supramammillary nucleus (SUM) as a potential target of the conjugated GLP-1-estrogen. We confirm that conjugated GLP-1 and estrogen directly target the SUM with site-specific microinjections. Additional microinjections of GLP-1-estrogen into classic energy balance controlling nuclei, the lateral hypothalamus (LH) and the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) revealed that the metabolic benefits resulting from GLP-1-estrogen injections are mediated through the LH and to some extent by the NTS. In contrast, no additional benefit of the conjugate was noted on food reward when the compound was microinjected into the LH or the NTS, identifying the SUM as the only neural substrate identified here to underlie the reward reducing benefits of GLP-1 and estrogen conjugate. Collectively we discover a surprising neural substrate underlying food intake and reward effects of GLP-1 and estrogen and uncover a new brain area capable of regulating energy balance and reward. PMID:27496691

  19. Initial evidence that GLP-1 receptor blockade fails to suppress postprandial satiety or promote food intake in humans.

    PubMed

    Melhorn, Susan J; Tyagi, Vidhi; Smeraglio, Anne; Roth, Christian L; Schur, Ellen A

    2014-11-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) has incretin effects that are well-documented, but the independent role of GLP-1 action in human satiety perception is debated. We hypothesized that blockade of GLP-1 receptors would suppress postprandial satiety and increase voluntary food intake. After an overnight fast, eight normal weight participants (seven men, BMI 19-24.7 kg/m(2), age 19-29 year) were enrolled in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized crossover study of the GLP-1 antagonist Exendin-[9-39] (Ex-9) to determine if the satiating effects of a meal are dependent on GLP-1 signaling in humans. Following a fasting blood draw, iv infusion of Ex-9 (600-750 pmol/kg/min) or saline began. Thirty minutes later, subjects consumed a standardized breakfast followed 90 min later (at the predicted time of maximal endogenous circulating GLP-1) by an ad libitum buffet meal to objectively measure satiety. Infusions ended once the buffet meal was complete. Visual analog scale ratings of hunger and fullness and serial assessments of plasma glucose, insulin, and GLP-1 concentrations were done throughout the experiment. Contrary to the hypothesis, during Ex-9 infusion subjects reported a greater decrease in hunger due to consumption of the breakfast (Ex-9 -62 ± 5; placebo -41 ± 9; P=0.01) than during placebo. There were no differences in ad libitum caloric intake between Ex-9 and placebo. Ex-9 increased glucose, insulin, and endogenous GLP-1, which may have counteracted any effects of Ex-9 infusion to block satiety signaling. Blockade of GLP-1 receptors failed to suppress subjective satiety following a standardized meal or increase voluntary food intake in healthy, normal-weight subjects.

  20. GLP1-RA Add-on Therapy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Currently on a Bolus Containing Insulin Regimen.

    PubMed

    Davies, Marie L; Pham, David Q; Drab, Scott R

    2016-08-01

    Adding glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) to basal insulin regimens has become a guideline-recommended treatment option for uncontrolled type 2 diabetes. However, limited data exist to support the use of GLP-1 RAs with insulin regimens, including bolus insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes. The primary objectives of this review were to identify if the combination of a GLP-1 RA and an insulin regimen containing bolus insulin resulted in improvements in HbA1c , weight loss, reduction in insulin doses, and to evaluate the side effect profile of this combination in terms of nausea and hypoglycemia risk. Eight studies using exenatide twice/day, liraglutide, and dulaglutide were reviewed ranging in average duration of follow-up from 3 to 15 months. Seven studies showed that addition of a GLP-1 RA was associated with significant HbA1c reductions ranging from 0.4% to 1.64% from baseline to follow-up. Patients in all eight studies had significant weight loss in the GLP-1 RA arm from baseline to follow-up ranging from 0.87 to 10.2 kg. In all the studies, total daily bolus insulin doses decreased 25-67% from baseline to follow-up. In some studies, a portion of patients were able to discontinue bolus insulin all together after initiation of a GLP-1 RA. In addition, in two randomized trials included in the review, the GLP-1 RA arm showed significant improvement in HbA1c and weight compared with the control group who received basal/bolus regimens. Nausea was identified in 7-42% of participants using GLP-1 RAs with insulin. Data support the use of GLP-1 RAs added to insulin regimens already containing bolus insulin for glycemic control, weight loss, and reduction or discontinuation of bolus insulin. PMID:27340935

  1. The evolving world of GLP-1 agonist therapies for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Baynes, Kevin C R

    2010-04-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonist drugs have attractions as a treatment for type 2 diabetes since they positively alter a number of key pathophysiological defects. These include increasing insulin release, reducing glucagon release, slowing gastric emptying and reducing food intake. In numerous clinical trials these agents have been shown to reduce DCCT-aligned HbA(1c) between 0.8% and 1.1% in patients with moderately controlled type 2 diabetes, whilst also being associated with some weight loss. Whilst medium-term safety and side-effect profiles are now well established, there are as yet no long-term studies on the safety of this group of drugs. The place of the GLP-1 agonists in the treatment paradigm for type 2 diabetes will evolve over the next decade.

  2. GLP-1 receptor signaling is not required for reduced body weight after RYGB in rodents.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jianping; Hao, Zheng; Mumphrey, Michael B; Townsend, R Leigh; Patterson, Laurel M; Stylopoulos, Nicholas; Münzberg, Heike; Morrison, Christopher D; Drucker, Daniel J; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf

    2014-03-01

    Exaggerated GLP-1 and PYY secretion is thought to be a major mechanism in the reduced food intake and body weight after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Here, we use complementary pharmacological and genetic loss-of-function approaches to test the role of increased signaling by these gut hormones in high-fat diet-induced obese rodents. Chronic brain infusion of a supramaximal dose of the selective GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin-9-39 into the lateral cerebral ventricle significantly increased food intake and body weight in both RYGB and sham-operated rats, suggesting that, while contributing to the physiological control of food intake and body weight, central GLP-1 receptor signaling tone is not the critical mechanism uniquely responsible for the body weight-lowering effects of RYGB. Central infusion of the selective Y2R-antagonist BIIE0246 had no effect in either group, suggesting that it is not critical for the effects of RYGB on body weight under the conditions tested. In a recently established mouse model of RYGB that closely mimics surgery and weight loss dynamics in humans, obese GLP-1R-deficient mice lost the same amount of body weight and fat mass and maintained similarly lower body weight compared with wild-type mice. Together, the results surprisingly provide no support for important individual roles of either gut hormone in the specific mechanisms by which RYGB rats settle at a lower body weight. It is likely that the beneficial effects of bariatric surgeries are expressed through complex mechanisms that require combination approaches for their identification.

  3. Blockade of cannabinoid 1 receptor improves GLP-1R mediated insulin secretion in mice.

    PubMed

    González-Mariscal, Isabel; Krzysik-Walker, Susan M; Kim, Wook; Rouse, Michael; Egan, Josephine M

    2016-03-01

    The cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1) is an important regulator of energy metabolism. Reports of in vivo and in vitro studies give conflicting results regarding its role in insulin secretion, possibly due to circulatory factors, such as incretins. We hypothesized that this receptor may be a regulator of the entero-insular axis. We found that despite lower food consumption and lower body weight postprandial GLP-1 plasma concentrations were increased in CB1(-/-) mice compared to CB1(+/+) mice administered a standard diet or high fat/sugar diet. Upon exogenous GLP-1 treatment, CB1(-/-) mice had increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In mouse insulinoma cells, cannabinoids reduced GLP-1R-mediated intracellular cAMP accumulation and subsequent insulin secretion. Importantly, such effects were also evident in human islets, and were prevented by pharmacologic blockade of CB1. Collectively, these findings suggest a novel mechanism in which endocannabinoids are negative modulators of incretin-mediated insulin secretion. PMID:26724516

  4. GLP-1 receptor antagonist as a potential probe for pancreatic {beta}-cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, Eri; Toyoda, Kentaro; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Kawashima, Hidekazu; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Masashi; Temma, Takashi; Hirao, Konomu; Nagakawa, Kenji; Saji, Hideo; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2009-11-20

    We examined exendin(9-39), an antagonist of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP-1R), as a potential probe for imaging of pancreatic {beta}-cells. To evaluate in vitro receptor specificity, binding assay was performed using dispersed mouse islet cells. Binding assay showed competitive inhibition of [{sup 125}I]BH-exendin(9-39) binding by non-radioactive exendin(9-39). To assess in vivo selectivity, the biodistribution was evaluated by intravenous administration of [{sup 125}I]BH-exendin(9-39) to mice. Radioactivity of harvested pancreas reached highest levels at 60 and 120 min among organs examined except lung. Pre-administration of excess non-radioactive exendin(9-39) remarkably and specifically blocked the radioactivity of pancreas. After [{sup 125}I]BH-exendin(9-39) injection into transgenic mice with pancreatic {beta}-cells expressing GFP, fluorescent and radioactive signals of sections of pancreas were evaluated with an image analyzer. Imaging analysis showed that the fluorescent GFP signals and the radioactive signals were correspondingly located. Thus, the GLP-1R antagonist exendin(9-39) may serve as a useful probe for pancreatic {beta}-cell imaging.

  5. Appetite-related peptides in childhood and adolescence: role of ghrelin, PYY, and GLP-1.

    PubMed

    Horner, Katy; Lee, SoJung

    2015-11-01

    During childhood and adolescence, a number of factors, including age, puberty, sex, race, and body composition, may contribute to differences in satiety, food intake, and appetite-related peptides. These peptides include the orexigenic peptide ghrelin and anorexigenic gut peptides peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). For example, lower fasting ghrelin levels, lower postprandial ghrelin suppression, and blunted PYY and GLP-1 responses to food intake could contribute to a dysregulation of appetite in already obese children and adolescents. Whereas, changes in these peptides observed during puberty could facilitate growth. A greater understanding of the major moderating factors of appetite-related peptides in the pediatric population is essential to improve interpretation of study findings and for effective tailoring of strategies targeting appetite control to individuals. While more studies are needed, there is some evidence to suggest that exercise-based lifestyle interventions could be a potential therapeutic strategy to improve appetite-peptide profiles in overweight and obese children and adolescents. The aim of this review is (i) to discuss the potential moderating factors of ghrelin, PYY, and GLP-1, including age and puberty, sex, race and body composition; and (ii) to examine the effects of exercise interventions on these appetite-related gut peptides in children and adolescents. PMID:26466085

  6. [Extrapancreatic effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists: an open window towards new treatment goals in type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Salvador, Javier; Andrada, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The wide ubiquity of GLP-1 receptors in the body has stimulated the search for different extrapancreatic actions of GLP-1 and its receptor agonists. Thus, severe cardioprotective effects directed on myocardial ischaemia and dysfunction as well as diverse antiaterogenic actions have been reported. Also, native and GLP-1 receptor agonists have demonstrated significant beneficial effects on liver steatosis and fibrosis and on neuronal protection in experimental models of Alzheimer, and Parkinson's disease as well as on cerebral ischaemia. Recent evidences suggest that these drugs may also be useful for prevention and treatment of diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy and peripheral neuropathy. Good results have also been reported in psoriasis. Despite we still need confirmation that these promising effects can be applied to clinical practice, they offer new interesting perspectives for treatment of type 2 diabetes associated complications and give to GLP-1 receptor agonists an even more integral position in diabetes therapy. PMID:25326841

  7. [Extrapancreatic effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists: an open window towards new treatment goals in type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Salvador, Javier; Andrada, Patricia

    2014-09-01

    The wide ubiquity of GLP-1 receptors in the body has stimulated the search for different extrapancreatic actions of GLP-1 and its receptor agonists. Thus, severe cardioprotective effects directed on myocardial ischaemia and dysfunction as well as diverse antiaterogenic actions have been reported. Also, native and GLP-1 receptor agonists have demonstrated significant beneficial effects on liver steatosis and fibrosis and on neuronal protection in experimental models of Alzheimer, and Parkinson's disease as well as on cerebral ischaemia. Recent evidences suggest that these drugs may also be useful for prevention and treatment of diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy and peripheral neuropathy. Good results have also been reported in psoriasis. Despite we still need confirmation that these promising effects can be applied to clinical practice, they offer new interesting perspectives for treatment of type 2 diabetes associated complications and give to GLP-1 receptor agonists an even more integral position in diabetes therapy. PMID:25437463

  8. Intraportal infusion of ghrelin could inhibit glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion by enteric neural net in Wistar rat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiyao; Li, Wensong; Li, Ping; Chang, Manli; Huang, Xu; Li, Qiang; Cui, Can

    2014-01-01

    As a regulator of food intake and energy metabolism, the role of ghrelin in glucose metabolism is still not fully understood. In this study, we determined the in vivo effect of ghrelin on incretin effect. We demonstrated that ghrelin inhibited the glucose-stimulated release of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) when infused into the portal vein of Wistar rat. Hepatic vagotomy diminished the inhibitory effect of ghrelin on glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion. In addition, phentolamine, a nonselective α receptor antagonist, could recover the decrease of GLP-1 release induced by ghrelin infusion. Pralmorelin (an artificial growth hormone release peptide) infusion into the portal vein could also inhibit the glucose-stimulated release of GLP-1. And growth hormone secretagogue receptor antagonist, [D-lys3]-GHRP-6, infusion showed comparable increases of glucose stimulated GLP-1 release compared to ghrelin infusion into the portal vein. The data showed that intraportal infusion of ghrelin exerted an inhibitory effect on GLP-1 secretion through growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1α (GHS1α receptor), which indicated that the downregulation of ghrelin secretion after food intake was necessary for incretin effect. Furthermore, our results suggested that the enteric neural net involved hepatic vagal nerve and sympathetic nerve mediated inhibition effect of ghrelin on incretin effect. PMID:25247193

  9. The impact of nanoparticles on the mucosal translocation and transport of GLP-1 across the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Francisca; Shrestha, Neha; Shahbazi, Mohammed-Ali; Fonte, Pedro; Mäkilä, Ermei M; Salonen, Jarno J; Hirvonen, Jouni T; Granja, Pedro L; Santos, Hélder A; Sarmento, Bruno

    2014-11-01

    Glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that is in the pipeline for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) therapy. However, oral administration of GLP-1 is hindered by the harsh conditions of the gastrointestinal tract and poor bioavailability. In this study, three nanosystems composed by three different biomaterials (poly(lactide-co-glycolide) polymer (PLGA), Witepsol E85 lipid (solid lipid nanoparticles, SLN) and porous silicon (PSi) were developed and loaded with GLP-1 to study their permeability in vitro. All the nanoparticles presented a size of approximately 200 nm. The nanoparticles' interaction with the mucus and the intestinal cells were enhanced after coating with chitosan (CS). PSi nanosystems presented the best association efficiency (AE) and loading degree (LD), even though a high AE was also observed for PLGA nanoparticles and SLN. Among all the nanosystems, PLGA and PSi were the only nanoparticles able to sustain the release of GLP-1 in biological fluids when coated with CS. This characteristic was also maintained when the nanosystems were in contact with the intestinal Caco-2 and HT29-MTX cell monolayers. The CS-coated PSi nanoparticles showed the highest GLP-1 permeation across the intestinal in vitro models. In conclusion, PLGA + CS and PSi + CS are promising nanocarriers for the oral delivery of GLP-1.

  10. Frog skin peptides (tigerinin-1R, magainin-AM1, -AM2, CPF-AM1, and PGla-AM1) stimulate secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) by GLUTag cells.

    PubMed

    Ojo, O O; Conlon, J M; Flatt, P R; Abdel-Wahab, Y H A

    2013-02-01

    Skin secretions of several frog species contain host-defense peptides with multiple biological activities including in vitro and in vivo insulin-releasing actions. This study investigates the effects of tigerinin-1R from Hoplobatrachus rugulosus (Dicroglossidae) and magainin-AM1, magainin-AM2, caerulein precursor fragment (CPF-AM1) and peptide glycine leucine amide (PGLa-AM1) from Xenopus amieti (Pipidae) on GLP-1 secretion from GLUTag cells. Tigerinin-1R showed the highest potency producing a significant (P<0.05) increase in GLP-1 release at a concentration of 0.1nM for the cyclic peptide and 0.3nM for the reduced form. All peptides from X. amieti significantly (P<0.05) stimulated GLP-1 release at concentrations ⩾300nM with magainin-AM2 exhibiting the greatest potency (minimum concentration producing a significant stimulation=1nM). The maximum stimulatory response (3.2-fold of basal rate, P<0.001) was produced by CPF-AM1 at a concentration of 3μM. No peptide stimulated release of the cytosolic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase from GLUTag cells at concentrations up to 3μM indicating that the integrity of the plasma membrane had been preserved. The data indicate that frog skin peptides, by stimulating GLP-1 release as well as direct effects on insulin secretion, show therapeutic potential as agents for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  11. iNKT Cells Induce FGF21 for Thermogenesis and Are Required for Maximal Weight Loss in GLP1 Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Lydia; Hogan, Andrew E; Duquette, Danielle; Lester, Chantel; Banks, Alexander; LeClair, Katherine; Cohen, David E; Ghosh, Abhisek; Lu, Bing; Corrigan, Michelle; Stevanovic, Darko; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria; Drucker, Daniel J; O'Shea, Donal; Brenner, Michael

    2016-09-13

    Adipose-resident invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are key players in metabolic regulation. iNKT cells are innate lipid sensors, and their activation, using their prototypic ligand α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer), induces weight loss and restores glycemic control in obesity. Here, iNKT activation induced fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) production and thermogenic browning of white fat. Complete metabolic analysis revealed that iNKT cell activation induced increased body temperature, V02, VC02, and fatty acid oxidation, without affecting food intake or activity. FGF21 induction played a major role in iNKT cell-induced weight loss, as FGF21 null mice lost significantly less weight after αGalCer treatment. The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, liraglutide, also activated iNKT cells in humans and mice. In iNKT-deficient mice, liraglutide promoted satiety but failed to induce FGF21, resulting in less weight loss. These findings reveal an iNKT cell-FGF21 axis that defines a new immune-mediated pathway that could be targeted for glycemic control and weight regulation. PMID:27593966

  12. Electrostatic interaction on loading of therapeutic peptide GLP-1 into porous silicon nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kaasalainen, Martti; Rytkönen, Jussi; Mäkilä, Ermei; Närvänen, Ale; Salonen, Jarno

    2015-02-10

    Porous silicon (PSi) nanoparticles' tunable properties are facilitating their use at highly challenging medical tasks such as peptide delivery. Because of many different mechanisms that are affecting the interaction between the peptide and the particle, the drug incorporation into the mesoporous delivery system is not straightforward. We have studied the adsorption and loading of incretin hormone glucagon like peptide 1 (GLP-1) on PSi nanoparticles. The results show that the highest loading degree can be achieved in pH values near the isoelectric point of peptide, and the phenomenon is independent of the surface's zeta potential. In order to study the interaction between the peptide and the nanoparticle, we studied the adsorption with lower concentrations and noticed that also non-Coulombic forces have a big role in adsorption of GLP-1. Adsorption is effective and pH-independent especially on low peptide concentrations and onto more hydrophobic nanoparticles. Reversibility of adsorption was studied as a function of buffer pH. When the loading is compared to the total mass of the formulation, the loading degree is 29%, and during desorption experiments 25% is released in 4 h and can be considered as a reversible loading degree. Thus, the peptides adsorbed first seem to create irreversibly adsorbed layer that facilitates reversible adsorption of following peptides.

  13. Engineering a long-acting, potent GLP-1 analog for microstructure-based transdermal delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Peng-Yu; Zou, Huafei; Chao, Elizabeth; Sherwood, Lance; Nunez, Vanessa; Keeney, Michael; Ghartey-Tagoe, Esi; Ding, Zhongli; Quirino, Herlinda; Luo, Xiaozhou; Welzel, Gus; Chen, Guohua; Singh, Parminder; Woods, Ashley K.; Schultz, Peter G.; Shen, Weijun

    2016-01-01

    Antidiabetic treatments aiming to reduce body weight are currently gaining increased interest. Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist administered twice daily via s.c. injection, improves glycemic control, often with associated weight reduction. To further improve the therapeutic efficacy of exendin-4, we have developed a novel peptide engineering strategy that incorporates a serum protein binding motif onto a covalent side-chain staple and applied to the peptide to enhance its helicity and, as a consequence, its potency and serum half-life. We demonstrated that one of the resulting peptides, E6, has significantly improved half-life and glucose tolerance in an oral glucose tolerance test in rodents. Chronic treatment of E6 significantly decreased body weight and fasting blood glucose, improved lipid metabolism, and also reduced hepatic steatosis in diet-induced obese mice. Moreover, the high potency of E6 allowed us to administer this peptide using a dissolvable microstructure-based transdermal delivery system. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies in guinea pigs showed that a single 5-min application of a microstructure system containing E6 significantly improved glucose tolerance for 96 h. This delivery strategy may offer an effective and patient-friendly alternative to currently marketed GLP-1 injectables and can likely be extended to other peptide hormones. PMID:27035989

  14. 36 CFR 7.36 - Mammoth Cave National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mammoth Cave National Park. 7.36 Section 7.36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.36 Mammoth Cave National Park. (a)...

  15. 36 CFR 7.36 - Mammoth Cave National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mammoth Cave National Park. 7.36 Section 7.36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.36 Mammoth Cave National Park. (a)...

  16. 36 CFR 7.36 - Mammoth Cave National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mammoth Cave National Park. 7.36 Section 7.36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.36 Mammoth Cave National Park. (a)...

  17. Oral hypoglycaemic effect of GLP-1 and DPP4 inhibitor based nanocomposites in a diabetic animal model.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Neha; Araújo, Francisca; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Mäkilä, Ermei; Gomes, Maria João; Airavaara, Mikko; Kauppinen, Esko I; Raula, Janne; Salonen, Jarno; Hirvonen, Jouni; Sarmento, Bruno; Santos, Hélder A

    2016-06-28

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), an incretin hormone, is used for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treatment because of its ability to stimulate insulin secretion and release in a glucose-dependent manner. Despite of its potent insulinotropic effect, oral GLP-1 delivery is greatly limited by its instability in the gastrointestinal tract, poor absorption efficiency and rapid degradation by dipeptidylpeptidase-4 (DPP4) enzyme leading to a short half-life (~2min). Thus, a multistage dual-drug delivery nanosystem was developed to deliver GLP-1 and DPP4 inhibitor simultaneously. The system comprised of chitosan-modified porous silicon (CSUn) nanoparticles, which were coated by an enteric polymer, hydroxypropylmethylcellulose acetate succinate MF, using aerosol flow reactor technology. A non-obese T2DM rat model induced by co-administration of nicotinamide and streptozotocin was used to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of the nanosystem. The oral administration of H-CSUn nanoparticles resulted in 32% reduction in blood glucose levels and ~6.0-fold enhancement in pancreatic insulin content, as compared to the GLP-1+DPP4 inhibitor solution. Overall, these results present a promising system for oral co-delivery of GLP-1 and DPP4 inhibitor that could be further evaluated in a chronic diabetic study. PMID:27091697

  18. Dual melanocortin-4 receptor and GLP-1 receptor agonism amplifies metabolic benefits in diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Clemmensen, Christoffer; Finan, Brian; Fischer, Katrin; Tom, Robby Zachariah; Legutko, Beata; Sehrer, Laura; Heine, Daniela; Grassl, Niklas; Meyer, Carola W; Henderson, Bart; Hofmann, Susanna M; Tschöp, Matthias H; Van der Ploeg, Lex HT; Müller, Timo D

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the efficacy of simultaneous agonism at the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) and the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) for the treatment of obesity and diabetes in rodents. Diet-induced obese (DIO) mice were chronically treated with either the long-acting GLP-1R agonist liraglutide, the MC4R agonist RM-493 or a combination of RM-493 and liraglutide. Co-treatment of DIO mice with RM-493 and liraglutide improves body weight loss and enhances glycemic control and cholesterol metabolism beyond what can be achieved with either mono-therapy. The superior metabolic efficacy of this combination therapy is attributed to the anorectic and glycemic actions of both drugs, along with the ability of RM-493 to increase energy expenditure. Interestingly, compared to mice treated with liraglutide alone, hypothalamic Glp-1r expression was higher in mice treated with the combination therapy after both acute and chronic treatment. Further, RM-493 enhanced hypothalamic Mc4r expression. Hence, co-dosing with MC4R and GLP-1R agonists increases expression of each receptor, indicative of minimized receptor desensitization. Together, these findings suggest potential opportunities for employing combination treatments that comprise parallel MC4R and GLP-1R agonism for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. PMID:25652173

  19. Circulating GLP-1 in infants born small-for-gestational-age: breast-feeding versus formula-feeding.

    PubMed

    Díaz, M; Bassols, J; Sebastiani, G; López-Bermejo, A; Ibáñez, L; de Zegher, F

    2015-10-01

    Prenatal growth restraint associates with the risk for later diabetes, particularly if such restraint is followed by postnatal formula-feeding (FOF) rather than breast-feeding (BRF). Circulating incretins can influence the neonatal programming of hypothalamic setpoints for appetite and energy expenditure, and are thus candidate mediators of the long-term effects exerted by early nutrition. We have tested this concept by measuring (at birth and at age 4 months) the circulating concentrations of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) in BRF infants born appropriate-for-gestational-age (AGA; n=63) and in small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infants receiving either BRF (n=28) or FOF (n=26). At birth, concentrations of GLP-1 were similar in AGA and SGA infants. At 4 months, pre-feeding GLP-1 concentrations were higher than at birth; SGA-BRF infants had GLP-1 concentrations similar to those in AGA-BRF infants but SGA-FOF infants had higher concentrations. In conclusion, nutrition appears to influence the circulating GLP-1 concentrations in SGA infants and may thereby modulate long-term diabetes risk.

  20. Novel Pentapeptide GLP-1 (32-36) Amide Inhibits β-Cell Apoptosis In Vitro and Improves Glucose Disposal in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lidan; Dai, Yuxuan; Wang, Chuandong; Chu, Yingying; Su, Xin; Yang, Jianyong; Zhou, Jie; Huang, Wenlong; Qian, Hai

    2015-12-01

    We proposed that a pentapeptide, LVKGR amide, GLP-1 (32-36) amide, derived from the gluco-incretin hormone, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), might possess favorable actions against diabetes. Therefore, GLP-1 (32-36) amide was synthesized and the effects of it were examined in INS-1 cell and streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice model. To determine the protective effects of GLP-1 (32-36) amide on INS-1 cell viability and apoptosis, cells were exposed to 1 μm streptozotocin (STZ) and GLP-1 (32-36) amide for 24 h. Results showed that GLP-1 (32-36) amide treatment decreased apoptosis rate and significantly retained cell viability compared with saline-treated controls. Then, GLP-1 (32-36) amide was administered intraperitoneally to streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice with normal mice used as control. Body weight, energy intake, plasma glucose, and histopathology of the pancreas were assessed. Results showed that GLP-1 (32-36) amide protected β-cell viability and apoptosis against STZ-induced toxicity, inhibited weight gain, and relieved symptoms of polydipsia. Moreover, GLP-1 pentapeptide-treated mice showed a slight trend toward reduced glucose excursions in intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test at the end of the experiment. GLP-1 (32-36) amide exerted favorable protective actions in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. The peptide curtailed weight gain and alleviates symptoms of polydipsia. These findings suggested the probable utility of GLP-1 (32-36) amide, a peptide mimetic derived there from GLP-1, for adjuvant treatment of diabetes.

  1. A missense variant in GLP1R gene is associated with the glycaemic response to treatment with gliptins.

    PubMed

    Javorský, M; Gotthardová, I; Klimčáková, L; Kvapil, M; Židzik, J; Schroner, Z; Doubravová, P; Gala, I; Dravecká, I; Tkáč, I

    2016-09-01

    Gliptins act by increasing endogenous incretin levels. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP1R) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide receptor (GIPR) are their indirect drug targets. Variants of GLP1R and GIPR have previously been associated with the incretin effect. The aim of the present pilot study was to examine associations of the GLP1R and GIPR gene variants with the glycaemic response to gliptins. A total of 140 consecutive patients with type 2 diabetes were followed-up 6 months after initiation of gliptin treatment. GLP1R rs6923761 (Gly168Ser) and GIPR rs10423928 genotyping was performed using real-time PCR, with subsequent high-resolution melting analysis. The main study outcome was reduction in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) after treatment. GLP1R Gly168Ser variant was significantly associated with reduction in HbA1c in an additive model (β = -0.33, p = 0.011). The mean reduction in HbA1c in Ser/Ser homozygotes was significantly lower compared with Gly-allele carriers [0.12 ± 0.23% vs. 0.80 ± 0.09% (1.3 ± 2.5 mmol/mol vs. 8.7 ± 1.0 mmol/mol); p = 0.008]. In conclusion, GLP1R missense variant was associated with a reduced response to gliptin treatment. The genotype-related effect size of ∼0.7% (8 mmol/mol) is equal to an average effect of gliptin treatment and makes this variant a candidate for use in precision medicine. PMID:27160388

  2. Dipeptidylpeptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are favourable to glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists: yes.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2012-03-01

    The pharmacological treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is becoming increasingly complex, especially since the availability of incretin-based therapies. Compared with other glucose-lowering strategies, these novel drugs offer some advantages such as an absence of weight gain and a negligible risk of hypoglycaemia and, possibly, better cardiovascular and β-cell protection. The physician has now multiple choices to manage his/her patient after secondary failure of metformin, and the question whether it is preferable to add an oral dipeptidylpeptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor (gliptin) or an injectable glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist will emerge. Obviously, DPP-4 inhibitors offer several advantages compared with GLP-1 receptor agonists, especially regarding easiness of use, tolerance profile and cost. However, because they can only increase endogenous GLP-1 concentrations to physiological (rather than pharmacological) levels, they are less potent to improve glucose control, promote weight reduction ("weight neutrality") and reduce blood pressure compared to GLP-1 receptor agonists. Of note, none of the two classes have proven long-term safety and positive impact on diabetic complications yet. The role of DPP-4 inhibitors and GLP-1 receptor agonists in the therapeutic armamentarium of T2DM is rapidly evolving, but their respective potential strengths and weaknesses should be better defined in long-term head-to-head comparative controlled trials. Instead of trying to answer the question whether DPP-4 inhibitors are favourable to GLP-1 receptor agonists (or vice versa), it is probably more clinically relevant to look at which T2DM patient will benefit more from one or the other therapy considering all his/her individual clinical characteristics ("personalized medicine").

  3. Analysis of the multiple roles of gld-1 in germline development: Interactions with the sex determination cascade and the glp-1 signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, R.; Schedl, T.; Maine, E.

    1995-02-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans gene gld-1 is essential for oocyte development; in gld-1 (null) hermaphrodites, a tumor forms where oogenesis would normally occur. We use genetic epistasis analysis to demonstrate that tumor formation is dependent on the sexual fate of the germline. When the germline sex determination pathway is set in the female mode (terminal fem/fog genes inactive), gld-1 (null) germ cells exit meiotic prophase and proliferate to form a tumor, but when the pathway is et in the male mode, they develop into sperm. We conclude that the gld-1 (null) phenotype is cell-type specific and that gld-1(+) acts at the end of the cascade to direct oogenesis. We also use cell ablation and epistasis analysis to examine the dependence of tumor formation on the glp-1 signaling pathway. Although glp-1 activity promotes tumor growth, it is not essential for tumor formation by gld-1 (null) germ cells. These data also reveal that gld-1(+) plays a nonessential (and sex nonspecific) role in regulating germ cell proliferation before their entry into meiosis. Thus gld-1(+) may negatively regulate proliferation at two distinct points in germ cell development: before entry into meiotic prophase in both sexes (nonessential premeiotic gld-1 function) and during meiotic prophase when the sex determination pathway is set in the female mode (essential meiotic gld-1 function). 46 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. [Treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus--which role do GLP-1 receptor agonists play?].

    PubMed

    Lüdemann, J

    2011-07-21

    The results of the ACCORD-, ADVANCE- and VADT- and further recent studies raised doubts regarding whether the guidelined therapy of type 2 diabetes mellitus, which aims at achieving HbA1c values of < 6.5%, is always beneficial. The higher rate of severe hypoglycemia and weight gain under intensive glycemic control has raised debates of whether the current guidelines should be adopted accordingly. Modern state-of-the-art treatment should consider: a) early treatment start, b) sustained blood sugar decrease, and c) simultaneously prevention of hypoglycemia and weight gain, d) prevention of little investigated multiple glucose-lowering agents, e) easy handling and easy to be integrated into daily schedules. The present work reviews current options with regard to these requirements with special focus on the new GLP-1 receptor agonists. PMID:23964469

  5. Cell-cycle quiescence maintains Caenorhabditis elegans germline stem cells independent of GLP-1/Notch.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Hannah S; Kimble, Judith

    2015-11-09

    Many types of adult stem cells exist in a state of cell-cycle quiescence, yet it has remained unclear whether quiescence plays a role in maintaining the stem cell fate. Here we establish the adult germline of Caenorhabditis elegans as a model for facultative stem cell quiescence. We find that mitotically dividing germ cells--including germline stem cells--become quiescent in the absence of food. This quiescence is characterized by a slowing of S phase, a block to M-phase entry, and the ability to re-enter M phase rapidly in response to re-feeding. Further, we demonstrate that cell-cycle quiescence alters the genetic requirements for stem cell maintenance: The signaling pathway required for stem cell maintenance under fed conditions--GLP-1/Notch signaling--becomes dispensable under conditions of quiescence. Thus, cell-cycle quiescence can itself maintain stem cells, independent of the signaling pathway otherwise essential for such maintenance.

  6. GLP1 and glucagon co-secreting pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor presenting as hypoglycemia after gastric bypass

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Marta; Rodrigues, Pedro; Pereira, Sofia S; Nora, Mário; Gonçalves, Gil; Albrechtsen, Nicolai Wewer; Hartmann, Bolette; Holst, Jens Juul

    2015-01-01

    Summary Post-prandial hypoglycemia is frequently found after bariatric surgery. Although rare, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET), which occasionally are mixed hormone secreting, can lead to atypical clinical manifestations, including reactive hypoglycemia. Two years after gastric bypass surgery for the treatment of severe obesity, a 54-year-old female with previous type 2 diabetes, developed post-prandial sweating, fainting and hypoglycemic episodes, which eventually led to the finding by ultrasound of a 1.8-cm solid mass in the pancreatic head. The 72-h fast test and the plasma chromogranin A levels were normal but octreotide scintigraphy showed a single focus of abnormal radiotracer uptake at the site of the nodule. There were no other clinical signs of hormone secreting pNET and gastrointestinal hormone measurements were not performed. The patient underwent surgical enucleation with complete remission of the hypoglycemic episodes. Histopathology revealed a well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma with low-grade malignancy with positive chromogranin A and glucagon immunostaining. An extract of the resected tumor contained a high concentration of glucagon (26.707 pmol/g tissue), in addition to traces of GLP1 (471 pmol/g), insulin (139 pmol/g) and somatostatin (23 pmol/g). This is the first report of a GLP1 and glucagon co-secreting pNET presenting as hypoglycemia after gastric bypass surgery. Although pNET are rare, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the clinical approach to the post-bariatric surgery hypoglycemia patient. Learning points pNETs can be multihormonal-secreting, leading to atypical clinical manifestations.Reactive hypoglycemic episodes are frequent after gastric bypass.pNETs should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hypoglycemia after bariatric surgery. PMID:26266036

  7. PEGylated exendin-4, a modified GLP-1 analog exhibits more potent cardioprotection than its unmodified parent molecule on a dose to dose basis in a murine model of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongchan; Tong, Guang; Kim, Tae Hyung; Ma, Nan; Niu, Gang; Cao, Feng; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    A Site-specifically PEGylated exendin-4 (denoted as PEG-Ex4) is an exendin-4 (denoted as Ex4) analog we developed by site-specific PEGylation of exendin-4 with a high molecular weight trimeric poly(ethylene glycol) (tPEG). It has been shown to possess prolonged half-life in vivo with similar receptor binding affinity compared to unmodified exendin-4 by our previous work. This study is sought to test whether PEG-Ex4 is suitable for treating myocardial infarction (MI). In the MI model, PEG-Ex4 was administered every 3 days while equivalent amount of Ex4 was administered every 3 days or twice daily. Animal survival rate, heart function, remodeling and neoangiogenesis were evaluated and compared. Tube formation was examined in endothelial cells. In addition, Western blotting and histology were performed to determine the markers of cardiac hypertrophy and angiogenesis and to explore the possible molecular mechanism involved. PEG-Ex4 and Ex4 showed comparable binding affinity to GLP-1 receptor. In MI mice, PEG-Ex4 given at 3 days interval achieved similar extent of protection as Ex4 given twice daily, while Ex4 given at 3 days interval failed to produce protection. PEG-Ex4 elevated endothelial tube formation in vitro and capillary density in the border area of MI. PEG-Ex4 increased Akt activity and VEGF production in a GLP-1R dependent manner in endothelial cells and antagonism of GLP-1R, Akt or VEGF abolished the protection of PEG-Ex4 in the MI model. PEG-Ex4 is a potent long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonist for the treatment of chronic heart disease. Its protection might be attributed to enhanced angiogenesis mediated by the activation of Akt and VEGF.

  8. The glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist enhances intrinsic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ activity in endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Onuma, Hirohisa; Inukai, Kouichi Kitahara, Atsuko; Moriya, Rie; Nishida, Susumu; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Katsuta, Hidenori; Takahashi, Kazuto; Sumitani, Yoshikazu; Hosaka, Toshio; Ishida, Hitoshi

    2014-08-22

    Highlights: • PPARγ activation was involved in the GLP-1-mediated anti-inflammatory action. • Exendin-4 enhanced endogenous PPARγ transcriptional activity in HUVECs. • H89, a PKA inhibitor, abolished GLP-1-induced PPARγ enhancement. • The anti-inflammatory effects of GLP-1 may be explained by PPARγ activation. - Abstract: Recent studies have suggested glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) signaling to exert anti-inflammatory effects on endothelial cells, although the precise underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated whether PPARγ activation is involved in the GLP-1-mediated anti-inflammatory action on endothelial cells. When we treated HUVEC cells with 0.2 ng/ml exendin-4, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, endogenous PPARγ transcriptional activity was significantly elevated, by approximately 20%, as compared with control cells. The maximum PPARγ activity enhancing effect of exendin-4 was observed 12 h after the initiation of incubation with exendin-4. As H89, a PKA inhibitor, abolished GLP-1-induced PPARγ enhancement, the signaling downstream from GLP-1 cross-talk must have been involved in PPARγ activation. In conclusion, our results suggest that GLP-1 has the potential to induce PPARγ activity, partially explaining the anti-inflammatory effects of GLP-1 on endothelial cells. Cross-talk between GLP-1 signaling and PPARγ activation would have major impacts on treatments for patients at high risk for cardiovascular disease.

  9. Mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase as a potential pharmacological drug target in the GLP-1 based therapy of obesity and diabetes mellitus type 2.

    PubMed

    Bavec, Aljosa

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) based therapy is well established for treating diabetes mellitus type 2. Moreover, GLP-1 receptor agonists influence weight loss, and have potential for treating obesity. GLP-1 receptor agonists should be administered in low doses, together with drugs that potentiate insulin release, to avoid some minor side effects. We have focused on incretin hormones, especially GLP-1 and its analogues. Here we discuss the effect of the third intracellular loop-derived peptide of GLP-1 receptor on intracellular mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase and its role in regulating the receptor. We suggest that this intracellular mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase could constitute a possible novel pharmacological target in the treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2 and obesity.

  10. The pepper GNA-related lectin and PAN domain protein gene, CaGLP1, is required for plant cell death and defense signaling during bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Lee, Dong Hyuk; Choi, Du Seok; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-12-01

    Carbohydrate-binding proteins, commonly referred to as lectins or agglutinins, function in defense responses to microbial pathogens. Pepper (Capsicum annuum) GNA-related lectin and PAN-domain protein gene CaGLP1 was isolated and functionally characterized from pepper leaves infected with Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv). CaGLP1 contained an amine-terminus prokaryotic membrane lipoprotein lipid attachment site, a Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)-related lectin domain responsible for the recognition of high-mannose N-glycans, and a carboxyl-terminus PAN/apple domain. RNA gel blot and immunoblot analyses determined that CaGLP1 was strongly induced in pepper by compatible and incompatible Xcv infection. CaGLP1 protein localized primarily to the plasma membrane and exhibited mannose-binding specificity. CaGLP1-silenced pepper plants were more susceptible to compatible or incompatible Xcv infection compared with that of non-silenced control plants. CaGLP1 silencing in pepper leaves did not accumulate H2O2 and induce cell death during incompatible Xcv infection. Defense-related CaDEF1 (defensin) gene expression was significantly reduced in CaGLP1-silenced pepper plants. CaGLP1-overexpression in Arabidopsis thaliana enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. Defense-related AtPDF1.2 expression was elevated in CaGLP1-overexpression lines. Together, these results suggest that CaGLP1 is required for plant cell death and defense responses through the reactive oxygen species burst and downstream defense-related gene expression in response to bacterial pathogen challenge.

  11. Body weight loss, reduced urge for palatable food and increased release of GLP-1 through daily supplementation with green-plant membranes for three months in overweight women.

    PubMed

    Montelius, Caroline; Erlandsson, Daniel; Vitija, Egzona; Stenblom, Eva-Lena; Egecioglu, Emil; Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte

    2014-10-01

    The frequency of obesity has risen dramatically in recent years but only few effective and safe drugs are available. We investigated if green-plant membranes, previously shown to reduce subjective hunger and promote satiety signals, could affect body weight when given long-term. 38 women (40-65 years of age, body mass index 25-33 kg/m(2)) were randomized to dietary supplementation with either green-plant membranes (5 g) or placebo, consumed once daily before breakfast for 12 weeks. All individuals were instructed to follow a three-meal paradigm without any snacking between the meals and to increase their physical activity. Body weight change was analysed every third week as was blood glucose and various lipid parameters. On days 1 and 90, following intake of a standardized breakfast, glucose, insulin and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) in plasma were measured, as well as subjective ratings of hunger, satiety and urge for different palatable foods, using visual analogue scales. Subjects receiving green-plant membranes lost significantly more body weight than did those on placebo (p < 0.01). Mean weight loss with green-plant extract was 5.0 ± 2.3 kg compared to 3.5 ± 2.3 kg in the control group. Consumption of green-plant membranes also reduced total and LDL-cholesterol (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05 respectively) compared to control. Single-meal tests performed on day 1 and day 90 demonstrated an increased postprandial release of GLP-1 and decreased urge for sweet and chocolate on both occasions in individuals supplemented with green-plant membranes compared to control. Waist circumference, body fat and leptin decreased in both groups over the course of the study, however there were no differences between the groups. In conclusion, addition of green-plant membranes as a dietary supplement once daily induces weight loss, improves obesity-related risk-factors, and reduces the urge for palatable food. The mechanism may reside in the observed

  12. Body weight loss, reduced urge for palatable food and increased release of GLP-1 through daily supplementation with green-plant membranes for three months in overweight women.

    PubMed

    Montelius, Caroline; Erlandsson, Daniel; Vitija, Egzona; Stenblom, Eva-Lena; Egecioglu, Emil; Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte

    2014-10-01

    The frequency of obesity has risen dramatically in recent years but only few effective and safe drugs are available. We investigated if green-plant membranes, previously shown to reduce subjective hunger and promote satiety signals, could affect body weight when given long-term. 38 women (40-65 years of age, body mass index 25-33 kg/m(2)) were randomized to dietary supplementation with either green-plant membranes (5 g) or placebo, consumed once daily before breakfast for 12 weeks. All individuals were instructed to follow a three-meal paradigm without any snacking between the meals and to increase their physical activity. Body weight change was analysed every third week as was blood glucose and various lipid parameters. On days 1 and 90, following intake of a standardized breakfast, glucose, insulin and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) in plasma were measured, as well as subjective ratings of hunger, satiety and urge for different palatable foods, using visual analogue scales. Subjects receiving green-plant membranes lost significantly more body weight than did those on placebo (p < 0.01). Mean weight loss with green-plant extract was 5.0 ± 2.3 kg compared to 3.5 ± 2.3 kg in the control group. Consumption of green-plant membranes also reduced total and LDL-cholesterol (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05 respectively) compared to control. Single-meal tests performed on day 1 and day 90 demonstrated an increased postprandial release of GLP-1 and decreased urge for sweet and chocolate on both occasions in individuals supplemented with green-plant membranes compared to control. Waist circumference, body fat and leptin decreased in both groups over the course of the study, however there were no differences between the groups. In conclusion, addition of green-plant membranes as a dietary supplement once daily induces weight loss, improves obesity-related risk-factors, and reduces the urge for palatable food. The mechanism may reside in the observed

  13. GLP-1R–Targeting Magnetic Nanoparticles for Pancreatic Islet Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Yoo, Byunghee; Yang, Jingsheng; Zhang, Xueli; Ross, Alana; Pantazopoulos, Pamela; Dai, Guangping; Moore, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive assessment of pancreatic β-cell mass would tremendously aid in managing type 1 diabetes (T1D). Toward this goal, we synthesized an exendin-4 conjugated magnetic iron oxide–based nanoparticle probe targeting glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R), which is highly expressed on the surface of pancreatic β-cells. In vitro studies in βTC-6, the β-cell line, showed specific accumulation of the targeted probe (termed MN-Ex10-Cy5.5) compared with nontargeted (termed MN-Cy5.5). In vivo magnetic resonance imaging showed a significant transverse relaxation time (T2) shortening in the pancreata of mice injected with the MN-Ex10-Cy5.5 probe compared with control animals injected with the nontargeted probe at 7.5 and 24 h after injection. Furthermore, ΔT2 of the pancreata of prediabetic NOD mice was significantly higher than that of diabetic NOD mice after the injection of MN-Ex10-Cy5.5, indicating the decrease of probe accumulation in these animals due to β-cell loss. Of note, ΔT2 of prediabetic and diabetic NOD mice injected with MN-Cy5.5 was not significantly changed, reflecting the nonspecific mode of accumulation of nontargeted probe. We believe our results point to the potential for using this agent for monitoring the disease development and response of T1D to therapy. PMID:24458362

  14. Cell-cycle quiescence maintains Caenorhabditis elegans germline stem cells independent of GLP-1/Notch

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Hannah S; Kimble, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Many types of adult stem cells exist in a state of cell-cycle quiescence, yet it has remained unclear whether quiescence plays a role in maintaining the stem cell fate. Here we establish the adult germline of Caenorhabditis elegans as a model for facultative stem cell quiescence. We find that mitotically dividing germ cells—including germline stem cells—become quiescent in the absence of food. This quiescence is characterized by a slowing of S phase, a block to M-phase entry, and the ability to re-enter M phase rapidly in response to re-feeding. Further, we demonstrate that cell-cycle quiescence alters the genetic requirements for stem cell maintenance: The signaling pathway required for stem cell maintenance under fed conditions—GLP-1/Notch signaling—becomes dispensable under conditions of quiescence. Thus, cell-cycle quiescence can itself maintain stem cells, independent of the signaling pathway otherwise essential for such maintenance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10832.001 PMID:26551561

  15. B-cell translocation gene 2 positively regulates GLP-1-stimulated insulin secretion via induction of PDX-1 in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seung-Lark; Kwon, Okyun; Kim, Sun-Gyun; Lee, In-Kyu; Kim, Yong Deuk

    2013-05-24

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a potent glucoincretin hormone and an important agent for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Here we demonstrate that B-cell translocation gene 2 (BTG2) is a crucial regulator in GLP-1-induced insulin gene expression and insulin secretion via upregulation of pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX-1) in pancreatic β-cells. GLP-1 treatment significantly increased BTG2, PDX-1 and insulin gene expression in pancreatic β-cells. Notably, adenovirus-mediated overexpression of BTG2 significantly elevated insulin secretion, as well as insulin and PDX-1 gene expression. Physical interaction studies showed that BTG2 is associated with increased PDX-1 occupancy on the insulin gene promoter via a direct interaction with PDX-1. Exendin-4 (Ex-4), a GLP-1 agonist, and GLP-1 in pancreatic β-cells increased insulin secretion through the BTG2-PDX-1-insulin pathway, which was blocked by endogenous BTG2 knockdown using a BTG2 small interfering RNA knockdown system. Finally, we revealed that Ex-4 and GLP-1 significantly elevated insulin secretion via upregulation of the BTG2-PDX-1 axis in pancreatic islets, and this phenomenon was abolished by endogenous BTG2 knockdown. Collectively, our current study provides a novel molecular mechanism by which GLP-1 positively regulates insulin gene expression via BTG2, suggesting that BTG2 has a key function in insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells.

  16. Quantification of the Contribution of GLP-1 to Mediating Insulinotropic Effects of DPP-4 Inhibition With Vildagliptin in Healthy Subjects and Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Using Exendin [9-39] as a GLP-1 Receptor Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Nauck, Michael A; Kind, Joachim; Köthe, Lars D; Holst, Jens J; Deacon, Carolyn F; Broschag, Matthias; He, Yan Ling; Kjems, Lise; Foley, James

    2016-08-01

    We quantified the contribution of GLP-1 as a mediator of the therapeutic effects of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibition (vildagliptin) by using the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin [9-39] in patients with type 2 diabetes and in healthy subjects. Thirty-two patients with type 2 diabetes and 29 age- and weight-matched healthy control subjects were treated in randomized order with 100 mg once daily vildagliptin or placebo for 10 days. Meal tests were performed (days 9 and 10) without and with a high-dose intravenous infusion of exendin [9-39]. The main end point was the ratio of the areas under the curve (AUCs) of integrated insulin secretion rates (total AUCISR) and glucose (total AUCglucose) over 4 h after the meal. Vildagliptin treatment more than doubled responses of intact GLP-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and lowered glucose responses without changing AUCISR/AUCglucose in healthy subjects. Vildagliptin significantly increased this ratio by 10.5% in patients with type 2 diabetes, and exendin [9-39] reduced it (both P < 0.0001). The percentage reduction in the AUCISR/AUCglucose ratio achieved with exendin [9-39] was significantly smaller after vildagliptin treatment than after placebo treatment (P = 0.026) and was equivalent to 47 ± 5% of the increments due to vildagliptin. Thus, other mediators appear to contribute significantly to the therapeutic effects of DPP-4 inhibition.

  17. Targeting the TGR5-GLP-1 pathway to combat type 2 diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Pols, T W H; Auwerx, J; Schoonjans, K

    2010-01-01

    Incretin-based therapies have shown promise in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Here we review our current understanding of TGR5 as a target to induce glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. These new observations suggest that TGR5 agonists may constitute a novel approach to treat type 2 diabetes, as well as complications of diabetes, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:20444564

  18. The GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Liraglutide Improves Memory Function and Increases Hippocampal CA1 Neuronal Numbers in a Senescence-Accelerated Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik H; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Niehoff, Michael L; Morley, John E; Jelsing, Jacob; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Farr, Susan A; Vrang, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists, currently used in the management of type 2 diabetes, exhibit neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects in amyloid-β (Aβ) toxicity models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We investigated the potential pro-cognitive and neuroprotective effects of the once-daily GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide in senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice, a model of age-related sporadic AD not dominated by amyloid plaques. Six-month-old SAMP8 mice received liraglutide (100 or 500 μg/kg/day, s.c.) or vehicle once daily for 4 months. Vehicle-dosed age-matched 50% back-crossed as well as untreated young (4-month-old) SAMP8 mice were used as control groups for normal memory function. Vehicle-dosed 10-month-old SAMP8 mice showed significant learning and memory retention deficits in an active-avoidance T-maze, as compared to both control groups. Also, 10-month-old SAMP8 mice displayed no immunohistological signatures of amyloid-β plaques or hyperphosphorylated tau, indicating the onset of cognitive deficits prior to deposition of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in this AD model. Liraglutide significantly increased memory retention and total hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron numbers in SAMP8 mice, as compared to age-matched vehicle-dosed SAMP8 mice. In conclusion, liraglutide delayed or partially halted the progressive decline in memory function associated with hippocampal neuronal loss in a mouse model of pathological aging with characteristics of neurobehavioral and neuropathological impairments observed in early-stage sporadic AD.

  19. The GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Liraglutide Improves Memory Function and Increases Hippocampal CA1 Neuronal Numbers in a Senescence-Accelerated Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Henrik H.; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Niehoff, Michael L.; Morley, John E.; Jelsing, Jacob; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Farr, Susan A.; Vrang, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies indicate that glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists, currently used in the management of type 2 diabetes, exhibit neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects in amyloid-β (Aβ) toxicity models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We investigated the potential pro-cognitive and neuroprotective effects of the once-daily GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide in senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice, a model of age-related sporadic AD not dominated by amyloid plaques. Six-month-old SAMP8 mice received liraglutide (100 or 500 μg/kg/day, s.c.) or vehicle once daily for 4 months. Vehicle-dosed age-matched 50% back-crossed as well as untreated young (4-month-old) SAMP8 mice were used as control groups for normal memory function. Vehicle-dosed 10-month-old SAMP8 mice showed significant learning and memory retention deficits in an active-avoidance T-maze, as compared to both control groups. Also, 10-month-old SAMP8 mice displayed no immunohistological signatures of amyloid-β plaques or hyperphosphorylated tau, indicating the onset of cognitive deficits prior to deposition of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in this AD model. Liraglutide significantly increased memory retention and total hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron numbers in SAMP8 mice, as compared to age-matched vehicle-dosed SAMP8 mice. In conclusion, liraglutide delayed or partially halted the progressive decline in memory function associated with hippocampal neuronal loss in a mouse model of pathological aging with characteristics of neurobehavioral and neuropathological impairments observed in early-stage sporadic AD. PMID:25869785

  20. Serum bile acids and GLP-1 decrease following telemetric induced weight loss: results of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Biemann, Ronald; Penner, Marina; Borucki, Katrin; Westphal, Sabine; Luley, Claus; Rönicke, Raik; Biemann, Kathleen; Weikert, Cornelia; Lux, Anke; Goncharenko, Nikolai; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Schneider, Jochen G; Isermann, Berend

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are increasingly recognised as metabolic regulators, potentially improving insulin sensitivity following bariatric surgery. However, physiological relevance of such observations remains unknown. Hence, we analysed serum BA composition and associated gut-derived hormone levels following lifestyle-induced weight loss in individuals with metabolic syndrome (MetS). 74 non-smoking men (45-55 yr) with MetS were randomised to a lifestyle-induced weight loss program (supervision via telemonitoring) or to a control arm. Before and after a 6 months intervention period clinical and laboratory parameters, body composition, serum BA profile, FGF-19, and GLP-1 concentrations were determined in fasting blood samples. 30 participants in the control and 33 participants in the treatment arm completed the study and were included in the data analysis. In participants of the treatment arm lifestyle-induced weight loss resulted in markedly improved insulin sensitivity. Serum levels of BA species and total GLP-1 decreased, while FGF-19 remained stable. Serum BA composition changed towards an increased 12α-hydroxylated/non-12α-hydroxylated ratio. None of these parameters changed in participants of the control arm. Our results demonstrate that improved metabolic control by lifestyle modifications lowers serum levels of BAs and GLP-1 and changes serum BA composition towards an increased 12α/non-12α ratio (ICTRP Trial Number: U1111-1158-3672). PMID:27452603

  1. Impact of Diabetes-Specific Nutritional Formulas versus Oatmeal on Postprandial Glucose, Insulin, GLP-1 and Postprandial Lipidemia.

    PubMed

    Mottalib, Adham; Mohd-Yusof, Barakatun-Nisak; Shehabeldin, Mohamed; Pober, David M; Mitri, Joanna; Hamdy, Osama

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes-specific nutritional formulas (DSNFs) are frequently used as part of medical nutrition therapy for patients with diabetes. This study aims to evaluate postprandial (PP) effects of 2 DSNFs; Glucerna (GL) and Ultra Glucose Control (UGC) versus oatmeal (OM) on glucose, insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), free fatty acids (FFA) and triglycerides (TG). After an overnight fast, 22 overweight/obese patients with type 2 diabetes were given 200 kcal of each of the three meals on three separate days in random order. Blood samples were collected at baseline and at 30, 60, 90, 120, 180 and 240 min. Glucose area under the curve (AUC0-240) after GL and UGC was lower than OM (p < 0.001 for both). Insulin positive AUC0-120 after UGC was higher than after OM (p = 0.02). GLP-1 AUC0-120 and AUC0-240 after GL and UGC was higher than after OM (p < 0.001 for both). FFA and TG levels were not different between meals. Intake of DSNFs improves PP glucose for 4 h in comparison to oatmeal of similar caloric level. This is achieved by either direct stimulation of insulin secretion or indirectly by stimulating GLP-1 secretion. The difference between their effects is probably related to their unique blends of amino acids, carbohydrates and fat. PMID:27455318

  2. Impact of Diabetes-Specific Nutritional Formulas versus Oatmeal on Postprandial Glucose, Insulin, GLP-1 and Postprandial Lipidemia.

    PubMed

    Mottalib, Adham; Mohd-Yusof, Barakatun-Nisak; Shehabeldin, Mohamed; Pober, David M; Mitri, Joanna; Hamdy, Osama

    2016-07-22

    Diabetes-specific nutritional formulas (DSNFs) are frequently used as part of medical nutrition therapy for patients with diabetes. This study aims to evaluate postprandial (PP) effects of 2 DSNFs; Glucerna (GL) and Ultra Glucose Control (UGC) versus oatmeal (OM) on glucose, insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), free fatty acids (FFA) and triglycerides (TG). After an overnight fast, 22 overweight/obese patients with type 2 diabetes were given 200 kcal of each of the three meals on three separate days in random order. Blood samples were collected at baseline and at 30, 60, 90, 120, 180 and 240 min. Glucose area under the curve (AUC0-240) after GL and UGC was lower than OM (p < 0.001 for both). Insulin positive AUC0-120 after UGC was higher than after OM (p = 0.02). GLP-1 AUC0-120 and AUC0-240 after GL and UGC was higher than after OM (p < 0.001 for both). FFA and TG levels were not different between meals. Intake of DSNFs improves PP glucose for 4 h in comparison to oatmeal of similar caloric level. This is achieved by either direct stimulation of insulin secretion or indirectly by stimulating GLP-1 secretion. The difference between their effects is probably related to their unique blends of amino acids, carbohydrates and fat.

  3. Impact of Diabetes-Specific Nutritional Formulas versus Oatmeal on Postprandial Glucose, Insulin, GLP-1 and Postprandial Lipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Mottalib, Adham; Mohd-Yusof, Barakatun-Nisak; Shehabeldin, Mohamed; Pober, David M.; Mitri, Joanna; Hamdy, Osama

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes-specific nutritional formulas (DSNFs) are frequently used as part of medical nutrition therapy for patients with diabetes. This study aims to evaluate postprandial (PP) effects of 2 DSNFs; Glucerna (GL) and Ultra Glucose Control (UGC) versus oatmeal (OM) on glucose, insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), free fatty acids (FFA) and triglycerides (TG). After an overnight fast, 22 overweight/obese patients with type 2 diabetes were given 200 kcal of each of the three meals on three separate days in random order. Blood samples were collected at baseline and at 30, 60, 90, 120, 180 and 240 min. Glucose area under the curve (AUC0–240) after GL and UGC was lower than OM (p < 0.001 for both). Insulin positive AUC0–120 after UGC was higher than after OM (p = 0.02). GLP-1 AUC0–120 and AUC0–240 after GL and UGC was higher than after OM (p < 0.001 for both). FFA and TG levels were not different between meals. Intake of DSNFs improves PP glucose for 4 h in comparison to oatmeal of similar caloric level. This is achieved by either direct stimulation of insulin secretion or indirectly by stimulating GLP-1 secretion. The difference between their effects is probably related to their unique blends of amino acids, carbohydrates and fat. PMID:27455318

  4. From Theory to Clinical Practice in the Use of GLP-1 Receptor Agonists and DPP-4 Inhibitors Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dicembrini, Ilaria; Pala, Laura; Rotella, Carlo Maria

    2011-01-01

    Promoting long-term adherence to lifestyle modification and choice of antidiabetic agent with low hypoglycemia risk profile and positive weight profile could be the most effective strategy in achieving sustained glycemic control and in reducing comorbidities. From this perspective, vast interest has been generated by glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4i). In this review our ten-year clinical and laboratory experience by in vitro and in vivo studies is reported. Herein, we reviewed available data on the efficacy and safety profile of GLP-1 receptor agonists and DPP-4i. The introduction of incretin hormone-based therapies represents a novel therapeutic strategy, because these drugs not only improve glycemia with minimal risk of hypoglycemia but also have other extraglycemic beneficial effects. In clinical studies, both GLP-1 receptor agonists and DPP-4i, improve β cell function indexes. All these agents showed trophic effects on beta-cell mass in animal studies. The use of these drugs is associated with positive or neucral effect on body weight and improvements in blood pressure, diabetic dyslipidemia, hepatic steazosis markets, and myocardial function. These effects have the potential to reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease, which is a major cause of mortality in patients with diabetes. PMID:21747834

  5. Serum bile acids and GLP-1 decrease following telemetric induced weight loss: results of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Biemann, Ronald; Penner, Marina; Borucki, Katrin; Westphal, Sabine; Luley, Claus; Rönicke, Raik; Biemann, Kathleen; Weikert, Cornelia; Lux, Anke; Goncharenko, Nikolai; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Schneider, Jochen G.; Isermann, Berend

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are increasingly recognised as metabolic regulators, potentially improving insulin sensitivity following bariatric surgery. However, physiological relevance of such observations remains unknown. Hence, we analysed serum BA composition and associated gut-derived hormone levels following lifestyle-induced weight loss in individuals with metabolic syndrome (MetS). 74 non-smoking men (45–55 yr) with MetS were randomised to a lifestyle-induced weight loss program (supervision via telemonitoring) or to a control arm. Before and after a 6 months intervention period clinical and laboratory parameters, body composition, serum BA profile, FGF-19, and GLP-1 concentrations were determined in fasting blood samples. 30 participants in the control and 33 participants in the treatment arm completed the study and were included in the data analysis. In participants of the treatment arm lifestyle-induced weight loss resulted in markedly improved insulin sensitivity. Serum levels of BA species and total GLP-1 decreased, while FGF-19 remained stable. Serum BA composition changed towards an increased 12α-hydroxylated/non-12α-hydroxylated ratio. None of these parameters changed in participants of the control arm. Our results demonstrate that improved metabolic control by lifestyle modifications lowers serum levels of BAs and GLP-1 and changes serum BA composition towards an increased 12α/non-12α ratio (ICTRP Trial Number: U1111-1158-3672). PMID:27452603

  6. GLP-1 analogue improves hepatic lipid accumulation by inducing autophagy via AMPK/mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    He, Qin; Sha, Sha; Sun, Lei; Zhang, Jing; Dong, Ming

    2016-08-01

    The incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) keeps rising year by year, and NAFLD is rapidly becoming the most common liver disease worldwide. Clinical studies have found that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue, liraglutide (LRG), cannot only reduce glucose levels, but also improve hepatic lipase, especially in patients also with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In addition, enhancing autophagy decreases lipid accumulation in hepatocytes. The aim of the present study is to explore the effect of LRG on hepatocyte steatosis and the possible role of autophagy. We set up an obesity mouse model with a high-fat diet (HFD) and induced hepatocyte steatosis with free fatty acids (FFA) in human L-O2 cells. LRG and two inhibitors of autophagy, Chloroquine (CQ) and bafilomycin A1 (Baf), were added into each group, respectively. The lipid profiles and morphological modifications of each group were tested. Immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence staining and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to measure autophagy in this study. The autophagy protein expression of SQSTM1 (P62), and LC3B, along with the signaling pathway proteins of mTOR, phosphorylated mTOR (p-mTOR), AMPK, phosphorylated AMPK (p-AMPK) and Beclin1, were evaluated by western blot. Our results showed that LRG improved hepatocyte steatosis by inducing autophagy, and the AMPK/mTOR pathway is involved. These findings suggest an important mechanism for the positive effects of LRG on hepatic steatosis, and provide new evidence for clinical use of LRG in NAFLD. PMID:27208776

  7. Differential responses of the incretin hormones GIP and GLP-1 to increasing doses of dietary carbohydrate but not dietary protein in lean rats.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Stephanie M; Yang, Qing; Kindel, Tammy L; Tso, Patrick

    2010-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that oral ingestion of nutrients stimulates secretion of the incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1); however, it is unclear whether there is a dose-dependent response between the amount of nutrient ingested and the secretion of the hormones in vivo. Using our lymph fistula rat model, we previously demonstrated that both GIP and GLP-1 responded dose dependently to increasing amounts of infused dietary lipid and that the GLP-1-secreting cells were more sensitive to changes in intestinal lipid content. In the present study, we investigated the dose-dependent relationships between incretin secretion and the two remaining macronutrients, carbohydrate and protein. To accomplish this objective, the major mesenteric lymphatic duct of male Sprague-Dawley rats was cannulated. Each animal received a single bolus (3 ml) of saline, dextrin, whey protein, or casein hydrolysate (0.275, 0.55, 1.1, 2.2, 4.4 kcal) via a surgically inserted duodenal or ileal feeding tube. Lymph was continuously collected for 3 h and analyzed for GIP and GLP-1 content. Both GIP and GLP-1 outputs responded dose dependently to increasing amounts of dietary carbohydrate but not protein. Additionally, we found that the GIP-secreting cells were more sensitive than the GLP-1-secreting cells to changes in intestinal carbohydrate content.

  8. Insulin-releasing and metabolic effects of small molecule GLP-1 receptor agonist 6,7-dichloro-2-methylsulfonyl-3-N-tert-butylaminoquinoxaline.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Nigel; Flatt, Peter R; Patterson, Steven; Green, Brian D

    2010-02-25

    Much recent attention has focused on the GLP-1 receptor as a potential target for antidiabetic drugs. Enzyme resistant GLP-1 mimetics such as exenatide are now employed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, but must be administered by injection. The present study has examined and compared the in vitro and in vivo metabolic actions of a small molecule GLP-1 receptor agonist 6,7-dichloro-2-methylsulfonyl-3-N-tert-butylaminoquinoxaline (DMB), with native GLP-1, exenatide and liraglutide. DMB significantly stimulated in vitro insulin secretion from BRIN-BD11 cells but with decreased molar potency compared to native GLP-1 or related mimetics. Administration of DMB in combination with glucose to mice significantly (P<0.05) decreased the overall glucose excursion compared to controls. Exenatide and liraglutide evoked similar (P<0.001) reductions of the overall glycaemic excursion, but were significantly (P<0.001 and P<0.05; respectively) more effective than DMB. These observations were associated with prominently (P<0.05) enhanced glucose-mediated insulin release by exenatide and liraglutide, but not by DMB. Combined injection of DMB with either liraglutide or exenatide did not substantially improve glucose-lowering or insulin-releasing responses. However, administration of DMB in combination with exendin(9-39) did not impair its glucoregulatory actions. These results provide evidence to support the development and potential use of low molecular weight GLP-1 receptor agonists for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:19917278

  9. Clinical and Patient-Related Variables Associated with Initiating GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Therapy in Type 2 Diabetes Patients in Primary Care in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Qing; Grandy, Susan; Hiller, Josh; Kostev, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Aims To investigate real-world clinical and patient-related variables associated with initiating GLP-1 receptor agonist (GLP-1RA) treatment relative to initiation of other glucose-lowering therapies in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients of primary care in Germany. Methods Data for 938 T2D patients who started therapy with a GLP-1RA within 823 practices of primary care throughout Germany were retrospectively analyzed (Disease Analyser: 01/2011–03/2014). 5,197 T2D patients who initiated other non-GLP-1RA antidiabetic therapies were selected as controls. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied to identify factors associated with GLP-1RA initiation in primary care. Results Mean age (SD) of GLP-1RA users was 57.8 (11.8) years (males: 55.5%) and the average BMI was 36.1 (6.7) kg/m2. 22.8% were in diabetologist care and 12.0% had private health insurance. In multivariate regression, choice of GLP-1RA therapy instead of a different glucose-lowering drug class was associated with obesity (odds ratio: 1.68; 95% CI: 1.34–2.10), private health insurance (2.42; 1.89–3.09), younger age (0.94; 0.93–0.95 per year), male sex (0.85; 0.73–0.99), diabetologist care (2.11; 1.73–2.57), and geographic practice location (East vs. West-Germany; 1.25; 1.05–1.49). Among co-medication, angiotensin II antagonists (increased) and non-steroidal antirheumatic agents (decreased) were related to GLP-1RA prescriptions (both p<0.001). Conclusions Consistent with German guidelines, GLP-1RA is mainly prescribed preferentially in T2D patients who are obese. GLP-1RA drugs were more frequently used than other options in privately health insured patients and in patients seeing a diabetologist. PMID:27019360

  10. Characteristics of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus newly treated with GLP-1 receptor agonists (CHADIG Study): a cross-sectional multicentre study in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Conget, Ignacio; Mauricio, Dídac; Ortega, Rafael; Detournay, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Objective Several glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists (GLP-1Ra) have been made recently available in Spain for type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) treatment. There are no published data on the clinical and sociodemographic profile of patients initiating treatment with GLP-1Ra in Spain. Our objective was to understand these patients' characteristics in a real-world clinical practice setting. Design Cross-sectional observational study. Setting Spanish specialist outpatient clinics. Participants 403 adults with DM2 initiating GLP-1Ra treatment were included. Primary and secondary outcome measures Sociodemographic and DM2-related clinical data, including treatment at and after GLP-1Ra initiation and comorbidities, were collected. Results Evaluable patients (n=403; 50.9% female) were included (July 2013 to March 2014) at 24 centres by 53 specialists (47 endocrinology, 6 internal medicine), with the following profile (value±SD): age (58.3±10.4 years), diabetes duration (9.9±7 years), body mass index (BMI; 36.2±5.5) and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c; 8.4±1.4%); 14% had HbA1c≤7%. Previous antidiabetic treatment: 53.8% only oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs), 5.2% insulin and 40% insulin and OAD; of those receiving OAD, 35% single drug, 38.2% 2 drugs and 24% 3 drugs. Concomitant to GLP-1Ra, 55.3% were only on OAD, 36.2% on insulin and OAD, and 7.2% only on insulin. Of those receiving OAD, the GLP-1Ra was mainly associated with 1 drug (65%) or 2 drugs (31.8%). GLP-1Ra are frequently added to existing antidiabetic drugs, with dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors being the OAD most frequently switched (45% receiving 1 before starting GLP-1Ra, only 2.7% receiving it concomitantly). Conclusions In Spain, GLP-1Ra therapy is usually started in combination with OADs or OADs and insulin. These drugs are used in relatively young patients often not reaching therapeutic goals with other treatment combinations, roughly a decade after diagnosis and with a relatively high BMI

  11. Lixisenatide, a novel GLP-1 receptor agonist: efficacy, safety and clinical implications for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bolli, G B; Owens, D R

    2014-07-01

    Recent advances in therapies for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have led to the development of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs), which, unlike insulin and sulphonylurea, are effective, with a low risk of hypoglycaemia. Lixisenatide is recommended as a once-daily GLP-1 RA for the treatment of T2DM. In persons with T2DM, lixisenatide 20 µg once-daily given by bolus subcutaneous injection improves insulin secretion and suppresses glucagon secretion in a glucose-dependent manner. Compared with the longer-acting GLP-1 RA liraglutide, lixisenatide achieved a significantly greater reduction in postprandial plasma glucose (PPG) during a standardized test breakfast in persons with T2DM otherwise insufficiently controlled on metformin alone. This is primarily due to the greater inhibition of gastric motility by lixisenatide compared with liraglutide. The efficacy and safety of lixisenatide was evaluated across a spectrum of T2DM in a series of phase III, randomized, placebo-controlled trials known as the GetGoal programme. Lixisenatide monotherapy or as add-on to oral antidiabetic agents or basal insulin achieved significant reductions in glycated haemoglobin, PPG and fasting plasma glucose, with either weight loss or no weight gain. The most frequent adverse events were gastrointestinal and transient in nature. Lixisenatide provides an easy, once-daily, single-dose, add-on treatment to oral antidiabetic agents or basal insulin for the management of T2DM, with little or no increased risk of hypoglycaemia and a potential beneficial effect on body weight.

  12. Experience with the high-intensity sweetener saccharin impairs glucose homeostasis and GLP-1 release in rats.

    PubMed

    Swithers, Susan E; Laboy, Alycia F; Clark, Kiely; Cooper, Stephanie; Davidson, T L

    2012-07-15

    Previous work from our lab has demonstrated that experience with high-intensity sweeteners in rats leads to increased food intake, body weight gain and adiposity, along with diminished caloric compensation and decreased thermic effect of food. These changes may occur as a result of interfering with learned relations between the sweet taste of food and the caloric or nutritive consequences of consuming those foods. The present experiments determined whether experience with the high-intensity sweetener saccharin versus the caloric sweetener glucose affected blood glucose homeostasis. The results demonstrated that during oral glucose tolerance tests, blood glucose levels were more elevated in animals that had previously consumed the saccharin-sweetened supplements. In contrast, during glucose tolerance tests when a glucose solution was delivered directly into the stomach, no differences in blood glucose levels between the groups were observed. Differences in oral glucose tolerance responses were not accompanied by differences in insulin release; insulin release was similar in animals previously exposed to saccharin and those previously exposed to glucose. However, release of GLP-1 in response to an oral glucose tolerance test, but not to glucose tolerance tests delivered by gavage, was significantly lower in saccharin-exposed animals compared to glucose-exposed animals. Differences in both blood glucose and GLP-1 release in saccharin animals were rapid and transient, and suggest that one mechanism by which exposure to high-intensity sweeteners that interfere with a predictive relation between sweet tastes and calories may impair energy balance is by suppressing GLP-1 release, which could alter glucose homeostasis and reduce satiety.

  13. The role of GLP-1 mimetics and basal insulin analogues in type 2 diabetes mellitus: guidance from studies of liraglutide

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, A H

    2012-01-01

    In people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the incretin effect is reduced, but the recent advent of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 agonists/analogues has enabled restoration of at least some of the function of the incretin system, with accompanying improvements in glycaemic control. Two GLP-1 receptor agonists/analogues are currently approved for the treatment of T2DM—exenatide (Byetta®, Eli Lilly & Co., Indianapolis, IN, US) and liraglutide (Victoza®, Novo Nordisk, Bagsvaerd, Denmark); a once-weekly formulation of exenatide (Bydureon®, Eli Lilly & Co.) has also been approved by the European Medicines Agency. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has recently published guidance on the use of liraglutide in T2DM, based on evidence from the Liraglutide Effect and Action in Diabetes (LEAD) Phase III trial programme, which compared liraglutide with existing glucose-lowering therapies, such as exenatide and insulin glargine. The LEAD programme reported HbA1c reductions from 0.8 to 1.5% with liraglutide (1.2 and 1.8 mg), accompanied by low rates of hypoglycaemia and some weight loss; side effects were primarily gastrointestinal in nature (e.g. nausea and diarrhoea). Based on the findings of the LEAD studies and the NICE recommendation, liraglutide now represents an important therapy widely available in the UK for certain patient groups, including those with a body mass index (BMI) ≥35.0 kg/m2, and patients with a BMI <35 kg/m2 who are considered unsuitable for insulin and are failing to meet targets for glycaemic control with oral agents. NICE guidelines still suggest that most patients without considerable obesity (BMI <35 kg/m2) are probably best managed using insulin therapy. Evidence also suggests a future role for GLP-1 mimetics in combination with basal insulin. PMID:22051096

  14. Activation of spinal glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors specifically suppresses pain hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Gong, Nian; Xiao, Qi; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Chang-Yue; Wang, Yan-Chao; Fan, Hui; Ma, Ai-Niu; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2014-04-01

    This study aims to identify the inhibitory role of the spinal glucagon like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) signaling in pain hypersensitivity and its mechanism of action in rats and mice. First, GLP-1Rs were identified to be specifically expressed on microglial cells in the spinal dorsal horn, and profoundly upregulated after peripheral nerve injury. In addition, intrathecal GLP-1R agonists GLP-1(7-36) and exenatide potently alleviated formalin-, peripheral nerve injury-, bone cancer-, and diabetes-induced hypersensitivity states by 60-90%, without affecting acute nociceptive responses. The antihypersensitive effects of exenatide and GLP-1 were completely prevented by GLP-1R antagonism and GLP-1R gene knockdown. Furthermore, exenatide evoked β-endorphin release from both the spinal cord and cultured microglia. Exenatide antiallodynia was completely prevented by the microglial inhibitor minocycline, β-endorphin antiserum, and opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. Our results illustrate a novel spinal dorsal horn microglial GLP-1R/β-endorphin inhibitory pathway in a variety of pain hypersensitivity states. PMID:24719110

  15. Synthetic small molecule GLP-1 secretagogues prepared by means of a three-component indole annulation strategy.

    PubMed

    Chepurny, Oleg G; Leech, Colin A; Tomanik, Martin; DiPoto, Maria C; Li, Hui; Han, Xinping; Meng, Qinghe; Cooney, Robert N; Wu, Jimmy; Holz, George G

    2016-01-01

    Rational assembly of small molecule libraries for purposes of drug discovery requires an efficient approach in which the synthesis of bioactive compounds is enabled so that numerous structurally related compounds of a similar basic formulation can be derived. Here, we describe (4 + 3) and (3 + 2) indole annulation strategies that quickly generate complex indole heterocycle libraries that contain novel cyclohepta- and cyclopenta[b]indoles, respectively. Screening of one such library comprised of these indoles identifies JWU-A021 to be an especially potent stimulator of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion in vitro. Surprisingly, JWU-A021 is also a potent stimulator of Ca(2+) influx through TRPA1 cation channels (EC50 ca. 200 nM), thereby explaining its ability to stimulate GLP-1 release. Of additional importance, the available evidence indicates that JWU-A021 is one of the most potent non-electrophilic TRPA-1 channel agonists yet to be reported in the literature. PMID:27352904

  16. Synthetic small molecule GLP-1 secretagogues prepared by means of a three-component indole annulation strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepurny, Oleg G.; Leech, Colin A.; Tomanik, Martin; Dipoto, Maria C.; Li, Hui; Han, Xinping; Meng, Qinghe; Cooney, Robert N.; Wu, Jimmy; Holz, George G.

    2016-06-01

    Rational assembly of small molecule libraries for purposes of drug discovery requires an efficient approach in which the synthesis of bioactive compounds is enabled so that numerous structurally related compounds of a similar basic formulation can be derived. Here, we describe (4 + 3) and (3 + 2) indole annulation strategies that quickly generate complex indole heterocycle libraries that contain novel cyclohepta- and cyclopenta[b]indoles, respectively. Screening of one such library comprised of these indoles identifies JWU-A021 to be an especially potent stimulator of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion in vitro. Surprisingly, JWU-A021 is also a potent stimulator of Ca2+ influx through TRPA1 cation channels (EC50 ca. 200 nM), thereby explaining its ability to stimulate GLP-1 release. Of additional importance, the available evidence indicates that JWU-A021 is one of the most potent non-electrophilic TRPA-1 channel agonists yet to be reported in the literature.

  17. The human GLP-1 analogs liraglutide and semaglutide: absence of histopathological effects on the pancreas in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Gotfredsen, Carsten F; Mølck, Anne-Marie; Thorup, Inger; Nyborg, Niels C Berg; Salanti, Zaki; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Larsen, Marianne O

    2014-07-01

    Increased pancreas mass and glucagon-positive adenomas have been suggested to be a risk associated with sitagliptin or exenatide therapy in humans. Novo Nordisk has conducted extensive toxicology studies, including data on pancreas weight and histology, in Cynomolgus monkeys dosed with two different human glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists. In a 52-week study with liraglutide, a dose-related increase in absolute pancreas weight was observed in female monkeys only. Such dose-related increase was not found in studies of 4, 13, or 87 weeks' duration. No treatment-related histopathological abnormalities were observed in any of the studies. Quantitative histology of the pancreas from the 52-week study showed an increase in the exocrine cell mass in liraglutide-dosed animals, with normal composition of endocrine and exocrine cellular compartments. Proliferation rate of the exocrine tissue was low and comparable between groups. Endocrine cell mass and proliferation rates were unaltered by liraglutide treatment. Semaglutide showed no increase in pancreas weight and no treatment-related histopathological findings in the pancreas after 13 or 52 weeks' dosing. Overall, results in 138 nonhuman primates showed no histopathological changes in the pancreas associated with liraglutide or semaglutide, two structurally different GLP-1 receptor agonists.

  18. Synthetic small molecule GLP-1 secretagogues prepared by means of a three-component indole annulation strategy

    PubMed Central

    Chepurny, Oleg G.; Leech, Colin A.; Tomanik, Martin; DiPoto, Maria C.; Li, Hui; Han, Xinping; Meng, Qinghe; Cooney, Robert N.; Wu, Jimmy; Holz, George G.

    2016-01-01

    Rational assembly of small molecule libraries for purposes of drug discovery requires an efficient approach in which the synthesis of bioactive compounds is enabled so that numerous structurally related compounds of a similar basic formulation can be derived. Here, we describe (4 + 3) and (3 + 2) indole annulation strategies that quickly generate complex indole heterocycle libraries that contain novel cyclohepta- and cyclopenta[b]indoles, respectively. Screening of one such library comprised of these indoles identifies JWU-A021 to be an especially potent stimulator of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion in vitro. Surprisingly, JWU-A021 is also a potent stimulator of Ca2+ influx through TRPA1 cation channels (EC50 ca. 200 nM), thereby explaining its ability to stimulate GLP-1 release. Of additional importance, the available evidence indicates that JWU-A021 is one of the most potent non-electrophilic TRPA-1 channel agonists yet to be reported in the literature. PMID:27352904

  19. Resistant starch and pullulan reduce postprandial glucose, insulin, and GLP-1, but have no effect on satiety in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Klosterbuer, Abby S; Thomas, William; Slavin, Joanne L

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of three novel fibers on satiety and serum parameters. In a randomized, double-blind, crossover design, fasted subjects (n=20) consumed a low-fiber control breakfast or one of four breakfasts containing 25 g of fiber from soluble corn fiber (SCF) or resistant starch (RS), alone or in combination with pullulan (SCF+P and RS+P). Visual analog scales assessed appetite, and blood samples were collected to measure glucose, insulin, ghrelin, and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). The fiber treatments did not influence satiety or energy intake compared to control. RS+P significantly reduced glucose, insulin, and GLP-1, but neither SCF treatment differed from control. To conclude, these fibers have little impact on satiety when provided as a mixed meal matched for calories and macronutrients. Additional research regarding the physiological effects of these novel fibers is needed to guide their use as functional ingredients in food products.

  20. GLP-1 secretion is stimulated by 1,10-phenanthroline via colocalized T2R5 signal transduction in human enteroendocrine L cell.

    PubMed

    Park, Jiyoung; Kim, Ki-Suk; Kim, Kang-Hoon; Lee, In-Seung; Jeong, Hyeon-soo; Kim, Yumi; Jang, Hyeung-Jin

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) hormone is known to regulate blood glucose by an insulinotropic effect and increases proliferation as and also prevents apoptosis of pancreatic β cells. We know that GLP-1 is secreted by nutrients such as fatty acids and sweet compounds but also bitter compounds via stimulation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the gut. Among these, bitter compounds are multiply-contained in phytochemicals or artificial materials and perceived as ligands of various bitter taste receptors. We hypothesized that GLP-1 hormone is secreted through stimulation of a single bitter taste receptor by 1,10-phenanthroline which is known agonist of taste receptor type 2 member 5 (T2R5). To prove this hypothesis, we used the representatively well-known 1,10-phenanthroline as ligand of single receptor and evaluated the existence of T2R5 by double-labeling immunofluorescence and then 1,10-phenanthroline is able to secrete GLP-1 hormone through stimulation of T2R5 in human enteroendocrine cells. Consequently, we verify that GLP-1 hormone is colocalized with T2R5 in the human duodenum and ileum tissue and is secreted by 1,10-phenanthroline via T2R5 signal transduction in differentiated human enteroendocrine L cells. PMID:26505793

  1. Exendin-4 Decreases Amphetamine-induced Locomotor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Erreger, Kevin; Davis, Adeola R.; Poe, Amanda M.; Greig, Nigel H.; Stanwood, Gregg D.; Galli, Aurelio

    2012-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is released in response to nutrient ingestion and is a regulator of energy metabolism and consummatory behaviors through both peripheral and central mechanisms. The GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is widely distributed in the central nervous system, however little is known about how GLP-1Rs regulate ambulatory behavior. The abused psychostimulant amphetamine (AMPH) promotes behavioral locomotor activity primarily by inducing the release of the neurotransmitter dopamine. Here, we identify the GLP-1R agonist exendin-4 (Ex-4) as a modulator of behavioral activation by AMPH. We report that in rats a single acute administration of Ex-4 decreases both basal locomotor activity as well as AMPH-induced locomotor activity. Ex-4 did not induce behavioral responses reflecting anxiety or aversion. Our findings implicate GLP-1R signaling as a novel modulator of psychostimulant-induced behavior and therefore a potential therapeutic target for psychostimulant abuse. PMID:22465309

  2. In vivo imaging of transplanted islets with 64Cu-DO3A-VS-Cys40-Exendin-4 by targeting GLP-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhanhong; Todorov, Ivan; Li, Lin; Bading, James R; Li, Zibo; Nair, Indu; Ishiyama, Kohei; Colcher, David; Conti, Peter E; Fraser, Scott E; Shively, John E; Kandeel, Fouad

    2011-08-17

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R) is highly expressed in pancreatic islets, especially on β-cells. Therefore, a properly labeled ligand that binds to GLP-1R could be used for in vivo pancreatic islet imaging. Because native GLP-1 is degraded rapidly by dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV), a more stable agonist of GLP-1 such as Exendin-4 is a preferred imaging agent. In this study, DO3A-VS-Cys(40)-Exendin-4 was prepared through the conjugation of DO3A-VS with Cys(40)-Exendin-4. The in vitro binding affinity of DO3A-VS-Cys(40)-Exendin-4 was evaluated in INS-1 cells, which overexpress GLP-1R. After (64)Cu labeling, biodistribution studies and microPET imaging of (64)Cu-DO3A-VS-Cys(40)-Exendin-4 were performed on both subcutaneous INS-1 tumors and islet transplantation models. The subcutaneous INS-1 tumor was clearly visualized with microPET imaging after the injection of (64)Cu-DO3A-VS-Cys(40)-Exendin-4. GLP-1R positive organs, such as pancreas and lung, showed high uptake. Tumor uptake was saturable, reduced dramatically by a 20-fold excess of unlabeled Exendin-4. In the intraportal islet transplantation models, (64)Cu-DO3A-VS-Cys(40)-Exendin-4 demonstrated almost two times higher uptake compared with normal mice. (64)Cu-DO3A-VS-Cys(40)-Exendin-4 demonstrated persistent and specific uptake in the mouse pancreas, the subcutaneous insulinoma mouse model, and the intraportal human islet transplantation mouse model. This novel PET probe may be suitable for in vivo pancreatic islets imaging in the human.

  3. 99mTc Labeled Glucagon-Like Peptide-1-Analogue (99mTc-GLP1) Scintigraphy in the Management of Patients with Occult Insulinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sowa-Staszczak, Anna; Trofimiuk-Müldner, Małgorzata; Stefańska, Agnieszka; Tomaszuk, Monika; Buziak-Bereza, Monika; Gilis-Januszewska, Aleksandra; Jabrocka-Hybel, Agata; Głowa, Bogusław; Małecki, Maciej; Bednarczuk, Tomasz; Kamiński, Grzegorz; Kowalska, Aldona; Mikołajczak, Renata; Janota, Barbara; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to assess the utility of [Lys40(Ahx-HYNIC-99mTc/EDDA)NH2]-exendin-4 scintigraphy in the management of patients with hypoglycemia, particularly in the detection of occult insulinoma. Materials and Methods Forty patients with hypoglycemia and increased/confusing results of serum insulin and C-peptide concentration and negative/inconclusive results of other imaging examinations were enrolled in the study. In all patients GLP-1 receptor imaging was performed to localise potential pancreatic lesions. Results Positive results of GLP-1 scintigraphy were observed in 28 patients. In 18 patients postsurgical histopathological examination confirmed diagnosis of insulinoma. Two patients had contraindications to the surgery, one patient did not want to be operated. One patient, who presented with postprandial hypoglycemia, with positive result of GLP-1 imaging was not qualified for surgery and is in the observational group. Eight patients were lost for follow up, among them 6 patients with positive GLP-1 scintigraphy result. One patient with negative scintigraphy was diagnosed with malignant insulinoma. In two patients with negative scintigraphy Munchausen syndrome was diagnosed (patients were taking insulin). Other seven patients with negative results of 99mTcGLP-1 scintigraphy and postprandial hypoglycemia with C-peptide and insulin levels within the limits of normal ranges are in the observational group. We would like to mention that 99mTc-GLP1-SPECT/CT was also performed in 3 pts with nesidioblastosis (revealing diffuse tracer uptake in two and a focal lesion in one case) and in two patients with malignant insulinoma (with the a focal uptake in the localization of a removed pancreatic headin one case and negative GLP-1 1 scintigraphy in the other patient). Conclusions 99mTc-GLP1-SPECT/CT could be helpful examination in the management of patients with hypoglycemia enabling proper localization of the pancreatic lesion and effective

  4. The effect of glucose when added to a fat load on the response of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and apolipoprotein B-48 in the postprandial phase.

    PubMed

    Zemánková, K; Mrázková, J; Piťha, J; Kovář, J

    2015-01-01

    Increased and prolonged postprandial lipemia has been identified as a risk factor of cardiovascular disease. However, there is no consensus on how to test postprandial lipemia, especially with respect to the composition of an experimental meal. To address this question of how glucose, when added to a fat load, affects the selected parameters of postprandial lipemia, we carried out a study in 30 healthy male volunteers. Men consumed an experimental meal containing either 75 g of fat + 25 g of glucose (F+G meal) or 75 g of fat (F meal) in a control experiment. Blood was taken before the meal and at selected time points within the following 8 h. Glucose, when added to a fat load, induced an increase of glycemia and insulinemia and, surprisingly, a 20 % reduction in the response of both total and active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) concentration. The addition of glucose did not affect the magnitude of postprandial triglyceridemia and TRL-C and TRL-TG concentrations but stimulated a faster response of chylomicrons to the test meal, evaluated by changes in apolipoprotein B-48 concentrations. The addition of glucose induced the physiological response of insulin and the lower response of GLP-1 to the test meal during the early postprandial phase, but had no effect on changes of TRL-cholesterol and TRL-TG within 8 h after the meal. PMID:26680669

  5. Effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 in diabetic rat small resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Zeliha; Nacitarhan, Cahit; Ozdem, Sadi S

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the functional effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 [GLP-1(7-36)] and GLP-1(9-36) and the mechanism(s) playing a role in the effects of these agents in isolated small resistance arteries from control and diabetic rats. Cumulative concentrations of GLP-1(7-36) and GLP-1(9-36) produced concentration-dependent relaxations in endothelium-intact but not endothelium-denuded arteries that were significantly decreased in diabetic rats. GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39) significantly inhibited responses to GLP-1 analogs. Nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway blockers, but not indomethacin, significantly decreased responses to GLP-1(7-36) or GLP-1(9-36) in control and diabetic rats. 4-Aminopyridine or glibenclamide incubation did not alter relaxations to GLP-1 analogs. GLP-1(7-36)- and GLP-1(9-36)-induced relaxations were blunted significantly and to similar extends by charybdotoxin and apamin combination in control and diabetic rats. Catalase did not affect, whereas superoxide dismutase (SOD) caused a significant increase in relaxations to GLP-1 analogs only in diabetic rats. We provided evidence about the relaxant effects of GLP-1(7-36) and GLP-1(9-36) in resistance arteries that were reduced in diabetic rats. Both calcium-activated potassium channels and endothelium played a major role in relaxations. Increment in certain reactive oxygen species and/or reduction in superoxide dismutase function might play a role in reduced relaxant responses of resistance arteries to GLP-1(7-36) and GLP-1(9-36) in diabetic rats.

  6. Expression of the fatty acid receptor GPR120 in the gut of diet-induced-obese rats and its role in GLP-1 secretion.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Sarah Juel; Larsen, Leif Kongskov; Hansen, Gitte; Chelur, Shekar; Larsen, Philip Just; Vrang, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Stimulation of the G protein coupled receptor GPR120 has been shown to have anti-inflammatory and insulin-sensitizing effects, to promote glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion, and to play a key role in sensing dietary fat and control energy balance. In a search for differentially expressed genes potentially involved in food intake and body-weight regulation we identified GPR120 to be differentially regulated in the intestine of selectively bred diet induced obese (DIO) and diet resistant (DR) rats. Subsequently we investigated the effect of GPR120 receptor stimulation with the long chain fatty acid alpha linolenic acid (ALA) on GLP-1 secretion in rats. Independent of diet (high or low fat), GPR120 expression showed a two-fold increase in the intestine of DIO compared to DR rats. In situ hybridization revealed a broad expression of GPR120 in the gut mucosa in both intestinal epithelial and endocrine cells. Using double in situ hybridization GPR120 mRNA did not appear to be enriched in preproglucagon expressing L-cells. In line with the anatomical data, ALA administration did not increase circulating GLP-1 levels. Our data shows a widespread expression of GPR120 in the gut epithelium and can not confirm a major role for GPR120 in the regulation of GLP-1 secretion. The broad expression of GPR120 in the gut epithelium supports reports indicating a putative role of GPR120 as a sensor of dietary fat.

  7. In vivo dual-delivery of glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) inhibitor through composites prepared by microfluidics for diabetes therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, F.; Shrestha, N.; Gomes, M. J.; Herranz-Blanco, B.; Liu, D.; Hirvonen, J. J.; Granja, P. L.; Santos, H. A.; Sarmento, B.

    2016-05-01

    Oral delivery of proteins is still a challenge in the pharmaceutical field. Nanoparticles are among the most promising carrier systems for the oral delivery of proteins by increasing their oral bioavailability. However, most of the existent data regarding nanosystems for oral protein delivery is from in vitro studies, lacking in vivo experiments to evaluate the efficacy of these systems. Herein, a multifunctional composite system, tailored by droplet microfluidics, was used for dual delivery of glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor (iDPP4) in vivo. Oral delivery of GLP-1 with nano- or micro-systems has been studied before, but the simultaneous nanodelivery of GLP-1 with iDPP4 is a novel strategy presented here. The type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) rat model, induced through the combined administration of streptozotocin and nicotinamide, a non-obese model of T2DM, was used. The combination of both drugs resulted in an increase in the hypoglycemic effects in a sustained, but prolonged manner, where the iDPP4 improved the therapeutic efficacy of GLP-1. Four hours after the oral administration of the system, blood glucose levels were decreased by 44%, and were constant for another 4 h, representing half of the glucose area under the curve when compared to the control. An enhancement of the plasmatic insulin levels was also observed 6 h after the oral administration of the dual-drug composite system and, although no statistically significant differences existed, the amount of pancreatic insulin was also higher. These are promising results for the oral delivery of GLP-1 to be pursued further in a chronic diabetic model study.

  8. In vivo dual-delivery of glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) inhibitor through composites prepared by microfluidics for diabetes therapy

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, F.; Shrestha, N.; Gomes, M. J.; Herranz-Blanco, B.; Liu, D.; Hirvonen, J. J.; Granja, P. L.; Santos, H. A.

    2016-01-01

    Oral delivery of proteins is still a challenge in the pharmaceutical field. Nanoparticles are among the most promising carrier systems for the oral delivery of proteins by increasing their oral bioavailability. However, most of the existent data regarding nanosystems for oral protein delivery is from in vitro studies, lacking in vivo experiments to evaluate the efficacy of these systems. Herein, a multifunctional composite system, tailored by droplet microfluidics, was used for dual delivery of glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor (iDPP4) in vivo. Oral delivery of GLP-1 with nano- or micro-systems has been studied before, but the simultaneous nanodelivery of GLP-1 with iDPP4 is a novel strategy presented here. The type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) rat model, induced through the combined administration of streptozotocin and nicotinamide, a non-obese model of T2DM, was used. The combination of both drugs resulted in an increase in the hypoglycemic effects in a sustained, but prolonged manner, where the iDPP4 improved the therapeutic efficacy of GLP-1. Four hours after the oral administration of the system, blood glucose levels were decreased by 44%, and were constant for another 4 h, representing half of the glucose area under the curve when compared to the control. An enhancement of the plasmatic insulin levels was also observed 6 h after the oral administration of the dual-drug composite system and, although no statistically significant differences existed, the amount of pancreatic insulin was also higher. These are promising results for the oral delivery of GLP-1 to be pursued further in a chronic diabetic model study. PMID:27150301

  9. Jejunal linoleic acid infusions require GLP-1 receptor signaling to inhibit food intake: implications for the effectiveness of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    PubMed Central

    Moghadam, Alexander A.; Moran, Timothy H.

    2011-01-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery results in sustained decreases in food intake and weight loss. A key component is likely the direct delivery of nutrients to the jejunum and resulting changes in levels of gut peptide secretion. Prior work modeling this aspect of the surgery has shown that small-volume, prolonged jejunal infusions of linoleic acid (LA) produce sustained decreases in food intake and weight loss. LA infusions also significantly elevate plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels. To assess a role for the increased circulating GLP-1 in the feeding suppression, we examined the effect of prolonged peripheral minipump administration of the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin 9–39 (Ex 9) on the feeding suppression produced by jejunal LA. Using a 2 × 2 design, we infused either saline or LA in the jejunum (7 h/day, 11.4 kcal) for 5 days with a subset of animals from each group receiving either saline or Ex 9 (25 pmol·kg−1·min−1) continuously via a minipump. The antagonist alone had no effect on food intake. LA reduced daily food intake greatly in excess of the kilocalories infused. Ex 9 completely blocked the feeding suppression produced by the jejunal LA infusion. Ex 9 also attenuated the increase in plasma GLP-1 induced by jejunal LA infusions. These data demonstrate that endogenous GLP-1 receptor signaling is necessary for the reduction in food intake produced by jejunal LA infusions. Whether increased secretion of additional gut peptides is also necessary for such suppressions remains to be determined. PMID:21917638

  10. Direct effects of exendin-(9,39) and GLP-1-(9,36)amide on insulin action, β-cell function, and glucose metabolism in nondiabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Sathananthan, Matheni; Farrugia, Luca P; Miles, John M; Piccinini, Francesca; Dalla Man, Chiara; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Cobelli, Claudio; Rizza, Robert A; Vella, Adrian

    2013-08-01

    Exendin-(9,39) is a competitive antagonist of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) at its receptor. However, it is unclear if it has direct and unique effects of its own. We tested the hypothesis that exendin-(9,39) and GLP-1-(9,36)amide have direct effects on hormone secretion and β-cell function as well as glucose metabolism in healthy subjects. Glucose containing [3-(3)H]glucose was infused to mimic the systemic appearance of glucose after a meal. Saline, GLP-1-(9,36)amide, or exendin-(9,39) at 30 pmol/kg/min (Ex 30) or 300 pmol/kg/min (Ex 300) were infused in random order on separate days. Integrated glucose concentrations were slightly but significantly increased by exendin-(9,39) (365 ± 43 vs. 383 ± 35 vs. 492 ± 49 vs. 337 ± 50 mmol per 6 h, saline, Ex 30, Ex 300, and GLP-1-[9,36]amide, respectively; P = 0.05). Insulin secretion did not differ among groups. However, insulin action was lowered by exendin-(9,39) (25 ± 4 vs. 20 ± 4 vs. 18 ± 3 vs. 21 ± 4 10(-4) dL/kg[min per μU/mL]; P = 0.02), resulting in a lower disposition index (DI) during exendin-(9,39) infusion (1,118 ± 118 vs. 816 ± 83 vs. 725 ± 127 vs. 955 ± 166 10(-14) dL/kg/min(2) per pmol/L; P = 0.003). Endogenous glucose production and glucose disappearance did not differ significantly among groups. We conclude that exendin-(9,39), but not GLP-1-(9,36)amide, decreases insulin action and DI in healthy humans.

  11. Evidence for glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor signaling to activate ATP-sensitive potassium channels in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hye-Jung; Park, Hyun-Sun; Park, Sung-Hee; Park, Jae-Hyung; Shin, Su-Kyung; Song, Seung Eun; Hwang, Meeyul; Cho, Ho-Chan; Song, Dae-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a gut peptide that promotes insulin release from pancreatic beta cells. GLP-1 has been shown to confer glucose-insensitive beta cells with glucose sensitivity by modulation of the activity of the ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel. The channel closing effect of GLP-1, interacting with corresponding G-protein-coupled receptors, has been well established; however, to our knowledge, no study has shown whether GLP-1 directly induces activation of beta-cell KATP channels. Here, we aimed to evaluate whether the activation of beta-cell KATP channels by GLP-1 exists and affects intracellular Ca(2+) levels ([Ca(2+)]i). KATP channel activity was measured in isolated rat pancreatic beta cells by whole-cell perforated patch-clamp recordings with a diazoxide-containing pipette solution. Changes in [Ca(2+)]i and the subcellular localization of KATP channels were observed using the calcium-sensitive dye fura-4/AM and anti-Kir6.2 antibodies in INS-1 beta cells, respectively. To eliminate the well-known inhibitory effects of GLP-1 on KATP channel activity, channels were fully inhibited by pretreatment with methyl pyruvate and epigallocatechin-3-gallate. In the pretreated beta cells, GLP-1 and exendin-4 promptly activated the channels, reducing [Ca(2+)]i. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 blocked the effects of GLP-1 on channel activity. Moreover, phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate mimicked the effects of GLP-1. These results suggested that beta-cell GLP-1 receptor signaling involved activation of KATP channels via a PI3K-dependent pathway. This alternative mechanism of GLP-1 function may act as a negative feedback pathway, modulating the glucose-dependent GLP-1 inhibition on KATP channel activity. PMID:26655814

  12. In Alzheimer's Disease, 6-Month Treatment with GLP-1 Analog Prevents Decline of Brain Glucose Metabolism: Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Gejl, Michael; Gjedde, Albert; Egefjord, Lærke; Møller, Arne; Hansen, Søren B; Vang, Kim; Rodell, Anders; Brændgaard, Hans; Gottrup, Hanne; Schacht, Anna; Møller, Niels; Brock, Birgitte; Rungby, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    In animal models, the incretin hormone GLP-1 affects Alzheimer's disease (AD). We hypothesized that treatment with GLP-1 or an analog of GLP-1 would prevent accumulation of Aβ and raise, or prevent decline of, glucose metabolism (CMRglc) in AD. In this 26-week trial, we randomized 38 patients with AD to treatment with the GLP-1 analog liraglutide (n = 18), or placebo (n = 20). We measured Aβ load in brain with tracer [(11)C]PIB (PIB), CMRglc with [(18)F]FDG (FDG), and cognition with the WMS-IV scale (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01469351). The PIB binding increased significantly in temporal lobe in placebo and treatment patients (both P = 0.04), and in occipital lobe in treatment patients (P = 0.04). Regional and global increases of PIB retention did not differ between the groups (P ≥ 0.38). In placebo treated patients CMRglc declined in all regions, significantly so by the following means in precuneus (P = 0.009, 3.2 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 5.45; 0.92), and in parietal (P = 0.04, 2.1 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 4.21; 0.081), temporal (P = 0.046, 1.54 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 3.05; 0.030), and occipital (P = 0.009, 2.10 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 3.61; 0.59) lobes, and in cerebellum (P = 0.04, 1.54 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 3.01; 0.064). In contrast, the GLP-1 analog treatment caused a numerical but insignificant increase of CMRglc after 6 months. Cognitive scores did not change. We conclude that the GLP-1 analog treatment prevented the decline of CMRglc that signifies cognitive impairment, synaptic dysfunction, and disease evolution. We draw no firm conclusions from the Aβ load or cognition measures, for which the study was underpowered. PMID:27252647

  13. In Alzheimer’s Disease, 6-Month Treatment with GLP-1 Analog Prevents Decline of Brain Glucose Metabolism: Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gejl, Michael; Gjedde, Albert; Egefjord, Lærke; Møller, Arne; Hansen, Søren B.; Vang, Kim; Rodell, Anders; Brændgaard, Hans; Gottrup, Hanne; Schacht, Anna; Møller, Niels; Brock, Birgitte; Rungby, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    In animal models, the incretin hormone GLP-1 affects Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We hypothesized that treatment with GLP-1 or an analog of GLP-1 would prevent accumulation of Aβ and raise, or prevent decline of, glucose metabolism (CMRglc) in AD. In this 26-week trial, we randomized 38 patients with AD to treatment with the GLP-1 analog liraglutide (n = 18), or placebo (n = 20). We measured Aβ load in brain with tracer [11C]PIB (PIB), CMRglc with [18F]FDG (FDG), and cognition with the WMS-IV scale (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01469351). The PIB binding increased significantly in temporal lobe in placebo and treatment patients (both P = 0.04), and in occipital lobe in treatment patients (P = 0.04). Regional and global increases of PIB retention did not differ between the groups (P ≥ 0.38). In placebo treated patients CMRglc declined in all regions, significantly so by the following means in precuneus (P = 0.009, 3.2 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 5.45; 0.92), and in parietal (P = 0.04, 2.1 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 4.21; 0.081), temporal (P = 0.046, 1.54 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 3.05; 0.030), and occipital (P = 0.009, 2.10 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 3.61; 0.59) lobes, and in cerebellum (P = 0.04, 1.54 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 3.01; 0.064). In contrast, the GLP-1 analog treatment caused a numerical but insignificant increase of CMRglc after 6 months. Cognitive scores did not change. We conclude that the GLP-1 analog treatment prevented the decline of CMRglc that signifies cognitive impairment, synaptic dysfunction, and disease evolution. We draw no firm conclusions from the Aβ load or cognition measures, for which the study was underpowered. PMID:27252647

  14. Ghrelin, GLP-1, and leptin responses during exposure to moderate hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Morishima, Takuma; Goto, Kazushige

    2016-04-01

    Severe hypoxia has been indicated to cause acute changes in appetite-related hormones, which attenuate perceived appetite. However, the effects of moderate hypoxia on appetite-related hormonal regulation and perceived appetite have not been elucidated. Therefore, we examined the effects of moderate hypoxia on appetite-related hormonal regulation and perceived appetite. Eight healthy males (21.0 ± 0.6 years; 173 ± 2.3 cm; 70.6 ± 5.0 kg; 23.4 ± 1.1 kg/m(2)) completed two experimental trials on separate days: a rest trial in normoxia (FiO2 = 20.9%) and a rest trial in hypoxia (FiO2 = 15.0%). The experimental trials were performed over 7 h in an environmental chamber. Blood samples and scores of subjective appetite were collected over 7 h. Standard meals were provided 1 h (745 kcal) and 4 h (731 kcal) after initiating exposure to hypoxia or normoxia within the chamber. Although each meal significantly reduced plasma active ghrelin concentrations (P < 0.05), the response did not differ significantly between the trials over 7 h. No significant differences in the area under the curves for plasma active ghrelin concentrations over 7 h were observed between the two trials. No significant differences were observed in glucagon-like peptide 1 or leptin concentrations over 7 h between the trials. The subjective feeling of hunger and fullness acutely changed in response to meal ingestions. However, these responses were not affected by exposure to moderate hypoxia. In conclusion, 7 h of exposure to moderate hypoxia did not change appetite-related hormonal responses or perceived appetite in healthy males.

  15. Transient overexpression of cyclin D2/CDK4/GLP1 genes induces proliferation and differentiation of adult pancreatic progenitors and mediates islet regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuyuan; Shimoda, Masyuki; Chen, Jiaxi; Matsumodo, Shinichi

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of β-cell regeneration remains poorly understood. Cyclin D2/CDK4 expresses in normal β cells and maintains adult β-cell growth. We hypothesized that gene therapy with cyclin D2/CDK4/GLP-1 plasmids targeted to the pancreas of STZ-treated rats by ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) would force cell cycle re-entry of residual G0-phase islet cells into G1/S phase to regenerate β cells. A single UTMD treatment induced β-cell regeneration with reversal of diabetes for 6 mo without evidence of toxicity. We observed that this β-cell regeneration was not mediated by self-replication of pre-existing β cells. Instead, cyclin D2/CDK4/GLP-1 initiated robust proliferation of adult pancreatic progenitor cells that exist within islets and terminally differentiate to mature islets with β cells and α cells. PMID:22373529

  16. A genomic approach to therapeutic target validation identifies a glucose-lowering GLP1R variant protective for coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Scott, Robert A; Freitag, Daniel F; Li, Li; Chu, Audrey Y; Surendran, Praveen; Young, Robin; Grarup, Niels; Stancáková, Alena; Chen, Yuning; Varga, Tibor V; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Luan, Jian'an; Zhao, Jing Hua; Willems, Sara M; Wessel, Jennifer; Wang, Shuai; Maruthur, Nisa; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Pirie, Ailith; van der Lee, Sven J; Gillson, Christopher; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Amouyel, Philippe; Arriola, Larraitz; Arveiler, Dominique; Aviles-Olmos, Iciar; Balkau, Beverley; Barricarte, Aurelio; Barroso, Inês; Garcia, Sara Benlloch; Bis, Joshua C; Blankenberg, Stefan; Boehnke, Michael; Boeing, Heiner; Boerwinkle, Eric; Borecki, Ingrid B; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Bowden, Sarah; Caldas, Carlos; Caslake, Muriel; Cupples, L Adrienne; Cruchaga, Carlos; Czajkowski, Jacek; den Hoed, Marcel; Dunn, Janet A; Earl, Helena M; Ehret, Georg B; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferrieres, Jean; Foltynie, Thomas; Ford, Ian; Forouhi, Nita G; Gianfagna, Francesco; Gonzalez, Carlos; Grioni, Sara; Hiller, Louise; Jansson, Jan-Håkan; Jørgensen, Marit E; Jukema, J Wouter; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kee, Frank; Kerrison, Nicola D; Key, Timothy J; Kontto, Jukka; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Kraja, Aldi T; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kuusisto, Johanna; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Chunyu; Marenne, Gaëlle; Mohlke, Karen L; Morris, Andrew P; Muir, Kenneth; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Munroe, Patricia B; Navarro, Carmen; Nielsen, Sune F; Nilsson, Peter M; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Packard, Chris J; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Peloso, Gina M; Perola, Markus; Peters, Annette; Poole, Christopher J; Quirós, J Ramón; Rolandsson, Olov; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Salomaa, Veikko; Sánchez, María-José; Sattar, Naveed; Sharp, Stephen J; Sims, Rebecca; Slimani, Nadia; Smith, Jennifer A; Thompson, Deborah J; Trompet, Stella; Tumino, Rosario; van der A, Daphne L; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Virtamo, Jarmo; Walker, Mark; Walter, Klaudia; Abraham, Jean E; Amundadottir, Laufey T; Aponte, Jennifer L; Butterworth, Adam S; Dupuis, Josée; Easton, Douglas F; Eeles, Rosalind A; Erdmann, Jeanette; Franks, Paul W; Frayling, Timothy M; Hansen, Torben; Howson, Joanna M M; Jørgensen, Torben; Kooner, Jaspal; Laakso, Markku; Langenberg, Claudia; McCarthy, Mark I; Pankow, James S; Pedersen, Oluf; Riboli, Elio; Rotter, Jerome I; Saleheen, Danish; Samani, Nilesh J; Schunkert, Heribert; Vollenweider, Peter; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Deloukas, Panos; Danesh, John; Goodarzi, Mark O; Kathiresan, Sekar; Meigs, James B; Ehm, Margaret G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Waterworth, Dawn M

    2016-06-01

    Regulatory authorities have indicated that new drugs to treat type 2 diabetes (T2D) should not be associated with an unacceptable increase in cardiovascular risk. Human genetics may be able to guide development of antidiabetic therapies by predicting cardiovascular and other health endpoints. We therefore investigated the association of variants in six genes that encode drug targets for obesity or T2D with a range of metabolic traits in up to 11,806 individuals by targeted exome sequencing and follow-up in 39,979 individuals by targeted genotyping, with additional in silico follow-up in consortia. We used these data to first compare associations of variants in genes encoding drug targets with the effects of pharmacological manipulation of those targets in clinical trials. We then tested the association of those variants with disease outcomes, including coronary heart disease, to predict cardiovascular safety of these agents. A low-frequency missense variant (Ala316Thr; rs10305492) in the gene encoding glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP1R), the target of GLP1R agonists, was associated with lower fasting glucose and T2D risk, consistent with GLP1R agonist therapies. The minor allele was also associated with protection against heart disease, thus providing evidence that GLP1R agonists are not likely to be associated with an unacceptable increase in cardiovascular risk. Our results provide an encouraging signal that these agents may be associated with benefit, a question currently being addressed in randomized controlled trials. Genetic variants associated with metabolic traits and multiple disease outcomes can be used to validate therapeutic targets at an early stage in the drug development process. PMID:27252175

  17. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor stimulation increases blood pressure and heart rate and activates autonomic regulatory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Lee, Charlotte E.; Marcus, Jacob N.; Williams, Todd D.; Overton, J. Michael; Lopez, Marisol E.; Hollenberg, Anthony N.; Baggio, Laurie; Saper, Clifford B.; Drucker, Daniel J.; Elmquist, Joel K.

    2002-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) released from the gut functions as an incretin that stimulates insulin secretion. GLP-1 is also a brain neuropeptide that controls feeding and drinking behavior and gastric emptying and elicits neuroendocrine responses including development of conditioned taste aversion. Although GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists are under development for the treatment of diabetes, GLP-1 administration may increase blood pressure and heart rate in vivo. We report here that centrally and peripherally administered GLP-1R agonists dose-dependently increased blood pressure and heart rate. GLP-1R activation induced c-fos expression in the adrenal medulla and neurons in autonomic control sites in the rat brain, including medullary catecholamine neurons providing input to sympathetic preganglionic neurons. Furthermore, GLP-1R agonists rapidly activated tyrosine hydroxylase transcription in brainstem catecholamine neurons. These findings suggest that the central GLP-1 system represents a regulator of sympathetic outflow leading to downstream activation of cardiovascular responses in vivo. PMID:12093887

  18. GLP-1 Receptor Agonists

    MedlinePlus

    ... confused. You can learn what to eat or drink to bring your blood glucose level back up to normal. Exenatide and liraglutide can cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, headache, weakness, or dizziness. Some side effects are warning signs of serious conditions. For example, ...

  19. The non-peptide GLP-1 receptor agonist WB4-24 blocks inflammatory nociception by stimulating β-endorphin release from spinal microglia

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hui; Gong, Nian; Li, Teng-Fei; Ma, Ai-Niu; Wu, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Ming-Wei; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Two peptide agonists of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor, exenatide and GLP-1 itself, exert anti-hypersensitive effects in neuropathic, cancer and diabetic pain. In this study, we have assessed the anti-allodynic and anti-hyperalgesic effects of the non-peptide agonist WB4-24 in inflammatory nociception and the possible involvement of microglial β-endorphin and pro-inflammatory cytokines. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We used rat models of inflammatory nociception induced by formalin, carrageenan or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), to test mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Expression of β-endorphin and pro-inflammatory cytokines was measured using real-time quantitative PCR and fluorescent immunoassays. KEY RESULTS WB4-24 displaced the specific binding of exendin (9–39) in microglia. Single intrathecal injection of WB4-24 (0.3, 1, 3, 10, 30 and 100 μg) exerted dose-dependent, specific, anti-hypersensitive effects in acute and chronic inflammatory nociception induced by formalin, carrageenan and CFA, with a maximal inhibition of 60–80%. Spinal WB4-24 was not effective in altering nociceptive pain. Subcutaneous injection of WB4-24 was also antinociceptive in CFA-treated rats. WB4-24 evoked β-endorphin release but did not inhibit expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in either the spinal cord of CFA-treated rats or cultured microglia stimulated by LPS. WB4-24 anti-allodynia was prevented by a microglial inhibitor, β-endorphin antiserum and a μ-opioid receptor antagonist. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results suggest that WB4-24 inhibits inflammatory nociception by releasing analgesic β-endorphin rather than inhibiting the expression of proalgesic pro-inflammatory cytokines in spinal microglia, and that the spinal GLP-1 receptor is a potential target molecule for the treatment of pain hypersensitivity including inflammatory nociception. PMID:25176008

  20. Agavins from Agave angustifolia and Agave potatorum affect food intake, body weight gain and satiety-related hormones (GLP-1 and ghrelin) in mice.

    PubMed

    Santiago-García, Patricia Araceli; López, Mercedes G

    2014-12-01

    Agavins act as a fermentable dietary fiber and have attracted attention due to their potential for reducing the risk of disease. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of supplementation using 10% agavins with a short-degree of polymerization (SDP) from Agave angustifolia Haw. (AASDP) or Agave potatorum Zucc. (APSDP) along with chicory fructans (RSE) as a reference for 5 weeks, on the energy intake, body weight gain, satiety-related hormones from the gut and blood (GLP-1 and ghrelin), blood glucose and lipids, and short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) from the gut of ad libitum-fed mice. We evaluated the energy intake daily and weight gain every week. At the end of the experiment, portal vein blood samples as well as intestinal segments and the stomach were collected to measure glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and ghrelin using RIA and ELISA kits, respectively. Colon SCFAs were measured using gas chromatography. The energy intake, body weight gain, and triglycerides were lower in the fructan-fed mice than in the STD-fed mice. The AASDP, APSDP, and RSE diets increased the serum levels of GLP-1 (40, 93, and 16%, respectively vs. STD) (P ≤ 0.05), whereas ghrelin was decreased (16, 38, and 42%, respectively) (P ≤ 0.05). Butyric acid increased significantly in the APSDP-fed mice (26.59 mmol g(-1), P ≤ 0.001) compared with that in the AASDP- and RSE-fed mice. We concluded that AASDP and APSDP are able to promote the secretion of the peptides involved in appetite regulation, which might help to control obesity and its associated metabolic disorder. PMID:25367106

  1. Agavins from Agave angustifolia and Agave potatorum affect food intake, body weight gain and satiety-related hormones (GLP-1 and ghrelin) in mice.

    PubMed

    Santiago-García, Patricia Araceli; López, Mercedes G

    2014-12-01

    Agavins act as a fermentable dietary fiber and have attracted attention due to their potential for reducing the risk of disease. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of supplementation using 10% agavins with a short-degree of polymerization (SDP) from Agave angustifolia Haw. (AASDP) or Agave potatorum Zucc. (APSDP) along with chicory fructans (RSE) as a reference for 5 weeks, on the energy intake, body weight gain, satiety-related hormones from the gut and blood (GLP-1 and ghrelin), blood glucose and lipids, and short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) from the gut of ad libitum-fed mice. We evaluated the energy intake daily and weight gain every week. At the end of the experiment, portal vein blood samples as well as intestinal segments and the stomach were collected to measure glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and ghrelin using RIA and ELISA kits, respectively. Colon SCFAs were measured using gas chromatography. The energy intake, body weight gain, and triglycerides were lower in the fructan-fed mice than in the STD-fed mice. The AASDP, APSDP, and RSE diets increased the serum levels of GLP-1 (40, 93, and 16%, respectively vs. STD) (P ≤ 0.05), whereas ghrelin was decreased (16, 38, and 42%, respectively) (P ≤ 0.05). Butyric acid increased significantly in the APSDP-fed mice (26.59 mmol g(-1), P ≤ 0.001) compared with that in the AASDP- and RSE-fed mice. We concluded that AASDP and APSDP are able to promote the secretion of the peptides involved in appetite regulation, which might help to control obesity and its associated metabolic disorder.

  2. Effect of Modified Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery on GLP-1, GIP in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Shao-Wei; Cao, Jing; Liu, Xian-Ming; Deng, Xing-Ming; Liu, Zeng; Zhang, Fang-Ting

    2015-01-01

    The type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is one of the most serious diseases that threaten public health. Modified gastric bypass surgery has been applied to the treatment of T2DM patients in the 1990s, but the therapeutic mechanism to this function is still unclear. The aim of this study was to further clarify the effect and the mechanism of modified gastric bypass surgery on glucose metabolism in patients with T2DM. In the study, the incretin indexes and blood glucose indexes were analyzed before surgery and 1 week and 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery. The results suggested that modified Roux-en-Y gastric bypass can promote GLP-1 secretion in patients with T2DM, while reducing the secretion of GIP. Thus it could effectively control blood glucose of patients with T2DM. PMID:26167177

  3. Expression of CTRP3, a novel adipokine, in rats at different pathogenic stages of type 2 diabetes mellitus and the impacts of GLP-1 receptor agonist on it.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Jiang, Li; Yang, Miao; Wu, Yu-wen; Sun, Su-xin; Sun, Jia-zhong

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the expression of C1q/TNF-related protein-3 (CTRP3) in rats at different pathogenic stages of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and the impacts of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist on it. Male wistar rats were fed with high-fat diet for 10 weeks to induce insulin resistance (IR) and then were given low-dose streptozotocin (STZ) intraperitoneal injection to induce T2DM. Exendin-4 (Ex-4), a GLP-1 receptor agonist, was subcutaneous injected to the IR rats and T2DM rats for 4 weeks. The expression of CTRP3 mRNA and protein in epididymis adipose tissue of rats at the stage of IR was lower significantly than that of normal control (NC) rats and decreased more when they were at the stage of overt T2DM (all P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). After the treatment with Ex-4, the mRNA and protein expressions of CTRP3 were increased by 15.5% (P < 0.01) and 14.8% (P < 0.05), respectively, in IR rats and increased by 20.6% (P < 0.01) and 16.5% (P < 0.05), respectively, in T2DM rats. Overall, this study found that the expression of CTRP3 in visceral adipose tissue was progressively decreased in a T2DM rat model from the pathogenic stage of IR to overt diabetes, while Ex-4 treatment increased its expression in such animals.

  4. Characterization of liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, in rat partial and full nigral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik H; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Jelsing, Jacob; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-09-01

    Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, have been demonstrated to promote neuroprotection in the rat 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) neurotoxin model of Parkinson's disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuron loss. In this report, we characterized the effect of a long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonist, liraglutide (500µg/kg/day, s.c.) in the context of a partial or advanced (full) 6-OHDA induced nigral lesion in the rat. Rats received a low (3µg, partial lesion) or high (13.5µg, full lesion) 6-OHDA dose stereotaxically injected into the right medial forebrain bundle (n=17-20 rats per experimental group). Six weeks after induction of a partial nigral dopaminergic lesion, vehicle or liraglutide was administered for four weeks. In the full lesion model, vehicle dosing or liraglutide treatment was applied for a total of six weeks starting three weeks pre-lesion, or administered for three weeks starting on the lesion day. Quantitative stereology was applied to assess the total number of midbrain tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive dopaminergic neurons. As compared to vehicle controls, liraglutide had no effect on the rotational responsiveness to d-amphetamine or apomorphine, respectively. In correspondence, while numbers of TH-positive nigral neurons were significantly reduced in the lesion side (partial lesion ≈55%; full lesion ≈90%) liraglutide administration had no influence dopaminergic neuronal loss in either PD model setting. In conclusion, liraglutide showed no neuroprotective effects in the context of moderate or substantial midbrain dopaminergic neuronal loss and associated functional motor deficits in the rat 6-OHDA lesion model of PD.

  5. Glucose Variability and β- Cell Response by GLP-1 Analogue added-on CSII for Patients with Poorly Controlled Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Hung; Hsieh, Sheng-Hwu; Sun, Jui-Hung; Tsai, Jir-Shiong; Huang, Yu-Yao

    2015-01-01

    The effects of twice-daily GLP-1 analogue injections added on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes (T2DM) were unknown. After optimization of blood glucose in the first 3 days by CSII during hospitalization, patients with poorly controlled T2DM were randomized to receive CSII combined with injections of exenatide or placebo for another 3 days. A total of 51 patients (30 in exenatide and 21 in placebo groups) with mean A1C 11% were studied. There was no difference in mean glucose but a significant higher standard deviation of plasma glucose (SDPG) was found in the exenatide group (50.51 ± 2.43 vs. 41.49 ± 3.00 mg/dl, p = 0.027). The improvement of incremental area under the curve (AUC) of glucose and insulinogenic index (Insulin0–peak/ Glucose0–peak) in 75 g oral glucose tolerance test was prominent in the exenatide group (p < 0.01). The adiponectin level was significantly increased with exenatide added on (0.39 ± 0.32 vs. −1.62 ± 0.97 μg/mL, in exenatide and placebo groups, respectively, p = 0.045). In conclusion, the add-on of GLP-1 analogue to CSII increased glucose variability and the β - cell response in patients with poorly controlled T2DM. PMID:26607841

  6. Activation of Transmembrane Bile Acid Receptor TGR5 Modulates Pancreatic Islet α Cells to Promote Glucose Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Divya P; Asgharpour, Amon; Mirshahi, Faridoddin; Park, So Hyun; Liu, Sichen; Imai, Yumi; Nadler, Jerry L; Grider, John R; Murthy, Karnam S; Sanyal, Arun J

    2016-03-25

    The physiological role of the TGR5 receptor in the pancreas is not fully understood. We previously showed that activation of TGR5 in pancreatic β cells by bile acids induces insulin secretion. Glucagon released from pancreatic α cells and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) released from intestinal L cells regulate insulin secretion. Both glucagon and GLP-1 are derived from alternate splicing of a common precursor, proglucagon by PC2 and PC1, respectively. We investigated whether TGR5 activation in pancreatic α cells enhances hyperglycemia-induced PC1 expression thereby releasing GLP-1, which in turn increases β cell mass and function in a paracrine manner. TGR5 activation augmented a hyperglycemia-induced switch from glucagon to GLP-1 synthesis in human and mouse islet α cells by GS/cAMP/PKA/cAMP-response element-binding protein-dependent activation of PC1. Furthermore, TGR5-induced GLP-1 release from α cells was via an Epac-mediated PKA-independent mechanism. Administration of the TGR5 agonist, INT-777, to db/db mice attenuated the increase in body weight and improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. INT-777 augmented PC1 expression in α cells and stimulated GLP-1 release from islets of db/db mice compared with control. INT-777 also increased pancreatic β cell proliferation and insulin synthesis. The effect of TGR5-mediated GLP-1 from α cells on insulin release from islets could be blocked by GLP-1 receptor antagonist. These results suggest that TGR5 activation mediates cross-talk between α and β cells by switching from glucagon to GLP-1 to restore β cell mass and function under hyperglycemic conditions. Thus, INT-777-mediated TGR5 activation could be leveraged as a novel way to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26757816

  7. Glucagon-like peptide-1 prevents methylglyoxal-induced apoptosis of beta cells through improving mitochondrial function and suppressing prolonged AMPK activation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tien-Jyun; Tseng, Hsing-Chi; Liu, Meng-Wei; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Hsieh, Meng-Lun; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of methylglyoxal (MG) contributes to glucotoxicity and mediates beta cell apoptosis. The molecular mechanism by which GLP-1 protects MG-induced beta cell apoptosis remains unclear. Metformin is a first-line drug for treating type 2 diabetes associated with AMPK activation. However, whether metformin prevents MG-induced beta cell apoptosis is controversial. Here, we explored the signaling pathway involved in the anti-apoptotic effect of GLP-1, and investigated whether metformin had an anti-apoptotic effect on beta cells. MG treatment induced apoptosis of beta cells, impaired mitochondrial function, and prolonged activation of AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). The MG-induced pro-apoptotic effects were abolished by an AMPK inhibitor. Pretreatment of GLP-1 reversed MG-induced apoptosis, and mitochondrial dysfunction, and suppressed prolonged AMPK activation. Pretreatment of GLP-1 reversed AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR)-induced apoptosis, and suppressed prolonged AMPK activation. However, metformin neither leads to beta cell apoptosis nor ameliorates MG-induced beta cell apoptosis. In parallel, GLP-1 also prevents MG-induced beta cell apoptosis through PKA and PI3K-dependent pathway. In conclusion, these data indicates GLP-1 but not metformin protects MG-induced beta cell apoptosis through improving mitochondrial function, and alleviating the prolonged AMPK activation. Whether adding GLP-1 to metformin provides better beta cell survival and delays disease progression remains to be validated. PMID:26997114

  8. Glucagon-like peptide-1 prevents methylglyoxal-induced apoptosis of beta cells through improving mitochondrial function and suppressing prolonged AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tien-Jyun; Tseng, Hsing-Chi; Liu, Meng-Wei; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Hsieh, Meng-Lun; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of methylglyoxal (MG) contributes to glucotoxicity and mediates beta cell apoptosis. The molecular mechanism by which GLP-1 protects MG-induced beta cell apoptosis remains unclear. Metformin is a first-line drug for treating type 2 diabetes associated with AMPK activation. However, whether metformin prevents MG-induced beta cell apoptosis is controversial. Here, we explored the signaling pathway involved in the anti-apoptotic effect of GLP-1, and investigated whether metformin had an anti-apoptotic effect on beta cells. MG treatment induced apoptosis of beta cells, impaired mitochondrial function, and prolonged activation of AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). The MG-induced pro-apoptotic effects were abolished by an AMPK inhibitor. Pretreatment of GLP-1 reversed MG-induced apoptosis, and mitochondrial dysfunction, and suppressed prolonged AMPK activation. Pretreatment of GLP-1 reversed AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR)-induced apoptosis, and suppressed prolonged AMPK activation. However, metformin neither leads to beta cell apoptosis nor ameliorates MG-induced beta cell apoptosis. In parallel, GLP-1 also prevents MG-induced beta cell apoptosis through PKA and PI3K-dependent pathway. In conclusion, these data indicates GLP-1 but not metformin protects MG-induced beta cell apoptosis through improving mitochondrial function, and alleviating the prolonged AMPK activation. Whether adding GLP-1 to metformin provides better beta cell survival and delays disease progression remains to be validated. PMID:26997114

  9. Proteomic Analysis of INS-1 Rat Insulinoma Cells: ER Stress Effects and the Protective Role of Exenatide, a GLP-1 Receptor Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Kyung; Cho, Jin-Hwan; Lee, Jae-Jin; Son, Moon-Ho; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Beta cell death caused by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a key factor aggravating type 2 diabetes. Exenatide, a glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 receptor agonist, prevents beta cell death induced by thapsigargin, a selective inhibitor of ER calcium storage. Here, we report on our proteomic studies designed to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. We conducted comparative proteomic analyses of cellular protein profiles during thapsigargin-induced cell death in the absence and presence of exenatide in INS-1 rat insulinoma cells. Thapsigargin altered cellular proteins involved in metabolic processes and protein folding, whose alterations were variably modified by exenatide treatment. We categorized the proteins with thapsigargin initiated alterations into three groups: those whose alterations were 1) reversed by exenatide, 2) exaggerated by exenatide, and 3) unchanged by exenatide. The most significant effect of thapsigargin on INS-1 cells relevant to their apoptosis was the appearance of newly modified spots of heat shock proteins, thimet oligopeptidase and 14-3-3β, ε, and θ, and the prevention of their appearance by exenatide, suggesting that these proteins play major roles. We also found that various modifications in 14-3-3 isoforms, which precede their appearance and promote INS-1 cell death. This study provides insights into the mechanisms in ER stress-caused INS-1 cell death and its prevention by exenatide. PMID:25793496

  10. Glucagon-like peptide 1: a potent glycogenic hormone.

    PubMed

    Valverde, I; Morales, M; Clemente, F; López-Delgado, M I; Delgado, E; Perea, A; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L

    1994-08-01

    GLP-1(7-36)amide is an insulinotropic peptide derived from the intestinal post-translational proglucagon process, the release of which is increased mainly after a carbohydrate meal; also, its anti-diabetogenic effect in normal and diabetic states has been reported. In this study, GLP-1(7-36)amide stimulates the formation of glycogen from glucose in isolated rat hepatocytes, such a glycogenic effect being achieved with physiological concentrations of the peptide. The GLP-1(7-36)amide-induced glycogenesis is abolished by glucagon, and it is accompanied by stimulation of the glycogen synthase alpha activity and by a decrease in the basal and glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP content. These findings could explain, at least in part, the GLP-1(7-36)amide insulin-independent plasma glucose lowering effect.

  11. Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Protects against Hyperglycemic-Induced Endothelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition and Improves Myocardial Dysfunction by Suppressing Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fei; Zhang, Guang-hao; Feng, Min; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Jia-ning; Dong, Wen-qian; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Yun; Chen, Li; Zhang, Ming-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Under high glucose conditions, endothelial cells respond by acquiring fibroblast characteristics, that is, endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT), contributing to diabetic cardiac fibrosis. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has cardioprotective properties independent of its glucose-lowering effect. However, the potential mechanism has not been fully clarified. Here we investigated whether GLP-1 inhibits myocardial EndMT in diabetic mice and whether this is mediated by suppressing poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1). Streptozotocin diabetic C57BL/6 mice were treated with or without GLP-1 analog (24 nmol/kg daily) for 24 wks. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed to assess cardiac function. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were cultured in normal glucose (NG) (5.5 mmol/L) or high glucose (HG) (30 mmol/L) medium with or without GLP-1analog. Immunofluorescent staining and Western blot were performed to evaluate EndMT and PARP-1 activity. Diabetes mellitus attenuated cardiac function and increased cardiac fibrosis. Treatment with the GLP-1 analog improved diabetes mellitus–related cardiac dysfunction and cardiac fibrosis. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that hyperglycemia markedly increased the percentage of von Willebrand factor (vWF)+/alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)+ cells in total α-SMA+ cells in diabetic hearts compared with controls, which was attenuated by GLP-1 analog treatment. In cultured HAECs, immunofluorescent staining and Western blot also showed that both GLP-1 analog and PARP-1 gene silencing could inhibit the HG-induced EndMT. In addition, GLP-1 analog could attenuate PARP-1 activation by decreasing the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, GLP-1 treatment could protect against the hyperglycemia-induced EndMT and myocardial dysfunction. This effect is mediated, at least partially, by suppressing PARP-1 activation. PMID:25715248

  12. Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor activation regulates cocaine actions and dopamine homeostasis in the lateral septum by decreasing arachidonic acid levels.

    PubMed

    Reddy, I A; Pino, J A; Weikop, P; Osses, N; Sørensen, G; Bering, T; Valle, C; Bluett, R J; Erreger, K; Wortwein, G; Reyes, J G; Graham, D; Stanwood, G D; Hackett, T A; Patel, S; Fink-Jensen, A; Torres, G E; Galli, A

    2016-01-01

    Agonism of the glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP-1R) has been effective at treating aspects of addictive behavior for a number of abused substances, including cocaine. However, the molecular mechanisms and brain circuits underlying the therapeutic effects of GLP-1R signaling on cocaine actions remain elusive. Recent evidence has revealed that endogenous signaling at the GLP-1R within the forebrain lateral septum (LS) acts to reduce cocaine-induced locomotion and cocaine conditioned place preference, both considered dopamine (DA)-associated behaviors. DA terminals project from the ventral tegmental area to the LS and express the DA transporter (DAT). Cocaine acts by altering DA bioavailability by targeting the DAT. Therefore, GLP-1R signaling might exert effects on DAT to account for its regulation of cocaine-induced behaviors. We show that the GLP-1R is highly expressed within the LS. GLP-1, in LS slices, significantly enhances DAT surface expression and DAT function. Exenatide (Ex-4), a long-lasting synthetic analog of GLP-1 abolished cocaine-induced elevation of DA. Interestingly, acute administration of Ex-4 reduces septal expression of the retrograde messenger 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), as well as a product of its presynaptic degradation, arachidonic acid (AA). Notably, AA reduces septal DAT function pointing to AA as a novel regulator of central DA homeostasis. We further show that AA oxidation product γ-ketoaldehyde (γ-KA) forms adducts with the DAT and reduces DAT plasma membrane expression and function. These results support a mechanism in which postsynaptic septal GLP-1R activation regulates 2-AG levels to alter presynaptic DA homeostasis and cocaine actions through AA. PMID:27187231

  13. Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor activation regulates cocaine actions and dopamine homeostasis in the lateral septum by decreasing arachidonic acid levels

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, I A; Pino, J A; Weikop, P; Osses, N; Sørensen, G; Bering, T; Valle, C; Bluett, R J; Erreger, K; Wortwein, G; Reyes, J G; Graham, D; Stanwood, G D; Hackett, T A; Patel, S; Fink-Jensen, A; Torres, G E; Galli, A

    2016-01-01

    Agonism of the glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP-1R) has been effective at treating aspects of addictive behavior for a number of abused substances, including cocaine. However, the molecular mechanisms and brain circuits underlying the therapeutic effects of GLP-1R signaling on cocaine actions remain elusive. Recent evidence has revealed that endogenous signaling at the GLP-1R within the forebrain lateral septum (LS) acts to reduce cocaine-induced locomotion and cocaine conditioned place preference, both considered dopamine (DA)-associated behaviors. DA terminals project from the ventral tegmental area to the LS and express the DA transporter (DAT). Cocaine acts by altering DA bioavailability by targeting the DAT. Therefore, GLP-1R signaling might exert effects on DAT to account for its regulation of cocaine-induced behaviors. We show that the GLP-1R is highly expressed within the LS. GLP-1, in LS slices, significantly enhances DAT surface expression and DAT function. Exenatide (Ex-4), a long-lasting synthetic analog of GLP-1 abolished cocaine-induced elevation of DA. Interestingly, acute administration of Ex-4 reduces septal expression of the retrograde messenger 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), as well as a product of its presynaptic degradation, arachidonic acid (AA). Notably, AA reduces septal DAT function pointing to AA as a novel regulator of central DA homeostasis. We further show that AA oxidation product γ-ketoaldehyde (γ-KA) forms adducts with the DAT and reduces DAT plasma membrane expression and function. These results support a mechanism in which postsynaptic septal GLP-1R activation regulates 2-AG levels to alter presynaptic DA homeostasis and cocaine actions through AA. PMID:27187231

  14. Prediction of the effect on antihyperglycaemic action of sitagliptin by plasma active form glucagon-like peptide-1

    PubMed Central

    Kushiyama, Akifumi; Kikuchi, Takako; Tanaka, Kentaro; Tahara, Tazu; Takao, Toshiko; Onishi, Yukiko; Yoshida, Yoko; Kawazu, Shoji; Iwamoto, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a prediction Factor of Effect of sitagliptin on patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (GLP-1 FEST:UMIN000010645). METHODS: Seventy-six patients with type 2 diabetes, who had insufficient glycemic control [Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) ≥ 7%] in spite of treatment with metformin and/or sulfonylurea, were included in the investigation. Patients were divided into three groups by tertiles of fasting plasma active GLP-1 level, before the administration of 50 mg sitagliptin. RESULTS: At baseline, body mass index, serum UA, insulin and HOMA-IR were higher in the high active GLP-1 group than in the other two groups. The high active GLP-1 group did not show any decline of HbA1c (7.6% ± 1.4% to 7.5% ± 1.5%), whereas the middle and low groups indicated significant decline of HbA1c (7.4 ± 0.7 to 6.8 ± 0.6 and 7.4 ± 1.2 to 6.9 ± 1.3, respectively) during six months. Only the low and middle groups showed a significant increment of active GLP-1, C-peptide level, a decreased log and proinsulin/insulin ratio after administration. In logistic analysis, the low or middle group is a significant explanatory variable for an HbA1c decrease of ≥ 0.5%, and its odds ratio is 4.5 (1.40-17.6) (P = 0.01) against the high active GLP-1 group. This remains independent when adjusted for HbA1c level before administration, patients’ medical history, medications, insulin secretion and insulin resistance. CONCLUSION: Plasma fasting active GLP-1 is an independent predictive marker for the efficacy of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor sitagliptin. PMID:27326345

  15. Effects of Teraphy with Basal Insulin Analogues Combined with GLP 1 Analogues and Metformin in the Treatment of Obese Patients with Poorly Regulated Postprandial Glycemia

    PubMed Central

    Buturovic, Belma Ascic; Ristic, Lejla Burnazovic; Narancic, Alma Mujanovic

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Patient-oriented therapy represents a modern approach in the treatment of patients with diabetes, an approach which is supported in the most recent guidelines by the ADA and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD). The progressive nature of diabetes demands the introduction of insulin therapy much earlier in order to prevent the development of late complications of the disease. Material and methods: The study included 30 patients who had been treated with long-acting insulin analogue and metformin in doses of 3 x 850 mg at least 6 months prior to study entry and in which a good glycaemic control had not been achieved, or with HbA1c > 7%. Patients who had a BMI > 28 kg /m2 were included in the study. Results and discussion: At the beginning of the study the patients were switched to combined therapy with long-acting basal analog, metformin and liraglutide in a dosage of 0.6 mg of 1x1. After 12 weeks of the new therapeutic regimen we recorded a significant reduction in the parameter levels that we monitored in the study. BMI value after the test was 28.2±1.39 kg/m2, p=0.025, HbA1c 7.24±0.47%, p=0.030, fasting blood glucose level 7.04±0.32 mmol/l, p=0.023, postprandial glucose level 7.6±0.46 mmol/l, p=0.012, systolic blood pressure level 123±5.75 mmHg, p=0.015, diastolic blood pressure level 79.1±2.91 mmHg, p=0.03. During research that we have conducted over 12 weeks, a reduction of body weight was achieved while improving the value of parameters significant for the study. Conclusion: There was a significant lowering of HbA1c, fasting blood glucose levels, postprandial glucose levels and better blood pressure control by which we have proved that GLP1 analogues in combination with basal insulin and metformin provide a good glycaemic control with a cardio protective effect, and reduce the risk of late complications. PMID:25568561

  16. A Comparison of the Effects of the GLP-1 Analogue Liraglutide and Insulin Glargine on Endothelial Function and Metabolic Parameters: A Randomized, Controlled Trial Sapporo Athero-Incretin Study 2 (SAIS2)

    PubMed Central

    Nomoto, Hiroshi; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Furumoto, Tomoo; Oba, Koji; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Miyoshi, Arina; Kondo, Takuma; Tsuchida, Kenichi; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Manda, Naoki; Kurihara, Yoshio; Aoki, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives GLP-1 improves hyperglycemia, and it has been reported to have favorable effects on atherosclerosis. However, it has not been fully elucidated whether GLP-1 is able to improve endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of the GLP-1 analogue, liraglutide on endothelial function and glycemic metabolism compared with insulin glargine therapy. Materials and Methods In this multicenter, prospective randomized parallel-group comparison study, 31 diabetic outpatients (aged 60.3 ± 10.3 years with HbA1c levels of 8.6 ± 0.8%) with current metformin and/or sulfonylurea treatment were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive liraglutide or glargine therapy once daily for 14 weeks. Flow mediated dilation (FMD), a comprehensive panel of hemodynamic parameters (Task Force Monitor), and serum metabolic markers were assessed before and after the treatment period. Results A greater reduction (worsening) in %FMD was observed in the glargine group, although this change was not statistically different from the liraglutide group (liraglutide; 5.7 to 5.4%, glargine 6.7 to 5.7%). The augmentation index, C-peptide index, derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolites and BMI were significantly improved in the liraglutide group. Central systolic blood pressure and NT-proBNP also tended to be improved in the liraglutide-treated group, while improvements in HbA1c levels were similar between groups. Cardiac index, blood pressure and most other metabolic parameters were not different. Conclusions Regardless of glycemic improvement, early liraglutide therapy did not affect endothelial function but may provide favorable effects on beta-cell function and cardioprotection in type 2 diabetics without advanced atherosclerosis. Trial Registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry System as trial ID UMIN000005331. PMID:26284918

  17. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Activation Enhances Gut Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Secretion and Improves Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peijian; Yan, Zhencheng; Zhong, Jian; Chen, Jing; Ni, Yinxing; Li, Li; Ma, Liqun; Zhao, Zhigang; Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is rapidly prevailing as a serious global health problem. Current treatments for T2DM may cause side effects, thus highlighting the need for newer and safer therapies. We tested the hypothesis that dietary capsaicin regulates glucose homeostasis through the activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-mediated glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion in the intestinal cells and tissues. Wild-type (WT) and TRPV1 knockout (TRPV1−/−) mice were fed dietary capsaicin for 24 weeks. TRPV1 was localized in secretin tumor cell-1 (STC-1) cells and ileum. Capsaicin stimulated GLP-1 secretion from STC-1 cells in a calcium-dependent manner through TRPV1 activation. Acute capsaicin administration by gastric gavage increased GLP-1 and insulin secretion in vivo in WT but not in TRPV1−/− mice. Furthermore, chronic dietary capsaicin not only improved glucose tolerance and increased insulin levels but also lowered daily blood glucose profiles and increased plasma GLP-1 levels in WT mice. However, this effect was absent in TRPV1−/− mice. In db/db mice, TRPV1 activation by dietary capsaicin ameliorated abnormal glucose homeostasis and increased GLP-1 levels in the plasma and ileum. The present findings suggest that TRPV1 activation–stimulated GLP-1 secretion could be a promising approach for the intervention of diabetes. PMID:22664955

  18. Glucagon-like peptide-1 binding to rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Delgado, E; Luque, M A; Alcántara, A; Trapote, M A; Clemente, F; Galera, C; Valverde, I; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L

    1995-01-01

    We have found [125I]glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)-amide-specific binding activity in rat skeletal muscle plasma membranes, with an estimated M(r) of 63,000 by cross-linking and SDS-PAGE. The specific binding was time and membrane protein concentration dependent, and displaceable by unlabeled GLP-1(7-36)-amide with an ID50 of 3 x 10(-9) M of the peptide; GLP-1(1-36)-amide also competed, whereas glucagon and insulin did not. GLP-1(7-36)-amide did not modify the basal adenylate cyclase activity in skeletal muscle plasma membranes. These data, together with our previous finding of a potent glycogenic effect of GLP-1(7-36)-amide in rat soleus muscle, and also in isolated hepatocytes, which was not accompanied by a rise in the cell cyclic AMP content, lead use to believe that the insulin-like effects of this peptide on glucose metabolism in the muscle could be mediated by a type of receptor somehow different to that described for GLP-1 in pancreatic B cells, where GLP-1 action is mediated by the cyclic AMP-adenylate cyclase system.

  19. Expression, purification, and C-terminal amidation of recombinant human glucagon-like peptide-1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Zhen; Yang, Sheng-Sheng; Dou, Hong; Mao, Ji-Fang; Li, Kang-Sheng

    2004-08-01

    Human glucagon-like peptide-1 (hGLP-1) (7-36) amide, a gastrointestinal hormone with a pharmaceutical potential in treating type 2 diabetes mellitus, is composed of 30 amino acid residues as a mature protein. We report here the development of a method for high-level expression and purification of recombinant hGLP-1 (7-36) amide (rhGLP-1) through glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion expression system. The cDNA of hGLP-1-Leu, the 31st-residue leucine-extended precursor peptide, was prepared by annealing and ligating of artificially synthetic oligonucleotide fragments, inserted into pBluescript SK (+/-) plasmid, and then cloned into pGEX-4T-3 GST fusion vector. The fusion protein GST-hGLP-1-Leu, expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3), was purified by affinity chromatography after high-level culture and sonication of bacteria. Following cleavage of GST-hGLP-1-Leu by cyanogen bromide, the recombinant hGLP-1-Leu was released from fusion protein, and purified using QAE Sepharose ion exchange and RP C(18) chromatography. After purification, the precursor hGLP-1-Leu was transacylated by carboxypeptidase Y, Arg-NH(2) as a nucleophile, to produce rhGLP-1. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry showed the molecular weight was as expected. The biological activity of rhGLP-1 in a rat model demonstrated that plasma glucose concentrations were significantly lower and insulin concentrations higher after intraperitoneal injection of rhGLP-1 together with glucose compared with glucose alone (P < 0.001). PMID:15249052

  20. Glucagon-like peptide-1 binding to rat hepatic membranes.

    PubMed

    Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L; Delgado, E; Trapote, M A; Alcántara, A; Clemente, F; Luque, M A; Perea, A; Valverde, I

    1995-07-01

    We have found [125I]glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1(7-36)amide specific binding activity in rat liver and isolated hepatocyte plasma membranes, with an M(r) of approximately 63,000, estimated by cross-linking and SDS-PAGE. The specific binding was time- and membrane protein concentration-dependent, and equally displaced by unlabelled GLP-1(7-36)amide and by GLP-1(1-36)amide, achieving its ID50 at 3 x 10(-9) M of the peptides. GLP-1(7-36)amide did not modify the basal or the glucagon (10(-8) M)-stimulated adenylate cyclase in the hepatocyte plasma membranes. These data, together with our previous findings of a potent glycogenic effect of GLP-1(7-36)amide in isolated rat hepatocytes, led us to postulate that the insulin-like effects of this peptide on glucose liver metabolism could be mediated by a type of receptor probably different from that described for GLP-1 in pancreatic B-cells or, alternatively, by the same receptor which, in this tissue as well as in muscle, uses a different transduction system.

  1. Simultaneous quantification of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor agonists in rodent plasma by on-line solid phase extraction and LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Roth, Jonathan D; Taylor, Steven W

    2014-04-15

    Peptide agonists of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) and the cholecystokinin-1 receptor (CCK1-R) have therapeutic potential because of their marked anorexigenic and weight lowering effects. Furthermore, recent studies in rodents have shown that co-administration of these agents may prove more effective than treatment either of the peptide classes alone. To correlate the pharmacodynamic effects to the pharmacokinetics of these peptide drugs in vivo, a sensitive and robust bioanalytical method is essential. Furthermore, the simultaneous determination of both analytes in plasma samples by a single method offers obvious advantages. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is well suited to this goal through its ability to simultaneously monitor multiple analytes through selected reaction monitoring (SRM). However, it is a challenge to find appropriate conditions that allow two peptides with widely disparate physiochemical properties to be simultaneously analyzed while maintaining the necessary sensitivity for their accurate plasma concentrations. Herein, we report an on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) LC-MS/MS method for simultaneous quantification of the CCK1-R agonist AC170222 and the GLP-1R agonist AC3174 in rodent plasma. The assay has a linear range from 0.0975 to 100ng/mL, with lower limits of quantification of 0.0975ng/mL and 0.195ng/mL for AC3174 and AC170222, respectively. The intra- and inter-day precisions were below 15%. The developed LC-MS/MS method was used to simultaneously quantify AC3174 and AC170222, the results showed that the terminal plasma concentrations of AC3174 or AC170222 were comparable between groups of animals that were administered with the peptides alone (247±15pg/mL of AC3174 and 1306±48pg/mL of AC170222), or in combination (222±32pg/mL and 1136±47pg/mL of AC3174 and AC170222, respectively). These data provide information on the drug exposure to aid in assessing the combination effects of AC3174 and AC

  2. Long-Term Treatment with Liraglutide, a Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Receptor Agonist, Has No Effect on β-Amyloid Plaque Load in Two Transgenic APP/PS1 Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik H; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Kongsbak-Wismann, Pernille; Schlumberger, Chantal; Jelsing, Jacob; Terwel, Dick; Termont, Annelies; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-01-01

    One of the major histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is cerebral deposits of extracellular β-amyloid peptides. Preclinical studies have pointed to glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptors as a potential novel target in the treatment of AD. GLP-1 receptor agonists, including exendin-4 and liraglutide, have been shown to promote plaque-lowering and mnemonic effects of in a number of experimental models of AD. Transgenic mouse models carrying genetic mutations of amyloid protein precursor (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) are commonly used to assess the pharmacodynamics of potential amyloidosis-lowering and pro-cognitive compounds. In this study, effects of long-term liraglutide treatment were therefore determined in two double APP/PS1 transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease carrying different clinical APP/PS1 mutations, i.e. the 'London' (hAPPLon/PS1A246E) and 'Swedish' mutation variant (hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9) of APP, with co-expression of distinct PS1 variants. Liraglutide was administered in 5 month-old hAPPLon/PS1A246E mice for 3 months (100 or 500 ng/kg/day, s.c.), or 7 month-old hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice for 5 months (500 ng/kg/day, s.c.). In both models, regional plaque load was quantified throughout the brain using stereological methods. Vehicle-dosed hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice exhibited considerably higher cerebral plaque load than hAPPLon/PS1A246E control mice. Compared to vehicle-dosed transgenic controls, liraglutide treatment had no effect on the plaque levels in hAPPLon/PS1A246E and hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice. In conclusion, long-term liraglutide treatment exhibited no effect on cerebral plaque load in two transgenic mouse models of low- and high-grade amyloidosis, which suggests differential sensitivity to long-term liraglutide treatment in various transgenic mouse models mimicking distinct pathological hallmarks of AD. PMID:27421117

  3. Long-Term Treatment with Liraglutide, a Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Receptor Agonist, Has No Effect on β-Amyloid Plaque Load in Two Transgenic APP/PS1 Mouse Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Barkholt, Pernille; Kongsbak-Wismann, Pernille; Schlumberger, Chantal; Jelsing, Jacob; Terwel, Dick; Termont, Annelies; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-01-01

    One of the major histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is cerebral deposits of extracellular β-amyloid peptides. Preclinical studies have pointed to glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptors as a potential novel target in the treatment of AD. GLP-1 receptor agonists, including exendin-4 and liraglutide, have been shown to promote plaque-lowering and mnemonic effects of in a number of experimental models of AD. Transgenic mouse models carrying genetic mutations of amyloid protein precursor (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) are commonly used to assess the pharmacodynamics of potential amyloidosis-lowering and pro-cognitive compounds. In this study, effects of long-term liraglutide treatment were therefore determined in two double APP/PS1 transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease carrying different clinical APP/PS1 mutations, i.e. the ‘London’ (hAPPLon/PS1A246E) and ‘Swedish’ mutation variant (hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9) of APP, with co-expression of distinct PS1 variants. Liraglutide was administered in 5 month-old hAPPLon/PS1A246E mice for 3 months (100 or 500 ng/kg/day, s.c.), or 7 month-old hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice for 5 months (500 ng/kg/day, s.c.). In both models, regional plaque load was quantified throughout the brain using stereological methods. Vehicle-dosed hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice exhibited considerably higher cerebral plaque load than hAPPLon/PS1A246E control mice. Compared to vehicle-dosed transgenic controls, liraglutide treatment had no effect on the plaque levels in hAPPLon/PS1A246E and hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice. In conclusion, long-term liraglutide treatment exhibited no effect on cerebral plaque load in two transgenic mouse models of low- and high-grade amyloidosis, which suggests differential sensitivity to long-term liraglutide treatment in various transgenic mouse models mimicking distinct pathological hallmarks of AD. PMID:27421117

  4. Subthreshold α₂-adrenergic activation counteracts glucagon-like peptide-1 potentiation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Pan, Minglin; Yang, Guang; Cui, Xiuli; Yang, Shao-Nian

    2011-01-01

    The pancreatic β cell harbors α₂-adrenergic and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors on its plasma membrane to sense the corresponding ligands adrenaline/noradrenaline and GLP-1 to govern glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. However, it is not known whether these two signaling systems interact to gain the adequate and timely control of insulin release in response to glucose. The present work shows that the α₂-adrenergic agonist clonidine concentration-dependently depresses glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from INS-1 cells. On the contrary, GLP-1 concentration-dependently potentiates insulin secretory response to glucose. Importantly, the present work reveals that subthreshold α₂-adrenergic activation with clonidine counteracts GLP-1 potentiation of glucose-induced insulin secretion. This counteractory process relies on pertussis toxin- (PTX-) sensitive Gi proteins since it no longer occurs following PTX-mediated inactivation of Gi proteins. The counteraction of GLP-1 potentiation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by subthreshold α₂-adrenergic activation is likely to serve as a molecular mechanism for the delicate regulation of insulin release.

  5. EFFECT OF THE INGESTION OF THE PALM OIL AND GLUTAMINE IN SERUM LEVELS OF GLP-1, PYY AND GLYCEMIA IN DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE 2 PATIENTS SUBMITTED TO METABOLIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    TAKEUTI, Tharsus Dias; TERRA, Guilherme Azevedo; da SILVA, Alex Augusto; TERRA-JÚNIOR, Júverson Alves; da SILVA, Luci Mara; CREMA, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Background Incretins are hormones produced by the intestine and can stimulate the secretion of insulin, helping to diminish the post-prandial glycemia. The administration of an emulsion of palm oil can help in the maintenance of the weight, and can increase circulating incretins levels. Glutamine increases the concentration of incretins in diabetic people. Both can help in metabolic syndrome. Aim To analyze the effects of ingestion of palm oil and glutamine in glycemia and in incretins in patients with diabetes submitted to surgical duodenojejunal exclusion with ileal interposition without gastrectomy. Methods Eleven diabetic type 2 patients were included and were operated. They were called to laboratory follow-up without eating anything between eight and 12 hours. They had there blood collected after the stimulus of the palm oil and glutamine taken in different days. For the hormonal doses were used ELISA kits. Results The glycemia showed a meaningful fall between the fast and two hours after the stimulus of the palm oil (p=0,018). With the glutamine the GLP-1 showed an increase between the fast and one hour (p=0,32), the PYY showed an important increase between the fast and one hour after the stimulus (p=0,06), the glycemia showed a meaningful fall after two hours of the administration of the stimulus (p=0,03). Conclusion Palm oil and glutamine can influence intestinal peptides and glucose PMID:25409967

  6. Taspoglutide, an analog of human glucagon-like Peptide-1 with enhanced stability and in vivo potency.

    PubMed

    Sebokova, Elena; Christ, Andreas D; Wang, Haiyan; Sewing, Sabine; Dong, Jesse Z; Taylor, John; Cawthorne, Michael A; Culler, Michael D

    2010-06-01

    Taspoglutide is a novel analog of human glucagon-like peptide-1 [hGLP-1(7-36)NH2] in clinical development for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Taspoglutide contains alpha-aminoisobutyric acid substitutions replacing Ala(8) and Gly(35) of hGLP-1(7-36)NH2. The binding affinity [radioligand binding assay using [(125)I]hGLP-1(7-36)NH2], potency (cAMP production in CHO cells stably overexpressing hGLP-1 receptor), and in vitro plasma stability of taspoglutide compared with hGLP-1(7-36)NH2 have been evaluated. Effects on basal and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion were determined in vitro in INS-1E cells and in vivo in normal rats. Taspoglutide has comparable affinity (affinity constant 1.1 +/- 0.2 nm) to the natural ligand (affinity constant 1.5 +/- 0.3 nm) for the hGLP-1 receptor and exhibits comparable potency in stimulating cAMP production (EC(50) Taspo 0.06 nm and EC(50) hGLP-1(7-36)NH2 0.08 nm). Taspoglutide exerts insulinotropic action in vitro and in vivo and retains the glucoincretin property of hGLP-1(7-36)NH2. Stimulation of insulin secretion is concentration dependent and evident in the presence of high-glucose concentrations (16.7 mm) with a taspoglutide concentration as low as 0.001 nm. Taspoglutide is fully resistant to dipeptidyl peptidase-4 cleavage (during 1 h incubation at room temperature with purified enzyme) and has an extended in vitro plasma half-life relative to hGLP-1(7-36)NH2 (9.8 h vs. 50 min). In vitro, taspoglutide does not inhibit dipeptidyl peptidase-4 activity. This study provides the biochemical and pharmacological basis for the sustained plasma drug levels and prolonged therapeutic activity seen in early clinical trials of taspoglutide. Excellent stability and potency with substantial glucoincretin effects position taspoglutide as a promising new agent for treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  7. Foetal proglucagon processing in relation to adult appetite control: lessons from a transplantable rat glucagonoma with severe anorexia.

    PubMed

    Jensen, P B; Larsen, P J; Karlsen, C; Jensen, H I; Holst, J J; Madsen, O D

    2011-10-01

    We have previously reported severe anorexia abruptly induced in rats 2-3 weeks after they have been transplanted subcutaneously with the glucagonoma MSL-G-AN. Vagotomy did not affect the time of onset and severity of anorexia, and the anorectic state resembles hunger with strongly elevated neuropeptide Y (NPY) mRNA levels in the nucleus arcuatus. We now show that circulating levels of bioactive glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) (7-36amide) start to increase above control levels exactly at the time of onset of anorexia. At this time-point, bioactive glucagon as well as total glucagon precursors and GLP-1 metabolites are already vastly elevated compared to controls. We further show that intravenous administration of very high concentrations of GLP-1 to hungry schedule-fed rats causes anorexia in a dose-dependent manner, which is blocked by the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin (9-39). GLP-1 (7-36amide) has a well-characterized anorectic effect but also causes taste aversion when administered centrally. The anorectic effect is blocked in rats treated neonatally by monosodium glutamate (MSG). We show that MSG treatment does not prevent the MSL-G-AN-induced anorexia, thereby suggesting a different type of anorectic function. We show a very strong component of taste aversion as anorectic rats, when presented to novel or known alternative food items, will resume normal feeding for 1 day, and then redevelop anorexia. We hypothetize that the anorexia in MSL-G-AN tumour-bearing rats correlates with a foetal processing pattern of proglucagon to both glucagon and GLP-1 (7-36amide), and is due to taste aversion. The sudden onset is characterized by a dramatic increase in circulating levels of biologically active GLP-1 (7-36amide), suggesting eventual saturation of proteolytic inactivation of its N-terminus.

  8. Exploration of structure-activity relationships at the two C-terminal residues of potent 11mer Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 receptor agonist peptides via parallel synthesis.

    PubMed

    Haque, Tasir S; Martinez, Rogelio L; Lee, Ving G; Riexinger, Douglas G; Lei, Ming; Feng, Ming; Koplowitz, Barry; Mapelli, Claudio; Cooper, Christopher B; Zhang, Ge; Huang, Christine; Ewing, William R; Krupinski, John

    2010-07-01

    We report the identification of potent agonists of the Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) via evaluation of two positional scanning libraries and a two-dimensional focused library, synthesized in part on SynPhase Lanterns. These compounds are 11 amino acid peptides containing several unnatural amino acids, including (in particular) analogs of biphenylalanine (Bip) at the two C-terminal positions. Typical activities of the most potent peptides in this class are in the picomolar range in an in vitro functional assay using human GLP-1 receptor.

  9. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Excites Firing and Increases GABAergic Miniature Postsynaptic Currents (mPSCs) in Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) Neurons of the Male Mice via Activation of Nitric Oxide (NO) and Suppression of Endocannabinoid Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Imre; Vastagh, Csaba; Farkas, Erzsébet; Bálint, Flóra; Skrapits, Katalin; Hrabovszky, Erik; Fekete, Csaba; Liposits, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a metabolic signal molecule, regulates reproduction, although, the involved molecular mechanisms have not been elucidated, yet. Therefore, responsiveness of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons to the GLP-1 analog Exendin-4 and elucidation of molecular pathways acting downstream to the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) have been challenged. Loose patch-clamp recordings revealed that Exendin-4 (100 nM–5 μM) elevated firing rate in hypothalamic GnRH-GFP neurons of male mice via activation of GLP-1R. Whole-cell patch-clamp measurements demonstrated increased excitatory GABAergic miniature postsynaptic currents (mPSCs) frequency after Exendin-4 administration, which was eliminated by the GLP-1R antagonist Exendin-3(9–39) (1 μM). Intracellular application of the G-protein inhibitor GDP-β-S (2 mM) impeded action of Exendin-4 on mPSCs, suggesting direct excitatory action of GLP-1 on GnRH neurons. Blockade of nitric-oxide (NO) synthesis by Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME; 100 μM) or N5-[Imino(propylamino)methyl]-L-ornithine hydrochloride (NPLA; 1 μM) or intracellular scavenging of NO by 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (CPTIO; 1 mM) partially attenuated the excitatory effect of Exendin-4. Similar partial inhibition was achieved by hindering endocannabinoid pathway using cannabinoid receptor type-1 (CB1) inverse-agonist 1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-(1-piperidyl) pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251; 1 μM). Simultaneous blockade of NO and endocannabinoid signaling mechanisms eliminated action of Exendin-4 suggesting involvement of both retrograde machineries. Intracellular application of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-antagonist 2E-N-(2, 3-Dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-6-yl)-3-[4-(1, 1-dimethylethyl)phenyl]-2-Propenamide (AMG9810; 10 μM) or the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH)-inhibitor PF3845 (5 μM) impeded the GLP-1-triggered endocannabinoid

  10. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Excites Firing and Increases GABAergic Miniature Postsynaptic Currents (mPSCs) in Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) Neurons of the Male Mice via Activation of Nitric Oxide (NO) and Suppression of Endocannabinoid Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Imre; Vastagh, Csaba; Farkas, Erzsébet; Bálint, Flóra; Skrapits, Katalin; Hrabovszky, Erik; Fekete, Csaba; Liposits, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a metabolic signal molecule, regulates reproduction, although, the involved molecular mechanisms have not been elucidated, yet. Therefore, responsiveness of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons to the GLP-1 analog Exendin-4 and elucidation of molecular pathways acting downstream to the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) have been challenged. Loose patch-clamp recordings revealed that Exendin-4 (100 nM-5 μM) elevated firing rate in hypothalamic GnRH-GFP neurons of male mice via activation of GLP-1R. Whole-cell patch-clamp measurements demonstrated increased excitatory GABAergic miniature postsynaptic currents (mPSCs) frequency after Exendin-4 administration, which was eliminated by the GLP-1R antagonist Exendin-3(9-39) (1 μM). Intracellular application of the G-protein inhibitor GDP-β-S (2 mM) impeded action of Exendin-4 on mPSCs, suggesting direct excitatory action of GLP-1 on GnRH neurons. Blockade of nitric-oxide (NO) synthesis by Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME; 100 μM) or N(5)-[Imino(propylamino)methyl]-L-ornithine hydrochloride (NPLA; 1 μM) or intracellular scavenging of NO by 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (CPTIO; 1 mM) partially attenuated the excitatory effect of Exendin-4. Similar partial inhibition was achieved by hindering endocannabinoid pathway using cannabinoid receptor type-1 (CB1) inverse-agonist 1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-(1-piperidyl) pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251; 1 μM). Simultaneous blockade of NO and endocannabinoid signaling mechanisms eliminated action of Exendin-4 suggesting involvement of both retrograde machineries. Intracellular application of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-antagonist 2E-N-(2, 3-Dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-6-yl)-3-[4-(1, 1-dimethylethyl)phenyl]-2-Propenamide (AMG9810; 10 μM) or the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH)-inhibitor PF3845 (5 μM) impeded the GLP-1-triggered endocannabinoid

  11. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Excites Firing and Increases GABAergic Miniature Postsynaptic Currents (mPSCs) in Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) Neurons of the Male Mice via Activation of Nitric Oxide (NO) and Suppression of Endocannabinoid Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Imre; Vastagh, Csaba; Farkas, Erzsébet; Bálint, Flóra; Skrapits, Katalin; Hrabovszky, Erik; Fekete, Csaba; Liposits, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a metabolic signal molecule, regulates reproduction, although, the involved molecular mechanisms have not been elucidated, yet. Therefore, responsiveness of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons to the GLP-1 analog Exendin-4 and elucidation of molecular pathways acting downstream to the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) have been challenged. Loose patch-clamp recordings revealed that Exendin-4 (100 nM-5 μM) elevated firing rate in hypothalamic GnRH-GFP neurons of male mice via activation of GLP-1R. Whole-cell patch-clamp measurements demonstrated increased excitatory GABAergic miniature postsynaptic currents (mPSCs) frequency after Exendin-4 administration, which was eliminated by the GLP-1R antagonist Exendin-3(9-39) (1 μM). Intracellular application of the G-protein inhibitor GDP-β-S (2 mM) impeded action of Exendin-4 on mPSCs, suggesting direct excitatory action of GLP-1 on GnRH neurons. Blockade of nitric-oxide (NO) synthesis by Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME; 100 μM) or N(5)-[Imino(propylamino)methyl]-L-ornithine hydrochloride (NPLA; 1 μM) or intracellular scavenging of NO by 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (CPTIO; 1 mM) partially attenuated the excitatory effect of Exendin-4. Similar partial inhibition was achieved by hindering endocannabinoid pathway using cannabinoid receptor type-1 (CB1) inverse-agonist 1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-(1-piperidyl) pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251; 1 μM). Simultaneous blockade of NO and endocannabinoid signaling mechanisms eliminated action of Exendin-4 suggesting involvement of both retrograde machineries. Intracellular application of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-antagonist 2E-N-(2, 3-Dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-6-yl)-3-[4-(1, 1-dimethylethyl)phenyl]-2-Propenamide (AMG9810; 10 μM) or the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH)-inhibitor PF3845 (5 μM) impeded the GLP-1-triggered endocannabinoid

  12. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Excites Firing and Increases GABAergic Miniature Postsynaptic Currents (mPSCs) in Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) Neurons of the Male Mice via Activation of Nitric Oxide (NO) and Suppression of Endocannabinoid Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Imre; Vastagh, Csaba; Farkas, Erzsébet; Bálint, Flóra; Skrapits, Katalin; Hrabovszky, Erik; Fekete, Csaba; Liposits, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a metabolic signal molecule, regulates reproduction, although, the involved molecular mechanisms have not been elucidated, yet. Therefore, responsiveness of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons to the GLP-1 analog Exendin-4 and elucidation of molecular pathways acting downstream to the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) have been challenged. Loose patch-clamp recordings revealed that Exendin-4 (100 nM–5 μM) elevated firing rate in hypothalamic GnRH-GFP neurons of male mice via activation of GLP-1R. Whole-cell patch-clamp measurements demonstrated increased excitatory GABAergic miniature postsynaptic currents (mPSCs) frequency after Exendin-4 administration, which was eliminated by the GLP-1R antagonist Exendin-3(9–39) (1 μM). Intracellular application of the G-protein inhibitor GDP-β-S (2 mM) impeded action of Exendin-4 on mPSCs, suggesting direct excitatory action of GLP-1 on GnRH neurons. Blockade of nitric-oxide (NO) synthesis by Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME; 100 μM) or N5-[Imino(propylamino)methyl]-L-ornithine hydrochloride (NPLA; 1 μM) or intracellular scavenging of NO by 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (CPTIO; 1 mM) partially attenuated the excitatory effect of Exendin-4. Similar partial inhibition was achieved by hindering endocannabinoid pathway using cannabinoid receptor type-1 (CB1) inverse-agonist 1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-(1-piperidyl) pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251; 1 μM). Simultaneous blockade of NO and endocannabinoid signaling mechanisms eliminated action of Exendin-4 suggesting involvement of both retrograde machineries. Intracellular application of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-antagonist 2E-N-(2, 3-Dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-6-yl)-3-[4-(1, 1-dimethylethyl)phenyl]-2-Propenamide (AMG9810; 10 μM) or the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH)-inhibitor PF3845 (5 μM) impeded the GLP-1-triggered endocannabinoid

  13. The discovery of glucagon-like peptide 1.

    PubMed

    Lund, P Kay

    2005-06-15

    The discovery of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) began more than two decades ago with the observations that anglerfish islet proglucagon messenger RNAs (mRNAs) contained coding sequences for two glucagon-related peptides arranged in tandem. Subsequent analyses revealed that mammalian proglucagon mRNAs encoded a precursor containing the sequence of pancreatic glucagon, intestinal glicentin and two glucagon-related peptides termed GLP-1 and GLP-2. Multidisciplinary approaches were then required to define the structure of biologically active GLP-1 7-36 amide and its role as an incretin, satiety hormone and, most recently, a neuroprotective peptide. This historial perspective outlines the use of traditional recombinant DNA approaches to derive the GLP-1 sequence and highlights the challenges and combination of clinical and basic science approaches required to define the physiology and pathophysiology of bioactive peptides discovered through genomics. PMID:15780428

  14. Modulation of Glucagon Receptor Pharmacology by Receptor Activity-modifying Protein-2 (RAMP2)*

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Cathryn; Lu, Jing; Li, Naichang; Barkan, Kerry; Richards, Gareth O.; Roberts, David J.; Skerry, Timothy M.; Poyner, David; Pardamwar, Meenakshi; Reynolds, Christopher A.; Dowell, Simon J.; Willars, Gary B.; Ladds, Graham

    2015-01-01

    The glucagon and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors play important, opposing roles in regulating blood glucose levels. Consequently, these receptors have been identified as targets for novel diabetes treatments. However, drugs acting at the GLP-1 receptor, although having clinical efficacy, have been associated with severe adverse side-effects, and targeting of the glucagon receptor has yet to be successful. Here we use a combination of yeast reporter assays and mammalian systems to provide a more complete understanding of glucagon receptor signaling, considering the effect of multiple ligands, association with the receptor-interacting protein receptor activity-modifying protein-2 (RAMP2), and the role of individual G protein α-subunits. We demonstrate that RAMP2 alters both ligand selectivity and G protein preference of the glucagon receptor. Importantly, we also uncover novel cross-reactivity of therapeutically used GLP-1 receptor ligands at the glucagon receptor that is abolished by RAMP2 interaction. This study reveals the glucagon receptor as a previously unidentified target for GLP-1 receptor agonists and highlights a role for RAMP2 in regulating its pharmacology. Such previously unrecognized functions of RAMPs highlight the need to consider all receptor-interacting proteins in future drug development. PMID:26198634

  15. Lymphocytic infiltration and immune activation in metallothionein promoter-exendin-4 (MT-Exendin) transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Baggio, Laurie L; Holland, Dianne; Wither, Joan; Drucker, Daniel J

    2006-06-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) exhibits considerable potential for the treatment of type 2 diabetes because of its effects on stimulation of insulin secretion and the inhibition of gastric emptying, appetite, and glucagon secretion. However, native GLP-1 undergoes rapid enzymatic inactivation, prompting development of long-acting degradation-resistant GLP-1 receptor agonists such as exendin-4 (Ex-4). To study the consequences of sustained exposure to Ex-4, we generated metallothionein promoter-exendin-4 (MT-Exendin) mice that continuously express a proexendin-4 transgene in multiple murine tissues. We now report that MT-Exendin mice develop extensive tissue lymphocytic infiltration with increased numbers of CD4(+) and CD8a(+) cells in the liver and/or kidney and increased numbers of B220(+) cells present in the pancreas and liver. MT-Exendin mice generate antibodies directed against Ex-4, exendin NH(2)-terminal peptide (ENTP), and proexendin-4 as well as antibodies that cross-react with native GLP-1. Furthermore, lymphocytes isolated from MT-Exendin mice proliferate in response to proexendin-4 but not after exposure to Ex-4 or ENTP. These findings demonstrate that expression of a proexendin-4 transgene may be associated with activation of humoral and cellular immune responses in mice.

  16. Spergularia marina Induces Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Secretion in NCI-H716 Cells Through Bile Acid Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyong; Lee, Yu Mi; Rhyu, Mee-Ra

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Spergularia marina Griseb. (SM) is a halophyte that grows in mud flats. The aerial portions of SM have been eaten as vegetables and traditionally used to prevent chronic diseases in Korea. However, there has been no scientific report that demonstrates the pharmacological effects of SM. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is important for the maintenance of glucose and energy homeostasis through acting as a signal in peripheral and neural systems. To discover a functional food for regulating glucose and energy homeostasis, we evaluated the effect of an aqueous ethanolic extract (AEE) of SM on GLP-1 release from enteroendocrine NCI-H716 cells. In addition, we explored the Takeda G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (TGR5) agonist activity of AEE-SM in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cells transiently transfected with human TGR5. As a result, treatment of NCI-H716 cells with AEE-SM increased GLP-1 secretion and intracellular Ca2+ and cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels in a dose-dependent manner. Transfection of NCI-H716 cells with TGR5-specific small interference RNA inhibited AEE-SM-induced GLP-1 secretion and the increase in Ca2+ and cAMP levels. Moreover, AEE-SM showed that the TGR5 agonist activity in CHO-K1 cells transiently transfected with TGR5. The results suggest that AEE-SM might be a candidate for a functional food to regulate glucose and energy homeostasis. PMID:25260089

  17. Correlation of Glypican-4 Level with Basal Active Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Level in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Gwanpyo; Cho, Suk Ju; Yoo, So-Yeon; Chin, Sang Ouk

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have reported that glypican-4 (GPC4) regulates insulin signaling by interacting with insulin receptor and through adipocyte differentiation. However, GPC4 has not been studied with regard to its effects on clinical factors in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We aimed to identify factors associated with GPC4 level in T2DM. Methods Between January 2010 and December 2013, we selected 152 subjects with T2DM and collected serum and plasma into tubes pretreated with aprotinin and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor to preserve active gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). GPC4, active GLP-1, active GIP, and other factors were measured in these plasma samples. We performed a linear regression analysis to identify factors associated with GPC4 level. Results The subjects had a mean age of 58.1 years, were mildly obese (mean body mass index [BMI], 26.1 kg/m2), had T2DM of long-duration (mean, 101.3 months), glycated hemoglobin 7.5%, low insulin secretion, and low insulin resistance (mean homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR], 1.2). Their mean GPC4 was 2.0±0.2 ng/mL. In multivariate analysis, GPC4 was independently associated with age (β=0.224, P=0.009), and levels of active GLP-1 (β=0.171, P=0.049) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST; β=–0.176, P=0.043) after being adjusted for other clinical factors. Conclusion GPC4 was independently associated with age, active GLP-1, and AST in T2DM patients, but was not associated with HOMA-IR and BMI, which are well known factors related to GPC4. Further study is needed to identify the mechanisms of the association between GPC4 and basal active GLP-1 levels. PMID:27704740

  18. Exendin-4 alleviates angiotensin II-induced senescence in vascular smooth muscle cells by inhibiting Rac1 activation via a cAMP/PKA-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Li, Ai Q; Zhou, Teng F; Zhang, Meng Q; Qin, Xiao M

    2014-12-15

    Vascular aging has been implicated in the progression of diabetes and age-related cardiovascular disorders. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone capable of cytoprotective actions in addition to its glucose-lowering effect. The present study was undertaken to examine whether Exendin-4, a specific ligand for the GLP-1 receptor, could prevent angiotensin (ANG) II-induced premature senescence in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and to determine the underlying mechanism involved. Senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA β-gal) assay showed that ANG II induced premature senescence of VSMCs. Pretreatment with Exendin-4 significantly attenuated ANG II-induced generation of H2O2 and the subsequent VSMC senescence. These effects were, however, reversed in the presence of exendin fragment 9-39, a GLP-1 receptor antagonist, or PKI14-22. Moreover, a marked increase in the levels of p53 and p21 induced by ANG II was blunted by the treatment with Exendin-4. Nevertheless, Exendin-4 failed to decrease ANG II-induced expression of NAD(P)H oxidase 1 (Nox1), NAD(P)H oxidase 4 (Nox4), p22(phox), or p47(phox) in VSMCs. Mechanistically, Exendin-4 blocked ANG II-induced Rac1 activation through the cAMP/PKA signaling cascade. Specifically, NSC23766, a Rac1 inhibitor, abrogated the suppressive effects of Exendin-4 on ANG II-induced premature senescence and H2O2 generation, respectively. Thus Exendin-4 confers resistance to ANG II-induced superoxide anion generation from NAD(P)H oxidase and the resultant VSMC senescence by inhibiting Rac1 activation via a cAMP/PKA-dependent pathway. These findings demonstrate that GLP-1 as well as its analogs (GLP-1-related reagents) may hold therapeutic potential in the treatment of diabetes with cardiovascular disease.

  19. Enzymatic mono-pegylation of glucagon-like peptide 1 towards long lasting treatment of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Selis, Fabio; Schrepfer, Rodolfo; Sanna, Riccardo; Scaramuzza, Silvia; Tonon, Giancarlo; Dedoni, Simona; Onali, Pierluigi; Orsini, Gaetano; Genovese, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Human glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a physiological gastrointestinal peptide with glucose-dependent insulinotropic effects which is therefore considered an interesting antidiabetic agent. However, after in vivo administration, exogenous GLP-1 does not exert its physiological action due to the combination of rapid proteolytic degradation by ubiquitous dipeptidyldipeptidase IV (DPP IV) enzyme and renal clearance resulting in an extremely short circulating half-life. In this work we describe the conjugation of GLP-1-(7-36)-amide derivatives with polyethylene glycol (PEG) by enzymatic site-specific transglutamination reaction as an approach to reduce both the proteolysis and the renal clearance rates. The compound GLP-1-(7-36)-amide-Q23-PEG 20 kDa monopegylated on the single glutamine residue naturally present in position 23 maintained the ability to activate the GLP-1 receptor expressed in the rat β-cell line RIN-m5F with nanomolar potency along with an increased in vitro resistance to DDP IV and a circulating half-life of about 12 h after subcutaneous administration in rats. These properties enabled GLP-(7-36)-amide-Q23-PEG 20 kDa to exert a glucose-stabilizing effect for a period as long as 8 h, as demonstrated by a single subcutaneous injection to diabetic mice concomitantly challenged with an oral glucose load. The results reported in this work indicate that GLP-(7-36)-amide-Q23-PEG 20 kDa could be a lead compound for the development of long-lasting anti-diabetic agents useful in the treatment of type 2 diabetes affected patients. PMID:25755995

  20. Angelica dahurica Extracts Improve Glucose Tolerance through the Activation of GPR119.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Eung-Hwi; Kim, Chul-Young; Kim, Mi-Hwi; Choung, Jin-Seung; Oh, Yoon-Sin; Moon, Hong-Sub; Jun, Hee-Sook

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 119 is expressed in pancreatic β-cells and intestinal L cells, and is involved in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) release, respectively. Therefore, the development of GPR119 agonists is a potential treatment for type 2 diabetes. We screened 1500 natural plant extracts for GPR119 agonistic actions and investigated the most promising extract, that from Angelica dahurica (AD), for hypoglycemic actions in vitro and in vivo. Human GPR119 activation was measured in GeneBLAzer T-Rex GPR119-CRE-bla CHO-K1 cells; intracellular cAMP levels and insulin secretion were measured in INS-1 cells; and GLP-1 release was measured in GLUTag cells. Glucose tolerance tests and serum plasma insulin levels were measured in normal C57BL6 mice and diabetic db/db mice. AD extract-treated cells showed significant increases in GPR119 activation, intracellular cAMP levels, GLP-1 levels and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion as compared with controls. In normal mice, a single treatment with AD extract improved glucose tolerance and increased insulin secretion. Treatment with multiple doses of AD extract or n-hexane fraction improved glucose tolerance in diabetic db/db mice. Imperatorin, phellopterin and isoimperatorin were identified in the active fraction of AD extract. Among these, phellopterin activated GPR119 and increased active GLP-1 and insulin secretion in vitro and enhanced glucose tolerance in normal and db/db mice. We suggest that phellopterin might have a therapeutic potential for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27391814

  1. Changes in the concentrations of glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)amide and gastric inhibitory polypeptide during the lactation cycle in goats.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, A; Martin, P A

    1998-08-01

    Plasma concentrations of glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)amide (GLP) and gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) were determined at fortnightly intervals for over a year throughout the pregnancy-lactation cycle of goats. Both GIP and GLP concentrations were elevated during lactation and fell rapidly when milk secretion was terminated. At the onset of lactation GLP concentrations rose rapidly whereas GIP concentrations showed a delayed response. GLP concentrations remained high throughout lactation but those of GIP declined linearly as milk yields fell. Serum insulin concentrations correlated positively with plasma glucose concentrations but not with either GIP or GLP concentrations. Negative correlations were found between serum insulin concentrations and milk yield and plasma non-esterified fatty acid concentrations. The results are consistent with plasma GIP and GLP concentrations being determined by other factors in addition to nutrient intake and absorption. Changes in GIP concentrations mirrored reported changes in the hypertrophy and atrophy of the intestine in ruminants while GLP concentrations may be more dependent on the neural and endocrine factors associated with lactation. The elevated concentrations of both peptides indicated a specific role in lactation independent of their normal anabolic and insulinotropic effects.

  2. Heterologous Expression and Delivery of Biologically Active Exendin-4 by Lactobacillus paracasei L14

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhu; Yu, Rui; Zuo, Fanglei; Zhang, Bo; Peng, Deju; Ma, Huiqin; Chen, Shangwu

    2016-01-01

    Exendin-4, a glucagon-like protein-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, is an excellent therapeutic peptide drug for type 2 diabetes due to longer lasting biological activity compared to GLP-1. This study explored the feasibility of using probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei as an oral vector for recombinant exendin-4 peptide delivery, an alternative to costly chemical synthesis and inconvenient administration by injection. L. paracasei transformed with a plasmid encoding the exendin-4 gene (L. paracasei L14/pMG76e-exendin-4) with a constitutive promotor was successfully constructed and showed efficient secretion of exendin-4. The secreted exendin-4 significantly enhanced insulin secretion of INS-1 β-cells, along with an increment in their proliferation and inhibition of their apoptosis, corresponding to the effect of GLP-1 on these cells. The transcription level of the pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 gene (PDX-1), a key transcription factor for cellular insulin synthesis and secretion, was upregulated by the treatment with secreted exendin-4, paralleling the upregulation of insulin gene expression. Caco-2 cell monolayer permeability assay showed a 34-fold increase in the transport of exendin-4 delivered by L. paracasei vs. that of free exendin-4 (control), suggesting effective facilitation of exendin-4 transport across the intestinal barrier by this delivery system. This study demonstrates that the probiotic Lactobacillus can be engineered to secrete bioactive exendin-4 and facilitate its transport through the intestinal barrier, providing a novel strategy for oral exendin-4 delivery using this lactic acid bacterium. PMID:27764251

  3. The effect of nopal (Opuntia ficus indica) on postprandial blood glucose, incretins, and antioxidant activity in Mexican patients with type 2 diabetes after consumption of two different composition breakfasts.

    PubMed

    López-Romero, Patricia; Pichardo-Ontiveros, Edgar; Avila-Nava, Azalia; Vázquez-Manjarrez, Natalia; Tovar, Armando R; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Torres, Nimbe

    2014-11-01

    Nopal is a plant used in traditional Mexican medicine to treat diabetes. However, there is insufficient scientific evidence to demonstrate whether nopal can regulate postprandial glucose. The purpose for conducting this study was to evaluate the glycemic index, insulinemic index, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) index, and the glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) index, and the effect of nopal on patients with type 2 diabetes after consumption of a high-carbohydrate breakfast (HCB) or high-soy-protein breakfast (HSPB) on the postprandial response of glucose, insulin, GIP, GLP-1, and antioxidant activity. In study 1, the glycemic index, insulinemic index, GIP index, and GLP-1 index were calculated for seven healthy participants who consumed 50 g of available carbohydrates from glucose or dehydrated nopal. In study 2, 14 patients with type 2 diabetes consumed nopal in HCB or HSPB with or without 300 g steamed nopal. The glycemic index of nopal was 32.5±4, insulinemic index was 36.1±6, GIP index was 6.5±3.0, and GLP-1 index was 25.9±18. For those patients with type 2 diabetes who consumed the HCB+nopal, there was significantly lower area under the curve for glucose (287±30) than for those who consumed the HCB only (443±49), and lower incremental area under the curve for insulin (5,952±833 vs 7,313±1,090), and those patients with type 2 diabetes who consumed the HSPB avoided postprandial blood glucose peaks. Consumption of the HSPB+nopal significantly reduced the postprandial peaks of GIP concentration at 30 and 45 minutes and increased the antioxidant activity after 2 hours measured by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrilhidracyl method. These findings suggest that nopal could reduce postprandial blood glucose, serum insulin, and plasma GIP peaks, as well as increase antioxidant activity in healthy people and patients with type 2 diabetes.

  4. OL3, a novel low-absorbed TGR5 agonist with reduced side effects, lowered blood glucose via dual actions on TGR5 activation and DPP-4 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shan-yao; Ning, Meng-meng; Zou, Qing-an; Feng, Ying; Ye, Yang-liang; Shen, Jian-hua; Leng, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Aim: TGR5 agonists stimulate intestinal glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) release, but systemic exposure causes unwanted side effects, such as gallbladder filling. In the present study, linagliptin, a DPP-4 inhibitor with a large molecular weight and polarity, and MN6, a previously described TGR5 agonist, were linked to produce OL3, a novel low-absorbed TGR5 agonist with reduced side-effects and dual function in lowering blood glucose by activation of TGR5 and inhibition of DPP-4. Methods: TGR5 activation was assayed in HEK293 cells stably expressing human or mouse TGR5 and a CRE-driven luciferase gene. DPP-4 inhibition was assessed based on the rate of hydrolysis of a surrogate substrate. GLP-1 secretion was measured in human enteroendocrine NCI-H716 cells. OL3 permeability was tested in Caco-2 cells. Acute glucose-lowering effects of OL3 were evaluated in ICR and diabetic ob/ob mice. Results: OL3 activated human and mouse TGR5 with an EC50 of 86.24 and 17.36 nmol/L, respectively, and stimulated GLP-1 secretion in human enteroendocrine NCI-H716 cells (3–30 μmol/L). OL3 inhibited human and mouse DPP-4 with IC50 values of 18.44 and 69.98 μmol/L, respectively. Low permeability of OL3 was observed in Caco-2 cells. In ICR mice treated orally with OL3 (150 mg/kg), the serum OL3 concentration was 101.10 ng/mL at 1 h, and decreased to 13.38 ng/mL at 5.5 h post dose, confirming the low absorption of OL3 in vivo. In ICR mice and ob/ob mice, oral administration of OL3 significantly lowered the blood glucose levels, which was a synergic effect of activating TGR5 that stimulated GLP-1 secretion in the intestine and inhibiting DPP-4 that cleaved GLP-1 in the plasma. In ICR mice, oral administration of OL3 did not cause gallbladder filling. Conclusion: OL3 is a low-absorbed TGR5 agonist that lowers blood glucose without inducing gallbladder filling. This study presents a new strategy in the development of potent TGR5 agonists in treating type 2 diabetes, which target to the

  5. Site-specific fatty chain-modified exenatide analogs with balanced glucoregulatory activity and prolonged in vivo activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lidan; Huang, Xun; Han, Jing; Cai, Xingguang; Dai, Yuxuan; Chu, Yingying; Wang, Chuandong; Huang, Wenlong; Qian, Hai

    2016-06-15

    The therapeutic utility of exenatide (Ex-4) is limited due to short plasma half-life of 2.4h and thus numerous approaches have been used to obtain a longer action time. However, such strategies often attend to one thing and lose another. The study aimed to identify a candidate with balanced glucoregulatory activity and prolonged in vivo activity. A series of fatty chain conjugates of Ex-4 were designed and synthesized. First, thirteen cysteine modified peptides (1-13) were prepared. Peptides 1, 10, and 13 showed improved glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor activate potency and were thus selected for second step modifications to yield conjugates I-1-I-9. All conjugates retained significant GLP-1 receptor activate potency and more importantly exerted enhanced albumin-binding properties and in vitro plasma stability. The protracted antidiabetic effects of the most stable I-3 were further confirmed by both multiple intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test and hypoglycemic efficacies test in vivo. Furthermore, once daily injection of I-3 to streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic mice achieved long-term beneficial effects on hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) lowering and glucose tolerance. Once daily injection of I-3 to diet induced obesity (DIO) mice also achieved favorable effects on food intake, body weight, and blood chemistry. Our results suggested that I-3 was a promising agent deserving further investigation to treat obesity patients with diabetes. PMID:27155328

  6. Glucagon-like peptides activate hepatic gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mommsen, T P; Andrews, P C; Plisetskaya, E M

    1987-07-13

    Piscine (anglerfish, catfish, coho salmon) glucagon-like peptides (GLPs), applied at 3.5 nM, stimulate (1.1-1.9-fold) flux through gluconeogenesis above control levels in isolated trout and salmon hepatocytes. Human GLP-1 and GLP-2 also activate gluconeogenesis, but to a lesser degree than their piscine counterparts. Minor increases of substrate oxidation are noticed at times of peak gluconeogenic activation through GLPs. These hormones, which are derived from the same precursor peptide as glucagon are more potent activators of gluconeogenesis than glucagon when applied at equimolar concentrations, and do not appear to employ cAMP or cGMP as the intracellular messenger in hepatic tissue. PMID:3109952

  7. Molecular Characterisation of Small Molecule Agonists Effect on the Human Glucagon Like Peptide-1 Receptor Internalisation

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Aiysha; Stephens, Jeffrey W.; Bain, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide receptor (GLP-1R), which is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), signals through both Gαs and Gαq coupled pathways and ERK phosphorylation to stimulate insulin secretion. The aim of this study was to determine molecular details of the effect of small molecule agonists, compounds 2 and B, on GLP-1R mediated cAMP production, intracellular Ca2+ accumulation, ERK phosphorylation and its internalisation. In human GLP-1R (hGLP-1R) expressing cells, compounds 2 and B induced cAMP production but caused no intracellular Ca2+ accumulation, ERK phosphorylation or hGLP-1R internalisation. GLP-1 antagonists Ex(9–39) and JANT-4 and the orthosteric binding site mutation (V36A) in hGLP-1R failed to inhibit compounds 2 and B induced cAMP production, confirming that their binding site distinct from the GLP-1 binding site on GLP-1R. However, K334A mutation of hGLP-1R, which affects Gαs coupling, inhibited GLP-1 as well as compounds 2 and B induced cAMP production, indicating that GLP-1, compounds 2 and B binding induce similar conformational changes in the GLP-1R for Gαs coupling. Additionally, compound 2 or B binding to the hGLP-1R had significantly reduced GLP-1 induced intracellular Ca2+ accumulation, ERK phosphorylation and hGLP-1R internalisation. This study illustrates pharmacology of differential activation of GLP-1R by GLP-1 and compounds 2 and B. PMID:27100083

  8. 24 CFR 7.36 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... unless the MSPB has dismissed the mixed case complaint or appeal for jurisdictional reasons. (See 29 CFR... § 7.35(c) and 29 CFR 1614.108(f) or at any time after 180 days have elapsed from the filing of the... Administrative Judges may dismiss complaints pursuant to 29 CFR 1614.107, on their own initiative, after...

  9. 24 CFR 7.36 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... unless the MSPB has dismissed the mixed case complaint or appeal for jurisdictional reasons. (See 29 CFR... § 7.35(c) and 29 CFR 1614.108(f) or at any time after 180 days have elapsed from the filing of the... Administrative Judges may dismiss complaints pursuant to 29 CFR 1614.107, on their own initiative, after...

  10. 24 CFR 7.36 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... unless the MSPB has dismissed the mixed case complaint or appeal for jurisdictional reasons. (See 29 CFR... § 7.35(c) and 29 CFR 1614.108(f) or at any time after 180 days have elapsed from the filing of the... Administrative Judges may dismiss complaints pursuant to 29 CFR 1614.107, on their own initiative, after...

  11. 24 CFR 7.36 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... unless the MSPB has dismissed the mixed case complaint or appeal for jurisdictional reasons. (See 29 CFR... § 7.35(c) and 29 CFR 1614.108(f) or at any time after 180 days have elapsed from the filing of the... Administrative Judges may dismiss complaints pursuant to 29 CFR 1614.107, on their own initiative, after...

  12. 24 CFR 7.36 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... unless the MSPB has dismissed the mixed case complaint or appeal for jurisdictional reasons. (See 29 CFR... § 7.35(c) and 29 CFR 1614.108(f) or at any time after 180 days have elapsed from the filing of the... Administrative Judges may dismiss complaints pursuant to 29 CFR 1614.107, on their own initiative, after...

  13. The regulation of K- and L-cell activity by GLUT2 and the calcium-sensing receptor CasR in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Mace, Oliver J; Schindler, Marcus; Patel, Sonal

    2012-06-15

    Intestinal enteroendocrine cells (IECs) secrete gut peptides in response to both nutrients and non-nutrients. Glucose and amino acids both stimulate gut peptide secretion. Our hypothesis was that the facilitative glucose transporter, GLUT2, could act as a glucose sensor and the calcium-sensing receptor, CasR, could detect amino acids in the intestine to modify gut peptide secretion. We used isolated loops of rat small intestine to study the secretion of gluco-insulinotropic peptide (GIP), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY) secretion stimulated by luminal perfusion of nutrients or bile acid. Inhibition of the sodium-dependent glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) with phloridzin partially inhibited GIP, GLP-1 and PYY secretion by 45%, suggesting another glucose sensor might be involved in modulating peptide secretion. The response was completely abolished in the presence of the GLUT2 inhibitors phloretin or cytochalasin B. Given that GLUT2 modified gut peptide secretion stimulated by glucose, we investigated whether it was involved in the secretion of gut peptide by other gut peptide secretagogues. Phloretin completely abolished gut peptide secretion stimulated by artificial sweetener (sucralose), dipeptide (glycylsarcosine), lipid (oleoylethanolamine), short chain fatty acid (propionate) and major rat bile acid (taurocholate) indicating a fundamental position for GLUT2 in the gut peptide secretory mechanism. We investigated how GLUT2 was able to influence gut peptide secretion mediated by a diverse range of stimulators and discovered that GLUT2 affected membrane depolarisation through the closure of K+(ATP)-sensitive channels. In the absence of SGLT1 activity (or presence of phloridzin), the secretion of GIP, GLP-1 and PYY was sensitive to K+(ATP)-sensitive channel modulators tolbutamide and diazoxide. L-amino acids phenylalanine (Phe), tryptophan (Trp), asparagine (Asn), arginine (Arg) and glutamine (Gln) also stimulated GIP, GLP-1 and

  14. The effect of nopal (Opuntia ficus indica) on postprandial blood glucose, incretins, and antioxidant activity in Mexican patients with type 2 diabetes after consumption of two different composition breakfasts.

    PubMed

    López-Romero, Patricia; Pichardo-Ontiveros, Edgar; Avila-Nava, Azalia; Vázquez-Manjarrez, Natalia; Tovar, Armando R; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Torres, Nimbe

    2014-11-01

    Nopal is a plant used in traditional Mexican medicine to treat diabetes. However, there is insufficient scientific evidence to demonstrate whether nopal can regulate postprandial glucose. The purpose for conducting this study was to evaluate the glycemic index, insulinemic index, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) index, and the glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) index, and the effect of nopal on patients with type 2 diabetes after consumption of a high-carbohydrate breakfast (HCB) or high-soy-protein breakfast (HSPB) on the postprandial response of glucose, insulin, GIP, GLP-1, and antioxidant activity. In study 1, the glycemic index, insulinemic index, GIP index, and GLP-1 index were calculated for seven healthy participants who consumed 50 g of available carbohydrates from glucose or dehydrated nopal. In study 2, 14 patients with type 2 diabetes consumed nopal in HCB or HSPB with or without 300 g steamed nopal. The glycemic index of nopal was 32.5±4, insulinemic index was 36.1±6, GIP index was 6.5±3.0, and GLP-1 index was 25.9±18. For those patients with type 2 diabetes who consumed the HCB+nopal, there was significantly lower area under the curve for glucose (287±30) than for those who consumed the HCB only (443±49), and lower incremental area under the curve for insulin (5,952±833 vs 7,313±1,090), and those patients with type 2 diabetes who consumed the HSPB avoided postprandial blood glucose peaks. Consumption of the HSPB+nopal significantly reduced the postprandial peaks of GIP concentration at 30 and 45 minutes and increased the antioxidant activity after 2 hours measured by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrilhidracyl method. These findings suggest that nopal could reduce postprandial blood glucose, serum insulin, and plasma GIP peaks, as well as increase antioxidant activity in healthy people and patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25132122

  15. Septal Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor Expression Determines Suppression of Cocaine-Induced Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Harasta, Anne E; Power, John M; von Jonquieres, Georg; Karl, Tim; Drucker, Daniel J; Housley, Gary D; Schneider, Miriam; Klugmann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and its receptor GLP-1R are a key component of the satiety signaling system, and long-acting GLP-1 analogs have been approved for the treatment of type-2 diabetes mellitus. Previous reports demonstrate that GLP-1 regulates glucose homeostasis alongside the rewarding effects of food. Both palatable food and illicit drugs activate brain reward circuitries, and pharmacological studies suggest that central nervous system GLP-1 signaling holds potential for the treatment of addiction. However, the role of endogenous GLP-1 in the attenuation of reward-oriented behavior, and the essential domains of the mesolimbic system mediating these beneficial effects, are largely unknown. We hypothesized that the central regions of highest Glp-1r gene activity are essential in mediating responses to drugs of abuse. Here, we show that Glp-1r-deficient (Glp-1r−/−) mice have greatly augmented cocaine-induced locomotor responses and enhanced conditional place preference compared with wild-type (Glp-1r+/+) controls. Employing mRNA in situ hybridization we located peak Glp-1r mRNA expression in GABAergic neurons of the dorsal lateral septum, an anatomical site with a crucial function in reward perception. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of dorsal lateral septum neurons revealed that genetic Glp-1r ablation leads to increased excitability of these cells. Viral vector-mediated Glp-1r gene delivery to the dorsal lateral septum of Glp-1r−/− animals reduced cocaine-induced locomotion and conditional place preference to wild-type levels. This site-specific genetic complementation did not affect the anxiogenic phenotype observed in Glp-1r−/− controls. These data reveal a novel role of GLP-1R in dorsal lateral septum function driving behavioral responses to cocaine. PMID:25669605

  16. Effect of valproic acid on body weight, food intake, physical activity and hormones: results of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Martin, CK; Han, H; Anton, SD; Greenway, FL; Smith, SR

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify mechanisms through which valproic acid (VPA) causes weight gain. Healthy participants (N = 52) were randomized to VPA or placebo in a double-blind study. Energy intake (EI) was measured in the laboratory at lunch and dinner, and physical activity (PA) was measured with accelerometry. Glucose levels and hormones [Peptide YY3–36, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), leptin, ghrelin, insulin] that regulate EI were measured. Assessments occurred at baseline and week 3. Change from baseline was evaluated with mixed models (α = 0.05). Weight significantly increased in the VPA group (+0.49 kg), but not the placebo group. The VPA group increased fast food fats cravings and decreased glucose levels compared with placebo. Change in weight, EI and PA did not differ by group. Within group analyses indicated that the VPA group increased PA, hunger, binge eating, depression and GLP-1. VPA-associated weight gain is not likely due to changes in PA or the gut hormones studied. Although EI did not increase when measured after 3 weeks of treatment, VPA decreased glucose levels and increased motivation to eat; hence, EI might have increased in the short-term. Research testing VPA on short-term (1 week) EI, metabolism, and substrate partitioning is warranted. PMID:18583434

  17. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists suppress water intake independent of effects on food intake.

    PubMed

    McKay, Naomi J; Kanoski, Scott E; Hayes, Matthew R; Daniels, Derek

    2011-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is produced by and released from the small intestine following ingestion of nutrients. GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists applied peripherally or centrally decrease food intake and increase glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. These effects make the GLP-1 system an attractive target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. In addition to these more frequently studied effects of GLP-1R stimulation, previous reports indicate that GLP-1R agonists suppress water intake. The present experiments were designed to provide greater temporal resolution and site specificity for the effect of GLP-1 and the long-acting GLP-1R agonists, exendin-4 and liraglutide, on unstimulated water intake when food was and was not available. All three GLP-1R ligands suppressed water intake after peripheral intraperitoneal administration, both in the presence of and the absence of food; however, the magnitude and time frame of water intake suppression varied by drug. GLP-1 had an immediate, but transient, hypodipsic effect when administered peripherally, whereas the water intake suppression by IP exendin-4 and liraglutide was much more persistent. Additionally, intracerebroventricular administration of GLP-1R agonists suppressed water intake when food was absent, but the suppression of intake showed modest differences depending on whether the drug was administered to the lateral or fourth ventricle. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of GLP-1 receptor agonists affecting unstimulated, overnight intake in the absence of food, the first test for antidipsogenic effects of hindbrain application of GLP-1 receptor agonists, and the first test of a central effect (forebrain or hindbrain) of liraglutide on water intake. Overall, these results show that GLP-1R agonists have a hypodipsic effect that is independent of GLP-1R-mediated effects on food intake, and this occurs, in part, through central nervous system GLP-1R activation.

  18. The Neuroprotection of Liraglutide Against Ischaemia-induced Apoptosis through the Activation of the PI3K/AKT and MAPK Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Huili; Zhang, Yusheng; Shi, Zhongshan; Lu, Dan; Li, Tingting; Ding, Yan; Ruan, Yiwen; Xu, Anding

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that increases glucose-dependent insulin secretion to reduce the glucose level. Liraglutide, a long-acting GLP-1 analogue, has been found to have neuroprotective action in various experimental models. However, the protective mechanisms of liraglutide in ischaemic stroke remain unclear. Here, we demonstrated that liraglutide significantly decreased the infarct volume, improved neurologic deficits, and lowered stress-related hyperglycaemia without causing hypoglycaemia in a rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Liraglutide inhibited cell apoptosis by reducing excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) and improving the function of mitochondria in neurons under oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) in vitro and MCAO in vivo. Liraglutide up-regulated the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and inhibited the phosphorylation of c-jun-NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38. Moreover, the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 and/or the ERK inhibitor U0126 counteracted the protective effect of liraglutide. Taken together, these results suggest that liraglutide exerts neuroprotective action against ischaemia-induced apoptosis through the reduction of ROS and the activation of the PI3K/AKT and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. Therefore, liraglutide has therapeutic potential for patients with ischaemic stroke, especially those with Type 2 diabetes mellitus or stress hyperglycaemia. PMID:27240461

  19. Control of liver glucokinase activity: A potential new target for incretin hormones?

    PubMed

    Francini, Flavio; Massa, María Laura; Polo, Mónica Patricia; Villagarcía, Hernán; Castro, María Cecilia; Gagliardino, Juan José

    2015-12-01

    We tested the exendin-4 and des-fluoro-sitagliptin effects on fructose-induced increase in liver glucokinase activity in rats with impaired glucose tolerance and the exendin-4 effect on glucokinase activity in HepG2 cells incubated with fructose in the presence/absence of exendin-9-39. After 3 weeks of in vivo fructose administration we measured: (1) serum glucose, insulin and triglyceride levels; (2) liver and HepG2 cells glucokinase activity and (3) liver glucokinase and 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-biphosphatase mRNA and protein levels. Fructose fed rats had: hypertriglyceridemia, hyperinsulinemia and high liver glucokinase activity (mainly located in the cytosolic fraction) together with higher glucokinase and 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-biphosphatase mRNA and protein concentrations compared to control rats. Co-administration of either exendin-4 or des-fluoro-sitagliptin prevented serum and liver changes except glucokinase protein expression. Exendin-4 also prevented fructose-induced increase in glucokinase activity in cultured HepG2 cells, effect blunted by co-incubation with exendin-9-36. In conclusion exendin-4/des-fluro-sitagliptin prevented fructose-induced effect on glucokinase activity, mainly affecting enzyme activity modulators. Exendin 9-39 blunted in vitro protective exendin-4 effect on glucokinase activity, thus suggesting a direct effect of the later on hepatocytes through GLP-1 receptor. Alterations of glucokinase activity modulators could play a role in the pathogenesis of liver dysfunction, becoming a potential new treatment target for GLP-1 receptor agonists.

  20. Isolation of Positive Modulator of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Signaling from Trigonella foenum-graecum (Fenugreek) Seed.

    PubMed

    King, Klim; Lin, Nai-Pin; Cheng, Yu-Hong; Chen, Gao-Hui; Chein, Rong-Jie

    2015-10-23

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is expressed in many tissues and has been implicated in diverse physiological functions, such as energy homeostasis and cognition. GLP-1 analogs are approved for treatment of type 2 diabetes and are undergoing clinical trials for other disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. GLP-1 analog therapies maintain chronically high plasma levels of the analog and can lead to loss of spatiotemporal control of GLP-1R activation. To avoid adverse effects associated with current therapies, we characterized positive modulators of GLP-1R signaling. We screened extracts from edible plants using an intracellular cAMP biosensor and GLP-1R endocytosis assays. Ethanol extracts from fenugreek seeds enhanced GLP-1 signaling. These seeds have previously been found to reduce glucose and glycated hemoglobin levels in humans. An active compound (N55) with a new N-linoleoyl-2-amino-γ-butyrolactone structure was purified from fenugreek seeds. N55 promoted GLP-1-dependent cAMP production and GLP-1R endocytosis in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. N55 specifically enhanced GLP-1 potency more than 40-fold, but not that of exendin 4, to stimulate cAMP production. In contrast to the current allosteric modulators that bind to GLP-1R, N55 binds to GLP-1 peptide and facilitates trypsin-mediated GLP-1 inactivation. These findings identify a new class of modulators of GLP-1R signaling and suggest that GLP-1 might be a viable target for drug discovery. Our results also highlight a feasible approach for screening bioactive activity of plant extracts. PMID:26336108

  1. Isolation of Positive Modulator of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Signaling from Trigonella foenum-graecum (Fenugreek) Seed*

    PubMed Central

    King, Klim; Lin, Nai-Pin; Cheng, Yu-Hong; Chen, Gao-Hui; Chein, Rong-Jie

    2015-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is expressed in many tissues and has been implicated in diverse physiological functions, such as energy homeostasis and cognition. GLP-1 analogs are approved for treatment of type 2 diabetes and are undergoing clinical trials for other disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. GLP-1 analog therapies maintain chronically high plasma levels of the analog and can lead to loss of spatiotemporal control of GLP-1R activation. To avoid adverse effects associated with current therapies, we characterized positive modulators of GLP-1R signaling. We screened extracts from edible plants using an intracellular cAMP biosensor and GLP-1R endocytosis assays. Ethanol extracts from fenugreek seeds enhanced GLP-1 signaling. These seeds have previously been found to reduce glucose and glycated hemoglobin levels in humans. An active compound (N55) with a new N-linoleoyl-2-amino-γ-butyrolactone structure was purified from fenugreek seeds. N55 promoted GLP-1-dependent cAMP production and GLP-1R endocytosis in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. N55 specifically enhanced GLP-1 potency more than 40-fold, but not that of exendin 4, to stimulate cAMP production. In contrast to the current allosteric modulators that bind to GLP-1R, N55 binds to GLP-1 peptide and facilitates trypsin-mediated GLP-1 inactivation. These findings identify a new class of modulators of GLP-1R signaling and suggest that GLP-1 might be a viable target for drug discovery. Our results also highlight a feasible approach for screening bioactive activity of plant extracts. PMID:26336108

  2. Interchangeability of Caenorhabditis elegans DSL proteins and intrinsic signalling activity of their extracellular domains in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, K; Greenwald, I

    1995-12-01

    Ligands of the Delta/Serrate/lag-2 (DSL) family and their receptors, members of the lin-12/Notch family, mediate cell-cell interactions that specify cell fate in invertebrates and vertebrates. In C. elegans, two DSL genes, lag-2 and apx-1, influence different cell fate decisions during development. Here we show that APX-1 can fully substitute for LAG-2 when expressed under the control of lag-2 regulatory sequences. In addition, we demonstrate that truncated forms lacking the transmembrane and intracellular domains of both LAG-2 and APX-1 can also substitute for endogenous lag-2 activity. Moreover, we provide evidence that these truncated forms are secreted and able to activate LIN-12 and GLP-1 ectopically. Finally, we show that expression of a secreted DSL domain alone may enhance endogenous LAG-2 signalling. Our data suggest ways that activated forms of DSL ligands in other systems may be created.

  3. Lowering blood glucose during hip surgery does not influence coagulation activation

    PubMed Central

    Sechterberger, Marjolein K.; Hermanides, Jeroen; Poolman, Rudolf W.; Kal, Jasper E.; Meijers, Joost C.M.; Hoekstra, Joost B.L.; Hans DeVries, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hyperglycaemia during and after hip surgery is associated with coagulation activation and an increased risk of venous thromboembolism. Whether lowering of glucose levels during hip surgery diminishes coagulation activation is unknown. We investigated the efficacy of the human GLP-1 analogue liraglutide to lower glucose during and after hip surgery and studied its influence on coagulation activation. Methods A total of 37 obese subjects who underwent hip surgery were randomized to subcutaneous liraglutide or placebo for 4 consecutive days, starting one day prior to surgery. Glucose levels and coagulation indices at three fixed time-points (pre-operative, 2 h post-operative and 3 days post-operative) were measured. Results Liraglutide reduced glucose at day three post-surgery (median glucose (IQR) liraglutide 5.5 (5.2–5.7) vs. placebo 5.8 (5.5–6.2); difference 0.3 mmol/L, P = 0.04). Changes in 6 out of 8 coagulation indices studied did not differ between the two groups. Only D-dimer levels were significantly lower in the liraglutide group at day three post-surgery and FVIII levels were significantly higher in the liraglutide group 2 h post-surgery. Conclusion Although the human GLP-1 analogue liraglutide moderately reduced post-operative blood glucose levels in non-diabetic and prediabetic obese patients undergoing elective hip surgery, no changes were observed with respect to coagulation activation. PMID:26675337

  4. Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor-Dependent GLP-1 and PYY Secretion in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Pais, Ramona; Rievaj, Juraj; Larraufie, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is the key hormone mediator of the renin angiotensin system, which regulates blood pressure and fluid and electrolyte balance in the body. Here we report that in the colonic epithelium, the Ang II type 1 receptor is highly and exclusively expressed in enteroendocrine L cells, which produce the gut hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide YY (PYY). Ang II stimulated glucagon-like peptide-1 and PYY release from primary cultures of mouse and human colon, which was antagonized by the specific Ang II type 1 receptor blocker candesartan. Ang II raised intracellular calcium levels in L cells in primary cultures, recorded by live-cell imaging of L cells specifically expressing the fluorescent calcium sensor GCaMP3. In Ussing chamber recordings, Ang II reduced short circuit currents in mouse distal colon preparations, which was antagonized by candesartan or a specific neuropeptide Y1 receptor inhibitor but insensitive to amiloride. We conclude that Ang II stimulates PYY secretion, in turn inhibiting epithelial anion fluxes, thereby reducing net fluid secretion into the colonic lumen. Our findings highlight an important role of colonic L cells in whole-body fluid homeostasis by controlling water loss through the intestine. PMID:27447725

  5. Brain insulin resistance in Alzheimer's disease and its potential treatment with GLP-1 analogs.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Konrad

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of Alzheimer's disease is increasing rapidly in the absence of truly effective therapies. A promising strategy for developing such therapies is the treatment of brain insulin resistance, a common and early feature of Alzheimer's disease, closely tied to cognitive decline and capable of promoting many biological abnormalities in the disorder. The proximal cause of brain insulin resistance appears to be neuronal elevation in the serine phosphorylation of IRS-1, most likely due to amyloid-β-triggered microglial release of proinflammatory cytokines. Preclinically, the first line of defense is behavior-lowering peripheral insulin resistance (e.g., physical exercise and a Mediterranean diet supplemented with foods rich in flavonoids, curcumin and ω-3 fatty acids). More potent remediation is required, however, at clinical stages. Fortunately, the US FDA-approved antidiabetics exenatide (Byetta; Amylin Pharmaceuticals, Inc., CA, USA) and liraglutide (Victoza; Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsvaerd, Denmark) are showing much promise in reducing Alzheimer's disease pathology and in restoring normal brain insulin responsiveness and cognitive function. PMID:24640977

  6. Treatment of type 2 diabetes, lifestyle, GLP1 agonists and DPP4 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tomkin, Gerald H

    2014-10-15

    In recent years the treatment focus for type 2 diabetes has shifted to prevention by lifestyle change and to more aggressive reduction of blood sugars during the early stage of treatment. Weight reduction is an important goal for many people with type 2 diabetes. Bariatric surgery is no longer considered a last resort treatment. Glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists given by injection are emerging as a useful treatment since they not only lower blood sugar but are associated with a modest weight reduction. The role of the oral dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors is emerging as second line treatment ahead of sulphonylureas due to a possible beneficial effect on the beta cell and weight neutrality. Drugs which inhibit glucose re-absorption in the kidney, sodium/glucose co-transport 2 inhibitors, may have a role in the treatment of diabetes. Insulin treatment still remains the cornerstone of treatment in many patients with type 2 diabetes.

  7. Treatment of type 2 diabetes, lifestyle, GLP1 agonists and DPP4 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tomkin, Gerald H

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the treatment focus for type 2 diabetes has shifted to prevention by lifestyle change and to more aggressive reduction of blood sugars during the early stage of treatment. Weight reduction is an important goal for many people with type 2 diabetes. Bariatric surgery is no longer considered a last resort treatment. Glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists given by injection are emerging as a useful treatment since they not only lower blood sugar but are associated with a modest weight reduction. The role of the oral dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors is emerging as second line treatment ahead of sulphonylureas due to a possible beneficial effect on the beta cell and weight neutrality. Drugs which inhibit glucose re-absorption in the kidney, sodium/glucose co-transport 2 inhibitors, may have a role in the treatment of diabetes. Insulin treatment still remains the cornerstone of treatment in many patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25317241

  8. Transferrin Fusion Technology: A Novel Approach to Prolonging Biological Half-Life of Insulinotropic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung-Joon; Zhou, Jie; Martin, Bronwen; Carlson, Olga D.; Maudsley, Stuart; Greig, Nigel H.; Mattson, Mark P.; Ladenheim, Ellen E.; Wustner, Jay; Turner, Andrew; Sadeghi, Homayoun

    2010-01-01

    Fusion proteins made up of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and exendin-4 (EX-4) fused to a nonglycosylated form of human transferrin (GLP-1-Tf or EX-4-Tf) were produced and characterized. GLP-1-Tf activated the GLP-1 receptor, was resistant to inactivation by peptidases, and had a half-life of approximately 2 days, compared with 1 to 2 min for native GLP-1. GLP-1-Tf retained the acute, glucose-dependent insulin-secretory properties of native GLP-1 in diabetic animals and had a profound effect on proliferation of pancreatic β-cells. In addition, Tf and the fusion proteins did not cross the blood-brain-barrier but still reduced food intake after peripheral administration. EX-4-Tf proved to be as effective as EX-4 but had longer lived effects on blood glucose and food intake. This novel transferrin fusion technology could improve the pharmacology of various peptides. PMID:20498254

  9. Sitagliptin inhibits endothelin-1 expression in the aortic endothelium of rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes by suppressing the nuclear factor-κB/IκBα system through the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    TANG, SONG-TAO; SU, HUAN; ZHANG, QIU; TANG, HAI-QIN; WANG, CHANG-JIANG; ZHOU, QING; WEI, WEI; ZHU, HUA-QING; WANG, YUAN

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, including sitagliptin, exert favourable effects on the vascular endothelium. DPP-4 inhibitors suppress the degradation of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), which has been reported to enhance nitric oxide (NO) production. However, the effects of DPP-4 inhibitors on endothelin-1 (ET-1) expression in the aorta, as well as the underlying mechanisms responsible for these effects, have yet to be investigated in animal models of diabetes mellitus (DM). In the present study, the rats were randomly divided into the following four groups: i) control; ii) DM; iii) DM + low-dose sitagliptin (10 mg/kg); and iv) DM + high-dose sitagliptin (30 mg/kg). Apart from the control group, all the rats received a high-fat diet for 8 weeks prior to the induction of diabetes with an intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. The treatments were then administered for 12 weeks. The serum levels of ET-1, NO, GLP-1 and insulin were measured as well as endothelial function. The expression of ET-1, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB/IκBα were determined. After 12 weeks of treatment, the diabetic rats receiving sitagliptin showed significantly elevated serum levels of GLP-1 and NO, and reduced levels of ET-1. Moreover, sitagliptin significantly attenuated endothelial dysfunction as well as the remodeling of the aortic wall. Notably, sitagliptin inhibited ET-1 expression at the transcriptional and translational level in the aorta, which may have been mediated by the suppression of the NF-κB/IκBα system induced by AMPK activation. The majority of the above-mentioned effects were dose dependent. Taken together, the findings of the present study indicate that sitagliptin inhibits ET-1 expression in the aortic endothelium by suppressing the NF-κB/IκBα system through the activation of the AMPK pathway in diabetic rats. These findings further demonstrate some of the vasoprotective properties

  10. Antidiabetic Effects of Yam (Dioscorea batatas) and Its Active Constituent, Allantoin, in a Rat Model of Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Go, Hyeon-Kyu; Rahman, Md. Mahbubur; Kim, Gi-Beum; Na, Chong-Sam; Song, Choon-Ho; Kim, Jin-Shang; Kim, Shang-Jin; Kang, Hyung-Sub

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacies of crude yam (Dioscorea batatas) powder (PY), water extract of yam (EY), and allantoin (the active constituent of yam) in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats with respect to glucose, insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), C-peptide, glycated hemoglobin (HbAlc), lipid metabolism, and oxidative stress. For this purpose, 50 rats were divided into five groups: normal control (NC), diabetic control (STZ), and STZ plus treatment groups (STZ + PY, STZ + EY, and STZ + allantoin). After treatment for one-month, there was a decrease in blood glucose: 385 ± 7 in STZ, 231 ± 3 in STZ + PY, 214 ± 11 in STZ + EY, and 243 ± 6 mg/dL in STZ + allantoin, respectively. There were significant statistical differences (p < 0.001) compared to STZ (100%): 60% in STZ + PY, 55% in STZ + EY, and 63% in STZ + allantoin. With groups in the same order, there were significant decreases (p < 0.001) in HbAlc (100% as 24.4 ± 0.6 ng/mL, 78%, 75%, and 77%), total cholesterol (100% as 122 ± 3 mg/dL, 70%, 67%, and 69%), and low-density lipoprotein (100% as 29 ± 1 mg/dL, 45%, 48%, and 38%). There were also significant increases (p < 0.001) in insulin (100% as 0.22 ± 0.00 ng/mL, 173%, 209%, and 177%), GLP-1 (100% as 18.4 ± 0.7 pmol/mL, 160%, 166%, and 162%), and C-peptide (100% as 2.56 ± 0.10 ng/mL, 129%, 132%, and 130%). The treatment effectively ameliorated antioxidant stress as shown by a significant decrease (p < 0.001) in malondialdehyde (100% as 7.25 ± 0.11 nmol/mL, 87%, 86%, and 85%) together with increases (p < 0.01) in superoxide dismutase (100% as 167 ± 6 IU/mL, 147%, 159%, and 145%) and reduced glutathione (100% as 167 ± 6 nmol/mL, 123%, 141%, and 140%). The results indicate that yam and allantoin have antidiabetic effects by modulating antioxidant activities, lipid profiles and by promoting the release of GLP-1, thereby improving the function of β-cells maintaining normal insulin and glucose

  11. Antidiabetic Effects of Yam (Dioscorea batatas) and Its Active Constituent, Allantoin, in a Rat Model of Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Go, Hyeon-Kyu; Rahman, Md Mahbubur; Kim, Gi-Beum; Na, Chong-Sam; Song, Choon-Ho; Kim, Jin-Shang; Kim, Shang-Jin; Kang, Hyung-Sub

    2015-10-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacies of crude yam (Dioscorea batatas) powder (PY), water extract of yam (EY), and allantoin (the active constituent of yam) in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats with respect to glucose, insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), C-peptide, glycated hemoglobin (HbAlc), lipid metabolism, and oxidative stress. For this purpose, 50 rats were divided into five groups: normal control (NC), diabetic control (STZ), and STZ plus treatment groups (STZ + PY, STZ + EY, and STZ + allantoin). After treatment for one-month, there was a decrease in blood glucose: 385 ± 7 in STZ, 231 ± 3 in STZ + PY, 214 ± 11 in STZ + EY, and 243 ± 6 mg/dL in STZ + allantoin, respectively. There were significant statistical differences (p < 0.001) compared to STZ (100%): 60% in STZ + PY, 55% in STZ + EY, and 63% in STZ + allantoin. With groups in the same order, there were significant decreases (p < 0.001) in HbAlc (100% as 24.4 ± 0.6 ng/mL, 78%, 75%, and 77%), total cholesterol (100% as 122 ± 3 mg/dL, 70%, 67%, and 69%), and low-density lipoprotein (100% as 29 ± 1 mg/dL, 45%, 48%, and 38%). There were also significant increases (p < 0.001) in insulin (100% as 0.22 ± 0.00 ng/mL, 173%, 209%, and 177%), GLP-1 (100% as 18.4 ± 0.7 pmol/mL, 160%, 166%, and 162%), and C-peptide (100% as 2.56 ± 0.10 ng/mL, 129%, 132%, and 130%). The treatment effectively ameliorated antioxidant stress as shown by a significant decrease (p < 0.001) in malondialdehyde (100% as 7.25 ± 0.11 nmol/mL, 87%, 86%, and 85%) together with increases (p < 0.01) in superoxide dismutase (100% as 167 ± 6 IU/mL, 147%, 159%, and 145%) and reduced glutathione (100% as 167 ± 6 nmol/mL, 123%, 141%, and 140%). The results indicate that yam and allantoin have antidiabetic effects by modulating antioxidant activities, lipid profiles and by promoting the release of GLP-1, thereby improving the function of β-cells maintaining normal insulin and glucose

  12. Glucagon-like peptide-1 inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell dedifferentiation through mitochondrial dynamics regulation.

    PubMed

    Torres, Gloria; Morales, Pablo E; García-Miguel, Marina; Norambuena-Soto, Ignacio; Cartes-Saavedra, Benjamín; Vidal-Peña, Gonzalo; Moncada-Ruff, David; Sanhueza-Olivares, Fernanda; San Martín, Alejandra; Chiong, Mario

    2016-03-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a neuroendocrine hormone produced by gastrointestinal tract in response to food ingestion. GLP-1 plays a very important role in the glucose homeostasis by stimulating glucose-dependent insulin secretion, inhibiting glucagon secretion, inhibiting gastric emptying, reducing appetite and food intake. Because of these actions, the GLP-1 peptide-mimetic exenatide is one of the most promising new medicines for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In vivo treatments with GLP-1 or exenatide prevent neo-intima layer formation in response to endothelial damage and atherosclerotic lesion formation in aortic tissue. Whether GLP-1 modulates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and proliferation by controlling mitochondrial dynamics is unknown. In this report, we showed that GLP-1 increased mitochondrial fusion and activity in a PKA-dependent manner in the VSMC cell line A7r5. GLP-1 induced a Ser-637 phosphorylation in the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1, and decreased Drp1 mitochondrial localization. GLP-1 inhibited PDGF-BB-induced VSMC migration and proliferation, actions inhibited by overexpressing wild type Drp1 and mimicked by the Drp1 inhibitor Mdivi-1 and by overexpressing dominant negative Drp1. These results show that GLP-1 stimulates mitochondrial fusion, increases mitochondrial activity and decreases PDGF-BB-induced VSMC dedifferentiation by a PKA/Drp1 signaling pathway. Our data suggest that GLP-1 inhibits vascular remodeling through a mitochondrial dynamics-dependent mechanism.

  13. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 and Its Class B G Protein-Coupled Receptors: A Long March to Therapeutic Successes.

    PubMed

    Graaf, Chris de; Donnelly, Dan; Wootten, Denise; Lau, Jesper; Sexton, Patrick M; Miller, Laurence J; Ahn, Jung-Mo; Liao, Jiayu; Fletcher, Madeleine M; Yang, Dehua; Brown, Alastair J H; Zhou, Caihong; Deng, Jiejie; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2016-10-01

    The glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a class B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that mediates the action of GLP-1, a peptide hormone secreted from three major tissues in humans, enteroendocrine L cells in the distal intestine, α cells in the pancreas, and the central nervous system, which exerts important actions useful in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity, including glucose homeostasis and regulation of gastric motility and food intake. Peptidic analogs of GLP-1 have been successfully developed with enhanced bioavailability and pharmacological activity. Physiologic and biochemical studies with truncated, chimeric, and mutated peptides and GLP-1R variants, together with ligand-bound crystal structures of the extracellular domain and the first three-dimensional structures of the 7-helical transmembrane domain of class B GPCRs, have provided the basis for a two-domain-binding mechanism of GLP-1 with its cognate receptor. Although efforts in discovering therapeutically viable nonpeptidic GLP-1R agonists have been hampered, small-molecule modulators offer complementary chemical tools to peptide analogs to investigate ligand-directed biased cellular signaling of GLP-1R. The integrated pharmacological and structural information of different GLP-1 analogs and homologous receptors give new insights into the molecular determinants of GLP-1R ligand selectivity and functional activity, thereby providing novel opportunities in the design and development of more efficacious agents to treat metabolic disorders. PMID:27630114

  14. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 and Its Class B G Protein–Coupled Receptors: A Long March to Therapeutic Successes

    PubMed Central

    de Graaf, Chris; Donnelly, Dan; Wootten, Denise; Lau, Jesper; Sexton, Patrick M.; Miller, Laurence J.; Ahn, Jung-Mo; Liao, Jiayu; Fletcher, Madeleine M.; Brown, Alastair J. H.; Zhou, Caihong; Deng, Jiejie; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a class B G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) that mediates the action of GLP-1, a peptide hormone secreted from three major tissues in humans, enteroendocrine L cells in the distal intestine, α cells in the pancreas, and the central nervous system, which exerts important actions useful in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity, including glucose homeostasis and regulation of gastric motility and food intake. Peptidic analogs of GLP-1 have been successfully developed with enhanced bioavailability and pharmacological activity. Physiologic and biochemical studies with truncated, chimeric, and mutated peptides and GLP-1R variants, together with ligand-bound crystal structures of the extracellular domain and the first three-dimensional structures of the 7-helical transmembrane domain of class B GPCRs, have provided the basis for a two-domain–binding mechanism of GLP-1 with its cognate receptor. Although efforts in discovering therapeutically viable nonpeptidic GLP-1R agonists have been hampered, small-molecule modulators offer complementary chemical tools to peptide analogs to investigate ligand-directed biased cellular signaling of GLP-1R. The integrated pharmacological and structural information of different GLP-1 analogs and homologous receptors give new insights into the molecular determinants of GLP-1R ligand selectivity and functional activity, thereby providing novel opportunities in the design and development of more efficacious agents to treat metabolic disorders. PMID:27630114

  15. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists increase pancreatic mass by induction of protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Jacqueline A; Baggio, Laurie L; Cao, Xiemin; Abdulla, Tahmid; Campbell, Jonathan E; Secher, Thomas; Jelsing, Jacob; Larsen, Brett; Drucker, Daniel J

    2015-03-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) controls glucose homeostasis by regulating secretion of insulin and glucagon through a single GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R). GLP-1R agonists also increase pancreatic weight in some preclinical studies through poorly understood mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that the increase in pancreatic weight following activation of GLP-1R signaling in mice reflects an increase in acinar cell mass, without changes in ductal compartments or β-cell mass. GLP-1R agonists did not increase pancreatic DNA content or the number of Ki67(+) cells in the exocrine compartment; however, pancreatic protein content was increased in mice treated with exendin-4 or liraglutide. The increased pancreatic mass and protein content was independent of cholecystokinin receptors, associated with a rapid increase in S6 phosphorylation, and mediated through the GLP-1R. Rapamycin abrogated the GLP-1R-dependent increase in pancreatic mass but had no effect on the robust induction of Reg3α and Reg3β gene expression. Mass spectrometry analysis identified GLP-1R-dependent upregulation of Reg family members, as well as proteins important for translation and export, including Fam129a, eIF4a1, Wars, and Dmbt1. Hence, pharmacological GLP-1R activation induces protein synthesis, leading to increased pancreatic mass, independent of changes in DNA content or cell proliferation in mice.

  16. Intestinal regulation of urinary sodium excretion and the pathophysiology of diabetic kidney disease: a focus on glucagon-like peptide 1 and dipeptidyl peptidase 4.

    PubMed

    Vallon, Volker; Docherty, Neil G

    2014-09-01

    The tubular hypothesis of glomerular filtration and nephropathy in diabetes is a pathophysiological concept that assigns a critical role to the tubular system, including proximal tubular hyper-reabsorption and growth, which is relevant for early glomerular hyperfiltration and later chronic kidney disease. Here we focus on how harnessing the bioactivity of hormones released from the gut may ameliorate the early effects of diabetes on the kidney in part by attenuating proximal tubular hyper-reabsorption and growth. The endogenous tone of the glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1)/GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) system and its pharmacological activation are nephroprotective in diabetes independent of changes in blood glucose. This is associated with suppression of increases in kidney weight and glomerular hyperfiltration, which may reflect, at least in part, its inhibitory effects on tubular hyper-reabsorption and growth. Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) is also nephroprotective independent of changes in blood glucose and involves GLP-1/GLP-1R-dependent and -independent mechanisms. The GLP-1R agonist exendin-4 induces natriuresis via activation of the GLP-1R. In contrast, DPP4 inhibition increases circulating GLP-1, but drives a GLP-1R-independent natriuretic response, implying a role for other DPP-4 substrates. The extent to which the intrarenal DPP-4/GLP-1 receptor system contributes to all these changes remains to be established, as does the direct impact of the system on renal inflammation. PMID:25085841

  17. Glucagon-like peptide-1 inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell dedifferentiation through mitochondrial dynamics regulation.

    PubMed

    Torres, Gloria; Morales, Pablo E; García-Miguel, Marina; Norambuena-Soto, Ignacio; Cartes-Saavedra, Benjamín; Vidal-Peña, Gonzalo; Moncada-Ruff, David; Sanhueza-Olivares, Fernanda; San Martín, Alejandra; Chiong, Mario

    2016-03-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a neuroendocrine hormone produced by gastrointestinal tract in response to food ingestion. GLP-1 plays a very important role in the glucose homeostasis by stimulating glucose-dependent insulin secretion, inhibiting glucagon secretion, inhibiting gastric emptying, reducing appetite and food intake. Because of these actions, the GLP-1 peptide-mimetic exenatide is one of the most promising new medicines for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In vivo treatments with GLP-1 or exenatide prevent neo-intima layer formation in response to endothelial damage and atherosclerotic lesion formation in aortic tissue. Whether GLP-1 modulates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and proliferation by controlling mitochondrial dynamics is unknown. In this report, we showed that GLP-1 increased mitochondrial fusion and activity in a PKA-dependent manner in the VSMC cell line A7r5. GLP-1 induced a Ser-637 phosphorylation in the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1, and decreased Drp1 mitochondrial localization. GLP-1 inhibited PDGF-BB-induced VSMC migration and proliferation, actions inhibited by overexpressing wild type Drp1 and mimicked by the Drp1 inhibitor Mdivi-1 and by overexpressing dominant negative Drp1. These results show that GLP-1 stimulates mitochondrial fusion, increases mitochondrial activity and decreases PDGF-BB-induced VSMC dedifferentiation by a PKA/Drp1 signaling pathway. Our data suggest that GLP-1 inhibits vascular remodeling through a mitochondrial dynamics-dependent mechanism. PMID:26807480

  18. The putative signal peptide of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor is not required for receptor synthesis but promotes receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Yunjun; Yang, Dehua; Dai, Antao; Zhou, Caihong; Zhu, Yue; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2014-01-01

    GLP-1R (glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor) mediates the ‘incretin effect’ and many other anti-diabetic actions of its cognate ligand, GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1). It belongs to the class B family of GPCRs (G protein-coupled receptors) and possesses an N-terminal putative SP (signal peptide). It has been reported that this sequence is required for the synthesis of GLP-1R and is cleaved after receptor synthesis. In the present study, we conducted an in-depth exploration towards the role of the putative SP in GLP-1R synthesis. A mutant GLP-1R without this sequence was expressed in HEK293 cells (human embryonic kidney 293 cells) and displayed normal functionality with respect to ligand binding and activation of adenylate cyclase. Thus the putative SP does not seem to be required for receptor synthesis. Immunoblotting analysis shows that the amount of GLP-1R synthesized in HEK293 cells is low when the putative SP is absent. This indicates that the role of the sequence is to promote the expression of GLP-1R. Furthermore, epitopes tagged at the N-terminal of GLP-1R are detectable by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting in our experiments. In conclusion, the present study points to different roles of SP in GLP-1R expression which broadens our understanding of the functionality of this putative SP of GLP-1R and possibly other Class B GPCRs. PMID:25330813

  19. Glucagon-like peptide-1 modulates neurally evoked mucosal chloride secretion in guinea pig small intestine in vitro.

    PubMed

    Baldassano, Sara; Wang, Guo-Du; Mulè, Flavia; Wood, Jackie D

    2012-02-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) acts at the G protein-coupled receptor, GLP-1R, to stimulate secretion of insulin and to inhibit secretion of glucagon and gastric acid. Involvement in mucosal secretory physiology has received negligible attention. We aimed to study involvement of GLP-1 in mucosal chloride secretion in the small intestine. Ussing chamber methods, in concert with transmural electrical field stimulation (EFS), were used to study actions on neurogenic chloride secretion. ELISA was used to study GLP-1R effects on neural release of acetylcholine (ACh). Intramural localization of GLP-1R was assessed with immunohistochemistry. Application of GLP-1 to serosal or mucosal sides of flat-sheet preparations in Ussing chambers did not change baseline short-circuit current (I(sc)), which served as a marker for chloride secretion. Transmural EFS evoked neurally mediated biphasic increases in I(sc) that had an initial spike-like rising phase followed by a sustained plateau-like phase. Blockade of the EFS-evoked responses by tetrodotoxin indicated that the responses were neurally mediated. Application of GLP-1 reduced the EFS-evoked biphasic responses in a concentration-dependent manner. The GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin-(9-39) suppressed this action of GLP-1. The GLP-1 inhibitory action on EFS-evoked responses persisted in the presence of nicotinic or vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor antagonists but not in the presence of a muscarinic receptor antagonist. GLP-1 significantly reduced EFS-evoked ACh release. In the submucosal plexus, GLP-1R immunoreactivity (IR) was expressed by choline acetyltransferase-IR neurons, neuropeptide Y-IR neurons, somatostatin-IR neurons, and vasoactive intestinal peptide-IR neurons. Our results suggest that GLP-1R is expressed in guinea pig submucosal neurons and that its activation leads to a decrease in neurally evoked chloride secretion by suppressing release of ACh at neuroepithelial junctions in the enteric neural networks

  20. Naturally-occurring TGR5 agonists modulating glucagon-like peptide-1 biosynthesis and secretion.

    PubMed

    Jafri, Laila; Saleem, Samreen; Calderwood, Danielle; Gillespie, Anna; Mirza, Bushra; Green, Brian D

    2016-04-01

    Selective GLP-1 secretagogues represent a novel potential therapy for type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study examined the GLP-1 secretory activity of the ethnomedicinal plant, Fagonia cretica, which is postulated to possess anti-diabetic activity. After extraction and fractionation extracts and purified compounds were tested for GLP-1 and GIP secretory activity in pGIP/neo STC-1 cells. Intracellular levels of incretin hormones and their gene expression were also determined. Crude F. cretica extracts stimulated both GLP-1 and GIP secretion, increased cellular hormone content, and upregulated gene expression of proglucagon, GIP and prohormone convertase. However, ethyl acetate partitioning significantly enriched GLP-1 secretory activity and this fraction underwent bioactivity-guided fractionation. Three isolated compounds were potent and selective GLP-1 secretagogues: quinovic acid (QA) and two QA derivatives, QA-3β-O-β-D-glycopyranoside and QA-3β-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(28→1)-β-D-glucopyranosyl ester. All QA compounds activated the TGR5 receptor and increased intracellular incretin levels and gene expression. QA derivatives were more potent GLP-1 secretagogues than QA. This is the first time that QA and its naturally-occurring derivatives have been shown to activate TGR5 and stimulate GLP-1 secretion. These data provide a plausible mechanism for the ethnomedicinal use of F. cretica and may assist in the ongoing development of selective GLP-1 agonists. PMID:26820940

  1. Glucagon-like Peptide-1 receptor signaling in the lateral parabrachial nucleus contributes to the control of food intake and motivation to feed.

    PubMed

    Alhadeff, Amber L; Baird, John-Paul; Swick, Jennifer C; Hayes, Matthew R; Grill, Harvey J

    2014-08-01

    Central glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation reduces food intake and the motivation to work for food, but the neurons and circuits mediating these effects are not fully understood. Although lateral parabrachial nucleus (lPBN) neurons are implicated in the control of food intake and reward, the specific role of GLP-1R-expressing lPBN neurons is unexplored. Here, neuroanatomical tracing, immunohistochemical, and behavioral/pharmacological techniques are used to test the hypothesis that lPBN neurons contribute to the anorexic effect of central GLP-1R activation. Results indicate that GLP-1-producing neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius project monosynaptically to the lPBN, providing a potential endogenous mechanism by which lPBN GLP-1R signaling may exert effects on food intake control. Pharmacological activation of GLP-1R in the lPBN reduced food intake, and conversely, antagonism of GLP-1R in the lPBN increased food intake. In addition, lPBN GLP-1R activation reduced the motivation to work for food under a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement. Taken together, these data establish the lPBN as a novel site of action for GLP-1R-mediated control of food intake and reward. PMID:24681814

  2. 36 CFR 7.36 - Mammoth Cave National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... crawfish for bait: Bylew, First, Second, Pine, Big Hollow, Buffalo, Ugly, Cub, Blowing Spring, Floating... bicycle use: (i) Connector Trail from the Big Hollow Trailhead to the Maple Springs Trailhead; (ii) Big Hollow Trail; (iii) Mammoth Cave Railroad Bike & Hike Trail; and (iv) White Oak Trail. (2) The...

  3. 36 CFR 7.36 - Mammoth Cave National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... entry and travel, and who are engaged in scientific research projects which in the opinion of the... all such actions through one or more of the methods listed in § 1.7 of this chapter. (ii) Violating...

  4. 43 CFR 7.36 - Permit reviews and disputes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... professional issues involved in a bureau permitting decision, such as professional qualifications, research design, or other professional archaeological matters. The Departmental Consulting Archeologist shall...

  5. A silica-based pH-sensitive nanomatrix system improves the oral absorption and efficacy of incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Wei; Li, Yong; Hovgaard, Lars; Li, Song; Dai, Wenbin; Wang, Jiancheng; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Background Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) (7–36) is a peptide incretin hormone released from the endocrine L-cells of the intestinal mucosa with unique antidiabetic potential. Due to low absorption efficiency and instability in the gastrointestinal tract, the introduction of orally active GLP-1 is a large challenge. Here we developed a novel silica-based pH-sensitive nanomatrix of GLP-1 (SPN-GLP-1) in order to provide a strategy for oral peptide delivery. Methods SPN-GLP-1 composed of silica nanoparticles and pH-sensitive Eudragit® was prepared and characterized by dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, high-performance liquid chromatography, surface analysis, drug release, and so on. Its permeability across the Caco-2 cell monolayer and intestinal mucosa, proteolytic stability against the intestinal enzymes, pharmacokinetics, hypoglycemic effect in the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT), and primary toxicity were then evaluated. Results It was indicated that the nanomatrix system obtained had a unique nanoscale structure and pH-sensitivity in drug release. It displayed a five-fold intestinal mucosa permeability and significantly higher proteolytic stability compared to native GLP-1 (P < 0.001). A longer half-life was observed after oral administration of SPN-GLP-1, and its relative bioavailability was 35.67% in comparison to intraperitoneal GLP-1. Oral delivery of SPN-GLP-1 significantly reduced the blood glucose level and its hypoglycemic effect over intraperitoneal GLP-1 reached 77%. There was no evident toxicity of SPN-GLP-1 found from both animal status and histochemical analysis of gastrointestinal tissues. Conclusion The silica-based pH-sensitive nanomatrix designed and prepared here might be considered as a potential oral delivery system not only for GLP-1, but also for other peptide or macromolecular drugs. PMID:23028226

  6. Positive Allosteric Modulation of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor by Diverse Electrophiles.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Ana B; Showalter, Aaron D; Wainscott, David B; Stutsman, Cynthia; Marín, Aranzazu; Ficorilli, James; Cabrera, Over; Willard, Francis S; Sloop, Kyle W

    2016-05-13

    Therapeutic intervention to activate the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) enhances glucose-dependent insulin secretion and improves energy balance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Studies investigating mechanisms whereby peptide ligands activate GLP-1R have utilized mutagenesis, receptor chimeras, photo-affinity labeling, hydrogen-deuterium exchange, and crystallography of the ligand-binding ectodomain to establish receptor homology models. However, this has not enabled the design or discovery of drug-like non-peptide GLP-1R activators. Recently, studies investigating 4-(3-benzyloxyphenyl)-2-ethylsulfinyl-6-(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidine (BETP), a GLP-1R-positive allosteric modulator, determined that Cys-347 in the GLP-1R is required for positive allosteric modulator activity via covalent modification. To advance small molecule activation of the GLP-1R, we characterized the insulinotropic mechanism of BETP. In guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding and INS1 832-3 insulinoma cell cAMP assays, BETP enhanced GLP-1(9-36)-NH2-stimulated cAMP signaling. Using isolated pancreatic islets, BETP potentiated insulin secretion in a glucose-dependent manner that requires both the peptide ligand and GLP-1R. In studies of the covalent mechanism, PAGE fluorography showed labeling of GLP-1R in immunoprecipitation experiments from GLP-1R-expressing cells incubated with [(3)H]BETP. Furthermore, we investigated whether other reported GLP-1R activators and compounds identified from screening campaigns modulate GLP-1R by covalent modification. Similar to BETP, several molecules were found to enhance GLP-1R signaling in a Cys-347-dependent manner. These chemotypes are electrophiles that react with GSH, and LC/MS determined the cysteine adducts formed upon conjugation. Together, our results suggest covalent modification may be used to stabilize the GLP-1R in an active conformation. Moreover, the findings provide pharmacological guidance for the discovery and

  7. Positive Allosteric Modulation of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor by Diverse Electrophiles*

    PubMed Central

    Showalter, Aaron D.; Wainscott, David B.; Stutsman, Cynthia; Marín, Aranzazu; Ficorilli, James; Cabrera, Over

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic intervention to activate the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) enhances glucose-dependent insulin secretion and improves energy balance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Studies investigating mechanisms whereby peptide ligands activate GLP-1R have utilized mutagenesis, receptor chimeras, photo-affinity labeling, hydrogen-deuterium exchange, and crystallography of the ligand-binding ectodomain to establish receptor homology models. However, this has not enabled the design or discovery of drug-like non-peptide GLP-1R activators. Recently, studies investigating 4-(3-benzyloxyphenyl)-2-ethylsulfinyl-6-(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidine (BETP), a GLP-1R-positive allosteric modulator, determined that Cys-347 in the GLP-1R is required for positive allosteric modulator activity via covalent modification. To advance small molecule activation of the GLP-1R, we characterized the insulinotropic mechanism of BETP. In guanosine 5′-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding and INS1 832-3 insulinoma cell cAMP assays, BETP enhanced GLP-1(9–36)-NH2-stimulated cAMP signaling. Using isolated pancreatic islets, BETP potentiated insulin secretion in a glucose-dependent manner that requires both the peptide ligand and GLP-1R. In studies of the covalent mechanism, PAGE fluorography showed labeling of GLP-1R in immunoprecipitation experiments from GLP-1R-expressing cells incubated with [3H]BETP. Furthermore, we investigated whether other reported GLP-1R activators and compounds identified from screening campaigns modulate GLP-1R by covalent modification. Similar to BETP, several molecules were found to enhance GLP-1R signaling in a Cys-347-dependent manner. These chemotypes are electrophiles that react with GSH, and LC/MS determined the cysteine adducts formed upon conjugation. Together, our results suggest covalent modification may be used to stabilize the GLP-1R in an active conformation. Moreover, the findings provide pharmacological guidance for the discovery and

  8. Glucagon-like peptide 1 induces natriuresis in healthy subjects and in insulin-resistant obese men.

    PubMed

    Gutzwiller, Jean-Pierre; Tschopp, Stefan; Bock, Andreas; Zehnder, Carlos E; Huber, Andreas R; Kreyenbuehl, Monika; Gutmann, Heike; Drewe, Jürgen; Henzen, Christoph; Goeke, Burkhard; Beglinger, Christoph

    2004-06-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1-(7-36)-amide (GLP-1) is involved in satiety control and glucose homeostasis. Animal studies suggest a physiological role for GLP-1 in water and salt homeostasis. This study's aim was to define the effects of GLP-1 on water and sodium excretion in both healthy and obese men. Fifteen healthy subjects and 16 obese men (mean body mass index, 36 kg/m2) were examined in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study to demonstrate the effects of a 3-h infusion of GLP-1 on urinary sodium excretion, urinary output, and the glomerular filtration rate after an i.v. 9.9-g salt load. Infusion of GLP-1 evoked a dose-dependent increase in urinary sodium excretion in healthy subjects (from 74 +/- 8 to 143 +/- 18 mmol/180 min, P = 0.0013). In obese men, there was a significant increase in urinary sodium excretion (from 59 to 96 mmol/180 min, P = 0.015), a decrease in urinary H+ secretion (from 1.1 to 0.3 pmol/180 min, P = 0.013), and a 6% decrease in the glomerular filtration rate (from 151 +/- 8 to 142 +/- 8 ml/min, P = 0.022). Intravenous infusions of GLP-1 enhance sodium excretion, reduce H+ secretion, and reduce glomerular hyperfiltration in obese men. These findings suggest an action at the proximal renal tubule and a potential renoprotective effect.

  9. Novel Small Molecule Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonist Stimulates Insulin Secretion in Rodents and From Human Islets

    PubMed Central

    Sloop, Kyle W.; Willard, Francis S.; Brenner, Martin B.; Ficorilli, James; Valasek, Kathleen; Showalter, Aaron D.; Farb, Thomas B.; Cao, Julia X.C.; Cox, Amy L.; Michael, M. Dodson; Gutierrez Sanfeliciano, Sonia Maria; Tebbe, Mark J.; Coghlan, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The clinical effectiveness of parenterally-administered glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mimetics to improve glucose control in patients suffering from type 2 diabetes strongly supports discovery pursuits aimed at identifying and developing orally active, small molecule GLP-1 receptor agonists. The purpose of these studies was to identify and characterize novel nonpeptide agonists of the GLP-1 receptor. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Screening using cells expressing the GLP-1 receptor and insulin secretion assays with rodent and human islets were used to identify novel molecules. The intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) and hyperglycemic clamp characterized the insulinotropic effects of compounds in vivo. RESULTS Novel low molecular weight pyrimidine-based compounds that activate the GLP-1 receptor and stimulate glucose-dependent insulin secretion are described. These molecules induce GLP-1 receptor-mediated cAMP signaling in HEK293 cells expressing the GLP-1 receptor and increase insulin secretion from rodent islets in a dose-dependent manner. The compounds activate GLP-1 receptor signaling, both alone or in an additive fashion when combined with the endogenous GLP-1 peptide; however, these agonists do not compete with radiolabeled GLP-1 in receptor-binding assays. In vivo studies using the IVGTT and the hyperglycemic clamp in Sprague Dawley rats demonstrate increased insulin secretion in compound-treated animals. Further, perifusion assays with human islets isolated from a donor with type 2 diabetes show near-normalization of insulin secretion upon compound treatment. CONCLUSIONS These studies characterize the insulinotropic effects of an early-stage, small molecule GLP-1 receptor agonist and provide compelling evidence to support pharmaceutical optimization. PMID:20823098

  10. Stressing diabetes? The hidden links between insulinotropic peptides and the HPA axis.

    PubMed

    Diz-Chaves, Yolanda; Gil-Lozano, Manuel; Toba, Laura; Fandiño, Juan; Ogando, Hugo; González-Matías, Lucas C; Mallo, Federico

    2016-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus exerts metabolic stress on cells and it provokes a chronic increase in the long-term activity of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis, perhaps thereby contributing to insulin resistance. GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists are pleiotropic hormones that not only affect glycaemic and metabolic control, but they also produce many other effects including activation of the HPA axis. In fact, several of the most relevant effects of GLP-1 might involve, at least in part, the modulation of the HPA axis. Thus, the anorectic activity of GLP-1 could be mediated by increasing CRF at the hypothalamic level, while its lipolytic effects could imply a local increase in glucocorticoids and glucocorticoid receptor (GC-R) expression in adipose tissue. Indeed, the potent activation of the HPA axis by GLP-1R agonists occurs within the range of therapeutic doses and with a short latency. Interestingly, the interactions of GLP-1 with the HPA axis may underlie most of the effects of GLP-1 on food intake control, glycaemic metabolism, adipose tissue biology and the responses to stress. Moreover, such activity has been observed in animal models (mice and rats), as well as in normal humans and in type I or type II diabetic patients. Accordingly, better understanding of how GLP-1R agonists modulate the activity of the HPA axis in diabetic subjects, especially obese individuals, will be crucial to design new and more efficient therapies for these patients.

  11. Role of lateral septum glucagon-like peptide 1 receptors in food intake.

    PubMed

    Terrill, Sarah J; Jackson, Christine M; Greene, Hayden E; Lilly, Nicole; Maske, Calyn B; Vallejo, Samantha; Williams, Diana L

    2016-07-01

    Hindbrain glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) neurons project to numerous forebrain areas, including the lateral septum (LS). Using a fluorescently labeled GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist, Exendin 4 (Ex4), we demonstrated GLP-1 receptor binding throughout the rat LS. We examined the feeding effects of Ex4 and the GLP-1R antagonist Exendin (9-39) (Ex9) at doses subthreshold for effect when delivered to the lateral ventricle. Intra-LS Ex4 suppressed overnight chow and high-fat diet (HFD) intake, and Ex9 increased chow and HFD intake relative to vehicle. During 2-h tests, intra-LS Ex9 significantly increased 0.25 M sucrose and 4% corn oil. Ex4 can cause nausea, but intra-LS administration of Ex4 did not induce pica. Furthermore, intra-LS Ex4 had no effect on anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze. We investigated the role of LS GLP-1R in motivation for food by examining operant responding for sucrose on a progressive ratio (PR) schedule, with and without a nutrient preload to maximize GLP-1 neuron activation. The preload strongly suppressed PR responding, but blockade of GLP-1R in the intermediate subdivision of the LS did not affect motivation for sucrose under either load condition. The ability of the nutrient load to suppress subsequent chow intake was significantly attenuated by intermediate LS Ex9 treatment. By contrast, blockade of GLP-1R in the dorsal subdivision of the LS increased both PR responding and overnight chow intake. Together, these studies suggest that endogenous activity of GLP-1R in the LS influence feeding, and dLS GLP-1Rs, in particular, play a role in motivation. PMID:27194565

  12. The effects of GLP-1 analogues, DPP-4 inhibitors and SGLT2 inhibitors on the renal system.

    PubMed

    Schernthaner, Guntram; Mogensen, Carl Erik; Schernthaner, Gerit-Holger

    2014-09-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) affects an estimated 20%-40% of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Key modifiable risk factors for DN are albuminuria, anaemia, dyslipidaemia, hyperglycaemia and hypertension, together with lifestyle factors, such as smoking and obesity. Early detection and treatment of these risk factors can prevent DN or slow its progression, and may even induce remission in some patients. DN is generally preceded by albuminuria, which frequently remains elevated despite treatment in patients with T2DM. Optimal treatment and prevention of DN may require an early, intensive, multifactorial approach, tailored to simultaneously target all modifiable risk factors. Regular monitoring of renal function, including urinary albumin excretion, creatinine clearance and glomerular filtration rate, is critical for following any disease progression and making treatment adjustments. Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors and sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors lower blood glucose levels without additional risk of hypoglycaemia, and may also reduce albuminuria. Further investigation of the potential renal benefits of DPP-4 and SGLT2 inhibitors is underway. PMID:25116004

  13. Oral Delivery of Pentameric Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 by Recombinant Lactobacillus in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Krogh-Andersen, Kasper; Pelletier, Julien; Marcotte, Harold; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Hammarström, Lennart

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone produced by intestinal cells and stimulates insulin secretion from the pancreas in a glucose-dependent manner. Exogenously supplied GLP-1 analogues are used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. An anti-diabetic effect of Lactobacillus in lowering plasma glucose levels and its use as a vehicle for delivery of protein and antibody fragments has been shown previously. The aim of this study was to employ lactobacilli as a vehicle for in situ production and delivery of GLP-1 analogue to normalize blood glucose level in diabetic GK (Goto-Kakizaki) rats. In this study, we designed pentameric GLP-1 (5×GLP-1) analogues which were both expressed in a secreted form and anchored to the surface of lactobacilli. Intestinal trypsin sites were introduced within 5×GLP-1, leading to digestion of the pentamer into an active monomeric form. The E. coli-produced 5×GLP-1 peptides delivered by intestinal intubation to GK rats resulted in a significant improvement of glycemic control demonstrated by an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. Meanwhile, the purified 5×GLP-1 (trypsin-digested) from the Lactobacillus cultures stimulated insulin secretion from HIT-T15 cells, similar to the E. coli-produced 5×GLP-1 peptides. When delivered by gavage to GK rats, non-expressor L. paracasei significantly lowered the blood glucose level but 5×GLP-1 expression did not provide an additional anti-diabetic effect, possibly due to the low levels produced. Our results indicate that lactobacilli themselves might be used as an alternative treatment method for type 2 diabetes, but further work is needed to increase the expression level of GLP-1 by lactobacilli in order to obtain a significant insulinotropic effect in vivo. PMID:27610615

  14. Oral Delivery of Pentameric Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 by Recombinant Lactobacillus in Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yin; Krogh-Andersen, Kasper; Pelletier, Julien; Marcotte, Harold; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Hammarström, Lennart

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone produced by intestinal cells and stimulates insulin secretion from the pancreas in a glucose-dependent manner. Exogenously supplied GLP-1 analogues are used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. An anti-diabetic effect of Lactobacillus in lowering plasma glucose levels and its use as a vehicle for delivery of protein and antibody fragments has been shown previously. The aim of this study was to employ lactobacilli as a vehicle for in situ production and delivery of GLP-1 analogue to normalize blood glucose level in diabetic GK (Goto-Kakizaki) rats. In this study, we designed pentameric GLP-1 (5×GLP-1) analogues which were both expressed in a secreted form and anchored to the surface of lactobacilli. Intestinal trypsin sites were introduced within 5×GLP-1, leading to digestion of the pentamer into an active monomeric form. The E. coli-produced 5×GLP-1 peptides delivered by intestinal intubation to GK rats resulted in a significant improvement of glycemic control demonstrated by an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. Meanwhile, the purified 5×GLP-1 (trypsin-digested) from the Lactobacillus cultures stimulated insulin secretion from HIT-T15 cells, similar to the E. coli-produced 5×GLP-1 peptides. When delivered by gavage to GK rats, non-expressor L. paracasei significantly lowered the blood glucose level but 5×GLP-1 expression did not provide an additional anti-diabetic effect, possibly due to the low levels produced. Our results indicate that lactobacilli themselves might be used as an alternative treatment method for type 2 diabetes, but further work is needed to increase the expression level of GLP-1 by lactobacilli in order to obtain a significant insulinotropic effect in vivo. PMID:27610615

  15. Multifunctional Antibody Agonists Targeting Glucagon-like Peptide-1, Glucagon, and Glucose-Dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide Receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Du, Jintang; Zou, Huafei; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Yuhan; Gonzalez, Jose; Chao, Elizabeth; Lu, Lucy; Yang, Pengyu; Parker, Holly; Nguyen-Tran, Van; Shen, Weijun; Wang, Danling; Schultz, Peter G; Wang, Feng

    2016-09-26

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP-1R), glucagon (GCG) receptor (GCGR), and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP, also known as gastric inhibitory polypeptide) receptor (GIPR), are three metabolically related peptide hormone receptors. A novel approach to the generation of multifunctional antibody agonists that activate these receptors has been developed. Native or engineered peptide agonists for GLP-1R, GCGR, and GIPR were fused to the N-terminus of the heavy chain or light chain of an antibody, either alone or in pairwise combinations. The fusion proteins have similar in vitro biological activities on the cognate receptors as the corresponding peptides, but circa 100-fold longer plasma half-lives. The GLP-1R mono agonist and GLP-1R/GCGR dual agonist antibodies both exhibit potent effects on glucose control and body weight reduction in mice, with the dual agonist antibody showing enhanced activity in the latter. PMID:27595986

  16. Sitagliptin inhibits endothelin-1 expression in the aortic endothelium of rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes by suppressing the nuclear factor-κB/IκBα system through the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Tang, Song-Tao; Su, Huan; Zhang, Qiu; Tang, Hai-Qin; Wang, Chang-Jiang; Zhou, Qing; Wei, Wei; Zhu, Hua-Qing; Wang, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, including sitagliptin, exert favourable effects on the vascular endothelium. DPP-4 inhibitors suppress the degradation of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP‑1), which has been reported to enhance nitric oxide (NO) production. However, the effects of DPP-4 inhibitors on endothelin-1 (ET-1) expression in the aorta, as well as the underlying mechanisms responsible for these effects, have yet to be investigated in animal models of diabetes mellitus (DM). In the present study, the rats were randomly divided into the following four groups: i) control; ii) DM; iii) DM + low‑dose sitagliptin (10 mg/kg); and iv) DM + high‑dose sitagliptin (30 mg/kg). Apart from the control group, all the rats received a high-fat diet for 8 weeks prior to the induction of diabetes with an intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. The treatments were then administered for 12 weeks. The serum levels of ET-1, NO, GLP-1 and insulin were measured as well as endothelial function. The expression of ET-1, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB/IκBα were determined. After 12 weeks of treatment, the diabetic rats receiving sitagliptin showed significantly elevated serum levels of GLP-1 and NO, and reduced levels of ET-1. Moreover, sitagliptin significantly attenuated endothelial dysfunction as well as the remodeling of the aortic wall. Notably, sitagliptin inhibited ET-1 expression at the transcriptional and translational level in the aorta, which may have been mediated by the suppression of the NF-κB/IκBα system induced by AMPK activation. The majority of the above-mentioned effects were dose dependent. Taken together, the findings of the present study indicate that sitagliptin inhibits ET-1 expression in the aortic endothelium by suppressing the NF-κB/IκBα system through the activation of the AMPK pathway in diabetic rats. These findings further demonstrate some of the

  17. Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kincaid, Charlene; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students collect and organize data from a real-world simulation of the scientific concept of half life. Students collect data using a marble sifter, analyze the data using a graphing calculator, and determine an appropriate mathematical model. Includes reproducible worksheets. (MDH)

  18. Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematics Teacher, 1982

    1982-01-01

    The material presented is designed to help students explore geometric patterns involving Fibonnaci numbers and the golden ratio, and to aid in review of basic geometry skills. Worksheet masters intended for duplication are provided. Suggestions are made of possible classroom extensions to the initial activities. (MP)

  19. [The physiology of glucagon-like peptide-1 and its role in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Escalada, Francisco Javier

    2014-09-01

    The hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is synthesized and secreted by L cells in the small intestine in response to food ingestion. After reaching the general circulation it has a half-life of 2-3 minutes due to degradation by the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4. Its physiological role is directed to control plasma glucose concentration, though GLP-1 also plays other different metabolic functions following nutrient absorption. Biological activities of GLP-1 include stimulation of insulin biosynthesis and glucose-dependent insulin secretion by pancreatic beta cell, inhibition of glucagon secretion, delay of gastric emptying and inhibition of food intake. GLP-1 is able to reduce plasma glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes and also can restore beta cell sensitivity to exogenous secretagogues, suggesting that the increasing GLP-1 concentration may be an useful therapeutic strategy for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes.

  20. [The physiology of glucagon-like peptide-1 and its role in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Escalada, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    The hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is synthesized and secreted by L cells in the small intestine in response to food ingestion. After reaching the general circulation it has a half-life of 2-3 minutes due to degradation by the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4. Its physiological role is directed to control plasma glucose concentration, though GLP-1 also plays other different metabolic functions following nutrient absorption. Biological activities of GLP-1 include stimulation of insulin biosynthesis and glucose-dependent insulin secretion by pancreatic beta cell, inhibition of glucagon secretion, delay of gastric emptying and inhibition of food intake. GLP-1 is able to reduce plasma glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes and also can restore beta cell sensitivity to exogenous secretagogues, suggesting that the increasing GLP-1 concentration may be an useful therapeutic strategy for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes.

  1. [The physiology of glucagon-like peptide-1 and its role in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Escalada, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    The hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is synthesized and secreted by L cells in the small intestine in response to food ingestion. After reaching the general circulation it has a half-life of 2-3 minutes due to degradation by the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4. Its physiological role is directed to control plasma glucose concentration, though GLP-1 also plays other different metabolic functions following nutrient absorption. Biological activities of GLP-1 include stimulation of insulin biosynthesis and glucose-dependent insulin secretion by pancreatic beta cell, inhibition of glucagon secretion, delay of gastric emptying and inhibition of food intake. GLP-1 is able to reduce plasma glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes and also can restore beta cell sensitivity to exogenous secretagogues, suggesting that the increasing GLP-1 concentration may be an useful therapeutic strategy for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25326836

  2. [The physiology of glucagon-like peptide-1 and its role in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Escalada, Francisco Javier

    2014-09-01

    The hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is synthesized and secreted by L cells in the small intestine in response to food ingestion. After reaching the general circulation it has a half-life of 2-3 minutes due to degradation by the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4. Its physiological role is directed to control plasma glucose concentration, though GLP-1 also plays other different metabolic functions following nutrient absorption. Biological activities of GLP-1 include stimulation of insulin biosynthesis and glucose-dependent insulin secretion by pancreatic beta cell, inhibition of glucagon secretion, delay of gastric emptying and inhibition of food intake. GLP-1 is able to reduce plasma glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes and also can restore beta cell sensitivity to exogenous secretagogues, suggesting that the increasing GLP-1 concentration may be an useful therapeutic strategy for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25437458

  3. Protein kinase A mediates glucagon-like peptide 1-induced nitric oxide production and muscle microvascular recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhenhua; Chai, Weidong; Wang, Wenhui; Zhao, Lina; Fu, Zhuo; Cao, Wenhong

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) causes vasodilation and increases muscle glucose uptake independent of insulin. Recently, we have shown that GLP-1 recruits muscle microvasculature and increases muscle glucose use via a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent mechanism. Protein kinase A (PKA) is a major signaling intermediate downstream of GLP-1 receptors. To examine whether PKA mediates GLP-1's microvascular action in muscle, GLP-1 was infused to overnight-fasted male rats for 120 min in the presence or absence of H89, a PKA inhibitor. Hindleg muscle microvascular recruitment and glucose use were determined. GLP-1 infusion acutely increased muscle microvascular blood volume within 30 min without altering microvascular blood flow velocity or blood pressure. This effect persisted throughout the 120-min infusion period, leading to a significant increase in muscle microvascular blood flow. These changes were paralleled with an approximately twofold increase in plasma NO levels and hindleg glucose extraction. Systemic infusion of H89 completely blocked GLP-1-mediated muscle microvascular recruitment and increases in NO production and muscle glucose extraction. In cultured endothelial cells, GLP-1 acutely increased PKA activity and stimulated endothelial NO synthase phosphorylation at Ser1177 and NO production. PKA inhibition abolished these effects. In ex vivo studies, perfusion of the distal saphenous artery with GLP-1 induced significant vasorelaxation that was also abolished by pretreatment of the vessels with PKA inhibitor H89. We conclude that GLP-1 recruits muscle microvasculature by expanding microvascular volume and increases glucose extraction in muscle via a PKA/NO-dependent pathway in the vascular endothelium. This may contribute to postprandial glycemic control and complication prevention in diabetes. PMID:23193054

  4. p21-Activated protein kinases and their emerging roles in glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yu-ting Alex; Jin, Tianru

    2014-04-01

    p21-Activated protein kinases (PAKs) are centrally involved in a plethora of cellular processes and functions. Their function as effectors of small GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42 has been extensively studied during the past two decades, particularly in the realms of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and hence tumorigenesis, as well as cytoskeletal remodeling and related cellular events in health and disease. In recent years, a large number of studies have shed light onto the fundamental role of group I PAKs, most notably PAK1, in metabolic homeostasis. In skeletal muscle, PAK1 was shown to mediate the function of insulin on stimulating GLUT4 translocation and glucose uptake, while in pancreatic β-cells, PAK1 participates in insulin granule localization and vesicle release. Furthermore, we demonstrated that PAK1 mediates the cross talk between insulin and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways and hence regulates gut proglucagon gene expression and the production of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). The utilization of chemical inhibitors of PAK and the characterization of Pak1(-/-) mice enabled us to gain mechanistic insights as well as to assess the overall contribution of PAKs in metabolic homeostasis. This review summarizes our current understanding of PAKs, with an emphasis on the emerging roles of PAK1 in glucose homeostasis.

  5. Glucagon-like peptide-1 inhibits angiotensin II-induced mesangial cell damage via protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yuji; Matsui, Takanori; Ojima, Ayako; Nishino, Yuri; Nakashima, Sae; Maeda, Sayaka; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2012-11-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that renin-angiotensin system plays a role in diabetic nephropathy. Recently, we have found that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), one of the incretins, a gut hormone secreted from L cells in the intestine in response to food intake, inhibits advanced glycation end product-induced monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 gene expression in mesangial cells thorugh the interaction with the receptor of GLP-1. However, effects of GLP-1 on angiotensin II-exposed mesangial cells are unknown. This study investigated whether and how GLP-1 blocked the angiotensin II-induced mesangial cell damage in vitro. GLP-1 completely blocked the angiotensin II-induced superoxide generation, NF-κB activation, up-regulation of mRNA levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in mesangial cells, all of which were prevented by the treatments with H-89, an inhibitor of protein kinase A. The present results demonstrated for the first time that GLP-1 blocked the angiotensin II-induced mesangial cell injury by inhibiting superoxide-mediated NF-κB activation via protein kinase C pathway. Our present study suggests that strategies to enhance the biological actions of GLP-1 may be a promising strategy for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  6. Deoxynivalenol (Vomitoxin)-Induced Cholecystokinin and Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Release in the STC-1 Enteroendocrine Cell Model Is Mediated by Calcium-Sensing Receptor and Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin-1 Channel.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui-Ren; Pestka, James J

    2015-06-01

    Food refusal is a hallmark of exposure of experimental animals to the trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON), a common foodborne contaminant. Although studies in the mouse suggest that DON suppresses food intake by aberrantly inducing the release of satiety hormones from enteroendocrine cells (EECs) found in the gut epithelium, the underlying mechanisms for this effect are not understood. To address this gap, we employed the murine neuroendocrine tumor STC-1 cell line, a widely used EEC model, to test the hypothesis that DON-induced hormone exocytosis is mediated by G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated Ca(2+) signaling. The results indicate for the first time that DON elicits Ca(2)-dependent secretion of cholecystokinin (CCK) and glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36) amide (GLP-1), hormones that regulate food intake and energy homeostasis and that are products of 2 critical EEC populations--I cells of the small intestine and L cells of the large intestine, respectively. Furthermore, these effects were mediated by the GPCR Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaSR) and involved the following serial events: (1)PLC-mediated activation of the IP3 receptor and mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+) stores, (2) activation of transient receptor potential melastatin-5 ion channel and resultant L-type voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) channel-facilitated extracellular Ca(2+) entry, (3) amplification of extracellular Ca(2+) entry by transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 channel activation, and finally (4) Ca(2+)-driven CCK and GLP-1 excytosis. These in vitro findings provide a foundation for future investigation of mechanisms by which DON and other trichothecenes modulate EEC function in ex vivo and in vivo models. PMID:25787141

  7. Deoxynivalenol (Vomitoxin)-Induced Cholecystokinin and Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Release in the STC-1 Enteroendocrine Cell Model Is Mediated by Calcium-Sensing Receptor and Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin-1 Channel.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui-Ren; Pestka, James J

    2015-06-01

    Food refusal is a hallmark of exposure of experimental animals to the trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON), a common foodborne contaminant. Although studies in the mouse suggest that DON suppresses food intake by aberrantly inducing the release of satiety hormones from enteroendocrine cells (EECs) found in the gut epithelium, the underlying mechanisms for this effect are not understood. To address this gap, we employed the murine neuroendocrine tumor STC-1 cell line, a widely used EEC model, to test the hypothesis that DON-induced hormone exocytosis is mediated by G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated Ca(2+) signaling. The results indicate for the first time that DON elicits Ca(2)-dependent secretion of cholecystokinin (CCK) and glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36) amide (GLP-1), hormones that regulate food intake and energy homeostasis and that are products of 2 critical EEC populations--I cells of the small intestine and L cells of the large intestine, respectively. Furthermore, these effects were mediated by the GPCR Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaSR) and involved the following serial events: (1)PLC-mediated activation of the IP3 receptor and mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+) stores, (2) activation of transient receptor potential melastatin-5 ion channel and resultant L-type voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) channel-facilitated extracellular Ca(2+) entry, (3) amplification of extracellular Ca(2+) entry by transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 channel activation, and finally (4) Ca(2+)-driven CCK and GLP-1 excytosis. These in vitro findings provide a foundation for future investigation of mechanisms by which DON and other trichothecenes modulate EEC function in ex vivo and in vivo models.

  8. Glucagon-like peptide-1, diabetes, and cognitive decline: possible pathophysiological links and therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Mossello, Enrico; Ballini, Elena; Boncinelli, Marta; Monami, Matteo; Lonetto, Giuseppe; Mello, Anna Maria; Tarantini, Francesca; Baldasseroni, Samuele; Mannucci, Edoardo; Marchionni, Niccolò

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic and neurodegenerative disorders have a growing prevalence in Western countries. Available epidemiologic and neurobiological evidences support the existence of a pathophysiological link between these conditions. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), whose activity is reduced in insulin resistance, has been implicated in central nervous system function, including cognition, synaptic plasticity, and neurogenesis. We review the experimental researches suggesting that GLP-1 dysfunction might be a mediating factor between Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and neurodegeneration. Drug treatments enhancing GLP-1 activity hold out hope for treatment and prevention of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cognitive decline.

  9. Major contributions of comparative endocrinology to the development and exploitation of the incretin concept.

    PubMed

    Conlon, J Michael; Patterson, Steven; Flatt, Peter R

    2006-09-01

    An incretin is a factor released by the gut in response to nutrients that facilitates uptake of glucose by peripheral tissues. The incretin concept predates the discovery of insulin but it is now clear that incretins act by stimulating secretion of this hormone. As glucagon has insulin-releasing activity, it was speculated that intestinal glucagon-like immunoreactivity (enteroglucagon) was involved in the incretin effect but it was an achievement in the field of comparative endocrinology that led to the demonstration that the preproglucagon gene encodes the most potent incretin in the human. Characterization of cloned cDNAs encoding two preproglucagons from the Brockmann body of the anglerfish Lophius americanus demonstrated that the glucagon sequence is flanked by a 34 amino-acid-residue sequence with appreciable structural similarity to glucagon that was termed glucagon-like peptide (GLP). A 36 amino-acid-residue ortholog of anglerfish GLP was subsequently identified in human preproglucagon but this peptide had only weak insulin-releasing activity. However, alignment of GLP sequences from human and teleost fish showed that the human ortholog is extended from its N-terminus by a hexapeptide. Removal of this extension by an endogenous protease generates GLP-1-(7-36)amide, the potent and effective form of the incretin. More recently, comparative endocrinology has contributed to the exploitation of incretins as antidiabetic drugs. Exendin-4, a GLP-1 receptor agonist first isolated from the venom of the Gila monster Heloderma suspectum, is a clinically valuable, long-acting incretin and the skins of several species of frogs synthesize potent insulin-releasing peptides with therapeutic potential. PMID:16902971

  10. The inactivation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase by glucagon-like peptide-1 contributes to neuroprotection against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Shingo; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Adachi, Naoki; Yoon, Hyung Shin; Odaka, Haruki; Ooshima, Yoshiko; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2016-03-11

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), an insulinotropic peptide secreted from enteroendocrine cells, has been known to have a neuroprotective effect. However, it is not fully understood the intracellular mediator of GLP-1 signaling in neuronal cells. In the present study, we examined the change in intracellular signaling of cortical neurons after GLP-1 application and luminal glucose stimulation in vitro and in vivo. GLP-1 receptor was highly expressed in cultured cortical neurons and brain tissues including the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. The activation of GLP-1 receptor (5min) significantly decreased levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK), which is involved in neuronal cell survival and death, in cultured cortical neurons. Oral glucose administration also rapidly reduced pERK levels in the prefrontal cortex, while intraperitoneal glucose injection did not show such an effect. Further, GLP-1 attenuated hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death and hyperactivity of ERK in cultured cortical neurons. It is possible that increased GLP-1 by luminal glucose stimulation affects cortical system including the maintenance of neuronal cell survival. PMID:26827720

  11. Fractionation of Plant Bioactives from Black Carrots (Daucus carota subspecies sativus varietas atrorubens Alef.) by Adsorptive Membrane Chromatography and Analysis of Their Potential Anti-Diabetic Activity.

    PubMed

    Esatbeyoglu, Tuba; Rodríguez-Werner, Miriam; Schlösser, Anke; Liehr, Martin; Ipharraguerre, Ignacio; Winterhalter, Peter; Rimbach, Gerald

    2016-07-27

    Black and purple carrots have attracted interest as colored extracts for coloring food due to their high content of anthocyanins. This study aimed to investigate the polyphenol composition of black carrots. Particularly, the identification and quantification of phenolic compounds of the variety Deep Purple carrot (DPC), which presents a very dark color, was performed by HPLC-PDA and HPLC-ESI-MS(n) analyses. The separation of polyphenols from a DPC XAD-7 extract into an anthocyanin fraction (AF) and co-pigment fraction (CF; primarily phenolic acids) was carried out by membrane chromatography. Furthermore, possible anti-diabetic effects of the DPC XAD-7 extract and its AF and CF were determined. DPC samples (XAD-7, CF, and AF) inhibited α-amylase and α-glucosidase in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, DPC XAD-7 and chlorogenic acid, but not DPC CF and DPC AF, caused a moderate inhibition of intestinal glucose uptake in Caco-2 cells. However, DPC samples did not affect glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion and dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-4) activity. Overall, DPC exhibits an inhibitory effect on α-amylase and α-glucosidase activity and on cellular glucose uptake indicating potential anti-diabetic properties.

  12. Fractionation of Plant Bioactives from Black Carrots (Daucus carota subspecies sativus varietas atrorubens Alef.) by Adsorptive Membrane Chromatography and Analysis of Their Potential Anti-Diabetic Activity.

    PubMed

    Esatbeyoglu, Tuba; Rodríguez-Werner, Miriam; Schlösser, Anke; Liehr, Martin; Ipharraguerre, Ignacio; Winterhalter, Peter; Rimbach, Gerald

    2016-07-27

    Black and purple carrots have attracted interest as colored extracts for coloring food due to their high content of anthocyanins. This study aimed to investigate the polyphenol composition of black carrots. Particularly, the identification and quantification of phenolic compounds of the variety Deep Purple carrot (DPC), which presents a very dark color, was performed by HPLC-PDA and HPLC-ESI-MS(n) analyses. The separation of polyphenols from a DPC XAD-7 extract into an anthocyanin fraction (AF) and co-pigment fraction (CF; primarily phenolic acids) was carried out by membrane chromatography. Furthermore, possible anti-diabetic effects of the DPC XAD-7 extract and its AF and CF were determined. DPC samples (XAD-7, CF, and AF) inhibited α-amylase and α-glucosidase in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, DPC XAD-7 and chlorogenic acid, but not DPC CF and DPC AF, caused a moderate inhibition of intestinal glucose uptake in Caco-2 cells. However, DPC samples did not affect glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion and dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-4) activity. Overall, DPC exhibits an inhibitory effect on α-amylase and α-glucosidase activity and on cellular glucose uptake indicating potential anti-diabetic properties. PMID:27362825

  13. Milk is not just food but most likely a genetic transfection system activating mTORC1 signaling for postnatal growth.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Bodo C; John, Swen Malte; Schmitz, Gerd

    2013-07-25

    Milk has been recognized to represent a functionally active nutrient system promoting neonatal growth of mammals. Cell growth is regulated by the nutrient-sensitive kinase mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). There is still a lack of information on the mechanisms of mTORC1 up-regulation by milk consumption. This review presents milk as a materno-neonatal relay system functioning by transfer of preferential amino acids, which increase plasma levels of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), insulin, growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) for mTORC1 activation. Importantly, milk exosomes, which regularly contain microRNA-21, most likely represent a genetic transfection system enhancing mTORC1-driven metabolic processes. Whereas human breast milk is the ideal food for infants allowing appropriate postnatal growth and species-specific metabolic programming, persistent high milk signaling during adolescence and adulthood by continued cow´s milk consumption may promote mTORC1-driven diseases of civilization.

  14. Milk is not just food but most likely a genetic transfection system activating mTORC1 signaling for postnatal growth

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Milk has been recognized to represent a functionally active nutrient system promoting neonatal growth of mammals. Cell growth is regulated by the nutrient-sensitive kinase mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). There is still a lack of information on the mechanisms of mTORC1 up-regulation by milk consumption. This review presents milk as a materno-neonatal relay system functioning by transfer of preferential amino acids, which increase plasma levels of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), insulin, growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) for mTORC1 activation. Importantly, milk exosomes, which regularly contain microRNA-21, most likely represent a genetic transfection system enhancing mTORC1-driven metabolic processes. Whereas human breast milk is the ideal food for infants allowing appropriate postnatal growth and species-specific metabolic programming, persistent high milk signaling during adolescence and adulthood by continued cow´s milk consumption may promote mTORC1-driven diseases of civilization. PMID:23883112

  15. The insulinotropic effect of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-1 is not affected by acute vagotomy in anaesthetized pigs.

    PubMed

    Veedfald, Simon; Hansen, Marie; Christensen, Louise Wulff; Larsen, Sara Agnete Hjort; Hjøllund, Karina Rahr; Plamboeck, Astrid; Hartmann, Bolette; Deacon, Carolyn Fiona; Holst, Jens Juul

    2016-07-01

    What is the central question of this study? We investigated whether intestinal vagal afferents are necessary for the insulinotropic effect of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) infused into a mesenteric artery or a peripheral vein before and after acute truncal vagotomy. What is the main finding and its importance? We found no effect of truncal vagotomy on the insulinotropic effect of exogenous GLP-1 and speculate that high circulating concentrations of GLP-1 after i.v. and i.a. infusion might have overshadowed any neural signalling component. We propose that further investigations into the possible vagal afferent signalling of GLP-1 would best be pursued using enteral stimuli to provide high subepithelial levels of endogenous GLP-1. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is secreted from the gut in response to luminal stimuli and stimulates insulin secretion in a glucose-dependent manner. As a result of rapid enzymatic degradation of GLP-1 by dipeptidyl peptidase-4, a signalling pathway involving activation of intestinal vagal afferents has been proposed. We conducted two series of experiments in α-chloralose-anaesthetized pigs. In protocol I, pigs (n = 14) were allocated for either i.v. or i.a. (mesenteric) GLP-1 infusions (1 and 2 pmol kg(-1)  min(-1) , 30 min) while maintaining permissive glucose concentrations at 6 mmol l(-1) by i.v. glucose infusion. The GLP-1 infusions were repeated after acute truncal vagotomy. In protocol II, pigs (n = 27) were allocated into six groups. Glucagon-like peptide 1 was infused i.v. or i.a. (mesenteric) for 1 h at 3 or 30 pmol kg(-1)  min(-1) . During the steady state (21 min into the GLP-1 infusion), glucose (0.2 g kg(-1) , i.v.) was administered over 9 min to stimulate β-cell secretion. Thirty minutes after the glucose infusion, GLP-1 infusions were discontinued. Following a washout period, the vagal trunks were severed in four of six groups (vagal trunks were left intact in two of six groups), whereupon all

  16. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist administration suppresses both water and saline intake in rats.

    PubMed

    McKay, N J; Daniels, D

    2013-10-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) plays an important role in energy homeostasis. Injections of GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists suppress food intake, and endogenous GLP-1 is released when nutrients enter the gut. There is also growing evidence that the GLP-1 system is involved in the regulation of body fluid homeostasis. GLP-1R agonists suppress water intake independent of their effects on food intake. It is unknown, however, whether this suppressive effect of GLP-1R agonists extends to saline intake. Accordingly, we tested the effect of the GLP-1R agonists liraglutide (0.05 μg) and exendin-4 (0.05 μg) on water and saline intake, as stimulated either by angiotensin II (AngII) or by water deprivation with partial rehydration (WD-PR). Each agonist suppressed AngII-induced water intake; however, only exendin-4 suppressed saline intake. WD-PR-induced water and saline intakes were both attenuated by each agonist. Analysis of drinking microstructure after WD-PR found a reliable effect of the agonists on burst number. Furthermore, exendin-4 conditioned a robust taste avoidance to saccharine; however, there was no similar effect of liraglutide. To evaluate the relevance of the conditioned taste avoidance, we tested whether inducing visceral malaise by injection of lithium chloride (LiCl) suppressed fluid intake. Injection of LiCl did not suppress water or saline intakes. Overall, these results indicate that the fluid intake suppression by GLP-1R activation is not selective to water intake, is a function of post-ingestive feedback, and is not secondary to visceral malaise.

  17. Central GLP-2 enhances hepatic insulin sensitivity via activating PI3K signaling in POMC neurons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucagon-like peptides (GLP-1/GLP-2) are coproduced and highlighted as key modulators to improve glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity after bariatric surgery. However, it is unknown if CNS GLP-2 plays any physiological role in the control of glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. We sho...

  18. Pituitary Adenlylate Cyclase Activating Peptide Protects Adult Neural Stem Cells from a Hypoglycaemic milieu

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Shiva; Lietzau, Grazyna; Lundberg, Mathias; Nathanson, David; Nyström, Thomas; Patrone, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    Hypoglycaemia is a common side-effect of glucose-lowering therapies for type-2 diabetic patients, which may cause cognitive/neurological impairment. Although the effects of hypoglycaemia in the brain have been extensively studied in neurons, how hypoglycaemia impacts the viability of adult neural stem cells (NSCs) has been poorly investigated. In addition, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of how hypoglycaemia regulates NSCs survival have not been characterized. Recent work others and us have shown that the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist Exendin-4 stimulate NSCs survival against glucolipoapoptosis. The aim of this study was to establish an in vitro system where to study the effects of hypoglycaemia on NSC survival. Furthermore, we determine the potential role of PACAP and Exendin-4 in counteracting the effect of hypoglycaemia. A hypoglycaemic in vitro milieu was mimicked by exposing subventricular zone-derived NSC to low levels of glucose. Moreover, we studied the potential involvement of apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress by quantifying protein levels of Bcl-2, cleaved caspase-3 and mRNA levels of CHOP. We show that PACAP via PAC-1 receptor and PKA activation counteracts impaired NSC viability induced by hypoglycaemia. The protective effect induced by PACAP correlated with endoplasmic reticulum stress, Exendin-4 was ineffective. The results show that hypoglycaemia decreases NSC viability and that this effect can be substantially counteracted by PACAP via PAC-1 receptor activation. The data supports a potential therapeutic role of PAC-1 receptor agonists for the treatment of neurological complications, based on neurogenesis impairment by hypoglycaemia. PMID:27305000

  19. Activation of Nesfatin-1-Containing Neurones in the Hypothalamus and Brainstem by Peripheral Administration of Anorectic Hormones and Suppression of Feeding via Central Nesfatin-1 in Rats.

    PubMed

    Saito, R; So, M; Motojima, Y; Matsuura, T; Yoshimura, M; Hashimoto, H; Yamamoto, Y; Kusuhara, K; Ueta, Y

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral anorectic hormones, such as glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1, cholecystokinin (CCK)-8 and leptin, suppress food intake. The newly-identified anorectic neuropeptide, nesfatin-1, is synthesised in both peripheral tissues and the central nervous system, particularly by various nuclei in the hypothalamus and brainstem. In the present study, we examined the effects of i.p. administration of GLP-1 and CCK-8 and co-administrations of GLP-1 and leptin at subthreshold doses as confirmed by measurement of food intake, on nesfatin-1-immunoreactive (-IR) neurones in the hypothalamus and brainstem of rats by Fos immunohistochemistry. Intraperitoneal administration of GLP-1 (100 μg/kg) caused significant increases in the number of nesfatin-1-IR neurones expressing Fos-immunoreactivity in the supraoptic nucleus (SON), the area postrema (AP) and the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) but not in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), the arcuate nucleus (ARC) or the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA). On the other hand, i.p. administration of CCK-8 (50 μg/kg) resulted in marked increases in the number of nesfatin-1-IR neurones expressing Fos-immunoreactivity in the SON, PVN, AP and NTS but not in the ARC or LHA. No differences in the percentage of nesfatin-1-IR neurones expressing Fos-immunoreactivity in the nuclei of the hypothalamus and brainstem were observed between rats treated with saline, GLP-1 (33 μg/kg) or leptin. However, co-administration of GLP-1 (33 μg/kg) and leptin resulted in significant increases in the number of nesfatin-1-IR neurones expressing Fos-immunoreactivity in the AP and the NTS. Furthermore, decreased food intake induced by GLP-1, CCK-8 and leptin was attenuated significantly by pretreatment with i.c.v. administration of antisense nesfatin-1. These results indicate that nesfatin-1-expressing neurones in the brainstem may play an important role in sensing peripheral levels of GLP-1 and leptin in addition to CCK-8, and also suppress food intake in

  20. The complexity of signalling mediated by the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Madeleine M; Halls, Michelle L; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M; Wootten, Denise

    2016-04-15

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a class B GPCR that is a major therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The receptor is activated by the incretin peptide GLP-1 promoting a broad range of physiological effects including glucose-dependent insulin secretion and biosynthesis, improved insulin sensitivity of peripheral tissues, preservation of β-cell mass and weight loss, all of which are beneficial in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Despite this, existing knowledge surrounding the underlying signalling mechanisms responsible for the physiological actions downstream of GLP-1R activation is limited. Here, we review the current understanding around GLP-1R-mediated signalling, in particular highlighting recent contributions to the field on biased agonism, the spatial and temporal aspects for the control of signalling and how these concepts may influence future drug development. PMID:27068973

  1. A Novel Allosteric Activator of Free Fatty Acid 2 Receptor Displays Unique Gi-functional Bias.

    PubMed

    Bolognini, Daniele; Moss, Catherine E; Nilsson, Karolina; Petersson, Annika U; Donnelly, Iona; Sergeev, Eugenia; König, Gabriele M; Kostenis, Evi; Kurowska-Stolarska, Mariola; Miller, Ashley; Dekker, Niek; Tobin, Andrew B; Milligan, Graeme

    2016-09-01

    The short chain fatty acid receptor FFA2 is able to stimulate signaling via both Gi- and Gq/G11-promoted pathways. These pathways are believed to control distinct physiological end points but FFA2 receptor ligands appropriate to test this hypothesis have been lacking. Herein, we characterize AZ1729, a novel FFA2 regulator that acts as a direct allosteric agonist and as a positive allosteric modulator, increasing the activity of the endogenously produced short chain fatty acid propionate in Gi-mediated pathways, but not at those transduced by Gq/G11 Using AZ1729 in combination with direct inhibitors of Gi and Gq/G11 family G proteins demonstrated that although both arms contribute to propionate-mediated regulation of phospho-ERK1/2 MAP kinase signaling in FFA2-expressing 293 cells, the Gq/G11-mediated pathway is predominant. We extend these studies by employing AZ1729 to dissect physiological FFA2 signaling pathways. The capacity of AZ1729 to act at FFA2 receptors to inhibit β-adrenoreceptor agonist-promoted lipolysis in primary mouse adipocytes and to promote chemotaxis of isolated human neutrophils confirmed these as FFA2 processes mediated by Gi signaling, whereas, in concert with blockade by the Gq/G11 inhibitor FR900359, the inability of AZ1729 to mimic or regulate propionate-mediated release of GLP-1 from mouse colonic preparations defined this physiological response as an end point transduced via activation of Gq/G11. PMID:27385588

  2. A Novel Allosteric Activator of Free Fatty Acid 2 Receptor Displays Unique Gi-functional Bias*

    PubMed Central

    Bolognini, Daniele; Moss, Catherine E.; Nilsson, Karolina; Petersson, Annika U.; Donnelly, Iona; Sergeev, Eugenia; König, Gabriele M.; Kostenis, Evi; Kurowska-Stolarska, Mariola; Miller, Ashley; Dekker, Niek; Tobin, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    The short chain fatty acid receptor FFA2 is able to stimulate signaling via both Gi- and Gq/G11-promoted pathways. These pathways are believed to control distinct physiological end points but FFA2 receptor ligands appropriate to test this hypothesis have been lacking. Herein, we characterize AZ1729, a novel FFA2 regulator that acts as a direct allosteric agonist and as a positive allosteric modulator, increasing the activity of the endogenously produced short chain fatty acid propionate in Gi-mediated pathways, but not at those transduced by Gq/G11. Using AZ1729 in combination with direct inhibitors of Gi and Gq/G11 family G proteins demonstrated that although both arms contribute to propionate-mediated regulation of phospho-ERK1/2 MAP kinase signaling in FFA2-expressing 293 cells, the Gq/G11-mediated pathway is predominant. We extend these studies by employing AZ1729 to dissect physiological FFA2 signaling pathways. The capacity of AZ1729 to act at FFA2 receptors to inhibit β-adrenoreceptor agonist-promoted lipolysis in primary mouse adipocytes and to promote chemotaxis of isolated human neutrophils confirmed these as FFA2 processes mediated by Gi signaling, whereas, in concert with blockade by the Gq/G11 inhibitor FR900359, the inability of AZ1729 to mimic or regulate propionate-mediated release of GLP-1 from mouse colonic preparations defined this physiological response as an end point transduced via activation of Gq/G11. PMID:27385588

  3. UBR-5, a Conserved HECT-Type E3 Ubiquitin Ligase, Negatively Regulates Notch-Type Signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Safdar, Komal; Gu, Anniya; Xu, Xia; Au, Vinci; Taylor, Jon; Flibotte, Stephane; Moerman, Donald G.; Maine, Eleanor M.

    2016-01-01

    Notch-type signaling mediates cell−cell interactions important for animal development. In humans, reduced or inappropriate Notch signaling activity is associated with various developmental defects and disease states, including cancers. Caenorhabditis elegans expresses two Notch-type receptors, GLP-1 and LIN-12. GLP-1 mediates several cell-signaling events in the embryo and promotes germline proliferation in the developing and adult gonad. LIN-12 acts redundantly with GLP-1 in certain inductive events in the embryo and mediates several cell−cell interactions during larval development. Recovery of genetic suppressors and enhancers of glp-1 or lin-12 loss- or gain-of-function mutations has identified numerous regulators of GLP-1 and LIN-12 signaling activity. Here, we report the molecular identification of sog-1, a gene identified in screens for recessive suppressors of conditional glp-1 loss-of-function mutations. The sog-1 gene encodes UBR-5, the sole C. elegans member of the UBR5/Hyd family of HECT-type E3 ubiquitin ligases. Molecular and genetic analyses indicate that the loss of ubr-5 function suppresses defects caused by reduced signaling via GLP-1 or LIN-12. In contrast, ubr-5 mutations do not suppress embryonic or larval lethality associated with mutations in a downstream transcription factor, LAG-1. In the gonad, ubr-5 acts in the receiving cells (germ cells) to limit GLP-1 signaling activity. SEL-10 is the F-box component of SCFSEL-10 E3 ubiquitin–ligase complex that promotes turnover of Notch intracellular domain. UBR-5 acts redundantly with SEL-10 to limit Notch signaling in certain tissues. We hypothesize that UBR-5 activity limits Notch-type signaling by promoting turnover of receptor or limiting its interaction with pathway components. PMID:27185398

  4. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Regulates Cholecystokinin Production in β-Cells to Protect From Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Linnemann, Amelia K.; Neuman, Joshua C.; Battiola, Therese J.; Wisinski, Jaclyn A.; Kimple, Michelle E.

    2015-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a classic gut hormone that is also expressed in the pancreatic islet, where it is highly up-regulated with obesity. Loss of CCK results in increased β-cell apoptosis in obese mice. Similarly, islet α-cells produce increased amounts of another gut peptide, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), in response to cytokine and nutrient stimulation. GLP-1 also protects β-cells from apoptosis via cAMP-mediated mechanisms. Therefore, we hypothesized that the activation of islet-derived CCK and GLP-1 may be linked. We show here that both human and mouse islets secrete active GLP-1 as a function of body mass index/obesity. Furthermore, GLP-1 can rapidly stimulate β-cell CCK production and secretion through direct targeting by the cAMP-modulated transcription factor, cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). We find that cAMP-mediated signaling is required for Cck expression, but CCK regulation by cAMP does not require stimulatory levels of glucose or insulin secretion. We also show that CREB directly targets the Cck promoter in islets from obese (Leptinob/ob) mice. Finally, we demonstrate that the ability of GLP-1 to protect β-cells from cytokine-induced apoptosis is partially dependent on CCK receptor signaling. Taken together, our work suggests that in obesity, active GLP-1 produced in the islet stimulates CCK production and secretion in a paracrine manner via cAMP and CREB. This intraislet incretin loop may be one mechanism whereby GLP-1 protects β-cells from apoptosis. PMID:25984632

  5. Effects of solid-phase extraction of plasma in measuring gut metabolic hormones in fasted and fed blood of lean and diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Reidelberger, Roger; Haver, Alvin; Anders, Krista; Apenteng, Bettye; Lanio, Craig

    2016-05-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), peptide YY (3-36) [PYY(3-36)], amylin, ghrelin, insulin, and leptin are thought to act as hormonal signals from periphery to brain to control food intake. Here, we determined the effects of solid-phase extraction of plasma in measuring these hormones in blood of lean and diet-induced obese rats. Individual enzyme-linked immunoassays and a multiplex assay were used to measure active GLP-1, total PYY, active amylin, active ghrelin, insulin, leptin, and total GIP in response to (1) addition of known amounts of the peptides to lean and obese plasma, (2) a large meal in lean and obese rats, and (3) intravenous infusions of anorexigenic doses of GLP-1, PYY(3-36), amylin, and leptin in lean rats. Extraction of lean and obese plasma prior to assays produced consistent recoveries across assays for GLP-1, PYY, amylin, ghrelin, and insulin, reflecting losses inherent to the extraction procedure. Plasma extraction prior to assays generally revealed larger meal-induced changes in plasma GLP-1, PYY, amylin, ghrelin, and insulin in lean and obese rats. Plasma extraction and the multiplex assay were used to compare plasma levels of GLP-1, PYY, and amylin after a large meal with plasma levels produced by IV infusions of anorexigenic doses of GLP-1, PYY(3-36), and amylin. Infusions produced dose-dependent increases in plasma peptide levels, which were well above their postprandial levels. These results do not support the hypothesis that postprandial plasma levels of GLP-1, PYY(3-36), and amylin are sufficient to decrease food intake by an endocrine mechanism.

  6. Modeling analysis of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-mediated Ca2+ mobilization under the control of glucagon-like peptide-1 in mouse pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yukari; Shimayoshi, Takao; Holz, George G; Noma, Akinori

    2016-03-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an intestinally derived blood glucose-lowering hormone that potentiates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells. The secretagogue action of GLP-1 is explained, at least in part, by its ability to stimulate cAMP production so that cAMP may facilitate the release of Ca(2+) from inositol trisphosphate receptor (IP3R)-regulated Ca(2+) stores. However, a quantitative model has yet to be provided that explains the molecular mechanisms and dynamic processes linking GLP-1-stimulated cAMP production to Ca(2+) mobilization. Here, we performed simulation studies to investigate how GLP-1 alters the abilities of Ca(2+) and IP3 to act as coagonists at IP3R Ca(2+) release channels. A new dynamic model was constructed based on the Kaftan model, which demonstrates dual steady-state allosteric regulation of the IP3R by Ca(2+) and IP3. Data obtained from β-cells were then analyzed to understand how GLP-1 facilitates IP3R-mediated Ca(2+) mobilization when UV flash photolysis is used to uncage Ca(2+) and IP3 intracellularly. When the dynamic model for IP3R activation was incorporated into a minimal cell model, the Ca(2+) transients and oscillations induced by GLP-1 were successfully reconstructed. Simulation studies indicated that transient and oscillatory responses to GLP-1 were produced by sequential positive and negative feedback regulation due to fast activation and slow inhibition of the IP3R by Ca(2+). The slow rate of Ca(2+)-dependent inhibition was revealed to provide a remarkable contribution to the time course of the decay of cytosolic Ca(2+) transients. It also served to drive and pace Ca(2+) oscillations that are significant when evaluating how GLP-1 stimulates insulin secretion. PMID:26741144

  7. New Insights Concerning the Glucose-dependent Insulin Secretagogue Action of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 in Pancreatic β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Holz, G.

    2010-01-01

    The GLP-1 receptor is a Class B heptahelical G-protein-coupled receptor that stimulates cAMP production in pancreatic β-cells. GLP-1 utilizes this receptor to activate two distinct classes of cAMP-binding proteins: protein kinase A (PKA) and the Epac family of cAMP-regulated guanine nucleotide exchange factors (cAMPGEFs). Actions of GLP-1 mediated by PKA and Epac include the recruitment and priming of secretory granules, thereby increasing the number of granules available for Ca2+-dependent exocytosis. Simultaneously, GLP-1 promotes Ca2+ influx and mobilizes an intracellular source of Ca2+. GLP-1 sensitizes intracellular Ca2+ release channels (ryanodine and IP3 receptors) to stimulatory effects of Ca2+, thereby promoting Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR). In the model presented here, CICR activates mitochondrial dehydrogenases, thereby upregulating glucose-dependent production of ATP. The resultant increase in cytosolic [ATP]/[ADP] concentration ratio leads to closure of ATP-sensitive K+ channels (K-ATP), membrane depolarization, and influx of Ca2+ through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs). Ca2+ influx stimulates exocytosis of secretory granules by promoting their fusion with the plasma membrane. Under conditions where Ca2+ release channels are sensitized by GLP-1, Ca2+ influx also stimulates CICR, generating an additional round of ATP production and K-ATP channel closure. In the absence of glucose, no “fuel” is available to support ATP production, and GLP-1 fails to stimulate insulin secretion. This new “feed-forward” hypothesis of β-cell stimulus-secretion coupling may provide a mechanistic explanation as to how GLP-1 exerts a beneficial blood glucose-lowering effect in type 2 diabetic subjects. PMID:15655710

  8. Glucagon-like peptide-1 improves beta-cell antioxidant capacity via extracellular regulated kinases pathway and Nrf2 translocation.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Millán, E; Martín, M A; Goya, L; Lizárraga-Mollinedo, E; Escrivá, F; Ramos, S; Álvarez, C

    2016-06-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the development of beta-cell dysfunction and insulin resistance, two major pathophysiological abnormalities of type 2 diabetes. Expression levels of antioxidant enzymes in beta cells are very low, rendering them more susceptible to damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although the antioxidant effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and its analogs have been previously reported, the exact mechanisms involved are still unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that GLP-1 was able to effectively inhibit oxidative stress and cell death of INS-1E beta cells induced by the pro-oxidant tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tert-BOOH). Incubation with GLP-1 enhanced cellular levels of glutathione and the activity of its related enzymes, glutathione-peroxidase (GPx) and -reductase (GR) in beta cells. However, inhibition of ERK, but not of the PI3K/AKT pathway abolished, at least in part, the antioxidant effect of GLP-1. Moreover, ERK activation seems to be protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent because inhibition of PKA with H-89 was sufficient to block the GLP-1-derived protective effect on beta cells. GLP-1 likewise increased the synthesis of GR and favored the translocation of the nuclear transcription factor erythroid 2p45-related factor (Nrf2), a transcription factor implicated in the expression of several antioxidant/detoxificant enzymes. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was also preserved in beta-cells challenged with tert-BOOH but pre-treated with GLP-1, probably through the down-regulation of the mitochondrial uncoupling-protein2 (UCP2). Thus, our results provide additional mechanisms of action of GLP-1 to prevent oxidative damage in beta cells through the modulation of signaling pathways involved in antioxidant enzyme regulation. PMID:26968794

  9. Glucagon-like peptide-1 improves beta-cell antioxidant capacity via extracellular regulated kinases pathway and Nrf2 translocation.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Millán, E; Martín, M A; Goya, L; Lizárraga-Mollinedo, E; Escrivá, F; Ramos, S; Álvarez, C

    2016-06-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the development of beta-cell dysfunction and insulin resistance, two major pathophysiological abnormalities of type 2 diabetes. Expression levels of antioxidant enzymes in beta cells are very low, rendering them more susceptible to damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although the antioxidant effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and its analogs have been previously reported, the exact mechanisms involved are still unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that GLP-1 was able to effectively inhibit oxidative stress and cell death of INS-1E beta cells induced by the pro-oxidant tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tert-BOOH). Incubation with GLP-1 enhanced cellular levels of glutathione and the activity of its related enzymes, glutathione-peroxidase (GPx) and -reductase (GR) in beta cells. However, inhibition of ERK, but not of the PI3K/AKT pathway abolished, at least in part, the antioxidant effect of GLP-1. Moreover, ERK activation seems to be protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent because inhibition of PKA with H-89 was sufficient to block the GLP-1-derived protective effect on beta cells. GLP-1 likewise increased the synthesis of GR and favored the translocation of the nuclear transcription factor erythroid 2p45-related factor (Nrf2), a transcription factor implicated in the expression of several antioxidant/detoxificant enzymes. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was also preserved in beta-cells challenged with tert-BOOH but pre-treated with GLP-1, probably through the down-regulation of the mitochondrial uncoupling-protein2 (UCP2). Thus, our results provide additional mechanisms of action of GLP-1 to prevent oxidative damage in beta cells through the modulation of signaling pathways involved in antioxidant enzyme regulation.

  10. Examination of mercaptobenzyl sulfonates as catalysts for native chemical ligation: application to the assembly of a glycosylated Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogue.

    PubMed

    Cowper, Ben; Sze, Tsz Mei; Premdjee, Bhavesh; Bongat White, Aileen F; Hacking, Andrew; Macmillan, Derek

    2015-02-21

    3/4-Mercaptobenzyl sulfonates were investigated as aryl thiol catalysts for native chemical ligation (NCL). Whilst catalysing NCL processes at a similar rate to 4-mercaptophenyl acetic acid (MPAA), the increased polarity and solubility of 3-mercaptobenzyl sulfonate in particular may favour its selection as NCL catalyst in many instances. PMID:25605668

  11. Evaluating preferences for profiles of GLP-1 receptor agonists among injection-naïve type 2 diabetes patients in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Gelhorn, Heather L; Poon, Jiat-Ling; Davies, Evan W; Paczkowski, Rosirene; Curtis, Sarah E; Boye, Kristina S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To use a discrete choice experiment (DCE) to evaluate preferences for the actual treatment features and overall profiles of two injectable glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (dulaglutide and liraglutide) among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the UK. Methods In-person interviews were conducted in the UK to administer a DCE to patients with self-reported T2DM, naïve to treatment with injectable medications. The DCE examined six attributes of T2DM treatment each described by two levels: “dosing frequency,” “hemoglobin A1c change,” “weight change,” “type of delivery system,” “frequency of nausea,” and “frequency of hypoglycemia.” Part-worth utilities were estimated using random effects logit models and were used to calculate relative importance (RI) values for each attribute. A chi-square test was used to determine differences in preferences for dulaglutide versus liraglutide profiles. Results A total of 243 participants [mean age: 60.5 (standard deviation 10.9) years; 76.1% male; mean body mass index: 29.8 (standard deviation 5.4) kg/m2] completed the study. RI values for the attributes in rank order were: “dosing frequency” (41.6%), “type of delivery system” (35.5%), “frequency of nausea” (10.4%), “weight change” (5.9%), “hemoglobin A1c change” (3.6%), and “frequency of hypoglycemia” (3.0%). Significantly more participants preferred the dulaglutide profile (83.1%) compared with the liraglutide profile (16.9%; P<0.0001). Conclusion This study elicited patients’ preferences for attributes and levels representing the actual characteristics of two specific glucagon-like peptide-1 medications. In this context, dosing frequency and type of delivery system were most important, accounting for over 75% of the RI. While previous studies have identified efficacy as highly important in T2DM medication decisions, this study suggests that when differences in efficacy between medications are small, other treatment features (eg, dosing frequency and delivery system) are of much greater importance to patients. PMID:26635470

  12. Examination of mercaptobenzyl sulfonates as catalysts for native chemical ligation: application to the assembly of a glycosylated Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogue.

    PubMed

    Cowper, Ben; Sze, Tsz Mei; Premdjee, Bhavesh; Bongat White, Aileen F; Hacking, Andrew; Macmillan, Derek

    2015-02-21

    3/4-Mercaptobenzyl sulfonates were investigated as aryl thiol catalysts for native chemical ligation (NCL). Whilst catalysing NCL processes at a similar rate to 4-mercaptophenyl acetic acid (MPAA), the increased polarity and solubility of 3-mercaptobenzyl sulfonate in particular may favour its selection as NCL catalyst in many instances.

  13. Effect of the low- versus high-intensity exercise training on endoplasmic reticulum stress and GLP-1 in adolescents with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Soo; Yoo, Jae Ho; So, Yong Seok

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] The primary objective of this study was to investigate the effect of low-intensity exercise training compare with high-intensity exercise training on endoplasmic reticulum stress and glucagon-like peptide-1 in adolescents with type 2 diabetes mellitus. [Subjects and Methods] The low-intensity exercise training group performed aerobic exercise training at an intensity of ≤ 45% of the heart rate reserve. The high-intensity interval exercise training group performed interval exercise training at an intensity of ≥ 80% of the heart rate reserve. The exercise-related energy consumption was determined for both groups on a per-week basis (1,200 kcal/week). [Results] Both groups showed improvement in the glucose-regulated protein 78 and dipeptidyl peptidase-4, but the size of the between-group effect was not statistically significant. The high-intensity interval exercise training group showed a significant reduction in percentage body fat. The C-peptide level increased after the 12-weeks programs and was significantly different, between the groups. Fasting glucose, insulin resistance in the fasting state according to homeostasis model assessment, and leptin decreased after the 12-weeks exercise program and were significantly different between the groups, and glucagon-like peptide-1 increased after the 12-week exercise programs and was significantly different between the groups. [Conclusion] In conclusion high-intensity interval exercise training, as defined in this study, may lead to improvements in body composition, glycemic control, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and the glucagon-like peptide-1 in adolescents with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  14. SGLT2 inhibitors or GLP-1 receptor agonists as second-line therapy in type 2 diabetes: patient selection and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Gurgle, Holly E; White, Karen; McAdam-Marx, Carrie

    2016-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding the selection of second-line therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who are unable to achieve glycemic control with metformin therapy alone. Newer pharmacologic treatments for T2DM include glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and sodium–glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors. Both the classes of medication are efficacious, exhibit positive effects on weight, and are associated with minimal risk of hypoglycemia. The purpose of this review is to compare the clinical trial and real-world effectiveness data of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists versus sodium–glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors related to A1c reduction, weight loss, cost-effectiveness, cardiovascular outcomes, and safety in patients with T2DM. This review summarizes comparative evidence for providers who are determining which of the two classes may be the most appropriate for a specific patient. PMID:27350752

  15. The hypoglycemic effect of a polysaccharide (GLP) from Gracilaria lemaneiformis and its degradation products in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xubiao; Yang, Lawei; Chen, Meizhen; Yu, Jie; Zhang, Shumeng; Ju, Yaoyao

    2015-08-01

    Gracilaria lemaneiformis is cultivated on a large scale in China for industrial production of agarose, a natural polysaccharide, which has been shown to have many beneficial bioactivities such as antitumor, antiviral antioxidant activities, etc. In the present study, the hypoglycemic and antioxidant effects of a polysaccharide extracted from Gracilaria lemaneiformis (GLP; Mw, 121.89 kDa) and its chemically degraded products (GLP1 and GLP2: Mw, 57.02 and 14.29 kDa, respectively) were investigated in alloxan-induced diabetic mice. The intragastric administration of GLP, GLP1 and GLP2 for 21 days induced an obvious decrease (P < 0.05) in blood glucose levels in comparison with untreated diabetic mice. Furthermore, GLP, GLP1 and GLP2 caused evident increases (P < 0.05) in both ant i-oxidase (SOD and GSH-Px) activities and the total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) and a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) in the liver, pancreas and kidney of diabetic mice. Even though GLP, GLP1 and GLP2 did not show any significant difference in the structure and sulfation levels, GLP1 demonstrated more potent effects than GLP and GLP2 at the same dose. Histopathological examination of the pancreas and kidney revealed that the damaged tissues induced by alloxan were repaired to a certain degree after the treatments of GLP, GLP1 and GLP2.

  16. REVIEW: Role of cyclic AMP signaling in the production and function of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhiwen; Jin, Tianru

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic cells express the proglucagon gene (gcg) and thereby produce the peptide hormone glucagon, which stimulates hepatic glucose production and thereby increases blood glucose levels. The same gcg gene is also expressed in the intestinal endocrine L cells and certain neural cells in the brain. In the gut, gcg expression leads to the production of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). This incretin hormone stimulates insulin secretion when blood glucose level is high. In addition, GLP-1 stimulates pancreatic cell proliferation, inhibits cell apoptosis, and has been utilized in the trans-differentiation of insulin producing cells. Today, a long-term effective GLP-1 receptor agonist has been developed as a drug in treating diabetes and potentially other metabolic disorders. Extensive investigations have shown that the expression of gcg and the production of GLP-1 can be activated by the elevation of the second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP). Recent studies suggest that in addition to protein kinase A (PKA), exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), another effector of cAMP signaling, and the crosstalk between PKA and Wnt signaling pathway, are also involved in cAMP-stimulated gcg expression and GLP-1 production. Furthermore, functions of GLP-1 in pancreatic cells are mainly mediated by cAMP-PKA, cAMP-Epac and Wnt signaling pathways as well.

  17. The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor as a potential treatment target in alcohol use disorder: evidence from human genetic association studies and a mouse model of alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Suchankova, P; Yan, J; Schwandt, M L; Stangl, B L; Caparelli, E C; Momenan, R; Jerlhag, E; Engel, J A; Hodgkinson, C A; Egli, M; Lopez, M F; Becker, H C; Goldman, D; Heilig, M; Ramchandani, V A; Leggio, L

    2015-06-16

    The hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) regulates appetite and food intake. GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation also attenuates the reinforcing properties of alcohol in rodents. The present translational study is based on four human genetic association studies and one preclinical study providing data that support the hypothesis that GLP-1R may have a role in the pathophysiology of alcohol use disorder (AUD). Case-control analysis (N = 908) was performed on a sample of individuals enrolled in the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) intramural research program. The Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment (SAGE) sample (N = 3803) was used for confirmation purposes. Post hoc analyses were carried out on data from a human laboratory study of intravenous alcohol self-administration (IV-ASA; N = 81) in social drinkers and from a functional magnetic resonance imaging study in alcohol-dependent individuals (N = 22) subjected to a Monetary Incentive Delay task. In the preclinical study, a GLP-1R agonist was evaluated in a mouse model of alcohol dependence to demonstrate the role of GLP-1R for alcohol consumption. The previously reported functional allele 168Ser (rs6923761) was nominally associated with AUD (P = 0.004) in the NIAAA sample, which was partially replicated in males of the SAGE sample (P = 0.033). The 168 Ser/Ser genotype was further associated with increased alcohol administration and breath alcohol measures in the IV-ASA experiment and with higher BOLD response in the right globus pallidus when receiving notification of outcome for high monetary reward. Finally, GLP-1R agonism significantly reduced alcohol consumption in a mouse model of alcohol dependence. These convergent findings suggest that the GLP-1R may be an attractive target for personalized pharmacotherapy treatment of AUD.

  18. The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor as a potential treatment target in alcohol use disorder: evidence from human genetic association studies and a mouse model of alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Suchankova, P; Yan, J; Schwandt, M L; Stangl, B L; Caparelli, E C; Momenan, R; Jerlhag, E; Engel, J A; Hodgkinson, C A; Egli, M; Lopez, M F; Becker, H C; Goldman, D; Heilig, M; Ramchandani, V A; Leggio, L

    2015-01-01

    The hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) regulates appetite and food intake. GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation also attenuates the reinforcing properties of alcohol in rodents. The present translational study is based on four human genetic association studies and one preclinical study providing data that support the hypothesis that GLP-1R may have a role in the pathophysiology of alcohol use disorder (AUD). Case–control analysis (N=908) was performed on a sample of individuals enrolled in the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) intramural research program. The Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment (SAGE) sample (N=3803) was used for confirmation purposes. Post hoc analyses were carried out on data from a human laboratory study of intravenous alcohol self-administration (IV-ASA; N=81) in social drinkers and from a functional magnetic resonance imaging study in alcohol-dependent individuals (N=22) subjected to a Monetary Incentive Delay task. In the preclinical study, a GLP-1R agonist was evaluated in a mouse model of alcohol dependence to demonstrate the role of GLP-1R for alcohol consumption. The previously reported functional allele 168Ser (rs6923761) was nominally associated with AUD (P=0.004) in the NIAAA sample, which was partially replicated in males of the SAGE sample (P=0.033). The 168Ser/Ser genotype was further associated with increased alcohol administration and breath alcohol measures in the IV-ASA experiment and with higher BOLD response in the right globus pallidus when receiving notification of outcome for high monetary reward. Finally, GLP-1R agonism significantly reduced alcohol consumption in a mouse model of alcohol dependence. These convergent findings suggest that the GLP-1R may be an attractive target for personalized pharmacotherapy treatment of AUD. PMID:26080318

  19. Glucagon-like peptide-1 protects cardiomyocytes from advanced oxidation protein product-induced apoptosis via the PI3K/Akt/Bad signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Xiong, Zhouyi; Wang, Jiao; Zhang, Shuangshuang; Lei, Lei; Yang, Li; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-02-01

    Cardiomyocyte apoptosis is a major event in the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy. Currently, no single effective treatment for diabetic cardiomyopathy exists. The present study investigated whether advanced oxidative protein products (AOPPs) have a detrimental role in the survival of cardiomyocytes and if glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) exerts a cardioprotective effect under these circumstances. The present study also aimed to determine the underlying mechanisms. H9c2 cells were exposed to increasing concentrations of AOPPs in the presence or absence of GLP-1, and the viability and apoptotic rate were detected using a cell counting kit-8 assay and flow cytometry, respectively. In addition, a phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, LY294002, was employed to illustrate the mechanism of the antiapoptotic effect of GLP-1. The expression levels of the apoptotic-associated proteins, Akt, B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2, Bcl-2-associated death promoter (Bad), Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and caspase-3 were measured by western blotting. It was revealed that GLP-1 significantly attenuated AOPP-induced cell toxicity and apoptosis. AOPPs inactivated the phosphorylation of Akt, reduced the phosphorylation of Bad, decreased the expression of Bcl-2, increased the expression of Bax and the activation of caspase-3 in H9c2 cells. GLP-1 reversed the above changes induced by AOPPs and the protective effects of GLP-1 were abolished by the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. In conclusion, the present data suggested that GLP-1 protected cardiomyocytes against AOPP-induced apoptosis, predominantly via the PI3K/Akt/Bad pathway. These results provided a conceivable mechanism for the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy and rendered a novel application of GLP-1 exerting favorable cardiac effects for the treatment of diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  20. Glucagon-like peptide-1 protects cardiomyocytes from advanced oxidation protein product-induced apoptosis via the PI3K/Akt/Bad signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, HUA; XIONG, ZHOUYI; WANG, JIAO; ZHANG, SHUANGSHUANG; LEI, LEI; YANG, LI; ZHANG, ZHEN

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyocyte apoptosis is a major event in the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy. Currently, no single effective treatment for diabetic cardiomyopathy exists. The present study investigated whether advanced oxidative protein products (AOPPs) have a detrimental role in the survival of cardiomyocytes and if glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) exerts a cardioprotective effect under these circumstances. The present study also aimed to determine the underlying mechanisms. H9c2 cells were exposed to increasing concentrations of AOPPs in the presence or absence of GLP-1, and the viability and apoptotic rate were detected using a cell counting kit-8 assay and flow cytometry, respectively. In addition, a phosphatidylino-sitol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, LY294002, was employed to illustrate the mechanism of the antiapoptotic effect of GLP-1. The expression levels of the apoptotic-associated proteins, Akt, B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2, Bcl-2-associated death promoter (Bad), Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and caspase-3 were measured by western blotting. It was revealed that GLP-1 significantly attenuated AOPP-induced cell toxicity and apoptosis. AOPPs inactivated the phosphorylation of Akt, reduced the phosphorylation of Bad, decreased the expression of Bcl-2, increased the expression of Bax and the activation of caspase-3 in H9c2 cells. GLP-1 reversed the above changes induced by AOPPs and the protective effects of GLP-1 were abolished by the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. In conclusion, the present data suggested that GLP-1 protected cardiomyocytes against AOPP-induced apoptosis, predominantly via the PI3K/Akt/Bad pathway. These results provided a conceivable mechanism for the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy and rendered a novel application of GLP-1 exerting favorable cardiac effects for the treatment of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:26717963

  1. An Emerging Role of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 in Preventing Advanced-Glycation-End-Product-Mediated Damages in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Puddu, Alessandra; Mach, François; Nencioni, Alessio; Viviani, Giorgio Luciano; Montecucco, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a gut hormone produced in the intestinal epithelial endocrine L cells by differential processing of the proglucagon gene. Released in response to the nutrient ingestion, GLP-1 plays an important role in maintaining glucose homeostasis. GLP-1 has been shown to regulate blood glucose levels by stimulating glucose-dependent insulin secretion and inhibiting glucagon secretion, gastric emptying, and food intake. These antidiabetic activities highlight GLP-1 as a potential therapeutic molecule in the clinical management of type 2 diabetes, (a disease characterized by progressive decline of beta-cell function and mass, increased insulin resistance, and final hyperglycemia). Since chronic hyperglycemia contributed to the acceleration of the formation of Advanced Glycation End-Products (AGEs, a heterogeneous group of compounds derived from the nonenzymatic reaction of reducing sugars with free amino groups of proteins implicated in vascular diabetic complications), the administration of GLP-1 might directly counteract diabetes pathophysiological processes (such as pancreatic β-cell dysfunction). This paper outlines evidence on the protective role of GLP-1 in preventing the deleterious effects mediated by AGEs in type 2 diabetes. PMID:23365488

  2. The incretin system ABCs in obesity and diabetes - novel therapeutic strategies for weight loss and beyond.

    PubMed

    João, A L; Reis, F; Fernandes, R

    2016-07-01

    Incretins are gastrointestinal-derived hormones released in response to a meal playing a key role in the regulation of postprandial secretion of insulin (incretin effect) and glucagon by the pancreas. Both incretins, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), have several other actions by peripheral and central mechanisms. GLP-1 regulates body weight by inhibiting appetite and delaying gastric, emptying actions that are dependent on central nervous system GLP-1 receptor activation. Several other hormones and gut peptides, including leptin and ghrelin, interact with GLP-1 to modulate appetite. GLP-1 is rapidly degraded by the multifunctional enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4). DPP-4 is involved in adipose tissue inflammation, which is associated with insulin resistance and diabetes progression, being a common pathophysiological mechanism in obesity-related complications. Furthermore, the incretin system appears to provide the basis for understanding the high weight loss efficacy of bariatric surgery, a widely used treatment for obesity, often in association with diabetes. The present review brings together new insights into obesity pathogenesis, integrating GLP-1 and DPP-4 in the complex interplay between obesity and inflammation, namely, in diabetic patients. This in turn will provide the basis for novel incretin-based therapeutic strategies for obesity and diabetes with promising benefits in addition to weight loss. © 2016 World Obesity.

  3. The CTRB1/2 locus affects diabetes susceptibility and treatment via the incretin pathway.

    PubMed

    't Hart, Leen M; Fritsche, Andreas; Nijpels, Giel; van Leeuwen, Nienke; Donnelly, Louise A; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Alssema, Marjan; Fadista, Joao; Carlotti, Françoise; Gjesing, Anette P; Palmer, Colin N A; van Haeften, Timon W; Herzberg-Schäfer, Silke A; Simonis-Bik, Annemarie M C; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Helmer, Quinta; Deelen, Joris; Guigas, Bruno; Hansen, Torben; Machicao, Fausto; Willemsen, Gonneke; Heine, Robert J; Kramer, Mark H H; Holst, Jens J; de Koning, Eelco J P; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Pedersen, Oluf; Groop, Leif; de Geus, Eco J C; Slagboom, P Eline; Boomsma, Dorret I; Eekhoff, Elisabeth M W; Pearson, Ewan R; Diamant, Michaela

    2013-09-01

    The incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) promotes glucose homeostasis and enhances β-cell function. GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, which inhibit the physiological inactivation of endogenous GLP-1, are used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Using the Metabochip, we identified three novel genetic loci with large effects (30-40%) on GLP-1-stimulated insulin secretion during hyperglycemic clamps in nondiabetic Caucasian individuals (TMEM114; CHST3 and CTRB1/2; n = 232; all P ≤ 8.8 × 10(-7)). rs7202877 near CTRB1/2, a known diabetes risk locus, also associated with an absolute 0.51 ± 0.16% (5.6 ± 1.7 mmol/mol) lower A1C response to DPP-4 inhibitor treatment in G-allele carriers, but there was no effect on GLP-1 RA treatment in type 2 diabetic patients (n = 527). Furthermore, in pancreatic tissue, we show that rs7202877 acts as expression quantitative trait locus for CTRB1 and CTRB2, encoding chymotrypsinogen, and increases fecal chymotrypsin activity in healthy carriers. Chymotrypsin is one of the most abundant digestive enzymes in the gut where it cleaves food proteins into smaller peptide fragments. Our data identify chymotrypsin in the regulation of the incretin pathway, development of diabetes, and response to DPP-4 inhibitor treatment. PMID:23674605

  4. The incretin system ABCs in obesity and diabetes - novel therapeutic strategies for weight loss and beyond.

    PubMed

    João, A L; Reis, F; Fernandes, R

    2016-07-01

    Incretins are gastrointestinal-derived hormones released in response to a meal playing a key role in the regulation of postprandial secretion of insulin (incretin effect) and glucagon by the pancreas. Both incretins, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), have several other actions by peripheral and central mechanisms. GLP-1 regulates body weight by inhibiting appetite and delaying gastric, emptying actions that are dependent on central nervous system GLP-1 receptor activation. Several other hormones and gut peptides, including leptin and ghrelin, interact with GLP-1 to modulate appetite. GLP-1 is rapidly degraded by the multifunctional enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4). DPP-4 is involved in adipose tissue inflammation, which is associated with insulin resistance and diabetes progression, being a common pathophysiological mechanism in obesity-related complications. Furthermore, the incretin system appears to provide the basis for understanding the high weight loss efficacy of bariatric surgery, a widely used treatment for obesity, often in association with diabetes. The present review brings together new insights into obesity pathogenesis, integrating GLP-1 and DPP-4 in the complex interplay between obesity and inflammation, namely, in diabetic patients. This in turn will provide the basis for novel incretin-based therapeutic strategies for obesity and diabetes with promising benefits in addition to weight loss. © 2016 World Obesity. PMID:27125902

  5. Novel Small Molecule Agonist of TGR5 Possesses Anti-Diabetic Effects but Causes Gallbladder Filling in Mice.

    PubMed

    Briere, Daniel A; Ruan, Xiaoping; Cheng, Christine C; Siesky, Angela M; Fitch, Thomas E; Dominguez, Carmen; Sanfeliciano, Sonia Gutierrez; Montero, Carlos; Suen, Chen S; Xu, Yanping; Coskun, Tamer; Michael, M Dodson

    2015-01-01

    Activation of TGR5 via bile acids or bile acid analogs leads to the release of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) from intestine, increases energy expenditure in brown adipose tissue, and increases gallbladder filling with bile. Here, we present compound 18, a non-bile acid agonist of TGR5 that demonstrates robust GLP-1 secretion in a mouse enteroendocrine cell line yet weak GLP-1 secretion in a human enteroendocrine cell line. Acute administration of compound 18 to mice increased GLP-1 and peptide YY (PYY) secretion, leading to a lowering of the glucose excursion in an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), while chronic administration led to weight loss. In addition, compound 18 showed a dose-dependent increase in gallbladder filling. Lastly, compound 18 failed to show similar pharmacological effects on GLP-1, PYY, and gallbladder filling in Tgr5 knockout mice. Together, these results demonstrate that compound 18 is a mouse-selective TGR5 agonist that induces GLP-1 and PYY secretion, and lowers the glucose excursion in an OGTT, but only at doses that simultaneously induce gallbladder filling. Overall, these data highlight the benefits and potential risks of using TGR5 agonists to treat diabetes and metabolic diseases.

  6. Substitution of the cysteine 438 residue in the cytoplasmic tail of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor alters signal transduction activity.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Patricia; Roncero, Isabel; Blázquez, Enrique; Alvarez, Elvira

    2005-04-01

    Several G-protein-coupled receptors contain cysteine residues in the C-terminal tail that may modulate receptor function. In this work we analysed the substitution of Cys438 by alanine in the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLPR), which led to a threefold decrease in cAMP production, although endocytosis and cellular redistribution of GLP-1 receptor agonist-induced processes were unaffected. Additionally, cysteine residues in the C-terminal tail of several G-protein-coupled receptors were found to act as substrates for palmitoylation, which might modify the access of protein kinases to this region. His-tagged GLP-1 receptors incorporated 3H-palmitate. Nevertheless, substitution of Cys438 prevented the incorporation of palmitate. Accordingly, we also investigated the effect of substitution of the consensus sequence by protein kinase C (PKC) Ser431/432 in both wild-type and Ala438 GLP-1 receptors. Substitution of Ser431/432 by alanine did not modify the ability of wild-type receptors to stimulate adenylate cyclase or endocytosis and recycling processes. By contrast, the substitution of Ser431/432 by alanine in the receptor containing Ala438 increased the ability to stimulate adenylate cyclase. All types of receptors were mainly internalised through coated pits. Thus, cysteine 438 in the cytoplasmic tail of the GLP-1 receptor would regulate its interaction with G-proteins and the stimulation of adenylyl cyclase. Palmitoylation of this residue might control the access of PKC to Ser431/432.

  7. Gut-brain connection: The neuroprotective effects of the anti-diabetic drug liraglutide.

    PubMed

    Candeias, Emanuel Monteiro; Sebastião, Inês Carolina; Cardoso, Susana Maria; Correia, Sónia Catarina; Carvalho, Cristina Isabel; Plácido, Ana Isabel; Santos, Maria Sancha; Oliveira, Catarina Resende; Moreira, Paula Isabel; Duarte, Ana Isabel

    2015-06-25

    Long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogues marketed for type 2 diabetes (T2D) treatment have been showing positive and protective effects in several different tissues, including pancreas, heart or even brain. This gut secreted hormone plays a potent insulinotropic activity and an important role in maintaining glucose homeostasis. Furthermore, growing evidences suggest the occurrence of several commonalities between T2D and neurodegenerative diseases, insulin resistance being pointed as a main cause for cognitive decline and increased risk to develop dementia. In this regard, it has also been suggested that stimulation of brain insulin signaling may have a protective role against cognitive deficits. As GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1R) are expressed throughout the central nervous system and GLP-1 may cross the blood-brain-barrier, an emerging hypothesis suggests that they may be promising therapeutic targets against brain dysfunctional insulin signaling-related pathologies. Importantly, GLP-1 actions depend not only on the direct effect mediated by its receptor activation, but also on the gut-brain axis involving an exchange of signals between both tissues via the vagal nerve, thereby regulating numerous physiological functions (e.g., energy homeostasis, glucose-dependent insulin secretion, as well as appetite and weight control). Amongst the incretin/GLP-1 mimetics class of anti-T2D drugs with an increasingly described neuroprotective potential, the already marketed liraglutide emerged as a GLP-1R agonist highly resistant to dipeptidyl peptidase-4 degradation (thereby having an increased half-life) and whose systemic GLP-1R activity is comparable to that of native GLP-1. Importantly, several preclinical studies showed anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and neuroprotective effects of liraglutide against T2D, stroke and Alzheimer disease (AD), whereas several clinical trials, demonstrated some surprising benefits of liraglutide on weight loss

  8. Gut-brain connection: The neuroprotective effects of the anti-diabetic drug liraglutide

    PubMed Central

    Candeias, Emanuel Monteiro; Sebastião, Inês Carolina; Cardoso, Susana Maria; Correia, Sónia Catarina; Carvalho, Cristina Isabel; Plácido, Ana Isabel; Santos, Maria Sancha; Oliveira, Catarina Resende; Moreira, Paula Isabel; Duarte, Ana Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogues marketed for type 2 diabetes (T2D) treatment have been showing positive and protective effects in several different tissues, including pancreas, heart or even brain. This gut secreted hormone plays a potent insulinotropic activity and an important role in maintaining glucose homeostasis. Furthermore, growing evidences suggest the occurrence of several commonalities between T2D and neurodegenerative diseases, insulin resistance being pointed as a main cause for cognitive decline and increased risk to develop dementia. In this regard, it has also been suggested that stimulation of brain insulin signaling may have a protective role against cognitive deficits. As GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1R) are expressed throughout the central nervous system and GLP-1 may cross the blood-brain-barrier, an emerging hypothesis suggests that they may be promising therapeutic targets against brain dysfunctional insulin signaling-related pathologies. Importantly, GLP-1 actions depend not only on the direct effect mediated by its receptor activation, but also on the gut-brain axis involving an exchange of signals between both tissues via the vagal nerve, thereby regulating numerous physiological functions (e.g., energy homeostasis, glucose-dependent insulin secretion, as well as appetite and weight control). Amongst the incretin/GLP-1 mimetics class of anti-T2D drugs with an increasingly described neuroprotective potential, the already marketed liraglutide emerged as a GLP-1R agonist highly resistant to dipeptidyl peptidase-4 degradation (thereby having an increased half-life) and whose systemic GLP-1R activity is comparable to that of native GLP-1. Importantly, several preclinical studies showed anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and neuroprotective effects of liraglutide against T2D, stroke and Alzheimer disease (AD), whereas several clinical trials, demonstrated some surprising benefits of liraglutide on weight loss

  9. Abomasal infusion of casein, starch and soybean oil differentially affect plasma concentrations of gut peptides and feed intake in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Relling, Alejandro E; Reynolds, Christopher K

    2008-07-01

    The effects of specific nutrients on secretion and plasma concentrations of gut peptides (glucagon-like peptide-1((7-36)) amide (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and cholecystokinin-8 (CCK)) differ across species, but are not reported for cattle. Our objective was to determine acute (hours) and chronic (1 week) effects of increased abomasal supply of protein, carbohydrate, or fat to the small intestine on dry matter intake (DMI) and plasma concentrations of GLP-1, GIP, CCK, and insulin. Four mid-lactation Holstein cows were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square design experiment. Treatments were 7-day abomasal infusions of water, soybean oil (500 g/d), corn starch (1100 g/d), or casein (800 g/d). Jugular vein plasma was obtained over 7h at the end of the first and last day of infusions. Oil infusion decreased DMI on day 7, but total metabolizable energy (ME) supply (diet plus infusate) did not differ from water infusion. Casein and starch infusion had no effect on feed DMI; thus, ME supply increased. Decreased DMI on day 7 of oil infusion was accompanied by increased plasma GLP-1 concentration, but decreased plasma CCK concentration. Increased plasma GIP concentration was associated with increased ME supply on day 7 of casein and starch infusion. Casein infusion tended to increase plasma CCK concentration on both days of sampling, and increased plasma GLP-1 and insulin concentration on day 1 of infusion. The present data indicate a sustained elevation of plasma concentration of GLP-1, but not CCK, may contribute to the reduced DMI observed in dairy cows provided supplemental fat.

  10. Incretin and islet hormonal responses to fat and protein ingestion in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Carr, Richard D; Larsen, Marianne O; Winzell, Maria Sörhede; Jelic, Katarina; Lindgren, Ola; Deacon, Carolyn F; Ahrén, Bo

    2008-10-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) regulate islet function after carbohydrate ingestion. Whether incretin hormones are of importance for islet function after ingestion of noncarbohydrate macronutrients is not known. This study therefore examined integrated incretin and islet hormone responses to ingestion of pure fat (oleic acid; 0.88 g/kg) or protein (milk and egg protein; 2 g/kg) over 5 h in healthy men, aged 20-25 yr (n=12); plain water ingestion served as control. Both intact (active) and total GLP-1 and GIP levels were determined as was plasma activity of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4). Following water ingestion, glucose, insulin, glucagon, GLP-1, and GIP levels and DPP-4 activity were stable during the 5-h study period. Both fat and protein ingestion increased insulin, glucagon, GIP, and GLP-1 levels without affecting glucose levels or DPP-4 activity. The GLP-1 responses were similar after protein and fat, whereas the early (30 min) GIP response was higher after protein than after fat ingestion (P<0.001). This was associated with sevenfold higher insulin and glucagon responses compared with fat ingestion (both P<0.001). After protein, the early GIP, but not GLP-1, responses correlated to insulin (r(2)=0.86; P=0.0001) but not glucagon responses. In contrast, after fat ingestion, GLP-1 and GIP did not correlate to islet hormones. We conclude that, whereas protein and fat release both incretin and islet hormones, the early GIP secretion after protein ingestion may be of primary importance to islet hormone secretion.

  11. Activation of transmembrane bile acid receptor TGR5 stimulates insulin secretion in pancreatic {beta} cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Divya P.; Rajagopal, Senthilkumar; Mahavadi, Sunila; Mirshahi, Faridoddin; Grider, John R.; Murthy, Karnam S.; Sanyal, Arun J.

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G protein coupled receptor TGR5 is expressed in mouse and human islets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGR5 is coupled to activation of Gs and Ca{sup 2+} release via cAMP/Epac/PLC-{epsilon} pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of TGR5 by bile salts and selective ligands causes insulin secretion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGR5 could be a potential therapeutic target to treat diabetes. -- Abstract: Bile acids act as signaling molecules and stimulate the G protein coupled receptor, TGR5, in addition to nuclear farnesoid X receptor to regulate lipid, glucose and energy metabolism. Bile acid induced activation of TGR5 in the enteroendocrine cells promotes glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) release, which has insulinotropic effect in the pancreatic {beta} cells. In the present study, we have identified the expression of TGR5 in pancreatic {beta} cell line MIN6 and also in mouse and human pancreatic islets. TGR5 selective ligands, oleanolic acid (OA) and INT-777 selectively activated G{alpha}{sub s} and caused an increase in intracellular cAMP and Ca{sup 2+}. OA and INT-777 also increased phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis and the increase was blocked by NF449 (a selective G{alpha}{sub s} inhibitor) or (U73122) (PI hydrolysis inhibitor). OA, INT-777 and lithocholic acid increased insulin release in MIN6 and human islets and the increase was inhibited by treatment with NF449, (U73122) or BAPTA-AM (chelator of calcium), but not with myristoylated PKI (PKA inhibitor), suggesting that the release is dependent on G{sub s}/cAMP/Ca{sup 2+} pathway. 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP, a cAMP analog, which activates Epac, but not PKA also stimulated PI hydrolysis. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the TGR5 expressed in the pancreatic {beta} cells regulates insulin secretion and highlights the importance of ongoing therapeutic strategies targeting TGR5 in the control of glucose homeostasis.

  12. Blood pressure-lowering effects of incretin-based diabetes therapies.

    PubMed

    Lovshin, Julie A; Zinman, Bernard

    2014-10-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1) agonists and dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are therapies that are used to treat hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Although both of these medication types primarily lower prandial and fasting blood glucose levels by enhanced GLP-1 receptor signalling, they have distinct mechanisms of action. Whereas DPP-4 inhibitors boost patient levels of endogenously produced GLP-1 (and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide) by preventing its metabolism by DPP-4 enzymatic activity, GLP-1 receptor agonists are either synthetic analogues of human GLP-1 or exendin-4 based molecules. They are tailored to resist hydrolysis by DPP-4 activity and to provide longer durability in the circulation compared with native GLP-1. Several roles for incretin-based diabetes therapies beyond the endocrine pancreas and their glycemic-lowering properties have now been described, including attenuation of cardiac myocyte injury and reduction in post-ischemic infarction size after cardiovascular insult. Favourable outcomes have also been observed on systolic blood pressure reduction, postprandial intestinal lipoprotein metabolism, endothelial cell function, modulation of innate immune-mediated inflammation and surrogate markers of renal function. As hypertension is an independent risk factor for premature death in patients with type 2 diabetes, potential favourable extrapancreatic actions, particularly within the heart, blood vessels and kidney, for this drug class are of considerable clinical interest. Herein, we highlight and provide critical appraisal of the clinical data supporting the antihypertensive effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors and link possible mechanisms of action to clinical outcomes reported for this drug class.

  13. Short-term sleep deprivation with nocturnal light exposure alters time-dependent glucagon-like peptide-1 and insulin secretion in male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Gil-Lozano, Manuel; Hunter, Paola M; Behan, Lucy-Ann; Gladanac, Bojana; Casper, Robert F; Brubaker, Patricia L

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal L cell is the principal source of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a major determinant of insulin release. Because GLP-1 secretion is regulated in a circadian manner in rodents, we investigated whether the activity of the human L cell is also time sensitive. Rhythmic fluctuations in the mRNA levels of canonical clock genes were found in the human NCI-H716 L cell model, which also showed a time-dependent pattern in their response to well-established secretagogues. A diurnal variation in GLP-1 responses to identical meals (850 kcal), served 12 h apart in the normal dark (2300) and light (1100) periods, was also observed in male volunteers maintained under standard sleep and light conditions. These findings suggest the existence of a daily pattern of activity in the human L cell. Moreover, we separately tested the short-term effects of sleep deprivation and nocturnal light exposure on basal and postprandial GLP-1, insulin, and glucose levels in the same volunteers. Sleep deprivation with nocturnal light exposure disrupted the melatonin and cortisol profiles and increased insulin resistance. Moreover, it also induced profound derangements in GLP-1 and insulin responses such that postprandial GLP-1 and insulin levels were markedly elevated and the normal variation in GLP-1 responses was abrogated. These alterations were not observed in sleep-deprived participants maintained under dark conditions, indicating a direct effect of light on the mechanisms that regulate glucose homeostasis. Accordingly, the metabolic abnormalities known to occur in shift workers may be related to the effects of irregular light-dark cycles on these glucoregulatory pathways. PMID:26530153

  14. Short-term sleep deprivation with nocturnal light exposure alters time-dependent glucagon-like peptide-1 and insulin secretion in male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Gil-Lozano, Manuel; Hunter, Paola M; Behan, Lucy-Ann; Gladanac, Bojana; Casper, Robert F; Brubaker, Patricia L

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal L cell is the principal source of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a major determinant of insulin release. Because GLP-1 secretion is regulated in a circadian manner in rodents, we investigated whether the activity of the human L cell is also time sensitive. Rhythmic fluctuations in the mRNA levels of canonical clock genes were found in the human NCI-H716 L cell model, which also showed a time-dependent pattern in their response to well-established secretagogues. A diurnal variation in GLP-1 responses to identical meals (850 kcal), served 12 h apart in the normal dark (2300) and light (1100) periods, was also observed in male volunteers maintained under standard sleep and light conditions. These findings suggest the existence of a daily pattern of activity in the human L cell. Moreover, we separately tested the short-term effects of sleep deprivation and nocturnal light exposure on basal and postprandial GLP-1, insulin, and glucose levels in the same volunteers. Sleep deprivation with nocturnal light exposure disrupted the melatonin and cortisol profiles and increased insulin resistance. Moreover, it also induced profound derangements in GLP-1 and insulin responses such that postprandial GLP-1 and insulin levels were markedly elevated and the normal variation in GLP-1 responses was abrogated. These alterations were not observed in sleep-deprived participants maintained under dark conditions, indicating a direct effect of light on the mechanisms that regulate glucose homeostasis. Accordingly, the metabolic abnormalities known to occur in shift workers may be related to the effects of irregular light-dark cycles on these glucoregulatory pathways.

  15. Refinement of Glucagon-like Peptide 1 Docking to Its Intact Receptor Using Mid-region Photolabile Probes and Molecular Modeling*

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Laurence J.; Chen, Quan; Lam, Polo C.-H.; Pinon, Delia I.; Sexton, Patrick M.; Abagyan, Ruben; Dong, Maoqing

    2011-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) receptor is an important drug target within the B family of G protein-coupled receptors. Its natural agonist ligand, GLP1, has incretin-like actions and the receptor is a recognized target for management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Despite recent solution of the structure of the amino terminus of the GLP1 receptor and several close family members, the molecular basis for GLP1 binding to and activation of the intact receptor remains unclear. We previously demonstrated molecular approximations between amino- and carboxyl-terminal residues of GLP1 and its receptor. In this work, we study spatial approximations with the mid-region of this peptide to gain insights into the orientation of the intact receptor and the ligand-receptor complex. We have prepared two new photolabile probes incorporating a p-benzoyl-l-phenylalanine into positions 16 and 20 of GLP1(7–36). Both probes bound to the GLP1 receptor specifically and with high affinity. These were each fully efficacious agonists, stimulating cAMP accumulation in receptor-bearing CHO cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Each probe specifically labeled a single receptor site. Protease cleavage and radiochemical sequencing identified receptor residue Leu141 above transmembrane segment one as its site of labeling for the position 16 probe, whereas the position 20 probe labeled receptor residue Trp297 within the second extracellular loop. Establishing ligand residue approximation with this loop region is unique among family members and may help to orient the receptor amino-terminal domain relative to its helical bundle region. PMID:21454562

  16. Renal extraction and acute effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 on central and renal hemodynamics in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Asmar, Ali; Simonsen, Lene; Asmar, Meena; Madsbad, Sten; Holst, Jens J; Frandsen, Erik; Moro, Cedric; Jonassen, Thomas; Bülow, Jens

    2015-04-15

    The present experiments were performed to elucidate the acute effects of intravenous infusion of glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 on central and renal hemodynamics in healthy men. Seven healthy middle-aged men were examined on two different occasions in random order. During a 3-h infusion of either GLP-1 (1.5 pmol·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹) or saline, cardiac output was estimated noninvasively, and intraarterial blood pressure and heart rate were measured continuously. Renal plasma flow, glomerular filtration rate, and uptake/release of hormones and ions were measured by Fick's Principle after catheterization of a renal vein. Subjects remained supine during the experiments. During GLP-1 infusion, both systolic blood pressure and arterial pulse pressure increased by 5±1 mmHg (P=0.015 and P=0.002, respectively). Heart rate increased by 5±1 beats/min (P=0.005), and cardiac output increased by 18% (P=0.016). Renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate as well as the clearance of Na⁺ and Li⁺ were not affected by GLP-1. However, plasma renin activity decreased (P=0.037), whereas plasma levels of atrial natriuretic peptide were unaffected. Renal extraction of intact GLP-1 was 43% (P<0.001), whereas 60% of the primary metabolite GLP-1 9-36amide was extracted (P=0.017). In humans, an acute intravenous administration of GLP-1 leads to increased cardiac output due to a simultaneous increase in stroke volume and heart rate, whereas no effect on renal hemodynamics could be demonstrated despite significant extraction of both the intact hormone and its primary metabolite. PMID:25670826

  17. Protective Role of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Against High-Glucose-Induced Endothelial Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lixin; Qiao, Yue; Zhang, Lina; Pan, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the protective effect of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) against cell damage induced by high glucose. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were divided into control group (5.5 mmol/L) and high glucose groups (19, 33, or 47 mmol/L), which were cultured with different concentrations of glucose for 48 hours, respectively. Cell viability was measured with MTT assay. Levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were monitored by flow cytometry and apoptotic cell death was measured by staining with Annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide. Cultured cells were detected with intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), VCAM-1, and JNK on protein. Compared with the control group, cell viability was decreased by 20% and 37%, respectively, when cultured under 33 and 47 mM, while increased in different GLP-1-treated groups (0.01 L, 0.1, 1, and 10 nmol/L). The GLP-1 treatment significantly reduced the ROS level of high glucose treatment group but not impact on the control group. Meanwhile, the level of apoptosis was elevated in the high glucose treatment group. Early apoptosis was significantly reversed in the GLP-1-treated group (0.1, 1, and 10 nmol/L). Late apoptosis was uniquely decreased in the GLP-1 concentrations of 10 nmol/L. Furthermore, GLP-1 could also reduce the protein levels of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and phospho JNK in the endothelial cells with high glucose treatment. GLP-1 could inhibit cell apoptosis and reduce ROS generation and JNK-Bax signaling pathway activation, which were induced by high glucose treatment. PMID:26632709

  18. Exendin-4 protects bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells against oxygen/glucose and serum deprivation-induced apoptosis through the activation of the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway and the attenuation of ER stress.

    PubMed

    He, Jieqiong; Wang, Chao; Sun, Yunpeng; Lu, Bo; Cui, Jinjin; Dong, Nana; Zhang, Maomao; Liu, Youbing; Yu, Bo

    2016-04-01

    Exendin-4 (ex-4) is a long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist which exerts beneficial effects on glycemic control and promotes cell viability. In the present study, we investigated the anti-apoptotic effects of ex-4, as well as the potential mechanisms responsible for these effects in rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) under conditions of oxygen, glucose and serum deprivation (OGD). The apoptosis of the MSCs was induced by subjecting the cells to OGD conditions for 4 h and was detected by Annexin V/PI and Hoechst 33258 staining. The MSCs were pre-conditioned with ex-4 for 12 h prior to being subjected to OGD conditions, and the expression levels of an apoptotic marker (cleaved caspase-3), endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers [phosphorylated (p-)protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK), PERK, binding immunoglobulin protein (BIP), activating transcription factor 4 (ATF-4) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP)], as well as those of a survival marker (Bcl-2) were measured by western blot analysis. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of ATF-4 and CHOP were determined by RT-qPCR. ELISA was used to examine the activity of intracellular cAMP. Moreover, the GLP-1R antagonist, exendin9-39 (ex9-39), the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, H89, and small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting rat ATF-4 and CHOP were co-incubated with the MSCs. The apoptotic rate was markedly diminished following pre-conditioning with ex-4 in a dose‑dependent manner (P<0.05). The ER stress markers, p-PERK, BIP, ATF-4 and CHOP, were upregulated in the cells subjected to OGD conditions. Ex-4 pre-conditioning significantly decreased the mRNA and protein levels of ATF-4 and CHOP (P<0.05), and increased the activity of intracellular cAMP (P<0.05). Furthermore, the anti-apoptotic effects of ex-4 were almost reversed by treatment with either H89 or ex9-39 (P<0.05); transfection with siRNA-CHOP significantly reduced the apoptotic rate of the MSCs

  19. Exendin-4 protects bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells against oxygen/glucose and serum deprivation-induced apoptosis through the activation of the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway and the attenuation of ER stress

    PubMed Central

    HE, JIEQIONG; WANG, CHAO; SUN, YUNPENG; LU, BO; CUI, JINJIN; DONG, NANA; ZHANG, MAOMAO; LIU, YOUBING; YU, BO

    2016-01-01

    Exendin-4 (ex-4) is a long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist which exerts beneficial effects on glycemic control and promotes cell viability. In the present study, we investigated the anti-apoptotic effects of ex-4, as well as the potential mechanisms responsible for these effects in rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) under conditions of oxygen, glucose and serum deprivation (OGD). The apoptosis of the MSCs was induced by subjecting the cells to OGD conditions for 4 h and was detected by Annexin V/PI and Hoechst 33258 staining. The MSCs were pre-conditioned with ex-4 for 12 h prior to being subjected to OGD conditions, and the expression levels of an apoptotic marker (cleaved caspase-3), endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers [phosphorylated (p-)protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK), PERK, binding immunoglobulin protein (BIP), activating transcription factor 4 (ATF-4) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP)], as well as those of a survival marker (Bcl-2) were measured by western blot analysis. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of ATF-4 and CHOP were determined by RT-qPCR. ELISA was used to examine the activity of intracellular cAMP. Moreover, the GLP-1R antagonist, exendin9-39 (ex9-39), the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, H89, and small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting rat ATF-4 and CHOP were co-incubated with the MSCs. The apoptotic rate was markedly diminished following pre-conditioning with ex-4 in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05). The ER stress markers, p-PERK, BIP, ATF-4 and CHOP, were upregulated in the cells subjected to OGD conditions. Ex-4 pre-conditioning significantly decreased the mRNA and protein levels of ATF-4 and CHOP (P<0.05), and increased the activity of intracellular cAMP (P<0.05). Furthermore, the anti-apoptotic effects of ex-4 were almost reversed by treatment with either H89 or ex9-39 (P<0.05); transfection with siRNA-CHOP significantly reduced the apoptotic rate of the MSCs and

  20. Farnesoid X receptor inhibits glucagon-like peptide-1 production by enteroendocrine L cells.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Mohamed-Sami; Daoudi, Mehdi; Prawitt, Janne; Ducastel, Sarah; Touche, Véronique; Sayin, Sama I; Perino, Alessia; Brighton, Cheryl A; Sebti, Yasmine; Kluza, Jérôme; Briand, Olivier; Dehondt, Hélène; Vallez, Emmanuelle; Dorchies, Emilie; Baud, Grégory; Spinelli, Valeria; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Caron, Sandrine; Bantubungi, Kadiombo; Caiazzo, Robert; Reimann, Frank; Marchetti, Philippe; Lefebvre, Philippe; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Gribble, Fiona M; Schoonjans, Kristina; Pattou, François; Tailleux, Anne; Staels, Bart; Lestavel, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are signalling molecules, which activate the transmembrane receptor TGR5 and the nuclear receptor FXR. BA sequestrants (BAS) complex bile acids in the intestinal lumen and decrease intestinal FXR activity. The BAS-BA complex also induces glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) production by L cells which potentiates β-cell glucose-induced insulin secretion. Whether FXR is expressed in L cells and controls GLP-1 production is unknown. Here, we show that FXR activation in L cells decreases proglucagon expression by interfering with the glucose-responsive factor Carbohydrate-Responsive Element Binding Protein (ChREBP) and GLP-1 secretion by inhibiting glycolysis. In vivo, FXR deficiency increases GLP-1 gene expression and secretion in response to glucose hence improving glucose metabolism. Moreover, treatment of ob/ob mice with the BAS colesevelam increases intestinal proglucagon gene expression and improves glycaemia in a FXR-dependent manner. These findings identify the FXR/GLP-1 pathway as a new mechanism of BA control of glucose metabolism and a pharmacological target for type 2 diabetes. PMID:26134028

  1. Farnesoid X Receptor Inhibits Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Production by Enteroendocrine L-cells

    PubMed Central

    TRABELSI, Mohamed-Sami; DAOUDI, Mehdi; PRAWITT, Janne; DUCASTEL, Sarah; TOUCHE, Véronique; SAYIN, Sama I.; PERINO, Alessia; BRIGHTON, Cheryl A.; SEBTI, Yasmine; KLUZA, Jérôme; BRIAND, Olivier; DEHONDT, Hélène; VALLEZ, Emmanuelle; DORCHIES, Emilie; BAUD, Grégory; SPINELLI, Valeria; HENNUYER, Nathalie; CARON, Sandrine; BANTUBUNGI, Kadiombo; CAIAZZO, Robert; REIMANN, Frank; MARCHETTI, Philippe; LEFEBVRE, Philippe; BÄCKHED, Fredrik; GRIBBLE, Fiona M.; SCHOONJANS, Kristina; PATTOU, François; TAILLEUX, Anne; STAELS, Bart; LESTAVEL, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids (BA) are signalling molecules which activate the transmembrane receptor TGR5 and the nuclear receptor FXR. BA sequestrants (BAS) complex BA in the intestinal lumen and decrease intestinal FXR activity. The BAS-BA complex also induces Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) production by L-cells which potentiates β-cell glucose-induced insulin secretion. Whether FXR is expressed in L-cells and controls GLP-1 production is unknown. Here we show that FXR activation in L-cells decreases proglucagon expression by interfering with the glucose-responsive factor Carbohydrate-Responsive Element Binding Protein (ChREBP) and GLP-1 secretion by inhibiting glycolysis. In vivo, FXR-deficiency increases GLP-1 gene expression and secretion in response to glucose hence improving glucose metabolism. Moreover, treatment of ob/ob mice with the BAS colesevelam increases intestinal proglucagon gene expression and improves glycemia in a FXR-dependent manner. These findings identify the FXR/GLP-1 pathway as a new mechanism of BA control of glucose metabolism and a pharmacological target for type 2 diabetes. PMID:26134028

  2. Sensitivity to the satiating effects of Exendin 4 is decreased in obesity-prone Osborne-Mendel rats compared to obesity-resistant S5B/Pl rats

    PubMed Central

    Primeaux, Stefany D.; Barnes, Maria J.; Braymer, H. Douglas; Bray, George A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Osborne-Mendel (OM) rats are prone to obesity when fed a high fat diet, while S5B/Pl (S5B) rats are resistant to diet-induced obesity when fed the same diet. OM rats have a decreased satiation response to fatty acids infused in the gastrointestinal tract, compared to S5B rats. One possible explanation is that OM rats are less sensitive to the satiating hormone, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). GLP-1 is produced in the small intestine and is released in response to a meal. The current experiments examined the role of GLP-1 in OM and S5B rats. Methods Experiment 1 examined preproglucagon mRNA expression in the ileum of OM and S5B rats fed a high fat (55% kcal) or low fat (10% kcal) diet. Experiment 2 investigated the effects of a 2h high fat meal following a 24h fast in OM and S5B rats on circulating GLP-1 (active) levels. Experiment 3 examined the effects of Exendin-4 (GLP-1 receptor agonist) administration on the intake of a high fat or a low fat diet in OM and S5B rats. Results Preproglucagon mRNA levels were increased in the ileum of OM rats compared to S5B rats and were increased by high fat diet in OM and S5B rats. OM and S5B rats exhibited a similar meal-initiated increase in circulating GLP-1 (active) levels. Exendin-4 dose-dependently decreased food intake to a greater extent in S5B rats, compared to OM rats. The intake of low fat diet, compared to the intake of high fat diet, was more sensitive to the effects of Exendin-4 in these strains. Conclusions These results suggest that though OM and S5B rats have similar preproglucagon mRNA expression in the ileum and circulating GLP-1 levels, OM rats are less sensitive to the satiating effects of GLP-1. Therefore, dysregulation of the GLP-1 system may be a mechanism through which OM rats overeat and gain weight. PMID:20404826

  3. Exenatide promotes cognitive enhancement and positive brain metabolic changes in PS1-KI mice but has no effects in 3xTg-AD animals.

    PubMed

    Bomba, M; Ciavardelli, D; Silvestri, E; Canzoniero, L M T; Lattanzio, R; Chiappini, P; Piantelli, M; Di Ilio, C; Consoli, A; Sensi, S L

    2013-05-02

    Recent studies have shown that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a risk factor for cognitive dysfunction or dementia. Insulin resistance is often associated with T2DM and can induce defective insulin signaling in the central nervous system as well as increase the risk of cognitive impairment in the elderly. Glucagone like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone and, like GLP-1 analogs, stimulates insulin secretion and has been employed in the treatment of T2DM. GLP-1 and GLP-1 analogs also enhance synaptic plasticity and counteract cognitive deficits in mouse models of neuronal dysfunction and/or degeneration. In this study, we investigated the potential neuroprotective effects of long-term treatment with exenatide, a GLP-1 analog, in two animal models of neuronal dysfunction: the PS1-KI and 3xTg-AD mice. We found that exenatide promoted beneficial effects on short- and long-term memory performances in PS1-KI but not in 3xTg-AD animals. In PS1-KI mice, the drug increased brain lactate dehydrogenase activity leading to a net increase in lactate levels, while no effects were observed on mitochondrial respiration. On the contrary, exenatide had no effects on brain metabolism of 3xTg-AD mice. In summary, our data indicate that exenatide improves cognition in PS1-KI mice, an effect likely driven by increasing the brain anaerobic glycolysis rate.

  4. Dietary resistant starch improves selected brain and behavioral functions in adult and aged rodents

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, June; Keenan, Michael J.; Fernandez-Kim, Sun Ok; Pistell, Paul J.; Ingram, Donald K.; Li, Bing; Raggio, Anne M.; Shen, Li; Zhang, Hanjie; McCutcheon, Kathleen L; Tulley, Richard T.; Blackman, Marc R.; Keller, Jeffrey N.; Martin, Roy J.

    2013-01-01

    Resistant starch (RS) is a dietary fiber that exerts multiple beneficial effects. The current study explored the effects of dietary RS on selected brain and behavioral functions in adult and aged rodents. Because glucokinase (GK) expression in hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and area postrema of the brainstem is important for brain glucose sensing, GK mRNA was measured by brain nuclei microdissection and PCR. Adult RS-fed rats had a higher GK mRNA than controls in both brain nuclei, an indicator of improved brain glucose sensing. Next, we tested whether dietary RS improve selected behaviors in aged mice. RS-fed aged mice exhibited (1) an increased eating responses to fasting, a behavioral indicator of improvement in aged brain glucose sensing; (2) a longer latency to fall from an accelerating rotarod, a behavioral indicator of improved motor coordination; and (3) a higher serum active GLP-1. Third, GLP-1 receptor null (GLP-1RKO) mice were used to test the role of GLP-1 in brain glucose sensing, and they exhibited impaired eating responses to fasting. We conclude that in rodents (1) dietary RS improves two important indicators of brain function: glucose sensing and motor coordination, and that (2) GLP-1 is important in the optimal feeding response to a fast. PMID:23818307

  5. Cardiovascular Biology of the Incretin System

    PubMed Central

    Ussher, John R.; Drucker, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that enhances glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and exerts direct and indirect actions on the cardiovascular system. GLP-1 and its related incretin hormone, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), are rapidly inactivated by the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4), a key determinant of incretin bioactivity. Two classes of medications that enhance incretin action, GLP-1R agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors, are used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We review herein the cardiovascular biology of GLP-1R agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors, including direct and indirect effects on cardiomyocytes, blood vessels, adipocytes, the control of blood pressure and postprandial lipoprotein secretion. Both GLP-1R activation and DPP-4 inhibition exert multiple cardioprotective actions in preclinical models of cardiovascular dysfunction, and short term studies in human subjects appear to demonstrate modest yet beneficial actions on cardiac function in subjects with ischemic heart disease. Incretin-based agents control body weight, improve glycemic control with a low risk of hypoglycemia, decrease blood pressure, inhibit the secretion of intestinal chylomicrons, and reduce inflammation in preclinical studies. Nevertheless, there is limited information on the cardiovascular actions of these agents in patients with diabetes and established cardiovascular disease. Hence, a more complete understanding of the cardiovascular risk:benefit ratio of incretin-based therapies will require completion of long term cardiovascular outcome studies currently underway in patients with T2DM. PMID:22323472

  6. Dietary resistant starch improves selected brain and behavioral functions in adult and aged rodents.

    PubMed

    Zhou, June; Keenan, Michael J; Fernandez-Kim, Sun Ok; Pistell, Paul J; Ingram, Donald K; Li, Bing; Raggio, Anne M; Shen, Li; Zhang, Hanjie; McCutcheon, Kathleen L; Tulley, Richard T; Blackman, Marc R; Keller, Jeffrey N; Martin, Roy J

    2013-11-01

    Resistant starch (RS) is a dietary fiber that exerts multiple beneficial effects. The current study explored the effects of dietary RS on selected brain and behavioral functions in adult and aged rodents. Because glucokinase (GK) expression in hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and area postrema of the brainstem is important for brain glucose sensing, GK mRNA was measured by brain nuclei microdissection and PCR. Adult RS-fed rats had a higher GK mRNA than controls in both brain nuclei, an indicator of improved brain glucose sensing. Next, we tested whether dietary RS improve selected behaviors in aged mice. RS-fed aged mice exhibited (i) an increased eating responses to fasting, a behavioral indicator of improvement in aged brain glucose sensing; (ii) a longer latency to fall from an accelerating rotarod, a behavioral indicator of improved motor coordination; and (iii) a higher serum active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Then, GLP-1 receptor null (GLP-1RKO) mice were used to test the role of GLP-1 in brain glucose sensing, and they exhibited impaired eating responses to fasting. We conclude that in rodents (i) dietary RS improves two important indicators of brain function: glucose sensing and motor coordination, and (ii) GLP-1 is important in the optimal feeding response to a fast.

  7. Exenatide promotes cognitive enhancement and positive brain metabolic changes in PS1-KI mice but has no effects in 3xTg-AD animals

    PubMed Central

    Bomba, M; Ciavardelli, D; Silvestri, E; Canzoniero, L MT; Lattanzio, R; Chiappini, P; Piantelli, M; Di Ilio, C; Consoli, A; Sensi, S L

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a risk factor for cognitive dysfunction or dementia. Insulin resistance is often associated with T2DM and can induce defective insulin signaling in the central nervous system as well as increase the risk of cognitive impairment in the elderly. Glucagone like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone and, like GLP-1 analogs, stimulates insulin secretion and has been employed in the treatment of T2DM. GLP-1 and GLP-1 analogs also enhance synaptic plasticity and counteract cognitive deficits in mouse models of neuronal dysfunction and/or degeneration. In this study, we investigated the potential neuroprotective effects of long-term treatment with exenatide, a GLP-1 analog, in two animal models of neuronal dysfunction: the PS1-KI and 3xTg-AD mice. We found that exenatide promoted beneficial effects on short- and long-term memory performances in PS1-KI but not in 3xTg-AD animals. In PS1-KI mice, the drug increased brain lactate dehydrogenase activity leading to a net increase in lactate levels, while no effects were observed on mitochondrial respiration. On the contrary, exenatide had no effects on brain metabolism of 3xTg-AD mice. In summary, our data indicate that exenatide improves cognition in PS1-KI mice, an effect likely driven by increasing the brain anaerobic glycolysis rate. PMID:23640454

  8. Identification of essential residues for binding and activation in the human 5-HT7(a) serotonin receptor by molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Impellizzeri, Aga