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Sample records for active groundwater flow

  1. Groundwater flow processes and mixing in active volcanic systems: the case of Guadalajara (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Antonio, A.; Mahlknecht, J.; Tamez-Meléndez, C.; Ramos-Leal, J.; Ramírez-Orozco, A.; Parra, R.; Ornelas-Soto, N.; Eastoe, C. J.

    2015-09-01

    Groundwater chemistry and isotopic data from 40 production wells in the Atemajac and Toluquilla valleys, located in and around the Guadalajara metropolitan area, were determined to develop a conceptual model of groundwater flow processes and mixing. Stable water isotopes (δ2H, δ18O) were used to trace hydrological processes and tritium (3H) to evaluate the relative contribution of modern water in samples. Multivariate analysis including cluster analysis and principal component analysis were used to elucidate distribution patterns of constituents and factors controlling groundwater chemistry. Based on this analysis, groundwater was classified into four groups: cold groundwater, hydrothermal groundwater, polluted groundwater and mixed groundwater. Cold groundwater is characterized by low temperature, salinity, and Cl and Na concentrations and is predominantly of Na-HCO3-type. It originates as recharge at "La Primavera" caldera and is found predominantly in wells in the upper Atemajac Valley. Hydrothermal groundwater is characterized by high salinity, temperature, Cl, Na and HCO3, and the presence of minor elements such as Li, Mn and F. It is a mixed-HCO3 type found in wells from Toluquilla Valley and represents regional flow circulation through basaltic and andesitic rocks. Polluted groundwater is characterized by elevated nitrate and sulfate concentrations and is usually derived from urban water cycling and subordinately from agricultural return flow. Mixed groundwaters between cold and hydrothermal components are predominantly found in the lower Atemajac Valley. Twenty-seven groundwater samples contain at least a small fraction of modern water. The application of a multivariate mixing model allowed the mixing proportions of hydrothermal fluids, polluted waters and cold groundwater in sampled water to be evaluated. This study will help local water authorities to identify and dimension groundwater contamination, and act accordingly. It may be broadly applicable to

  2. Groundwater flow characterization in a fractured bedrock aquifer using active DTS tests in sealed boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Thomas I.; Parker, Beth L.; Maldaner, Carlos H.; Mondanos, Michael J.

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, wireline temperature profiling methods have evolved to offer new insight into fractured rock hydrogeology. Important advances in wireline temperature logging in boreholes make use of active line source heating alone and then in combination with temporary borehole sealing with flexible impervious fabric liners to eliminate the effects of borehole cross-connection and recreate natural flow conditions. Here, a characterization technique was developed based on combining fiber optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS) with active heating within boreholes sealed with flexible borehole liners. DTS systems provide a temperature profiling method that offers significantly enhanced temporal resolution when compared with conventional wireline trolling-based techniques that obtain a temperature-depth profile every few hours. The ability to rapidly and continuously collect temperature profiles can better our understanding of transient processes, allowing for improved identification of hydraulically active fractures and determination of relative rates of groundwater flow. The advantage of a sealed borehole environment for DTS-based investigations is demonstrated through a comparison of DTS data from open and lined conditions for the same borehole. Evidence for many depth-discrete active groundwater flow features under natural gradient conditions using active DTS heat pulse testing is presented along with high resolution geologic and geophysical logging and hydraulic datasets. Implications for field implementation are discussed.

  3. Global scale groundwater flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutanudjaja, Edwin; de Graaf, Inge; van Beek, Ludovicus; Bierkens, Marc

    2013-04-01

    As the world's largest accessible source of freshwater, groundwater plays vital role in satisfying the basic needs of human society. It serves as a primary source of drinking water and supplies water for agricultural and industrial activities. During times of drought, groundwater sustains water flows in streams, rivers, lakes and wetlands, and thus supports ecosystem habitat and biodiversity, while its large natural storage provides a buffer against water shortages. Yet, the current generation of global scale hydrological models does not include a groundwater flow component that is a crucial part of the hydrological cycle and allows the simulation of groundwater head dynamics. In this study we present a steady-state MODFLOW (McDonald and Harbaugh, 1988) groundwater model on the global scale at 5 arc-minutes resolution. Aquifer schematization and properties of this groundwater model were developed from available global lithological model (e.g. Dürr et al., 2005; Gleeson et al., 2010; Hartmann and Moorsdorff, in press). We force the groundwtaer model with the output from the large-scale hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB (van Beek et al., 2011), specifically the long term net groundwater recharge and average surface water levels derived from routed channel discharge. We validated calculated groundwater heads and depths with available head observations, from different regions, including the North and South America and Western Europe. Our results show that it is feasible to build a relatively simple global scale groundwater model using existing information, and estimate water table depths within acceptable accuracy in many parts of the world.

  4. Groundwater flow processes and mixing in active volcanic systems: the case of Guadalajara (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Antonio, A.; Mahlknecht, J.; Tamez-Meléndez, C.; Ramos-Leal, J.; Ramírez-Orozco, A.; Parra, R.; Ornelas-Soto, N.; Eastoe, C. J.

    2015-02-01

    Groundwater chemistry and isotopic data from 40 production wells in the Atemajac and Toluquilla Valleys, located in and around the Guadalajara metropolitan area, were determined to develop a conceptual model of groundwater flow processes and mixing. Multivariate analysis including cluster analysis and principal component analysis were used to elucidate distribution patterns of constituents and factors controlling groundwater chemistry. Based on this analysis, groundwater was classified into four groups: cold groundwater, hydrothermal water, polluted groundwater and mixed groundwater. Cold groundwater is characterized by low temperature, salinity, and Cl and Na concentrations and is predominantly of Na-HCO3 type. It originates as recharge at Primavera caldera and is found predominantly in wells in the upper Atemajac Valley. Hydrothermal water is characterized by high salinity, temperature, Cl, Na, HCO3, and the presence of minor elements such as Li, Mn and F. It is a mixed HCO3 type found in wells from Toluquilla Valley and represents regional flow circulation through basaltic and andesitic rocks. Polluted groundwater is characterized by elevated nitrate and sulfate concentrations and is usually derived from urban water cycling and subordinately from agricultural practices. Mixed groundwaters between cold and hydrothermal components are predominantly found in the lower Atemajac Valley. Tritium method elucidated that practically all of the sampled groundwater contains at least a small fraction of modern water. The multivariate mixing model M3 indicates that the proportion of hydrothermal fluids in sampled well water is between 13 (local groundwater) and 87% (hydrothermal water), and the proportion of polluted water in wells ranges from 0 to 63%. This study may help local water authorities to identify and quantify groundwater contamination and act accordingly.

  5. RAFT: A simulator for ReActive Flow and Transport of groundwater contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Chilakapati, A

    1995-07-01

    This report documents the use of the simulator RAFT for the ReActive flow and Transport of groundwater contaminants. RAFT can be used as a predictive tool in the design and analysis of laboratory and field experiments or it can be used for the estimation of model/process parameters from experiments. RAFT simulates the reactive transport of groundwater contaminants in one, two-, or three-dimensions and it can model user specified source/link configurations and arbitrary injection strategies. A suite of solvers for transport, reactions and regression are employed so that a combination of numerical methods best suited for a problem can be chosen. User specified coupled equilibrium and kinetic reaction systems can be incorporated into RAFT. RAFT is integrated with a symbolic computational language MAPLE, to automate code generation for arbitrary reaction systems. RAFT is expected to be used as a simulator for engineering design for field experiments in groundwater remediation including bioremediation, reactive barriers and redox manipulation. As an integrated tool with both the predictive ability and the ability to analyze experimental data, RAFT can help in the development of remediation technologies, from laboratory to field.

  6. Oahu Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for the island of Oahu. Data is from the following sources: Rotzoll, K., A.I. El-Kadi. 2007. Numerical Ground-Water Flow Simulation for Red Hill Fuel Storage Facilities, NAVFAC Pacific, Oahu, Hawaii - Prepared TEC, Inc. Water Resources Research Center, University of Hawaii, Honolulu.; Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume VII – Island of Oahu Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008.; and Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2009. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. December 2009.

  7. Groundwater hydrology--coastal flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, Ward E.

    2010-01-01

    How groundwater flow varies when long-term external conditions change is little documented. Geochemical evidence shows that sea-level rise at the end of the last glacial period led to a shift in the flow patterns of coastal groundwater beneath Florida.

  8. Kauai Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for Kauai. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014.; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume IV – Island of Kauai Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2015.

  9. Groundwater Flow and Transport Calculations Supporting the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeron, Marcel P.; Wurstner, Signe K.

    2000-12-04

    This report summarizes the Hanford Site-Wide Groundwater Model and its application to the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) Disposal Facility Performance Assessment (PA). The site-wide model and supporting local-scale models are used to evaluate impacts from the transport of contaminants at a hypothetical well 100 m downgradient of the disposal facilities and to evaluate regional flow conditions and transport from the ILAW disposal facilities to the Columbia River. These models were used to well-intercept factors (WIFs) or dilution factors from a given areal flux of a hypothetical contaminant released to the unconfined aquifer from the ILAW disposal facilities for two waste-disposal options: 1) a remote-handled trench concept and 2) a concrete-vault concept. The WIF is defined as the ratio of the concentration at a well location in the aquifer to the concentration of infiltrating water entering the aquifer. These WIFs are being used in conjunction with calculations of released contaminant fluxes through the vadose zone to estimate potential impacts from radiological and hazardous chemical contaminants within the ILAW disposal facility at compliance points.

  10. Monitoring probe for groundwater flow

    DOEpatents

    Looney, B.B.; Ballard, S.

    1994-08-23

    A monitoring probe for detecting groundwater migration is disclosed. The monitor features a cylinder made of a permeable membrane carrying an array of electrical conductivity sensors on its outer surface. The cylinder is filled with a fluid that has a conductivity different than the groundwater. The probe is placed in the ground at an area of interest to be monitored. The fluid, typically saltwater, diffuses through the permeable membrane into the groundwater. The flow of groundwater passing around the permeable membrane walls of the cylinder carries the conductive fluid in the same general direction and distorts the conductivity field measured by the sensors. The degree of distortion from top to bottom and around the probe is precisely related to the vertical and horizontal flow rates, respectively. The electrical conductivities measured by the sensors about the outer surface of the probe are analyzed to determine the rate and direction of the groundwater flow. 4 figs.

  11. Monitoring probe for groundwater flow

    DOEpatents

    Looney, Brian B.; Ballard, Sanford

    1994-01-01

    A monitoring probe for detecting groundwater migration. The monitor features a cylinder made of a permeable membrane carrying an array of electrical conductivity sensors on its outer surface. The cylinder is filled with a fluid that has a conductivity different than the groundwater. The probe is placed in the ground at an area of interest to be monitored. The fluid, typically saltwater, diffuses through the permeable membrane into the groundwater. The flow of groundwater passing around the permeable membrane walls of the cylinder carries the conductive fluid in the same general direction and distorts the conductivity field measured by the sensors. The degree of distortion from top to bottom and around the probe is precisely related to the vertical and horizontal flow rates, respectively. The electrical conductivities measured by the sensors about the outer surface of the probe are analyzed to determine the rate and direction of the groundwater flow.

  12. The deep hydrogeologic flow system underlying the Oak Ridge Reservation -- Assessing the potential for active groundwater flow and origin of the brine

    SciTech Connect

    Nativ, R.; Halleran, A.; Hunley, A.

    1997-08-01

    The deep hydrogeologic system underlying the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) contains contaminants such as radionuclides, heavy metals, nitrates, and organic compounds. The groundwater in the deep system is saline and has been considered to be stagnant in previous studies. This study was designed to address the following questions: is groundwater in the deep system stagnant; is contaminant migration controlled by diffusion only or is advection a viable mechanism; where are the potential outlet points? On the basis of existing and newly collected data, the nature of saline groundwater flow and potential discharge into shallow, freshwater systems was assessed. Data used for this purpose included (1) spatial and temporal pressures and hydraulic heads measured in the deep system, (2) hydraulic parameters of the formations in question, (3) spatial and temporal temperature variations at depth, and (4) spatial and temporal chemical and isotopic composition of the saline groundwater. The observations suggest that the saline water contained at depth is old but not isolated (in terms of recharge and discharge) from the overlying active, freshwater-bearing units. Influx of recent water does occur. Groundwater volumes involved in this flow are likely to be small. The origin of the saline groundwater was assessed by using existing and newly acquired chemical and isotopic data. The proposed model that best fits the data is modification of residual brine from which halite has been precipitated. Other models, such as ultrafiltration and halite dissolution, were also evaluated.

  13. Revised conceptualization of the North China Basin groundwater flow system: Groundwater age, heat and flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Guoliang; Han, Dongmei; Currell, Matthew J.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2016-09-01

    Groundwater flow in deep sedimentary basins results from complex evolution processes on geological timescales. Groundwater flow systems conceptualized according to topography and/or groundwater table configuration generally assume a near-equilibrium state with the modern landscape. However, the time to reach such a steady state, and more generally the timescales of groundwater flow system evolution are key considerations for large sedimentary basins. This is true in the North China Basin (NCB), which has been studied for many years due to its importance as a groundwater supply. Despite many years of study, there remain contradictions between the generally accepted conceptual model of regional flow, and environmental tracer data. We seek to reconcile these contractions by conducting simulations of groundwater flow, age and heat transport in a three dimensional model, using an alternative conceptual model, based on geological, thermal, isotope and historical data. We infer flow patterns under modern hydraulic conditions using this new model and present the theoretical maximum groundwater ages under such a flow regime. The model results show that in contrast to previously accepted conceptualizations, most groundwater is discharged in the vicinity of the break-in-slope of topography at the boundary between the piedmont and central plain. Groundwater discharge to the ocean is in contrast small, and in general there are low rates of active flow in the eastern parts of the basin below the central and coastal plain. This conceptualization is more compatible with geochemical and geothermal data than the previous model. Simulated maximum groundwater ages of ∼1 Myrs below the central and coastal plain indicate that residual groundwater may be retained in the deep parts of the basin since being recharged during the last glacial period or earlier. The groundwater flow system has therefore probably not reached a new equilibrium state with modern-day hydraulic conditions. The

  14. Characterizing Ground-Water Flow Paths in High-Altitude Fractured Rock Settings Impacted by Mining Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wireman, M.; Williams, D.

    2003-12-01

    The Rocky Mountains of the western USA have tens of thousands of abandoned, inactive and active precious-metal(gold,silver,copper)mine sites. Most of these sites occur in fractured rock hydrogeologic settings. Mining activities often resulted in mobilization and transport of associated heavy metals (zinc,cadmium,lead) which pose a significant threat to aquatic communities in mountain streams.Transport of heavy metals from mine related sources (waste rock piles,tailings impoudments,underground workings, mine pits)can occur along numerous hydrological pathways including complex fracture controlled ground-water pathways. Since 1991, the United States Environmental Protection Agency, the Colorado Division of Minerals and Geology and the University of Colorado (INSTAAR)have been conducting applied hydrologic research at the Mary Murphy underground mine. The mine is in the Chalk Creek mining district which is located on the southwestern flanks of the Mount Princeton Batholith, a Tertiary age intrusive comprised primarily of quartz monzonite.The Mount Princeton batholith comprises a large portion of the southern part of the Collegiate Range west of Buena Vista in Chaffee County, CO. Chalk Creek and its 14 tributaries drain about 24,900 hectares of the eastern slopes of the Range including the mining district. Within the mining district, ground-water flow is controlled by the distribution, orientation and permeability of discontinuities within the bedrock. Important discontinuities include faults, joints and weathered zones. Local and intermediate flow systems are perturbed by extensive underground excavations associated with mining (adits, shafts, stopes, drifts,, etc.). During the past 12 years numerous hydrological investigations have been completed. The investigations have been focused on developing tools for characterizing ground-water flow and contaminant transport in the vicinity of hard-rock mines in fractured-rock settings. In addition, the results from these

  15. Groundwater flow code verification ``benchmarking`` activity (COVE-2A): Analysis of participants` work

    SciTech Connect

    Dykhuizen, R.C.; Barnard, R.W.

    1992-02-01

    The Nuclear Waste Repository Technology Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is investigating the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential site for underground burial of nuclear wastes. One element of the investigations is to assess the potential long-term effects of groundwater flow on the integrity of a potential repository. A number of computer codes are being used to model groundwater flow through geologic media in which the potential repository would be located. These codes compute numerical solutions for problems that are usually analytically intractable. Consequently, independent confirmation of the correctness of the solution is often not possible. Code verification is a process that permits the determination of the numerical accuracy of codes by comparing the results of several numerical solutions for the same problem. The international nuclear waste research community uses benchmarking for intercomparisons that partially satisfy the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) definition of code verification. This report presents the results from the COVE-2A (Code Verification) project, which is a subset of the COVE project.

  16. Modeling groundwater flow on MPPs

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, S.F.; Falgout, R.D.; Smith, S.G.; Tompson, A.F.B.

    1993-10-01

    The numerical simulation of groundwater flow in three-dimensional heterogeneous porous media is examined. To enable detailed modeling of large contaminated sites, preconditioned iterative methods and massively parallel computing power are combined in a simulator called PARFLOW. After describing this portable and modular code, some numerical results are given, including one that demonstrates the code`s scalability.

  17. Groundwater flow and transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, L.F.; Mercer, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Deterministic, distributed-parameter, numerical simulation models for analyzing groundwater flow and transport problems have come to be used almost routinely during the past decade. A review of the theoretical basis and practical use of groundwater flow and solute transport models is used to illustrate the state-of-the-art. Because of errors and uncertainty in defining model parameters, models must be calibrated to obtain a best estimate of the parameters. For flow modeling, data generally are sufficient to allow calibration. For solute-transport modeling, lack of data not only limits calibration, but also causes uncertainty in process description. Where data are available, model reliability should be assessed on the basis of sensitivity tests and measures of goodness-of-fit. Some of these concepts are demonstrated by using two case histories. ?? 1988.

  18. West Maui Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for West Maui. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume V – Island of Maui Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008.

  19. Hawaii Island Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for Hawaii Island. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume II – Island of Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008; and Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014.

  20. East Maui Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for East Maui. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume V – Island of Maui Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008.

  1. Groundwater dating for understanding nitrogen in groundwater systems - Time lag, fate, and detailed flow path ways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenstern, Uwe; Hadfield, John; Stenger, Roland

    2014-05-01

    Nitrate contamination of groundwater is a problem world-wide. Nitrate from land use activities can leach out of the root zone of the crop into the deeper part of the unsaturated zone and ultimately contaminate the underlying groundwater resources. Nitrate travels with the groundwater and then discharges into surface water causing eutrophication of surface water bodies. To understand the source, fate, and future nitrogen loads to ground and surface water bodies, detailed knowledge of the groundwater flow dynamics is essential. Groundwater sampled at monitoring wells or discharges may not yet be in equilibrium with current land use intensity due to the time lag between leaching out of the root zone and arrival at the sampling location. Anoxic groundwater zones can act as nitrate sinks through microbial denitrification. However, the effect of denitrification on overall nitrate fluxes depends on the fraction of the groundwater flowing through such zones. We will show results from volcanic aquifers in the central North Island of New Zealand where age tracers clearly indicate that the groundwater discharges into large sensitive lakes like Lake Taupo and Lake Rotorua are not yet fully realising current land use intensity. The majority of the water discharging into these lakes is decades and up to over hundred years old. Therefore, increases in dairy farming over the last decades are not yet reflected in these old water discharges, but over time these increased nitrate inputs will eventually work their way through the large groundwater systems and increasing N loads to the lakes are to be expected. Anoxic zones are present in some of these aquifers, indicating some denitrification potential, however, age tracer results from nested piezo wells show young groundwater in oxic zones indicating active flow in these zones, while anoxic zones tend to have older water indicating poorer hydraulic conductivity in these zones. Consequently, to evaluate the effect of denitrification

  2. Geochemical evidence of groundwater flow paths and the fate and transport of constituents of concern in the alluvial aquifer at Fort Wingate Depot Activity, New Mexico, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Andrew J.; Henry, David W.; Langman, Jeffery B.

    2013-01-01

    As part of an environmental investigation at Fort Wingate Depot Activity, New Mexico, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, interpreted aqueous geochemical concentrations to better understand the groundwater flow paths and the fate and transport of constituents of concern in the alluvial aquifer underlying the study area. The fine-grained nature of the alluvial matrix creates a highly heterogeneous environment, which adds to the difficulty of characterizing the flow of groundwater and the fate of aqueous constituents of concern. The analysis of the groundwater geochemical data collected in October 2009 provides evidence that is used to identify four groundwater flow paths and their extent in the aquifer and indicates the dominant attenuation processes for the constituents of concern. The extent and interaction of groundwater flow paths were delineated by the major ion concentrations and their relations to each other. Four areas of groundwater recharge to the study area were identified based on groundwater elevations, hydrogeologic characteristics, and geochemical and isotopic evidence. One source of recharge enters the study area from the saturated alluvial deposits underlying the South Fork of the Puerco River to the north of the study area. A second source of recharge is shown to originate from a leaky cistern containing production water from the San Andres-Glorieta aquifer. The other two sources of recharge are shown to enter the study area from the south: one from an arroyo valley draining an area to the south and one from hill-front recharge that passes under the reported release of perchlorate and explosive constituents. The spatial extent and interaction of groundwater originating from these various sources along identified flow paths affect the persistence and attenuation of constituents of concern. It was determined that groundwater originating in the area of a former explosives’ wash-out operation and an

  3. Influence of perched groundwater on base flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Niswonger, R.G.; Fogg, G.E.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis with a three-dimensional variably saturated groundwater flow model provides a basic understanding of the interplay between streams and perched groundwater. A simplified, layered model of heterogeneity was used to explore these relationships. Base flow contribution from perched groundwater was evaluated with regard to varying hydrogeologic conditions, including the size and location of the fine-sediment unit and the hydraulic conductivity of the fine-sediment unit and surrounding coarser sediment. Simulated base flow was sustained by perched groundwater with a maximum monthly discharge in excess of 15 L/s (0.6 feet3/s) over the length of the 2000-m stream reach. Generally, the rate of perched-groundwater discharge to the stream was proportional to the hydraulic conductivity of sediment surrounding the stream, whereas the duration of discharge was proportional to the hydraulic conductivity of the fine-sediment unit. Other aspects of the perched aquifer affected base flow, such as the depth of stream penetration and the size of the fine-sediment unit. Greater stream penetration decreased the maximum base flow contribution but increased the duration of contribution. Perched groundwater provided water for riparian vegetation at the demand rate but reduced the duration of perched-groundwater discharge nearly 75%. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Regional Groundwater Processes and Flow Dynamics from Age Tracer Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenstern, Uwe; Stewart, Mike K.; Matthews, Abby

    2016-04-01

    Age tracers are now used in New Zealand on regional scales for quantifying the impact and lag time of land use and climate change on the quantity and quality of available groundwater resources within the framework of the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2014. Age tracers provide measurable information on the dynamics of groundwater systems and reaction rates (e.g. denitrification), essential for conceptualising the regional groundwater - surface water system and informing the development of land use and groundwater flow and transport models. In the Horizons Region of New Zealand, around 200 wells have tracer data available, including tritium, SF6, CFCs, 2H, 18O, Ar, N2, CH4 and radon. Well depths range from shallower wells in gravel aquifers in the Horowhenua and Tararua districts, and deeper wells in the aquifers between Palmerston North and Wanganui. Most of the groundwater samples around and north of the Manawatu River west of the Tararua ranges are extremely old (>100 years), even from relatively shallow wells, indicating that these groundwaters are relatively disconnected from fresh surface recharge. The groundwater wells in the Horowhenua tap into a considerably younger groundwater reservoir with groundwater mean residence time (MRT) of 10 - 40 years. Groundwater along the eastern side of the Tararua and Ruahine ranges is significantly younger, typically <5 years MRT. Vertical groundwater recharge rates, as deduced from groundwater depth and MRT, are extremely low in the central coastal area, consistent with confined groundwater systems, or with upwelling of old groundwater close to the coast. Very low vertical recharge rates along the Manawatu River west of the Manawatu Gorge indicate upwelling groundwater conditions in this area, implying groundwater discharge into the river is more likely here than loss of river water into the groundwater system. High recharge rates observed at several wells in the Horowhenua area and in the area east of

  5. PUMa - modelling the groundwater flow in Baltic Sedimentary Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvane, G.; Marnica, A.; Bethers, U.

    2012-04-01

    In 2009-2012 at University of Latvia and Latvia University of Agriculture project "Establishment of interdisciplinary scientist group and modelling system for groundwater research" is implemented financed by the European Social Fund. The aim of the project is to develop groundwater research in Latvia by establishing interdisciplinary research group and modelling system covering groundwater flow in the Baltic Sedimentary Basin. Researchers from fields like geology, chemistry, mathematical modelling, physics and environmental engineering are involved in the project. The modelling system is used as a platform for addressing scientific problems such as: (1) large-scale groundwater flow in Baltic Sedimentary Basin and impact of human activities on it; (2) the evolution of groundwater flow since the last glaciation and subglacial groundwater recharge; (3) the effects of climate changes on shallow groundwater and interaction of hydrographical network and groundwater; (4) new programming approaches for groundwater modelling. Within the frame of the project most accessible geological information such as description of geological wells, geological maps and results of seismic profiling in Latvia as well as Estonia and Lithuania are collected and integrated into modelling system. For example data form more then 40 thousands wells are directly used to automatically generate the geological structure of the model. Additionally a groundwater sampling campaign is undertaken. Contents of CFC, stabile isotopes of O and H and radiocarbon are the most significant parameters of groundwater that are established in unprecedented scale for Latvia. The most important modelling results will be published in web as a data set. Project number: 2009/0212/1DP/1.1.1.2.0/09/APIA/VIAA/060. Project web-site: www.puma.lu.lv

  6. Considering Barometric Pressure in Groundwater Flow Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Spane, Frank A. )

    2002-06-18

    Well water-level elevation measurements are commonly used as the basis to delineate groundwater-flow patterns (i.e., flow direction and hydraulic gradient). Barometric pressure fluctuations, however, can have a discernable impact on well water-levels. These barometric effects may lead to erroneous indications of hydraulic head within the aquifer. Total hydraulic head within the aquifer, not well water-level elevation, is the hydrologic parameter for determining groundwater-flow direction and hydraulic gradient conditions. For low-gradient, unconfined aquifer sites exhibiting variable vadose zone characteristics (e.g., thickness, pneumatic diffusivity), barometric pressure fluctuations can also cause actual, temporal changes in lateral flow direction and flow velocity. Discrete water-level measurements used to determine the average or long-term groundwater-flow conditions, therefore, may provide non-representative results. Calculation of the barometric response characteristics for individual wells provides the basis to account for the temporal effects of barometric pressure fluctuations from monitor well measurements, so that average, long-term groundwater-flow pattern behavior can be determined.

  7. Effects of wetlands creation on groundwater flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hensel, B.R.; Miller, M.V.

    1991-01-01

    Changes in groundwater flow were observed near four Experimental Wetland Areas (EWAs) constructed along a reach of the Des Plaines River in northeastern Illinois. These changes were observed during monthly monitoring of groundwater elevation in nested piezometers and shallow observation wells before and after the wetlands were filled with water. A numerical model was calibrated with observed data and used to estimate seepage from the wetlands into the Des Plaines River. After the wetlands became operational, groundwater levels in adjacent wells increased by about 0.5m, while water levels in wells distant from the wetlands decreased. The increase in groundwater levels near the wetlands is a result of seepage from the wetlands. Numerical predictions of seepage from the wetlands are 60-150 m3 day-1 for two wetlands situated over sand and gravel and less than 1 m3 day-1 for two wetlands situated over clayey till. The difference in seepage rates is attributed to two factors. First, the hydraulic conductivity of the sand and gravel unit is greater than that of the till, and thus there is less mounding and a greater capacity for transmitting water beneath the wetlands overlying this deposit. Secondly, the wetlands located over till are groundwater flow-through ponds, whereas the wetlands over the sand and gravel are primarily groundwater recharge areas. The model was used to estimate that seepage from the wetlands will double groundwater discharge into the Des Plaines River and a tributary relative to pre-operational discharge from the study area. Overall, the wetlands have acted as a constant head boundary, stabilizing groundwater flow patterns. ?? 1991.

  8. Regression modeling of ground-water flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooley, R.L.; Naff, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Nonlinear multiple regression methods are developed to model and analyze groundwater flow systems. Complete descriptions of regression methodology as applied to groundwater flow models allow scientists and engineers engaged in flow modeling to apply the methods to a wide range of problems. Organization of the text proceeds from an introduction that discusses the general topic of groundwater flow modeling, to a review of basic statistics necessary to properly apply regression techniques, and then to the main topic: exposition and use of linear and nonlinear regression to model groundwater flow. Statistical procedures are given to analyze and use the regression models. A number of exercises and answers are included to exercise the student on nearly all the methods that are presented for modeling and statistical analysis. Three computer programs implement the more complex methods. These three are a general two-dimensional, steady-state regression model for flow in an anisotropic, heterogeneous porous medium, a program to calculate a measure of model nonlinearity with respect to the regression parameters, and a program to analyze model errors in computed dependent variables such as hydraulic head. (USGS)

  9. GROUNDWATER FLOW IN LOW-PERMEABILITY ENVIRONMENTS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    Certain geologic media are known to have small permeability; subsurface environments composed of these media and lacking well developed secondary permeability have groundwater flow systems with many distinctive characteristics. Moreover, groundwater flow in these environments appears to influence the evolution of certain hydrologic, geologic, and geochemical systems, may affect the accumulation of petroleum and ores, and probably has a role in the structural evolution of parts of the crust. Such environments are also important in the context of waste disposal. This review attempts to synthesize the diverse contributions of various disciplines to the problem of flow in low-permeability environments. Problems hindering analysis are enumerated together with suggested approaches to overcoming them. A common thread running through the discussion is the significance of size- and time-scale limitations of the ability to directly observe flow behavior and make significance of size- and time-scale limitations of the ability to directly observe flow behavior and make measurements of parameters.

  10. Groundwater Flow and Arsenic Biogeochemistry in Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, C. F.

    2004-12-01

    Although groundwater in Bangladesh is severely contaminated by arsenic, little is known about the complex transient patterns of groundwater flow that flush solutes from aquifers and carry solutes into the subsurface. Hydrologic modeling results for our field site in the Munshiganj district indicate that groundwater flow is vigorous, flushing the aquifer over time-scales of decades and also introducing solute loads into the aquifer with recharge from rice fields, ponds and rivers. The combined hydrologic and biogeochemical results from our field site imply that the biogeochemistry of the aquifer system may not be in steady-state, and that the net effect of competing processes could either increase or decrease arsenic concentrations over the next decades. Modeling results suggest that irrigation has greatly changed the location, timing and chemical content of recharge to the aquifer, drawing large fluxes of anoxic water into the aquifer during the dry season that may mobilize arsenic from oxides in near-surface sediments.

  11. Geomorphic aspects of groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaFleur, Robert G.

    The many roles that groundwater plays in landscape evolution are becoming more widely appreciated. In this overview, three major categories of groundwater processes and resulting landforms are considered: (1) Dissolution creates various karst geometries, mainly in carbonate rocks, in response to conditions of recharge, geologic setting, lithology, and groundwater circulation. Denudation and cave formation rates can be estimated from kinetic and hydraulic parameters. (2) Groundwater weathering generates regoliths of residual alteration products at weathering fronts, and subsequent exhumation exposes corestones, flared slopes, balanced rocks, domed inselbergs, and etchplains of regional importance. Groundwater relocation of dissolved salts creates duricrusts of various compositions, which become landforms. (3) Soil and rock erosion by groundwater processes include piping, seepage erosion, and sapping, important agents in slope retreat and headward gully migration. Thresholds and limits are important in many chemical and mechanical groundwater actions. A quantitative, morphometric approach to groundwater landforms and processes is exemplified by selected studies in carbonate and clastic terrains of ancient and recent origins. Résumé Les rôles variés joués par les eaux souterraines dans l'évolution des paysages deviennent nettement mieux connus. La revue faite ici prend en considération trois grandes catégories de processus liés aux eaux souterraines et les formes associées: (1) La dissolution crée des formes karstiques variées, surtout dans les roches carbonatées, en fonction des conditions d'alimentation, du cadre géologique, de la lithologie et de la circulation des eaux souterraines. Les taux d'érosion et de formation des grottes peuvent être estimés à partir de paramètres cinétiques et hydrauliques. (2) L'érosion par les eaux souterraines donne naissance à des régolites, résidus d'altération sur des fronts d'altération, et l'exhumation r

  12. Geomorphic aspects of groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaFleur, Robert G.

    The many roles that groundwater plays in landscape evolution are becoming more widely appreciated. In this overview, three major categories of groundwater processes and resulting landforms are considered: (1) Dissolution creates various karst geometries, mainly in carbonate rocks, in response to conditions of recharge, geologic setting, lithology, and groundwater circulation. Denudation and cave formation rates can be estimated from kinetic and hydraulic parameters. (2) Groundwater weathering generates regoliths of residual alteration products at weathering fronts, and subsequent exhumation exposes corestones, flared slopes, balanced rocks, domed inselbergs, and etchplains of regional importance. Groundwater relocation of dissolved salts creates duricrusts of various compositions, which become landforms. (3) Soil and rock erosion by groundwater processes include piping, seepage erosion, and sapping, important agents in slope retreat and headward gully migration. Thresholds and limits are important in many chemical and mechanical groundwater actions. A quantitative, morphometric approach to groundwater landforms and processes is exemplified by selected studies in carbonate and clastic terrains of ancient and recent origins. Résumé Les rôles variés joués par les eaux souterraines dans l'évolution des paysages deviennent nettement mieux connus. La revue faite ici prend en considération trois grandes catégories de processus liés aux eaux souterraines et les formes associées: (1) La dissolution crée des formes karstiques variées, surtout dans les roches carbonatées, en fonction des conditions d'alimentation, du cadre géologique, de la lithologie et de la circulation des eaux souterraines. Les taux d'érosion et de formation des grottes peuvent être estimés à partir de paramètres cinétiques et hydrauliques. (2) L'érosion par les eaux souterraines donne naissance à des régolites, résidus d'altération sur des fronts d'altération, et l'exhumation r

  13. IN SITU FLOW METERS AROUND A GROUNDWATER CIRCULATION WELL (ABSTRACT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary benefit of groundwater circulation well (GCW) technology is the development of strong vertical flows surrounding the treatment well. The extent of significant vertical flow surrounding a circulation well is difficult to establish from traditional groundwater elevation...

  14. IN SITU FLOW METERS AROUND A GROUNDWATER CIRCULATION WELL (PAPER)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary benefit of groundwater circulation well (GCW) technology is the development of strong vertical flows surrounding the treatment well. The extent of significant vertical flow surrounding a circulation well is difficult to establish from traditional groundwater elevation...

  15. 3PE: A Tool for Estimating Groundwater Flow Vectors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of hydraulic gradients and the associated groundwater flow rates and directions is a fundamental aspect of hydrogeologic characterization. Many methods, ranging in complexity from simple three-point solution techniques to complex numerical models of groundwater flow, ...

  16. Modeling groundwater flow on massively parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, S.F.; Falgout, R.D.; Fogwell, T.W.; Tompson, A.F.B.

    1994-12-31

    The authors will explore the numerical simulation of groundwater flow in three-dimensional heterogeneous porous media. An interdisciplinary team of mathematicians, computer scientists, hydrologists, and environmental engineers is developing a sophisticated simulation code for use on workstation clusters and MPPs. To date, they have concentrated on modeling flow in the saturated zone (single phase), which requires the solution of a large linear system. they will discuss their implementation of preconditioned conjugate gradient solvers. The preconditioners under consideration include simple diagonal scaling, s-step Jacobi, adaptive Chebyshev polynomial preconditioning, and multigrid. They will present some preliminary numerical results, including simulations of groundwater flow at the LLNL site. They also will demonstrate the code`s scalability.

  17. Multiphase groundwater flow near cooling plutons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayba, D.O.; Ingebritsen, S.E.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate groundwater flow near cooling plutons with a computer program that can model multiphase flow, temperatures up to 1200??C, thermal pressurization, and temperature-dependent rock properties. A series of experiments examines the effects of host-rock permeability, size and depth of pluton emplacement, single versus multiple intrusions, the influence of a caprock, and the impact of topographically driven groundwater flow. We also reproduce and evaluate some of the pioneering numerical experiments on flow around plutons. Host-rock permeability is the principal factor influencing fluid circulation and heat transfer in hydrothermal systems. The hottest and most steam-rich systems develop where permeability is of the order of 10-15 m2. Temperatures and life spans of systems decrease with increasing permeability. Conduction-dominated systems, in which permeabilities are ???10-16m2, persist longer but exhibit relatively modest increases in near-surface temperatures relative to ambient conditions. Pluton size, emplacement depth, and initial thermal conditions have less influence on hydrothermal circulation patterns but affect the extent of boiling and duration of hydrothermal systems. Topographically driven groundwater flow can significantly alter hydrothermal circulation; however, a low-permeability caprock effectively decouples the topographically and density-driven systems and stabilizes the mixing interface between them thereby defining a likely ore-forming environment.

  18. Connections between groundwater flow and transpiration partitioning.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Reed M; Condon, Laura E

    2016-07-22

    Understanding freshwater fluxes at continental scales will help us better predict hydrologic response and manage our terrestrial water resources. The partitioning of evapotranspiration into bare soil evaporation and plant transpiration remains a key uncertainty in the terrestrial water balance. We used integrated hydrologic simulations that couple vegetation and land-energy processes with surface and subsurface hydrology to study transpiration partitioning at the continental scale. Both latent heat flux and partitioning are connected to water table depth, and including lateral groundwater flow in the model increases transpiration partitioning from 47 ± 13 to 62 ± 12%. This suggests that lateral groundwater flow, which is generally simplified or excluded in Earth system models, may provide a missing link for reconciling observations and global models of terrestrial water fluxes. PMID:27463671

  19. Connections between groundwater flow and transpiration partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Reed M.; Condon, Laura E.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding freshwater fluxes at continental scales will help us better predict hydrologic response and manage our terrestrial water resources. The partitioning of evapotranspiration into bare soil evaporation and plant transpiration remains a key uncertainty in the terrestrial water balance. We used integrated hydrologic simulations that couple vegetation and land-energy processes with surface and subsurface hydrology to study transpiration partitioning at the continental scale. Both latent heat flux and partitioning are connected to water table depth, and including lateral groundwater flow in the model increases transpiration partitioning from 47 ± 13 to 62 ± 12%. This suggests that lateral groundwater flow, which is generally simplified or excluded in Earth system models, may provide a missing link for reconciling observations and global models of terrestrial water fluxes.

  20. Groundwater flow as a cooling agent of the continental lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, Henk

    2016-03-01

    Groundwater that flows through the outer shell of the Earth as part of the hydrologic cycle influences the distribution of heat and, thereby, the temperature field in the Earth’s crust. Downward groundwater flow in recharge areas lowers crustal temperatures, whereas upward flow in discharge areas tends to raise temperatures relative to a purely conductive geothermal regime. Here I present numerical simulations of generalized topography-driven groundwater flow. The simulations suggest that groundwater-driven convective cooling exceeds groundwater-driven warming of the Earth’s crust, and hence that groundwater flow systems cause net temperature reductions of groundwater basins. Moreover, the simulations demonstrate that this cooling extends into the underlying crust and lithosphere. I find that horizontal components of groundwater flow play a central role in this net subsurface cooling by conveying relatively cold water to zones of upward groundwater flow. The model calculations suggest that the crust and lithosphere beneath groundwater basins can cool by several tens of degrees Celsius where groundwater flows over large distances in basins that consist of crustal rock. In contrast, groundwater-induced cooling is small in unconsolidated sedimentary settings, such as deltas.

  1. Coupled Groundwater and Heat Flow in the Tahoe Basin Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trask, J. C.

    2002-12-01

    We propose that recent developments in available temperature probe technology and improvements in appropriate modeling software, together with the advent of desktop high-speed computing, have enabled the thermal analysis approach to be an inexpensive, robust, and practical way to constrain groundwater flow fields in a wide variety of environments. We present field measurements and numerical models of coupled heat and groundwater flow in the Tahoe Basin region. In montane regions such as the Tahoe Basin, steep topography provides a driving force for deep groundwater flow. Deep groundwater flow re-routes subsurface heat flow, impacting temperature gradients to depth, including the shallow subsurface (<100m depth). In the Tahoe Basin region, the magnitude of deep groundwater flow on the areal or regional scale has been largely unknown. We present examples of borehole temperature profiles that constrain possible areal groundwater flow patterns, including the magnitude of flow beneath the bottom of boreholes probed.

  2. Patterns in groundwater chemistry resulting from groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuyfzand, Pieter J.

    Groundwater flow influences hydrochemical patterns because flow reduces mixing by diffusion, carries the chemical imprints of biological and anthropogenic changes in the recharge area, and leaches the aquifer system. Global patterns are mainly dictated by differences in the flux of meteoric water passing through the subsoil. Within individual hydrosomes (water bodies with a specific origin), the following prograde evolution lines (facies sequence) normally develop in the direction of groundwater flow: from strong to no fluctuations in water quality, from polluted to unpolluted, from acidic to basic, from oxic to anoxic-methanogenic, from no to significant base exchange, and from fresh to brackish. This is demonstrated for fresh coastal-dune groundwater in the Netherlands. In this hydrosome, the leaching of calcium carbonate as much as 15m and of adsorbed marine cations (Na+, K+, and Mg2+) as much as 2500m in the flow direction is shown to correspond with about 5000yr of flushing since the beach barrier with dunes developed. Recharge focus areas in the dunes are evidenced by groundwater displaying a lower prograde quality evolution than the surrounding dune groundwater. Artificially recharged Rhine River water in the dunes provides distinct hydrochemical patterns, which display groundwater flow, mixing, and groundwater ages. Résumé Les écoulements souterrains influencent les différents types hydrochimiques, parce que l'écoulement réduit le mélange par diffusion, porte les marques chimiques de changements biologiques et anthropiques dans la zone d'alimentation et lessive le système aquifère. Ces types dans leur ensemble sont surtout déterminés par des différences dans le flux d'eau météorique traversant le sous-sol. Dans les "hydrosomes" (masses d'eau d'origine déterminée), les lignes marquant une évolution prograde (séquence de faciès) se développent normalement dans la direction de l'écoulement souterrain : depuis des fluctuations fortes de la

  3. Groundwater Flow Model for Taos, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burck, P. W.; Barroll, P. W.; Core, A. B.; Rappuhn, D.

    2003-12-01

    The New Mexico Office of the State Engineer - Hydrology Bureau (OSE) has developed a regional groundwater flow model for Taos, New Mexico. The MODFLOW 2000 model will serve as a tool to evaluate alternatives in settlement negotiations in an on-going water rights adjudication. If current settlement negotiations fail, it is conceivable that the model might be used in support of litigation. OSE produced the model in cooperation with technical representatives of the various parties to the adjudication. Regional hydrogeologic data including well records, aquifer test results, stream flow measurements and seepage studies have been shared relatively freely among the parties. A recent deep drilling program conducted in conjunction with the negotiation effort has added substantially to the hydrogeologic data set. Among the hydrologic processes simulated by the model are mountain front recharge; areal recharge from precipitation; evapotranspiration; discharge from springs; river and stream flow; accretions to groundwater from irrigation return flow, seepage from acequias, canals, and ditches, and deep percolation; and pumping by municipal entities and mutual domestic water users associations. The resulting model files are available for all parties to review and evaluate. Comments are assessed and many have resulted in significant improvements to the model. At this stage, however, it is unclear whether adopting this cooperative approach will increase the likelihood of model acceptance by the parties.

  4. Guidelines for Evaluating Ground-Water Flow Models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reilly, Thomas E.; Harbaugh, Arlen W.

    2004-01-01

    Ground-water flow modeling is an important tool frequently used in studies of ground-water systems. Reviewers and users of these studies have a need to evaluate the accuracy or reasonableness of the ground-water flow model. This report provides some guidelines and discussion on how to evaluate complex ground-water flow models used in the investigation of ground-water systems. A consistent thread throughout these guidelines is that the objectives of the study must be specified to allow the adequacy of the model to be evaluated.

  5. Groundwater flow pattern and related environmental phenomena in complex geologic setting based on integrated model construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Ádám; Havril, Tímea; Simon, Szilvia; Galsa, Attila; Monteiro Santos, Fernando A.; Müller, Imre; Mádl-Szőnyi, Judit

    2016-08-01

    Groundwater flow, driven, controlled and determined by topography, geology and climate, is responsible for several natural surface manifestations and affected by anthropogenic processes. Therefore, flowing groundwater can be regarded as an environmental agent. Numerical simulation of groundwater flow could reveal the flow pattern and explain the observed features. In complex geologic framework, where the geologic-hydrogeologic knowledge is limited, the groundwater flow model could not be constructed based solely on borehole data, but geophysical information could aid the model building. The integrated model construction was presented via the case study of the Tihany Peninsula, Hungary, with the aims of understanding the background and occurrence of groundwater-related environmental phenomena, such as wetlands, surface water-groundwater interaction, slope instability, and revealing the potential effect of anthropogenic activity and climate change. The hydrogeologic model was prepared on the basis of the compiled archive geophysical database and the results of recently performed geophysical measurements complemented with geologic-hydrogeologic data. Derivation of different electrostratigraphic units, revealing fracturing and detecting tectonic elements was achieved by systematically combined electromagnetic geophysical methods. The deduced information can be used as model input for groundwater flow simulation concerning hydrostratigraphy, geometry and boundary conditions. The results of numerical modelling were interpreted on the basis of gravity-driven regional groundwater flow concept and validated by field mapping of groundwater-related phenomena. The 3D model clarified the hydraulic behaviour of the formations, revealed the subsurface hydraulic connection between groundwater and wetlands and displayed the groundwater discharge pattern, as well. The position of wetlands, their vegetation type, discharge features and induced landslides were explained as

  6. Using Groundwater Age and Other Isotopic Signatures to Delineate Groundwater Flow and Stratification

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, J E; Hudson, G B

    2005-08-31

    Isotopic tracers, such as stable isotopes of the water molecule and tritium, have been used in investigations of groundwater flow and transport and recharge water source for several decades. While these data can place hard constraints on groundwater flow rates, the degree of vertical flow between aquifers and across aquitards, and recharge source area(s), they are rarely used, even for validation, in conceptual or numerical models of groundwater flow. The Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Program, sponsored by the California State Water Resources Control Board, and carried out in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey, has provided the means to gather an unprecedented number of tritium-helium groundwater ages in the basins of California. As the examples below illustrate, a collection of groundwater ages in a basin allows delineation of recharge areas (youngest ages), bulk flow rates and flowpaths, as well as a means of assessing susceptibility to anthropogenic contaminants.

  7. Analysis of groundwater flow in mountainous, headwater catchments with permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Sarah G.; Ge, Shemin; Liang, Sihai

    2015-12-01

    Headwater catchments have a direct impact on the water resources of downstream lowland regions as they supply freshwater in the form of surface runoff and discharging groundwater. Often, these mountainous catchments contain expansive permafrost that may alter the natural topographically controlled groundwater flow system. As permafrost could degrade with climate change, it is imperative to understand the effect of permafrost on groundwater flow in headwater catchments. This study characterizes groundwater flow in mountainous headwater catchments and evaluates the effect of permafrost in the context of climate change on groundwater movement using a three-dimensional, finite element, hydrogeologic model. The model is applied to a representative headwater catchment on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, China. Results from the model simulations indicate that groundwater contributes significantly to streams in the form of baseflow and the majority of groundwater flow is from the shallow aquifer above the permafrost, disrupting the typical topographically controlled flow pattern observed in most permafrost-free headwater catchments. Under a warming scenario where mean annual surface temperature is increased by 2°C, reducing the areal extent of permafrost in the catchment, groundwater contribution to streamflow may increase three-fold. These findings suggest that, in headwater catchments, permafrost has a large influence on groundwater flow and stream discharge. Increased annual air temperatures may increase groundwater discharge to streams, which has implications for ecosystem health and the long-term availability of water resources to downstream regions.

  8. CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR REGRESSION MODELING OF GROUND-WATER FLOW.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooley, Richard L.

    1985-01-01

    The author examines the uses of ground-water flow models and which classes of use require treatment of stochastic components. He then compares traditional and stochastic procedures for modeling actual (as distinguished from hypothetical) systems. Finally, he examines the conceptual basis and characteristics of the regression approach to modeling ground-water flow.

  9. From groundwater baselines to numerical groundwater flow modelling for the Milan metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosta, Giovanni B.; Frattini, Paolo; Peretti, Lidia; Villa, Federica; Gorla, Maurizio

    2015-04-01

    Contamination of major aquifers in highly densely populated areas is a major concern for stakeholders involved in the use and protection of groundwater resources. Sustainable groundwater withdrawal and management, and the identification of trends in groundwater contamination require a careful hydrochemical baseline characterization. This characterization is fundamental to investigate the presence and evolutionary trend of contaminants. In fact, it allows recovering and understanding: the spatial-temporal trend of contamination; the relative age of the contamination episodes; the reasons for anomalous behavior of some compounds during migration to and in the groundwater; the associations with which some contaminants can be found; the different behaviors in phreatic and semi-confined and confined aquifers. To attain such a characterization for the Milan metropolitan area (about 2,500 km2, ca 4.000.000 inhabitants, Lombardy, Italy), we carried out three main activities. (1) Collection of complete and reliable datasets concerning the geological, hydrogeological and hydrochemical (over 60,000 chemical analysis since 2003 to 2013) characteristics of the area and of the involved aquifers. This activity was very demanding because the available data are provided by different authorities (Lombardy Region, Provinces, Lombardy Environmental Agency - ARPA Lombardia, public own companies in charge of water system managements) in raw format and with different database standard, which required a large effort of manual verification and harmonization. (2) Completion of a hydrochemical characterization of the metropolitan area aquifers by classical statistical and multivariate statistical analyses, in order to define a baseline both for some major physical chemical characteristics and for the most relevant contaminants. (3) Development of a three dimensional hydrogeological model for the metropolitan area starting from the above listed datasets and existing models. This model will

  10. Wave-Induced Groundwater Flows in a Freshwater Beach Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malott, S. S.; Robinson, C. E.; O'Carroll, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Wave-induced recirculation across the sediment-water interface can impact the transport of pollutants through a beach aquifer and their ultimate flux into coastal waters. The fate of nutrients (e.g. from septic and agricultural sources) and fecal indicator bacteria (e.g. E. coil) near the sediment-water interface are of particular concern as these pollutants often lead to degradation of recreational water quality and nearshore ecosystems. This paper presents detailed field measurements of groundwater flows in a freshwater beach aquifer on Lake Huron over periods of intensified wave conditions. Quantifying wave-driven processes in a freshwater beach aquifer enables wave effects to be studied in isolation from density and tidal effects that complicate groundwater flows in marine beaches. Water exchange across the sediment-water interface and groundwater flow patterns were measured using groundwater wells, arrays of vertically nested pressure transducers and manometers. Results show that wave action induces rapid infiltration/exfiltration across the sediment-water interface and a larger recirculation cell through the beach aquifer. Field data is used to validate a numerical groundwater model of wave-induced groundwater flows. While prior studies have simulated the effects of waves on beach groundwater flows, this study is the first attempt to validate these sophisticated modeling approaches. Finally, field data illustrating the impact of wave-induced groundwater flows on nutrient and bacteria fate and transport in beach aquifers will also be presented.

  11. Hydrogeologic framework and simulation of ground-water flow and travel time in the shallow aquifer system in the area of Naval Support Activity Memphis, Millington, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, James L.; Carmichael, John K.; Halford, Keith J.; Ladd, David E.

    1997-01-01

    Naval Support Activity (NSA) Memphis is a Department of the Navy facility located at the City of Millington, Tennessee, about 5 miles north of Memphis. Contaminants have been detected in surface-water, sediment, and ground-water samples collected at the facility. As part of the Installation Restoration Program, the Navy is considering remedial-action options to prevent or lessen the effect of ground-water contamination at the facility and to control the movement and discharge of contaminants. A numerical model of the ground-water-flow system in the area of NSA Memphis was constructed and calibrated so that quantifiable estimates could be made of ground-water-flow rates, direction, and time-of-travel. The sediments beneath NSA Memphis, to a depth of about 200 feet, form a shallow aquifer system. From youngest to oldest, the stratigraphic units that form the shallow aquifer system are alluvium, loess, fluvial deposits, and the Cockfield and Cook Mountain Formations. The shallow aquifer system is organized into five hydrogeologic units: (1) a confining unit composed of the relatively low permeability sediments of the upper alluvium and the loess; (2) the A1 aquifer comprising sand and gravel of the lower alluvium and the fluvial deposits, and sand lenses in the upper part of the preserved section of the Cockfield Formation; (3) a confining unit composed of clay and silt within the upper part of the Cockfield Formation; (4) the Cockfield aquifer comprising sand lenses within the lower part of the preserved section of the Cockfield Formation; and (5) a confining unit formed by low permeability sediments of the Cook Mountain Formation that composes the upper confining unit for the Memphis aquifer. Thicknesses of individual units vary considerably across the facility. Structural and depositional features that affect the occurrence of ground water in the shallow aquifer system include faulting, an erosional scarp, and 'windows' in the confining units. Underlying the

  12. Groundwater ages from the freshwater zone of the Edwards aquifer, Uvalde County, Texas—Insights into groundwater flow and recharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Landis, Gary P.; Faith, Jason R.

    2016-01-01

    Tritium–helium-3 groundwater ages of the Edwards aquifer in south-central Texas were determined as part of a long-term study of groundwater flow and recharge in the Edwards and Trinity aquifers. These ages help to define groundwater residence times and to provide constraints for calibration of groundwater flow models. A suite of 17 samples from public and private supply wells within Uvalde County were collected for active and noble gases, and for tritium–helium-3 analyses from the confined and unconfined parts of the Edwards aquifer. Samples were collected from monitoring wells at discrete depths in open boreholes as well as from integrated pumped well-head samples. The data indicate a fairly uniform groundwater flow system within an otherwise structurally complex geologic environment comprised of regionally and locally faulted rock units, igneous intrusions, and karst features within carbonate rocks. Apparent ages show moderate, downward average, linear velocities in the Uvalde area with increasing age to the east along a regional groundwater flow path. Though the apparent age data show a fairly consistent distribution across the study area, many apparent ages indicate mixing of both modern (less than 60 years) and premodern (greater than 60 years) waters. This mixing is most evident along the “bad water” line, an arbitrary delineation of 1,000 milligrams per liter dissolved solids that separates the freshwater zone of the Edwards aquifer from the downdip saline water zone. Mixing of modern and premodern waters also is indicated within the unconfined zone of the aquifer by high excess helium concentrations in young waters. Excess helium anomalies in the unconfined aquifer are consistent with possible subsurface discharge of premodern groundwater from the underlying Trinity aquifer into the younger groundwater of the Edwards aquifer.

  13. Death Valley regional groundwater flow system, Nevada and California-Hydrogeologic framework and transient groundwater flow model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    : Belcher, Wayne R., (Edited By); Sweetkind, Donald S.

    2010-01-01

    A numerical three-dimensional (3D) transient groundwater flow model of the Death Valley region was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for the U.S. Department of Energy programs at the Nevada Test Site and at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Decades of study of aspects of the groundwater flow system and previous less extensive groundwater flow models were incorporated and reevaluated together with new data to provide greater detail for the complex, digital model. A 3D digital hydrogeologic framework model (HFM) was developed from digital elevation models, geologic maps, borehole information, geologic and hydrogeologic cross sections, and other 3D models to represent the geometry of the hydrogeologic units (HGUs). Structural features, such as faults and fractures, that affect groundwater flow also were added. The HFM represents Precambrian and Paleozoic crystalline and sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic to Cenozoic intrusive rocks, Cenozoic volcanic tuffs and lavas, and late Cenozoic sedimentary deposits of the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system (DVRFS) region in 27 HGUs. Information from a series of investigations was compiled to conceptualize and quantify hydrologic components of the groundwater flow system within the DVRFS model domain and to provide hydraulic-property and head-observation data used in the calibration of the transient-flow model. These studies reevaluated natural groundwater discharge occurring through evapotranspiration (ET) and spring flow; the history of groundwater pumping from 1913 through 1998; groundwater recharge simulated as net infiltration; model boundary inflows and outflows based on regional hydraulic gradients and water budgets of surrounding areas; hydraulic conductivity and its relation to depth; and water levels appropriate for regional simulation of prepumped and pumped conditions within the DVRFS model domain. Simulation results appropriate for the regional extent and scale of the model were provided

  14. Modelling Contributions of the Local and Regional Groundwater Flow of Managed Aquifer Recharge Activities at Querença-Silves Aquifer System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Luís; Monteiro, José Paulo; Oliveira, Manuel; Mota, Rogério; Lobo-Ferreira, João Paulo; Martins de Carvalho, José; Martins de Carvalho, Tiago; Agostinho, Rui; Hugman, Rui

    2015-04-01

    The Querença-Silves (QS) aquifer system is one of the most important natural groundwater reservoirs in the Algarve region of southern Portugal. With a surface area of 324 km2, this karst aquifer system is the main source of supply for irrigation as well as an important source of water for the urban supply. Due to the importance given to QS aquifer system by both governmental actors and end users, ongoing research during the last two decades at the University of Algarve has attempted to provide a better understanding of the hydrogeology and hydraulic behavior, which has resulted in the development of regional scale numerical models. The most recent hydrogeological data has been acquired during the ongoing MARSOL project (MARSOL-GA-2013-619120) which aims to demonstrate that Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) is a sound, safe and sustainable strategy that can be applied with great confidence in finding solutions to water scarcity in Southern Europe. Within the scope of the project large diameter well injection tests (with and without tracers) as well as geophysical surveys have been carried out in order to determine the infiltration capacity and aquifer properties. The results of which allowed the use of analytical methods to determine local scale values of hydraulic parameters (e.g. hydraulic conductivity and storage coefficient). These values will be compared with results from pre-existing numerical flow and transport models in order to obtain complementary solutions to the problem at local and regional scales. This analysis will contribute to the selection of the most appropriate methods to interpret, reproduce and model the impacts of MAR activities planned within the scope of the MARSOL project. Subsequent to the planned injection tests and, with the support of modelling efforts, the capacity of infiltration of rejected water from water treatment plants or surface storage dams in the large diameter well will be assessed.

  15. Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California -- hydrogeologic framework and transient ground-water flow model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    : Belcher, Wayne R., (Edited By)

    2004-01-01

    A numerical three-dimensional (3D) transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley region was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for the U.S. Department of Energy programs at the Nevada Test Site and at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Decades of study of aspects of the ground-water flow system and previous less extensive ground-water flow models were incorporated and reevaluated together with new data to provide greater detail for the complex, digital model. A 3D digital hydrogeologic framework model (HFM) was developed from digital elevation models, geologic maps, borehole information, geologic and hydrogeologic cross sections, and other 3D models to represent the geometry of the hydrogeologic units (HGUs). Structural features, such as faults and fractures, that affect ground-water flow also were added. The HFM represents Precambrian and Paleozoic crystalline and sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic to Cenozoic intrusive rocks, Cenozoic volcanic tuffs and lavas, and late Cenozoic sedimentary deposits of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System (DVRFS) region in 27 HGUs. Information from a series of investigations was compiled to conceptualize and quantify hydrologic components of the ground-water flow system within the DVRFS model domain and to provide hydraulic-property and head-observation data used in the calibration of the transient-flow model. These studies reevaluated natural ground-water discharge occurring through evapotranspiration and spring flow; the history of ground-water pumping from 1913 through 1998; ground-water recharge simulated as net infiltration; model boundary inflows and outflows based on regional hydraulic gradients and water budgets of surrounding areas; hydraulic conductivity and its relation to depth; and water levels appropriate for regional simulation of prepumped and pumped conditions within the DVRFS model domain. Simulation results appropriate for the regional extent and scale of the model were

  16. Using 14C and 3H to understand groundwater flow and recharge in an aquifer window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, A. P.; Cartwright, I.; Gilfedder, B. S.; Cendón, D. I.; Unland, N. P.; Hofmann, H.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of groundwater residence times and recharge locations is vital to the sustainable management of groundwater resources. Here we investigate groundwater residence times and patterns of recharge in the Gellibrand Valley, southeast Australia, where outcropping aquifer sediments of the Eastern View Formation form an "aquifer window" that may receive diffuse recharge from rainfall and recharge from the Gellibrand River. To determine recharge patterns and groundwater flow paths, environmental isotopes (3H, 14C, δ13C, δ18O, δ2H) are used in conjunction with groundwater geochemistry and continuous monitoring of groundwater elevation and electrical conductivity. The water table fluctuates by 0.9 to 3.7 m annually, implying recharge rates of 90 and 372 mm yr-1. However, residence times of shallow (11 to 29 m) groundwater determined by 14C are between 100 and 10 000 years, 3H activities are negligible in most of the groundwater, and groundwater electrical conductivity remains constant over the period of study. Deeper groundwater with older 14C ages has lower δ18O values than younger, shallower groundwater, which is consistent with it being derived from greater altitudes. The combined geochemistry data indicate that local recharge from precipitation within the valley occurs through the aquifer window, however much of the groundwater in the Gellibrand Valley predominantly originates from the regional recharge zone, the Barongarook High. The Gellibrand Valley is a regional discharge zone with upward head gradients that limits local recharge to the upper 10 m of the aquifer. Additionally, the groundwater head gradients adjacent to the Gellibrand River are generally upwards, implying that it does not recharge the surrounding groundwater and has limited bank storage. 14C ages and Cl concentrations are well correlated and Cl concentrations may be used to provide a first-order estimate of groundwater residence times. Progressively lower chloride concentrations from 10

  17. Locating groundwater flow in karst by acoustic emission surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Stokowski, S.J. Jr.; Clark, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    An acoustic emission survey of Newala Fm. (primarily dolomite) karst has helped to locate subsurface water flow. This survey was performed on the Rock Quarry Dome, Sevier County, Tennessee. A Dresser RS-4 recording seismograph, adjusted to provide a gain of 1000, collected acoustic emission data using Mark Products CN368 vertical geophones with 3-inch spikes. Data was collected for 5-15 second intervals. The geophones were laid out along traverses with 10, 20, or 30-ft spacing and covered with sand bags in locations of high ambient noise. Traverses were laid out: along and across lineaments known to correspond with groundwater flow in natural subsurface channels; across and along a joint-controlled sink suspected of directing groundwater flow; and across a shallow sinkhole located tangentially to the Little Pigeon River and suspected of capturing river water for the groundwater system. Acoustic emissions of channelized flowing groundwater have a characteristic erratic spiked spectral signature. These acoustic emission signatures increase in amplitude and number in the immediate vicinity of the vertical projection of channelized groundwater flow if it occurs within approximately 30 feet of the surface. If the groundwater flow occurs at greater depths the emissions may be offset from the projection of the actual flow, due to propagation of the signal along rock pinnacles or attenuation by residual soils.

  18. Permafrost thaw in a nested groundwater-flow system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, Jeffery M.; Voss, Clifford I.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater flow in cold regions containing permafrost accelerates climate-warming-driven thaw and changes thaw patterns. Simulation analyses of groundwater flow and heat transport with freeze/thaw in typical cold-regions terrain with nested flow indicate that early thaw rate is particularly enhanced by flow, the time when adverse environmental impacts of climate-warming-induced permafrost loss may be severest. For the slowest climate-warming rate predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), once significant groundwater flow begins, thick permafrost layers can vanish in several hundred years, but survive over 1,000 years where flow is minimal. Large-scale thaw depends mostly on the balance of heat advection and conduction in the supra-permafrost zone. Surface-water bodies underlain by open taliks allow slow sub-permafrost flow, with lesser influence on regional thaw. Advection dominance over conduction depends on permeability and topography. Groundwater flow around permafrost and flow through permafrost impact thaw differently; the latter enhances early thaw rate. Air-temperature seasonality also increases early thaw. Hydrogeologic heterogeneity and topography strongly affect thaw rates/patterns. Permafrost controls the groundwater/surface-water-geomorphology system; hence, prediction and mitigation of impacts of thaw on ecology, chemical exports and infrastructure require improved hydrogeology/permafrost characterization and understanding

  19. An Integrated Approach on Groundwater Flow and Heat/Solute Transport for Sustainable Groundwater Source Heat Pump (GWHP) System Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, D. K.; Bae, G. O.; Joun, W.; Park, B. H.; Park, J.; Park, I.; Lee, K. K.

    2015-12-01

    The GWHP system uses a stable temperature of groundwater for cooling and heating in buildings and thus has been known as one of the most energy-saving and cost-efficient renewable energy techniques. A GWHP facility was installed at an island located at the confluence of North Han and South Han rivers, Korea. Because of well-developed alluvium, the aquifer is suitable for application of this system, extracting and injecting a large amount of groundwater. However, the numerical experiments under various operational conditions showed that it could be vulnerable to thermal interference due to the highly permeable gravel layer, as a preferential path of thermal plume migration, and limited space for well installation. Thus, regional groundwater flow must be an important factor of consideration for the efficient operation under these conditions but was found to be not simple in this site. While the groundwater level in this site totally depends on the river stage control of Paldang dam, the direction and velocity of the regional groundwater flow, observed using the colloidal borescope, have been changed hour by hour with the combined flows of both the rivers. During the pumping and injection tests, the water discharges in Cheongpyeong dam affected their respective results. Moreover, the measured NO3-N concentrations might imply the effect of agricultural activities around the facility on the groundwater quality along the regional flow. It is obvious that the extraction and injection of groundwater during the facility operation will affect the fate of the agricultural contaminants. Particularly, the gravel layer must also be a main path for contaminant migration. The simulations for contaminant transport during the facility operation showed that the operation strategy for only thermal efficiency could be unsafe and unstable in respect of groundwater quality. All these results concluded that the integrated approach on groundwater flow and heat/solute transport is necessary

  20. Validation Analysis of the Shoal Groundwater Flow and Transport Model

    SciTech Connect

    A. Hassan; J. Chapman

    2008-11-01

    Environmental restoration at the Shoal underground nuclear test is following a process prescribed by a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) between the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. Characterization of the site included two stages of well drilling and testing in 1996 and 1999, and development and revision of numerical models of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport. Agreement on a contaminant boundary for the site and a corrective action plan was reached in 2006. Later that same year, three wells were installed for the purposes of model validation and site monitoring. The FFACO prescribes a five-year proof-of-concept period for demonstrating that the site groundwater model is capable of producing meaningful results with an acceptable level of uncertainty. The corrective action plan specifies a rigorous seven step validation process. The accepted groundwater model is evaluated using that process in light of the newly acquired data. The conceptual model of ground water flow for the Project Shoal Area considers groundwater flow through the fractured granite aquifer comprising the Sand Springs Range. Water enters the system by the infiltration of precipitation directly on the surface of the mountain range. Groundwater leaves the granite aquifer by flowing into alluvial deposits in the adjacent basins of Fourmile Flat and Fairview Valley. A groundwater divide is interpreted as coinciding with the western portion of the Sand Springs Range, west of the underground nuclear test, preventing flow from the test into Fourmile Flat. A very low conductivity shear zone east of the nuclear test roughly parallels the divide. The presence of these lateral boundaries, coupled with a regional discharge area to the northeast, is interpreted in the model as causing groundwater from the site to flow in a northeastward direction into Fairview Valley. Steady-state flow conditions are assumed given the absence of

  1. The effects of groundwater abstraction on low flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, I. E. M.; van Beek, L. P. H.; Wada, Y.; Bierkens, M. F. P.

    2012-04-01

    In regions with frequent water stress and large aquifer systems, groundwater often constitutes an essential source of water. If groundwater abstraction exceeds groundwater recharge over a long time and over large areas persistent groundwater depletion can occur. The resulting lowering of groundwater levels can have negative effects on agricultural productivity but also on natural streamflow and associated wetlands and ecosystems, in particular during low-flow events when the groundwater contribution through baseflow is relatively large. In this study we focus on the effects of global groundwater abstraction on low-flow magnitude, frequency and duration for the major rivers of the world for the period 1960-2000. As a basis, we use the large-scale hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB that calculates all major water balance terms on a daily time step at a 0.5ox0.5o resolution. Currently, PCR-GLOBWB represents groundwater and the associated baseflow by means of a linear reservoir that is parameterized using global lithological data and drainage density. It simulates renewable groundwater storage within each 0.5o cell. Lateral flow between cells is not considered. The specific runoff from the model is subsequently transformed into discharge by means of a kinematic wave routing scheme. In this study we perform a sensitivity analysis in which we evaluate the effects of total water demand for the period 1960-2000 (Wada et al., 2011: doi:10.5194/hess-15-3785-2011). This demand is preferentially met by renewable groundwater storage, secondly by surface water. Any remainder is assumed to stem from non- renewable (i.e. fossil) groundwater resources. Thus, groundwater abstractions act as a direct sink of (renewable) groundwater storage, whereas surface water abstractions act as a direct sink of streamflow. The resulting response is non-trivial as abstractions are variably taken from both groundwater and surface water, where return-flows contribute to a single source: return flow from

  2. Using Groundwater Temperatures and Heat Flow Patterns to Assess Groundwater Flow in Snake Valley, Nevada and Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masbruch, M. D.; Chapman, D. S.

    2009-12-01

    The Southern Nevada Water Authority’s (SNWA) proposal to develop groundwater resources in Snake Valley and adjacent basins in eastern Nevada has focused attention on understanding the links between basin-fill and carbonate aquifer systems, groundwater flow paths, and the movement of groundwater between basins. The SNWA development plans are contentious in part because (1) there are few perennial streams that flow into the basins and these surface-water resources are fully appropriated; (2) groundwater resources that sustain streams, springs, wetlands, and the local agricultural economy are also limited; and (3) because Snake Valley straddles the Utah-Nevada state line. We report groundwater temperatures and estimates of heat flow used to constrain estimates of groundwater flow into and through Snake Valley. Thermal logs have been collected from 24 monitoring wells in the Utah part of the valley. Natural, undisturbed geothermal gradients within the Basin and Range are generally 30 °C/km, which correspond to heat flow values of approximately 90 mW/m2. Geothermal gradients in the southern portion of Snake Valley are lower than typical Basin and Range geothermal gradients, with the majority ranging between 10 and 20 °C/km, corresponding to heat flow values of 30 to 60 mW/m2. In the northern portion of the basin, however, geothermal gradients are generally higher than typical Basin and Range geothermal gradients, with thermal logs of two wells indicating gradients of 39 °C/km and 51 °C/km, which correspond to heat flow values of approximately 117 and 153 mW/m2, respectively. These observations suggest heat is being redistributed by groundwater flow to discharge points in northern Snake Valley. This interpretation is also supported by spring temperatures in northern Snake Valley and at Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge to the northeast that are higher than ambient (12 °C) surface temperature. These thermal data are being used together with water levels and

  3. Wellbore and groundwater temperature distribution eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho: Implications for groundwater flow and geothermal potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLing, Travis L.; Smith, Richard P.; Smith, Robert W.; Blackwell, David D.; Roback, Robert C.; Sondrup, Andrus J.

    2016-06-01

    A map of groundwater temperatures from the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) regional aquifer can be used to identify and interpret important features of the aquifer, including aquifer flow direction, aquifer thickness, and potential geothermal anomalies. The ESRP is an area of high heat flow, yet most of this thermal energy fails to reach the surface, due to the heat being swept downgradient by the aquifer to the major spring complexes near Thousand Springs, ID, a distance of 300 km. Nine deep boreholes that fully penetrate the regional aquifer display three common features: (1) high thermal gradients beneath the aquifer, corresponding to high conductive heat flow in low-permeability hydrothermally-altered rocks; (2) isothermal temperature profiles within the aquifer, characteristic of an actively flowing groundwater; and (3) moderate thermal gradients in the vadose zone with values that indicate that over half of the geothermal heat flow is removed by advective transport in the regional aquifer system. This study utilized temperature data from 250 ESRP aquifer wells to evaluate regional aquifer flow direction, aquifer thickness, and potential geothermal anomalies. Because the thermal gradients are typically low in the aquifer, any measurement of groundwater temperature is a reasonable estimate of temperature throughout the aquifer thickness, allowing the construction of a regional aquifer temperature map for the ESRP. Mapped temperatures are used to identify cold thermal plumes associated with recharge from tributary valleys and adjacent uplands, and warm zones associated with geothermal input to the aquifer. Warm zones in the aquifer can have various causes, including local circulation of groundwater through the deep conductively dominated region, slow groundwater movement in low-permeability regions, or localized heat flow from deeper thermal features.

  4. Well data and groundwater flow direction problem: Steuben County, Indiana case study

    SciTech Connect

    Goings, M.H. ); Isiorho, S.A. . Dept. of Geosciences)

    1994-04-01

    The rapid industrial growth in Northeastern Indiana has lead to the demand for more complete geologic information for Steuben County, Indiana by the citizenry. The information would allow environmental scientists, geologists and engineers to more accurately predict the potential migration and impact of pollutants on the soil and groundwater. As part of ongoing environmental site investigations in Steuben County, well data were collected from Indiana Department of Environmental management (IDEM) and the State of Indiana Department of Natural Resources to determine local and regional groundwater flow directions. Of the 162 registered wells in the study area, only 67 of them, that is, 41% of the data could be used. The remaining well data could not be used because of poor, inaccurate or incomplete information on the forms (i.e., location description, well log, elevation, etc.). The regional groundwater flow direction was northwest as would be expected from the topography. A groundwater divide or ridge that was implied from the local groundwater flow directions could not be confirmed due to poor well data. The determination of groundwater flow direction was made more complicated due to incomplete well logs from drillers. Increased industrial activities in the region could lead to greater potential for surface and groundwater pollution problems. It is recommended that well data be collected by qualified personnel (field geologists) during well drilling.

  5. Sructural Control Of Groundwater Flow In The Sinai Peninsula: Integrated Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, L.; Sultan, M.; Farag, A. Z. A.

    2014-12-01

    The crystalline complex and overlying sedimentary sequences in southern and central Sinai are highly dissected by numerous faults, shear systems, and dikes, hereafter referred to as discontinuities. Understanding the distribution of these discontinuities, their cross cutting relations, and the hydraulic gradient gives clues as to the distribution of water resources in the area. In the study area, extensional tectonics has been active as early as the Precambrian era as evidenced by the widely distributed dikes, bimodal volcanics, and dip-slip faults and shear zones of varying ages. These extensional tectonics and associated structural elements enhance the porosity and permeability of Sinai's basement and overlying sedimentary sequences. To investigate the impact of the discontinuities on groundwater flow, the following steps were conducted: 1) the spatial and temporal precipitation events over the basement complex were identified from TRMM data; 2) observations extracted from temporal change in backscattering coefficient in radar (Envisat ASAR radar scenes) were used to identify water-bearing discontinuities; 3) the discontinuities were delineated using false color images that were generated from ASTER, SIR C and band ratio images, 4) field observations, Very Low Frequency (VLF), magnetic investigations, and stable isotopic analyses for groundwater samples were then applied to refine satellite-based observations and selections, test the validity of our satellite-based methodologies for locating sub-vertical discontinuities, and decipher their role as conduits or barriers for groundwater flow. Findings include: (1) sub-vertical faults and shear zones and highly weathered chilled margins of sub-vertical mafic dykes are water-bearing and are conducive for groundwater flow; felsic dykes are massive (do not promote groundwater flow), (2) groundwater flow generally follows the topographic relief, but locally the flow is controlled by the discontinuities, (3

  6. Glaciation and regional groundwater flow in the Fennoscandian shield

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Provost, A.M.; Voss, C.I.; Neuzil, C.E.

    2012-01-01

    Regional-scale groundwater flow modeling of the Fennoscandian shield suggests that groundwater flow can be strongly affected by future climate change and glaciation. We considered variable-density groundwater flow in a 1500-km-long and approximately 10-km-deep cross-section through southern Sweden. Groundwater flow and shield brine transport in the cross-sectional model were analyzed under projected surface conditions for the next 140 ka. Simulations suggest that blockage of recharge and discharge by low-permeability permafrost or cold-based ice causes sinking of brine and consequent freshening of near-surface water in areas of natural discharge. Although recharge of basal meltwater is limited by the requirement that water pressure at the base of the ice sheet not exceed the pressure exerted by the weight of the ice, warm-based ice with basal melting creates a potential for groundwater recharge rates much larger than those of present, ice-free conditions. In the simulations, regional-scale redistribution of recharged water by subsurface flow is minor over the duration of a glacial advance (approximately 10 ka). During glacial retreat, significant upward flow of groundwater may occur below the ice sheet owing to pressure release. If the mechanical loading efficiency of the rocks is high, both subsurface penetration of meltwater during glacial advance and up-flow during glacial retreat are reduced because of loading-induced pressure changes. The maximum rate of groundwater discharge in the simulations occurs at the receding ice margin, and some discharge occurs below incursive postglacial seas. Recharge of basal meltwater could decrease the concentration of dissolved solids significantly below present-day levels at depths of up to several kilometers and may bring oxygenated conditions to an otherwise reducing chemical environment for periods exceeding 10 ka.

  7. Numerical simulations of groundwater flow at New Jersey Shallow Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehr, Annick; Patterson, Fabian; Lofi, Johanna; Reiche, Sönke

    2016-04-01

    During IODP Expedition 313, three boreholes were drilled in the so-called New Jersey transect. Hydrochemical studies revealed the groundwater situation as more complex than expected, characterized by several sharp boundaries between fresh and saline groundwater. Two conflicting hypotheses regarding the nature of these freshwater reservoirs are currently debated. One hypothesis is that these reservoirs are connected with onshore aquifers and continuously recharged by seaward-flowing groundwater. The second hypothesis is that fresh groundwater was emplaced during the last glacial period. In addition to the petrophysical properties measured during IODP 313 expedition, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements were performed on samples from boreholes M0027, M0028 and M0029 in order to deduce porosities and permeabilities. These results are compared with data from alternative laboratory measurements and with petrophysical properties inferred from downhole logging data. We incorporate these results into a 2D numerical model that reflects the shelf architecture as known from drillings and seismic data to perform submarine groundwater flow simulations. In order to account for uncertainties related to the spatial distribution of physical properties, such as porosity and permeability, systematic variation of input parameters was performed during simulation runs. The target is to test the two conflicting hypotheses of fresh groundwater emplacements offshore New Jersey and to improve the understanding of fluid flow processes at marine passive margins.

  8. Groundwater: A Vital Resource. Student Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Carla, Ed.

    Twenty-three activities dealing with various aspects of groundwater are provided in this manual. The activities are arranged under four headings: (1) the water cycle; (2) water distribution in soils (considering such topics as calculating water table depth and purifying water by filtering); (3) water quality (considering such topics as acid rain,…

  9. A guide for using the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blainey, Joan B.; Faunt, Claudia C.; Hill, Mary C.

    2006-01-01

    This report is a guide for executing numerical simulations with the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California using the U.S. Geological Survey modular finite-difference ground-water flow model, MODFLOW-2000. Model inputs, including observations of hydraulic head, discharge, and boundary flows, are summarized. Modification of the DVRFS transient ground-water model is discussed for two common uses of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model: predictive pumping scenarios that extend beyond the end of the model simulation period (1998), and model simulations with only steady-state conditions.

  10. A Guide for Using the Transient Ground-Water Flow Model of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect

    Joan B. Blainey; Claudia C. Faunt, and Mary C. Hill

    2006-05-16

    This report is a guide for executing numerical simulations with the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California using the U.S. Geological Survey modular finite-difference ground-water flow model, MODFLOW-2000. Model inputs, including observations of hydraulic head, discharge, and boundary flows, are summarized. Modification of the DVRFS transient ground-water model is discussed for two common uses of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model: predictive pumping scenarios that extend beyond the end of the model simulation period (1998), and model simulations with only steady-state conditions.

  11. An initial examination of tungsten geochemistry along groundwater flow paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, H. B.; Johannesson, K. H.

    2008-12-01

    Groundwater samples were collected along groundwater flow paths from the Upper Floridan (Florida), Carrizo Sand (Texas), and the Aquia (Maryland) aquifers and analyzed for tungsten (W) concentrations by high- resolution inductively couple plasma mass spectrometry. At each well head, groundwater samples were also analyzed for pH, specific conductance, temperature, alkalinity, dissolved oxygen (DO), oxidation-reduction potential (Eh), dissolved iron speciation, and dissolved sulfide [S(-II)] concentrations. Sediment samples from the Carrizo Sand and Aquia aquifers were also collected and subjected to sequential extractions to provide additional insights into the solid-phase speciation of W in these aquifers. Tungsten concentrations varied along the groundwater flow paths chiefly in response to changing pH, and to a lesser extent, variations in the redox conditions. For groundwater from the Carrizo Sand aquifer, W ranges between 3.64 and 1297 pmol/kg, exhibiting the lowest values proximal to the recharge zone. Tungsten concentrations progressively increase along the flow path, reaching 1297 pmol/kg in the sulfidic groundwaters located approximately 60 km downgradient from the recharge area. Tungsten is strongly correlated with S(-II) concentrations and pH in Carrizo groundwaters (r = 0.95 and 0.78, respectively). Within the Aquia aquifer, however, W generally occurs at lower concentrations than the Carrizo (14 to 184 pmol/kg; mean = 80 pmol/kg), and shows no systematic trends along the flow path (e.g., r = 0.08 and 0.4 for W vs. S(-II) and pH, respectively). Our data are consistent with the increase in W concentrations in Carrizo groundwaters reflecting, in part, pH-related desorption, which has been shown to be substantial for pH greater than 8. Moreover, because of the broad similarities in the chemistry of W and Mo, which forms thiomolybdates in sulfidic waters, we suggest that thiotungstate complexes may form in sulfidic groundwaters, thus partially explaining the

  12. Flow calculations for Yucca Mountain groundwater travel time (GWTT-95)

    SciTech Connect

    Altman, S.J.; Arnold, B.W.; Barnard, R.W.; Barr, G.E.; Ho, C.K.; McKenna, S.A.; Eaton, R.R.

    1996-09-01

    In 1983, high-level radioactive waste repository performance requirements related to groundwater travel time were defined by NRC subsystem regulation 10 CFR 60.113. Although DOE is not presently attempting to demonstrate compliance with that regulation, understanding of the prevalence of fast paths in the groundwater flow system remains a critical element of any safety analyses for a potential repository system at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Therefore, this analysis was performed to allow comparison of fast-path flow against the criteria set forth in the regulation. Models developed to describe the conditions for initiation, propagation, and sustainability of rapid groundwater movement in both the unsaturated and saturated zones will form part of the technical basis for total- system analyses to assess site viability and site licensability. One of the most significant findings is that the fastest travel times in both unsaturated and saturated zones are in the southern portion of the potential repository, so it is recommended that site characterization studies concentrate on this area. Results support the assumptions regarding the importance of an appropriate conceptual model of groundwater flow and the incorporation of heterogeneous material properties into the analyses. Groundwater travel times are sensitive to variation/uncertainty in hydrologic parameters and in infiltration flux at upper boundary of the problem domain. Simulated travel times are also sensitive to poorly constrained parameters of the interaction between flow in fractures and in the matrix.

  13. Complex groundwater flow systems as traveling agent models

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, Pablo; Escolero, Oscar; González, Tomas; Morales-Casique, Eric; Osorio-Olvera, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing field data from pumping tests, we show that as with many other natural phenomena, groundwater flow exhibits complex dynamics described by 1/f power spectrum. This result is theoretically studied within an agent perspective. Using a traveling agent model, we prove that this statistical behavior emerges when the medium is complex. Some heuristic reasoning is provided to justify both spatial and dynamic complexity, as the result of the superposition of an infinite number of stochastic processes. Even more, we show that this implies that non-Kolmogorovian probability is needed for its study, and provide a set of new partial differential equations for groundwater flow. PMID:25337455

  14. A Method to Evaluate Groundwater flow system under the Seabed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohara, N.; Marui, A.

    2011-12-01

    / fresh water interface (position of the submarine groundwater discharge) may appear on the seafloor. Moreover, neither the salinity concentration nor the groundwater age depends on depth. It is thought that it is because that the groundwater forms the complex flow situation through the change in a long-term groundwater flow system. The technology to understand the coastal groundwater flow consists of remote sensing, geographical features analysis, surface of the earth investigation, geophysical exploration, drilling survey, and indoor examination and the measurement. Integration of each technology is needed to interpret groundwater flow system because the one is to catch the local groundwater flow in the time series and another one is to catch the long-term and regional groundwater flow in the general situation. The purpose of this study is to review the previous research of coastal groundwater flow, and to integrate an applicable evaluation approach to understand this mechanism. In this presentation, the review of the research and case study using numerical simulation are introduced.

  15. Consistency of groundwater flow patterns in mountainous topography: Implications for valley bottom water replenishment and for defining groundwater flow boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, L. A.; Allen, D. M.

    2012-05-01

    Topographic influences on groundwater flow processes that contribute to baseflow and mountain block recharge (MBR) are conceptually investigated using three-dimensional numerical models of saturated groundwater flow. Model domains for conceptual and real topographies are developed as "mountain groundwatershed units" (MGUs) to represent regional-scale watershed systems. Results indicate regularity in groundwater flow patterns that reflect consistency of prominent topographic features, providing a basis for conceptualizing three-dimensional groundwater flow. Baseflow is generated mainly from recharge within the watershed area. MBR is produced primarily from recharge that is focused across triangular facets near the mountain front (˜73%-97% of total MBR), with additional contributions originating within the watershed (up to ˜27% of MBR). MBR contributions originating from recharge near the highest-elevation watershed boundaries are minimal but are greater for topography with less stream incision. With orographic influences, more MBR originates within the watershed. MBR rates are relatively consistent between models because of similarities in mountain front topography, while baseflow is variable. Gains and losses to systems via cross-watershed groundwater flux, generated because of topographic differences between adjacent watersheds, cause baseflow to vary by up to ˜10% but do not significantly influence MBR. In data-sparse regions such as mountains, a basic numerical modeling approach, using the MGU concept with topography data and mapped watershed boundaries, can be used to develop site-specific conceptual models to constrain water budgets, to delineate recharge areas, and to guide further investigation and data collection.

  16. Patterns and rates of ground-water flow on Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buxton, Herbert T.; Modica, Edward

    1992-01-01

    Increased ground-water contamination from human activities on Long Island has prompted studies to define the pattern and rate of ground-water movement. A two-dimensional, fine-mesh, finite-element model consisting of 11,969 nodes and 22,880 elements was constructed to represent ground-water flow along a north-south section through central Long Island. The model represents average hydrologic conditions within a corridor approximately 15 miles wide. The model solves discrete approximations of both the potential and stream functions. The resulting flownet depicts flow paths and defines the vertical distribution of flow within the section. Ground-water flow rates decrease with depth. Sixty-two percent of the water flows no deeper than the upper glacial (water-table) aquifer, 38 percent enters the underlying Magothy aquifer, and only 3.1 percent enters the Lloyd aquifer. The limiting streamlines for flow to the Magothy and Lloyd aquifers indicate that aquifer recharge areas are narrow east-west bands through the center of the island. The recharge area of the Magothy aquifer is only 5.4 miles wide; that of the Lloyd aquifer is less than 0.5 miles. The distribution of ground-water traveltime and a flownet are calculated from model results; both are useful in the investigation of contaminant transport or the chemical evolution of ground water within the flow system. A major discontinuity in traveltime occurs across the streamline which separates the flow subsystems of the two confined aquifers. Water that reaches the Lloyd aquifer attains traveltimes as high as 10,000 years, whereas water that has not penetrated deeper than the Magothy aquifer attains traveltimes of only 2,000 years. The finite-element approach used in this study is particularly suited to ground-water systems that have complex hydrostratigraphy and cross-sectional symmetry.

  17. Modeling groundwater flow by lattice Boltzmann method in curvilinear coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budinski, Ljubomir; Fabian, Julius; Stipic, Matija

    2015-07-01

    In order to promote the use of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for the simulation of isotropic groundwater flow in a confined aquifer with arbitrary geometry, Poisson's equation was transformed into a curvilinear coordinate system. With the metric function between the physical and the computational domain established, Poisson's equation written in Cartesian coordinates was transformed in curvilinear coordinates. Following, the appropriate equilibrium function for the D2Q9 square lattice has been defined. The resulting curvilinear formulation of the LBM for groundwater flow is capable of modeling flow in domains of complex geometry with the opportunity of local refining/coarsening of the computational mesh corresponding to the complexity of the flow pattern and the required accuracy. Since the proposed form of the LBM uses the transformed equation of flow implemented in the equilibrium function, finding a solution does not require supplementary procedures along the curvilinear boundaries, nor in the zones requiring mesh density adjustments. Thus, the basic concept of the LBM is completely maintained. The improvement of the proposed LBM over the previously published classical methods is completely verified by three examples with analytical solutions. The results demonstrate the advantages of the proposed curvilinear LBM in modeling groundwater flow in complex flow domains.

  18. Comparison of groundwater flow in Southern California coastal aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, Randall T.; Izbicki, John A.; Reichard, Eric G.; Edwards, Brian D.; Land, Michael; Martin, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Development of the coastal aquifer systems of Southern California has resulted in overdraft, changes in streamflow, seawater intrusion, land subsidence, increased vertical flow between aquifers, and a redirection of regional flow toward pumping centers. These water-management challenges can be more effectively addressed by incorporating new understanding of the geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical setting of these aquifers. Groundwater and surface-water flow are controlled, in part, by the geologic setting. The physiographic province and related tectonic fabric control the relation between the direction of geomorphic features and the flow of water. Geologic structures such as faults and folding also control the direction of flow and connectivity of groundwater flow. The layering of sediments and their structural association can also influence pathways of groundwater flow and seawater intrusion. Submarine canyons control the shortest potential flow paths that can result in seawater intrusion. The location and extent of offshore outcrops can also affect the flow of groundwater and the potential for seawater intrusion and land subsidence in coastal aquifer systems. As coastal aquifer systems are developed, the source and movement of ground-water and surface-water resources change. In particular, groundwater flow is affected by the relative contributions of different types of inflows and outflows, such as pump-age from multi-aquifer wells within basal or upper coarse-grained units, streamflow infiltration, and artificial recharge. These natural and anthropogenic inflows and outflows represent the supply and demand components of the water budgets of ground-water within coastal watersheds. They are all significantly controlled by climate variability related to major climate cycles, such as the El Niño–Southern Oscillation and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. The combination of natural forcings and anthropogenic stresses redirects the flow of groundwater and either

  19. Detecting groundwater flow direction from infrared thermal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Akhundzadah Noor; Saito, Hirotaka; Asada, Kei; Kato, Makoto

    In this study we propose an approach to directly measure temperature changes around the heat source placed in a borehole using an infrared camera for determining groundwater flow direction. A plastic box filled with sands with a cylindrical perforated column placed in middle of the box was used in lab experiments. A heater was inserted in the center of the borehole. To detect the flow direction from the temperature distribution, an infrared camera that was placed face-down at the top of the cylinder (i.e., borehole) was used. COMSOL was used to numerically simulate coupled water flow and heat transfer to evaluate experimental results. Results show that when the flux is in the order of 10-2 to 10-4cm s-1, we can determine the groundwater flow direction because of a skewed temperature distribution due to convective transport of heat.

  20. Perturbation of ground surface temperature reconstructions by groundwater flow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Grant; Beltrami, Hugo; Woodbury, Allan D.

    2006-07-01

    Subsurface temperatures have been shown to be a robust source of information on past climates. Most analyses neglect groundwater flow (GWF) and assume purely conductive heat flow. However, in many situations GWF has not been fully considered and to date there are no general GWF criteria for either accepting or rejecting a temperature profile for paleoclimate analysis. Here we examine the transition from conduction dominated environments to environments where advection has a significant effect on the subsurface temperature regime and thus ground surface temperature (GST) histories. We provide guidelines indicating when advection is important and conclude that it is unlikely that groundwater flow is a significant source of error in the global data set maintained by the International Heat Flow Commission.

  1. Radiocarbon determinations for estimating groundwater flow velocities in central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanshaw, B.B.; Back, W.; Rubin, M.

    1965-01-01

    Carbon-14 activity was determined from HCO3- in samples of groundwater obtained from the principal artesian aquifer in Florida. From these data the "age" of water obtained from a series of wells, each progressively farther down gradient on the piezometric surface, was established. Relative carbon-14 ages indicated a velocity of groundwater movement of 23 feet (7 meters) per year for about 85 miles (137 kilometers) of travel. A velocity of 23 feet per year was calculated independently from Darcy's law.

  2. Characterization and conceptualization of groundwater flow systems: Chapter 2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plummer, L.N.; Sanford, W.E.; Glynn, P.D.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses some of the fundamental concepts, data needs and approaches that aid in developing a general understanding of a groundwater system. Principles of the hydrological cycle are reviewed; the processes of recharge and discharge in aquifer systems; types of geological, hydrological and hydraulic data needed to describe the hydrogeological framework of an aquifer system; factors affecting the distribution of recharge to aquifers; and uses of groundwater chemistry, geochemical modelling, environmental tracers and age interpretations in groundwater studies. Together, these concepts and observations aid in developing a conceptualization of groundwater flow systems and provide input to the development of numerical models of a flow system. Conceptualization of the geology, hydrology, geochemistry, and hydrogeological and hydrochemical framework can be quite useful in planning, study design, guiding sampling campaigns, acquisition of new data and, ultimately, developing numerical models capable of assessing a wide variety of societal issues — for example, sustainability of groundwater resources in response to real or planned withdrawals from the system, CO2 sequestration or other waste isolation issues (such as nuclear waste disposal).

  3. Investigation of groundwater flow paths through combined inversion of strontium isotope ratios and hydraulic head data. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas M. Johnson

    1999-12-04

    Strontium (Sr) isotope and other geochemical data were collected for groundwater samples from the Snake River Plain aquifer in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These geochemical data provide strong evidence for slow and fast groundwater flow zones that had not been previously characterized. The geochemical data were combined with existing hydraulic head data in groundwater flow and transport models. These models enable quantitative extraction of flow information from the data (i.e., inversion of the data). This new approach and the implications for INEEL environmental activities will be reported in two journal articles. One submitted recently and a second in preparation.

  4. Sublacustrine groundwater discharge in esker aquifers; fully integrated groundwater flow modeling compared with novel field techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ala-aho, Pertti; Rossi, Pekka M.; Isokangas, Elina; Kløve, Bjørn

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater (GW) discharge to surface water bodies such as streams, lakes and wetlands can greatly affect their water quantity, quality and related aquatic ecology. Therefore better understanding of GW - surface water interaction is needed in integrated management of water resources. Sublacustrine groundwater discharge (SGD) to lakes was studied in a complex unconfined Rokua esker aquifer system. SGD was studied for 12 lakes in the area to better understand water and solute inputs through lake beds and thereby the role of GW on lake water budget and solute concentrations. The locations and fluxes of SGD were simulated using a fully integrated groundwater flow model HydroGeoSphere. The used hydrological simulator allows water to flow and partition into overland and stream flow, evaporation, infiltration, and subsurface discharge into surface water features in a physically-based way, which was needed in simulating SGD of the complex aquifer system. The model was first calibrated for subsurface hydraulic conductivity in steady state using data of measured long-term average groundwater and lake levels and stream baseflow. The model performance in transient simulations was then examined against recorded hydrographs for lake and groundwater levels and stream flow. After model performance was verified, the simulated locations and fluxes of SGD were extracted from the model and compared with results from three independent field methods: airborne thermal imaging, stable isotope water balance and seepage meter measurements. Airborne thermal imaging was used to infer locations of SGD into lakes based on temperature anomalies at lakes shorelines due to discharging cold groundwater. Isotopic composition (H2 and O18) was analysed for lake water, groundwater and the data was used to estimate SGD flux into lakes. Finally, seepage meter measurements were conducted for one of the lakes to establish both locations and fluxes of SGD in detail. The simulated and field-based estimated

  5. Simulation of groundwater flow around a pilot waste tire site

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.; Chyi, L.L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1994-04-01

    The groundwater system in the area contains several aquifers divided by underclays as confining layers. The three aquifers addressed under this research include the upper aquifer above the No. 6 underclay, the middle aquifer above the No. 5 underclay and the lower aquifer above the No. 4 underclay. A quasi-3D conceptual model is used in simulating groundwater flow and MODFLOW is used for the actual modeling. The boundary of the model area is defined by a local divide on the north, the Hugle Run on the west and the Temple Ditch on the east and the Sandy Creek on the south. The model consists of three aquifer layers and two confining layers. The upper one is unconfined, the middle one is a hybrid, and the lower one is confined. In the simulation of the upper aquifer, drain boundary condition is defined to include seepage. In the simulation of the middle aquifer, the Hugle Run and the Temple ditch associated with the alluvium represent a drain boundary and the Sand Creek to the south represents a constant head. The lower aquifer does not have a natural hydrogeologic boundary. The equipotential contours are assigned as constant head boundary. Simulation has indicated that minimal groundwater flow existed in the upper aquifer and it is flowing toward the southwest. Groundwater flow in the middle aquifer near the pilot waste site is somewhat divergent to the south. The velocity is slow near the site but increases quickly toward the southwest. Leakage from the upper aquifer appears to be predominant over the regional flow in the recharge of the middle aquifer. The lower aquifer is recharged mainly by the regional flow and is flowing almost due south.

  6. The transition of flow patterns through critical stagnation points in two-dimensional groundwater flow

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A flow pattern is characterized by aquifer features and the number, type, and distribution of stagnation points (locations where the discharge is zero). This article identifies a condition for transition of flow patterns in two-dimensional groundwater flow obeying Darcy's law by examining changes in...

  7. Bias in groundwater samples caused by wellbore flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reilly, Thomas E.; Franke, O. Lehn; Bennett, Gordon D.

    1989-01-01

    Proper design of physical installations and sampling procedures for groundwater monitoring networks is critical for the detection and analysis of possible contaminants. Monitoring networks associated with known contaminant sources sometimes include an array of monitoring wells with long well screens. The purpose of this paper is: (a) to report the results of a numerical experiment indicating that significant borehole flow can occur within long well screens installed in homogeneous aquifers with very small head differences in the aquifer (less than 0.01 feet between the top and bottom of the screen); (b) to demonstrate that contaminant monitoring wells with long screens may completely fail to fulfill their purpose in many groundwater environments.

  8. Groundwater availability as constrained by hydrogeology and environmental flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, Katelyn A.; Mayer, Alex S.; Reeves, Howard W.

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater pumping from aquifers in hydraulic connection with nearby streams has the potential to cause adverse impacts by decreasing flows to levels below those necessary to maintain aquatic ecosystems. The recent passage of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact has brought attention to this issue in the Great Lakes region. In particular, the legislation requires the Great Lakes states to enact measures for limiting water withdrawals that can cause adverse ecosystem impacts. This study explores how both hydrogeologic and environmental flow limitations may constrain groundwater availability in the Great Lakes Basin. A methodology for calculating maximum allowable pumping rates is presented. Groundwater availability across the basin may be constrained by a combination of hydrogeologic yield and environmental flow limitations varying over both local and regional scales. The results are sensitive to factors such as pumping time, regional and local hydrogeology, streambed conductance, and streamflow depletion limits. Understanding how these restrictions constrain groundwater usage and which hydrogeologic characteristics and spatial variables have the most influence on potential streamflow depletions has important water resources policy and management implications.

  9. Groundwater flow systems in mountainous terrain, 1. Numerical modeling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, Craig; Smith, Leslie

    1988-07-01

    A coupled model of fluid flow and heat transfer is developed to characterize steady groundwater flow within a mountain massif. A coupled model is necessary because high-relief terrain can enhance groundwater flow to depths where elevated temperatures are encountered. A wide range in water table form and elevation expected in high-relief terrain is accommodated using a free-surface method. This approach allows us to examine the influence of thermal conditions on the patterns and rates of groundwater flow and the position of the water table. Vertical fluid flow is assumed to occur within the unsaturated zone to provide a simple basis for modeling advective heat transfer above the water table. This approach ensures that temperatures at the water table, and throughout the domain, are consistent with temperature conditions specified at the bedrock surface. Conventional free-surface methods provide poor estimates of the water table configuration in high-relief terrain. A modified free-surface approach is introduced to accommodate recharge at upper elevations on the seepage face, in addition to recharge at the free surface.

  10. Partitioning a regional groundwater flow system into shallow local and deep regional flow compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goderniaux, Pascal; Davy, Philippe; Bresciani, Etienne; Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald; Borgne, Tanguy

    2013-04-01

    The distribution of groundwater fluxes in aquifers is strongly influenced by topography, and organized between hillslope and regional scales. The objective of this study is to provide new insights regarding the compartmentalization of aquifers at the regional scale and the partitioning of recharge between shallow/local and deep/regional groundwater transfers. A finite-difference flow model was implemented, and the flow structure was analyzed as a function of recharge (from 20 to 500 mm/yr), at the regional-scale (1400 km2), in three dimensions, and accounting for variable groundwater discharge zones; aspects which are usually not considered simultaneously in previous studies. The model allows visualizing 3-D circulations, as those provided by Tothian models in 2-D, and shows local and regional transfers, with 3-D effects. The probability density function of transit times clearly shows two different parts, interpreted using a two-compartment model, and related to regional groundwater transfers and local groundwater transfers. The role of recharge on the size and nature of the flow regimes, including groundwater pathways, transit time distributions, and volumes associated to the two compartments, have been investigated. Results show that topography control on the water table and groundwater compartmentalization varies with the recharge rate applied. When recharge decreases, the absolute value of flow associated to the regional compartment decreases, whereas its relative value increases. The volume associated to the regional compartment is calculated from the exponential part of the two-compartment model, and is nearly insensitive to the total recharge fluctuations.

  11. Simulation of Ground-Water Flow and Effects of Ground-Water Irrigation on Base Flow in the Elkhorn and Loup River Basins, Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Steven M.; Stanton, Jennifer S.; Saunders, Amanda T.; Bradley, Jesse R.

    2008-01-01

    Irrigated agriculture is vital to the livelihood of communities in the Elkhorn and Loup River Basins in Nebraska, and ground water is used to irrigate most of the cropland. Concerns about the sustainability of ground-water and surface-water resources have prompted State and regional agencies to evaluate the cumulative effects of ground-water irrigation in this area. To facilitate understanding of the effects of ground-water irrigation, a numerical computer model was developed to simulate ground-water flow and assess the effects of ground-water irrigation (including ground-water withdrawals, hereinafter referred to as pumpage, and enhanced recharge) on stream base flow. The study area covers approximately 30,800 square miles, and includes the Elkhorn River Basin upstream from Norfolk, Nebraska, and the Loup River Basin upstream from Columbus, Nebraska. The water-table aquifer consists of Quaternary-age sands and gravels and Tertiary-age silts, sands, and gravels. The simulation was constructed using one layer with 2-mile by 2-mile cell size. Simulations were constructed to represent the ground-water system before 1940 and from 1940 through 2005, and to simulate hypothetical conditions from 2006 through 2045 or 2055. The first simulation represents steady-state conditions of the system before anthropogenic effects, and then simulates the effects of early surface-water development activities and recharge of water leaking from canals during 1895 to 1940. The first simulation ends at 1940 because before that time, very little pumpage for irrigation occurred, but after that time it became increasingly commonplace. The pre-1940 simulation was calibrated against measured water levels and estimated long-term base flow, and the 1940 through 2005 simulation was calibrated against measured water-level changes and estimated long-term base flow. The calibrated 1940 through 2005 simulation was used as the basis for analyzing hypothetical scenarios to evaluate the effects of

  12. Approaches to the simulation of unconfined flow and perched groundwater flow in MODFLOW

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bedekar, Vivek; Niswonger, Richard G.; Kipp, Kenneth; Panday, Sorab; Tonkin, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Various approaches have been proposed to manage the nonlinearities associated with the unconfined flow equation and to simulate perched groundwater conditions using the MODFLOW family of codes. The approaches comprise a variety of numerical techniques to prevent dry cells from becoming inactive and to achieve a stable solution focused on formulations of the unconfined, partially-saturated, groundwater flow equation. Keeping dry cells active avoids a discontinuous head solution which in turn improves the effectiveness of parameter estimation software that relies on continuous derivatives. Most approaches implement an upstream weighting of intercell conductance and Newton-Raphson linearization to obtain robust convergence. In this study, several published approaches were implemented in a stepwise manner into MODFLOW for comparative analysis. First, a comparative analysis of the methods is presented using synthetic examples that create convergence issues or difficulty in handling perched conditions with the more common dry-cell simulation capabilities of MODFLOW. Next, a field-scale three-dimensional simulation is presented to examine the stability and performance of the discussed approaches in larger, practical, simulation settings.

  13. Approaches to the simulation of unconfined flow and perched groundwater flow in MODFLOW.

    PubMed

    Bedekar, Vivek; Niswonger, Richard G; Kipp, Kenneth; Panday, Sorab; Tonkin, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Various approaches have been proposed to manage the nonlinearities associated with the unconfined flow equation and to simulate perched groundwater conditions using the MODFLOW family of codes. The approaches comprise a variety of numerical techniques to prevent dry cells from becoming inactive and to achieve a stable solution focused on formulations of the unconfined, partially-saturated, groundwater flow equation. Keeping dry cells active avoids a discontinuous head solution which in turn improves the effectiveness of parameter estimation software that relies on continuous derivatives. Most approaches implement an upstream weighting of intercell conductance and Newton-Raphson linearization to obtain robust convergence. In this study, several published approaches were implemented in a stepwise manner into MODFLOW for comparative analysis. First, a comparative analysis of the methods is presented using synthetic examples that create convergence issues or difficulty in handling perched conditions with the more common dry-cell simulation capabilities of MODFLOW. Next, a field-scale three-dimensional simulation is presented to examine the stability and performance of the discussed approaches in larger, practical, simulation settings. PMID:21635246

  14. Ground-water flow and quality beneath sewage-sludge lagoons, and a comparison with the ground-water quality beneath a sludge-amended landfill, Marion County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bobay, K.E.

    1988-01-01

    The groundwater beneath eight sewage sludge lagoons, was studied to characterize the flow regime and to determine whether leachate had infiltrated into the glacio-fluvial sediments. Groundwater quality beneath the lagoons was compared with the groundwater quality beneath a landfill where sludge had been applied. The lagoons and landfills overlie outwash sand and gravel deposits separated by discontinuous clay layers. Shallow groundwater flows away from the lagoons and discharges into the White River. Deep groundwater discharges to the White River and flows southwest beneath Eagle Creek. After an accumulation of at least 2 inches of precipitation during 1 week, groundwater flow is temporarily reversed in the shallow aquifer, and all deep flow is along a relatively steep hydraulic gradient to the southwest. The groundwater is predominantly a calcium bicarbonate type, although ammonium accounts for more than 30% of the total cations in water from three wells. Concentrations of sodium, chloride, sulfate, iron, arsenic, boron, chemical oxygen demand, total dissolved solids, and methylene-blue-active substances indicate the presence of leachate in the groundwater. Concentrations of cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, selenium, and zinc were less than detection limits. The concentrations of 16 of 19 constituents or properties of groundwater beneath the lagoons are statistically different than groundwater beneath the landfill at the 0.05 level of significance. Only pH and concentrations of dissolved oxygen and bromide are higher in groundwater beneath the landfill than beneath the lagoons. 

  15. Effects of intraborehole flow on groundwater age distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zinn, B.A.; Konikow, L.F.

    2007-01-01

    Environmental tracers are used to estimate groundwater ages and travel times, but the strongly heterogeneous nature of many subsurface environments can cause mixing between waters of highly disparate ages, adding additional complexity to the age-estimation process. Mixing may be exacerbated by the presence of wells because long open intervals or long screens with openings at multiple depths can transport water and solutes rapidly over a large vertical distance. The effect of intraborehole flow on groundwater age was examined numerically using direct age transport simulation coupled with the Multi-Node Well Package of MODFLOW. Ages in a homogeneous, anisotropic aquifer reached a predevelopment steady state possessing strong depth dependence. A nonpumping multi-node well was then introduced in one of three locations within the system. In all three cases, vertical transport along the well resulted in substantial changes in age distributions within the system. After a pumping well was added near the nonpumping multi-node well, ages were further perturbed by a flow reversal in the nonpumping multi-node well. Results indicated that intraborehole flow can substantially alter groundwater ages, but the effects are highly dependent on local or regional flow conditions and may change with time. ?? Springer-Verlag 2007.

  16. Detecting influential observations in nonlinear regression modeling of groundwater flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, R.M.

    1998-01-01

    Nonlinear regression is used to estimate optimal parameter values in models of groundwater flow to ensure that differences between predicted and observed heads and flows do not result from nonoptimal parameter values. Parameter estimates can be affected, however, by observations that disproportionately influence the regression, such as outliers that exert undue leverage on the objective function. Certain statistics developed for linear regression can be used to detect influential observations in nonlinear regression if the models are approximately linear. This paper discusses the application of Cook's D, which measures the effect of omitting a single observation on a set of estimated parameter values, and the statistical parameter DFBETAS, which quantifies the influence of an observation on each parameter. The influence statistics were used to (1) identify the influential observations in the calibration of a three-dimensional, groundwater flow model of a fractured-rock aquifer through nonlinear regression, and (2) quantify the effect of omitting influential observations on the set of estimated parameter values. Comparison of the spatial distribution of Cook's D with plots of model sensitivity shows that influential observations correspond to areas where the model heads are most sensitive to certain parameters, and where predicted groundwater flow rates are largest. Five of the six discharge observations were identified as influential, indicating that reliable measurements of groundwater flow rates are valuable data in model calibration. DFBETAS are computed and examined for an alternative model of the aquifer system to identify a parameterization error in the model design that resulted in overestimation of the effect of anisotropy on horizontal hydraulic conductivity.

  17. Estimation of the pore pressure distribution from three dimensional groundwater flow model at mine sites in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sangsoo; Jang, Myounghwan; Kim, Gyoungman; Kim, Donghui; Kim, Daehoon; Baek, Hwanjo

    2016-04-01

    Mining activities continually change the groundwater flow and associated pore pressure distributions within the rockmass around the mine openings or the open-pit bench during the operational periods. As the pore pressure distributions may substantially affect the mechanical behaviour or stability of the rockmass, it is important to monitor the variation of pore pressure incurred by mining operation. The pore pressure distributions within the rockmass can be derived using a two- or three-dimensional finite element groundwater flow model, adopted to simulate the groundwater flow. While the groundwater inflow at mines has generally been dealt with respect to the working environment, detailed case studies on the distribution of pore water pressure related to the stability analysis of mine openings have been relatively rare in Korea. Recently, however, as the health and safety problems are emerged for sustainable mining practice, these issues are of the major concerns for the mining industries. This study aims to establish a three dimensional groundwater flow model to estimate the pore pressure distributions in order to employ as an input parameter for numerical codes such as the FLAC 3D. Also, the groundwater flow simulated can be used for de-watering design at a mine site. The MINEDW code, a groundwater flow model code specifically developed to simulate the complicated hydro-geologic conditions related to mining, has mainly been used in this study. Based on the data collected from field surveys and literature reviews, a conceptual model was established and sensitivity analysis was performed.

  18. The apparent groundwater age rejuvenation caused by the human activity in Jakarta area, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagabu, M.; Shimada, J.; Nakamura, T.; Delinom, R.; Taniguchi, M.

    2010-12-01

    The rapid urbanization in Jakarta area has become a serious subsurface environmental issues such as groundwater level decline and land subsidence due to excessive groundwater pumping. These problems began to emerge recently by some hydrological studies. The comparison of 14C activity between 1985 and 2008 shows the apparent groundwater age rejuvenation in the deep aquifer under the DKI Jakarta. We discussed by using a numerical groundwater flow model to evaluate the process of this rejuvenation in the urbanized area. Since the groundwater pumping was not performed intensely, the groundwater discharge flow toward the sea coast was dominant until 1983, however, this outward flux switched to intrusion flux into deeper aquifer after mid-1980s because of over-pumping in the urban area. The most largest flux among six flux directions toward the deep aquifer under the DKI Jakarta became “vertical downward flux” which means the shallower groundwater intrude into the deep one due to the excessive groundwater pumping from mid-1980s and this flux grows about 50% in 2000s. This result is consistent with the detection of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-12, which works as an indicator of young groundwater even in the deep groundwater. As the rejuvenation ratio “R” was determined by using 14C activity in the groundwater, R increase with the CFC-12 concentration and boths have good correlation. Besides, we estimated the “vertical downward flux” at each well's screen depth by the model estimation. The result shows that this flux has larger in the urban groundwater depression area and especially at shallower part of the deep aquifer, and it affects the magnitude of the shallow groundwater intrusion. Relationship between R and CFC-12 concentration. The diameter of cube shows the magnitude of the “vertical downward flux”

  19. Effects of aquifer heterogeneity on ground-water flow and chloride concentrations in the Upper Floridan aquifer near and within an active pumping well field, west-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tihansky, A.B.

    2005-01-01

    Formation and the Tampa/Suwannee Limestones, seismic-reflection data and photolinear analyses indicate that fractures and discontinuities in the Ocala Limestone are present within the southwestern part of the well field. It is possible that some fracture zones extend upward from the Avon Park Formation through the Ocala, Suwannee, and Tampa Limestones to land surface. These fractures may provide a more direct hydrologic connection between transmissive zones that are vertically separated by less permeable stratigraphic units. Ground water moves along permeable zones within the Upper Floridan aquifer in response to changes in head gradients as a result of pumping. Borehole geophysical measurements, including flow logs, specific conductance logs, and continuous monitoring of specific conductance at selected fixed depths, indicate that borehole specific conductance varies substantially with time and in response to pumping stresses. Ground-water mixing between hydrogeologic units likely occurs along highly transmissive zones and within boreholes of active production wells. Ground-water movement and water-quality changes were greatest along the most transmissive zones. Variable mixing of three water-type end members (freshwater, deepwater, and saltwater) occurs throughout the study area. Both deepwater and saltwater are likely sources for elevated chloride and sulfate concentrations in ground water. Mass-balance calculations of mixtures of the three end members indicate that deepwater is found throughout the aquifer units. Samples from wells within the southwestern part of the well field indicate that deepwater migrates into the shallow permeable units in the southwestern part of the well field. Deepwater contributes to elevated sulfate and chloride concentrations, which increase with depth and are elevated in wells less than 400 feet deep. The greatest increases in chloride concentrations over time are found in water from wells closest to the saltwater interface. Gro

  20. Flow partitioning in regional groundwater flow systems as a function of recharge and topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goderniaux, P.; Davy, P.; Bresciani, E.; De Dreuzy, J.; Le Borgne, T.

    2013-12-01

    The distribution of groundwater fluxes in aquifers is strongly influenced by topography, and organized between hillslope and regional scales. In this study, we use a finite-difference flow model to quantify the partitioning of recharge and compartmentalization of aquifers between shallow/local and deep/regional groundwater transfers. The flow structure is analyzed for a regional aquifers, as a function of recharge (from 20 to 500 mm/yr), in 3-dimensions, and accounting for variable groundwater discharge zones. The Probability Density Function of transit times shows two different parts, interpreted using a two-compartment model, related to regional and local groundwater flows. The role of recharge on the size and nature of the flow regimes, including groundwater pathways, transit time distributions, and volumes associated to the two compartments is investigated. Results show that topography control on the water table and groundwater compartmentalization varies with the recharge rate applied. The volume associated to the regional compartment is calculated from the exponential part of the two-compartment model, and is nearly insensitive to the total recharge fluctuations. The model also allows visualizing 3D circulations, as those provided by Tothian models in 2D, and shows local and regional transfers, with 3D effects. Results are presented for a specific basin (1400 km2) in Brittany (France). Preliminary results using different kinds of topography are presented and compared.

  1. New understanding of the complexity of groundwater flow in Chalk catchments of the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, D.; Shand, P.; Gooddy, D.; Abesser, C.; Bloomfield, J.; Mathias, S.; Butler, A.; Williams, A.; Binley, A.; Wheater, H.

    2006-12-01

    The Chalk is the largest aquifer in the UK accounting for more than half the groundwater used and nearly a quarter of the total public water supplied in England and Wales. Although the Chalk is a double porosity and permeability medium, transmission of water in the saturated zone depends largely on flow through fractures, the location and distribution of which are controlled by lithology and geological structure. These features operate on a number of spatial scales and so provide a range of flow pathways that can markedly affect both stream flow and water quality. In addition, overlying Palaeogene or superficial deposits can act as controls on recharge and zones of increased groundwater storage. As part of a major initiative on Lowland Catchment Research in the UK two Chalk sub-catchments, in the River Thames basin, the rivers Pang and Lambourn, have been the focus of an intensive set of studies. The catchments have been characterised using a multidisciplinary approach. This has resulted in an improved understanding of the way such catchments work and the mechanisms that control groundwater flow. The low fracture porosity gives rise to a low specific yield, which means that large fluctuations in water table elevation beneath the interfluves are not uncommon. Consequently, groundwater catchments differ from the topographic catchments and their size varies seasonally. This means, for example, that groundwater might be flowing to the River Pang in winter but to the River Thames in summer. It also means that various flow features in the catchment may be active at different locations and times during the year. Four flow systems have been identified, through a detailed analysis of the data; a shallow, but rapid flow system; a slower, deeper system; a very high velocity system developed in large diameter solution enhanced fractures and a system found in the river valley sediments. The interconnections between and within these systems can be poor and sometimes vary on a

  2. ShowFlow: A practical interface for groundwater modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Tauxe, J.D.

    1990-12-01

    ShowFlow was created to provide a user-friendly, intuitive environment for researchers and students who use computer modeling software. What traditionally has been a workplace available only to those familiar with command-line based computer systems is now within reach of almost anyone interested in the subject of modeling. In the case of this edition of ShowFlow, the user can easily experiment with simulations using the steady state gaussian plume groundwater pollutant transport model SSGPLUME, though ShowFlow can be rewritten to provide a similar interface for any computer model. Included in this thesis is all the source code for both the ShowFlow application for Microsoft{reg sign} Windows{trademark} and the SSGPLUME model, a User's Guide, and a Developer's Guide for converting ShowFlow to run other model programs. 18 refs., 13 figs.

  3. Basin wide Nitrate-Nitrogen pollution of groundwater, Miyakonojo, Japan, with the relation of the regional Groundwater flow system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikami, K.; Shimada, J.; Zikuzono, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Miyakonojo basin is well-known agriculture area in Southern Kyushu, Japan and highly depends on groundwater resources for their everyday use. Local unconfined groundwater aquifer is widely polluted by Nitrate-Nitrogen originated from agriculture. It will become serious problem if this unconfined Nitrate pollution enlarges into the confined aquifer system which is used for local city water source. However, the detailed groundwater flow system between unconfined and confined aquifer system has not been cleared yet. The detailed three dimensional groundwater flow system study has been done by using existing wells in a basin to understand the three dimensional distribution pattern of Nitrate-Nitrogen in the aquifer. The field sampling for unconfined, intermediate and confined groundwater was done in July, 2005 and February, 2006 for about 200 wells to analyze inorganic water chemistry, hydrogen / oxygen stable isotopes and tritium. For the unconfined groundwater, there exists clear difference for the groundwater flow pattern between the eastern and western basin, which is mostly affected by the surface topography. The unconfined groundwater flowed into the confined aquifer at the eastern part of a basin, while in the western part of a basin the unconfined groundwater on a plateau flowed into the confined aquifer somehow, but most part of the unconfined groundwater has been discharge out to small river valleys between plateaus. While for the confined groundwater, the topographic effect has been disappeared and basin scale groundwater flow from the basin margin toward the basin center is dominated. In the unconfined aquifer, basin wide distribution of Nitrate-Nitrogen content has been recognized and it is relatively higher in the western basin where the cattle farming are dominated. While in the confined aquifer, there are some high Nitrate-Nitrogen spots but do not have regional trend. It is considered that some part of the basin has not distributed the welded tuff

  4. Intercomparison of Groundwater Flow Monitoring Technologies at Site OU 1, Former Fort Ord, California

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, P F; Jantos, J; Pedler, W H; Mandell, W A

    2005-09-20

    This report presents an intercomparison of three groundwater flow monitoring technologies at a trichloroethylene (TCE) groundwater plume at Operational Unit 1 (OU 1) adjacent to the former Fritzsche Army Airfield at the former Fort Ord Army Base, located on Monterey Bay in northern Monterey County, California. Soil and groundwater at this site became contaminated by fuels and solvents that were burned on a portion of OU 1 called the Fire Drill Area (FDA) as part of firefighter training from 1962 and 1985. Cont Contamination is believed to be restricted to the unconfined A-aquifer, where water is reached at a depth of approximately 60 to 80 feet below the ground surface; the aquifer is from 15 to 20 feet in thickness, and is bounded below by a dense clay layer, the Salinas Valley Aquitard. Soil excavation and bioremediation were initiated at the site of fire training activities in the late 1980s. Since that time a pump-and-treat operation has been operated close to the original area of contamination, and this system has been largely successful at reducing groundwater contamination in this source area. However, a trichloroethylene (TCE) groundwater plume extends approximately 3000 ft (900 m) to the northwest away from the FDA. In this report, we have augmented flow monitoring equipment permanently installed in an earlier project (Oldenburg et al., 2002) with two additional flow monitoring devices that could be deployed in existing monitoring wells, in an effort to better understand their performance in a nearly ideal, homogeneous sand aquifer, that we expected would exhibit laminar groundwater flow owing to the site's relatively simple hydrogeology. The three flow monitoring tools were the Hydrotechnics{reg_sign} In In-Situ Permeable Flow Sensor (ISPFS), the RAS Integrated Subsurface Evaluation Hydrophysical Logging tool (HPL), and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Scanning Colloidal Borescope Flow Meter (SCBFM). All three devices produce groundwater flow

  5. Groundwater flow system and Nitrogen cycle in volcanic aquifer of pyroclastic flow uplands, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikami, K.; Shimada, J.; Tashiro, S.; Niimi, H.

    2007-12-01

    Study area is well-known agriculture area in Southern Kyushu, Japan and highly depends on groundwater resources for their everyday use. Local unconfined groundwater aquifer is widely polluted by Nitrate-Nitrogen originated from agriculture and cattle farming. It will become serious problem if this unconfined Nitrate pollution enlarges into the confined aquifer system which is used for local city water source. The detailed three dimensional groundwater flow system study has been done by using existing wells in the basin to understand the three dimensional distribution pattern of Nitrate-Nitrogen in the aquifer. However, the detailed groundwater age analysis by using Tritium for unconfined and confined groundwater has not been succeeded because of present low atmosphere tritium concentration. Thus we applied to challenge the CFCs dating method. Although the CFCs method has been widely used for dating the young groundwater instead of tritium in many countries, in Japan CFCs has been used only by Oceanographic study and has not been used in the field of Hydrology. The history and fate of Nitrate contamination have been shown in multidisciplinary local transect studies in areas with agricultural sources (Bohlke and Denver 1995). However, identification of Nitrogen sources can be difficult in larger regional studies because of co-occurrence of multiple anthropogenic Nitrogen sources and uncertainty in Nitrogen transformation pathways. Thus, the characterization of N geochemistry remains challenging, particularly in aquifer-scale assessments (Stephen 2006). In this study, the evidence of the shallow groundwater flowing towards deep aquifer was verified by the groundwater dating and the detailed Nitrogen reduction process was confirmed along the groundwater flow.

  6. Geochemical and Isotopic Interpretations of Groundwater Flow in the Oasis Valley Flow System, Southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Thomas; F.C. Benedict, Jr.; T.P. Rose; R.L. Hershey; J.B. Paces; Z.E. Peterman; I.M. Farnham; K.H. Johannesson; A.K. Singh; K.J. Stetzenbach; G.B. Hudson; J.M. Kenneally; G.F. Eaton; D.K. Smith

    2003-01-08

    This report summarizes the findings of a geochemical investigation of the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley groundwater flow system in southwestern Nevada. It is intended to provide geochemical data and interpretations in support of flow and contaminant transport modeling for the Western and Central Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Units.

  7. On the mechanism of earthquake induced groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley Ward, Nicholas F.

    2015-11-01

    The Canterbury/Christchurch earthquakes and aftershocks of 2010-2011 generated groundwater level responses throughout New Zealand. However, the greater part of damage was sustained by the city of Christchurch which is built on a layered sequence of artesian aquifers. In a previous paper we analysed the earthquake induced groundwater responses. We quantified groundwater responses by fitting a simple statistical model which differentiated between immediate earthquake induced response (spike) and post-seismic change (offset). The most notable feature of this analysis was the consistency of responses between the earthquakes: deeper wells correlate with negative offset and shallower wells correlate with positive offset. In that paper we argued that this is consistent with the upwards vertical movement of water. In this paper we focus on the physical mechanisms, and consider a model that further explains and supports this hypothesis. We postulate a groundwater flow model in which storativity and aquitard permeability are modelled as time-varying shocks. We analyse the solutions for a range of non-dimensional parameters and obtain type curves that exhibit the same behaviour as the observed responses. Finally we consider data from the 2010 Mw 7.1 Darfield (Canterbury) earthquake.

  8. Comparison of groundwater flow model particle tracking results and isotopic data in the Leon valley, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Garcia, G.; Cortes, A. S.; Martínez-Reyes, J.; Perez-Quezadas, J.; Grupo de Hidrologia Isotopica

    2013-05-01

    The study area is located in the Guanajuato state, north-west of Mexico City. The Leon Valley covers with groundwater its water demand estimated in about 20.6 m3/s. The constant population increase and related economic activities in the region have a steady growth in water needs. Related abstraction rate has produced an average drawdown of about 1.0 m/year in the last two decades. It suggests that present groundwater management needs to be reviewed. The groundwater management in the study area implies a possibility that abstraction will produce environmental impacts. This vital resource under stress becomes necessary to study its hydro-geologic functioning to achieve a scientific groundwater management in the valley. This investigation was based on the analysis and integration of existing information and the one generated in the field by the authors. Highlighted concepts were: i) the geologic structure of the area, ii) the hydraulic parameters and iii) the delta-deuterium and delta-oxigen-18 composition. This information was analysed integrally by means of applying a groundwater flow model (MODFLOW) and a particle-tracking model (FLOWPATH): the results were similar to flow paths and time-of travel interpretations derived from isotopic data.

  9. Update to the Ground-Water Withdrawals Database for the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System, Nevada and California, 1913-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moreo, Michael T.; Justet, Leigh

    2008-01-01

    Ground-water withdrawal estimates from 1913 through 2003 for the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system are compiled in an electronic database to support a regional, three-dimensional, transient ground-water flow model. This database updates a previously published database that compiled estimates of ground-water withdrawals for 1913-1998. The same methodology is used to construct each database. Primary differences between the 2 databases are an additional 5 years of ground-water withdrawal data, well locations in the updated database are restricted to Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model boundary, and application rates are from 0 to 1.5 feet per year lower than original estimates. The lower application rates result from revised estimates of crop consumptive use, which are based on updated estimates of potential evapotranspiration. In 2003, about 55,700 acre-feet of ground water was pumped in the DVRFS, of which 69 percent was used for irrigation, 13 percent for domestic, and 18 percent for public supply, commercial, and mining activities.

  10. Update to the Ground-Water Withdrawals Database for the Death Valley REgional Ground-Water Flow System, Nevada and California, 1913-2003

    SciTech Connect

    Michael T. Moreo; and Leigh Justet

    2008-07-02

    Ground-water withdrawal estimates from 1913 through 2003 for the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system are compiled in an electronic database to support a regional, three-dimensional, transient ground-water flow model. This database updates a previously published database that compiled estimates of ground-water withdrawals for 1913–1998. The same methodology is used to construct each database. Primary differences between the 2 databases are an additional 5 years of ground-water withdrawal data, well locations in the updated database are restricted to Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model boundary, and application rates are from 0 to 1.5 feet per year lower than original estimates. The lower application rates result from revised estimates of crop consumptive use, which are based on updated estimates of potential evapotranspiration. In 2003, about 55,700 acre-feet of ground water was pumped in the DVRFS, of which 69 percent was used for irrigation, 13 percent for domestic, and 18 percent for public supply, commercial, and mining activities.

  11. Groundwater Management Policies for Maintaining Stream Flow Given Variable Climatic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohll, G.; Carroll, R. W.; Brozovic, N.

    2012-12-01

    Groundwater is an important resource to agriculture throughout the semi-arid United States, where farmers often supplement surface water diversions with groundwater pumping. Understanding the complex exchange over space and time between rivers and aquifers is important in developing management alternatives that are capable of preserving stream flow for habitat and increasing water deliveries downstream while minimizing lost crop production. Previous integrated hydrologic-economic models have generally assumed superposition of the impacts of groundwater pumping on the hydrologic system for analytical tractability. Although this assumption may be reasonable for some surface water-groundwater systems, in many systems the behavior diverges considerably from the linear assumption. We present analyses using an integrated hydrologic-economic model of surface water-groundwater interaction with nonlinear dynamics, developed for the Mason Valley area in Nevada. The study area has active water conflict between upstream and downstream water users, where groundwater pumping has an important impact on streamflow. The model replicates the movement of water throughout the coupled river and aquifer of the Walker River system and is used to analyze hypothetical tradeoffs between increasing streamflow at the basin outlet and meeting crop water demands for irrigation. The model is run from 1997 to 2006 to capture wet and dry climatic conditions, including a four year drought period in which groundwater pumping accounts for more than 50% of the irrigated water budget. Three alternate groundwater management policies are analyzed to compare economic performance (resulting from reductions in crop area due to reduced groundwater pumping) and hydrologic impact (in terms of increased stream discharge at the basin outlet). First, uniform pumping quotas are the simplest policy to implement and are modeled here as equal reductions in groundwater pumping for each stakeholder at a lumped field

  12. Tide-induced fingering flow during submarine groundwater discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greskowiak, Janek

    2013-04-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) is a relevant component of the hydrological cycle (Moore, 2010). The discharge of fresh groundwater that originated from precipitation on the land typically occurs at the near shore scale (~ 10m-100m) and the embayment scale (~ 100m - 10km) (Bratton, 2010). In the recent years a number of studies revealed that tidal forcing has an important effect on the fresh SGD pattern in the beach zone, i.e., it leads to the formation of an upper saline recirculation cell and a lower "freshwater discharge tube" (Boufadel, 2000, Robinson et al., 2007; Kuan et al., 2012). Thereby the discharge of the fresh groundwater occurs near the low-tide mark. The shape and extent of the upper saline recirculation cell is mainly defined by the tidal amplitude, beach slope, fresh groundwater discharge rate and hydraulic conductivity (Robinson et al., 2007). In spite of fact that in this case sea water overlies less denser freshwater, all previous modeling studies suggested that the saline recirculation cell and the freshwater tube are rather stable. However, new numerical investigations indicate that there maybe realistic cases where the upper saline recirculation cell becomes unstable as a result of the density contrast to the underlying freshwater tube. In these cases salt water fingers develop and move downward, thereby penetrating the freshwater tube. To the author's knowledge, the present study is the first that illustrate the possibility of density induced fingering flow during near shore SGD. A total of 240 high resolution simulations with the density dependent groundwater modelling software SEAWAT-2000 (Langevin et al., 2007) has been carried out to identify the conditions under which salt water fingering starts to occur. The simulations are based on the field-scale model setup employed in Robinson et al. (2007). The simulation results indicate that a very flat beach slope of less than 1:35, a hydraulic conductivity of 10 m/d and already a tidal

  13. Deterministic modelling of the cumulative impacts of underground structures on urban groundwater flow and the definition of a potential state of urban groundwater flow: example of Lyon, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attard, Guillaume; Rossier, Yvan; Winiarski, Thierry; Cuvillier, Loann; Eisenlohr, Laurent

    2016-02-01

    Underground structures have been shown to have a great influence on subsoil resources in urban aquifers. A methodology to assess the actual and the potential state of the groundwater flow in an urban area is proposed. The study develops a three-dimensional modeling approach to understand the cumulative impacts of underground infrastructures on urban groundwater flow, using a case in the city of Lyon (France). All known underground structures were integrated in the numerical model. Several simulations were run: the actual state of groundwater flow, the potential state of groundwater flow (without underground structures), an intermediate state (without impervious structures), and a transient simulation of the actual state of groundwater flow. The results show that underground structures fragment groundwater flow systems leading to a modification of the aquifer regime. For the case studied, the flow systems are shown to be stable over time with a transient simulation. Structures with drainage systems are shown to have a major impact on flow systems. The barrier effect of impervious structures was negligible because of the small hydraulic gradient of the area. The study demonstrates that the definition of a potential urban groundwater flow and the depiction of urban flow systems, which involves understanding the impact of underground structures, are important issues with respect to urban underground planning.

  14. Deterministic modelling of the cumulative impacts of underground structures on urban groundwater flow and the definition of a potential state of urban groundwater flow: example of Lyon, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attard, Guillaume; Rossier, Yvan; Winiarski, Thierry; Cuvillier, Loann; Eisenlohr, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    Underground structures have been shown to have a great influence on subsoil resources in urban aquifers. A methodology to assess the actual and the potential state of the groundwater flow in an urban area is proposed. The study develops a three-dimensional modeling approach to understand the cumulative impacts of underground infrastructures on urban groundwater flow, using a case in the city of Lyon (France). All known underground structures were integrated in the numerical model. Several simulations were run: the actual state of groundwater flow, the potential state of groundwater flow (without underground structures), an intermediate state (without impervious structures), and a transient simulation of the actual state of groundwater flow. The results show that underground structures fragment groundwater flow systems leading to a modification of the aquifer regime. For the case studied, the flow systems are shown to be stable over time with a transient simulation. Structures with drainage systems are shown to have a major impact on flow systems. The barrier effect of impervious structures was negligible because of the small hydraulic gradient of the area. The study demonstrates that the definition of a potential urban groundwater flow and the depiction of urban flow systems, which involves understanding the impact of underground structures, are important issues with respect to urban underground planning.

  15. Thermal effects of groundwater flow through subarctic fens: A case study based on field observations and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöberg, Ylva; Coon, Ethan; Sannel, A. Britta K.; Pannetier, Romain; Harp, Dylan; Frampton, Andrew; Painter, Scott L.; Lyon, Steve W.

    2016-03-01

    Modeling and observation of ground temperature dynamics are the main tools for understanding current permafrost thermal regimes and projecting future thaw. Until recently, most studies on permafrost have focused on vertical ground heat fluxes. Groundwater can transport heat in both lateral and vertical directions but its influence on ground temperatures at local scales in permafrost environments is not well understood. In this study we combine field observations from a subarctic fen in the sporadic permafrost zone with numerical simulations of coupled water and thermal fluxes. At the Tavvavuoma study site in northern Sweden, ground temperature profiles and groundwater levels were observed in boreholes. These observations were used to set up one- and two-dimensional simulations down to 2 m depth across a gradient of permafrost conditions within and surrounding the fen. Two-dimensional scenarios representing the fen under various hydraulic gradients were developed to quantify the influence of groundwater flow on ground temperature. Our observations suggest that lateral groundwater flow significantly affects ground temperatures. This is corroborated by modeling results that show seasonal ground ice melts 1 month earlier when a lateral groundwater flux is present. Further, although the thermal regime may be dominated by vertically conducted heat fluxes during most of the year, isolated high groundwater flow rate events such as the spring freshet are potentially important for ground temperatures. As sporadic permafrost environments often contain substantial portions of unfrozen ground with active groundwater flow paths, knowledge of this heat transport mechanism is important for understanding permafrost dynamics in these environments.

  16. Evaluation of groundwater flow patterns around a dual-screened groundwater circulation well.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Richard L; Simon, Michelle A

    2007-08-15

    Dual-screened groundwater circulation wells (GCWs) can be used to remove contaminant mass and to mix reagents in situ. GCWs are so named because they force water in a circular pattern between injection and extraction screens. The radial extent, flux and direction of the effective flow of this circulation cell are difficult to measure or predict. The objective of this study is to develop a robust protocol for assessing GCW performance. To accomplish this, groundwater flow patterns surrounding a GCW are assessed using a suite of tools and data, including: hydraulic head, in situ flow velocity, measured hydraulic conductivity data from core samples, chemical tracer tests, contaminant distribution data, and numerical flow and transport models. The hydraulic head data show patterns that are consistent with pumping on a dual-screened well, however, many of the observed changes are smaller than expected. In situ thermal perturbation flow sensors successfully measured horizontal flow, but vertical flow could not be determined with sufficient accuracy to be useful in mapping flow patterns. Two types of chemical tracer tests were utilized at the site and showed that much of the flow occurs within a few meters of the GCW. Flow patterns were also assessed based on changes in contaminant (trichloroethylene, TCE) concentrations over time. The TCE data clearly showed treated water moving away from the GCW at shallow and intermediate depths, but the circulation of that water back to the well, except very close to the well, was less clear. Detailed vertical and horizontal hydraulic conductivities were measured on 0.3 m-long sections from a continuous core from the GCW installation borehole. The measured vertical and horizontal hydraulic conductivity data were used to construct numerical flow and transport models, the results of which were compared to the head, velocity and concentration data. Taken together, the field data and modeling present a fairly consistent picture of flow

  17. Spatial geochemical and isotopic characteristics associated with groundwater flow in the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianyao; Tang, Changyuan; Sakura, Yasuo; Kondoh, Akihiko; Yu, Jingjie; Shimada, Jun; Tanaka, Tadashi

    2004-11-01

    The North China Plain (NCP) is an important agricultural area in China and has a high population density. Serious water shortages have occurred in this region over the last 20 years. Water transfer from the Yangtze River (the east route) was initiated in the year 2002 to provide water for the major cities of the NCP. This study was carried out before the implementation of the water transfer project, focusing on the spatial integration of the groundwater flow system and geochemical characteristics, which are mainly controlled by tectonics, geomorphology, and lithology. The field survey and the geochemical analyses of the groundwater samples indicated that the groundwater in the NCP has a two-layer structure, with a boundary at a depth of about 100-150 m. The two layers differ in pH, concentrations of SiO2 and major ions, and isotopes (18O, deuterium and tritium (T)). Chemical components in the upper layer showed a wider range and higher variability than those in the lower layer, indicating the impact of human activity. The flow direction of the groundwater in the upper layer was examined in detail in two profiles, showing that the upper layer flows east towards the Cangzhou-Daming fault, while the groundwater in the lower layer flows northeast towards Tianjin. Three hydrogeological zones are identified: recharge (Zone I), intermediate (Zone II), and discharge (Zone III). The recharge zone was found to be low in chloride (Cl-) but high in T. The discharge zone was found to be high in Cl- and low in T. This may be due to the difference in groundwater age. The discharge zone was subdivided into two sub-zones, Zone III1 and Zone III2, by considering the effects of human activities. Zone III2 was strongly affected by water diversions from the Yellow River. As groundwater flows from the recharge zone to the intermediate and discharge zones, chemical patterns evolve in the order: Ca-HCO3 > Mg-HCO3 > Na-Cl + SO4.

  18. Groundwater flow and potential effects on evaporite dissolution in the Paradox Basin, SE Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitman, N.; Ge, S.; Mueller, K. J.

    2012-12-01

    A hydrogeologic study was conducted in the portion of the Paradox Basin south of the Needles District of Canyonlands National Park, Utah. Geology of the study area comprises fractured and faulted Paleozoic sandstone, limestone, and shale, which are underlain by evaporite cycles of the Paradox Formation. The evaporite deposits deform and dissolve when they come in contact with groundwater, generating land subsidence, saline groundwater, and salt input to the Colorado River. Active faults in the region slip at a rate of approximately 2 mm/year, likely due to evaporite dissolution. The objective of this study is to better understand groundwater flow and solute transport dynamics and to help determine the rate and timing of subsurface salt dissolution, which is an important control on the salt tectonics in the region. Study methods include hydrologic fieldwork, laboratory tests, and numerical modeling. No groundwater wells exist in the study area. Water samples from springs and seeps were collected throughout the study area. Analysis of total dissolved solids (TDS), stable oxygen (δ18O) and deuterium (δD) isotopes, spring and seep locations, and prior data are used to gain a preliminary understanding of the shallow groundwater flow in the region. Stable isotope ratios of oxygen (18O/16O) and deuterium (D/H) are used to constrain the source of spring water. Measured δ values are compared to predicted δ values for precipitation from WaterIsotopes.org for each sample site. Measured isotopic values range from -14.9 ‰ to -10.7 ‰ for δ18O and -108 ‰ to -78 ‰ for δD. The majority of samples from above 2000 m match predicted isotopic values for precipitation. Most samples taken below 2000 m are lighter than predicted isotopic values for precipitation. The TDS of spring samples measured in the lab show they range from 184 mg/L to 1552 mg/L with the majority of samples between 220 - 430 mg/L. TDS shows a weak correlation (R2 = 0.54) with altitude, where lower TDS

  19. Groundwater: Illinois' Buried Treasure. Education Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Education Association of Illinois, Chicago.

    Groundwater is an extremely valuable resource that many feel has been too long neglected and taken for granted. There is growing recognition in Illinois and throughout the United States that comprehensive groundwater protection measures are vital. Illinois embarked on a course in protecting groundwater resources with the passage of the Illinois…

  20. Groundwater Parameters and Flow Systems Near Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, G.K.

    1989-01-01

    Precipitation near Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) averages 132 cm/yr. About 76 cm/yr of water is consumed by evapotranspiration. The natural streamflow, which averages 56 cm/yr of water, consists of overland flow (about 21 cm/yr) from water bodies, wetlands, and impervious areas of groundwater discharge (about 35 cm/yr of water). Groundwater occurs in a stormflow zone that extends from the land surface to a depth of 0.3-2 m and in shallow and deeper aquifers that extend from the water table to the base of fresh water. in the stormflow zone, most water flows through macropores and mesopores, which have a volumetric porosity of about 0.002. In the vadose zone and below the water table, water flows through fractures that have a volumetric porosity in the range 1 x 10{sup -5} to 0.02. Water inflow occurs by precipitation and infiltration. infiltration that exceeds the soil water deficit forms a perched water table in the stormflow zone at the level where infiltration rate exceeds vertical hydraulic conductivity. Some water percolates down to the water table but the majority flows downslope to the streams. Recharge of the shallow aquifer is only about 3.2 cm/yr of water or 5.7% of streamflow. Most of the water that recharges the shallow aquifer is discharged by evapotranspiration above the water table. The remainder is discharged at springs and streams where the water table is within the stormflow zone. Digital models that permit unsaturated conditions and transient flows may be more appropriate than steady-state models of saturated flow for the ORNL area.

  1. Numerical modeling of groundwater flow in the coastal aquifer system of Taranto (southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Filippis, Giovanna; Giudici, Mauro; Negri, Sergio; Margiotta, Stefano; Cattaneo, Laura; Vassena, Chiara

    2014-05-01

    The Mediterranean region is characterized by a strong development of coastal areas with a high concentration of water-demanding human activities, resulting in weakly controlled withdrawals of groundwater which accentuate the saltwater intrusion phenomenon. The worsening of groundwater quality is a huge problem especially for those regions, like Salento (southern Italy), where a karst aquifer system represents the most important water resource because of the deficiency of a well developed superficial water supply. In this frame, the first 2D numerical model describing the groundwater flow in the karst aquifer of Salento peninsula was developed by Giudici et al. [1] at the regional scale and then improved by De Filippis et al. [2]. In particular, the estimate of the saturated thickness of the deep aquifer highlighted that the Taranto area is particularly sensitive to the phenomenon of seawater intrusion, both for the specific hydrostratigraphic configuration and for the presence of highly water-demanding industrial activities. These remarks motivate a research project which is part of the research program RITMARE (The Italian Research for the Sea), within which a subprogram is specifically dedicated to the problem of the protection and preservation of groundwater quality in Italian coastal aquifers and in particular, among the others, in the Taranto area. In this context, the CINFAI operative unit aims at providing a contribution to the characterization of groundwater in the study area. The specific objectives are: a. the reconstruction of the groundwater dynamic (i.e., the preliminary identification of a conceptual model for the aquifer system and the subsequent modeling of groundwater flow in a multilayered system which is very complex from the hydrostratigraphical point of view); b. the characterization of groundwater outflows through submarine and subaerial springs and the water exchanges with the shallow coastal water bodies (e.g. Mar Piccolo) and the off

  2. Groundwater Flow Model of the General Separations Area Using PORFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    FLACH, GREGORY

    2004-07-15

    The E Area PA (McDowell-Boyer et al. 2000) includes a steady-state simulation of groundwater flow in the General Separations Area as a prerequisite for saturated zone contaminant transport analyses. The groundwater flow simulations are based on the FACT code (Hamm and Aleman2000). The FACT-based GSA model was selected during preparation of the original PA to take advantage of an existing model developed for environmental restoration applications at the SRS (Flach and Harris 1997, 1999; Flach 1999). The existing GSA/FACT model was then slightly modified for PA use, as described in the PA document. FACT is a finite-element code utilizing deformed brick elements. Material properties are defined at element centers, and state variables such as hydraulic head are located at element vertices. The PORFLOW code (Analytic and Computational Research, Inc. 2000) was selected for performing saturated zone transport simulations of source zone radionuclides and their progeny. PORFLOW utilizes control volume discretization and the nodal point integration method, with all properties and state variables being defined at the center of an interior grid cell. The groundwater flow calculation includes translating the Darcy velocity field computed by FACT into a form compatible for input to PORFLOW. The FACT velocity field is defined at element vertices, whereas PORFLOW requires flux across cell faces. For the present PA, PORFLOW cell face flux is computed in a two-step process. An initial face flux is computed from FACT as an average of the normal components of Darcy velocity at the four corners. The derived flux field approximately conserves mass, but not rigorously. Thus, the flux field is subsequently perturbed to force rigorous mass conservation on a cell-by-cell basis. The undocumented process used is non-unique and can introduce significant artifacts into the final flux field.

  3. Extracellular enzyme activities and nutrient availability during artificial groundwater recharge.

    PubMed

    Kolehmainen, Reija E; Korpela, Jaana P; Münster, Uwe; Puhakka, Jaakko A; Tuovinen, Olli H

    2009-02-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) removal is the main objective of artificial groundwater recharge (AGR) for drinking water production and biodegradation plays a substantial role in this process. This study focused on the biodegradation of NOM and nutrient availability for microorganisms in AGR by the determination of extracellular enzyme activities (EEAs) and nutrient concentrations along a flow path in an AGR aquifer (Tuusula Water Works, Finland). Natural groundwater in the same area but outside the influence of recharge was used as a reference. Determination of the specific alpha-d-glucosidase (alpha-Glu), beta-d-glucosidase (beta-Glu), phosphomonoesterase (PME), leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) and acetate esterase (AEST) activities by fluorogenic model substrates revealed major increases in the enzymatic hydrolysis rates in the aquifer within a 10m distance from the basin. The changes in the EEAs along the flow path occurred simultaneously with decreases in nutrient concentrations. The results support the assumption that the synthesis of extracellular enzymes in aquatic environments is up and down regulated by nutrient availability. The EEAs in the basin sediment and pore water samples (down to 10cm) were in the same order of magnitude as in the basin water, suggesting similar nutritional conditions. Phosphorus was likely to be the limiting nutrient at this particular AGR site. Furthermore, the extracellular enzymes functioned in a synergistic and cooperative way. PMID:19028394

  4. Effects of Hysteresis on Groundwater Recharge From Ephemeral Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parissopoulos, G. A.; Wheater, H. S.

    1992-11-01

    The effects of hysteresis on the movement of the saturated and unsaturated soil water phase due to infiltration from ephemeral surface water flows are investigated for different scenarios of flood events in homogeneous and heterogeneous media with the use of a two-dimensional model based on Richards' equation and the dependent domain hysteresis model of Mualem (1984). Hysteresis effects were found in general to be small, but sensitive to water ponding depth, hydraulic contact between surface and groundwater and initial moisture distribution. In all cases tested, hysteresis resulted in higher rise of the toe of the water mound formed beneath the wadi despite a decrease of cumulative infiltration.

  5. Sources and flow of north Canterbury plains groundwater, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, C. B.; Wilson, D. D.; Brown, L. J.; Stewart, M. K.; Burden, R. J.; Brailsford, G. W.

    1989-04-01

    Geological, hydrological, isotope (tritium and 18O) and chemical (mainly nitrate and chloride concentrations) evidence is interpreted to give a mutually consistent picture of the recharge sources and flow patterns of the important groundwater resource in the deep glacial and interglacial deposits of the sector of the Canterbury Plains between the Selwyn River and Ashley River. Particular attention is paid to the confined gravel aquifers which presently provide about 300,000 m 3 daily of mainly very high-quality water for the needs of Christchurch city. The study period for tritium measurements extends over 27 years, encompassing the peak and decline of thermonuclear tritium fallout in this region. Major rivers emerging from the hill and mountain catchments to the west of the Plains are depleted in 18O relative to average low-level precipitation. Most of the groundwater is river-recharged, but some areas of significant local precipitation recharge contribution are clearly identified by 18O and chemical concentrations. The pressure distribution, tritium and chemical data reveal that the artesian ground-water underlying Christchurch ascends from deeper aquifers into the shallowest aquifer via gaps in the confining layers; much of this flow is induced by withdrawal, and the data reveal nothing about possible offshore discharge through the seaward extension of the shallowest aquifer, which is known to outcrop 40 km beyond the coast. The Christchurch aquifers are recharged by infiltration from Waimakariri River in its central Plains reaches, and the resulting flow regime is east- and southeast-directed; satisfactory water quality of the deeper Christchurch aquifers appears to be guaranteed for the future provided the river can be maintained in its present condition. Shallow groundwater, and water recharged to depth by other rivers, irrigation and local precipitation on the unconfined western areas of the Plains, are more susceptible to agricultural and other pollutants

  6. Hydrogeochemical Indicators of Groundwater Flow Systems in the Yangwu River Alluvial Fan, Xinzhou Basin, Shanxi, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dongmei; Liang, Xing; Jin, Menggui; Currell, Matthew J.; Han, Ying; Song, Xianfang

    2009-08-01

    Based on analysis of groundwater hydrochemical and isotopic indicators, this article aims to identify the groundwater flow systems in the Yangwu River alluvial fan, in the Xinzhou Basin, China. Groundwater δ2H and δ18O values indicate that the origin of groundwater is mainly from precipitation, with local evaporative influence. d-excess values lower than 10% in most groundwaters suggest a cold climate during recharge in the area. Major ion chemistry, including rCa/rMg and rNa/rCl ratios, show that groundwater salinization is probably dominated by water-rock interaction (e.g., silicate mineral weathering, dissolution of calcite and dolomite and cation exchange) in the Yangwu River alluvial fan, and locally by intensive evapotranspiration in the Hutuo River valley. Cl and Sr concentrations follow an increasing trend in shallow groundwater affected by evaporation, and a decreasing trend in deep groundwater. 87Sr/86Sr ratios reflect the variety of lithologies encountered during throughflow. The groundwater flow systems (GFS) of the Yangwu River alluvial fan include local and intermediate flow systems. Hydrogeochemical modeling results, simulated using PHREEQC, reveal water-rock interaction processes along different flow paths. This modeling method is more effective for characterizing flow paths in the intermediate system than in the local system. Artificial exploitation on groundwater in the alluvial fan enhances mixing between different groundwater flow systems.

  7. Hydrogeochemical indicators of groundwater flow systems in the Yangwu River alluvial fan, Xinzhou Basin, Shanxi, China.

    PubMed

    Han, Dongmei; Liang, Xing; Jin, Menggui; Currell, Matthew J; Han, Ying; Song, Xianfang

    2009-08-01

    Based on analysis of groundwater hydrochemical and isotopic indicators, this article aims to identify the groundwater flow systems in the Yangwu River alluvial fan, in the Xinzhou Basin, China. Groundwater delta(2)H and delta(18)O values indicate that the origin of groundwater is mainly from precipitation, with local evaporative influence. d-excess values lower than 10% in most groundwaters suggest a cold climate during recharge in the area. Major ion chemistry, including rCa/rMg and rNa/rCl ratios, show that groundwater salinization is probably dominated by water-rock interaction (e.g., silicate mineral weathering, dissolution of calcite and dolomite and cation exchange) in the Yangwu River alluvial fan, and locally by intensive evapotranspiration in the Hutuo River valley. Cl and Sr concentrations follow an increasing trend in shallow groundwater affected by evaporation, and a decreasing trend in deep groundwater. (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios reflect the variety of lithologies encountered during throughflow. The groundwater flow systems (GFS) of the Yangwu River alluvial fan include local and intermediate flow systems. Hydrogeochemical modeling results, simulated using PHREEQC, reveal water-rock interaction processes along different flow paths. This modeling method is more effective for characterizing flow paths in the intermediate system than in the local system. Artificial exploitation on groundwater in the alluvial fan enhances mixing between different groundwater flow systems. PMID:19548025

  8. Is there a geomorphic expression of interbasin groundwater flow in watersheds? Interactions between interbasin groundwater flow, springs, streams, and geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisbee, Marty D.; Tysor, Elizabeth H.; Stewart-Maddox, Noah S.; Tsinnajinnie, Lani M.; Wilson, John L.; Granger, Darryl E.; Newman, Brent D.

    2016-02-01

    Interbasin groundwater flow (IGF) can play a significant role in the generation and geochemical evolution of streamflow. However, it is exceedingly difficult to identify IGF and to determine the location and quantity of water that is exchanged between watersheds. How does IGF affect landscape/watershed geomorphic evolution? Can geomorphic metrics be used to identify the presence of IGF? We examine these questions in two adjacent sedimentary watersheds in northern New Mexico using a combination of geomorphic/landscape metrics, springflow residence times, and spatial geochemical patterns. IGF is expressed geomorphically in the landscape placement of springs and flow direction and shape of stream channels. Springs emerge preferentially on one side of stream valleys where landscape incision has intercepted IGF flow paths. Stream channels grow toward the IGF source and show little bifurcation. In addition, radiocarbon residence times of springs decrease and the geochemical composition of springs changes as the connection to IGF is lost.

  9. Mechanism and rate of denitrification in an agricultural watershed: Electron and mass balance along groundwater flow paths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tesoriero, A.J.; Liebscher, H.; Cox, S.E.

    2000-01-01

    The rate and mechanism of nitrate removal along and between groundwater flow paths were investigated using a series of well nests screened in an unconfined sand and gravel aquifer. Intensive agricultural activity in this area has resulted in nitrate concentrations in groundwater often exceeding drinking water standards. Both the extent and rate of denitrification varied depending on the groundwater flow path. While little or no denitrification occurred in much of the upland portions of the aquifer, a gradual redox gradient is observed as aerobic upland groundwater moves deeper in the aquifer. In contrast, a sharp shallow redox gradient is observed adjacent to a third-order stream as aerobic groundwater enters reduced sediments. An essentially complete loss of nitrate concurrent with increases in excess N2 provide evidence that denitrification occurs as groundwater enters this zone. Electron and mass balance calculations suggest that iron sulfide (e.g., pyrite) oxidation is the primary source of electrons for denitrification. Denitrification rate estimates were based on mass balance calculations using nitrate and excess N2 coupled with groundwater travel times. Travel times were determined using a groundwater flow model and were constrained by chlorofluorocarbon-based age dates. Denitrification rates were found to vary considerably between the two areas where denitrification occurs. Denitrification rates in the deep, upland portions of the aquifer were found to range from < 0.01 to 0.14 mM of N per year; rates at the redoxcline along the shallow flow path range from 1.0 to 2.7 mM of N per year. Potential denitrification rates in groundwater adjacent to the stream may be much faster, with rates up to 140 mM per year based on an in situ experiment conducted in this zone.The rate and mechanism of nitrate removal along and between groundwater flow paths were investigated using a series of well nests screened in an unconfined sand and gravel aquifer. Intensive

  10. A General Solution for Groundwater Flow in Estuarine Leaky Aquifer System with Considering Aquifer Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Chia; Chuang, Mo-Hsiung; Tan, Yih-Chi

    2014-05-01

    In recent years the urban and industrial developments near the coastal area are rapid and therefore the associated population grows dramatically. More and more water demand for human activities, agriculture irrigation, and aquaculture relies on heavy pumping in coastal area. The decline of groundwater table may result in the problems of seawater intrusion and/or land subsidence. Since the 1950s, numerous studies focused on the effect of tidal fluctuation on the groundwater flow in the coastal area. Many studies concentrated on the developments of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) analytical solutions describing the tide-induced head fluctuations. For example, Jacob (1950) derived an analytical solution of 1D groundwater flow in a confined aquifer with a boundary condition subject to sinusoidal oscillation. Jiao and Tang (1999) derived a 1D analytical solution of a leaky confined aquifer by considered a constant groundwater head in the overlying unconfined aquifer. Jeng et al. (2002) studied the tidal propagation in a coupled unconfined and confined costal aquifer system. Sun (1997) presented a 2D solution for groundwater response to tidal loading in an estuary. Tang and Jiao (2001) derived a 2D analytical solution in a leaky confined aquifer system near open tidal water. This study aims at developing a general analytical solution describing the head fluctuations in a 2D estuarine aquifer system consisted of an unconfined aquifer, a confined aquifer, and an aquitard between them. Both the confined and unconfined aquifers are considered to be anisotropic. The predicted head fluctuations from this solution will compare with the simulation results from the MODFLOW program. In addition, the solutions mentioned above will be shown to be special cases of the present solution. Some hypothetical cases regarding the head fluctuation in costal aquifers will be made to investigate the dynamic effects of water table fluctuation, hydrogeological conditions, and

  11. Groundwater Budget Analysis of Cross Formational Flow: Hueco Bolson (Texas and Chihuahua)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, W. R.

    2005-12-01

    Groundwater from the Hueco Bolson supplies the majority of municipal water in El Paso, Texas and Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, the largest international border community in the world. For over 100 years, water managers and researchers have been developing an understanding of Hueco Bolson groundwater occurrence and movement, and the interaction between surface water and groundwater. Since 2001, isotopic studies of groundwater chemistry on both sides of the border have provided valuable insights into the occurrence of groundwater and its historic movement. Numerical groundwater flow models of the area have been developed and used since the 1970s. The results of the most recent model were used to develop a detailed analysis of the groundwater inflows, outflows and storage change of the entire area and subregions of the model domain from 1903 to 2002. These detailed groundwater budgets were used to quantify temporal and spatial flow changes that resulted from groundwater pumping: induced inflow of surface water, decreased natural outflows, and storage declines. In addition, the detailed groundwater budgets were used to quantify the changes in cross formational flow between the Rio Grande Alluvium and the Hueco Bolson, as well as the changes in vertical flow within the Hueco Bolson. The groundwater budget results are consistent with the results of the isotopic analyses, providing a much needed confirmation of the overall conceptual model of the numerical model. In addition, the groundwater budgets have provided information that has been useful in further interpreting the results of the isotopic analyses.

  12. Influence of vertical flows in wells on groundwater sampling.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Lindsay A; Rivett, Michael O; Tellam, John H; Dumble, Peter; Sharp, Helen

    2014-11-15

    Pumped groundwater sampling evaluations often assume that horizontal head gradients predominate and the sample comprises an average of water quality variation over the well screen interval weighted towards contributing zones of higher hydraulic conductivity (a permeability-weighted sample). However, the pumping rate used during sampling may not always be sufficient to overcome vertical flows in wells driven by ambient vertical head gradients. Such flows are reported in wells with screens between 3 and 10m in length where lower pumping rates are more likely to be used during sampling. Here, numerical flow and particle transport modeling is used to provide insight into the origin of samples under ambient vertical head gradients and under a range of pumping rates. When vertical gradients are present, sample provenance is sensitive to pump intake position, pumping rate and pumping duration. The sample may not be drawn from the whole screen interval even with extended pumping times. Sample bias is present even when the ambient vertical flow in the wellbore is less than the pumping rate. Knowledge of the maximum ambient vertical flow in the well does, however, allow estimation of the pumping rate that will yield a permeability-weighted sample. This rate may be much greater than that recommended for low-flow sampling. In practice at monitored sites, the sampling bias introduced by ambient vertical flows in wells may often be unrecognized or underestimated when drawing conclusions from sampling results. It follows that care should be taken in the interpretation of sampling data if supporting flow investigations have not been undertaken. PMID:24999176

  13. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VI - Groundwater Flow Model Documentation Package

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    Volume VI of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the groundwater flow model data. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  14. Groundwater Recharge and Flow Processes in Taihang Mountains, a Semi-humid Region, North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Koichi; Tsujimura, Maki; Song, Xianfang; Zhang, Jie

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater flow/recharge variations in time and space are crucial for effective water management especially in semi-arid and semi-humid regions. In order to reveal comprehensive groundwater flow/recharge processes in a catchment with a large topographical relief and seasonal hydrological variations, intensive field surveys were undertaken at 4 times in different seasons (June 2011, August 2012, November 2012, February 2014) in the Wangkuai watershed, Taihang mountains, which is a main groundwater recharge area of the North China Plain. The groundwater, spring, stream water and reservoir water were taken, and inorganic solute constituents and stable isotopes of oxygen-18 and deuterium were determined on all water samples. Also, the stream flow rate and the depth of groundwater table were observed. The stable isotopic compositions and inorganic solute constituents in the groundwater are depleted and shown similar values as those of the surface water at the mountain-plain transitional area. Additionally, the groundwater in the vicinity of the Wangkuai Reservoir presents clearly higher stable isotopic compositions and lower d-excess than those of the stream water, indicating the groundwater around the reservoir is affected by evaporation same as the Wangkuai Reservoir itself. Hence, the surface water in the mountain-plain transitional area and Wangkuai Reservoir are principal groundwater recharge sources. An inversion analysis and simple mixing model were applied in the Wangkuai watershed using stable isotopes of oxygen-18 and deuterium to construct a groundwater flow model. The model shows that multi-originated groundwater flows from upstream to downstream along topography with certain mixing. In addition, the groundwater recharge occurs dominantly at the altitude from 421 m to 953 m, and the groundwater recharge rate by the Wangkuai Reservoir is estimated to be 2.4 % of the total groundwater recharge in the Wangkuai watershed. Therefore, the stream water and

  15. Topographically driven groundwater flow and the San Andreas heat flow paradox revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saffer, D.M.; Bekins, B.A.; Hickman, S.

    2003-01-01

    Evidence for a weak San Andreas Fault includes (1) borehole heat flow measurements that show no evidence for a frictionally generated heat flow anomaly and (2) the inferred orientation of ??1 nearly perpendicular to the fault trace. Interpretations of the stress orientation data remain controversial, at least in close proximity to the fault, leading some researchers to hypothesize that the San Andreas Fault is, in fact, strong and that its thermal signature may be removed or redistributed by topographically driven groundwater flow in areas of rugged topography, such as typify the San Andreas Fault system. To evaluate this scenario, we use a steady state, two-dimensional model of coupled heat and fluid flow within cross sections oriented perpendicular to the fault and to the primary regional topography. Our results show that existing heat flow data near Parkfield, California, do not readily discriminate between the expected thermal signature of a strong fault and that of a weak fault. In contrast, for a wide range of groundwater flow scenarios in the Mojave Desert, models that include frictional heat generation along a strong fault are inconsistent with existing heat flow data, suggesting that the San Andreas Fault at this location is indeed weak. In both areas, comparison of modeling results and heat flow data suggest that advective redistribution of heat is minimal. The robust results for the Mojave region demonstrate that topographically driven groundwater flow, at least in two dimensions, is inadequate to obscure the frictionally generated heat flow anomaly from a strong fault. However, our results do not preclude the possibility of transient advective heat transport associated with earthquakes.

  16. Hydraulic-property estimates for use with a transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect

    W.R. Belcher; P.E. Elliott; A.L. Geldon

    2001-12-31

    The Death Valley regional ground-water flow system encompasses an area of about 43,500 square kilometers in southeastern California and southern Nevada. The study area is underlain by Quaternary to Tertiary basin-fill sediments and mafic-lava flows; Tertiary volcanic, volcaniclastic, and sedimentary rocks; Tertiary to Jurassic granitic rocks; Triassic to Middle Proterozoic carbonate and clastic sedimentary rocks; and Early Proterozoic igneous and metamorphic rocks. The rock assemblage in the Death Valley region is extensively faulted as a result of several episodes of tectonic activity. This study is comprised of published and unpublished estimates of transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, storage coefficient, and anisotropy ratios for hydrogeologic units within the Death Valley region study area. Hydrogeologic units previously proposed for the Death Valley regional transient ground-water flow model, were recognized for the purpose of studying the distribution of hydraulic properties. Analyses of regression and covariance were used to assess if a relation existed between hydraulic conductivity and depth for most hydrogeologic units. Those analyses showed a weak, quantitatively indeterminate, relation between hydraulic conductivity and depth.

  17. Hydraulic-property estimates for use with a transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belcher, Wayne R.; Elliott, Peggy E.; Geldon, Arthur L.

    2001-01-01

    The Death Valley regional ground-water flow system encompasses an area of about 43,500 square kilometers in southeastern California and southern Nevada, between latitudes 35? and 38?15' north and longitudes 115? and 117?45' west. The study area is underlain by Quaternary to Tertiary basin-fill sediments and mafic-lava flows; Tertiary volcanic, volcaniclastic, and sedimentary rocks; Tertiary to Jurassic granitic rocks; Triassic to Middle Proterozoic carbonate and clastic sedimentary rocks; and Early Proterozoic igneous and metamorphic rocks. The rock assemblage in the Death Valley region is extensively faulted as a result of several episodes of tectonic activity. This study is comprised of published and unpublished estimates of transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, storage coefficient, and anisotropy ratios for hydrogeologic units within the Death Valley region study area. Hydrogeologic units previously proposed for the Death Valley regional transient ground-water flow model were recognized for the purpose of studying the distribution of hydraulic properties. Analyses of regression and covariance were used to assess if a relation existed between hydraulic conductivity and depth for most hydrogeologic units. Those analyses showed a weak, quantitatively indeterminate, relation between hydraulic conductivity and depth.

  18. STRING 3: An Advanced Groundwater Flow Visualization Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Simon; Michel, Isabel; Biedert, Tim; Gräfe, Marius; Seidel, Torsten; König, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The visualization of 3D groundwater flow is a challenging task. Previous versions of our software STRING [1] solely focused on intuitive visualization of complex flow scenarios for non-professional audiences. STRING, developed by Fraunhofer ITWM (Kaiserslautern, Germany) and delta h Ingenieurgesellschaft mbH (Witten, Germany), provides the necessary means for visualization of both 2D and 3D data on planar and curved surfaces. In this contribution we discuss how to extend this approach to a full 3D tool and its challenges in continuation of Michel et al. [2]. This elevates STRING from a post-production to an exploration tool for experts. In STRING moving pathlets provide an intuition of velocity and direction of both steady-state and transient flows. The visualization concept is based on the Lagrangian view of the flow. To capture every detail of the flow an advanced method for intelligent, time-dependent seeding is used building on the Finite Pointset Method (FPM) developed by Fraunhofer ITWM. Lifting our visualization approach from 2D into 3D provides many new challenges. With the implementation of a seeding strategy for 3D one of the major problems has already been solved (see Schröder et al. [3]). As pathlets only provide an overview of the velocity field other means are required for the visualization of additional flow properties. We suggest the use of Direct Volume Rendering and isosurfaces for scalar features. In this regard we were able to develop an efficient approach for combining the rendering through raytracing of the volume and regular OpenGL geometries. This is achieved through the use of Depth Peeling or A-Buffers for the rendering of transparent geometries. Animation of pathlets requires a strict boundary of the simulation domain. Hence, STRING needs to extract the boundary, even from unstructured data, if it is not provided. In 3D we additionally need a good visualization of the boundary itself. For this the silhouette based on the angle of

  19. Groundwater flow and hydrochemistry in mountain areas affected by DSGSDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosta, Giovanni B.; Frattini, Paolo; Pena Reyes, Fredy; Riva, Federico

    2014-05-01

    Large slope instabilities such as DSGSD and rockslides locally affect the groundwater flow at the slope scale. These phenomena present morphostructures (scarps, counterscarps and trenches) parallel to the slope direction that control the surface water runoff, directing it transversal to the slope dip and favouring its percolation within the slope through the more conductive materials aligned with the trench . This also affects the slope hydrochemistry, locally controlling the solute transport and circulation. The upper Valtellina (Central European Alps, Northern Italy) is characterize by a high density of DSGSD phenomena, with 29 DSGSDs within an area of about 900 km2 (Crosta et al, 2013). The study area ranges from 1150 to 3500 m in altitude, and shows a clear glacial imprint, which significantly influenced the geomorphology and water distribution in the study area. In order to characterize the groundwater flow and the hydrochemistry of the area, we collected historical data analysis (4070 samples from springs, wells, lakes, rivers and public fountains), and we performed four seasonal campaigns, from summer 2012 to spring 2013, to complete a hydrologic year. During these campaigns, we measured the spring discharge, and we collected samples for chemical (anions and cations) and isotopic (tritium, deuterium and O18) analyses in more almost 40 selected spring located throughout the study area. These springs were selected because representative of main spring clusters, with a particular attention to problems related to the presence of Arsenic in high concentration. In this study, we analyze the effect of DSGSD phenomena on the aquifers of upper Valtellina through the quantitative analysis of hydro-chemical and isotopic data. We show how these phenomena affect the ground water flow also in relation to the presence of geological structures that are associated and locally reactivated by DSGSDs.

  20. Hydrological Modeling of Groundwater Disturbance to Gravity Signal for High-accuracy Monitoring of Volcanic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazama, T.; Okubo, S.

    2007-12-01

    Gravity observation is one of the effective methods to detect magma movements in volcanic eruptions [e.g., Furuya et al., J. Geoph. Res., 2003]. Groundwater-derived disturbances have to be corrected from gravity variations for highly accurate monitoring of volcanic activities. They have been corrected with empirical methods, such as tank models and regression curves [e.g., Imanishi et al., J. Geodyn., 2006]. These methods, however, are not based on hydrological background, and are very likely to eliminate volcanic signals excessively. The correction method of groundwater disturbance has to be developed with hydrological and quantitative approach. We thus estimate the gravity disturbance arising from groundwater as follows. (1) Groundwater distributions are simulated on a hydrological model, utilizing groundwater flow equations. (2) Groundwater-derived gravity value is estimated for each instant of time, by integrating groundwater distributions spatially. (3) The groundwater-derived gravity, as the correction value, is subtracted from observed gravity data. In this study, we simulated groundwater flow and groundwater-derived gravity value on the east part of the Asama volcano, central Japan. A simple hydrological model was supposed, consisting of homogeneous soil, lying on a flat impermeable basement. Hydraulic conductivity, which defines groundwater velocity, was set as 2.0×10-6[m/s], which is consistent with typical volcanic soils. We also observed time variations of watertable height, soil moisture and gravity simultaneously during the summer of 2006 at Asama volcano, and compared the observations with the theoretical values. Both simulated groundwater distributions and gravity changes agree fairly well with observed values. On variations of water level and moisture content, rapid increase at the time of rainfalls and exponential decrease after rainfalls were illustrated. Theoretical gravity changes explained 90% of the observed gravity increase (+20μgals) for

  1. Predicting groundwater flow system discharge in the river network at the watershed scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, Alice; Ridolfi, Luca; Boano, Fulvio

    2016-04-01

    discharge and the pathway transit time distribution exhibit exponential tailing at river-watershed scale. These findings denote that the topographic conformation of the whole basin contributes to determine the spatial complexity of the groundwater flow field together with the geomorphological river configuration. This complexity reflects on the depth and the intensity of the hyporheic exchange since the hyporheic zone is confined and embedded by the groundwater system. The evaluation of the spatial distribution of water fluxes from and to the river network is useful to relate water quality and nutrient fluxes to anthropogenic activity in a watershed.

  2. Adaptive multiresolution modeling of groundwater flow in heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malenica, Luka; Gotovac, Hrvoje; Srzic, Veljko; Andric, Ivo

    2016-04-01

    different temporal lines and local time stepping control. Critical aspect of time integration accuracy is construction of spatial stencil due to accurate calculation of spatial derivatives. Since common approach applied for wavelets and splines uses a finite difference operator, we developed here collocation one including solution values and differential operator. In this way, new improved algorithm is adaptive in space and time enabling accurate solution for groundwater flow problems, especially in highly heterogeneous porous media with large lnK variances and different correlation length scales. In addition, differences between collocation and finite volume approaches are discussed. Finally, results show application of methodology to the groundwater flow problems in highly heterogeneous confined and unconfined aquifers.

  3. Scaling of flow and transport behavior in heterogeneous groundwater systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheibe, Timothy; Yabusaki, Steven

    1998-11-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations using a detailed synthetic hydraulic conductivity field developed from geological considerations provide insight into the scaling of subsurface flow and transport processes. Flow and advective transport in the highly resolved heterogeneous field were modeled using massively parallel computers, providing a realistic baseline for evaluation of the impacts of parameter scaling. Upscaling of hydraulic conductivity was performed at a variety of scales using a flexible power law averaging technique. A series of tests were performed to determine the effects of varying the scaling exponent on a number of metrics of flow and transport behavior. Flow and transport simulation on high-performance computers and three-dimensional scientific visualization combine to form a powerful tool for gaining insight into the behavior of complex heterogeneous systems. Many quantitative groundwater models utilize upscaled hydraulic conductivity parameters, either implicitly or explicitly. These parameters are designed to reproduce the bulk flow characteristics at the grid or field scale while not requiring detailed quantification of local-scale conductivity variations. An example from applied groundwater modeling is the common practice of calibrating grid-scale model hydraulic conductivity or transmissivity parameters so as to approximate observed hydraulic head and boundary flux values. Such parameterizations, perhaps with a bulk dispersivity imposed, are then sometimes used to predict transport of reactive or non-reactive solutes. However, this work demonstrates that those parameters that lead to the best upscaling for hydraulic conductivity and head do not necessarily correspond to the best upscaling for prediction of a variety of transport behaviors. This result reflects the fact that transport is strongly impacted by the existence and connectedness of extreme-valued hydraulic conductivities, in contrast to bulk flow which depends more strongly on

  4. Analysis of Aquifer Response, Groundwater Flow, and PlumeEvolution at Site OU 1, Former Fort Ord, California

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Preston D.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Su, Grace W.

    2005-02-24

    This report presents a continuation from Oldenburg et al. (2002) of analysis of the hydrogeology, In-Situ Permeable Flow Sensor (ISPFS) results, aquifer response, and changes in the trichloroethylene (TCE) groundwater plume at Operational Unit 1 (OU 1) adjacent to the former Fritzsche Army Airfield at the former Fort Ord Army Base, located on Monterey Bay in northern Monterey County. Fuels and solvents were burned on a portion of OU 1 called the Fire Drill Area (FDA) during airport fire suppression training between 1962 and 1985. This activity resulted in soil and groundwater contamination in the unconfined A-aquifer. In the late 1980's, soil excavation and bioremediation were successful in remediating soil contamination at the site. Shortly thereafter, a groundwater pump, treat, and recharge system commenced operation. This system has been largely successful at remediating groundwater contamination at the head of the groundwater plume. However, a trichloroethylene (TCE) groundwater plume extends approximately 3000 ft (900 m) to the northwest away from the FDA. In the analyses presented here, we augment our prior work (Oldenburg et al., 2002) with new information including treatment-system totalizer data, recent water-level and chemistry data, and data collected from new wells to discern trends in contaminant migration and groundwater flow that may be useful for ongoing remediation efforts. Some conclusions from the prior study have been modified based on these new analyses, and these are pointed out clearly in this report.

  5. Simulation of groundwater flow and effects of groundwater irrigation on stream base flow in the Elkhorn and Loup River Basins, Nebraska, 1895-2055-Phase Two

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanton, Jennifer S.; Peterson, Steven M.; Fienen, Michael N.

    2010-01-01

    Regional groundwater-flow simulations for a 30,000-square-mile area of the High Plains aquifer, referred to collectively as the Elkhorn-Loup Model, were developed to predict the effects of groundwater irrigation on stream base flow in the Elkhorn and Loup River Basins, Nebraska. Simulations described the stream-aquifer system from predevelopment through 2005 [including predevelopment (pre-1895), early development (1895-1940), and historical development (1940 through 2005) conditions] and future hypothetical development conditions (2006 through 2033 or 2055). Predicted changes to stream base flow that resulted from simulated changes to groundwater irrigation will aid development of long-term strategies for management of hydrologically connected water supplies. The predevelopment through 2005 simulation was calibrated using an automated parameter-estimation method to optimize the fit to pre-1940 groundwater levels and base flows, 1945 through 2005 decadal groundwater-level changes, and 1940 through 2005 base flows. The calibration results of the pre-1940 period indicated that 81 percent of the simulated groundwater levels were within 30 feet of the measured water levels. The results did not indicate large areas of simulated groundwater levels that were biased too high or too low, indicating that the simulation generally captures the regional trends. Calibration results using 1945 through 2005 decadal groundwater-level changes indicated that a majority of the simulated groundwater-level changes were within 5 feet of the changes calculated from measured groundwater levels. Simulated groundwater-level rises generally were smaller than measured rises near surface-water irrigation districts. Simulated groundwater-level declines were larger than measured declines in several parts of the study area having large amounts of irrigated crops. Base-flow trends and volumes generally were reproduced by the simulation at most sites. Exceptions include downward trends of simulated

  6. Spatial variability analysis of combining the water quality and groundwater flow model to plan groundwater and surface water management in the Pingtung plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ching-Fang; Chen, Jui-Sheng; Jang, Cheng-Shin

    2014-05-01

    As a result of rapid economic growth in the Pingtung Plain, the use of groundwater resources has changed dramatically. The groundwater is quite rich in the Pingtung plain and the most important water sources. During the several decades, a substantial amount of groundwater has been pumped for the drinking, irrigation and aquaculture water supplies. However, because the sustainable use concept of groundwater resources is lack, excessive pumping of groundwater causes the occurrence of serious land subsidence and sea water intrusion. Thus, the management and conservation of groundwater resources in the Pingtung plain are considerably critical. This study aims to assess the conjunct use effect of groundwater and surface water in the Pingtung plain on recharge by reducing the amount of groundwater extraction. The groundwater quality variability and groundwater flow models are combined to spatially analyze potential zones of groundwater used for multi-purpose in the Pingtung Plain. First, multivariate indicator kriging (MVIK) is used to analyze spatial variability of groundwater quality based on drinking, aquaculture and irrigation water quality standards, and probabilistically delineate suitable zones in the study area. Then, the groundwater flow model, Processing MODFLOW (PMWIN), is adopted to simulate groundwater flow. The groundwater flow model must be conducted by the calibration and verification processes, and the regional groundwater recovery is discussed when specified water rights are replaced by surface water in the Pingtung plain. Finally, the most suitable zones of reducing groundwater use are determined for multi-purpose according to combining groundwater quality and quantity. The study results can establish a sound and low-impact management plan of groundwater resources utilization for the multi-purpose groundwater use, and prevent decreasing ground water tables, and the occurrence of land subsidence and sea water intrusion in the Pingtung plain.

  7. Groundwater.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braids, Olin C.; Gillies, Nola P.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of groundwater quality covering publications of 1977. This review includes: (1) sources of groundwater contamination; and (2) management of groundwater. A list of 59 references is also presented. (HM)

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH BRIEF : ANALYTIC ELEMENT MODELING OF GROUND-WATER FLOW AND HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several advances in the analytic element method have been made to enhance its performance and facilitate three-dimensional ground-water flow modeling in a regional aquifer setting. First, a new public domain modular code (ModAEM) has been developed for modeling ground-water flow ...

  9. Ground-water flow in the Coastal Plain aquifers of South Carolina.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aucott, W.R.; Speiran, G.K.

    1985-01-01

    The Coastal Plain aquifers are recharged primarily by precipitation in their outcrop areas. Groundwater flows from these areas of recharge, through the aquifers, and discharges to upper Costal Plain rivers, overlying aquifers as upward leakage, and wells. Ground-water flow in the Floridan aquifer system and the Tertiary sand aquifer prior to development is generally perpendicular to the coast.-from Authors

  10. Investigation of uranium geochemistry along groundwater flow path in the Continental Intercalaire aquifer (Southern Tunisia).

    PubMed

    Dhaoui, Z; Chkir, N; Zouari, K; Ammar, F Hadj; Agoune, A

    2016-06-01

    Environmental tracers ((2)H, (18)O, isotopes of Uranium) and geochemical processes occurring within groundwaters from the Continental Intercalaire (CI) in Southern Tunisia were used to understand the hydrodynamics and the recharge conditions of this aquifer. This study investigates the chemical and isotopic compositions of the CI groundwater. The water types are dominated by Na(+), SO4(2-), Cl(-) throughout most of the basin with a general increase in total dissolved solids from the Saharan Platform margins towards the Chotts region. Large scale groundwater flow paths are toward the Chotts region. The stable isotopes composition of the analyzed groundwater ranges from -8.8 to -6‰ vs V-SMOW for δ(18)O and from -67 to -40‰ vs V-SMOW for δ(2)H. The relatively enriched stable isotopes contents suggest the contribution of the Dahar sandstones outcrops in the current recharge of the CI aquifer in an arid context. However, the most depleted values in heavy isotopes indicate a paleorecharge of the aquifer under wetter conditions revealing a long residence time of groundwaters. The results from water samples using alpha spectrometry method indicate a range in (238)U concentrations and (234)U/(238)U activity ratios (AR) of 0.044-1.285 μg kg(-1) and 1.2 to 8.84 respectively. The geochemistry of uranium isotopes in groundwater is controlled by many factors, essentially, the influence of water rock interactions, the preferential dissolution of (234)U relative to (238)U due to alpha recoil and the mixing processes between different waters with distinct AR as well as (238)U concentrations. PMID:27015035

  11. Ground-water flow and solute transport at a municipal landfill site on Long Island, New York; Part 2, Simulation of ground-water flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wexler, E.J.; Maus, P.E.

    1988-01-01

    Data on the hydrogeology of a 26-sq-mi area surrounding the Brookhaven landfill site in central Suffolk County were collected as part of a hydrologic investigation of solute transport from the site. These data were used to develop a steady-state groundwater flow model of the upper glacial (water table) aquifer in the area. The model accounts for the leakage through confining units underlying the aquifer, seepage to streams, recharge from precipitation, and pumpage and redistribution of water. Refined estimates of aquifer and confining-unit properties were obtained through model calibrations. Water table altitudes generated by the calibrated model were used to determine groundwater velocities and probable flow paths in the vicinity of the site under long-term average hydrologic conditions. Groundwater velocities and probable flow paths in the study area were calculated from simulated water table altitudes generated by the calibrated flow model. Groundwater at the center of the site flows southeastward at a velocity of 1.1 ft/d. The report is the second in a three part series describing the hydrologic conditions and groundwater quality, groundwater flow, and solute transport in the vicinity of the Brookhaven landfill. (USGS)

  12. Groundwater flow near the Shoal Site, Sand Springs Range, Nevada: Impact of density-driven flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, J.; Mihevc, T.; McKay, A.

    1994-09-01

    The nature of flow from a highland recharge area in a mountain range in north-central Nevada to discharge areas on either side of the range is evaluated to refine a conceptual model of contaminant transport from an underground nuclear test conducted beneath the range. The test, known as the Shoal event, was conducted in 1963 in granitic rocks of the Sand Springs Range. Sparse hydraulic head measurements from the early 1960s suggest flow from the shot location to the east to Fairview Valley, while hydrochemistry supports flow to salt pans in Fourmile Flat to the west. Chemical and isotopic data collected from water samples and during well-logging arc best explained by a reflux brine system on the west side of the Sand Springs Range, rather than a typical local flow system where all flow occurs from recharge areas in the highlands to a central discharge area in a playa. Instead, dense saline water from the playa is apparently being driven toward the range by density contrasts. The data collected between the range and Fourmile Flat suggest the groundwater is a mixture of younger, fresher recharge water with older brine. Chemical contrasts between groundwater in the east and west valleys reflect the absence of re-flux water in Fairview Valley because the regional discharge area is distant and thus there is no accumulation of salts. The refluxing hydraulic system probably developed after the end of the last pluvial period and differences between the location of the groundwater divide based on hydraulic and chemical indicators could reflect movement of the divide as the groundwater system adjusts to the new reflux condition.

  13. Numerical error in groundwater flow and solute transport simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Juliette A.; Teubner, Michael D.; Simmons, Craig T.; Narayan, Kumar A.

    2003-06-01

    Models of groundwater flow and solute transport may be affected by numerical error, leading to quantitative and qualitative changes in behavior. In this paper we compare and combine three methods of assessing the extent of numerical error: grid refinement, mathematical analysis, and benchmark test problems. In particular, we assess the popular solute transport code SUTRA [Voss, 1984] as being a typical finite element code. Our numerical analysis suggests that SUTRA incorporates a numerical dispersion error and that its mass-lumped numerical scheme increases the numerical error. This is confirmed using a Gaussian test problem. A modified SUTRA code, in which the numerical dispersion is calculated and subtracted, produces better results. The much more challenging Elder problem [Elder, 1967; Voss and Souza, 1987] is then considered. Calculation of its numerical dispersion coefficients and numerical stability show that the Elder problem is prone to error. We confirm that Elder problem results are extremely sensitive to the simulation method used.

  14. Stochastic Collocation Method for Three-dimensional Groundwater Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, L.; Zhang, D.

    2008-12-01

    The stochastic collocation method (SCM) has recently gained extensive attention in several disciplines. The numerical implementation of SCM only requires repetitive runs of an existing deterministic solver or code as in the Monte Carlo simulation. But it is generally much more efficient than the Monte Carlo method. In this paper, the stochastic collocation method is used to efficiently qualify uncertainty of three-dimensional groundwater flow. We introduce the basic principles of common collocation methods, i.e., the tensor product collocation method (TPCM), Smolyak collocation method (SmCM), Stround-2 collocation method (StCM), and probability collocation method (PCM). Their accuracy, computational cost, and limitation are discussed. Illustrative examples reveal that the seamless combination of collocation techniques and existing simulators makes the new framework possible to efficiently handle complex stochastic problems.

  15. Calibrating SWAT with River flows, Groundwater table, and GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, L.

    2010-12-01

    Various combinations of model parameters can provide equal simulations for certain water component (like river discharge) due to compensating interactions among parameters in most hydrologic models. SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) physically simulates the movements and distributions for water, sediments and nutrients with widely varied parameters usually encountering this kind of problem. Previous SWAT applications mostly limited model calibrations on surface runoff (sometime including nutrients and sediments) and lose overall control to the whole hydrologic process consisting of ET, Surface runoff, soil water, and ground water variations. This study constrains the SWAT model in lower Missouri River Basin with surface water recharge and discharge (river flows), basin-wide water storage (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE)), Groundwater table fluctuations(well logs) under a SUFI (sequential uncertainty fitting) framework. This would reduce the parameter uncertainty and provide reliable model for hydrologic studies within the basin.

  16. A numerical approach for groundwater flow in unsaturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintana, F.; Guarracino, L.; Saliba, R.

    2006-07-01

    In this article, a computational tool to simulate groundwater flow in variably saturated non-deformable fractured porous media is presented, which includes a conceptual model to obtain analytical expressions of water retention and hydraulic conductivity curves for fractured hard rocks and a numerical algorithm to solve the Richards equation. To calculate effective saturation and relative hydraulic conductivity curves we adopt the Brooks-Corey model assuming fractal laws for both aperture and number of fractures. A standard Galerkin formulation was employed to solve the Richards' equation together with a Crank-Nicholson scheme with Richardson extrapolation for the time discretization.The main contribution of this paper is to group an analytical model of the authors with a robust numerical algorithm designed to solve adequately the highly non-linear Richards' equation generating a tool for porous media engineering.

  17. Quantitative dye-tracing of karst ground-water flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smoot, James; Mull, Donald; Liebermann, Timothy

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of the results of repeat quantitative dye traces between a sinkhole and a spring used for public water supply were used to describe predictive relations between discharge, mean travel time, apparent ground-water flow velocity and solute transport characteristics. Normalized peak concentration, mean travel time, and standard deviation of travel times were used to produce a dimensionless, composite type curve that was used to produce a dimensionless, composite type curve that was used to simulate solute transport characteristics for selected discharges. Using this curve and previously developed statistical relations, a water manager can estimate the arrival time, peak concentration, and persistence of a soluble contaminant at a supply spring or well based on discharge and the quantity of spilled contaminant.

  18. When is groundwater flow an important consideration in ground surface temperature reconstructions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, G.; Woodbury, A. D.; Beltrami, H.

    2005-12-01

    The utility of subsurface temperatures in paleoclimate studies has become well established in recent years. However, there are many different factors that could cause questioning of the result of ground surface temperature (GST) reconstructions from temperature measured in boreholes. One of these factors is groundwater flow, particularly downward groundwater flow. In this case, the resulting curvature in the temperature profile is similar to that observed in many conductive environments where GST has increased over the past century. Simulations of heat flow with steady-state groundwater flow and constant GST indicate that groundwater flow will only significantly affect groundwater reconstructions when Peclet numbers are greater than 0.1 to 1.0. This generally occurs in areas with moderately high recharge rates. Here we show how meteorological records and information on permeability of the rocks and soils in the vicinity of a borehole can be used boreholes in areas where advection will have a minimal effect on GST reconstructions.

  19. Characterizing Field Biodegradation of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) in Groundwater with Active Reclaimed Water Recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCraven, S.; Zhou, Q.; Garcia, J.; Gasca, M.; Johnson, T.

    2007-12-01

    N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) is an emerging contaminant in groundwater, because of its aqueous miscibility, exceptional animal toxicity, and human carcinogenicity. NDMA detections in groundwater have been tracked to either decomposition of unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) used in rocket fuel facilities or chlorine disinfection in wastewater reclamation plants. Laboratory experiments on both unsaturated and saturated soil samples have demonstrated that NDMA can be biodegraded by microbial activity, under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. However, very limited direct evidence for its biodegradation has been found from the field in saturated groundwater. Our research aimed to evaluate photolysis and biodegradation of NDMA occurring along the full travel path - from wastewater reclamation plant effluent, through rivers and spreading grounds, to groundwater. For this evaluation, we established an extensive monitoring network to characterize NDMA concentrations at effluent discharge points, surface water stations, and groundwater monitoring and production wells, during the operation of the Montebello Forebay Groundwater Recharge facilities in Los Angeles County, California. Field monitoring for NDMA has been conducted for more than six years, including 32 months of relatively lower NDMA concentrations in effluent, 43 months of elevated NDMA effluent concentrations, and 7 months with significantly reduced NDMA effluent concentrations. The NDMA effluent concentration increase and significant concentration decrease were caused by changes in treatment processes. The NDMA sampling data imply that significant biodegradation occurred in groundwater, accounting for a 90% mass reduction of NDMA over the six-year monitoring period. In addition, the occurrence of a discrete well monitored effluent release during the study period allowed critical analysis of the fate of NDMA in a well- characterized, localized groundwater flow subsystem. The data indicate that 80% of the

  20. Is in situ stress important to groundwater flow in shallow fractured rock aquifers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortimer, L.; Aydin, A.; Simmons, C. T.; Love, A. J.

    2011-03-01

    SummaryIn situ stress affects the permeability tensor of fractured rock masses at depth but its effect on shallow to near-surface fractured rock aquifers has received little attention. This is partly because stress-related effects on groundwater flow at shallow depths are difficult to identify and characterise due to the complex interactions between all of the inherent properties of a fractured rock aquifer. These properties include the factors that dominantly control groundwater flow: fracture network density, geometry, connectivity and infill. Furthermore, surface processes such as weathering, erosion and unloading alter the original hydraulic nature (connectivity, transmissivity) of fractured rock masses resulting in higher degrees of spatial heterogeneity within shallow flow systems. These processes and interactions often mask the influence of in situ stress fields on fracture network permeability and groundwater flow. In this study, an integrated analysis of local area fracture networks, borehole geophysical logs, borehole groundwater yields and hydromechanical models demonstrate that in situ stress does affect groundwater flow in shallow (<200 m) fractured rock aquifers by altering fracture hydraulic aperture distributions, fracture network connectivity and groundwater flow rates via fracture deformation processes. In particular, a comparison between representative models of deformed (stressed state) and undeformed (zero stress state) fracture networks showed that below 100 m depth, groundwater flow rates could decrease several fold under the influence of the contemporary stress field. This prediction was highly consistent with the field observations. In contrast, groundwater flow modelling of shallow fractured rock aquifers is typically conducted under the assumption that permeability is independent of the state of stress. A key finding of this study is that in situ stress may be a more important control on both local and regional scale shallow groundwater

  1. Relation of streams, lakes, and wetlands to groundwater flow systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Thomas C.

    Surface-water bodies are integral parts of groundwater flow systems. Groundwater interacts with surface water in nearly all landscapes, ranging from small streams, lakes, and wetlands in headwater areas to major river valleys and seacoasts. Although it generally is assumed that topographically high areas are groundwater recharge areas and topographically low areas are groundwater discharge areas, this is true primarily for regional flow systems. The superposition of local flow systems associated with surface-water bodies on this regional framework results in complex interactions between groundwater and surface water in all landscapes, regardless of regional topographic position. Hydrologic processes associated with the surface-water bodies themselves, such as seasonally high surface-water levels and evaporation and transpiration of groundwater from around the perimeter of surface-water bodies, are a major cause of the complex and seasonally dynamic groundwater flow fields associated with surface water. These processes have been documented at research sites in glacial, dune, coastal, mantled karst, and riverine terrains. Résumé Les eaux de surface sont parties intégrantes des systèmes aquifères. Les eaux souterraines interagissent avec les eaux de surface dans presque tous les types d'environnements, depuis les petits ruisseaux, les lacs et les zones humides jusqu'aux bassins versants des vallées des grands fleuves et aux lignes de côte. Il est en général admis que les zones topographiquement hautes sont des lieux de recharge des aquifères et les zones basses des lieux de décharge, ce qui est le cas des grands systèmes aquifères régionaux. La superposition de systèmes locaux, associés à des eaux de surface, à l'organisation régionale d'écoulements souterrains résulte d'interactions complexes entre les eaux souterraines et les eaux de surface dans tous les environnements, quelle que soit la situation topographique régionale. Les processus

  2. Modeling Steady-State Groundwater Flow Using Microcomputer Spreadsheets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ousey, John Russell, Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Describes how microcomputer spreadsheets are easily adapted for use in groundwater modeling. Presents spreadsheet set-ups and the results of five groundwater models. Suggests that this approach can provide a basis for demonstrations, laboratory exercises, and student projects. (ML)

  3. Field identification of groundwater flow systems and hydraulic traps in drainage basins using a geophysical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiao-Wei; Wan, Li; Wang, Jun-Zhi; Yin, Bin-Xi; Fu, Wen-Xiang; Lin, Chang-Hong

    2014-04-01

    Groundwater flow systems and stagnant zones in drainage basins are critical to a series of geologic processes. Unfortunately, the difficulty of mapping flow system boundaries and no field example of detected stagnant zones restrict the application of the concept of nested flow systems. By assuming the variation in bulk resistivity of an aquifer with uniform porosity is mainly caused by groundwater salinity, the magnetotelluric technique is used to obtain the apparent resistivity of a profile across a groundwater-fed river in the Ordos Plateau, China. Based on the variations in apparent resistivity of the Cretaceous sandstone aquifer, the basin-bottom hydraulic trap below the river has been detected for the first time, and its size is found to be large enough for possible deposition of large ore bodies. The boundaries between local and regional flows have also been identified, which would be useful for groundwater exploration and calibration of large-scale groundwater models.

  4. Use of a ground-water flow model with particle tracking to evaluate ground-water vulnerability, Clark County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, Daniel T.; Wilkinson, James M.; Orzol, Leonard L.

    1998-01-01

    A ground-water flow model was used in conjunction with a particle-tracking program to demonstrate a method of evaluating ground-water vulnerability. The study area encompassed the part of the Portland Basin located in Clark County, Washington. A new computer program was developed that interfaces the particle-tracking program with a geographic information system (GIS). The GIS was used to display and analyze the particle-tracking results and to evaluate ground-water vulnerability by identifying recharge areas and their characteristics, determining the downgradient impact of land use at recharge areas, and estimating the age of ground water. The report presents a description of the methods used and the results of the evaluation of ground-water vulnerability.

  5. Thermal effects of groundwater flow through subarctic fens: A case study based on field observations and numerical modeling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sjöberg, Ylva; Coon, Ethan; K. Sannel, A. Britta; Pannetier, Romain; Harp, Dylan; Frampton, Andrew; Painter, Scott L.; Lyon, Steve W.

    2016-02-05

    Modeling and observation of ground temperature dynamics are the main tools for understanding current permafrost thermal regimes and projecting future thaw. Until recently, most studies on permafrost have focused on vertical ground heat fluxes. Groundwater can transport heat in both lateral and vertical directions but its influence on ground temperatures at local scales in permafrost environments is not well understood. In this paper, we combine field observations from a subarctic fen in the sporadic permafrost zone with numerical simulations of coupled water and thermal fluxes. At the Tavvavuoma study site in northern Sweden, ground temperature profiles and groundwater levels weremore » observed in boreholes. These observations were used to set up one- and two-dimensional simulations down to 2 m depth across a gradient of permafrost conditions within and surrounding the fen. Two-dimensional scenarios representing the fen under various hydraulic gradients were developed to quantify the influence of groundwater flow on ground temperature. Our observations suggest that lateral groundwater flow significantly affects ground temperatures. This is corroborated by modeling results that show seasonal ground ice melts 1 month earlier when a lateral groundwater flux is present. Further, although the thermal regime may be dominated by vertically conducted heat fluxes during most of the year, isolated high groundwater flow rate events such as the spring freshet are potentially important for ground temperatures. Finally, as sporadic permafrost environments often contain substantial portions of unfrozen ground with active groundwater flow paths, knowledge of this heat transport mechanism is important for understanding permafrost dynamics in these environments.« less

  6. Effect of irrigation return flow on groundwater recharge in an overexploited aquifer in Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touhidul Mustafa, Syed Md.; Shamsudduha, Mohammad; Huysmans, Marijke

    2016-04-01

    Irrigated agriculture has an important role in the food production to ensure food security of Bangladesh that is home to over 150 million people. However, overexploitation of groundwater for irrigation, particularly during the dry season, causes groundwater-level decline in areas where abstraction is high and surface geology inhibits direct recharge to underlying shallow aquifer. This is causing a number of potential adverse socio-economic, hydrogeological, and environmental problems in Bangladesh. Alluvial aquifers are primarily recharged during monsoon season from rainfall and surface sources. However, return flow from groundwater-fed irrigation can recharge during the dry months. Quantification of the effect of return flow from irrigation in the groundwater system is currently unclear but thought to be important to ensure sustainable management of the overexploited aquifer. The objective of the study is to investigate the effect of irrigation return flow on groundwater recharge in the north-western part of Bangladesh, also known as Barind Tract. A semi-physically based distributed water balance model (WetSpass-M) is used to simulate spatially distributed monthly groundwater recharge. Results show that, groundwater abstraction for irrigation in the study area has increased steadily over the last 29 years. During the monsoon season, local precipitation is the controlling factor of groundwater recharge; however, there is no trend in groundwater recharge during that period. During the dry season, however, irrigation return-flow plays a major role in recharging the aquifer in the irrigated area compared to local precipitation. Therefore, during the dry season, mean seasonal groundwater recharge has increased and almost doubled over the last 29 years as a result of increased abstraction for irrigation. The increase in groundwater recharge during dry season has however no significant effect in the improvement of groundwater levels. The relation between groundwater

  7. Characterization of fracture aperture for groundwater flow and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, A.; Sato, H.; Tetsu, K.; Sakamoto, K.

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents experiments and numerical analyses of flow and transport carried out on natural fractures and transparent replica of fractures. The purpose of this study was to improve the understanding of the role of heterogeneous aperture patterns on channelization of groundwater flow and dispersion in solute transport. The research proceeded as follows: First, a precision plane grinder was applied perpendicular to the fracture plane to characterize the aperture distribution on a natural fracture with 1 mm of increment size. Although both time and labor were intensive, this approach provided a detailed, three dimensional picture of the pattern of fracture aperture. This information was analyzed to provide quantitative measures for the fracture aperture distribution, including JRC (Joint Roughness Coefficient) and fracture contact area ratio. These parameters were used to develop numerical models with corresponding synthetic aperture patterns. The transparent fracture replica and numerical models were then used to study how transport is affected by the aperture spatial pattern. In the transparent replica, transmitted light intensity measured by a CCD camera was used to image channeling and dispersion due to the fracture aperture spatial pattern. The CCD image data was analyzed to obtain the quantitative fracture aperture and tracer concentration data according to Lambert-Beer's law. The experimental results were analyzed using the numerical models. Comparison of the numerical models to the transparent replica provided information about the nature of channeling and dispersion due to aperture spatial patterns. These results support to develop a methodology for defining representative fracture aperture of a simplified parallel fracture model for flow and transport in heterogeneous fractures for contaminant transport analysis.

  8. Impact of Groundwater Flow and Energy Load on Multiple Borehole Heat Exchangers.

    PubMed

    Dehkordi, S Emad; Schincariol, Robert A; Olofsson, Bo

    2015-01-01

    The effect of array configuration, that is, number, layout, and spacing, on the performance of multiple borehole heat exchangers (BHEs) is generally known under the assumption of fully conductive transport. The effect of groundwater flow on BHE performance is also well established, but most commonly for single BHEs. In multiple-BHE systems the effect of groundwater advection can be more complicated due to the induced thermal interference between the boreholes. To ascertain the influence of groundwater flow and borehole arrangement, this study investigates single- and multi-BHE systems of various configurations. Moreover, the influence of energy load balance is also examined. The results from corresponding cases with and without groundwater flow as well as balanced and unbalanced energy loads are cross-compared. The groundwater flux value, 10(-7) m/s, is chosen based on the findings of previous studies on groundwater flow interaction with BHEs and thermal response tests. It is observed that multi-BHE systems with balanced loads are less sensitive to array configuration attributes and groundwater flow, in the long-term. Conversely, multi-BHE systems with unbalanced loads are influenced by borehole array configuration as well as groundwater flow; these effects become more pronounced with time, unlike when the load is balanced. Groundwater flow has more influence on stabilizing loop temperatures, compared to array characteristics. Although borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) systems have a balanced energy load function, preliminary investigation on their efficiency shows a negative impact by groundwater which is due to their dependency on high temperature gradients between the boreholes and surroundings. PMID:25227154

  9. Assessment of factors influencing groundwater-level change using groundwater flow simulation, considering vertical infiltration from rice-planted and crop-rotated paddy fields in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Yumi; Nakamura, Kimihito; Horino, Haruhiko; Kawashima, Shigeto

    2014-12-01

    Assessing factors that influence groundwater levels such as land use and pumping strategy, is essential to adequately manage groundwater resources. A transient numerical model for groundwater flow with infiltration was developed for the Tedori River alluvial fan (140 km2), Japan. The main water input into the groundwater body in this area is irrigation water, which is significantly influenced by land use, namely paddy and upland fields. The proposed model consists of two models, a one-dimensional (1-D) unsaturated-zone water flow model (HYDRUS-1D) for estimating groundwater recharge and a 3-D groundwater flow model (MODFLOW). Numerical simulation of groundwater flow from October 1975 to November 2009 was performed to validate the model. Simulation revealed seasonal groundwater level fluctuations, affected by paddy irrigation management. However, computational accuracy was limited by the spatiotemporal data resolution of the groundwater use. Both annual groundwater levels and recharge during the irrigation periods from 1975 to 2009 showed long-term decreasing trends. With the decline in rice-planted paddy field area, groundwater recharge cumulatively decreased to 61 % of the peak in 1977. A paddy-upland crop-rotation system could decrease groundwater recharge to 73-98 % relative to no crop rotation.

  10. Degradation of ground ice in a changing climate: the potential impact of groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Grandpré, I.; Fortier, D.; Stephani, E.

    2011-12-01

    Climate changes affecting the North West portion of Canada alter the thermal state of the permafrost and promote ground ice degradation. Melting of ground ice leads to greater water flow into the ground and to significant hydraulic changes (i.e. drainage of peatland and lakes, triggering of thermokarst and new groundwater flow patterns). Road infrastructures built on permafrost are particularly sensitive to permafrost degradation. Road construction and maintenance induce heat flux into the ground by the increase of solar radiation absorption (comparing to natural ground), the increase of snow cover on side slopes, the infiltration of water in embankment material and the migration of surface water in the active layer. The permafrost under the roads is therefore submitted to a warmer environment than in natural ground and his behavior reflects how the permafrost will act in the future with the global warming trend. The permafrost degradation dynamic under a road was studied at the Beaver Creek (Yukon) experimental site located on the Alaska Highway. Permafrost was characterized as near-zero Celcius and highly susceptible to differential thaw-settlement due to the ground ice spatial distribution. Ice-rich cryostructures typical of syngenetic permafrost (e.g. microlenticular) were abundant in the upper and lower cryostratigraphic units of fine-grained soils (Units 1, 2A, and 2C). The middle ice-poor silt layer (Unit 2B) characterized by porous cryostructure comprised the top of a buried ice-wedge network extending several meters in the underlying layers and susceptible to degradation by thermo-erosion. These particular features of the permafrost at the study site facilitated the formation of taliks (unfrozen zones) under the road which leaded to a greater water flow. We believe that water flow is promoting an acceleration of permafrost degradation by advective heat transfer. This process remains poorly studied and quantified in permafrost environment. Field data on

  11. Influence of groundwater levels on zero river flow: A study in Ashburton River North Branch, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riegler, Angelika; Horrell, Graeme

    2013-04-01

    Timing and quantity flows in many alluvial rivers of the Canterbury Plains, New Zealand are influenced by abstraction for irrigation, damming, gravel mining and other activities. Water demand in New Zealand has been increasing significantly since the 1980's, mainly due to an explosion in dairy farming and intensification of irrigated agriculture. In this study a statistical model was constructed for the highly-allocated, and abstracted, Ashburton River North Branch, to predict the duration of low flows and the occurrence and expansion/contraction of dry (no flow) reaches. Regression analysis was undertaken combining existing data on concurrent river flows at specific locations with additional flow measurements to verify the hypothesis that highlights the influence of groundwater level on zero river flow. Considering all available information, intensification of irrigated agriculture abstracting from groundwater is probably the main driver of the increase in the number of days of low flow/dry days at one river cross section. Problems with periodically dry river beds are not only limited to the Ashburton North Branch but can be expected to occur all over the Canterbury Plains in the near future. With extensive research into groundwater surface water interactions it will be possible to provide solutions for safe allocation and the appropriate residual river flows.

  12. Groundwater Flow in the Arthur Marble Aquifer, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, M. K.

    2008-05-01

    Arthur Marble underlies the Takaka Valley and outcrops in Karst Uplands to east and west of the valley in the South Island of New Zealand. It is the principal groundwater aquifer in the region and host to the remarkable Waikoropupu Springs near the coast. With average flow of 13,300 L/s, the karstic springs have many interesting features including unusual size and clarity. This work uses rainfall and river level, natural tracer and chemical measurements to determine the recharge sources and nature of the flow system in the Arthur Marble Aquifer (AMA). Total recharge to the AMA of 19,750 L/s comes from three sources (Karst Uplands stream seepage, Takaka River seepage and Takaka Valley rainfall infiltration). Since 13,300 L/s is discharged at the springs, the remainder must escape via offshore springs (6,450 L/s). The oxygen-18 mass balance allows the contribution of each source to each spring to be determined; most of the flow to the Main Spring of the Waikoropupu Springs comes from the Karst Uplands. The offshore springs are mostly fed from the Takaka River. The chemical concentrations of the Main Spring show input of 0.5% of sea water on average, but varying with flow. This variation with flow shows that two water components (sea-water-bearing and non-sea-water-bearing) contribute to the spring's discharge. Tritium measurements spanning 40 years, and CFC-11 measurements, give a mean residence time of 8 years for the Main Spring water using the preferred two-component model. Our conceptual flow model, based on the flow, oxygen-18, chloride and tritium measurements, reveals that two different flow systems with different recharge sources are needed to explain the flow within the AMA. One system contains deeply penetrating old water with mean age 10.2 years and water volume 3 cubic kilometers, recharged from the Karst Uplands. The other, at shallow levels below the valley floor, has much younger water, with mean age 1.2 years and water volume 0.4 cubic kilometers

  13. Simulation for the development of the continuous groundwater flow measurement technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kaoru; Kumagai, Koki; Fujima, Ritsuko; Chikahisa, Hiroshi

    The flow of groundwater varies with time due to rainfall, atmospheric pressure change, tidal change, melting of snow during seasonal change, underground construction works etc. Therefore, to increase the precision of assessing in-situ groundwater flow characteristics, it is important to measure continuously the direction and velocity of the flow, in addition to obtaining accurate data for the afore mentioned environmental changes. The first part of this paper describes the development of a new device for measuring the direction and velocity of groundwater flow. The device was composed of a unique floating sensor with a hinge end at the bottom, which enabled continuous measurement of groundwater flow based on image data processing technique. In the second part, discussion is focused on clarifying the optimum cross-section shape and the behavior of the float sensor in saltwater and freshwater using numerical analysis.

  14. Groundwater flow system under a rapidly urbanizing coastal city as determined by hydrogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagabu, Makoto; Shimada, Jun; Delinom, Robert; Tsujimura, Maki; Taniguchi, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    In the Jakarta area (Indonesia), excessive groundwater pumping due to the rapidly increasing population has caused groundwater-related problems such as brackish water contamination in coastal areas and land subsidence. In this study, we adopted multiple hydrogeochemical techniques to demonstrate the groundwater flow system in the Jakarta area. Although almost all groundwater existing in the Jakarta basin is recharged at similar elevations, the water quality and residence time demonstrates a clear difference between the shallow and deep aquifers. Due to the rapid decrease in the groundwater potential in urban areas, we found that the seawater intrusion and the shallow and deep groundwaters are mixing, a conclusion confirmed by major ions, Br -:Cl - ratios, and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-12 analysis. Spring water and groundwater samples collected from the southern mountainside area show younger age characteristics with high concentrations of 14C and Ca-HCO 3 type water chemistry. We estimated the residence times of these groundwaters within 45 years under piston flow conditions by tritium analysis. Also, these groundwater ages can be limited to 20-30 years with piston flow evaluated by CFCs. Moreover, due to the magnitude of the CFC-12 concentration, we can use a pseudo age indicator in this field study, because we found a positive correlation between the major type of water chemistry and the CFC-12 concentration.

  15. Groundwater-flow modeling in the Yucatan karstic aquifer, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Herrera, Roger; Sánchez-y-Pinto, Ismael; Gamboa-Vargas, José

    2002-09-01

    The current conceptual model of the unconfined karstic aquifer in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, is that a fresh-water lens floats above denser saline water that penetrates more than 40 km inland. The transmissivity of the aquifer is very high so the hydraulic gradient is very low, ranging from 7-10 mm/km through most of the northern part of the peninsula. The computer modeling program AQUIFER was used to investigate the regional groundwater flow in the aquifer. The karstified zone was modeled using the assumption that it acts hydraulically similar to a granular, porous medium. As part of the calibration, the following hypotheses were tested: (1) karstic features play an important role in the groundwater-flow system; (2) a ring or belt of sinkholes in the area is a manifestation of a zone of high transmissivity that facilitates the channeling of groundwater toward the Gulf of Mexico; and (3) the geologic features in the southern part of Yucatan influence the groundwater-flow system. The model shows that the Sierrita de Ticul fault, in the southwestern part of the study area, acts as a flow barrier and head values decline toward the northeast. The modeling also shows that the regional flow-system dynamics have not been altered despite the large number of pumping wells because the volume of water pumped is small compared with the volume of recharge, and the well-developed karst system of the region has a very high hydraulic conductivity. Résumé. Le modèle conceptuel classique de l'aquifère karstique libre de la péninsule du Yucatan (Mexique) consiste en une lentille d'eau douce flottant sur une eau salée plus dense qui pénètre à plus de 40 km à l'intérieur des terres. La transmissivité de l'aquifère est très élevée, en sorte que le gradient hydraulique est très faible, compris entre 7 et 10 mm/km dans la plus grande partie du nord de la péninsule. Le modèle AQUIFER a été utilisé pour explorer les écoulements souterrains régionaux dans cet

  16. Simulating the effect of climate extremes on groundwater flow through a lakebed.

    PubMed

    Virdi, Makhan L; Lee, Terrie M; Swancar, Amy; Niswonger, Richard G

    2013-03-01

    Groundwater exchanges with lakes resulting from cyclical wet and dry climate extremes maintain lake levels in the environment in ways that are not well understood, in part because they remain difficult to simulate. To better understand the atypical groundwater interactions with lakes caused by climatic extremes, an original conceptual approach is introduced using MODFLOW-2005 and a kinematic-wave approximation to variably saturated flow that allows lake size and position in the basin to change while accurately representing the daily lake volume and three-dimensional variably saturated groundwater flow responses in the basin. Daily groundwater interactions are simulated for a calibrated lake basin in Florida over a decade that included historic wet and dry departures from the average rainfall. The divergent climate extremes subjected nearly 70% of the maximum lakebed area and 75% of the maximum shoreline perimeter to both groundwater inflow and lake leakage. About half of the lakebed area subject to flow reversals also went dry. A flow-through pattern present for 73% of the decade caused net leakage from the lake 80% of the time. Runoff from the saturated lake margin offset the groundwater deficit only about half of that time. A centripetal flow pattern present for 6% of the decade was important for maintaining the lake stage and generated 30% of all net groundwater inflow. Pumping effects superimposed on dry climate extremes induced the least frequent but most cautionary flow pattern with leakage from over 90% of the actual lakebed area. PMID:22891702

  17. Simulating the effect of climate extremes on groundwater flow through a lakebed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virdi, Makhan L.; Lee, Terrie M.; Swancar, Amy; Niswonger, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater exchanges with lakes resulting from cyclical wet and dry climate extremes maintain lake levels in the environment in ways that are not well understood, in part because they remain difficult to simulate. To better understand the atypical groundwater interactions with lakes caused by climatic extremes, an original conceptual approach is introduced using MODFLOW-2005 and a kinematic-wave approximation to variably saturated flow that allows lake size and position in the basin to change while accurately representing the daily lake volume and three-dimensional variably saturated groundwater flow responses in the basin. Daily groundwater interactions are simulated for a calibrated lake basin in Florida over a decade that included historic wet and dry departures from the average rainfall. The divergent climate extremes subjected nearly 70% of the maximum lakebed area and 75% of the maximum shoreline perimeter to both groundwater inflow and lake leakage. About half of the lakebed area subject to flow reversals also went dry. A flow-through pattern present for 73% of the decade caused net leakage from the lake 80% of the time. Runoff from the saturated lake margin offset the groundwater deficit only about half of that time. A centripetal flow pattern present for 6% of the decade was important for maintaining the lake stage and generated 30% of all net groundwater inflow. Pumping effects superimposed on dry climate extremes induced the least frequent but most cautionary flow pattern with leakage from over 90% of the actual lakebed area.

  18. Regional groundwater flow and geochemical evolution in the Amacuzac River Basin, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Casique, Eric; Guinzberg-Belmont, Jacobo; Ortega-Guerrero, Adrián

    2016-05-01

    An approach is presented to investigate the regional evolution of groundwater in the basin of the Amacuzac River in Central Mexico. The approach is based on groundwater flow cross-sectional modeling in combination with major ion chemistry and geochemical modeling, complemented with principal component and cluster analyses. The hydrogeologic units composing the basin, which combine aquifers and aquitards both in granular, fractured and karstic rocks, were represented in sections parallel to the regional groundwater flow. Steady-state cross-section numerical simulations aided in the conceptualization of the groundwater flow system through the basin and permitted estimation of bulk hydraulic conductivity values, recharge rates and residence times. Forty-five water locations (springs, groundwater wells and rivers) were sampled throughout the basin for chemical analysis of major ions. The modeled gravity-driven groundwater flow system satisfactorily reproduced field observations, whereas the main geochemical processes of groundwater in the basin are associated to the order and reactions in which the igneous and sedimentary rocks are encountered along the groundwater flow. Recharge water in the volcanic and volcano-sedimentary aquifers increases the concentration of HCO3 -, Mg2+ and Ca2+ from dissolution of plagioclase and olivine. Deeper groundwater flow encounters carbonate rocks, under closed CO2 conditions, and dissolves calcite and dolomite. When groundwater encounters gypsum lenses in the shallow Balsas Group or the deeper Huitzuco anhydrite, gypsum dissolution produces proportional increased concentration of Ca2+ and SO4 2-; two samples reflected the influence of hydrothermal fluids and probably halite dissolution. These geochemical trends are consistent with the principal component and cluster analyses.

  19. Hyporheic transport and biogeochemical reactions in pool-riffle systems under varying ambient groundwater flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauth, Nico; Schmidt, Christian; Vieweg, Michael; Maier, Uli; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2014-05-01

    At the interface between stream water, groundwater, and the hyporheic zone (HZ), important biogeochemical processes that play a crucial role in fluvial ecology occur. Solutes that infiltrate into the HZ can react with each other and possibly also with upwelling solutes from the groundwater. In this study, we systematically evaluate how variations of gaining and losing conditions, stream discharge, and pool-riffle morphology affect aerobic respiration (AR) and denitrification (DN) in the HZ. For this purpose, a computational fluid dynamics model of stream water flow is coupled to a reactive transport model. Scenarios of variations of the solute concentration in the upwelling groundwater were conducted. Our results show that solute influx, residence time, and the size of reactive zones strongly depend on presence, magnitude, and direction of ambient groundwater flow. High magnitudes of ambient groundwater flow lower AR efficiency by up to 4 times and DN by up to 3 orders of magnitude, compared to neutral conditions. The influence of stream discharge and morphology on the efficiency of AR and DN are minor, in comparison to that of ambient groundwater flow. Different scenarios of O2 and NO3 concentrations in the upwelling groundwater reveal that DN efficiency of the HZ is highest under low upwelling magnitudes accompanied with low concentrations of O2 and NO3. Our results demonstrate how ambient groundwater flow influences solute transport, AR, and DN in the HZ. Neglecting groundwater flow in stream-groundwater interactions would lead to a significant overestimation of the efficiency of biogeochemical reactions in fluvial systems.

  20. Stable isotope and groundwater flow dynamics of agricultural irrigation recharge into groundwater resources of the Central Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Davisson, M.L.; Criss, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    Intensive agricultural irrigation and overdraft of groundwater in the Central Valley of California profoundly affect the regional quality and availability of shallow groundwater resources. In the natural state, the {delta}{sup 18}O values of groundwater were relatively homogeneous (mostly -7.0 {+-} 0.5{per_thousand}), reflecting local meteoric recharge that slowly (1-3m/yr) flowed toward the valley axis. Today, on the west side of the valley, the isotope distribution is dominated by high {sup 18}O enclosures formed by recharge of evaporated irrigation waters, while the east side has bands of low {sup 18}O groundwater indicating induced recharge from rivers draining the Sierra Nevada mountains. Changes in {delta}{sup 18}O values caused by the agricultural recharge strongly correlate with elevated nitrate concentrations (5 to >100 mg/L) that form pervasive, non-point source pollutants. Small, west-side cities dependent solely on groundwater resources have experienced increases of >1.0 mg/L per year of nitrate for 10-30 years. The resultant high nitrates threaten the economical use of the groundwater for domestic purposes, and have forced some well shut-downs. Furthermore, since >80% of modern recharge is now derived from agricultural irrigation, and because modern recharge rates are {approximately}10 times those of the natural state, agricultural land retirement by urbanization will severely curtail the current safe-yields and promote overdraft pumping. Such overdrafting has occurred in the Sacramento metropolitan area for {approximately}40 years, creating cones of depression {approximately}25m deep. Today, groundwater withdrawal in Sacramento is approximately matched by infiltration of low {sup 18}O water (-11.0{per_thousand}) away from the Sacramento and American Rivers, which is estimated to occur at 100-300m/year from the sharp {sup 18}O gradients in our groundwater isotope map.

  1. Evaluation of uncertainties due to hydrogeological modeling and groundwater flow analysis: Steady flow, transient flow, and thermal studies

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, Christine; Karasaki, Kenzi

    2002-12-11

    Starting with regional geographic, geologic, surface and subsurface hydrologic, and geophysical data for the Tono area in Gifu, Japan, we develop an effective continuum model to simulate subsurface flow and transport in a 4 km by 6 km by 3 km thick fractured granite rock mass overlain by sedimentary layers. Individual fractures are not modeled explicitly. Rather, continuum permeability and porosity distributions are assigned stochastically, based on well-test data and fracture density measurements. Lithologic layering and one major fault, the Tsukiyoshi Fault, are assigned deterministically. We conduct three different studies: (1) the so-called base case, in which the model simulates the steady-state groundwater flow through the site, and then stream trace analysis is used to calculate travel times to the model boundary from specified release points; (2) simulations of transient flow during long term pump tests (LTPT) using the base-case model; and (3) thermal studies in which coupled heat flow and fluid flow are modeled, to examine the effects of the geothermal gradient on groundwater flow. The base-case study indicates that the choice of open or closed lateral boundaries has a strong influence on the regional groundwater flow patterns produced by the models, but no field data exist that can be used to determine which boundary conditions are more realistic. The LTPT study cannot be used to distinguish between the alternative boundary conditions, because the pumping rate is too small to produce an analyzable pressure response at the model boundaries. In contrast, the thermal study shows that the temperature distributions produced by the open and closed models differ greatly. Comparison with borehole temperature data may be used to eliminate the closed model from further consideration.

  2. Interpreting Variations in Groundwater Flows from Repeated Distributed Thermal Perturbation Tests.

    PubMed

    Hausner, Mark B; Kryder, Levi; Klenke, John; Reinke, Richard; Tyler, Scott W

    2016-07-01

    To better understand the groundwater resources of southern Nye County, Nevada, a multipart distributed thermal perturbation sensing (DTPS) test was performed on a complex of three wells. These wells penetrate an alluvial aquifer that drains the Nevada National Security Site, and characterizing the hydraulic properties and flow paths of the regional groundwater flow system has proven very difficult. The well complex comprised one pumping well and two observation wells, both located 18 m from the pumping well. Using fiber-optic cables and line heaters, DTPS tests were performed under both stressed and unstressed conditions. Each test injects heat into the water column over a period of one to two days, and observes the rising temperature during heat injection and falling temperatures after heating ceases. Aquifer thermal properties are inferred from temperature patterns in the cased section of the wells, and fluxes through the 30-m screened section are estimated based on a model that incorporates conductive and advective heat fluxes. Vertical variations in flux are examined on a scale of tens of cm. The actively flowing zones of the aquifer change between the stressed and unstressed test, and anisotropy in the aquifer permeability is apparent from the changing fluxes between tests. The fluxes inferred from the DTPS tests are compared to solute tracer tests previously performed on the same site. The DTPS-based fluxes are consistent with the fastest solute transport observed in the tracer test, but appear to overestimate the mean flux through the system. PMID:26714003

  3. Simulation of ground-water flow and land subsidence in the Antelope Valley ground-water basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leighton, David A.; Phillips, Steven P.

    2003-01-01

    Antelope Valley, California, is a topographically closed basin in the western part of the Mojave Desert, about 50 miles northeast of Los Angeles. The Antelope Valley ground-water basin is about 940 square miles and is separated from the northern part of Antelope Valley by faults and low-lying hills. Prior to 1972, ground water provided more than 90 percent of the total water supply in the valley; since 1972, it has provided between 50 and 90 percent. Most ground-water pumping in the valley occurs in the Antelope Valley ground-water basin, which includes the rapidly growing cities of Lancaster and Palmdale. Ground-water-level declines of more than 200 feet in some parts of the ground-water basin have resulted in an increase in pumping lifts, reduced well efficiency, and land subsidence of more than 6 feet in some areas. Future urban growth and limits on the supply of imported water may continue to increase reliance on ground water. To better understand the ground-water flow system and to develop a tool to aid in effectively managing the water resources, a numerical model of ground-water flow and land subsidence in the Antelope Valley ground-water basin was developed using old and new geohydrologic information. The ground-water flow system consists of three aquifers: the upper, middle, and lower aquifers. The aquifers, which were identified on the basis of the hydrologic properties, age, and depth of the unconsolidated deposits, consist of gravel, sand, silt, and clay alluvial deposits and clay and silty clay lacustrine deposits. Prior to ground-water development in the valley, recharge was primarily the infiltration of runoff from the surrounding mountains. Ground water flowed from the recharge areas to discharge areas around the playas where it discharged either from the aquifer system as evapotranspiration or from springs. Partial barriers to horizontal ground-water flow, such as faults, have been identified in the ground-water basin. Water-level declines owing to

  4. Groundwater flow and solute movement to drain laterals, western San Joaquin Valley, California: 2. Quantitative hydrologic assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fio, John L.; Deverel, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    Groundwater flow modeling was used to quantitatively assess the hydrologic processes affecting ground water and solute movement to drain laterals. Modeling results were used to calculate the depth distribution of groundwater flowing into drain laterals at 1.8 m (drain lateral 1) and 2.7 m (drain lateral 2) below land surface. The simulations indicated that under nonirrigated conditions about 89% of the flow in drain lateral 2 was from groundwater originating from depths greater than 6 m below land surface. The deep groundwater has higher selenium concentrations than shallow groundwater. Simulation of irrigated conditions indicates that as recharge (deep percolation) increases, the proportional contribution of deep groundwater to drain lateral flow decreases. Groundwater flow paths and travel times estimated from the simulation results indicate that groundwater containing high concentrations of selenium (greater than 780 μg L−1) probably will continue to enter drain lateral 2 for decades.

  5. Groundwater resources of the Wood River Valley, Idaho--A groundwater-flow model for resource management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartolino, James; Vincent, Sean

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in collaboration with the Idaho Department of Water Resources (IDWR), will use the current understanding of the Wood River Valley aquifer system to construct a MODFLOW numerical groundwater-flow model to simulate potential anthropogenic and climatic effects on groundwater and surface-water resources. This model will serve as a tool for water rights administration and water-resource management and planning. The study will be conducted over a 3-year period from late 2012 until model and report completion in 2015.

  6. Controls on groundwater flow in the Bengal Basin of India and Bangladesh: Regional modeling analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michael, H.A.; Voss, C.I.

    2009-01-01

    Groundwater for domestic and irrigation purposes is produced primarily from shallow parts of the Bengal Basin aquifer system (India and Bangladesh), which contains high concentrations of dissolved arsenic (exceeding worldwide drinking water standards), though deeper groundwater is generally low in arsenic. An essential first step for determining sustainable management of the deep groundwater resource is identification of hydrogeologic controls on flow and quantification of basin-scale groundwater flow patterns. Results from groundwater modeling, in which the Bengal Basin aquifer system is represented as a single aquifer with higher horizontal than vertical hydraulic conductivity, indicate that this anisotropy is the primary hydrogeologic control on the natural flowpath lengths. Despite extremely low hydraulic gradients due to minimal topographic relief, anisotropy implies large-scale (tens to hundreds of kilometers) flow at depth. Other hydrogeologic factors, including lateral and vertical changes in hydraulic conductivity, have minor effects on overall flow patterns. However, because natural hydraulic gradients are low, the impact of pumping on groundwater flow is overwhelming; modeling indicates that pumping has substantially changed the shallow groundwater budget and flowpaths from predevelopment conditions. ?? Springer-Verlag 2009.

  7. Effects of linking a soil-water-balance model with a groundwater-flow model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanton, Jennifer S.; Ryter, Derek W.; Peterson, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    A previously published regional groundwater-flow model in north-central Nebraska was sequentially linked with the recently developed soil-water-balance (SWB) model to analyze effects to groundwater-flow model parameters and calibration results. The linked models provided a more detailed spatial and temporal distribution of simulated recharge based on hydrologic processes, improvement of simulated groundwater-level changes and base flows at specific sites in agricultural areas, and a physically based assessment of the relative magnitude of recharge for grassland, nonirrigated cropland, and irrigated cropland areas. Root-mean-squared (RMS) differences between the simulated and estimated or measured target values for the previously published model and linked models were relatively similar and did not improve for all types of calibration targets. However, without any adjustment to the SWB-generated recharge, the RMS difference between simulated and estimated base-flow target values for the groundwater-flow model was slightly smaller than for the previously published model, possibly indicating that the volume of recharge simulated by the SWB code was closer to actual hydrogeologic conditions than the previously published model provided. Groundwater-level and base-flow hydrographs showed that temporal patterns of simulated groundwater levels and base flows were more accurate for the linked models than for the previously published model at several sites, particularly in agricultural areas.

  8. Structural control of groundwater flow regimes and groundwater chemistry along the lower reaches of the Zerka River, West Jordan, using remote sensing, GIS, and field methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odeh, Taleb; Salameh, Elias; Schirmer, Mario; Strauch, Gerhard

    2009-10-01

    A hydrogeological study was completed within a sub-catchment of the Zerka River drainage basin, in western Jordan. The system is characterized by anticlinal bending with an axis trending SSW-NNE and plunging a few degrees in the SSW direction. The anticlinal structure diverts groundwater flow towards the SSW while the strike-slipe faults cause the groundwater to diverge where the fault is perpendicular to the groundwater flow lines, and to converge where the fault is parallel to the groundwater flow lines. A direct relationship was found between the location of springs and the type of groundwater flow with regard to the amount of discharge wherein large spring discharges are located in zones of converging groundwater flow lines. In areas where faults are not abundant, the groundwater retention time in the aquifers is long and a zonation of the electrical conductivity was detected due to mineral dissolution. By controlling groundwater flow, the anticlinal setting produces three genetic groups of groundwater flow systems: (1) alkaline-earth alkaline water which is predominately a bicarbonate-type composition, (2) alkaline-earth alkaline water which is predominately bicarbonate-sulfate, and (3) alkaline-earth alkaline water with a high alkaline component.

  9. AN INTEGRATED VIEW OF GROUNDWATER FLOW CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING IN FRACTURED GEOLOGIC MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The particular attributes of fractured geologic media pertaining to groundwater flow characterization and modeling are presented. These cover the issues of fracture network and hydraulic control of fracture geometry parameters, major and minor fractures, heterogeneity, anisotrop...

  10. Combining groundwater quality analysis and a numerical flow simulation for spatially establishing utilization strategies for groundwater and surface water in the Pingtung Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Cheng-Shin; Chen, Ching-Fang; Liang, Ching-Ping; Chen, Jui-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    Overexploitation of groundwater is a common problem in the Pingtung Plain area of Taiwan, resulting in substantial drawdown of groundwater levels as well as the occurrence of severe seawater intrusion and land subsidence. Measures need to be taken to preserve these valuable groundwater resources. This study seeks to spatially determine the most suitable locations for the use of surface water on this plain instead of extracting groundwater for drinking, irrigation, and aquaculture purposes based on information obtained by combining groundwater quality analysis and a numerical flow simulation assuming the planning of manmade lakes and reservoirs to the increase of water supply. The multivariate indicator kriging method is first used to estimate occurrence probabilities, and to rank townships as suitable or unsuitable for groundwater utilization according to water quality standards for drinking, irrigation, and aquaculture. A numerical model of groundwater flow (MODFLOW) is adopted to quantify the recovery of groundwater levels in townships after model calibration when groundwater for drinking and agricultural demands has been replaced by surface water. Finally, townships with poor groundwater quality and significant increases in groundwater levels in the Pingtung Plain are prioritized for the groundwater conservation planning based on the combined assessment of groundwater quality and quantity. The results of this study indicate that the integration of groundwater quality analysis and the numerical flow simulation is capable of establishing sound strategies for joint groundwater and surface water use. Six southeastern townships are found to be suitable locations for replacing groundwater with surface water from manmade lakes or reservoirs to meet drinking, irrigation, and aquaculture demands.

  11. Teaching groundwater flow processes: connecting lecture to practical and field classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakoun, V.; Mazzilli, N.; Pistre, S.; Jourde, H.

    2013-05-01

    Preparing future hydrogeologists to assess local and regional hydrogeological changes and issues related to water supply is a challenging task that creates a need for effective teaching frameworks. The educational literature suggests that hydrogeology courses should consistently integrate lecture class instructions with practical and field classes. However, most teaching examples still separate these three class components. This paper presents an introductory course to groundwater flow processes taught at Université Montpellier 2, France. The adopted pedagogical scheme and the proposed activities are described in details. The key points of the proposed scheme for the course are: (i) iterations into the three class components to address groundwater flow processes topics, (ii) a course that is structured around a main thread (well testing) present in each class component, and (iii) a pedagogical approach that promotes active learning strategies, in particular using original practical classes and field experiments. The experience indicates that the proposed scheme improves the learning process, as compared to a classical, teacher-centered approach.

  12. Effects of turbulence on hydraulic heads and parameter sensitivities in preferential groundwater flow layers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shoemaker, W.B.; Cunningham, K.J.; Kuniansky, E.L.; Dixon, J.

    2008-01-01

    A conduit flow process (CFP) for the Modular Finite Difference Ground-Water Flow model, MODFLOW-2005, has been created by the U.S. Geological Survey. An application of the CFP on a carbonate aquifer in southern Florida is described; this application examines (1) the potential for turbulent groundwater flow and (2) the effects of turbulent flow on hydraulic heads and parameter sensitivities. Turbulent flow components were spatially extensive in preferential groundwater flow layers, with horizontal hydraulic conductivities of about 5,000,000 m d-1, mean void diameters equal to about 3.5 cm, groundwater temperature equal to about 25??C, and critical Reynolds numbers less than or equal to 400. Turbulence either increased or decreased simulated heads from their laminar elevations. Specifically, head differences from laminar elevations ranged from about -18 to +27 cm and were explained by the magnitude of net flow to the finite difference model cell. Turbulence also affected the sensitivities of model parameters. Specifically, the composite-scaled sensitivities of horizontal hydraulic conductivities decreased by as much as 70% when turbulence was essentially removed. These hydraulic head and sensitivity differences due to turbulent groundwater flow highlight potential errors in models based on the equivalent porous media assumption, which assumes laminar flow in uniformly distributed void spaces. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Quantifying uranium complexation by groundwater dissolved organic carbon using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranville, James F.; Hendry, M. Jim; Reszat, Thorsten N.; Xie, Qianli; Honeyman, Bruce D.

    2007-05-01

    The long-term mobility of actinides in groundwaters is important for siting nuclear waste facilities and managing waste-rock piles at uranium mines. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) may influence the mobility of uranium, but few field-based studies have been undertaken to examine this in typical groundwaters. In addition, few techniques are available to isolate DOC and directly quantify the metals complexed to it. Determination of U-organic matter association constants from analysis of field-collected samples compliments laboratory measurements, and these constants are needed for accurate transport calculations. The partitioning of U to DOC in a clay-rich aquitard was investigated in 10 groundwater samples collected between 2 and 30 m depths at one test site. A positive correlation was observed between the DOC (4-132 mg/L) and U concentrations (20-603 μg/L). The association of U and DOC was examined directly using on-line coupling of Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AsFlFFF) with UV absorbance (UVA) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) detectors. This method has the advantages of utilizing very small sample volumes (20-50 μL) as well as giving molecular weight information on U-organic matter complexes. AsFlFFF-UVA results showed that 47-98% of the DOC (4-136 mg C/L) was recovered in the AsFlFFF analysis, of which 25-64% occurred in the resolvable peak. This peak corresponded to a weight-average molecular weight of about 900-1400 Daltons (Da). In all cases, AsFlFFF-ICP-MS suggested that ≤ 2% of the U, likely present as U(VI), was complexed with the DOC. This result was in good agreement with the U speciation modeling performed on the sample taken from the 2.3 m depth, which predicted approximately 3% DOC-complexed U. This good agreement suggests that the AsFlFFF-ICP-MS method may be very useful for determining U-organic matter association in small volume samples. Because the pH (7.0-8.1) and carbonate concentrations of these waters

  14. Documentation of finite-difference model for simulation of three-dimensional ground-water flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trescott, Peter C.; Larson, S.P.

    1976-01-01

    User experience has indicated that the documentation of the model of three-dimensional ground-water flow (Trescott and Larson, 1975) should be expanded. This supplement is intended to fulfill that need. The original report emphasized the theory of the strongly implicit procedure, instructions for using the groundwater-flow model, and practical considerations for application. (See also W76-02962 and W76-13085) (Woodard-USGS)

  15. Estimation of the velocities and discharge rates of groundwater flows by helium and tritium distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, V.V.; Antonenko, E.F.; Obukhova, S.N.

    1995-11-01

    Modeling is used to show that bends in the curves of groundwater flows and confluence of different-age flows demonstrate themselves in spatial variability in concentration fields of {sup 4}He, {sup 3}H, and {sup 14}C isotopes. The results are used to reveal typical flows in a section of Switzerland and to estimate their velocities and discharge rates.

  16. Effects of groundwater lateral flow on land surface processes: a case study in Heihe River Basin, north-west of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Z.; Zeng, Y.; Yu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    As an important component of hydrologic cycle, groundwater is affected by topography, vegetation, climate condition, and anthropogenic activity. Groundwater horizontal convergence and divergence and vertical interaction with soil water result in variations of soil moisture, water and energy exchanges between the land surface and the atmosphere, which ultimately influences climate. In this work, a two-dimensional groundwater lateral flow scheme based on groundwater mass equation, is developed and incorporated into the land surface model CLM4.5 to investigate effects of groundwater lateral flow on land surface processes in a river basin. A 30-year simulation with groundwater lateral flow and a control run without the horizontal movement are conducted over Heihe River Basin, north-west China, from 1979 to 2012 using the developed model. Results show that with groundwater lateral flow, equilibrium distribution of groundwater table shows more spatial variability following topography rather than the water balance between local precipitation and evapotranspiration, and are much closer to well observations especially over middle reaches area. Along with shallower groundwater table over piedmont areas in the middle reaches, increased soil moisture is shown which alleviates the underestimation of CLM4.5 at here. Changes in evapotranspiration are occurred and it is mainly controlled by the variation of local surface soil moisture, since water is the major limitation factor of evapotranspiration over this arid area. Besides, groundwater lateral flow can change the distribution of surface runoff by changing the saturated area fraction of each model grid cell. Energy cycle also responds to the changes of hydrological cycle which redistributes the sensible heat flux and latent heat flux in the entire basin.

  17. Density-Thermal-Driven Groundwater Flow and Brine Transport Near Salt Domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamshidzadeh, Z.; Tsai, F. T.; Mirbagheri, S.; Ghasemzadeh, H.

    2012-12-01

    A major environmental and economic concern in many parts of the world is progressive salinization of groundwater system. Therefore, understanding the sources and flow patterns of encroachment of saline or brine water into freshwater aquifers is necessary for groundwater resources management. Flow patterns near salt domes in deep formation is of interest in this study because of complexity of different driving forces from salt concentration, thermal, and fluid pressure gradients. Because of rock formation and relative high temperature in the vicinity of salt domes, fluid salinity is much higher than seawater and density variation in the brine waters exceeds 20% with respect to fresh water. Groundwater flow, salt transport and heat transport equations are strongly coupled. Moreover, it is necessary to include the dispersive flux of total fluid mass in the flow equation. In this study, a two-dimensional density-thermal-driven groundwater flow induced by salt mass fraction gradient and temperature gradient near a hypothetical salt dome is considered. A fully implicit finite difference method has been developed to solve three coupled governing equations. The classical Elder problems and the Henry problem were used as benchmarks to verify the numerical code for solving the coupled flow and heat equations and the coupled flow and transport equations. Then, the numerical model is applied to a hypothetical salt dome problem to simulate upward density-thermal-driven groundwater flow and brine transport.

  18. Application of a fully-integrated groundwater-surface water flow model in municipal asset management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, L. K.; Unger, A.; Jones, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Access to affordable potable water is critical in the development and maintenance of urban centres. Given that water is a public good in Canada, all funds related to operation and maintenance of the drinking water and wastewater networks must come from consumers. An asset management system can be put in place by municipalities to more efficiently manage their water and wastewater distribution system to ensure proper use of these funds. The system works at the operational, tactical, and strategic levels, thus ensuring optimal scheduling of operation and maintenance activities, as well as prediction of future water demand scenarios. At the operational level, a fully integrated model is used to simulate the groundwater-surface water interaction of the Laurel Creek Watershed, of which 80% is urbanized by the City of Waterloo. Canadian municipalities typically lose 13% of their potable water through leaks in watermains and sanitary sewers, and sanitary sewers often generate substantial inflows from fractures in pipe walls. The City of Waterloo sanitary sewers carry an additional 10,000 cubic meters of water to wastewater treatment plants. Therefore, watermain and sanitary sewers present a significant impact on the groundwater-surface water interaction, as well as the affordability of the drinking water and wastewater networks as a whole. To determine areas of concern within the network, the integrated groundwater-surface water model also simulates flow through the City of Waterloo's watermain and sanitary sewer networks. The final model will be used to assess the interaction between measured losses of water from the City of Waterloo's watermain system, infiltration into the sanitary sewer system adjacent to the watermains, and the response of the groundwater system to deteriorated sanitary sewers or to pipes that have been recently renovated. This will ultimately contribute to the City of Waterloo's municipal asset management plan.

  19. The impact of glaciations and glacial processes on groundwater flow dynamics: a numerical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterckx, A.; Lemieux, J. M.; Vaikmae, R.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical models are widely used to investigate the impact of glaciations on groundwater flow systems because they can simulate complex glacial processes. However, it isn't clear which of these processes are relevant to adequately capture groundwater flow dynamics. Given the complexity of representing these processes in a numerical model and the paucity of field data available for their validation, it is of prime interest to assess how they impact groundwater flow and if any of these processes could be neglected. In order to assess the specific impact of glacial processes on groundwater flow dynamics, those processes were included in the numerical model FEFLOW and simulations were conducted in a simple conceptual model representing a 21 ky glacial cycle in a sedimentary basin. The following processes have been simulated: subglacial recharge, linear and non-linear compaction of the porous medium under the weight of the ice, isostasy, proglacial lakes, as well as permafrost. Solute transport was simulated along with groundwater flow to track groundwater originating from the ice-sheet. To interpret the results, a base case scenario considering only subglacial recharge was selected and compared with the other scenarios, where individual glacial processes were simulated. When comparing the results at the end of the simulations, it appears that most of the aforementioned glacial processes don't lead to a significant difference in meltwater distribution with respect to the base case. Only hydromechanical coupling brings some noticeable change. Conversely, the type and the value of the boundary condition applied at the base of the ice-sheet play a major role in groundwater flow dynamics. The presence of confining hydrogeological units also seems to be a key to understand the long-term effect of glaciations. These results suggest that some of the glacial processes may be neglected for the simulation of groundwater flow dynamics during a glacial period.

  20. Ramification of Channel Networks Incised by Groundwater Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, R. S.; Seybold, H. F.; Petroff, A. P.; Devauchelle, O.; Rothman, D.

    2011-12-01

    The geometry of channel networks has been a source of fascination since at least Leonardo da Vinci's time. Yet a comprehensive understanding of ramification---the mechanism of branching by which a stream network acquires its geometric complexity---remains elusive. To investigate the mechanisms of ramification and network growth, we consider channel growth driven by groundwater flow as a model system, analogous to a medical scientist's laboratory rat. We test our theoretical predictions through analysis of a particularly compelling example found on the Florida Panhandle north of Bristol. As our ultimate goal is to understand ramification and growth dynamics of the entire network, we build a computational model based on the following growth hypothesis: Channels grow in the direction that captures the maximum water flux. When there are two such directions, tips bifurcate. The direction of growth can be determined from the expansion of the ground water field around each tip, where each coefficient in this expansion has a physical interpretation. The first coefficient in the expansion determines the ground water discharge, leading to a straight growth of the channel. The second term describes the asymmetry in the water field leading to a bending of the stream in the direction of maximal water flux. The ratio between the first and the third coefficient determines a critical distance rc over which the tip feels inhomogeneities in the ground water table. This initiates then the splitting of the tip. In order to test our growth hypothesis and to determine rc, we grow the Florida network backward. At each time step we calculate the solution of the ground water field and determine the appropriate expansion coefficients around each tip. Comparing this simulation result to the predicted values provides us with a stringent measure for rc and the significance of our growth hypothesis.

  1. Groundwater flow in a relatively old oceanic volcanic island: the Betancuria area, Fuerteventura Island, Canary Islands, Spain.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Christian; Custodio, Emilio

    2014-10-15

    The island of Fuerteventura is the oldest of the Canary Islands' volcanic archipelago. It is constituted by volcanic submarine and subaerial activity and intrusive Miocene events, with some residual later volcanism and Quaternary volcanic deposits that have favored groundwater recharge. The climate is arid, with an average rainfall that barely attains 60 mm/year in the coast and up to 200 mm/year in the highlands. The aquifer recharge is small but significant; it is brackish due to large airborne atmospheric salinity, between 7 and 15 gm(-2)year(-1) of chloride deposition, and high evapo-concentration in the soil. The average recharge is estimated to be less than about 5 mm/year at low altitude and up to 10 mm/year in the highlands, and up to 20 mm/year associated to recent lava fields. Hydrochemical and water isotopic studies, supported by water table data and well and borehole descriptions, contribute a preliminary conceptual model of groundwater flow and water origin in the Betancuria area, the central area of the island. In general, water from springs and shallow wells tends to be naturally brackish and of recent origin. Deep saline groundwater is found and is explained as remnants of very old marine water trapped in isolated features in the very low permeability intrusive rocks. Preliminary radiocarbon dating indicates that this deep groundwater has an apparent age of less than 5000 years BP but it is the result of mixing recent water recharge with very old deep groundwater. Most of the groundwater flow occurs through the old raised volcanic shield of submarine and subaerial formations and later Miocene subaerial basalts. Groundwater transit time through the unsaturated zone is of a few decades, which allows the consideration of long-term quasi-steady state recharge. Transit times are up to a few centuries through the saturated old volcanics and up to several millennia in the intrusive formations, where isolated pockets of very old water may exist. PMID

  2. Groundwater activity on Mars and implications for a deep biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalski, Joseph R.; Cuadros, Javier; Niles, Paul B.; Parnell, John; Deanne Rogers, A.; Wright, Shawn P.

    2013-02-01

    By the time eukaryotic life or photosynthesis evolved on Earth, the martian surface had become extremely inhospitable, but the subsurface of Mars could potentially have contained a vast microbial biosphere. Crustal fluids may have welled up from the subsurface to alter and cement surface sediments, potentially preserving clues to subsurface habitability. Here we present a conceptual model of subsurface habitability of Mars and evaluate evidence for groundwater upwelling in deep basins. Many ancient, deep basins lack evidence for groundwater activity. However, McLaughlin Crater, one of the deepest craters on Mars, contains evidence for Mg-Fe-bearing clays and carbonates that probably formed in an alkaline, groundwater-fed lacustrine setting. This environment strongly contrasts with the acidic, water-limited environments implied by the presence of sulphate deposits that have previously been suggested to form owing to groundwater upwelling. Deposits formed as a result of groundwater upwelling on Mars, such as those in McLaughlin Crater, could preserve critical evidence of a deep biosphere on Mars. We suggest that groundwater upwelling on Mars may have occurred sporadically on local scales, rather than at regional or global scales.

  3. Seasonal Reversals of Groundwater Flow Around Lakes and the Relevance to Stagnation Points and Lake Budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Mary P.; Munter, James A.

    1981-08-01

    Several researchers have observed seasonal reversals in the direction of groundwater flow around lakes. If these reversals are prolonged and are accompanied by the formation of a stagnation point, they may have a significant effect on a lake's water and nutrient budgets. The formation of a stagnation point at a flow-through lake (i.e., a lake that receives groundwater through part of the lake basin and recharges the groundwater system over the rest of the lake basin) is accomplished by the formation of a groundwater mound on the downgradient side of the lake. In this paper the seasonal formation of a stagnation point at Snake Lake, Wisconsin, is investigated with the aid of two-dimensional transient computer models applied in cross section and areally. The analysis demonstrates the potential for the seasonal formation of a stagnation point at a flow-through lake and provides some insight into the transient development of the stagnation point.

  4. Comparison of groundwater flow in Southern California coastal aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, Randall T.; Izbicki, John A.; Reichard, Eric G.; Edwards, Brian D.; Land, Michael; Martin, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Maintaining the sustainability of Southern California coastal aquifers requires joint management of surface water and groundwater (conjunctive use). This requires new data collection and analyses (including research drilling, modern geohydrologic investigations, and development of detailed computer groundwater models that simulate the supply and demand components separately), implementation of new facilities (including spreading and injection facilities for artificial recharge), and establishment of new institutions and policies that help to sustain the water resources and better manage regional development.

  5. GSFLOW - Coupled Ground-Water and Surface-Water Flow Model Based on the Integration of the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) and the Modular Ground-Water Flow Model (MODFLOW-2005)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markstrom, Steven L.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Regan, R. Steven; Prudic, David E.; Barlow, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    The need to assess the effects of variability in climate, biota, geology, and human activities on water availability and flow requires the development of models that couple two or more components of the hydrologic cycle. An integrated hydrologic model called GSFLOW (Ground-water and Surface-water FLOW) was developed to simulate coupled ground-water and surface-water resources. The new model is based on the integration of the U.S. Geological Survey Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) and the U.S. Geological Survey Modular Ground-Water Flow Model (MODFLOW). Additional model components were developed, and existing components were modified, to facilitate integration of the models. Methods were developed to route flow among the PRMS Hydrologic Response Units (HRUs) and between the HRUs and the MODFLOW finite-difference cells. This report describes the organization, concepts, design, and mathematical formulation of all GSFLOW model components. An important aspect of the integrated model design is its ability to conserve water mass and to provide comprehensive water budgets for a location of interest. This report includes descriptions of how water budgets are calculated for the integrated model and for individual model components. GSFLOW provides a robust modeling system for simulating flow through the hydrologic cycle, while allowing for future enhancements to incorporate other simulation techniques.

  6. Evaluation of groundwater flow and transport at the Shoal underground nuclear test: An interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Pohll, G.; Chapman, J.; Hassan, A.; Papelis, C.; Andricevic, R.; Shirley, C.

    1998-07-01

    Since 1962, all United States nuclear tests have been conducted underground. A consequence of this testing has been the deposition of large amounts of radioactive materials in the subsurface, sometimes in direct contact with groundwater. The majority of this testing occurred on the Nevada Test Site, but a limited number of experiments were conducted in other locations. One of these is the subject of this report, the Project Shoal Area (PSA), located about 50 km southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The Shoal test consisted of a 12-kiloton-yield nuclear detonation which occurred on October 26, 1963. Project Shoal was part of studies to enhance seismic detection of underground nuclear tests, in particular, in active earthquake areas. Characterization of groundwater contamination at the Project Shoal Area is being conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) with the State of Nevada Department of Environmental Protection and the US Department of Defense (DOD). This order prescribes a Corrective Action Strategy (Appendix VI), which, as applied to underground nuclear tests, involves preparing a Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP), Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD), Corrective Action Plan, and Closure Report. The scope of the CAIP is flow and transport modeling to establish contaminant boundaries that are protective of human health and the environment. This interim report describes the current status of the flow and transport modeling for the PSA.

  7. Use of tritium and helium to define groundwater flow conditions in Everglades National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, René M.; Top, Zafer; Happell, James D.; Swart, Peter K.

    2003-09-01

    The concentrations of tritium (3H) and helium isotopes (3He and 4He) were used as tracers of groundwater flow in the surficial aquifer system (SAS) beneath Everglades National Park (ENP), south Florida. From ages determined by 3H/3He dating techniques, groundwater within the upper 28 m originated within the last 30 years. Below 28 m, waters originated prior to 30 years before present with evidence of mixing at the interface. Interannual variation of the 3H/3He ages within the upper 28 m was significant throughout the 3 year investigation, corresponding with varying hydrologic conditions. In the region of Taylor Slough Bridge, younger groundwater was consistently detected below older groundwater in the Biscayne Aquifer, suggesting preferential flow to the lower part of the aquifer. An increase in 4He with depth in the SAS indicated that radiogenic 4He produced in the underlying Hawthorn Group migrates into the SAS by diffusion. Higher Δ4He values in brackish groundwaters compared to fresh waters from similar depths suggested a possible enhanced vertical transport of 4He in the seawater mixing zone. Groundwater salinity measurements indicated the presence of a wide (6-28 km) seawater mixing zone. Comparison of groundwater levels with surface water levels in this zone indicated the potential for brackish groundwater discharge to the overlying Everglades surface water.

  8. ADAPTATION OF THE CARTER-TRACY WATER INFLUX CALCULATION TO GROUNDWATER FLOW SIMULTATION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kipp, Kenneth L.

    1986-01-01

    The Carter-Tracy calculation for water influx is adapted to groundwater flow simulation with additional clarifying explanation not present in the original papers. The Van Everdingen and Hurst aquifer-influence functions for radial flow from an outer aquifer region are employed. This technique, based on convolution of unit-step response functions, offers a simple but approximate method for embedding an inner region of groundwater flow simulation within a much larger aquifer region where flow can be treated in an approximate fashion. The use of aquifer-influence functions in groundwater flow modeling reduces the size of the computational grid with a corresponding reduction in computer storage and execution time. The Carter-Tracy approximation to the convolution integral enables the aquifer influence function calculation to be made with an additional storage requirement of only two times the number of boundary nodes more than that required for the inner region simulation.

  9. Groundwater hydrochemical characteristics and processes along flow paths in the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Lina; Guo, Huaming; Zhan, Yanhong

    2013-07-01

    The North China Plain is one of the biggest plains in China, where municipal, agricultural and industrial water supplies are highly dependent on groundwater resources. It is crucial to investigate water chemistry and hydrogeochemical processes related to hydrogeologic settings for sustainable utilization of groundwater resources. Two hydrochemical profiles proximately along the groundwater flow paths were selected for hydrogeochemical study. Major components and 2H and 18O isotopes were analyzed in groundwater samples from the profiles. The study area was divided into three zones, including strong runoff-alluvial/pluvial fans in the piedmont area (Zone I), slow runoff-alluvial/lacustrine plain in the central area (Zone II), and discharge-alluvial/marine plain in the coastal area (Zone III). Major components of groundwater samples showed obvious zonation patterns from Zone I to Zone III. Total dissolved solid (TDS) concentrations gradually increased, and the hydrochemical type changed from HCO3-SO4-Ca-Mg and HCO3-Cl-Ca-Mg types to HCO3-SO4-Na-Ca, SO4-Cl-Na-Ca and SO4-Cl-Na types from Zone I to Zone III. Abrupt increases in concentrations of Na+, Cl- and SO42- in deep groundwater were observed around the depression cones, which indicated that overexploitation resulted in water quality deterioration. Calcite and dolomite precipitation occurred in Zone I of deep groundwater systems and shallow groundwater systems. Cation exchange was believed to take place along the entire flow paths. Gypsum tended to dissolve in groundwater systems. The depletion in D and 18O isotopes in deep groundwater was related to the recharge from precipitation in paleo-climate conditions in glacial or interglacial periods, indicating that renewal groundwater was very limited. Efficient strategies must be taken to preserve the valued water resources for sustainable development.

  10. Groundwater Flow Model of Göksu Delta Coastal Aquifer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem Dokuz, Uǧur; Çelik, Mehmet; Arslan, Şebnem; Engin, Hilal

    2016-04-01

    Like many other coastal areas, Göksu Delta (Mersin-Silifke, Southern Turkey) is a preferred place for human settlement especially due to its productive farmlands and water resources. The water dependent ecosystem in Göksu delta hosts about 332 different plant species and 328 different bird species besides serving for human use. Göksu Delta has been declared as Special Environmental Protection Zone, Wildlife Protection Area, and RAMSAR Convention for Wetlands of International Importance area. Unfortunately, rising population, agricultural and industrial activities cause degradation of water resources both by means of quality and quantity. This problem also exists for other wetlands around the world. It is necessary to prepare water management plans by taking global warming issues into account to protect water resources for next generations. To achieve this, the most efficient tool is to come up with groundwater management strategies by constructing groundwater flow models. By this aim, groundwater modeling studies were carried out for Göksu Delta coastal aquifer system. As a first and most important step in all groundwater modeling studies, geological and hydrogeological settings of the study area have been investigated. Göksu Delta, like many other deltaic environments, has a complex structure because it was formed with the sediments transported by Göksu River throughout the Quaternary period and shaped throughout the transgression-regression periods. Both due to this complex structure and the lack of observation wells penetrating deep enough to give an idea of the total thickness of the delta, it was impossible to reveal out the hydrogeological setting in a correct manner. Therefore, six wells were drilled to construct the conceptual hydrogeological model of Göksu Delta coastal aquifer system. On the basis of drilling studies and slug tests that were conducted along Göksu Delta, hydrostratigraphic units of the delta system have been obtained. According to

  11. Groundwater flow and solute movement to drain laterals, western San Joaquin Valley, California: 1. Geochemical assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deverel, S.J.; Fio, John L.

    1991-01-01

    A study was undertaken to quantitatively evaluate the hydrologic processes affecting the chemical and isotopic composition of drain lateral water in a drained agricultural field in the western San Joaquin Valley, California. The results elucidate the process of mixing of deep and shallow groundwater (below and within 6 m from land surface) entering the drain laterals. The deep groundwater was subject to evapoconcentration prior to drainage system installation and has been displaced downward (to depths greater than 6 m) in the groundwater system. The proportions of deep and shallow groundwater entering the drain laterals was calculated from the end-member oxygen 18 compositions determined in groundwater samples. The percentage of total drain lateral flow which is deep groundwater flow is about 30% for the shallow drain lateral (1.8 m below land surface) (drain lateral 1)) and 60% for the deep drain lateral (2.7 m below land surface (drain lateral 2)). During irrigation, the percentages of deep groundwater flow decrease to 0 and 30% for the shallow and deep drain laterals, respectively. Selenium concentrations in drain lateral waters decrease during irrigation but selenium loads increase. Total estimated annual loads were 1.1 and 5.4 kg of selenium for drain laterals 1 and 2, respectively. Substantial percentages of the annual load occurred during 8 days of irrigation, 23 and 9% for drain laterals 1 and 2, respectively.

  12. Conceptual model and numerical simulation of the groundwater-flow system of Bainbridge Island, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frans, Lonna M.; Bachmann, Matthew P.; Sumioka, Steve S.; Olsen, Theresa D.

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater is the sole source of drinking water for the population of Bainbridge Island. Increased use of groundwater supplies on Bainbridge Island as the population has grown over time has created concern about the quantity of water available and whether saltwater intrusion will occur as groundwater usage increases. A groundwater-flow model was developed to aid in the understanding of the groundwater system and the effects of groundwater development alternatives on the water resources of Bainbridge Island. Bainbridge Island is underlain by unconsolidated deposits of glacial and nonglacial origin. The surficial geologic units and the deposits at depth were differentiated into aquifers and confining units on the basis of areal extent and general water-bearing characteristics. Eleven principal hydrogeologic units are recognized in the study area and form the basis of the groundwater-flow model. A transient variable-density groundwater-flow model of Bainbridge Island and the surrounding area was developed to simulate current (2008) groundwater conditions. The model was calibrated to water levels measured during 2007 and 2008 using parameter estimation (PEST) to minimize the weighted differences or residuals between simulated and measured hydraulic head. The calibrated model was used to make some general observations of the groundwater system in 2008. Total flow through the groundwater system was about 31,000 acre-ft/ yr. The recharge to the groundwater system was from precipitation and septic-system returns. Groundwater flow to Bainbridge Island accounted for about 1,000 acre-ft/ yr or slightly more than 5 percent of the recharge amounts. Groundwater discharge was predominately to streams, lakes, springs, and seepage faces (16,000 acre-ft/yr) and directly to marine waters (10,000 acre-ft/yr). Total groundwater withdrawals in 2008 were slightly more than 6 percent (2,000 acre-ft/yr) of the total flow. The calibrated model was used to simulate predevelopment conditions

  13. Use of a ground-water flow model with particle tracking to evaluate ground-water vulnerability, Clark County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, D.T.; Wilkinson, J.M.; Orzol, L.L.

    1996-01-01

    A ground-water flow model was used in conjunction with particle tracking to evaluate ground-water vulnerability in Clark County, Washington. Using the particle-tracking program, particles were placed in every cell of the flow model (about 60,000 particles) and tracked backwards in time and space upgradient along flow paths to their recharge points. A new computer program was developed that interfaces the results from a particle-tracking program with a geographic information system (GIS). The GIS was used to display and analyze the particle-tracking results. Ground-water vulnerability was evaluated by selecting parts of the ground-water flow system and combining the results with ancillary information stored in the GIS to determine recharge areas, characteristics of recharge areas, downgradient impact of land use at recharge areas, and age of ground water. Maps of the recharge areas for each hydrogeologic unit illustrate the presence of local, intermediate, or regional ground-water flow systems and emphasize the three-dimensional nature of the ground-water flow system in Clark County. Maps of the recharge points for each hydrogeologic unit were overlaid with maps depicting aquifer sensitivity as determined by DRASTIC (a measure of the pollution potential of ground water, based on the intrinsic characteristics of the near-surface unsaturated and saturated zones) and recharge from on-site waste-disposal systems. A large number of recharge areas were identified, particularly in southern Clark County, that have a high aquifer sensitivity, coincide with areas of recharge from on-site waste-disposal systems, or both. Using the GIS, the characteristics of the recharge areas were related to the downgradient parts of the ground-water system that will eventually receive flow that has recharged through these areas. The aquifer sensitivity, as indicated by DRASTIC, of the recharge areas for downgradient parts of the flow system was mapped for each hydrogeologic unit. A number of

  14. Evaluation of geohydrologic framework, recharge estimates and ground-water flow of the Joshua Tree area, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nishikawa, Tracy; Izbicki, John A.; Hevesi, Joseph A.; Stamos, Christina L.; Martin, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Ground water historically has been the sole source of water supply for the community of Joshua Tree in the Joshua Tree ground-water subbasin of the Morongo ground-water basin in the southern Mojave Desert. The Joshua Basin Water District (JBWD) supplies water to the community from the underlying Joshua Tree ground-water subbasin. The JBWD is concerned with the long-term sustainability of the underlying aquifer. To help meet future demands, the JBWD plans to construct production wells in the adjacent Copper Mountain ground-water subbasin. As growth continues in the desert, there may be a need to import water to supplement the available ground-water resources. In order to manage the ground-water resources and to identify future mitigating measures, a thorough understanding of the ground-water system is needed. The purpose of this study was threefold: (1) improve the understanding of the geohydrologic framework of the Joshua Tree and Copper Mountain ground-water subbasins, (2) determine the distribution and quantity of recharge using field and numerical techniques, and (3) develop a ground-water flow model that can be used to help manage the water resources of the region. The geohydrologic framework was refined by collecting and interpreting water-level and water-quality data, geologic and electric logs, and gravity data. The water-bearing deposits in the Joshua Tree and Copper Mountain ground-water subbasins are Quarternary alluvial deposits and Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic deposits. The Quarternary alluvial deposits were divided into two aquifers (referred to as the 'upper' and the 'middle' alluvial aquifers), which are about 600 feet (ft) thick, and the Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic deposits were assigned to a single aquifer (referred to as the 'lower' aquifer), which is as thick as 1,500 ft. The ground-water quality of the Joshua Tree and Copper Mountain ground-water subbasins was defined by collecting 53 ground-water samples from 15 wells (10 in the

  15. Ground-water flow in the shallow aquifer system at the Naval Weapons Station Yorktown, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Barry S.

    2001-01-01

    The Environmental Directorate of the Naval Weapons Station Yorktown, Virginia, is concerned about possible contamination of ground water at the Station. Ground water at the Station flows through a shallow system of layered aquifers and leaky confining units. The units of the shallow aquifer system are the Columbia aquifer, the Cornwallis Cave confining unit, the Cornwallis Cave aquifer, the Yorktown confining unit, and the Yorktown-Eastover aquifer. The Eastover-Calvert confining unit separates the shallow aquifer system from deeper confined aquifers beneath the Station. A three-dimensional, finite-difference, ground-water flow model was used to simulate steady-state ground-water flow of the shallow aquifer system in and around the Station. The model simulated ground-water flow from the peninsular drainage divide that runs across the Lackey Plain near the southern end of the Station north to King Creek and the York River and south to Skiffes Creek and the James River. The model was calibrated by minimizing the root mean square error between 4 7 measured and corresponding simulated water levels. The calibrated model was used to determine the ground-water budget and general directions of ground-water flow. A particle-tracking routine was used with the calibrated model to estimate groundwater flow paths, flow rates, and traveltimes from selected sites at the Station. Simulated ground-water flow velocities of the Station-area model were small beneath the interstream areas of the Lackey Plain and Croaker Flat, but increased outward toward the streams and rivers where the hydraulic gradients are larger. If contaminants from the land surface entered the water table at or near the interstream areas of the Station, where hydraulic gradients are smaller, they would migrate more slowly than if they entered closer to the streams or the shores of the rivers where gradients commonly are larger. The ground-water flow simulations indicate that some ground water leaks downward from

  16. Enhancing Safety Of Nuclear Waste Disposal By Exploiting Regional Groundwater Flow: The Recharge Area Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, József; Sheng, Grant

    1996-04-01

    The Recharge Area Concept is the proposition that in Canadian-Shield type natural environments recharge areas of regional groundwater flow systems are superior for high-level nuclear waste repositories to other types of groundwater flow regimes, especially to areas of groundwater discharge. This conclusion is reached from an analysis of basinal groundwater flow models. The calculations were made for a two-dimensional flank of a fully saturated topographic basin, 20 km long and 4 km deep, in which groundwater is driven by gravity. Variants of hydraulic-conductivity distributions were considered: 1) homogeneous; 2) stratified; and 3) stratified-faulted. The faults' attitudes were changed by steps from vertical to horizontal for different variants. The model is assumed conceptually to represent the crystalline-rock environment of the Canadian Shield. The hydrogeologic performances of hypothetical repositories placed 500 m deep in the recharge and discharge areas were characterized by thirteen parameters. The principal advantages of recharge- over discharge-area locations are: 1) longer travel paths and return-flow times from repository to surface; 2) robustness of predicted values of performance parameters; 3) field-verifiability of favourable hydrogeologic conditions (amounting to an implicit validation of the calculated minimum values of return-flow times); 4) site acceptance based on quantifiable and observable flow-controlling parameters; and 5) simple logistics and favourable economics of site selection and screening. As a by-product of modeling, it is demonstrated that the presence of old water is not an indication of stagnancy.

  17. Simulation of ground-water flow in the Intermediate and Floridan aquifer systems in Peninsular Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepulveda, Nicasio

    2002-01-01

    A numerical model of the intermediate and Floridan aquifer systems in peninsular Florida was used to (1) test and refine the conceptual understanding of the regional ground-water flow system; (2) develop a data base to support subregional ground-water flow modeling; and (3) evaluate effects of projected 2020 ground-water withdrawals on ground-water levels. The four-layer model was based on the computer code MODFLOW-96, developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The top layer consists of specified-head cells simulating the surficial aquifer system as a source-sink layer. The second layer simulates the intermediate aquifer system in southwest Florida and the intermediate confining unit where it is present. The third and fourth layers simulate the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers, respectively. Steady-state ground-water flow conditions were approximated for time-averaged hydrologic conditions from August 1993 through July 1994 (1993-94). This period was selected based on data from Upper Floridan a quifer wells equipped with continuous water-level recorders. The grid used for the ground-water flow model was uniform and composed of square 5,000-foot cells, with 210 columns and 300 rows.

  18. Tracing Groundwater Flow on a Barrier Island in the North-east Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reide Corbett, D.; Dillon, K.; Burnett, W.

    2000-08-01

    Groundwater flow on St. George Island, a barrier island in the north-east Gulf of Mexico, was monitored downfield from wastewater systems using artificial tracer techniques. Sulphur hexafluoride and fluorescein dye were used to determine groundwater flow velocity, hydraulic conductivity, and dispersivity at selected sites on the island. Monthly hydraulic head measurements illustrate the aquifer's dependence on recharge associated with rainfall. However, during periods of little rain, tidal stage also influences the direction and magnitude of groundwater flow within approximately 30 m of the waters edge. Estimated hydraulic conductivities ranged from 3 to 180 m day -1, with an overall estimate of 36 m day -1. Groundwater tracers showed very little dilution and calculated longitudinal dispersivities were approximately 0·1 to 0·5 m, which is in the same range as previous studies of sandy aquifers. The total groundwater flux into adjacent Apalachicola Bay was also evaluated using two independent techniques. Darcy's law was applied using an estimated cross sectional area and the experimental horizontal transport rates to estimate the volumetric flow. In addition, a simple water balance calculation was used, which accounted for all known sources and sinks of water to the aquifer. The two independent approaches agreed very well, with an estimated groundwater flux from the surficial aquifer to Apalachicola Bay between 1-9×10 6 m 3 year -1.

  19. Groundwater flows in weathered crystalline rocks: Impact of piezometric variations and depth-dependent fracture connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guihéneuf, N.; Boisson, A.; Bour, O.; Dewandel, B.; Perrin, J.; Dausse, A.; Viossanges, M.; Chandra, S.; Ahmed, S.; Maréchal, J. C.

    2014-04-01

    Groundwater in shallow weathered and fractured crystalline rock aquifers is often the only perennial water resource, especially in semi-arid region such as Southern India. Understanding groundwater flows in such a context is of prime importance for sustainable aquifer management. Here, we describe a detailed study of fracture properties and relate the hydraulic connectivity of fractures to groundwater flows at local and watershed scales. Investigations were carried out at a dedicated Experimental Hydrogeological Park in Andhra Pradesh (Southern India) where a large network of observation boreholes has been set up. Twenty-height boreholes have been drilled in a small area of about 18,000 m2 in which borehole loggings and hydraulic tests were carried out to locate the main flowing fractured zones and investigate fractures connectivity. Several hydraulic tests (nineteen slug tests and three pumping tests) performed under two water level conditions revealed contrasting behavior. Under high water level conditions, the interface including the bottom of the saprolite and the first flowing fractured zone in the upper part of the granite controls groundwater flows at the watershed-scale. Under low water level conditions, the aquifer is characterized by lateral compartmentalization due to a decrease in the number of flowing fractures with depth. Depending on the water level conditions, the aquifer shifts from a watershed flow system to independent local flow systems. A conceptual groundwater flow model, which includes depth-dependent fracture connectivity, is proposed to illustrate this contrasting hydrological behavior. Implications for watershed hydrology, groundwater chemistry and aquifer vulnerability are also discussed.

  20. Application of boundary-fitted coordinate (BFC) transformations to groundwater flow and transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.K.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical method is presented to simulate groundwater flow and transport using the Boundary-Fitted Coordinate (BFC) systems approach initially developed for aerodynamics. An irregularly-shaped physical domain is transformed to a simple computational domain with uniform grids. Governing equations defined in the physical domain are transformed into the computational domain, wherein all transformed equations are solved by the Finite Difference Method (FDM). This study developed three FORTRAN 77 computer programs: (1) BFCGW, which simulates groundwater flow and transport, (2) SEEPAGE, which simulates free-surface and seepage face, and (3) Q3D, which simulates multi-layered flow. A series of plotting programs using [open quotes]DISSPLA,[close quotes] an IBM FORTRAN graphics package, was also developed to plot grid lines, contour lines, and flow vectors in an irregularly-shaped physical domain with non-uniform grids. Each of the three programs was verified by solving an idealized problem for which the analytical solution was known and/or a realistic problem for which field measurements could be obtained. The computer program BFCGW was employed to simulate an idealized well flow in a triangular physical domain and actual groundwater flows in the area of West Lafayette, Indiana. The numerical solutions in both cases closely matched the analytical solutions and/or numerical simulations by other computer codes such as AQUA and MODFLOW. The program BFCGW performs rotation and stretching of local coordinates prior to BFC transformations to simulate heterogeneous and anisotropic groundwater flow. The rotation and stretching technique simplifies transformed governing equations of anisotropic groundwater flow. With the program BFCGW, the groundwater flow and the transport equations are solved sequentially to simulate solute concentration distributions.

  1. Regional ground-water flow in the Lower Peninsula of Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Grannemann, N.G.; Huffman, G.C. )

    1994-04-01

    A steady-state, numerical model is being developed to simulate groundwater flow in four regional aquifers in Michigan's Lower Peninsula. The uppermost layer in the model simulates flow in the glaciofluvial aquifer and the second layer simulates flow in the Saginaw aquifer, both of which contain freshwater. The lower two modeled units simulate flow in the Parma-Bayport and Marshall aquifers, both of which contain saline water or brine, except at or near their subcrop, where they contain freshwater. The US Geological Survey's Modular Model (MODFLOW) was modified to simulate variable-density groundwater flow in the lower two aquifers by assuming that groundwater density and viscosity differ from place to place but do not change over time. The model simulates groundwater conditions prior to large-scale withdrawals from the aquifer. Boundaries for the model include constant-head boundaries at the shorelines of Lakes Michigan, Huron, St. Clair, and Erie, as well as the St. Clair and Detroit Rivers. The southern boundary is simulated as a no-flow condition along several major stream divides in Michigan and Indiana. Recharge to the glaciofluvial aquifer is estimated to range from 0.2 to 22 inches per year and averages 8.4 inches per year. Regional groundwater flow occurs in areas where the bedrock aquifers are confined and in parts of the glaciofluvial aquifer, such as in the north-central part of the Lower Peninsula. Regional discharge primarily occurs to Saginaw Bay and to streams in the Saginaw and Michigan Lowlands. Parts of the Grand and Maple rivers may also receive discharge on a regional scale. Local flow systems control the direction and rate of groundwater flow in areas where aquifers are unconfined or hydraulically connected to overlying glacial deposits.

  2. Analytical solutions for two-dimensional groundwater flow with subsurface drainage tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiuyu; Zhang, You-Kuan; Schilling, Keith E.

    2015-02-01

    The tile drainage problem in an unconfined aquifer was investigated. A mathematical model was established that describes two-dimensional groundwater flow in an unconfined aquifer near a river with a linearized Boussinesq equation, time-dependent sources and a sloped tile. Analytical solutions for groundwater level and discharge were derived and used to compare hydrologic conditions in a system with and without tile (natural drainage). We found that the spatial and temporal variations of groundwater level and discharge were significantly altered by the presence of drainage tile. In an aquifer with tile drainage, the groundwater level was lower and total groundwater discharge to the river increased compared to an aquifer with no tile. Application of the solutions to a synthetic case demonstrates that the analytical solutions derived can be used to quantify effect of tiles on nitrate loads in the baseflow of a river and assess the effectiveness of various conservation practices.

  3. Regional groundwater flow and tritium transport modeling and risk assessment of the underground test area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    The groundwater flow system of the Nevada Test Site and surrounding region was evaluated to estimate the highest potential current and near-term risk to the public and the environment from groundwater contamination downgradient of the underground nuclear testing areas. The highest, or greatest, potential risk is estimated by assuming that several unusually rapid transport pathways as well as public and environmental exposures all occur simultaneously. These conservative assumptions may cause risks to be significantly overestimated. However, such a deliberate, conservative approach ensures that public health and environmental risks are not underestimated and allows prioritization of future work to minimize potential risks. Historical underground nuclear testing activities, particularly detonations near or below the water table, have contaminated groundwater near testing locations with radioactive and nonradioactive constituents. Tritium was selected as the contaminant of primary concern for this phase of the project because it is abundant, highly mobile, and represents the most significant contributor to the potential radiation dose to humans for the short term. It was also assumed that the predicted risk to human health and the environment from tritium exposure would reasonably represent the risk from other, less mobile radionuclides within the same time frame. Other contaminants will be investigated at a later date. Existing and newly collected hydrogeologic data were compiled for a large area of southern Nevada and California, encompassing the Nevada Test Site regional groundwater flow system. These data were used to develop numerical groundwater flow and tritium transport models for use in the prediction of tritium concentrations at hypothetical human and ecological receptor locations for a 200-year time frame. A numerical, steady-state regional groundwater flow model was developed to serve as the basis for the prediction of the movement of tritium from the

  4. Recharge and Lateral Groundwater Flow Boundary Conditions for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model

    SciTech Connect

    B. Arnold; T. Corbet

    2001-12-18

    The purpose of the flow boundary conditions analysis is to provide specified-flux boundary conditions for the saturated zone (SZ) site-scale flow and transport model. This analysis is designed to use existing modeling and analysis results as the basis for estimated groundwater flow rates into the SZ site-scale model domain, both as recharge at the upper (water table) boundary and as underflow at the lateral boundaries. The objective is to provide consistency at the boundaries between the SZ site-scale flow model and other groundwater flow models. The scope of this analysis includes extraction of the volumetric groundwater flow rates simulated by the SZ regional-scale flow model to occur at the lateral boundaries of the SZ site-scale flow model and the internal qualification of the regional-scale model for use in this analysis model report (AMR). In addition, the scope includes compilation of information on the recharge boundary condition taken from three sources: (1) distributed recharge as taken from the SZ regional-scale flow model, (2) recharge below the area of the unsaturated zone (UZ) site-scale flow model, and (3) focused recharge along the Fortymile Wash channel.

  5. Climate change and groundwater ecohydrology: Simulating subsurface flow and discharge zones in Covey Hill, Quebec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levison, J.; Larocque, M.; Ouellet, M.; van Waterschoot, L.

    2013-12-01

    Nearly 2 billion people use groundwater and in Canada it is the potable water supply for about 30% of the population. Groundwater is also used in industrial and agricultural applications, and contributes to important hydrological habitats for various species. Limited research has been conducted to determine the potential impacts of climate change on groundwater. Local studies are crucial to better understand how, for example, increased duration and frequency of storms or drought periods may affect groundwater dependent ecosystems in order to anticipate and mitigate the impacts. Thus, the aim of this research is to explore the effects of climate change on a groundwater-surface water interacting system that supports a fragile ecosystem. This research is used to inform ecological conservation measures. The research site is the 17500 ha Covey Hill Natural Laboratory, which is located on the Quebec, Canada and New York State, USA border in the Chateauguay River watershed. At various locations within the Natural Laboratory there is continuous monitoring of groundwater levels and river flows. Covey Hill is an important recharge zone for the regional aquifer and provides habitat for endangered salamanders in discharge zones. Two hydrogeological models were constructed to represent flow at the site. First, a three-dimensional, finite difference model was developed using MODFLOW software to simulate overall groundwater flow at the research site. Second, a smaller-scale, discrete fracture, transient, three-dimensional, finite difference, integrated model was developed using HydroGeoSphere software to represent in better detail flow from bedrock springs that occur at mid-slope and provide the habitat for endangered salamanders. The models were used to: 1) observe groundwater flow under current climate conditions; 2) quantify water dynamics in response to climate change using 10 scenarios from the Canadian Regional Climate Model (for 1971-2000 and 2041-2070 time periods); and 3

  6. Investigations of groundwater system and simulation of regional groundwater flow for North Penn Area 7 Superfund site, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senior, Lisa A.; Goode, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater in the vicinity of several industrial facilities in Upper Gwynedd Township and vicinity, Montgomery County, in southeast Pennsylvania has been shown to be contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), the most common of which is the solvent trichloroethylene (TCE). The 2-square-mile area was placed on the National Priorities List as the North Penn Area 7 Superfund site by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in 1989. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted geophysical logging, aquifer testing, and water-level monitoring, and measured streamflows in and near North Penn Area 7 from fall 2000 through fall 2006 in a technical assistance study for the USEPA to develop an understanding of the hydrogeologic framework in the area as part of the USEPA Remedial Investigation. In addition, the USGS developed a groundwater-flow computer model based on the hydrogeologic framework to simulate regional groundwater flow and to estimate directions of groundwater flow and pathways of groundwater contaminants. The study area is underlain by Triassic- and Jurassic-age sandstones and shales of the Lockatong Formation and Brunswick Group in the Mesozoic Newark Basin. Regionally, these rocks strike northeast and dip to the northwest. The sequence of rocks form a fractured-sedimentary-rock aquifer that acts as a set of confined to partially confined layers of differing permeabilities. Depth to competent bedrock typically is less than 20 ft below land surface. The aquifer layers are recharged locally by precipitation and discharge locally to streams. The general configuration of the potentiometric surface in the aquifer is similar to topography, except in areas affected by pumping. The headwaters of Wissahickon Creek are nearby, and the stream flows southwest, parallel to strike, to bisect North Penn Area 7. Groundwater is pumped in the vicinity of North Penn Area 7 for industrial use, public supply, and residential supply. Results of field investigations

  7. Groundwater flow and contaminant transport modelling at an air weapons range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordeleau, Geneviève; Martel, Richard; Schäfer, Dirk; Ampleman, Guy; Thiboutot, Sonia

    2008-07-01

    Numerical modelling was done at the Cold Lake Air Weapons Range, Canada, to test whether the dissolved RDX and nitrate detected in groundwater come from the same sources, and to predict whether contamination poses a threat to the surface water receptors near the site. Military live fire training activities may indeed pose a risk of contamination to groundwater resources, however field investigations on military bases are quite recent, and little information is available on the long-term behaviour of munition residues related contaminants. Very limited information was available about the contaminant source zones, which were assigned based on our knowledge of current training activities. The RDX plume was well represented with the model, but the heterogeneous distribution of nitrate concentrations was more difficult to reproduce. It was nonetheless determined that both contaminants originate from the same areas. According to the model, both contaminants should reach the nearby river, but concentrations in the river should remain very low if the source zone concentration does not change. Finally, the model allowed the recommendation of a new location for the main bombing target, which would offer added protection to the river and the lake into which it flows.

  8. Flow Model Development for the Idaho National Laboratory OU 10-08 Sitewide Groundwater Model

    SciTech Connect

    Hai Huang; Swen Magnuson; Thomas Wood

    2005-09-01

    A two-dimensional (2D), steady-state groundwater flow model was developed for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) sitewide groundwater model. A total of 224 wells inside the model domain were used to calibrate the 2D flow model. Three different calibration techniques, zonation approach, pilot point approach and coupled zonation/pilot point approach, were explored and applied during the model development. The pilot point approach allows modelers to model aquifer heterogeneities at various scales, and extract the maximum amount of data from available monitoring data, permitting the best possible representation of flow and transport at the INL.

  9. A model of regional ground-water flow in secondary-permeability terrane ( Susquehanna River).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerhart, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The ground-water flow system in the Lower Susquehanna River Basin in Pennsylvania and Maryland can be considered as one complex unconfined aquifer in which secondary porosity and permeability are the dominant influences on the occurrence and flow of ground water. The degree of development of secondary porosity and permeability in the various lithologies of the lower basin determines the aquifer characteristics of each lithology. Based on qualitative evidence, the use of a porous-media model was assumed to be appropriate on a regional scale and a finite-difference ground-water flow model was constructed for the lower basin. -from Author

  10. GROUNDWATER FLOW MODEL CALIBRATION USING WATER LEVEL MEASUREMENTS AT SHORT INTERVALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Groundwater flow models are usually calibrated with respect to water level measurements collected at intervals of several months or even years. Measurements of these kinds are not sensitive to sudden or short stress conditions, such as impact from stormwater drainage flow or flas...

  11. Relationships between basic soils-engineering equations and basic ground-water flow equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jorgensen, Donald G.

    1980-01-01

    The many varied though related terms developed by ground-water hydrologists and by soils engineers are useful to each discipline, but their differences in terminology hinder the use of related information in interdisciplinary studies. Equations for the Terzaghi theory of consolidation and equations for ground-water flow are identical under specific conditions. A combination of the two sets of equations relates porosity to void ratio and relates the modulus of elasticity to the coefficient of compressibility, coefficient of volume compressibility, compression index, coefficient of consolidation, specific storage, and ultimate compaction. Also, transient ground-water flow is related to coefficient of consolidation, rate of soil compaction, and hydraulic conductivity. Examples show that soils-engineering data and concepts are useful to solution of problems in ground-water hydrology.

  12. Hydrogeological and Groundwater Flow Model for C, K, L, and P Reactor Areas, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, G.P.

    1999-02-24

    A regional groundwater flow model encompassing approximately 100 mi{sup 2} surrounding the C, K. L. and P reactor areas has been developed. The Reactor flow model is designed to meet the planning objectives outlined in the General Groundwater Strategy for Reactor Area Projects by providing a common framework for analyzing groundwater flow, contaminant migration and remedial alternatives within the Reactor Projects team of the Environmental Restoration Department.

  13. Effects of Daily Precipitation and Evapotranspiration Patterns on Flow and VOC Transport to Groundwater along a Watershed Flow Path

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, R.L.; Thoms, R.B.; Zogorski, J.S.

    2003-01-01

    MTBE and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are widely observed in shallow groundwater in the United States, especially in urban areas. Previous studies suggest that the atmosphere and/or nonpoint surficial sources could be responsible for some of those VOCs, especially in areas where there is net recharge to groundwater. However, in semiarid locations where annual potential evapotranspiration can exceed annual precipitation, VOC detections in groundwater can be frequent. VOC transport to groundwater under net discharge conditions has not previously been examined. A numerical model is used here to demonstrate that daily precipitation and evapotranspiration (ET) patterns can have a significant effect on recharge to groundwater, water table elevations, and VOC transport. Ten-year precipitation/ET scenarios from six sites in the United States are examined using both actual daily observed values and "average" pulsed precipitation. MTBE and tetrachloroethylene transport, including gas-phase diffusion, are considered. The effects of the precipitation/ET scenarios on net recharge and groundwater flow are significant and complicated, especially under low-precipitation conditions when pulsed precipitation can significantly underestimate transport to groundwater. In addition to precipitation and evapotranspiration effects, location of VOC entry into the subsurface within the watershed is important for transport in groundwater. This is caused by groundwater hydraulics at the watershed scale as well as variations in ET within the watershed. The model results indicate that it is important to consider both daily precipitation/ET patterns and location within the watershed in order to interpret VOC occurrence in groundwater, especially in low-precipitation settings.

  14. MODFLOW-2005 : the U.S. Geological Survey modular ground-water model--the ground-water flow process

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harbaugh, Arlen W.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents MODFLOW-2005, which is a new version of the finite-difference ground-water model commonly called MODFLOW. Ground-water flow is simulated using a block-centered finite-difference approach. Layers can be simulated as confined or unconfined. Flow associated with external stresses, such as wells, areal recharge, evapotranspiration, drains, and rivers, also can be simulated. The report includes detailed explanations of physical and mathematical concepts on which the model is based, an explanation of how those concepts are incorporated in the modular structure of the computer program, instructions for using the model, and details of the computer code. The modular structure consists of a MAIN Program and a series of highly independent subroutines. The subroutines are grouped into 'packages.' Each package deals with a specific feature of the hydrologic system that is to be simulated, such as flow from rivers or flow into drains, or with a specific method of solving the set of simultaneous equations resulting from the finite-difference method. Several solution methods are incorporated, including the Preconditioned Conjugate-Gradient method. The division of the program into packages permits the user to examine specific hydrologic features of the model independently. This also facilitates development of additional capabilities because new packages can be added to the program without modifying the existing packages. The input and output systems of the computer program also are designed to permit maximum flexibility. The program is designed to allow other capabilities, such as transport and optimization, to be incorporated, but this report is limited to describing the ground-water flow capability. The program is written in Fortran 90 and will run without modification on most computers that have a Fortran 90 compiler.

  15. Indications of regional scale groundwater flows in the Amazon Basins: Inferences from results of geothermal studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, Elizabeth T.; Hamza, Valiya M.

    2012-08-01

    The present work deals with determination groundwater flows in the Amazon region, based on analysis of geothermal data acquired in shallow and deep wells. The method employed is based on the model of simultaneous heat transfer by conduction and advection in permeable media. Analysis of temperature data acquired in water wells indicates down flows of groundwaters with velocities in excess of 10-7 m/s at depths less than 300 m in the Amazonas basin. Bottom-hole temperature (BHT) data sets have been used in determining characteristics of fluid movements at larger depths in the basins of Acre, Solimões, Amazonas, Marajó and Barreirinhas. The results of model simulations point to down flow of groundwaters with velocities of the order of 10-8 to 10-9 m/s, at depths of up to 4000 m. No evidence has been found for up flow typical of discharge zones. The general conclusion compatible with such results is that large-scale groundwater recharge systems operate at both shallow and deep levels in all sedimentary basins of the Amazon region. However, the basement rock formations of the Amazon region are relatively impermeable and hence extensive down flow systems through the sedimentary strata are possible only in the presence of generalized lateral movement of groundwater in the basal parts of the sedimentary basins. The direction of this lateral flow, inferred from the basement topography and geological characteristics of the region, is from west to east, following roughly the course of surface drainage system of the Amazon River, with eventual discharge into the Atlantic Ocean. The estimated flow rate at the continental margin is 3287 m3/s, with velocities of the order of 218 m/year. It is possible that dynamic changes in the fluvial systems in the western parts of South American continent have been responsible for triggering alterations in the groundwater recharge systems and deep seated lateral flows in the Amazon region.

  16. Hydrogeology and simulation of ground-water flow at Dover Air Force Base, Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinaman, Kurt C.; Tenbus, Frederick J.

    2000-01-01

    Dover Air Force Base in Kent County, Delaware, has many contaminated sites that are in active remediation. To assist in this remediation, a steady-state model of ground-water flow was developed to aid in understanding the hydrology of the system, and for use as a ground-watermanagement tool. This report describes the hydrology on which the model is based, a description of the model itself, and some applications of the model.Dover Air Force Base is underlain by unconsolidated sediments of the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The primary units that were investigated include the upper Calvert Formation and the overlying Columbia Formation. The uppermost sand unit in the Calvert Formation at Dover Air Force Base is the Frederica aquifer, which is the deepest unit investigated in this report. A confining unit of clayey silt in the upper Calvert Formation separates the Frederica aquifer from the lower surficial aquifer, which is the basal Columbia Formation. North and northwest of Dover Air Force Base, the Frederica aquifer subcrops beneath the Columbia Formation and the upper Calvert Formation confining unit is absent. The Calvert Formation dips to the southeast. The Columbia Formation consists predominately of sands, silts, and gravels, although in places there are clay layers that separate the surficial aquifer into an upper and lower surficial aquifer. The areal extent of these clay layers has been mapped by use of gamma logs. Long-term hydrographs reveal substantial changes in both seasonal and annual ground-water recharge. These variations in recharge are related to temporal changes in evaporation, transpiration, and precipitation. The hydrographs show areas where extensive silts and clays are present in the surficial aquifer. In these areas, the vertical gradient between water levels in wells screened above and below the clays can be as large as several feet, and local ground-water highs typically form during normal recharge conditions. When drought conditions persist

  17. EVALUATION OF GROUNDWATER FLOW PATTERNS AROUND A DUAL-SCREENED GROUNDWATER CIRCULATION WELL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dual-screened groundwater circulation wells (GCWs) can be used to remove contaminant mass and to mix reagents in situ. GCWs are so named because they force water in a circular pattern between injection and extraction screens. The radial extent, flux and direction of the effective...

  18. MODFLOW-2000, The U.S. Geological Survey Modular Ground-Water Model - User Guide to Modularization Concepts and the Ground-Water Flow Process

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harbaugh, Arlen W.; Banta, Edward R.; Hill, Mary C.; McDonald, Michael G.

    2000-01-01

    MODFLOW is a computer program that numerically solves the three-dimensional ground-water flow equation for a porous medium by using a finite-difference method. Although MODFLOW was designed to be easily enhanced, the design was oriented toward additions to the ground-water flow equation. Frequently there is a need to solve additional equations; for example, transport equations and equations for estimating parameter values that produce the closest match between model-calculated heads and flows and measured values. This report documents a new version of MODFLOW, called MODFLOW-2000, which is designed to accommodate the solution of equations in addition to the ground-water flow equation. This report is a user's manual. It contains an overview of the old and added design concepts, documents one new package, and contains input instructions for using the model to solve the ground-water flow equation.

  19. Groundwater flow model for the General Separations Area, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-15

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility located near Aiken, South Carolina. Assessment of groundwater flow rates and directions, potential contaminant transport times, and concentration of potential contaminants is required to determine current and future environmental effects resulting from releases by these facilities. Proposed closure actions and/or remedial alternatives also need to be evaluated. Numerical groundwater flow and solute transport models are a means of assessing the environmental effects on the groundwater system. They provide a logical method of integrating all available data into a consistent framework for quantitative analysis. The results of groundwater models can be used directly for input to management decisions and design/construct issues or can provide input into risk assessment models for site evaluations. GeoTrans, Inc. was contracted by the Environmental Restoration Department of WSRC to develop a groundwater model of the entire General Separations Area (GSA). Of particular interest is the area surrounding the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) as shown in Figure 1.2. The model developed in this phase of the study will be used to assess groundwater flow issues for the entire GSA. The second phase of the study will address contaminant transport issues specific to the area surrounding the MWMF.

  20. Review: Impact of underground structures on the flow of urban groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attard, Guillaume; Winiarski, Thierry; Rossier, Yvan; Eisenlohr, Laurent

    2016-02-01

    Property economics favours the vertical development of cities but flow of groundwater can be affected by the use of underground space in them. This review article presents the state of the art regarding the impact of disturbances caused by underground structures (tunnels, basements of buildings, deep foundations, etc.) on the groundwater flow in urban aquifers. The structures built in the underground levels of urban areas are presented and organised in terms of their impact on flow: obstacle to the flow or disturbance of the groundwater budget of the flow system. These two types of disturbance are described in relation to the structure area and the urban area. The work reviewed shows, on one hand, the individual impacts of different urban underground structures, and on the other, their cumulative impacts on flow, using real case studies. Lastly, the works are placed in perspective regarding the integration of underground structures with the aim of operational management of an urban aquifer. The literature presents deterministic numerical modelling as a tool capable of contributing to this aim, in that it helps to quantify the effect of an underground infrastructure project on groundwater flow, which is crucial for decision-making processes. It can also be an operational decision-aid tool for choosing construction techniques or for formulating strategies to manage the water resource.

  1. Quasi 3D modeling of water flow in vadose zone and groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, M.; Yakirevich, A.; Pachepsky, Y. A.; Sorek, S.; Weisbrod, N.

    2012-07-01

    SummaryThe complexity of subsurface flow systems calls for a variety of concepts leading to the multiplicity of simplified flow models. One habitual simplification is based on the assumption that lateral flow and transport in unsaturated zone are not significant unless the capillary fringe is involved. In such cases the flow and transport in the unsaturated zone above groundwater level can be simulated as a 1D phenomenon, whereas the flow and transport through groundwater are viewed as 2D or 3D phenomena. A new approach for a numerical scheme for 3D variably saturated flow using quasi 3D Richards' equation and finite difference scheme is presented. The corresponding numerical algorithm and the QUASI-3D computer code were developed. Results of the groundwater level simulations were compared with transient laboratory experimental data for 2D data constant-flux infiltration, quasi-3D HYDRUS-MODFLOW numerical model and a FULL-3D numerical model using Richards' equation. Hypothetical 3D examples of infiltration, pumping and groundwater mound dissipation for different spatial-time scales are presented. Water flow simulation for the Alto Piura aquifer (Peru) demonstrates the QUASI-3D model application at the regional scale. Computationally the QUASI-3D code was found to be more efficient by an order of 10-300%, while being accurate with respect to the benchmark fully 3D variable saturation code, when the capillary fringe was considered.

  2. Flow path oscillations in transient ground-water simulations of large peatland systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reeve, A.S.; Evensen, R.; Glaser, P.H.; Siegel, D.I.; Rosenberry, D.

    2006-01-01

    Transient numerical simulations of the Glacial Lake Agassiz Peatland near the Red Lakes in Northern Minnesota were constructed to evaluate observed reversals in vertical ground-water flow. Seasonal weather changes were introduced to a ground-water flow model by varying evapotranspiration and recharge over time. Vertical hydraulic reversals, driven by changes in recharge and evapotranspiration were produced in the simulated peat layer. These simulations indicate that the high specific storage associated with the peat is an important control on hydraulic reversals. Seasonally driven vertical flow is on the order of centimeters in the deep peat, suggesting that seasonal vertical advective fluxes are not significant and that ground-water flow into the deep peat likely occurs on decadal or longer time scales. Particles tracked within the ground-water flow model oscillate over time, suggesting that seasonal flow reversals will enhance vertical mixing in the peat column. The amplitude of flow path oscillations increased with increasing peat storativity, with amplitudes of about 5 cm occurring when peat specific storativity was set to about 0.05 m-1. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Evidence for deep groundwater flow and convective heat transport in mountainous terrain, Delta County, Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazear, Gregory D.

    2006-12-01

    The Tongue Creek watershed lies on the south flank of Grand Mesa in western Colorado, USA and is a site with 1.5 km of topographic relief, heat flow of 100 mW/m2, thermal conductivity of 3.3 W m-1 °C-1, hydraulic conductivity of 10-8 m/s, a water table that closely follows surface topography, and groundwater temperatures 3-15°C above mean surface temperatures. These data suggest that convective heat transport by groundwater flow has modified the thermal regime of the site. Steady state three-dimensional numerical simulations of heat flow, groundwater flow, and convective transport were used to model these thermal and hydrological data. The simulations provided estimates for the scale of hydraulic conductivity and bedrock base flow discharge within the watershed. The numerical models show that (1) complex three-dimensional flow systems develop with a range of scales from tens of meters to tens of kilometers; (2) mapped springs are frequently found at locations where contours of hydraulic head indicate strong vertical flow at the water table, and; (3) the distribution of groundwater temperatures in water wells as a function of surface elevation is predicted by the model.

  4. A Groundwater flow Model of the Colorado River Delta to Support Riparian Habitat Restoration in Northern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddock, T.; Feirstein, E.; Baird, K. J.; Ajami, H.

    2007-05-01

    Quantification of groundwater flow dynamics and of the interactions among groundwater, surface water, and riparian vegetation, represent key components in the development of a balanced restoration plan for functional riparian ecosystems. A groundwater model was developed using MODFLOW 2000 to support of riparian restoration along the Colorado River Delta (Mexico: Baja California, Sonora). The Colorado River is widely recognized as one of the most modified and allocated rivers in the United States. For over 50 years flows into the Delta were severely reduced by the requirements of an emergent American West. However, subsequent to discharge pulses associated with the filling of Lake Powell, and the increased precipitation that accompanied ENSO cycles, a semblance of a native riparian habitat has been observed in the Delta since the 1980's (Zamora- Arroyo et al. 2001). The Delta and the riparian ecosystems of the region have since become the focus of a substantial body of multidisciplinary research. The research goal is to understand water table dynamics with particular attention to stream-aquifer interactions and groundwater behavior in the root zone. Groundwater reliant transpiration requirements were quantified for a set of dominant native riparian species using the Riparian ET (RIP-ET) package, an improved MODFLOW evapotranspiration (ET) module. RIP-ET simulates ET using a set of eco-physiologically based curves that more accurately represents individual plant species, reflects habitat complexity, and deals spatially with plant and water table distribution. When used in conjunction with a GIS based postprocessor (RIP-GIS.net), RIP-ET provides the basis for mapping groundwater conditions as they relate to user-specified plant groups. This explicit link between groundwater and plant sustainability is a driver to restoration design and allows for scenario modeling of various hydrologic conditions. Groundwater requirements determined in this research will be used by

  5. Using 14C and 3H to understand groundwater flow and recharge in an aquifer window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, A. P.; Cartwright, I.; Gilfedder, B. S.; Cendón, D. I.; Unland, N. P.; Hofmann, H.

    2014-06-01

    Knowledge of groundwater residence times and recharge locations are vital to the sustainable management of groundwater resources. Here we investigate groundwater residence times and patterns of recharge in the Gellibrand Valley, southeast Australia, where outcropping aquifer sediments of the Eastern View Formation form an "aquifer window" that may receive diffuse recharge and recharge from the Gellibrand River. To determine recharge patterns and groundwater flowpaths, environmental isotopes (3H, 14C, δ13C, δ18O, δ2H) are used in conjunction with groundwater geochemistry and continuous monitoring of groundwater elevation and electrical conductivity. Despite the water table fluctuating by 0.9-3.7 m annually producing estimated recharge rates of 90 and 372 mm yr-1, residence times of shallow (11-29 m) groundwater determined by 14C ages are between 100 and 10 000 years. 3H activities are negligible in most of the groundwater and groundwater electrical conductivity in individual areas remains constant over the period of study. Although diffuse local recharge is evident, the depth to which it penetrates is limited to the upper 10 m of the aquifer. Rather, groundwater in the Gellibrand Valley predominantly originates from the regional recharge zone, the Barongarook High, and acts as a regional discharge zone where upward head gradients are maintained annually, limiting local recharge. Additionally, the Gellibrand River does not recharge the surrounding groundwater and has limited bank storage. 14C ages and Cl concentrations are well correlated and Cl concentrations may be used to provide a first-order estimate of groundwater residence times. Progressively lower chloride concentrations from 10 000 years BP to the present day are interpreted to indicate an increase in recharge rates on the Barongarook High.

  6. Implementation and influence of heterogeneous riverbed hydraulic conductivity in groundwater flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghysels, Gert; Huysmans, Marijke

    2015-04-01

    Characterization of groundwater-surface water exchange fluxes is important for assessing riparian ecology, determining quantity and quality of pumped groundwater close to rivers, modeling groundwater flow, predicting flood peaks and low flows, and river water quality. The exchange fluxes between river and aquifer are strongly influenced by the hydraulic conductivity of the riverbed which can vary several orders of magnitude and shows a strong spatial variation. Direct measurement of riverbed hydraulic conductivity is cumbersome and therefore often indirect data such as temperature data or calibration of groundwater models are used to constrain riverbed hydraulic conductivity. In these approaches, the riverbed is usually represented as a homogeneous geological structure and the spatial variation of riverbed hydraulic conductivity is thus neglected. However, neglecting this spatial variation can lead to systematic underestimation of net river-aquifer exchange fluxes and may have important implications for the estimation of peak mass flows, for the hydrochemistry of streambed sediments, nutrient cycling and biogeochemical gradients. The MODFLOW software is the most wide-spread package used for groundwater modelling. In MODFLOW rivers are usually modelled using the River-package. However, in this package no distinction can be made between horizontal and vertical riverbed hydraulic conductivity and the riverbed cannot be subdivided into layers with different hydraulic characteristics. Riverbed sediments are strongly layered and thus another approach is advised. Different ways of introducing heterogeneous riverbeds in MODFLOW groundwater flow models are explored and compared. The influence of heterogeneous riverbeds on groundwater-surface water exchange fluxes is analyzed for two case studies: the Aa River in the Nete catchment and a stretch of the Dijle River near the nature reserve 'de Doode Bemde' (Belgium). For both cases fine-scale distributed local groundwater flow

  7. Mathematical modelling of surface water-groundwater flow and salinity interactions in the coastal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanoudaki, Katerina; Kampanis, Nikolaos A.

    2014-05-01

    Coastal areas are the most densely-populated areas in the world. Consequently water demand is high, posing great pressure on fresh water resources. Climatic change and its direct impacts on meteorological variables (e.g. precipitation) and indirect impact on sea level rise, as well as anthropogenic pressures (e.g. groundwater abstraction), are strong drivers causing groundwater salinisation and subsequently affecting coastal wetlands salinity with adverse effects on the corresponding ecosystems. Coastal zones are a difficult hydrologic environment to represent with a mathematical model due to the large number of contributing hydrologic processes and variable-density flow conditions. Simulation of sea level rise and tidal effects on aquifer salinisation and accurate prediction of interactions between coastal waters, groundwater and neighbouring wetlands requires the use of integrated surface water-groundwater models. In the past few decades several computer codes have been developed to simulate coupled surface and groundwater flow. In these numerical models surface water flow is usually described by the 1-D Saint Venant equations (e.g. Swain and Wexler, 1996) or the 2D shallow water equations (e.g. Liang et al., 2007). Further simplified equations, such as the diffusion and kinematic wave approximations to the Saint Venant equations, are also employed for the description of 2D overland flow and 1D stream flow (e.g. Gunduz and Aral, 2005). However, for coastal bays, estuaries and wetlands it is often desirable to solve the 3D shallow water equations to simulate surface water flow. This is the case e.g. for wind-driven flows or density-stratified flows. Furthermore, most integrated models are based on the assumption of constant fluid density and therefore their applicability to coastal regions is questionable. Thus, most of the existing codes are not well-suited to represent surface water-groundwater interactions in coastal areas. To this end, the 3D integrated

  8. Structural Controls on Groundwater Flow in Basement Terrains: Geophysical, Remote Sensing, and Field Investigations in Sinai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Lamees; Sultan, Mohamed; Ahmed, Mohamed; Zaki, Abotalib; Sauck, William; Soliman, Farouk; Yan, Eugene; Elkadiri, Racha; Abouelmagd, Abdou

    2015-09-01

    An integrated [very low frequency (VLF) electromagnetic, magnetic, remote sensing, field, and geographic information system (GIS)] study was conducted over the basement complex in southern Sinai (Feiran watershed) for a better understanding of the structural controls on the groundwater flow. The increase in satellite-based radar backscattering values following a large precipitation event (34 mm on 17-18 January 2010) was used to identify water-bearing features, here interpreted as preferred pathways for surface water infiltration. Findings include: (1) spatial analysis in a GIS environment revealed that the distribution of the water-bearing features (conductive features) corresponds to that of fractures, faults, shear zones, dike swarms, and wadi networks; (2) using VLF (43 profiles), magnetic (7 profiles) techniques, and field observations, the majority (85 %) of the investigated conductive features were determined to be preferred pathways for groundwater flow; (3) northwest-southeast- to north-south-trending conductive features that intersect the groundwater flow (southeast to northwest) at low angles capture groundwater flow, whereas northeast-southwest to east-west features that intersect the flow at high angles impound groundwater upstream and could provide potential productive well locations; and (4) similar findings are observed in central Sinai: east-west-trending dextral shear zones (Themed and Sinai Hinge Belt) impede south to north groundwater flow as evidenced by the significant drop in hydraulic head (from 467 to 248 m above mean sea level) across shear zones and by reorientation of regional flow (south-north to southwest-northeast). The adopted integrated methodologies could be readily applied to similar highly fractured basement arid terrains elsewhere.

  9. Speleothems in the desert: Glimpses of the Pleistocene history of the Death Valley Regional Groundwater Flow System, Nevada and California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spötl, Christoph; Dublyansky, Yuri; Moseley, Gina; Wendt, Kathleen; Edwards, Larry; Scholger, Robert; Woodhead, Jon

    2016-04-01

    Death Valley in eastern California holds North Americás record for the deepest, hottest and driest place. Despite these unfavourable boundary conditions speleothems are present in this hyperarid depression and the surrounding deserts and provide unique insights into long-term regional climate change and landscape evolution of this tectonically and geomorphologically highly active region. Most of the speleothems are inactive and exposed due to tectonic uplift and erosion. They differ from common speleothems, because the majority formed under phreatic conditions as part of a regional groundwater flow system that is still active today. Data from three sites will be discussed illustrating the spectrum of speleothem deposits and their modes of formation. At Devils Hole, the thermal aquifer and the associated subaqueous and water-table speleothems can be directly accessed and provide a record reaching back about 1 million years. At Travertine Point, close to modern discharge points of this large groundwater flow system, phreatic speleothems form near-vertical veins up to about 2 m wide showing evidence of high flow rates along these fractures, which are connected to fossil spring tufa deposits. Finally, outcrops along Titus Canyon expose several generations of speleothems documenting the progressive lowering of the regional groundwater table. The youngest calcite generation records the transition towards vadose conditions 500-400 ka ago.

  10. Buried Distributaries as a Conduit for Groundwater Flow in Barataria Bay, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breaux, A.; Schneider, A.; Kolker, A.; Telfeyan, K.; Kim, J.; Johannesson, K. H.; Cable, J. E.; Coleman, D.

    2013-12-01

    Many studies have focused on hydrological and geochemical fluxes to the ocean from land to the ocean via submarine groundwater discharge (SGD), however few have assessed these contributions of SGD in deltaic settings. The Mississippi River delta is the largest delta in North America, and the magnitude of groundwater that discharges from the River into its delta is relatively unknown. Hydrological budgets have indicated that there is a large magnitude of water lost in the Mississippi's Delta. Recent evidence in our study indicates that paleochannels, or semi-permeable buried sandy channels that were former distributaries of the River, allow for water to discharge out of the Mississippi's main channel and into its Delta. Our study uses geophysical data, including CHIRP and resistivity methods, to detect the location of these paleochannels in Barataria Bay, a coastal bay located in the Mississippi Delta. CHIRP data shows that these paleochannel features are ubiquitous in the Mississippi Delta, while resistivity data indicates that lower salinity water is found during high river flow in bays proximate to the River. Sediment core analysis is also used to characterize the area of study, as well as further understand the regional geology of the Mississippi Delta. The geophysical and sediment core data will be used to contextualize geochemical data collected in the field, which includes an assessment of major cations and anions, as well as in situ Rn-222 activities, a method that has been proven to be useful as a tracer of groundwater movement. The results may be useful in understanding potential global magnitude of hydrological and geochemical fluxes of other large rivers with abandoned distributaries.

  11. Groundwater flow velocity measurements in a sinkhole at the Weeks Island Strategic Petroleum Reserve Facility, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, S.; Gibson, J.

    1995-02-01

    In 1992, a sinkhole was discovered above a Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage facility at Weeks Island, Louisiana. The oil is stored in an old salt mine located within a salt dome. In order to assess the hydrologic significance of the sink hole, an In Situ Permeable Flow Sensor was deployed within a sand-filled conduit in the salt dome directly beneath the sinkhole. The flow sensor is a recently developed instrument which uses a thermal perturbation technique to measure the magnitude and direction of the full 3-dimensional groundwater flow velocity vector in saturated, permeable materials. The flow sensor measured substantial groundwater flow directed vertically downward into the salt dome. The data obtained with the flow sensor provided critical evidence which was instrumental in assessing the significance of the sinkhole in terms of the integrity of the oil storage facility.

  12. Application of MODFLOW and geographic information system to groundwater flow simulation in North China Plain, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiqin; Shao, Jingli; Song, Xianfang; Zhang, Yongbo; Huo, Zhibin; Zhou, Xiaoyuan

    2008-10-01

    MODFLOW is a groundwater modeling program. It can be compiled and remedied according to the practical applications. Because of its structure and fixed data format, MODFLOW can be integrated with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology for water resource management. The North China Plain (NCP), which is the politic, economic and cultural center of China, is facing with water resources shortage and water pollution. Groundwater is the main water resource for industrial, agricultural and domestic usage. It is necessary to evaluate the groundwater resources of the NCP as an entire aquifer system. With the development of computer and internet information technology it is also necessary to integrate the groundwater model with the GIS technology. Because the geological and hydrogeological data in the NCP was mainly in MAPGIS format, the powerful function of GIS of disposing of and analyzing spatial data and computer languages such as Visual C and Visual Basic were used to define the relationship between the original data and model data. After analyzing the geological and hydrogeological conditions of the NCP, the groundwater flow numerical simulation modeling was constructed with MODFLOW. On the basis of GIS, a dynamic evaluation system for groundwater resources under the internet circumstance was completed. During the process of constructing the groundwater model, a water budget was analyzed, which showed a negative budget in the NCP. The simulation period was from 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2003. During this period, the total recharge of the groundwater system was 49,374 × 106 m3 and the total discharge was 56,530 × 106 m3 the budget deficit was -7,156 × 106 m3. In this integrated system, the original data including graphs and attribution data could be stored in the database. When the process of evaluating and predicting groundwater flow was started, these data were transformed into files that the core program of MODFLOW could read. The calculated water

  13. Simulation of vertical compaction in models of regional ground-water flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leake, S.A.

    1991-01-01

    A new computer program was developed to simulate vertical compaction in models of regional ground-water flow. The program accounts for ground-water storage changes and compaction in discontinuous interbeds or in extensive confining beds. The new program is a package for the U.S. Geological Survey modular finite-difference ground-water flow model. Several features of the program make it useful for application in shallow unconfined flow systems. Geostatic load can be treated as a function of water-table elevation, and compaction is a function of computed changes in effective stress at the center of a model layer. Thickness of compressible sediments in an unconfined model layer can vary in proportion to saturated thickness. The new package was tested by comparison with an existing model of one-dimensional compaction.

  14. A quantitative model of ground-water flow during formation of tabular sandstone uranium deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, R.F.

    1994-01-01

    Presents a quantitative simulation of regional groundwater flow during uranium deposition in the Westwater Canyon Member and Jackpile Sandstone Member of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation in the San Juan basin. Topographic slope, shoreline position, and density contrasts in the lake and pore fluids controlled the directions of flow and recharge-discharge areas. The most important results for uranium ore deposit formation are that regional groundwater discharged throughout the basin, regional discharge was concentrated along the shore line or playa margin, flow was dominantly gravity driven, and compaction dewatering was negligible. A strong association is found between the tabular sandstone uranium deposits and major inferred zones of mixed local and regional groundwater discharge. -from Author

  15. An initial inverse calibration of the ground-water flow model for the Hanford unconfined aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, E.A. . Desert Research Inst.); Freshly, M.D. )

    1990-03-01

    Large volumes of process cooling water are discharged to the ground form U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear fuel processing operations in the central portion of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. Over the years, these large volumes of waste water have recharged the unconfined aquifer at the Site. This artificial recharge has affected ground-water levels and contaminant movement in the unconfined aquifer. Ground-water flow and contaminant transport models have been applied to assess the impacts of site operations on the rate and direction of ground-water flow and contaminant transport in unconfined aquifer at the Hanford Site. The inverse calibration method developed by Neuman and modified by Jacobson was applied to improve calibration of a ground-water flow model of the unconfined aquifer at the Hanford Site. All information about estimates of hydraulic properties of the aquifer, hydraulic heads, boundary conditions, and discharges to and withdrawals form the aquifer is included in the inverse method to obtain an initial calibration of the ground-water flow model. The purpose of this report is to provide a description of the inverse method, its initial application to the unconfined aquifer at Hanford, and to present results of the initial inverse calibration. 28 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Geohydrology, simulation of regional groundwater flow, and assessment of watermanagement strategies, Twentynine Palms area, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, Zhen; Martin, Peter

    2011-01-01

    aquifers (referred to as the upper and the middle aquifers) and the Tertiary sedimentary deposits into a single aquifer (referred to as the lower aquifer). In general, wells perforated in the upper aquifer yield more water than wells perforated in the middle and lower aquifers. The study area is dominated by extensive faulting and moderate to intense folding that has displaced or deformed the pre-Tertiary basement complex as well as the overlying Tertiary and Quaternary deposits. Many of these faults act as barriers to the lateral movement of groundwater flow and form many of the boundaries of the groundwater subbasins. The principal recharge to the study area is groundwater underflow across the western and southern boundaries that originates as runoff in the surrounding mountains. Groundwater discharges naturally from the study area as spring flow, as groundwater underflow to downstream basins, and as water vapor to the atmosphere by transpiration of phreatophytes and direct evaporation from moist soil. The annual volume of water that naturally recharged to or discharged from the groundwater flow system in the study area during predevelopment conditions was estimated to be 1,010 acre-feet per year (acre-ft/yr). About 90 percent of this recharge originated as runoff from the Little San Bernardino and the Pinto Mountains to the south, and the remainder originated as runoff from the San Bernardino Mountains to the west. Evapotranspiration by phreatophytes near Mesquite Lake (dry) was the primary form of predevelopment groundwater discharge. From 1953 through 2007, approximately 139,400 acre-feet (acre-ft) of groundwater was pumped by the MCAGCC from the Surprise Spring subbasin. A regional-scale numerical groundwater flow model was developed using MODFLOW-2000 for the Surprise Spring, Deadman, Mesquite, and Mainside subbasins. The aquifer system was simulated by using three model layers representing the upper, middle, and lower aquifers. Measured groundwater levels

  17. Geohydrology of the Central Oahu, Hawaii, Ground-Water Flow System and Numerical Simulation of the Effects of Additional Pumping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oki, Delwyn S.

    1998-01-01

    A two-dimensional, finite-difference, ground-water flow model was developed for the central Oahu flow system, which is the largest and most productive ground-water flow system on the island. The model is based on the computer code SHARP which simulates both freshwater and saltwater flow. The ground-water model was developed using average pumping and recharge conditions during the 1950's, which was considered to be a steady-state period. For 1950's conditions, model results indicate that 62 percent (90.1 million gallons per day) of the discharge from the Schofield ground-water area flows southward and the remaining 38 percent (55.2 million gallons per day) of the discharge from Schofield flows northward. Although the contribution of recharge from infiltration of rainfall and irrigation water directly on top of the southern and northern Schofield ground-water dams was included in the model, the distribution of natural discharge from the Schofield ground-water area was estimated exclusive of the recharge on top of the dams. The model was used to investigate the long-term effects of pumping under future land-use conditions. Future recharge was conservatively estimated by assuming no recharge associated with agricultural activities. Future pumpage used in the model was based on the 1995-allocated rates. Model results indicate that the long-term effect of pumping at the 1995-allocated rates will be a reduction of water levels from present (1995) conditions in all ground-water areas of the central Oahu flow system. In the Schofield ground-water area, model results indicate that water levels could decline about 30 feet from the 1995 water-level altitude of about 275 feet. In the remaining ground-water areas of the central Oahu flow system, water levels may decline from less than 1 foot to as much as 12 feet relative to 1995 water levels. Model results indicate that the bottoms of several existing deep wells in northern and southern Oahu extend below the model

  18. Control on groundwater flow in a semiarid folded and faulted intermountain basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, Lyndsay B.; Caine, Jonathan S.; Ge, Shemin

    2013-01-01

    The major processes controlling groundwater flow in intermountain basins are poorly understood, particularly in basins underlain by folded and faulted bedrock and under regionally realistic hydrogeologic heterogeneity. To explore the role of hydrogeologic heterogeneity and poorly constrained mountain hydrologic conditions on regional groundwater flow in contracted intermountain basins, a series of 3-D numerical groundwater flow models were developed using the South Park basin, Colorado, USA as a proxy. The models were used to identify the relative importance of different recharge processes to major aquifers, to estimate typical groundwater circulation depths, and to explore hydrogeologic communication between mountain and valley hydrogeologic landscapes. Modeling results show that mountain landscapes develop topographically controlled and predominantly local-scale to intermediate-scale flow systems. Permeability heterogeneity of the fold and fault belt and decreased topographic roughness led to permeability controlled flow systems in the valley. The structural position of major aquifers in the valley fold and fault belt was found to control the relative importance of different recharge mechanisms. Alternative mountain recharge model scenarios showed that higher mountain recharge rates led to higher mountain water table elevations and increasingly prominent local flow systems, primarily resulting in increased seepage within the mountain landscape and nonlinear increases in mountain block recharge to the valley. Valley aquifers were found to be relatively insensitive to changing mountain water tables, particularly in structurally isolated aquifers inside the fold and fault belt.

  19. Simulation of groundwater flow at the LBNL site using TOUGH2

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Quanlin; Birkholzer, Jens T.; Javandel, Iraj; Jordan, Preston D.

    2003-05-12

    In the late 1980s, groundwater contamination was detected at the site of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). A detailed investigation was conducted to locate the source and the extent of the contamination. Interim corrective measures were initiated where appropriate and required, typically directed towards removing the source of contamination, excavating contaminated soil, and limiting further spreading of contaminants. As the first step for predicting the fate of remaining contaminants, a three-dimensional transient groundwater flow model was developed for the complex hydrogeological situation. This flow model captured strong variations in thickness, slope, and hydrogeological properties of geologic units, representative of a mountainous groundwater system with accentuated morphology. The flow model accounts for strong seasonal fluctuations in the groundwater table. Other significant factors are local recharge from leaking underground storm drains and significant water re charge from steep hills located upstream. The strong heterogeneous rock properties were calibrated using the inverse simulator ITOUGH2. For validation purposes, the model was calibrated for a time period from 1994 to 1996, and then applied to a period from 1996 to 1998. Comparison of simulated and measured water levels demonstrated that the model accurately represents the complex flow situation, including the significant seasonal fluctuations in water table and flow rate. Paths of particles originating from contaminant plumes in the simulated transient flow fields were obtained to represent advective transport.

  20. Study of electrokinetic effects to quantify groundwater flow

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.R.; Haupt, R.W.

    1997-04-01

    An experimental study of electrokinetic effects (streaming potential) in earth materials was undertaken. The objective was to evaluate the measurement of electrokinetic effects as a method of monitoring and predicting the movement of groundwater, contaminant plumes, and other fluids in the subsurface. The laboratory experiments verified that the electrokinetic effects in earth materials are prominent, repeatable, and can be described well to first order by a pair of coupled differential equations.

  1. Geohydrology and ground-water quality at the Pueblo Depot activity landfill near Pueblo, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watts, Kenneth R.; Ortiz, Roderick F.

    1990-01-01

    Groundwater samples were collected from the shallow unconfined aquifer at the Pueblo Depot Activity (Colorado) landfill and downstream from the landfill. The Pueblo Depot Activity is a U.S. Department of the Army facility in southeastern Colorado about 15 miles east of Pueblo, Colorado. The land-fill is underlain by upland alluvial terrace deposits that overlie a thick and almost impermeable shale. Saturated thickness of the aquifer generally is from 5 to 10 feet. Groundwater flow at the landfill is to the south-southeast toward the Arkansas River valley. Though not hydraulically connected to the upland terrace deposits, the alluvium underlying the Arkansas River valley may be recharged by groundwater that is discharged from seeps at the contact of the upland terrace deposits and the Pierre Shale. The water is classified as a mixed-cation mixed-anion type water that has concentrations of dissolved solids of 710 to 1,810 mg/L. Dissolved-solids concentrations increase downgradient. Chemical analysis, done to determine possible contamination of the groundwater, indicated that concentrations of trichloroethylene ranged from 5.2 to 2,900 microg/L and of trans-1,2-dichloroethylene ranged from 5 to 720 microg/L. The areal distribution of these volatile organic compounds indicate that there possibly are two sources of contamination of groundwater at the landfill, one upgradient from the landfill and the other within the landfill. Analysis of water samples from wells and seeps offsite and downgradient from the landfill did not indicate either contaminant in groundwater from the alluvial aquifer underlying the Arkansas River valley. (USGS)

  2. Quasi 3D modeling of water flow and solute transport in vadose zone and groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakirevich, A.; Kuznetsov, M.; Weisbrod, N.; Pachepsky, Y. A.

    2013-12-01

    The complexity of subsurface flow systems calls for a variety of concepts leading to the multiplicity of simplified flow models. One commonly used simplification is based on the assumption that lateral flow and transport in unsaturated zone is insignificant unless the capillary fringe is involved. In such cases the flow and transport in the unsaturated zone above groundwater level can be simulated as a 1D phenomenon, whereas through groundwater they are viewed as 2D or 3D phenomena. A new approach for a numerical scheme for 3D variably saturated flow and transport is presented. A Quasi-3D approach allows representing flow in the 'vadose zone - aquifer' system by a series of 1D Richards' equations solved in variably-saturated zone and by 3D-saturated flow equation in groundwater (modified MODFLOW code). The 1D and 3D equations are coupled at the phreatic surface in a way that aquifer replenishment is calculated using the Richards' equation, and solving for the moving water table does not require definition of the specific yield parameter. The 3D advection-dispersion equation is solved in the entire domain by the MT3D code. Using implicit finite differences approximation to couple processes in the vadose zone and groundwater provides mass conservation and increase of computational efficiency. The above model was applied to simulate the impact of irrigation on groundwater salinity in the Alto Piura aquifer (Northern Peru). Studies on changing groundwater quality in arid and semi-arid lands show that irrigation return flow is one of the major factors contributing to aquifer salinization. Existing mathematical models do not account explicitly for the solute recycling during irrigation on a daily scale. Recycling occurs throughout the unsaturated and saturated zones, as function of the solute mass extracted from pumping wells. Salt concentration in irrigation water is calculated at each time step as a function of concentration of both surface water and groundwater

  3. Modelling the effect of buried valleys on groundwater flow: case study in Ventspils vicinity, Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delina, Aija; Popovs, Konrads; Bikse, Janis; Retike, Inga; Babre, Alise; Kalvane, Gunta

    2015-04-01

    Buried subglacial valleys are widely distributed in glaciated regions and they can have great influence on groundwater flow and hence on groundwater resources. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of the buried valleys on groundwater flow in a confined aquifer (Middle Devonian Eifelian stage Arukila aquifer, D2ar) applying numerical modelling. The study area is located at vicinity of Ventspils Town, near wellfield Ogsils where number of the buried valleys with different depth and filling material are present. Area is located close to the Baltic Sea at Piejūra lowland Rinda plain and regional groundwater flow is towards sea. Territory is covered by thin layer of Quaternary sediments in thicknesses of 10 to 20 meters although Prequaternary sediments are exposed at some places. Buried valleys are characterized as narrow, elongated and deep formations that is be filled with various, mainly Pleistocene glacigene sediments - either till loam of different ages or sand and gravel or interbedding of both above mentioned. The filling material of the valleys influences groundwater flow in the confined aquifers which is intercepted by the valleys. It is supposed that glacial till loam filled valleys serves as a barrier to groundwater flow and as a recharge conduit when filled with sand and gravel deposits. Numerical model was built within MOSYS modelling system (Virbulis et al. 2012) using finite element method in order to investigate buried valley influence on groundwater flow in the study area. Several conceptual models were tested in numerical model depending on buried valley filling material: sand and gravel, till loam or mixture of them. Groundwater flow paths and travel times were studied. Results suggested that valley filled with glacial till is acting as barrier and it causes sharp drop of piezometric head and downward flow. Valley filled with sand and gravel have almost no effect on piezometric head distribution, however it this case buried valleys

  4. Groundwater flow and heat flow in an area of mineral springs

    SciTech Connect

    Vasseur, G. )

    1991-01-01

    As part of the project Geologie Profonde de la France, two boreholes have been drilled in the active hydrothermal area of Chassole, an area of metamorphic Variscan basement characterized by the occurrence of sodium-bicarbonate waters that have undergone high temperatures during their underground cycle. The underground water flow system, as revealed from various hydraulic and chemical observations, appears very complex: it is characterized by the simultaneous presence of meteoric water flowing downwards and mineralized water of deep origin flowing upwards. Geothermal measurements performed in the borehole are presented in detail and a semi-quantitative interpretation is given. A vertical profile of heat flow down to 1400 m depth indicates important variations, which are interpreted as the result of upward vertical movement of water. The quantitative interpretation of the data is based on simple models of steady state and transient temperature disturbances associated with water flow.

  5. Occurrence of Volcanic CO2 by Groundwater Flow Systems in the Eifel Mountains, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyer, K.; May, F.; Ellis, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    Weyer (2010) showed why and how discharge areas of regional groundwater flow systems are also discharge points of natural and stored CO2. As groundwater flow systems reach to great depth by penetrating aquitards and caprocks any successful design of on-shore geological carbon storage must regard the migration effects groundwater flow systems exert on stored CO2. Eventually all of the CO2 will be dissolved by groundwater and migrate to the discharge areas of these flow systems. By implication there will rarely be the anticipated permanent storage of CO2 in the subsurface. Instead the deep ground water flow will transport the dissolved CO2 into surface waters. A telling example of such a system is the Green River in Utah with its natural discharge points of volcanic CO2 and the artificial discharge point Crystal Geyser, a flowing abandoned well located at the bank of the Green River. The advantage of this situation is that there have been hydrogeological tools developed which allow the determination of the flow path of the groundwater flow systems and their approximate time scale to reach their groundwater discharge areas. These time spans may be as large as 50,000 to 100,000 years. In any case residence times of a thousand years and more would suffice in mitigating the atmospheric effect of CO2 discharge. The above concepts have so far not created much resonance in the scientific and practical world of geologic CO2 storage. Therefore the investigation of groundwater dynamics at areas with natural discharge of volcanic CO2 provides a test for the effect groundwater flow systems will exert on the geologic storage of CO2. The Eifel Mountains in Germany present such a natural laboratory as it contains over a hundred known Tertiary and Quaternary volcanoes. Its discharge points of water carrying CO2 are well-known as they have been used for generations for the production of carbonated mineral waters. For the western part of the Eifel-Mountains, May (2002) listed all

  6. Death Valley regional groundwater flow model calibration using optimal parameter estimation methods and geoscientific information systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    D'Agnese, F. A.; Faunt, C.C.; Hill, M.C.; Turner, A.K.

    1996-01-01

    A three-layer Death Valley regional groundwater flow model was constructed to evaluate potential regional groundwater flow paths in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Geoscientific information systems were used to characterize the complex surface and subsurface hydrogeological conditions of the area, and this characterization was used to construct likely conceptual models of the flow system. The high contrasts and abrupt contacts of the different hydrogeological units in the subsurface make zonation the logical choice for representing the hydraulic conductivity distribution. Hydraulic head and spring flow data were used to test different conceptual models by using nonlinear regression to determine parameter values that currently provide the best match between the measured and simulated heads and flows.

  7. Slope instability in complex 3D topography promoted by convergent 3D groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, M. E.; Brien, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    Slope instability in complex topography is generally controlled by the interaction between gravitationally induced stresses, 3D strengths, and 3D pore-fluid pressure fields produced by flowing groundwater. As an example of this complexity, coastal bluffs sculpted by landsliding commonly exhibit a progression of undulating headlands and re-entrants. In this landscape, stresses differ between headlands and re-entrants and 3D groundwater flow varies from vertical rainfall infiltration to lateral groundwater flow on lower permeability layers with subsequent discharge at the curved bluff faces. In plan view, groundwater flow converges in the re-entrant regions. To investigate relative slope instability induced by undulating topography, we couple the USGS 3D limit-equilibrium slope-stability model, SCOOPS, with the USGS 3D groundwater flow model, MODFLOW. By rapidly analyzing the stability of millions of potential failures, the SCOOPS model can determine relative slope stability throughout the 3D domain underlying a digital elevation model (DEM), and it can utilize both fully 3D distributions of pore-water pressure and material strength. The two models are linked by first computing a groundwater-flow field in MODFLOW, and then computing stability in SCOOPS using the pore-pressure field derived from groundwater flow. Using these two models, our analyses of 60m high coastal bluffs in Seattle, Washington showed augmented instability in topographic re-entrants given recharge from a rainy season. Here, increased recharge led to elevated perched water tables with enhanced effects in the re-entrants owing to convergence of groundwater flow. Stability in these areas was reduced about 80% compared to equivalent dry conditions. To further isolate these effects, we examined groundwater flow and stability in hypothetical landscapes composed of uniform and equally spaced, oscillating headlands and re-entrants with differing amplitudes. The landscapes had a constant slope for both

  8. Ground-water levels and flow near the industrial excess landfill, Uniontown, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bair, E.S.; Norris, S.E.

    1989-01-01

    Under an interagency contractual agreement with the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registration, the U.S. Geological Survey evaluated geologic and hydrogeologic data available for the Industrial Excess Landfill (IEL) site in Uniontown, Ohio. During previous studies, ground-water contaminations was detected in observation wells installed at the site and in residential wells near the site. Water levels recorded on drillers' logs from 279 wells were used to characterize the regional ground-water flow system in the area of the IEL site. On the basis of the gross lithologic differences between the unconsolidated glacial-drift material and the indurated bedrock, and the inferred differences in their hydraulic properties, the flow system in the area of the IEL site was divided into two regional aquifers: a shallow, unconfined glacial-drift aquifer and a deeper, semiconfined bedrock aquifer. About 33 percent of the drillers' logs were from wells completed in the glacial-drift aquifer, whereas 67 percent were from wells completed in the bedrock aquifer. A composite potentiometric-surface map of the glacial drift aquifer shows that the IEL site appears to straddle a prominent ground-water ridge that trends northeast-southwest. Ground water flows radially away from this ridge, primarily to the northwest and to the southeast; as a result flow in the glacial-drift aquifer as the IEL site moves in a radial pattern away from the site in all directions. A composite, regional potentiometric-surface map of the bedrock aquifer shows a similar shows a similar elongated ground-water ridge trending northeast-southwest across the north-western corner of the IEL site; however, it does not appear that the IEL site straddles the ground-water ridge in the bedrock potentiometric surface. As a consequence of the radial-type of flow pattern in the glacial-drift aquifer at the IEL site, the direction of potential off-site movement of a contaminant at the IEL site, This radial type of

  9. Underground pumped storage hydroelectricity using abandoned works (deep mines or open pits) and the impact on groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujades, Estanislao; Willems, Thibault; Bodeux, Sarah; Orban, Philippe; Dassargues, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Underground pumped storage hydroelectricity (UPSH) plants using open-pit or deep mines can be used in flat regions to store the excess of electricity produced during low-demand energy periods. It is essential to consider the interaction between UPSH plants and the surrounding geological media. There has been little work on the assessment of associated groundwater flow impacts. The impacts on groundwater flow are determined numerically using a simplified numerical model which is assumed to be representative of open-pit and deep mines. The main impact consists of oscillation of the piezometric head, and its magnitude depends on the characteristics of the aquifer/geological medium, the mine and the pumping and injection intervals. If an average piezometric head is considered, it drops at early times after the start of the UPSH plant activity and then recovers progressively. The most favorable hydrogeological conditions to minimize impacts are evaluated by comparing several scenarios. The impact magnitude will be lower in geological media with low hydraulic diffusivity; however, the parameter that plays the more important role is the volume of water stored in the mine. Its variation modifies considerably the groundwater flow impacts. Finally, the problem is studied analytically and some solutions are proposed to approximate the impacts, allowing a quick screening of favorable locations for future UPSH plants.

  10. Hydrologic controls on nitrogen cycling processes and functional gene abundance in sediments of a groundwater flow-through lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoliker, Deborah L.; Repert, Deborah A.; Smith, Richard L.; Song, Bongkeun; LeBlanc, Denis R.; McCobb, Timothy D.; Conaway, Christopher; Hyun, Sung Pil; Koh, Dong-Chan; Moon, Hee Sun; Kent, Douglas B.

    2016-01-01

    The fate and transport of inorganic nitrogen (N) is a critically important issue for human and aquatic ecosystem health because discharging N-contaminated groundwater can foul drinking water and cause algal blooms. Factors controlling N-processing were examined in sediments at three sites with contrasting hydrologic regimes at a lake on Cape Cod, MA. These factors included water chemistry, seepage rates and direction of groundwater flow, and the abundance and potential rates of activity of N-cycling microbial communities. Genes coding for denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), and nitrification were identified at all sites regardless of flow direction or groundwater dissolved oxygen concentrations. Flow direction was, however, a controlling factor in the potential for N-attenuation via denitrification in the sediments. Potential rates of denitrification varied from 6 to 4500 pmol N/g/h from the inflow to the outflow side of the lake, owing to fundamental differences in the supply of labile organic matter. The results of laboratory incubations suggested that when anoxia and limiting labile organic matter prevailed, the potential existed for concomitant anammox and denitrification. Where oxic lake water was downwelling, potential rates of nitrification at shallow depths were substantial (1640 pmol N/g/h). Rates of anammox, denitrification, and nitrification may be linked to rates of organic N-mineralization, serving to increase N-mobility and transport downgradient.

  11. Ground-water flow and ground- and surface-water interaction at the Weldon Spring quarry, St. Charles County, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Imes, J.L.; Kleeschulte, M.J.

    1997-12-31

    Ground-water-level measurements to support remedial actions were made in 37 piezometers and 19 monitoring wells during a 19-month period to assess the potential for ground-water flow from an abandoned quarry to the nearby St. Charles County well field, which withdraws water from the base of the alluvial aquifer. From 1957 to 1966, low-level radioactive waste products from the Weldon Spring chemical plant were placed in the quarry a few hundred feet north of the Missouri River alluvial plain. Uranium-based contaminants subsequently were detected in alluvial ground water south of the quarry. During all but flood conditions, lateral ground-water flow in the bedrock from the quarry, as interpreted from water-table maps, generally is southwest toward Little Femme Osage Creek or south into the alluvial aquifer. After entering the alluvial aquifer, the ground water flows southeast to east toward a ground-water depression presumably produced by pumping at the St. Charles County well field. The depression position varies depending on the Missouri River stage and probably the number and location of active wells in the St. Charles County well field.

  12. Hydrologic Controls on Nitrogen Cycling Processes and Functional Gene Abundance in Sediments of a Groundwater Flow-Through Lake.

    PubMed

    Stoliker, Deborah L; Repert, Deborah A; Smith, Richard L; Song, Bongkeun; LeBlanc, Denis R; McCobb, Timothy D; Conaway, Christopher H; Hyun, Sung Pil; Koh, Dong-Chan; Moon, Hee Sun; Kent, Douglas B

    2016-04-01

    The fate and transport of inorganic nitrogen (N) is a critically important issue for human and aquatic ecosystem health because discharging N-contaminated groundwater can foul drinking water and cause algal blooms. Factors controlling N-processing were examined in sediments at three sites with contrasting hydrologic regimes at a lake on Cape Cod, MA. These factors included water chemistry, seepage rates and direction of groundwater flow, and the abundance and potential rates of activity of N-cycling microbial communities. Genes coding for denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), and nitrification were identified at all sites regardless of flow direction or groundwater dissolved oxygen concentrations. Flow direction was, however, a controlling factor in the potential for N-attenuation via denitrification in the sediments. Potential rates of denitrification varied from 6 to 4500 pmol N/g/h from the inflow to the outflow side of the lake, owing to fundamental differences in the supply of labile organic matter. The results of laboratory incubations suggested that when anoxia and limiting labile organic matter prevailed, the potential existed for concomitant anammox and denitrification. Where oxic lake water was downwelling, potential rates of nitrification at shallow depths were substantial (1640 pmol N/g/h). Rates of anammox, denitrification, and nitrification may be linked to rates of organic N-mineralization, serving to increase N-mobility and transport downgradient. PMID:26967929

  13. Ground-water flow and water quality in the sand aquifer of Long Beach Peninsula, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, B.E.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes a study that was undertaken to improve the understanding of ground-water flow and water quality in the coastal sand aquifer of the Long Beach Peninsula of southwestern Washington. Data collected for the study include monthly water levels at 103 wells and 28 surface-water sites during 1992, and water-quality samples from about 40 wells and 13 surface-water sites in February and July 1992. Ground water generally flows at right angles to a ground-water divide along the spine of the low-lying peninsula. Historical water-level data indicate that there was no long-term decline in the water table from 1974 to 1992. The water quality of shallow ground water was generally good with a few local problems. Natural concentrations of dissolved iron were higher than 0.3 milligrams per liter in about one-third of the samples. The dissolved-solids concentrations were generally low, with a range of 56 to 218 milligrams per liter. No appreciable amount of seawater has intruded into the sand aquifer, chloride concentrations were low, with a maximum of 52 milligrams per liter. Agricultural activities do not appear to have significantly affected the quality of ground water. Concentrations of nutrients were low in the cranberry-growing areas, and selected pesticides were not found above the analytical detection limits. Septic systems probably caused an increase in the concentration of nitrate from medians of less than 0.05 milligrams per liter in areas of low population density to 0.74 milligrams per liter in areas of high density.

  14. Simulation of ground-water flow and areas contributing ground water to production wells, Cadillac, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoard, Christopher J.; Westjohn, David B.

    2005-01-01

    Ground water is the primary source of water for domestic, municipal, and industrial use within the northwest section of Michigan's Lower Peninsula. Because of the importance of this resource, numerous communities including the city of Cadillac in Wexford County, Michigan, have begun local wellhead protection programs. In these programs, communities protect their ground-water resources by identifying the areas that contribute water to production wells, identifying potential sources of contamination, and developing methods to cooperatively manage and minimize threats to the water supply. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of Cadillac, simulated regional ground-water flow and estimated areas contributing recharge and zones of transport to the production well field. Ground-water flow models for the Clam River watershed, in Wexford and Missaukee Counties, were developed using the U.S. Geological Survey modular three-dimensional finite-difference ground-water flow model (MODFLOW 2000). Ground-water flow models were calibrated using the observation, sensitivity, and parameter estimation packages of MODFLOW 2000. Ground-water-head solutions from calibrated flow models were used in conjunction with MODPATH, a particle-tracking program, to simulate regional ground-water flow and estimate areas contributing recharge and zones of transport to the Cadillac production-well field for a 10-year period. Model simulations match the conceptual model in that regional ground-water flow in the deep ground-water system is from southeast to northwest across the watershed. Areas contributing water were determined for the optimized parameter set and an alternate parameter set that included increased recharge and hydraulic conductivity values. Although substantially different hydrologic parameters (assumed to represent end-member ranges of realistic hydrologic parameters) were used in alternate numerical simulations, simulation results differ little in predictions of

  15. Water scarcity, groundwater and base flow in Dutch catchments: effects of climate and human impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriks, D. M. D.; van Ek, R.; Kuijper, M. J. M.

    2012-04-01

    During recent years (2003, 2006 en 2008) water boards in the Netherlands have had to cope with drought and water scarcity. Because of human impacts in the area, like groundwater abstraction and extensive drainage, the upper parts of streams run dry during low precipitation periods. The lack of water is a risk for the environmental flow needs of the streams. In addition, agricultural areas encounter problems due to low groundwater levels and limited availability of water for spray irrigation. Such problems are likely to occur more frequent in the future, because of increasing frequency of dry spells, reduced water intake possibilities from large rivers and a higher demand for water for agriculture and other land use functions. Several studies have been carried out to investigate the possibilities for structural improvement of groundwater and base flow conditions, thereby improving the situation of agriculture and ecology (Hendriks et al., 2010; Kuijper et al., 2012). The effects of both climate change and unsustainable use of water resources on base flow were assessed at various scales. For this purpose, spatially distributed groundwater models with fine meshed grids (25x25 m) were used to simultaneously assess the effects of climate and human impacts on both groundwater conditions and surface water discharge. Climatic effects were assessed by comparison of meteorologically dry and average years, as well as through climate scenarios from the Royal Dutch Weather Service (KNMI). Human impacts were assessed by modeling various scenarios with reduced or increased drainage and groundwater abstraction, including a scenario of the undisturbed situation. Also, the impact of stream morphology was studied. The suitability of a new modeling approach (Van der Velde et al., 2009), allowing a fast assessment of discharge with high accuracy, was tested to improve discharge simulations from groundwater models. Model results show that extensive drainage systems have a large impact

  16. Calculating discharge of phosphorus and nitrogen with groundwater base flow to a small urban stream reach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, Alex; Roy, James W.; Smith, James E.

    2015-09-01

    Elevated levels of nutrients, especially phosphorus, in urban streams can lead to eutrophication and general degradation of stream water quality. Contributions of phosphorus from groundwater have typically been assumed minor, though elevated concentrations have been associated with riparian areas and urban settings. The objective of this study was to investigate the importance of groundwater as a pathway for phosphorus and nitrogen input to a gaining urban stream. The stream at the 28-m study reach was 3-5 m wide and straight, flowing generally eastward, with a relatively smooth bottom of predominantly sand, with some areas of finer sediments and a few boulders. Temperature-based methods were used to estimate the groundwater flux distribution. Detailed concentration distributions in discharging groundwater were mapped using in-stream piezometers and diffusion-based peepers, and showed elevated levels of soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) and ammonium compared to the stream (while nitrate levels were lower), especially along the south bank, where groundwater fluxes were lower and geochemically reducing conditions dominated. Field evidence suggests the ammonium may originate from nearby landfills, but that local sediments likely contribute the SRP. Ammonium and SRP mass discharges with groundwater were then estimated as the product of the respective concentration distributions and the groundwater flux distribution. These were determined as approximately 9 and 200 g d-1 for SRP and ammonium, respectively, which compares to stream mass discharges over the observed range of base flows of 20-1100 and 270-7600 g d-1, respectively. This suggests that groundwater from this small reach, and any similar areas along Dyment's Creek, has the potential to contribute substantially to the stream nutrient concentrations.

  17. Multivariate analyses with end-member mixing to characterize groundwater flow: Wind Cave and associated aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, Andrew J.; Valder, Joshua F.

    2011-01-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) applied to hydrochemical data has been used with end-member mixing to characterize groundwater flow to a limited extent, but aspects of this approach are unresolved. Previous similar approaches typically have assumed that the extreme-value samples identified by PCA represent end members. The method presented herein is different from previous work in that (1) end members were not assumed to have been sampled but rather were estimated and constrained by prior knowledge; (2) end-member mixing was quantified in relation to hydrogeologic domains, which focuses model results on major hydrologic processes; (3) a method to select an appropriate number of end members using a series of cluster analyses is presented; and (4) conservative tracers were weighted preferentially in model calibration, which distributed model errors of optimized values, or residuals, more appropriately than would otherwise be the case. The latter item also provides an estimate of the relative influence of geochemical evolution along flow paths in comparison to mixing. This method was applied to groundwater in Wind Cave and the associated karst aquifer in the Black Hills of South Dakota, USA. The end-member mixing model was used to test a hypothesis that five different end-member waters are mixed in the groundwater system comprising five hydrogeologic domains. The model estimated that Wind Cave received most of its groundwater inflow from local surface recharge with an additional 33% from an upgradient aquifer. Artesian springs in the vicinity of Wind Cave primarily received water from regional groundwater flow.

  18. Groundwater as a nonpoint source of atrazine and deethylatrazine in a river during base flow conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Squillace, Paul J.; Thurman, E.M.; Furlong, Edward T.

    1993-01-01

    Alluvial groundwater adjacent to the main stem river is the principal nonpoint source of atrazine and deethylatrazine in the Cedar River of Iowa after the river has been in base flow conditions for 5 days. Between two sites along a 116-km reach of the Cedar River, tributaries contributed about 25% of the increase in the atrazine and deethylatrazine load, whereas groundwater from the alluvial aquifer contributed at least 75% of the increase in load. Within the study area, tributaries aggregate almost all of the discharge from tile drains, and yet the tributaries still only contribute 25% of the increase in loads in the main stem river. At an unfamned study site adjacent to the Cedar River, the sources of atrazine and deethylatrazine in the alluvial groundwater are bank storage of river water and groundwater recharge from areas distant from the river. Atrazine and deethylatrazine associated with bank storage water will provide larger concentrations to the river during early base flow conditions. After the depletion of bank storage, stable and smaller concentrations of atrazine and deethylatrazine, originating from groundwater recharge, continue to be discharged from the alluvial aquifer to the river; thus these results indicate that alluvial aquifers are an important nonpoint source of atrazine and deethylatrazine in rivers during base flow.

  19. Concepts of Groundwater Occurrence and Flow Near Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, G.K.

    1988-01-01

    Previous studies of the area near Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) assumed that nearly all groundwater from precipitation and infiltration moves vertically down to the water table and then follows a combination of intergranular and fracture flow paths to the streams. These studies also generally assumed nearly linear flow paths, amounts of groundwater flow that are determined by differences in water-level elevation, large permeability differences between regolith and bedrock, and important hydrologic differences between named geologic units. It has been commonly stated for 37 years, for example, that the Conasauga Group has fewer cavities and is less permeable than the Chickamauga Group. All of these assumptions and conclusions are faulty. The new concepts in this report may be controversial, but they explain the available data. Only the stormflow zone from land surface to a depth of 1-2 m has a permeability large enough to transport most groundwater to the streams. Calculations show that 90-95% of all groundwater flow is in the stormflow zone, 4-9% is in a few water-producing intervals below the water table, and about 1% occurs in other intervals. The available data also show that nearly all groundwater flows through enlarged openings such as macropores, fractures, and cavities, and that there are no significant differences between regolith and bedrock or between the Conasauga Group and the Chickamauga group. Flow paths apparently are much more complex than was previously assumed. Multiple paths connect any two points below the water table, and each flow path is more likely to be tortuous than linear. Hydraulic gradients are affected by this complexity and by changes in hydraulic potential on steep hillsides. Below the water table, a large difference in the head of two points generally does not indicate a large flow rate between these points. Groundwater storage in amounts above field capacity is apparently intergranular in only the stormflow and vadose zones

  20. Numerical simulation of the groundwater-flow system in the Chambers-Clover Creek Watershed and Vicinity, Pierce County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Kenneth H.; Savoca, Mark E.; Clothier, Burt

    2011-01-01

    A groundwater-flow model was developed to contribute to an improved understanding of water resources in the Chambers-Clover Creek Watershed. The model covers an area of about 491 square miles in western Pierce County, Washington, and is bounded to the northeast by the Puyallup River valley, to the southwest by the Nisqually River valley, and extends northwest to Puget Sound, and southeast to Tanwax Creek. The Puyallup and Nisqually Rivers occupy large, relatively flat alluvial valleys that are separated by a broad, poorly drained, upland area that covers most of the model area. Chambers and Clover Creeks drain much of the central uplands and flow westward to Puget Sound. The model area is underlain by a northwest-thickening sequence of unconsolidated glacial (till and outwash) and interglacial (fluvial and lacustrine) deposits. Ten unconsolidated hydrogeologic units in the model area form the basis of the groundwater-flow model. Groundwater flow in the Chambers-Clover Creek Watershed and vicinity was simulated using the groundwater-flow model, MODFLOW-2000. The finite-difference model grid comprises 146 rows, 132 columns, and 11 layers. Each model cell has a horizontal dimension of 1,000 by 1,000 feet, and the model contains a total of 123,602 active cells. The thickness of model layers varies throughout the model area and ranges from 1.5 feet in the A3 aquifer unit to 1,567 feet in the G undifferentiated unit. Groundwater flow was simulated for both steady-state and transient conditions. Steady-state conditions were simulated using average recharge, discharge, and water levels for the 24-month period September 2006-August 2008. Transient conditions were simulated for the period September 2006-August 2008 using 24 monthly stress periods. Resource managers and local stakeholders intend to use the model to evaluate a range of water resource issues under both steady-state and transient conditions. Initial conditions for the transient model were developed from a 3-year

  1. Groundwater flow systems in the great Aletsch glacier region (Valais, Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpiger, Andrea; Loew, Simon

    2014-05-01

    Groundwater flow systems in Alpine areas are often complex and challenging to investigate due to special topographic and climatic conditions governing groundwater recharge and bedrock flow. Studies seeking to characterize high-alpine groundwater systems remain rare, but are of high interest, e.g. for water supply, hydropower systems, traffic tunnels or rock slope deformation and landslide hazards. The goal of this study is to better understand the current and past groundwater flow systems of the UNESCO World Heritage mountain ridge separating the great Aletsch glacier and the Rhone valley, considering climatic and glacier fluctuations during the Lateglacial and Holocene periods. This ridge is crossed by a hydropower bypass drift (Riederhornstollen) and is composed of fractured crystalline rocks overlain by various types of landslides and glacial deposits. Surface hydrology observations (fracture properties, groundwater seepage, spring lines and physico-chemical parameters) and hydropower drift inflow measurements contributed to the characterization of bedrock hydraulic conductivities and preferential groundwater pathways. Basic conceptual hydrogeological models were tested with observed drift inflows and the occurrence of springs using free-surface, variably saturated, vertical 2D groundwater flow models (using the code SEEP/W from GeoStudio 2007). Already simple two-layer models, representing profile sections orthogonal to the mountain ridge, provided useful results. Simulations show that differences in the occurrence of springs on each side of the mountain ridge are likely caused by the occurrence of glacial till (generating perched groundwater), the deep-seated sagging landslide mass, faults and asymmetric ridge topography, which together force the main groundwater flow direction to be oriented towards the Rhone valley, even from beyond the mountain ridge. Surprisingly, the most important springs (those with high discharge rates) are located at high elevations

  2. In-situ radionuclide transport and preferential groundwater flows at INEEL (Idaho): Decay-series disequilibrium studies

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, S.; Ku, T.L.; Roback, R.; Murrell, M.; McLing, T.L.

    2000-03-01

    Uranium and thorium-decay series disequilibria in groundwater occur as a result of water-rock interactions, and they provide site-specific, natural analog information for assessment of in-situ, long-term migration of radionuclides in the far field of a nuclear waste disposal site. In this study, a mass balance model was used to relate the decay-series radionuclide distributions among solution, sorbed and solid phases in an aquifer system to processes of water transport, sorption-desorption, dissolution-precipitation, radioactive ingrowth-decay, and {alpha} recoil. Isotopes of U and Rn were measured in 23 groundwater samples collected from a basaltic aquifer at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Idaho. The results show that groundwater activities of Th and Ra isotopes are 2--4 orders lower than those of their U progenitors. Modeling of the observed disequilibria places the following constraints on the time scale of radionuclide migration and water-rock interaction at INEEL: (1) Time for sorption is minutes for Ra and Th; time for desorption is days for Ra and years for Th; and time for precipitation is days for Th, years for Ra, and centuries for U. (2) Retardation factors due to sorption average > 10{sup 6} for {sup 232}Th, {approximately}10{sup 4} for {sup 226}Ra, and {approximately}10{sup 3} for {sup 238}U. (3) Dissolution rates of rocks are {approximately}70 to 800 mg/L/y. (4) Ages of groundwater range from <10 to 100 years. Contours of groundwater age, as well as spatial patterns of radionuclide disequilibria, delineate two north-south preferential flow pathways and two stagnated locales. Relatively high rates of dissolution and precipitation and {alpha}-recoil of {sup 222}Rn occur near the groundwater recharging sites as well as in the major flow pathways. Decay of the sorbed parent radionuclides (e.g., {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra) on micro-fracture surfaces constitutes an important source of their daughter ({sup 222}Rn and

  3. Ground-water discharge determined from estimates of evapotranspiration, Death Valley regional flow system, Nevada and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laczniak, Randell J.; Smith, J. LaRue; Elliott, Peggy E.; DeMeo, Guy A.; Chatigny, Melissa A.; Roemer, Gaius J.

    2001-01-01

    The Death Valley regional flow system (DVRFS) is one of the larger ground-water flow systems in the southwestern United States and includes much of southern Nevada and the Death Valley region of eastern California. Centrally located within the ground-water flow system is the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS, a large tract covering about 1,375 square miles, historically has been used for testing nuclear devices and currently is being studied as a potential repository for the long-term storage of high-level nuclear waste generated in the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy, as mandated by Federal and State regulators, is evaluating the risk associated with contaminants that have been or may be introduced into the subsurface as a consequence of any past or future activities at the NTS. Because subsurface contaminants can be transported away from the NTS by ground water, components of the ground-water budget are of great interest. One such component is regional ground-water discharge. Most of the ground water leaving the DVRFS is limited to local areas where geologic and hydrologic conditions force ground water upward toward the surface to discharge at springs and seeps. Available estimates of ground-water discharge are based primarily on early work done as part of regional reconnaissance studies. These early efforts covered large, geologically complex areas and often applied substantially different techniques to estimate ground-water discharge. This report describes the results of a study that provides more consistent, accurate, and scientifically defensible measures of regional ground-water losses from each of the major discharge areas of the DVRFS. Estimates of ground-water discharge presented in this report are based on a rigorous quantification of local evapotranspiration (ET). The study identifies areas of ongoing ground-water ET, delineates different ET areas based on similarities in vegetation and soil-moisture conditions, and determines an ET rate for

  4. Modelling of seasonal dynamics of Wetland-Groundwater flow interaction in the Canadian Prairies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Melkamu; Nussbaumer, Raphaël; Ireson, Andrew; Keim, Dawn

    2015-04-01

    Wetland-shallow groundwater interaction is studied at the St. Denis National Wildlife Area in Saskatchewan, Canada, located within the northern glaciated prairies of North America. Ponds in the Canadian Prairies are intermittently connected by fill-spill processes in the spring and growing season of some wetter years. The contribution of the ponds and wetlands to groundwater is still a significant research challenge. The objective of this study is to evaluate model's ability to reproduce observed effects of groundwater-wetland interactions including seasonal pattern of shallow groundwater table, intended flow direction and to quantify the depression induced infiltration from the wetland to the surrounding uplands. The integrated surface-wetland-shallow groundwater processes and the changes in land-energy and water balances caused by the flow interaction are simulated using ParFlow-CLM at a small watershed of 1km2 containing both permanent and seasonal wetland complexes. We compare simulated water table depth with piezometers reading monitored by level loggers at the watershed. We also present the strengths and limitations of the model in reproducing observed behaviour of the groundwater table response to the spring snowmelt and summer rainfall. Simulations indicate that the shallow water table at the uphill recovers quickly after major rainfall events in early summer that generates lateral flow to the pond. In late summer, the wetland supplies water to the surrounding upland when the evapotranspiration is higher than the precipitation in which more water from the root zone is up taken by plants. Results also show that Parflow-CLM is able to reasonably simulate the water table patterns response to summer rainfall, while it is insufficient to reproduce the spring snowmelt infiltration which is the most dominant hydrological process in the Prairies.

  5. Guidelines for model calibration and application to flow simulation in the Death Valley regional groundwater system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, M.C.; D'Agnese, F. A.; Faunt, C.C.

    2000-01-01

    Fourteen guidelines are described which are intended to produce calibrated groundwater models likely to represent the associated real systems more accurately than typically used methods. The 14 guidelines are discussed in the context of the calibration of a regional groundwater flow model of the Death Valley region in the southwestern United States. This groundwater flow system contains two sites of national significance from which the subsurface transport of contaminants could be or is of concern: Yucca Mountain, which is the potential site of the United States high-level nuclear-waste disposal; and the Nevada Test Site, which contains a number of underground nuclear-testing locations. This application of the guidelines demonstrates how they may be used for model calibration and evaluation, and also to direct further model development and data collection.Fourteen guidelines are described which are intended to produce calibrated groundwater models likely to represent the associated real systems more accurately than typically used methods. The 14 guidelines are discussed in the context of the calibration of a regional groundwater flow model of the Death Valley region in the southwestern United States. This groundwater flow system contains two sites of national significance from which the subsurface transport of contaminants could be or is of concern: Yucca Mountain, which is the potential site of the United States high-level nuclear-waste disposal; and the Nevada Test Site, which contains a number of underground nuclear-testing locations. This application of the guidelines demonstrates how they may be used for model calibration and evaluation, and also to direct further model development and data collection.

  6. GROUND-WATER FLOW MODELING STUDY OF THE LOVE CANAL AREA, NEW YORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the overall Love Canal monitoring effort an assessment of the ground water hydrology of the Love Canal area, New York was performed. As part of this assessment, ground-water flow models were used to aid in well siting, data analysis and reduction, and prediction of gro...

  7. Incorporation of prior information on parameters into nonlinear regression groundwater flow models 2. Applications.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooley, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Investigates factors influencing the degree of improvement in estimates of parameters of a nonlinear regression groundwater flow model by incorporating prior information of unknown reliability. Consideration of expected behavior of the regression solutions and results of a hypothetical modeling problem lead to several general conclusions. -from Author

  8. Appendix H: Past and Current Groundwater Flow and Contamination beneath Shell Tank Waste Management Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Duane G.

    2008-01-17

    This is being prepared as an appendix for CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. and is part of PNNL support of the RCRA Facility Investigation Report. The document contains a detailed description of groundwater flow and contamination under the Central Plateau, emphasizing the areas around the tank farms.

  9. Groundwater flow and its effect on salt dissolution in Gypsum Canyon watershed, Paradox Basin, southeast Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitman, Nadine G.; Ge, Shemin; Mueller, Karl

    2014-09-01

    Groundwater flow is an important control on subsurface evaporite (salt) dissolution. Salt dissolution can drive faulting and associated subsidence on the land surface and increase salinity in groundwater. This study aims to understand the groundwater flow system of Gypsum Canyon watershed in the Paradox Basin, Utah, USA, and whether or not groundwater-driven dissolution affects surface deformation. The work characterizes the groundwater flow and solute transport systems of the watershed using a three-dimensional (3D) finite element flow and transport model, SUTRA. Spring samples were analyzed for stable isotopes of water and total dissolved solids. Spring water and hydraulic conductivity data provide constraints for model parameters. Model results indicate that regional groundwater flow is to the northwest towards the Colorado River, and shallow flow systems are influenced by topography. The low permeability obtained from laboratory tests is inconsistent with field observed discharges, supporting the notion that fracture permeability plays a significant role in controlling groundwater flow. Model output implies that groundwater-driven dissolution is small on average, and cannot account for volume changes in the evaporite deposits that could cause surface deformation, but it is speculated that dissolution may be highly localized and/or weaken evaporite deposits, and could lead to surface deformation over time.

  10. Ground-water levels and directions of flow near the Industrial Excess Landfill, Uniontown, Ohio, March 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dumouchelle, D.H.; Bair, E.S.

    1994-01-01

    Industrial Excess Landfill (IEL), a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Super-fund site, is a closed landfill in northeastern Ohio. In March 1994, personnel from the U.S. Geological Survey, Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, and PRC Environmental Management, Inc., measured water levels in 149 wells in the area. Surface-water altitudes were measured in 9 piezometers associated with the gages. The data show that the regional pattern of ground-water flow generally is from east to west, but it is locally altered by ground-water mounds that reflect the hummocky terrain. At the landfill, regional flow is altered by two ground-water mounds- one in the southeastern corner of the site and one just to the north. The relatively small ground-water mound at the landfill causes ground water to flow radially away from the southeastern corner of the landfill. Ground water that flows to east and south flows toward Metzger Ditch, whereas flow to the west is consistent with the regional direction of ground-water flow. Ground-water flow northward from IEL is diverted east or west by the southerly component of flow from the larger ground-water mound north of IEL.

  11. A Numerical Study for Groundwater Flow, Heat and Solute Transport Associated with Operation of Open-loop Geothermal System in Alluvial Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, D. K.; Bae, G. O.; Lee, K. K.

    2014-12-01

    The open-loop geothermal system directly uses a relatively stable temperature of groundwater for cooling and heating in buildings and thus has been known as an eco-friendly, energy-saving, and cost-efficient technique. The facility for this system was installed at a site located near Paldang-dam in Han-river, Korea. Because of the well-developed alluvium, the site might be appropriate to application of this system requiring extraction and injection of a large amount of groundwater. A simple numerical experiment assuming various hydrogeologic conditions demonstrated that regional groundwater flow direction was the most important factor for efficient operation of facility in this site having a highly permeable layer. However, a comparison of river stage data and groundwater level measurements showed that the daily and seasonal controls of water level at Paldang-dam have had a critical influence on the regional groundwater flow in the site. Moreover, nitrate concentrations measured in the monitoring wells gave indication of the effect of agricultural activities around the facility on the groundwater quality. The facility operation, such as extraction and injection of groundwater, will obviously affect transport of the agricultural contaminant and, maybe, it will even cause serious problems in the normal operation. Particularly, the high-permeable layer in this aquifer must be a preferential path for quick spreadings of thermal and contaminant plumes. The objective of this study was to find an efficient, safe and stable operation plan of the open-loop geothermal system installed in this site having the complicated conditions of highly permeable layer, variable regional groundwater flow, and agricultural contamination. Numerical simulations for groundwater flow, heat and solute transport were carried out to analyze all the changes in groundwater level and flow, temperature, and quality according to the operation, respectively. Results showed that an operation plan for

  12. Hydrogeology and simulation of ground-water flow near the Lantana Landfill, Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russell, G.M.; Wexler, E.J.

    1993-01-01

    The Lantana landfill in Palm Beach County has a surface that is 40 to 50 feet above original ground level and consists of about 250 acres of compacted garbage and trash. Parts of the landfill are below the water table. Surface-resistivity measurements and water-quality analyses indicate that leachate-enriched ground water along the eastern perimeter of the landfill has moved about 500 feet eastward toward an adjacent lake. Concentrations of chloride and nutrients within the leachate-enriched ground water were greater than background concentrations. The surficial aquifer system in the area of the landfill consists primarily of sand of moderate permeability, from land surface to a depth of about 68 feet deep, and consists of sand interbedded with sandstone and limestone of high permeability from a depth of about 68 feet to a depth of 200 feet. The potentiometric surface in the landfill is higher than that in adjacent areas to the east, indicating ground-water movement from the landfill toward a lake to the east. Steady-state simulation of ground-water flow was made using a telescoping-grid technique where a model covering a large area is used to determine boundaries and fluxes for a finer scale model. A regional flow model encompassing a 500-square mile area in southeastern Palm Beach County was used to calculate ground-water fluxes in a 126.5-square mile subregional area. Boundary fluxes calculated by the subregional model were then used to calculate boundary fluxes for a local model of the 3.75-square mile area representing the Lantana landfill site and vicinity. Input data required for simulating ground-water flow in the study area were obtained from the regional flow models, thus, effectively coupling the models. Additional simulations were made using the local flow model to predict effects of possible remedial actions on the movement of solutes in the ground-water system. Possible remedial actions simulated included capping the landfill with an impermeable layer

  13. Closing the irrigation deficit in Cambodia: Implications for transboundary impacts on groundwater and Mekong River flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erban, Laura E.; Gorelick, Steven M.

    2016-04-01

    Rice production in Cambodia, essential to food security and exports, is largely limited to the wet season. The vast majority (96%) of land planted with rice during the wet season remains fallow during the dry season. This is in large part due to lack of irrigation capacity, increases in which would entail significant consequences for Cambodia and Vietnam, located downstream on the Mekong River. Here we quantify the extent of the dry season "deficit" area in the Cambodian Mekong River catchment, using a recent agricultural survey and our analysis of MODIS satellite data. Irrigation of this land for rice production would require a volume of water up to 31% of dry season Mekong River flow to Vietnam. However, the two countries share an aquifer system in the Mekong Delta, where irrigation demand is increasingly met by groundwater. We estimate expansion rates of groundwater-irrigated land to be >10% per year in the Cambodian Delta using LANDSAT satellite data and simulate the effects of future expansion on groundwater levels over a 25-year period. If groundwater irrigation continues to expand at current rates, the water table will drop below the lift limit of suction pump wells, used for domestic supply by >1.5 million people, throughout much of the area within 15 years. Extensive groundwater irrigation jeopardizes access for shallow domestic water supply wells, raises the costs of pumping for all groundwater users, and may exacerbate arsenic contamination and land subsidence that are already widespread hazards in the region.

  14. Hydrogeology, simulated ground-water flow, and ground-water quality, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dumouchelle, D.H.; Schalk, C.W.; Rowe, G.L.; De Roche, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    Ground water is the primary source of water in the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base area. The aquifer consists of glacial sands and gravels that fill a buried bedrock-valley system. Consolidated rocks in the area consist of poorly permeable Ordovician shale of the Richmondian stage, in the upland areas, the Brassfield Limestone of Silurian age. The valleys are filled with glacial sediments of Wisconsinan age consisting of clay-rich tills and coarse-grained outwash deposits. Estimates of hydraulic conductivity of the shales based on results of displacement/recovery tests range from 0.0016 to 12 feet per day; estimates for the glacial sediments range from less than 1 foot per day to more than 1,000 feet per day. Ground water flow from the uplands towards the valleys and the major rivers in the region, the Great Miami and the Mad Rivers. Hydraulic-head data indicate that ground water flows between the bedrock and unconsolidated deposits. Data from a gain/loss study of the Mad River System and hydrographs from nearby wells reveal that the reach of the river next to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base is a ground-water discharge area. A steady-state, three-dimensional ground-water-flow model was developed to simulate ground-water flow in the region. The model contains three layers and encompasses about 100 square miles centered on Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Ground water enters the modeled area primarily by river leakage and underflow at the model boundary. Ground water exits the modeled area primarily by flow through the valleys at the model boundaries and through production wells. A model sensitivity analysis involving systematic changes in values of hydrologic parameters in the model indicates that the model is most sensitive to decreases in riverbed conductance and vertical conductance between the upper two layers. The analysis also indicates that the contribution of water to the buried-valley aquifer from the bedrock that forms the valley walls is about 2 to 4

  15. Estimating evapotranspiration and groundwater flow from water-table fluctuations for a general wetland scenario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlson Mazur, Martha L.; Michael J. Wiley; Douglas A. Wilcox

    2015-01-01

    The use of diurnal water-table fluctuation methods to calculate evapotranspiration (ET) and groundwater flow is of increasing interest in ecohydrological studies. Most studies of this type, however, have been located in riparian wetlands of semi-arid regions where groundwater levels are consistently below topographic surface elevations and precipitation events are infrequent. Current methodologies preclude application to a wider variety of wetland systems. In this study, we extended a method for estimating sub-daily ET and groundwater flow rates from water-level fluctuations to fit highly dynamic, non-riparian wetland scenarios. Modifications included (1) varying the specific yield to account for periodic flooded conditions and (2) relating empirically derived ET to estimated potential ET for days when precipitation events masked the diurnal signal. To demonstrate the utility of this method, we estimated ET and groundwater fluxes over two growing seasons (2006–2007) in 15 wetlands within a ridge-and-swale wetland complex of the Laurentian Great Lakes under flooded and non-flooded conditions. Mean daily ET rates for the sites ranged from 4.0 mm d−1 to 6.6 mm d−1. Shallow groundwater discharge rates resulting from evaporative demand ranged from 2.5 mm d−1 to 4.3 mm d−1. This study helps to expand our understanding of the evapotranspirative demand of plants under various hydrologic and climate conditions.

  16. Statistical Performance Evaluation of Spatiotemporal Characteristics of Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Mass Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matiatos, Ioannis; Papadopoulou, Maria P.; Varouchakis, Emmanouil A.

    2016-04-01

    As groundwater remains one of the most critical natural resources worldwide, numerical models of groundwater flow and contaminant mass transport provide a reliable tool for the efficient protection, planning and sustainable management of groundwater resources. This work focuses on the evaluation of the performance of different numerical models which have been developed to simulate spatiotemporal groundwater flow and contaminant mass transport in a coastal aquifer system. The evaluation of the models' performance has been based on 9 different statistical measures and indices of goodness of fit. Overall, the simulation of groundwater level and contaminant mass concentration delivered very good calibration and validation results in all cases, quite close to the desired values. Maps of aquifer water level and contaminant mass concentrations are provided for all cases in order the differences to be discussed and assessed. The selection of the appropriate model(s) is case oriented and it should be based on the problem's characteristics in order the spatiotemporal variability of the components under study to be optimally estimated.

  17. Recharge and Lateral Groundwater Flow Boundary Conditions for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model

    SciTech Connect

    S. James

    2004-10-06

    This analysis is designed to use existing modeling and analysis results as the basis for estimated groundwater flow rates into the saturated zone (SZ) site-scale model domains, both as recharge (infiltration) at the upper boundary (water table), and as underflow at the lateral boundaries. Specifically, this work compiles information on the recharge boundary conditions supplied to the base-case and alternate SZ site-scale flow models taken from (1) distributed recharge from the 1997 (D'Agnese et al. 1997 [DIRS 100131]) or 2001 (D'Agnese et al. 2002 [DIRS 158876]) SZ regional-scale (Death Valley Regional Flow System [DVRFS]) model; (2) recharge below the area of the 1997 (Wu et al. 1997 [DIRS 156453]) or 2003 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]) unsaturated zone (UZ) site-scale flow model; and (3) focused recharge along Fortymile Wash. In addition, this analysis includes extraction of the groundwater flow rates simulated by the 1997 and 2001 DVRFS models coincident with the lateral boundaries of the SZ site-scale flow models. The fluxes from the 1997 DVRFS were used to calibrate the base-case SZ site-scale flow model. The 2001 DVRFS fluxes are used in the alternate SZ site-scale flow model.

  18. Basin-scale conceptual groundwater flow model for an unconfined and confined thick carbonate region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mádl-Szőnyi, Judit; Tóth, Ádám

    2015-11-01

    Application of the gravity-driven regional groundwater flow (GDRGF) concept to the hydrogeologically complex thick carbonate system of the Transdanubian Range (TR), Hungary, is justified based on the principle of hydraulic continuity. The GDRGF concept informs about basin hydraulics and groundwater as a geologic agent. It became obvious that the effect of heterogeneity and anisotropy on the flow pattern could be derived from hydraulic reactions of the aquifer system. The topography and heat as driving forces were examined by numerical simulations of flow and heat transport. Evaluation of groups of springs, in terms of related discharge phenomena and regional chloride distribution, reveals the dominance of topography-driven flow when considering flow and related chemical and temperature patterns. Moreover, heat accumulation beneath the confined part of the system also influences these patterns. The presence of cold, lukewarm and thermal springs and related wetlands, creeks, mineral precipitates, and epigenic and hypogenic caves validates the existence of GDRGF in the system. Vice versa, groups of springs reflect rock-water interaction and advective heat transport and inform about basin hydraulics. Based on these findings, a generalized conceptual GDRGF model is proposed for an unconfined and confined carbonate region. An interface was revealed close to the margin of the unconfined and confined carbonates, determined by the GDRGF and freshwater and basinal fluids involved. The application of this model provides a background to interpret manifestations of flowing groundwater in thick carbonates generally, including porosity enlargement and hydrocarbon and heat accumulation.

  19. Stratabound pathways of preferred groundwater flow: An example from the Copper Ridge Dolomite in East Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.; Ketelle, D.

    1987-07-14

    The Copper Ridge Dolomite of the Upper Cambrian Knox Group underlies a site at Oak Ridge, Tennessee under consideration by the Department of Energy (DOE) for a below ground waste disposal facility. The Copper Ridge was studied for DOE to understand the influence of lithology on deep groundwater flow. Three facies types are distinguished which comprise laterally continuous, 1 to 4 m thick rock units interpreted to represent upward-shallowing depositional cycles having an apparently significant effect on groundwater flow at depth. Rock core observations indicate one of the recurring facies types is characterized by thin to medium-bedded, fine-grained dolostone with planar cryptalgal laminae and thin shaley partings. Distinctive fracturing in this facies type, that may have resulted from regional structural deformation, it considered to be responsible for weathering at depth and the development of stratabound pathways of preferred groundwater flow. In addition, geophysical data suggest that one occurrence of this weathered facies type coincides with an apparent geochemical interface at depth. Geophysical data also indicate the presence of several fluid invasion horizons, traceable outside the study area, which coincide with the unweathered occurrence of this fine-grained facies type. The subcropping of recurrent zones of preferred groundwater flow at the weathered/unweathered interface may define linear traces of enhanced aquifer recharge paralleling geologic strike. Vertical projection of these zones from the weathered/unweathered rock interface to the ground surface may describe areas of enhanced infiltration. Tests to determine the role of stratigraphic controls on groundwater flow are key components of future investigations on West Chestnut Ridge. 14 refs., 13 figs.

  20. Tafilalet OASIS System: Water Resources Management and Investigation by GIS and Groundwater Flow Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouaamlat, I.; Larabi, A.; Faouzi, M.

    2014-12-01

    The geographical location of Tafilalet oasis system (TOS) in the south of the valley of Ziz (Morocco) offers him a particular advantage on the plane of water potential. The surface water which comes from humid regions of the High Atlas and intercepted by a dam then converged through the watercourse of Ziz towards the plain of the TOS, have created the conditions for the formation of a water table relatively rich with regard to the local climatic conditions (arid climate with recurrent drought). Given the role of the water table in the economic development of the region, a hydrogeological study was conducted to understand the impact of artificial recharge and recurrent droughts on the development of the groundwater reserves of TOS. In this study, a three-dimensional model of groundwater flow was developed for the TOS, to assist the decision makers as a "management tool" in order to assess alternative schemes for development and exploitation of groundwater resources based on the variation of artificial recharge and drought. The results from this numerical investigation of the TOS aquifer shows that the commissioning of the dam to control the flows of extreme flood and good management of water releases, has avoided the losses of irrigation water and consequently the non-overexploitation of the groundwater. So that with one or two water releases per year from the dam of flow rate more than 28 million m3/year it is possible to reconstruct the volume of water abstracted by wells. The idea of lowering water table by pumping wells is not exactly true, as well the development of groundwater abstraction has not prevented the wound of water table in these last years, the pumping wells accompanied more than it triggers the lowering of water table and it is mainly the succession of dry periods causing the decreases of the piezometric level. This situation confirms the important role that groundwater plays as a "buffer" during the drought periods.

  1. Groundwater--Baseflow interactions of a shallow fracture flow system: Childress Creek basin, central Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, J.F. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-02-01

    The Georgetown Formation in central Texas crops out west of the major urban growth along Interstate Highway 35. The Georgetown Formation, comprised of interbedded limestone and calcareous shale, is not recognized as a major aquifer. However, numerous shallow wells occur in these bedrock units and shallow groundwater is directly connected to surface streams. A large percentage of cities throughout central Texas are dependent upon surface water for their primary water supply. Recent investigations revealed shallow flow systems along bedding plane separations and fractures associated with weathering, release of overburden, neotectonic movements and the Balcones Fault Zone. Many pollutants which can affect this source are conveyed through the groundwater system and return to the streams as baseflow. Therefore a better understanding of surface-groundwater relations is needed to aid in understanding the potential for impacts in the watershed. Data obtained from monitoring baseflow, groundwater levels, and rainfall is being used to investigate recharge, shallow fracture flow systems, transmissivity in the watershed, baseflow recession, and groundwater levels. This information will help determine regional aquifer characteristics, modeling flow paths, and water budgets in watersheds having highly fractured unconfined aquifers such as those found in the Washita Prairie. As a result coefficients of storage, transmissivity, and scale simulation model will yield a regional water budget. This study provided a detailed analysis of the relationship between groundwater levels and stream baseflow in Childress Creek. These same methods may in turn be applied to watersheds in areas of increased urban development and used in watershed models for analysis of regional impacts related to landuse changes and pollution loads.

  2. Groundwater Flow Dynamic Simulations of a Buried Valley Aquifer Calibrated with Field and Remotely Sensed Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderhead, A. I.; Hinton, M. J.; Logan, C. E.; Sharpe, D.; Russel, H. A.; Oldenborger, G. A.; Pugin, A.; Rivera, A.; Castellazzi, P.; Martel, R.

    2013-12-01

    Buried valleys are a common occurrence in the North American prairie landscape. They are often characterized as high yield sources of groundwater in regions where low yield shale and tills dominate the hydrogeological setting. Firstly, 3D conceptual and geological models have been generated and used as a basis for creating a 3D finite element groundwater flow model. Field data, including piezometric readings, base flow measurements, and soil moisture probe data were collected between 2011 and 2013 and are used for calibrating the flow model. Secondly, the study aims to improve the spatial discretization of recharge estimates and include these refined values in the flow model. A temporal series of C-band Radar data and several land surface models were compared with the soil moisture probe data from the Spiritwood buried valley aquifer. The radar backscatter was used to develop moisture estimates at the regional scale. These estimates were then input into the HELP multi-parameter recharge model with the aim of assisting in estimates of a spatial discretization for groundwater recharge. Preliminary groundwater simulation results, with uniform recharge, show good agreement with piezometer readings and measured base flow readings. The temporal series of C-band radar backscatter, moisture probe data, and land surface models show corresponding variations between October, 2011 and October, 2012. The high resolution and regional extent of the radar data has a high potential to help develop a better understanding of recharge patterns in buried valley settings. Integrating a temporal series of high-resolution data into conceptual and numerical model development will refine our mapping, understanding and assessment of buried valley aquifers. Future work will include incorporating the spatially variable recharge estimates into the 3D finite element flow model. Additionally, various interpretations of the geological model will be tested to determine the extent, if any, that a

  3. Perched groundwater-surface interactions and their consequences in stream flow generation in a semi-arid headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molenat, Jerome; Bouteffeha, Maroua; Raclot, Damien; Bouhlila, Rachida

    2013-04-01

    In semi-arid headwater catchment, it is usually admitted that stream flow comes predominantly from Hortonian overland flow (infiltration excess overland flow). Consequently, subsurface flow processes, and especially perched or shallow groundwater flow, have not been studied extensively. Here we made the assumption that perched groundwater flow could play a significant role in stream flow generation in semi-arid catchment. To test this assumption, we analyzed stream flow time series of a headwater catchment in the Tunisian Cap Bon region and quantified the flow fraction coming from groundwater discharge and that from overland flow. Furthermore, the dynamics of the perched groundwater was analyzed, by focusing on the different perched groundwater-surface interaction processes : diffuse and local infiltration, diffuse exfiltration, and direct groundwater discharge to the stream channel. This work is based on the 2.6 km² Kamech catchment (Tunisia), which belongs to the long term Mediterranean hydrological observatory OMERE (Voltz and Albergel, 2002). Results show that even though Hortonian overland flow was the main hydrological process governing the stream flow generation, groundwater discharge contribution to the stream channel annually accounted for from 10% to 20 % depending on the year. Furthermore, at some periods, rising of groundwater table to the soil surface in bottom land areas provided evidences of the occurrence of saturation excess overland flow processes during some storm events. Reference Voltz , M. and Albergel , J., 2002. OMERE : Observatoire Méditerranéen de l'Environnement Rural et de l'Eau - Impact des actions anthropiques sur les transferts de masse dans les hydrosystèmes méditerranéens ruraux. Proposition d'Observatoire de Recherche en Environnement, Ministère de la Recherche.

  4. Testing and benchmarking of a three-dimensional groundwater flow and solute transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, P.N.; Andersen, P.F.; Faust, C.R.; Stephenson, D.E.

    1988-12-31

    A three-dimensional finite-difference model was developed to simulate groundwater flow and solute transport. The model is intended for application to a variety of groundwater resource and solute migration evaluations, including several complex sites at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Because the model, FTWORK, is relatively new, there is a need to provide confidence in the model results. Methodologies that test models include comparisons with analytical solutions, comparisons with empirical data, and checking that conservation properties hold. Another level of testing is the comparison of one code against another. This paper describes the testing and benchmarking procedure used to verify the validate FTWORK.

  5. Application of the Colloidal Borescope to Determine a Complex Groundwater Flow Pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Narbutovskih, Susan M.; McDonald, John P.; Schalla, Ronald; Sweeney, Mark D.; M.N. Sara and L.G. Everett

    2002-10-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory made in situ flow measurements in groundwater monitoring wells at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to determine the flow direction in an aquifer with a flat water table. Given the total errors in water level elevations, flow directions based on the potentiometric surface are ambiguous at best. The colloidal borescope was used because it allows direct, real time observation of mobile colloidal particles in the open interval of a water well and thus, avoids the use of water level data. The results characterize a complex groundwater flow pattern under several buried waste storage tank farms. The aquifer, artificially high due to large volume liquid discharges to the soil column from Hanford's nuclear production era, is currently receding to original conditions. The aquifer lies in unconsolidated gravel beds overlying an impermeable basalt surface that has a plucked, flood-scoured, scabland structure. The current aquifer thickness is similar to the relief on the basalt basement. Thus the groundwater must flow around the impermeable basalt structures producing a complicated flow pattern under the waste storage unit. The original monitoring network was designed for northwest flow when the water table was held artificially high. Proper locations for new wells are dependent on our knowledge of the flow direction. The results of the colloidal borescope investigation agree with the southerly direction indicated from hydrographs, contaminant trends, other direct flow data and the general concept of a receding aquifer draining off the southern limb of a basalt anticline. Flow in the aquifer is diverted by irregular local structural highs of very low permeability basalt.

  6. Borehole Heat Exchangers: heat transfer simulation in the presence of a groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelotti, A.; Alberti, L.; La Licata, I.; Antelmi, M.

    2014-04-01

    The correct design of the Borehole Heat Exchanger is crucial for the operation and the energy performance of a Ground Source Heat Pump. Most design methods and tools are based on the assumption that the ground is a solid medium where conduction is the only heat transfer mechanism. In turn in regions rich in groundwater the groundwater flow influence has to be assessed, by including the convection effects. In this paper a numerical model of a 100 m U-pipe in a saturated porous medium is presented. The model is created adopting MT3DMS coupled to MODFLOW. A Darcy flow is imposed across the medium. The typical operation of a Borehole Heat Exchanger operating both in winter and in summer is simulated for two years, under different groundwater velocities. The energy injected to and extracted from the ground is derived as a function of the Darcy velocity and compared with the purely conductive case. Temperature fields in the ground at key moments are shown and discussed. From both the energy and the aquifer temperature field points of view, the velocity ranges for respectively negligible and relevant influence of the groundwater flow are identified.

  7. Groundwater Storage and Flow Pathways in a Rock Glacier Complex in the Canadian Rockies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, M.; Mozil, A.; Harrington, J.; Bentley, L. R.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrological functions of alpine glaciers and their responses to the warming climate have received much attention by hydrologists working in alpine catchments around the world. As alpine glaciers retreat, they commonly leave debris-covered ice or ice-cored moraine behind, which can remain frozen in ground for many decades or centuries. In many alpine catchments, characteristic landforms indicating rock glaciers or their relicts are found in locations where glaciers do not exist under the current climate. These landscape features associated with mountain permafrost are ubiquitous in alpine catchments, but their hydrological functions have not received much attention. Do rock glaciers and other mountain-permafrost features contribute significantly to storage of snowmelt water and its delayed release to sustain baseflow in the critical alpine stream habitats? How are these storage functions responding to the climate warming? In order to answer these questions, we initiated a hydrological study of rock glaciers in an alpine catchment in the Canadian Rockies in 2014. We will present preliminary results of our study using geophysical imaging techniques, hydro-meteorological monitoring, and groundwater tracing using various environmental tracers. Key findings are: 1) substantial amount of permafrost exists in the rock glacier which is inactive (i.e. no active motion) under the present climate, 2) spatial distribution of permafrost is controlled by both meteorological and geological factors, 3) the rock glacier complex contributes 30-50 % of summer stream flow even though they occupy less than 5% of the catchment area, and 4) the low temperature (< 2 C) of groundwater discharging at the toe of rock glacier plays a significant role in regulating the temperature of stream, which hosts a population of trout species that is listed as "threatened" in the list of the status of endangered wildlife in Canada.

  8. Analysis of the shallow groundwater flow system near Connetqout Brook, Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prince, K.R.; Reilly, T.E.; Franke, O.L.

    1989-01-01

    Streamflow on Long Island is derived principally from shallow groundwater that flows above the deeper regional flow system. The movement of shallow groundwater was studied during 1975-1982 at Connetquot Brook - an undisturbed stream in Connetquot River State Park - in south-central Long Island. The investigation encompassed: (1) field studies of streamflow, groundwater levels, and age of water as indicated by tritium concentrations, and (2) numerical simulation of the shallow flow system to evaluate the hydraulic factors that influence groundwater flow near and beneath the stream. Analysis of water-level data indicates that groundwater flow is essentially horizontal throughout the drainage basin except near and beneath the stream, where it moves upward diagonally and discharges into the streambank at three sites were 1-2 ft higher than stream stage in the and in wells driven into the streambank at three sites were 1-2 ft higher than stream stage in the first 5 ft of penetration. Increases in head, which were detected to depths of 30 ft beneath the streambed, indicate upward movement of water above that depth. Water samples from selected wells were analyzed for tritium concentration to determine the relative age of water to locate the bottom boundary of the shallow flow system. Tritium concentrations indicate that the lower boundary is from 45 to 100 ft below the water table. A two-dimensional cross-sectional flow model of the shallow flow system indicated that: (1) stream width and streambed hydraulic conductivity influence heads mostly within about 50 ft of the stream; (2) the thickness of the shallow flow system influences heads more distant from the stream but has a negligible effect near the stream; and (3) the quantity of water entering the system as recharge from precipitation influences the heads throughout the area. Field measurements of hydraulic head indicate the shallow flow system to extend to about 30 ft below the stream channel. Results of the

  9. Groundwater flow and tritium migration from the SRS Old Burial Ground to Fourmile Branch

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, G.P.; Hamm, L.L.; Harris, M.K.

    1996-04-01

    The objectives of this investigation are twofold. The initial goal is to devise and demonstrate a technique for directly incorporating fine-scale lithologic data into heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity fields, for improved groundwater flow and contaminant transport model accuracy. The ultimate goal is to rigorously simulate past and future tritium migration from the SRS Old Burial Ground towards Fourmile Branch, to better understand the effects of various remediation alternatives such as no action and capping. Large-scale variability in hydraulic conductivity is usually the main influence on field-scale groundwater flow patterns and dispersive transport, following the relative locations of recharge and discharge areas. Incorporating realistic hydraulic conductivity heterogeneity into flow and transport models is paramount to accurate simulations, particularly for contaminant migration. Sediment lithologic descriptions and geophysical logs typically offer finer spatial resolution, and therefore more potential information about heterogeneity, than other site characterization data.

  10. Local Modelling of Groundwater Flow Using Analytic Element Method Three-dimensional Transient Unconfined Groundwater Flow With Partially Penetrating Wells and Ellipsoidal Inhomogeneites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankovic, I.; Barnes, R. J.; Soule, R.

    2001-12-01

    The analytic element method is used to model local three-dimensional flow in the vicinity of partially penetrating wells. The flow domain is bounded by an impermeable horizontal base, a phreatic surface with recharge and a cylindrical lateral boundary. The analytic element solution for this problem contains (1) a fictitious source technique to satisfy the head and the discharge conditions along the phreatic surface, (2) a fictitious source technique to satisfy specified head conditions along the cylindrical boundary, (3) a method of imaging to satisfy the no-flow condition across the impermeable base, (4) the classical analytic solution for a well and (5) spheroidal harmonics to account for the influence of the inhomogeneities in hydraulic conductivity. Temporal variations of the flow system due to time-dependent recharge and pumping are represented by combining the analytic element method with a finite difference method: analytic element method is used to represent spatial changes in head and discharge, while the finite difference method represents temporal variations. The solution provides a very detailed description of local groundwater flow with an arbitrary number of wells of any orientation and an arbitrary number of ellipsoidal inhomogeneities of any size and conductivity. These inhomogeneities may be used to model local hydrogeologic features (such as gravel packs and clay lenses) that significantly influence the flow in the vicinity of partially penetrating wells. Several options for specifying head values along the lateral domain boundary are available. These options allow for inclusion of the model into steady and transient regional groundwater models. The head values along the lateral domain boundary may be specified directly (as time series). The head values along the lateral boundary may also be assigned by specifying the water-table gradient and a head value at a single point (as time series). A case study is included to demonstrate the application

  11. A preliminary evaluation of regional ground-water flow in south-central Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    La Sala, A. M., Jr.; Doty, G.C.; Pearson, F.J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The characteristics of regional ground-water flow were investigated in a 4,500-square-mile region of south-central Washington, centered on the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission Hanford Reservation. The investigation is part of the Commission's feasibility study on storing high-level radioactive waste in chambers mined in basaltic rocks at a. depth of about 3,000 feet or more below the surface. Ground-water flow., on a regional scale, occurs principally in the basalt and-in interbedded sediments of the Columbia River Group, and is controlled by topography, the structure of the basalt, and the large streams--the Columbia, Snake, and Yakima Rivers. The ground water beneath the main part of the Hanford Reservation, south and west of the Columbia River, inures southeastward from recharge areas in the uplands, including Cold Creek and Dry Creek valleys, and ultimately discharges to the Columbia River south of the reservation: East and southeast of the Columbia River, ground water flows generally southwestward and discharges to the River. The Yakima River valley contains a distinct flow system in which movement is toward the Yakima River from the topographic divides. A large southward-flowing ground-water system beneath the southern flank of the Horse Heaven Hills discharges to the Columbia River in the westward-trending reach downstream from Wallula Gap.

  12. Temporal evolution of soil moisture statistical fractal and controls by soil texture and regional groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xinye; Shen, Chaopeng; Riley, William J.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture statistical fractal is an important tool for downscaling remotely-sensed observations and has the potential to play a key role in multi-scale hydrologic modeling. The fractal was first introduced two decades ago, but relatively little is known regarding how its scaling exponents evolve in time in response to climatic forcings. Previous studies have neglected the process of moisture re-distribution due to regional groundwater flow. In this study we used a physically-based surface-subsurface processes model and numerical experiments to elucidate the patterns and controls of fractal temporal evolution in two U.S. Midwest basins. Groundwater flow was found to introduce large-scale spatial structure, thereby reducing the scaling exponents (τ), which has implications for the transferability of calibrated parameters to predict τ. However, the groundwater effects depend on complex interactions with other physical controls such as soil texture and land use. The fractal scaling exponents, while in general showing a seasonal mode that correlates with mean moisture content, display hysteresis after storm events that can be divided into three phases, consistent with literature findings: (a) wetting, (b) re-organizing, and (c) dry-down. Modeling experiments clearly show that the hysteresis is attributed to soil texture, whose "patchiness" is the primary contributing factor. We generalized phenomenological rules for the impacts of rainfall, soil texture, groundwater flow, and land use on τ evolution. Grid resolution has a mild influence on the results and there is a strong correlation between predictions of τ from different resolutions. Overall, our results suggest that groundwater flow should be given more consideration in studies of the soil moisture statistical fractal, especially in regions with a shallow water table.

  13. Characterization of Groundwater Flow at a Mountainous Watershed, Niwot Ridge, Front Range, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, S. G.; Ge, S.

    2013-12-01

    We present a 3D coupled flow and solute transport hydrogeologic model for the Niwot Ridge Watershed in the Front Range of Colorado. This is the first 3D modeling attempt at detailing groundwater recharges at this site. The 7.6 km2 watershed ranges in elevation from 3241 to 4082 m and is representative of an alpine setting. Its climate is characterized by a mean annual precipitation of 1.95 m, mean annual air temperature of -2.1 °C, and extensive snow coverage six months of the year with 80% of the precipitation falling as snow. At the study site, Proterozoic metamorphic and igneous bedrock is intruded by Tertiary stocks and overlain by Quaternary deposits. In the middle of the watershed are six paternoster lakes connected by North Boulder Creek, the headwaters of the South Platte River. We use a steady state 3D finite element coupled flow and solute transport model to characterize the groundwater and solute transport systems and quantify mountain recharge under averaged long-term conditions. Field data including effective porosity, hydraulic conductivity, and solute concentration in surface water are utilized to constrain and calibrate model parameters. We conduct model sensitivity analysis to examine how uncertainties in model input parameters may influence model results. Preliminary model results indicate that regional groundwater flow is from northwest to southeast, towards North Boulder Creek. This groundwater flow pattern is consistent with field observations. The average hydraulic head gradient over the entire modeled area is approximately 0.12 m/m. Groundwater velocity varies from 1.4 x 10-6 to 1.8 x 10-3 m/s. Groundwater flow is primarily driven by a topographically influenced precipitation regime, with 7% of the total precipitation recharging into the subsurface. Groundwater contribution to baseflow of North Boulder Creek is at an average rate of 0.03 m3/s, which is on the same magnitude as observed values. Modeled discharge solute concentration (Na

  14. Glaciation and regional ground-water flow in the Fennoscandian Shield: Site 94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Provost, Alden M.; Voss, Clifford I.; Neuzil, C.E.

    1998-01-01

    Results from a regional-scale ground-water flow model of the Fennoscandian shield suggest that ground-water flow is strongly affected by surface conditions associated with climatic change and glaciation. The model was used to run a series of numerical simulations of variable-density ground-water flow in a 1500-km-long and approximately 10-km-deep cross-section that passes through southern Sweden. Ground-water flow and shield brine transport in the cross-sectional model are controlled by an assumed time evolution of surface conditions over the next 140 ka. Simulations show that, under periglacial conditions, permafrost may locally or extensively impede the free recharge or discharge of ground water. Below cold-based glacial ice, no recharge or discharge of ground water occurs. Both of these conditions result in the settling of shield brine and consequent freshening of near-surface water in areas of natural discharge blocked by permafrost. The presence of warm-based ice with basal melting creates a potential for ground-water recharge rates much larger than under present, ice-free conditions. Recharging basal meltwater can reach depths of a few kilometers in a few thousand years. The vast majority of recharged water is accommodated through storage in the volume of bedrock below the local area of recharge; regional (lateral) redistribution of recharged water by subsurface flow is minor over the duration of a glacial advance (~10 ka). During glacial retreat, the weight of the ice overlying a given surface location decreases, and significant upward flow of ground water may occur below the ice sheet due to pressure release, despite the continued potential for recharge of basal meltwater. Excess meltwater must exit from below the glacier through subglacial cavities and channels. Subsurface penetration of meltwater during glacial advance and up-flow during glacial retreat are greatest if the loading efficiency of the shield rock is low. The maximum rate of ground-water

  15. Hydrologic data and groundwater flow simulations in the vicinity of Long Lake, Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, near Gary, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lampe, David C.; Bayless, Randall

    2013-01-01

    groundwater divide south of US-12. Wetlands to the south of West Long Lake act as points of recharge to the surficial aquifer in both dry- and wet-weather conditions. Among the noteworthy results from a dry-weather groundwater flow model simulation are (1) US-12 ditch does not receive water from East Long Lake or West Long Lake, (2) the filtration pond at the east end of East Long Lake, when active, contributed approximately 10 percent of the total water entering East Long Lake, and (3) County Line Road ditch has little effect on simulated water level. Among the noteworthy results from a wet-weather groundwater flow simulation are (1) US-12 ditch does not receive water from East Long Lake or West Long Lake, (2) when the seepage from the filtration pond to the surficial aquifer is not active, sources of inflow to East Long Lake are restricted to only precipitation (46 percent of total) and inflow from the surficial aquifer (54 percent of total), and (3) County Line Road ditch bisects the groundwater divide and creates two water-table mounds south of US-12. The results from a series of model scenarios simulating certain engineering controls and changes in Lake Michigan levels include the following: (1) The simulated removal of beaver dams in US-12 ditch during a wet-weather simulation increased discharge from the ditch to the Gary Sanitary system by 13 percent. (2) Discontinuation of seepage from the filtration pond east of East Long Lake decreased discharge from US-12 ditch to the Gary Sanitary system by 2.3 percent. (3) Simulated discontinuation of discharge from the US-12 ditch to the GSD sewer system increased the area where the water table was estimated to be above the land surface beyond the inundated area in the initial wet-weather simulation. (4) Simulated modifications to the control structure at the discharge point of US-12 ditch to the GSD sewer system can decrease discharge by as much as 61 percent while increasing the simulated inundated area during dry weather and

  16. Knowledge, transparency, and refutability in groundwater models, an example from the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Mary C.; Faunt, Claudia C.; Belcher, Wayne R.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Tiedeman, Claire R.; Kavetski, Dmitri

    This work demonstrates how available knowledge can be used to build more transparent and refutable computer models of groundwater systems. The Death Valley regional groundwater flow system, which surrounds a proposed site for a high level nuclear waste repository of the United States of America, and the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), where nuclear weapons were tested, is used to explore model adequacy, identify parameters important to (and informed by) observations, and identify existing old and potential new observations important to predictions. Model development is pursued using a set of fundamental questions addressed with carefully designed metrics. Critical methods include using a hydrogeologic model, managing model nonlinearity by designing models that are robust while maintaining realism, using error-based weighting to combine disparate types of data, and identifying important and unimportant parameters and observations and optimizing parameter values with computationally frugal schemes. The frugal schemes employed in this study require relatively few (10-1000 s), parallelizable model runs. This is beneficial because models able to approximate the complex site geology defensibly tend to have high computational cost. The issue of model defensibility is particularly important given the contentious political issues involved.

  17. MODOPTIM: A general optimization program for ground-water flow model calibration and ground-water management with MODFLOW

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halford, Keith J.

    2006-01-01

    MODOPTIM is a non-linear ground-water model calibration and management tool that simulates flow with MODFLOW-96 as a subroutine. A weighted sum-of-squares objective function defines optimal solutions for calibration and management problems. Water levels, discharges, water quality, subsidence, and pumping-lift costs are the five direct observation types that can be compared in MODOPTIM. Differences between direct observations of the same type can be compared to fit temporal changes and spatial gradients. Water levels in pumping wells, wellbore storage in the observation wells, and rotational translation of observation wells also can be compared. Negative and positive residuals can be weighted unequally so inequality constraints such as maximum chloride concentrations or minimum water levels can be incorporated in the objective function. Optimization parameters are defined with zones and parameter-weight matrices. Parameter change is estimated iteratively with a quasi-Newton algorithm and is constrained to a user-defined maximum parameter change per iteration. Parameters that are less sensitive than a user-defined threshold are not estimated. MODOPTIM facilitates testing more conceptual models by expediting calibration of each conceptual model. Examples of applying MODOPTIM to aquifer-test analysis, ground-water management, and parameter estimation problems are presented.

  18. A hydrogeological conceptual approach to study urban groundwater flow in Bucharest city, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukhemacha, Mohamed Amine; Gogu, Constantin Radu; Serpescu, Irina; Gaitanaru, Dragos; Bica, Ioan

    2015-05-01

    Management of groundwater systems in urban areas is necessary and can be reliably performed by means of mathematical modeling combined with geospatial analysis. A conceptual approach for the study of urban hydrogeological systems is presented. The proposed approach is based on the features of Bucharest city (Romania) and can be adapted to other urban areas showing similar characteristics. It takes into account the interaction between groundwater and significant urban infrastructure elements that can be encountered in modern cities such as subway tunnels and water-supply networks, and gives special attention to the sewer system. In this respect, an adaptation of the leakage factor approach is proposed, which uses a sewer-system zoning function related to the conduits' location in the aquifer system and a sewer-conduits classification function related to their structural and/or hydraulic properties. The approach was used to elaborate a single-layered steady state groundwater flow model for a pilot zone of Bucharest city.

  19. Groundwater flow and water budget in the surficial and Floridan aquifer systems in east-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepulveda, Nicasio; Tiedeman, Claire R.; O'Reilly, Andrew M.; Davis, Jeffrey B.; Burger, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    A numerical transient model of the surficial and Floridan aquifer systems in east-central Florida was developed to (1) increase the understanding of water exchanges between the surficial and the Floridan aquifer systems, (2) assess the recharge rates to the surficial aquifer system from infiltration through the unsaturated zone and (3) obtain a simulation tool that could be used by water-resource managers to assess the impact of changes in groundwater withdrawals on spring flows and on the potentiometric surfaces of the hydrogeologic units composing the Floridan aquifer system. The hydrogeology of east-central Florida was evaluated and used to develop and calibrate the groundwater flow model, which simulates the regional fresh groundwater flow system. The U.S. Geological Survey three-dimensional groundwater flow model, MODFLOW-2005, was used to simulate transient groundwater flow in the surficial, intermediate, and Floridan aquifer systems from 1995 to 2006. The East-Central Florida Transient model encompasses an actively simulated area of about 9,000 square miles. Although the model includes surficial processes-rainfall, irrigation, evapotranspiration (ET), runoff, infiltration, lake water levels, and stream water levels and flows-its primary purpose is to characterize and refine the understanding of groundwater flow in the Floridan aquifer system. Model-independent estimates of the partitioning of rainfall into ET, streamflow, and aquifer recharge are provided from a water-budget analysis of the surficial aquifer system. The interaction of the groundwater flow system with the surface environment was simulated using the Green-Ampt infiltration method and the MODFLOW-2005 Unsaturated-Zone Flow, Lake, and Streamflow-Routing Packages. The model is intended to simulate the part of the groundwater system that contains freshwater. The bottom and lateral boundaries of the model were established at the estimated depths where the chloride concentration is 5,000 milligrams

  20. Groundwater flow and water budget in the surficial and Floridan aquifer systems in east-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepulveda, Nicasio; Tiedeman, Claire R.; O'Reilly, Andrew M.; Davis, Jeffery B.; Burger, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    A numerical transient model of the surficial and Floridan aquifer systems in east-central Florida was developed to (1) increase the understanding of water exchanges between the surficial and the Floridan aquifer systems, (2) assess the recharge rates to the surficial aquifer system from infiltration through the unsaturated zone and (3) obtain a simulation tool that could be used by water-resource managers to assess the impact of changes in groundwater withdrawals on spring flows and on the potentiometric surfaces of the hydrogeologic units composing the Floridan aquifer system. The hydrogeology of east-central Florida was evaluated and used to develop and calibrate the groundwater flow model, which simulates the regional fresh groundwater flow system. The U.S. Geological Survey three-dimensional groundwater flow model, MODFLOW-2005, was used to simulate transient groundwater flow in the surficial, intermediate, and Floridan aquifer systems from 1995 to 2006. The east-central Florida transient model encompasses an actively simulated area of about 9,000 square miles. Although the model includes surficial processes-rainfall, irrigation, evapotranspiration, runoff, infiltration, lake water levels, and stream water levels and flows-its primary purpose is to characterize and refine the understanding of groundwater flow in the Floridan aquifer system. Model-independent estimates of the partitioning of rainfall into evapotranspiration, streamflow, and aquifer recharge are provided from a water-budget analysis of the surficial aquifer system. The interaction of the groundwater flow system with the surface environment was simulated using the Green-Ampt infiltration method and the MODFLOW-2005 Unsaturated-Zone Flow, Lake, and Streamflow-Routing Packages. The model is intended to simulate the part of the groundwater system that contains freshwater. The bottom and lateral boundaries of the model were established at the estimated depths where the chloride concentration is 5

  1. Steady-state simulation of ground-water flow in the Rush Springs Aquifer, western Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, M.F.

    1998-01-01

    A simplified steady-state ground-water flow model was prepared for the Rush Springs aquifer in western Oklahoma. A 3-kilometer square grid was established over the area containing two layers with 674 active nodes simulated in the model. The steady-state model simulation used a mean recharge rate of 3.05 x 10-4 feet per day and a hydraulic conductivity range from 0.8 to 10 feet per day. The error at each node in the model is defined as the difference between the measured and simulated water levels.The arithmetic mean error for 170 of the 674 active nodes was -0.11 feet, the absolute value mean error was 7.55 feet, and the standard deviation of the error was 10.21 feet. A net simulated recharge of 231 cubic feet per second is balanced by a discharge to drains and seeps of 190.6 cubic feet per second about 82 percent of the total recharge. Discharge to the main stem of the Washita River is about 41 cubic feet per second about 18 percent of the recharge.

  2. Comparison of ground-water flow model particle-tracking results and isotopic data in the Mojave River ground-water basin, southern California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izbicki, J.A.; Stamos, C.L.; Nishikawa, T.; Martin, P.

    2004-01-01

    Flow-path and time-of-travel results for the Mojave River ground-water basin, southern California, calculated using the ground-water flow model MODFLOW and particle-tracking model MODPATH were similar to flow path and time-of-travel interpretations derived from delta-deuterium and carbon-14 data. Model and isotopic data both show short flow paths and young ground-water ages throughout the floodplain aquifer along most the Mojave River. Longer flow paths and older ground-water ages as great as 10,000 years before present were measured and simulated in the floodplain aquifer near the Mojave Valley. Model and isotopic data also show movement of water between the floodplain and regional aquifer and subsequent discharge of water from the river to dry lakes in some areas. It was not possible to simulate the isotopic composition of ground-water in the regional aquifer away from the front of the San Gabriel and San Bernardino Mountains - because recharge in these areas does not occur under the present-day climatic conditions used for calibration of the model.

  3. Effects of ground-water chemistry and flow on quality of drainflow in the western San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fio, John L.; Leighton, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Chemical and geohydrologic data were used to assess the effects of regional ground-water flow on the quality of on-farm drainflows in a part of the western San Joaquin Valley, California. Shallow ground water beneath farm fields has been enriched in stable isotopes and salts by partial evaporation from the shallow water table and is being displaced by irrigation, drainage, and regional ground-water flow. Ground-water flow is primarily downward in the study area but can flow upward in some down- slope areas. Transitional areas exist between the downward and upward flow zones, where ground water can move substantial horizontal distances (0.3 to 3.6 kilometers) and can require 10 to 90 years to reach the downslope drainage systems. Simulation of ground-water flow to drainage systems indicates that regional ground water contributes to about 11 percent of annual drainflow. Selenium concentrations in ground water and drainwater are affected by geologic source materials, partial evaporation from a shallow water table, drainage-system, and regional ground-water flow. Temporal variability in drainflow quality is affected in part by the distribution of chemical constituents in ground water and the flow paths to the drainage systems. The mass flux of selenium in drainflows, or load, generally is proportional to flow, and reductions in drainflow quantity should reduce selenium loads over the short-term. Uncertain changes in the distribution of ground-water quality make future changes in drainflow quality difficult to quantify.

  4. Upper washita river experimental watersheds: reservoir, groundwater, and stream flow data.

    PubMed

    Moriasi, Daniel N; Starks, Patrick J; Guzman, Jorge A; Garbrecht, Jurgen D; Steiner, Jean L; Stoner, J Chris; Allen, Paul B; Naney, James W

    2014-07-01

    Surface and groundwater quantity and quality data are essential in many hydrologic applications and to the development of hydrologic and water quality simulation models. We describe the hydrologic data available in the Little Washita River Experimental Watershed (LWREW) of the Southern Great Plains Research Watershed (SGPRW) and Fort Cobb Reservoir Experimental Watershed (FCREW), both located in southwest Oklahoma. Specifically, we describe the flood retarding structures and corresponding stage, discharge, seepage, and consumptive use data (), stream gauges, and groundwater wells and their corresponding stream flow (; LWREW ARS 522-526 stream gauges) and groundwater level data (SGPRW groundwater levels data; LWREW groundwater data; ; ), respectively. Data collection is a collaborative effort between federal and state agencies. Stage, discharge, seepage, and consumptive use data for the Fort Cobb Reservoir are available from the Bureau of Reclamation and cover a period of 1959 to present. There are 15 stream gauges in the LWREW and six in the FCREW with varying data records. There were 479 observation wells with data in the SGPRW and 80 in the LWREW, with the latest records collected in 1992. In addition, groundwater level data are available from five real-time monitoring wells and 34 historical wells within the FCREW. These data sets have been used for several research applications. Plans for detailed groundwater data collection are underway to calibrate and validate the linked Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT)-MODFLOW model. Also, plans are underway to conduct reservoir bathymetric surveys to determine the current reservoir capacity as affected by land use/land cover and overland and stream channel soil erosion. PMID:25603074

  5. Definition of boundary and initial conditions in the analysis of saturated ground-water flow systems; an introduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franke, O.L.; Reilly, T.E.; Bennett, G.D.

    1984-01-01

    Accurate definition of boundary and initial conditions is an essential part of conceptualizing and modeling ground-water flow systems. This report explains the properties of the seven most common boundary conditions encountered in ground-water systems and discusses major aspects of their application. It also discusses the significance and specification of initial conditions and evaluates some common errors in applying this concept to ground-water system models. (USGS)

  6. Uranium-series constraints on radionuclide transport and groundwater flow at the Nopal I uranium deposit, Sierra Pena Blanca, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, S.J.; Abdel-Fattah, A.I.; Murrell, M.T.; Dobson, P.F.; Norman, D.E.; Amato, R.S.; Nunn, A. J.

    2009-10-01

    Uranium-series data for groundwater samples from the Nopal I uranium ore deposit were obtained to place constraints on radionuclide transport and hydrologic processes for a nuclear waste repository located in fractured, unsaturated volcanic tuff. Decreasing uranium concentrations for wells drilled in 2003 are consistent with a simple physical mixing model that indicates that groundwater velocities are low ({approx}10 m/y). Uranium isotopic constraints, well productivities, and radon systematics also suggest limited groundwater mixing and slow flow in the saturated zone. Uranium isotopic systematics for seepage water collected in the mine adit show a spatial dependence which is consistent with longer water-rock interaction times and higher uranium dissolution inputs at the front adit where the deposit is located. Uranium-series disequilibria measurements for mostly unsaturated zone samples indicate that {sup 230}Th/{sup 238}U activity ratios range from 0.005-0.48 and {sup 226}Ra/{sup 238}U activity ratios range from 0.006-113. {sup 239}Pu/{sup 238}U mass ratios for the saturated zone are <2 x 10{sup -14}, and Pu mobility in the saturated zone is >1000 times lower than the U mobility. Saturated zone mobility decreases in the order {sup 238}U{approx}{sup 226}Ra > {sup 230}Th{approx}{sup 239}Pu. Radium and thorium appear to have higher mobility in the unsaturated zone based on U-series data from fractures and seepage water near the deposit.

  7. Uranium-series constraints on radionuclide transport and groundwater flow at the Nopal I uranium deposit, Sierra Pena Blanca, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Steven J; Abdel-Fattah, Amr I; Murrell, Michael T; Dobson, Patrick F; Norman, Deborah E; Amato, Ronald S; Nunn, Andrew J

    2010-03-01

    Uranium-series data for groundwater samples from the Nopal I uranium ore deposit were obtained to place constraints on radionuclide transport and hydrologic processes for a nuclear waste repository located in fractured, unsaturated volcanic tuff. Decreasing uranium concentrations for wells drilled in 2003 are consistent with a simple physical mixing model that indicates that groundwater velocities are low ( approximately 10 m/y). Uranium isotopic constraints, well productivities, and radon systematics also suggest limited groundwater mixing and slow flow in the saturated zone. Uranium isotopic systematics for seepage water collected in the mine adit show a spatial dependence which is consistent with longer water-rock interaction times and higher uranium dissolution inputs at the front adit where the deposit is located. Uranium-series disequilibria measurements for mostly unsaturated zone samples indicate that (230)Th/(238)U activity ratios range from 0.005 to 0.48 and (226)Ra/(238)U activity ratios range from 0.006 to 113. (239)Pu/(238)U mass ratios for the saturated zone are <2 x 10(-14), and Pu mobility in the saturated zone is >1000 times lower than the U mobility. Saturated zone mobility decreases in the order (238)U approximately (226)Ra > (230)Th approximately (239)Pu. Radium and thorium appear to have higher mobility in the unsaturated zone based on U-series data from fractures and seepage water near the deposit. PMID:20136119

  8. Development of one-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code 'GFLOW' for groundwater flow and contaminant transport analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rahatgaonkar, P. S.; Datta, D.; Malhotra, P. K.; Ghadge, S. G.

    2012-07-01

    Prediction of groundwater movement and contaminant transport in soil is an important problem in many branches of science and engineering. This includes groundwater hydrology, environmental engineering, soil science, agricultural engineering and also nuclear engineering. Specifically, in nuclear engineering it is applicable in the design of spent fuel storage pools and waste management sites in the nuclear power plants. Ground water modeling involves the simulation of flow and contaminant transport by groundwater flow. In the context of contaminated soil and groundwater system, numerical simulations are typically used to demonstrate compliance with regulatory standard. A one-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics code GFLOW had been developed based on the Finite Difference Method for simulating groundwater flow and contaminant transport through saturated and unsaturated soil. The code is validated with the analytical model and the benchmarking cases available in the literature. (authors)

  9. MODFLOW-Based Coupled Surface Water Routing and Groundwater-Flow Simulation.

    PubMed

    Hughes, J D; Langevin, C D; White, J T

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a flexible approach for simulating one- and two-dimensional routing of surface water using a numerical surface water routing (SWR) code implicitly coupled to the groundwater-flow process in MODFLOW. Surface water routing in SWR can be simulated using a diffusive-wave approximation of the Saint-Venant equations and/or a simplified level-pool approach. SWR can account for surface water flow controlled by backwater conditions caused by small water-surface gradients or surface water control structures. A number of typical surface water control structures, such as culverts, weirs, and gates, can be represented, and it is possible to implement operational rules to manage surface water stages and streamflow. The nonlinear system of surface water flow equations formulated in SWR is solved by using Newton methods and direct or iterative solvers. SWR was tested by simulating the (1) Lal axisymmetric overland flow, (2) V-catchment, and (3) modified Pinder-Sauer problems. Simulated results for these problems compare well with other published results and indicate that SWR provides accurate results for surface water-only and coupled surface water/groundwater problems. Results for an application of SWR and MODFLOW to the Snapper Creek area of Miami-Dade County, Florida, USA are also presented and demonstrate the value of coupled surface water and groundwater simulation in managed, low-relief coastal settings. PMID:24902965

  10. Groundwater Flow and Salt Transport at a Sand Tailings Dam: Field Observations and Modelling Results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, A. C.; Mendoza, C. A.

    2004-05-01

    Large volumes of sand tailings are produced during the extraction of bitumen from the oil sands of Northeastern Alberta. The long-term groundwater response and subsequent movement of water and solutes within the large permeable sand tailings storage areas is uncertain. At the Southwest Sand Storage (SWSS) Facility, located at Syncrude's Mildred Lake operations near Ft. McMurray, there is concern that salts from the tailings water may discharge to newly placed reclamation material that covers the sand tailings. This saline discharge water could destroy the reclamation soil structure and negatively impact vegetation. The steady-state groundwater flow and transient movement of salts at the local (bench and slope) and intermediate (pile) scales in the SWSS are investigated. Water levels, seepage and groundwater quality (including TDS) have been measured for over a year along two transects of piezometers installed in the SWSS. The field data have been used to complete traditional hydrogeological interpretations of the site, and to develop a conceptual model of flow and transport. The local and intermediate flow systems and salt transport in the dam are being evaluated with numerical models. The models will allow possible future hydrogeological behaviour of the structure to be tested. Preliminary results show differences in flow systems and salinity distribution that depend on the deposition of the SWSS. This research will facilitate better long-term environmental management of this and similar sites.

  11. MODFLOW-based coupled surface water routing and groundwater-flow simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, Joseph D.; Langevin, Christian D.; White, Jeremy T.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a flexible approach for simulating one- and two-dimensional routing of surface water using a numerical surface water routing (SWR) code implicitly coupled to the groundwater-flow process in MODFLOW. Surface water routing in SWR can be simulated using a diffusive-wave approximation of the Saint-Venant equations and/or a simplified level-pool approach. SWR can account for surface water flow controlled by backwater conditions caused by small water-surface gradients or surface water control structures. A number of typical surface water control structures, such as culverts, weirs, and gates, can be represented, and it is possible to implement operational rules to manage surface water stages and streamflow. The nonlinear system of surface water flow equations formulated in SWR is solved by using Newton methods and direct or iterative solvers. SWR was tested by simulating the (1) Lal axisymmetric overland flow, (2) V-catchment, and (3) modified Pinder-Sauer problems. Simulated results for these problems compare well with other published results and indicate that SWR provides accurate results for surface water-only and coupled surface water/groundwater problems. Results for an application of SWR and MODFLOW to the Snapper Creek area of Miami-Dade County, Florida, USA are also presented and demonstrate the value of coupled surface water and groundwater simulation in managed, low-relief coastal settings.

  12. Geo-Hydro Statistical Characterization of Preferential Flow and Transport Processes in Karst Groundwater Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anaya, A. A.; Padilla, I. Y.; Macchiavelli, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Karst groundwater systems are highly productive and provide an important fresh water resource for human development and ecological integrity. Their high productivity is often associated with conduit flow and high matrix permeability. The same characteristics that make these aquifers productive also make them highly vulnerable to contamination and a likely for contaminant exposure. Of particular interest are chlorinated organic contaminants and phthalates derived from industrial solvents and plastic by-products. These chemicals have been identified as potential precursors of pre-term birth, a leading cause of neonatal complications with a significant health and societal cost. The general objectives of this work are to: (1) develop fundamental knowledge and determine the processes controlling the release, mobility, persistence, and possible pathways of contaminants in karst groundwater systems, and (2) characterize transport processes in conduit and diffusion-dominated flow under base flow and storm flow conditions. The work presented herein focuses on the development of geo-hydro statistical tools to characterize flow and transport processes under different flow regimes. Multidimensional, laboratory-scale Geo-Hydrobed models were developed and tested for this purpose. The models consist of stainless-steel tanks containing karstified limestone blocks collected from the karst aquifer formation of northern Puerto Rico. The models a network of sampling wells to monitor flow, pressure, and solute concentrations temporally and spatially. Experimental work entailed making a series of point injections in wells while monitoring the hydraulic response in other wells. Statistical mixed models were applied to spatial probabilities of hydraulic response and weighted injected volume data, and were used to determinate the best spatial correlation structure to represent paths of preferential flow in the limestone units under different groundwater flow regimes. Preliminary testing

  13. Regional groundwater-flow model of the Redwall-Muav, Coconino, and alluvial basin aquifer systems of northern and central Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pool, D.R.; Blasch, Kyle W.; Callegary, James B.; Leake, Stanley A.; Graser, Leslie F.

    2011-01-01

    A numerical flow model (MODFLOW) of the groundwater flow system in the primary aquifers in northern Arizona was developed to simulate interactions between the aquifers, perennial streams, and springs for predevelopment and transient conditions during 1910 through 2005. Simulated aquifers include the Redwall-Muav, Coconino, and basin-fill aquifers. Perennial stream reaches and springs that derive base flow from the aquifers were simulated, including the Colorado River, Little Colorado River, Salt River, Verde River, and perennial reaches of tributary streams. Simulated major springs include Blue Spring, Del Rio Springs, Havasu Springs, Verde River headwater springs, several springs that discharge adjacent to major Verde River tributaries, and many springs that discharge to the Colorado River. Estimates of aquifer hydraulic properties and groundwater budgets were developed from published reports and groundwater-flow models. Spatial extents of aquifers and confining units were developed from geologic data, geophysical models, a groundwater-flow model for the Prescott Active Management Area, drill logs, geologic logs, and geophysical logs. Spatial and temporal distributions of natural recharge were developed by using a water-balance model that estimates recharge from direct infiltration. Additional natural recharge from ephemeral channel infiltration was simulated in alluvial basins. Recharge at wastewater treatment facilities and incidental recharge at agricultural fields and golf courses were also simulated. Estimates of predevelopment rates of groundwater discharge to streams, springs, and evapotranspiration by phreatophytes were derived from previous reports and on the basis of streamflow records at gages. Annual estimates of groundwater withdrawals for agriculture, municipal, industrial, and domestic uses were developed from several sources, including reported withdrawals for nonexempt wells, estimated crop requirements for agricultural wells, and estimated per

  14. Ground-water flow in Melton Valley, Oak Ridge reservation, Roane County, Tennessee; preliminary model analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tucci, Patrick

    1986-01-01

    Shallow land burial of low-level radioactive waste has been practiced since 1951 in Melton Valley. Groundwater flow modeling was used to better understand the geohydrology of the valley, and to provide a foundation for future contaminant transport modeling. The three-dimensional, finite difference model simulates the aquifer as a two layer system that represents the regolith and bedrock. Transmissivities, which were adjusted during model calibration, range from 8 to 16 sq ft/day for the regolith, and from 0.2 to 1.5 sq ft/day for bedrock. An anisotropy ratio of 1:3 for strike-normal to strike-parallel transmissivity values, in conjunction with recharge rate = 6% of precipitation that is uniformly distributed over the model area, produces the best match between simulated and observed water levels. Simulated water levels generally compare well to observed or estimated 1978 groundwater conditions. Simulated water levels for the regolith for 39 of 69 comparison points are within +/- 10 ft of average 1978 levels. Simulated vertical flow components are in the observed direction for 9 of 11 comparison points. Preliminary simulations indicate that nearly all groundwater flow is within the regolith and discharges to either the Clinch River or the White Oak Creek-Melton Branch drainage systems. Less than 3% of the flow is between the regolith and bedrock, and < 1% of total groundwater flow discharges to the Clinch River through bedrock. Additional data needed to refine and further calibrate the model, include: (1) quantity and areal distribution of recharge; (2) water levels in the regolith near the model boundaries and beyond the Clinch River; (3) water levels and aquifer characteristics for bedrock; and (4) additional surface water data. (Author 's abstract)

  15. Effects of alongshore morphology on groundwater flow and solute transport in a nearshore aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Ling; Erler, Dirk V.; Santos, Isaac; Lockington, David

    2016-02-01

    Variations of beach morphology in both the cross-shore and alongshore directions, associated with tidal creeks, are common at natural coasts, as observed at a field site on the east coast of Rarotonga, Cook Islands. Field investigations and three-dimensional (3-D) numerical simulations were conducted to study the nearshore groundwater flow and solute transport in such a system. The results show that the beach morphology, combined with tides, induced a significant alongshore flow and modified local pore water circulation and salt transport in the intertidal zone substantially. The bathymetry and hydraulic head of the creek enabled further and more rapid landward intrusion of seawater along the creek than in the aquifer, which created alongshore hydraulic gradient and solute concentration gradient to drive pore water flow and salt transport in the alongshore direction within the aquifer. The effects of the creek led to the formation of a saltwater plume in groundwater at an intermediate depth between fresher water zones on a cross-shore transect. The 3-D pore water flow in the nearshore zone was also complicated by the landward hydraulic head condition, resulting in freshwater drainage across the inland section of the creek while seawater infiltrating the seaward section. These results provided new insights into the complexity, intensity, and time scales of mixing among fresh groundwater, recirculating seawater and creek water in three dimensions. The 3-D characteristics of nearshore pore water flow and solute transport have important implications for studies of submarine groundwater discharge and associated chemical input to the coastal sea, and for evaluation of the beach habitat conditions.

  16. Uncertainty analysis of a groundwater flow model in East-central Florida.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Nicasio; Doherty, John

    2015-01-01

    A groundwater flow model for east-central Florida has been developed to help water-resource managers assess the impact of increased groundwater withdrawals from the Floridan aquifer system on heads and spring flows originating from the Upper Floridan Aquifer. The model provides a probabilistic description of predictions of interest to water-resource managers, given the uncertainty associated with system heterogeneity, the large number of input parameters, and a nonunique groundwater flow solution. The uncertainty associated with these predictions can then be considered in decisions with which the model has been designed to assist. The "Null Space Monte Carlo" method is a stochastic probabilistic approach used to generate a suite of several hundred parameter field realizations, each maintaining the model in a calibrated state, and each considered to be hydrogeologically plausible. The results presented herein indicate that the model's capacity to predict changes in heads or spring flows that originate from increased groundwater withdrawals is considerably greater than its capacity to predict the absolute magnitudes of heads or spring flows. Furthermore, the capacity of the model to make predictions that are similar in location and in type to those in the calibration dataset exceeds its capacity to make predictions of different types at different locations. The quantification of these outcomes allows defensible use of the modeling process in support of future water-resources decisions. The model allows the decision-making process to recognize the uncertainties, and the spatial or temporal variability of uncertainties that are associated with predictions of future system behavior in a complex hydrogeological context. PMID:25040026

  17. Uncertainty analysis of a groundwater flow model in east-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepulveda, Nicasio; Doherty, John E.

    2014-01-01

    A groundwater flow model for east-central Florida has been developed to help water-resource managers assess the impact of increased groundwater withdrawals from the Floridan aquifer system on heads and spring flows originating from the Upper Floridan aquifer. The model provides a probabilistic description of predictions of interest to water-resource managers, given the uncertainty associated with system heterogeneity, the large number of input parameters, and a nonunique groundwater flow solution. The uncertainty associated with these predictions can then be considered in decisions with which the model has been designed to assist. The “Null Space Monte Carlo” method is a stochastic probabilistic approach used to generate a suite of several hundred parameter field realizations, each maintaining the model in a calibrated state, and each considered to be hydrogeologically plausible. The results presented herein indicate that the model’s capacity to predict changes in heads or spring flows that originate from increased groundwater withdrawals is considerably greater than its capacity to predict the absolute magnitudes of heads or spring flows. Furthermore, the capacity of the model to make predictions that are similar in location and in type to those in the calibration dataset exceeds its capacity to make predictions of different types at different locations. The quantification of these outcomes allows defensible use of the modeling process in support of future water-resources decisions. The model allows the decision-making process to recognize the uncertainties, and the spatial/temporal variability of uncertainties that are associated with predictions of future system behavior in a complex hydrogeological context.

  18. Multivariate analyses with end-member mixing to characterize groundwater flow: Wind Cave and associated aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, A.J.; Valder, J.F.

    2011-01-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) applied to hydrochemical data has been used with end-member mixing to characterize groundwater flow to a limited extent, but aspects of this approach are unresolved. Previous similar approaches typically have assumed that the extreme-value samples identified by PCA represent end members. The method presented herein is different from previous work in that (1) end members were not assumed to have been sampled but rather were estimated and constrained by prior knowledge; (2) end-member mixing was quantified in relation to hydrogeologic domains, which focuses model results on major hydrologic processes; (3) a method to select an appropriate number of end members using a series of cluster analyses is presented; and (4) conservative tracers were weighted preferentially in model calibration, which distributed model errors of optimized values, or residuals, more appropriately than would otherwise be the case. The latter item also provides an estimate of the relative influence of geochemical evolution along flow paths in comparison to mixing. This method was applied to groundwater in Wind Cave and the associated karst aquifer in the Black Hills of South Dakota, USA. The end-member mixing model was used to test a hypothesis that five different end-member waters are mixed in the groundwater system comprising five hydrogeologic domains. The model estimated that Wind Cave received most of its groundwater inflow from local surface recharge with an additional 33% from an upgradient aquifer. Artesian springs in the vicinity of Wind Cave primarily received water from regional groundwater flow. ?? 2011.

  19. Groundwater and surface water interaction in flow-through gravel pit lakes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nella Mollema, Pauline; Antonellini, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Gravel pits are excavated in aquifers to fulfill the need for construction materials. Flow-through lakes form when the gravel pits are below the water table and fill with groundwater. In certain areas there are more than 60 of these lakes close together and their presence changes the drainage patterns and water- and hydrochemical budgets of a watershed. In flow-through gravel pit lakes, groundwater mixes with surface water and interacts with the atmosphere; outflow occurs only via groundwater. The lifespan of gravel pit lakes may be up to thousands of years as their depth to surface ratio is typically large and sedimentation rates are low. We have studied two gravel pit lake systems, a fluvial freshwater system in the Netherlands and a coastal brackish lake system in Italy. One Dutch gravel pit lake studied in detail is in part artificially replenished with Meuse River water for drinking water production that occurs downstream of the lake by water pumps. The Italian gravel pit lakes are fed by brackish groundwater that is a mix of freshwater from precipitation, Apennine Rivers and brackish (Holocene) Adriatic Sea water. Here, the drainage system of the low lying land enhances groundwater flow into the lake. Surface water evaporation is larger in temperate and Mediterranean climates than the actual evapotranspiration of pre-existing grassland and forests. The lakes, therefore, cause a loss of freshwater. The creation of water surfaces allows algae and other flora and fauna to develop. In general, water becomes gradually enriched in certain chemical constituents on its way through the hydrological cycle, especially as groundwater due to water-rock interactions. When groundwater ex-filtrates into gravel pit lakes, the natural flow of solutes towards the sea is interrupted. Hydrochemical analysis of ground- and surface waters, as well as chemical analysis of lake bottom sediments and stable H and O isotope data, show that gravel pit lake water is characterized (among

  20. Water and rock geochemistry, geologic cross sections, geochemical modeling, and groundwater flow modeling for identifying the source of groundwater to Montezuma Well, a natural spring in central Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Raymond H.; DeWitt, Ed; Wirt, Laurie; Arnold, L. Rick; Horton, John D.

    2011-01-01

    The National Park Service (NPS) seeks additional information to better understand the source(s) of groundwater and associated groundwater flow paths to Montezuma Well in Montezuma Castle National Monument, central Arizona. The source of water to Montezuma Well, a flowing sinkhole in a desert setting, is poorly understood. Water emerges from the middle limestone facies of the lacustrine Verde Formation, but the precise origin of the water and its travel path are largely unknown. Some have proposed artesian flow to Montezuma Well through the Supai Formation, which is exposed along the eastern margin of the Verde Valley and underlies the Verde Formation. The groundwater recharge zone likely lies above the floor of the Verde Valley somewhere to the north or east of Montezuma Well, where precipitation is more abundant. Additional data from groundwater, surface water, and bedrock geology are required for Montezuma Well and the surrounding region to test the current conceptual ideas, to provide new details on the groundwater flow in the area, and to assist in future management decisions. The results of this research will provide information for long-term water resource management and the protection of water rights.

  1. Heat flow and subsurface temperature as evidence for basin-scale ground-water flow, North Slope of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deming, D.; Sass, J.H.; Lachenbruch, A.H.; De Rito, R. F.

    1992-01-01

    Several high-resolution temperature logs were made in each of 21 drillholes and a total of 601 thermal conductivity measurements were made on drill cuttings and cores. Near-surface heat flow (??20%) is inversely correlated with elevation and ranges from a low of 27 mW/m2 in the foothills of the Brooks Range in the south, to a high of 90 mW/m2 near the north coast. Subsurface temperatures and thermal gradients estimated from corrected BHTs are similarly much higher on the coastal plain than in the foothills province to the south. Significant east-west variation in heat flow and subsurface temperature is also observed; higher heat flow and temperature coincide with higher basement topography. The observed thermal pattern is consistent with forced convection by a topographically driven ground-water flow system. Average ground-water (Darcy) velocity in the postulated flow system is estimated to be of the order of 0.1 m/yr; the effective basin-scale permeability is estimated to be of the order of 10-14 m2. -from Authors

  2. Influence of faults on groundwater flow and transport at YuccaMountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Andrew J.B.; Sitar, Nicholas

    1999-10-07

    Numerical simulations of groundwater flow at Yucca Mountain, Nevada are used to investigate how faults influence groundwater flow pathways and regional-scale macrodispersion. The 3-D model has a unique grid block discretization that facilitates the accurate representation of the complex geologic structure present in faulted formations. Each hydrogeologic layer is discretized into a single layer of irregular and dipping grid blocks, and faults are discretized such that they are laterally continuous and varied in displacement varies along strike. In addition, the presence of altered fault zones is explicitly modeled, as appropriate. Simulations show that upward head gradients can be readily explained by the geometry of hydrogeologic layers, the variability of layer permeabilities, and the presence of permeable fault zones or faults with displacement only, not necessarily by upwelling from a deep aquifer. Large-scale macrodispersion results from the vertical and lateral diversion of flow near the contact of high- and low-permeability layers at faults, and from upward flow within high-permeability fault zones. Conversely, large-scale channeling can occur as a result of groundwater flow into areas with minimal fault displacement. Contaminants originating at the water table can flow in a direction significantly different from that of the water table gradient, and isolated zones of contaminants can occur at the water table downgradient. By conducting both 2-D and 3-D simulations, we show that the 2-D cross-sectional models traditionally used to examine flow in faulted formations may not be appropriate. In addition, the influence of a particular type of fault cannot be generalized; depending on the location where contaminants enter the saturated zone, faults may either enhance or inhibit vertical dispersion.

  3. Elevated levels of diesel range organic compounds in groundwater near Marcellus gas operations are derived from surface activities.

    PubMed

    Drollette, Brian D; Hoelzer, Kathrin; Warner, Nathaniel R; Darrah, Thomas H; Karatum, Osman; O'Connor, Megan P; Nelson, Robert K; Fernandez, Loretta A; Reddy, Christopher M; Vengosh, Avner; Jackson, Robert B; Elsner, Martin; Plata, Desiree L

    2015-10-27

    Hundreds of organic chemicals are used during natural gas extraction via high-volume hydraulic fracturing (HVHF). However, it is unclear whether these chemicals, injected into deep shale horizons, reach shallow groundwater aquifers and affect local water quality, either from those deep HVHF injection sites or from the surface or shallow subsurface. Here, we report detectable levels of organic compounds in shallow groundwater samples from private residential wells overlying the Marcellus Shale in northeastern Pennsylvania. Analyses of purgeable and extractable organic compounds from 64 groundwater samples revealed trace levels of volatile organic compounds, well below the Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant levels, and low levels of both gasoline range (0-8 ppb) and diesel range organic compounds (DRO; 0-157 ppb). A compound-specific analysis revealed the presence of bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, which is a disclosed HVHF additive, that was notably absent in a representative geogenic water sample and field blanks. Pairing these analyses with (i) inorganic chemical fingerprinting of deep saline groundwater, (ii) characteristic noble gas isotopes, and (iii) spatial relationships between active shale gas extraction wells and wells with disclosed environmental health and safety violations, we differentiate between a chemical signature associated with naturally occurring saline groundwater and one associated with alternative anthropogenic routes from the surface (e.g., accidental spills or leaks). The data support a transport mechanism of DRO to groundwater via accidental release of fracturing fluid chemicals derived from the surface rather than subsurface flow of these fluids from the underlying shale formation. PMID:26460018

  4. Digital models of ground-water flow in the Cape Cod aquifer system, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guswa, John H.; LeBlanc, Denis R.

    1985-01-01

    The Cape Cod aquifer system was simulated with three-dimensional finite-difference ground-water-flow models. Five areas were modeled to provide tools that can be used to evaluate the hydrologic impacts of regional water development and waste disposal. The model boundaries were selected to represent the natural hydrologic boundaries of the aquifer. The boundary between fresh and saline ground water was treated as an interface along which there is no dispersion. The saline-water zone was treated as static (nonflowing). Comparisons of calculated and observed values of head, position of the boundary between fresh and saline water, and ground-water discharge (at locations where data were available) indicate that the simulated groundwater reservoirs generally agree with field conditions. Model analyses indicate that the total steady-state freshwater-flow rate through the five modeled areas is approximately 412 cubic feet per second.

  5. Automatic Time Stepping with Global Error Control for Groundwater Flow Models

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Guoping

    2008-09-01

    An automatic time stepping with global error control is proposed for the time integration of the diffusion equation to simulate groundwater flow in confined aquifers. The scheme is based on an a posteriori error estimate for the discontinuous Galerkin (dG) finite element methods. A stability factor is involved in the error estimate and it is used to adapt the time step and control the global temporal error for the backward difference method. The stability factor can be estimated by solving a dual problem. The stability factor is not sensitive to the accuracy of the dual solution and the overhead computational cost can be minimized by solving the dual problem using large time steps. Numerical experiments are conducted to show the application and the performance of the automatic time stepping scheme. Implementation of the scheme can lead to improvement in accuracy and efficiency for groundwater flow models.

  6. Age dating and flow path evaluation of groundwater by SF6 and microbe in the foot of Mt. Fuji, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Chisato; Tsujimura, Maki; Kato, Kenji; Nagaosa, Kazuyo; Sakakibara, Koichi; Umei, Yohei; Ohara, Kazuma

    2016-04-01

    A variety of industries are developed at the foot of volcanic mountains in Japan and the groundwater is major source for industrial activity in those regions. The age of groundwater has been estimated to be from 10 to 30 years in Mt. Fuji regions by using 36Cl and 3H. However, the age has not been evaluated using SF6 with higher time resolution in these regions. Also, the total number of prokaryotes shows a specific value in each spring water, suggesting different path and age of the groundwater. Therefore, we aim to estimate residence time and the groundwater flow in three dimensions using the multi-tracers approach; CFCs, SF6, the total number of prokaryotes, the stable isotopes of oxygen-18, deuterium. We collected totally 25 spring water samples in Mt. Fuji and analyzed concentration of inorganic ions, the stable isotopes of oxygen-18, deuterium, CFCs, SF6. The apparent age of the spring water was estimated to be ranging from 4 to 19 years at the foot of Mt. Fuji. These results are reasonable as considering the existed age data by36Cl (Tosaki, 2008) in this region. The spring water with younger age tends to show higher total number of prokaryotes, suggesting that the groundwater flows dominantly through the shallow and young lava with the higher total number of prokaryotes, leads to younger age. Focusing on a specific spring water, the seasonal change of SF6 and total number of prokaryotes were monitored. The spring water showed a younger age and higher total number of prokaryotes during the high water flow season, whereas it showed an older age and lower total number of prokaryotes. Therefore, the total number of prokaryotes shows a good negative correlation with the residence time of the spring/ groundwater in space and time. This shows a possibility that the total number of prokaryotes could be a useful tracer of groundwater for time and space in the three dimensions information.

  7. Description and Evaluation of Numerical Groundwater Flow Models for the Edwards Aquifer, South-Central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindgren, Richard J.; Taylor, Charles J.; Houston, Natalie A.

    2009-01-01

    A substantial number of public water system wells in south-central Texas withdraw groundwater from the karstic, highly productive Edwards aquifer. However, the use of numerical groundwater flow models to aid in the delineation of contributing areas for public water system wells in the Edwards aquifer is problematic because of the complex hydrogeologic framework and the presence of conduit-dominated flow paths in the aquifer. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, evaluated six published numerical groundwater flow models (all deterministic) that have been developed for the Edwards aquifer San Antonio segment or Barton Springs segment, or both. This report describes the models developed and evaluates each with respect to accessibility and ease of use, range of conditions simulated, accuracy of simulations, agreement with dye-tracer tests, and limitations of the models. These models are (1) GWSIM model of the San Antonio segment, a FORTRAN computer-model code that pre-dates the development of MODFLOW; (2) MODFLOW conduit-flow model of San Antonio and Barton Springs segments; (3) MODFLOW diffuse-flow model of San Antonio and Barton Springs segments; (4) MODFLOW Groundwater Availability Modeling [GAM] model of the Barton Springs segment; (5) MODFLOW recalibrated GAM model of the Barton Springs segment; and (6) MODFLOW-DCM (dual conductivity model) conduit model of the Barton Springs segment. The GWSIM model code is not commercially available, is limited in its application to the San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer, and lacks the ability of MODFLOW to easily incorporate newly developed processes and packages to better simulate hydrologic processes. MODFLOW is a widely used and tested code for numerical modeling of groundwater flow, is well documented, and is in the public domain. These attributes make MODFLOW a preferred code with regard to accessibility and ease of use. The MODFLOW conduit-flow model

  8. Chemical Evolution of Groundwater Near a Sinkhole Lake, Northern Florida: 1. Flow Patterns, Age of Groundwater, and Influence of Lake Water Leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Brian G.; Lee, Terrie M.; Plummer, L. Niel; Busenberg, Eurybiades

    1995-06-01

    Leakage from sinkhole lakes significantly influences recharge to the Upper Floridan aquifer in poorly confined sediments in northern Florida. Environmental isotopes (oxygen 18, deuterium, and tritium), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs: CFC-11, CCl3F; CFC-12, CCl2F2; and CFC-113, C2Cl3F3), and solute tracers were used to investigate groundwater flow patterns near Lake Barco, a seepage lake in a mantled karst setting in northern Florida. Stable isotope data indicated that the groundwater downgradient from the lake contained 11-67% lake water leakage, with a limit of detection of lake water in groundwater of 4.3%. The mixing fractions of lake water leakage, which passed through organic-rich sediments in the lake bottom, were directly proportional to the observed methane concentrations and increased with depth in the groundwater flow system. In aerobic groundwater upgradient from Lake Barco, CFC-modeled recharge dates ranged from 1987 near the water table to the mid 1970s for water collected at a depth of 30 m below the water table. CFC-modeled recharge dates (based on CFC-12) for anaerobic groundwater downgradient from the lake ranged from the late 1950s to the mid 1970s and were consistent with tritium data. CFC-modeled recharge dates based on CFC-11 indicated preferential microbial degradation in anoxic waters. Vertical hydraulic conductivities, calculated using CFC-12 modeled recharge dates and Darcy's law, were 0.17, 0.033, and 0.019 m/d for the surficial aquifer, intermediate confining unit, and lake sediments, respectively. These conductivities agreed closely with those used in the calibration of a three-dimensional groundwater flow model for transient and steady state flow conditions.

  9. Ground-water levels, predevelopment ground-water flow, and stream-aquifer relations in the vicinity of the Savannah River Site, Georgia and South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, John S.; West, Christopher T.

    1998-01-01

    Ground-water levels, predevelopment ground-water flow, and stream-aquifer relations in the vicinity of the U.S. Department of Energy Savannah River Site, Georgia and South Carolina, were evaluated as part of a cooperative study between the U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Department of Energy, and Georgia Department of Natural Resources. As part of this evaluation: (1) ground-water-level fluctuations and trends in three aquifer systems in sediment of Cretaceous and Tertiary age were described and related to patterns of ground-water use and precipitations; (2) a conceptual model ofthe stream-aquifer flow system was developed; (3) the predevelopment ground-water flow system, configuration of potentiometric surfaces, trans-river flow, and recharge-discharge relations were described; and (4) stream-aquifer relations and the influence of river incision on ground-water flow and stream-aquifer relations were described. The 5,147-square mile study area is located in the northern part of the Coastal Plain physiographic province of Georgia and South Carolina. Coastal Plain sediments comprise three aquifer systems consisting of seven aquifers that are separated hydraulically by confining units. The aquifer systems are, in descending order: (1) the Floridan aquifer system?consisting of the Upper Three Runs and Gordon aquifers in sediments of Eocene age; (2) the Dublin aquifer system?consisting of the Millers Pond, upper Dublin, and lower Dublin aquifers in sediments of Paleocene-Late Cretaceous age; and (3) the Midville aquifer system?consisting of the upper Midville and lower Midville aquifers in sediments of Late Cretaceous age. The Upper Three Runs aquifer is the shallowest aquifer and is unconfined to semi-confined throughout most of the study area. Ground-water levels in the Upper Three Runs aquifer respond to a local flow system and are affected mostly by topography and climate. Ground-water flow in the deeper, Gordon aquifer and Dublin and Midville aquifer systems is

  10. A comparison of uncertainty analysis methods using a groundwater flow model

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, P.G.; Jacobson, E.A.; Buchanan, J.A.

    1988-06-01

    This report evaluates three uncertainty analysis methods that are proposed for use in performances assessment activities within the OCRWM and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) communities. The three methods are Monte Carlo simulation with unconstrained sampling, Monte Carlo simulation with Latin Hypercube sampling, and first-order analysis. Monte Carlo simulation with unconstrained sampling is a generally accepted uncertainty analysis method, but it has the disadvantage of being costly and time consuming. Latin Hypercube sampling was proposed to make Monte Carlo simulation more efficient. However, although it was originally formulated for independent variables, which is a major drawback in performance assessment modeling, Latin Hypercube can be used to generate correlated samples. The first-order method is efficient to implement because it is based on the first-order Taylor series expansion; however, there is concern that it does not adequately describe the variability for complex models. These three uncertainty analysis methods were evaluated using a calibrated groundwater flow model of a unconfined aquifer in southern Arizona. The two simulation methods produced similar results, although the Latin Hypercube method tends to produce samples whose estimates of statistical parameters are closer to the desired parameters. The mean travel times for the first-order method does not agree with those of the simulations. In additions, the first-order method produces estimates of variance in travel times that are more variable than those produced by the simulation methods, resulting in nonconservative tolerance intervals. 13 refs., 33 figs.

  11. Dye tracing techniques used to determine ground-water flow in a carbonate aquifer system near Elizabethtown, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mull, D.S.; Smoot, J.L.; Liebermann, T.D.

    1988-01-01

    Because of the vulnerability of karst aquifers to contamination and the need for water managers to know recharge areas and groundwater flow characteristics for springs and wells used for public water supply, qualitative and quantitative dye tracing techniques were used during a groundwater investigation in the Elizabethtown area, Hardin County, in north-central Kentucky. The principal aquifer in the Elizabethtown area is thick, nearly horizontal beds of limestone, and thin beds of shale of Mississippi age. As much as 65% of all water pumped for the city water supply is obtained from two springs and two wells that obtain water from these rocks. Sinkholes were classified according to their ability to funnel runoff directly into the groundwater flow system, based primarily on the nature of the swallet draining the sinkhole. The presence of bedrock in the sinkhole nearly always ensured a well defined swallet leading to the subsurface. Qualitative and quantitative dye tracing techniques and equipment are discussed in detail. Qualitative dye tracing with fluorescein dye and passive dye detectors, consisting of activated coconut charcoal identified point to point connection between representative sinkholes, sinking streams, and karst windows and the city springs and wells. Qualitative tracing confirmed the presence of infiltrated surface water from a perennial stream, Valley Creek, in water from city wells and generally confirmed the direction of groundwater flow as shown by a water level contour map. Quantitative dye tracing with rhodamin WT, automatic samplers, discharge measurements, and fluorometric analyses were used to determine flow characteristics such as traveltime for arrival of the leading edge, peak concentration, trailing edge, and persistence of the dye cloud at the spring resurgence. Analyses of the dye recovery curves for quantitative dye traces completed between the same sinkholes and a city spring, and during different flow conditions showed that the

  12. Experimental and numerical modelling of surface water-groundwater flow and pollution interactions under tidal forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanoudaki, Katerina; Bockelmann-Evans, Bettina; Schaefer, Florian; Kampanis, Nikolaos; Nanou-Giannarou, Aikaterini; Stamou, Anastasios; Falconer, Roger

    2015-04-01

    Surface water and groundwater are integral components of the hydrologic continuum and the interaction between them affects both their quantity and quality. However, surface water and groundwater are often considered as two separate systems and are analysed independently. This separation is partly due to the different time scales, which apply in surface water and groundwater flows and partly due to the difficulties in measuring and modelling their interactions (Winter et al., 1998). Coastal areas in particular are a difficult hydrologic environment to represent with a mathematical model due to the large number of contributing hydrologic processes. Accurate prediction of interactions between coastal waters, groundwater and neighbouring wetlands, for example, requires the use of integrated surface water-groundwater models. In the past few decades a large number of mathematical models and field methods have been developed in order to quantify the interaction between groundwater and hydraulically connected surface water bodies. Field studies may provide the best data (Hughes, 1995) but are usually expensive and involve too many parameters. In addition, the interpretation of field measurements and linking with modelling tools often proves to be difficult. In contrast, experimental studies are less expensive and provide controlled data. However, experimental studies of surface water-groundwater interaction are less frequently encountered in the literature than filed studies (e.g. Ebrahimi et al., 2007; Kuan et al., 2012; Sparks et al., 2013). To this end, an experimental model has been constructed at the Hyder Hydraulics Laboratory at Cardiff University to enable measurements to be made of groundwater transport through a sand embankment between a tidal water body such as an estuary and a non-tidal water body such as a wetland. The transport behaviour of a conservative tracer was studied for a constant water level on the wetland side of the embankment, while running a

  13. POTENTIAL EFFECTS OF FAULTS ON GROUNDWATER FLOW FOR THE YUCCA FLAT BASIN, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, R. P.; Fryer, W.

    2009-12-01

    The permeability changes resulting from finely comminuted material in fault cores and the fractured and brecciated rock in fault damage zones allows faults to channelize groundwater flow along the plane of the fault. The efficiency of faults as permeability structures depends on fault zone width, fault offset, depth at which the fault developed, type of faulted rock, extent of secondary mineralization, and fault orientation within current stress field. Studies of faulted volcanic rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, indicate that fault zone width and brecciation increase with fault offset, that faulted welded tuff is more permeable than nonwelded or bedded tuff, and that non-hydrothermal secondary mineralization commonly diminishes fracture permeability. These results are applied to the groundwater conceptual flow model for Yucca Flat (YF) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Yucca Flat contains Tertiary volcanic rocks similar to thoise at Yucca Mountain deposited on Paleozoic carbonate rocks whose thickness is increased by local thrust-faults. The YF basin contains north-striking normal faults and is bordered by southwest-striking strike-slip faults to the south and east. Fault permeability values derived from faulted volcanic rocks at Yucca Mountain suggests that major normal faults in Yucca Flat potentially manifest permeability values along the fault plane equal to the highest values determined for volcanic aquifers. Numerous minor faults not assigned specific permeability values are assumed to imbue the basin with a hydraulic anisotropy favoring fault-parallel flow. In this scenario groundwater flows generally from north to south in the Yucca Flat basin, even as the head gradient is primarily towards the centrally located Yucca Fault, which acts as the main subsurface drainage feature within the basin. Studies show that the regional stress field has rotated clockwise such that southwest-striking strike-slip faults are currently under tension. In this scenario these

  14. Phytoremediation of explosives contaminated groundwater in constructed wetlands: 2. Flow through study. Draft report

    SciTech Connect

    DBehrends, L.L.; Sikora, F.J.; Phillips, W.D.; Baily, E.; McDonald, C.

    1996-02-01

    This study evaluates the utility of constructed wetlands for remediating explosives contaminated groundwaters using bench scale flow-through type reactors. Specifially the study examines: the degradation of TNT, TNB, RDX, and HMX in contaminated waters in plant lagoons and gravel-based wetlands. The study also provides design recommendations for the wetland demonstration project to be located at the Milan Army Ammunition Plant (MAAP), in Tennessee.

  15. Overland flow caused by groundwater springs in the Catskill Mountains, New York, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpold, A. A.; Steenhuis, T.

    2007-12-01

    Groundwater springs have been shown to be important for baseflow maintenance, ecological diversity, and biogeochemical transport in the Catskill Mountains of New York State. A study was undertaken to evaluate the importance of groundwater springs to stream flow response, spatial distribution of saturated areas, and chemical transport on a 2 km2 watershed. Discharge and water chemistry were monitored at five upland springs and the watershed outlet during three storm events and weekly for one year. The spatiotemporal connectivity of groundwater springs to the stream was evaluated using the isotopes, conservative geochemical tracers, groundwater heights, temperature probes, and soil moisture measurements. The data indicates that spring discharge is capable of maintaining isolated areas of saturation and overland flow that provide hydrologic connections between upland hillslopes and the stream. Thus, upslope springs can be important sources of solutes and nutrients, especially during baseflow periods. The response of the individual springs was correlated to the upslope contributing area during large rain events. However, terrain indices were not capable of predicting relative spring discharge during moderate to dry conditions. The results suggest that two geomorphologic wetness states exist for this Catskill watershed: 1. during wet antecedent conditions surface topography is a first- order control on water table heights and overland flow, 2. during dry to average antecedent wetness conditions geomorphologic heterogeneities (e.g. bedrock fractures and confining layers) control locations and extent of saturated areas and overland flow. The two-state wetness system hypothesis has important ramifications for developing watershed-scale parameters (i.e. drainage density) and spatial modeling in heterogeneous landscapes.

  16. Estimating groundwater recharge through unsaturated flow modelling: Sensitivity to boundary conditions and vertical discretization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera-Hernández, J. J.; Smerdon, B. D.; Mendoza, C. A.

    2012-07-01

    SummaryUnsaturated flow modelling is increasingly being used to estimate potential groundwater recharge. A review of previous studies found that unit-gradient and fixed water table lower boundary conditions have been applied to models of both constant and variable vertical grid spacing (discretization). In order to provide a general guidance, this work studies the effect of both discretization and boundary conditions on simulation times and estimated fluxes at the water table, using one-dimensional models of 2, 4, 6, and 12 m comprised of sand, sandy loam, loamy sand, and loam. The study uses climatological data from the Boreal Plain of northern Alberta, Canada. Because of the long-term average water deficit and the thick unconsolidated glacial deposits, unsaturated flow is expected to be vertical, both downward and upward, and inter-annual changes in water storage will be important. Long-term simulations (1919-2007) that comprised both wet and dry cycles, reveal that when a variable vertical discretization at both the top and bottom of the columns (varying from 0.1 to 10 cm) is utilized, a balance between simulation accuracy and running time can be achieved. It is also found that whenever the unsaturated flow modelling approach is used to estimate potential groundwater recharge, a fixed-head lower boundary condition should be selected because it also allows upward flux from the water table during dry periods, a situation that prevails on both sub-humid and semi-arid areas, where accurate groundwater recharge estimates are needed the most. However, it should be kept in mind that the use of a fixed water table is a simple representation of the regional water table, which in reality interacts with the regional groundwater flow and surface water bodies (e.g., lakes and wetlands).

  17. A comparison of several methods of solving nonlinear regression groundwater flow problems.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooley, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Computational efficiency and computer memory requirements for four methods of minimizing functions were compared for four test nonlinear-regression steady state groundwater flow problems. The fastest methods were the Marquardt and quasi-linearization methods, which required almost identical computer times and numbers of iterations; the next fastest was the quasi-Newton method, and last was the Fletcher-Reeves method, which did not converge in 100 iterations for two of the problems.-from Author

  18. Incorporation of prior information on parameters into nonlinear regression groundwater flow models. l. Theory.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooley, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Prior information on the parameters of a groundwater flow model can be used to improve parameter estimates obtained from nonlinear regression solution of a modeling problem. Two scales of prior information can be available: 1) prior information having known reliability (that is, bias and random error structure), and 2) prior information consisting of best available estimates of unknown reliability. It is shown that if both scales of prior information are available, then a combined regression analysis may be made. -from Author

  19. Analytical solutions for groundwater flow with arbitrary dimensionality and a finite well radius in fractured rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehbinder, G.

    2010-03-01

    The generalized radial flow model describes mathematically nonsteady flow of arbitrary dimensionality from a source in a porous medium. Closed solutions of the corresponding equation have hitherto been considered as impractical except for one simple special case. Two closed solutions of the generalized radial flow equation, corresponding to given head in or given discharge from the source have been derived. The noninteger dimensionality is the only parameter in the problem. The solutions become not valid if the time tends to infinity, such as for 1-D and 2-D flows. The influence of a possible noninteger dimensionality has attracted interest in connection with the flow of groundwater in fractured rock, particularly around a repository for nuclear waste or in connection with grouting. In contrast to numerical solutions, the closed solutions offer simple means for evaluation of field tests.

  20. Parameter identification in stationary groundwater flow problems in drainage basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malengier, B.

    2004-07-01

    We discuss the recovery of some parameters in an elliptic boundary value problem, which models a specific stationary flow problem in drainage basins, by using the measured values of the hydraulic head in discrete points through the physical domain. The underlying direct problem is the one considered by Toth (J. Geophys. Res. 67 (1962) 4375; 67 (1963) 4795), among others. The inverse problem is solved by means of the Levenberg-Marquardt method (in: G.A. Watson (Ed.), Numerical Analysis, Lecture Notes in Mathematics, Vol. 630, Springer, Berlin, New York, 1977, pp. 105-116). We also show how the infinite element method allows the identification of the far field value of the hydraulic head.

  1. Connecting Surface Planting with Subsurface Erosion Due to Groundwater Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reardon, M.; Curran, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Bank erosion and failure is a major contributor of fine sediment to streams and rivers, and can be driven by subsurface flow. In restoration projects, vegetation is often planted on banks to reduce erosion and stabilize the banks. However, the relationship between subsurface flow, erosion and vegetation remains somewhat speculative. A comparative study quantified the effect of surface planting on subsurface erosion and soil strength. Six 32-gallon containers were layered with a sandy loam overlying a highly conductive sand layer and a confining clay. Three treatments were applied in pairs: switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), sod (turf-type tall fescue and Kentucky bluegrass mix), and no vegetation. After a vegetation establishment period, the 2, 10, and 100 year rainfalls were simulated. Samples collected from ports in the containers were analyzed for subsurface drainage volume and suspended sediment concentration. After all rainfall simulations, a sediment core was taken from each container to measure shear strength and root density. Results indicate the relative benefits of vegetative planting to reduce subsurface erosion during storms and enhance soil strength. Switchgrass reduced the total amount of sediment removed from containers during all three storms when compared to the sod and during the 10 and 100 year storms when compared to the bare ground. Results from the volume analysis were more variable. Switchgrass retained the greatest volume of water from the 100 year storm event, but also released the largest fraction of water in the 2 and 10 year storms. Both sod and switchgrass planting considerably increased the time required for the soil samples to fail despite reducing the shear stress at failure. Where switchgrass grew long, woody roots, the sod developed a dense mat of interconnected thin roots. We suspect the different root patterns between sod and switchgrass to be a dominant factor in the response of the different containers.

  2. Simulating the influence of two shallow, flow-through lakes on a groundwater system: implications for groundwater mounds and hinge lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosselin, David C.; Khisty, Mohan J.

    2001-10-01

    Groundwater mounds and hinge lines are important features related to the interaction of groundwater and lakes. In contrast to the transient formation of groundwater mounds, numerical simulations indicate that permanent groundwater mounds form between closely spaced lakes as the natural consequence of adding two net sinks to a groundwater flow system. The location of the groundwater mound and the position of the hinge lines between the two lakes are intimately related. As the position of the mound changes there is a corresponding shift in the position of the hinge line. This results in a change in the ratio of groundwater inflow to outflow (Qi/Qo) for the lake. The response of the lake is an increase or decrease in the lake level. Our simulations indicate that the movement of the hinge line in a natural system is a consequence of the dynamic interrelationships between recharge, the slope of the water table upgradient and downgradient of the lake, and the loss of water from the lake by evaporation. The extent of the seasonal movement of the hinge line will vary from one year to the next depending on local changes in the magnitude of the hydrologic variables.

  3. Effect of land fill on the groundwater flow and nutrient supply in the coastal area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onodera, S.; Saito, M.; Kato, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Yoshikawa, S.

    2009-12-01

    To clarify the land fill effect of tidal flat and offshore on groundwater flow and seawater nutrient, we conducted the tracer measurements of sea and terrestrial water and observations of piezometers at a coast are with a small city of Seto Inland Sea watershed. The research area is located on the Marugame city and suburban area around that in Sikoku island of southwest Japan. This city has 100,000 of population and land fill area distributes around coastal area. The present coastal line shifted to offshore 2km for last 50 years. The rainfall is around 1000mm. Water samples contained sea water at 500m intervals around a coastal line of 10km, river and blackish water at the some points in two rivers at the city and suburban area, pore water of the river bed, and groundwater at some boreholes and wells. We analyzed the samples for 222Rn, nutrient, and inorganic elements. The samplings were conducted in summer of 2008 and 2009 and observations were from 2007 to 2009, respectively. The 222Rn concentration of seawater was higher around suburban area, on the other hand that was lower than around city area. In addition, piezometric head in the piezometer were higher than tidal river water level at the inland area of around 2km from the present river mouth, but those were same as the river water level at around the river mouth area in the city area. These results suggested that groundwater discharge stopped to the ocean, whereas groundwater discharged to the tidal river around the past coastal line. Consequently, we confirmed that nutrient of groundwater does not reached directly to the ocean around city area. We should consider more about the nutrient transport process in the tidal river. Keywords: land fill, seawater, tidal flat, groundwater, nutrient

  4. Numerical simulation of groundwater flow in Dar es Salaam Coastal Plain (Tanzania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luciani, Giulia; Sappa, Giuseppe; Cella, Antonella

    2016-04-01

    They are presented the results of a groundwater modeling study on the Coastal Aquifer of Dar es Salaam (Tanzania). Dar es Salaam is one of the fastest-growing coastal cities in Sub-Saharan Africa, with with more than 4 million of inhabitants and a population growth rate of about 8 per cent per year. The city faces periodic water shortages, due to the lack of an adequate water supply network. These two factors have determined, in the last ten years, an increasing demand of groundwater exploitation, carried on by quite a number of private wells, which have been drilled to satisfy human demand. A steady-state three dimensional groundwater model has been set up by the MODFLOW code, and calibrated with the UCODE code for inverse modeling. The aim of the model was to carry out a characterization of groundwater flow system in the Dar es Salaam Coastal Plain. The inputs applied to the model included net recharge rate, calculated from time series of precipitation data (1961-2012), estimations of average groundwater extraction, and estimations of groundwater recharge, coming from zones, outside the area under study. Parametrization of the hydraulic conductivities was realized referring to the main geological features of the study area, based on available literature data and information. Boundary conditions were assigned based on hydrogeological boundaries. The conceptual model was defined in subsequent steps, which added some hydrogeological features and excluded other ones. Calibration was performed with UCODE 2014, using 76 measures of hydraulic head, taken in 2012 referred to the same season. Data were weighted on the basis of the expected errors. Sensitivity analysis of data was performed during calibration, and permitted to identify which parameters were possible to be estimated, and which data could support parameters estimation. Calibration was evaluated based on statistical index, maps of error distribution and test of independence of residuals. Further model

  5. Hydrogeology and simulation of ground-water flow at the South Well Field, Columbus, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, W.L.; Bair, E.S.; Yost, W.P.

    1996-01-01

    use of the U.S. Geological Survey three-dimensional finite-difference ground-water-flow code. Recharge, boundary flux, and river leakage are the principal sources of water to the flow system. The study area is bounded on the north and south by streamlines, with flow entering the area from the east and west. Areal recharge is contributed throughout the study area, although a comparatively high percentage of precipitation reaches the water table in the area east of the Scioto River where little surface drain age exists. Ground-water flow is downward in the uplands of the Scioto River, and upward near the river in the glacial drift and carbonate bedrock aquifers. The numerical model contains 53 rows, 45 columns, and 3 layers. The uppermost two layers represent the glacial drift. The bottom layer represents the carbonate bedrock. The horizontal model grid is variably spaced to account for differences in available data and to simulate heads accurately in specific areas of interest. The length and width of grid cells range from 200 to 2,000 feet; the finer spacings are designed to increase detail in the areas near the collector wells. The model uses 7,155 active nodes. Measurements of water levels from October 1979 were used to represent steady-state conditions before municipal pumping at the well field began. Measurements made during March 1986 were used to represent steady-state conditions after commencement of pumping at the well field. Water levels measured during March 1986 - June 1991 were used for calibration targets in the transient simulations. The transient model was discretized into eight stress periods of 93 to 487 days on the basis of recharge, well-field pumpage, and available water-level data. Transient model calibration was based on seven sets of hydraulic-head measure ments made during March 1986 - June 1991. This time period includes large-scale increases in well- field production associated with a drought in the summer of 1988, an

  6. Simultaneous parameter estimation and contaminant source characterization for coupled groundwater flow and contaminant transport modelling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, B.J.

    1992-01-01

    Parameter estimation and contaminant source characterization are key steps in the development of a coupled groundwater flow and contaminant transport simulation model. Here a methodologyfor simultaneous model parameter estimation and source characterization is presented. The parameter estimation/source characterization inverse model combines groundwater flow and contaminant transport simulation with non-linear maximum likelihood estimation to determine optimal estimates of the unknown model parameters and source characteristics based on measurements of hydraulic head and contaminant concentration. First-order uncertainty analysis provides a means for assessing the reliability of the maximum likelihood estimates and evaluating the accuracy and reliability of the flow and transport model predictions. A series of hypothetical examples is presented to demonstrate the ability of the inverse model to solve the combined parameter estimation/source characterization inverse problem. Hydraulic conductivities, effective porosity, longitudinal and transverse dispersivities, boundary flux, and contaminant flux at the source are estimated for a two-dimensional groundwater system. In addition, characterization of the history of contaminant disposal or location of the contaminant source is demonstrated. Finally, the problem of estimating the statistical parameters that describe the errors associated with the head and concentration data is addressed. A stage-wise estimation procedure is used to jointly estimate these statistical parameters along with the unknown model parameters and source characteristics. ?? 1992.

  7. Reduced order modeling of the Newton formulation of MODFLOW to solve unconfined groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, Scott E.; Nishikawa, Tracy; Yeh, William W.-G.

    2015-09-01

    Projection-based model reduction techniques have been shown to be very effective for reducing the computational burden of high-dimensional groundwater simulations, but only applied to confined groundwater flow. A new methodology is proposed that reduces the dimension of a discretized, transient, unconfined groundwater-flow model. This unconfined model reduction technique is based on Galerkin projection and the Newton formulation of MODFLOW. The method is implemented following the standard package design and code structure that MODFLOW employs for all its features. When the package is invoked within MODFLOW it can collect snapshots, produce a basis, construct the reduced model and propagate the reduced model forward in time. The new formulation accurately represents the water-table surface under a variety of nonlinear settings, such as intraborehole flow from a Multi-Node Well. The unconfined model reduction is applied to four test cases to illustrate its flexibility in handling nonlinear features. Several test cases are discussed to demonstrate the unconfined model reduction applicability. The final test case applies the new model reduction methodology to a scoping MODFLOW model of Santa Barbara, CA composed of 113,578 cells, which requires solving 113,578 equations per time step, and reduces it to 127 equations.

  8. Inferring shallow groundwater flow in saprolite and fractured rock using environmental tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cook, P.G.; Solomon, D.K.; Sanford, W.E.; Busenberg, E.; Plummer, L.N.; Poreda, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    The Ridge and Valley Province of eastern Tennessee is characterized by (1) substantial topographic relief, (2) folded and highly fractured rocks of various lithologies that have low primary permeability and porosity, and (3) a shallow residuum of medium permeability and high total porosity. Conceptual models of shallow groundwater flow and solute transport in this system have been developed but are difficult to evaluate using physical characterization or short-term tracer methods due to extreme spatial variability in hydraulic properties. In this paper we describe how chlorofluorocarbon 12, 3H, and 3He were used to infer groundwater flow and solute transport in saprolite and fractured rock near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the shallow residuum, fracture spacings are <0.05 m, suggesting that concentrations of these tracers in fractures and in the matrix have time to diffusionally equilibrate. The relatively smooth nature of tracer concentrations with depth in the residuum is consistent with this model and quantitatively suggests recharge fluxes of 0.2 to 0.4 m yr-. In contrast, groundwater flow within the unweathered rock appears to be controlled by fractures with spacings of the order of 2 to 5 m, and diffusional equilibration of fractures and matrix has not occurred. For this reason, vertical fluid fluxes in the unweathered rock cannot be estimated from the tracer data.

  9. Evaluation of ground-water flow by particle tracking, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, W.L.; Sheets, R.A.; Schalk, C.W.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) began a Basewide Monitoring Program (BMP) in 1992. The purpose of the BMP was to establish a long-term ground-water and surface- water sampling network in order to (1) characterize current ground-water and surface-water quality; (2) describe water-quality changes as water enters, flows across, and exits Base boundaries; (3) conduct statistical analyses of water quality; and (4) estimate the effect of WPAFB on regional water quality. As part of the BMP, the USGS conducted ground-water particle-tracking analyses based on a ground-water-flow model produced during a previous USGS study. This report briefly describes the previous USGS study, the inherent assumptions of particle-tracking analyses, and information on the regional ground-water-flow field as inferred from particle pathlines. Pathlines for particles placed at the Base boundary and particles placed within identified Installation Restoration Program sites are described.

  10. NONLINEAR-REGRESSION GROUNDWATER FLOW MODELING OF A DEEP REGIONAL AQUIFER SYSTEM.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooley, Richard L.; Konikow, Leonard F.; Naff, Richard L.

    1986-01-01

    A nonlinear regression groundwater flow model, based on a Galerkin finite-element discretization, was used to analyze steady state two-dimensional groundwater flow in the areally extensive Madison aquifer in a 75,000 mi**2 area of the Northern Great Plains. Regression parameters estimated include intrinsic permeabilities of the main aquifer and separate lineament zones, discharges from eight major springs surrounding the Black Hills, and specified heads on the model boundaries. Aquifer thickness and temperature variations were included as specified functions. The regression model was applied using sequential F testing so that the fewest number and simplest zonation of intrinsic permeabilities, combined with the simplest overall model, were evaluated initially; additional complexities (such as subdivisions of zones and variations in temperature and thickness) were added in stages to evaluate the subsequent degree of improvement in the model results. It was found that only the eight major springs, a single main aquifer intrinsic permeability, two separate lineament intrinsic permeabilities of much smaller values, and temperature variations are warranted by the observed data (hydraulic heads and prior information on some parameters) for inclusion in a model that attempts to explain significant controls on groundwater flow.

  11. Characterization of Flow Paths, Residence Time and Media Chemistry in Complex Landscapes to Integrate Surface, Groundwater and Stream Processes and Inform Models of Hydrologic and Water Quality Response to Land Use Activities; Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Bitew, Menberu; Jackson, Rhett

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this report is to document the methodology used to calculate the three hydro-geomorphic indices: C Index, Nhot spot, and Interflow Contributing Area (IFC Area). These indices were applied in the Upper Four Mile Creek Watershed in order to better understand the potential mechanisms controlling retention time, path lengths, and potential for nutrient and solute metabolism and exchange associated with the geomorphic configurations of the upland contributing areas, groundwater, the riparian zone, and stream channels.

  12. Partitioning groundwater recharge between rainfall infiltration and irrigation return flows using stable isotopes: the Crau aquifer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seraphin, Pierre; Vallet-Coulomb, Christine; Gonçalvès, Julio

    2016-04-01

    Traditional flood irrigation is used since the 16th century in the Crau plain (Southern France) for hay production. To supply this high consuming irrigation practice, water is diverted from the Durance River, originating from the Alps, and the large amount of irrigation return flows constitutes the main recharge of the Crau aquifer, which is in turn largely exploited for domestic, industrial and agricultural water use. A possible reduction of irrigation fluxes due to a need of water saving or to a future land-use change could endanger the groundwater resource. A robust quantification of the groundwater mass balance is thus required to assess a sustainable water management in the region. The high isotopic contrast between these exogenous irrigation waters and local precipitations allows the use of stable isotopes of water as conservative tracers to deduce their contributions to the surface recharge. An extensive groundwater sampling was performed to obtain δ18O and δ2H over the whole aquifer. Based on a new piezometric contour map, combined with a reestimate of the aquifer geometry, the isotopic data are implemented in a geostatistical approach to produce a conceptual equivalent-homogeneous reservoir, in order to apply a simple water and isotope mass balance mixing model. The isotopic composition of the two end-members is assessed, and the quantification of groundwater flows is then used to calculate the two recharge fluxes. Near to steady-state condition, the set of isotopic data treated by geostatistics leads to a recharge by irrigation of 5.20 ± 0.93 m3 s-1 i.e. 1173 ± 210 mm yr-1, and a natural recharge of 2.26 ± 0.91 m3 s-1 i.e. 132 ± 53 mm yr-1. Thus, 70 ± 9% of the effective surface recharge comes from the irrigation return flow, consistent with the literature (between 67% and 78%). This study constitutes a straightforward and independent approach to assess groundwater surface recharges with uncertainties and will help to constrain a future transient

  13. Regional groundwater flow model for C, K. L. and P reactor areas, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, G.P.

    2000-02-11

    A regional groundwater flow model encompassing approximately 100 mi2 surrounding the C, K, L, and P reactor areas has been developed. The reactor flow model is designed to meet the planning objectives outlined in the General Groundwater Strategy for Reactor Area Projects by providing a common framework for analyzing groundwater flow, contaminant migration and remedial alternatives within the Reactor Projects team of the Environmental Restoration Department. The model provides a quantitative understanding of groundwater flow on a regional scale within the near surface aquifers and deeper semi-confined to confined aquifers. The model incorporates historical and current field characterization data up through Spring 1999. Model preprocessing is automated so that future updates and modifications can be performed quickly and efficiently. The CKLP regional reactor model can be used to guide characterization, perform scoping analyses of contaminant transport, and serve as a common base for subsequent finer-scale transport and remedial/feasibility models for each reactor area.

  14. Dissolved inert gases (He, Ne, N2) as marker of groundwater flow-lines and degassing sources in Etnean area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paonita, A.; Longo, M.; Bellomo, S.; Brusca, L.; D'Alessandro, W.

    2015-12-01

    Several studies in the past three decades have demonstrated the role played by monitoring chemical and isotopic composition of dissolved gases in groundwaters hosted in volcanic area, which represents by now a powerful tool to evaluate the state of activity of volcanoes and its evolution. The first step to make it possible, is a comprehensive understanding of fluids circulation inside the volcano edifice, starting from groundwaters characterization up to the identification of the underground pathways and their relationships with tectonic structures, that enhance interactions between waters and magmatic gases. In this work, we focussed on chemical composition of inert dissolved gases (He, Ne, N2) and He isotope abundances coming from groundwaters circulating in Mt Etna, as having great contrast between magmatic and shallow sources and no chemical interaction with rocks. We identified waters which intersect anomalous degassing areas, such as well evident or buried tectonic structures. These waters show both nearly magmatic He isotopic composition and high ratios of dissolved magmatic gases (He, CO2) versus the atmospherics ones (N2). Along the hydrologic flow-lines and faraway from the degassing structures, we found waters with lower He isotopic ratios and consequently richer of atmospheric-derived gases (Ne, N2). On this basis, we set-up a model of unidimensional dispersion-advection, coupled to a two-layer dynamic exchange of volatiles between the aquifer surface and atmosphere. The model is able to quantitatively explain the progressive "dilution" of the magmatic signal through several kilometres-long distances, from the source point of the anomaly towards the final stage of flow-lines at the coast. Typical hydro geological parameters, such as rock permeability, could be constrained by this approach. Moreover, anomalous compositions found along water flow-lines could represent possible new sources of degassing, allowing to detect hidden degassing structures.

  15. wrv: An R Package for Groundwater Flow Model Construction, Wood River Valley Aquifer System, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater models are one of the main tools used in the hydrogeological sciences to assess resources and to simulate possible effects from future water demands and changes in climate. The hydrological inputs to groundwater models can be numerous and can vary in both time and space. Difficulties associated with model construction are often related to extensive datasets and cumbersome data processing tasks. To mitigate these difficulties, a graphical user interface (GUI) is often employed to aid the input of data for creating models. Unfortunately, GUI software presents an obstacle to reproducibility, a cornerstone of research. The considerable effort required to document processing steps in a GUI program, and the rapid obsoleteness of these steps with subsequent versions of the software, has prompted modelers to explicitly write down processing steps as source code to make them 'easily' reproducible. This research describes the R package wrv, a collection of datasets and functions for pre- and post-processing the numerical groundwater flow model of the Wood River Valley aquifer system, south-central Idaho. R largely facilitates reproducible modeling with the package vignette; a document that is a combination of content and source code. The code is run when the vignette is built, and all data analysis output (such as figures and tables) is created on the fly and inserted into the final document. The wrv package includes two vignettes that explain and run steps that (1) create package datasets from raw data files located on a publicly accessible repository, and (2) create and run the groundwater flow model. MODFLOW-USG, the numerical groundwater model used in this study, is executed from the vignette, and model output is returned for exploratory analyses. The ability of R to perform all processing steps in a single workflow is attributed to its comprehensive list of features; that include geographic information system and time series functionality.

  16. Water-balance and groundwater-flow estimation for an arid environment: San Diego region, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flint, L. E.; Flint, A. L.; Stolp, B. J.; Danskin, W. R.

    2012-03-01

    The coastal-plain aquifer that underlies the San Diego City metropolitan area in southern California is a groundwater resource. The understanding of the region-wide water balance and the recharge of water from the high elevation mountains to the east needs to be improved to quantify the subsurface inflows to the coastal plain in order to develop the groundwater as a long term resource. This study is intended to enhance the conceptual understanding of the water balance and related recharge processes in this arid environment by developing a regional model of the San Diego region and all watersheds adjacent or draining to the coastal plain, including the Tijuana River basin. This model was used to quantify the various components of the water balance, including semi-quantitative estimates of subsurface groundwater flow to the coastal plain. Other approaches relying on independent data were used to test or constrain the scoping estimates of recharge and runoff, including a reconnaissance-level groundwater model of the San Diego River basin, one of three main rivers draining to the coastal plain. Estimates of subsurface flow delivered to the coastal plain from the river basins ranged from 12.3 to 28.8 million m3 yr-1 from the San Diego River basin for the calibration period (1982-2009) to 48.8 million m3 yr-1 from all major river basins for the entire coastal plain for the long-term period 1940-2009. This range of scoping estimates represents the impact of climatic variability and realistically bounds the likely groundwater availability, while falling well within the variable estimates of regional recharge. However, the scarcity of physical and hydrologic data in this region hinders the exercise to narrow the range and reduce the uncertainty.

  17. Simulation of the effects of ground-water withdrawals and recharge on ground-water flow in Cape Cod, Martha's Vineyard, and Nantucket Island basins, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masterson, John P.; Barlow, Paul M.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of changing patterns of ground-water pumping and aquifer recharge on the surface-water and ground-water hydrologic systems were determined for the Cape Cod, Martha's Vineyard, and Nantucket Island Basins. Three-dimensional, transient, ground-water-flow modelS that simulate both freshwater and saltwater flow were developed for the f1ow cells of Cape Cod which currently have large-capacity public-supply wells. Only the freshwater-flow system was simulated for the Cape Cod flow cells where public-water supply demands are satisfied by small-capacity domestic wells. Two- dimensional, finite-difference, change models were developed for Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket Island to determine the projected drawdowns in response to projected in-season pumping rates for 180 days of no aquifer recharge. Results of the simulations indicate very little change in the position of the freshwater-saltwater interface from predevelopment flow conditions to projected ground-water pumping and recharge rates for Cape Cod in the year 2020. Results of change model simulations for Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket Island indicate that the greatest impact in response to projected in-season ground-water pumping occurs at the pumping centers and the magnitude of the drawdowns are minimal with respect to the total thickness of the aquifers.

  18. Multigrid preconditioned conjugate gradients for the numerical simulation of groundwater flow on the Cray T3D

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, S.F.; Falgout, R.D.; Smith, S.G.; Fogwell, T.W.

    1994-09-01

    This paper discusses the numerical simulation of groundwater flow through heterogeneous porous media. The focus is on the performance of a parallel multigrid preconditioner for accelerating convergence of conjugate gradients, which is used to compute the hydraulic pressure head. The numerical investigation considers the effects of enlarging the domain, increasing the grid resolution, and varying the geostatistical parameters used to define the subsurface realization. The results were obtained using the PARFLOW groundwater flow simulator on the Cray T3D massively parallel computer.

  19. A moving mesh algorithm for 3-D regional groundwater flow with water table and seepage face

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knupp, P.

    A numerical algorithm is described for solving the free-surface groundwater flow equations in 3-D large-scale unconfined aquifers with strongly heterogeneous conductivity and surface recharge. The algorithm uses a moving mesh to track the water-table as it evolves according to kinematic and seepage face boundary conditions. Both steady-state and transient algorithms are implemented in the SECO-Flow 3-D code and demonstrated on stratigraphy based on the Delaware Basin of south-eastern New Mexico.

  20. A Field Exercise on Groundwater Flow Using Seepage Meters and Mini-Piezometers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, David R.; Cherry, John A.

    1979-01-01

    Basic principles of physical hydrogeology and the nature of hydrologic interactions between groundwater and surface water can be demonstrated using two devices, the miniature piezometer and the seepage meter which can be cheaply constructed by the teacher and students. Use of the devices and learning activities are presented. (RE)

  1. Budgets and chemical characterization of groundwater for the Diamond Valley flow system, central Nevada, 2011–12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger, David L.; Mayers, C. Justin; Garcia, C. Amanda; Buto, Susan G.; Huntington, Jena M.

    2016-01-01

    The pre-development, steady state, groundwater budget for the Diamond Valley flow system was estimated at about 70,000 acre-ft/yr of inflow and outflow. During years 2011–12, inflow components of groundwater recharge from precipitation and subsurface inflow from adjacent basins totaled 70,000 acre-ft/yr for the DVFS, whereas outflow components included 64,000 acre-ft/yr of groundwater evapotranspiration and 69,000 acre-ft/yr of net groundwater withdrawals, or net pumpage. Spring discharge in northern Diamond Valley declined about 6,000 acre-ft/yr between pre-development time and years 2011–12. Assuming net groundwater withdrawals minus spring flow decline is equivalent to the storage change, the 2011–12 summation of inflow and storage change was balanced with outflow at about 133,000 acre-ft/yr.

  2. Assessing controls on diffuse groundwater recharge using unsaturated flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keese, K. E.; Scanlon, B. R.; Reedy, R. C.

    2005-06-01

    Understanding climate, vegetation, and soil controls on recharge is essential for estimating potential impacts of climate variability and land use/land cover change on recharge. Recharge controls were evaluated by simulating drainage in 5-m-thick profiles using a one-dimensional (1-D) unsaturated flow code (UNSAT-H), climate data, and vegetation and soil coverages from online sources. Soil hydraulic properties were estimated from STATSGO/SSURGO soils data using pedotransfer functions. Vegetation parameters were obtained from the literature. Long-term (1961-1990) simulations were conducted for 13 county-scale regions representing arid to humid climates and different vegetation and soil types, using data for Texas. Areally averaged recharge rates are most appropriate for water resources; therefore Geographic Information Systems were used to determine spatial weighting of recharge results from 1-D models for the combination of vegetation and soils in each region. Simulated 30-year mean annual recharge in bare sand is high (51-709 mm/yr) and represents 23-60% (arid-humid) of mean annual precipitation (MAP). Adding vegetation reduced recharge by factors of 2-30 (humid-arid), and soil textural variability reduced recharge by factors of 2-11 relative to recharge in bare sand. Vegetation and soil textural variability both resulted in a large range of recharge rates within each region; however, spatially weighted, long-term recharge rates were much less variable and were positively correlated with MAP (r2 = 0.85 for vegetated sand; r2 = 0.62 for variably textured soils). The most realistic simulations included vegetation and variably textured soils, which resulted in recharge rates from 0.2 to 118 mm/yr (0.1-10% of MAP). Mean annual precipitation explains 80% of the variation in recharge and can be used to map recharge.

  3. Model Reduction of a Transient Groundwater-Flow Model for Bayesian Inverse Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, S. E.; Yeh, W. W.

    2011-12-01

    A Bayesian inverse problem requires many repeated model simulations to characterize an unknown parameter's posterior probability distribution. It is computationally infeasible to solve a Bayesian inverse problem of a discretized groundwater flow model with a high dimension parameter and state space. Model reduction has been shown to reduce the dimension of a groundwater model by several orders of magnitude and is well suited for Bayesian inverse problems. A projection-based model reduction approach is proposed to reduce the parameter and state dimensions of a groundwater model. Previous work has done this by using a greedy algorithm for the selection of parameter vectors that make up a basis and their corresponding steady-state solutions for a state basis. The proposed method extends this idea to include transient models by assembling sequentially though the greedy algorithm the parameter and state projection bases. The method begins with the parameter basis being a single vector that is equal to one or an accepted series of values. A set of state vectors that are solutions to the groundwater model using this parameter vector at appropriate times is called the parameter snapshot set. The appropriate times for the parameter snapshot set are determined by maximizing the set's minimum singular value. This optimization is a similar to those used in experimental design for maximizing information. The two bases are made orthonormal by a QR decomposition and applied to the full groundwater model to form a reduced model. The parameter basis is increased with a new parameter vector that maximizes the error between the full model and the reduced model at a set of observation times. The new parameter vector represents where the reduced model is least accurate in representing the original full model. The corresponding parameter snapshot set's appropriate times are found using a greedy algorithm. This sequentially chooses times that have maximum error between the full and

  4. Revised Multi-Node Well (MNW2) Package for MODFLOW Ground-Water Flow Model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, Leonard F.; Hornberger, George Z.; Halford, Keith J.; Hanson, Randall T.; Harbaugh, Arlen W.

    2009-01-01

    Wells that are open to multiple aquifers can provide preferential pathways to flow and solute transport that short-circuit normal fluid flowlines. Representing these features in a regional flow model can produce a more realistic and reliable simulation model. This report describes modifications to the Multi-Node Well (MNW) Package of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) three-dimensional ground-water flow model (MODFLOW). The modifications build on a previous version and add several new features, processes, and input and output options. The input structure of the revised MNW (MNW2) is more well-centered than the original verion of MNW (MNW1) and allows the user to easily define hydraulic characteristics of each multi-node well. MNW2 also allows calculations of additional head changes due to partial penetration effects, flow into a borehole through a seepage face, changes in well discharge related to changes in lift for a given pump, and intraborehole flows with a pump intake located at any specified depth within the well. MNW2 also offers an improved capability to simulate nonvertical wells. A new output option allows selected multi-node wells to be designated as 'observation wells' for which changes in selected variables with time will be written to separate output files to facilitate postprocessing. MNW2 is compatible with the MODFLOW-2000 and MODFLOW-2005 versions of MODFLOW and with the version of MODFLOW that includes the Ground-Water Transport process (MODFLOW-GWT).

  5. Development of a conceptual model of groundwater flow, Chesterfield County, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, Bruce G.; Landmeyer, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Chesterfield County is located in the north central part of South Carolina (SC) and is adjacent to the North Carolina border. The County lies along the Fall Line, the geologic boundary between the Atlantic Coastal Plain (ACP) and Piedmont physiographic provinces. Between 2000 and 2007, the population increased from 42,768 to 43,191 people (U.S. Census Bureau, 2007). Associated with this population growth is an increased demand for domestic, public, industrial, and agricultural water supplies. The ACP sediments underlying Chesterfield County contain abundant supplies of highquality groundwater (Newcome, 2004). The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources is investigating the ACP groundwater resources of Chesterfield County. The initial task of the study is to establish a hydrologic data-collection network for the ACP part of the County. A groundwater-flow model and derived water budgets for the ACP aquifer that underlies most of the County will be constructed and calibrated later in the study. Both anthropogenic and natural groundwater contaminants that have been identified in the study area will be quantified and described as part of a companion study.

  6. Semi-analytical solution of groundwater flow in a leaky aquifer system subject to bending effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chia-Chi; Yang, Shaw-Yang; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2013-04-01

    SummaryThe bending of aquitard like a plate due to aquifer pumping and compression is often encountered in many practical problems of subsurface flow. This reaction will have large influence on the release of the volume of water from the aquifer, which is essential for the planning and management of groundwater resources in aquifers. However, the groundwater flow induced by pumping in a leaky aquifer system is often assumed that the total stress of aquifer maintains constant all the time and the mechanical behavior of the aquitard formation is negligible. Therefore, this paper devotes to the investigation of the effect of aquitard bending on the drawdown distribution in a leaky aquifer system, which is obviously of interest in groundwater hydrology. Based on the work of Wang et al. (2004) this study develops a mathematical model for investigating the impacts of aquitard bending and leakage rate on the drawdown of the confined aquifer due to a constant-rate pumping in the leaky aquifer system. This model contains three equations; two flow equations delineate the transient drawdown distributions in the aquitard and the confined aquifer, while the other describes the vertical displacement in response to the aquitard bending. For the case of no aquitard bending, this new solution can reduce to the Hantush Laplace-domain solution (Hantush, 1960). On the other hand, this solution without the leakage effect can reduce to the time domain solution of Wang et al. (2004). The results show that the aquifer drawdown is influenced by the bending effect at early time and by the leakage effect at late time. The results of sensitivity analysis indicate that the aquifer compaction is sensitive only at early time, causing less amount of water released from the pumped aquifer than that predicted by the traditional groundwater theory. The dimensionless drawdown is rather sensitive to aquitard's hydraulic conductivity at late time. Additionally, both the hydraulic conductivity and

  7. Analysis of ground-water flow along a regional flow path of the Midwestern Basins and Arches aquifer system in Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanover, R.H.

    1994-01-01

    A cross-sectional analysis of ground-water flow in central-western and northwestern Ohio was done as part of the Midwestern Basins and Arches Regional Aquifer-System Analysis project. The Midwestern Basins and Arches aquifer system is composed of carbonate bedrock of Silurian and Devonian age and overlying glacial flow analysis of the Scioto and Blanchard rivers in the study area were used to describe patrems of ground-water flow, to evaluate stream-aquifer interaction, and to quantify recharge and discharge within the ground-water-flow system along a regional ground-water-flow path. The selected regional flow path begins at a regional topographic high in Logan County, Ohio, and ends in Sandusky Bay (Lake Erie), a regional topographic low. Recharge to the ground-water system along the selected regional flow path was estimated from hydrograph separation of streamflow and averaged 3.24 inches per year. Computer model simulations indicate that 84 percent of the water entering the ground-water system flows less than 5 miles from point of recharge to point of discharge and no deeper than the upper surficial aquifers. The distance and depth that ground water travels and traveltime from point of recharge to point of discharge is controlled largely by where ground water enters the flow system. Ground water entering the flow system in the vicinity of major surface- water divides generally travels further, deeper, and longer than ground water entering the flow system elsewhere along the regional flow path. Particle tracking simulations substantiate the concept that the 80-mile-long regional flow path is within a continuous ground-water basin. Estimated traveltimes for ground-water from the regional high to Sandusky Bay range from 22,000 to 40,700 years, given a range of porosities from 8 to 22 percent for the carbonate-rock aquifer.

  8. Parameter Identification and Uncertainty Analysis for Visual MODFLOW based Groundwater Flow Model in a Small River Basin, Eastern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, S.

    2015-12-01

    The overexploitation of groundwater resulted in abandoning many shallow tube wells in the river Basin in Eastern India. For the sustainability of groundwater resources, basin-scale modelling of groundwater flow is essential for the efficient planning and management of the water resources. The main intent of this study is to develope a 3-D groundwater flow model of the study basin using the Visual MODFLOW package and successfully calibrate and validate it using 17 years of observed data. The sensitivity analysis was carried out to quantify the susceptibility of aquifer system to the river bank seepage, recharge from rainfall and agriculture practices, horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivities, and specific yield. To quantify the impact of parameter uncertainties, Sequential Uncertainty Fitting Algorithm (SUFI-2) and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques were implemented. Results from the two techniques were compared and the advantages and disadvantages were analysed. Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient (NSE) and coefficient of determination (R2) were adopted as two criteria during calibration and validation of the developed model. NSE and R2 values of groundwater flow model for calibration and validation periods were in acceptable range. Also, the MCMC technique was able to provide more reasonable results than SUFI-2. The calibrated and validated model will be useful to identify the aquifer properties, analyse the groundwater flow dynamics and the change in groundwater levels in future forecasts.

  9. Evaluation of Parameter Uncertainty Reduction in Groundwater Flow Modeling Using Multiple Environmental Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, B. W.; Gardner, P.

    2013-12-01

    Calibration of groundwater flow models for the purpose of evaluating flow and aquifer heterogeneity typically uses observations of hydraulic head in wells and appropriate boundary conditions. Environmental tracers have a wide variety of decay rates and input signals in recharge, resulting in a potentially broad source of additional information to constrain flow rates and heterogeneity. A numerical study was conducted to evaluate the reduction in uncertainty during model calibration using observations of various environmental tracers and combinations of tracers. A synthetic data set was constructed by simulating steady groundwater flow and transient tracer transport in a high-resolution, 2-D aquifer with heterogeneous permeability and porosity using the PFLOTRAN software code. Data on pressure and tracer concentration were extracted at well locations and then used as observations for automated calibration of a flow and transport model using the pilot point method and the PEST code. Optimization runs were performed to estimate parameter values of permeability at 30 pilot points in the model domain for cases using 42 observations of: 1) pressure, 2) pressure and CFC11 concentrations, 3) pressure and Ar-39 concentrations, and 4) pressure, CFC11, Ar-39, tritium, and He-3 concentrations. Results show significantly lower uncertainty, as indicated by the 95% linear confidence intervals, in permeability values at the pilot points for cases including observations of environmental tracer concentrations. The average linear uncertainty range for permeability at the pilot points using pressure observations alone is 4.6 orders of magnitude, using pressure and CFC11 concentrations is 1.6 orders of magnitude, using pressure and Ar-39 concentrations is 0.9 order of magnitude, and using pressure, CFC11, Ar-39, tritium, and He-3 concentrations is 1.0 order of magnitude. Data on Ar-39 concentrations result in the greatest parameter uncertainty reduction because its half-life of 269

  10. Development of a digital model of ground-water flow in deeply weathered crystalline rock, Indian Creek area, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, C.C. III; Eimers, J.L. )

    1994-03-01

    The digital ground-water model of the regolith-bedrock aquifer system in the Indian Creek area is based on the US Geological Survey's modular finite-difference ground-water flow model (MODFLOW). Use of MODFLOW assumes porous media equivalence; however, special approaches have been used to account for non-uniform fracture distribution. The model is divided into a uniformly spaced grid having 196 rows, 140 columns, and a 500-foot spacing. Rows are oriented parallel to fractures (N 72 E) and columns are oriented parallel to foliation (N 18 W). The area represented by active model cells is 146 square miles and has about 17,400 cells. The model has 11 layers of different thickness; the top layer represents the regolith and the lower 10 layers represent bedrock. The regolith-bedrock contact is at a uniform depth of 50 feet. The base of the model is 850 feet below land surface. Hydraulic properties of regolith are based on diffusivity calculated from streamflow recession and are assumed to be areally constant. The steady-state model simulates recharge to, flow through, and discharge from the regolith-bedrock aquifer system. The mass balance between inflow and outflow differs by less than 1%. Along select sections, computed travel times from drainage divides to streams range from less than 4 years in the regolith to as much as 300 years for flow passing through the bottom layer of bedrock. The volume of ground water that flows through the bottom layer is only about 2% of the flow through the regolith.

  11. Hydrogeologic evaluation and numerical simulation of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect

    D`Agnese, F.A.; Faunt, C.C.; Turner, A.K.; Hill, M.C.

    1997-12-31

    Yucca Mountain is being studied as a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. In cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Geological Survey is evaluating the geologic and hydrologic characteristics of the ground-water system. The study area covers approximately 100,000 square kilometers between lat 35{degrees}N., long 115{degrees}W and lat 38{degrees}N., long 118{degrees}W and encompasses the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system. Hydrology in the region is a result of both the and climatic conditions and the complex described as dominated by interbasinal flow and may be conceptualized as having two main components: a series of relatively shallow and localized flow paths that are superimposed on deeper regional flow paths. A significant component of the regional ground-water flow is through a thick Paleozoic carbonate rock sequence. Throughout the regional flow system, ground-water flow is probably controlled by extensive and prevalent structural features that result from regional faulting and fracturing. Hydrogeologic investigations over a large and hydrogeologically complex area impose severe demands on data management. This study utilized geographic information systems and geoscientific information systems to develop, store, manipulate, and analyze regional hydrogeologic data sets describing various components of the ground-water flow system.

  12. Numerical Study of a Groundwater Flow Cycling Controlled By Seawater Intrusion within Karst Conduit Networks Using Modflow-CFP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z.; Hu, B. X.; Davis, H.

    2014-12-01

    A groundwater flow cycling process between a submarine spring and an inland fresh water spring has been simulated using the latest research version of MODFLOW-CFP (Conduit Flow Process). Spring Creek Springs and Wakulla Spring, which are located in a marine estuary and 18 km inland, respectively, are two major groundwater discharge spots of Woodville Karst Plain (WKP), North Florida, USA. The two springs are found to be connected with karst conduits networks. Rising sea level may put seawater into the Spring Creek Springs and block groundwater discharge, which, in turn, increases freshwater discharge at Wakulla Spring. Three repeating phases in a karst spring flow cycle were proposed from low rainfall period to heavy rainfall period, and back to low rainfall period. During low rainfall periods, seawater flowed back into the conduits at Spring Creek Spring and freshwater was diverted to Wakulla Spring. After heavy rainfall, seawater was pushed back from Spring Creek Spring conduits. A MODFLOW model for WKP was modified to numerically study the groundwater flow cycling and seawater intrusion for three years. Conduit network distribution, high speed groundwater flow and exchange between conduits and matrix domain were simulated through the MODFLOW-CFP model. Rainfall, springs and creeks discharge data were used to calibrate the model. Simulation results catch very well with measurements, and numerically presented the three-phase groundwater cycling. In additional, simulation results were also supported by temperature data measured in conduits, which reflect precipitation recharge to groundwater, and indicate conduit flow direction. Key Words: Karst, Seawater Instrusion, MODFLOW-CFP, Groundwater Cycling

  13. Inverse Modeling of Groundwater Flow for a Fractured Confined Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Wang, D.

    2013-12-01

    A two-dimensional inverse method is developed to simultaneously estimate steady-state hydraulic conductivities, state variables, and boundary conditions (BC) for a fractured confined aquifer. Computation experiments were performed with five fractured models where each model is driven by dominantly lateral flow (true BC) through both fractures (Kf) and matrix (Km). From each model, observation data including hydraulic heads and Darcy fluxes were sampled without imposing measurement errors. These data were provided to inversion to estimate Kf and the unknown model BC. For the first 4 models, the same sampling data density was used, while Kf/Km ratio is fixed at 10. The 1st model contains a single vertical fracture, and the error of the estimated Kf is almost 0. The 2nd model contains a single horizontal fracture, and the error of the estimated Kf is 4.6%. The 3rd model contains a vertical and a horizontal fracture, and the error is 5.3%. The 4th model is same as the third, except that the fracture volume is 25 times greater, and the error is 0.70%. In this model, the highest BC estimation error occurred at the domain corners, where the inversion extrapolation error is the greatest (reduction of this error will be investigated in the future with local grid refinement and increased data density). The 5th model contains a set of diagonal fractures, two of which run from the left bottom corner to the right top corner and the other one runs from the left top corner to the right bottom corner. For this model, under a given data density, increasing Kf/Km (10 to 1,000,000) was tested. Kf estimation is found not to be sensitive to this variability - the largest Kf error is only 5.27%. For the same model, at Kf/Km =10, local sensitivity analysis using 1 percent scaled sensitivity (1ss) suggests that observed heads at different locations are important for estimating different parameters. A global inverse sensitivity analysis was then performed by increasing the number of the

  14. Active Flow Control Activities at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Scott G.; Sellers, William L., III; Washburn, Anthony E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Langley continues to aggressively investigate the potential advantages of active flow control over more traditional aerodynamic techniques. This paper provides an update to a previous paper and describes both the progress in the various research areas and the significant changes in the NASA research programs. The goals of the topics presented are focused on advancing the state of knowledge and understanding of controllable fundamental mechanisms in fluids as well as to address engineering challenges. An organizational view of current research activities at NASA Langley in active flow control as supported by several projects is presented. On-center research as well as NASA Langley funded contracts and grants are discussed at a relatively high level. The products of this research are to be demonstrated either in bench-top experiments, wind-tunnel investigations, or in flight as part of the fundamental NASA R&D program and then transferred to more applied research programs within NASA, DOD, and U.S. industry.

  15. Calculation of an interaction index between extractive activity and groundwater resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Louise; Hallet, Vincent; Barthélemy, Johan; Moriamé, Marie; Cartletti, Timotéo

    2015-04-01

    There are two underground resources intensively exploited in Wallonia (the southern Region of Belgium): groundwater and rock. Groundwater production rate is about 380*106 cubic meter per year from which 80 % is used for drinking water (SPW-DGO3, 2014). Annual rock extraction is about 73*106 tons per year and 80.6% of the materials are carbonate rocks (Collier and Hallet, 2013) corresponding to the most important aquifer formations. Given the high population density and environmental pressures, lateral quarry extensions are limited and the only solution for the operators is to excavate deeper. In this context, the aquifer level of the exploited formation is often reached and dewatering systems have to be installed to depress the water table below the quarry pit bottom. This affects the regional hydrogeology and, in some cases, the productivity of the water catchments is threatened. Using simple geological and hydrogeological parameters, an interaction index was developed to assess the interaction between extractive activity and groundwater resources and, in consequence, to define how far the feasibility study should go into detailed hydrogeological investigations. The interaction index is based on the equation used in the assessment of natural hazards (Dauphiné, 2003), which gives: Interaction = F (Quarry, Aquifer). The interaction is the risk, which is equal to a function where the hazard is defined from parameters corresponding to the quarry and vulnerability from parameters related to groundwater resources. Six parameters have been determined. The parameters chosen to represent the hazard of a quarry are: the geological, the hydrogeological and the piezometric contexts. The parameters chosen to represent the vulnerability of the water resources are: the relative position between the quarry and the water catchment (well, spring, gallery, etc.) sites, the productivity of the catchment and the quality of the groundwater. Each parameter was classified into four

  16. A statistical processor for analyzing simulations made using the Modular Finite-Difference Ground-water Flow Model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    Many hydrologic studies of ground-water systems are conducted using a digital computer model as an aid to understanding the flow system. One of the most commonly used ground-water modeling programs is the Modular Three-Dimensional Ground-water Flow Model (Modular Model) by McDonald and Harbaugh. This report presents a computer program to summarize the data input to and output from the Modular Model. The program is named the Modular Model Statistical Processor and is designed to be run following the Modular Model. The Modular Model Statistical Processor provides ground-water modelers with the capabilities to easily read data input to and output from the Modular Model, calculate descriptive statistics, generate histograms, perform logical tests using relational operators, calculate data arrays using arithmetic operators, and calculate flow vectors for use in a graphical-display program.

  17. Development of a numerical model to simulate groundwater flow in the shallow aquifer system of Assateague Island, Maryland and Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masterson, John P.; Fienen, Michael N.; Gesch, Dean B.; Carlson, Carl S.

    2013-01-01

    A three-dimensional groundwater-flow model was developed for Assateague Island in eastern Maryland and Virginia to simulate both groundwater flow and solute (salt) transport to evaluate the groundwater system response to sea-level rise. The model was constructed using geologic and spatial information to represent the island geometry, boundaries, and physical properties and was calibrated using an inverse modeling parameter-estimation technique. An initial transient solute-transport simulation was used to establish the freshwater-saltwater boundary for a final calibrated steady-state model of groundwater flow. This model was developed as part of an ongoing investigation by the U.S. Geological Survey Climate and Land Use Change Research and Development Program to improve capabilities for predicting potential climate-change effects and provide the necessary tools for adaptation and mitigation of potentially adverse impacts.

  18. Development of a regional groundwater flow model for the area of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, J.M.; Arnett, R.C.; Neupauer, R.M.

    1995-03-01

    This report documents a study conducted to develop a regional groundwater flow model for the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer in the area of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The model was developed to support Waste Area Group 10, Operable Unit 10-04 groundwater flow and transport studies. The products of this study are this report and a set of computational tools designed to numerically model the regional groundwater flow in the Eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. The objective of developing the current model was to create a tool for defining the regional groundwater flow at the INEL. The model was developed to (a) support future transport modeling for WAG 10-04 by providing the regional groundwater flow information needed for the WAG 10-04 risk assessment, (b) define the regional groundwater flow setting for modeling groundwater contaminant transport at the scale of the individual WAGs, (c) provide a tool for improving the understanding of the groundwater flow system below the INEL, and (d) consolidate the existing regional groundwater modeling information into one usable model. The current model is appropriate for defining the regional flow setting for flow submodels as well as hypothesis testing to better understand the regional groundwater flow in the area of the INEL. The scale of the submodels must be chosen based on accuracy required for the study.

  19. Migration of contaminants in groundwater at a landfill: A case study. 1. Groundwater flow and plume delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacFarlane, D. S.; Cherry, J. A.; Gillham, R. W.; Sudicky, E. A.

    1983-05-01

    A landfill-derived contaminant plume with a maximum width of ˜600 m, a length of ˜700 m and a maximum depth of 20 m in an unconfined sand aquifer was delineated by means of a monitoring network that includes standpipe piezometers, multilevel point-samplers and bundle-piezometers. The extent of detectable contamination caused by the landfill, which began operation in 1940 and which became inactive in 1976, was determined from the distributions of chloride, sulfate and electrical conductance in the sand aquifer, all of which have levels in the leachate that are greatly above those in uncontaminated groundwater. The maximum temperature of groundwater in the zone of contamination beneath the landfill is 12°C, which is 4-5°C above background. The thermal plume in the aquifer extends ˜150 m downgradient from the centre of the landfill. A slight transient water-table mound exists beneath the landfill in the late spring and summer in response to snowmelt and heavy rainfall. Beneath the landfill, the zone of leachate contamination extends to the bottom of the aquifer, apparently because of transient downward components of hydraulic gradient caused by the water-table mound and possibly because of the higher density and lower viscosity of the contaminated water. Values of hydraulic conductivity, which show variations due to local heterogeneity, were obtained from slug tests of piezometers, from pumping tests and from laboratory tests. Because of the inherent uncertainty in the aquifer parameter values, the 38-yr. frontal position of the plume calculated using the Darcy equation with the assumption of plug flow can differ from the observed frontal position by many hundreds of metres, although the use of mean parameter values produces a close agreement. The width of the plume is large relative to the width of the landfill and can be accounted for primarily by variable periods of lateral east- and westward flow caused by changes in water-table configuration due to the

  20. Documentation of a Groundwater Flow Model Developed To Assess Groundwater Availability in the Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain Aquifer System From Long Island, New York, to North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masterson, John P.; Pope, Jason P.; Fienen, Michael N.; Monti, Jr., Jack; Nardi, Mark R.; Finkelstein, Jason S.

    2016-01-01

    The numerical representation of the hydrogeologic information used in the development of this regional flow model was dependent upon how the aquifer system and simulated hydrologic stresses were discretized in space and time. Lumping hydraulic parameters in space and hydrologic stresses and time-varying observational data in time can limit the capabilities of this tool to simulate how the groundwater flow system responds to changes in hydrologic stresses, particularly at the local scale.

  1. Advances in Fluid Dynamics of Subsurface Flow of Groundwater, Hydrocarbons, and CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyer, K. U.

    2015-12-01

    In the past, the chemical methods of contaminant hydrogeology have dominated much of hydrogeological thinking. In their wake, understanding the physics of subsurface fluid flow and its application to practice and science seemingly has played a secondary role and it often has been replaced by numerical modelling only. Building an understanding of the actual physics of subsurface flow beyond numerical modelling, however, is a confusing experience exposing one to conflicting statements from the sides of engineers, hydrogeologists, and, for a decade or more, by the followers of free convection and density-driven flow. Within the physics of subsurface flow a number of questions arise, such as: Is water really incompressible as assumed in engineering hydraulics? How does buoyancy work? Are underground buoyancy forces generally directed vertically upwards or downwards? What is the consequential difference between hydrostatic and hydrodynamic conditions? What are the force fields causing subsurface flow for water, hydrocarbons and CO2? Is fluid flow really driven by pressure gradients as assumed in reservoir engineering? What is the effect of geothermal gradients on subsurface flow? Do convection cells and free convection exist on-shore? How does variable density flow work? Can today's numerical codes adequately determine variable density flow? Does saltwater really sink to the bottom of geologic systems due to its higher density? Aquitards create confining conditions and thereby confine fluid movements to aquifers? Does more water flow in aquifers than aquitards? The presentation will shed light on the maze of conflicting statements issued within engineering hydraulics and groundwater dynamics. It will also present a field case and its numerical modelling of variable density flow at a major industrial landfill site. The presentation will thereby foster the understanding of the correct physics involved and how this physics can be beneficially applied to practical cases

  2. Imaging lateral groundwater flow in the shallow subsurface using stochastic temperature fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairley, Jerry P.; Nicholson, Kirsten N.

    2006-04-01

    Although temperature has often been used as an indication of vertical groundwater movement, its usefulness for identifying horizontal fluid flow has been limited by the difficulty of obtaining sufficient data to draw defensible conclusions. Here we use stochastic simulation to develop a high-resolution image of fluid temperatures in the shallow subsurface at Borax Lake, Oregon. The temperature field inferred from the geostatistical simulations clearly shows geothermal fluids discharging from a group of fault-controlled hydrothermal springs, moving laterally through the subsurface, and mixing with shallow subsurface flow originating from nearby Borax Lake. This interpretation of the data is supported by independent geochemical and isotopic evidence, which show a simple mixing trend between Borax Lake water and discharge from the thermal springs. It is generally agreed that stochastic simulation can be a useful tool for extracting information from complex and/or noisy data and, although not appropriate in all situations, geostatistical analysis may provide good definition of flow paths in the shallow subsurface. Although stochastic imaging techniques are well known in problems involving transport of species, e.g. delineation of contaminant plumes from soil gas survey data, we are unaware of previous applications to the transport of thermal energy for the purpose of inferring shallow groundwater flow.

  3. Hydrogeology and groundwater flow in a basalt-capped Mesozoic sedimentary series of the Ethiopian highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecasteele, Ine; Nyssen, Jan; Clymans, Wim; Moeyersons, Jan; Martens, Kristine; van Camp, Marc; Gebreyohannes, Tesfamichael; Desmedt, Florimond; Deckers, Jozef; Walraevens, Kristine

    2011-05-01

    A hydrogeological study was undertaken in the Zenako-Argaka catchment, near Hagere Selam in Tigray, northern Ethiopia, during the rainy season of 2006. A geological map was produced through geophysical measurements and field observations, and a fracture zone identified in the north west of the catchment. A perched water table was found within the Trap Basalt series above the laterized upper Aram Aradam Sandstones. A map of this water table was compiled. Water-level variation during the measurement period was at least 4.5 m. Variation in basal flow for the whole catchment for the measurement period was between 12 and 276 m3/day. A groundwater flow model was produced using Visual MODFLOW, indicating the general direction of flow to be towards the south, and illustrating that the waterways have only a limited influence on groundwater flow. The soil water budget was calculated for the period 1995-2006, which showed the important influence of the distribution of rainfall in time. Although Hagere Selam received some 724 mm of rainfall per year over this period, the strong seasonal variation in rainfall meant there was a water deficit for on average 10 months per year.

  4. Two-phase flow numerical simulation of infiltration and groundwater drainage in a rice field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugomela, G. V.

    Farming of rice normally uses a substantially larger amount of water than other cereal grain crops mainly due to the traditional flooding of rice fields. Flooding of the fields result in a seepage flow condition whereby infiltration occurs at a potential rate. The potential infiltration rate obstructs the free movement of pore-air through the ground surface and gradually compresses the pore-air between the infiltrating wetting front and the groundwater table under which subsurface drains are installed. The Galerkin finite element method (FEM) simulation of two-phase flow of air and water in the porous media of the rice field shows that the subsequent increase in the pore-air pressure makes the pore-air act as a link phase which transfers the effects of the processes taking place in the wetting front above and the saturated zone below the groundwater table. This phenomenon is clearly demonstrated when the results of the two-phase flow simulation are compared to the corresponding single-phase flow simulation which neglects the effect of the pore-air. It is concluded that the ‘ponding’ which appears in rice fields can partly be explained by the resistance offered by the pore-air to the percolation process. The study demonstrates that flooding of rice fields during most of its growth time is not necessary rather it is enough to keep the ground surface just saturated and the rest of the water can be saved.

  5. Estimates of tracer-based piston-flow ages of groundwater from selected sites-National Water-Quality Assessment Program, 1992-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkle, Stephen R.; Shapiro, Stephanie D.; Plummer, L. Niel; Busenberg, Eurybiades; Widman, Peggy K.; Casile, Gerolamo C.; Wayland, Julian E.

    2011-01-01

    This report documents selected age data interpreted from measured concentrations of environmental tracers in groundwater from 1,399 National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program groundwater sites across the United States. The tracers of interest were chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), and tritium/helium-3 (3H/3He). Tracer data compiled for this analysis primarily were from wells representing two types of NAWQA groundwater studies - Land-Use Studies (shallow wells, usually monitoring wells, in recharge areas under dominant land-use settings) and Major-Aquifer Studies (wells, usually domestic supply wells, in principal aquifers and representing the shallow, used resource). Reference wells (wells representing groundwater minimally impacted by anthropogenic activities) associated with Land-Use Studies also were included. Tracer samples were collected between 1992 and 2005, although two networks sampled from 2006 to 2007 were included because of network-specific needs. Tracer data from other NAWQA Program components (Flow System Studies, which are assessments of processes and trends along groundwater flow paths, and various topical studies) were not compiled herein. Tracer data from NAWQA Land-Use Studies and Major-Aquifer Studies that previously had been interpreted and published are compiled herein (as piston-flow ages), but have not been reinterpreted. Tracer data that previously had not been interpreted and published are evaluated using documented methods and compiled with aqueous concentrations, equivalent atmospheric concentrations (for CFCs and SF6), estimates of tracer-based piston-flow ages, and selected ancillary data, such as redox indicators, well construction, and major dissolved gases (N2, O2, Ar, CH4, and CO2). Tracer-based piston-flow ages documented in this report are simplistic representations of the tracer data. Tracer-based piston-flow ages are a convenient means of conceptualizing groundwater age. However, the piston-flow

  6. Driving mechanisms for groundwater flow and salt transport in a subterranean estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, C.; Gibbes, B.; Li, L.

    2006-02-01

    This paper presents field measurements and numerical simulations of groundwater dynamics in the intertidal zone of a sandy meso-tidal beach. The study, focusing on vertical hydraulic gradients and pore water salinities, reveals that tides and waves provide important forcing mechanisms for flow and salt transport in the nearshore aquifer. Such forcing, interacting with the beach morphology, enhances the exchange between the aquifer and ocean. The spatial and temporal variations of vertical hydraulic gradients demonstrate the complexity and dynamic nature of the processes and the extent of mixing between fresh groundwater and seawater in a ``subterranean estuary''. These results provide evidence of a potentially important reaction zone in the nearshore aquifer driven by oceanic oscillations. Land-derived contaminants may undergo important biogeochemical transformations in this zone prior to discharge.

  7. Evaluating the sources of water to wells: Three techniques for metamodeling of a groundwater flow model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fienen, Michael N.; Nolan, Bernard T.; Feinstein, Daniel T.

    2016-01-01

    For decision support, the insights and predictive power of numerical process models can be hampered by insufficient expertise and computational resources required to evaluate system response to new stresses. An alternative is to emulate the process model with a statistical “metamodel.” Built on a dataset of collocated numerical model input and output, a groundwater flow model was emulated using a Bayesian Network, an Artificial neural network, and a Gradient Boosted Regression Tree. The response of interest was surface water depletion expressed as the source of water-to-wells. The results have application for managing allocation of groundwater. Each technique was tuned using cross validation and further evaluated using a held-out dataset. A numerical MODFLOW-USG model of the Lake Michigan Basin, USA, was used for the evaluation. The performance and interpretability of each technique was compared pointing to advantages of each technique. The metamodel can extend to unmodeled areas.

  8. U-234/U-238 ratio: Qualitative estimate of groundwater flow in Rocky Flats monitoring wells

    SciTech Connect

    Laul, J.C.

    1994-02-01

    Groundwater movement through various pathways is the primary mechanism for the transport of radionuclides and trace elements in a water/rock interaction. About three dozen wells, installed in the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) Solar Evaporation Ponds (SEP) area, are monitored quarterly to evaluate the extent of any lateral and downgradient migration of contaminants from the Solar Evaporation Ponds: 207-A; 207-B North, 207-B Center, and 207-B South; and 207-C. The Solar Ponds are the main source for the various contaminants: radionuclides (U-238, U-234, Pu-239, 240 and Am-241); anions; and trace metals to groundwaters. The U-238 concentrations in Rocky Flats groundwaters vary from <0.2 to 69 pCi/I (IpCi = 3 ug). However, the activity U-234/U-238 ratios are low and range mostly 1.2 to 2.7. The low activity ratios can be interpreted to suggest that the groundwaters are moving slow (

  9. The Role of Groundwater Flow and Faulting on Hydrothermal Ore Formation in Sedimentary Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garven, G.

    2006-05-01

    Sediment-hosted ore formation is thought to occur as a normal outcome of basin evolution, due to deep groundwater flow, heat transport, and reactive mass transport ---all of which are intimately coupled. This paper reviews recent attempts to understand the hydrologic and geochemical processes forming some of the world's largest sediment-hosted ores. Several questions still dominate the literature (driving forces for flows, source and controls on metal acquisition, concentrations of ore-forming components, timing and duration, role of faults, effects of transient flows). This paper touches upon all of these questions. Coupled reactive transport models have been applied for understanding the genesis of sandstone-hosted uranium ores of North America and Australia, red-bed copper ores of North America and northern Europe, carbonate-hosted MVT lead-zinc ores of the U.S. Midcontinent and northwestern Canada, and the carbonate- hosted lead-zinc ores of Ireland and southeast France. Good progress has been made in using these computational methods for comparing and contrasting both carbonate hosted (MVT and Irish types) and shale- hosted (SEDEX type) Pb-Zn deposits. The former are mostly associated with undeformed carbonate platforms associated with distal orogenic belts and the later are mostly associated with extensional basins and failed rifts that are heavily faulted. Two giant ore provinces in extensional basins provide good examples of structural control on reactive mass transport: shale-hosted Pb-Zn ores of the Proterozoic McArthur basin, Australia, and shale-hosted Pb-Zn-Ba ores of the Paleozoic Kuna basin, Alaska. For the McArthur basin, hydrogeologic simulations of thermally-driven free convection suggest a strong structural control on fluid flow created by the north-trending fault systems that dominate this Proterozoic extensional basin. Brines appear to have descended to depths of a few kilometers along the western side of the basin, migrated laterally to the

  10. Identification of potential groundwater flow paths using geological and geophysical data

    SciTech Connect

    Pohlmann, K.; Andricevic, R.

    1994-09-01

    This project represents the first phase in the development of a methodology for generating three-dimensional equiprobable maps of hydraulic conductivity for the Nevada Test Site (NTS). In this study, potential groundwater flow paths were investigated for subsurface tuffs at Yucca Flat by studying how these units are connected. The virtual absence of site-specific hydraulic conductivity data dictates that as a first step a surrogate attribute (geophysical logs) be utilized. In this first phase, the connectivity patterns of densely welded ash-flow tuffs were studied because these tuffs are the most likely to form zones of high hydraulic conductivity. Densely welded tuffs were identified based on the response shown on resistivity logs and this information was transformed into binary indicator values. The spatial correlation of the indicator data was estimated through geostatistical methods. Equiprobable three-dimensional maps of the distribution of the densely-welded and nonwelded tuffs (i.e., subsurface heterogeneity) were then produced using a multiple indicator simulation formalism. The simulations demonstrate that resistivity logs are effective as soft data for indicating densely welded tuffs. The simulated welded tuffs reproduce the stratigraphic relationships of the welded tuffs observed in hydrogeologic cross sections, while incorporating the heterogeneity and anisotropy that is expected in this subsurface setting. Three-dimensional connectivity of the densely welded tuffs suggests potential groundwater flow paths with lengths easily over 1 km. The next phase of this investigation should incorporate other geophysical logs (e.g., gamma-gamma logs) and then calibrate the resulting soft data maps with available hard hydraulic conductivity data. The soft data maps can then augment the hard data to produce the final maps of the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity that can be used as input for numerical solution of groundwater flow and transport.

  11. Interpretation of groundwater flow patterns through a reconstruction of the tritium precipitation record in the Cochabamba Valley, Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stimson, Jesse; Rudolph, David; Frape, Shaun; Drimmie, Robert

    1996-05-01

    Regional behaviour of the groundwater flow system in the Cochabamba Valley, Bolivia, is evaluated through the interpretation of tritium ( 3H) distributions in groundwater samples from wells and springs. In order to interpret groundwater 3H concentrations in Cochabamba Valley, where no historical record of 3H concentrations in rainfall exists, a reconstructed 3H precipitation record is developed. The record of 3H concentrations in precipitation is fairly extensive in the Amazon Basin and this record was extrapolated to the neighbouring Cochabamba Valley. Tritium concentrations in rainfall have been observed to increase under natural conditions with increasing latitude and with increasing distance from the ocean. By considering these trends, a linear relationship for increasing 3H concentration in precipitation is developed, based on data from the Amazon Basin, that realistically predicts regional 3H distributions from the northeast Brazilian coast to Cuzco, Peru. This 3H precipitation record is then extrapolated to the Cochabamba Valley and, after correction for radiogenic decay, is used to interpret trends in groundwater 3H concentrations within the valley. The groundwater flow system in one of the principal alluvial fans, which serves as an important groundwater resource for the city, is studied in detail. Tritium concentrations drop from approximately 8-10 tritium units (TU) in the recharge area to concentrations below the detection limit of 0.8 TU further out in the valley. Groundwater velocities of approximately 0.3 to 0.9 m d -1 are estimated from distributions of groundwater 3H concentrations along the alluvial fan with the use of the reconstructed precipitation 3H record. Regional characteristics of the groundwater flow system are discussed with respect to future development and protection of the groundwater resources.

  12. Palaeosol control on groundwater flow and pollutant distribution: the example of arsenic.

    PubMed

    McArthur, John M; Nath, Bibhash; Banerjee, Dhiraj M; Purohit, R; Grassineau, N

    2011-02-15

    The consumption of groundwater polluted by arsenic (As) has a severe and adverse effect on human health, particularly where, as happens in parts of SE Asia, groundwater is supplied largely from fluvial/deltaic aquifers. The lateral distribution of the As-pollution in such aquifers is heterogeneous. The cause of the heterogeneity is obscure. The location and severity of the As-pollution is therefore difficult to predict, despite the importance of such predictions to the protection of consumer health, aquifer remediation, and aquifer development. To explain the heterogeneity, we mapped As-pollution in groundwater using 659 wells across 102 km(2) of West Bengal, and logged 43 boreholes, to reveal that the distribution of As-pollution is governed by subsurface sedimentology. Across 47 km(2) of contiguous palaeo-interfluve, we found that the shallow aquifer (<70 mbgl) is unpolluted by As (<10 μg/L) because it is capped by an impermeable palaeosol of red clay (the last glacial maximum palaeosol, or LGMP, of ref 1 ) at depths between 16 and 24 mbgl. The LGMP protects the aquifer from vertical recharge that might carry As-rich water or dissolved organic matter that might drive reduction of sedimentary iron oxides and so release As to groundwater. In 55 km(2) of flanking palaeo-channels, the palaeosol is absent, so invasion of the aquifer by As and dissolved organic matter can occur, so palaeo-channel groundwater is mostly polluted by As (>50 μg/L). The role of palaeosols and, in particular, the LGMP, has been overlooked as a control on groundwater flow and pollutant movement in deltaic and coastal aquifers worldwide. Models of pollutant infiltration in such environments must include the appreciation that, where the LGMP (or other palaeosols) are present, recharge moves downward in palaeo-channel regions that are separated by palaeo-interfluvial regions where vertical recharge to underlying aquifers cannot occur and where horizontal flow occurs above the LGMP and any

  13. Numerical investigation for the impact of CO2 geologic sequestration on regional groundwater flow

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, H.; Zhang, K.; Karasaki, K.; Marui, A.; Uehara, H.; Nishikawa, N.

    2009-04-15

    Large-scale storage of carbon dioxide in saline aquifers may cause considerable pressure perturbation and brine migration in deep rock formations, which may have a significant influence on the regional groundwater system. With the help of parallel computing techniques, we conducted a comprehensive, large-scale numerical simulation of CO{sub 2} geologic storage that predicts not only CO{sub 2} migration, but also its impact on regional groundwater flow. As a case study, a hypothetical industrial-scale CO{sub 2} injection in Tokyo Bay, which is surrounded by the most heavily industrialized area in Japan, was considered, and the impact of CO{sub 2} injection on near-surface aquifers was investigated, assuming relatively high seal-layer permeability (higher than 10 microdarcy). A regional hydrogeological model with an area of about 60 km x 70 km around Tokyo Bay was discretized into about 10 million gridblocks. To solve the high-resolution model efficiently, we used a parallelized multiphase flow simulator TOUGH2-MP/ECO2N on a world-class high performance supercomputer in Japan, the Earth Simulator. In this simulation, CO{sub 2} was injected into a storage aquifer at about 1 km depth under Tokyo Bay from 10 wells, at a total rate of 10 million tons/year for 100 years. Through the model, we can examine regional groundwater pressure buildup and groundwater migration to the land surface. The results suggest that even if containment of CO{sub 2} plume is ensured, pressure buildup on the order of a few bars can occur in the shallow confined aquifers over extensive regions, including urban inlands.

  14. Simulation of the shallow groundwater-flow system near the Hayward Airport, Sawyer County, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Randall J.; Juckem, Paul F.; Dunning, Charles P.

    2010-01-01

    There are concerns that removal and trimming of vegetation during expansion of the Hayward Airport in Sawyer County, Wisconsin, could appreciably change the character of a nearby cold-water stream and its adjacent environs. In cooperation with the Wisconsin Department of Transportation, a two-dimensional, steady-state groundwater-flow model of the shallow groundwater-flow system near the Hayward Airport was refined from a regional model of the area. The parameter-estimation code PEST was used to obtain a best fit of the model to additional field data collected in February 2007 as part of this study. The additional data were collected during an extended period of low runoff and consisted of water levels and streamflows near the Hayward Airport. Refinements to the regional model included one additional hydraulic-conductivity zone for the airport area, and three additional parameters for streambed resistance in a northern tributary to the Namekagon River and in the main stem of the Namekagon River. In the refined Hayward Airport area model, the calibrated hydraulic conductivity was 11.2 feet per day, which is within the 58.2 to 7.9 feet per day range reported for the regional glacial and sandstone aquifer, and is consistent with a silty soil texture for the area. The calibrated refined model had a best fit of 8.6 days for the streambed resistance of the Namekagon River and between 0.6 and 1.6 days for the northern tributary stream. The previously reported regional groundwater-recharge rate of 10.1 inches per year was adjusted during calibration of the refined model in order to match streamflows measured during the period of extended low runoff; this resulted in an optimal groundwater-recharge rate of 7.1 inches per year during this period. The refined model was then used to simulate the capture zone of the northern tributary to the Namekagon River.

  15. Modeling Groundwater Flow and Infiltration at Potential Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Sites in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, B. W.; Lee, C.; Ma, C.; Knowlton, R. G.

    2006-12-01

    Taiwan is evaluating representative sites for the potential disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW), including consideration of shallow land burial and cavern disposal concepts. A representative site for shallow land burial is on a small island in the Taiwan Strait with basalt bedrock. The shallow land burial concept includes an engineered cover to limit infiltration into the waste disposal cell. A representative site for cavern disposal is located on the southeast coast of Taiwan. The tunnel system for this disposal concept would be several hundred meters below the mountainous land surface in argillite bedrock. The LLW will consist of about 966,000 drums, primarily from the operation and decommissioning of four nuclear power plants. Sandia National Laboratories and the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research have collaborated to develop performance assessment models to evaluate the long-term safety of LLW disposal at these representative sites. Important components of the system models are sub-models of groundwater flow in the natural system and infiltration through the engineered cover for the shallow land burial concept. The FEHM software code was used to simulate groundwater flow in three-dimensional models at both sites. In addition, a higher-resolution two-dimensional model was developed to simulate flow through the engineered tunnel system at the cavern site. The HELP software was used to simulate infiltration through the cover at the island site. The primary objective of these preliminary models is to provide a modeling framework, given the lack of site-specific data and detailed engineering design specifications. The steady-state groundwater flow model at the island site uses a specified recharge boundary at the land surface and specified head at the island shoreline. Simulated groundwater flow vectors are extracted from the FEHM model along a cross section through one of the LLW disposal cells for utilization in radionuclide transport simulations in

  16. Groundwater flow and radionuclide decay-chain transport modelling around a proposed uranium tailings pond in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elango, L.; Brindha, K.; Kalpana, L.; Sunny, Faby; Nair, R. N.; Murugan, R.

    2012-06-01

    Extensive hydrogeological investigations followed by three-dimensional groundwater flow and contaminant transport modelling were carried out around a proposed uranium tailings pond at Seripalli in Andhra Pradesh, India, to estimate its radiological impact. The hydrogeological parameters and measured groundwater level were used to model the groundwater flow and contaminant transport from the uranium tailings pond using a finite-element-based model. The simulated groundwater level compares reasonably with the observed groundwater level. Subsequently, the transport of long-lived radionuclides such as 238U, 234U, 230Th and 226Ra from the proposed tailings pond was modelled. The ingrowths of progenies were also considered in the modelling. It was observed that these radionuclides move very little from the tailings pond, even at the end of 10,000 y, due to their high distribution coefficients and low groundwater velocities. These concentrations were translated into committed effective dose rates at different distances in the vicinity of the uranium tailings pond. The results indicated that the highest effective dose rate to members of the public along the groundwater flow pathway is 2.5 times lower than the drinking water guideline of 0.1 mSv/y, even after a long time period of 10,000 y.

  17. Spatial and temporal constraints on regional-scale groundwater flow in the Pampa del Tamarugal Basin, Atacama Desert, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayne, Richard S.; Pollyea, Ryan M.; Dodd, Justin P.; Olson, Elizabeth J.; Swanson, Susan K.

    2016-08-01

    Aquifers within the Pampa del Tamarugal Basin (Atacama Desert, northern Chile) are the sole source of water for the coastal city of Iquique and the economically important mining industry. Despite this, the regional groundwater system remains poorly understood. Although it is widely accepted that aquifer recharge originates as precipitation in the Altiplano and Andean Cordillera to the east, there remains debate on whether recharge is driven primarily by near-surface groundwater flow in response to periodic flood events or by basal groundwater flux through deep-seated basin fractures. In addressing this debate, the present study quantifies spatial and temporal variability in regional-scale groundwater flow paths at 20.5°S latitude by combining a two-dimensional model of groundwater and heat flow with field observations and δ18O isotope values in surface water and groundwater. Results suggest that both previously proposed aquifer recharge mechanisms are likely influencing aquifers within the Pampa del Tamarugal Basin; however, each mechanism is operating on different spatial and temporal scales. Storm-driven flood events in the Altiplano readily transmit groundwater to the eastern Pampa del Tamarugal Basin through near-surface groundwater flow on short time scales, e.g., 100-101 years, but these effects are likely isolated to aquifers in the eastern third of the basin. In addition, this study illustrates a physical mechanism for groundwater originating in the eastern highlands to recharge aquifers and salars in the western Pampa del Tamarugal Basin over timescales of 104-105 years.

  18. Simulation of recharge for the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system using an integrated hydrologic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hevesi, J. A.; Regan, R. S.; Hill, M. C.; Heywood, C.; Kohn, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    A proof-of-concept study was conducted using the integrated hydrologic model, GSFLOW, to simulate spatially and temporally distributed recharge for the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system (DVRFS). GSFLOW is an integrated groundwater - surface water flow model that combines two modeling applications: the Precipitation-Runoff-Modeling-System (PRMS) and MODFLOW. Previous methods used to estimate recharge for the DVRFS include empirical models based on precipitation, applications of the chloride mass-balance method, and applications of a precipitation-runoff model, INFIL, which used a daily time step to simulate recharge as net infiltration through the root zone. The GSFLOW model offers several potential advantages compared to the previous methods including (1) the ability to simulate complex flow through a thick unsaturated zone (UZ), allowing for the dampening and time delay of recharge relative to the infiltration signal at the top of the UZ and also allowing for the redistribution of flow within the UZ, as enabled by the MODFLOW-NWT and UZF capabilities, (2) the simulation of rejected recharge in response to the dynamics of groundwater discharge and low permeability zones in the UZ, (3) a more explicit representation of streamflow and recharge processes in the mostly ephemeral stream channels that characterize the DVRFS, and (4) the ability to simulate complex flow paths for runoff occurring as both overland flow and shallow subsurface flow (interflow) in the soil zone using a network of cascades connecting hydrologic response units (HRUs). Simulations were done using a daily time step for water years 1980-2010. Preliminary estimates of recharge using GSFLOW indicate that the distribution of recharge is highly variable both spatially and temporally due to variability in precipitation, snowmelt, evapotranspiration, runoff, and the permeability of bedrock and alluvium underlying the root zone. Results averaged over the areas of subbasins were similar to

  19. Numerical Groundwater Flow Modeling of the Arsenic Contaminated Gotra Aquifer, West Bengal, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, C. E.; Desbarats, A. J.; Beckie, R. D.; Pal, T.; Mukherjee, P. K.

    2009-12-01

    We present results of a groundwater flow study in a 7 square kilometer region centered on our field site in the village of Gotra, West Bengal, India, where naturally occurring arsenic contaminates shallow groundwater (mostly < 40 m below surface) at levels that exceed World Health Organization limits. Field investigations since 2004 include sediment coring, geochemical surveys of domestic wells and dedicated piezometers, and monitoring of piezometric levels with dataloggers in several wells over a period of three years. The village itself is situated upon the natural levee of a sinuous abandoned channel, which terminates a classical fluvio-deltaic depositional sequence originating from the north east. The formerly prograding meander bend deposited point bar sands that now comprise the 25-30m-thick shallow aquifer, while incising a deeper sand unit as well as a floodplain sequence to the south west. Hand-pumped domestic tubewells are restricted to the point bar sands, whereas the majority of irrigation wells are screened within the deeper aquifer. Both steady-state and transient simulations were used to estimate aquifer recharge and boundary fluxes, as well as to distinguish groundwater flow paths and average residence times under the influence of irrigation and seasonal stresses. The hydrogeology of the deeper aquifer, as well as the thickness and continuity of the low permeable paleosol separating shallow and deep flow systems are major uncertainties that are explored through model sensitivity testing. Recharge to the shallow flow system is estimated at ~170mm/yr, predominantly by monsoon precipitation. Groundwater in the arsenic affected area generally flows downward through the fine-grained channel-fill deposits, then horizontally through the point bar sands perpendicular to the trend of the abandoned channel. This flowpath coincides with observed geochemical gradients from surveys of domestic well quality conducted in previous years, and supports a model of

  20. Detailed measurement of the magnitude and orientation of thermal gradients in lined boreholes for characterizing groundwater flow in fractured rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pehme, Peeter; Parker, Beth L.; Cherry, John A.; Blohm, Detlef

    2014-05-01

    Recent developments have led to revitalization of the use of temperature logging for characterizing flow through fractured rock. The sealing of boreholes using water-filled, flexible impermeable liners prevents vertical cross connection between fractures intersecting the hole and establishes a static water column with a temperature stratification that mimics that in the surrounding formation. Measurement of the temperature profile of the lined-hole, water column (using a high sensitivity single-point probe achieving resolution on the order of 0.001 °C) has identified fractures with active flow under ambient groundwater conditions (without cross connecting flow along the borehole). Detection of flow in fractures was further improved with the use of a heater to create thermal disequilibrium in the active line source (ALS) technique and eliminate normal depth limitations in the process. This paper presents another advancement; detailed measurement of the magnitude and direction of the thermal gradient to characterize flow through fractured rock. The temperature within the water column is measured along the length of the lined hole using a temperature vector probe (TVP): four high sensitivity sensors arranged in a tetrahedral pattern oriented using three directional magnetometers. Based on these data, the horizontal and vertical components of the thermal field, as well as the direction of temperature gradient are determined, typically at depth intervals of less than 0.01 m. This probe was assessed and refined by trials in over 30 lined boreholes; the results from two holes through a fractured dolostone aquifer in Guelph, Ontario are used as exampled. Since no other device exists for measuring flow magnitude and direction under the ambient flow condition created by lined holes, the performance of the TVP is assessed by examining the reproducibility of the temperature measurements through an ALS test, and by the consistency of the results relative to other types of

  1. Simulation of ground-water flow and potential land subsidence, upper Santa Cruz Basin, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, R.T.; Benedict, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    A numerical ground-water flow model of the upper Santa Cruz basin in Pinal, Pima, and Santa Cruz Counties was developed to evaluate predevelopment conditions in 1940, ground-water withdrawals for 1940-86, and potential water-level declines and land subsidence for 1987-2024. Simulations of steady-state ground-water conditions indicate 12,900 acre-feet of ground-water inflow, 15,260 acre-feet of outflow, 53,000 acre-feet of pre- development pumpage, 29,840 acre-feet of mountain- front recharge, and 34,020 acre-feet of streamflow infiltration in 1940. Simulations of transient ground-water conditions indicate a total of 6.6 million acre-feet of net pumpage and 3.4 million acre-feet of water removed from aquifer storage for 1941-86. A difference of 1.2 million acre-feet between estimated and net pumpage is attributed to increased recharge from irrigation return flow, mine return flow, and infiltration of sewage effluent. Estimated natural recharge represents 40 percent of pumpage for 1966-86 and averaged 63,860 acre-feet per year for 1940-57 and 76,250 acre-feet per year for 1958-86. The increase in recharge after 1958 was coincident with above- average winter streamflow in the Santa Cruz River for 1959-86. Increased recharge after 1958 and decreased pumpage after 1975 contributed to decreased water-level declines or to recoveries after 1977 in wells near the Santa Cruz River and its tributaries. The results of projection simu- lations indicate that a maximum potential subsi- dence for 1987-2024 ranges from 1.2 feet for an inelastic specific storage of .0001 ft to 12 feet for an inelastic specific storage of .0015 ft. The simulations were made on the basis of pumpage and recharge rates from 1986 and by using a preconso- lidation-stress threshold of 100 feet. A permanent reduction in acquitard storage can range from 1 to 12 percent of the potential loss of 3.9 million acre-feet in aquifer-system storage for 1987-2024.

  2. Approximate analytic solutions to 3D unconfined groundwater flow within regional 2D models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther, K.; Haitjema, H. M.

    2000-04-01

    We present methods for finding approximate analytic solutions to three-dimensional (3D) unconfined steady state groundwater flow near partially penetrating and horizontal wells, and for combining those solutions with regional two-dimensional (2D) models. The 3D solutions use distributed singularities (analytic elements) to enforce boundary conditions on the phreatic surface and seepage faces at vertical wells, and to maintain fixed-head boundary conditions, obtained from the 2D model, at the perimeter of the 3D model. The approximate 3D solutions are analytic (continuous and differentiable) everywhere, including on the phreatic surface itself. While continuity of flow is satisfied exactly in the infinite 3D flow domain, water balance errors can occur across the phreatic surface.

  3. Understanding response times and groundwater flow dynamics of thaw zone (talik) evolution below lakes in the Yukon Flats, Alaska, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellman, T. P.; Minsley, B. J.; Voss, C. I.; Walvoord, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    In cold regions, hydrologic systems possess seasonal and perennial ice-free zones (taliks) within areas of permafrost that control and are enhanced by groundwater flow. Simulation of talik development that follows lake formation in watersheds modeled after those in the Yukon Flats of interior Alaska (USA) provides insight on the coupled interaction between groundwater flow and ice distribution. The SUTRA groundwater simulator with freeze-thaw physics is used to examine the effect of climate, lake size, and lake-groundwater relations on talik formation. Considering a range of these factors, simulated times for a through-going sub-lake talik to form through 90 m of permafrost range from ~200 to >1,000 years (vertical thaw rates <0.1-0.5 m yr^-1). Seasonal temperature cycles along lake margins impact supra-permafrost flow and late-stage cryologic processes. Warmer climate accelerates complete permafrost thaw and enhances seasonal flow within the supra-permafrost layer. Prior to open talik formation, sub-lake permafrost thaw is dominated by heat conduction. When hydraulic conditions induce upward or downward flow between the lake and sub-permafrost aquifer, thaw rates are greatly increased. The complexity of ground-ice and water-flow interplay, together with anticipated warming in the arctic, underscores the utility of coupled groundwater-energy transport models in evaluating hydrologic systems impacted by permafrost.

  4. Using noble gas tracers to constrain a groundwater flow model with recharge elevations: A novel approach for mountainous terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doyle, Jessica M.; Gleeson, Tom; Manning, Andrew H.; Mayer, K. Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Environmental tracers provide information on groundwater age, recharge conditions, and flow processes which can be helpful for evaluating groundwater sustainability and vulnerability. Dissolved noble gas data have proven particularly useful in mountainous terrain because they can be used to determine recharge elevation. However, tracer-derived recharge elevations have not been utilized as calibration targets for numerical groundwater flow models. Herein, we constrain and calibrate a regional groundwater flow model with noble-gas-derived recharge elevations for the first time. Tritium and noble gas tracer results improved the site conceptual model by identifying a previously uncertain contribution of mountain block recharge from the Coast Mountains to an alluvial coastal aquifer in humid southwestern British Columbia. The revised conceptual model was integrated into a three-dimensional numerical groundwater flow model and calibrated to hydraulic head data in addition to recharge elevations estimated from noble gas recharge temperatures. Recharge elevations proved to be imperative for constraining hydraulic conductivity, recharge location, and bedrock geometry, and thus minimizing model nonuniqueness. Results indicate that 45% of recharge to the aquifer is mountain block recharge. A similar match between measured and modeled heads was achieved in a second numerical model that excludes the mountain block (no mountain block recharge), demonstrating that hydraulic head data alone are incapable of quantifying mountain block recharge. This result has significant implications for understanding and managing source water protection in recharge areas, potential effects of climate change, the overall water budget, and ultimately ensuring groundwater sustainability.

  5. Impact of heterogeneous permeability distribution on the groundwater flow systems of a small sedimentary basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zech, Alraune; Zehner, Björn; Kolditz, Olaf; Attinger, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Ground water flow systems of shallow sedimentary basins are studied in general by analyzing the fluid dynamics at the real world example of the Thuringian Basin. The impact of the permeability distribution and density differences on the flow velocity pattern, the salt concentration, and the temperature distribution is quantified by means of transient coupled simulations of fluid flow, heat, and mass transport processes. Simulations are performed with different permeabilities in the sedimentary layering and heterogeneous permeability distributions as well as with a non-constant fluid density. Three characteristic numbers are useful to describe the effects of permeability on the development of flow systems and subsurface transport: the relation of permeability between aquiclude and aquifer, the variance, and the correlation length of the log-normal permeability distribution. Density dependent flow due to temperature or concentration gradients is of minor importance for the distribution of the flow systems, but can lead to increased mixing dissolution of salt. Thermal convection is in general not present. The dominant driver of groundwater flow is the topography in combination with the permeability distribution. The results obtained for the Thuringian Basin give general insights into the dynamics of a small sedimentary basin due to the representative character of the basin structure as well as the transferability of the settings to other small sedimentary basins.

  6. Considerations of a nonhomogeneous fluid in the deep groundwater flow system at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.W.

    1988-11-01

    This report presents such a general theory capable of describing the flow on nonhomogeneous fluids in porous media, theory that is a composite from several disciplines including groundwater hydrology, soil physics, civil engineering, petroleum reservoir engineering, mechanics, and mathematical physics. The report discussed the conceptual basis for considering the flow of nonhomogeneous fluids. From this conceptual basis emphasis shifts to providing complete definitions and then appropriately describing those definitions in mathematical terms. Throughout the report, the necessary assumptions are stated in detail because the limitations of any theory are best assessed through careful scrutiny of the assumptions. From the mathematical definitions with appropriate functional dependence the results and constraints needed are derived to provide the general theory necessary to describe the flow of nonhomogeneous fluids in porous media. Particular attention is given to comparing the general theory with the classical theory of flow for a homogeneous fluid. Such comparison provides significant insight to the effects of variable fluid properties on subsurface flow systems. The comparisons also indicate the importance of carefully formulating subsurface flow models within the more general theoretical framework describing the flow of nonhomogeneous fluids in porous media. 29 refs.; 6 figs.; 1 tab.

  7. Mega-scale Groundwater Flow in the Submarine Plover Aquifer, Continental Shelf of Northern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garven, G.; James, B.; Gale, J.

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes a continental-scale groundwater flow system that exists under the sea floor along the ~2,000+ km long passive margin of northern Australia. The flow system has been mapped using data from off-shore petroleum exploration wells, and is confined within a 30~300-m thick sequence of quartzose sandstones of the Plover Formation. The Plover Aquifer comprises a Jurassic-age siliciclastic fluviodeltaic interval that grades stratigraphically into Cretaceous marine sandstones of the overlying Flamingo Group. Observed patterns of hydraulic head indicate a gentle northeast-to-southwest hydraulic gradient, which is parallel to a strong structural fabric created by faulting and extension along the Timor Trench/Australian continental margin. We propose that mostly lateral flow exists within the highly permeable Plover and Flamingo sandstones, over a distance of 1500-2000 km, that extends from the southern foreland basin of Papua, Indonesia, across the Arafura Basin and arches, and the 5-10 km thick passive margin sequence of the Mesozoic-Cenozoic age Sahul Platform. We further propose that this giant hydrodynamic system was created and sustained since Eocene time during uplift of the New Guinea fold-and-thrust belt. The flow system observed today is a paleohydrologic relict of Pleistocene-Holocene times, when glaciation-induced sea level lowstands resulted in subaerial emergence of the Arafura Basin and Sahul Platform. Finite element modeling supports our hypothesis that simple topographically-driven flow created this mega-scale groundwater flow system, which has since been submerged by rising sea levels in the most recent Holocene.

  8. PHAST Version 2-A Program for Simulating Groundwater Flow, Solute Transport, and Multicomponent Geochemical Reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parkhurst, David L.; Kipp, Kenneth L.; Charlton, Scott R.

    2010-01-01

    The computer program PHAST (PHREEQC And HST3D) simulates multicomponent, reactive solute transport in three-dimensional saturated groundwater flow systems. PHAST is a versatile groundwater flow and solute-transport simulator with capabilities to model a wide range of equilibrium and kinetic geochemical reactions. The flow and transport calculations are based on a modified version of HST3D that is restricted to constant fluid density and constant temperature. The geochemical reactions are simulated with the geochemical model PHREEQC, which is embedded in PHAST. Major enhancements in PHAST Version 2 allow spatial data to be defined in a combination of map and grid coordinate systems, independent of a specific model grid (without node-by-node input). At run time, aquifer properties are interpolated from the spatial data to the model grid; regridding requires only redefinition of the grid without modification of the spatial data. PHAST is applicable to the study of natural and contaminated groundwater systems at a variety of scales ranging from laboratory experiments to local and regional field scales. PHAST can be used in studies of migration of nutrients, inorganic and organic contaminants, and radionuclides; in projects such as aquifer storage and recovery or engineered remediation; and in investigations of the natural rock/water interactions in aquifers. PHAST is not appropriate for unsaturated-zone flow, multiphase flow, or density-dependent flow. A variety of boundary conditions are available in PHAST to simulate flow and transport, including specified-head, flux (specified-flux), and leaky (head-dependent) conditions, as well as the special cases of rivers, drains, and wells. Chemical reactions in PHAST include (1) homogeneous equilibria using an ion-association or Pitzer specific interaction thermodynamic model; (2) heterogeneous equilibria between the aqueous solution and minerals, ion exchange sites, surface complexation sites, solid solutions, and gases; and

  9. Using isotopic, hydrogeochemical-tracer and temperature data to characterize recharge and flow paths in a complex karst groundwater flow system in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ziyong; Ma, Rui; Wang, Yanxin; Ma, Teng; Liu, Yunde

    2016-04-01

    Isotopic and hydrogeochemical analysis, combined with temperature investigation, was conducted to characterize the flow system in the carbonate aquifer at Taiyuan, northern China. The previous division of karst subsystems in Taiyuan, i.e. the Xishan (XMK), Dongshan (DMK) and Beishan (BMK) mountain systems, were also examined. The measured δD, δ 18O and 3He/4He in water indicate that both thermal and cold groundwaters have a meteoric origin rather than deep crustal origin. Age dating using 3H and 14C shows that groundwater samples from discharge zones along faults located at the margin of mountains in the XMK and DMK are a mixture of paleometeoric thermal waters and younger cold waters from local flow systems. 14C data suggest that the average age was about 10,000 years and 4,000 years for thermal and cold groundwater in discharge zones, respectively. Based on the data of temperature, water solute chemical properties, 14C, δ 34SSO4, 87Sr/86Sr and δ 18O, different flow paths in the XMK and DMK were distinguished. Shallow groundwater passes through the upper Ordovician formations, producing younger waters at the discharge zone (low temperature and ionic concentration and enriched D and 18O). Deep groundwater flows through the lower Ordovi