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Sample records for active growing season

  1. Projected changes in Malawi's growing season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizy, Edward K.; Cook, Kerry H.; Chimphamba, James; McCusker, Brent

    2015-09-01

    Regional climate model projections at 30-km resolution are used to predict future mid-century and late-century growing season changes over Malawi due to global warming under the Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 business-as-usual emissions forcing scenario. Three different methods for estimating growing season characteristics are applied and evaluated. All three methods yield reasonable growing season length, onset, and demise date estimates over Malawi given the wide range of uncertainty of the observations. The projections indicate the likelihood for a shorter growing season in the future over Malawi south of 13.5°S. At mid-century the growing season length is predicted to be 20-40 % (20-55 days) shorter over the southernmost districts and 5-20 % (5-30 days) shorter over the central districts. By late-century the length is predicted to be 25-55 % (20-70 days) shorter with significant differences extending into northern Malawi. The shorter growing season is primarily associated with an earlier demise date, as no significant change in the onset date is predicted. Analysis of the regional circulation and horizontal moisture flux transport indicates that the earlier demise is associated with an intensification of the thermal low over the Kalahari Desert to the south and west of Malawi and an expansion of the mid-tropospheric Kalahari anticyclone over southern Africa. The stronger thermal low/anticyclone enhances the moisture flux divergence over Malawi suppressing the convective activity at the end of the wet season.

  2. Impact of Faba Bean-Seed Rhizobial Inoculation on Microbial Activity in the Rhizosphere Soil during Growing Season.

    PubMed

    Siczek, Anna; Lipiec, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Inoculation of legume seeds with Rhizobium affects soil microbial community and processes, especially in the rhizosphere. This study aimed at assessing the effect of Rhizobium inoculation on microbial activity in the faba bean rhizosphere during the growing season in a field experiment on a Haplic Luvisol derived from loess. Faba bean (Vicia faba L.) seeds were non-inoculated (NI) or inoculated (I) with Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae and sown. The rhizosphere soil was analyzed for the enzymatic activities of dehydrogenases, urease, protease and acid phosphomonoesterase, and functional diversity (catabolic potential) using the Average Well Color Development, Shannon-Weaver, and Richness indices following the community level physiological profiling from Biolog EcoPlate™. The analyses were done on three occasions corresponding to the growth stages of: 5-6 leaf, flowering, and pod formation. The enzymatic activities were higher in I than NI (p < 0.05) throughout the growing season. However, none of the functional diversity indices differed significantly under both treatments, regardless of the growth stage. This work showed that the functional diversity of the microbial communities was a less sensitive tool than enzyme activities in assessment of rhizobial inoculation effects on rhizosphere microbial activity. PMID:27213363

  3. Impact of Faba Bean-Seed Rhizobial Inoculation on Microbial Activity in the Rhizosphere Soil during Growing Season

    PubMed Central

    Siczek, Anna; Lipiec, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Inoculation of legume seeds with Rhizobium affects soil microbial community and processes, especially in the rhizosphere. This study aimed at assessing the effect of Rhizobium inoculation on microbial activity in the faba bean rhizosphere during the growing season in a field experiment on a Haplic Luvisol derived from loess. Faba bean (Vicia faba L.) seeds were non-inoculated (NI) or inoculated (I) with Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae and sown. The rhizosphere soil was analyzed for the enzymatic activities of dehydrogenases, urease, protease and acid phosphomonoesterase, and functional diversity (catabolic potential) using the Average Well Color Development, Shannon-Weaver, and Richness indices following the community level physiological profiling from Biolog EcoPlate™. The analyses were done on three occasions corresponding to the growth stages of: 5–6 leaf, flowering, and pod formation. The enzymatic activities were higher in I than NI (p < 0.05) throughout the growing season. However, none of the functional diversity indices differed significantly under both treatments, regardless of the growth stage. This work showed that the functional diversity of the microbial communities was a less sensitive tool than enzyme activities in assessment of rhizobial inoculation effects on rhizosphere microbial activity. PMID:27213363

  4. Climate change, growing season water deficit and vegetation activity along the north-south transect of Eastern China from 1982 through 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, P.; Yu, Z.; Liu, S.; Wei, X.; Wang, J.; Zegre, N.

    2012-05-01

    Considerable work has been done to examine the relationship between environmental constraints and vegetation activities represented by the remote sensing-based Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). However, the relationships along either environmental or vegetation type gradients are rarely examined. The aim of this paper was to identify the vegetation types that are potentially susceptible to climate change through examining the interaction between vegetation activity and water deficit. We selected 12 major vegetation types along the north-south transect of Eastern China (NSTEC), examined their time trends from 1982 to 2006 with respect to climate change, vegetation activity and water deficit. The results showed that all vegetation types experienced warming during the study period, and the majority of them experienced precipitation decline. Warming and growing season water deficit exert counteracting controls on vegetation activity. Our study found insignificant greening trends in the northernmost cold temperate coniferous forest (CTCF), three temperate herbaceous types including the meadow steppe (TMS), grass steppe (TGS) and grassland (TG), where the growing season warming exerted more than offset effect on vegetation activity (phenology) than growing season water deficit. For the three temperate forest including the coniferous (TCF), mixed (TMF) and deciduous-broadleaved (TDBF), growing season water deficit was the main constraint on vegetation activity. Differently, the growing season browning in subtropical or tropical forests of coniferous (STCF), deciduous-broadleaved (SDBF) and evergreen-broadleaved (SEBF) and subtropical grasslands (STG) were likely attributed to decline in sunshine duration due to increased summer cloudiness. Poor water status in TDS, TG, TMS and severe drought in TGS have been identified by using growing season water deficit index (GWDI), suggested these ecosystems were subjected to severe progressing drought that may create

  5. Monitoring and modeling growing season dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Michael Aaron

    Phenology, the study of recurring biological cycles and their connection to climate, is a growing field of global change research. Vegetation phenology exerts a strong control over carbon cycles, weather, and global radiation partitioning between sensible and latent heat fluxes. Phenological monitors of the timing and length of the growing season can also be used as barometers of vegetation responses to climatic variability. In the following chapters, I present research investigating the monitoring and interpretation of growing season dynamics. Ecological modeling is limited more by data availability than by model theory. In particular, the description of vegetation functional types (biomes) for distributed modeling has been lacking. In chapter 1, I present a documented description and sensitivity analysis of the 34 parameters used in the ecosystem model, BIOME-BGC, for major temperate biomes. I applied BIOME-BGC in the eastern U.S. deciduous broad leaf forest and found that minor phenological variation created large impacts on simulated net ecosystem exchange of carbon (chapter 2). In addition to simulating the effects of growing season variability, it is also important to develop accurate field monitoring techniques, both as a means of testing modeling activities and as a validation of satellite remote sensing estimates. I conducted an intercomparison of field techniques that could be used to monitor phenological dynamics in and ecosystems (chapter 3). I found that methodological barriers to rapid, low cost monitoring were severe, but that a digital camera with both visible and near-infrared channels was a viable option. Satellite remote sensing provides the only means of obtaining consistent estimates of phenological variation at a global scale, yet our understanding of these data has been limited by a lack of ground observations. To address this problem, I proposed, developed, and wrote a phenology measurement protocol for the Global Learning and Observations

  6. Climate change in winter versus the growing-season leads to different effects on soil microbial activity in northern hardwood forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorensen, P. O.; Templer, P. H.; Finzi, A.

    2014-12-01

    Mean winter air temperatures have risen by approximately 2.5˚ C per decade over the last fifty years in the northeastern U.S., reducing the maximum depth of winter snowpack by approximately 26 cm over this period and the duration of winter snow cover by 3.6 to 4.2 days per decade. Forest soils in this region are projected to experience a greater number of freeze-thaw cycles and lower minimum winter soil temperatures as the depth and duration of winter snow cover declines in the next century. Climate change is likely to result not only in lower soil temperatures during winter, but also higher soil temperatures during the growing-season. We conducted two complementary experiments to determine how colder soils in winter and warmer soils in the growing-season affect microbial activity in hardwood forests at Harvard Forest, MA and Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, NH. A combination of removing snow via shoveling and buried heating cables were used to induce freeze-thaw events during winter and to warm soils 5˚C above ambient temperatures during the growing-season. Increasing the depth and duration of soil frost via snow-removal resulted in short-term reductions in soil nitrogen (N) production via microbial proteolytic enzyme activity and net N mineralization following snowmelt, prior to tree leaf-out. Declining mass specific rates of carbon (C) and N mineralization associated with five years of snow removal at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest may be an indication of microbial physiological adaptation to winter climate change. Freeze-thaw cycles during winter reduced microbial extracellular enzyme activity and the temperature sensitivity of microbial C and N mineralization during the growing-season, potentially offsetting nutrient and soil C losses due to soil warming in the growing-season. Our multiple experimental approaches show that winter climate change is likely to contribute to reduced microbial activity in northern hardwood forests.

  7. Elevated CO2 further lengthens growing season under warming conditions.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Fox, Melissa; Steltzer, Heidi; Trlica, M J; McMaster, Gregory S; Andales, Allan A; LeCain, Dan R; Morgan, Jack A

    2014-06-12

    Observations of a longer growing season through earlier plant growth in temperate to polar regions have been thought to be a response to climate warming. However, data from experimental warming studies indicate that many species that initiate leaf growth and flowering earlier also reach seed maturation and senesce earlier, shortening their active and reproductive periods. A conceptual model to explain this apparent contradiction, and an analysis of the effect of elevated CO2--which can delay annual life cycle events--on changing season length, have not been tested. Here we show that experimental warming in a temperate grassland led to a longer growing season through earlier leaf emergence by the first species to leaf, often a grass, and constant or delayed senescence by other species that were the last to senesce, supporting the conceptual model. Elevated CO2 further extended growing, but not reproductive, season length in the warmed grassland by conserving water, which enabled most species to remain active longer. Our results suggest that a longer growing season, especially in years or biomes where water is a limiting factor, is not due to warming alone, but also to higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations that extend the active period of plant annual life cycles. PMID:24759322

  8. Climate change, growing season water deficit and vegetation activity along the north-south transect of eastern China from 1982 through 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, P.; Yu, Z.; Liu, S.; Wei, X.; Wang, J.; Zegre, N.; Liu, N.

    2012-10-01

    Considerable work has been done to examine the relationship between environmental constraints and vegetation activities represented by the remote sensing-based normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). However, the relationships along either environmental or vegetational gradients are rarely examined. The aim of this paper was to identify the vegetation types that are potentially susceptible to climate change through examining their interactions between vegetation activity and evaporative water deficit. We selected 12 major vegetation types along the north-south transect of eastern China (NSTEC), and tested their time trends in climate change, vegetation activity and water deficit during the period 1982-2006. The result showed significant warming trends accompanied by general precipitation decline in the majority of vegetation types. Despite that the whole transect increased atmospheric evaporative demand (ET0) during the study period, the actual evapotranspiration (ETa) showed divergent trends with ET0 in most vegetation types. Warming and water deficit exert counteracting controls on vegetation activity. Our study found insignificant greening trends in cold temperate coniferous forest (CTCF), temperate deciduous shrub (TDS), and three temperate herbaceous types including the meadow steppe (TMS), grass steppe (TGS) and grassland (TG), where warming exerted more effect on NDVI than offset by water deficit. The increasing growing season water deficit posed a limitation on the vegetation activity of temperate coniferous forest (TCF), mixed forest (TMF) and deciduous broad-leaved forest (TDBF). Differently, the growing season brownings in subtropical or tropical forests of coniferous (STCF), deciduous broad-leaved (SDBF), evergreen broad-leaved (SEBF) and subtropical grasslands (STG) were likely attributed to evaporative energy limitation. The growing season water deficit index (GWDI) has been formulated to assess ecohydrological equilibrium and thus indicating

  9. L-band active/passive time series measurements over a growing season usign the COMRAD ground-based SMAP

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scheduled to launch in October 2014, NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission will provide high-resolution global mapping of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state every 2-3 days. These new measurements of the hydrological condition of the Earth’s surface will build on data from European Spa...

  10. Rainfall and the length of the growing season in Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odekunle, T. O.

    2004-03-01

    This study examines the length of the growing season in Nigeria using the daily rainfall data of Ikeja, Ondo, Ilorin, Kaduna and Kano. The data were collected from the archives of the Nigerian Meteorological Services, Oshodi, Lagos. The length of the growing season was determined using the cumulative percentage mean rainfall and daily rainfall probability methods.Although rainfall in Ikeja, Ondo, Ilorin, Kaduna, and Kano appears to commence around the end of the second dekad of March, middle of the third dekad of March, mid April, end of the first dekad of May, and early June respectively, its distribution characteristics at the respective stations remain inadequate for crop germination, establishment, and development till the end of the second dekad of May, early third dekad of May, mid third dekad of May, end of May, and end of the first dekad of July respectively. Also, rainfall at the various stations appears to retreat starting from the early third dekad of October, early third dekad of October, end of the first dekad of October, end of September, and early second dekad of September respectively, but its distribution characteristics only remain adequate for crop development at the respective stations till around the end of the second dekad of October, end of the second dekad of October, middle of the first dekad of October, early October, and middle of the first dekad of September respectively. Thus, the active lengths of the growing season are approximately 5 months, 5 months, 4 months, 4 months, and 2 months respectively. Plants that are short-dry-spell tolerant may thrive early in the rainy season, i.e. from the end of the second dekad of March to the end of the second dekad of May (in Ikeja), middle of the third dekad of March to the early third dekad of May (in Ondo), mid April to the middle of the third dekad of May (in Ilorin), end of the first dekad of May to end of May (in Kaduna), and early June to the end of the first dekad in July (in Kano), but

  11. Monitoring Southern African Rainfall Season Utilizing Growing Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husak, G. J.; Magadzire, T.

    2005-12-01

    Variability in timing and amount of rainfall during the growing season in southern Africa can have a dramatic impact on livelihoods in the region. This research integrates satellite model rainfall amounts with expectations for the remainder of the season to provide an envelope of likely outcomes for different growing regions. Satellite information combined with station observations combine to make the African Rainfall Climatology (ARC), which is used to estimate the start of season (SOS) and monitor the season-to-date rainfall accumulations at a pixel level. The Collaborative Historical African Rainfall Model (CHARM) - a 36-year climatology based on available station fields, global climate models and an orographic component - is used to estimate various scenarios for the remainder of the season. The season length is defined by location specific length of growing period provided by the Southern African Development Community (SADC). Once the SOS is observed according to the ARC, seasonal accumulations for each pixel begin and are evaluated at a dekadal interval. These accumulations can be compared to historical accumulations after an equal number of dekads to evaluate the progression of the season as a percentage of historical season-to-date totals for each pixel. Rainfall accumulations for the remainder of the growing period can be tallied for each year of the CHARM dataset, and Gamma probability distribution parameters can be fit to these values. Using these distribution parameters, it is possible to evaluate scenarios for the remainder of the season and combine them with the accumulations from the ARC to arrive at total rainfall accumulated during a growing period. Analysis of these totals can be compared with long-term mean accumulations for the growing period to estimate how crops will fare relative to past performance. Evaluation of various wet and dry scenarios for the remainder of the season, defined here as the 80th percentile and 20th percentile, provide an

  12. Seasonal branch and fine root growth of juvenile loblolly pine five growing seasons after fertilization.

    PubMed

    Sword, M. A.; Gravatt, D. A.; Faulkner, P. L.; Chambers, J. L.

    1996-01-01

    In 1989, we established two replications of two fertilization treatments in a 10-year-old loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantation. Between March and September 1993, branch internode and needle fascicle expansion in the upper and lower third of crowns were measured weekly on three south-facing branches of each of four trees, and new root initiation and elongation were measured at 10-day intervals in three vertical rhizotrons per plot. In one replication, soil water content was measured daily. Fertilization significantly increased the expansion of first flush internodes in the upper crown and first flush needle fascicles in the upper and lower crown. New root growth was stimulated by fertilization in the second half of the growing season. The timing of root growth responses to fertilization corresponded to branch phenologies in the upper and lower crown that were conducive to increased basipetal transport of photosynthate. We conclude, therefore, that new root growth was linked to source-sink activities in the crown. Root initiation was greater in the upper than in the lower part of the soil profile; however, as the growing season progressed and water deficit increased, this relationship was reversed. The effect of soil depth on seasonal root growth was closely associated with water availability, suggesting that root initiation deep in the soil profile is critical for the continued production of new roots in environments subjected to short-term, but relatively severe, water deficits. PMID:14871782

  13. GrowLab: Activities for Growing Minds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pranis, Eve; Cohen, Joy

    As students observe plant growth, the questions that naturally arise can provide opportunities for student exploration and discovery. This guide presents a collection of activities for students in grades K-8 that turn students' questions into life sciences learning experiences. The guide contains four chapters, each with background information and…

  14. Photosynthetic Control of Atmospheric Carbonyl Sulfide during the Growing Season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. Elliott; Carmichael, Gregory R.; Chai, T.; Mena-Carrasco, M.; Tang, Y.; Blake, D. R.; Blake, N. J.; Vay, Stephanie A.; Collatz, G. James; Baker, I.; Berry, J. A.; Montzka, S. A.; Sweeney, C.; Schnoor, J. L.; Stanier, Charles O.

    2008-01-01

    Climate models incorporate photosynthesis-climate feedbacks, yet we lack robust tools for large-scale assessments of these processes. Recent work suggests that carbonyl sulfide (COS), a trace gas consumed by plants, could provide a valuable constraint on photosynthesis. Here we analyze airborne observations of COS and carbon dioxide concentrations during the growing season over North America with a three-dimensional atmospheric transport model. We successfully modeled the persistent vertical drawdown of atmospheric COS using the quantitative relation between COS and photosynthesis that has been measured in plant chamber experiments. Furthermore, this drawdown is driven by plant uptake rather than other continental and oceanic fluxes in the model. These results provide quantitative evidence that COS gradients in the continental growing season may have broad use as a measurement-based photosynthesis tracer.

  15. 317/319 phytoremediation site monitoring report - 2003 growing season.

    SciTech Connect

    Negri, M. C.; Gopalakrishnan, G.; Hamilton, C.; Energy Systems

    2004-02-20

    In 1999, Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) designed and installed a series of engineered plantings consisting of a vegetative cover system and approximately 800 hybrid poplars and willows rooting at various predetermined depths. The plants were installed using various methods including Applied Natural Science's TreeWell{reg_sign} system. The goal of the installation was to protect downgradient surface and groundwater by hydraulic control of the contaminated plume by intercepting the contaminated groundwater with the tree roots, removing moisture from the upgradient soil area, reducing water infiltration, preventing soil erosion, degrading and/or transpiring the residual volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and removing tritium from the subsoil and groundwater. This report presents the results of the monitoring activities conducted by Argonne's Energy Systems Division (ES) in the growing season of 2003. ES was tasked with the biomonitoring of the plantation to determine contaminant uptake and groundwater contact. VOCs were found in plant tissue both at the French Drain and the Hydraulic Control locations in varying concentrations, and tritium levels in transpirate was found to continue a trend of higher concentrations compared to the background in the ANL-E area.

  16. Microwave remote sensing of flash droughts during crop growing seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xing; Ma, Zhuguo; Pan, Ming; Shi, Chunxiang

    2015-04-01

    Severe short-term droughts frequently occurred over China in recent years, with devastating impacts on crop production. Short-term droughts during the crop growing seasons sometimes occur together with abnormally high temperature, and positive feedbacks between the land and atmosphere often intensify the drought conditions. These droughts are recently termed as "flash droughts" due to their rapid development, unusual intensity and devastating impacts. This study assesses the capability of microwave remote sensing in detecting soil moisture droughts over China and in providing early warnings. The 22-year (1992-2013) satellite surface soil moisture retrievals produced by the European Space Agency Climate Change Initiative (ESA CCI) are compared against the in-situ observations at 312 stations in China, the ERA Interim and GLDAS soil moisture reanalysis, and the observed rainfall deficit. Both the reanalysis and remote sensing products can only detect less than 60% of drought months over most in-situ stations, but they capture the responses of inter-annual drought variations to ENSO at river basin scales quite well. As compared with reanalysis, the satellite products provide independent drought information over sparsely observed regions such as northwestern China, and the active microwave product with better vegetation penetration works the best in southern China. This study suggests that the microwave remote sensing data is useful for soil moisture drought monitor as well as verification for drought modeling or forecasting.

  17. Growing season precipitation in Finland under recent and projected climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ylhäisi, J. S.; Tietäväinen, , H.; Peltonen-Sainio, P.; Venäläinen, A.; Eklund, J.; Räisänen, J.; Jylhä, K.

    2010-07-01

    The past and projected future precipitation sum in May-September for two areas in Finland, one located in the south-west (SW) and the other in the north-east (NE), is studied using 13 regional climate simulations and three observational datasets. The conditions in the present-day climate for agricultural crop production are far more favourable in the south-western part of the country than the more continental north-eastern Finland. Based on a new high-resolution observational precipitation dataset for Finland (FMI_grid), with a resolution of 10×10 km, the only statistically significant past long-term (1908-2008) precipitation tendencies in the two study regions are positive. Differences between FMI_grid and two other observational datasets during 1961-2000 are rather large in the NE, whereas in the SW the datasets agree better. Observational uncertainties stem from the interpolation and sampling errors. The projected increases in precipitation in the early stage of the growing season would be most favourable for agricultural productivity, but the projected increases in August and September might be harmful. Model projections for the future indicate a statistically significant increase in precipitation for most of the growing season by 2100, but the distribution of precipitation within the growing season is not necessarily the most optimal.

  18. Pollutants dynamics in a rice field catchment during storms in the growing and non-growing seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. S.; Lee, J. B.; Cho, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    We compared the behavior of pollutants such as total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorous (TP), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and suspended solid (SS) in runoff from a Korean rice field catchment during storm events between growing and non-growing seasons. The study catchment has a size of 21.9 ha and its water source is river. Fertilizers were applied at rates of 91 N kg ha-1 and 18 P kg ha-1 as basal and top dressings. The rice fields are shallowly (3-10 cm) flooded during most of the growing season, and therefore runoff water always flows during the growing season but flows only during storms in the non-growing season. TN concentrations in runoff water decreased with discharge irrespective of the season, whereas TP, COD and SS concentrations increased with discharge. Event mean concentrations (EMCs) of pollutants in runoff water from the catchment during the non-growing season were 2 to 3 times higher than those during the growing season. This may be because flooded water in the growing season greatly reduces transport of pollutant associated with soil erosion. The results suggest that the rice field catchment may act as a sink of some pollutants during growing season but as a source of all pollutants during non-growing season. .

  19. Inter-annual Variation in Growing Season Length of a Tropical Seasonal Forest in Northern Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshifuji, N.; Tanaka, N.; Suzuki, M.; Tantasirin, C.

    2007-12-01

    Growing season length is an important factor affecting energy balance and water and carbon cycling at deciduous forests. The impact of its inter-annual variation on annual energy and carbon exchange is likely to be critical especially in tropical region because of high radiant energy throughout the year; however, few studies investigated inter-annual variation in growing season length of tropical deciduous forests. This study revealed year-to-year variations in the canopy duration and transpiration period as measures of growing season length using time series data of radiative transmittance and heat pulse velocities of canopy trees in a teak plantation in northern Thailand from 2001 to 2006. This study also examined whether year-to-year variation in growing season revealed by field measurements could be detected by satellite NDVI data, as a first step to investigate the inter- annual variation in growing season length of deciduous forests over tropical monsoon region. Leaf-out and transpiration commenced earlier in 2001 than other years following exceptionally heavy rainfall in the late dry season, suggesting that enhanced soil moisture advanced leaf unfolding and start of transpiration. Leaf-fall and decline in transpiration at the beginning of 2003 were late in coming in correlation with a prolonged rainy season. Declines in transpiration were directly controlled by soil moisture at the beginning of the dry season. These results revealed that soil moisture is a major cause of large inter-annual variation in the growing season at this site. Seasonal variation in NDVI corresponded to that of LAI, while transpiration declined earlier than LAI and NDVI in the dry season. Year-to-year variation in canopy duration could be also detected by NDVI. The variation in canopy duration and transpiration period of this site from 2001-2006 spanned about 60 days. This was much larger than the inter-annual variations previously reported in temperate deciduous forests, implying a

  20. Increased photosynthesis compensates for shorter growing season in subarctic tundra - seven years of snow accumulation manipulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosiö, Julia; Johansson, Margareta; Njuabe, Herbert; Christensen, Torben R.

    2013-04-01

    This study was initiated to analyze the effect of snow cover on photosynthesis and plant growth in subarctic mires underlain by permafrost. Due to their narrow environmental window these raised bogs, often referred to as palsa mires, are highly sensitive to climatic changes. In Fennoscandia palsa mires are currently subjected to climate related thawing and shift in vegetational and hydrological patterns. Yet, we know little of how these subarctic permafrost mires react and feed back to such changes. By using snow fences to hinder snow drift the accumulation of snow was increased in six plots (10x20 m) in a snow manipulation experiment on a subarctic permafrost mire in northern Sweden. The thicker snow pack prolongs the duration of the snow cover in spring, causing a delay in the onset, as well as an overall shortening of the growing season. By measuring incoming and reflected photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) we wanted to address the question whether the increased snow thickness and associated delay of the growing season start affected the absorbed PAR and the accumulated gross primary production (GPP) over the season. The reflected PAR was measured at twelve plots where six of the plots experienced increased snow accumulation (treatment), and remaining six plots were untreated (control). Minikin QT sensors with integrated data loggers logged incoming and reflected PAR hourly throughout the growing seasons of 2011 and 2012. In July - September 2010 PAR measurements were coupled with flux chamber measurements to assess GPP and light use efficiency of the plots. The increased accumulation of snow prolonged the duration of the snow cover in spring, causing a delay in the onset, as well as an overall shortening of the growing season in the treated plots. The end of the growing season was not affected by the snow manipulation. The delay of the growing season start and hence overall shortening of the growing season in the treatment plots was 18 days in 2011 and 3

  1. Comparison of COD and SS dynamics in a rice catchment during storms between the growing and non-growing season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Soo; Lee, Jeong-Beom; Lee, Jae-Yong; Li, Si-Hong

    2014-05-01

    We compared the behavior of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and suspended solid (SS) in runoff from a Korean rice field catchment during storm events between growing and non-growing seasons. The study catchment has a size of 21.9 ha with a water source of river. Fertilizers were applied at rates of 91 N kg ha-1 and 18 P kg ha-1 as basal and top dressings. The rice fields are shallowly flooded during most of the growing season, and therefore runoff water always occurs during the growing season. However, runoff water occurs only during storms in the non-growing season. Overall, COD and SS concentrations increased with discharge. Event mean concentration (EMC) of COD in runoff water from the catchment during the non-growing season was 2.6 times higher than that during the growing season. However EMC of SS in runoff water from the paddy field catchment during the non-growing season was almost the same as that during the growing season, much lower than that from the upland catchment. This may be because rice roots and residues in paddy soil during the non-growing season greatly reduce transport of SS associated with soil erosion.

  2. 317/319 phytoremediation site monitoring report - 2005 growing season.

    SciTech Connect

    Negri, M. C.; Gopalakrishnan, G.; Energy Systems

    2006-03-31

    In 1999, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) designed and installed a series of engineered plantings consisting of a vegetative cover system and approximately 800 hybrid poplars and willows rooting at various predetermined depths. The plants were installed using various methods including Applied Natural Science's TreeWell{reg_sign} system. The goal of the installation was to protect downgradient surface and groundwater by hydraulic control of the contaminated plume by intercepting the contaminated groundwater with the tree roots, removing moisture from the upgradient soil area, reducing water infiltration, preventing soil erosion, degrading and/or transpiring the residual volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and removing tritium from the subsoil and groundwater. This report presents the results of the monitoring activities conducted by Argonne's Energy Systems Division (ES) in the growing season of 2005. Monitoring of the planted trees began soon after the trees were installed in 1999 and has been conducted every summer since then. As the trees grew and consolidated their growth into the contaminated soil and groundwater, their exposure to the contaminants was progressively shown through tissue sampling. However, as trees grow larger, some of the findings obtained in the early years when trees were much smaller may not hold true now and need to be verified again. During the 2005 sampling campaign, data from the French Drain area confirmed the results obtained in 2004 and earlier, and the previously found correlation between soil and branch concentrations. During the 2005 summer, studies under controlled conditions (cartridges) have shown a generally linear dose response of PCE uptake, and have also shown that tree concentrations of PCE decrease after flushing with clean water in short times when trees are exposed to low levels of the contaminant. This data proves that tree concentrations are transient, and that with proper time levels can return close to background

  3. Estimation of Growing Season ET using Wyoming ET Calculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, R. W.; Park, G.

    2011-12-01

    Accurate estimations of Evapotranspiration (ET) and Consumptive Irrigation Requirement (CIR) are essential for water resources planning and management. The Wyoming State Engineer's Office currently determines monthly reference evapotranspiration (ET) with an Excel Spreadsheet ET model using average monthly data from a nearby weather station (usually an airport weather station) for the irrigated area of interest, and interpolates them into daily reference ET using either linear or cubic functions. The purpose of this project is to replace the current Excel model with a GIS-based ET calculator. Our approach uses daily weather data to calculate daily reference and actual ET, and then aggregate actual ET into monthly and seasonal ET. Among many reference ET equations available, the ASCE Standardized Reference Evapotranspiration Equation (ASCE-ET) and the Hargreaves-Samani equations were selected to calculate daily reference ET. Wyoming ET Calculator, a GIS-based ET tool, was developed to calculate daily potential ET, CIR, and actual ET, using daily reference ET, crop coefficients, effective precipitation ratios, and water stress factors. Total monthly and growing season ET and CIR were determined over the Upper Green River Basin in Wyoming. The long term trends of these totals from 1960-2009 were analyzed and compared to trends in weather data (minimum and maximum temperatures, wind speed, and dew point temperature). We also evaluated the total monthly and growing season ET from Wyoming ET Calculator against satellite-based ET (METRIC ET) estimations for June, July, and August of 2009 around an irrigated area near the Wind River Mountain Range in Wyoming. The total monthly ET from Wyoming ET Calculator agrees very well with total monthly ET from METRIC for well-watered crop areas. For other areas, the Wyoming ET Calculator tends to overestimate total monthly ET values than METRIC, because the tool assumes all NLCD crop area are being irrigated.

  4. Responses of Scots pine to waterlogging during growing season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repo, Tapani; Launiainen, Samuli; Lehto, Tarja; Sutinen, Sirkka; Ruhanen, Hanna; Heiskanen, Juha; Laurén, Ari; Silvennoinen, Raimo; Vapaavuori, Elina; Finér, Leena

    2016-04-01

    For the future management and sustainable use of boreal forests it is crucial to consider the rate and strength of tree responses to an elevated water table and the concurrent oxygen limitations, especially in peatlands. We examined the response dynamics of 7-year-old Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) seedlings to a five-week waterlogging (WL) during a growing season in a root lab experiment. WL took place after shoot elongation had ended whereas growth of the trunk diameter was still in progress. We monitored shoots and roots before, during and after WL treatment. Relations between the shoot and root responses, the latter being the primary target of the WL stress, will be discussed. We hypothesize that root responses, in terms of growth by minirhizotron imaging, will appear with delay as compared with the first symptoms in physiology of above-ground organs.

  5. The seasonal timing of warming that controls onset of the growing season.

    PubMed

    Clark, James S; Melillo, Jerry; Mohan, Jacqueline; Salk, Carl

    2014-04-01

    Forecasting how global warming will affect onset of the growing season is essential for predicting terrestrial productivity, but suffers from conflicting evidence. We show that accurate estimates require ways to connect discrete observations of changing tree status (e.g., pre- vs. post budbreak) with continuous responses to fluctuating temperatures. By coherently synthesizing discrete observations with continuous responses to temperature variation, we accurately quantify how increasing temperature variation accelerates onset of growth. Application to warming experiments at two latitudes demonstrates that maximum responses to warming are concentrated in late winter, weeks ahead of the main budbreak period. Given that warming will not occur uniformly over the year, knowledge of when temperature variation has the most impact can guide prediction. Responses are large and heterogeneous, yet predictable. The approach has immediate application to forecasting effects of warming on growing season length, requiring only information that is readily available from weather stations and generated in climate models. PMID:24115181

  6. Growing Season Evapotranspiration with Satellite Remote Sensing Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irmak, A.; Ratcliffe, I.; Ranade, P.; Kamble, B.; Mutiibwa, D.; Akasheh, O. Z.; Hydrologic Information System Team

    2010-12-01

    Water is the most important constraint facing agriculture in the most of the Central High Plains of the U.S.A.. Local, state and federal water management regulatory agencies need good quality water use estimates by different land surfaces to assess short and long-term water management, planning, and allocations on a watershed scale. Evapotranspiration (ET) can be defined as the loss of water from the ground, lake or pond, and vegetative surfaces to the atmosphere through vaporization of liquid water. The ability is required to accurately estimate the magnitude of this flux will, therefore, go a long way towards being able to compute the water balance and plan the water resources and regimes.. Furthermore, quantification of this flux on a watershed or a regional scale is much more difficult. In this study we applied the Mapping Evapotranspiration at High Resolution with internal calibration (METRIC) to obtain ET maps for Central and Western parts of Nebraska. Landsat 5 and Landsat 7 images were processed for the 2005 and 2007 growing seasons to obtain instantaneous and daily ET. Monthly and Seasonal ET data are rarely presented in previous studies and are often required for quantifying water consumption. In order to produce monthly and seasonal ET maps, individual daily ET maps generated from METRIC were interpolated between dates on a daily basis using a cubic-spline model. Cloud artifacts were removed and filled back in using interpolated ET data and a daily background evaporation adjustment based on the FAO-56 Ke evaporation model. The maps generated by the METRICtm allowed us to follow the seasonal trend in evaporative faction and ET for major land use classes. If calibrated properly, the model could be a viable tool to estimate water use in managed and native ecosystems in sub-humid climates at a large scale. The METRICtm approach presented in this paper illustrated how an ‘off-the-shelf’ model can be applied operationally over a significant time period and

  7. 317/319 phytoremediation site monitoring report - 2004 growing season.

    SciTech Connect

    Negri, M. C.; Gopalakrishnan, G.; Bogner, J.; Energy Systems

    2009-02-21

    In 1999, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) designed and installed a series of engineered plantings consisting of a vegetative cover system and approximately 800 hybrid poplars and willows rooting at various predetermined depths. The plants were installed using various methods including Applied Natural Science's TreeWell{reg_sign} system. The goal of the installation was to protect downgradient surface and groundwater by hydraulic control of the contaminated plume by intercepting the contaminated groundwater with the tree roots, removing moisture from the upgradient soil area, reducing water infiltration, preventing soil erosion, degrading and/or transpiring the residual volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and removing tritium from the subsoil and groundwater. This report presents the results of the monitoring activities conducted by Argonne's Energy Systems Division (ES) in the growing season of 2004. Monitoring of the planted trees began soon after the trees were installed in 1999 and has been conducted every summer since then. As the trees grew and consolidated their growth into the contaminated soil and groundwater, their exposure to the contaminants was progressively shown through tissue sampling. Since the inception of the project, significant progress was made in the refinement and testing of the analytical method (for which no official method is available), the determination of the optimal tissue for sampling, and of the variability of the concentrations within a specific tree. An understanding has also been developed on background concentrations of VOCs, and how to discriminate between VOCs that are associated with plant tissue because of aerial or of soil/groundwater uptake pathways. Also, during the 2003 sampling campaign, core samples from tree trunks were collected for the first time (the trees were large enough to stand the procedure). Data collected from the French Drain area last year supported the hypothesis that a correlation was present between

  8. Growing season methane budget of an Inner Mongolian steppe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunyan; Holst, Jirko; Yao, Zhisheng; Brüggemann, Nicolas; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Han, Shenghui; Han, Xingguo; Tas, Bart; Susenbeth, Andreas; Zheng, Xunhua

    We present a methane (CH 4) budget for the area of the Baiyinxile Livestock Farm, which comprises approximately 1/3 of the Xilin river catchment in central Inner Mongolia, P.R. China. The budget calculations comprise the contributions of natural sources and sinks as well as sources related to the main land-use in this region (non-nomadic pastoralism) during the growing season (May-September). We identified as important CH 4 sources floodplains (mean 1.55 ± 0.97 mg CH 4-C m -2 h -1) and domestic ruminants, which are mainly sheep in this area. Within the floodplain significant differences between investigated positions were detected, whereby only positions close-by the river or bayous emitted large amounts of CH 4 (mean up to 6.21 ± 1.83 mg CH 4-C m -2 h -1). Further CH 4 sources were sheepfolds (0.08-0.91 mg CH 4-C m -2 h -1) and pasture faeces (1.34 ± 0.22 mg CH 4-C g -1 faeces dry weight), but they did not play a significant role for the CH 4 budget. In contrast, dung heaps were not a net source of CH 4 (0.0 ± 0.2 for an old and 0.0 ± 0.3 μg CH 4-C kg -1 h -1 for a new dung heap). Trace gas measurements along two landscape transects (volcano, hill slope) revealed expectedly a mean CH 4 uptake (volcano: 76.5 ± 4.3; hill: 28.3 ± 5.3 μg CH 4-C m -2 h -1), which is typical for the aerobic soils in this and other steppe ecosystems. The observed fluxes were rarely influenced by topography. The CH 4 emissions from the floodplain and the sheep were not compensated by the CH 4 oxidation of aerobic steppe soils and thus, this managed semi-arid grassland did not serve as a terrestrial sink, but as a source for this globally important greenhouse gas. The source strength amounted to 1.5-3.6 kg CH 4-C ha -1 during the growing season, corresponding to 3.5-8.7 kg C ha -1 yr -1.

  9. Excess growing-season water limits lowland black spruce productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymond, S.; Kolka, R. K.; Bolstad, P. V.; Gill, K.; Curzon, M.; D'Amato, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    The annual growth of many tree species is limited by water availability, with growth increasing as water becomes less scarce. In lowland bogs of northern Minnesota, however, black spruce (Picea mariana) is often exposed to excess water via high water table elevations. These trees grow in thick deposits of organic mucky peat and often have shallow rooting systems to avoid the complete submersion of roots in water. While it is generally believed that black spruce decrease growth rates with rising water table elevations, this hypothesis has not been tested in situ. We used a unique, 50-year record of daily bog water table elevations at the Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF) in northern Minnesota to investigate the relationship between climate and black spruce productivity. Nine 1/20th ha circular plots were established in five different bogs and tree height, diameter-at-breast-height (DBH), and crown class were recorded. Additionally, two perpendicular cores were collected on all trees greater than 10 cm diameter-at-breast-height. Tree cores were sanded, mounted, cross-dated, and de-trended according to standard dendrochronological procedures. Ring width measurements were correlated with precipitation, temperature, and water table elevation using package BootRes in R to determine the climatic variables most associated with stand level productivity. Across the different plots, we found that early growing season water table elevation (May and June) was negatively correlated with both individual and stand-level black spruce growth (p < 0.01), while growth was positively correlated with March temperatures (p < 0.01). No significant relationships existed between black spruce growth and monthly precipitation. If summer water table elevations in these peatland ecosystems rise as is anticipated with more extreme precipitation events due to climate change, we could see an overall decrease in the stand level productivity of black spruce.

  10. Coordination of Different Phenological Events during the Growing Season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berninger, F.; Lemieux, J.; Zhai, L.

    2008-12-01

    In two separate studies we followed the phenological development of black spruce on different microsites and of three congeneric species (Jack pine, white birch and trembling aspen) with different growth patterns on a single site. All studies were done in the northern black spruce belt in northern Quebec (northern boreal forest). We followed several phenological points during the growing season (bud development, shoot extension, onset of the diameter growth, diameter growth, budset, end of diamter growth, maximum foliage growth, end of foliage growth, end of latewood differentiation). We hypothesized that phenological development and growth are internally regulated in trees in a way that: (1) the time that it takes to pass through a certain phenological phase is similar for all trees. (2) trees that start bud development earlier will start also diameter growth earlier (3) that growth of "early trees" will end earlier.These kind of relationships are suggested by the hormonal theory of tree growth and would be useful to understand when trees are vulnerable to different abiotic and biotic events. The different sites had a clear impact on phenology which was linked to the microclimate of the site. Bud- development of the warm site was clearly more rapid on a warmer site, separated from about 100 meters from weter colder sites. However, coordination between sites broke down and clear differences in the early stages of bud development were already less clear at the late stages of bud development. The end of growth was quite similar between the sites. Between species it became evident that different species have similar "phenological timetales" and the onset. Ranks of the species were different for budbreak and the onset of xylem development. Also, birch, the species with an earlier budbreak reached full leaf size later than aspen. In addition the often proclaimed linkage between end of extension growth and onset of latewood formation did not hold for Jack pine. The

  11. Impacts of climate change on the growing season in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markstrom, Steven L.; Hay, Lauren E.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the effects of climate change on the vegetative growing season is key to quantifying future hydrologic water budget conditions. The U.S. Geological Survey modeled changes in future growing season length at 14 basins across 11 states. Simulations for each basin were generated using five general circulation models with three emission scenarios as inputs to the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS). PRMS is a deterministic, distributed-parameter, watershed model developed to simulate the effects of various combinations of precipitation, climate, and land use on watershed response. PRMS was modified to include a growing season calculation in this study. The growing season was examined for trends in the total length (annual), as well as changes in the timing of onset (spring) and the end (fall) of the growing season. The results showed an increase in the annual growing season length in all 14 basins, averaging 27–47 days for the three emission scenarios. The change in the spring and fall growing season onset and end varied across the 14 basins, with larger increases in the total length of the growing season occurring in the mountainous regions and smaller increases occurring in the Midwest, Northeast, and Southeast regions. The Clear Creek basin, 1 of the 14 basins in this study, was evaluated to examine the growing season length determined by emission scenario, as compared to a growing season length fixed baseline condition. The Clear Creek basin showed substantial variation in hydrologic responses, including streamflow, as a result of growing season length determined by emission scenario.

  12. The Effect of Agricultural Growing Season Change on Market Prices in Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deBeurs, K.M.; Brown, M. E.

    2013-01-01

    to plan effective adaptation strategies. Remote sensing data can also provide some understanding of the spatial extent of these changes and whether they are likely to continue. Given the agricultural nature of most economies on the African continent, agricultural production continues to be a critical determinant of both food security and economic growth (Funk and Brown, 2009). Crop phenological parameters, such as the start and end of the growing season, the total length of the growing season, and the rate of greening and senescence are important for planning crop management, crop diversification, and intensification. The World Food Summit of 1996 defined food security as: "when all people at all times have access to sufficient, safe, nutritious food to maintain a healthy and active life". Food security roughly depends on three factors: 1) availability of food; 2) access to food and 3) appropriate use of food, as well as adequate water and sanitation. The first factor is dependent on growing conditions and weather and climate. In a previous paper we have investigated this factor by evaluating the effect of large scale climate oscillation on land surface phenology (Brown et al., 2010). We found that all areas in Africa are significantly affected by at least one type of large scale climate oscillations and concluded that these somewhat predictable oscillations could perhaps be used to forecast agricultural production. In addition, we have evaluated changes in agricultural land surface phenology over time (Brown et al., 2012). We found that land surface phenology models, which link large-scale vegetation indices with accumulated humidity, could successfully predict agricultural productivity in several countries around the world. In this chapter we are interested in the effect of variability in peak timing of the growing season, or phenology, on the second factor of food security, food access. In this chapter we want to determine if there is a link between market prices

  13. Reflectance and internal structure of leaves from several crops during a growing season.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, T. R.; Hoffer, R. M.; Schreiber, M. M.

    1971-01-01

    Measurements of spectral reflectance characteristics during a growing season of leaves from six crops are reported. These crops include soybeans, wheat, oats, sorghum, corn, and sudangrass. The characteristics measured are related to changes in leaf structure and water content.

  14. Reserves accumulated in non-photosynthetic organs during the previous growing season drive plant defenses and growth in aspen in the subsequent growing season.

    PubMed

    Najar, Ahmed; Landhäusser, Simon M; Whitehill, Justin G A; Bonello, Pierluigi; Erbilgin, Nadir

    2014-01-01

    Plants store non-structural carbohydrates (NSC), nitrogen (N), as well as other macro and micronutrients, in their stems and roots; the role of these stored reserves in plant growth and defense under herbivory pressure is poorly understood, particularly in trees. Trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings with different NSC and N reserves accumulated during the previous growing season were generated in the greenhouse. Based on NSC and N contents, seedlings were assigned to one of three reserve statuses: Low N-Low NSC, High N-Medium NSC, or High N-High NSC. In the subsequent growing season, half of the seedlings in each reserve status was subjected to defoliation by forest tent caterpillar (Malacosoma disstria) while the other half was left untreated. Following defoliation, the effect of reserves was measured on foliar chemistry (N, NSC) and caterpillar performance (larval development). Due to their importance in herbivore feeding, we also quantified concentrations of phenolic glycoside compounds in foliage. Seedlings in Low N-Low NSC reserve status contained higher amounts of induced phenolic glycosides, grew little, and supported fewer caterpillars. In contrast, aspen seedlings in High N-Medium or High NSC reserve statuses contained lower amounts of induced phenolic glycosides, grew faster, and some of the caterpillars which fed on these seedlings developed up to their fourth instar. Furthermore, multiple regression analysis indicated that foliar phenolic glycoside concentration was related to reserve chemistry (NSC, N). Overall, these results demonstrate that reserves accumulated during the previous growing season can influence tree defense and growth in the subsequent growing season. Additionally, our study concluded that the NSC/N ratio of reserves in the previous growing season represents a better measure of resources available for use in defense and growth than the foliar NSC/N ratios. PMID:24363094

  15. Intra-seasonal rainfall variability during the maize growing season in the northern lowlands of Lesotho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tongwane, Mphethe Isaac; Moeletsi, Mokhele Edmond

    2015-05-01

    Intra-seasonal rainfall distribution was identified as a priority gap that needs to be addressed for southern Africa to cope with agro-meteorological risks. The region in the northwest of Lesotho is appropriate for crop cultivation due to its relatively favourable climatic conditions and soils. High rainfall variability is often blamed for poor agricultural production in this region. This study aims to determine the onset of rains, cessation of rains and rainy season duration using historical climate data. Temporal variability of these rainy season characteristics was also investigated. The earliest and latest onset dates of the rainy season are during the last week of October at Butha-Buthe and the third week of November at Mapoteng, respectively. Cessation of the season is predominantly in the first week of April making the season approximately 137-163 days long depending on the location. Average seasonal rainfall ranged from 474 mm at Mapoteng to 668 mm at Butha-Buthe. Onset and cessation of the rainfall season vary by 4-7 weeks and 1 week, respectively. Mean coefficient of variation of seasonal rainfall is 39 %, but monthly variations are higher. These variations make annual crop management and planning difficult each year. Trends show a decrease in the rainfall amounts but improvements in both the temporal distribution of annual rainfall, onset and cessation dates.

  16. Early and late seasonal carbon sequestration and allocation in larch trees growing on permafrost in Central Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masyagina, Oxana; Prokushkin, Anatoly; Kirdyanov, Alexander; Artyukhov, Aleksey; Udalova, Tatiana; Senchenkov, Sergey; Rublev, Aleksey

    2014-05-01

    Despite large geographic extent of deciduous conifer species Larix gmelinii, its seasonal photosynthetic activity and translocation of photoassimilated carbon within a tree remain poorly studied. To get better insight into productivity of larch trees growing on permafrost soils in Siberian larch biome we aimed to analyze dynamics of foliage parameters (i.e. leaf area, biomass, %N, %P etc.), seasonal dynamics of photosynthetic activity and apply whole tree labeling by 13CO2, which is powerful and effective tool for tracing newly developed assimilates translocation to tissues and organs of a tree (Kagawa et al., 2006; Keel et al., 2012). Experimental plot has been established in mature 105 year-old larch stand located within the continuous permafrost area near Tura settlement (Central Siberia, 64o17'13" N, 100o11'55" E, 148 m a.s.l.). Trees selected for experiments represented mean tree of the stand. Measurements of seasonal photosynthetic activity and foliar biomass sampling were arranged from early growing season (June 8, 2013) until yellowing and senescence of needles on September 17, 2013. Labeling by 13C in whole tree chamber was conducted by three pulses ([CO2]max ≤ 2,500 ppmv, 13CO2 (30% v/v)) at the early (June) and late (August) phase of growing season for different trees in 3 replicates each time. Both early season and late season labeling experiments demonstrated high rate of 13CO2 assimilation and respective enrichment of needle tissues by 13C: δ13C increased from -28.7 up to +670‰ just after labeling. However, there was distinct post-labeling dynamics of needle δ13C among two seasonal experiments. At the early season 13C depletion in labeled needles was slower, and δ13C approached after 40 days ca. +110 ‰ and remained constant till senescence. In the late season (August) needles were losing labeled C with much faster rate and approached only +1.5 ‰ upon senescence (28 days exposition). These findings suggest that in early season ca. 20% of

  17. Higher northern latitude normalized difference vegetation index and growing season trends from 1982 to 1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, C. J.; Slayback, D. A.; Pinzon, J. E.; Los, S. O.; Myneni, R. B.; Taylor, M. G.

    2001-01-01

    Normalized difference vegetation index data from the polar-orbiting National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration meteorological satellites from 1982 to 1999 show significant variations in photosynthetic activity and growing season length at latitudes above 35 degrees N. Two distinct periods of increasing plant growth are apparent: 1982-1991 and 1992-1999, separated by a reduction from 1991 to 1992 associated with global cooling resulting from the volcanic eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in June 1991. The average May to September normalized difference vegetation index from 45 degrees N to 75 degrees N increased by 9% from 1982 to 1991, decreased by 5% from 1991 to 1992, and increased by 8% from 1992 to 1999. Variations in the normalized difference vegetation index were associated with variations in the start of the growing season of -5.6, +3.9, and -1.7 days respectively, for the three time periods. Our results support surface temperature increases within the same period at higher northern latitudes where temperature limits plant growth.

  18. Growing season net ecosystem CO2 exchange of two desert ecosystems with alkaline soils in Kazakhstan

    PubMed Central

    Li, Longhui; Chen, Xi; van der Tol, Christiaan; Luo, Geping; Su, Zhongbo

    2014-01-01

    Central Asia is covered by vast desert ecosystems, and the majority of these ecosystems have alkaline soils. Their contribution to global net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) is of significance simply because of their immense spatial extent. Some of the latest research reported considerable abiotic CO2 absorption by alkaline soil, but the rate of CO2 absorption has been questioned by peer communities. To investigate the issue of carbon cycle in Central Asian desert ecosystems with alkaline soils, we have measured the NEE using eddy covariance (EC) method at two alkaline sites during growing season in Kazakhstan. The diurnal course of mean monthly NEE followed a clear sinusoidal pattern during growing season at both sites. Both sites showed significant net carbon uptake during daytime on sunny days with high photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) but net carbon loss at nighttime and on cloudy and rainy days. NEE has strong dependency on PAR and the response of NEE to precipitation resulted in an initial and significant carbon release to the atmosphere, similar to other ecosystems. These findings indicate that biotic processes dominated the carbon processes, and the contribution of abiotic carbon process to net ecosystem CO2 exchange may be trivial in alkaline soil desert ecosystems over Central Asia. PMID:24455157

  19. Higher northern latitude normalized difference vegetation index and growing season trends from 1982 to 1999.

    PubMed

    Tucker, C J; Slayback, D A; Pinzon, J E; Los, S O; Myneni, R B; Taylor, M G

    2001-11-01

    Normalized difference vegetation index data from the polar-orbiting National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration meteorological satellites from 1982 to 1999 show significant variations in photosynthetic activity and growing season length at latitudes above 35 degrees N. Two distinct periods of increasing plant growth are apparent: 1982-1991 and 1992-1999, separated by a reduction from 1991 to 1992 associated with global cooling resulting from the volcanic eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in June 1991. The average May to September normalized difference vegetation index from 45 degrees N to 75 degrees N increased by 9% from 1982 to 1991, decreased by 5% from 1991 to 1992, and increased by 8% from 1992 to 1999. Variations in the normalized difference vegetation index were associated with variations in the start of the growing season of -5.6, +3.9, and -1.7 days respectively, for the three time periods. Our results support surface temperature increases within the same period at higher northern latitudes where temperature limits plant growth. PMID:11769318

  20. Warming and elevated CO2 lead to longer growing season in temperate grassland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Observational data over time suggest that as climate has warmed the growing season has lengthened, although experimental warming shortens early-growing species’ life cycles. Are other plant species living longer? We found that experimental warming in a temperate, semi-arid grassland led to earlier l...

  1. Pan-Arctic linkages between snow accumulation and growing season air temperature, soil moisture and vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luus, K. A.; Gel, Y.; Lin, J. C.; Kelly, R. E. J.; Duguay, C. R.

    2013-01-01

    Arctic field studies have indicated that the air temperature, soil moisture and vegetation at a site influence the quantity of snow accumulated, and that snow accumulation can alter growing season soil moisture and vegetation. Climate change is predicted to bring about warmer air temperatures, greater snow accumulation and northward movements of the shrub and tree lines. Understanding the response of northern environments to changes in snow and growing season land surface characteristics requires: (1) insights into the present-day linkages between snow and growing season land surface characteristics; and (2) the ability to continue to monitor these associations over time across the vast pan-Arctic. The objective of this study was therefore to examine the pan-Arctic (north of 60° N) linkages between two temporally distinct data products created from AMSR-E satellite passive microwave observations: GlobSnow snow water equivalent, and NTSG (growing season air temperature, soil moisture and vegetation transmissivity). Due to the complex and interconnected nature of processes determining snow and growing season land surface characteristics, these associations were analyzed using the modern non-parametric technique of Alternating Conditional Expectations (ACE), as this approach does not impose a predefined analytic form. Findings indicate that regions with lower vegetation transmissivity (more biomass) at the start and end of the growing season tend to accumulate less snow at the start and end of the snow season, possibly due to interception and shading. Warmer air temperatures at the start and end of the growing season were associated with diminished snow accumulation at the start and end of the snow season. High latitude sites with warmer mean annual growing season temperatures tended to accumulate more snow, probably due to the greater availability of water vapor for snow season precipitation at warmer locations. Regions with drier soils preceding snow onset tended

  2. Quantifying the growing season dynamics and phenology of a boreal black spruce wildfire chronosequence: Coupling field measurements with MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serbin, S. P.; Ahl, D. E.; Gower, S. T.

    2007-12-01

    The boreal forest is the second largest forested biome and the vast area and large carbon stores in the soil makes these forests important to the global carbon, water and energy cycles. Analysis of global coverage, coarse resolution satellite Vegetation Index (VI) data have provided considerable information on the seasonal cycles of vegetation in the mid-to high-latitudes, including the boreal forest, with evidence of an increase in the magnitude of vegetation greenness and a lengthening of the active growing season, which has been attributed to climate warming. However, boreal forests are prone to extensive wildfire disturbance that influence canopy dynamics (i.e. species composition, LAI, and phenology) and separating the direct affect of warming from the indirect affect of increased wildfire frequency on the patterns of boreal phenology and seasonal greeness requires further analysis coupled to ground measurements. In this research we address the need for detailed information on the growing season dynamics and phenological patterns of boreal vegetation. We evaluate whether MODIS reflectance data can resolve small inter-annual variations in canopy phenology and growing season dynamics of boreal forests. We quantified the seasonality and inter-annual differences of the overstory and understory vegetation by optically measuring the LAI and light harvesting potential (FPAR) during the 2004-2006 growing seasons. An automated continuously operating system is used to monitor growing season PAR transmittance. We focused on a boreal wildfire chronosequence of sites comprising a range of forest ages (1-154 years since fire) to quantify the differences in vegetation dynamics and phenology between the deciduous/mixed and coniferous forests. The spatial and temporal characteristics of LAI / FPAR within the chronosequence were examined by comparing both the in situ measurements and the relevant MODIS products. A statistical curve fitting procedure is used to derive the key

  3. Impact of soil moisture changes on growing season length at a teak plantation in Northern Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshifuji, N.; Kumagai, T.; Tantasirin, C.; Suzuki, M.

    2008-12-01

    Growing season length is an important factor affecting energy, water, and carbon exchange at deciduous forests. However, our understandings about the extent of inter-annual variation in growing season length and its cause of deciduous forests in tropical region are still not enough, though the impact of modification of growing season length is likely to be critical especially in tropical region because of high radiant energy throughout the year. In order to clarify the extent of inter-annual variation in growing season length and its major cause of a teak plantation in Northern Thailand, we monitored radiative transmittance through the canopy and heat-pulse velocities of canopy trees for 7-year period. We found large inter-annual variations in the timings of leaf-out, leaf-fall, and the start and stop of transpiration. As a result, we revealed that the year-to-year variation in the length of canopy duration and transpiration period spanned about 60 days. It was also found that these large year-to-year variations can be explained by the differences in the timings of soil moisture changes caused by the differences in the timings of rainfall occurrence. These results imply a profound potential impact of modification of rainfall regime on canopy-atmosphere water and carbon exchange on annual time scale through the modification of growing season length.

  4. New satellite-based maps of the growing season north of 50°N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rune Karlsen, Stein; Arild Høgda, Kjell; Tolvanen, Anne; Johansen, Bernt; Elvebakk, Arve

    2009-09-01

    In this study we present new satellite-based maps of the growing season of northern areas. The maps show trends and mean date in onset and length of the growing season at different scales north of 50° N. For all the circumpolar area we use the GIMMS-NDVI satellite dataset for the 1982 to 2006 period, and for the Nordic countries we used the MODISNDVI satellite data for the 2000 to 2007 period. The circumpolar maps are not as accurate as the one covering the Nordic countries, this due to lack of ancillary environmental geo-data available that can be included in the mapping process. In particular this is a problem for the Russian part of the circumpolar north. The resulting growing season maps are useful in a broad range of ecological and climatic changes studies. Changes in the timing of the growing season are sensitive bio-indicators of climate change of northern areas, and these changes crucially affects primary industries, such as agriculture, animal husbandry and forestry, as well as the population dynamics of wild mammals and birds. The onset of growing season maps is also useful to improve pollen forecasts, and the maps can be used to improve the global change models.

  5. New satellite-based maps of the growing season north of 50°N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rune Karlsen, Stein; Arild Høgda, Kjell; Tolvanen, Anne; Johansen, Bernt; Elvebakk, Arve

    2010-11-01

    In this study we present new satellite-based maps of the growing season of northern areas. The maps show trends and mean date in onset and length of the growing season at different scales north of 50° N. For all the circumpolar area we use the GIMMS-NDVI satellite dataset for the 1982 to 2006 period, and for the Nordic countries we used the MODISNDVI satellite data for the 2000 to 2007 period. The circumpolar maps are not as accurate as the one covering the Nordic countries, this due to lack of ancillary environmental geo-data available that can be included in the mapping process. In particular this is a problem for the Russian part of the circumpolar north. The resulting growing season maps are useful in a broad range of ecological and climatic changes studies. Changes in the timing of the growing season are sensitive bio-indicators of climate change of northern areas, and these changes crucially affects primary industries, such as agriculture, animal husbandry and forestry, as well as the population dynamics of wild mammals and birds. The onset of growing season maps is also useful to improve pollen forecasts, and the maps can be used to improve the global change models.

  6. Effects of chronic doses of ozone on loblolly pine: Photosynthetic characteristics in the third growing season

    SciTech Connect

    Sasek, T.W.; Richardson, C.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Gas exchange characteristics of loblolly pine seedlings were measured in the third growing season of ozone fumigations to determine the effects of long-term ozone exposure on photosynthetic capacity. Light and CO{sub 2} response curves indicated significant decreases of 21% and 27%, respectively, in light-saturated and CO{sub 2}-saturated photosynthetic capacities at 2 {times} ambient ozone compared to charcoal-filtered (CF) air, approximately 0.5 {times} ambient ozone. Differences in the response curves suggest changes in light-harvesting and biochemical efficiencies as well as changes in the activity of RuBP carboxylase and the regeneration rate of RuBP. Chlorophyll and carotenoid conditions per unit leaf area were decreased at the high ozone treatment in older flushes. Stomatal resistance limited photosynthesis by about 29% in both CF and 2 {times} ambient ozone treated plants, suggesting that chronic ozone exposure did not affect stomatal control in loblolly pine.

  7. Population genetics of freeze tolerance among natural populations of Populus balsamifera across the growing season.

    PubMed

    Menon, Mitra; Barnes, William J; Olson, Matthew S

    2015-08-01

    Protection against freeze damage during the growing season influences the northern range limits of plants. Freeze tolerance and freeze avoidance are the two major freeze resistance strategies. Winter survival strategies have been extensively studied in perennials, but few have addressed them and their genetic basis during the growing season. We examined intraspecific phenotypic variation in freeze resistance of Populus balsamifera across latitude and the growing season. To investigate the molecular basis of this variation, we surveyed nucleotide diversity and examined patterns of gene expression in the poplar C-repeat binding factor (CBF) gene family. Foliar freeze tolerance exhibited latitudinal and seasonal variation indicative of natural genotypic variation. CBF6 showed signatures of recent selective sweep. Of the 46 SNPs surveyed across the six CBF homologs, only CBF2_619 exhibited latitudinal differences consistent with increased freeze tolerance in the north. All six CBF genes were cold inducible, but showed varying patterns of expression across the growing season. Some Poplar CBF homologs exhibited patterns consistent with historical selection and clinal variation in freeze tolerance documented here. However, the CBF genes accounted for only a small amount of the variation, indicating that other genes in this and other molecular pathways likely play significant roles in nature. PMID:25809016

  8. Time constraints in temperate-breeding species: influence of growing season length on reproductive strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gurney, K. E. B.; Clark, Russell G.; Slattery, Stuart; Smith-Downey, N. V.; Walker, Jordan I.; Armstrong, L.M.; Stephens, S.E.; Petrula, Michael J.; Corcoran, R.M.; Martin, K.; Degroot, K.A.; Brook, Rodney W.; Afton, Alan; Cutting, K.; Warren, J.M.; Fournier, M.; Koons, David N.

    2011-01-01

    Organisms that reproduce in temperate regions have limited time to produce offspring successfully, and this constraint is expected to be more pronounced in areas with short growing seasons. Information concerning how reproductive ecology of endotherms might be influenced by growing season length (GSL) is rare, and species that breed over a broad geographic range provide an opportunity to study the effects of time constraints on reproductive strategies. We analyzed data from a temperate-breeding bird, the lesser scaup Aythya affinis; hereafter scaup, collected at eight sites across a broad gradient of GSL to evaluate three hypotheses related to reproductive compensation in response to varying time constraints. Clutch initiation date in scaup was unaffected by GSL and was unrelated to latitude; spring thaw dates had a marginal impact on timing of breeding. Clutch size declined during the nesting season, as is reported frequently in bird species, but was also unaffected by GSL. Scaup do not appear to compensate for shorter growing seasons by more rapidly reducing clutch size. This study demonstrates that this species is remarkably consistent in terms of timing of breeding and clutch size, regardless of growing season characteristics. Such inflexibility could make this species particularly sensitive to environmental changes that affect resource availabilities.

  9. Time constraints in temperate-breeding species: Influence of growing season length on reproductive strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gurney, K. E. B.; Clark, R.G.; Slattery, S.M.; Smith-Downey, N. V.; Walker, J.; Armstrong, L.M.; Stephens, S.E.; Petrula, M.; Corcoran, R.M.; Martin, K.H.; Degroot, K.A.; Brook, Rodney W.; Afton, A.D.; Cutting, K.; Warren, J.M.; Fournier, M.; Koons, D.N.

    2011-01-01

    Organisms that reproduce in temperate regions have limited time to produce offspring successfully, and this constraint is expected to be more pronounced in areas with short growing seasons. Information concerning how reproductive ecology of endotherms might be influenced by growing season length (GSL) is rare, and species that breed over a broad geographic range provide an opportunity to study the effects of time constraints on reproductive strategies. We analyzed data from a temperate-breeding bird, the lesser scaup Aythya affinis; hereafter scaup, collected at eight sites across a broad gradient of GSL to evaluate three hypotheses related to reproductive compensation in response to varying time constraints. Clutch initiation date in scaup was unaffected by GSL and was unrelated to latitude; spring thaw dates had a marginal impact on timing of breeding. Clutch size declined during the nesting season, as is reported frequently in bird species, but was also unaffected by GSL. Scaup do not appear to compensate for shorter growing seasons by more rapidly reducing clutch size. This study demonstrates that this species is remarkably consistent in terms of timing of breeding and clutch size, regardless of growing season characteristics. Such inflexibility could make this species particularly sensitive to environmental changes that affect resource availabilities. ?? 2011 The Authors. Ecography ?? 2011 Ecography.

  10. Determination of Spring Onset and Growing Season Duration using Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, Q.; Lin, Bing

    2006-01-01

    An integrated approach to retrieve microwave emissivity difference vegetation index (EDVI) over land regions has been developed from combined multi-platform/multi-sensor satellite measurements, including SSM/I measurements. A possible relationship of the remotely sensed EDVI and the leaf physiology of canopy is exploited at the Harvard Forest site for two growing seasons. This study finds that the EDVI is sensitive to leaf development through vegetation water content of the crown layer of the forest canopy, and has demonstrated that the spring onset and growing season duration can be determined accurately from the time series of satellite estimated EDVI within uncertainties about 3 and 7 days for spring onsets and growing season duration, respectively, compared to in-situ observations. The leaf growing stage may also be quantitatively monitored by a normalized EDVI. Since EDVI retrievals from satellite are generally possible during both daytime and nighttime under non-rain conditions, the EDVI technique studied here may provide higher temporal resolution observations for monitoring the onset of spring and the duration of growing season compared to currently operational satellite methods.

  11. The effect of timing of growing season drought on flowering of a dominant C4 grass.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, John D; Smith, Melinda D

    2016-06-01

    Timing of precipitation is equally important as amount for determining ecosystem function, especially aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP), in a number of ecosystems. In tallgrass prairie of the Central Plains of North America, grass flowering stalks of dominant C4 grasses, such as Andropogon gerardii, can account for more than 70 % of ANPP, or almost none of it, as the number of flowering stalks produced is highly variable. Although growing season precipitation amount is important for driving variation in flowering stalk production, it remains unknown whether there are critical periods within the growing season in which sufficient rainfall must occur to allow for flowering. The effect of timing of rainfall deficit (drought) on flowering of A. gerardii, was tested by excluding rainfall during three periods within the growing season (starting in mid-April, mid-May and mid-June). Mid-summer drought (starting in mid-June) strongly reduced the flowering rate (e.g., density and biomass) of A. gerardii (e.g., as high as 94 % compared to the control), suggesting flowering is highly sensitive to precipitation at this time. This effect appeared to be related to plant water status at the time of flowering stalk initiation, rather than an indirect consequence of reduced C assimilation. Our results suggest that increased frequency of growing season drought forecast with climate change could reduce sexual reproduction in this dominant grass species, particularly if it coincides with timing of flowering stalk initiation, with important implications for ecosystem functioning. PMID:26886131

  12. Fertilizer Application Timing Influences Greenhouse Gas Fluxes Over a Growing Season

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbial production and consumption of greenhouse gases (GHG) at the soil surface is influenced by temperature and nutrients, so effects of nutrient application on GHG fluxes should be greater as conditions warm during the growing season. We designed a replicated (n=5) field experiment to test for...

  13. USDA Cranberry Entomology Laboratory (CEL) research priorities in the 2016 growing season

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research priorities during the 2016 growing season will be focused on 1) discovery and screening of native WI nematodes as bio-control agents, and 2) continued refinement of the drone-deployed mating disruption system. Extramural funding will be needed for both, and the degree of funding will dictat...

  14. Phosphorus Dynamics in Amended Soils During the Growing Season: II. Ligand Exchange and Mineralization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A field study was conducted near Bushland, TX to evaluate changes in phosphorus (P) pools in soils amended with cattle manure and monoammonium phosphate (MAP) throughout a single growing season. Unfertilized checks were included for P extractability comparisons. Grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.)...

  15. Diurnal patterns of gas-exchange and metabolic pools in tundra plants during three phases of the arctic growing season

    PubMed Central

    Patankar, Rajit; Mortazavi, Behzad; Oberbauer, Steven F; Starr, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Arctic tundra plant communities are subject to a short growing season that is the primary period in which carbon is sequestered for growth and survival. This period is often characterized by 24-h photoperiods for several months a year. To compensate for the short growing season tundra plants may extend their carbon uptake capacity on a diurnal basis, but whether this is true remains unknown. Here, we examined in situ diurnal patterns of physiological activity and foliar metabolites during the early, mid, and late growing season in seven arctic species under light-saturated conditions. We found clear diurnal patterns in photosynthesis and respiration, with midday peaks and midnight lulls indicative of circadian regulation. Diurnal patterns in foliar metabolite concentrations were less distinct between the species and across seasons, suggesting that metabolic pools are likely governed by proximate external factors. This understanding of diurnal physiology will also enhance the parameterization of process-based models, which will aid in better predicting future carbon dynamics for the tundra. This becomes even more critical considering the rapid changes that are occurring circumpolarly that are altering plant community structure, function, and ultimately regional and global carbon budgets. PMID:23467719

  16. Temporal disparity in leaf chlorophyll content and leaf area index across a growing season in a temperate deciduous forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, H.; Chen, J. M.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Spatial and temporal variations in canopy structure and leaf biochemistry have considerable influence on fluxes of CO2, water and energy and nutrient cycling in vegetation. Two vegetation indices (VI), NDVI and Macc01, were used to model the spatio-temporal variability of broadleaf chlorophyll content and leaf area index (LAI) across a growing season. Ground data including LAI, hyperspectral leaf reflectance factors (400-2500 nm) and leaf chlorophyll content were measured across the growing season and satellite-derived canopy reflectance data was acquired for 33 dates at 1200 m spatial resolution. Key phenological information was extracted using the TIMESAT software. Results showed that LAI and chlorophyll start of season (SOS) dates were at day of year (DOY) 130 and 157 respectively, and total season duration varied by 57 days. The spatial variability of chlorophyll and LAI phenology was also analyzed at the landscape scale to investigate phenological patterns over a larger spatial extent. Whilst a degree of spatial variability existed, results showed that chlorophyll SOS lagged approximately 20-35 days behind LAI SOS, and the end of season (EOS) LAI dates were predominantly between 20 and 30 days later than chlorophyll EOS. The large temporal differences between VI-derived chlorophyll content and LAI has important implications for biogeochemical models using NDVI or LAI to represent the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by a canopy, in neglecting to account for delays in chlorophyll production and thus photosynthetic capacity.

  17. Enhanced winter soil frost reduces methane emission during the subsequent growing season in a boreal peatland.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junbin; Peichl, Matthias; Nilsson, Mats B

    2016-02-01

    Winter climate change may result in reduced snow cover and could, consequently, alter the soil frost regime and biogeochemical processes underlying the exchange of methane (CH4 ) in boreal peatlands. In this study, we investigated the short-term (1-3 years) vs. long-term (11 years) effects of intensified winter soil frost (induced by experimental snow exclusion) on CH4 exchange during the following growing season in a boreal peatland. In the first 3 years (2004-2006), lower CH4 emissions in the treatment plots relative to the control coincided with delayed soil temperature increase in the treatment plots at the beginning of the growing season (May). After 11 treatment years (in 2014), CH4 emissions were lower in the treatment plots relative to the control over the entire growing season, resulting in a reduction in total growing season CH4 emission by 27%. From May to July 2014, reduced sedge leaf area coincided with lower CH4 emissions in the treatment plots compared to the control. From July to August, lower dissolved organic carbon concentrations in the pore water of the treatment plots explained 72% of the differences in CH4 emission between control and treatment. In addition, greater Sphagnum moss growth in the treatment plots resulted in a larger distance between the moss surface and the water table (i.e., increasing the oxic layer) which may have enhanced the CH4 oxidation potential in the treatment plots relative to the control in 2014. The differences in vegetation might also explain the lower temperature sensitivity of CH4 emission observed in the treatment plots relative to the control. Overall, this study suggests that greater soil frost, associated with future winter climate change, might substantially reduce the growing season CH4 emission in boreal peatlands through altering vegetation dynamics and subsequently causing vegetation-mediated effects on CH4 exchange. PMID:26452333

  18. Estimating the Sensitivity of CLM-Crop to Plant Date and Growing Season Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewniak, B. A.; Kotamarthi, V. R.

    2012-12-01

    The Community Land Model (CLM), the land component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM), is designed to estimate the land surface response to climate through simulated vegetation phenology and soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics. Since human influences play a significant role shaping the land surface, the vegetation has been expanded to include agriculture (CLM-Crop) for three crop types: corn, soybean, and spring wheat. CLM-Crop parameters, which define crop phenology, are optimized against AmeriFlux observations of gross primary productivity, net ecosystem exchange, and stored biomass and carbon, for two sites in the U.S. growing corn and soybean. However, there is uncertainty in the measurements and using a small subset of data to determine model parameters makes validation difficult. In order to account for the differences in plant behavior across climate zones, an input dataset is used to define the planting dates and the length of the growing season. In order to improve model performance, and to understand the impacts of uncertainty from the input data, we evaluate the sensitivity of crop productivity and production against planting date and the length of the growing season. First, CLM-Crop is modified to establish plant date based on temperature trends for the previous 10-day period, constrained against the range of observed planting dates. This new climate-based model is compared with the standard fixed plant dates to determine how sensitive the model is to when seeding occurs, and how comparable the climate calculated plant dates are to the fixed dates. Next, the length of the growing season will be revised to account for an alternative climate. Finally, both the climate-based planting and new growth season will be simulated together. Results of the different model runs will be compared to the standard model and to observations to determine the importance of planting date and growing season length on crop productivity and yield.

  19. Strong contribution of autumn phenology to changes in satellite-derived growing season length estimates across Europe (1982-2011).

    PubMed

    Garonna, Irene; de Jong, Rogier; de Wit, Allard J W; Mücher, Caspar A; Schmid, Bernhard; Schaepman, Michael E

    2014-11-01

    Land Surface Phenology (LSP) is the most direct representation of intra-annual dynamics of vegetated land surfaces as observed from satellite imagery. LSP plays a key role in characterizing land-surface fluxes, and is central to accurately parameterizing terrestrial biosphere-atmosphere interactions, as well as climate models. In this article, we present an evaluation of Pan-European LSP and its changes over the past 30 years, using the longest continuous record of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) available to date in combination with a landscape-based aggregation scheme. We used indicators of Start-Of-Season, End-Of-Season and Growing Season Length (SOS, EOS and GSL, respectively) for the period 1982-2011 to test for temporal trends in activity of terrestrial vegetation and their spatial distribution. We aggregated pixels into ecologically representative spatial units using the European Landscape Classification (LANMAP) and assessed the relative contribution of spring and autumn phenology. GSL increased significantly by 18-24 days decade(-1) over 18-30% of the land area of Europe, depending on methodology. This trend varied extensively within and between climatic zones and landscape classes. The areas of greatest growing-season lengthening were the Continental and Boreal zones, with hotspots concentrated in southern Fennoscandia, Western Russia and pockets of continental Europe. For the Atlantic and Steppic zones, we found an average shortening of the growing season with hotspots in Western France, the Po valley, and around the Caspian Sea. In many zones, changes in the NDVI-derived end-of-season contributed more to the GSL trend than changes in spring green-up, resulting in asymmetric trends. This underlines the importance of investigating senescence and its underlying processes more closely as a driver of LSP and global change. PMID:24797086

  20. 317/319 Phytoremediation site monitoring report - 2009 growing season : final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Negri, C .N.; Benda, P. L.; Gopalakrishnan, G.; Energy Systems

    2010-02-10

    In 1999, Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) designed and installed a series of engineered plantings consisting of a vegetative cover system and approximately 800 hybrid poplars and willows rooting at various predetermined depths. The plants were installed using various methods including Applied Natural Science's TreeWell{reg_sign} system. The goal of the installation was to protect downgradient surface and groundwater by intercepting the contaminated groundwater with the tree roots, removing moisture from the upgradient soil area, reducing water infiltration, preventing soil erosion, degrading and/or transpiring the residual volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and removing tritium from the subsoil and groundwater. This report presents the results of the monitoring activities conducted by Argonne's Energy Systems (ES) Division in the growing season of 2009. Monitoring of the planted trees began soon after the trees were installed in 1999 and has been conducted every summer since then. As the trees grew and consolidated their growth into the contaminated soil and groundwater, their exposure to the contaminants was progressively shown through tissue sampling. During the 2009 sampling campaign, VOC concentrations found in the French Drain area were in general consistent with or slightly lower than the 2008 results. Additionally, closely repeated, stand wide analyses showed contaminant fluctuations that may indicate short-term contaminant depletion in the area of interest of roots. This data will be useful to determine short-term removal rate by the trees. As in previous years, levels in the Hydraulic Control Area were close to background levels except for a few exceptions.

  1. Predicting Future Temperate and Boreal of Growing Season Start With a Land Surface Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaduk, J.

    2008-12-01

    Controlled ecological experiments show that temperate and boreal trees require chilling in winter for rapid leaf out in spring. If the amount of chilling falls below a species specific threshold then an exponentially increasing amount of warming is required to initiate leaf out - potentially actually delaying it in a future warmer climate. The boreal areas could be particularly affected as climate predictions indicate strong warming in these regions. Moreover, currently a large part of the land carbon sink is located in temperate and boreal regions and a changing growing season start might have a large impact on this important sink. Warming-chilling models for green-up, which have been calibrated with remotely sensed normalized difference vegetation index from the years 1983-1995, indicate that in future the chilling requirements reduce the rate of advance of the start of the growing season to earlier times compared to advance rates in the last two decades. Climate scenarios with large warming (IPCC A2 scenarios) show lower advance rates of green- up to earlier times than predictions with a smaller warming (B1 scenarios) due to the reduced chilling in high warming scenarios. When incorporated into a coupled land-surface carbon cycle model based on JULES (the Joint-UK-Land Environment Simulator) the chilling requirements lead to a early growing season photosynthetic carbon up that is correspondingly lower than in simulations where the start of the growing season as simply modelled as responding to warming only. Thus the phenological response in effect provides a positive feedback to global warming.

  2. Comparison of Phenology Models for Predicting the Onset of Growing Season over the Northern Hemisphere

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yang; Zhang, Haicheng; Dong, Wenjie; Yuan, Wenping

    2014-01-01

    Vegetation phenology models are important for examining the impact of climate change on the length of the growing season and carbon cycles in terrestrial ecosystems. However, large uncertainties in present phenology models make accurate assessment of the beginning of the growing season (BGS) a challenge. In this study, based on the satellite-based phenology product (i.e. the V005 MODIS Land Cover Dynamics (MCD12Q2) product), we calibrated four phenology models, compared their relative strength to predict vegetation phenology; and assessed the spatial pattern and interannual variability of BGS in the Northern Hemisphere. The results indicated that parameter calibration significantly influences the models' accuracy. All models showed good performance in cool regions but poor performance in warm regions. On average, they explained about 67% (the Growing Degree Day model), 79% (the Biome-BGC phenology model), 73% (the Number of Growing Days model) and 68% (the Number of Chilling Days-Growing Degree Day model) of the BGS variations over the Northern Hemisphere. There were substantial differences in BGS simulations among the four phenology models. Overall, the Biome-BGC phenology model performed best in predicting the BGS, and showed low biases in most boreal and cool regions. Compared with the other three models, the two-phase phenology model (NCD-GDD) showed the lowest correlation and largest biases with the MODIS phenology product, although it could catch the interannual variations well for some vegetation types. Our study highlights the need for further improvements by integrating the effects of water availability, especially for plants growing in low latitudes, and the physiological adaptation of plants into phenology models. PMID:25279567

  3. Comparison of phenology models for predicting the onset of growing season over the Northern Hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yang; Zhang, Haicheng; Dong, Wenjie; Yuan, Wenping

    2014-01-01

    Vegetation phenology models are important for examining the impact of climate change on the length of the growing season and carbon cycles in terrestrial ecosystems. However, large uncertainties in present phenology models make accurate assessment of the beginning of the growing season (BGS) a challenge. In this study, based on the satellite-based phenology product (i.e. the V005 MODIS Land Cover Dynamics (MCD12Q2) product), we calibrated four phenology models, compared their relative strength to predict vegetation phenology; and assessed the spatial pattern and interannual variability of BGS in the Northern Hemisphere. The results indicated that parameter calibration significantly influences the models' accuracy. All models showed good performance in cool regions but poor performance in warm regions. On average, they explained about 67% (the Growing Degree Day model), 79% (the Biome-BGC phenology model), 73% (the Number of Growing Days model) and 68% (the Number of Chilling Days-Growing Degree Day model) of the BGS variations over the Northern Hemisphere. There were substantial differences in BGS simulations among the four phenology models. Overall, the Biome-BGC phenology model performed best in predicting the BGS, and showed low biases in most boreal and cool regions. Compared with the other three models, the two-phase phenology model (NCD-GDD) showed the lowest correlation and largest biases with the MODIS phenology product, although it could catch the interannual variations well for some vegetation types. Our study highlights the need for further improvements by integrating the effects of water availability, especially for plants growing in low latitudes, and the physiological adaptation of plants into phenology models. PMID:25279567

  4. Changing water availability during the African maize-growing season, 1979-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estes, Lyndon D.; Chaney, Nathaniel W.; Herrera-Estrada, Julio; Sheffield, Justin; Caylor, Kelly K.; Wood, Eric F.

    2014-07-01

    Understanding how global change is impacting African agriculture requires a full physical accounting of water supply and demand, but accurate, gridded data on key drivers (e.g., humidity) are generally unavailable. We used a new bias-corrected meteorological dataset to analyze changes in precipitation (supply), potential evapotranspiration ({{E}_{p}}, demand), and water availability (expressed as the ratio P/{{E}_{p}}) in 20 countries (focusing on their maize-growing regions and seasons), between 1979 and 2010, and the factors driving changes in {{E}_{p}}. Maize-growing areas in Southern Africa, particularly South Africa, benefitted from increased water availability due in large part to demand declines driven primarily by declining net radiation, increasing vapor pressure, and falling temperatures (with no effect from changing windspeed), with smaller increases in supply. Sahelian zone countries in West Africa, as well as Ethiopia in East Africa, had strong increases in availability driven primarily by rainfall rebounding from the long-term Sahelian droughts, with little change or small reductions in demand. However, intra-seasonal supply variability generally increased in West and East Africa. Across all three regions, declining net radiation contributed downwards pressure on demand, generally over-riding upwards pressure caused by increasing temperatures, the regional effects of which were largest in East Africa. A small number of countries, mostly in or near East Africa (Tanzania and Malawi) experienced declines in water availability primarily due to decreased rainfall, but exacerbated by increasing demand. Much of the reduced water availability in East Africa occurred during the more sensitive middle part of the maize-growing season, suggesting negative consequences for maize production.

  5. Evaluating the vegetation growing season changes in the arid region of northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanfang; Shen, Yanjun; Sun, Fubao; Chen, Yaning

    2014-11-01

    Temperature has long been accepted as the major controlling factor in determining vegetation phenology in the middle and higher latitudes. The influence of water availability is often overlooked even in arid and semi-arid environments. We compared vegetation phenology metrics derived from both in situ temperature and satellite-based normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) observations from 1982 to 2006 by an example of the arid region of northwestern China. From the satellite-based results, it was found the start of the growing season (SOS) advanced by 0.37 days year-1 and the end of the growing season (EOS) delayed by 0.61 days year-1 in Southern Xinjiang over 25 years. In the Tianshan Mountains, the SOS advanced by 0.35 days year-1 and the EOS delayed by 0.31 days year-1. There were almost no changes in Northern Xinjiang. Compared with satellite-based results, those estimates based on temperature contain less details of spatial variability of vegetation phenology. Interestingly, they show different and at times reversed spatial patterns from the satellite results arising from water limitation. Phenology metrics derived from temperature and NDVI conclude that water limitation of onset of the growing season is more severe than the cessation. Phenology spatial patterns of four oases in Southern Xingjiang show that, on average, there is a delay of the SOS of 1.6 days/10 km of distance from the mountain outlet stations. Our results underline the importance of water availability in determining the vegetation phenology in arid regions and can lead to important consequences in interpreting the possible change of vegetation phenology with climate.

  6. Seasonal variation in muscle sympathetic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Muller, Matthew D; Blaha, Cheryl; Kunselman, Allen R; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2015-08-01

    Epidemiologic data suggest there are seasonal variations in the incidence of severe cardiac events with peak levels being evident in the winter. Whether autonomic indices including muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) vary with season remains unclear. In this report, we tested the hypothesis that resting MSNA varies with the seasons of the year with peak levels evident in the winter. We analyzed the supine resting MSNA in 60 healthy subjects. Each subject was studied during two, three, or four seasons (total 237 visits). MSNA burst rate in the winter (21.0 ± 6.8 burst/min, mean ± SD) was significantly greater than in the summer (13.5 ± 5.8 burst/min, P < 0.001), the spring (17.1 ± 9.0 burst/min, P = 0.03), and the fall (17.9 ± 7.7 burst/min, P = 0.002). There was no significant difference in MSNA for other seasonal comparisons. The results suggest that resting sympathetic nerve activity varies along the seasons, with peak levels evident in the winter. We speculate that the seasonal changes in sympathetic activity may be a contribution to the previously observed seasonal variations in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:26265752

  7. Seasonal variation in muscle sympathetic nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jian; Muller, Matthew D; Blaha, Cheryl; Kunselman, Allen R; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiologic data suggest there are seasonal variations in the incidence of severe cardiac events with peak levels being evident in the winter. Whether autonomic indices including muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) vary with season remains unclear. In this report, we tested the hypothesis that resting MSNA varies with the seasons of the year with peak levels evident in the winter. We analyzed the supine resting MSNA in 60 healthy subjects. Each subject was studied during two, three, or four seasons (total 237 visits). MSNA burst rate in the winter (21.0 ± 6.8 burst/min, mean ± SD) was significantly greater than in the summer (13.5 ± 5.8 burst/min, P < 0.001), the spring (17.1 ± 9.0 burst/min, P = 0.03), and the fall (17.9 ± 7.7 burst/min, P = 0.002). There was no significant difference in MSNA for other seasonal comparisons. The results suggest that resting sympathetic nerve activity varies along the seasons, with peak levels evident in the winter. We speculate that the seasonal changes in sympathetic activity may be a contribution to the previously observed seasonal variations in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:26265752

  8. Does the start and end of the biological growing season respond independently to a changing climate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolmgren, Kjell

    2016-04-01

    Adaptation of the biological growing season to a changing climatic requires that plants can adapt their phenology plastically or genetically to new conditions. Physiological and evolutionary constraints may, however, hamper such adaptations. Here, we study correlations between leafing out and autumn coloration phenology, that is, the start and end of the green growing season. In temperate, deciduous tree species the period with green leaves is more or less the same as the individual leaf's life span. General plant ecological strategy schemes suggest that the individual leaf's life span is one of the major dimensions evolutionary associated with other leaf and plant characteristics, including expensive investments in leaf nutrient content and leaf morphology. Leaf life span is thus considered highly conserved within evolutionary lineages. At the same time, local adaptation of leaf phenology to the length of the climatic growing season is common, both when it comes to leafing out cues and autumn senescence cues, suggesting that there are strong selection pressures and adaptability (plastic and/or genetic) to make use of the climatically defined growing season. We used a data set from a Swedish, national phenology network where volunteer observers recorded the start of leafing out defined as 'when the tree looks green from a distance' and the start of autumn leaf coloration as 'when 1/3 of the tree canopy had attained autumn colors'. In the subset used observations were made at 489 sites/farms between 1873-1922. We only included data when the observer at a site and year had recorded both spring leafing and autumn leaf coloration phenology on the same species. In total, the data set comprised 25'099 observations of 17 species. As the participants in the phenology monitoring network were volunteers, the data matrix has lots of missing data and unbalanced representation from different sites. We used linear mixed model analyses, including year as random factor, to analyse

  9. Mutation at the circadian clock gene EARLY MATURITY 8 adapts domesticated barley (Hordeum vulgare) to short growing seasons

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Sebastien; Turner, Adrian S.; Gruszka, Damian; Christodoulou, Vangelis; Davis, Seth J.; von Korff, Maria; Laurie, David A.

    2012-01-01

    The circadian clock is an autonomous oscillator that produces endogenous biological rhythms with a period of about 24 h. This clock allows organisms to coordinate their metabolism and development with predicted daily and seasonal changes of the environment. In plants, circadian rhythms contribute to both evolutionary fitness and agricultural productivity. Nevertheless, we show that commercial barley varieties bred for short growing seasons by use of early maturity 8 (eam8) mutations, also termed mat-a, are severely compromised in clock gene expression and clock outputs. We identified EAM8 as a barley ortholog of the Arabidopsis thaliana circadian clock regulator EARLY FLOWERING3 (ELF3) and demonstrate that eam8 accelerates the transition from vegetative to reproductive growth and inflorescence development. We propose that eam8 was selected as barley cultivation moved to high-latitude short-season environments in Europe because it allowed rapid flowering in genetic backgrounds that contained a previously selected late-flowering mutation of the photoperiod response gene Ppd-H1. We show that eam8 mutants have increased expression of the floral activator HvFT1, which is independent of allelic variation at Ppd-H1. The selection of independent eam8 mutations shows that this strategy facilitates short growth-season adaptation and expansion of the geographic range of barley, despite the pronounced clock defect. PMID:22566625

  10. Growing season ecosystem and leaf-level gas exchange of an exotic and native semiarid bunchgrass.

    PubMed

    Hamerlynck, Erik P; Scott, Russell L; Moran, M Susan; Keefer, Timothy O; Huxman, Travis E

    2010-07-01

    The South African grass, Lehmann lovegrass (Eragrostis lehmanniana), may alter ecosystem processes across extensive semiarid grasslands and savannahs of western North America. We compared volumetric soil moisture (theta), total and green tissue leaf area index (LAI), ecosystem (i.e. whole-plant and soil), and leaf-level gas exchange of Lehmann lovegrass and the native bush muhly (Muhlenbergia porteri) over the 2008 monsoon season in a semiarid savanna in southern Arizona, USA, to see if these were consistent with high productivity associated with lovegrass invasive success. theta across 0-5 and 0-25 cm was higher while evapotranspiration (ET) was similar between lovegrass and bush muhly plots, except shortly after rainfall, when ET was 32-81% higher in lovegrass plots. Lehmann lovegrass had lower, quickly developing LAI with greater leaf proportions than bush muhly. When early season theta was high, net ecosystem CO(2) exchange (NEE) was similar, but as storm frequency and theta declined, NEE was more negative in lovegrass (-0.69 to -3.00 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) than bush muhly (+1.75 to -1.55 micromol m(-2) s(-1)). Ecosystem respiration (R (eco)) responded quickly to monsoon onset and late-season rains, and was lower in lovegrass (2.44-3.74 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) than bush muhly (3.60-5.3 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) across the season. Gross ecosystem photosynthesis (GEP) was greater in Lehmann lovegrass, concurrent with higher leaf-level photosynthesis and stomatal conductance. We conclude that canopy structure facilitates higher theta under Lehmann lovegrass, reducing phenological constraints and stomatal limitations to whole-plant carbon uptake through the short summer monsoon growing season. PMID:20063168

  11. Season of testing and its effect on feed intake and efficiency in growing beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Mujibi, F D N; Moore, S S; Nkrumah, D J; Wang, Z; Basarab, J A

    2010-12-01

    This study sought to assess whether residual feed intake (RFI) calculated by regressing feed intake (DMI) on growth rate (ADG) and metabolic mid-BW in 3 different ways led to similar estimates of genetic parameters and variance components for young growing cattle tested for feed intake in fall and winter seasons. A total of 378 beef steers in 5 cohorts were fed a typical high energy feedlot diet and had free-choice access to feed and water. Feed intake data were collected in fall or winter seasons. Climate data were obtained from the University of Alberta Kinsella meteorological station and Vikings AGCM station. Individual animal RFI was obtained by either fitting a regression model to each test group separately (RFI(C)), fitting a regression model to pooled data consisting of all cohorts but including test group as a fixed effect (RFI(O)), or fitting a regression to pooled data with test group as a fixed effect but within seasonal (fall-winter or winter-spring) groups (RFI(S)). Two animal models (M1 and M2) that differed by the inclusion of fixed effects of test group or season, respectively, were used to evaluate RFI measurements. Feed intake was correlated with air temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, and wind speed (-0.26, 0.23, 0.30, -0.14 for fall-winter and 0.31, -0.04, 0.14, 0.16 for winter-spring, respectively), but the nature and magnitude of the correlations were different for the 2 seasons. Single trait direct heritability, model likelihood, direct genetic variance, and EBV accuracy estimates were greatest for RFI(C) and least for RFI(O) for both M1 and M2 models. A significant genetic correlation was also observed between RFI(O) and ADG, but not for RFI(C) and RFI(S). Including a season effect (M2) in the genetic evaluation of RFI(O) resulted in the smallest heritability, model LogL, EBV accuracy, and largest residual variance estimates. These results, though not conclusive, suggest a possible effect of seasonality on feed intake and thus

  12. Growing Season Carbon Dioxide Exchange in Flooded Non-Mulching and Non-Flooded Mulching Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi-guo; Zhang, Run-hua; Wang, Xiu-jun; Chen, Fang; Tian, Chang-yan

    2012-01-01

    There is much interest in the role that agricultural practices might play in sequestering carbon to help offset rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. However, limited information exists regarding the potential for increased carbon sequestration of different management strategies. The objective of this study was to quantify and contrast carbon dioxide exchange in traditional non-mulching with flooding irrigation (TF) and plastic film mulching with drip irrigation (PM) cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) fields in northwest China. Net primary productivity (NPP), soil heterotrophic respiration (Rh) and net ecosystem productivity (NEP) were measured during the growing seasons in 2009 and 2010. As compared with TF, PM significantly increased the aboveground and belowground biomass and the NPP (340 g C m−2 season−1) of cotton, and decreased the Rh (89 g C m−2 season−1) (p<0.05). In a growing season, PM had a higher carbon sequestration in terms of NEP of ∼ 429 g C m−2 season−1 than the TF. These results demonstrate that conversion of this type of land use to mulching practices is an effective way to increase carbon sequestration in the short term in cotton systems of arid areas. PMID:23226376

  13. Trends toward an earlier peak of the growing season in Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chongyang; Liu, Hongyan; Williams, A Park; Yin, Yi; Wu, Xiuchen

    2016-08-01

    Changes in peak photosynthesis timing (PPT) could substantially change the seasonality of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Spring PPT in dry regions has been documented for some individual plant species on a stand scale, but both the spatio-temporal pattern of shifting PPT on a continental scale and its determinants remain unclear. Here, we use satellite measurements of vegetation greenness to find that the majority of Northern Hemisphere, mid-latitude vegetated area experienced a trend toward earlier PPT during 1982-2012, with significant trends of an average of 0.61 day yr(-1) across 19.4% of areas. These shifts correspond to increased annual accumulation of growing degree days (GDD) due to warming and are most highly concentrated in the eastern United States and Europe. Earlier mean PPT is generally a trait common among areas with summer temperatures higher than 27.6 ± 2.9 °C, summer precipitation lower than 84.2 ± 41.5 mm, and fraction of cold season precipitation greater than 89.2 ± 1.5%. The trends toward earlier PPT discovered here have co-occurred with overall increases in vegetation greenness throughout the growing season, suggesting that summer drought is not a dominant driver of these trends. These results imply that continued warming may facilitate continued shifts toward earlier PPT and cause these trends to become more pervasive, with important implications for terrestrial carbon, water, nutrient, and energy budgets. PMID:26752300

  14. A multi-refuge study to evaluate the effectiveness of growing-season and dormant-season burns to control cattail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gleason, Robert A.; Tangen, Brian A.; Laubhan, Murray K.; Lor, Socheata

    2012-01-01

    Proliferation of invasive cattails (for example, Typha x glauca, T. angustifolia) is a concern of wetland managers across the country, and numerous methods have been used to control the spatial extent and density of the plant. To date, however, no single method has proven widely or consistently effective at reducing the long-term growth and spread of these species. We performed a multi-refuge study to evaluate the relative effects of growing-season and dormant-season prescribed burns on cattail production and to gain insight on variables such as soil moisture, groundwater, and biomass that affect the efficacy of burning as a control method. Results indicate total cattail cover recovers to pre-burn levels within 1 year regardless of whether the controlled burn was implemented during the growing season or dormant season. Growing-season burns, however, did result in lower aboveground and belowground cattail biomass 1-year post-burn, whereas no significant change in biomass was detected for dormant-season burns. Study results support the premise that burns implemented during the growing season should have a greater effect on nutrient reserves and cattail re-growth. Results from this and other studies suggest long-term research that incorporates multiple management strategies will be required to evaluate the potential of prescribed burning as a method to control cattail.

  15. Does increased mid-growing season absorbed PAR compensate for the loss due to longer snow cover duration in a subarctic permafrost mire?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosio, J.; Christensen, T. R.; Johansson, M.

    2012-12-01

    This study was initiated to analyse the effect of snow cover on photosynthesis and plant growth in subarctic mires underlain by permafrost. Due to their narrow environmental window these raised bogs, called palsa mires, are highly sensitive to climatic changes. In Fennoscandia palsa mires are currently subjected to climate related thawing and shift in vegetational and hydrological patterns. Yet, we know little of how these subarctic permafrost mires react and feed back to such changes. By using snow fences to hinder snow drift the amount of accumulated snow was increased in a snow manipulation experiment on a subarctic permafrost mire in northern Sweden. The increase in accumulated snow prolongs the duration of the snow cover in spring, causing a delay in the onset, as well as an overall shortening of the growing season. By measuring incoming and reflected photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) we wanted to address the question whether this shortening of the growing season affected the absorbed PAR, and possibly the total gross primary production (GPP) over the season. The reflected PAR was measured at twelve plots where six of the plots experienced increased snow accumulation (treatment), and remaining six plots were untreated (control). Minikin QT sensors and dataloggers logged incoming and reflected PAR hourly throughout the growing seasons of 2011 and 2012. The increased accumulation of snow resulted in a 18 and 3 days delay in the growing season start in treatment plots for 2011 and 2012 respectively. The end of the growing season was not affected by the snow manipulation; hence the overall length of the growing season was shortened by 18 and 3 days in treatment plots in relation to the control plots in 2011 and 2012 respectively. Preliminary results show that the loss in absorbed PAR due to the shortening of the growing season in the treatment plots is well compensated for by a significant increase in absorption of PAR throughout the whole growing season. This

  16. Growing season loss of nitrate at three northeastern hardwood forests: A regional indicator of nitrogen saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, L.H.; Murdoch, P.E.; Mitchell, M.J.; Driscoll, C.T.; Likens, G.E. )

    1994-06-01

    Nitrogen is typically tightly retained in terrestrial ecosystems in the Northeast. In ecosystems with episodic nitrogen losses, nitrate export during the summer period of high biotic demand remains low. Increasing nitrate loss during the growing season is an early indicator of ecosystems shifting from episodic to chronic nitrogen loss (nitrogen saturation). Studies of nitrogen cycling from Biscuit Brook, Catskills, NY, Huntington Forest, Adirondacks, NY and Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, White Mountains, NH, showed high nitrate loss at each site during the summer of 1990. This regional pattern many be caused by anthropogenic (higher nitrogen deposition), climatic (temperature and weather interactions), and/or natural (eg. pest outbreaks) disturbance. High nitrate loss causes surface water quality deterioration and may be linked to forest decline. The pattern also demonstrates the need for surface water monitoring on a regional scale to assess the effects of air pollution emissions legislation.

  17. The net exchange of methane with high Arctic landscapes during the summer growing season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St Louis, V. L.; Emmerton, C. A.; Lehnherr, I.; Humphreys, E.; Rydz, E.; Kosolofski, H.

    2014-12-01

    High Arctic landscapes are essentially vast cold deserts interspersed with streams, ponds and wetlands. These landscapes may be important consumers and sources of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4), though few measurements exist from this region. To quantify the flux of CH4 (FCH4) between the atmosphere and high Arctic landscapes on northern Ellesmere Island, Canada, we made static chamber measurements over five and three growing seasons at a desert and wetland, respectively, and eddy covariance (EC) measurements at a wetland in 2012. Chamber measurements revealed that, during the growing season, desert soils consumed CH4 (-1.37±0.06 mg- CH4 m-2 d-1), whereas the wetland margin emitted CH4 (+0.22±0.14 mg- CH4 m-2 d-1). Desert CH4 consumption rates were positively associated with soil temperature among years, and were similar to temperate locations, likely because of suitable landscape conditions for soil gas diffusion. Wetland FCH4 varied closely with stream discharge entering the wetland and hence extent of soil saturation. Landscape-scale FCH4 measured by EC was +1.27±0.18 mg- CH4 m-2 d-1 and varied with soil temperature and carbon dioxide flux. FCH4 measured using EC was higher than using chambers because EC measurements incorporated a larger, more saturated footprint of the wetland. Using EC FCH4 and quantifying the mass of CH4 entering and exiting the wetland in stream water, we determined that methanogenesis within wetland soils was the dominant source of FCH4. Low FCH4 at the wetland was likely due to a shallow organic soil layer, and thus limited carbon resources for methanogens. Considering the prevalence of dry soils in the high Arctic, our results suggest that these landscapes cannot be overlooked as important consumers of atmospheric CH4.

  18. Forest phenology and a warmer climate - Growing season extension in relation to climatic provenance

    SciTech Connect

    Gunderson, Carla A; Edwards, Nelson T; Walker, Ashley V; O'Hara, Keiran H; Campion, Christina M; Hanson, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    Predicting forest responses to warming climates relies on assumptions about niche and temperature sensitivity that remain largely untested. Observational studies have related current and historical temperatures to phenological shifts, but experimental evidence is sparse, particularly for autumn responses. A five-year field experiment exposed four deciduous forest species from contrasting climates (Liquidambar styraciflua, Quercus rubra, Populus grandidentata, and Betula alleghaniensis) to air temperatures 2 and 4 C above ambient controls. Impacts of year-round warming on bud burst (BB), senescence and abscission were evaluated in relation to thermal provenance. Leaves emerged earlier in all species, by an average of 6-9 days at +2 and +4 C. Magnitude of advance varied with species and year, but was larger for the first 2 C increment than the second. The effect of warming increased with early BB, favoring Liquidambar, from the warmest climate, but even BB in northern species advanced, despite temperatures well beyond those of the realized niche. Treatment differences in BB were poorly explained by temperature sums, which increased with treatment. In autumn, chlorophyll was retained an average of 4 and 7 days longer in +2 and +4 C treatments, and abscission delayed by 8 and 13 days. Species differences in autumn responses were marginally significant. Growing seasons in the warmer atmospheres were 6 - 28 days longer, with the least impact in Quercus. Results are compared with a 16-year record of canopy onset and offset in a nearby upland deciduous forest, where BB showed similar responsiveness to spring temperatures (2 - 4 days C-1). Offset dates in the stand tracked August-September temperatures, except when late summer drought caused premature senescence. The common garden-like experimental approach provides evidence that warming alone extends the growing season, at both ends, even if stand-level impacts are complicated by other environmental factors.

  19. Multi-sensor analysis of changing growing season dynamics across northwest North America since 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemani, R.; White, M.; Schwartz, M.; Saatchi, S.; Myneni, R.; Dettinger, M.; Cayan, D.

    2005-12-01

    Changes in Pacific Climate on interannual (ENSO) and decadal time scales (Pacific Decadal Oscillation, PDO)have a strong impact on a variety of biospheric processes over northwest North America, including changes in vegetation phenology, snow hydrology, summer drought and fire frequency, forest growth and crop yields. Though evidence exists for a shift in PDO in 1998, the impact of such a shift on terrestrial ecosystems is not yet known. We used a variety of satellite (AVHRR, SSM/I, GOES) and surface (NWS, SNOTEL, streamflow) networks to characterize changes in climate and ecosystem conditions between 1991-97 and 1998-04. Satellite data show that cooler sea surface temperatures during 1998-04 period led to lower atmospheric water vapor over the North Pacific, which in turn led to lower dewpoint and night minimum temperatures over northwest North America. Such climatic changes were dramatic over spring, leading to a delay in the satellite-derived onset of growing season. Modeled budbreak/flowering phases, based on observed weather data, also show a delay of 4-7 days during 1998-04 compared to 1991-97. The delay in growing season onset after 1998 was further supported by later occurrence of soil thaw and snowmelt. It is probably too early to determine if any of the observed changes are a part of the purported shift in PDO. However if they persist, climate-sensitive sectors such as viticulture, with large expansions in recent years, could face potential problems. Continuous monitoring facilitated by a variety of satellite and ground-based sensors offers an unprecedented, spatio-temporal view of changes as they happen.

  20. Pan-Arctic linkages between snow accumulation and growing-season air temperature, soil moisture and vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luus, K. A.; Gel, Y.; Lin, J. C.; Kelly, R. E. J.; Duguay, C. R.

    2013-11-01

    Arctic field studies have indicated that the air temperature, soil moisture and vegetation at a site influence the quantity of snow accumulated, and that snow accumulation can alter growing-season soil moisture and vegetation. Climate change is predicted to bring about warmer air temperatures, greater snow accumulation and northward movements of the shrub and tree lines. Understanding the responses of northern environments to changes in snow and growing-season land surface characteristics requires: (1) insights into the present-day linkages between snow and growing-season land surface characteristics; and (2) the ability to continue to monitor these associations over time across the vast pan-Arctic. The objective of this study was therefore to examine the pan-Arctic (north of 60° N) linkages between two temporally distinct data products created from AMSR-E satellite passive microwave observations: GlobSnow snow water equivalent (SWE), and NTSG growing-season AMSR-E Land Parameters (air temperature, soil moisture and vegetation transmissivity). Due to the complex and interconnected nature of processes determining snow and growing-season land surface characteristics, these associations were analyzed using the modern nonparametric technique of alternating conditional expectations (ACE), as this approach does not impose a predefined analytic form. Findings indicate that regions with lower vegetation transmissivity (more biomass) at the start and end of the growing season tend to accumulate less snow at the start and end of the snow season, possibly due to interception and sublimation. Warmer air temperatures at the start and end of the growing season were associated with diminished snow accumulation at the start and end of the snow season. High latitude sites with warmer mean annual growing-season temperatures tended to accumulate more snow, probably due to the greater availability of water vapor for snow season precipitation at warmer locations. Regions with drier

  1. Effects of grazing on ecosystem CO₂ exchange in a meadow grassland on the Tibetan Plateau during the growing season.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji; Shi, Weiyu; Cao, Junji

    2015-02-01

    Effects of human activity on ecosystem carbon fluxes (e.g., net ecosystem exchange (NEE), ecosystem respiration (R(eco)), and gross ecosystem exchange (GEE)) are crucial for projecting future uptake of CO2 in terrestrial ecosystems. However, how ecosystem that carbon fluxes respond to grazing exclusion is still under debate. In this study, a field experiment was conducted to study the effects of grazing exclusion on R(eco), NEE, and GEE with three treatments (free-range grazing (FG) and grazing exclusion for 3 and 5 years (GE3 and GE5, respectively)) in a meadow grassland on the Tibetan Plateau. Our results show that grazing exclusion significantly increased NEE by 47.37 and 15.84%, and R eco by 33.14 and 4.29% under GE3 and GE5 plots, respectively, although carbon sinks occurred in all plots during the growing season, with values of 192.11, 283.12, and 222.54 g C m(-2) for FG, GE3, and GE5, respectively. Interestingly, grazing exclusion increased temperature sensitivity (Q10) of R eco with larger increases at the beginning and end of growing season (i.e., May and October, respectively). Soil temperature and soil moisture were key factors on controlling the diurnal and seasonal variations of R(eco), NEE, and GEE, with soil temperature having a stronger influence. Therefore, the combined effects of grazing and temperature suggest that grazing should be taken into consideration in assessing global warming effects on grassland ecosystem CO2 exchange. PMID:25355630

  2. Effects of Grazing on Ecosystem CO2 Exchange in a Meadow Grassland on the Tibetan Plateau During the Growing Season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ji; Shi, Weiyu; Cao, Junji

    2015-02-01

    Effects of human activity on ecosystem carbon fluxes (e.g., net ecosystem exchange (NEE), ecosystem respiration ( R eco), and gross ecosystem exchange (GEE)) are crucial for projecting future uptake of CO2 in terrestrial ecosystems. However, how ecosystem that carbon fluxes respond to grazing exclusion is still under debate. In this study, a field experiment was conducted to study the effects of grazing exclusion on R eco, NEE, and GEE with three treatments (free-range grazing (FG) and grazing exclusion for 3 and 5 years (GE3 and GE5, respectively)) in a meadow grassland on the Tibetan Plateau. Our results show that grazing exclusion significantly increased NEE by 47.37 and 15.84 %, and R eco by 33.14 and 4.29 % under GE3 and GE5 plots, respectively, although carbon sinks occurred in all plots during the growing season, with values of 192.11, 283.12, and 222.54 g C m-2 for FG, GE3, and GE5, respectively. Interestingly, grazing exclusion increased temperature sensitivity ( Q 10) of R eco with larger increases at the beginning and end of growing season (i.e., May and October, respectively). Soil temperature and soil moisture were key factors on controlling the diurnal and seasonal variations of R eco, NEE, and GEE, with soil temperature having a stronger influence. Therefore, the combined effects of grazing and temperature suggest that grazing should be taken into consideration in assessing global warming effects on grassland ecosystem CO2 exchange.

  3. Quantification winter wheat LAI with HJ-1CCD image features over multiple growing seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinchuan; Zhang, Youjing; Luo, Juhua; Jin, Xiuliang; Xu, Ying; Yang, Wenzhi

    2016-02-01

    Remote sensing images are widely used to map leaf area index (LAI) continuously over landscape. The objective of this study is to explore the ideal image features from Chinese HJ-1 A/B CCD images for estimating winter wheat LAI in Beijing. Image features were extracted from such images over four seasons of winter wheat growth, including five vegetation indices (VIs), principal components (PC), tasseled cap transformations (TCT) and texture parameters. The LAI was significantly correlated with the near-infrared reflectance band, five VIs [normalized difference vegetation index, enhanced vegetation index (EVI), modified nonlinear vegetation index (MNLI), optimization of soil-adjusted vegetation index, and ratio vegetation index], the first principal component (PC1) and the second TCT component (TCT2). However, these image features cannot significantly improve the estimation accuracy of winter wheat LAI in conjunction with eight texture measures. To determine the few ideal features with the best estimation accuracy, partial least squares regression (PLSR) and variable importance in projection (VIP) were applied to predict LAI values. Four remote sensing features (TCT2, PC1, MNLI and EVI) were chosen based on VIP values. The result of leave-one-out cross-validation demonstrated that the PLSR model based on these four features produced better result than the ten features' model, throughout the whole growing season. The results of this study suggest that selecting a few ideal image features is sufficient for LAI estimation.

  4. Controls for ecosystem methane exchange are time-scale specifc and shift during the growing season of a temperate fen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachs, T.; Koebsch, F.; Jurasinski, G.; Koch, M.; Hofmann, J.; Glatzel, S.

    2014-12-01

    Wetlands are the largest natural sources for atmospheric methane (CH4). In wetlands with permanent shallow inundation, the seasonal variation of CH4 exchange is mainly controlled by temperature and phenology. In addition, ecosystem CH4 exchange varies considerably on smaller temporal scales such as days or weeks. Several single processes that control CH4 emissions on the local soil-plant-atmosphere continuum are well investigated, but their interaction on ecosystem level is not well understood yet. We applied wavelet analysis to a quasi-continuous Eddy Covariance CH4 flux time series to describe the temporal variation of ecosystem CH4 exchange within the growing season of a permanently inundated temperate fen. Moreover, we addressed time scale-specific controls and investigated whether their impact changes during the course of the growing season. On large time scales of two weeks to three months, temperature explained most of the variation in ecosystem CH4 exchange. In general, the temperature in the shallow water column had the largest impact as explanatory variable, however, air temperature and soil temperature became increasingly important as explanatory variables when water level dropped slightly up to June. The diurnal variation of ecosystem CH4 exchange shifted during the course of the growing season: During a short time period at the end of April, plant activity (expressed by canopy photosynthesis) caused a diurnal variation of ecosystem CH4 exchange with peak time around noon. In the following weeks, the daily cycle of convective mixing within the water column (expressed by the water temperature gradient) gradually gained importance and caused high night-time CH4 emissions, thereby levelling off the diurnal CH4 emission pattern. Moreover, shear-induced turbulence caused short-term fluctuations of ecosystem CH4 exchange on time scales up to two hours. Our study highlights the need for multi-scale approaches that consider the non-stationarity of the

  5. Controls for multi-scale temporal variation in ecosystem methane exchange during the growing season of a permanently inundated fen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koebsch, Franziska; Jurasinski, Gerald; Koch, Marian; Hofmann, Joachim; Glatzel, Stephan

    2014-05-01

    Temperature and phenology trigger seasonal variation of CH4 emissions in many ecosystems. However, ecosystem CH4 exchange varies also considerably on smaller temporal scales such as days or weeks. Indeed, we are aware of many processes that control CH4 emissions on the local soil-plant-atmosphere continuum, but their interaction on ecosystem level is not well understood yet. We used a quasi-continuous Eddy Covariance CH4 flux time series and wavelet analysis to describe the temporal variation of ecosystem CH4 exchange within the growing season of a permanently inundated temperate fen. Moreover, we assigned time scale-specific controls and investigated whether their impact changes during the course of the growing season. Water/soil temperature correlated with ecosystem CH4 exchange at time scales of 6-11 and 22 days which exceeds the time scales that are typically associated with the passage of weather fronts. The low response time might be due to the high heat capacity of the water column. On a daily scale, shear-induced turbulence (presented by friction velocity) and plant activity (presented by canopy photosynthesis) caused a diurnal variation of ecosystem CH4 exchange with peak time around noon. However, this pattern was apparent only at the beginning of the growing season (April/May). In the following, convective mixing of the water column (presented by the water temperature gradient) gradually gained importance and caused high night-time CH4 emissions, thereby levelling off the diurnal CH4 emission pattern. Our study highlights the need for multi-scale approaches that consider the non-stationarity of the underlying processes to adequately describe the complexity of ecosystem CH4 exchange. Moreover, we show that CH4 release processes such as convective mixing of the water column which has been mainly known from aquatic ecosystems until recently (Godwin et al. 2013), might be also of importance in shallowly flooded terrestrial ecosystems. Citation: Godwin CM, Mc

  6. Seasonal variation in leisure time physical activity.

    PubMed

    Uitenbroek, D G

    1993-06-01

    In this paper seasonal variation in leisure time physical activity for exercise is studied and quantified with regard to several popular exercise activities and taking the respondents gender, occupational status, and age into consideration. The analysis concerns data collected by telephone in Scotland between January 1989 and March 1992. Data from 7,202 male and 9,284 female respondents is used in the analysis; cosinor analysis using GLIM is applied. Considerable seasonal variation was found affecting both outdoor and indoor activities. During the peak phase in July, 32% of the respondents reported exercising for at least 20 min three or more times during the previous week, in the winter period this decreased to 23%. Older respondents were found to exercise more later in the year and also showed seasonal variation to a larger extent than younger respondents. This is particularly so for those respondents who exercise at a relatively high frequency. PMID:8321115

  7. Impact of mulches and growing season on indicator bacteria survival during lettuce cultivation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Aixia; Buchanan, Robert L; Micallef, Shirley A

    2016-05-01

    In fresh produce production, the use of mulches as ground cover to retain moisture and control weeds is a common agricultural practice, but the influence that various mulches have on enteric pathogen survival and dispersal is unknown. The goal of this study was to assess the impact of different mulching methods on the survival of soil and epiphytic fecal indicator bacteria on organically grown lettuce during different growing seasons. Organically managed lettuce, cultivated with various ground covers--polyethylene plastic, corn-based biodegradable plastic, paper and straw mulch--and bare ground as a no-mulch control, was overhead inoculated with manure-contaminated water containing known levels of generic Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. Leaves and soil samples were collected at intervals over a two week period on days 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 10 and 14, and quantitatively assessed for E. coli, fecal coliforms and Enterococcus spp. Data were analyzed using mixed models with repeated measures and an exponential decline with asymptote survival model. Indicator bacterial concentrations in the lettuce phyllosphere decreased over time under all treatments, with more rapid E. coli declines in the fall than in the spring (p<0.01). Persistence of E. coli in spring was correlated with higher maximum and minimum temperatures in this season, and more regular rainfall. The survival model gave very good fits for the progression of E. coli concentrations in the phyllosphere over time (R(2)=0.88 ± 0.12). In the spring season, decline rates of E. coli counts were faster (2013 p=0.18; 2014 p<0.005) for the bare ground-cultivated lettuce compared to mulches. In fall 2014, the E. coli decline rate on paper mulch-grown lettuce was higher (p<0.005). Bacteria fluctuated more, and persisted longer, in soil compared to lettuce phyllosphere, and mulch type was a factor for fecal coliform levels (p<0.05), with higher counts retrieved under plastic mulches in all trials, and higher enterococci

  8. The Seasons Explained by Refutational Modeling Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frede, Valerie

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the principles and investigation of a small-group laboratory activity based on refutational modeling to teach the concept of seasons to preservice elementary teachers. The results show that these teachers improved significantly when they had to refute their initial misconceptions practically. (Contains 8 figures and 1 table.)

  9. Effects of urban green infrastructure (UGI) on local outdoor microclimate during the growing season.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yafei; Bakker, Frank; de Groot, Rudolf; Wörtche, Heinrich; Leemans, Rik

    2015-12-01

    This study analyzed how the variations of plant area index (PAI) and weather conditions alter the influence of urban green infrastructure (UGI) on microclimate. To observe how diverse UGIs affect the ambient microclimate through the seasons, microclimatic data were measured during the growing season at five sites in a local urban area in The Netherlands. Site A was located in an open space; sites B, C, and D were covered by different types and configurations of green infrastructure (grove, a single deciduous tree, and street trees, respectively); and site E was adjacent to buildings to study the effects of their façades on microclimate. Hemispherical photography and globe thermometers were used to quantify PAI and thermal comfort at both shaded and unshaded locations. The results showed that groves with high tree density (site B) have the strongest effect on microclimate conditions. Monthly variations in the differences of mean radiant temperature (∆Tmrt) between shaded and unshaded areas followed the same pattern as the PAI. Linear regression showed a significant positive correlation between PAI and ∆Tmrt. The difference of daily average air temperature (∆T a ) between shaded and unshaded areas was also positively correlated to PAI, but with a slope coefficient below the measurement accuracy (±0.5 °C). This study showed that weather conditions can significantly impact the effectiveness of UGI in regulating microclimate. The results of this study can support the development of appropriate UGI measures to enhance thermal comfort in urban areas. PMID:26547322

  10. The effect of a permafrost disturbance on growing-season carbon-dioxide fluxes in a high Arctic tundra ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, A. E.; Christen, A.; Henry, G. H. R.

    2015-12-01

    Soil carbon stored in high-latitude permafrost landscapes is threatened by warming, and could contribute significant amounts of carbon to the atmosphere and hydrosphere as permafrost thaws. Permafrost disturbances, especially active layer detachments and retrogressive thaw slumps, have increased in frequency and magnitude across the Fosheim Peninsula, Ellesmere Island, Canada. To determine the effects of retrogressive thaw slumps on net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 in high Arctic tundra, we used two eddy covariance (EC) tower systems to simultaneously and continuously measure CO2 fluxes from a disturbed site and the surrounding undisturbed tundra. During the 32-day measurement period in the 2014 growing season the undisturbed tundra was a small net sink (NEE = -0.12 g C m-2 d-1); however, the disturbed terrain of the retrogressive thaw slump was a net source (NEE = +0.39 g C m-2 d-1). Over the measurement period, the undisturbed tundra sequestered 3.84 g C m-2, while the disturbed tundra released 12.48 g C m-2. Before full leaf out in early July, the undisturbed tundra was a small source of CO2, but shifted to a sink for the remainder of the sampling season (July), whereas the disturbed tundra remained a source of CO2 throughout the season. A static chamber system was also used to measure fluxes in the footprints of the two towers, in both disturbed and undisturbed tundra, and fluxes were partitioned into ecosystem respiration (Re) and gross primary production (GPP). Average GPP and Re found in disturbed tundra were smaller (+0.41 μmol m-2 s-1 and +0.50 μmol m-2 s-1, respectively) than those found in undisturbed tundra (+1.21 μmol m-2 s-1 and +1.00 μmol m-2 s-1, respectively). Our measurements indicated clearly that the permafrost disturbance changed the high Arctic tundra system from a sink to a source for CO2 during the growing season.

  11. The effect of a permafrost disturbance on growing-season carbon-dioxide fluxes in a high Arctic tundra ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, Alison E.; Christen, Andreas; Henry, Gregory H. R.

    2016-04-01

    Soil carbon stored in high-latitude permafrost landscapes is threatened by warming and could contribute significant amounts of carbon to the atmosphere and hydrosphere as permafrost thaws. Thermokarst and permafrost disturbances, especially active layer detachments and retrogressive thaw slumps, are present across the Fosheim Peninsula, Ellesmere Island, Canada. To determine the effects of retrogressive thaw slumps on net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 in high Arctic tundra, we used two eddy covariance (EC) tower systems to simultaneously and continuously measure CO2 fluxes from a disturbed site and the surrounding undisturbed tundra. During the 32-day measurement period in the 2014 growing season, the undisturbed tundra was a small net sink (NEE = -0.1 g C m-2 d-1); however, the disturbed terrain of the retrogressive thaw slump was a net source (NEE = +0.4 g C m-2 d-1). Over the measurement period, the undisturbed tundra sequestered 3.8 g C m-2, while the disturbed tundra released 12.5 g C m-2. Before full leaf-out in early July, the undisturbed tundra was a small source of CO2 but shifted to a sink for the remainder of the sampling season (July), whereas the disturbed tundra remained a source of CO2 throughout the season. A static chamber system was also used to measure daytime fluxes in the footprints of the two towers, in both disturbed and undisturbed tundra, and fluxes were partitioned into ecosystem respiration (Re) and gross primary production (GPP). Average GPP and Re found in disturbed tundra were smaller (+0.40 µmol m-2 s-1 and +0.55 µmol m-2 s-1, respectively) than those found in undisturbed tundra (+1.19 µmol m-2 s-1 and +1.04 µmol m-2 s-1, respectively). Our measurements indicated clearly that the permafrost disturbance changed the high Arctic tundra system from a sink to a source for CO2 during the majority of the growing season (late June and July).

  12. Changes of accumulated temperature, growing season and precipitation in the North China Plain from 1961 to 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yanling; Zhao, Yanxia; Wang, Chunyi

    2011-08-01

    Using the high-quality observed meteorological data, changes of the thermal conditions and precipitation over the North China Plain from 1961 to 2009 were examined. Trends of accumulated temperature and negative temperature, growing season duration, as well as seasonal and annual rainfalls at 48 stations were analyzed. The results show that the accumulated temperature increased significantly by 348.5°C day due to global warming during 1961-2009 while the absolute accumulated negative temperature decreased apparently by 175.3°C day. The start of growing season displayed a significant negative trend of -14.3 days during 1961-2009, but the end of growing season delayed insignificantly by 6.7 days. As a result, the length of growing season increased by 21.0 days. The annual and autumn rainfalls decreased slightly while summer rainfall and summer rainy days decreased significantly. In contrast, spring rainfall increased slightly without significant trends. All the results indicate that the thermal conditions were improved to benefit the crop growth over the North China Plain during 1961-2009, and the decreasing annual and summer rainfalls had no direct negative impact on the crop growth. But the decreasing summer rainfall was likely to influence the water resources in North China, especially the underground water, reservoir water, as well as river runoff, which would have influenced the irrigation of agriculture.

  13. Seasonality on the rainfall partitioning of a fast-growing tree plantation under Mediterranean conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    molina, antonio; llorens, pilar; biel, carme

    2014-05-01

    Studies on rainfall interception in fast-growing tree plantations are less numerous than those in natural forests. Trees in these plantations are regularly distributed, and the canopy cover is clumped but changes quickly, resulting on high variability in the volume and composition of water that reach the soil. In addition, irrigation supply is normally required in semiarid areas to get optimal wood production; consequently, knowing rainfall interception and its yearly evolution is crucial to manage the irrigation scheme properly. This work studies the rainfall partitioning seasonality in a cherry tree (Prunus avium) plantation orientated to timber production under Mediterranean conditions. The monitoring design started on March 2012 and consists of a set of 58 throughfall tipping buckets randomly distributed (based on a 1x1 m2 grid) in a plot of 128 m2 with 8 trees. Stemflow is measured in all the trees with 2 tipping buckets and 6 accumulative collectors. Canopy cover is regularly measured throughout the study period, in leaf and leafless periods, by mean of sky-orientated photographs taken 50 cm above the center of each tipping bucket. Others tree biometrics are also measured such as diameter and leaf area index. Meteorological conditions are measured at 2 m above the forest cover. This work presents the first analyses describing the rainfall partitioning and its dependency on canopy cover, distance to tree and meteorological conditions. The modified Gash' model for rainfall interception in dispersed vegetation is also preliminary evaluated.

  14. Rainfall-derived growing season characteristics for agricultural impact assessments in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosino, Chiara; Chandler, Richard E.; Todd, Martin C.

    2014-02-01

    Precipitation variability imposes significant pressure in areas where agricultural practice is dominated by smallholder farmers who are dependent on subsistence farming. Advances in the understanding of this variability, in both time and space, have an important role to play in increasing the resilience of agricultural systems. The need is particularly pressing in regions of the world such as the African continent, which is already affected by multiple stresses including poverty and economic and political instability. In this paper, we explore the use of generalised linear models (GLMs) for this purpose, via a case study from north-east South Africa. A GLM is used to link the local rainfall variability to large-scale climate drivers identified from previous subcontinental-scale analyses, and the ability of the resulting model to simulate precipitation features that are relevant in agricultural applications is evaluated. We focus in particular on a set of growing season indices, proposed for the investigation of intraseasonal characteristics relevant for maize production in the region. Seven indices were computed from spatially averaged daily rainfall series from nine stations in the study area. As a first attempt to use GLMs for this type of application, the results are encouraging and suggest that the models are able to reproduce a range of agriculture-relevant indices. However, further research into spatial correlation structure is recommended to improve the multisite generation of the rainfall-derived characteristics.

  15. Simulated water fluxes during the growing season in semiarid grassland ecosystems under severe drought conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Na; Liu, Chengyu

    2014-05-01

    To help improve understanding of how changes in climate and land cover affect water fluxes, water budgets, and the structure and function of regional grassland ecosystems, the Grassland Landscape Productivity Model (GLPM) was used to simulate spatiotemporal variation in primary water fluxes. The study area was a semiarid region in Inner Mongolia, China, in 2002, when severe drought was experienced. For Stipa grandis steppe, Leymus chinensis steppe, shrubland, and croplands, the modeled total, daily and monthly averaged, and maximum evapotranspiration during the growing season and the modeled water deficits were similar to those measured in Inner Mongolia under similar precipitation conditions. The modeled temporal variations in daily evaporation rate, transpiration rate, and evapotranspiration rate for the typical steppes also agreed reasonably well with measured trends. The results demonstrate that water fluxes varied in response to spatiotemporal variations in environmental factors and associated changes in the phenological and physiological characteristics of plants. It was also found that transpiration and evapotranspiration (rather than precipitation) were the primary factors controlling differences in water deficit among land cover types. The results also demonstrate that specific phenomena occur under severe drought conditions; these phenomena are considerably different to those occurring under normal or well-watered conditions. The findings of the present study will be useful for evaluating day-scale water fluxes and their relationships with climate change, hydrology, land cover, and vegetation dynamics.

  16. Temporal evolution of the macropore network and saturated hydraulic conductivity in an arable, clayey topsoil during one growing season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandin, Maria; Köstel, Johannes; Jarvis, Nicholas; Larsbo, Mats

    2015-04-01

    Soil macropore networks and thus hydraulic properties at and close to saturation vary considerably with time, as a result of the dynamic nature of a diverse range of interacting soil structure-forming and degrading factors such as tillage and traffic events, faunal and plant root activity, swell/shrink arising from wetting and drying cycles, freeze-thaw etc. These properties are nevertheless treated as constants in most hydrological modelling studies. This is mostly justified by a lack of understanding of the processes driving these changes. Temporal variations of saturated and near-saturated hydraulic conductivity have been studied in the field (e.g. by tension disc infiltrometer), but these measurements only indirectly reflect the characteristics of the macropore network. In this study, we used non-destructive X-ray tomography to investigate the temporal changes in the macropore network characteristics occurring in the harrowed layer of a conventionally-tilled agricultural field over one growing season. Undisturbed soil cores (60-70 mm height, 68 mm diameter) were sampled on five different occasions. Changes in the geometric and topological properties of the X-ray imaged macropore system (voxel resolution = 120 µm) were compared with variations in saturated hydraulic conductivity measured on the same samples. Image analysis showed that total porosity, specific surface area, average pore diameter and the connectivity of the pore system in the uppermost 60-70 mm of ploughed and harrowed soil decreased from the first sampling occasion shortly after seedbed preparation and sowing until the middle of the growing season after which it slightly increased again. Separate analysis of the total porosity of the top 5 mm showed a marked decrease between the first two sampling occasions, followed by a gradual increase. Despite these structural changes in the macropore system, saturated hydraulic conductivity was only weakly correlated with macropore network characteristics.

  17. Long-term experimentally deepened snow decreases growing-season respiration in a low- and high-arctic tundra ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenchuk, Philipp R.; Christiansen, Casper T.; Grogan, Paul; Elberling, Bo; Cooper, Elisabeth J.

    2016-05-01

    Tundra soils store large amounts of carbon (C) that could be released through enhanced ecosystem respiration (ER) as the arctic warms. Over time, this may change the quantity and quality of available soil C pools, which in-turn may feedback and regulate ER responses to climate warming. Therefore, short-term increases in ER rates due to experimental warming may not be sustained over longer periods, as observed in other studies. One important aspect, which is often overlooked, is how climatic changes affecting ER in one season may carry-over and determine ER in following seasons. Using snow fences, we increased snow depth and thereby winter soil temperatures in a high-arctic site in Svalbard (78°N) and a low-arctic site in the Northwest Territories, Canada (64°N), for 5 and 9 years, respectively. Deepened snow enhanced winter ER while having negligible effect on growing-season soil temperatures and soil moisture. Growing-season ER at the high-arctic site was not affected by the snow treatment after 2 years. However, surprisingly, the deepened snow treatments significantly reduced growing-season ER rates after 5 years at the high-arctic site and after 8-9 years at the low-arctic site. We speculate that the reduction in ER rates, that became apparent only after several years of experimental manipulation, may, at least in part, be due to prolonged depletion of labile C substrate as a result of warmer soils over multiple cold seasons. Long-term changes in winter climate may therefore significantly influence annual net C balance not just because of increased wintertime C loss but also because of "legacy" effects on ER rates during the following growing seasons.

  18. Early Season Goose Grazing Has a Greater Effect Than Advancement of the Growing Season on Net Ecosystem Exchange in a Sub-Arctic Coastal Wetland of Western Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leffler, A. J.; Choi, R. T.; Beard, K. H.; Schmutz, J. A.; Welker, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The wetlands of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta in western Alaska are important breeding areas for geese and are experiencing rapid climate change. Growing seasons now begin earlier but geese have not advanced their breeding enough to match the advancement of spring. Consequently, geese enter a greener system that may be less nutritious than in the past because grasses and sedges have highest nutrient density shortly following emergence. One consequence of this changing phenology is that vegetation consumed by geese and returned as feces may have a different carbon to nitrogen ratio than in the past, which may influence net ecosystem exchange (NEE). We examine the effect of the advancement of the growing season and different arrival times by Brant Geese on NEE. Our study consists of six experimental blocks, each with nine plots. Half of the plots are warmed to advance the growing season. Two plots each receive early, mid, and late season grazing; the remaining two plots are not grazed and there is one control plot. In one block, we monitor NEE hourly with an automatic gas exchange system. In the other blocks, survey measurements of NEE and ecosystem respiration (ER) are made periodically with a portable system. Geese remove considerable vegetation from the system and maintain "grazing lawns" <1 cm tall of high quality forage. Plots grazed in the early summer were net sources of C to the atmosphere, releasing ca. 2-4 g m-2 d-1. Non-grazed plots were C sinks of similar magnitude. Grazing had little effect on ER but an advanced growing season enhanced ER in the plots by ca. 0.5 μmol m-2 s-1. We observed a similar advanced growing season effect on NEE that we attribute to enhanced ER. Consequently, the larger influence on NEE in the system is grazing and this influence is through removal of photosynthetic tissue. Grazing by Brant Geese shifts large areas of this coastal wetland to a C source while advanced growing season only reduces the strength of the C sink.

  19. Plant phenological responses to a long-term experimental extension of growing season and soil warming in the tussock tundra of Alaska.

    PubMed

    Khorsand Rosa, Roxaneh; Oberbauer, Steven F; Starr, Gregory; Parker La Puma, Inga; Pop, Eric; Ahlquist, Lorraine; Baldwin, Tracey

    2015-12-01

    Climate warming is strongly altering the timing of season initiation and season length in the Arctic. Phenological activities are among the most sensitive plant responses to climate change and have important effects at all levels within the ecosystem. We tested the effects of two experimental treatments, extended growing season via snow removal and extended growing season combined with soil warming, on plant phenology in tussock tundra in Alaska from 1995 through 2003. We specifically monitored the responses of eight species, representing four growth forms: (i) graminoids (Carex bigellowii and Eriophorum vaginatum); (ii) evergreen shrubs (Ledum palustre, Cassiope tetragona, and Vaccinium vitis-idaea); (iii) deciduous shrubs (Betula nana and Salix pulchra); and (iv) forbs (Polygonum bistorta). Our study answered three questions: (i) Do experimental treatments affect the timing of leaf bud break, flowering, and leaf senescence? (ii) Are responses to treatments species-specific and growth form-specific? and (iii) Which environmental factors best predict timing of phenophases? Treatment significantly affected the timing of all three phenophases, although the two experimental treatments did not differ from each other. While phenological events began earlier in the experimental plots relative to the controls, duration of phenophases did not increase. The evergreen shrub, Cassiope tetragona, did not respond to either experimental treatment. While the other species did respond to experimental treatments, the total active period for these species did not increase relative to the control. Air temperature was consistently the best predictor of phenology. Our results imply that some evergreen shrubs (i.e., C. tetragona) will not capitalize on earlier favorable growing conditions, putting them at a competitive disadvantage relative to phenotypically plastic deciduous shrubs. Our findings also suggest that an early onset of the growing season as a result of decreased snow cover

  20. Seasonal and cumulative loblolly pine development under two stand density and fertility levels through four growing seasons. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Haywood, J.D.

    1994-06-01

    A loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) plantation was subjected to two cultural treatments to examine seasonal cumulative pine development in the 9th through 12th growing seasons: (1) pine stocking was either reduced by thinning to 303 trees per acre at a 12- by 12-ft spacing or the plots were left uncut with an original density of 1,210 trees per acre at a 6- by 6-ft spacing, and (2) either no fertilizer was applied or diammonium phosphate was broadcast at 134 lb of phosphorus and 120 lb of nitrogen per acre. Competing vegetation was controlled on all plots. Thinning resulted in less spring height growth in the 9th and 10th growing seasons that not cutting, but thinning increased diameter growth each year. Beginning in the 10th growing season, fertilization increased height, diameter, and basal area per acre growth, with the effect of fertilization on diameter growth being most pronounced on the thinned plots. Therefore, fertilization of thinned plots was more beneficial than thinning alone, and thinning alone resulted in less height and basal area per acre growth than the other treatment combinations for the 4-year period.

  1. Non-growing season soil CO2 efflux patterns in five land-use types in northern China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Overgrazing and unsuitable farming practices have led to grassland degradation in northern China. This studhy examined soil CO2 efflux (Fc) from five land-use types during the non-growing season on the southeastern edge of the Mongolian Plateau in China. The land-use types included three native v...

  2. n-Alkane biosynthetic hydrogen isotope fractionation is not constant throughout the growing season in the riparian tree Salix viminalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newberry, Sarah L.; Kahmen, Ansgar; Dennis, Paul; Grant, Alastair

    2015-09-01

    Compound-specific δ2H values of leaf wax n-alkanes have emerged as a potentially powerful paleohydrological proxy. Research suggests terrestrial plant n-alkane δ2H values are strongly correlated with meteoric water δ2H values, and may provide information on temperature, relative humidity, evaporation, and precipitation. This is based upon several assumptions, including that biosynthetic fractionation of n-alkanes during synthesis is constant within a single species. Here we present a multi-isotope study of the n-alkanes of riparian Salix viminalis growing in Norwich, UK. We measured n-alkane δ2H, leaf water δ2H, xylem water δ2H, and bulk foliar δ13C and evaluated the variability of n-alkane δ2H values and net biosynthetic fractionation (εlw-wax) over a whole growing season. S. viminalis n-alkane δ2H values decreased by 40‰ between the start of the growing season in April and the time when they stabilized in July. Variation in leaf and xylem water δ2H did not explain this variability. εlw-wax varied from -116‰ during leaf expansion in April to -156‰ during the stable phase. This suggests that differential biosynthetic fractionation was responsible for the strong seasonal trends in S. viminalis n-alkane δ2H values. We suggest that variability in εlw-wax is driven by seasonal differences in the carbohydrate source and thus the NADPH used in n-alkane biosynthesis, with stored carbohydrates utilized during spring and recent occurring growing season assimilates used later in the season. This is further supported by bulk foliar δ13C values, which are 13C-enriched during the period of leaf flush, relative to the end of the growing season. Our results challenge the assumption that biosynthetic fractionation is constant for a given species, and suggest that 2H-enriched stored assimilates are an important source for n-alkane biosynthesis early in the growing season. These findings have implications for the interpretation of sedimentary n-alkanes and call

  3. Earlier growing seasons and changes in migration timing influence carbon uptake and plant production in Arctic coastal wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leffler, A. J.; Beard, K. H.; Kelsey, K.; Choi, R. T.; Welker, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The wetlands of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta in western Alaska are important breeding areas for geese and are experiencing rapid climate change, specifically earlier onset of the growing season. Consequently, geese arrive 'later' in the growing season than in the past, potentially setting up a phenological mismatch with consequences for their nutrition, plant growth, and C and N processes in the ecosystem. We examined the interactive effects between the start of the growing season and Black Brant arrival time on these processes in a manipulative experiment. Advancing the growing season had a modest influence on CO2 exchange and plant growth. An early growing season shifted the rate of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) by 1-1.5 µmol m-2 s-1 toward a carbon (C) source. This change was driven by an increase in the rate of ecosystem respiration (ER). The advanced growing season nearly doubled the rate of leaf elongation in the early summer and this difference persisted as taller vegetation later in the year; belowground biomass was not affected. Timing of grazing had greater influence on CO2 exchange and plant growth. Grazing early in the season shifted the system to a carbon source by ca. 2 μmol m-2 s-1 while delaying grazing enhanced the carbon sink by 1 μmol m-2 s-1. Here, the influence was not through ER, but through reducing and enhancing standing leaf area, respectively. Early grazing also reduced season-long root production by over 50% while delayed grazing enhanced root production by 30%. Although delaying grazing enhanced C uptake and promoted plant growth in this ecosystem, leaf tissue in delayed-grazing plots had C:N of 16.7 compared to 14.2 in the typical-grazing plots, potentially reducing the digestibility of goose forage and slowing rates of decomposition. Biotic forcing in arctic tundra can thus be major drivers of ecosystem function and need to be considered as tundra system respond to changing conditions.

  4. Microwave remote sensing of short-term droughts during crop growing seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xing; Ma, Zhuguo; Pan, Ming; Shi, Chunxiang

    2015-06-01

    Severe short-term (monthly to seasonal) droughts frequently occurred over China in recent years, with devastating impacts on crop production. This study assesses the capability of microwave remote sensing in detecting soil moisture (agricultural) droughts over China and in providing early warnings. The 22 year (1992-2013) European Space Agency satellite soil moisture retrievals are compared against the in situ observations at 312 stations in China, the global soil moisture reanalysis, and the observed rainfall deficit. Both the reanalysis and remote sensing products can only detect less than 60% of drought months at in situ station scale, but they capture the interannual variations of short-term drought area at river basin scales quite well. As compared with reanalysis, the passive and merged microwave products have better drought detection over sparsely vegetated regions in northwestern China and the active microwave product with better vegetation penetration works the best in eastern China.

  5. Toward the resolution of microscopic seasonal variations in slow growing speleothems by ELA-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, N. R.; Wong, C. I.; Cunningham, M. T.; Banner, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Speleothems constitute potential seasonal proxies of terrestrial environmental change over multi-decadal to millennial time-scales, but have highly variable growth rates that bear on the practical spatial resolution that is achievable by conventional analytical approaches. Although attractive as possible chronometers of long-term environmental change, slow growing speleothems pose particular challenges for representative sampling required to obtain robust high-resolution geochemical time series. U-series dates demonstrate that many central Texas speleothems are slow growing records, with growth rates commonly in the range of 5-30 μm/yr. In contrast to fast-growth speleothems (i.e. >0.5 mm/yr), banding at predicted seasonal stratigraphic frequencies is not apparent by petrographic inspection. Complementary UV imagery reveals that band thicknesses can vary over short distances by a factor of 40, consistent with the allowable range of U-series growth rate estimates, but also suggesting that significant short-term growth rate variations are possible, if not endemic, to such records. Excimer laser ablation, ELA-ICP-MS, offers potential solutions to the sampling challenges posed by finely banded speleothems, but signal to noise level at this small scale has not been widely explored. We present results of tests to improve fine-scale spatial resolution through optimization of conventional instrumental variables associated with measurement and hardware changes. The latter include adoption of rectangular slit apertures, a large-format laser cell with localized "fast" sampling of the ablation plume, and a high energy optical attenuator. We focus on two speleothems from the same locality, having median U-series growth rates of ~15 μm/year, and employ slow line scans using a narrow slit aperture. Our approach is to modulate instrumental parameters (laser power, rep rate, scan rate, He flow) to obtain symmetrical wash-in and wash-out times, while obtaining lowest possible RSDs

  6. Spatial variability in UV radiation during the growing season across the continental USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, R. H.; Slusser, J. R.

    A major limitation in predicting the ultraviolet-B irradiance on humans, plant leaves and flowers and aquatic organisms is the difficulty in estimating exposure. This study analyzes the spatial variability in the daily exposure of narrow band 300nm and 368nm and broadband 290-315nm (UVB) solar radiation between twelve paired locations in the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) UVB Climate Network over two summer growing seasons (May through August of 2000 and 2001). The spatial correlation of the UVB, 300nm and 368nm daily exposures between locations was approximately 0.7 to 0.8 for spacing distances of 100km. The 300nm daily exposure was typically more highly correlated between locations than the 368nm daily exposure. Both the diffuse and direct beam components to the 300nm daily exposure were similarly correlated with distance between locations. The 368nm diffuse component of the daily exposures was less correlated with distance than the direct beam component, limiting the ability to interpolate daily exposures from measurement locations. In general the variability in daily exposures of UVB in the USDA UVB Climate Network is too large to interpolate daily exposures of solar radiation, with estimated 300nm, 368nm and broadband UVB errors at one-half the mean station spacing of the USDA Network of 22%, 21% and 16% respectively. More accurate interpolations of UVB exposure from this network will require either the incorporation of cloud cover variability from satellite imagery for daily exposure or the use of longer periods of accumulated exposure.

  7. Sensitivity study of reference crop evapotranspiration during growing season in the West Liao River basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhendong; He, Junshi; Dong, Kebao; Bian, Xiaodong; Li, Xiang

    2016-05-01

    We have analyzed the trends of reference crop evapotranspiration (ET0) through the Penman-Monteith model and climate factors in the West Liao River basin using the Mann-Kendall test after removing the effect of significant lag-1 serial correlation from the time series of the data by trend-free pre-whitening. The changing characteristics of the sensitivity coefficients and the spatial distribution during growing season are investigated, and the correlation between the sensitivity coefficients with elevation and the key climate factors by relative contribution and stepwise regression methods are evaluated. A significant overall increase in air temperature, and a significant decrease in wind speed, solar radiation, sunshine duration, relative humidity, and a slight decrease in ET0 are observed. Sensitivity analysis shows that ET0 is most sensitive to solar radiation, followed by relative humidity. In contrast, ET0 is least sensitive to the average air temperature. The sensitivity coefficients for the maximum and minimum air temperature and relative humidity have a significant negative correlation with elevation, while the coefficients for other variables are not strongly correlated with elevation. The spatial distribution of the sensitivity coefficients for wind speed and solar radiation is opposite, i.e., in regions where the sensitivity coefficients for wind speed are high; the sensitivity coefficients for solar radiation are low and vice versa. The sensitivity for relative humidity and average air temperature is region specific in the plain area. However, ET0 is most sensitive to the climate change in regions of high elevation. Wind speed is the most dominant contributor followed by solar radiation. Average air temperature contributes the least. The stepwise regression analysis indicates that wind speed is the foremost dominant variable influencing ET0. Relative contribution and stepwise regression analysis can be used to determine the main variables affecting ET0

  8. Nutrient runoff from a Korean rice paddy watershed during multiple storm events in the growing season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin S.; Oh, Seung Y.; Oh, Kwang Y.

    2006-07-01

    SummaryThe concentrations and loading characteristics of total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorous (TP) in runoff from a 50.1-ha rice paddy field watershed in South Korea were investigated for eight storm events during the 1998-2001 growing seasons. TN concentrations in total runoff were inversely related to discharge, except in periods with high fertilization rates. In contrast, TP concentrations were strongly proportional to discharge under non-ponded paddy conditions, but not correlated with discharge under most ponded paddy conditions. Stormflow and irrigation return flow were separated from total runoff using the constant-discharge method. The flow-weighted mean TN concentration in stormflow was lower than that in irrigation return flow, mainly because of rainwater dilution, except for periods with a residual fertilizer effect. The flow-weighted mean TP concentration in stormflow, however, was always higher than that in irrigation return flow, likely a result of sediment-associated phosphorus transport. The ratio of mean TP concentration in stormflow to that in irrigation return flow under ponded paddy conditions (1.6) was approximately one-half that under non-ponded conditions (3.1), suggesting that ponding on paddy fields played an important role in reducing soil erosion-related phosphorus export. Relationships between TN loads and stormflow runoff volumes were found except during a storm event in the high fertilization period ( p < 0.05). TP loads were also correlated with stormflow runoff volumes ( p < 0.05), except for storm events under non-ponded and dry antecedent conditions. These results indicate that nitrogen runoff from paddy field watersheds depends on fertilization rates, while phosphorus runoff is controlled by ponding conditions.

  9. Effects of application of corn straw on soil microbial community structure during the maize growing season.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Lin, Yin-Hua; Yang, Zhong-Qi; Xu, Yan-Peng; Tan, Fei; Jia, Xu-Dong; Wang, Miao; Xu, De-Rong; Wang, Xi-Zhuo

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of corn straw application on soil microbial communities and the relationship between such communities and soil properties in black soil. The crop used in this study was maize (Zea mays L.). The five treatments consisted of applying a gradient (50, 100, 150, and 200%) of shattered corn straw residue to the soil. Soil samples were taken from May through September during the 2012 maize growing season. The microbial community structure was determined using phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. Our results revealed that the application of corn straw influenced the soil properties and increased the soil organic carbon and total nitrogen. Applying corn straw to fields also influenced the variation in soil microbial biomass and community composition, which is consistent with the variations found in soil total nitrogen (TN) and soil respiration (SR). However, the soil carbon-to-nitrogen ratio had no effect on soil microbial communities. The abundance of PLFAs, TN, and SR was higher in C1.5 than those in other treatments, suggesting that the soil properties and soil microbial community composition were affected positively by the application of corn straw to black soil. A Principal Component Analysis indicated that soil microbial communities were different in the straw decomposition processes. Moreover, the soil microbial communities from C1.5 were significantly different from those of CK (p < 0.05). We also found a high ratio of fungal-to-bacterial PLFAs in black soil and significant variations in the ratio of monounsaturated-to-branched fatty acids with different straw treatments that correlated with SR (p < 0.05). These results indicated that the application of corn straw positively influences soil properties and soil microbial communities and that these properties affect these communities. The individual PLFA signatures were sensitive indicators that reflected the changes in the soil environment condition. PMID:24652702

  10. Likely changes in growing season indices under a climate change scenario for crop production in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosino, C.; Chandler, R. E.; Todd, M. C.

    2011-12-01

    Agriculture is still the major source of income and livelihood for most of South Africa's population, and cereals and grains are among the country's most important crops. In particular, the largest locally produced field crop and the most important source of carbohydrates in South Africa is maize (Zea mays L.). As well as extensive monoculture, maize production also dominates the smallholder farming system in areas such as the Limpopo District in north-east South Africa. It is therefore critical to understand the year-to-year changes in the planting season and rainfall characteristics in order to introduce management decision and mitigation measures in the agricultural sector (e.g. planting of drought-resistant crops or the choice between long and short-season cultivars). Indeed, one of the strategies that may be easily introduced by farmers is shifting the crop planting dates to adjust to changes in the rainfall regimes. The study presented here aims to characterise the inter-annual growing season variability through the use of 7 indices derived from daily precipitation, considered the most critical factor in rain-fed agriculture, having an impact on maize production. A statistical model is developed to generate daily rainfall sequences for the study area driven by large scale climate controls. An independent validation period is chosen to evaluate the performance of the statistical model in the rainfall generation process. Onset, length and cessation of the growing season, as well as indices representing the length of the mean and maximum dry spell during the season are derived from the area average daily simulated precipitation values. The fraction of rainy days and total precipitation during the growing season are also calculated. Finally, the projected change of the growing season indices between two investigated periods in the 20th and 21st centuries is investigated under a climate change scenario (a1b; e.g.: Fig.1). The outputs of this study may be used to

  11. Growing Together with the Treetures. Activity Guide. Series 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnell, Bobbi; Blau, Judith H.; Hinrichs, Jennifer Judd

    This activity guide is designed to be used with the Growing Together program. Tree-related activities are correlated to the Benchmarks for Scientific Literacy, the recommended standards for mathematics, science, and technology suggested by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). The Treature Educational Program is dedicated…

  12. Growing season temperature and precipitation variability and extremes in the U.S. Corn Belt from 1981 to 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, S.; Shulski, M.

    2013-12-01

    Climate warming and changes in rainfall patterns and increases in extreme events are resulting in higher risks of crop failures. A greater sense of urgency has been induced to understand the impacts of past climate on crop production in the U.S. As one of the most predominant sources of feed grains, corn is also the main source of U.S. ethanol. In the U.S. Corn Belt, region-scale evaluation on temperature and precipitation variability and extremes during the growing season is not well-documented yet. This study is part of the USDA-funded project 'Useful to Usable: Transforming climate variability and change information for cereal crop producers'. The overall goal of our work is to study the characteristics of average growing season conditions and changes in growing season temperature- and precipitation-based indices that are closely correlated with corn grain yield in the U.S. Corn Belt. The research area is the twelve major Corn Belt states, including IL, IN, IA, KS, MI, MN, MO, NE, OH, SD, ND, and WI. Climate data during 1981-2010 from 132 meteorological stations (elevation ranges from 122 m to 1,202 m) are used in this study, including daily minimum, maximum, and mean temperature, and daily precipitation. From 1981 to 2012, beginning date (BD), ending date (ED), and growing season length (GSL) in the climatological corn growing season are studied. Especially, during the agronomic corn growing season, from Apr to Oct, temperature- and precipitation-based indices are analyzed. The temperature-based indices include: number of days with daily mean temperature below 10°C, number of days with daily mean temperature above 30°C, the sum of growing degree days (GDD) between 10°C to 30°C (GDD10,30, growth range for corn), the sum of growing degree days above 30°C (GDD30+, exposure to harmful warming for corn), the sum of growing degree days between 0°C and 44°C (GDD0,44, survival range limits for corn), the sum of growing degree days between 5°C and 35°C (GDD5

  13. Temporal variability of atmospheric particulate matter and chemical composition during a growing season at an agricultural site in northeastern China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiwei; Tong, Daniel; Zhang, Shichun; Dan, Mo; Zhang, Xuelei; Zhao, Hongmei

    2015-12-01

    This study presents the observations of PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations at an agricultural site from April to October 2012 in Dehui city, China. Ambient air was sampled by filter-based samplers and online PM monitors. The filter samples were analyzed to determine the abundance of ionic/inorganic elements, organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC). The daily PM10 concentrations varied significantly over the monitoring period, with an average of 168±63 (in the range of 52-277)μg/m(3) during the land preparation/planting period (26 April-15 June), 85±65 (36-228)μg/m(3) during the growing season (16 June-25 September), and 207±88 (103-310)μg/m(3) during the harvest period (26 September-31 October). PM2.5 accounted for 44%, 56% and 66% of atmospheric PM10 during these periods, respectively. The PM10 diurnal variation showed a distinct peak from 16:00 to 21:00 (LST) during the growing and harvesting seasons, while a gradual increase throughout the daytime until 17:00 was observed during tilling season. Mineral dust elements (Al, Ca, Fe, and Mg) dominated the PM10 chemical composition during the tilling season; OC, NO3(-), SO4(2-) and NH4(+) during the growing season; and carbonaceous species (i.e., OC and EC) during the harvesting season. Our results indicate that the soil particles emitted by farm tillage and organic matter released from straw burning are the two most significant sources of PM10 emissions contributing to the recurring high pollution events in this region. Therefore, development of agricultural PM inventories from soil tillage and straw burning is prioritized to support air quality modeling. PMID:26702977

  14. Calculating High Resolution CWSI Maps for Entire Growing Season of a Cultivated Barley Field with UAV-Collected Surface Temperatures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, H.; Jensen, R.; Nieto Solana, H.; Friborg, T.; Thomsen, A.

    2015-12-01

    With agriculture as the largest consumer of freshwater and an overall increasing pressure on water resources, developing more efficient irrigation systems is important. Combining the crop water stress index (CWSI) with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) enables detection of which specific areas within a cultivated field that requires irrigation to ensure healthy growing plants. In this study remotely sensed, high resolution surface temperatures are collected with a thermal camera onboard an UAV. Temperatures are used to calculate spatially distributed, high resolution CWSI maps over a barley field during growing seasons 2014 and 2015. In early stages of the barley growing season, surface temperatures are an ensemble of both soil and canopy temperatures. Canopy temperatures are extracted using leaf area index and the two source energy balance modelling scheme. This approach enables CWSI calculations for homogeneous and evenly distributed crops (such as barley) during early as well as late stages of a growing season. CWSI maps are calculated using both an empirical and an analytical approach and are compared and validated against modelled canopy conductance and transpiration rates.

  15. Temperature drives inter-annual variability of growing season CO2 and CH4 fluxes of Siberian lowland tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutzbach, Lars; Wille, Christian; Runkle, Benjamin; Schreiber, Peter; Sachs, Torsten; Langer, Moritz; Boike, Julia; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2015-04-01

    Due to the logistic and technical difficulties associated with experimental work in high latitudes, long-term measurements of CO2 and CH4 fluxes from arctic ecosystems are still rare, and published trace gas balances often rely on measurements from one or few growing seasons. The inter-annual variability of environmental conditions such as temperature, precipitation, snow cover, and timing of snow melt can be high in the Arctic, especially for regions which are influenced by both continental and maritime climates, such as the Siberian arctic lowlands. For these ecosystems, we must also expect a great inter-annual variability in the balance of trace gases. Multi-annual data sets are needed to investigate this variability and its drivers. Here we present multi-annual late summer CO2 and CH4 flux data from the Lena River Delta in the Siberian Arctic (72° N, 126° E). The study site Samoylov Island is characterized by polygonal lowland tundra, a vegetation dominated by mosses and sedges, a soil complex of Glacic, Turbic and Histic Cryosols, and an active layer depth of on average 0.5 m. Seasonal flux measurements were carried out with the eddy covariance technique during the 13-year period 2002 - 2014. Within this period, CO2 flux data overlaps during 37 days (20 July - 25 August) for 12 years, and CH4 flux data overlaps during 25 days (28 July - 21 August) for 9 years. Cumulative net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) during the late summer overlap period is fairly consistent for 9 out of 12 years with a CO2 uptake of 1.9 ± 0.1 mol m-2. Three years show a clearly smaller uptake of

  16. Physiological responses of birch (Betula pendula) to ozone: a comparison between open-soil-grown trees exposed for six growing seasons and potted seedlings exposed for one season.

    PubMed

    Oksanen, Elina

    2003-06-01

    Physiological responses of 4-year-old potted saplings of an O3-tolerant clone of Betula pendula Roth to short-term ozone (O3) exposure (one growing season) were compared with those of 6-year-old open-soil-grown trees of the same clone fumigated with O3 for six growing seasons. In the 2001 growing season, both groups of plants were exposed to ambient (control) and 1.6x ambient (elevated) O3 concentration under similar microclimatic conditions in a free air O3 exposure facility. Growth, net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, stomatal density, visible foliar injury, starch and nutrient concentrations, bud formation and differences in O3 responses between lower, middle and upper sections of the canopy were determined. The potted saplings were unaffected by elevated O3 concentration, whereas the open-soil-grown trees showed a 3-38% reduction in shoot growth, a 22% reduction in number of overwintering buds, a 26-65% decrease in autumnal net photosynthesis, 30% and 20-23% reductions in starch and nitrogen concentrations of senescing leaves, respectively, and disturbances in stomatal conductance. The greater O3 sensitivity of open-soil-grown trees compared with potted saplings was a result of senescence-related physiological factors. First, a lower net photosynthesis to stomatal conductance ratio in open-soil-grown trees at the end of the season promoted O3 uptake and decreased photosynthetic gain, leading to the onset of visible foliar injuries. Second, decreased carbohydrate reserves may have resulted in deleterious carry-over effects arising from the reduced formation of over-wintering buds. Finally, the leaf-level O3 load was higher for open-soil-grown trees than for potted saplings because of slower leaf senescence in the trees. Thus, O3 sensitivity in European white birch increases with increasing exposure time and tree size. PMID:12750053

  17. Effect of season and variety on the differentiation of geographic growing origin of pistachios by stable isotope profiling.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kim A; Smith, Brian W

    2006-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to demonstrate if seasonal or variety differences affected the feasibility of stable isotope profiling methods to differentiate the geographical growing regions of pistachios (Pistachia vera). Bulk carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses of approximately 150 pistachios samples were performed. Isotope ratios were determined using a stable isotope mass spectrometer. The pistachio samples analyzed were from the three major pistachio-growing regions: Turkey, Iran, and the United States (California). Geographic regions were well separated on the basis of isotope ratios. Seasonal effects were found to affect some isotopes for some regions. Pistachio varieties within specified geographic regions were not found to affect the discriminating power of stable isotopes, for the varieties tested. This paper reports the development of a simple chemical profiling method using bulk stable isotope ratios that may be widely applied to the determination of the geographic origin of foods. PMID:16506828

  18. Positive effects of night warming on physiology of coniferous trees in late growing season: Leaf and root

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Bo; Yin, Chunying; Wang, Yujie; Sun, Yuyu; Liu, Qing

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies about the effects of experimental warming on tree species have focused primarily on response of morphology and physiology in leaf and biomass allocation in the growing season, and a few studies considered the importance of roots. Based on the available evidence, it is unclear whether photosynthesis rate is enhanced by night warming in late autumn an issue that deserves further investigation. Thus, we exposed two coniferous species, Picea asperata and Abies faxoniana, to night warming continued throughout the year to investigate morphological and physiological responses of roots and leaves in the autumn. The results showed that night warming caused significant increases in net influxes of NH4+ and NO3- in P. asperata seedlings corresponding well with net H+ efflux and net influx of O2. Meanwhile, night warming had a positive effect on foliar gas exchange such as net photosynthesis rate, apparent quantum efficiency, dark respiration rate and maximum quantum efficiency of PS II, and nitrate reductase activity of roots. Additionally, root morphology such as total roots length, surface area, specific root area and specific root length was also stimulated by night warming. In contrast, night warming decreased concentrations of non-structural carbohydrate in leaves and roots of both species in autumn. The present study demonstrates that night warming would enhance late autumn leaf photosynthetic rate, and increase N uptake capacity of roots.

  19. Transcriptome profiling in fast versus slow-growing rainbow trout across seasonal gradients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Circannual rhythms in vertebrates can influence a wide variety of physiological processes. Some notable examples include annual reproductive cycles and for poikilotherms, seasonal changes modulating growth. Increasing water temperature elevates growth rates in fishes, but increases i...

  20. Increases in Growing Season Length and Changes in Precipitation at Six Different Arctic and Subarctic Ecosystems from 1906-Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culler, L. E.; Finger, R.; Plane, E.; Ayres, M.; Virginia, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Ecological dynamics across the Arctic are responding to rapid changes in climate. As a whole, the Arctic has warmed at approximately twice the rate of the rest of the world, but changes in temperature and precipitation experienced at regional and local scales are most important for coupled human-natural systems. In addition, biologically-relevant climate indices are necessary for quantifying ecological responses of terrestrial and aquatic systems to varying climate. We compared climatic changes at six different Arctic and sub-Arctic locations, including two in Greenland (Kangerlussuaq, Sisimiut), one in Sweden (Abisko), and three in Alaska (Barrow, Nome, Fairbanks). We amassed weather data (daily temperature and precipitation), dating as far back as 1906, from public-access databases and used these data to calculate indices such as length of growing season, growing season degree days (GDD), and growing season precipitation. Annual GDD increased at all locations (average of 13% increase in GDD since 1980), but especially in western Greenland (16 and 37% in Kangerlussuaq and Sisimiut, respectively). Changes in growing season precipitation were more variable, with only Barrow, AK and Abisko, Sweden experiencing increased precipitation. All other sites experienced stable or slightly declining precipitation. Increasing temperatures and relatively stable precipitation translates to increased evapotranspiration potential, which influences soil moisture, lake depth, vegetation, carbon emissions, and fire susceptibility. Understanding local and regional trends in temperature and precipitation can help explain observed phenological changes and other processes at population, community, and ecosystem levels. In addition, identification of locations most susceptible to future change will allow scientists to closely monitor their ecological dynamics, anticipate changes in coupled human-natural systems, and consider adaptation plans for the most rapidly changing systems.

  1. Growing with EASE: Eating, Activity, and Self-Esteem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huettig, Carol; Rich, Shannon; Engelbrecht, Jo Ann; Sanborn, Charlotte; Essery, Eve; DiMarco, Nancy; Velez, Luisa; Levy, Luba

    2006-01-01

    A diverse group of professionals associated with Texas Woman's University's Institute for Women's Health, working collaboratively with school administrators, teachers, family support teams, and family members, developed Growing with EASE: Eating, Activity, and Self-Esteem, a nutrition program for young children and their families. In tracking the…

  2. Seasonality in Children's Pedometer-Measured Physical Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beighle, Aaron; Alderman, Brandon; Morgan, Charles F.; Le Masurier, Guy

    2008-01-01

    Seasonality appears to have an impact on children's physical activity levels, but equivocal findings demand more study in this area. With the increased use of pedometers in both research and practice, collecting descriptive data in various seasons to examine the impact of seasonality on pedometer-measured physical activity among children is…

  3. Changes in growing season duration and productivity of northern vegetation inferred from long-term remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Taejin; Ganguly, Sangram; Tømmervik, Hans; Euskirchen, Eugénie S.; Høgda, Kjell-Arild; Rune Karlsen, Stein; Brovkin, Victor; Nemani, Ramakrishna R.; Myneni, Ranga B.

    2016-08-01

    Monitoring and understanding climate-induced changes in the boreal and arctic vegetation is critical to aid in prognosticating their future. We used a 33 year (1982–2014) long record of satellite observations to robustly assess changes in metrics of growing season (onset: SOS, end: EOS and length: LOS) and seasonal total gross primary productivity. Particular attention was paid to evaluating the accuracy of these metrics by comparing them to multiple independent direct and indirect growing season and productivity measures. These comparisons reveal that the derived metrics capture the spatio-temporal variations and trends with acceptable significance level (generally p < 0.05). We find that LOS has lengthened by 2.60 d dec‑1 (p < 0.05) due to an earlier onset of SOS (‑1.61 d dec‑1, p < 0.05) and a delayed EOS (0.67 d dec‑1, p < 0.1) at the circumpolar scale over the past three decades. Relatively greater rates of changes in growing season were observed in Eurasia (EA) and in boreal regions than in North America (NA) and the arctic regions. However, this tendency of earlier SOS and delayed EOS was prominent only during the earlier part of the data record (1982–1999). During the later part (2000–2014), this tendency was reversed, i.e. delayed SOS and earlier EOS. As for seasonal total productivity, we find that 42.0% of northern vegetation shows a statistically significant (p < 0.1) greening trend over the last three decades. This greening translates to a 20.9% gain in productivity since 1982. In contrast, only 2.5% of northern vegetation shows browning, or a 1.2% loss of productivity. These trends in productivity were continuous through the period of record, unlike changes in growing season metrics. Similarly, we find relatively greater increasing rates of productivity in EA and in arctic regions than in NA and the boreal regions. These results highlight spatially and temporally varying vegetation dynamics and are reflective of biome-specific responses

  4. Temperature and geographic attribution of change in the Taraxacum mongolicum growing season from 1990 to 2009 in eastern China's temperate zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoqiu; Tian, Youhua; Xu, Lin

    2015-10-01

    Using leaf unfolding and leaf coloration data of a widely distributed herbaceous species, Taraxacum mongolicum, we detected linear trend and temperature response of the growing season at 52 stations from 1990 to 2009. Across the research region, the mean growing season beginning date marginal significantly advanced at a rate of -2.1 days per decade, while the mean growing season end date was significantly delayed at a rate of 3.1 days per decade. The mean growing season length was significantly prolonged at a rate of 5.1 days per decade. Over the 52 stations, linear trends of the beginning date correlate negatively with linear trends of spring temperature, whereas linear trends of the end date and length correlate positively with linear trends of autumn temperature and annual mean temperature. Moreover, the growing season linear trends are also closely related to the growing season responses to temperature and geographic coordinates plus elevation. Regarding growing season responses to temperature, a 1 °C increase in regional mean spring temperature results in an advancement of 2.1 days in regional mean growing season beginning date, and a 1 °C increase in regional mean autumn temperature causes a delay of 2.3 days in regional mean growing season end date. A 1 °C increase in regional annual mean temperature induces an extension of 8.7 days in regional mean growing season length. Over the 52 stations, response of the beginning date to spring temperature depends mainly on local annual mean temperature and geographic coordinates plus elevation. Namely, a 1 °C increase in spring temperature induces a larger advancement of the beginning date at warmer locations with lower latitudes and further west longitudes than at colder locations with higher latitudes and further east longitudes, while a 1 °C increase in spring temperature causes a larger advancement of the beginning date at higher than at lower elevations.

  5. Temperature and geographic attribution of change in the Taraxacum mongolicum growing season from 1990 to 2009 in eastern China's temperate zone.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoqiu; Tian, Youhua; Xu, Lin

    2015-10-01

    Using leaf unfolding and leaf coloration data of a widely distributed herbaceous species, Taraxacum mongolicum, we detected linear trend and temperature response of the growing season at 52 stations from 1990 to 2009. Across the research region, the mean growing season beginning date marginal significantly advanced at a rate of -2.1 days per decade, while the mean growing season end date was significantly delayed at a rate of 3.1 days per decade. The mean growing season length was significantly prolonged at a rate of 5.1 days per decade. Over the 52 stations, linear trends of the beginning date correlate negatively with linear trends of spring temperature, whereas linear trends of the end date and length correlate positively with linear trends of autumn temperature and annual mean temperature. Moreover, the growing season linear trends are also closely related to the growing season responses to temperature and geographic coordinates plus elevation. Regarding growing season responses to temperature, a 1 °C increase in regional mean spring temperature results in an advancement of 2.1 days in regional mean growing season beginning date, and a 1 °C increase in regional mean autumn temperature causes a delay of 2.3 days in regional mean growing season end date. A 1 °C increase in regional annual mean temperature induces an extension of 8.7 days in regional mean growing season length. Over the 52 stations, response of the beginning date to spring temperature depends mainly on local annual mean temperature and geographic coordinates plus elevation. Namely, a 1 °C increase in spring temperature induces a larger advancement of the beginning date at warmer locations with lower latitudes and further west longitudes than at colder locations with higher latitudes and further east longitudes, while a 1 °C increase in spring temperature causes a larger advancement of the beginning date at higher than at lower elevations. PMID:25627826

  6. Are BVOC exchanges in agricultural ecosystems overestimated? Insights from fluxes measured in a maize field over a whole growing season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachy, Aurélie; Aubinet, Marc; Schoon, Niels; Amelynck, Crist; Bodson, Bernard; Moureaux, Christine; Heinesch, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    Although maize is the second most important crop worldwide, and the most important C4 crop, no study on biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) has yet been conducted on this crop at ecosystem scale and over a whole growing season. This has led to large uncertainties in cropland BVOC emission estimations. This paper seeks to fill this gap by presenting, for the first time, BVOC fluxes measured in a maize field at ecosystem scale (using the disjunct eddy covariance by mass scanning technique) over a whole growing season in Belgium. The maize field emitted mainly methanol, although exchanges were bi-directional. The second most exchanged compound was acetic acid, which was taken up mainly in the growing season. Bi-directional exchanges of acetaldehyde, acetone and other oxygenated VOCs also occurred, whereas the terpenes, benzene and toluene exchanges were small, albeit significant. Surprisingly, BVOC exchanges were of the same order of magnitude on bare soil and on well developed vegetation, suggesting that soil is a major BVOC reservoir in agricultural ecosystems. Quantitatively, the maize BVOC emissions observed were lower than those reported in other maize, crops and grasses studies. The standard emission factors (SEFs) estimated in this study (231 ± 19 µg m-2 h-1 for methanol, 8 ± 5 µg m-2 h-1 for isoprene and 4 ± 6 µg m-2 h-1 for monoterpenes) were also much lower than those currently used by models for C4 crops, particularly for terpenes. These results suggest that maize fields are small BVOC exchangers in north-western Europe, with a lower BVOC emission impact than that modelled for growing C4 crops in this part of the world. They also reveal the high variability in BVOC exchanges across world regions for maize and suggest that SEFs should be estimated for each region separately.

  7. Seasonal photosynthetic activity in evergreen conifer leaves monitored with spectral reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, C. Y.; Gamon, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    productivity. Furthermore, the seasonal transitions between photosynthetically active and inactive states can be clearly detected by the PRI. These findings have implications for using remote sensing to detect dynamics in photosynthetic activity in response to changing growing season length in northern latitudes.

  8. High-Frequency Measurements of Methane Ebullition Over a Growing Season at a Temperate Peatland Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, Jordan P.; Varner, Ruth K.; Frolking, Steve; Duncan, Bryan N.; Crill, Patrick M.

    2011-01-01

    Bubbles can contribute a significant fraction of methane emissions fr om wetlands; however the range of reported fractions is very large an d accurate characterization of this pathway has proven difficult. Her e we show that continuous automated flux chambers combined with an in tegrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) instrument allow us to qua ntify both CH4 ebullition rate and magnitude. For a temperate poor f en in 2009, ebullition rate varied on hourly to seasonal time scales. A diel pattern in ebullition was identified with peak release occurr ing between 20:00 and 06:00 local time, though steady fluxes (i.e., t hose with a linear increase in chamber headspace CH4 concentration) d id not exhibit diel variability. Seasonal mean ebullition rates peake d at 843.5 +/- 384.2 events m(exp -2)/d during the summer, with a me an magnitude of 0.19 mg CH4 released in each event.

  9. Impacts of climate change on corn yield and the length of corn growing season in U.S. Corn Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niyogi, D.; Liu, X.; Takle, E. S.; Anderson, C.; Andresen, J.; Alagarswamy, G.; Gramig, B. M.; Doering, O.

    2015-12-01

    This study is a result of a USDA sponsored project titled Useful to Usable (U2U): "Transforming Climate Variability and Change Information for Cereal Crop Producers". The objective of this project is to improve farm resilience and profitability in the U.S. Corn Belt region by transforming existing meteorological dataset into usable knowledge and tools for the agricultural community. In this study, we conducted the Hybrid-Maize corn growth simulation model at 18 sites across the U.S. Corn Belt with 5 CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project) climate models. The crop model was running for two time periods: 1981-2010 ('current') and 2041-2070 ('future'). We also developed a "delta" method, which combines the current climate variability with the "mean" model projected climate change. The results indicate that under the 'future' climate, growing degree days (GDD) projected corn growing season (from planting date reach to maturity required GDD) are shortened due to the increasing of mean temperature. Compare to the contemporary simulations, the shorter growing season under "future" scenario brings lower attainable yields if farmers using the same cultivar. This presentation will focus on the details about the model simulations, the interactive process employed in developing the simulations, the implications of the results, the uncertainties, and the lessons learned.

  10. Landscape controls on the timing of spring, autumn, and growing season length in mid-Atlantic forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elmore, A.J.; Guinn, S.M.; Minsley, B.J.; Richardson, A.D.

    2012-01-01

    The timing of spring leaf development, trajectories of summer leaf area, and the timing of autumn senescence have profound impacts to the water, carbon, and energy balance of ecosystems, and are likely influenced by global climate change. Limited field-based and remote-sensing observations have suggested complex spatial patterns related to geographic features that influence climate. However, much of this variability occurs at spatial scales that inhibit a detailed understanding of even the dominant drivers. Recognizing these limitations, we used nonlinear inverse modeling of medium-resolution remote sensing data, organized by day of year, to explore the influence of climate-related landscape factors on the timing of spring and autumn leaf-area trajectories in mid-Atlantic, USA forests. We also examined the extent to which declining summer greenness (greendown) degrades the precision and accuracy of observations of autumn offset of greenness. Of the dominant drivers of landscape phenology, elevation was the strongest, explaining up to 70% of the spatial variation in the onset of greenness. Urban land cover was second in importance, influencing spring onset and autumn offset to a distance of 32 km from large cities. Distance to tidal water also influenced phenological timing, but only within ~5 km of shorelines. Additionally, we observed that (i) growing season length unexpectedly increases with increasing elevation at elevations below 275 m; (ii) along gradients in urban land cover, timing of autumn offset has a stronger effect on growing season length than does timing of spring onset; and (iii) summer greendown introduces bias and uncertainty into observations of the autumn offset of greenness. These results demonstrate the power of medium grain analyses of landscape-scale phenology for understanding environmental controls on growing season length, and predicting how these might be affected by climate change.

  11. Partitioning the grapevine growing season in the Douro Valley of Portugal: accumulated heat better than calendar dates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Real, António C.; Borges, José; Cabral, J. Sarsfield; Jones, Gregory V.

    2015-08-01

    Temperature and water status profiles during the growing season are the most important factors influencing the ripening of wine grapes. To model weather influences on the quality and productivity of the vintages, it is necessary to partition the growing season into smaller growth intervals in which weather variables are evaluated. A significant part of past and ongoing research on the relationships between weather and wine quality uses calendar-defined intervals to partition the growing season. The phenology of grapevines is not determined by calendar dates but by several factors such as accumulated heat. To examine the accuracy of different approaches, this work analyzed the difference in average temperature and accumulated precipitation using growth intervals with boundaries defined by means of estimated historical phenological dates and intervals defined by means of accumulated heat or average calendar dates of the Douro Valley of Portugal. The results show that in situations where there is an absence of historical phenological dates and/or no available data that makes the estimation of those dates possible, it is more accurate to use grapevine heat requirements than calendar dates to define growth interval boundaries. Additionally, we analyzed the ability of the length of growth intervals with boundaries based on grapevine heat requirements to differentiate the best from the worst vintage years with the results showing that vintage quality is strongly related to the phenological events. Finally, we analyzed the variability of growth interval lengths in the Douro Valley during 1980-2009 with the results showing a tendency for earlier grapevine physiology.

  12. [Effects of precipitation variation on growing seasonal dynamics of soil microbial biomass in broadleaved Korean pine mixed forest].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Wang, Mei-ju; Li, Shi-lan; Wang, Nan-nan; Feng, Fu-juan; Han, Shi-jie

    2015-05-01

    Broadleaved Korean pine mixed forest is the zonal climax vegetation in Northeast China and it plays a significant role in maintaining the ecological security. Changbai Mountains is a suitable region to study the positive and negative feedback mechanisms of temperate forest for precipitation variation. This study analyzed responses of soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC) and microbial biomass nitrogen (SMBN) to precipitation variation (± 30%) in original broadleaved Korean pine mixed forest of Changbai Mountains. The results showed that, during the growing seasons (from May to September), the averages of SMBC and SMBN were 879.09 and 100.03 mg · kg(-1), respectively. Moreover, both of these two parameters gradually decreased with the soil depth. The contents of SMBC and SMBN all increased with the increasing precipitation, and the changes of SMBC and SMBN in the 0-5 cm soil layer were stronger than in the 5-10 cm soil layer. The value of SMBC/SMBN declined with the increase of precipitation. The precipitation variation significantly influenced the means of SMBC and SMBN. Compared with precipitation reduction, precipitation enhancement affected the indices much significantly. Both SMBC and SMBN showed similar seasonal patterns, which were the lowest in May, and after that, they increased and then decreased and increased again, showing 1-2 peaks in the growing season. However, the value and occurring time of the peaks varied with the precipitation and soil layer, and the seasonal variations of SMBC and SMBN in the 0-5 cm soil layer were higher than in the 5-10 cm soil layer. SMBC and SMBN had significant positive correlation with organic matter and total nitrogen content. The variances of soil physical and chemical properties caused by precipitation variation were closely related with the difference in spatial-temporal patterns of the soil microbial biomass in the forest. In conclusion, the precipitation variations could cause the change of the soil microbial

  13. The variation of methane flux rates from boreal tree species at the beginning of the growing season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haikarainen, Iikka; Halmeenmäki, Elisa; Machacova, Katerina; Pihlatie, Mari

    2016-04-01

    Boreal forests are considered as net sink for atmospheric methane (CH4) because of the CH4 oxidizing bacteria in the aerobic soil layer. However, within the last decades it has become more evident that trees play an important role in the global CH4 budget by offering pathways for anaerobically produced CH4 from deeper soil layers to the atmosphere. Furthermore, trees may also act as independent sources of CH4. To confirm magnitude, variability and the origin of the tree mediated CH4 emissions more research is needed, especially in boreal forests which have been in a minority in such investigation. We measured tree stem and shoot CH4 exchange of three boreal tree species at the beginning of the growing season (13.4.-13.6.2015) at SMEAR II station in Hyytiälä, located in southern Finland (61° 51'N, 24° 17'E, 181 asl). The fluxes were measured from silver birch (Betula pendula), downy birch (B. pubescens) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) on two sites with differing soil type and characteristics (paludified and mineral soil), vegetation and forest structure by using the static chamber technique. Scaffold towers were used for measurements at multiple stem heights and shoots. The aim was to study the vertical profile of CH4 fluxes at stem and shoot level and compare these fluxes among the studied species, and to observe temporal changes in CH4 flux over the beginning of the growing season. We found that all the trees emitted CH4 from their stems and shoots. Overall, the birches showed higher emissions compared to the spruces. The emission rates were considerably larger in the lower parts of the birch stems than upper parts, and these emissions increased during the growing season. The spruces had more variation in the stem CH4 flux, but the emission rates of the upper parts of the stem exceeded the birch emissions at the same height. The shoot fluxes of all the studied trees indicated variable CH4 emissions without a clear pattern regarding the vertical profile and

  14. Exploring the correlation between Southern Africa NDVI and Pacific sea surface temperatures: Results for the 1998 maize growing season

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verdin, J.; Funk, C.; Klaver, R.; Roberts, D.

    1999-01-01

    Several studies have identified statistically significant correlations between Pacific sea surface temperature anomalies and NDVI anomalies in Southern Africa. The potential predictive value of the relationship was explored for the 1998 maize growing season. Cross-validation techniques suggested a more useful relationship for regions of wet anomaly than for regions of dry anomaly. Observed 1998 NDVI anomaly patterns were consistent with this result. Wet anomalies were observed as expected, but wide areas of expected dry anomalies exhibited average or above-average greeness.

  15. Plot-level Microtopographical Controls on Arctic Growing Season and Fall Shoulder Season Soil CO2 Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkman, E.; Oechel, W. C.; Zona, D.

    2015-12-01

    Permafrost soils are among the most obvious environments in which current constraints on decomposition are likely to change as a result of climatic alterations, potentially exposing large amounts of previously stored carbon (C) to microbial degradation and emission during the next few decades (Davidson & Janssens, 2006). As a best estimate, the soils of the circumpolar Arctic store over 1,035 ± 150 Pg C in the near surface (0-3 m), approximately twice the amount of C that is currently in the atmosphere (Tarnocai et al., 2009; Hugelius et al., 2014). Currently, however, much of this previously stored carbon is at risk of loss to the atmosphere due to accelerated soil organic matter decomposition in warmer future climates (Dorrepaal et al., 2009; Schuur et al., 2015). Polygonization, a predominant cryogenic process, produces micro-topographical and hydrological heterogeneity, as polygon rims produce lower water tables and drier conditions and low polygon centers produce higher water tables and wetter conditions (Brown et al., 1980). As climate models increasingly suggest that current warming trends in the Arctic (4-8 °C higher annual surface air temperatures) will continue by century's end, C cycling in these northern climes may be further amplified (IPCC, 2013). Much uncertainty remains in regard to the spatial and temporal extent of CO2 emissions from these systems, especially in view of the potential for modifications to C cycling in response to increased warming and deeper summer thawing of the active soil layer (Mastepanov et al., 2013). Therefore, an LI-8100 Automated Soil Flux System (LI-COR Biosciences) was deployed in Barrow, AK, to gather high temporal frequency soil CO2 fluxes from a wet sedge tundra ecosystem. Dark chamber fluxes were gathered from 5 microtopographical habitats (designated flat, high, low, polygon rim, and polygon troughs) to calculate daily average, diurnal, and monthly respiratory fluxes. With the addition of concurrently gathered

  16. Verification of Satellite Radar Remote Sensing Based Estimates of Boreal and Subalpine Growing Seasons Using an Ecosystem Process Model and Surface Biophysical Measurement Network Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimball, J. S.; McDonald, K. C.; Running, S. W.; Zimmermann, R.

    2002-12-01

    We employ daily surface Radar backscatter data from the SeaWinds Ku-band Scatterometer onboard Quikscat to estimate landscape freeze-thaw state and associated length of the seasonal non-frozen period as a surrogate for determining the annual growing season across boreal and subalpine regions of North America for 2000 and 2001. We compare these results with estimates of growing season length derived from a network of surface stations, utilizing BIOME-BGC stand-level ecosystem process model simulations, site sap flow and tower eddy flux net CO2 exchange measurements for a network of mature evergreen coniferous forest stands. Remote sensing based estimates of spatial patterns in the timing of seasonal freeze-thaw vary by more than 8 weeks, while associated estimates of growing season length span more than 14 weeks across the region. Inter-annual variability between 2000 and 2001 is found to be on the order of 1-4 weeks. Remote sensing estimates of growing season initiation and length are found to be well correlated with both site measurements and model simulations. Remote sensing measurements of the end of the seasonal non-frozen period are also found to be consistent with site based temperature measurements, but not with site based estimates of growing season termination. These findings are attributed to a relatively strong dependence of the onset of the growing season to snowmelt and associated soil thaw in spring and the relative importance of additional factors such as light availability and day length in controlling growing season termination. This work was performed at the University of Montana, and at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  17. Environmental and societal consequences of a possible CO/sub 2/-induced climate change. Volume II, Part 8. Impacts of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels on agricultural growing seasons and crop water use efficiencies

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, J. E.

    1982-09-01

    The researchable areas addressed relate to the possible impacts of climate change on agricultural growing seasons and crop adaptation responses on a global basis. The research activities proposed are divided into the following two main areas of investigation: anticipated climate change impacts on the physical environmental characteristics of the agricultural growing seasons and, the most probable food crop responses to the possible changes in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ levels in plant environments. The main physical environmental impacts considered are the changes in temperature, or more directly, thermal energy levels and the growing season evapotranspiration-precipitation balances. The resulting food crop, commercial forest and rangeland species response impacts addressed relate to potential geographical shifts in agricultural growing seasons as determined by the length in days of the frost free period, thermal energy changes and water balance changes. In addition, the interaction of possible changes in plant water use efficiencies during the growing season in relationship to changing atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentrations, is also considered under the scenario of global warming due to increases in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration. These proposed research investigations are followed by adaptive response evaluations.

  18. Improving crop biomass through asynchronous assimilation of LAI and soil moisture during multiple growing seasons of corn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongiovanni, T. E.; Nagarajan, K.; Jones, J. W.; Monsivais Huertero, A.; Judge, J.

    2010-12-01

    Crop biomass is an important indicator of the health of a plant and is also critical for various remote sensing algorithms. In addition, it determines water uptake by the roots, affecting the root zone soil moisture (RZSM). Typically, crop models are used to simulate growth and development in a growing season and estimate biomass and yield. However large uncertainties in these estimates occur over time due to errors in computation, initialization conditions, forcings, and model parameters. Such uncertainties can be significantly reduced by assimilating in situ and/or remotely sensed observations. Satellite-based LAI and near-surface soil moisture (SM) are available weekly and 3 days, respectively. In this study, an EnKF-based assimilation algorithm was implemented to improve crop biomass using the Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT) Cropping System Model. In situ observations of weekly LAI and every 3-day SM were assimilated asynchronously to update model estimates of LAI, RZSM, and crop biomass. The in situ observations were obtained from intensive field experiments during three seasons of sweet corn grown in North Central Florida. The impact of different assimilation scenarios for crop biomass was determined by the root mean squared difference and the standard deviation between the model estimates and observations during the seasons.

  19. Investigating the Persistence of a Snowpack Sublimation Stable Isotope Signal in Tree Xylem Water during the Growing Season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, E. S.; Bowling, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Previous work identified a riparian meadow in the Rocky Mountains where streamside box elder (Acer negundo) trees did not use stream water, the most reliable and readily available source. A follow-up study showed that the water used by trees appears to be more evaporatively enriched than all available measured sources, including stream water, precipitation-derived soil water, and groundwater. While it is unlikely that there is a missing pool of water these trees are accessing, they may be tapping into a distinct subset of the bulk soil water available, possibly derived from much colder and older snowmelt. In this study, we investigated whether snowpack sublimation and subsequent melt water may impart an enriched isotopic signature that persists throughout the following growing season in less-mobile soil water pools. Profile samples of the snowpack, bulk melt water, and early season soil lysimeter water were collected throughout the winter and analyzed for hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopes. As snow began to melt in the spring, water samples for isotope analysis were taken from soil profiles, stream water, groundwater, and stems. Although sublimation likely occurred at the site, such processes did not impart an evaporative isotope enrichment on the snowpack throughout the season. Both snow pack and melt water remained closely tied to the local meteoric water line as they infiltrated soil. These findings suggest that snowpack sublimation processes preceding melt water infiltration are not the source of evaporative enrichment in tree water at our site.

  20. A comparative synoptic climatology of cool-season rainfall in major grain-growing regions of southern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pook, Michael J.; Risbey, James S.; McIntosh, Peter C.

    2014-08-01

    Two distinct synoptic weather systems, cut-off lows and fronts, deliver most of the cool-season rainfall to the cropping regions of southern Australia. A comparative synoptic climatology of daily rainfall events over approximately five decades reveals both spatial and temporal variations of the dominant synoptic types. The rainfall characteristics and associated large-scale drivers differ between the two synoptic types. Understanding regional rainfall depends on understanding these differences. Cut-off lows contribute one half of growing season rainfall in southeast Australia, while frontal systems associated with Southern Ocean depressions contribute about a third. The proportions are reversed in the Central Wheat Belt (CWB) of Western Australia where Southern Ocean fronts are the dominant source of growing season rainfall. In the southern island state of Tasmania, topography strongly influences the outcome with cut-off lows contributing about half the rainfall near the east coast and fronts dominating a short distance to the west. Cut-off lows generally contribute their highest proportion of rainfall in the austral autumn and spring while frontal rainfall is at its maximum in late winter. Cut-off low rainfall contributes more strongly in percentage terms to the recent decline in rainfall. The distribution of synoptic types is explained by the dominant long-wave structure in the winter half of the year. The major trough near Western Australia favours frontogenesis to the southwest of the CWB but fronts moving out of the region encounter a persistent meridional ridge in the Tasman Sea where there is a high frequency of blocking events.

  1. Spatiotemporal properties of growing season indices during 1961-2010 and possible association with agroclimatological regionalization of dominant crops in Xinjiang, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ci, Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Singh, Vijay P.; Xiao, Mingzhong; Liu, Lin

    2016-08-01

    Variations of frost days and growing season length (GSL) have been drawing increasing attention due to their impact on agriculture. The Xinjiang region in China is climatically an arid region and plays an important role in agriculture development. In this study, the GSL and frost events are analyzed in both space and time, based on the daily minimum, mean and maximum air surface temperature data covering a period of 1961-2010. Results indicate that: (1) a significant lengthening of GSL is detected during 1961-2010 in Xinjiang, China. The increasing rate of GSL over Xinjiang is about 2.5 days per decade. Besides, the starting time of growing season is 0.7 days earlier per decade and the ending time is 1.6 days later per decade. Generally, GSL in southern Xinjiang has larger increasing magnitude when compared to other regions of Xinjiang; (2) longer GSL and larger changing magnitude of growing season start (GSS), growing season end (GSE) and GSL in southern Xinjiang implies higher sensitivity of the growing season response to climate warming. Besides, GSL is in close relation with latitude, and higher latitude usually corresponds to later start and earlier end of growing season, and hence shorter GSL. In general, a northward increase of 1° latitude triggers an 8-day delay of the starting time of growing season, 6-day advance of the ending time of growing season, and thus the GSL is 14 days shorter; (3) GSL under different rates can reflect light and heat resources over Xinjiang. The GSL related to 80 % guarantee rate is 5-14 days shorter than the long-term annual mean GSL; (4) Lengthening of GSL has the potential to increase agricultural production. However, negative influences by climate warming, such as enhanced evapotranspiration, increasing weeds, insects, and pathogen-mediated plant diseases, should also be considered in planning, management and development of agriculture in Xinjiang.

  2. Spatiotemporal properties of growing season indices during 1961-2010 and possible association with agroclimatological regionalization of dominant crops in Xinjiang, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ci, Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Singh, Vijay P.; Xiao, Mingzhong; Liu, Lin

    2015-11-01

    Variations of frost days and growing season length (GSL) have been drawing increasing attention due to their impact on agriculture. The Xinjiang region in China is climatically an arid region and plays an important role in agriculture development. In this study, the GSL and frost events are analyzed in both space and time, based on the daily minimum, mean and maximum air surface temperature data covering a period of 1961-2010. Results indicate that: (1) a significant lengthening of GSL is detected during 1961-2010 in Xinjiang, China. The increasing rate of GSL over Xinjiang is about 2.5 days per decade. Besides, the starting time of growing season is 0.7 days earlier per decade and the ending time is 1.6 days later per decade. Generally, GSL in southern Xinjiang has larger increasing magnitude when compared to other regions of Xinjiang; (2) longer GSL and larger changing magnitude of growing season start (GSS), growing season end (GSE) and GSL in southern Xinjiang implies higher sensitivity of the growing season response to climate warming. Besides, GSL is in close relation with latitude, and higher latitude usually corresponds to later start and earlier end of growing season, and hence shorter GSL. In general, a northward increase of 1° latitude triggers an 8-day delay of the starting time of growing season, 6-day advance of the ending time of growing season, and thus the GSL is 14 days shorter; (3) GSL under different rates can reflect light and heat resources over Xinjiang. The GSL related to 80 % guarantee rate is 5-14 days shorter than the long-term annual mean GSL; (4) Lengthening of GSL has the potential to increase agricultural production. However, negative influences by climate warming, such as enhanced evapotranspiration, increasing weeds, insects, and pathogen-mediated plant diseases, should also be considered in planning, management and development of agriculture in Xinjiang.

  3. Growing season boundary layer climate and surface exchanges in a subarctic lichen woodland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzjarrald, David R.; Moore, Kathleen E.

    1994-01-01

    Between June and August 1990, observations were made at two surface micrometeorological towers near Schefferville Quebec (54 deg 52 min N, 66 deg 40.5 min W), one in a fen and one in the subarctic lichen woodland, and at four surface climatological stations. Data from these surface stations were supplemented by regular radiosonde launches. Supporting measurements of radiative components and soil temperatures allowed heat and moisture balances to be obtained at two sites. The overall surface meteorological experiment design and results of micrometeorological observations made on a 30-m tower in the lichen woodland are presented here. Seasonal variation in the heat and water vapor transport characteristics illustrate the marked effect of the late summer climatological shift in air mass type. During the first half of the summer, average valley sidewalls only 100 m high are sufficient to channel winds along the valley in the entire convective boundary layer. Channeling effects at the surface, known for some time at the long-term climate station in Schefferville, are observed both at ridge top and in the valley, possibly the response of the flow to the NW-SE orientation of valleys in the region. Diurnal surface temperature amplitude at ridge top (approximately equal to 10 C) was found to be half that observed in the valley. Relatively large differences in precipitation among these stations and the climatological station at Schefferville airport were observed and attributed to the local topography. Eddy correlation observations of the heat, moisture and momentum transports were obtained from a 30-m tower above a sparse (approximately equal to 616 stems/ha) black spruce lichen woodland. Properties of the turbulent surface boundary layer agree well with previous wind tunnel studies over idealized rough surfaces. Daytime Bowen ratios of 2.5-3 are larger than those reported in previous studies. Surface layer flux data quality was assessed by looking at the surface layer heat

  4. Seasonal energy requirements and thermoregulation of growing pouched mice, Saccostomus campestris (Cricetidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, G. T. H.; Skinner, J. D.

    1991-06-01

    Pouched mice ( Saccostomus campestris) were born in captivity during January and March and subsequently maintained under long photoperiod (14 h light: 10 h dark) at 25°C. During their first winter (July) and the following summer (January) the pouched mice were exposed to natural photoperiod in an unheated laboratory for 3 weeks prior to measurement. The pouched mice continued to grow during the study, and were significantly heavier after summer exposure than after winter exposure 6 months earlier. Although this increase in body mass would result in a decline in their surface area to volume ratio there was no significant decline in minimal thermal conductance ( C m) and winter-exposed pouched mice had a relatively lower C m than expected. Meanwhile the smaller, winter-exposed animals displayed a significantly higher capacity for non-shivering thermogenesis, together with higher levels of basal metabolism than summer individuals. These differences were not solely attributable to the contrasting body mass of each group and it is therefore clear that S. campestris can increase thermoregulatory heat production, and modify heat loss following exposure to short photoperiod and cold during their first winter. Despite the significant increase in metabolism, the overall energy requirements of small, winter-exposed animals were significantly lower than those for heavier pouched mice following exposure to summer conditions. These results suggest that growing pouched mice can effectively adapt to lower temperature conditions during their first winter, yet accrue considerable overall savings in total energy requirements as a result of their smaller body mass.

  5. Growing Degree Vegetation Production Index (GDVPI): A Novel and Data-Driven Approach to Delimit Season Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, W. D.; Spruce, J.; Ross, K. W.; Gasser, J.; Grulke, N.

    2014-12-01

    Growing Degree Vegetation Production Index (GDVPI) is a parametric approach to delimiting vegetation seasonal growth and decline cycles using incremental growing degree days (GDD), and NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) 8-day composite cumulative integral data. We obtain a specific location's daily minimum and maximum temperatures from the nearest National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) weather stations posted on the National Climate Data Center (NCDC) Climate Data Online (CDO) archive and compute GDD. The date range for this study is January 1, 2000 through December 31, 2012. We employ a novel process, a repeating logistic product (RLP), to compensate for short-term weather variability and data drops from the recording stations and fit a curve to the median daily GDD values, adjusting for asymmetry, amplitude, and phase shift that minimize the sum of squared errors when comparing the observed and predicted GDD. The resulting curve, here referred to as the surrogate GDD, is the time-temperature phasing parameter used to convert Cartesian NDVI values into polar coordinate pairs, multiplying the NDVI values as the radial by the cosine and sine of the surrogate GDD as the angular. Depending on the vegetation type and the original NDVI curve, the polar NDVI curve may be nearly circular, kidney-shaped, or pear-shaped in the case of conifers, deciduous, or agriculture, respectively. We examine the points of tangency about the polar coordinate NDVI curve, identifying values of 1, 0, -1, or infinity, as each of these represent natural inflection points. Lines connecting the origin to each tangent point illustrate and quantify the parametrically segmentation of the growing season based on the GDD and NDVI ostensible dependency. Furthermore, the area contained by each segment represents the apparent vegetation production. A particular benefit is that the inflection points are determined

  6. Climatic warming above the Arctic Circle: are there trends in timing and length of the thermal growing season in Murmansk Region (Russia) between 1951 and 2012?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinova, Ilona; Chmielewski, Frank-Michael

    2015-06-01

    Anomalies in the timing of the thermal growing season have become obvious in the NE part of Fennoscandia since 2000. They are in accordance with climatic changes reported for Europe and Fennoscandia. The actual length of the growing season reached 120 days on average, onset on 30 May and ending on 27 September (1981-2010). Shifts in the timing of the growing season and its mean prolongation by 18.5 days/62a are demonstrated for Murmansk Region (1951-2012). In this period, the onset of the growing season advanced by 7.1 days/62a, while the end was extended by 11.4 days/62a. The delay in the end of the growing season is similar to the entire Fennoscandian pattern but it has not been detected in the rest of Europe. The regional pattern of climatic regimes in Murmansk Region remained stable in comparison with earlier climatic maps (1971). However, the actual shifts in the timing of the growing season were more pronounced in colder (oceanic and mountainous) parts. Recent climatic trends could influence the retreat of the tundra zone and changes in the forest line. Losses of tundra biodiversity and enrichment of the northern taiga by southern species could be expected from present climatic trends.

  7. Climatic warming above the Arctic Circle: are there trends in timing and length of the thermal growing season in Murmansk Region (Russia) between 1951 and 2012?

    PubMed

    Blinova, Ilona; Chmielewski, Frank-Michael

    2015-06-01

    Anomalies in the timing of the thermal growing season have become obvious in the NE part of Fennoscandia since 2000. They are in accordance with climatic changes reported for Europe and Fennoscandia. The actual length of the growing season reached 120 days on average, onset on 30 May and ending on 27 September (1981-2010). Shifts in the timing of the growing season and its mean prolongation by 18.5 days/62a are demonstrated for Murmansk Region (1951-2012). In this period, the onset of the growing season advanced by 7.1 days/62a, while the end was extended by 11.4 days/62a. The delay in the end of the growing season is similar to the entire Fennoscandian pattern but it has not been detected in the rest of Europe. The regional pattern of climatic regimes in Murmansk Region remained stable in comparison with earlier climatic maps (1971). However, the actual shifts in the timing of the growing season were more pronounced in colder (oceanic and mountainous) parts. Recent climatic trends could influence the retreat of the tundra zone and changes in the forest line. Losses of tundra biodiversity and enrichment of the northern taiga by southern species could be expected from present climatic trends. PMID:25155187

  8. Verification of satellite radar remote sensing based estimates of boreal and subalpine growing seasons using an ecosystem process model and surface biophysical measurement network information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, K. C.; Kimball, J. S.; Zimmerman, R.

    2002-01-01

    We employ daily surface Radar backscatter data from the SeaWinds Ku-band Scatterometer onboard Quikscat to estimate landscape freeze-thaw state and associated length of the seasonal non-frozen period as a surrogate for determining the annual growing season across boreal and subalpine regions of North America for 2000 and 2001.

  9. Leaf ontogeny dominates the seasonal exchange of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in a SRC-poplar plantation during an entire growing season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brilli, Federico; Gioli, Beniamino; Fares, Silvano; Zenone, Terenzio; Zona, Donatella; Gielen, Bert; Loreto, Francesco; Janssens, Ivan; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2015-04-01

    The declining cost of many renewable energy technologies and changes in the prices of fossil fuels have recently encouraged governments policies to subsidize the use of biomass as a sustainable source of energy. Deciduous poplars (Populus spp.) trees are often selected for biomass production in short rotation coppiced (SRC) for their high CO2 photosynthetic assimilation rates and their capacity to develop dense canopies with high values of leaf area index (LAI). So far, observations and projections of seasonal variations of many VOC fluxes has been limited to strong isoprenoids emitting evergreen ecosystems such tropical and Mediterranean forests as well as Citrus and oil palm plantation, all having constant values of LAI. We run a long-term field campaign where the exchange of VOC, together with CO2 and water vapor was monitored during an entire growing season (June - November, 2012) above a SRC-based poplar plantation. Our results confirmed that isoprene and methanol were the most abundant fluxes emitted, accounting for more than 90% of the total carbon released in form of VOC. However, Northern climates characterized by fresh summertime temperatures and recurring precipitations favored poplar growth while inhibiting the development of isoprene emission that resulted in only 0.7% of the net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE). Besides, measurements of a multitude of VOC fluxes by PTR-TOF-MS showed bi-directional exchange of oxygenated-VOC (OVOC) such as: formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, isoprene oxidation products (iox, namely MVK, MAC and MEK) as well as ethanol and formic acid. The application of Self Organizing Maps to visualize the relationship between the full time-series of many VOC fluxes and the observed seasonal variations of environmental, physiological and structural parameters proved the most abundant isoprene ad methanol fluxes to occur mainly on the hottest days under mid-high light intensities when also NEE and evapotraspiration reached the highest

  10. Seasonal prevalence of MS disease activity(Podcast)

    PubMed Central

    Meier, D.S.; Balashov, K.E.; Healy, B.; Weiner, H.L.; Guttmann, C.R.G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This observational cohort study investigated the seasonal prevalence of multiple sclerosis (MS) disease activity (likelihood and intensity), as reflected by new lesions from serial T2-weighted MRI, a sensitive marker of subclinical disease activity. Methods: Disease activity was assessed from the appearance of new T2 lesions on 939 separate brain MRI examinations in 44 untreated patients with MS. Likelihood functions for MS disease activity were derived, accounting for the temporal uncertainty of new lesion occurrence, individual levels of disease activity, and uneven examination intervals. Both likelihood and intensity of disease activity were compared with the time of year (season) and regional climate data (temperature, solar radiation, precipitation) and among relapsing and progressive disease phenotypes. Contrast-enhancing lesions and attack counts were also compared for seasonal effects. Results: Unlike contrast enhancement or attacks, new T2 activity revealed a likelihood 2–3 times higher in March–August than during the rest of the year, and correlated strongly with regional climate data, in particular solar radiation. In addition to the likelihood or prevalence, disease intensity was also elevated during the summer season. The elevated risk season appears to lessen for progressive MS and occur about 2 months earlier. Conclusion: This study documents evidence of a strong seasonal pattern in subclinical MS activity based on noncontrast brain MRI. The observed seasonality in MS disease activity has implications for trial design and therapy assessment. The observed activity pattern is suggestive of a modulating role of seasonally changing environmental factors or season-dependent metabolic activity. GLOSSARY CEL = contrast-enhancing lesions; MS = multiple sclerosis. PMID:20805526

  11. [Effects of nitrogen addition on available nitrogen content and acidification in cold-temperate coniferous forest soil in the growing season].

    PubMed

    Chen, Gao-Qi; Fu, Wa-Li; Luo, Ya-Chen; Gao, Wen-Long; Li, Sheng-Gong; Yang, Hao

    2014-12-01

    Based on a low-level and multi-form N addition control experiment, this study took cold-temperate coniferous forest in Daxing'an Ling as the research object. After long-term and continuous nitrogen addition in situ, the available nitrogen (NH4(+) -N & NO3(-) -N) contents and pH values of the soil (0-10 cm) were measured in the early growing season (May) and the peak growing season (August) in 2010, 2012 and 2013. The results showed that, the available nitrogen in the early and peak growing seasons was mainly NH4(+) -N which accounted for over 96% of the inorganic nitrogen content, while the content of NO3(-) -N was very low. With the time extension of nitrogen addition, the effects of nitrogen addition on the NH4(+) -N content in 0-10 cm soil were more obvious in the early growing season than that in the peak growing season, and the NH4(+) -N content was mainly affected by the type of nitrogen addition. On the contrary, the NO3(-) -N content in 0-10 cm soil was higher in the peak growing season than that in the early growing season. The effect of N input was obvious on NO3(-) -N content in both early and peak growing seasons, and low nitrogen treatment tended to promote the enrichment of NO3(-) -N. As time went on, the response of NH4(+) -N and NO3(-) -N content to N addition was changed from insignificant in the early stage to significant in the late stage. N addition had a significant impact on the pH value of the 0-10 cm soil in the early and peak growing seasons. The pH values of the soil with low nitrogen treatment and the soil in the peak growing season were relatively lower. With the extension of the nitrogen addition time, the response of pH value also turned from insignificant in the early stage to significant in the late stage. Because of the long-term and continuous nitrogen addition, the 0 - 10 cm soil in this cold-temperate coniferous forest was obviously acidified. PMID:25826942

  12. Irrigated acreage in the Bear River Basin as of the 1975 growing season. [Idaho, Utah, and Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ridd, M. K.; Jaynes, R. A.; Landgraf, K. F.; Clark, L. D., Jr. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    The irrigated cropland in the Bear River Basin as of the 1975 growing season was inventoried from satellite imagery. LANDSAT color infrared images (scale 1:125,000) were examined for early, mid, and late summer dates, and acreage was estimated by use of township/section overlays. The total basin acreage was estimated to be 573,435 acres, with individual state totals as follows: Idaho 234,370 acres; Utah 265,505 acres; and Wyoming 73,560 acres. As anticipated, wetland areas intermingled among cropland appears to have produced an over-estimation of irrigated acreage. According to a 2% random sample of test sites evaluated by personnel from the Soil Conservation Service such basin-wide over-estimation is 7.5%; individual counties deviate significantly from the basin-wide figure, depending on the relative amount of wetland areas intermingled with cropland.

  13. Sensitivity of Active and Passive Microwave Observations to Soil Moisture during Growing Corn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, J.; Monsivais-Huertero, A.; Liu, P.; De Roo, R. D.; England, A. W.; Nagarajan, K.

    2011-12-01

    Soil moisture (SM) in the root zone is a key factor governing water and energy fluxes at the land surface and its accurate knowledge is critical to predictions of weather and near-term climate, nutrient cycles, crop-yield, and ecosystem productivity. Microwave observations, such as those at L-band, are highly sensitive to soil moisture in the upper few centimeters (near-surface). The two satellite-based missions dedicated to soil moisture estimation include, the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission and the planned NASA Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) [4] mission. The SMAP mission will include active and passive sensors at L-band to provide global observations of SM, with a repeat coverage of every 2-3 days. These observations can significantly improve root zone soil moisture estimates through data assimilation into land surface models (LSMs). Both the active (radar) and passive (radiometer) microwave sensors measure radiation quantities that are functions of soil dielectric constant and exhibit similar sensitivities to SM. In addition to the SM sensitivity, radar backscatter is highly sensitive to roughness of soil surface and scattering within the vegetation. These effects may produce a much larger dynamic range in backscatter than that produced due to SM changes alone. In this study, we discuss the field observations of active and passive signatures of growing corn at L-band from several seasons during the tenth Microwave, Water and Energy Balance Experiment (MicroWEX-10) conducted in North Central Florida, and to understand the sensitivity of these signatures to soil moisture under dynamic vegetation conditions. The MicroWEXs are a series of season-long field experiments conducted during the growing seasons of sweet corn, cotton, and energy cane over the past six years (for example, [22]). The corn was planted on July 5 and harvested on September 23, 2011 during MicroWEX-10. The size of the field was 0.04 km2 and the soils

  14. Contribution of grazing to soil atmosphere CH4 exchange during the growing season in a continental steppe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shiming; Wang, Chengjie; Wilkes, Andreas; Zhou, Pei; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Han, Guodong; Zhao, Mengli; Huang, Ding; Schönbach, Philipp

    2013-03-01

    Degradation of steppes induced by overgrazing may affect the uptake of atmospheric methane (CH4) by soil sinks. However, uncertainty is associated with the very limited knowledge of gas fluxes in rapidly degrading steppe. In this study, we investigated the effects of grazing on CH4 uptake during the growing season in three types of steppe (meadow steppe, typical steppe and desert steppe and) in Inner Mongolia, China, to quantify and compare CH4 uptake in steppe ecosystems under different grazing management conditions. The CH4 fluxes were measured using an automatic cavity ring-down spectrophotometer at three steppe locations that differed primarily in grazing intensity. The results indicated that steppe soils were CH4 sinks throughout the growing season. CH4 uptake at all sites averaged 7.98 kg CH4-C ha-1 yr-1 (ranging from 1.53 to 18.74 kg CH4-C ha-1 yr-1), of which approximately 43.8% occurred in the desert steppe. CH4 uptake in the desert steppe increased 20.4% and 51.2% compared with the typical steppe and meadow steppe, respectively. Light grazing (LG) of steppe did not significantly change CH4 uptake compared with un-grazed (UG) steppe, but moderate and heavy grazing (MG, HG) reduced CH4 uptake significantly (by 6.8-37.9%, P < 0.05). These findings imply that reducing the grazing pressure on steppe would help increase the atmospheric CH4 sinks in steppe soils. Our results suggest that HG exerts a considerable negative impact on CH4 uptake in a continental steppe. Further studies involving year-round, intensive measurements of CH4 uptake are needed.

  15. Downscaling 250-m MODIS growing season NDVI based on multiple-date landsat images and data mining approaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gu, Yingxin; Wylie, Bruce K.

    2015-01-01

    The satellite-derived growing season time-integrated Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (GSN) has been used as a proxy for vegetation biomass productivity. The 250-m GSN data estimated from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors have been used for terrestrial ecosystem modeling and monitoring. High temporal resolution with a wide range of wavelengths make the MODIS land surface products robust and reliable. The long-term 30-m Landsat data provide spatial detailed information for characterizing human-scale processes and have been used for land cover and land change studies. The main goal of this study is to combine 250-m MODIS GSN and 30-m Landsat observations to generate a quality-improved high spatial resolution (30-m) GSN database. A rule-based piecewise regression GSN model based on MODIS and Landsat data was developed. Results show a strong correlation between predicted GSN and actual GSN (r = 0.97, average error = 0.026). The most important Landsat variables in the GSN model are Normalized Difference Vegetation Indices (NDVIs) in May and August. The derived MODIS-Landsat-based 30-m GSN map provides biophysical information for moderate-scale ecological features. This multiple sensor study retains the detailed seasonal dynamic information captured by MODIS and leverages the high-resolution information from Landsat, which will be useful for regional ecosystem studies.

  16. Radionuclide concentrations in vegetation at radioactive-waste disposal Area G during the 1994 growing season

    SciTech Connect

    Fresquez, P.R.; Biggs, J.B.; Bennett, K.D.

    1995-07-01

    Overstory (pinon pine) and understory (grass and forb) vegetation samples were collected within and around selected points at Area G-a low-level radioactive solid-waste disposal facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory-for the analysis of tritium ({sup 3}H), strontium ({sup 90}Sr), plutonium ({sup 238} Pu and {sup 239}Pu), cesium ({sup 137}Cs), americium ({sup 241}Am), and total uranium. In general, most vegetation samples collected within and around Area G contained radionuclide levels in higher concentrations than vegetation collected from background areas. Tritium, in particular, was detected as high as 5,800 pCi/mL in overstory vegetation collected outside the fence just west of the tritium shafts; this suggests that tritium is migrating from this waste repository through subsurface pathways. Also, understory vegetation collected north of the transuranic (TRU) pads (outside the fence of Area G) contained the highest values of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 241}Am, and may be a result of surface holding, storage, or disposal activities.

  17. Exposure to Atrazine and Selected Non-Persistent Pesticides among Corn Farmers during a Growing Season

    PubMed Central

    Bakke, Berit; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Barr, Dana B.; Stewart, Patricia A.; Blair, Aaron; Freeman, Laura Beane; Lynch, Charles F.; Allen, Ruth H.; Alavanja, Michael C.R.; Vermeulen, Roel

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to develop quantitative estimates of farmers’ pesticide exposure to atrazine and to provide an overview of background levels of selected non-persistent pesticides among corn farmers in a longitudinal molecular epidemiologic study. Methods The study population consisted of 30 Agricultural Health Study farmers from Iowa and 10 nonfarming controls. Farmers completed daily and weekly diaries from March to November in 2002 and 2003 on pesticide use and other exposure determinants. Urine samples were collected at 10 timepoints relative to atrazine application and other farming activities. Pesticide exposure was assessed using urinary metabolites and diaries. Results The analytical limit of detection (LOD) ranged between 0.1–0.2 μg/l for all pesticide analytes except for isazaphos (1.5 μg/l) and diazinon (0.7 μg/l). Farmers had higher geometric mean urinary atrazine mercapturate (AZM) values than controls during planting (1.1 vs.

  18. Contrasting Metabolism in Perenniating Structures of Upland and Lowland Switchgrass Plants Late in the Growing Season

    PubMed Central

    Tobias, Christian M.; Twigg, Paul; Xia, Yuannan; Vogel, Kenneth P.; Madhavan, Soundararajan; Sattler, Scott E.; Sarath, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Background Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is being developed as a bioenergy crop for many temperate regions of the world. One way to increase biomass yields is to move southern adapted lowland cultivars to more northern latitudes. However, many southerly adapted switchgrass germplasm can suffer significant winter kill in northerly climes. Materials and Methods Here, we have applied next-generation sequencing in combination with biochemical analyses to query the metabolism of crowns and rhizomes obtained from two contrasting switchgrass cultivars. Crowns and rhizomes from field-grown lowland (cv Kanlow) and upland (cv Summer) switchgrass cultivars were collected from three randomly selected post-flowering plants. Summer plants were senescing, whereas Kanlow plants were not at this harvest date. Results Principal component analysis (PCA) differentiated between both the Summer and Kanlow transcriptomes and metabolomes. Significant differences in transcript abundances were detected for 8,050 genes, including transcription factors such as WRKYs and those associated with phenylpropanoid biosynthesis. Gene-set enrichment analyses showed that a number of pathways were differentially up-regulated in the two populations. For both populations, protein levels and enzyme activities agreed well with transcript abundances for genes involved in the phenylpropanoid pathway that were up-regulated in Kanlow crowns and rhizomes. The combination of these datasets suggests that dormancy-related mechanisms had been triggered in the crowns and rhizomes of the Summer plants, whereas the crowns and rhizomes of Kanlow plants had yet to enter dormancy. Conclusions Delayed establishment of dormancy at more northerly latitudes could be one factor that reduces winter-survival in the high-yielding Kanlow plants. Understanding the cellular signatures that accompany the transition to dormancy can be used in the future to select plants with improved winter hardiness. PMID:25133804

  19. Evaluation of growth potential of Crimean juniper (Juniperus excelsa Bieb.) seedlings for the first growing season under Tekir forest nursery conditions in Kahramanmaras, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Avsar, Mahmut D; Tonguc, Fatih

    2003-04-01

    In this study, growth potential of Crimean juniper (Juniperus excelsa Bieb.) seedlings for the first growing season under Tekir Forest Nursery conditions in Kahramanmaras was evaluated. The height growth of Crimean juniper seedlings was relatively close to that of Lebanon cedar (Cedrus libani A. Rich.) seedlings produced in the same nursery, but their root collar diameters were fairly lower than that of Lebanon cedar seedlings. According to coniferous seedling standards of Turkish Standards Institute, the height growth of Crimean juniper seedlings was fairly good, but their root collar diameters were slightly small. In this respect, that 2+0 or 1+1 Crimean juniper seedlings are used in reforestation activities in the region would be more useful than 1+0 seedlings. PMID:12974456

  20. Importance of recent shifts in soil thermal dynamics on growing season length, productivity, and carbon sequestration in terrestrial high-latitude ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Euskirchen, E.S.; McGuire, A.D.; Kicklighter, D.W.; Zhuang, Q.; Clein, J.S.; Dargaville, R.J.; Dye, D.G.; Kimball, J.S.; McDonald, K.C.; Melillo, J.M.; Romanovsky, V.E.; Smith, N.V.

    2006-01-01

    In terrestrial high-latitude regions, observations indicate recent changes in snow cover, permafrost, and soil freeze-thaw transitions due to climate change. These modifications may result in temporal shifts in the growing season and the associated rates of terrestrial productivity. Changes in productivity will influence the ability of these ecosystems to sequester atmospheric CO2. We use the terrestrial ecosystem model (TEM), which simulates the soil thermal regime, in addition to terrestrial carbon (C), nitrogen and water dynamics, to explore these issues over the years 1960-2100 in extratropical regions (30-90??N). Our model simulations show decreases in snow cover and permafrost stability from 1960 to 2100. Decreases in snow cover agree well with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellite observations collected between the years 1972 and 2000, with Pearson rank correlation coefficients between 0.58 and 0.65. Model analyses also indicate a trend towards an earlier thaw date of frozen soils and the onset of the growing season in the spring by approximately 2-4 days from 1988 to 2000. Between 1988 and 2000, satellite records yield a slightly stronger trend in thaw and the onset of the growing season, averaging between 5 and 8 days earlier. In both, the TEM simulations and satellite records, trends in day of freeze in the autumn are weaker, such that overall increases in growing season length are due primarily to earlier thaw. Although regions with the longest snow cover duration displayed the greatest increase in growing season length, these regions maintained smaller increases in productivity and heterotrophic respiration than those regions with shorter duration of snow cover and less of an increase in growing season length. Concurrent with increases in growing season length, we found a reduction in soil C and increases in vegetation C, with greatest losses of soil C occurring in those areas with more vegetation, but simulations also suggest that

  1. Learning Activities for the Growth Season.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darby, Linda, Ed.

    This poster, illustrated with a graphic of a caterpillar changing to a cocoon and emerging as a butterfly, presents learning activities for 7 weeks based on the seven stages of growth in the President's "Call to Action." Each week includes 5 days of activities based on seven themes: (1) "Reading on Your Own"; (2) "Getting Ready for Algebra"; (3)…

  2. The growing season water balance and controls on evapotranspiration in wetland reclamation test cells Fort McMurray, Alberta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faubert, Jean-Pascal R.

    In the oil sands mining region near Fort McMurray, Alberta, efforts to establish specific wetland reclamation techniques are underway. During the 2010 growing season, the water balance of 12 plots (cells) of different soil and vegetation treatments were studied with emphasis on understanding the controls on evapotranspiration (ET) and the effects of construction techniques. Cell hydrologic behaviour was distinct from natural wetlands due to frequent artificial irrigation. ET ranged from ˜0 6 mm day-1 to ˜8.2 mm day-1 with a mean of ˜3.2 mm day-1 and variation among the cells was attributed to the construction techniques used, specifically placement period and soil depth. ET was weakly correlated to individual environmental variables; however, multivariate statistical models revealed complex interactions among environmental variables that acted to control ET. Cumulative water balances indicated certain construction techniques produced ET rates comparable to natural wetlands, which may be an important factor in improving the long-term sustainability of reclaimed wetlands.

  3. Wet and Dry Atmospheric Depositions of Inorganic Nitrogen during Plant Growing Season in the Coastal Zone of Yellow River Delta

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunzhao; Du, Siyao; Han, Guangxuan; Xing, Qinghui; Wu, Huifeng; Wang, Guangmei

    2014-01-01

    The ecological problems caused by dry and wet deposition of atmospheric nitrogen have been widespread concern in the world. In this study, wet and dry atmospheric depositions were monitored in plant growing season in the coastal zone of the Yellow River Delta (YRD) using automatic sampling equipment. The results showed that SO42− and Na+ were the predominant anion and cation, respectively, in both wet and dry atmospheric depositions. The total atmospheric nitrogen deposition was ~2264.24 mg m−2, in which dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition was about 32.02%. The highest values of dry and wet atmospheric nitrogen deposition appeared in May and August, respectively. In the studied area, NO3−–N was the main nitrogen form in dry deposition, while the predominant nitrogen in wet atmospheric deposition was NH4+–N with ~56.51% of total wet atmospheric nitrogen deposition. The average monthly attribution rate of atmospheric deposition of NO3−–N and NH4+–N was ~31.38% and ~20.50% for the contents of NO3−–N and NH4+–N in 0–10 cm soil layer, respectively, suggested that the atmospheric nitrogen was one of main sources for soil nitrogen in coastal zone of the YRD. PMID:24977238

  4. Wet and dry atmospheric depositions of inorganic nitrogen during plant growing season in the coastal zone of Yellow River Delta.

    PubMed

    Yu, Junbao; Ning, Kai; Li, Yunzhao; Du, Siyao; Han, Guangxuan; Xing, Qinghui; Wu, Huifeng; Wang, Guangmei; Gao, Yongjun

    2014-01-01

    The ecological problems caused by dry and wet deposition of atmospheric nitrogen have been widespread concern in the world. In this study, wet and dry atmospheric depositions were monitored in plant growing season in the coastal zone of the Yellow River Delta (YRD) using automatic sampling equipment. The results showed that SO4 (2-) and Na(+) were the predominant anion and cation, respectively, in both wet and dry atmospheric depositions. The total atmospheric nitrogen deposition was ~2264.24 mg m(-2), in which dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition was about 32.02%. The highest values of dry and wet atmospheric nitrogen deposition appeared in May and August, respectively. In the studied area, NO3 (-)-N was the main nitrogen form in dry deposition, while the predominant nitrogen in wet atmospheric deposition was NH4 (+)-N with ~56.51% of total wet atmospheric nitrogen deposition. The average monthly attribution rate of atmospheric deposition of NO3 (-)-N and NH4 (+)-N was ~31.38% and ~20.50% for the contents of NO3 (-)-N and NH4 (+)-N in 0-10 cm soil layer, respectively, suggested that the atmospheric nitrogen was one of main sources for soil nitrogen in coastal zone of the YRD. PMID:24977238

  5. Wavelength shifts in fluorescence maxima of stressed and non-stressed Norway spruce needles over the growing season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banninger, Cliff; Chappelle, E.

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory fluorescence measurements of first and third year metal stressed and non stressed Norway spruce needles collected in May, Jul. Sep. and Nov. display significant wavelength shifts in the intensity maxima in the blue, green, red, and near infrared spectral regions, with the largest shifts occurring in the blue spectral region for both first and third year needles from Nov. Smaller, but the otherwise significant shifts also take place in the blue spectral region for first year needles from Sep. in the red spectral region for third year neddles from May, Jul. and Sep. and in the near infrared spectral region for first and third year needles from Jul. and Sep. Wavelength shifts in needle fluorescence maxima over the growing season are greatest in the blue and to a lesser extent, greenspectral regions from Sep. to Nov. but are also significant in the red and near infrared spectral regions from Jul. to Sep. and Sep. to Nov., and in the near infrared spectral region also from May to Jul.

  6. Utilisation of young and old soil carbon sources by microbial groups differ during the growing season and between experimental treatments in a long-term field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börjesson, Gunnar; Menichetti, Lorenzo; Thornton, Barry; Campbell, Colin; Kätterer, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM)is the largest active carbon pool in the terrestrial environment. SOM is a key factor for soil fertility, but is also important for the sequestration of atmospheric CO2. In agricultural soils, management of plant residues and the use of organic fertilisers play important roles for maintaining SOM. Switching from C3 plants to C4 plants such as maize, enables a natural labelling in situ; when coupled with compound specific 13C isotope analysis of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) it allows the proportion of new C (fixed after the switch added to soil from above- and belowground litter and root exudates) and the proportion of old C (fixed prior to the switch derived from turnover of organic matter) utilised by the soil microbial community to be determined. (new paragraph) A field experiment in Sweden, amended with different mineral and organic fertilisers since 1956, was grown with C3 plants, mainly cereals until 1999. From the year 2000 silage maize was grown every year. In 2012, soil from four replicate plots of five experimental treatments, N fertilised, N fertilised amended with straw and sewage sludge, and two controls (bare fallow and cropped unfertilised) were sampled three times, at the start, middle and end of the growing season. Phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) were extracted from all soil samples and analysed for concentrations and 13C content. (new paragraph) Total PLFA concentrations and also the PLFA/SOM ratios increased with SOM in the different treatments. Seasonal variation in total PLFA was small except for the most SOM-rich treatment (sewage sludge) where concentrations significantly decreased during the growing season indicating the depletion of a labile SOM pool. Weighted mean values of δ13C in PLFAs show that the plots fertilised with only calcium nitrate had the highest δ13C-values in PLFAs before (-20.24 o) and after the vegetation period (-20.37 o), due to a large input of 13C-enriched plant material. However, during

  7. Seasonal variation in the temperature sensitivity of proteolytic enzyme activity in temperate forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzostek, Edward R.; Finzi, Adrien C.

    2012-03-01

    Increasing soil temperature has the potential to alter the activity of the extracellular enzymes that mobilize nitrogen (N) from soil organic matter (SOM) and ultimately the availability of N for primary production. Proteolytic enzymes depolymerize N from proteinaceous components of SOM into amino acids, and their activity is a principal driver of the within-system cycle of soil N. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the soils of temperate forest tree species differ in the temperature sensitivity of proteolytic enzyme activity over the growing season and the role of substrate limitation in regulating temperature sensitivity. Across species and sampling dates, proteolytic enzyme activity had relatively low sensitivity to temperature with a mean activation energy (Ea) of 33.5 kJ mol-1. Ea declined in white ash, American beech, and eastern hemlock soils across the growing season as soils warmed. By contrast, Eain sugar maple soil increased across the growing season. We used these data to develop a species-specific empirical model of proteolytic enzyme activity for the 2009 calendar year and studied the interactive effects of soil temperature (ambient or +5°C) and substrate limitation (ambient or elevated protein) on enzyme activity. Declines in substrate limitation had a larger single-factor effect on proteolytic enzyme activity than temperature, particularly in the spring. There was, however, a large synergistic effect of increasing temperature and substrate supply on proteolytic enzyme activity. Our results suggest limited increases in N availability with climate warming unless there is a parallel increase in the availability of protein substrates.

  8. Rate of Nitrogen Application during the Growing Season Alters Response of Container-Grown Rhododendron and Azalea to Foliar Urea in Autumn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One-year-old liners of rhododendron (Rhododendron ‘H-1 P.J.M’) and azalea (Rhododendron ‘Cannon’s Double’) grown at different N fertilization rates were used to assess the influence of foliar urea application in the autumn and soil nitrogen (N) applications during the growing season on N storage, N ...

  9. Seasonal variations in physical activity and implications for human health.

    PubMed

    Shephard, Roy J; Aoyagi, Yukitoshi

    2009-10-01

    This review explores the implications of seasonal changes in physical activity for fitness and human health. Photosensitivity and nutrient shortages mediate animal hibernation via the hypothalamus and changes in leptin and ghrelin concentrations. Opportunities for hunting and crop cultivation determine seasonal activity in under-developed human societies, but in developed societies temperature and rainfall are dominant influences, usually over-riding innate rhythms. Both questionnaire data and objective measurements show that many groups from children to the elderly increase their physical activity from winter to spring or summer. Measurements of maximal oxygen intake and muscle strength commonly show parallel seasonal changes. However, potential effects upon body mass and body fat may be counteracted by changes of food intake; subsistence agriculturists sometimes maintain or increase physical activity at the expense of a decrease in body mass. In developed societies, body fat commonly increases during the winter, with parallel changes in blood lipids, blood pressure and blood coagulability; moreover, these changes are not always fully reversed the following summer. Most developed societies show increased all-cause and cardiac mortalities in the winter. Health consequences of seasonal variations in physical activity including an increased vulnerability to cardiac catastrophe and a year-by-year increase in total body fat seem most likely if the average level of physical activity for the year is low. Public health recommendations should underline the importance of maintaining physical activity during adverse environmental conditions by adapting clothing, modifying behaviour and exploiting any available air-conditioned indoor facilities. PMID:19609553

  10. N2O and CH4 emissions from a Chinese wheat-rice cropping system under different tillage practices during the wheat-growing season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The annual wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)-rice (Oryza sativa L.) cropping system is the most important cereal production system in the Yangtze River Valley of China, in which various tillage systems are currently implemented during the wheat-growing season. The emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) from the different tillage systems in this system remain unclear. We conducted a 3-year field experiment in a wheat-rice cropping system in a silt clay loam soil to investigate the effects of the type of tillage employed during the wheat-growing season (no-tillage (NT), reduced tillage (RT) or conventional tillage (CT)) on the emissions of N2O and CH4 using the static chamber method over three annual rotation cycles from the 2008 wheat season to the 2011 rice season. The results revealed that the adoption of an NT system during the wheat-growing season significantly increased CH4 emissions during both the wheat-growing season and the following rice-growing season. Over the three annual rotation cycles studied, the annual N2O emissions from the NT (2.24 kg N2O-N ha-1) and CT (2.01 kg N2O-N ha-1) treatments were similar to each other and significantly higher than those from the RT treatment (1.73 kg N2O-N ha-1); the annual CH4 emissions were significantly higher from the NT (100.1 kg CH4-C ha-1) than the CT (83.7 kg CH4-C ha-1) and RT (73.9 kg CH4-C ha-1) systems. The overall results regarding the net global warming potential associated with annual N2O and CH4 emissions indicate that the conversion of conventional tillage to no-tillage systems during the wheat-growing season would intensify the radiative forcing in wheat-rice cropping systems in China.

  11. Phenology Shifts at Start vs. End of Growing Season in Temperate Vegetation Over the Northern Hemisphere for the Period 1982-2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeong, Su-Jong; Ho, Chang-Hoi; Gim, Hyeon-Ju; Brown, Molley E.

    2011-01-01

    Changes in vegetative growing seasons are dominant indicators of the dynamic response of ecosystems to climate change. Therefore, knowledge of growing seasons over the past decades is essential to predict ecosystem changes. In this study, the long-term changes in the growing seasons of temperate vegetation over the Northern Hemisphere were examined by analyzing satellite-measured normalized difference vegetation index and reanalysis temperature during 1982 2008. Results showed that the length of the growing season (LOS) increased over the analysis period; however, the role of changes at the start of the growing season (SOS) and at the end of the growing season (EOS) differed depending on the time period. On a hemispheric scale, SOS advanced by 5.2 days in the early period (1982-1999) but advanced by only 0.2 days in the later period (2000-2008). EOS was delayed by 4.3 days in the early period, and it was further delayed by another 2.3 days in the later period. The difference between SOS and EOS in the later period was due to less warming during the preseason (January-April) before SOS compared with the magnitude of warming in the preseason (June September) before EOS. At a regional scale, delayed EOS in later periods was shown. In North America, EOS was delayed by 8.1 days in the early period and delayed by another 1.3 days in the later period. In Europe, the delayed EOS by 8.2 days was more significant than the advanced SOS by 3.2 days in the later period. However, in East Asia, the overall increase in LOS during the early period was weakened in the later period. Admitting regional heterogeneity, changes in hemispheric features suggest that the longer-lasting vegetation growth in recent decades can be attributed to extended leaf senescence in autumn rather than earlier spring leaf-out. Keywords: climate change, growing season, NDVI (normalized difference vegetation index), Northern Hemisphere, phenology,

  12. Effect of soil frost on growing season nitrogen uptake by fine roots of mature trees in northern hardwood forests of the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socci, A. M.; Templer, P. H.

    2010-12-01

    Forests of the northeastern United States are predicted to experience a decrease in the depth and duration of the winter snowpack over the next 100 years. Even when coupled with warmer winter air temperatures, the absence of snow as insulation can increase soil frost during the winter months. Past research has determined that there are species-level effects of soil frost on dominant forest trees. For example, in stands dominated by sugar maple (Acer saccharum), induced soil frost led to increased fine root mortality and soil nitrate leaching. Soil frost also increased fine root mortality in stands dominated by yellow birch (Betula allegheniensis), but there was no significant change in leaching of soil nitrate. We hypothesized that greater nitrogen (N) losses from stands dominated by sugar maple may be due to reduced N uptake by fine roots of this tree species. To determine the impact of increased soil freezing on fine root uptake of N, we established a snow manipulation experiment in mixed sugar maple/American beech (Fagus grandifolia) forests at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire (n=4 paired snow-removal and reference plots; each 13m X 13m). Snow removal occurred during the first six weeks of winter over two years. During each growing season following snow removal, we used the N depletion technique to measure in situ rates of uptake of ammonium and nitrate by fine roots of sugar maple during the early, peak and late growing season. Among all sampling dates and plots, we observed significantly lower uptake of N as nitrate compared to ammonium. During the first growing season, at moderate ammonium availability (35 μM N) we observed significantly less uptake of ammonium by fine roots of sugar maple in the snow removal plots relative to the reference plots during the early growing season (April-May), with no significant differences in uptake of ammonium during the peak (July) and late (September) growing season. We observed no differences in

  13. Impacts of Short-Rotation Early-Growing Season Prescribed Fire on a Ground Nesting Bird in the Central Hardwoods Region of North America

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Landscape-scale short-rotation early-growing season prescribed fire, hereafter prescribed fire, in upland hardwood forests represents a recent shift in management strategies across eastern upland forests. Not only does this strategy depart from dormant season to growing season prescriptions, but the strategy also moves from stand-scale to landscape-scale implementation (>1,000 ha). This being so, agencies are making considerable commitments in terms of time and resources to this management strategy, but the effects on wildlife in upland forests, especially those dominated by hardwood canopy species, are relatively unknown. We initiated our study to assess whether this management strategy affects eastern wild turkey reproductive ecology on the Ozark-St. Francis National Forest. We marked 67 wild turkey hens with Global Positioning System (GPS) Platform Transmitting Terminals in 2012 and 2013 to document exposure to prescribed fire, and estimate daily nest survival, nest success, and nest-site selection. We estimated these reproductive parameters in forest units managed with prescribed fire (treated) and units absent of prescribed fire (untreated). Of 60 initial nest attempts monitored, none were destroyed or exposed to prescribed fire because a majority of fires occurred early than a majority of the nesting activity. We found nest success was greater in untreated units than treated units (36.4% versus 14.6%). We did not find any habitat characteristic differences between successful and unsuccessful nest-sites. We found that nest-site selection criteria differed between treated and untreated units. Visual concealment and woody ground cover were common selection criteria in both treated and untreated units. However, in treated units wild turkey selected nest-sites with fewer small shrubs (<5 cm ground diameter) and large trees (>20 cm DBH) but not in untreated units. In untreated units wild turkey selected nest-sites with more large shrubs (≥5cm ground diameter) but

  14. Impacts of Short-Rotation Early-Growing Season Prescribed Fire on a Ground Nesting Bird in the Central Hardwoods Region of North America.

    PubMed

    Pittman, H Tyler; Krementz, David G

    2016-01-01

    Landscape-scale short-rotation early-growing season prescribed fire, hereafter prescribed fire, in upland hardwood forests represents a recent shift in management strategies across eastern upland forests. Not only does this strategy depart from dormant season to growing season prescriptions, but the strategy also moves from stand-scale to landscape-scale implementation (>1,000 ha). This being so, agencies are making considerable commitments in terms of time and resources to this management strategy, but the effects on wildlife in upland forests, especially those dominated by hardwood canopy species, are relatively unknown. We initiated our study to assess whether this management strategy affects eastern wild turkey reproductive ecology on the Ozark-St. Francis National Forest. We marked 67 wild turkey hens with Global Positioning System (GPS) Platform Transmitting Terminals in 2012 and 2013 to document exposure to prescribed fire, and estimate daily nest survival, nest success, and nest-site selection. We estimated these reproductive parameters in forest units managed with prescribed fire (treated) and units absent of prescribed fire (untreated). Of 60 initial nest attempts monitored, none were destroyed or exposed to prescribed fire because a majority of fires occurred early than a majority of the nesting activity. We found nest success was greater in untreated units than treated units (36.4% versus 14.6%). We did not find any habitat characteristic differences between successful and unsuccessful nest-sites. We found that nest-site selection criteria differed between treated and untreated units. Visual concealment and woody ground cover were common selection criteria in both treated and untreated units. However, in treated units wild turkey selected nest-sites with fewer small shrubs (<5 cm ground diameter) and large trees (>20 cm DBH) but not in untreated units. In untreated units wild turkey selected nest-sites with more large shrubs (≥5 cm ground diameter

  15. Non-growing-season soil respiration is controlled by freezing and thawing processes in the summer monsoon-dominated Tibetan alpine grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yonghui; Liu, Huiying; Chung, Haegeun; Yu, Lingfei; Mi, Zhaorong; Geng, Yan; Jing, Xin; Wang, Shiping; Zeng, Hui; Cao, Guangmin; Zhao, Xinquan; He, Jin-Sheng

    2014-10-01

    The Tibetan alpine grasslands, sharing many features with arctic tundra ecosystems, have a unique non-growing-season climate that is usually dry and without persistent snow cover. Pronounced winter warming recently observed in this ecosystem may significantly alter the non-growing-season carbon cycle processes such as soil respiration (Rs), but detailed measurements to assess the patterns, drivers of, and potential feedbacks on Rs have not been made yet. We conducted a 4 year study on Rs using a unique Rs measuring system, composed of an automated soil CO2 flux sampling system and a custom-made container, to facilitate measurements in this extreme environment. We found that in the nongrowing season, (1) cumulative Rs was 82-89 g C m-2, accounting for 11.8-13.2% of the annual total Rs; (2) surface soil freezing controlled the diurnal pattern of Rs and bulk soil freezing induced lower reference respiration rate (R0) and temperature sensitivity (Q10) than those in the growing season (0.40-0.53 versus 0.84-1.32 µmol CO2 m-2 s-1 for R0 and 2.5-2.9 versus 2.9-5.6 for Q10); and (3) the intraannual variation in cumulative Rs was controlled by accumulated surface soil temperature. We found that in the summer monsoon-dominated Tibetan alpine grassland, surface soil freezing, bulk soil freezing, and accumulated surface soil temperature are the day-, season-, and year-scale drivers of the non-growing-season Rs, respectively. Our results suggest that warmer winters can trigger carbon loss from this ecosystem because of higher Q10 of thawed than frozen soils.

  16. Crop evapotranspiration-based irrigation management during the growing season in the arid region of northwestern China.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xuexiang; Zhao, Wenzhi; Zeng, Fanjiang

    2015-11-01

    In arid northwestern China, water shortages have triggered recent regulations affecting irrigation water use in desert-oasis agricultural systems. In order to determine the actual water demand of various crops and to develop standards for the rational use of water resources, we analyzed meteorological data from the Fukang desert ecosystem observation and experiment station (FKD), the Cele desert-grassland ecosystem observation and research station (CLD), and the Linze Inland River Basin Comprehensive Research Station (LZD), which all belong to the Chinese Ecosystem Research Network. We researched crop evapotranspiration (ETc) using the water balance method, the FAO-56 Penman-Monteith method, the Priestley-Taylor method, and the Hargreaves method, during the growing seasons of 2005 through 2009. Results indicate substantial differences in ETc, depending on the method used. At the CLD, the ETc from the soil water balance, FAO-56 Penman-Monteith, Priestley-Taylor, and Hargreaves methods were 1150.3±380.8, 783.7±33.6, 1018.3±22.1, and 611.2±23.3 mm, respectively; at the FKD, the corresponding results were 861.0±67.0, 834.2±83.9, 1453.5±47.1, and 1061.0±38.2 mm, respectively; and at the LZD, 823.4±110.4, 726.0±0.4, 722.3±29.4, and 1208.6±79.1 mm, respectively. The FAO-56 Penman-Monteith method provided a fairly good estimation of E Tc compared with the Priestley-Taylor and Hargreaves methods. PMID:26497559

  17. The warming-induced increase of growing-season freezing event and its effect on the survival and growth of treeline seedlings in the Sergyemla Mountains, Southeast Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, W.; Zhang, L.; Liu, X.; Luo, T.

    2013-12-01

    Seedling establishment is important to the formation and dynamics of alpine treeline. How can we understand the limitation to the survival and growth of seedlings at and above treeline under a warmer climate? In this study, we conducted a 4-yr reciprocal transplant experiment of seed-based fir and root-sprouting juniper seedlings on opposite slopes of a valley in the Sergyemla Mountains, where annual mean air-temperature differed by 0.5-2.1 K and annual precipitation was similar. We aim to test the hypotheses that the warmer climate on the south-facing slope generally has more severe growing-season freezing events, and the seed-based fir seedlings are especially vulnerable to the warming-induced increase of freezing days in the early growing season. The frequency, intensity and duration of the growing-season freezing events across site habitats generally increased from north- to south-facing slopes. The freezing days in the early growing season (April-June) were mainly determined by daily minimum net radiation and relative humidity, and positively correlated with annual mean air-temperature across sites and years. The survival rates of transplanted fir seedlings on the south-facing slope greatly decreased by <60% in forested habitat and by <40% in non-forested habitat, while their survival rates on the north-facing slope did not change in forested habitat and slowly decreased by 85% in non-forested habitat. The survival rates of transplanted juniper seedlings decreased by 68%-84% with unclear change trends among different slopes and habitats. In pooled data across sites and years, annual top-shoot growth rates decreased in fir seedlings but varied little in juniper seedlings with increasing freezing days in the early growing season. The data supported our hypotheses. The warming-enhanced difficulty of seedling establishment above treeline can explain why the fir treeline position did not advance with climatic warming in past 200 years.

  18. Seasonal changes in ovarian activity: lessons learnt from the horse.

    PubMed

    Donadeu, F X; Watson, E D

    2007-08-01

    The annual reproductive cycle in the horse involves a reduction in ovarian activity during short days. The absence of ovulatory activity during winter has important consequences for an equine industry eager to breed mares early during the year. The anovulatory season results from a reduction in the secretion of pituitary gonadotropin that is in turn triggered by the inhibitory effects of short photoperiod on the hypothalamus-pituitary axis. Recent studies have provided evidence that the response of the ovaries to endocrine stimuli during the anovulatory season is affected not only by circulating concentrations of trophic hormones but also by locally produced growth factors that are putative modulators of follicular responses to gonadotropins. The present review summarises current knowledge on ovarian dynamics during the equine anovulatory season and the regulatory mechanisms involved at both systemic and local levels. PMID:17207590

  19. Regulation of Seasonal Reproduction by Hypothalamic Activation of Thyroid Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Shinomiya, Ai; Shimmura, Tsuyoshi; Nishiwaki-Ohkawa, Taeko; Yoshimura, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Organisms living outside the tropics measure the changes in the length of the day to adapt to seasonal changes in the environment. Animals that breed during spring and summer are called long-day breeders, while those that breed during fall are called short-day breeders. Although the influence of thyroid hormone in the regulation of seasonal reproduction has been known for several decades, its precise mechanism remained unknown. Recent studies revealed that the activation of thyroid hormone within the mediobasal hypothalamus plays a key role in this phenomenon. This localized activation of the thyroid hormone is controlled by thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone) secreted from the pars tuberalis of the pituitary gland. Although seasonal reproduction is a rate-limiting factor in animal production, genes involved in photoperiodic signal transduction pathway could emerge as potential targets to facilitate domestication. PMID:24600435

  20. Teaching Writing. Three Seasonal Activities to Hone Kids' Observation Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Brenda

    1997-01-01

    The seasonal activities presented are: observing herbs to encourage use of the senses in writing; watching a jack-o'-lantern wither to learn skills in writing details; and building snowmen to learn to explain a string of events in writing. (SM)

  1. Are BVOC exchanges in agricultural ecosystems overestimated? Insights from fluxes measured in a maize field over a whole growing season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachy, Aurélie; Aubinet, Marc; Schoon, Niels; Amelynck, Crist; Bodson, Bernard; Moureaux, Christine; Heinesch, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    Maize is the most important C4 crop worldwide. It is also the second most important crop worldwide (C3 and C4 mixed), and is a dominant crop in some world regions. Therefore, it can potentially influence local climate and air quality through its exchanges of gases with the atmosphere. Among others, biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) are known to influence the atmospheric composition and thereby modify greenhouse gases lifetime and pollutant formation in the atmosphere. However, so far, only two studies have dealt with BVOC exchanges from maize. Moreover, these studies were conducted on a limited range of meteorological and phenological conditions, so that the knowledge of BVOC exchanges by this crop remains poor. Here, we present the first BVOC measurement campaign performed at ecosystem-scale on a maize field during a whole growing season. It was carried out in the Lonzée Terrestrial Observatory (LTO), an ICOS site. BVOC fluxes were measured by the disjunct by mass-scanning eddy covariance technique with a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer for BVOC mixing ratios measurements. Outstanding results are (i) BVOC exchanges from soil were as important as BVOC exchanges from maize itself; (ii) BVOC exchanges observed on our site were much lower than exchanges observed by other maize studies, even under normalized temperature and light conditions, (iii) they were also lower than those observed on other crops grown in Europe. Lastly (iv), BVOC exchanges observed on our site under standard environmental conditions, i.e., standard emission factors SEF, were much lower than those currently considered by BVOC exchange up-scaling models. From those observations, we deduced that (i) soil BVOC exchanges should be better understood and should be incorporated in terrestrial BVOC exchanges models, and that (ii) SEF for the C4 crop plant functional type cannot be evaluated at global scale but should be determined for each important agronomic and pedo-climatic region

  2. Forest Gaps Inhibit Foliar Litter Pb and Cd Release in Winter and Inhibit Pb and Cd Accumulation in Growing Season in an Alpine Forest

    PubMed Central

    He, Jie; Yang, Wanqin; Li, Han; Xu, Liya; Ni, Xiangyin; Tan, Bo; Zhao, Yeyi; Wu, Fuzhong

    2015-01-01

    Aims The release of heavy metals (such as Pb and Cd) from foliar litter play an important role in element cycling in alpine forest ecosystems. Although natural forest gaps could play important roles in the release of heavy metals from foliar litter by affecting the snow cover during the winter and solar irradiation during the growing season, few studies have examined these potential roles. The objectives of this study were to document changes in Pb and Cd dynamics during litter decomposition in the center of gaps and under closed canopies and to investigate the factors that controlled these changes during the winter and growing seasons. Methods Senesced foliar litter from six dominant species, including Kangding willow (Salix paraplesia), Masters larch (Larix mastersiana), Mingjiang fir (Abies faxoniana), Alpine azalea (Rhododendron lapponicum), Red birch (Betula albosinensis) and Mourning cypress (Sabina saltuaria), was placed in litterbags and incubated between the gap center and closed canopy conditions in an alpine forest in the eastern region of the Tibetan Plateau. The litterbags were sampled at the snow formation stage, snow coverage stage, snow melt stage and during the growing season. The Pb and Cd concentrations in the sampled foliar litter were determined by acid digestion (HNO3/HClO4). Important findings Over one year of decomposition, Pb accumulation and Cd release from the foliar litter occurred, regardless of the foliar litter species. However, Pb and Cd were both released from the foliar litter during the winter and accumulated during the growing season. Compared with the gap center and the canopy gap edge, the extended gap edge and the closed canopy showed higher Pb and Cd release rates in winter and higher Pb and Cd accumulation rates during the growing season, respectively. Statistical analyses indicate that the dynamics of Pb were significantly influenced by frequent freeze–thaw cycles in winter and appropriate hydrothermal conditions during

  3. Leaf Tissue C:N and Soil N are Modified by Growing Season and Goose Grazing Phenology in a Sub-Arctic Coastal Wetland of Western Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, R. T.; Beard, K. H.; Leffler, A. J.; Schmutz, J. A.; Welker, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change in Arctic wetlands is resulting in a widening phenological mismatch between the onset of the growing season and the arrival and hatch date of migratory geese, the primary consumers in the system. During the past three decades, the growing season has advanced but geese have not advanced arrival or hatch date at the same rate. Geese now arrive into a system that has been growing longer than in the past with potential changes in forage quality because sedges have their highest nutrient density shortly following emergence. One potential concomitant result of this phenological gap is altered carbon to nitrogen ratio (C:N) of leaf tissue being returned to the ecosystem as feces that is more N-poor. Altering the C:N of these inputs can further influence C and N cycling in the system. We examine the influence of advanced growing season and different arrival times by black brant on leaf and soil C:N ratio and soil N-form. Our experiment consists of six blocks with nine study plots each. Half the plots are warmed to advance the growing season. Two plots each receive early, typical, late, and no grazing; one plot is a control that is not warmed and grazing is natural. Leaf tissue was collected to determine C and N concentration using an elemental analyzer. Anion and cation exchange membranes were used to monitor inorganic N forms in soil; samples were analyzed via fluorescence following extraction. Soil water collected from lysimeters was analyzed for organic N. Warming advanced plant growth between one and two weeks and resulted in higher C:N of leaf tissue Geese maintained 'grazing lawns', areas of exceptionally short vegetation, where plants had high N compared to non-grazed areas. Grazing early in the season promoted higher N content of leaves and soil while grazing late had little influence on N. The timing of the growing season and grazing both have important implications for C and N in this system.

  4. Seasonal variations in daily rhythms of activity in athletic horses.

    PubMed

    Bertolucci, C; Giannetto, C; Fazio, F; Piccione, G

    2008-07-01

    Circadian rhythms reflect extensive programming of biological activity that meets and exploits the challenges and opportunities offered by the periodic nature of the environment. In the present investigation, we recorded the total activity of athletic horses kept at four different times of the year (vernal equinox, summer solstice, autumn equinox and winter solstice), to evaluate the presence of seasonal variations of daily activity rhythms. Athletic Thoroughbred horses were kept in individual boxes with paddock. Digitally integrated measure of total activity of each mare was continuously recorded by actigraphy-based data loggers. Horse total activities were not evenly distributed over the day, but they were mainly diurnal during the year. Daily activity rhythms showed clear seasonal variations, with the highest daily amount of activity during the vernal equinox and the lowest during the winter solstice. Interestingly, the amount of activity during either photophase or scotophase changed significantly throughout the year. Circadian analysis of horse activities showed that the acrophase, the estimated time at which the peak of the rhythm occurs, did not change during the year, it always occurred in the middle of the photoperiod. Analysing the time structure of long-term and continuously measured activity and feeding could be a useful method to critically evaluate athletic horse management systems in which spontaneous locomotor activity and feeding are severely limited. Circadian rhythms are present in several elements of sensory motor and psychomotor functions and these would be taken into consideration to plan the training schedules and competitions in athletic horses. PMID:22443706

  5. Seasonal Activity Budget of Adult Baltic Ringed Seals

    PubMed Central

    Harkonen, Tero; Jüssi, Mart; Jüssi, Ivar; Verevkin, Michail; Dmitrieva, Lilia; Helle, Eero; Sagitov, Roustam; Harding, Karin C.

    2008-01-01

    Although ringed seals are important components in oceanic and fresh water ecosystems at high latitudes, little is known about how they exploit these harsh environments. Seasonal activity and diving behaviour of 19 adult Baltic ringed seals were studied by satellite telemetry. We elaborated an activity budget for ten months of the year, extending over the period from moult to the breeding season. Seals from three main regions showed explicit site fidelity and the distributions of animals tagged from different areas did not overlap, suggesting separate stocks. Both the mean duration and the mean depth of dives peaked in June and July. Seals spent 70% (females) to 85% (males) of their time diving in June and July which decreased to 50% in late autumn. Less than one percent of dives exceeded 10 min in females, while 10% of male dives lasted longer than 10 min in June to September. Less than one percent of dives lasted for more than 25 min. Both females and males were most active during day time and hauled out predominantly during the night. Activity patterns during the summer are suggested to be correlated to energy accumulation and prey availability. The information on seasonal activity budget is crucial for developing population energetic models where interactions between ringed seals and other trophic levels can be evaluated. PMID:18414676

  6. Ten Years of Growing Season Water, Energy and Carbon Exchange From an Oil sands Reclamation Site, Fort McMurray, Alberta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, S. K.; Drewitt, G. B.

    2013-12-01

    The oil sands mining industry in Canada has made a commitment to restore disturbed areas to an equivalent capability to that which existed prior to mining. Certification requires successful reclamation, which can in part be evaluated through long-term ecosystem studies. A reclamation site, informally named South Bison Hill (SBH) has had growing season water, energy and carbon fluxes measured via the eddy covariance method for 10 years since establishment. SBH was capped with a 0.2 m peat-glacial till mixture overlying 0.8 m of reworked glacial till soil. The site was seeded to barley cultivar (Hordeum spp.) in the summer of 2002 and later planted to white spruce (Picea glauca) and aspen (Populus spp.) in the summer/fall of 2004. Since 2007, the major species atop SBH has been aspen, and by 2012 was on average ~ 4 m in height. Climatically, mean growing temperature did not vary greatly, yet there was considerable difference in rainfall among years, with 2012 having the greatest rainfall at 321 mm, whereas 2011 and 2007 were notably dry at 180 and 178 mm, respectively. The partitioning of energy varied among years, but the fraction of latent heat as a portion of net radiation increased with the establishment of aspen, along with concomitant increases in LAI and growing season net ecosystem exchange (NEE). Peat growing season ET was smallest in 2004 at 2.3 mm/d and greatest in 2010 at ~3.9 mm/d. ET rates showed a marked increase in 2008 corresponding with the increase in LAI attributed to the aspen cover. Since the establishment of a surface cover and vegetation in 2003, SBH has been a growing season sink for carbon dioxide. Values of NEE follow similar patterns to those of ET, with values gradually becoming more negative (greater carbon uptake) as the aspen forest established. Comparison with other disturbed and undisturbed boreal aspen stands show that SBH exhibits similar water, energy and carbon flux patterns during the growing season.

  7. Active toddlers are less likely to grow obese.

    PubMed

    2016-09-12

    Keep toddlers toddling, and you will reduce the chance of them becoming obese in the future. That is the conclusion of a survey of physical activity among pre-school children that relates exercise to body mass index (BMI) scores. PMID:27615574

  8. Activities to Grow On: Buttons, Beads, and Beans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzolis, Amy; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents new ideas for using buttons, beans, and beads as teaching manipulatives for elementary school children. The ideas include a button scavenger hunt, a button count, a cup puppet bean game, a numbers guessing game with beans in jars, and a bead stringing activity. (SM)

  9. The variation of the water deficit during the winter wheat growing season and its impact on crop yield in the North China Plain.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianjun; Liu, Ming; Lü, Aifeng; He, Bin

    2014-11-01

    The North China Plain (NCP) is one of the main agricultural areas in China. However, it is also widely known for its water shortages, especially during the winter wheat growing season. Recently, climate change has significantly affected the water environment for crop growth. Analyzing the changes in the water deficit, which is only affected by climate factor, will help to improve water management in the NCP. In this study, the Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT) was used to investigate the variations in the water deficit during the winter wheat growing season from 1961 to 2010 in 12 selected stations in the NCP. To represent the changes in the water deficit without any artificial affection, the rainfed simulation was used. Over the past 50 years, the average temperature during the winter wheat growing season increased approximately 1.42 °C. The anthesis date moved forward approximately 7-10 days and to late April, which increased the water demand in April. Precipitation in March and May showed a positive trend, but there was a negative trend in April. The water deficit in late April and early May became more serious than before, with an increasing trend of more than 0.1 mm/year. In addition, because the heading stage, which is very important to crop yield of winter wheat, moved forward, the impact of water deficit in late April was more serious to crop yield. PMID:24531705

  10. Spatiotemporal variations in growing season exchanges of CO2, H2O,and sensible heat in agricultural fields of the Southern GreatPlains

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Marc L.; Billesbach, David P.; Berry, Joseph A.; Riley,William J.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2007-06-13

    Climate, vegetation cover, and management create fine-scaleheterogeneity in unirrigated agricultural regions, with important but notwell-quantified consequences for spatial and temporal variations insurface CO2, water, and heat fluxes. We measured eddy covariance fluxesin seven agricultural fields--comprising winter wheat, pasture, andsorghum--in the U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP) during the 2001-2003growing seasons. Land-cover was the dominant source of variation insurface fluxes, with 50-100 percent differences between fields planted inwinter-spring versus fields planted in summer. Interannual variation wasdriven mainly by precipitation, which varied more than two-fold betweenyears. Peak aboveground biomass and growing-season net ecosystem exchange(NEE) of CO2 increased in rough proportion to precipitation. Based on apartitioning of gross fluxes with a regression model, ecosystemrespiration increased linearly with gross primary production, but with anoffset that increased near the time of seed production. Because theregression model was designed for well-watered periods, it successfullyretrieved NEE and ecosystem parameters during the peak growing season,and identified periods of moisture limitation during the summer. Insummary, the effects of crop type, land management, and water limitationon carbon, water, and energy fluxes were large. Capturing the controllingfactors in landscape scale models will be necessary to estimate theecological feedbacks to climate and other environmental impactsassociated with changing human needs for agricultural production of food,fiber, and energy.

  11. The variation of the water deficit during the winter wheat growing season and its impact on crop yield in the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianjun; Liu, Ming; Lü, Aifeng; He, Bin

    2014-02-01

    The North China Plain (NCP) is one of the main agricultural areas in China. However, it is also widely known for its water shortages, especially during the winter wheat growing season. Recently, climate change has significantly affected the water environment for crop growth. Analyzing the changes in the water deficit, which is only affected by climate factor, will help to improve water management in the NCP. In this study, the Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT) was used to investigate the variations in the water deficit during the winter wheat growing season from 1961 to 2010 in 12 selected stations in the NCP. To represent the changes in the water deficit without any artificial affection, the rainfed simulation was used. Over the past 50 years, the average temperature during the winter wheat growing season increased approximately 1.42 °C. The anthesis date moved forward approximately 7-10 days and to late April, which increased the water demand in April. Precipitation in March and May showed a positive trend, but there was a negative trend in April. The water deficit in late April and early May became more serious than before, with an increasing trend of more than 0.1 mm/year. In addition, because the heading stage, which is very important to crop yield of winter wheat, moved forward, the impact of water deficit in late April was more serious to crop yield.

  12. Bayesian analysis of the species-specific lengthening of the growing season in two European countries and the influence of an insect pest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, Annette; Estrella, Nicole; Heitland, Werner; Susnik, Andreja; Schleip, Christoph; Dose, Volker

    2008-01-01

    A recent lengthening of the growing season in mid and higher latitudes of the northern hemisphere is reported as a clear indicator for climate change impacts. Using data from Germany (1951-2003) and Slovenia (1961-2004), we study whether changes in the start, end, and length of the growing season differ among four deciduous broad-leaved tree species and countries, how the changes are related to temperature changes, and what might be the confounding effects of an insect attack. The functional behaviour of the phenological and climatological time series and their trends are not analysed by linear regression, but by a new Bayesian approach taking into account different models for the functional description (one change-point, linear, constant models). We find advanced leaf unfolding in both countries with the same species order (oak > horse chestnut, beech, and birch). However, this advance is non linear over time and more apparent in Germany with clear change-points in the late 1970s, followed by marked advances (on average 3.67 days decade-1 in the 2000s). In Slovenia, we find a more gradual advance of onset dates (on average 0.8 days decade-1 in the 2000s). Leaf colouring of birch, beech, and oak has been slightly delayed in the last 3 decades, especially in Germany, however with no clear functional behaviour. Abrupt changes in leaf colouring dates of horse chestnut with recent advancing onset dates can be linked across countries to damage by a newly emerging pest, the horse chestnut leaf-miner ( Cameraria ohridella). The lengthening of the growing season, more distinct in Germany than in Slovenia (on average 4.2 and 1.0 days decade-1 in the 2000s, respectively), exhibits the same species order in both countries (oak > birch > beech). Damage by horse chestnut leaf-miner leads to reduced lengthening (Germany) and drastic shortening (Slovenia) of the horse chestnut growing season (-12 days decade-1 in the 2000s). Advanced spring leaf unfolding and lengthening of the

  13. Seasonal activity and morphological changes in martian gullies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dundas, Colin M.; Diniega, Serina; Hansen, Candice J.; Byrne, Shane; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies of martian dune and non-dune gullies have suggested a seasonal control on present-day gully activity. The timing of current gully activity, especially activity involving the formation or modification of channels (which commonly have been taken as evidence of fluvial processes), has important implications regarding likely gully formation processes and necessary environmental conditions. In this study, we describe the results of frequent meter-scale monitoring of several active gully sites by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). The aim is to better assess the scope and nature of current morphological changes and to provide improved constraints on timing of gully activity on both dune and non-dune slopes. Our observations indicate that (1) gully formation on Mars is ongoing today and (2) the most significant morphological changes are strongly associated with seasonal frost and defrosting activity. Observed changes include formation of all major components of typical gully landforms, although we have not observed alcove formation in coherent bedrock. These results reduce the need to invoke recent climate change or present-day groundwater seepage to explain the many martian gullies with pristine appearance.

  14. Sensory and chemical flavor analyses of tomato genotypes grown in Florida during three different growing seasons in multiple years

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty-eight tomato genotypes were analyzed for sensory attributes “sweet”, “sour” and “overall flavor” over seven years, one to three seasons per year (March, June and December) as well as for physical and chemical flavor-related attributes including color, sugars, acids and aroma volatiles (6-7 ye...

  15. Downscaling large-scale NCEP CFS to resolve fine-scale seasonal precipitation and extremes for the crop growing seasons over the southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Young-Kwon; Cocke, Steven; Shin, D. W.; Schoof, Justin T.; Larow, Timothy E.; O'Brien, James J.

    2010-08-01

    Seasonally predicted precipitation at a resolution of 2.5° was statistically downscaled to a fine spatial scale of ~20 km over the southeastern United States. The downscaling was conducted for spring and summer, when the fine-scale prediction of precipitation is typically very challenging in this region. We obtained the global model precipitation for downscaling from the National Center for Environmental Prediction/Climate Forecast System (NCEP/CFS) retrospective forecasts. Ten member integration data with time-lagged initial conditions centered on mid- or late February each year were used for downscaling, covering the period from 1987 to 2005. The primary techniques involved in downscaling are Cyclostationary Empirical Orthogonal Function (CSEOF) analysis, multiple regression, and stochastic time series generation. Trained with observations and CFS data, CSEOF and multiple regression facilitated the identification of the statistical relationship between coarse-scale and fine-scale climate variability, leading to improved prediction of climate at a fine resolution. Downscaled precipitation produced seasonal and annual patterns that closely resemble the fine resolution observations. Prediction of long-term variation within two decades was improved by the downscaling in terms of variance, root mean square error, and correlation. Relative to the coarsely resolved unskillful CFS forecasts, the proposed downscaling drove a significant reduction in wet biases, and correlation increased by 0.1-0.5. Categorical predictability of seasonal precipitation and extremes (frequency of heavy rainfall days), measured with the Heidke skill score (HSS), was also improved by the downscaling. For instance, domain averaged HSS for two category predictability by the downscaling are at least 0.20, while the scores by the CFS are near zero and never exceed 0.1. On the other hand, prediction of the frequency of subseasonal dry spells showed limited improvement over half of the Georgia and

  16. Seasonal Pacing - Match Importance Affects Activity in Professional Soccer.

    PubMed

    Link, Daniel; de Lorenzo, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    This research explores the influence of match importance on player activity in professional soccer. Therefore, we used an observational approach and analyzed 1,211 matches of German Bundesliga and 2nd Bundesliga. The importance measurement employed is based on post season consequences of teams involved in a match. This means, if a match result could potentially influence the final rank, and this rank would lead to different consequences for a team, such as qualification for Champions League opposed to qualification for Europe League, then this match is classified as important; otherwise not. Activity was quantified by TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED, SPRINTS, FAST RUNS, DUELS, FOULS and ATTEMPTS. Running parameters were recorded using a semi-automatic optical tracking system, while technical variables were collected by professional data loggers. Based on our importance classification, low important matches occurred at the beginning of round 29. A two-way ANOVA indicates significantly increased FAST RUNS (+4%, d = 0.3), DUELS (+16%, d = 1.0) and FOULS (+36%, d = 1.2) in important matches compared to low important ones. For FAST RUNS and FOULS, this effect only exists in Bundesliga. A comparison of the two leagues show that TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED (+3%, d = 0.9), SPRINTS (+25%, d = 1.4) and FAST RUNS (+15%, d = 1.4) are higher compared to 2nd Bundesliga, whilst FOULS is less in Bundesliga (-7%, d = 0.3). No difference in player activity was found between matches at the beginning of a season (round 1-6) and at the end of a season (round 29-34). We conclude that match importance influences player activity in German professional soccer. The most reasonable explanation is a conscious or unconscious pacing strategy, motivated by preserving abilities or preventing injury. Since this tendency mainly exists in Bundesliga, this may suggest that more skilled players show a higher awareness for the need of pacing. PMID:27281051

  17. Seasonal Pacing - Match Importance Affects Activity in Professional Soccer

    PubMed Central

    Link, Daniel; de Lorenzo, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    This research explores the influence of match importance on player activity in professional soccer. Therefore, we used an observational approach and analyzed 1,211 matches of German Bundesliga and 2nd Bundesliga. The importance measurement employed is based on post season consequences of teams involved in a match. This means, if a match result could potentially influence the final rank, and this rank would lead to different consequences for a team, such as qualification for Champions League opposed to qualification for Europe League, then this match is classified as important; otherwise not. Activity was quantified by TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED, SPRINTS, FAST RUNS, DUELS, FOULS and ATTEMPTS. Running parameters were recorded using a semi-automatic optical tracking system, while technical variables were collected by professional data loggers. Based on our importance classification, low important matches occurred at the beginning of round 29. A two-way ANOVA indicates significantly increased FAST RUNS (+4%, d = 0.3), DUELS (+16%, d = 1.0) and FOULS (+36%, d = 1.2) in important matches compared to low important ones. For FAST RUNS and FOULS, this effect only exists in Bundesliga. A comparison of the two leagues show that TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED (+3%, d = 0.9), SPRINTS (+25%, d = 1.4) and FAST RUNS (+15%, d = 1.4) are higher compared to 2nd Bundesliga, whilst FOULS is less in Bundesliga (-7%, d = 0.3). No difference in player activity was found between matches at the beginning of a season (round 1–6) and at the end of a season (round 29–34). We conclude that match importance influences player activity in German professional soccer. The most reasonable explanation is a conscious or unconscious pacing strategy, motivated by preserving abilities or preventing injury. Since this tendency mainly exists in Bundesliga, this may suggest that more skilled players show a higher awareness for the need of pacing. PMID:27281051

  18. Seasonal variation of macro and trace mineral contents in 14 browse species that grow in northeastern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, R G.; Haenlein, G F.W.; Núñez-González, M A.

    2001-02-01

    Leaves and twigs from shrub species consumed by range goats: Acacia berlandieri, Acacia farnesiana, Acacia greggii, Acacia rigidula, Celtis pallida, Cercidium macrum, Condalia obovata, Cordia boissieri, Desmanthus virgathus, Leucaena leucocephala, Leucophyllum texanum, Opuntia lindehimieri, Porlieria angustifolia, Prosopis glandulosa, and Ziziphus obtusifolia were evaluated for comparative seasonal contents of Ca, P, Mg K, Zn, Mn, Cu and Fe. Plants were collected in summer (September 12, 1992), fall (November 20, 1992), winter (February 20, 1993) and spring (May 22, 1993) in Marín, County, Nuevo Leon, Mexico. During spring and summer mineral concentrations were higher in general. Only Ca, Mg, K, and Fe were in substantial amounts in all seasons to meet adult goat requirements. With the exception of spring, shrubs had extremely low P concentrations. Manganese, Cu and Zn in most plants had low marginal levels to meet adult goat requirements. Moreover, potential intake of P, Mn, Cu and Zn in shrub species by goats weighing 50kg BW consuming 2.0kg per day DM was low. However, plants such as D. virgathus, L. texanum, P. glandulosa, L. leucocephala and C. macrum can be considered prominent components in diets of range goats because of their high mineral concentrations. It appears that ration formulations for range goats in northeastern Mexico should include P, Mn, Cu and Zn in all seasons of the year. PMID:11182308

  19. Can reduced stocking rates and natural forage utilization produce market sized catfish from fingerlings in one growing season

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of growing marketable channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus from pond-run fingerlings (15.9 g/fish) using low stocking densities (7,413 or 14,826 fish/ha) and electrified bug lights to enhance natural forage available to fish. Even at low sto...

  20. LATITUDINAL AND SEASONAL VARIATION IN CALCULATED ULTRAVIOLET-B IRRADIANCE IN THE RICE-GROWING REGIONS OF ASIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ultraviolet-B (UV-B, 280-329 nm) irradiance was calculated for more than 1200 sites in Asia to characterize the spatial and temporal variation in the present UV-B climate for rice-growing regions. he analytical model of Green et al. was used to compute UV-B irradiance for clear s...

  1. Growing season fluxes and sources of CO2 and CH4 in high arctic ecosystems, NW Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupascu, M.; Seibt, U.; Stills, A. K.; Xu, X.; Lindsey, D. S.; Welker, J. M.; Czimczik, C. I.

    2010-12-01

    Arctic tundra soils store vast amounts of organic carbon. Understanding how rapidly this pool can be mineralized as a consequence of warming and changes in the magnitude and timing of precipitation is a major uncertainty in predicting future levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. We quantified the magnitudes and patterns of ecosystem-atmosphere fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) from polar semi-desert landscapes in NW Greenland. The measurements were undertaken from May to August 2010 at a multi-factorial, long-term climate change experiment started in 2003. In each treatment, fluxes were monitored from vegetated and barren soils. The experimental treatments consist of +2oC warming (T1), +4oC warming (T2), +50% summer precipitation (W), +4oC × +50% summer precipitation (T2W), and control (C). We used radiocarbon analysis to investigate the sources of carbon contributing to ecosystem carbon respiration under current and future climate conditions. Net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 and CH4 was measured continuously from four clear, automated chambers using cavity ring-down spectroscopy (Picarro 1301) under ambient and under conditions of high warming and added summer water (T2W). In all treatments, ecosystem respiration (R) from opaque chambers and soil pore space CO2 concentrations from soil wells were monitored daily via infrared spectroscopy (LI-COR 800 & 840) and sampled monthly for radiocarbon analysis. NEE fluxes were higher in vegetated than in bare soils and showed a clear seasonal pattern: both C and T2W treatments were a source of CO2 to the atmosphere in the spring and a net CO2 sink during summer. During the summer, NEE fluxes from vegetated soil were up to 5 times higher in the T2W (-11 µmol m-2 s-1) than ambient conditions (~ - 2 µmol m-2 s-1). Bare soils were a net source of CO2 at all times. All plots were a net sink of CH4 and showed a maximum in mid summer (-3 µmol m-2 s-1) when soil moisture was at a minimum. In the T2W

  2. The Growing Season, but Not the Farming System, Is a Food Safety Risk Determinant for Leafy Greens in the Mid-Atlantic Region of the United States

    PubMed Central

    Marine, Sasha C.; Pagadala, Sivaranjani; Wang, Fei; Pahl, Donna M.; Melendez, Meredith V.; Kline, Wesley L.; Oni, Ruth A.; Walsh, Christopher S.; Everts, Kathryne L.; Buchanan, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Small- and medium-size farms in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States use varied agricultural practices to produce leafy greens during spring and fall, but the impact of preharvest practices on food safety risk remains unclear. To assess farm-level risk factors, bacterial indicators, Salmonella enterica, and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) from 32 organic and conventional farms were analyzed. A total of 577 leafy greens, irrigation water, compost, field soil, and pond sediment samples were collected. Salmonella was recovered from 2.2% of leafy greens (n = 369) and 7.7% of sediment (n = 13) samples. There was an association between Salmonella recovery and growing season (fall versus spring) (P = 0.006) but not farming system (organic or conventional) (P = 0.920) or region (P = 0.991). No STEC was isolated. In all, 10% of samples were positive for E. coli: 6% of leafy greens, 18% of irrigation water, 10% of soil, 38% of sediment, and 27% of compost samples. Farming system was not a significant factor for levels of E. coli or aerobic mesophiles on leafy greens but was a significant factor for total coliforms (TC) (P < 0.001), with higher counts from organic farm samples. Growing season was a factor for aerobic mesophiles on leafy greens (P = 0.004), with higher levels in fall than in spring. Water source was a factor for all indicator bacteria (P < 0.001), and end-of-line groundwater had marginally higher TC counts than source samples (P = 0.059). Overall, the data suggest that seasonal events, weather conditions, and proximity of compost piles might be important factors contributing to microbial contamination on farms growing leafy greens. PMID:25616798

  3. Net ecosystem exchange, gross primary production, and ecosystem respiration of carbon dioxide during barley growing season in rice-barley paddy field of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, M.; Shim, K.; Min, S.; Kim, Y.; Kim, S.; So, K.

    2013-12-01

    This study was conducted to measure carbon dioxide exchange between customarily cultivated rice-barley double cropping paddy field and the atmosphere during barley growing season (October 2012 and June 2013) and to estimate carbon dioxide fluxes using agro-meteorological factors (temperature, net radiation etc. ) and barley biomass. The carbon dioxide fluxes were quantified by eddy covariance technique in paddy fields with rice-barley double cropping system, located at the Gimje flux site in the southwestern coast of Korea. The total values of net ecosystem carbon dioxide exchange (NEE), gross primary production (GPP), and ecosystem respiration (Re) were -100.6, 782.7, and 682.5 g C m-2 during barley growing season, respectively. The NEE was tended to keep between 0 and 5 g C m-2 d-1 from sowing date (Oct. 21, 2012) to winter rest stage (Dec. 3, 2012 to Feb. 22, 2013), and gradually decreased in tillering stage (Feb. 23, 2013 to May 5, 2013) with its maximum around heading date, and then started to increase in ripening stage (May 6, 2013 to Jun. 8, 2013). The soil temperature was strongly correlated with the Re (r2=0.86), while the net radiation showed the weak relationship with the GPP during the emergence, seedling, and winter rest stage. The aboveground biomass of barley was significantly correlated with the values of NEE (r2=0.79), GPP (r2=0.83), and Re (r2=0.77), respectively.

  4. Interactions between light and growing season temperatures on, growth and development and gas exchange of Semillon (Vitis vinifera L.) vines grown in an irrigated vineyard.

    PubMed

    Greer, Dennis H; Weedon, Mark M

    2012-05-01

    High-light intensities and temperatures of the warm climate regions of Australia and elsewhere have a major effect on the growth and development of grapevines (Vitis vinifera L.). The objective of this research was to assess interactions between the light and seasonal temperatures by shading some vines and comparing these with vines exposed to high-light intensities. Canopy temperatures were monitored using infrared radiometers and budbreak, phenology, growth, yield, berry ripening and gas exchange determined over three growing seasons. Results showed canopies were generally about 4 °C cooler than air and shading extended this cooling. Irradiance, irrespective of seasonal temperatures, had no effect on time of budbreak, shoot phenology, stem growth, yield and bunch fresh weights while bunch and leaf dry weights were reduced in low-light. Bunch ripening was initially delayed by low-light but thereafter the ripening process was highly temperature-dependent. Rates increased linearly with increasing temperature in both low and high-light and were optimal at about 35 °C. Maximum photosynthetic capacity was impaired by low irradiance, in accordance with shade leaf attributes, and attributable to stomatal closure. No effects of the low photosynthetic capacity apparently carried-over to sugar accumulation, consistent with the strong sink capacity of bunches. PMID:22381656

  5. Monitoring seasonal progress of rice stubble burning in major rice growing districts of Haryana, India, using multidate AWiFS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, M.; Prawasi, R.; Jangra, S.; Rana, P.; Kumari, K.; Lal, S.; Jakhar, K.; Sharma, S.; Hooda, R. S.

    2014-11-01

    The present paper describes the methodology and results of assessment of seasonal progress of rice stubble burning for 10 major rice growing districts of Haryana state in India. These 10 districts contribute about 84 per cent of total rice area of the state. As the rice fields are immediately required to be vacated for the sowing of next crop the farmers opt for mechanized harvesting and easy way out of burning the stubbles in the field. Such burning result in release of polluting gases and aerosols. Besides, the heating of the soil kills the useful micro-flora of the soil causing soil degradation. Multi-date AWiFS data from Resourcesat 1 and 2 satellites acquired between October 16, 2013 to November 26, 2013 were used for estimating paddy stubble burning areas at different intervals for the year 2013 crop growing season. In season collected ground truth data using hand held GPS along with field photographs were used to identify paddy stubble burning areas and other land features. Complete enumeration approach and Iterative Self-organizing Data Analysis Technique (ISODATA) unsupervised classifier was used for digital analysis. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) of each date was also used with other spectral bands of temporal images. To improve the classification accuracy the non-agricultural areas were masked out. The area was estimated by computing pixels under the classified image mask. Progress of paddy stubble burning was estimated at different intervals for the year 2013 using available cloud free multi-date IRS-P6 AWiFS data to identify the crucial period when stubbles burning takes place in major area so that preventive measures can be taken to curb the menace.

  6. The contribution of soil biogenic NO emissions from a managed hyper-arid ecosystem to the regional NO2 emissions during growing season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamtimin, B.; Badawy, M.; Behrendt, T.; Meixner, F. X.; Wagner, T.

    2015-12-01

    A study was carried out to understand the contributions of soil biogenic NO emissions from managed (fertilized and irrigated) hyper-arid ecosystem in NW-China to the regional NO2 emissions during growing season. Soil biogenic NO emissions were quantified by laboratory incubation of corresponding soil samples. We have developed the Geoscience General Tool Package (GGTP) to obtain soil temperature, soil moisture and biogenic soil NO emission at oasis scale. Bottom-up anthropogenic NO2 emissions have been scaled down from annual to monthly values to compare mean monthly soil biogenic NO2 emissions. The top-down emission estimates have been derived from satellite observations compared then with the bottom-up emission estimates (anthropogenic and biogenic). The results show that the soil biogenic emissions of NO2 during the growing period are (at least) equal until twofold of the related anthropogenic sources. We found that the grape soils are the main summertime contributor to the biogenic NO emissions of study area, followed by cotton soils. The top-down and bottom-up emission estimates were shown to be useful methods to estimate the monthly/seasonal cycle of the total regional NO2 emissions. The resulting total NO2 emissions show a strong peak in winter and a secondary peak in summer, providing confidence in the method. These findings provide strong evidence that biogenic emissions from soils of managed drylands (irrigated and fertilized) in the growing period can be much more important contributors to the regional NO2 budget (hence to regional photochemistry) of dryland regions than thought before.

  7. Structure of the rare archaeal biosphere and seasonal dynamics of active ecotypes in surface coastal waters

    PubMed Central

    Hugoni, Mylène; Taib, Najwa; Debroas, Didier; Domaizon, Isabelle; Jouan Dufournel, Isabelle; Bronner, Gisèle; Salter, Ian; Agogué, Hélène; Mary, Isabelle; Galand, Pierre E.

    2013-01-01

    Marine Archaea are important players among microbial plankton and significantly contribute to biogeochemical cycles, but details regarding their community structure and long-term seasonal activity and dynamics remain largely unexplored. In this study, we monitored the interannual archaeal community composition of abundant and rare biospheres in northwestern Mediterranean Sea surface waters by pyrosequencing 16S rDNA and rRNA. A detailed analysis of the rare biosphere structure showed that the rare archaeal community was composed of three distinct fractions. One contained the rare Archaea that became abundant at different times within the same ecosystem; these cells were typically not dormant, and we hypothesize that they represent a local seed bank that is specific and essential for ecosystem functioning through cycling seasonal environmental conditions. The second fraction contained cells that were uncommon in public databases and not active, consisting of aliens to the studied ecosystem and representing a nonlocal seed bank of potential colonizers. The third fraction contained Archaea that were always rare but actively growing; their affiliation and seasonal dynamics were similar to the abundant microbes and could not be considered a seed bank. We also showed that the major archaeal groups, Thaumarchaeota marine group I and Euryarchaeota group II.B in winter and Euryarchaeota group II.A in summer, contained different ecotypes with varying activities. Our findings suggest that archaeal diversity could be associated with distinct metabolisms or life strategies, and that the rare archaeal biosphere is composed of a complex assortment of organisms with distinct histories that affect their potential for growth. PMID:23536290

  8. Radionuclide Concentrations in Soils and Vegetation at Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Area G during the 1997 Growing Season

    SciTech Connect

    L. Naranjo, Jr.; P. R. Fresquez; R. J. Wechsler

    1998-08-01

    Soil and overstory and understory vegetation (washed and unwashed) collected at eight locations within and around Area G-a low-level radioactive solid-waste disposal facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory-were analyzed for 3H, 238Pu, 239Pu, 137CS, 234U, 235U, 228AC, Be, 214Bi, 60Co, 40& 54Mn, 22Na, 214Pb and 208Tl. In general, most radionuclide concentrations, with the exception of 3Ef and ~9Pu, in soils and overstory and understory vegetation collected from within and around Area G were within upper (95'%) level background concentrations. Although 3H concentrations in vegetation from most sites were significantly higher than background (>2 pCi mL-l), concentrations decreased markedly in comparison to last year's results. The highest `H concentration in vegetation was detected from a juniper tree that was growing over tritium shaft /+150; it contained 530,000 pCi 3H mL-l. Also, as in the pas~ the transuranic waste pad area contained the highest levels of 239Pu in soils and in understory vegetation as compared to other areas at Area G.

  9. The contribution of soil biogenic NO and HONO emissions from a managed hyperarid ecosystem to the regional NOx emissions during growing season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamtimin, Buhalqem; Meixner, Franz X.; Behrendt, Thomas; Badawy, Moawad; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    A study was carried out to understand the contributions of soil biogenic NO emissions from managed (fertilized and irrigated) hyperarid ecosystems in NW China to the regional NOx emissions during the growing season. Soil biogenic net potential NO fluxes were quantified by laboratory incubation of soil samples from the three dominating ecosystems (desert, cotton, and grape fields). Regional biogenic NO emissions were calculated bottom-up hourly for the entire growing season (April-September 2010) by considering corresponding land use, hourly data of soil temperature, gravimetric soil moisture, and fertilizer enhancement factors. The regional HONO emissions were estimated using the ratio of the optimum condition ((FN,opt(HONO) to FN,opt (NO)). Regional anthropogenic NOx emissions were calculated bottom-up from annual statistical data provided by regional and local government bureaus which have been downscaled to monthly value. Regional top-down emission estimates of NOx were derived on the monthly basis from satellite observations (OMI) of tropospheric vertical NO2 column densities and prescribed values of the tropospheric NOx lifetime. In order to compare the top-down and bottom-up emission estimates, all emission estimates were expressed in terms of mass of atomic nitrogen. Consequently, monthly top-down NOx emissions (total) were compared with monthly bottom-up NOx emissions (biogenic + anthropogenic) for the time of the satellite overpass (around 13:00 LT) with the consideration of the diurnal cycle of bottom-up estimates. Annual variation in total Tohsun Oasis NOx emissions is characterized by a strong peak in winter (December-February) and a secondary peak in summer (June-August). During summer, soil biogenic emissions were from equal to double that of related anthropogenic emissions, and grape soils were the main contributor to soil biogenic emissions, followed by cotton soils, while emissions from the desert were negligible. The top-down and bottom

  10. Deeper winter snow reduces ecosystem C losses but increases the global warming potential of Arctic tussock tundra over the growing season.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc-Betes, E.; Welker, J. M.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.; Gonzalez-Meler, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic winter precipitation is projected to increase globally over the next decades, spatial variability encompassing areas with increases and decreases in winter snow. Changes in winter precipitation strongly affect C dynamics in Arctic systems and may lead to major positive climate forcing feedbacks. However, impacts of predicted changes in snowfall and accumulation on the rate and form of C fluxes (CO2 and CH4) and associated forcing feedbacks from Arctic tundra remain uncertain. We investigated how changes in winter precipitation affect net ecosystem CO2 and CH4 fluxes and budgets of moist acidic tundra in an 18-yrs snow fence experiment over a complete growing season at Toolik Lake, AK. Arctic tundra under ambient winter precipitation (CTL) was a net source of CO2 and CH4, yielding net C losses over the growing season. Reduced snow (-15-30% snow depth; RS) switched the system to a net CO2 sink mostly by limiting SOC decomposition within colder soils. Snow additions progressively reduced net ecosystem CO2 losses compared to CTL, switching the system into a weaker net CO2 source with medium additions (+20-45% snow depth; MS) and into a small net CO2 sink with high additions (+70-100% snow depth; HS). Increasingly wetter soils with snow additions constrained the temperature sensitivity of aerobic decomposition and favored the anaerobic metabolism, buffering ecosystem CO2 losses despite substantial soil warming. Accordingly, Arctic tundra switched from a sustained CH4 sink at RS site to an increasingly stronger CH4 source with snow additions. Accounting for both CO2 and CH4, the RS site became a net C sink over the growing season, overall reducing the global warming potential (CO2 equiv.; GWP) of the system relative to CTL. Snow additions progressively reduced net C losses at the MS site compared to CTL and the system transitioned into a net C sink at HS plots, partly due to the slower metabolism of anaerobic decomposition. However, given the greater radiative

  11. Isoprene Emissions from Downy Oak under Water Limitation during an Entire Growing Season: What Cost for Growth?

    PubMed Central

    Genard-Zielinski, Anne-Cyrielle; Ormeño, Elena; Boissard, Christophe; Fernandez, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Increases in the production of terpene- and phenolic-like compounds in plant species under abiotic stress conditions have been interpreted in physiological studies as a supplementary defense system due to their capacity to limit cell oxidation. From an ecological perspective however, these increases are only expected to confer competitive advantages if they do not imply a significant cost for the plant, that is, growth reduction. We investigated shifts of isoprene emissions, and to a lesser extent phenolic compound concentration, of Quercus pubescens Willd. from early leaf development to leaf senescence under optimal watering (control: C), mild and severe water stress (MS, SS). The impact of water stress was concomitantly assessed on plant physiological (chlorophyll fluorescence, stomatal conductance, net photosynthesis, water potential) functional (relative leaf water content, leaf mass per area ratio) and growth (aerial and root biomass) traits. Growth changes allowed to estimate the eventual costs related to the production of isoprene and phenolics. The total phenolic content was not modified under water stress whereas isoprene emissions were promoted under MS over the entire growing cycle despite the decline of Pn by 35%. Under SS, isoprene emissions remained similar to C all over the study despite the decline of Pn by 47% and were thereby clearly uncoupled to Pn leading to an overestimation of the isoprene emission factor by 44%. Under SS, maintenance of isoprene emissions and phenolic compound concentration resulted in very significant costs for the plants as growth rates were very significantly reduced. Under MS, increases of isoprene emission and maintenance of phenolic compound concentration resulted in moderate growth reduction. Hence, it is likely that investment in isoprene emissions confers Q. pubescens an important competitive advantage during moderate but not severe periods of water scarcity. Consequences of this response for air quality in North

  12. Isoprene emissions from downy oak under water limitation during an entire growing season: what cost for growth?

    PubMed

    Genard-Zielinski, Anne-Cyrielle; Ormeño, Elena; Boissard, Christophe; Fernandez, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Increases in the production of terpene- and phenolic-like compounds in plant species under abiotic stress conditions have been interpreted in physiological studies as a supplementary defense system due to their capacity to limit cell oxidation. From an ecological perspective however, these increases are only expected to confer competitive advantages if they do not imply a significant cost for the plant, that is, growth reduction. We investigated shifts of isoprene emissions, and to a lesser extent phenolic compound concentration, of Quercus pubescens Willd. from early leaf development to leaf senescence under optimal watering (control: C), mild and severe water stress (MS, SS). The impact of water stress was concomitantly assessed on plant physiological (chlorophyll fluorescence, stomatal conductance, net photosynthesis, water potential) functional (relative leaf water content, leaf mass per area ratio) and growth (aerial and root biomass) traits. Growth changes allowed to estimate the eventual costs related to the production of isoprene and phenolics. The total phenolic content was not modified under water stress whereas isoprene emissions were promoted under MS over the entire growing cycle despite the decline of Pn by 35%. Under SS, isoprene emissions remained similar to C all over the study despite the decline of Pn by 47% and were thereby clearly uncoupled to Pn leading to an overestimation of the isoprene emission factor by 44%. Under SS, maintenance of isoprene emissions and phenolic compound concentration resulted in very significant costs for the plants as growth rates were very significantly reduced. Under MS, increases of isoprene emission and maintenance of phenolic compound concentration resulted in moderate growth reduction. Hence, it is likely that investment in isoprene emissions confers Q. pubescens an important competitive advantage during moderate but not severe periods of water scarcity. Consequences of this response for air quality in North

  13. Growing Season CO2-Net Ecosystem Exchange and CH4 Fluxes Response to Increase Precipitation in a Boreal Peatland, Eastmain Region, Quebec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelletier, L.; Garneau, M.

    2010-12-01

    Climate scenarios for northern Quebec, Canada, predict a rise in temperature of 3.9 to 4.5oC and an increase in precipitation of 3 to 7mm per month in a double CO2 climate. The response of Quebec’s James Bay peatlands to an increase in moisture/precipitation has not been thoroughly documented although these ecosystems are an important feature representing 30% of the landscape. Here we present results from three growing seasons of a study looking at CO2-net ecosystem exchange and CH4 fluxes to assess inter annual variability and the impact of greater precipitation on gas exchange. Monthly average temperatures between the studied growing seasons were within 1oC except in August 2008, which was 3oC warmer than previous years. Total precipitation was 30% greater between June and August 2008 than previous years. Results of CO2 exchange show significantly different relationships between photosynthetic photon flux density and NEE in 2008 on 3 of the 4 microforms studied as a result of increased precipitation. We found that when water table was closer to the surface productivity was increased on high and low hummocks through an increase in maximum rates of photosynthesis, and productivity was reduced on hollows through the flooding of the surface vegetation. Water table position was also a significant control on ecosystem respiration but only on the lawn microform. Elevated water table in 2008 had no significant effect on CH4 fluxes from the 4 microforms suggesting that reducing the oxidation layer thickness by 10cm does not influence fluxes at the surface. These results highlight the spatial and temporal variability in GHG fluxes from peatlands and the different responses of microforms to changing environmental conditions. The rapid response of vegetation productivity to the increase in precipitation in 2008 should also be considered for peat/carbon accumulation models.

  14. Evaluation of the onset and length of growing season to define planting date—`a case study for Mali (West Africa)'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinseye, F. M.; Agele, S. O.; Traore, P. C. S.; Adam, M.; Whitbread, A. M.

    2016-05-01

    The agroecological zones (AEZ) of Mali fall within the semi-arid climate, the ability to determine efficiently or predict accurately the onset of growing season (OGS), and length of growing season (LGS) cannot be over-emphasized due to highly variable rainfall pattern and the dependence of smallholder farmers practising on rainfed farming agriculture. In this study, we determined the most suitable method for predicting the onset date of rainfall across AEZ that fitted with the planting windows of major cereal crops (maize, millet, and sorghum). Using long-term daily rainfall records from 22 meteorological stations spread across AEZ of Mali, four (4) known methods were applied to determine the onset dates of the rain. The mean onset dates were statistically compared with the farmer's planting window for the selected weather stations to determine the suitable dates of OGS and LGS. The hypothesis considered a time lag minimum of 7 days between the mean onset date and traditional farmer sowing dates for the crops. Then, the preferred method was used to estimate OGS based on early, normal and late dates respectively across the stations. Also, the estimated LGS according to each zone was evaluated using probability distribution chart with duration to maturity for varieties of the same crops. The results showed that Def_4 was found appropriate for Sahelian and Sudano-Sahelian zones; Def_3 satisfied the criteria and exhibited superior capacity into farmer's average planting date over Sudanian and Guinea Savannah zones. These results have an important application in cropping systems in order to prevent crop failure and ensure a better choice of crop variety according to LGS under climate variability and change being experienced across Mali.

  15. Changes in volatile emissions from apple trees and associated response of adult female codling moths over the fruit-growing season.

    PubMed

    Vallat, Armelle; Dorn, Silvia

    2005-05-18

    Odors in the headspace of apple trees were characterized by in situ volatile collections in the orchard. Sixty-two compounds were quantitatively identified with thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry over the complete fruit-growing season. Overall quantities in the headspace of fruit-bearing twig were highest at petal fall and at the beginning of June and August. Interestingly, the latter two periods coincide with the flight maxima of the codling moth, Cydia pomonella, one of the principal pest insects of apple fruit worldwide. Dual-choice bioassays with mated adult female moths in a Y-tube olfactometer showed that the blend of plant-derived volatiles repelled this key pest of apple at petal fall and attracted it from July to mid-August. Single-component analysis indicated that benzaldehyde and butyl acetate might contribute to the observed repellent effect, but the constituents accounting for the attractant effect mid-season remain to be further elucidated. The attractant effect clearly originates from the apple fruit and not from the twig with leaves, as bioassays demonstrated conclusively. PMID:15884843

  16. Beyond leaf color: Comparing camera-based phenological metrics with leaf biochemical, biophysical, and spectral properties throughout the growing season of a temperate deciduous forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xi; Tang, Jianwu; Mustard, John F.

    2014-03-01

    Plant phenology, a sensitive indicator of climate change, influences vegetation-atmosphere interactions by changing the carbon and water cycles from local to global scales. Camera-based phenological observations of the color changes of the vegetation canopy throughout the growing season have become popular in recent years. However, the linkages between camera phenological metrics and leaf biochemical, biophysical, and spectral properties are elusive. We measured key leaf properties including chlorophyll concentration and leaf reflectance on a weekly basis from June to November 2011 in a white oak forest on the island of Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, USA. Concurrently, we used a digital camera to automatically acquire daily pictures of the tree canopies. We found that there was a mismatch between the camera-based phenological metric for the canopy greenness (green chromatic coordinate, gcc) and the total chlorophyll and carotenoids concentration and leaf mass per area during late spring/early summer. The seasonal peak of gcc is approximately 20 days earlier than the peak of the total chlorophyll concentration. During the fall, both canopy and leaf redness were significantly correlated with the vegetation index for anthocyanin concentration, opening a new window to quantify vegetation senescence remotely. Satellite- and camera-based vegetation indices agreed well, suggesting that camera-based observations can be used as the ground validation for satellites. Using the high-temporal resolution dataset of leaf biochemical, biophysical, and spectral properties, our results show the strengths and potential uncertainties to use canopy color as the proxy of ecosystem functioning.

  17. Ultra-high Resolution Carbon Isotope Records in Tree Rings: Indicators of Carbon Allocation and Growing Season Precipitation/Temperature (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahren, A.; Schubert, B.

    2010-12-01

    The rapidity and ease of carbon stable isotope measurements on organic substrates has opened the possibility of ultra-high resolution δ13C analyses within tree rings at < 30 to 100 micron increments. We present such measurements for 80 individual tree rings, from 10 trees spanning the last 55 million years in age from arctic, temperate, and tropical environments. Morphological features such as growth rings and resin canals were not preserved in some ancient specimens making identification of annual rings via standard techniques impossible. However, the annual patterns observed in ultra-high resolution δ13C records allowed for characterization of these unknown specimens as evergreen or deciduous. A combination of our data with that published in the literature showed a strong correlation between the amplitude of the δ13C pattern and growing season precipitation/temperature in > 90% of modern evergreen trees examined to date. Ultra-high resolution δ13C analyses of ancient, non-permineralized, evergreen trees could therefore provide quantitative estimates of past climate at annual or seasonal resolution.

  18. Radionuclide concentrations in/on vegetation at radioactive-waste disposal Area G during the 1995 growing season. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Fresquez, P.R.; Vold, E.L.; Naranjo, L. Jr.

    1996-03-01

    Overstory (pinon pine) and understory (grass and forb) vegetation were collected within and around selected points at Area G--a low- level radioactive solid-waste disposal facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory--for the analysis of tritium ({sup 3}H), strontium ({sup 90}Sr), plutonium ({sup 238}Pu and {sup 239}Pu), cesium ({sup 137}Cs), and total uranium. Also, heavy metals (Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, and Tl) in/on vegetation were determined. In general, most (unwashed) vegetation collected within and around Area G contained {sup 3}H, uranium, {sup 238}Pu, and {sup 239}Pu in higher concentrations than vegetation collected from background areas. Tritium, in particular, was detected as high as 7300 pCi mL{sup -1} in understory vegetation collected from the west side of the transuranic (TRU) pads. The south and west ends of the tritium shaft field also contained elevated levels of {sup 3}H in overstory, and especially in understory vegetation, as compared to background; this suggests that {sup 3}H may be migrating from this waste repository through surface and subsurface pathways. Also, understory vegetation collected north of the TRU pads (adjacent to the fence line of Area G) contained the highest values of {sup 238}Pu and {sup 239}Pu as compared to background, and may be a result of surface holding, storage, and/or disposal activities.

  19. Seasonality in circadian locomotor activity and serum testosterone level in the subtropical tree sparrow (Passer montanus).

    PubMed

    Dixit, Anand S; Singh, Namram S

    2016-05-01

    Seasonality in daily locomotor activity pattern was investigated in the subtropical tree sparrow by exposing a group of birds to natural day lengths (NDL) for 30days and another group to 12L/12D for 14days followed by transfer to constant dim light (LLdim) for another 15days in four different seasons of the year. Serum testosterone levels were also measured during different seasons. Sparrows, under NDL, exhibited distinct circadian rhythmicity in their locomotor activity with almost similar general pattern in different seasons that restricted mainly to the light hours. However, they showed season-dependent differences in the characteristics of circadian locomotor activity rhythm. Birds, when exposed to 12L/12D, showed entrainment of their locomotor activity rhythm with the activity confined mainly during the light phase. Though, tau (τ) under free run conditions did not show any significant difference, the activity period varied significantly in different seasons. The highest level of testosterone was recorded in the spring season that corresponded with the maximum locomotor activity in spring months. The seasonality in daily locomotor activity correlates with the seasonal changes in testosterone levels suggesting the influence of gonadal steroids on endogenous circadian system which is indicative of adaptation of tree sparrow to local photoperiodic conditions. PMID:26945648

  20. A complete and continuous pesticide screening during one growing season in five small Swiss rivers with agricultural watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangold, Simon; Comte, Rahel; Doppler, Tobias; Wittmer, Irene; Moschet, Christoph; Stamm, Christian; Singer, Heinz; Kunz, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Agricultural pesticides are regularly found in surface waters at concentration levels that raise ecotoxicological concerns. Due to large fluctuations in concentration over time and the potentially high number of pesticides in agricultural watersheds, it is difficult to obtain a comprehensive overview of the actual pollution level. This collaborative project between research and Swiss federal and cantonal authorities aimed for a comprehensive analysis of pesticide pollution in five small agricultural streams to address this knowledge gap. The five rivers are located in catchments (1.5 to 9 km2) with intensive agriculture covering a wide range of crops, such as grains, vegetables, vineyards and orchards. Urban activities and influences are low. Twelve-hour composite samples were collected continuously from March until the end of August with automatic sampling devices, resulting in 360 samples per site. Using precipitation and water level data, we differentiated between discharge events and low-flow periods. Samples taken during dry weather were pooled for the analysis. This procedure resulted in a complete concentration profile over the entire monitoring period covered by 60 samples per site. The analysis, using liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (Orbitrap technology), involved a target screening of 248 pesticides including fungicides, herbicides, insecticides, as well as important transformation products. Data on the total number and distribution of pesticides, their detection frequency, crop specific applications and concentration time profiles will be presented. Preliminary results indicate substantial pesticide exposure since at least 20 different compounds were detected in all samples. One sample even contained a mixture of 80 pesticides. The majority of concentrations were in the low ng/L range but concentrations of a few compounds were very high (several micrograms/L) during discharge events as well as during low flow conditions

  1. Reproductive phenology of the American Bullfrog in subtropical Brazil: photoperiod as a main determinant of seasonal activity.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Camila I; Both, Camila; Kaefer, Igor L; Cechin, Sonia Z

    2016-07-11

    The North American bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus continues to invade ecosystems worldwide, potentially causing population declines and even extinctions. Within its native distribution, bullfrogs show prolonged reproductive seasons and high fertility. However, data on breeding biology of bullfrogs ex-situ in invaded localities mainly comes from anecdotal reports. Understanding how invasive species are adjusting their life histories to new colonized environments is important for conservation purposes. Here we describe temporal and spatial abundance, calling activity, spawning and tadpole distribution of bullfrogs in southern Brazil. Eighteen samplings occurred during one year. The abundance of individuals was positively related to longer photoperiods and higher temperatures. Reproductive activity was also positively associated with longer photoperiods. Calling sites, spawning and tadpoles were associated with microhabitats presenting hydrophytes, which may provide shelter and thermal stability to bullfrogs. The reproductive seasonal activity of bullfrogs can be highly variable across its growing geographical range, but in subtropical Brazil it is associated with photoperiod, a highly predictable abiotic determinant. In our study area, bullfrogs presented a breeding season twice as long as that observed in some native localities. We suggest that management strategies directed to bullfrog populations must consider the habitat structures and seasonal regimes determined by each invaded environment. PMID:27411069

  2. Water activity of poultry litter: Relationship to moisture content during a grow-out.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, Mark W; McAuley, Jim; Blackall, Patrick J; Stuetz, Richard M

    2016-05-01

    Poultry grown on litter floors are in contact with their own waste products. The waste material needs to be carefully managed to reduce food safety risks and to provide conditions that are comfortable and safe for the birds. Water activity (Aw) is an important thermodynamic property that has been shown to be more closely related to microbial, chemical and physical properties of natural products than moisture content. In poultry litter, Aw is relevant for understanding microbial activity; litter handling and rheological properties; and relationships between in-shed relative humidity and litter moisture content. We measured the Aw of poultry litter collected throughout a meat chicken grow-out (from fresh pine shavings bedding material to day 52) and over a range of litter moisture content (10-60%). The Aw increased non-linearly from 0.71 to 1.0, and reached a value of 0.95 when litter moisture content was only 22-33%. Accumulation of manure during the grow-out reduced Aw for the same moisture content. These results are relevant for making decisions regarding litter re-use in multiple grow-outs as well as setting targets for litter moisture content to minimise odour, microbial risks and to ensure necessary litter physical conditions are maintained during a grow-out. Methods to predict Aw in poultry litter from moisture content are proposed. PMID:26946169

  3. Cold Season Ground Validation Activities in support of GPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudak, D. R.; Petersen, W. A.

    2012-12-01

    A fundamental component of the next-generation global precipitation data products that will be addressed by the GPM mission is the hydrologic cycle at higher latitudes. In this respect, falling snow represents a primary contribution to regional atmospheric and terrestrial water budgets. The current study provides provide information on the precipitation microphysics and processes associated with cold season precipitation and precipitating cloud systems across multiple scales. It also addresses the ability of in-situ ground-based sensors as well as multi-frequency active and passive microwave sensors to detect and estimate falling snow, and more generally to contribute to our knowledge and understanding of the complete global water cycle. The work supports the incorporation of appropriate physics into GPM snowfall retrieval algorithms and the development of improved ground validation techniques for GPM product evaluation. Important information for developing GPM falling snow retrieval algorithms will be provided by a field campaign that took place in the winter of 2011/12 in the Great Lakes area of North America, termed the GPM Cold Season Precipitation Experiment (GCPEx). GCPEx represented a collaboration among the NASA, Environment Canada (EC), the Canadian Space Agency and several US, Canadian and European universities. The data collection strategy for GCPEx was coordinated, stacked high-altitude and in-situ cloud aircraft missions sampling within a broader network of ground-based volumetric observations and measurements. The NASA DSC-8 research aircraft provided a platform for the downward-viewing dual-frequency radar and multi-frequency radiometer observations. The University of North Dakota Citation and the Canadian NRC Convair-580 aircraft provided in-situ profiles of cloud and precipitation microphysics using a suite of optical array probes and bulk measurement instrumentation. Ground sampling was focused about a densely-instrumented central location that is

  4. Seasonal Activity of Gullies in South Polar Pits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raack, Jan; Reiss, Dennis; Vincendon, Mathieu; Ruesch, Ottaviano; Appéré, Thomas; Hiesinger, Harald

    2013-04-01

    Seasonal activity of gullies under current climatic conditions on Mars was observed by [1-6]. These observations were made on mountain and/or crater slopes [2-4], on dune slopes at mid-latitudes [2,5,6], and on slopes of polar pits [1,2]. The suggested mechanisms to form new gully deposits are melting of H2O ice [3,5] or sublimation/removal of CO2 ice [2,4,6]. With high-resolution imaging, temperature, and spectral data we analyzed gully changes in a polar pit north of Sisyphi Cavi at ~68.5°S and ~1.5°E. One investigated gully shows dark material within the channel in martian years (MY) 28, 29, and 30. The dark material results to the formation of new dark deposits (dark flow-like features) at LS ~223° in MY 28, between LS 209° and 226° (beginning of spring) in MY 29, and between LS 218° and LS 249° in MY 30. We observed a new deposition of material at the channel termini, which shortens the channel by about 40 m in MY 29. Maximum surface temperature data of the area indicate that temperatures in autumn and winter are ~150 K. In mid-spring (between LS ~220° and ~250°) temperatures increase rapidly up to ~270 K due to solar insolation and ice sublimation. To better understand the temporal evolution of H2O and CO2, we processed near infrared spectral data and analyzed the strengths of absorption bands caused by these volatiles (ices). These investigations show that CO2 and H2O ices sublimate between LS ~225° and ~240°. This is also the time range when temperatures rise rapidly and when gully changes occurred. More detailed analyses show that the spectral signatures of ice are generally lower on the dark flow features within the gully channel / above the gully apron compared to the surrounding terrain. Our investigations either imply 1) a generally lower value of volatiles within gully channels due to non uniform volatile deposition on the slope, 2) a faster sublimation of volatiles within gully channels, or 3) deposition of debris above ice from the

  5. Monitoring of a fast-growing speleothem site from the Han-sur-Lesse cave, Belgium, indicates equilibrium deposition of the seasonal δ18O and δ13C signals in the calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Rampelbergh, M.; Verheyden, S.; Allan, M.; Quinif, Y.; Keppens, E.; Claeys, P.

    2014-10-01

    values. The cave system varies seasonally in response to the activity of the vegetation cover and outside air temperature between a "summer mode" lasting from June to December and a "winter mode" from December to June. The low δ18O and high δ13C values of the darker speleothem layers indicate that they are formed during summer, while light layers are formed during winter. The darker the color of a layer, the more compact its calcite structure is, and the more negative its δ18O signal and the more positive its δ13C signal are. Darker layers deposited from summer drip water affected by PCP are suggested to contain lower Ca2+ concentration. If indeed the calcite saturation represents the main factor driving the Proserpine growth rate, the dark layers should grow slower than the white layers.

  6. Observations of the northern seasonal polar cap on Mars: I. Spring sublimation activity and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, C. J.; Byrne, S.; Portyankina, G.; Bourke, M.; Dundas, C.; McEwen, A.; Mellon, M.; Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.

    2013-08-01

    Spring sublimation of the seasonal CO2 northern polar cap is a dynamic process in the current Mars climate. Phenomena include dark fans of dune material propelled out onto the seasonal ice layer, polygonal cracks in the seasonal ice, sand flow down slipfaces, and outbreaks of gas and sand around the dune margins. These phenomena are concentrated on the north polar erg that encircles the northern residual polar cap. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has been in orbit for three Mars years, allowing us to observe three northern spring seasons. Activity is consistent with and well described by the Kieffer model of basal sublimation of the seasonal layer of ice applied originally in the southern hemisphere. Three typical weak spots have been identified on the dunes for escape of gas sublimed from the bottom of the seasonal ice layer: the crest of the dune, the interface of the dune with the interdune substrate, and through polygonal cracks in the ice. Pressurized gas flows through these vents and carries out material entrained from the dune. Furrows in the dunes channel gas to outbreak points and may be the northern equivalent of southern radially-organized channels ("araneiform" terrain), albeit not permanent. Properties of the seasonal CO2 ice layer are derived from timing of seasonal events such as when final sublimation occurs. Modification of dune morphology shows that landscape evolution is occurring on Mars today, driven by seasonal activity associated with sublimation of the seasonal CO2 polar cap.

  7. Observations of the northern seasonal polar cap on Mars: I. Spring sublimation activity and processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, C.J.; Byrne, S.; Portyankina, G.; Bourke, M.; Dundas, C.; McEwen, A.; Mellon, M.; Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.

    2013-01-01

    Spring sublimation of the seasonal CO2 northern polar cap is a dynamic process in the current Mars climate. Phenomena include dark fans of dune material propelled out onto the seasonal ice layer, polygonal cracks in the seasonal ice, sand flow down slipfaces, and outbreaks of gas and sand around the dune margins. These phenomena are concentrated on the north polar erg that encircles the northern residual polar cap. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has been in orbit for three Mars years, allowing us to observe three northern spring seasons. Activity is consistent with and well described by the Kieffer model of basal sublimation of the seasonal layer of ice applied originally in the southern hemisphere. Three typical weak spots have been identified on the dunes for escape of gas sublimed from the bottom of the seasonal ice layer: the crest of the dune, the interface of the dune with the interdune substrate, and through polygonal cracks in the ice. Pressurized gas flows through these vents and carries out material entrained from the dune. Furrows in the dunes channel gas to outbreak points and may be the northern equivalent of southern radially-organized channels (“araneiform” terrain), albeit not permanent. Properties of the seasonal CO2 ice layer are derived from timing of seasonal events such as when final sublimation occurs. Modification of dune morphology shows that landscape evolution is occurring on Mars today, driven by seasonal activity associated with sublimation of the seasonal CO2 polar cap.

  8. Seasonal Transition of Active Bacterial and Archaeal Communities in Relation to Water Management in Paddy Soils

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Hideomi; Ishii, Satoshi; Shiratori, Yutaka; Oshima, Kenshiro; Otsuka, Shigeto; Hattori, Masahira; Senoo, Keishi

    2013-01-01

    Paddy soils have an environment in which waterlogging and drainage occur during the rice growing season. Fingerprinting analysis based on soil RNA indicated that active microbial populations changed in response to water management conditions, although the fundamental microbial community was stable as assessed by DNA-based fingerprinting analysis. Comparative clone library analysis based on bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNAs (5,277 and 5,436 clones, respectively) revealed stable and variable members under waterlogged or drained conditions. Clones related to the class Deltaproteobacteria and phylum Euryarchaeota were most frequently obtained from the samples collected under both waterlogged and drained conditions. Clones related to syntrophic hydrogen-producing bacteria, hydrogenotrophic methanogenic archaea, rice cluster III, V, and IV, and uncultured crenarchaeotal group 1.2 appeared in greater proportion in the samples collected under waterlogged conditions than in those collected under drained conditions, while clones belonging to rice cluster VI related to ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) appeared at higher frequency in the samples collected under drained conditions than in those collected under waterlogged conditions. These results suggested that hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis may become active under waterlogged conditions, whereas ammonia oxidation may progress by rice cluster VI becoming active under drained conditions in the paddy field. PMID:24005888

  9. Antioxidant activity and total phenolic content of 24 Lamiaceae species growing in Iran.

    PubMed

    Firuzi, Omidreza; Javidnia, Katayoun; Gholami, Maryam; Soltani, Mohammad; Miri, Ramin

    2010-02-01

    The antioxidant activities of the methanolic extracts of 9 Salvia species and 15 other Lamiaceae plants growing in Iran were evaluated using ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging assays. FRAP values ranged form 8.5 to 79.0 microM quercetin equivalents/g dry weight, and IC50 values in the DPPH assay from 115.7 to 1350.2 microg dry weight/mL. Salvia species showed the highest antioxidant activities. S. santolinifolia, S. eremophila and S. palestina, which have not been studied before, were the most active plants. These were more active than the previously studied species from this family, such as S. multicaulis and Marrubium vulgare. S. hydrangea and Gontscharovia popovii also showed high antioxidant activities. FRAP and DPPH assay results showed good correlations with the total phenolic contents of the plants, measured by the Folin-Ciocalteau assay (r2 = 0.925 and 0.799, respectively, p < 0.0001). In conclusion, our study shows that some Lamiaceae plants growing in Iran represent good potential sources of natural antioxidants useful for either prevention or treatment of oxidative stress-related diseases. PMID:20334140

  10. The danger is growing! A new paradigm for immune system activation and peripheral tolerance.

    PubMed

    Bewick, Sharon; Yang, Ruoting; Zhang, Mingjun

    2009-01-01

    Successful immune defense is a complex balancing act. In order to protect a host against invasion by harmful pathogens, an immune response must be rapid and vigorous, and must eliminate foreign invaders before their populations grow beyond control. That same immune response, however, must be selective enough to recognize and ignore commensal bacteria, environmental antigens and host tissue itself. How the immune system makes the crucial decision whether or not to attack a particular antigen has been a long-standing question central to the study of immunology. Here we show that the structure of the signaling network between regulatory T-cells and type 17 helper T-cells allows the immune system to selectively attack pathogens based on whether or not the pathogens represent a growing, and thus dangerous population. We term this mechanism for immune system activation the 'Growth Detection Paradigm', because it offers an entirely new explanation for immune system regulation and peripheral tolerance. PMID:19956616

  11. Seasonal variation in metabolic rate, flight activity and body size of Anopheles gambiae in the Sahel

    PubMed Central

    Huestis, Diana L.; Yaro, Alpha S.; Traoré, Adama I.; Dieter, Kathryne L.; Nwagbara, Juliette I.; Bowie, Aleah C.; Adamou, Abdoulaye; Kassogué, Yaya; Diallo, Moussa; Timbiné, Seydou; Dao, Adama; Lehmann, Tovi

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Malaria in Africa is vectored primarily by the Anopheles gambiae complex. Although the mechanisms of population persistence during the dry season are not yet known, targeting dry season mosquitoes could provide opportunities for vector control. In the Sahel, it appears likely that M-form A. gambiae survive by aestivation (entering a dormant state). To assess the role of eco-physiological changes associated with dry season survival, we measured body size, flight activity and metabolic rate of wild-caught mosquitoes throughout 1 year in a Sahelian locality, far from permanent water sources, and at a riparian location adjacent to the Niger River. We found significant seasonal variation in body size at both the Sahelian and riparian sites, although the magnitude of the variation was greater in the Sahel. For flight activity, significant seasonality was only observed in the Sahel, with increased flight activity in the wet season when compared with that just prior to and throughout the dry season. Whole-organism metabolic rate was affected by numerous biotic and abiotic factors, and a significant seasonal component was found at both locations. However, assay temperature accounted completely for seasonality at the riparian location, while significant seasonal variation remained after accounting for all measured variables in the Sahel. Interestingly, we did not find that mean metabolic rate was lowest during the dry season at either location, contrary to our expectation that mosquitoes would conserve energy and increase longevity by reducing metabolism during this time. These results indicate that mosquitoes may use mechanisms besides reduced metabolic rate to enable survival during the Sahelian dry season. PMID:22623189

  12. Seasonal and Daily Variation in Physical Activity among Three-Year-Old Finnish Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soini, Anne; Tammelin, Tuija; Sääkslahti, Arja; Watt, Anthony; Villberg, Jari; Kettunen, Tarja; Mehtälä, Anette; Poskiparta, Marita

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to assess seasonal, daily, and gender variations in children's physical activity (PA). ActiGraph GT3X accelerometers were used to record the three-year-old children's PA levels for five consecutive days in autumn and winter. Complete data for both seasons were obtained for 47 children. Despite a…

  13. Growing season variability of net ecosystem CO2 exchange and evapotranspiration of a sphagnum mire in the broad-leaved forest zone of European Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olchev, A.; Volkova, E.; Karataeva, T.; Novenko, E.

    2013-09-01

    The spatial and temporal variability of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 and evapotranspiration (ET) of a karst-hole sphagnum peat mire situated at the boundary between broad-leaved and forest-steppe zones in the central part of European Russia in the Tula region was described using results from field measurements. NEE and ET were measured using a portable measuring system consisting of a transparent ventilated chamber combined with an infrared CO2/H2O analyzer, LI-840A (Li-Cor, USA) along a transect from the southern peripheral part of the mire to its center under sunny clear-sky weather conditions in the period from May to September of 2012 and in May 2013. The results of the field measurements showed significant spatial and temporal variability of NEE and ET that was mainly influenced by incoming solar radiation and ground water level. The seasonal patterns of NEE and ET within the mire were quite different. During the entire growing season the central part of the mire was a sink of CO2 for the atmosphere. NEE reached maximal values in June-July (-6.8 ± 4.2 μmol m-2 s-1). The southern peripheral part of the mire, due to strong shading by the surrounding forest, was a sink of CO2 for the atmosphere in June-July only. ET reached maximal values in the well-lighted central parts of the mire in May (0.34 ± 0.20 mm h-1) mainly because of high air and surface temperatures and the very wet upper peat horizon and sphagnum moss. Herbaceous species made the maximum contribution to the total gross primary production (GPP) in both the central and the peripheral parts of the mire. The contribution of sphagnum to the total GPP of these plant communities was relatively small and ranged on sunny days of July-August from -1.1 ± 1.1 mgC g-1 of dry weight (DW) per hour in the peripheral zone of the mire to -0.6 ± 0.2 mgC g-1 DW h-1 at the mire center. The sphagnum layer made the maximum contribution to total ET at the mire center (0.25 ± 0.10 mm h-1) and the herbaceous

  14. Rate of Nitrogen Application during the Growing Season and Spraying Plants with Urea in the Autumn Alters Uptake of other Nutrients by Deciduous and Evergreen Container-Grown Rhododendron

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of N rate during the growing season and spraying plants with urea in the autumn on the uptake of other nutrients was assessed using container-grown rhododendron (Rhododendron 'H-1 P.J.M') and azalea (Rhododendron 'Cannon’s Double'). Plants were grown with a complete fertilizer containi...

  15. Effects of zinc levels on activities of gastrointestinal enzymes in growing rats.

    PubMed

    Jing, M Y; Sun, J Y; Weng, X Y; Wang, J F

    2009-10-01

    The present study investigated the effect of different zinc (Zn) levels on activities of gastrointestinal digestive enzymes of growing rats. Four diets including Zn-adequate (ZA; 46 mg/kg, control), Zn-deficient (ZD; 3 mg/kg), high Zn supply (ZH; 234 mg/kg) and pair-fed in which animals received the ZA diet at restricted amounts reflecting feed intake of the ZD group were fed to rats for 5 weeks. Dietary Zn was supplemented with ZnO. The results showed that Zn deficiency resulted in decreases in body weight, while ZH supply stimulated growth. The activities of sucrase, lactase and lipase were unaffected by dietary Zn levels. Maltase activity, however, was reduced in ZD group and elevated in ZH group. Amylase and protease activities were depressed by zinc deficiency. However, rats fed the Zn-repletion diet displayed higher activity of pepsin, pancreatic amylase and protease. In particular, ZH supply did have no effect on intestinal hydrolases activities. The present study suggested that zinc deficiency impaired the activities of digestive enzymes and growth of animals. However, ZH supply might improve the digestion of nutrients via increasing activities of gastrointestinal hydrolase and probably enhanced animal health. PMID:19178608

  16. Malassezia globosa tends to grow actively in summer conditions more than other cutaneous Malassezia species.

    PubMed

    Akaza, Narifumi; Akamatsu, Hirohiko; Takeoka, Shiori; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Mizutani, Hiroshi; Nakata, Satoru; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2012-07-01

    Malassezia globosa is a major pathogen of Malassezia folliculitis (MF) and the predominant species on human skin. The aim of this study was to clarify the differences between M. globosa and other cutaneous Malassezia species, M. restricta, M. dermatis, M. sympodialis and M. furfur. The optimum growth temperature, effects of compounds of sweat and free fatty acids on growth, and lipase activities of five cutaneous Malassezia species were determined. The growth of M. globosa was promoted strongly by the compounds of sweat and high temperature unlike that of other cutaneous Malassezia species. This result clarified that M. globosa tended to grow actively in summer conditions more than other cutaneous Malassezia species. Furthermore, M. globosa showed high lipase activity. We consider these characteristics of M. globosa to relate to the pathogenesis of MF. PMID:22229642

  17. Proliferative activity of endotheliocytes of growing capillaries of the rabbit cornea

    SciTech Connect

    Gurina, O.Yu.; Mamontov, S.G.; Banin, V.V.

    1987-10-01

    The authors studied the intensity of DNA synthesis by cells of newly formed capillaries, growing in the rabbit cornea, after infliction of a silver nitrate burn and local application of colchicine. The intensity of capillary growth was investigated during stimulation and a combination of the burn with colchicine. Changes in activity of DNA synthesis by the endotheliocytes of newly formed capillaries during exposure throughout growth were also investigated. The intensity of cell proliferation was studied by measuring the incorporation of tritium-labelled thymidine into the endotheoiocyte nuclei.

  18. Associations of season and region on objectively assessed physical activity and sedentary behaviour.

    PubMed

    Hagströmer, Maria; Rizzo, Nico S; Sjöström, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal and regional variation may influence physical activity (PA) patterns. These associations are in need of further investigation. The objective of the current study was to examine the association of season and region on objectively measured PA. The study was designed as a cross-sectional study with 1172 participants living in Sweden. Data on PA were collected throughout a calendar year using accelerometry. Regions were categorised as south (Götaland), central (Svealand) and north (Norrland). Outcome variables included accelerometer-measured mean counts per minute, sedentary time and time in low intensity and moderate-intensity physical activity (MVPA) or greater. ANCOVA was used to determine the associations of season and region with PA, adjusting for sex, age, body mass index (BMI) and education. The results showed that during the Spring season more time was spent in MVPA than during the Autumn. For participants living in the south of Sweden, a significant trend for season was found for MVPA, with Spring having the highest MVPA (P = 0.025). Season had a borderline significant association with MVPA or higher intensity activities (P = 0.051). No significant effects of region or season on total PA, low-intensity PA and sedentary periods of time were observed. The results indicate that studies conducted in a population living in high latitudes, may not be significantly affected by seasonality or region when assessing PA. PMID:24102558

  19. Growing up Active: A Study into Physical Activity in Long Day Care Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashmore, Aaron W.; Jones, Sandra C.

    2008-01-01

    The child care center is an ideal setting in which to implement strategies to promote physical activity and healthy weight, but there is a paucity of empirical evidence on factors that influence physical activity in these settings. The current study gathered initial qualitative data to explore these factors. Child care workers from five long day…

  20. Projections of the advance in the start of the growing season during the 21st century based on CMIP5 simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jiangjiang; Yan, Zhongwei; Jia, Gensuo; Zeng, Heqing; Jones, Philip Douglas; Zhou, Wen; Zhang, Anzhi

    2015-06-01

    It is well-known that global warming due to anthropogenic atmospheric greenhouse effects advanced the start of the vegetation growing season (SOS) across the globe during the 20th century. Projections of further changes in the SOS for the 21st century under certain emissions scenarios (Representative Concentration Pathways, RCPs) are useful for improving understanding of the consequences of global warming. In this study, we first evaluate a linear relationship between the SOS (defined using the normalized difference vegetation index) and the April temperature for most land areas of the Northern Hemisphere for 1982-2008. Based on this relationship and the ensemble projection of April temperature under RCPs from the latest state-of-the-art global coupled climate models, we show the possible changes in the SOS for most of the land areas of the Northern Hemisphere during the 21st century. By around 2040-59, the SOS will have advanced by -4.7 days under RCP2.6, -8.4 days under RCP4.5, and -10.1 days under RCP8.5, relative to 1985-2004. By 2080-99, it will have advanced by -4.3 days under RCP2.6, -11.3 days under RCP4.5, and -21.6 days under RCP8.5. The geographic pattern of SOS advance is considerably dependent on that of the temperature sensitivity of the SOS. The larger the temperature sensitivity, the larger the date-shift-rate of the SOS.

  1. Fusarium species and fumonisins associated with maize kernels produced in Rio Grande do Sul State for the 2008/09 and 2009/10 growing seasons

    PubMed Central

    Stumpf, R.; dos Santos, J.; Gomes, L.B.; Silva, C.N.; Tessmann, D.J.; Ferreira, F.D.; Machinski, M.; Del Ponte, E.M.

    2013-01-01

    Ear rots caused by Fusarium spp. are among the main fungal diseases that contribute to poor quality and the contamination of maize grains with mycotoxins. This study aimed to determine the visual incidence of fungal-damaged kernels (FDKs), the incidence of two main Gibberella (a teleomorph of Fusarium) complexes (G. fujikuroi and G. zeae) associated with maize using a seed health blotter test, and the fumonisin levels, using high performance liquid chromatography, in samples of maize grains grown across 23 municipalities during the 2008/09 and 2009/10 growing seasons. Additionally, 104 strains that were representative of all of the analysed samples were identified to species using PCR assays. The mean FDK was seven per cent, and only six of the samples had levels greater than six per cent. Fusarium spp. of the G. fujikuroi complex were present in 96% of the samples, and G. zeae was present in 18% of the samples (5/27). The mean incidence of G. fujikuroi was 58%, and the incidence of G. zeae varied from 2 to 6%. FB1 was found in 58.6%, FB2 in 37.9%, and both toxins in 37.9% of the samples. The FB1 and FB2 levels were below the quantification limits for 41.3% of the samples, and the mean FB1 levels (0.66 μg/g) were higher than the mean FB2 levels (0.42 μg/g). The PCR identification separated the 104 isolates into three of the G. fujikuroi complex: F. verticillioides (76%), F. subglutinans (4%) and F. proliferatum (2%); and G. zeae (anamorph = F. graminearum) (18%). Our results confirmed the dominance of F. verticillioides, similar to other regions of Brazil, but they differed due to the relatively higher incidence of F. graminearum. Total fumonisin levels were below the maximum limit determined by current Brazilian regulations. PMID:24159288

  2. Fusarium species and fumonisins associated with maize kernels produced in Rio Grande do Sul State for the 2008/09 and 2009/10 growing seasons.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, R; Dos Santos, J; Gomes, L B; Silva, C N; Tessmann, D J; Ferreira, F D; Machinski, M; Del Ponte, E M

    2013-01-01

    Ear rots caused by Fusarium spp. are among the main fungal diseases that contribute to poor quality and the contamination of maize grains with mycotoxins. This study aimed to determine the visual incidence of fungal-damaged kernels (FDKs), the incidence of two main Gibberella (a teleomorph of Fusarium) complexes (G. fujikuroi and G. zeae) associated with maize using a seed health blotter test, and the fumonisin levels, using high performance liquid chromatography, in samples of maize grains grown across 23 municipalities during the 2008/09 and 2009/10 growing seasons. Additionally, 104 strains that were representative of all of the analysed samples were identified to species using PCR assays. The mean FDK was seven per cent, and only six of the samples had levels greater than six per cent. Fusarium spp. of the G. fujikuroi complex were present in 96% of the samples, and G. zeae was present in 18% of the samples (5/27). The mean incidence of G. fujikuroi was 58%, and the incidence of G. zeae varied from 2 to 6%. FB1 was found in 58.6%, FB2 in 37.9%, and both toxins in 37.9% of the samples. The FB1 and FB2 levels were below the quantification limits for 41.3% of the samples, and the mean FB1 levels (0.66 μg/g) were higher than the mean FB2 levels (0.42 μg/g). The PCR identification separated the 104 isolates into three of the G. fujikuroi complex: F. verticillioides (76%), F. subglutinans (4%) and F. proliferatum (2%); and G. zeae (anamorph = F. graminearum) (18%). Our results confirmed the dominance of F. verticillioides, similar to other regions of Brazil, but they differed due to the relatively higher incidence of F. graminearum. Total fumonisin levels were below the maximum limit determined by current Brazilian regulations. PMID:24159288

  3. The impact of growing-season length variability on carbon assimilation and evapotranspiration over 88 years in the eastern US deciduous forest

    PubMed

    White; Running; Thornton

    1999-02-01

    Recent research suggests that increases in growing-season length (GSL) in mid-northern latitudes may be partially responsible for increased forest growth and carbon sequestration. We used the BIOME-BGC ecosystem model to investigate the impacts of including a dynamically regulated GSL on simulated carbon and water balance over a historical 88-year record (1900-1987) for 12 sites in the eastern USA deciduous broadleaf forest. For individual sites, the predicted GSL regularly varied by more than 15 days. When grouped into three climatic zones, GSL variability was still large and rapid. There is a recent trend in colder, northern sites toward a longer GSL, but not in moderate and warm climates. The results show that, for all sites, prediction of a long GSL versus using the mean GSL increased net ecosystem production (NEP), gross primary production (GPP), and evapotranspiration (ET); conversely a short GSL is predicted to decrease these parameters. On an absolute basis, differences in GPP between the dynamic and mean GSL simulations were larger than the differences in NEP. As a percentage difference, though, NEP was much more sensitive to changes in GSL than were either GPP or ET. On average, a 1-day change in GSL changed NEP by 1.6%, GPP by 0.5%, and ET by 0.2%. Predictions of NEP and GPP in cold climates were more sensitive to changes in GSL than were predictions in warm climates. ET was not similarly sensitive. First, our results strongly agree with field measurements showing a high correlation between NEP and dates of spring growth, and second they suggest that persistent increases in GSL may lead to long-term increases in carbon storage. PMID:10083835

  4. New 2-Thiopyridines as Potential Candidates for Killing both Actively Growing and Dormant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ryabova, Olga; Kaprelyants, Arseny; Makarov, Vadim

    2014-01-01

    From in vivo observations, a majority of M. tuberculosis cells in latently infected individuals are in a dormant and probably nonculturable state, display little metabolic activity, and are phenotypically resistant to antibiotics. Despite many attempts, no specific antimicrobials effective against latent tuberculosis have yet been found, partly because of a lack of reliable and adequate in vitro models for screening of drug candidates. We propose here a novel in vitro model of M. tuberculosis dormancy that meets the important criteria of latency, namely, nonculturability of cells, considerable reduction of metabolic activity, and significant phenotypic resistance to the first-line antibiotics rifampin and isoniazid. Using this model, we found a new group of 2-thiopyridine derivatives that had potent antibacterial activity against both actively growing and dormant M. tuberculosis cells. By means of the model of M. tuberculosis nonculturability, several new 2-thiopyridine derivatives were found to have potent antitubercular activity. The compounds are effective against both active and dormant M. tuberculosis cells. The bactericidal effects of compounds against dormant M. tuberculosis was confirmed by using three different in vitro models of tuberculosis dormancy. The model of nonculturability could be used as a reliable tool for screening drug candidates, and 2-thiopyridine derivatives may be regarded as prominent compounds for further development of new drugs for curing latent M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:24126578

  5. An Estimate of the North Atlantic Basin Tropical Cyclone Activity for the 2011 Hurricane Season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Estimates are presented for the expected level of tropical cyclone activity for the 2011 North Atlantic Basin hurricane season. It is anticipated that the frequency of tropical cyclones for the North Atlantic Basin during the 2011 hurricane season will be near to above the post-1995 means. Based on the Poisson distribution of tropical cyclone frequencies for the current more active interval 1995-2010, one computes P(r) = 63.7% for the expected frequency of the number of tropical cyclones during the 2011 hurricane season to be 14 plus or minus 3; P(r) = 62.4% for the expected frequency of the number of hurricanes to be 8 plus or minus 2; P(r) = 79.3% for the expected frequency of the number of major hurricanes to be 3 plus or minus 2; and P(r) = 72.5% for the expected frequency of the number of strikes by a hurricane along the coastline of the United States to be 1 plus or minus 1. Because El Nino is not expected to recur during the 2011 hurricane season, clearly, the possibility exists that these seasonal frequencies could easily be exceeded. Also examined are the effects of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation phase and climatic change (global warming) on tropical cyclone seasonal frequencies, the variation of the seasonal centroid (latitude and longitude) location of tropical cyclone onsets, and the variation of the seasonal peak wind speed and lowest pressure for tropical cyclones.

  6. [Seasonal dynamics of soil active carbon pool in a purple paddy soil in southwest China].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan; Jiang, Chang-sheng; Hao, Qing-ju

    2012-08-01

    The seasonal dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC), readily oxidized carbon (ROC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) in a purple paddy soil were studied in a long-term field experimental station in Chongqing, China. The results showed that the seasonal variations of the contents of SOC, ROC and MBC had similar trends in the rape growing season. The contents were much higher in the early and late stages than in the middle stage of the rape growth. SOC, ROC and MBC all achieved the highest values of 16.20 g x kg(-1), 3.58 g x kg(-1) and 309.70 mg x kg(-1) at the end of the growing period, respectively. The seasonal change of DOC content presented as a single peak and reached to the highest value of 37.64 mg x kg(-1) at the middle stage of the rape growth. The temporal dynamics of the allocation ratios of ROC, MBC and DOC were similar to that of their contents. The allocation ratios of ROC, MBC and DOC were 15.49%-23.93%, 1.44%-2.06% and 0.11%-0.32% during the rape growing season, respectively. The influencing factors of SOC and ROC contents were the soil temperature at 5 cm soil depth, soil total nitrogen content and pH. MBC content was jointly impacted by the soil temperature at 5 cm soil depth, root biomass and its C and N contents. DOC content was mainly affected by soil moisture. PMID:23213908

  7. Sexually active males prevent the display of seasonal anestrus in female goats.

    PubMed

    Delgadillo, J A; Flores, J A; Hernández, H; Poindron, P; Keller, M; Fitz-Rodríguez, G; Duarte, G; Vielma, J; Fernández, I G; Chemineau, P

    2015-03-01

    A well-defined season of sexual rest controlled by photoperiod is observed in female sheep and goats during spring and summer, delineating their "anestrous season"; bucks also decrease sexual activity at about the same time. Nutrition and/or socio-sexual stimuli play only secondary roles. However, the presence of sexually active males can reduce the length of seasonal anestrus. Whether it can also completely suppress anestrus has not been investigated. Here we tested this in goats in 3 experiments, using bucks rendered sexually active out of season by exposure to long days. The continuous presence of these males prevented goats to display seasonal anestrus: 12/14 females cycled the year round, vs. 0/13 and 0/11 for females with un-treated bucks or without bucks (experiment 1). When active bucks were removed, females immediately entered anestrus (7/7 stopped ovulating vs. 1/7 if maintained with active bucks; experiment 2). Finally, 7/7 anestrous does with bucks in sexual rest since 1.5months commenced cycling rapidly during mid-anestrous, when these bucks became sexually active following a treatment with artificial long days, vs. 0/7 with un-treated bucks or no bucks (experiment 3). The presence/withdrawal of active bucks had a highly significant effect in the three experiments (P≤0.002). Therefore, the presence of a mating opportunity can completely override the photoperiodic inhibition of reproduction of females throughout the anestrous season. Results suggest that we must re-evaluate the relative contributions of photoperiod vs. other external cues in controlling seasonal reproduction, thus offering new non-pharmaceutical ways for controlling out-of-season reproduction in small ruminants. PMID:25497417

  8. Growing Mouse Oocytes Transiently Activate Folate Transport via Folate Receptors As They Approach Full Size.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Megan; MacNeil, Allison H; Trasler, Jacquetta M; Baltz, Jay M

    2016-06-01

    The folate cycle is central to cellular one-carbon metabolism, where folates are carriers of one-carbon units that are critical for synthesis of purines, thymidylate, and S-adenosylmethionine, the universal methyl donor that forms the cellular methyl pool. Although folates are well-known to be important for early embryo and fetal development, their role in oogenesis has not been clearly established. Here, folate transport proteins were detected in developing neonatal ovaries and growing oocytes by immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and immunofluorescence. The folate receptors FOLR1 and FOLR2 as well as reduced folate carrier 1 (RFC1, SLC19A1 protein) each appeared to be present in follicular cells including granulosa cells. In growing oocytes, however, only FOLR2 immunoreactivity appeared abundant. Localization of apparent FOLR2 immunofluorescence near the plasma membrane increased with oocyte growth and peaked in oocytes as they neared full size. We assessed folate transport using the model folate leucovorin (folinic acid). Unexpectedly, there was a transient burst of folate transport activity for a brief period during oocyte growth as they neared full size, while folate transport was otherwise undetectable for the rest of oogenesis and in fully grown germinal vesicle stage oocytes. This folate transport was inhibited by dynasore, an inhibitor of endocytosis, but insensitive to the anion transport inhibitor stilbene 4-acetamido-40-isothiocyanato-stilbene-2,20-disulfonic acid, consistent with folate receptor-mediated transport but not with RFC1-mediated transport. Thus, near the end of their growth, growing oocytes may take up folates that could support the final stage of oogenesis or be stored to provide the endogenous folates needed in early embryogenesis. PMID:27122634

  9. Genetic diversity and insecticide resistance during the growing season in the green peach aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) on primary and secondary hosts: a farm-scale study in Central Chile.

    PubMed

    Rubiano-Rodríguez, J A; Fuentes-Contreras, E; Figueroa, C C; Margaritopoulos, J T; Briones, L M; Ramírez, C C

    2014-04-01

    The seasonal dynamics of neutral genetic diversity and the insecticide resistance mechanisms of insect pests at the farm scale are still poorly documented. Here this was addressed in the green peach aphid Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) in Central Chile. Samples were collected from an insecticide sprayed peach (Prunus persica L.) orchard (primary host), and a sweet-pepper (Capsicum annum var. grossum L.) field (secondary host). In addition, aphids from weeds (secondary hosts) growing among these crops were also sampled. Many unique multilocus genotypes were found on peach trees, while secondary hosts were colonized mostly by the six most common genotypes, which were predominantly sensitive to insecticides. In both fields, a small but significant genetic differentiation was found between aphids on the crops vs. their weeds. Within-season comparisons showed genetic differentiation between early and late season samples from peach, as well as for weeds in the peach orchard. The knock-down resistance (kdr) mutation was detected mostly in the heterozygote state, often associated with modified acetylcholinesterase throughout the season for both crops. This mutation was found in high frequency, mainly in the peach orchard. The super-kdr mutation was found in very low frequencies in both crops. This study provides farm-scale evidence that the aphid M. persicae can be composed of slightly different genetic groups between contiguous populations of primary and secondary hosts exhibiting different dynamics of insecticide resistance through the growing season. PMID:24484894

  10. Screening for estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities of plants growing in Egypt and Thailand

    PubMed Central

    El-Halawany, Ali M.; El Dine, Riham Salah; Chung, Mi Hwa; Nishihara, Tsutomu; Hattori, Masao

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is a growing demand for the discovery of new phytoestrogens to be used as a safe and effective hormonal replacement therapy. Materials and Methods: The methanol extracts of 40 plants from the Egyptian and Thailand folk medicines were screened for their estrogen agonist and antagonist activities. The estrogenic and antiestrogenic effects of the tested extracts were carried out using the yeast two-hybrid assay system expressing ERα and ERβ. In addition, all the extracts were subjected to a naringinase treatment and retested for their estrogenic activity. Results: The methanol extracts of Derris reticulata and Dracaena lourieri showed the most potent estrogenic activity on both estrogen-receptor subtypes, while, the methanol extracts of Butea monosperma, Erythrina fusca, and Dalbergia candenatensis revealed significant estrogenic activity on ERβ only. Nigella sativa, Sophora japonica, Artabotrys harmandii, and Clitorea hanceana showed estrogenic effect only after naringinase treatment. The most potent antiestrogenic effect was revealed by Aframomum melegueta, Dalbergia candenatensis, Dracena loureiri, and Mansonia gagei. PMID:21772754

  11. The persistence of equatorial spread F - an analysis on seasonal, solar activity and geomagnetic activity aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeja, V.; Devasia, C. V.; Ravindran, Sudha; Sridharan, R.

    2009-02-01

    The persistence (duration) of Equatorial Spread F (ESF), which has significant impact on communication systems, is addressed. Its behavior during different seasons and geomagnetic activity levels under the solar maximum (2001) and minimum (2006) conditions, is reported using the data from the magnetic equatorial location of Trivandrum (8.5° N; 77° E; dip 0.5° N) in India. The study reveals that the persistence of the irregularities can be estimated to a reasonable extent by knowing the post sunset F region vertical drift velocity (Vz) and the magnetic activity index Kp. Any sort of advance information on the possible persistence of the ionospheric irregularities responsible for ESF is important for understanding the scintillation morphology, and the results which form the first step in this direction are presented and discussed.

  12. Creating leptin-like biofunctions by active immunization against chicken leptin receptor in growing chickens.

    PubMed

    Lei, M M; Wu, S Q; Shao, X B; Li, X W; Chen, Z; Ying, S J; Shi, Z D

    2015-01-01

    In this study, immunization against chicken leptin receptor (cLEPR) extracellular domain (ECD) was applied to investigate leptin regulation and LEPR biofunction in growing chicken pullets. A recombinant protein (cLEPR ECD) based on the cLEPR complemenary DNA sequence corresponding to the 582nd to 796th amino acid residues of cLEPR mature peptide was prepared and used as antigen. Immunization against cLEPR ECD in growing chickens increased anti-cLEPR ECD antibody titers in blood, enhanced proportions of phosphorylated janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and served as signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) protein in liver tissue. Chicken live weight gain and abdominal fat mass were significantly decreased (P < 0.05), but feed intake was stimulated by cLEPR ECD immunization (P < 0.05). The treatment also upregulated the gene expression levels of lepR, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), acetyl CoA carboxylase-2 (ACC2), and uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) in liver, abdominal fat, and breast muscle (P < 0.05) but decreased fasn expression levels (P < 0.01). Apart from that of lepR, the expression of appetite-regulating genes, such as orexigenic genes, agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY), were upregulated (P < 0.01), whereas the anorexigenic gene proopiomelanocortin (POMC) was downregulated in the hypothalamic tissue of cLEPR-immunized pullets (P < 0.01). Blood concentrations of metabolic molecules, such as glucose, triglycerides, and very-low-density lipoprotein, were significantly decreased in cLEPR-immunized pullets but those of cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, and low-density lipoprotein increased. These results demonstrate that antibodies to membrane proximal cLEPR ECD enhance cLEPR signal transduction, which stimulates metabolism and reduces fat deposition in chickens. PMID:25447880

  13. Comparative study of volatile oil content and antimicrobial activity of pecan cultivars growing in Egypt.

    PubMed

    El Hawary, Seham S; Zaghloul, Soumaya S; El Halawany, Ali M; El Bishbishy, Mahitab H

    2013-11-01

    The volatile oils obtained from the leaves of four pecan cultivars growing in Egypt were evaluated for their chemical composition and antimicrobial activity. The selected cultivars (cv.) were Carya illinoinensis (Wangneh.) K. Koch. cv. Wichita, C. illinoinensis cv. Western Schley, C. illinoinensis cv. Cherokee, and C. illinoinensis cv. Sioux. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses revealed that the volatile oils from samples of the different cultivars differ in composition and percentage of their components. β-Curcumene was found as the major constituent of the cv. Wichita oil, whereas germacrene D was the major component of cv. Sioux, cv. Cherokee, and cv. Western Schley. The antimicrobial activity was assayed using the Kirby-Bauer Method by measuring the zone of inhibition of growth. All volatile oils displayed an antimicrobial activity against the tested bacterial strains. On the other hand, only the volatile oil of cv. Wichita showed an antifungal effect on Aspergillus flavus. This work has identified candidates of volatile oils for future in vivo studies to develop antibiotic substitutes for the diminution of human and animal pathogenic bacteria. Nevertheless, the variations of the volatile oil components and antimicrobial potencies of the different studied cultivars, necessitate identifying the cultivars used in future studies. PMID:24180553

  14. Stoichiometry and kinetics of poly-{beta}-hydroxybutyrate metabolism in aerobic, slow growing, activated sludge cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Beun, J.J.; Paletta, F.; Loosdrecht, M.C.M. Van; Heijnen, J.J.

    2000-02-20

    This paper discusses the poly-{beta}-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) metabolism in aerobic, slow growing, activated sludge cultures, based on experimental data and on a metabolic model. The dynamic conditions which occur in activated sludge processes were simulated in a 2-L sequencing batch reactor (SBR) by subjecting a mixed microbial population to successive periods of external substrate availability (feast period) and no external substrate availability (famine period). Under these conditions intracellular storage and consumption of PHB was observed. It appeared that in the feast period, 66% to almost 100% of the substrate consumed is used for storage of PHB, the remainder is used for growth and maintenance processes. Furthermore, it appeared that at high sludge retention time (SRT) the growth rate in the feast and famine periods was the same. With decreasing SRT the growth rate in the feast period increased relative to the growth rate in the famine period. Acetate consumption and PHB production in the feast period both proceeded with a zero-order rate in acetate and PHB concentration respectively. PHB consumption in the famine period could best be described kinetically with a nth order degradation equation in PHB concentration. The obtained results are discussed in the context of the general activated sludge models.

  15. Implications of climatic seasonality on activity patterns and resource use by sympatric peccaries in northern Pantanal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Gabriel Selbach; Coelho, Igor Pfeifer; Bastazini, Vinicius Augusto Galvão; Cordeiro, José Luís Passos; de Oliveira, Luiz Flamarion Barbosa

    2016-03-01

    We evaluated the effects of climate seasonality from a thermal and water availability perspective on the activity patterns and resource use of Pecari tajacu and Tayassu pecari during wet and dry seasons in the northeastern Brazilian Pantanal. We used camera traps and temperature sensors to record species activity patterns in relation to temperature, established five habitat categories based on flooding intensity and local vegetation characteristics, assessed the activity patterns of each species in dry and wet periods and in artificial water bodies using circular statistical metrics, and calculated niche amplitude and overlap on three axes (temperature, time, and habitat) in both periods. Peccaries shared a strong resemblance in resource use and in their responses to seasonal variations in the tested gradients. The activity patterns of both species exhibited a significant correlation with air temperature on all the evaluated measures, and both species strongly reduced their activity when the air temperature exceeded 35 °C. High temperatures associated with low water availability were most likely responsible for the changes in species activity patterns, which resulted in an increased temporal overlap in habitat use throughout the dry season. However, the peccaries avoided intensively flooded habitats; therefore, the habitat gradient overlap was greater during the wet period. Our results show that an increase in niche overlap on the environmental gradient as a result of climatic seasonality may be partially compensated by a reduction in other niche dimensions. In this case, temporal partitioning appears to be an important, viable mechanism to reduce competition by potentially competing species.

  16. Antioxidant and antibacterial activities of extracts from Conyza bonariensis growing in Yemen.

    PubMed

    Thabit, Riyadh Abdulmajid Saleh; Cheng, Xiang-Rong; Tang, Xue; Sun, Jin; Shi, Yong-Hui; Le, Guo-Wei

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the antioxidant and antibacterial activities and phenolic contents of Conyza bonariensis growing in Yemen. The whole plants of C. bonariensis were ultrasonically extracted by ethanol. The antioxidant activity of the extract was determined by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and β-carotene bleaching (BCB). The effectiveness of the extract on the growth inhibition of some indicators of foodborne illness bacteria were investigated by agar well diffusion assay. The total phenols (TP), total flavonoids (TF), total tannins (TT), and total anthocyanins (TA) were determined by Folin-Ciocalteu method, aluminium chloride method, Folin and Ciocalteu method, and pH-differential method, respectively. The extract of C. bonariensis possessed TP 144.1 mg/g, TF 143 mg/g, TT 0.99mg/g, and TA 0.97mg 100g, with 94.57% inhibition of DPPH and 92.47% inhibition of BCB, and strong inhibitory effects against tested bacteria, which was approximate to those of peel extract of Punica granatum. PMID:25553691

  17. Seasonal forecasting of lightning and thunderstorm activity in tropical and temperate regions of the world

    PubMed Central

    Dowdy, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Thunderstorms are convective systems characterised by the occurrence of lightning. Lightning and thunderstorm activity has been increasingly studied in recent years in relation to the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and various other large-scale modes of atmospheric and oceanic variability. Large-scale modes of variability can sometimes be predictable several months in advance, suggesting potential for seasonal forecasting of lightning and thunderstorm activity in various regions throughout the world. To investigate this possibility, seasonal lightning activity in the world’s tropical and temperate regions is examined here in relation to numerous different large-scale modes of variability. Of the seven modes of variability examined, ENSO has the strongest relationship with lightning activity during each individual season, with relatively little relationship for the other modes of variability. A measure of ENSO variability (the NINO3.4 index) is significantly correlated to local lightning activity at 53% of locations for one or more seasons throughout the year. Variations in atmospheric parameters commonly associated with thunderstorm activity are found to provide a plausible physical explanation for the variations in lightning activity associated with ENSO. It is demonstrated that there is potential for accurately predicting lightning and thunderstorm activity several months in advance in various regions throughout the world. PMID:26865431

  18. Seasonal Dynamics of Enzymatic Activities and Functional Diversity in Soils under Different Organic Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil microbial activity and diversity fluctuate seasonally under annual organic amendment for improving soil quality. We investigated the effects of municipal compost (MC), poultry litter (PL), and cover crops of spring oats and red clover (RC) on soil enzyme activities, and soil bacterial community...

  19. Seasonal activity of the small hive beetle, Aethina tumida, as estimated by baited flight traps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seasonal variation in flight activity of the small hive beetle was monitored at two sites in north-central Florida, one near colonies of the European honeybee and the other far removed from bee colonies. Activity was monitored by flight traps baited with fermenting pollen dough that had been inocul...

  20. Seasonal forecasting of lightning and thunderstorm activity in tropical and temperate regions of the world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowdy, Andrew J.

    2016-02-01

    Thunderstorms are convective systems characterised by the occurrence of lightning. Lightning and thunderstorm activity has been increasingly studied in recent years in relation to the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and various other large-scale modes of atmospheric and oceanic variability. Large-scale modes of variability can sometimes be predictable several months in advance, suggesting potential for seasonal forecasting of lightning and thunderstorm activity in various regions throughout the world. To investigate this possibility, seasonal lightning activity in the world’s tropical and temperate regions is examined here in relation to numerous different large-scale modes of variability. Of the seven modes of variability examined, ENSO has the strongest relationship with lightning activity during each individual season, with relatively little relationship for the other modes of variability. A measure of ENSO variability (the NINO3.4 index) is significantly correlated to local lightning activity at 53% of locations for one or more seasons throughout the year. Variations in atmospheric parameters commonly associated with thunderstorm activity are found to provide a plausible physical explanation for the variations in lightning activity associated with ENSO. It is demonstrated that there is potential for accurately predicting lightning and thunderstorm activity several months in advance in various regions throughout the world.

  1. Using an active sensor to make in-season nitrogen recommendations for corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An active crop canopy reflectance sensor could increase N-use efficiency in corn (Zea mays L.), if temporal and spatial variability in soil N availability and plant demand are adequately accounted for with an in-season application. Our objective was to evaluate the success of using an active sensor ...

  2. Seasonal forecasting of lightning and thunderstorm activity in tropical and temperate regions of the world.

    PubMed

    Dowdy, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Thunderstorms are convective systems characterised by the occurrence of lightning. Lightning and thunderstorm activity has been increasingly studied in recent years in relation to the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and various other large-scale modes of atmospheric and oceanic variability. Large-scale modes of variability can sometimes be predictable several months in advance, suggesting potential for seasonal forecasting of lightning and thunderstorm activity in various regions throughout the world. To investigate this possibility, seasonal lightning activity in the world's tropical and temperate regions is examined here in relation to numerous different large-scale modes of variability. Of the seven modes of variability examined, ENSO has the strongest relationship with lightning activity during each individual season, with relatively little relationship for the other modes of variability. A measure of ENSO variability (the NINO3.4 index) is significantly correlated to local lightning activity at 53% of locations for one or more seasons throughout the year. Variations in atmospheric parameters commonly associated with thunderstorm activity are found to provide a plausible physical explanation for the variations in lightning activity associated with ENSO. It is demonstrated that there is potential for accurately predicting lightning and thunderstorm activity several months in advance in various regions throughout the world. PMID:26865431

  3. The activity of recent anti-allergic drugs in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Clement, P; Smitz, J; De Waele, M

    1996-01-01

    Two experiments were performed during the pollen season to study the activity of different antiallergic drugs in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis. Nasal allergen challenge (NAC) was performed to mimic an acute attack of allergic rhinitis and to objectively evaluate the effect of the drugs on the early-phase reaction during the season. The first study assessed the effect of H1 (Cetirizine 10 mg a day) and of a combination of H1 (Cetirizine 10 mg) plus H2 (Cimetidine 800 mg a day) antagonists on nasal symptoms, mediator release and eosinophil count in a group of 16 patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis. During the same season a second study compared in a randomized way (2 parallel groups) the effect of Budesonide (Rhinocort Aqua) and Azelastine (Allergodil nasal spray) in a group of 14 patients. Results showed that both antihistamines, applied topically of dosed orally, reduced sneezing even when significant increases of histamine concentration in nasal secretions were evidenced immediately after NAC. When a combination of Cetirizine and Cimetidine was administered, a significant (p < 0.01) reduction of nasal airway resistance and increase of nasal airflow after NAC were demonstrated as well. In addition, topical application of Budesonide showed a strong (p < 0.01) effect on the infiltration and activation of eosinophils during the season, and on tryptase release after NAC. These effects lasted at least for one week after therapy. PMID:8669268

  4. Mercuric reductase activity and evidence of broad-spectrum mercury resistance among clinical isolates of rapidly growing mycobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Steingrube, V.A.; Wallace, R.J. Jr.; Steele, L.C.; Pang, Y.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Resistance to mercury was evaluated in 356 rapidly growing mycobacteria belonging to eight taxonomic groups. Resistance to inorganic Hg2+ ranged from 0% among the unnamed third biovariant complex of Mycobacterium fortuitum to 83% among M. chelonae-like organisms. With cell extracts and 203Hg(NO3)2 as the substrate, mercuric reductase (HgRe) activity was demonstrable in six of eight taxonomic groups. HgRe activity was inducible and required NADPH or NADH and a thiol donor for optimai activity. Species with HgRe activity were also resistant to organomercurial compounds, including phenylmercuric acetate. Attempts at intraspecies and intragenus transfer of HgRe activity by conjugation or transformation were unsuccessful. Mercury resistance is common in rapidly growing mycobacteria and appears to function via the same inducible enzyme systems already defined in other bacterial species. This system offers potential as a strain marker for epidemiologic investigations and for studying genetic systems in rapidly growing mycobacteria.

  5. The Effect of Transdermal Delivery of Fentanyl on Activity in Growing Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Malavasi, LM; Augustsson, H; Jensen-Waern, M; Nyman, G

    2005-01-01

    Recently, decreased activity levels have been observed in pigs treated postoperatively with transdermal delivery of fentanyl (TD-fentanyl) after isoflurane anaesthesia. Whether the change in behaviour is related to opioid-induced sedation or to insufficient pain relief remains to be investigated. This study was therefore undertaken to evaluate the effect of TD-fentanyl 50 μg h-1 on the activity level with and without isoflurane anaesthesia. Eight pigs (25.4 ± 5.2 kg) were submitted to a cross-over study and given two treatments; 1) fentanyl patch applied after 30 minutes of anaesthesia (treatment A/F) and 2) fentanyl patch without anaesthesia (treatment F). The pigs' behaviour was observed from a video recording instantaneously every 10 minutes for 24 h before treatments and up to 72 h after the patch attachment. Venous blood samples were taken 1, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h after the patch application. The behaviour recordings showed that TD-fentanyl did not produce sedation in any pig. No differences were found between the two treatments in activity level, weight gain or serum fentanyl concentration. This concentration measured after 24 h was 0.27 ± 0.11 ng ml-1 and 0.47 ± 0.40 ng ml-1 in the A/F and F group, respectively. In conclusion, transdermal delivery of 50 μg h-1 fentanyl did not cause inactivity in growing pigs. However, the large variations in serum fentanyl concentration indicate that drug absorption from transdermal patches is unpredictable and sometimes deficient. PMID:16261927

  6. Seasonal distribution of microbial activity in bioaerosols in the outdoor environment of the Qingdao coastal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xi; Qi, Jianhua; Li, Hongtao; Dong, Lijie; Gao, Dongmei

    2016-09-01

    Microbial activities in the atmosphere can indicate the physiological processes of microorganisms and can indirectly affect cloud formation and environmental health. In this study, the microbial activity in bioaerosols collected in the Qingdao coastal region was investigated using the fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolysis method to detect the enzyme activity of microorganisms. The results showed that the microbial activity ranged from 5.49 to 102 ng/m3 sodium fluorescein from March 2013 to February 2014; the average value was 34.4 ng/m3. Microbial activity has no statistical correlation with total microbial quantity. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that meteorological factors such as atmospheric temperature, relative humidity and wind speed accounted for approximately 35.7% of the variation of the microbial activity, although their individual impacts on microbial activity varied. According to the correlation analysis, atmospheric temperature and wind speed had a significant positive and negative influence on microbial activity, respectively, whereas relative humidity and wind direction had no significant influence. The seasonal distribution of microbial activity in bioaerosols was in the order of summer > autumn > winter > spring, with high fluctuations in the summer and autumn. Microbial activity in bioaerosols differed in different weather conditions such as the sunny, foggy, and hazy days of different seasons. Further in situ observations in different weather conditions at different times and places are needed to understand the seasonal distribution characteristics of microbial activity in bioaerosols and the influence factors of microbial activity.

  7. Effect of altitude and season on microbial activity, abundance and community structure in Alpine forest soils.

    PubMed

    Siles, José A; Cajthaml, Tomas; Minerbi, Stefano; Margesin, Rosa

    2016-03-01

    In the current context of climate change, the study of microbial communities along altitudinal gradients is especially useful. Only few studies considered altitude and season at the same time. We characterized four forest sites located in the Italian Alps, along an altitude gradient (545-2000 m a.s.l.), to evaluate the effect of altitude in spring and autumn on soil microbial properties. Each site in each season was characterized with regard to soil temperature, physicochemical properties, microbial activities (respiration, enzymes), community level physiological profiles (CLPP), microbial abundance and community structure (PLFA). Increased levels of soil organic matter (SOM) and nutrients were found at higher altitudes and in autumn, resulting in a significant increase of (soil dry-mass related) microbial activities and abundance at higher altitudes. Significant site- and season-specific effects were found for enzyme production. The significant interaction of the factors site and incubation temperature for soil microbial activities indicated differences in microbial communities and their responses to temperature among sites. CLPP revealed site-specific effects. Microbial community structure was influenced by altitudinal, seasonal and/or site-specific effects. Correlations demonstrated that altitude, and not season, was the main factor determining the changes in abiotic and biotic characteristics at the sites investigated. PMID:26787774

  8. Dealing with Climate Change and Variability in the Growing Season: a U2U Decision Support Tool for Central United States Corn Producers Based on Corn Growing Degree Days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, J. R.; Todey, D.; Massey, R.; Widhalm, M.; Biehl, L. L.; Andresen, J.

    2014-12-01

    Climate extremes are a major challenge for corn producers in the central United States. Among those extremes are wet springs that lead to planting delays, late spring and early fall frosts that can damage crops, and extreme summer temperatures either too warm or too cool. A newly-operational corn growing degree-day (CGDD) tool helps producers manage and adapt to these extremes. For example, a challenge in recent years has been exceptionally wet springs that have led to significant planting delays. Producers have been forced to re-assess their planting strategies on short notice, such as switching to a faster-growing but lower-yielding hybrids. With this pattern of wetter springs projected to continue or worsen in the central United States, the problem will remain and likely get worse. Another example is helping producers identify the risk of early or late frost/freezes. The CGDD tool puts current conditions into a 30-year historical perspective and offers trend projections (based on climatology or forecasts) through the end of the calendar year. Corn, or sometimes called modified, growing degree-days use a temperature base of 10 C (50 F) and a ceiling of 30 C (86 F) and is strongly correlated with the development of the corn crop. This tool was developed as part of USDA-supported U2U Useful to Usable Project for transforming climate variability and change information for cereal crop producers.

  9. Using a model and forecasted weather to predict forage and livestock production for making stocking decisions in the coming growing season

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forecasting peak standing crop (PSC) for the coming grazing season can help ranchers make appropriate stocking decisions to reduce enterprise risks. Previously developed PSC predictors were based on short-term experimental data (<15 yr) and limited stocking rates (SR) without including the effect of...

  10. Seasonal divergence in the interannual responses of Northern Hemisphere vegetation activity to variations in diurnal climate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiuchen; Liu, Hongyan; Li, Xiaoyan; Liang, Eryuan; Beck, Pieter S A; Huang, Yongmei

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal asymmetry in the interannual variations in the daytime and nighttime climate in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) is well documented, but its consequences for vegetation activity remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the interannual responses of vegetation activity to variations of seasonal mean daytime and nighttime climate in NH (>30 °N) during the past decades using remote sensing retrievals, FLUXNET and tree ring data. Despite a generally significant and positive response of vegetation activity to seasonal mean maximum temperature (Tmax) in ~22-25% of the boreal (>50 °N) NH between spring and autumn, spring-summer progressive water limitations appear to decouple vegetation activity from the mean summer Tmax, particularly in climate zones with dry summers. Drought alleviation during autumn results in vegetation recovery from the marked warming-induced drought limitations observed in spring and summer across 24-26% of the temperate NH. Vegetation activity exhibits a pervasively negative correlation with the autumn mean minimum temperature, which is in contrast to the ambiguous patterns observed in spring and summer. Our findings provide new insights into how seasonal asymmetry in the interannual variations in the mean daytime and nighttime climate interacts with water limitations to produce spatiotemporally variable responses of vegetation growth. PMID:26751166

  11. Seasonal divergence in the interannual responses of Northern Hemisphere vegetation activity to variations in diurnal climate

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiuchen; Liu, Hongyan; Li, Xiaoyan; Liang, Eryuan; Beck, Pieter S. A.; Huang, Yongmei

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal asymmetry in the interannual variations in the daytime and nighttime climate in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) is well documented, but its consequences for vegetation activity remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the interannual responses of vegetation activity to variations of seasonal mean daytime and nighttime climate in NH (>30 °N) during the past decades using remote sensing retrievals, FLUXNET and tree ring data. Despite a generally significant and positive response of vegetation activity to seasonal mean maximum temperature () in ~22–25% of the boreal (>50 °N) NH between spring and autumn, spring-summer progressive water limitations appear to decouple vegetation activity from the mean summer , particularly in climate zones with dry summers. Drought alleviation during autumn results in vegetation recovery from the marked warming-induced drought limitations observed in spring and summer across 24–26% of the temperate NH. Vegetation activity exhibits a pervasively negative correlation with the autumn mean minimum temperature, which is in contrast to the ambiguous patterns observed in spring and summer. Our findings provide new insights into how seasonal asymmetry in the interannual variations in the mean daytime and nighttime climate interacts with water limitations to produce spatiotemporally variable responses of vegetation growth. PMID:26751166

  12. Seasonal divergence in the interannual responses of Northern Hemisphere vegetation activity to variations in diurnal climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiuchen; Liu, Hongyan; Li, Xiaoyan; Liang, Eryuan; Beck, Pieter S. A.; Huang, Yongmei

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal asymmetry in the interannual variations in the daytime and nighttime climate in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) is well documented, but its consequences for vegetation activity remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the interannual responses of vegetation activity to variations of seasonal mean daytime and nighttime climate in NH (>30 °N) during the past decades using remote sensing retrievals, FLUXNET and tree ring data. Despite a generally significant and positive response of vegetation activity to seasonal mean maximum temperature () in ~22-25% of the boreal (>50 °N) NH between spring and autumn, spring-summer progressive water limitations appear to decouple vegetation activity from the mean summer , particularly in climate zones with dry summers. Drought alleviation during autumn results in vegetation recovery from the marked warming-induced drought limitations observed in spring and summer across 24-26% of the temperate NH. Vegetation activity exhibits a pervasively negative correlation with the autumn mean minimum temperature, which is in contrast to the ambiguous patterns observed in spring and summer. Our findings provide new insights into how seasonal asymmetry in the interannual variations in the mean daytime and nighttime climate interacts with water limitations to produce spatiotemporally variable responses of vegetation growth.

  13. Evaluation of bactericidal activity of Hannon honey on slowly growing bacteria in the chemostat

    PubMed Central

    Sufya, Najib; Matar, Noora; Kaddura, Rawanda; Zorgani, Abdulaziz

    2014-01-01

    There is renewed interest in the therapeutic use of honey, including use in the treatment of infected wounds and burn patients. In this study, we have assessed the antibacterial activity of Libyan floral Hannon honey on Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, both known to infect wounds. The effects of four concentrations (5%–30%) of honey were compared with that of four antibiotics (ampicillin, tetracycline, polymyxin, and ciprofloxacin) on the growth of these bacteria at early log, mid log, and late log phases. It has been shown that E. coli and S. aureus are to some degree susceptible during mid log phase compared with late log phase, demonstrated by their complete resistance to antibiotics. Chemostat culture was used to investigate the effect of honey on E. coli grown at a steady state with specific growth rates between 0.1 to 0.5 hour−1. The rate of killing was distinctively clear during the two stages of growth monitored: there was a relatively moderate reduction at the slow growth phase (0.1 to 0.3 hour−1), while a dramatic reduction was obtained at the fast growth phase (0.3 to 0.5 hour−1), reaching a complete reduction at 0.5 hour−1. These results complement data using the cup-cut technique. The antibacterial effect of honey was concentration and time dependent, the bactericidal effect was indeed observed at low concentrations, it demonstrates that the honey has more impact on slow growing bacteria than antibiotics have. We suggest that more reduction could be achieved at higher concentrations of honey. These results may have important clinical implications, such as for the management of wound and burn patients. PMID:25342919

  14. Evaluation of bactericidal activity of Hannon honey on slowly growing bacteria in the chemostat.

    PubMed

    Sufya, Najib; Matar, Noora; Kaddura, Rawanda; Zorgani, Abdulaziz

    2014-01-01

    There is renewed interest in the therapeutic use of honey, including use in the treatment of infected wounds and burn patients. In this study, we have assessed the antibacterial activity of Libyan floral Hannon honey on Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, both known to infect wounds. The effects of four concentrations (5%-30%) of honey were compared with that of four antibiotics (ampicillin, tetracycline, polymyxin, and ciprofloxacin) on the growth of these bacteria at early log, mid log, and late log phases. It has been shown that E. coli and S. aureus are to some degree susceptible during mid log phase compared with late log phase, demonstrated by their complete resistance to antibiotics. Chemostat culture was used to investigate the effect of honey on E. coli grown at a steady state with specific growth rates between 0.1 to 0.5 hour(-1). The rate of killing was distinctively clear during the two stages of growth monitored: there was a relatively moderate reduction at the slow growth phase (0.1 to 0.3 hour(-1)), while a dramatic reduction was obtained at the fast growth phase (0.3 to 0.5 hour(-1)), reaching a complete reduction at 0.5 hour(-1). These results complement data using the cup-cut technique. The antibacterial effect of honey was concentration and time dependent, the bactericidal effect was indeed observed at low concentrations, it demonstrates that the honey has more impact on slow growing bacteria than antibiotics have. We suggest that more reduction could be achieved at higher concentrations of honey. These results may have important clinical implications, such as for the management of wound and burn patients. PMID:25342919

  15. Implications of climatic seasonality on activity patterns and resource use by sympatric peccaries in northern Pantanal.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Gabriel Selbach; Coelho, Igor Pfeifer; Bastazini, Vinicius Augusto Galvão; Cordeiro, José Luís Passos; de Oliveira, Luiz Flamarion Barbosa

    2016-03-01

    We evaluated the effects of climate seasonality from a thermal and water availability perspective on the activity patterns and resource use of Pecari tajacu and Tayassu pecari during wet and dry seasons in the northeastern Brazilian Pantanal. We used camera traps and temperature sensors to record species activity patterns in relation to temperature, established five habitat categories based on flooding intensity and local vegetation characteristics, assessed the activity patterns of each species in dry and wet periods and in artificial water bodies using circular statistical metrics, and calculated niche amplitude and overlap on three axes (temperature, time, and habitat) in both periods. Peccaries shared a strong resemblance in resource use and in their responses to seasonal variations in the tested gradients. The activity patterns of both species exhibited a significant correlation with air temperature on all the evaluated measures, and both species strongly reduced their activity when the air temperature exceeded 35 °C. High temperatures associated with low water availability were most likely responsible for the changes in species activity patterns, which resulted in an increased temporal overlap in habitat use throughout the dry season. However, the peccaries avoided intensively flooded habitats; therefore, the habitat gradient overlap was greater during the wet period. Our results show that an increase in niche overlap on the environmental gradient as a result of climatic seasonality may be partially compensated by a reduction in other niche dimensions. In this case, temporal partitioning appears to be an important, viable mechanism to reduce competition by potentially competing species. PMID:26219606

  16. Improving in-season nitrogen recommendations for maize using an active sensor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An active crop canopy reflectance sensor could be used to increase N-use efficiency in corn (Zea mays L.), if temporal and spatial variability in soil N availability and plant demand are adequately accounted for with an in-season N application. Our objective was to evaluate the success of using an a...

  17. An Estimate of the North Atlantic Basin Tropical Cyclone Activity for the 2010 Hurricane Season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Estimates are presented for the tropical cyclone activity expected for the 2010 North Atlantic basin hurricane season. It is anticipated that the 2010 season will be more active than the 2009 season, reflecting increased frequencies more akin to that of the current more active phase that has been in vogue since 1995. Averages (+/- 1 sd) during the current more active phase are 14.5+/-4.7, 7.8+/-3.2, 3.7+/-1.8, and 2+/- 2, respectively, for the number of tropical cyclones (NTC), the number of hurricanes (NH), the number of major hurricanes (NMH), and the number of United States (U.S.) land-falling hurricanes (NUSLFH). Based on the "usual" behavior of the 10-yma parametric first differences, one expects NTC = 19+/-2, NH = 14+/-2, NMH = 7+/-2, and NUSLFH = 4+/-2 for the 2010 hurricane season; however, based on the "best guess" 10-yma values of surface-air temperature at the Armagh Observatory (Northern Ireland) and the Oceanic Nino Index, one expects NTC > or equals 16, NH > or equals 14, NMH > or equals 7, and NUSLFH > or equals 6.

  18. Influence of harvest season on antioxidant activity and constituents of rabbiteye blueberry ( Vaccinium ashei ) leaves.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liancai; Liu, Xi; Tan, Jun; Wang, Bochu

    2013-11-27

    To select rabbiteye blueberry leaves from an appropriate harvest season to develop functional foods, this paper studied the bioactive secondary metabolites and the antioxidant capacity of rabbiteye blueberry leaves from May, September, and November. The results showed the leaves from May had the highest content of total flavonoids (114.21 mg/g) and the leaves from November had the highest content of total polyphenols and proanthocyanidins (425.24 and 243.29 mg/g, respectively). It was further found that blueberry leaves from different seasons have similar bioactive constituents, but their contents are obviously different by HPLC. The rabbiteye blueberry leaves from November had the highest antioxidant capacity, which was well correlated with their highest proanthocyanidin content. The results clarify that the blueberry leaves from different seasons have different contents of bioactive secondary metabolites and different antioxidant activities, which implied that leaves from November should be selected first for utilization in functional foods. PMID:24175648

  19. Galanin immunoreactivity in the brain of the desert lizard Uromastyx acanthinura during activity season.

    PubMed

    Hammouche, Sadjia Benmansour; Bennis, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    The distribution of galanin immunoreactive perikarya and nerve fibers in the brain of the desert lizard U. acanthinura was studied by means of immunofluorescence using an antiserum against rabbit galanin. The animals were captured during the activity season in March (wet season) just before reproduction period and in June (arid season) after ovulation period. Immunoreactive neurons were mostly detected in the mediobasal and the infundibular recess nuclei, the nucleus of the paraventricular organ, the paraventricular organ, the periventricular nucleus and in the anterior hypothalamus at the level of the periventricular nucleus, the paraventricular nucleus and the supraoptic nucleus. The differences in brain galanin expression between animals collected under both sets of environmental conditions indicated changes which occur during the annual and reproductive cycles. The wide hypothalamic and extrahypothalamic distribution of galanin immunoreactive fibers suggests that this peptide may have hypophysiotropic, neuromodulator and neurotransmitter roles in the lizard U. acanthinura. PMID:23690217

  20. Peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity and sympathetic nerve activity are normal in apnea divers during training season.

    PubMed

    Breskovic, Toni; Ivancev, Vladimir; Banic, Ivana; Jordan, Jens; Dujic, Zeljko

    2010-04-19

    Apnea divers are exposed to repeated massive arterial oxygen desaturation, which could perturb chemoreflexes. An earlier study suggested that peripheral chemoreflex regulation of sympathetic vasomotor tone and ventilation may have recovered 4 or more weeks into the off season. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that peripheral chemoreflex regulation of ventilation and sympathetic vasomotor tone is present during the training season. We determined ventilation, heart rate, blood pressure, cardiac stroke volume, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during isocapnic hypoxia in 10 breath hold divers and 11 matched control subjects. The study was carried out at the end of the season of intense apnea trainings. Baseline MSNA frequency was 30+/-4bursts/min in control subjects and 25+/-4bursts/min in breath hold divers (P=0.053). During hypoxia burst frequency and total sympathetic activity increased similarly in both groups. Sympathetic activity normalized during the 30-minute recovery. Hypoxia-induced stimulation of minute ventilation was similar in both groups, although in divers it was maintained by higher tidal volumes and lower breathing frequency compared with control subjects. In both groups, hypoxia increased heart rate and cardiac output whereas total peripheral resistance decreased. Blood pressure remained unchanged. We conclude that peripheral chemoreflex regulation of ventilation and sympathetic vasomotor tone is paradoxically preserved in apnea divers, both, during the off and during the training season. The observation suggests that repeated arterial oxygen desaturation may not be sufficient explaining sympathetic reflex abnormalities similar to those in obstructive sleep apnea patients. PMID:19926535

  1. Antileishmanial activity of the essential oil from Tetradenia riparia obtained in different seasons.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Bruna Muller; de Mello, Tatiane França Perles; Lopes, Sara Negrão; Demarchi, Izabel Galhardo; Lera, Daniele Stefani Lopes; Pedroso, Raíssa Bocchi; Cortez, Diogenes Aparício; Gazim, Zilda Cristiani; Aristides, Sandra Mara Alessi; Silveira, Thais Gomes Verzignassi; Lonardoni, Maria Valdrinez Campana

    2015-12-01

    The herbaceous shrub Tetradenia riparia has been traditionally used to treat inflammatory and infectious diseases. Recently, a study showed that T. riparia essential oil (TrEO) obtained in summer has antileishmanial effects, although these results could be influenced by seasonal variation. This study evaluated the activity of the TrEO obtained in different seasons against Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis, in vitro and in vivo. The compounds in the TrEO were analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; terpenoids were present and oxygenated sesquiterpenes were the majority compounds (55.28%). The cytotoxicity and nitric oxide (NO) production were also tested after TrEO treatment. The TrEO from all seasons showed a 50% growth inhibitory concentration for promastigotes of about 15 ng/mL; at 30 ng/mL and 3 ng/mL, the TrEO reduced intracellular amastigote infection, independently of season. The TrEO from plants harvested in summer had the highest 50% cytotoxic concentration, 1,476 ng/mL for J774.A1 macrophages, and in spring (90.94 ng/mL) for murine macrophages. NO production did not change in samples of the TrEO from different seasons. The antileishmanial effect in vivo consisted of a reduction of the parasite load in the spleen. These results suggest that the TrEO has potential effects on L. (L.) amazonensis, consonant with its traditional use to treat parasitic diseases. PMID:26602873

  2. Antileishmanial activity of the essential oil from Tetradenia riparia obtained in different seasons

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Bruna Muller; de Mello, Tatiane França Perles; Lopes, Sara Negrão; Demarchi, Izabel Galhardo; Lera, Daniele Stefani Lopes; Pedroso, Raíssa Bocchi; Cortez, Diogenes Aparício; Gazim, Zilda Cristiani; Aristides, Sandra Mara Alessi; Silveira, Thais Gomes Verzignassi; Lonardoni, Maria Valdrinez Campana

    2015-01-01

    The herbaceous shrub Tetradenia riparia has been traditionally used to treat inflammatory and infectious diseases. Recently, a study showed that T. riparia essential oil (TrEO) obtained in summer has antileishmanial effects, although these results could be influenced by seasonal variation. This study evaluated the activity of the TrEO obtained in different seasons against Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis, in vitro and in vivo. The compounds in the TrEO were analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; terpenoids were present and oxygenated sesquiterpenes were the majority compounds (55.28%). The cytotoxicity and nitric oxide (NO) production were also tested after TrEO treatment. The TrEO from all seasons showed a 50% growth inhibitory concentration for promastigotes of about 15 ng/mL; at 30 ng/mL and 3 ng/mL, the TrEO reduced intracellular amastigote infection, independently of season. The TrEO from plants harvested in summer had the highest 50% cytotoxic concentration, 1,476 ng/mL for J774.A1 macrophages, and in spring (90.94 ng/mL) for murine macrophages. NO production did not change in samples of the TrEO from different seasons. The antileishmanial effect in vivo consisted of a reduction of the parasite load in the spleen. These results suggest that the TrEO has potential effects on L. (L.) amazonensis, consonant with its traditional use to treat parasitic diseases. PMID:26602873

  3. Seasonal variation in American black bear Ursus americanus activity patterns: Quantification via remote photography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bridges, A.S.; Vaughan, M.R.; Klenzendorf, S.

    2004-01-01

    Activity pattern plasticity may serve as an evolutionary adaptation to optimize fitness in an inconstant environment, however, quantifying patterns and demonstrating variation can be problematic. For American black bears Ursus americanus, wariness and habitat inaccessibility further complicate quantification. Radio telemetry has been the primary technique used to examine activity, however, interpretation error and limitation on numbers of animals available to monitor prevent extrapolation to unmarked or untransmittered members of the population. We used remote cameras to quantify black bear activity patterns and examined differences by season, sex and reproductive class in the Alleghany Mountains of western Virginia, USA. We used 1,533 pictures of black bears taken during 1998-2002 for our analyses. Black bears generally were diurnal in summer and nocturnal in autumn with a vespertine activity peak during both seasons. Bear-hound training seasons occurred during September and may offer explanation for the observed shift towards nocturnal behaviour. We found no substantial differences in activity patterns between sex and reproductive classes. Use of remote cameras allowed us to efficiently sample larger numbers of individual animals and likely offered a better approximation of population-level activity patterns than individual-level, telemetry-based methodologies.

  4. Views of Growing Methane Emissions near Oil and Natural Gas Activity: Satellite, Aircraft, and Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollonige, D. E.; Thompson, A. M.; Diskin, G. S.; Hannigan, J. W.; Nussbaumer, E.

    2015-12-01

    To better understand the discrepancies between current top-down and bottom-up estimates, additional methane (CH4) measurements are necessary for regions surrounding growing oil and natural gas (ONG) development. We have evaluated satellite measurements of CH4 in US regions with ONG operations for their application as "top-down" constraints (part of the NASA Air Quality Applied Sciences Team (AQAST) project). For validation of the satellite instruments' sensitivities to emitted gases, we focus on regions where the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) campaign deployed ground and aircraft measurements in Maryland (2011), California and Texas (2013), and Colorado (2014). The largest CH4 signals were observed in the Greater Green River and Powder River Basins using Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) Representative Tropospheric Volume Mixing Ratio (RTVMR) measurements. A long-term comparison between a ground remote-sensing Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) at Boulder and TES for 2010-2013 shows good correlation and differences ranging 2.5-5% for their yearly distribution of total column CH4. To determine any correlation between lower/mid-tropospheric CH4 (where a thermal IR sensor, such as TES, is most sensitive) and near-surface/boundary CH4 (where sources emit), we analyze the variability of DISCOVER-AQ aircraft profiles using principal component analysis and assess the correlation between near-surface (0-2 km) and mid-tropospheric (>2 km) CH4 concentrations. Using these relationships, we estimate near-surface CH4 using mid-tropospheric satellite measurements based on the partial column amounts within vertical layers with a linear regression. From this analysis, we will demonstrate whether the uncertainties of satellite-estimated near-surface CH4 are comparable to observed variability near ONG activity. These results will assist validation of satellite instrument

  5. Temporal Dynamics of the Cecal Gut Microbiota of Juvenile Arctic Ground Squirrels: a Strong Litter Effect across the First Active Season

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Timothy J.; Buck, C. Loren

    2014-01-01

    Arctic ground squirrels (Urocitellus parryii) are active for a scant 3 to 5 months of the year. During the active season, adult squirrels compete for mates, reproduce, and fatten in preparation for hibernation, while juvenile squirrels, weaned in early July, must grow and acquire sufficient fat to survive their first hibernation season. During hibernation, the gut microbial community is altered in diversity, abundance, and activity. To date, no studies have examined the gut microbiota of hibernators across the truncated active season. We characterized trends in diversity (454 pyrosequencing), density (flow cytometry), viability (flow cytometry), and metabolism (short-chain fatty acid analysis) of the gut microbial community of juvenile arctic ground squirrels across their first active season at weaning and at 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks postweaning. At 8 weeks postweaning, the mean bacterial density was significantly higher than that at weaning, and the mean percentage of live bacteria was significantly higher than that at either weaning or 4 weeks postweaning. No significant differences in microbial diversity, total short-chain fatty acid concentrations, or molar proportions of individual short-chain fatty acids were observed among sample periods. The level of variability in gut microbial diversity among squirrels was high across the active season but was most similar among littermates, except at weaning, indicating strong maternal or genetic influences across development. Our results indicate that genetic or maternal influences exert profound effects on the gut microbial community of juvenile arctic ground squirrels. We did not find a correlation between host adiposity and gut microbial diversity during prehibernation fattening, likely due to a high level of variability among squirrels. PMID:24795380

  6. Temporal dynamics of the cecal gut microbiota of juvenile arctic ground squirrels: a strong litter effect across the first active season.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Timothy J; Buck, C Loren; Duddleston, Khrystyne N

    2014-07-01

    Arctic ground squirrels (Urocitellus parryii) are active for a scant 3 to 5 months of the year. During the active season, adult squirrels compete for mates, reproduce, and fatten in preparation for hibernation, while juvenile squirrels, weaned in early July, must grow and acquire sufficient fat to survive their first hibernation season. During hibernation, the gut microbial community is altered in diversity, abundance, and activity. To date, no studies have examined the gut microbiota of hibernators across the truncated active season. We characterized trends in diversity (454 pyrosequencing), density (flow cytometry), viability (flow cytometry), and metabolism (short-chain fatty acid analysis) of the gut microbial community of juvenile arctic ground squirrels across their first active season at weaning and at 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks postweaning. At 8 weeks postweaning, the mean bacterial density was significantly higher than that at weaning, and the mean percentage of live bacteria was significantly higher than that at either weaning or 4 weeks postweaning. No significant differences in microbial diversity, total short-chain fatty acid concentrations, or molar proportions of individual short-chain fatty acids were observed among sample periods. The level of variability in gut microbial diversity among squirrels was high across the active season but was most similar among littermates, except at weaning, indicating strong maternal or genetic influences across development. Our results indicate that genetic or maternal influences exert profound effects on the gut microbial community of juvenile arctic ground squirrels. We did not find a correlation between host adiposity and gut microbial diversity during prehibernation fattening, likely due to a high level of variability among squirrels. PMID:24795380

  7. Seasonal changes in glacial polynya activity inferred from Weddell Sea varves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprenk, D.; Weber, M. E.; Kuhn, G.; Wennrich, V.; Hartmann, T.; Seelos, K.

    2014-06-01

    The Weddell Sea and the associated Filchner-Rønne Ice Shelf constitute key regions for global bottom-water production today. However, little is known about bottom-water production under different climate and ice-sheet conditions. Therefore, we studied core PS1795, which consists primarily of fine-grained siliciclastic varves that were deposited on contourite ridges in the southeastern Weddell Sea during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). We conducted high-resolution X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis and grain-size measurements with the RADIUS tool (Seelos and Sirocko, 2005) using thin sections to characterize the two seasonal components of the varves at sub-mm resolution to distinguish the seasonal components of the varves. Bright layers contain coarser grains that can mainly be identified as quartz in the medium-to-coarse silt grain size. They also contain higher amounts of Si, Zr, Ca, and Sr, as well as more ice-rafted debris (IRD). Dark layers, on the other hand, contain finer particles such as mica and clay minerals from the chlorite and illite groups. In addition, Fe, Ti, Rb, and K are elevated. Based on these findings as well as on previous analyses on neighbouring cores, we propose a model of enhanced thermohaline convection in front of a grounded ice sheet that is supported by seasonally variable coastal polynya activity during the LGM. Accordingly, katabatic (i.e. offshore blowing) winds removed sea ice from the ice edge, leading to coastal polynya formation. We suggest that glacial processes were similar to today with stronger katabatic winds and enhanced coastal polynya activity during the winter season. Under these conditions, lighter coarser-grained layers are likely glacial winter deposits, when brine rejection was increased, leading to enhanced bottom-water formation and increased sediment transport. Vice versa, darker finer-grained layers were then deposited during less windier season, mainly during summer, when coastal polynya activity was likely

  8. Xylogenesis: Coniferous Trees of Temperate Forests Are Listening to the Climate Tale during the Growing Season But Only Remember the Last Words!

    PubMed

    Cuny, Henri E; Rathgeber, Cyrille B K

    2016-05-01

    The complex inner mechanisms that create typical conifer tree-ring structure (i.e. the transition from large, thin-walled earlywood cells to narrow, thick-walled latewood cells) were recently unraveled. However, what physiological or environmental factors drive xylogenesis key processes remain unclear. Here, we aim to quantify the influence of seasonal variations in climatic factors on the spectacular changes in the kinetics of wood cell differentiation and in the resulting tree-ring structure. Wood formation was monitored in three sites over 3 years for three coniferous species (Norway spruce [Picea abies], Scots pine [Pinus sylvestris], and silver fir [Abies alba]). Cell differentiation rates and durations were calculated and related to tracheid final dimensions and corresponding climatic conditions. On the one hand, we found that the kinetics of cell enlargement and the final size of the tracheids were not explained by the seasonal changes in climatic factors. On the other hand, decreasing temperatures strongly constrained cell wall deposition rates during latewood formation. However, the influence of temperature was permanently written into tree-ring structure only for the very last latewood cells, when the collapse of the rate of wall deposition was no longer counterbalanced by the increase of its duration. Our results show that the formation of the typical conifer tree-ring structure, in normal climatic conditions, is only marginally driven by climate, suggesting strong developmental control of xylogenesis. The late breakage of the compensatory mechanism at work in the wall deposition process appears as a clue to understand the capacity of the maximum latewood density to record past temperature conditions. PMID:27208048

  9. Influenza Activity - United States, 2015-16 Season and Composition of the 2016-17 Influenza Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Davlin, Stacy L; Blanton, Lenee; Kniss, Krista; Mustaquim, Desiree; Smith, Sophie; Kramer, Natalie; Cohen, Jessica; Cummings, Charisse Nitura; Garg, Shikha; Flannery, Brendan; Fry, Alicia M; Grohskopf, Lisa A; Bresee, Joseph; Wallis, Teresa; Sessions, Wendy; Garten, Rebecca; Xu, Xiyan; Elal, Anwar Isa Abd; Gubareva, Larisa; Barnes, John; Wentworth, David E; Burns, Erin; Katz, Jacqueline; Jernigan, Daniel; Brammer, Lynnette

    2016-01-01

    During the 2015-16 influenza season (October 4, 2015-May 21, 2016) in the United States, influenza activity* was lower and peaked later compared with the previous three seasons (2012-13, 2013-14, and 2014-15). Activity remained low from October 2015 until late December 2015 and peaked in mid-March 2016. During the most recent 18 influenza seasons (including this season), only two other seasons have peaked in March (2011-12 and 2005-06). Overall influenza activity was moderate this season, with a lower percentage of outpatient visits for influenza-like illness (ILI),(†) lower hospitalization rates, and a lower percentage of deaths attributed to pneumonia and influenza (P&I) compared with the preceding three seasons. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses predominated overall, but influenza A(H3N2) viruses were more commonly identified from October to early December, and influenza B viruses were more commonly identified from mid-April through mid-May. The majority of viruses characterized this season were antigenically similar to the reference viruses representing the recommended components of the 2015-16 Northern Hemisphere influenza vaccine (1). This report summarizes influenza activity in the United States during the 2015-16 influenza season (October 4, 2015-May 21, 2016)(§) and reports the vaccine virus components recommended for the 2016-17 Northern Hemisphere influenza vaccines. PMID:27281364

  10. Comparative analysis of antioxidant activity and functional components of the ethanol extract of lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) from various growing regions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xu; Shen, Jian; Chang, Kyung Ja; Kim, Sung Hoon

    2014-07-01

    The variations in antioxidant activity and concentration of functional components in the ethanol extracts of lotus seeds and rhizomes based on the growing region and dryness were investigated. Free radical scavenging activity, total phenolic and flavonoid content, and concentration of several specific flavonoids and alkaloids in the ethanol extracts of lotus were measured. Antioxidant activity and its correlative total phenolic content varied characteristically depending on the growing region and dryness. High-perfomance liquid chromatography analysis showed that the ethanol extracts of lotus seeds from Vietnam (Ho Chi Minh City), raw rhizomes from Korea (Siheung), and dried rhizomes from Japan (Nigata) had the greatest specific flavonoid content. The ethanol extracts of seeds from China (Hubei), raw rhizomes from Japan (Nigata), and dried rhizomes from Korea (Siheung) had the greatest specific alkaloid content. Astragaline, rutin, isoquercetin, nuciferine, dauricine, isoliensinine, and neferine were identified in lotus rhizomes for the first time in this study. PMID:24932940

  11. Spatio-temporal reconstruction of air temperature maps and their application to estimate rice growing season heat accumulation using multi-temporal MODIS data*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li-wen; Huang, Jing-feng; Guo, Rui-fang; Li, Xin-xing; Sun, Wen-bo; Wang, Xiu-zhen

    2013-01-01

    The accumulation of thermal time usually represents the local heat resources to drive crop growth. Maps of temperature-based agro-meteorological indices are commonly generated by the spatial interpolation of data collected from meteorological stations with coarse geographic continuity. To solve the critical problems of estimating air temperature (T a) and filling in missing pixels due to cloudy and low-quality images in growing degree days (GDDs) calculation from remotely sensed data, a novel spatio-temporal algorithm for T a estimation from Terra and Aqua moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) data was proposed. This is a preliminary study to calculate heat accumulation, expressed in accumulative growing degree days (AGDDs) above 10 °C, from reconstructed T a based on MODIS land surface temperature (LST) data. The verification results of maximum T a, minimum T a, GDD, and AGDD from MODIS-derived data to meteorological calculation were all satisfied with high correlations over 0.01 significant levels. Overall, MODIS-derived AGDD was slightly underestimated with almost 10% relative error. However, the feasibility of employing AGDD anomaly maps to characterize the 2001–2010 spatio-temporal variability of heat accumulation and estimating the 2011 heat accumulation distribution using only MODIS data was finally demonstrated in the current paper. Our study may supply a novel way to calculate AGDD in heat-related study concerning crop growth monitoring, agricultural climatic regionalization, and agro-meteorological disaster detection at the regional scale. PMID:23365013

  12. Spatio-temporal reconstruction of air temperature maps and their application to estimate rice growing season heat accumulation using multi-temporal MODIS data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-wen; Huang, Jing-feng; Guo, Rui-fang; Li, Xin-xing; Sun, Wen-bo; Wang, Xiu-zhen

    2013-02-01

    The accumulation of thermal time usually represents the local heat resources to drive crop growth. Maps of temperature-based agro-meteorological indices are commonly generated by the spatial interpolation of data collected from meteorological stations with coarse geographic continuity. To solve the critical problems of estimating air temperature (T(a)) and filling in missing pixels due to cloudy and low-quality images in growing degree days (GDDs) calculation from remotely sensed data, a novel spatio-temporal algorithm for T(a) estimation from Terra and Aqua moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) data was proposed. This is a preliminary study to calculate heat accumulation, expressed in accumulative growing degree days (AGDDs) above 10 °C, from reconstructed T(a) based on MODIS land surface temperature (LST) data. The verification results of maximum T(a), minimum T(a), GDD, and AGDD from MODIS-derived data to meteorological calculation were all satisfied with high correlations over 0.01 significant levels. Overall, MODIS-derived AGDD was slightly underestimated with almost 10% relative error. However, the feasibility of employing AGDD anomaly maps to characterize the 2001-2010 spatio-temporal variability of heat accumulation and estimating the 2011 heat accumulation distribution using only MODIS data was finally demonstrated in the current paper. Our study may supply a novel way to calculate AGDD in heat-related study concerning crop growth monitoring, agricultural climatic regionalization, and agro-meteorological disaster detection at the regional scale. PMID:23365013

  13. Seasonality and daily flight activity of stable flies (Diptera: Muscidae) on dairy farms in Saraburi Province, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Phasuk, Jumnongjit; Prabaripai, Atchariya; Chareonviriyaphap, Theeraphap

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of seasonal abundance and flight activity patterns are required to design effective management programs for insect pests of humans and livestock. In this study, the seasonality and daily flight activity of Stomoxys species were observed on two dairy farms in Saraburi Province, Thailand. Data were assessed throughout 1 year using Vavoua traps from September 2010 to August 2011. A total of 2,520 individuals belonging to four species were collected. Most Stomoxys species peaked in September (rainy season) and gradually decreased in number toward February (dry season); a second peak occurred between March and April (hot season). Stomoxys calcitrans was caught throughout the year and was the most abundant species in this study. The total number of males and females of S. calcitrans differed significantly among seasons and time intervals. The weather parameters of relative humidity and light intensity were significantly correlated with S. calcitrans abundance. PMID:23673316

  14. Predicting Atlantic seasonal hurricane activity using outgoing longwave radiation over Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnauskas, Kristopher B.; Li, Laifang

    2016-07-01

    Seasonal hurricane activity is a function of the amount of initial disturbances (e.g., easterly waves) and the background environment in which they develop into tropical storms (i.e., the main development region). Focusing on the former, a set of indices based solely upon the meridional structure of satellite-derived outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) over the African continent are shown to be capable of predicting Atlantic seasonal hurricane activity with very high rates of success. Predictions of named storms based on the July OLR field and trained only on the time period prior to the year being predicted yield a success rate of 87%, compared to the success rate of NOAA's August outlooks of 53% over the same period and with the same average uncertainty range (±2). The resulting OLR indices are statistically robust, highly detectable, physically linked to the predictand, and may account for longer-term observed trends.

  15. Seasonal prediction of lightning activity in North Western Venezuela: Large-scale versus local drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Á. G.; Díaz-Lobatón, J.; Chourio, X.; Stock, M. J.

    2016-05-01

    The Lake Maracaibo Basin in North Western Venezuela has the highest annual lightning rate of any place in the world (~ 200 fl km- 2 yr- 1), whose electrical discharges occasionally impact human and animal lives (e.g., cattle) and frequently affect economic activities like oil and natural gas exploitation. Lightning activity is so common in this region that it has a proper name: Catatumbo Lightning (plural). Although short-term lightning forecasts are now common in different parts of the world, to the best of the authors' knowledge, seasonal prediction of lightning activity is still non-existent. This research discusses the relative role of both large-scale and local climate drivers as modulators of lightning activity in the region, and presents a formal predictability study at seasonal scale. Analysis of the Catatumbo Lightning Regional Mode, defined in terms of the second Empirical Orthogonal Function of monthly Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS-TRMM) and Optical Transient Detector (OTD) satellite data for North Western South America, permits the identification of potential predictors at seasonal scale via a Canonical Correlation Analysis. Lightning activity in North Western Venezuela responds to well defined sea-surface temperature patterns (e.g., El Niño-Southern Oscillation, Atlantic Meridional Mode) and changes in the low-level meridional wind field that are associated with the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone migrations, the Caribbean Low Level Jet and tropical cyclone activity, but it is also linked to local drivers like convection triggered by the topographic configuration and the effect of the Maracaibo Basin Nocturnal Low Level Jet. The analysis indicates that at seasonal scale the relative contribution of the large-scale drivers is more important than the local (basin-wide) ones, due to the synoptic control imposed by the former. Furthermore, meridional CAPE transport at 925 mb is identified as the best potential predictor for lightning activity in the Lake

  16. Seasonal brain acetylcholinesterase activity in three species of shorebirds overwintering in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitchell, C.A.; White, D.H.

    1982-01-01

    There was no seasonal variation in average brain AChE activity for the 3 species of wild birds collected between October and February. Further work needs to be done, however, covering an even broader time frame which includes the reproductive cycle. It appears that some birds feeding at the mouth of an agricultural drain, at some distance from the nearest pesticide applications, were affected by AChE inhibitors.

  17. Storm activity in North Atlantic and precipitation anomalies in European region during winter seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyazilova, N. A.; Vyazilova, A. E.

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show the storm activity influence on the formation of wet and dry zone in North Atlantic and European region during winter seasons 1994/95, 2006/07 and 2007/08 years with positive mode of NAO, 1995/96, 2000/01 and 2005/06 years with negative mode of NAO. The study of storm activity includes the analyses of cyclonic intensity and cyclone track number. Analyses of cyclonic intensity based on calculation cyclone centers number (CCN) and sum of cyclone centers MSLP anomalies (CCMA). This analyses based on automated cyclone tracking algorithm and the 6-hourly MSLP from the NCEP/NCAR reanalyses 2 from 1979 to 2009. Precipitation anomalies were calculated from CMAP archive. Analyses had included the calculation of cyclone track number in all region [30°N-80°N, 50°W-70°E]and selected latitude zone for long cyclones (with lifetime more 2 day) and short cyclones (with lifetime less 2 day). The study had shown the special features of CCN and CCMA patterns in region for long and short cyclones. The study shows, that every winter season short cyclone track number twice as much long cyclone track number. However, the contribution of long cyclones in main determines the CCMA in region. Study had shown that winter seasons with positive NAO mode Nord Europe were outstanding by strong positive precipitation anomalies and strong cyclonic intensity, and during winter seasons with negative NAO mode in this region were observed negative precipitation anomalies and weak cyclonic activity. Standartizide anomalies of integral CCMA for selected latitude zone [55°N-80°N, 50°W-70°E] had shown the intensification of cyclonic activity over North Atlantic and North European region in last years.

  18. Cytochalasin-like activity in cultured aorta smooth muscle cells (ASMC) is increased in extracts of growing cells

    SciTech Connect

    Magargal, W.W.

    1987-05-01

    A cytochalasin-like protein, present in cultured chicken embryo fibroblasts, is increased in cells transformed by Rous sarcoma virus. They find similar activity present in ASMC. Confluent cultured porcine and rat, ASMC, were homogenized in Buffer A and centrifuged at 200,000g for 35 min. Resulting extracts reduced the low shear viscosity of F-actin. To determine whether the activity alters during the growth of non-transformed cells, cultured rat ASMC were plated at 2 x 10/sup 4/ cells/cm/sup 2/ in medium plus 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). After 3 days actively growing cells (by /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation) were either scraped into phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or fed media plus 1% FBS. Three days later the fed cells were scraped into PBS (nongrowing, /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation). Cells in PBS were pelleted, homogenized in Buffer A, and centrifuged as above. Extracts from the growing and nongrowing cells reduced the low shear viscosity of actin. However, the ED/sub 50/ for growing cells was 8..mu..g and 15..mu..g for nongrowing cells. These results support those obtained with normal and transformed CEF's. This evidence indicates a relationship between cytochalasin-like activity and the growth state of cells in culture.

  19. Leisure time physical activity in the Framingham Offspring Study. Description, seasonal variation, and risk factor correlates.

    PubMed

    Dannenberg, A L; Keller, J B; Wilson, P W; Castelli, W P

    1989-01-01

    Self-reported leisure time physical activity was analyzed for 1,598 men and 1,762 women aged 20-69 years in the Framingham Offspring Cycle 2 exam in 1979-1983. Walking for pleasure was generally the most common physical activity for both sexes throughout the year. Substantial seasonal variation was noted for the most common activities: gardening, carpentry, lawn mowing, golf, and running for men; and gardening, swimming, health club exercise, dancing, and bicycling for women. Both sexes expended more kilocalories in physical activities in summer than in winter (p less than 0.001). Frequency of participation in activities sufficient to induce perspiration was associated with frequency of participation in at least one hour of conditioning (greater than or equal to 7.5 kilocal/minute) activities per week (p less than 0.001). Based on age-adjusted mean levels, higher high density lipoprotein cholesterol, lower heart rate, lower body mass index and fewer cigarettes smoked per day were consistently observed across four quartiles of increasing physical activity levels (p less than 0.01). Men who participated in at least one hour of conditioning activities per week had significantly different mean levels for these four risk factors than men who reported less than one hour of such activities per week (p less than 0.001). Results substantiate previous reports of an inverse relation between physical activity levels and cardiovascular risk, and suggest seasonal variation in activity levels should be considered in future studies which explore the relation between physical activity and cardiovascular disease. PMID:2910074

  20. Sexually active bucks are efficient to stimulate female ovulatory activity during the anestrous season also under temperate latitudes.

    PubMed

    Chasles, Manon; Chesneau, Didier; Moussu, Chantal; Delgadillo, José Alberto; Chemineau, Philippe; Keller, Matthieu

    2016-05-01

    Goats are seasonal breeders and photoperiod is the main cue controlling the onset and offset of the breeding season. Nevertheless introducing a sexually active buck in a group of females during anestrous can stimulate their reproductive function and induce ovulation. This "male-effect" is very efficient under subtropical latitudes, when using sexually active males previously stimulated by a photoperiodic treatment. However, there is less evidence of its feasibility under temperate latitudes where the more important variation in day length could be responsible for a stronger inhibition of female sexual activity. The aim of this study was therefore to determine whether intense sexual activity can be induced in alpine bucks during the non-breeding season by a long-day treatment under temperate latitude and if these males could be used to produce an efficient male-effect. Bucks (n=21) were divided in two groups, one submitted to a photoperiodic treatment from November 1st to January 15th and then switched to natural photoperiod, while the other group remained entirely under the natural photoperiod. The ones submitted to this light treatment exhibit higher testicular volume and testosterone level 6 weeks after the end of the treatment. At the end of March, bucks were used to stimulate anestrous does (n=41) continuously for 15 days. We showed that (a) light treatment was efficient to induce an increase of sexual activity in bucks and (b) that the introduction of stimulated bucks among females induced a significantly higher proportion of ovulation in anestrous does than control bucks (86% vs 5%). Our results indicate that under temperate latitudes induction of ovulation in females during the anestrous season is feasible using bucks treated with long-days during winter. PMID:27006331

  1. Seasonal distribution of systemic lupus erythematosus activity and its correlation with climate factors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Lu, Yu-Wei; Pan, Hai-Feng; Tao, Jin-Hui; Zou, Yan-Feng; Bao, Wei; Ye, Dong-Qing

    2012-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease with a variety of clinical manifestations. Although inter-individual variations exist with respect to susceptibility to develop SLE, no study has been carried out to determine the role of different climate conditions in predisposing the susceptible individuals to SLE. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of different seasons and climate factors on SLE activity. From 2000 to 2009, the seasonal distribution of 2,802 active SLE patients recruited from Anhui Provincial Hospital and the First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University was analyzed retrospectively. The climate data were provided by the Institute of Geographical Sciences and Resources, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The correlation between climate factors and SLE activity was also analyzed. The proportion of active SLE patients in winter, spring, summer, and autumn was 10.06, 10.31, 9.74, and 8.66‰, respectively. In autumn, the proportion was much lower than that in winter and spring (P < 0.05). The proportion among winter, spring, and summer had no statistical difference (P > 0.05). The number of active SLE patients had no correlation with air temperature (r = 0.483, P > 0.05), relative humidity (r = -0.294, P > 0.05), and sunshine percentage (r = 0.503, P > 0.05), but it had positive correlation with amount of precipitation (r = 0.601, P < 0.05), wind velocity (r = 0.713, P < 0.01), and sunshine duration (r = 0.769, P < 0.01) and negative correlation with barometric pressure (r = -0.664, P < 0.05). The disease activity of patients with SLE is affected by seasons and climate factors. PMID:21667078

  2. Monitoring seasonal bat activity on a coastal barrier island in Maryland, USA.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joshua B; Gates, J Edward; Zegre, Nicolas P

    2011-02-01

    Research on effects of wind turbines on bats has increased dramatically in recent years because of significant numbers of bats killed by rotating wind turbine blades. Whereas most research has focused on the Midwest and inland portions of eastern North America, bat activity and migration on the Atlantic Coast has largely been unexamined. We used three long-term acoustic monitoring stations to determine seasonal bat activity patterns on the Assateague Island National Seashore, a barrier island off the coast of Maryland, from 2005 to 2006. We recorded five species, including eastern red bats (Lasiurus borealis), big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus), tri-colored bats (Perimyotis subflavus), and silver-haired bats (Lasionycteris noctivagans). Seasonal bat activity (number of bat passes recorded) followed a cosine function and gradually increased beginning in April, peaked in August, and declined gradually until cessation in December. Based on autoregressive models, inter-night bat activity was autocorrelated for lags of seven nights or fewer but varied among acoustic monitoring stations. Higher nightly temperatures and lower wind speeds positively affected bat activity. When autoregressive model predictions were fitted to the observed nightly bat pass totals, model residuals>2 standard deviations from the mean existed only during migration periods, indicating that periodic increases in bat activity could not be accounted for by seasonal trends and weather variables alone. Rather, the additional bat passes were attributable to migrating bats. We conclude that bats, specifically eastern red, hoary, and silver-haired bats, use this barrier island during migration and that this phenomenon may have implications for the development of near and offshore wind energy. PMID:20364316

  3. Seasonal thermogenic acclimation of diurnally and nocturnally active desert spiny mice.

    PubMed

    Kronfeld-Schor, N; Haim, A; Dayan, T; Zisapel, N; Klingenspor, M; Heldmaier, G

    2000-01-01

    Diurnally active golden spiny mice (Acomys russatus) and nocturnal common spiny mice (Acomys cahirinus) coexist in hot rocky deserts of Israel. Diurnal and nocturnal activities expose these species to different climatic conditions. Nonshivering thermogenesis (NST) capacity of individuals of both species immediately upon removal from the field exhibited seasonal changes, with no significant interspecific difference. Colony-reared mice of either species transferred in the laboratory from long to short photoperiod increased NST capacity, though to a lesser extent than observed in the seasonal acclimatization. The underlying biochemical mechanisms of short photoperiod acclimation differed between the species. In both Cytochrome-c oxidase (Cox) activity was higher in short as compared to long photoperiod. In short-photoperiod-acclimated A. cahirinus uncoupling protein (UCP) content in brown adipose tissue (BAT) was significantly higher than in long photoperiod, while in A. russatus there was no significant change. In A. russatus there was a significant increase in lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity in BAT in short-photoperiod-acclimated individuals, while in A. cahirinus LPL activity was high under both acclimations. The low LPL activity in brown adipose tissue of desert-adapted A. russatus may facilitate lipid uptake in white adipose tissue, an advantage in desert conditions where food is scarce and irregularly distributed in space and time. PMID:10685905

  4. Intake, digestibility, nitrogen efficiency, and animal performance of growing and finishing beef cattle fed warm-season legume (Stylosanthes capitata plus Stylosanthes macrocephala) silage replacing corn silage.

    PubMed

    Souza, W F; Pereira, O G; Ribeiro, K G; Santos, S A; Valadares Filho, S C

    2014-09-01

    It was hypothesized that Stylosanthes cv. Campo Grande (ES) silage could be used as the single source of dietary forage for beef cattle and that performance on ES would be similar to corn silage (CS) at a 50:50 forage:concentrate. The objectives of this study were to evaluate intake, total and partial digestibility of nutrients, ruminal pH, ruminal ammonia, and productive performance in growing beef cattle fed diets with varying proportions of ES silage replacing CS. Treatments consisted of diets with ratios of 0:100, 25:75, 50:50, 75:25, and 100:0% ES:CS. Two experiments were conducted simultaneously. In the first experiment, 10 crossbred Holstein-Zebu bulls with an average initial weight of 272 ± 86 kg were used. The bulls were rumen and abomasums fistulated. An experimental design of two 5 × 5 Latin squares (Exp. 1) was used. The second experiment used 40 Nellore bulls with an average BW of 386 ± 30 kg in a completely randomized design (Exp. 2). Results showed a linear increase in CP intake (P < 0.05) in response to increased dietary ES. An increase in the proportion of ES in the diet had a negative linear effect on TDN. Apparent ruminal digestibility of CP increased linearly, and apparent intestinal digestibility of nonfibrous carbohydrates increased with the addition of ES to the diet (P < 0.05). Intestinal digestibility of DM exhibited a quadratic response (P < 0.05). Nitrogen balance, excretion of urinary urea, and plasma urea nitrogen did not respond to the inclusion of ES in the diet (P > 0.05). There was also no effect (P > 0.05) of ES inclusion on animal performance. Ruminal pH was not affected by an increased proportion of ES in the diet (P > 0.05), but ruminal pH was affected (P < 0.05) by the time of collection, for which a cubic model fit the data. There was an interaction (P < 0.05) between treatment and collection time for ruminal ammonia nitrogen concentration. It can be concluded that ES silage can be used as a source of roughage in the diet

  5. Mosquito repellent activity of essential oils of aromatic plants growing in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Gillij, Y G; Gleiser, R M; Zygadlo, J A

    2008-05-01

    Mosquitoes are important vectors of diseases and nuisance pests. Repellents minimize contact with mosquitoes. Repellents based on essential oils (EO) are being developed as an alternative to DEET (N,N-diethyl-m-methylbenzamide), an effective compound that has disadvantages including toxic reactions, and damage to plastic and synthetic fabric. This work evaluated the repellency against Aedes aegypti of EO from aromatic plants that grow in Argentina: Acantholippia seriphioides, Achyrocline satureioides, Aloysia citriodora, Anemia tomentosa, Baccharis spartioides, Chenopodium ambrosioides, Eucalyptus saligna, Hyptis mutabilis, Minthostachys mollis, Rosmarinus officinalis, Tagetes minuta and Tagetes pusilla. Most EO were effective. Variations depending on geographic origin of the plant were detected. At a 90% EO concentration, A. satureoides and T. pusilla were the least repellent. At concentrations of 12.5% B. spartioides, R. officinalis and A. citriodora showed the longest repellency times. Comparisons of the principal components of each EO suggest that limonene and camphor were the main components responsible for the repellent effects. PMID:17583499

  6. Emergency department syndromic surveillance providing early warning of seasonal respiratory activity in England.

    PubMed

    Hughes, H E; Morbey, R; Hughes, T C; Locker, T E; Pebody, R; Green, H K; Ellis, J; Smith, G E; Elliot, A J

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal respiratory infections place an increased burden on health services annually. We used a sentinel emergency department syndromic surveillance system to understand the factors driving respiratory attendances at emergency departments (EDs) in England. Trends in different respiratory indicators were observed to peak at different points during winter, with further variation observed in the distribution of attendances by age. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed acute respiratory infection and bronchitis/bronchiolitis ED attendances in patients aged 1-4 years were particularly sensitive indicators for increasing respiratory syncytial virus activity. Using near real-time surveillance of respiratory ED attendances may provide early warning of increased winter pressures in EDs, particularly driven by seasonal pathogens. This surveillance may provide additional intelligence about different categories of attendance, highlighting pressures in particular age groups, thereby aiding planning and preparation to respond to acute changes in EDs, and thus the health service in general. PMID:26415918

  7. [Seasonal peculiarities of the ground squirrel (Spermophilus undulatus) and Wistar rats circadian activity].

    PubMed

    Semenova, T P; Spiridonova, L A; Zakharova, N M

    2014-09-01

    The seasonal peculiarities of the circadian activity of hibernator, Yakutian long tail ground squirrels (S. undulatus) (n = 35) and non hibernator, Wistar rats (n = 35), were studied. The locomotor activity was registered in each subject individually during 5-17 days by means of "Animex" in the different periods of annual cycle. It was shown that ground squirrels were animals with daily type of activity. On the contrary, the Wistar rats demonstrated nocturne type of locomotors activity. The active period in rats was longer than in ground squirrels. It included not only at night, but morning time in spring, and daytime--in summer. The circadian differences between hibernators and non-hibernators were kept during all annual cycle at night time, but in daytime--only in spring and summer time. PMID:25697015

  8. Melatonin concentrations in the two jugular veins, and relationship with the seasonal reproductive activity in goats.

    PubMed

    Zarazaga, L A; Celi, I; Guzmán, J L; Malpaux, B

    2010-07-15

    The authors investigated whether melatonin concentrations vary between the two jugular veins and whether absolute (nocturnal) or relative (nocturnal/diurnal ratio) plasma melatonin concentrations are associated with seasonal reproductive activity measured by oestrus or ovulatory activity in Payoya goats. Thirty-two adult Payoya goats were penned under natural photoperiod. Oestrus activity was tested daily using aproned males-twice a week plasma was sampled for progesterone. Melatonin plasma concentrations were studied at each equinox and solstice of the year in jugular samples taken simultaneously by venipuncture. Nocturnal and diurnal plasma melatonin concentrations from each jugular vein were assessed in 3 and 2 plasma samples per goat, respectively, taken at hourly intervals in each period. No differences in melatonin concentrations between the two veins were observed, but there was a significant interaction (P < 0.001) between jugular vein and animal in nocturnal melatonin concentrations. There was no effect of sampling period on melatonin concentrations and the coefficient of correlation between sampling periods was very high. The analyses performed indicated that neither absolute nor relative melatonin concentrations were related with the dates of onset or end of ovulatory/oestrus activity. Therefore, we concluded that in goats (1) melatonin concentrations are highly variable between jugular veins in the same individual but not in the general population, (2) melatonin concentrations are highly repeatable for each individual, and (3) absolute and relative amplitudes of melatonin concentrations are not linked to the seasonal breeding activity in Mediterranean goats. PMID:20451998

  9. When I Grow Up... Career Activities for Kindergarten through Sixth Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City. Curriculum Div.

    This resource unit provides activities and resources for career awareness at the elementary school level. Student pages which can be used as a basis for activities are included for both primary and intermediate levels. The student pages are related to the following job areas in which growth has been predicted: (1) manufacturing; (2) foods; (3)…

  10. Antifungal activity of the essential oil from Calendula officinalis L. (asteraceae) growing in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Gazim, Zilda Cristiane; Rezende, Claudia Moraes; Fraga, Sandra Regina; Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez Estivaleti; Cortez, Diógenes Aparicio Garcia

    2008-01-01

    This study tested in vitro activity of the essential oil from flowers of Calendula officinalis using disk-diffusion techniques. The antifungal assay results showed for the first time that the essential oil has good potential antifungal activity: it was effective against all 23 clinical fungi strains tested. PMID:24031180

  11. The Green Pages Environmental Education Activities K-12: Gardens for Young Growing Lives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Jan

    1997-01-01

    Describes several gardening activities that can be kept simple or used as a foundation for more in-depth projects. Activities include setting up an indoor garden spot, making compost which helps students understand the terms "decompose" and "compost", watching plants drink in which students measure water movement in plants, making herb gardens,…

  12. Growing Good Kids: 28 Activities To Enhance Self-Awareness, Compassion, and Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delisle, Deb; Delisle, Jim

    This book offers teachers of grades 3-8 creative and fun activities that build students' skills in problem solving, decision making, cooperative learning, divergent thinking, and communication. The book offers 28 diverse and original enrichment activities that teach personal values such as responsibility, compassion, leadership, and respect for…

  13. INTERACTIVE EFFECTS OF ATMOSPHERIC CARBON DIOXIDE AND OZONE ON GAS-EXCHANGE, BIOMASS, AND YIELD OF ESSEX SOYBEAN: A COMPILATION OF STUDIES FROM TEN GROWING SEASONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current levels of pollutant ozone in industrialized regions worldwide suppress the growth and yield of many agronomically important crops. Meanwhile, atmospheric concentrations of CO2 continue to increase, due in large part to the same activities leading to elevated tropospheric ozone production, c...

  14. Seasonal variations in Be-7 activity in the sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuel, E. A.; Martens, C. S.; Benninger, L. K.

    1990-01-01

    The short-term sediment-accumulation rates in the interior of the Cape Lookout Bight (North Caroline) were determined using data on Be-7 activity distribution in the surface of sediments of the bight. Lack of a significant bioturbation in this lagoon made it possible to interpret variations in depth-integrated activity profiles of Be-7 as short-term accumulation events. The accumulation rates calculated from Be-7 activity profiles indicate that the delivery of particulate matter to the sediments of Cape Lookout Bight is not constant throughout an annual cycle, with the highest monthly accumulation rates being associated with north/northeast storm activity. Inputs were found to be highest during the late winter/early spring season, when the storm frequency is greatest.

  15. The patterns of seasonal activity of Ixodes vespertilionis (Acari: Ixodidae) on Rhinolophus hipposideros in nursery colonies.

    PubMed

    Piksa, Krzysztof; Górz, Andrzej; Nowak-Chmura, Magdalena; Siuda, Krzysztof

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the dynamics of the long-legged bat tick Ixodes vespertilionis infestation on the lesser horseshoe bat Rhinolophus hipposideros in 2 nursery colonies roosting in attics. Out of a total of 810 lesser horseshoe bats examined, 217 (26.8%) were found to be infested with a total of 464 I. vespertilionis individuals. The developmental stage most frequently found was the larva, followed by the nymph, and the adult female. Bats were significantly more frequently infested with I. vespertilionis ticks in the period April to May than in other months. In these months, all tick developmental stages were observed. During summer and autumn, only immature developmental stages were recorded, whilst in September and October larvae predominated. Considerable differences in tick load between nursery colonies were observed. The length of seasonal presence on bats, prevalence, and infestation intensity of I. vespertilionis on lesser horseshoe bats were higher in the nursery colony situated in close vicinity of a cave than in the colony situated far from the caves. The results suggest that the pattern of seasonal infestation of ticks on bats roosting in nursery colonies coincides with the seasonal activity of Rh. hipposideros in the caves. The first case of mixed infestation of the lesser horseshoe bat with I. vespertilionis and I. ricinus were also recorded. PMID:24252260

  16. Interaction Activities in the Foreign Classroom, or How to Grow a Tulip-Rose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulston, Christina Bratt; Selekman, Howard R.

    1976-01-01

    A report is made on the use of foreign language for spontaneous communication in an elementary language class. Four correction-free, peer communicative/interaction activities are outlined according to procedures, objectives, and evaluations. (Author/RM)

  17. Seasonal variation in daily activity patterns of free-ranging European ground squirrels (Spermophilus citellus).

    PubMed

    Everts, Lammina G; Strijkstra, Arjen M; Hut, Roelof A; Hoffmann, Ilse E; Millesi, Eva

    2004-01-01

    Daily aboveground activity of European ground squirrels (Spermophilus citellus) in their natural habitat was recorded with a visual scanning procedure during the active seasons of 1992 and 1993. Activity patterns were analyzed with respect to time of year and to the animal's reproductive state. Aboveground activity started on average 3.9 h (SD 0.6 h, n = 37 days) after civil twilight at dawn and ended on average 3.2 h (SD 0.9 h, n = 37 days) before civil twilight at dusk. Between onset and offset of activity, 54% was spent aboveground, of which 73% was spent foraging. Activity patterns were influenced by photoperiod, rainfall, and by reproductive state. During mating, reproductively active males started activity earlier than females and reproductively inactive males. For females, time spent foraging was high during lactation. The midpoint of daily activity was at 12:16 h (SD 0.37 h, n = 37 days). Activity patterns of European ground squirrels thus appear robustly positioned in the middle of the photoperiod. PMID:15129824

  18. Visualizing in situ translational activity for identifying and sorting slow-growing archaeal−bacterial consortia

    PubMed Central

    Hatzenpichler, Roland; Connon, Stephanie A.; Goudeau, Danielle; Malmstrom, Rex R.; Woyke, Tanja; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2016-01-01

    To understand the biogeochemical roles of microorganisms in the environment, it is important to determine when and under which conditions they are metabolically active. Bioorthogonal noncanonical amino acid tagging (BONCAT) can reveal active cells by tracking the incorporation of synthetic amino acids into newly synthesized proteins. The phylogenetic identity of translationally active cells can be determined by combining BONCAT with rRNA-targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization (BONCAT-FISH). In theory, BONCAT-labeled cells could be isolated with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (BONCAT-FACS) for subsequent genetic analyses. Here, in the first application, to our knowledge, of BONCAT-FISH and BONCAT-FACS within an environmental context, we probe the translational activity of microbial consortia catalyzing the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), a dominant sink of methane in the ocean. These consortia, which typically are composed of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria, have been difficult to study due to their slow in situ growth rates, and fundamental questions remain about their ecology and diversity of interactions occurring between ANME and associated partners. Our activity-correlated analyses of >16,400 microbial aggregates provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, that AOM consortia affiliated with all five major ANME clades are concurrently active under controlled conditions. Surprisingly, sorting of individual BONCAT-labeled consortia followed by whole-genome amplification and 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed previously unrecognized interactions of ANME with members of the poorly understood phylum Verrucomicrobia. This finding, together with our observation that ANME-associated Verrucomicrobia are found in a variety of geographically distinct methane seep environments, suggests a broader range of symbiotic relationships within AOM consortia than previously thought. PMID:27357680

  19. Visualizing in situ translational activity for identifying and sorting slow-growing archaeal-bacterial consortia.

    PubMed

    Hatzenpichler, Roland; Connon, Stephanie A; Goudeau, Danielle; Malmstrom, Rex R; Woyke, Tanja; Orphan, Victoria J

    2016-07-12

    To understand the biogeochemical roles of microorganisms in the environment, it is important to determine when and under which conditions they are metabolically active. Bioorthogonal noncanonical amino acid tagging (BONCAT) can reveal active cells by tracking the incorporation of synthetic amino acids into newly synthesized proteins. The phylogenetic identity of translationally active cells can be determined by combining BONCAT with rRNA-targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization (BONCAT-FISH). In theory, BONCAT-labeled cells could be isolated with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (BONCAT-FACS) for subsequent genetic analyses. Here, in the first application, to our knowledge, of BONCAT-FISH and BONCAT-FACS within an environmental context, we probe the translational activity of microbial consortia catalyzing the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), a dominant sink of methane in the ocean. These consortia, which typically are composed of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria, have been difficult to study due to their slow in situ growth rates, and fundamental questions remain about their ecology and diversity of interactions occurring between ANME and associated partners. Our activity-correlated analyses of >16,400 microbial aggregates provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, that AOM consortia affiliated with all five major ANME clades are concurrently active under controlled conditions. Surprisingly, sorting of individual BONCAT-labeled consortia followed by whole-genome amplification and 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed previously unrecognized interactions of ANME with members of the poorly understood phylum Verrucomicrobia This finding, together with our observation that ANME-associated Verrucomicrobia are found in a variety of geographically distinct methane seep environments, suggests a broader range of symbiotic relationships within AOM consortia than previously thought. PMID:27357680

  20. Dichloromethane dehalogenase with improved catalytic activity isolated from a fast-growing dichloromethane-utilizing bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Scholtz, R.; Egli, C.; Cook, A.M.; Leisinger, T. ); Wackett, L.P. )

    1988-12-01

    A methylotrophic bacterium, denoted strain DM11, was isolated from groundwater and shown to utilize dichloromethane or dibromomethane as the sole carbon and energy source. The new isolate grew at the high rate of 0.22 h{sup {minus}1} compared with 11 previously characterized dichloromethane-utilizing bacteria ({mu}{sub max}, 0.08 h{sup {minus}1}). The dichloromethane dehalogenase from strain DM11 (group B enzyme) was purified by anion-exchange chromatography. It was shown to be substantially different from the set of dichloromethane dehalogenases from the 11 slow-growing strains (group A enzymes) that had previously been demonstrated to be identical. The V{sub max} for the group B enzyme was 97 mkat/kg of protein, some 5.6-fold higher than that of the group A enzymes. The group A dehalogenases showed hyperbolic saturation with the cosubstrate glutathione, whereas the group B enzyme showed positive cooperativity in glutathione binding. Only 1 of 15 amino acids occupied common positions at the N termini, and amino acid contents were substantially different in group A and group B dehalogenases. Immunological assays demonstrated weak cross-reactivity between the two enzymes. Despite the observed structural and kinetic differences, there is potentially evolutionary relatedness between group A and group B enzymes, as indicated by (i) hybridization of DM11 DNA with a gene probe of the group A enzyme, (ii) a common requirement for glutathione in catalysis, and (iii) similar subunit molecular weights of about 34,000.

  1. Seasonal prediction of tropical cyclone activity over the north Indian Ocean using three artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Sankar; Kotal, S. D.; Kundu, P. K.

    2016-03-01

    Three artificial neural network (ANN) methods, namely, multilayer perceptron (MLP), radial basis function (RBF) and generalized regression neural network (GRNN) are utilized to predict the seasonal tropical cyclone (TC) activity over the north Indian Ocean (NIO) during the post-monsoon season (October, November, December). The frequency of TC and large-scale climate variables derived from NCEP/NCAR reanalysis dataset of resolution 2.5° × 2.5° were analyzed for the period 1971-2013. Data for the years 1971-2002 were used for the development of the models, which were tested with independent sample data for the year 2003-2013. Using the correlation analysis, the five large-scale climate variables, namely, geopotential height at 500 hPa, relative humidity at 500 hPa, sea-level pressure, zonal wind at 700 hPa and 200 hPa for the preceding month September, are selected as potential predictors of the post-monsoon season TC activity. The result reveals that all the three different ANN methods are able to provide satisfactory forecast in terms of the various metrics, such as root mean-square error (RMSE), standard deviation (SD), correlation coefficient (r), and bias and index of agreement (d). Additionally, leave-one-out cross validation (LOOCV) method is also performed and the forecast skill is evaluated. The results show that the MLP model is found to be superior to the other two models (RBF, GRNN). The (MLP) is expected to be very useful to operational forecasters for prediction of TC activity.

  2. Locomotor micro-activities associated with therapeutic responses in patients with seasonal affective disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu; Teicher, Martin H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Psychomotor retardation, leaden paralysis and fatigue are often used to describe patients with depressive disorders. However, there is limited understanding of their meaning and how they are objectively manifested in the physical world. Patients with seasonal affective disorder (SAD) are characteristically hypoactive, and experience restoration in energy during effective treatment with bright light. In this study, we attempt to identify quantitative metrics of psychomotor activity that correspond to the clinical perceptions of hypoactivity and to the early activating effects of treatment. Methods Novel means of assessing the microstructure of activity was employed using wavelets and Hurst exponents to indicate the proclivity of subjects to persist at higher and lower levels of activity. This was assesed using actigraphs in 16 unmedicated patients with SAD before and following two weeks of bright light therapy. Results Two weeks of phototherapy had no significant effect on mean levels of diurnal activity, but altered the microstructure of the activity. Specifically, phototherapy produced a significant reduction in inertial resistance in patients who had a 50% or greater reduction in Hamilton Depression scores (n=8), as reflected in reduced tendency to persist at low levels of activity. There was also a strong correlation between ratings of fatigue and measures of persistence at high versus low activity in initial responders, but not in initial non-responders. Conclusion These findings suggest that light therapy alters the nature of diurnal activity troughs in early responsive patients, reducing their tendency to persist at low levels, possibly reflecting an alleviation of psychomotor retardation. PMID:27135034

  3. Inequity outside the Classroom: Growing Class Differences in Participation in Extracurricular Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snellman, Kaisa; Silva, Jennifer M.; Putnam, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the authors report on research that shows that extracurricular activities help cultivate the skills, connections, and knowledge that prepare children for lifelong success. They add, however, that low-income students are increasingly being excluded from participating. Struggling with budget cuts and deficits, many school districts…

  4. Chemical composition and biological activities of essential oil from Hyptis crenata growing in the Brazilian cerrado.

    PubMed

    Violante, Ivana Maria Póvoa; Garcez, Walmir Silva; Barbosa, Carolina da Silva; Garcez, Fernanda Rodrigues

    2012-10-01

    Essential oils from species of the genus Hyptis are well-known for their significant biological properties, including antimicrobial and acaricidal activities. The essential oil from the aerial parts of H. crenata was obtained by hydrodistillation; bomeol (17.8%), 1,8-cineol (15.6%) and p-cimene (7.9%) were characterized by GC-MS as its major constituents. The essential oil was evaluated in vitro for its antimicrobial activities against six fungal and five bacterial strains, by measuring the respective MICs, MFCs and MBCs, using broth microdilution methods. The strongest bactericidal activities were shown against Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis, while the strongest fungicidal activities were against Cryptococcus neoformans, Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis. The oil was also assessed for its anti-tick properties and, at a concentration of 2.5%, it significantly inhibited in vivo oviposition of engorged females of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, using the adult immersion test., with an effectiveness of 94.4%. PMID:23157018

  5. Growing into Greatness: A Study of a Local History Group of Active-Retired Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corrigan, Trudy; Byrne, Brid; Harris, Phyllis; Lalor, Maureen; O'Connor, Maura; O'Reilly, Kathleen; Quinn, Frank; Forde, Kathleen

    2005-01-01

    Research in Canada on the learning needs of older people looked at such issues as how to cope with changes in society, the need to make a contribution and the need to be influential. The White Paper on Adult Education "Learning for Life" notes that strategies for active ageing stress the critical importance of access to learning as a key tool in…

  6. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of different parts of Tribulus terrestris L. growing in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Al-Bayati, Firas A; Al-Mola, Hassan F

    2008-02-01

    Antimicrobial activity of organic and aqueous extracts from fruits, leaves and roots of Tribulus terrestris L., an Iraqi medicinal plant used as urinary anti-infective in folk medicine, was examined against 11 species of pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms: Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Corynebacterium diphtheriae, Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Serratia marcescens, Salmonella typhimurium, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans using microdilution method in 96 multiwell microtiter plates. All the extracts from the different parts of the plant showed antimicrobial activity against most tested microorganisms. The most active extract against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria was ethanol extract from the fruits with a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 0.15 mg/ml against B. subtilis, B. cereus, P. vulgaris and C. diphtheriae. In addition, the same extract from the same plant part demonstrated the strongest antifungal activity against C. albicans with an MIC value of 0.15 mg/ml. PMID:18257138

  7. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of different parts of Tribulus terrestris L. growing in Iraq

    PubMed Central

    Al-Bayati, Firas A.; Al-Mola, Hassan F.

    2008-01-01

    Antimicrobial activity of organic and aqueous extracts from fruits, leaves and roots of Tribulus terrestris L., an Iraqi medicinal plant used as urinary anti-infective in folk medicine, was examined against 11 species of pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms: Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Corynebacterium diphtheriae, Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Serratia marcescens, Salmonella typhimurium, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans using microdilution method in 96 multiwell microtiter plates. All the extracts from the different parts of the plant showed antimicrobial activity against most tested microorganisms. The most active extract against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria was ethanol extract from the fruits with a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 0.15 mg/ml against B. subtilis, B. cereus, P. vulgaris and C. diphtheriae. In addition, the same extract from the same plant part demonstrated the strongest antifungal activity against C. albicans with an MIC value of 0.15 mg/ml. PMID:18257138

  8. Antimycoplasmic activity and seasonal variation of essential oil of Eugenia hiemalis Cambess. (Myrtaceae).

    PubMed

    Zatelli, Gabriele Andressa; Zimath, Priscila; Tenfen, Adrielli; Mendes de Cordova, Caio Maurício; Scharf, Dilamara Riva; Simionatto, Edésio Luiz; Alberton, Michele Debiasi; Falkenberg, Miriam

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the chemical composition and antimycoplasmic and anticholinesterase activities of the essential oil of Eugenia hiemalis leaves collected throughout the year. A total of 42 compounds were identified by CG, and are present in almost every seasons. Sesquiterpenes were dominant (86.01-91.48%), and non-functionalised sesquiterpenes comprised the major fraction, which increased in the summer; monoterpenes were not identified. The major components were spathulenol (5.36-16.06%), δ-cadinene (7.50-15.93%), bicyclogermacrene (5.70-14.24%) and β-caryophyllene (4.80-9.43%). The highest oil yield was obtained in summer and autumn. Essential oils presented activity against three evaluated Mycoplasma strains, but no activity was observed in the anticholinesterase assay. PMID:26428391

  9. Responses to Global Warming Over the Eastern and Central Tibetan Plateau as Reflected in Day-time and Night-time Temperatures, Extreme Temperature Events, and Growing Season Length During 1961-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Z.; Liu, X.; Shao, X.

    2006-12-01

    This study examines the trends and variation patterns in daily maximum (day-time) and minimum (night-time) temperatures (hereafter referred to as Tm and Tn), extreme events, and growing season lengths over the eastern and central Tibetan Plateau (TP), in comparison with the results from other regions. Data during the period 1961-2003 from 66 weather stations over the eastern and central TP with elevations above 2000 m are used in this study, after going through rigorous quality assessment/quality control procedures. Statistically significant warming trends are identified in various measures of the temperature regime, especially in night- time temperatures, extreme warm/cold events, and diurnal temperature range (DTR). We find that the trends in Tn and Tm display distinct spatial patterns in the study region. The warming trends in winter night-time temperatures are among the highest when compared with studies conducted in other regions. Our results also confirm the asymmetric pattern of greater warming trends in minimum or night-time temperatures as compared to the day-time temperatures, which reduces the DTR in the region. Based on the time-varying percentiles of Tn and Tm, prominent warming trends are found in Tn during cold season months across the relative temperature scale of both warm and cold events. The warming in night-time temperatures causes the number of frost days to decrease significantly and the number of warm days to increase. The mean length of growing season has increased by approximately 17 days during the 43-year study period for the region. Most of the record-setting months for cold events are found in the earlier part of the study period, while that of the warm events have occurred mostly in the later half, especially since the 1990s. The changes in the temperature regime in this region may have brought regional-specific impacts on the ecosystems. It is found that grain production in Qinghai Province, located in the northeastern part of the

  10. Seasonal, interannual, and long-term variabilities in biomass burning activity over South Asia.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, P; Naja, M; Kumar, R; Chandola, H C

    2016-03-01

    The seasonal, interannual, and long-term variations in biomass burning activity and related emissions are not well studied over South Asia. In this regard, active fire location retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the retrievals of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from MODIS Terra, and tropospheric column NO2 from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) are used to understand the effects of biomass burning on the tropospheric pollution loadings over South Asia during 2003-2013. Biomass burning emission estimates from Global Fire Emission Database (GFED) and Global Fire Assimilation System (GFAS) are also used to quantify uncertainties and regional discrepancies in the emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxide (NOx), and black carbon (BC) due to biomass burning in South Asia. In the Asian continent, the frequency of fire activity is highest over Southeast Asia, followed by South Asia and East Asia. The biomass burning activity in South Asia shows a distinct seasonal cycle that peaks during February-May with some differences among four (north, central, northeast, and south) regions in India. The annual biomass burning activity in north, central, and south regions shows an increasing tendency, particularly after 2008, while a decrease is seen in northeast region during 2003-2013. The increase in fire counts over the north and central regions contributes 24 % of the net enhancement in fire counts over South Asia. MODIS AOD and OMI tropospheric column NO2 retrievals are classified into high and low fire activity periods and show that biomass burning leads to significant enhancement in tropospheric pollution loading over both the cropland and forest regions. The enhancement is much higher (110-176 %) over the forest region compared to the cropland (34-62 %) region. Further efforts are required to understand the implications of biomass burning on the regional air quality and climate of South Asia. PMID:26503008

  11. Growing older with health and vitality: a nexus of physical activity, exercise and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Witard, Oliver C; McGlory, Chris; Hamilton, D Lee; Phillips, Stuart M

    2016-06-01

    The preservation of skeletal muscle mass and strength with advancing age are, we propose, critical aspects of ageing with health and vitality. Physical inactivity and poor nutrition are known to accelerate the gradual age-related decline in muscle mass and strength-sarcopenia-however, both are subject to modification. The main purpose of this review is to present the latest, evidence-based recommendations for physical activity and exercise, as well as diet for older adults that would help in preserving muscle mass and strength. We take the position that future physical activity/exercise guidelines need to make specific reference to resistance exercise and highlight the benefits of higher-intensity aerobic exercise training, alongside advocating older adults perform aerobic-based physical activity and household tasks (e.g., carrying groceries). In terms of dietary recommendations, greater emphasis should be placed on optimal rather than minimum protein intakes for older adults. Indeed, guidelines that endorse a daily protein intake of 1.2-1.5 g/kg BM/day, which are levels 50-90 % greater than the current protein Recommendation Dietary Allowance (0.8 g/kg BM/day), are likely to help preserve muscle mass and strength and are safe for healthy older adults. Being cognisant of factors (e.g., reduced appetite) that may preclude older adults from increasing their total daily protein intake, we echo the viewpoint of other active researchers in advocating that protein recommendations for older adults be based on a per meal approach in order to maximize muscle protein synthesis (MPS). On this basis, assuming three meals are consumed daily, a protein dose of 0.4-0.5 g/kg BM should be contained in each meal. We are beginning to understand ways in which to increase the utilization of ingested protein for the stimulation of MPS, namely by increasing the proportion of leucine contained in a given dose of protein, co-ingesting other nutrients (e.g., carbohydrate and fat or

  12. Community shifts of actively growing lake bacteria after N-acetyl-glucosamine addition: improving the BrdU-FACS method.

    PubMed

    Tada, Yuya; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2014-02-01

    In aquatic environments, community dynamics of bacteria, especially actively growing bacteria (AGB), are tightly linked with dissolved organic matter (DOM) quantity and quality. We analyzed the community dynamics of DNA-synthesizing and accordingly AGB by linking an improved bromodeoxyuridine immunocytochemistry approach with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (BrdU-FACS). FACS-sorted cells of even oligotrophic ecosystems in winter were characterized by 16S rRNA gene analysis. In incubation experiments, we examined community shifts of AGB in response to the addition of N-acetyl-glucosamine (NAG), one of the most abundant aminosugars in aquatic systems. Our improved BrdU-FACS analysis revealed that AGB winter communities of oligotrophic Lake Stechlin (northeastern Germany) substantially differ from those of total bacteria and consist of Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma-, Deltaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Candidatus OP10 and Chloroflexi. AGB populations with different BrdU-fluorescence intensities and cell sizes represented different phylotypes suggesting that single-cell growth potential varies at the taxon level. NAG incubation experiments demonstrated that a variety of widespread taxa related to Alpha-, Beta-, Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Planctomycetes, Spirochaetes, Verrucomicrobia and Chloroflexi actively grow in the presence of NAG. The BrdU-FACS approach enables detailed phylogenetic studies of AGB and, thus, to identify those phylotypes which are potential key players in aquatic DOM cycling. PMID:23985742

  13. Community shifts of actively growing lake bacteria after N-acetyl-glucosamine addition: improving the BrdU-FACS method

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Yuya; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    In aquatic environments, community dynamics of bacteria, especially actively growing bacteria (AGB), are tightly linked with dissolved organic matter (DOM) quantity and quality. We analyzed the community dynamics of DNA-synthesizing and accordingly AGB by linking an improved bromodeoxyuridine immunocytochemistry approach with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (BrdU-FACS). FACS-sorted cells of even oligotrophic ecosystems in winter were characterized by 16S rRNA gene analysis. In incubation experiments, we examined community shifts of AGB in response to the addition of N-acetyl-glucosamine (NAG), one of the most abundant aminosugars in aquatic systems. Our improved BrdU-FACS analysis revealed that AGB winter communities of oligotrophic Lake Stechlin (northeastern Germany) substantially differ from those of total bacteria and consist of Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma-, Deltaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Candidatus OP10 and Chloroflexi. AGB populations with different BrdU-fluorescence intensities and cell sizes represented different phylotypes suggesting that single-cell growth potential varies at the taxon level. NAG incubation experiments demonstrated that a variety of widespread taxa related to Alpha-, Beta-, Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Planctomycetes, Spirochaetes, Verrucomicrobia and Chloroflexi actively grow in the presence of NAG. The BrdU-FACS approach enables detailed phylogenetic studies of AGB and, thus, to identify those phylotypes which are potential key players in aquatic DOM cycling. PMID:23985742

  14. Effect of age and season on the thyroid hormone activity of Mizoram strain female mithun (Bos frontalis)

    PubMed Central

    Lalsangpuii; Ali, M. Ayub; Devi, L. Inaotombi; Behera, Parthasarathi; Ralte, Lalsanglura

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to generate baseline data on the normal values of the thyroidhormone (TH) activity as well as their correlation with age and season. Materials and Methods: Blood samples (10 ml) were collected from jugular vein of 30 female mithun’s of three different age groups viz. Calves (6 months to 1 year), heifer (1-3 years) and adult (above 3 years) during the three season’s viz. Monsoon, winter and spring of a year. The serum was analyzed for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), triiodothyronine (T3), and thyroxine (T4) activity. Result: The result showed a significantly (p<0.05) a higher T3 level in heifers followed by adults and calves and higher T4 level in adults followed by heifers and calves in all the seasons. The TSH level was higher in heifers in all the seasons. The winter season recorded higher level of T3, T4, and TSH as compared to the other seasons of a year. Conclusion: The TSH and T3 level were the highest for aheifer, whereas T4 level was the highest for adults inall the season. Furthermore, the higher level of TH was observed in winter season. The increased level of the TH during the winter season signifies their calorigenic effect. Similarly in heifers, the increased T3 concentrations show its importance in reproductive physiology and its association with ovarian activity. This indicates that age and season have aprofound effect on TH activity of Mizoram strain female mithun. PMID:27047046

  15. Serum copper and ceruloplasmin activity at the early growing stage in foals.

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, M; Asano, M; Tagami, M; Tsukiyama, K; Fujinaga, T

    1998-01-01

    Serum concentrations of copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), calcium (Ca) and inorganic phosphorus (P), as well as antigenic ceruloplasmin (Cp) and oxidase activity as a functional index for copper metabolism, were measured in 10 foals (5 males and 5 females) and their dams. Samples were harvested from the foals within 1 wk after birth and monthly from 1 to 17 mo of age. Samples were collected from their dams in the perinatal period (monthly from 2 mo before delivery to 5 mo postpartum). Serum oxidase activity, antigenic Cp and Cu in foals were extremely low at 1 wk. Serum Cp had the lowest value of 17.0 +/- 8.0 (mean +/- SD) mg/dL within the 1st wk, then increased rapidly up to 43.7 +/- 5.8 mg/dL at 1 mo, and maintained this level until the 17th mo. Serum Zn in foals had the highest value of 73.2 +/- 13.1 micrograms/dL within 1 wk, then decreased to 38.3 +/- 5.9 micrograms/dL by 17 mo. Serum Mn, Ca and P in mares were almost stable and within established reference ranges for our laboratory in the perinatal period, and these values in foals were also in the normal range. Even on appropriate feeding, serum Cu, Cp and oxidase activity were quite low a few weeks after birth, while a higher proportion of Cp-binding copper was found in the foals. This might be caused by the limited synthesis of ceruloplasmin in this period. These data suggest that newborn foals are in a critical situation of marginal copper status in the early stage of growth. PMID:9553711

  16. Long-range signaling in growing neurons after local elevation of cyclic AMP-dependent activity

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Cyclic AMP-dependent activity at the growth cone or the soma of cultured Xenopus spinal neurons was elevated by local extracellular perfusion of the neuron with culture medium containing 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-br-cAMP) or forskolin. During local perfusion of one of the growth cones of multipolar neurons with these drugs, the perfused growth cone showed further extension, while the distant, unperfused growth cones were inhibited in their growth. Local perfusion of the growth cone with culture medium or local perfusion with 8-br-cAMP at a cell-free region 100 microns away from the growth cone did not produce any effect on the extension of the growth cone. Reduced extension of all growth cones was observed when the perfusion with 8-br-cAMP was restricted to the soma. The distant inhibitory effect does not depend on the growth of the perfused growth cone since local coperfusion of the growth cone with 8-br-cAMP and colchicine inhibited growth on both perfused and unperfused growth cones, while local perfusion with colchicine alone inhibited only the perfused growth cone. The distant inhibitory effect was abolished when the perfusion of 8-br-cAMP was carried out together with kinase inhibitor H- 8, suggesting the involvement of cAMP-dependent protein kinase and/or its downstream factors in the long-range inhibitory signaling. Uniform exposure of the entire neuron to bath-applied 8-br-cAMP, however, led to enhanced growth activity at all growth cones. Thus, local elevation of cAMP-dependent activity produces long-range and opposite effects on distant parts of the neuron, and a cytosolic gradient of second messengers may produce effects distinctly different from those following uniform global elevation of the messenger, leading to differential growth regulation at different regions of the same neuron. PMID:7798321

  17. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oils from four Ruta species growing in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Haddouchi, Farah; Chaouche, Tarik Mohammed; Zaouali, Yosr; Ksouri, Riadh; Attou, Amina; Benmansour, Abdelhafid

    2013-11-01

    Antimicrobial properties of plants essential oils have been investigated in order to suggest them as potential tools to overcome the microbial drug resistance and the increasing incidence of food borne diseases problems. The aim of this research is to study the antibacterial and antifungal effects of four traditional plants essential oils, Ruta angustifolia, Ruta chalepensis, Ruta graveolens and Ruta tuberculata, against standard bacterial and fungal strains. The chemical compounds of the oils were examined by GC/MS. Results revealed a powerful antifungal activity against filamentous fungi. Aspergillus fumigatus and Cladosporium herbarum are the most sensitive strains to these oils with MIC values less than 3.5 μg ml(-1) for certain oils, reaching 7.8 μg ml(-1) for other. GC/MS essay exhibited ketones as the most abundant constituent of these oils except for R. tuberculata essential oil which has a completely different composition, monoterpenes alcohols being the most abundant. These compositions explain their potential antifungal activity. PMID:23768355

  18. Plant Growth Promotion Activity of Keratinolytic Fungi Growing on a Recalcitrant Waste Known as "Hair Waste".

    PubMed

    Cavello, Ivana A; Crespo, Juan M; García, Sabrina S; Zapiola, José M; Luna, María F; Cavalitto, Sebastián F

    2015-01-01

    Purpureocillium lilacinum (Thom) Samsom is one of the most studied fungi in the control of plant parasitic nematodes. However, there is not specific information on its ability to inhibit some pathogenic bacteria, fungi, or yeast. This work reports the production of several antifungal hydrolytic enzymes by a strain of P. lilacinum when it is grown in a medium containing hair waste. The growth of several plant-pathogenic fungi, Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus niger, and Fusarium culmorum, was considerably affected by the presence of P. lilacinum's supernatant. Besides antifungal activity, P. lilacinum demonstrates the capability to produce indoleacetic acid and ammonia during time cultivation on hair waste medium. Plant growth-promoting activity by cell-free supernatant was evidenced through the increase of the percentage of tomato seed germination from 71 to 85% after 48 hours. A 21-day plant growth assay using tomato plants indicates that crude supernatant promotes the growth of the plants similar to a reference fertilizer (p > 0.05). These results suggest that both strain and the supernatant may have potential to be considered as a potent biocontrol agent with multiple plant growth-promoting properties. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the antifungal, IAA production and tomato growth enhancing compounds produced by P. lilacinum LPSC #876. PMID:26697226

  19. Phenolic composition, physicochemical properties and antioxidant activity of interspecific hybrids of grapes growing in Poland.

    PubMed

    Samoticha, Justyna; Wojdyło, Aneta; Golis, Tomasz

    2017-01-15

    The study evaluated fruit quality parameters and chemical properties (soluble solids, pH, total acidity and total sugars content, phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity (ABTS, FRAP and ORAC methods)) of 30 grape cultivars of white, red and pink grape, as 28 interspecific hybrids and 2 Vitis vinifera L. popularly grown in Poland. Some of them were analyzed for the first time. A total of 49 polyphenolic compounds were identified by LC-PDA-QTOF/MS and quantified by UPLC-PDA-FL, as 26 anthocyanins, 9 flavonols and flavons, 7 phenolic acids, 6 flavan-3-ols, and 1 stilbene. The content of total polyphenols ranged from 1037.0 (Cascade cv.) to 5759.1mg/100gdm (Roesler cv.). However, the content of stilbene represented by trans resveratrol-3-glucoside was only 18.5-70.5mg/100gdm. Red grape cultivars like Roesler, Rothay and Swenson Red were characterized by the highest content of bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity (significantly more than 24, 12 and 53mmol TE/100gdm, by ABTS, FRAP and ORAC, respectively). Average total acidity and soluble solids for white (0.95g of tartaric acid in 100gfm and 17.1°Bx, respectively) and for red and pink (0.93g of tartaric acid in 100gfm and 17.4°Bx, respectively) cultivars were not significantly different (p>0.05). PMID:27542475

  20. Essential Oil Composition, Antioxidant, Cytotoxic and Antiviral Activities of Teucrium pseudochamaepitys Growing Spontaneously in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Hammami, Saoussen; Jmii, Habib; El Mokni, Ridha; Khmiri, Abdelbaki; Faidi, Khaled; Dhaouadi, Hatem; El Aouni, Mohamed Hédi; Aouni, Mahjoub; Joshi, Rajesh K

    2015-01-01

    The chemical composition, antioxidant, cytotoxic and antiviral activities of the essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation from the aerial parts of Teucrium pseudochamaepitys (Lamiaceae) collected from Zaghouan province of Tunisia are reported. The essential oil was analyzed by gas chromatography equipped with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID) and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Thirty-one compounds were identified representing 88.6% of the total essential oil. Hexadecanoic acid was found to be the most abundant component (26.1%) followed by caryophyllene oxide (6.3%), myristicin (4.9%) and α-cubebene (3.9%). The antioxidant capacity of the oil was measured on the basis of the scavenging activity to the stable 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). The IC50 value of the oil was evaluated as 0.77 mg·mL(-1). In addition, the essential oil was found to possess moderate cytotoxic effects on the HEp-2 cell line (50% cytotoxic concentration (CC50)=653.6 µg·mL(-1)). The potential antiviral effect was tested against Coxsackievirus B (CV-B), a significant human and mouse pathogen that causes pediatric central nervous system disease, commonly with acute syndromes. The reduction of viral infectivity by the essential oil was measured using a cytopathic (CPE) reduction assay. PMID:26580590

  1. Seasonal development of cambial activity in relation to xylem formation in Chinese fir.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongyang; Xu, Huimin; Li, Hanyin; Wei, Dongmei; Lin, Jinxing; Li, Xiaojuan

    2016-05-20

    The vascular cambium is a lateral meristem which can differentiate into secondary phloem and xylem. The secondary growth of woody plants resulting from vascular cambium activity has been a focus of considerable attention, but the quantitative relationships between cambial activity and secondary xylem formation have been little studied. Our analysis of cytological changes in the cambium of Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata), revealed a significant positive correlation between vascular cambium cell numbers and cambium zone width through the seasonal cycle. Cambium cell numbers and the cambium cell radial diameter were closely related to xylem formation. Immuno-labeling showed that de-esterified homogalacturonan and (1-4)-β-d-galactan epitopes were highly abundant in cell walls of dormant-stage cambium, whereas high methylesterified homogalacturonan was strongly labeled in the active stage. Raman spectroscopy detected significant changes in the chemical composition of cell walls during the active-dormant stage transition. More pectin and less monolignols occurred in radial cell walls than in tangential walls during the dormant stage, but no significant changes were found in other stages, indicating that pectin accumulation facilitates cell wall expansion, with cambium activity transition. Our quantitative analysis of the relationship between cambial activity and xylem formation, as well as the cell wall modification during the active stage provides useful information about cambial characteristics and xylogenesis. PMID:26986869

  2. In vitro antiprotozoal activity of triterpenoid constituents of Kleinia odora growing in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al Musayeib, Nawal M; Mothana, Ramzi A; Gamal, Ali A El; Al-Massarani, Shaza M; Maes, Louis

    2013-01-01

    Two lupane and four ursane triterpenes, namely epilupeol (1), lupeol acetate (2), ursolic acid (3), brein (4), 3β 11α-dihydroxy urs-12-ene (5) and ursolic acid lactone (6) were isolated from aerial parts of Kleinia odora and identified. Compounds 1 and 3-6 were isolated for the first time from K. odora. The triterpene constituents were investigated for antiprotozoal potential against erythrocytic schizonts of Plasmodium falciparum, intracellular amastigotes of Leishmania infantum and Trypanosoma cruzi and free trypomastigotes of T. brucei. Cytotoxicity was determined against MRC-5 fibroblasts to assess selectivity. The ursane triterpenes were found to be active against more than one type of the tested parasites, with the exception of compound 6. This is also the first report on the occurrence of ursane type triterpenes in the genus Kleinia and their antiprotozoal potential against P. falciparum, L. infantum, T. cruzi, and T. brucei. PMID:23912274

  3. Let Nature Be the Teacher: Seasonal Natural History Activities for Parents and Other Educators To Share with Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gertz, Lucille N.

    This book is designed to provide parents and other adult companions with activities to do with children on outdoor walks. The activities offer adults and children a shared learning experience and have been adapted from the children's education program at Habitat Institute for the Environment (Massachusetts). The activities are arranged seasonally,…

  4. Influence of season on daytime behavioral activities of donkeys in the Northern Guinea Savanna zone of Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    ZAKARI, Friday Ocheja; AYO, Joseph Olusegun; REKWOT, Peter Ibrahim; KAWU, Mohammed Umar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The present experiment was performed with the aim of investigating the effect of season on behavioral activities of donkeys during the rainy and harmattan seasons in the Northern Guinea zone of Nigeria. Sixteen apparently healthy donkeys were used as subjects and divided into four groups based on age. During each season, behavioral activities of each donkey were evaluated for three weeks using the focal animal sampling technique. The dry-bulb temperature (DBT), relative humidity (RH), and temperature-humidity index (THI) were obtained three times each day during the experimental period using standard procedures. In the rainy season, the mean DBT (31.65 ± 0.49°C), RH (73.63 ± 1.09%), and THI (84.39 ± 0.71) were significantly (P<0.0001) higher than the corresponding values of 24.00 ± 0.44°C, 36.80 ± 0.92%, and 64.80 ± 0.62 in the harmattan season. During the rainy season, the donkeys spent 60.00 ± 0.77%, 25.40 ± 0.69%, and 2.94 ± 0.21% on grazing, resting, and grooming, respectively. During the harmattan season, the donkeys spent the most time on grazing (76.76 ± 0.43%), less time on resting (11.97 ± 0.38%), and the least time on grooming (0.89 ± 0.05%). In conclusion, season and seasonal variations affect the daytime behavioral activities of donkeys in the zone, and this should be considered in husbandry practices for donkeys. PMID:26858575

  5. Influence of season on daytime behavioral activities of donkeys in the Northern Guinea Savanna zone of Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Zakari, Friday Ocheja; Ayo, Joseph Olusegun; Rekwot, Peter Ibrahim; Kawu, Mohammed Umar

    2015-01-01

    The present experiment was performed with the aim of investigating the effect of season on behavioral activities of donkeys during the rainy and harmattan seasons in the Northern Guinea zone of Nigeria. Sixteen apparently healthy donkeys were used as subjects and divided into four groups based on age. During each season, behavioral activities of each donkey were evaluated for three weeks using the focal animal sampling technique. The dry-bulb temperature (DBT), relative humidity (RH), and temperature-humidity index (THI) were obtained three times each day during the experimental period using standard procedures. In the rainy season, the mean DBT (31.65 ± 0.49°C), RH (73.63 ± 1.09%), and THI (84.39 ± 0.71) were significantly (P<0.0001) higher than the corresponding values of 24.00 ± 0.44°C, 36.80 ± 0.92%, and 64.80 ± 0.62 in the harmattan season. During the rainy season, the donkeys spent 60.00 ± 0.77%, 25.40 ± 0.69%, and 2.94 ± 0.21% on grazing, resting, and grooming, respectively. During the harmattan season, the donkeys spent the most time on grazing (76.76 ± 0.43%), less time on resting (11.97 ± 0.38%), and the least time on grooming (0.89 ± 0.05%). In conclusion, season and seasonal variations affect the daytime behavioral activities of donkeys in the zone, and this should be considered in husbandry practices for donkeys. PMID:26858575

  6. SEASONAL EFFECTS ON COMET NUCLEI EVOLUTION: ACTIVITY, INTERNAL STRUCTURE, AND DUST MANTLE FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    De Sanctis, M. C.; Capria, M. T.; Lasue, J.

    2010-07-15

    Rotational properties can strongly influence a comet's evolution in terms of activity, dust mantling, and internal structure. In this paper, we investigate the effects of various rotation axis directions on the activity, internal structure, and dust mantling of cometary nuclei. The numerical code developed is able to reproduce different shapes and spin axis inclinations, taking into account both the latitudinal and the longitudinal variations of illumination, using a quasi-three-dimensional approach. The results obtained show that local variations in the dust and gas fluxes can be induced by the different spin axis directions and completely different behaviors of the comet evolution can result in the same cometary shape by using different obliquities of the models. The internal structures of cometary nuclei are also influenced by comet obliquity, as well as dust mantling. Gas and dust production rates show diversities related to the comet seasons.

  7. A predictive relationship between early season North Atlantic hurricane activity and the upcoming winter North Atlantic Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Jessica; Saunders, Mark

    2016-04-01

    The winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is linked strongly to European winter climate including windstorms. Predicting the winter NAO is key to making successful seasonal predictions of European winter climate. We observe that in recent decades there are many instances of an inverse relationship between the strength of the North Atlantic hurricane season and the strength of the subsequent European winter windstorm season. Stormy European winter seasons often follow quiet Atlantic hurricane seasons and calm European winters follow active hurricane seasons. We explore the strength and temporal stability of this inverse relationship, consider a facilitating physical mechanism, and briefly discuss the implications of our findings for end users, in particular global reinsurers. We find there is a statistically significant link between North Atlantic hurricane activity and the upcoming winter NAO. The relationship is established by the midway point of the hurricane season in early September. The link is strongest when hurricane activity is in the upper or lower tercile and when summer ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscillation) is neutral. The relationship works well going back 40 years to the mid 1970s. The early winter (October-November-December) NAO is predicted best but since the early 1980s the predictive link extends to the main winter (December-January-February) NAO. The inverse link can be facilitated by a persistence and slow evolution of atmospheric circulation patterns and sea surface temperature anomalies over the North Atlantic between the summer and the winter. This persistence is best when hurricane seasons are more extreme and when summer ENSO is neutral. Our findings offer the potential for predicting the early winter and winter NAO from early September. The implied inverse relationship between US hurricane activity and European windstorm activity may enable more effective offsetting of risks between territories.

  8. Seasonal dynamics of active SAR11 ecotypes in the oligotrophic Northwest Mediterranean Sea

    PubMed Central

    Salter, Ian; Galand, Pierre E; Fagervold, Sonja K; Lebaron, Philippe; Obernosterer, Ingrid; Oliver, Matthew J; Suzuki, Marcelino T; Tricoire, Cyrielle

    2015-01-01

    A seven-year oceanographic time series in NW Mediterranean surface waters was combined with pyrosequencing of ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) and ribosomal RNA gene copies (16S rDNA) to examine the environmental controls on SAR11 ecotype dynamics and potential activity. SAR11 diversity exhibited pronounced seasonal cycles remarkably similar to total bacterial diversity. The timing of diversity maxima was similar across narrow and broad phylogenetic clades and strongly associated with deep winter mixing. Diversity minima were associated with periods of stratification that were low in nutrients and phytoplankton biomass and characterised by intense phosphate limitation (turnover time<5 h). We propose a conceptual framework in which physical mixing of the water column periodically resets SAR11 communities to a high diversity state and the seasonal evolution of phosphate limitation competitively excludes deeper-dwelling ecotypes to promote low diversity states dominated (>80%) by SAR11 Ia. A partial least squares (PLS) regression model was developed that could reliably predict sequence abundances of SAR11 ecotypes (Q2=0.70) from measured environmental variables, of which mixed layer depth was quantitatively the most important. Comparison of clade-level SAR11 rRNA:rDNA signals with leucine incorporation enabled us to partially validate the use of these ratios as an in-situ activity measure. However, temporal trends in the activity of SAR11 ecotypes and their relationship to environmental variables were unclear. The strong and predictable temporal patterns observed in SAR11 sequence abundance was not linked to metabolic activity of different ecotypes at the phylogenetic and temporal resolution of our study. PMID:25238399

  9. Sunlight mediated seasonality in canopy structure and photosynthetic activity of Amazonian rainforests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Jian; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Choi, Sungho; Park, Taejin; Barichivich, Jonathan; Ciais, Philippe; Fu, Rong; Ganguly, Sangram; Hall, Forrest; Hilker, Thomas; Huete, Alfredo; Jones, Matthew; Kimball, John; Lyapustin, Alexei I.; Mõttus, Matti; Nemani, Ramakrishna R.; Piao, Shilong; Poulter, Benjamin; Saleska, Scott R.; Saatchi, Sassan S.; Xu, Liang; Zhou, Liming; Myneni, Ranga B.

    2015-06-01

    Resolving the debate surrounding the nature and controls of seasonal variation in the structure and metabolism of Amazonian rainforests is critical to understanding their response to climate change. In situ studies have observed higher photosynthetic and evapotranspiration rates, increased litterfall and leaf flushing during the Sunlight-rich dry season. Satellite data also indicated higher greenness level, a proven surrogate of photosynthetic carbon fixation, and leaf area during the dry season relative to the wet season. Some recent reports suggest that rainforests display no seasonal variations and the previous results were satellite measurement artefacts. Therefore, here we re-examine several years of data from three sensors on two satellites under a range of sun positions and satellite measurement geometries and document robust evidence for a seasonal cycle in structure and greenness of wet equatorial Amazonian rainforests. This seasonal cycle is concordant with independent observations of solar radiation. We attribute alternative conclusions to an incomplete study of the seasonal cycle, i.e. the dry season only, and to prognostications based on a biased radiative transfer model. Consequently, evidence of dry season greening in geometry corrected satellite data was ignored and the absence of evidence for seasonal variation in lidar data due to noisy and saturated signals was misinterpreted as evidence of the absence of changes during the dry season. Our results, grounded in the physics of radiative transfer, buttress previous reports of dry season increases in leaf flushing, litterfall, photosynthesis and evapotranspiration in well-hydrated Amazonian rainforests.

  10. Sunlight Mediated Seasonality in Canopy Structure and Photosynthetic Activity of Amazonian Rainforests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, J.; Knyazikhin, Y.; CHOI, S.; Park, T.; Barichivich, J.; Ciais, P.; Fu, R.; Ganguly, S.; Hall, F. G.; Hilker, T.; Huete, A. R.; Jones, M. O.; Kimball, J. S.; Lyapustin, A.; Mottus, M.; Nemani, R. R.; Piao, S.; Poulter, B.; Saleska, S. R.; Saatchi, S. S.; Xu, L.; Zhou, L.; Myneni, R.

    2015-12-01

    Resolving the debate about the nature and controls of seasonal variation in structure and metabolism of Amazonian rainforests is critical to understanding their response to climate change. In situ studies have observed higher photosynthetic and evapotranspiration rates, increased litterfall and leaf flushing during the sunlight-rich dry season. Satellite data also indicated higher greenness level, a proven surrogate of photosynthetic carbon fixation, and leaf area during the dry season relative to the wet season. Some recent reports suggest that rainforests display no seasonal variations and the previous results were satellite measurement artefacts. Therefore, we re-examine here several years of data from three sensors on two satellites under a range of sun positions and satellite measurement geometries and document robust evidence for a seasonal cycle in structure and greenness of wet equatorial Amazonian rainforests. This seasonal cycle is concordant with independent observations of solar radiation. We attribute alternative conclusions to an incomplete study of the seasonal cycle, i.e. the dry season only, and to prognostications based on a biased radiative transfer model. Consequently, evidence of dry season greening in geometry corrected satellite data was ignored and the absence of evidence for seasonal variation in lidar data due to noisy and saturated signals was misinterpreted as evidence of absence of changes during the dry season. Our results, grounded in the physics of radiative transfer, buttress previous reports of dry season increases in leaf flushing, litterfall, photosynthesis and evapotranspiration in well-hydrated Amazonian rainforests.

  11. Seasonal changes in the invertebrate community of granular activated carbon filters and control technologies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; You, Wei; Li, Xiaowei; Yang, Yufeng; Liu, Lijun

    2014-03-15

    Invertebrate colonization of granular activated carbon (GAC) filters in the waterworks is one of the most frequently occurring and least studied biological problems of water processing in China. A survey of invertebrate colonization of GAC filters was carried out weekly from October 2010 to December 2011 at a reservoir water treatment works in South China. Twenty-six kinds of invertebrates were observed. The abundance was as high as 5600ind.m(-3) with a mean of 860ind.m(-3). Large variations in abundance were observed among different seasons and before and after GAC filtration. The dominant organisms were rotifers and copepods. The average invertebrate abundance in the filtrate was 12-18.7 times of that in the pre-filtered water. Results showed that the GAC filters were colonized by invertebrates which may lead to a higher output of organisms in the filtrate than in the pre-filtered water. The invertebrate abundance in the GAC filters was statistically correlated with the water temperature. Seasonal patterns were observed. The invertebrate abundance grew faster in the spring and summer. Copepods were dominant in the summer while rotifers dominated in all other seasons of the year. There was a transition of small invertebrates (rotifers) gradually being substituted by larger invertebrates (copepods) from spring to summer. Control measures such as backwashing with chloric water, drying filter beds and soaking with saliferous water were implemented in the waterworks to reduce invertebrate abundances in the GAC filters. The results showed that soaking with saliferous water (99%, reduction in percent) was best but drying the filter beds (84%) was more economical. Soaking filter beds with 20g/L saliferous water for one day can be implemented in case of emergency. In order to keep invertebrate abundance in the acceptable range, some of these measures should be adopted. PMID:24268057

  12. Antinociceptive activity of extracts and secondary metabolites from wild growing and micropropagated plants of Renealmia alpinia

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Betancur, Isabel; Cortés, Natalie; Benjumea, Dora; Osorio, Edison; León, Francisco; Cutler, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Renealmia alpinia is native to the American continent and can be found from Mexico to Brazil, and in the Caribbean islands. It is known as “matandrea” in Colombia, and it has been commonly used in traditional medicine to treat painful diseases and ailments. Based on its traditional uses, it is of interest to evaluate the pharmacologic effects of this plant and its secondary metabolites. Materials and methods Methanol and aqueous extracts of wild and micropropagated R. alpinia (leaves) were obtained and chemically compared by High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography (HPTLC). The antinociceptive activity of these extracts was examined using an in vivo assay (Siegmund test). Additionally, the dichloromethane extract of R. alpinia was fractionated and pure compounds were isolated by chromatographic methods. The structure elucidation of isolated compounds was performed by NMR experiments and spectroscopic techniques and comparison with the literature data. Purified compounds were evaluated for their in vitro binding affinity for opioids and cannabinoids receptors. Results The dichloromethane extract of the plant’s aerial part afforded sinostrobin (1), naringenin 7,4′-dimethyl ether (2), 2′,6′-dihydroxy-4′-methoxychalcone (3), 4-methoxy-6-(2-phenylethenyl)-2H-pyran-2-one (4), naringenin 7-methyl ether (5) and 3,5-heptanediol, 1,7-diphenyl (6), which were isolated using chromatographic methods. Their chemical structures were established by physical and spectroscopic techniques. The antinociceptive effects observed in mice by extracts of wild and micropropagated plants were similar. The compounds isolated from R. alpinia do not show affinity to opioid or cannabinoid receptors. Conclusion Aqueous and methanol extracts of R. alpinia provide antinociceptive and analgesic effects in an in vivo model. These results contribute additional insight as to why this plant is traditionally used for pain management. Also, this is the first

  13. Antibacterial Activity of Blue Light against Nosocomial Wound Pathogens Growing Planktonically and as Mature Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Thwaite, Joanne E.; Burt, Rebecca; Laws, Thomas R.; Raguse, Marina; Moeller, Ralf; Webber, Mark A.; Oppenheim, Beryl A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The blue wavelengths within the visible light spectrum are intrinisically antimicrobial and can photodynamically inactivate the cells of a wide spectrum of bacteria (Gram positive and negative) and fungi. Furthermore, blue light is equally effective against both drug-sensitive and -resistant members of target species and is less detrimental to mammalian cells than is UV radiation. Blue light is currently used for treating acnes vulgaris and Helicobacter pylori infections; the utility for decontamination and treatment of wound infections is in its infancy. Furthermore, limited studies have been performed on bacterial biofilms, the key growth mode of bacteria involved in clinical infections. Here we report the findings of a multicenter in vitro study performed to assess the antimicrobial activity of 400-nm blue light against bacteria in both planktonic and biofilm growth modes. Blue light was tested against a panel of 34 bacterial isolates (clinical and type strains) comprising Acinetobacter baumannii, Enterobacter cloacae, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Elizabethkingia meningoseptica. All planktonic-phase bacteria were susceptible to blue light treatment, with the majority (71%) demonstrating a ≥5-log10 decrease in viability after 15 to 30 min of exposure (54 J/cm2 to 108 J/cm2). Bacterial biofilms were also highly susceptible to blue light, with significant reduction in seeding observed for all isolates at all levels of exposure. These results warrant further investigation of blue light as a novel decontamination strategy for the nosocomial environment, as well as additional wider decontamination applications. IMPORTANCE Blue light shows great promise as a novel decontamination strategy for the nosocomial environment, as well as additional wider decontamination applications (e.g., wound closure during surgery). This warrants further

  14. How faceted liquid droplets grow tails: from surface topology to active motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloutskin, Eli

    Among all possible shapes of a volume V, a sphere has the smallest surface area A. Therefore, liquid droplets are spherical, minimizing their interfacial energy γA for a given interfacial tension γ > 0 . This talk will demonstrate that liquid oil (alkane) droplets in water, stabilized by a common surfactant can be temperature-tuned to adopt icosahedral and other faceted shapes, above the bulk melting temperature of the oil. Although emulsions have been studied for centuries no faceted liquid droplets have ever been reported. The formation of an icosahedral shape is attributed to the interplay between γ and the elastic properties of the interfacial monomolecular layer, which crystallizes here 10-15K above bulk melting, leaving the droplet's bulk liquid. The icosahedral symmetry is dictated by twelve five-fold topological defects, forming within the hexagonally-packed interfacial crystalline monolayer. Moreover, we demonstrate that upon further cooling this `interfacial freezing' effect makes γ transiently switch its sign, leading to a spontaneous splitting of droplets and an active growth of their surface area, reminiscent of the classical spontaneous emulsification, yet driven by completely different physics. The observed phenomena allow deeper insights to be gained into the fundamentals of molecular elasticity and open new vitas for a wide range of novel nanotechnological applications, from self-assembly of complex shapes to new delivery strategies in bio-medicine. Acknowledgment is made to the Donors of the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund for support of this research and to the Kahn Foundation for the purchase of equipment.

  15. Risks of hormonally active pharmaceuticals to amphibians: a growing concern regarding progestagens

    PubMed Central

    Säfholm, Moa; Ribbenstedt, Anton; Fick, Jerker; Berg, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Most amphibians breed in water, including the terrestrial species, and may therefore be exposed to water-borne pharmaceuticals during critical phases of the reproductive cycle, i.e. sex differentiation and gamete maturation. The objectives of this paper were to (i) review available literature regarding adverse effects of hormonally active pharmaceuticals on amphibians, with special reference to environmentally relevant exposure levels and (ii) expand the knowledge on toxicity of progestagens in amphibians by determining effects of norethindrone (NET) and progesterone (P) exposure to 0, 1, 10 or 100 ng l−1 (nominal) on oogenesis in the test species Xenopus tropicalis. Very little information was found on toxicity of environmentally relevant concentrations of pharmaceuticals on amphibians. Research has shown that environmental concentrations (1.8 ng l−1) of the pharmaceutical oestrogen ethinylestradiol (EE2) cause developmental reproductive toxicity involving impaired spermatogenesis in frogs. Recently, it was found that the progestagen levonorgestrel (LNG) inhibited oogenesis in frogs by interrupting the formation of vitellogenic oocytes at an environmentally relevant concentration (1.3 ng l−1). Results from the present study revealed that 1 ng NET l−1 and 10 ng P l−1 caused reduced proportions of vitellogenic oocytes and increased proportions of previtellogenic oocytes compared with the controls, thereby indicating inhibited vitellogenesis. Hence, the available literature shows that the oestrogen EE2 and the progestagens LNG, NET and P impair reproductive functions in amphibians at environmentally relevant exposure concentrations. The progestagens are of particular concern given their prevalence, the range of compounds and that several of them (LNG, NET and P) share the same target (oogenesis) at environmental exposure concentrations, indicating a risk for adverse effects on fertility in exposed wild amphibians. PMID:25405966

  16. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of Pinus halepensis Miller growing in West Northern of Algeria

    PubMed Central

    Fekih, Nadia; Allali, Hocine; Merghache, Salima; Chaïb, Faïza; Merghache, Djamila; El Amine, Mohamed; Djabou, Nassim; Muselli, Alain; Tabti, Boufeldja; Costa, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Objective To find new bioactive natural products, the chemical composition and to sudy the antibacterial activity of essential oil components extracted from the aerial parts of the Algerian aromatic plant Pinus halepensis Miller (P. halepensis) (needles, twigs and buds). Methods The essential oil used in this study was isolated by hydrodistillation using a Clevenger-type apparatus according to the European Pharmacopoeia. The chemical composition was investigated using GC-retention indices (RI) and GC-MS. Results Forty-nine compounds, representing 97.9% of the total collective oil, were identified. Essential oil was dominated by hydrocarbon compounds (80.6%) especially monoterpenes (65.5%). The major compounds from ten oils stations were: myrcene (15.2%-32.0%), α-pinene (12.2%-24.5%), E-β-caryophyllene (7.0%-17.1%), terpinolene (1.8%-13.3%), 2-phenyl ethyl isovalerate (4.8%-10.9%), terpinene-4-ol (1.0%-8.2 %) and sabinene (1.5%-6.3%). The intra-species variations of the chemical compositions of P. halepensis aerial parts essential oils from ten Algerian sample locations were investigated using statistical analysis. Essential oil samples were clustered in 2 groups by hierarchical cluster analysis, according to their chemical composition. The essential oil revealed an interesting antimicrobial effect against Lysteria monocytogenes, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumanii, Citrobacter freundii and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Conclusions These results suggest that the essential oil from P. halepensis may be a new potential source as natural antimicrobial applied in pharmaceutical and food industries.

  17. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, Fe3+ reduction and enzymatic activities in cultures of Ganoderma australe growing on Drimys winteri wood.

    PubMed

    Elissetche, Juan-Pedro; Ferraz, André; Freer, Juanita; Mendonça, Régis; Rodríguez, Jaime

    2006-07-01

    Ganoderma australe is a basidiomycete responsible for a natural process of selective and extensive lignin degradation. Fatty acids, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), Fe3+-reduction and enzymatic activities were monitored in cultures of G. australe growing on Drimys winteri wood chips. Linoleic acid was de novo synthesized, and steadily increased during 12 weeks of cultivation. Part of the unsaturated fatty acids underwent peroxidation as TBARS accumulated with biodegradation time. TBARS accumulation was proportional to the wood weight and component losses. Manganese-dependent peroxidase and lignin peroxidase were not detected in the culture extracts, whereas laccase-induced oxidation of syringaldazine peaked after 2 weeks (104+/-9 micromol oxidized min(-1) kg(-1) of dry wood), subsequently decreasing. On the other hand, nonenzymatic Fe3+-reducing activity increased as a function of cultivation time and could be involved in the initiation of lipid peroxidation. PMID:16790026

  18. Seasonal variation of pharmaceutically active compounds in surface (Tagus River) and tap water (Central Spain).

    PubMed

    Valcárcel, Y; Alonso, S González; Rodríguez-Gil, J L; Castaño, A; Montero, J C; Criado-Alvarez, J J; Mirón, I J; Catalá, M

    2013-03-01

    Numerous studies have shown the presence of pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) in different environmental compartments, for example, in surface water or wastewater ranging from nanograms per litre to micrograms per litre. Likewise, some recent studies have pointed to seasonal variability, thus indicating that PhAcs concentrations in the aquatic environment may depend on the time of year. This work intended to find out (1) whether Tagus fluvial and drinking water were polluted with different groups of PhACs and (2) if their concentrations differed between winter and summer seasons. From the 58 substances analysed, 41 were found belonging to the main therapeutic groups. Statistical differences were seen for antibacterials, antidepressants, anxiolytics, antiepileptics, and cardiovascular drugs, with higher concentrations being detected in winter than in summer. These results might indicate that the PhACs analysed in this study undergo lower environmental degradation in winter than in summer. In order to confirm these initial results, a continuous monitoring should be performed especially on those PhACs that either because of an elevated consumption or an intrinsic chemical persistence are poorly degraded during winter months due to low temperatures and solar irradiation. It is especially important to identify which of these specific PhACs are in order to recommend their substitution by equally effective and safe substances but also environmentally friendly. PMID:22847337

  19. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of Juniperus excelsa M.Bieb. growing wild in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Madona; El Beyrouthy, Marc; Ouaini, Naïm; Iriti, Marcello; Eparvier, Véronique; Stien, Didier

    2014-05-01

    The essential oils (EOs) isolated from the leaves and twigs of Juniperus excelsa M.Bieb. growing wild in Lebanon were characterized, and their antimicrobial activity and antiradical capacity were evaluated. The EOs were obtained by hydrodistillation using a Clevenger-type apparatus and characterized by GC and GC/MS analyses. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated by determining minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) against a Gram-positive and a Gram-negative bacterium, a yeast, and a dermatophyte with the broth microdilution technique. A total of 28 constituents was identified and accounted for 90.1 and 95.6% of the twig and leaf EO composition, respectively. Both EOs were essentially composed of monoterpene hydrocarbons (46.7 and 59.6% for twig and leaf EOs, resp.) and sesquiterpenes (39.4 and 32.1%, resp.). The main components were α-pinene, α-cedrol, and δ-car-3-ene. The J. excelsa EOs did not show any antiradical potential, but revealed interesting in vitro antimicrobial activities against Staphylococcus aureus and Trichophyton rubrum (MICs of 64 and 128 μg/ml, resp.). The three major compounds were tested separately and in combination according to their respective amounts in the oil. δ-Car-3-ene was the most active component and is undoubtedly one of the constituents driving the antifungal activity of J. excelsa essential oil, even though synergies are probably involved. PMID:24827694

  20. Seasons on Saturn. II. Influence of solar activity on variation of methane absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidmachenko, A. P.

    2015-10-01

    Methane and ammonia in the atmosphere of Saturn are in the form of impurities at the level of less than tenths of a percentage. They take part in photochemical processes, the main products of which are hydrocarbons and ammonia NH3. Polyacetylenes absorb sunlight almost to 400 nm, and hydrocarbons <180 nm. Therefore, the solar activity cycle, the slope of the equator to the plane of the orbit, the orbital motion and the presence of the rings induce change in composition of the upper atmosphere. Radiation constants in the atmosphere depend on the physical and chemical conditions, decreasing from ~10 years at the visible clouds level, to months in tropopause, and days in stratosphere. The observed seasonal effects may be associated also with condensation and convection, and the dynamic time scale may be only tens of hours. The data analysis on the methane absorption distribution over the disk of Saturn for 1964-2012 showed a significant seasonal changes in the levels of visible clouds and above clouds haze. Changes of methane absorption along the meridian in the equinox 1966 and 1995, had the opposite course to the results in equinox 1980. But the expected differences in the change of methane absorption at the equinox 2009, similar to 1980, did not happen. Although all the physical and orbital characteristics of Saturn at equinoxes in these moments repeated, but the response to them were received various. A few years before the equinox in 1966, 1980 and 1995, the number of R, characterizing solar activity, varied from 40 to 180. Before equinox 2009 the Sun has minimal activity and the R value was practically zero. According to observations at the time of equinox 2009, convection in the Saturn's atmosphere stayed at a minimal level. After exiting of rings shadows in winter northern hemisphere deep cloud layer was "frozen" at the same low level at absence of active processes on the Sun. This allowed easily to register a thick layer of methane and ammonia gas. So how

  1. Seasonal trends in the composition and ROS activity of fine particulate matter in Baghdad, Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamad, Samera Hussein; Shafer, Martin Merrill; Kadhim, Ahmed K. H.; Al-Omran, Sabah M.; Schauer, James Jay

    2015-01-01

    Baghdad suffers from severe atmospheric particulate matter (PM) pollution and has limited infrastructure to monitor and control PM-pollution. To help better understand the nature of particulate matter in Baghdad, daily PM2.5 samples were collected every 6th day from September, 2012 to September, 2013. The samples were analyzed for chemical composition and cellular oxidative stress activity using a macrophage-based assay. The annual average PM2.5 concentration was 50 ± 19 μg m-3, and was comprised of approximately 28% crustal materials, 26% organic carbon (OC), 17% sulfate, 12% elemental carbon (EC), and 8.0% ammonium ion. No clear seasonal trend was observed for the total PM2.5 mass and PM2.5 OC, but EC exhibited higher concentrations in the warmer months, likely due to the extensive use of electric generators operated by diesel and gasoline for cooling. April showed the lowest levels of both EC and OC compared with other months due to both sand and rainstorm events which led to increased deposition and dispersion of local emissions. Concentrations of nitrate ion were low in all seasons due to the high temperatures and low humidity, but slightly higher levels were observed in the cooler months of winter. The oxidative stress (reactive oxygen species (ROS)) activity (59 ± 35 μg Zymosan equivalents m-3) of the PM was relatively lower than in other studied areas. Association between the water soluble PM constituents and the oxidative activity was investigated using a multi-linear regression model which showed no strong relationships between ROS activity and the water soluble components of PM2.5, but a moderate correlation of water soluble organic carbon from biomass burning (WSOC-BB) was observed (R2 = 0.52). Biomass burning PM has been shown to be an important contributor to ROS activity in other published studies, but additional work is needed to better understand the sources leading to the ROS activity in Baghdad.

  2. Distribution and seasonal variation of global lightning activities observed by ISUAL experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A. B.; Chiang, C.; Su, C.; Lee, Y.; Hu, C.; Tsai, L.; Huang, Y.; Chou, J.; Lee, L.; Huang, S.; Hsu, R.; Su, H.; Liu, T.; Chang, Y.; Lee, L.

    2007-12-01

    Lightnings serve as an important charge transporter between cloud and ground, and emit sferics those propagate in the ground-ionosphere cavity. The question on how global lightning activity might change in the future as a result of the global warming has attracted great attention. During the three-year observation of ISUAL/FORMOSAT-2, besides upper atmospheric transient luminous events more than 60,000 lightnings which exceeded the trigger threshold were recorded. In this presentation, the distribution, occurrence rate, and seasonal variation of these lightnings at local time between 22:30 and 23:00 will be reported, and compared with that of the OTD/LIS experiment (Christian, et al., 2003). Our results may suggest that intensive lightnings are possible more efficient to generate elves, and the production efficient is assessed in this presentation.

  3. Seasonal and nocturnal activities of the rhinoceros borer (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) in the north Saharan oases ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Ehsine, M'hammed; Belkadhi, Mohamed Sadok; Chaieb, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    The rhinoceros borer Oryctes agamemnon Burmeister (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) is a date palm insect pest that causes damage to trunk and roots of palm trees in several countries, including Tunisia, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Oman, and Saudi Arabia. The aim of this study was to monitor the seasonal and nocturnal activities of this beetle. Experiments were performed on a date palm of Rjim Maatoug during a 6-yr period (2004-2007, 2009-2010). Field survey using light traps shows that O. agamemnon is a univoltine, with a single population peak. Adults appear in the field around late May-early June and the population continued to build until maximum numbers are reached between the end of July and the beginning of August in the same year. No adults were found after first 10 d of November. This peak was characterized by female dominance in number. The monitoring of nocturnal activity showed that it starts its activities roughly 40 min after the sundown and continues until approximately 1 h before sunrise. The highest number of trapped beetles was remarked in the two first hours of flight activity, with a dominance of female in the first hour and a dominance of male in the second hour. We remarked that the sex ratio (female:male) of the cumulated number of trapped adults in the different years and nights of survey was in favor of females. PMID:25527574

  4. On the Relationship Between the Length of Season and Tropical Cyclone Activity in the North Atlantic Basin During the Weather Satellite Era, 1960-2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Officially, the North Atlantic basin tropical cyclone season runs from June 1 through November 30 of each year. During this 183-day interval, the vast majority of tropical cyclone onsets are found to occur. For example, in a study of the 715 tropical cyclones that occurred in the North Atlantic basin during the interval 1945-2010, it was found that about 97 percent of them had their onsets during the conventional hurricane season, with the bulk (78 percent) having had onset during the late summer-early fall months of August, September, and October and with none having had onset in the month of March. For the 2014 hurricane season, it already has had the onset of its first named storm on July 1 (day of year (DOY) 182), Arthur, which formed off the east coast of Florida, rapidly growing into a category-2 hurricane with peak 1-minute sustained wind speed of about 90 kt and striking the coast of North Carolina as a category-2 hurricane on July 3. Arthur is the first hurricane larger than category-1 to strike the United States (U.S.) since the year 2008 when Ike struck Texas as a category-2 hurricane and there has not been a major hurricane (category-3 or larger) to strike the U.S. since Wilma struck Florida as a category-3 hurricane in 2005. Only two category-1 hurricanes struck the U.S. in the year 2012 (Isaac and Sandy, striking Louisiana and New York, respectively) and there were no U.S. land-falling hurricanes in 2013 (also true for the years 1962, 1973, 1978, 1981, 1982, 1990, 1994, 2000, 2001, 2006, 2009, and 2010). In recent years it has been argued that the length of season (LOS), determined as the inclusive elapsed time between the first storm day (FSD) and the last storm day (LSD) of the yearly hurricane season (i.e., when peak 1-minute sustained wind speed of at least 34 kt occurred and the tropical cyclone was not classified as 'extratropical'), has increased in length with the lengthening believed to be due to the FSD occurring sooner and the LSD occurring

  5. Nymex activity keeps growing

    SciTech Connect

    McFadden, R.T.

    1989-01-23

    The New York Mercantile Exchange (Nymex) continues to strengthen its role in the world's oil markets. Contract trading volume grew significantly in 1988, participation expanded, and more and more trades of crude and products around the world were linked to the Exchange. Last November 14, Nymex marked the 10th anniversary of its heating oil futures contract. Widely considered the starting point for all energy futures trading worldwide, the contract launch coincided with the deregulation of heating oil in the U.S. Today, Nymex is widely recognized as an integral component of the energy industry. It is a risk management tool and serves as a reference price for crude oil and refined products.

  6. Gardening: A Growing Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Phyllis

    2011-01-01

    While Americans are as eager as ever to beautify their homes and yards with attractive landscaping, more and more gardeners are looking to the practical aspects of gardening--raising plants for food and choosing easy-care ornamental plants that are friendly to the environment. For some gardeners, raising their own food is a lifestyle choice. With…

  7. SEASONAL PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY IN THREE CHARACTERISTIC SOILS OF THE ENGLISH UPLANDS POLLUTED BY LONG-TERM ATMOSPHERIC NITROGEN DEPOSITION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphomonoesterase activities were determined monthly during a seasonal cycle in three characteristic soil types of the English uplands that have been subject to long-term atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Activities (µmol para-nitrophenol per gram soil dry wt per hour) ranged between 83.9 - 307 in...

  8. Generalized antifungal activity and 454-screening of Pseudonocardia and Amycolatopsis bacteria in nests of fungus-growing ants

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Ruchira; Ishak, Heather D.; Estrada, Dora; Dowd, Scot E.; Hong, Eunki; Mueller, Ulrich G.

    2009-01-01

    In many host-microbe mutualisms, hosts use beneficial metabolites supplied by microbial symbionts. Fungus-growing (attine) ants are thought to form such a mutualism with Pseudonocardia bacteria to derive antibiotics that specifically suppress the coevolving pathogen Escovopsis, which infects the ants' fungal gardens and reduces growth. Here we test 4 key assumptions of this Pseudonocardia-Escovopsis coevolution model. Culture-dependent and culture-independent (tag-encoded 454-pyrosequencing) surveys reveal that several Pseudonocardia species and occasionally Amycolatopsis (a close relative of Pseudonocardia) co-occur on workers from a single nest, contradicting the assumption of a single pseudonocardiaceous strain per nest. Pseudonocardia can occur on males, suggesting that Pseudonocardia could also be horizontally transmitted during mating. Pseudonocardia and Amycolatopsis secretions kill or strongly suppress ant-cultivated fungi, contradicting the previous finding of a growth-enhancing effect of Pseudonocardia on the cultivars. Attine ants therefore may harm their own cultivar if they apply pseudonocardiaceous secretions to actively growing gardens. Pseudonocardia and Amycolatopsis isolates also show nonspecific antifungal activities against saprotrophic, endophytic, entomopathogenic, and garden-pathogenic fungi, contrary to the original report of specific antibiosis against Escovopsis alone. We conclude that attine-associated pseudonocardiaceous bacteria do not exhibit derived antibiotic properties to specifically suppress Escovopsis. We evaluate hypotheses on nonadaptive and adaptive functions of attine integumental bacteria, and develop an alternate conceptual framework to replace the prevailing Pseudonocardia-Escovopsis coevolution model. If association with Pseudonocardia is adaptive to attine ants, alternate roles of such microbes could include the protection of ants or sanitation of the nest. PMID:19805175

  9. Comparative Studies on Phenolic Composition, Antioxidant, Wound Healing and Cytotoxic Activities of Selected Achillea L. Species Growing in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Agar, Osman Tuncay; Dikmen, Miris; Ozturk, Nilgun; Yilmaz, Mustafa Abdullah; Temel, Hamdi; Turkmenoglu, Fatma Pinar

    2015-01-01

    Turkey is one of the most important centers of diversity for the genus Achillea L. in the world. Keeping in mind the immense medicinal importance of phenols, in this study, three species growing in Turkey, A. coarctata Poir. (AC), A. kotschyi Boiss. subsp. kotschyi (AK) and A. lycaonica Boiss. & Heldr. (AL) were evaluated for their phenolic compositions, total phenolic contents (TPC), antioxidant properties, wound healing potencies on NIH-3T3 fibroblasts and cytotoxic effects on MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Comprehensive LC-MS/MS analysis revealed that AK was distinctively rich in chlorogenic acid, hyperoside, apigenin, hesperidin, rutin, kaempferol and luteolin (2890.6, 987.3, 797.0, 422.5, 188.1, 159.4 and 121.2 µg analyte/g extract, respectively). The findings exhibited a strong correlation between TPC and both free radical scavenging activity and total antioxidant capacity (TAC). Among studied species, the highest TPC (148.00 mg GAE/g extract) and TAC (2.080 UAE), the strongest radical scavenging (EC50 = 32.63 μg/mL), the most prominent wound healing and most abundant cytotoxic activities were observed with AK. The results suggested that AK is a valuable source of flavonoids and chlorogenic acid with important antioxidant, wound healing and cytotoxic activities. These findings warrant further studies to assess the potential of AK as a bioactive source that could be exploited in pharmaceutical, cosmetics and food industries. PMID:26437391

  10. Empowering Prospective Teachers to Become Active Sense-Makers: Multimodal Modeling of the Seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Mi Song

    2015-10-01

    Situating science concepts in concrete and authentic contexts, using information and communications technologies, including multimodal modeling tools, is important for promoting the development of higher-order thinking skills in learners. However, teachers often struggle to integrate emergent multimodal models into a technology-rich informal learning environment. Our design-based research co-designs and develops engaging, immersive, and interactive informal learning activities called "Embodied Modeling-Mediated Activities" (EMMA) to support not only Singaporean learners' deep learning of astronomy but also the capacity of teachers. As part of the research on EMMA, this case study describes two prospective teachers' co-design processes involving multimodal models for teaching and learning the concept of the seasons in a technology-rich informal learning setting. Our study uncovers four prominent themes emerging from our data concerning the contextualized nature of learning and teaching involving multimodal models in informal learning contexts: (1) promoting communication and emerging questions, (2) offering affordances through limitations, (3) explaining one concept involving multiple concepts, and (4) integrating teaching and learning experiences. This study has an implication for the development of a pedagogical framework for teaching and learning in technology-enhanced learning environments—that is empowering teachers to become active sense-makers using multimodal models.

  11. Seasonal activity and host associations of Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) in southeastern Missouri.

    PubMed

    Kollars, T M; Oliver, J H; Kollars, P G; Durden, L A

    1999-11-01

    Based on tick collections recovered from wild vertebrates and by dragging, the seasonal occurrence of adult blacklegged ticks, Ixodes scapularis Say, extended from October through May in southeastern Missouri. Adult activity was bimodal with the higher peak occurring in November followed by a lower peak in February. The activity of immature I. scapularis had the general pattern of that found in the Northeast where Lyme disease is hyperendemic, with larval activity (July) peaking after that of nymphs (May and June). Vertebrates varied in their importance as hosts of I. scapularis. White-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginanus (Zimmerman), and coyotes, Canis latrans Say, were the primary hosts of adult I. scapularis. Broad-headed skinks, Eumeces laticeps (Schneider), and eastern fence lizards, Sceloporus undulatus (Latreille), were the primary hosts of nymphal I. scapularis. The broad-headed skink, 5-lined skink, Eumeces fasciatus (L.), and Carolina wren, Thryothorus ludovicianus (Latham), were the primary hosts of larval I. scapularis. Homeotherms were important hosts of immature I. scapularis, accounting for 30% of nymphs and 39% of larvae collected. The eastern cottontail rabbit, Sylvilagus floridanus (Allen), may play an important role in the epidemiology of Lyme disease in Missouri. Isolates of Borrelia burgdorferi Johnson, Schmid, Hyde, Steigerwalt & Brenner were made from ticks recovered from rabbits, making the cottontail rabbit a key species for further study of the epidemiology of Lyme borreliosis in Missouri. PMID:10593072

  12. Characterization of Gulf sturgeon diel and seasonal activity in the Pensacola Bay system, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrege, Beth Marie

    2009-12-01

    We assess temporal and spatial distribution and diel variability in activity of Gulf of Mexico sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus desotoi in the Pensacola Bay system, Florida, using stationary ultrasonic telemetry. Gulf of Mexico sturgeon (n = 54) migrated through the bay system in fall to wintering areas in the Gulf of Mexico and Santa Rosa Sound. In spring, sturgeon migrated back through the bay system to summering habitats in rivers. Gulf of Mexico sturgeon use East Bay and Escambia Bay primarily as migration routes between riverine areas used in spring and summer and the Gulf of Mexico used in winter. North Central Pensacola Bay was not routinely frequented. Gulf of Mexico sturgeon used specific areas within the Pensacola Bay system in summer and winter not previously documented as essential sturgeon habitat. Areas in southeastern Pensacola were used heavily during winter by a portion of the population. Gulf of Mexico sturgeon also exhibited long-term winter residency in Santa Rosa Sound. Interestingly, an area in northeastern Escambia Bay supported Gulf of Mexico sturgeon in summer. This observation was unexpected; however, the identification of Gulf of Mexico sturgeon in this area at this time has important ecological and management implications. Gulf of Mexico sturgeon exhibited a strong diel activity pattern. Gulf of Mexico sturgeon were more active at night than during day in all seasons but summer. The use of prepositioned arrays of acoustic receivers not only provides continuous data within a defined area, but provides insights into nocturnal behavior not previously examined.

  13. Seasonal and Diel Variability in Dissolved DNA and in Microbial Biomass and Activity in a Subtropical Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Paul, John H.; DeFlaun, Mary F.; Jeffrey, Wade H.; David, Andrew W.

    1988-01-01

    Dissolved DNA and microbial biomass and activity parameters were measured over a 15-month period at three stations along a salinity gradient in Tampa Bay, Fla. Dissolved DNA showed seasonal variation, with minimal values in December and January and maximal values in summer months (July and August). This pattern of seasonal variation followed that of particulate DNA and water temperature and did not correlate with bacterioplankton (direct counts and [3H]thymidine incorporation) or phytoplankton (chlorophyll a and 14CO2 fixation) biomass and activity. Microautotrophic populations showed maxima in the spring and fall, whereas microheterotrophic activity was greatest in late summer (September). Both autotrophic and heterotrophic microbial activity was greatest at the high estuarine (low salinity) station and lowest at the mouth of the bay (high salinity station), irrespective of season. Dissolved DNA carbon and phosphorus constituted 0.11 ± 0.05% of the dissolved organic carbon and 6.6 ± 6.5% of the dissolved organic phosphorus, respectively. Strong diel periodicity was noted in dissolved DNA and in microbial activity in Bayboro Harbor during the dry season. A noon maximum in primary productivity was followed by an 8 p.m. maximum in heterotrophic activity and a midnight maximum in dissolved DNA. This diel periodicity was less pronounced in the wet season, when microbial parameters were strongly influenced by episodic inputs of freshwater. These results suggest that seasonal and diel production of dissolved DNA is driven by primary production, either through direct DNA release by phytoplankton, or more likely, through growth of bacterioplankton on phytoplankton exudates, followed by excretion and lysis. PMID:16347583

  14. Seasonal variations of the ovarian activity and pregnancy rate in the Egyptian buffalo cows (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Ali, Ahmed

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of season on the follicular and luteal dynamics and pregnancy rate in Egyptian buffaloes. A total of 327 genital tracts and 596 animals were used. The genital tracts were examined in winter (n = 58), spring (n = 179), summer (n = 49), and autumn (n = 41) for follicular population, incidence of presence of developed or mature corpus luteum (CL), and diameters of the preovulatory follicle (OF) and the mature CL. Buffaloes were mated in winter (n = 297) and summer (n = 299) and examined for pregnancy rate. Results showed that the mean number of the large follicles was higher in winter (1.21 ± 0.08 mm) and spring (1.04 ± 0.05 mm) than in summer (0.64 ± 0.1 mm) and autumn (0.78 ± 0.1 mm) (P = 0.0001). Likewise, the mean diameter of the OF was greater in winter (14.71 ± 0.7 mm) and spring (14.36 ± 0.5 mm) than in summer (12.4 ± 0.8 mm) and autumn (12 ± 0.8 mm) (P = 0.02). In addition, the mean diameter of the mature CL was higher in winter (15.8 ± 0.4 mm) and spring (15.5 ± 1.1 mm) than in summer (14.2 ± 1 mm) and autumn (13.2 ± 0.7 mm) (P = 0.003). The incidence of presence of developed or mature CL was lower in summer (69.4 %) than in winter (74.1 %), spring (87.2 %), or autumn (85.4 %) (P = 0.01). Double CLs (0.9 %) were observed only in spring. Ovarian cysts (2.5 %) were detected in winter and spring. The pregnancy rate was higher in buffaloes mated in winter (75.4 %) than in those mated in summer (61.9 %) (P = 0.0004). In conclusion, season affects the ovarian activity and reproductive efficiency of buffaloes, where winter and spring are the optimum seasons for breeding. PMID:25778728

  15. Flocs, turbulence, and biological activity: The seasonal mood-swings of a UK estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, David; Souza, Alejandro; Jago, Colin

    2014-05-01

    Both turbulence and biological activity have been shown to be important mediators of floc characteristics. Low turbulence promotes collisions and flocculation, while high levels may result in shear-induced rupture, literally tearing flocs apart. Because of this, turbulence parameterisation is key to understanding the relationship between turbulence and particle size. In addition, biological polysaccharides and other substances have been shown to increase collision efficiency, collision strength, and the strength of the resultant flocs. The results of a measurement campaign undertaken in a hypertidal UK estuary from February-March and May-June 2009 are presented utilising a combination of acoustic and optical instruments, moorings, and CTD stations. The data displays a seasonally varying flocculation signal in which a seasonal regime shift occurs: winter is turbulence-controlled with evidence of flocculation at high and low water under low turbulence conditions and breakup occurring during the higher turbulence conditions of the flood and ebb tides. Conversely, the summer regime is biologically-controlled and dominated by stronger, more shear-resistant flocs that do not break up under the high-turbulence conditions of the peak flood and ebb tides. Instead, the summer regime is dominated by a resuspension signal in which both particle size and concentration increase during the flood and ebb tides. This shift appears to be the result of the presence of biological polysaccharides during the summer months which increase both the floc size, and floc strength through an increase in the collision strength and collision efficiency of the particles, making them more resistant to turbulence-induced shear effects.

  16. Seasonal Changes in Testes Vascularisation in the Domestic Cat (Felis domesticus): Evaluation of Microvasculature, Angiogenic Activity, and Endothelial Cell Expression

    PubMed Central

    Alexandre-Pires, Graça; Mateus, Luísa; Martins, Catarina; Ferreira-Dias, Graça

    2012-01-01

    Some male seasonal breeders undergo testicular growth and regression throughout the year. The objective of this study was to understand the effect of seasonality on: (i) microvasculature of cat testes; (ii) angiogenic activity in testicular tissue in vitro; and (iii) testicular endothelial cells expression throughout the year. Testicular vascular areas increased in March and April, June and July, being the highest in November and December. Testes tissue differently stimulated in vitro angiogenic activity, according to seasonality, being more evident in February, and November and December. Even though CD143 expression was higher in December, smaller peaks were present in April and July. As changes in angiogenesis may play a role on testes vascular growth and regression during the breeding and non-breeding seasons, data suggest that testicular vascularisation in cats is increased in three photoperiod windows of time, November/December, March/April and June/July. This increase in testicular vascularisation might be related to higher seasonal sexual activity in cats, which is in agreement with the fact that most queens give birth at the beginning of the year, between May and July, and in September. PMID:22567311

  17. Possible seasonal activity of gullies on an sand dune (Russell crater, Mars)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouannic, Gwénaël.; Gargani, Julien; Costard, François

    2010-05-01

    Recent work has shown that gullies are among the most youthful features on Mars (Malin and Edgett, 2000; Costard et al., 2002; Reiss and Jaumann, 2003, Malin et al., 2006). Here we show that the gullies located on the Russell Crater dune are not only extremely youthful but also seem to be still actives. Various geomorphological features consistent with a seasonal activity suggest reactivated flows over the last three terrestrial years. Moreover, using an assemblage of 26 HiRISE images over a 31 month period (November 2006-May 2009) and superposed with MOLA tracks, we performed a quantitative analysis of the sinuosity and branching of the gullies on the shallow slope of the Russell crater. These geomorphologicals features suggest that debris flow have been formed by a fluid flow. As pure water generally is not thought to be stable on the surface of Mars under current conditions, these gullies could be indicative of a highly localized zone of meta-stability heretofore unidentified in the literature or by a highly mineralized water. Equally, the occurrence of the gullies on a dune may point to a near-surface source, i.e. near surface permafrost (Vedie et al. 2008), that could have been emplaced under conditions associated with late Amazonian obliquity excursions (Costard et al., 2002). Nevertheless, the precise composition of the fluid (CO2, mineralized water,…) is still unknown. Costard, F., Forget, F., Mangold, N., Peulvast, J.P., 2002. Formation of recent martian debris flow by melting of near-surface ground ice at high obliquity. Science, 295, 110-113. Malin, M.C., Edgett, K.E., 2000. Evidence for recent groundwater seepage and surface runoff on Mars. Science, 288, 2330-2335. Malin, M.C., Edgett, K.E., Posiolova, L.V., McColley, S.M., Dobrea, E.Z., 2006. Present day impact crater rate and contemporary gully activity on Mars. Science, 314, 1573-1577. Reiss, D., Jaumann, R., 2003. Recent debris flows on Mars : Seasonal observations of the Russell Crater dune field

  18. Influence of feeding alternative fiber sources on the gastrointestinal fermentation, digestive enzyme activities and mucosa morphology of growing Greylag geese.

    PubMed

    He, L W; Meng, Q X; Li, D Y; Zhang, Y W; Ren, L P

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this trial was to study the influence of dietary fiber sources on the gastrointestinal fermentation, digestive enzyme activity, and mucosa morphology of growing Greylag geese. In total, 240 Greylag geese (28-day-old) were allocated to 4 treatments (15 pens/treatment) differing in dietary fiber source: corn straw silage (CSS group), steam-exploded corn straw (SECS group), steam-exploded wheat straw (SEWS group), or steam-exploded rice straw (SERS group). At 112 days of age, 15 birds per group were euthanized to collect samples. No difference (P > 0.05) was found on all the gastrointestinal pH values and ammonia-nitrogen concentrations between the groups. The CSS and SERS groups had a lower (P < 0.05) proportion of acetic acid in the gizzard than the SECS and SEWS groups. The CSS group had a higher VFA concentration in the jejunum (P < 0.05) and acetic acid proportion (P < 0.01) in the ceca, and a lower (P < 0.01) butyric acid proportion than the other groups except for the SECS group. The SECS group had a higher (P < 0.01) acetic acid proportion and lower (P < 0.05) proportions of propionic acid and valeric acid in the ceca than the SEWS and SERS groups. Different fiber sources resulted in different VFA profiles, especially in the gizzard and ceca. Almost all gastrointestinal protease activities of the CSS group were higher (P < 0.05) than the other groups, along with lower (P < 0.01) amylase activities in the duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and ceca. Lipase activity in proventriculus was highest (P < 0.01) in the SEWS group and its cecal activity was lower (P < 0.01) in the SECS and SEWS groups than the CSS and SERS groups with a higher (P < 0.01) lipase activity in the CSS group than the SERS group. The SECS and SERS groups had a higher cellulase activity in the ceca than the CSS and SEWS groups, with a higher (P < 0.01) rectal cellulase activity in the SERS group than the other groups. There was no

  19. Synergistic activity of rifampicin and ethambutol against slow-growing nontuberculous mycobacteria is currently of questionable clinical significance.

    PubMed

    van Ingen, Jakko; Hoefsloot, Wouter; Mouton, Johan W; Boeree, Martin J; van Soolingen, Dick

    2013-07-01

    A key issue in the treatment of disease caused by slow-growing nontuberculous mycobacteria is the limited association between in vitro minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of rifampicin and ethambutol alone and the in vivo outcome of treatment with these drugs. Combined susceptibility testing to rifampicin and ethambutol could provide a more realistic view of the efficacy of these drugs. In this study, Mycobacterium avium (n = 5), Mycobacterium chimaera (n = 6), Mycobacterium intracellulare (n = 4), Mycobacterium xenopi (n = 4), Mycobacterium malmoense (n = 3) and Mycobacterium simiae (n = 2) clinical isolates were selected and the MICs of rifampicin and ethambutol alone and in combination were measured using the Middlebrook 7H10 agar dilution method. Synergy was defined as a fractional inhibitory concentration index ≤ 0.5. Rifampicin and ethambutol showed synergistic activity against the majority of M. avium (4/5), M. chimaera (5/6) and M. intracellulare (3/4) isolates and 1 of 2 eligible M. malmoense isolates. No synergistic activity was measured against M. xenopi and M. simiae. Synergy was neither universal for all species nor for all isolates of one species; it thus needs to be tested for rather than assumed. Even if this synergy exists in vivo, it is questionable whether the MICs to the combined drugs can be overcome by the drug exposure attained by current regimens at the recommended dosages. New dosing strategies for rifampicin and ethambutol should be studied to increase the exposure to these drugs and thus maximise their impact. PMID:23664674

  20. Chemical Composition and In Vitro Cytotoxic Activity of Essential Oil of Leaves of Malus domestica Growing in Western Himalaya (India)

    PubMed Central

    Walia, Mayanka; Mann, Tavleen S.; Kumar, Dharmesh; Agnihotri, Vijai K.; Singh, Bikram

    2012-01-01

    Light pale-colored volatile oil was obtained from fresh leaves of Malus domestica tree, growing in Dhauladhar range of Himalaya (Himachal Pradesh, India), with characteristic eucalyptol dominant fragrance. The oil was found to be a complex mixture of mono-, sesqui-, di-terpenes, phenolics, and aliphatic hydrocarbons. Seventeen compounds accounting for nearly 95.3% of the oil were characterized with the help of capillary GC, GC-MS, and NMR. Major compounds of the oil were characterized as eucalyptol (43.7%), phytol (11.5%), α-farnesene (9.6%), and pentacosane (7.6%). Cytotoxicity of essential oil of leaves of M. domestica was evaluated by sulforhodamine B (SRB) assays. The essential oil of leaves of M. domestica, tested against three cancer cell lines, namely, C-6 (glioma cells), A549 (human lung carcinoma), CHOK1 (Chinese hamster ovary cells), and THP-1 (human acute monocytic leukemia cell). The highest activity showed by essential oil on C-6 cell lines (98.2%) at concentration of 2000 μg/ml compared to control. It is the first paper in literature to exploit the chemical composition and cytotoxic activity of leaves essential oil of M. domestica. PMID:22619691

  1. Composition and antioxidant activity of Senecio nudicaulis Wall. ex DC. (Asteraceae): a medicinal plant growing wild in Himachal Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pankaj; Shah, G C

    2015-01-01

    The composition of essential oil isolated from Senecio nudicaulis Wall. ex DC. growing wild in Himachal Pradesh, India, was analysed, for the first time, by capillary gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry. A total of 30 components representing 95.3% of the total oil were identified. The essential oil was characterised by a high content of oxygenated sesquiterpenes (54.97%) with caryophyllene oxide (24.99%) as the major component. Other significant constituents were humulene epoxide-II (21.25%), α-humulene (18.75%), β-caryophyllene (9.67%), epi-α-cadinol (2.90%), epi-α-muurolol (2.03%), β-cedrene (1.76%), longiborneol (1.76%), 1-tridecene (1.16%) and citronellol (1.13%). The oil was screened for antioxidant activity using DPPH, ABTS and nitric oxide-scavenging assay. The oil was found to exhibit significant antioxidant activity by scavenging DPPH, ABTS and nitric oxide radicals with IC50 values of 10.61 ± 0.14 μg mL(- 1), 11.85 ± 0.28 μg mL(- 1) and 11.29 ± 0.42 μg mL(- 1), respectively. PMID:25515495

  2. Active-treatment effects of the Forsus fatigue resistant device during comprehensive Class II correction in growing patients

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Giorgio; Alvetro, Lisa; Defraia, Efisio; Ghislanzoni, Luis Tomas Huanc

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the active-treatment effects of the Forsus fatigue resistant device (Forsus) during comprehensive correction of Class II malocclusion in growing patients. Methods Fifty-four patients (mean age, 12.5 ± 1.2 years) with Class II division 1 malocclusion were consecutively treated with fixed app-liances in combination with Forsus. Lateral cephalograms were analyzed at the beginning of the fixed treatment (T1), Forsus insertion (T2), its removal (T3), and end of the comprehensive therapy (T4). Statistical comparisons were carried out by repeated-measures ANOVA with Tukey's post-hoc test (p < 0.05). Results The overall therapeutic effects were mainly dentoalveolar and occurred mostly during the active treatment with Forsus (T2-T3, mean duration = 0.5 ± 0.1 years). The overjet and overbite decreased significantly (-3.5 and -1.5 mm, respectively) and the molar relationship improved by 4.3 mm. These changes were associated with significant retroclination of the maxillary incisors (-3.1°), proclination and intrusion of the mandibular incisors (+5.0° and -1.5 mm, respectively), and mesialization of the mandibular molars (+2.0 mm). Conclusions Forsus had mainly dentoalveolar effects and contributed largely to the overall therapeutic outcome. PMID:24892027

  3. Physical Meaning of the Equinoctial Effect for Seasonal Variation of Geomagnetic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, A.

    2008-12-01

    The general tendency for magnetic disturbances to be more stormy at equinoxes than at solstices has been recognised for more than 150 years. To explain the seasonal variation three principal hypotheses have been proposed; the axial hypothesis (Cortie, 1912), the equinoctial hypothesis (Bartels, 1932; McIntosh, 1959), and the Russell and McPherron (RM) hypothesis (Russell and McPherron, 1973). The RM hypothesis, which is based on the recognition that the magnetic field in the solar equatorial plane tends to have the largest southward component in geocentric solar magnetospheric (GSM) coordinates in early April and October, has been largely accepted for many years. However, recent studies have confirmed that the RM effect accounts for only a subordinate proportion of the seasonal variation of geomagnetic activity, and that the larger part of the phenomenon is attributable to the equinoctial effect in which the angle between the solar wind flow and the dipole axis of the Earth plays an essential role (Cliver, Kamide and Ling, 2000; Cliver, Kamide, Ling and Yokoyama, 2001; O'Brien and McPherron, 2002). In this paper physical meaning of the equinoctial effect is investigated based on the data of three-hourly am index and solar wind parameters acquired by the ACE satellite. The am indices are well correlated with BsVxVx, where Bs is the southward component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and Vx is the solar wind velocity in the sun-earth direction. It is found, however, that the am - BsVxVx relation depends on the range of VxVx: The am in higher ranges of VxVx tends to be larger than am in lower ranges of VxVx for both equinoctial and solstitial epochs for the same value of BsVxVx. Using the data sets of the same VxVx range, it is shown that distribution of points in the am - BsVxVx diagram at the solstitial epochs overlaps with that at the equinoctial epochs and the average am values in each BsVxVx bin in solstitial epochs are almost equal to those in

  4. Seasonally-Active Water on Mars: Vapour, Ice, Adsorbate, and the Possibility of Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, M. I.

    2002-12-01

    Seasonally-active water can be defined to include any water reservoir that communicates with other reservoirs on time scales of a year or shorter. It is the interaction of these water reservoirs, under the influence of varying solar radiation and in conjunction with surface and atmospheric temperatures, that determines the phase-stability field for water at the surface, and the distribution of water in various forms below, on, and above the surface. The atmosphere is the critical, dynamical link in this cycling system, and also (fortunately) one of the easiest to observe. Viking and Mars Global Surveyor observations paint a strongly asymmetric picture of the global seasonal water cycle, tied proximately to planetary eccentricity, and the existence of residual ice caps of different composition at the two poles. The northern summer experiences the largest water vapour columns, and is associated with sublimation from the northern residual water ice cap. The southern summer residual carbon dioxide ice cap is cold trap for water. Asymmetry in the water cycle is an unsolved problem. Possible solutions may involve the current timing of perihelion (the water cap resides at the pole experiencing the longer but cooler summer), the trapping of water ice in the northern hemisphere by tropical water ice clouds, and the bias in the annual-average, zonal-mean atmospheric circulation resulting from the zonal-mean difference in the elevation of the northern and southern hemispheres. Adsorbed and frozen water have proven harder to constrain. Recent Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer results suggest substantial ground ice in the mid- and high-latitudes, but this water is likely below the seasonal skin depth for two reasons: the GRS results are best fit with such a model, and GCM models of the water cycle produce dramatically unrealistic atmospheric vapour distributions when such a very near surface, GRS-like distribution is initialized - ultimately removing the water to the northern and

  5. A new insight into the nature of seasonal variations in coordinate time series of GPS sites located near active faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimenko, Sergey V.; Bykov, Victor G.; Shestakov, Nikolay V.; Grib, Nikolay N.; Takahashi, Hiroaki

    2016-09-01

    This study provides new insights into the nature of seasonal variations in coordinate time series of GPS sites located near active faults and methods of their modeling. Monthly averaged coordinate time series were analyzed for several pairs of collocated GPS sites situated near the active fault intersection area, in close proximity to the central part of the northern boundary of the Amurian plate and the vicinity of the San Andreas Fault zone. It is concluded that the observed seasonal variations are best described by a breather function which is one of the solutions of the well-known sine-Gordon equation. The obtained results suggest that, in this case, the source of seasonal variations may be caused by the appearance of solitary strain waves in the fault intersection system, which may be qualitatively treated as standing waves of compression-extension of the geological medium. Based on statistical testing, the limits of applicability of the suggested model have been established.

  6. A new insight into the nature of seasonal variations in coordinate time series of GPS sites located near active faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimenko, Sergey V.; Bykov, Victor G.; Shestakov, Nikolay V.; Grib, Nikolay N.; Takahashi, Hiroaki

    2016-05-01

    This study provides new insights into the nature of seasonal variations in coordinate time series of GPS sites located near active faults and methods of their modeling. Monthly averaged coordinate time series were analyzed for several pairs of collocated GPS sites situated near the active fault intersection area, in close proximity to the central part of the northern boundary of the Amurian plate and the vicinity of the San Andreas Fault zone. It is concluded that the observed seasonal variations are best described by a breather function which is one of the solutions of the well-known sine-Gordon equation. The obtained results suggest that, in this case, the source of seasonal variations may be caused by the appearance of solitary strain waves in the fault intersection system, which may be qualitatively treated as standing waves of compression-extension of the geological medium. Based on statistical testing, the limits of applicability of the suggested model have been established.

  7. Titan's cloud seasonal activity from winter to spring with Cassini/VIMS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, S.; Le, Mouelic S.; Rannou, P.; Sotin, C.; Brown, R.H.; Barnes, J.W.; Griffith, C.A.; Burgalat, J.; Baines, K.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    Since Saturn orbital insertion in July 2004, the Cassini orbiter has been observing Titan throughout most of the northern winter season (October 2002-August 2009) and the beginning of spring, allowing a detailed monitoring of Titan's cloud coverage at high spatial resolution with close flybys on a monthly basis. This study reports on the analysis of all the near-infrared images of Titan's clouds acquired by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) during 67 targeted flybys of Titan between July 2004 and April 2010.The VIMS observations show numerous sporadic clouds at southern high and mid-latitudes, rare clouds in the equatorial region, and reveal a long-lived cloud cap above the north pole, ubiquitous poleward of 60??N. These observations allow us to follow the evolution of the cloud coverage during almost a 6-year period including the equinox, and greatly help to further constrain global circulation models (GCMs). After 4. years of regular outbursts observed by Cassini between 2004 and 2008, southern polar cloud activity started declining, and completely ceased 1. year before spring equinox. The extensive cloud system over the north pole, stable between 2004 and 2008, progressively fractionated and vanished as Titan entered into northern spring. At southern mid-latitudes, clouds were continuously observed throughout the VIMS observing period, even after equinox, in a latitude band between 30??S and 60??S. During the whole period of observation, only a dozen clouds were observed closer to the equator, though they were slightly more frequent as equinox approached. We also investigated the distribution of clouds with longitude. We found that southern polar clouds, before disappearing in mid-2008, were systematically concentrated in the leading hemisphere of Titan, in particular above and to the east of Ontario Lacus, the largest reservoir of hydrocarbons in the area. Clouds are also non-homogeneously distributed with longitude at southern mid

  8. Seasonal variation of the chemical composition and antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of the essential oils from Inga laurina (Sw.) Willd.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Fabiana B; de Aquino, Francisco J T; Nascimento, Evandro A; de M Martins, Carla; de Morais, Sérgio A L; Chang, Roberto; Cunha, Luís C S; Leandro, Luís F; Martins, Carlos H G; Martins, Mário M; da Silva, Claudio V; Machado, Fabrício C; de Oliveira, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The seasonal chemical composition of essential oils from Inga laurina was determined by GC/MS. In the stem bark's essential oil extracted during the dry season, the presence of terpenoids (30.05%) stood out, and phytol (9.76%) was the major compound identified. For the stem bark oil obtained during the rainy season, in addition to terpenoids (26.63%), a large amount of fatty acids (46.84%) were identified, in particular palmitic acid (25.40%). Regarding the leaves' essential oil obtained in the dry season, esters (42.35%) were the main components. The main ester present was (Z)-hex-3-enyl benzoate (10.15%) and the major compound of this oil was (Z)-hex-3-en-1-ol (14.23%). Terpenoids (33.84%), long-chain alkanes (27.04%) and fatty acids (21.72%) were the main components of the essential oil from leaves in the rainy season. Phytol (33.21%), nonacosane (21.95%) and palmitic acid (15.20%) were the major compounds identified. The antimicrobial activity against aerobic and anaerobic oral bacteria was evaluated by the microdilution broth method and cytotoxic activity was carried out with Vero cells. The essential oils from the rainy season showed a better inhibition of the bacterial growth with Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations (MIC) values of 25 or 50 µg·mL⁻¹ for aerobic bacteria, and high selectivity against bacteria was observed. The large amount of fatty acids in rainy season oils may be related to the better inhibitory effects observed. PMID:24731985

  9. Newton's Apple Teachers Guides. Seasons 9-10-11-12: A Collection of Lessons and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twin Cities Public Television, St. Paul, MN.

    Newton's Apple is a PBS family science program that explores basic science through high-energy, hands-on demonstrations. This volume is a collection of the teacher's guides from four seasons of Newton's Apple which were originally broadcast from 1991 through 1994. Each of the four seasons in the volume contains 26 lessons and a combination of…

  10. The novel Solanum tuberosum calcium dependent protein kinase, StCDPK3, is expressed in actively growing organs.

    PubMed

    Grandellis, Carolina; Giammaria, Verónica; Bialer, Magalí; Santin, Franco; Lin, Tian; Hannapel, David J; Ulloa, Rita M

    2012-12-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are key components of calcium regulated signaling cascades in plants. In this work, isoform StCDPK3 from Solanum tuberosum was studied and fully described. StCDPK3 encodes a 63 kDa protein with an N-terminal variable domain (NTV), rich in prolines and glutamines, which presents myristoylation and palmitoylation consensus sites and a PEST sequence indicative of rapid protein degradation. StCDPK3 gene (circa 11 kb) is localized in chromosome 3, shares the eight exons and seven introns structure with other isoforms from subgroup IIa and contains an additional intron in the 5'UTR region. StCDPK3 expression is ubiquitous being transcripts more abundant in early elongating stolons (ES), leaves and roots, however isoform specific antibodies only detected the protein in leaf particulate extracts. The recombinant 6xHis-StCDPK3 is an active kinase that differs in its kinetic parameters and calcium requirements from StCDPK1 and 2 isoforms. In vitro, StCDPK3 undergoes autophosphorylation regardless of the addition of calcium. The StCDPK3 promoter region (circa 1,800 bp) was subcloned by genome walking and fused to GUS. Light and ABRE responsive elements were identified in the promoter region as well as elements associated to expression in roots. StCDPK3 expression was enhanced by ABA while GA decreased it. Potato transgenic lines harboring StCDPK3 promoter∷GUS construct were generated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated plant transformation. Promoter activity was detected in leaves, root tips and branching points, early ES, tuber eyes and developing sprouts indicating that StCDPK3 is expressed in actively growing organs. PMID:22922879

  11. Active crop canopy sensor optimal spatial scale for in-season variable-rate nitrogen application in corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Active crop canopy reflectance sensors have shown to be an efficient method for assessing spatially-variable crop nitrogen (N) need and controlling remedial in-season N applications in wheat. Recently, these sensors have been studied for N application in corn. This study will be conducted during the...

  12. Seasonality and depth distribution of the abundance and activity of ammonia oxidizing microorganisms in marine coastal sediments (North Sea)

    PubMed Central

    Lipsewers, Yvonne A.; Bale, Nicole J.; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Schouten, Stefan; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Villanueva, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Microbial processes such as nitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) are important for nitrogen cycling in marine sediments. Seasonal variations of archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidizers (AOA and AOB) and anammox bacteria, as well as the environmental factors affecting these groups, are not well studied. We have examined the seasonal and depth distribution of the abundance and potential activity of these microbial groups in coastal marine sediments of the southern North Sea. This was achieved by quantifying specific intact polar lipids as well as the abundance and gene expression of their 16S rRNA gene, the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) gene of AOA and AOB, and the hydrazine synthase (hzsA) gene of anammox bacteria. AOA, AOB, and anammox bacteria were detected and transcriptionally active down to 12 cm sediment depth. In all seasons, the abundance of AOA was higher compared to the AOB abundance suggesting that AOA play a more dominant role in aerobic ammonia oxidation in these sediments. Anammox bacteria were abundant and active even in oxygenated and bioturbated parts of the sediment. The abundance of AOA and AOB was relatively stable with depth and over the seasonal cycle, while anammox bacteria abundance and transcriptional activity were highest in August. North Sea sediments thus seem to provide a common, stable, ecological niche for AOA, AOB, and anammox bacteria. PMID:25250020

  13. Dogwood Borer (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) Abundance and Seasonal Flight Activity in Apple Orchards, Urban Landscapes and Woodlands in Five Eastern States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The relative abundance and seasonal flight activity of dogwood borer, Synanthedon scitula Harris (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) was measured using weekly records from traps baited with its sex pheromone and deployed in apple orchards, urban landscapes and native woodland sites in New York, West Virginia, V...

  14. Comparison of Irrigation Water Use Estimates Calculated from Remotely Sensed Irrigated Acres and State Reported Irrigated Acres in the Lake Altus Drainage Basin, Oklahoma and Texas, 2000 Growing Season

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masoner, J.R.; Mladinich, C.S.; Konduris, A.M.; Smith, S. Jerrod

    2003-01-01

    Increased demand for water in the Lake Altus drainage basin requires more accurate estimates of water use for irrigation. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, is investigating new techniques to improve water-use estimates for irrigation purposes in the Lake Altus drainage basin. Empirical estimates of reference evapotranspiration, crop evapotranspiration, and crop irrigation water requirements for nine major crops were calculated from September 1999 to October 2000 using a solar radiation-based evapotranspiration model. Estimates of irrigation water use were calculated using remotely sensed irrigated crop acres derived from Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus imagery and were compared with irrigation water-use estimates calculated from irrigated crop acres reported by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board and the Texas Water Development Board for the 2000 growing season. The techniques presented will help manage water resources in the Lake Altus drainage basin and may be transferable to other areas with similar water management needs. Irrigation water use calculated from the remotely sensed irrigated acres was estimated at 154,920 acre-feet; whereas, irrigation water use calculated from state reported irrigated crop acres was 196,026 acre-feet, a 23 percent difference. The greatest difference in irrigation water use was in Carson County, Texas. Irrigation water use for Carson County, Texas, calculated from the remotely sensed irrigated acres was 58,555 acrefeet; whereas, irrigation water use calculated from state reported irrigated acres was 138,180 acre-feet, an 81 percent difference. The second greatest difference in irrigation water use occurred in Beckham County, Oklahoma. Differences between the two irrigation water use estimates are due to the differences of irrigated crop acres derived from the mapping process and those reported by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board and Texas Water Development Board.

  15. Potential signals mediating the maintenance of reproductive activity during the non-breeding season of the mare.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, B P; Reedy, S E; Sessions, D R; Powell, D M; McManus, C J

    2002-01-01

    The seasonal nature of reproductive activity in mares is widely accepted and considerable attention has focused on the mechanisms that lead to the initiation of the breeding season. In contrast, considerably less information is available about the termination of the breeding season. It is interesting to note that each winter a sub-population of mares continues to undergo oestrous cyclicity during the non-breeding season. Continuation of reproductive activity during the winter occurs most frequently in mares that maintain a non-pregnant condition in successive years. The maintenance of a non-pregnant condition in successive years leads to an increase in the percentage of total body fat and it has been proposed that the degree of adiposity may be a determinant of reproductive activity during the winter months. To investigate this hypothesis we have manipulated fat stores by either pharmacological treatments or feed restriction. The studies described in this review demonstrate that manipulation of body fat during the autumn months fails to modify the mechanisms that lead to anoestrus or the proportion of mares that continues to show oestrous cyclicity during the winter months. On the basis of these and related studies two hypotheses are presented that may serve as a template for future work. The first hypothesis proposes that one aspect of the long-term regulation of seasonal reproductive rhythms in mares, specifically anoestrus, may reflect recognition of the availability of metabolic fuels before perception of a change in photoperiod. Alternatively, energy availability may need to reach a critical value before a presumptive inhibitory daylength signal initiates termination of the breeding season. This review describes previous and current studies that have led to development of these proposals. PMID:12698977

  16. Volatile constituents and antioxidant activity of peel, flowers and leaf oils of Citrus aurantium L. growing in Greece.

    PubMed

    Sarrou, Eirini; Chatzopoulou, Paschalina; Dimassi-Theriou, Kortessa; Therios, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    The volatile constituents of the essential oils of the peel, flower (neroli) and leaves (petitgrain) of bitter orange (Citrus aurantium L.) growing in Greece were studied by GC-MS. The analytical procedures enabled the quantitative determination of 31 components. More specifically, the components of the essential oils identified were: twelve in the peel, twenty-six in the flowers, and twenty and sixteen in old and young leaves, respectively. The major constituents of the different parts of Citrus aurantium L. essential oils were: β-pinene (0.62%-19.08%), limonene (0.53%-94.67%), trans-β-ocimene (3.11%-6.06%), linalool (0.76%-58.21%), and α-terpineol (0.13%-12.89%). The DPPH test demonstrated that the essential oils in the old leaves had the maximum antioxidant activity, followed by the flowers, young leaves and the peel in that order. This study updates the data in the literature on the essential oils of bitter orange, and provides information on the composition of the oils for a further evaluation of this product. PMID:24002139

  17. No differences in sheep somatic cell nuclear transfer outcomes using serum-starved or actively growing donor granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Peura, T T; Hartwich, K M; Hamilton, H M; Walker, S K

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare serum-starved and non-starved donor cells in sheep nuclear transfer with a special emphasis on cloning outcomes. Sheep oocytes, derived either in vivo or in vitro, were fused with cultured serum-starved or actively growing adult granulosa cells. Resulting blastocysts were transferred to recipients fresh or after vitrification, and subsequent pregnancies followed to term. Donor cell treatment did not significantly affect preimplantation development, pregnancy rates, fetal loss or neonate survival rates. Of 22 lambs born, ten survived the immediate perinatal period but all succumbed at various timepoints within the first few weeks of life. The results of the study suggest that the use of serum-starved cells offers no advantages or disadvantages to cloning outcomes. Neither were significant differences in outcomes observed when using either in vivo- or in vitro-derived oocytes or embryos transferred fresh or after vitrification. Yet, these results continue to highlight problems associated with somatic cell cloning as indicated by offspring mortality. It remains unclear whether the high offspring mortality in the current study was related to species, associated with the cell lines used or the result of other causes. PMID:12921702

  18. Seasonal activity of nymphal Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) in different habitats in New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Lord, C C

    1995-01-01

    Activity patterns of nymphal Ixodes scapularis Say were compared between habitat types (dominant tree types: mixed deciduous, oak, white pine, red cedar, sassafras, and spicebush). Both the time of peak abundance and the relative abundance of questing nymphs at the peak were compared. Several smoothing algorithms were tested with the data to determine if they could be used to estimate the time of peak abundance more accurately. Determination of the time of peak abundance using the raw data or simple moving averages was susceptible to outliers. Weighted averages were less susceptible to outliers. The seasonal pattern of nymphal abundance was similar in all habitat types. Variation in the time of peak abundance between habitats was low. Peak densities were lower in deciduous habitats (0.24 +/- 0.05 nymphs per square meter) than in nondeciduous habitats (0.85 +/- 0.15 nymphs per square meter); this could have resulted from higher host use of the nondeciduous areas. These data suggest that there are differences in the population dynamics of nymphs found in different habitats. PMID:7869344

  19. [GLUCOSE CONTENT FLUCTUATION IN BLOOD OF NEWBORN RATS DEPENDING ON SEASON AND PATTERN OF SPONTANEOUS MOTOR ACTIVITY].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, N N; Selina, E N

    2015-01-01

    Earlier we have shown that in newborn rats the glucose level in blood serum changes depending on the pattern of spontaneous periodic motor activity (SPMA). During rest periods, both under dominant decasecond rhythm and under dominant minute rhythm, the glucose level in blood serum is higher than during activity periods. We have also shown that the glucose level in the blood serum rises with age reaching the level of adult animals by day 10. In the present study carried out on 3-10-day-old rats under conditions of free behavior the blood glucose content was investigated in different periods of <activity-rest> cycle during different seasons. It is found that in newborn rats of all ages studied (3-, 5-, 7-, and 10-day-old ones) the lowest glucose concentration in the blood is observed in the winter period. In spring its level increases and in summer reaches the maximum different significantly from the winter and spring levels in all age groups except day 5. In autumn the glucose level decreases and approaches the spring values but it is still different from the winter indices. In 5-day-old rats statistically significant differences of glucose levels in different seasons were not observed. The data obtained provide evidence of seasonal fluctuations of the glucose level in blood serum of newborn rats. At the same time during all seasons except spring the dependence of glucose level on the pattern of motor activity persists. In spring these differences are smoothed. Key words: ontogenesis, motor activity, metabolic factors, glucose, seasonal variations. PMID:26856074

  20. Successional Development of Sulfate-Reducing Bacterial Populations and Their Activities in a Wastewater Biofilm Growing under Microaerophilic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tsukasa; Okabe, Satoshi; Satoh, Hisashi; Watanabe, Yoshimasa

    2002-01-01

    A combination of fluorescence in situ hybridization, microprofiles, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified 16S ribosomal DNA fragments, and 16S rRNA gene cloning analysis was applied to investigate successional development of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) community structure and in situ sulfide production activity within a biofilm growing under microaerophilic conditions (dissolved oxygen concentration in the bulk liquid was in the range of 0 to 100 μM) and in the presence of nitrate. Microelectrode measurements showed that oxygen penetrated 200 μm from the surface during all stages of biofilm development. The first sulfide production of 0.32 μmol of H2S m−2 s−1 was detected below ca. 500 μm in the 3rd week and then gradually increased to 0.70 μmol H2S m−2 s−1 in the 8th week. The most active sulfide production zone moved upward to the oxic-anoxic interface and intensified with time. This result coincided with an increase in SRB populations in the surface layer of the biofilm. The numbers of the probe SRB385- and 660-hybridized SRB populations significantly increased to 7.9 × 109 cells cm−3 and 3.6 × 109 cells cm−3, respectively, in the surface 400 μm during an 8-week cultivation, while those populations were relatively unchanged in the deeper part of the biofilm, probably due to substrate transport limitation. Based on 16S rRNA gene cloning analysis data, clone sequences that related to Desulfomicrobium hypogeium (99% sequence similarity) and Desulfobulbus elongatus (95% sequence similarity) were most frequently found. Different molecular analyses confirmed that Desulfobulbus, Desulfovibrio, and Desulfomicrobium were found to be the numerically important members of SRB in this wastewater biofilm. PMID:11872492

  1. Testing anti-fungal activity of a soil-like substrate for growing plants in bioregenerative life support systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterenko, E. V.; Kozlov, V. A.; Khizhnyak, S. V.; Manukovsky, N. S.; Kovalev, V. S.; Gurevich, Yu. L.; Liu, Hong; Xing, Yidong; Hu, Enzhu

    2009-10-01

    The object of this research is to study a soil-like substrate (SLS) to grow plants in a Bioregenerative Life Support System (BLSS). Wheat and rice straw were used as raw materials to prepare SLS. Anti-fungal activity of SLS using test cultures of Bipolaris sorokiniana, a plant-pathogenic fungus which causes wheat root rot was studied. Experiments were conducted with SLS samples, using natural soil and sand as controls. Infecting the substrates, was performed at two levels: the first level was done with wheat seeds carrying B. sorokiniana and the second level with seeds and additional conidia of B. sorokiniana from an outside source. We measured wheat disease incidence and severity in two crop plantings. Lowest disease incidence values were obtained from the second planting, SLS: 26% and 41% at the first and the second infection levels, respectively. For soil the values were 60% and 82%, respectively, and for sand they were 67% and 74%, respectively. Wheat root rot in the second crop planting on SLS, at both infection levels was considerably less severe (9% and 13%, respectively) than on natural soil (20% and 33%) and sand (22% and 32%). SLS significantly suppressed the germination of B. sorokiniana conidia. Conidia germination was 5% in aqueous SLS suspension, and 18% in clean water. No significant differences were found regarding the impact on conidia germination between the SLS samples obtained from wheat and rice straw. The anti-fungal activity in SLS increased because of the presence of worms. SLS also contained bacteria stimulating and inhibiting B. sorokiniana growth.

  2. Do seasonal patterns of rat snake (Pantherophis obsoletus) and black racer (Coluber constrictor) activity predict avian nest predation?

    PubMed

    DeGregorio, Brett A; Weatherhead, Patrick J; Ward, Michael P; Sperry, Jinelle H

    2016-04-01

    Avian nest success often varies seasonally and because predation is the primary cause of nest failure, seasonal variation in predator activity has been hypothesized to explain seasonal variation in nest success. Despite the fact that nest predator communities are often diverse, recent evidence from studies of snakes that are nest predators has lent some support to the link between snake activity and nest predation. However, the strength of the relationship has varied among studies. Explaining this variation is difficult, because none of these studies directly identified nest predators, the link between predator activity and nest survival was inferred. To address this knowledge gap, we examined seasonal variation in daily survival rates of 463 bird nests (of 17 bird species) and used cameras to document predator identity at 137 nests. We simultaneously quantified seasonal activity patterns of two local snake species (N = 30 individuals) using manual (2136 snake locations) and automated (89,165 movements detected) radiotelemetry. Rat snakes (Pantherophis obsoletus), the dominant snake predator at the site (~28% of observed nest predations), were most active in late May and early June, a pattern reported elsewhere for this species. When analyzing all monitored nests, we found no link between nest predation and seasonal activity of rat snakes. When analyzing only nests with known predator identities (filmed nests), however, we found that rat snakes were more likely to prey on nests during periods when they were moving the greatest distances. Similarly, analyses of all monitored nests indicated that nest survival was not linked to racer activity patterns, but racer-specific predation (N = 17 nests) of filmed nests was higher when racers were moving the greatest distances. Our results suggest that the activity of predators may be associated with higher predation rates by those predators, but that those effects can be difficult to detect when nest predator communities

  3. Effect of Changes in Seasonal Rain Regime on Coastal Ecosystem Structure and Aquaculture Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosimo, S.; Melaku Canu, D.; Libralato, S.; Cossarini, G.; Giorgi, F.

    2008-12-01

    A downscaling experiment linked climate forcing produced by a Regional Climate Model for Europe to a 3D high resolution coupled transport biogeochemical model for the Lagoon of Venice, which in turn forced: a) a food web model for evaluation of cascading effects on ecosystem structure and b) a population dynamic bioenergetic filter feeders bivalvae model for evaluation of effects on aquaculture activities. The hierarchy of models was used to compare result for a reference situation (RF, 1961-1990) with results for two future IPCC scenarios (2071-2100), representing market oriented and local sustainability policies (scenarios A2 and B2, respectively). Future climate projections suggest that, locally, annual mean rain will not change much but the seasonal patterns will likely do so. Summer and spring will be more dry and winter and autumn more rainy. This will potentially increase winter nutrient concentrations but -because of unfavourable timing - primary and secondary productions will decrease, and nutrient surplus will be exported from the Lagoon of Venice to the Adriatic Sea. The impacts on higher trophic levels could be softened thanks to presence of alternative energy pathways and role of omnivory. However, in our future scenario of the lagoon food web the suitability for higher trophic level organisms seems lower. A more detailed analysis on clam aquaculture indicates that this activity will suffer the decrease of primary productivity, and point to the need of implementation of proper aquaculture management policies. In the light of adaptive management. These policies cannot be a straightfoward extrapolation of present practises, but need to be defined basing on future conditions.

  4. Effects of seasonal variations on antioxidant activity of pink guava fruits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Haniza; Abdullah, Aminah

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of seasonal variations during rainy and hot season on antioxidant activity of pink guava fruits in approximately one year duration specifically on November 2012, December 2012, January 2013, March 2013, April 2013, May 2013, July 2013, August 2013 and November 2013. Fruit samples (Sungkai and Semenyih variants) were collected from Sime Darby Beverages plantation located in Sitiawan. The fruits were samples for 9 times from Nov 2012 to Nov 2013 except Feb 2013, Jun 2013, Sept 2013 and Oct 2013. Fruits were peeled, seeded and blended into uniform puree. Samples were then extracted for its antioxidant activity determination using 50% acetone. Antioxidant activity was evaluated using total phenolic compounds (TPC) assay, ferric-reducing antioxidant power assay (FRAP) and 1,1-diphenyl1-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical-scavenging capacity (DPPH). Analysis was conducted using 96-well microplate spectrophotometer UV. The highest TPC result was Semenyih var recorded 2192.80 mg GAE/100g FW whilst Sungkai var 1595.98 mg GAE/100g FW both on July 2013 with rainfall was at the least (45mm) and the lowest for Sungkai var was 792.75 mg GAE/100g FW and 1032.41 mg GAE/100g FW for Semenyih var, both on Nov 2012 with 185mm rainfall. There were significant negative correlation between TPC and rainfall (mm) for both Semenyih var (r = - 0.699, p<0.005, r2 = 0.489) and Sungkai var (r = -0.72, p<0.05, r2 = 0.531). The highest FRAP result (mg TE/100g FW) was 1677.74 for Semenyih var (Aug 2013, rainfall = 160.5mm) and the highest FRAP for Sungkai var was 1104.60 (Jul 2013, rainfall = 45.0mm) whereas the lowest for Semenyih and Sungkai var was 1090.22 (Mar 2013, rainfall = 97.5mm) and 767.88 (Nov 2012, rainfall = 185.50) respectively. There was weak negative correlation between FRAP and rainfall(mm) for both Sungkai var (r = - 0.324, p<0.05, r2 = 0.105) and Semenyih var (r = - 0.362, p<0.05, r2 = 0.132). The highest DPPH for Semenyih var was 88.40% (Aug

  5. Seasonal variations of the phenolic constituents in bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) leaves, stems and fruits, and their antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Bujor, Oana-Crina; Le Bourvellec, Carine; Volf, Irina; Popa, Valentin I; Dufour, Claire

    2016-12-15

    The seasonal variations of the content and diversity of phenolic compounds, as well as the antioxidant activity of leaves, stems and fruits of bilberry collected in May, July and September, were evaluated for two consecutive years. UPLC/MS(n) analyses showed the predominance of anthocyanins in fruits, caffeic acid derivatives in leaves whereas flavanol oligomers represented more than half of the phenolic compounds in stems. Thioacidolysis revealed degrees of polymerization between 2 and 4 and (-)-epicatechin as the main flavanol unit. The sum of the phenolic compounds by UPLC was highly correlated with the total polyphenol content and the antioxidant activity in the DPPH test for all the extracts except for May leaves. The latter were relatively rich in p-coumaric acid derivatives. Seasonal effects were more marked for leaves, which exhibited higher antioxidant activities and phenolic contents in July and September when these parameters were at their highest in July for stems. PMID:27451155

  6. Seasonal variations in the activity budget of Japanese macaques in the coniferous forest of Yakushima: effects of food and temperature.

    PubMed

    Hanya, Goro

    2004-07-01

    Seasonal variations in the activity budget of Japanese macaques in the coniferous forest of Yakushima were studied over the course of 1 year. On an annual basis, they spent 38% of the daytime feeding, 16% traveling, 14% in social interactions, and 32% engaged in resting. The effects of temperature and food-related factors (i.e., food distribution, feeding speed, and food abundance) on the seasonal variations of activity budget were examined by stepwise multiple regression analysis. When the temperature was low, the macaques decreased traveling and feeding time, in accordance with the prediction that endothermal animals save energy under severe thermoregulatory cost. When the feeding speed of available foods was slow, they spent more time feeding. When high-quality foods were abundant, they decreased feeding time. These macaques did not respond to fluctuations in food distribution. The present results indicate the importance of temperature, in addition to food-related factors, as a determinant of activity budgets. PMID:15258960

  7. Towards a complete census of active galactic nuclei in nearby galaxies: the incidence of growing black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulding, A. D.; Alexander, D. M.; Lehmer, B. D.; Mullaney, J. R.

    2010-07-01

    We investigate the local supermassive black hole (SMBH) density function and relative mass accretion rates of all active galactic nuclei (AGNs) identified in a volume-limited sample of infrared (IR) bright galaxies (LIR > 3 × 109Lsolar) to D < 15Mpc. A data base of accurate SMBH mass (MBH) estimates is compiled from literature sources using physically motivated AGN modelling techniques (reverberation mapping, maser mapping and gas kinematics) and well-established indirect MBH estimation methods (the M-σ* and MBH-LK,bul relations). For the three sources without previously published MBH estimates, we use Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) K-band imaging and GALFIT to constrain the bulge luminosities, and hence SMBH masses. In general, we find the AGNs in the sample host SMBHs which are spread over a wide mass range [MBH ~ (0.1-30) × 107Msolar], but with the majority in the poorly studied MBH ~ 106-107Msolar region. Using sensitive hard X-ray (2-10keV) and mid-IR constraints we calculate the bolometric luminosities of the AGNs (LBol,AGN) and use them to estimate relative mass accretion rates. We use these data to calculate the volume-averaged SMBH growth rate of galaxies in the local Universe and find that the AGNs hosting SMBHs in the mass range MBH ~ 106-107Msolar are dominated by optically unidentified AGNs. These relatively small SMBHs are acquiring a significant proportion of their mass in the present day, and are amongst the most rapidly growing in the local Universe (SMBH mass-doubling times of ~6Gyr). Additionally, we find tentative evidence for an increasing volume-weighted AGN fraction with decreasing SMBH mass in the MBH ~ 106-108Msolar range. Overall, we conclude that significant mass accretion on to small SMBHs may be missed in even the most sensitive optical surveys due to absent or weak optical AGN signatures.

  8. Seasonal activity patterns of Ixodes pacificus nymphs in relation to climatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Eisen, L; Eisen, R J; Lane, R S

    2002-09-01

    In western North America, the tick Ixodes pacificus Cooley & Kohls (Acari: Ixodidae) is the primary vector to humans and domestic animals of the disease agents causing Lyme disease and granulocytic ehrlichiosis. We examined the seasonal activity patterns of I. pacificus nymphs over a 4-year period, including the wet and cold El Niño winter/spring of 1998, in a dry oak/madrone woodland, and for one year in a cooler and moister redwood/tanoak woodland in Mendocino County, California. Linear regressions were used to estimate when nymphal densities first exceeded and then fell below 25, 50 and 75% of the recorded yearly peak densities. In oak/madrone woodland, nymphs typically were active by mid-March, reached 50% of their yearly peak densities in early to mid-April, peaked by early May, fell below 50% of their peak densities by early to mid-June, and were absent by late July to mid-August. The lengths of the periods with nymphal densities exceeding 50 and 75% of the recorded yearly peaks in oak/madrone woodland were associated positively with rainfall and negatively with maximum air temperatures during April-May. Moreover, nymphal numbers typically reached 50% of their peak 10-15 days later, remained at levels above 50% of the peak 1.3-1.5 times longer, and started declining 4-6 weeks later under cooler, moister climatic conditions (oak/madrone woodland in 1998 and redwood/tanoak woodland in 2000) relative to warmer, drier conditions (oak/madrone woodland in 2000-2001). In oak/madrone woodland, nymphal densities typically started to decline when mean maximum daily air temperatures exceeded 23 degrees C. Nymphal densities were higher in dry oak/madrone relative to moist redwood/tanoak woodland from mid-March to late May 2000, similar in both habitat types in early June, but higher in redwood/tanoak woodland from late June onwards. We conclude that large-scale studies of the density of I. pacificus nymphs in California need to consider spatial variation in the length

  9. Seasonal dynamics of prokaryotic abundance and activities in relation to environmental parameters in a transitional aquatic ecosystem (Cape Peloro, Italy).

    PubMed

    Zaccone, R; Azzaro, M; Azzaro, F; Bergamasco, A; Caruso, G; Leonardi, M; La Ferla, R; Maimone, G; Mancuso, M; Monticelli, L S; Raffa, F; Crisafi, E

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the effects of temporal changes on microbial parameters in a brackish aquatic ecosystem. To this aim, the abundances of prokaryotes and vibrios together with the rates of enzymatic hydrolysis of proteins by leucine aminopeptidase (LAP), polysaccharides by β-glucosidase (GLU) and organic phosphates by alkaline phosphatase (AP), heterotrophic prokaryotic production (HPP), respiration (R), were seasonally investigated, during a 2-year period in the coastal area of Cape Peloro (Messina, Italy), constituted by two brackish lakes (Faro and Ganzirri). In addition, physical and chemical parameters (temperature, salinity, nutrients) and particulate organic carbon and nitrogen (POC, PN) were measured. The influence of multiple factors on prokaryotic abundances and activities was analysed. The results showed that Cape Peloro area is characterised by high seasonal variability of the microbial parameters that is higher than the spatial one. Combined changes in particulate matter and temperature (T), could explain the variability in vibrios abundance, GLU and R activities in both lakes, indicating a direct stimulation of the warm season on the heterotrophic prokaryotic metabolism. Positive correlations between T (from 13.3 to 29.6 °C) and HPP, LAP, AP, POC, PN are also observed in Ganzirri Lake. Moreover, the trophic status index and most of the microbial parameters show significant seasonal differences. This study demonstrates that vibrios abundance and microbial activities are responsive to the spatial and seasonal changes of examined area. The combined effects of temperature and trophic conditions on the microbial parameters lead us to suggest their use as potential indicators of the prokaryotic response to climate changes in temperate brackish areas. PMID:24158689

  10. Photometry of Pluto 2008–2014: Evidence of Ongoing Seasonal Volatile Transport and Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buratti, B. J.; Hicks, M. D.; Dalba, P. A.; Chu, Devin; O’Neill, Ariel; Hillier, J. K.; Masiero, J.; Banholzer, Sophianna; Rhoades, H.

    2015-05-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft will encounter Pluto in 2015 July. As this fast flyby will yield a picture of Pluto frozen in time, ground-based observations are key to understanding this dwarf ice planet, especially with regard to the seasonal transport of surface volatiles. This paper reports on changes in Pluto's rotational light curve as evidence for this transport. Historical observations are consistent with a stable frost pattern, but since 2002, changes began to appear in both light curves and Hubble Space Telescope maps. Our BVR observations at Table Mountain Observatory from 2008 to 2014 show evidence for sustained and continued albedo and color changes on Pluto. The B and V albedos are stable, but Pluto is becoming redder in color, particularly on its low-albedo side. This view is consistent with the transport of a bright volatile (nitrogen) with the uncovering of a substrate of red material such as photolyzed methane. As Buie et al. reported a B – V of 0.96 in 2002–2003, and our B – V was higher in 2008–2012, Pluto may have experienced a transient reddening in the 1999–2012 period. We also discovered an opposition supersurge in all three colors at very small solar phase angles (∼0.°10). Explosive geysers have been observed on Triton and Mars, the two other celestial bodies with receding polar caps. Because the physical conditions existing on Pluto are similar to those on Triton, we predict that plume deposits and possibly active plumes will be found on its surface.

  11. The antioxidant activities of seasonings used in Asian cooking. Powerful antioxidant activity of dark soy sauce revealed using the ABTS assay.

    PubMed

    Long, L H; Kwee, D C; Halliwell, B

    2000-02-01

    Scavenging of the ABTS (2,2'-azinobis[3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonate])-derived nitrogen-centred radical cation (ABTS*+) was used to compare the total antioxidant activities of several seasonings used in Asian cooking. The results were expressed as Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC). The TEAC activities of dark soy sauces were found to be exceptionally high. In evaluating the TEAC of commercial products, attention must be paid to the addition of preservatives by manufacturers to the seasonings tested. Sodium benzoate (a preservative added to several seasonings) did not react significantly with ABTS*+, but the sulphite content of certain white wines may have led to an over-estimation of their TEAC. PMID:10653488

  12. Performance of active solar space-heating systems, 1980-1981 heating season

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, K.; Kendall, P.; Pakkala, P.; Cramer, M.

    1981-01-01

    Data are provided on 32 solar heating sites in the National Solar Data Network (NSDN). Of these, comprehensive data are included for 14 sites which cover a range of system types and solar applications. A brief description of the remaining sites is included along with system problems experienced which prevented comprehensive seasonal analyses. Tables and discussions of individual site parameters such as collector areas, storage tank sizes, manufacturers, building dimensions, etc. are provided. Tables and summaries of 1980-1981 heating season data are also provided. Analysis results are presented in graphic form to highlight key summary information. Performance indices are graphed for two major groups of collectors - liquid and air. Comparative results of multiple NSDN systems' operation for the 1980-1981 heating season are summarized with discussions of specific cases and conclusions which may be drawn from the data. (LEW)

  13. Seasonality of the activity pattern of Callithrix penicillata (Primates, Callitrichidae) in the cerrado (scrub savanna vegetation).

    PubMed

    Vilela, S L; de Faria, D S

    2004-05-01

    Two wild groups of Callithrix penicillata, the Black Pincelled Marmoset, were observed from January to September 1998, in two areas, one an area of dense scrub savanna vegetation (cerrado) and the other, a semidecidual woodland (cerradão), both within the boundaries of the Ecological Reserve of IBGE (Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics), in an environmentally protected area, the APA (Portuguese abbreviation for "environmental protected area") Gama/Cabeça-de-Veado, Brasília, DF. The behavioral data collected during the rainy (January 15 to April 15) and dry season (June 1 to September 15) were compared. Because of the proximity to the Reserve facilities, the group from the dense scrub savanna vegetation (CD) was submitted to antropic impacts different from the group in the semidecidual woodland (CE), which was using as territory an area that had been suffering from man-made fires every two years as part of a long-term experimental project on fire impacts. The behavioral data was quantified by instantaneous cross-section ("scan sampling") every ten minutes with records of locomotion, rest, foraging for insects, use of exudate, and feeding. During the whole year, the greatest percentage of time spent by CE and CD was in foraging for insects, with 44% and 39%, respectively. It was evident when comparing the data for the two seasons that, for both groups, foraging for insects was more intense during the dry season, possibly to complement the shortage of food, and locomotion increased during the rainy season. The greater the availability and distribution of fruit in the areas, the greater the locomotion of the groups to obtain these resources. None of the other behavioral patterns, including the use of exudates, presented significant differences between the two seasons. Both groups foraged more frequently during the dry season and locomoted more during the rainy one. PMID:15462311

  14. Seasonal changes in the white blood cell system, lyzozyme activity and cortisol level in Arabian brood mares and their foals.

    PubMed

    Gill, J; Kompanowska-Jezierska, E; Jakubow, K; Kott, A; Szumska, D

    1985-01-01

    In 34 pure-breed Arabian horses divided into four groups (Gr. I, ten pregnant mares; Gr. II, seven barren mares; Gr. III, ten foals born in 1981; Gr. IV, seven foals born in 1982) seasonal changes in the white blood cell system, cortisol level and lyzozyme activity were studied. Seasonal periodicity was found in all groups for the number of lymphocytes, segmented neutrophils and eosinophils and cortisol level. Leukocyte periodicity was found in three groups, but not in the barren mares. In lyzozyme activity there was periodicity in three groups but not in the youngest foals. In the stab neutrophils, basophils and monocytes no cycle was observed. The behaviour of the indices studied showed the influence of age of the horses (mature vs young) and the physiological state of the mares (pregnancy or barrenness). PMID:2863038

  15. Effect of Season and High Ambient Temperature on Activity Levels and Patterns of Grizzly Bears (Ursus arctos)

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, Michelle L.; McLellan, Bruce N.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding factors that influence daily and annual activity patterns of a species provides insights to challenges facing individuals, particularly when climate shifts, and thus is important in conservation. Using GPS collars with dual-axis motion sensors that recorded the number of switches every 5 minutes we tested the hypotheses: 1. Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) increase daily activity levels and active bout lengths when they forage on berries, the major high-energy food in this ecosystem, and 2. Grizzly bears become less active and more nocturnal when ambient temperature exceeds 20°C. We found support for hypothesis 1 with both male and female bears being active from 0.7 to 2.8 h longer in the berry season than in other seasons. Our prediction under hypothesis 2 was not supported. When bears foraged on berries on a dry, open mountainside, there was no relationship between daily maximum temperature (which varied from 20.4 to 40.1°C) and the total amount of time bears were active, and no difference in activity levels during day or night between warm (20.4–27.3°C) and hot (27.9–40.1°C) days. Our results highlight the strong influence that food acquisition has on activity levels and patterns of grizzly bears and is a challenge to the heat dissipation limitation theory. PMID:25692979

  16. Effect of season and high ambient temperature on activity levels and patterns of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos).

    PubMed

    McLellan, Michelle L; McLellan, Bruce N

    2015-01-01

    Understanding factors that influence daily and annual activity patterns of a species provides insights to challenges facing individuals, particularly when climate shifts, and thus is important in conservation. Using GPS collars with dual-axis motion sensors that recorded the number of switches every 5 minutes we tested the hypotheses: 1. Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) increase daily activity levels and active bout lengths when they forage on berries, the major high-energy food in this ecosystem, and 2. Grizzly bears become less active and more nocturnal when ambient temperature exceeds 20°C. We found support for hypothesis 1 with both male and female bears being active from 0.7 to 2.8 h longer in the berry season than in other seasons. Our prediction under hypothesis 2 was not supported. When bears foraged on berries on a dry, open mountainside, there was no relationship between daily maximum temperature (which varied from 20.4 to 40.1°C) and the total amount of time bears were active, and no difference in activity levels during day or night between warm (20.4-27.3°C) and hot (27.9-40.1°C) days. Our results highlight the strong influence that food acquisition has on activity levels and patterns of grizzly bears and is a challenge to the heat dissipation limitation theory. PMID:25692979

  17. First survey of seasonal abundance and daily activity of Stomoxys spp. (Diptera: Muscidae) in Kamphaengsaen Campus, Nakornpathom province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Masmeatathip, R; Gilles, J; Ketavan, C; Duvallet, G

    2006-09-01

    The seasonal changes and the daily activity of Stomoxyine species (Diptera: Muscidae) were examined, using Vavoua traps, in a dairy and a beef cattle farm in Nakhonpathom province, Thailand during July 2004 to June 2005. Over this period, Stomoxys calcitrans was the most commonly trapped species, followed by S. sitiens and S. indica. For the later species, this is the first report of its presence in Thailand. A total of 80 % of flies were captured during the rainy season from May to October and 20 % during the dry season from November to April. No major difference of fly density was observed between the dairy and the beef cattle farm. The activity pattern of S. calcitrans was diurnal with a peak between 08:00 am to 10:00 am and another less marked one in the afternoon. The activity pattern of S. sitiens and S. indica was mainly crepuscular with 2 peaks, early in the morning (06:00 a.m.) and late in the afternoon (6:00 p.m.). Those species are important pests of livestock in Thailand, where they are known as a mechanical vector of trypanosomes. A better knowledge of their ecology is a prerequisite for more efficient control measures. PMID:17007217

  18. Seasonal changes in the activity of the adrenal medulla of Viscacha (Lagostomus maximus maximus).

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Hugo; Filippa, Verónica Palmira; Penissi, Alicia; Fogal, Teresa; Domínguez, Susana; Piezzi, Ramón Salvador; Scardapane, Luis

    2013-07-01

    Animals living in nontropical climates modify their physiology and behavior to adapt to seasonal environmental changes. Part of this adaptation involves the release of catecholamine from sympathetic nerve endings and the adrenal medulla, which play a major role in regulating energy balance. The aim of this work was to investigate whether adult male viscachas in their natural habitat exhibits structural changes in the adrenal medulla during the annual seasonal cycle. In August-September, chromaffin granules revealed ultrastructural changes suggestive of piecemeal degranulation. Quantitative morphometric analysis by transmission electron microscopy showed a significantly lower percentage of resting chromaffin granules and a higher percentage of altered granules and empty containers in August-September (late winter) compared to February-March (late summer), suggesting an increased secretory process of catecholamines in August-September. The mechanism of piecemeal degranulation might amplify this process, encouraging the adaptive response to winter environmental conditions. Tissue levels of epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine (analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography) changed throughout the year, reaching maximum values in February-March and minimum values in August-September. These results demonstrate morphological and biochemical seasonal variations of the adrenal medulla, suggesting that epinephrine might promote energy mobilization, which allow the Lagostomus to cope with adverse environmental conditions and thus to survive during winter season. PMID:23630194

  19. Macroscopic and molecular-scale assessment of soil lead contamination impacted by seasonal dove hunting activities

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Y.; Tappero, R.; Rick, A.R.; Saylor, T.; Faas, E. & Lanzirotti, A.

    2011-05-24

    Environmental contamination of lead (Pb) in soils and sediments poses serious threats to human and ecological health. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of seasonal dove sports hunting activities on Pb contamination in acid forest soils. A grid sampling method was used to investigate the spatial distribution of Pb contamination in surface soils. Soils were analyzed for total metal(loid) concentration and characterized for physicochemical properties and mineralogy. Adsorption isotherm experiments were also conducted to understand the reactivity and retention capacity of Pb(II) in soils. Finally, synchrotron-based X-ray microprobe and X-ray absorption spectroscopy were used to understand the chemical speciation of Pb that controls the retention/release mechanisms of Pb in soils. There was no excessive accumulation of Pb at the site. However, the concentration of Pb in surface soils was greater than the background level (<16 mg kg{sup -1}). The contamination level of Pb was as high as 67 mg kg{sup -1} near a patch of corn field where lime was frequently applied. A microfocused X-ray microprobe analysis showed the presence of Pb pellet fragments that predominantly contain oxidized Pb(II), suggesting that oxidative dissolution was occurring in soils. Dissolved Pb(II) can be readily retained in soils up to {approx}3,600 mg kg{sup -1} via inner-sphere and outer-sphere surface complexation on carbon and aluminol functional groups of soil components, suggesting that partitioning reactions control the concentration of Pb in soil solution. The fate of Pb is likely to be controlled by (1) oxidative dissolution process of Pb(0) pellets and (2) the release of outer-sphere and/or inner-sphere Pb surface complexes in humic substances and aluminosilicate/Al oxyhydroxides. Although no remedial actions are immediately required, the long-term accumulation of Pb in soils should be carefully monitored in protecting ecosystem and water quality at the dove hunting

  20. [Role of hormonal and seasonal factors in the effect of vitamin E on cholinesterase activity in the nervous system].

    PubMed

    Teplyĭ, D L; Savich, V F

    1975-01-01

    Tests were set up on 73 Citellus fulvus to study the influence exerted by different doses of vitamin E (4 and 8 mg) introduced per os on the activity of the total cholinesterase in various divisions of the central nervous system and also the part played by the hormonal and seasonal factors in this effect. Each test series lasted 30 days (in spring, summer and autumn). The cholinesterase activity was determined after Vensen and Segonzak (1968). The results of the experiments revealed some characteristic trends in the change of the cholinesterase activity occurring under the effect of vitamin E that depended upon a number of factors, such as: the dose of tocopherol, the sex of the animal, time of the year, the brain division under study and the seasonal dynamics of the initial activity. It is shown that in the brain sectors where a material difference existed in the cholinesterase activity between the control males and females it vanished under the effect of tocopherol. On the other hand, in the brain sectors where no such difference existed, it appeared under the effect of tocopherol. The regular character of changes in the cholinesterase activity of the brain and spinal cord produced by different doses of vitamin E suggest the possibility of the brain cholinesterase activity disorders to a play a part in the development of neuro-muscular pathology in cases of the E vitamin deficiency. PMID:1210181

  1. Grow Beasts: Growing Mathematical Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roddy, Mark; Behrend, Kat

    2015-01-01

    What do you do when you want to get your Stage 3 students authentically and enthusiastically engaged in the active construction of their understanding and fluency with measurement, data collection, representation and interpretation? How do you enable them to make choices about their learning, to measure with purpose, to record and organise the…

  2. Seasonal changes in the body size of two rotifer species living in activated sludge follow the Temperature-Size Rule

    PubMed Central

    Kiełbasa, Anna; Walczyńska, Aleksandra; Fiałkowska, Edyta; Pajdak-Stós, Agnieszka; Kozłowski, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Temperature-Size Rule (TSR) is a phenotypic body size response of ectotherms to changing temperature. It is known from the laboratory studies, but seasonal patterns in the field were not studied so far. We examined the body size changes in time of rotifers inhabiting activated sludge. We hypothesize that temperature is the most influencing parameter in sludge environment, leading sludge rotifers to seasonally change their body size according to TSR, and that oxygen content also induces the size response. The presence of TSR in Lecane inermis rotifer was tested in a laboratory study with two temperature and two food-type treatments. The effect of interaction between temperature and food was significant; L. inermis followed TSR in one food type only. The seasonal variability in the body sizes of the rotifers L. inermis and Cephalodella gracilis was estimated by monthly sampling and analyzed by multiple regression, in relation to the sludge parameters selected as the most influential by multivariate analysis, and predicted to alter rotifer body size (temperature and oxygen). L. inermis varied significantly in size throughout the year, and this variability is explained by temperature as predicted by the TSR, but not by oxygen availability. C. gracilis also varied in size, though this variability was explained by both temperature and oxygen. We suggest that sludge age acts as a mortality factor in activated sludge. It may have a seasonal effect on the body size of L. inermis and modify a possible effect of oxygen. Activated sludge habitat is driven by both biological processes and human regulation, yet its resident organisms follow general evolutionary rule as they do in other biological systems. The interspecific response patterns differ, revealing the importance of taking species-specific properties into account. Our findings are applicable to sludge properties enhancement through optimizing the conditions for its biological component. PMID:25558362

  3. Seasonal changes in the body size of two rotifer species living in activated sludge follow the Temperature-Size Rule.

    PubMed

    Kiełbasa, Anna; Walczyńska, Aleksandra; Fiałkowska, Edyta; Pajdak-Stós, Agnieszka; Kozłowski, Jan

    2014-12-01

    Temperature-Size Rule (TSR) is a phenotypic body size response of ectotherms to changing temperature. It is known from the laboratory studies, but seasonal patterns in the field were not studied so far. We examined the body size changes in time of rotifers inhabiting activated sludge. We hypothesize that temperature is the most influencing parameter in sludge environment, leading sludge rotifers to seasonally change their body size according to TSR, and that oxygen content also induces the size response. The presence of TSR in Lecane inermis rotifer was tested in a laboratory study with two temperature and two food-type treatments. The effect of interaction between temperature and food was significant; L. inermis followed TSR in one food type only. The seasonal variability in the body sizes of the rotifers L. inermis and Cephalodella gracilis was estimated by monthly sampling and analyzed by multiple regression, in relation to the sludge parameters selected as the most influential by multivariate analysis, and predicted to alter rotifer body size (temperature and oxygen). L. inermis varied significantly in size throughout the year, and this variability is explained by temperature as predicted by the TSR, but not by oxygen availability. C. gracilis also varied in size, though this variability was explained by both temperature and oxygen. We suggest that sludge age acts as a mortality factor in activated sludge. It may have a seasonal effect on the body size of L. inermis and modify a possible effect of oxygen. Activated sludge habitat is driven by both biological processes and human regulation, yet its resident organisms follow general evolutionary rule as they do in other biological systems. The interspecific response patterns differ, revealing the importance of taking species-specific properties into account. Our findings are applicable to sludge properties enhancement through optimizing the conditions for its biological component. PMID:25558362

  4. Field-scale tracking of active methane-oxidizing communities in a landfill cover soil reveals spatial and seasonal variability.

    PubMed

    Henneberger, Ruth; Chiri, Eleonora; Bodelier, Paul E L; Frenzel, Peter; Lüke, Claudia; Schroth, Martin H

    2015-05-01

    Aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) in soils mitigate methane (CH4 ) emissions. We assessed spatial and seasonal differences in active MOB communities in a landfill cover soil characterized by highly variable environmental conditions. Field-based measurements of CH4 oxidation activity and stable-isotope probing of polar lipid-derived fatty acids (PLFA-SIP) were complemented by microarray analysis of pmoA genes and transcripts, linking diversity and function at the field scale. In situ CH4 oxidation rates varied between sites and were generally one order of magnitude lower in winter compared with summer. Results from PLFA-SIP and pmoA transcripts were largely congruent, revealing distinct spatial and seasonal clustering. Overall, active MOB communities were highly diverse. Type Ia MOB, specifically Methylomonas and Methylobacter, were key drivers for CH4 oxidation, particularly at a high-activity site. Type II MOB were mainly active at a site showing substantial fluctuations in CH4 loading and soil moisture content. Notably, Upland Soil Cluster-gamma-related pmoA transcripts were also detected, indicating concurrent oxidation of atmospheric CH4 . Spatial separation was less distinct in winter, with Methylobacter and uncultured MOB mediating CH4 oxidation. We propose that high diversity of active MOB communities in this soil is promoted by high variability in environmental conditions, facilitating substantial removal of CH4 generated in the waste body. PMID:25186436

  5. GROWING SEEDS, TEACHER'S GUIDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elementary Science Study, Newton, MA.

    THIS TEACHER'S GUIDE IS DESIGNED FOR USE WITH AN ELEMENTARY SCIENCE STUDY UNIT, "GROWING SEEDS," IN WHICH SUCH BASIC SCIENCE SKILLS AND PROCESSES AS MEASUREMENT, OBSERVATION, AND HYPOTHESIS FORMATION ARE INTRODUCED THROUGH STUDENT ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SEEDS, GERMINATION, AND SEEDLING GROWTH. THE MATERIALS WERE DEVELOPED FOR USE IN ELEMENTARY…

  6. The influence of habitat, season and tidal regime in the activity of the intertidal crab Neohelice (= Chasmagnathus) granulata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luppi, Tomás; Bas, Claudia; Méndez Casariego, Agustina; Albano, Mariano; Lancia, Juan; Kittlein, Marcelo; Rosenthal, Alan; Farías, Nahuel; Spivak, Eduardo; Iribarne, Oscar

    2013-03-01

    The activity pattern of intertidal crabs is influenced by factors that usually change rhythmically following tidal and/or diel cycles, and is often associated with the use of refuges. The movement activity of the burrowing crab Neohelice granulata was compared among three populations from SW Atlantic coastal areas where they face different tidal regimes, water salinities, substrata and biological factors. At each site, we examined the seasonal activity of the crabs (individuals collected in pitfall traps) in two types of habitat: mudflat and salt marsh. The working hypothesis is that the activity would vary according to the diverse environmental conditions encountered at geographical and local scales. Crab activity varied between sites and seasons showing to be more intense when habitats were covered by water. The most active groups were large males, followed by large non-ovigerous females. Ovigerous females were almost inactive. Most crabs were near or inside burrows at low tides in Mar Chiquita and Bahía Blanca, but they were active at both low and high tides in San Antonio during spring and summer. N. granulata were active in a wide range of temperatures: from 10 to 37 °C at low tides and at temperatures as low as 2 °C when covered by water. Differences of activity between mudflat and salt marsh varied among sites depending on flooding frequencies. Movement activity of N. granulata varied both in space and in time; crabs move under very different abiotic conditions (e.g., low or high tide, daylight or night, low and high temperature) and their movement may also be prevented or elicited by biotic conditions like burrow complexity, food quality and predation pressure. The wide set of conditions under which N. granulata can be active may explain why this is the only semiterrestrial crab inhabiting latitudes higher than 40°S in South America.

  7. Seasonal variations of antimicrobial activity and chemical composition of essential oils extracted from three Citrus limon L. Burm. cultivars.

    PubMed

    Settanni, L; Randazzo, W; Palazzolo, E; Moschetti, M; Aleo, A; Guarrasi, V; Mammina, C; San Biagio, P L; Marra, F P; Moschetti, G; Germanà, M A

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the seasonal variations of antimicrobial properties and chemical composition of essential oils (EOs), three different cultivars of Citrus limon L. Burm. spp. (Femminello Santa Teresa, Monachello and Femminello Continella) were collected at 6-week intervals, from December 2012 to April 2013, for a total of four harvests. The EOs were extracted from lemon peel by hydro-distillation. The antimicrobial activity, tested by paper disc diffusion method, was evaluated against common food-related pathogenic bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella enterica and Enterobacter spp.). EOs were more effective against Gram-positive than Gram-negative bacteria at each collection time, but a strong strain dependence was evidenced. Monachello EOs showed the highest inhibition power. The chemical characterisation of the EOs performed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry identified from 36 to 42 molecules. The chemical difference registered among samples and seasons may explain the different antimicrobial efficacies recorded. PMID:24443967

  8. Seeding cool-season grasses to suppress white locoweed (Oxytropis sericea) reestablishment and increase forage production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Livestock poisoning can occur on short-grass prairies when locoweeds (Astragalus and Oxytropis spp.) are actively growing in spring before warm-season grasses begin growth. White locoweed grows in early spring, completes flowering and seed production by early summer, and goes dormant. Perennial co...

  9. Response of Broom Snakeweed (Gutierrezia sarothrae) and Cool-Season Grasses to Defoliation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Livestock poisoning can occur on short-grass prairies when locoweeds (Astragalus and Oxytropis spp.) are actively growing in spring before warm-season grasses begin growth. White locoweed grows in early spring, completes flowering and seed production by early summer, and goes dormant. Perennial co...

  10. Linking activity, composition and seasonal dynamics of atmospheric methane oxidizers in a meadow soil

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Kammann, Claudia; Lenhart, Katharina; Dam, Bomba; Liesack, Werner

    2012-01-01

    Microbial oxidation is the only biological sink for atmospheric methane. We assessed seasonal changes in atmospheric methane oxidation and the underlying methanotrophic communities in grassland near Giessen (Germany), along a soil moisture gradient. Soil samples were taken from the surface layer (0–10 cm) of three sites in August 2007, November 2007, February 2008 and May 2008. The sites showed seasonal differences in hydrological parameters. Net uptake rates varied seasonally between 0 and 70 μg CH4 m−2 h−1. Greatest uptake rates coincided with lowest soil moisture in spring and summer. Over all sites and seasons, the methanotrophic communities were dominated by uncultivated methanotrophs. These formed a monophyletic cluster defined by the RA14, MHP and JR1 clades, referred to as upland soil cluster alphaproteobacteria (USCα)-like group. The copy numbers of pmoA genes ranged between 3.8 × 105–1.9 × 106 copies g−1 of soil. Temperature was positively correlated with CH4 uptake rates (P<0.001), but had no effect on methanotrophic population dynamics. The soil moisture was negatively correlated with CH4 uptake rates (P<0.001), but showed a positive correlation with changes in USCα-like diversity (P<0.001) and pmoA gene abundance (P<0.05). These were greatest at low net CH4 uptake rates during winter times and coincided with an overall increase in bacterial 16S rRNA gene abundances (P<0.05). Taken together, soil moisture had a significant but opposed effect on CH4 uptake rates and methanotrophic population dynamics, the latter being increasingly stimulated by soil moisture contents >50 vol% and primarily related to members of the MHP clade. PMID:22189499

  11. Seasonal Variation of American Indian Children's School-Day Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brusseau, Timothy A.; Kulinna, Pamela H.; Kloeppel, Tiffany; Ferry, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Study aim: To examine the pedometer steps taken during the school-day by American Indian children during all four seasons. Material and methods: Participants included third-sixth grade children (n = 157) aged 9.6 plus or minus 1.07 (boys) and 9.7 plus or minus 1.2 (girls) attending school from one Southwestern US American Indian community.…

  12. Variation of D-region nitric-oxide density with solar activity and season at the dip equator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarty, D. K.; Pakhomov, S. V.; Beig, G.

    1989-01-01

    To study the solar control on electron density (N sub e) in the equatorial D region, a program was initiated with Soviet collaboration in 1979. A total of 31 rockets were launched during the high solar activity period, and 47 rockets during the low solar activity period, from Thumba to measure the N sub e profiles. Analysis of the data shows that the average values of N sub e for the high solar activity period are higher by a factor of about 2 to 3 compared to the low solar activity values. It was found that a single nitric oxide density, (NO), profile cannot reproduce all the observed N sub e profiles. An attempt was made to reproduce theoretically the observed N sub e profiles by introducing variation in (NO) for the different solar activity periods and seasons.

  13. Comparison of within hive sampling and seasonal activity of Nosema ceranae in honey bee colonies.

    PubMed

    Traver, Brenna E; Williams, Matthew R; Fell, Richard D

    2012-02-01

    Nosema ceranae is a microsporidian parasite of the European honey bee, Apis mellifera, that is found worldwide and in multiple Apis spp.; however, little is known about the effects of N. ceranae on A. mellifera. Previous studies using spore counts suggest that there is no longer a seasonal cycle for N. ceranae and that it is found year round with little variation in infection intensity among months. Our goal was to determine whether infection levels differ in bees collected from different areas of the hive and if there may be seasonal differences in N. ceranae infections. A multiplex species-specific real-time PCR assay was used for the detection and quantification of N. ceranae. Colonies were sampled monthly from September 2009-2010 by collecting workers from honey supers, the fringe of the brood nest, and the brood nest. We found that all bees sampled were infected with N. ceranae and that there was no significant difference in infection levels among the different groups of bees sampled (P=0.74). However, significant differences in colony infection levels were found at different times of the year (P<0.01) with the highest levels in April-June and lower levels in the fall and winter. While our study was only performed for one year, it sheds light on the fact that there may be a seasonality to N. ceranae infections. Being able to predict future N. ceranae infections can be used to better advise beekeepers on N. ceranae management. PMID:22085836

  14. Male effect in seasonally anovulatory lactating goats depends on the presence of sexually active bucks, but not estrous females.

    PubMed

    Véliz, F G; Moreno, S; Duarte, G; Vielma, J; Chemineau, P; Poindron, P; Malpaux, B; Delgadillo, J A

    2002-08-15

    A study was conducted in subtropical northern Mexico (26 degrees N) to determine whether the presence of estrous females can improve the response of seasonally anovulatory goats to the introduction of bucks in the group. The induction of estrous activity was studied in three groups of anovulatory lactating goats during seasonal anestrus. These females were of the Mexican Creole breed. In the control group (sexually inactive (SI), n = 20), two control (SI) bucks exposed to normal seasonal daylength variations were used. In the second group (SI + E, n = 20 + 3), two control males were also used, but in addition, three females of the group were in estrus at the time of male introduction. In the third group (sexually active, SA + E, n = 19 + 4), anovulatory females were exposed to two bucks made sexually active by exposure to 2.5 months of long days (16L:8D) followed by two subcutaneous 18 mg melatonin implants, and four estrous females were also present when introducing the bucks. In all groups, males were introduced on 15 March and estrous detection was conducted twice daily for 15 days. The sexual activity of the bucks was observed from 08:00 to 10:00 h during the first five days of exposure to females. More females displayed estrous behavior in the first 15 days following the introduction of the males in the SA + E group (18/19) as compared with the SI or SI + E groups (2/20 and 0/20, respectively; P < 0.001). No difference was observed between the two latter groups. Thirteen females of SA + E group showed a second estrus between days 6 and 11 (short estrous cycle duration: 5.4 +/- 0.4 days). By contrast, in the SI group none showed a second estrus. The sexual behavior of the males in the SA + E group was greater as compared with that of the males in SI and SI + E groups (over 80% of the total sexual activity recorded in the three groups; P < 0.001). By contrast, no differences were found between SI and SI + E males. These results indicate that the presence of

  15. Seasonal and spatial distribution of extracellular enzymatic activities and microbial incorporation of dissolved organic substrates in marine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer-Reil, L.

    1987-08-01

    Seasonal and spatial distributions of extracellular enzymatic activities and microbial incorporations of dissolved organic substrates were followed in sediments of the brackish water Kiel Bight (Baltic Sea). Enzymatic hydrolysis of polymeric organic compounds was determined by means of fluorogenic substrates; incorporation of dissolved organic substrates into microbial biomass was measured by using tritiated substances (acetate, leucine, and thymidine). Based on a recently developed core injection technique, substrates were injected in microliter portions into undisturbed sediment cores. Enzymatic and incorporation activities underwent strong seasonal variations related to the enrichment of organic material in the sediment surface following sedimentation events. The input of the phytoplankton bloom during autumn caused stimulation of both enzymatic hydrolysis of polymeric organic compounds and microbial incorporation of dissolved organic substrates. Following input by spring phytoplankton bloom, mainly incorporation activities were stimulated. In late spring the development of the benthic fauna obviously greatly influenced microbial activities. During summer individual periods of high microbial activities were observed which might be traced back to short-term sedimentation events.

  16. Present-Day Seasonal Gully Activity in a South Polar Pit (Sisyphi Cavi) on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raack, Jan; Reiss, Dennis; Appéré, Thomas; Vincendon, Mathieu; Ruesch, Ottaviano; Hiesinger, Harald

    2014-05-01

    Seasonal activity of gullies under current climatic conditions on Mars was observed by [1-7]. Dundas et al. [2] reviewed the present-day activity of classical gullies (including the gully presented in this work), dune gullies, and other mass wasting processes in the southern hemisphere on Mars. Recent polar gullies in Sisyphi Cavi were also analyzed by [8], who estimated ages of about 20 ka to 20 Ma for the gullies. In this study we focus on a single gully in Sisyphi Cavi, located in the south polar region at 1.44° E and 68.54° S. The gully occurs on the gullied equator-facing slope of an isolated polar pit within an infilled impact crater. Multi-temporal high-resolution image data analyses show new deposits at the terminus of the gully channel and on the gully apron within spring (after solar longitudes of 236°) of martian years (MY) 29 and 31. In MY 29 deposition of material shortens the channel by about 40 m; in MY 31 a new deposit at the western flank of the gully apron with approximately 300-600 m3 of material is visible [3]. Our morphological investigations show that the identified new deposits were formed by dark flows through the entire gully deposited on top of the apron between LS ~218° and ~226°. Thermal data show a temperature increase between solar longitudes (LS) ~218° and ~226°. Near-infrared spectral data show relatively constant band strengths of CO2 ice and H2O ice in this time range. After the formation of the dark flows (after LS ~226°), temperatures increase rapidly from ~180 K to >~270 K at LS ~250°. At this time, spectral data indicate that all volatiles on the surface sublimated. However, an earlier beginning of sublimation when the dark flows were observed (between LS ~218° and ~226°) is likely, due to the fact that the instruments can only show the last phase of sublimation (decrease of volatile band strengths) [3]. Spectral modeling shows that from winter to mid-spring, the surface of the studied area is covered by CO2 slab

  17. Response of Seasonal Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Activity to Suppression of African Easterly Waves in a Regional Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patricola, C. M.; Saravanan, R.; Chang, P.

    2014-12-01

    Atlantic tropical cyclones and African easterly waves (AEWs) are strongly linked on the synoptic timescale, with about 85% of observed major Atlantic hurricanes originating from AEWs (e.g., Landsea et al. 1993). However, the influence of variability in AEWs on seasonal Atlantic tropical cyclone activity is not fully understood; a positive correlation between AEW activity and Atlantic tropical cyclone activity exists on the interannual timescale during just some periods of the observational record (e.g., Thorncroft and Hodges, 2001; Hopsch et al. 2007). This study investigates the impact of AEWs on seasonal Atlantic tropical cyclone activity using regional climate model simulations in which AEWs were either prescribed or removed through the lateral boundary condition (LBC). The control simulation (10-member ensemble) was run at 27 km resolution and used 6-hourly LBCs from the NCEP CFS Reanalysis and daily NOAA Optimum Interpolation (OI) V2 sea surface temperature (SST) from the year 2005. In the experiment AEWs were suppressed by filtering 2-10 day variability over tropical latitudes from the eastern LBC, located along the west coast of the Sahel. The difference in Atlantic tropical cyclone frequency was insignificant between the simulations in which AEWs were prescribed versus suppressed, indicating that AEWs are not necessary to maintain climatological tropical cyclone frequency even though tropical cyclones readily originate from these features. This further implies that seasonal Atlantic tropical cyclone frequency is uninfluenced by variability in AEWs, and that the value of AEW variability as a predictor of Atlantic tropical cyclones is limited to the weekly timescale. However in response to filtering AEWs, accumulated cyclone energy significantly increased by about 15% of the control simulation mean and the spatial pattern of track density shifted in association with changes in steering winds. This suggests the importance of AEWs in impacting tropical cyclone

  18. Interdisciplinary class on the asymmetric seasonal march from autumn to the next spring around Japan at Okayama University (Joint activity with art and music expressions on the seasonal feeling)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kuranoshin; Kato, Haruko; Akagi, Rikako; Haga, Yuichi

    2015-04-01

    There are many stages with rapid seasonal transitions in East Asia, greatly influenced by the considerable phase differences of seasonal cycle among the Asian monsoon subsystems, resulting in the variety of "seasonal feeling" around there. For example, the "wintertime pressure pattern" begins to prevail already from November due to the seasonal development of the Siberian Air mass and the Siberian High. The intermittent rainfall due to the shallow cumulus clouds in such situation is called "Shi-gu-re" in Japanese (consisting of the two Chinese characters which mean for "sometimes" (or intermittent) and "rain", respectively) and is often used for expression of the "seasonal feeling" in the Japanese classic literature (especially we can see in the Japanese classic poems called "Wa-Ka"). However, as presented by Kato et al. (EGU2014-3708), while the appearance frequency of the "wintertime pressure pattern" around November (early winter) and in early March (early spring) is nearly the same as each other, air temperature is rather lower in early spring. The solar radiation, however, is rather stronger in early spring. Such asymmetric seasonal cycle there would result in rather different "seasonal feeling" between early winter and early spring. Inversely, such difference of the "seasonal feelings" might be utilized for deeper understanding of the seasonal cycle of the climate system around Japan. As such, the present study reports the joint activity of the meteorology with music and art on these topics mainly in the class at the Faculty of Education, Okayama University. In that class, the students tried firstly the expression of the both selected stages in early winter and early spring, respectively, by combination of the 6 colors students selected from the 96 colored papers, based on the Johannes Itten's (1888-1967) exercise of the representation of the four seasons. Next, the students' activity on the music expression of what they firstly presented by the colors was

  19. Metagenomic analysis on seasonal microbial variations of activated sludge from a full-scale wastewater treatment plant over 4 years.

    PubMed

    Ju, Feng; Guo, Feng; Ye, Lin; Xia, Yu; Zhang, Tong

    2014-02-01

    Metagenomic technique was employed to characterize the seasonal dynamics of activated sludge (AS) communities in a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) over 4 years. The results indicated that contrary to Eukaryota (mainly Rotifera and Nematoda), abundances of Bacteria and Archaea (mainly Euryarchaeota) were significantly higher in winter than summer. Two-way analysis of variance and canonical correspondence analysis revealed that many functionally important genera followed strong seasonal variation patterns driven by temperature and salinity gradients; among them, two nitrifying bacteria, Nitrospira and Nitrosomonas, displayed much higher abundances in summer, whereas phosphate-removing genus Tetrasphaera, denitrifier Paracoccus and potential human faecal bacteria, i.e. Bifidobacterium, Dorea and Ruminococcus, showed significantly higher abundances in winter. Particularly, occurrence of dual variation patterns beyond explanation merely by seasonality indicated that multivariables (e.g. dissolved oxygen, sludge retention time, nutrients) participated in shaping AS community structure. However, SEED subsystems annotation showed that functional categories in AS showed no significant difference between summer and winter, indicating that compared with its microbial components, the functional profiles of AS were much more stable. Taken together, our study provides novel insights into the microbial community variations in AS and discloses their correlations with influential factors in WWTPs. PMID:24596265

  20. Seasonal changes in the activity of antioxidative defense in the kidneys of the euthermic ground squirrel (Citellus citellus).

    PubMed

    Buzadzić, B; Blagojević, D; Korać, B; Saicić, Z S; Spasić, M B; Petrović, V M

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the activity of the antioxidant enzymes: superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1; SOD), catalase (EC 1.11.1.6; CAT), glutathione peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.9; GSH-Px), glutathione-S-transferase (EC 2.5.1.18; GST), glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2; GR) and the low molecular mass antioxidants: ascorbic acid (ASA) and vitamin E (vit E) in the kidney of ground squirrels during circannual changes. Keeping the ground squirrel at the temperature of thermic neutrality (30 degrees C) provides a stable euthermic state during the whole year and thus any change is due to the circannual rhythm. The highest specific activity of all examined antioxidative defense enzymes in the kidney was found in the spring, when ground squirrels are seasonally the most active. In the summer, lower specific activity of GSH-Px as well as of SOD and CAT were noted and, when expressed per g wet mass, only a decrease in GSH-Px activity was recorded. In the kidney of ground squirrels kept at 30 degrees C, the lowest specific activity of all examined enzymes was found during the winter and, when expressed per g wet mass, only the SOD activity was lower than in the spring and summer. Higher amounts of vitamins C and E were found in the ground squirrel kidneys in the summer. The results obtained in this work demonstrate that circannual regulation of metabolic activity, which is inherent to seasonal hibernators, is also expressed at the level of antioxidative defense in the kidneys. PMID:9726801

  1. Temporal evolution of Saturn lightning activity during Saturn's change of season in spring equinox 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagaran, J. A.; Fischer, G.

    2015-10-01

    Saturn Electrostatic Discharges or SEDs are measured by the Cassini/RPWS (Radio and Plasma Wave Sci- ence) instrument from 1 to 16 MHz. In August 2009,Saturn's northern (southern) hemisphere enters spring (autumn) 7-year-long season. The RPWS instrument,has so far recorded more than a dozen storms since the spacecraft's orbital insertion in 2004. Lasting for several months, each storm consisted of episodes with a periodicity lasting close to one Saturn rotation (about 10 hours and 40 minutes), which start/stop when the SED cloud enters/leaves the radio horizon.

  2. Relationships between microbial extracellular enzymatic activity and suspended and sinking particulate organic matter: seasonal transformations in the North Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huston, A. L.; Deming, J. W.

    Despite the importance of hydrolytic activities by bacterial extracellular enzymes (EE) in the temperate ocean, little is known about the role of extracellular enzymatic activity (EEA) in determining the fate of particulate organic matter (POM) in polar seas. To explore the issue further, we measured various chemical and bacterial parameters in the near-0°C waters of the North Water during the months of May and July of 1998. Seawater (SW) samples were collected by Niskin bottle at the depth of the chlorophyll fluorescence maximum (8-90 m), while samples of sinking particles and aggregates were collected in short-term (0.5-1.2 d), unpoisoned, floating sediment traps deployed at depths typically below the mixed layer (50-136 m). Samples were analyzed for POC, PON, and abundance of total and actively respiring bacteria. They were also incubated with fluorescently tagged substrate analogs to measure potential maximal rates of three classes of EE (leucine-aminopeptidase, chitobiase, and β-glucosidase) at -1°C. The percentage of actively respiring bacteria was always higher in sediment trap samples than in SW (medians of 38% and 24% versus 10% and 12% in May and July, respectively). Cell-specific rates of EEA were also higher in the trap samples and, for both sample types, similar to published rates from temperate waters. Rates of EEA when scaled to the abundance of actively respiring bacteria, however, did not differ between sample types, suggesting that the elevated EEA associated with sinking material is due to the greater abundance of metabolically active cells supported by such material and not due to enhanced enzyme expression in general, as suggested by previous studies. In this study, leucine-aminopeptidase activity was always much higher than the other classes of EEA, becoming even more dominant later in the season; it always correlated positively with the abundance of both total and actively respiring bacteria. Enzyme ratios indicating protease dominance

  3. Activities of clarithromycin against eight slowly growing species of nontuberculous mycobacteria, determined by using a broth microdilution MIC system.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, B A; Wallace, R J; Onyi, G O

    1992-01-01

    MICs of clarithromycin against 324 clinical isolates belonging to eight species of slowly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria were determined by using a broth microdilution system. Isolates were inoculated into twofold drug dilutions in Middlebrook 7H9 broth (pH corrected to 7.4) and then incubated at 30 degrees C for 7 days for Mycobacterium marinum and for 14 days for all other species. The MIC for 90% of the strains (MIC90) was less than or equal to 0.5 micrograms/ml for isolates of Mycobacterium gordonae (6 strains), Mycobacterium scrofulaceum (5 strains), Mycobacterium szulgai (6 strains), and Mycobacterium kansasii (35 strains). MICs for M. marinum (25 strains) and Mycobacterium avium complex (237 strains) were higher, but 100% and 89% of the strains, respectively, were susceptible to less than or equal to 4 micrograms/ml. In contrast, MICs for five of six M. simiae strains were greater than 8 micrograms/ml, and the range of MICs for Mycobacterium nonchromogenicum varied from less than or equal to 0.125 to 8 micrograms/ml. For the 237 isolates of M. avium complex, the MIC50 was 2 micrograms/ml and the MIC90 was 8 micrograms/ml. MICs for most isolates (77%) were in the 1- to 4-micrograms/ml range. For the 80 isolates in this group known to be from AIDS patients, the MIC50 was 4 micrograms/ml and the MIC90 was 8 micrograms/ml. These MIC studies combined with preliminary clinical trials suggest that clarithromycin may be useful for drug therapy of most species of the slowly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria except M. simiae. PMID:1416891

  4. Seasonal variations in soil carbonic anhydrase activity in a pine forest ecosystem as inferred from soil CO18O flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogee, Jerome; Wingate, Lisa; Bosc, Alexandre; Burlett, Régis

    2015-04-01

    Quantifying terrestrial carbon storage and predicting the sensitivity of ecosystems to climate change relies on our ability to obtain observational constraints on photosynthesis and respiration at large scales (ecosystem, regional and global). Photosynthesis (GPP), the largest CO2 flux from the land surface, is currently estimated with considerable uncertainty (1-3). Robust estimates of global GPP can be obtained from an atmospheric budget of the oxygen isotopic composition (δ18O) of atmospheric CO2, provided that we have a good knowledge of the δ18O signatures of the terrestrial CO2 fluxes (1,4). The latter reflect the δ18O of leaf and soil water pools because CO2 exchanges 'isotopically' with water [CO2+H218O⇔H2O+CO18O]. This exchange can be accelerated by the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA). In leaves, where CA is present and abundant, this isotopic equilibrium is reached almost instantaneously. As a consequence, and because soil and leaf water pools have different δ18O signatures, CO2 fluxes from leaves and soils carry very distinct δ18O signals and can thus be tracked from the fluctuations in the δ18O of atmospheric CO2 (δa). There is growing evidence that the accelerated isotopic exchange between CO2 and water due to CA activity is a widespread phenomenon in soils as well (4). At the global scale, accounting for soil CA activity dramatically shifts the influence of soil and leaf fluxes on δa, thus changing the estimates of terrestrial gross CO2 fluxes (1,4). In this talk we will briefly present the current state of understanding of the environmental and ecological causes behind the variability in CA activity observed in soils and illustrate, using field data from a temperate pine forest, how soil CA activity varies over a single growing season and how it responds to soil surface environmental variables. References 1. L. R. Welp et al., Interannual variability in the oxygen isotopes of atmospheric CO2 driven by El Niño, Nature 477, 579-582 (2011

  5. Late-seasonal activity and diet of the evening bat (Nycticeius humeralis) in Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geluso, K.; Damm, J.P.; Valdez, E.W.

    2008-01-01

    In North America, Nebraska represents part of the northwestern edge of the distribution for the evening bat (Nycticeius humeralis). To date, little information on this bat's natural history has been published from the state or from other parts of the Great Plains. Here we report on aspects of its natural history in Nebraska from 2 localities. In late summer and early autumn of 2006, we documented individuals farther west in Nebraska (Harlan County) than previously reported and determined that individuals fed mainly on Coleoptera and Hymenoptera. In 2006, evening bats appeared to migrate from Nebraska during late September-early October, and individuals were extremely fat, about 15 g, prior to migration. Evening bats likely are more widespread and common in south central Nebraska than previously documented. On 6 October 2005, we reported on an individual from eastern Nebraska (Douglas County), which represents the latest seasonal record of N. humeralis from the state.

  6. Mapping Seasonal Inundation of Amazonian Wetlands with Active Microwave Sensors: Current Status and Future Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, L. L.; Melack, J. M.; Novo, E. M.; Mertes, L. A.; Barbosa, C. C.; Costa, M. P.; Gastil, M. M.

    2001-12-01

    Japanese Earth Resources Satellite 1 (JERS-1) imagery acquired over the Amazon basin during low- and high-water periods makes it possible to map seasonal inundation and vegetation of wetlands for most of the basin. Dual-season mapping has now been completed for a central Amazon quadrat extending from 72\\deg W,0\\deg S to 54\\deg W,8\\deg S. Imagery was acquired by the JERS-1 L-band, HH-polarized SAR during Sept.-Oct. 1995 and May-June 1996, and mosaicked at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory into low- and high-water mosaics with pixel dimensions of approx. 100 m. Image segmentation software developed at INPE was used to carry out a polygon-based classification of the co-registered mosaics into wetland and non-wetland classes. Wetland areas were classified by inundation state (flooded vs. non-flooded) and vegetation type (non-vegetated, woody, or her