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Sample records for active gtp bound

  1. The pretranslocation ribosome is targeted by GTP-bound EF-G in partially activated form

    PubMed Central

    Hauryliuk, Vasili; Mitkevich, Vladimir A.; Eliseeva, Natalia A.; Petrushanko, Irina Yu.; Ehrenberg, Måns; Makarov, Alexander A.

    2008-01-01

    Translocation of the tRNA·mRNA complex through the bacterial ribosome is driven by the multidomain guanosine triphosphatase elongation factor G (EF-G). We have used isothermal titration calorimetry to characterize the binding of GDP and GTP to free EF-G at 4°C, 20°C, and 37°C. The binding affinity of EF-G is higher to GDP than to GTP at 4°C, but lower at 37°C. The binding enthalpy and entropy change little with temperature in the case of GDP binding but change greatly in the case of GTP binding. These observations are compatible with a large decrease in the solvent-accessible hydrophobic surface area of EF-G on GTP, but not GDP, binding. The explanation we propose is the locking of the switch 1 and switch 2 peptide loops in the G domain of EF-G to the γ-phosphate of GTP. From these data, in conjunction with previously reported structural data on guanine nucleotide-bound EF-G, we suggest that EF-G enters the pretranslocation ribosome as an “activity chimera,” with the G domain activated by the presence of GTP but the overall factor conformation in the inactive form typical of a GDP-bound multidomain guanosine triphosphatase. We propose that the active overall conformation of EF-G is attained only in complex with the ribosome in its “ratcheted state,” with hybrid tRNA binding sites. PMID:18836081

  2. Structural Insights into a Unique Legionella pneumophila Effector LidA Recognizing Both GDP and GTP Bound Rab1 in Their Active State

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Defen; Li, Bingqing; Zhu, Deyu; Chen, Yuzhen; Zhang, Hao; Xu, Sujuan; Chai, Jijie; Gu, Lichuan

    2012-01-01

    The intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila hijacks the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived vesicles to create an organelle designated Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) required for bacterial replication. Maturation of the LCV involved acquisition of Rab1, which is mediated by the bacterial effector protein SidM/DrrA. SidM/DrrA is a bifunctional enzyme having the activity of both Rab1-specific GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) displacement factor (GDF) and guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF). LidA, another Rab1-interacting bacterial effector protein, was reported to promote SidM/DrrA-mediated recruitment of Rab1 to the LCV as well. Here we report the crystal structures of LidA complexes with GDP- and GTP-bound Rab1 respectively. Structural comparison revealed that GDP-Rab1 bound by LidA exhibits an active and nearly identical conformation with that of GTP-Rab1, suggesting that LidA can disrupt the switch function of Rab1 and render it persistently active. As with GTP, LidA maintains GDP-Rab1 in the active conformation through interaction with its two conserved switch regions. Consistent with the structural observations, biochemical assays showed that LidA binds to GDP- and GTP-Rab1 equally well with an affinity approximately 7.5 nM. We propose that the tight interaction with Rab1 allows LidA to facilitate SidM/DrrA-catalyzed release of Rab1 from GDIs. Taken together, our results support a unique mechanism by which a bacterial effector protein regulates Rab1 recycling. PMID:22416225

  3. GTP-specific fab fragment-based GTPase activity assay.

    PubMed

    Kopra, Kari; Rozwandowicz-Jansen, Anita; Syrjänpää, Markku; Blaževitš, Olga; Ligabue, Alessio; Veltel, Stefan; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Abankwa, Daniel; Härmä, Harri

    2015-03-17

    GTPases are central cellular signaling proteins, which cycle between a GDP-bound inactive and a GTP-bound active conformation in a controlled manner. Ras GTPases are frequently mutated in cancer and so far only few experimental inhibitors exist. The most common methods for monitoring GTP hydrolysis rely on luminescent GDP- or GTP-analogs. In this study, the first GTP-specific Fab fragment and its application are described. We selected Fab fragments using the phage display technology. Six Fab fragments were found against 2'/3'-GTP-biotin and 8-GTP-biotin. Selected antibody fragments allowed specific detection of endogenous, free GTP. The most potent Fab fragment (2A4(GTP)) showed over 100-fold GTP-specificity over GDP, ATP, or CTP and was used to develop a heterogeneous time-resolved luminescence based assay for the monitoring of GTP concentration. The method allows studying the GEF dependent H-Ras activation (GTP binding) and GAP-catalyzed H-Ras deactivation (GTP hydrolysis) at nanomolar protein concentrations.

  4. Identification of a second GTP-bound magnesium ion in archaeal initiation factor 2.

    PubMed

    Dubiez, Etienne; Aleksandrov, Alexey; Lazennec-Schurdevin, Christine; Mechulam, Yves; Schmitt, Emmanuelle

    2015-03-11

    Eukaryotic and archaeal translation initiation processes involve a heterotrimeric GTPase e/aIF2 crucial for accuracy of start codon selection. In eukaryotes, the GTPase activity of eIF2 is assisted by a GTPase-activating protein (GAP), eIF5. In archaea, orthologs of eIF5 are not found and aIF2 GTPase activity is thought to be non-assisted. However, no in vitro GTPase activity of the archaeal factor has been reported to date. Here, we show that aIF2 significantly hydrolyses GTP in vitro. Within aIF2γ, H97, corresponding to the catalytic histidine found in other translational GTPases, and D19, from the GKT loop, both participate in this activity. Several high-resolution crystal structures were determined to get insight into GTP hydrolysis by aIF2γ. In particular, a crystal structure of the H97A mutant was obtained in the presence of non-hydrolyzed GTP. This structure reveals the presence of a second magnesium ion bound to GTP and D19. Quantum chemical/molecular mechanical simulations support the idea that the second magnesium ion may assist GTP hydrolysis by helping to neutralize the developing negative charge in the transition state. These results are discussed in light of the absence of an identified GAP in archaea to assist GTP hydrolysis on aIF2.

  5. Differential dynamics of RAS isoforms in GDP- and GTP-bound states.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Abhijeet; Travesset, Alex

    2015-06-01

    RAS subfamily proteins regulates cell growth promoting signaling processes by cycling between active (GTP-bound) and inactive (GDP-bound) states. Different RAS isoforms, though structurally similar, exhibit functional specificity and are associated with different types of cancers and developmental disorders. Understanding the dynamical differences between the isoforms is crucial for the design of inhibitors that can selectively target a particular malfunctioning isoform. In this study, we provide a comprehensive comparison of the dynamics of all the three RAS isoforms (HRAS, KRAS, and NRAS) using extensive molecular dynamics simulations in both the GDP- (total of 3.06 μs) and GTP-bound (total of 2.4 μs) states. We observed significant differences in the dynamics of the isoforms, which rather interestingly, varied depending on the type of the nucleotide bound and the simulation temperature. Both SwitchI (Residues 25-40) and SwitchII (Residues 59-75) differ significantly in their flexibility in the three isoforms. Furthermore, Principal Component Analysis showed that there are differences in the conformational space sampled by the GTP-bound RAS isoforms. We also identified a previously unreported pocket, which opens transiently during MD simulations, and can be targeted to regulate nucleotide exchange reaction or possibly interfere with membrane localization. Further, we present the first simulation study showing GDP destabilization in the wild-type RAS protein. The destabilization of GDP/GTP occurred only in 1/50 simulations, emphasizing the need of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) to accelerate such an extremely unfavorable process. This observation along with the other results presented in this article further support our previously hypothesized mechanism of GEF-assisted nucleotide exchange.

  6. LRRK2 kinase activity is dependent on LRRK2 GTP binding capacity but independent of LRRK2 GTP binding.

    PubMed

    Taymans, Jean-Marc; Vancraenenbroeck, Renée; Ollikainen, Petri; Beilina, Alexandra; Lobbestael, Evy; De Maeyer, Marc; Baekelandt, Veerle; Cookson, Mark R

    2011-01-01

    Leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) is a Parkinson's disease (PD) gene that encodes a large multidomain protein including both a GTPase and a kinase domain. GTPases often regulate kinases within signal transduction cascades, where GTPases act as molecular switches cycling between a GTP bound "on" state and a GDP bound "off" state. It has been proposed that LRRK2 kinase activity may be increased upon GTP binding at the LRRK2 Ras of complex proteins (ROC) GTPase domain. Here we extensively test this hypothesis by measuring LRRK2 phosphorylation activity under influence of GDP, GTP or non-hydrolyzable GTP analogues GTPγS or GMPPCP. We show that autophosphorylation and lrrktide phosphorylation activity of recombinant LRRK2 protein is unaltered by guanine nucleotides, when co-incubated with LRRK2 during phosphorylation reactions. Also phosphorylation activity of LRRK2 is unchanged when the LRRK2 guanine nucleotide binding pocket is previously saturated with various nucleotides, in contrast to the greatly reduced activity measured for the guanine nucleotide binding site mutant T1348N. Interestingly, when nucleotides were incubated with cell lysates prior to purification of LRRK2, kinase activity was slightly enhanced by GTPγS or GMPPCP compared to GDP, pointing to an upstream guanine nucleotide binding protein that may activate LRRK2 in a GTP-dependent manner. Using metabolic labeling, we also found that cellular phosphorylation of LRRK2 was not significantly modulated by nucleotides, although labeling is significantly reduced by guanine nucleotide binding site mutants. We conclude that while kinase activity of LRRK2 requires an intact ROC-GTPase domain, it is independent of GDP or GTP binding to ROC.

  7. Structure of BipA in GTP form bound to the ratcheted ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Veerendra; Chen, Yun; Ero, Rya; Ahmed, Tofayel; Tan, Jackie; Li, Zhe; Wong, Andrew See Weng; Bhushan, Shashi; Gao, Yong-Gui

    2015-01-01

    BPI-inducible protein A (BipA) is a member of the family of ribosome-dependent translational GTPase (trGTPase) factors along with elongation factors G and 4 (EF-G and EF4). Despite being highly conserved in bacteria and playing a critical role in coordinating cellular responses to environmental changes, its structures (isolated and ribosome bound) remain elusive. Here, we present the crystal structures of apo form and GTP analog, GDP, and guanosine-3′,5′-bisdiphosphate (ppGpp)-bound BipA. In addition to having a distinctive domain arrangement, the C-terminal domain of BipA has a unique fold. Furthermore, we report the cryo-electron microscopy structure of BipA bound to the ribosome in its active GTP form and elucidate the unique structural attributes of BipA interactions with the ribosome and A-site tRNA in the light of its possible function in regulating translation. PMID:26283392

  8. A neutrophil GTP-binding protein that regulates cell free NADPH oxidase activation is located in the cytosolic fraction.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G; Eklund, E A; Potter, G B; Dykes, J R

    1990-08-01

    The dormant O2(-)-generating oxidase in plasma membranes from unstimulated neutrophils becomes activated in the presence of arachidonate and a multicomponent cytosolic fraction. This process is stimulated by nonhydrolyzable GTP analogues and may involve a pertussis toxin insensitive GTP-binding protein. Our studies were designed to characterize the putative GTP-binding protein, localizing it to either membrane or cytosolic fraction in this system. Exposure of the isolated membrane fraction to guanosine-5'-(3-O-thio)triphosphate (GTP gamma S), with or without arachidonate, had no effect on subsequent NADPH oxidase activation by the cytosolic fraction. Preexposure of the cytosolic fraction to GTP gamma S alone did not enhance activation of the membrane oxidase. However, preexposure of the cytosol to GTP gamma S then arachidonate caused a four-fold enhancement of its ability to activate the membrane oxidase. This enhancement was evident after removal of unbound GTP gamma S and arachidonate, and was not augmented by additional GTP gamma S during membrane activation. A reconstitution assay was developed for cytosolic component(s) responsible for the GTP gamma S effect. Cytosol preincubated with GTP gamma 35S then arachidonate was fractionated by anion exchange chromatography. A single peak of protein-bound GTP gamma 35S was recovered that had reconstitutive activity. Cytosol preincubated with GTP gamma 35S alone was similarly fractionated and the same peak of protein-bound GTP gamma 35S was observed. However, this peak had no reconstitutive activity. We conclude that the GTP-binding protein regulating this cellfree system is located in the cytosolic fraction. The GTP gamma S-liganded form of this protein may be activated or stabilized by arachidonate.

  9. Invited review: Activation of G proteins by GTP and the mechanism of Gα-catalyzed GTP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Sprang, Stephen R

    2016-08-01

    This review addresses the regulatory consequences of the binding of GTP to the alpha subunits (Gα) of heterotrimeric G proteins, the reaction mechanism of GTP hydrolysis catalyzed by Gα and the means by which GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) stimulate the GTPase activity of Gα. The high energy of GTP binding is used to restrain and stabilize the conformation of the Gα switch segments, particularly switch II, to afford stable complementary to the surfaces of Gα effectors, while excluding interaction with Gβγ, the regulatory binding partner of GDP-bound Gα. Upon GTP hydrolysis, the energy of these conformational restraints is dissipated and the two switch segments, particularly switch II, become flexible and are able to adopt a conformation suitable for tight binding to Gβγ. Catalytic site pre-organization presents a significant activation energy barrier to Gα GTPase activity. The glutamine residue near the N-terminus of switch II (Glncat ) must adopt a conformation in which it orients and stabilizes the γ phosphate and the water nucleophile for an in-line attack. The transition state is probably loose with dissociative character; phosphoryl transfer may be concerted. The catalytic arginine in switch I (Argcat ), together with amide hydrogen bonds from the phosphate binding loop, stabilize charge at the β-γ bridge oxygen of the leaving group. GAPs that harbor "regulator of protein signaling" (RGS) domains, or structurally unrelated domains within G protein effectors that function as GAPs, accelerate catalysis by stabilizing the pre-transition state for Gα-catalyzed GTP hydrolysis, primarily by restraining Argcat and Glncat to their catalytic conformations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 449-462, 2016.

  10. Hydrolysis of bound GTP by ARF protein triggers uncoating of Golgi- derived COP-coated vesicles

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The cycle of nucleotide exchange and hydrolysis by a small GTP-binding protein, ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF), helps to provide vectoriality to vesicle transport. Coat assembly is triggered when ARF binds GTP, initiating transport vesicle budding, and coat disassembly is triggered when ARF hydrolyzes GTP, allowing the uncoated vesicle to fuse. PMID:8253837

  11. Activation of GTP hydrolysis in mRNA-tRNA translocation by elongation factor G

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen; Liu, Zheng; Koripella, Ravi Kiran; Langlois, Robert; Sanyal, Suparna; Frank, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    During protein synthesis, elongation of the polypeptide chain by each amino acid is followed by a translocation step in which mRNA and transfer RNA (tRNA) are advanced by one codon. This crucial step is catalyzed by elongation factor G (EF-G), a guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase), and accompanied by a rotation between the two ribosomal subunits. A mutant of EF-G, H91A, renders the factor impaired in guanosine triphosphate (GTP) hydrolysis and thereby stabilizes it on the ribosome. We use cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) at near-atomic resolution to investigate two complexes formed by EF-G H91A in its GTP state with the ribosome, distinguished by the presence or absence of the intersubunit rotation. Comparison of these two structures argues in favor of a direct role of the conserved histidine in the switch II loop of EF-G in GTPase activation, and explains why GTP hydrolysis cannot proceed with EF-G bound to the unrotated form of the ribosome. PMID:26229983

  12. Mechanism of muscarinic receptor-induced K+ channel activation as revealed by hydrolysis-resistant GTP analogues

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The role of a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (Gk) in the coupling between muscarinic receptor activation and opening of an inwardly rectifying K+ channel [IK(M)] was examined in cardiac atrial myocytes, using hydrolysis-resistant GTP analogues. In the absence of muscarinic agonist, GTP analogues produced a membrane current characteristic of IK(M). The initial rate of appearance of this receptor-independent IK(M) was measured for the various analogues in order to explore the kinetic properties of IK(M) activation. We found that IK(M) activation is controlled solely by the intracellular analogue/GTP ratio and not by the absolute concentrations of the nucleotides. Analogues competed with GTP for binding to Gk with the following relative affinities: GTP gamma S greater than GTP greater than GppNHp greater than GppCH2p. At sufficiently high intracellular concentrations, however, all GTP analogues produced the same rate of IK(M) activation. This analogue- independent limiting rate is likely to correspond to the rate of GDP release from inactive, GDP-bound Gk. Muscarinic receptor stimulation by nanomolar concentrations of acetylcholine (ACh), which do not elicit IK(M) under control conditions, catalyzed IK(M) activation in the presence of GTP analogues. The rate of Gk activation by ACh (kACh) was found to be described by the simple relationship kACh = 8.4 X 10(8) min- 1 M-1.[ACh] + 0.44 min-1, the first term of which presumably reflects the agonist-catalyzed rate of GDP release from the Gk.GDP complex, while the second term corresponds to the basal rate of receptor- independent GDP release. Combined with the estimated K0.5 of the IK(M)- [ACh] dose-effect relationship, 160 nM, this result also allowed us to estimate the rate of Gk.GTP hydrolysis, kcat, to be near 135 min-1. These results provide, for the first time, a quantitative description of the salient features of G-protein function in vivo. PMID:2455765

  13. GEFs: structural basis for their activation of small GTP-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Cherfils, J; Chardin, P

    1999-08-01

    Small GTP-binding proteins of the Ras superfamily function as molecular switches in fundamental events such as signal transduction, cytoskeleton dynamics and intracellular trafficking. Guanine-nucleotide-exchange factors (GEFs) positively regulate these GTP-binding proteins in response to a variety of signals. GEFs catalyze the dissociation of GDP from the inactive GTP-binding proteins. GTP can then bind and induce structural changes that allow interaction with effectors. Representative structures of four main classes of exchange factors have been described recently and, in two cases, structures of the GTP-binding protein-GEF complex have been solved. These structures, together with biochemical studies, have allowed a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of activation of Ras-like GTP-binding proteins and suggested how they might represent targets for therapeutic intervention.

  14. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ski7 Is a GTP-Binding Protein Adopting the Characteristic Conformation of Active Translational GTPases.

    PubMed

    Kowalinski, Eva; Schuller, Anthony; Green, Rachel; Conti, Elena

    2015-07-07

    Ski7 is a cofactor of the cytoplasmic exosome in budding yeast, functioning in both mRNA turnover and non-stop decay (NSD), a surveillance pathway that degrades faulty mRNAs lacking a stop codon. The C-terminal region of Ski7 (Ski7C) shares overall sequence similarity with the translational GTPase (trGTPase) Hbs1, but whether Ski7 has retained the properties of a trGTPase is unclear. Here, we report the high-resolution structures of Ski7C bound to either intact guanosine triphosphate (GTP) or guanosine diphosphate-Pi. The individual domains of Ski7C adopt the conformation characteristic of active trGTPases. Furthermore, the nucleotide-binding site of Ski7C shares similar features compared with active trGTPases, notably the presence of a characteristic monovalent cation. However, a suboptimal polar residue at the putative catalytic site and an unusual polar residue that interacts with the γ-phosphate of GTP distinguish Ski7 from other trGTPases, suggesting it might function rather as a GTP-binding protein than as a GTP-hydrolyzing enzyme.

  15. GTP cyclohydrolase I expression, protein, and activity determine intracellular tetrahydrobiopterin levels, independent of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein expression.

    PubMed

    Tatham, Amy L; Crabtree, Mark J; Warrick, Nicholas; Cai, Shijie; Alp, Nicholas J; Channon, Keith M

    2009-05-15

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a required cofactor for nitricoxide synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. Alterations of GTPCH activity and BH4 availability play an important role in human disease. GTPCH expression is regulated by inflammatory stimuli, in association with reduced expression of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). However, the relative importance of GTPCH expression versus GTPCH activity and the role of GFRP in relation to BH4 bioavailability remain uncertain. We investigated these relationships in a cell line with tet-regulated GTPCH expression and in the hph-1 mouse model of GTPCH deficiency. Doxycycline exposure resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GTPCH protein and activity, with a strong correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.85, p < 0.0001). These changes in GTPCH and BH4 had no effect on GFRP expression or protein levels. GFRP overexpression and knockdown in tet-GCH cells did not alter GTPCH activity or BH4 levels, and GTPCH-specific knockdown in sEnd.1 endothelial cells had no effect on GFRP protein. In mouse liver we observed a graded reduction of GTPCH expression, protein, and activity, from wild type, heterozygote, to homozygote littermates, with a striking linear correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Neither GFRP expression nor protein differed between wild type, heterozygote, nor homozygote mice, despite the substantial differences in BH4. We suggest that GTPCH expression is the primary regulator of BH4 levels, and changes in GTPCH or BH4 are not necessarily accompanied by changes in GFRP expression.

  16. Light- and GTP-activated hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate in squid photoreceptor membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, K.M.; Saibil, H.R.

    1988-01-05

    Light stimulates the hydrolysis of exogenous, (/sup 3/H)inositol-labeled phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PtdInsP2) added to squid photoreceptor membranes, releasing inositol trisphosphate (InsP3). At free calcium levels of 0.05 microM or greater, hydrolysis of the labeled lipid is stimulated up to 4-fold by GTP and light together, but not separately. This activity is the biochemical counterpart of observations on intact retina showing that a rhodopsin-activated GTP-binding protein is involved in visual transduction in invertebrates, and that InsP3 release is correlated with visual excitation and adaptation. Using an in vitro assay, we investigated the calcium and GTP dependence of the phospholipase activity. At calcium concentrations between 0.1 and 0.5 microM, some hydrolysis occurs independently of GTP and light, with a light- and GTP-activated component superimposed. At 1 microM calcium there is no background activity, and hydrolysis absolutely requires both GTP and light. Ion exchange chromatography on Dowex 1 (formate form) of the water-soluble products released at 1 microM calcium reveals that the product is almost entirely InsP3. Invertebrate rhodopsin is homologous in sequence and function to vertebrate visual pigment, which modulates the concentration of cyclic GMP through the mediation of the GTP-binding protein transducin. While there is some evidence that light also modulates PtdInsP2 content in vertebrate photoreceptors, the case for its involvement in phototransduction is stronger for the invertebrate systems. The results reported here support the scheme of rhodopsin----GTP-binding protein----phospholipase C activation in invertebrate photoreceptors.

  17. Formation of a Trimeric Xpo1-Ran[GTP]-Ded1 Exportin Complex Modulates ATPase and Helicase Activities of Ded1.

    PubMed

    Hauk, Glenn; Bowman, Gregory D

    2015-01-01

    The DEAD-box RNA helicase Ded1, which is essential in yeast and known as DDX3 in humans, shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm and takes part in several basic processes including RNA processing and translation. A key interacting partner of Ded1 is the exportin Xpo1, which together with the GTP-bound state of the small GTPase Ran, facilitates unidirectional transport of Ded1 out of the nucleus. Here we demonstrate that Xpo1 and Ran[GTP] together reduce the RNA-stimulated ATPase and helicase activities of Ded1. Binding and inhibition of Ded1 by Xpo1 depend on the affinity of the Ded1 nuclear export sequence (NES) for Xpo1 and the presence of Ran[GTP]. Association with Xpo1/Ran[GTP] reduces RNA-stimulated ATPase activity of Ded1 by increasing the apparent KM for the RNA substrate. Despite the increased KM, the Ded1:Xpo1:Ran[GTP] ternary complex retains the ability to bind single stranded RNA, suggesting that Xpo1/Ran[GTP] may modulate the substrate specificity of Ded1. These results demonstrate that, in addition to transport, exportins such as Xpo1 also have the capability to alter enzymatic activities of their cargo.

  18. Phytochrome regulates GTP-binding protein activity in the envelope of pea nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. B.; Memon, A. R.; Thompson, G. A. Jr; Roux, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    Three GTP-binding proteins with apparent molecular masses of 27, 28 and 30 kDa have been detected in isolated nuclei of etiolated pea plumules. After LDS-PAGE and transfer to nitrocellulose these proteins bind [32P]GTP in the presence of excess ATP, suggesting that they are monomeric G proteins. When nuclei are disrupted, three proteins co-purify with the nuclear envelope fraction and are highly enriched in this fraction. The level of [32P]GTP-binding for all three protein bands is significantly increased when harvested pea plumules are irradiated by red light, and this effect is reversed by far-red light. The results indicate that GTP-binding activity associated with the nuclear envelope of plant cells is photoreversibly regulated by the pigment phytochrome.

  19. Actin filament organization in activated mast cells is regulated by heterotrimeric and small GTP-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Rat peritoneal mast cells, both intact and permeabilized, have been used widely as model secretory cells. GTP-binding proteins and calcium play a major role in controlling their secretory response. Here we have examined changes in the organization of actin filaments in intact mast cells after activation by compound 48/80, and in permeabilized cells after direct activation of GTP-binding proteins by GTP-gamma-S. In both cases, a centripetal redistribution of cellular F-actin was observed: the content of F-actin was reduced in the cortical region and increased in the cell interior. The overall F-actin content was increased. Using permeabilized cells, we show that AIF4-, an activator of heterotrimeric G proteins, induces the disassembly of F-actin at the cortex, while the appearance of actin filaments in the interior of the cell is dependent on two small GTPases, rho and rac. Rho was found to be responsible for de novo actin polymerization, presumably from a membrane-bound monomeric pool, while rac was required for an entrapment of the released cortical filaments. Thus, a heterotrimeric G-protein and the small GTPases, rho and rac, participate in affecting the changes in the actin cytoskeleton observed after activation of mast cells. PMID:8051203

  20. Ras-GTP dimers activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway

    DOE PAGES

    Nan, Xiaolin; Tamgüney, Tanja M.; Collisson, Eric A.; ...

    2015-06-16

    Rat sarcoma (Ras) GTPases regulate cell proliferation and survival through effector pathways including Raf-MAPK, and are the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. Although it is well established that Ras activity requires binding to both GTP and the membrane, details of how Ras operates on the cell membrane to activate its effectors remain elusive. Efforts to target mutant Ras in human cancers to therapeutic benefit have also been largely unsuccessful. Here we show that Ras-GTP forms dimers to activate MAPK. We used quantitative photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) to analyze the nanoscale spatial organization of PAmCherry1-tagged KRas 4B (hereafter referredmore » to KRas) on the cell membrane under various signaling conditions. We found that at endogenous expression levels KRas forms dimers, and KRasG12D, a mutant that constitutively binds GTP, activates MAPK. Overexpression of KRas leads to formation of higher order Ras nanoclusters. Conversely, at lower expression levels, KRasG12D is monomeric and activates MAPK only when artificially dimerized. Moreover, dimerization and signaling of KRas are both dependent on an intact CAAX (C, cysteine; A, aliphatic; X, any amino acid) motif that is also known to mediate membrane localization. These results reveal a new, dimerization-dependent signaling mechanism of Ras, and suggest Ras dimers as a potential therapeutic target in mutant Ras-driven tumors.« less

  1. Ras-GTP dimers activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Nan, Xiaolin; Tamgüney, Tanja M.; Collisson, Eric A.; Lin, Li -Jung; Pitt, Cameron; Galeas, Jacqueline; Lewis, Sophia; Gray, Joe W.; McCormick, Frank; Chu, Steven

    2015-06-16

    Rat sarcoma (Ras) GTPases regulate cell proliferation and survival through effector pathways including Raf-MAPK, and are the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. Although it is well established that Ras activity requires binding to both GTP and the membrane, details of how Ras operates on the cell membrane to activate its effectors remain elusive. Efforts to target mutant Ras in human cancers to therapeutic benefit have also been largely unsuccessful. Here we show that Ras-GTP forms dimers to activate MAPK. We used quantitative photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) to analyze the nanoscale spatial organization of PAmCherry1-tagged KRas 4B (hereafter referred to KRas) on the cell membrane under various signaling conditions. We found that at endogenous expression levels KRas forms dimers, and KRasG12D, a mutant that constitutively binds GTP, activates MAPK. Overexpression of KRas leads to formation of higher order Ras nanoclusters. Conversely, at lower expression levels, KRasG12D is monomeric and activates MAPK only when artificially dimerized. Moreover, dimerization and signaling of KRas are both dependent on an intact CAAX (C, cysteine; A, aliphatic; X, any amino acid) motif that is also known to mediate membrane localization. These results reveal a new, dimerization-dependent signaling mechanism of Ras, and suggest Ras dimers as a potential therapeutic target in mutant Ras-driven tumors.

  2. Mechanism of activation of elongation factor Tu by ribosome: catalytic histidine activates GTP by protonation.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Alexey; Field, Martin

    2013-09-01

    Elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) is central to prokaryotic protein synthesis as it has the role of delivering amino-acylated tRNAs to the ribosome. Release of EF-Tu, after correct binding of the EF-Tu:aa-tRNA complex to the ribosome, is initiated by GTP hydrolysis. This reaction, whose mechanism is uncertain, is catalyzed by EF-Tu, but requires activation by the ribosome. There have been a number of mechanistic proposals, including those spurred by a recent X-ray crystallographic analysis of a ribosome:EF-Tu:aa-tRNA:GTP-analog complex. In this work, we have investigated these and alternative hypotheses, using high-level quantum chemical/molecular mechanical simulations for the wild-type protein and its His85Gln mutant. For both proteins, we find previously unsuggested mechanisms as being preferred, in which residue 85, either His or Gln, directly assists in the reaction. Analysis shows that the RNA has a minor catalytic effect in the wild-type reaction, but plays a significant role in the mutant by greatly stabilizing the reaction's transition state. Given the similarity between EF-Tu and other members of the translational G-protein family, it is likely that these mechanisms of ribosome-activated GTP hydrolysis are pertinent to all of these proteins.

  3. Ras and GTPase-activating protein (GAP) drive GTP into a precatalytic state as revealed by combining FTIR and biomolecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Rudack, Till; Xia, Fei; Schlitter, Jürgen; Kötting, Carsten; Gerwert, Klaus

    2012-09-18

    Members of the Ras superfamily regulate many cellular processes. They are down-regulated by a GTPase reaction in which GTP is cleaved into GDP and P(i) by nucleophilic attack of a water molecule. Ras proteins accelerate GTP hydrolysis by a factor of 10(5) compared to GTP in water. GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) accelerate hydrolysis by another factor of 10(5) compared to Ras alone. Oncogenic mutations in Ras and GAPs slow GTP hydrolysis and are a factor in many cancers. Here, we elucidate in detail how this remarkable catalysis is brought about. We refined the protein-bound GTP structure and protein-induced charge shifts within GTP beyond the current resolution of X-ray structural models by combining quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics simulations with time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The simulations were validated by comparing experimental and theoretical IR difference spectra. The reactant structure of GTP is destabilized by Ras via a conformational change from a staggered to an eclipsed position of the nonbridging oxygen atoms of the γ- relative to the β-phosphates and the further rotation of the nonbridging oxygen atoms of α- relative to the β- and γ-phosphates by GAP. Further, the γ-phosphate becomes more positive although two of its oxygen atoms remain negative. This facilitates the nucleophilic attack by the water oxygen at the phosphate and proton transfer to the oxygen. Detailed changes in geometry and charge distribution in the ligand below the resolution of X-ray structure analysis are important for catalysis. Such high resolution appears crucial for the understanding of enzyme catalysis.

  4. Hepatitis B virus HBx protein activates Ras-GTP complex formation and establishes a Ras, Raf, MAP kinase signaling cascade.

    PubMed Central

    Benn, J; Schneider, R J

    1994-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus produces a small (154-amino acid) transcriptional transactivating protein, HBx, which is required for viral infection and has been implicated in virus-mediated liver oncogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism for HBx activity and its possible influence on cell proliferation have remained obscure. A number of studies suggest that HBx may stimulate transcription by indirectly activating transcription factors, possibly by influencing cell signaling pathways. We now present biochemical evidence that HBx activates Ras and rapidly induces a cytoplasmic signaling cascade linking Ras, Raf, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase), leading to transcriptional transactivation. HBx strongly elevates levels of GTP-bound Ras, activated and phosphorylated Raf, and tyrosine-phosphorylated and activated MAP kinase. Transactivation of transcription factor AP-1 by HBx is blocked by inhibition of Ras or Raf activities but not by inhibition of Ca(2+)- and diacylglycerol-dependent protein kinase C. HBx was also found to stimulate DNA synthesis in serum-starved cells. The hepatitis B virus HBx protein therefore stimulates Ras-GTP complex formation and promotes downstream signaling through Raf and MAP kinases, and may influence cell proliferation. Images PMID:7937954

  5. A New Use for a Familiar Fold: the X-Ray Crystal Structure of GTP-Bound GTP Cyclohydrolase III From Methanocaldococcus Jannaschii Reveals a Two Metal Ion Catalytic Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, S.D.; Roberts, S.A.; Zegeer, A.M.; Montfort, W.R.; Bandarian, V.

    2009-05-26

    GTP cyclohydrolase (GCH) III from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, which catalyzes the conversion of GTP to 2-amino-5-formylamino-6-ribosylamino-4(3H)-pyrimidinone 5'-phosphate (FAPy), has been shown to require Mg{sup 2+} for catalytic activity and is activated by monovalent cations such as K{sup +} and ammonium [Graham, D. E., Xu, H., and White, R. H. (2002) Biochemistry 41, 15074-15084]. The reaction is formally identical to that catalyzed by a GCH II ortholog (SCO 6655) from Streptomyces coelicolor; however, SCO 6655, like other GCH II proteins, is a zinc-containing protein. The structure of GCH III complexed with GTP solved at 2 {angstrom} resolution clearly shows that GCH III adopts a distinct fold that is closely related to the palm domains of phosphodiesterases, such as DNA polymerase I. GCH III is a tetramer of identical subunits; each monomer is composed of an N- and a C-terminal domain that adopt nearly superimposible structures, suggesting that the protein has arisen by gene duplication. Three metal ions were located in the active site, two of which occupy positions that are analogous to those occupied by divalent metal ions in the structures of a number of palm domain containing proteins, such as DNA polymerase I. Two conserved Asp residues that coordinate the metal ions, which are also found in palm domain containing proteins, are observed in GCH III. Site-directed variants (Asp{yields}Asn) of these residues in GCH III are less active than wild-type. The third metal ion, most likely a potassium ion, is involved in substrate recognition through coordination of O6 of GTP. The arrangement of the metal ions in the active site suggests that GCH III utilizes two metal ion catalysis. The structure of GCH III extends the repertoire of possible reactions with a palm fold to include cyclohydrolase chemistry.

  6. Sliding of a 43S ribosomal complex from the recognized AUG codon triggered by a delay in eIF2-bound GTP hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Terenin, Ilya M.; Akulich, Kseniya A.; Andreev, Dmitry E.; Polyanskaya, Sofya A.; Shatsky, Ivan N.; Dmitriev, Sergey E.

    2016-01-01

    During eukaryotic translation initiation, 43S ribosomal complex scans mRNA leader unless an AUG codon in an appropriate context is found. Establishing the stable codon–anticodon base-pairing traps the ribosome on the initiator codon and triggers structural rearrangements, which lead to Pi release from the eIF2-bound GTP. It is generally accepted that AUG recognition by the scanning 43S complex sets the final point in the process of start codon selection, while latter stages do not contribute to this process. Here we use translation reconstitution approach and kinetic toe-printing assay to show that after the 48S complex is formed on an AUG codon, in case GTP hydrolysis is impaired, the ribosomal subunit is capable to resume scanning and slides downstream to the next AUG. In contrast to leaky scanning, this sliding is not limited to AUGs in poor nucleotide contexts and occurs after a relatively long pause at the recognized AUG. Thus, recognition of an AUG per se does not inevitably lead to this codon being selected for initiation of protein synthesis. Instead, it is eIF5-induced GTP hydrolysis and Pi release that irreversibly trap the 48S complex, and this complex is further stabilized by eIF5B and 60S joining. PMID:26717981

  7. Membrane-associated 41-kDa GTP-binding protein in collagen-induced platelet activation

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, G.; Bourguignon, L.Y. )

    1990-08-01

    Initially we established that the binding of collagen to human blood platelets stimulates both the rapid loss of PIP2 and the generation of inositol-4,5-bisphosphate (IP2) and inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3). These results indicate that the binding of collagen stimulates inositol phospholipid-specific phospholipase C during platelet activation. The fact that GTP or GTP-gamma-S augments, and pertussis toxin inhibits, collagen-induced IP3 formation suggests that a GTP-binding protein or (or proteins) may be directly involved in the regulation of phospholipase C-mediated phosphoinositide turnover in human platelets. We have used several complementary techniques to isolate and characterize a platelet 41-kDa polypeptide (or polypeptides) that has a number of structural and functional similarities to the regulatory alpha i subunit of the GTP-binding proteins isolated from bovine brain. This 41-kDa polypeptide (or polypeptides) is found to be closely associated with at least four membrane glycoproteins (e.g., gp180, gp110, gp95, and gp75) in a 330-kDa complex that can be dissociated by treatment with high salt plus urea. Most important, we have demonstrated that antilymphoma 41-kDa (alpha i subunit of GTP-binding proteins) antibody cross-reacts with the platelet 41-kDa protein (or proteins) and the alpha i subunit of bovine brain Gi alpha proteins, and blocks GTP/collagen-induced IP3 formation. These data provide strong evidence that the 41-kDa platelet GTP-binding protein (or proteins) is directly involved in collagen-induced signal transduction during platelet activation.

  8. A SelB/EF-Tu/aIF2γ-like protein from Methanosarcina mazei in the GTP-bound form binds cysteinyl-tRNA(Cys.).

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Tatsuo; Ishii, Ryohei; Hikida, Yasushi; Fukunaga, Ryuya; Sengoku, Toru; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-03-01

    The putative translation elongation factor Mbar_A0971 from the methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina barkeri was proposed to be the pyrrolysine-specific paralogue of EF-Tu ("EF-Pyl"). In the present study, the crystal structures of its homologue from Methanosarcina mazei (MM1309) were determined in the GMPPNP-bound, GDP-bound, and apo forms, by the single-wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing method. The three MM1309 structures are quite similar (r.m.s.d. < 0.1 Å). The three domains, corresponding to domains 1, 2, and 3 of EF-Tu/SelB/aIF2γ, are packed against one another to form a closed architecture. The MM1309 structures resemble those of bacterial/archaeal SelB, bacterial EF-Tu in the GTP-bound form, and archaeal initiation factor aIF2γ, in this order. The GMPPNP and GDP molecules are visible in their co-crystal structures. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements of MM1309·GTP·Mg(2+), MM1309·GDP·Mg(2+), and MM1309·GMPPNP·Mg(2+) provided dissociation constants of 0.43, 26.2, and 222.2 μM, respectively. Therefore, the affinities of MM1309 for GTP and GDP are similar to those of SelB rather than those of EF-Tu. Furthermore, the switch I and II regions of MM1309 are involved in domain-domain interactions, rather than nucleotide binding. The putative binding pocket for the aminoacyl moiety on MM1309 is too small to accommodate the pyrrolysyl moiety, based on a comparison of the present MM1309 structures with that of the EF-Tu·GMPPNP·aminoacyl-tRNA ternary complex. A hydrolysis protection assay revealed that MM1309 binds cysteinyl (Cys)-tRNA(Cys) and protects the aminoacyl bond from non-enzymatic hydrolysis. Therefore, we propose that MM1309 functions as either a guardian protein that protects the Cys moiety from oxidation or an alternative translation factor for Cys-tRNA(Cys).

  9. Live-cell imaging of endogenous Ras-GTP illustrates predominant Ras activation at the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Augsten, Martin; Pusch, Rico; Biskup, Christoph; Rennert, Knut; Wittig, Ute; Beyer, Katja; Blume, Alfred; Wetzker, Reinhard; Friedrich, Karlheinz; Rubio, Ignacio

    2006-01-01

    Ras-GTP imaging studies using the Ras-binding domain (RBD) of the Ras effector c-Raf as a reporter for overexpressed Ras have produced discrepant results about the possible activation of Ras at the Golgi apparatus. We report that RBD oligomerization provides probes for visualization of endogenous Ras-GTP, obviating Ras overexpression and the side effects derived thereof. RBD oligomerization results in tenacious binding to Ras-GTP and interruption of Ras signalling. Trimeric RBD probes fused to green fluorescent protein report agonist-induced endogenous Ras activation at the plasma membrane (PM) of COS-7, PC12 and Jurkat cells, but do not accumulate at the Golgi. PM illumination is exacerbated by Ras overexpression and its sensitivity to dominant-negative RasS17N and pharmacological manipulations matches Ras-GTP formation assessed biochemically. Our data illustrate that endogenous Golgi-located Ras is not under the control of growth factors and argue for the PM as the predominant site of agonist-induced Ras activation. PMID:16282985

  10. Tyr39 of ran preserves the Ran.GTP gradient by inhibiting GTP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Brucker, Sven; Gerwert, Klaus; Kötting, Carsten

    2010-08-06

    Ran is a member of the superfamily of small GTPases, which cycle between a GTP-bound "on" and a GDP-bound "off" state. Ran regulates nuclear transport. In order to maintain a gradient of excess Ran.GTP within the nucleoplasm and excess Ran.GDP within the cytoplasm, the hydrolysis of Ran.GTP in the nucleoplasm should be prevented, whereas in the cytoplasm, hydrolysis is catalyzed by Ran.GAP (GTPase-activating protein). In this article, we investigate the GTPase reaction of Ran in complex with its binding protein Ran-binding protein 1 by time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy: We show that the slowdown of the intrinsic hydrolysis of RanGTP is accomplished by tyrosine 39, which is probably misplacing the attacking water. We monitored the interaction of Ran with RanGAP, which reveals two reactions steps. By isotopic labeling of Ran and RanGAP, we were able to assign the first step to a small conformational change within the catalytic site. The following bond breakage is the rate-limiting step of hydrolysis. An intermediate of protein-bound phosphate as found for Ras or Rap systems is kinetically unresolved. This demonstrates that despite the structural similarity among the G-domain of the GTPases, different reaction mechanisms are utilized.

  11. Pheromone signalling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires the small GTP-binding protein Cdc42p and its activator CDC24.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Z S; Leung, T; Manser, E; Lim, L

    1995-01-01

    Pheromone signalling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is mediated by the STE4-STE18 G-protein beta gamma subunits. A possible target for the subunits is Ste20p, whose structural homolog, the serine/threonine kinase PAK, is activated by GTP-binding p21s Cdc42 and Rac1. The putative Cdc42p-binding domain of Ste20p, expressed as a fusion protein, binds human and yeast GTP-binding Cdc42p. Cdc42p is required for alpha-factor-induced activation of FUS1.cdc24ts strains defective for Cdc42p GDP/GTP exchange show no pheromone induction at restrictive temperatures but are partially rescued by overexpression of Cdc42p, which is potentiated by Cdc42p12V mutants. Epistatic analysis indicates that CDC24 and CDC42 lie between STE4 and STE20 in the pathway. The two-hybrid system revealed that Ste4p interacts with Cdc24p. We propose that Cdc42p plays a pivotal role both in polarization of the cytoskeleton and in pheromone signalling. PMID:7565673

  12. Irreversible stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity of fat cell membranes of phosphoramidate and phosphonate analogs of GTP.

    PubMed

    Cuatrecasas, P; Bennett, V; Jacobs, S

    1975-01-01

    The ability of 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p) to stimulate irreversibly the adenylate cyclease activity of fat cell membranes has been studied by preincubating the membranes with this or related analogs followed by assaying after thoroughly washing the membranes. Activation can occur in a simple Tris-HCl buffer, in the absence of added divalent cations and in the presence of EDTA. Dithiothreitol enhances the apparent degree of activation, perhaps by stabilization. The importance of utilizing optimal conditions for stabilizing enzyme activity, and of measuring the simultaneous changes in the control enzyme, is illustrated. The organomercurial, p-aminophenylmercuric acetate, inhibits profoundly the activity of the native as well as the Gpp(NH)p-stimulated adenylate cyclase, but in both cases subsequent exposure to dithiothreitol restores fully the original enzyme activity. However, the mercurial-inactivated enzyme does not react with Gpp(NP)p, as evidenced by the subsequent restoration of only the control enzyme activity upon exposure to dithiothreitol. Thus, reaction with Gpp(NH)p requires intact sulfhydryl groups, but the activated state is not irreversibly destroyed by the inactivation caused by sulfhydryl blockade. GTP and, less effectively, GDP and ATP inhibit activation by Gpp(NH)p, but interpretations are complicated by the facts that this inhibition is overcome with time and that GTP and ATP can protect potently from spontaneous inactivation. These two nucleotides can be used in the Gpp(NH)p preincubation to stabilize the enzyme. The Gpp(NH)p-activated enzyme cannot be reversed spontaneously during prolonged incubation at 30 degrees C in the absence or presence of GTP, ATP, MgCl2, glycine, dithiothreitol, NaF or EDTA. The strong nucleophile, neutral hydroxylamine, decreases the Gpp(NH)p-activated enzyme activity and no subsequent activation is detected upon re-exposure to the nucleotide.

  13. The specific vibrational modes of GTP in solution and bound to Ras: a detailed theoretical analysis by QM/MM simulations.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fei; Rudack, Till; Kötting, Carsten; Schlitter, Jürgen; Gerwert, Klaus

    2011-12-28

    The hydrolysis of guanosine triphosphate (GTP) in general, and especially by GTPases like the Ras protein, is in the focus of biological investigations. A huge amount of experimental data from Fourier-transformed infrared studies is currently available, and many vibrational bands of free GTP, GTP·Mg(2+), and Ras·GTP·Mg(2+) in solution have been assigned by isotopic labeling. In the Ras environment, bands between 800 cm(-1) and 1300 cm(-1) have already been assigned, but not those below 800 cm(-1). The combination of quantum and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods takes the quantum effects for selected relevant atoms into account. This provides structural details, vibrational frequencies and electron distributions of the region of interest. We therefore used MM and QM/MM simulations to investigate the normal vibrational modes of GTP, GTP·Mg(2+), and Ras·GTP·Mg(2+) in solution, and assigned the vibrational frequencies for each normal vibration mode. In this study, the quantum box contains the nucleoside and the Mg(2+). The comparison of calculated and experimental vibrational spectra provides a very good control for the quality of the calculations. Structurally, MM and QM/MM simulations reveal a stable tridentate coordination of the Mg(2+) by GTP in water, and a stable bidentate coordination by GTP in complex with Ras. For validation, we compare the calculated frequencies and isotopic shifts with the experimental results available in the range of 800 cm(-1) to 1300 cm(-1). For the first time we suggest band assignments of the vibrational modes below 800 cm(-1) by comparison of calculated and experimental spectra.

  14. Purification and cloning of the GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein, GFRP.

    PubMed

    Milstien, S; Jaffe, H; Kowlessur, D; Bonner, T I

    1996-08-16

    The activity of GTP cyclohydrolase I, the initial enzyme of the de novo pathway for biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin, the cofactor required for aromatic amino acid hydroxylations and nitric oxide synthesis, is sensitive to end-product feedback inhibition by tetrahydrobiopterin. This inhibition by tetrahydrobiopterin is mediated by the GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein GFRP, previously named p35 (Harada, T., Kagamiyama, H., and Hatakeyama, K. (1993) Science 260, 1507-1510), and -phenylalanine specifically reverses the tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent inhibition. As a first step in the investigation of the physiological role of this unique mechanism of regulation, a convenient procedure has been developed to co-purify to homogeneity both GTP cyclohydrolase I and GFRP from rat liver. GTP cyclohydrolase I and GFRP exist in a complex which can be bound to a GTP-affinity column from which GTP cyclohydrolase I and GFRP are separately and selectively eluted. GFRP is dissociated from the GTP agarose-bound complex with 0.2 NaCl, a concentration of salt which also effectively blocks the tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent inhibitory activity of GFRP. GTP cyclohydrolase I is then eluted from the GTP-agarose column with GTP. Both GFRP and GTP cyclohydrolase I were then purified separately to near homogeneity by sequential high performance anion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. GFRP was found to have a native molecular mass of 20 kDa and consist of a homodimer of 9.5-kDa subunits. Based on peptide sequences obtained from purified GFRP, oligonucleotides were synthesized and used to clone a cDNA from a rat liver cDNA library by polymerase chain reaction-based methods. The cDNA contained an open reading frame that encoded a novel protein of 84 amino acids (calculated molecular mass 9665 daltons). This protein when expressed in Escherichia coli as a thioredoxin fusion protein had tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent GTP cyclohydrolase I inhibitory activity. Northern

  15. Partial characterization of GTP-binding proteins in Neurospora

    SciTech Connect

    Hasunuma, K.; Miyamoto-Shinohara, Y.; Furukawa, K.

    1987-08-14

    Six fractions of GTP-binding proteins separated by gel filtration of a mycelial extract containing membrane components of Neurospora crassa were partially characterized. (/sup 35/S)GTP gamma S bound to GTP-binding protein was assayed by repeated treatments with a Norit solution and centrifugation. The binding of (/sup 35/S)GTP gamma S to GTP-binding proteins was competitively prevented in the presence of 0.1 to 1 mM GTP but not in the presence of ATP. These GTP-binding proteins fractionated by the gel column had Km values of 20, 7, 4, 4, 80 and 2 nM. All six fractions of these GTP-binding proteins showed the capacity to be ADP-ribosylated by pertussis toxin.

  16. Interaction of the GTP-binding and GTPase-activating domains of ARD1 involves the effector region of the ADP-ribosylation factor domain.

    PubMed

    Vitale, N; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1997-02-14

    ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are a family of approximately 20-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins and members of the Ras superfamily, originally identified and purified by their ability to enhance the ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of cholera toxin and more recently recognized as critical participants in vesicular trafficking pathways and phospholipase D activation. ARD1 is a 64-kDa protein with an 18-kDa carboxyl-terminal ARF domain (p3) and a 46-kDa amino-terminal extension (p5) that is widely expressed in mammalian tissues. Using recombinant proteins, we showed that p5, the amino-terminal domain of ARD1, stimulates the GTPase activity of p3, the ARF domain, and appears to be the GTPase-activating protein (GAP) component of this bifunctional protein, whereas in other members of the Ras superfamily a separate GAP molecule interacts with the effector region of the GTP-binding protein. p5 stimulated the GTPase activity of p3 but not of ARF1, which differs from p3 in several amino acids in the effector domain. After substitution of 7 amino acids from p3 in the appropriate position in ARF1, the chimeric protein ARF1(39-45p3) bound to p5, which increased its GTPase activity. Specifically, after Gly40 and Thr45 in the putative effector domain of ARF1 were replaced with the equivalent Asp and Pro, respectively, from p3, functional interaction of the chimeric ARF1 with p5 was increased. Thus, Asp25 and Pro30 of the ARF domain (p3) of ARD1 are involved in its functional and physical interaction with the GTPase-activating (p5) domain of ARD1. After deletion of the amino-terminal 15 amino acids from ARF1(39-45p3), its interaction with p5 was essentially equivalent to that of p3, suggesting that the amino terminus of ARF1(39-45p3) may interfere with binding to p5. These results are consistent with the conclusion that the GAP domain of ARD1 interacts with the effector region of the ARF domain and thereby stimulates GTP hydrolysis.

  17. GTP depletion synergizes the anti-proliferative activity of chemotherapeutic agents in a cell type-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Tao; Meng, Lingjun; Tsai, Robert Y.L.

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} Strong synergy between mycophenolic acid (MPA) and 5-FU in MDA-MB-231 cells. {yields} Cell type-dependent synergy between MPA and anti-proliferative agents. {yields} The synergy of MPA on 5-FU is recapitulated by RNA polymerase-I inhibition. {yields} The synergy of MPA on 5-FU requires the expression of nucleostemin. -- Abstract: Mycophenolic acid (MPA) depletes intracellular GTP by blocking de novo guanine nucleotide synthesis. GTP is used ubiquitously for DNA/RNA synthesis and as a signaling molecule. Here, we made a surprising discovery that the anti-proliferative activity of MPA acts synergistically with specific chemotherapeutic agents in a cell type-dependent manner. In MDA-MB-231 cells, MPA shows an extremely potent synergy with 5-FU but not with doxorubicin or etoposide. The synergy between 5-FU and MPA works most effectively against the highly tumorigenic mammary tumor cells compared to the less tumorigenic ones, and does not work in the non-breast cancer cell types that we tested, with the exception of PC3 cells. On the contrary, MPA shows the highest synergy with paclitaxel but not with 5-FU in SCC-25 cells, derived from oral squamous cell carcinomas. Mechanistically, the synergistic effect of MPA on 5-FU in MDA-MB-231 cells can be recapitulated by inhibiting the RNA polymerase-I activity and requires the expression of nucleostemin. This work reveals that the synergy between MPA and anti-proliferative agents is determined by cell type-dependent factors.

  18. Role of the Arf6 GDP/GTP cycle and Arf6 GTPase-activating proteins in actin remodeling and intracellular transport.

    PubMed

    Klein, Stéphanie; Franco, Michel; Chardin, Pierre; Luton, Frédéric

    2006-05-05

    We have analyzed both biochemically and functionally a series of Arf6 mutants, providing new insights into the molecular mode of action of the small G protein Arf6. First, by comparing a fast-cycling mutant (Arf6(T157N)) and a GTPase-deficient mutant (Arf6(Q67L)), we established the necessity for completion of the Arf6 GDP/GTP cycle for recycling of major histocompatibility complex molecules to the plasma membrane. Second, we found that aluminum fluoride (AlF), known for inducing membrane protrusion in cells expressing exogenous wild-type Arf6, stabilized a functional wild-type Arf6.AlF(x) . GTPase-activating protein (GAP) complex in vitro and in vivo. We also found that the tandem mutation Q37E/S38I prevented the binding of two Arf GAPs, but not the effector ARHGAP10, and blocked the formation of membrane protrusion and actin reorganization. Together, our results with AlF(x) and Arf6(Q37E/S38I) demonstrate the critical role of the Arf6 GAPs as effectors for Arf6-regulated actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Finally, competition experiments conducted in vivo suggest the existence of a membrane receptor for GDP-bound Arf6.

  19. GTP-Binding Proteins Inhibit cAMP Activation of Chloride Channels in Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwiebert, Erik M.; Kizer, Neil; Gruenert, Dieter C.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    1992-11-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease characterized, in part, by defective regulation of Cl^- secretion by airway epithelial cells. In CF, cAMP does not activate Cl^- channels in the apical membrane of airway epithelial cells. We report here whole-cell patch-clamp studies demonstrating that pertussis toxin, which uncouples heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (G proteins) from their receptors, and guanosine 5'-[β-thio]diphosphate, which prevents G proteins from interacting with their effectors, increase Cl^- currents and restore cAMP-activated Cl^- currents in airway epithelial cells isolated from CF patients. In contrast, the G protein activators guanosine 5'-[γ-thio]triphosphate and AlF^-_4 reduce Cl^- currents and inhibit cAMP from activating Cl^- currents in normal airway epithelial cells. In CF cells treated with pertussis toxin or guanosine 5'-[β-thio]diphosphate and in normal cells, cAMP activates a Cl^- conductance that has properties similar to CF transmembrane-conductance regulator Cl^- channels. We conclude that heterotrimeric G proteins inhibit cAMP-activated Cl^- currents in airway epithelial cells and that modulation of the inhibitory G protein signaling pathway may have the therapeutic potential for improving cAMP-activated Cl^- secretion in CF.

  20. Autophosphorylation in the Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 (LRRK2) GTPase Domain Modifies Kinase and GTP-Binding Activities

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Philip J.; Smith, Archer D.; Sen, Saurabh; Renfrow, Matthew B.; Mobley, James A.; West, Andrew B.

    2011-01-01

    The LRRK2 protein has both GTPase and kinase activities and mutation in either enzymatic domain can cause late-onset Parkinson’s disease (PD). Nucleotide binding in the GTPase domain may be required for kinase activity and residues in the GTPase domain are potential sites for autophosphorylation, suggesting a complex mechanism of intrinsic regulation. To further define the effects of LRRK2 autophosphorylation, we applied a technique optimal for detection of protein phosphorylation, electron transfer dissociation (ETD), and identified autophosphorylation events exclusively nearby the nucleotide binding pocket in the GTPase domain. PD-linked mutations alter kinase activity but did not alter autophosphorylation site specificity or sites of phosphorylation in a robust in vitro substrate myelin basic protein. Amino-acid substitutions in the GTPase domain have large effects on kinase activity, as insertion of the GTPase-associated R1441C pathogenic mutation together with the G2019S kinase-domain mutation resulted in a multiplicative increase (~7-fold) in activity. Removal of a conserved autophosphorylation site (T1503) by mutation to an alanine residue resulted in greatly decreased GTP-binding and kinase activity. While autophosphorylation likely serves to potentiate kinase activity, we find that oligomerization and loss of the active dimer species occurs in an ATP and autophosphorylation independent manner. LRRK2 autophosphorylation sites are overall robustly protected from dephosphorylation in vitro, suggesting tight control over activity in vivo. We developed highly specific antibodies targeting pT1503 but failed to detect endogenous autophosphorylation in protein derived from transgenic mice and cell lines. LRRK2 activity in vivo is unlikely to be constitutive but rather refined to specific responses. PMID:21806997

  1. 78 FR 18326 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Upward Bound and Upward Bound Math...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Upward Bound and Upward Bound Math Science... Upward Bound Math Science Annual Performance Report. OMB Control Number: 1840-NEW. Type of Review: New... under the regular Upward Bound (UB) and Upward Bound Math and Science (UBMS) Programs. The Department...

  2. Reduction of exportin 6 activity leads to actin accumulation via failure of RanGTP restoration and NTF2 sequestration in the nuclei of senescent cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Su Hyun; Park, Tae Jun; Lim, In Kyoung

    2011-04-15

    We have previously reported that G-actin accumulation in nuclei is a universal phenomenon of cellular senescence. By employing primary culture of human diploid fibroblast (HDF) and stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS), we explored whether the failure of actin export to cytoplasm is responsible for actin accumulation in nuclei of senescent cells. Expression of exportin 6 (Exp6) and small G-protein, Ran, was significantly reduced in the replicative senescence, but not yet in SIPS, whereas nuclear import of actin by cofilin was already increased in SIPS. After treatment of young HDF cells with H(2)O(2), rapid reduction of nuclear RanGTP was observed along with cytoplasmic increase of RanGDP. Furthermore, significantly reduced interaction of Exp6 with RanGTP was found by GST-Exp6 pull-down analysis. Failure of RanGTP restoration was accompanied with inhibition of ATP synthesis and NTF2 sequestration in the nuclei along with accordant change of senescence morphology. Indeed, knockdown of Exp6 expression significantly increased actin molecule in the nuclei of young HDF cells. Therefore, actin accumulation in nuclei of senescent cells is most likely due to the failure of RanGTP restoration with ATP deficiency and NTF2 accumulation in nuclei, which result in the decrease of actin export via Exp6 inactivation, in addition to actin import by cofilin activation.

  3. Reduction of exportin 6 activity leads to actin accumulation via failure of RanGTP restoration and NTF2 sequestration in the nuclei of senescent cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Su Hyun; Park, Tae Jun; Lim, In Kyoung

    2011-04-15

    We have previously reported that G-actin accumulation in nuclei is a universal phenomenon of cellular senescence. By employing primary culture of human diploid fibroblast (HDF) and stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS), we explored whether the failure of actin export to cytoplasm is responsible for actin accumulation in nuclei of senescent cells. Expression of exportin 6 (Exp6) and small G-protein, Ran, was significantly reduced in the replicative senescence, but not yet in SIPS, whereas nuclear import of actin by cofilin was already increased in SIPS. After treatment of young HDF cells with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, rapid reduction of nuclear RanGTP was observed along with cytoplasmic increase of RanGDP. Furthermore, significantly reduced interaction of Exp6 with RanGTP was found by GST-Exp6 pull-down analysis. Failure of RanGTP restoration was accompanied with inhibition of ATP synthesis and NTF2 sequestration in the nuclei along with accordant change of senescence morphology. Indeed, knockdown of Exp6 expression significantly increased actin molecule in the nuclei of young HDF cells. Therefore, actin accumulation in nuclei of senescent cells is most likely due to the failure of RanGTP restoration with ATP deficiency and NTF2 accumulation in nuclei, which result in the decrease of actin export via Exp6 inactivation, in addition to actin import by cofilin activation.

  4. Mechanism and catalytic strategy of the prokaryotic specific GTP cyclohydrolase IB.

    PubMed

    Paranagama, Naduni; Bonnett, Shilah A; Alvarez, Jonathan; Luthra, Amit; Stec, Boguslaw; Gustafson, Andrew; Iwata-Reuyl, Dirk; Swairjo, Manal

    2017-01-26

    GTP cyclohydrolase I catalyzes the first step in folic acid biosynthesis in bacteria and plants, biopterin biosynthesis in mammals, and the biosynthesis of 7-deazaguanosine modified tRNA nucleosides in bacteria and archaea.  The type IB GTP cyclohydrolase (GCYH-IB) is a prokaryotic-specific enzyme found in a number of pathogens. GCYH-IB is structurally distinct from the canonical type IA GTP cyclohydrolase involved in biopterin biosynthesis in humans and animals, and thus is of interest as a potential antibacterial drug target.  We report kinetic and inhibition data of Neisseria gonorrhoeae GCYH-IB, and two high-resolution crystal structures of the enzyme; one in complex with the reaction intermediate analog and competitive inhibitor 8-oxo-GTP, and one with a TRIS molecule bound in the active site and mimicking another reaction intermediate. Comparison with the type IA enzyme bound to 8-oxo-GTP reveals an inverted mode of binding of the inhibitor ribosyl moiety and, together with site-directed mutagenesis data, shows that the two enzymes utilize different strategies for catalysis. Notably, the inhibitor interacts with a conserved active site Cys149, and this residue is S-nitrosylated in the structures. This is the first structural characterization of a biologically S-nitrosylated bacterial protein. Mutagenesis and biochemical analyses demonstrate that Cys149 is essential for the cyclohydrolase reaction, and S-nitrosylation maintains enzyme activity, suggesting a potential role of the S-nitrosothiol in catalysis.

  5. Discovery of common human genetic variants of GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) governing nitric oxide, autonomic activity, and cardiovascular risk

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lian; Rao, Fangwen; Zhang, Kuixing; Khandrika, Srikrishna; Das, Madhusudan; Vaingankar, Sucheta M.; Bao, Xuping; Rana, Brinda K.; Smith, Douglas W.; Wessel, Jennifer; Salem, Rany M.; Rodriguez-Flores, Juan L.; Mahata, Sushil K.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Ziegler, Michael G.; O’Connor, Daniel T.

    2007-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) is rate limiting in the provision of the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin for biosynthesis of catecholamines and NO. We asked whether common genetic variation at GCH1 alters transmitter synthesis and predisposes to disease. Here we undertook a systematic search for polymorphisms in GCH1, then tested variants’ contributions to NO and catecholamine release as well as autonomic function in twin pairs. Renal NO and neopterin excretions were significantly heritable, as were baroreceptor coupling (heart rate response to BP fluctuation) and pulse interval (1/heart rate). Common GCH1 variant C+243T in the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTRs) predicted NO excretion, as well as autonomic traits: baroreceptor coupling, maximum pulse interval, and pulse interval variability, though not catecholamine secretion. In individuals with the most extreme BP values in the population, C+243T affected both diastolic and systolic BP, principally in females. In functional studies, C+243T decreased reporter expression in transfected 3′-UTRs plasmids. We conclude that human NO secretion traits are heritable, displaying joint genetic determination with autonomic activity by functional polymorphism at GCH1. Our results document novel pathophysiological links between a key biosynthetic locus and NO metabolism and suggest new strategies for approaching the mechanism, diagnosis, and treatment of risk predictors for cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension. PMID:17717598

  6. Activation of a GTP-binding protein and a GTP-binding-protein-coupled receptor kinase (beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase-1) by a muscarinic receptor m2 mutant lacking phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Kameyama, K; Haga, K; Haga, T; Moro, O; Sadée, W

    1994-12-01

    A mutant of the human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtype (m2 receptor), lacking a large part of the third intracellular loop, was expressed and purified using the baculovirus/insect cell culture system. The mutant was not phosphorylated by beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase, as expected from the previous assignment of phosphorylation sites to the central part of the third intracellular loop. However, the m2 receptor mutant was capable of stimulating beta-adrenergic-receptor-kinase-1-mediated phosphorylation of a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein containing the m2 phosphorylation sites in an agonist-dependent manner. Both mutant and wild-type m2 receptors reconstituted with the guanine-nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G protein), G(o) and G(i)2, displayed guanine-nucleotide-sensitive high-affinity agonist binding, as assessed by displacement of [3H]quinuclidinyl-benzilate binding with carbamoylcholine, and both stimulated guanosine 5'-3-O-[35S]thiotriphosphate ([35S]GTP[S]) binding in the presence of carbamoylcholine and GDP. The Ki values of carbamoylcholine effects on [3H]quinuclidinyl-benzilate binding were indistinguishable for the mutant and wild-type m2 receptors. Moreover, the phosphorylation of the wild-type m2 receptor by beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase-1 did not affect m2 interaction with G proteins as assessed by the binding of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate or [35S]GTP[S]. These results indicate that (a) the m2 receptor serves both as an activator and as a substrate of beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase, and (b) a large part of the third intracellular loop of the m2 receptor does not contribute to interaction with G proteins and its phosphorylation by beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase does not uncouple the receptor and G proteins in reconstituted lipid vesicles.

  7. Deletion mutants of Harvey ras p21 protein reveal the absolute requirement of at least two distant regions for GTP-binding and transforming activities.

    PubMed Central

    Lacal, J C; Anderson, P S; Aaronson, S A

    1986-01-01

    Deletions of small sequences from the viral Harvey ras gene have been generated, and resulting ras p21 mutants have been expressed in Escherichia coli. Purification of each deleted protein allowed the in vitro characterization of GTP-binding, GTPase and autokinase activity of the proteins. Microinjection of the highly purified proteins into quiescent NIH/3T3 cells, as well as transfection experiments utilizing a long terminal repeat (LTR)-containing vector, were utilized to analyze the biological activity of the deleted proteins. Two small regions located at 6-23 and 152-165 residues are shown to be absolutely required for in vitro and in vivo activities of the ras product. By contrast, the variable region comprising amino acids 165-184 was shown not to be necessary for either in vitro or in vivo activities. Thus, we demonstrate that: (i) amino acid sequences at positions 5-23 and 152-165 of ras p21 protein are probably directly involved in the GTP-binding activity; (ii) GTP-binding is required for the transforming activity of ras p21 and by extension for the normal function of the proto-oncogene product; and (iii) the variable region at the C-terminal end of the ras p21 molecule from amino acids 165 to 184 is not required for transformation. Images Fig.2. Fig.4. PMID:3011420

  8. Control of 6-(D-threo-1',2'-dihydroxypropyl) pterin (dictyopterin) synthesis during aggregation of Dictyostelium discoideum. Involvement of the G-protein-linked signalling pathway in the regulation of GTP cyclohydrolase I activity.

    PubMed Central

    Gütlich, M; Witter, K; Bourdais, J; Veron, M; Rödl, W; Ziegler, I

    1996-01-01

    6-(D-threo-1',2'-Dihydroxypropylpterin (dictyopterin) has been identified in extracts of growing Dictyostelium dicoideum cells [Klein, Thiery and Tatischeff (1990) Eur. J. Biochem. 187, 665-669]. We demonstrate that it originates from GTP by de novo biosynthesis and that the first committed step is catalysed by GTP cyclohydrolase I, yielding dihydroneopterin triphosphate [neopterin is 6-(D-erythro-1',2',3'-trihydroxypropyl) pterin]. The GTP cyclohydrolase I activity is found in the cytosolic fraction and in a membrane-associated form. The level of a 0.9 kb mRNA coding for GTP cyclohydrolase I decreases to about 10% of its initial value within 2 h after Dictyostelium cells start development induced by starvation. In the cytosolic fraction, the specific activities of GTP cyclohydrolase I, as well as the concentrations of (6R/S)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrodictyopterin (H4dictyopterin), follow this decline of the mRNA level. In the particulate fraction, however, the specific activities of GTP cyclohydrolase I and, in consequence, H4dictyopterin synthesis, transiently increase and reach a maximum after 4-5 h of development. The time-course of H4dictyopterin concentrations in the starvation medium closely correlates with its production in the membrane fraction. The activity of membrane-associated GTP cyclohydrolase I can be increased by pre-incubation of the cell lysate with guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate and Mg2+. This GTP analogue does not serve as a substrate and has no direct effect on the enzyme activity, indicating that a G-protein-linked signalling pathway is involved in the regulation of GTP cyclohydrolase I activity and thus in H4dictyopterin production during early development of D. discoideum. PMID:8660315

  9. Control of 6-(D-threo-1',2'-dihydroxypropyl) pterin (dictyopterin) synthesis during aggregation of Dictyostelium discoideum. Involvement of the G-protein-linked signalling pathway in the regulation of GTP cyclohydrolase I activity.

    PubMed

    Gütlich, M; Witter, K; Bourdais, J; Veron, M; Rödl, W; Ziegler, I

    1996-02-15

    6-(D-threo-1',2'-Dihydroxypropylpterin (dictyopterin) has been identified in extracts of growing Dictyostelium dicoideum cells [Klein, Thiery and Tatischeff (1990) Eur. J. Biochem. 187, 665-669]. We demonstrate that it originates from GTP by de novo biosynthesis and that the first committed step is catalysed by GTP cyclohydrolase I, yielding dihydroneopterin triphosphate [neopterin is 6-(D-erythro-1',2',3'-trihydroxypropyl) pterin]. The GTP cyclohydrolase I activity is found in the cytosolic fraction and in a membrane-associated form. The level of a 0.9 kb mRNA coding for GTP cyclohydrolase I decreases to about 10% of its initial value within 2 h after Dictyostelium cells start development induced by starvation. In the cytosolic fraction, the specific activities of GTP cyclohydrolase I, as well as the concentrations of (6R/S)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrodictyopterin (H4dictyopterin), follow this decline of the mRNA level. In the particulate fraction, however, the specific activities of GTP cyclohydrolase I and, in consequence, H4dictyopterin synthesis, transiently increase and reach a maximum after 4-5 h of development. The time-course of H4dictyopterin concentrations in the starvation medium closely correlates with its production in the membrane fraction. The activity of membrane-associated GTP cyclohydrolase I can be increased by pre-incubation of the cell lysate with guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate and Mg2+. This GTP analogue does not serve as a substrate and has no direct effect on the enzyme activity, indicating that a G-protein-linked signalling pathway is involved in the regulation of GTP cyclohydrolase I activity and thus in H4dictyopterin production during early development of D. discoideum.

  10. Measuring Ras-family GTP levels in vivo--running hot and cold.

    PubMed

    Castro, Ariel F; Rebhun, John F; Quilliam, Lawrence A

    2005-10-01

    The detection of Ras-family GTPase activity is important in the determination of cell signaling events elicited by numerous ligands and cellular processes. This has been made much easier in recent years by the use of glutathione S-transferase (GST)-fused Ras binding domains. These domains from downstream effectors such as Raf and RalGDS preferentially bind the GTP-bound Ras proteins enabling their extraction and subsequent quantification by immunoblotting. Despite this advance, effectors that efficiently discriminate between GTP- and GDP-bound states are not available for many Ras-family members. While this hampers the ability to detect activity in tissue specimens, it is still possible to metabolically label cells with (32)Pi to load the GTP/GDP pool with labeled nucleotides, immunoprecipitate the Ras protein and detect the bound label following thin layer chromatographic separation and exposure to film or a phosphorimager. Using a transfection system and antibodies that recognize epitope tags one can test the ability of a protein to work as a GEF or GAP for a certain GTPase. Alternatively, if an immunoprecipitating antibody is available to the target GTPase, then analysis of endogenous GTP/GDP ratio is possible. Here we describe the detection of M-Ras and Rap1 activity by GST-RBD pull-down as well as that of Rheb and epitope-tagged R-Ras by classical metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation.

  11. The myristoylated amino terminus of ADP-ribosylation factor 1 is a phospholipid- and GTP-sensitive switch.

    PubMed

    Randazzo, P A; Terui, T; Sturch, S; Fales, H M; Ferrige, A G; Kahn, R A

    1995-06-16

    ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (Arf1) is an essential N-myristoylated 21-kDa GTP-binding protein with activities that include the regulation of membrane traffic and phospholipase D activity. Both the N terminus of the protein and the N-myristate bound to glycine 2 have previously been shown to be essential to the function of Arf in cells. We show that the bound nucleotide affects the conformation of either the N terminus or residues of Arf1 that are in direct contact with the N terminus. This was demonstrated by examining the effects of mutations in this N-terminal domain on guanosine 5'-O-(3-thio)triphosphate (GTP gamma S) and GDP binding and dissociation kinetics. Arf1 mutants, lacking 13 or 17 residues from the N terminus or mutated at residues 3-7, had a greater affinity for GTP gamma S and a lower affinity for GDP than did the wild-type protein. As the N terminus is required for interactions with target proteins, we conclude that the N terminus of Arf1 is a GTP-sensitive effector domain. When Arf1 was acylated, the GTP-dependent conformational changes were codependent on added phospholipids. In the absence of phospholipids, myristoylated Arf1 has a lower affinity for GTP gamma S than for GDP, and in the presence of phospholipids, the myristoylated protein has a greater affinity for GTP gamma S than for GDP. Thus, N-myristoylation is a critical component in the construction of this phospholipid- and GTP-dependent switch.

  12. Histamine H3-receptor activation augments voltage-dependent Ca2+ current via GTP hydrolysis in rabbit saphenous artery.

    PubMed

    Oike, M; Kitamura, K; Kuriyama, H

    1992-03-01

    1. Actions of histamine on the voltage-dependent Ba2+(Ca2+) currents (IBa, ICa) were investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique on dispersed smooth muscle cells from the rabbit saphenous artery. 2. Histamine (half-maximal dose, EC50 = 530 nM) augmented the IBa evoked by a brief depolarizing pulse (100 ms duration; to +10 mV from a holding potential of -80 mV) in a concentration-dependent manner. The maximum augmentation was obtained with 30 microM-histamine (1.29 times control). This augmentation of IBa was inhibited by the H3-antagonist, thioperamide (Ki = 30 nM, slope of the Schild plot = 1.0), but not by H1- or H2-antagonists (mepyramine or diphenhydramine, or cimetidine, respectively). 3. An H3-agonist, R alpha-methylhistamine (EC50 = 93 nM), also augmented IBa in a concentration-dependent manner at a holding potential of -80 mV and the maximum augmentation (1.25 times control) was obtained with 10 microM. This augmentation was also inhibited by thioperamide, but not by the above H1- and H2- antagonists. 4. Intracellularly applied 500 microM-guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) enhanced, but 1 mM-guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP beta S) abolished, the histamine-induced augmentation of IBa. When one of the non-hydrolysable GTP analogues, guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S; greater than 5 microM), guanylyl-imidodiphosphate (GMP-PNP; 200 microM) or guanylyl (beta, gamma-methylene)-diphosphonate (GMP-PCP; 1 mM) was intracellularly applied, the IBa amplitude evoked without the application of histamine was not affected, but the excitatory effect of histamine on IBa was reversed to an inhibition. Pre-treatment with pertussis toxin (PTX: 300 ng/ml and 3 micrograms/ml) did not modify the histamine-induced responses in the absence or presence of GTP gamma S. 5. 4 beta-Phorbol 12,13-dibutylate (PDBu) increased the amplitude of IBa. However, this action of PDBu was not enhanced by the application of GTP (500 microM) in the pipette, but

  13. Crystal structure of transglutaminase 2 with GTP complex and amino acid sequence evidence of evolution of GTP binding site.

    PubMed

    Jang, Tae-Ho; Lee, Dong-Sup; Choi, Kihang; Jeong, Eui Man; Kim, In-Gyu; Kim, Young Whan; Chun, Jung Nyeo; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Park, Hyun Ho

    2014-01-01

    Transglutaminase2 (TG2) is a multi-functional protein involved in various cellular processes, including apoptosis, differentiation, wound healing, and angiogenesis. The malfunction of TG2 causes many human disease including inflammatory disease, celiac disease, neurodegenerative diseases, tissue fibrosis, and cancers. Protein cross-linking activity, which is representative of TG2, is activated by calcium ions and suppressed by GTP. Here, we elucidated the structure of TG2 in complex with its endogenous inhibitor, GTP. Our structure showed why GTP is the optimal nucleotide for interacting with and inhibiting TG2. In addition, sequence comparison provided information describing the evolutionary scenario of GTP usage for controlling the activity of TG2.

  14. The RanGTP Pathway: From Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Transport to Spindle Assembly and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Cavazza, Tommaso; Vernos, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPase Ran regulates the interaction of transport receptors with a number of cellular cargo proteins. The high affinity binding of the GTP-bound form of Ran to import receptors promotes cargo release, whereas its binding to export receptors stabilizes their interaction with the cargo. This basic mechanism linked to the asymmetric distribution of the two nucleotide-bound forms of Ran between the nucleus and the cytoplasm generates a switch like mechanism controlling nucleo-cytoplasmic transport. Since 1999, we have known that after nuclear envelope breakdown (NEBD) Ran and the above transport receptors also provide a local control over the activity of factors driving spindle assembly and regulating other aspects of cell division. The identification and functional characterization of RanGTP mitotic targets is providing novel insights into mechanisms essential for cell division. Here we review our current knowledge on the RanGTP system and its regulation and we focus on the recent advances made through the characterization of its mitotic targets. We then briefly review the novel functions of the pathway that were recently described. Altogether, the RanGTP system has moonlighting functions exerting a spatial control over protein interactions that drive specific functions depending on the cellular context. PMID:26793706

  15. Decameric GTP cyclohydrolase I forms complexes with two pentameric GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory proteins in the presence of phenylalanine or of a combination of tetrahydrobiopterin and GTP.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, T; Hatakeyama, K

    1998-08-07

    The activity of GTP cyclohydrolase I is inhibited by (6R)-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and stimulated by phenylalanine through complex formation with GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). Gel filtration experiments as well as enzyme activity measurements showed that the number of subunits of GFRP in both the inhibitory and stimulatory complexes is equal to that of GTP cyclohydrolase I. Because GFRP is a pentamer and GTP cyclohydrolase I was shown here by cross-linking experiments to be a decamer, the results indicate that two molecules of a pentameric GFRP associate with one molecule of GTP cyclohydrolase I. Gel filtration analysis suggested that the complex has a radius of gyration similar to that of the enzyme itself. These observations support our model that one molecule of GFRP binds to each of the two outer faces of the torus-shaped GTP cyclohydrolase I. For formation of the inhibitory protein complex, both BH4 and GTP were required; the median effective concentrations of BH4 and GTP were 2 and 26 microM, respectively. BH4 was the most potent of biopterins with different oxidative states. Among GTP analogues, dGTP as well as guanosine 5'-O-(3'-thiotriphosphate) exhibited similar inducibility compared with GTP, whereas other nucleotide triphosphates had no effect. On the other hand, phenylalanine alone was enough for formation of the stimulatory protein complex, and positive cooperativity was found for the phenylalanine-induced protein complex formation. Phenylalanine was the most potent of the aromatic amino acids.

  16. Ligand binding to the inhibitory and stimulatory GTP cyclohydrolase I/GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, T; Hatakeyama, K

    2001-04-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) mediates feedback inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I activity by 6R-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), which is an essential cofactor for key enzymes producing catecholamines, serotonin, and nitric oxide as well as phenylalanine hydroxylase. GFRP also mediates feed-forward stimulation of GTP cyclohydrolase I activity by phenylalanine at subsaturating GTP levels. These ligands, BH4 and phenylalanine, induce complex formation between one molecule of GTP cyclohydrolase I and two molecules of GFRP. Here, we report the analysis of ligand binding using the gel filtration method of Hummel and Dreyer. BH4 binds to the GTP cyclohydrolase I/GFRP complex with a Kd of 4 microM, and phenylalanine binds to the protein complex with a Kd of 94 microM. The binding of BH4 is enhanced by dGTP. The binding stoichiometrics of BH4 and phenylalanine were estimated to be 10 molecules of each per protein complex, in other words, one molecule per subunit of protein, because GTP cyclohydrolase I is a decamer and GFRP is a pentamer. These findings were corroborated by data from equilibrium dialysis experiments. Regarding ligand binding to free proteins, BH4 binds weakly to GTP cyclohydrolase I but not to GFRP, and phenylalanine binds weakly to GFRP but not to GTP cyclohydrolase I. These results suggest that the overall structure of the protein complex contributes to binding of BH4 and phenylalanine but also that each binding site of BH4 and phenylalanine may be primarily composed of residues of GTP cyclohydrolase I and GFRP, respectively.

  17. GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein-dependent and -independent inhibitors of GTP cyclohydrolase I.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, T; Wilson, L M; Hatakeyama, K

    2001-04-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) mediates the feedback inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I activity by (6R)-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) through protein complex formation. Since guanine and BH4 have a common pyrimidine ring structure, we examined the inhibitory effect of guanine and its analogs on the enzyme activity. Guanine, 8-hydroxyguanine, 8-methylguanine, and 8-bromoguanine inhibited the enzyme activity in a GFRP-dependent and pH-dependent manner and induced complex formation between GTP cyclohydrolase I and GFRP. The type of inhibition by this group is a mixed type. All these properties were shared with BH4. In striking contrast, inhibition by 8-azaguanine and 8-mercaptoguanine was GFRP-independent and pH-independent. The type of inhibition by 8-azaguanine and 8-mercaptoguanine was a competitive type. The two compounds did not induce complex formation between the enzyme and GFRP. These results demonstrate that guanine compounds of the first group bind to the BH4-binding site of the GTP cyclohydrolase I/GFRP complex, whereas 8-azaguanine and 8-mercaptoguanine bind to the active site of the enzyme. Finally, the possible implications in Lesch-Nyhan syndrome and Parkinson diseases of the inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I by guanine and 8-hydroxyguanine are discussed.

  18. NDK Interacts with FtsZ and Converts GDP to GTP to Trigger FtsZ Polymerisation - A Novel Role for NDK

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Saurabh; Jakkala, Kishor; Srinivasan, Ramanujam; Arumugam, Muthu; Ranjeri, Raghavendra; Gupta, Prabuddha; Rajeswari, Haryadi; Ajitkumar, Parthasarathi

    2015-01-01

    to the possibility of direct phosphorylation of FtsZ-bound GDP by NDK. Conclusion Irrespective of the bacterial species, NDK interacts with FtsZ in vitro and ex vivo and, through the synthesis of GTP from FtsZ-bound GDP and/or free GDP, and ATP (CTP/TTP/UTP), triggers FtsZ polymerisation. The possible biological context of this novel activity of NDK is presented. PMID:26630542

  19. Blue News Update: BODIPY-GTP Binds to the Blue-Light Receptor YtvA While GTP Does Not

    PubMed Central

    Schmieder, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Light is an important environmental factor for almost all organisms. It is mainly used as an energy source but it is also a key factor for the regulation of multiple cellular functions. Light as the extracellular stimulus is thereby converted into an intracellular signal by photoreceptors that act as signal transducers. The blue-light receptor YtvA, a bacterial counterpart of plant phototropins, is involved in the stress response of Bacillus subtilis. The mechanism behind its activation, however, remains unknown. It was suggested based on fluorescence spectroscopic studies that YtvA function involves GTP binding and that this interaction is altered by absorption of light. We have investigated this interaction by several biophysical methods and show here using fluorescence spectroscopy, ITC titrations, and three NMR spectroscopic assays that while YtvA interacts with BODIPY-GTP as a fluorescent GTP analogue originally used for the detection of GTP binding, it does not bind GTP. PMID:22247770

  20. The GTP binding protein-dependent activation and deactivation of cGMP phosphodiesterase in rod photoreceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Akio.

    1989-01-01

    Cyclic GMP (cGMP) has a crucial role in visual transduction. Recent electrophysiological studies clearly indicate the existence of cGMP-activated conductance in photoreceptor plasma membranes. In darkness, Na{sup +}, Ca{sup ++}, and Mg{sup ++} enter rod outer segments (ROS) through cGMP-activated channels while light closes channels by lowering cGMP concentrations through activation of cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE). Many excellent reviews reference the mechanism of PDE activation in photoreceptors. However, recent progress in understanding the mechanisms regulating cGMP hydrolysis has raised an important question in the PDE-regulation: how does the three-dimensional movement of a subunit of transducin (retinal G protein) relate to the PDE activation Associated with that question, the mechanism of PDE regulation appears to vary at different stages of evolution, for example, frog and bovine photoreceptors. This review examines recent progress of the cGMP hydrolysis mechanism by focusing on the subunit interactions between transducin and PDE. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Assessment of the Activation State of Rho Family GTP-Binding Proteins in Breast Cancer Cells and Specimens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    with the yeast cell division cycle protein Caenorhabditis elegans , 23 in Drosophila Cdc24 and the human break point cluster region melanogaster and 46...Graf fused to MLL Abbreviations: C. elegans , Caenorhabditis elegans ; FAK, focal-adhesion kinase; GAP, GTPase-activating protein; MAP, mitogen...suppressors are the prominent ones. Overexpression or mutation of these receptors and many signal transducers downstream of these receptors, as well as genetic

  2. Intracellular GTP level determines cell's fate toward differentiation and apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Meshkini, Azadeh; Yazdanparast, Razieh Nouri, Kazem

    2011-06-15

    Since the adequate supply of guanine nucleotides is vital for cellular activities, limitation of their syntheses would certainly result in modulation of cellular fate toward differentiation and apoptosis. The aim of this study was to set a correlation between the intracellular level of GTP and the induction of relevant signaling pathways involved in the cell's fate toward life or death. In that regard, we measured the GTP level among human leukemia K562 cells exposed to mycophenolic acid (MPA) or 3-hydrogenkwadaphnin (3-HK) as two potent inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibitors. Our results supported the maturation of the cells when the intracellular GTP level was reduced by almost 30-40%. Under these conditions, 3-HK and/or MPA caused up-regulation of PKC{alpha} and PI3K/AKT pathways. Furthermore, co-treatment of cells with hypoxanthine plus 3-HK or MPA, which caused a reduction of about 60% in the intracellular GTP levels, led to apoptosis and activation of mitochondrial pathways through inverse regulation of Bcl-2/Bax expression and activation of caspase-3. Moreover, our results demonstrated that attenuation of GTP by almost 60% augmented the intracellular ROS and nuclear localization of p21 and subsequently led to cell death. These results suggest that two different threshold levels of GTP are needed for induction of differentiation and/or ROS-associated apoptosis. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted

  3. Activation of SIRT1 by resveratrol represses transcription of the gene for the cytosolic form of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (GTP) by deacetylating hepatic nuclear factor 4alpha

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cytosolic isoform of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (GTP) (PEPCK-C) is a key enzyme of gluconeogenesis and glyceroneogenesis. While this enzyme is often over-expressed in diabetes and obesity, studies showed that decrease in its expression results in lessening the diseases condition in animal...

  4. Identification of residues in the human guanylate-binding protein 1 critical for nucleotide binding and cooperative GTP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Praefcke, Gerrit J K; Kloep, Stephan; Benscheid, Utz; Lilie, Hauke; Prakash, Balaji; Herrmann, Christian

    2004-11-12

    The guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) form a group of interferon-gamma inducible GTP-binding proteins which belong to the family of dynamin-related proteins. Like other members of this family, human guanylate-binding protein 1 (hGBP1) shows nucleotide-dependent oligomerisation that stimulates the GTPase activity of the protein. A unique feature of the GBPs is their ability to hydrolyse GTP to GDP and GMP. In order to elucidate the relationship between these findings, we designed point mutants in the phosphate-binding loop (P-loop) as well as in the switch I and switch II regions of the protein based on the crystal structure of hGBP1. These mutant proteins were analysed for their interaction with guanine nucleotides labeled with a fluorescence dye and for their ability to hydrolyse GTP in a cooperative manner. We identified mutations of amino acid residues that decrease GTPase activity by orders of magnitude a part of which are conserved in GTP-binding proteins. In addition, mutants in the P-loop were characterized that strongly impair binding of nucleotide. In consequence, together with altered GTPase activity and given cellular nucleotide concentrations this results in hGBP1 mutants prevailingly resting in the nucleotide-free (K51A and S52N) or the GTP bound form (R48A), respectively. Using size-exclusion chromatography and analytical ultracentrifugation we addressed the impact on protein oligomerisation. In summary, mutants of hGBP1 were identified and biochemically characterized providing hGBP1 locked in defined states in order to investigate their functional role in future cell biology studies.

  5. GTP binding to the ROC domain of DAP-kinase regulates its function through intramolecular signalling.

    PubMed

    Carlessi, Rodrigo; Levin-Salomon, Vered; Ciprut, Sara; Bialik, Shani; Berissi, Hanna; Albeck, Shira; Peleg, Yoav; Kimchi, Adi

    2011-09-01

    Death-associated protein kinase (DAPk) was recently suggested by sequence homology to be a member of the ROCO family of proteins. Here, we show that DAPk has a functional ROC (Ras of complex proteins) domain that mediates homo-oligomerization and GTP binding through a defined P-loop motif. Upon binding to GTP, the ROC domain negatively regulates the catalytic activity of DAPk and its cellular effects. Mechanistically, GTP binding enhances an inhibitory autophosphorylation at a distal site that suppresses kinase activity. This study presents a new mechanism of intramolecular signal transduction, by which GTP binding operates in cis to affect the catalytic activity of a distal domain in the protein.

  6. 6-Acetyldihydrohomopterin and sepiapterin affect some GTP cyclohydrolase I's and not others

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, K.B.; Manos, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    The first enzyme in pteridine biosynthesis, GTP cyclohydrolase I, is a likely site for regulation of pteridine biosynthesis to occur. GTP cyclohydrolase I responds to hormonal treatment and is found altered in a variety of mice with genetically based neurological and immunological disorders. Genetic loci can greatly modify the activity of GTP cyclohydrolase: Punch mutant in Drosophila hph-1 in mouse and atypical phenylketonuria in human. This report examines the ability of Ahp and sepiapterin to alter the activity of GTP cyclohydrolase I from mouse liver, rat liver and Drosophila head. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  7. Mechanisms of calcium release induced by GTP and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, D.L.; Chueh, S.H.; Mullaney, J.M.; Mallet, M.K.

    1987-05-01

    Recent studies show that Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux from ER is controlled by a sensitive and specific guanine nucleotide regulatory mechanism. Using microsomes of permeabilized cells derived from N1E-115 neuroblastoma or DDT/sub 1/MF-2 smooth muscle cell lines, both GTP and IP/sub 3/ effect Ca/sup 2 +/ release from a common intracellular pool; however, the mechanisms of activation of Ca/sup 2 +/ release by the two agents appear distinct with regard to several parameters. Studies using liver microsomes are currently investigating whether similar distinctions between the actions of IP/sub 3/ and GTP exist in other cell types. At present it is unknown if GTP-activated Ca/sup 2 +/ release is mediated by a G-protein-like activity. Studies indicate that such release is not altered by pertussis toxin. Since GTP..gamma..S is inactive and blocks the action of GTP, a modified G-protein activation process must be invoked. Current investigations are attempting to identify the protein(s) involved in GTP-mediated Ca/sup 2 +/ release by direct photo-crosslinking experiments using (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)GTP. Successful labeling of many nucleotide-binding proteins has been accomplished; most but not all labeling is displaced by ATP. GTP-specifically labeled proteins are being assessed as candidates for the GTP-mediated release process.

  8. Structural basis unifying diverse GTP hydrolysis mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Anand, Baskaran; Majumdar, Soneya; Prakash, Balaji

    2013-02-12

    Central to biological processes is the regulation rendered by GTPases. Until recently, the GTP hydrolysis mechanism, exemplified by Ras-family (and G-α) GTPases, was thought to be universal. This mechanism utilizes a conserved catalytic Gln supplied "in cis" from the GTPase and an arginine finger "in trans" from a GAP (GTPase activating protein) to stabilize the transition state. However, intriguingly different mechanisms are operative in structurally similar GTPases. MnmE and dynamin like cation-dependent GTPases lack the catalytic Gln and instead employ a Glu/Asp/Ser situated elsewhere and in place of the arginine finger use a K(+) or Na(+) ion. In contrast, Rab33 possesses the Gln but does not utilize it for catalysis; instead, the GAP supplies both a catalytic Gln and an arginine finger in trans. Deciphering the underlying principles that unify seemingly unrelated mechanisms is central to understanding how diverse mechanisms evolve. Here, we recognize that steric hindrance between active site residues is a criterion governing the mechanism employed by a given GTPase. The Arf-ArfGAP structure is testimony to this concept of spatial (in)compatibility of active site residues. This understanding allows us to predict an as yet unreported hydrolysis mechanism and clarifies unexplained observations about catalysis by Rab11 and the need for HAS-GTPases to employ a different mechanism. This understanding would be valuable for experiments in which abolishing GTP hydrolysis or generating constitutively active forms of a GTPase is important.

  9. GDP-to-GTP exchange on the microtubule end can contribute to the frequency of catastrophe

    PubMed Central

    Piedra, Felipe-Andrés; Kim, Tae; Garza, Emily S.; Geyer, Elisabeth A.; Burns, Alexander; Ye, Xuecheng; Rice, Luke M.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules are dynamic polymers of αβ-tubulin that have essential roles in chromosome segregation and organization of the cytoplasm. Catastrophe—the switch from growing to shrinking—occurs when a microtubule loses its stabilizing GTP cap. Recent evidence indicates that the nucleotide on the microtubule end controls how tightly an incoming subunit will be bound (trans-acting GTP), but most current models do not incorporate this information. We implemented trans-acting GTP into a computational model for microtubule dynamics. In simulations, growing microtubules often exposed terminal GDP-bound subunits without undergoing catastrophe. Transient GDP exposure on the growing plus end slowed elongation by reducing the number of favorable binding sites on the microtubule end. Slower elongation led to erosion of the GTP cap and an increase in the frequency of catastrophe. Allowing GDP-to-GTP exchange on terminal subunits in simulations mitigated these effects. Using mutant αβ-tubulin or modified GTP, we showed experimentally that a more readily exchangeable nucleotide led to less frequent catastrophe. Current models for microtubule dynamics do not account for GDP-to-GTP exchange on the growing microtubule end, so our findings provide a new way of thinking about the molecular events that initiate catastrophe. PMID:27146111

  10. GDP-to-GTP exchange on the microtubule end can contribute to the frequency of catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Piedra, Felipe-Andrés; Kim, Tae; Garza, Emily S; Geyer, Elisabeth A; Burns, Alexander; Ye, Xuecheng; Rice, Luke M

    2016-11-07

    Microtubules are dynamic polymers of αβ-tubulin that have essential roles in chromosome segregation and organization of the cytoplasm. Catastrophe-the switch from growing to shrinking-occurs when a microtubule loses its stabilizing GTP cap. Recent evidence indicates that the nucleotide on the microtubule end controls how tightly an incoming subunit will be bound (trans-acting GTP), but most current models do not incorporate this information. We implemented trans-acting GTP into a computational model for microtubule dynamics. In simulations, growing microtubules often exposed terminal GDP-bound subunits without undergoing catastrophe. Transient GDP exposure on the growing plus end slowed elongation by reducing the number of favorable binding sites on the microtubule end. Slower elongation led to erosion of the GTP cap and an increase in the frequency of catastrophe. Allowing GDP-to-GTP exchange on terminal subunits in simulations mitigated these effects. Using mutant αβ-tubulin or modified GTP, we showed experimentally that a more readily exchangeable nucleotide led to less frequent catastrophe. Current models for microtubule dynamics do not account for GDP-to-GTP exchange on the growing microtubule end, so our findings provide a new way of thinking about the molecular events that initiate catastrophe.

  11. GTP-blot analysis of small GTP-binding proteins. The C-terminus is involved in renaturation of blotted proteins.

    PubMed

    Klinz, F J

    1994-10-01

    Recombinant c-Ha-ras, ralA and rap2, but not rap1A or rap1B proteins retained their ability to bind [alpha-32P]GTP after SDS/PAGE and transfer to nitrocellulose. Recombinant c-Has-ras missing the C-terminal 23 amino acid residues failed to bind [alpha-32P]GTP after the blot, and the ability of recombinant ralA missing the C-terminal 28 amino acid residues to bind [alpha-32P]GTP was decreased many-fold. The presence of nonionic detergents of the polyoxyethylene type such as Tween 20, Triton X-100, Nonidet P40 or Lubrol PX in the incubation buffer was necessary to induce renaturation of blotted recombinant c-Ha-ras protein, whereas other types of detergents were ineffective. We propose that detergents of the polyoxyethylene type induce the refolding of some types of blotted small GTP-binding proteins and that the C-terminus is involved in the refolding process. Membranes from NIH3T3 fibroblasts overexpressing c-Ha-ras protein showed much weaker binding of [alpha-32P]GTP as expected from the level of ras immunoreactivity. Treatment of fibroblasts with lovastatin, an inhibitor of hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, caused the accumulation of the unfarnesylated form of c-Ha-ras in the cytosol. Examination of [alpha-32P]GTP-binding and immunoreactivity for cytosolic and membrane-bound c-Ha-ras revealed that binding of [alpha-32P]GTP to unprocessed c-Ha-ras was increased about threefold compared to the same amount of processed c-Ha-ras. Our results demonstrate that detection and quantification of small GTP-binding proteins in eukaryotic cells by GTP-blot analysis is hampered by the fact that these proteins differ strongly in their ability to renature after blotting to nitrocellulose.

  12. Direct binding of translation initiation factor eIF2gamma-G domain to its GTPase-activating and GDP-GTP exchange factors eIF5 and eIF2B epsilon.

    PubMed

    Alone, Pankaj V; Dever, Thomas E

    2006-05-05

    The GTP-binding eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF2 delivers initiator methionyl-tRNA to the 40 S ribosomal subunit. The factor eIF5 stimulates hydrolysis of GTP by eIF2 upon AUG codon recognition, whereas the factor eIF2B promotes guanine nucleotide exchange on eIF2 to recycle the factor for additional rounds of translation initiation. The GTP-binding (G) domain resides in the gamma subunit of the heterotrimeric eIF2; however, only eIF2beta, and not eIF2gamma, has been reported to directly bind to eIF5 or eIF2B. Using proteins expressed in yeast or recombinant systems we show that full-length yeast eIF2gamma, as well as its isolated G domain, binds directly to eIF5 and the epsilon subunit of eIF2B, and we map the interaction sites to the catalytically important regions of these factors. Consistently, an internal deletion of residues 50-100 of yeast eIF5 impairs the interaction with recombinant eIF2gamma-G domain and abolishes the ability of eIF5 to stimulate eIF2 GTPase activity in translation initiation complexes in vitro. Thus, rather than allosterically regulating eIF2gamma-G domain function via eIF2beta, our data support a model in which the GTPase-activating factor eIF5 and the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor eIF2B modulate eIF2 function through direct interactions with the eIF2gamma-G domain.

  13. Intrinsic GTP hydrolysis is observed for a switch 1 variant of Cdc42 in the presence of a specific GTPase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Kyla M.; Henderson, Rory; Suresh Kumar, Thallapuranam Krishnaswamy; Heyes, Colin D.; Adams, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Ras-related protein Cell division cycle 42 (Cdc42) is important in cell-signaling processes. Protein interactions involving Cdc42 occur primarily in flexible “Switch” regions that help regulate effector binding. We studied the kinetics of intrinsic GTP hydrolysis reaction in the absence and presence of a biologically active peptide derivative of a p21-activated kinase effector (PBD46) for wt Cdc42 and compared it to the Switch 1 variant Cdc42(T35A). While the binding of PBD46 to wt Cdc42 results in complete inhibition of GTP hydrolysis, this interaction in Cdc42(T35A) does not. Comparison of the crystal structure of wt Cdc42 in the absence of effector (1AN0.pdb), as well as the NMR structure of wt Cdc42 bound to an effector in the Switch 1 region (1CF4.pdb) (www.rcsb.org) suggests that the orientation of T35 with bound Mg2+ changes in the presence of effector, resulting in movement of GTP away from the catalytic box leading to the inhibition of GTP hydrolysis. For Cdc42(T35A), molecular dynamics simulations and structural analyses suggest that the nucleotide does not undergo the conformational shift observed for the wt Cdc42-effector interaction. Our data suggest that change in dynamics in the Switch 1 region of Cdc42 caused by the T35A mutation (Chandrashekar, et al. 2011, Biochemistry, 50, p. 6196) fosters a conformation for this Cdc42 variant that allows hydrolysis of GTP in the presence of PBD46, and that alteration of the conformational dynamics could potentially modulate Ras-related over-activity. PMID:26828437

  14. Intrinsic GTP hydrolysis is observed for a switch 1 variant of Cdc42 in the presence of a specific GTPase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Morris, Kyla M; Henderson, Rory; Suresh Kumar, Thallapuranam Krishnaswamy; Heyes, Colin D; Adams, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    The Ras-related protein Cell division cycle 42 (Cdc42) is important in cell-signaling processes. Protein interactions involving Cdc42 occur primarily in flexible "Switch" regions that help regulate effector binding. We studied the kinetics of intrinsic GTP hydrolysis reaction in the absence and presence of a biologically active peptide derivative of a p21-activated kinase effector (PBD46) for wt Cdc42 and compared it to the Switch 1 variant Cdc42(T35A). While the binding of PBD46 to wt Cdc42 results in complete inhibition of GTP hydrolysis, this interaction in Cdc42(T35A) does not. Comparison of the crystal structure of wt Cdc42 in the absence of effector (1AN0.pdb), as well as the NMR structure of wt Cdc42 bound to an effector in the Switch 1 region (1CF4.pdb) ( www.rcsb.org ) suggests that the orientation of T(35) with bound Mg(2+) changes in the presence of effector, resulting in movement of GTP away from the catalytic box leading to the inhibition of GTP hydrolysis. For Cdc42(T35A), molecular dynamics simulations and structural analyses suggest that the nucleotide does not undergo the conformational shift observed for the wt Cdc42-effector interaction. Our data suggest that change in dynamics in the Switch 1 region of Cdc42 caused by the T35A mutation (Chandrashekar, et al. 2011, Biochemistry, 50, p. 6196) fosters a conformation for this Cdc42 variant that allows hydrolysis of GTP in the presence of PBD46, and that alteration of the conformational dynamics could potentially modulate Ras-related over-activity.

  15. Role of a ribosomal RNA phosphate oxygen during the EF-G-triggered GTP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Koch, Miriam; Flür, Sara; Kreutz, Christoph; Ennifar, Eric; Micura, Ronald; Polacek, Norbert

    2015-05-19

    Elongation factor-catalyzed GTP hydrolysis is a key reaction during the ribosomal elongation cycle. Recent crystal structures of G proteins, such as elongation factor G (EF-G) bound to the ribosome, as well as many biochemical studies, provide evidence that the direct interaction of translational GTPases (trGTPases) with the sarcin-ricin loop (SRL) of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is pivotal for hydrolysis. However, the precise mechanism remains elusive and is intensively debated. Based on the close proximity of the phosphate oxygen of A2662 of the SRL to the supposedly catalytic histidine of EF-G (His87), we probed this interaction by an atomic mutagenesis approach. We individually replaced either of the two nonbridging phosphate oxygens at A2662 with a methyl group by the introduction of a methylphosphonate instead of the natural phosphate in fully functional, reconstituted bacterial ribosomes. Our major finding was that only one of the two resulting diastereomers, the SP methylphosphonate, was compatible with efficient GTPase activation on EF-G. The same trend was observed for a second trGTPase, namely EF4 (LepA). In addition, we provide evidence that the negative charge of the A2662 phosphate group must be retained for uncompromised activity in GTP hydrolysis. In summary, our data strongly corroborate that the nonbridging proSP phosphate oxygen at the A2662 of the SRL is critically involved in the activation of GTP hydrolysis. A mechanistic scenario is supported in which positioning of the catalytically active, protonated His87 through electrostatic interactions with the A2662 phosphate group and H-bond networks are key features of ribosome-triggered activation of trGTPases.

  16. Calcium Modulation of Plant Plasma Membrane-Bound Atpase Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, C.

    1983-01-01

    The kinetic properties of barley enzyme are discussed and compared with those of other plants. Possibilities for calcium transport in the plasma membrane by proton pump and ATPase-dependent calcium pumps are explored. Topics covered include the ph phase of the enzyme; high affinity of barley for calcium; temperature dependence, activation enthalpy, and the types of ATPase catalytic sites. Attention is given to lipids which are both screened and bound by calcium. Studies show that barley has a calmodulin activated ATPase that is found in the presence of magnesium and calcium.

  17. Enhanced activities of organically bound tritium in biota samples.

    PubMed

    Svetlik, I; Fejgl, M; Malátová, I; Tomaskova, L

    2014-11-01

    A pilot study aimed on possible occurrence of elevated activity of non-exchangable organically bound tritium (NE-OBT) in biota was performed. The first results showed a significant surplus of NE-OBT activity in biota of the valley of Mohelno reservoir and Jihlava river. The liquid releases of HTO from the nuclear power plant Dukovany is the source of tritium in this area. This area can be a source of various types of natural samples for future studies of tritium pathways.

  18. Active Batch Selection via Convex Relaxations with Guaranteed Solution Bounds.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Shayok; Balasubramanian, Vineeth; Sun, Qian; Panchanathan, Sethuraman; Ye, Jieping

    2015-10-01

    Active learning techniques have gained popularity to reduce human effort in labeling data instances for inducing a classifier. When faced with large amounts of unlabeled data, such algorithms automatically identify the exemplar instances for manual annotation. More recently, there have been attempts towards a batch mode form of active learning, where a batch of data points is simultaneously selected from an unlabeled set. In this paper, we propose two novel batch mode active learning (BMAL) algorithms: BatchRank and BatchRand. We first formulate the batch selection task as an NP-hard optimization problem; we then propose two convex relaxations, one based on linear programming and the other based on semi-definite programming to solve the batch selection problem. Finally, a deterministic bound is derived on the solution quality for the first relaxation and a probabilistic bound for the second. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first research effort to derive mathematical guarantees on the solution quality of the BMAL problem. Our extensive empirical studies on 15 binary, multi-class and multi-label challenging datasets corroborate that the proposed algorithms perform at par with the state-of-the-art techniques, deliver high quality solutions and are robust to real-world issues like label noise and class imbalance.

  19. Simplified /sup 14/CO/sub 2/-trapping microassay for GTP cyclohydrolases I and II

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, R.S.; Abell, C.W.

    1986-05-01

    GTP cyclohydrolases (GTP-CH) I and II catalyze the removal of the C/sub 8/ atom from GTP as formate. The reaction product of GTP-CH I is D-erythro-7,8-dihydroneopterin triphosphate, a key intermediate leading to the biosynthesis of folic acid in microorganisms and of tetrahydrobiopterin in mammals and microorganisms, and that of GTP-CH II is 2,5-diamino-6-hydroxy-4-(ribosylamino)pyrimidine 5'-phosphate, a key intermediate in the biosynthesis of riboflavin in microorganisms. They have simplified the /sup 14/CO/sub 2/-trapping assay of Burg and Brown for determining GTP-CH I and II activities. The assay consists of two consecutive steps which are carried out in a 2 ml tube. The first reaction yields formate from GTP (37/sup 0/C, 10 min). The reaction mixture contains 1 mM (8-/sup 14/C)-GTP (0.5 ..mu..Ci/..mu..mol), 50 mM Tris-HCl buffer (pH 8.2 for GTP-CH II and 7.7 for GTP-CH I), 0.2 M MgCl/sub 2/ for GTP-CH II or 0.3 M KCl and 1 mM EDTA for GTP-CH I, and enzyme in a final volume of 0.2 ml. The second reaction is the oxidation of /sup 14/C-formate to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ (95/sup 0/C, 20 min) in the presence of 5% TCA and 1 mM formate (final volume 0.3 ml). Liberated /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ is trapped by the folded filter paper strip (1 x 4 cm), that has been placed inside the top of each tube and impregnated with 30 ..mu..l Protosol. This method is fast, comparable to the HPLC-fluorometric method for the assay of GTP-CH I activity, and ideal for performing a large number of determinations. Human and rat liver express both GTP-CH I and II activities. GTP-CH II is the predominant enzyme in both tissues and exists in multiple forms.

  20. A polymorphism of the GTP-cyclohydrolase I feedback regulator gene alters transcriptional activity and may affect response to SSRI antidepressants.

    PubMed

    McHugh, P C; Joyce, P R; Deng, X; Kennedy, M A

    2011-06-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) is an essential cofactor for synthesis of many neurotransmitters including serotonin. In serotonergic neurons, BH(4) is tightly regulated by GTP-cyclohydrolase I feedback regulator (GFRP). Given the pivotal role of the serotonergic system in mood disorders and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) antidepressant function, we tested the hypothesis that GFRP gene (GCHFR) variants would modify response to antidepressants in subjects with major depression. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs7164342 and rs7163862) in the GCHFR promoter were identified and occurred as two haplotypes (GA or TT). A multiple regression analysis revealed that homozygous individuals for the TT haplotype were less likely to respond to the SSRI fluoxetine than to the tricyclic antidepressant nortriptyline (P = 0.037). Moreover, the TT haplotype showed a reduced transcription rate in luciferase reporter gene assays, which may impact on BH(4)-mediated neurotransmitter production, thus suggesting a biological process through which GCHFR promoter variants might influence antidepressant response.

  1. Transcriptome Analysis of Escherichia coli during dGTP Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Itsko, Mark

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Our laboratory recently discovered that Escherichia coli cells starved for the DNA precursor dGTP are killed efficiently (dGTP starvation) in a manner similar to that described for thymineless death (TLD). Conditions for specific dGTP starvation can be achieved by depriving an E. coli optA1 gpt strain of the purine nucleotide precursor hypoxanthine (Hx). To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying dGTP starvation, we conducted genome-wide gene expression analyses of actively growing optA1 gpt cells subjected to hypoxanthine deprivation for increasing periods. The data show that upon Hx withdrawal, the optA1 gpt strain displays a diminished ability to derepress the de novo purine biosynthesis genes, likely due to internal guanine accumulation. The impairment in fully inducing the purR regulon may be a contributing factor to the lethality of dGTP starvation. At later time points, and coinciding with cell lethality, strong induction of the SOS response was observed, supporting the concept of replication stress as a final cause of death. No evidence was observed in the starved cells for the participation of other stress responses, including the rpoS-mediated global stress response, reinforcing the lack of feedback of replication stress to the global metabolism of the cell. The genome-wide expression data also provide direct evidence for increased genome complexity during dGTP starvation, as a markedly increased gradient was observed for expression of genes located near the replication origin relative to those located toward the replication terminus. IMPORTANCE Control of the supply of the building blocks (deoxynucleoside triphosphates [dNTPs]) for DNA replication is important for ensuring genome integrity and cell viability. When cells are starved specifically for one of the four dNTPs, dGTP, the process of DNA replication is disturbed in a manner that can lead to eventual death. In the present study, we investigated the transcriptional changes in the

  2. Interferon-induced guanylate-binding proteins lack an N(T)KXD consensus motif and bind GMP in addition to GDP and GTP.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y S; Patterson, C E; Staeheli, P

    1991-09-01

    The primary structures of interferon (IFN)-induced guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) were deduced from cloned human and murine cDNAs. These proteins contained only two of the three sequence motifs typically found in GTP/GDP-binding proteins. The N(T)KXD motif, which is believed to confer guanine specificity in other nucleotide-binding proteins, was absent. Nevertheless, the IFN-induced GBPs exhibited a high degree of selectivity for binding to agarose-immobilized guanine nucleotides. An interesting feature of IFN-induced GBPs is that they strongly bound to GMP agarose in addition to GDP and GTP agaroses but failed to bind to ATP agarose and all other nucleotide agaroses tested. Both GTP and GMP, but not ATP, competed for binding of murine GBP-1 to agarose-immobilized GMP. The IFN-induced GBPs thus define a distinct novel family of proteins with GTP-binding activity. We further demonstrate that human and murine cells contain at least two genes encoding IFN-induced GBPs. The cloned murine cDNA codes for GBP-1, an IFN-induced protein previously shown to be absent from mice of Gbp-1b genotype.

  3. Methodology for a bounding estimate of activation source-term.

    PubMed

    Culp, Todd

    2013-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories' Z-Machine is the world's most powerful electrical device, and experiments have been conducted that make it the world's most powerful radiation source. Because Z-Machine is used for research, an assortment of materials can be placed into the machine; these materials can be subjected to a range of nuclear reactions, producing an assortment of activation products. A methodology was developed to provide a systematic approach to evaluate different materials to be introduced into the machine as wire arrays. This methodology is based on experiment specific characteristics, physical characteristics of specific radionuclides, and experience with Z-Machine. This provides a starting point for bounding calculations of radionuclide source-term that can be used for work planning, development of work controls, and evaluating materials for introduction into the machine.

  4. Activation of ras p21 transforming properties associated with an increase in the release rate of bound guanine nucleotide.

    PubMed Central

    Lacal, J C; Aaronson, S A

    1986-01-01

    An Ala-to-Thr substitution at position 59 activates the transforming properties of the p21ras protein without impairment of GTPase activity, a biochemical alteration associated with other activating mutations. To investigate the basis for the transforming properties of the Thr-59 mutant, we characterized guanine nucleotide release. This reaction exhibited a slow rate and stringent temperature requirements. To further dissect the release reaction, we used monoclonal antibodies directed against different epitopes of the p21 molecule. One monoclonal specifically interfered with nucleotide release, while others which recognized different regions of the molecule blocked nucleotide binding. Mutants with the Thr-59 substitution exhibited a three- to ninefold-higher rate of GDP and GTP release than normal p21 or mutants with other activating lesions. This alteration in the Thr-59 mutant would have the effect of increasing its rate of nucleotide exchange. In an intracellular environment with a high GTP/GDP ratio, this would favor the association of GTP with the Thr-59 mutant. Consistent with knowledge of known G-regulatory proteins, these findings support a model in which the p21-GTP complex is the biologically active form of the p21 protein. PMID:3540608

  5. Ribosome-induced changes in elongation factor Tu conformation control GTP hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Elizabeth; Sengupta, Jayati; Trabuco, Leonardo G.; LeBarron, Jamie; Baxter, William T.; Shaikh, Tanvir R.; Grassucci, Robert A.; Nissen, Poul; Ehrenberg, Måns; Schulten, Klaus; Frank, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    In translation, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) molecules deliver aminoacyl-tRNAs to the mRNA-programmed ribosome. The GTPase activity of EF-Tu is triggered by ribosome-induced conformational changes of the factor that play a pivotal role in the selection of the cognate aminoacyl-tRNAs. We present a 6.7-Å cryo-electron microscopy map of the aminoacyl-tRNA·EF-Tu·GDP·kirromycin-bound Escherichia coli ribosome, together with an atomic model of the complex obtained through molecular dynamics flexible fitting. The model reveals the conformational changes in the conserved GTPase switch regions of EF-Tu that trigger hydrolysis of GTP, along with key interactions, including those between the sarcin-ricin loop and the P loop of EF-Tu, and between the effector loop of EF-Tu and a conserved region of the 16S rRNA. Our data suggest that GTP hydrolysis on EF-Tu is controlled through a hydrophobic gate mechanism. PMID:19122150

  6. The pebble GTP exchange factor and the control of cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, L; Somers, W G; Harley, A; Saint, R

    2001-12-01

    Several G proteins of the Rho family have been shown to be required for cytokinesis. The activity of these proteins is regulated by GTP exchange factors (GEFs), which stimulate GDP/GTP exchange, and by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs), which suppress activity by stimulating the intrinsic GTPase activity. The role of Rho family members during cytokinesis is likely to be determined by their spatial and temporal interactions with these factors. Here we focus on the role of the pebble (pbl) gene of Drosophila melanogaster, a RhoGEF that is required for cytokinesis. We summarise the evidence that the primary target of PBL is Rho1 and describe genetic approaches to elucidating the function of PBL and identifying other components of the PBL-activated Rho signalling pathway.

  7. The lipid kinase PI5P4Kβ is an intracellular GTP sensor for metabolism and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sumita, Kazutaka; Lo, Yu-Hua; Takeuchi, Koh; Senda, Miki; Kofuji, Satoshi; Ikeda, Yoshiki; Terakawa, Jumpei; Sasaki, Mika; Yoshino, Hirofumi; Majd, Nazanin; Zheng, Yuxiang; Kahoud, Emily Rose; Yokota, Takehiro; Emerling, Brooke M.; Asara, John M.; Ishida, Tetsuo; Locasale, Jason W.; Daikoku, Takiko; Anastasiou, Dimitrios; Senda, Toshiya; Sasaki, Atsuo T.

    2016-01-01

    Summary While cellular GTP concentration dramatically changes in response to an organism’s cellular status, whether it serves as a metabolic cue for biological signaling remains elusive due to the lack of molecular identification of GTP sensors. Here we report that PI5P4Kβ, a phosphoinositide kinase that regulates PI(5)P levels, detects GTP concentration and converts them into lipid second messenger signaling. Biochemical analyses show that PI5P4Kβ preferentially utilizes GTP, rather than ATP, for PI(5)P phosphorylation and its activity reflects changes in direct proportion to the physiological GTP concentration. Structural and biological analyses reveal that the GTP-sensing activity of PI5P4Kβ is critical for metabolic adaptation and tumorigenesis. These results demonstrate that PI5P4Kβ is the missing GTP sensor and that GTP concentration functions as a metabolic cue via PI5P4Kβ. The critical role of the GTP-sensing activity of PI5P4Kβ in cancer signifies this lipid kinase as a cancer therapeutic target. PMID:26774281

  8. The small G-protein Arf6GTP recruits the AP-2 adaptor complex to membranes.

    PubMed

    Paleotti, Olivia; Macia, Eric; Luton, Frederic; Klein, Stephanie; Partisani, Mariagrazia; Chardin, Pierre; Kirchhausen, Tom; Franco, Michel

    2005-06-03

    The small GTP-binding protein ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) is involved in plasma membrane/endosomes trafficking. However, precisely how the activation of Arf6 regulates vesicular transport is still unclear. Here, we show that, in vitro, recombinant Arf6GTP recruits purified clathrin-adaptor complex AP-2 (but not AP-1) onto phospholipid liposomes in the absence of phosphoinositides. We also show that phosphoinositides and Arf6 tightly cooperate to translocate AP-2 to the membrane. In vivo, Arf6GTP (but not Arf6GDP) was found associated to AP-2. The expression of the GTP-locked mutant of Arf6 leads to the plasma membrane redistribution of AP-2 in Arf6GTP-enriched areas. Finally, we demonstrated that the expression of the GTP-locked mutant of Arf6 inhibits transferrin receptor internalization without affecting its recycling. Altogether, our results demonstrated that Arf6GTP interacts specifically with AP-2 and promotes its membrane recruitment. These findings strongly suggest that Arf6 plays a major role in clathrin-mediated endocytosis by directly controlling the assembly of the AP-2/clathrin coat.

  9. Biochemical and functional characterization of Plasmodium falciparum GTP cyclohydrolase I

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Antifolates are currently in clinical use for malaria preventive therapy and treatment. The drugs kill the parasites by targeting the enzymes in the de novo folate pathway. The use of antifolates has now been limited by the spread of drug-resistant mutations. GTP cyclohydrolase I (GCH1) is the first and the rate-limiting enzyme in the folate pathway. The amplification of the gch1 gene found in certain Plasmodium falciparum isolates can cause antifolate resistance and influence the course of antifolate resistance evolution. These findings showed the importance of P. falciparum GCH1 in drug resistance intervention. However, little is known about P. falciparum GCH1 in terms of kinetic parameters and functional assays, precluding the opportunity to obtain the key information on its catalytic reaction and to eventually develop this enzyme as a drug target. Methods Plasmodium falciparum GCH1 was cloned and expressed in bacteria. Enzymatic activity was determined by the measurement of fluorescent converted neopterin with assay validation by using mutant and GTP analogue. The genetic complementation study was performed in ∆folE bacteria to functionally identify the residues and domains of P. falciparum GCH1 required for its enzymatic activity. Plasmodial GCH1 sequences were aligned and structurally modeled to reveal conserved catalytic residues. Results Kinetic parameters and optimal conditions for enzymatic reactions were determined by the fluorescence-based assay. The inhibitor test against P. falciparum GCH1 is now possible as indicated by the inhibitory effect by 8-oxo-GTP. Genetic complementation was proven to be a convenient method to study the function of P. falciparum GCH1. A series of domain truncations revealed that the conserved core domain of GCH1 is responsible for its enzymatic activity. Homology modelling fits P. falciparum GCH1 into the classic Tunnelling-fold structure with well-conserved catalytic residues at the active site. Conclusions

  10. Ribosome-associated GTPases: the role of RNA for GTPase activation.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Nina; Polacek, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    The GTPase super-family comprises a variety of G proteins found in all three domains of life. Although they are participating in completely different processes like signal transduction, protein biosynthesis and regulation of cell proliferation, they all share a highly conserved G domain and use a common mechanism for GTP hydrolysis. Exact timing in hydrolyzing the bound GTP serves as a molecular switch to initiate diverse cellular reactions. Classical GTPases depend on external proteins to fire GTP hydrolysis (GAPs), and following the GTPase reaction to exchange GDP for GTP (GEFs), converting the GTPase into the active state again. In recent years it became clear that there are many GTPases that do not follow this classical switch mode scheme. Certain ribosome-associated GTPases are not reliant on other GEF proteins to exchange GDP for GTP. Furthermore many of these G proteins are not activated by external GAPs, but by evolutionarily ancient molecules, namely by RNA.

  11. Rheb protein binds CAD (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase) protein in a GTP- and effector domain-dependent manner and influences its cellular localization and carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase (CPSase) activity.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tatsuhiro; Akasu, Hitomi; Shimono, Wataru; Matsu, Chisa; Fujiwara, Yuki; Shibagaki, Yoshio; Heard, Jeffrey J; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Hattori, Seisuke

    2015-01-09

    Rheb small GTPases, which consist of Rheb1 and Rheb2 (also known as RhebL1) in mammalian cells, are unique members of the Ras superfamily and play central roles in regulating protein synthesis and cell growth by activating mTOR. To gain further insight into the function of Rheb, we carried out a search for Rheb-binding proteins and found that Rheb binds to CAD protein (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase), a multifunctional enzyme required for the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. CAD binding is more pronounced with Rheb2 than with Rheb1. Rheb binds CAD in a GTP- and effector domain-dependent manner. The region of CAD where Rheb binds is located at the C-terminal region of the carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase domain and not in the dihydroorotase and aspartate transcarbamoylase domains. Rheb stimulated carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase activity of CAD in vitro. In addition, an elevated level of intracellular UTP pyrimidine nucleotide was observed in Tsc2-deficient cells, which was attenuated by knocking down of Rheb. Immunostaining analysis showed that expression of Rheb leads to increased accumulation of CAD on lysosomes. Both a farnesyltransferase inhibitor that blocks membrane association of Rheb and knockdown of Rheb mislocalized CAD. These results establish CAD as a downstream effector of Rheb and suggest a possible role of Rheb in regulating de novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis.

  12. Importin {beta}-type nuclear transport receptors have distinct binding affinities for Ran-GTP

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Silvia; Schlenstedt, Gabriel

    2011-03-18

    Highlights: {yields} Determination of binding properties of nuclear transport receptor/Ran-GTP complexes. {yields} Biosensor measurements provide constants for dissociation, on-rates, and off-rates. {yields} The affinity of receptors for Ran-GTP is widely divergent. {yields} Dissociation constants differ for three orders of magnitude. {yields} The cellular concentration of yeast Ran is not limiting. -- Abstract: Cargos destined to enter or leave the cell nucleus are typically transported by receptors of the importin {beta} family to pass the nuclear pore complex. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae comprises 14 members of this protein family, which can be divided in importins and exportins. The Ran GTPase regulates the association and dissociation of receptors and cargos as well as the transport direction through the nuclear pore. All receptors bind to Ran exclusively in its GTP-bound state and this event is restricted to the nuclear compartment. We determined the Ran-GTP binding properties of all yeast transport receptors by biosensor measurements and observed that the affinity of importins for Ran-GTP differs significantly. The dissociation constants range from 230 pM to 270 nM, which is mostly based on a variability of the off-rate constants. The divergent affinity of importins for Ran-GTP suggests the existence of a novel mode of nucleocytoplasmic transport regulation. Furthermore, the cellular concentration of {beta}-receptors and of other Ran-binding proteins was determined. We found that the number of {beta}-receptors altogether about equals the amounts of yeast Ran, but Ran-GTP is not limiting in the nucleus. The implications of our results for nucleocytoplasmic transport mechanisms are discussed.

  13. Interaction of a novel fluorescent GTP analogue with the small G-protein K-Ras.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Seigo; Masuhara, Kaori; Umeki, Nobuhisa; Sako, Yasushi; Maruta, Shinsaku

    2016-01-01

    A novel fluorescent guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) analogue, 2'(3')-O-{6-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-l,3-diazol-4-yl)amino) hexanoic}-GTP (NBD-GTP), was synthesized and utilized to monitor the effect of mutations in the functional region of mouse K-Ras. The effects of the G12S, A59T and G12S/A59T mutations on GTPase activity, nucleotide exchange rates were compared with normal Ras. Mutation at A59T resulted in reduction of the GTPase activity by 0.6-fold and enhancement of the nucleotide exchange rate by 2-fold compared with normal Ras. On the other hand, mutation at G12S only slightly affected the nucleotide exchange rate and did not affect the GTPase activity. We also used NBD-GTP to study the effect of these mutations on the interaction between Ras and SOS1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor. The mutation at A59T abolished the interaction with SOS1. The results suggest that the fluorescent GTP analogue, NBD-GTP, is applicable to the kinetic studies for small G-proteins.

  14. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase activation by synthetic peptides mapping within the carboxyl-terminal domain of small GTP-binding proteins. Lack of amino acid sequence specificity and importance of polybasic motif.

    PubMed

    Joseph, G; Gorzalczany, Y; Koshkin, V; Pick, E

    1994-11-18

    The small GTP-binding protein (G protein) Rac1 is an obligatory participant in the assembly of the superoxide (O2-.)-generating NADPH oxidase complex of macrophages. We investigated the effect of synthetic peptides, mapping within the near carboxyl-terminal domains of Rac1 and of related G proteins, on the activity of NADPH oxidase in a cell-free system consisting of solubilized guinea pig macrophage membrane, a cytosolic fraction enriched in p47phox and p67phox (or total cytosol), highly purified Rac1-GDP dissociation inhibitor for Rho (Rho GDI) complex, and the activating amphiphile, lithium dodecyl sulfate. Peptides Rac1-(178-188) and Rac1-(178-191), but not Rac2-(178-188), inhibited NADPH oxidase activity in a Rac1-dependent system when added prior to or simultaneously with the initiation of activation. However, undecapeptides corresponding to the near carboxyl-terminal domains of RhoA and RhoC and, most notably, a peptide containing the same amino acids as Rac1-(178-188), but in reversed orientation, were also inhibitory. Surprisingly, O2-. production in a Rac2-dependent cell-free system was inhibited by Rac1-(178-188) but not by Rac2-(178-188). Finally, basic polyamino acids containing lysine, histidine, or arginine, also inhibited NADPH oxidase activation. We conclude that inhibition of NADPH oxidase activation by synthetic peptides mapping within the carboxyl-terminal domain of certain small G proteins is not amino acid sequence-specific but related to the presence of a polybasic motif. It has been proposed that such a motif serves as a plasma membrane targeting signal for a number of small G proteins (Hancock, J.F., Paterson, H., and Marshall, C.J. (1990) Cell 63, 133-139).

  15. A novel GTP-dependent mechanism of ileal muscarinic metabotropic channel desensitization.

    PubMed Central

    Zholos, A. V.; Bolton, T. B.

    1996-01-01

    1. Cationic current (Icat) was evoked in single isolated smooth muscle cells either by activating muscarinic receptors with the stable muscarinic agonist, carbachol (CCh), or by dialysing cells with GTP-gamma S. It was studied using patch-clamp recording techniques in cells obtained by enzymatic digestion from the longitudinal muscle layer of the guinea-pig small intestine. 2. Icat appears only when muscarinic receptors or G-proteins are activated, but it is strongly voltage-dependent. Its activation could be described by the Boltzmann equation. During desensitization of Icat evoked by 50 microM CCh, the slope factor, k, remained constant whereas the maximal conductance, Gmax, slowly decreased and the potential of half-maximal activation, V1/2, shifted positively by 32 mV during 4 min. 3. At peak response either to extracellular application of CCh (GTP-free, or 1 mM GTP-containing, pipette solution) or to intracellular application of GTP-gamma S (no CCh), the size and voltage-dependent properties of Icat were similar. However, Icat desensitization was slower in the presence of GTP (CCh applied) in the pipette solution and much slower with GTP-gamma S in the pipette (no CCh) compared to GTP-free pipette solution (CCh applied); the decrease in Gmax with time was much delayed and the positive shift of the activation curve was inhibited. GDP-beta S added to the pipette solution at 2 mM abolished Icat in response to applied CCh; 50 microM did not prevent Icat generation but significantly accelerated desensitization. 4. It was concluded that the rate of desensitization of the carbachol-evoked cationic current was due to a decline in the concentration of activated G-protein in the cell, which reduced the maximum number of channels which could be opened and shifted their activation range to less negative potentials. PMID:8922752

  16. Nuclear Ras2-GTP Controls Invasive Growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Broggi, Serena; Martegani, Enzo; Colombo, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Using an eGFP-RBD3 probe, which specifically binds Ras-GTP, we recently showed that the fluorescent probe was localized to the plasma membrane and to the nucleus in wild type cells growing exponentially on glucose medium, indicating the presence of active Ras in these cellular compartments. To investigate the nuclear function of Ras-GTP, we generated a strain where Ras2 is fused to the nuclear export signal (NES) from the HIV virus, in order to exclude this protein from the nucleus. Our results show that nuclear active Ras2 is required for invasive growth development in haploid yeast, while the expression of the NES-Ras2 protein does not cause growth defects either on fermentable or non-fermentable carbon sources and does not influence protein kinase A (PKA) activity related phenotypes analysed. Moreover, we show that the cAMP/PKA pathway controls invasive growth influencing the localization of active Ras. In particular, we show that PKA activity plays a role in the localization of active Ras and influences the ability of the cells to invade the agar: high PKA activity leads to a predominant nuclear accumulation of active Ras and induces invasive growth, while low PKA activity leads to plasma membrane localization of active Ras and to a defective invasive growth phenotype. PMID:24244466

  17. Rho-associated kinase, a novel serine/threonine kinase, as a putative target for small GTP binding protein Rho.

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, T; Amano, M; Yamamoto, T; Chihara, K; Nakafuku, M; Ito, M; Nakano, T; Okawa, K; Iwamatsu, A; Kaibuchi, K

    1996-01-01

    The small GTP binding protein Rho is implicated in cytoskeletal responses to extracellular signals such as lysophosphatidic acid to form stress fibers and focal contacts. Here we have purified a Rho-interacting protein with a molecular mass of approximately 164 kDa (p164) from bovine brain. This protein bound to GTPgammaS (a non-hydrolyzable GTP analog).RhoA but not to GDP.RhoA or GTPgammaS.RhoA with a mutation in the effector domain (RhoAA37).p164 had a kinase activity which was specifically stimulated by GTPgammaS.RhoA. We obtained the cDNA encoding p164 on the basis of its partial amino acid sequences and named it Rho-associated kinase (Rho-kinase). Rho-kinase has a catalytic domain in the N-terminal portion, a coiled coil domain in the middle portion and a zinc finger-like motif in the C-terminal portion. The catalytic domain shares 72% sequence homology with that of myotonic dystrophy kinase and the coiled coil domain contains a Rho-interacting interface. When COS7 cells were cotransfected with Rho-kinase and activated RhoA, some Rho-kinase was recruited to membranes. Thus it is likely that Rho-kinase is a putative target serine/threonine kinase for Rho and serves as a mediator of the Rho-dependent signaling pathway. Images PMID:8641286

  18. 78 FR 44553 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Veterans Upward Bound Annual...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Veterans Upward Bound Annual Performance... Report. OMB Control Number: 1840-NEW. Type of Review: New information collection. Respondents/Affected... requesting a new Annual Performance Report (APR) for grants under the Veterans Upward Bound (VUB)...

  19. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Behavior: III. Estimating Bound Site Activity Coefficients

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although detailed thermodynamic analyses of the 2-pK diffuse layer surface complexation model generally specify bound site activity coefficients for the purpose of accounting for those non-ideal excess free energies contributing to bound site electrochemical potentials, in applic...

  20. Characterization of GTP-binding proteins in Golgi-associated membrane vesicles from rat adipocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Schürmann, A; Rosenthal, W; Schultz, G; Joost, H G

    1992-01-01

    We have previously reported that guanine nucleotides inhibit glucose transport activity reconstituted from adipocyte membrane fractions. In order to further investigate the hypothetical involvement of guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins (GTP-binding proteins) in the regulation of insulin-sensitive glucose transport activity, we studied their subcellular distribution in adipocytes treated or not with insulin. Adipocytes were homogenized and fractionated to yield plasma membranes (PM) and a Golgi-enriched fraction of intracellular membranes (low-density microsomes, LDM). In these membrane fractions, total guanosine 5'-[gamma-[35S]thio]triphosphate ([35S]GTP[S]) binding, alpha- and beta-subunits of heterotrimeric G-proteins, proto-oncogenes Ha-ras and K-ras, and 23-28 kDa GTP-binding proteins were assayed. The levels of alpha s and alpha i (the alpha-subunits of Gs and Gi) were approx. 8-fold lower in LDM than in PM; beta-subunits, Ha-ras and K-ras were not detectable in LDM. Total GTP[S]-binding sites and 23-28 kDa GTP-binding proteins were present in LDM in approximately the same concentrations as in PM. Insulin gave rise to the characteristic translocation of glucose transporters, but failed to alter the subcellular distribution of any of the GTP-binding proteins. Fractionation of the LDM on a discontinuous sucrose gradient revealed that alpha s and alpha i, as detected with antiserum against a common peptide sequence (alpha common), and the bulk of the 23-28 kDa G-proteins sedimented at different sucrose densities. None of the GTP-binding proteins co-sedimented with glucose transporters. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of GTP[S] on the reconstituted transport activity was lost in the peak fractions of glucose transporters partially purified on the sucrose gradient. These data indicate that LDM from adipocytes contain several GTP-binding proteins in discrete vesicle populations. However, the intracellular GTP-binding proteins are not tightly associated with the

  1. Free energy simulations of a GTPase: GTP and GDP binding to archaeal initiation factor 2.

    PubMed

    Satpati, Priyadarshi; Clavaguéra, Carine; Ohanessian, Gilles; Simonson, Thomas

    2011-05-26

    Archaeal initiation factor 2 (aIF2) is a protein involved in the initiation of protein biosynthesis. In its GTP-bound, "ON" conformation, aIF2 binds an initiator tRNA and carries it to the ribosome. In its GDP-bound, "OFF" conformation, it dissociates from tRNA. To understand the specific binding of GTP and GDP and its dependence on the ON or OFF conformational state of aIF2, molecular dynamics free energy simulations (MDFE) are a tool of choice. However, the validity of the computed free energies depends on the simulation model, including the force field and the boundary conditions, and on the extent of conformational sampling in the simulations. aIF2 and other GTPases present specific difficulties; in particular, the nucleotide ligand coordinates a divalent Mg(2+) ion, which can polarize the electronic distribution of its environment. Thus, a force field with an explicit treatment of electronic polarizability could be necessary, rather than a simpler, fixed charge force field. Here, we begin by comparing a fixed charge force field to quantum chemical calculations and experiment for Mg(2+):phosphate binding in solution, with the force field giving large errors. Next, we consider GTP and GDP bound to aIF2 and we compare two fixed charge force fields to the recent, polarizable, AMOEBA force field, extended here in a simple, approximate manner to include GTP. We focus on a quantity that approximates the free energy to change GTP into GDP. Despite the errors seen for Mg(2+):phosphate binding in solution, we observe a substantial cancellation of errors when we compare the free energy change in the protein to that in solution, or when we compare the protein ON and OFF states. Finally, we have used the fixed charge force field to perform MDFE simulations and alchemically transform GTP into GDP in the protein and in solution. With a total of about 200 ns of molecular dynamics, we obtain good convergence and a reasonable statistical uncertainty, comparable to the force

  2. Altering the GTP binding site of the DNA/RNA-binding protein, Translin/TB-RBP, decreases RNA binding and may create a dominant negative phenotype.

    PubMed

    Chennathukuzhi, V M; Kurihara, Y; Bray, J D; Yang, J; Hecht, N B

    2001-11-01

    The DNA/RNA-binding protein, Translin/Testis Brain RNA-binding protein (Translin/TB-RBP), contains a putative GTP binding site in its C-terminus which is highly conserved. To determine if guanine nucleotide binding to this site functionally alters nucleic acid binding, electrophoretic mobility shift assays were performed with RNA and DNA binding probes. GTP, but not GDP, reduces RNA binding by approximately 50% and the poorly hydrolyzed GTP analog, GTPgammaS, reduces binding by >90% in gel shift and immunoprecipitation assays. No similar reduction of DNA binding is seen. When the putative GTP binding site of TB-RBP, amino acid sequence VTAGD, is altered to VTNSD by site directed mutagenesis, GTP will no longer bind to TB-RBP(GTP) and TB-RBP(GTP) no longer binds to RNA, although DNA binding is not affected. Yeast two-hybrid assays reveal that like wild-type TB-RBP, TB-RBP(GTP) will interact with itself, with wild-type TB-RBP and with Translin associated factor X (Trax). Transfection of TB-RBP(GTP) into NIH 3T3 cells leads to a marked increase in cell death suggesting a dominant negative function for TB-RBP(GTP) in cells. These data suggest TB-RBP is an RNA-binding protein whose activity is allosterically controlled by nucleotide binding.

  3. Polyphosphate colocalizes with factor XII on platelet-bound fibrin and augments its plasminogen activator activity

    PubMed Central

    Lionikiene, Ausra S.; Georgiev, Georgi; Klemmer, Anja; Brain, Chelsea; Kim, Paul Y.

    2016-01-01

    Activated factor XII (FXIIa) has plasminogen activator capacity but its relative contribution to fibrinolysis is considered marginal compared with urokinase and tissue plasminogen activator. Polyphosphate (polyP) is released from activated platelets and mediates FXII activation. Here, we investigate the contribution of polyP to the plasminogen activator function of αFXIIa. We show that both polyP70, of the chain length found in platelets (60-100 mer), and platelet-derived polyP significantly augment the plasminogen activation capacity of αFXIIa. PolyP70 stimulated the autoactivation of FXII and subsequent plasminogen activation, indicating that once activated, αFXIIa remains bound to polyP70. Indeed, complex formation between polyP70 and αFXIIa provides protection against autodegradation. Plasminogen activation by βFXIIa was minimal and not enhanced by polyP70, highlighting the importance of the anion binding site. PolyP70 did not modulate plasmin activity but stimulated activation of Glu and Lys forms of plasminogen by αFXIIa. Accordingly, polyP70 was found to bind to FXII, αFXIIa, and plasminogen, but not βFXIIa. Fibrin and polyP70 acted synergistically to enhance αFXIIa-mediated plasminogen activation. The plasminogen activator activity of the αFXIIa-polyP70 complex was modulated by C1 inhibitor and histidine-rich glycoprotein, but not plasminogen activator inhibitors 1 and 2. Platelet polyP and FXII were found to colocalize on the activated platelet membrane in a fibrin-dependent manner and decorated fibrin strands extending from platelet aggregates. We show that in the presence of platelet polyP and the downstream substrate fibrin, αFXIIa is a highly efficient and favorable plasminogen activator. Our data are the first to document a profibrinolytic function of platelet polyP. PMID:27694320

  4. Role of GTP-CHI links PAH and TH in melanin synthesis in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Wang, Jiying; Li, Haiyin; Li, Yan; Chen, Peng; Li, Tian; Chen, Xi; Xiao, Junjie; Zhang, Liang

    2015-08-10

    In insects, pigment patterns are formed by melanin, ommochromes, and pteridines. Here, the effects of pteridine synthesis on melanin formation were studied using 4th instar larvae of a wild-type silkworm strain, dazao (Bombyx mori), with normal color and markings. Results from injected larvae and in vitro integument culture indicated that decreased activity of guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase I (GTP-CH I, a rate-limiting enzyme for pteridine synthesis), lowers BH4 (6R-l-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin, a production correlated with GTP-CH I activity) levels and eliminates markings and coloration. The conversion of phenylalanine and tyrosine to melanin was prevented when GTP-CH I was inhibited. When BH4 was added, phenylalanine was converted to tyrosine, and the tyrosine concentration increased. Tyrosine was then converted to melanin to create normal markings and coloration. Decreasing GTP-CH I activity did not affect L-DOPA (3,4-l-dihydroxyphenylalanine). GTP-CH I affected melanin synthesis by generating the BH4 used in two key reaction steps: (1) conversion of phenylalanine to tyrosine by PAH (phenylalanine hydroxylase) and (2) conversion of tyrosine to L-DOPA by TH (tyrosine hydroxylase). Expression profiles of BmGTPCH Ia, BmGTPCH Ib, BmTH, and BmPAH in the integument were consistent with the current findings.

  5. Superoxide dismutase activity of Cu-bound prion protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, Jerry

    2009-03-01

    Misfolding of the prion protein, PrP, has been linked to a group of neurodegenerative diseases, including the mad cow disease in cattle and the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. The normal function of PrP is still unknown, but it was found that the PrP can efficiently bind Cu(II) ions. Early experiments suggested that Cu-PrP complex possesses significant superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, but later experiments failed to confirm it and at present this issue remains unresolved. Using a recently developed hybrid DFT/DFT method, which combines Kohn-Sham DFT for the solute and its first solvation shells with orbital-free DFT for the remainder of the solvent, we have investigated SOD activity of PrP. The PrP is capable of incorporating Cu(II) ions in several binding modes and our calculations find that each mode has a different SOD activity. The highest activity found is comparable to those of well-known SOD proteins, suggesting that the conflicting experimental results may be due to different bindings of Cu(II) in those experiments.

  6. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide down-regulates expression of GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Werner, Ernst R; Bahrami, Soheyl; Heller, Regine; Werner-Felmayer, Gabriele

    2002-03-22

    GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) is a 9.7-kDa protein regulating GTP cyclohydrolase I activity in dependence of tetrahydrobiopterin and phenylalanine concentrations, thus enabling stimulation of tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis by phenylalanine to ensure its efficient metabolism by phenylalanine hydroxylase. Here, we were interested in regulation of GFRP expression by proinflammatory cytokines and stimuli, which are known to induce GTP cyclohydrolase I expression. Recombinant human GFRP stimulated recombinant human GTP cyclohydrolase I in the presence of phenylalanine and mediated feedback inhibition by tetrahydrobiopterin. Levels of GFRP mRNA in human myelomonocytoma (THP-1) cells remained unaltered by treatment of cells with interferon-gamma or interleukin-1beta, but were significantly down-regulated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 1 microg/ml), without or with cotreatment by interferon-gamma, which strongly up-regulated GTP cyclohydrolase I expression and activity. GFRP expression was also suppressed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells treated with 1 microg/ml LPS, as well as in rat tissues 7 h post intraperitoneal injection of 10 mg/kg LPS. THP-1 cells stimulated with interferon-gamma alone showed increased pteridine synthesis by addition of phenylalanine to the culture medium. Cells stimulated with interferon-gamma plus LPS, in contrast, showed phenylalanine-independent pteridine synthesis. These results demonstrate that LPS down-regulates expression of GFRP, thus rendering pteridine synthesis independent of metabolic control by phenylalanine.

  7. Release and Activity of Bound beta-Amylase in a Germinating Barley Grain.

    PubMed

    Sopanen, T; Laurière, C

    1989-01-01

    In resting grains of Triumph barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Triumph) about 40% of the beta-amylase could be extracted with a saline solution, the remaining 60% being in a bound form. During seedling growth (20 degrees C), the bound form was released mainly between days 1 and 3. When a preparation containing bound beta-amylase was incubated with an extract made of endosperms separated from germinating grains, release of bound beta-amylase took place and could be studied in vitro. The release was almost completely prevented by leupeptin and antipain, specific inhibitors of a group of SH-proteinases, but it was not inhibited by pepstatin A or EDTA, which inhibit some other barley proteinases. It is thus very likely that in a whole grain, at least the bulk of the bound beta-amylase is released by the proteolytic action of one or several SH-proteinases. When the bound beta-amylase was released by papain, its molecular weight was about 5000 daltons smaller than that of beta-amylase released by dithiothreitol. This indicates that the release is due to removal of a sequence of beta-amylase itself. A similar decrease in size took place during seedling growth. Bound beta-amylase showed some activity against native starch and it hydrolyzed maltotetraose at a rate that was about 70% of the rate the same amount of bound beta-amylase gave after release. Bound beta-amylase is thus not inactive and it is likely that the slower rate of hydrolysis is due to steric hindrances which prevent substrates from reaching the active site.

  8. Crystal structure of the stimulatory complex of GTP cyclohydrolase I and its feedback regulatory protein GFRP.

    PubMed

    Maita, Nobuo; Okada, Kengo; Hatakeyama, Kazuyuki; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2002-02-05

    In the presence of phenylalanine, GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) forms a stimulatory 360-kDa complex with GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCHI), which is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin. The crystal structure of the stimulatory complex reveals that the GTPCHI decamer is sandwiched by two GFRP homopentamers. Each GFRP pentamer forms a symmetrical five-membered ring similar to beta-propeller. Five phenylalanine molecules are buried inside each interface between GFRP and GTPCHI, thus enhancing the binding of these proteins. The complex structure suggests that phenylalanine-induced GTPCHI x GFRP complex formation enhances GTPCHI activity by locking the enzyme in the active state.

  9. How guanylate-binding proteins achieve assembly-stimulated processive cleavage of GTP to GMP.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Agnidipta; Praefcke, Gerrit J K; Renault, Louis; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Herrmann, Christian

    2006-03-02

    Interferons are immunomodulatory cytokines that mediate anti-pathogenic and anti-proliferative effects in cells. Interferon-gamma-inducible human guanylate binding protein 1 (hGBP1) belongs to the family of dynamin-related large GTP-binding proteins, which share biochemical properties not found in other families of GTP-binding proteins such as nucleotide-dependent oligomerization and fast cooperative GTPase activity. hGBP1 has an additional property by which it hydrolyses GTP to GMP in two consecutive cleavage reactions. Here we show that the isolated amino-terminal G domain of hGBP1 retains the main enzymatic properties of the full-length protein and can cleave GDP directly. Crystal structures of the N-terminal G domain trapped at successive steps along the reaction pathway and biochemical data reveal the molecular basis for nucleotide-dependent homodimerization and cleavage of GTP. Similar to effector binding in other GTP-binding proteins, homodimerization is regulated by structural changes in the switch regions. Homodimerization generates a conformation in which an arginine finger and a serine are oriented for efficient catalysis. Positioning of the substrate for the second hydrolysis step is achieved by a change in nucleotide conformation at the ribose that keeps the guanine base interactions intact and positions the beta-phosphates in the gamma-phosphate-binding site.

  10. Identification of a prostacyclin receptor coupled to the adenylate cyclase system via a stimulatory GTP-binding protein in mouse mastocytoma P-815 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, H.; Negishi, M.; Ichikawa, A. )

    1990-11-01

    A stable analogue of prostacyclin, iloprost, specifically bound to 30,000 x g pellet (the membrane fraction) prepared from mouse mastocytoma P-815 cells. The binding was dependent on time, temperature and pH, and absolutely required a divalent cation. The equilibrium dissociation constant and the maximal concentration of the binding site as determined by Scatchard plot analysis were 10.4 nM and 1.12 pmol/mg of protein, respectively. The Hill coefficient was 1.0, indicating a single entity of binding site and no cooperativity. The binding site was highly specific for iloprost among PGs tested (iloprost much greater than PGE1 greater than carbacyclin greater than PGE2). In contrast, the membrane fraction had the binding site specific for PGE2 and PGE1, which was distinct from the prostacyclin receptor. The dissociation of bound (3H)iloprost from the membrane fraction was specifically enhanced by guanine nucleotides. Furthermore, iloprost dose-dependently enhanced the activity of adenylate cyclase in a GTP-dependent manner. These results indicate that a specific prostacyclin receptor is coupled to the adenylate cyclase system via a stimulatory GTP-binding protein in mastocytoma cells.

  11. Probable systemic lupus erythematosus with cell-bound complement activation products (CB-CAPS).

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, D; Weinstein, A

    2016-08-01

    Complement activation is a key feature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Detection of cell-bound complement activation products (CB-CAPS) occurs more frequently than serum hypocomplementemia in definite lupus. We describe a patient with normocomplementemic probable SLE who did not fulfill ACR classification criteria for lupus, but the diagnosis was supported by the presence of CB-CAPS.

  12. Uncoupling of gamma-aminobutyric acid B receptors from GTP-binding proteins by N-ethylmaleimide: effect of N-ethylmaleimide on purified GTP-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, T.; Ogasawara, N.

    1986-03-01

    Treatment of membranes from bovine cerebral cortex with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) resulted in inhibition of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) binding to GABAB receptors. The binding curve for increasing concentrations of agonist was shifted to the right by NEM treatment. Guanine nucleotide had little effect on the binding of GABA to NEM-treated membranes. The addition of purified GTP-binding proteins, which were the substrates of islet-activating protein (IAP), pertussis toxin, to the NEM-treated membranes caused a shift of the binding curve to the left, suggesting modification of GTP-binding proteins rather than receptors by NEM. The effect of NEM on two purified GTP-binding proteins, Gi (composed of three subunits with molecular weight of alpha, 41,000; beta, 35,000; gamma, 10,000) and Go (alpha, 39,000; beta, 35,000; gamma, 10,000) was studied. NEM did not significantly change guanosine 5'-(3-O-thio)triphosphate (GTP gamma S) binding and GTPase activity of these two proteins. NEM-treated Gi and Go were not ADP-ribosylated by IAP and did not increase GABA binding to NEM-treated membranes. When alpha and beta gamma subunits were treated with NEM and then mixed with nontreated alpha and beta gamma to form Gi or Go, respectively, both oligomers with NEM-treated alpha-subunits lost their abilities to be IAP substrates and to couple to receptors. Results indicate that NEM uncoupled GTP-binding proteins from receptors by modifying alpha-subunits of GTP-binding proteins, and the site seemed to be on or near the site of ADP-ribosylation by IAP. When alpha and beta gamma subunits were treated with NEM and then mixed to form Gi or Go, GTP gamma S binding in the absence of Mg2+ and GTPase activity were changed, although they were not affected when oligomers were treated with NEM. Results suggest the existence of another sulfhydryl group which is protected from NEM by the association of subunits.

  13. Structure and Mutational Analysis of the Archaeal GTP:AdoCbi-P Guanylyltransferase (CobY) from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii: Insights into GTP Binding and Dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Newmister, Sean A.; Otte, Michele M.; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.; Rayment, Ivan

    2012-02-08

    In archaea and bacteria, the late steps in adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) biosynthesis are collectively known as the nucleotide loop assembly (NLA) pathway. In the archaeal and bacterial NLA pathways, two different guanylyltransferases catalyze the activation of the corrinoid. Structural and functional studies of the bifunctional bacterial guanylyltransferase that catalyze both ATP-dependent corrinoid phosphorylation and GTP-dependent guanylylation are available, but similar studies of the monofunctional archaeal enzyme that catalyzes only GTP-dependent guanylylation are not. Herein, the three-dimensional crystal structure of the guanylyltransferase (CobY) enzyme from the archaeon Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (MjCobY) in complex with GTP is reported. The model identifies the location of the active site. An extensive mutational analysis was performed, and the functionality of the variant proteins was assessed in vivo and in vitro. Substitutions of residues Gly8, Gly153, or Asn177 resulted in {ge}94% loss of catalytic activity; thus, variant proteins failed to support AdoCbl synthesis in vivo. Results from isothermal titration calorimetry experiments showed that MjCobY{sup G153D} had 10-fold higher affinity for GTP than MjCobY{sup WT} but failed to bind the corrinoid substrate. Results from Western blot analyses suggested that the above-mentioned substitutions render the protein unstable and prone to degradation; possible explanations for the observed instability of the variants are discussed within the framework of the three-dimensional crystal structure of MjCobY{sup G153D} in complex with GTP. The fold of MjCobY is strikingly similar to that of the N-terminal domain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis GlmU (MtbGlmU), a bifunctional acetyltransferase/uridyltransferase that catalyzes the formation of uridine diphosphate-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc).

  14. RAB21 Activity Assay Using GST-fused APPL1

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Steve; Kiger, Amy A.

    2016-01-01

    The Rab family of small GTPases are essential regulators of membrane trafficking events. As with other small GTPase families, Rab GTPases cycle between an inactive GDP-bound state and an active GTP-bound state. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) promote Rab activation with the exchange of bound GDP for GTP, while GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) regulate Rab inactivation with GTP hydrolysis. Numerous methods have been established to monitor the activation status of Rab GTPases. Of those, FRET-based methods are used to identify when and where a Rab GTPase is activated in cells. Unfortunately, the generation of such probes is complex, and only a limited number of Rabs have been probed this way. Biochemical purification of activated Rabs from cell or tissue extracts is easily achievable through the use of a known Rab effector domain to pull down a specific GTP-bound Rab form. Although this method is not ideal for detailed subcellular localization, it can offer temporal resolution of Rab activity. The identification of a growing number of specific effectors now allows tests for activation levels of many Rab GTPases in specific conditions. Here, we described an affinity purification approach using GST fused APPL1 (a known RAB21 effector) to test RAB21 activation in mammalian cells. This method was successfully used to assay changes in RAB21 activation status under nutrient rich versus starved conditions and to test the requirement of the MTMR13 RAB21 GEF in this process. PMID:28251173

  15. Synthetic activity enhancement of membrane-bound lipase from Rhizopus chinensis by pretreatment with isooctane.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Xu, Yan; Teng, Yun

    2007-05-01

    The cell-bound lipase from Rhizopus chinensis CCTCC M201021 with high catalysis ability for ester synthesis was located as a membrane-bound lipase by the treatments of Yatalase firstly. In order to improve its synthetic activity in non-aqueous phase, the pretreatments of this enzyme with various organic solvents were investigated. The pretreatment with isooctane improved evidently the lipase synthetic activity, resulting in about 139% in relative synthetic activity and 115% in activity recovery. The morphological changes of mycelia caused by organic solvent pretreatments could influence the exposure of the membrane-bound enzyme from mycelia and the exhibition of the lipase activity. The pretreatment conditions with isooctane and acetone were further investigated, and the optimum effect was obtained by the isooctane pretreatment at 4 degrees C for 1 h, resulting in 156% in relative synthetic activity and 126% in activity recovery. When the pretreated lipases were employed as catalysts for the esterification production of ethyl hexanoate in heptane, higher initial reaction rate and higher final molar conversion were obtained using the lipase pretreated with isooctane, compared with the untreated lyophilized one. This result suggested that the pretreatment of the membrane-bound lipase with isooctane could be an effective method to substitute the lyophilization for preparing biocatalysts used in non-aqueous phase reactions.

  16. Conformational states of Ras complexed with the GTP analogue GppNHp or GppCH2p: implications for the interaction with effector proteins.

    PubMed

    Spoerner, Michael; Nuehs, Andrea; Ganser, Petra; Herrmann, Christian; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2005-02-15

    The guanine nucleotide-binding protein Ras occurs in solution in two different states, state 1 and state 2, when the GTP analogue GppNHp is bound to the active center as detected by (31)P NMR spectroscopy. Here we show that Ras(wt).Mg(2+).GppCH(2)p also exists in two conformational states in dynamic equilibrium. The activation enthalpy DeltaH(++)(12) and the activation entropy DeltaS(++)(12) for the transition from state 1 to state 2 are 70 kJ mol(-1) and 102 J mol(-1) K(-1), within the limits of error identical to those determined for the Ras(wt).Mg(2+).GppNHp complex. The same is true for the equilibrium constants K(12) = [2]/[1] of 2.0 and the corresponding DeltaG(12) of -1.7 kJ mol(-1) at 278 K. This excludes a suggested specific effect of the NH group of GppNHp on the equilibrium. The assignment of the phosphorus resonance lines of the bound analogues has been done by two-dimensional (31)P-(31)P NOESY experiments which lead to a correction of the already reported assignments of bound GppNHp. Mutation of Thr35 in Ras.Mg(2+).GppCH(2)p to serine leads to a shift of the conformational equilibrium toward state 1. Interaction of the Ras binding domain (RBD) of Raf kinase or RalGDS with Ras(wt) or Ras(T35S) shifts the equilibrium completely to state 2. The (31)P NMR experiments suggest that, besides the type of the side chain of residue 35, a main contribution to the conformational equilibrium in Ras complexes with GTP and GTP analogues is the effective acidity of the gamma-phosphate group of the bound nucleotide. A reaction scheme for the Ras-effector interaction is presented which includes the existence of two conformations of the effector loop and a weak binding state.

  17. The GDP-bound form of Arf6 is located at the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Macia, Eric; Luton, Frédéric; Partisani, Mariagrazia; Cherfils, Jacqueline; Chardin, Pierre; Franco, Michel

    2004-05-01

    The function of Arf6 has been investigated largely by using the T27N and the Q67L mutants, which are thought to be blocked in GDP- and GTP-bound states, respectively. However, these mutants have been poorly characterized biochemically. Here, we found that Arf6(T27N) is not an appropriate marker of the inactive GDP-bound form because it has a high tendency to lose its nucleotide in vitro and to denature. As a consequence, most of the protein is aggregated in vivo and localizes to detergent-insoluble structures. However, a small proportion of Arf6(T27N) is able to form a stable complex with its exchange factor EFA6 at the plasma membrane, accounting for its dominant-negative phenotype. To define the cellular localization of Arf6-GDP, we designed a new mutant, Arf6(T44N). In vitro, this mutant has a 30-fold decreased affinity for GTP. In vivo, it is mostly GDP bound and, in contrast to the wild type, does not switch to the active conformation when expressed with EFA6. This GDP-locked mutant is found at the plasma membrane, where it localizes with EFA6 and Ezrin in actin- and phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate-enriched domains. From these results, we conclude that the Arf6 GDP-GTP cycle takes place at the plasma membrane.

  18. Antioxidant activity of commercial buckwheat flours and their free and bound phenolic compositions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Buckwheat flours (Whole, Farinetta, Supreme, and Fancy) were investigated for their compositions, free and bound phenolic contents, antioxidant activities, and flavonoid contents using spectrophotometer and LC-ESI-IT- MS (LC-MS). Farinetta flour contained the highest oil, protein, and free and boun...

  19. Over-expression of GTP-cyclohydrolase 1 feedback regulatory protein attenuates LPS and cytokine-stimulated nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Manasi; Kelly, Peter; Vallance, Patrick; Leiper, James

    2008-02-01

    GTP-cyclohydrolase 1 (GTP-CH1) catalyses the first and rate-limiting step for the de novo production of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)), an essential cofactor for nitric oxide synthase (NOS). The GTP-CH1-BH(4) pathway is emerging as an important regulator in a number of pathologies associated with over-production of nitric oxide (NO) and hence a more detailed understanding of this pathway may lead to novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of certain vascular diseases. GTP-CH1 activity can be inhibited by BH(4) through its protein-protein interactions with GTP-CH1 regulatory protein (GFRP), and transcriptional and post-translational modification of both GTP-CH1 and GFRP have been reported in response to proinflammatory stimuli. However, the functional significance of GFRP/GTP-CH1 interactions on NO pathways has not yet been demonstrated. We aimed to investigate whether over-expression of GFRP could affect NO production in living cells. Over-expression of N-terminally Myc-tagged recombinant human GFRP in the murine endothelial cell line sEnd 1 resulted in no significant effect on basal BH(4) nor NO levels but significantly attenuated the rise in BH(4) and NO observed following lipopolysaccharide and cytokine stimulation of cells. This study demonstrates that GFRP can play a direct regulatory role in iNOS-mediated NO synthesis and suggests that the allosteric regulation of GTP-CH1 activity by GFRP may be an important mechanism regulating BH(4) and NO levels in vivo.

  20. Pertussis toxin modifies the characteristics of both the inhibitory GTP binding proteins and the somatostatin receptor in anterior pituitary tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mahy, N.; Woolkalis, M.; Thermos, K.; Carlson, K.; Manning, D.; Reisine, T.

    1988-08-01

    The effects of pertussis toxin treatment on the characteristics of somatostatin receptors in the anterior pituitary tumor cell line AtT-20 were examined. Pertussis toxin selectively catalyzed the ADP ribosylation of the alpha subunits of the inhibitory GTP binding proteins in AtT-20 cells. Toxin treatment abolished somatostatin inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity and somatostatin stimulation of GTPase activity. To examine the effects of pertussis toxin treatment on the characteristics of the somatostatin receptor, the receptor was labeled by the somatostatin analog (125I)CGP 23996. (125I)CGP 23996 binding to AtT-20 cell membranes was saturable and within a limited concentration range was to a single high affinity site. Pertussis toxin treatment reduced the apparent density of the high affinity (125I)CGP 23996 binding sites in AtT-20 cell membranes. Inhibition of (125I)CGP 23996 binding by a wide concentration range of CGP 23996 revealed the presence of two binding sites. GTP predominantly reduced the level of high affinity sites in control membranes. Pertussis toxin treatment also diminished the amount of high affinity sites. GTP did not affect (125I)CGP 23996 binding in the pertussis toxin-treated membranes. The high affinity somatostatin receptors were covalently labeled with (125I) CGP 23996 and the photoactivated crosslinking agent n-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-azidobenzoate. No high affinity somatostatin receptors, covalently bound to (125I)CGP 23996, were detected in the pertussis toxin-treated membranes. These results are most consistent with pertussis toxin uncoupling the inhibitory G proteins from the somatostatin receptor thereby converting the receptor from a mixed population of high and low affinity sites to only low affinity receptors.

  1. Proteins that interact with GTP during sporulation of Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, C.; Vary, J.C. )

    1989-06-01

    During sporulation of Bacillus subtilis, several proteins were shown to interact with GTP in specific ways. UV light was used to cross-link ({alpha}-{sup 32}P)GTP to proteins in cell extracts at different stages of growth. After electrophoresis, 11 bands of radioactivity were found in vegetative cells, 4 more appeared during sporulation, and only 9 remained in mature spores. Based on the labeling pattern with or without UV light to cross-link either ({alpha}-{sup 32}P)GTP or ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)GTP, 11 bands of radioactivity were apparent guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, and 5 bands appeared to be phosphorylated and/or guanylated. Similar results were found with Bacillus megaterium. Assuming the GTP might be a type of signal for sporulation, it could interact with and regulate proteins by at least three mechanisms.

  2. Structures of Drosophila melanogaster Rab2 and Rab3 bound to GMPPNP

    PubMed Central

    Lardong, Jennifer A.; Driller, Jan H.; Depner, Harald; Weise, Christoph; Petzoldt, Astrid; Wahl, Markus C.; Sigrist, Stephan J.; Loll, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Rab GTPases belong to the large family of Ras proteins. They act as key regulators of membrane organization and intracellular trafficking. Functionally, they act as switches. In the active GTP-bound form they can bind to effector proteins to facilitate the delivery of transport vesicles. Upon stimulation, the GTP is hydrolyzed and the Rab proteins undergo conformational changes in their switch regions. This study focuses on Rab2 and Rab3 from Drosophila melanogaster. Whereas Rab2 is involved in vesicle transport between the Golgi and the endoplasmatic reticulum, Rab3 is a key player in exocytosis, and in the synapse it is involved in the assembly of the presynaptic active zone. Here, high-resolution crystal structures of Rab2 and Rab3 in complex with GMPPNP and Mg2+ are presented. In the structure of Rab3 a modified cysteine residue is observed with an enigmatic electron density attached to its thiol function. PMID:25615965

  3. Role of GTP-binding proteins in the regulation of mammalian cardiac chloride conductance

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Beta-Adrenoceptor agonists activate a time- and voltage-independent Cl- conductance in mammalian cardiac myocytes. To characterize the cellular signaling pathways underlying its regulation, wide-tipped pipettes fitted with a pipette perfusion device were used to record whole-cell current and to introduce nucleotides to the interior of guinea pig ventricular myocytes. Replacement of pipette GTP with GDP beta S prevented activation of the Cl- conductance by Iso, suggesting a requirement for G protein turnover. With GTP in the pipette, the effect of Iso could be abolished by the beta-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol, and mimicked by histamine or forskolin. These actions of Iso and forskolin are mediated exclusively via cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), because (a) maximal activation of the Cl- conductance by forskolin or pipette cAMP occluded the effect of Iso, and (b) switching to pipette solution containing a synthetic peptide inhibitor (PKI) of PKA completely abolished the Cl- conductance activated by Iso and prevented the action of forskolin, but had no further effect. These results argue against basal activation of the Cl- conductance, and make it extremely unlikely that the stimulatory G protein, Gs, has any direct, phosphorylation-independent influence. The muscarinic receptor agonists acetylcholine (ACh) and carbachol diminished, in a reversible manner, Cl- conductance activated by Iso or forskolin, but not that elicited by cAMP. The muscarinic inhibition was abolished by replacing pipette GTP with GDP beta S, or by preincubating cells with pertussis toxin (PTX), and was therefore mediated by an inhibitory G protein, presumably Gi, influencing adenylyl cyclase activity. Nonhydrolyzable GTP analogues (GTP gamma S or GppNHp) applied via the pipette did not themselves activate Cl- conductance, but rendered Cl- current activation by brief exposures to Iso or histamine, but not to forskolin, irreversible. The Cl- conductance persistently activated by Iso was

  4. GTP binding controls complex formation by the human ROCO protein MASL1.

    PubMed

    Dihanich, Sybille; Civiero, Laura; Manzoni, Claudia; Mamais, Adamantios; Bandopadhyay, Rina; Greggio, Elisa; Lewis, Patrick A

    2014-01-01

    The human ROCO proteins are a family of multi-domain proteins sharing a conserved ROC-COR supra-domain. The family has four members: leucine-rich repeat kinase 1 (LRRK1), leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1) and malignant fibrous histiocytoma amplified sequences with leucine-rich tandem repeats 1 (MASL1). Previous studies of LRRK1/2 and DAPK1 have shown that the ROC (Ras of complex proteins) domain can bind and hydrolyse GTP, but the cellular consequences of this activity are still unclear. Here, the first biochemical characterization of MASL1 and the impact of GTP binding on MASL1 complex formation are reported. The results demonstrate that MASL1, similar to other ROCO proteins, can bind guanosine nucleotides via its ROC domain. Furthermore, MASL1 exists in two distinct cellular complexes associated with heat shock protein 60, and the formation of a low molecular weight pool of MASL1 is modulated by GTP binding. Finally, loss of GTP enhances MASL1 toxicity in cells. Taken together, these data point to a central role for the ROC/GTPase domain of MASL1 in the regulation of its cellular function.

  5. Characterization of GTP binding and hydrolysis in plasma membranes of zucchini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perdue, D. O.; Lomax, T. L.

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the possibility that G-protein-like entities may be present in the plasma membrane (PM) of zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyls by examining a number of criteria common to animal and yeast G-proteins. The GTP binding and hydrolysis characteristics of purified zucchini PM are similar to the characteristics of a number of known G-proteins. Our results demonstrate GTP binding to a single PM site having a Kd value between 16-31 nM. This binding has a high specificity for guanine nucleotides, and is stimulated by Mg2+, detergents, and fluoride or aluminium ions. The GTPase activity (Km = 0.49 micromole) of zucchini PM shows a sensitivity to NaF similar to that seen for other G-proteins. Localization of GTP mu 35S binding to nitrocellulose blots of proteins separated by SDS-PAGE indicates a 30-kDa protein as the predominant GTP-binding species in zucchini PM. Taken together, these data indicate that plant PM contains proteins which are biochemically similar to previously characterized G-proteins.

  6. Bni1p implicated in cytoskeletal control is a putative target of Rho1p small GTP binding protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Kohno, H; Tanaka, K; Mino, A; Umikawa, M; Imamura, H; Fujiwara, T; Fujita, Y; Hotta, K; Qadota, H; Watanabe, T; Ohya, Y; Takai, Y

    1996-01-01

    The RHO1 gene encodes a homolog of mammalian RhoA small GTP binding protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Rho1p is localized at the growth sites, including the bud tip and the cytokinesis site, and is required for bud formation. We have recently shown that Pkc1p, a yeast homolog of mammalian protein kinase C, and glucan synthase are targets of Rho1p. Using the two-hybrid screening system, we cloned a gene encoding a protein which interacted with the GTP-bound form of Rho1p. This gene was identified as BNI1, known to be implicated in cytokinesis or establishment of cell polarity in S.cerevisiae. Bni1p shares homologous domains (FH1 and FH2 domains) with proteins involved in cytokinesis or establishment of cell polarity, including formin of mouse, capu and dia of Drosophila and FigA of Aspergillus. A temperature-sensitive mutation in which the RHO1 gene was replaced by the mammalian RhoA gene showed a synthetically lethal interaction with the bni1 mutation and the RhoA bni1 mutant accumulated cells with a deficiency in cytokinesis. Furthermore, this synthetic lethality was caused by the incapability of RhoA to activate Pkc1p, but not glucan synthase. These results suggest that Rho1p regulates cytoskeletal reorganization at least through Bni1p and Pkc1p. Images PMID:8947028

  7. Inhibitory activities of soluble and bound millet seed phenolics on free radicals and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekara, Anoma; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2011-01-12

    Oxidative stress, caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS), is responsible for modulating several pathological conditions and aging. Soluble and bound phenolic extracts of commonly consumed millets, namely, kodo, finger (Ravi), finger (local), foxtail, proso, little, and pearl, were investigated for their phenolic content and inhibition of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical and ROS, namely, hydroxyl radical, peroxyl radical, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), hypochlorous acid (HOCl), and singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)). Inhibition of DPPH and hydroxyl radicals was detrmined using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The peroxyl radical inhibitory activity was measured using the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay. The scavenging of H(2)O(2), HOCl, and (1)O(2) was evaluated using colorimetric methods. The results were expressed as micromoles of ferulic acid equivalents (FAE) per gram of grain on a dry weight basis. In addition, major hydroxycinnamic acids were identified and quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and HPLC-mass spectrometry (MS). All millet varieties displayed effective radical and ROS inhibition activities, which generally positively correlated with phenolic contents, except for hydroxyl radical. HPLC analysis revealed the presence of ferulic and p-coumaric acids as major hydroxycinnamic acids in phenolic extract and responsible for the observed effects. Bound extracts of millet contributed 38-99% to ROS scavenging, depending on the variety and the test system employed. Hence, bound phenolics must be included in the evaluation of the antioxidant activity of millets and other cereals.

  8. Rho family and Rap GTPase activation assays.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Richard T; Knaus, Ulla G

    2014-01-01

    The detection of Ras superfamily GTPase activity in innate immune cells is important when studying signaling events elicited by various ligands and cellular processes. The development of high-affinity probes detecting the activated, GTP-bound form of small GTPases has significantly enhanced our understanding of initiation and termination of GTPase-regulated signaling pathways. These probes are created by fusing a high-affinity GTPase-binding domain derived from a specific downstream effector protein to glutathione S-transferase (GST). Such domains bind preferentially to the GTP-bound form of the upstream Rho or Ras GTPase. Coupling these probes to beads enables extraction of the complex and subsequent quantification of the active GTP-binding protein by immunoblotting. Although effector domains that discriminate efficiently between GDP- and GTP-bound states and highly specific antibodies are not yet available for every small GTPase, analysis of certain members of the Rho and Ras GTPase family is now routinely performed. Here, we describe affinity-based pulldown assays for detection of Rho GTPase (Rac1/2, Cdc42, RhoA/B) and Rap1/2 activity in stimulated neutrophils or macrophages.

  9. Activation of mTor Signaling by Gene Transduction to Induce Axon Regeneration in the Central Nervous System Following Neural Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    phosphorylates and thereby inhibits the GTPase activity of the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). This inhibition allows accumulation of activated GTP-bound...Sobue, 2009). Transduction of neurons with a constitutively active form of p70S6K induced the formation of multiple axons, whereas increased expression

  10. Kinetic Mechanisms of Mutation-dependent Harvey Ras Activation and Their Relevance for Development of Costello Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wey, Michael; Lee, Jungwoon; Jeong, Soon Seog; Kim, Jungho; Heo, Jongyun

    2013-01-01

    Costello syndrome is linked to activating mutations of a residue in the p-loop or the NKCD/SAK motifs of Harvey Ras (HRas). More than 10 HRas mutants that induce Costello syndrome have been identified; G12S HRas is the most prevalent of these. However, certain HRas p-loop mutations also are linked to cancer formation that are exemplified with G12V HRas. Despite these relations, specific links between types of HRas mutations and diseases evade definition because some Costello syndrome HRas p-loop mutations, such as G12S HRas, also often cause cancer. This study established novel kinetic parameter-based equations that estimate the value of the cellular fractions of the GTP-bound active form of HRas mutant proteins. Such calculations differentiate between two basic kinetic mechanisms that populate the GTP-bound form of Ras in cells. (i) The increase in GTP-bound Ras by the HRas mutation-mediated perturbation of the intrinsic kinetic characteristics of Ras. This generates a broad spectrum of the population of the GTP-bound form of HRas that typically causes Costello syndrome. The upper end of this spectrum of HRas mutants, as exemplified by G12S HRas, can also cause cancer. (ii) The increase in GTP-bound Ras because the HRas mutations perturb the p120GAP action on Ras. This causes production of a significantly high population of the only GTP-bound form of HRas linked merely to cancer formation. The HRas mutant G12V belongs to this category. PMID:24224811

  11. Transferred nuclear Overhauser effect analyses of membrane-bound enkephalin analogues by sup 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance: Correlation between activities and membrane-bound conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Milon, Alain; Miyazawa, Tatsuo; Higashijima, Tsutomu )

    1990-01-09

    Leu-enkephalin, (D-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin, and (D-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalinamide (agonists) and (L-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin (inactive analogue) bind to lipid bilayer consisting of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine. The conformations that these compounds assume, once bound to perdeuterated phospholipid bilayer, have been shown to be unique, as shown by the transferred nuclear Overhauser effect (TRNOE) of {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. In addition, their location in the bilayer was analyzed by TRNOE in the presence of spin-labeled phospholipids. These analyses showed a clear relationship between the activity and the peptide-membrane interaction. The three active peptides, when bound to membranes, adopt the same conformation, characterized by a type II{prime} {beta}-turn around Gly{sup 3}-Phe and a {gamma}-turn around Gly{sup 2} (or D-Ala{sup 2}). The inactive analogue, (L-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin, displayed a completely different TRNOE pattern corresponding to a different conformation in the membrane-bound state. The tyrosine residue of the active compounds is not inserted into the interior of membrane, but it is inserted into the bilayer for the L-Ala{sup 2} analogue. According to these results, (L-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin may be explained to be inactive because the mode of binding to the membranes is different from that of active compounds.

  12. Allosteric activation of membrane-bound glutamate receptors using coordination chemistry within living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Kubota, Ryou; Michibata, Yukiko; Sakakura, Masayoshi; Takahashi, Hideo; Numata, Tomohiro; Inoue, Ryuji; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Hamachi, Itaru

    2016-10-01

    The controlled activation of proteins in living cells is an important goal in protein-design research, but to introduce an artificial activation switch into membrane proteins through rational design is a significant challenge because of the structural and functional complexity of such proteins. Here we report the allosteric activation of two types of membrane-bound neurotransmitter receptors, the ion-channel type and the G-protein-coupled glutamate receptors, using coordination chemistry in living cells. The high programmability of coordination chemistry enabled two His mutations, which act as an artificial allosteric site, to be semirationally incorporated in the vicinity of the ligand-binding pockets. Binding of Pd(2,2‧-bipyridine) at the allosteric site enabled the active conformations of the glutamate receptors to be stabilized. Using this approach, we were able to activate selectively a mutant glutamate receptor in live neurons, which initiated a subsequent signal-transduction pathway.

  13. Chromosomal gain promotes formation of a steep RanGTP gradient that drives mitosis in aneuploid cells

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Keisuke; Ryu, Sung Jin

    2013-01-01

    Many mitotic factors were shown to be activated by Ran guanosine triphosphatase. Previous studies in Xenopus laevis egg extracts and in highly proliferative cells showed that mitotic chromosomes were surrounded by steep Ran guanosine triphosphate (GTP) concentration gradients, indicating that RanGTP-activated factors promote spindle assembly around chromosomes. However, the mitotic role of Ran in normal differentiated cells is not known. In this paper, we show that although the steep mitotic RanGTP gradients were present in rapidly growing cell lines and were required for chromosome congression in mitotic HeLa cells, the gradients were strongly reduced in slow-growing primary cells, such as HFF-1 fibroblasts. The overexpression of RCC1, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ran, induced steeper mitotic RanGTP gradients in HFF-1 cells, showing the critical role of RCC1 levels in the regulation of mitosis by Ran. Remarkably, in vitro fusion of HFF-1 cells produced cells with steep mitotic RanGTP gradients comparable to HeLa cells, indicating that chromosomal gain can promote mitosis in aneuploid cancer cells via Ran. PMID:23319601

  14. The higher level of complexity of K-Ras4B activation at the membrane

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyunbum; Banerjee, Avik; Chavan, Tanmay S.; Lu, Shaoyong; Zhang, Jian; Gaponenko, Vadim; Nussinov, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Is nucleotide exchange sufficient to activate K-Ras4B? To signal, oncogenic rat sarcoma (Ras) anchors in the membrane and recruits effectors by exposing its effector lobe. With the use of NMR and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we observed that in solution, farnesylated guanosine 5′-diphosphate (GDP)-bound K-Ras4B is predominantly autoinhibited by its hypervariable region (HVR), whereas the GTP-bound state favors an activated, HVR-released state. On the anionic membrane, the catalytic domain adopts multiple orientations, including parallel (∼180°) and perpendicular (∼90°) alignments of the allosteric helices, with respect to the membrane surface direction. In the autoinhibited state, the HVR is sandwiched between the effector lobe and the membrane; in the active state, with membrane-anchored farnesyl and unrestrained HVR, the catalytic domain fluctuates reinlessly, exposing its effector-binding site. Dimerization and clustering can reduce the fluctuations. This achieves preorganized, productive conformations. Notably, we also observe HVR-autoinhibited K-Ras4B-GTP states, with GDP-bound-like orientations of the helices. Thus, we propose that the GDP/GTP exchange may not be sufficient for activation; instead, our results suggest that the GDP/GTP exchange, HVR sequestration, farnesyl insertion, and orientation/localization of the catalytic domain at the membrane conjointly determine the active or inactive state of K-Ras4B. Importantly, K-Ras4B-GTP can exist in active and inactive states; on its own, GTP binding may not compel K-Ras4B activation.—Jang, H., Banerjee, A., Chavan, T. S, Lu, S., Zhang, J., Gaponenko, V., Nussinov, R. The higher level of complexity of K-Ras4B activation at the membrane. PMID:26718888

  15. Surface-bound phosphatase activity in living hyphae of ectomycorrhizal fungi of Nothofagus obliqua.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Maricel; Godoy, Roberto; Heyser, Wolfgang; Härtel, Steffen

    2004-01-01

    We determined the location and the activity of surface-bound phosphomonoesterase (SBP) of five ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi of Nothofagus oblique. EM fungal mycelium of Paxillus involutus, Austropaxillus boletinoides, Descolea antartica, Cenococcum geophilum and Pisolithus tinctorius was grown in media with varying concentrations of dissolved phosphorus. SBP activity was detected at different pH values (3-7) under each growth regimen. SBP activity was assessed using a colorimetric method based on the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP) to p-nitrophenol phosphate (pNP) + P. A new technique involving confocal laser-scanning microscopy (LSM) was used to locate and quantify SBP activity on the hyphal surface. EM fungi showed two fundamentally different patterns of SBP activity in relation to varying environmental conditions (P-concentrations and pH). In the cases of D. antartica, A. boletinoides and C. geophilum, changes in SBP activity were induced primarily by changes in the number of SBP-active centers on the hyphae. In the cases of P. tinctorius and P. involutus, the number of SBP-active centers per μm hyphal length changed much less than the intensity of the SBP-active centers on the hyphae. Our findings not only contribute to the discussion about the role of SBP-active centers in EM fungi but also introduce LSM as a valuable method for studying EM fungi.

  16. Can Cell Bound Complement Activation Products Predict Inherited Complement Deficiency in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus?

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the classical pathway complement system has long been implicated in stimulating immune complex mediated tissue destruction in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). C3 and C4 complement levels are utilized as part of SLE diagnosis and monitoring criteria. Recently, cell bound complement activation products (CBCAPs) have shown increased sensitivity in diagnosing and monitoring lupus activity, compared to traditional markers. CBCAPs are increasingly utilized in rheumatology practice as additional serological markers in evaluating SLE patients. We report a case of a patient diagnosed with SLE that had chronically low C3 and C4, along with negative CBCAPs. We surmise that the patient has an inherited complement deficiency as the etiology of her SLE and that CBCAPs could be used to predict such deficiency. PMID:28074166

  17. Carrier-bound Alt a 1 peptides without allergenic activity for vaccination against Alternaria alternata allergy

    PubMed Central

    Twaroch, T. E.; Focke, M.; Fleischmann, K.; Balic, N.; Lupinek, C.; Blatt, K.; Ferrara, R.; Mari, A.; Ebner, C.; Valent, P.; Spitzauer, S.; Swoboda, I.; Valenta, R.

    2017-01-01

    Background The mould Alternaria alternata is a major elicitor of allergic asthma. Diagnosis and specific immunotherapy (SIT) of Alternaria allergy are often limited by the insufficient quality of natural mould extracts. Objective To investigate whether recombinant Alt a 1 can be used for reliable diagnosis of Alternaria alternata allergy and to develop a safe, non-allergenic vaccine for SIT of Alternaria allergy. Methods The qualitative sensitization profile of 80 Alternaria-allergic patients from Austria and Italy was investigated using an allergen micro-array and the amount of Alternaria-specific IgE directed to rAlt a 1 was quantified by ImmunoCAP measurements. Peptides spanning regions of predicted high surface accessibility of Alt a 1 were synthesized and tested for IgE reactivity and allergenic activity, using sera and basophils from allergic patients. Carrier-bound peptides were studied for their ability to induce IgG antibodies in rabbits which recognize Alt a 1 and inhibit allergic patients’ IgE reactivity to Alt a 1. Results rAlt a 1 allowed diagnosis of Alternaria allergy in all tested patients, bound the vast majority (i.e. >95%) of Alternaria-specific IgE and elicited basophil activation already at a concentration of 0.1 ng/mL. Four non-allergenic peptides were synthesized which, after coupling to the carrier protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin, induced Alt a 1-specific IgG and inhibited allergic patients’ IgE binding to Alt a 1. Conclusions and clinical relevance rAlt a 1 is a highly allergenic molecule allowing sensitive diagnosis of Alternaria allergy. Carrier-bound non-allergenic Alt a 1 peptides are candidates for safe SIT of Alternaria allergy. PMID:22909168

  18. The N-terminal peptide of mammalian GTP cyclohydrolase I is an autoinhibitory control element and contributes to binding the allosteric regulatory protein GFRP.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Christina E; Gross, Steven S

    2011-04-08

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is the rate-limiting enzyme for biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), an obligate cofactor for NO synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. BH4 can limit its own synthesis by triggering decameric GTPCH to assemble in an inhibitory complex with two GTPCH feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) pentamers. Subsequent phenylalanine binding to the GTPCH·GFRP inhibitory complex converts it to a stimulatory complex. An N-terminal inhibitory peptide in GTPCH may also contribute to autoregulation of GTPCH activity, but mechanisms are undefined. To characterize potential regulatory actions of the N-terminal peptide in rat GTPCH, we expressed, purified, and characterized a truncation mutant, devoid of 45 N-terminal amino acids (Δ45-GTPCH) and contrasted its catalytic and GFRP binding properties to wild type GTPCH (wt-GTPCH). Contrary to prior reports, we show that GFRP binds wt-GTPCH in the absence of any small molecule effector, resulting in allosteric stimulation of GTPCH activity: a 20% increase in Vmax, 50% decrease in KmGTP, and increase in Hill coefficient to 1.6, from 1.0. These features of GFRP-stimulated wt-GTPCH activity were phenocopied by Δ45-GTPCH in the absence of bound GFRP. Addition of GFRP to Δ45-GTPCH failed to elicit complex formation or a substantial further increase in GTPCH catalytic activity. Expression of Δ45-GTPCH in HEK-293 cells elicited 3-fold greater BH4 accumulation than an equivalent of wt-GTPCH. Together, results indicate that the N-terminal peptide exerts autoinhibitory control over rat GTPCH and is required for GFRP binding on its own. Displacement of the autoinhibitory peptide provides a molecular mechanism for physiological up-regulation of GTPCH activity.

  19. Mg2+ is an essential activator of hydrolytic activity of membrane-bound pyrophosphatase of Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, A; Ordaz, H; Romero, I; Celis, H

    1992-01-01

    The substrate for the hydrolytic activity of membrane-bound pyrophosphatase is the PP(i)-Mg2+ complex. The enzyme has no activity when the free Mg2+ concentration is lower than 10 microM (at 0.5 mM-PP(i)-Mg2+), and therefore free Mg2+ is an essential activator of the hydrolytic activity. The Km for the substrate changes in response to variation in free Mg2+ concentration, from 10.25 to 0.6 mM when free Mg2+ is increased from 0.03 to 1.0 mM respectively. The Km for Mg2+ depends on the substrate concentration: the Km decreases from 0.52 to 0.14 mM from 0.25 to 0.75 mM-PP(i)-Mg2+ respectively. The extrapolated Km for Mg2+ in the absence of the substrate is 0.73 mM. Imidodiphosphate-Mg2+ and free Ca2+ were used as competitive inhibitors of substrate and activator respectively. The equilibrium binding kinetics suggest an ordered mechanism for the activator and the substrate: Mg2+ ions bind the enzyme before PP(i)-Mg2+ in the formation of the catalytic complex, membrane-bound pyrophosphatase-(Mg2+)-(PP(i)-Mg2+). PMID:1315519

  20. A photophysical study of two fluorogen-activating proteins bound to their cognate fluorogens

    SciTech Connect

    Gaiotto, Tiziano; Nguyen, Hau B; Jung, Jaemyeong; Bradbury, Andrew M; Gnanakaran, S.; Schmidt, Jurgen G; Waldo, Geoffrey S; Goodwin, Peter M

    2010-12-14

    We are exploring the feasibility of using recently developed flu orogen-activating proteins (FAPs) as reporters for single-molecule imaging. FAPs are single-chain antibodies choosen to specifically bind small chromophoric molecules termed f1uorogens. Upon binding to its cognate FAP the fluorescence quantum yield of the fluorogen can increase substantially giving rise to a fluorescent complex. Based on the seminal work of Szent-Gyorgyi et al. (Nature Biotechnology, Volume 26, Number 2, pp 235-240, 2008) we have chosen to study two fluorogen-activating single-chain antibodies, HL 1.0.1-TOI and H6-MG bound to their cognate fluorogens, thiazole orange and malachite green derivatives, respectively. Here we use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy study the photophysics of these fluorescent complexes.

  1. Mitochondrial GTP Insensitivity Contributes to Hypoglycemia in Hyperinsulinemia Hyperammonemia by Inhibiting Glucagon Release

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Cheol Soo; Lee, Hui-Young; Cabrera, Over; Pongratz, Rebecca L.; Zhao, Xiaojian; Birkenfeld, Andreas L.; Li, Changhong; Berggren, Per-Olof; Stanley, Charles; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial GTP (mtGTP)-insensitive mutations in glutamate dehydrogenase (GDHH454Y) result in fasting and amino acid–induced hypoglycemia in hyperinsulinemia hyperammonemia (HI/HA). Surprisingly, hypoglycemia may occur in this disorder despite appropriately suppressed insulin. To better understand the islet-specific contribution, transgenic mice expressing the human activating mutation in β-cells (H454Y mice) were characterized in vivo. As in the humans with HI/HA, H454Y mice had fasting hypoglycemia, but plasma insulin concentrations were similar to the controls. Paradoxically, both glucose- and glutamine-stimulated insulin secretion were severely impaired in H454Y mice. Instead, lack of a glucagon response during hypoglycemic clamps identified impaired counterregulation. Moreover, both insulin and glucagon secretion were impaired in perifused islets. Acute pharmacologic inhibition of GDH restored both insulin and glucagon secretion and normalized glucose tolerance in vivo. These studies support the presence of an mtGTP-dependent signal generated via β-cell GDH that inhibits α-cells. As such, in children with activating GDH mutations of HI/HA, this insulin-independent glucagon suppression may contribute importantly to symptomatic hypoglycemia. The identification of a human mutation causing congenital hypoglucagonemic hypoglycemia highlights a central role of the mtGTP–GDH–glucagon axis in glucose homeostasis. PMID:25024374

  2. A naturally occurring, noncanonical GTP aptamer made of simple tandem repeats

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Edward A; Liu, David R

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we used in vitro selection to identify a new class of naturally occurring GTP aptamer called the G motif. Here we report the discovery and characterization of a second class of naturally occurring GTP aptamer, the “CA motif.” The primary sequence of this aptamer is unusual in that it consists entirely of tandem repeats of CA-rich motifs as short as three nucleotides. Several active variants of the CA motif aptamer lack the ability to form consecutive Watson-Crick base pairs in any register, while others consist of repeats containing only cytidine and adenosine residues, indicating that noncanonical interactions play important roles in its structure. The circular dichroism spectrum of the CA motif aptamer is distinct from that of A-form RNA and other major classes of nucleic acid structures. Bioinformatic searches indicate that the CA motif is absent from most archaeal and bacterial genomes, but occurs in at least 70 percent of approximately 400 eukaryotic genomes examined. These searches also uncovered several phylogenetically conserved examples of the CA motif in rodent (mouse and rat) genomes. Together, these results reveal the existence of a second class of naturally occurring GTP aptamer whose sequence requirements, like that of the G motif, are not consistent with those of a canonical secondary structure. They also indicate a new and unexpected potential biochemical activity of certain naturally occurring tandem repeats. PMID:24824832

  3. Septin6 and Septin7 GTP Binding Proteins Regulate AP-3- and ESCRT-Dependent Multivesicular Body Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Traikov, Sofia; Stange, Christoph; Wassmer, Thomas; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Salamero, Jean; Raposo, Graça; Hoflack, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Septins (SEPTs) form a family of GTP-binding proteins implicated in cytoskeleton and membrane organization, cell division and host/pathogen interactions. The precise function of many family members remains elusive. We show that SEPT6 and SEPT7 complexes bound to F-actin regulate protein sorting during multivesicular body (MVB) biogenesis. These complexes bind AP-3, an adapter complex sorting cargos destined to remain in outer membranes of maturing endosomes, modulate AP-3 membrane interactions and the motility of AP-3-positive endosomes. These SEPT-AP interactions also influence the membrane interaction of ESCRT (endosomal-sorting complex required for transport)-I, which selects ubiquitinated cargos for degradation inside MVBs. Whereas our findings demonstrate that SEPT6 and SEPT7 function in the spatial, temporal organization of AP-3- and ESCRT-coated membrane domains, they uncover an unsuspected coordination of these sorting machineries during MVB biogenesis. This requires the E3 ubiquitin ligase LRSAM1, an AP-3 interactor regulating ESCRT-I sorting activity and whose mutations are linked with Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies. PMID:25380047

  4. Identification and biochemical characterization of Rap2C, a new member of the Rap family of small GTP-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Paganini, Simona; Guidetti, Gianni Francesco; Catricalà, Silvia; Trionfini, Piera; Panelli, Simona; Balduini, Cesare; Torti, Mauro

    2006-01-01

    The Rap family of small GTP-binding proteins is composed by four different members: Rap1A, Rap1B, Rap2A and Rap2B. In this work we report the identification and characterization of a fifth member of this family of small GTPases. This new protein is highly homologous to Rap2A and Rap2B, binds labeled GTP on nitrocellulose, and is recognized by a specific anti-Rap2 antibody, but not by an anti-Rap1 antibody. The protein has thus been named Rap2C. Binding of GTP to recombinant purified Rap2C was Mg(2+)-dependent. However, accurate comparison of the kinetics of nucleotide binding and release revealed that Rap2C bound GTP less efficiently and possessed slower rate of GDP release compared to the highly homologous Rap2B. Moreover, in the presence of Mg(2+), the relative affinity of Rap2C for GTP was only about twofold higher than that for GDP, while, under the same conditions, Rap2B was able to bind GTP with about sevenfold higher affinity than GDP. When expressed in eukaryotic cells, Rap2C localized at the plasma membrane, as dictated by the presence of a CAAX motif at the C-terminus. We found that Rap2C represented the predominant Rap2 protein expressed in circulating mononuclear leukocytes, but was not present in platelets. Importantly, Rap2C was found to be expressed in human megakaryocytes, suggesting that the protein may be down-regulated during platelets generation. This work demonstrates that Rap2C is a new member of the Rap2 subfamily of proteins, able to bind guanine nucleotides with peculiar properties, and differently expressed by various hematopoietic subsets. This new protein may therefore contribute to the still poorly clarified cellular events regulated by this subfamily of GTP-binding proteins.

  5. GTP gamma S causes contraction of skinned frog skeletal muscle via the DHP-sensitive Ca2+ channels of sealed T-tubules.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, B; Tregear, R T; Trentham, D R

    1991-03-01

    We have investigated the involvement of G-proteins in excitation-contraction coupling of fast-twitch skeletal muscle, using a fibre preparation designed to retain intact T-tubules and sarcoplasmic reticulum. The nonhydrolysable analogue of guanosine triphosphate, GTP gamma S (50-500 microM) caused a strong, transient isometric contraction in this preparation. Reduction of ethylene-bis(oxonitrilo)tetraacete (EGTA) in the sealed T-tubules from 5 mM to 0.1 mM lowered the threshold to GTP gamma S and removal of sodium reversibly raised it. The dihydropyridine (DHP) calcium channel antagonists nicardipine and nifedipine allowed a first contraction and then blocked subsequent GTP gamma S action. The phenylalkylamine methoxyverapamil (D-600) did likewise, reversibly, at 10 degrees C. The guanosine diphosphate analogue, GDP beta S, and procaine reversibly blocked the action of GTP gamma S; pertussis toxin also blocked it. Photolytic release of 40-100 microM GTP gamma S within 0.1 s from S-caged GTP gamma S caused contraction after a latent period of 0.3-20 s. We conclude that GTP gamma S can activate contraction in frog skeletal muscle via a route requiring both the integrity of the T-tubular DHP-sensitive calcium channel (DHPr) and the presence of sodium in the sealed T-tubules. We propose that in this preparation GTP gamma S activates a G-protein, which in turn activates the DHPr as a calcium channel and releases stored calcium from within the sealed T-tubule. Implications of these results for the excitation-contraction coupling mechanism in skeletal muscle are discussed.

  6. Preparation and crystallization of the stimulatory and inhibitory complexes of GTP cyclohydrolase I and its feedback regulatory protein GFRP.

    PubMed

    Maita, N; Okada, K; Hirotsu, S; Hatakeyama, K; Hakoshima, T

    2001-08-01

    Mammalian GTP cyclohydrolase I is a decameric enzyme in the first and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin, which is an essential cofactor for enzymes producing neurotransmitters such as catecholamines and for nitric oxide synthases. The enzyme is dually regulated by its feedback regulatory protein GFRP in the presence of its stimulatory effector phenylalanine and its inhibitory effector biopterin. Here, both the stimulatory and inhibitory complexes of rat GTP cyclohydrolase I bound to GFRP were crystallized by vapour diffusion. Diffraction data sets at resolutions of 3.0 and 2.64 A were collected for the stimulatory and inhibitory complexes, respectively. Each complex consists of two GTPCHI pentamer rings and two GFRP pentamer rings, with pseudo-52 point-group symmetry.

  7. Multiple GTP-binding proteins regulate vesicular transport from the ER to Golgi membranes

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Using indirect immunofluorescence we have examined the effects of reagents which inhibit the function of ras-related rab small GTP- binding proteins and heterotrimeric G alpha beta gamma proteins in ER to Golgi transport. Export from the ER was inhibited by an antibody towards rab1B and an NH2-terminal peptide which inhibits ARF function (Balch, W. E., R. A. Kahn, and R. Schwaninger. 1992. J. Biol. Chem. 267:13053-13061), suggesting that both of these small GTP-binding proteins are essential for the transport vesicle formation. Export from the ER was also potently inhibited by mastoparan, a peptide which mimics G protein binding regions of seven transmembrane spanning receptors activating and uncoupling heterotrimeric G proteins from their cognate receptors. Consistent with this result, purified beta gamma subunits inhibited the export of VSV-G from the ER suggesting an initial event in transport vesicle assembly was regulated by a heterotrimeric G protein. In contrast, incubation in the presence of GTP gamma S or AIF(3-5) resulted in the accumulation of transported protein in different populations of punctate pre-Golgi intermediates distributed throughout the cytoplasm of the cell. Finally, a peptide which is believed to antagonize the interaction of rab proteins with putative downstream effector molecules inhibited transport at a later step preceding delivery to the cis Golgi compartment, similar to the site of accumulation of transported protein in the absence of NSF or calcium (Plutner, H., H. W. Davidson, J. Saraste, and W. E. Balch. 1992. J. Cell Biol. 119:1097-1116). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that multiple GTP-binding proteins including a heterotrimeric G protein(s), ARF and rab1 differentially regulate steps in the transport of protein between early compartments of the secretory pathway. The concept that G protein-coupled receptors gate the export of protein from the ER is discussed. PMID:1447289

  8. Fluoroaluminate treatment of rat liver microsomes inhibits GTP-dependent vesicle fusion.

    PubMed Central

    Comerford, J G; Dawson, A P

    1991-01-01

    1. Inhibition of GTP-dependent membrane fusion of rat liver microsomes requires preincubation of the membranes with GDP (17 microM) and relatively high Mg2+ concentration (0.5 mM) as well as AlCl3 (30 microM) and KF (5 mM). Preincubation is required for maximal inhibition (75%). 2. Vesicle fusion in rat liver microsomes has been demonstrated in the absence of polyethylene glycol (PEG). Further, inhibition by AlF4- of GTP-dependent vesicle fusion in the absence of PEG has been demonstrated. 3. Under similar preincubation conditions AlF4- can bring about inhibition (80%) of the high-affinity PEG-stimulated GTPase activity in rat liver microsomes, previously described by Nicchitta, Joseph & Williamson [(1986) FEBS Lett. 209, 243-248]. 4. Preincubation of small-Mr GTP-binding proteins (Gn proteins) on nitrocellulose strips with GDP (20 pM), AlCl3 (30 microM) and KF (5 mM) results in inhibition of binding of guanosine 5'-[gamma-[35S]thio]triphosphate to Gn proteins. The extent of inhibition of this binding differs for different Gn proteins. PMID:1747106

  9. Mechanisms of Allosteric Activation and Inhibition of the Deoxyribonucleoside Triphosphate Triphosphohydrolase from Enterococcus faecalis*♦

    PubMed Central

    Vorontsov, Ivan I.; Wu, Ying; DeLucia, Maria; Minasov, George; Mehrens, Jennifer; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Anderson, Wayne F.; Ahn, Jinwoo

    2014-01-01

    EF1143 from Enterococcus faecalis, a life-threatening pathogen that is resistant to common antibiotics, is a homo-tetrameric deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) triphosphohydrolase (dNTPase), converting dNTPs into the deoxyribonucleosides and triphosphate. The dNTPase activity of EF1143 is regulated by canonical dNTPs, which simultaneously act as substrates and activity modulators. Previous crystal structures of apo-EF1143 and the protein bound to both dGTP and dATP suggested allosteric regulation of its enzymatic activity by dGTP binding at four identical allosteric sites. However, whether and how other canonical dNTPs regulate the enzyme activity was not defined. Here, we present the crystal structure of EF1143 in complex with dGTP and dTTP. The new structure reveals that the tetrameric EF1143 contains four additional secondary allosteric sites adjacent to the previously identified dGTP-binding primary regulatory sites. Structural and enzyme kinetic studies indicate that dGTP binding to the first allosteric site, with nanomolar affinity, is a prerequisite for substrate docking and hydrolysis. Then, the presence of a particular dNTP in the second site either enhances or inhibits the dNTPase activity of EF1143. Our results provide the first mechanistic insight into dNTP-mediated regulation of dNTPase activity. PMID:24338016

  10. Structure of the Branched-chain Amino Acid and GTP-sensing Global Regulator, CodY, from Bacillus subtilis*

    PubMed Central

    Levdikov, Vladimir M.; Blagova, Elena; Young, Vicki L.; Belitsky, Boris R.; Lebedev, Andrey; Sonenshein, Abraham L.

    2017-01-01

    CodY is a branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) and GTP sensor and a global regulator of transcription in low G + C Gram-positive bacteria. It controls the expression of over 100 genes and operons, principally by repressing during growth genes whose products are required for adaptations to nutrient limitation. However, the mechanism by which BCAA binding regulates transcriptional changes is not clear. It is known that CodY consists of a GAF (cGMP-stimulated phosphodiesterases, adenylate cyclases, FhlA) domain that binds BCAAs and a winged helix-turn-helix (wHTH) domain that binds to DNA, but the way in which these domains interact and the structural basis of the BCAA dependence of this interaction are unknown. To gain new insights, we determined the crystal structure of unliganded CodY from Bacillus subtilis revealing a 10-turn α-helix linking otherwise discrete GAF and wHTH domains. The structure of CodY in complex with isoleucine revealed a reorganized GAF domain. In both complexes CodY was tetrameric. Size exclusion chromatography with multiangle laser light scattering (SEC-MALLS) experiments showed that CodY is a dimer at concentrations found in bacterial cells. Comparison of structures of dimers of unliganded CodY and CodY-Ile derived from the tetramers showed a splaying of the wHTH domains when Ile was bound; splaying is likely to account for the increased affinity of Ile-bound CodY for DNA. Electrophoretic mobility shift and SEC-MALLS analyses of CodY binding to 19–36-bp operator fragments are consistent with isoleucine-dependent binding of two CodY dimers per duplex. The implications of these observations for effector control of CodY activity are discussed. PMID:28011634

  11. Proteolytic activation of receptor-bound anthrax protective antigen on macrophages promotes its internalization.

    PubMed

    Beauregard, K E; Collier, R J; Swanson, J A

    2000-06-01

    Immunofluorescence and other methods have been used to probe the self-assembly and internalization of the binary toxin, anthrax lethal toxin (LeTx), in primary murine macrophages. Proteolytic activation of protective antigen (PA; 83 kDa, the B moiety of the toxin) by furin was the rate-limiting step in internalization of LeTx and promoted clearance of PA from the cell surface. A furin-resistant form of PA remained at the cell surface for at least 90 min. Oligomerization of receptor-bound PA63, the 63 kDa active fragment of PA, was manifested by its conversion to a pronase-resistant state, characteristic of the heptameric prepore form in solution. That oligomerization of PA63 triggers toxin internalization is supported by the observation that PA20, the complementary 20 kDa fragment of PA, inhibited clearance of nicked PA. The PA63 prepore, with or without lethal factor (LF), cleared slowly from the cell surface. These studies show that proteolytic cleavage of PA, in addition to permitting oligomerization and LF binding, also promotes internalization of the protein. The relatively long period of activation and internalization of PA at the cell surface may reflect adaptation of this binary toxin that maximizes self-assembly.

  12. Human Gpn1 purified from bacteria binds guanine nucleotides and hydrolyzes GTP as a protein dimer stabilized by its C-terminal tail.

    PubMed

    González-González, Rogelio; Guerra-Moreno, José A; Cristóbal-Mondragón, Gema R; Romero, Violeta; Peña-Gómez, Sonia G; Montero-Morán, Gabriela M; Lara-González, Samuel; Hernández-Arana, Andrés; Fernández-Velasco, Daniel A; Calera, Mónica R; Sánchez-Olea, Roberto

    2017-04-01

    The essential GTPase Gpn1 mediates RNA polymerase II nuclear targeting and controls microtubule dynamics in yeast and human cells by molecular mechanisms still under investigation. Here, we purified human HisGpn1 expressed as a recombinant protein in bacteria E. coli BL-21 (DE3). Affinity purified HisGpn1 eluted from a size exclusion column as a protein dimer, a state conserved after removing the hexa-histidine tail and confirmed by separating HisGpn1 in native gels, and in dynamic light scattering experiments. Human HisGpn1 purity was higher than 95%, molecularly monodisperse and could be concentrated to more than 10 mg/mL without aggregating. Circular dichroism spectra showed that human HisGpn1 was properly folded and displayed a secondary structure rich in alpha helices. HisGpn1 effectively bound GDP and the non-hydrolyzable GTP analogue GMPPCP, and hydrolyzed GTP. We next tested the importance of the C-terminal tail, present in eukaryotic Gpn1 but not in the ancestral archaeal Gpn protein, on HisGpn1 dimer formation. C-terminal deleted human HisGpn1 (HisGpn1ΔC) was also purified as a protein dimer, indicating that the N-terminal GTPase domain contains the interaction surface needed for dimer formation. In contrast to HisGpn1, however, HisGpn1ΔC dimer spontaneously dissociated into monomers. In conclusion, we have developed a method to purify properly folded and functionally active human HisGpn1 from bacteria, and showed that the C-terminal tail, universally conserved in all eukaryotic Gpn1 orthologues, stabilizes the GTPase domain-mediated Gpn1 protein dimer. The availability of recombinant human Gpn1 will open new research avenues to unveil the molecular and pharmacological properties of this essential GTPase.

  13. Comparison of the free and bound phenolic profiles and cellular antioxidant activities of litchi pulp extracts from different solvents

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The phenolic contents and antioxidant activities of fruits could be underestimated if the bound phenolic compounds are not considered. In the present study, the extraction efficiencies of various solvents were investigated in terms of the total content of the free and bound phenolic compounds, as well as the phenolic profiles and antioxidant activities of the extracts. Methods Five different solvent mixtures were used to extract the free phenolic compounds from litchi pulp. Alkaline and acidic hydrolysis methods were compared for the hydrolysis of bound phenolic compounds from litchi pulp residue. The phenolic compositions of the free and bound fractions from the litchi pulp were identified using HPLC-DAD. The antioxidant activities of the litchi pulp extracts were determined by oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) and cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assays. Results Of the solvents tested, aqueous acetone extracted the largest amount of total free phenolic compounds (210.7 mg GAE/100 g FW) from litchi pulp, followed sequentially by aqueous mixtures of methanol, ethanol and ethyl acetate, and water itself. The acid hydrolysis method released twice as many bound phenolic compounds as the alkaline hydrolysis method. Nine phenolic compounds were detected in the aqueous acetone extract. In contrast, not all of these compounds were found in the other four extracts. The classification and content of the bound phenolic compounds released by the acid hydrolysis method were higher than those achieved by the alkaline hydrolysis. The aqueous acetone extract showing the highest ORAC value (3406.9 μmol TE/100 g FW) for the free phenolic extracts. For the CAA method, however, the aqueous acetone and methanol extracts (56.7 and 55.1 μmol QE/100 g FW) showed the highest levels of activity of the five extracts tested. The ORAC and CAA values of the bound phenolic compounds obtained by acid hydrolysis were 2.6- and 1.9-fold higher than those obtained using the

  14. Active disturbance rejection based trajectory linearization control for hypersonic reentry vehicle with bounded uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xingling; Wang, Honglun

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates a novel compound control scheme combined with the advantages of trajectory linearization control (TLC) and alternative active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) for hypersonic reentry vehicle (HRV) attitude tracking system with bounded uncertainties. Firstly, in order to overcome actuator saturation problem, nonlinear tracking differentiator (TD) is applied in the attitude loop to achieve fewer control consumption. Then, linear extended state observers (LESO) are constructed to estimate the uncertainties acting on the LTV system in the attitude and angular rate loop. In addition, feedback linearization (FL) based controllers are designed using estimates of uncertainties generated by LESO in each loop, which enable the tracking error for closed-loop system in the presence of large uncertainties to converge to the residual set of the origin asymptotically. Finally, the compound controllers are derived by integrating with the nominal controller for open-loop nonlinear system and FL based controller. Also, comparisons and simulation results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the control strategy.

  15. Interactions of a designed peptide with lipopolysaccharide: Bound conformation and anti-endotoxic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bhunia, Anirban; Chua, Geok Lin; Domadia, Prerna N.; Warshakoon, Hemamali; Cromer, Jens R.; David, Sunil A.; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2008-05-09

    Designed peptides that would selectively interact with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or endotoxin and fold into specific conformations could serve as important scaffolds toward the development of antisepsis compounds. Here, we describe solution structure of a designed amphipathic peptide, H{sub 2}N-YVKLWRMIKFIR-CONH{sub 2} (YW12D) in complex with endotoxin as determined by transferred nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy. The conformation of the isolated peptide is highly flexible, but undergoes a dramatic structural stabilization in the presence of LPS. Structure calculations reveal that the peptide presents two amphipathic surfaces in its bound state to LPS whereby each surface is characterized by two positive charges and a number of aromatic and/or aliphatic residues. ITC data suggests that peptide interacts with two molecules of lipid A. In activity assays, YW12D exhibits neutralization of LPS toxicity with very little hemolysis of red blood cells. Structural and functional properties of YW12D would be applicable in designing low molecular weight non-toxic antisepsis molecules.

  16. A mechanism of catalyzed GTP hydrolysis by Ras protein through magnesium ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qiang; Nassar, Nicolas; Wang, Jin

    2011-11-01

    The hydrolysis by Ras plays pivotal roles in the activation of signaling pathways that lead to cell growth, proliferation, and differentiation. Despite their significant role in human cancer, the hydrolysis mechanism remains unclear. In the present Letter, we propose a GTP hydrolysis mechanism in which the γ phosphate is cut off primarily by magnesium ion. We studied both normal and mutated Ras and the cause of the malfunction of these mutants, compared the effect of Mg2+ and Mn2+. The simulation results are consistent with the experiments and support the new hydrolysis mechanism. This work will benefit both GTPases and ATPases hydrolysis studies.

  17. Dynamic structure of membrane-anchored Arf•GTP

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yizhou; Kahn, Richard A.; Prestegard, James H.

    2010-01-01

    Arfs (ADP ribosylation factors) are N-myristoylated GTP/GDP switch proteins playing key regulatory roles in vesicle transport in eukaryotic cells. ARFs execute their roles by anchoring to membrane surfaces where they interact with other proteins to initiate budding and maturation of transport vesicles. However, existing structures of Arf•GTP are limited to non-myristoylated and truncated forms with impaired membrane binding. We report a high resolution NMR structure for full-length myristoylated yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Arf1 in complex with a membrane mimic. The two domain structure, in which the myristoylated N-terminal helix is separated from the C-terminal domain by a flexible linker, suggests a level of adaptability in binding modes for the myriad of proteins with which Arf interacts, and allows predictions of specific lipid binding sites on some of these proteins. PMID:20601958

  18. Immunochemical similarity of GTP-binding proteins from different systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinina, S.N.

    1986-06-20

    It was found that antibodies against the GTP-binding proteins of bovine retinal photoreceptor membranes blocked the inhibitory effect of estradiol on phosphodiesterase from rat and human uterine cytosol and prevented the cumulative effect of catecholamines and guanylyl-5'-imidodiphosphate on rat skeletal muscle adenylate cyclase. It was established by means of double radial immunodiffusion that these antibodies form a precipitating complex with purified bovine brain tubulin as well as with retinal preparations obtained from eyes of the bull, pig, rat, frog, some species of fish, and one reptile species. Bands of precipitation were not observed with these antibodies when retinal preparations from invertebrates (squid and octopus) were used as the antigens. The antibodies obtained interacted with the ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-subunits of GTP-binding proteins from bovine retinal photoreceptor membranes.

  19. Polarization of Diploid Daughter Cells Directed by Spatial Cues and GTP Hydrolysis of Cdc42 in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Monisha; Chou, Ching-Shan; Park, Hay-Oak

    2013-01-01

    Cell polarization occurs along a single axis that is generally determined by a spatial cue. Cells of the budding yeast exhibit a characteristic pattern of budding, which depends on cell-type-specific cortical markers, reflecting a genetic programming for the site of cell polarization. The Cdc42 GTPase plays a key role in cell polarization in various cell types. Although previous studies in budding yeast suggested positive feedback loops whereby Cdc42 becomes polarized, these mechanisms do not include spatial cues, neglecting the normal patterns of budding. Here we combine live-cell imaging and mathematical modeling to understand how diploid daughter cells establish polarity preferentially at the pole distal to the previous division site. Live-cell imaging shows that daughter cells of diploids exhibit dynamic polarization of Cdc42-GTP, which localizes to the bud tip until the M phase, to the division site at cytokinesis, and then to the distal pole in the next G1 phase. The strong bias toward distal budding of daughter cells requires the distal-pole tag Bud8 and Rga1, a GTPase activating protein for Cdc42, which inhibits budding at the cytokinesis site. Unexpectedly, we also find that over 50% of daughter cells lacking Rga1 exhibit persistent Cdc42-GTP polarization at the bud tip and the distal pole, revealing an additional role of Rga1 in spatiotemporal regulation of Cdc42 and thus in the pattern of polarized growth. Mathematical modeling indeed reveals robust Cdc42-GTP clustering at the distal pole in diploid daughter cells despite random perturbation of the landmark cues. Moreover, modeling predicts different dynamics of Cdc42-GTP polarization when the landmark level and the initial level of Cdc42-GTP at the division site are perturbed by noise added in the model. PMID:23437206

  20. In vitro guanine nucleotide exchange activity of DHR-2/DOCKER/CZH2 domains.

    PubMed

    Côté, Jean-François; Vuori, Kristiina

    2006-01-01

    Rho family GTPases regulate a large variety of biological processes, including the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. Like other members of the Ras superfamily of small GTP-binding proteins, Rho GTPases cycle between a GDP-bound (inactive) and a GTP-bound (active) state, and, when active, the GTPases relay extracellular signals to a large number of downstream effectors. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) promote the exchange of GDP for GTP on Rho GTPases, thereby activating them. Most Rho-GEFs mediate their effects through their signature domain known as the Dbl Homology-Pleckstrin Homology (DH-PH) module. Recently, we and others identified a family of evolutionarily conserved, DOCK180-related proteins that also display GEF activity toward Rho GTPases. The DOCK180-family of proteins lacks the canonical DH-PH module. Instead, they rely on a novel domain, termed DHR-2, DOCKER, or CZH2, to exchange GDP for GTP on Rho targets. In this chapter, the experimental approach that we used to uncover the exchange activity of the DHR-2 domain of DOCK180-related proteins will be described.

  1. Validating the GTP-cyclohydrolase 1-feedback regulatory complex as a therapeutic target using biophysical and in vivo approaches

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, D; Starr, A; Heikal, L; McNeill, E; Channon, K M; Brown, P R; Sutton, B J; McDonnell, J M; Nandi, M

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose 6R-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential cofactor for nitric oxide biosynthesis. Substantial clinical evidence indicates that intravenous BH4 restores vascular function in patients. Unfortunately, oral BH4 has limited efficacy. Therefore, orally bioavailable pharmacological activators of endogenous BH4 biosynthesis hold significant therapeutic potential. GTP-cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1), the rate limiting enzyme in BH4 synthesis, forms a protein complex with GCH1 feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). This complex is subject to allosteric feed-forward activation by L-phenylalanine (L-phe). We investigated the effects of L-phe on the biophysical interactions of GCH1 and GFRP and its potential to alter BH4 levels in vivo. Experimental Approach Detailed characterization of GCH1–GFRP protein–protein interactions were performed using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) with or without L-phe. Effects on systemic and vascular BH4 biosynthesis in vivo were investigated following L-phe treatment (100 mg·kg−1, p.o.). Key Results GCH1 and GFRP proteins interacted in the absence of known ligands or substrate but the presence of L-phe doubled maximal binding and enhanced binding affinity eightfold. Furthermore, the complex displayed very slow association and dissociation rates. In vivo, L-phe challenge induced a sustained elevation of aortic BH4, an effect absent in GCH1(fl/fl)-Tie2Cre mice. Conclusions and Implications Biophysical data indicate that GCH1 and GFRP are constitutively bound. In vivo, data demonstrated that L-phe elevated vascular BH4 in an endothelial GCH1 dependent manner. Pharmacological agents which mimic the allosteric effects of L-phe on the GCH1–GFRP complex have the potential to elevate endothelial BH4 biosynthesis for numerous cardiovascular disorders. PMID:26014146

  2. Regulation of cytoplasmic division of Xenopus embryo by rho p21 and its inhibitory GDP/GTP exchange protein (rho GDI)

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that the rho family, a member of the ras p21- related small GTP-binding protein superfamily, regulates cell morphology, cell motility, and smooth muscle contraction through the actomyosin system. The actomyosin system is also known to be essential for cytoplasmic division of cells (cytokinesis). In this study, we examined the action of rho p21, its inhibitory GDP/GTP exchange protein, named rho GDI, its stimulatory GDP/GTP exchange protein, named smg GDS, and botulinum ADP-ribosyltransferase C3, known to selectively ADP-ribosylate rho p21 and to impair its function, in the cytoplasmic division using Xenopus embryos. The sperm-induced cytoplasmic division of Xenopus embryos was not affected by microinjection into the embryos of either smg GDS or the guanosine-5'-(3-O-thio)triphosphate (GTP gamma S)-bound form of rhoA p21, one member of the rho family, but completely inhibited by microinjection of rho GDI or C3. Under these conditions, nuclear division occurred normally but the furrow formation, which was induced by the contractile ring consisting of actomyosin just beneath the plasma membrane, was impaired. Comicroinjection of rho GDI with the GTP gamma S-bound form of rhoA p21 prevented the rho GDI action. Moreover, the sperm-induced cytoplasmic division of Xenopus embryos was inhibited by microinjection into the embryos of the rhoA p21 pre-ADP- ribosylated by C3 which might serve as a dominant negative inhibitor of endogenous rho p21. These results indicate that rho p21 together with its regulatory proteins regulates the cytoplasmic division through the actomyosin system. PMID:8436590

  3. Disease Mutations in Rab7 Result in Unregulated Nucleotide Exchange and Inappropriate Activation

    SciTech Connect

    B McCray; E Skordalakes; J Taylor

    2011-12-31

    Rab GTPases are molecular switches that orchestrate vesicular trafficking, maturation and fusion by cycling between an active, GTP-bound form, and an inactive, GDP-bound form. The activity cycle is coupled to GTP hydrolysis and is tightly controlled by regulatory proteins. Missense mutations of the GTPase Rab7 cause a dominantly inherited axonal degeneration known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2B through an unknown mechanism. We present the 2.8 A crystal structure of GTP-bound L129F mutant Rab7 which reveals normal conformations of the effector binding regions and catalytic site, but an alteration to the nucleotide binding pocket that is predicted to alter GTP binding. Through extensive biochemical analysis, we demonstrate that disease-associated mutations in Rab7 do not lead to an intrinsic GTPase defect, but permit unregulated nucleotide exchange leading to both excessive activation and hydrolysis-independent inactivation. Consistent with augmented activity, mutant Rab7 shows significantly enhanced interaction with a subset of effector proteins. In addition, dynamic imaging demonstrates that mutant Rab7 is abnormally retained on target membranes. However, we show that the increased activation of mutant Rab7 is counterbalanced by unregulated, GTP hydrolysis-independent membrane cycling. Notably, disease mutations are able to rescue the membrane cycling of a GTPase-deficient mutant. Thus, we demonstrate that disease mutations uncouple Rab7 from the spatial and temporal control normally imposed by regulatory proteins and cause disease not by a gain of novel toxic function, but by misregulation of native Rab7 activity.

  4. Contribution of Particle-Bound Bacteria to Total Microheterotrophic Activity in Five Ponds and Two Marshes

    PubMed Central

    Kirchman, David; Mitchell, Ralph

    1982-01-01

    We examined the abundance and heterotrophic uptake of bacteria attached to particulate matter suspended in five coastal ponds and two marshes near Woods Hole, Mass. Although the number of particle-bound bacteria was low (<10%), these bacteria incorporated a large proportion (>40%) of [14C]glucose and [14C]glutamate in selected aquatic systems. The uptake per cell was significantly higher for epibacteria than for unattached bacteria in all systems. Two groups of the aquatic environments sampled were statistically different in the contribution made by particle-bound bacteria to total bacterial abundance and to total assimilation of [14C]glucose and [14C]glutamate. Particle-bound bacteria were more important in those waters with a high particle concentration and not flushed regularly by tides than in waters with a low particle concentration and flushed regularly. PMID:16345921

  5. Transport to Rhebpress activity.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Amanda; Brandt, Marta; Djouder, Nabil

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPases from the rat sarcoma (Ras) superfamily are a heterogeneous group of proteins of about 21 kDa that act as molecular switches, modulating cell signaling pathways and controlling diverse cellular processes. They are active when bound to guanosine triphosphate (GTP) and inactive when bound to guanosine diphosphate (GDP). Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb) is a member of the Ras GTPase superfamily and a key activator of the mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). We recently determined that microspherule protein 1 (MCRS1) maintains Rheb at lysosomal surfaces in an amino acid-dependent manner. MCRS1 depletion promotes the formation of the GDP-bound form of Rheb, which is then delocalized from the lysosomal platform and transported to endocytic recycling vesicles, leading to mTORC1 inactivation. During this delocalization process, Rheb-GDP remains farnesylated and associated with cellular endomembranes. These findings provide new insights into the regulation of small GTPases, whose activity depends on both their GTP/GDP switch state and their capacity to move between different cellular membrane-bound compartments. Dynamic spatial transport between compartments makes it possible to alter the proximity of small GTPases to their activatory sites depending on the prevailing physiological and cellular conditions.

  6. Establishing bounding internal dose estimates for thorium activities at Rocky Flats.

    PubMed

    Ulsh, Brant A; Rich, Bryce L; Chew, Melton H; Morris, Robert L; Sharfi, Mutty; Rolfes, Mark R

    2008-07-01

    As part of an evaluation of a Special Exposure Cohort petition filed on behalf of workers at the Rocky Flats Plant, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) was required to demonstrate that bounding values could be established for radiation doses due to the potential intake of all radionuclides present at the facility. The main radioactive elements of interest at Rocky Flats were plutonium and uranium, but much smaller quantities of several other elements, including thorium, were occasionally handled at the site. Bounding potential doses from thorium has proven challenging at other sites due to the early historical difficulty in detecting this element through urinalysis methods and the relatively high internal dose delivered per unit intake. This paper reports the results of NIOSH's investigation of the uses of thorium at Rocky Flats and provides bounding dose reconstructions for these operations. During this investigation, NIOSH reviewed unclassified reports, unclassified extracts of classified materials, material balance and inventory ledgers, monthly progress reports from various groups, and health physics field logbooks, and conducted interviews with former Rocky Flats workers. Thorium operations included: (1) an experimental metal forming project with 240 kg of thorium in 1960; (2) the use of pre-formed parts in weapons mockups; (3) the removal of Th from U; (4) numerous analytical procedures involving trace quantities of thorium; and (5) the possible experimental use of thorium as a mold coating compound. The thorium handling operations at Rocky Flats were limited in scope, well-monitored and documented, and potential doses can be bounded.

  7. Biochemical and functional characterization of the ROC domain of DAPK establishes a new paradigm of GTP regulation in ROCO proteins.

    PubMed

    Bialik, Shani; Kimchi, Adi

    2012-10-01

    DAPK (death-associated protein kinase) is a newly recognized member of the mammalian family of ROCO proteins, characterized by common ROC (Ras of complex proteins) and COR (C-terminal of ROC) domains. In the present paper, we review our recent work showing that DAPK is functionally a ROCO protein; its ROC domain binds and hydrolyses GTP. Furthermore, GTP binding regulates DAPK catalytic activity in a novel manner by enhancing autophosphorylation on inhibitory Ser308, thereby promoting the kinase 'off' state. This is a novel mechanism for in cis regulation of kinase activity by the distal ROC domain. The functional similarities between DAPK and the Parkinson's disease-associated protein LRRK2 (leucine-rich repeat protein kinase 2), another member of the ROCO family, are also discussed.

  8. The Rho GTP exchange factor Lfc promotes spindle assembly in early mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Bakal, Christopher J.; Finan, Dina; LaRose, José; Wells, Clark D.; Gish, Gerald; Kulkarni, Sarang; DeSepulveda, Paulo; Wilde, Andrew; Rottapel, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Rho GTPases regulate reorganization of actin and microtubule cytoskeletal structures during both interphase and mitosis. The timing and subcellular compartment in which Rho GTPases are activated is controlled by the large family of Rho GTP exchange factors (RhoGEFs). Here, we show that the microtubule-associated RhoGEF Lfc is required for the formation of the mitotic spindle during prophase/prometaphase. The inability of cells to assemble a functioning spindle after Lfc inhibition resulted in a delay in mitosis and an accumulation of prometaphase cells. Inhibition of Lfc's primary target Rho GTPase during prophase/prometaphase, or expression of a catalytically inactive mutant of Lfc, also prevented normal spindle assembly and resulted in delays in mitotic progression. Coinjection of constitutively active Rho GTPase rescued the spindle defects caused by Lfc inhibition, suggesting the requirement of RhoGTP in regulating spindle assembly. Lastly, we implicate mDia1 as an important effector of Lfc signaling. These findings demonstrate a role for Lfc, Rho, and mDia1 during mitosis. PMID:15976019

  9. Observation by sup 13 C NMR of the EPSP synthase tetrahedral intermediate bound to the enzyme active site

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.S.; Sammons, R.D.; Leo, G.C.; Sikorski, J.A. ); Benesi, A.J.; Johnson, K.A. )

    1990-02-13

    Direct observation of the tetrahedral intermediate in the EPSP synthase reaction pathway was provided by {sup 13}C NMR by examining the species bound to the enzyme active site under internal equilibrium conditions and using (2-{sup 13}C)PEP as a spectroscopic probe. The tetrahedral center of the intermediate bound to the enzyme gave a unique signal appearing at 104 ppm. Separate signals were observed for free EPSP and EPSP bound to the enzyme in a ternary complex with phosphate. These peak assignments account for the quantitation of the species bound to the enzyme and liberated upon quenching with either triethylamine or base. A comparison of quenching with acid, base, or triethylamine was conducted. After long times of incubation during the NMR measurement, a signal at 107 ppm appeared. The compound giving rise to this resonance was isolated and identified as an EPSP ketal. The rate of formation of the EPSP ketal was very slow establishing that it is a side product of the normal enzymatic reaction. To look for additional signals that might arise from a covalent adduct which has been postulated to arise from reaction of enzyme with PEP, and NMR experiment was performed with an analogue of S3P lacking the 4- and 5-hydroxyl groups. All of these results reaffirm identification of the tetrahedral species as the only observable intermediate in the EPSP synthase reaction.

  10. Glucose- and GTP-dependent stimulation of the carboxyl methylation of CDC42 in rodent and human pancreatic islets and pure beta cells. Evidence for an essential role of GTP-binding proteins in nutrient-induced insulin secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Kowluru, A; Seavey, S E; Li, G; Sorenson, R L; Weinhaus, A J; Nesher, R; Rabaglia, M E; Vadakekalam, J; Metz, S A

    1996-01-01

    the stimulus-secretion coupling of nutrient-induced insulin secretion, but not in the exocytotic event itself. Furthermore, AFC blocked glucose-activated phosphoinositide turnover, which may provide a partial biochemical explanation for its effect on secretion, and implies that certain G-proteins must be carboxyl methylated for their interaction with signaling effector molecules, a step which can be regulated by intracellular availability of GTP. PMID:8755667

  11. Obligatory role in GTP hydrolysis for the amide carbonyl oxygen of the Mg(2+)-coordinating Thr of regulatory GTPases.

    PubMed

    Zurita, Adolfo; Zhang, Yinghao; Pedersen, Lee; Darden, Tom; Birnbaumer, Lutz

    2010-05-25

    When G-protein alpha subunits binds GTP and Mg(2+), they transition from their inactive to their active conformation. This transition is accompanied by completion of the coordination shell of Mg(2+) with electrons from six oxygens: two water molecules, the ss and gamma phosphoryls of GTP, a helix-alpha1 Ser, and a switch I domain (SWI) Thr, and the repositioning of SWI and SWII domains. SWII binds and regulates effector enzymes and facilitates GTP hydrolysis by repositioning the gamma-carbonyl of a Gln. Mutating the Ser generates regulatory GTPases that cannot lock Mg(2+) into its place and are locked in their inactive state with dominant negative properties. Curiously, mutating the Thr appears to reduce GTP hydrolysis. The reason for this difference is not known because it is also not known why removal of the Thr should affect the overall GTPase cycle differently than removal of the Ser. Working with recombinant Gsalpha, we report that mutating its SWI-Thr to either Ala, Glu, Gln, or Asp results not only in diminished GTPase activity but also in spontaneous activation of the SWII domain. Upon close examination of existing alpha subunit crystals, we noted the oxygen of the backbone carbonyl of SWI-Thr and of the gamma-carbonyl of SWII Gln to be roughly equidistant from the oxygen of the hydrolytic H(2)O. Our observations indicate that the Gln and Thr carbonyls play equihierarchical roles in the GTPase process and provide the mechanism that explains why mutating the Thr mimics mutating the Gln and not that of the Ser.

  12. A wheat embryo cell-free protein synthesis system not requiring an exogenous supply of GTP.

    PubMed

    Koga, Hirohisa; Misawa, Satoru; Shibui, Tatsuro

    2009-01-01

    Most in vitro protein synthesis systems require a supply of GTP for the formation of translation initiation complexes, with two GTP molecules per amino acid needed as an energy source for a peptide elongation reaction. In order to optimize protein synthesis reactions in a continuous-flow wheat embryo cell-free system, we have examined the influence of adding GTP and found that the system does not require any supply of GTP. We report here the preparation of a wheat embryo extract from which endogenous GTP was removed by gel filtration, and the influence of adding GTP to the system on protein synthesis reactions. Using Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) as a reporter, higher levels of production were observed at lower concentrations of GTP, with the optimal level of production obtained with no supply of GTP. A HPLC-based analysis of the extract and the translation mixture containing only ATP as an energy source revealed that GTP was not detectable in the extract, however, 35 microM of GTP was found in the translation mixture. This result suggests that GTP could be generated from other compounds, such as GDP and GMP, using ATP. A similar experiment with a C-terminally truncated form of human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (hPTP1B(1-320)) gave almost the same result. The wheat embryo cell-free translation system worked most efficiently without exogenous GTP, producing 3.5 mg/mL of translation mixture over a 48-h period at 26 degrees C.

  13. Two active site divalent ions in the crystal structure of the hammerhead ribozyme bound to a transition state analogue

    DOE PAGES

    Mir, Aamir; Golden, Barbara L.

    2015-11-09

    The crystal structure of the hammerhead ribozyme bound to the pentavalent transition state analogue vanadate reveals significant rearrangements relative to the previously determined structures. The active site contracts, bringing G10.1 closer to the cleavage site and repositioning a divalent metal ion such that it could, ultimately, interact directly with the scissile phosphate. This ion could also position a water molecule to serve as a general acid in the cleavage reaction. A second divalent ion is observed coordinated to O6 of G12. This metal ion is well-placed to help tune the pKA of G12. Finally, on the basis of this crystalmore » structure as well as a wealth of biochemical studies, in this paper we propose a mechanism in which G12 serves as the general base and a magnesium-bound water serves as a general acid.« less

  14. Two active site divalent ions in the crystal structure of the hammerhead ribozyme bound to a transition state analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Mir, Aamir; Golden, Barbara L.

    2015-11-09

    The crystal structure of the hammerhead ribozyme bound to the pentavalent transition state analogue vanadate reveals significant rearrangements relative to the previously determined structures. The active site contracts, bringing G10.1 closer to the cleavage site and repositioning a divalent metal ion such that it could, ultimately, interact directly with the scissile phosphate. This ion could also position a water molecule to serve as a general acid in the cleavage reaction. A second divalent ion is observed coordinated to O6 of G12. This metal ion is well-placed to help tune the pKA of G12. Finally, on the basis of this crystal structure as well as a wealth of biochemical studies, in this paper we propose a mechanism in which G12 serves as the general base and a magnesium-bound water serves as a general acid.

  15. Rhodopsin-stimulated activation-deactivation cycle of transducin: Kinetics of the intrinsic fluorescence response of the alpha subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, P.M.; Koland, J.G.; Cerione, R.A. )

    1990-07-31

    The intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of the alpha subunit of transducin (alpha T) has been shown to be sensitive to the binding of guanine nucleotides, with the fluorescence being enhanced by as much as 2-fold upon the binding of GTP or nonhydrolyzable GTP analogues. In this work, we have used these fluorescence changes to analyze the kinetics for the activation (GTP binding)-deactivation (GTPase) cycle of transducin in a well-defined reconstituted phospholipid vesicle system containing purified rhodopsin and the alpha T and beta gamma T subunits of the retinal GTP-binding protein. Both the rate and the extent of the GTP-induced fluorescence enhancement are dependent on (rhodopsin), while only the rate (and not the extent) of the GTP gamma S-induced enhancement is dependent on the levels of rhodopsin. Comparisons of the fluorescence enhancements elicited by GTP gamma S and GTP indicate that the GTP gamma S-induced enhancements directly reflect the GTP gamma S-binding event while the GTP-induced enhancements represent a composite of the GTP-binding and GTP hydrolysis events. At high (rhodopsin), the rates for GTP binding and GTPase are sufficiently different such that the GTP-induced enhancement essentially reflects GTP binding. A fluorescence decay, which always follows the GTP-induced enhancement, directly reflects the GTP hydrolytic event. The rate of the fluorescence decay matches the rate of (32P)Pi production due to (gamma-32P)GTP hydrolysis, and the decay is immediately reversed by rechallenging with GTP. The GTP-induced fluorescence changes (i.e., the enhancement and ensuing decay) could be fit to a simple model describing the activation-deactivation cycle of transducin.

  16. Depletion of GTP pool is not the predominant mechanism by which ribavirin exerts its antiviral effect on Lassa virus.

    PubMed

    Ölschläger, Stephan; Neyts, Johan; Günther, Stephan

    2011-08-01

    Ribavirin (1-β-d-ribofuranosyl-1,2,4-triazole-3-carboxamide) is the standard treatment for Lassa fever, though its mode of action is unknown. One possibility is depletion of the intracellular GTP pool via inhibition of the cellular enzyme inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH). This study compared the anti-arenaviral effect of ribavirin with that of two other IMPDH inhibitors, mycophenolic acid (MPA) and 5-ethynyl-1-β-d-ribofuranosylimidazole-4-carboxamide (EICAR). All three compounds were able to inhibit Lassa virus replication by ≥2 log units in cell culture. Restoring the intracellular GTP pool by exogenous addition of guanosine reversed the inhibitory effects of MPA and EICAR, while ribavirin remained fully active. Analogous experiments performed with Zaire Ebola virus showed that IMPDH inhibitors are also active against this virus, although to a lesser extent than against Lassa virus. In conclusion, the experiments with MPA and EICAR indicate that replication of Lassa and Ebola virus is sensitive to depletion of the GTP pool mediated via inhibition of IMPDH. However, this is not the predominant mechanism by which ribavirin exerts its in-vitro antiviral effect on Lassa virus.

  17. GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein is a pentamer of identical subunits. Purification, cDNA cloning, and bacterial expression.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, T; Brewer, J M; Hatakeyama, K

    1997-04-11

    GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) mediates feedback inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I activity by tetrahydrobiopterin and also mediates the stimulatory effect of phenylalanine on the enzyme activity. To characterize the molecular structure of GFRP, we have purified it from rat liver using an efficient step of affinity chromatography and isolated cDNA clones, based on partial amino acid sequences of peptides derived from purified GFRP. Comparison between the amino acid sequence deduced from the cDNA and the N-terminal amino acid sequence of purified GFRP showed that the mature form of GFRP consists of 83 amino acid residues with a calculated Mr of 9,542. The isolated GFRP cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with six consecutive histidine residues at its N terminus. The fusion protein was affinity-purified and digested with thrombin to remove the histidine tag. The resulting recombinant GFRP showed kinetic properties similar to those of GFRP purified from rat liver. Cross-linking experiments using dimethyl suberimidate indicated that GFRP was a pentamer of 52 kDa. Sedimentation equilibrium measurements confirmed the pentameric structure of GFRP by giving an average Mr of 49,734, which is 5 times the calculated molecular weight of the recombinant GFRP polypeptide. Based on the pentameric structure of GFRP, we have proposed a model for the quaternary structure of GFRP and GTP cyclohydrolase I complexes.

  18. Crystal structure of rat GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein, GFRP.

    PubMed

    Bader, G; Schiffmann, S; Herrmann, A; Fischer, M; Gütlich, M; Auerbach, G; Ploom, T; Bacher, A; Huber, R; Lemm, T

    2001-10-05

    Tetrahydrobiopterin, the cofactor required for hydroxylation of aromatic amino acids regulates its own synthesis in mammals through feedback inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I. This mechanism is mediated by a regulatory subunit called GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). The 2.6 A resolution crystal structure of rat GFRP shows that the protein forms a pentamer. This indicates a model for the interaction of mammalian GTP cyclohydrolase I with its regulator, GFRP. Kinetic investigations of human GTP cyclohydrolase I in complex with rat and human GFRP showed similar regulatory effects of both GFRP proteins.

  19. The Protein Partners of GTP Cyclohydrolase I in Rat Organs

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jianhai; Teng, Ru-Jeng; Lawrence, Matt; Guan, Tongju; Xu, Hao; Ge, Ying; Shi, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Objective GTP cyclohydrolase I (GCH1) is the rate-limiting enzyme for tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis and has been shown to be a promising therapeutic target in ischemic heart disease, hypertension, atherosclerosis and diabetes. The endogenous GCH1-interacting partners have not been identified. Here, we determined endogenous GCH1-interacting proteins in rat. Methods and Results A pulldown and proteomics approach were used to identify GCH1 interacting proteins in rat liver, brain, heart and kidney. We demonstrated that GCH1 interacts with at least 17 proteins including GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) in rat liver by affinity purification followed by proteomics and validated six protein partners in liver, brain, heart and kidney by immunoblotting. GCH1 interacts with GFRP and very long-chain specific acyl-CoA dehydrogenase in the liver, tubulin beta-2A chain in the liver and brain, DnaJ homolog subfamily A member 1 and fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase in the liver, heart and kidney and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit I (EIF3I) in all organs tested. Furthermore, GCH1 associates with mitochondrial proteins and GCH1 itself locates in mitochondria. Conclusion GCH1 interacts with proteins in an organ dependant manner and EIF3I might be a general regulator of GCH1. Our finding indicates GCH1 might have broader functions beyond tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis. PMID:22479495

  20. Human γ-Glutamyl Transpeptidase 1: STRUCTURES OF THE FREE ENZYME, INHIBITOR-BOUND TETRAHEDRAL TRANSITION STATES, AND GLUTAMATE-BOUND ENZYME REVEAL NOVEL MOVEMENT WITHIN THE ACTIVE SITE DURING CATALYSIS.

    PubMed

    Terzyan, Simon S; Burgett, Anthony W G; Heroux, Annie; Smith, Clyde A; Mooers, Blaine H M; Hanigan, Marie H

    2015-07-10

    γ-Glutamyl transpeptidase 1 (GGT1) is a cell surface, N-terminal nucleophile hydrolase that cleaves glutathione and other γ-glutamyl compounds. GGT1 expression is essential in cysteine homeostasis, and its induction has been implicated in the pathology of asthma, reperfusion injury, and cancer. In this study, we report four new crystal structures of human GGT1 (hGGT1) that show conformational changes within the active site as the enzyme progresses from the free enzyme to inhibitor-bound tetrahedral transition states and finally to the glutamate-bound structure prior to the release of this final product of the reaction. The structure of the apoenzyme shows flexibility within the active site. The serine-borate-bound hGGT1 crystal structure demonstrates that serine-borate occupies the active site of the enzyme, resulting in an enzyme-inhibitor complex that replicates the enzyme's tetrahedral intermediate/transition state. The structure of GGsTop-bound hGGT1 reveals its interactions with the enzyme and why neutral phosphonate diesters are more potent inhibitors than monoanionic phosphonates. These structures are the first structures for any eukaryotic GGT that include a molecule in the active site covalently bound to the catalytic Thr-381. The glutamate-bound structure shows the conformation of the enzyme prior to release of the final product and reveals novel information regarding the displacement of the main chain atoms that form the oxyanion hole and movement of the lid loop region when the active site is occupied. These data provide new insights into the mechanism of hGGT1-catalyzed reactions and will be invaluable in the development of new classes of hGGT1 inhibitors for therapeutic use.

  1. Membrane-bound α-synuclein interacts with glucocerebrosidase and inhibits enzyme activity

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Thai Leong; Velayati, Arash; Sidransky, Ellen; Lee, Jennifer C.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in GBA, the gene encoding glucocerebrosidase, the lysosomal enzyme deficient in Gaucher disease increase the risk for developing Parkinson disease. Recent research suggests a relationship between glucocerebrosidase and the Parkinson disease-related amyloid-forming protein, α-synuclein; however, the specific molecular mechanisms responsible for association remain elusive. Previously, we showed that α-synuclein and glucocerebrosidase interact selectively under lysosomal conditions, and proposed that this newly identified interaction might influence cellular levels of α-synuclein by either promoting protein degradation and/or preventing aggregation. Here, we demonstrate that membrane-bound α-synuclein interacts with glucocerebrosidase, and that this complex formation inhibits enzyme function. Using site-specific fluorescence and Förster energy transfer probes, we mapped the protein-enzyme interacting regions on unilamellar vesicles. Our data suggest that on the membrane surface, the glucocerebrosidase-α-synuclein interaction involves a larger α-synuclein region compared to that found in solution. In addition, α-synuclein acts as a mixed inhibitor with an apparent IC50 in the submicromolar range. Importantly, the membrane-bound, α-helical form of α-synuclein is necessary for inhibition. This glucocerebrosidase interaction and inhibition likely contribute to the mechanism underlying GBA-associated parkinsonism. PMID:23266198

  2. Specific interaction between EF-G and RRF and its implication for GTP-dependent ribosome splitting into subunits

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ning; Zavialov, Andrey V.; Ehrenberg, Måns; Frank, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Summary After termination of protein synthesis, the bacterial ribosome is split into its 30S and 50S subunits by the action of ribosome recycling factor (RRF) and elongation factor G (EF-G) in a GTP-hydrolysis dependent manner. Based on a previous cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) study of ribosomal complexes, we have proposed that the binding of EF-G to an RRF containing post-termination ribosome triggers an inter-domain rotation of RRF, which destabilizes two strong intersubunit bridges (B2a and B3) and, ultimately, separates the two subunits. Here, we present a 9 Å (FSC at 0.5 cutoff) cryo-EM map of a 50S EFG GDPNP RRF complex and a quasi-atomic model derived from it, showing the interaction between EF-G and RRF on the 50S subunit in the presence of the non-cleavable GTP analogue GDPNP. The detailed information in this model and a comparative analysis of EF-G structures in various nucleotide- and ribosome-bound states show how rotation of the RRF head domain may be triggered by various domains of EF-G. For validation of our structural model, all known mutations in EF-G and RRF that relate to ribosome recycling have been taken into account. More importantly, our results indicate a substantial conformational change in the Switch I region of EF-G, suggesting that a conformational signal transduction mechanism, similar to that employed in tRNA translocation on the ribosome by EF-G, translates a large-scale movement of EF-G’s domain IV, induced by GTP hydrolysis, into the domain rotation of RRF that eventually splits the ribosome into subunits. PMID:17996252

  3. Gibberellic Acid Activates Chromatin-bound DNA-dependent RNA Polymerase in Wounded Potato Tuber Tissue 1

    PubMed Central

    Wielgat, Bernard; Kahl, Günter

    1979-01-01

    Chromatin-bound DNA-dependent RNA polymerases react upon wounding of white potato tuber tissues with an increase in activity, which is additionally enhanced to 300% in the presence of 0.1 micromolar gibberellic acid (GA3). 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid is only weakly effective and indoleacetic acid not at all. Wounding and treatment with GA3 affect template availability of chromatin only slightly. The hormone has no effect on chromatin-bound RNA polymerases, if added in vitro. The enzymes from intact, wounded, and hormone-treated tissues possess similar characteristics: their activity is dependent on the presence of all four ribonucleotides and a divalent cation such as Mg2+ or Mn2+. However, the sensitivity of the enzymes from different preparations toward α-amanitin differs. Total RNA polymerase activity of chromatin was inhibited by α-amanitin to about 44% in intact, to about 22% in wounded, and only 15% in GA3-treated tissues. The relative activities of polymerases I and II were estimated by varying the (NH4)2SO4 and α-amanitin concentrations in the assay system. It is evident that GA3 preferentially stimulates polymerase I and hence ribosomal RNA synthesis. RNA polymerase II is but slightly affected by GA3. Nearest neighbor frequency analysis revealed that the RNA synthesized by the enzymes from the intact tuber is different from that of wounded or GA3-treated tissues. PMID:16661071

  4. Critical evaluation of changes in the ratio of insoluble bound to soluble phenolics on antioxidant activity of lentils during germination.

    PubMed

    Yeo, JuDong; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2015-01-21

    A new indicator, the ratio of insoluble bound phenolics (IBPs) to soluble phenolics (SPs), is suggested as an effective means to monitor changes in the antioxidant activity of lentils during germination. This indicator may be used to monitor other process-induced changes in antioxidant potential of food phenolics in other foods. The antioxidant activity of SPs, IBPs, and total value, the sum of both free and esterified phenolics, of germinated CDC Richlea lentil variety was evaluated for 4 days. Total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, and 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical cation scavenging ability were employed to record antioxidant activities. An incremental increase in IBPs was found in TPC, TFC, DPPH, and ABTS radical cation scavenging ability, whereas SPs showed a declining trend in TFC, DPPH, and ABTS, except TPC during 4 days of germination. The ratio of IBPs to SPs increased using most methods, and this may be possibly due to the changes of phenolic compound formation from soluble into insoluble bound form during germination process. The ratio can be used as a novel method for monitoring process-induced changes in the antioxidant activity of foods.

  5. Nucleotide binding interactions modulate dNTP selectivity and facilitate 8-oxo-dGTP incorporation by DNA polymerase lambda

    PubMed Central

    Burak, Matthew J.; Guja, Kip E.; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    8-Oxo-7,8,-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine triphosphate (8-oxo-dGTP) is a major product of oxidative damage in the nucleotide pool. It is capable of mispairing with adenosine (dA), resulting in futile, mutagenic cycles of base excision repair. Therefore, it is critical that DNA polymerases discriminate against 8-oxo-dGTP at the insertion step. Because of its roles in oxidative DNA damage repair and non-homologous end joining, DNA polymerase lambda (Pol λ) may frequently encounter 8-oxo-dGTP. Here, we have studied the mechanisms of 8-oxo-dGMP incorporation and discrimination by Pol λ. We have solved high resolution crystal structures showing how Pol λ accommodates 8-oxo-dGTP in its active site. The structures indicate that when mispaired with dA, the oxidized nucleotide assumes the mutagenic syn-conformation, and is stabilized by multiple interactions. Steady-state kinetics reveal that two residues lining the dNTP binding pocket, Ala510 and Asn513, play differential roles in dNTP selectivity. Specifically, Ala510 and Asn513 facilitate incorporation of 8-oxo-dGMP opposite dA and dC, respectively. These residues also modulate the balance between purine and pyrimidine incorporation. Our results shed light on the mechanisms controlling 8-oxo-dGMP incorporation in Pol λ and on the importance of interactions with the incoming dNTP to determine selectivity in family X DNA polymerases. PMID:26220180

  6. Combination of redox-active ligand and lewis acid for dioxygen reduction with π-bound molybdenum-quinonoid complexes.

    PubMed

    Henthorn, Justin T; Lin, Sibo; Agapie, Theodor

    2015-02-04

    A series of π-bound Mo-quinonoid complexes supported by pendant phosphines have been synthesized. Structural characterization revealed strong metal-arene interactions between Mo and the π system of the quinonoid fragment. The Mo-catechol complex (2a) was found to react within minutes with 0.5 equiv of O(2) to yield a Mo-quinone complex (3), H(2)O, and CO. Si- and B-protected Mo-catecholate complexes also react with O(2) to yield 3 along with (R(2)SiO)n and (ArBO)(3) byproducts, respectively. Formally, the Mo-catecholate fragment provides two electrons, while the elements bound to the catecholate moiety act as acceptors for the O(2) oxygens. Unreactive by itself, the Mo-dimethyl catecholate analogue reduces O(2) in the presence of added Lewis acid, B(C(6)F(5))(3), to generate a Mo(I) species and a bis(borane)-supported peroxide dianion, [[(F(5)C(6))(3)B](2)O(2)(2-)], demonstrating single-electron-transfer chemistry from Mo to the O(2) moiety. The intramolecular combination of a molybdenum center, redox-active ligand, and Lewis acid reduces O(2) with pendant acids weaker than B(C(6)F(5))(3). Overall, the π-bound catecholate moiety acts as a two-electron donor. A mechanism is proposed in which O(2) is reduced through an initial one-electron transfer, coupled with transfer of the Lewis acidic moiety bound to the quinonoid oxygen atoms to the reduced O(2) species.

  7. Synergistic transcriptional enhancement does not depend on the number of acidic activation domains bound to the promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Oliviero, S; Struhl, K

    1991-01-01

    Many eukaryotic transcriptional activator proteins contain a DNA-binding domain that interacts with specific promoter sequences and an acidic activation region that is required to stimulate transcription. Transcriptional enhancement by such activator proteins is often synergistic and promiscuous; promoters containing multiple binding sites for an individual protein or even for unrelated proteins can be 10-100 times more active than promoters with single sites. It has been suggested that such synergy reflects a nonlinear response of the basic transcription machinery to the number and/or quality of acidic activation regions. Here, we determine the transcriptional activity of Jun-Fos heterodimers containing one or two GCN4 acidic activation regions on promoters containing one or two Ap-1 target sites. Surprisingly, heterodimers with one or two acidic regions activate transcription with similar efficiency and are equally synergistic (10- to 15-fold) on promoters containing two target sites. Thus, transcriptional synergy does not depend on the number of acidic activation regions but rather on the number of proteins bound to the promoter. This suggests that synergy is mediated either by cooperative DNA binding or by alternative mechanisms in which the DNA-binding domain plays a more direct role in transcription (e.g., changes in DNA structure, nucleosome displacement, or direct interactions with the transcriptional machinery). Images PMID:1898773

  8. Isolation, enzyme-bound structure and antibacterial activity of platencin A[subscript 1] from Streptomyces platensis

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Sheo B.; Ondeyka, John G.; Herath, Kithsiri B.; Zhang, Chaowei; Jayasuriya, Hiranthi; Zink, Deborah L.; Parthasarathy, Gopalakrishnan; Becker, Joseph W.; Wang, Jun; Soisson, Stephen M.; Merck

    2010-09-03

    Natural products continue to serve as one of the best sources for discovery of antibacterial agents as exemplified by the recent discoveries of platensimycin and platencin. Chemical modifications as well as discovery of congeners are the main sources for gaining knowledge of structure-activity relationship of natural products. Screening for congeners in the extracts of the fermentation broths of Streptomyces platensis led to the isolation of platencin A{sub 1}, a hydroxy congener of platencin. The hydroxylation of the tricyclic enone moiety negatively affected the antibacterial activity and appears to be consistent with the hydrophobic binding pocket of the FabF. Isolation, structure, enzyme-bound structure and activity of platencin A{sub 1} and two other congeners have been described.

  9. Structure of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase with the Inhibitor β-thujaplicinol Bound at the RNase H Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Himmel, Daniel M.; Maegley, Karen A.; Pauly, Tom A.; Bauman, Joseph D.; Das, Kalyan; Dharia, Chhaya; Clark, Arthur D.; Ryan, Kevin; Hickey, Michael J.; Love, Robert A.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Bergqvist, Simon; Arnold, Eddy

    2012-01-01

    Summary Novel inhibitors are needed to counteract the rapid emergence of drug-resistant HIV variants. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) has both DNA polymerase and RNase H (RNH) enzymatic activities, but approved drugs that inhibit RT target the polymerase. Inhibitors that act against new targets, like RNH, would be effective against all of the current drug-resistant variants. Here, we present 2.80 Å and 2.04 Å resolution crystal structures of an RNH inhibitor, β-thujaplicinol, bound at the RNH active site of both HIV-1 RT and an isolated RNH domain. β-thujaplicinol chelates two divalent metal ions at the RNH active site. We provide biochemical evidence that β-thujaplicinol is a slow-binding RNH inhibitor with non-competitive kinetics and suggest that it forms a tropylium ion that interacts favorably with RT and the RNA:DNA substrate. PMID:20004166

  10. Quantum Chemical Studies on Stability and Chemical Activities in Calcium Ion Bound Calmodulin Loops.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Samapan; Ghosh, Mahua; De Raychaudhury, Molly; Chakrabarti, J

    2015-11-19

    Quantum chemical (QC) calculations for macromolecules require truncation of the molecule, highlighting the portion of interest due to heavy computation cost. As a result, an estimation of the effects of truncation is important to interpret the energy spectrum of such calculations. We perform density functional theory based QC calculations on calcium ion bound EF-hand loops of Calmodulin isolated from the crystal structure in an implicit solvent. We find that the terminal contributions of neutral capping are negligible across the entire ground-state energy spectrum. The coordination energy range and the nature of hybridization of the coordination state molecular orbitals remain qualitatively similar across these loops. While the HOMO and LUMO of loops in the N-terminal domain are dominated by the acidic aspartates, and the polar/hydrophobic residues, respectively, these levels of the C-terminal domain loops show strong localized electron density on the phenyl rings of the tyrosines. The Fukui index calculation identifies the hydroxyl oxygen in the phenyl ring of Y99 as a potent nucleophile. Our analysis indicates a general way of interpreting the electronic energy spectra to understand stability and functions of large biomolecules where the truncation of the molecule and, hence, the terminal capping effects are inevitable.

  11. Composition, characteristic and activity of rare earth element-bound polysaccharide from tea.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Wang, C; Zhao, G; Wei, Z; Tao, Y; Liang, X

    2001-09-01

    The compositions and structural characteristics of rare earth elements-bound polysaccharides from tea (REE-TPS) were studied with the methods of Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), Gas Chromatography (GC) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The results show that polysaccharide from tea (TPS) was a sort of glycoprotein and coordinated with Rare Earth Elements (REE) closely. The sugar fraction was composed of Rha, Ara, Xyl, Fuc, Glc, and Gal. There existed almost all natural amino acids with Glx, Asx, and Hyp as the major parts in the protein fraction. The REEs in REE-TPS were mainly composed of La, Ce, and Nd, especially, more than 75% of them was La. The coordination atom of the first coordination shell of La in REE-TPS was oxygen, the coordination number of which was 6, and the average distance between the atoms was 2.52 A. The second shell was formed from sulfur atoms, the coordination number and the average distance were 3 and 2.91 A, respectively. The bio-experiments show that REE-TPS could decrease the content of blood glucose in mice significantly.

  12. Rapid parallel flow cytometry assays of active GTPases using effector beads.

    PubMed

    Buranda, Tione; BasuRay, Soumik; Swanson, Scarlett; Agola, Jacob; Bondu, Virginie; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2013-11-15

    We describe a rapid assay for measuring the cellular activity of small guanine triphosphatases (GTPases) in response to a specific stimulus. Effector-functionalized beads are used to quantify in parallel multiple GTP-bound GTPases in the same cell lysate by flow cytometry. In a biologically relevant example, five different Ras family GTPases are shown for the first time to be involved in a concerted signaling cascade downstream of receptor ligation by Sin Nombre hantavirus.

  13. Structure of RCC1 chromatin factor bound to the nucleosome core particle

    SciTech Connect

    Makde, Ravindra D.; England, Joseph R.; Yennawar, Hemant P.; Tan, Song

    2010-11-11

    The small GTPase Ran enzyme regulates critical eukaryotic cellular functions including nuclear transport and mitosis through the creation of a RanGTP gradient around the chromosomes. This concentration gradient is created by the chromatin-bound RCC1 (regulator of chromosome condensation) protein, which recruits Ran to nucleosomes and activates Ran's nucleotide exchange activity. Although RCC1 has been shown to bind directly with the nucleosome, the molecular details of this interaction were not known. Here we determine the crystal structure of a complex of Drosophila RCC1 and the nucleosome core particle at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution, providing an atomic view of how a chromatin protein interacts with the histone and DNA components of the nucleosome. Our structure also suggests that the Widom 601 DNA positioning sequence present in the nucleosomes forms a 145-base-pair nucleosome core particle, not the expected canonical 147-base-pair particle.

  14. Discovery of widespread GTP-binding motifs in genomic DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Edward A; Liu, David R

    2013-04-18

    Biological RNAs that bind small molecules have been implicated in a variety of regulatory and catalytic processes. Inspired by these examples, we used in vitro selection to search a pool of genome-encoded RNA fragments for naturally occurring GTP aptamers. Several aptamer classes were identified, including one (the "G motif") with a G-quadruplex structure. Further analysis revealed that most RNA and DNA G-quadruplexes bind GTP. The G motif is abundant in eukaryotes, and the human genome contains ~75,000 examples with dissociation constants comparable to the GTP concentration of a eukaryotic cell (~300 μM). G-quadruplexes play roles in diverse cellular processes, and our findings raise the possibility that GTP may play a role in the function of these elements. Consistent with this possibility, the sequence requirements of several classes of regulatory G-quadruplexes parallel those of GTP binding.

  15. Inhibitory GTP binding protein G/sub i/ regulates US -adrenoceptor affinity towards US -agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Marbach, I.; Levitzki, A.

    1987-05-01

    Treatment of S-49 lymphoma cell membranes with pertussis toxin (PT) causes a three-fold reduction of US -adrenoceptor (US AR) affinity towards isoproterenol. A similar treatment with cholera toxin (CT) does not cause such a modulation. The effects were studied by the detailed analysis of SVI-cyanopindolol (CYP) binding curves in the absence and presence of increasing agonist concentrations. Thus, the authors were able to compare in detail the effects of G/sub s/ and G/sub i/ on the agonist-associated state of the US AR. In contrast to these findings, PT treatment does not have any effect on the displacement of SVI-CYP by (-)isoproterenol. These results demonstrate that the inhibitory GTP protein G/sub i/ modulates the US AR affinity towards US -agonists. This might be due to the association of G/sub i/ with the agonist-bound US AR x G/sub s/ x C complex within the membrane. This hypothesis, as well as others, is under investigation.

  16. Pantetheinase activity of membrane-bound Vanin-1: lack of free cysteamine in tissues of Vanin-1 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Pitari, G; Malergue, F; Martin, F; Philippe, J M; Massucci, M T; Chabret, C; Maras, B; Duprè, S; Naquet, P; Galland, F

    2000-10-20

    Pantetheinase (EC 3.5.1.-) is an ubiquitous enzyme which in vitro has been shown to recycle pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) and to produce cysteamine, a potent anti-oxidant. We show that the Vanin-1 gene encodes pantetheinase widely expressed in mouse tissues: (1) a pantetheinase activity is specifically expressed by Vanin-1 transfectants and is immunodepleted by specific antibodies; (2) Vanin-1 is a GPI-anchored pantetheinase, and consequently an ectoenzyme; (3) Vanin-1 null mice are deficient in membrane-bound pantetheinase activity in kidney and liver; (4) in these organs, a major metabolic consequence is the absence of detectable free cysteamine; this demonstrates that membrane-bound pantetheinase is the main source of cysteamine in tissues under physiological conditions. Since the Vanin-1 molecule was previously shown to be involved in the control of thymus reconstitution following sublethal irradiation in vivo, this raises the possibility that Vanin/pantetheinase might be involved in the regulation of some immune functions maybe in the context of the response to oxidative stress.

  17. Dephosphorylation of cofilin in stimulated platelets: roles for a GTP-binding protein and Ca2+.

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, M M; Haslam, R J

    1994-01-01

    In human platelets, thrombin not only stimulates the phosphorylation of pleckstrin (P47) and of myosin P-light chains, but also induces the dephosphorylation of an 18-19 kDa phosphoprotein (P18) [Imaoka, Lynham and Haslam (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 11404-11414]. We have now studied this protein in detail. The thrombin-induced dephosphorylation reaction did not begin until the phosphorylation of myosin P-light chains and the secretion of dense-granule 5-hydroxytryptamine were nearly complete, but did parallel the later stages of platelet aggregation. Experiments with ionophore A23187 and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate indicated that dephosphorylation of P18 was stimulated by Ca2+, but not by protein kinase C. Two-dimensional analysis of platelet proteins, using non-equilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis followed by SDS/PAGE, showed that thrombin decreased the amount of phosphorylated P18 in platelets by up to 70% and slightly increased the amount of a more basic unlabelled protein that was present in 3-fold excess of P18 in unstimulated platelets. These two proteins were identified as the phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated forms of the pH-sensitive actin-depolymerizing protein, cofilin, by sequencing of peptide fragments and immunoblotting with a monoclonal antibody specific for cofilin. The molar concentration of cofilin in platelets was approx. 10% that of actin. Platelet cofilin was phosphorylated exclusively on serine. Experiments with electropermeabilized platelets showed that dephosphorylation of cofilin could be stimulated by guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[S]) in the absence of Ca2+ or by a free Ca2+ concentration of 10 microM. This GTP[S]-induced dephosphorylation reaction was inhibited by 1-naphthyl phosphate, but not by okadaic acid. Our results add cofilin to the actin-binding proteins that may regulate the platelet cytoskeleton, and suggest that platelet cofilin can be activated by dephosphorylation reactions initiated either by a GTP

  18. Effect of Butanedioic Acid Mono (2,2-Dimethylhydrazide) on the Activity of Membrane-Bound Succinate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    See, Raymond M.; Foy, Chester L.

    1982-01-01

    Mitochondria isolated from hypocotyls of five-day-old bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. `Black Valentine') seedlings rapidly oxidized succinate, malate, and NADH. Oxidation rates, respiratory control, and ADP:O ratios obtained with saturating concentrations of all three substrates indicated that the mitochondria were tightly coupled. The mitochondrial preparation was then employed to investigate the respiration-inhibiting effects of butanedioic acid mono (2,2-dimethyl-hydrazide) (daminozide) a plant growth retardant having structural similarity to an endogenous respiratory substrate (succinate). Daminozide markedly inhibited the activity of membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase. Inhibition was of the competitive type (apparent Ki, 20.2 millimolar) with respect to succinate. Although not excluding other hypotheses, the results support an active role for daminozide in the suppression of respiration as an important metabolic site of its action as a plant growth regulator. PMID:16662493

  19. Localization and activity of tissue bound cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase in normal and lack of changes in psoriatic human skin.

    PubMed

    Mahrle, G; Organos, C E

    1976-12-01

    This study has been undertaken to elucidate the localization and the activity of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) in psoriatic epidermis compared to normal. The results showed that the evaluation of cytochemical methods may be difficult because of the various factors which interfere with the reaction and the considerable amount of background staining. Additionally, only the tissue bound particulate enzyme fraction may be demonstrated by cytochemical means. Nevertheless, the method did reveal that the activity of PDE, if any, is localized on the cytoplasmic membranes of the cells, independent of their origin, and not on the cell surface. Moreover, no differences were found between normal and psoriatic skin. It seems, therefore, that the intracellular degradation of cAMP remains unaltered in psoriasis.

  20. The mechanism of potent GTP cyclohydrolase I inhibition by 2,4-diamino-6-hydroxypyrimidine: requirement of the GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Kolinsky, Monica A; Gross, Steven S

    2004-09-24

    Inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) has been used as a selective tool to assess the role of de novo synthesis of (6R)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-L-biopterin (BH4) in a biological system. Toward this end, 2,4-diamino-6-hydroxypyrimidine (DAHP) has been used as the prototypical GTPCH inhibitor. Using a novel real-time kinetic microplate assay for GTPCH activity and purified prokaryote-expressed recombinant proteins, we show that potent inhibition by DAHP is not the result of a direct interaction with GTPCH. Rather, inhibition by DAHP in phosphate buffer occurs via an indirect mechanism that requires the presence of GTPCH feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). Notably, GFRP was previously discovered as the essential factor that reconstitutes inhibition of pure recombinant GTPCH by the pathway end product BH4. Thus, DAHP inhibits GTPCH by engaging the endogenous feedback inhibitory system. We further demonstrate that L-Phe fully reverses the inhibition of GTPCH by DAHP/GFRP, which is also a feature in common with inhibition by BH4/GFRP. These findings suggest that DAHP is not an indiscriminate inhibitor of GTPCH in biological systems; instead, it is predicted to preferentially attenuate GTPCH activity in cells that most abundantly express GFRP and/or contain the lowest levels of L-Phe.

  1. Binding of dicamba to soluble and bound extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from aerobic activated sludge: a fluorescence quenching study.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiangliang; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Daoyong; Chen, Xi; Song, Wenjuan; Wu, Fengchang

    2010-05-15

    Binding of dicamba to soluble EPS (SEPS) and bound EPS (BEPS) from aerobic activated sludge was investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy. Two protein-like fluorescence peaks (peak A with Ex/Em=225 nm/342-344 nm and peak B with Ex/Em=275/340-344 nm) were identified in SEPS and BEPS. Humic-like fluorescence peak C (Ex/Em=270-275 nm/450-460 nm) was only found in BEPS. Fluorescence of the peaks A and B for SEPS and peak A for BEPS were markedly quenched by dicamba at all temperatures whereas fluorescence of peaks B and C for BEPS was quenched only at 298 K. A dynamic process dominated the fluorescence quenching of peak A of both SEPS and BEPS. Fluorescence quenching of peak B and C was governed a static process. The effective quenching constants (logK(a)) were 4.725-5.293 for protein-like fluorophores of SEPS and 4.23-5.190 for protein-like fluorophores of BEPS, respectively. LogK(a) for humic-like substances was 3.85. Generally, SEPS had greater binding capacity for dicamba than BEPS, and protein-like substances bound dicamba more strongly than humic-like substances. Binding of dicamba to SEPS and BEPS was spontaneous and exothermic. Electrostatic force and hydrophobic interaction forces play a crucial role in binding of dicamba to EPS.

  2. COEXISTENCE OF GRAVITATIONALLY-BOUND AND RADIATION-DRIVEN C IV EMISSION LINE REGIONS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Huiyuan; Wang Tinggui; Zhou Hongyan; Liu Bo; Dong Xiaobo; Wang Jianguo

    2011-09-01

    There are mutually contradictory views in the literature of the kinematics and structure of high-ionization line (e.g., C IV) emitting regions in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Two kinds of broad emission line region (BELR) models have been proposed, outflow and gravitationally-bound BELR, which are supported, respectively, by blueshift of the C IV line and reverberation mapping observations. To reconcile these two apparently different models, we present a detailed comparison study between the C IV and Mg II lines using a sample of AGNs selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find that the kinematics of the C IV region is different from that of Mg II, which is thought to be controlled by gravity. A strong correlation is found between the blueshift and asymmetry of the C IV profile and the Eddington ratio. This provides strong observational support for the postulation that the outflow is driven by radiation pressure. In particular, we find robust evidence that the C IV line region is largely dominated by outflow at high Eddington ratios, while it is primarily gravitationally-bounded at low Eddington ratios. Our results indicate that these two emitting regions coexist in most AGNs. The emission strength from these two gases varies smoothly with Eddington ratio in opposite ways. This explanation naturally reconciles the apparently contradictory views proposed in previous studies. Finally, candidate models are discussed which can account for both the enhancement of outflow emission and suppression of normal BEL in AGNs with high Eddington ratios.

  3. A rice membrane-bound calcium-dependent protein kinase is activated in response to low temperature.

    PubMed

    Martín, M L; Busconi, L

    2001-03-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are found in various subcellular localizations, which suggests that this family of serine/threonine kinases may be involved in multiple signal transduction pathways. CDPKs are believed to be involved in the response of plants to low temperatures, but the precise role in the signal transduction pathway is largely unknown. Previous reports described changes in CDPKs' mRNA levels in response to cold treatment, but whether these changes are accompanied by increases in protein level and/or kinase activities is unknown. In the present study, we identify in rice (Oryza sativa L. cv Don Juan) plants a 56-kD membrane-bound CDPK that is activated in response to cold treatment. Immunoblot analysis of the enzyme preparations from control and cold-treated plants showed that the kinase level was similar in both preparations. However, both kinase and autophosphorylating activities of the enzyme prepared from cold-treated plants were significantly higher than that obtained from control plants. The activation of the CDPK is detected after 12 to 18 h of cold treatment, which indicates that the kinase does not participate in the initial response to low temperature but in the adaptative process to adverse conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a CDPK that is posttranscriptionally activated in response to low temperature.

  4. Mutagenesis in the switch IV of the helical domain of the human Gsalpha reduces its GDP/GTP exchange rate.

    PubMed

    Echeverría, V; Hinrichs, M V; Torrejón, M; Ropero, S; Martinez, J; Toro, M J; Olate, J

    2000-01-01

    The Galpha subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins are constituted by a conserved GTPase "Ras-like" domain (RasD) and by a unique alpha-helical domain (HD). Upon GTP binding, four regions, called switch I, II, III, and IV, have been identified as undergoing structural changes. Switch I, II, and III are located in RasD and switch IV in HD. All Galpha known functions, such as GTPase activity and receptor, effector, and Gbetagamma interaction sites have been found to be localized in RasD, but little is known about the role of HD and its switch IV region. Through the construction of chimeras between human and Xenopus Gsalpha we have previously identified a HD region, encompassing helices alphaA, alphaB, and alphaC, that was responsible for the observed functional differences in their capacity to activate adenylyl cyclase (Antonelli et al. [1994]: FEBS Lett 340:249-254). Since switch IV is located within this region and contains most of the nonconservative amino acid differences between both Gsalpha proteins, in the present work we constructed two human Gsalpha mutant proteins in which we have changed four and five switch IV residues for the ones present in the Xenopus protein. Mutants M15 (hGsalphaalphaS133N, M135P, P138K, P143S) and M17 (hGsalphaalphaS133N, M135P, V137Y, P138K, P143S) were expressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and characterized by their ability to bind GTPgammaS, dissociate GDP, hydrolyze GTP, and activate adenylyl cyclase. A decreased rate of GDP release, GTPgammaS binding, and GTP hydrolysis was observed for both mutants, M17 having considerably slower kinetics than M15 for all functions tested. Reconstituted adenylyl cyclase activity with both mutants showed normal activation in the presence of AlF(4)(-), but a decreased activation with GTPgammaS, which is consistent with the lower GDP dissociating rate they displayed. These data provide new evidence on the role that HD is playing in modulating the GDP/GTP exchange of the Gsalpha subunit.

  5. An Arabidopsis Ran-binding protein, AtRanBP1c, is a co-activator of Ran GTPase-activating protein and requires the C-terminus for its cytoplasmic localization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Soo-Hwan; Roux, Stanley J.

    2003-01-01

    Ran-binding proteins (RanBPs) are a group of proteins that bind to Ran (Ras-related nuclear small GTP-binding protein), and thus either control the GTP/GDP-bound states of Ran or help couple the Ran GTPase cycle to a cellular process. AtRanBP1c is a Ran-binding protein from Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. that was recently shown to be critically involved in the regulation of auxin-induced mitotic progression [S.-H. Kim et al. (2001) Plant Cell 13:2619-2630]. Here we report that AtRanBP1c inhibits the EDTA-induced release of GTP from Ran and serves as a co-activator of Ran-GTPase-activating protein (RanGAP) in vitro. Transient expression of AtRanBP1c fused to a beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter reveals that the protein localizes primarily to the cytosol. Neither the N- nor C-terminus of AtRanBP1c, which flank the Ran-binding domain (RanBD), is necessary for the binding of PsRan1-GTP to the protein, but both are needed for the cytosolic localization of GUS-fused AtRanBP1c. These findings, together with a previous report that AtRanBP1c is critically involved in root growth and development, imply that the promotion of GTP hydrolysis by the Ran/RanGAP/AtRanBP1c complex in the cytoplasm, and the resulting concentration gradient of Ran-GDP to Ran-GTP across the nuclear membrane could be important in the regulation of auxin-induced mitotic progression in root tips of A. thaliana.

  6. Maintenance of biological activity of pertussis toxin radioiodinated while bound to fetuin-agarose

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, G.D.; Peppler, M.S.

    1987-05-01

    We developed a method to produce radioiodinated pertussis toxin (PT) which was active in the goose erythrocyte agglutination and CHO cell assay systems. The procedure used fetuin coupled to agarose to prevent inactivation of the toxin during the iodination reaction. Analysis of the labeled PT by affinity chromatography on fetuin-agarose and wheat germ agglutinin-agarose and by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that there were minimal amounts of labeled fetuin or other contaminants in the labeled PT preparations. All five of the subunits of the toxin appeared to be labeled by the procedure. The labeling method will facilitate further investigations into the nature of the interaction and activity of PT in host tissues.

  7. Target-depth estimation in active sonar: Cramer-Rao bounds for a bilinear sound-speed profile.

    PubMed

    Mours, Alexis; Ioana, Cornel; Mars, Jérôme I; Josso, Nicolas F; Doisy, Yves

    2016-09-01

    This paper develops a localization method to estimate the depth of a target in the context of active sonar, at long ranges. The target depth is tactical information for both strategy and classification purposes. The Cramer-Rao lower bounds for the target position as range and depth are derived for a bilinear profile. The influence of sonar parameters on the standard deviations of the target range and depth are studied. A localization method based on ray back-propagation with a probabilistic approach is then investigated. Monte-Carlo simulations applied to a summer Mediterranean sound-speed profile are performed to evaluate the efficiency of the estimator. This method is finally validated on data in an experimental tank.

  8. Visualization of poly(ADP-ribose) bound to PARG reveals inherent balance between exo- and endo-glycohydrolase activities

    PubMed Central

    Barkauskaite, Eva; Brassington, Amy; Tan, Edwin S.; Warwicker, Jim; Dunstan, Mark S.; Banos, Benito; Lafite, Pierre; Ahel, Marijan; Mitchison, Timothy J.; Ahel, Ivan; Leys, David

    2013-01-01

    Poly-ADP-ribosylation is a post-translational modification that regulates processes involved in genome stability. Breakdown of the poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymer is catalysed by poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), whose endo-glycohydrolase activity generates PAR fragments. Here we present the crystal structure of PARG incorporating the PAR substrate. The two terminal ADP-ribose units of the polymeric substrate are bound in exo-mode. Biochemical and modelling studies reveal that PARG acts predominantly as an exo-glycohydrolase. This preference is linked to Phe902 (human numbering), which is responsible for low-affinity binding of the substrate in endo-mode. Our data reveal the mechanism of poly-ADP-ribosylation reversal, with ADP-ribose as the dominant product, and suggest that the release of apoptotic PAR fragments occurs at unusual PAR/PARG ratios. PMID:23917065

  9. Protein-bound polysaccharide activates dendritic cells and enhances OVA-specific T cell response as vaccine adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Abbi L.; Sun, Guan-Cheng; Gad, Ekram; Rastetter, Lauren R.; Strobe, Katie; Yang, Yi; Dang, Yushe; Disis, Mary L; Lu, Hailing

    2013-01-01

    Protein-bound polysaccharide-K (PSK) is a hot water extract from Trametes versicolor mushroom. It has been used traditionally in Asian countries for its immune stimulating and anti-cancer effects. We have recently found that PSK can activate toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). TLR2 is highly expressed on dendritic cells (DC), so the currently study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of PSK on DC activation and the potential of using PSK as a vaccine adjuvant. In vitro experiments using mouse bone marrow-derived DC (BMDC) demonstrated that PSK induces DC maturation as shown by dose-dependent increase in the expression of CD80, CD86, MHCII, and CD40. PSK also induces the production of multiple inflammatory cytokines by DC, including IL-12, TNF-α, and IL-6, at both mRNA and protein levels. In vivo experiments using PSK as an adjuvant to OVAp323-339 vaccine showed that PSK as adjuvant leads to enlarged draining lymph nodes with higher number of activated DC. PSK also stimulates proliferation of OVA-specific T cells, and induces T cells that produce multiple cytokines, IFN-γ, IL-2, and TNF-α. Altogether, these results demonstrate the ability of PSK to activate DC in vitro and in vivo and the potential of using PSK as a novel vaccine adjuvant. PMID:23735481

  10. Structural insights into the mechanism of activation of the TRPV1 channel by a membrane-bound tarantula toxin.

    PubMed

    Bae, Chanhyung; Anselmi, Claudio; Kalia, Jeet; Jara-Oseguera, Andres; Schwieters, Charles D; Krepkiy, Dmitriy; Won Lee, Chul; Kim, Eun-Hee; Kim, Jae Il; Faraldo-Gómez, José D; Swartz, Kenton J

    2016-02-10

    Venom toxins are invaluable tools for exploring the structure and mechanisms of ion channels. Here, we solve the structure of double-knot toxin (DkTx), a tarantula toxin that activates the heat-activated TRPV1 channel. We also provide improved structures of TRPV1 with and without the toxin bound, and investigate the interactions of DkTx with the channel and membranes. We find that DkTx binds to the outer edge of the external pore of TRPV1 in a counterclockwise configuration, using a limited protein-protein interface and inserting hydrophobic residues into the bilayer. We also show that DkTx partitions naturally into membranes, with the two lobes exhibiting opposing energetics for membrane partitioning and channel activation. Finally, we find that the toxin disrupts a cluster of hydrophobic residues behind the selectivity filter that are critical for channel activation. Collectively, our findings reveal a novel mode of toxin-channel recognition that has important implications for the mechanism of thermosensation.

  11. Structural insights into the mechanism of activation of the TRPV1 channel by a membrane-bound tarantula toxin

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Chanhyung; Anselmi, Claudio; Kalia, Jeet; Jara-Oseguera, Andres; Schwieters, Charles D; Krepkiy, Dmitriy; Won Lee, Chul; Kim, Eun-Hee; Kim, Jae Il; Faraldo-Gómez, José D; Swartz, Kenton J

    2016-01-01

    Venom toxins are invaluable tools for exploring the structure and mechanisms of ion channels. Here, we solve the structure of double-knot toxin (DkTx), a tarantula toxin that activates the heat-activated TRPV1 channel. We also provide improved structures of TRPV1 with and without the toxin bound, and investigate the interactions of DkTx with the channel and membranes. We find that DkTx binds to the outer edge of the external pore of TRPV1 in a counterclockwise configuration, using a limited protein-protein interface and inserting hydrophobic residues into the bilayer. We also show that DkTx partitions naturally into membranes, with the two lobes exhibiting opposing energetics for membrane partitioning and channel activation. Finally, we find that the toxin disrupts a cluster of hydrophobic residues behind the selectivity filter that are critical for channel activation. Collectively, our findings reveal a novel mode of toxin-channel recognition that has important implications for the mechanism of thermosensation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11273.001 PMID:26880553

  12. Progesterone-induced activation of membrane-bound progesterone receptors in murine macrophage cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Reese, Joshua; Zhou, Ying; Hirsch, Emmet

    2015-02-01

    Parturition is an inflammatory process mediated to a significant extent by macrophages. Progesterone (P4) maintains uterine quiescence in pregnancy, and a proposed functional withdrawal of P4 classically regulated by nuclear progesterone receptors (nPRs) leads to labor. P4 can affect the functions of macrophages despite the reported lack of expression of nPRs in these immune cells. Therefore, in this study we investigated the effects of the activation of the putative membrane-associated PR on the function of macrophages (a key cell for parturition) and discuss the implications of these findings for pregnancy and parturition. In murine macrophage cells (RAW 264.7), activation of mPRs by P4 modified to be active only extracellularly by conjugation to BSA (P4BSA, 1.0×10(-7) mol/l) caused a pro-inflammatory shift in the mRNA expression profile, with significant upregulation of the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2 (Ptgs2)), Il1B, and Tnf and downregulation of membrane progesterone receptor alpha (Paqr7) and oxytocin receptor (Oxtr). Pretreatment with PD98059, a MEK1/2 inhibitor, significantly reduced P4BSA-induced expression of mRNA of Il1B, Tnf, and Ptgs2. Inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) by H89 blocked P4BSA-induced expression of Il1B and Tnf mRNA. P4BSA induced rapid phosphorylation of MEK1/2 and CREB (a downstream target of PKA). This phosphorylation was inhibited by pretreatment with PD98059 and H89, respectively, revealing that MEK1/2 and PKA are two of the components involved in mPR signaling. Taken together, these results indicate that changes in membrane progesterone receptor alpha expression and signaling in macrophages are associated with the inflammatory responses; and that these changes might contribute to the functional withdrawal of P4 related to labor.

  13. Generation and characterization of tabalumab, a human monoclonal antibody that neutralizes both soluble and membrane-bound B-cell activating factor

    PubMed Central

    Manetta, Joseph; Bina, Holly; Ryan, Paul; Fox, Niles; Witcher, Derrick R; Kikly, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    B-cell activating factor (BAFF) is a B-cell survival factor with a key role in B-cell homeostasis and tolerance. Dysregulated BAFF expression may contribute to autoimmune diseases or B-cell malignancies via effects on abnormal B-lymphocyte activation, proliferation, survival, and immunoglobulin secretion. Monoclonal antibodies were generated against human BAFF, characterized for species specificity and affinity, and screened for the ability to neutralize both membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. In addition, studies were undertaken to determine the relative potency of membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. Tabalumab has a high affinity for human, cynomolgus monkey, and rabbit BAFF. No binding to mouse BAFF was detected. Tabalumab was able to neutralize soluble human, cynomolgus monkey, or rabbit BAFF with equal potency. Our data demonstrate that membrane-bound BAFF can be a more potent stimulus for B-cells than soluble BAFF, and tabalumab also neutralized membrane-bound BAFF. Tabalumab prevented BAFF from binding to BAFF receptors and demonstrated pharmacodynamic effects in human BAFF transgenic mice. Tabalumab is a high-affinity human antibody with neutralizing activity against membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. Given our findings that membrane-bound BAFF can have greater in vitro potency than soluble BAFF, neutralization of both forms of BAFF is likely to be important for optimal therapeutic effect. PMID:25258549

  14. Mechanistic characterization and crystal structure of a small molecule inactivator bound to plasminogen activator inhibitor-1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shih-Hon; Reinke, Ashley A.; Sanders, Karen L.; Emal, Cory D.; Whisstock, James C.; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Lawrence, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) is a member of the serine protease inhibitor (serpin) family. Excessive PAI-1 activity is associated with human disease, making it an attractive pharmaceutical target. However, like other serpins, PAI-1 has a labile structure, making it a difficult target for the development of small molecule inhibitors, and to date, there are no US Food and Drug Administration–approved small molecule inactivators of any serpins. Here we describe the mechanistic and structural characterization of a high affinity inactivator of PAI-1. This molecule binds to PAI-1 reversibly and acts through an allosteric mechanism that inhibits PAI-1 binding to proteases and to its cofactor vitronectin. The binding site is identified by X-ray crystallography and mutagenesis as a pocket at the interface of β-sheets B and C and α-helix H. A similar pocket is present on other serpins, suggesting that this site could be a common target in this structurally conserved protein family. PMID:24297881

  15. A substrate-bound structure of cyanobacterial biliverdin reductase identifies stacked substrates as critical for activity

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Haruna; Hirabayashi, Kei; Nishigaya, Yuki; Kouriki, Haruna; Nakaniwa, Tetsuko; Hagiwara, Yoshinori; Harada, Jiro; Sato, Hideaki; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Asada, Yujiro; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Ken; Fukuyama, Keiichi; Sugishima, Masakazu; Wada, Kei

    2017-01-01

    Biliverdin reductase catalyses the last step in haem degradation and produces the major lipophilic antioxidant bilirubin via reduction of biliverdin, using NAD(P)H as a cofactor. Despite the importance of biliverdin reductase in maintaining the redox balance, the molecular details of the reaction it catalyses remain unknown. Here we present the crystal structure of biliverdin reductase in complex with biliverdin and NADP+. Unexpectedly, two biliverdin molecules, which we designated the proximal and distal biliverdins, bind with stacked geometry in the active site. The nicotinamide ring of the NADP+ is located close to the reaction site on the proximal biliverdin, supporting that the hydride directly attacks this position of the proximal biliverdin. The results of mutagenesis studies suggest that a conserved Arg185 is essential for the catalysis. The distal biliverdin probably acts as a conduit to deliver the proton from Arg185 to the proximal biliverdin, thus yielding bilirubin. PMID:28169272

  16. Structure of Cryptosporidium IMP dehydrogenase bound to an inhibitor with in vivo antiparasitic activity

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Youngchang; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; ...

    2015-04-21

    Inosine 5´-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is a promising target for the treatment of Cryptosporidium infections. Here, the structure of C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) in complex with inosine 5´-monophosphate (IMP) and P131, an inhibitor with in vivo anticryptosporidial activity, is reported. P131 contains two aromatic groups, one of which interacts with the hypoxanthine ring of IMP, while the second interacts with the aromatic ring of a tyrosine in the adjacent subunit. In addition, the amine and NO2 moieties bind in hydrated cavities, forming water-mediated hydrogen bonds to the protein. The design of compounds to replace these water molecules is a new strategymore » for the further optimization of C. parvum inhibitors for both antiparasitic and antibacterial applications.« less

  17. Upward Bound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Aerospace Education, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Describes an Upward Bound program at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University designed to assist disadvantaged high school juniors and seniors in overcoming academic deficiencies in order to enter and succeed in college. The Saturday program centered on various aspects of aviation, including career opportunities. (MLH)

  18. Outward Bound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Outward Bound, Inc., Andover, MA.

    The Outward Bound concept was developed in Germany and Great Britain with the saving of human life as the ultimate goal. Courses are designed to help students discover their true physical and mental limits through development of skills including emergency medical aid, firefighting, search and rescue, mountaineering, and sailing. Five Outward Bound…

  19. Control of lymphocyte shape and the chemotactic response by the GTP exchange factor Vav.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Manzanares, Miguel; Cruz-Adalia, Aranzazu; Martín-Cófreces, Noa B; Cabrero, José R; Dosil, Mercedes; Alvarado-Sánchez, Brenda; Bustelo, Xosé R; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2005-04-15

    Rho GTPases control many facets of cell polarity and migration; namely, the reorganization of the cellular cytoskeleton to extracellular stimuli. Rho GTPases are activated by GTP exchange factors (GEFs), which induce guanosine diphosphate (GDP) release and the stabilization of the nucleotide-free state. Thus, the role of GEFs in the regulation of the cellular response to extracellular cues during cell migration is a critical step of this process. In this report, we have analyzed the activation and subcellular localization of the hematopoietic GEF Vav in human peripheral blood lymphocytes stimulated with the chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1alpha). We show a robust activation of Vav and its redistribution to motility-associated subcellular structures, and we provide biochemical evidence of the recruitment of Vav to the membrane of SDF-1alpha-activated human lymphocytes, where it transiently interacts with the SDF-1alpha receptor CXCR4. Overexpression of a dominant negative form of Vav abolished lymphocyte polarization, actin polymerization, and migration. SDF-1alpha-mediated cell polarization and migration also were impaired by overexpression of an active, oncogenic Vav, although the mechanism appears to be different. Together, our data postulate a pivotal role for Vav in the transmission of the migratory signal through the chemokine receptor CXCR4.

  20. Chelation of Membrane-Bound Cations by Extracellular DNA Activates the Type VI Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wilton, Mike; Wong, Megan J. Q.; Tang, Le; Liang, Xiaoye; Moore, Richard; Parkins, Michael D.; Lewenza, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs its type VI secretion system (T6SS) as a highly effective and tightly regulated weapon to deliver toxic molecules to target cells. T6SS-secreted proteins of P. aeruginosa can be detected in the sputum of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, who typically present a chronic and polymicrobial lung infection. However, the mechanism of T6SS activation in the CF lung is not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that extracellular DNA (eDNA), abundant within the CF airways, stimulates the dynamics of the H1-T6SS cluster apparatus in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Addition of Mg2+ or DNase with eDNA abolished such activation, while treatment with EDTA mimicked the eDNA effect, suggesting that the eDNA-mediated effect is due to chelation of outer membrane-bound cations. DNA-activated H1-T6SS enables P. aeruginosa to nonselectively attack neighboring species regardless of whether or not it was provoked. Because of the importance of the T6SS in interspecies interactions and the prevalence of eDNA in the environments that P. aeruginosa inhabits, our report reveals an important adaptation strategy that likely contributes to the competitive fitness of P. aeruginosa in polymicrobial communities. PMID:27271742

  1. Bisphosphonates Inhibit Stellate Cell Activity and Enhance Antitumor Effects of Nanoparticle Albumin Bound-Paclitaxel in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Villasana, Vianey; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Arumugam, Thiruvengadam; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Fuentes-Mattei, Enrique; Deng, Defeng; Hwang, Rosa F.; Wang, Huamin; Ivan, Cristina; Garza, Raul Joshua; Cohen, Evan; Gao, Hui; Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo N.; Monroig-Bosque, Paloma del C.; Philip, Bincy; Rashed, Mohammed H.; Aslan, Burcu; Erdogan, Mumin Alper; Gutierrez-Puente, Yolanda; Ozpolat, Bulent; Reuben, James M.; Sood, Anil K.; Logsdon, Craig; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) have been recognized as the principal cells responsible for the production of fibrosis in PDAC. Recently PSCs have been noted to share characteristics with cells of monocyte-macrophage lineage (MML cells). Thus, we tested whether PSCs could be targeted with the nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (NBPs) [pamidronate (Pam) or zoledronic acid (ZA)], which are potent MML cell inhibitors. In addition, we tested NBPs treatment combination with nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) to enhance antitumor activity. In vitro we observed that PSCs possess α-naphthyl butyrate esterase (ANBE) enzyme activity, a specific marker of MML cells. Moreover NBPs inhibited PSCs proliferation, activation, release of macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and type I collagen expression. NBPs also induced PSC apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase. In vivo, NBPs inactivated PSCs; reduced fibrosis; inhibited tumor volume, tumor weight, peritoneal dissemination, angiogenesis, and cell proliferation; and increased apoptosis in an orthotopic murine model of PDAC. These in vivo antitumor effects were enhanced when NBPs were combined with nab-paclitaxel but not gemcitabine (Gem). Our study suggests that targeting PSCs and tumor cells with NBPs in combination with nab-paclitaxel may be a novel therapeutic approach to PDAC. PMID:25193509

  2. Chelation of Membrane-Bound Cations by Extracellular DNA Activates the Type VI Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wilton, Mike; Wong, Megan J Q; Tang, Le; Liang, Xiaoye; Moore, Richard; Parkins, Michael D; Lewenza, Shawn; Dong, Tao G

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs its type VI secretion system (T6SS) as a highly effective and tightly regulated weapon to deliver toxic molecules to target cells. T6SS-secreted proteins of P. aeruginosa can be detected in the sputum of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, who typically present a chronic and polymicrobial lung infection. However, the mechanism of T6SS activation in the CF lung is not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that extracellular DNA (eDNA), abundant within the CF airways, stimulates the dynamics of the H1-T6SS cluster apparatus in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Addition of Mg(2+) or DNase with eDNA abolished such activation, while treatment with EDTA mimicked the eDNA effect, suggesting that the eDNA-mediated effect is due to chelation of outer membrane-bound cations. DNA-activated H1-T6SS enables P. aeruginosa to nonselectively attack neighboring species regardless of whether or not it was provoked. Because of the importance of the T6SS in interspecies interactions and the prevalence of eDNA in the environments that P. aeruginosa inhabits, our report reveals an important adaptation strategy that likely contributes to the competitive fitness of P. aeruginosa in polymicrobial communities.

  3. Structure of the Human Activating Natural Cytotoxicity Receptor NKp30 Bound to its Tumor Cell Ligand B7-H6

    SciTech Connect

    Y Li; Q Wang; R Mariuzza

    2011-12-31

    Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system that participate in the elimination of tumor cells. In humans, the activating natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs) NKp30, NKp44, and NKp46 play a major role in NK cell-mediated tumor cell lysis. NKp30 recognizes B7-H6, a member of the B7 family which is expressed on tumor, but not healthy, cells. To understand the basis for tumor surveillance by NCRs, we determined the structure of NKp30, a member of the CD28 family which includes CTLA-4 and PD-1, in complex with B7-H6. The overall organization of the NKp30-B7-H6-activating complex differs considerably from those of the CTLA-4-B7 and PD-1-PD-L T cell inhibitory complexes. Whereas CTLA-4 and PD-1 use only the front {beta}-sheet of their Ig-like domain to bind ligands, NKp30 uses both front and back {beta}-sheets, resulting in engagement of B7-H6 via the side, as well as face, of the {beta}-sandwich. Moreover, B7-H6 contacts NKp30 through the complementarity-determining region (CDR) - like loops of its V-like domain in an antibody-like interaction that is not observed for B7 or PD-L. This first structure of an NCR bound to ligand provides a template for designing molecules to stimulate NKp30-mediated cytolytic activity for tumor immunotherapy.

  4. Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 CruA (sll0147) encodes lycopene cyclase and requires bound chlorophyll a for activity.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Shen, Gaozhong; Bryant, Donald A

    2017-03-01

    The genome of the model cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, encodes two paralogs of CruA-type lycopene cyclases, SynPCC7002_A2153 and SynPCC7002_A0043, which are denoted cruA and cruP, respectively. Unlike the wild-type strain, a cruA deletion mutant is light-sensitive, grows slowly, and accumulates lycopene, γ-carotene, and 1-OH-lycopene; however, this strain still produces β-carotene and other carotenoids derived from it. Expression of cruA from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (cruA 6803) in Escherichia coli strains that synthesize either lycopene or γ-carotene did not lead to the synthesis of either γ-carotene or β-carotene, respectively. However, expression of this orthologous cruA 6803 gene (sll0147) in the Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 cruA deletion mutant produced strains with phenotypic properties identical to the wild type. CruA6803 was purified from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 by affinity chromatography, and the purified protein was pale yellow-green due to the presence of bound chlorophyll (Chl) a and β-carotene. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the partly purified protein in the presence of lithium dodecylsulfate at 4 °C confirmed that the protein was yellow-green in color. When purified CruA6803 was assayed in vitro with either lycopene or γ-carotene as substrate, β-carotene was synthesized. These data establish that CruA6803 is a lycopene cyclase and that it requires a bound Chl a molecule for activity. Possible binding sites for Chl a and the potential regulatory role of the Chl a in coordination of Chl and carotenoid biosynthesis are discussed.

  5. Earthtech, Dig-Texas and Upward Bound: Outreach to At-Risk Students with Interdisciplinary STEM Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olgin, J. G.; Güereque, M.; Pennington, D. D.; Everett, A.; Dixon, J. G.; Reyes, A.; Houser, P. I. Q.; Baker, J. A.; Stocks, E.; Ellins, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Geological Sciences department at the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) hosted the EarthTech outreach program - a one-week intensive summer camp for low-income, at-risk high school students. The EarthTech program engaged students in STEM activities from geological and environmental sciences. Developed and led by university student-mentors with guidance from a supervising faculty member, the course engaged Upward Bound students with lectures, interactive projects, and excursions to local ecological preserves and geological sites around El Paso, Texas. Topics covered plant and animal distribution and diversity, water and soil dynamics, evolution and paleontology, geohazards, and planetary science. Field trips were combined with hands-on activities, including activities from DIG Texas teaching modules. The NSF-funded DIG Texas Instructional Blueprints project is organizing vetted, high quality online educational resources and learning activities into teaching modules. The modules follow a storyline and demonstrate congruency with the Next Generation Science Standards. Selected DIG Texas resources were included in the daily curriculum to complement the field trip and other hands-on activities. EarthTech students created ESRI Online GIS story maps in which they showed the locations of the field trips, incorporated photographs they had taken, and provided written reflections about their camp experiences. The DIG Texas project evaluation collected survey and interview data from the university student mentors throughout the week to ascertain the efficacy of the program. This poster presentation will include an overview of the program, including examples of work and evaluation results.

  6. GTP binding to the. beta. -subunit of tubulin is greatly reduced in Alzheimers disease

    SciTech Connect

    Khatoon, S.; Slevin, J.T.; Haley, B.E.

    1987-05-01

    A decrease occurs (80-100%) in the (/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/GTP photoinsertion into a cytosolic protein (55K M/sub r/) of Alzheimer's (AD) brain, tentatively identified as the ..beta..-subunit of tubulin (co-migration with purified tubulin, concentration dependence of interaction with GTP, ATP and their 8-azido photoprobes, and similar effects of Ca/sup 2 +/ and EDTA on photoinsertion). This agrees with prior observations of (/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/GTP interactions with brain tubulin and a recent report on faulty microtubular assembly in AD brain. The decrease in (/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/GTP photoinsertion into the 55K M/sub r/ protein of AD brain was in contrast with other photolabeled proteins, which remained at equal levels in AD and age-matched normal brain tissues. The 55K and 45K M/sub r/ were the two major (/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/GTP photoinsertion species in non-AD brain. Of 5 AD brains, the photoinsertion of (/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/GTP into the 55K M/sub r/ region was low or absent in 4 (55K/45K=0.1); one was 75% below normals (55K/45K=0.24). Total protein migrating at 55K M/sub r/ was similar in AD and controls. AD brain tubulin, while present, has its exchangeable GTP binding site on ..beta..-tubulin blocked/modified such that (/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/GTP cannot interact normally with this site.

  7. Cramer-Rao Lower Bound Evaluation for Linear Frequency Modulation Based Active Radar Networks Operating in a Rice Fading Environment

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chenguang; Salous, Sana; Wang, Fei; Zhou, Jianjiang

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the joint target parameter (delay and Doppler) estimation performance of linear frequency modulation (LFM)-based radar networks in a Rice fading environment. The active radar networks are composed of multiple radar transmitters and multichannel receivers placed on moving platforms. First, the log-likelihood function of the received signal for a Rician target is derived, where the received signal scattered off the target comprises of dominant scatterer (DS) component and weak isotropic scatterers (WIS) components. Then, the analytically closed-form expressions of the Cramer-Rao lower bounds (CRLBs) on the Cartesian coordinates of target position and velocity are calculated, which can be adopted as a performance metric to access the target parameter estimation accuracy for LFM-based radar network systems in a Rice fading environment. It is found that the cumulative Fisher information matrix (FIM) is a linear combination of both DS component and WIS components, and it also demonstrates that the joint CRLB is a function of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), target’s radar cross section (RCS) and transmitted waveform parameters, as well as the relative geometry between the target and the radar network architectures. Finally, numerical results are provided to indicate that the joint target parameter estimation performance of active radar networks can be significantly improved with the exploitation of DS component. PMID:27929433

  8. Visible-Light-Induced Activity Control of Peroxidase Bound to Fe-Doped Titanate Nanosheets with Nanometric Lateral Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Kai; Ito, Daiki; Soh, Nobuaki

    2015-10-21

    Catalytic performance of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) electrostatically adsorbed on nanometric and semiconducting Fe-doped titanate (FT) nanosheets was successfully manipulated by visible light illumination. A colloidal solution of FT with a narrow band gap corresponding to a visible light region was fabricated through a hydrolysis reaction of metals sources. HRP could be easily bound to the FT at pH = 4 through an electrostatic interaction between them, and the formed HRP-FT was utilized for the visible-light-driven enzymatic reaction. Under exposure to visible light with enough energy for band gap excitation of the FT, catalytic activity of HRP-FT was dramatically enhanced as compared with free (unbound) HRP and was simply adjusted by light intensity. In addition, wavelength dependence of an enzymatic reaction rate was analogous to an optical absorption spectrum of the FT. These results substantiated an expected reaction mechanism in which the photoenzymatic reaction was initiated by band gap excitation of FT followed by transferring holes generated in the valence band of irradiated FT to HRP. The excited HRP oxidized substrates (amplex ultrared: AUR) accompanied by two-electron reduction to regenerate the resting state. In addition, the catalytic activity was clearly switched by turning on and off the light source.

  9. Cramer-Rao Lower Bound Evaluation for Linear Frequency Modulation Based Active Radar Networks Operating in a Rice Fading Environment.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chenguang; Salous, Sana; Wang, Fei; Zhou, Jianjiang

    2016-12-06

    This paper investigates the joint target parameter (delay and Doppler) estimation performance of linear frequency modulation (LFM)-based radar networks in a Rice fading environment. The active radar networks are composed of multiple radar transmitters and multichannel receivers placed on moving platforms. First, the log-likelihood function of the received signal for a Rician target is derived, where the received signal scattered off the target comprises of dominant scatterer (DS) component and weak isotropic scatterers (WIS) components. Then, the analytically closed-form expressions of the Cramer-Rao lower bounds (CRLBs) on the Cartesian coordinates of target position and velocity are calculated, which can be adopted as a performance metric to access the target parameter estimation accuracy for LFM-based radar network systems in a Rice fading environment. It is found that the cumulative Fisher information matrix (FIM) is a linear combination of both DS component and WIS components, and it also demonstrates that the joint CRLB is a function of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), target's radar cross section (RCS) and transmitted waveform parameters, as well as the relative geometry between the target and the radar network architectures. Finally, numerical results are provided to indicate that the joint target parameter estimation performance of active radar networks can be significantly improved with the exploitation of DS component.

  10. Dimeric structure of pseudokinase RNase L bound to 2-5A reveals a basis for interferon induced antiviral activity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hao; Zeqiraj, Elton; Dong, Beihua; Jha, Babal Kant; Duffy, Nicole; Orlicky, Stephen; Thevakumaran, Neroshan; Talukdar, Manisha; Pillon, Monica C.; Ceccarelli, Derek F.; Wan, Leo; Juang, Yu-Chi; Mao, Daniel Y.L.; Gaughan, Christina; Brinton, Margo A.; Perelygin, Andrey A.; Kourinov, Igor; Guarné, Alba; Silverman, Robert H.; Sicheri, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Summary RNase L is an ankyrin repeat domain containing dual endoribonuclease-pseudokinase that is activated by unusual 2′,5′-oligoadenylate (2-5A) second messengers and which impedes viral infections in higher vertebrates. Despite its importance in interferon regulated antiviral innate immunity, relatively little is known about its precise mechanism of action. Here, we present a functional characterization of 2.5 Å and 3.25 Å X-ray crystal and small angle x-ray scattering structures of RNase L bound to a natural 2-5A activator with and without ADP or the non-hydrolysable ATP mimetic AMP-PNP. These studies reveal how recognition of 2-5A through interactions with the ankyrin repeat domain and the pseudokinase domain together with nucleotide binding, impose a rigid intertwined dimer configuration that is essential for RNase catalytic and anti-viral functions. The involvement of the pseudokinase domain of RNase L in 2-5A sensing, nucleotide binding, dimerization, and ribonuclease functions highlights the evolutionary adaptability of the eukaryotic protein kinase fold. PMID:24462203

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Membrane-Bound STIM1 to Investigate Conformational Changes during STIM1 Activation upon Calcium Release.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sreya; Karolak, Aleksandra; Debant, Marjolaine; Buscaglia, Paul; Renaudineau, Yves; Mignen, Olivier; Guida, Wayne C; Brooks, Wesley H

    2017-02-27

    Calcium is involved in important intracellular processes, such as intracellular signaling from cell membrane receptors to the nucleus. Typically, calcium levels are kept at less than 100 nM in the nucleus and cytosol, but some calcium is stored in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen for rapid release to activate intracellular calcium-dependent functions. Stromal interacting molecule 1 (STIM1) plays a critical role in early sensing of changes in the ER's calcium level, especially when there is a sudden release of stored calcium from the ER. Inactive STIM1, which has a bound calcium ion, is activated upon ion release. Following activation of STIM1, there is STIM1-assisted initiation of extracellular calcium entry through channels in the cell membrane. This extracellular calcium entering the cell then amplifies intracellular calcium-dependent actions. At the end of the process, ER levels of stored calcium are reestablished. The main focus of this work was to study the conformational changes accompanying homo- or heterodimerization of STIM1. For this purpose, the ER luminal portion of STIM1 (residues 58-236), which includes the sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain plus the calcium-binding EF-hand domains 1 and 2 attached to the STIM1 transmembrane region (TM), was modeled and embedded in a virtual membrane. Next, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the conformational changes that take place during STIM1 activation and subsequent protein-protein interactions. Indeed, the simulations revealed exposure of residues in the EF-hand domains, which may be important for dimerization steps. Altogether, understanding conformational changes in STIM1 can help in drug discovery when targeting this key protein in intracellular calcium functions.

  12. Effects of iron on growth, antioxidant enzyme activity, bound extracellular polymeric substances and microcystin production of Microcystis aeruginosa FACHB-905.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Wang, Xun; Wang, Peifang; Chen, Bin; Hou, Jun; Qian, Jin; Yang, Yangyang

    2016-10-01

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms have occurred in various water bodies during recent decades and made serious health hazards to plants, animals and humans. Iron is an important micronutrient for algal growth and recently, the concentration of which has increased remarkably in freshwaters. In this paper, the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa FACHB-905 was cultivated under non-iron (0μM), iron-limited (10μM) and iron-replete (100μM) conditions to investigate the effects of iron on growth, antioxidant enzyme activity, EPS and microcystin production. The results showed that algal cell density and chlorophyll-a content were maximal at the highest iron concentration. Antioxidant enzymes activity increased notably under all three conditions in the early stage of experiment, of which the SOD activity recovered soon from oxidative stress in 10μM group. The productions of some protein-like substances and humic acid-like substances of bound EPS were inhibited in iron-containing groups in the early stage of experiment while promoted after the adaptation period of Microcystis aeruginosa. Iron addition is a factor affecting the formation of cyanobacterial blooms through its impact on the content of LB-EPS and the composition of TB-EPS. The intracellular MC-LR concentration and the productivity potential of MC-LR were the lowest in 0μM group and highest in 10μM group. No obvious extracellular release of MC-LR was observed during the cultivation time. Therefore, iron addition can promote the physiological activities of M. aeruginosa, but a greater harm could be brought into environment under iron-limited (10μM) condition than under iron-replete (100μM) condition.

  13. Survival, mobility, and membrane-bound enzyme activities of freshwater planarian, Dugesia japonica, exposed to synthetic and natural surfactants.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei-Hui

    2012-04-01

    Surfactants are a major class of emerging pollutants widely used in large quantities in everyday life and commonly found in surface waters worldwide. Freshwater planarian was selected to examine the effects of different surfactants by measuring mortality, mobility, and membrane-bound enzyme activities. Among the 10 surfactants tested, the acute toxicities of betaine and polyethylene glycol (PEG-200) to planarians were relatively low, with a median lethal concentration (LC50) greater than 10,000 mg/L. The toxicity to planarians of the other eight surfactants based on 48-h LC50 could be arranged in the descending order of cetylpyridinum chloride (CPC) > 4-tert-octylphenol (4-tert-OP) > ammonium lauryl sulfate > benzalkonium chloride > saponin > sodium lauroylsarcosinate > dioctyl sulfosuccinate > dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB). Both CPC and 4-tert-OP were very toxic to planarians, with 48-h LC50 values <1 mg/L. The median effective concentrations (EC50s) of planarian mobility were in the 0.1 to 50 mg/L range and were in the same range as the 24-h LC50 of planarians exposed to different surfactants, except for DTAB. In addition, significant inhibition of cholinesterase activity activities was found in planarians exposed to 4-tert-OP at 2.5 and 5 mg/L and to saponin at 10 mg/L after 2-h treatments. This result suggests that planarian mobility responses can be used as an alternative indicator for acute toxicity of surfactants after a very short exposure period.

  14. Depression of membrane-bound Na sup + -K sup + -ATPase activity induced by free radicals and by ischemia of kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Kako, K.; Kato, M.; Matsuoka, T.; Mustapha, A. )

    1988-02-01

    A partially purified, membrane-bound Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase fraction, prepared from the outer medulla of porcine kidney, was incubated in the presence of 0.1-100 mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} for either 15 or 30 min at 37{degree}C. The activity of ouabain-sensitive Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase was reduced proportionally to the concentration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and the duration of incubation. There were decreases in SH contents and turnover rates of the Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase preparation, while malondialdehyde (MDA) and conjugated dienes were generated from the membrane lipids in the course of the incubation. The concentrations of ethanolamine (E) plasmalogen and of arachidonic acid in the E glycerophospholipid molecules were reduced by the free radical reaction. Similarly, a reduction in Na{sup +}K{sup +}-ATPase activity and the formation of MDA and conjugated dienes, together with a decrease in E glycerophospholipids, were observed when the membrane fraction was exposed to ultraviolet irradiation (254 nm) for 30 min at 4{degree}C. Microsomal fractions, prepared from the outer medulla of canine kidney after 1 h of unilateral ischemia and 1 h of reperfusion, showed a decreased Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase activity, a reduced amount of SH groups, and an increased MDA. These changes were normalized by the infusion of N-mercaptopropionylglycine. These results support the view (1) that free radical generation affects the enzyme protein as well as membrane lipids, and (2) that free radicals may be formed in the ischemic reperfused kidney.

  15. Structure of human guanylate-binding protein 1 representing a unique class of GTP-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Prakash, B; Praefcke, G J; Renault, L; Wittinghofer, A; Herrmann, C

    2000-02-03

    Interferon-gamma is an immunomodulatory substance that induces the expression of many genes to orchestrate a cellular response and establish the antiviral state of the cell. Among the most abundant antiviral proteins induced by interferon-gamma are guanylate-binding proteins such as GBP1 and GBP2. These are large GTP-binding proteins of relative molecular mass 67,000 with a high-turnover GTPase activity and an antiviral effect. Here we have determined the crystal structure of full-length human GBP1 to 1.8 A resolution. The amino-terminal 278 residues constitute a modified G domain with a number of insertions compared to the canonical Ras structure, and the carboxy-terminal part is an extended helical domain with unique features. From the structure and biochemical experiments reported here, GBP1 appears to belong to the group of large GTP-binding proteins that includes Mx and dynamin, the common property of which is the ability to undergo oligomerization with a high concentration-dependent GTPase activity.

  16. Mutational analysis of op18/stathmin-tubulin-interacting surfaces. Binding cooperativity controls tubulin GTP hydrolysis in the ternary complex.

    PubMed

    Segerman, B; Larsson, N; Holmfeldt, P; Gullberg, M

    2000-11-17

    Oncoprotein 18 (Op18) is a microtubule regulator that forms a ternary complex with two tubulin heterodimers. Dispersed regions of Op18 are involved in two-site cooperative binding and subsequent modulation of tubulin GTPase activity. Here we have analyzed specific determinants of Op18 that govern both stoichiometry and positive cooperativity in tubulin binding and consequent stimulatory and inhibitory effects on tubulin GTPase activity. The data revealed that the central and C-terminal regions of Op18 contain overlapping binding-motifs contacting both tubulin heterodimers, suggesting that these regions of Op18 are wedged into the previously noted 1-nm gap between the two longitudinally arranged tubulin heterodimers. Both the N- and C-terminal flanks adjacent to the central region are involved in stabilizing the ternary complex, but only the C-terminal flank does so by imposing positive binding cooperativity. Within the C-terminal flank, deletion of a 7-amino acid region attenuated positive binding cooperativity and resulted in a switch from stimulation to inhibition of tubulin GTP hydrolysis. This switch can be explained by attenuated binding cooperativity, because Op18 under these conditions may block longitudinal contact surfaces of single tubulins with consequent interference of tubulin-tubulin interaction-dependent GTP hydrolysis. Together, our results suggest that Op18 links two tubulin heterodimers via longitudinal contact surfaces to form a ternary GTPase productive complex.

  17. GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein is expressed in serotonin neurons and regulates tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kapatos, G; Hirayama, K; Shimoji, M; Milstien, S

    1999-02-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin, the coenzyme required for hydroxylation of phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan, regulates its own synthesis through feedback inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) mediated by a regulatory subunit, the GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). In the liver, L-phenylalanine specifically stimulates tetrahydrobiopterin synthesis by displacing tetrahydrobiopterin from the GTPCH-GFRP complex. To explore the role of this regulatory system in rat brain, we examined the localization of GFRP mRNA using double-label in situ hybridization. GFRP mRNA expression was abundant in serotonin neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus but was undetectable in dopamine neurons of the midbrain or norepinephrine neurons of the locus coeruleus. Simultaneous nuclease protection assays for GFRP and GTPCH mRNAs showed that GFRP mRNA is most abundant within the brainstem and that the ratio of GFRP to GTPCH mRNA is much higher than in the ventral midbrain. Two species of GFRP mRNA differing by approximately 20 nucleotides in length were detected in brainstem but not in other tissues, with the longer, more abundant form being common to other brain regions. It is interesting that the pineal and adrenal glands did not contain detectable levels of GFRP mRNA, although GTPCH mRNA was abundant in both. Primary neuronal cultures were used to examine the role of GFRP-mediated regulation of GTPCH on tetrahydrobiopterin synthesis within brainstem serotonin neurons and midbrain dopamine neurons. L-Phenylalanine increased tetrahydrobiopterin levels in serotonin neurons to a maximum of twofold in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas D-phenylalanine and L-tryptophan were without effect. In contrast, tetrahydrobiopterin levels within cultured dopamine neurons were not altered by L-phenylalanine. The time course of this effect was very rapid, with a maximal response observed within 60 min. Inhibitors of tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis prevented the L

  18. Briefly Bound to Activate: Transient Binding of a Second Catalytic Magnesium Activates the Structure and Dynamics of CDK2 Kinase for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Zhao Qin; Jacobsen, Douglas M.; Young, Matthew A.

    2014-10-02

    We have determined high-resolution crystal structures of a CDK2/Cyclin A transition state complex bound to ADP, substrate peptide, and MgF{sub 3}{sup -}. Compared to previous structures of active CDK2, the catalytic subunit of the kinase adopts a more closed conformation around the active site and now allows observation of a second Mg{sup 2+} ion in the active site. Coupled with a strong [Mg{sup 2+}] effect on in vitro kinase activity, the structures suggest that the transient binding of the second Mg{sup 2+} ion is necessary to achieve maximum rate enhancement of the chemical reaction, and Mg{sup 2+} concentration could represent an important regulator of CDK2 activity in vivo. Molecular dynamics simulations illustrate how the simultaneous binding of substrate peptide, ATP, and two Mg{sup 2+} ions is able to induce a more rigid and closed organization of the active site that functions to orient the phosphates, stabilize the buildup of negative charge, and shield the subsequently activated {gamma}-phosphate from solvent.

  19. Distribution of adenylate cyclase and GTP-binding proteins in hepatic plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Dixon, B S; Sutherland, E; Alexander, A; Nibel, D; Simon, F R

    1993-10-01

    Hepatic membrane subfractions prepared from control rats demonstrated forskolin (FSK)-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in the basolateral (sinusoidal) but not apical (canalicular) plasma membrane. After bile duct ligation (BDL) for 12 or 24 h, there was an increase in FSK-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in the apical membrane (54.2 +/- 3.9 pmol.mg-1 x min-1). The mechanism for this increase was explored further. ATP hydrolysis was found to be much higher in the apical than the basolateral membrane. Increasing the ATP levels in the assay enhanced apical membrane adenylate cyclase activity (10.5 +/- 0.2 pmol.mg-l.min-1); however, total adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) activity was not altered after BDL. Extraction of the apical membrane with bile acids or other detergents resulted in a two- to threefold increase in adenylate cyclase activity (30.6 +/- 3.6 pmol.mg-1 x min-1; detergent C12E8) This suggested that bile duct ligation was acting via the detergent-like action of bile acids to uncover latent adenylate cyclase activity on apical membranes. Further studies demonstrated that both BDL and detergent extraction also enhanced toxin-directed ADP-ribosylation of Gs alpha (cholera toxin) and Gi alpha (pertussis toxin) in the apical but not the basolateral membrane. After BDL, Gi alpha was found to be twofold greater in the apical membrane than the basolateral membrane. Immunoblotting using specific G protein antibodies further confirmed that apical membranes from control rats had a higher concentration of Gi1, 2 alpha and beta and slightly elevated levels of Gi3 alpha and Gs alpha compared with the basolateral membrane. The results demonstrate that adenylate cyclase and heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins are present on the apical membrane, but measurement of their functional activity requires detergent permeabilization of apical membrane vesicles and is limited by the presence of high ATPase activity.

  20. Rhodopsin-stimulated activation-deactivation cycle of transducin: kinetics of the intrinsic fluorescence response of the alpha subunit.

    PubMed

    Guy, P M; Koland, J G; Cerione, R A

    1990-07-31

    The intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of the alpha subunit of transducin (alpha T) has been shown to be sensitive to the binding of guanine nucleotides, with the fluorescence being enhanced by as much as 2-fold upon the binding of GTP or nonhydrolyzable GTP analogues [cf. Phillips and Cerione (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 15498-15505]. In this work, we have used these fluorescence changes to analyze the kinetics for the activation (GTP binding)-deactivation (GTPase) cycle of transducin in a well-defined reconstituted phospholipid vesicle system containing purified rhodopsin and the alpha T and beta gamma T subunits of the retinal GTP-binding protein. Both the rate and the extent of the GTP-induced fluorescence enhancement are dependent on [rhodopsin], while only the rate (and not the extent) of the GTP gamma S-induced enhancement is dependent on the levels of rhodopsin. Comparisons of the fluorescence enhancements elicited by GTP gamma S and GTP indicate that the GTP gamma S-induced enhancements directly reflect the GTP gamma S-binding event while the GTP-induced enhancements represent a composite of the GTP-binding and GTP hydrolysis events. At high [rhodopsin], the rates for GTP binding and GTPase are sufficiently different such that the GTP-induced enhancement essentially reflects GTP binding. A fluorescence decay, which always follows the GTP-induced enhancement, directly reflects the GTP hydrolytic event. The rate of the fluorescence decay matches the rate of [32P]Pi production due to [gamma-32P]GTP hydrolysis, and the decay is immediately reversed by rechallenging with GTP. The GTP-induced fluorescence changes (i.e., the enhancement and ensuing decay) could be fit to a simple model describing the activation-deactivation cycle of transducin. The results of this modeling suggest the following points: (1) the dependency of the activation-deactivation cycle on [rhodopsin] can be described by a simple dose response profile; (2) the rate of the rhodopsin

  1. Structural and biochemical characterisation of Archaeoglobus fulgidus esterase reveals a bound CoA molecule in the vicinity of the active site

    PubMed Central

    Sayer, Christopher; Finnigan, William; Isupov, Michail N.; Levisson, Mark; Kengen, Servé W. M.; van der Oost, John; Harmer, Nicholas J.; Littlechild, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    A new carboxyl esterase, AF-Est2, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus has been cloned, over-expressed in Escherichia coli and biochemically and structurally characterized. The enzyme has high activity towards short- to medium-chain p-nitrophenyl carboxylic esters with optimal activity towards the valerate ester. The AF-Est2 has good solvent and pH stability and is very thermostable, showing no loss of activity after incubation for 30 min at 80 °C. The 1.4 Å resolution crystal structure of AF-Est2 reveals Coenzyme A (CoA) bound in the vicinity of the active site. Despite the presence of CoA bound to the AF-Est2 this enzyme has no CoA thioesterase activity. The pantetheine group of CoA partially obstructs the active site alcohol pocket suggesting that this ligand has a role in regulation of the enzyme activity. A comparison with closely related α/β hydrolase fold enzyme structures shows that the AF-Est2 has unique structural features that allow CoA binding. A comparison of the structure of AF-Est2 with the human carboxyl esterase 1, which has CoA thioesterase activity, reveals that CoA is bound to different parts of the core domain in these two enzymes and approaches the active site from opposite directions. PMID:27160974

  2. Isatis tinctoria mediated synthesis of amphotericin B-bound silver nanoparticles with enhanced photoinduced antileishmanial activity: A novel green approach.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Aftab; Wei, Yun; Syed, Fatima; Khan, Shafiullah; Khan, Gul Majid; Tahir, Kamran; Khan, Arif Ullah; Raza, Muslim; Khan, Faheem Ullah; Yuan, Qiping

    2016-08-01

    After malaria, Leishmaniasis is the most prevalent infectious disease in terms of fatality and geographical distribution. The availability of a limited number of antileishmanial agents, emerging resistance to the available drugs, and the high cost of treatment complicate the treatment of leishmaniasis. To overcome these issues, critical research for new therapeutic agents with enhanced antileishmanial potential and low treatment cost is needed. In this contribution, we developed a green protocol to prepare biogenic silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and amphotericin B-bound biogenic silver nanoparticles (AmB-AgNPs). Phytochemicals from the aqueous extract of Isatis tinctoria were used as reducing and capping agents to prepare silver nanoparticles. Amphotericin B was successfully adsorbed on the surface of biogenic silver nanoparticles. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized by various analytical techniques. UV-Visible spectroscopy was employed to detect the characteristic localized surface plasmon resonance peaks (LSPR) for the prepared nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) studies revealed the formation of spherical silver nanoparticles with an average particle size of 10-20nm. The cubic crystalline structure of the prepared nanoparticles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) study. FTIR spectroscopic analysis revealed that plant polyphenolic compounds are mainly involved in metal reduction and capping. Under visible light irradiation, biogenic silver nanoparticles exhibited significant activity against Leishmania tropica with an IC50 value of 4.2μg/mL. The leishmanicidal activity of these nanoparticles was considerably enhanced by conjugation with amphotericin B (IC50=2.43μg/mL). In conclusion, the findings of this study reveal that adsorption of amphotericin B, an antileishmanial drug, to biogenic silver nanoparticles, could be a safe, more effective and economic alternative to the available

  3. Rap1-GTP-interacting Adaptor Molecule (RIAM) Protein Controls Invasion and Growth of Melanoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Varas, Pablo; Coló, Georgina P.; Bartolomé, Ruben A.; Paterson, Andrew; Medraño-Fernández, Iria; Arellano-Sánchez, Nohemí; Cabañas, Carlos; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Lafuente, Esther M.; Boussiotis, Vassiliki A.; Strömblad, Staffan; Teixidó, Joaquin

    2011-01-01

    The Mig-10/RIAM/lamellipodin (MRL) family member Rap1-GTP-interacting adaptor molecule (RIAM) interacts with active Rap1, a small GTPase that is frequently activated in tumors such as melanoma and prostate cancer. We show here that RIAM is expressed in metastatic human melanoma cells and that both RIAM and Rap1 are required for BLM melanoma cell invasion. RIAM silencing in melanoma cells led to inhibition of tumor growth and to delayed metastasis in a severe combined immunodeficiency xenograft model. Defective invasion of RIAM-silenced melanoma cells arose from impairment in persistent cell migration directionality, which was associated with deficient activation of a Vav2-RhoA-ROCK-myosin light chain pathway. Expression of constitutively active Vav2 and RhoA in cells depleted for RIAM partially rescued their invasion, indicating that Vav2 and RhoA mediate RIAM function. These results suggest that inhibition of cell invasion in RIAM-silenced melanoma cells is likely based on altered cell contractility and cell polarization. Furthermore, we show that RIAM depletion reduces β1 integrin-dependent melanoma cell adhesion, which correlates with decreased activation of both Erk1/2 MAPK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, two central molecules controlling cell growth and cell survival. In addition to causing inhibition of cell proliferation, RIAM silencing led to higher susceptibility to cell apoptosis. Together, these data suggest that defective activation of these kinases in RIAM-silenced cells could account for inhibition of melanoma cell growth and that RIAM might contribute to the dissemination of melanoma cells. PMID:21454517

  4. Invited review: Mechanisms of GTP hydrolysis and conformational transitions in the dynamin superfamily

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dynamin superfamily proteins are multidomain mechano‐chemical GTPases which are implicated in nucleotide‐dependent membrane remodeling events. A prominent feature of these proteins is their assembly‐ stimulated mechanism of GTP hydrolysis. The molecular basis for this reaction has been initially clarified for the dynamin‐related guanylate binding protein 1 (GBP1) and involves the transient dimerization of the GTPase domains in a parallel head‐to‐head fashion. A catalytic arginine finger from the phosphate binding (P‐) loop is repositioned toward the nucleotide of the same molecule to stabilize the transition state of GTP hydrolysis. Dynamin uses a related dimerization‐dependent mechanism, but instead of the catalytic arginine, a monovalent cation is involved in catalysis. Still another variation of the GTP hydrolysis mechanism has been revealed for the dynamin‐like Irga6 which bears a glycine at the corresponding position in the P‐loop. Here, we highlight conserved and divergent features of GTP hydrolysis in dynamin superfamily proteins and show how nucleotide binding and hydrolysis are converted into mechano‐chemical movements. We also describe models how the energy of GTP hydrolysis can be harnessed for diverse membrane remodeling events, such as membrane fission or fusion. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 580–593, 2016. PMID:27062152

  5. Invited review: Mechanisms of GTP hydrolysis and conformational transitions in the dynamin superfamily.

    PubMed

    Daumke, Oliver; Praefcke, Gerrit J K

    2016-08-01

    Dynamin superfamily proteins are multidomain mechano-chemical GTPases which are implicated in nucleotide-dependent membrane remodeling events. A prominent feature of these proteins is their assembly- stimulated mechanism of GTP hydrolysis. The molecular basis for this reaction has been initially clarified for the dynamin-related guanylate binding protein 1 (GBP1) and involves the transient dimerization of the GTPase domains in a parallel head-to-head fashion. A catalytic arginine finger from the phosphate binding (P-) loop is repositioned toward the nucleotide of the same molecule to stabilize the transition state of GTP hydrolysis. Dynamin uses a related dimerization-dependent mechanism, but instead of the catalytic arginine, a monovalent cation is involved in catalysis. Still another variation of the GTP hydrolysis mechanism has been revealed for the dynamin-like Irga6 which bears a glycine at the corresponding position in the P-loop. Here, we highlight conserved and divergent features of GTP hydrolysis in dynamin superfamily proteins and show how nucleotide binding and hydrolysis are converted into mechano-chemical movements. We also describe models how the energy of GTP hydrolysis can be harnessed for diverse membrane remodeling events, such as membrane fission or fusion. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 580-593, 2016.

  6. The Presence of a Stable Block bounded by Active Zones (Mobile Belts) in the southwestern North American Proterozoic craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodell, P.; Martinez P, C.; Mahar, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Bouguer gravity data, initial Sr isotope values, zircon U-Pb, and multiple occurrences of felsic Proterozoic rocks, have revealed an elevated, less deformed, felsic cratonic block in the northern Mexico. The block is situated in western Chihuahua and is bounded by active zones or mobile belts on three sides, and is here referred to as the Western Chihuahua Cratonic Block (WCCB). Bouguer gravity data clearly indicate a region of a highly negative anomaly (< -200 mgal) in contrast to adjoining areas. The region is large and the anomaly is relatively smooth over broad areas; the WCCB appears as a smaller version of the Colorado Plateau. The block is characterized by high initial Sr isotope ratios (<0.706). Several occurrences of Proterozoic rocks are located within or next to the WCCB, and they reveal the character of the Bouguer anomaly. On the east, at Los Filtros, Proterozoic rocks crop out in a basement cored uplift interpreted to having been derived from the WCCB during the Ouachita orogeny. At Sierra La Mojina boulders of 1.1 Ga granites are found in Permian conglomerates. And at Basasiachic, xenoliths of 1.1 Ga granites are present in ash flow tuffs. Establishment of the Precambrian character of the WCCB is of importance, and these multiple occurrences are evidence. Prior studies of the Sierra Madre Occidental suggest that the region was uplifted because of a vast Cenozoic batholith presumed to lie under the SLIP (Silicic Large Igneous Province), the Upper Volcanic Series. The present study challenges that conclusion and maintains the SMO is underlain by Proterozoic silicic crust. The geology of age dated samples supports this. The WCCB is surrounded on three sides by Active Zones or Mobile Belts, which have been active extensional and translational zones periodically over a long period of time. On the east are the Paleozoic Pedrogosa Basin, Mesozoic Chihuahua Trough and Cenozoic Rio Grande Rift, the first two of which also continue around the northern border

  7. The Avise Lupus Test and Cell-bound Complement Activation Products Aid the Diagnosis of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Mossell, James; Goldman, John A.; Barken, Derren; Alexander, Roberta Vezza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multifaceted disease, and its diagnosis may be challenging. A blood test for the diagnosis of SLE, the Avise Lupus test, has been recently commercialized and validated in clinical studies. Objectives: To evaluate the use of the Avise Lupus test by community rheumatologists. Methods: The study is a longitudinal, case-control, retrospective review of medical charts. Cases had a positive test result, and controls had a negative result; all patients were anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) positive but negative for SLE-specific autoantibodies. Features of SLE, diagnosis, and medications at two time points were recorded. Results: Twenty of the 23 cases (87%) and 4 of the 23 controls (17%) were diagnosed with SLE (sensitivity=83%; specificity=86%). More cases than controls (43% vs. 17%) fulfilled 4 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) classification criteria of SLE. Sensitivity of the test was significantly higher than the ACR score (83% vs. 42%, p=0.006). A higher percentage of patients who met the classification criteria had elevated cell-bound complement activation products (CB-CAPs) compared to patients who did not. Anti-rheumatic medications were used in a higher percentage of cases than controls (83% vs. 35% at baseline, p=0.002), suggesting that cases were treated more aggressively early on. Conclusion: A positive Avise Lupus test result aids in formulating a SLE diagnosis when diagnosis based on standard-of-care tests and clinical features may be challenging, and impacts patient management. Prospective studies will be performed to better evaluate the clinical utility of the test and of CB-CAPs as biomarkers of SLE. PMID:27867431

  8. Activation of Ras in vitro and in intact fibroblasts by the Vav guanine nucleotide exchange protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gulbins, E; Coggeshall, K M; Langlet, C; Baier, G; Bonnefoy-Berard, N; Burn, P; Wittinghofer, A; Katzav, S; Altman, A

    1994-01-01

    We recently identified Vav, the product of the vav proto-oncogene, as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Ras. Vav is enzymatically activated by lymphocyte antigen receptor-coupled protein tyrosine kinases or independently by diglycerides. To further evaluate the physiological role of Vav, we assessed its GDP-GTP exchange activity against several Ras-related proteins in vitro and determined whether Vav activation in transfected NIH 3T3 fibroblasts correlates with the activity status of Ras and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. In vitro translated purified Vav activated by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or phosphorylation with recombinant p56lck displayed GEF activity against Ras but not against recombinant RacI, RacII, Ral, or RhoA proteins. Expression of vav or proto-vav in stably transfected NIH 3T3 cells led to a approximately 10-fold increase in basal or PMA-stimulated Ras exchange activity, respectively, in total-cell lysates and Vav immunoprecipitates. Elevated GEF activity was paralleled in each case by a significant increase in the proportion of active, GTP-bound Ras. PMA had a minimal effect on the low Ras. GTP level in untransfected control fibroblasts but increased it from 20 to 37% in proto-vav-transfected cells. vav-transfected cells displayed a constitutively elevated Ras. GTP level (35%), which was not increased further by PMA treatment. MAP kinases, known downstream intermediates in Ras-dependent signaling pathways, similarly exhibited increased basal or PMA-stimulated activity in Vav-expressing cells by comparison with normal NIH 3T3 cells. These results demonstrate a physiologic interaction between Vav and its target, Ras, leading to MAP kinase activation. Images PMID:8289830

  9. Guanine-nucleotide exchange on ribosome-bound elongation factor G initiates the translocation of tRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Zavialov, Andrey V; Hauryliuk, Vasili V; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2005-01-01

    Background During the translation of mRNA into polypeptide, elongation factor G (EF-G) catalyzes the translocation of peptidyl-tRNA from the A site to the P site of the ribosome. According to the 'classical' model, EF-G in the GTP-bound form promotes translocation, while hydrolysis of the bound GTP promotes dissociation of the factor from the post-translocation ribosome. According to a more recent model, EF-G operates like a 'motor protein' and drives translocation of the peptidyl-tRNA after GTP hydrolysis. In both the classical and motor protein models, GDP-to-GTP exchange is assumed to occur spontaneously on 'free' EF-G even in the absence of a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF). Results We have made a number of findings that challenge both models. First, free EF-G in the cell is likely to be in the GDP-bound form. Second, the ribosome acts as the GEF for EF-G. Third, after guanine-nucleotide exchange, EF-G in the GTP-bound form moves the tRNA2-mRNA complex to an intermediate translocation state in which the mRNA is partially translocated. Fourth, subsequent accommodation of the tRNA2-mRNA complex in the post-translocation state requires GTP hydrolysis. Conclusion These results, in conjunction with previously published cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of the ribosome in various functional states, suggest a novel mechanism for translocation of tRNAs on the ribosome by EF-G. Our observations suggest that the ribosome is a universal guanosine-nucleotide exchange factor for EF-G as previously shown for the class-II peptide-release factor 3. PMID:15985150

  10. A family of ras-like GTP-binding proteins expressed in electromotor neurons.

    PubMed

    Ngsee, J K; Elferink, L A; Scheller, R H

    1991-02-05

    The cDNAs encoding seven low molecular weight (LMW) GTP-binding proteins were isolated from an electrode lobe library of the marine ray Discopyge ommata. Four were assigned as the ray homologues of previously identified LMW GTP-binding proteins rab1, ral, Krev, and rho. Three others showed unique sequences, including two exhibiting significant similarity to the yeast SEC4 protein. Northern analysis indicated that several of the transcripts are enriched in neural tissues with a moderate level of expression in cardiac muscle. This tissue distribution was corroborated with affinity purified antibodies against the LMW GTP-binding proteins. Subcellular fractionation revealed that the proteins co-purify with cholinergic synaptic vesicles. Immunohistochemical analysis confirms this localization. At least two of the proteins, oral and o-rho, are localized to the pre-synaptic terminals.

  11. Involvement of a small GTP binding protein in HIV-1 release

    PubMed Central

    Audoly, Gilles; Popoff, Michel R; Gluschankof, Pablo

    2005-01-01

    Background There is evidence suggesting that actin binding to HIV-1 encoded proteins, or even actin dynamics themselves, might play a key role in virus budding and/or release from the infected cell. A crucial step in the reorganisation of the actin cytoskeleton is the engagement of various different GTP binding proteins. We have thus studied the involvement of GTP-binding proteins in the final steps of the HIV-1 viral replication cycle. Results Our results demonstrate that virus production is abolished when cellular GTP binding proteins involved in actin polymerisation are inhibited with specific toxins. Conclusion We propose a new HIV budding working model whereby Gag interactions with pre-existing endosomal cellular tracks as well as with a yet non identified element of the actin polymerisation pathway are required in order to allow HIV-1 to be released from the infected cell. PMID:16080789

  12. Phase changes at the end of a microtubule with a GTP cap.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, T L; Chen, Y

    1984-01-01

    Examination of Monte Carlo kinetic simulations, based on a realistic set of microscopic rate constants that apply to the end of a microtubule with a GTP cap, suggests that the end of a microtubule alternates between two quasimacroscopic phases. In one phase, the microtubule end has a GTP cap that fluctuates in size; in the other phase, the GTP cap has been lost. These repeated phase changes take place at any given tubulin concentration in a wide range of concentrations. While in the first phase, the microtubule grows slowly; while in the second phase, it shortens rapidly and may disappear completely. These results are closely related to the recent experimental work of Mitchison and Kirschner [Mitchison, T. & Kirschner, M.W. (1984) Nature (London), in press]. PMID:6592585

  13. The Structure of Dasatinib (BNS-354825) Bound to Activated ABL Kinase Domain Elucidates its Inhibitory Activity Against Imatinib-Resistant ABL Mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Tokarski,J.; Newitt, J.; Chang, C.; Cheng, J.; Wittekind, M.; Kiefer, S.; Kish, K.; Lee, F.; Borzilerri, R.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is caused by the constitutively activated tyrosine kinase breakpoint cluster (BCR)-ABL. Current frontline therapy for CML is imatinib, an inhibitor of BCR-ABL. Although imatinib has a high rate of clinical success in early phase CML, treatment resistance is problematic, particularly in later stages of the disease, and is frequently mediated by mutations in BCR-ABL. Dasatinib (BMS-354825) is a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor that targets oncogenic pathways and is a more potent inhibitor than imatinib against wild-type BCR-ABL. It has also shown preclinical activity against all but one of the imatinib-resistant BCR-ABL mutants tested to date. Analysis of the crystal structure of dasatinib-bound ABL kinase suggests that the increased binding affinity of dasatinib over imatinib is at least partially due to its ability to recognize multiple states of BCR-ABL. The structure also provides an explanation for the activity of dasatinib against imatinib-resistant BCR-ABL mutants.

  14. Insights into the GTP/GDP cycle of RabX3, a novel GTPase from Entamoeba histolytica with tandem G-domains.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Mintu; Mukherjee, Madhumita; Srivastava, Vijay Kumar; Saito-Nakano, Yumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Datta, Sunando

    2014-02-25

    Members of the small GTPase Ras superfamily regulate a host of systems through their ability to catalyze the GTP/GDP cycle. All family members reported thus far possess a single GTPase domain with a P-loop containing a nucleoside triphosphate hydrolase fold. Here for the first time we report a novel member from Entamoeba histolytica, EhRabX3, which harbors two GTPase domains in tandem and exhibits unique biochemical properties. A combination of biochemical and microcalorimetric studies revealed that EhRabX3 binds to a single guanine nucleotide through its N-terminal domain. Unlike most of the members of the Ras superfamily, the dissociation of the nucleotide from EhRabX3 is independent of Mg(2+), perhaps indicating a novel mechanism of nucleotide exchange by this protein. We found that EhRabX3 is extremely sluggish in hydrolyzing GTP, and that could be attributed to its atypical nucleotide binding pocket. It harbors substitutions at two positions that confer oncogenicity to Ras because of impaired GTP hydrolysis. Engineering these residues into the conserved counterparts enhanced their GTPase activity by at least 20-fold. In contrast to most of the members of the Ras superfamily, EhRabX3 lacks the prenylation motif. Using indirect immunofluorescence and biochemical fractionation, we demonstrated that the protein is distributed all over the cytosol in amoebic trophozoites. Collectively, this unique ancient GTPase exhibits a striking evolutionary divergence from the other members of the superfamily.

  15. GTP cyclohydrolase I inhibition by the prototypic inhibitor 2, 4-diamino-6-hydroxypyrimidine. Mechanisms and unanticipated role of GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Xie, L; Smith, J A; Gross, S S

    1998-08-14

    2,4-Diamino-6-hydroxypyrimidine (DAHP) is considered to be a selective and direct-acting inhibitor of GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH), the first and rate-limiting enzyme in the pathway for synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). Accordingly, DAHP has been widely employed to distinguish whether de novo BH4 synthesis is required in a given biological system. Although it has been assumed that DAHP inhibits GTPCH by direct competition with substrate GTP, this has never been formally demonstrated. In view of apparent structural homology between DAHP and BH4, we questioned whether DAHP may mimic BH4 in its inhibition of GTPCH by an indirect mechanism, involving interaction with a recently cloned 9.5-kDa protein termed GTPCH Feedback Regulatory Protein (GFRP). We show by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction that GFRP mRNA is constitutively expressed in rat aortic smooth muscle cells and further induced by treatment with immunostimulants. Moreover, functional GFRP is expressed and immunostimulant-induced BH4 accumulates in sufficient quantity to trigger feedback inhibition of GTPCH. Studies with DAHP reveal that GFRP is also essential to achieve potent inhibition of GTPCH. Indeed, DAHP inhibits GTPCH by dual mechanisms. At a relatively low concentration, DAHP emulates BH4 and engages the GFRP-dependent feedback inhibitory system; at higher concentrations, DAHP competes directly for binding with GTP substrate. This knowledge predicts that DAHP would preferably target GTPCH in tissues with abundant GFRP.

  16. Occurrence of matrix-bound phosphine in polar ornithogenic tundra ecosystems: effects of alkaline phosphatase activity and environmental variables.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Renbin; Ma, Dawei; Ding, Wei; Bai, Bo; Liu, Yashu; Sun, Jianjun

    2011-09-01

    Phosphine (PH(3)), a reduced phosphorus compound, is a highly toxic and reactive atmospheric trace gas. In this study, a total of ten ornithogenic soil/sediment profiles were collected from tundra ecosystems of east Antarctica and Arctic, and matrix-bound phosphine (MBP), the phosphorus fractions and alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) were analyzed. High MBP concentrations were found in these profiles with the range from 39.59 ng kg(-1) dw to 11.77 μg kg(-1) dw. MBP showed a consistent vertical distribution pattern in almost all the soil profiles, and its concentrations increased at soil surface layers and then decreased with depths. MBP levels in the ornithogenic soils were two to three orders of magnitude lower than those in ornithogenic sediments. The yield of PH(3) as a fraction of total P in all the profiles ranged from 10(-5) to 10(-9) mgPH(3) mg(-1)P with higher mean PH(3) yield in the ornithogenic sediments. The ornithogenic soils showed high concentrations of total phosphorus (TP), organic phosphorus (OP), inorganic phosphorus (IP) and metal elements (Cu, Zn, Mn, Fe, Al and Ca) but low MBP levels, vice versa for the ornithogenic sediments. No correlation had been obtained between MBP concentrations and IP, OP and TP. There existed an exponential correlation (r=0.67, p<0.01) between MBP and soil/sediment moisture. MBP concentrations showed a significant positive correlation with APA (r=0.668, p<0.0001), total organic carbon (r=0.501, p<0.0001), total hydrogen (r=0.483, p<0.0001) and total sulfur (r=0.398, p<0.001), indicating that the production of MBP is associated with microbially mediated factors rather than the contents of TP, IP and OP in the P-enriched ornithogenic soils/sediments. Our results indicated that MBP is an important gaseous link in the phosphorus biogeochemical cycles of ornithogenic tundra ecosystems in Antarctica and Arctic.

  17. Northwest Outward Bound Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Outward Bound School, Portland, OR.

    Instructor responsibilities, procedures for completing activities safely, and instructional methods and techniques are outlined to assist instructors in the Northwest Outward Bound School (Portland, Oregon) as they strive for teaching excellence. Information is organized into six chapters addressing: history and philosophy of Outward Bound; course…

  18. A recombinant inwardly rectifying potassium channel coupled to GTP- binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    GTP-binding (G) proteins have been shown to mediate activation of inwardly rectifying potassium (K+) channels in cardiac, neuronal and neuroendocrine cells. Here, we report functional expression of a recombinant inwardly rectifying channel which we call KGP (or hpKir3.4), to signify that it is K+ selective, G-protein-gated and isolated from human pancreas. KGP expression in Xenopus oocytes resulted in sizeable basal (or agonist-independent) currents while coexpression with a G-protein-linked receptor, yielded additional agonist-induced currents. Coexpression of KGP and hGIRK1 (a human brain homolog of GIRK1/Kir3.1) produced much larger basal currents than those observed with KGP or hGIRK1 alone, and upon coexpression with receptor, similarly large agonist-induced currents could be obtained. Pertussis toxin treatment significantly diminished agonist-dependent currents due to either KGP or KGP/hGIRK1 expression. Interestingly, PTX also significantly reduced basal KGP or KGP/hGIRK1 currents, suggesting that basal activity is largely the result of G-protein gating as well. When the two channels were coexpressed with receptor, the relative increase in current elicited by agonist was similar whether KGP and hGIRK1 were expressed alone or together. When in vitro translated or when expressed in Xenopus oocytes or CHO mammalian cells, KGP gave rise to a nonglycosylated 45-kD protein. Antibodies directed against either KGP or hGIRK1 coprecipitated both proteins coexpressed in oocytes, providing evidence for the heteromeric assembly of the two channels and suggesting that the current potentiation seen with coexpression of the two channel subunits is due to specific interactions between them. An endogenous oocyte protein similar in size to KGP was also coprecipitated with hGIRK1. PMID:8868049

  19. Activation of initiation factor 2 by ligands and mutations for rapid docking of ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Michael Y; Zorzet, Anna; Andersson, Dan I; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2011-01-01

    We previously identified mutations in the GTPase initiation factor 2 (IF2), located outside its tRNA-binding domain, compensating strongly (A-type) or weakly (B-type) for initiator tRNA formylation deficiency. We show here that rapid docking of 30S with 50S subunits in initiation of translation depends on switching 30S subunit-bound IF2 from its inactive to active form. Activation of wild-type IF2 requires GTP and formylated initiator tRNA (fMet-tRNAi). In contrast, extensive activation of A-type IF2 occurs with only GTP or with GDP and fMet-tRNAi, implying a passive role for initiator tRNA as activator of IF2 in subunit docking. The theory of conditional switching of GTPases quantitatively accounts for all our experimental data. We find that GTP, GDP, fMet-tRNAi and A-type mutations multiplicatively increase the equilibrium ratio, K, between active and inactive forms of IF2 from a value of 4 × 10−4 for wild-type apo-IF2 by factors of 300, 8, 80 and 20, respectively. Functional characterization of the A-type mutations provides keys to structural interpretation of conditional switching of IF2 and other multidomain GTPases. PMID:21151095

  20. Human γ-glutamyl transpeptidase 1: Structures of the free enzyme, inhibitor-bound tetrahedral transition states, and glutamate-bound enzyme reveal novel movement within the active site during catalysis [Human gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase: Inhibitor binding and movement within the active site

    SciTech Connect

    Terzyan, Simon S.; Burgett, Anthony W. G.; Heroux, Annie; Smith, Clyde A.; Mooers, Blaine H. M.; Hanigan, Marie H.

    2015-05-26

    γ-Glutamyl transpeptidase 1 (GGT1) is a cell surface, N-terminal nucleophile hydrolase that cleaves glutathione and other γ-glutamyl compounds. GGT1 expression is essential in cysteine homeostasis, and its induction has been implicated in the pathology of asthma, reperfusion injury, and cancer. In this study, we report four new crystal structures of human GGT1 (hGGT1) that show conformational changes within the active site as the enzyme progresses from the free enzyme to inhibitor-bound tetrahedral transition states and finally to the glutamate-bound structure prior to the release of this final product of the reaction. The structure of the apoenzyme shows flexibility within the active site. The serine-borate-bound hGGT1 crystal structure demonstrates that serine-borate occupies the active site of the enzyme, resulting in an enzyme-inhibitor complex that replicates the enzyme's tetrahedral intermediate/transition state. The structure of GGsTop-bound hGGT1 reveals its interactions with the enzyme and why neutral phosphonate diesters are more potent inhibitors than monoanionic phosphonates. These structures are the first structures for any eukaryotic GGT that include a molecule in the active site covalently bound to the catalytic Thr-381. The glutamate-bound structure shows the conformation of the enzyme prior to release of the final product and reveals novel information regarding the displacement of the main chain atoms that form the oxyanion hole and movement of the lid loop region when the active site is occupied. Lastly,tThese data provide new insights into the mechanism of hGGT1-catalyzed reactions and will be invaluable in the development of new classes of hGGT1 inhibitors for therapeutic use.

  1. Human γ-glutamyl transpeptidase 1: Structures of the free enzyme, inhibitor-bound tetrahedral transition states, and glutamate-bound enzyme reveal novel movement within the active site during catalysis [Human gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase: Inhibitor binding and movement within the active site

    DOE PAGES

    Terzyan, Simon S.; Burgett, Anthony W. G.; Heroux, Annie; ...

    2015-05-26

    γ-Glutamyl transpeptidase 1 (GGT1) is a cell surface, N-terminal nucleophile hydrolase that cleaves glutathione and other γ-glutamyl compounds. GGT1 expression is essential in cysteine homeostasis, and its induction has been implicated in the pathology of asthma, reperfusion injury, and cancer. In this study, we report four new crystal structures of human GGT1 (hGGT1) that show conformational changes within the active site as the enzyme progresses from the free enzyme to inhibitor-bound tetrahedral transition states and finally to the glutamate-bound structure prior to the release of this final product of the reaction. The structure of the apoenzyme shows flexibility within themore » active site. The serine-borate-bound hGGT1 crystal structure demonstrates that serine-borate occupies the active site of the enzyme, resulting in an enzyme-inhibitor complex that replicates the enzyme's tetrahedral intermediate/transition state. The structure of GGsTop-bound hGGT1 reveals its interactions with the enzyme and why neutral phosphonate diesters are more potent inhibitors than monoanionic phosphonates. These structures are the first structures for any eukaryotic GGT that include a molecule in the active site covalently bound to the catalytic Thr-381. The glutamate-bound structure shows the conformation of the enzyme prior to release of the final product and reveals novel information regarding the displacement of the main chain atoms that form the oxyanion hole and movement of the lid loop region when the active site is occupied. Lastly,tThese data provide new insights into the mechanism of hGGT1-catalyzed reactions and will be invaluable in the development of new classes of hGGT1 inhibitors for therapeutic use.« less

  2. Active site plasticity revealed from the structure of the enterobacterial N-ribohydrolase RihA bound to a competitive inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pyrimidine-preferring N-ribohydrolases (CU-NHs) are a class of Ca2+-dependent enzymes that catalyze the hydrolytic cleavage of the N-glycosidic bond in pyrimidine nucleosides. With the exception of few selected organisms, their physiological relevance in prokaryotes and eukaryotes is yet under investigation. Results Here, we report the first crystal structure of a CU-NH bound to a competitive inhibitor, the complex between the Escherichia coli enzyme RihA bound to 3, 4-diaminophenyl-iminoribitol (DAPIR) to a resolution of 2.1 Å. The ligand can bind at the active site in two distinct orientations, and the stabilization of two flexible active site regions is pivotal to establish the interactions required for substrate discrimination and catalysis. Conclusions A comparison with the product-bound RihA structure allows a rationalization of the structural rearrangements required for an enzymatic catalytic cycle, highlighting a substrate-assisted cooperative motion, and suggesting a yet overlooked role of the conserved His82 residue in modulating product release. Differences in the structural features of the active sites in the two homologous CU-NHs RihA and RihB from E. coli provide a rationale for their fine differences in substrate specificity. These new findings hint at a possible role of CU-NHs in the breakdown of modified nucleosides derived from RNA molecules. PMID:20529317

  3. Protective effect of fish oil on changes in the activities of membrane-bound ATPases and mineral status in experimentally induced myocardial infarction in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Padma, Viswanadha Vijaya; Devi, Chennam Srinivasulu Shyamala; Kalaiselvi, Palaniswamy

    2010-12-01

    The present study evaluated the protective effect of fish oil in isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarction in rats. The results of the present study indicate that the IPH administration decreases the activities of membrane-bound ATPases compared to control animals. Fish oil pretreatment brought about significant increase in the activity of these membrane-bound ATPases in IPH (isoproterenol hydrochloride)-treated animals. Significant increase in serum potassium level with concomitant decrease in the values of sodium, magnesium, and calcium were observed in IPH-treated rats compared to control rats, fish oil pretreatment reversed these changes to near normal. Significant elevation of sodium and calcium levels with concomitant decrease in the levels of potassium and magnesium were observed in the myocardial tissue of IPH-administered rats compared to control rats, fish oil pretreatment followed by IPH administration brought these levels to near normal. The levels of lipid peroxidation (LPO) in both serum and tissue were increased in IPH-treated rats compared with control rats, whereas pretreatment with fish oil in IPH-treated rats maintained near-normal LPO levels. The results of the present study reveals that the pretreatment of fish maintains the activities of membrane-bound ATPases and the mineral levels at near normal by the inhibition of lipid peroxidation.

  4. Hypocretin stimulates [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding in Hcrtr 2-transfected cell lines and in brain homogenate.

    PubMed

    Shiba, T; Ozu, M; Yoshida, Y; Mignot, E; Nishino, S

    2002-06-14

    In vitro functional analyses of hypocretin/orexin receptor systems were performed using [(125)I]hypocretin radioreceptor and hypocretin-stimulated [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding assay in cell lines expressing human or canine (wild-type and narcoleptic-mutation) hypocretin receptor 2 (Hcrtr 2). Hypocretin-2 stimulated [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding in human and canine Hcrtr 2 expressing cell lines, while cell lines expressing the mutated canine Hcrtr 2 did not exhibit specific binding for [(125)I]hypocretin or hypocretin-stimulated [(35)S]GTP gamma S. In rat brain homogenates, regional specific hypocretin-stimulated [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding was also observed. Hypocretin-stimulated [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding, may thus be a useful functional assay for hypocretin receptors in both cell lines and brain tissue homogenates.

  5. Occurrence and Ecological Significance of GTP in the Ocean and in Microbial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Karl, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    A comparison between the ATP concentrations based on peak height light emission values (0 to 3 s) and integrated light flux determinations (15 to 75 s) for a variety of seawater samples revealed that the integrated method of light detection consistently yielded higher ATP concentrations, ranging from 1.38 to 2.35 times larger than the corresponding peak ATP values. A significant correlation (r = 0.923) was observed for a plot of ΔADP (i.e., integrated ATP - peak ATP) versus GTP + UTP, suggesting that the analytical interference on the ATP assay was the result of the presence of non-adenine nucleotide triphosphates. Size-fractionation studies revealed an enrichment of the non-adenine nucleotide triphosphates, relative to ATP, in the smallest size fraction analyzed (<10 μm). Investigations were conducted with 20 species of unicellular marine algae to determine their intracellular nucleotide concentrations, and these determinations were compared to the levels measured in lab cultures of the marine bacterium Serratia marinorubra. These results indicated that the intracellular GTP/ATP ratios in S. marinorubra increase in direct proportion to the rate of cell growth, and that the GTP/ATP ratios in bacteria are much greater than in growing algae, presumably due to the differences in rates of cellular biosynthesis. It is concluded that quantitative determinations of GTP/ATP ratios in environmental sample extracts may be useful for measuring microbial growth. PMID:16345313

  6. Isolation of cDNAs encoding GTP cyclohydrolase II from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Sugiyama, M; Yamamoto, K

    1995-07-28

    A GTP cyclohydrolase II-encoding gene from Arabidopsis thaliana was isolated through functional complementation of a mutant of Escherichia coli, BSV18, deficient in this protein. The derived amino-acid sequence constitutes a polypeptide of 27 kDa and shows 37-58% identity with previously published sequences of Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Photobacterium leiognathi and P. phosphoreum.

  7. A novel domain in translational GTPase BipA mediates interaction with the 70S ribosome and influences GTP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    deLivron, Megan A; Makanji, Heeren S; Lane, Maura C; Robinson, Victoria L

    2009-11-10

    BipA is a universally conserved prokaryotic GTPase that exhibits differential ribosome association in response to stress-related events. It is a member of the translation factor family of GTPases along with EF-G and LepA. BipA has five domains. The N-terminal region of the protein, consisting of GTPase and beta-barrel domains, is common to all translational GTPases. BipA domains III and V have structural counterparts in EF-G and LepA. However, the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the protein is unique to the BipA family. To investigate how the individual domains of BipA contribute to the biological properties of the protein, deletion constructs were designed and their GTP hydrolysis and ribosome binding properties assessed. Data presented show that removal of the CTD abolishes the ability of BipA to bind to the ribosome and that ribosome complex formation requires the surface provided by domains III and V and the CTD. Additional mutational analysis was used to outline the BipA-70S interaction surface extending across these domains. Steady state kinetic analyses revealed that successive truncation of domains from the C-terminus resulted in a significant increase in the intrinsic GTP hydrolysis rate and a loss of ribosome-stimulated GTPase activity. These results indicate that, similar to other translational GTPases, the ribosome binding and GTPase activities of BipA are tightly coupled. Such intermolecular regulation likely plays a role in the differential ribosome binding by the protein.

  8. A Novel Domain in Translational GTPase BipA Mediates Interaction with the 70S Ribosome and Influences GTP Hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    deLivron, M.; Makanji, H; Lane, M; Robinson, V

    2009-01-01

    BipA is a universally conserved prokaryotic GTPase that exhibits differential ribosome association in response to stress-related events. It is a member of the translation factor family of GTPases along with EF-G and LepA. BipA has five domains. The N-terminal region of the protein, consisting of GTPase and {beta}-barrel domains, is common to all translational GTPases. BipA domains III and V have structural counterparts in EF-G and LepA. However, the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the protein is unique to the BipA family. To investigate how the individual domains of BipA contribute to the biological properties of the protein, deletion constructs were designed and their GTP hydrolysis and ribosome binding properties assessed. Data presented show that removal of the CTD abolishes the ability of BipA to bind to the ribosome and that ribosome complex formation requires the surface provided by domains III and V and the CTD. Additional mutational analysis was used to outline the BipA-70S interaction surface extending across these domains. Steady state kinetic analyses revealed that successive truncation of domains from the C-terminus resulted in a significant increase in the intrinsic GTP hydrolysis rate and a loss of ribosome-stimulated GTPase activity. These results indicate that, similar to other translational GTPases, the ribosome binding and GTPase activities of BipA are tightly coupled. Such intermolecular regulation likely plays a role in the differential ribosome binding by the protein.

  9. Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel type of regulatory protein (GDI) for smg p25A, a ras p21-like GTP-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Y; Kikuchi, A; Araki, S; Hata, Y; Kondo, J; Teranishi, Y; Takai, Y

    1990-01-01

    We recently purified to near homogeneity a novel type of regulatory protein for smg p25A, a ras p21-like GTP-binding protein, from bovine brain cytosol. This regulatory protein, named smg p25A GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI), regulates the GDP-GTP exchange reaction of smg p25A by inhibiting dissociation of GDP from and subsequent binding of GTP to it. In the present studies, we isolated and sequenced the cDNA of smg p25A GDI from a bovine brain cDNA library by using an oligonucleotide probe designed from the partial amino acid sequence of purified smg p25A GDI. The cDNA has an open reading frame that encodes a protein of 447 amino acids with a calculated Mr of 50,565. This Mr is similar to those of the purified smg p25A GDI estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation, which are about 54,000 and 65,000, respectively. The isolated cDNA is expressed in Escherichia coli, and the encoded protein exhibits GDI activity. smg p25A GDI is hydrophilic overall, except for one hydrophobic region near the N terminus. smg p25A GDI shares low amino acid sequence homology with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae CDC25-encoded protein, which has been suggested to serve as a factor that regulates the GDP-GTP exchange reaction of the yeast RAS2-encoded protein, but not with the beta gamma subunits of GTP-binding proteins having an alpha beta gamma subunit structure, such as Gs and Gi. The smg p25A GDI mRNA was present in various tissues, including not only tissues in which smg p25A was detectable but also tissues in which it was not detectable. This fact has raised the possibility that smg p25A GDI interacts with another G protein in tissues in which smg p25A is absent. Images PMID:2115118

  10. A yeast 2-hybrid analysis of human GTP cyclohydrolase I protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Swick, Lance; Kapatos, Gregory

    2006-06-01

    The yeast 2-hybrid system was used to identify protein domains involved in the oligomerization of human guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) Cyclohydrolase I (GCH1) and the interaction of GCH1 with its regulatory partner, GCH1 feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). When interpreted within the structural framework derived from crystallography, our results indicate that the GCH1 N-terminal alpha-helices are not the only domains involved in the formation of dimers from monomers and also suggest an important role for the C-terminal alpha-helix in the assembly of dimers to form decamers. Moreover, a previously unknown role of the extended N-terminal alpha-helix in the interaction of GCH1 and GFRP was revealed. To discover novel GCH1 protein binding partners, we used the yeast 2-hybrid system to screen a human brain library with GCH1 N-terminal amino acids 1-96 as prey. This protruding extension of GCH1 contains two canonical Type-I Src homology-3 (SH3) ligand domains located within amino acids 1-42. Our screen yielded seven unique clones that were subsequently shown to require amino acids 1-42 for binding to GCH1. The interaction of one of these clones, Activator of Heat Shock 90 kDa Protein (Aha1), with GCH1 was validated by glutathione-s-transferase (GST) pull-down assay. Although the physiological relevance of the Aha1-GCH1 interaction requires further study, Aha1 may recruit GCH1 into the endothelial nitric oxide synthase/heat shock protein (eNOS/Hsp90) complex to support changes in endothelial nitric oxide production through the local synthesis of BH4.

  11. An organelle-free assay for pea chloroplast Mg-chelatase: Resolution of the activity into soluble and membrane bound fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.J.; Weinstein, J.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Mg-chelatase, which catalyzes the insertion of magnesium into protoporphyrin, lies at the branchpoint of heme and chlorophyll biosynthesis in chloroplasts. Since magnesium chelation is the first step unique to chlorophyll synthesis, one would expect this step to be highly regulated. However, to date little is known about the enzymology or regulation of Mg-chelatase due mostly to an inability to assay it's activity outside of the intact plastid. Here the authors report the first truly in vitro i.e. organelle-free, assay for Mg-chelatase. Mg-chelatase activity in intact pea chloroplasts which is 3 to 4 fold higher than in cucumber chloroplasts, survived chloroplast lysis and could be fractionated, by centrifugation, into supernatant and pellet components. Both of these fractions were required to reconstitute Mg-chelatase activity and both were inactivated by boiling; indicating that the enzyme is composed of soluble and membrane bound protein(s). The specific activity of the reconstituted system was typically 1 nmol Mg-Deuteroporphyrin/h/mg protein and activity was linear for at least 60 min under our assay conditions. ATP and magnesium were required for Mg-chelatase activity. The soluble component could be fractionated with ammonium sulfate. The product of the reaction was confirmed fluorometrically as the magnesium chelate of the porphyrin substrate. Crude separation of chloroplast membranes into thylakoids and envelopes, suggested that the membrane-bound component of Mg-chelatase is probably located in the envelope.

  12. Modification of the activity of cell wall-bound peroxidase by hypergravity in relation to the stimulation of lignin formation in azuki bean epicotyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Nakano, Saho; Soga, Kouichi; Hoson, Takayuki

    Lignin is a component of cell walls of terrestrial plants, which provides cell walls with the mechanical rigidity. Lignin is a phenolic polymer with high molecular mass and formed by the polymerization of phenolic substances on a cellulosic matrix. The polymerization is catalyzed by cell wall-bound peroxidase, and thus the activity of this enzyme regulates the rate of formation of lignin. In the present study, the changes in the lignin content and the activity of cell wall peroxidase were investigated along epicotyls of azuki bean seedlings grown under hypergravity conditions. The endogenous growth occurred primarily in the upper regions of the epicotyl and no growth was detected in the middle or basal regions. The amounts of acetyl bromide-soluble lignin increased from the upper to the basal regions of epicotyls. The lignin content per unit length in the basal region was three times higher than that in the upper region. Hypergravity treatment at 300 g for 6 h stimulated the increase in the lignin content in all regions of epicotyls, particularly in the basal regions. The peroxidase activity in the protein fraction extracted from the cell wall preparation with a high ionic strength buffer also increased gradually toward the basal region, and hypergravity treatment clearly increased the activity in all regions. There was a close correlation between the lignin content and the enzyme activity. These results suggest that gravity stimuli modulate the activity of cell wall-bound peroxidase, which, in turn, causes the stimulation of the lignin formation in stem organs.

  13. MSDsite: a database search and retrieval system for the analysis and viewing of bound ligands and active sites.

    PubMed

    Golovin, Adel; Dimitropoulos, Dimitris; Oldfield, Tom; Rachedi, Abdelkrim; Henrick, Kim

    2005-01-01

    The three-dimensional environments of ligand binding sites have been derived from the parsing and loading of the PDB entries into a relational database. For each bound molecule the biological assembly of the quaternary structure has been used to determine all contact residues and a fast interactive search and retrieval system has been developed. Prosite pattern and short sequence search options are available together with a novel graphical query generator for inter-residue contacts. The database and its query interface are accessible from the Internet through a web server located at: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/msd-srv/msdsite.

  14. Combining dehydration, construct optimization and improved data collection to solve the crystal structure of a CRM1-RanGTP-SPN1-Nup214 quaternary nuclear export complex.

    PubMed

    Monecke, Thomas; Dickmanns, Achim; Weiss, Manfred S; Port, Sarah A; Kehlenbach, Ralph H; Ficner, Ralf

    2015-12-01

    High conformational flexibility is an intrinsic and indispensable property of nuclear transport receptors, which makes crystallization and structure determination of macromolecular complexes containing exportins or importins particularly challenging. Here, the crystallization and structure determination of a quaternary nuclear export complex consisting of the exportin CRM1, the small GTPase Ran in its GTP-bound form, the export cargo SPN1 and an FG repeat-containing fragment of the nuclear pore complex component nucleoporin Nup214 fused to maltose-binding protein is reported. Optimization of constructs, seeding and the development of a sophisticated protocol including successive PEG-mediated crystal dehydration as well as additional post-mounting steps were essential to obtain well diffracting crystals.

  15. The structure of the pleiotropic transcription regulator CodY provides insight into its GTP-sensing mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ah-reum; Kang, Hye-Ri; Son, Jonghyeon; Kwon, Do Hoon; Kim, Sulhee; Lee, Woo Cheol; Song, Hyun Kyu; Song, Moon Jung; Hwang, Kwang Yeon

    2016-01-01

    GTP and branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are metabolic sensors that are indispensable for the determination of the metabolic status of cells. However, their molecular sensing mechanism remains unclear. CodY is a unique global transcription regulator that recognizes GTP and BCAAs as specific signals and affects expression of more than 100 genes associated with metabolism. Herein, we report the first crystal structures of the full-length CodY complex with sensing molecules and describe their functional states. We observed two different oligomeric states of CodY: a dimeric complex of CodY from Staphylococcus aureus with the two metabolites GTP and isoleucine, and a tetrameric form (apo) of CodY from Bacillus cereus. Notably, the tetrameric state shows in an auto-inhibitory manner by blocking the GTP-binding site, whereas the binding sites of GTP and isoleucine are clearly visible in the dimeric state. The GTP is located at a hinge site between the long helical region and the metabolite-binding site. Together, data from structural and electrophoretic mobility shift assay analyses improve understanding of how CodY senses GTP and operates as a DNA-binding protein and a pleiotropic transcription regulator. PMID:27596595

  16. A host small GTP-binding protein ARL8 plays crucial roles in tobamovirus RNA replication.

    PubMed

    Nishikiori, Masaki; Mori, Masashi; Dohi, Koji; Okamura, Hideyasu; Katoh, Etsuko; Naito, Satoshi; Meshi, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2011-12-01

    Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV), like other eukaryotic positive-strand RNA viruses, replicates its genomic RNA in replication complexes formed on intracellular membranes. Previous studies showed that a host seven-pass transmembrane protein TOM1 is necessary for efficient ToMV multiplication. Here, we show that a small GTP-binding protein ARL8, along with TOM1, is co-purified with a FLAG epitope-tagged ToMV 180K replication protein from solubilized membranes of ToMV-infected tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cells. When solubilized membranes of ToMV-infected tobacco cells that expressed FLAG-tagged ARL8 were subjected to immunopurification with anti-FLAG antibody, ToMV 130K and 180K replication proteins and TOM1 were co-purified and the purified fraction showed RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity that transcribed ToMV RNA. From uninfected cells, TOM1 co-purified with FLAG-tagged ARL8 less efficiently, suggesting that a complex containing ToMV replication proteins, TOM1, and ARL8 are formed on membranes in infected cells. In Arabidopsis thaliana, ARL8 consists of four family members. Simultaneous mutations in two specific ARL8 genes completely inhibited tobamovirus multiplication. In an in vitro ToMV RNA translation-replication system, the lack of either TOM1 or ARL8 proteins inhibited the production of replicative-form RNA, indicating that TOM1 and ARL8 are required for efficient negative-strand RNA synthesis. When ToMV 130K protein was co-expressed with TOM1 and ARL8 in yeast, RNA 5'-capping activity was detected in the membrane fraction. This activity was undetectable or very weak when the 130K protein was expressed alone or with either TOM1 or ARL8. Taken together, these results suggest that TOM1 and ARL8 are components of ToMV RNA replication complexes and play crucial roles in a process toward activation of the replication proteins' RNA synthesizing and capping functions.

  17. Analysis of GTPases carrying hydrophobic amino acid substitutions in lieu of the catalytic glutamine: implications for GTP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Rajeev; Gara, Sudheer Kumar; Mishra, Shambhavi; Prakash, Balaji

    2005-05-01

    Ras superfamily GTP-binding proteins regulate important signaling events in the cell. Ras, which often serves as a prototype, efficiently hydrolyzes GTP in conjunction with its regulator GAP. A conserved glutamine plays a vital role in GTP hydrolysis in most GTP-binding proteins. Mutating this glutamine in Ras has oncogenic effects, since it disrupts GTP hydrolysis. The analysis presented here is of GTP-binding proteins that are a paradox to oncogenic Ras, since they have the catalytic glutamine (Glncat) substituted by a hydrophobic amino acid, yet can hydrolyze GTP efficiently. We term these proteins HAS-GTPases. Analysis of the amino acid sequences of HAS-GTPases reveals prominent presence of insertions around the GTP-binding pocket. Homology modeling studies suggest an interesting means to achieve catalysis despite the drastic hydrophobic substitution replacing the key Glncat of Ras-like GTPases. The substituted hydrophobic residue adopts a "retracted conformation," where it is positioned away from the GTP, as its role in catalysis would be unproductive. This conformation is further stabilized by interactions with hydrophobic residues in its vicinity. These interacting residues are strongly conserved and hydrophobic in all HAS-GTPases, and correspond to residues Asp92 and Tyr96 of Ras. An experimental support for the "retracted conformation" of Switch II arises from the crystal structures of Ylqf and hGBP1. This conformation allows us to hypothesize that, unlike in classical GTPases, catalytic residues could be supplied by regions other than the Switch II (i.e., either the insertions or a neighboring domain).

  18. QTLs for cell wall-bound phenolics in relation to the photosynthetic apparatus activity and leaf water status under drought stress at different growth stages of triticale.

    PubMed

    Hura, Tomasz; Tyrka, Mirosław; Hura, Katarzyna; Ostrowska, Agnieszka; Dziurka, Kinga

    2017-04-01

    The present study aimed at identifying the regions of triticale genome responsible for cell wall saturation with phenolic compounds under drought stress during vegetative and generative growth. Moreover, the loci determining the activity of the photosynthetic apparatus, leaf water content (LWC) and osmotic potential (Ψ o) were identified, as leaf hydration and functioning of the photosynthetic apparatus under drought are associated with the content of cell wall-bound phenolics (CWPh). Compared with LWC and Ψ o, CWPh fluctuations were more strongly associated with changes in chlorophyll fluorescence. At the vegetative stage, CWPh fluctuations were due to the activity of three loci, of which only QCWPh.4B was also related to changes in F v/F m and ABS/CSm. In the other QTLs (QCWPh.6R.2 and QCWPh.6R.3), the genes of these loci determined also the changes in majority of chlorophyll fluorescence parameters. At the generative stage, the changes in CWPh in loci QCWPh.4B, QCWPh.3R and QCWPh.6R.1 corresponded to those in DIo/CSm. The locus QCWPh.6R.3, active at V stage, controlled majority of chlorophyll fluorescence parameters. This is the first study on mapping quantitative traits in triticale plants exposed to drought at different stages of development, and the first to present the loci for cell wall-bound phenolics.

  19. Fenofibrate, a PPARα agonist, protect proximal tubular cells from albumin-bound fatty acids induced apoptosis via the activation of NF-kB.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Nan; Zheng, Xiaoyu; Liu, Hanzhe; Ma, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    Albumin-bound fatty acids is the main cause of renal damage, PPARα is responsible in the metabolism of fatty acids. Previous study found that PPARα played a protective role in fatty acids overload associated tubular injury. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether fenofibrate, a PPARα ligands, could contribute to the renoprotective action in fatty acids overload proximal tubule epithelial cells. We observed in HK-2 cells that fenofibrate significantly inhibited fatty acids bound albumin (FA-BSA) induced up-regulation of MCP-1 and IL-8. Treatment with fenofibrate attenuated renal oxidative stress induced by FA-BSA as evidenced by decreased MDA level, increased SOD activity and catalase, GPx-1 expression. FA-BSA induced apoptosis of HK-2 cells were also obviously prevented by fenofibrate. Furthermore, fenofibrate significantly increased the expression of PPARα mRNA and protein in FA-BSA treated cells. Finally, the activation of NF-kB induced by FA-BSA was markedly suppressed by fenofibrate. Taken together, our study describes a renoprotective role of fenofibrate in fatty acids associated tubular toxicity, and the transcriptional activation of PPARα and suppression of NF-kB were at least partially involved.

  20. The RGK family: a regulatory tail of small GTP-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Kathleen

    2005-12-01

    RGK proteins are small Ras-related GTP-binding proteins that function as potent inhibitors of voltage-dependent calcium channels, and two members of the family, Gem and Rad, modulate Rho-dependent remodeling of the cytoskeleton. Within the Ras superfamily, RGK proteins have distinct structural and regulatory characteristics. It is an open question as to whether RGK proteins catalyze GTP hydrolysis in vivo. Binding of calmodulin and the 14-3-3 protein to RGK proteins controls downstream pathways. Here, we discuss the structural and functional properties of RGK proteins and highlight recent work by Beguin and colleagues addressing the mechanism of Gem regulation by calmodulin and 14-3-3.

  1. The sequential 2',3'-cyclic phosphodiesterase and 3'-phosphate/5'-OH ligation steps of the RtcB RNA splicing pathway are GTP-dependent.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Anupam K; Shuman, Stewart

    2012-09-01

    The RNA ligase RtcB splices broken RNAs with 5'-OH and either 2',3'-cyclic phosphate or 3'-phosphate ends. The 3'-phosphate ligase activity requires GTP and entails the formation of covalent RtcB-(histidinyl)-GMP and polynucleotide-(3')pp(5')G intermediates. There are currently two models for how RtcB executes the strand sealing step. Scheme 1 holds that the RNA 5'-OH end attacks the 3'-phosphorus of the N(3')pp(5')G end to form a 3',5'-phosphodiester and release GMP. Scheme 2 posits that the N(3')pp(5')G end is converted to a 2',3'-cyclic phosphodiester, which is then attacked directly by the 5'-OH RNA end to form a 3',5'-phosphodiester. Here we show that the sealing of a 2',3'-cyclic phosphate end by RtcB requires GTP, is contingent on formation of the RtcB-GMP adduct, and involves a kinetically valid RNA(3')pp(5')G intermediate. Moreover, we find that RtcB catalyzes the hydrolysis of a 2',3'-cyclic phosphate to a 3'-phosphate at a rate that is at least as fast as the rate of ligation. These results weigh in favor of scheme 1. The cyclic phosphodiesterase activity of RtcB depends on GTP and the formation of the RtcB-GMP adduct, signifying that RtcB guanylylation precedes the cyclic phosphodiesterase and 3'-phosphate ligase steps of the RNA splicing pathway.

  2. Activated RhoA Binds to the Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain of PDZ-RhoGEF, a Potential Site for Autoregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhe; Medina, Frank; Liu, Mu-ya; Thomas, Celestine; Sprang, Stephen R.; Sternweis, Paul C.

    2010-07-19

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) catalyze exchange of GDP for GTP by stabilizing the nucleotide-free state of the small GTPases through their Dbl homology/pleckstrin homology (DH {center_dot} PH) domains. Unconventionally, PDZ-RhoGEF (PRG), a member of the RGS-RhoGEFs, binds tightly to both nucleotide-free and activated RhoA (RhoA {center_dot} GTP). We have characterized the interaction between PRG and activated RhoA and determined the structure of the PRG-DH {center_dot} PH-RhoA {center_dot} GTP{gamma}S (guanosine 5{prime}-O-[{gamma}-thio]triphosphate) complex. The interface bears striking similarity to a GTPase-effector interface and involves the switch regions in RhoA and a hydrophobic patch in PRG-PH that is conserved among all Lbc RhoGEFs. The two surfaces that bind activated and nucleotide-free RhoA on PRG-DH {center_dot} PH do not overlap, and a ternary complex of PRG-DH {center_dot} PH bound to both forms of RhoA can be isolated by size-exclusion chromatography. This novel interaction between activated RhoA and PH could play a key role in regulation of RhoGEF activity in vivo.

  3. Synthetic inhibitors of bacterial cell division targeting the GTP-binding site of FtsZ.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Avila, Laura B; Huecas, Sonia; Artola, Marta; Vergoñós, Albert; Ramírez-Aportela, Erney; Cercenado, Emilia; Barasoain, Isabel; Vázquez-Villa, Henar; Martín-Fontecha, Mar; Chacón, Pablo; López-Rodríguez, María L; Andreu, José M

    2013-09-20

    Cell division protein FtsZ is the organizer of the cytokinetic Z-ring in most bacteria and a target for new antibiotics. FtsZ assembles with GTP into filaments that hydrolyze the nucleotide at the association interface between monomers and then disassemble. We have replaced FtsZ's GTP with non-nucleotide synthetic inhibitors of bacterial division. We searched for these small molecules among compounds from the literature, from virtual screening (VS), and from our in-house synthetic library (UCM), employing a fluorescence anisotropy primary assay. From these screens we have identified the polyhydroxy aromatic compound UCM05 and its simplified analogue UCM44 that specifically bind to Bacillus subtilis FtsZ monomers with micromolar affinities and perturb normal assembly, as examined with light scattering, polymer sedimentation, and negative stain electron microscopy. On the other hand, these ligands induce the cooperative assembly of nucleotide-devoid archaeal FtsZ into distinct well-ordered polymers, different from GTP-induced filaments. These FtsZ inhibitors impair localization of FtsZ into the Z-ring and inhibit bacterial cell division. The chlorinated analogue UCM53 inhibits the growth of clinical isolates of antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. We suggest that these interfacial inhibitors recapitulate binding and some assembly-inducing effects of GTP but impair the correct structural dynamics of FtsZ filaments and thus inhibit bacterial division, possibly by binding to a small fraction of the FtsZ molecules in a bacterial cell, which opens a new approach to FtsZ-based antibacterial drug discovery.

  4. Structural basis of biopterin-induced inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I by GFRP, its feedback regulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Maita, Nobuo; Hatakeyama, Kazuyuki; Okada, Kengo; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2004-12-03

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCHI) is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin, a key cofactor necessary for nitric oxide synthase and for the hydroxylases that are involved in the production of catecholamines and serotonin. In animals, the GTPCHI feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) binds GTPCHI to mediate feed-forward activation of GTPCHI activity in the presence of phenylalanine, whereas it induces feedback inhibition of enzyme activity in the presence of biopterin. Here, we have reported the crystal structure of the biopterin-induced inhibitory complex of GTPCHI and GFRP and compared it with the previously reported phenylalanine-induced stimulatory complex. The structure reveals five biopterin molecules located at each interface between GTPCHI and GFRP. Induced fitting structural changes by the biopterin binding expand large conformational changes in GTPCHI peptide segments forming the active site, resulting in inhibition of the activity. By locating 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylalanine-responsive dystonia mutations in the complex structure, we found mutations that may possibly disturb the GFRP-mediated regulation of GTPCHI.

  5. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase interferes with GTP. gamma. S stimulated IP sub 3 formation in differentiated HL-60 cell membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Misaki, Naoyuki; Imaizumi, Taro; Watanabe, Yashuiro )

    1989-01-01

    The effects of addition of activated cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) on the function of islet-activating protein (IAP)-sensitive GTP-binding (G) protein were studied in the plasma membranes of {sup 3}H-inositol-labeled differentiated human leukemic (HL-60) cells. Pretreatment of the membranes with activated PKA in the presence of MgATP for 15 min. at 37{degree}C decreased GTP {gamma}S-stimulated inositol trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) formation by about 30%, but had no influence on Ca{sup 2+}-stimulated IP{sub 3} formation. And autoradiography in the phosphorylation experiments of solubilized HL-60 cell membranes by PKA showed some {sup 32}P incorporated bands, and among them one of the major bands showed the migration at 40 kDa supporting that the G protein coupling with PI response was phosphorylated by PKA. These results showed that pretreatment with activated PKA inhibited the mediating function of the G protein between the fMLP receptor and phospholipase C by its phosphorylation.

  6. RF3:GTP promotes rapid dissociation of the class 1 termination factor.

    PubMed

    Koutmou, Kristin S; McDonald, Megan E; Brunelle, Julie L; Green, Rachel

    2014-05-01

    Translation termination is promoted by class 1 and class 2 release factors in all domains of life. While the role of the bacterial class 1 factors, RF1 and RF2, in translation termination is well understood, the precise contribution of the bacterial class 2 release factor, RF3, to this process remains less clear. Here, we use a combination of binding assays and pre-steady state kinetics to provide a kinetic and thermodynamic framework for understanding the role of the translational GTPase RF3 in bacterial translation termination. First, we find that GDP and GTP have similar affinities for RF3 and that, on average, the t1/2 for nucleotide dissociation from the protein is 1-2 min. We further show that RF3:GDPNP, but not RF3:GDP, tightly associates with the ribosome pre- and post-termination complexes. Finally, we use stopped-flow fluorescence to demonstrate that RF3:GTP enhances RF1 dissociation rates by over 500-fold, providing the first direct observation of this step. Importantly, catalytically inactive variants of RF1 are not rapidly dissociated from the ribosome by RF3:GTP, arguing that a rotated state of the ribosome must be sampled for this step to efficiently occur. Together, these data define a more precise role for RF3 in translation termination and provide insights into the function of this family of translational GTPases.

  7. Ribosome-induced tuning of GTP hydrolysis by a translational GTPase.

    PubMed

    Maracci, Cristina; Peske, Frank; Dannies, Ev; Pohl, Corinna; Rodnina, Marina V

    2014-10-07

    GTP hydrolysis by elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), a translational GTPase that delivers aminoacyl-tRNAs to the ribosome, plays a crucial role in decoding and translational fidelity. The basic reaction mechanism and the way the ribosome contributes to catalysis are a matter of debate. Here we use mutational analysis in combination with measurements of rate/pH profiles, kinetic solvent isotope effects, and ion dependence of GTP hydrolysis by EF-Tu off and on the ribosome to dissect the reaction mechanism. Our data suggest that--contrary to current models--the reaction in free EF-Tu follows a pathway that does not involve the critical residue H84 in the switch II region. Binding to the ribosome without a cognate codon in the A site has little effect on the GTPase mechanism. In contrast, upon cognate codon recognition, the ribosome induces a rearrangement of EF-Tu that renders GTP hydrolysis sensitive to mutations of Asp21 and His84 and insensitive to K(+) ions. We suggest that Asp21 and His84 provide a network of interactions that stabilize the positions of the γ-phosphate and the nucleophilic water, respectively, and thus play an indirect catalytic role in the GTPase mechanism on the ribosome.

  8. Heme-bound iron activates placenta growth factor in erythroid cells via erythroid Krüppel-like factor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xunde; Mendelsohn, Laurel; Rogers, Heather; Leitman, Susan; Raghavachari, Nalini; Yang, Yanqin; Yau, Yu Ying; Tallack, Michael; Perkins, Andrew; Taylor, James G; Noguchi, Constance Tom; Kato, Gregory J

    2014-08-07

    In adults with sickle cell disease (SCD), markers of iron burden are associated with excessive production of the angiogenic protein placenta growth factor (PlGF) and high estimated pulmonary artery pressure. Enforced PlGF expression in mice stimulates production of the potent vasoconstrictor endothelin-1, producing pulmonary hypertension. We now demonstrate heme-bound iron (hemin) induces PlGF mRNA >200-fold in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. In murine and human erythroid cells, expression of erythroid Krüppel-like factor (EKLF) precedes PlGF, and its enforced expression in human erythroid progenitor cells induces PlGF mRNA. Hemin-induced expression of PlGF is abolished in EKLF-deficient murine erythroid cells but rescued by conditional expression of EKLF. Chromatin immunoprecipitation reveals that EKLF binds to the PlGF promoter region. SCD patients show higher level expression of both EKLF and PlGF mRNA in circulating blood cells, and markers of iron overload are associated with high PlGF and early mortality. Finally, PlGF association with iron burden generalizes to other human diseases of iron overload. Our results demonstrate a specific mechanistic pathway induced by excess iron that is linked in humans with SCD and in mice to markers of vasculopathy and pulmonary hypertension. These trials were registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00007150, #NCT00023296, #NCT00081523, and #NCT00352430.

  9. Crystal structure of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin protease in a product-bound state: Evidence for noncanonical zinc protease activity.

    PubMed

    Segelke, Brent; Knapp, Mark; Kadkhodayan, Saloumeh; Balhorn, Rod; Rupp, Bernhard

    2004-05-04

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), the most potent toxins known, disrupt neurotransmission through proteolysis of proteins involved in neuroexocytosis. The light chains of BoNTs are unique zinc proteases that have stringent substrate specificity and require exceptionally long substrates. We have determined the crystal structure of the protease domain from BoNT serotype A (BoNT/A). The structure reveals a homodimer in a product-bound state, with loop F242-V257 from each monomer deeply buried in its partner's catalytic site. The loop, which acts as a substrate, is oriented in reverse of the canonical direction for other zinc proteases. The Y249-Y250 peptide bond of the substrate loop is hydrolyzed, leaving the Y249 product carboxylate coordinated to the catalytic zinc. From the crystal structure of the BoNT/A protease, detailed models of noncanonical binding and proteolysis can be derived which we propose are also consistent with BoNT/A binding and proteolysis of natural substrate synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25). The proposed BoNT/A substrate-binding mode and catalytic mechanism are markedly different from those previously proposed for the BoNT serotype B.

  10. Structural characterization and anticancer activity of cell-bound exopolysaccharide from Lactobacillus helveticus MB2-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Xia, Xiudong; Tang, Weizhi; Ji, Juan; Rui, Xin; Chen, Xiaohong; Jiang, Mei; Zhou, Jianzhong; Zhang, Qiuqin; Dong, Mingsheng

    2015-04-08

    A novel cell-bound exopolysaccharide (c-EPS) was isolated from Lactobacillus helveticus MB2-1 by ultrasonic extraction, anion exchange, and gel filtration chromatography before being structurally characterized. The c-EPS is a heteropolysaccharide with an average molecular weight of 1.83 × 10(5) Da and is composed of glucose, mannose, galactose, rhamnose, and arabinose at a molar ratio of 3.12:1.01:1.00:0.18:0.16. Methylation analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis revealed that the c-EPS is a linear glucomannogalactan containing repeating units of → 6)-β-D-Manp-(1 → 3)-β-D-Glcp-(1 → 3)-β-D-Glcp-(1 → 3)-β-D-Glcp-(1 → 4)-α-D-Galp-(1 → and trace amounts of Rhap-(1 → and (1 → 4)-Arap residues. Complex formation with Congo red demonstrated a triple-strand helical conformation for the c-EPS. Scanning electron microscopy of the c-EPS revealed many regular feather-like structural units. Topographical examination of c-EPS by atomic force microscopy revealed that the c-EPS formed rounded-to-spherical lumps with different sizes and chain formations. Furthermore, preliminary in vitro tests revealed that c-EPS significantly inhibited the proliferation of HepG-2, BGC-823, and especially HT-29 cancer cells.

  11. Neutron Crystal Structure of RAS GTPase Puts in Question the Protonation State of the GTP γ-Phosphate.

    PubMed

    Knihtila, Ryan; Holzapfel, Genevieve; Weiss, Kevin; Meilleur, Flora; Mattos, Carla

    2015-12-25

    RAS GTPase is a prototype for nucleotide-binding proteins that function by cycling between GTP and GDP, with hydrogen atoms playing an important role in the GTP hydrolysis mechanism. It is one of the most well studied proteins in the superfamily of small GTPases, which has representatives in a wide range of cellular functions. These proteins share a GTP-binding pocket with highly conserved motifs that promote hydrolysis to GDP. The neutron crystal structure of RAS presented here strongly supports a protonated γ-phosphate at physiological pH. This counters the notion that the phosphate groups of GTP are fully deprotonated at the start of the hydrolysis reaction, which has colored the interpretation of experimental and computational data in studies of the hydrolysis mechanism. The neutron crystal structure presented here puts in question our understanding of the pre-catalytic state associated with the hydrolysis reaction central to the function of RAS and other GTPases.

  12. Neutron Crystal Structure of RAS GTPase Puts in Question the Protonation State of the GTP γ-Phosphate*

    PubMed Central

    Knihtila, Ryan; Holzapfel, Genevieve; Weiss, Kevin; Meilleur, Flora; Mattos, Carla

    2015-01-01

    RAS GTPase is a prototype for nucleotide-binding proteins that function by cycling between GTP and GDP, with hydrogen atoms playing an important role in the GTP hydrolysis mechanism. It is one of the most well studied proteins in the superfamily of small GTPases, which has representatives in a wide range of cellular functions. These proteins share a GTP-binding pocket with highly conserved motifs that promote hydrolysis to GDP. The neutron crystal structure of RAS presented here strongly supports a protonated γ-phosphate at physiological pH. This counters the notion that the phosphate groups of GTP are fully deprotonated at the start of the hydrolysis reaction, which has colored the interpretation of experimental and computational data in studies of the hydrolysis mechanism. The neutron crystal structure presented here puts in question our understanding of the pre-catalytic state associated with the hydrolysis reaction central to the function of RAS and other GTPases. PMID:26515069

  13. Neutron crystal structure of RAS GTPase puts in question the protonation state of the GTP γ-phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Knihtila, Ryan; Holzapfel, Genevieve; Weiss, Kevin; Meilleur, Flora; Mattos, Carla

    2015-10-29

    RAS GTPase is a prototype for nucleotide-binding proteins that function by cycling between GTP and GDP, with hydrogen atoms playing an important role in the GTP hydrolysis mechanism. It is one of the most well studied proteins in the superfamily of small GTPases, which has representatives in a wide range of cellular functions. These proteins share a GTP-binding pocket with highly conserved motifs that promote hydrolysis to GDP. The neutron crystal structure of RAS presented here strongly supports a protonated gamma-phosphate at physiological pH. This counters the notion that the phosphate groups of GTP are fully deprotonated at the start of the hydrolysis reaction, which has colored the interpretation of experimental and computational data in studies of the hydrolysis mechanism. As a result, the neutron crystal structure presented here puts in question our understanding of the pre-catalytic state associated with the hydrolysis reaction central to the function of RAS and other GTPases.

  14. Crystal structure of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein with a di-nuclear ferroxidase center in a zinc or cadmium-bound form

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, Hideshi; Tsuruta, Osamu; Akao, Naoya; Fujii, Satoshi

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structures of a metal-bound Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two zinc ions were tetrahedrally coordinated by ferroxidase center (FOC) residues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two cadmium ions were coordinated in a trigonal-bipyramidal and octahedral manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The second metal ion was more weakly coordinated than the first at the FOC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A zinc ion was found in one negatively-charged pore suitable as an ion path. -- Abstract: Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) is a Dps-like iron storage protein forming a dodecameric shell, and promotes adhesion of neutrophils to endothelial cells. The crystal structure of HP-NAP in a Zn{sup 2+}- or Cd{sup 2+}-bound form reveals the binding of two zinc or two cadmium ions and their bridged water molecule at the ferroxidase center (FOC). The two zinc ions are coordinated in a tetrahedral manner to the conserved residues among HP-NAP and Dps proteins. The two cadmium ions are coordinated in a trigonal-bipyramidal and distorted octahedral manner. In both structures, the second ion is more weakly coordinated than the first. Another zinc ion is found inside of the negatively-charged threefold-related pore, which is suitable for metal ions to pass through.

  15. Crystal structures of human 3-hydroxyanthranilate 3,4-dioxygenase with native and non-native metals bound in the active site.

    PubMed

    Pidugu, Lakshmi Swarna Mukhi; Neu, Heather; Wong, Tin Lok; Pozharski, Edwin; Molloy, John L; Michel, Sarah L J; Toth, Eric A

    2017-04-01

    3-Hydroxyanthranilate 3,4-dioxygenase (3HAO) is an enzyme in the microglial branch of the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation. 3HAO is a non-heme iron-containing, ring-cleaving extradiol dioxygenase that catalyzes the addition of both atoms of O2 to the kynurenine pathway metabolite 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid (3-HANA) to form quinolinic acid (QUIN). QUIN is a highly potent excitotoxin that has been implicated in a number of neurodegenerative conditions, making 3HAO a target for pharmacological downregulation. Here, the first crystal structure of human 3HAO with the native iron bound in its active site is presented, together with an additional structure with zinc (a known inhibitor of human 3HAO) bound in the active site. The metal-binding environment is examined both structurally and via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR). The studies identified Met35 as the source of potential new interactions with substrates and inhibitors, which may prove useful in future therapeutic efforts.

  16. Comparison of the Antiproliferative Activity of Two Antitumour Ruthenium(III) Complexes With Their Apotransferrin and Transferrin-Bound Forms in a Human Colon Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Keppler, B. K.; Hartmann, M.; Messori, L.; Berger, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    Two ruthenium(III) complexes, namely trans-indazolium[tetrachlorobis(indazole)- ruthenate(III)], HInd[RuInd2Cl4] and trans-imidazolium[tetrachlorobis(imidazole)- ruthenate(III)], HIm[RuIm2Cl4] exhibit high anticancer activity in an autochthonous colorectal carcinoma model in rats. Recently, it has been shown that both complexes bind specifically to human serum apotransferrin and the resulting adducts have been studied through spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques with the ultimate goal of preparing adducts with good selectivity for cancer cells due to the fact that tumour cells express high amounts of transferrin receptors on their cell surface. In order to investigate whether the cellular uptake of the complexes was mediated by apotransferrin or transferrin, we compared the antiproliferative efficacy of HInd[RuInd2Cl4] and HIm[RuIm2Cl4] with its apotransferrin- and transferrin-bound form in the human colon cancer cell line SW707 using the microculture tetrazolium test (MTT). Our results show that especially the transferrin-bound forms exhibit high antiproliferative activity, which exceeds that of the free complex, indicating that this protein can act as a carrier of the ruthenium complexes into the tumor cell. PMID:18472789

  17. Overexpression of GTP cyclohydrolase 1 feedback regulatory protein is protective in a murine model of septic shock.

    PubMed

    Starr, Anna; Sand, Claire A; Heikal, Lamia; Kelly, Peter D; Spina, Domenico; Crabtree, Mark; Channon, Keith M; Leiper, James M; Nandi, Manasi

    2014-11-01

    Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) by inducible NO synthase contributes toward refractory hypotension, impaired microvascular perfusion, and end-organ damage in septic shock patients. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential NOS cofactor. GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) is the rate-limiting enzyme for BH4 biosynthesis. Under inflammatory conditions, GCH1 activity and hence BH4 levels are increased, supporting pathological NOS activity. GCH1 activity can be controlled through allosteric interactions with GCH1 feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). We investigated whether overexpression of GFRP can regulate BH4 and NO production and attenuate cardiovascular dysfunction in sepsis. Sepsis was induced in mice conditionally overexpressing GFRP and wild-type littermates by cecal ligation and puncture. Blood pressure was monitored by radiotelemetry, and mesenteric blood flow was quantified by laser speckle contrast imaging. Blood biochemistry data were obtained using an iSTAT analyzer, and BH4 levels were measured in plasma and tissues by high-performance liquid chromatography. Increased BH4 and NO production and hypotension were observed in all mice, but the extents of these pathophysiological changes were attenuated in GFRP OE mice. Perturbations in blood biochemistry were similarly attenuated in GFRP OE compared with wild-type controls. These results suggest that GFRP overexpression regulates GCH1 activity during septic shock, which in turn limits BH4 bioavailability for iNOS. We conclude that the GCH1-GFRP axis is a critical regulator of BH4 and NO production and the cardiovascular derangements that occur in septic shock.

  18. A specific CD4 epitope bound by tregalizumab mediates activation of regulatory T cells by a unique signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Helling, Bianca; König, Martin; Dälken, Benjamin; Engling, Andre; Krömer, Wolfgang; Heim, Katharina; Wallmeier, Holger; Haas, Jürgen; Wildemann, Brigitte; Fritz, Brigitte; Jonuleit, Helmut; Kubach, Jan; Dingermann, Theodor; Radeke, Heinfried H; Osterroth, Frank; Uherek, Christoph; Czeloth, Niklas; Schüttrumpf, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) represent a specialized subpopulation of T cells, which are essential for maintaining peripheral tolerance and preventing autoimmunity. The immunomodulatory effects of Tregs depend on their activation status. Here we show that, in contrast to conventional anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), the humanized CD4-specific monoclonal antibody tregalizumab (BT-061) is able to selectively activate the suppressive properties of Tregs in vitro. BT-061 activates Tregs by binding to CD4 and activation of signaling downstream pathways. The specific functionality of BT-061 may be explained by the recognition of a unique, conformational epitope on domain 2 of the CD4 molecule that is not recognized by other anti-CD4 mAbs. We found that, due to this special epitope binding, BT-061 induces a unique phosphorylation of T-cell receptor complex-associated signaling molecules. This is sufficient to activate the function of Tregs without activating effector T cells. Furthermore, BT-061 does not induce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These results demonstrate that BT-061 stimulation via the CD4 receptor is able to induce T-cell receptor-independent activation of Tregs. Selective activation of Tregs via CD4 is a promising approach for the treatment of autoimmune diseases where insufficient Treg activity has been described. Clinical investigation of this new approach is currently ongoing. PMID:25512343

  19. Aminoglycoside 2′′-Phosphotransferase IIIa (APH(2′′)-IIIa) Prefers GTP over ATP

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Clyde A.; Toth, Marta; Frase, Hilary; Byrnes, Laura J.; Vakulenko, Sergei B.

    2012-01-01

    Contrary to the accepted dogma that ATP is the canonical phosphate donor in aminoglycoside kinases and protein kinases, it was recently demonstrated that all members of the bacterial aminoglycoside 2′′-phosphotransferase IIIa (APH(2′′)) aminoglycoside kinase family are unique in their ability to utilize GTP as a cofactor for antibiotic modification. Here we describe the structural determinants for GTP recognition in these enzymes. The crystal structure of the GTP-dependent APH(2′′)-IIIa shows that although this enzyme has templates for both ATP and GTP binding superimposed on a single nucleotide specificity motif, access to the ATP-binding template is blocked by a bulky tyrosine residue. Substitution of this tyrosine by a smaller amino acid opens access to the ATP template. Similar GTP binding templates are conserved in other bacterial aminoglycoside kinases, whereas in the structurally related eukaryotic protein kinases this template is less conserved. The aminoglycoside kinases are important antibiotic resistance enzymes in bacteria, whose wide dissemination severely limits available therapeutic options, and the GTP binding templates could be exploited as new, previously unexplored targets for inhibitors of these clinically important enzymes. PMID:22367198

  20. Effect of lipid peroxidation on membrane-bound Ca2+-ATPase activity of the intestinal brush-border membranes.

    PubMed

    Ohta, A; Mohri, T; Ohyashiki, T

    1989-09-04

    We have studied lipid peroxidation and Ca2+-ATPase activity of the porcine intestinal brush-border membranes using a oxygen-radical-generating system consisting of dithiothreitol (DTT)/Fe2+ and tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BuOOH). The rates of lipid peroxidation were measured by formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBAR) and conjugated diene. Incubation of the membranes with DTT/Fe2+ in the absence and presence of t-BuOOH resulted in a slight (about 20%) and a marked (about 50%) inhibition of Ca2+-ATPase activity, respectively. The degree of inhibition was dependent on the hydroperoxide concentration. Addition of thiourea effectively protected Ca2+-ATPase activity but catalase and superoxide dismutase showed a slight and no effect on protection of the ATPase activity, respectively. Results of kinetic studies on the ATPase activity with varying ATP and Ca2+ concentrations revealed that the decrease in the enzyme activity by treatment with these oxidizing agents is mainly due to decrease of the Vmax value. Modification of SH groups in the membrane proteins by thiol group reagents such as N-ethylmaleimide, monoiodoacetate and monoiodacetamide did not induce the inhibition of Ca2+-ATPase activity. From these results, it is suggested that inhibition of the ATPase activity of the membranes by treatment with DTT/Fe2+ in the presence and absence of t-BuOOH is dependent on lipid peroxidation and that oxidative modification of SH groups may not be directly involved to the loss of the ATPase activity. In addition, results of the fluorescence anisotropy measurements of pyrene-labeled membranes suggested that change in the Ca2+-ATPase activity is partly related to a decrease in the membrane lipid fluidity.

  1. RhoA GTPase oxidation stimulates cell proliferation via nuclear factor-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Gyu; Kwon, Hyung-Joo; Wu, Guang; Park, Yohan; Lee, Jae-Yong; Kim, Jaebong; Kim, Sung-Chan; Choe, Myoen; Kang, Seung Goo; Seo, Goo-Young; Kim, Pyeung-Hyeun; Park, Jae-Bong

    2017-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by many kinds of stimuli are essential for cellular signaling including cell proliferation. The dysregulation of ROS, therefore, is related to a variety of diseases including cancer. However, it was not clearly elucidated how ROS regulate cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. In this study, we investigated a mechanism by which the oxidation of RhoA GTPase regulates nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and cell proliferation. Hydrogen peroxide activated NF-κB and RhoA GTPase, but did not activate RhoA C16/20A mutant, an oxidation-resistant form. Remarkably, the oxidation of RhoA reduced its affinity towards RhoGDI, leading to the dissociation of RhoA-RhoGDI complex. Si-Vav2, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), inhibited RhoA activation upon hydrogen peroxide. The oxidized RhoA (oxRhoA)-GTP was readily bound to IκB kinase γ (IKKγ), whereas oxidized RhoGDI did not bind to IKKγ. The oxRhoA-GTP bound to IKKγ activated IKKβ, leading to IκB phosphorylation and degradation, consequently NF-κB activation. Hydrogen peroxide induced cell proliferation, but RhoA C16/20A mutant suppressed cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. Conclusively, RhoA oxidation at Cys16/20 is critically involved in cell proliferation and tumorigenesis through NF-κB activation in response to ROS.

  2. Characterization of cerebral microvasculature in transgenic mice with endothelium targeted over-expression of GTP-cyclohydrolase I

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, Anantha Vijay R.; d’Uscio, Livius V.; Katusic, Zvonimir S.

    2015-01-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is a critical determinant of nitric oxide (NO) production by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the vascular endothelium and its biosynthesis is regulated by the enzymatic activity of GTP-cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH I). The present study was designed to determine the effects of endothelium-targeted overexpression of GTPCH I (eGCH-Tg) on murine cerebral vascular function. Endothelium targeted over-expression of GTPCH I was associated with a significant increase in levels of BH4, as well as its oxidized product, 7,8-dihydrobiopterin (7,8-BH2) in cerebral microvessels. Importantly, ratio of BH4 to 7,8-BH2, indicative of BH4 available for eNOS activation, was significantly increased in eGCH-Tg mice. However, expression of endothelial NOS, levels of nitrate/nitrite - indicative of NO production - remained unchanged between cerebral microvessels of wild-type and eGCH-Tg mice. Furthermore, increased BH4 biosynthesis neither affected production of superoxide anion nor expression of antioxidant proteins. Moreover, endothelium-specific GTPCH I overexpression did not alter intracellular levels of cGMP, reflective of NO signaling in cerebral microvessels. The obtained results suggest that, despite a significant increase in BH4 bioavailability, generation of endothelial NO in cerebral microvessels remained unchanged in eGCH-Tg mice. We conclude that under physiological conditions the levels of BH4 in the cerebral microvessels are optimal for activation of endothelial NOS and NO/cGMP signaling. PMID:26343845

  3. Monocyte surface-bound IL-15 can function as an activating receptor and participate in reverse signaling.

    PubMed

    Neely, Graham G; Epelman, Slava; Ma, Ling Ling; Colarusso, Pina; Howlett, Christopher J; Amankwah, Ernest K; McIntyre, Amanda C; Robbins, Stephen M; Mody, Christopher H

    2004-04-01

    IL-15 is a short chain, four-alpha helix cytokine that shares some biological function with IL-2. One striking difference between IL-2 and IL-15 is the ability of monocytes to express IL-15 on their cell surface after activation. In the current study we have investigated the ability of human monocyte cell surface IL-15 to participate in reverse signaling. Cross-linking anti-IL-15 Abs were used as a surrogate ligand for surface IL-15 engagement. Ligation of cell surface-expressed IL-15 induced monocyte adhesion that required the activity of small m.w. GTPases. Reverse signals through surface IL-15 activated the Rho-GTPase Rac3. In addition, engagement of cell surface IL-15 was found to activate a number of signaling pathways, including both extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38, and resulted in the secretion of IL-8. IL-8 production required mitogen-activated protein kinase activity. Thus, the current study has established that cell surface IL-15 is more than just a ligand; it can function as a receptor and participate in reverse signaling that results in cellular adhesion and production of inflammatory cytokines.

  4. Differences in the effect of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate on the hydrolytic and transphosphatidylation activities of membrane-bound phospholipase D from poppy seedlings.

    PubMed

    Oblozinsky, Marek; Bezakova, Lydia; Mansfeld, Johanna; Heilmann, Ingo; Ulbrich-Hofmann, Renate

    2013-08-01

    The hydrolytic activity of phospholipase D (PLD) yielding phosphatidic acid from phosphatidylcholine and other glycerophospholipids is known to be involved in many cellular processes. In contrast, it is not clear whether the competitive transphosphatidylation activity of PLD catalyzing the head group exchange of phospholipids has a natural function. In poppy seedlings (Papaver somniferum L.) where lipid metabolism and alkaloid synthesis are closely linked, five isoenzymes with different substrate and hydrolysis/transphosphatidylation selectivities have been detected hitherto. A membrane-bound PLD, found in microsomal fractions of poppy seedlings, is active at micromolar concentrations of Ca(2+) ions and needs phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) as effector in the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine (PC). The optimum PIP2 concentration at 1.2 mol% of the concentration of the substrate PC indicates a specific activation effect. Transphosphatidylation with glycerol, ethanolamine, l-serine, or myo-inositol as acceptor alcohols is also activated by PIP2, however, with an optimum concentration at 0.6-0.9 mol%. In contrast to hydrolysis, a basic transphosphatidylation activity occurs even in the absence of PIP2, suggesting a different fine-tuning of the two competing reactions.

  5. Computational Simulation of the Activation Cycle of Gα Subunit in the G Protein Cycle Using an Elastic Network Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Hyeok; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Hee Ryung; Jeon, Tae-Joon; Choi, Jae Boong; Chung, Ka Young; Kim, Moon Ki

    2016-01-01

    Agonist-activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) interact with GDP-bound G protein heterotrimers (Gαβγ) promoting GDP/GTP exchange, which results in dissociation of Gα from the receptor and Gβγ. The GTPase activity of Gα hydrolyzes GTP to GDP, and the GDP-bound Gα interacts with Gβγ, forming a GDP-bound G protein heterotrimer. The G protein cycle is allosterically modulated by conformational changes of the Gα subunit. Although biochemical and biophysical methods have elucidated the structure and dynamics of Gα, the precise conformational mechanisms underlying the G protein cycle are not fully understood yet. Simulation methods could help to provide additional details to gain further insight into G protein signal transduction mechanisms. In this study, using the available X-ray crystal structures of Gα, we simulated the entire G protein cycle and described not only the steric features of the Gα structure, but also conformational changes at each step. Each reference structure in the G protein cycle was modeled as an elastic network model and subjected to normal mode analysis. Our simulation data suggests that activated receptors trigger conformational changes of the Gα subunit that are thermodynamically favorable for opening of the nucleotide-binding pocket and GDP release. Furthermore, the effects of GTP binding and hydrolysis on mobility changes of the C and N termini and switch regions are elucidated. In summary, our simulation results enabled us to provide detailed descriptions of the structural and dynamic features of the G protein cycle. PMID:27483005

  6. Inositol phospholipids regulate the guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor Tiam1 by facilitating its binding to the plasma membrane and regulating GDP/GTP exchange on Rac1

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Binding of the Rac1-specific guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor, Tiam1, to the plasma membrane requires the N-terminal pleckstrin homology domain. In the present study, we show that membrane-association is mediated by binding of PtdIns(4,5)P2 to the pleckstrin homology domain. Moreover, in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, translocation of Tiam1 to the cytosol, following receptor-mediated stimulation of PtdIns(4,5)P2 breakdown, correlates with decreased Rac1-GTP levels, indicating that membrane-association is required for GDP/GTP exchange on Rac1. In addition, we show that platelet-derived growth factor activates Rac1 in vivo by increasing PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 concentrations, rather than the closely related lipid, PtdIns(3,4)P2. Finally, the data demonstrate that PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 bind to the same pleckstrin homology domain in Tiam1 and that soluble inositol phosphates appear to compete with lipids for this binding. Together, these novel observations provide strong evidence that distinct phosphoinositides regulate different functions of this enzyme, indicating that local concentrations of signalling lipids and the levels of cytosolic inositol phosphates will play crucial roles in determining its activity in vivo. PMID:15242348

  7. Inositol phospholipids regulate the guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor Tiam1 by facilitating its binding to the plasma membrane and regulating GDP/GTP exchange on Rac1.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Ian N; Batty, Ian H; Prescott, Alan R; Gray, Alex; Kular, Gursant S; Stewart, Hazel; Downes, C Peter

    2004-09-15

    Binding of the Rac1-specific guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor, Tiam1, to the plasma membrane requires the N-terminal pleckstrin homology domain. In the present study, we show that membrane-association is mediated by binding of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) to the pleckstrin homology domain. Moreover, in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, translocation of Tiam1 to the cytosol, following receptor-mediated stimulation of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) breakdown, correlates with decreased Rac1-GTP levels, indicating that membrane-association is required for GDP/GTP exchange on Rac1. In addition, we show that platelet-derived growth factor activates Rac1 in vivo by increasing PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) concentrations, rather than the closely related lipid, PtdIns(3,4)P(2). Finally, the data demonstrate that PtdIns(4,5)P(2) and PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) bind to the same pleckstrin homology domain in Tiam1 and that soluble inositol phosphates appear to compete with lipids for this binding. Together, these novel observations provide strong evidence that distinct phosphoinositides regulate different functions of this enzyme, indicating that local concentrations of signalling lipids and the levels of cytosolic inositol phosphates will play crucial roles in determining its activity in vivo.

  8. Aspergillus oryzae lectin induces anaphylactoid oedema and mast cell activation through its interaction with fucose of mast cell-bound non-specific IgE.

    PubMed

    Yamaki, K; Yoshino, S

    2011-11-01

    We investigated whether Aspergillus oryzae lectin (AOL), a fucose-specific lectin, induces anaphylactoid reactions and mast cell activation. The injection of AOL into footpads of mice produced a dose-related acute paw oedema. The AOL-induced oedema was attenuated by predose of histamine H1 receptor blocker or pretreatment of the lectin with fucose before injection and was not observed in SCID and mast cell-deficient WBB6F1-W/Wv mice. These results suggested that the AOL-induced anaphylactoid reaction was mediated by histamine released from mast cells. In addition, the activation of mast cells was seemed to be induced by the crosslinking of IgE on the cell surface following the binding of AOL to fucose residues in IgE. Consistent with the in vivo results, AOL induced the degranulation of the rat mast cell line RBL2H3 sensitized with monoclonal IgE. As AOL induced the increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration of IgE-sensitized RBL2H3 cells as well as antigen stimulation, AOL could input signals from FcεRI. The degranulation of IgE-sensitized RBL2H3 cells by AOL was diminished by pretreatment of AOL with fucose. Defucosylated IgE did not induce degranulation of RBL2H3 cells in response to AOL stimulation, in spite of its ability to induce degranulation by antigen stimulation as intact IgE. These results indicated that AOL bound to fucose residue of IgE causing antigen-independent IgE-mediated mast cell activation and anaphylactoid reactions in vitro and in vivo, respectively. AOL bound to human IgE as well as to mouse IgE, suggesting the possible implication of AOL in the allergic response to Aspergillus oryzae in humans.

  9. Antitumoural activity of a cytotoxic peptide of Lactobacillus casei peptidoglycan and its interaction with mitochondrial-bound hexokinase

    PubMed Central

    Fichera, Giuseppe A.; Milone, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study, we reported the cytotoxic activity against various tumour cells of the peptidoglycan of Lactobacillus casei. To isolate the most active components, we performed column-chromatography separation of the peptidoglycan complex and tested the related fractions for their cytotoxic activity. The most active fractions were then lyophilized and the residue was analysed by gas chromatography for its amino acid content and composition. On the basis of the known chemical formula of the basic peptidic component of the peptidoglycan complex of L. casei, a peptide was then synthesized [Europ. (CH-DE-FR-GB) Patent number 1217005; IT number 01320177] and its cytotoxicity was tested against tumoural and normal cells. The synthetic peptide was found to impair the entire metabolism of cultured tumour cells and to restore the apoptotic process. By contrast, normal cells appeared to be stimulated rather than inhibited by the peptide, whereas primary mouse embryo fibroblasts behaved similarly to tumour cells. On the basis of these results, L. casei peptidoglycan fragments and their constituent basic peptide might be applicable as potent antitumour agents. PMID:27101258

  10. Reactivity of oxygen radical anions bound to scandia nanoparticles in the gas phase: C-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Li-Hua; Meng, Jing-Heng; Wu, Xiao-Nan; Zhao, Yan-Xia; Ding, Xun-Lei; He, Sheng-Gui; Ma, Tong-Mei

    2014-01-20

    The activation of C-H bonds in alkanes is currently a hot research topic in chemistry. The atomic oxygen radical anion (O(-·)) is an important species in C-H activation. The mechanistic details of C-H activation by O(-·) radicals can be well understood by studying the reactions between O(-·) containing transition metal oxide clusters and alkanes. Here the reactivity of scandium oxide cluster anions toward n-butane was studied by using a high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer coupled with a fast flow reactor. Hydrogen atom abstraction (HAA) from n-butane by (Sc2O3)(N)O(-) (N=1-18) clusters was observed. The reactivity of (Sc2O3)(N)O(-) (N=1-18) clusters is significantly sizedependent and the highest reactivity was observed for N=4 (Sc8O13(-)) and 12 (Sc24O37(-)). Larger (Sc2O3)(N)O(-) clusters generally have higher reactivity than the smaller ones. Density functional theory calculations were performed to interpret the reactivity of (Sc2O3)(N)O(-) (N=1-5) clusters, which were found to contain the O(-·) radicals as the active sites. The local charge environment around the O(-·) radicals was demonstrated to control the experimentally observed size-dependent reactivity. This work is among the first to report HAA reactivity of cluster anions with dimensions up to nanosize toward alkane molecules. The anionic O(-·) containing scandium oxide clusters are found to be more reactive than the corresponding cationic ones in the C-H bond activation.

  11. In vitro assay of the chlorophyll biosynthetic enzyme Mg-chelatase: Resolution of the activity into soluble and membrane-bound fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.J.; Weinstein, J.D. )

    1991-07-01

    The first committed step in chlorophyll synthesis is the Mg-chelatase-catalyzed insertion of magnesium into protoporphyrin IX. Since iron insertion into protoporphyrin leads to heme formation, Mg-chelatase lies at the branch point of heme and chlorophyll synthesis in chloroplasts. Little is known about the enzymology or regulation of Mg-chelatase, as it has been assayed only in intact cucumber chloroplasts. In this report we describe an in vitro assay for Mg-chelatase. Mg-chelatase activity in intact pea chloroplasts was 3- to 4-fold higher than in cucumber chloroplasts. This activity survived chloroplast lysis and could be fractionated by centrifugation into supernatant and pellet components. Both of these fractions were required to reconstitute Mg-chelatase activity, and both were inactivated by boiling indicating that the enzyme is composed of soluble and membrane-bound protein(s). The product of the reaction was confirmed fluorometrically as the magnesium chelate of the porphyrin substrate. The specific activity of the reconstituted system was typically 1 nmol of Mg-deuteroporphyrin per h per mg of protein, and activity was linear for at least 60 min under our assay conditions. ATP and magnesium were required for Mg-chelatase activity and the enzymen was sensitive to the sulfhydryl reagent N-ethylmaleimide (I{sub 50}, 20 {mu}M). Broken and reconstituted cucumber chloroplasts were unable to maintain Mg-chelatase activity. However, the cucumber supernatant fraction was active when combined with the pellet fraction of peas; the converse was not true, which suggested that the cucumber pellet was the component that lost activity during lysis.

  12. Red cells bound to influenza virus N9 neuraminidase are not released by the N9 neuraminidase activity.

    PubMed

    Air, G M; Laver, W G

    1995-08-01

    Influenza virus neuraminidase (NA) of the N9 subtype also possesses hemagglutinin activity and the hemagglutinating, or hemabsorbing (HB), site is distinct from the catalytic site. Previous results suggested that the NA was binding to sialic acid on the red cell surface, but we now report that the HB receptor is not sensitive to N9 influenza neuraminidase activity. Cell lines that constitutively express N9 or N2 neuraminidase have been used to further investigate the specificity of red blood cell binding to the HB site. The results suggest that the ligand is N-acetylneuraminic acid in a linkage or environment that is not sensitive to influenza virus neuraminidase, but which is released by the broadly specific bacterial sialidases from Micromonospora viridifaciens or Arthrobacter ureafaciens.

  13. Serum amyloid P component bound to gram-negative bacteria prevents lipopolysaccharide-mediated classical pathway complement activation.

    PubMed

    de Haas, C J; van Leeuwen, E M; van Bommel, T; Verhoef, J; van Kessel, K P; van Strijp, J A

    2000-04-01

    Although serum amyloid P component (SAP) is known to bind many ligands, its biological function is not yet clear. Recently, it was demonstrated that SAP binds to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In the present study, SAP was shown to bind to gram-negative bacteria expressing short types of LPS or lipo-oligosaccharide (LOS), such as Salmonella enterica serovar Copenhagen Re and Escherichia coli J5, and also to clinical isolates of Haemophilus influenzae. It was hypothesized that SAP binds to the bacteria via the lipid A part of LPS or LOS, since the htrB mutant of the nontypeable H. influenzae strain NTHi 2019-B29-3, which expresses a nonacetylated lipid A, did not bind SAP. This was in contrast to the parental strain NTHi 2019. The binding of SAP resulted in a clear inhibition of the deposition of complement component C3 on the bacteria. SAP inhibited only the activation of the classical complement pathway; the alternative route remained unaffected. In the classical route, SAP prevented the deposition of the first complement component, Clq, probably by interfering with the binding of Clq to LPS. Since antibody-mediated Clq activation was not inhibited by SAP, SAP seems to inhibit only the LPS-induced classical complement pathway activation. The SAP-induced inhibition of C3 deposition strongly diminished the complement-mediated lysis as well as the phagocytosis of the bacteria. The binding of SAP to gram-negative bacteria, therefore, might influence the pathophysiology of an infection with such bacteria.

  14. Molecular cloning and catalytic activity of a membrane-bound prenyl diphosphate phosphatase from Croton stellatopilosus Ohba.

    PubMed

    Nualkaew, Natsajee; Guennewich, Nils; Springob, Karin; Klamrak, Anuwatchakit; De-Eknamkul, Wanchai; Kutchan, Toni M

    2013-07-01

    Geranylgeraniol (GGOH), a bioactive acyclic diterpene with apoptotic induction activity, is the immediate precursor of the commercial anti-peptic, plaunotol (18-hydroxy geranylgeraniol), which is found in Croton stellatopilosus (Ohba). From this plant, a cDNA encoding a prenyl diphosphate phosphatase (CsPDP), which catalyses the dephosphorylation of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) to GGOH, was isolated using a PCR approach. The full-length cDNA contained 888bp and encoded a 33.6 kDa protein (295 amino acids) that was phylogenetically grouped into the phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP) enzyme family. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 6 hydrophobic transmembrane regions with 57-85% homology to the sequences of other plant PAPs. The recombinant CsPDP and its 4 truncated constructs exhibited decreasing dephosphorylation activities relative to the lengths of the N-terminal deletions. While the full-length CsPDP successfully performed the two sequential monodephosphorylation steps on GGPP to form GGOH, the larger N-terminal deletion in the truncated enzymes appeared to specifically decrease the catalytic efficiency of the second monodephosphorylation step. The information presented here on the CsPDP cDNA and factors affecting the dephosphorylation activity of its recombinant protein may eventually lead to the discovery of the specific GGPP phosphatase gene and enzyme that are involved in the formation of GGOH in the biosynthetic pathway of plaunotol in C. stellatopilosus.

  15. Bound states and the Bekenstein bound

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael

    2003-10-16

    We explore the validity of the generalized Bekenstein bound, S<= pi M a. We define the entropy S as the logarithm of the number of states which have energy eigenvalue below M and are localized to a flat space region of width alpha. If boundary conditions that localize field modes are imposed by fiat, then the bound encounters well-known difficulties with negative Casimir energy and large species number, as well as novel problems arising only in the generalized form. In realistic systems, however, finite-size effects contribute additional energy. We study two different models for estimating such contributions. Our analysis suggests that the bound is both valid and nontrivial if interactions are properly included, so that the entropy S counts the bound states of interacting fields.

  16. The integrated global temperature change potential (iGTP) and relationships between emission metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Glen P.; Aamaas, Borgar; Berntsen, Terje; Fuglestvedt, Jan S.

    2011-12-01

    The Kyoto Protocol compares greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) using the global warming potential (GWP) with a 100 yr time-horizon. The GWP was developed, however, to illustrate the difficulties in comparing GHGs. In response, there have been many critiques of the GWP and several alternative emission metrics have been proposed. To date, there has been little focus on understanding the linkages between, and interpretations of, different emission metrics. We use an energy balance model to mathematically link the absolute GWP, absolute global temperature change potential (AGTP), absolute ocean heat perturbation (AOHP), and integrated AGTP. For pulse emissions, energy conservation requires that AOHP = AGWP - iAGTP/λ and hence AGWP and iAGTP are closely linked and converge as AOHP decays to zero. When normalizing the metrics with CO2 (GWP, GTP, and iGTP), we find that the iGTP and GWP are similar numerically for a wide range of GHGs and time-horizons, except for very short-lived species. The similarity between the iGTPX and GWPX depends on how well a pulse emission of CO2 can substitute for a pulse emission of X across a range of time-horizons. The ultimate choice of emission metric(s) and time-horizon(s) depends on policy objectives. To the extent that limiting integrated temperature change over a specific time-horizon is consistent with the broader objectives of climate policy, our analysis suggests that the GWP represents a relatively robust, transparent and policy-relevant emission metric.

  17. Reconstitution of constitutive secretion using semi-intact cells: regulation by GTP but not calcium

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Regulated exocytosis in many permeabilized cells can be triggered by calcium and nonhydrolyzable GTP analogues. Here we examine the role of these effectors in exocytosis of constitutive vesicles using a system that reconstitutes transport between the trans-Golgi region and the plasma membrane. Transport is assayed by two independent methods: the movement of a transmembrane glycoprotein (vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein [VSV G protein]) to the cell surface; and the release of a soluble marker, sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains, that have been synthesized and radiolabeled in the trans-Golgi. The plasma membrane of CHO cells was selectively perforated with the bacterial cytolysin streptolysin-O. These perforated cells allow exchange of ions and cytosolic proteins but retain intracellular organelles and transport vesicles. Incubation of the semi-intact cells with ATP and a cytosolic fraction results in transport of VSV G protein and GAG chains to the cell surface. The transport reaction is temperature dependent, requires hydrolyzable ATP, and is inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide. Nonhydrolyzable GTP analogs such as GTP gamma S, which stimulate the fusion of regulated secretory granules, completely abolish constitutive secretion. The rate and extent of constitutive transport between the trans-Golgi and the plasma membrane is independent of free Ca2+ concentrations. This is in marked contrast to fusion of regulated secretory granules with the plasma membrane, and transport between the ER and the cis-Golgi (Beckers, C. J. M., and W. E. Balch. 1989. J. Cell Biol. 108:1245-1256; Baker, D., L. Wuestehube, R. Schekman, and D. Botstein. 1990. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 87:355-359). PMID:1986006

  18. Electroosmotic perfusion of tissue: sampling the extracellular space and quantitative assessment of membrane-bound enzyme activity in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Yangguang; Wu, Juanfang; Sandberg, Mats

    2014-01-01

    This review covers recent advances in sampling fluid from the extracellular space of brain tissue by electroosmosis (EO). Two techniques, EO sampling with a single fused-silica capillary and EO push–pull perfusion, have been developed. These tools were used to investigate the function of membrane-bound enzymes with outward-facing active sites, or ectoenzymes, in modulating the activity of the neuropeptides leu-enkephalin and galanin in organotypic-hippocampal-slice cultures (OHSCs). In addition, the approach was used to determine the endogenous concentration of a thiol, cysteamine, in OHSCs. We have also investigated the degradation of coenzyme A in the extracellular space. The approach provides information on ectoenzyme activity, including Michaelis constants, in tissue, which, as far as we are aware, has not been done before. On the basis of computational evidence, EO push–pull perfusion can distinguish ectoenzyme activity with a ~100 µm spatial resolution, which is important for studies of enzyme kinetics in adjacent regions of the rat hippocampus. PMID:25168111

  19. Construction of a plasmid for co-expression of mouse membrane-bound form of IL-15 and RAE-1ε and its biological activity.

    PubMed

    Qian, Li; Ji, Ming-Chun; Pan, Xin-Yuan; Gong, Wei-Juan; Tian, Fang; Duan, Qiu-Fang

    2011-05-01

    Interleukin 15 (IL-15) is a pivotal cytokine for the proliferation and activation of a specific group of immune cells such as natural killer (NK), IFN-producing killer dendritic cells (IKDC) and CD8 T cells. RAE-1ε, the ligand for the activating NKG2D receptor, which also play an important role in the proliferation and activation of NK cells and IKDCs. In this study, a membrane-bound form of IL-15 (termed mb15) encoding sequence and RAE-1ε gene were obtained by SOE-PCR or PCR amplification. The amplified mb15 and RAE-1ε gene were then digested and inserted into the multiple cloning site1 (MCS1) and MCS2 of pVITRO2-mcs vector, respectively. A recombinant eukaryotic expression vector for co-expression of mb15 and RAE-1ε was successfully constructed. After it was transfected to BaF3 cells, the expression of IL-15 and RAE-1ε in recombinant BaF3/mb15/RAE-1ε cells were verified by RT-PCR, western blot and FCM analysis. Furthermore, BaF3/mb15/RAE-1ε cells had the ability of promoting NK cells proliferation and IFN-γ secretion. In conclusion, BaF3/mb15/RAE-1ε cells were successfully constructed, which is very useful for further studies, especially for the expansion and activation of certain subsets of immune cells such as NK cells and IKDCs.

  20. Crystal Structure of the Human Ubiquitin-activating Enzyme 5 (UBA5) Bound to ATP Mechanistic Insights into a Minimalistic E1 Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Bacik, John-Paul; Walker, John R.; Ali, Mohsin; Schimmer, Aaron D.; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano

    2010-08-30

    E1 ubiquitin-activating enzymes (UBAs) are large multidomain proteins that catalyze formation of a thioester bond between the terminal carboxylate of a ubiquitin or ubiquitin-like modifier (UBL) and a conserved cysteine in an E2 protein, producing reactive ubiquityl units for subsequent ligation to substrate lysines. Two important E1 reaction intermediates have been identified: a ubiquityl-adenylate phosphoester and a ubiquityl-enzyme thioester. However, the mechanism of thioester bond formation and its subsequent transfer to an E2 enzyme remains poorly understood. We have determined the crystal structure of the human UFM1 (ubiquitin-fold modifier 1) E1-activating enzyme UBA5, bound to ATP, revealing a structure that shares similarities with both large canonical E1 enzymes and smaller ancestral E1-like enzymes. In contrast to other E1 active site cysteines, which are in a variably sized domain that is separate and flexible relative to the adenylation domain, the catalytic cysteine of UBA5 (Cys{sup 250}) is part of the adenylation domain in an {alpha}-helical motif. The novel position of the UBA5 catalytic cysteine and conformational changes associated with ATP binding provides insight into the possible mechanisms through which the ubiquityl-enzyme thioester is formed. These studies reveal structural features that further our understanding of the UBA5 enzyme reaction mechanism and provide insight into the evolution of ubiquitin activation.

  1. Activation by Allostery in Cell-Wall Remodeling by a Modular Membrane-Bound Lytic Transglycosylase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Gil, Teresa; Lee, Mijoon; Acebrón-Avalos, Iván; Mahasenan, Kiran V; Hesek, Dusan; Dik, David A; Byun, Byungjin; Lastochkin, Elena; Fisher, Jed F; Mobashery, Shahriar; Hermoso, Juan A

    2016-10-04

    Bacteria grow and divide without loss of cellular integrity. This accomplishment is notable, as a key component of their cell envelope is a surrounding glycopeptide polymer. In Gram-negative bacteria this polymer-the peptidoglycan-grows by the difference between concurrent synthesis and degradation. The regulation of the enzymatic ensemble for these activities is poorly understood. We report herein the structural basis for the control of one such enzyme, the lytic transglycosylase MltF of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Its structure comprises two modules: an ABC-transporter-like regulatory module and a catalytic module. Occupancy of the regulatory module by peptidoglycan-derived muropeptides effects a dramatic and long-distance (40 Å) conformational change, occurring over the entire protein structure, to open its active site for catalysis. This discovery of the molecular basis for the allosteric control of MltF catalysis is foundational to further study of MltF within the complex enzymatic orchestration of the dynamic peptidoglycan.

  2. Alzheimer Amyloid-β Oligomer Bound to Post-Synaptic Prion Protein Activates Fyn to Impair Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Um, Ji Won; Nygaard, Haakon B.; Heiss, Jacqueline K.; Kostylev, Mikhail A.; Stagi, Massimiliano; Vortmeyer, Alexander; Wisniewski, Thomas; Gunther, Erik C.; Strittmatter, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Amyloid-beta (Aβ) oligomers are thought to trigger Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathophysiology. Cellular Prion Protein (PrPC) selectively binds oligomeric Aβ and can mediate AD-related phenotypes. Here, we examined the specificity, distribution and signaling from Aβ/PrP complexes, seeking to explain how they might alter the function of NMDA receptors in neurons. PrPC is enriched in post-synaptic densities, and Aβ/PrPC interaction leads to Fyn kinase activation. Soluble Aβ assemblies derived from human AD brain interact with PrPC to activate Fyn. Aβ engagement of PrPC/Fyn signaling yields phosphorylation of the NR2B subunit of NMDA-receptors, which is coupled to an initial increase and then loss of surface NMDA-receptors. Aβ-induced LDH release and dendritic spine loss require both PrPC and Fyn, and human familial AD transgene-induced convulsive seizures do not occur in mice lacking PrPC. These results delineate an Aβ oligomer signal transduction pathway requiring PrPC and Fyn to alter synaptic function with relevance to AD. PMID:22820466

  3. Exportin 5 is a RanGTP-dependent dsRNA-binding protein that mediates nuclear export of pre-miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Bohnsack, Markus T; Czaplinski, Kevin; Gorlich, Dirk

    2004-02-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are widespread among eukaryotes, and studies in several systems have revealed that miRNAs can regulate expression of specific genes. Primary miRNA transcripts are initially processed to approximately 70-nucleotide (nt) stem-loop structures (pre-miRNAs), exported to the cytoplasm, further processed to yield approximately 22-nt dsRNAs, and finally incorporated into ribonucleoprotein particles, which are thought to be the active species. Here we study nuclear export of pre-miRNAs and show that the process is saturable and thus carrier-mediated. Export is sensitive to depletion of nuclear RanGTP and, according to this criterion, mediated by a RanGTP-dependent exportin. An unbiased affinity chromatography approach with immobilized pre-miRNAs identified exportin 5 as the pre-miRNA-specific export carrier. We have cloned exportin 5 from Xenopus and demonstrate that antibodies raised against the Xenopus receptor specifically block pre-miRNA export from nuclei of Xenopus oocytes. We further show that exportin 5 interacts with double-stranded RNA in a sequence-independent manner.

  4. The structure of YqeH: An AtNOS1/AtNOA1 ortholog that couples GTP hydrolysis to molecular recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Sudhamsu, J.; Lee, G.I.; Klessig, D.F.; Crane, B.R.

    2009-03-27

    AtNOS1/AtNOA1 was identified as a nitric oxide-generating enzyme in plants, but that function has recently been questioned. To resolve issues surrounding AtNOA1 activity, we report the biochemical properties and a 2.36 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a bacterial AtNOA1 ortholog (YqeH). Geobacillus YqeH fused to a putative AtNOA1 leader peptide complements growth and morphological defects of Atnoa1 mutant plants. YqeH does not synthesize nitric oxide from L-arginine but rather hydrolyzes GTP. The YqeH structure reveals a circularly permuted GTPase domain and an unusual C-terminal {beta}-domain. A small N-terminal domain, disordered in the structure, binds zinc. Structural homology among the C-terminal domain, the RNA-binding regulator TRAP, and the hypoxia factor pVHL define a recognition module for peptides and nucleic acids. TRAP residues important for RNA binding are conserved by the YqeH C-terminal domain, whose positioning is coupled to GTP hydrolysis. YqeH and AtNOA1 probably act as G-proteins that regulate nucleic acid recognition and not as nitric-oxide synthases.

  5. Spectroscopic insights into axial ligation and active-site H-bonding in substrate-bound human heme oxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Jessica D; Yi, Li; Ragsdale, Stephen W; Brunold, Thomas C

    2010-09-01

    Heme oxygenases (HOs) are monooxygenases that catalyze the first step in heme degradation, converting heme to biliverdin with concomitant release of Fe(II) and CO from the porphyrin macrocycle. Two heme oxygenase isoforms, HO-1 and HO-2, exist that differ in several ways, including a complete lack of Cys residues in HO-1 and the presence of three Cys residues as part of heme-regulatory motifs (HRMs) in HO-2. HRMs in other heme proteins are thought to directly bind heme, or to otherwise regulate protein stability or activity; however, it is not currently known how the HRMs exert these effects on HO-2 function. To better understand the properties of this vital enzyme and to elucidate possible roles of its HRMs, various forms of HO-2 possessing distinct alterations to the HRMs were prepared. In this study, variants with Cys265 in a thiol form are compared with those with this residue in an oxidized (part of a disulfide bond or existing as a sulfenate moiety) form. Absorption and magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopic data of these HO-2 variants clearly demonstrate that a new low-spin Fe(III) heme species characteristic of thiolate ligation is formed when Cys265 is reduced. Additionally, absorption, magnetic circular dichroism, and resonance Raman data collected at different temperatures reveal an intriguing temperature dependence of the iron spin state in the heme-HO-2 complex. These findings are consistent with the presence of a hydrogen-bonding network at the heme's distal side within the active site of HO-2 with potentially significant differences from that observed in HO-1.

  6. Exploring functionally related enzymes using radially distributed properties of active sites around the reacting points of bound ligands

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Structural genomics approaches, particularly those solving the 3D structures of many proteins with unknown functions, have increased the desire for structure-based function predictions. However, prediction of enzyme function is difficult because one member of a superfamily may catalyze a different reaction than other members, whereas members of different superfamilies can catalyze the same reaction. In addition, conformational changes, mutations or the absence of a particular catalytic residue can prevent inference of the mechanism by which catalytic residues stabilize and promote the elementary reaction. A major hurdle for alignment-based methods for prediction of function is the absence (despite its importance) of a measure of similarity of the physicochemical properties of catalytic sites. To solve this problem, the physicochemical features radially distributed around catalytic sites should be considered in addition to structural and sequence similarities. Results We showed that radial distribution functions (RDFs), which are associated with the local structural and physicochemical properties of catalytic active sites, are capable of clustering oxidoreductases and transferases by function. The catalytic sites of these enzymes were also characterized using the RDFs. The RDFs provided a measure of the similarity among the catalytic sites, detecting conformational changes caused by mutation of catalytic residues. Furthermore, the RDFs reinforced the classification of enzyme functions based on conventional sequence and structural alignments. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the application of RDFs provides advantages in the functional classification of enzymes by providing information about catalytic sites. PMID:22536854

  7. The RNA chaperone activity of the Trypanosoma brucei editosome raises the dynamic of bound pre-mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Leeder, W.-Matthias; Voigt, Christin; Brecht, Michael; Göringer, H. Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcript maturation in African trypanosomes requires an RNA editing reaction that is characterized by the insertion and deletion of U-nucleotides into otherwise non-functional mRNAs. The reaction is catalyzed by editosomes and requires guide (g)RNAs as templates. Recent data demonstrate that the binding of pre-edited mRNAs to editosomes is followed by a chaperone-type RNA remodeling reaction. Here we map the changes in RNA folding using selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE). We demonstrate that pre-mRNAs in their free state adopt intricately folded, highly stable 2D-structures. Editosome binding renders the pre-mRNAs to adopt 2D-conformations of reduced stabilities. On average about 30% of the nucleotides in every pre-mRNA are affected with a prevalence for U-nucleotides. The data demonstrate that the chaperone activity acts by increasing the flexibility of U-residues to lower their base-pairing probability. This results in a simplified RNA folding landscape with a reduced energy barrier to facilitate the binding of gRNAs. The data provide a first rational for the enigmatic U-specificity of the editing reaction. PMID:26782631

  8. Depollution potential of three macrophytes: exudated, wall-bound and intracellular peroxidase activities plus intracellular phenol concentrations.

    PubMed

    Larue, Camille; Korboulewsky, Nathalie; Wang, Runying; Mévy, Jean-Philippe

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of three macrophyte species (Iris pseudacorus, Typha latifolia and Phragmites australis) for detoxication of xenobiotics, and to study their variations with seasons or concentrations of sewage sludge from the food industry. For this purpose, some aspects of the green liver concept were explored through peroxidase measurements in three compartments in roots: intracellular, cell wall and extracellular. In addition, phenol concentrations were also measured in order to assess heavy metal detoxication potential. Enzyme activities and phenol concentrations were overall lower in winter according to the phenological stages and some sludge effects occurred. Results show that P. australis roots exuded and contained more peroxidase in all seasons: 17 U/g (1373 U/g protein), 0.8 U/g (613 U/g protein) and 4.8 U/g (1329 U/g protein) in intracellular compartments, cell wall and exudates, respectively. In contrast, the highest phenol concentration was found in I. pseudacorus roots: 3.58 mg eq. [corrected] gallic acid/g. Hence, in constructed wetlands, P. australis is suitable for organic waste water treatment, while I. pseudacorus should be used in the case of waters highly charged with heavy metals.

  9. Staphylococcus aureus DsbA is a membrane-bound lipoprotein with thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase activity.

    PubMed

    Dumoulin, Alexis; Grauschopf, Ulla; Bischoff, Markus; Thöny-Meyer, Linda; Berger-Bächi, Brigitte

    2005-11-01

    DsbA proteins, the primary catalysts of protein disulfide bond formation, are known to affect virulence and penicillin resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. We identified a putative DsbA homologue in the Gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus that was able to restore the motility phenotype of an Escherichia coli dsbA mutant and thus demonstrated a functional thiol oxidoreductase activity. The staphylococcal DsbA (SaDsbA) had a strong oxidative redox potential of -131 mV. The persistence of the protein throughout the growth cycle despite its predominant transcription during exponential growth phase suggested a rather long half-life for the SaDsbA. SaDsbA was found to be a membrane localised lipoprotein, supporting a role in disulfide bond formation. But so far, neither in vitro nor in vivo phenotype could be identified in a staphylococcal dsbA mutant, leaving its physiological role unknown. The inability of SaDsbA to interact with the E. coli DsbB and the lack of an apparent staphylococcal DsbB homologue suggest an alternative re-oxidation pathway for the SaDsbA.

  10. Myosin II ATPase activity mediates the long-term potentiation-induced exodus of stable F-actin bound by drebrin A from dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Mizui, Toshiyuki; Sekino, Yuko; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Ishizuka, Yuta; Takahashi, Hideto; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Kojima, Masami; Shirao, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    The neuronal actin-binding protein drebrin A forms a stable structure with F-actin in dendritic spines. NMDA receptor activation causes an exodus of F-actin bound by drebrin A (DA-actin) from dendritic spines, suggesting a pivotal role for DA-actin exodus in synaptic plasticity. We quantitatively assessed the extent of DA-actin localization to spines using the spine-dendrite ratio of drebrin A in cultured hippocampal neurons, and found that (1) chemical long-term potentiation (LTP) stimulation induces rapid DA-actin exodus and subsequent DA-actin re-entry in dendritic spines, (2) Ca(2+) influx through NMDA receptors regulates the exodus and the basal accumulation of DA-actin, and (3) the DA-actin exodus is blocked by myosin II ATPase inhibitor, but is not blocked by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) or Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibitors. These results indicate that myosin II mediates the interaction between NMDA receptor activation and DA-actin exodus in LTP induction. Furthermore, myosin II seems to be activated by a rapid actin-linked mechanism rather than slow MLC phosphorylation. Thus the myosin-II mediated DA-actin exodus might be an initial event in LTP induction, triggering actin polymerization and spine enlargement.

  11. Integration of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Steady-state Kinetics and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Gαi1 Distinguishes between the GTP Hydrolysis and GDP Release Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Schröter, Grit; Mann, Daniel; Kötting, Carsten; Gerwert, Klaus

    2015-07-10

    Gα subunits are central molecular switches in cells. They are activated by G protein-coupled receptors that exchange GDP for GTP, similar to small GTPase activation mechanisms. Gα subunits are turned off by GTP hydrolysis. For the first time we employed time-resolved FTIR difference spectroscopy to investigate the molecular reaction mechanisms of Gαi1. FTIR spectroscopy is a powerful tool that monitors reactions label free with high spatio-temporal resolution. In contrast to common multiple turnover assays, FTIR spectroscopy depicts the single turnover GTPase reaction without nucleotide exchange/Mg(2+) binding bias. Global fit analysis resulted in one apparent rate constant of 0.02 s(-1) at 15 °C. Isotopic labeling was applied to assign the individual phosphate vibrations for α-, β-, and γ-GTP (1243, 1224, and 1156 cm(-1), respectively), α- and β-GDP (1214 and 1134/1103 cm(-1), respectively), and free phosphate (1078/991 cm(-1)). In contrast to Ras · GAP catalysis, the bond breakage of the β-γ-phosphate but not the Pi release is rate-limiting in the GTPase reaction. Complementary common GTPase assays were used. Reversed phase HPLC provided multiple turnover rates and tryptophan fluorescence provided nucleotide exchange rates. Experiments were complemented by molecular dynamics simulations. This broad approach provided detailed insights at atomic resolution and allows now to identify key residues of Gαi1 in GTP hydrolysis and nucleotide exchange. Mutants of the intrinsic arginine finger (Gαi1-R178S) affected exclusively the hydrolysis reaction. The effect of nucleotide binding (Gαi1-D272N) and Ras-like/all-α interface coordination (Gαi1-D229N/Gαi1-D231N) on the nucleotide exchange reaction was furthermore elucidated.

  12. Role of N-terminal methionine residues in the redox activity of copper bound to alpha-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Esaú E; Arcos-López, Trinidad; Trujano-Ortiz, Lidia G; Fernández, Claudio O; González, Felipe J; Vela, Alberto; Quintanar, Liliana

    2016-09-01

    Amyloid aggregation of α-synuclein (AS) is one of the hallmarks of Parkinson's disease. The interaction of copper ions with the N-terminal region of AS promotes its amyloid aggregation and metal-catalyzed oxidation has been proposed as a plausible mechanism. The AS(1-6) fragment represents the minimal sequence that models copper coordination to this intrinsically disordered protein. In this study, we evaluated the role of methionine residues Met1 and Met5 in Cu(II) coordination to the AS(1-6) fragment, and in the redox activity of the Cu-AS(1-6) complex. Spectroscopic and electronic structure calculations show that Met1 may play a role as an axial ligand in the Cu(II)-AS(1-6) complex, while Met5 does not participate in metal coordination. Cyclic voltammetry and reactivity studies demonstrate that Met residues play an important role in the reduction and reoxidation processes of this complex. However, Met1 plays a more important role than Met5, as substitution of Met1 by Ile decreases the reduction potential of the Cu-AS(1-6) complex by ~80 mV, causing a significant decrease in its rate of reduction. Reoxidation of the complex by oxygen results in oxidation of the Met residues to sulfoxide, being Met1 more susceptible to copper-catalyzed oxidation than Met5. The sulfoxide species can suffer elimination of methanesulfenic acid, rendering a peptide with no thioether moiety, which would impair the ability of AS to bind Cu(I) ions. Overall, our study underscores the important roles that Met1 plays in copper coordination and the reactivity of the Cu-AS complex.

  13. Ortho-7 bound to the active-site gorge of free and OP-conjugated acetylcholinesterase: cation-π interactions.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Arup Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Tusar

    2016-01-01

    Despite the immense importance of cation-π interactions prevailing in bispyridinium drug acetylcholinesterase (AChE) complexes, a precise description of cation-π interactions at molecular level has remained elusive. Here, we consider a bispyridinium drug, namely, ortho-7 in three different structures of AChE, with and without complexation with organophosphorus (OP) compounds for detailed investigation using all atom molecular dynamics simulation. By quantum mechanical calculations, Y72, W86, Y124, W286, Y337, and Y341 aromatic residues of the enzyme are investigated for possible cation-π interactions with ortho-7. The cation-π interactions in each of the protein-drug complexes are studied using distance, angle, a suitable functional form of them, and electrostatic criteria. The variation of cation-π functional is remarkably consistent with that of the Columbic variation. It is clearly observed that cation-π interactions for some of the residues in the catalytic active site (CAS) and peripheral anionic site (PAS) of the enzyme are either enhanced or reduced based on the nature of OP conjugation (i.e., nerve gas, tabun or pesticide, fenamiphos) when compared with the OP-free enzyme. The strength of cation-π interaction is strongly dependent on the type OP conjugation. The effect of conjugation at CAS is also seen to influence the cation-π interaction at the PAS region. The variation of cation-π interactions on the type of conjugating OP compounds might be suggestive of a reason as to why wide spectrum drug against any OP poisoning is yet to arrive in the market.

  14. Quenched Assembly of NIR-Active Gold Nanoclusters Capped with Strongly Bound Ligands by Tuning Particle Charge via pH and Salinity.

    PubMed

    Stover, Robert J; Murthy, Avinash K; Nie, Golay D; Gourisankar, Sai; Dear, Barton J; Truskett, Thomas M; Sokolov, Konstantin V; Johnston, Keith P

    2014-07-03

    Gold nanospheres coated with a binary monolayer of bound citrate and cysteine ligands were assembled into nanoclusters, in which the size and near-infrared (NIR) extinction were tuned by varying the pH and concentration of added NaCl. During full evaporation of an aqueous dispersion of 4.5 ± 1.8 nm Au primary particles, the nanoclusters were formed and quenched by the triblock copolymer polylactic acid (PLA)(1K)-b-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)(10K)-b-PLA(1K), which also provided steric stabilization. The short-ranged depletion and van der Waals attractive forces were balanced against longer ranged electrostatic repulsion to tune the nanocluster diameter and NIR extinction. Upon lowering the pH from 7 to 5 at a given salinity, the magnitude of the charge on the primary particles decreased, such that the weaker electrostatic repulsion increased the hydrodynamic diameter and, consequently, NIR extinction of the clusters. At a given pH, as the concentration of NaCl was increased, the NIR extinction decreased monotonically. Furthermore, the greater screening of the charges on the nanoclusters weakened the interactions with PLA(1K)-b-PEG(10K)-b-PLA(1K) and thus lowered the amount of adsorbed polymer on the nanocluster surface. The generalization of the concept of self-assembly of small NIR-active nanoclusters to include a strongly bound thiol and the manipulation of the morphologies and NIR extinction by variation of pH and salinity not only is of fundamental interest but also is important for optical biomedical imaging and therapy.

  15. Rho activation patterns after spinal cord injury and the role of activated Rho in apoptosis in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Dubreuil, Catherine I.; Winton, Matthew J.; McKerracher, Lisa

    2003-01-01

    Growth inhibitory proteins in the central nervous system (CNS) block axon growth and regeneration by signaling to Rho, an intracellular GTPase. It is not known how CNS trauma affects the expression and activation of RhoA. Here we detect GTP-bound RhoA in spinal cord homogenates and report that spinal cord injury (SCI) in both rats and mice activates RhoA over 10-fold in the absence of changes in RhoA expression. In situ Rho-GTP detection revealed that both neurons and glial cells showed Rho activation at SCI lesion sites. Application of a Rho antagonist (C3–05) reversed Rho activation and reduced the number of TUNEL-labeled cells by ∼50% in both injured mouse and rat, showing a role for activated Rho in cell death after CNS injury. Next, we examined the role of the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) in Rho signaling. After SCI, an up-regulation of p75NTR was detected by Western blot and observed in both neurons and glia. Treatment with C3–05 blocked the increase in p75NTR expression. Experiments with p75NTR-null mutant mice showed that immediate Rho activation after SCI is p75NTR dependent. Our results indicate that blocking overactivation of Rho after SCI protects cells from p75NTR-dependent apoptosis. PMID:12860969

  16. Association of the GTP-binding protein Rab3A with bovine adrenal chromaffin granules

    SciTech Connect

    Darchen, F.; Hammel, F.; Monteils, M.P.; Scherman, D. ); Zahraoui, A.; Tavitian, A. )

    1990-08-01

    The Rab3A protein belongs to a large family of small GTP-binding proteins that are present in eukaryotic cells and that share amino acid identities with the Ras proteins (products of the ras protooncogenes). Rab3A, which is specifically located in nervous and endocrine tissues, is suspected to play a key role in secretion. Its localization was investigated in bovine adrenal gland by using a polyclonal antibody. Rab3A was detected in adrenal medulla but not in adrenal cortex. In cultured adrenal medulla cells, Rab3A was specifically expressed in the catecholamine-secreting chromaffin cells. Subcellular fractionation suggested that Rab3A is about 30% cytosolic and that particulate Rab3A is associated with the membrane of chromaffin granules (the catecholamine storage organelles) and with a second compartment likely to be the plasma membrane. The Rab3A localization on chromaffin granule membranes was confirmed by immunoadsorption with an antibody against dopamine {beta}-hydroxylase. Rab3A was not extracted from this membrane by NaCl or KBr but was partially extracted by urea and totally solubilized by Triton X-100, suggesting either an interaction with an intrinsic protein or a membrane association through fatty acid acylation. This study suggests that Rab3A, which may also be located on other secretory vesicles containing noncharacterized small GTP-binding proteins, is involved in their biogenesis or in the regulated secretion process.

  17. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of the human GTP fucose pyrophosphorylase

    SciTech Connect

    Quirk, Stephen; Seley-Radtke, Katherine L.

    2006-04-01

    The human GTP fucose pyrophosphohydrolase protein has been crystallized via the hanging-drop technique over a reservoir of polyethylene glycol (MW 8000) and ethylene glycol. The orthorhombic crystals diffract to 2.8 Å resolution. The human nucleotide-sugar metabolizing enzyme GTP fucose pyrophosphorylase (GFPP) has been purified to homogeneity by an affinity chromatographic procedure that utilizes a novel nucleoside analog. This new purification regime results in a protein preparation that produces significantly better crystals than traditional purification methods. The purified 66.6 kDa monomeric protein has been crystallized via hanging-drop vapor diffusion at 293 K. Crystals of the native enzyme diffract to 2.8 Å and belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. There is a single GFPP monomer in the asymmetric unit, giving a Matthews coefficient of 2.38 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 48.2%. A complete native data set has been collected as a first step in determining the three-dimensional structure of this enzyme.

  18. Proteomics Identification of Nuclear Ran GTPase as an Inhibitor of Human VRK1 and VRK2 (Vaccinia-related Kinase) Activities*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-García, Marta; López-Sánchez, Inmaculada; Lazo, Pedro A.

    2008-01-01

    Human vaccinia-related kinase (VRK) 1 is a novel serine-threonine kinase that regulates several transcription factors, nuclear envelope assembly, and chromatin condensation and is also required for cell cycle progression. The regulation of this kinase family is unknown. Mass spectrometry has permitted the identification of Ran as an interacting and regulatory protein of the VRK serine-threonine kinase activities. The stable interaction has been validated by pulldown of endogenous proteins as well as by reciprocal immunoprecipitations. The three members of the VRK family stably interact with Ran, and the interaction was not affected by the bound nucleotide, GDP or GTP. The interaction was stronger with the RanT24N that is locked in its inactive conformation and cannot bind nucleotides. None of the kinases phosphorylated Ran or RCC1. VRK1 does not directly interact with RCC1, but if Ran is present they can be isolated as a complex. The main effect of the interaction of inactive RanGDP with VRK1 is the inhibition of its kinase activity, which was detected by a reduction in VRK1 autophosphorylation and a reduction in phosphorylation of histone H3 in residues Thr-3 and Ser-10. The kinase activity inhibition can be relieved by the interaction with the constitutively active RanGTP or RanL43E, which locks Ran in its GTP-bound active conformation. In this complex, the interaction with VRK proteins does not alter the effect of its guanine exchange factor, RCC1. Ran is a novel negative regulator of nuclear VRK1 and VRK2 kinase activity, which may vary in different subcellular localizations generating an asymmetric intracellular distribution of kinase activity depending on local protein interactions. PMID:18617507

  19. Degradation of membrane-bound ganglioside GM1. Stimulation by bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate and the activator proteins SAP-B and GM2-AP.

    PubMed

    Wilkening, G; Linke, T; Uhlhorn-Dierks, G; Sandhoff, K

    2000-11-17

    According to our hypothesis (Fürst, W., and Sandhoff, K. (1992) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1126, 1-16) glycosphingolipids of the plasma membrane are digested after endocytosis as components of intraendosomal and intralysosomal vesicles and membrane structures. The lysosomal degradation of glycosphingolipids with short oligosaccharide chains by acid exohydrolases requires small, non-enzymatic cofactors, called sphingolipid activator proteins (SAPs). A total of five activator proteins have been identified as follows: namely the saposins SAP-A, -B, -C, and -D, which are derived from the single chain SAP-precursor protein (prosaposin), and the GM2 activator protein. A deficiency of prosaposin results in the storage of ceramide and sphingolipids with short oligosaccharide head groups. The loss of the GM2 activator protein blocks the degradation of the ganglioside GM2. The enzymatic hydrolysis of the ganglioside GM1 is catalyzed by beta-galactosidase, a water-soluble acid exohydrolase. The lack of ganglioside GM1 accumulation in patients suffering from either prosaposin or GM2 activator protein deficiency has led to the hypothesis that SAPs are not needed for the hydrolysis of the ganglioside GM1 in vivo. In this study we demonstrate that an activator protein is required for the enzymatic degradation of membrane-bound ganglioside GM1 and that both SAP-B and the GM2 activator protein significantly enhance the degradation of the ganglioside GM1 by acid beta-galactosidase in a liposomal, detergent-free assay system. These findings offer a possible explanation for the observation that no storage of the ganglioside GM1 has been observed in patients with either isolated prosaposin or isolated GM2 activator deficiency. We also demonstrate that anionic phospholipids such as bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate and phosphatidylinositol, which specifically occur in inner membranes of endosomes and in lysosomes, are essential for the activator-stimulated hydrolysis of the ganglioside GM1

  20. Overexpression of GTP Cyclohydrolase 1 Feedback Regulatory Protein Is Protective in a Murine Model of Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Starr, Anna; Sand, Claire A.; Heikal, Lamia; Kelly, Peter D.; Spina, Domenico; Crabtree, Mark; Channon, Keith M.; Leiper, James M.; Nandi, Manasi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) by inducible NO synthase contributes toward refractory hypotension, impaired microvascular perfusion, and end-organ damage in septic shock patients. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential NOS cofactor. GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) is the rate-limiting enzyme for BH4 biosynthesis. Under inflammatory conditions, GCH1 activity and hence BH4 levels are increased, supporting pathological NOS activity. GCH1 activity can be controlled through allosteric interactions with GCH1 feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). We investigated whether overexpression of GFRP can regulate BH4 and NO production and attenuate cardiovascular dysfunction in sepsis. Sepsis was induced in mice conditionally overexpressing GFRP and wild-type littermates by cecal ligation and puncture. Blood pressure was monitored by radiotelemetry, and mesenteric blood flow was quantified by laser speckle contrast imaging. Blood biochemistry data were obtained using an iSTAT analyzer, and BH4 levels were measured in plasma and tissues by high-performance liquid chromatography. Increased BH4 and NO production and hypotension were observed in all mice, but the extents of these pathophysiological changes were attenuated in GFRP OE mice. Perturbations in blood biochemistry were similarly attenuated in GFRP OE compared with wild-type controls. These results suggest that GFRP overexpression regulates GCH1 activity during septic shock, which in turn limits BH4 bioavailability for iNOS. We conclude that the GCH1-GFRP axis is a critical regulator of BH4 and NO production and the cardiovascular derangements that occur in septic shock. PMID:25046538

  1. Influence of pH and temperature on the activity of SnO2-bound α-amylase: a genotoxicity assessment of SnO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohd Jahir; Husain, Qayyum

    2014-01-01

    Immobilization of biologically important molecules on a myriad of nanosized materials has attracted great attention due to their small size, biocompatibility, higher surface-to-volume ratio, and lower toxicity. These properties make nanoparticles (NPs) a superior matrix over bulk material for the immobilization of enzymes and proteins. In the present study, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens α-amylase was immobilized on SnO2 nanoparticles by a simple adsorption mechanism. Nanoparticle-adsorbed enzyme retained 90% of the original enzyme activity. Thermal stability of nanosupport was investigated by thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis. Scanning electron microscopic studies showed that NPs have porous structure for the high-yield immobilization of α-amylase. The genotoxicity of SnO2-NPs was analyzed by pUC(19) plasmid nicking and comet assay and revealed that no remarkable DNA damage occurred in lymphocytes. The pH-optima was found to be the same for both free and SnO2-NPs bound enzyme, while the temperature-optimum for NPs-adsorbed α-amylase was 5°C higher than its free counterpart. Immobilized enzyme retained more than 70% enzyme activity even after its eight repeated uses.

  2. α-Synuclein Membrane Association Is Regulated by the Rab3a Recycling Machinery and Presynaptic Activity*♦

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Robert H. C.; Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine; Samuel, Filsy; Visanji, Naomi P.; Zhang, Gang; Marsilio, Diana; Langman, Tammy; Fraser, Paul E.; Tandon, Anurag

    2013-01-01

    α-Synuclein is an abundant presynaptic protein and a primary component of Lewy bodies in Parkinson disease. Although its pathogenic role remains unclear, in healthy nerve terminals α-synuclein undergoes a cycle of membrane binding and dissociation. An α-synuclein binding assay was used to screen for vesicle proteins involved in α-synuclein membrane interactions and showed that antibodies directed to the Ras-related GTPase Rab3a and its chaperone RabGDI abrogated α-synuclein membrane binding. Biochemical analyses, including density gradient sedimentation and co-immunoprecipitation, suggested that α-synuclein interacts with membrane-associated GTP-bound Rab3a but not to cytosolic GDP-Rab3a. Accumulation of membrane-bound α-synuclein was induced by the expression of a GTPase-deficient Rab3a mutant, by a dominant-negative GDP dissociation inhibitor mutant unable to recycle Rab3a off membranes, and by Hsp90 inhibitors, radicicol and geldanamycin, which are known to inhibit Rab3a dissociation from membranes. Thus, all treatments that inhibited Rab3a recycling also increased α-synuclein sequestration on intracellular membranes. Our results suggest that membrane-bound GTP-Rab3a stabilizes α-synuclein on synaptic vesicles and that the GDP dissociation inhibitor·Hsp90 complex that controls Rab3a membrane dissociation also regulates α-synuclein dissociation during synaptic activity. PMID:23344955

  3. Further characterization of the red beet plasma membrane Ca sup 2+ -ATPase using GTP as an alternative substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, L.E.; Schueler, S.B.; Briskin, D.P. )

    1990-03-01

    The GTP-driven component of Ca{sup 2+} uptake in red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) plasma membrane vesicles was further characterized to confirm its association with the plasma membrane Ca{sup 2+}-translocating ATPase and assess its utility as a probe for this transport system. Uptake of {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} in the presence of GTP demonstrated similar properties to those previously observed for red beet plasma membrane vesicles utilizing ATP with respect to pH optimum sensitivity to orthovanadate, dependence on Mg:substrate concentration and dependence on Ca{sup 2+} concentration. Calcium uptake in the presence of GTP was also strongly inhibited by erythrosin B, a potent inhibitor of the plant plasma membrane Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase. Furthermore, after treatment with EGTA to remove endogenous calmodulin, the stimulation of {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+}-uptake by exogeneous calmodulin was nearly equivalent in the presence of either ATP or GTP. Taken together these results support the proposal that GTP-driven {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake represents the capacity of the plasma membrane Ca{sup 2+}-translocating ATPase to utilize this nucleoside triphosphate as an alternative substrate. When plasma membrane vesicles were phosphorylated with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)GTP, a rapidly turning over, 100 kilodalton phosphorylated peptide was observed which contained an acyl-phosphate linkage. While it is proposed that this peptide could represent the catalytic subunit of the plasma membrane Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase, it is noted that this molecular weight is considerably lower than the 140 kilodalton size generally observed for plasma membrane Ca{sup 2+}-ATPases present in animal cells.

  4. Physical Uncertainty Bounds (PUB)

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, Diane Elizabeth; Preston, Dean L.

    2015-03-19

    This paper introduces and motivates the need for a new methodology for determining upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulations of engineered systems due to limited fidelity in the composite continuum-level physics models needed to simulate the systems. We show that traditional uncertainty quantification methods provide, at best, a lower bound on this uncertainty. We propose to obtain bounds on the simulation uncertainties by first determining bounds on the physical quantities or processes relevant to system performance. By bounding these physics processes, as opposed to carrying out statistical analyses of the parameter sets of specific physics models or simply switching out the available physics models, one can obtain upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulated quantities of interest.

  5. Structural changes accompanying GTP hydrolysis in microtubules: information from a slowly hydrolyzable analogue guanylyl-(alpha,beta)- methylene-diphosphonate

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    We have used cryoelectron microscopy to try to understand the structural basis for the role of GTP hydrolysis in destabilizing the microtubule lattice. We have measured a structural difference introduced into microtubules by replacing GTP with guanylyl- (alpha,beta)-methylene-diphosphonate (GMPCPP). In a stable GMPCPP microtubule lattice, the moire patterns change and the tubulin subunits increase in size by 1.5 A. This information provides a clue to the role of hydrolysis in inducing the structural change at the end of a microtubule during the transition from a growing to a shrinking phase. PMID:7822409

  6. Ran-dependent TPX2 activation promotes acentrosomal microtubule nucleation in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Shin; Chen, Yi-Ju; Huang, Yung-An; Hsieh, Bing-Yuan; Chiu, Ho-Chieh; Kao, Pei-Ying; Chao, Chih-Yuan; Hwang, Eric

    2017-01-01

    The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton is essential for the formation of morphologically appropriate neurons. The existence of the acentrosomal MT organizing center in neurons has been proposed but its identity remained elusive. Here we provide evidence showing that TPX2 is an important component of this acentrosomal MT organizing center. First, neurite elongation is compromised in TPX2-depleted neurons. In addition, TPX2 localizes to the centrosome and along the neurite shaft bound to MTs. Depleting TPX2 decreases MT formation frequency specifically at the tip and the base of the neurite, and these correlate precisely with the regions where active GTP-bound Ran proteins are enriched. Furthermore, overexpressing the downstream effector of Ran, importin, compromises MT formation and neuronal morphogenesis. Finally, applying a Ran-importin signaling interfering compound phenocopies the effect of TPX2 depletion on MT dynamics. Together, these data suggest a model in which Ran-dependent TPX2 activation promotes acentrosomal MT nucleation in neurons. PMID:28205572

  7. Drug Target Exploitable Structural Features of Adenylyl Cyclase Activity in Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Mbah, Andreas N.; Kamga, Henri L.; Awofolu, Omotayo R.; Isokpehi, Raphael D.

    2012-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of the parasitic flatworm Schistosoma mansoni (S. mansoni), a cause of schistosomiasis, encodes a predicted guanosine triphosphate (GTP) binding protein tagged Smp_059340.1. Smp_059340.1 is predicted to be a member of the G protein alpha-s subunit responsible for regulating adenylyl cyclase activity in S. mansoni and a possible drug target against the parasite. Our structural bioinformatics analyses identified key amino acid residues (Ser53, Thr188, Asp207 and Gly210) in the two molecular switches responsible for cycling the protein between active (GTP bound) and inactive (GDP bound) states. Residue Thr188 is located on Switch I region while Gly210 is located on Switch II region with Switch II longer than Switch I. The Asp207 is located on the G3 box motif and Ser53 is the binding residue for magnesium ion. These findings offer new insights into the dynamic and functional determinants of the Smp_059340.1 protein in regulating the S. mansoni life cycle. The binding interfaces and their residues could be used as starting points for selective modulations of interactions within the pathway using small molecules, peptides or mutagenesis. PMID:23133313

  8. Casein kinase II protein kinase is bound to lamina-matrix and phosphorylates lamin-like protein in isolated pea nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, H.; Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    A casein kinase II (CK II)-like protein kinase was identified and partially isolated from a purified envelope-matrix fraction of pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclei. When [gamma-32P]ATP was directly added to the envelope-matrix preparation, the three most heavily labeled protein bands had molecular masses near 71, 48, and 46 kDa. Protein kinases were removed from the preparation by sequential extraction with Triton X-100, EGTA, 0.3 M NaCl, and a pH 10.5 buffer, but an active kinase still remained bound to the remaining lamina-matrix fraction after these treatments. This kinase had properties resembling CK II kinases previously characterized from animal and plant sources: it preferred casein as an artificial substrate, could use GTP as efficiently as ATP as the phosphoryl donor, was stimulated by spermine, was calcium independent, and had a catalytic subunit of 36 kDa. Some animal and plant CK II kinases have regulatory subunits near 29 kDa, and a lamina-matrix-bound protein of this molecular mass was recognized on immunoblot by anti-Drosophila CK II polyclonal antibodies. Also found associated with the envelope-matrix fraction of pea nuclei were p34cdc2-like and Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases, but their properties could not account for the protein kinase activity bound to the lamina. The 71-kDa substrate of the CK II-like kinase was lamin A-like, both in its molecular mass and in its cross-reactivity with anti-intermediate filament antibodies. Lamin phosphorylation is considered a crucial early step in the entry of cells into mitosis, so lamina-bound CK II kinases may be important control points for cellular proliferation.

  9. Chemotactic and enzyme-releasing activity of amphipathic proteins for neutrophils. A possible role for protease in chemotaxis on substratum-bound protein gradients.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, P C; Bradley, G R

    1981-01-01

    The purified amphipathic proteins, alpha s 1-casein, beta-casein, and alkali-denatured serum albumin were studied for chemotactic and enzyme-releasing effects on human neutrophil leucocytes. Evidence for chemotaxis both in fluid-phase gradients and on solid-phase gradients was obtained using visual assays. In fluid-phase gradients, neutrophils showed good orientation to gradient sources of these proteins at concentrations of 10(-4) to 10(-5) M. Solid-phase gradients of casein and of denatured albumin were prepared on glass coverslips, and the locomotion of neutrophils attached to these coverslips was filmed by time-lapse cinematography. Displacement of neutrophils towards the highest concentration of substratum-bound protein was observed, suggesting that neutrophils can show true chemotaxis on a solid-phase gradient. All three proteins induced enzyme release from neutrophils in the absence of cytochalasin B. Lysozyme release was equivalent to that released by stimulation with formyl methionyl peptide in the presence of cytochalasin B, but the proteins stimulated a smaller release of beta-glucuronidase than the peptide. The proteins stimulated release of neutrophil proteases which were able to digest both casein and denatured albumin extracellularly. It is suggested that this proteolytic activity may assist locomotion of neutrophils, especially on solid-phase protein gradients, by cleaving membrane-attached protein, thus both freeing cell-surface receptors and allowing the cell to detach itself from the substratum and continue movement. Images Figure 1 PMID:7016748

  10. Effect of thiostrepton and 3'-terminal fragments of aminoacyl-tRNA on EF-Tu and ribosome-dependent GTP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Bhuta, P; Chládek, S

    1982-08-30

    The effect of the antibiotics thiostrepton and micrococcin on EF-Tu-catalyzed (ribosome-dependent) GTP hydrolysis in the presence of A-Phe, C-A-Phe, or C-C-A-Phe (related to the sequence of the 3'-terminus of aminoacyl-tRNA)(System I) or by methanol ('uncoupled GTPase', System II) was investigated. In System I, thiostrepton increases the binding affinities of the effectors to the EF-Tu.GTP.70 S ribosome complex, as well as the extent of the GTP hydrolysis, while the KmGTP is virtually unchanged. Similarly, in the uncoupled system (System II) and in the absence of effectors, thiostrepton significantly increases VmaxGTP, whereas KmGTP remains unaffected. Micrococcin is without any effect in both systems. The 'uncoupled GTPase' (in System II) is also strongly inhibited by C-A-Phe. The results indicate the crucial role of the EF-Tu site which binds the aminoacylated C-C-A terminus of aminoacyl-tRNA in promoting GTP hydrolysis. It follows that the binding of the model effectors (such as C-C-A-Phe) to that site is favorably influenced by the interaction of thiostrepton with the 50 S ribosomal subunit, whereas thiostrepton, per se, does not influence the affinity of EF-Tu for GTP.

  11. Bounding Species Distribution Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Jarnevich, Cahterine S.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Esaias, Wayne E.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5): 642-647, 2011].

  12. Causality and Tsirelson's bounds

    SciTech Connect

    Buhrman, H.; Massar, S.

    2005-11-15

    We study the properties of no-signaling correlations that cannot be reproduced by local measurements on entangled quantum states. We say that such correlations violate Tsirelson bounds. We show that if these correlations are obtained by some reversible unitary quantum evolution U, then U cannot be written in the product form U{sub A}xU{sub B}. This implies that U can be used for signaling and for entanglement generation. This result is completely general and in fact can be viewed as a characterization of Tsirelson bounds. We then show how this result can be used as a tool to study Tsirelson bounds and we illustrate this by rederiving the Tsirelson bound of 2{radical}(2) for the Clauser-Horn-Shimony-Holt inequality, and by deriving a new Tsirelson bound for qutrits.

  13. Bounding species distribution models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, T.J.; Jarnevich, C.S.; Esaias, W.E.; Morisette, J.T.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used. ?? 2011 Current Zoology.

  14. A novel GTP-binding protein hGBP3 interacts with NIK/HGK.

    PubMed

    Luan, Zhidong; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Aihua; Man, Yunfang; Cheng, Lu; Hu, Gengxi

    2002-10-23

    A novel human guanylate-binding protein (GBP) hGBP3 was identified and characterized. Similar as the two human guanylate-binding proteins hGBP1 and hGBP2, hGBP3 has the first two motifs of the three classical guanylate-binding motifs, GXXXXGKS (T) and DXXG, but lacks the N (T) KXD motif. Escherichia coli-expressed hGBP3 protein specifically binds to guanosine triphosphate (GTP). Using a yeast two-hybrid system, it was revealed that the N-terminal region of hGBP3 binds to the C-terminal regulatory domain of NIK/HGK, a member of the group I GCK (germinal center kinase) family. This interaction was confirmed by in vitro glutathione-S-transferase (GST) pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays.

  15. Small GTP-binding proteins of the ras family: a conserved functional mechanism?

    PubMed

    Chardin, P

    1991-04-01

    Mutated ras genes can acquire a transforming potential and are frequently detected in human tumors. The mammalian ras gene family includes at least 35 distinct members that can be divided into three main groups on the basis of their sequence similarity to ras, rho, or rab genes. All these genes encode small GTP-binding proteins. Rho proteins are implicated in actin organization and control of cell shape, probably by interacting with the cytoskeleton and intracellular membranes. Rab proteins are involved in vesicular traffic, and appear to control the translocation of vesicles from donor to acceptor membranes. The precise function of ras proteins is unknown, although the prevailing view is that they act as transducers of mitogenic signals. We propose that ras proteins, by analogy with rho and rab, are involved in the lateral segregation of multi-protein complexes at the plasma membrane, and we suggest how this process may be important for mitogenic signal transduction.

  16. Reduction of GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulating protein expression by hydrogen peroxide in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Masakazu; Shimizu, Shunichi; Wajima, Teruaki; Hagiwara, Tamio; Negoro, Takaharu; Miyazaki, Akira; Tobe, Takashi; Kiuchi, Yuji

    2005-02-01

    We examined the effect of H(2)O(2) on the expression of GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) feedback regulating protein (GFRP). Addition of H(2)O(2) to endothelial cells decreased GFRP mRNA levels, in contrast to the increase of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) content and GTPCH mRNA levels. The inhibitors of nitric oxide (NO) synthase and GTPCH had no influence on the decrease of GFRP mRNA levels in H(2)O(2)-treated cells. It is suggested that H(2)O(2) induces BH(4) synthesis through not only induction of GTPCH but also reduction of GFRP. The decrease of GFRP mRNA level appears to be independent of the produced NO and BH(4).

  17. AMPD2 Regulates GTP Synthesis and is Mutated in a Potentially-Treatable Neurodegenerative Brainstem Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Akizu, Naiara; Cantagrel, Vincent; Schroth, Jana; Cai, Na; Vaux, Keith; McCloskey, Douglas; Naviaux, Robert K.; Vleet, Jeremy Van; Fenstermaker, Ali G.; Silhavy, Jennifer L.; Scheliga, Judith S.; Toyama, Keiko; Morisaki, Hiroko; Sonmez, Fatma Mujgan; Celep, Figen; Oraby, Azza; Zaki, Maha S.; Al-Baradie, Raidah; Faqeih, Eissa; Saleh, Mohammad; Spencer, Emily; Rosti, Rasim Ozgur; Scott, Eric; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Gabriel, Stacey; Morisaki, Takayuki; Holmes, Edward W.; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2013-01-01

    Purine biosynthesis and metabolism, conserved in all living organisms, is essential for cellular energy homeostasis and nucleic acids synthesis. The de novo synthesis of purine precursors is under tight negative feedback regulation mediated by adenosine and guanine nucleotides. We describe a new distinct early-onset neurodegenerative condition resulting from mutations in the adenosine monophosphate deaminase 2 gene (AMPD2). Patients have characteristic brain imaging features of pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH), due to loss of brainstem and cerebellar parenchyma. We found that AMPD2 plays an evolutionary conserved role in the maintenance of cellular guanine nucleotide pools by regulating the feedback inhibition of adenosine derivatives on de novo purine synthesis. AMPD2 deficiency results in defective GTP-dependent initiation of protein translation, which can be rescued by administration of purine precursors. These data suggest AMPD2-related PCH as a new, potentially treatable early-onset neurodegenerative disease. PMID:23911318

  18. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition of the Drosophila mesoderm requires the Rho GTP exchange factor Pebble.

    PubMed

    Smallhorn, Masha; Murray, Michael J; Saint, Robert

    2004-06-01

    Drosophila pebble (pbl) encodes a Rho-family GTP exchange factor (GEF) required for cytokinesis. The accumulation of high levels of PBL protein during interphase and the developmentally regulated expression of pbl in mesodermal tissues suggested that the primary cytokinetic mutant phenotype might be masking other roles. Using various muscle differentiation markers, we found that Even skipped (EVE) expression in the dorsal mesoderm is greatly reduced in pbl mutant embryos. EVE expression in the dorsalmost mesodermal cells is induced in response to DPP secreted by the dorsal epidermal cells. Further analysis revealed that this phenotype is likely to be a consequence of an earlier defect. pbl mutant mesodermal cells fail to undergo the normal epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and dorsal migration that follows ventral furrow formation. This phenotype is not a secondary consequence of failed cytokinesis, as it is rescued by a mutant form of pbl that does not rescue the cytokinetic defect. In wild-type embryos, newly invaginated cells at the lateral edges of the mesoderm extend numerous protrusions. In pbl mutant embryos, however, cells appear more tightly adhered to their neighbours and extend very few protrusions. Consistent with the dependence of the mesoderm EMT and cytokinesis on actin organisation, the GTP exchange function of the PBL RhoGEF is required for both processes. By contrast, the N-terminal BRCT domains of PBL are required only for the cytokinetic function of PBL. These studies reveal that a novel PBL-mediated intracellular signalling pathway operates in mesodermal cells during the transition from an epithelial to migratory mesenchymal morphology during gastrulation.

  19. Potato lectin activates basophils and mast cells of atopic subjects by its interaction with core chitobiose of cell-bound non-specific immunoglobulin E

    PubMed Central

    Pramod, S N; Venkatesh, Y P; Mahesh, P A

    2007-01-01

    A major factor in non-allergic food hypersensitivity could be the interaction of dietary lectins with mast cells and basophils. Because immunoglobulin E (IgE) contains 10–12% carbohydrates, lectins can activate and degranulate these cells by cross-linking the glycans of cell-bound IgE. The present objective focuses on the effect of potato lectin (Solanum tuberosum agglutinin; STA) for its ability to release histamine from basophils in vitro and mast cells in vivo from non-atopic and atopic subjects. In this study, subjects were selected randomly based on case history and skin prick test responses with food, pollen and house dust mite extracts. Skin prick test (SPT) was performed with STA at 100 µg/ml concentration. Histamine release was performed using leucocytes from non-atopic and atopic subjects and rat peritoneal exudate cells. SPT on 110 atopic subjects using STA showed 39 subjects positive (35%); however, none showed STA-specific IgE; among 20 non-atopic subjects, none were positive by SPT. Maximal histamine release was found to be 65% in atopic subjects (n = 7) compared to 28% in non-atopic subjects (n = 5); the release was inhibited specifically by oligomers of N-acetylglucosamine and correlates well with serum total IgE levels (R2 = 0·923). Binding of STA to N-linked glycoproteins (horseradish peroxidase, avidin and IgG) was positive by dot blot and binding assay. As potato lectin activates and degranulates both mast cells and basophils by interacting with the chitobiose core of IgE glycans, higher intake of potato may increase the clinical symptoms as a result of non-allergic food hypersensitivity in atopic subjects. PMID:17362264

  20. Increased antitumor activity, intratumor paclitaxel concentrations, and endothelial cell transport of cremophor-free, albumin-bound paclitaxel, ABI-007, compared with cremophor-based paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Desai, Neil; Trieu, Vuong; Yao, Zhiwen; Louie, Leslie; Ci, Sherry; Yang, Andrew; Tao, Chunlin; De, Tapas; Beals, Bridget; Dykes, Donald; Noker, Patricia; Yao, Rosie; Labao, Elizabeth; Hawkins, Michael; Soon-Shiong, Patrick

    2006-02-15

    ABI-007, an albumin-bound, 130-nm particle form of paclitaxel, was developed to avoid Cremophor/ethanol-associated toxicities in Cremophor-based paclitaxel (Taxol) and to exploit albumin receptor-mediated endothelial transport. We studied the antitumor activity, intratumoral paclitaxel accumulation, and endothelial transport for ABI-007 and Cremophor-based paclitaxel. Antitumor activity and mortality were assessed in nude mice bearing human tumor xenografts [lung (H522), breast (MX-1), ovarian (SK-OV-3), prostate (PC-3), and colon (HT29)] treated with ABI-007 or Cremophor-based paclitaxel. Intratumoral paclitaxel concentrations (MX-1-tumored mice) were compared for radiolabeled ABI-007 and Cremophor-based paclitaxel. In vitro endothelial transcytosis and Cremophor inhibition of paclitaxel binding to cells and albumin was compared for ABI-007 and Cremophor-based paclitaxel. Both ABI-007 and Cremophor-based paclitaxel caused tumor regression and prolonged survival; the order of sensitivity was lung > breast congruent with ovary > prostate > colon. The LD(50) and maximum tolerated dose for ABI-007 and Cremophor-based paclitaxel were 47 and 30 mg/kg/d and 30 and 13.4 mg/kg/d, respectively. At equitoxic dose, the ABI-007-treated groups showed more complete regressions, longer time to recurrence, longer doubling time, and prolonged survival. At equal dose, tumor paclitaxel area under the curve was 33% higher for ABI-007 versus Cremophor-based paclitaxel, indicating more effective intratumoral accumulation of ABI-007. Endothelial binding and transcytosis of paclitaxel were markedly higher for ABI-007 versus Cremophor-based paclitaxel, and this difference was abrogated by a known inhibitor of endothelial gp60 receptor/caveolar transport. In addition, Cremophor was found to inhibit binding of paclitaxel to endothelial cells and albumin. Enhanced endothelial cell binding and transcytosis for ABI-007 and inhibition by Cremophor in Cremophor-based paclitaxel may account in

  1. Membrane tethering by the atlastin GTPase depends on GTP hydrolysis but not on forming the cross-over configuration.

    PubMed

    Saini, Simran G; Liu, Chuang; Zhang, Peijun; Lee, Tina H

    2014-12-01

    The membrane-anchored atlastin GTPase couples nucleotide hydrolysis to the catalysis of homotypic membrane fusion to form a branched endoplasmic reticulum network. Trans dimerization between atlastins anchored in opposing membranes, accompanied by a cross-over conformational change, is thought to draw the membranes together for fusion. Previous studies on the conformational coupling of atlastin to its GTP hydrolysis cycle have been carried out largely on atlastins lacking a membrane anchor. Consequently, whether fusion involves a discrete tethering step and, if so, the potential role of GTP hydrolysis and cross-over in tethering remain unknown. In this study, we used membrane-anchored atlastins in assays that separate tethering from fusion to dissect the requirements for each. We found that tethering depended on GTP hydrolysis, but, unlike fusion, it did not depend on cross-over. Thus GTP hydrolysis initiates stable head-domain contact in trans to tether opposing membranes, whereas cross-over formation plays a more pivotal role in powering the lipid rearrangements for fusion.

  2. Neutron crystal structure of RAS GTPase puts in question the protonation state of the GTP γ-phosphate

    DOE PAGES

    Knihtila, Ryan; Holzapfel, Genevieve; Weiss, Kevin; ...

    2015-10-29

    RAS GTPase is a prototype for nucleotide-binding proteins that function by cycling between GTP and GDP, with hydrogen atoms playing an important role in the GTP hydrolysis mechanism. It is one of the most well studied proteins in the superfamily of small GTPases, which has representatives in a wide range of cellular functions. These proteins share a GTP-binding pocket with highly conserved motifs that promote hydrolysis to GDP. The neutron crystal structure of RAS presented here strongly supports a protonated gamma-phosphate at physiological pH. This counters the notion that the phosphate groups of GTP are fully deprotonated at the startmore » of the hydrolysis reaction, which has colored the interpretation of experimental and computational data in studies of the hydrolysis mechanism. As a result, the neutron crystal structure presented here puts in question our understanding of the pre-catalytic state associated with the hydrolysis reaction central to the function of RAS and other GTPases.« less

  3. Membrane tethering by the atlastin GTPase depends on GTP hydrolysis but not on forming the cross-over configuration

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Simran G.; Liu, Chuang; Zhang, Peijun; Lee, Tina H.

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-anchored atlastin GTPase couples nucleotide hydrolysis to the catalysis of homotypic membrane fusion to form a branched endoplasmic reticulum network. Trans dimerization between atlastins anchored in opposing membranes, accompanied by a cross-over conformational change, is thought to draw the membranes together for fusion. Previous studies on the conformational coupling of atlastin to its GTP hydrolysis cycle have been carried out largely on atlastins lacking a membrane anchor. Consequently, whether fusion involves a discrete tethering step and, if so, the potential role of GTP hydrolysis and cross-over in tethering remain unknown. In this study, we used membrane-anchored atlastins in assays that separate tethering from fusion to dissect the requirements for each. We found that tethering depended on GTP hydrolysis, but, unlike fusion, it did not depend on cross-over. Thus GTP hydrolysis initiates stable head-domain contact in trans to tether opposing membranes, whereas cross-over formation plays a more pivotal role in powering the lipid rearrangements for fusion. PMID:25253720

  4. Regulation of β-adrenergic control of heart rate by GTP-cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) and tetrahydrobiopterin

    PubMed Central

    Adlam, David; Herring, Neil; Douglas, Gillian; De Bono, Joseph P.; Li, Dan; Danson, Edward J.; Tatham, Amy; Lu, Cheih-Ju; Jennings, Katie A.; Cragg, Stephanie J.; Casadei, Barbara; Paterson, David J.; Channon, Keith M.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Clinical markers of cardiac autonomic function, such as heart rate and response to exercise, are important predictors of cardiovascular risk. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is a required cofactor for enzymes with roles in cardiac autonomic function, including tyrosine hydroxylase and nitric oxide synthase. Synthesis of BH4 is regulated by GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH), encoded by GCH1. Recent clinical studies report associations between GCH1 variants and increased heart rate, but the mechanistic importance of GCH1 and BH4 in autonomic function remains unclear. We investigate the effect of BH4 deficiency on the autonomic regulation of heart rate in the hph-1 mouse model of BH4 deficiency. Methods and results In the hph-1 mouse, reduced cardiac GCH1 expression, GTPCH enzymatic activity, and BH4 were associated with increased resting heart rate; blood pressure was not different. Exercise training decreased resting heart rate, but hph-1 mice retained a relative tachycardia. Vagal nerve stimulation in vitro induced bradycardia equally in hph-1 and wild-type mice both before and after exercise training. Direct atrial responses to carbamylcholine were equal. In contrast, propranolol treatment normalized the resting tachycardia in vivo. Stellate ganglion stimulation and isoproterenol but not forskolin application in vitro induced a greater tachycardic response in hph-1 mice. β1-adrenoceptor protein was increased as was the cAMP response to isoproterenol stimulation. Conclusion Reduced GCH1 expression and BH4 deficiency cause tachycardia through enhanced β-adrenergic sensitivity, with no effect on vagal function. GCH1 expression and BH4 are novel determinants of cardiac autonomic regulation that may have important roles in cardiovascular pathophysiology. PMID:22241166

  5. Myristoylation-facilitated binding of the G protein ARF1GDP to membrane phospholipids is required for its activation by a soluble nucleotide exchange factor.

    PubMed

    Franco, M; Chardin, P; Chabre, M; Paris, S

    1996-01-19

    We have investigated the role of N-myristoylation in the activation of bovine ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1). We previously showed that myristoylation allows some spontaneous GDP-to-GTP exchange to occur on ARF1 at physiological Mg2+ levels in the presence of phospholipid vesicles (Franco, M., Chardin, P., Chabre, M., and Paris, S. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 1337-1341). Here, we report that this basal nucleotide exchange can be accelerated (by up to 5-fold) by addition of a soluble fraction obtained from bovine retinas. This acceleration is totally abolished by brefeldin A (IC50 = 2 microM) and by trypsin treatment of the retinal extract, as expected for an ARF-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor. To accelerate GDP release from ARF1, this soluble exchange factor absolutely requires myristoylation of ARF1 and the presence of phospholipid vesicles. The retinal extract also stimulates guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)-triphosphate (GTP gamma S) release from ARF1 in the presence of phospholipids, but in this case myristoylation of ARF is not required. These observations, together with our previous findings that both myristoylated and non-myristoylated forms of ARF GTP-gamma S but only the myristoylated form of ARFGDP bind to membrane phospholipids, suggest that (i) the retinal exchange factor acts only on membrane-bound ARF, (ii) the myristate is not involved in the protein-protein interaction between ARF1 and the exchange factor, and (iii) N-myristoylation facilitates both spontaneous and catalyzed GDP-to-GTP exchange on ARF1 simply by facilitating the binding of ARFGDP to membrane phospholipids.

  6. Regulators of G-protein Signaling accelerate GPCR signaling kinetics and govern sensitivity solely by accelerating GTPase activity

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Nevin A.; Johnston, Christopher A.; Cappell, Steven D.; Kuravi, Sudhakiranmayi; Kimple, Adam J.; Willard, Francis S.; Siderovski, David P.

    2010-01-01

    G-protein heterotrimers, composed of a guanine nucleotide-binding Gα subunit and an obligate Gβγ dimer, regulate signal transduction pathways by cycling between GDP- and GTP-bound states. Signal deactivation is achieved by Gα-mediated GTP hydrolysis (GTPase activity) which is enhanced by the GTPase-accelerating protein (GAP) activity of “regulator of G-protein signaling” (RGS) proteins. In a cellular context, RGS proteins have also been shown to speed up the onset of signaling, and to accelerate deactivation without changing amplitude or sensitivity of the signal. This latter paradoxical activity has been variably attributed to GAP/enzymatic or non-GAP/scaffolding functions of these proteins. Here, we validated and exploited a Gα switch-region point mutation, known to engender increased GTPase activity, to mimic in cis the GAP function of RGS proteins. While the transition-state, GDP·AlF4 −-bound conformation of the G202A mutant was found to be nearly identical to wild-type, Gαi1(G202A)·GDP assumed a divergent conformation more closely resembling the GDP·AlF4 −-bound state. When placed within Saccharomyces cerevisiae Gα subunit Gpa1, the fast-hydrolysis mutation restored appropriate dose–response behaviors to pheromone signaling in the absence of RGS-mediated GAP activity. A bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) readout of heterotrimer activation with high temporal resolution revealed that fast intrinsic GTPase activity could recapitulate in cis the kinetic sharpening (increased onset and deactivation rates) and blunting of sensitivity also engendered by RGS protein action in trans. Thus Gα-directed GAP activity, the first biochemical function ascribed to RGS proteins, is sufficient to explain the activation kinetics and agonist sensitivity observed from G-protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling in a cellular context. PMID:20351284

  7. Virial Expansion Bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, Stephen James

    2013-10-01

    In the 1960s, the technique of using cluster expansion bounds in order to achieve bounds on the virial expansion was developed by Lebowitz and Penrose (J. Math. Phys. 5:841, 1964) and Ruelle (Statistical Mechanics: Rigorous Results. Benjamin, Elmsford, 1969). This technique is generalised to more recent cluster expansion bounds by Poghosyan and Ueltschi (J. Math. Phys. 50:053509, 2009), which are related to the work of Procacci (J. Stat. Phys. 129:171, 2007) and the tree-graph identity, detailed by Brydges (Phénomènes Critiques, Systèmes Aléatoires, Théories de Jauge. Les Houches 1984, pp. 129-183, 1986). The bounds achieved by Lebowitz and Penrose can also be sharpened by doing the actual optimisation and achieving expressions in terms of the Lambert W-function. The different bound from the cluster expansion shows some improvements for bounds on the convergence of the virial expansion in the case of positive potentials, which are allowed to have a hard core.

  8. β,γ-CHF- and β,γ-CHCl-dGTP diastereomers: synthesis, discrete 31P NMR signatures and absolute configurations of new stereochemical probes for DNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yue; Zakharova, Valeria M.; Kashemirov, Boris A.; Goodman, Myron F.; Batra, Vinod K.; Wilson, Samuel H.; McKenna, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Deoxynucleoside 5′-triphosphate analogues in which the β,γ-bridging oxygen has been replaced with a CXY group are useful chemical probes to investigate DNA polymerase catalytic and base selection mechanisms. A limitation of such probes has been that conventional synthetic methods generate a mixture of diastereomers when the bridging carbon substitution is non-equivalent (X ≠ Y). We report here a general solution to this long-standing problem with four examples of individual β,γ-CXY dNTP diastereomers: (S)- and (R)-β,γ-CHCl dGTP (12a-1, 12a-2) and (S)- and (R)-β,γ-CHF dGTP (12b-1, 12b-2). Central to their preparation was conversion of the achiral parent bisphosphonic acids to P,C-dimorpholinamide derivatives (7) of their (R)-mandelic acid monoesters (6), which provided access to the individual diastereomers 7a-1, 7a-2, 7b-1, and 7b-2 by preparative HPLC. Selective acidic hydrolysis of the P-N bond then afforded the “ portal ” diastereomers 10, which were readily coupled to morpholine-activated dGMP. Removal of the chiral auxiliary by H2 (Pd/C) afforded the four individual diastereomeric nucleotides (12), which were characterized by 31P, 1H and 19F NMR, and by MS. After treatment with Chelex®-100 to remove traces of paramagnetic ions, at pH ~10 the diastereomer pairs 12a and 12b exhibit discrete Pα and Pβ 31P resonances. The more upfield Pα and more downfield Pβ resonances (and also the more upfield 19F NMR resonance in 12b) are assigned to the (R) configuration at the Pβ-CHX-Pγ carbons, based on the absolute configurations of the individual diastereomers as determined by X-ray crystallographic structures of their ternary complexes with DNA-pol β. PMID:22397499

  9. Interaction between plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) bound to fibrin and either tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) or urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA). Binding of t-PA/PAI-1 complexes to fibrin mediated by both the finger and the kringle-2 domain of t-PA.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, O F; de Vries, C; Hohmann, C; Veerman, H; Pannekoek, H

    1989-01-01

    Plasminogen activation is catalyzed both by tissue-type-(t-PA) and by urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA). This reaction is controlled by plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) that is either present in plasma or bound to fibrin, present in a thrombus. We studied the mechanism of in vitro inhibition of both t-PA and u-PA activity by PAI-1 bound to fibrin. It is shown that activation of latent PAI-1 unmasks a specific fibrin-binding site that is distinct from its reactive site. This reactive site of activated PAI-1 bound to fibrin is fully exposed to form complexes with t-PA and u-PA, that are unable to activate plasminogen. Upon complex formation with either one of the plasminogen activators, PAI-1 apparently undergoes a conformational change and loses its affinity for fibrin. Consequently, complexes of u-PA and PAI-1 dissociate from the fibrin matrix and are encountered in the fluid phase. In contrast, t-PA/PAI-1 complexes remain bound to fibrin. By employing recombinant t-PA deletion-mutant proteins, that precisely lack domains involved in fibrin binding, we demonstrate that binding of t-PA/PAI-1 complexes is mediated by both the "finger" (F) and the "kringle-2" (K2) domain of t-PA. A model is proposed that explains inhibition of the fibrinolytic process, at the level of plasminogen activation by t-PA, directed by PAI-1 bound to fibrin. An implication of the proposed model is that t-PA/PAI-1 complexes and free t-PA compete for the same binding sites on fibrin. Images PMID:2503541

  10. CG methylated microarrays identify a novel methylated sequence bound by the CEBPB|ATF4 heterodimer that is active in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mann, Ishminder K; Chatterjee, Raghunath; Zhao, Jianfei; He, Ximiao; Weirauch, Matthew T; Hughes, Timothy R; Vinson, Charles

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of CG methylation on DNA binding of sequence-specific B-ZIP transcription factors (TFs) in a high-throughput manner, we enzymatically methylated the cytosine in the CG dinucleotide on protein binding microarrays. Two Agilent DNA array designs were used. One contained 40,000 features using de Bruijn sequences where each 8-mer occurs 32 times in various positions in the DNA sequence. The second contained 180,000 features with each CG containing 8-mer occurring three times. The first design was better for identification of binding motifs, while the second was better for quantification. Using this novel technology, we show that CG methylation enhanced binding for CEBPA and CEBPB and inhibited binding for CREB, ATF4, JUN, JUND, CEBPD, and CEBPG. The CEBPB|ATF4 heterodimer bound a novel motif CGAT|GCAA 10-fold better when methylated. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) confirmed these results. CEBPB ChIP-seq data using primary female mouse dermal fibroblasts with 50× methylome coverage for each strand indicate that the methylated sequences well-bound on the arrays are also bound in vivo. CEBPB bound 39% of the methylated canonical 10-mers ATTGC|GCAAT in the mouse genome. After ATF4 protein induction by thapsigargin which results in ER stress, CEBPB binds methylated CGAT|GCAA in vivo, recapitulating what was observed on the arrays. This methodology can be used to identify new methylated DNA sequences preferentially bound by TFs, which may be functional in vivo.

  11. Molecular cloning of the gene for the human placental GTP-binding protein Gp (G25K): identification of this GTP-binding protein as the human homolog of the yeast cell-division-cycle protein CDC42.

    PubMed Central

    Shinjo, K; Koland, J G; Hart, M J; Narasimhan, V; Johnson, D I; Evans, T; Cerione, R A

    1990-01-01

    We have isolated cDNA clones from a human placental library that code for a low molecular weight GTP-binding protein originally designated Gp (also called G25K). This identification is based on comparisons with the available peptide sequences for the purified human Gp protein and the use of two highly specific anti-peptide antibodies. The predicted amino acid sequence of the protein is very similar to those of various members of the ras superfamily of low molecular weight GTP-binding proteins, including the N-, Ki-, and Ha-ras proteins (30-35% identical), the rho proteins (approximately 50% identical), and the rac proteins (approximately 70% identical). The highest degree of sequence identity (80%) is found with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell-division-cycle protein CDC42. The human placental gene, which we designate CDC42Hs, complements the cdc42-1 mutation in S. cerevisiae, which suggests that this GTP-binding protein is the human homolog of the yeast protein. Images PMID:2124704

  12. Molecular cloning of the gene for the human placental GTP-binding protein Gp (G25K): identification of this GTP-binding protein as the human homolog of the yeast cell-division-cycle protein CDC42.

    PubMed

    Shinjo, K; Koland, J G; Hart, M J; Narasimhan, V; Johnson, D I; Evans, T; Cerione, R A

    1990-12-01

    We have isolated cDNA clones from a human placental library that code for a low molecular weight GTP-binding protein originally designated Gp (also called G25K). This identification is based on comparisons with the available peptide sequences for the purified human Gp protein and the use of two highly specific anti-peptide antibodies. The predicted amino acid sequence of the protein is very similar to those of various members of the ras superfamily of low molecular weight GTP-binding proteins, including the N-, Ki-, and Ha-ras proteins (30-35% identical), the rho proteins (approximately 50% identical), and the rac proteins (approximately 70% identical). The highest degree of sequence identity (80%) is found with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell-division-cycle protein CDC42. The human placental gene, which we designate CDC42Hs, complements the cdc42-1 mutation in S. cerevisiae, which suggests that this GTP-binding protein is the human homolog of the yeast protein.

  13. Molecular cloning of the gene for the human placental GTP-binding protein G sub p (G25K): Identification of this GTP-binding protein as the human homolog of the yeast cell-division-cycle protein CDC42

    SciTech Connect

    Shinjo, K.; Koland, J.G.; Hart, M.J.; Narasimhan, V.; Cerione, R.A. ); Johnson, D.I. ); Evans, T. )

    1990-12-01

    The authors have isolated cDNA clones from a human placental library that code for a low molecular weight GTP-binding protein originally designated G{sub p} (also called G25K). This identification is based on comparisons with the available peptide sequences for the purified human G{sub p} protein and the use of two highly specific anti-peptide antibodies. The predicted amino acid sequence of the protein is very similar to those of various members of the ras superfamily of low molecular weight GTP-binding proteins, including the N-, Ki-, and Ha-ras proteins (30-35% identical), the rho proteins and the rac proteins. The highest degree of sequence identity (80%) is found with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell division-cycle protein CDC42. The human placental gene, which they designate CDC42Hs, complements the cdc42-1 mutation in S. cerevisiae, which suggests that this GTP-binding protein is the human homolog of the yeast protein.

  14. Validation of EMP bounds

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, L.K.; Merewether, K.O.; Chen, K.C.; Jorgenson, R.E.; Morris, M.E.; Solberg, J.E.; Lewis, J.G.; Derr, W.

    1996-07-01

    Test data on canonical weapon-like fixtures are used to validate previously developed analytical bounding results. The test fixtures were constructed to simulate (but be slightly worse than) weapon ports of entry but have known geometries (and electrical points of contact). The exterior of the test fixtures exhibited exterior resonant enhancement of the incident fields at the ports of entry with magnitudes equal to those of weapon geometries. The interior consisted of loaded transmission lines adjusted to maximize received energy or voltage but incorporating practical weapon geometrical constraints. New analytical results are also presented for bounding the energies associated with multiple bolt joints and for bounding the exterior resonant enhancement of the exciting fields.

  15. Phenylalanine improves dilation and blood pressure in GTP cyclohydrolase inhibition-induced hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Brett M; Dorrance, Anne M; Webb, R Clinton

    2004-06-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase (GTPCH), the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of the nitric oxide synthase cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), is partly regulated by the GTPCH feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). GFRP can inhibit GTPCH by end-product negative feedback, and L-phenylalanine (L-Phe) reverses this inhibition and increases BH4 biosynthesis in vitro. We hypothesized that L-Phe would increase endothelium-dependent relaxation and decrease blood pressure in rats made hypertensive by GTPCH inhibition. Di-amino-hydroxypyrimidine (DAHP, 10 mmol/L), a known inhibitor of GTPCH, was given with or without L-Phe or D-Phe (2 mmol/L) in the drinking water of rats for 3 days and blood pressure was measured via tail-cuff. Endothelium-intact aortic segments were hung in organ chambers for measurement of isometric force generation. Systolic blood pressure was increased significantly in DAHP-treated rats compared with controls. The addition of L-Phe attenuated the hypertensive effect, whereas D-Phe had no effect. Acetylcholine- and A23187-induced relaxation was decreased in aortas from DAHP-treated rats compared with controls, but was restored in aortas from DAHP+L-Phe-treated rats. Following NOS inhibition, sensitivity to sodium nitroprusside was increased in aortas from DAHP-treated rats, but restored in DAHP+L-Phe-treated rats. These results suggest that L-Phe can reverse GTPCH inhibition in vivo leading to increased vasodilation and decreased blood pressure.

  16. Myristoylation of an inhibitory GTP-binding protein. alpha. subunit is essential for its membrane attachment

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T.L.Z.; Simonds, W.F.; Merendino, J.J. Jr.; Brann, M.R.; Spiegel, A.M. )

    1990-01-01

    The authors transfected COS cells with cDNAs for the {alpha} subunits of stimulatory and inhibitory GTP-binding proteins, {alpha}{sub s} and {alpha}{sub i1}, respectively, and immunoprecipitated the metabolically labeled products with specific peptide antibodies. Cells were separated into particulate and soluble fractions before immunoprecipitation; ({sup 35}S)methionine-labeled {alpha}{sub s} and {alpha}{sub i} were both found primarily in the particulate fraction. ({sup 3}H)Myristate was incorporated into endogenous and transfected {alpha}{sub i} but could not be detected in {alpha}{sub s} even when it was overexpressed. They converted the second residue, glycine, of {alpha}{sub i1} into alanine by site-directed mutagenesis. Upon transfection of the mutant {alpha}{sub i1} into COS cells, the ({sup 35}S)methionine-labeled product was localized primarily to the soluble fraction, and, also unlike normal {alpha}{sub i1}, the mutant failed to incorporate ({sup 3}H)myristate. The unmyristoylated mutant {alpha}{sub i1} could still interact with the {beta}-{gamma} complex, since purified {beta}{gamma} subunits promoted pertussis toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of both the normal and mutant {alpha}{sub i1} subunits. These results indicate that myristoylation is critical for membrane attachment of {alpha}{sub i} but not {alpha}{sub s} subunits.

  17. A RanGTP-independent mechanism allows ribosomal protein nuclear import for ribosome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Schütz, Sabina; Fischer, Ute; Altvater, Martin; Nerurkar, Purnima; Peña, Cohue; Gerber, Michaela; Chang, Yiming; Caesar, Stefanie; Schubert, Olga T; Schlenstedt, Gabriel; Panse, Vikram G

    2014-01-01

    Within a single generation time a growing yeast cell imports ∼14 million ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) into the nucleus for ribosome production. After import, it is unclear how these intrinsically unstable and aggregation-prone proteins are targeted to the ribosome assembly site in the nucleolus. Here, we report the discovery of a conserved nuclear carrier Tsr2 that coordinates transfer of the r-protein eS26 to the earliest assembling pre-ribosome, the 90S. In vitro studies revealed that Tsr2 efficiently dissociates importin:eS26 complexes via an atypical RanGTP-independent mechanism that terminates the import process. Subsequently, Tsr2 binds the released eS26, shields it from proteolysis, and ensures its safe delivery to the 90S pre-ribosome. We anticipate similar carriers—termed here escortins—to securely connect the nuclear import machinery with pathways that deposit r-proteins onto developing pre-ribosomal particles. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03473.001 PMID:25144938

  18. A putative GTP binding protein homologous to interferon-inducible Mx proteins performs an essential function in yeast protein sorting.

    PubMed

    Rothman, J H; Raymond, C K; Gilbert, T; O'Hara, P J; Stevens, T H

    1990-06-15

    Members of the Mx protein family promote interferon-inducible resistance to viral infection in mammals and act by unknown mechanisms. We identified an Mx-like protein in yeast and present genetic evidence for its cellular function. This protein, the VPS1 product, is essential for vacuolar protein sorting, normal organization of intracellular membranes, and growth at high temperature, implying that Mx-like proteins are engaged in fundamental cellular processes in eukaryotes. Vps1p contains a tripartite GTP binding motif, which suggests that binding to GTP is essential to its role in protein sorting. Vps1p-specific antibody labels punctate cytoplasmic structures that condense to larger structures in a Golgi-accumulating sec7 mutant; thus, Vps1p may associate with an intermediate organelle of the secretory pathway.

  19. Structural model of FeoB, the iron transporter from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, predicts a cysteine lined, GTP-gated pore

    PubMed Central

    Seyedmohammad, Saeed; Fuentealba, Natalia Alveal; Marriott, Robert A.J.; Goetze, Tom A.; Edwardson, J. Michael; Barrera, Nelson P.; Venter, Henrietta

    2016-01-01

    Iron is essential for the survival and virulence of pathogenic bacteria. The FeoB transporter allows the bacterial cell to acquire ferrous iron from its environment, making it an excellent drug target in intractable pathogens. The protein consists of an N-terminal GTP-binding domain and a C-terminal membrane domain. Despite the availability of X-ray crystal structures of the N-terminal domain, many aspects of the structure and function of FeoB remain unclear, such as the structure of the membrane domain, the oligomeric state of the protein, the molecular mechanism of iron transport, and how this is coupled to GTP hydrolysis at the N-terminal domain. In the present study, we describe the first homology model of FeoB. Due to the lack of sequence homology between FeoB and other transporters, the structures of four different proteins were used as templates to generate the homology model of full-length FeoB, which predicts a trimeric structure. We confirmed this trimeric structure by both blue-native-PAGE (BN-PAGE) and AFM. According to our model, the membrane domain of the trimeric protein forms a central pore lined by highly conserved cysteine residues. This pore aligns with a central pore in the N-terminal GTPase domain (G-domain) lined by aspartate residues. Biochemical analysis of FeoB from Pseudomonas aeruginosa further reveals a putative iron sensor domain that could connect GTP binding/hydrolysis to the opening of the pore. These results indicate that FeoB might not act as a transporter, but rather as a GTP-gated channel. PMID:26934982

  20. Unique 5′-P recognition and basis for dG:dGTP misincorporation of ASFV DNA polymerase X

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiqing; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Hehua; Gao, Yanqing; Li, Xuhang; Zheng, Lina; Cui, Ruixue; Yao, Qingqing; Rong, Liang; Li, Jixi; Huang, Zhen; Ma, Jinbiao; Gan, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) can cause highly lethal disease in pigs and is becoming a global threat. ASFV DNA Polymerase X (AsfvPolX) is the most distinctive DNA polymerase identified to date; it lacks two DNA-binding domains (the thumb domain and 8-KD domain) conserved in the homologous proteins. AsfvPolX catalyzes the gap-filling reaction during the DNA repair process of the ASFV virus genome; it is highly error prone and plays an important role during the strategic mutagenesis of the viral genome. The structural basis underlying the natural substrate binding and the most frequent dG:dGTP misincorporation of AsfvPolX remain poorly understood. Here, we report eight AsfvPolX complex structures; our structures demonstrate that AsfvPolX has one unique 5′-phosphate (5′-P) binding pocket, which can favor the productive catalytic complex assembly and enhance the dGTP misincorporation efficiency. In combination with mutagenesis and in vitro catalytic assays, our study also reveals the functional roles of the platform His115-Arg127 and the hydrophobic residues Val120 and Leu123 in dG:dGTP misincorporation and can provide information for rational drug design to help combat ASFV in the future. PMID:28245220

  1. Non-transferrin bound iron, cytokine activation and intracellular reactive oxygen species generation in hemodialysis patients receiving intravenous iron dextran or iron sucrose.

    PubMed

    Pai, Amy Barton; Conner, Todd; McQuade, Charles R; Olp, Jonathan; Hicks, Paul

    2011-08-01

    Intravenous (IV) iron supplementation is widely used to support erythropoeisis in hemodialysis patients. IV iron products are associated with oxidative stress that has been measured principally by circulating biomarkers such as products of lipid peroxidation. The pro-oxidant effects of IV iron are presumed to be due at least in part, by free or non-transferrin bound iron (NTBI). However, the effects of IV iron on intracellular redox status and downstream effectors is not known. This prospective, crossover study compared cytokine activation, reactive oxygen species generation and oxidative stress after single IV doses of iron sucrose and iron dextran. This was a prospective, open-label, crossover study. Ten patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis and four age and sex-matched healthy were assigned to receive 100 mg of each IV iron product over 5 min in random sequence with a 2 week washout between products. Subjects were fasted and fed a low iron diet in the General Clinical Research Center at the University of New Mexico. Serum and plasma samples for IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α and IL-10 and NTBI were obtained at baseline, 60 and 240 min after iron infusion. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated at the same time points and stained with fluorescent probes to identify intracellular reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) by flow cytometry. Lipid peroxidation was assessed by plasma F(2) isoprostane concentration. Mean ± SEM maximum serum NTBI values were significantly higher among patients receiving IS compared to ID (2.59 ± 0.31 and 1.0 ± 0.36 µM, respectively, P = 0.005 IS vs. ID) Mean ± SEM NTBI area under the serum concentration-time curve (AUC) was 3-fold higher after IS versus ID (202 ± 53 vs. 74 ± 23 µM*min/l, P = 0.04) in ESRD patients, indicating increased exposure to NTBI. IV iron administration was associated with increased pro-inflammatory cytokines. Serum IL-6 concentrations increased most

  2. Computing Graphical Confidence Bounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mezzacappa, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    Approximation for graphical confidence bounds is simple enough to run on programmable calculator. Approximation is used in lieu of numerical tables not always available, and exact calculations, which often require rather sizable computer resources. Approximation verified for collection of up to 50 data points. Method used to analyze tile-strength data on Space Shuttle thermal-protection system.

  3. Rapid Transacylations of Activated Ester Substrates Bound to the Primary Side Beta-Cyclodextrin-Cyclen Conjugate and its M(2+) Complexes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-20

    nitrophenolate from the following substrates: p- nitrophenyl acetate (8; "PNPA"), bis-p-nitrophenylcarbonate (9; "BIS-PNPC"), and p...afford accelerations in ester, amide, and phosphate hydrolyses, due in part to their ability to form metal-bound hydroxide under conditions that are...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE p- nitrophenyl acetate. at pH 5.2. Subsequent descriptions of cyclodextrin-based artificial metalloenzymes have been

  4. Formation of. beta. ,. gamma. -methylene-7,8-dihydroneopterin 3'-triphosphate from. beta. ,. gamma. -methyleneguanosine 5'-triphosphate by GTP cyclohydrolase I of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Ferre, J.; Jacobson, K.B.

    1984-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I of Escherichia coli converts (..beta..,..gamma..-methylene)GTP to a fluorescent product that is characterized as (..beta..,..gamma..-methylene)dihydroneopterin triphosphate. Interaction between the GTP analog and the enzyme gave a K/sub i/ of 3.0 ..mu..M, which may be compared to the K/sub m/ of 0.1 ..mu..M for GTP. This new analog of dihydroneopterin triphosphate may, in turn, be converted to the same greenish-yellow pteridines (compounds X, X1, and X2) that are obtained from dihydroneopterin triphosphate. Because of its stability to phosphatase action, this analog may be useful for studies in pteridine metabolism. 14 references, 5 figures.

  5. PRESERVING MITOCHONDRIAL FUNCTION PREVENTS THE PROTEASOMAL DEGRADATION OF GTP CYCLOHYDROLASE I

    PubMed Central

    SHARMA, SHRUTI; SUN, XUTONG; KUMAR, SANJIV; RAFIKOV, RUSLAN; ARAMBURO, ANGELA; KALKAN, GOKHAN; TIAN, JING; REHMANI, IMRAN; KALLARACKAL, SUPHIN; FINEMAN, JEFFERY R.; BLACK, STEPHEN M.

    2012-01-01

    The development of pulmonary hypertension is a common accompaniment of congenital heart disease (CHD) with increased pulmonary blood flow. Our recent evidence suggests that asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction causes endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling secondary to a proteasome-dependent degradation of GTP cyclohydrolase I (GCH1) that results in a decrease in the NOS co-factor, tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). Decreases in NO signaling are thought to be an early hallmark of endothelial dysfunction. As L-carnitine plays an important role in maintaining mitochondrial function in this study we examined the protective mechanisms and the therapeutic potential of L-carnitine on NO signaling in pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAEC) and in a lamb model of CHD and increased pulmonary blood flow (Shunt). Acetyl L-carnitine (ALC) attenuated the ADMA-mediated proteasomal degradation of GCH1. This preservation was associated with a decrease in the association of GCH1 with the Hsp70 and the C-terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) and a decrease in its ubiquitination. This in turn prevented the decrease in BH4 levels induced by ADMA and preserved NO signaling. Treatment of Shunt lambs with L-carnitine also reduced GCH1/CHIP interactions, attenuated the ubiquitination and degradation of GCH1, and increased BH4 levels compared to vehicle treated Shunt lambs. The increases in BH4 were associated with decreased NOS uncoupling and enhanced NO generation. Thus, we conclude that L-carnitine may have a therapeutic potential in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension in children with CHD with increased pulmonary blood flow. PMID:22583703

  6. Ultrastructural localization of the small GTP-binding protein Rap1 in human platelets and megakaryocytes.

    PubMed

    Berger, G; Quarck, R; Tenza, D; Levy-Toledano, S; de Gunzburg, J; Cramer, E M

    1994-10-01

    Several functions have been proposed for Rap1B in human platelets, including the regulation of phospholipase (PL) C gamma and Ca2+ ATPase. However, its localization is largely unknown. In the present study we have investigated the subcellular distribution of Rap1 by immunocytochemical techniques using affinity purified polyclonal antibodies raised against residues 121-137 common to the 95% homologous Rap1A and Rap1B proteins. By immunofluorescence, a positive labelling was obtained on intact resting platelets and was abolished after adsorption of the antibodies with the control peptide. Immunoelectron microscopy was then used to further define the subcellular localization of Rap1B in platelets and megakaryocytes (MK). In resting cells, immunolabelling for Rap1B was associated with the plasma membrane, mostly at its inner face, and lined the membrane of the open canalicular system (OCS). Some labelling was also found outlining the alpha-granules, identified as such by a double labelling with an anti-GPIIb-IIIa. On thrombasthenic platelets the same localization was observed. When platelets were stimulated by thrombin, immunolabelling for Rap1B was redistributed to the zones of fusion of the granules with the OCS, and to the plasma membrane with a higher concentration on pseudopods. Human MK expressed Rap1 and the staining revealed the association of the protein with the demarcation membranes and alpha-granules. This study presents a first approach to the localization of a small GTP binding-protein Rap1B in whole platelets and MK, and shows its association with both the plasma and OCS membranes, as well as with the alpha-granule membranes.

  7. TC21 mediates transformation and cell survival via activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt and NF-kappaB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Rong, Rong; He, Qin; Liu, Yusen; Sheikh, M Saeed; Huang, Ying

    2002-02-07

    The signaling pathways of TC21-mediated transformation and cell survival are not well-established. In this study, we have investigated the role of PI3-K/Akt signaling pathway in oncogenic-TC21-mediated transformation and cell survival. We found that oncogenic-TC21 stimulated the PI3-K activity. This was associated with the activation of Akt, a key component of PI3-K signaling pathway. We also found that TC21 interacted and formed complex with PI3-K. Mutations in the GTP-binding region of TC21, which enhanced GTP-binding potential of this protein, also stimulated its association with PI3-K, suggesting that PI3-K may preferentially interact with the GTP-bound form. Suppression of PI3-K and Akt by specific inhibitors LY294002 and Wortmannin reversed TC21-induced transformation. Likewise, inhibition of PI3-K activity by the PI3-K phosphotase PTEN reduced TC21-mediated focus formation in NIH3T3 cells. Investigation of TC21's effect on cell survival revealed that mutant-TC21 expressing cells were more resistant to etoposide- and cisplatin-induced cell death, and this was associated with the activation of anti-apoptotic protein NF-kappaB, a downstream target of Akt. Treatment of PI3-K inhibitor LY294002 significantly suppressed TC21-mediated NF-kappaB activation. In conclusion, we have identified PI3-K as an effector of TC21 and demonstrated that the PI3-K/Akt signaling pathway plays important roles in TC21-mediated transformation and cell survival.

  8. Crystal Structure of the Redox-Active Cofactor Dibromothymoquinone Bound to Circadian Clock Protein KaiA and Structural Basis for Dibromothymoquinone's Ability to Prevent Stimulation of KaiC Phosphorylation by KaiA

    SciTech Connect

    Pattanayek, Rekha; Sidiqi, Said K.; Egli, Martin

    2013-09-19

    KaiA protein that stimulates KaiC phosphorylation in the cyanobacterial circadian clock was recently shown to be destabilized by dibromothymoquinone (DBMIB), thus revealing KaiA as a sensor of the plastoquinone (PQ) redox state and suggesting an indirect control of the clock by light through PQ redox changes. Here we show using X-ray crystallography that several DBMIBs are bound to KaiA dimer. Some binding modes are consistent with oligomerization of N-terminal KaiA pseudoreceiver domains and/or reduced interdomain flexibility. DBMIB bound to the C-terminal KaiA (C-KaiA) domain and limited stimulation of KaiC kinase activity by C-KaiA in the presence of DBMIB demonstrate that the cofactor may weakly inhibit KaiA-KaiC binding.

  9. Two active states of the Ras-related Bud1/Rsr1 protein bind to different effectors to determine yeast cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hay-Oak; Bi, Erfei; Pringle, John R.; Herskowitz, Ira

    1997-01-01

    Cells of budding yeast organize their cytoskeleton in a highly polarized manner during vegetative growth. Selection of a site for polarization requires a group of proteins including a Ras-like GTPase, Bud1, and its regulators. Another group of proteins, which includes a Rho-like GTPase (Cdc42), its guanine nucleotide exchange factor (Cdc24), and Bem1, is necessary for organization of the actin cytoskeleton and for cell polarization. We have proposed previously that the Bud1 protein, through its GTPase cycle, determines the localization of one or more of the cell polarity proteins to the bud site. Herein we demonstrate that Bud1 directly interacts with Cdc24 and Bem1: Bud1 in its GTP-bound form associates preferentially with Cdc24, whereas the GDP-bound form of Bud1 associates with Bem1. We also present subcellular fractionation data for Bud1 that is consistent with the idea that Bud1 can travel between the site for budding on the plasma membrane and the cytosol. We propose that Bud1 can exist in two active states for association with different partners and that the switch from Bud1–GTP to Bud1–GDP provides a regulatory device for ordered assembly of a macromolecular complex at the bud site. PMID:9114012

  10. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials. PMID:24938656

  11. Minimal determinants for binding activated G-alpha from the structure of a G-alpha-i1/peptide dimer†

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Christopher A.; Lobanova, Ekaterina S.; Shavkunov, Alexander S.; Low, Justin; Ramer, J. Kevin; Blaesius, Rainer; Fredericks, Zoey; Willard, Francis S.; Kuhlman, Brian; Arshavsky, Vadim Y.; Siderovski, David P.

    2008-01-01

    G-proteins cycle between an inactive GDP-bound state and active GTP-bound state, serving as molecular switches that coordinate cellular signaling. We recently used phage-display to identify a series of peptides that bind Gα subunits in a nucleotide-dependent manner [Johnston, C. A., Willard, F. S., Jezyk, M. R., Fredericks, Z., Bodor, E. T., Jones, M. B., Blaesius, R., Watts, V. J., Harden, T. K., Sondek, J., Ramer, J. K., and Siderovski, D. P. (2005) Structure 13, 1069–1080]. Here we describe the structural features and functions of KB-1753, a peptide that binds selectively to GDP·AlF4−- and GTPγS-bound states of Gαi subunits. KB-1753 blocks interaction of Gαtransducin with its effector, cGMP phosphodiesterase, and inhibits transducin-mediated activation of cGMP degradation. Additionally, KB-1753 interferes with RGS protein binding and resultant GAP activity. A fluorescent KB-1753 variant was found to act as a sensor for activated Gα in vitro. The crystal structure of KB-1753 bound to Gαi1·GDP·AlF4− reveals binding to a conserved hydrophobic groove between switch II and α3 helices, and, along with supporting biochemical data and previous structural analyses, supports the notion that this is the site of effector interactions for Gαi subunits. PMID:16981699

  12. The ligand-bound thyroid hormone receptor in macrophages ameliorates kidney injury via inhibition of nuclear factor-κB activities

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Fumihiko; Ishii, Toshihisa; Tamura, Shogo; Takahashi, Kazuya; Kobayashi, Hidetoshi; Ichijo, Masashi; Takizawa, Soichi; Kaneshige, Masahiro; Suzuki-Inoue, Katsue; Kitamura, Kenichiro

    2017-01-01

    In chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, inflammation plays a pivotal role in the progression of renal fibrosis. Hypothyroidism is associated with an increased occurrence of atherosclerosis and inflammation, suggesting protective roles of thyroid hormones and their receptors against inflammatory processes. The contribution of thyroid hormone receptors to macrophage differentiation has not been well documented. Here, we focused on the endogenous thyroid hormone receptor α (TRα) in macrophages and examined the role of ligand-bound TRα in macrophage polarization-mediated anti-inflammatory effects. TRα-deficient irradiated chimeric mice showed exacerbated tubulointerstitial injury in a unilateral ureteral obstruction model. Compared with wild-type macrophages, macrophages isolated from the obstructed kidneys of mice lacking TRα displayed increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines that was accompanied by enhanced nuclear translocation of p65. Comparison of TRα-deficient bone marrow-derived macrophages with wild-type macrophages confirmed the propensity of the former cells to produce excessive IL-1β levels. Co-culture of these macrophages with renal epithelial cells induced more severe damage to the epithelial cells via the IL-1 receptor. Our findings indicate that ligand-bound TRα on macrophages plays a protective role in kidney inflammation through the inhibition of NF-κB pathways, possibly by affecting the pro- and anti-inflammatory balance that controls the development of CKD. PMID:28272516

  13. The ligand-bound thyroid hormone receptor in macrophages ameliorates kidney injury via inhibition of nuclear factor-κB activities.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Fumihiko; Ishii, Toshihisa; Tamura, Shogo; Takahashi, Kazuya; Kobayashi, Hidetoshi; Ichijo, Masashi; Takizawa, Soichi; Kaneshige, Masahiro; Suzuki-Inoue, Katsue; Kitamura, Kenichiro

    2017-03-08

    In chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, inflammation plays a pivotal role in the progression of renal fibrosis. Hypothyroidism is associated with an increased occurrence of atherosclerosis and inflammation, suggesting protective roles of thyroid hormones and their receptors against inflammatory processes. The contribution of thyroid hormone receptors to macrophage differentiation has not been well documented. Here, we focused on the endogenous thyroid hormone receptor α (TRα) in macrophages and examined the role of ligand-bound TRα in macrophage polarization-mediated anti-inflammatory effects. TRα-deficient irradiated chimeric mice showed exacerbated tubulointerstitial injury in a unilateral ureteral obstruction model. Compared with wild-type macrophages, macrophages isolated from the obstructed kidneys of mice lacking TRα displayed increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines that was accompanied by enhanced nuclear translocation of p65. Comparison of TRα-deficient bone marrow-derived macrophages with wild-type macrophages confirmed the propensity of the former cells to produce excessive IL-1β levels. Co-culture of these macrophages with renal epithelial cells induced more severe damage to the epithelial cells via the IL-1 receptor. Our findings indicate that ligand-bound TRα on macrophages plays a protective role in kidney inflammation through the inhibition of NF-κB pathways, possibly by affecting the pro- and anti-inflammatory balance that controls the development of CKD.

  14. Universal bounds on current fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietzonka, Patrick; Barato, Andre C.; Seifert, Udo

    2016-05-01

    For current fluctuations in nonequilibrium steady states of Markovian processes, we derive four different universal bounds valid beyond the Gaussian regime. Different variants of these bounds apply to either the entropy change or any individual current, e.g., the rate of substrate consumption in a chemical reaction or the electron current in an electronic device. The bounds vary with respect to their degree of universality and tightness. A universal parabolic bound on the generating function of an arbitrary current depends solely on the average entropy production. A second, stronger bound requires knowledge both of the thermodynamic forces that drive the system and of the topology of the network of states. These two bounds are conjectures based on extensive numerics. An exponential bound that depends only on the average entropy production and the average number of transitions per time is rigorously proved. This bound has no obvious relation to the parabolic bound but it is typically tighter further away from equilibrium. An asymptotic bound that depends on the specific transition rates and becomes tight for large fluctuations is also derived. This bound allows for the prediction of the asymptotic growth of the generating function. Even though our results are restricted to networks with a finite number of states, we show that the parabolic bound is also valid for three paradigmatic examples of driven diffusive systems for which the generating function can be calculated using the additivity principle. Our bounds provide a general class of constraints for nonequilibrium systems.

  15. GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein controls cofactor 6-tetrahydrobiopterin synthesis in the cytosol and in the nucleus of epidermal keratinocytes and melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Bhaven; Gillbro, Johanna M; Rokos, Hartmut; Schallreuter, Karin U

    2006-11-01

    (6R)-L-erythro 5,6,7,8 tetrahydrobiopterin (6BH4) is crucial in the hydroxylation of L-phenylalanine-, L-tyrosine-, and L-tryptophan-regulating catecholamine and serotonin synthesis as well as tyrosinase in melanogenesis. The rate-limiting step of 6BH4 de novo synthesis is controlled by guanosine triphosphate (GTP) cyclohydrolase I (GTPCHI) and its feedback regulatory protein (GFRP), where binding of L-phenylalanine to GFRP increases enzyme activities, while 6BH4 exerts the opposite effect. Earlier it was demonstrated that the human epidermis holds the full capacity for autocrine 6BH4 de novo synthesis and recycling. However, besides the expression of epidermal mRNA for GFRP, the presence of a functioning GFRP feedback has never been shown. Therefore, it was tempting to investigate whether this important mechanism is present in epidermal cells. Our results identified indeed a functioning GFRP/GTPCHI axis in epidermal keratinocytes and melanocytes in the cytosol, adding the missing link for 6BH4 de novo synthesis which in turn controls cofactor supply for catecholamine and serotonin biosynthesis as well as melanogenesis in the human epidermis. Moreover, GFRP expression and GTPCHI activities have been found in the nucleus of both cell types. The significance of this result warrants further investigation.

  16. Blog life: Entropy Bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Peter

    2008-06-01

    Who is the blog written by? Peter Steinberg is a nuclear physicist at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York, US. He is acting project manager of the PHOBOS experiment, which used Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to search for unusual events produced during collisions between gold nuclei. He is also involved with the PHENIX experiment, which seeks to discover a new state of matter known as the quark-gluon plasma. In addition to his own blog Entropy Bound, Steinberg is currently blogging on a website that was set up last year to publicize the involvement of US scientists with the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

  17. Unprenylated RhoA Contributes to IL-1β Hypersecretion in Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency Model through Stimulation of Rac1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    van der Burgh, Robert; Pervolaraki, Kalliopi; Turkenburg, Marjolein; Waterham, Hans R.; Frenkel, Joost; Boes, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Protein prenylation is a post-translational modification whereby non-sterol isoprenoid lipid chains are added, thereby modifying the molecular partners with which proteins interact. The autoinflammatory disease mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) is characterized by a severe reduction in protein prenylation. A major class of proteins that are affected are small GTPases, including Rac1 and RhoA. It is not clear how protein prenylation of small GTPases relates to GTP hydrolysis activity and downstream signaling. Here, we investigated the contribution of RhoA prenylation to the biochemical pathways that underlie MKD-associated IL-1β hypersecretion using human cell cultures, Rac1 and RhoA protein variants, and pharmacological inhibitors. We found that when unprenylated, the GTP-bound levels of RhoA decrease, causing a reduction in GTPase activity and increased protein kinase B (PKB) phosphorylation. Cells expressing unprenylated RhoA produce increased levels of interleukin 1β mRNA. Of other phenotypic cellular changes seen in MKD, increased mitochondrial potential and mitochondrial elongation, only mitochondrial elongation was observed. Finally, we show that pharmacological inactivation of RhoA boosts Rac1 activity, a small GTPase whose activity was earlier implied in MKD pathogenesis. Together, our data show that RhoA plays a pivotal role in MKD pathogenesis through Rac1/PKB signaling toward interleukin 1β production and elucidate the effects of protein prenylation in monocytes. PMID:25107911

  18. Multifunctions of bounded variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinter, R. B.

    2016-02-01

    Consider control systems described by a differential equation with a control term or, more generally, by a differential inclusion with velocity set F (t , x). Certain properties of state trajectories can be derived when it is assumed that F (t , x) is merely measurable w.r.t. the time variable t. But sometimes a refined analysis requires the imposition of stronger hypotheses regarding the time dependence. Stronger forms of necessary conditions for minimizing state trajectories can be derived, for example, when F (t , x) is Lipschitz continuous w.r.t. time. It has recently become apparent that significant addition properties of state trajectories can still be derived, when the Lipschitz continuity hypothesis is replaced by the weaker requirement that F (t , x) has bounded variation w.r.t. time. This paper introduces a new concept of multifunctions F (t , x) that have bounded variation w.r.t. time near a given state trajectory, of special relevance to control. We provide an application to sensitivity analysis.

  19. Bound water in Kevlar 49 fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Garza, R.G.; Pruneda, C.O.; Morgan, R.J.

    1981-04-01

    From elemental analyses, thermogravimetric-mass spectroscopy studies and re-evaluation of previous water diffusion studies in Kevlar 49 fibers it is concluded that these fibers can contain two types of sorbed moisture. The fibers can absorb up to approx. 6 wt % loosely bound water with an activation energy for outgassing by desorption of 6 kcal/mole. This loosely bound water is a direct result of the presence of Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ impurities and the perturbations they induce on the packing of the rod-like poly (p-phenylene terephthalamide) macromolecules. Kevlar 49 fibers also inherently contain up to 30 wt % additional water which is tightly bound within the crystal lattice. This water exhibits an activation energy for outgassing by diffusion of approx. 40 kcal/mole and is only evolved from the fiber in significant quantities at t > 350/sup 0/C over a period of hours.

  20. Differential regulation of serotonin-1A receptor-stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding in the dorsal raphe nucleus by citalopram and escitalopram.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Dania V; Burke, Teresa F; Hensler, Julie G

    2008-03-31

    The effect of chronic citalopram or escitalopram administration on 5-HT1A receptor function in the dorsal raphe nucleus was determined by measuring [35S]GTP gamma S binding stimulated by the 5-HT1A receptor agonist (R)-(+)-8-OH-DPAT (1nM-10 microM). Although chronic administration of citalopram or escitalopram has been shown to desensitize somatodendritic 5-HT1A autoreceptors, we found that escitalopram treatment decreased the efficacy of 5-HT1A receptors to activate G proteins, whereas citalopram treatment did not. The binding of [3H]8-OH-DPAT to the coupled, high affinity agonist state of the receptor was not altered by either treatment. Interestingly, escitalopram administration resulted in greater occupancy of serotonin transporter sites as measured by the inhibition of [3H]cyanoimipramine binding. As the binding and action of escitalopram is limited by the inactive enantiomer R-citalopram present in racemic citalopram, we propose that the regulation of 5-HT1A receptor function in the dorsal raphe nucleus at the level of receptor-G protein interaction may be a result of greater inhibition of the serotonin transporter by escitalopram.

  1. ADP-ribosylation factor, a small GTP-binding protein, is required for binding of the coatomer protein beta-COP to Golgi membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, J G; Cassel, D; Kahn, R A; Klausner, R D

    1992-01-01

    The coatomer is a cytosolic protein complex that reversibly associates with Golgi membranes and is implicated in modulating Golgi membrane transport. The association of beta-COP, a component of coatomer, with Golgi membranes is enhanced by guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[gamma S]), a nonhydrolyzable analogue of GTP, and by a mixture of aluminum and fluoride ions (Al/F). Here we show that the ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) is required for the binding of beta-COP. Thus, beta-COP contained in a coatomer fraction that has been resolved from ARF does not bind to Golgi membranes, whereas binding can be reconstituted by the addition of recombinant ARF. Furthermore, an N-terminal peptide of ARF, which blocks ARF binding to Golgi membranes, inhibits GTP[gamma S]- as well as the Al/F-enhanced binding of beta-COP. We show that Golgi coat protein binding involves a sequential reaction where an initial interaction of ARF and GTP[gamma S] with the membrane allows subsequent binding of beta-COP to take place in the absence of free ARF and GTP[gamma S]. The fungal metabolite brefeldin A, which is known to prevent the association of coat proteins with Golgi membrane, is shown to exert this effect by interfering with the initial ARF-membrane interaction step. Images PMID:1631136

  2. Culture-bound syndromes.

    PubMed

    Levine, R E; Gaw, A C

    1995-09-01

    Since its inception, scholars have struggled with the concept of CBSs. This struggle is reflected in the continuing use of a term that is confusing and inaccurate. Most authors would agree that the term "culture-bound syndrome" was intended to describe forms of otherwise common mental illness that are rendered unusual because of the pathoplastic influence of culture. It was intended not only to describe specific syndromes, but also meanings of illness and non-Western notions of disease causation. The term has become an anachronism, for the word, "syndrome," implies specific disease entities, not illnesses of attribution of idioms of distress. Furthermore, the word "bound" implies that the entities described are restricted to a single culture. Close examination reveals that many of the so-called "culture-bound" syndromes are found in multiple cultures that have in common only that they are "non-Western." It may be unreasonable to expect one term to describe these different concepts. The most accurate of the designations offered might be "folk diagnostic categories." Perhaps the most difficult question remaining is "How can we understand (and classify) these phenomena in such a way that highlights their uniqueness but does not dismiss them as too rare and exotic to warrant attention?" The first step is to recognize that the CBSs are a heterogeneous group of conditions. We must next acknowledge that the concepts represented may be difficult for the average Western clinician to recognize but, in their respective cultures, are neither rare nor unusual. With 80% of our increasingly shrinking world coming from "non-Western" cultures, a familiarity with non-Western notions of disease causation is particularly important for modern clinicians. Many authors have recommended that those CBSs that are "true" syndromes be classified together with their Western counterparts. In order to do this, the folk labels need to be put aside and the fundamental components of each disorder

  3. Bioactivity of albumins bound to silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mariam, Jessy; Sivakami, S; Kothari, D C; Dongre, P M

    2014-06-01

    The last decade has witnessed a tremendous rise in the proposed applications of nanomaterials in the field of medicine due to their very attractive physiochemical properties and novel actions such as the ability to reach previously inaccessible targets such as brain. However biological activity of functional molecules bound to nanoparticles and its physiological consequences is still unclear and hence this area requires immediate attention. The functional properties of Human Serum Albumin (HSA) and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) bound to silver nanoparticles (~60 nm) have been studied under physiological environment. Esterase activity, binding of drugs (warfarin and ibuprofen), antioxidant activity and copper binding by albumins was evaluated. The catalytic efficiencies of HSA and BSA diminished upon binding to silver nanoparticles. Perturbation in binding of warfarin and ibuprofen, loss of free sulphydryls, antioxidant activity and enhancement of copper binding were observed in albumins bound to nanoparticles. These alterations in functional activity of nanoparticle bound albumins which will have important consequences should be taken into consideration while using nanoparticles for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

  4. Chicken guanylate-binding protein. Conservation of GTPase activity and induction by cytokines.

    PubMed

    Schwemmle, M; Kaspers, B; Irion, A; Staeheli, P; Schultz, U

    1996-04-26

    To gain further insights into the cytokine network of birds, we used polymerase chain reaction technology to clone a cDNA that codes for a chicken homolog of the interferon-induced guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs). In its N-terminal moiety, the 64-kDa chicken GBP contains two sequence blocks of 100 and 19 amino acids, respectively, that are about 70% identical to mammalian GBPs. The first region includes two motifs of the canonical GTP-binding consensus element. The other parts of chicken GBP are poorly conserved, except for a CAAX motif at the extreme C terminus which might signal isoprenylation. Like mammalian GBPs, recombinant chicken GBP specifically bound to agarose-immobilized guanine nucleotides and hydrolyzed GTP to both GDP and GMP. Regulation by interferons was also conserved: chicken GBP RNA was barely detectable in uninduced chicken cells. Low GBP RNA levels were found in cells treated with type I interferon, whereas very high levels were observed in cells treated with supernatant of a chicken T cell line that secretes a gamma-interferon-like activity. Together with recent phylogenetic studies of interferon genes, these results suggest that in spite of low sequence conservation, the various components of the avian interferon system are functionally well conserved.

  5. Cryo-EM reveals an active role for aminoacyl-tRNA in the accommodation process

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Mikel; Sengupta, Jayati; Swami, Neil K.; Grassucci, Robert A.; Burkhardt, Nils; Nierhaus, Knud H.; Agrawal, Rajendra K.; Frank, Joachim

    2002-01-01

    During the elongation cycle of protein biosynthesis, the specific amino acid coded for by the mRNA is delivered by a complex that is comprised of the cognate aminoacyl-tRNA, elongation factor Tu and GTP. As this ternary complex binds to the ribosome, the anticodon end of the tRNA reaches the decoding center in the 30S subunit. Here we present the cryo- electron microscopy (EM) study of an Escherichia coli 70S ribosome-bound ternary complex stalled with an antibiotic, kirromycin. In the cryo-EM map the anticodon arm of the tRNA presents a new conformation that appears to facilitate the initial codon–anticodon interaction. Furthermore, the elbow region of the tRNA is seen to contact the GTPase-associated center on the 50S subunit of the ribosome, suggesting an active role of the tRNA in the transmission of the signal prompting the GTP hydrolysis upon codon recognition. PMID:12093756

  6. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a GTP-binding protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hao; Sun, Lei; Brouns, Stan J. J.; Fu, Sheng; Akerboom, Jasper; Li, Xuemei; Oost, John van der

    2007-03-01

    A GTP-binding protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus has been crystallized. Combined with biochemical analyses, it is expected that the structure of this protein will give insight in the function of a relatively unknown subfamily of the GTPase superfamily. A predicted GTP-binding protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus, termed SsGBP, has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique in the presence of 0.05 M cadmium sulfate and 0.8 M sodium acetate pH 7.5. A single-wavelength anomalous dispersion data set was collected to a maximum resolution of 2.0 Å using a single cadmium-incorporated crystal. The crystal form belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with approximate unit-cell parameters a = 65.0, b = 72.6, c = 95.9 Å and with a monomer in the asymmetric unit.

  7. RanGTP-Binding Protein NXT1 Facilitates Nuclear Export of Different Classes of RNA In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ossareh-Nazari, Batool; Maison, Christèle; Black, Ben E.; Lévesque, Lyne; Paschal, Bryce M.; Dargemont, Catherine

    2000-01-01

    To better characterize the mechanisms responsible for RNA export from the nucleus, we developed an in vitro assay based on the use of permeabilized HeLa cells. This new assay supports nuclear export of U1 snRNA, tRNA, and mRNA in an energy- and Xenopus extract-dependent manner. U1 snRNA export requires a 5′ monomethylated cap structure, the nuclear export signal receptor CRM1, and the small GTPase Ran. In contrast, mRNA export does not require the participation of CRM1. We show here that NXT1, an NTF2-related protein that binds directly to RanGTP, strongly stimulates export of U1 snRNA, tRNA, and mRNA. The ability of NXT1 to promote export is dependent on its capacity to bind RanGTP. These results support the emerging view that NXT1 is a general export factor, functioning on both CRM1-dependent and CRM1-independent pathways of RNA export. PMID:10848583

  8. GABAB receptor GTP-binding is decreased in the prefrontal cortex but not the hippocampus of aged rats

    PubMed Central

    McQuail, Joseph A.; Bañuelos, Cristina; LaSarge, Candi L.; Nicolle, Michelle M.; Bizon, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    GABAB receptors (GABABRs) have been linked to a wide range of physiological and cognitive processes and are of interest for treating a number of neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. As many of these diseases are associated with advanced age, it is important to understand how the normal aging process impacts GABABR expression and signaling. Thus, we investigated GABABR expression and function in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus of young and aged rats characterized in a spatial learning task. Baclofen-stimulated GTP-binding and GABABR1 and GABABR2 proteins were reduced in the PFC of aged rats but these reductions were not associated with spatial learning abilities. In contrast, hippocampal GTP-binding was comparable between young and aged rats but reduced hippocampal GABABR1 expression was observed in aged rats with spatial learning impairment. These data demonstrate marked regional differences in GABABR complexes in the adult and aged brain and could have implications for both understanding the role of GABAergic processes in normal brain function and the development of putative interventions that target this system. PMID:22169202

  9. Effect of mutational alteration of Asn-128 in the putative GTP-binding domain of tetracycline resistance determinant Tet(O) from Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed Central

    Grewal, J; Manavathu, E K; Taylor, D E

    1993-01-01

    The deduced amino acid sequence of Campylobacter jejuni Tet(O), cloned in Escherichia coli, has shown that it contains the five highly conserved sequences of the GTP-binding domain found in other GTPases. Asn-128 belongs to the G4 motif of such a domain and is involved in hydrogen bonding with the guanine ring of the nucleotide. Substitution of Asn-128 by 11 other amino acids resulted in a decrease in tetracycline resistance, indicating that tetracycline resistance conferred by Tet(O) is related to GTP binding. The effect of the mutations on the GTP-binding domain is discussed with the EF-Tu-GDP complex as a model. PMID:8109930

  10. Starvation actively inhibits splicing of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA via a bifunctional ESE/ESS element bound by hnRNP K.

    PubMed

    Cyphert, T J; Suchanek, A L; Griffith, B N; Salati, L M

    2013-09-01

    Regulated expression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is due to changes in the rate of pre-mRNA splicing and not changes in its transcription. Starvation alters pre-mRNA splicing by decreasing the rate of intron removal, leading to intron retention and a decrease in the accumulation of mature mRNA. A regulatory element within exon 12 of G6PD pre-mRNA controls splicing efficiency. Starvation caused an increase in the expression of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K protein and this increase coincided with the increase in the binding of hnRNP K to the regulatory element and a decrease in the expression of G6PD mRNA. HnRNP K bound to two C-rich motifs forming an ESS within exon 12. Overexpression of hnRNP K decreased the splicing and expression of G6PD mRNA, while siRNA-mediated depletion of hnRNP K caused an increase in the splicing and expression of G6PD mRNA. Binding of hnRNP K to the regulatory element was enhanced in vivo by starvation coinciding with a decrease in G6PD mRNA. HnRNP K binding to the C-rich motifs blocked binding of serine-arginine rich, splicing factor 3 (SRSF3), a splicing enhancer. Thus hnRNP K is a nutrient regulated splicing factor responsible for the inhibition of the splicing of G6PD during starvation.

  11. Potassium Acts as a GTPase-Activating Element on Each Nucleotide-Binding Domain of the Essential Bacillus subtilis EngA

    PubMed Central

    Foucher, Anne-Emmanuelle; Reiser, Jean-Baptiste; Ebel, Christine; Housset, Dominique; Jault, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    EngA proteins form a unique family of bacterial GTPases with two GTP-binding domains in tandem, namely GD1 and GD2, followed by a KH (K-homology) domain. They have been shown to interact with the bacterial ribosome and to be involved in its biogenesis. Most prokaryotic EngA possess a high GTPase activity in contrast to eukaryotic GTPases that act mainly as molecular switches. Here, we have purified and characterized the GTPase activity of the Bacillus subtilis EngA and two shortened EngA variants that only contain GD1 or GD2-KH. Interestingly, the GTPase activity of GD1 alone is similar to that of the whole EngA, whereas GD2-KH has a 150-fold lower GTPase activity. At physiological concentration, potassium strongly stimulates the GTPase activity of each protein construct. Interestingly, it affects neither the affinities for nucleotides nor the monomeric status of EngA or the GD1 domain. Thus, potassium likely acts as a chemical GTPase-activating element as proposed for another bacterial GTPase like MnmE. However, unlike MnmE, potassium does not promote dimerization of EngA. In addition, we solved two crystal structures of full-length EngA. One of them contained for the first time a GTP-like analogue bound to GD2 while GD1 was free. Surprisingly, its overall fold was similar to a previously solved structure with GDP bound to both sites. Our data indicate that a significant structural change must occur upon K+ binding to GD2, and a comparison with T. maritima EngA and MnmE structures allowed us to propose a model explaining the chemical basis for the different GTPase activities of GD1 and GD2. PMID:23056455

  12. A historical perspective on the lateral diffusion model of GTPase activation and related coupling of membrane signaling proteins

    PubMed Central

    Liebman, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Aspects of our discovery of lateral diffusion of the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) rhodopsin and that a single activated rhodopsin can non-covalently catalyze GTP binding to thousands of GTPases per second on rod disk membranes via this diffusion are summarized herein. Rapid GTPase coupling to membrane-bound phosphodiesterase (PDE) further amplifies the signal via cGMP hydrolysis, essential to visual transduction. Important generalizations from this work are that biomembranes can uniquely concentrate, orient for reaction and provide a solvent appropriate to rapid, powerful and appropriately controlled sequential interaction of signaling proteins. Of equal importance to function is timely control and termination of such powerful amplification via receptor phosphorylation (quenching) and arrestin binding. Downstream kinetic modulation by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) and regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) and related mechanisms as well as limitations set by membrane domain fencing, structural protein binding etc. can be essential in relevant systems. PMID:25279248

  13. A potential link between insulin signaling and GLUT4 translocation: Association of Rab10-GTP with the exocyst subunit Exoc6/6b

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, Hiroyuki; Peck, Grantley R.; Blachon, Stephanie; Lienhard, Gustav E.

    2015-09-25

    Insulin increases glucose transport in fat and muscle cells by stimulating the exocytosis of specialized vesicles containing the glucose transporter GLUT4. This process, which is referred to as GLUT4 translocation, increases the amount of GLUT4 at the cell surface. Previous studies have provided evidence that insulin signaling increases the amount of Rab10-GTP in the GLUT4 vesicles and that GLUT4 translocation requires the exocyst, a complex that functions in the tethering of vesicles to the plasma membrane, leading to exocytosis. In the present study we show that Rab10 in its GTP form binds to Exoc6 and Exoc6b, which are the two highly homologous isotypes of an exocyst subunit, that both isotypes are found in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and that knockdown of Exoc6, Exoc6b, or both inhibits GLUT4 translocation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. These results suggest that the association of Rab10-GTP with Exoc6/6b is a molecular link between insulin signaling and the exocytic machinery in GLUT4 translocation. - Highlights: • Insulin stimulates the fusion of vesicles containing GLUT4 with the plasma membrane. • This requires vesicular Rab10-GTP and the exocyst plasma membrane tethering complex. • We find that Rab10-GTP associates with the Exoc6 subunit of the exocyst. • We find that knockdown of Exoc6 inhibits fusion of GLUT4 vesicles with the membrane. • The interaction of Rab10-GTP with Exoc6 potentially links signaling to exocytosis.

  14. Structures of the Michaelis Complex (1.2A) and the Covalent Acyl Intermediate (2.0A ) of Cefamandole Bound in the Active Sites of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis beta-Lactamase K72A and E166A Mutants

    SciTech Connect

    L Tremblay; h Xu; J Blanchard

    2011-12-31

    The genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) contains a gene that encodes a highly active {beta}-lactamase, BlaC, that imparts TB with resistance to {beta}-lactam chemotherapy. The structure of covalent BlaC-{beta}-lactam complexes suggests that active site residues K73 and E166 are essential for acylation and deacylation, respectively. We have prepared the K73A and E166A mutant forms of BlaC and have determined the structures of the Michaelis complex of cefamandole and the covalently bound acyl intermediate of cefamandole at resolutions of 1.2 and 2.0 {angstrom}, respectively. These structures provide insight into the details of the catalytic mechanism.

  15. The GTP-binding protein RhoA localizes to the cortical granules of Strongylocentrotus purpuratas sea urchin egg and is secreted during fertilization.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar-Mata, P; Martínez-Cadena, G; López-Godínez, J; Obregón, A; García-Soto, J

    2000-02-01

    The sea urchin egg has thousands of secretory vesicles known as cortical granules. Upon fertilization, these vesicles undergo a Ca2+-dependent exocytosis. G-protein-linked mechanisms may take place during the egg activation. In somatic cells from mammals, GTP-binding proteins of the Rho family regulate a number of cellular processes, including organization of the actin cytoskeleton. We report here that a crude membrane fraction from homogenates of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus sea urchin eggs, incubated with C3 (which ADP-ribosylates specifically Rho proteins) and [32P]NAD, displayed an [32P]ADP-ribosylated protein of 25 kDa that had the following characteristics: i) identical electrophoretic mobility in SDS-PAGE gels as the [32P]ADP-ribosylated Rho from sea urchin sperm; ii) identical mobility in isoelectro focusing gels as human RhoA; iii) positive cross-reactivity by immunoblotting with an antibody against mammalian RhoA. Thus, unfertilized S. purpuratus eggs contain a mammalian RhoA-like protein. Immunocytochemical analyses indicated that RhoA was localized preferentially to the cortical granules; this was confirmed by experiments of [32P]ADP-ribosylation with C3 in isolated cortical granules. Rho was secreted and retained in the fertilization membrane after insemination or activation with A23187. It was observed that the Rho protein present in the sea urchin sperm acrosome was also secreted during the exocytotic acrosome reaction. Thus, Rho could participate in those processes related to the cortical granules, i.e., in the Ca2+-regulated exocytosis or actin reorganization that accompany the egg activation.

  16. Bound Rationality and Organizational Learning.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-23

    8217 . 90 0 8 0.. O 4 BOUNDED RATIONALITY AND ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING Technical Report AlP - 107 Herbert A. Simon Department of Psychology Carnegie Mellon...ACCESSION No N/A N/A N/A N/A 1 1 TITLE (include Security Classificarnon) Bounded rationality and organizational learning 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) HretA io 13a...organizations organizational psychology organizational learning bounded rationality cognitive psychology 𔄃 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary

  17. Association of redox-active iron bound to high molecular weight structures in nuclei with inhibition of cell growth by H2O2.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Byrnes, R W

    1999-01-01

    Perturbations to Fe species contributing to generation of DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) and inhibition of growth by H2O2 were studied in HL-60 cells made Fe-deficient by 24 h pretreatment with 144 microM bathophenanthroline disulfonic acid and 400 microM ascorbic acid (Free Radic. Biol. Med. 20: 399; 1996). The diffusion distance for SSB generation (d) in Fe-deficient cells, measured via inhibition with the *OH scavenger Me2SO using alkaline elution, was 6.5 nm. This is similar to the d for Fe-normal cells reported previously. After 1 and 3 h in fresh RPMI 1640 medium containing 10% serum, SSB generation increased from 29 to 56 and 93% of control Fe-normal cells, respectively. The d of the major contributor to SSB generation at these two treatment times was 1.9 nm. This d resembled the d for Fe-ATP as determined in isolated Ehrlich cell nuclei. The association of ATP with Fe2+ was further supported by decreased SSB generation in cells in which ATP synthesis was inhibited. In contrast to SSB generation, H2O2-induced inhibition of growth of Fe-deficient cells treated immediately after placing in fresh medium was not appreciably different from Fe-normal cells. However, after 3 h, an approximately 70% greater concentration of H2O2 than for control, Fe-normal cells was required to inhibit growth. This increase in H2O2 concentration was associated with decreased generation of SSBs by H2O2 in isolated HL-60 cell nuclei. Thus, Fe bound to nuclear structures is more closely associated with inhibition of cell growth than apparent Fe-ATP species. In parallel experiments, changes in total cellular Fe assayed by ashing and complexing with ferrozine were consistent with a non-transferrin mode of acquisition. These short-term changes appear due to processes accompanying reestablishment of the Fe content and distribution normally observed during long-term growth.

  18. Exposure of airway epithelial cells to Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm-derived quorum sensing molecules decrease the activity of the anti-oxidant response element bound by NRF2.

    PubMed

    Roussel, Lucie; Rousseau, Simon

    2017-02-05

    Chronic bacterial infections in cystic fibrosis lung disease are often characterized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms that are regulated by bacterial intercellular signals termed quorum sensing (QS), such as N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL). This study reports that biofilm-derived exoproducts decrease the transcriptional activity of the anti-oxidant response element in bronchial epithelial cells. In a live co-culture assay of BEAS-2B cells and P. aeruginosa biofilm, the QS molecule 3OC12-HSL was an important but not sole contributor to the inhibition of basal NRF2 luciferase reporter activity. Moreover, biofilm-derived exoproducts and 3OC12-HSL decrease the expression of endogenous antioxidant response element-regulated genes hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H Quinone Dehydrogenase-1 (NQO-1) while they increase IL-8 expression. As previously reported, IL-8 expression is partially dependent on p38 MAPK activity, but the inhibitory effect of biofilm QS molecules on HO-1 and NQO-1 expression occurs independently of this protein kinase. Finally, the transfection of CFTRdelF508 but not its wild type counterpart decreases basal, planktonic PsaDM and sulforaphane-driven NRF2 luciferase reporter activity in BEAS-2B cells. Therefore, the presence of quorum sensing molecules derived from bacterial biofilms lowers the transcriptional activity of the anti-oxidant response element, which may contribute to the establishment of chronic bacterial infections, especially in the presence of mutated CFTR. Increasing NRF2 activity may thus be a promising strategy to potentiate anti-biofilm activity in cystic fibrosis lung disease.

  19. Protein phosphatase 6 regulates mitotic spindle formation by controlling the T-loop phosphorylation state of Aurora A bound to its activator TPX2

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Kang; Bastos, Ricardo Nunes

    2010-01-01

    Many protein kinases are activated by a conserved regulatory step involving T-loop phosphorylation. Although there is considerable focus on kinase activator proteins, the importance of specific T-loop phosphatases reversing kinase activation has been underappreciated. We find that the protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) holoenzyme is the major T-loop phosphatase for Aurora A, an essential mitotic kinase. Loss of PP6 function by depletion of catalytic or regulatory subunits interferes with spindle formation and chromosome alignment because of increased Aurora A activity. Aurora A T-loop phosphorylation and the stability of the Aurora A–TPX2 complex are increased in cells depleted of PP6 but not other phosphatases. Furthermore, purified PP6 acts as a T-loop phosphatase for Aurora A–TPX2 complexes in vitro, whereas catalytically inactive mutants cannot dephosphorylate Aurora A or rescue the PPP6C depletion phenotype. These results demonstrate a hitherto unappreciated role for PP6 as the T-loop phosphatase regulating Aurora A activity during spindle formation and suggest the general importance of this form of regulation. PMID:21187329

  20. Structures of E. coli peptide deformylase bound to formate: insight into the preference for Fe2+ over Zn2+ as the active site metal.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rinku; Hao, Bing; Liu, Ren-Peng; Chan, Michael K

    2005-04-06

    E. coli peptide deformylase (PDF) catalyzes the deformylation of nascent polypeptides generated during protein synthesis. While PDF was originally thought to be a zinc enzyme, subsequent studies revealed that the active site metal is iron. In an attempt to understand this unusual metal preference, high-resolution structures of Fe-, Co-, and Zn-PDF were determined in complex with its deformylation product, formate. In all three structures, the formate ion binds the metal and forms hydrogen-bonding interactions with the backbone nitrogen of Leu91, the amide side chain of Gln50, and the carboxylate side chain of Glu133. One key difference, however, is how the formate binds the metal. In Fe-PDF and Co-PDF, formate binds in a bidentate fashion, while in Zn-PDF, it binds in a monodentate fashion. Importantly, these structural results provide the first clues into the origins of PDF's metal-dependent activity differences. On the basis of these structures, we propose that the basis for the higher activity of Fe-PDF stems from the better ability of iron to bind and activate the tetrahedral transition state required for cleavage of the N-terminal formyl group.

  1. Surfactant-free poly(styrene-co-glycidyl methacrylate) particles with surface-bound antibodies for activation and proliferation of human T cells.

    PubMed

    Thümmler, Katja; Häntzschel, Nadine; Skapenko, Alla; Schulze-Koops, Hendrik; Pich, Andrij

    2010-05-19

    In this article, we present our results on the design of new polymeric carriers for antibodies. Polymer colloids based on poly(styrene-co-glycidyl methacrylate) were synthesized by surfactant-free emulsion polymerization. Obtained polymer particles stabilized by grafted poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains and carrying active epoxy groups were used for the covalent immobilization of activating antibodies against the human surface proteins CD (cluster of differentiation) 3 and CD28. The particle-antibody conjugates were employed for the stimulation of human CD4 memory T cells. This was analyzed by the up-regulation of the activation markers CD69 and CD25 on T cells and T cell proliferation as assessed by the dilution of a fluorescent dye on dividing daughter T cells. The particle-antibody conjugates were able to stimulate T cells at least as efficiently as conventional methods, e.g., surface-immobilized antibodies. Furthermore, an increase of the PEG chain length of the particles decreased the efficiency of the particle-antibody conjugates to activate T cells.

  2. Differential effects of eNOS uncoupling on conduit and small arteries in GTP-cyclohydrolase I-deficient hph-1 mice

    PubMed Central

    d'Uscio, Livius V.; Smith, Leslie A.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we used the hph-1 mouse, which displays GTP-cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH I) deficiency, to test the hypothesis that loss of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) in conduit and small arteries activates compensatory mechanisms designed to protect vascular wall from oxidative stress induced by uncoupling of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Both GTPCH I activity and BH4 levels were reduced in the aortas and small mesenteric arteries of hph-1 mice. However, the BH4-to-7,8-dihydrobiopterin ratio was significantly reduced only in hph-1 aortas. Furthermore, superoxide anion and 3-nitrotyrosine production were significantly enhanced in aortas but not in small mesenteric arteries of hph-1 mice. In contrast to the aorta, protein expression of copper- and zinc-containing superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) was significantly increased in small mesenteric arteries of hph-1 mice. Protein expression of catalase was increased in both aortas and small mesenteric arteries of hph-1 mice. Further analysis of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling demonstrated that protein expression of phosphorylated Ser1177-eNOS as well as basal cGMP levels and hydrogen peroxide was increased in hph-1 aortas. Increased production of hydrogen peroxide in hph-1 mice aortas appears to be the most likely mechanism responsible for phosphorylation of eNOS and elevation of cGMP. In contrast, upregulation of CuZnSOD and catalase in resistance arteries is sufficient to protect vascular tissue from increased production of reactive oxygen species generated by uncoupling of eNOS. The results of our study suggest that anatomical origin determines the ability of vessel wall to cope with oxidative stress induced by uncoupling of eNOS. PMID:21963838

  3. Rejection of tmRNA·SmpB after GTP hydrolysis by EF-Tu on ribosomes stalled on intact mRNA.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Daisuke; Miller, Mickey R; Muto, Akira; Buskirk, Allen R; Himeno, Hyouta

    2014-11-01

    Messenger RNAs lacking a stop codon trap ribosomes at their 3' ends, depleting the pool of ribosomes available for protein synthesis. In bacteria, a remarkable quality control system rescues and recycles stalled ribosomes in a process known as trans-translation. Acting as a tRNA, transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) is aminoacylated, delivered by EF-Tu to the ribosomal A site, and accepts the nascent polypeptide. Translation then resumes on a reading frame within tmRNA, encoding a short peptide tag that targets the nascent peptide for degradation by proteases. One unsolved issue in trans-translation is how tmRNA and its protein partner SmpB preferentially recognize stalled ribosomes and not actively translating ones. Here, we examine the effect of the length of the 3' extension of mRNA on each step of trans-translation by pre-steady-state kinetic methods and fluorescence polarization binding assays. Unexpectedly, EF-Tu activation and GTP hydrolysis occur rapidly regardless of the length of the mRNA, although the peptidyl transfer to tmRNA decreases as the mRNA 3' extension increases and the tmRNA·SmpB binds less tightly to the ribosome with an mRNA having a long 3' extension. From these results, we conclude that the tmRNA·SmpB complex dissociates during accommodation due to competition between the downstream mRNA and the C-terminal tail for the mRNA channel. Rejection of the tmRNA·SmpB complex during accommodation is reminiscent of the rejection of near-cognate tRNA from the ribosome in canonical translation.

  4. Crystal structure of the karyopherin Kap121p bound to the extreme C-terminus of the protein phosphatase Cdc14p

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Junya; Hirano, Hidemi; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2015-07-31

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the protein phosphatase Cdc14p is an antagonist of mitotic cyclin-dependent kinases and is a key regulator of late mitotic events such as chromosome segregation, spindle disassembly and cytokinesis. The activity of Cdc14p is controlled by cell-cycle dependent changes in its association with its competitive inhibitor Net1p (also known as Cfi1p) in the nucleolus. For most of the cell cycle up to metaphase, Cdc14p is sequestered in the nucleolus in an inactive state. During anaphase, Cdc14p is released from Net1p, spreads into the nucleus and cytoplasm, and dephosphorylates key mitotic targets. Although regulated nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Cdc14p has been suggested to be important for exit from mitosis, the mechanism underlying Cdc14p nuclear trafficking remains poorly understood. Here we show that the C-terminal region (residues 517–551) of Cdc14p can function as a nuclear localization signal (NLS) in vivo and also binds to Kap121p (also known as Pse1p), an essential nuclear import carrier in yeast, in a Gsp1p-GTP-dependent manner in vitro. Moreover we report a crystal structure, at 2.4 Å resolution, of Kap121p bound to the C-terminal region of Cdc14p. The structure and structure-based mutational analyses suggest that either the last five residues at the extreme C-terminus of Cdc14p (residues 547–551; Gly-Ser-Ile-Lys-Lys) or adjacent residues with similar sequence (residues 540–544; Gly-Gly-Ile-Arg-Lys) can bind to the NLS-binding site of Kap121p, with two residues (Ile in the middle and Lys at the end of the five residues) of Cdc14p making key contributions to the binding specificity. Based on comparison with other structures of Kap121p-ligand complexes, we propose “IK-NLS” as an appropriate term to refer to the Kap121p-specific NLS. - Highlights: • The C-terminus of Cdc14p binds to Kap121p in a Gsp1p-GTP-dependent manner. • The crystal structure of Kap121p-Cdc14p complex is determined. • The structure reveals how

  5. A novel member of the rho family of small GTP-binding proteins is specifically required for cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Several members of the rho/rac family of small GTP-binding proteins are known to regulate the distribution of the actin cytoskeleton in various subcellular processes. We describe here a novel rac protein, racE, which is specifically required for cytokinesis, an actomyosin-mediated process. The racE gene was isolated in a molecular genetic screen devised to isolate genes required for cytokinesis in Dictyostelium. Phenotypic characterization of racE mutants revealed that racE is not essential for any other cell motility event, including phagocytosis, chemotaxis, capping, or development. Our data provide the first genetic evidence for the essential requirement of a rho-like protein, specifically in cytokinesis, and suggest a role for these proteins in coordinating cytokinesis with the mitotic events of the cell cycle. PMID:8682867

  6. Fractional diffusion on bounded domains

    DOE PAGES

    Defterli, Ozlem; D'Elia, Marta; Du, Qiang; ...

    2015-03-13

    We found that the mathematically correct specification of a fractional differential equation on a bounded domain requires specification of appropriate boundary conditions, or their fractional analogue. In this paper we discuss the application of nonlocal diffusion theory to specify well-posed fractional diffusion equations on bounded domains.

  7. Bounds for Asian basket options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deelstra, Griselda; Diallo, Ibrahima; Vanmaele, Michèle

    2008-09-01

    In this paper we propose pricing bounds for European-style discrete arithmetic Asian basket options in a Black and Scholes framework. We start from methods used for basket options and Asian options. First, we use the general approach for deriving upper and lower bounds for stop-loss premia of sums of non-independent random variables as in Kaas et al. [Upper and lower bounds for sums of random variables, Insurance Math. Econom. 27 (2000) 151-168] or Dhaene et al. [The concept of comonotonicity in actuarial science and finance: theory, Insurance Math. Econom. 31(1) (2002) 3-33]. We generalize the methods in Deelstra et al. [Pricing of arithmetic basket options by conditioning, Insurance Math. Econom. 34 (2004) 55-57] and Vanmaele et al. [Bounds for the price of discrete sampled arithmetic Asian options, J. Comput. Appl. Math. 185(1) (2006) 51-90]. Afterwards we show how to derive an analytical closed-form expression for a lower bound in the non-comonotonic case. Finally, we derive upper bounds for Asian basket options by applying techniques as in Thompson [Fast narrow bounds on the value of Asian options, Working Paper, University of Cambridge, 1999] and Lord [Partially exact and bounded approximations for arithmetic Asian options, J. Comput. Finance 10 (2) (2006) 1-52]. Numerical results are included and on the basis of our numerical tests, we explain which method we recommend depending on moneyness and time-to-maturity.

  8. Isolation, purification, and partial characterization of a membrane-bound Cl(-)/HCO3(-)-activated ATPase complex from rat brain with sensitivity to GABAAergic ligands.

    PubMed

    Menzikov, Sergey A

    2017-02-07

    This study describes the isolation and purification of a protein complex with [Formula: see text]-ATPase activity and sensitivity to GABAAergic ligands from rat brain plasma membranes. The ATPase complex was enriched using size-exclusion, affinity, and ion-exchange chromatography. The fractions obtained at each purification step were subjected to SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), which revealed four subunits with molecular mass ∼48, 52, 56, and 59 kDa; these were retained at all stages of the purification process. Autoradiography revealed that the ∼52 and 56 kDa subunits could bind [(3)H]muscimol. The [Formula: see text]-ATPase activity of this enriched protein complex was regulated by GABAAergic ligands but was not sensitive to blockers of the NKCC or KCC cotransporters.

  9. p21-activated Kinases (PAKs) Mediate the Phosphorylation of PREX2 Protein to Initiate Feedback Inhibition of Rac1 GTPase.

    PubMed

    Barrows, Douglas; Schoenfeld, Sarah M; Hodakoski, Cindy; Silkov, Antonina; Honig, Barry; Couvillon, Anthony; Shymanets, Aliaksei; Nürnberg, Bernd; Asara, John M; Parsons, Ramon

    2015-11-27

    Phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3)-dependent Rac exchanger 2 (PREX2) is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for the Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) GTPase, facilitating the exchange of GDP for GTP on Rac1. GTP-bound Rac1 then activates its downstream effectors, including p21-activated kinases (PAKs). PREX2 and Rac1 are frequently mutated in cancer and have key roles within the insulin-signaling pathway. Rac1 can be inactivated by multiple mechanisms; however, negative regulation by insulin is not well understood. Here, we show that in response to being activated after insulin stimulation, Rac1 initiates its own inactivation by decreasing PREX2 GEF activity. Following PREX2-mediated activation of Rac1 by the second messengers PIP3 or Gβγ, we found that PREX2 was phosphorylated through a PAK-dependent mechanism. PAK-mediated phosphorylation of PREX2 reduced GEF activity toward Rac1 by inhibiting PREX2 binding to PIP3 and Gβγ. Cell fractionation experiments also revealed that phosphorylation prevented PREX2 from localizing to the cellular membrane. Furthermore, the onset of insulin-induced phosphorylation of PREX2 was delayed compared with AKT. Altogether, we propose that second messengers activate the Rac1 signal, which sets in motion a cascade whereby PAKs phosphorylate and negatively regulate PREX2 to decrease Rac1 activation. This type of regulation would allow for transient activation of the PREX2-Rac1 signal and may be relevant in multiple physiological processes, including diseases such as diabetes and cancer when insulin signaling is chronically activated.

  10. p21-activated Kinases (PAKs) Mediate the Phosphorylation of PREX2 Protein to Initiate Feedback Inhibition of Rac1 GTPase*

    PubMed Central

    Barrows, Douglas; Schoenfeld, Sarah M.; Hodakoski, Cindy; Silkov, Antonina; Honig, Barry; Couvillon, Anthony; Shymanets, Aliaksei; Nürnberg, Bernd; Asara, John M.; Parsons, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3)-dependent Rac exchanger 2 (PREX2) is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for the Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) GTPase, facilitating the exchange of GDP for GTP on Rac1. GTP-bound Rac1 then activates its downstream effectors, including p21-activated kinases (PAKs). PREX2 and Rac1 are frequently mutated in cancer and have key roles within the insulin-signaling pathway. Rac1 can be inactivated by multiple mechanisms; however, negative regulation by insulin is not well understood. Here, we show that in response to being activated after insulin stimulation, Rac1 initiates its own inactivation by decreasing PREX2 GEF activity. Following PREX2-mediated activation of Rac1 by the second messengers PIP3 or Gβγ, we found that PREX2 was phosphorylated through a PAK-dependent mechanism. PAK-mediated phosphorylation of PREX2 reduced GEF activity toward Rac1 by inhibiting PREX2 binding to PIP3 and Gβγ. Cell fractionation experiments also revealed that phosphorylation prevented PREX2 from localizing to the cellular membrane. Furthermore, the onset of insulin-induced phosphorylation of PREX2 was delayed compared with AKT. Altogether, we propose that second messengers activate the Rac1 signal, which sets in motion a cascade whereby PAKs phosphorylate and negatively regulate PREX2 to decrease Rac1 activation. This type of regulation would allow for transient activation of the PREX2-Rac1 signal and may be relevant in multiple physiological processes, including diseases such as diabetes and cancer when insulin signaling is chronically activated. PMID:26438819

  11. Exercise affects memory acquisition, anxiety-like symptoms and activity of membrane-bound enzyme in brain of rats fed with different dietary fats: impairments of trans fat.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, A M; Pase, C S; Boufleur, N; Roversi, K; Barcelos, R C S; Benvegnú, D M; Segat, H J; Dias, V T; Reckziegel, P; Trevizol, F; Dolci, G S; Carvalho, N R; Soares, F A A; Rocha, J B T; Emanuelli, T; Bürger, M E

    2011-11-10

    Here we evaluated the influence of physical exercise on behavior parameters and enzymatic status of rats supplemented with different dietary fatty acids (FA). Male Wistar rats fed diets enriched with soybean oil (SO), lard (L), or hydrogenated vegetable fat (HVF) for 48 weeks were submitted to swimming (30 min/d, five times per week) for 90 days. Dietary FA per se did not cause anxiety-like symptoms in the animals, but after physical exercise, SO group showed a better behavioral performance than L and the HVF groups in elevated plus maze (EPM). In Barnes maze, HVF group showed impaired memory acquisition as compared to L group, and exercise reversed this effect. SO-fed rats showed an improvement in memory acquisition after 1 day of training, whereas lard caused an improvement of memory only from day 4. HVF-fed rats showed no improvement of memory acquisition, but this effect was reversed by exercise in all training days. A lower activity of the Na(+)K(+)-ATPase in brain cortex of rats fed lard and HVF was observed, and this effect was maintained after exercise. Similarly, the HVF diet was related to lower activity of hippocampal Na(+)K(+)-ATPase, and exercise reduced activity of this enzyme in the SO and L groups. Our findings show influences of dietary FA on memory acquisition, whereas regular exercise improved this function and was beneficial on anxiety-like symptoms. As FA are present in neuronal membrane phospholipids and play a critical role in brain function, our results suggest that low incorporation of trans FA in neuronal membranes may act on cortical and hippocampal Na(+)K(+)-ATPase activity, but this change appears to be unrelated to the behavioral parameters primarily harmed by consumption of trans and less so by saturated FA, which were reversed by exercise.

  12. Morphological development and cytochrome c oxidase activity in Streptomyces lividans are dependent on the action of a copper bound Sco protein.

    PubMed

    Blundell, Katie L I M; Wilson, Michael T; Svistunenko, Dimitri A; Vijgenboom, Erik; Worrall, Jonathan A R

    2013-01-23

    Copper has an important role in the life cycle of many streptomycetes, stimulating the developmental switch between vegetative mycelium and aerial hyphae concomitant with the production of antibiotics. In streptomycetes, a gene encoding for a putative Sco-like protein has been identified and is part of an operon that contains two other genes predicted to handle cellular copper. We report on the Sco-like protein from Streptomyces lividans (Sco(Sl)) and present a series of experiments that firmly establish a role for Sco(Sl) as a copper metallochaperone as opposed to a role as a thiol-disulphide reductase that has been assigned to other bacterial Sco proteins. Under low copper concentrations, a Δsco mutant in S. lividans displays two phenotypes; the development switch between vegetative mycelium and aerial hyphae stalls and cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) activity is significantly decreased. At elevated copper levels, the development and CcO activity in the Δsco mutant are restored to wild-type levels and are thus independent of Sco(Sl). A CcO knockout reveals that morphological development is independent of CcO activity leading us to suggest that Sco(Sl) has at least two targets in S. lividans. We establish that one Sco(Sl) target is the dinuclear Cu(A) domain of CcO and it is the cupric form of Sco(Sl) that is functionally active. The mechanism of cupric ion capture by Sco(Sl) has been investigated, and an important role for a conserved His residue is identified.

  13. Morphological development and cytochrome c oxidase activity in Streptomyces lividans are dependent on the action of a copper bound Sco protein

    PubMed Central

    Blundell, Katie L. I. M.; Wilson, Michael T.; Svistunenko, Dimitri A.; Vijgenboom, Erik; Worrall, Jonathan A. R.

    2013-01-01

    Copper has an important role in the life cycle of many streptomycetes, stimulating the developmental switch between vegetative mycelium and aerial hyphae concomitant with the production of antibiotics. In streptomycetes, a gene encoding for a putative Sco-like protein has been identified and is part of an operon that contains two other genes predicted to handle cellular copper. We report on the Sco-like protein from Streptomyces lividans (ScoSl) and present a series of experiments that firmly establish a role for ScoSl as a copper metallochaperone as opposed to a role as a thiol-disulphide reductase that has been assigned to other bacterial Sco proteins. Under low copper concentrations, a Δsco mutant in S. lividans displays two phenotypes; the development switch between vegetative mycelium and aerial hyphae stalls and cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) activity is significantly decreased. At elevated copper levels, the development and CcO activity in the Δsco mutant are restored to wild-type levels and are thus independent of ScoSl. A CcO knockout reveals that morphological development is independent of CcO activity leading us to suggest that ScoSl has at least two targets in S. lividans. We establish that one ScoSl target is the dinuclear CuA domain of CcO and it is the cupric form of ScoSl that is functionally active. The mechanism of cupric ion capture by ScoSl has been investigated, and an important role for a conserved His residue is identified. PMID:23345541

  14. Development of a dynamic model for real-time determination of membrane-bound acetylcholinesterase activity upon perfusion with inhibitors and reactivators.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Saskia; Eyer, Peter; Mückter, Harald; Worek, Franz

    2006-07-28

    Quantitative predictions of the course of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, following interference of inhibitors and reactivators, are usually obscured by the time-dependent changes of all reaction partners. To mimic these dynamics we developed an in vitro model. Immobilized human erythrocyte ghosts in a bioreactor were continuously perfused while AChE activity was monitored by a modified Ellman method. The perfusion system consisted of two HPLC pumps with integrated quaternary low-pressure gradient formers that were programmed by a computer using commercial HPLC software. The combined eluates passed a particle filter (Millex-GS, 0.22 microm) containing a thin layer of erythrocytes that was immersed in a temperature-controlled water bath. The effluent passed a flow cell in a UV-vis detector, the signal of which was digitized, written to disc and calculated with curve fitting programs. AChE activity decreased by 3.4% within 2.5 h. The day-to-day variation of the freshly prepared bioreactor using the same enzyme source was +/-3.3%. Residual activity of 0.2% marked the limit of quantification. Following perfusion with paraoxon, pseudo first-order rate constants of inhibition were established that did not differ from results obtained in conventional assays. The same holds true for reactivation with obidoxime. The set-up presented allows freely programmable time-dependent changes of up to eight solvents to mimic pharmacokinetic profiles without accumulation of products. Due to some hysteresis in the system, reaction half-lives should be >3 min and concentration changes in critical compounds should exceed half-lives of 5 min. Otherwise, the system offers much flexibility and operates with high precision.

  15. Metabolism of organically bound tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    The classic methodology for estimating dose to man from environmental tritium ignores the fact that organically bound tritium in foodstuffs may be directly assimilated in the bound compartment of tissues without previous oxidation. We propose a four-compartment model consisting of a free body water compartment, two organic compartments, and a small, rapidly metabolizing compartment. The utility of this model lies in the ability to input organically bound tritium in foodstuffs directly into the organic compartments of the model. We found that organically bound tritium in foodstuffs can increase cumulative total body dose by a factor of 1.7 to 4.5 times the free body water dose alone, depending on the bound-to-loose ratio of tritium in the diet. Model predictions are compared with empirical measurements of tritium in human urine and tissue samples, and appear to be in close agreement. 10 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  16. Close identity between alternatively folded state N2 of ubiquitin and the conformation of the protein bound to the ubiquitin-activating enzyme.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Soichiro; Kameda, Tomoshi; Kumo, Ayumi; Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Baxter, Nicola J; Kato, Koichi; Williamson, Mike P; Kitahara, Ryo

    2014-01-28

    We present the nuclear Overhauser effect-based structure determination of the Q41N variant of ubiquitin at 2500 bar, where the alternatively folded N2 state is 97% populated. This allows us to characterize the structure of the "pure" N2 state of ubiquitin. The N2 state shows a substantial change in the orientation of strand β5 compared to that of the normal folded N1 state, which matches the changes seen upon binding of ubiquitin to ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1. The recognition of E1 by ubiquitin is therefore best explained by conformational selection rather than induced-fit motion.

  17. Structures of the Apo and FAD-Bound Forms of 2-Hydroxybiphenyl 3-monooxygenase (HbpA) Locate Activity Hotspots Identified by Using Directed Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Chantel N; Mielke, Tamara; Farrugia, Joseph E; Frank, Annika; Man, Henry; Hart, Sam; Turkenburg, Johan P; Grogan, Gideon

    2015-01-01

    The FAD-dependent monooxygenase HbpA from Pseudomonas azelaica HBP1 catalyses the hydroxylation of 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2HBP) to 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl (23DHBP). HbpA has been used extensively as a model for studying flavoprotein hydroxylases under process conditions, and has also been subjected to directed-evolution experiments that altered its catalytic properties. The structure of HbpA has been determined in its apo and FAD-complex forms to resolutions of 2.76 and 2.03 Å, respectively. Comparisons of the HbpA structure with those of homologues, in conjunction with a model of the reaction product in the active site, reveal His48 as the most likely acid/base residue to be involved in the hydroxylation mechanism. Mutation of His48 to Ala resulted in an inactive enzyme. The structures of HbpA also provide evidence that mutants achieved by directed evolution that altered activity are comparatively remote from the substrate-binding site. PMID:25737306

  18. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, thermal studies, catalytic epoxidation and biological activity of chromium and molybdenum hexacarbonyl bound to a novel N 2O 2 Schiff base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Aziz, Ayman A.

    2010-08-01

    Complexes of M(CO) 6 (M = Cr and Mo) with novel Schiff base N,N'-bis(salicylidene)4,5-dichloro-1,2-phenylenediamine (H 2L) were prepared in benzene in two different conditions: (i) under reduced pressure resulting the dicarbonyl precursors [Cr(CO) 2(H 2L)] and [Mo(CO) 2(L)] and (ii) in air resulting the oxo complex [Cr(O)(L)] and the dioxo complex [Mo(O) 2(L)]. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR, mass spectrometry, and magnetic measurement. Thermal behaviors of the complexes were also studied by using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The catalytic activity of the novel complexes in the epoxidation of cyclooctene, cyclohexene, 1-octene and 1-hexene with tert-butyl-hydroperoxide (TBHP) in methylene chloride was investigated. The antimicrobial activities of the ligand and their complexes have been screened against various strains of bacteria and fungi and the results have been compared with some known antibiotics.

  19. Comparison of free and bound iodine and iodide species as a function of the dilution of three commercial povidone-iodine formulations and their microbicidal activity.

    PubMed

    Atemnkeng, Magnus A; Plaizier-Vercammen, Jacqueline; Schuermans, Annette

    2006-07-24

    Equilibrium dialysis on povidone-iodine-solutions (Braunol, standardized Betadine and non-standardized iso-Betadine reveal that the amount of available iodine, free iodine, iodide and triiodide varies significantly both in the undiluted and diluted forms. These differences are reflected in the different bactericidal activity against Staphyloccus aureus as determined by the standard quantitative in vitro suspension test. The amount of available iodine is not an appropriate measure for an assessment of the microbicidal activity. For this, the free iodine has to be determined by means of equilibrium dialysis. The free iodine concentration in the Braunol concentrate was found to be 22 mg/L, in the standardized Betadine 9.7 mg/L and in the non-standardized Betadine concentrate only 2.1mg/L. Because of the atypical behaviour of iodophores and the increase of free iodine at dilution and because of a bactericidal level of free iodine of 5mg/L, Braunol and standardized Betadine can be employed as disinfectant as such, iso-Betadine has to be diluted before use. Summarizing all results, it can be stated that Braunol is superior to standardized Betadine and unstandardized iso-Betadine both as to the release of free iodine in the undiluted and in the diluted forms as in the killing rate of S. aureus.

  20. Unliganded and substrate bound structures of the cellooligosaccharide active lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase LsAA9A at low pH.

    PubMed

    Frandsen, Kristian E H; Poulsen, Jens-Christian N; Tandrup, Tobias; Lo Leggio, Leila

    2017-03-24

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) have been found to be key components in microbial (bacterial and fungal) degradation of biomass. They are copper metalloenzymes that degrade polysaccharides oxidatively and act in synergy with glycoside hydrolases. Recently crystallographic studies carried out at pH 5.5 of the LPMO from Lentinus similis belonging to the fungal LPMO family AA9 have provided the first atomic resolution view of substrate-LPMO interactions. The LsAA9A structure presented here determined at pH 3.5 shows significant disorder of the active site in the absence of substrate ligand. Furthermore some differences are also observed in regards to substrate (cellohexaose) binding, although the major interaction with the N-terminal histidine remains unchanged.

  1. Structure of Cryptosporidium IMP dehydrogenase bound to an inhibitor with in vivo antiparasitic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Youngchang; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2015-04-21

    Inosine 5´-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is a promising target for the treatment of Cryptosporidium infections. Here, the structure of C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) in complex with inosine 5´-monophosphate (IMP) and P131, an inhibitor with in vivo anticryptosporidial activity, is reported. P131 contains two aromatic groups, one of which interacts with the hypoxanthine ring of IMP, while the second interacts with the aromatic ring of a tyrosine in the adjacent subunit. In addition, the amine and NO2 moieties bind in hydrated cavities, forming water-mediated hydrogen bonds to the protein. The design of compounds to replace these water molecules is a new strategy for the further optimization of C. parvum inhibitors for both antiparasitic and antibacterial applications.

  2. Higher-order septin assembly is driven by GTP-promoted conformational changes: evidence from unbiased mutational analysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Weems, Andrew D; Johnson, Courtney R; Argueso, Juan Lucas; McMurray, Michael A

    2014-03-01

    Septin proteins bind GTP and heterooligomerize into filaments with conserved functions across a wide range of eukaryotes. Most septins hydrolyze GTP, altering the oligomerization interfaces; yet mutations designed to abolish nucleotide binding or hydrolysis by yeast septins perturb function only at high temperatures. Here, we apply an unbiased mutational approach to this problem. Mutations causing defects at high temperature mapped exclusively to the oligomerization interface encompassing the GTP-binding pocket, or to the pocket itself. Strikingly, cold-sensitive defects arise when certain of these same mutations are coexpressed with a wild-type allele, suggestive of a novel mode of dominance involving incompatibility between mutant and wild-type molecules at the septin-septin interfaces that mediate filament polymerization. A different cold-sensitive mutant harbors a substitution in an unstudied but highly conserved region of the septin Cdc12. A homologous domain in the small GTPase Ran allosterically regulates GTP-binding domain conformations, pointing to a possible new functional domain in some septins. Finally, we identify a mutation in septin Cdc3 that restores the high-temperature assembly competence of a mutant allele of septin Cdc10, likely by adopting a conformation more compatible with nucleotide-free Cdc10. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that GTP binding and hydrolysis promote, but are not required for, one-time events--presumably oligomerization-associated conformational changes--during assembly of the building blocks of septin filaments. Restrictive temperatures impose conformational constraints on mutant septin proteins, preventing new assembly and in certain cases destabilizing existing assemblies. These insights from yeast relate directly to disease-causing mutations in human septins.

  3. Antimutagenic activity of green tea polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z Y; Cheng, S J; Zhou, Z C; Athar, M; Khan, W A; Bickers, D R; Mukhtar, H

    1989-07-01

    For centuries green tea has been a widely consumed beverage throughout the world. It is known to contain a number of pharmacologically active compounds. In this study water extracts of green tea (WEGT) and their major constituents, green tea polyphenols (GTP), were examined for antimutagenic activity. WEGT and GTP were found to significantly inhibit the reverse mutation induced by benzo[alpha]pyrene (BP), aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), 2-aminofluorene, and methanol extracts of coal tar pitch in Salmonella typhimurium TA100 and/or TA98 in the presence of a rat-liver microsomal activation system. GTP also inhibited gene forward mutation in V79 cells treated with AFB1 and BP, and also decreased the frequency of sister-chromatid exchanges and chromosomal aberrations in V79 cells treated with AFB1. The addition of GTP during and after nitrosation of methylurea resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of mutagenicity. Studies to define the mechanism of the antimutagenic activity of GTP suggest that it may affect carcinogen metabolism, DNA adduct formation, the interaction of ultimate carcinogen or the scavenging of free radicals.

  4. Crystal structures of cyanide- and triiodide-bound forms of Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase at different pH values. Perturbations of active site residues and their implication in enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Fukuyama, K; Kunishima, N; Amada, F; Kubota, T; Matsubara, H

    1995-09-15

    The structures of the cyanide and triiodide complexes of Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase (ARP) at different pH values were investigated by x-ray crystallography in order to examine the behavior of the invariant residues of arginine (Arg-52) and distal histidine (His-56) during the enzyme reaction as well as to provide the structural basis of the active site of peroxidase. The models of the cyanide complexes at pH 7.5, 5.0, and 4.0, respectively, were refined to the R-factors of 17.8, 17.8, and 18.5% using 7.0-1.6-A resolution data, and those of the triiodide complexes at pH 6.5 and 5.0 refined to 16.9 and 16.8% using 7.0-1.9-A resolution data. The structures of the cyanide complexes at pH 7.5, 5.0, and 4.0 are identical within experimental error. Cyanide ion bound to the heme in the bent conformation rather than in the tilt conformation. Upon cyanide ion binding, the N epsilon atom of His-56 moved toward the ion by rotation of the imidazole ring around the C beta-C gamma bond, but there was little conformational change in the remaining residues. The distance between the N epsilon atom of His-56 and the nitrogen atom of the cyanide suggests the presence of a hydrogen bond between them in the pH range investigated. In the triiodide complexes, one of the two triiodides bound to ARP was located at the distal side of the heme. When triiodide bound to ARP, unlike the rearrangement of the distal arginine of cytochrome c peroxidase that occurs on formation of the fluoride complex or compound I, the side chain of Arg-52 moved little. The conformation of the side chain of His-56, however, changed markedly. Conformational flexibility of His-56 appears to be a requisite for proton translocation from one oxygen atom to the other of HOO- by acid-base catalysis to produce compound I. The iron atom in each cyanide complex (low-spin ferric) is located in the heme plane, whereas in each triiodide complex (high-spin ferric) the iron atom is displaced from the plane about 0.2 A toward

  5. Bound Indoleacetic Acid in Avena Coleoptiles 1

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Alan; Thimann, Kenneth V.

    1966-01-01

    When C14 carboxyl indoleacetic acid (IAA) is transported through Avena coleoptile sections a fraction of the activity becomes bound. The nature of this bound IAA has been investigated. Upon extraction with solvents and chromatography a substance having the RF of IAA in 4 solvents was detected. No evidence could be found for the formation of indoleacetyl conjugates. In pea stem sections subjected to a similar experimental regime good evidence was obtained for the occurrence of conjugates. When IAA was supplied exogenously to coleoptile sections floating in solutions the occurrence of conjugates was shown to be dependent on the presence of the primary leaf. In its absence no conjugates could be detected. On grinding coleoptile sections and subsequent centrifugation at 240 × g the radioactivity was found to be in the tissue fraction as opposed to the supernatant. The radioactivity cannot be removed from the tissue by extraction with water, buffer solution or treatment with ribonuclease. It is readily removed by 10% urea, crystalline trypsin and chymotrypsin. It is therefore concluded that IAA becomes bound to a protein. Bound IAA does not appear to be able to cause growth in Avena coleoptile sections. PMID:16656259

  6. Investigation of thiourea activated polyglutaraldehyde with bound Ag(I) or Pt(II) as an alternative to avidin for immobilizing biotin conjugates.

    PubMed

    Kim, D H; Miles, D R; Knotts, J W; García, A A

    1995-01-01

    Pre-polymerized glutaraldehyde covalently linked to thiourea has been synthesized as a soluble polymer for immobilizing Ag(I) and Pt(II) and it has also been used for activating a polyacrylamide gel filtration media. The modified gel filtration media (Bio-Gel P-200) has a high capacity for Ag(I) (20 mumol/ml) and Pt(II) (8 mumol/ml) and has been shown to be stable and useful even in the presence of relatively high chloride (up to 1 M NaCl) and phosphate concentrations (0.25 M). The soluble polymer can have a Ag(I) capacity of between 2-11 mmol/g. Bio-Gel P-200 modified using glutaraldehyde/thiourea and in the Ag(I) and Pt(II) form selectively binds biotinylated BSA (b-BSA) over BSA. Using the Ag(I) form of the gel at pH 4.8 (0.05 M phosphate) only b-BSA binds and 30% can be eluted using 0.15 M NaCl, while no BSA binds to the column under these conditions. For the Pt(II) form of Bio-Gel P-200 at pH 4.8, none of the applied BSA binds to the modified resin while 40% of b-BSA does bind.

  7. Structure of Natural Killer Receptor 2B4 Bound to CD48 Reveals Basis for Heterophilic Recognition in Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule Family

    SciTech Connect

    Velikovsky,C.; Deng, L.; Chlewicki, L.; Fernandez, M.; Kumar, V.; Mariuzza, R.

    2007-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells eliminate virally infected and tumor cells. Among the receptors regulating NK cell function is 2B4 (CD244), a member of the signaling lymphocyte-activation molecule (SLAM) family that binds CD48. 2B4 is the only heterophilic receptor of the SLAM family, whose other members, e.g., NK-T-B-antigen (NTB-A), are self-ligands. We determined the structure of the complex between the N-terminal domains of mouse 2B4 and CD48, as well as the structures of unbound 2B4 and CD48. The complex displayed an association mode related to, yet distinct from, that of the NTB-A dimer. Binding was accompanied by the rigidification of flexible 2B4 regions containing most of the polymorphic residues across different species and receptor isoforms. We propose a model for 2B4-CD48 interactions that permits the intermixing of SLAM receptors with major histocompatibility complex-specific receptors in the NK cell immune synapse. This analysis revealed the basis for heterophilic recognition within the SLAM family.

  8. Bound states in string nets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Marc Daniel; Dusuel, Sébastien; Vidal, Julien

    2016-11-01

    We discuss the emergence of bound states in the low-energy spectrum of the string-net Hamiltonian in the presence of a string tension. In the ladder geometry, we show that a single bound state arises either for a finite tension or in the zero-tension limit depending on the theory considered. In the latter case, we perturbatively compute the binding energy as a function of the total quantum dimension. We also address this issue in the honeycomb lattice where the number of bound states in the topological phase depends on the total quantum dimension. Finally, the internal structure of these bound states is analyzed in the zero-tension limit.

  9. Heterosubtypic Antibodies to Influenza A Virus Have Limited Activity against Cell-Bound Virus but Are Not Impaired by Strain-Specific Serum Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Wyrzucki, Arkadiusz; Bianchi, Matteo; Kohler, Ines; Steck, Marco

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The majority of influenza virus-specific antibodies elicited by vaccination or natural infection are effective only against the eliciting or closely related viruses. Rare stem-specific heterosubtypic monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) can neutralize multiple strains and subtypes by preventing hemagglutinin (HA)-mediated fusion of the viral membrane with the endosomal membrane. The epitopes recognized by these hMAbs are therefore considered promising targets for the development of pan-influenza virus vaccines. Here, we report the isolation of a novel human HA stem-reactive monoclonal antibody, hMAb 1.12, with exceptionally broad neutralizing activity encompassing viruses from 15 distinct HA subtypes. Using MAb 1.12 and two other monoclonal antibodies, we demonstrate that neutralization by hMAbs is virtually irreversible but becomes severely impaired following virus attachment to cells. In contrast, no interference by human anti-influenza virus serum antibodies was found, indicating that apically binding antibodies do not impair access to the membrane-proximal heterosubtypic epitopes. Our findings therefore encourage development of new vaccine concepts aiming at the induction of stem-specific heterosubtypic antibodies, as we provide support for their effectiveness in individuals previously exposed to influenza virus. IMPORTANCE The influenza A virus hemagglutinin (HA) can easily accommodate changes in its antigenic structures to escape preexisting immunity. This variability restricts the breadth and long-term efficacy of influenza vaccines. Only a few heterosubtypic antibodies (hMAbs), i.e., antibodies that can neutralize more than one subtype of influenza A virus, have been identified. The molecular interactions between these heterosubtypic antibodies and hemagglutinin are well characterized, yet little is known about the functional properties of these antibodies. Using a new, extraordinarily broad hMAb, we show that virus neutralization by hMAbs is virtually

  10. ADP-ribosylation by cholera toxin: functional analysis of a cellular system that stimulates the enzymic activity of cholera toxin fragment A/sub 1/

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, D.M.; Coburn, J.

    1987-10-06

    The authors have clarified relationships between cholera toxin, cholera toxin substrates, a membrane protein S that is required for toxin activity, and a soluble protein CF that is needed for the function of S. The toxin has little intrinsic ability to catalyze ADP-ribosylations unless it encounters the active form of the S protein, which is S liganded to GTP or to a GTP analogue. In the presence of CF, S x GTP forms readily, though reversibly, but a more permanent active species, S-guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (S x GTP..gamma..S), forms over a period of 10-15 min at 37/sup 0/C. Both guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) and GTP block this quasi-permanent activation. Some S x GTP..gamma..S forms in membranes that are exposed to CF alone and then to GTP..gamma..S, with a wash in between, and it is possible that CF facilitates a G nucleotide exchange. S x GTP..gamma..S dissolved by nonionic detergents persists in solution and can be used to support the ADP-ribosylation of nucleotide-free substrates. In this circumstance, added guanyl nucleotides have no further effect. This active form of S is unstable, especially when heated, but the thermal inactivation above 45/sup 0/C is decreased by GTP..gamma..S. Active S is required equally for the ADP-ribosylation of all of cholera toxin's protein substrates, regardless of whether they bind GTP or not. They suggest that active S interacts directly with the enzymic A/sub 1/ fragments of cholera toxin and not with any toxin substrate. The activation and activity of S are independent of the state, or even the presence, of adenylate cyclase and seem to be involved with the cyclase system only via cholera toxin. S is apparently not related by function to certain other GTP binding proteins, including p21/sup ras/, and appears to be a new GTP binding protein whose physiologic role remains to be identified.

  11. Metabolic initiation of differentiation and secondary metabolism by Streptomyces griseus: significance of the stringent response (ppGpp) and GTP content in relation to A factor.

    PubMed Central

    Ochi, K

    1987-01-01

    I investigated the significance of the intracellular accumulation of guanosine 5'-diphosphate 3'-diphosphate (ppGpp) and of the coordinated decrease in the GTP pool for initiating morphological and physiological differentiation of Streptomyces griseus, a streptomycin-producing strain. In solid cultures, aerial mycelium formation was severely suppressed by the presence of excess nutrients. However, decoyinine, a specific inhibitor of GMP synthetase, enabled the cells to develop aerial mycelia in the suppressed cultures at concentrations which only partially inhibited growth. A factor (2S-isocapryloyl-3S-hydroxymethyl-gamma-butyrolactone) added exogenously had no such effect. Decoyinine was also effective in initiating the formation of submerged spores in liquid culture. The ability to produce streptomycin did not increase but decreased drastically on the addition of decoyinine. This sharp decrease in streptomycin production was accompanied by a decrease in intracellular accumulation of ppGpp. A relaxed (rel) mutant was found among 25 thiopeptin-resistant isolates which developed spontaneously. The rel mutant had a severely reduced ability to accumulate ppGpp during a nutritional shift-down and also during postexponential growth and showed a less extensive decrease in the GTP pool than that in the rel+ parental strain. The rel mutant failed to induce the enzymes amidinotransferase and streptomycin kinase, which are essential for the biosynthesis of streptomycin. The abilities to form aerial mycelia and submerged spores were still retained, but the amounts were less, and for both the onset of development was markedly delayed. The decreased ability to produced submerged spores was largely restored by the addition of decoyinine. This was accompanied by an extensive GTP pool decrease. The rel mutant produced A factor normally, indicating that synthesis of A factor is controlled neither by ppGpp nor by GTP. Conversely, a mutant defective in A-factor synthesis accumulated

  12. Tandem duplications of a degenerated GTP-binding domain at the origin of GTPase receptors Toc159 and thylakoidal SRP

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez Torres, Jorge Maldonado, Monica Alexandra Arias; Chomilier, Jacques

    2007-12-14

    The evolutionary origin of some nuclear encoded proteins that translocate proteins across the chloroplast envelope remains unknown. Therefore, sequences of GTPase proteins constituting the Arabidopsis thaliana translocon at the outer membrane of chloroplast (atToc) complexes were analyzed by means of HCA. In particular, atToc159 and related proteins (atToc132, atToc120, and atToc90) do not have proven homologues of prokaryotic or eukaryotic ancestry. We established that the three domains commonly referred to as A, G, and M originate from the GTPase G domain, tandemly repeated, and probably evolving toward an unstructured conformation in the case of the A domain. It resulted from this study a putative common ancestor for these proteins and a new domain definition, in particular the splitting of A into three domains (A1, A2, and A3), has been proposed. The family of Toc159, previously containing A. thaliana and Pisum sativum, has been extended to Medicago truncatula and Populus trichocarpa and it has been revised for Oryza sativa. They have also been compared to GTPase subunits involved in the cpSRP system. A distant homology has been revealed among Toc and cpSRP GTP-hydrolyzing proteins of A. thaliana, and repetitions of a GTPase domain were also found in cpSRP protein receptors, by means of HCA analysis.

  13. A small nuclear GTP-binding protein from tomato suppresses a Schizosaccharomyces pombe cell-cycle mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Ach, R A; Gruissem, W

    1994-01-01

    Ran is a 25-kDa Ras-related nuclear GTP-binding protein which is very highly conserved in humans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Ran has been found to form a stable, noncovalent complex with the chromatin-associated protein RCC1, a negative regulator of mitosis. In Sch. pombe, a temperature-sensitive mutation in the RCC1 homolog encoded by the pim1 gene causes premature induction of mitosis, and this mutation can be suppressed by overexpression of the Ran homolog encoded by spi1. We report here the cloning of three Ran cDNAs from tomato. The Ran protein is very highly conserved among plants, animals, and fungi. In tomato, Ran mRNA is expressed in all tissues examined, even those with little or no cell division, indicating that Ran in plants may have functions other than just control of mitosis. We have found that the tomato Ran protein can direct a beta-glucuronidase reporter protein to the plant cell nucleus, confirming that Ran is a nuclear protein in plants. We show that the tomato Ran protein can suppress the Sch. pombe pim1 mutation, indicating that the tomato Ran protein and the Sch. pombe spi1 protein are functionally homologous. Images PMID:8016079

  14. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (GTP): Characterization of the human PCK1 gene and localization distal to MODY on chromosome 20

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, Chao Nan; Burgess, D.L.; Chamberlain, J.S.; Meisler, M.H. ); Keith, T.P.; Falls, K. )

    1993-06-01

    The human PCK 1 gene encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (GTP) (PEPCK) was isolated and sequenced. There is 91% amino acid sequence identity (567/622 residues) between the human and the rat proteins, with conservation of intron/exon borders. A polymorphic dinucleotide microsatellite with the structure (CA)[sub 16](TA)[sub 5](CA) was identified in the 3[prime] untranslated region of the cloned human PCK1 gene. This highly informative genetic marker has an estimated PIC value of 0.79 and heterozygosity of 0.81. Analysis of the RW pedigree demonstrated recombination between PCK1 and the MODY gene on chromosome 20. Multipoint linkage analysis of the reference pedigrees of the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain localized PCK1 on the genetic map of chromosome 20 at a position distal to markers that are closely linked to MODY. PCK1 is part of a conserved linkage group on mouse Chromosome 2 with identical gene order but expanded length in the human genome. 34ref., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Functional polymorphism of the GTP cyclohydrolase 1 gene affects the personality trait of novelty seeking in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sadahiro, Ryoichi; Suzuki, Akihito; Matsumoto, Yoshihiko; Shibuya, Naoshi; Enokido, Masanori; Kamata, Mitsuhiro; Goto, Kaoru; Otani, Koichi

    2011-10-10

    GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) is the initial and rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin, which is an essential cofactor for biosynthetic enzymes of dopamine, serotonin, and nitric oxide. In the present study, the association of functional polymorphism of the GCH1 gene (C+243T, rs841) with personality traits was examined in 902 healthy Japanese subjects. Personality traits were assessed by the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), and the GCH1 genotype was detected by a PCR-RFLP method. There were no significant main effects of the GCH1 genotype on the seven TCI dimension scores, but significant interaction effects between the GCH1 genotype and gender were found on the scores of novelty seeking. Post-hoc analysis revealed that males with the C/C genotype had higher scores of novelty seeking than those with the C/T genotype or those with the T/T genotype, while in females the scores of novelty seeking were not different among the genotype groups. The present study thus suggests that the C+243T polymorphism of the GCH1 gene affects the personality trait of novelty seeking in males.

  16. Assessment of the Activation of Rho Family GTP-Binding Proteins in Breast Cancer Cells and Specimens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-08-01

    cells by Na,K-ATPase. The mechanism by which the formation of tight junctions and desmosomes are regulated in polarized epithelial cells are not well...laboratory (UCLA), we have investigated the involvement of RhoA GTPase in Na,K-ATPase mediated assembly of tight junctions and desmosomes in MDCK cells...16). We found that an increased sodium level caused by the inhibition of Na,K-ATPase prevents the formation of tight junctions and desmosomes and

  17. Degradation of Internalized αvβ5 Integrin Is Controlled by uPAR Bound uPA: Effect on β1 Integrin Activity and α-SMA Stress Fiber Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingyan; Pedroja, Benjamin S.; Meyers, Erin E.; Garcia, Angelo L.; Twining, Sally S.; Bernstein, Audrey M.

    2012-01-01

    Myofibroblasts (Mfs) that persist in a healing wound promote extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation and excessive tissue contraction. Increased levels of integrin αvβ5 promote the Mf phenotype and other fibrotic markers. Previously we reported that maintaining uPA (urokinase plasminogen activator) bound to its cell-surface receptor, uPAR prevented TGFβ-induced Mf differentiation. We now demonstrate that uPA/uPAR controls integrin β5 protein levels and in turn, the Mf phenotype. When cell-surface uPA was increased, integrin β5 levels were reduced (61%). In contrast, when uPA/uPAR was silenced, integrin β5 total and cell-surface levels were increased (2–4 fold). Integrin β5 accumulation resulted from a significant decrease in β5 ubiquitination leading to a decrease in the degradation rate of internalized β5. uPA-silencing also induced α-SMA stress fiber organization in cells that were seeded on collagen, increased cell area (1.7 fold), and increased integrin β1 binding to the collagen matrix, with reduced activation of β1. Elevated cell-surface integrin β5 was necessary for these changes after uPA-silencing since blocking αvβ5 function reversed these effects. Our data support a novel mechanism by which downregulation of uPA/uPAR results in increased integrin αvβ5 cell-surface protein levels that regulate the activity of β1 integrins, promoting characteristics of the persistent Mf. PMID:22470492

  18. Ligand-bound structures of 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate 8-phosphate phosphatase from Moraxella catarrhalis reveal a water channel connecting to the active site for the second step of catalysis.

    PubMed

    Dhindwal, Sonali; Priyadarshini, Priyanka; Patil, Dipak N; Tapas, Satya; Kumar, Pramod; Tomar, Shailly; Kumar, Pravindra

    2015-02-01

    KdsC, the third enzyme of the 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid (KDO) biosynthetic pathway, catalyzes a substrate-specific reaction to hydrolyze 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate 8-phosphate to generate a molecule of KDO and phosphate. KdsC is a phosphatase that belongs to the C0 subfamily of the HAD superfamily. To understand the molecular basis for the substrate specificity of this tetrameric enzyme, the crystal structures of KdsC from Moraxella catarrhalis (Mc-KdsC) with several combinations of ligands, namely metal ion, citrate and products, were determined. Various transition states of the enzyme have been captured in these crystal forms. The ligand-free and ligand-bound crystal forms reveal that the binding of ligands does not cause any specific conformational changes in the active site. However, the electron-density maps clearly showed that the conformation of KDO as a substrate is different from the conformation adopted by KDO when it binds as a cleaved product. Furthermore, structural evidence for the existence of an intersubunit tunnel has been reported for the first time in the C0 subfamily of enzymes. A role for this tunnel in transferring water molecules from the interior of the tetrameric structure to the active-site cleft has been proposed. At the active site, water molecules are required for the formation of a water bridge that participates as a proton shuttle during the second step of the two-step phosphoryl-transfer reaction. In addition, as the KDO biosynthesis pathway is a potential antibacterial target, pharmacophore-based virtual screening was employed to identify inhibitor molecules for the Mc-KdsC enzyme.

  19. Distinct roles for the two Rho GDP/GTP exchange factor domains of kalirin in regulation of neurite growth and neuronal morphology.

    PubMed

    Penzes, P; Johnson, R C; Kambampati, V; Mains, R E; Eipper, B A

    2001-11-01

    The actin cytoskeleton, essential for neuronal development, is regulated in part by small GTP binding proteins of the Rho subfamily. Kalirin-9, with two Rho subfamily-specific GDP/GTP exchange factor (GEF) domains, localizes to neurites and growth cones of primary cortical neurons. Kalirin-9 overexpression in cultured cortical neurons induces longer neurites and altered neuronal morphology. Expression of the first GEF domain alone results in drastically shortened axons and excessive growth cones, mediated by Rac1. Expression of the second GEF domain alone induces axonal over-elongation and abundant filopodial neurites, mediated by RhoA. Coordination of the actions of the individual GEF domains through their presence in Kalirin-9, with its Sec14p, spectrin, and Src homology domain 3 motifs, is essential for regulating neurite extension and neuronal morphology.