Science.gov

Sample records for active hands-on inquiry

  1. Managing Hands-on Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossman, Alan D.

    1993-01-01

    Presents the following guidelines to consider before, during, and after hands-on inquiry: (1) plan and prepare; (2) create problem intrigue; (3) give students the responsibility of solving the problem; (4) offer feedback and guidance; (5) debrief; and (6) anticipate, prevent, monitor, and adapt. (PR)

  2. Teaching genetics using hands-on models, problem solving, and inquiry-based methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, Stephanie Ann

    Teaching genetics can be challenging because of the difficulty of the content and misconceptions students might hold. This thesis focused on using hands-on model activities, problem solving, and inquiry-based teaching/learning methods in order to increase student understanding in an introductory biology class in the area of genetics. Various activities using these three methods were implemented into the classes to address any misconceptions and increase student learning of the difficult concepts. The activities that were implemented were shown to be successful based on pre-post assessment score comparison. The students were assessed on the subjects of inheritance patterns, meiosis, and protein synthesis and demonstrated growth in all of the areas. It was found that hands-on models, problem solving, and inquiry-based activities were more successful in learning concepts in genetics and the students were more engaged than tradition styles of lecture.

  3. The effect of inquiry-based, hands-on labs on achievement in middle school science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Donna Kaye Green

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to measure the difference in science achievement between students who had been taught with an inquiry-based, hands-on pedagogical approach and those who had not. Improving student academic achievement and standardized test scores is the major objective of teachers, parents, school administrators, government entities, and students themselves. One major barrier to this academic success in Georgia, and the entire United States, has been the paucity of success in middle level science classes. Many studies have been conducted to determine the learning approaches that will best enable students to not only acquire a deeper understanding of science concepts, but to equip them to apply that new knowledge in their daily activities. Inquiry-based, hands-on learning involves students participating in activities that reflect methods of scientific investigation. The effective utilization of the inquiry-based learning approach demands inclusion of learners in a self-directed learning environment, the ability to think critically, and an understanding of how to reflect and reason scientifically. The treatment group using an inquiry-based, hands-on program did score slightly higher on the CRCT. However, the results revealed that there was not a significant difference in student achievement. This study showed that the traditionally instructed control group had slightly higher interest in science than the inquiry-based treatment group. The findings of this research study indicated that the NCLB mandates might need to be altered if there are no significant academic gains that result from the use of inquiry-based strategies.

  4. Inquiry-Based Learning Using Everyday Objects: Hands-On Instructional Strategies That Promote Active Learning in Grades 3-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarado, Amy Edmonds; Herr, Patricia R.

    This book explores the concept of using everyday objects as a process initiated both by students and teachers, encouraging growth in student observation, inquisitiveness, and reflection in learning. After "Introduction: Welcome to Inquiry-Based Learning using Everyday Objects (Object-Based Inquiry), there are nine chapters in two parts. Part 1,…

  5. A Study on Using Hands-On Science Inquiries to Promote the Geology Learning of Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Ching-San

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the geology learning performance of preservice teachers. A total of 31 sophomores (including 11 preservice teachers) from an educational university in Taiwan participated in this study. The course arrangements include class teaching and hands-on science inquiry activities. The study searches both quantitative and…

  6. Digging up your dirt. High school students combine small-scale respiration and soil carbon measurements with satellite imagery in hands-on inquiry activities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, K.; Throop, H.

    2015-12-01

    One of the greatest impacts on the global carbon cycle is changes in land use. Making this concept relevant and inquiry-based for high school students is challenging. Many are familiar with reconstructing paleo-climate from ice core data, but few have a connection to current climate research. Many students ask questions like 'What will our area be like in 20 years?' or 'How much does planting trees help?' while few have the scientific language to engage in a discussion to answer these questions. Our work connects students to climate change research in several ways: first, teacher Keska Kemper engaged in field research with Dr. Heather Throop creating a 'teacher in the field' perspective for students in the classroom. Dr. Throop met with Keska Kemper's students several times to develop an inquiry-based field study. Students predicted and then measured rates of respiration between different soil types in an urban park close to their school. Students then could compare their results from Portland, Oregon to Throop's work across a rain gradient in Australia. Discussions about percent tree cover and soil carbon helped students see connections between land use changes and changes in carbon cycling. Last, students examined satellite imagery to determine percent tree cover and numberss of trees to compare to soil carbon in the same region. Students were able to examine imagery over the last 30 years to visualize land use changes in the greater Portland area.

  7. Hands-On Science Mysteries for Grades 3-6: Standards-Based Inquiry Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taris, James Robert; Taris, Louis James

    2006-01-01

    In "Hands-On Science Mysteries for Grades 3-6," the authors connect science to real-world situations by investigating actual mysteries and phenomena, such as the strange heads on Easter Island, the ghost ship "Mary Celeste," and the "Dancing Stones" of Death Valley. The labs are designed to encourage the development of science inquiry, in which…

  8. Hands-On Activities and Their Influence on Students' Interest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holstermann, Nina; Grube, Dietmar; Bogeholz, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of hands-on activities on students' interest. We researched whether students with experience in specific hands-on activities show higher interest in these activities than students without experience. Furthermore, the relationship between the quality of the hands-on experience and interest in the respective…

  9. Natural Disasters Workshop Integrating Hands-On Activities, Internet-Based Data, and GIS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Melida; Coulter, Bob; Goodwin, David R.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a week-long "Mapping Natural Disasters" workshop offered to K-12 teachers to promote inquiry-based teaching approaches. The workshop modeled the integration of hands-on activities, internet-based data, and the use of geographic information systems (GIS) software. (Author/MM)

  10. Fifth Graders' Science Inquiry Abilities: A Comparative Study of Students in Hands-On and Textbook Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pine, Jerome; Aschbacher, Pamela; Roth, Ellen; Jones, Melanie; McPhee, Cameron; Martin, Catherine; Phelps, Scott; Kyle, Tara; Foley, Brian

    2006-01-01

    A large number of American elementary school students are now studying science using the hands-on inquiry curricula developed in the 1990s: Insights; Full Option Science System (FOSS); and Science and Technology for Children (STC). A goal of these programs, echoed in the "National Science Education Standards," is that children should gain…

  11. Fifth graders' science inquiry abilities: A comparative study of students in hands-on and textbook curricula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pine, Jerome; Aschbacher, Pamela; Roth, Ellen; Jones, Melanie; McPhee, Cameron; Martin, Catherine; Phelps, Scott; Kyle, Tara; Foley, Brian

    2006-05-01

    A large number of American elementary school students are now studying science using the hands-on inquiry curricula developed in the 1990s: Insights; Full Option Science System (FOSS); and Science and Technology for Children (STC). A goal of these programs, echoed in the National Science Education Standards, is that children should gain abilities to do scientific inquiry and understanding about scientific inquiry. We have studied the degree to which students can do inquiries by using four hands-on performance assessments, which required one or three class periods. To be fair, the assessments avoided content that is studied in depth in the hands-on programs. For a sample of about 1000 fifth grade students, we compared the performance of students in hands-on curricula with an equal number of students with textbook curricula. The students were from 41 classrooms in nine school districts. The results show little or no curricular effect. There was a strong dependence on students' cognitive ability, as measured with a standard multiple-choice instrument. There was no significant difference between boys and girls. Also, there was no difference on a multiple-choice test, which used items released from the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS). It is not completely clear whether the lack of difference on the performance assessments was a consequence of the assessments, the curricula, and/or the teaching.

  12. Blended Inquiry with Hands-On and Virtual Laboratories: The Role of Perceptual Features during Knowledge Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toth, Eva Erdosne; Ludvico, Lisa R.; Morrow, Becky L.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the characteristics of virtual and hands-on inquiry environments for the development of blended learning in a popular domain of bio-nanotechnology: the separation of different-sized DNA fragments using gel-electrophoresis, also known as DNA-fingerprinting. Since the latest scientific developments in nano- and micro-scale tools…

  13. Thinking with Hands-On Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conover, Patricia Ross

    2009-01-01

    The goal for library media specialists and teachers is to lead students to use technology to communicate, in a powerful and meaningful way, and to creatively display what they have learned. With these ideas in mind, this article details several projects using Microsoft PowerPoint XP. The activities, with simplified instructions, can be adapted to…

  14. Hands-On Environmental Education Activities for K-6 Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Donald G.; Eshbaugh, Stephen H.

    This environmental education workbook is aimed at helping kindergarten through 6th-grade teachers and contains hands-on activities directly targeted toward a particular age group, with equal distribution to each grade. Subject area descriptions and several multicultural activities are also included. Each activity lists the title, subject taught,…

  15. Fun with Hands-on Science Activities for Elementary Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Dana M.

    This document contains hands-on activities in science that make use of balloons and are fun and stimulating as well as challenging. By actively participating in these activities, students can develop science process and critical thinking skills as well as technical and measuring skills. Topics include Air as Matter, Pressure, Chemical Change,…

  16. Innovative Hands-on Activities for Middle School Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Dana M.

    This paper contains some hands-on activities that relate science to art and language arts. The focus is placed on middle schools and activities engage students in the discovery that chemicals are used to draw and color. Students also read and write poetry and literature that employ science-related topics. A number of spin-off activities are…

  17. Hands-On Activities for Integrating Geography across the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handley, Leslie Mills, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Describes ways to integrate geography into the curriculum of primary and intermediate grades. Suggests hands-on activities for teaching abstract concepts through concrete experiences. Includes two units: creating a global map of the earth and incorporating social studies into language arts and mathematics by using magnet cars on maps. (NL)

  18. Adapting a successful inquiry-based immersion program to create an Authentic, Hands- on, Field based Curriculum in Environmental Science at Barnard College

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenna, T. C.; Pfirman, S.; Mailloux, B. J.; Martin, S.; Kelsey, R.; Bower, P.

    2008-12-01

    Adapting a successful inquiry-based immersion program to create an Authentic, Hands-on, Field based Curriculum in Environmental Science at Barnard College T. C. Kenna, S. Pfirman, B. J. Mailloux, M. Stute, R. Kelsey, and P. Bower By adapting a successful inquiry-based immersion program (SEA semester) to the typical college format of classes, we are improving the technical and quantitative skills of undergraduate women and minorities in environmental science and improving their critical thinking and problem-solving by exposing our students to open-ended real-world environmental issues. Our approach uses the Hudson River Estuary as a natural laboratory. In a series of hands-on inquiry-based activities, students use advanced equipment to collect data and samples. Each class session introduces new analytical and data analysis techniques. All classes have the connecting theme of the river. Working with real data is open-ended. Our major findings as indicated by surveys as well as journaling throughout the semester are that the field- based experience significantly contributed to student learning and engagement. Journaling responses indicated that nearly all students discussed the importance and excitement of an authentic research experience. Some students were frustrated with data irregularities, uncertainty in methods and data, and the general challenge of a curriculum with inherent ambiguity. The majority were satisfied with the aims of the course to provide an integrative experience. All students demonstrated transfer of learned skills. This project has had a significant impact on our undergraduate female students: several students have pursued senior thesis projects stemming from grant activities, stating that the field activities were the highlight of their semester. Some students love the experience and want more. Others decide that they want to pursue a different career. All learn how science is conducted and have a better foundation to understand concepts such

  19. A comparison of hands-on inquiry instruction to lectureinstruction with special needs high school biology students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen-Ruopp, Helga Spitko

    A comparison of hands-on inquiry instruction with lecture instruction was presented to 134 Patterns and Process Biology students. Students participated in seven biology lessons that were selected from Biology Survey of Living Things (1992). A pre and post paper and pencil assessment was used as the data collecting instrument. The treatment group was taught using hands-on inquiry strategies while the non-treatment group was taught in the lecture method of instruction. The team teaching model was used as the mode of presentation to the treatment group and the non-treatment group. Achievement levels using specific criterion; novice (0% to 50%), developing proficiency (51% to 69%), accomplished (70% to 84) and exceptional or mastery level (85% to 100%) were used as a guideline to tabulate the results of the pre and post assessment. Rubric tabulation was done to interpret the testing results. The raw data was plotted using percentage change in test score totals versus reading level score by gender as well as percentage change in test score totals versus auditory vocabulary score by gender. Box Whisker plot comparative descriptive of individual pre and post test scores for the treatment and non-treatment group was performed. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) using MINITAB Statistical Software version 14.11 was run on data of the seven lessons, as well as on gender (male results individual and combined, and female results individual and combined) results. Normal Probability Plots for total scores as well as individual test scores were performed. The results suggest that hands-on inquiry based instruction when presented to special needs students including; at-risk; English as a second language limited, English proficiency and special education inclusive students' learning may enhance individual student achievement.

  20. Inquiry Science and Active Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandifer, Cody

    2011-01-01

    Pairing an inquiry lesson with a traditional reading activity creates a jarring philosophical mismatch between the interaction, deep thinking, and scientific reasoning that drives meaningful inquiry instruction and the "scan the text, copy the answers" response often obtained from elementary nonfiction readers. Realizing that there must be a…

  1. Designing and Implementing a Hands-On, Inquiry-Based Molecular Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regassa, Laura B.; Morrison-Shetlar, Alison I.

    2007-01-01

    Inquiry-based learning was used to enhance an undergraduate molecular biology course at Georgia Southern University, a primarily undergraduate institution in rural southeast Georgia. The goal was to use a long-term, in-class project to accelerate higher-order thinking, thereby enabling students to problem solve and apply their knowledge to novel…

  2. Hands-on astronomy activities for the elementary school

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, T.E.; Horne, J.C.

    1994-12-31

    We held a series of astronomy workshops for local school teachers using astronomy activities from a course we give for Elementary Education majors. The school teachers provide us with feedback about successes and failures. Then we try the revised activities in the classroom. Via this in-service and pre-service feedback, the astronomy laboratory activities in the course have been completely revised over the last three years. The activities we use are almost entirely hands-on. The activities include use of log book (or journal) for describing outside-of-class observations of sunsets, phases of the moon, portable sundial, and the somewhat unique method we use to teach the constellations. In addition, all laboratory activity records are kept in the log book. Laboratory activities cover the use of fists to measure degrees, constellations, phases of the moon, relative distances and size of planets, Invent an Alien, lenses, images and telescopes, and the making of a comet. In our poster, based roughly on the theme of the seasons, we will describe a portable, multi-user sundial, length of the day display using newspaper data, two temperature/season activities, and a model demonstration of why the sundial shadows behave as they do.

  3. Technology and Engineering Education Students' Perceptions of Hands-On and Hands-Off Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sianez, David M.; Fugere, Madeleine A.; Lennon, Carter A.

    2010-01-01

    Technology and engineering education students responded to a survey regarding hands-on and hands-off activities. First, the students listed hands-on and hands-off activities and what characterized the two types of activities. Activities such as building or assembling something as well as working manually with tools were viewed as hands-on. Passive…

  4. How can the curation of hands-on STEM activities power successful mobile apps and websites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porcello, D.; Peticolas, L. M.; Schwerin, T. G.

    2015-12-01

    The Lawrence Hall of Science (LHS) is University of California, Berkeley's public science center. Over the last decade, the Center for Technology Innovation at LHS has partnered with many institutions to establish a strong track record of developing successful technology solutions to support STEM teaching and learning within informal environments. Curation by subject-matter experts has been at the heart of many educational technology products from LHS and its partners that are directed at educators and families. This work includes: (1) popular digital libraries for inquiry-based activities at Howtosmile.org (NSF DRL #0735007) and NASA Earth and Space science education resources at NASAwavelength.org; and novel mobile apps like DIY Sun Science (NASA NNX10AE05G) and DIY Human Body (NIH 5R25OD010543) designed to scaffold exploration of STEM phenomena at home. Both NASA Wavelength and DIY Sun Science arose out of long-term collaborations with the Space Sciences Laboratory at UC Berkeley, Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES), and other NASA-funded organizations, in partnership with NASA through cooperative agreements. This session will review the development, formative evaluation, and usage metrics for these two Earth and Space science-themed educational technology products directly relevant to the AGU community. Questions reviewed by presenters will include: What makes a good hands-on activity, and what essential information do educators depend on when searching for programming additions? What content and connections do families need to explore hands-on activities? How can technology help incorporate educational standards into the discovery process for learning experiences online? How do all these components drive the design and user experience of websites and apps that showcase STEM content?

  5. Promoting Female Students' Learning Motivation towards Science by Exercising Hands-On Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wen-jin, Kuo; Chia-ju, Liu; Shi-an, Leou

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to design different hands-on science activities and investigate which activities could better promote female students' learning motivation towards science. This study conducted three types of science activities which contains nine hands-on activities, an experience scale and a learning motivation scale for data…

  6. Cultural Earth Science in Hawai`i: Hands-on Place-Based Investigations that Merge Traditional Knowledge with Earth Science Inquiry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moxey, L.; Dias, R. K.; Legaspi, E.

    2011-12-01

    During the summer of 2011, the Mālama Ke Ahupua`a (to care of our watershed) GEARUP summer program provided 25 under-served and under-represented minority public high school students (Hawaiian, part-Hawaiian, Filipino, Pacific Islanders) from Farrington High School (Kalihi, Honolulu) with a hands-on place-based multidiscipline course located within Manoa Valley (Ahupua`a O Kona) with the objective of engaging participants in scientific environmental investigations while exploring Hawaii's linkages between traditional knowledge, culture and science. The 4-week field program enabled students to collect samples along the perennial Manoa Stream and conduct water quality assessments throughout the Manoa watershed. Students collected science quality data from eight different sampling stations by means of field- and laboratory-based quantitative water quality testing equipment and GPS/GIS technology. While earning Hawaii DOE academic credits, students were able to document changes along the stream as related to pollution and urbanization. While conducting the various scientific investigations, students also participated in cultural fieldtrips and activities that highlighted the linkages between historical sustainable watershed uses by native Hawaiian communities, and their connections with natural earth processes. Additionally, students also participated in environmental service-learning projects that highlight the Hawaiian values of laulima (teamwork), mālama (to care for), and imi `ike (to seek knowledge). By contextualizing and merging hands-on place-based earth science inquiry with native Hawaiian traditional knowledge, students experienced the natural-cultural significance of their ahupua`a (watershed). This highlighted the advantages for promoting environmental literacy and geoscience education to under-served and under-represented minority populations in Hawaii from a rich native Hawaiian cultural framework.

  7. Art Activities for All Ages. Hands-On Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, Yvonne Y.

    This book explores the art heritage of Sub-Saharan Africa with projects (n=40) and activities (n=15) featuring African animals. Artifacts from museums and private collections have inspired the activity choices in the book, and an effort has been made to present fresh and new ideas, not always found in most activity books on diversity. As with all…

  8. Hands-On Environmental Science Activities. Teacher's Edition. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutscher, Eugene

    The ability of students to go beyond facts and to think critically, while at the same time enjoying and valuing the learning process, is fundamental to science and environmentalism. This book provides enrichment activities for the science curriculum that provide concrete connections with important world events. Each activity is self-contained and…

  9. Deserts: Information and Hands-On Activities. Interactive Geography Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard, Robin

    This book is designed to introduce students to a variety of fascinating desert ecosystems through a series of learning activities including games, graphs, experiments, and crafts. Each section contains an information section along with student activities and worksheets. The section topics are sand, scorpions, and snow; scenic sculpture; desert…

  10. Do Hands-On, Technology-Based Activities Enhance Learning by Reinforcing Cognitive Knowledge and Retention?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korwin, Anthony R.; Jones, Ronald E.

    1990-01-01

    The geodesic dome concept was presented to 25 eighth graders through reading and a hands-on group assignment and to 25 via reading and lecture. Pre/posttest results showed that organized hands-on activities increased learning and retention of technological concepts. (SK)

  11. Small Wonders. Hands-On Science Activities for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perdue, Peggy K.

    Children are natural scientists and are constantly questioning and challenging the world around them. This book is designed to help preschool and primary teachers see the science in common things. It is a book of manipulative activities that are designed to nurture a child's natural curiosity as well as integrate science with other areas.…

  12. The Timber Wolf: Hands-On Activities for Elementary Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Donald G.; Oh, Bobbie S.

    The focus of this manual is the timber wolf and its experience in the United States. The activities are designed to enable students to gain a factual understanding of the timber wolf, question any misinformation they have learned regarding wolves, and learn to appreciate the wolf as a creature of nature rather than fear it as a creature of fairy…

  13. One Key LOGO and Hands-On Activity Cards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friesen, Chuck; And Others

    Developed to assist primary school teachers who wish to implement LOGO and One-Key LOGO (OKL) in their schools, this document consists of a LOGO resource manual and 92 color-coded activity cards designed to guide a pre-reader or primary child through a series of problem solving steps. After a brief introduction, which contains computer terminology…

  14. The Art and Science Connection: Hands-on Activities for Intermediate Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolley, Kimberley

    Most people think that the artist and the scientist live in two totally different worlds. However, art and science are only two different ways of understanding and knowing the world. To help intermediate students make a connection between art and science, a collection of hands-on activities have been developed. By engaging in these activities that…

  15. The Art and Science Connection. Hands-On Activities for Primary Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolley, Kimberley

    Most people think that the artist and the scientist live in two totally different worlds. However, art and science are only two different ways of understanding and knowing the world. To help primary students make a connection between art and science, a collection of hands-on activities have been developed. By engaging in these activities that…

  16. Pi in the Sky: Hands-on Mathematical Activities for Teaching Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pethoud, Robert

    This book of activities was designed to provide students with the opportunity to create mental models of concepts in astronomy while using simple, homemade tools. In addition, these sequential, hands-on activities are to help students see how scientific knowledge is obtained. The introduction describes the rationale for the book and describes the…

  17. A Hands-On Activity Incorporating the Threefold Representation on Limiting Reactant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonza´lez-Sa´nchez, Ange´lica M.; Ortiz-Nieves, Edgardo L.; Medina, Zuleikra

    2014-01-01

    Many students share the common belief that the limiting reactant in a chemical reaction is the reactant in the smallest quantity of material. To help students overcome this difficulty a hands-on activity for the limiting reactant concept was developed. The activity incorporates the three levels of representation (macroscopic, submicroscopic, and…

  18. Alignment of Hands-On STEM Engagement Activities with Positive STEM Dispositions in Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Rhonda; Knezek, Gerald; Tyler-Wood, Tandra

    2015-01-01

    This study examines positive dispositions reported by middle school and high school students participating in programs that feature STEM-related activities. Middle school students participating in school-to-home hands-on energy monitoring activities are compared to middle school and high school students in a different project taking part in…

  19. Of Heart & Kidneys: Hands-On Activities for Demonstrating Organ Function & Repair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kao, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in teaching organ development and disease is deconstructing a complex choreography of molecular and cellular changes over time into a linear stepwise process for students. As an entry toward learning developmental concepts, I propose two inexpensive hands-on activities to help facilitate learning of (1) how to identify defects in…

  20. Teaching the Common Core Math Standards with Hands-On Activities, Grades 6-8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muschla, Judith A.; Muschla, Gary Robert; Muschla, Erin

    2012-01-01

    The new Common Core State Standards for Mathematics have been formulated to provide students with instruction that will help them acquire a thorough knowledge of math at their grade level, which will in turn enable them to move on to higher mathematics with competence and confidence. "Hands-on Activities for Teaching the Common Core Math…

  1. Witness to History: Using Hands-On Activities, A Guidebook for High School History Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metzler, Suzanne

    This guidebook is intended to help high school students discover the connection between themselves and the people from the past by being engaged in hands-on activities. The guidebook allows students to create artifacts or recreate a process known well to people from times past. The guide is arranged to provide historical background, materials…

  2. Got Inquiry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Daniel J.; Olson, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    Many elementary teachers encounter science lessons with a hands-on component that requires very little engaged thinking by the students. The good news is that any teacher can create successful minds-on inquiry opportunities by adding key instructional strategies to a typical "cookbook" activity. The authors discuss some of these strategies using a…

  3. Active Inquiry, Web-based Oceanography Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckels-Martin, Ellen E.; Howell, Paul D.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses using web sites to develop active inquiry lessons that mimic some of the tasks and thought processes scientists use everyday. The exercises available at the web sites are designed to develop science process skills and convey basic course content. Exercises stress the interactions between the ocean and the atmosphere. (Author/SAH)

  4. Developing Web Literacy in Collaborative Inquiry Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuiper, Els; Volman, Monique; Terwel, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Although many children are technically skilled in using the Web, their competences to use it in a critical and meaningful way are usually less well developed. In this article, we report on a multiple case study focusing on the possibilities and limitations of collaborative inquiry activities as an appropriate context to acquire Web literacy skills…

  5. Informal Activities with Lasers, Lights, and Lenses: The Hands-On Optics Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompea, S. M.; Sparks, C. E.; Sparks, R. T.

    2005-12-01

    The Hands-On Optics project began as a follow-up to the 2001 NSF planning grant "Optics Education -- A Blueprint for the 21st Century", which described the value of informal science programs in addressing the disconnect between the ubiquity of optics in everyday life and the noticeable absence of optics education in K-12 curricula and in informal science education programs. Key partners in the project are NOAO, SPIE-The International Society for Optical Engineering, and the Optical Society of America (OSA). The informal instructional materials created by the project are distributed through science centers nationwide and through the Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement Program (MESA) in a number of states, including Arizona, California, Washington, and Maryland. A key part of the project is the involvement, modeled after Project ASTRO, of optics professionals currently engaged in outreach activities and programs. Optics professionals (termed optics resource volunteers) are teamed with MESA and science center educators in implementing the program. These hands-on, high-interest, standards-connected activities and materials provide 6, three-hour-long optics activity modules that can be used in a variety of informal settings. We will describe the techniques used at NOAO to train educators, parents, and optics professionals who will work with the HOO activities as well as the different approaches needed for different informal education programs, ranging from Saturday programs, after-school programs, and science center programs. NOAO is developing the six modules and associated kits as well as competitions that have broad appeal to 12-year olds. Hands-On Optics: Making an Impact with Light (HOO) is a collaborative NSF-funded four-year informal science education program to excite students about science by actively engaging them in optics activities. NOAO is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc. under cooperative

  6. Pupil Inquiry Behavior Analysis and Change Activity. Interim Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manion, Raymond C.

    This interim report discusses progress toward three major goals of the Pupil Inquiry Behavior Analysis and Change Activity: increased pupil inquiry, changed teacher behavior to facilitate pupil inquiry, and the development of a 32-week course of instruction to provide for these behavioral changes. Data currently available deals with the emotional…

  7. Effectiveness of Hands-on and Minds-on Activities on Students' Achievement and Attitudes towards Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ates, Ozlem; Eryilmaz, Ali

    2011-01-01

    This research aimed to investigate the effectiveness of hands-on and minds-on activities on ninth grade students' achievement in and attitudes towards simple electric circuits. The study was conducted with 130 students, 70 of which were assigned as experimental group and instructed by hands-on/minds-on activities, while the 60 were assigned as…

  8. Alignment of Hands-on STEM Engagement Activities with Positive STEM Dispositions in Secondary School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Rhonda; Knezek, Gerald; Tyler-Wood, Tandra

    2015-12-01

    This study examines positive dispositions reported by middle school and high school students participating in programs that feature STEM-related activities. Middle school students participating in school-to-home hands-on energy monitoring activities are compared to middle school and high school students in a different project taking part in activities such as an after-school robotics program. Both groups are compared and contrasted with a third group of high school students admitted at the eleventh grade to an academy of mathematics and science. All students were assessed using the same science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) dispositions instrument. Findings indicate that the after-school group whose participants self-selected STEM engagement activities, and the self-selected academy of mathematics and science group, each had highly positive STEM dispositions comparable to those of STEM professionals, while a subset of the middle school whole-classroom energy monitoring group that reported high interest in STEM as a career, also possessed highly positive STEM dispositions comparable to the STEM Professionals group. The authors conclude that several different kinds of hands-on STEM engagement activities are likely to foster or maintain positive STEM dispositions at the middle school and high school levels, and that these highly positive levels of dispositions can be viewed as a target toward which projects seeking to interest mainstream secondary students in STEM majors in college and STEM careers, can hope to aspire. Gender findings regarding STEM dispositions are also reported for these groups.

  9. Hands-On Astrophysics, 680 Hands at a Time: Lab Activities in Big Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipman, H.

    1996-12-01

    In brief: it is possible to have students do experiments in very large lecture classes. Evaluations show it works. Hands-on science, while traditional in many other disciplines, has not played a large role in astronomy teaching, though many of the concepts we deal with such as heat and pressure can be explored with simple experiments. 340 students in a large lecture class did an experiment with drink bottles, ice, warm water, and baggies to explore the dependence of pressure on temperature. They worked together in approximately 100 groups, working through a teaching sequence which included both a classic demonstration done by the instructor and a hands-on activity where they did the experiment themselves. This activity was carried out in a rather challenging setting: a large lecture room with fixed seats and no plumbing. Handling and disposing of the materials was only modestly more challenging than teaching a regular class. Student evaluations and student performance on exam questions demonstrated that the activity was successful. This research was part of DISCUS (Delaware Innovative Science/Math Collaborative for Undergraduate Success), an initiative supported by the Delaware Department of Public Instruction and the National Science Foundation (DUE-9553787).

  10. Hands-on Activities versus Worksheets in Reinforcing Physical Science Principles: Effects on Student Achievement and Attitude.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Donald M.; Wardlow, George W.; Franklin, Timothy D.

    1997-01-01

    A group of 132 agricultural science students were divided into an experimental group who completed hands-on activities on Ohm's Law and incline plane and a control group who completed worksheets. There were no significant differences in immediate or follow-up measures of achievement. Hands-on students had significantly more positive attitudes. (SK)

  11. Future Directions of Inquiry in Adapted Physical Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Greg

    2000-01-01

    Sketches some future trends of inquiry in adapted physical activity. These include investigation into ethics in adapted physical activity. Empirically based issues of inquiry include physical activity as a dependent measure, diverse and changing populations, theoretical and applied research, nomothetic and idiographic research perspectives,…

  12. Activity systems in the inquiry classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortham, Donald William

    Inquiry science, as called for by reform-minded organizations such as the National Research Council (1996), offers a platform with the potential for introducing all students to the practice of science while maintaining focus on key concepts and theories. This project followed two small groups as they completed an inquiry unit on genetics at a Midwestern high school. I investigated whether levels of student-to-teacher, student-to-student, student-apparatus, and student-concept connections were approximately equal across all students in each of the two groups. I found differences among students in levels of student-to-teacher, student-to-student, and student-concept connections. From a situated idiopathic perspective, these differences may indicate different levels of opportunity-to-learn. At a more abstract (nomothetic) level, these differences may be due to emergent divisions of labor (roles) within the two groups. From the perspective of Activity Theory (Leont'ev, 1978; Engestrom, 1987), roles serve as important mediators that simultaneously allow the social unit to accomplish its objectives, while shaping the development of participants. I describe three roles that capture modes of participation for students interacting in the small groups, and that may contribute to what Engestrom (2001) calls subject-producing activity systems: networked contributor, social member, and isolate. This paper also describes tools for teachers and researchers to use in identifying levels of mediation and roles as they occur in small groups.

  13. A Guided Inquiry Activity for Teaching Ligand Field Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Brian J.; Graham, Kate J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe a guided inquiry activity for teaching ligand field theory. Previous research suggests the guided inquiry approach is highly effective for student learning. This activity familiarizes students with the key concepts of molecular orbital theory applied to coordination complexes. Students will learn to identify factors that…

  14. `Didn't Get Expected Answer, Rectify It.': Teaching science content in an elementary science classroom using hands-on activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Aik-Ling; Wong, Hwei-Ming

    2012-01-01

    The call for inquiry science to be a part of the school science curriculum is popular in many parts of the world. While some research in this area revealed success stories of students' learning when they are engaged in student-directed, open-ended scientific inquiry activities, others are more sceptical about how these activities impact students' learning in and of science. Using the microanalysis of classroom talk in a grade-six science classroom dealing with the conversion of energy, we illustrate the dilemma in communicative approach used by a teacher when using an inductive hands-on activity to teach canonical science content. We unravel the complexity between dialogic-authoritative approaches in establishing learning as well as the need to fulfil the teaching purposes set for each lesson. Here we illustrate how the use of fine grain analysis of classroom talk and interaction can reveal the details of classroom learning, such as mismatch of teaching purposes and adopting appropriate approach to fulfil the intended teaching purpose.

  15. Development of Pupils' Transfer Skills by Means of Hands On Activities with Artisan Materials in Natural Sciences Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciascai, Liliana; Chicinas, Luminita

    2008-01-01

    Hands on activities with artisan materials used in order to realize different practical devices helpful in learning process are one of the most frequently used activity in science classes. Usually, the main strength of these activities are: a deeper learning, an increased motivation of pupils for actively learning and development of practical…

  16. The Geography of Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Hands-On! Developing Active Learning Modules on the Human Dimensions of Global Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liverman, Diana; Solem, Michael

    This learning module aims to engage students in problem solving, critical thinking, scientific inquiry, and cooperative learning. The module is appropriate for use in any introductory or intermediate undergraduate course that focuses on human-environment relationships. The module examines the geography of human activities that produce the major…

  17. The Healthy Heart Race: A Short-Duration, Hands-on Activity in Cardiovascular Physiology for Museums and Science Festivals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pressley, Thomas A.; Limson, Melvin; Byse, Miranda; Matyas, Marsha Lakes

    2011-01-01

    The "Healthy Heart Race" activity provides a hands-on demonstration of cardiovascular function suitable for lay audiences. It was field tested during the United States of America Science and Engineering Festival held in Washington, DC, in October 2010. The basic equipment for the activity consisted of lengths of plastic tubing, a hand pump,…

  18. Do Predators Always Win? Starfish versus Limpets: A Hands-On Activity Examining Predator-Prey Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faria, Claudia; Boaventura, Diana; Galvao, Cecilia; Chagas, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    In this article we propose a hands-on experimental activity about predator-prey interactions that can be performed both in a research laboratory and in the classroom. The activity, which engages students in a real scientific experiment, can be explored not only to improve students' understanding about the diversity of anti-predator behaviors but…

  19. Rain Forest: The Latest Information and Hands-on Activities To Explore Animals, Plants, and Geography. Grades 2-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard, Robin

    This book contains information and activities to help make the study of rainforests an exciting exploration for teachers and students. Students explore the animals, plants, and geography of the rainforest by completing hands-on activities from various disciplines. This book contains five units: (1) "Living Layers"; (2) "Animals, Animals, Animals";…

  20. Quantum Mechanics for Everyone: Hands-On Activities Integrated with Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zollman, Dean A.; Rebello, N. Sanjay; Hogg, Kirsten

    2002-01-01

    Explains a hands-on approach to teaching quantum mechanics that challenges the belief shared by many physics instructors that quantum mechanics is a very abstract subject that cannot be understood until students have learned much of the classical physics. (Contains 23 references.) (Author/YDS)

  1. Place-Based Investigations and Authentic Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarkar, Somnath; Frazier, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Although many science students perform hands-on activities as inquiry exercises, such activities sometimes remain disconnected in the student's mind and fail to nurture a deeper understanding of methods of science and the role these methods play in scientific inquiry. Students may be able to reiterate the steps of the standard "scientific method"…

  2. An Educational Device for a Hands-on Activity to Visualize the Effect of Atherosclerosis on Blood Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Almeida, J. P. P. G. L.; de Lima, J. L. M. P.

    2013-01-01

    An educational device was created to develop a hands-on activity to illustrate how atherosclerosis can dramatically reduce blood flow in human vessels. The device was conceived, designed, and built at the University of Coimbra, in response to a request from the Exploratorio Infante D. Henrique Science Centre Museum, where it is presently…

  3. Square Wheels and Other Easy-To-Build Hands-On Science Activities. An Exploratorium Science Snackbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathjen, Don; Doherty, Paul

    This book, part of The Exploratorium science "snackbook" series, explains science with a hands-on approach. Activities include: (1) "3-D Shadow"; (2) "Bits and Bytes"; (3) "Circuit Workbench"; (4) "Diamagnetic Repulsion"; (5) "Film Can Racer"; (6) "Fractal Patterns"; (7) "Hoop Nightmares"; (8) "Hydraulic Arm"; (9) "Hyperbolic Slot"; (10) "Light…

  4. Using a Hands-On Hydrogen Peroxide Decomposition Activity to Teach Catalysis Concepts to K-12 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cybulskis, Viktor J.; Ribeiro, Fabio H.; Gounder, Rajamani

    2016-01-01

    A versatile and transportable laboratory apparatus was developed for middle and high school (6th-12th grade) students as part of a hands-on outreach activity to estimate catalytic rates of hydrogen peroxide decomposition from oxygen evolution rates measured by using a volumetric displacement method. The apparatus was constructed with inherent…

  5. The Use of Molecular Modeling as "Pseudoexperimental" Data for Teaching VSEPR as a Hands-On General Chemistry Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Christopher B.; Vandehoef, Crissie; Cook, Allison

    2015-01-01

    A hands-on activity appropriate for first-semester general chemistry students is presented that combines traditional VSEPR methods of predicting molecular geometries with introductory use of molecular modeling. Students analyze a series of previously calculated output files consisting of several molecules each in various geometries. Each structure…

  6. Learning about Modes in Atomic Force Microscopy by Means of Hands-On Activities Based on a Simple Apparatus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phuapaiboon, Unchada; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Osotchan, Tanakorn

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the results of using a low-cost hands-on setup in combination with accompanying activities to promote understanding of the contact mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM). This contact mode setup enabled learners to study how AFM works by hand scanning using probing cantilevers with different characteristics on…

  7. Science Action Labs Part 3: Puzzlers. An Innovative Collection of Hands-On Science Activities and Labs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shevick, Ed

    This book contains hands-on science laboratory activities for grades 4 through 9 that use discrepant events to challenge students. All of the "puzzlers" are based upon science principles and include directions for building gadgets that explain the "puzzlers." Topics covered include: volume conservation, magnetic phenomena, optical illusions,…

  8. Teaching Astronomy with an Inquiry Activity on Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafelski, M.; Foley, M.; Graves, G. J.; Kretke, K. A.; Mills, E.; Nassir, M.; Patel, S.

    2010-12-01

    We describe a new inquiry design aimed at teaching advanced high-school to senior college students the basics of stellar populations. The inquiry is designed to have students come up with their own version of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram as a tool to understand how stars evolve based on their color, mass, and luminosity. The inquiry makes use of pictures and spectra of stars, which the students analyze and interpret to answer the questions they come up with at the beginning. The students undergo a similar experience to real astronomers, using the same tools and methods to figure out the phenomena they are trying to understand. Specifically, they use images and spectra of stars, and organize the data via tables and plots to find trends that will then enable them to answer their questions. The inquiry also includes a "thinking tool" to help connect the trends students observe to the larger picture of stellar evolution. We include a description of the goals of the inquiry, the activity description, the motivations and thoughts that went into the design of the inquiry, and reflections on how the inquiry activity worked in practice.

  9. Hands On Earth Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisgarber, Sherry L.; Van Doren, Lisa; Hackathorn, Merrianne; Hannibal, Joseph T.; Hansgen, Richard

    This publication is a collection of 13 hands-on activities that focus on earth science-related activities and involve students in learning about growing crystals, tectonics, fossils, rock and minerals, modeling Ohio geology, geologic time, determining true north, and constructing scale-models of the Earth-moon system. Each activity contains…

  10. The European Hands-On Universe project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferlet, Roger

    The EU-HOU project aims at participating in solving the major challenge of inspiring and exciting students toward science and technology. By adopting inquiry-based science education (IBSE) techniques and new technologies, EU-HOU is promoting more attractive and innovative hands-on activities on-line and in the classroom, with astronomy and space science as the over-arching theme. The expertise of EU-HOU in producing IBSE resources and in training secondary science school teachers has been awarded a silver medal of the European Commission.

  11. "Didn't Get Expected Answer, Rectify It." Teaching Science Content in an Elementary Science Classroom Using Hands-On Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Aik-Ling; Wong, Hwei-Ming

    2012-01-01

    The call for inquiry science to be a part of the school science curriculum is popular in many parts of the world. While some research in this area revealed success stories of students' learning when they are engaged in student-directed, open-ended scientific inquiry activities, others are more sceptical about how these activities impact students'…

  12. Hands-on Herps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Activities, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Presents a hands-on activity to help primary, intermediate, and advanced students learn about and compare the general characteristics of reptiles and amphibians. Suggests "herp stations" to provide experiences. Details materials, background and procedures necessary for using this activity. (CW)

  13. Hands-On Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we discuss manipulatives and hands-on investigations for Calculus involving volume, arc length, and surface area to motivate and develop formulae which can then be verified using techniques of integration. Pre-service teachers in calculus courses using these activities experience a classroom in which active learning is encouraged and…

  14. Progress of Systematic Hands on Devices for Active Learning Methods by Visualizing ICT Tools in Physics with Milliseconds Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Akizo; Okiharu, Fumiko

    We are developing various systematic hands on devices for progress of active learning (AL) to improve students' conceptual understanding in physics laws. We are promoting AL methods in physics education for getting deeper conceptual understanding by using various ICT-based hands on devices and using visualizing ICT tools with milliseconds resolution. Here we investigate AL modules on collisions of big balloon pendulum with another known mass pendulum to get directly the air mass in the big balloon. We also discuss on Newton's laws of blowgun darts systems by using tapioca straws where we get definite works and energy just proportional to the length of the pipes of connected tapioca straws. These AL plans by using modules of big balloon system and blowgun-darts system are shown to be very effective for deeper conceptual understanding of Newton's Laws in almost frictionless worlds.

  15. Hands-On Hydrology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Catherine E.; Monroe, Louise Nelson

    2004-01-01

    A professional school and university collaboration enables elementary students and their teachers to explore hydrology concepts and realize the beneficial functions of wetlands. Hands-on experiences involve young students in determining water quality at field sites after laying the groundwork with activities related to the hydrologic cycle,…

  16. Hands-on Humidity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankiewicz, Philip R.

    1992-01-01

    Presents five hands-on activities that allow students to detect, measure, reduce, and eliminate moisture. Students make a humidity detector and a hygrometer, examine the effects of moisture on different substances, calculate the percent of water in a given food, and examine the absorption potential of different desiccants. (MDH)

  17. Calculator-Controlled Robots: Hands-On Mathematics and Science Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuchscherer, Tyson

    2010-01-01

    The Calculator Controlled Robots activities are designed to engage students in hands-on inquiry-based missions. These activities address National science and technology standards, as well as specifically focusing on mathematics content and process standards. There are ten missions and three exploration extensions that provide activities for up to…

  18. Seeing the Moon: A Series of Inquiry Activities Using Light to Investigate the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shupla, Christine; Runyon, C.; Shipp, S.; Tremain, A. H.

    2007-12-01

    Seeing the Moon: Using Light to Investigate the Moon is a series of educational activity modules created for the Moon Mineralogy Mapper instrument aboard the Chandrayaan-1. In these modules, classroom students investigate light and the geologic history of the Moon. Through the hands-on inquiry based activities, 5th to 8th grade students experiment with light and color, collect and analyze authentic data from rock samples using an ALTA reflectance spectrometer, map the rock types of the Moon, and develop theories of the Moon's history. This poster will describe the activities and share the location of the modules. This poster will also share information on the availability of loaner kits which including rock samples and sets of the ALTA reflectance spectrometer.

  19. Hands-On Life Science Activities for Middle Schools. Teacher's Edition. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Barbara; Kramer, Stephanie

    This book provides 50 enrichment activities for the science curriculum that provide concrete connections with important world events. Each activity is self-contained and provides everything the student needs to gain a basic understanding of a concept or to work through a project. The activities include innovative and traditional projects for both…

  20. Kidspiration[R] for Inquiry-Centered Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Edward L., Jr.; Baggett, Paige V.; Salyer, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Computer technology can be integrated into science inquiry activities to increase student motivation and enhance and expand scientific thinking. Fifth-grade students used the visual thinking tools in the Kidspiration[R] software program to generate and represent a web of hypotheses around the question, "What affects the distance a marble rolls?"…

  1. A Model Approach to the Electrochemical Cell: An Inquiry Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Deanna M.; Pentecost, Thomas C.

    2011-01-01

    In an attempt to address some student misconceptions in electrochemistry, this guided-inquiry laboratory was devised to give students an opportunity to use a manipulative that simulates the particulate-level activity within an electrochemical cell, in addition to using an actual electrochemical cell. Students are led through a review of expected…

  2. A Hands-On Activity to Introduce the Effects of Transmission by an Invasive Species

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Barbara Jean

    2013-01-01

    This activity engages students to better understand the impact of transmission by invasive species. Using dice, poker chips, and paper plates, an entire class mimics the spread of an invasive species within a geographic region. The activity can be modified and conducted at the K-16 levels.

  3. Planet Chemistry. Hands-on Activities for Kids from All Planets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Michael, Ed.

    This publication issues a challenge to students to collect data in a nationwide analysis of water hardness. Background information on the chemistry of hard water is presented using a cartoon format, and each of the four activities contains an explanation about the chemistry illustrated in the activity. The effect of hard water on soap, the effect…

  4. The Impact of Hands-On-Approach on Student Academic Performance in Basic Science and Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekwueme, Cecilia O.; Ekon, Esther E.; Ezenwa-Nebife, Dorothy C.

    2015-01-01

    Children can learn mathematics and sciences effectively even before being exposed to formal school curriculum if basic Mathematics and Sciences concepts are communicated to them early using activity oriented (Hands-on) method of teaching. Mathematics and Science are practical and activity oriented and can best be learnt through inquiry (Okebukola…

  5. How-to-Do-It: Hands-on Activities that Relate Mendelian Genetics to Cell Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKean, Heather R.; Gibson, Linda S.

    1989-01-01

    Presented is an activity designed to connect Mendelian laws with the physical processes of cell division. Included are materials production, procedures and worksheets for the meiosis-mitosis game and a genetics game. (CW)

  6. Glimpses of Science: Multimedia-Enhanced Hands-On Activities for Primary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatsidimitris, George; Connor, Rick; Ginges, Jacinda; Wolfe, Joe

    2010-01-01

    "Glimpses of Science" is the outcome of collaboration between the University of New South Wales and four primary schools in the Sydney metropolitan region. A prototype kit on the topic of sound was developed and demonstrated by the team. This kit formed the basis for further science activities to be designed and produced in conjunction with the…

  7. An Evaluation of Two Hands-On Lab Styles for Plant Biodiversity in Undergraduate Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basey, John M.; Maines, Anastasia P.; Francis, Clinton D.; Melbourne, Brett

    2014-01-01

    We compared learning cycle and expository formats for teaching about plant biodiversity in an inquiry-oriented university biology lab class (n = 465). Both formats had preparatory lab activities, a hands-on lab, and a postlab with reflection and argumentation. Learning was assessed with a lab report, a practical quiz in lab, and a multiple-choice…

  8. The healthy heart race: a short-duration, hands-on activity in cardiovascular physiology for museums and science festivals.

    PubMed

    Pressley, Thomas A; Limson, Melvin; Byse, Miranda; Matyas, Marsha Lakes

    2011-09-01

    The "Healthy Heart Race" activity provides a hands-on demonstration of cardiovascular function suitable for lay audiences. It was field tested during the United States of America Science and Engineering Festival held in Washington, DC, in October 2010. The basic equipment for the activity consisted of lengths of plastic tubing, a hand pump, collection containers, clamps, and simulated blood prepared by tinting water with red food coloring. Student participants were first asked to experience the effort required to pump through an unaltered tube. A presenter then applied a strong clamp that pinched each tube downstream from the pump, and students were asked to pump against the increased resistance. The students' observations were then used as the basis for discussions of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease with the presenters. Distribution of informative postcards during the 2 days of the festival indicated that at least 2,500 students completed the Healthy Heart Race activity. Our experiences to date suggest that the Healthy Heart Race activity can be accomplished effectively in the high-volume, high-distraction environment of a science fair or museum.

  9. Folding Inquiry into Cookbook Lab Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gooding, Julia; Metz, Bill

    2012-01-01

    Cookbook labs have been a part of science programs for years, even though they serve little purpose other than to verify phenomena that have been previously presented by means other than through investigations. Cookbook science activities follow a linear path to a known outcome, telling students what procedures to follow, which materials to use,…

  10. Could hands-on activities and smartphone in science CLIL teaching foster motivation and positive attitudes in students?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercolino, Immacolata; Maraffi, Sabina; Sacerdoti, Francesco M.

    2016-04-01

    Motivating students is one of the most challenging things we do as educators. We know that students need to be engaged to fully appreciate and learn what has been taught; the secret consists in nurturing student engagement. One of the newer ways to involve students and foster motivation in their Science learning consists in focusing on their usage and on applying knowledge and skills in their real-life. Students usually are engaged in authentic teaching pathway. Learning focusing on the experience helps teachers to improve classroom management by gathering students around a common organized activity. Hands-on activities support problem-based approaches to learning by focusing on the experience and process of investigating, proposing and creating solutions developing critical thinking skills and enlarge student's scientific glossary. We utilized in our classroom some lab activities that we learned at an ESA/GTTP Teacher training Workshop 2014 program at the Lorentz Center Leiden, Netherlands. "Cooking a comet - Ingredients for life" "Demonstration of the second Kepler's law using marbles" New media equipment, as student's own smartphones, can increase the teaching impact speaking the same language used by the students every day. They can measure magnetic fields, their GPS coordinates (longitude and latitude), and so on. In this way we can measure distances as parallax using mobile devices and simulating distance measurements in the classroom, on the school campus. The smartphone is the device with which the students answer questions, take decisions, and solve quests. Students infact can observe the Universe from their classroom and scientifically they can watch the Sun with "Google sky map" or "Star walk" are excellent tools to learn your way around the night sky .As teachers we used these apps in the classroom when Sun goes through the constellations so our students don't believe in horoscopes. This paper is focused on hands on activities and the effects of the

  11. What's Up in the Atmosphere? Exploring How Aerosols Impact Sky Color Through Hands-on Activities with Elementary GLOBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damadeo, K.; Taylor, J.

    2015-12-01

    What color is the sky today? The GLOBE Kids - Anita, Simon, and Dennis want to know why the sky isn't always the same shade of blue and sometimes isn't even blue. Through the new Elementary GLOBE Aerosols Storybook and Learning Activities, the GLOBE Kids learn that there's a lot more than air in the atmosphere, which can affect the colors we see in the sky. There are four hands-on activities in this unit: 1) Sky Observers - Students make observations of the sky, record their findings and share their observation reports with their peers. The activity promotes active observation and recording skills to help students observe sky color, and recognize that sky color changes; 2) Why (Not) So Blue? - Students make predictions about how drops of milk will affect color and visibility in cups of water representing the atmosphere to help them understand that aerosols in the atmosphere have an effect on sky conditions, including sky color and visibility. The activity also introduces the classification categories for daytime sky color and visibility; 3) See the Light - Students use prisms and glue sticks to explore the properties of light. The activity demonstrates that white light is made up of seven colors that represent different wavelengths, and illustrates why the sky is blue during the day and red at sunset; 4) Up in the Air - Students work in groups to make an aerosol sampler, a simple adhesive tool that allows students to collect data and estimate the extent of aerosols present at their school, understanding that, in fact, there are particles in the air we breathe. NGSS Alignment includes: Disciplinary Core Ideas- ESS2.D: Weather and Climate, ESS3.C: Human Impacts on Earth Systems, PS4.B: Electromagnetic Radiation, ESS3.A: Natural Resources; Science and Engineering Practices- Asking Questions and Defining Problems, Planning and Carrying Out an Investigation, Analyzing and Interpreting Data, Engaging in Argument from Evidence, Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating

  12. Think Locally, Act Globally! Linking Local and Global Communities through Democracy and Environment. Hands-On! Developing Active Learning Modules on the Human Dimensions of Global Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowler, Lorraine

    Designed so that it can be adapted to a wide range of student abilities and institutional settings, this learning module on the human dimensions of global change seeks to: actively engage students in problem solving, challenge them to think critically, invite them to participate in the process of scientific inquiry, and involve them in cooperative…

  13. Human Health in the Balance. Hands-On! Developing Active Learning Modules on the Human Dimensions of Global Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meade, Melinda S.; Washburn, Sarah; Holman, Jeremy T.

    This learning module aims to engage students in problem solving, critical thinking, scientific inquiry, and cooperative learning. The module is appropriate for use in any introductory or intermediate undergraduate course that focuses on human-environment relationships. The module states that human health is a product of complex interactions among…

  14. Hands-On Activities: A New Instructional Method for a Fluid Mechanics Course---Never Underestimate the Teaching Power of Jell-O RTM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, Lynn Alwine

    Background In order to eliminate the fear-factor associated with learning FluidMechanics, a new instructional method was created. The new method is neatly packaged into hands-on activities (as defined in this dissertation) in order to ease implementation and dissemination into an engineering class. Because of variations in learning and teaching styles of students and lecturers [34], the hands-on activities are designed to help the lecturer communicate key concepts to a wider spectrum of students. Typically engineering lectures are biased towards intuitive, verbal, reflective and sequential learners whereas few engineering students fall into these categories. [35] The hands-on activities are meant to bridge the communication gap resulting in a positive educational experience. Purpose In order to assess the impact of the new instructional method, a new engineering education experimental design was created. Engineering Education research is very interdisciplinary in nature and therefore requires cooperation from multiple Colleges including, but not limited to, Engineering, Education, and Science (Statistics). Design/Method Two groups of engineering students were allocated to test the hypothesis, "Does being exposed to hands-on activities (a new instructional method) in a section of MAE 308 - Fluid Mechanics result in higher student achievement?" Comparison of the quiz results between the control group and experimental group assessed the effectiveness of the hands-on activities. The problems within each quiz correlated to a level of Bloom's Taxonomy. A comparison of the results on the problems assessed which level of Bloom's were impacted. NHST was performed to determine statistical significance while the effect size was calculated to determine practical significance. Results The hands-on activities have a positive effect on learning. 3.30% more students per class perform better on each problem on each quiz. The hands-on activity, Rainbow Layer Cake, was a superstar

  15. Ongoing Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    An in-depth science inquiry is an ongoing investigation in which children are introduced to materials through hands-on experiences and, with teacher guidance, begin to investigate a question that they can answer through their own actions, observations, and with teacher-assisted research. Qualities that make an experience appropriate to include in…

  16. The mobile GeoBus outreach project: hands-on Earth and Mars activities for secondary schools in the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Ruth; Pike, Charlotte; Roper, Kathryn

    2015-04-01

    GeoBus (www.geobus.org.uk) is an educational outreach project that was developed in 2012 by the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of St Andrews, and it is sponsored jointly by industry and the UK Research Councils (NERC and EPSRC). The aims of GeoBus are to support the teaching of Earth Science in secondary schools by providing teaching resources that are not readily available to educators, to inspire young learners by incorporating new science research outcomes in teaching activities, and to provide a bridge between industry, higher education institutions, research councils and schools. Since its launch, GeoBus has visited over 160 different schools across the length and breadth of Scotland. Just under 35,000 pupils have been involved in practical hands-on Earth science learning activities since the project began in 2012, including many in remote and disadvantaged regions. The resources that GeoBus brings to schools include all the materials and equipment needed to run 50 - 80 minute workshops, and half- or whole-day Enterprise Challenges and field excursions. Workshops are aimed at a class of up to 30 pupils and topics include minerals, rocks, fossils, geological time, natural resources, climate change, volcanoes, earthquakes, and geological mapping. As with all GeoBus activities, the inclusion of equipment and technology otherwise unavailable to schools substantially increases the engagement of pupils in workshops. Field excursions are increasingly popular, as many teachers have little or no field trainng and feel unable to lead this type of activity. The excursions comprise half or full day sessions for up to 30 pupils and are tailored to cover the local geology or geomorphology. Enterprise Challenge are half or full day sessions for up to 100 pupils. Topics include "Journey to Mars", "Scotland's Rocks", "Drilling for Oil", and "Renewable Energy". Both of the energy Enterprise Challenges were designed to incorporates ideas and

  17. Science Curriculum in Practice: Student Teachers' Use of Hands-On Activities in High-Stakes Testing Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eick, Charles J.

    2002-01-01

    This article describes the influence of recently adopted high-stakes testing on the curriculum and instruction of 12 secondary science student teachers (or interns). The study, which used a postpositivist, qualitative method with researcher as participant as the university supervisor, focused on interns' abilities to implement hands-on,…

  18. Student Learning through Participation in Inquiry Activities: Two Case Studies in Teacher and Computer Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damsa, Crina I.; Nerland, Monika

    2016-01-01

    The two case studies reported in this article contribute to a better understanding of how inquiry tasks and activities are employed as resourceful means for learning in higher professional education. An observation-based approach was used to explore characteristics of and challenges in students' participation in collaborative inquiry activities in…

  19. Incorporating Active Learning and Student Inquiry into an Introductory Merchandising Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hyun-Hwa; Hines, Jean D.

    2012-01-01

    Many educators believe that student learning is enhanced when they are actively involved in classroom activities that require student inquiry. The purpose of this paper is to report on three student inquiry projects that were incorporated into a merchandising class with the focus on making students responsible for their learning, rather than the…

  20. Simple Protocol for Secondary School Hands-On Activity: Electrophoresis of Pre-Stained Nucleic Acids on Agar-Agar Borate Gels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britos, Leticia; Goyenola, Guillermo; Orono, Silvia Umpierrez

    2004-01-01

    An extremely simple, inexpensive, and safe method is presented, which emulates nucleic acids isolation and electrophoretic analysis as performed in a research environment, in the context of a secondary school hands-on activity. The protocol is amenable to an interdisciplinary approach, taking into consideration the electrical and chemical…

  1. A Year of Hands-on Science: Exciting Theme Units with More Than 100 Activities, Projects, and Experiments To Make Science Come Alive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne; Novelli, Joan, Ed.

    This book contains 18 themed teaching units with 2 themes per chapter, organized seasonally around the traditional school year. Each theme includes natural connections and hands-on science activities that correspond to what children are already observing in their world. Each chapter begins with highlights of the month and a reproducible "Science…

  2. A Case Study for Comparing the Effectiveness of a Computer Simulation and a Hands-on Activity on Learning Electric Circuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekmekci, Adem; Gulacar, Ozcan

    2015-01-01

    Science education reform emphasizes innovative and constructivist views of science teaching and learning that promotes active learning environments, dynamic instructions, and authentic science experiments. Technology-based and hands-on instructional designs are among innovative science teaching and learning methods. Research shows that these two…

  3. The Frequency of Hands-On Experimentation and Student Attitudes toward Science: A Statistically Significant Relation (2005-51-Ornstein)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornstein, Avi

    2006-01-01

    Attitudinal data tested hypotheses that students have more positive attitudes toward science when teachers regularly emphasize hands-on laboratory activities and when students more frequently experience higher levels of experimentation or inquiry. The first predicted that students would have more positive attitudes toward science in classrooms…

  4. Standing Waves and Inquiry Using Water Droplets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Dina; Vondracek, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Most high school and introductory college physics classes study simple harmonic motion and various wave phenomena. With the majority of states adopting the Next Generation Science Standards and pushing students to explore the scientific process for themselves, there is a growing demand for hands-on inquiry activities that involve and develop more…

  5. 76 FR 40455 - Agency Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Inquiry) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-08

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Inquiry) Activity Under OMB Review... INFORMATION: Title: Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance Inquiry, VA Form 29-0543. OMB Control Number: 2900-0501... insured under Veterans Mortgage Life Insurance (VMLI) completes VA Form 29-0543 to report any...

  6. The inquiry continuum: Science teaching practices and student performance on standardized tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jernnigan, Laura Jane

    Few research studies have been conducted related to inquiry-based scientific teaching methodologies and NCLB-required state testing. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the strategies used by seventh-grade science teachers in Illinois and student scores on the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to aid in determining best practices/strategies for teaching middle school science. The literature review defines scientific inquiry by placing teaching strategies on a continuum of scientific inquiry methodologies from No Inquiry (Direct Instruction) through Authentic Inquiry. Five major divisions of scientific inquiry: structured inquiry, guided inquiry, learning cycle inquiry, open inquiry, and authentic inquiry, have been identified and described. These five divisions contain eight sub-categories: demonstrations; simple or hands-on activities; discovery learning; variations of learning cycles; problem-based, event-based, and project-based; and student inquiry, science partnerships, and Schwab's enquiry. Quantitative data were collected from pre- and posttests and surveys given to the participants: five seventh grade science teachers in four Academic Excellence Award and Spotlight Award schools and their 531 students. Findings revealed that teachers reported higher inquiry scores for themselves than for their students; the two greatest reported factors limiting teachers' use of inquiry were not enough time and concern about discipline and large class size. Although the correlation between total inquiry and mean difference of pre- and posttest scores was not statistically significant, the survey instrument indicated how often teachers used inquiry in their classes, not the type of inquiry used. Implications arose from the findings that increase the methodology debate between direction instruction and inquiry-based teaching strategies; teachers are very knowledgeable about the Illinois state standards, and various inquiry-based methods

  7. Teaching Molecular Diffusion Using an Inquiry Approach: Diffusion Activities in a Secondary School Inquiry-Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Rens, Lisette; van der Schee, Joop; Pilot, Albert

    2009-01-01

    This design research describes the development of a student inquiry project in which upper-secondary school chemistry students learn domain-specific concepts by doing inquiry in a simulated inquiry community. The design of the inquiry project is based on the extended procedural and conceptual knowledge in science (PACKS) model; the student…

  8. The Universe at Your Fingertips 2.0 DVD-ROM: A Collection of Hands-on Activities, Resource Guides, Informational Articles, and Videos for Teaching Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraknoi, A.; Kruse, B.; Gurton, S.; Schmitt, A. H.; Proudfit, L.; Schatz, D.

    2012-08-01

    A new edition of the ASP's key educational publication The Universe at Your Fingertips has been issued in DVD-ROM format, containing 133 classroom-tested, hands-on activities (organized by subject), 43 articles with background information about topics in astronomy, 9 articles on teaching and learning space science in the 21st century, 17 guides to the best published and web resources on key topics, 12 short instructional videos, and a host of images.

  9. Hands-On Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frantz, Marc; Crannell, Annalisa; Maki, Dan; Hodgson, Ted

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the mathematics underlying the construction of perspective images of three-dimensional objects. Through hands-on applications and the use of standard secondary content, the article presents perspective art in a away that is accessible to secondary teachers and their students.

  10. The Amazing Animal Activity Book: Dozens of Hands-on Projects That Teach across the Curriculum. Grades 1-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard, Robin

    The activities in this book are designed to encourage children's scientific curiosity as well as their creativity. Activities include puppet making, word scrambles, matching exercises, crossword and jigsaw puzzles, mobiles, games, mini books, coloring activities, Venn diagrams, and plays. These activities are intended as a foundation for children…

  11. Acting Out! Combating Homophobia through Teacher Activism. Practitioner Inquiry Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, Mollie V., Ed.; Clark, Caroline T., Ed.; Kenney, Lauren M., Ed.; Smith, Jill M., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    In this volume, teachers from urban, suburban, and rural districts join together in a teacher inquiry group to challenge homophobia and heterosexism in schools and classrooms. To create safe learning environments for all students they address key topics, including seizing teachable moments, organizing faculty, deciding whether to come out in the…

  12. Activating Teacher Energy Through "Inquiry-Oriented" Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeichner, Kenneth M.

    In an inquiry-oriented teacher education program, prospective teachers are encouraged to examine the origins and consequences of their actions and settings in which they work. Many of the characteristics of the elementary student teaching program at the University of Wisconsin at Madison are similar to this approach. During the students' 15-week…

  13. Discovering Biofilms: Inquiry-Based Activities for the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redelman, Carly V.; Marrs, Kathleen; Anderson, Gregory G.

    2012-01-01

    In nature, bacteria exist in and adapt to different environments by forming microbial communities called "biofilms." We propose simple, inquiry-based laboratory exercises utilizing a biofilm formation assay, which allows controlled biofilm growth. Students will be able to qualitatively assess biofilm growth via staining. Recently, we developed a…

  14. Exploring the Solar System Activities Outline: Hands-On Planetary Science for Formal Education K-14 and Informal Settings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. S.; Tobola, K. W.; Lindstrom, M. L.

    2003-01-01

    Activities by NASA scientists and teachers focus on integrating Planetary Science activities with existing Earth science, math, and language arts curriculum. The wealth of activities that highlight missions and research pertaining to the exploring the solar system allows educators to choose activities that fit a particular concept or theme within their curriculum. Most of the activities use simple, inexpensive techniques that help students understand the how and why of what scientists are learning about comets, asteroids, meteorites, moons and planets. With these NASA developed activities students experience recent mission information about our solar system such as Mars geology and the search for life using Mars meteorites and robotic data. The Johnson Space Center ARES Education team has compiled a variety of NASA solar system activities to produce an annotated thematic outline useful to classroom educators and informal educators as they teach space science. An important aspect of the outline annotation is that it highlights appropriate science content information and key science and math concepts so educators can easily identify activities that will enhance curriculum development. The outline contains URLs for the activities and NASA educator guides as well as links to NASA mission science and technology. In the informal setting educators can use solar system exploration activities to reinforce learning in association with thematic displays, planetarium programs, youth group gatherings, or community events. Within formal education at the primary level some of the activities are appropriately designed to excite interest and arouse curiosity. Middle school educators will find activities that enhance thematic science and encourage students to think about the scientific process of investigation. Some of the activities offered are appropriate for the upper levels of high school and early college in that they require students to use and analyze data.

  15. Hands-on Activities for Exploring the Solar System in K-14 Formal and Informal Education Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, J. S.; Tobola, K. W.

    2004-12-01

    Introduction: Activities developed by NASA scientists and teachers focus on integrating Planetary Science activities with existing Earth science, math, and language arts curriculum. Educators may choose activities that fit a particular concept or theme within their curriculum from activities that highlight missions and research pertaining to exploring the solar system. Most of the activities use simple, inexpensive techniques that help students understand the how and why of what scientists are learning about comets, asteroids, meteorites, moons and planets. The web sites for the activities contain current information so students experience recent mission information such as data from Mars rovers or the status of Stardust sample return. The Johnson Space Center Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science education team has compiled a variety of NASA solar system activities to produce an annotated thematic syllabus useful to classroom educators and informal educators as they teach space science. An important aspect of the syllabus is that it highlights appropriate science content information and key science and math concepts so educators can easily identify activities that will enhance curriculum development. The outline contains URLs for the activities and NASA educator guides as well as links to NASA mission science and technology. In the informal setting, educators can use solar system exploration activities to reinforce learning in association with thematic displays, planetarium programs, youth group gatherings, or community events. In both the informal and the primary education levels the activities are appropriately designed to excite interest, arouse curiosity and easily take the participants from pre-awareness to the awareness stage. Middle school educators will find activities that enhance thematic science and encourage students to think about the scientific process of investigation. Some of the activities offered may easily be adapted for the upper

  16. It's More Fun than It Sounds--Enhancing Science Concepts through Hands-on Activities for Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guha, Smita

    2012-01-01

    To teach young children, teachers choose topics in science that children are curious about. Children's inquisitive nature is reflected through the activities as they make repetitive sounds to find the cause and effect relationship. Teachers can make best use of those invaluable moments by incorporating those activities into science lessons on…

  17. 3Hs Education: Examining hands-on, heads-on and hearts-on early childhood science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeynep Inan, Hatice; Inan, Taskin

    2015-08-01

    Active engagement has become the focus of many early childhood science education curricula and standards. However, active engagement usually emphasizes getting children engaged with science solely through hands-on activities. Active engagement by way of hands, heads, and hearts are kept separate and rarely discussed in terms of getting all to work together, although inquiry-based education and student interest have been accepted as important in science education. The current study is an inquiry-based research. It aims to describe and examine projects and activity stations for preschoolers in a Turkish preschool classroom bringing together the pieces of the puzzle of science education, called here 'Hands-Heads-Hearts-on Science Education'. The study, conducted from a qualitative-interpretivist paradigm, reveals that activity stations and projects create a context for hands-on (active engagement), heads-on (inquiry based or mental-engagement), and hearts-on (interest based) science education. It is found that activity stations and projects, when maintained by appropriate teacher-support, create a playful context in which children can be actively and happily engaged in science-related inquiry.

  18. Teaching reactions and stoichiometry: A comparison of guided inquiry and traditional laboratory activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister Thomas, Lynn

    There is a major movement in science education towards the inclusion of science inquiry and process. Guided-inquiry instruction is expected to have a positive impact on students' concrete and conceptual knowledge along with their ability to engage in the practices of science. This study examined the impact of inquiry-based teaching on student achievement. The topics of reactions and stoichiometry were taught in two different periods of first-year secondary honors chemistry. Both classes received the same lectures and assignments for this curriculum and both classes performed the same laboratory activities. However, one class received traditional, step-by-step (often called "cookbook") laboratory instructions while the other class developed their own procedures and made decisions about data to complete the laboratory activities. Pre- and post-tests were given to each class, followed by a test of retention after ten weeks. The results of this study indicate that inquiry-based instruction has a positive impact on student achievement. A significant increase between pre- and post- test scores for the experimental group as opposed to the scores for the control group suggests that achievement was correlated with guided inquiry instruction methods. Additionally, a notable trend suggested that guided inquiry instruction has a positive effect on learning retention.

  19. A Hands-On Activity to Build Mastery of Intermolecular Forces and Its Impacts on Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruck, Laura B.

    2016-01-01

    The intermolecular forces activity presented in this article is designed to foster concept-building through students' use of concrete, manipulative objects, and it was developed to be pedagogically sound. Data analysis via pre- and posttesting and subsequent exam questions indicated that students who had the opportunity to participate in the…

  20. Social competence and collaborative guided inquiry science activities: Experiences of students with learning disabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Jennifer Anne

    This thesis presents a qualitative investigation of the effects of social competence on the participation of students with learning disabilities (LD) in the science learning processes associated with collaborative, guided inquiry learning. An inclusive Grade 2 classroom provided the setting for the study. Detailed classroom observations were the primary source of data. In addition, the researcher conducted two interviews with the teacher, and collected samples of students' written work. The purpose of the research was to investigate: (a) How do teachers and peers mediate the participation of students with LD in collaborative, guided inquiry science activities, (b) What learning processes do students with LD participate in during collaborative, guided inquiry science activities, and (c) What components of social competence support and constrain the participation of students with LD during collaborative, guided inquiry science activities? The findings of the study suggest five key ideas for research and teaching in collaborative, guided inquiry science in inclusive classrooms. First, using a variety of collaborative learning formats (whole-class, small-group, and pairs) creates more opportunities for the successful participation of diverse students with LD. Second, creating an inclusive community where students feel accepted and valued may enhance the academic and social success of students with LD. Third, careful selection of partners for students with LD is important for a positive learning experience. Students with LD should be partnered with academically successful, socially competent peers; also, this study suggested that students with LD experience more success working collaboratively in pairs rather than in small groups. Fourth, a variety of strategies are needed to promote active participation and positive social interactions for students with and without LD during collaborative, guided inquiry learning. Fifth, adopting a general approach to teaching

  1. Learning Outcomes of Project-Based and Inquiry-Based Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panasan, Mookdaporn; Nuangchalerm, Prasart

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: Organization of science learning activities is necessary to rely on various methods of organization of learning and to be appropriate to learners. Organization of project-based learning activities and inquiry-based learning activities are teaching methods which can help students understand scientific knowledge. It would be more…

  2. Preservice elementary teachers' development of pedagogical design capacity for inquiry---an activity-theoretical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Cory T.

    Preservice elementary teachers need to begin developing their pedagogical design capacities for inquiry by learning how to translate their conceptions of inquiry into classroom practice through the adaptation and enactment of curriculum materials. Using both qualitative and quantitative research methods, I draw upon cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT) to investigate preservice elementary teachers' curriculum design and development of pedagogical design capacity for inquiry during the final year of their teacher education program. This study involved analysis of curricular artifacts and survey data from 46 prospective elementary teachers in two sections of an undergraduate elementary science teaching methods course, as well as interviews, observational fieldnotes, reflective journals, and other artifacts from four preservice teachers from this larger group studied during the methods and student teaching semesters. Results show that preservice teachers were able to translate their espoused inquiry frameworks into planned and enacted science lessons. This involved adapting existing curriculum materials to better promote specific inquiry practices, but also to fundamentally shift the nature of classroom science. The preservice teachers' curriculum design efforts were constrained, however, by features of their institutional contexts and subject to emergent tensions. In attempting to resolve these tensions through curriculum design for inquiry, the preservice teachers ultimately articulated a fundamental contradiction between two distinct and competing visions for classroom inquiry: traditional classroom science, which promotes students' reproduction of scientific explanations by objectifying students, and a novel form of classroom inquiry that repositions students as contributing community members involved in the co-construction of knowledge through lesson-specific shared problem-spaces. For each of the preservice teachers, this contradiction had important

  3. Experimental Comparison of Inquiry and Direct Instruction in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobern, William; Schuster, David; Adams, Betty

    2010-01-01

    It is evident that "experientially-based" instruction and "active student engagement" are advantageous for effective science learning. However, "hands-on" and "minds-on" aspects can occur in both inquiry and direct science instruction, and convincing comparative evidence for the superiority of either mode remains rare. Thus, the pertinent question…

  4. Hands-on Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities that teach elementary students how light works by having them make rainbows. A primary-/intermediate- level activity involves conducting a rainbow color survey, and a student page provides a copy of the rainbow color survey. A primary-level activity has students create rainbows using water and a mirror. (SM)

  5. Are all hands-on activities equally effective? Effect of using plastic models, organ dissections, and virtual dissections on student learning and perceptions.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Sara A; Hicks, Reimi E; Thompson, Katerina V; Marbach-Ad, Gili

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the impact of three commonly used cardiovascular model-assisted activities on student learning and student attitudes and perspectives about science. College students enrolled in a Human Anatomy and Physiology course were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups (organ dissections, virtual dissections, or plastic models). Each group received a 15-min lecture followed by a 45-min activity with one of the treatments. Immediately after the lesson and then 2 mo later, students were tested on anatomy and physiology knowledge and completed an attitude survey. Students who used plastic models achieved significantly higher overall scores on both the initial and followup exams than students who performed organ or virtual dissections. On the initial exam, students in the plastic model and organ dissection treatments scored higher on anatomy questions than students who performed virtual dissections. Students in the plastic model group scored higher than students who performed organ dissections on physiology questions. On the followup exam, when asked anatomy questions, students in the plastic model group scored higher than dissection students and virtual dissection students. On attitude surveys, organ dissections had higher perceived value and were requested for inclusion in curricula twice as often as any other activity. Students who performed organ dissections were more likely than the other treatment groups to agree with the statement that "science is fun," suggesting that organ dissections may promote positive attitudes toward science. The findings of this study provide evidence for the importance of multiple types of hands-on activities in anatomy laboratory courses.

  6. Presenting Theoretical Ideas Prior to Inquiry Activities Fosters Theory-Level Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wecker, Christof; Rachel, Alexander; Heran-Dörr, Eva; Waltner, Christine; Wiesner, Hartmut; Fischer, Frank

    2013-01-01

    In the course of inquiry activities similar to those of real scientists, learners are supposed to develop knowledge both on the level of observable phenomena and on the level of explanatory theories. However, some theories involve theoretical entities (e.g., "Weiss domains") that cannot be observed directly and therefore may be hard to…

  7. Changes in Belief Orientations of Preservice Teachers and Their Relation to Inquiry Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilitsis, Vicky; Duncan, Ravit Golan

    2012-01-01

    Research in science education suggests that teachers' beliefs are linked to the use of inquiry-based instruction; teachers holding a constructivist belief are more likely to engage in student-centered activities in the classroom. However, there is currently little research on the ways in which teachers' beliefs change over time, and in particular,…

  8. The Opinions of Turkish Highschool Pupils on Inquiry Based Laboratory Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilinc, Ahmet

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to prepare inquiry based experimental activities on the photosynthesis, thought to be a very difficult subject by pupils, and to determine the pupil's ideas towards this method. This study was made with 24 pupils from Grade 3 at Ataturk Anatolian High school in Turkey. As data gathering material; seven inquiry…

  9. Web2Quests: Updating a Popular Web-Based Inquiry-Oriented Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurt, Serhat

    2009-01-01

    WebQuest is a popular inquiry-oriented activity in which learners use Web resources. Since the creation of the innovation, almost 15 years ago, the Web has changed significantly, while the WebQuest technique has changed little. This article examines possible applications of new Web trends on WebQuest instructional strategy. Some possible…

  10. Repairing Student Misconceptions in Heat Transfer Using Inquiry-Based Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince, Michael; Vigeant, Margot; Nottis, Katharyn

    2016-01-01

    Eight inquiry-based activities, described here in sufficient detail for faculty to adopt in their own courses, were designed to teach students fundamental concepts in heat transfer. The concept areas chosen were (1) factors affecting the rate vs. amount of heat transfer, (2) temperature vs. perceptions of hot and cold, (3) temperature vs. energy…

  11. Designing for Inquiry-Based Learning with the Learning Activity Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, P.; Aiyegbayo, O.; Little, S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between practitioners' pedagogical purposes, values and practices in designing for inquiry-based learning in higher education, and the affordances of the Learning Activity Management System (LAMS) as a tool for creating learning designs in this context. Using a qualitative research methodology, variation was…

  12. A Context-Aware Ubiquitous Learning Approach to Conducting Scientific Inquiry Activities in a Science Park

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Tsai, Chin-Chung; Chu, Hui-Chun; Kinshuk; Chen, Chieh-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Fostering students' scientific inquiry competence has been recognised as being an important and challenging objective of science education. To strengthen the understanding of science theories or notations, researchers have suggested conducting some learning activities in the field via operating relevant devices. In a traditional infield scientific…

  13. Inquiry-Based Laboratory Activities in Electrochemistry: High School Students' Achievements and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sesen, Burcin Acar; Tarhan, Leman

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of inquiry-based laboratory activities on high school students' understanding of electrochemistry and attitudes towards chemistry and laboratory work. The participants were 62 high school students (average age 17 years) in an urban public high school in Turkey. Students were assigned to experimental (N =…

  14. Investigating the Use of Inquiry & Web-Based Activities with Inclusive Biology Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodzin, Alec M.; Waller, Patricia L.; Edwards, Lana; Darlene Kale, Santoro

    2007-01-01

    A Web-integrated biology program is used to explore how to best assist inclusive high school students to learn biology with inquiry-based activities. Classroom adaptations and instructional strategies teachers may use to assist in promoting biology learning with inclusive learners are discussed.

  15. Developing Inquiry through Activities That Integrate Fieldwork and Microcomputer-Based Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espinoza, Fernando

    2002-01-01

    Describes a science activity appropriate for middle and high school students investigating the temperature, pH, and conductivity of a man-made lake. Uses an inquiry-based interdisciplinary approach. Collects and analyzes data to determine whether there is any significant difference among the factors considering the very little variance in lake…

  16. What's the Diagnosis? An Inquiry-Based Activity Focusing on Mole-Mass Conversions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruck, Laura B.; Towns, Marcy H.

    2011-01-01

    An inquiry-based mole-to-mass activity is presented associated with the analysis of blood. Students working in groups choose between two medical cases to determine if the "patient" has higher or lower concentrations of minerals than normal. The data are presented such that students must convert moles to mass in order to compare the patient values…

  17. Hands-On Thunderstorms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Mark H.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces activities published by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) that can be used to explain the physical properties of a thunderstorm. Activities include cloud formation and the first step of thunderstorm development, cycle of a thunderstorm, the nature of lightning, ice in a thunderstorm, and tornado warning. Lists…

  18. Using a Combined Approach of Guided Inquiry & Direct Instruction to Explore How Physiology Affects Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machtinger, Erika T.

    2014-01-01

    Hands-on activities with live organisms allow students to actively explore scientific investigation. Here, I present activities that combine guided inquiry with direct instruction and relate how nutrition affects the physiology and behavior of the common housefly. These experiments encourage student involvement in the formulation of experimental…

  19. Exploring Marine Ecosystems with Elementary School Portuguese Children: Inquiry-Based Project Activities Focused on "Real-Life" Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilherme, Elsa; Faria, Cláudia; Boaventura, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate how young students engage in an inquiry-based project driven by real-life contexts. Elementary school children were engaged in a small inquiry project centred on marine biodiversity and species adaptations. All activities included the exploration of an out-of-school setting as a learning context. A total…

  20. To Tan or Not to Tan?: Students Learn About Sunscreens through an Inquiry Activity Based on the Learning Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keen-Rocha, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Science instructors sometimes avoid inquiry-based activities due to limited classroom time. Inquiry takes time, as students choose problems, design experiments, obtain materials, conduct investigations, gather data, communicate results, and discuss their experiments. While there are no quick solutions to time concerns, the 5E learning cycle seeks…

  1. Connecting Inquiry and the Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Erin

    2006-01-01

    Inquiry has been one of the most prominent reforms in science education. One of the goals of teaching through inquiry methods is to enable students to have experiences that are authentic to scientists' experiences. Too often, inquiry science is taught as either the "scientific method" or as "hands-on," disconnected activities…

  2. Are all hands-on activities equally effective? Effect of using plastic models, organ dissections, and virtual dissections on student learning and perceptions.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Sara A; Hicks, Reimi E; Thompson, Katerina V; Marbach-Ad, Gili

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the impact of three commonly used cardiovascular model-assisted activities on student learning and student attitudes and perspectives about science. College students enrolled in a Human Anatomy and Physiology course were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups (organ dissections, virtual dissections, or plastic models). Each group received a 15-min lecture followed by a 45-min activity with one of the treatments. Immediately after the lesson and then 2 mo later, students were tested on anatomy and physiology knowledge and completed an attitude survey. Students who used plastic models achieved significantly higher overall scores on both the initial and followup exams than students who performed organ or virtual dissections. On the initial exam, students in the plastic model and organ dissection treatments scored higher on anatomy questions than students who performed virtual dissections. Students in the plastic model group scored higher than students who performed organ dissections on physiology questions. On the followup exam, when asked anatomy questions, students in the plastic model group scored higher than dissection students and virtual dissection students. On attitude surveys, organ dissections had higher perceived value and were requested for inclusion in curricula twice as often as any other activity. Students who performed organ dissections were more likely than the other treatment groups to agree with the statement that "science is fun," suggesting that organ dissections may promote positive attitudes toward science. The findings of this study provide evidence for the importance of multiple types of hands-on activities in anatomy laboratory courses. PMID:24585474

  3. Hands-on optics: an informal science education initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Anthony M.; Pompea, Stephen M.; Arthurs, Eugene G.; Walker, Constance E.; Sparks, Robert T.

    2007-09-01

    The project is collaboration between two scientific societies, the Optical Society of America (OSA) and SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO). The program is designed to bring science education enrichment to thousands of underrepresented middle school students in more than ten states, including female and minority students, who typically have not been the beneficiaries of science and engineering resources and investments. HOO provides each teacher with up to six activity modules, each containing enough materials for up to 30 students to participate in 6-8 hours of hands-on optics-related activities. Sample activities, developed by education specialists at NOAO, include building kaleidoscopes and telescopes, communicating with a beam of light, and a hit-the-target laser beam challenge. Teachers engage in two days of training and, where possible, are partnered with a local optics professional (drawn from the local rosters of SPIE and OSA members) who volunteers to spend time with the teacher and students as they explore the module activities. Through these activities, students gain experience and understanding of optics principles, as well as learning the basics of inquiry, critical thinking, and problem solving skills involving optics, and how optics interfaces with other disciplines. While the modules were designed for use in informal after- school or weekend sessions, the number of venues has expanded to large and small science centers, Boys and Girls Clubs, Girl Scouts, summer camps, family workshops, and use in the classroom.

  4. Guided-Inquiry Labs Using Bean Beetles for Teaching the Scientific Method & Experimental Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlueter, Mark A.; D'Costa, Allison R.

    2013-01-01

    Guided-inquiry lab activities with bean beetles ("Callosobruchus maculatus") teach students how to develop hypotheses, design experiments, identify experimental variables, collect and interpret data, and formulate conclusions. These activities provide students with real hands-on experiences and skills that reinforce their understanding of the…

  5. Introduction to the Human Dimensions of Global Change. Hands-On! Developing Active Learning Modules on the Human Dimensions of Global Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Emma R. M.; Turner, Billie L., II

    This learning module aims to engage students in problem solving, critical thinking, scientific inquiry, and cooperative learning. The module is appropriate for use in any introductory or intermediate undergraduate course that focuses on human-environment relationships. The module provides students with a broad overview of the human dimensions of…

  6. Human Driving Forces and Their Impacts on Land Use/Land Cover. Hands-On! Developing Active Learning Modules on the Human Dimensions of Global Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moser, Susanne

    This learning module aims to engage students in problem solving, critical thinking, scientific inquiry, and cooperative learning. The module is appropriate for use in any introductory or intermediate undergraduate course that focuses on human-environment relationships. The module explains that land use/cover change has occurred at all times in all…

  7. Global Change and Urbanization in Latin America. Hands-On! Developing Active Learning Modules on the Human Dimensions of Global Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilbert, Sarah; Lawson, Victoria

    This learning module aims to engage students in problem solving, critical thinking, scientific inquiry, and cooperative learning. The module is appropriate for use in any introductory or intermediate undergraduate course that focuses on human-environment relationships. The module examines how social, economic, political, and environmental forces…

  8. How does participation in inquiry-based activities influence gifted students' higher order thinking?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reger, Barbara H.

    Inquiry-based learning is considered a useful technique to strengthen the critical thinking skills of students. The National Science Standards emphasize its use and the complexities and challenge it provides are well suited for meeting the needs of the gifted. While many studies have documented the effectiveness of this type of instruction, there is a lack of research on growth in higher-order thinking through participation in science inquiry. This study investigated such growth among a small group of gifted fifth-grade students. In this study a group of fifth-grade gifted science students completed a series of three forensics inquiry lessons, and documented questions, ideas and reflections as they constructed evidence to solve a crime. From this class of students, one small group was purposely selected to serve as the focus of the study. Using qualitative techniques, the questions and statements students made as they interacted in the activity were analyzed. Videotaped comments and student logs were coded for emerging patterns and also examined for evidence of increased levels of higher-order thinking based on a rubric that was designed using the six levels of Bloom's Taxonomy. Evidence from this study showed marked increase in and deeper levels of higher-order thinking for two of the students. The other boy and girl showed progress using the inquiry activities, but it was not as evident. The social dynamics of the group seemed to hinder one girl's participation during some of the activities. The social interactions played a role in strengthening the exchange of ideas and thinking skills for the others. The teacher had a tremendous influence over the production of higher-level statements by modeling that level of thinking as she questioned the students. Through her practice of answering a question with a question, she gradually solicited more analytical thinking from her students.

  9. An Inquiry Activity for Genetics Using Chromosome Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, William H.; Snodgrass, George

    1982-01-01

    Concepts to be developed, objectives, and student instructions are provided for an activity useful as an introduction to or review of Mendelian genetics and sex determination. Universal codes (read by optical scanners at supermarket checkout stands) from soup can labels are used as chromosome maps during the activity. (JN)

  10. Hands-on Science. Exploring Magnification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1993-01-01

    Presents hands-on science activities using inexpensive, hand-held microscopes and slides made from simple, readily available materials. The article describes how to introduce students to microscopes and presents directions for using the microscopes and making slides. A student page investigates fingerprints with microscopes. (SM)

  11. Models, Part IV: Inquiry Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Discusses models for information skills that include inquiry-oriented activities. Highlights include WebQuest, which uses Internet resources supplemented with videoconferencing; Minnesota's Inquiry Process based on the Big Six model for information problem-solving; Indiana's Student Inquiry Model; constructivist learning models for inquiry; and…

  12. Enzyme Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushton, Gregory T.; Dias, Michael; McDurmon, Grant

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a two-phase inquiry lesson in which students explore the catalytic activity of amylase on starch (Rungruangsa and Panijpan 1979). In the first phase, students' prior knowledge about the reaction is assessed through a set of directed prompts and small-group discussion, then challenged or reinforced as students…

  13. Faculty Guidance/Counseling Activities: A Decade Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blai, Boris, Jr.

    Ten years ago the Office of Research conducted a survey among some 30 'small' (less than 1000 students) junior colleges in the northeastern United States. Its purpose was to ascertain to what extent full-time faculty participated in student guidance activities. During the spring of 1977 some 50 'small' junior colleges in the northeastern United…

  14. Exploring Ovulation & Pregnancy Using Over-the-Counter Products: A Novel Guided Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venditti, Jennifer J.; Surmacz, Cynthia A.

    2012-01-01

    In this guided inquiry, students explore the complex hormonal regulation of the female reproductive cycle using inexpensive ovulation and pregnancy detection kits that are readily available over the counter. This hands-on activity engages students in the practice of doing science as highlighted by the "National Science Education Standards." The…

  15. Can an Inquiry Approach Improve College Student Learning in a Teaching Laboratory?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rissing, Steven W.; Cogan, John G.

    2009-01-01

    We present an inquiry-based, hands-on laboratory exercise on enzyme activity for an introductory college biology course for science majors. We measure student performance on a series of objective and subjective questions before and after completion of this exercise; we also measure performance of a similar cohort of students before and after…

  16. Hands-On Nuclear Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittaker, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear science is an important topic in terms of its application to power generation, medical diagnostics and treatment, and national defense. Unfortunately, the subatomic domain is far removed from daily experience, and few learning aids are available to teachers. What follows describes a low-tech, hands-on method to teach important concepts in…

  17. Transforming a Traditional Hands-On Activity into an Enquiry Activity to Foster More In-Depth Understanding of the Concept of Density

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yeung Chung; Kwok, Ping Wai

    2010-01-01

    Traditional methods used to teach the concept of density that employ solid objects of different masses and volumes can be supplemented by enquiry activities in which students vary the mass-to-volume ratio of the same object to test ideas about density and flotation. A simple substance, Blu-Tack, is an ideal material to use in this case. The…

  18. Teachers' Perspectives on Online Virtual Labs vs. Hands-On Labs in High School Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohr, Teresa M.

    This study of online science teachers' opinions addressed the use of virtual labs in online courses. A growing number of schools use virtual labs that must meet mandated laboratory standards to ensure they provide learning experiences comparable to hands-on labs, which are an integral part of science curricula. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine teachers' perceptions of the quality and effectiveness of high school virtual labs. The theoretical foundation was constructivism, as labs provide student-centered activities for problem solving, inquiry, and exploration of phenomena. The research questions focused on experienced teachers' perceptions of the quality of virtual vs. hands-on labs. Data were collected through survey questions derived from the lab objectives of The Next Generation Science Standards . Eighteen teachers rated the degree of importance of each objective and also rated how they felt virtual labs met these objectives; these ratings were reported using descriptive statistics. Responses to open-ended questions were few and served to illustrate the numerical results. Many teachers stated that virtual labs are valuable supplements but could not completely replace hands-on experiences. Studies on the quality and effectiveness of high school virtual labs are limited despite widespread use. Comprehensive studies will ensure that online students have equal access to quality labs. School districts need to define lab requirements, and colleges need to specify the lab experience they require. This study has potential to inspire positive social change by assisting science educators, including those in the local school district, in evaluating and selecting courseware designed to promote higher order thinking skills, real-world problem solving, and development of strong inquiry skills, thereby improving science instruction for all high school students.

  19. Investigating Climate Change Issues With Web-Based Geospatial Inquiry Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempsey, C.; Bodzin, A. M.; Sahagian, D. L.; Anastasio, D. J.; Peffer, T.; Cirucci, L.

    2011-12-01

    In the Environmental Literacy and Inquiry middle school Climate Change curriculum we focus on essential climate literacy principles with an emphasis on weather and climate, Earth system energy balance, greenhouse gases, paleoclimatology, and how human activities influence climate change (http://www.ei.lehigh.edu/eli/cc/). It incorporates a related set of a framework and design principles to provide guidance for the development of the geospatial technology-integrated Earth and environmental science curriculum materials. Students use virtual globes, Web-based tools including an interactive carbon calculator and geologic timeline, and inquiry-based lab activities to investigate climate change topics. The curriculum includes educative curriculum materials that are designed to promote and support teachers' learning of important climate change content and issues, geospatial pedagogical content knowledge, and geographic spatial thinking. The curriculum includes baseline instructional guidance for teachers and provides implementation and adaptation guidance for teaching with diverse learners including low-level readers, English language learners and students with disabilities. In the curriculum, students use geospatial technology tools including Google Earth with embedded spatial data to investigate global temperature changes, areas affected by climate change, evidence of climate change, and the effects of sea level rise on the existing landscape. We conducted a designed-based research implementation study with urban middle school students. Findings showed that the use of the Climate Change curriculum showed significant improvement in urban middle school students' understanding of climate change concepts.

  20. Carroll County hands-on elementary science

    SciTech Connect

    Herlocker, H.G.; Dunkleberger, G.L.

    1994-12-31

    Carroll County Hands-on Elementary Science is a nationally recognized Elementary Science Curriculum which has been disseminated in forty states, Puerto Rico, The Virgin Islands, Saipan, and Samoa. The curriculum is a non-textbook, process-based, constructivist approach to teaching science. Unique features of this curriculum include its teacher-written daily lesson plan format, its complete kit of science supplies, and its complete set of Spanish materials. In order to be included by the National Diffusion Network, Hands-on Elementary Science collected data to support the following claims: the program enhances teacher and student attitudes toward science; the program changes both the amount and the type of science instruction; the program is adaptable and transportable; the teacher training component is effective. The poster display will feature sample activities, data which demonstrates the effectiveness of the staff development plan, and samples which show the degree to which the program supports selected state curriculum frameworks.

  1. Standing Waves and Inquiry Using Water Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, Dina; Vondracek, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Most high school and introductory college physics classes study simple harmonic motion and various wave phenomena. With the majority of states adopting the Next Generation Science Standards1 and pushing students to explore the scientific process for themselves, there is a growing demand for hands-on inquiry activities that involve and develop more data analysis and computational thinking skills. This article outlines several options for using an engaging standing wave phenomenon, Faraday waves, in physics classes. These options include the instructor using Faraday waves as a class demonstration of interesting fluid and wave properties, students doing an inquiry lab to investigate several properties of Faraday waves on water droplets, and the possibility of smaller numbers of students using Faraday waves as an independent research topic.

  2. The Bohr Model and the Fifth Grade: A New Standards-Based Hands-On Physics Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Jeff; Springer, Russell; Goldberg, Bennett

    2004-03-01

    A semester-long, standards-based, hands-on physics curriculum appropriate for the fifth grade was developed. Previously available curricula were successful in using hands-on activities to teach basic fifth-grade physics skills and concepts, but did not attempt to foster understanding of the fundamental underlying physics. We expanded the role of inquiry-based instruction to expose students to the fundamental physics behind electricity, forces, energy, light and sound. Central to the course, the Bohr model of the atom was used as a key tool both to motivate exploration of these topics as well as to develop basic conceptual understanding of fundamental ideas in quantum and electromagnetic physics. The curriculum was designed to be compatible with both district and state-mandated standards in a high-stakes test environment. This work was supported by NSF grant DGE-0231909.

  3. European Hands-on Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Rosa; Ferlet, Roger; Gómez de Castro, Ana I.; Hill, Robert; Horellou, Cathy; Mankiewicz, Lech; Melchior, Anne-Laure; Metaxa, Margarita; Zanazzi, Alessandra

    2007-08-01

    Hands-on Universe is a project born at UC@Berkeley. A project devoted to enrich the teaching of Astronomy within the classroom environment with a different approach, more connected to the new technologies. Its main goals are not only to promote the use of such technologies but also to reawaken on students the taste for STEM (Science, technologies, engineering and math) related issues and also to increase their scientific culture. Eight countries in Europe decided to adopt the method and, funded by MINERVA, formed the European Hands-on Universe. Several resources were produced and a data reduction software developed http://www.euhou.net/.Other European countries are interested and should join this coordinated effort in the near future. At an international level there are 20 countries using this approach. There are plans to develop scientific cooperation among these countries. Pilot scientific research projects in schools are being tested in EU-HOU schools, Russia and USA. There is also a game being developed to be used as a new tool for teaching scientific content in the classroom environment. An effort to develop an international network of scientific / educational collaboration is the next step.

  4. Primary Sources and Inquiry Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappas, Marjorie L.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses inquiry learning and primary sources. Inquiry learning puts students in the active role of investigators. Questioning, authentic and active learning, and interactivity are a few of the characteristics of inquiry learning that put the teacher and library media specialist in the role of coaches while students…

  5. Inquiry Learning in the Singaporean Context: Factors affecting student interest in school science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jocz, Jennifer Ann; Zhai, Junqing; Tan, Aik Ling

    2014-10-01

    Recent research reveals that students' interest in school science begins to decline at an early age. As this lack of interest could result in fewer individuals qualified for scientific careers and a population unprepared to engage with scientific societal issues, it is imperative to investigate ways in which interest in school science can be increased. Studies have suggested that inquiry learning is one way to increase interest in science. Inquiry learning forms the core of the primary syllabus in Singapore; as such, we examine how inquiry practices may shape students' perceptions of science and school science. This study investigates how classroom inquiry activities relate to students' interest in school science. Data were collected from 425 grade 4 students who responded to a questionnaire and 27 students who participated in follow-up focus group interviews conducted in 14 classrooms in Singapore. Results indicate that students have a high interest in science class. Additionally, self-efficacy and leisure-time science activities, but not gender, were significantly associated with an increased interest in school science. Interestingly, while hands-on activities are viewed as fun and interesting, connecting learning to real-life and discussing ideas with their peers had a greater relation to student interest in school science. These findings suggest that inquiry learning can increase Singaporean students' interest in school science; however, simply engaging students in hands-on activities is insufficient. Instead, student interest may be increased by ensuring that classroom activities emphasize the everyday applications of science and allow for peer discussion.

  6. How Can Teachers Help Students Formulate Scientific Hypotheses? Some Strategies Found in Abductive Inquiry Activities of Earth Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Phil Seok

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find how the teacher could help students formulate scientific hypotheses. Data came from two microteaching episodes in which two groups of pre-service secondary science teachers taught high school students as they were engaged in abductive inquiry activities of earth science. Multiple data sources including video…

  7. The Effect of Reflective Discussions following Inquiry-Based Laboratory Activities on Students' Views of Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yacoubian, Hagop A.; BouJaoude, Saouma

    2010-01-01

    This research investigated the effect of reflective discussions following inquiry-based laboratory activities on students' views of the tentative, empirical, subjective, and social aspects of nature of science (NOS). Thirty-eight grade six students from a Lebanese school participated in the study. The study used a pretest-posttest control-group…

  8. An Inquiry-Based Biochemistry Laboratory Structure Emphasizing Competency in the Scientific Process: A Guided Approach with an Electronic Notebook Format

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Mona L.; Vardar-Ulu, Didem

    2014-01-01

    The laboratory setting is an exciting and gratifying place to teach because you can actively engage the students in the learning process through hands-on activities; it is a dynamic environment amenable to collaborative work, critical thinking, problem-solving and discovery. The guided inquiry-based approach described here guides the students…

  9. A Laboratory Experiment Investigating Different Aspects of Catalase Activity in an Inquiry - Based Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimbrough, Doris R.; Magoun, Mary Ann; Langfur, Meg

    1997-02-01

    The action of the enzyme catalase on aqueous hydrogen peroxide to generate oxygen gas is a well-established demonstration (1-3). Catalase is typically obtained by aqueous extraction of a potato, and the potato extract is mixed together with 3% hydrogen peroxide. The oxygen that is produced can be collected over water. Variations on the procedure can demonstrate the dependence of catalytic activity on temperature or the presence of inhibitors (1, 2). The University of Colorado at Denver has used a version of this procedure as a laboratory in its second-semester course for nonmajors. Recently, students have been allowed to expand upon the procedures prescribed in the laboratory handout in an open-ended project format. We explored some of these variations in detail, and the results provided here offer ideas, centered around this laboratory, for open-ended projects that can be used in an inquiry-based approach.

  10. Changes in Belief Orientations of Preservice Teachers and Their Relation to Inquiry Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilitsis, Vicky; Duncan, Ravit Golan

    2012-12-01

    Research in science education suggests that teachers' beliefs are linked to the use of inquiry-based instruction; teachers holding a constructivist belief are more likely to engage in student-centered activities in the classroom. However, there is currently little research on the ways in which teachers' beliefs change over time, and in particular, the relationship between instructional activities in teacher education programs and their impact on teachers' beliefs. We examined shifts in secondary preservice teachers' belief orientations as they progressed through a science methods course. We found that overall many of the preservice teachers progressed in their orientation beliefs from a teacher-centered orientation to more student-centered orientation. We characterized four trajectories of change or clusters that describe how preservice teachers' beliefs changed over the course of the semester (15 weeks). We also describe the different ways in which preservice teachers reacted to specific instructional activities, and how those activities influenced their belief orientation. In particular, we found that preservice teachers in a cluster that exhibited a particular trajectory (progression or regression toward/away from student-centered belief orientation) reacted differently to some activities compared to preservice teachers in some other clusters. We discuss these shifts as reflecting changes in priorities of beliefs within belief systems. We argue that teacher educators need to think carefully about the interplay of these beliefs when designing activities so that they can respond (i.e., to a reversal in beliefs) during the course rather than waiting until the end.

  11. An Analysis of Activities in Saudi Arabian Middle School Science Textbooks and Workbooks for the Inclusion of Essential Features of Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldahmash, Abdulwali H.; Mansour, Nasser S.; Alshamrani, Saeed M.; Almohi, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    This study examines Saudi Arabian middle school science textbooks' coverage of the essential features of scientific inquiry. All activities in the middle school science textbooks and workbooks were analyzed by using the scientific inquiry "essential features" rubric. The results indicated that the essential features are included in about…

  12. Teaching, as Learning, as Inquiry: Moving beyond Activity in the Analysis of Teaching Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandoval, William A.; Deneroff, Victoria; Franke, Megan L.

    This paper describes an ongoing high school science teacher professional development project, Beyond Final Form Science, that focuses on developing teachers' ideas of scientific inquiry and inquiry pedagogy. It analyzes the first several months of the project, highlighting analyses of teachers' interactions during monthly professional development…

  13. Searching for a Common Ground--A Literature Review of Empirical Research on Scientific Inquiry Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rönnebeck, Silke; Bernholt, Sascha; Ropohl, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Despite the importance of scientific inquiry in science education, researchers and educators disagree considerably regarding what features define this instructional approach. While a large body of literature addresses theoretical considerations, numerous empirical studies investigate scientific inquiry on quite different levels of detail and also…

  14. Students Doing Chemistry: A Hand-On Experience for K-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selco, Jodye I.; Bruno, Mary; Chan, Sue

    2012-01-01

    A hands-on, minds-on inquiry chemistry experiment was developed for use in K-12 schools that enables students to combine the chemicals of their choice and observe the results. The chemistry involved is water based and builds upon acid-base, double displacement, and iodometric detection of starch reactions. Chemicals readily available in the…

  15. Hands-on physics displays for undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerlof, Carl W.

    2014-07-01

    Initiated by Frank Oppenheimer in 1969, the Exploratorium in San Francisco has been the model for hands-on science museums throughout the world. The key idea has been to bring people with all levels of scientific background in contact with interesting and attractive exhibits that require the active participation of the visitor. Unfortunately, many science museums are now forced to cater primarily to very young audiences, often 8 years old or less, with predictable constraints on the intellectual depth of their exhibits. To counter this trend, the author has constructed several hands-on displays for the University of Michigan Physics Department that demonstrate: (1) magnetic levitation of pyrolytic graphite, (2) the varied magnetic induction effects in aluminum, copper and air, (3) chaotic motion of a double pendulum, (4) conservation of energy and momentum in a steel ball magnetic accelerator, (5) the diffraction pattern of red and green laser pointer beams created by CDs and DVDs, (6) a magnetic analog of the refraction of light at a dielectric boundary and (7) optical rotation of light in an aqueous fructose solution. Each of these exhibits can be constructed for something like $1000 or less and are robust enough to withstand unsupervised public use. The dynamic behavior of these exhibits will be shown in accompanying video sequences. The following story has a history that goes back quite a few years. In the late 70's, I was spending time at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center accompanied by my family that included our two grade school children. Needless to say, we much enjoyed weekend excursions to all sorts of interesting sites in the Bay Area, especially the Exploratorium, an unusual science museum created by Frank Oppenheimer that opened in 1969. The notion that exhibits would be designed specifically for "hands-on" interactions was at that time quite revolutionary. This idea captivated a number of people everywhere including a friend in Ann Arbor, Cynthia

  16. An Inquiry-Based Vision Science Activity for Graduate Students and Postdoctoral Research Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putnam, N. M.; Maness, H. L.; Rossi, E. A.; Hunter, J. J.

    2010-12-01

    The vision science activity was originally designed for the 2007 Center for Adaptive Optics (CfAO) Summer School. Participants were graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, and professionals studying the basics of adaptive optics. The majority were working in fields outside vision science, mainly astronomy and engineering. The primary goal of the activity was to give participants first-hand experience with the use of a wavefront sensor designed for clinical measurement of the aberrations of the human eye and to demonstrate how the resulting wavefront data generated from these measurements can be used to assess optical quality. A secondary goal was to examine the role wavefront measurements play in the investigation of vision-related scientific questions. In 2008, the activity was expanded to include a new section emphasizing defocus and astigmatism and vision testing/correction in a broad sense. As many of the participants were future post-secondary educators, a final goal of the activity was to highlight the inquiry-based approach as a distinct and effective alternative to traditional laboratory exercises. Participants worked in groups throughout the activity and formative assessment by a facilitator (instructor) was used to ensure that participants made progress toward the content goals. At the close of the activity, participants gave short presentations about their work to the whole group, the major points of which were referenced in a facilitator-led synthesis lecture. We discuss highlights and limitations of the vision science activity in its current format (2008 and 2009 summer schools) and make recommendations for its improvement and adaptation to different audiences.

  17. Population Growth, Energy Use, and Pollution: Understanding the Driving Forces of Global Change. Hands-On! Developing Active Learning Modules on the Human Dimensions of Global Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuby, Michael

    Since the beginning of the scientific revolution in the 1700s, the absolute scale of the human economy has increased many times over, and, with it, the impact on the natural environment. This learning module's activities introduce the student to linkages among population growth, energy use, level of economic and technological development and their…

  18. Are All Hands-On Activities Equally Effective? Effect of Using Plastic Models, Organ Dissections, and Virtual Dissections on Student Learning and Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardi, Sara A.; Hicks, Reimi E.; Thompson, Katerina V.; Marbach-Ad, Gili

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of three commonly used cardiovascular model-assisted activities on student learning and student attitudes and perspectives about science. College students enrolled in a Human Anatomy and Physiology course were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups (organ dissections, virtual dissections, or…

  19. A New Two-Step Approach for Hands-On Teaching of Gene Technology: Effects on Students' Activities During Experimentation in an Outreach Gene Technology Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharfenberg, Franz-Josef; Bogner, Franz X.

    2011-08-01

    Emphasis on improving higher level biology education continues. A new two-step approach to the experimental phases within an outreach gene technology lab, derived from cognitive load theory, is presented. We compared our approach using a quasi-experimental design with the conventional one-step mode. The difference consisted of additional focused discussions combined with students writing down their ideas (step one) prior to starting any experimental procedure (step two). We monitored students' activities during the experimental phases by continuously videotaping 20 work groups within each approach ( N = 131). Subsequent classification of students' activities yielded 10 categories (with well-fitting intra- and inter-observer scores with respect to reliability). Based on the students' individual time budgets, we evaluated students' roles during experimentation from their prevalent activities (by independently using two cluster analysis methods). Independently of the approach, two common clusters emerged, which we labeled as `all-rounders' and as `passive students', and two clusters specific to each approach: `observers' as well as `high-experimenters' were identified only within the one-step approach whereas under the two-step conditions `managers' and `scribes' were identified. Potential changes in group-leadership style during experimentation are discussed, and conclusions for optimizing science teaching are drawn.

  20. A Cross National Examination of Inquiry and Its Relationship to Student Performance in Science: Evidence from the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, Kevin A.; Wong, Kenneth K.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between four inquiry-based teaching practices (use of: (1) models or applications, (2) hands-on activities, (3) interaction and (4) independent investigations) and science achievement for 15-year olds across eight countries participating in the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2006. Within each…

  1. Beyond Density: An Inquiry-Based Activity Involving Students Searching for Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMeo, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Explains the limitations of a traditional density experiment and presents an inquiry-based laboratory experiment which allows students to develop an understanding on the relationship between the object's properties and the volume of water the object displaces. (YDS)

  2. Rocketing into Adaptive Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farenga, Stephen J.; Joyce, Beverly A.; Dowling, Thomas W.

    2002-01-01

    Defines adaptive inquiry and argues for employing this method which allows lessons to be shaped in response to student needs. Illustrates this idea by detailing an activity in which teams of students build rockets. (DDR)

  3. Inquiry in Action: Investigating Matter through Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessler, James H.; Galvan, Patricia M.

    This book gives elementary and middle school teachers a set of physical science activities to help teach major concepts in the study of matter. The activities were developed to lend themselves to a guided inquiry approach for use with grades 3-8. To be effective over such a wide grade range, activities are designed to cover basic concepts but have…

  4. How can Teachers Help Students Formulate Scientific Hypotheses? Some Strategies Found in Abductive Inquiry Activities of Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Phil Seok

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to find how the teacher could help students formulate scientific hypotheses. Data came from two microteaching episodes in which two groups of pre-service secondary science teachers taught high school students as they were engaged in abductive inquiry activities of earth science. Multiple data sources including video recordings of the microteaching, the pre-service teachers' oral and written reports, student worksheets, and instructional materials were examined. The analysis identified four categories of teaching strategies which could be used by science teachers to help students in hypothesis-generating inquiry. These included: (1) expanding and activating students' background knowledge, (2) providing analogies, (3) questioning, and (4) encouraging students to use alternative forms of representation. Implications for science education as well as for further research are suggested.

  5. Approaching a Conceptual Understanding of Enzyme Kinetics and Inhibition: Development of an Active Learning Inquiry Activity for Prehealth and Nonscience Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, Chloe; Meades, Glen; Linenberger, Kimberly J.

    2016-01-01

    Presented is a guided inquiry activity designed to be conducted with prenursing students using an analogous system to help develop a conceptual understanding of factors impacting enzyme kinetics and the various types of enzyme inhibition. Pre- and postconceptual understanding evaluations and effectiveness of implementation surveys were given to…

  6. Inquiry-based Science Activities Using The Infrared Zoo and Infrared Yellowstone Resources at Cool Cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daou, D.; Gauthier, A.

    2003-12-01

    Inquiry-based activities that utilize the Cool Cosmos image galleries have been designed and developed by K12 teachers enrolled in The Invisible Universe Online for Teachers course. The exploration activities integrate the Our Infrared World Gallery (http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/image_galleries/our_ir_world_gallery.html) with either the Infrared Zoo gallery (http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/image_galleries/ir_zoo/index.html) or the Infrared Yellowstone image http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/image_galleries/ir_yellowstone/index.html) and video (http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/videos/ir_yellowstone/index.html) galleries. Complete instructor guides have been developed for the activities and will be presented by the authors in poster and CD form. Although the activities are written for middle and highschool learners, they can easily be adapted for college audiences. The Our Infrared World Gallery exploration helps learners think critically about visible light and infrared light as they compare sets of images (IR and visible light) of known objects. For example: by taking a regular photograph of a running faucet, can you tell if it is running hot or cold water? What new information does the IR image give you? The Infrared Zoo activities encourage learners to investigate the differences between warm and cold blooded animals by comparing sets of IR and visible images. In one activity, learners take on the role of a pit viper seeking prey in various desert and woodland settings. The main activities are extended into the real world by discussing and researching industrial, medical, and societal applications of infrared technologies. The Infrared Yellowstone lessons give learners a unique perspective on Yellowstone National Park and it's spectacular geologic and geothermal features. Infrared video technology is highlighted as learners make detailed observations about the visible and infrared views of the natural phenomena. The "Cool Cosmos" EPO activities are

  7. Hands-on Science: Wildcatters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markle, Sandra

    1988-01-01

    A science unit illustrates the concept of scientific predictions by using how geologists predict where to drill for oil as an example. In a related exercise, everyday items such as bricks, sand, and marbles introduce permeability. Other activities demonstrate how to base predictions on established patterns. A reproducible page is provided. (JL)

  8. Using NASA-Unique Lunar Sample Disks and Resources to Inspire and Promote Scientific Inquiry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J.; Graff, P. V.; Willis, K. J.; Runco, S.

    2014-01-01

    The opportunity for educators and students across the nation to hold precious, NASA lunar samples in their hands and examine materials brought back by astronauts during the Apollo era is an experience and memory that can last a lifetime. Combine that experience with the opportunity to be engaged with hands-on activities that promote scientific inquiry and an understanding of the importance of these samples...now you are preparing our nation's future scientific explorers.

  9. Integrated Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trautmann, Nancy M.; Carlsen, William S.; Krasny, Marianne E.; Cunningham, Christine M.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces the Environmental Inquiry (EI) program which focuses on five topics: watershed dynamics, environmental toxicology, ecology of invasive species, biodegradations, and urban ecosystem modeling. (YDS)

  10. Is the Inquiry Real? Working Definitions of Inquiry in the Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, William H.; Penick, John E.

    2009-01-01

    When describing activities in today's K-12 science classrooms, the word inquiry often causes some confusion. As a result, many of us find ourselves asking the same questions: How do we know when inquiry is authentic? What should happen in an inquiry-centered science classroom? What is the teacher's role in an inquiry-centered class and what is the…

  11. Emergent self-regulatory activity among young children during scientific inquiry: An analysis of six kindergarten children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomangino, Adrienne Gelpi

    2000-10-01

    This qualitative investigation extends the study of self-regulation to examine young children's developing self-regulated learning competencies. The framework for this research draws upon social cognitive, developmental, and sociocultural perspectives on self-regulation and research on children's scientific thinking. Taking a multiple case study approach, this study examines six kindergarten children's emerging self-regulatory competencies during inquiry-based science instruction. Data were collected during two inquiry-based science programs of study, one pertaining to light and shadow and a second pertaining to motion on inclined planes. Data sources included: videotaped records of the instruction, transcriptions of the videotapes, interviews with the children and teacher, student work, and field notes. Taking an inductive approach to analysis, patterns in the children's activity were identified through a recursive process of defining and refining categories that characterized the children's verbal and behavioral activity. Each case study examines a child's behavior within each phase of the inquiry for evidence of emerging self-regulatory competence. Analysis revealed nascent forms of goal-setting and planning, monitoring, resource management, seeking social assistance, and evaluating. Monitoring activity occurred more frequently than planning or evaluating. For several children, animating materials served to promote motivation. Children's efforts to support peers' activity and monitor the meaning of ongoing discourse contrast with common assumptions about children's attention to others' thinking. Variations in self-regulatory activity were found across phases of instruction. The children exhibited interpersonal self-regulatory efforts, in which monitoring and control of the self was entwined with the activity of others. Joint participation also played a critical role in supporting the metacognitive demands of self-regulation and prompting metacognitive awareness

  12. Supported inquiry science: teaching for conceptual change in urban and suburban science classrooms.

    PubMed

    Dalton, B; Morocco, C C; Tivnan, T; Mead, P L

    1997-01-01

    Science education professionals generally agree that hands-on, inquiry-based science potentially benefits all students, yet there are few specific guidelines for helping students with learning disabilities (LD) achieve success in general education science classrooms. This study compared the effects of two approaches to hands-on science--supported inquiry science (SIS) and activity-based science--in six urban and two suburban fourth-grade general education classrooms. Participants included 172 students, 33 of whom had learning disabilities. The study found that students with and without LD demonstrated greater concept learning in the SIS classrooms, which focused on eliciting and reworking students' misconceptions and co-constructing knowledge under the guidance of a teacher-coach.

  13. Hands-on Science Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, L. L.

    2006-08-01

    Many of the most important questions studied in science touch on fundamental issues with a great popular appeal, such as: How was the world created? How did life arise? Are we alone? How does it all end? Communication of science to the public is important and will play an even greater role in the coming years. The communication of achieved results is more and more often seen as a natural and mandatory activity to inform the public, attract funding, and attract science students. In some countries university statutes are even being rewritten in these years to include communication with the public as the third mandatory function besides research and education. A number of interesting "lessons learned" from the daily work at the Education and Outreach (EPO) office of the European Space Agency's Hubble Space Telescope will be presented. The topics include conventional as well as unconventional issues such as: • How does the flow of communication from scientist to public work, which actors are involved, and which pitfalls are present in their interaction? How can possible problems be avoided? • What are the criteria that determine whether press releases "make it" or not? • How can a commercial approach benefit an EPO office? • What is the right skills base in a modern EPO office? • How can modern technology be used to communicate science more efficiently?

  14. Hands-On Whole Science. Pass the Beetles, Please.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1992-01-01

    Several hands-on whole science activities help elementary students learn about animals' diets and how they affect other animals. One activity involves identifying animals as carnivores, herbivores, or omnivores. Another has students construct food chains. Two across-the-curriculum ideas involve naming carnivores and preparing imaginary menus for…

  15. Hands-on Science. Why Do Mittens Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1996-01-01

    This article presents hands-on, experiential science activities that use mittens to teach elementary students about classification and insulation. The first involves children sorting mittens. The second has them find out for themselves why mittens keep their hands warm. Across-the-curriculum activities are also described. (SM)

  16. Burglar Alarm: A Simple Circuit Hands-On Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akarsu, Bayram

    2011-01-01

    Hands-on activities are one of the most popular instructional tools that enhance student understandings of the science concepts and enable them to get involved in science practices as well. However, most of science educators underestimate its effectiveness in the classrooms. In order to illustrate how these activities could be utilized for science…

  17. Hands-On Science. Bright Ideas for Teaching About Shadows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1997-01-01

    Presents an elementary level hands-on science activity designed to teach students about shadows. The activity helps students draw conclusions about shadows by experimenting with different materials and determining which will make a shadow. A sidebar explains what a shadow is and offers further resources. (SM)

  18. Hands-On Science: Science Start-ups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1992-01-01

    Article discusses the four elements of good elementary science programs and offers ideas for creative hands-on science and across-the-curriculum activities (e.g., a please touch science center, curriculum planning chart, and getting to know you water activity). It notes science-related events and describes four science reference books. (SM)

  19. Science Fun: Hands-On Science with Dr. Zed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penrose, Gordon

    This book presents 65 simple, safe, and intriguing hands-on science activities. In doing these simple experiments, children can make a variety of discoveries that will surprise them. It includes many activities from discovering how people see color and what makes people's hair stand on end, to creating a tornado in a jar or a propeller-driven boat…

  20. Collaborative Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David, Jane L.

    2009-01-01

    Teachers can make better use of data when they work together than when they do it alone. Creating the conditions for such collaboration is a tall order. This article describes the idea behind the collaborative inquiry approach. It also mentions several studies that indicate its effectiveness. Tips on how collaborative inquiry can be implemented…

  1. An inquiry-based course in nano-photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadbridge, Christine; Calvert, Jodi; Donnelly, Judith; Garofano, Jacquelynn; Massa, Nicholas

    2010-08-01

    We developed a curriculum to introduce nanotechnology and photonics concepts to community college students enrolled in a program designed to attract and retain students in technology associate degree programs. Working with the Center for Research on Interface Structures and Phenomena, an NSF Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, and the PHOTON projects, funded by the Advanced Technological Education program of NSF, we developed hands-on, inquiry-based activities to address the course goals: improve critical thinking, introduce science and technology concepts common to technology programs and provide opportunity to practice math skills in context.

  2. Inquiry-Based Pre-Engineering Activities for K-4 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrin, Michele

    2004-01-01

    This paper uses inquiry-based learning to introduce primary students to the concepts and terminology found in four introductory engineering courses: Differential Equations, Circuit Analysis, Thermodynamics, and Dynamics. Simple electronic sensors coupled with everyday objects, such as a troll doll, demonstrate and reinforce the physical principles…

  3. Imploding Soda Cans: From Demonstration to Guided-Inquiry Laboratory Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichler, Jack F.

    2009-01-01

    A guided-inquiry exercise conducted in both the lecture and laboratory components of a college introductory chemistry course for non-science majors is described. The exercise gave students the opportunity to independently determine the relationship between the temperature of water in an aluminum soda can and the intensity of implosion upon placing…

  4. Collaborative Curriculum Making in the Physical Education Vein: A Narrative Inquiry of Space, Activity and Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Cheryl J.; You, JeongAe; Oh, Suhak

    2013-01-01

    Located at the intersection where teaching and curriculum meet, this narrative inquiry examines how collaborative curriculum making unfolded between and among six members of a physical education department in a middle school in the mid-southern USA. The internationally significant work takes the position that long-term relations are prerequisite…

  5. Exploring Secondary Students' Understanding of Chemical Kinetics through Inquiry-Based Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chairam, Sanoe; Klahan, Nutsuda; Coll, Richard K.

    2015-01-01

    This research is trying to evaluate the feedback of Thai secondary school students to inquiry-based teaching and learning methods, exemplified by the study of chemical kinetics. This work used the multiple-choice questions, scientifically practical diagram and questionnaire to assess students' understanding of chemical kinetics. The findings…

  6. A Career in Inquiry.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Helen S

    2015-01-01

    This article, based on the 52nd Eleanor Clarke Slagle lecture given at the 95th American Occupational Therapy Association Annual Conference & Expo, explores the concept of inquiry as the basis for a career and as an activity of daily living. Using the heliocentric theory and the space program at NASA as examples, the broad concept of inquiry is discussed, because it has led to important changes in society over the course of history. The article describes how a career as a clinician-scientist can be grounded in the concept of inquiry and explains how all occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants can base their own careers in inquiry, using examples from the early history of the profession of occupational therapy and from work by current investigators. Practical suggestions applicable to every clinician are provided.

  7. A Career in Inquiry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This article, based on the 52nd Eleanor Clarke Slagle lecture given at the 95th American Occupational Therapy Association Annual Conference & Expo, explores the concept of inquiry as the basis for a career and as an activity of daily living. Using the heliocentric theory and the space program at NASA as examples, the broad concept of inquiry is discussed, because it has led to important changes in society over the course of history. The article describes how a career as a clinician–scientist can be grounded in the concept of inquiry and explains how all occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants can base their own careers in inquiry, using examples from the early history of the profession of occupational therapy and from work by current investigators. Practical suggestions applicable to every clinician are provided. PMID:26565091

  8. A Career in Inquiry.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Helen S

    2015-01-01

    This article, based on the 52nd Eleanor Clarke Slagle lecture given at the 95th American Occupational Therapy Association Annual Conference & Expo, explores the concept of inquiry as the basis for a career and as an activity of daily living. Using the heliocentric theory and the space program at NASA as examples, the broad concept of inquiry is discussed, because it has led to important changes in society over the course of history. The article describes how a career as a clinician-scientist can be grounded in the concept of inquiry and explains how all occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants can base their own careers in inquiry, using examples from the early history of the profession of occupational therapy and from work by current investigators. Practical suggestions applicable to every clinician are provided. PMID:26565091

  9. Using Lunar Sample Disks and Resources to Promote Scientific Inquiry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, Paige; Allen, Jaclyn; Runco, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This poster presentation will illustrate the use of NASA Lunar Sample Disks and resources to promote scientific inquiry and address the Next Generation Science Standards. The poster will present information on the Lunar Sample Disks, housed and managed by the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Directorate at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The poster will also present information on an inquiry-based planetary sample and impact cratering unit designed to introduce students in grades 4-10 to the significance of studying the rocks, soils, and surfaces of a planetary world. The unit, consisting of many hands-on activities, provides context and background information to enhance the impact of the Lunar Sample Disks.

  10. Eight Ways to Do Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Daniel Z.; Kubarek-Sandor, Joy; Kedvesh, James; Heitzman, Cheryl; Pan, Yaozhen; Faik, Sima

    2012-01-01

    Creating inquiry activities is inherently difficult. Asking meaningful questions requires both background knowledge on the part of the students and complexity on the part of the phenomena. Yet numerous strategies can help teachers conduct inquiry activities. In this article, the authors share a taxonomy of teaching strategies used to create…

  11. Inquiry, Land Snails, and Environmental Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Lloyd H.; Krantz, Patrick D.

    2002-01-01

    Introduces land snails for use in inquiry-based science activities. Describes common characteristics and safety considerations while introducing students to land snails. Explains procedures for inquiry-based use of land snails in classrooms. (YDS)

  12. Mini-Lab Activities: Inquiry-Based Lab Activities for Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branan, Daniel; Morgan, Matt

    2010-01-01

    Students everywhere love chemistry demonstrations, especially if they involve explosions. But have you ever wanted to move beyond the "wow" factor and find a way to incorporate active student learning into your demos? What if you could get them to think more deeply about what they're observing, and then find out if they really understand what…

  13. Electrifying Inquiry: Electrical Circuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godbey, Susan; Barnett, Jessica; Webster, Lois

    2005-01-01

    An activity involving parallel electrical circuits was modified to incorporate an open inquiry approach. Both the original and revised versions of the activity were tested in the middle school classroom. We present a comparison of the two versions of the activity in terms of facilitating learning and engaging students' interests.

  14. A Hands-On Approach to Maglev for Gifted Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budd, Raymond T.

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses how Magnetic Levitation (Maglev) can be taught to gifted students in grades 4-9 using hands-on activities that align to the National Science Standards. Principles of magnetic levitation, advantages of magnetic levitation, construction of a Maglev project, testing and evaluation of vehicles, and presentation of the unit are…

  15. Not-So-Messy Hands-On Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Denise; Denty, Amy

    2002-01-01

    Presents four elementary hands-on science activities that highlight animal adaptation (how birds' beaks are adapted to suit their habitats), the water cycle (how nature cleans rainwater that seeps into the ground), aquatic ecosystems (changes over time in an aquatic habitat), and animal habitats (all living beings' need for food, water, shelter,…

  16. Hands-On Experiences with Buoyant-Less Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slisko, Josip; Planinsic, Gorazd

    2010-01-01

    The phenomenon of weightlessness is known to students thanks to videos of amazing things astronauts do in spaceships orbiting the Earth. In this article we propose two hands-on activities which give students opportunities to infer by themselves the absence of buoyant force in a gravity accelerated system. The system is a free-falling or vertically…

  17. Hands-On Mathematics: Two Cases from Ancient Chinese Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Youjun

    2009-01-01

    In modern mathematical teaching, it has become increasingly emphasized that mathematical knowledge should be taught by problem-solving, hands-on activities, and interactive learning experiences. Comparing the ideas of modern mathematical education with the development of ancient Chinese mathematics, we find that the history of mathematics in…

  18. Information Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the components of information inquiry that are necessary to meet basic information and media literacy skills. Highlights include questioning; exploration; assimilation; inference; reflection; information environments, including school, workplace, and personal; information needs; information problems; and literacy and fluency. (LRW)

  19. An investigation into the factors that motivate teachers to implement inquiry in the science classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Beth Schieber

    Inquiry-based science teaching is an inductive approach to science instruction that originated in constructivist learning theory and requires students to be active participants in their own learning process. In an inquiry-based classroom, students actively construct their knowledge of science through hands-on, engaged practices and inquiry-based approaches. Inquiry-based teaching stands in contrast to more traditional forms of teaching that see students as empty vessels to be filled by the teacher with rote facts. Despite calls from the NSF, the NRC, and the AAAS for more inquiry-based approaches to teaching science, research has shown that many teachers still do not use inquiry-based approaches. Teachers have cited difficulties including lack of time, high-stakes testing, a shortage of materials, problems with school-wide logistics, rigid science curricula, student passivity, and lack of prerequisite skills. The objective of this mixed-methods study was to examine to what extent specific, identifiable personality traits contribute to the likelihood that a teacher will use inquiry in the science classroom, and what factors figure predominantly as teachers' reasons for implementing inquiry. The findings of the study showed that the null hypotheses were not rejected. However, reduced conscientiousness and increased openness may be significant in indicating why teachers use inquiry-based teaching methods and avenues for further research. In addition, the qualitative results aligned with previous findings that showed that lack of resources (e.g., time and money) and peer support act as powerful barriers to implementing inquiry-based teaching. Inquiry teachers are flexible, come to teaching as a second or third career, and their classrooms can be characterized as chaotic, fun, and conducive to learning through engagement. The study suggests changes in practice among administrators and teachers. With adjustments in methods and survey instruments, additional research

  20. Curiosity and Open Inquiry Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zion, Michal; Sadeh, Irit

    2007-01-01

    Asking questions is an activity central to inquiry learning. This research examined documents created during an open inquiry learning process of the Biomind programme for Israeli high school students. In addition, to understand how students express and develop curiosity in learning, we observed students during a molecular biology lesson, a subject…

  1. The Hands-On Optics Project: a demonstration of module 3-magnificent magnifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompea, Stephen M.; Sparks, Robert T.; Walker, Constance E.

    2014-07-01

    The Hands-On Optics project offers an example of a set of instructional modules that foster active prolonged engagement. Developed by SPIE, OSA, and NOAO through funding from the U.S. National Science Foundation, the modules were originally designed for afterschool settings and museums. However, because they were based on national standards in mathematics, science, and technology, they were easily adapted for use in classrooms. The philosophy and implementation strategies of the six modules will be described as well as lessons learned in training educators. The modules were implementing with the help of optics industry professionals who served as expert volunteers to assist educators. A key element of the modules was that they were developed around an understanding of optics misconceptions and used culminating activities in each module as a form of authentic assessment. Thus student achievement could be measured by evaluating the actual product created by each student in applying key concepts, tools, and applications together at the end of each module. The program used a progression of disciplinary core concepts to build an integrated sequence and crosscutting ideas and practices to infuse the principles of the modern electro-optical field into the modules. Whenever possible, students were encouraged to experiment and to create, and to pursue inquiry-based approaches. The result was a program that had high appeal to regular as well as gifted students.

  2. Infusing Authentic Inquiry into Biotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanegan, Nikki L.; Bigler, Amber

    2009-10-01

    Societal benefit depends on the general public's understandings of biotechnology (Betsch in World J Microbiol Biotechnol 12:439-443, 1996; Dawson and Cowan in Int J Sci Educ 25(1):57-69, 2003; Schiller in Business Review: Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia (Fourth Quarter), 2002; Smith and Emmeluth in Am Biol Teach 64(2):93-99, 2002). A National Science Foundation funded survey of high school biology teachers reported that hands-on biotechnology education exists in advanced high school biology in the United States, but is non-existent in mainstream biology coursework (Micklos et al. in Biotechnology labs in American high schools, 1998). The majority of pre-service teacher content preparation courses do not teach students appropriate content knowledge through the process of inquiry. A broad continuum exists when discussing inquiry-oriented student investigations (Hanegan et al. in School Sci Math J 109(2):110-134, 2009). Depending on the amount of structure in teacher lessons, inquiries can often be categorized as guided or open. The lesson can be further categorized as simple or authentic (Chinn and Malhotra in Sci Educ 86(2):175-218, 2002). Although authentic inquiries provide the best opportunities for cognitive development and scientific reasoning, guided and simple inquiries are more often employed in the classroom (Crawford in J Res Sci Teach 37(9):916-937, 2000; NRC in Inquiry and the national science education standards: a guide for teaching and learning, 2000). For the purposes of this study we defined inquiry as "authentic" if original research problems were resolved (Hanegan et al. in School Sci Math J 109(2):110-134, 2009; Chinn and Malhotra in Sci Educ 86(2):175-218, 2002; Roth in Authentic school science: knowing and learning in open-inquiry science laboratories, 1995). The research question to guide this study through naturalistic inquiry research methods was: How will participants express whether or not an authentic inquiry experience enhanced

  3. Inquiry and Aquifers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leuenberger, Ted; Shepardson, Daniel; Harbor, Jon; Bell, Cheryl; Meyer, Jason; Klagges, Hope; Burgess, Willie

    2001-01-01

    Presents inquiry-oriented activities that acquaint students with groundwater sources, movement of water through aquifers, and contamination of groundwater by pollution. In one activity, students use well log data from web-based resources to explore groundwater systems. Provides sample well log data for those not having access to local information.…

  4. Extending Paper Chromatography Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finson, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    One of the "good old" standard activities middle school students seem to enjoy is paper chromatography. The procedures and materials needed are relatively simple and the results can be colorful. All too often, the activity ends just after these colorful results are obtained, cutting short the potential it holds for some further inquiry. With some…

  5. An Analysis of Activities in Saudi Arabian Middle School Science Textbooks and Workbooks for the Inclusion of Essential Features of Inquiry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldahmash, Abdulwali H.; Mansour, Nasser S.; Alshamrani, Saeed M.; Almohi, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    This study examines Saudi Arabian middle school science textbooks' coverage of the essential features of scientific inquiry. All activities in the middle school science textbooks and workbooks were analyzed by using the scientific inquiry `essential features' rubric. The results indicated that the essential features are included in about 59 % of the analyzed science activities. However, feature 2, `making learner give priority to evidence in responding to questions' and feature 3, `allowing learner to formulate explanations from evidence' appeared more frequently than the other three features (feature 1: engaging learner in scientifically oriented questions, feature 4: helping learner connect explanations to scientific knowledge, and feature 5: helping learner communicate and justify explanations to others), whether in the activities as a whole, or in the activities included in each of the four science domains (physical science, Earth science, life science and chemistry). These features are represented in almost all activities. This means that almost all activities in the middle school science textbooks and the workbooks include features 2 and 3. Meanwhile, the mean level of inclusion of the five essential features of scientific inquiry found in the middle school science textbooks and workbooks as a whole is 2.55. However, results found for features 1, 4, 5 and for in-level inclusion of the inquiry features in each of the science domains indicate that the inclusion of the essential inquiry features is teacher-centred. As a result, neither science textbooks nor workbooks provide students with the opportunity or encouragement to develop their inquiry skills. Consequently, the results suggest important directions for educational administrators and policy-makers in the preparation and use of science educational content.

  6. Dealing with the Ambiguities of Science Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Yuen Sze Michelle; Caleon, Imelda Santos

    2016-01-01

    The current vision of science education in myriad educational contexts encourages students to learn through the process of science inquiry. Science inquiry has been used to promote conceptual learning and engage learners in an active process of meaning-making and investigation to understand the world around them. The science inquiry process…

  7. Sustaining a Mature Teacher Inquiry Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satter, Sarah Bea

    2014-01-01

    This research consisted of a case study of an active network for teacher inquiry. Specifically, I investigated how an organization dedicated to teacher inquiry had provided the structure, leadership, and resources to sustain, maintain, and expand the network. The group studied was the Mid-Ohio Writing Project, a teacher inquiry network affiliated…

  8. Dissection as Inquiry: Using the "Peanut Observation" Activity to Promote a Revised Paradigm of Dissection and Facilitate Student Involvement and Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Penny L.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces the peanut observation activity to teach about the pros and cons of dissection. As an inquiry-based approach, dissection is one way to teach process skills. Lists the progression of the activity as observation, questioning and finding the answer, challenge, discussion, and further examination. (Contains 12 references.) (YDS)

  9. An Examination of the Influence of Inquiry-Based Laboratory Activities and Success on Standards Based Achievement Tests in a Suburban High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vilardi, Virginia A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether there is a difference in high school students' achievement and retention on standardized tests between students who participate in inquiry-based laboratory activities and those that participate in traditional style laboratory activities. Additionally, student and teacher opinions of…

  10. College science teachers' views of classroom inquiry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Patrick L.; Abell, Sandra K.; Demir, Abdulkadir; Schmidt, Francis J.

    2006-09-01

    The purposes of this study were to (a) gain an understanding of the views of inquiry held by faculty members involved in undergraduate science teaching and (b) describe the challenges, constraints, and opportunities that they perceived in designing and teaching inquiry-based laboratories. Participants included 19 college professors, representing both life and physical science disciplines, from (a) 2-year community college, (b) small, private nonprofit liberal arts college, (c) public master's granting university, and (d) public doctoral/research extensive university. We collected data through semistructured interviews and applied an iterative data analysis process. College science faculty members held a full and open inquiry view, seeing classroom inquiry as time consuming, unstructured, and student directed. They believed that inquiry was more appropriate for upper level science majors than for introductory or nonscience majors. Although faculty members valued inquiry, they perceived limitations of time, class size, student motivation, and student ability. These limitations, coupled with their view of inquiry, constrained them from implementing inquiry-based laboratories. Our proposed inquiry continuum represents a broader view of inquiry that recognizes the interaction between two dimensions of inquiry: (a) the degree of inquiry and (b) the level of student directedness, and provides for a range of inquiry-based classroom activities.

  11. Reading, Science, and Hands On Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    This paper discusses the different ways in which science can be taught, including reading of subject matter from a basal textbook and a hands-on approach in ongoing science lessons and units of study. The paper first points out that in 1996 the National Science Teachers Association came out with a set of standards for teachers to emphasize in…

  12. Hands-On Training for Deckhands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Carl

    1992-01-01

    Describes riverboat deckhand training program operated by East Mississippi Community College and local river towing companies. Residential program trains deckhands using actual towing equipment, including boat and "quarters barge" with classroom. Describes trainees' rigorous workday, including classes, hands-on drills, and physical training.…

  13. Hands-on science and student achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruby, Allen Michael

    From the late 1950s through today, hands-on science has been promoted as a method of science instruction. Currently, recent national science reform efforts seek to temper its role. However, no consensus has been reached on the relationship of hands-on science to student achievement though this topic has been researched since the turn of the 20th century using various methods. To improve upon the literature, this work addresses three major limitations of past research---the lack of data on performance assessments of student achievement, the need to control for factors affecting both hands-on science and test scores, and the potential for a differential relationship by student ability. This work focuses on three research questions: (1) whether hands-on science is positively related to student achievement as measured by standardized test scores using both multiple choice and performance tests, (2) whether this relationship is stronger when using performance tests, and (3) whether this relationship differs by student ability. We apply regression analysis to two data sources. The primary data set is the 1994 RAND Survey of 1400 8th grade students and their teachers in Southern California which includes multiple choice and performance test scores. A second data source is the nationally representative NELS:88 with a focus on the 8th grade student sample. The initial findings vary by source of report, student or teacher, on the level of hands-on science. When accounting for the quality of the reports, the results show an association between the level of handson science and student test scores for both multiple choice and performance tests. The results find little difference for this relationship by type of test. Nor do they show strong evidence for a differential relationship due to student ability. These findings support the promotion of hands-on science at the middle school/junior high level while raising a concern about current science reform attempts to reduce and

  14. Hands-on optics and photonics outreach in Riga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesina, Natalija; Spigulis, Janis

    2014-07-01

    A long-term exposition focused on optics and photonics was created in Institute of Atomic Physics and Spectroscopy at University of Latvia in 2010. Considering unpopularity of science in Latvia and lack of broadly accessible hands-on outreach activities for school children, as well as rapid development of advanced photonic technologies, this exposition was meant to involve more students to the natural sciences and modern technologies. Exposition covers 10 topics of optics - colors, diffraction, interference, polarization, reflection, liquid crystals, gas discharge, lasers, fluorescence, infrared and ultraviolet radiation. Students' visits are organized as an exciting adventure, which differs from ordinary school lessons. The visit mainly includes own actions with hands-on exhibits, lecturer's explanations about the most difficult topics and some demonstrations shown by the lecturer. The main accent is made on hands-on experiments due to the fact that students, who had performed hands-on experiments, will be emboldened to choose their career in the field of science and technologies. The exposition now is running and is part of Riga Photonics Center. Nearly 300 students from the 8th till 12th grades visited it during academic years 2011/2012 and 2012/2013 and their generally positive feedback has been analyzed.

  15. An evaluation of two hands-on lab styles for plant biodiversity in undergraduate biology.

    PubMed

    Basey, John M; Maines, Anastasia P; Francis, Clinton D; Melbourne, Brett

    2014-01-01

    We compared learning cycle and expository formats for teaching about plant biodiversity in an inquiry-oriented university biology lab class (n = 465). Both formats had preparatory lab activities, a hands-on lab, and a postlab with reflection and argumentation. Learning was assessed with a lab report, a practical quiz in lab, and a multiple-choice exam in the concurrent lecture. Attitudes toward biology and treatments were also assessed. We used linear mixed-effect models to determine impacts of lab style on lower-order cognition (LO) and higher-order cognition (HO) based on Bloom's taxonomy. Relative to the expository treatment, the learning cycle treatment had a positive effect on HO and a negative effect on LO included in lab reports; a positive effect on transfer of LO from the lab report to the quiz; negative impacts on LO quiz performance and on attitudes toward the lab; and a higher degree of perceived difficulty. The learning cycle treatment had no influence on transfer of HO from lab report to quiz or exam; quiz performance on HO questions; exam performance on LO and HO questions; and attitudes toward biology as a science. The importance of LO as a foundation for HO relative to these lab styles is addressed.

  16. An Evaluation of Two Hands-On Lab Styles for Plant Biodiversity in Undergraduate Biology

    PubMed Central

    Maines, Anastasia P.; Francis, Clinton D.; Melbourne, Brett

    2014-01-01

    We compared learning cycle and expository formats for teaching about plant biodiversity in an inquiry-oriented university biology lab class (n = 465). Both formats had preparatory lab activities, a hands-on lab, and a postlab with reflection and argumentation. Learning was assessed with a lab report, a practical quiz in lab, and a multiple-choice exam in the concurrent lecture. Attitudes toward biology and treatments were also assessed. We used linear mixed-effect models to determine impacts of lab style on lower-order cognition (LO) and higher-order cognition (HO) based on Bloom's taxonomy. Relative to the expository treatment, the learning cycle treatment had a positive effect on HO and a negative effect on LO included in lab reports; a positive effect on transfer of LO from the lab report to the quiz; negative impacts on LO quiz performance and on attitudes toward the lab; and a higher degree of perceived difficulty. The learning cycle treatment had no influence on transfer of HO from lab report to quiz or exam; quiz performance on HO questions; exam performance on LO and HO questions; and attitudes toward biology as a science. The importance of LO as a foundation for HO relative to these lab styles is addressed. PMID:25185232

  17. Argument-Driven Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Victor; Grooms, Jonathon; Walker, Joi

    2009-01-01

    Argument-Driven Inquiry (ADI) is an instructional model that enables science teachers to transform a traditional laboratory activity into a short integrated instructional unit. To illustrate how the ADI instructional model works, this article describes an ADI lesson developed for a 10th-grade chemistry class. This example lesson was designed to…

  18. A Domain-Specific Account of Self-Regulated Learning: The Cognitive and Metacognitive Activities Involved in Learning through Historical Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poitras, Eric G.; Lajoie, Susanne P.

    2013-01-01

    Educational researchers have recently begun to conceptualize theoretical constructs and mechanisms of metacognitive activities in terms of the features that are specific to particular academic domains and subject matter. In this paper, we propose a framework of domain-specific metacognition in relation to learning through historical inquiry. The…

  19. An Augmented Reality-Based Mobile Learning System to Improve Students' Learning Achievements and Motivations in Natural Science Inquiry Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiang, Tosti H. C.; Yang, Stephen J. H.; Hwang, Gwo-Jen

    2014-01-01

    In this study, an augmented reality-based mobile learning system is proposed for conducting inquiry-based learning activities. An experiment has been conducted to examine the effectiveness of the proposed approach in terms of learning achievements and motivations. The subjects were 57 fourth graders from two classes taught by the same teacher in…

  20. Student Inquiry in the Research Process, Part 4: Inquiry Research Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preddy, Leslie B.

    2003-01-01

    Explains a hands-on, classroom teacher/library media specialist collaborative model for implementing the inquiry approach to the research process into the classroom and school library media center. Topics include the investigation phase; source notes; primary sources; interviews; community resources; storyboards; and peer conferences. (LRW)

  1. Issues in Inquiry-Based Science Education Seen through Dewey's Theory of Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Won, Mihye

    2009-01-01

    To understand the issues of inquiry-based education, I adopted John Dewey's theory of inquiry as the analytical framework to examine science learning activities, students' interactions, and education standards. Educators have tried to engage students in meaningful learning, but the analysis revealed that the meaning of inquiry was diverse:…

  2. GeoMapApp Learning Activities: Grab-and-go inquiry-based geoscience activities that bring cutting-edge technology to the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwillie, A. M.; Kluge, S.

    2011-12-01

    NSF-funded GeoMapApp Learning Activities (http://serc.carleton.edu/geomapapp) provide self-contained learning opportunities that are centred around the principles of guided inquiry. The activities allow students to interact with and analyse research-quality geoscience data to explore and enhance student understanding of underlying geoscience content and concepts. Each activity offers ready-to-use step-by-step student instructions and answer sheets that can be downloaded from the web page. Also provided are annotated teacher versions of the worksheets that include teaching tips, additional content and suggestions for further work. Downloadable pre- and post- quizzes tied to each activity help educators gauge the learning progression of their students. Short multimedia tutorials and details on content alignment with state and national teaching standards round out the package of material that comprises each "grab-and-go" activity. GeoMapApp Learning Activities expose students to content and concepts typically found at the community college, high school and introductory undergraduate levels. The activities are based upon GeoMapApp (http://www.geomapapp.org), a free, easy-to-use map-based data exploration and visualisation tool that allows students to access a wide range of geoscience data sets in a virtual lab-like environment. Activities that have so far been created under this project include student exploration of seafloor spreading rates, a study of mass wasting as revealed through geomorphological evidence, and an analysis of plate motion and hotspot traces. The step-by-step instructions and guided inquiry approach lead students through each activity, thus reducing the need for teacher intervention whilst also boosting the time that students can spend on productive exploration and learning. The activities can be used, for example, in a classroom lab with the educator present and as self-paced assignments in an out-of-class setting. GeoMapApp Learning Activities

  3. Learning Environment, Attitudes and Achievement among Middle-School Science Students Using Inquiry-Based Laboratory Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Stephen J.; Fraser, Barry J.

    2008-01-01

    This study compared inquiry and non-inquiry laboratory teaching in terms of students' perceptions of the classroom learning environment, attitudes toward science, and achievement among middle-school physical science students. Learning environment and attitude scales were found to be valid and related to each other for a sample of 1,434 students in…

  4. Physiology Should Be Taught as Science Is Practiced: An Inquiry-Based Activity to Investigate the "Alkaline Tide"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lujan, Heidi L.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) strongly recommends that "science be taught as science is practiced." This means that the teaching approach must be consistent with the nature of scientific inquiry. In this article, the authors describe how they added scientific inquiry to a large lecture-based physiology…

  5. Making Sense of Epistemic Categories: Analysing Students' Use of Categories of Progressive Inquiry in Computer Mediated Collaborative Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnseth, H. C.; Saljo, R.

    2007-01-01

    The topic of this article concerns how students make sense of categories of progressive inquiry made available to them through a discussion and inquiry type of software called Future Learning Environments 2 (FLE2). The idea behind tools of this kind is to induce approaches to school-work that build on the metaphor of learning as research. By…

  6. The effects on community college student physics achievement and attitudes about learning physics due to inquiry-based laboratory activities versus cookbook laboratory activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nock, George Allen Brittingham

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to determine the effects on community college student physics conceptual achievement and attitudes about learning physics due to the use of inquiry-based laboratory activities versus cookbook laboratory activities. An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was performed to test for differences in mean post-test Force Concept Inventory (FCI) score for two different types of physics lab instruction (IL versus CBL). Results of the ANCOVA, F (1, 35) = 0.761, p < 0.389, supported the null hypothesis that no significant difference was found in the post-test FCI scores of the two groups. An ANCOVA was performed to test for differences in mean post-test Mechanics Baseline Test (MBT) score for two different types of physics lab instruction (IL versus CBL)., however, the covariate and the dependent variable were shown to not be linearly related. Therefore, a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare MBT scores. The results of the ANOVA, F (1, 36) = 0.066, p < 0.798, supported the null hypothesis that there was no significant difference in MBT scores of the two groups. A step-wise multiple linear regression was used to analyze the relationships between the FCI post-test score and the type of instruction, FCI pre-test score, and American College Test (ACT) science reasoning sub-scores. The FCI pre-test score and ACT science score were shown to be the best predictors of FCI post-test score. Another step-wise multiple linear regression was used to analyze the relationships between the MBT post-test score and type of instruction, MBT pre-test score, and ACT science reasoning sub-scores. The ACT Science sub-scores were determined to be the best predictor of MBT post-test score. An independent t-test was used to compare the mean lecture test grades for the lab groups taught using inquiry and cookbook methods. The mean lecture test scores of the inquiry-based lab group (M = 81.39, S.D. = 8.15) were found to be significantly

  7. STAR Library Education Network: a hands-on learning program for libraries and their communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P.

    2010-12-01

    Science and technology are widely recognized as major drivers of innovation and industry (e.g. Rising above the Gathering Storm, 2006). While the focus for education reform is on school improvement, there is considerable research that supports the role that out-of-school experiences can play in student achievement and public understanding of STEM disciplines. Libraries provide an untapped resource for engaging underserved youth and their families in fostering an appreciation and deeper understanding of science and technology topics. Designed spaces, like libraries, allow lifelong, life-wide, and life-deep learning to take place though the research basis for learning in libraries is not as developed as other informal settings like science centers. The Space Science Institute’s National Center for Interactive Learning (NCIL) in partnership with the American Library Association (ALA), the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI), and the National Girls Collaborative Project (NGCP) have received funding from NSF to develop a national education project called the STAR Library Education Network: a hands-on learning program for libraries and their communities (or STAR-Net for short). STAR stands for Science-Technology, Activities and Resources. The overarching goal of the project is to reach underserved youth and their families with informal STEM learning experiences. This project will deepen our knowledge of informal/lifelong learning that takes place in libraries and establish a learning model that can be compared to the more established free-choice learning model for science centers and museums. The project includes the development of two STEM hands-on exhibits on topics that are of interest to library staff and their patrons: Discover Earth and Discover Tech. In addition, the project will produce resources and inquiry-based activities that libraries can use to enrich the exhibit experience. Additional resources will be provided through partnerships with relevant

  8. Teaching PCR Through Inquiry in an Undergraduate Biology Laboratory Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorighi, K. M.; Betancourt, J.; Sapp, J.; Quan, T. K.; Lee, J.

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of an inquiry-based laboratory unit on the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). This unit was designed and taught for the undergraduate Eukaryotic Genetics Laboratory class (Bio105L) at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Our activity utilizes an authentic molecular biology research question to teach the underlying molecular mechanisms and experimental technique of PCR, as well as fundamental scientific process skills such as planning experiments, making predictions and interpreting data. In particular, the activity prompts students to use PCR to determine which gene has been deleted in a region of the Drosophila genome. During this activity, students also gained technical experience in common molecular biology techniques, learned about additional applications of PCR and used a hands-on approach to model each step of PCR.

  9. Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL) ecological and physical science study center: A hands-on science program for K-12 students

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, S.P.

    1994-12-31

    In our tenth year of educational service and outreach, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Ecological and Physical Science Study Center (EPSSC) provides hands-on, inquiry-based science activities for area students and teachers. Established in 1984, the EPSSC now hosts over 20,000 student visits. Designed to foster a positive attitude towards science, each unit includes activities which reinforce the science concept being explored. Outdoor science units provide field experience at the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park and outreach programs are offered on-site in area schools. Other programs are offered as extensions of the EPSSC core programs, including on-site student science camps, all-girl programs, outreach science camps, student competitions, teacher in-service presentations and teacher workshops.

  10. Comparing Two Inquiry Professional Development Interventions in Science on Primary Students' Questioning and Other Inquiry Behaviours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Kim; Burgh, Gilbert; Kennedy, Callie

    2015-12-01

    Developing students' skills to pose and respond to questions and actively engage in inquiry behaviours enables students to problem solve and critically engage with learning and society. The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of providing teachers with an intervention in inquiry pedagogy alongside inquiry science curriculum in comparison to an intervention in non-inquiry pedagogy alongside inquiry science curriculum on student questioning and other inquiry behaviours. Teacher participants in the comparison condition received training in four inquiry-based science units and in collaborative strategic reading. The experimental group, the community of inquiry (COI) condition, received training in facilitating a COI in addition to training in the same four inquiry-based science units. This study involved 227 students and 18 teachers in 9 primary schools across Brisbane, Australia. The teachers were randomly allocated by school to one of the two conditions. The study followed the students across years 6 and 7 and students' discourse during small group activities was recorded, transcribed and coded for verbal inquiry behaviours. In the second year of the study, students in the COI condition demonstrated a significantly higher frequency of procedural and substantive higher-order thinking questions and other inquiry behaviours than those in the comparison condition. Implementing a COI within an inquiry science curriculum develops students' questioning and science inquiry behaviours and allows teachers to foster inquiry skills predicated by the Australian Science Curriculum. Provision of inquiry science curriculum resources alone is not sufficient to promote the questioning and other verbal inquiry behaviours predicated by the Australian Science Curriculum.

  11. Taking inquiry to the next level: Tablet PC's to stimulate active learning and unify introductory physics curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, Tikhon; Kosheleva, Yelena

    2009-03-01

    A project has been started in 2005 to design innovative curriculum for the intro physics courses at McMurry University. The project is rooted in science education research and ideas from the NFW. The goal is to achieve better integration of traditional course components by means of instructional design and technology. First, a system of flexible curriculum modules with emphasis on inquiry-based teaching has been introduced. Second, technology is used to improve continuity among module components (lecture/lab/discussion) and stimulate active learning. Enabling technology suite incorporates Tablet PC's and software applications including java-based Physlets, tablet-adapted personal response systems, and PASCO data acquisition systems. Lab curriculum has been modified to accommodate for different learning styles, and levels of baseline knowledge. Activity options and pre-lab Physlet-based assignments were added. To enhance knowledge generalization, multiple experiments are used to illustrate different aspects of the same physics phenomenon. Physlet-based problems were adapted for student peer group discussions. Student feedback showed that modifications were beneficial. Student knowledge assessment, performed with the FCI test, indicated improvement in student learning.

  12. Active Learning: Qualitative Inquiries into Vocabulary Instruction in Chinese L2 Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Helen H.; Xu, Wenjing

    2015-01-01

    Active learning emerged as a new approach to learning in the 1980s. The core concept of active learning involves engaging students not only in actively exploring knowledge but also in reflecting on their own learning process in order to become more effective learners. Because the nonalphabetic nature of the Chinese writing system makes learning to…

  13. An inquiry into evolutionary inquiry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, Samuel S.

    2005-11-01

    While evolution education has received a great deal of attention within the science education research community it still poses difficult teaching and learning challenges. Understanding evolutionary biology has been given high priority in national science education policy because of its role in coordinating our understanding of the life sciences, its importance in our intellectual history, its role in the perception of humans' position in nature, and its impact on our current medical, agricultural, and conservation practices. The rhetoric used in evolution education policy statements emphasizes familiarity with the nature of scientific inquiry as an important learning outcome associated with understanding evolution but provide little guidance with respect to how one might achieve this goal. This dissertation project explores the nature of evolutionary inquiry and how understanding the details of disciplinary reasoning can inform evolution education. The first analysis involves recasting the existing evolution education research literature to assess educational outcomes related to students ability to reason about data using evolutionary biology methods and models. This is followed in the next chapter by a detailed historical and philosophical characterization of evolutionary biology with the goal of providing a richer context for considering what exactly it is we want students to know about evolution as a discipline. Chapter 4 describes the development and implementation of a high school evolution curriculum that engages students with many aspects of model based reasoning. The final component of this reframing of evolution education involves an empirical study characterizing students' understanding of evolutionary biology as a modeling enterprise. Each chapter addresses a different aspect of evolution education and explores the implications of foregrounding disciplinary reasoning as an educational outcome. The analyses are coordinated with one another in the sense

  14. Schoolyard Inquiry for English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westervelt, Miriam

    2007-01-01

    This article presents outdoor inquiry activities to help English Language Learner (ELL) students learn life science concepts. As a public high school ELL science teacher, the author of this article use these place-based and scaffolded inquiry activities outside to reinforce concepts she teaches in the classroom all year long. Through inductive…

  15. Embracing Learners' Ideas about Diffusion and Osmosis: A Coupled-Inquiry Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Ryan M.; Martin-Hansen, Lisa; Verma, Geeta; Dunkhase, John

    2009-01-01

    Learning about osmosis and diffusion is often a challenging task for middle school students. Here the authors present a lesson that was converted from a "cookbook" lab (McLaughlin and Thompson 2007) into a more inquiry-oriented lab that uses inquiry teaching strategies and hands-on investigations to teach middle-grade students about osmosis and…

  16. Zeroing in on Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coatney, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the highlights of an Inquiry Summit held by the publisher ABC-CLIO in summer 2012. The event tackled various issues concerning inquiry in education. Topics discussed include the definition of inquiry learning, how and why should inquiry learning be integrated in teaching and learning, the best strategies for implementing…

  17. It's a Snap! An Inquiry-Based, Snapping Shrimp Bioacoustics Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Bradley K.; Gorospe, Kelvin D.; Haverkort-Yeh, Roxanne D.; Rivera, Malia Ana J.

    2013-01-01

    This bioacoustics activity combines concepts in invertebrate taxonomy, animal communication, and acoustical physics while providing a unique opportunity for physics and biology teachers to collaborate and introduce their students to an exciting, interdisciplinary research field. Here, we propose a lab-and field-based activity that uses hydrophones…

  18. Periodic Properties and Inquiry: Student Mental Models Observed during a Periodic Table Puzzle Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Kathleen G.; Long, George R.; Briggs, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    The mental models of both novice and advanced chemistry students were observed while the students performed a periodic table activity. The mental model framework seems to be an effective way of analyzing student behavior during learning activities. The analysis suggests that students do not recognize periodic trends through the examination of…

  19. NGSS and Inquiry-Based Learning with The GLOBE Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, K.; Bydlowski, D.; Seavey, M.; Andersen, T.; Mackaro, J.; Malmberg, J.; Randolph, J. G.; Tessendorf, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    The GLOBE Program (www.globe.gov) engages K-12 students through scientific discovery to learn about the Earth as a system and provides a curricular example for the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). A key component of GLOBE is its inquiry-based, hands-on activities, which align with the eight practices found in Dimension 1 of the Standards. GLOBE teachers currently address the crosscutting concepts from Dimension 2 in the Standards by engaging students in data analysis and application through GLOBE Investigations, such as GPS, hydrology and atmosphere. Hands-on activities align to the disciplinary core ideas of Dimension 3 of the Standards through the implementation of protocols in air, water, soil, land cover, and seasons in over 25,000 schools in more than 110 countries worldwide. Integration of technology, engineering, and the application of science have played a central role in The GLOBE Program since its inception in 1995. The GLOBE Program provides a venue for students to report their own scientific investigations to scientists, teachers, and other students through student research reports, as well as a variety of student conference opportunities. This presentation will provide samples of how The GLOBE Program and GLOBE teachers encourage inquiry-based learning for student achievement of the NGSS through the review of student reports. These reports serve as artifacts illustrating the scientific practices, crosscutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas students engage in while participating in GLOBE. This review will illustrate the extent to which GLOBE protocols and activities support NGSS, indicate gaps or mismatches in scope and sequence, provide recommendations for new materials development, and demonstrate a process that can be repeated by other science education programs to review their own current alignment to NGSS.

  20. Hands-on-Science: Using Education Research to Construct Learner-Centered Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, R. R.; Chimonidou, A.; Kopp, S.

    2014-07-01

    Research into the process of learning, and learning astronomy, can be informative for the development of a course. Students are better able to incorporate and make sense of new ideas when they are aware of their own prior knowledge (Resnick et al. 1989; Confrey 1990), have the opportunity to develop explanations from their own experience in their own words (McDermott 1991; Prather et al. 2004), and benefit from peer instruction (Mazur 1997; Green 2003). Students in astronomy courses often have difficulty understanding many different concepts as a result of difficulties with spatial reasoning and a sense of scale. The Hands-on-Science program at UT Austin incorporates these research-based results into four guided-inquiry, integrated science courses (50 students each). They are aimed at pre-service K-5 teachers but are open to other majors as well. We find that Hands-on-Science students not only attain more favorable changes in attitude towards science, but they also outperform students in traditional lecture courses in content gains. Workshop Outcomes: Participants experienced a research-based, guided-inquiry lesson about the motion of objects in the sky and discussed the research methodology for assessing students in such a course.

  1. Dealing with the Ambiguities of Science Inquiry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yuen Sze Michelle; Caleon, Imelda Santos

    2016-03-01

    The current vision of science education in myriad educational contexts encourages students to learn through the process of science inquiry. Science inquiry has been used to promote conceptual learning and engage learners in an active process of meaning-making and investigation to understand the world around them. The science inquiry process typically involves asking questions and defining problems; constructing explanations and designing solutions; planning and carrying out investigations; analyzing and interpreting data; and engaging in argument from evidence. Despite the importance and provision of new directions and standards about science inquiry, ambiguities in conceptualizations of inquiry still exist. These conceptualizations may serve as barriers to students learning science. In this article, we detail three main concerns related to teachers' conceptualization of science inquiry in the context of a Singapore classroom—concerns that may be similarly faced by teachers elsewhere.

  2. Learning about Cellular Respiration: An Active Approach Illustrating the Process of Scientific Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Margaret (Peg)

    1998-01-01

    Details the active-learning approach to teaching cellular respiration in an introductory, one-semester course for nonmajors. Focuses on a laboratory exercise designed to answer the question of what happens to food when eaten. Contains 19 references. (DDR)

  3. Evaluating Bacteriocin Production by Environmental Enterococci: An Inquiry-Based Activity in Bacterial Antgonism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, June

    2007-01-01

    Bacteriocins, bacteriocidal proteins produced by bacteria, have a very restricted killing range. In this exercise each student isolates an environmental "Enterococcus spp." culture using selective media and then evaluates it for bacteriocin activity against "Enterococcus" strains isolated by classmates.

  4. Twenty-first century skills for students: hands-on learning after school builds school and life success.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Leide

    2006-01-01

    At the core of the movement for twenty-first century skills are students. The growing efforts to increase programs leveraging out-of-school time are focused on giving American youth everything they need to compete in this increasingly complex world. The author is one of many students who have been well served by initiatives imparting twenty-first century skills during after-school hours. Now a senior at Boston Latin School, the author has been helped along the way by Citizen Schools, an after-school education program focused on hands-on learning apprenticeships and homework help. While enrolled in the program as a middle school student, the author took part in projects that exemplified hands-on, inquiry-based learning that helped her develop twenty-first century skills. For example, along with dozens of other students, she advanced her data analysis skills by analyzing statistics about Boston Public high schools, which also helped her select and enroll in one of the city's premier exam schools. Also, she and her peers worked with corporate attorneys who served as writing coaches and whose expertise the author drew from in producing a published essay and greatly improving her writing skills. The author now finds that the public speaking, leadership, organizational, social, and management abilities she built through her participation in Citizen Schools are a great asset to her in high school. The confidence with which she tackles her responsibilities can also be traced back to her experiences in the program. As she looks toward college, the author reflects and realizes that being actively involved in a quality after-school program put her on track for a successful future.

  5. Using the Activity Model of Inquiry to Enhance General Chemistry Students' Understanding of Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchlewicz, Sara C.; Wink, Donald J.

    2011-01-01

    Nature of science refers to the processes of scientific activity and the social and cultural premises involved in the creation of scientific knowledge. Having an informed view of nature of science is important in the development of scientifically literate citizens. However, students often come to the classroom with misconceptions about nature of…

  6. The Dynamic Density Bottle: A Make-and-Take, Guided Inquiry Activity on Density

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntzleman, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    An activity is described wherein students observe dynamic floating and sinking behavior of plastic pieces in various liquids. The liquids and solids are all contained within a plastic bottle; the entire assembly is called a "density bottle". After completing a series of experiments that guides students to think about the relative…

  7. Central Dog-ma Disease Detectives: A Molecular Biology Inquiry Activity for Undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, T. K.; Yuh, P.; Black, F.

    2010-12-01

    The Minority Access to Research Careers (MARC) and Minority Biomedical Research Support (MBRS) are programs at the University of California at Santa Cruz designed to support minority undergraduate students majoring in the sciences. Each summer MARC/MBRS sponsors a Summer Institute that involves week long "rotations" with different faculty mentors. In 2008, the Center for Adaptive Optics (CfAO) Professional Development Program (PDP) was responsible for overseeing one week of the Summer Institute, and designed it to be a Biomedical Short Course. As part of this short course, we designed a four-hour activity in which students collected their own data and explored relationships between the basic biomolecules DNA, RNA, and protein. The goal was to have the students use experimental data to support their explanation of the "Central Dogma" of molecular biology. Here we describe details of our activity and provide a post-teaching reflection on its success.

  8. Directed Student Inquiry: Modeling in Roborovsky Hamsters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elwess, Nancy L.; Bouchard, Adam

    2007-01-01

    In this inquiry-based activity, Roborovsky hamsters are used to provide students with an opportunity to develop their skills of analysis, inquiry, and design. These hamsters are easy to maintain, yet offer students a means to use conventional techniques and those of their own design to make further observations through measuring, assessing, and…

  9. Developing the Essential Features of Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Robin; Burke, Kathaleen

    2008-01-01

    This lesson can be used at the beginning of the year to teach students how to conduct inquiries using the essential features described in "Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards" (NRC 1996). The lesson is divided into several activities which may be spread over several days or interspersed with your other beginning-of-the-year…

  10. Does Artificial Tutoring Foster Inquiry Based Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmoelz, Alexander; Swertz, Christian; Forstner, Alexandra; Barberi, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    This contribution looks at the Intelligent Tutoring Interface for Technology Enhanced Learning, which integrates multistage-learning and inquiry-based learning in an adaptive e-learning system. Based on a common pedagogical ontology, adaptive e-learning systems can be enabled to recommend learning objects and activities, which follow inquiry-based…

  11. Hands-On Science Workshop "Controlling Variables."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dependents Schools (DOD), Washington, DC. Pacific Region.

    In this document, a description is given of a one activity inservice session intended for teachers kindergarten through grade six. The objective of this activity is to identify the launch angle of a catapult as the variable controlling the distance a projectile will travel. The activity conducted by participants of this workshop deals with the…

  12. A Guided Inquiry Experiment for the Measurement of Activation Energies in the Biophysical Chemistry Laboratory: Decarboxylation of Pyrrole-2-Carboxylate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Kelly M.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Mettee, Howard D.; Smiley, Jeffrey A.

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory experiment for undergraduate biophysical chemistry is described, in which the acid concentration and temperature dependences of the decarboxylation of pyrrole-2-carboxylate are measured using a continuous ultraviolet (UV) spectrophotometric assay. Data collection and analysis are structured using principles of guided inquiry. Data…

  13. Structures and Improvisation for Inquiry-Based Science Instruction: A Teacher's Adaptation of a Model of Magnetism Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlow, Danielle Boyd

    2010-01-01

    One aspect of scientific inquiry that appears to be particularly challenging to learn is how explanatory models are developed and used in science. It is even more challenging to learn to teach through methods that engage young students in building and using explanatory models. In part, this is because to do so requires that teachers make real-time…

  14. Using Inquiry to Break the Language Barrier in Chemistry Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Andrew; Jessup, Weston; Criswell, Brett A.; Weaver-High, Consuelo; Rushton, Gregory T.

    2015-01-01

    A guided inquiry lesson intended to support the linguistic and conceptual development of English language learners (ELLs) in a small, cotaught, high-needs secondary setting is presented. Collaborative groupings based on language and content ability coupled with an emphasis on student-student discourse and a hands-on investigation appeared to…

  15. Targeted Courses in Inquiry Science for Future Elementary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Richard; Wyner, Yael; Borman, Greg; Salame, Issa I.

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on targeted science courses for undergraduate childhood education majors. We describe an inquiry-oriented, three-course sequence spanning physical, life, and environmental science. All three courses are hands-on and are designed to reflect the content and pedagogy most important to future elementary school teachers.

  16. "Polite Directiveness" in Science Inquiry: A Contradiction in Terms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bencze, John Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    "Inquiry" is a nearly ubiquitous part of recommendations for effective practice in school science worldwide. Teachers often experience difficulties, however, in engaging students in inquiry activities in which they are asked to explore physical phenomena (and energy) and, from their inquiries, derive appropriate conclusions about nature. It has…

  17. Hands-On Science, 680 Hands at a Time: Shrinking the Large Lecture with a Collapsing Can Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipman, Harry L.

    2001-01-01

    Explains how hands-on science activities can be done in a class designed as a lecture setting. Uses the collapsing can activity to demonstrate the birth of a black hole. Evaluates student responses to the hands-on approach. (YDS)

  18. Hands-On Whole Science. What Rots?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markle, Sandra

    1991-01-01

    Presents activities on the science of garbage to help elementary students learn to save the earth. A rotting experiment teaches students what happens to apple slices sealed in plastic or buried in damp soil. Other activities include reading stories on the subject and conducting classroom composting or toxic materials projects. (SM)

  19. Guided Inquiry Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, J. B.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Advocates the use of discovery or guided inquiry experiments for developing critical thinking in problem solving. Provides a stepwise method for creating inquiry experiments and provides an example by comparing the two methods for a freezing point experiment. (JM)

  20. A Recipe for Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Jesse

    2003-01-01

    Explains the difference between traditional and inquiry-based chemistry experiments. Modifies a traditional cookbook laboratory for determining molar volume of gas to include inquiry. Also discusses methods for assessment. (Author/NB)

  1. Active Science as a Contribution to the Trauma Recovery Process: Preliminary Indications with Orphans from the 1994 Genocide in Rwanda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrier, Frederic; Nsengiyumva, Jean-Baptiste

    2003-01-01

    Constructivist, hands-on, inquiry-based, science activities may have a curative potential that could be valuable in a psychological assistance programme for child victims of violence and war. To investigate this idea, pilot sessions were performed in an orphanage located in Ruhengeri, Rwanda, with seven young adults and two groups of 11 children…

  2. The effects of the level of inquiry of situated secondary science laboratory activities on students' understanding of concepts and the nature of science, ability to use process skills and attitudes toward problem solving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dana, Lisa Ann

    Although there has been over thirty years of studies on the effects of inquiry-based science instruction on students' understanding of concepts and the nature of science, ability to use process skills, and attitudes toward problem solving and subsequent meta-analyses of these studies, little is conclusive because of the inability of researchers to adequately describe the various levels of inquiry-based science instruction being utilized. In many of these past studies inquiry-based science instruction was vaguely defined. Past descriptions of inquiry have mainly focused on the teacher vs. student responsibility in the parts of a laboratory activity (Herron 1971, Pella, 1961, and Schwab, 1962) and although others have since focused on other various aspects (Luft, 1999; Priestley, Priestley, Sutman, Schumuckler, Hilosky, & White 1998), none have been complete in scope to describe the classroom interactions between teacher and student, before, during and after manipulation of laboratory materials and to clearly define the various levels of inquiry-based science instruction occurring in a classroom. Utilizing some of these previous theoretical frameworks, this study created the Situated Laboratory Activity Instrument (SLAI) that clearly defines various levels of inquiry based upon specific categories of teacher-student behaviors. The term, situated laboratory activities, more clearly represents the time before, during and after the actual manipulation of material. Validity and reliability were established for the SLAI. The instrument was derived from both historical and current instruments for looking at inquiry. The data for the creation and revision of this instrument were collected through initial reliability measures and observing the situated laboratory activities in four secondary physics classrooms during the study. The SLAI was utilized in a preliminary study in a public high school of the effects of various levels of inquiry teaching on students' understanding

  3. Presto: Open Inquiry!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermann, Ronald S.; Miranda, Rommel J.

    2010-01-01

    Although inquiry-based science teaching has been around since the 1960s, many teachers are slow to incorporate inquiry principles into their science lessons. The authors address this issue by using an analogy between a magician's card trick and open inquiry. This analogy was chosen to portray a difference of perspective and demonstrate how the…

  4. Useful Procedures of Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handy, Rollo; Harwood, E. C.

    This book discusses and analyzes the many different procedures of inquiry, both old and new, which have been used in an attempt to solve the problems men encounter. Section A examines some outmoded procedures of inquiry, describes scientific inquiry, and presents the Dewey-Bentley view of scientific method. Sections B and C, which comprise the…

  5. Diving into Science. Hands-On Water-Related Experiments. Grades 2-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perdue, Peggy K.

    This book contains hands-on ocean-related laboratory activities. Major chapter hearings are: (1) "Water Experiments" (dealing with the physical nature of water and listing 10 activities); (2) "Ocean-Going Vessels" (studying the principles of boats, with three experiments); (3) "Experiments Using Shells" (containing four activities); (4) "Sand…

  6. Make Science Matter. Hands on Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1992-01-01

    Presents class activities to help elementary students learn about changes in the state of matter by making ice cream. In addition to making observations on the changes of state, students can practice measuring and identifying the properties (e.g., color, size, and shape). (SM)

  7. Hands-on Science. How Fireflies Communicate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1995-01-01

    One creative way that elementary science educators can teach their students about animal communication is to give them glow sticks and a set of cards with descriptions of what different firefly flash signals mean. The paper describes such a project and presents related activities. (SM)

  8. Mapping a Science Inquiry Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerlin, Steven C.; McDonald, Scott P.; Kelly, Gregory J.

    2009-01-01

    This study describes an analytic procedure to examine inquiry processes in science teaching and learning. This procedure was applied to the study of a seismology unit in a ninth-grade earth science classroom. An emergent coding scheme was developed that provided a description of the different activities, science content, and type of scientific…

  9. Guided-Inquiry Based Laboratory Instruction: Investigation of Critical Thinking Skills, Problem Solving Skills, and Implementing Student Roles in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Tanya

    2012-01-01

    Recent initiatives in the laboratory curriculum have encouraged an inquiry-based approach to learning and teaching in the laboratory. It has been argued that laboratory instruction should not just be hands-on, but it should portray the essence of inquiry through the process of experiential learning and reflective engagement in collaboration with…

  10. The Effect of Hands-on '"Energy-Saving House" Learning Activities on Elementary School Students' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behavior Regarding Energy Saving and Carbon-Emissions Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Lung-Sheng; Lin, Kuen-Yi; Guu, Yunn-Horng; Chang, Liang-Te; Lai, Chih-Chien

    2013-01-01

    Energy saving and carbon-emissions reduction (ESCER) are widely regarded as important issues for progress towards ensuring sustainable forms of economic development. This Taiwanese study focuses on the effects of a series of educational activities about ESCER on students' knowledge, attitudes and behavior. Sixty fifth-grade students from two…

  11. Effects of participation in inquiry science workshops and follow-up activities on middle school science teachers' content knowledge, teacher-held misconceptions, and classroom practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepeda, Linda F.

    An important aspect of developing science literacy for all students is developing science-literate teachers. With the implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act, many middle school teachers found themselves in a position where they were no longer qualified to teach middle school science. This study was designed to help science teachers increase their science content knowledge, identify and resolve misconceptions/errors they may have, and assist them in their teaching by providing strategies for inquiry-based teaching, science laboratory exercises, and science equipment. Teachers enrolled in biology courses offered by the Rocky Mountain Middle School Math and Science Partnership participated in this study. They were required to take pre-, post-, and follow-up assessments over course concepts, complete a survey over their background and teaching pedagogy, and be observed teaching in their classrooms for three class periods followed by an interview after each observation. The results included key findings: (1) These assessments indicated that science teachers can increase their science content knowledge by attending high-quality professional development courses designed to help increase basic science content knowledge on science content. (2) Teachers held numerous misconceptions as shown by the assessments and classroom observations. Some were resolved, some that appeared to be resolved at the time of the post test reappeared again on the follow-up test, and some were not resolved. (3) Teacher observations showed that they did use science equipment provided by the course instructors and they taught the content from the Biology course where appropriate. Teachers teaching classes other than biology demonstrated their ability to teach inquiry science by employing inquiry activities and teaching with a "scientific method" approach.

  12. Developing hands-on ergonomics lessons for youth

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C; Alexandre, M; Jacobs, K

    2006-02-22

    By the time students are ready to enter the workforce they have been exposed to up to 20 years of ergonomics risk factors. As technology evolves, it provides more opportunities for intensive repetitive motion and with computers, cell phones, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and electronic games. The average student engages in fewer active physical activities, sit stationary in mismatched furniture in schools for hours and carry heavy backpacks. While long-term effects remain to be identified, increasingly ergonomists and others concerned with musculoskeletal health and wellness, see a need for early ergonomics education. This interactive session provides a hands-on approach to introducing ergonomics to students. Although different approaches may effectively introduce ergonomics at even early stages of development, this program was designed for youth at the middle to high school age. Attendees will participate in four activities designed to introduce ergonomics at an experiential level. The modules focus on grip strength, effective breathing, optimizing your chair, and backpack safety. The workshop will include presentation and worksheets designed for use by teachers with minimal ergonomics training. Feedback from the participants will be sought for further refining the usability and safety of the training package.

  13. An inquiry-based approach to teaching research design: asking the right questions.

    PubMed

    Yonts, Nikki; Abramson, Charles I; McKenna, Jessica; DeBoer, Stacy; McMillin, Ann; Rice, Justin; Potts, Richard; Scott, Bill

    2002-06-01

    To describe an inquiry-based learning activity and discuss the advantages of using such activities to demonstrate research design to undergraduate psychology students the authors presented students with the research problem of eyewitness memory recall and asked students to solve the problem, using the information provided by the course. Working in small groups, students reviewed eyewitness studies and designed their own research materials, including a videotaped theft and a CD-ROM version of the eyewitness survey and potential suspect line-up. Poststudy interviews showed that the students enjoyed the activity and felt that they had a better understanding of experimental research design than they had before the exercise. It is proposed that this activity may be a useful hands-on tool for instructors who have difficulty teaching students fundamental topics such as literature reviews, hypothesis testing, reliability and validity of research measures, and experimental design. PMID:12150385

  14. Hands-On in the Non-Laboratory Classroom Reconstructing Plant Phylogenies Using Morphological Characters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flory, S. Luke; Ingram, Ella L.; Heidinger, Britt J.; Tintjer, Tammy

    2005-01-01

    Laboratory components of introductory biology college-level courses are becoming increasingly rare. Due to the absence of laboratory funding and time, instructors at all levels are faced with the problem of implementing inquiry-based projects. In this article, the authors present an activity that they developed for the 50-minute discussion period…

  15. PBL, Hands-On/ Digital resources in Geology, (Teaching/ Learning)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Rosa; Santos, Cátia; Carvalho, Sara

    2015-04-01

    The present study reports the elaboration, application and evaluation of a problem-based learning (PBL) program that aims to evaluate the effectiveness in students learning the Rock Cycle theme. Prior research on both PBL and Rock Cycle was conducted within the context of science education so as to elaborate and construct the intervention program. Findings from these studies indicated both the PBL methodology and Rock Cycle as helpful for teachers and students. PBL methodology has been adopted in this study since it is logically incorporated in a constructivism philosophy application and it was expected that this approach would assist students towards achieving a specific set of competencies. PBL is a student-centered method based on the principle of using problems as the starting point for the acquisition of new knowledge. Problems are based on complex real-world situations. All information needed to solve the problem is initially not given. Students will identify, find, and use appropriate resources to complete the exercise. They work permanently in small groups, developing self-directed activities and increasing participation in discussions. Teacher based guidance allows students to be fully engaged in knowledge building. That way, the learning process is active, integrated, cumulative, and connected. Theme "Rock Cycle" was introduced using a problematic situation, which outlined the geological processes highlighted in "Foz do Douro" the next coastline of the school where the study was developed. The questions proposed by the students were solved, using strategies that involved the use of hands-on activities and virtual labs in Geology. The systematization of the selected theme was performed in a field excursion, implemented according to the organizational model of Nir Orion, to The "Foz do Douro" metamorphic complex. In the evaluation of the learning process, data were obtained on students' development of knowledge and competencies through the application of

  16. Hands-On Science: Is It an Acid or a Base? These Colorful Tests Tell All!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanCleave, Janice

    1998-01-01

    Two hands-on science activities for K-6 students teach them how to determine if something is an acid or a base. The activities require acid/base indicator juice, testing strips, and a base solution. A recipe for making them in the classroom using red cabbage and baking soda is provided. (SM)

  17. Conducting Original, Hands-On Astronomical Research in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corneau, M. J.

    2009-12-01

    teachers to convey moderately complex computer science, optical, geographic, mathematical, informational and physical principles through hands-on telescope operations. In addition to the general studies aspects of classroom internet-based astronomy, Tzec Maun supports real science by enabling operators precisely point telescopes and acquire extremely faint, magnitude 19+ CCD images. Thanks to the creative Team of Photometrica (photometrica.org), my teams now have the ability to process and analyze images online and produce results in short order. Normally, astronomical data analysis packages cost greater than thousands of dollars for single license operations. Free to my team members, Photometrica allows students to upload their data to a cloud computing server and read precise photometric and/or astrometric results. I’m indebted to Michael and Geir for their support. The efficacy of student-based research is well documented. The Council on Undergraduate Research defines student research as, "an inquiry or investigation conducted by an undergraduate that makes an original intellectual or creative contribution to the discipline." (http://serc.carleton.edu/introgeo/studentresearch/What. Teaching from Tzec Maun in the classroom is the most original teaching research I can imagine. I very much look forward to presenting this program to the convened body.

  18. Optics education in the frame of the Comenius "Hands-on Science" project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M. Costa, Manuel F.; Sporea, Dan; Clementina, T.

    2005-10-01

    In the Society of our days there is a major increasing need of an in depth quality education in Science and Technology. Science teaching at school should be generalized aiming not only the sound establishment of a "Science" culture in our societies but also to guarantee a steady basis for the improvement of Science and its technological applications. The European Commission, under the program Socrates, Comenus 3 action (project n°. 110157-CP-1-2003-1-PT-COMENIUS-C3) supports the network "Hands-on Science". The activities of our network focus on the development and or diffusion at European scale of positive hands-on experimental practices on teaching science at basic secondary and vocational training schools, by leading the students to an active volunteer and committed participation in the teaching/learning process through hands-on practice and experimentation, making intensive use of the new instruments and resources of the Information Society.

  19. Hands-On Fractals and the Unexpected in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluchoff, Alan

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a hands-on project in which unusual fractal images are produced using only a photocopy machine and office supplies. The resulting images are an example of the contraction mapping principle.

  20. Education: Linking History and Hands-On Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, David R.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the idea that hands-on science education should give credit to the scientists who originally conducted the experiments now repeated in classrooms. Plant experiments originally done by Stephen Hales are described and given as examples. (KR)

  1. Close view of statue showing her right hand on the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close view of statue showing her right hand on the hilt of a sword - U.S. Capitol, Statue of Freedom, Intersection of North, South, & East Capitol Streets & Capitol Mall, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  2. Collaborative Inquiry Learning: Models, tools, and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Thorsten; Urhahne, Detlef; Schanze, Sascha; Ploetzner, Rolf

    2010-02-01

    Collaborative inquiry learning is one of the most challenging and exciting ventures for today's schools. It aims at bringing a new and promising culture of teaching and learning into the classroom where students in groups engage in self-regulated learning activities supported by the teacher. It is expected that this way of learning fosters students' motivation and interest in science, that they learn to perform steps of inquiry similar to scientists and that they gain knowledge on scientific processes. Starting from general pedagogical reflections and science standards, the article reviews some prominent models of inquiry learning. This comparison results in a set of inquiry processes being the basis for cooperation in the scientific network NetCoIL. Inquiry learning is conceived in several ways with emphasis on different processes. For an illustration of the spectrum, some main conceptions of inquiry and their focuses are described. In the next step, the article describes exemplary computer tools and environments from within and outside the NetCoIL network that were designed to support processes of collaborative inquiry learning. These tools are analysed by describing their functionalities as well as effects on student learning known from the literature. The article closes with challenges for further developments elaborated by the NetCoIL network.

  3. What Students Learn from Hands-On Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwichow, Martin; Zimmerman, Corinne; Croker, Steve; Härtig, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    The ability to design and interpret controlled experiments is an important scientific process skill and a common objective of science standards. Numerous intervention studies have investigated how the control-of-variables-strategy (CVS) can be introduced to students. However, a meta-analysis of 72 intervention studies found that the opportunity to…

  4. Comparing Open and Guided Inquiry Activities in an Informal Physics Program To Promote Agency, Communication, and Reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulf, Rosemary Philomena

    In this thesis, we investigate an informal after-school science program. We examine two inquiry curricula used in this program; one more guided and the other more open. We have developed new methods to analyze middle school children's scientific notebooks, and we measure how the children exhibit agency, how the children communicate, and the mechanistic reasoning children use. We compare the two curricula and find that the children exhibit more agency in the open curriculum, write and draw more in the open curriculum, demonstrate a wide variety of scientific communication, and use more varied types of mechanistic reasoning in the open curriculum. These aspects can be linked to science identity, and we conclude that the more open curriculum supports the development of positive science identity.

  5. Paper Table Hands-on Challenge: Explore Structures with PBS's "Design Squad"[TM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinberg, Lauren

    2010-01-01

    Build a table that's sturdy enough to hold a heavy weight! The catch? Students can only use eight sheets of newspaper, one piece of cardboard, and masking tape. This article describes "Paper Table," a hands-on activity from "Design Squad," in which kids investigate structures while following the steps of the engineering design process. Teachers…

  6. Build a Band Hands-on Challenge: Investigate Sound with PBS's "Design Squad Nation"[TM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinberg, Lauren

    2010-01-01

    This article describes "Build a Band" hands-on activity from "Design Squad Nation," which allows kids to use simple materials to build a four-stringed instrument, then tune it and play a song. Kids explore frequency, pitch, and sound energy while following the steps of the engineering design process. By weaving "Design Squad Nation" episodes,…

  7. Process and Learning Outcomes from Remotely-Operated, Simulated, and Hands-on Student Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corter, James E.; Esche, Sven K.; Chassapis, Constantin; Ma, Jing; Nickerson, Jeffrey V.

    2011-01-01

    A large-scale, multi-year, randomized study compared learning activities and outcomes for hands-on, remotely-operated, and simulation-based educational laboratories in an undergraduate engineering course. Students (N = 458) worked in small-group lab teams to perform two experiments involving stress on a cantilever beam. Each team conducted the…

  8. The Hands-On and Far-Out Physics Team: It Starts Out Walking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Bob; Firedrake, George

    1998-01-01

    The Hands-On and Far-Out Physics project is part of the Center for Technology, Environment, and Communication (C-TEC), a project-based learning community at Piner High School in Santa Rosa (California). This article introduces the project team, discusses member activities, presents a walking-speed experiment, and describes a Mars Colony course…

  9. Inquiring into Three Approaches to Hands-On Learning in Elementary and Secondary Science Methods Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Marianne B.; Foley, Kathleen R.

    1999-01-01

    Investigates three approaches to hands-on science learning in two contexts, an elementary science methods class and a secondary science methods class. Focused on an activity on foam. Concludes that when developing models for teaching science methods courses, methods instructors need to share power with prospective teachers. (Author/MM)

  10. A Low-Tech, Hands-On Approach To Teaching Sorting Algorithms to Working Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dios, R.; Geller, J.

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on identifying the educational effects of "activity oriented" instructional techniques. Examines which instructional methods produce enhanced learning and comprehension. Discusses the problem of learning "sorting algorithms," a major topic in every Computer Science curriculum. Presents a low-tech, hands-on teaching method for sorting…

  11. A Hands-On Approach to Teaching Protein Translation & Translocation into the ER

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaBonte, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    The process of protein translation and translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) can often be challenging for introductory college biology students to visualize. To help them understand how proteins become oriented in the ER membrane, I developed a hands-on activity in which students use Play-Doh to simulate the process of protein…

  12. Investigating Plants: Hands-On, Low-Cost Laboratory Exercises in Plant Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Thomas R.; Johnson, Marty

    This manual describes 14 hands-on exercises for middle school introductory biology courses that are designed to allow all students to be involved in self-discoveries about life and plant life in particular. The exercises were developed to supplement normal classroom activities by allowing students to initiate ongoing projects to investigate the…

  13. Illustrating Probability in Genetics with Hands-On Learning: Making the Math Real

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Benjamin A.; Honeycutt, Brenda B.

    2007-01-01

    Probability is an essential tool for understanding heredity and modern genetics, yet many students have difficulty with this topic due to the abstract and quantitative nature of the subject. To facilitate student learning of probability in genetics, we have developed a set of hands-on, cooperative activities that allow students to determine…

  14. Building Communities Through Role Models, Mentors, and Hands-on-Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferreira, Maria

    2001-01-01

    Describes afterschool science program, implemented by a group of women engineers, to provide 18 African American middle-school female students with hands-on science activities related to the manufacture and design of automobiles. Women engineers served as mentors and role models. Program had positive influence on students' attitudes towards math,…

  15. Open-Ended Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Lindsay; Bell, Randy

    2012-01-01

    Inquiry has a reputation for being a great way for students to learn but difficult for teachers to implement. It does not have to be that way. Inquiry comes in many forms, which can be adapted for any science classroom at any point in the year for any level of student. In this article the authors describe how to help chemistry students develop a…

  16. Orchestrating Inquiry Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littleton, Karen, Ed.; Scanlon, Eileen, Ed.; Sharples, Mike, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    There is currently a rapidly growing interest in inquiry learning and an emerging consensus among researchers that, particularly when supported by technology, it can be a significant vehicle for developing higher order thinking skills. Inquiry learning methods also offer learners meaningful and productive approaches to the development of their…

  17. Differentiated Science Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Llewellyn, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Given that each child learns differently, it makes sense that one type of science instruction does not fit all. Best-selling author Douglas Llewellyn gives teachers standards-based strategies for differentiating inquiry-based science instruction to more effectively meet the needs of all students. This book takes the concept of inquiry-based…

  18. [Inquiry Teaching Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strasser, Ben B.; Dalis, Gus T.

    The DALSTRA (DALis/STRAsser) Inquiry Teaching Strategy is a model of teacher behaviors regarding teaching as a process composed of three categories of actions: basic behaviors, goal-directed behaviors, and diagnostic behaviors. The materials in this document were designed for use in an inservice education program in DALSTRA inquiry methods, and…

  19. Inquiry in Limnology Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Variano, Evan; Taylor, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Inquiry can be implemented in various ways, ranging from simple classroom discussions to longterm research projects. In this article, the authors developed a project in which high school students were introduced to the nature and process of scientific discovery through a two-week guided inquiry unit on "limnology"--the study of fresh water, which…

  20. Inquiry and Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorson, Annette, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This issue of ENC Focus focuses on the topic of inquiry and problem solving. Featured articles include: (1) "Inquiry in the Everyday World of Schools" (Ronald D. Anderson); (2) "In the Cascade Reservoir Restoration Project Students Tackle Real-World Problems" (Clint Kennedy with Advanced Biology Students from Cascade High School); (3) "Project…

  1. Is Inquiry the Answer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Gregory

    2001-01-01

    Conducts an action research investigation to determine which type of student benefits more from inquiry-based science laboratories. Designs two labs on diffusion and osmosis using both traditional and inquiry-based approaches and assesses student learning in these settings. (YDS)

  2. Scientific Inquiry 'R' Us.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourdeau, Virginia D.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the role that informal interpretative programs and facilities can play in providing inquiry-oriented science experiences. Presents two examples of scientific inquiry programs: investigating wetlands and investigating density. In both examples, participants formulate questions, collect data, and attempt to answer their own questions. (DLH)

  3. HANDS-ON, Career Exploration for Bright Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stovall, Betty J.; And Others

    Produced as part of a 5 week workshop on career explorations for 51 bright, middle grade students and 20 teachers, the curriculum guide discusses career education, outlines the workshop experiences, considers the inquiry process, and outlines 60 units on non baccalaureate careers in 15 career clusters. A lack of career education programs with…

  4. Boundary Breaking: Intercultural "Hands-On" Creative Arts Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade-Leeuwen, Bronwen

    2012-01-01

    This arts-based research inquiry applies innovative approaches to fostering "creativity" in pre-service primary art teachers during their tertiary training. The main research question investigates how to foster "creativity" in pre-service primary art teachers so they can better mentor the children they teach. I argue that pre-service primary art…

  5. In harmony: inquiry based learning in a blended physics and music class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hechter, Richard P.; Bergman, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    The power of music to resonate within us transcends conventional boundaries established in cultural, geographic, and political contexts. In our world, as physics educators, so does the resonating of physics phenomena. Secondary level physics is a perfect place to blend these two genres. While advocating for STEM-based education is at the forefront of pedagogical reform, seldom do we use this cross-boundary vision as the foundation to teach and learn in true collaboration of science and arts classrooms. As music enthusiasts, and physics educators, we developed new resources for a blended music and physics class through inquiry-based learning activities. Punctuated with modern technology, we aimed our activities for an engaging learning experience towards developing conceptual understandings of sound and harmonics at the grade 11 level. The umbrella activity shared here was designed to engage a wide range of students through the universal language of music, and provide them a hands-on and minds-on experience to explore harmonics through both music and physics lenses. It is our intention to provide readers with an overview of the activity, a description of exemplar student-designed inquiry-based investigations, and helpful suggestions for potential for use in reader’s classrooms.

  6. Knowledge Retention for Computer Simulations: A study comparing virtual and hands-on laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croom, John R., III

    The use of virtual laboratories has the potential to change physics education. These low-cost, interactive computer activities interest students, allow for easy setup, and give educators a way to teach laboratory based online classes. This study investigated whether virtual laboratories could replace traditional hands-on laboratories and whether students could retain the same long-term knowledge in virtual laboratories as compared to hands-on laboratories. This study is a quantitative quasi-experiment that used a multiple posttest design to determine if students using virtual laboratories would retain the same knowledge as students who performed hands-on laboratories after 9 weeks. The study was composed of 336 students from 14 school districts. Students had their performances on the laboratories and their retention of the laboratories compared to a series of factors that might have affected their retention using a pretest and two posttests, which were compared using a t test. The results showed no significant difference in short-term learning between the hands-on laboratory groups and virtual laboratory groups. There was, however, a significant difference (p = .005) between the groups in long-term retention; students in the hands-on laboratory groups retained more information than those in the virtual laboratory groups. These results suggest that long-term learning is enhanced when a laboratory contains a hands-on component. Finally, the results showed that both groups of students felt their particular laboratory style was superior to the alternative method. The findings of this study can be used to improve the integration of virtual laboratories into science curriculum.

  7. Exploring Osmosis and Diffusion in Cells: A Guided-Inquiry Activity for Biology Classes, Developed through the Lesson-Study Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maguire, Lauren; Myerowitz, Lindsay; Sampson, Victor

    2010-01-01

    Guided inquiry is an instructional technique that requires students to answer a teacher-proposed research question, design an investigation, collect and analyze data, and then develop a conclusion (Bell, Smetana, and Binns 2005; NRC 2000). In this article, the authors describe a guided-inquiry lesson developed through the lesson-study process…

  8. Preparing pre-service teachers to integrate technology into inquiry-based science education: Three case studies in The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Trinh-Ba; van den Berg, Ed; Ellermeijer, Ton; Beishuizen, Jos

    2016-05-01

    Integration of technology ( e.g. measuring with sensors, video measurement, and modeling) into secondary-school science teaching is a need globally recognized. A central issue of incorporating these technologies in teaching is how to turn manipulations of equipment and software into manipulations of ideas. Therefore, preparation for pre-service teachers to apply ICT tools should be combined with the issues of minds-on inquiring and meaning-making. From this perspective, we developed a course within the post-graduate teacher-education program in the Netherlands. During the course, pre-service teachers learnt not only to master ICT skills but also to design, teach, and evaluate an inquiry-based lesson in which the ICT tool was integrated. Besides three life sessions, teachers' learning scenario also consisted of individual tasks which teachers could carry out mostly in the school or at home with support materials and online assistance. We taught three iterations of the course within a design-research framework in 2013, 2014 and collected data on the teacher learning processes and outcomes. The analyses of these data from observation, interviews, questionnaires, and documents were to evaluate implementation of the course, then suggest for revisions of the course set-up, which was executed and then assessed again in a subsequent case study. Main outcomes of the three case studies can be summarized as follows: within a limited time (3 life sessions spread over 2-3 months), the heterogeneous groups of pre-service teachers achieved a reasonable level of competence regarding the use of ICT tools in inquiry-based lessons. The blended set-up with support materials, especially the Coach activities and the lesson-plan form for an ICT-integrated inquiry-based lesson, contributed to this result under the condition that the course participants really spent considerable time outside the life sessions. There was a need for more time for hands-on, in-group activities in life

  9. Hands-on Space Exploration through High Altitude Ballooning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammergren, Mark; Gyuk, G.

    2010-01-01

    The Adler Planetarium's "Far Horizons" high-altitude ballooning effort serves as the focus for a diverse set of educational activities, including middle school summer camps, a high school summer program (the Astro-Science Workshop), school-year internships for high school students, summer internships for undergraduates, a NSF-funded graduate fellowship, and a thriving public volunteer program. The relatively low costs of both the reusable hardware (less than $1000) and expendable supplies (around $150 per launch) allow us to mount frequent missions throughout the year - and make such a program ideal for replication at institutions of any size. The rapid development schedule for each individual mission permits the cradle-to-grave involvement of short-term participants, making it easy to draw in a wide audience. Students are involved literally in a hands-on manner in all aspects of the construction, launch, tracking, and recovery of simple experimental payloads, which typically include sensors for temperature, pressure, light intensity, and radiation. Stunning imagery provided by onboard cameras can attract significant media interest, which can bring outreach efforts to a very broad audience. Future plans include the design and construction of CubeSats - decimeter-sized picosatellites carried to orbit as secondary payloads. Our first satellite will be a relatively simple Earth-imager, built from commercial, off-the-shelf components. As in the ballooning program, students and volunteers will be involved in all stages of this effort. Once operational, imagery and other data from the satellite will be incorporated into a museum exhibit that will allow visitors to submit target requests. This material is based in part upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0525995.

  10. Maintaining and Expanding the Hands-On Optics Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompea, Stephen M.; Sparks, R. T.; Walker, C. E.

    2008-05-01

    Hands-On Optics (HOO) was funded by the National Science Foundation Informal Science Education program to bring optics education to traditionally underserved middle school students. We developed a series of six optics modules each covering a different topic in optics. During the four-year grant, we brought the program to the Mathematics, Science and Engineering Achievement (MESA) programs in seven states as well as 8 major science centers. We continue to support our established sites as well as expand our program. One of our expansion efforts involves continuing our partnership with the International Society for Optical Engineering (SPIE). We have been working closely with SPIE to present workshops for student chapter leaders at SPIE meetings. The student chapter leaders use HOO materials in their outreach activities. SPIE has teamed with us to bring HOO to Europe. We have received a grant from the Science Foundation of Arizona to expand HOO in Arizona. This program builds on our successful programs at the South Tucson Boys and Girls Club as well as the Sells Boys and Girls Club by expanding HOO to other sites around the state with an emphasis on rural locations such as Bisbee, Safford, Prescott Valley and the Tohon O'odham Nation. We have been working with a variety of Boys and Girls Clubs around the state. Several programs are underway and we hope to add more sites in the coming year. We continue to host local events at Kitt Peak National Observatory as well as special events for the community and students in the Tucson area. Our events include science nights at local schools, optics festivals and competitions, career days and teacher fairs. We will describe the current state of the program as well as lessons learned as we expand the program in a variety of settings.

  11. Adaptation of the Hands-On Optics Activiites for Small and Large Science Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompea, Stephen M.; Walker, C. E.; Sparks, R.

    2006-06-01

    Hands On Optics and Informal Science Education PartnershipsHands-On Optics (HOO) is a collaborative four-year program to create and sustain a unique, national, informal science education program to excite students about science by actively engaging them in optics activities. Key partners in the project are NOAO, SPIE-The International Society for Optical Engineering, and the Optical Society of America (OSA). A vital component of HOO is the partnerships that are being formed with a variety of science centers around the country. We will describe the current partnerships with science centers and the current impact of the programs. We will also describe the challenges of integrating Hands On Optics into existing science center programs. Science centers have different needs than traditional classroom teachers and we will discuss the lessons learned from our science center programs. Our current partners include the New York Hall of Science, the Adventure Science Center, the Orlando Science Center and the Maryland Science Center. We are expanding our efforts to include smaller science and nature centers by partnering Astronomical Society of the Pacific’s program, Astronomy From the Ground Up (AFGU). AFGU will train staff members from 300 small to medium science and nature centers over the next three years, all of which will include some HOO materials.The Hands On Optics Project is funded by the National Science Foundation ISE program. NOAO is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc. under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  12. Was "Inquiry" a Mistake? It's All in the Name

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Donald P.

    2005-01-01

    Inquiry refers to the activities of students in which they develop knowledge and understanding of scientific ideas, as well as an understanding of how scientists study the natural world. Inquiry is a multifaceted activity that involves making observations; posing questions; examining books and other sources of information to see what is already…

  13. Redesigning a Curriculum for Inquiry: An Ecology Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spronken-Smith, R. A.; Walker, R.; Dickinson, K. J. M.; Closs, G. P.; Lord, J. M.; Harland, T.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on an interdisciplinary ecology degree that was redesigned to provide more research activity for undergraduates. A case study approach explored how the teaching team constructed a curriculum that used inquiry activities. The development of an inquiry curriculum was enabled by a University audit focusing on the links between…

  14. An inquiry-based programming lesson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Stephanie; Rice, Emily; Derdzinski, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    We designed a 2-day inquiry activity where students learned about error analysis and coding practices in Python. Inquiry-based lessons provide students with opportunities to independently investigate scientific concepts and tools. A general structure is developed ahead of time and minimal, careful guidance provided during the activity, but students are given as much freedom as possible to explore the concepts at their own pace. We designed our activity to help students learn to write flexible, re-usable, and readable code. I will describe the lesson structure we initially designed, as well as what aspects worked for our students (or didn't) and our experience leading the activity.

  15. Questioning the Validity of Inquiry Assessment in a High Stakes Physical Sciences Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramnarain, Umesh

    2014-01-01

    The South African science curriculum advocates an inquiry-based approach to practical work. Inquiry is a complex and multifaceted activity involving both cognitive and physical activity; thus, paper-and-pencil items do not provide the authentic context for this assessment. This study investigates the construct validity of inquiry-related questions…

  16. Google Earth for Landowners: Insights from Hands-on Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huff, Tristan

    2014-01-01

    Google Earth is an accessible, user-friendly GIS that can help landowners in their management planning. I offered hands-on Google Earth workshops to landowners to teach skills, including mapmaking, length and area measurement, and database management. Workshop participants were surveyed at least 6 months following workshop completion, and learning…

  17. Hands-On Classroom Photolithography Laboratory Module to Explore Nanotechnology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stelick, Scott J.; Alger, William H.; Laufer, Jesse S.; Waldron, Anna M.; Batt, Carl A.

    2005-01-01

    Nanotechnology is an area of significant interest and can be used as a motivator for students in subject areas including physics, chemistry, and life sciences. A 5X reducer system and associated lesson plan was used to provide students a hands-on exposure to the basic principles of photolithography and microscale circuit fabrication.

  18. Teaching DNA Fingerprinting using a Hands-on Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schug, Thatcher

    1998-01-01

    Presents an inexpensive hands-on lesson in DNA fingerprinting that can be completed in a single class period. Involves students in solving a murder in which a drop of blood is fingerprinted and matched with the blood of the murderer. (DDR)

  19. Enhancing Students' Inferential Reasoning: From Hands-On to "Movies"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Pip; Pfannkuch, Maxine; Wild, Chris J.; Regan, Matt; Budgett, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    Computer simulations and animations for developing statistical concepts are often not understood by beginners. Hands-on physical simulations that morph into computer simulations are teaching approaches that can build students' concepts. In this paper we review the literature on visual and verbal cognitive processing and on the efficacy of…

  20. Teaching Hands-On Linux Host Computer Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shumba, Rose

    2006-01-01

    In the summer of 2003, a project to augment and improve the teaching of information assurance courses was started at IUP. Thus far, ten hands-on exercises have been developed. The exercises described in this article, and presented in the appendix, are based on actions required to secure a Linux host. Publicly available resources were used to…

  1. A Set of Hands-On Exercises on Conformational Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellegrinet, Silvina C.; Mata, Ernesto G.

    2005-01-01

    Conformational analysis is one of the first topics in the organic chemistry curriculum that deals with the crucial problem of viewing and drawing organic molecules. A set of comprehensive exercises is devised that facilitates the students understanding of elementary concepts of conformational analysis with the use of a hands-on approach.

  2. ECHOS: Early Childhood Hands-On Science Efficacy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Judy A.; Greenfield, Daryl B.; Bell, Elizabeth; Juárez, Cheryl Lani; Myers, Ted; Nayfeld, Irena

    2013-01-01

    "ECHOS: Early Childhood Hands-On Science" was developed at the Miami Science Museum as a comprehensive set of science lessons sequenced to lead children toward a deeper understanding of science content and the use of science process skills. The purpose of the research is to determine whether use of the "ECHOS" model will…

  3. Hands-On Sports Medicine Training for Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanji, Jeffrey L.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the development of a hands-on sports medicine training program for residents at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center. Education strategies include clinical teaching, on-the-field education, experiential learning, and didactic instruction. Programs focusing exclusively on sports medicine are needed because the number of…

  4. CIT Vet Students Learn with Their Hands on the Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cournoyer, David

    2000-01-01

    Describes Crownpoint Institute of Technology's (CIT's) (New Mexico) veterinary technology program. CIT veterinary students earn veterinary associate's degrees and job skills while working with their hands on the animals. Discusses CIT's hopes of becoming a national leader in elk management and its focus on delivering technology and modern skills…

  5. Hands on CERN: A Well-Used Physics Education Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, K. E.

    2006-01-01

    The "Hands on CERN" education project makes it possible for students and teachers to get close to the forefront of scientific research. The project confronts the students with contemporary physics at its most fundamental level with the help of particle collisions from the DELPHI particle physics experiment at CERN. It now exists in 14 languages…

  6. Hands-On Science. Trace Water to Its Source.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1993-01-01

    A hands-on science project on watersheds helps elementary students understand the water cycle. The unit, which focuses on the fact that all living things need water and that watersheds are sources of water for rivers and streams, teaches students to observe, make inferences, predict, and draw conclusions. (SM)

  7. Enhancing Lean Manufacturing Learning Experience through Hands-On Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elbadawi, Isam; McWilliams, Douglas L.; Tetteh, Edem G.

    2010-01-01

    Finding appropriate interactive exercises to increase students' learning in technical topic courses is always challenging to educators. In this study, several paper plane hands-on simulation exercises were developed, used, and tested in a lean manufacturing course for beginning college students. A pretest and posttest was used to assess the…

  8. Learning Environments and Inquiry Behaviors in Science Inquiry Learning: How Their Interplay Affects the Development of Conceptual Understanding in Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bumbacher, Engin; Salehi, Shima; Wierzchula, Miriam; Blikstein, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Studies comparing virtual and physical manipulative environments (VME and PME) in inquiry-based science learning have mostly focused on students' learning outcomes but not on the actual processes they engage in during the learning activities. In this paper, we examined experimentation strategies in an inquiry activity and their relation to…

  9. Molecular Biology for the Environment: an EC-US hands-on Course in Environmental Biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Victor de Lorenzo; Juan Luis Ramos; Jerome Kukor; Gerben J. Zylstra

    2004-02-15

    One of the central goals of this activity is to bring together young scientists (at the late Ph.D. or early postdoctoral stages of their careers) in a forum that should result in future collaborations. The course is designed to give scientists hands-on experience in modern, up-to-date biotechnological methods at the interface between molecular biology and environmental biotechnology for the analysis of microorganisms and their activities with regard to the remediation of pollutants in the environment.

  10. Communicate science: an example of food related hands-on laboratory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Addezio, Giuliana; Marsili, Antonella; Vallocchia, Massimiliano

    2014-05-01

    The Laboratorio Didattica e Divulgazione Scientifica of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV's Educational and Outreach Laboratory) organized activity with kids to convey scientific knowledge and to promote research on Earth Science, focusing on volcanic and seismic hazard. The combination of games and learning in educational activity can be a valuable tool for study of complex phenomena. Hands-on activity may help in engage kids in a learning process through direct participation that significantly improves the learning performance of children. Making learning fun motivate audience to pay attention on and stay focused on the subject. We present the experience of the hand-on laboratory "Laboratorio goloso per bambini curiosi di scienza (a delicious hands-on laboratory for kids curious about science)", performed in Frascati during the 2013 European Researchers' Night, promoted by the European Commission, as part of the program organized by the Laboratorio Didattica e Divulgazione Scientifica in the framework of Associazione Frascati Scienza (http://www.frascatiscienza.it/). The hand-on activity were designed for primary schools to create enjoyable and unusual tools for learning Earth Science. During this activity kids are involved with something related to everyday life, such as food, through manipulation, construction and implementation of simple experiments related to Earth dynamics. Children become familiar with scientific concepts such as composition of the Earth, plates tectonic, earthquakes and seismic waves propagation and experience the effect of earthquakes on buildings, exploring their important implications for seismic hazard. During the activity, composed of several steps, participants were able to learn about Earth inner structure, fragile lithosphere, waves propagations, impact of waves on building ecc.., dealing with eggs, cookies, honey, sugar, polenta, flour, chocolate, candies, liquorice sticks, bread, pudding and sweets. The

  11. Hands-on lessons in ergonomics for youth

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C; Alexandre, M; Jacobs, K

    2005-09-29

    Ergonomics risk factors apply to everybody. Numerous adults have experienced disabling injuries related to use of computers and other forms of technology. Now children are using technology even more than adults. Increasingly ergonomics risk factors are being recognized as present in the world of children. Outreach to schools and the surrounding community by employers may help protect the future work force. A growing body of researchers believe that children can benefit from the early introduction of ergonomics awareness and preventative measures. While individual representatives of the educational system may embrace the concept of introducing ergonomics into the classroom, a number of barriers can prevent implementation of integrated programs. Some of the barriers to introducing ergonomics in schools have been absence of a tie to educational standards, the existing demands on teaching hours, and the absence of easily executable lesson plans. Ergonomics is rarely included in teacher training and professional ergonomics expertise is needed for the development of a class-based program. As part of Strategic Vision plan for 2025, a National Laboratory identified community outreach and the future workforces as key areas for initiatives. A series of hands-on interactive modules have been developed by professional ergonomics specialists. They are being tested with elementary, middle and high school students. Where possible, the content has been tied to the educational standards in the State of California in the USA. Currently the modules include grip strength, effective breathing, optimal keyboard and mouse positions, optimizing chairs, posture and movement, backpack safety and safe lifting. Each module takes the students through a related activity or experience. An individual worksheet asks them questions about the experience and guides them to consider implications in their activities of daily living. A module on hearing is under development. The goal is to have a

  12. Wondering + Online Inquiry = Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sekeres, Diane Carver; Coiro, Julie; Castek, Jill; Guzniczak, Lizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Digital information sources can form the basis of effective inquiry-based learning if teachers construct the information and exercises in ways that will promote collaboration, communication, and problem solving.

  13. Experiments in Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galus, Pamela

    2001-01-01

    Introduces an inquiry-based lab design in which students try to find evidence on a particular problem. Investigates the effects of decreases in the pH level on the environment. Includes students' hypotheses and research results. (YDS)

  14. Promoting Student Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Clifford H.

    1997-01-01

    Argues that in order to have bona fide inquiry experiences, students must formulate their own questions, create hypotheses, and design investigations that test those hypotheses and answer the proposed questions. (DDR)

  15. 3"H"s Education: Examining Hands-On, Heads-On and Hearts-On Early Childhood Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inan, Hatice Zeynep; Inan, Taskin

    2015-01-01

    Active engagement has become the focus of many early childhood science education curricula and standards. However, active engagement usually emphasizes getting children engaged with science solely through hands-on activities. Active engagement by way of hands, heads, and hearts are kept separate and rarely discussed in terms of getting all to work…

  16. Inquiry based learning with a virtual microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, S. P.; Sharples, M.; Tindle, A.; Villasclaras-Fernández, E.

    2012-12-01

    As part of newly funded initiative, the Wolfson OpenScience Laboratory, we are linking a tool for inquiry based learning, nQuire (http://www.nquire.org.uk) with the virtual microscope for Earth science (http://www.virtualmicroscope.co.uk) to allow students to undertake projects and gain from inquiry based study thin sections of rocks without the need for a laboratory with expensive petrological microscopes. The Virtual Microscope (VM) was developed for undergraduate teaching of petrology and geoscience, allowing students to explore rock hand specimens and thin sections in a browser window. The system is based on HTML5 application and allows students to scan and zoom the rocks in a browser window, view in ppl and xpl conditions, and rotate specific areas to view birefringence and pleochroism. Importantly the VM allows students to gain access to rare specimens such as Moon rocks that might be too precious to suffer loss or damage. Experimentation with such specimens can inspire the learners' interest in science and allows them to investigate relevant science questions. Yet it is challenging for learners to engage in scientific processes, as they may lack scientific investigation skills or have problems in planning their activities; for teachers, managing inquiry activities is a demanding task (Quintana et al., 2004). To facilitate the realization of inquiry activities, the VM is being integrated with the nQuire tool. nQuire is a web tool that guides and supports students through the inquiry process (Mulholland et al., 2011). Learners are encouraged to construct their own personally relevant hypothesis, pose scientific questions, and plan the method to answer them. Then, the system enables users to collect and analyze data, and share their conclusions. Teachers can monitor their students' progress through inquiries, and give them access to new parts of inquiries as they advance. By means of the integration of nQuire and the VM, inquiries that involve collecting data

  17. Nudging toward Inquiry: Developing Questions and a Sense of Wonder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontichiaro, Kristin, Comp.

    2010-01-01

    Inquiry does not replace information literacy; it encompasses it. It encourages librarians to consider instructional design beyond information search, retrieval, citation, and use. Inquiry-based learning invites school librarians to step into all aspects of instructional planning, from activating prior knowledge straight through to reflection.…

  18. Inquiry-Based Examination of Chemical Disruption of Bacterial Biofilms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redelman, Carly V.; Hawkins, Misty A. W.; Drumwright, Franklin R.; Ransdell, Beverly; Marrs, Kathleen; Anderson, Gregory G.

    2012-01-01

    Inquiry-based instruction in the sciences has been demonstrated as a successful educational strategy to use for both high school and college science classrooms. As participants in the NSF Graduate STEM Fellows in K-12 Education (GK-12) Program, we were tasked with creating novel inquiry-based activities for high school classrooms. As a way to…

  19. Making Authentic Data Accessible: The Sensing the Environment Inquiry Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffis, Kathy; Thadani, Vandana; Wise, Joe

    2008-01-01

    We report on the development of a middle school life sciences inquiry module, Sensing the Environment. This "data-enriched" inquiry module includes a series of activities exploring the nature of science, photosynthesis, transpiration, and natural selection, which culminates in students' querying authentic environmental data to support a scientific…

  20. JELL-O and Detergents: A Successful Inquiry Recipe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Patrick; Friedrichsen, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an activity for early-in-the-year parents' night. The beginning of a new school year is an exciting time. The authors, as teachers, like to capture that excitement by engaging their 10th-grade biology students in an inquiry project demonstrating the nature of science and scientific inquiry. They developed the Next Step…

  1. Elements of Information Inquiry, Evolution of Models & Measured Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel; Baker, Katie

    2014-01-01

    In 2003 Paula Montgomery, founding editor of School Library Media Activities Monthly and former branch chief of school media services for the Maryland State Department of Education, published a guide to teaching information inquiry. Her staff also illustrated the elements of information inquiry as a recursive cycle with interaction among the…

  2. Bilingual Language Supports in Online Science Inquiry Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Douglas B.; Touchman, Stephanie; Martinez-Garza, Mario; Ramirez-Marin, Frank; Drews, Tina Skjerping

    2012-01-01

    Research over the past fifteen years has investigated and developed online science inquiry environments to support students engaging in authentic scientific inquiry practices. This research has focused on developing activity structures and tools to scaffold students in engaging in different aspects of these practices, but relatively little of this…

  3. Using Web-Based Simulations to Promote Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Limson, Mel; Witzlib, Crystal; Desharnais, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    It is widely accepted that inquiry-based curriculum programs have positive effects on cognitive achievement, process skills, and attitudes toward science (NRC 2000). Science teachers seek engaging, effective, and inquiry-based activities that are standards-aligned and convenient to implement in their classrooms. For many years, the web has…

  4. Professional Scholarship in Educational Technology: Criteria for Judging Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwen, Thomas M.

    An attempt to establish criteria to judge scholarly activities in the field of educational technology focused on skills of inquiry, a process which includes problem definition, hypothesis formation, and hypothesis verification. To be judged adequate such inquiry should be: (1) publicly verifiable; (2) disciplined; (3) generalizable; (4) based on a…

  5. Moon Journals: Inquiry into Nature, Art, Literature, and Self.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasgow, Jackie

    1999-01-01

    Shares the results of a yearlong project of staff development where teachers kept a personal inquiry journal and participated in group activities. Finds the teachers grew together as a cohesive staff in learning to appreciate the inquiry process, to value the interests of their colleagues, to develop meaningful curriculum, and to enjoy the beauty…

  6. Inquiry, Land Snails, and Environmental Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Lloyd H.; Krantz, Patrick D.

    2005-01-01

    Land snails are common invertebrates that fascinate children. Unfortunately, they are seldom used for activities in the science classroom. Snails are inexpensive, take up little space in the classroom, and require only low maintenance, and their learning dividends can be enormous. For example, students can use them in inquiry-based activities that…

  7. Students' Design of Experiments: An Inquiry Module on the Conduction of Heat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatzikraniotis, E.; Kallery, M.; Molohidis, A.; Psillos, D.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines secondary students' design of experiments after engagement in an innovative and inquiry-oriented module on heat transfer. The module consists of an integration of hands-on experiments, simulated experiments and microscopic model simulations, includes a structured series of guided investigative tasks and was implemented for a…

  8. Assessing Inquiry Process Skills in the Lab Using a Fast, Simple, Inexpensive Fermentation Model System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knabb, Maureen T.; Misquith, Geraldine

    2006-01-01

    Incorporating inquiry-based learning in the college-level introductory biology laboratory is challenging because the labs serve the dual purpose of providing a hands-on opportunity to explore content while also emphasizing the development of scientific process skills. Time limitations and variations in student preparedness for college further…

  9. Eco-Inquiry: A Guide to Ecological Learning Experiences for the Upper Elementary/Middle Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Kathleen

    Eco-Inquiry may be defined as a "whole science" curriculum that embeds hands-on science within thematic multi-dimensional learning experiences. Three modules for the upper elementary and middle grades focus on food webs, decomposition, and nutrient cycling. Each module lasts 4-7 weeks and may be used alone or in sequence. Student research teams…

  10. Do Content, Format, and Level of Inquiry Affect Scores on Open-Ended Science Tasks?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stecher, Brian M.; Klein, Stephen P.; Solano-Flores, Guillermo; McCaffrey, Dan; Robyn, Abby; Shavelson, Richard J.; Haertel, Edward

    This study investigated three factors that may contribute to the large variation in student performance across open-ended measures. These factors are content domain, format (whether the task required only pencil and paper or involved a hands-on manipulation of equipment), and level of inquiry (whether the task guided the student toward the…

  11. Developing Mental Models about Air Using Inquiry-Based Instruction with Kindergartners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hook, Stephen; Huziak, Tracy; Nowak, Katherine

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the development of mental models of air by kindergarten students after completing a series of hands-on, inquiry-based science lessons. The lessons focused on two properties of air: (1) that air takes up space and (2) that it is made of particles ("balls of air"). The students were interviewed about their ideas of air and about…

  12. Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Studies of Inquiry-Based Science Teaching: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furtak, Erin Marie; Seidel, Tina; Iverson, Heidi; Briggs, Derek C.

    2012-01-01

    Although previous meta-analyses have indicated a connection between inquiry-based teaching and improved student learning, the type of instruction characterized as inquiry based has varied greatly, and few have focused on the extent to which activities are led by the teacher or student. This meta-analysis introduces a framework for inquiry-based…

  13. The effects of inquiry-based summer enrichment activities on rising eighth graders' knowledge of science processes, attitude toward science, and perceptions of scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Juanita Martin

    The purpose of this research was to examine the effects of summer science enrichment on eighth-graders' science process skills knowledge, attitude toward science and perceptions of scientists. A single group pre- and post-test design was used to test participants in a summer science enrichment camp, which took place over a three-week period in the summer of 2000. Participants, all of whom were residents of the Mississippi area known as the Delta, lived on the campus of Mississippi Valley State University for the entire course of the camp. Activities included several guided inquiry-based projects such as water rocket design and solar or battery-powered car design. Participants also took trips to an environmental camp in north Mississippi and to the Stennis Space Center on the Mississippi Gulf Coast. Participants worked on their projects in groups, supervised by an undergraduate student "mentor". Participants were encouraged to keep journals of their experiences throughout the camp, and the researcher developed a rubric to evaluate student journals for process knowledge, evidence of planning, reflective thought, and disposition toward science. Tests were used to evaluate student knowledge of process skills, attitude toward science, and perceptions of scientists. On the Test of Integrated Process Skills (Dillashaw & Okey, 1983), the students showed significant improvement overall, but when evaluated separately, males showed significant improvement while females did not. On the Attitude toward Science in School Assessment (Germane, 1988), data indicated that attitude toward science improved significantly for the group as a whole, but upon closer inspection, indicated a significant improvement for the female students only. On Chamber's Draw-a-Scientist Test (1983), analysis of student drawings indicated no significant change in stereotypical images of scientists for the group overall. However, boys' scores indicated a significant improvement when analyzed separately

  14. Language of Art: Inquiry Based Studio Practices in Early Childhood Settings: Inquiry Based Studio Practices in Early Childhood Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelo, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Incorporate inquiry-based practices into the early childhood classroom or family child care home. Inspired by an approach to teaching and learning born in Reggio Emilia, Italy, this book emphasizes investigation anchored by drawing, painting, and other art activities. It provides advice on setting up a studio space for art and inquiry and fifteen…

  15. Inquiry-Based Projects Within the Local Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitina, D.

    2006-12-01

    Hydrological and geomorphologic characteristics of local watersheds are being investigated by undergraduate students in different Geoscience classes at California University of Pennsylvania. Local stream assessments, water quality monitoring, assessment of drinking water supply, non-point source pollution, stream bank erosion, mass wasting, environmental impact of different land use practices are among topics of laboratory reports, individual and group course long projects of students in the Department of Earth Sciences at California University of Pennsylvania. These projects have two folded educational benefits. Students gain unique educational opportunities being involved into service-learning projects, residents of the community are being educated as students present results of their studies on the website and in the Newsletter. Local environmental groups benefit from students projects as student contribute their time to organizational activities, collect and analyze data, make recommendations, propose future study designs, and staying involved with organizations as officers after the course of study or though internship programs. This paper will present several examples of inquiry-based hands-on educational opportunities conducted by students within local watersheds in Southwestern Pennsylvania.

  16. Supporting Inquiry Processes with an Interactive Learning Environment: Inquiry Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslinger, Eric; White, Barbara; Frederiksen, John; Brobst, Joseph

    2008-12-01

    This research addresses the effectiveness of an interactive learning environment, Inquiry Island, as a general-purpose framework for the design of inquiry-based science curricula. We introduce the software as a scaffold designed to support the creation and assessment of inquiry projects, and describe its use in a middle-school genetics unit. Students in the intervention showed significant gains in inquiry skills. We also illustrate the power of the software to gather and analyze qualitative data about student learning.

  17. Neuroscience in middle schools: a professional development and resource program that models inquiry-based strategies and engages teachers in classroom implementation.

    PubMed

    MacNabb, Carrie; Schmitt, Lee; Michlin, Michael; Harris, Ilene; Thomas, Larry; Chittendon, David; Ebner, Timothy J; Dubinsky, Janet M

    2006-01-01

    The Department of Neuroscience at the University of Minnesota and the Science Museum of Minnesota have developed and implemented a successful program for middle school (grades 5-8) science teachers and their students, called Brain Science on the Move. The overall goals have been to bring neuroscience education to underserved schools, excite students about science, improve their understanding of neuroscience, and foster partnerships between scientists and educators. The program includes BrainU, a teacher professional development institute; Explain Your Brain Assembly and Exhibit Stations, multimedia large-group presentation and hands-on activities designed to stimulate student thinking about the brain; Class Activities, in-depth inquiry-based investigations; and Brain Trunks, materials and resources related to class activities. Formal evaluation of the program indicated that teacher neuroscience knowledge, self-confidence, and use of inquiry-based strategies and neuroscience in their classrooms have increased. Participating teachers increased the time spent teaching neuroscience and devoted more time to "inquiry-based" teaching versus "lecture-based teaching." Teachers appreciated in-depth discussions of pedagogy and science and opportunities for collegial interactions with world-class researchers. Student interest in the brain and in science increased. Since attending BrainU, participating teachers have reported increased enthusiasm about teaching and have become local neuroscience experts within their school communities.

  18. Scientific evaluation of an intra-curricular educational kit to foster inquiry-based learning (IBL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debaes, Nathalie; Cords, Nina; Prasad, Amrita; Fischer, Robert; Euler, Manfred; Thienpont, Hugo

    2014-07-01

    Society becomes increasingly dependent on photonics technologies; however there is an alarming lack of technological awareness among secondary school students. They associate photonics with experiments and components in the class room that seem to bear little relevance to their daily life. The Rocard Report [5] highlights the need for fostering students' scientific skills and technological awareness and identifies inquiry based learning (IBL) as a means to achieve this. Students need to actively do science rather than be silent spectators. The `Photonics Explorer' kit was developed as an EU funded project to equip teachers, free-of-charge, with educational material designed to excite, engage and educate European secondary school students using guided inquiry based learning techniques. Students put together their own experiments using up-to-date versatile components, critically interpret results and relate the conclusions to relevant applications in their daily life. They work hands-on with the material, thus developing and honing their scientific and analytical skills that are otherwise latent in a typical class room situation. A qualitative and quantitative study of the impact of the kit in the classroom was undertaken with 50 kits tested in 7 EU countries with over 1500 students in the local language. This paper reports on the results of the EU wide field tests that show the positive impact of the kit in raising the self-efficacy, scientific skills and interest in science among students and the effectiveness of the kit in implementing IBL strategies in classrooms across EU.

  19. Making the Failure More Productive: Scaffolding the Invention Process to Improve Inquiry Behaviors and Outcomes in Invention Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, N. G.; Day, James; Park, Anthony H. K.; Bonn, D. A.; Roll, Ido

    2014-01-01

    Invention activities are Productive Failure activities in which students attempt (and often fail) to invent methods that capture deep properties of a construct before being taught expert solutions. The current study evaluates the effect of scaffolding on the invention processes and outcomes, given that students are not expected to succeed in their…

  20. Teaching radio astrophysics the hand-on way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Bhal Chandra

    Astronomy and space sciences have always been instrumental in attracting young students to physical sciences. While the lectures/demonstrations and exhibitions pertaining to space sci-ences capture the imagination of young students, these alone are not sufficient to induce them to join scientific research. In countries like India, where a large number of students take to physical sciences for under-graduate education, complex sociological factors are key issues in translating this large body of students to potential researchers. While lectures and exhibition lead to an increase in scientific awareness for these students, these do not give a feel for scien-tific research and bridge the gap between high school/college science education and high end research. In this context, a hands-on approach to astronomy education, in science research environments or closely connected to scientific institutions, offers a promising alternative. This approach has been used in optical astronomy, where inexpensive small telescopes are available, often coupling a vast network of amateur astronomy clubs to leading astronomy institutes. The non-visual and relatively more technical nature of radio astronomy has limited a similar approach in past for connecting students to space sciences using radio waveband. The tech-nological explosion in communication industry and radio connectivity in the last decade along with an expansion in engineering education makes this possible now using a hands-on approach in teaching radio astrophysics. In this presentation, the sociological factors affecting the student choice are discussed followed by a review of the efforts to bridge the above mentioned gap by various groups in the world in the last decade with a view to enumerate the best practices in a hands-on approach. A program using this approach at National Center for Radio Astrophysics is described, where the students are exposed to simple hands-on radio astronomy experiments such as spectral line

  1. Guided-inquiry based laboratory instruction: Investigation of critical thinking skills, problem solving skills, and implementing student roles in chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Tanya

    Recent initiatives in the laboratory curriculum have encouraged an inquiry-based approach to learning and teaching in the laboratory. It has been argued that laboratory instruction should not just be hands-on, but it should portray the essence of inquiry through the process of experiential learning and reflective engagement in collaboration with peers and in facilitation by the instructor. A student-centered active learning approach may be an effective way to enhance student understanding of concepts in the laboratory. The dissertation research work explores the impact of laboratory instruction and its relevance for college-level chemistry. Each chapter is different from the preceding chapter in terms of the purpose of the study and the research questions asked. However, the overarching idea is to address the importance of guided-inquiry based laboratory instruction in chemistry and its relevance in helping students to make connections with the chemistry content and in imparting skills to students. Such skills include problem solving, collaborative group work and critical thinking. The first research study (Chapter 2) concerns the impact of first year co-requisite general chemistry laboratory instruction on the problem-solving skills of students. The second research study (Chapter 3) examines the impact of implementing student roles also known as Student-Led Instructor Facilitated Guided-Inquiry based Laboratories, SLIFGIL) by modifying the Science Writing Heuristic approach of laboratory instruction. In the third research study (Chapter 4), critical thinking skills of first semester general chemistry laboratory students were compared to advanced (third or fourth year) chemistry laboratory students based on the analysis of their laboratory reports.

  2. Ocean Science in a K-12 setting: Promoting Inquiry Based Science though Graduate Student and Teacher Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodico, J. M.; Greely, T.; Lodge, A.; Pyrtle, A.; Ivey, S.; Madeiros, A.; Saleem, S.

    2005-12-01

    The University of South Florida, College of Marine Science Oceans: GK-12 Teaching Fellowship Program is successfully enriching science learning via the oceans. Funded by the National Science Foundation, the program provides a unique opportunity among scientists and K-12 teachers to interact with the intention of bringing ocean science concepts and research to the classroom environment enhance the experience of learning and doing science, and to promote `citizen scientists' for the 21st century. The success of the program relies heavily on the extensive summer training program where graduate students develop teaching skills, create inquiry based science activities for a summer Oceanography Camp for Girls program and build a relationship with their mentor teacher. For the last year and a half, two graduate students from the College of Marine Science have worked in cooperation with teachers from the Pinellas county School District, Southside Fundamental Middle School. Successful lesson plans brought into a 6th grade Earth Science classroom include Weather and climate: Global warming, The Geologic timescale: It's all about time, Density: Layering liquids, and Erosion processes: What moves water and sediment. The school and students have benefited greatly from the program experiencing hands-on inquiry based science and the establishment of an after school science club providing opportunities for students to work on their science fair projects and pursuit other science interests. Students are provided scoring rubrics and their progress is creatively assessed through KWL worksheets, concept maps, surveys, oral one on one and classroom discussions and writing samples. The year culminated with a series of hands on lessons at the nearby beach, where students demonstrated their mastery of skills through practical application. Benefits to the graduate student include improved communication of current science research to a diverse audience, a better understanding of the

  3. Effective Evaluation through Appreciative Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Cheryl A.

    2008-01-01

    Evaluators in the HPI field can improve their performance program results with effective evaluation through appreciative inquiry. Appreciative inquiry and evaluation have many similarities, and when combined they add value and effectiveness to the measurement of intervention results. Appreciative inquiry is beneficial in many evaluation contexts:…

  4. Strategic Scaffolding for Scientific Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, Angela; Natarajan, Uma; Willard, Catherine; Kane, Tera; Ketelhut, Diane Jass; Schifter, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Though many national and international science organizations stress the importance of integrating scientific inquiry into classroom instruction, this is often difficult for teachers. Moreover, assessing and scaffolding inquiry skills for students can be even more of a challenge. This paper investigated the student performances in an inquiry-based,…

  5. Teaching Inquiry in Nigeria and Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strubbe, Linda

    2015-08-01

    Inquiry is a teaching strategy in which student work mirrors authentic scientific research: students have ownership over their learning path, and learning scientific concepts (e.g., properties of light, motion in a gravitational field) is intertwined with learning scientific practices (e.g., asking questions, planning an investigation, constructing explanations). I will describe inquiry and education research showing its effectiveness; and I will present inquiry-based astronomy curricula and assessment strategies we have designed for undergraduate and graduate courses in Nigeria and Canada: an activity on the cosmic distance ladder (part of a short course in Abuja); a course on order-of-magnitude astronomy problem solving (Toronto); and new education research from the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative at the University of British Columbia (where I am a new postdoc).

  6. Guided-inquiry learning in environmental health.

    PubMed

    Jin, Guang; Bierma, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    The field of environmental health requires the knowledge of many facts and terms, and it also requires mastery of an array of concepts that can be difficult for many students to thoroughly comprehend. Guided-inquiry learning is a process by which students "discover" basic concepts through active investigation. In this article, the authors describe several guided-inquiry learning modules used in their undergraduate environmental health program and their experience in using them. Some modules are used in professional courses while others are used in a general education course. Overall, the authors experienced increased student engagement and interest with guided-inquiry learning. Students are able to comprehend some abstract concepts more quickly and seem to retain the concepts longer.

  7. An Action Research Inquiry into the Relationship Among Aerobic Activities, Memory, and Stress with Students Identified as Gifted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Denise Marie

    Students identified as gifted come from varying socio-economic strata and nationalities with a range of talents and temperaments comprising a diverse community. They may experience stress for a variety of reasons. Although a certain amount of stress can enhance the learning process, too much stress can impede learning, especially memory. Strategies have been offered for relieving stress, yet the benefits of physical activities as stress reducers for the gifted have frequently been overlooked. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship among aerobic activity, stress, and memory ability in students in an elementary school gifted program. An exceptional aspect of this research was that the students were an integral part of their own study. As co-researchers they had a vested interest in what they were doing, enhancing the significance of the experience and heightening learning. This action research project conducted in a mid-western school district with fourth and fifth grade students examined the impact of aerobic movement on physical indicators of stress and memory. The study lasted twelve weeks with data collected on physical indicators of stress, memory test scores, parent observations, interviews with students, a parent focus group session, observational data, student comments, and investigator/teacher journal. By infusing regular exercise into curricula, stress levels in students identified as gifted were examined. Students' scores on declarative memory tasks conducted with and without an accompanying aerobic activity were documented. Students learned of the delicate relationship between stress and memory as they studied the physiology of the brain. Twenty-four hour retention rates of declarative memory items were higher when a 20-minute aerobic activity intervention preceded the memory activity. Perceived stress levels were lowered for 14 of the 16 co-researchers. Students indicated a positive attitude toward physical activity and its

  8. Using the Hands-On Optics ``Terrific Telescopes'' Kit in the International Year of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompea, S. M.; Walker, C. E.; Sparks, R. T.

    2008-06-01

    Hands-On Optics (HOO) is a collaborative four-year program to create and sustain a unique, national, informal science education program to excite students about science by actively engaging them in optics activities. The standards based activities and demonstrations have been successfully used in a variety of settings including formal classrooms, after school clubs, and science centers. One of the themes for the International Year of Astronomy (IYA) is "Looking Through a Telescope". We intend to use HOO activities in conjunction with the IYA to reinforce this important area. In this workshop, participants completed a series of activities involving refraction, lenses, telescopes, and ultraviolet light and took home a kit containing all the materials required to do the activities with a small group of students. Participants explored the basic properties of positive lenses to create images through the use of hands-on activities, exciting experiments, and educator-lead demonstrations, culminating with the building of a small refracting telescope. Several prototype telescopes were examined in the workshop for use in the International Year of Astronomy.

  9. Supporting Preservice Teacher Inquiry with Electronic Portfolios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepherd, Craig; Hannafin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Six preservice social studies teachers created electronic portfolios to examine techniques believed to promote active student engagement during a 12-week field experience. Inquiry into these practices was facilitated through embedded tutorials, assignment suggestions, and question prompts based on principles of evidential reasoning. Although…

  10. How Teachers Respond to Children's Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, Susan; Randall, Kellie

    2009-01-01

    This study examined how teachers respond when children engage in inquiry-based deviations from a planned task. Thirty-one teachers each completed a brief science activity and accompanying worksheet with a student confederate. Teachers were given one of two goals for the study: help the students complete a worksheet or help the students learn more…

  11. Collaborative Inquiry Learning: Models, Tools, and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Thorsten; Urhahne, Detlef; Schanze, Sascha; Ploetzner, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    Collaborative inquiry learning is one of the most challenging and exciting ventures for today's schools. It aims at bringing a new and promising culture of teaching and learning into the classroom where students in groups engage in self-regulated learning activities supported by the teacher. It is expected that this way of learning fosters…

  12. Inquiry-Based Learning Using the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bugajski, Kellie

    2003-01-01

    Notes that through trial and error, one of the most effective activities the author and her first grade gifted reading students discovered was an Internet Inquiry method. Concludes that with the rapidly changing world, children's literacy futures will include new technology. Considers how the new technologies should support and not replace…

  13. Student Leadership in Small Group Science Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliveira, Alandeom W.; Boz, Umit; Broadwell, George A.; Sadler, Troy D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Science educators have sought to structure collaborative inquiry learning through the assignment of static group roles. This structural approach to student grouping oversimplifies the complexities of peer collaboration and overlooks the highly dynamic nature of group activity. Purpose: This study addresses this issue of…

  14. Narrative Structure in Inquiry-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinsey, L. Christine; Moore, Teresa E.

    2015-01-01

    Our goal with this paper is three-fold. We want to increase awareness of inquiry-based learning by presenting the strategy we use to develop and implement lessons and activities. We describe our approach to structuring lessons in mathematics in a way that engages the students by using language and constructs with which they are familiar from other…

  15. Collaborative Inquiry in Science, Math, and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Dennis; Hamm, Mary

    This book endeavors to show elementary teachers how to integrate mathematics, science, and technology in a cooperative learning environment. The reason for detailing this approach is to help students become creative and critical thinkers. Throughout the text there are numerous inquiry-based, thematic activities specifically designed to promote…

  16. Technology-Based Inquiry for Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christmann, Edwin

    2006-01-01

    Activities featured in this new compendium--a collection of 26 articles published in Science Scope, NSTA's member journal for middle school teachers--will show how. Technology-Based Inquiry offers fresh approaches that teachers and students can use to explore physical science, Earth and space science, life science, and more. It covers the…

  17. Rearing Media as a Variable in Fruit Fly Fecundity: An Activity to Introduce Scientific Methods of Inquiry to Biology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wollard, Laura; Klein, Benjamin; Carlson, Darby J.; Carlson, Kimberly A.

    2006-01-01

    A major challenge in teaching the process of science to students is designing and implementing laboratory activities that emulate what is actually done in a research laboratory. To facilitate this effort, science educators have been encouraged to design exercises that span multiple laboratory periods, encourage independent thinking, promote…

  18. Classroom questioning strategies as indicators of inquiry based science instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goossen, Linda Hale

    Inquiry teaching often rests upon the assumption that through the use of questioning and response strategies, teachers can stimulate students to actively construct knowledge. Based on this hypothesis, middle-school science lessons were observed and questioning and response strategies were identified that are related to inquiry-based instruction. Twenty-four science lessons were observed, videotaped, and ranked by inquiry characteristics other than questioning strategy. The video and audio portions of the recordings were analyzed to determine the student and teacher's questioning and response strategies in each classroom. These strategies were then compared to teaching style, along a continuum from traditional to inquiry, to identify questioning and response strategies that stimulate students to ask questions, solve problems, analyze evidence, consider alternative explanations, and other similar inquiry behaviors. The analyses indicated several questioning strategies of teachers that are related to inquiry teaching and learning and might be used as indicators of inquiry teaching in middle school science lessons. These include the number of content-related questions asked by teachers, the number of divergent questions asked by teachers, the number of times teachers probe for the intended response, the number of times teachers answer students' questions, and the number questions per concept asked by teachers. Perhaps more important was the observation that even after several decades of emphasizing the importance of inquiry methods in science education, neither students nor teachers participating in this study are asking higher-level cognitive questions deemed to be an important facet in the effective teaching and learning of science.

  19. The Inquiry of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    While discussions of the moral dimensions of the caring relation and their implications for teaching and learning are well developed within the literature, there has not been much analysis of the place of inquiry within our understanding of caring and the education inspired by it. Previous discussions offer important insight into what…

  20. Writing through Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jablon, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The inquiry science process provides a perfect opportunity for students to practice relational meaning in language. As students design their experiments, negotiate their ideas with peers, and share their data and conclusions, they sharpen both their reading and written communication skills. This process needs to be mediated by having the teacher…

  1. Inquiry in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stohl, Christina

    2010-01-01

    (Purpose) As schools scramble to restructure in the hope of thwarting failure, administrators often appropriate money for outside experts who counsel on professional development as well as outside magic-pill programs for student achievement. High-stakes testing remains the arbiter. Perhaps the use of the best practice of inquiry, or classroom…

  2. Small Group Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koller, Martin M.

    Learning in small groups is a practical way to bring about behavior change. The inquiry learning process is perceived to be the most natural and scientific way of learning. Skills developed include those of problem-solving task analysis, decision-making, value formation and adaptability. The art of small group interaction is developed. Factual…

  3. Designing for Watershed Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodzin, Alec; Shive, Louise

    2004-01-01

    In this article, we describe a collaborative design initiative with three secondary school teachers to promote the use of Web-based inquiry in the context of a watershed investigation. Design interviews that focus on instructional goals and pedagogical beliefs of classroom teachers were conducted. The interview protocol used a curricular framework…

  4. Narrative as Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendry, Petra Munro

    2010-01-01

    The author suggests that all research is narrative. Resituating all research as narrative, as opposed to characterizing narrative as one particular form of inquiry, provides a critical space for rethinking "research" beyond current dualisms and bifurcations that create boundaries that limit the capacity for dialogue across diverse epistemologies.…

  5. This Is Inquiry ... Right?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zangori, Laura; Forbes, Cory; Biggers, Mandy

    2012-01-01

    Many teachers have taught their share of science lessons that needed improvements. For the past eight years, the authors have been working with elementary teachers to implement quick and easy strategies to modify existing science lessons to make them more inquiry-based. Elementary teachers can use these strategies to adapt existing science lessons…

  6. Instruction and Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caws, Peter

    1974-01-01

    Instruction, the facilitation of the idiocyncratic internalizing process of each student, and inquiry, a form of self-instruction engaged in by the faculty and by advanced students, are interrelated in the forum of the university. By elucidating the interrelationship, recommendations can be made for the improvement of the university. (JH)

  7. Inquiry Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    It is exciting to see children display an interest in discovering the world through their actions. Those actions are the beginning of science inquiry, the process children use to develop knowledge and understanding of scientific ideas, including an understanding of how scientists study the natural world. This month's column features an activity…

  8. Hands-On Optics: An Informal Education Program for Exploring Light and Color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompea, S. M.; Walker, C. E.; Peruta, C. C.; Kinder, B. A.; Aceituno, J. C.; Pena, M. A.

    2005-05-01

    Hands-On Optics (HOO) is a collaborative four-year program to create and sustain a unique, national, informal science education program to excite students about science by actively engaging them in optics activities. It will reach underrepresented middle school students in after-school programs and at hands-on science centers nationwide. Project partners with NOAO are SPIE-The International Society for Optical Engineering, the Optical Society of America (OSA), and the Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement Program (MESA) of California. This program builds on the 2001 National Science Foundation planning grant (number ESI-0136024), Optics Education - A Blueprint for the 21st Century, undertaken to address the disconnect between the ubiquity of optics in everyday life and the noticeable absence of optics education in K-12 curricula and in informal science education. NOAO - with expertise in teaching optics, developing optics kits, and in science-educator partnerships is designing the HOO instructional materials by adapting well-tested formal education activities on light, color, and optical technology for the informal setting. These hands-on, high-interest, standards-connected activities and materials serve as the basis for 6, three-hour-long optics activity modules that will be used in informal education programs at 23 HOO host sites. NOAO also will train the educators, parents, and optics professionals who will work in teams to lead the HOO activities. A key component of the project will be the optics professionals from the two optical societies who currently are engaged in outreach activities and programs. Optics professionals will serve as resource agents teamed with science center and MESA educators, a model very successfully used by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific's Project ASTRO. The six modules and associated challenges and contests address reflection from one or many mirrors, image formation, colors and polarization, ultraviolet and infrared

  9. Fundamental Research in Engineering Education. Development of Concept Questions and Inquiry-Based Activities in Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer: An Example for Equilibrium vs. Steady-State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigeant, Margot; Prince, Michael; Nottis, Katharyn

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the use of inquiry-based instruction to promote the understanding of critical concepts in thermodynamics and heat transfer. Significant research shows that students frequently enter our courses with tightly held misconceptions about the physical world that are not effectively addressed through traditional instruction. Students'…

  10. Becoming Familiar with other Disciplines Through Hands-on Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremner, P. M.

    2014-12-01

    Transitioning to a new discipline can be challenging because of the need to quickly assimilate new skills and knowledge that others brought up in the field took years to develop. While reading and taking classes help to add knowledge, hands-on experience is key to developing your new skill set. Fieldwork is one obvious way to gain experience. Fieldwork provides intimate knowledge of your new found discipline, which is one component of your skill set. However, fieldwork is normally for a short period of time and very focused, which does not quickly provide the second component of your skill set, that is, insight into how your discipline fits in the big picture of solving problems. Academic workshops and internships can help provide the additional experience to bring any young researcher into this higher level of understanding. As a specific example, I'll talk about a summer workshop I recently attended called CIDER (Cooperative Institute for Dynamic Earth Research), which is open for students to apply for every year. This workshop provided the opportunity to learn a working knowledge of other disciplines in geology, and helped to expand my view of geophysics' place in solving real problems. The workshop is a month long, the first two weeks of which were lectures and tutorials of every discipline represented. The second two weeks consisted of new research on projects that were proposed by the attendees. The attendees select which of those projects to participate in, and join a team to work vigorously for two weeks. Teams may continue work after the CIDER workshop for presentations at AGU (as in my case) and has potential for publication later. Why this workshop succeeds in advancing young researchers' understanding is that different disciplines work side by side on their research project. Students need to be made aware of this workshop, and other workshops and internships like it, to provide this added hands-on experience.

  11. Inquiry into chemotherapy-induced p53 activation in cancer cells as a model for teaching signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Srougi, Melissa C; Carson, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular and extracellular communication is conducted through an intricate and interwoven network of signal transduction pathways. The mechanisms for how cells speak with one another are of significant biological importance to both basic and industrial scientists from a number of different disciplines. We have therefore developed and implemented a new laboratory-intensive course that teaches students the theory and techniques used to study cell signaling pathways. Students learn these methodologies as they conduct a hypothesis-driven research project where they elucidate the mechanism of breast cancer cell death caused by a cancer chemotherapeutic agent. While each lab experiment can be conducted independently, the findings build upon one another to form the beginnings of a signaling pathway. In the lecture component of the course, students investigate different signaling pathways and the methods employed to study them. In addition, students actively participate in journal article discussions where they assess the primary scientific literature. We evaluated the course over two semesters and found that in both semesters learning outcomes were met by both undergraduate and graduate students. The evaluation of the course was based on a number of instructor assessments of student work, including lab reports, experimental results, journal article discussions, and a final cumulative exam. Furthermore, students' self-assessments revealed gains in perceived confidence in both conceptual knowledge and technical skills

  12. Inquiry into chemotherapy-induced p53 activation in cancer cells as a model for teaching signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Srougi, Melissa C; Carson, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular and extracellular communication is conducted through an intricate and interwoven network of signal transduction pathways. The mechanisms for how cells speak with one another are of significant biological importance to both basic and industrial scientists from a number of different disciplines. We have therefore developed and implemented a new laboratory-intensive course that teaches students the theory and techniques used to study cell signaling pathways. Students learn these methodologies as they conduct a hypothesis-driven research project where they elucidate the mechanism of breast cancer cell death caused by a cancer chemotherapeutic agent. While each lab experiment can be conducted independently, the findings build upon one another to form the beginnings of a signaling pathway. In the lecture component of the course, students investigate different signaling pathways and the methods employed to study them. In addition, students actively participate in journal article discussions where they assess the primary scientific literature. We evaluated the course over two semesters and found that in both semesters learning outcomes were met by both undergraduate and graduate students. The evaluation of the course was based on a number of instructor assessments of student work, including lab reports, experimental results, journal article discussions, and a final cumulative exam. Furthermore, students' self-assessments revealed gains in perceived confidence in both conceptual knowledge and technical skills PMID:24259336

  13. Over reported and misunderstood? A study of teachers' reported enactment and knowledge of inquiry-based science teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capps, Daniel K.; Shemwell, Jonathan T.; Young, Ashley M.

    2016-04-01

    Science education reforms worldwide call on teachers to engage students in investigative approaches to instruction, like inquiry. Studies of teacher self-reported enactment indicate that inquiry is used frequently in the classroom, suggesting a high level of proficiency with inquiry that would be amenable to inquiry reform. However, it is unclear whether the high frequency of self-report is based on sound knowledge inquiry. In the absence of sound knowledge, high rates of self-reported enactment would be suspect. We conducted a study to measure teachers' knowledge of inquiry as it related to the known, high frequency of reported enactment. We developed a multidimensional survey instrument using US reform documents and administered it to 149 K-12 teachers at a national science teachers' conference. The majority of the teachers surveyed did not report inquiry enactment based on well-structured knowledge of inquiry. Interviews with participants showed how teachers could readily map non-inquiry activities onto inquiry statements taken directly from reform documents. From these results we argue that teachers often believed they were enacting inquiry, when likely they were not. We further reason that teachers may struggle to interpret and enact inquiry-related requirements of science education reform and will need support distinguishing inquiry from non-inquiry practices.

  14. At-Risk and Bilingual Fifth-Grade Students' On-Task Behavior and Conceptual Understanding in Earth Science-Related Topics during Inquiry-, Technology-, and Game-Based Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeal, K.; Vasquez, Y.; Avandano, C.; Moreno, K.; Besinaiz, J.

    2007-12-01

    The Graduate K-12 (GK12) program has been developed by NSF to support the national effort to advance scientific knowledge through educational partnerships. This paper highlights research conducted during the 2006-2007 school year with the Texas A&M University GK12 project. Two elementary schools with very high numbers of at risk students - those who are poor, speak English as their second language, and have a history of failing state-mandated tests were identified to be the field site for the GK12 project. In these two, high-minority (97% and 40% African American and Hispanic) schools, 80% and 56% of the children have been identified by the state as at risk; 94% and 52% are classified as economically disadvantaged; and 46% and 2% are limited English proficient, respectively. In the past year, 30% and 73% of fifth grade students in these schools passed the science portion of the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) test. Data collected during a three- week period where GK12 fellows taught the fifth graders Earth science-related topics is presented. During the implementation, students were engaged in technology-, inquiry-, and game-based activities. Students were divided into low-, medium-, and high-abilities in one school, and regular and bilingual groups in the other. Pre- post open-ended multiple choice tests indicated that all but the low performing students' conceptual understanding (CU) significantly (p < 0.05) improved during the IT activity. The low and high student groups' CU significantly improved during the inquiry activity, and the high and bilingual students' CU significantly improved for the game activities. Classroom observation assessments showed that there was a significant (p < 0.10) positive (0.347) correlation between on-task behavior and CU. Significant differences between student groups' CU and on-task behavior indicated that technology-based activities showed greatest differences between the low- ability learners and the other

  15. Inquiry Objectives in the Teaching of Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingman, Richard M., Ed.

    Five perspectives are identified for viewing inquiry: "Guiding Principles: (for example the antecedent-consequent principle), Inquiry Factors or logical steps in inquiry, Behavioral Objectives, Affective or Attitudinal Qualities, and Inquiry into Inquiry. Many components of these perspectives are enumerated, together with related student behaviors…

  16. Introductory Physics Laboratories for Life Scientists - Hands on Physics of Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losert, Wolfgang; Moore, Kim

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a set of laboratories and hands on activities to accompany a new two-semester interdisciplinary physics course that has been successfully implemented as the required physics course for premeds at the University of Maryland. The laboratories include significant content on physics relevant to cellular scales, from chemical interactions to random motion and charge screening in fluids. We also introduce the students to research-grade equipment and modern physics analysis tools in contexts relevant to biology, while maintaining the pedagogically valuable open-ended laboratory structure of reformed laboratories.

  17. The impact of a hands-on approach to learning visible spectrometry upon students' performance, motivation, and attitudes.

    PubMed

    Vrtacnik, Margareta; Gros, Natasa

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of introducing visible spectrometry concepts through hands-on laboratory work upon student learning within four vocational programs are discussed. All together, 118 students, average 18.6 years old, participated in the study. The results showed no correlation between students' motivational components (intrinsic, regulated, and controlled), chemistry self-concept and their achievement on an experiential knowledge test and knowledge gained from this hands-on approach. Statistically significant differences were found for academic achievement among students in a biotechnology technical program (School 1), food processing program (School 2), laboratory biomedicine program (School 3), and a biotechnology general program (School 4). Differences in academic achievement are further reflected in students' perception of particular knowledge gained through their hands-on experiences and in their expressed attitude toward different didactical characteristics. All students, regardless of their study program, highly evaluated the relaxed atmosphere that contributed to their self-confidence in completing their laboratory activities. PMID:23841355

  18. Enhancing the Connection to Undergraduate Engineering Students: A Hands-On and Team-Based Approach to Fluid Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Tie; Ford, Julie

    2015-01-01

    This article provides information about the integration of innovative hands-on activities within a sophomore-level Fluid Mechanics course at New Mexico Tech. The course introduces students to the fundamentals of fluid mechanics with emphasis on teaching key equations and methods of analysis for solving real-world problems. Strategies and examples…

  19. From Maxwell to Millikan: A Little History and a Little Hands-on with the Photoelectric Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gipps, John

    1993-01-01

    Provides an historical chronology of events related to understanding the photoelectric effect. Focuses on the early history, the mystery of the photoelectric effect, the contributions of Albert Einstein and Robert Millikan to the field, and hands-on activities that demonstrate the phenomenon to students. (DDR)

  20. A Hands-On, Interdisciplinary Laboratory Program and Educational Model to Strengthen a Radar Curriculum for Broad Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeary, Mark; Yu, Tian-You; Palmer, Robert; Biggerstaff, Michael; Fink, L. Dee; Ahem, Carolyn; Tarp, Keli Pirtle

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the details of a National Science Foundation multi-year educational project at the University of Oklahoma (OU). The goal of this comprehensive active-learning and hands-on laboratory program is to develop an interdisciplinary program, in which engineering, geoscience, and meteorology students participate, which forms a…

  1. Toward "Reality-Based" Integrative Laboratories in ChE: Introducing Real-Time, Hands-On Troubleshooting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoare, Todd

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of troubleshooting within a pre-existing expository laboratory is described and evaluated. Student feedback indicated that troubleshooting activities are highly effective in providing a hands-on opportunity to exercise problem-solving skills and gain a better understanding of the whole process in addition to effectively…

  2. Hands on What? The Relative Effectiveness of Physical versus Virtual Materials in an Engineering Design Project by Middle School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klahr, David; Triona, Lara M.; Williams, Cameron

    2007-01-01

    "Hands-on" activities play an important, but controversial, role in early science education. In this study we attempt to clarify some of the issues surrounding the controversy by calling attention to distinctions between: (a) type of instruction (direct or discovery); (b) type of knowledge to be acquired (domain-general or domain-specific); and…

  3. Inquiry into the Heart of a Comet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Whitney; Roundtree-Brown, Maura; McFadden, Lucy; Warner, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Real science means wrangling with peers over real ideas. Wouldn't it be thrilling to emulate a real life model of science in action in classrooms? How? By starting with a great, hands-on activity modeling an object in space that introduces both key vocabulary and science concepts with visuals to support retention and learning; encouraging…

  4. Inquiry and groups: student interactions in cooperative inquiry-based science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods-McConney, Amanda; Wosnitza, Marold; Sturrock, Keryn L.

    2016-03-01

    Science education research has recommended cooperative inquiry based science in the primary science context for more than two decades but after more than 20 years, student achievement in science has not substantially improved. This study, through direct observation and analysis, investigated content-related student interactions in an authentic inquiry based primary science class setting. Thirty-one upper primary students were videotaped working in cooperative inquiry based science activities. Cooperative talk and negotiation of the science content was analysed to identify any high-level group interactions. The data show that while all groups have incidences of high-level content-related group interactions, the frequency and duration of these interactions were limited. No specific pattern of preceding events was identified and no episodes of high-level content-related group interactions were immediately preceded by the teacher's interactions with the groups. This in situ study demonstrated that even without any kind of scaffolding, specific skills in knowing how to implement cooperative inquiry based science, high-level content-related group interactions did occur very briefly. Support for teachers to develop their knowledge and skills in facilitating cooperative inquiry based science learning is warranted to ensure that high-level content-related group interactions and the associated conceptual learning are not left to chance in science classrooms.

  5. An Educational Model for Hands-On Hydrology Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AghaKouchak, A.; Nakhjiri, N.; Habib, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    This presentation provides an overview of a hands-on modeling tool developed for students in civil engineering and earth science disciplines to help them learn the fundamentals of hydrologic processes, model calibration, sensitivity analysis, uncertainty assessment, and practice conceptual thinking in solving engineering problems. The toolbox includes two simplified hydrologic models, namely HBV-EDU and HBV-Ensemble, designed as a complement to theoretical hydrology lectures. The models provide an interdisciplinary application-oriented learning environment that introduces the hydrologic phenomena through the use of a simplified conceptual hydrologic model. The toolbox can be used for in-class lab practices and homework assignments, and assessment of students' understanding of hydrological processes. Using this modeling toolbox, students can gain more insights into how hydrological processes (e.g., precipitation, snowmelt and snow accumulation, soil moisture, evapotranspiration and runoff generation) are interconnected. The educational toolbox includes a MATLAB Graphical User Interface (GUI) and an ensemble simulation scheme that can be used for teaching more advanced topics including uncertainty analysis, and ensemble simulation. Both models have been administered in a class for both in-class instruction and a final project, and students submitted their feedback about the toolbox. The results indicate that this educational software had a positive impact on students understanding and knowledge of hydrology.

  6. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-On Integrated Reliability Evaluations.

    2014-08-01

    Version 00 The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has developed a powerful personal computer (PC) software application for performing probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs), called Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Version 8. Using SAPHIRE 8 on a PC, an analyst can perform a PRA for any complex system, facility, or process. Regarding nuclear power plants, SAPHIRE can be used to model a plant's response to initiating events, quantify associated core damage frequencies,more » and identify important contributors to core damage (Level 1 PRA). It can also be used to evaluate containment failure and release models for severe accident conditions, given that core damage has occurred (Level 2 PRA). It can be used for a PRA assuming that the reactor is at full power, at low power, or at shutdown conditions. Furthermore, it can be used to analyze both internal and external initiating events, and it has special features for transforming models built for internal event analysis to models for external event analysis. It can also be used in a limited manner to quantify risk for release consequences to both the public and the environment (Level 3 PRA). For all of these models, SAPHIRE can evaluate the uncertainty inherent in the probabilistic models. SAPHIRE has evolved with advances in computer technology.« less

  7. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-On Integrated Reliability Evaluations.

    SciTech Connect

    2014-08-01

    Version 00 The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has developed a powerful personal computer (PC) software application for performing probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs), called Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Version 8. Using SAPHIRE 8 on a PC, an analyst can perform a PRA for any complex system, facility, or process. Regarding nuclear power plants, SAPHIRE can be used to model a plant's response to initiating events, quantify associated core damage frequencies, and identify important contributors to core damage (Level 1 PRA). It can also be used to evaluate containment failure and release models for severe accident conditions, given that core damage has occurred (Level 2 PRA). It can be used for a PRA assuming that the reactor is at full power, at low power, or at shutdown conditions. Furthermore, it can be used to analyze both internal and external initiating events, and it has special features for transforming models built for internal event analysis to models for external event analysis. It can also be used in a limited manner to quantify risk for release consequences to both the public and the environment (Level 3 PRA). For all of these models, SAPHIRE can evaluate the uncertainty inherent in the probabilistic models. SAPHIRE has evolved with advances in computer technology.

  8. Hospital inquiries. The listening blank.

    PubMed

    Higgins, J

    2001-09-13

    The major failures reported in the Bristol inquiry have been highlighted in most hospital inquiry reports over the past 30 years. The tendency to victimise the whistleblower has characterised virtually all inquiries. Inadequate leadership, isolation, system failures, poor communication and disempowerment of staff and service users are the common themes. While organisational reform is essential, the real challenge is to change behaviour. And this depends on the example of senior staff.

  9. Enhancing Hispanic Minority Undergraduates' Botany Laboratory Experiences: Implementation of an Inquiry-Based Plant Tissue Culture Module Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siritunga, Dimuth; Navas, Vivian; Diffoot, Nanette

    2012-01-01

    Early involvement of students in hands-on research experiences are known to demystify research and promote the pursuit of careers in science. But in large enrollment departments such opportunities for undergraduates to participate in research are rare. To counteract such lack of opportunities, inquiry-based laboratory module in plant tissue…

  10. GeoScape: An Instructional Rock Garden for Inquiry-Based Cooperative Learning Exercises in Introductory Geology Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calderone, Gary J.; Thompson, J. Robert; Johnson, Wayne M.; Kadel, Steve D.; Nelson, Pamela J.; Hall-Wallace, Michelle; Butler, Robert F.

    2003-01-01

    GeoScape is a landscape design consisting of colored gravel, strategically placed flagstone and boulders, and two vertical features that simulate the geology of fictitious regions. Employs "hands-on", inquiry-based, and cooperative learning techniques to help students develop problem solving and critical thinking skills. Explains the construction,…

  11. Tip-to-Tail: Developing a Conceptual Model of Magnetism with Kindergartners Using Inquiry-Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hook, Stephen J.; Huziak-Clark, Tracy L.

    2007-01-01

    This study reports changes in kindergarten students' understanding of magnets after participating in a series of hands-on, inquiry-based lessons. The lessons focused on the dipole nature of magnets and employed a visual representation of a magnet as an arrow for the kindergarten students. This dipole model was used to describe how magnets interact…

  12. Characteristics of Hands-On Simulations with Added Value for Innovative Secondary and Higher Vocational Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khaled, Anne; Gulikers, Judith; Biemans, Harm; van der Wel, Marjan; Mulder, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The intentions with which hands-on simulations are used in vocational education are not always clear. Also, pedagogical-didactic approaches in hands-on simulations are not well conceptualised from a learning theory perspective. This makes it difficult to pinpoint the added value that hands-on simulations can have in an innovative vocational…

  13. A Comparative Analysis of Earth Science Curriculum Using Inquiry Methodology between Korean and the U.S. Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Mira; Park, Do-Yong; Lee, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate in what ways the inquiry task of teaching and learning in earth science textbooks reflect the unique characteristics of earth science inquiry methodology, and how it provides students with opportunities to develop their scientific reasoning skills. This study analyzes a number of inquiry activities in…

  14. Hands-on-Entropy, Energy Balance with Biological Relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Entropy changes underlie the physics that dominates biological interactions. Indeed, introductory biology courses often begin with an exploration of the qualities of water that are important to living systems. However, one idea that is not explicitly addressed in most introductory physics or biology textbooks is important contribution of the entropy in driving fundamental biological processes towards equilibrium. From diffusion to cell-membrane formation, to electrostatic binding in protein folding, to the functioning of nerve cells, entropic effects often act to counterbalance deterministic forces such as electrostatic attraction and in so doing, allow for effective molecular signaling. A small group of biology, biophysics and computer science faculty have worked together for the past five years to develop curricular modules (based on SCALEUP pedagogy). This has enabled students to create models of stochastic and deterministic processes. Our students are first-year engineering and science students in the calculus-based physics course and they are not expected to know biology beyond the high-school level. In our class, they learn to reduce complex biological processes and structures in order model them mathematically to account for both deterministic and probabilistic processes. The students test these models in simulations and in laboratory experiments that are biologically relevant such as diffusion, ionic transport, and ligand-receptor binding. Moreover, the students confront random forces and traditional forces in problems, simulations, and in laboratory exploration throughout the year-long course as they move from traditional kinematics through thermodynamics to electrostatic interactions. This talk will present a number of these exercises, with particular focus on the hands-on experiments done by the students, and will give examples of the tangible material that our students work with throughout the two-semester sequence of their course on introductory

  15. The effects of hands-on-science instruction on the science achievement of middle school students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, Felita

    Student achievement in the Twenty First Century demands a new rigor in student science knowledge, since advances in science and technology require students to think and act like scientists. As a result, students must acquire proficient levels of knowledge and skills to support a knowledge base that is expanding exponentially with new scientific advances. This study examined the effects of hands-on-science instruction on the science achievement of middle school students. More specifically, this study was concerned with the influence of hands-on science instruction versus traditional science instruction on the science test scores of middle school students. The subjects in this study were one hundred and twenty sixth-grade students in six classes. Instruction involved lecture/discussion and hands-on activities carried out for a three week period. Specifically, the study ascertained the influence of the variables gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status on the science test scores of middle school students. Additionally, this study assessed the effect of the variables gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status on the attitudes of sixth grade students toward science. The two instruments used to collect data for this study were the Prentice Hall unit ecosystem test and the Scientific Work Experience Programs for Teachers Study (SWEPT) student's attitude survey. Moreover, the data for the study was treated using the One-Way Analysis of Covariance and the One-Way Analysis of Variance. The following findings were made based on the results: (1) A statistically significant difference existed in the science performance of middle school students exposed to hands-on science instruction. These students had significantly higher scores than the science performance of middle school students exposed to traditional instruction. (2) A statistically significant difference did not exist between the science scores of male and female middle school students. (3) A statistically

  16. Bumps in the Night. Hands-on Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1992-01-01

    Presents elementary school science activities with a Halloween orientation. One activity teaches students to appreciate and understand bats. A second activity has students group and classify monsters by individual characteristics. Activities for integrating science across the curriculum include creating monster myths, conducting surveys of…

  17. Geographic Inquiry into Global Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, A. David

    1993-01-01

    Describes the background and development of the Geographic Inquiry into Global Issues (GIGI) project. Maintains that the secondary school lessons are designed to teach citizenship and critical thinking skills. Emphasizes that the pedagogical approach is founded on the inquiry approach. (CFR)

  18. Step up to Full Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Jill; Kindem, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    Elementary students make great scientists. They are natural questioners and observers. Capitalizing on this natural curiosity and wonderment, the authors have developed a method of doing inquiry investigations with students that many teachers have found practical and user friendly. Their belief is that full inquiry lessons serve as a vital method…

  19. Taking on Inquiry in Iowa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carruthers, Cheryl; Lampe, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Over the last year, "School Library Monthly" ("SLM") has challenged school librarians to "nudge toward inquiry" through the "SLM" blog-driven submissions compiled by Kristin Fontichiaro. Iowa took up the challenge! This article describes how teacher librarians across Iowa teamed with classroom teachers to create inquiry-based learning plans for a…

  20. Science on a Roll. Part One: Absorbing Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brendzel, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    Presents an activity that tests the absorbency of different brands of paper towels. Suggests making this activity into an open-ended inquiry type of activity. Includes sample questions to guide students, topics for class discussion, and sample methods of using the absorbency activity. (KHR)

  1. Measure, Then Show: Grasping Human Evolution Through an Inquiry-Based, Data-driven Hominin Skulls Lab

    PubMed Central

    Luberda, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Incomprehension and denial of the theory of evolution among high school students has been observed to also occur when teachers are not equipped to deliver a compelling case also for human evolution based on fossil evidence. This paper assesses the outcomes of a novel inquiry-based paleoanthropology lab teaching human evolution to high-school students. The inquiry-based Be a Paleoanthropologist for a Day lab placed a dozen hominin skulls into the hands of high-school students. Upon measuring three variables of human evolution, students explain what they have observed and discuss findings. In the 2013/14 school year, 11 biology classes in 7 schools in the Greater New Orleans area participated in this lab. The interviewed teacher cohort unanimously agreed that the lab featuring hominin skull replicas and stimulating student inquiry was a pedagogically excellent method of delivering the subject of human evolution. First, the lab’s learning path of transforming facts to data, information to knowledge, and knowledge to acceptance empowered students to themselves execute part of the science that underpins our understanding of deep time hominin evolution. Second, although challenging, the hands-on format of the lab was accessible to high-school students, most of whom were readily able to engage the lab’s scientific process. Third, the lab’s exciting and compelling pedagogy unlocked higher order thinking skills, effectively activating the cognitive, psychomotor and affected learning domains as defined in Bloom’s taxonomy. Lastly, the lab afforded students a formative experience with a high degree of retention and epistemic depth. Further study is warranted to gauge the degree of these effects. PMID:27513927

  2. Measure, Then Show: Grasping Human Evolution Through an Inquiry-Based, Data-driven Hominin Skulls Lab.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Chris N; Luberda, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Incomprehension and denial of the theory of evolution among high school students has been observed to also occur when teachers are not equipped to deliver a compelling case also for human evolution based on fossil evidence. This paper assesses the outcomes of a novel inquiry-based paleoanthropology lab teaching human evolution to high-school students. The inquiry-based Be a Paleoanthropologist for a Day lab placed a dozen hominin skulls into the hands of high-school students. Upon measuring three variables of human evolution, students explain what they have observed and discuss findings. In the 2013/14 school year, 11 biology classes in 7 schools in the Greater New Orleans area participated in this lab. The interviewed teacher cohort unanimously agreed that the lab featuring hominin skull replicas and stimulating student inquiry was a pedagogically excellent method of delivering the subject of human evolution. First, the lab's learning path of transforming facts to data, information to knowledge, and knowledge to acceptance empowered students to themselves execute part of the science that underpins our understanding of deep time hominin evolution. Second, although challenging, the hands-on format of the lab was accessible to high-school students, most of whom were readily able to engage the lab's scientific process. Third, the lab's exciting and compelling pedagogy unlocked higher order thinking skills, effectively activating the cognitive, psychomotor and affected learning domains as defined in Bloom's taxonomy. Lastly, the lab afforded students a formative experience with a high degree of retention and epistemic depth. Further study is warranted to gauge the degree of these effects. PMID:27513927

  3. Hands-On Whole Science: A Leaf Sampler.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1991-01-01

    Presents two elementary school activities to help students learn about autumn. The activities use autumn leaves to teach that each type of tree has its own distinctive type of leaf. One activity involves tracing, drawing, and writing about leaves; the other involves making a quilt using leaf designs. (SM)

  4. "Martian Boneyards": Sustained Scientific Inquiry in a Social Digital Game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asbell-Clarke, Jordis

    Social digital gaming is an explosive phenomenon where youth and adults are engaged in inquiry for the sake of fun. The complexity of learning evidenced in social digital games is attracting the attention of educators. Martian Boneyards is a proof-of-concept game designed to study how a community of voluntary gamers can be enticed to engage in sustained, high-quality scientific inquiry. Science educators and game designers worked together to create an educational game with the polish and intrigue of a professional-level game, striving to attract a new audience to scientific inquiry. Martian Boneyards took place in the high-definition, massively multiplayer online environment, Blue Mars, where players spent an average of 30 hours in the game over the 4-month implementation period, with some exceeding 200 hours. Most of the players' time was spent in scientific inquiry activities and about 30% of the players' in-game interactions were in the analysis and theory-building phases of inquiry. Female players conducted most of the inquiry, in particular analysis and theory building. The quality of scientific inquiry processes, which included extensive information gathering by players, and the resulting content were judged to be very good by a team of independent scientists. This research suggests that a compelling storyline, a highly aesthetic environment, and the emergent social bonds among players and between players and the characters played by designers were all responsible for sustaining high quality inquiry among gamers in this free-choice experience. The gaming environment developed for Martian Boneyards is seen as an evolving ecosystem with interactions among design, players' activity, and players' progress.

  5. Enactment of Scientific Inquiry: Observation of Two Cases at Different Grade Levels in China Mainland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Zhang, Ronghui; Clarke, David; Wang, Weizhen

    2014-04-01

    Enactment of scientific inquiry in classroom has attracted a great attention of science educators around the world. In this study, we examined two competent teachers' (one Grade 9 chemistry teacher and one Grade 4 science teacher) enactment of scientific inquiry in selected teaching units to reveal the characteristics of enacted inquiry at different grade levels by analyzing lesson sequence videos. The coding schemes for enacted inquiry consist of ontological properties and instructional practices. Pre-topic and post-topic teacher interviews and the two teachers' responses to a questionnaire were adopted to identify the factors influencing teacher's enactment. The results indicate that the two case teachers' enactment involved a range of inquiry activities. The enacted inquiry at fourth-grade level covered all the inquiry elements, tending to engage students in the whole procedure of inquiry. The ninth-grade chemistry class placed emphasis on the elements "making plans" to solve problems in authentic context. Important factors influencing the enactment include teacher's understanding about scientific inquiry, textbooks, assessment, students and resource. Implications for inquiry enactment and instruction improvement have been provided.

  6. Implementing Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) in Undergraduate Biomechanics: Lessons Learned by a Novice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Shawn R.; Shadle, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) uses specially designed activities and cooperative learning to teach content and to actively engage students in inquiry, analytical thinking and teamwork. It has been used extensively in Chemistry education, but the use of POGIL is not well documented in other physical and biological sciences. This…

  7. Development of an Inquiry-Based Learning Support System Based on an Intelligent Knowledge Exploration Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Ji-Wei; Tseng, Judy C. R.; Hwang, Gwo-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL) is an effective approach for promoting active learning. When inquiry-based learning is incorporated into instruction, teachers provide guiding questions for students to actively explore the required knowledge in order to solve the problems. Although the World Wide Web (WWW) is a rich knowledge resource for students to…

  8. Inquiry in the Life Sciences: The Plant-in-a-Jar as a Catalyst for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Stephen L.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author presents and discusses activities that use a phenomena-first, guided inquiry approach to teach important concepts related to plant function, as well as the history and nature of scientific inquiry. These activities are intended for use with students in grades 3-8, as well as in elementary science methods courses. The…

  9. Moving from Didactic to Inquiry-Based Instruction in a Science Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lord, Thomas; Orkwiszewski, Terri

    2006-01-01

    Involving students in inquiry-based exercises is much more difficult than simply providing activities for them to do in the classroom. While active learning suggests students are physically participating in the lesson, inquiry learning requires that they are also mentally participating in it. Academic theorists agree it is more the mental…

  10. Constructing a Discourse of Inquiry: Findings from a Five-Year Ethnography at One Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Louise; Mills, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Background/Context: In an age of test-driven accountability, many schools are returning to banking pedagogies in which students passively take in content. Inquiry-based instruction offers one approach for actively involving students in meaningful learning activity, however, research on inquiry pedagogies often focuses on academic accomplishments.…

  11. Scaffolding elementary students' authentic inquiry through a written science curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hee-Sun

    This study investigated scaffolding elementary school students' formulation of explanations through an 8-week biodiversity curriculum. Authentic inquiry situations in the curriculum provided opportunities for students to conduct elements of scientists' practices in hands-on investigations driven by the students' interests. Three support features-modeled explanations, direct content prompts, and sentence starters-were designed to help students focus on salient features of the inquiry situations. These three support features were placed differently in two treatments. In the consistent support treatment, three support features were present throughout eleven authentic inquiry situations. In the fading support treatment, three support features were gradually withdrawn over the same inquiry situations. The manipulation of the fading dimension of the scaffolding concept was based on the idea that students can learn more effectively when they take more responsibility to complete the learning task as they gain knowledge and experience. Forty-eight students in two 5th/6th combined classes participated. This study was quasi-experimental with two treatment variations. Based on students' prior knowledge and explanation ability, block strategies were used to assign students into the two treatments. Data sources included a multiple-choice test and an open-ended test administered before and after the treatments. Students' written explanations in the eleven inquiry situations were collected. Eighteen students were interviewed after the treatments. Results demonstrate that both groups improved on the multiple-choice and open-ended tests. While these two tests were not sensitive to the treatment differences, students' explanations were a much better indicator of the treatment effects. The consistent support group included fewer valid warrants in explanations before the treatments but gradually outperformed the fading support group as certain support features were withdrawn in the

  12. Hands-on, online, and workshop-based K-12 weather and climate education resources from the Center for Multi-scale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, S. Q.; Johnson, R. M.; Randall, D. A.; Denning, A.; Burt, M. A.; Gardiner, L.; Genyuk, J.; Hatheway, B.; Jones, B.; La Grave, M. L.; Russell, R. M.

    2009-12-01

    The need for improving the representation of cloud processes in climate models has been one of the most important limitations of the reliability of climate-change simulations. Now in its fourth year, the National Science Foundation-funded Center for Multi-scale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes (CMMAP) at Colorado State University (CSU) is addressing this problem through a revolutionary new approach to representing cloud processes on their native scales, including the cloud-scale interaction processes that are active in cloud systems. CMMAP has set ambitious education and human-resource goals to share basic information about the atmosphere, clouds, weather, climate, and modeling with diverse K-12 and public audiences. This is accomplished through collaborations in resource development and dissemination between CMMAP scientists, CSU’s Little Shop of Physics (LSOP) program, and the Windows to the Universe (W2U) program at University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). Little Shop of Physics develops new hands on science activities demonstrating basic science concepts fundamental to understanding atmospheric characteristics, weather, and climate. Videos capture demonstrations of children completing these activities which are broadcast to school districts and public television programs. CMMAP and LSOP educators and scientists partner in teaching a summer professional development workshops for teachers at CSU with a semester's worth of college-level content on the basic physics of the atmosphere, weather, climate, climate modeling, and climate change, as well as dozens of LSOP inquiry-based activities suitable for use in classrooms. The W2U project complements these efforts by developing and broadly disseminating new CMMAP-related online content pages, animations, interactives, image galleries, scientists’ biographies, and LSOP videos to K-12 and public audiences. Reaching nearly 20 million users annually, W2U is highly valued as a curriculum enhancement

  13. Alternative certification science teachers' understanding and implementation of inquiry-based instruction in their beginning years of teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Abdulkadir

    The purpose of this phenomenographic study was to: (a) understand how beginning science teachers recruited from various science disciplines and prepared in an Alternative Teacher Certification Program (ATCP) implemented inquiry during their initial years of teaching; (b) describe constraints and needs that these beginning science teachers perceived in implementing inquiry-based science instruction; and (c) understand the relation between what they learned in their ATCP and their practice of teaching science through inquiry. The participants of this study consisted of four ATCP teachers who are in their beginning years of teaching. Semi-structured interviews, classroom observation, field notes, and artifacts used as source of data collection. The beginning science teachers in this study held incomplete views of inquiry. These views of inquiry did not reflect inquiry as described in NRC (2000)---essential features of inquiry,---nor did they reflect views of faculty members involved in teaching science methods courses. Although the participants described themselves as reform-oriented, there were inconsistencies between their views and practices. Their practice of inquiry did not reflect inquiry either as outlined by essential features of inquiry (NRC, 2000) or inquiry as modeled in activities used in their ATCP. The research participants' perceived constraints and needs in their implementation of inquiry-based activities. Their perceived constraints included logistical and student constraints and school culture. The perceived needs included classroom management, pedagogical skills, practical knowledge, discipline, successful grade-specific models of inquiry, and access to a strong support system. Prior professional work experience, models and activities used in the ATCP, and benefits of inquiry to student learning were the declared factors that facilitated the research participants' practice of inquiry-based teaching.

  14. Reconsideration of the Paradox of Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Kunimasa

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the Meno presents the argument called "the paradox of inquiry." This paper has two purposes. First, I analyze the paradox of inquiry and reformulate the argument as the "renewed paradox of inquiry." Second, I clarify that the problem of inquiry posed by this paradox concerns the necessary conditions for a…

  15. Reconceptualising inquiry in science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevins, Stuart; Price, Gareth

    2016-01-01

    Decades of discussion and debate about how science is most effectively taught and learned have resulted in a number of similar but competing inquiry models. These aim to develop students learning of science through approaches which reflect the authenticity of science as practiced by professional scientists while being practical and manageable within the school context. This paper offers a collection of our current reflections and suggestions concerning inquiry and its place in science education. We suggest that many of the current models of inquiry are too limited in their vision concerning themselves, almost exclusively, with producing a scaffold which reduces the complex process of inquiry into an algorithmic approach based around a sequence of relatively simple steps. We argue that this restricts students' experience of authentic inquiry to make classroom management and assessment procedures easier. We then speculate that a more integrated approach is required through an alternative inquiry model that depends on three dimensions (conceptual, procedural and personal) and we propose that it will be more likely to promote effective learning and a willingness to engage in inquiry across all facets of a students' school career and beyond.

  16. Exploring the Effects of Specific, Hands-On Interventions, on Environmental Science Topics in Teacher Education Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, S. M.; Hayhoe, D.

    2012-12-01

    With increased concern over the environment, all Ontario students now study soils, energy conservation, water systems, and climate change & the greenhouse effect in Grades 3, 5, 7, 8 and 10. Unfortunately, many prospective teachers at the elementary and intermediate levels come to teacher education programs with little or no formal science education beyond their own experiences as students in the K-12 system. We devised a series of concept tests (some binary choice, some multiple choice) designed to assess teacher candidates' conceptual understandings of soils, energy, water systems, and climate change and the greenhouse effect - the very content they are expected to teach their future students in the school system. We administered a pre-test to our students at two institutions to establish a baseline of their understanding. Then, we specifically devoted class time to exploring each of these themes in our science curriculum methods courses in order using research-based principles of teaching devoted to promoting conceptual change through the use of hands-on, inquiry approaches in science. After a few months had passed, we again administered the same tests to teacher candidates to measure candidates' conceptual gain. Some teacher candidates also participated in follow-up focus group interviews so that they could have the opportunity to articulate their understandings of concepts in environmental science using their own words. In this poster we will report on data collected for this project over the past two academic years. We have reached two broad conclusions. First, teacher candidates know a considerable amount about the four environmental topics that were selected, despite the fact that most participants in the research did not have post-secondary training in science. For example, participants tended to know that planting different crops on the soil in different years helps to maintain fertile soils and that warmer oceans will cause an increase in the severity of

  17. Teaching science through inquiry in K--5 classrooms: Analysis of change in practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciulli, Joseph A.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role professional development takes in fostering change in the pedagogical practices of K--5 classroom teachers, specifically in teaching science through inquiry. Michael Fullan's three elements essential for change: curriculum, instruction, and philosophy, were used as the lens through which to observe and analyze the impact of an intervention for changing teaching practices in K--5 classrooms. The intervention that assisted in creating an environment for change in behaviors was a morphed version of the Exploratorium's Institute for Inquiry, the ASSET Institute for Inquiry, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. During a three year period 208 teachers attended the five day Institute. It modeled the pedagogy, philosophy and related curriculum strategies indigenous to teaching science through inquiry. Each teacher was sent a questionnaire. The questionnaire was a compilation of Horizon Research, National Science Education Standards, and the National Science Education Inquiry Standard. The analysis of the statistical relationships between the Institute and change in the use of curriculum, instruction, or beliefs in action was done. The results indicate a statistically significant relationship between the Institute for Inquiry and change in teaching practices. There was an increase in the use and implementation of hands-on inquiry-based curricula: STC, FOSS, and INSIGHTS. There was an increase in those instructional strategies and classroom practices supportive of science through inquiry. There was a statistical relationship between the intervention and the NSES indicators of inquiry in practice. Further research was done with regard to teaching experience (i.e., number of years teaching), time interval between completion of the intervention and implementation of the philosophy and strategies indigenous to inquiry, and the relationship a resource teacher (e.g., teacher teaching teacher) develops with classroom teachers and the

  18. Connecting the Hands-On to the Minds-On: A Video Case Analysis of South African Physical Sciences Lessons for Student Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramnarain, Umesh

    2015-01-01

    In South Africa, there is a strong curriculum imperative for South African school science teachers to not only involve learners in practical inquiry activities but also to support students in making a connection between the construction of substantive scientific knowledge to these activities. The research reported in this article investigated the…

  19. Inquiry, instrumentalism, and the public understanding of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, John L.

    2005-09-01

    Two seemingly complementary trends stand out currently in school science education in the United States: one is the increased emphasis on inquiry activities in classrooms, and the other is the high level of attention given to student understanding of the nature of science. This essay looks at the range of activities that fall within the first trend, noting, in particular, the growing popularity of inquiry activities that engage students in engineering-type tasks. The potential for public disengagement from science and technology issues is described as a result of the continued juxtaposition of these sorts of inquiry activities with our current, idealized portrayals of the nature of science - the emphasis of the second trend. Drawing on Dewey's instrumental theory of knowledge, an alternative way of thinking about science is offered that would not only provide for a more authentic understanding of science, but also invite much needed public participation in the broad governance of science in modern-day democratic societies.

  20. Student Understanding of Chromatography: A Hands-On Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtright, Robert D.; Emry, Randy; Markwell*, John

    1999-02-01

    This exercise sets up a collaborative activity that challenges students to develop a chromatographic solvent with the appropriate polarity to separate leaf chlorophyll and anthocyanin pigments by TLC. The suggested activity has been tested with both high-school advanced-chemistry students and with undergraduate students in an introductory biochemistry class. It includes a demonstration introducing the basic principles of partitioning and differential distribution based on solubility. For the student activity, the materials to be used are leaves of the variegated Coleus plant, plastic-backed silica TLC plates, 2-propanol, acetone, and methanol. Students may work collaboratively within a set of boundary parameters to optimize the chromatographic solvent through a series of rapid iterations of chromatography. Students can also use these chromatography systems to carry out independent projects.

  1. Inquiry Teaching in Clinical Periodontics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heins, Paul J.; Mackenzie, Richard S.

    1987-01-01

    An adaptation of the inquiry method of teaching, which develops skills of information retrieval and reasoning through systematic questioning by the teacher, is proposed for instruction in clinical periodontics. (MSE)

  2. Hands-on Science: Getting-to-Know-You Graphing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1992-01-01

    Elementary teachers can use graphing to introduce students to one another. An eye color graphing activity helps students learn more about each other while experimenting with different ways of organizing and displaying information. For follow up, students can apply their graphing knowledge by collecting and displaying data from their families. (SM)

  3. Discovering Fossils--A Hands-on Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Describes fossil investigations developed and provided by the Falls of the Ohio State Park near Louisville, Kentucky. The Devonian shale beds contain representatives of over 600 species including corals, sponges, brachiopods, mollusks, and echinoderms. Rather than focusing on identification, the activities emphasize the past ecological…

  4. Hands-on and Online: Scientific Explorations through Distance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawn, Mary V.; Carrico, Pauline; Charuk, Ken; Stote, Kim S.; Lawrence, Betty

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory experiments are often considered the defining characteristic of science courses. Such activities provide students with real-world contexts for applying scientific concepts, while also allowing them to develop scientific ways of thinking and promoting an interest in science. In recent years, an increasing number of campuses have moved…

  5. First-Year Hands-On Design Course: Implementation & Reception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butterfield, Anthony E.; Branch, Kyle; Trujillo, Edward

    2015-01-01

    To incorporate active and collaborative teaching methods early in our curriculum, we have developed a freshman design laboratory. The course introduces numerous core concepts and lab skills, by way of seven teaching modules, including spectrometer construction and a collaborative project with seniors. Survey data show students enjoyed and learned…

  6. Chaos in the Kitchen: A Hands-On Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roe-Dale, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This article outlines a class activity where students prepare croissants to get an intuitive feeling for the nature of a strange attractor. In particular during the preparation of the pastry dough, students investigate the effects of stretching and folding. These physical processes force trajectories (in this case the pastry dough) to remain…

  7. Comparing the perceptions of scientific inquiry between experts and practitioners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooding, Julia Terese Chembars

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a difference in the perception of scientific inquiry between experts and practitioners, and, if a difference was shown to exist, to analyze those perceptions in order to better understand the extent of that difference or gap. A disconnect was found between how experts and practitioners perceived scientific inquiry. The practitioners differed from both the experts and the literature in three key areas. First, although the teachers indicated that students would be manipulating materials, there was no direct reference to this manipulation actually being performed for the purpose of investigating. Second, the practitioners implied active physical engagement with materials, but they did not tie this to active mental engagement or direct involvement in their own learning. Third, teachers omitted their role in laying the foundation for inquiry. Though classroom teachers lacked a complete understanding of true inquiry and its place in the K-12 classroom, most of them actually believed they were practicing the art of teaching via inquiry. Additionally, two other points of interest arose. First, an examination of the national standards for a number of curricular areas established that the process skills of scientific inquiry are mirrored in those standards, implying that inquiry is not limited to the sciences. Second, a definition of inquiry was formulated based upon interviews with experts in the field. Although the literature and the experts were in unison in their definition, there was a disparity between the accepted definition and that provided by the teachers. The struggle for a comprehensive understanding of inquiry continues to this day. It might very well be that the concept still remains elusive partly because the teacher behaviors associated with it run counter to more traditional methods of instruction...methods that most teachers have experienced throughout their own educational careers. The most pervasive

  8. Student Content Knowledge Increases after Participation in a Hands-on Biotechnology Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Amber M.; Hanegan, Nikki L.

    2011-01-01

    Implementing biotechnology education through hands-on teaching methods should be considered by secondary biology teachers. This study is an experimental research design to examine increased student content knowledge in biotechnology after a hands-on biotechnology intervention. The teachers from both school groups participated in, Project Crawfish,…

  9. Hands-On Practice Helps Students Master IT Skills and Succeed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittman, William

    2010-01-01

    Students in information technology (IT) need realistic, hands-on experience to master IT skills. When students have the opportunity to train with a hands-on curriculum and prepare to certify in the IT field, they become more deeply engaged in both their education and their career path. This article discusses LabSim, an IT certification training…

  10. A Virtual Tour of Plate Tectonics: Using Google Earth for Inquiry Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvey, Bridget; Bell, Randy

    2012-01-01

    Google Earth is an exciting way to engage students in scientific inquiry--the foundation of science education standards and reforms. The National Science Education Standards identify inquiry as an active process that incorporates questioning, gathering and analyzing data, and thinking critically about the interplay of evidence and explanations.…

  11. A Scoping Study Investigating Student Perceptions towards Inquiry Based Learning in the Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Nicola; Van der Touw, Thomas; Spowart, Lucy; Lawlor, Craig

    2016-01-01

    There has been an increasing movement towards the introduction of inquiry based learning in undergraduate physiology laboratories. Students can however find this challenging when there is a sudden transition from traditional didactic practicals to full inquiry based activities. One reason for this could be the students' perceptions about the…

  12. Using Inquiry-Based Instruction for Teaching Science to Students with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydeniz, Mehmet; Cihak, David F.; Graham, Shannon C.; Retinger, Larryn

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of inquiry-based science instruction for five elementary students with learning disabilities (LD). Students participated in a series of inquiry-based activities targeting conceptual and application-based understanding of simple electric circuits, conductors and insulators, parallel circuits, and…

  13. Student Responses to a Context- and Inquiry-Based Three-Step Teaching Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walan, Susanne; Rundgren, Shu-Nu Chang

    2015-01-01

    Research has indicated that both context- and inquiry-based approaches could increase student interest in learning sciences. This case study aims to present a context- and inquiry-based combined teaching approach, using a three-step teaching model developed by the PROFILES project, and investigates Swedish students' responses to the activity. A…

  14. An Inquiry-Oriented Curriculum in Map Making and Map Interpretation for the Intermediate Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janeway, W. Whitney

    This publication contains class activities and provocative inquiry questions for intermediate-grade teachers to use to involve students in map making and map interpretation. The author believes that the only things that are needed to develop an inquiry-oriented unit on mapping are a good map, a small group of students, and a perceptive teacher who…

  15. Demonstrating Inquiry-Based Teaching Competencies in the Life Sciences--Part 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    This set of botany demonstrations is a continuation of the inquiry-based lecture activities that provide realistic connections to the history and nature of science and employ technology in data collection. The demonstrations also provide examples of inquiry-based teaching practices in the life sciences. (Contains 5 figures.) [For Part 1, see…

  16. Fostering Learner Autonomy in a Technology-Enhanced, Inquiry-Based Foreign Language Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luke, Christopher L.

    2006-01-01

    This article focuses on a qualitative teacher research project with a fourth-semester university Spanish class that emphasized inquiry-based learning. One of the primary objectives of the class was to increase learner autonomy through self-selected inquiries, self-directed learning activities, and curricular negotiation. Multiple data sources were…

  17. Science from the Pond up: Using Measurement to Introduce Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demir, Abdulkadir; Schmidt, Frank; Abell, Sandra K.

    2010-01-01

    The authors engaged nonscience majors enrolled in an integrated science course with a prototype activity designed to change their mindset from cookbook to inquiry science. This article describes the activity, the Warm Little Pond, which helped students develop essential understanding of basic statistics, significant figures, and the idea that…

  18. NASA's Student Glovebox: An Inquiry-Based Technology Educator's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Carla B.; Rogers, Melissa J. B.

    This inquiry-based activity discusses the development of a glovebox like those used on the International Space Station and Space Shuttle. A glovebox is a box used for experimentation in which the user inserts hands into gloved access holes in order to work in the box. Activities concerning the study of liquid droplets are included to give students…

  19. 22 CFR 146.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....545 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE CIVIL RIGHTS NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 146.545 Pre-employment inquiries....

  20. 22 CFR 229.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....545 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 229.545 Pre-employment inquiries....

  1. Using LEDs and Phosphorescent Materials to Teach High School Students Quantum Mechanics: A Guided-Inquiry Laboratory for Introductory High School Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, William P.; Trotochaud, Alan; Sherman, Julia; Kazerounian, Kazem; Faraclas, Elias W.

    2009-01-01

    The quantization of electronic energy levels in atoms is foundational to a mechanistic explanation of the periodicity of elemental properties and behavior. This paper presents a hands-on, guided inquiry approach to teaching this concept as part of a broader treatment of quantum mechanics, and as a foundation for an understanding of chemical…

  2. Promoting Student Development of Models and Scientific Inquiry Skills in Acid-Base Chemistry: An Important Skill Development in Preparation for AP Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale-Hanes, Cara

    2015-01-01

    In this study, two groups of 11th grade chemistry students (n = 210) performed a sequence of hands-on and virtual laboratories that were progressively more inquiry-based. One-half of the students did the laboratory sequence with the addition of a teacher-led discussion connecting student data to student-generated visual representations of…

  3. Determination of Fe Content of Some Food Items by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (FAAS): A Guided-Inquiry Learning Experience in Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fakayode, Sayo O.; King, Angela G.; Yakubu, Mamudu; Mohammed, Abdul K.; Pollard, David A.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a guided-inquiry (GI) hands-on determination of Fe in food samples including plantains, spinach, lima beans, oatmeal, Frosted Flakes cereal (generic), tilapia fish, and chicken using flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS). The utility of the GI experiment, which is part of an instrumental analysis laboratory course,…

  4. Classes Azur Astro Espace International Hands-on Space Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, P.

    2002-01-01

    Created in 1994 in the wake of the closure of the Space Camp of Patrick Baudry in Cannes, Classes Azur Astro Espace (AAE) provide a world's unique combination of space and astronomy courses, as given by active and retired professionals of two of the best space and astronomical facilities extant: Alcatel Space in Cannes and Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (OCA) in Nice, Grasse and Caussols. Fifteen space modules, of 30 to 60 minutes each, have been established, giving simple and clear explanations on launchers, satellites, their applications, their development, together with an historical background. Basic experiments are included, such as an unique small catapult to explain gravity, or more classical water rockets. The basic AAE sojourn extends over 3 days: one day for space (including a visit of Alcatel Space, the biggest satellite manufacturer outside the US and Russia), one day for astronomy (including a visit of the biggest observatory in Europe) and one day à-la-carte (Côte d'Azur offers much, such as the Oceanographic Museum in Monaco). More and more groups are adding a fourth day, with a visit to the nice old village of Perinaldo in Italy, where famous astronomer Cassini was born. Lycée de Cachan, near Paris, even takes 12-day sojourns every year. The public has been extremely wide, from age 5 to 70, from students to enthusiasts. Coming initially all over from France, participants now include since 2001 German and Italian pupils and teachers. In 2001 also, ESA came in the shape of a Space Camp. ISU's Master of Space Studies participates to a shortened version of AAE every even-year. Up to the end of 2001, 62 classes with 2,025 participants from 20 countries had thus come to enjoy space education on Côte d'Azur. Such success is due in no small part to the very attractive price and flexibility of these activities, notably thanks to the support of ESA, CNES, Rectorat d'Académie de Nice, Conseil Général des Alpes-Maritimes, Ville de Cannes, AAAF, TDF

  5. Hands-On Experiences in Deploying Cost-Effective Ambient-Assisted Living Systems

    PubMed Central

    Dasios, Athanasios; Gavalas, Damianos; Pantziou, Grammati; Konstantopoulos, Charalampos

    2015-01-01

    Older adults’ preferences to remain independent in their own homes along with the high costs of nursing home care have motivated the development of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) technologies which aim at improving the safety, health conditions and wellness of the elderly. This paper reports hands-on experiences in designing, implementing and operating UbiCare, an AAL based prototype system for elderly home care monitoring. The monitoring is based on the recording of environmental parameters like temperature and light intensity as well as micro-level incidents which allows one to infer daily activities like moving, sitting, sleeping, usage of electrical appliances and plumbing components. The prototype is built upon inexpensive, off-the-shelf hardware (e.g., various sensors, Arduino microcontrollers, ZigBee-compatible wireless communication modules) and license-free software, thereby ensuring low system deployment costs. The network comprises nodes placed in a house’s main rooms or mounted on furniture, one wearable node, one actuator node and a centralized processing element (coordinator). Upon detecting significant deviations from the ordinary activity patterns of individuals and/or sudden falls, the system issues automated alarms which may be forwarded to authorized caregivers via a variety of communication channels. Furthermore, measured environmental parameters and activity incidents may be monitored through standard web interfaces. PMID:26094631

  6. Improving chemical education from high school to college using a more hands-on approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruddick, Kristie Winfield

    In this work, various alternative teaching methods and activities for chemical education are developed, presented, and evaluated. In the first study, an original hands-on activity using LEGO® blocks to model ionic chemical formulas is presented together with quantitative and qualitative data regarding its educational effectiveness. Students explore cation to anion ratios using LEGO® blocks to represent trivalent, divalent and monovalent cations and anions. High school chemistry students who participated in the LEGO® lab showed significantly higher post-test scores than other students. The second study grows out of the creation of a computational lab module that is shown to significantly increase student learning in the subject of molecular orbital theory in first semester college General Chemistry. The third and final study presented is a course redesign project for college CHEM 1100, Preparation for General Chemistry. In this project the classroom is “flipped”. Students watch video lectures at home, and spend class time working with peers and the instructor on problem solving activities. The results presented here are one of the first quantitative studies showing the effectiveness of “flipping the classroom”. Students who were taught using the Reverse-Instruction (RI) method had significantly higher success in both the Preparation for General Chemistry course and traditionally taught General Chemistry I the following semester.

  7. Hands-On Experiences in Deploying Cost-Effective Ambient-Assisted Living Systems.

    PubMed

    Dasios, Athanasios; Gavalas, Damianos; Pantziou, Grammati; Konstantopoulos, Charalampos

    2015-01-01

    Older adults' preferences to remain independent in their own homes along with the high costs of nursing home care have motivated the development of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) technologies which aim at improving the safety, health conditions and wellness of the elderly. This paper reports hands-on experiences in designing, implementing and operating UbiCare, an AAL based prototype system for elderly home care monitoring. The monitoring is based on the recording of environmental parameters like temperature and light intensity as well as micro-level incidents which allows one to infer daily activities like moving, sitting, sleeping, usage of electrical appliances and plumbing components. The prototype is built upon inexpensive, off-the-shelf hardware (e.g., various sensors, Arduino microcontrollers, ZigBee-compatible wireless communication modules) and license-free software, thereby ensuring low system deployment costs. The network comprises nodes placed in a house's main rooms or mounted on furniture, one wearable node, one actuator node and a centralized processing element (coordinator). Upon detecting significant deviations from the ordinary activity patterns of individuals and/or sudden falls, the system issues automated alarms which may be forwarded to authorized caregivers via a variety of communication channels. Furthermore, measured environmental parameters and activity incidents may be monitored through standard web interfaces. PMID:26094631

  8. Challenges and Support When Teaching Science Through an Integrated Inquiry and Literacy Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ødegaard, Marianne; Haug, Berit; Mork, Sonja M.; Ove Sørvik, Gard

    2014-12-01

    In the Budding Science and Literacy project, we explored how working with an integrated inquiry-based science and literacy approach may challenge and support the teaching and learning of science at the classroom level. By studying the inter-relationship between multiple learning modalities and phases of inquiry, we wished to illuminate possible dynamics between science inquiry and literacy in an integrated science approach. Six teachers and their students were recruited from a professional development course for the current classroom study. The teachers were to try out the Budding Science teaching model. This paper presents an overall video analysis of our material demonstrating variations and patterns of inquiry-based science and literacy activities. Our analysis revealed that multiple learning modalities (read it, write it, do it, and talk it) are used in the integrated approach; oral activities dominate. The inquiry phases shifted throughout the students' investigations, but the consolidating phases of discussion and communication were given less space. The data phase of inquiry seems essential as a driving force for engaging in science learning in consolidating situations. The multiple learning modalities were integrated in all inquiry phases, but to a greater extent in preparation and data. Our results indicate that literacy activities embedded in science inquiry provide support for teaching and learning science; however, the greatest challenge for teachers is to find the time and courage to exploit the discussion and communication phases to consolidate the students' conceptual learning.

  9. Developing the Critical Thinking Skills of Astrobiology Students through Creative and Scientific Inquiry

    PubMed Central

    Lemus, Judith D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Scientific inquiry represents a multifaceted approach to explore and understand the natural world. Training students in the principles of scientific inquiry can help promote the scientific learning process as well as help students enhance their understanding of scientific research. Here, we report on the development and implementation of a learning module that introduces astrobiology students to the concepts of creative and scientific inquiry, as well as provide practical exercises to build critical thinking skills. The module contained three distinct components: (1) a creative inquiry activity designed to introduce concepts regarding the role of creativity in scientific inquiry; (2) guidelines to help astrobiology students formulate and self-assess questions regarding various scientific content and imagery; and (3) a practical exercise where students were allowed to watch a scientific presentation and practice their analytical skills. Pre- and post-course surveys were used to assess the students' perceptions regarding creative and scientific inquiry and whether this activity impacted their understanding of the scientific process. Survey results indicate that the exercise helped improve students' science skills by promoting awareness regarding the role of creativity in scientific inquiry and building their confidence in formulating and assessing scientific questions. Together, the module and survey results confirm the need to include such inquiry-based activities into the higher education classroom, thereby helping students hone their critical thinking and question asking skill set and facilitating their professional development in astrobiology. Key Words: Scientific inquiry—Critical thinking—Curriculum development—Astrobiology—Microbialites. Astrobiology 15, 89–99. PMID:25474292

  10. Developing the critical thinking skills of astrobiology students through creative and scientific inquiry.

    PubMed

    Foster, Jamie S; Lemus, Judith D

    2015-01-01

    Scientific inquiry represents a multifaceted approach to explore and understand the natural world. Training students in the principles of scientific inquiry can help promote the scientific learning process as well as help students enhance their understanding of scientific research. Here, we report on the development and implementation of a learning module that introduces astrobiology students to the concepts of creative and scientific inquiry, as well as provide practical exercises to build critical thinking skills. The module contained three distinct components: (1) a creative inquiry activity designed to introduce concepts regarding the role of creativity in scientific inquiry; (2) guidelines to help astrobiology students formulate and self-assess questions regarding various scientific content and imagery; and (3) a practical exercise where students were allowed to watch a scientific presentation and practice their analytical skills. Pre- and post-course surveys were used to assess the students' perceptions regarding creative and scientific inquiry and whether this activity impacted their understanding of the scientific process. Survey results indicate that the exercise helped improve students' science skills by promoting awareness regarding the role of creativity in scientific inquiry and building their confidence in formulating and assessing scientific questions. Together, the module and survey results confirm the need to include such inquiry-based activities into the higher education classroom, thereby helping students hone their critical thinking and question asking skill set and facilitating their professional development in astrobiology.

  11. An investigation of children's levels of inquiry in an informal science setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark-Thomas, Beth Anne

    Elementary school students' understanding of both science content and processes are enhanced by the higher level thinking associated with inquiry-based science investigations. Informal science setting personnel, elementary school teachers, and curriculum specialists charged with designing inquiry-based investigations would be well served by an understanding of the varying influence of certain present factors upon the students' willingness and ability to delve into such higher level inquiries. This study examined young children's use of inquiry-based materials and factors which may influence the level of inquiry they engaged in during informal science activities. An informal science setting was selected as the context for the examination of student inquiry behaviors because of the rich inquiry-based environment present at the site and the benefits previously noted in the research regarding the impact of informal science settings upon the construction of knowledge in science. The study revealed several patterns of behavior among children when they are engaged in inquiry-based activities at informal science exhibits. These repeated behaviors varied in the children's apparent purposeful use of the materials at the exhibits. These levels of inquiry behavior were taxonomically defined as high/medium/low within this study utilizing a researcher-developed tool. Furthermore, in this study adult interventions, questions, or prompting were found to impact the level of inquiry engaged in by the children. This study revealed that higher levels of inquiry were preceded by task directed and physical feature prompts. Moreover, the levels of inquiry behaviors were haltered, even lowered, when preceded by a prompt that focused on a science content or concept question. Results of this study have implications for the enhancement of inquiry-based science activities in elementary schools as well as in informal science settings. These findings have significance for all science educators

  12. Hands-on training in health district management.

    PubMed

    De Brouwere, V; Van Balen, H

    1996-01-01

    include: an integrated health system under the direction of a health team, a large enough team to do student training but small enough to maintain communication, and active participation of trainees.

  13. Hands-On Educational Programs and Projects at SICSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, L.

    2002-01-01

    The Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA) has a long history of projects that involve the design of space structures, including habitats for low-Earth orbit (LEO) and planetary applications. Some of these projects are supported by corporate sponsors, such as a space tourism research, planning and design study conducted for the owner of national U.S. hotel chain. Some have been undertaken in support of programs sponsored by the State Government of Texas, including current commercial spaceport development planning for the Texas Aerospace Commission and three counties that represent candidate spaceport sites. Other projects have been supported by NASA and the Texas Aerospace Consortium, including the design and development of SICSA's "Space Habitation Laboratory", a space station module sized environmental simulator facility which has been featured in the "NASA Select" television broadcast series. This presentation will highlight representative projects. SICSA is internationally recognized for its leadership in the field of space architecture. Many program graduates have embarked upon productive and rewarding careers with aerospace organizations throughout the world. NASA has awarded certificates of appreciation to SICSA for significant achievements contributing to its advanced design initiatives. SICSA and its work have been featured in numerous popular magazines, professional publications, and public media broadcasts in many countries. SICSA applies a very comprehensive scope of activities to the practice of space architecture. Important roles include mission planning conceptualization of orbital and planetary structures and assembly processes, and design of habitats to optimize human safety, adaptation and productivity. SICSA sponsors educational programs for upper division undergraduate students and graduate students with interests in space and experimental architecture. Many fourth year participants continue in the SICSA program throughout

  14. The Development of Dynamic Inquiry Performances within an Open Inquiry Setting: A Comparison to Guided Inquiry Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadeh, Irit; Zion, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic inquiry learning emphasizes aspects of change, intellectual flexibility, and critical thinking. Dynamic inquiry learning is characterized by the following criteria: learning as a process, changes during the inquiry, procedural understanding, and affective points of view. This study compared the influence of open versus guided inquiry…

  15. 10 CFR 1022.6 - Public inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Public inquiries. 1022.6 Section 1022.6 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS General § 1022.6 Public inquiries. Inquiries regarding DOE's floodplain and wetland...

  16. 10 CFR 1022.6 - Public inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Public inquiries. 1022.6 Section 1022.6 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS General § 1022.6 Public inquiries. Inquiries regarding DOE's floodplain and wetland...

  17. 10 CFR 1022.6 - Public inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Public inquiries. 1022.6 Section 1022.6 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS General § 1022.6 Public inquiries. Inquiries regarding DOE's floodplain and wetland...

  18. 10 CFR 1022.6 - Public inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Public inquiries. 1022.6 Section 1022.6 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS General § 1022.6 Public inquiries. Inquiries regarding DOE's floodplain and wetland...

  19. 10 CFR 1022.6 - Public inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Public inquiries. 1022.6 Section 1022.6 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS General § 1022.6 Public inquiries. Inquiries regarding DOE's floodplain and wetland...

  20. Strategies of Qualitative Inquiry. Third Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denzin, Norman K., Ed.; Lincoln, Yvonna S., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Strategies of Qualitative Inquiry, Third Edition," the second volume in the paperback version of "The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative Research, 3rd Edition," consists of Part III of the handbook ("Strategies of Inquiry"). "Strategies of Qualitative Inquiry, Third Edition" presents the major tactics--historically, the research methods--that…