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Sample records for active hbv infection

  1. Long-Term Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Response to Lamivudine-Containing Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-HBV Co-Infected Patients in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Khamduang, Woottichai; Gaudy-Graffin, Catherine; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Jourdain, Gonzague; Moreau, Alain; Luekamlung, Nuananong; Halue, Guttiga; Buranawanitchakorn, Yuwadee; Kunkongkapan, Sura; Buranabanjasatean, Sudanee; Lallemant, Marc; Sirirungsi, Wasna; Goudeau, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Background Approximately 4 million of people are co-infected with HIV and Hepatitis B virus (HBV). In resource-limited settings, the majority of HIV-infected patients initiate first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy containing lamivudine (3TC-containing-HAART) and long-term virological response of HBV to lamivudine-containing HAART in co-infected patients is not well known. Methodology/Principal Finding HIV-HBV co-infected patients enrolled in the PHPT cohort (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00433030) and initiating a 3TC-containing-HAART regimen were included. HBV-DNA, HIV-RNA, CD4+ T-cell counts and alanine transaminase were measured at baseline, 3 months, 12 months and then every 6 months up to 5 years. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate the cumulative rates of patients who achieved and maintained HBV-DNA suppression. Of 30 co-infected patients, 19 were positive for HBe antigen (HBeAg). At initiation of 3TC-containing-HAART, median HBV DNA and HIV RNA levels were 7.35 log10 IU/mL and 4.47 log10 copies/mL, respectively. At 12 months, 67% of patients achieved HBV DNA suppression: 100% of HBeAg-negative patients and 47% of HBeAg-positive. Seventy-three percent of patients had HIV RNA below 50 copies/mL. The cumulative rates of maintained HBV-DNA suppression among the 23 patients who achieved HBV-DNA suppression were 91%, 87%, and 80% at 1, 2, and 4 years respectively. Of 17 patients who maintained HBV-DNA suppression while still on 3TC, 4 (24%) lost HBsAg and 7 of 8 (88%) HBeAg-positive patients lost HBeAg at their last visit (median duration, 59 months). HBV breakthrough was observed only in HBeAg-positive patients and 6 of 7 patients presenting HBV breakthrough had the rtM204I/V mutations associated with 3TC resistance along with rtL180M and/or rtV173L. Conclusions All HBeAg-negative patients and 63% of HBeAg-positive HIV-HBV co-infected patients achieved long-term HBV DNA suppression while on 3TC-containing-HAART. This study provides information useful for

  2. Active co-infection with HBV and/or HCV in South African HIV positive patients due for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Musyoki, Andrew M; Msibi, Thembeni L; Motswaledi, Mojakgomo H; Selabe, Selokela G; Monokoane, Tshweu S; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey

    2015-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) share routes of transmission. There is limited data on the incidence of active co-infection with HBV and/or HCV in cancer patients infected with HIV in Africa. This was a prospective study based on 34 patients with varied cancer diagnosis, infected with HIV and awaiting cancer therapy in South Africa. HIV viral load, CD4+ cell counts, Alanine-aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels were tested. Exposure to HBV and HCV was assessed serologically using commercial kits. Active HBV and/or HCV co-infection was detected using viral specific nested PCR assays. HCV 5'-UTR PCR products were sequenced to confirm active HCV infection. Active viral infection was detected in 64.7% of patients for HBV, 38.2% for HCV, and 29.4% for both HBV and HCV. Occult HBV infection was observed in 63.6% of the patients, while seronegative HCV infection was found in 30.8% of patients. In addition, CD4+ cell count < 350 cells/µl was not a risk factor for increased active HBV, HCV or both HBV and HCV co-infections. A total of 72.7%, 18.2% and 9.1% of the HCV sequences were assigned genotype 5, 1 and 4 respectively.The study revealed for the first time a high active HBV and/or HCV co-infection rate in cancer patients infected with HIV. The findings call for HBV and HCV testing in such patients, and where feasible, appropriate antiviral treatment be indicated, as chemotherapy or radiotherapy has been associated with reactivation of viral hepatitis and termination of cancer therapy. PMID:25156907

  3. Rethinking the pathogenesis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Yuan; Hu, Ke-Qin

    2015-12-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection affects approximately 375 million people worldwide. Current antiviral treatment effectively controls, but rarely clears chronic HBV infection. In addition, a significant portion of chronic HBV infected patients are not suitable for currently available antiviral therapy, and still face higher risk for cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The poorly understood pathogenesis of HBV infection is the main barrier for developing more effective treatment strategies. HBV has long been viewed as non-cytopathic and the central hypothesis for HBV pathogenesis lies in the belief that hepatitis B is a host specific immunity-mediated liver disease. However, this view has been challenged by the accumulating experimental and clinical data that support a model of cytopathic HBV replication. In this article we systematically review the pathogenic role of HBV replication in hepatitis B and suggest possible HBV replication related mechanisms for HBV-mediated liver injury. We propose that a full understanding of HBV pathogenesis should consider the following elements. I. Liver injury can be caused by high levels of HBV replication and accumulation of viral products in the infected hepatocytes. II. HBV infection can be either directly cytopathic, non-cytopathic, or a mix of both in an individual patient depending upon accumulation levels of viral products that are usually associated with HBV replication activity in individual infected hepatocytes.

  4. Global strategies are required to cure and eliminate HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Revill, Peter; Testoni, Barbara; Locarnini, Stephen; Zoulim, Fabien

    2016-04-01

    Chronic HBV infection results in >1 million deaths per year from cirrhosis and liver cancer. No known cure for chronic HBV exists, due in part to the continued presence of transcriptionally active DNA in the nucleus that is not directly targeted by current antiviral therapies. A coordinated approach is urgently needed to advance an HBV cure worldwide, such as those established in the HIV field. We propose the establishment of an International Coalition to Eliminate Hepatitis B Virus (ICE-HBV) to facilitate the formation of international working groups on HBV virology, immunology, innovative tools and clinical trials: to promote awareness and education as well as to drive changes in government policy and ensure funds are channelled to HBV cure research and drug development. With the ICE-HBV in place, it should be possible to enable a HBV cure within the next decade. PMID:26907881

  5. Intrahepatic Toll-Like Receptor 3 in Chronic HBV Infection Subjects: Asymptomatic Carriers, Active Chronic Hepatitis, Cirrhosis, and Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jia Wen; Ping Huang, Mao; Zhong, Bei

    2016-01-01

    Background The entire disease spectrum of chronic HBV infection (CHB) includes asymptomatic carriers (AC), active chronic hepatitis (ACH), cirrhosis (Cir), and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Previous study have demonstrated that the costimulation profiles from the livers of patients influenced immune responses and played various immunological roles in AC, ACH, Cir, and HCC. In addition, activation of TLR3 signaling in the liver may contribute to HBV clearance, although some HBV components are able to block TLR3 signaling and counteract HBV clearance through positive or negative feedback loops. Previous clinical studies have demonstrated that different TLR3 expressions are present in ACH patients, but no studies investigated the expression of TLR3 proteins in the livers of patients with AC, Cir, or HCC. Objectives This study investigated intrahepatic TLR3 expression throughout the entire disease spectrum of CHB patients and assessed the interrelations between TLR3 and costimulation proteins. Patients and Methods Patients with ACH, Cir, HCC, and AC and healthy donors (HD) were recruited. TLR3 expression in the livers of patients were investigated using western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Correlations between TLR3 and costimulation proteins, including CD80, CD86, CD83, CD28, CTLA-4, CD40, and ICAM-1, were assessed. Results The TLR3 protein in the ACH group tended toward reduction although the P Value of the comparison between the ACH group and HD group was not statistically significant. The TLR3 levels in the HCC, AC, and Cir groups were higher than those in the HD and ACH groups. TLR3 was not interrelated with all costimulation proteins in the DCs and T cells in all five groups. No group presented any interrelation between TLR3 and CD40, except the AC group. Conclusions The AC, HCC, and Cir patients displayed increased levels of the intrahepatic TLR3 protein compared to the HD and AC patients. Both activation of TLR3/INF-β signaling and inhibition of

  6. High Seroprevalence of HBV and HCV Infection in HIV-Infected Adults in Kigali, Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    Rusine, John; Ondoa, Pascale; Asiimwe-Kateera, Brenda; Boer, Kimberly R.; Uwimana, Jean Marie; Mukabayire, Odette; Zaaijer, Hans; Mugabekazi, Julie; Reiss, Peter; van de Wijgert, Janneke H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Data on prevalence and incidence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in Rwanda are scarce. Methods HBV status was assessed at baseline and Month 12, and anti-HCV antibodies at baseline, in a prospective cohort study of HIV-infected patients in Kigali, Rwanda: 104 men and 114 women initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) at baseline, and 200 women not yet eligible for ART. Results Baseline prevalence of active HBV infection (HBsAg positive), past or occult HBV infection (anti-HBc positive and HBsAg negative) and anti-HCV was 5.2%, 42.9%, and 5.7%, respectively. The active HBV incidence rate was 4.2/1,000 person years (PY). In a multivariable logistic regression model using baseline data, participants with WHO stage 3 or 4 HIV disease were 4.19 times (95% CI 1.21–14.47) more likely to have active HBV infection, and older patients were more likely to have evidence of past exposure to HBV (aRR 1.03 per year; 95%CI 1.01–1.06). Older age was also positively associated with having anti-HCV antibodies (aOR 1.09; 95%CI 1.04–1.14) while having a higher baseline HIV viral load was negatively associated with HCV (aOR 0.60; 95% CI 0.40–0.98). The median CD4 increase during the first 12 months of ART was lower for those with active HBV infection or anti-HCV at baseline. Almost all participants (88%) with active HBV infection who were on ART were receiving lamivudine monotherapy for HBV. Conclusion HBV and HCV are common in HIV-infected patients in Rwanda. Regular HBsAg screening is needed to ensure that HIV-HBV co-infected patients receive an HBV-active ART regimen, and the prevalence of occult HBV infection should be determined. Improved access to HBV vaccination is recommended. Active HCV prevalence and incidence should be investigated further to determine whether HCV RNA PCR testing should be introduced in Rwanda. PMID:23717409

  7. Regulation of HBV-specific CD8(+) T cell-mediated inflammation is diversified in different clinical presentations of HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Dinney, Colin M; Zhao, Lu-Dong; Conrad, Charles D; Duker, Jay M; Karas, Richard O; Hu, Zhibin; Hamilton, Michele A; Gillis, Thomas R; Parker, Thomas M; Fan, Bing; Advani, Andrew H; Poordad, Fred B; Fauceglia, Paulette L; Kirsch, Kathrin M; Munk, Peter T; Ladanyi, Marc P; Bochner, Bernard A; Bekelman, Justin A; Grandori, Carla M; Olson, James C; Lechan, Ronald D; Abou, Ghassan M A; Goodarzi, Mark A

    2015-10-01

    Chronic HBV infection is the leading cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatic cancer, but the individual responses toward HBV infection are highly variable, ranging from asymptomatic to chronic active hepatitis B inflammation. In this study, we hypothesized that the different individual responses to HBV infection was associated with differences in HBV-specific CD8(+) T cell-mediated inflammation and cytotoxicity. Blood samples were collected from subjects with asymptomatic HBV-infection, subjects undergoing active chronic HBV flares (active CHB), and subjects with HBV-infected hepatocellular carcinoma (HBV-HCC). By tetramer staining, we found that all three groups had similar frequencies of HBVspecific CD8(+) T cells. However, after HBV peptide stimulation, the HBV-specific CD8(+) T cells in asymptomatic subjects had significantly stronger interferon gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and CD107a expression than those in active CHB and HBV-HCC patients. Examination of surface marker expression revealed that the PD-1(-)Tim-3(-) double-negative cell population was the main contributor to HBV-specific inflammation. In active CHB patients and HBV-HCC patients, however, the frequencies of activated PD-1(-)Tim-3(-) cells were significantly reduced. Moreover, the serum HBV DNA titer was not correlated with the frequencies of HBV-specific CD8(+) T cells but was inversely correlated with the frequencies of IFN-g-expressing and CD107a-express cells in response to HBV stimulation. Together, our data demonstrated that the status of HBVspecific CD8(+) T cell exhaustion was associated with different clinical outcomes of chronic HBV infection.

  8. HBV vaccine efficacy and detection and genotyping of vaccineé asymptomatic breakthrough HBV infection in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Abushady, Eman AE; Gameel, Magda MA; Klena, John D; Ahmed, Salwa F; Abdel-Wahab, Kouka SE; Fahmy, Sanya M

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the impact of mass vaccination against the hepatitis B virus (HBV) in Egypt, and to search for vaccinee asymptomatic breakthrough HBV infection and its genotype. METHODS: Seven hundred serum samples from vaccinated children and adults (aged 2-47 years) were used for quantitative and qualitative detection of HBsAb by ELISA. Three hundred and sixty serum samples representing undetectable or low or high HBsAb were screened for markers of active HBV infection (HBsAg, HBcAb (IgG) and HBeAb by ELISA, plus HBsAg by AxSYM) and HBV-DNA genotyping by nested multiplex PCR and by DNA sequencing. RESULTS: It was found that 65% of children aged 2-4 years, and 20.5% aged 4-13 years, as well as 45% adults were good responders to HBV vaccination mounting protective level HBsAb. Poor responders were 28%, 59.5% and 34%, and non-responders were 7%, 20% and 21% respectively, in the three studied groups. Markers of asymptomatic HBV infections were HBsAg detected by ELISA in 2.5% vs 11.39% by AxSYM. Other markers were HBcAb (IgG) in 1.38%, HBeAb in 0.83%, and HBV-DNA in 7.8%. All had HBV genotype E infection. CONCLUSION: It is concluded that HBV vaccine is efficient in controlling HBV infection among children and adults. The vaccine breakthrough infection was by HBV genotype E. A booster dose of vaccine is recommended, probably four years after initial vaccination. PMID:21860674

  9. Management of HBV infection in Japan.

    PubMed

    Minami, Masahito; Okanoue, Takeshi

    2007-07-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is usually transmitted from mother to infant, and genotype C is prevalent in Japan. Because of these features, guidelines for HBV treatment from other countries are not directly adaptable to Japanese patients. Age is an important factor in deciding the treatment strategy, because many vertically transmitted HBV carriers naturally show spontaneous remission by the age of 25-30 years. In addition, genotype C is considered more refractory to antiviral therapies than genotypes A and B. Considering these differences, we propose a treatment for HBV in Japanese patients. Although the guidelines indicate who to treat and when therapy should be started, it is unclear for how long patientsshould be treated. This situation arises because current lamivudine and interferon monotherapies are not potent at curing HBV infection. To develop a more efficient treatment, we performed a pilot study of lamivudine/interferon sequential therapy in Japan. The biochemical and virological responses were comparable or superior to lamivudine or interferon monotherapies, and this protocol can be a potent alternative because we can take advantage of both the mild side-effects of lamivudine and finite duration of interferon.

  10. Clinical Relevance of HLA Gene Variants in HBV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Zou, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Host gene variants may influence the natural history of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in humans, is one of the most important host factors that are correlated with the clinical course of HBV infection. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have shown that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near certain HLA gene loci are strongly associated with not only persistent HBV infection but also spontaneous HBV clearance and seroconversion, disease progression, and the development of liver cirrhosis and HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in chronic hepatitis B (CHB). These variations also influence the efficacy of interferon (IFN) and nucleot(s)ide analogue (NA) treatment and response to HBV vaccines. Meanwhile, discrepant conclusions were reached with different patient cohorts. It is therefore essential to identify the associations of specific HLA allele variants with disease progression and viral clearance in chronic HBV infection among different ethnic populations. A better understanding of HLA polymorphism relevance in HBV infection outcome would enable us to elucidate the roles of HLA SNPs in the pathogenesis and clearance of HBV in different areas and ethnic groups, to improve strategies for the prevention and treatment of chronic HBV infection. PMID:27243039

  11. If You Have Chronic Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Infection

    MedlinePlus

    If you have chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection . . . If you have chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, you are not alone. Today, approximately one ... receive pneumococcal polysaccharide vac- cine.  Get vaccinated against hepatitis A. Hepati- tis A can further damage your ...

  12. HBV Lamivudine Resistance among Hepatitis B and HIV Co-infected Patients Starting Lamivudine, Stavudine and Nevirapine in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Nina Kim, H.; Scott, John; Cent, Anne; Cook, Linda; Ashley Morrow, Rhoda; Richardson, Barbra; Tapia, Kenneth; Jerome, Keith R.; Lule, Godfrey; John-Stewart, Grace; Chung, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    Widespread use of lamivudine in antiretroviral therapy may lead to hepatitis B virus resistance in HIV-HBV co-infected patients from endemic settings where tenofovir is not readily available. We evaluated 389 Kenyan HIV-infected adults before and for 18 months after starting highly-active antiretroviral therapy with stavudine, lamivudine and nevirapine. Twenty-seven (6.9%) were HBsAg(+) and anti-HBs negative: 24 were HBeAg-negative, 18 had HBV DNA ≤10,000 IU/ml. Sustained HBV suppression to <100 IU/ml occurred in 89% of 19 evaluable patients. Resistance occurred in only 2 subjects, both with high baseline HBV DNA levels. Lamivudine resistance can emerge in the setting of incomplete HBV suppression but was infrequently observed among HIV-HBV co-infected patients with low baseline HBV DNA levels. PMID:21914062

  13. Trained immunity in newborn infants of HBV-infected mothers

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Michelle; Sandalova, Elena; Low, Diana; Gehring, Adam J.; Fieni, Stefania; Amadei, Barbara; Urbani, Simonetta; Chong, Yap-Seng; Guccione, Ernesto; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The newborn immune system is characterized by an impaired Th1-associated immune response. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmitted from infected mothers to newborns is thought to exploit the newborns’ immune system immaturity by inducing a state of immune tolerance that facilitates HBV persistence. Contrary to this hypothesis, we demonstrate here that HBV exposure in utero triggers a state of trained immunity, characterized by innate immune cell maturation and Th1 development, which in turn enhances the ability of cord blood immune cells to respond to bacterial infection in vitro. These training effects are associated with an alteration of the cytokine environment characterized by low IL-10 and, in most cases, high IL-12p40 and IFN-α2. Our data uncover a potentially symbiotic relationship between HBV and its natural host, and highlight the plasticity of the fetal immune system following viral exposure in utero. PMID:25807344

  14. High prevalence of human parvovirus 4 infection in HBV and HCV infected individuals in shanghai.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuelian; Zhang, Jing; Hong, Liang; Wang, Jiayu; Yuan, Zhengan; Zhang, Xi; Ghildyal, Reena

    2012-01-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) has been detected in blood and diverse tissues samples from HIV/AIDS patients who are injecting drug users. Although B19 virus, the best characterized human parvovirus, has been shown to co-infect patients with hepatitis B or hepatitis C virus (HBV, HCV) infection, the association of PARV4 with HBV or HCV infections is still unknown.The aim of this study was to characterise the association of viruses belonging to PARV4 genotype 1 and 2 with chronic HBV and HCV infection in Shanghai.Serum samples of healthy controls, HCV infected subjects and HBV infected subjects were retrieved from Shanghai Center for Disease Control and Prevention (SCDC) Sample Bank. Parvovirus-specific nested-PCR was performed and results confirmed by sequencing. Sequences were compared with reference sequences obtained from Genbank to derive phylogeny trees.The frequency of parvovirus molecular detection was 16-22%, 33% and 41% in healthy controls, HCV infected and HBV infected subjects respectively, with PARV4 being the only parvovirus detected. HCV infected and HBV infected subjects had a significantly higher PARV4 prevalence than the healthy population. No statistical difference was found in PARV4 prevalence between HBV or HCV infected subjects. PARV4 sequence divergence within study groups was similar in healthy subjects, HBV or HCV infected subjects.Our data clearly demonstrate that PARV4 infection is strongly associated with HCV and HBV infection in Shanghai but may not cause increased disease severity.

  15. High prevalence of human parvovirus 4 infection in HBV and HCV infected individuals in shanghai.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuelian; Zhang, Jing; Hong, Liang; Wang, Jiayu; Yuan, Zhengan; Zhang, Xi; Ghildyal, Reena

    2012-01-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) has been detected in blood and diverse tissues samples from HIV/AIDS patients who are injecting drug users. Although B19 virus, the best characterized human parvovirus, has been shown to co-infect patients with hepatitis B or hepatitis C virus (HBV, HCV) infection, the association of PARV4 with HBV or HCV infections is still unknown.The aim of this study was to characterise the association of viruses belonging to PARV4 genotype 1 and 2 with chronic HBV and HCV infection in Shanghai.Serum samples of healthy controls, HCV infected subjects and HBV infected subjects were retrieved from Shanghai Center for Disease Control and Prevention (SCDC) Sample Bank. Parvovirus-specific nested-PCR was performed and results confirmed by sequencing. Sequences were compared with reference sequences obtained from Genbank to derive phylogeny trees.The frequency of parvovirus molecular detection was 16-22%, 33% and 41% in healthy controls, HCV infected and HBV infected subjects respectively, with PARV4 being the only parvovirus detected. HCV infected and HBV infected subjects had a significantly higher PARV4 prevalence than the healthy population. No statistical difference was found in PARV4 prevalence between HBV or HCV infected subjects. PARV4 sequence divergence within study groups was similar in healthy subjects, HBV or HCV infected subjects.Our data clearly demonstrate that PARV4 infection is strongly associated with HCV and HBV infection in Shanghai but may not cause increased disease severity. PMID:22235298

  16. HIV-HBV vaccine escape mutant infection with loss of HBV surface antibody and persistent HBV viremia on tenofovir/emtricitabine without antiviral resistance.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, P; Winters, M; Holodniy, M

    2011-11-01

    We report a case of acute hepatitis B virus genotype A vaccine escape mutant infection with loss of HBV vaccine-induced seropositivity in a HIV-1 infected patient. His HBV is unresponsive to tenofovir/emtricitabine treatment demonstrated by persistent viremia despite lacking known resistance mutations and while having an undetectable HIV-1 viral load. PMID:21840252

  17. [Control of HCV, HBV and HIV Infections in Hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Fabrizi, Fabrizio; Martin, Paul; Messa, Piergiorgio

    2013-01-01

    Infections with blood-borne pathogens are still common among patients on maintenance dialysis all over the world. The control of infection due to blood-borne viruses (particularly HBV) within dialysis units has been a major goal in the management of patients with chronic kidney disease in the industrialized world. Standard precautions and specific procedures have been recommended to prevent infections with HBV, HCV and HIV within dialysis units. Isolation of HBsAg positive patients by dialysis rooms, staff and machines continues to be an important step to control HBV infection within dialysis units, according to the CDC and other regulatory agencies. Some prospective observational studies have reported the complete prevention of HCV transmission to hemodialysis patients in the absence of any isolation policy, and the use of dedicated dialysis machines for HCV-infected patients is not recommended by clinical guidelines. Isolation of HCV-infected patients should be considered in special circumstances only. Vaccination is an important tool against transmission of HBV among patients on long-term dialysis even if the immune response towards the hepatitis B vaccine remains unsatisfactory. Hemodialysis is considered a low risk setting for the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, providing that standard and specific procedures are carefully observed. HIV-infected patients do not have to be isolated from other patients or dialyzed separately on dedicated machines.

  18. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) X gene diversity and evidence of recombination in HBV/HIV co-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Martin, Christina M; Welge, Jeffrey A; Blackard, Jason T

    2011-07-01

    The high frequency of mutation during hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has resulted in 8 genotypes (A-H) with varying effects on disease severity and treatment efficacy. However, analysis of intrapatient HBV diversity is limited, especially during HIV co-infection. Therefore, a preliminary study was performed to analyze HBV X gene diversity in 17 HBV/HIV co-infected individuals. Phylogenetic analysis revealed HBV genotype A in 13 individuals (76.5%) or genotype E in 1 individual (5.9%). Additionally, 3 individuals were dually infected with HBV genotypes A and G (17.6%). Overall, higher genetic distance and entropy were observed in the X region and overlapping polymerase (Pol(X)) regions when compared to the PreS, S, and overlapping polymerase (Pol(PS) and Pol(S)) regions analyzed in the same patients as part of a previous study. In addition, multiple viral variants from 2 individuals with dual HBV infection did not group with either genotype A or G by phylogenetic analysis, indicating possible recombination. SimPlot bootscan analysis confirmed recombination breakpoints within the X gene in both individuals. Recombination between HBV genotypes may represent an important evolutionary strategy that enhances overall pathogenic potential and/or alters the downstream effects of the HBV X protein.

  19. Molecular epidemiology of HBV infection in chronic hepatitis B virus infected patients in northeast India.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Anjan; Bose, Moumita; Barman, Narendra Nath; Deka, Manab; Thangkhiew, Rangsan Singh; Bose, Sujoy

    2015-09-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the molecular epidemiology of HBV in chronic HBV infected cases from northeast India (NEI), since scanty data are available from the region which has a predominant ethnically distinct tribal population. A total of 523 clinically diagnosed index chronic HBV infected cases and 172 asymptomatic patients (based on family screening) were enrolled with informed consent. Patients were stratified based on serology, imaging, pathology, and clinical data and grouped as chronic HBV and cirrhotic cohorts. Analysis for serum HBV DNA levels and HBV genotyping was performed, and was statistically co-related with disease severity. Males were more prone to chronic HBV infection. Majority of the patients who had Chronic HBV infection based on family screening were females (59.88%), majorly wives of index patients. Mean viral load in Chronic HBV patients was almost 4.5-folds higher than cirrhosis patients, and was significantly associated with e-antigen positive status(P < 0.001) in both groups. HBV genotype D was the most prevalent genotype (62.30%) in NEI. Mixed genotype infection of A + D was found from Assam, along with C + D cases (1.29%) cumulatively. There is a high prevalence of HBV genotype C (13.96%) in our studied cohort which was found to be associated with higher viral load(P = 0.018), e-antigen positivity(P = 0.043), and increased cirrhosis risk compared to Chronic HBV cases [OR = 1.670]. Family contacts in NEI are prone to infection with HBV and development of Chronic HBV. Higher presence of e-positive cases and genotype C along with the mixed genotypes in NEI is unique and of significance with reference to predisposition to disease severity and even response to antiviral therapy.

  20. Is mother-to-infant transmission the most important factor for persistent HBV infection?

    PubMed

    Li, Zixiong; Hou, Xiaomei; Cao, Guangwen

    2015-05-01

    Of the infants born to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive mothers globally, 42.1% who did not receive hepatitis B virus (HBV) passive-active immunoprophylaxis and 2.9% of infants who received the immunoprophylaxis acquired HBV infection perinatally. Moreover, perinatal infection occurred in 84.2% (18.8%-100%) and 8.7% (0.0-21.0%) of infants born to hepatitis B e-antigen (HBeAg)-positive mothers who did not and did receive immunoprophylaxis, respectively; by contrast, the infection rates were 6.7% (0.0-15.4%) and 0.4% (0.0-2.5%) for infants born to HBeAg-negative-carrier mothers, respectively. The chronicity rates of HBV infection acquired perinatally were 28.2% (17.4%-33.9%) in infants born to HBeAg-negative mothers and 64.5% (53.5%-100%) in infants born to HBeAg-positive mothers. HBV mother-to-child transmission was more frequent in East Asia relative to other areas. In addition to differences in the endemic HBV genotype, the interchange of allelic dominance in genetic polymorphisms in HLA class II and NF-κB between the Chinese and European populations may explain why chronic HBV infection frequently affects the Chinese. The risk of progressing into chronic infection was inversely related to the age of children at the time of horizontal transmission. To further diminish HBV chronic infection, it is necessary to enforce antiviral treatment after the 28th week of gestation for HBeAg-positive mothers and to improve the health habits of carrier mothers and household sanitary conditions. PMID:26060603

  1. Peripheral blood dendritic cells are phenotypically and functionally intact in chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, S; Mederacke, I; Herzog-Hauff, S; Glebe, D; Grün, S; Strand, D; Urban, S; Gehring, A; Galle, P R; Böcher, W O

    2008-01-01

    Persistence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is associated with reduced anti-viral T cell responses. Impaired dendritic cell (DC) function was suggested as the cause of reduced T cell stimulation in chronic HBV carriers. Thus, we compared myeloid (mDC) and plasmacytoid DC (pDC) from chronic HBV carriers and controls. Frequency and phenotype of isolated DC were analysed by fluorescence activated cell sorter staining, DC function by mixed lymphocyte reaction, cytokine bead array, intracellular cytokine staining, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and enzyme-linked immunospot. Expression of HBV DNA and mRNA was studied by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Circulating total DC, mDC or pDC were not reduced in chronic HBV carriers. Isolated mDC and pDC from chronic HBV carriers exhibited similar expression of co-stimulatory molecules and alloreactive T helper cell stimulation as control DC, whether tested directly ex vivo or after in vitro maturation. Secretion of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines by CD40 or Toll-like receptor ligand-stimulated patient DC was intact, as was human leucocyte antigen A2-restricted HBV-specific cytotoxic lymphocyte stimulation. Although both DC populations contained viral DNA, viral mRNA was undetectable by reverse transcription–PCR, arguing against viral replication in DC. We found no quantitative, phenotypic or functional impairment of mDC or pDC in chronic hepatitis B, whether studied ex vivo or after in vitro maturation. PMID:18031557

  2. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) receptors: Deficiency in tumor results in scant HBV infection and overexpression in peritumor leads to higher recurrence risk

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Fei; Fan, Qing-Min; Yu, Guo-Feng; Yu, Dan-Dan; Gao, Lu; Sun, Kai; Han, Zhi-Peng; Li, Rong; Yang, Yang; Zhao, Qiu-Dong; Wu, Meng-Chao; Wang, Hong-Yang; Wei, Li-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a risk factor for hepatocarcinogenesis and recurrence. Here, we sought to characterize intratumoral and peritumoral expression of HBsAg and its specific receptors in HBsAg-positive hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients and further examined their correlation with the recurrence-free survival (RFS). HCC tissue and adjacent normal tissue specimens were acquired from HBsAg-positive patients. The presence of HBsAg and receptors, as well as hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) were detected by tissue microassay and immunohistochemistry. Necroinflammatory activity was evaluated by HE staining. The mean IOD of HBsAg and HBV DNA in the intratumoral tissues was markedly lower than that in the peritumoral tissues (P < 0.001). Pearson correlation analysis further showed a significant correlation between the expression of HBsAg and NTCP (r = 0.461, P < 0.001) or ASGPR (r = 0.506, P < 0.001) in peritumoral tissues. And the peritumoral HBsAg and receptors presented a positive association with necroinflammatory activity (P < 0.05). Inflammation induced by HBV infection presented a positive association with HPCs activation (P < 0.05). Additionally, due to lack of HBV receptors, HPCs was not preferentially infected with HBV, but activated HPCs had a significant correlation with HBsAg expression in peritumoral tissues, and the peritumoral HPCs activation was associated with RFS of HCC patients, therefore, the overexpression of HBsAg and receptors in peritumor were also with higher recurrence risk (P < 0.05). In conclusion, lack of HBV receptors resulted in scant HBV infection in tumor cells, and overexpression of HBsAg and receptors in peritumor was strongly associated with higher recurrence risk in HCC patients. PMID:26515593

  3. A case of Gianotti Crosti syndrome with HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Dikici, B; Uzun, H; Konca, C; Kocamaz, H; Yel, S

    2008-01-01

    Gianotti-Crosti syndrome (papular acrodermatitis of childhood), which was first described in 1955, is a nonspecific rash that usually consists of the abrupt onset of pink flesh coloring, smooth or lichenoid, flat-topped papules. It was first related to hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection; however, cases not associated with HBV infection were reported as well. Although a type of delayed hypersensitivity reaction is speculated as a cause, exact pathogenesis still remains unclear. The prognosis is favorable and successful management relies upon general supportive and symptomatic care. We report a seven-year-old boy diagnosed with Gianotti-Crosti syndrome with monomorphous papules on his cheeks, buttocks and extremities associated with hepatitis B virus infection.

  4. Hepatitis B virus infection in blood donors in Argentina: prevalence of infection, genotype distribution and frequency of occult HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Pisano, María Belén; Blanco, Sebastián; Carrizo, Horacio; Ré, Viviana Elizabeth; Gallego, Sandra

    2016-10-01

    This study describes the prevalence of HBV infection based on detection of HBsAg and HBV-DNA by NAT in 70,102 blood donors in Argentina (Córdoba province) and shows the viral genotype distribution and frequency of occult HBV infection (OBI) in this population. Forty-two donors were confirmed positive for HBV infection (0.06 %), and four had OBI. Genotype F was the most prevalent (71.4 %), followed by A (14.3 %), C (7.1 %) and D (7.1 %). This is the first report of the prevalence of confirmed HBV infection and the high frequency of occult HBV infection in a blood bank in Argentina.

  5. Molecular analysis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in an HIV co-infected patient with reactivation of occult HBV infection following discontinuation of lamivudine-including antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (OBI) is characterized by HBV DNA persistence even though the pattern of serological markers indicates an otherwise resolved HBV infection. Although OBI is usually clinically silent, immunocompromised patients may experience reactivation of the liver disease. Case presentation We report the case of an individual with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and anti-HBV core antibody positivity, who experienced severe HBV reactivation after discontinuation of lamivudine-including antiretroviral therapy (ART). HBV sequencing analysis showed a hepatitis B surface antigen escape mutant whose presence in an earlier sample excluded reinfection. Molecular sequencing showed some differences between two isolates collected at a 9-year interval, indicating HBV evolution. Resumption of ART containing an emtricitabine/tenofovir combination allowed control of plasma HBV DNA, which fell to undetectable levels. Conclusion This case stresses the ability of HBV to evolve continuously, even during occult infection, and the effectiveness of ART in controlling OBI reactivation in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:22054111

  6. Occult HBV Infection: A Faceless Enemy in Liver Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Romero, Jaime; Vargas, Gustavo; García-Román, Rebeca

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) represents a worldwide public health problem; the virus is present in one third of the global population. However, this rate may in fact be higher due to occult hepatitis B virus infection (OBI). This condition is characterized by the presence of the viral genome in the liver of individuals sero-negative for the virus surface antigen (HBsAg). The causes of the absence of HBsAg in serum are unknown, however, mutations have been identified that produce variants not recognized by current immunoassays. Epigenetic and immunological host mechanisms also appear to be involved in HBsAg suppression. Current evidence suggests that OBI maintains its carcinogenic potential, favoring the progression of fibrosis and cirrhosis of the liver. In common with open HBV infection, OBI can contribute to the establishment of hepatocellular carcinoma. Epidemiological data regarding the global prevalence of OBI vary due to the use of detection methods of different sensitivity and specificity. In Latin America, which is considered an area of low prevalence for HBV, diagnostic screening methods using gene amplification tests for confirmation of OBI are not conducted. This prevents determination of the actual prevalence of OBI, highlighting the need for the implementation of cutting edge technology in epidemiological surveillance systems. PMID:24717680

  7. Clonorchis sinensis Co-infection Could Affect the Disease State and Treatment Response of HBV Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Chen, Tingjin; Kong, Xiangzhan; Sun, Hengchang; Yu, Xinbing; Xu, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis) is considered to be an important parasitic zoonosis because it infects approximately 35 million people, while approximately 15 million were distributed in China. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major public health issue. Two types of pathogens have the potential to cause human liver disease and eventually hepatocellular carcinoma. Concurrent infection with HBV and C. sinensis is often observed in some areas where C. sinensis is endemic. However, whether C. sinensis could impact HBV infection or vice versa remains unknown. Principal Findings Co-infection with C. sinensis and HBV develops predominantly in males. Co-infected C. sinensis and HBV patients presented weaker liver function and higher HBV DNA titers. Combination treatment with antiviral and anti-C. sinensis drugs in co-infected patients could contribute to a reduction in viral load and help with liver function recovery. Excretory-secretory products (ESPs) may, in some ways, increase HBV viral replication in vitro. A mixture of ESP and HBV positive sera could induce peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to produce higher level of Th2 cytokines including IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 compared to HBV alone, it seems that due to presence of ESP, the cytokine production shift towards Th2. C. sinensis/HBV co-infected patients showed higher serum IL-6 and IL-10 levels and lower serum IFN-γ levels. Conclusions/Significance Patients with concomitant C. sinensis and HBV infection presented weaker liver function and higher HBV DNA copies. In co-infected patients, the efficacy of anti-viral treatment was better in patients who were prescribed with entecavir and praziquantel than entecavir alone. One possible reason for the weaker response to antiviral therapies in co-infected patients was the shift in cytokine production from Th1 to Th2 that may inhibit viral clearance. C. sinensis/HBV co-infection could exacerbate the imbalance of Th1/Th2 cytokine. PMID:27348302

  8. Association of preS/S Mutations with Occult Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Infection in South Korea: Transmission Potential of Distinct Occult HBV Variants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2015-06-15

    Occult hepatitis B virus infection (HBV) is characterized by HBV DNA positivity but HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) negativity. Occult HBV infection is associated with a risk of HBV transmission through blood transfusion, hemodialysis, and liver transplantation. Furthermore, occult HBV infection contributes to the development of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. We recently reported the characteristic molecular features of mutations in the preS/S regions among Korean individuals with occult infections caused by HBV genotype C2; the variants of preS and S related to severe liver diseases among chronically infected patients were also responsible for the majority of HBV occult infections. We also reported that HBsAg variants from occult-infected Korean individuals exhibit lower HBsAg secretion capacity but not reduced HBV DNA levels. In addition, these variants exhibit increased ROS-inducing capacity compared with the wild-type strain, linking HBV occult infections to liver cell damage. Taken together, our previous reports suggest the transmission potential of distinct HBV occult infection-related variants in South Korea.

  9. Immune mediated crescentic MPGN secondary to HBV infection: A rare presentation for a common infection.

    PubMed

    Mareddy, Aswani Srinivas; Rangaswamy, Dharshan; Vankalakunti, Mahesha; Attur, Ravindra Prabhu; Nagaraju, Shankar Prasad; Koti, Neeraja

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection presenting as crescentic glomerulonephritis in the absence of cryoglobulinemia is an extremely rare phenomenon. We report a case of a 44-year-old male with HBV infection, who underwent kidney biopsy for rapidly progressive renal failure and nephrotic range proteinuria. Histopathological evaluation of the kidney biopsy was consistent with immune complex mediated crescentic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN). The patient achieved complete renal and virological remission with steroids, plasmapheresis and antiviral therapy. This case report summarises the importance of early initiation of immunosuppression and plasmapheresis under antiviral coverage for improved clinical outcomes.

  10. Genomic responses to hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in primary human hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ancey, Pierre-Benoit; Testoni, Barbara; Gruffaz, Marion; Cros, Marie-Pierre; Durand, Geoffroy; Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence; Durantel, David; Herceg, Zdenko; Hernandez-Vargas, Hector

    2015-01-01

    Viral infections are able to modify the host's cellular programs, with DNA methylation being a biological intermediate in this process. The extent to which viral infections deregulate gene expression and DNA methylation is not fully understood. In the case of Hepatitis B virus (HBV), there is evidence for an interaction between viral proteins and the host DNA methylation machinery. We studied the ability of HBV to modify the host transcriptome and methylome, using naturally infected primary human hepatocytes to better mimic the clinical setting. Gene expression was especially sensitive to culture conditions, independently of HBV infection. However, we identified non-random changes in gene expression and DNA methylation occurring specifically upon HBV infection. There was little correlation between expression and methylation changes, with transcriptome being a more sensitive marker of time-dependent changes induced by HBV. In contrast, a set of differentially methylated sites appeared early and were stable across the time course experiment. Finally, HBV-induced DNA methylation changes were defined by a specific chromatin context characterized by CpG-poor regions outside of gene promoters. These data support the ability of HBV to modulate host cell expression and methylation programs. In addition, it may serve as a reference for studies addressing the genome-wide consequences of HBV infection in human hepatocytes. PMID:26565721

  11. Genomic responses to hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in primary human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ancey, Pierre-Benoit; Testoni, Barbara; Gruffaz, Marion; Cros, Marie-Pierre; Durand, Geoffroy; Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence; Durantel, David; Herceg, Zdenko; Hernandez-Vargas, Hector

    2015-12-29

    Viral infections are able to modify the host's cellular programs, with DNA methylation being a biological intermediate in this process. The extent to which viral infections deregulate gene expression and DNA methylation is not fully understood. In the case of Hepatitis B virus (HBV), there is evidence for an interaction between viral proteins and the host DNA methylation machinery. We studied the ability of HBV to modify the host transcriptome and methylome, using naturally infected primary human hepatocytes to better mimic the clinical setting.Gene expression was especially sensitive to culture conditions, independently of HBV infection. However, we identified non-random changes in gene expression and DNA methylation occurring specifically upon HBV infection. There was little correlation between expression and methylation changes, with transcriptome being a more sensitive marker of time-dependent changes induced by HBV. In contrast, a set of differentially methylated sites appeared early and were stable across the time course experiment. Finally, HBV-induced DNA methylation changes were defined by a specific chromatin context characterized by CpG-poor regions outside of gene promoters.These data support the ability of HBV to modulate host cell expression and methylation programs. In addition, it may serve as a reference for studies addressing the genome-wide consequences of HBV infection in human hepatocytes.

  12. Occult infection with HBV intergenotypic A2/G recombinant following acute hepatitis B caused by an HBV/A2 isolate.

    PubMed

    de Barros, José Júnior França; Peres, Luciana Rego; de Sousa, Paulo Sérgio Fonseca; do Amaral Mello, Francisco Campello; de Araujo, Natalia Motta; de Andrade Gomes, Selma; Niel, Christian; Lewis-Ximenez, Lia Laura

    2015-06-01

    Viral and host factors leading to occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (OBI) are not fully understood. Whether HBV genotype may influence the occurrence and course of OBIs is unknown. Here, we describe the case of a patient infected with HBV genotype A2 who developed symptomatic acute hepatitis and did not seroconvert after loss of HBsAg and HBeAg. The acute phase of hepatitis B was followed by a period of more than 2 years during which the DNA of an intergenotypic HBV/A2/G recombinant was intermittently detected in serum.

  13. Expression quantitative trait loci for TNFRSF10 influence both HBV infection and hepatocellular carcinoma development.

    PubMed

    Wen, Juan; Song, Ci; Liu, Jibin; Chen, Jianguo; Zhai, Xiangjun; Hu, Zhibin

    2016-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 10 (TNFRSF10) is a death domain-containing receptor for the apoptotic ligand TNFSF10, which involves multiple processes, including hepatocarcinogenesis and immune response against HBV infection. Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) for TNFRSF10. To assess the association of TNFRSF10 eQTL SNPs with the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and chronic HBV infection, we designed a case-control study that included 1,300 HBV-related HCC patients, 1,344 chronic HBV carriers, and 1,344 subjects with HBV natural clearance, and then genotyped two TNFRSF10 eQTL SNPs (rs79037040 and rs2055822). We found that rs79037040 GT/TT genotypes were associated with a decreased HCC risk (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.83, 95% confidence intervals [CIs] = 0.71-0.97, P = 0.021) but an increased chronic HBV infection risk of borderline significance (adjusted OR = 1.14, 95%CIs = 0.98-1.33, P = 0.085). In contrast, the rs2055822 G allele was a risk factor for HCC (adjusted OR = 1.12, 95%CIs = 1.00-1.25, P = 0.041) but a protective factor for chronic HBV infection (adjusted OR = 0.89, 95%CIs = 0.80-0.99, P = 0.038). Furthermore, we observed a dose-dependent relationship between the number of alleles (rs79037040-T and rs2055822-A) and the risk of HCC and chronic HBV infection. In comparison with "0" alleles, having "1-4" alleles was significantly associated with decreased HCC risk and increased HBV infection risk. These findings suggest that eQTL SNPs for TNFRSF10 may be susceptibility markers for HCC and chronic HBV infection.

  14. Molecular Characterization of HBV Strains Circulating among the Treatment-Naive HIV/HBV Co-Infected Patients of Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Debraj; Pal, Ananya; Biswas, Avik; Panigrahi, Rajesh; Sarkar, Neelakshi; Das, Dipanwita; Sarkar, Jayeeta; Guha, Subhasish Kamal; Saha, Bibhuti; Chakrabarti, Sekhar; Chakravarty, Runu

    2014-01-01

    Previously we reported that the exposure to hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection serves as a major threat among the treatment naive HIV infected population of eastern India. Hence, molecular characterization of these strains is of utmost importance in order to identify clinically significant HBV mutations. A total of 85 treatment naive HIV/HBV co-infected participants were included of whom the complete basal core promoter/precore region, the core and the whole envelope gene could be successfully sequenced for 59, 57 and 39 isolates respectively. Following phylogenetic analysis, it was found that HBV/D was the predominant genotype with HBV/D2 (38.5%) being the most prevalent subgenotype followed by HBV/A1. The major mutations affecting HBeAg expression includes the A1762T/G1764A (13.6%), G1896A (22%) and G1862T mutation (33.9%) which was predominantly associated with HBV/A1. Moreover, the prevalence of G1896A was considerably high among the HBeAg negative HIV/HBV co-infected subjects compared to HBV mono-infection. The main amino acid substitutions within the MHC class II restricted T-cell epitope of HBcAg includes the T12S (15.8%) and T67N (12.3%) mutation and the V27I (10.5%) mutation in the MHC class I restricted T-cell epitope. PreS1/S2 deletion was detected in 3 isolates with all harboring the BCP double mutation. Furthermore, the frequently occurring mutations in the major hydrophilic loop of the S gene include the T125M, A128V and M133I/L. Therefore, this study is the first from India to report useful information on the molecular heterogeneity of the HBV strains circulating among the treatment naive HIV/HBV co-infected population and is thus clinically relevant. PMID:24587360

  15. HBV integrants of hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines contain an active enhancer.

    PubMed

    Shamay, M; Agami, R; Shaul, Y

    2001-10-18

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major risk factor worldwide for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Integrated HBV DNA fragments, often highly rearranged, are frequently detected in HCC. In woodchuck, the viral enhancer plays a central role in hepatocarcinogenesis, but in humans the mechanism of HBV oncogenesis has not been established. In this study we investigated the status of the viral enhancer in two human HCC cell lines, Hep3B and PLC/PRF/5 each containing one or more integrated HBV DNA fragments. Active enhancer was defined by virtue of its protein occupancy as determined by genomic in vivo DMS footprinting. In PLC/PRF/5 cells, the HBV DNA was integrated in a cellular gene at chromosome 11q13, at a locus reported to be amplified in many tumors. We show here that in both cell lines, the integrated HBV DNA fragments contain an active enhancer-I. In particular, the occupation of the two previously defined basic enhancer elements, E and EP, was prominent. While in both cell lines the same protein binds to the EP elements, the E element, however, is occupied in a cell-line specific manner. In PLC/PRF/5 but not Hep3B, the prominent binding of an undefined protein was detected. Our data suggest that this protein is likely to be the fetoprotein transcription factor (FTF). The finding that enhancer sequences are conserved and functional in different cell lines suggests a selection pressure for their long-term maintenance. We therefore propose that the HBV enhancer-I might play a role in hepatocellular carcinogenesis. PMID:11687960

  16. Resveratrol enhances HBV replication through activating Sirt1-PGC-1α-PPARα pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yixian; Li, Yongjun; Huang, Chenjie; Ying, Lixiong; Xue, Jihua; Wu, Haicong; Chen, Zhi; Yang, Zhenggang

    2016-01-01

    The population of hepatitis B combined with a number of metabolic disorders is increasing significantly. Resveratrol (RSV) has been used as a preclinical drug for the treatment of the metabolic disorders. However, the impact of RSV on HBV replication remains unknown. In this study, the HBV-expressing hepatocelluar carcinoma cell line and mouse model created by hydrodynamic injection of viral DNA were used. We found that RSV activates Sirt1, which in turn deacetylates PGC-1α and subsequently increases the transcriptional activity of PPARα, leading to the enhanced HBV transcription and replication in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we found that this pathway is also required for fasting-induced HBV transcription. Taken together, this study identifies that RSV enhances HBV transcription and replication especially acting on the core promoter, which depends on Sirt1-PGC-1α-PPARα pathway. We conclude that RSV may exacerbate the progression of hepatitis B and that patients with hepatitis B infection should be cautious taking RSV as a dietary supplement. PMID:27098390

  17. Chronic hepatitis B infection and HBV DNA-containing capsids: Modeling and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manna, Kalyan; Chakrabarty, Siddhartha P.

    2015-05-01

    We analyze the dynamics of chronic HBV infection taking into account both uninfected and infected hepatocytes along with the intracellular HBV DNA-containing capsids and the virions. While previous HBV models have included either the uninfected hepatocytes or the intracellular HBV DNA-containing capsids, our model accounts for both these two populations. We prove the conditions for local and global stability of both the uninfected and infected steady states in terms of the basic reproduction number. Further, we incorporate a time lag in the model to encompass the intracellular delay in the production of the infected hepatocytes and find that this delay does not affect the overall dynamics of the system. The results for the model and the delay model are finally numerically illustrated.

  18. Conditional expression of IFN-alpha and IFN-gamma activated by HBV as genetic therapy for hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Matskevich, Alexey A; Cordelier, Pierre; Strayer, David S

    2003-12-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) has potentially devastating consequences and is very difficult to treat. Therapy with recombinant interferons (IFN), especially IFN-alpha, may be effective. The blood IFN-alpha levels that are needed to maintain therapeutic IFN-alpha levels in the liver, however, often cause severe side effects. Gene delivery to the liver may provide a solution. Using a long-term expression construct could provide the desired levels of IFN locally without the need to maintain potentially problematic blood levels. Recombinant, Tag-deleted SV40-derived vectors transduce hepatocytes efficiently and provide permanent transgene expression. We designed an expression construct that was effective against HBV and whose activity was limited to HBV-infected cells. To do this, we exploited the ability of HBV X protein to activate NF-kappaB and, via NF-kappaB, to activate promoter activity of HIV long terminal repeat (LTR) in hepatocytes. Using HIVLTR as a conditional promoter upstream of human and murine IFN-alpha and IFN-gamma cDNAs, rSV40 vectors were used to test the responsiveness of IFN to HBV and the ability of these IFNs to inhibit HBV transcripts and protein production and to activate IFN signaling in neighboring untransduced cells. We found that in hepatocyte cell lines and in primary hepatocytes, HBV activated the promoter activity of the HIVLTR via NF-kappaB. When whole HBV genome was delivered to cells by transfection to simulate HBV infection, IFN expression was activated, IFNs were produced and secreted, and they protected cells from HBV. Levels of IFN proteins that were secreted in this context were comparable to targeted blood levels needed to control chronic hepatitis viral infection. Further, IFNs that were elicited and secreted in this manner were able to activate IFN-induced signaling pathways in neighboring, untransduced cells and so were likely to provide protection even to cells that the rSV40 vector did not transduce. Gene

  19. Antihepatitis B virus activity of a protein-enriched fraction from housefly (Musca domestica) in a stable HBV-producing cell line.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xuemei; Jin, Xiaobao; Wang, Jie; Chu, Fujiang; Zhu, Jiayong

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major public health problem. Although several vaccines and therapeutic strategies are currently being implemented to combat HBV virus, effective antiviral therapy against HBV infection has not been fully developed. Alternative strategies and new drugs to combat this disease are urged. Insects and insect derivatives are a large and unexploited source of potentially useful compounds for modern medicine. In the present study, we investigated the first anti-HBV activity of a protein-enriched fraction (PE) from the larvae of the housefly (Musca domestica) in a stable HBV-producing cell line. HBsAg and HBeAg in the culture medium were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. HBV-DNA was quantified by fluorescent quantification PCR. HBV core protein was assayed by immunofluorescent staining. Results indicate PE treatment inhibited both HBsAg, HBeAg secretion, and HBV-DNA replication. Furthermore, PE could also suppress HBV core protein expression. PE could be a potential candidate for the development of a novel and effective drug for the treatment of HBV infection.

  20. Reestablishment of Active Immunity against HBV Graft Reinfection after Liver Transplantation for HBV-Related End Stage Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Wei; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Jing; Zeng, Dao-Bing; Li, Chuan-Yun; Wang, Meng-Long; Lin, Dong-Dong; Zhu, Yue; Li, You-Ping; Li, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to establish a hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination protocol among orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) recipients under the coverage of a low-dose hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) combined with an antiviral agent prophylaxis protocol. Method. Two hundred OLT recipients were included in this study. The vaccine was injected at months 0, 1, 2, and 6. Low-dose HBIG combined with antiviral agent prophylaxis protocol was continued before reestablishment of active immunity against HBV in order to maintain a steady anti-HBs titer. Results. Active immunity against HBV was reestablished in 50 patients, for an overall response rate of 25%. Of the 50 patients, 24 discontinued HBIG without any HBV graft reinfection during a follow-up period of 26.13 ± 7.05 months. 21 patients discontinued both HBIG and antiviral agents during a follow-up period of 39.86 ± 15.47 months, and 4 patients among them appeared to be HBsAg positive. There was no recipient death or graft loss because of HBV reinfection. Conclusions. Vaccination preventing HBV reinfection for OLT recipients is feasible. The strategy withdrawal of HBIG with induction of active immunity against hepatitis B is reasonable for long-term survivors of OLT; however, discontinuation nucleoside analogues should be cautious. PMID:25759834

  1. Epidemiology, Risk Factors and Genotypes of HBV in HIV-Infected Patients in the Northeast Region of Colombia: High Prevalence of Occult Hepatitis B and F3 Subgenotype Dominance

    PubMed Central

    Bautista-Amorocho, Henry; Castellanos-Domínguez, Yeny Zulay; Rodríguez-Villamizar, Laura Andrea; Velandia-Cruz, Sindi Alejandra; Becerra-Peña, Jeysson Andrey; Farfán-García, Ana Elvira

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. HIV-positive patients are commonly co-infected with HBV due to shared routes of transmission. Objectives Our aim was to determine the risk factors, prevalence, genotypes, and mutations of the Surface S gene of HBV, and occult hepatitis B infection (OBI) among patients infected with HIV in a northeastern Colombian city. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with 275 HIV-positive patients attending an outpatient clinic in Bucaramanga, Colombia during 2009–2010. Blood samples were collected and screened for serological markers of HBV (anti-HBs, anti-HBc and HBsAg) through ELISA assay. Regardless of their serological profile, all samples were tested for the HBV S gene by nested-PCR and HBV genotypes were determined by phylogenetic inference. Clinical records were used to examine demographic, clinical, virological, immunological and antiretroviral therapy (ART) variables of HIV infection. Results Participants were on average 37±11 years old and 65.1% male. The prevalence of HIV-HBV coinfection was 12% (95%CI 8.4–16.4) of which 3.3% had active HBV infection and 8.7% OBI. The prevalence of HIV-HBV coinfection was associated with AIDS stage and ART treatment. Sequence analysis identified genotype F, subgenotype F3 in 93.8% of patients and genotype A in 6.2% of patients. A C149R mutation, which may have resulted from failure in HBsAg detection, was found in one patient with OBI. Conclusions The present study found a high prevalence of HIV-HBV coinfection with an incidence of OBI 2.6-fold higher compared to active HBV infection. These findings suggest including HBV DNA testing to detect OBI in addition to screening for HBV serological markers in HIV patients. PMID:25462190

  2. HBV and HIV co-infection: Prevalence and clinical outcomes in tertiary care hospital Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Ali; Khan, Amer Hayat; Sulaiman, Syed Azhar Syed; Soo, Chow Ting; Khan, Kashifullah

    2016-03-01

    According to WHO, Malaysia has been classified as a concentrated epidemic country due to progression of HIV infection in the population of injecting drug users. The main objectives of current study are to determine the prevalence of HBV among HIV-positive individuals in a tertiary care hospital of Malaysia and to assess the predictors involved in the outcomes of HIV-HBV co-infected patients. A retrospective, cross-sectional study is conducted at Hospital Palau Pinang, Malaysia. The collection of socio-demographic data as well as clinical data is done with the help of data collection form. Data were analyzed after putting the collected values of required data by using statistical software SPSS version 20.0 and P > 0.05 is considered as significant. Results show that the overall prevalence of HBV was 86 (13%) including 495 (74.5%) males and 169 (25.5%) females among a total of 664 HIV-infected patients. It was observed that there is a high prevalence of HIV-HBV co-infection in males 76 (11.4%) as compared to females 10 (1.5%) (P = 0.002). The median age of the study population was 39 years. The statistical significant risk factors involved in the outcomes of HIV-HBV co-infected patients were observed in the variables of gender, age groups, and injecting drug users. The findings of the present study shows that the prevalence of HBV infection among HIV-positive patients was 13% and the risk factors involved in the outcomes of HIV-HBV co-infected patients were gender, age, and intravenous drug users.

  3. Interleukin-22 Promotes Proliferation of Liver Stem/Progenitor Cells in Mice and Patients with Chronic HBV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Dechun; Kong, Xiaoni; Weng, Honglei; Park, Ogyi; Wang, Hua; Dooley, Steven; Gershwin, M. Eric; Gao, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Proliferation of liver stem/progenitor cells (LPCs), which can differentiate into hepatocytes or biliary epithelial cells, is often observed in chronically inflamed regions of liver in patients. We investigated how inflammation might promote proliferation of LPCs. Methods We examined the role of interleukin (IL)-22, a survival factor for hepatocytes, on proliferation of LPCs in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and in mice. Proliferation of LPCs in mice was induced by feeding a diet that contained 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC). Results Hepatic expression of IL-22 was increased in patients with HBV and correlated with the grade of inflammation and proliferation of LPCs. Mice on the DDC diet that overexpressed an IL-22 transgene specifically in liver (IL-22TG), or that were infected with an IL-22–expressing adenovirus, had increased proliferation of LPCs. Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3, a component of the IL-22 signaling pathway, was activated in LPCs isolated from DDC-fed IL-22TG mice. Deletion of STAT3 from livers of IL-22TG mice reduced proliferation of LPCs. Moreover, the receptors IL-22R1 and IL-10R2 were detected on EpCAM+CD45– LPCs isolated from DDC-fed wild-type mice. Culture of these cells with IL-22 activated STAT3 and led to cell proliferation, but IL-22 had no effect on proliferation of STAT3-deficient EpCAM+CD45– LPCs. IL-22 also activated STAT3 and promoted proliferation of cultured BMOL cells (a mouse LPC line). Conclusion In livers of mice and patients with chronic HBV infection, inflammatory cells produce IL-22, which promotes proliferation of LPCs via STAT3. These findings link inflammation with proliferation of LPCs in patients with HBV infection. PMID:22484119

  4. Evolution of Hepatitis B Virus in a Chronic HBV-Infected Patient over 2 Years

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tao; Yan, Xin-Min; Zhang, Jin-Ping; Wang, Jin-Li; Zuo, Rong-Xia; Li, Li; Wang, Lin-Pin

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in full-length HBV isolates obtained from a chronic HBV-infected patient were evaluated at three time points: 1 day, 6 months, and 31 months. While 5 nucleotides variation, and an 18 bp deletion of preS1 have been kept in during at least the first two years, C339T mutation occurring in the hydrophilic region of HBsAg and T770C that caused polymerase V560A substitution were the new point mutations found existing in sequenced clones of the 3rd time point. Internal deletion of coding region obviously appeared in the 3rd time point. The splicers included two new 5′-splice donors and three new 3′-splice acceptors besides the reported donors and acceptors and may have produced presumptive HBV-spliced proteins or truncated preS proteins. ALT, HBeAg and viral DNA load varied during the follow-up years. These data demonstrated the diversity of genomes in HBV-infected patient during evolution. Combined with clinical data, the HBV variants discovered in this patient may contribute to viral persistence of infection or liver pathogenesis. PMID:21785721

  5. Co-infection assessment in HBV, HCV, and HIV patients in Western Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Mughales, Jamil A

    2016-09-01

    To estimate the prevalence of diagnosed and undiagnosed coinfections among HIV, HBV, and HCV infected patients. Retrospective analysis of laboratory records for HIV, HBV, and HCV patients presenting at the HIV outpatient clinic. Serological data including hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B e-antigen (HBeAg), hepatitis B e-antibody (anti-HBe), antibodies to HIV and HCV, anti-toxoplasmosis IgG and IgM antibodies, and anti-syphilis antibodies (VDRL) were collected. We obtained data for 628 (218 HCV, 268 HBV, and 142 HIV) patients. Male-to-female ratios were 1:1 for HCV, 3:4 for HBV, and 5:3 for HIV. Age means (SD) were 54.24 (16.40), 44.53 (18.83), and 40.39 (15.92) years for HCV, HBV, and HIV, respectively. In HIV group, the prevalence of HBV and HCV coinfections was 8.5% and 2.8%, respectively. In HBV group, the prevalence of HCV and HIV coinfections was 1.1% and 1.5%, respectively. In HCV group, HIV or HBV coinfections occurred at the same frequency (1.4%). An absence of screening for coinfections was detected in 7.0-48.5% patients as per the group and the infectious agent; which represents an estimated proportion of 20 out of 1,000 patients with an undiagnosed coinfection. Despite a relatively low prevalence of coinfections, a significant proportion of cases remain undiagnosed because of a lack of systematic screening. J. Med. Virol. 88:1545-1551, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26895691

  6. Co-infection assessment in HBV, HCV, and HIV patients in Western Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Mughales, Jamil A

    2016-09-01

    To estimate the prevalence of diagnosed and undiagnosed coinfections among HIV, HBV, and HCV infected patients. Retrospective analysis of laboratory records for HIV, HBV, and HCV patients presenting at the HIV outpatient clinic. Serological data including hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B e-antigen (HBeAg), hepatitis B e-antibody (anti-HBe), antibodies to HIV and HCV, anti-toxoplasmosis IgG and IgM antibodies, and anti-syphilis antibodies (VDRL) were collected. We obtained data for 628 (218 HCV, 268 HBV, and 142 HIV) patients. Male-to-female ratios were 1:1 for HCV, 3:4 for HBV, and 5:3 for HIV. Age means (SD) were 54.24 (16.40), 44.53 (18.83), and 40.39 (15.92) years for HCV, HBV, and HIV, respectively. In HIV group, the prevalence of HBV and HCV coinfections was 8.5% and 2.8%, respectively. In HBV group, the prevalence of HCV and HIV coinfections was 1.1% and 1.5%, respectively. In HCV group, HIV or HBV coinfections occurred at the same frequency (1.4%). An absence of screening for coinfections was detected in 7.0-48.5% patients as per the group and the infectious agent; which represents an estimated proportion of 20 out of 1,000 patients with an undiagnosed coinfection. Despite a relatively low prevalence of coinfections, a significant proportion of cases remain undiagnosed because of a lack of systematic screening. J. Med. Virol. 88:1545-1551, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Continuous up to 4 Years Entecavir Treatment of HBV-Infected Adolescents – A Longitudinal Study in Real Life

    PubMed Central

    Pawłowska, Małgorzata; Smok, Beata; Rajewski, Paweł; Wietlicka-Piszcz, Magdalena; Halota, Waldemar; Tretyn, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the long-term (up to 4 years) efficacy and safety of entecavir ETV treatment and analysed the significance of baseline and on-treatment factors in long-term ETV outcomes in adolescents with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). We determined the cumulative virological and serological outcomes of 44 adolescents with CHB receiving ETV for up to 4 years. To investigate the dynamics of HBV DNA, ALT activity and hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) seroconversion over time and their associations with the considered factors, generalized estimating equation (GEE) models were used. The cumulative rates of undetectable HBV DNA (<20 IU/ml) and HBeAg seroconversion after 4 years were 89.7% and 55.4%, respectively. In the study group, we showed that having undetectable HBV DNA at the 6th or 12th month of therapy predicted the achievement of a sustained response rate (SRR, defined as the loss of HBV DNA, loss of HBeAg and ALT normalization) at year 3 of ETV therapy (P = 0.048, OR = 5.83; P = 0.012; OR = 14.57, respectively). The GEE analysis indicated that of the different factors, the duration of ETV therapy had a strong impact on the achievement of virological suppression, HBeAg seroconversion and SRR in adolescents. Each month after the initiation of therapy, the odds of loss of HBV DNA increased by approximately 5% (OR = 1.05, P<0.0001), on average. Additionally, the GEE analysis revealed that adolescents with an age at infection of ≥10 years had 3 times higher odds of achieving undetectable HBV DNA than patients with a younger infection age (OR = 3.67, P = 0.028). None of the ETV-treated patients reported significant adverse effects. ETV is an effective and safe treatment option for adolescents with CHB. Undetectable HBV DNA in the 6th and/or 12th month of ETV treatment and older age at infection could predict maintained virological suppression. PMID:27685782

  8. Analysis of Hepatitis B Virus Intrahepatic Covalently Closed Circular DNA and Serum Viral Markers in Treatment-Naive Patients with Acute and Chronic HBV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Zhengsheng; Liu, Yan; Li, Baosen; Sun, Ying; Li, Xiaodong; Liu, Shuhong; Cai, Shaoping; Yao, Weimin; Xin, Shaojie; Lu, Fengmin; Xu, Dongping

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the relationships of intrahepatic cccDNA with serum HBsAg and with HBV DNA in treatment-naive patients throughout acute and chronic HBV infection. Methods A total of 120 patients who had a liver biopsy were enrolled, including 19 with acute hepatitis B (AHB), and 101 patients with chronic HBV infection (CHB) of whom were 10 in immune-tolerant (IT) phase, 59 in immune-clearance (IC) phase, 8 in low-replicative (LR) phase, and 24 in HBeAg-negative hepatitis (ENH) phase. Intrahepatic cccDNA, serum HBsAg and serum HBV DNA levels were comparatively analyzed. Results The median intrahepatic cccDNA levels were 0.18 4.80, 3.81, 0.22 and 0.97 copies/cell for patients with AHB, CHB-IT, CHB-IC, CHB-LR, and CHB-ENH, respectively. In AHB patients, intrahepatic cccDNA was positively correlated with serum HBsAg (r = 0.665, P = 0.003), as well as serum HBV DNA (r = 0.536, P = 0.022). In CHB patients, intrahepatic cccDNA was positively correlated with serum HBsAg in the IC phase (r = 0.392, P = 0.005), and with serum HBV DNA in the IC phase (r = 0.301, P = 0.036) and ENH phase (r = 0.588, P = 0.013). HBV replicative efficiency, defined as the ratio of serum HBV DNA to intrahepatic cccDNA, was obviously lower in AHB and CHB-LR patients than in CHB-IT, CHB-IC and CHB-ENH patients (0.70 and 0.53 vs. 1.12, 1.09 and 0.99, P<0.001, values were logarithmic transformed for analysis). In CHB-IC patients, HBV replicative efficiency was positively correlated with histological activity index of liver inflammation (r = 0.308, P = 0.009). Conclusion Serum HBsAg and HBV DNA levels may reflect the amount of active intrahepatic cccDNA in treatment-naive AHB and CHB-IC patients. Reduced intrahepatic cccDNA and HBV replicative efficiency may imply effective immune control of HBV infection. PMID:24551214

  9. Association of TIP30 expression and prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xia; Lv, Lizhi; Ouyang, Xuenong; Zhang, Shi'an; Fang, Jian; Cai, Lirong; Li, Dongliang

    2016-09-01

    Altered expression of TIP30, a tumor suppressor, has been observed in many cancers. In this study, we have evaluated the expression of TIP30 in the tissues of 209 hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) and their adjacent tissues by using a high-density tissue microarray, and analyzed its correlation with the clinical pathological parameters of the patients. The results revealed negative or weak expression of TIP30 in 43.5% (91/209) of the HCC tissues, and in only 27% (56/209) of the adjacent tissues. The expression level of TIP30 in HCC was inversely correlated with serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels, HBV infection, and tumor differentiation. Multivariate analysis for survival indicated that serum HBV infection was the most significant predictor of poor prognosis in HCC (P = 0.0023), and TIP30 expression and tumor differentiation were also independent indicators in this respect (P = 0.0364 and P = 0.0397, respectively). Patients with medium or high expression levels of TIP30 (TIP30(++/+++) ) had a better 5-year overall survival rate than those with low/negative (TIP30(+/-) ) expression (P < 0.001). TIP30(+/-/) HBV(+) patients had the worst 5-year overall survival rate, whereas TIP30(++/+++) /HBV(-) patients had the best. To further explore the correlation between TIP30 and HBV infection in HCC, HBV(+) hepatoblastoma cell-line HepG2 2.2.15 and HCC cell-line Hep3B were used. Upon silencing of HBV, we observed an upregulation of TIP30 and decreased cell proliferation. In the in vivo studies, we found that the mice inoculated with HepG2 2.2.15 cells with HBV silencing had a prolonged tumor latency and a longer life span, as compared to the control mice inoculated with untreated control cells. In conclusion, the results suggest that downregulation of TIP30 may result from HBV infection, and subsequently promotes the progression of HCC.

  10. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte activity is enhanced in tumors with low IL-10 production in HBV-induced hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Yang Song, Qingwei; Hu, Dianhe; Zhuang, Xiaohu; Yu, Shengcai

    2015-05-22

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers and can be induced by chronic HBV infection. The role of HBV-specific immune responses in mediating tumorigenesis and HCC prognosis is debated. The effect of intratumoral microenvironment on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) is also unclear. Here, we examined resected tumor tissue from 36 patients with HBV-induced HCC. We categorized study cohort based on ex vivo IL-10 secretion by tumor cells into high IL-10-secreting (Hi10) and low IL-10-secreting (Lo10) groups, and found that the Lo10 group was less sensitive to TLR ligand stimulation. TILs from the Lo10 group contained higher frequencies of HBV-specific IFN-g-producing cells and total IFN-g-producing cells, and possessed higher proliferative capacity. Moreover, the proliferative capacity of TILs from the Hi10 group was negatively correlated with IL-10 secretion from tumor cells. Together, our data demonstrated that low IL-10-producing capacity in HBV-induced HCC tumors is associated with enhanced TIL activity. - Highlights: • We examined intratumoral IL-10 production in HBV-induced HCC. • We grouped HCC tumors into Hi10 and Lo10 groups based on their IL-10 production. • Lo10 groups had better IFN-g response by TILs. • Lo10 groups had better TIL proliferative capacity. • Lo10 group tumor cells were refractory to TLR ligand stimulation.

  11. Baseline characteristics of HIV & hepatitis B virus (HIV/HBV) co-infected patients from Kolkata, India

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Jayeeta; Saha, Debraj; Bandyopadhyay, Bhaswati; Saha, Bibhuti; Kedia, Deepika; Guha Mazumder, D.N.; Chakravarty, Runu; Guha, Subhasish Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and HIV co-infection has variable prevalence worldwide. In comparison to HBV mono-infection, the course of chronic HBV infection is accelerated in HIV/HBV co-infected patients. The present study was carried out to analyse the baseline characteristics (clinical, biochemical, serological and virological) of treatment naïve HIV/HBV co-infected and HIV mono-infected patients. Methods: Between July 2011 and January 2013, a total number of 1331 HIV-seropositive treatment naïve individuals, enrolled in the ART Centre of Calcutta School of Tropical Medicine, Kolkata, India, were screened for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). A total of 1253 HIV mono-infected and 78 HIV/HBV co-infected patients were characterized. The co-infected patients were evaluated for HBeAg and anti-HBe antibody by ELISA. HIV RNA was quantified for all co-infected patients. HBV DNA was detected and quantified by real time-PCR amplification followed by HBV genotype determination. Results: HIV/HBV co-infected patients had proportionately more advanced HIV disease (WHO clinical stage 3 and 4) than HIV mono-infected individuals (37.1 vs. 19.9%). The co-infected patients had significantly higher serum bilirubin, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase and ALT/platelet ratio index (APRI). CD4 count was non-significantly lower in co-infected patients. Majority (61.5%) were HBeAg positive with higher HIV RNA (P<0.05), HBV DNA (P<0.001) and APRI (P<0.05) compared to those who were HBeAg negative. HBV/D was the predominant genotype (73.2%) and D2 (43.7%) was the commonest subgenotype. Interpretation & conclusions: HIV/HBV co-infected patients had significantly higher serum bilirubin, ALT, alkaline phosphatase and lower platelet count. HBeAg positive co-infected patients had higher HIV RNA and HBV DNA compared to HBeAg negative co-infected patients. Prior to initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART) all patients should be screened for HBsAg to

  12. HBV cure: why, how, when?

    PubMed

    Levrero, Massimo; Testoni, Barbara; Zoulim, Fabien

    2016-06-01

    Current HBV treatments control replication and liver disease progression in the vast majority of treated patients. However, HBV patients often require lifelong therapies due to the persistence of transcriptionally active viral cccDNA mini-chromosome in the nucleus, which is not directly targeted by current antiviral therapies. A true complete cure of HBV would require clearance of intranuclear cccDNA from all infected hepatocytes. An intermediate but still relevant step forward that would allow treatment cessation would be reaching a functional cure, equivalent to resolved acute infection, with a durable HBsAg loss±anti-HBs seroconversion, undetectable serum DNA and persistence of cccDNA in a transcriptionally inactive status. Recent advances in technologies and pharmaceutical sciences, including the cloning of the mayor HBV receptor (i.e. the NTCP transporter) and the development in vitro HBV infection models, have heralded a new horizon of innovative antiviral and immune-therapeutic approaches. PMID:27447092

  13. Current antiviral practice and course of Hepatitis B virus infection in inflammatory arthritis: a multicentric observational study (A + HBV study)

    PubMed Central

    Kalyoncu, Umut; Emmungil, Hakan; Onat, Ahmet Mesut; Yılmaz, Sedat; Kaşifoglu, Timuçin; Akar, Servet; İnanç, Nevsun; Yıldız, Fatih; Küçükşahin, Orhan; Karadağ, Ömer; Mercan, Rıdvan; Bes, Cemal; Yazısız, Veli; Yılmazer, Barış; Özmen, Mustafa; Erten, Şükran; Şenel, Soner; Yazıcı, Ayten; Taşçılar, Koray; Kalfa, Melike; Kiraz, Sedat; Kısacık, Bünyamin; Pehlivan, Yavuz; Kılıç, Levent; Şimşek, İsmail; Çefle, Ayşe; Akkoç, Nurullah; Direskeneli, Haner; Erken, Eren; Turgay, Murat; Öztürk, Mehmet Akif; Soy, Mehmet; Aksu, Kenan; Dinç, Ayhan; Ertenli, İhsan

    2015-01-01

    Objective The reactivation of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a well-known event in hepatitis B surface antigen (HbsAg)-positive patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy. The objective of this study was to assess the antiviral practice and course of HBV infection in inflammatory arthritis. Material and Methods Nineteen rheumatology centers participated in this retrospective study. HbsAg-positive patients who were taking disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and who were being tested for HBV viral load at a minimum of two different time points were included. The case report form (CRF) consisted of demographic data, rheumatic diseases, treatment profiles, transaminase levels, viral hepatitis serological markers, and HBV viral load. The reactivation of HBV was defined as the abrupt rise in HBV replication by an increase in serum HBV DNA levels in a patient with a previously inactive HBV infection. Results In total, the data of 101 (female 50.5%) patients were included (76 patients with inactive HBV carriers and 25 patients with chronic HBV infection). The mean age of patients was 44±12 years, and the mean follow-up duration was 31±22 months. Of the 101 patients, 70 (69.3%) received antiviral treatment. HBV reactivation was detected in 13 of 76 (17.1%) patients with inactive HBV carriers. HBV reactivation was observed less frequently, not although significantly, in those patients receiving antiviral prophylaxis compared with those not receiving prophylaxis [5/41 (12.2%) vs. 8/33 (24.2%), p=0.17]. Forty-two patients (31 patients had inactive HBV carriers) were using anti-tumor necrosis factor agents. HBV reactivation was detected in 6 of the 31 (19.3%) patients. Twenty-five patients had chronic hepatitis, and five (20%) of them had not received antiviral prophylaxis. HBV viral loads were persistently elevated in 7 (28%) of 25 patients (three patients under and four patients not under antiviral treatment). Conclusion HBV reactivation was observed in

  14. Association of CMV, HBV, or HCV co-infection with vaccine response in adults with well-controlled HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Troy, S B; Rossheim, A E B; Siik, J; Cunningham, T D; Kerry, J A

    2016-05-01

    Even after CD4 count recovery on antiretroviral therapy, HIV infection is associated with decreased response to most vaccines compared to the general population. Chronic infections with viruses such as cytomegalovirus (CMV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV), which are more prevalent in HIV-infected populations, have been linked to immune dysfunction and decreased vaccine response in the general population. However, whether co-infection with these other viruses contributes to the decreased vaccine response seen in adults with well-controlled HIV infection is unknown. We conducted a secondary analysis of data and serum from adults with well-controlled HIV infection from an inactivated polio vaccine trial (224 subjects) and a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine study (128 subjects). We evaluated the association of CMV, HBV, or HCV co-infection with post-vaccination antibody levels using both univariate and multivariate analyses, controlling for factors such as age, race, CD4 count, comorbidities, smoking status, and baseline antibody levels. Ninety-three percent, 7%, and 14% of subjects were co-infected with CMV, HBV, and HCV respectively. On both univariate and multivariate analysis, neither CMV nor HCV co-infection were significantly associated with post-vaccination antibody levels to either vaccine. HBV co-infection was significantly associated with post-vaccination antibody concentrations for pneumococcal serotype 7F on univariate analysis and 6A on multivariate analysis, but the association was with higher antibody concentrations. In conclusion, co-infection with CMV, HBV, or HCV does not appear to contribute to the decreased vaccine response seen in adults with well-controlled HIV infection.

  15. Increased CD86 but Not CD80 and PD-L1 Expression on Liver CD68+ Cells during Chronic HBV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Said, Elias A.; Al-Reesi, Iman; Al-Riyami, Marwa; Al-Naamani, Khalid; Al-Sinawi, Shadia; Al-Balushi, Mohammed S.; Koh, Crystal Y.; Al-Busaidi, Juma Z.; Idris, Mohamed A.; Al-Jabri, Ali A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The failure to establish potent anti-HBV T cell responses suggests the absence of an effective innate immune activation. Kupffer cells and liver-infiltrating monocytes/macrophages have an essential role in establishing anti-HBV responses. These cells express the costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86. CD80 expression on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) induces Th1 cell differentiation, whereas CD86 expression drives the differentiation towards a Th2 profile. The relative expression of CD80, CD86 and PD-L1 on APCs, regulates T cell activation. Few studies investigated CD80 and CD86 expression on KCs and infiltrating monocytes/macrophages in HBV-infected liver and knowledge about the expression of PD-L1 on these cells is controversial. The expression of these molecules together in CD68+ cells has not been explored in HBV-infected livers. Methods Double staining immunohistochemistry was applied to liver biopsies of HBV-infected and control donors to explore CD80, CD86 and PD-L1 expression in the lobular and portal areas. Results Chronic HBV infection was associated with increased CD68+CD86+ cell count and percentage in the lobular areas, and no changes in the count and percentage of CD68+CD80+ and CD68+PD-L1+ cells, compared to the control group. While CD68+CD80+ cell count in portal areas correlated with the fibrosis score, CD68+CD80+ cell percentage in lobular areas correlated with the inflammation grade. Conclusion The upregulation of CD86 but not CD80 and PD-L1 on CD68+ cells in HBV-infected livers, suggests that these cells do not support the induction of potent Th1. Moreover, the expression of CD80 on CD68+ cells correlates with liver inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:27348308

  16. Clearance of HBV DNA in immunized children born to HBsAg-positive mothers, years after being diagnosed with occult HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, A; Yahyapour, Y; Poortahmasebi, V; Shahmoradi, S; Roggendorf, M; Karimzadeh, H; Alavian, S M; Jazayeri, S M

    2016-04-01

    In a previous study, we observed immunoprophylaxis failure due to occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (OBI) despite the presence of adequate levels of anti-HBs in 21 (28%) of 75 children born to HBsAg-positive mothers. The aim of the study was to explore the maintenance of this cryptic condition in this population. Of 21 OBI-positive children, 17 were enrolled. HBV serological profiles were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Highly sensitive real-time and standard PCR followed by direct sequencing were applied in positive cases. The mean age (±SD) of studied patients was 6.57 ± 2.75 years. All children still were negative for HBsAg. All but one (94%) were negative for HBV DNA. Only two children were positive for anti-HBc. The results of the most recent anti-HBs titration showed that 4 (23.5%) and 13 (76.5%) had low (<10 IU/mL) and adequate (>10 IU/mL) levels of anti-HBs, respectively. The only still OBI-positive patient had an HBV DNA level of 50 copy/mL, carried the G145R mutation when tested in 2009 and again in 2013 in the 'a' determinant region of the surface protein. Further follow-up showed that after 18 months, he was negative for HBV DNA. In high-risk children, the initial HBV DNA positivity early in the life (vertical infection) does not necessarily indicate a prolonged persistence of HBV DNA (occult infection). Adequate levels of anti-HBs after vaccine and hepatitis B immune globulin immunoprophylaxis following birth could eventually clear the virus as time goes by. Periodic monitoring of these children at certain time intervals is highly recommended.

  17. HBV and HAV infection in chronic hepatitis in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Tanno, H; Fay, O H; Roncoroni, M; Palazzi, J

    1981-01-01

    Sera of 155 chronic hepatitis (CH) patients in Argentina were tested for the presence of HBsAg, anti-HBs, anti-HBc, and anti-HAV. Our purpose was to define the role that both virus A and B might play in the etiology and pathogenesis of this condition. The patients were divided into two groups: group I (57) HBsAg-negative; group II (98) HBsAg-positive. The control group consisted of 1,209 healthy blood donors from Banco Central de Sangre de Rosario; 286/1,209 (24%) had viral markers for HBV. In group I, 38/57 (67%) had anti-HBs and/or anti-HBc, but none had anti-HBs alone. Group II showed a higher percentage of males (P less than 0.05). We found similar incidence of anti-HAV among group I, group II, and the control group.

  18. Presence of anti-HBc is associated to high rates of HBV resolved infection and low threshold for Occult HBV Infection in HIV patients with negative HBsAg in Chile.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Jose Ignacio; Jensen, Daniela; Sarmiento, Valeska; Peirano, Felipe; Acuña, Pedro; Fuster, Felipe; Soto, Sabrina; Ahumada, Rodrigo; Huilcaman, Marco; Bruna, Mario; Jensen, Werner; Fuster, Francisco

    2016-04-01

    HBV-HIV coinfection is prevalent. Frequently, anti-HBc is the only serological marker of HBV, which can be indicative of HBV resolved infection, when found together with anti-HBs reactivity; or present as "isolated anti-HBc," related to HBV occult infection with presence of detectable DNA HBV, more prevalent in HIV-positive individuals. Regional data about this condition are scarce. Anti-HBc rapid test has been used as screening, but its performance has not been described in HIV-positive patients. The aim of this study was determine prevalence of anti-HBc in HIV-positive patients, serological pattern of HBV resolved infection and isolated anti-HBc, evaluating presence of HBV occult infection. Assess anti-HBc rapid test compared to ECLIA. Methods included measurement of anti-HBc and anti-HBs in HIV-positive patients with negative HBsAg. Serum HBV DNA quantification and HBV booster vaccination to "isolated anti-HBc" individuals. Detection of anti-HBc by rapid test and ECLIA. In 192 patients, prevalence of anti-HBc was 42.7% (82/192); associated to male gender, drug use, men-sex-men, positive-VDRL, and longer time HIV diagnosis. 34.4% (66/192) had presence of anti-HBs, mean titers of 637 ui/ml. Isolated anti-HBc in 8.3% (16/192), associated to detectable HIV viral load and no-use of HAART; in them, HBV DNA was undetectable, and 60% responded to HBV vaccination booster. Anti-HBc rapid test showed low sensibility (32.9%) compared to ECLIA. These results show that prevalence of anti-HBc in HIV-positive individuals is high, in most cases accompanied with anti-HBs as HBV resolved infection. Low prevalence of "isolated anti-HBc," with undetectable HBV DNA, and most had anamnestic response to HBV vaccination; suggest low possibility of occult HBV infection. Anti-HBc rapid test cannot be recommended as screening method for anti-HBc. PMID:26381185

  19. Presence of anti-HBc is associated to high rates of HBV resolved infection and low threshold for Occult HBV Infection in HIV patients with negative HBsAg in Chile.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Jose Ignacio; Jensen, Daniela; Sarmiento, Valeska; Peirano, Felipe; Acuña, Pedro; Fuster, Felipe; Soto, Sabrina; Ahumada, Rodrigo; Huilcaman, Marco; Bruna, Mario; Jensen, Werner; Fuster, Francisco

    2016-04-01

    HBV-HIV coinfection is prevalent. Frequently, anti-HBc is the only serological marker of HBV, which can be indicative of HBV resolved infection, when found together with anti-HBs reactivity; or present as "isolated anti-HBc," related to HBV occult infection with presence of detectable DNA HBV, more prevalent in HIV-positive individuals. Regional data about this condition are scarce. Anti-HBc rapid test has been used as screening, but its performance has not been described in HIV-positive patients. The aim of this study was determine prevalence of anti-HBc in HIV-positive patients, serological pattern of HBV resolved infection and isolated anti-HBc, evaluating presence of HBV occult infection. Assess anti-HBc rapid test compared to ECLIA. Methods included measurement of anti-HBc and anti-HBs in HIV-positive patients with negative HBsAg. Serum HBV DNA quantification and HBV booster vaccination to "isolated anti-HBc" individuals. Detection of anti-HBc by rapid test and ECLIA. In 192 patients, prevalence of anti-HBc was 42.7% (82/192); associated to male gender, drug use, men-sex-men, positive-VDRL, and longer time HIV diagnosis. 34.4% (66/192) had presence of anti-HBs, mean titers of 637 ui/ml. Isolated anti-HBc in 8.3% (16/192), associated to detectable HIV viral load and no-use of HAART; in them, HBV DNA was undetectable, and 60% responded to HBV vaccination booster. Anti-HBc rapid test showed low sensibility (32.9%) compared to ECLIA. These results show that prevalence of anti-HBc in HIV-positive individuals is high, in most cases accompanied with anti-HBs as HBV resolved infection. Low prevalence of "isolated anti-HBc," with undetectable HBV DNA, and most had anamnestic response to HBV vaccination; suggest low possibility of occult HBV infection. Anti-HBc rapid test cannot be recommended as screening method for anti-HBc.

  20. Correlates of HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis infections among prison inmates and officers in Ghana: A national multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Adjei, Andrew A; Armah, Henry B; Gbagbo, Foster; Ampofo, William K; Boamah, Isaac; Adu-Gyamfi, Clement; Asare, Isaac; Hesse, Ian FA; Mensah, George

    2008-01-01

    Background Prisons are known to be high-risk environments for the spread of bloodborne and sexually transmitted infections. Prison officers are considered to have an intermittent exposure potential to bloodborne infectious diseases on the job, however there has been no studies on the prevalence of these infections in prison officers in Ghana. Methods A national multicenter cross-sectional study was undertaken on correlates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and syphilis infections in sample of prison inmates and officers from eight of ten regional central prisons in Ghana. A total of 1366 inmates and 445 officers were enrolled between May 2004 and December 2005. Subjects completed personal risk-factor questionnaire and provided blood specimens for unlinked anonymous testing for presence of antibodies to HIV, HCV and Treponema pallidum; and surface antigen of HBV (HBsAg). These data were analyzed using both univariate and multivariate techniques. Results Almost 18% (1336) of 7652 eligible inmates and 21% (445) of 2139 eligible officers in eight study prisons took part. Median ages of inmates and officers were 36.5 years (range 16–84) and 38.1 years (range 25–59), respectively. Among inmates, HIV seroprevalence was 5.9%, syphilis seroprevalence was 16.5%, and 25.5% had HBsAg. Among officers tested, HIV seroprevalence was 4.9%, HCV seroprevalence was 18.7%, syphilis seroprevalence was 7.9%, and 11.7% had HBsAg. Independent determinants for HIV, HBV and syphilis infections among inmates were age between 17–46, being unmarried, being illiterate, female gender, being incarcerated for longer than median time served of 36 months, history of homosexuality, history of intravenous drug use, history of sharing syringes and drug paraphernalia, history of participation in paid sexual activity, and history of sexually transmitted diseases. Independent determinants for HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis infections among officers

  1. Seroprevalence of HBV, HCV & HIV Co-Infection and Risk Factors Analysis in Tripoli-Libya

    PubMed Central

    Daw, Mohamed A.; Shabash, Amira; El-Bouzedi, Abdallah; Dau, Aghnya A.

    2014-01-01

    Background In 1998 Libya experienced a major outbreak of multiple blood borne viral hepatitis and HIV infections. Since then, no studies have been done on the epidemic features and risk factors of HBV, HCV, HIV and co-infection among the general population. Methods A prospective study was carried out using a multi-centre clustering method to collect samples from the general population. The participants were interviewed, and relevant information was collected, including socio-demographic, ethnic, and geographic variables. This information was correlated with the risk factors involved in the transmission of HBV, HCV and HIV. Blood samples were collected and the sera were tested for HBsAg, anti-HCV and anti-HIV using enzyme immunoassay. Results A total of 9,170 participants from the nine districts of Tripoli were enrolled. The average prevalence of HBsAg was 3.7%, anti-HCV 0.9%, anti-HIV 0.15% and co-infection 0.02%. The prevalence varied from one district to another. HBV was more prevalent among those aged over 50 years and was associated with family history. Anti-HCV and anti-HIV were more prevalent among those aged 20–40 years. Intravenous drug use and blood transfusion were the main risk factors for HCV and HIV infection. Conclusion HBV, HCV, HIV and co-infection are relatively common in Libya. High prevalence was associated with geographic, ethnic and socioeconomic variability within the community. HCV and HIV infections among the younger age groups are becoming an alarming issue. Regulations and health care education need to be implemented and longer term follow-up should be planned. PMID:24936655

  2. Design, synthesis, molecular docking studies and anti-HBV activity of phenylpropanoid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sheng; Li, Yubin; Wei, Wanxing; Wang, Kuiwu; Wang, Lisheng; Wang, Jianyi

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a series of phenylpropanoid derivatives were synthesized, and their anti-hepatitis B virus (HBV) activity was evaluated. Most of the synthesized derivatives showed effective anti-HBV activity. And compound 4d-3 showed the most effective anti-HBV activity, performing strong potent inhibitory not only on the secretion of HBsAg (IC50 = 58.28 μM, SI = 23.26) and HBeAg (IC50 = 97.21 μM, SI = 13.95), but also on the HBV DNA replication (IC50 = 42.28 μM, SI = 32.06). The structure-activity relationships (SARs) of the derivatives had been discussed, which were useful for developing phenylpropanoid derivatives as novel anti-HBV agents. Moreover, the docking study of all synthesized compounds inside the HLA-A protein (PDB ID: 3OX8) active site was carried out to explore the molecular interactions and a molecular target for activity and a modified assay method measuring the interaction between our derivatives and HBcAg was investigated, indicating that the HBV core protein might be their potential target for anti-HBV. This study identified a new class of potent non-nucleoside anti-HBV agents.

  3. Hepatitis B vaccination with or without hepatitis B immunoglobulin at birth to babies born of HBsAg-positive mothers prevents overt HBV transmission but may not prevent occult HBV infection in babies: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pande, C; Sarin, S K; Patra, S; Kumar, A; Mishra, S; Srivastava, S; Bhutia, K; Gupta, E; Mukhopadhyay, C K; Dutta, A K; Trivedi, S S

    2013-11-01

    Vertical transmission of Hepatitis B virus HBV can result in a state of chronic HBV infection and its complications. HBV vaccination with or without hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) prevents transmission of overt infection to the babies. However, whether it also prevents occult HBV infection in babies is not known. Consecutive pregnant women of any gestation found to be HBsAg positive were followed till delivery, and their babies were included in the study. Immediately after delivery, babies were randomized to receive either HBIG or placebo in addition to recombinant HBV vaccine (at 0, 6, 10 and 14 weeks). The primary end-point of the study, assessed at 18 weeks of age, was remaining free of any HBV infection (either overt or occult) plus the development of adequate immune response to vaccine. The babies were further followed up for a median of 2 years of age to determine their eventual outcome. Risk factors for HBV transmission and for poor immune response in babies were studied. Of the 283 eligible babies, 259 were included in the trial and randomized to receive either HBIG (n=128) or placebo (n=131) in addition to recombinant HBV vaccine. Of the 222 of 259 (86%) babies who completed 18 weeks of follow-up, only 62/222 (28%) reached primary end-point. Of the remaining, 6/222 (3%) developed overt HBV infection, 142/222 (64%) developed occult HBV infection, and 12/222 (5%) had no HBV infection but had poor immune response. All 6 overt infections occurred in the placebo group (P=0.030), while occult HBV infections were more common in the HBIG group (76/106 [72%] vs. 66/116 [57%]; P=0.025). This may be due to the immune pressure of HBIG. There was no significant difference between the two groups in frequency of babies developing poor immune response or those achieving primary end-point. The final outcome of these babies at 24 months of age was as follows: overt HBV infection 4%, occult HBV infection 42%, no HBV infection but poor immune response 8% and no HBV

  4. IL28B Is Associated with Outcomes of Chronic HBV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaodong; Chi, Xiumei; Pan, Yu; Gao, Yanhang; Li, Wanyu; Yang, Chen; Zhong, Jin; Xu, Damo; Zhang, Manna; Minuk, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The role of IL28B gene variants and expression in hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections are not well understood. Here, we evaluated whether IL28B gene expression and rs12979860 variations are associated with HBV outcomes. Materials and Methods IL28B genetic variations (rs12979860) were genotyped by pyrosequencing of DNA samples from 137 individuals with chronic HBV infection [50 inactive carriers (IC), 34 chronic hepatitis B (CHB), 27 cirrhosis, 26 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)], and 19 healthy controls. IL28A/B mRNA expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was determined by qRT-PCR, and serum IL28B protein was measured by ELISA. Results Patients with IL28B C/C genotype had greater IL28A/B mRNA expression and higher IL28B protein levels than C/T patients. Within the various disease stages, compared to IC and healthy controls, IL28B expression was reduced in the CHB, cirrhosis, and HCC cohorts (CHB vs. IC, p=0.02; cirrhosis vs. IC, p=0.01; HCC vs. IC, p=0.001; CHB vs. controls, p<0.01; cirrhosis vs. controls, p<0.01; HCC vs. controls, p<0.01). When stratified with respect to serum HBV markers in the IC and CHB cohorts, IL28B mRNA and protein levels were higher in HBeAg-positive than negative individuals (p=0.01). Logistic regression analysis revealed that factors associated with high IL28B protein levels were C/C versus C/T genotype [p=0.016, odds ratio (OR)=0.25, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.08-0.78], high alanine aminotransferase values (p<0.001, OR=8.02, 95% CI=2.64-24.4), and the IC stage of HBV infection (p<0.001). Conclusion Our data suggest that IL28B genetic variations may play an important role in long-term development of disease in chronic HBV infections. PMID:25837166

  5. Liver microRNA hsa-miR-125a-5p in HBV chronic infection: correlation with HBV replication and disease progression.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Nicola; Potenza, Nicoletta; Pisaturo, Mariantonietta; Mosca, Nicola; Tonziello, Gilda; Signoriello, Giuseppe; Messina, Vincenzo; Sagnelli, Caterina; Russo, Aniello; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2013-01-01

    To study in HBsAg chronic carriers the expression of liver hsa-miR-125a-5p and its correlation with liver HBV-DNA values and clinical presentation, 27 consecutive Caucasian, HBsAg/anti-HBe/HBV-DNA-positive patients who were naive to nucleos(t)ide analogues and interferon therapy and had no marker of HCV, HDV or HIV infection and no history of alcohol intake were enrolled. For each patient, liver HBV DNA and liver hsa-miR-125a-5p were quantified by real-time PCR in relation to β-globin DNA or RNU6B, respectively. Liver fibrosis and necroinflammation were graded by applying Ishak's scoring system. Liver hsa-miR-125a-5p was detected in all patients enrolled and a correlation between its concentration and liver HBV DNA was demonstrated (p<0.0001). Higher liver hsa-miR-125a-5p concentrations were observed in patients with HBV-DNA plasma level >10(3) IU/ml (p<0.02), in those with HAI >6 (p = 0.02) and those with fibrosis score >2 (p<0.02) than in patients with lower scores. Higher HBV-DNA liver concentrations were found in patients with abnormal AST (p = 0.005) and ALT serum levels (p = 0.05), in those with serum HBV DNA higher than 10E3 IU/mL (p = 0.001) and those with fibrosis score >2 (p = 0.02) than in patients with a lower load. By multivariate logistic regression analysis, liver hsa-miR-125a-5p was identified as an independent predictor of disease progression: O.R. = 4.21, C.I. 95% = 1.08-16.43, p<0.05, for HAI >6; O.R. = 3.12, C.I. 95% = 1.17-8.27, p<0.05, for fibrosis score >2. In conclusion, in HBsAg/anti-HBe-positive patients, the liver hsa-miR-125a-5p level correlated with liver and plasma HBV-DNA values and was associated to a more severe disease progression. PMID:23843939

  6. HBV and liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Leung, Nancy

    2005-07-01

    The association of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and liver cancer is well documented in epidemiological study. Patients with chronic hepatitis B have increased risk of hepatocelluar carcinoma (HCC), in particular those with active liver disease and cirrhosis. The incidence of HCC increases with age and is more common among male patients. The introduction of universal HBV vaccination program for the newborn in endemic regions has started to show beneficial impact. Taiwan introduced this program two decades ago and the incidence of liver cancer among infants and young children have declined significantly. The carcinogenic events leading to HCC are under intense research. A number of hypotheses have been proposed. HBV is not directly hepatotoxic but its interaction with the host immune system creates opportunity for HBV DNA integration into the host genome. One of the main foci of research is the HBX-encoded X protein. Its integration and protein expression impose alteration in cell proliferation cycle and apoptosis process. Many other factors may be involved including viral-induced alterations in p53 and telemerase, HBV genotypes, co-infection with HCV or delta agents, patient's lifestyle such as smoking, alcohol excesses, and genetic factors of the host patient. The processes of necroinflammation, cell proliferation and fibrosis facilitate the initial carcinogenic development. HCC surveillance with tumor markers such as alpha-foetal protein, decarboxylated prothrombin, in conjunction with imaging techniques has identified early small HCC that is amenable to curative therapy. Viral load has been correlated with increase risk of HCC. The available anti-viral agents have demonstrated clinical benefit among those with maintained and sustained response. Interferon and lamivudine therapy have demonstrated reduction of HCC among responders. However, they only constitute a minority proportion of treated patients. The mainstay of prevention should lie in prevention of

  7. An outbreak of HBV and HCV infection in a paediatric oncology ward: epidemiological investigations and prevention of further spread.

    PubMed

    Dumpis, Uga; Kovalova, Zanna; Jansons, Juris; Cupane, Liene; Sominskaya, Irina; Michailova, Marija; Karayiannis, Peter; Gardovska, Dace; Viazov, Sergey; Ross, Stefan; Roggendorf, Michael; Pumpens, Paul

    2003-03-01

    Hospital-acquired hepatitis B (HBV) and C virus (HCV) infections continue to occur despite increased awareness of this problem among the medical community. One hundred six patients were infected in a haematology oncology ward for children, over the time period 1996 to 2000. Serum samples from 45 such patients and 3 from infected medical personnel were used for nucleic acid amplification. HBV core, as well as HCV core and hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) nucleotide sequences, were analysed by phylogenetic tree analysis, in order to characterise the epidemiological pattern of viral transmission on the ward. Samples from 32 patients were positive for HBV-DNA or HCV-RNA by PCR. Ten patients were positive for both markers. Seventeen out of twenty-three HCV core gene sequences were found to be evolutionarily related and clustered separately from other local sequences in the phylogenetic tree, indicating nosocomial transmission. This was confirmed by analysis of HVR1 gene sequences. One nurse and one physician from the ward were HCV RNA positive, but their HCV sequences were not related evolutionarily to those of the patient cluster. Fifteen out of nineteen HBV core gene sequences were also clustered together and were positioned separately in the relevant tree. Epidemiological investigation excluded a common source infection and indicated that spread of infection was most likely due to inappropriate infection control measures on the ward. No obvious risk factors for transmission were identified during the retrospective survey in patients with related sequences, except use of multidose vials for saline and poor staff compliance with routine hand hygiene procedures. The preventive measures that were introduced reduced the incidence of infection significantly. No new cases of HBV infection and only three anti-HCV seroconversions occurred over a period of 19 months. The introduction and maintenance of strict prevention measures over a 2 year period, combined with HBV vaccination

  8. Unique impacts of HBV co-infection on clinical and laboratory findings in a recent dengue outbreak in China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yangbo; Kou, Zhihua; Tang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Fuchun; Yao, Xian; Liu, Shengyong; Jin, Xia

    2008-08-01

    High prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in China offers a unique setting to examine HBV's influence on the presentation of dengue fever. In 398 patients admitted for suspected dengue fever, 89% (353/398) were positive for dengue IgM antibodies. Among dengue-infected patients, 8% (29/353) had chronic HBV co-infection. Only dengue virus serotype 1 was identified by virus isolation and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assays. No case of dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome was diagnosed. In addition to routine clinical tests, interleukin 2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, interferon gamma (IFNgamma), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) levels were measured in the sera of 95% (334/353) of dengue-infected subjects as well as controls. Surprisingly, HBV/dengue co-infected patients made less IL-6 (P < 0.05) and TNFalpha (P < 0.05) than patients with only dengue infection. Similar levels of IL-4, IL-10, and IFNgamma were found in both groups. Thus, HBV co-infection seems to alter the cytokine production pattern when patients contract dengue infection.

  9. Across-sectional study on anxiety and stress in pregnant women with chronic HBV infection in the People’s Republic of China

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fen; Li, Jianju; Lin, Keke; Ji, Ping; Sun, Yumei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the anxiety and pregnancy-associated stress of pregnant women with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in the People’s Republic of China and analyze the relationship between anxiety and pregnancy-associated stress in the hope of finding ways to reduce the stress or improve the coping skills for these mothers-to-be during pregnancy. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted. One hundred and sixty chronic HBV-infected pregnant women (HBV group) and 160 healthy pregnant women (control group) selected from three Peking University-affiliated hospitals participated in the study, and completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and Pregnancy Stress Rating Scale (PSRS) survey. Results The mean scores of STAI and PSRS for the HBV group were higher than for the control group. Factor 2 of PSRS (stress caused by worrying about mother and child’s health and safety) was the highest, and was significantly higher in the HBV group than in the control group. Correlation analysis showed STAI scores were significantly correlated with economic status and diagnosis, as well as the total score, factor 1 (stress about identifying with the role of mother), and factor 2 of PSRS, but not significantly correlated with factor 3 of PSRS (stress caused by the changes of body shape and physical activity). Conclusion Pregnant women with chronic HBV infection experienced higher levels of anxiety and stress than healthy pregnant women. Their major stress came from concerns for the health and safety of the mother and the child. PMID:26346004

  10. Efficacy of HBV-pulsed DCs in combination with entecavir in patients with chronic hepatitis B infection.

    PubMed

    Wei, Mei-Juan; Pan, Xing-Nan; Wei, Kai-Peng; Li, Xu-Hong; Liu, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Xiao-Man; Jiang, Ya-Ling; Zhang, Chun-Yu; Shen, Jian-Kun

    2015-08-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are multifunctional cells that initiate adaptive immune responses. Patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection have reduced numbers of DCs which may be functionally impaired, a defect that may contribute to viral persistence. Autologous DC-based immunotherapy is considered to be a treatment option for chronic HBV infection (CHB). We evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of HBV-pulsed DCs in combination with the antiviral drug entecavir in patients with CHB. Eighty patients were divided into four groups: HBV-pulsed DCs only, HBV-pulsed DCs plus entecavir, entecavir only, and an untreated control group. Patients on combination therapy exhibited greater antiviral responses than patients on either monotherapy. The combination of HBV-pulsed DCs and entecavir resulted in the largest reduction in serum viral DNA levels and the highest percentage of virologic response. In addition, combination therapy resulted in viral e antigen (HBeAg) loss and seroconversion. These results suggest that the combination of HBV-pulsed autologous DCs and entecavir could be therapeutically advantageous for patients with CHB.

  11. [Effect of IL-28B polymorphisms on the natural course of HBV infection].

    PubMed

    Demirtürk, Neşe; Aykın, Nevil; Çevik, Figen; Koca, Buğra; Doğan, Nurhan; Köken, Tülay

    2016-01-01

    The prediction of the consequences of disease is important to determine the therapy approaches and prevention of the chronical state in patients infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV). In recent years various studies are carried on to investigate the effect of IL-28B gene polymorphisms on the clinical course or therapy response in patients with chronic hepatitis B infection. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of IL-28B rs12979860 polymorphisms on the natural course of HBV infection. The study was designed prospectively, and the subjects were randomly selected among patients admitted to infectious disease outpatient clinics of Kocatepe University Medical School Hospital and Yunus Emre State Hospital located at provinces in Central Anatolia, Turkey. A total of 99 cases were included in the study and evaluated into three groups, namely, chronic hepatitis B patients (group 1, n= 43); inactive HBV carriers (group 2, n= 34) and subjects with acquired immunity after native infection (group 3, n= 22). There were no significant differences regarding the age and gender distribution between the groups (p> 0.05). All subjects were investigated for the IL-28B promoter single nucleotide polymorphism rs12979860 at position 3176 C/T, by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Evaluation of the range of IL-28B rs12979860 C/T polymorphisms observed in the study groups showed that, the frequency of CC, CT and TT allels were as follows; 34.9%, 48.8% and 16.3 % in group 1; 47.1%, 35.3% and 17.6% in group 2; 63.6%, 27.7% and 13.6% in group 3, respectively. No significant differences were observed between the groups in terms of C/T allel distriubution (p> 0.05). However, in spite of statistical insignificance, the rate of CC allel in IL-28B rs12979860 gene was the highest in immune subjects (63.6%), while it was the lowest in chronic hepatitis B patients (34.9%). According to our data, IL-28B rs12979860 gene polymorphisms were not effective on the clinical course of

  12. Host Genetic Factors and Vaccine-Induced Immunity to HBV Infection: Haplotype Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ryckman, Kelli K.; Fielding, Katherine; Hill, Adrian V.; Mendy, Maimuna; Rayco-Solon, Pura; Sirugo, Giorgio; van der Sande, Marianne A.; Waight, Pauline; Whittle, Hilton C.; Hall, Andrew J.; Williams, Scott M.; Hennig, Branwen J.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a significant health burden world-wide, although vaccines help decrease this problem. We previously identified associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms in several candidate genes with vaccine-induced peak antibody level (anti-HBs), which is predictive of long-term vaccine efficacy and protection against infection and persistent carriage; here we report on a haplotype-based analysis. A total of 688 SNPs from 117 genes were examined for a two, three and four sliding window haplotype analysis in a Gambian cohort. Analysis was performed on 197 unrelated individuals, 454 individuals from 174 families, and the combined sample (N = 651). Global and individual haplotype association tests were carried out (adjusted for covariates), employing peak anti-HBs level as outcome. Five genes (CD44, CD58, CDC42, IL19 and IL1R1) had at least one significant haplotype in the unrelated or family analysis as well as the combined analysis. Previous single locus results were confirmed for CD44 (combined global p = 9.1×10−5 for rs353644-rs353630-rs7937602) and CD58 (combined global p = 0.008 for rs1414275-rs11588376-rs1016140). Haplotypes in CDC42, IL19 and IL1R1 also associated with peak anti-HBs level. We have identified strong haplotype effects on HBV vaccine-induced antibody level in five genes, three of which, CDC42, IL19 and IL1R1, did not show evidence of association in a single SNP analyses and corroborated the majority of these effects in two datasets. The haplotype analysis identified associations with HBV vaccine-induced immunity in several new genes. PMID:20806065

  13. PCR-Based Molecular Diagnosis of Hepatitis Virus (HBV and HDV) in HCV Infected Patients and Their Biochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Raheel, Ummar; Badshah, Yasmeen; Akhtar, Hashaam; Tamanna, Kosar; Tahir, Muhammad; Sadaf Zaidi, Najam us Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Seroprevalence of HCV indicates that HCV is found in more than 10% of HBV- or HDV-infected patients worldwide leading to liver disease. Here we show HBV and HDV coinfection association with HCV infected Pakistani patients, study of disease severity, and possible interpretation of associated risk factors in coinfected patients. A total of 730 liver diseased patients were included, out of which 501 were found positive for HCV infection via PCR. 5.1% of patients were coinfected with HBV while 1% were coinfected with HBV and HDV both. LFTs were significantly altered in dually and triply infected patients as compared to single HCV infection. Mean bilirubin, AST, and ALT levels were highest (3.25 mg/dL, 174 IU/L, and 348 IU/L) in patients with triple infection while dual infection LFTs (1.6 mg/dL, 61 IU/L, and 74 IU/L) were not high as in single infection (1.9 mg/dL, 76 IU/L, and 91 IU/L). The most prominent risk factor in case of single (22%) and dual infection (27%) group was “reuse of syringes” while in triple infection it was “intravenous drug users” (60%). It is concluded that HBV and HDV coinfections are strongly associated with HCV infected Pakistani patients and in case of severe liver disease the possibility of double and triple coinfection should be kept in consideration. PMID:27366331

  14. Characterization of Treatment-Naive HIV/HBV Co-Infected Patients Attending ART Clinic of a Tertiary Healthcare Centre in Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Avik; Panigrahi, Rajesh; Sarkar, Neelakshi; Sarkar, Jayeeta; Pal, Manisha; Guha, Subhasish Kamal; Saha, Bibhuti; Chakrabarti, Sekhar; Chakravarty, Runu

    2013-01-01

    Objective The study was designed to assess the hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection scenario among the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients attending a tertiary healthcare unit in eastern India. Additionally, clinical and virological characterization of these viruses, prior to antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation was also done for better understanding of the disease profile. Methods Pool of ART-naive HIV/HBV co-infected and HIV mono-infected patients, participating in two different studies, were included in this study. HBV DNA was detected by nested-PCR amplification followed by HBV genotype determination and HBV reverse transcriptase (RT) region amplification and direct sequencing for detecting drug resistance. Results The prevalence of HBsAg (11.3%) was higher compared to anti-HCV (1.9%) among the HIV infected ART-naive patients. Moreover, majority of the HBeAg positive HIV/HBV co-infected patients (87.7%) had HBV DNA ≥20,000 IU/ml with median HBV DNA significantly higher than that of HBeAg negative subjects (5.7 log10 IU/ml vs. 4.2 log10 IU/ml; p<0.0001). Multivariate analysis also showed that HBeAg-positive status was independently associated with higher HBV DNA level (p = <0.001). Notably, 60.9% of the HBeAg negative co-infected subjects had HBV DNA ≥2,000 IU/ml of which 37.0% had HBV DNA ≥20,000 IU/ml. Genotype HBV/D (68.2%) was the predominant genotype followed by HBV/A (24.3%) and HBV/C (7.5%). Anti-HBV drug resistant mutations were detected in two (3.8%) of the ART-naive patients. Conclusion The prevalence of HIV/HBV co-infection was relatively higher in our study subjects. HBeAg testing might provide clue for early treatment initiation. Furthermore, HBeAg negative patients are also associated with high HBV DNA levels and therefore require appropriate medical attention. Pre-treatment screening for anti-HBV drug resistant mutations is not necessary before ART initiation. PMID:24023688

  15. Association of TNF-α Promoter Polymorphism with HBV Associated Disease Outcome Among HBV Infected Patients from Orissa, Southern Part of East India

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, Rajesh; Sarkar, Neelakshi; Biswas, Avik; Pal, Ananya; Saha, Debraj; Singh, Shivaram P.; Panigrahi, Manas K.; Bandopadhyay, Manikanana; Chakrabarti, Sekhar; Chakravarty, Runu

    2014-01-01

    Background TNF-α promoter polymorphism has been known to be a potential predictive factor in patients with HBV infection. We therefore tried to investigate whether the TNF-α promoter polymorphism at position −238, −857 and −863 was associated with the outcome of HBV infection in a population from Orissa, southern part of East India. Methods A total of 195 patients recruited for the study were classified into 85 controls and 110 HBV infected cases, which included 34 IC, 30 CLD, 32 LC and 14 HCC patients. The polymorphisms at the respective sites were detected by a PCR-RFLP followed by statistical analysis. Results The frequency of the genotype −238 GG and the allele −238G in the cases (89.0% and 92.7% respectively) was significantly higher than that in the controls (68.2% and 82.2% respectively) (P < 0.001, OR = 3.8 and P = 0.001, OR = 2.73). Whereas the −238 GA genotype was significantly high in the control group (28.2%) when compared to the cases (7.2%) (P < 0.001, OR = 0.2). Similarly, the frequency of −863CC and the allele −863C was significantly higher among the cases (24.5% and 49.5%) compared to controls (1.17% and 34.7%), (P < 0.001, OR = 27.32 and P = 0.003, OR = 1.85), whereas the −863CA genotype was significantly high in the controls (67.0%) when compared to the cases (50.0%) (P = 0.01, OR = 0.49). Haplotype −863C/−857C/−238G in cases was significantly higher than controls (P = 0.002). Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicates that the genotype −863CC bears a negative association with liver disease progression. Conclusion The present study established an association of polymorphisms at site −238 and −863 of the TNF-α promoter with the outcome HBV infection and disease progression. PMID:25755561

  16. [HORIZONTAL TRANSMISSION OF HBV INFECTION IN MIGRANTSFROM A HYPERENDEMIC AREA TO THEIR CONTACTS IN A LOW ENDEMICITY AREA IN PERU

    PubMed

    Cabezas, César; Anaya, Elizabeth; Bartalesi, Filippo; Sánchez, Jaime

    1997-01-01

    Migration of inhabitants from high endemicity to low endemicity areas, where the majority of population is susceptible, implies a risk of transmission. This factor suggested the study of the presence of HBV infection on migrants from Huanta and in their host communities in Lima.MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty families from a human settlement in the District of San Juan de Lurigancho, Lima, were chosen at random. This sample included migrant families and people who had born in Lima.The members of these families were subjected to a survey to obtain demographic data and possible risk factor for HBV infection, and venous blood sample was obtained to determine HBV serological markers by ELIZA techniques.RESULTS: A total of 215 people were evaluated, 130 (60,5%) were female, and 85 (39,5%) were male. There were 9 (4,2%) HbsAg carriers; 4 (1,9%) of them were born in Huanta; the other 5 (2,3%) were born in Lima, and had never been to Huanta. They were under 20 years of age. No significant association was found between the presence of HbsAg and the use of injectables, blood transfusions, tatoos, previous surgery, dental extractions or sexual relations.CONCLUSION: The presence of HbsAg carrier on people born in Lima, with no "classical" risk factor for HBV infection, could be associated with carriers migrating from a hyperendemic HBV area, suggesting a mechanism of horizontal transmission. PMID:12219100

  17. Association of Periodontal Diseases and Liver Fibrosis in Patients With HCV and/or HBV infection

    PubMed Central

    Nagao, Yumiko; Kawahigashi, Yuji; Sata, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Background: Periodontal disease and systemic health are closely associated. However, there is no data supporting the association between periodontal disease and patients with liver diseases associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and/or hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between periodontitis and progression of liver diseases in patients with HCV and/or HBV infection. Patients and Methods: In this retrospective study, 351 patients with HCV- and/or HBV-related liver diseases underwent screening for periodontal disease using the Salivaster® salivary occult blood test from February 2010 to June 2014. Furthermore, we examined the prevalence of fimbrillin (fimA) genotype of Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) in 28 HCV-infected patients visited at our hospital between January 2013 and June 2014. P. gingivalis with fimA genotype with types I to V was further detected using a PCR method. Results: Of 351 patients, 76 patients (group 1) had a strong positive result for salivary occult blood test and 275 patients (group 2) had weak positive or negative test results. Significant factors between the groups were obesity, level of AST, ALT, LDH, ALP, Alb, D.Bil, T.cho, AFP, platelets (Plt), IRI, HOMA-IR, current interferon (IFN) treatment and the daily frequency of tooth brushing. Between-groups analysis indicated that total protein (T.pro) level and liver fibrosis were significant factors. According to multivariate analysis, five factors were associated with periodontal disease as Plt count below 80000, brushing teeth only once a day, current IFN treatment, aged 65 years or older and obesity. The adjusted odds ratios for these five factors were 5.80, 3.46, 2.87, 2.50 and 2.33, respectively, and each was statistically significant. Twenty-eight saliva specimens had positive results for P. gingivalis with fimA genotype types I to V. The prevalence of fimA genotype II was higher in 14 patients with liver

  18. [Prevalence change of HGV(GBV-C) infection and its coinfection with HBV a HCV infections in haemodialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Klusonová, Hana; Stepánová, Vlasta; Plísková, Lenka; Stilec, Roman

    2003-01-01

    Prevalence of HGV(GBV-C) infection and its coinfection with HBV a HCV infections were studied in group of 82 haemodialysis patients. This study was realized 20 months latter again -- 16 patients from 82 were running in dialysis, 17 patients were transplanted and 49 patients died (non of this viruses was cause of their death). HGV(GBV-C) RNA was detected in serum of 22 patients, 20 months latter it was detected in serum of 3 patients; one positive was new. 20 months latter any HGV(GBV-C) RNA was not detected in serum of 4 originally positive patients. Three of ten HBsAg positive patients were coinfected by HGV(GBV-C) RNA; 20 months latter any coinfection was found. In the first we found HGV(GBV-C) RNA in serum of 5 anti-HCV positive patients and in serum of 1 HCV RNA positive patient; 20 months latter it was in serum of 1 and 1 respectively. Elevation of ALT and AST levels were found in serum of 3 from 82 patients; two patients were coinfected with HBV or HCV. Any from 2 running dialysis patients with elevation of ALT and AST levels was not HGV(GBV-C) RNA positive. This virus is not probably frequent cause of liver disease in dialysis patients and it is not necessary to routinely screen for HGV(GBV-C) infection in this group of patients. PMID:19569590

  19. Toll-Like Receptor 3 is Associated With the Risk of HCV Infection and HBV-Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Pei-Liang; Song, Li-Xue; An, Huaijie; Huang, Jing-Yu; Li, Sheng; Zeng, Xian-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There are inconsistent data on the association of risk of hepatitis virus infection and hepatitis virus-related diseases with the toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) gene. Several common polymorphism sites were targeted to assess the risk of HBV infection, HCV infection, and HBV-related diseases. Meta-analysis combining data for 3547 cases and 2797 controls from 8 studies was performed in this study. Pooled ORs were calculated to measure the risk of hepatitis virus infection and hepatitis virus-related diseases. Fixed-effects pooled ORs were calculated using the Mantel-Haenszel method. The TLR3 gene was associated with a significantly increased risk of HBV-related diseases among 1355 patients and 1130 controls ([pooled OR, [95%CI]: 1.30, [1.15–1.48] for dominant; 1.77, [1.35–2.31] for recessive; 1.28 [1.16–1.41] for allele frequency). Subgroup analyses by a polymorphism site indicated an increased risk of HCV infection in relation to the TT/CT genotypes of rs3775291 (1.50 [1.11–2.01]), and a decreased risk ascribed to the T allele (0.20 [0.16–0.25]). We also noted an association between rs3775291 and significantly increased risk of HBV-related diseases (2.23 [1.55–3.21]). No significant inter-study heterogeneity or publication bias was detected in the analyses. These data suggest a likely effect on the risk to infect HCV and develop HBV-related diseases for the TLR3 gene. Large-scale studies with racially diverse populations are required to validate these findings. PMID:27227908

  20. HBV culture and infectious systems.

    PubMed

    Hayes, C Nelson; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2016-07-01

    While an effective vaccine against hepatitis B virus (HBV) has long been available, chronic HBV infection remains a severe global public health concern. Current treatment options have limited effectiveness, and long-term therapy is required to suppress HBV replication; however, complete elimination of the virus is rare. The lack of suitable animal models and infection systems has hindered efforts to unravel the HBV life cycle, particularly the early events in HBV entry, which appear to be highly species- and tissue-specific. Human primary hepatocytes remain the gold standard for HBV replication studies but are limited by availability and variability. While the HepaRG cell line is permissive for HBV replication, other hepatoma cell lines such as HepG2 do not support HBV replication. The recent discovery of sodium taurocholate transporting peptide (NTCP) as a primary receptor for HBV binding has led to the development of replication-competent cell lines such as HepG2-NTCP. Human hepatocytes grown in chimeric mice have provided another approach that allows primary human hepatocytes to be used while overcoming many of their limitations. Although the difficulty in developing HBV infection systems has hindered development of effective treatments, the variability and limited replication efficiency among cell lines point to additional liver-specific factors involved in HBV infection. It is hoped that HBV infection studies will lead to novel drug targets and therapeutic options for the treatment of chronic HBV infection.

  1. Khmer American Mothers’ Knowledge about HPV and HBV Infection and Their Perceptions of Parenting: My English Speaking Daughter Knows More

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Haeok; Kiang, Peter; Tang, Shirely S.; Chea, Phala; Peou, Sonith; Semino-Asaro, Semira; Grigg-Saito, Dorcas C.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Purpose The purpose of this study is to explore and describe Khmer mothers’ understanding of HBV and HPV prevention as well as their perception of parenting on health and health education of their daughters in the US. Methods The qualitative pilot study guided by the revised Network Episode Model and informed by ethnographic analysis and community-based purposive sampling method were used. Face-to-face audiotaped interviews with eight Khmer mothers were conducted by bilingual female middle-aged community health leaders who spoke Khmer. Results The findings revealed that Khmer mothers clearly lacked knowledge about HBV and HPV infection prevention and had difficulty understanding and educating their daughters about health behavior, especially on sex-related topics. The findings showed that histo-sociocultural factors are integrated with the individual factor, and these factors influenced the HBV and HPV knowledge and perspective of Khmer mothers’ parenting. Conclusion The study suggests that situation-specific conceptual and methodological approaches that take into account the uniqueness of the sociocultural context of CAs is a novel method for identifying factors that are significant in shaping the perception of Khmer mothers’ health education related to HBV and HPV prevention among their daughters. The communication between mother and daughter about sex and the risk involved in contracting HBV and HPV has been limited, partly because it is seen as a “taboo subject” and partly because mothers think that schools educate their children regarding sexuality and health. PMID:26160247

  2. Noninvasive diagnosis of liver fibrosis in patients with HIV infection and HCV/HBV co-infection.

    PubMed

    Moreno, S; García-Samaniego, J; Moreno, A; Ortega, E; Pineda, J A; del Romero, J; Tural, C; von Wichmann, M A; Berenguer, J; Castro, A; Espacio, R

    2009-04-01

    The measurement of fibrosis stage critically affects the identification of the progression of liver disease, the establishment of a prognosis and therapeutic decision making. Liver biopsy has been the single, most useful method to determine the degree of liver fibrosis (LF), but with recognized limitations, mainly associated with its invasiveness. In recent years, alternative noninvasive methods have been developed, including imaging methods, such as transient elastometry, and assays based on serum biomarkers. This article reviews the available studies evaluating the value of various noninvasive methods for the assessment of LF in patients with HIV-infection and HBV/HCV co-infection, and makes recommendations on how to best use and combine them in clinical practice.

  3. Cimetidine synergizes with Praziquantel to enhance the immune response of HBV DNA vaccine via activating cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaoping; Geng, Shuang; Liu, Hu; Li, Chaofan; Yang, Yuqin; Wang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we have reported that either CIM or PZQ, 2 clinical drugs, could be used to develop as adjuvants on HBV DNA vaccine to elicit both humoral and cellular immune responses. Here, we demonstrate that combinations of CIM and PZQ as adjuvants for a HBV DNA vaccine, could induce much stronger antigen specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses compared either with CIM or PZQ alone. The synergistic effects of CIM plus PZQ to HBV DNA vaccine were observed on a higher IgG2a/IgG1 ratio, an increase of HBsAg-specific CD4(+) T cells capable of producing IFN-γ or IL-17A and a robust IFN-γ-, IL-17A-, or TNF-α-producing CD8(+) T cells to HBsAg. Most importantly, the antigen-specific CTL response was also elevated significantly, which is critical for the eradication of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infected cells. Using an HBsAg transgenic mouse model, the expression of HBsAg in the hepatic cells was also significantly reduced after immunized with pCD-S 2 in the presence of 0.5% CIM and 0.25% PZQ. Further investigations demonstrated that the synergistic effects of combination of CIM and PZQ were dependent on enhanced cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells, which was correlated with impaired activities of regulatory T cells. Therefore, combinations of CIM and PZQ have great potential to be used as effective adjuvants on DNA-based vaccinations for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B. PMID:24643207

  4. Association Between IL-10 Gene Promoter Polymorphisms (-592 A/C, -819 T/C, -1082 A/G) and Susceptibility to HBV Infection in an Iranian Population

    PubMed Central

    Moudi, Bita; Heidari, Zahra; Mahmoudzadeh-Sagheb, Hamidreza; Hashemi, Mohammad; Metanat, Malihe; Khosravi, Soheila; Farrokh, Parisa

    2016-01-01

    Background IL-10 can play a vital role in immune response against HBV. Three biallelic SNPs from the transcription start site control the transcription of the IL-10 gene. An association between susceptibility to HBV and IL-10 polymorphisms has been suggested in patients with HBV infection. Objectives The present study was designed to study the association between polymorphisms in interleukin-10 (-1082 A/G, -819 T/C and -592 A/C) promoter gene and chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Patients and Methods 221 chronically infected patients and 200 healthy control subjects were enrolled in the study. Three biallelic (-1082 A/G, -819 T/C and -592 A/C) polymorphisms in the IL-10 promoter gene were determined by PCR-RFLP method. Results Persistent HBV infection was associated with IL-10-1082 AG (P = 0.001) and GG (P = 0.004) genotypes and G (P = 0.000) allele. IL-10-819 T/C and -592 A/C genotype and allele frequencies did not show any correlation with the risk of chronic hepatitis B infection. Conclusions These results suggest that polymorphisms in interleukin-10 gene promoter influence clinical outcome of HBV infection and susceptibility to HBV infection. PMID:27148384

  5. Titration of hepatitis B virus infectivity in the sera of pre-acute and late acute phases of HBV infection: transmission experiments to chimeric mice with human liver repopulated hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, Ayako; Tanaka, Junko; Katayama, Keiko; Mizui, Masaaki; Matsukura, Harumichi; Yugi, Hisao; Shimada, Takashi; Miyakawa, Yuzo; Yoshizawa, Hiroshi

    2008-12-01

    Studies of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in non-human primates such as chimpanzees are no longer possible due to ethical considerations and the endangered status of chimpanzees since April 2007 in Japan. A human hepatocyte transplanted chimeric mouse was used to characterize HBV infectivity in serial stages of acute infection. Chimeric mice were inoculated intravenously with serum samples obtained from an experimentally infected chimpanzee with HBV. Sera from the pre-acute phases (i.e., rump-up viremia prior to anti-HBc) and late acute phases (i.e., declining phase of HBsAg and anti-HBcAb positive) were collected from the chimpanzees 57 and 244 days after inoculation. These sera contained 2.6 x 10(6) and 2.8 x 10(6) copies/ml of HBV DNA, respectively. Three chimeric mice inoculated intravenously with 100 microl of pre-acute serum (equivalent to 10(0) copy of HBV DNA) developed an HBV infection. The three chimeric mice that received 100 microl of pre-acute serum (equivalent to 10(1) copies of HBV DNA), developed high levels of serum HBV DNA. None of the three chimeric mice inoculated with 100 microl of 1:10(4) dilution (equivalent to 10(1) copies of HBV DNA) of late-acute serum was infected, while only one of three chimeric mice inoculated with 100 microl of 1:10(3) dilution (equivalent to 10(2) copies of HBV DNA) of late-acute serum developed an HBV infection. Based on these results, chimeric mice can be used as animal models for the study of HBV infectivity, pathogenesis and control. The results show that pre-acute phase HBV serum is about 100-times more infectious than late acute phase serum.

  6. Differences in antiproliferative effect of STAT3 inhibition in HCC cells with versus without HBV expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yun; Zhou, Lin; Xie, Haiyang; Wang, Weilin; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-06-05

    Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) plays an important role in the etiology of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) inactivation could inhibit the tumor growth of HCC. In this study, differential antiproliferative effect of STAT3 inhibition was observed with HBV-related HCC cells being more resistant than non-HBV-related HCC cells. Resistance of HBV-related HCC cells to STAT3 inhibition was positively correlated to the expression of HBV. Enhanced ERK activation after STAT3 blockade was detected in HBV-related HCC cells but not in non-HBV-related HCC cells. Combined ERK and STAT3 inhibition eliminates the discrepancy between the two types of HCC cells. Moderate reduced HBV expression was found after STAT3 inhibition. These findings disclose a discrepancy in cellular response to STAT3 inhibition between non-HBV-related and HBV-related HCC cells and underscore the complexity of antiproliferative effect of STAT3 inactivation in HBV-related HCC cells. - Highlights: • HBV endows HCC cells with resistance to STAT3 inactivation on proliferation. • Abnormal ERK activation after STAT3 inhibition in HBV-related HCC cells. • Combined ERK and STAT3 inhibition eliminates the discrepancy. • STAT3 inhibition moderately reduces HBV expression.

  7. Preparation and determination of immunological activities of anti-HBV egg yolk extraction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan Ping; Zou, Wei Min; Zhan, Xue Jun; Yang, Shu Hua; Xie, Da Ze; Peng, Sai Liang

    2006-02-01

    To prepare an effective immune preparation to treat hepatitis B, hens were immunized with hepatitis B vaccines, and then anti-HBV egg yolk extraction (anti-HBV EYE) was refined from egg yolk by a dialyzable method. Its chemical characteristics were identified by ultraviolet spectrum, HPLC, Lowry analysis and pharmacopocia-raleted methods. The specific immunological activity was examined by leukocyte adherence inhibition (LAI) in vitro and delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) in vivo. Anti-HBV EYE was a small dialyzable substance with molecular weight less than 12 kD containing 18 kinds of amino acids. The preparation could obviously inhibit LAI and DTH which was similar to hepatitis B virus-specific transfer factor of pig spleen. However, there were no similar effects observed in the nonspecific transfer factor (NTF) group, control egg yolk extraction (CEYE) group and hepatitis A virus (HAV) group. The results suggested that anti-HBV EYE contained hepatitis B virus-specific transfer factor (STF) and had the antigen-specific cell immune activity similar to PSHBV-TF. The STF obtained from egg yolk of the hens immunized with specific antigen, might be a potential candidate for immunoregulation in hepatitis B prevention and treatment.

  8. Chronic HBV infection in pregnant immigrants: a multicenter study of the Italian Society of Infectious and Tropical Diseases.

    PubMed

    Sagnelli, Evangelista; Taliani, Gloria; Castelli, Francesco; Bartolozzi, Dario; Cacopardo, Bruno; Armignacco, Orlando; Scotto, Gaetano; Coppola, Nicola; Stroffolini, Tommaso; Sagnelli, Caterina

    2016-04-01

    The aims of the study were to estimate the clinical impact of HBV infection in pregnant immigrants and their family members and to identify a useful approach to managing the healthcare of HBsAg-positive immigrants. Included in this study were 143 HBsAg-positive pregnant immigrants of the 1,970 from countries with intermediate/high HBV endemicity who delivered in 8 Italian hospitals in 2012-2013. In addition, 172 family members of 96 HBsAg-positive pregnant immigrants were tested for serum HBsAg. The median age of the 143 HBsAg-positive pregnant immigrants was 31.0±12.1 years and the length of stay in Italy 5.0±4.1 years; 56.5% were unaware of their HBsAg positivity. HBV DNA was detected in 74.5% of the pregnant immigrants, i.e., 94.3% from Eastern Europe, 72.2% from East Asia and 58.1% from Sub-Saharan Africa. HBV DNA ≥2000 IU/mL was detected in 47.8% of pregnant immigrants, associated with ALT ≥1.5 times the upper normal value in 15% of cases. Anti-HDV was detected in 10% of cases. HBsAg was detected in 31.3% of the 172 family members. All HBsAg-positive immigrants received counseling on HBV infection and its prevention, and underwent a complete clinical evaluation. The findings validate the approach used for the healthcare management of the HBsAg-positive immigrant population. PMID:27196549

  9. Chronic HBV infection in pregnant immigrants: a multicenter study of the Italian Society of Infectious and Tropical Diseases.

    PubMed

    Sagnelli, Evangelista; Taliani, Gloria; Castelli, Francesco; Bartolozzi, Dario; Cacopardo, Bruno; Armignacco, Orlando; Scotto, Gaetano; Coppola, Nicola; Stroffolini, Tommaso; Sagnelli, Caterina

    2016-04-01

    The aims of the study were to estimate the clinical impact of HBV infection in pregnant immigrants and their family members and to identify a useful approach to managing the healthcare of HBsAg-positive immigrants. Included in this study were 143 HBsAg-positive pregnant immigrants of the 1,970 from countries with intermediate/high HBV endemicity who delivered in 8 Italian hospitals in 2012-2013. In addition, 172 family members of 96 HBsAg-positive pregnant immigrants were tested for serum HBsAg. The median age of the 143 HBsAg-positive pregnant immigrants was 31.0±12.1 years and the length of stay in Italy 5.0±4.1 years; 56.5% were unaware of their HBsAg positivity. HBV DNA was detected in 74.5% of the pregnant immigrants, i.e., 94.3% from Eastern Europe, 72.2% from East Asia and 58.1% from Sub-Saharan Africa. HBV DNA ≥2000 IU/mL was detected in 47.8% of pregnant immigrants, associated with ALT ≥1.5 times the upper normal value in 15% of cases. Anti-HDV was detected in 10% of cases. HBsAg was detected in 31.3% of the 172 family members. All HBsAg-positive immigrants received counseling on HBV infection and its prevention, and underwent a complete clinical evaluation. The findings validate the approach used for the healthcare management of the HBsAg-positive immigrant population.

  10. Lower than expected hepatitis B virus infection prevalence among first generation Koreans in the U.S.: results of HBV screening in the Southern California Inland Empire

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is prevalent in Asian immigrants in the USA. California’s Inland Empire region has a population of approximately four million, including an estimated 19,000 first generation Koreans. Our aim was to screen these adult individuals to establish HBV serological diagnoses, educate, and establish linkage to care. Methods A community-based program was conducted in Korean churches from 11/2009 to 2/2010. Subjects were asked to complete a HBV background related questionnaire, provided with HBV education, and tested for serum HBsAg, HBsAb and HBcAb. HBsAg positive subjects were tested for HBV quantitative DNA, HBeAg and HBeAb, counseled and directed to healthcare providers. Subjects unexposed to HBV were invited to attend a HBV vaccination clinic. Results A total of 973 first generation Koreans were screened, aged 52.3y (18-93y), M/F: 384/589. Most (75%) had a higher than high school education and were from Seoul (62.2%). By questionnaire, 24.7% stated they had been vaccinated against HBV. The serological diagnoses were: HBV infected (3.0%), immune due to natural infection (35.7%), susceptible (20.1%), immune due to vaccination (40.3%), and other (0.9%). Men had a higher infection prevalence (4.9% vs. 1.7%, p = 0.004) and a lower vaccination rate (34.6% vs. 44.0%, p = 0.004) compared to women. Self-reports of immunization status were incorrect for 35.1% of subjects. Conclusions This large screening study in first generation Koreans in Southern California demonstrates: 1) a lower than expected HBV prevalence (3%), 2) a continued need for vaccination, and 3) a need for screening despite a reported history of vaccination. PMID:24884673

  11. Sorafenib Combined With Transarterial Chemoembolization in Treating HBV-infected Patients With Intermediate Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-04-24

    PHENYTOIN/SORAFENIB [VA Drug Interaction]; Liver Neoplasms; Carcinoma, Hepatocellular; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Liver Diseases; Adenocarcinoma; Carcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; DOXORUBICIN/TRASTUZUMAB [VA Drug Interaction]; HBV

  12. Relationship Between Hepatic Steatosis and the Elevation of Aminotransferases in HBV-Infected Patients With HBe-Antigen Negativity and a Low Viral Load

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, Hirayuki; Aizawa, Nobuhiro; Nishikawa, Hiroki; Ikeda, Naoto; Sakai, Yoshiyuki; Takata, Ryo; Hasegawa, Kunihiro; Nakano, Chikage; Nishimura, Takashi; Yoh, Kazunori; Ishii, Akio; Takashima, Tomoyuki; Iwata, Yoshinori; Iijima, Hiroko; Nishiguchi, Shuhei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease has been suggested to be associated with alanine aminotransferase (ALT) elevation in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected patients with HBe antigen (HBeAg)-negativity and a low HBV-DNA level. However, few studies have evaluated the association according to histological findings of the liver. Among a total of 198 HBV-infected patients who received a percutaneous liver biopsy, we studied the histological and laboratory findings of HBeAg-negative patients without receiving nucleoside/nucleotide analogues treatment (N = 70) in order to evaluate whether hepatic steatosis and its related metabolic disorders were associated with an elevation in ALT levels in HBeAg-negative patients. In HBeAg-negative patients with a high serum HBV-DNA level (≥2000 IU/mL), the level of HBV-DNA was the only significant factor related to ALT elevation. However, in HBeAg-negative patients with a low HBV-DNA level, the serum ferritin level, and histologically observed hepatic steatosis were significantly associated factors with ALT elevation. When we evaluated 2 metabolic variables (serum ferritin and fasting insulin) that are suggested to be relevant to the presence of progressive disease in Japanese patients, we found that the rate of metabolic disorders was significantly higher among patients with a high ALT level and a low HBV-DNA level than it was among those with other conditions. The triglyceride level and the frequency of moderate or severe hepatic steatosis were significantly higher in patients with a low HBV-DNA level than in those with a high HBV-DNA level. Histologically proven hepatic steatosis and its related metabolic disorders are suggested to be involved in the elevation of aminotransferases of HBeAg-negative patients, particularly those with low HBV-DNA levels. PMID:27124068

  13. Inactivated ORF virus shows antifibrotic activity and inhibits human hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication in preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Daniela; Urban, Andreas; Knorr, Andreas; Hirth-Dietrich, Claudia; Siegling, Angela; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Mercer, Andrew A; Limmer, Andreas; Schumak, Beatrix; Knolle, Percy; Ruebsamen-Schaeff, Helga; Weber, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Inactivated orf virus (iORFV), strain D1701, is a potent immune modulator in various animal species. We recently demonstrated that iORFV induces strong antiviral activity in animal models of acute and chronic viral infections. In addition, we found D1701-mediated antifibrotic effects in different rat models of liver fibrosis. In the present study, we compare iORFV derived from two different strains of ORFV, D1701 and NZ2, respectively, with respect to their antifibrotic potential as well as their potential to induce an antiviral response controlling infections with the hepatotropic pathogens hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). Both strains of ORFV showed anti-viral activity against HCV in vitro and against HBV in a transgenic mouse model without signs of necro-inflammation in vivo. Our experiments suggest that the absence of liver damage is potentially mediated by iORFV-induced downregulation of antigen cross-presentation in liver sinus endothelial cells. Furthermore, both strains showed significant anti-fibrotic activity in rat models of liver fibrosis. iORFV strain NZ2 appeared more potent compared to strain D1701 with respect to both its antiviral and antifibrotic activity on the basis of dosages estimated by titration of active virus. These results show a potential therapeutic approach against two important human liver pathogens HBV and HCV that independently addresses concomitant liver fibrosis. Further studies are required to characterize the details of the mechanisms involved in this novel therapeutic principle.

  14. Recognition of core-derived epitopes from a novel HBV-targeted immunotherapeutic by T-cells from patients infected by different viral genotypes.

    PubMed

    Godon, Ophelie; Evlachev, Alexei; Bourgine, Maryline; Meritet, Jean-François; Martin, Perrine; Inchauspe, Genevieve; Michel, Marie-Louise

    2015-08-26

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infects millions of people worldwide and is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Current therapies based on nucleos(t)ide analogs or pegylated-interferon-α lead to control of viral replication in most patients but rarely achieve cure. A potential strategy to control chronic hepatitis B is to restore or induce functional anti-HBV T-cell immune responses using HBV-specific immunotherapeutics. However, viral diversity is a challenge to the development of this class of products as HBV genotypes display a sequence diversity of up to 8%. We have developed a novel HBV-targeted immunotherapeutic, TG1050, based on a non-replicative Adenovirus vector encoding a unique and large fusion protein composed of multiple antigenic regions derived from a HBV genotype D sequence. Using peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 23 patients chronically infected by five distinct genotypes (gt A, B, C, D and E) and various sets of peptides encompassing conserved versus divergent regions of HBV core we have measured ability of TG1050 genotype D core-derived peptides to be recognized by T-cells from patients infected by various genotypes. Overall, PBMCs from 78% of genotype B or C- and 100% genotype A or E-infected patients lead to detection of HBV core-specific T-cells recognizing genotype D antigenic domains located both in conserved and variable regions. This proof-of-concept study supports the clinical development of TG1050 in large patient populations independently of infecting genotypes.

  15. Seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis infections among blood donors at Gondar University Teaching Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia: declining trends over a period of five years

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Transfusion-transmissible infectious agents such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and syphilis are among the greatest threats to blood safety for the recipient. This study aimed to determine the seroprevalence, risk factors and trends of HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis infections among blood donors over a period of five years at Gondar University Teaching Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. Methods A retrospective analysis of consecutive blood donors' records covering the period between January 2003 and December 2007 was conducted. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine risk factors associated with HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis infections. Results From the total of 6361 consecutive blood donors, 607 (9.5%) had serological evidence of infection with at least one pathogen and 50 (0.8%) had multiple infections. The overall seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis was 3.8%, 4.7%, 0.7%, and 1.3% respectively. Among those with multiple infections, the most common combinations were HIV - syphilis 19 (38%) and HIV - HBV 17 (34%). The seropositivity of HIV was significantly increased among female blood donors, first time donors, housewives, merchants, soldiers, drivers and construction workers. Significantly increased HBV seropositivity was observed among farmers, first time donors and age groups of 26 - 35 and 36 - 45 years. Similarly, the seroprevalence of syphilis was significantly increased among daily labourers and construction workers. Statistically significant association was observed between syphilis and HIV infections, and HCV and HIV infections. Moreover, significantly declining trends of HIV, HCV and syphilis seropositivity were observed over the study period. Conclusions A substantial percentage of the blood donors harbour HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis infections. Strict selection of blood donors and comprehensive screening of donors' blood using standard methods are highly recommended to ensure

  16. HIV, HBV, and HCV infections among drug-involved, inner-city, street sex workers in Miami, Florida.

    PubMed

    Inciardi, James A; Surratt, Hilary L; Kurtz, Steven P

    2006-03-01

    This study describes the rates of HIV, HBV, and HCV seropositivity among drug-involved, female street sex workers in low-income, inner-city sections of Miami, Florida; further, their sociodemographic characteristics, drug use, and sexual risk behaviors were assessed; and predictors of infection were reported. A sample of 586 sex workers was recruited through targeted sampling methods, interviewed, and counseled and tested for the presence of antibody to HIV, HBV, and HCV. Respondents' median age was 38 years, median time in sex work was 14 years, all were heavily involved in the use of alcohol and drugs, and 42% were homeless. More than half (51.0%) had engaged in unprotected vaginal sex in the past month. Prevalences were HIV, 22.4%; HBV, 53.4%; HCV, 29.7%. A multidimensional public health program must address not only issues related to unsafe sex, but also the problems of drug abuse, homelessness, and other lifestyle factors that contribute to risk behaviors. PMID:16378168

  17. The impact of HBV or HCV infection in a cohort of HIV-infected pregnant women receiving a nevirapine-based antiretroviral regimen in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Coinfection with the hepatitis viruses is common in the HIV population in sub-Saharan Africa. The aim of this study was to assess, in a cohort of HIV-infected pregnant women receiving antiretroviral drugs (ARVs), the prevalence of HBV and HCV infections and to determine the impact of these infections on the occurrence of liver toxicity and on the viro-immunological response. Methods Women were screened for HBsAg and HCV-RNA before starting, at week 25 of gestational age, an antiretroviral regimen consisting of lamivudine and nevirapine plus either stavudine or zidovudine. Women with CD4+ < 350/mm3 continued ARVs indefinitely, while the other women interrupted treatment 6 months postpartum (end of breastfeeding period). Both groups were followed for 2 years after delivery. Liver function was monitored by alanine aminotransferase (ALT) measurement. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to identify factors associated with the emergence of liver toxicity. Results A total of 28 women out of the 309 enrolled in the study (9.1%) were coinfected with HBV (n. 27), or HCV (n. 1). During follow-up 125 women (40.4%) developed a grade ≥ 1 ALT elevation, 28 (9.1%) a grade ≥ 2 and 6 (1.9%) an elevation defining grade 3 toxicity. In a multivariate model including age, baseline CD4+ count and hemoglobin level, the presence of either HBV or HCV infection was significantly associated with the development of an ALT increase of any grade (P = 0.035). Moderate or severe liver laboratory toxicity (grade ≥ 2) was more frequent among women with baseline CD4+ > 250/mm3 (P = 0.030). In HBV-infected women a baseline HBV-DNA level above 10,000 IU/ml was significantly associated to the development of liver toxicity of grade ≥ 1 (P = 0.040). Coinfections had no impact on the immunological and virological response to antiretroviral drugs up to 2 years after delivery. Conclusions In this cohort of nevirapine-treated women the presence of

  18. Rather than Rs1800796 polymorphism, expression of interleukin-6 is associated with disease progression of chronic HBV infection in a Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shengli; Liu, Zhisu; Zhang, Yongxi; He, Yueming; Pan, Dingyu; Liu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Quanyan; Zhang, Zhonglin; Yuan, Yufeng

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-6 plays an important role in chronic inflammation as well as tumor growth and progression. Here, a case-control study was undertaken to investigate the association of rs1800796 polymorphism of IL-6 gene and serum levels with disease progression of chronic HBV infection. Rs1800796 polymorphism was genotyped in 641 Chinese Han patients with chronic HBV infection, including 23 IT, 25 IC, 292 CHB, 153 LC, and 148 HCC patients and 265 healthy controls. Serum IL-6 levels were measured in 23 IT, 25 IC, 47 CHB, 41 LC, and 49 HCC patients and 45 healthy controls, and the classifications of HCC were accorded to BCLC staging system. We found no significant association between rs1800796 polymorphism and disease progression of chronic HBV infection; however, serum IL-6 levels showed significant statistical differences between patients with CHB, LC, and HCC. Moreover, statistical differences can be observed in patients with terminal stage HCC compared with those of early to intermediate or advanced stage HCC. Our findings suggest that rs1800796 polymorphism unlikely contribute significantly to affect the progression of chronic HBV infection, and serum IL-6 levels can act as a useful indicator for disease progression and severity of chronic HBV infection.

  19. Pegylated Interferon α-2a Triggers NK-Cell Functionality and Specific T-Cell Responses in Patients with Chronic HBV Infection without HBsAg Seroconversion.

    PubMed

    Bruder Costa, Juliana; Dufeu-Duchesne, Tania; Leroy, Vincent; Bertucci, Inga; Bouvier-Alias, Magali; Pouget, Noelle; Brevot-Lutton, Ophelie; Bourliere, Marc; Zoulim, Fabien; Plumas, Joel; Aspord, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Pegylated interferon α-2a (Peg-IFN-α) represents a therapeutic alternative to the prolonged use of nucleos(t)ide analog (NA) in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection. The mechanisms leading to a positive clinical outcome remain unclear. As immune responses are critical for virus control, we investigated the effects of Peg-IFN-α on both innate and adaptive immunity, and related it to the clinical evolution. The phenotypic and functional features of the dendritic cells (DCs), natural killer (NK) cells and HBV-specific CD4/CD8 T cells were analyzed in HBeAg-negative CHB patients treated for 48-weeks with NA alone or together with Peg-IFN-α, before, during and up to 2-years after therapy. Peg-IFN-α induced an early activation of DCs, a potent expansion of the CD56bright NK subset, and enhanced the activation and functionality of the CD56dim NK subset. Peg-IFN-α triggered an increase in the frequencies of Th1- and Th17-oriented HBV-specific CD4/CD8 T cells. Peg-IFN-α reversed the unresponsiveness of patients to a specific stimulation. Most of the parameters returned to baseline after the stop of Peg-IFN-α therapy. Peg-IFN-α impacts both innate and adaptive immunity, overcoming dysfunctional immune responses in CHB patients. These modulations were not associated with seroconversion, which questioned the benefit of the add-on Peg-IFN-α treatment. PMID:27348813

  20. Pegylated Interferon α-2a Triggers NK-Cell Functionality and Specific T-Cell Responses in Patients with Chronic HBV Infection without HBsAg Seroconversion

    PubMed Central

    Bruder Costa, Juliana; Dufeu-Duchesne, Tania; Leroy, Vincent; Bertucci, Inga; Bouvier-Alias, Magali; Pouget, Noelle; Brevot-Lutton, Ophelie; Bourliere, Marc; Zoulim, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    Pegylated interferon α-2a (Peg-IFN-α) represents a therapeutic alternative to the prolonged use of nucleos(t)ide analog (NA) in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection. The mechanisms leading to a positive clinical outcome remain unclear. As immune responses are critical for virus control, we investigated the effects of Peg-IFN-α on both innate and adaptive immunity, and related it to the clinical evolution. The phenotypic and functional features of the dendritic cells (DCs), natural killer (NK) cells and HBV-specific CD4/CD8 T cells were analyzed in HBeAg-negative CHB patients treated for 48-weeks with NA alone or together with Peg-IFN-α, before, during and up to 2-years after therapy. Peg-IFN-α induced an early activation of DCs, a potent expansion of the CD56bright NK subset, and enhanced the activation and functionality of the CD56dim NK subset. Peg-IFN-α triggered an increase in the frequencies of Th1- and Th17-oriented HBV-specific CD4/CD8 T cells. Peg-IFN-α reversed the unresponsiveness of patients to a specific stimulation. Most of the parameters returned to baseline after the stop of Peg-IFN-α therapy. Peg-IFN-α impacts both innate and adaptive immunity, overcoming dysfunctional immune responses in CHB patients. These modulations were not associated with seroconversion, which questioned the benefit of the add-on Peg-IFN-α treatment. PMID:27348813

  1. Interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α trigger restriction of hepatitis B virus infection via a cytidine deaminase activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID).

    PubMed

    Watashi, Koichi; Liang, Guoxin; Iwamoto, Masashi; Marusawa, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Nanako; Daito, Takuji; Kitamura, Kouichi; Muramatsu, Masamichi; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Kiyohara, Tomoko; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Li, Jisu; Tong, Shuping; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Murata, Kazumoto; Aizaki, Hideki; Wakita, Takaji

    2013-11-01

    Virus infection is restricted by intracellular immune responses in host cells, and this is typically modulated by stimulation of cytokines. The cytokines and host factors that determine the host cell restriction against hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection are not well understood. We screened 36 cytokines and chemokines to determine which were able to reduce the susceptibility of HepaRG cells to HBV infection. Here, we found that pretreatment with IL-1β and TNFα remarkably reduced the host cell susceptibility to HBV infection. This effect was mediated by activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. A cytidine deaminase, activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), was up-regulated by both IL-1β and TNFα in a variety of hepatocyte cell lines and primary human hepatocytes. Another deaminase APOBEC3G was not induced by these proinflammatory cytokines. Knockdown of AID expression impaired the anti-HBV effect of IL-1β, and overexpression of AID antagonized HBV infection, suggesting that AID was one of the responsible factors for the anti-HBV activity of IL-1/TNFα. Although AID induced hypermutation of HBV DNA, this activity was dispensable for the anti-HBV activity. The antiviral effect of IL-1/TNFα was also observed on different HBV genotypes but not on hepatitis C virus. These results demonstrate that proinflammatory cytokines IL-1/TNFα trigger a novel antiviral mechanism involving AID to regulate host cell permissiveness to HBV infection.

  2. Interleukin-1 and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Trigger Restriction of Hepatitis B Virus Infection via a Cytidine Deaminase Activation-induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID)*

    PubMed Central

    Watashi, Koichi; Liang, Guoxin; Iwamoto, Masashi; Marusawa, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Nanako; Daito, Takuji; Kitamura, Kouichi; Muramatsu, Masamichi; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Kiyohara, Tomoko; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Li, Jisu; Tong, Shuping; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Murata, Kazumoto; Aizaki, Hideki; Wakita, Takaji

    2013-01-01

    Virus infection is restricted by intracellular immune responses in host cells, and this is typically modulated by stimulation of cytokines. The cytokines and host factors that determine the host cell restriction against hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection are not well understood. We screened 36 cytokines and chemokines to determine which were able to reduce the susceptibility of HepaRG cells to HBV infection. Here, we found that pretreatment with IL-1β and TNFα remarkably reduced the host cell susceptibility to HBV infection. This effect was mediated by activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. A cytidine deaminase, activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), was up-regulated by both IL-1β and TNFα in a variety of hepatocyte cell lines and primary human hepatocytes. Another deaminase APOBEC3G was not induced by these proinflammatory cytokines. Knockdown of AID expression impaired the anti-HBV effect of IL-1β, and overexpression of AID antagonized HBV infection, suggesting that AID was one of the responsible factors for the anti-HBV activity of IL-1/TNFα. Although AID induced hypermutation of HBV DNA, this activity was dispensable for the anti-HBV activity. The antiviral effect of IL-1/TNFα was also observed on different HBV genotypes but not on hepatitis C virus. These results demonstrate that proinflammatory cytokines IL-1/TNFα trigger a novel antiviral mechanism involving AID to regulate host cell permissiveness to HBV infection. PMID:24025329

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of torque teno virus genome from Pakistani isolate and incidence of co-infection among HBV/HCV infected patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Torque Teno Virus (TTV) was the first single stranded circular DNA virus to be discovered that infects humans. Although there have been numerous reports regarding the prevalence of TTV from other countries of South Asia, there is severe lack of information regarding its prevalence in Pakistan. Thus the present study compiles the first indigenous report to comprehensively illustrate the incidence of the virus in uninfected and hepatitis infected population from Pakistan. Another aim of the study was to present the sequence of full length TTV genome from a local isolate and compare it with the already reported genome sequences from other parts of the world. Methods TTV DNA was screened in the serum of 116, 100 and 40 HBV infected, HCV infected and uninfected individuals respectively. Nearly full length genome of TTV was cloned from a HBV patient. The genome sequence was subjected to in-silico analysis using CLC Workbench, ClustalW, ClustalX and TreeView. Statistical analysis was carried out in SPSS v17.0. Results Our results report that 89.7%, 90.0% and 92.5% of HBV, HCV patients and healthy control population were positive for TTV infection. TTV genome of 3603 bp was also cloned from a local isolate and given the identity of TPK01. The TTV genome sequence mentioned in this paper is submitted in the GenBank/EMBL/DDBJ under the accession number JN980171. Phylogenetic analysis of TPK01 revealed that the Pakistani isolate has sequence similarities with genotype 23 and 22 (Genogroup 2). Conclusion The results of the current study indicate that the high frequency of TTV viremia in Pakistan conforms to the reports from other areas of the world, wherever screening of TTV DNA was performed against 5′-UTR of the genome. The high sequence diversity among TTV genome sequences and the high frequency of prevalence makes it harder to study this virus in cellular systems. PMID:23270330

  4. HIV-1, HBV, HCV, HTLV, HPV-16/18, and Treponema pallidum Infections in a Sample of Brazilian Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Caroline C.; Georg, Ingebourg; Lampe, Elisabeth; Lewis, Lia; Morgado, Mariza G.; Nicol, Alcina F.; Pinho, Adriana A.; Salles, Regina C. S.; Teixeira, Sylvia L. M.; Vicente, Ana Carolina P.; Viscidi, Raphael P.; Gomes, Selma A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Men who have sex with men (MSM) are more vulnerable to blood-borne infections and/or sexually-transmitted infections (STI). This study was conducted to estimate the prevalences of mono and co-infections of HIV-1 and other blood-borne/STIs in a sample of MSM in Campinas, Brazil. Methods Responding Driven Sampling (RDS) was used for recruitment of MSM. Serum samples collected from 558 MSM were analyzed for the presence of serological markers for HIV-1, HBV, HCV, HTLV, HPV-16/18, and T. pallidum infections. Results The highest prevalences of infection in serum samples were found for HPV-16 and 18 (31.9% and 20.3%, respectively). Approximately 8% of the study population showed infection with HIV-1, and within that group, 27.5% had recently become infected with HIV-1. HBV infection and syphilis were detected in 11.4% and 10% of the study population, respectively, and the rates of HTLV and HCV infection were 1.5% and 1%, respectively. With the exception of HTLV, all other studied infections were usually found as co-infections rather then mono-infections. The rates of co-infection for HCV, HPV-18, and HIV-1 were the highest among the studied infections (100%, 83%, and 85%, respectively). Interestingly, HTLV infection was usually found as a mono-infection in the study group, whereas HCV was found only as a co-infection. Conclusions The present findings highlight the need to educate the MSM population concerning their risk for STIs infections and methods of prevention. Campaigns to encourage vaccination against HBV and HPV could decrease the rates of these infections in MSM. PMID:25083768

  5. Association of an HLA-G 14-bp Insertion/Deletion polymorphism with high HBV replication in chronic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Laaribi, A B; Zidi, I; Hannachi, N; Ben Yahia, H; Chaouch, H; Bortolotti, D; Zidi, N; Letaief, A; Yacoub, S; Boudabous, A; Rizzo, R; Boukadida, J

    2015-10-01

    Identification of an HLA-G 14-bp Insertion/Deletion (Ins/Del) polymorphism at the 3' untranslated region of HLA-G revealed its importance in HLA-G mRNA stability and HLA-G protein level variation. We evaluated the association between the HLA-G 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism in patients with chronic Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in a case-control study. Genomic DNA was extracted from 263 patients with chronic HBV hepatitis and 246 control subjects and was examined for the HLA-G 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism by PCR. The polymorphic variants were genotyped in chronic HBV seropositive cases stratified according to HBV DNA levels, fibrosis stages and in a control population. There was no statistical significant association between the 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism and increased susceptibility to HBV infection neither for alleles (P = 0.09) nor for genotypes (P = 0.18). The stratification of HBV patients based on HBV DNA levels revealed an association between the 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism and an enhanced HBV activity with high HBV DNA levels. In particular, the Ins allele was significantly associated with high HBV DNA levels (P = 0.0024, OR = 1.71, 95% CI 1.2-2.4). The genotype Ins/Ins was associated with a 2.5-fold (95% CI, 1.29-4.88) increased risk of susceptibility to high HBV replication compared with the Del/Del and Ins/Del genotypes. This susceptibility is linked to the presence of two Ins alleles. No association was observed between the 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism and fibrosis stage of HBV infection. We observed an association between the 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism and high HBV replication characterized by high HBV DNA levels in chronic HBV patients. These results suggest a potential prognostic value for disease outcome evaluation.

  6. Association of an HLA-G 14-bp Insertion/Deletion polymorphism with high HBV replication in chronic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Laaribi, A B; Zidi, I; Hannachi, N; Ben Yahia, H; Chaouch, H; Bortolotti, D; Zidi, N; Letaief, A; Yacoub, S; Boudabous, A; Rizzo, R; Boukadida, J

    2015-10-01

    Identification of an HLA-G 14-bp Insertion/Deletion (Ins/Del) polymorphism at the 3' untranslated region of HLA-G revealed its importance in HLA-G mRNA stability and HLA-G protein level variation. We evaluated the association between the HLA-G 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism in patients with chronic Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in a case-control study. Genomic DNA was extracted from 263 patients with chronic HBV hepatitis and 246 control subjects and was examined for the HLA-G 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism by PCR. The polymorphic variants were genotyped in chronic HBV seropositive cases stratified according to HBV DNA levels, fibrosis stages and in a control population. There was no statistical significant association between the 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism and increased susceptibility to HBV infection neither for alleles (P = 0.09) nor for genotypes (P = 0.18). The stratification of HBV patients based on HBV DNA levels revealed an association between the 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism and an enhanced HBV activity with high HBV DNA levels. In particular, the Ins allele was significantly associated with high HBV DNA levels (P = 0.0024, OR = 1.71, 95% CI 1.2-2.4). The genotype Ins/Ins was associated with a 2.5-fold (95% CI, 1.29-4.88) increased risk of susceptibility to high HBV replication compared with the Del/Del and Ins/Del genotypes. This susceptibility is linked to the presence of two Ins alleles. No association was observed between the 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism and fibrosis stage of HBV infection. We observed an association between the 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism and high HBV replication characterized by high HBV DNA levels in chronic HBV patients. These results suggest a potential prognostic value for disease outcome evaluation. PMID:25619305

  7. Mushroom lectin enhanced immunogenicity of HBV DNA vaccine in C57BL/6 and HBsAg-transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenjuan; Sun, Yuhan; Chen, Shiwen; Zhang, Jingyao; Kang, Jingjing; Wang, Yongqiang; Wang, Hexiang; Xia, Guoliang; Liu, Qinghong; Kang, Youmin

    2013-04-26

    DNA vaccination is a promising strategy for activating immune responses against hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. However, the accumulated data have shown that DNA vaccination alone generates weak immune responses. To enhance the immunogenicity of HBV DNA vaccine, lectin purified from pleurotus ostreatus (POL) was used as adjuvant of HBV DNA vaccine for C57BL/6 and HBV surface antigen transgenic (HBVsAg-Tg) mice. Our data demonstrate that low dose of POL (1 μg/mouse) in conjunction with HBV DNA vaccine stimulated stronger HBV-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses and higher HBV-specific IgG level than that in high dose of POL groups (5 μg/mouse and 10 μg/mouse). POL activated strong Th2 and Tc1 cell responses in immunized C57BL/6 and HBVsAg-Tg mice. POL as adjuvant of HBV DNA vaccine effectively enhanced HBV surface protein antibody (HBVsAb) and decreased HBVsAg level for HBV Tg mice treatment. Furthermore, POL infiltrated more lymphocytes excluding Th1, Th2 and Tc1 cell subtypes to liver of HBVsAg-Tg mice. Together, these results suggest that POL as adjuvant enhanced immunogenicity of HBV DNA vaccination and effectively stimulated immune reaponse for HBsAg-Tg mice treatment. Our findings implicate the potential of mushroom lectin as adjuvant of HBV DNA vaccine.

  8. Liver Fibrosis Regression Measured by Transient Elastography in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)-Coinfected Individuals on Long-Term HBV-Active Combination Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Audsley, Jennifer; Robson, Christopher; Aitchison, Stacey; Matthews, Gail V; Iser, David; Sasadeusz, Joe; Lewin, Sharon R

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Advanced fibrosis occurs more commonly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfected individuals; therefore, fibrosis monitoring is important in this population. However, transient elastography (TE) data in HIV-HBV coinfection are lacking. We aimed to assess liver fibrosis using TE in a cross-sectional study of HIV-HBV coinfected individuals receiving combination HBV-active (lamivudine and/or tenofovir/tenofovir-emtricitabine) antiretroviral therapy, identify factors associated with advanced fibrosis, and examine change in fibrosis in those with >1 TE assessment. Methods.  We assessed liver fibrosis in 70 HIV-HBV coinfected individuals on HBV-active combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Change in fibrosis over time was examined in a subset with more than 1 TE result (n = 49). Clinical and laboratory variables at the time of the first TE were collected, and associations with advanced fibrosis (≥F3, Metavir scoring system) and fibrosis regression (of least 1 stage) were examined. Results.  The majority of the cohort (64%) had mild to moderate fibrosis at the time of the first TE, and we identified alanine transaminase, platelets, and detectable HIV ribonucleic acid as associated with advanced liver fibrosis. Alanine transaminase and platelets remained independently advanced in multivariate modeling. More than 28% of those with >1 TE subsequently showed liver fibrosis regression, and higher baseline HBV deoxyribonucleic acid was associated with regression. Prevalence of advanced fibrosis (≥F3) decreased 12.3% (32.7%-20.4%) over a median of 31 months. Conclusions.  The observed fibrosis regression in this group supports the beneficial effects of cART on liver stiffness. It would be important to study a larger group of individuals with more advanced fibrosis to more definitively assess factors associated with liver fibrosis regression.

  9. Drug delivery systems and liver targeting for the improved pharmacotherapy of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection.

    PubMed

    Cuestas, María L; Mathet, Verónica L; Oubiña, José R; Sosnik, Alejandro

    2010-07-01

    In spite of the progress made in vaccine and antiviral therapy development, hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is still the most common cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, with more than 400 million people chronically infected worldwide. Antiviral therapy with nucleos(t)ide analogues and/or immunomodulating peptides is the only option to control and prevent the progression of the disease in chronic hepatitis B (CHB)-infected patients. So far, the current antiviral monotherapy remains unsatisfactory because of the low efficacy and the development of drug resistance mutants. Moreover, viral rebound is frequently observed following therapy cessation, since covalent closed circular DNA (cccDNA) is not removed from hepatocytes by antiviral therapy. First, this review describes the current pharmacotherapy for the management of CHB and the new drug candidates being investigated. Then, the challenges in the development of drug delivery systems for the targeting of antiviral drugs to the liver parenchyma are discussed. Finally, perspectives in the design of a more efficient pharmacotherapy to eradicate the virus from the host are addressed.

  10. Drug delivery systems and liver targeting for the improved pharmacotherapy of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection.

    PubMed

    Cuestas, María L; Mathet, Verónica L; Oubiña, José R; Sosnik, Alejandro

    2010-07-01

    In spite of the progress made in vaccine and antiviral therapy development, hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is still the most common cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, with more than 400 million people chronically infected worldwide. Antiviral therapy with nucleos(t)ide analogues and/or immunomodulating peptides is the only option to control and prevent the progression of the disease in chronic hepatitis B (CHB)-infected patients. So far, the current antiviral monotherapy remains unsatisfactory because of the low efficacy and the development of drug resistance mutants. Moreover, viral rebound is frequently observed following therapy cessation, since covalent closed circular DNA (cccDNA) is not removed from hepatocytes by antiviral therapy. First, this review describes the current pharmacotherapy for the management of CHB and the new drug candidates being investigated. Then, the challenges in the development of drug delivery systems for the targeting of antiviral drugs to the liver parenchyma are discussed. Finally, perspectives in the design of a more efficient pharmacotherapy to eradicate the virus from the host are addressed. PMID:20333454

  11. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) X protein-mediated regulation of hepatocyte metabolic pathways affects viral replication.

    PubMed

    Bagga, Sumedha; Rawat, Siddhartha; Ajenjo, Marcia; Bouchard, Michael J

    2016-11-01

    Chronic HBV infection is a risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The HBV HBx protein stimulates HBV replication and likely influences the development of HBV-associated HCC. Whether HBx affects regulators of metabolism in normal hepatocytes has not been addressed. We used an ex vivo, cultured primary rat hepatocyte system to assess the interplay between HBV replication and mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. HBx activated mTORC1 signaling; however, inhibition of mTORC1 enhanced HBV replication. HBx also decreased ATP levels and activated the energy-sensing factor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Inhibition of AMPK decreased HBV replication. Inhibition of AMPK activates mTORC1, and we showed that activated mTORC1 is one factor that reduces HBV replication when AMPK is inhibited. HBx activation of both AMPK and mTORC1 suggests that these activities could provide a balancing mechanism to facilitate persistent HBV replication. HBx activation of mTORC1 and AMPK could also influence HCC development.

  12. Anti-HBV Drugs: Progress, Unmet Needs, and New Hope

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Lei; Pan, Jiaqian; Wu, Jiaofen; Hu, Jiali; Sun, Qian; Tang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 240 million people worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), which represents a significant challenge to public health. The current goal in treating chronic HBV infection is to block progression of HBV-related liver injury and inflammation to end-stage liver diseases, including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, because we are unable to eliminate chronic HBV infection. Available therapies for chronic HBV infection mainly include nucleos/tide analogues (NAs), non-NAs, and immunomodulatory agents. However, none of them is able to clear chronic HBV infection. Thus, a new generation of anti-HBV drugs is urgently needed. Progress has been made in the development and testing of new therapeutics against chronic HBV infection. This review aims to summarize the state of the art in new HBV drug research and development and to forecast research and development trends and directions in the near future. PMID:26389937

  13. Anti-HBV Drugs: Progress, Unmet Needs, and New Hope.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lei; Pan, Jiaqian; Wu, Jiaofen; Hu, Jiali; Sun, Qian; Tang, Jing

    2015-09-15

    Approximately 240 million people worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), which represents a significant challenge to public health. The current goal in treating chronic HBV infection is to block progression of HBV-related liver injury and inflammation to end-stage liver diseases, including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, because we are unable to eliminate chronic HBV infection. Available therapies for chronic HBV infection mainly include nucleos/tide analogues (NAs), non-NAs, and immunomodulatory agents. However, none of them is able to clear chronic HBV infection. Thus, a new generation of anti-HBV drugs is urgently needed. Progress has been made in the development and testing of new therapeutics against chronic HBV infection. This review aims to summarize the state of the art in new HBV drug research and development and to forecast research and development trends and directions in the near future.

  14. TLR3 Plays Significant Roles against HBV-Associated HCC

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-lan; Xu, Yu-yin; Chen, Li; Wang, Gui-lan; Shen, Yin

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) is a pattern-recognizing receptor that is involved in immune signaling and plays a crucial role in survival by being able to recognize various viral components including double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). The role of TLR3 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections is not well understood. To investigate the ability of TLR3 in regulating HBV replication in HCC, 80 cases of human HCC were collected and their tissue microarray was made. In HCC cells, the expression and location of TLR3, hepatitis-associated virus, and interstitial immunoreactive cells were assayed with immunohistochemical staining. The apoptosis of tumor cells was also detected by TUNEL stain. Correlations between TLR3 expression and HBV infection, interstitial immunoreactive cells, and cells apoptosis in HCC were investigated. In addition, we explored whether TLR3 agonist dsRNA can inhibit HepG2.2.15 cells secreting HBV. We found that the cytoplasmic expression of TLR3 in HCC is positively related to HBsAg infection and HCC with cirrhosis and promotes interstitial immunoreactive cells infiltration and cancer cells apoptosis. In HepG2.2.15 cells, dsRNA inhibited the secretion of HBV and induced apoptosis. These results indicate that TLR3 signaling activity may be involved in immune responses against HBV in HCC. PMID:25983748

  15. Mapping of histone modifications in episomal HBV cccDNA uncovers an unusual chromatin organization amenable to epigenetic manipulation.

    PubMed

    Tropberger, Philipp; Mercier, Alexandre; Robinson, Margaret; Zhong, Weidong; Ganem, Don E; Holdorf, Meghan

    2015-10-20

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection affects 240 million people worldwide and is a major risk factor for liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma. Current antiviral therapy inhibits cytoplasmic HBV genomic replication, but is not curative because it does not directly affect nuclear HBV closed circular DNA (cccDNA), the genomic form that templates viral transcription and sustains viral persistence. Novel approaches that directly target cccDNA regulation would therefore be highly desirable. cccDNA is assembled with cellular histone proteins into chromatin, but little is known about the regulation of HBV chromatin by histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs). Here, using a new cccDNA ChIP-Seq approach, we report, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide maps of PTMs in cccDNA-containing chromatin from de novo infected HepG2 cells, primary human hepatocytes, and from HBV-infected liver tissue. We find high levels of PTMs associated with active transcription enriched at specific sites within the HBV genome and, surprisingly, very low levels of PTMs linked to transcriptional repression even at silent HBV promoters. We show that transcription and active PTMs in HBV chromatin are reduced by the activation of an innate immunity pathway, and that this effect can be recapitulated with a small molecule epigenetic modifying agent, opening the possibility that chromatin-based regulation of cccDNA transcription could be a new therapeutic approach to chronic HBV infection.

  16. The Diagnostic Accuracy and Clinical Utility of Three Noninvasive Models for Predicting Liver Fibrosis in Patients with HBV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiqiao; Wang, Gongsui; Kang, Kaifu; Wu, Guobiao; Wang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and clinical utility of the fibrosis index based on the four factors (FIB-4), aspartate aminotransferase -to-platelet ratio index (APRI), and aspartate aminotransferase–alanine aminotransferase ratio index (AAR) for predicting liver fibrosis in patients with HBV infection. Methods From January 2006 to December 2010,a total of 1543 consecutive chronic hepatitis B(CHB) patients who underwent liver biopsies were enrolled. FIB-4,APRI, and AAR were calculated.The areas under the receiver-operating characteristic curves (AUROCs) were calculated to assess the diagnostic accuracy of these models.The AUROCs of these models were compared by DeLong’s test.For further comparisons in different studies,the AUROCs were adjusted to conduct Adjusted AUROCs(ADjAUROCs) according to the prevalence of fibrosis stages using the difference between advanced and nonadvanced fibrosis (DANA). Results For prediction of significant fibrosis,severe fibrosis,and cirrhosis,the AUROCs of FIB-4 were 0.646(ADjAUROC 0.717),0.670(ADjAUROC 0.741), and 0.715(ADjAUROC 0.786) respectively;whereas it were 0.656(ADjAUROC 0.727),0.653(ADjAUROC 0.724) and 0.639(ADjAUROC 0.710) for APRI, 0.498(ADjAUROC 0.569),0.548(ADjAUROC 0.619) and 0.573(ADjAUROC 0.644) for AAR. The further comparisons demonstrated that there were no significant differences of AUROCs between FIB-4 and APRI in predicting significant and severe fibrosis(P > 0.05),while FIB-4 was superior to APRI in predicting cirrhosis(P < 0.001). Further subgroup analysis demonstrated that the diagnostic accuracy of FIB-4 and APRI in patients with normal alanine aminotransferase(ALT) were higher than that in patients with elevated ALT. Conclusions The results demonstrated that FIB-4 and APRI are useful for diagnosis of fibrosis. FIB-4 and APRI have similar diagnostic accuracy in predicting significant and severe fibrosis,while FIB-4 is superior to APRI in predicting cirrhosis. The clinical utility of FIB-4 and APRI

  17. HBX Protein-Induced Downregulation of microRNA-18a is Responsible for Upregulation of Connective Tissue Growth Factor in HBV Infection-Associated Hepatocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaomin; Zhang, Yingjian; Wang, Ping; Wang, Hongyun; Su, Huanhuan; Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Lamei

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was designed to improve our understanding of the role of miR-18a and its target (connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), which are mediators in HBX-induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Material/Methods We first investigated the expression of several candidate microRNAs (miRNAs) reported to have been aberrantly expressed between HepG2 and HepG2.2.15, which is characterized by stable HBV infection, while the CTGF is identified as a target of miR-18a. Furthermore, the expression of CTGF evaluated in HepG2 was transfected with HBX, while the HepG2.2.15 was transfected with miR-18a and CTGF siRNA. We examined the cell cycle at the same time. Results We found that the expression of miR-18a was abnormally reduced in the HBV-positive HCC tissue samples compared with HBV-negative HCC samples. Through the use of a luciferase reporter system, we also identified CTGF 3′UTR (1046–1052 bp) as the exact binding site for miR-18a. We also observed a clear increase in CTGF mRNA and protein expression levels in HBV-positive HCC human tissue samples in comparison with the HBV-negative controls, indicating a possible negatively associated relationship between miR-18a and CTGF. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of HBX overexpression on miR-18a and CTGF, as well as the viability and cell cycle status of HepG2 cells. In addition, we found that HBX introduction downregulated miR-18a, upregulated CTGF, elevated the viability, and promoted cell cycle progression. We transfected HepG2.2.15 with miR-18a mimics and CTGF siRNA, finding that upregulated miR-18a and downregulated CTGF suppress the viability and cause cell cycle arrest. Conclusions Our study shows the role of the CTGF gene as a target of miR-18a, and identifies the function of HBV/HBX/miR-18a/CTGF as a key signaling pathway mediating HBV infection-induced HCC. PMID:27421245

  18. Combinatorial RNA Interference Therapy Prevents Selection of Pre-existing HBV Variants in Human Liver Chimeric Mice.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yao-Ming; Sun, Cheng-Pu; Chou, Hui-Hsien; Wu, Tzu-Hui; Chen, Chun-Chi; Wu, Ping-Yi; Enya Chen, Yu-Chen; Bissig, Karl-Dimiter; Tao, Mi-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Selection of escape mutants with mutations within the target sequence could abolish the antiviral RNA interference activity. Here, we investigated the impact of a pre-existing shRNA-resistant HBV variant on the efficacy of shRNA therapy. We previously identified a highly potent shRNA, S1, which, when delivered by an adeno-associated viral vector, effectively inhibits HBV replication in HBV transgenic mice. We applied the "PICKY" software to systemically screen the HBV genome, then used hydrodynamic transfection and HBV transgenic mice to identify additional six highly potent shRNAs. Human liver chimeric mice were infected with a mixture of wild-type and T472C HBV, a S1-resistant HBV variant, and then treated with a single or combined shRNAs. The presence of T472C mutant compromised the therapeutic efficacy of S1 and resulted in replacement of serum wild-type HBV by T472C HBV. In contrast, combinatorial therapy using S1 and P28, one of six potent shRNAs, markedly reduced titers for both wild-type and T472C HBV. Interestingly, treatment with P28 alone led to the emergence of escape mutants with mutations in the P28 target region. Our results demonstrate that combinatorial RNAi therapy can minimize the escape of resistant viral mutants in chronic HBV patients.

  19. Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Promotes Degradation of SMC5/6 to Enhance HBV Replication.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Christopher M; Xu, Yanping; Li, Feng; Nio, Kouki; Reszka-Blanco, Natalia; Li, Xiaodong; Wu, Yaxu; Yu, Yanbao; Xiong, Yue; Su, Lishan

    2016-09-13

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) regulatory protein X (HBx) activates gene expression from the HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) genome. Interaction of HBx with the DDB1-CUL4-ROC1 (CRL4) E3 ligase is critical for this function. Using substrate-trapping proteomics, we identified the structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) complex proteins SMC5 and SMC6 as CRL4(HBx) substrates. HBx expression and HBV infection degraded the SMC5/6 complex in human hepatocytes in vitro and in humanized mice in vivo. HBx targets SMC5/6 for ubiquitylation by the CRL4(HBx) E3 ligase and subsequent degradation by the proteasome. Using a minicircle HBV (mcHBV) reporter system with HBx-dependent activity, we demonstrate that SMC5/6 knockdown, or inhibition with a dominant-negative SMC6, enhance HBx null mcHBV-Gluc gene expression. Furthermore, SMC5/6 knockdown rescued HBx-deficient HBV replication in human hepatocytes. These results indicate that a primary function of HBx is to degrade SMC5/6, which restricts HBV replication by inhibiting HBV gene expression. PMID:27626656

  20. Activated natural killer cells accelerate liver damage in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Q; Zhu, Y Y; Chen, J; Ye, Y B; Li, J Y; Liu, Y R; Hu, M L; Zheng, Y C; Jiang, J J

    2015-06-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that natural killer (NK) cells may contribute to liver injury in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Because HBV infection progresses through various disease phases, the cytolytic profiles of peripheral and intrahepatic NK cells in HBV-infected patients remain to be defined. In this study, we comprehensively characterized intrahepatic and peripheral NK cells in a cohort of HBV-infected individuals, and investigated their impact on liver pathogenesis during chronic HBV infection. The study population included 34 immune-clearance (IC) patients, 36 immune-tolerant (IT) carriers and 10 healthy subjects. We found that the activity of peripheral NK cells from IC patients was functionally elevated compared to IT carriers and controls, and NK cell activation was indicated by an increased expression of CD69, CD107a, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Further analysis showed that the increased activity of both peripheral and hepatic NK cells was correlated positively with liver injury, which was assessed by serum alanine aminotransferase levels (ALT) and the liver histological activity index (HAI). Interestingly, the frequency of peripheral NK cells was reduced in IC patients (especially those with higher HAI scores of 3-4), but there was a concomitant increase in hepatic NK cells. The functionally activated NK cells are enriched preferentially in the livers of IC patients and skew towards cytolytic activity that accelerates liver injury in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients.

  1. Prevalence of HCV Infections and Co-Infection With HBV and HIV and Associated Risk Factors Among Addicts in Drug Treatment Centers, Lorestan Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Norouzian, Hossein; Gholami, Mohammadreza; Shakib, Pegah; Goudarzi, Gholamreza; Ghobadian Diali, Hamze; Rezvani, Azam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis C is an infectious disease caused by blood-borne pathogen, hepatitis C virus (HCV). Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of HCV infection and associated risk factors among addicts in drug treatment centers in Lorestan Province, Iran. Patients and Methods: A cross-sectional sero-behavioral survey was given to drug addicts in the drug treatment centers of Khorramabad, Lorestan Province, Iran during June 2012 - March 2013. Drug addicts were interviewed using a standard questionnaire including demographic, imprisonment history, and HCV-related risk behavior items. Thereafter, the sera drawn from the participants were tested for anti-HCV antibody (Ab), anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Ab, and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Results: The mean age of the cohorts was 31.7. Up to 60.2% of drug users had educational levels less than high school, 67.5% were self-employed, and 32.5% were office workers. The mean duration of drug injection was 6.8 years. Statistical analyses indicated that the prevalence of HCV among drug addicts was positively associated with age, past incarceration, drug injection history, the duration of drug use, and tattooing. In addition, 16.23% of volunteers were HCV-positive. Of those infected with HCV, 1.10% was co-infected with HBV, 2.95% were positive for HIV, and 0.36% of HCV-positive cases were infected with all three viruses. Conclusions: The high prevalence of HCV infection among this group implies a high rate of transmission and exposure to the risk of serious diseases. It is important that the high prevalence of HCV infection be taken into consideration to control further transmission of this infection. PMID:27162762

  2. [HCV and HBV prevalence in hemodialyzed pediatric patients. Multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Cañero-Velasco, M C; Mutti, J E; Gonzalez, J E; Alonso, A; Otegui, L; Adragna, M; Antonuccio, M; Laso, M; Montenegro, M; Repetto, L; Brandi, M; Canepa, J; Baimberg, E

    1998-01-01

    Hemodialized pediatric patients are a risk population for the hepatitis B and C virus infection. The aim of this paper was to study the serum prevalence of HBV and HCV infection in hemodialized children. We study 61 pediatric patients at hemodialisis, 12 on renal transplant, range between 2 and 20 years old (mean: 12.9 years), 23 male and 38 female. The specific anti-HCV IgC were measured by enzyme immunoassay (ELISA Abbott) and confirmed by LIA-TEK (Organon). The anti-HBV were measured by ELISA Abbott and transaminases by cinetic method (ASAT: 29 UI/L and ALT: 33 UI/L). The 19.7% of studied children were HCV (+) and 29.5% were HBV (+), 38.9% of them were HbsAg (+) and 50% anti-HBs (+). The HCV and HBV infection was more elevated in relation to the transfusion number and the hemodilisis time. The elevation of ALT/ASAT activity isn't a right infection index for HCV and HBV in this children. PMID:9773156

  3. ZEB2 inhibits HBV transcription and replication by targeting its core promoter.

    PubMed

    He, Qiao; Li, Wanyu; Ren, Jihua; Huang, Yecai; Huang, Ying; Hu, Qin; Chen, Juan; Chen, Weixian

    2016-03-29

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major cause of liver diseases, especially liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the interaction between host and HBV has not been fully elucidated. ZEB2 is a Smad-interacting, multi-zinc finger protein that acts as a transcription factor or repressor for several signaling pathways. This study found that the expression of ZEB2 was decreased in HBV-expressing cells. Overexpression of ZEB2 inhibited HBV DNA replicative intermediates, 3.5kb mRNA, core protein level, and the secretion of HBsAg and HBeAg. In contrast, ZEB2 knockdown promoted HBV replication. Furthermore, ZEB2 could bind to HBV core promoter and inhibit its promoter activity. Mutation at the ZEB2 binding site in HBV core promoter eradicated ZEB2-mediated inhibition of HBV replication. This study identifies ZEB2 as a novel host restriction factor that inhibits HBV replication in hepatocytes. These data may shed light on development of new antiviral strategies.

  4. Long-term monitoring drug resistance by ultra-deep pyrosequencing in a chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected patient exposed to several unsuccessful therapy schemes.

    PubMed

    Sede, M; Ojeda, D; Cassino, L; Westergaard, G; Vazquez, M; Benetti, S; Fay, F; Tanno, H; Quarleri, J

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the spectrum and dynamics of low-prevalent HBV mutations in the reverse transcriptase (rt) and S antigen by ultra-deep pyrosequencing (UDPS). Samples were obtained from a chronically infected patient who was followed throughout a thirteen-year period. This technology enabled simultaneous analysis of 4084 clonally amplified fragments from the patient allowing detecting low prevalent (<1%) mutations during the follow-up. At baseline, HBV sequences were predominately wild-type. Under sequential HBV monotherapies including lamivudine, adefovir and entecavir, a high frequency of rtM204I mutation was detected initially as unique and then coexisting with rtM204V. Both mutations were statistically associated with rtA200V and rtV207I, respectively. Once the entecavir and tenofovir combined therapy was started, polymerase and consequently envelope gene mutations appeared at several positions at a higher frequency than before, including the entecavir resistance-associated mutation rtT184L.

  5. Development of a lipopeptide-based therapeutic vaccine to treat chronic HBV infection. I. Induction of a primary cytotoxic T lymphocyte response in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Vitiello, A; Ishioka, G; Grey, H M; Rose, R; Farness, P; LaFond, R; Yuan, L; Chisari, F V; Furze, J; Bartholomeuz, R

    1995-01-01

    Our goal is to use peptide epitopes that are recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) as immunogens for the development of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection being our first therapeutic target. Because most CTL peptide epitopes are poor immunogens, we specifically modified them by covalently attaching two additional components: a T helper peptide epitope and two lipid molecules. Using the murine influenza virus CTL epitope NP 147-155 as a model system, we found this construct to be highly immunogenic, and a single injection resulted in memory CTL induction that persisted for > 1 yr. Based on the animal studies, a vaccine was designed and tested for both safety and its ability to induce a primary CTL response in normal subjects. The three vaccine components included HBV core antigen peptide 18-27 as the CTL epitope, tetanus toxoid peptide 830-843 as the T helper peptide, and two palmitic acid molecules as the lipids. A dose escalation trial (5, 50, and 500 micrograms) carried out in 26 normal subjects showed that the vaccine was safe and able to induce a primary HBV-specific CTL response. A dose-response curve was observed and five out of five subjects responded to the 500-micrograms dose. PMID:7814635

  6. Synthesis and biological evaluation of nucleoside analogues than contain silatrane on the basis of the structure of acyclovir (ACV) as novel inhibitors of hepatitis B virus (HBV).

    PubMed

    Han, Anyue; Li, Lingna; Qing, Kuiyou; Qi, Xiaolu; Hou, Leping; Luo, Xintong; Shi, Shaohua; Ye, Faqing

    2013-03-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection causes major public health problems worldwide. Acyclovir (ACV) is mainly used to inhibit herpes simplex virus (HSV) rather than HBV. In this study, we used the combination principle to design and synthesize nucleoside analogues that contain silatrane on the basis of the structure of ACV. We found that the compounds were effective inhibitors of HBV, both in vitro and in vivo. All of the compounds showed suppressive activity on the expression of HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) and HBV e antigen (HBeAg) in the HepG2.2.15 cell line with low cytotoxicity. One of compounds was studied in HBV transgenic mice model, and the test results showed its ability to reduce the levels of HBsAg, HBeAg and HBV DNA by ELASE and qPCR. Furthermore, significant improvement of T lymphocyte was observed after treatment, as evaluated by flow cytometry (FCM).

  7. Concurrent infection of hepatitis B virus negatively affects the clinical outcome and prognosis of patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma after chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Wang, Jianmin; Yang, Jianmin; Zhang, Weiping; Song, Xianmin; Chen, Li

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is hepatotropic and lymphotropic. HBV-infected individuals have an increased risk of developing malignant lymphoma, and the HBV infection rate in lymphoma patients is significantly higher than that in the general population. However, the exact mechanism and correlation between HBV infection and lymphoma onset and progression currently remain unclear. We retrospectively analyzed clinical data from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) patients with different HBV infection statuses. The results showed that the HBV infection rate was significantly higher in patients with B-cell type and late stage of NHL. The chemotherapy efficacy for NHL patients with chronic active HBV infection was significantly lower than that for the patients with chronic inactive HBV infection, the patients with HBV carriers and the patients without HBV infection. In addition, the NHL chemotherapy activated HBV replication and caused significant liver dysfunction, which could further reduce the chemotherapy efficacy. Through Kaplan-Meier survival curve and log-rank analysis, we found that the HBV infection status in NHL patients was significantly correlated with the patients' progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Compared with the patients without HBV infection (PFS: 95% CI 47.915 to 55.640; OS: 95% CI 81.324 to 86.858), the PFS and OS of the patients with chronic active HBV infection were significantly shorter (PFS: 95% CI 9.424 to 42.589, P < 0.001; OS: 95% CI 42.840 to 82.259, P = 0.006). The study demonstrated that the sustained HBV replication in patients with chronic active HBV infection could be a key factor that influences the prognosis of NHL patients after chemotherapy, and thus may provide information for designing rational clinical treatments for NHL patients with different HBV infection statuses and improve the treatment efficacy and prognosis. PMID:23861969

  8. IL-35 inhibits HBV antigen-specific IFN-γ-producing CTLs in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuefen; Tian, Li; Dong, Yuejiao; Zhu, Qiaoyun; Wang, Yiyin; Han, Wenzheng; Liu, Xia; Ni, Qin; Chen, Yu; Li, Lanjuan

    2015-09-01

    Interleukin (IL)-35 is an inhibitory cytokine consisting of IL-12A and Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (Ebi3) and is required by regulatory T-cells (Tregs) for maximal activity. During chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, Tregs have immunosuppressive effects on HBV-specific T helper (Th) cells, yet little is known about the complex regulation of Tregs and their contribution to the inadequate immune system response to the virus. In the present study, we investigated whether IL-35 is involved in HBV-related cellular immune responses. Cluster of differentiation (CD)4(+) T-cells from peripheral blood were derived from healthy volunteers, resolved HBV individuals and chronic active hepatitis B patients and stimulated with CD3/28-conjugated beads. We analysed mRNA and protein levels of IL-35 and assessed the inhibitory effect of IL-35 on HBV core antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), dendritic cells (DCs) and effector T-cells (Teffs). Correlation analyses between liver inflammation and HBV DNA load were conducted. Results show that chronic HBV patients harbour significantly higher levels of Ebi3 mRNA and protein in CD4(+) T-cells compared with healthy volunteers and resolved HBV individuals. IL-35 suppressed the proliferation of HBV antigen-specific CTLs and interferon (IFN)-γ production in vitro. Ex vivo, IL-35 decreased the proliferation of CD4(+)CD45RA(+) naïve T-cells, especially in CD4(+)CD25(-)CD45RA(+) naïve Teffs. IL-35 inhibited the expansion of CD11c(+) DCs. Our data indicate that IL-35 is highly expressed in chronic HBV CD4(+) T-cells and plays an important role in the inhibition of the cellular immune response in chronic HBV.

  9. A novel dendritic-cell-targeting DNA vaccine for hepatitis B induces T cell and humoral immune responses and potentiates the antivirus activity in HBV transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Debin; Liu, Hong; Shi, Shuai; Dong, Liwei; Wang, Hongge; Wu, Nuoting; Gao, Hui; Cheng, Zhaojun; Zheng, Qun; Cai, Jiaojiao; Zou, Libo; Zou, Zhihua

    2015-12-01

    Strategies for inducing an effective immune response following vaccination have focused on targeting antigens to dendritic cells (DCs) through the DC-specific surface molecule DEC-205. The immunogenicity and efficacy of DNA vaccination can also be enhanced by fusing the encoded antigen to single-chain antibodies directed against DEC-205. Here, we investigated this promising approach for its enhancement of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-specific cellular and humoral immune responses and its antiviral effects in HBV transgenic mice. A plasmid DNA vaccine encoding mouse DEC-205 single-chain fragment variable (mDEC-205-scFv) linked with the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was constructed. Vaccination with this fusion DNA vaccine in HBV transgenic mice induced robust antiviral T cell and antibody immunity against HBsAg. The levels of serum-circulating HBsAg and the HBV DNA copy number were downregulated by the induction of a higher HBsAg-specific response. Thus, in this study, we demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of the novel mDEC-205-scFv-fused DNA vaccine in a mouse model of immune-tolerant, chronic HBV infection.

  10. [Present state and the future direction of HBV vaccine].

    PubMed

    Mizokami, Masashi; Sugiyama, Masaya

    2012-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) prevention program in Japan is considered one of the most successful and effective public anti-counter programs to HBV infection. However, almost all of population under twenty-five years is extremely susceptibility for HBV infection. HBV genotype A, which was not in Japan and has been from western countries, is increasing in chronic hepatitis B patients in Japan as a consequence of acute hepatitis B spreading in the younger generation through promiscuous sexual transmitted infection and the characteristics of HBV genotype A is a prolonged high HBVDNA viremia compared with other HBV genotypes. These data have strongly indicated that the main transmission route of HBV in Japan has been changed to a horizontal infection with sexual transmitted disease from perinatal transmission from HBsAg positive mothers. Although the HBV vaccine has tipped the balance in our favor, newly issues of HBV vaccine has been arisen such as vaccine escape mutant, efficacy and potency for the prevention of HBV infection, especially different HBV genotypes, HBV reactivation on the patients with HBsAg negative and anti-HBs antibody positive under systemic chemotherapy, and universal vaccination or selective vaccination and so on. PMID:23189826

  11. Comparison of Elastography, Serum Marker Scores, and Histology for the Assessment of Liver Fibrosis in Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)-Infected Patients in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Bonnard, Philippe; Sombié, Roger; Lescure, Francois-Xavier; Bougouma, Alain; Guiard-Schmid, Jean Baptiste; Poynard, Thierry; Calès, Paul; Housset, Chantal; Callard, Patrice; Pendeven, Catherine Le; Drabo, Joseph; Carrat, Fabrice; Pialoux, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    Liver fibrosis (LF) must be assessed before talking treatment decisions in hepatitis B. In Burkina Faso, liver biopsy (LB) remains the “gold standard” method for this purpose. Access to treatment might be simpler if reliable alternative techniques for LF evaluation were available. The hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected patients who underwent LB was invited to have liver stiffness measurement (Fibroscan) and serum marker assays. Fifty-nine patients were enrolled. The performance of each technique for distinguishing F0F1 from F2F3F4 was compared. The area under receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curves was 0.61, 0.71, 0.79, 0.82, and 0.87 for the aspartate transaminase to platelet ratio index (APRI), Fib-4, Fibrotest, Fibrometre, and Fibroscan. Elastometric thresholds were identified for significant fibrosis and cirrhosis. Combined use of Fibroscan and a serum marker could avoid 80% of biopsies. This study shows that the results of alternative methods concord with those of histology in HBV-infected patients in Burkina Faso. These alternative techniques could help physicians to identify patients requiring treatment. PMID:20207872

  12. Frequency and genotypic distribution of GB virus C (GBV-C) among Colombian population with Hepatitis B (HBV) or Hepatitis C (HCV) infection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background GB virus C (GBV-C) is an enveloped positive-sense ssRNA virus belonging to the Flaviviridae family. Studies on the genetic variability of the GBV-C reveals the existence of six genotypes: genotype 1 predominates in West Africa, genotype 2 in Europe and America, genotype 3 in Asia, genotype 4 in Southwest Asia, genotype 5 in South Africa and genotype 6 in Indonesia. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and genotypic distribution of GBV-C in the Colombian population. Methods Two groups were analyzed: i) 408 Colombian blood donors infected with HCV (n = 250) and HBV (n = 158) from Bogotá and ii) 99 indigenous people with HBV infection from Leticia, Amazonas. A fragment of 344 bp from the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) was amplified by nested RT PCR. Viral sequences were genotyped by phylogenetic analysis using reference sequences from each genotype obtained from GenBank (n = 160). Bayesian phylogenetic analyses were conducted using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach to obtain the MCC tree using BEAST v.1.5.3. Results Among blood donors, from 158 HBsAg positive samples, eight 5.06% (n = 8) were positive for GBV-C and from 250 anti-HCV positive samples, 3.2%(n = 8) were positive for GBV-C. Also, 7.7% (n = 7) GBV-C positive samples were found among indigenous people from Leticia. A phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of the following GBV-C genotypes among blood donors: 2a (41.6%), 1 (33.3%), 3 (16.6%) and 2b (8.3%). All genotype 1 sequences were found in co-infection with HBV and 4/5 sequences genotype 2a were found in co-infection with HCV. All sequences from indigenous people from Leticia were classified as genotype 3. The presence of GBV-C infection was not correlated with the sex (p = 0.43), age (p = 0.38) or origin (p = 0.17). Conclusions It was found a high frequency of GBV-C genotype 1 and 2 in blood donors. The presence of genotype 3 in indigenous population was previously reported from Santa Marta region in Colombia and

  13. The presence of HBV mRNA in the fertilized in vitro embryo of HBV patients confirms vertical transmission of HBV via the ovum.

    PubMed

    Ye, F; Jin, Y; Kong, Y; Shi, J Z; Qiu, H T; Zhang, X; Zhang, S L; Lin, S M

    2013-05-01

    This study aimed to confirm that vertical transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) can occur via the infected ovum. Specimens studied were obtained from discarded test-tube embryos from mothers with chronic HBV infection who had received in vitro fertilization treatment. Single-cell reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was used to detect HBV mRNA in the embryos. HBV mRNA was detected in the cleavage embryos of patients with chronic HBV infection, with a detection rate of 13.2% (5/38). The level of serum HBV DNA was not related to the HBV mRNA positivity rates in embryos. In this study, HBV mRNA was detected in test-tube embryos from HBV-infected mothers who had received in vitro fertilization treatment. This confirms the theory of vertical transmission of HBV via the ovum, thereby providing an important theoretical basis for further study on the mechanism of HBV vertical transmission, influencing factors and blocking measures.

  14. Innate immune targets of hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Li; Wang, Kai; Yu, Ji-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 400 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) globally despite the widespread immunization of HBV vaccine and the development of antiviral therapies. The immunopathogenesis of HBV infection is initiated and driven by complexed interactions between the host immune system and the virus. Host immune responses to viral particles and proteins are regarded as the main determinants of viral clearance or persistent infection and hepatocyte injury. Innate immune system is the first defending line of host preventing from virus invasion. It is acknowledged that HBV has developed active tactics to escape innate immune recognition or actively interfere with innate immune signaling pathways and induce immunosuppression, which favor their replication. HBV reduces the expression of pattern-recognition receptors in the innate immune cells in humans. Also, HBV may interrupt different parts of antiviral signaling pathways, leading to the reduced production of antiviral cytokines such as interferons that contribute to HBV immunopathogenesis. A full comprehension of the mechanisms as to how HBV inactivates various elements of the innate immune response to initiate and maintain a persistent infection can be helpful in designing new immunotherapeutic methods for preventing and eradicating the virus. In this review, we aimed to summarize different branches the innate immune targeted by HBV infection. The review paper provides evidence that multiple components of immune responses should be activated in combination with antiviral therapy to disrupt the tolerance to HBV for eliminating HBV infection. PMID:27330680

  15. Innate immune targets of hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Li; Wang, Kai; Yu, Ji-Guang

    2016-06-18

    Approximately 400 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) globally despite the widespread immunization of HBV vaccine and the development of antiviral therapies. The immunopathogenesis of HBV infection is initiated and driven by complexed interactions between the host immune system and the virus. Host immune responses to viral particles and proteins are regarded as the main determinants of viral clearance or persistent infection and hepatocyte injury. Innate immune system is the first defending line of host preventing from virus invasion. It is acknowledged that HBV has developed active tactics to escape innate immune recognition or actively interfere with innate immune signaling pathways and induce immunosuppression, which favor their replication. HBV reduces the expression of pattern-recognition receptors in the innate immune cells in humans. Also, HBV may interrupt different parts of antiviral signaling pathways, leading to the reduced production of antiviral cytokines such as interferons that contribute to HBV immunopathogenesis. A full comprehension of the mechanisms as to how HBV inactivates various elements of the innate immune response to initiate and maintain a persistent infection can be helpful in designing new immunotherapeutic methods for preventing and eradicating the virus. In this review, we aimed to summarize different branches the innate immune targeted by HBV infection. The review paper provides evidence that multiple components of immune responses should be activated in combination with antiviral therapy to disrupt the tolerance to HBV for eliminating HBV infection.

  16. HBV/HIV coinfection is associated with poorer outcomes in hospitalized patients with HBV or HIV.

    PubMed

    Rajbhandari, R; Jun, T; Khalili, H; Chung, R T; Ananthakrishnan, A N

    2016-10-01

    We examined the impact of HBV/HIV coinfection on outcomes in hospitalized patients compared to those with HBV or HIV monoinfection. Using the 2011 US Nationwide Inpatient Sample, we identified patients who had been hospitalized with HBV or HIV monoinfection or HBV/HIV coinfection using ICD-9-CM codes. We compared liver-related admissions between the three groups. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify independent predictors of in-hospital mortality, length of stay and total charges. A total of 72 584 discharges with HBV monoinfection, 133 880 discharges with HIV monoinfection and 8156 discharges with HBV/HIV coinfection were included. HBV/HIV coinfection was associated with higher mortality compared to HBV monoinfection (OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.30-2.15) but not when compared to HIV monoinfection (OR 1.22, 95% CI 0.96-1.54). However, the presence of HBV along with cirrhosis or complications of portal hypertension was associated with three times greater in-hospital mortality in patients with HIV compared to those without these complications (OR 3.00, 95% CI 1.80-5.02). Length of stay and total hospitalization charges were greater in the HBV-/HIV-coinfected group compared to the HBV monoinfection group (+1.53 days, P < 0.001; $17595, P < 0.001) and the HIV monoinfection group (+0.62 days, P = 0.034; $8840, P = 0.005). In conclusion, HBV/HIV coinfection is a risk factor for in-hospital mortality, particularly in liver-related admissions, compared to HBV monoinfection. Overall healthcare utilization from HBV/HIV coinfection is also higher than for either infection alone and higher than the national average for all hospitalizations, thus emphasizing the healthcare burden from these illnesses.

  17. TGF-β triggers HBV cccDNA degradation through AID-dependent deamination.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Ying; Han, Xiaoxu; Guan, Gefei; Wu, Na; Sun, Jianbo; Pak, Vladimir; Liang, Guoxin

    2016-02-01

    The covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) of hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a viral center molecule for HBV infection and persistence. However, the cellular restriction factors of HBV cccDNA are not well understood. Here, we show that TGF-β can induce nuclear viral cccDNA degradation and hypermutation via activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) deamination activity in hepatocytes. This suppression by TGF-β is abrogated when AID or the activity of uracil-DNA glycosylase (UNG) is absent, which indicates that AID deamination and the UNG-mediated excision of uracil act in concert to degrade viral cccDNA. Moreover, the HBV core protein promotes the interaction between AID and viral cccDNA. Overall, our results indicate a novel molecular mechanism that allows cytokine TGF-β to restrict viral nuclear cccDNA in innate immunity, thereby suggesting a novel method for potentially eliminating cccDNA.

  18. Possible role of tocopherols in the modulation of host microRNA with potential antiviral activity in patients with hepatitis B virus-related persistent infection: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fiorino, S; Bacchi-Reggiani, L; Sabbatani, S; Grizzi, F; di Tommaso, L; Masetti, M; Fornelli, A; Bondi, A; de Biase, D; Visani, M; Cuppini, A; Jovine, E; Pession, A

    2014-12-14

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection represents a serious global health problem and persistent HBV infection is associated with an increased risk of cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and liver failure. Recently, the study of the role of microRNA (miRNA) in the pathogenesis of HBV has gained considerable interest as well as new treatments against this pathogen have been approved. A few studies have investigated the antiviral activity of vitamin E (VE) in chronic HBV carriers. Herein, we review the possible role of tocopherols in the modulation of host miRNA with potential anti-HBV activity. A systematic research of the scientific literature was performed by searching the MEDLINE, Cochrane Library and EMBASE databases. The keywords used were 'HBV therapy', 'HBV treatment', 'VE antiviral effects', 'tocopherol antiviral activity', 'miRNA antiviral activity' and 'VE microRNA'. Reports describing the role of miRNA in the regulation of HBV life cycle, in vitro and in vivo available studies reporting the effects of VE on miRNA expression profiles and epigenetic networks, and clinical trials reporting the use of VE in patients with HBV-related chronic hepatitis were identified and examined. Based on the clinical results obtained in VE-treated chronic HBV carriers, we provide a reliable hypothesis for the possible role of this vitamin in the modulation of host miRNA profiles perturbed by this viral pathogen and in the regulation of some cellular miRNA with a suggested potential anti-HBV activity. This approach may contribute to the improvement of our understanding of pathogenetic mechanisms involved in HBV infection and increase the possibility of its management and treatment.

  19. Suppression of USP18 Potentiates the Anti-HBV Activity of Interferon Alpha in HepG2.2.15 Cells via JAK/STAT Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Lei, Qing-song; Zhang, Shu-Jun; Kong, Ling-na; Qin, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitin-specific protease 18 (USP18, also known as UBP43) has both interferon stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) dependent and ISG15-independent functions. By silencing the expression of USP18 in HepG2.2.15 cells, we studied the effect of USP18 on the anti-HBV activity of IFN-α and demonstrated that knockdown of USP18 significantly Inhibited the HBV expression and increased the expression of ISGs. Levels of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg), HBV DNA and intracellular hepatitis B virus core antigen (HBcAg) were dramatically decreased with or without treatment of indicated dose of IFN-α. Suppression of USP18 activated the JAK/STAT signaling pathway as shown by the increased and prolonged expression of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (p-STAT1) in combination with enhanced expression of several interferon stimulated genes (ISGs). Our results indicated that USP18 modulates the anti-HBV activity of IFN-α via activation of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway in Hepg2.2.15 cells. PMID:27227879

  20. IL6 Inhibits HBV Transcription by Targeting the Epigenetic Control of the Nuclear cccDNA Minichromosome

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Gianna Aurora; Scisciani, Cecilia; Pediconi, Natalia; Lupacchini, Leonardo; Alfalate, Dulce; Guerrieri, Francesca; Calvo, Ludovica; Salerno, Debora; Di Cocco, Silvia; Levrero, Massimo; Belloni, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) is organized as a mini-chromosome in the nuclei of infected hepatocytes by histone and non-histone proteins. Transcription from the cccDNA of the RNA replicative intermediate termed pre-genome (pgRNA), is the critical step for genome amplification and ultimately determines the rate of HBV replication. Multiple evidences suggest that cccDNA epigenetic modifications, such as histone modifications and DNA methylation, participate in regulating the transcriptional activity of the HBV cccDNA. Inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, LTβ) and the pleiotropic cytokine interleukin-6 (IL6) inhibit hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication and transcription. Here we show, in HepG2 cells transfected with linear HBV monomers and HBV-infected NTCP-HepG2 cells, that IL6 treatment leads to a reduction of cccDNA-bound histone acetylation paralleled by a rapid decrease in 3.5kb/pgRNA and subgenomic HBV RNAs transcription without affecting cccDNA chromatinization or cccDNA levels. IL6 repressive effect on HBV replication is mediated by a loss of HNF1α and HNF4α binding to the cccDNA and a redistribution of STAT3 binding from the cccDNA to IL6 cellular target genes. PMID:26580974

  1. Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infected Southern African Adults: Occult or Overt – That Is the Question

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Trevor G.; Makondo, Euphodia; Martinson, Neil A.; Kramvis, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) share transmission routes and are endemic in sub-Saharan Africa. The objective of the present study was to use the Taormina definition of occult HBV infection, together with stringent amplification conditions, to determine the prevalence and characteristics of HBV infection in antiretroviral treatment (ART)-naïve HIV+ve adults in a rural cohort in South Africa. The presence of HBV serological markers was determined by enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA) tests. HBV DNA-positivity was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of at least two of three different regions of the HBV genome. HBV viral loads were determined by real-time PCR. Liver fibrosis was determined using the aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index. Of the 298 participants, 231 (77.5%) showed at least one HBV marker, with 53.7% HBV DNA−ve (resolved) and 23.8% HBV DNA+ve (current) [8.7% HBsAg+ve: 15.1% HBsAg−ve]. Only the total number of sexual partners distinguished HBV DNA+ve and HBV DNA−ve participants, implicating sexual transmission of HBV and/or HIV. It is plausible that sexual transmission of HBV and/or HIV may result in a new HBV infection, superinfection and re-activation as a consequence of immunesuppression. Three HBsAg−ve HBV DNA+ve participants had HBV viral loads <200 IU/ml and were therefore true occult HBV infections. The majority of HBsAg−ve HBV DNA+ve participants did not differ from HBsAg+ve HBV DNA+ve (overt) participants in terms of HBV viral loads, ALT levels or frequency of liver fibrosis. Close to a quarter of HIV+ve participants were HBV DNA+ve, of which the majority were HBsAg−ve and were only detected using nucleic acid testing. Detection of HBsAg−ve HBV DNA+ve subjects is advisable considering they were clinically indistinguishable from HBsAg+ve HBV DNA+ve individuals and should not be overlooked, especially if lamivudine is included in the ART. PMID:23049685

  2. [Requirement of standardizing anti-HBs assay methods in Japan for HBV infection-preventing strategy--discrepancy of anti-HBs measurements among three different kits widely used in Japan].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Norio

    2006-09-01

    The strategy to eliminate hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection by administrating an HB vaccine is changing worldwide; however, this is not the case in Japan. An important concern about the HBV infection-preventing strategy in Japan may be that the assay methods for the antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) are not standardized. The minimum protective anti-HBs titer against HBV infection has been established as 10 mIU/ml by World Health Organization (WHO) -standardized assay methods worldwide, but that is still determined as a "positive" test result by the passive hemagglutination (PHA) method in Japan. We compared anti-HBs measurements in given samples among PHA(Mycell II, Institute of Immunology), chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA) (Lumipulse, Fujirebio), and chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA) (Architect, Abbott), all of which are currently in wide use in Japan. First, anti-HBs measurements in serum from individuals who received a yeast-derived recombinant HB vaccine composed of the major surface protein of either subtype adr or subtype ayw were compared. The results clearly showed that in subtype adr-vaccinees CLIA underestimated the anti-HBs amount compared with CLEIA and PHA, but in ayw-vaccinees, the discordance in the measurements among the three kits was not prominent. Second, anti-HBs measurements in standard or calibration solutions of each assay kit were compared. Surprisingly, CLEIA showed higher measurements in all three kit-associated standard or calibration solutions than CLIA. Thus, the anti-HBs titer of 10 mIU/ml is difficult to introduce in Japan as the minimum protective level against HBV infection. Efforts to standardize anti-HBs assay methods are expected to share international evidence about the HBV infection-preventing strategy.

  3. HBx truncation mutants differentially modulate SREBP-1a and -1c transcription and HBV replication.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi; Liu, Qiang

    2015-12-01

    As master transcription factors for lipogenesis, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) has two isoforms, SREBP-1a and SREBP-1c. Hepatitis B virus X (HBx) can up-regulate the transcription of both SREBP-1a and SREBP-1c. HBx is a small protein consisting of 154 amino acids. Truncated forms of HBx, often found in the tissues after HBV infection, may have a role in the pathogenesis associated with HBV infection. In this study, we examined the effects of two HBx truncation mutants, HBx aa. 1-127 and HBx aa. 43-154, on the transcription of SREBP-1a and SREBP-1c. HBx 1-127 can up-regulate SREBP-1c, but not SREBP-1a transcription, whereas HBx 43-154 can activate SREBP-1a, but not SREBP-1c transcription. We further determined the activities of two HBV enhancers after the expression of the truncated HBx proteins. HBx 1-127 and HBx 43-154 can only up-regulate HBV enhancer I or HBV enhancer II, respectively. Knocking down SREBP-1 abrogates enhancer activation by HBx proteins, suggesting a role of SREBP-1. In addition, using HBV enhancer mutants, we found that the binding sequence for AP-1 on enhancer I is essential for its activation by HBx 1-127, whereas C/EBP and Sp1 sites are required for enhancer II activation by HBx 43-154. Finally, we showed that both HBx 1-127 and HBx 43-154 can increase HBV transcription and HBV replication dependent upon SREBP-1 because knocking down SREBP-1 abrogates the up-regulation. Furthermore, upon ectopic expression of either SREBP-1a or SREBP-1c, we showed that SREBP-1a is involved in HBV transcription and replication up-regulation by HBx 43-154, whereas SREBP-1c is involved in HBV transcription and replication up-regulation by HBx 1-127. Our results should help understand the interactions between HBV and the SREBP-1-mediated lipogenic pathway.

  4. Occupational Risk of HIV, HBV and HSV-2 Infections in Health Care Personnel Caring for AIDS Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhls, Thomas L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Female health care workers with exposure to AIDS patients were studied. Two of the 246 workers showed evidence of opportunistic infections. This analysis confirms the low risk of occupationally acquired HIV infection when hospital infection control practices are employed around AIDS patients. (Author/VM)

  5. A Tat-conjugated Peptide Nucleic Acid Tat-PNA-DR Inhibits Hepatitis B Virus Replication In Vitro and In Vivo by Targeting LTR Direct Repeats of HBV RNA

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhengyang; Han, Shisong; Hong, Wei; Lang, Yange; Li, Fangfang; Liu, Yongxiang; Li, Zeyong; Wu, Yingliang; Li, Wenxin; Zhang, Xianzheng; Cao, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major cause of chronic active hepatitis, cirrhosis, and primary hepatocellular carcinoma, all of which are severe threats to human health. However, current clinical therapies for HBV are limited by potential side effects, toxicity, and drug-resistance. In this study, a cell-penetrating peptide-conjugated peptide nucleic acid (PNA), Tat-PNA-DR, was designed to target the direct repeat (DR) sequences of HBV. Tat-PNA-DR effectively inhibited HBV replication in HepG2.2.15 cells. Its anti-HBV effect relied on the binding of Tat-PNA-DR to the DR, whereby it suppressed the translation of hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), HBsAg, HBV core, hepatitis B virus x protein, and HBV reverse transcriptase (RT) and the reverse transcription of the HBV genome. Furthermore, Tat-PNA-DR administered by intravenous injection efficiently cleared HBeAg and HBsAg in an acute hepatitis B mouse model. Importantly, it induced an 80% decline in HBV DNA in mouse serum, which was similar to the effect of the widely used clinical drug Lamivudine (3TC). Additionally, a long-term hydrodynamics HBV mouse model also demonstrated Tat-PNA-DR's antiviral effect. Interestingly, Tat-PNA-DR displayed low cytotoxicity, low mouse acute toxicity, low immunogenicity, and high serum stability. These data indicate that Tat-PNA-DR is a unique PNA and a promising drug candidate against HBV. PMID:26978579

  6. The effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy on liver function in human immunodeficiency virus-infected pediatric patients with or without hepatitis virus co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lijuan; Jin, Changzhong; Bai, Shi; Davies, Henry; Rao, Heping; Liang, Yong; Wu, Nanping

    2015-01-01

    Background: Co-infection of hepatitis virus is common in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected adults in China. But little is known about hepatitis virus co-infection in pediatric HIV-infected subjects. The study aimed to investigate the impact of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on liver function of pediatric HIV-infected subjects. Materials and Methods: A cohort study including 101 pediatric HIV-infected subjects with HBV/HCV co-infection and 44 pediatric comparators with HIV mono-infection was carried out in Henan Province of China from September 2011 to September 2012. All patients received HAART for 1-year. HBV and HCV infection was determined by antibody tests. HIV RNA load, CD4+ T-cell counts and liver function were determined before and after HAART. The Student's t-test or a one-way ANOVA was used for normally distributed values and A Mann-Whitney U-test was performed for values without normal distribution using SPSS statistical package 18.0 (SPSS Inc.). Results: After HAART for 1-year, the median levels of viral load were decreased to lower limit of detection in 90.34% pediatric HIV-infected subjects with/without HBV/HCV co-infection (P < 0.001), and CD4+ T-cell counts increased significantly (P < 0.001). Compared with the pre-HAART, mean level of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in each group had a significant increase after HAART (P < 0.01). The mean levels of ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) in nevirapine (NVP) based HAART group increased significantly after HAART (P < 0.01). Mean change values of ALT and AST were significantly higher in the NVP based regimen group than in the efavirenz (EFV) based regimen group (P < 0.01). For HIV/HBV/HCV co-infected patients, mean change values of ALT and AST in NVP-based HAART group was significantly higher than that in EFV-based HAART group (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Highly active antiretroviral therapy can damage liver

  7. Progress and Prospects of Anti-HBV Gene Therapy Development.

    PubMed

    Maepa, Mohube B; Roelofse, Ilke; Ely, Abdullah; Arbuthnot, Patrick

    2015-07-31

    Despite the availability of an effective vaccine against hepatitis B virus (HBV), chronic infection with the virus remains a major global health concern. Current drugs against HBV infection are limited by emergence of resistance and rarely achieve complete viral clearance. This has prompted vigorous research on developing better drugs against chronic HBV infection. Advances in understanding the life cycle of HBV and improvements in gene-disabling technologies have been impressive. This has led to development of better HBV infection models and discovery of new drug candidates. Ideally, a regimen against chronic HBV infection should completely eliminate all viral replicative intermediates, especially covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA). For the past few decades, nucleic acid-based therapy has emerged as an attractive alternative that may result in complete clearance of HBV in infected patients. Several genetic anti-HBV strategies have been developed. The most studied approaches include the use of antisense oligonucleotides, ribozymes, RNA interference effectors and gene editing tools. This review will summarize recent developments and progress made in the use of gene therapy against HBV.

  8. Changes of HBV DNA After Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma and the Efficacy of Antiviral Treatment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiao-Jun; Lao, Xiang-Ming; Shi, Ming; Li, Sheng-Ping

    2016-09-01

    Unlike systemic chemotherapy for hematological malignancies with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) for HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has only recently been reported to cause HBV reactivation and subsequent hepatitis. Most patients with HBV-related HCC have an underlying disease with liver fibrosis or cirrhosis, and TACE may potentially induce HBV reactivation and liver decompensation. Currently, there are no clinical guidelines for managing TACE-caused HBV reactivation. In this review, we summarize the changes of HBV status and liver function after TACE and the effect of antiviral treatment before, during, or after TACE.

  9. HBV-Associated Postinfectious Acute Glomerulonephritis: A Report of 10 Cases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Junxia; Peng, Weihua; Yu, Guoqing; Wang, Liping; Chen, Jian; Zheng, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Postinfectious acute glomerulonephritis (PIGN) may occur after various bacterial and viral infections. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a cause of chronic glomerulonephritis. We report here 10 cases (ages 7-20 years-old) of chronic HBV carriers with acute glomerulonephritis, with positive glomerular staining of hepatitis B surface antigen, and detectable presence of HBV DNA in the glomeruli. This form of PIGN, HBV-PIGN, has not been previously identified. To further characterize clinical and pathological features of HBV- PIGN, we selected 10 cases of age-matched non-HBV PIGN for comparison. While both HBV associated PIGN and non-HBV PIGN similarly presented as proteinuria, hematuria, and hypertension, there was a trend of higher acute kidney injury and worsened prognosis in HBV-PIGN. 6 months after the onset, 4 patients with HBV associated PIGN did not show improvement from the disease, whereas all patients with non-HBV PIGN had complete or partial recovery. Pathologically, both HBV associated PIGN and non-HBV PIGN showed typical diffuse glomerular endocapillary proliferation, but HBV associated PIGN differed from classical PIGN with much fewer sub-epithelial glomerular "hump-shape" immune complex depositions. In conclusion, we have identified a novel association of HBV infection with acute glomerulonephritis.

  10. HBV-Associated Postinfectious Acute Glomerulonephritis: A Report of 10 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Junxia; Peng, Weihua; Yu, Guoqing; Wang, Liping; Chen, Jian; Zheng, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Postinfectious acute glomerulonephritis (PIGN) may occur after various bacterial and viral infections. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a cause of chronic glomerulonephritis. We report here 10 cases (ages 7–20 years-old) of chronic HBV carriers with acute glomerulonephritis, with positive glomerular staining of hepatitis B surface antigen, and detectable presence of HBV DNA in the glomeruli. This form of PIGN, HBV-PIGN, has not been previously identified. To further characterize clinical and pathological features of HBV- PIGN, we selected 10 cases of age-matched non-HBV PIGN for comparison. While both HBV associated PIGN and non-HBV PIGN similarly presented as proteinuria, hematuria, and hypertension, there was a trend of higher acute kidney injury and worsened prognosis in HBV-PIGN. 6 months after the onset, 4 patients with HBV associated PIGN did not show improvement from the disease, whereas all patients with non-HBV PIGN had complete or partial recovery. Pathologically, both HBV associated PIGN and non-HBV PIGN showed typical diffuse glomerular endocapillary proliferation, but HBV associated PIGN differed from classical PIGN with much fewer sub-epithelial glomerular “hump-shape” immune complex depositions. In conclusion, we have identified a novel association of HBV infection with acute glomerulonephritis. PMID:27512989

  11. Hepatitis B (HBV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Hepatitis B (HBV) KidsHealth > For Teens > Hepatitis B (HBV) Print A A A Text Size ... Prevented? How Is It Treated? What Is It? Hepatitis (pronounced: hep-uh-TIE-tiss) is a disease ...

  12. Synthesis and anti-HBV activity of α-stereoisomer of aristeromycin based analogs.

    PubMed

    Kasula, Mohan; Toyama, Masaaki; Samunuri, Ramakrishnamraju; Rozy, Farhana; Yadav, Monika; Bal, Chandralata; Jha, Ashok Kumar; Baba, Masanori; Sharon, Ashoke

    2016-08-15

    The potential antiviral activity of aristeromycin type of derivatives (I) is limited by associated toxicity due to its possible 5'-O-phosphorylation and S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine hydrolase (SAHase) inhibitory activity. Aristeromycin structure has major pharmacophoric motif as 5'-OH and adenosine base, which may have significant role in enzyme binding followed by activity and or toxicity. Thus, the structural optimization to alter this major motif by replacing with its bioisostere and changing the 5'-O conformation through stereochemistry reversal was of interest. Thus, the inverted stereochemistry at 4'-position coupled with bioisostere of adenosine base in the target compounds (6-7) to access antiviral potential. The stereoselective formation of a key stereoisomer (2a) was achieved exclusively from neplanocin sugar (1a) by reduction in a single step. The novel target molecules (6-7) were synthesized in 4 steps with 55-62% yield. Compound 6 was analyzed by single crystal X-ray diffraction, which confirms the stereoselective formation of α-analogs with highly puckered cyclopentane ring and 2'-endo conformation. The compound 6 shown significant anti-hepatitis B virus activity of 6.5μM with CC50>100μM and yielded a promising lead with novel structural feature. PMID:27426303

  13. Construction and Immunological Evaluation of Multivalent Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Core Virus-Like Particles Carrying HBV and HCV Epitopes▿

    PubMed Central

    Sominskaya, Irina; Skrastina, Dace; Dislers, Andris; Vasiljev, Denis; Mihailova, Marija; Ose, Velta; Dreilina, Dzidra; Pumpens, Paul

    2010-01-01

    A multivalent vaccine candidate against hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections was constructed on the basis of HBV core (HBc) virus-like particles (VLPs) as carriers. Chimeric VLPs that carried a virus-neutralizing HBV pre-S1 epitope corresponding to amino acids (aa) 20 to 47 in the major immunodominant region (MIR) and a highly conserved N-terminal HCV core epitope corresponding to aa 1 to 60 at the C terminus of the truncated HBcΔ protein (N-terminal aa 1 to 144 of full-length HBc) were produced in Escherichia coli cells and examined for their antigenicity and immunogenicity. The presence of two different foreign epitopes within the HBc molecule did not interfere with its VLP-forming ability, with the HBV pre-S1 epitope exposed on the surface and the HCV core epitope buried within the VLPs. After immunization of BALB/c mice, specific T-cell activation by both foreign epitopes and a high-titer antibody response against the pre-S1 epitope were found, whereas an antibody response against the HBc carrier was notably suppressed. Both inserted epitopes also induced a specific cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte (CTL) response, as shown by the gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production profile. PMID:20410327

  14. Mechanisms of HBV-induced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Levrero, Massimo; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) contributes to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development through direct and indirect mechanisms. HBV DNA integration into the host genome occurs at early steps of clonal tumor expansion and induces both genomic instability and direct insertional mutagenesis of diverse cancer-related genes. Prolonged expression of the viral regulatory protein HBx and/or altered versions of the preS/S envelope proteins dysregulates cell transcription and proliferation control and sensitizes liver cells to carcinogenic factors. Accumulation of preS1 large envelope proteins and/or preS2/S mutant proteins activates the unfold proteins response, that can contribute to hepatocyte transformation. Epigenetic changes targeting the expression of tumor suppressor genes occur early in the development of HCC. A major role is played by the HBV protein, HBx, which is recruited on cellular chromatin and modulates chromatin dynamics at specific gene loci. Compared with tumors associated with other risk factors, HBV-related tumors have a higher rate of chromosomal alterations, p53 inactivation by mutations and overexpression of fetal liver/hepatic progenitor cells genes. The WNT/β-catenin pathway is also often activated but HBV-related tumors display a low rate of activating β-catenin mutations. HBV-related HCCs may arise on non-cirrhotic livers, further supporting the notion that HBV plays a direct role in liver transformation by triggering both common and etiology specific oncogenic pathways in addition to stimulating the host immune response and driving liver chronic necro-inflammation.

  15. Hepatocytes proteomic alteration and seroproteome analysis of HBV-transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chen; Wei, Haiming; Sun, Rui; Zhang, Jian; Tian, Zhigang

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis B is the most common and serious liver disease, especially in developing countries. Although HBV pathogenesis has been extensively investigated, the proteomic alteration of hepatocytes during HBV chronic infection is still unclear. Using the purified hepatocytes, we compared the protein profiles by 2-DE and LC-MS between HBV-transgenic (Tg) and corresponding background mice. Twenty-seven altered proteins were identified in hepatocytes from HBV-Tg mice, among which 13 proteins were involved in mitochondrion metabolism pathway including tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and oxidative response; four proteins (SELENBP, SCP2, RGN and PRDX1) were also dramatically changed in liver samples from HBV-infected patients. Important genes (gpx, sod, ogg et al.) correlated to oxidative damage were up-regulated in the liver of HBV-Tg mice. Reactive oxygen species production was significantly increased while ATP production was decreased in liver mitochondria from HBV-Tg mice. Moreover, hepatocytes of HBV-Tg mice were more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death than that of wild-type control. Using 2-D Western blotting analysis, eight hepatocyte proteins were found to react with sera of HBV-Tg mice but not with that of background mice. Interestingly, two (Etfa and Dmgdh) of the eight reactive proteins were overexpressed in HBV-Tg mice. We believe this study is the first proteomic and seroproteome analysis of HBV-infected mammalian hepatocyte and provides insightful links between HBV infection and HBV-induced liver diseases.

  16. The Early Results of a New Health Care Program Implementation in HBV Screening: an Iranian Experience.

    PubMed

    Sharifian, Afsaneh; Naderi, Nostratollah; Sanati, Azar; Mohebi, Seyed Reza; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Golmohamadi, Ali; Nori, Simin; Khanyaghma, Mahsa; Sheikhesmaeili, Farshad; Zali, Mohamad Reza

    2015-10-01

    BACKGROUND According to the reports of World Health Organization (WHO) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the prevalence of chronic hepatitis B infection in Iran has decreased from 2-7% in 2001 to 1.3-0.8% in children aged 2-14 years. In 2010 the Institute of Medicine recommended more comprehensive screening by primary care physicians (PCPs) for evaluation, vaccination, and management of infected patients for further decrease in the prevalence of chronic HBV infection. Thus, with contribution of the Health Department, we developed a practical flowchart for PCPs to start active screening of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in all visited patients and refer the positive cases for further evaluation and management to Taleghani Hospital. METHODS With collaboration of Health Department of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences), physicians of health centers were asked to screen all their patients for HBsAg. Positive cases were referred to Taleghani Hospital. They were first registered and educated about their disease, life style, and prevention methods. Their first degree families were screened for HBV infection too and were referred for vaccination if needed. According to the results of lab tests, appropriate management was done by a hepatologist. RESULTS Since implementation of this program, we have encountered a significant rise in patient detection (even in high risk groups). Many of them were not aware of their disease and most of those who were aware of their disease were not managed appropriately. Family screening and vaccination were inadequate and need more emphasis. CONCLUSION Although health system is active about screening of HBV infection in high risk populations, it is not perfect. It seems that health system needs to upgrade the screening and management programs of HBV infection.

  17. Inhibition of HBV Replication in HepG2.2.15 Cells by Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell-Derived Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Song, Hong-Li; Zheng, Wei-Ping; Shen, Zhong-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Anti-HBV therapy is essential for patients awaiting liver transplantation. This study aimed to explore the effects of dendritic cells (DCs) derived from the peripheral blood of hepatitis B patients on the replication of HBV in vivo and to evaluate the biosafety of DCs in clinical therapy. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from HBV-infected patients and maturation-promoting factors and both HBsAg and HBcAg were used to induce DC maturation. Mature DCs and lymphocytes were co-cultured with human hepatocyte cell HL-7702 or HBV-producing human hepatocellular carcinoma cell HepG2.2.15. We found that mature lymphocytes exposed to DCs in vitro did not influence morphology or activities of HL-7702 and HepG2.2.15 cells. Liver function indexes and endotoxin levels in the cell supernatants did not change in these co-cultures. Additionally, supernatant and intracellular HBV DNA levels were reduced when HepG2.2.15 cells were co-cultured with mature lymphocytes that had been cultured with DCs, and HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) levels in HepG2.2.15 cells also decreased. Importantly, DC-mediated immunotherapy had no mutagenic effect on HBV genomic DNA by gene sequencing of the P, S, X, and C regions of HBV genomic DNA. We conclude that PBMC-derived DCs from HBV-infected patients act on autologous lymphocytes to suppress HBV replication and these DC clusters showed favorable biosafety.

  18. New HBV subgenotype D9, a novel D/C recombinant, identified in patients with chronic HBeAg-negative infection in Eastern India.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Banerjee, P; Deny, P; Mondal, R K; Nandi, M; Roychoudhury, A; Das, K; Banerjee, S; Santra, A; Zoulim, F; Chowdhury, A; Datta, S

    2013-03-01

    Genome diversity is a hallmark of hepatitis B virus (HBV), which allowed its classification into 10 genotypes (A-J) and numerous subgenotypes. Among them, Genotype D is currently segregated into eight subgenotypes (D1-D8). Here, we report the identification and characterization of a novel subgenotype within genotype D of HBV from chronic hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-negative patients of Eastern India. Phylogenetic tree analysis based on complete genome sequences revealed that six of 39 HBV/D isolates formed a distinct cluster supported by high bootstrap value and had nucleotide divergence >4% relative to the known D subgenotypes (D1-D8), justifying their assignment into a new subgenotype (D9). By comparing the amino acid sequences of the four ORFs of HBV/D9 with D1-D8, 36 specific residues, including a unique one (E(112) in the core region), were identified that could be considered as a signature of D9. Further analysis by Simplot, BootScan and jpHMM demonstrated that D9 resulted from a discrete recombination with genotype C over the precore-core region. This type of recombination has not been described previously as all C/D recombinants reported so far possessed genotype C backbones with mosaic fragments derived from HBV/D. Interestingly, compared to other subgenotypes of HBV/D, D9 isolates had a higher frequency of mutations (A1762T and G1764A) in the basal core promoter region that had been implicated in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. Further investigations are needed to determine the overall prevalence and clinical significance of these newly characterized D9 strains and to assess the impact of inter-genotypic recombination on viral properties.

  19. HBV endemicity in Mexico is associated with HBV genotypes H and G

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Sonia; Panduro, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes have distinct genetic and geographic diversity and may be associated with specific clinical characteristics, progression, severity of disease and antiviral response. Herein, we provide an updated overview of the endemicity of HBV genotypes H and G in Mexico. HBV genotype H is predominant among the Mexican population, but not in Central America. Its geographic distribution is related to a typical endemicity among the Mexicans which is characterized by a low hepatitis B surface antigen seroprevalence, apparently due to a rapid resolution of the infection, low viral loads and a high prevalence of occult B infection. During chronic infections, genotype H is detected in mixtures with other HBV genotypes and associated with other co-morbidities, such as obesity, alcoholism and co-infection with hepatitis C virus or human immunodeficiency virus. Hepatocellular carcinoma prevalence is low. Thus, antiviral therapy may differ significantly from the standard guidelines established worldwide. The high prevalence of HBV genotype G in the Americas, especially among the Mexican population, raises new questions regarding its geographic origin that will require further investigation. PMID:24023487

  20. HBV endemicity in Mexico is associated with HBV genotypes H and G.

    PubMed

    Roman, Sonia; Panduro, Arturo

    2013-09-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes have distinct genetic and geographic diversity and may be associated with specific clinical characteristics, progression, severity of disease and antiviral response. Herein, we provide an updated overview of the endemicity of HBV genotypes H and G in Mexico. HBV genotype H is predominant among the Mexican population, but not in Central America. Its geographic distribution is related to a typical endemicity among the Mexicans which is characterized by a low hepatitis B surface antigen seroprevalence, apparently due to a rapid resolution of the infection, low viral loads and a high prevalence of occult B infection. During chronic infections, genotype H is detected in mixtures with other HBV genotypes and associated with other co-morbidities, such as obesity, alcoholism and co-infection with hepatitis C virus or human immunodeficiency virus. Hepatocellular carcinoma prevalence is low. Thus, antiviral therapy may differ significantly from the standard guidelines established worldwide. The high prevalence of HBV genotype G in the Americas, especially among the Mexican population, raises new questions regarding its geographic origin that will require further investigation.

  1. HBV: Do I treat my immunotolerant patients?

    PubMed

    Vlachogiannakos, Jiannis; Papatheodoridis, George V

    2016-01-01

    Immunotolerant patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection are characterized by positive HBeAg, high viral replication, persistently normal ALT and no or minimal liver damage. Since the risk of the progression of liver disease and the chance of a sustained response with existing anti-HBV agents are low, current guidelines do not recommend treatment but close monitoring with serial alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and HBV DNA measurements instead. However, not treating all these patients is a concern because advanced histological lesions have been reported in certain cases who are usually older (>30-40 years old), and continued high HBV replication could increase the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Thus, the optimal management of immunotolerant patients is often individualised according to age, which is associated with histological severity and patient outcome. In particular, immunotolerant patients <30 years old can be monitored for ALT and HBV DNA, while treatment is often recommended in the few patients over 40. A liver biopsy and/or non-invasive assessment of fibrosis may be helpful to determine the therapeutic strategy in patients between 30 and 40 years old. Moreover, there are three specific subgroups of immunotolerant patients who often require treatment with oral anti-HBV agents: patients who will receive immunosuppressive treatment or chemotherapy, women with serum HBV DNA >10(6-7) IU/ml during the last trimester of pregnancy and certain healthcare professionals with high viraemia levels. More studies are needed to further clarify the natural history for the optimal timing of treatment in this setting.

  2. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Maya, Ram; Gershwin, M Eric; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2008-02-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases have long been an enigmatic subject that have involved genetic and environmental factors. Recent intriguing data has contributed to the mechanisms involved, including the relationship of infectious agents and loss of tolerance. This loss of tolerance is illustrated by the data on the immune response to Hepatitis B virus such as the molecular mimicry between HBV antigens and self proteins, the generation of immune complexes between HBV antigens and antibodies, and apoptosis/tissue damage resulting in the exposure of intracellular antigens to the immune system. In this paper, we review the current database related to HBV infection and a variety of autoimmune conditions, including autoimmune hepatitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, aplastic anemia, antiphospholipid syndrome, polyarteritis nodosa, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, thyroid disease and uveitis. PMID:18270862

  3. Core protein: a pleiotropic keystone in the HBV lifecycle

    PubMed Central

    Zlotnick, Adam; Venkatakrishnan, Balasubramanian; Tan, Zhenning; Lewellyn, Eric; Turner, William; Francis, Samson

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) is a small virus whose genome has only four open reading frames. We argue that the simplicity of the virion correlates with a complexity of functions for viral proteins. We focus on the HBV core protein (Cp), a small (183 residue) protein that self-assembles to form the viral capsid. However, its functions are a little more complicated than that. In an infected cell Cp modulates every step of the viral lifecycle. Cp is bound to nuclear viral DNA and affects its epigenetics. Cp correlates with RNA specificity. Cp assembles specifically on a reverse transcriptase-viral RNA complex or, apparently, nothing at all. Indeed Cp has been one of the model systems for investigation of virus self-assembly. Cp participates in regulation of reverse transcription. Cp signals completion of reverse transcription to support virus secretion. Cp carries both nuclear localization signals and HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) binding sites; both of these functions appear to be regulated by contents of the capsid. Cp can be targeted by antivirals -- while self-assembly is the most accessible of Cp activities, we argue that it makes sense to engage the broader spectrum of Cp function. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on “From the discovery of the Australia antigen to the development of new curative therapies for hepatitis B: an unfinished story.” PMID:26129969

  4. Core protein: A pleiotropic keystone in the HBV lifecycle.

    PubMed

    Zlotnick, Adam; Venkatakrishnan, Balasubramanian; Tan, Zhenning; Lewellyn, Eric; Turner, William; Francis, Samson

    2015-09-01

    Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) is a small virus whose genome has only four open reading frames. We argue that the simplicity of the virion correlates with a complexity of functions for viral proteins. We focus on the HBV core protein (Cp), a small (183 residue) protein that self-assembles to form the viral capsid. However, its functions are a little more complicated than that. In an infected cell Cp modulates almost every step of the viral lifecycle. Cp is bound to nuclear viral DNA and affects its epigenetics. Cp correlates with RNA specificity. Cp assembles specifically on a reverse transcriptase-viral RNA complex or, apparently, nothing at all. Indeed Cp has been one of the model systems for investigation of virus self-assembly. Cp participates in regulation of reverse transcription. Cp signals completion of reverse transcription to support virus secretion. Cp carries both nuclear localization signals and HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) binding sites; both of these functions appear to be regulated by contents of the capsid. Cp can be targeted by antivirals - while self-assembly is the most accessible of Cp activities, we argue that it makes sense to engage the broader spectrum of Cp function. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on "From the discovery of the Australia antigen to the development of new curative therapies for hepatitis B: an unfinished story." PMID:26129969

  5. The gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase to platelet ratio (GPR) predicts significant liver fibrosis and cirrhosis in patients with chronic HBV infection in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Lemoine, Maud; Shimakawa, Yusuke; Nayagam, Shevanthi; Khalil, Mustapha; Suso, Penda; Lloyd, Jo; Goldin, Robert; Njai, Harr-Freeya; Ndow, Gibril; Taal, Makie; Cooke, Graham; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Vray, Muriel; Mbaye, Papa Saliou; Njie, Ramou; Mallet, Vincent; Thursz, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background Simple and inexpensive non-invasive fibrosis tests are highly needed but have been poorly studied in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods Using liver histology as a gold standard, we developed a novel index using routine laboratory tests to predict significant fibrosis in patients with chronic HBV infection in The Gambia, West Africa. We prospectively assessed the diagnostic accuracy of the novel index, Fibroscan, aspartate transaminase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI), and Fib-4 in Gambian patients with CHB (training set) and also in French and Senegalese CHB cohorts (validation sets). Results Of 135 consecutive treatment-naïve patients with CHB who had liver biopsy, 39% had significant fibrosis (Metavir fibrosis stage ≥F2) and 15% had cirrhosis (F4). In multivariable analysis, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) and platelet count were independent predictors of significant fibrosis. Consequently, GGT-to-platelet ratio (GPR) was developed. In The Gambia, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) of the GPR was significantly higher than that of APRI and Fib-4 to predict ≥F2, ≥F3 and F4. In Senegal, the AUROC of GPR was significantly better than Fib-4 and APRI for ≥F2 (0.73, 95% CI 0.59 to 0.86) and better than Fib-4 and Fibroscan for ≥F3 (0.93, 0.87 to 0.99). In France, the AUROC of GPR to diagnose ≥F2 (0.72, 95% CI 0.59 to 0.85) and F4 (0.87, 0.76 to 0.98) was equivalent to that of APRI and Fib-4. Conclusions The GPR is a more accurate routine laboratory marker than APRI and Fib-4 to stage liver fibrosis in patients with CHB in West Africa. The GPR represents a simple and inexpensive alternative to liver biopsy and Fibroscan in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:26109530

  6. Active vaccination to prevent de novo hepatitis B virus infection in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Che; Yong, Chee-Chien; Chen, Chao-Long

    2015-10-21

    The shortage of organ donors mandates the use of liver allograft from anti-HBc(+) donors, especially in areas highly endemic for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The incidence of de novo hepatitis B infection (DNH) is over 30%-70% among recipients of hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb) (+) grafts without any prophylaxis after liver transplantation (LT). Systematic reviews showed that prophylactic therapy [lamivudine and/or hepatitits B immunoglobulin (HBIG)] dramatically reduces the probability of DNH. However, there are limited studies regarding the effects of active immunization to prevent DNH, and the role of active vaccination is not well-defined. This review focuses on the feasibility and efficacy of pre- and post-LT HBV vaccination to prevent DNH in HBsAg(-) recipient using HBcAb(+) grafts. The presence of HBsAb in combination with lamivudine or HBIG results in lower incidence of DNH and may reduce the requirement of HBIG. There was a trend towards decreasing incidence of DNH with higher titers of HBsAb. High titers of HBsAb (> 1000 IU/L) achieved after repeated vaccination could eliminate the necessity for additional antiviral prophylaxis in pediatric recipients. In summary, active vaccination with adequate HBsAb titer is a feasible, cost-effective strategy to prevent DNH in recipients of HBcAb(+) grafts. HBV vaccination is advised for candidates on waiting list and for recipients after withdrawal of steroids and onset of low dose immunosuppression after transplantation.

  7. Dysregulation of Retinoic Acid Receptor Diminishes Hepatocyte Permissiveness to Hepatitis B Virus Infection through Modulation of Sodium Taurocholate Cotransporting Polypeptide (NTCP) Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Tsukuda, Senko; Watashi, Koichi; Iwamoto, Masashi; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Aizaki, Hideki; Okada, Maiko; Sugiyama, Masaya; Kojima, Soichi; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Mizokami, Masashi; Li, Jisu; Tong, Shuping; Wakita, Takaji

    2015-01-01

    Sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) is an entry receptor for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and is regarded as one of the determinants that confer HBV permissiveness to host cells. However, how host factors regulate the ability of NTCP to support HBV infection is largely unknown. We aimed to identify the host signaling that regulated NTCP expression and thereby permissiveness to HBV. Here, a cell-based chemical screening method identified that Ro41-5253 decreased host susceptibility to HBV infection. Pretreatment with Ro41-5253 inhibited the viral entry process without affecting HBV replication. Intriguingly, Ro41-5253 reduced expression of both NTCP mRNA and protein. We found that retinoic acid receptor (RAR) regulated the promoter activity of the human NTCP (hNTCP) gene and that Ro41-5253 repressed the hNTCP promoter by antagonizing RAR. RAR recruited to the hNTCP promoter region, and nucleotides −112 to −96 of the hNTCP was suggested to be critical for RAR-mediated transcriptional activation. HBV susceptibility was decreased in pharmacologically RAR-inactivated cells. CD2665 showed a stronger anti-HBV potential and disrupted the spread of HBV infection that was achieved by continuous reproduction of the whole HBV life cycle. In addition, this mechanism was significant for drug development, as antagonization of RAR blocked infection of multiple HBV genotypes and also a clinically relevant HBV mutant that was resistant to nucleoside analogs. Thus, RAR is crucial for regulating NTCP expression that determines permissiveness to HBV infection. This is the first demonstration showing host regulation of NTCP to support HBV infection. PMID:25550158

  8. The direct and indirect roles of HBV in liver cancer: prospective markers for HCC screening and potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Ringelhan, Marc; O'Connor, Tracy; Protzer, Ulrike; Heikenwalder, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains the number one risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), accounting for more than 600 000 deaths/year. Despite highly effective antiviral treatment options, chronic hepatitis B (CHB), subsequent end-stage liver disease and HCC development remain a major challenge worldwide. In CHB, liver damage is mainly caused by the influx of immune cells and destruction of infected hepatocytes, causing necro-inflammation. Treatment with nucleoside/nucleotide analogues can effectively suppress HBV replication in patients with CHB and thus decrease the risk for HCC development. Nevertheless, the risk of HCC in treated patients showing sufficient suppression of HBV DNA replication is significantly higher than in patients with inactive CHB, regardless of the presence of baseline liver cirrhosis, suggesting direct, long-lasting, predisposing effects of HBV. Direct oncogenic effects of HBV include integration in the host genome, leading to deletions, cis/trans-activation, translocations, the production of fusion transcripts and generalized genomic instability, as well as pleiotropic effects of viral transcripts (HBsAg and HBx). Analysis of these viral factors in active surveillance may allow early identification of high-risk patients, and their integration into a molecular classification of HCC subtypes might help in the development of novel therapeutic approaches.

  9. Hepatitis B virus infection and primary hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Feitelson, M

    1992-01-01

    For many years, epidemiological studies have demonstrated a strong link between chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and the development of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (PHC). Other hepatocarcinogens such as hepatitis C virus and aflatoxin also contribute to hepatocarcinogenesis either in conjunction with HBV infection or alone. Cellular and molecular biological studies are providing explanations for the HBV-PHC relationship, and models are now being formulated to further test the relative importance of various factors such as viral DNA integration, activation of oncogenes, genetic instability, loss of tumor suppressor genes, and trans-activating properties of HBV to the pathogenesis of PHC. Further research will probably define more than a single mechanism whereby chronic HBV infection results in PHC. PMID:1323384

  10. Selection of affinity-improved neutralizing human scFv against HBV PreS1 from CDR3 VH/VL mutant library.

    PubMed

    Chen, YanMin; Bai, Yin; Guo, XiaoChen; Wang, WenFei; Zheng, Qi; Wang, FuXiang; Sun, Dejun; Li, DeShan; Ren, GuiPing; Yin, JieChao

    2016-07-01

    A CDR3 mutant library was constructed from a previously isolated anti-HBV neutralizing Homo sapiens scFv-31 template by random mutant primers PCR. Then the library was displayed on the inner membrane surface in Escherichia coli periplasmic space. Seven scFv clones were isolated from the mutant library through three rounds of screening by flow cytometry. Competition ELISA assay indicates that isolated scFv fragments show more efficient binding ability to HBV PreS1 compared with parental scFv-31. HBV neutralization assay indicated that two clones (scFv-3 and 59) show higher neutralizing activity by blocking the HBV infection to Chang liver cells. Our method provides a new strategy for rapid screening of mutant antibody library for affinity-enhanced scFv clones and the neutralizing scFvs obtained from this study provide a potential alternative of Hepatitis B immune globulin.

  11. A real-time quantitative assay for hepatitis B DNA virus (HBV) developed to detect all HBV genotypes.

    PubMed

    Sitnik, Roberta; Paes, Angela; Mangueira, Cristovão Pitangueira; Pinho, João Renato Rebello

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. Besides genotype, quantitative analysis of HBV infection is extensively used for monitoring disease progression and treatment. Affordable viral load monitoring is desirable in resource-limited settings and it has been already shown to be useful in developing countries for other viruses such as Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and HIV. In this paper, we describe the validation of a real-time PCR assay for HBV DNA quantification with TaqMan chemistry and MGB probes. Primers and probes were designed using an alignment of sequences from all HBV genotypes in order to equally amplify all of them. The assay is internally controlled and was standardized with an international HBV panel. Its efficacy was evaluated comparing the results with two other methods: Versant HBV DNA Assay 3.0 (bDNA, Siemens, NY, USA) and another real-time PCR from a reference laboratory. Intra-assay and inter-assay reproducibilities were determined and the mean of CV values obtained were 0.12 and 0.09, respectively. The assay was validated with a broad dynamic range and is efficient for amplifying all HBV genotypes, providing a good option to quantify HBV DNA as a routine procedure, with a cheap and reliable protocol. PMID:20602019

  12. Regulation of microRNA by hepatitis B virus infection and their possible association with control of innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xia; Kanda, Tatsuo; Wu, Shuang; Nakamura, Masato; Miyamura, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Banerjee, Arup; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) chronically infects more than 350 million people worldwide. HBV causes acute and chronic hepatitis, and is one of the major causes of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. There exist complex interactions between HBV and the immune system including adaptive and innate immunity. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and TLR-signaling pathways are important parts of the innate immune response in HBV infections. It is well known that TLR-ligands could suppress HBV replication and that TLRs play important roles in anti-viral defense. Previous immunological studies demonstrated that HBV e antigen (HBeAg) is more efficient at eliciting T-cell tolerance, including production of specific cytokines IL-2 and interferon gamma, than HBV core antigen. HBeAg downregulates cytokine production in hepatocytes by the inhibition of MAPK or NF-κB activation through the interaction with receptor-interacting serine/threonine protein kinase. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are also able to regulate various biological processes such as the innate immune response. When the expressions of approximately 1000 miRNAs were compared between human hepatoma cells HepG2 and HepG2.2.15, which could produce HBV virion that infects chimpanzees, using real-time RT-PCR, we observed several different expression levels in miRNAs related to TLRs. Although we and others have shown that HBV modulates the host immune response, several of the miRNAs seem to be involved in the TLR signaling pathways. The possibility that alteration of these miRNAs during HBV infection might play a critical role in innate immunity against HBV infection should be considered. This article is intended to comprehensively review the association between HBV and innate immunity, and to discuss the role of miRNAs in the innate immune response to HBV infection. PMID:24966589

  13. Regulation of microRNA by hepatitis B virus infection and their possible association with control of innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xia; Kanda, Tatsuo; Wu, Shuang; Nakamura, Masato; Miyamura, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Banerjee, Arup; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2014-06-21

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) chronically infects more than 350 million people worldwide. HBV causes acute and chronic hepatitis, and is one of the major causes of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. There exist complex interactions between HBV and the immune system including adaptive and innate immunity. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and TLR-signaling pathways are important parts of the innate immune response in HBV infections. It is well known that TLR-ligands could suppress HBV replication and that TLRs play important roles in anti-viral defense. Previous immunological studies demonstrated that HBV e antigen (HBeAg) is more efficient at eliciting T-cell tolerance, including production of specific cytokines IL-2 and interferon gamma, than HBV core antigen. HBeAg downregulates cytokine production in hepatocytes by the inhibition of MAPK or NF-κB activation through the interaction with receptor-interacting serine/threonine protein kinase. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are also able to regulate various biological processes such as the innate immune response. When the expressions of approximately 1000 miRNAs were compared between human hepatoma cells HepG2 and HepG2.2.15, which could produce HBV virion that infects chimpanzees, using real-time RT-PCR, we observed several different expression levels in miRNAs related to TLRs. Although we and others have shown that HBV modulates the host immune response, several of the miRNAs seem to be involved in the TLR signaling pathways. The possibility that alteration of these miRNAs during HBV infection might play a critical role in innate immunity against HBV infection should be considered. This article is intended to comprehensively review the association between HBV and innate immunity, and to discuss the role of miRNAs in the innate immune response to HBV infection. PMID:24966589

  14. Prevention of hepatitis B virus infection: from the past to the future.

    PubMed

    Orlando, R; Foggia, M; Maraolo, A E; Mascolo, S; Palmiero, G; Tambaro, O; Tosone, G

    2015-06-01

    About 3-5 % of the world's population is chronically infected by hepatitis B virus (HBV) and is at risk of developing liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. The risk of dying prematurely because of chronic HBV infection is higher in younger people. The current strategies to prevent HBV infection involve immunization (active and/or passive) and antiviral chemoprophylaxis. The vaccines available for active immunization, containing hepatitis B surface antigen, are safe and confer long-term immunity in most healthy subjects. Since the vaccination is unsatisfactory in some patients, e.g., those with chronic kidney disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection, type I diabetes mellitus, and celiac disease, new strategies of vaccination are required. The neonatal, infant, and adolescent routine program vaccination in about 180 countries has greatly decreased the disease burden. Passive immunization with specific HBV immunoglobulins is recommended after single acute exposure, in infants born to infected mothers, and in HBV-infected patients undergoing liver transplantation combined with nucleoside/nucleotide analogues (chemoprophylaxis). Chemoprophylaxis is also indicated in HBV carrier candidates for immunosuppressive treatment and in patients with occult B infection undergoing immunosuppressive therapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Since HBV is not eradicable by an immune response or by antiviral drugs developed so far, the only preventive strategy remains global neonatal vaccination in all countries, firstly in HBV-endemic countries. PMID:25678010

  15. 2-Octynoic Acid Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Infection through Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Darong; Xue, Binbin; Wang, Xiaohong; Yu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Nianli; Gao, Yimin; Liu, Chen; Zhu, Haizhen

    2013-01-01

    Many chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients with current therapy do not clear the virus. It is necessary to find novel treatments. The effect of 2-octynoic acid (2-OA) on HCV infection in human hepatocytes was examined. The mechanism of 2-OA antiviral activity was explored. Our data showed that 2-OA abrogated lipid accumulation in HCV replicon cells and virus-infected hepatocytes. It suppressed HCV RNA replication and infectious virus production with no cytotoxicity to the host cells. 2-OA did not affect hepatitis B virus replication in HepG2.2.15 cells derived from HepG2 cells transfected with full genome of HBV. Further study demonstrated that 2-OA activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibited acetyl-CoA carboxylase in viral-infected cells. Compound C, a specific inhibitor of AMPK, inhibited AMPK activity and reversed the reduction of intracellular lipid accumulation and the antiviral effect of 2-OA. Knockdown of AMPK expression by RNA interference abolished the activation of AMPK by 2-OA and blocked 2-OA antiviral activity. Interestingly, 2-OA induced interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and inhibited microRNA-122 (miR-122) expression in virus-infected hepatocytes. MiR-122 overexpression reversed the antiviral effect of 2-OA. Furthermore, knockdown of AMPK expression reversed both the induction of ISGs and suppression of miR-122 by 2-OA, implying that activated AMPK induces the intracellular innate response through the induction of ISGs and inhibiting miR-122 expression. 2-OA inhibits HCV infection through regulation of innate immune response by activated AMPK. These findings reveal a novel mechanism by which active AMPK inhibits HCV infection. 2-OA and its derivatives hold promise for novel drug development for chronic hepatitis C. PMID:23741428

  16. Overrepresentation of IL-10-Expressing B Cells Suppresses Cytotoxic CD4+ T Cell Activity in HBV-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hongwu; Zhu, Zun-Qiang; Zhang, Zhang-Yun; Zhao, Ludong

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common cancer with poor prognosis and low five-year survival rate. A strong and effective CD4+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity was associated with better survival and low recurrence rate in HCC, but the regulatory mechanism that controls CD4+ T cell cytotoxicity in HCC patients is not fully examined. Given that IL-10-expressing B cells could suppress the inflammation of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells, T helper 1 (Th1) cells and Th17 cells, while promoting regulatory T (Treg) cell differentiation, we examined the role of IL-10-expressing B cells in HBV-related HCC patients. We found that compared to healthy controls, HCC patients exhibited significantly higher frequencies of IL-10-expressing B cells, which were negatively correlated with the frequencies of granzyme A, granzyme B, and perforin expressing CD4+ T cells. Surface molecule Tim-1 was preferentially expressed on IL-10-expressing B cells. Therefore, we separated total B cells into Tim-1+ and Tim-1- B cells. CD4+ T cells incubated with Tim-1+ B cells exhibited significantly reduced levels of granzyme A, granzyme B and perforin expression, compared to the CD4+ T cells incubated with Tim-1- B cells. Antagonizing IL-10 in culture rescued CD4+ T cell cytotoxicity. Compared to that in peripheral blood, the level of IL-10-expressing B cells were further upregulated in resected tumor, while the level of CD4+ cytotoxic T cells was downregulated. The negative correlations between IL-10-expressing B cells and CD4+ cytotoxic T cells were also observed in tumor-infiltrating cells. Together, our data revealed an additional antitumor mechanism mediated by IL-10-expressing B cells. PMID:27136203

  17. [Hepatitis B virus infection in pregnancy and the immunosuppressed patient].

    PubMed

    Riveiro-Barciela, Mar; Buti, María

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection continues to be a major public health problem worldwide. Although treatment indications are well established in clinical practice guidelines, there are some risk groups, such as pregnant women and immunosuppressed patients, who require different and specific management of HBV infection. In pregnant women, treatment indication should be individualized and the risk of HBV transmission to the newborn evaluated because cases of vertical transmission continue to be reported, despite active and passive immunoprophylaxis. In patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy, HBV reactivation is associated with high morbidity and mortality, even in patients with past HBV infection, highlighting the importance of screening and the need to evaluate prophylactic therapy in some cases. PMID:25066320

  18. Pre-acute hepadnaviral infection is associated with activation-induced apoptotic death of lymphocytes in the woodchuck (Marmota monax) model of hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Gujar, Shashi A; Jenkins, Adam K M; Macparland, Sonya A; Michalak, Tomasz I

    2010-09-01

    Woodchucks (Marmota monax) infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) represent a highly valuable immunopathogenic model of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Both WHV and HBV are noncytopathic hepadnaviruses which induce a strong but delayed virus-specific cellular immune response believed to be a cause of hepatitis. The reason behind this postponement is not well understood and its dissection in the woodchuck model has been hampered by the lack of appropriate research tools. In this study, we applied an assay for the simultaneous detection of cell apoptosis and proliferation to determine the fate of T lymphocytes after WHV infection leading to acute hepatitis. The results revealed that pre-acute WHV infection is associated with the significantly heightened susceptibility of T lymphocytes to activation-induced apoptotic death. This suggests that T lymphocyte function is compromised very early in the course of hepadnaviral infection and this may directly contribute to the postponement of virus-specific T cell response.

  19. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate opposes HBV-induced incomplete autophagy by enhancing lysosomal acidification, which is unfavorable for HBV replication

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, L; Hu, J; Shu, W; Gao, B; Xiong, S

    2015-01-01

    Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major polyphenol in green tea, exhibits diverse beneficial properties, including antiviral activity. Autophagy is a cellular process that is involved in the degradation of long-lived proteins and damaged organelles. Recent evidence indicates that modulation of autophagy is a potential therapeutic strategy for various viral diseases. In the present study, we investigated the effect of EGCG on hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication and the possible involvement of autophagy in this process. Our results showed that HBV induced autophagosome formation, which was required for replication of itself. However, although EGCG efficiently inhibited HBV replication, it enhanced, but not inhibited, autophagosome formation in hepatoma cells. Further study showed that HBV induced an incomplete autophagy, while EGCG, similar to starvation, was able to induce a complete autophagic process, which appeared to be unfavorable for HBV replication. Furthermore, it was found that HBV induced an incomplete autophagy by impairing lysosomal acidification, while it lost this ability in the presence of EGCG. Taken together, these data demonstrated that EGCG treatment opposed HBV-induced incomplete autophagy via enhancing lysosomal acidification, which was unfavorable for HBV replication. PMID:25996297

  20. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate opposes HBV-induced incomplete autophagy by enhancing lysosomal acidification, which is unfavorable for HBV replication.

    PubMed

    Zhong, L; Hu, J; Shu, W; Gao, B; Xiong, S

    2015-05-21

    Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major polyphenol in green tea, exhibits diverse beneficial properties, including antiviral activity. Autophagy is a cellular process that is involved in the degradation of long-lived proteins and damaged organelles. Recent evidence indicates that modulation of autophagy is a potential therapeutic strategy for various viral diseases. In the present study, we investigated the effect of EGCG on hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication and the possible involvement of autophagy in this process. Our results showed that HBV induced autophagosome formation, which was required for replication of itself. However, although EGCG efficiently inhibited HBV replication, it enhanced, but not inhibited, autophagosome formation in hepatoma cells. Further study showed that HBV induced an incomplete autophagy, while EGCG, similar to starvation, was able to induce a complete autophagic process, which appeared to be unfavorable for HBV replication. Furthermore, it was found that HBV induced an incomplete autophagy by impairing lysosomal acidification, while it lost this ability in the presence of EGCG. Taken together, these data demonstrated that EGCG treatment opposed HBV-induced incomplete autophagy via enhancing lysosomal acidification, which was unfavorable for HBV replication.

  1. Inhibitory effect on hepatitis B virus in vitro by a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} ligand, rosiglitazone

    SciTech Connect

    Wakui, Yuta; Inoue, Jun; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Fukushima, Koji; Kondo, Yasuteru; Kakazu, Eiji; Obara, Noriyuki; Kimura, Osamu; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2010-05-28

    Although chronic infection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) is currently managed with nucleot(s)ide analogues or interferon-{alpha}, the control of HBV infection still remains a clinical challenge. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor, that plays a role in glucose and lipid metabolism, immune reactions, and inflammation. In this study, the suppressive effect of PPAR ligands on HBV replication was examined in vitro using a PPAR{alpha} ligand, bezafibrate, and a PPAR{gamma} ligand, rosiglitazone. The effects were examined in HepG2 cells transfected with a plasmid containing 1.3-fold HBV genome. Whereas bezafibrate showed no effect against HBV replication, rosiglitazone reduced the amount of HBV DNA, hepatitis B surface antigen, and hepatitis B e antigen in the culture supernatant. Southern blot analysis showed that the replicative intermediates of HBV in the cells were also inhibited. It was confirmed that GW9662, an antagonist of PPAR{gamma}, reduced the suppressive effect of rosiglitazone on HBV. Moreover, rosiglitazone showed a synergistic effect on HBV replication with lamivudine or interferon-{alpha}-2b. In conclusion, this study showed that rosiglitazone inhibited the replication of HBV in vitro, and suggested that the combination therapy of rosiglitazone and nucleot(s)ide analogues or interferon could be a therapeutic option for chronic HBV infection.

  2. [Risk Management of HBV Reactivation: Construction of Check System].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, reactivation of HBV in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy or immunosuppressive therapy has been a problem. Generally, HBV-DNA levels are elevated prior to HBsAg concentration, and then hepatic dysfunction is observed in the process of hepatitis by HBV reactivation. Therefore, the monitoring of HBV-DNA is useful for the prediction of hepatic dysfunction, and nucleoside/nucleoside analogue (NA) administration is able to prevent this HBV reactivation. According to these facts, "Guidelines for the Prevention of HBV Reactivation in Patients Receiving Immunosuppressive Therapy or Chemotherapy", 2009 (revised as "JSH Guidelines for the Management of Hepatitis B Virus Infection", 2013) is established, and the diagnostic algorithm of HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HBs, and HBV-DNA has relevant descriptions. Combination therapy with rituximab and steroid for malignant lymphoma has a high risk of leading to fulminant hepatitis and, consequently, the guidelines are widely followed in such cases. We introduced the improvement of electronic medical recording and ordering systems in collaboration with hepatologists, and such a system has been widely used. Although the monitoring of HBV-DNA levels is required every 1-3 months, the guidelines are not followed strictly in cases such as rheumatoid disease and solid tumors only with chemotherapy or steroid treatment. Since a DNA assay is complicated and expensive, cost-effective, time-saving, and highly sensitive/specific measurements are required as well. Therefore, Lumipulse HBsAg-HQ (CLIA method) with high sensitivity is expected to be used for the monitoring of HBV reactivation.

  3. HIV/HBV coinfection in children and antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Sara A; Gupta, Sonia; Melvin, Ann J

    2016-01-01

    Small cohort studies from countries where both HIV and HBV are endemic demonstrate prevalence rates of chronic hepatitis B in HIV-infected children of between 1 and 49%. While data on coinfected children are limited, results from studies in adults with HIV/HBV coinfection raise the concern that coinfected children may be at a higher risk of liver disease, hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis. With the scale-up of combination antiretroviral therapy worldwide, of which lamivudine is included in most first-line regimens, coinfected children treated with lamivudine risk development of HBV resistance mutations. This article summarizes the current literature relevant to HIV/HBV coinfection in children, the options for treatment and highlights priorities for future research. PMID:23458766

  4. Primary and secondary prevention of liver cancer caused by HBV

    PubMed Central

    Blumberg, Baruch S.

    2010-01-01

    Primary cancer of the liver (hepatocellular carcinoma, HCC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide; HBV is the major cause of HCC. A vaccine that protects against HBV infection was invented in 1969 and is now one of the most commonly used vaccines. National vaccination programs have dramatically reduced the prevalence of HBV infection and carriers, with a concomitant decrease in the incidence of HCC in the vaccine-impacted populations. HBV vaccine is the first widely used cancer prevention vaccine; a second that protects against papilloma virus and cancer of the cervix has recently been introduced. Appropriate treatment of HBV carriers with antivirals can reduce the titers of HBV in their blood and thereby greatly reduce the risk of HCC and chronic liver disease. Further data are required to establish criterion for treatment to enable protocols for medical and prevention programs. There are other viral caused cancers and an understanding of their pathogenesis is an important future direction for research to reduce the human burden of cancer. PMID:20036981

  5. Physical activity, immunity and infection.

    PubMed

    Romeo, J; Wärnberg, J; Pozo, T; Marcos, A

    2010-08-01

    During the last few decades, scientific evidence has confirmed a wide range of health benefits related to regular physical activity. How physical activity affects the immune function and infection risk is, however, still under debate. Commonly, intensive exercise suppresses the activity and levels of several immune cells, while other immune functions may be stimulated by moderate physical activity. With this knowledge, the understanding of the relationship between different levels of physical activity on the immune function has been raised as a potential tool to protect health not only in athletes but also in the general population; the mechanisms that translate a physically active lifestyle into good health continue to be investigated. Reviewing the literature, although several outcomes (i.e. the mechanisms by which different levels and duration of physical activity programmes affect numerous cell types and responses) remain unclear, given that the additional benefits encompass healthy habits including exercise, the use of physical activity programmes may result in improved health of elderly populations. Moderate physical activity or moderate-regulated training may enhance the immune function mainly in less fit subjects or sedentary population and the pre-event fitness status also seems to be an important individual factor regarding this relationship. Although adequate nutrition and regular physical activity habits may synergistically improve health, clinical trials in athletes using nutritional supplements to counteract the immune suppression have been inconclusive so far.Further research is necessary to find out to what extent physical activity training can exert an effect on the immune function.

  6. Prevalence, Risk Behaviors, and Virological Characteristics of Hepatitis B Virus Infection in a Group of Men Who Have Sex with Men in Brazil: Results from a Respondent-Driven Sampling Survey

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina P.; Matos, Márcia A. D.; Silva, Ágabo M. C.; Lopes, Carmen L. R.; Teles, Sheila A.; Matos, Marcos A.; Spitz, Natália; Araujo, Natalia M.; Mota, Rosa M. S.; Kerr, Ligia R. F. S.; Martins, Regina M. B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Men who have sex with men (MSM) are at increased risk of exposure to hepatitis B virus (HBV) compared with the general population. This study aims to assess the epidemiological and virological characteristics of HBV infection in a sample of MSM in Brazil, where data are scarce. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among MSM in the City of Goiânia, Central Brazil, from March to November 2014, using Respondent-Driven Sampling (RDS). After signing the consent form, participants were interviewed and a blood sample collected. All samples were tested for HBV serological markers and HBV DNA. HBV nucleotide sequence analysis was also performed. Results A total of 522 MSM were recruited in the study. The prevalence of HBV infection (current or past [presence of anti-HBc marker]) was 15.4% (95% CI: 8.7–25.8) and the rate of HBsAg carriers was 0.6% (95% CI: 0.2–1.6). About 40% (95% CI: 32.3–48.8) of the participants had serological evidence of previous HBV vaccination (reactive for isolated anti-HBs). In addition, 44.3% (95% CI: 36.1–52.9) were seronegative for all HBV markers. Age over 25 years old, receptive anal intercourse, previous sex with women, and history of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) were factors associated with HBV infection. HBV DNA was detected only in HBsAg-positive individuals. HBV isolates were classified into genotype A (subgenotypes A1 and A2), and some mutations were identified throughout the genome. Therefore, occult HBV infection was not observed in the study population. Conclusions Public health strategies should be improved for the MSM population in order to prevent HBV and other STIs, as well as to provide appropriate management of patients with active infections. PMID:27508385

  7. Hepatitis B virus infection in isolated Afro-Brazilian communities.

    PubMed

    Motta-Castro, Ana R C; Martins, Regina M B; Yoshida, Clara F T; Teles, Sheila A; Paniago, Anamaria M; Lima, Kátia M B; Gomes, Selma A

    2005-10-01

    The prevalence and genotypes of hepatitis B virus (HBV) have distinct geographical distribution. In Brazil, some African-descendants have been maintained as small isolated communities since the slavery period. In this study, HBV infection among these communities of African origin was examined. Individuals (1,058) living in 12 communities were interviewed and serum samples screened for the presence of HBV markers. HBsAg-positive sera were tested for HBV DNA by PCR and positive samples were genotyped by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). The overall prevalence of HBV infection was 19.8% (95% CI: 17.5-22.3), ranging from 5.5% to 42.4%, depending on the communities studied. Multivariate analysis of risk factors showed that increasing age, family history of hepatitis, and sexual activity were associated significantly with this infection. HBsAg was detected in 23/1,058 (2.2%) individuals. HBV DNA was present in 2/2 of HBeAg-positive serum samples and in 18/21 (85.7%) anti-HBe-positive samples. All HBV isolates belonged to genotype A, subtype Aa. Three RFLP patterns were identified: AI (17 isolates), AIV (1 isolate), and AVI (2 isolates). These findings suggest a common introduction of HBV during the slave trade from Africa to Brazil.

  8. Comparison of the effects of formaldehyde and gaseous ozone on HBV-contaminated hospital quilts

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dan; Li, Ziqiong; Jia, Bei; Che, Xiaoqiong; Song, Tianshuang; Huang, Wenxiang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Besides being highly infectious, Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major cause of liver disease worldwide. In hospital settings, it is easy for the environment and quilts to be contaminated by HBV patient blood and body fluids. Therefore, HBV can be transmitted to other patients via contaminated environmental surfaces or quilts, resulting in an HBV nosocomial infection. Formaldehyde and ozone are commonly used disinfectants that may influence this infectious situation. Objective: To investigate the clinical effectiveness of formaldehyde and gaseous ozone for the terminal cleaning of hospital quilts contaminated by HBV. Methods: Thin cloth and thick cotton soaked with the serum from high HBV copy number patients were prepared and disinfected using formaldehyde fumigation and gaseous ozone at different times. The copy numbers of HBV DNA in the HBV-contaminated cloth and cotton samples were measured quantitatively with fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: When gaseous ozone was used to disinfect HBV-contaminated quilts for 23 minutes (min), 36 min, 49 min, and 90 min, the HBV DNA copy number displayed no significant decrease compared with the copy number before disinfection (P > 0.05). In comparison, the copy number of the HBV DNA in the cloth group decreased significantly (P < 0.05) after formaldehyde fumigation disinfection for 1 hour (h), and there was no difference when longer times and increased concentrations were used. In the thick cotton group, there was also a significant decrease (P < 0.05) of the HBV DNA copy numbers, but the decrease was not as dramatic. In addition, in this group, the disinfection effect observed at 4 h was the strongest. Conclusions: The application of ozone to disinfect HBV-contaminated hospital quilts possibly has no effect, whereas, formaldehyde oxide fumigation effectively reduced HBV copy numbers. PMID:26770591

  9. CD28 family of receptors on T cells in chronic HBV infection: Expression characteristics, clinical significance and correlations with PD-1 blockade

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zong-Sheng; Hao, You-Hua; Zhang, E-Juan; Xu, Chun-Li; Zhou, Yun; Zheng, Xin; Yang, Dong-Liang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the overall clinical expression characteristics of the cluster of differentiation (CD)28 family receptors [CD28, inducible T-cell co-stimulator, programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 and B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator] on T cells in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), analyze the correlations among these receptors and the clinical parameters, and to investigate the effects of PD-1 blockade on the receptor expression profiles, T-cell function and other biological effects. The expression characteristics of the CD28 family of receptors, the effects of PD-1 blockade on the receptor expression profiles and the levels of interferon (IFN)-γ were investigated in the T cells of patients with CHB. In addition, the transcription factor, T-box 21 (T-bet) and GATA binding protein 3 (GATA-3) mRNA expression levels were investigated in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with CHB. The expression levels of the CD28 family receptors in the T cells of patients with CHB demonstrated distinct characteristics, for example levels of PD-1 and CTLA-4 on CD4 T cells and ICOS, PD-1, and BTLA on CD8 T cells were increased in cells from patients with CHB compared with those from the healthy individuals. A significant positive correlation was demonstrated among the serum HBV DNA titers and the levels of PD-1 on CD8+ T cells with the highest expression of PD-1 corresponding to viral levels >106 IU/ml. A significant positive correlation was observed between the serum HBV DNA titers and the expression levels of BTLA on CD8+ T cells with the highest expression of BTLA corresponding to viral levels >106 IU/ml. PD-1 blockade altered the expression profiles of CD28 family receptors in the T cells of patients with CHB, partly enhanced T cell function and increased the ratio of T-bet/GATA-3 mRNA in PBMCs. Thus, CD28 family receptors are potential clinical indicators for the rapid

  10. Prevention of hepatitis B virus infection in vivo by entry inhibitors derived from the large envelope protein.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Joerg; Dandri, Maura; Mier, Walter; Lütgehetmann, Marc; Volz, Tassilo; von Weizsäcker, Fritz; Haberkorn, Uwe; Fischer, Lutz; Pollok, Joerg-Matthias; Erbes, Berit; Seitz, Stefan; Urban, Stephan

    2008-03-01

    360 million people are chronically infected with the human hepatitis B virus (HBV) and are consequently prone to develop liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. As approved therapeutic regimens-which modulate patients' antiviral defenses or inhibit the viral reverse transcriptase-are generally noncurative, strategies interfering with other HBV replication steps are required. Expanding on our demonstration that acylated peptides derived from the large HBV envelope protein block virus entry in vitro, we show their applicability to prevent HBV or woolly monkey hepatitis B virus infection in vivo, using immunodeficient urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) mice repopulated with primary human or Tupaia belangeri hepatocytes. Accumulation of the peptides in the liver, their extraordinary inhibitory potency and specific mode of action permit subcutaneous delivery at very low doses. Inhibition of hepadnavirus entry thus constitutes a therapeutic approach to prevent primary HBV infection, such as after liver transplantation, and might also restrain virus spread in chronically infected patients. PMID:18297057

  11. Differential regulation of host genes including hepatic fatty acid synthase in HBV-transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongmin; Li, Hong; Yang, Yixuan; Li, Sanglin; Ren, Hong; Zhang, Dazhi; Hu, Huaidong

    2013-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the most common of the hepatitis viruses that cause chronic liver infections in humans, and it is considered to be a major global health problem. To gain a better understanding of HBV pathogenesis, and identify novel putative targets for anti-HBV therapy, this study was designed to elucidate the differential expression of host proteins in liver tissue from HBV-transgenic mice. Liver samples from two groups, (1) HBV-transgenic (Tg) mice, (2) corresponding background normal mice, wild-type (WT) mice, were collected and subjected to iTRAQ and mass spectrometry analysis. In total, 1950 unique proteins were identified, and 68 proteins were found to be differentially expressed in HBV-Tg mice as compared with that in WT mice. Several differentially expressed proteins were further validated by real-time quantitative RT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis. Furthermore, the association of HBV replication with fatty acid synthase (FASN), one of the highly expressed proteins in HBV-Tg mice, was verified. Silencing of FASN expression in HepG2.2.15 cells suppressed viral replication through the IFN signaling pathway, and some downstream antiviral effectors. The implicated role of FASN in HBV replication provides an opportunity to test existing compounds against FASN for adjuvant therapy and/or treatment of HBV replication. PMID:23675653

  12. Traditional Chinese medicine and related active compounds: a review of their role on hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Qi, F H; Wang, Z X; Cai, P P; Zhao, L; Gao, J J; Kokudo, N; Li, A Y; Han, J Q; Tang, W

    2013-12-01

    Since the significant public health hazard of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and obvious drug resistance and dose-dependent side effects for common antiviral agents (e.g., interferon α, lamivudine, and adefovir), continuous development of agents to treat HBV infection is urgently needed. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is an established segment of the health care system in China. Currently, it is widely used for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) in China and many parts of the world. Over a long period of time in clinical practice and in basic research progress, the effectiveness and beneficial contribution of TCM on CHB have been gradually known and confirmed. Based upon our review of related papers and because of our prior knowledge and experience, we have selected some Chinese medicines, including Chinese herbal formulas (e.g., Xiao-Chai-Hu-Tang, Xiao-Yao-San, and Long-Dan-Xie-Gan-Tang), single herbs (e.g., Phyllanthus niruri, Radix astragali, Polygonum cuspidatum, Rheum palmatum, and Salvia miltiorrhiza) and related active compounds (e.g., wogonin, artesunate, saikosaponin, astragaloside IV, and chrysophanol 8-O-beta-Dglucoside) and Chinese medicine preparations (e.g., silymarin, silibinin, kushenin, and cinobufacini), which seem effective and worthy of additional and indepth study in treating CHB, and we have given them a brief review. We conclude that these Chinese herbal medicines exhibit significant anti-HBV activities with improved liver function, and enhanced HBeAg and HBsAg sero-conversion rates as well as HBV DNA clearance rates in HepG2 2.2.15 cells, DHBV models, or patients with CHB. We hope this review will contribute to an understanding of TCM and related active compounds as an effective treatment for CHB and provide useful information for the development of more effective antiviral drugs. PMID:24423652

  13. Efficient Inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus Infection by a preS1-binding Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaoli; Zhou, Ming; He, Yonggang; Wan, Yanmin; Bai, Weiya; Tao, Shuai; Ren, Yanqin; Zhang, Xinxin; Xu, Jianqing; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Junqi; Hu, Kanghong; Xie, Youhua

    2016-01-01

    Entry inhibitors are promising novel antivirals against hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The existing potential entry inhibitors have targeted the cellular receptor(s). In this study, we aim to develop the first entry inhibitor that inhibits HBV infection via targeting viral particles. The preS1 segment of the large envelope glycoprotein of HBV is essential for virion attachment and infection. Previously, we obtained a preS1-binding short peptide B10 by screening a phage display peptide library using the N-terminal half of preS1 (residues 1 to 60, genotype C). We report here that by means of concatenation of B10, we identified a quadruple concatemer 4B10 that displayed a markedly increased preS1-binding activity. The main binding site of 4B10 in preS1 was mapped to the receptor binding enhancing region. 4B10 blocked HBV attachment to hepatic cells and inhibited HBV infection of primary human and tupaia hepatocytes at low nanomolar concentrations. The 4B10-mediated inhibition of HBV infection is specific as it did not inhibit the infection of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein pseudotyped lentivirus or human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Moreover, 4B10 showed no binding activity to hepatic cells. In conclusion, we have identified 4B10 as a promising candidate for a novel class of HBV entry inhibitors. PMID:27384014

  14. The prognosis and management of inactive HBV carriers.

    PubMed

    Invernizzi, Federica; Viganò, Mauro; Grossi, Glenda; Lampertico, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection lacking the serum hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and with antibodies against HBeAg (anti-HBe), are the prevalent subgroup of HBV carriers worldwide. The prognosis of these patients is different from inactive carriers (ICs), who are characterized by persistently normal serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and low (<2000 IU/ml) serum HBV DNA levels, a serological profile that may also be intermittently observed in patients with HBeAg-negative chronic hepatitis. This is why a confirmed diagnosis of IC requires quarterly ALT and HBV DNA measurements for at least 1 year, while a single-point detection of combined HBsAg <1000 IU/ml and HBV DNA <2000 IU/ml has a robust predictive value for the diagnosis of IC. Characteristically, ICs have minimal or no histological lesions of the liver corresponding to liver stiffness values on Fibroscan of <5 kPa. Antiviral treatment is not indicated in ICs since the prognosis for the progression of liver disease is favourable if there are no cofactors of liver damage such as alcohol abuse, excess weight or co-infection with the hepatitis C virus or delta virus. Moreover, spontaneous HBsAg loss frequently occurs (1-1.9% per year) in these patients while the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is rare, at least in Caucasian patients. However, an emerging issue reinforcing the need for clinical surveillance of ICs is the risk of HBV reactivation in patients who undergo immunosuppressive therapy without receiving appropriate antiviral prophylaxis. After diagnosis, management of ICs includes monitoring of ALT and HBV DNA every 12 months with periodic measurement of serum HBsAg levels to identify viral clearance. PMID:26725905

  15. Hepatitis B and Delta Virus: Advances on Studies about Interactions between the Two Viruses and the Infected Hepatocyte

    PubMed Central

    Giersch, Katja; Dandri, Maura

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms determining persistence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and long-term pathogenesis of HBV-associated liver disease appear to be multifactorial. Although viral replication can be efficiently suppressed by the antiviral treatments currently available, viral clearance is generally not achieved since HBV has developed unique replication strategies, enabling persistence of its genome within the infected hepatocytes. Moreover, no direct antiviral therapy exists for the more than 15 million people worldwide that are also coinfected with the hepatitis delta virus (HDV), a defective virus that needs the HBV envelope proteins for propagation. The limited availability of robust HBV and HDV infection systems has hindered the understanding of the complex network of virus-virus and virus-host interactions that are established in the course of infection and slowed down progress in drug development. Since chronic HBV/HDV coinfection leads to the most severe form of chronic viral hepatitis, elucidation of the molecular mechanisms regulating virus-host interplay and pathogenesis are urgently needed. This article summarizes the current knowledge regarding the interactions among HBV, HDV, and the infected target cell and discusses the dependence of HDV on HBV activity and possible future therapeutic approaches. PMID:26623269

  16. Incident Hepatitis B Virus Infection in HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Men Who Have Sex With Men From Pre-HAART to HAART Periods

    PubMed Central

    Falade-Nwulia, Oluwaseun; Seaberg, Eric C.; Snider, Anna E.; Rinaldo, Charles R.; Phair, John; Witt, Mallory D.; Thio, Chloe L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Men who have sex with men (MSM) are at high risk for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Data on the effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on incident HBV infection in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected MSM are limited. Objective To determine predictors of incident HBV infection in MSM during pre-HAART and HAART periods. Design Observational cohort study. Setting Cohort of MSM who have, or are at risk for, HIV infection. Patients 2375 HBV-uninfected MSM in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study. Measurements Poisson regression was used to compare incidence rates of HBV infection in the pre-HAART and HAART eras and to identify factors associated with incidence of HBV infection. Results In 25 322 person-years of follow-up, 244 incident HBV infections occurred. The unadjusted incidence rate was higher in HIV-infected MSM than in HIV-uninfected MSM (IRR, 1.9 [95% CI, 1.5 to 2.4]) and was significantly lower in the HAART era than in the pre-HAART era among HIV-infected (IRR, 0.2 [CI, 0.1 to 0.4]) and HIV-uninfected (IRR, 0.3 [CI, 0.2 to 0.4]) MSM. Age younger than 40 years (IRR, 2.3 [CI, 1.7 to 3.0]), more than 1 recent sexual partner (IRR, 3.1 [CI, 2.3 to 4.2]), and HIV infection (IRR, 2.4 [CI, 1.8 to 3.1]) were independently associated with higher incidence of HBV infection, whereas HBV vaccination was protective (IRR, 0.3 [CI, 0.2 to 0.4]). Highly active antiretroviral therapy with HIV RNA levels less than 400 copies/mL was associated with protection (IRR, 0.2 [CI, 0.1 to 0.5]), but HAART in those with HIV RNA levels of 400 copies/mL or greater was not. Limitation The observational nature limits inferences about causality. Conclusion Effective HAART is associated with lower incidence of HBV infection; however, even in the HAART era, incidence of HBV infection remains high among MSM. Primary Funding Source National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. PMID:26457744

  17. Occult HBV reactivation induced by ibrutinib treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    de Jésus Ngoma, Patrick; Kabamba, Benoît; Dahlqvist, Geraldine; Sempoux, Christine; Lanthier, Nicolas; Shindano, Tony; Van Den Neste, Eric; Horsmans, Yves

    2015-12-01

    Ibrutinib is a small molecule that has been recently developped for the treatment of B cell malignancies. Common side effects are diarrhoea, nausea, fatigue, infections, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Here we report the first case of Hepatitis B virus reactivation in a 80 years old chronic lymphocytic leukaemia patient receiving ibrutinib, suggesting that such treatment must be associated with HBV screening. PMID:26712054

  18. TMEM2 inhibits hepatitis B virus infection in HepG2 and HepG2.2.15 cells by activating the JAK-STAT signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X; Xie, C; Li, Y-M; Huang, Z-L; Zhao, Q-Y; Hu, Z-X; Wang, P-P; Gu, Y-R; Gao, Z-L; Peng, L

    2016-01-01

    We have previously observed the downregulation of TMEM2 in the liver tissue of patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and in HepG2.2.15 cells with HBV genomic DNA. In the present study, we investigated the role and mechanism of TMEM2 in HepG2 and HepG2.2.15 during HBV infection HepG2 and HepG2.2.15. HepG2 shTMEM2 cells with stable TMEM2 knockdown and HepG2 TMEM2 and HepG2.2.15 TMEM2 cells with stable TMEM2 overexpression were established using lentivirus vectors. We observed reduced expression of TMEM2 in HBV-infected liver tissues and HepG2.2.15 cells. HBsAg, HBcAg, HBV DNA, and HBV cccDNA levels were significantly increased in HepG2 shTMEM2 cells but decreased in HepG2 TMEM2 and HepG2.2.15 TMEM2 cells compared with naive HepG2 cells. On the basis of the western blotting results, the JAK-STAT signaling pathway was inhibited in HepG2 shTMEM2 cells but activated in HepG2 TMEM2 and HepG2.2.15 TMEM2 cells. In addition, reduced and increased expression of the antiviral proteins MxA and OAS1 was observed in TMEM2-silenced cells (HepG2 shTMEM2 cells) and TMEM2-overexpressing cells (HepG2 TMEM2 and HepG2.2.15 TMEM2 cells), respectively. The expression of Interferon regulatory factor 9 (IRF9) was not affected by TMEM2. However, we found that overexpression and knockdown of TMEM2, respectively, promoted and inhibited importation of IRF9 into nuclei. The luciferase reporter assay showed that IRF9 nuclear translocation affected interferon-stimulated response element activities. In addition, the inhibitory effects of TMEM2 on HBV infection in HepG2 shTMEM2 cells was significantly enhanced by pre-treatment with interferon but significantly inhibited in HepG2.2.15 TMEM2 cells by pre-treatment with JAK1 inhibitor. TMEM2 inhibits HBV infection in HepG2 and HepG2.2.15 by activating the JAK-STAT signaling pathway. PMID:27253403

  19. Positive hepatitis B virus core antibody in HIV infection--false positive or evidence of previous infection?

    PubMed

    Pallawela, S N S; Sonnex, C; Mabayoje, D; Bloch, E; Chaytor, S; Johnson, M A; Carne, C; Webster, D P

    2015-02-01

    Isolated HBV core antibody (anti-HBc) is defined as the presence of anti-HBc with a negative HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) and HBV surface antibody (anti-HBs <10 IU/l). In patients infected with HIV with isolated anti-HBc, the aim was to determine: The prevalence of isolated positive anti-HBc; The most effective method of identifying which patients have had previous Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) infection; The prevalence of false positive anti-HBc. HBV serology results were identified from 539 patients infected with HIV sampled between January 2010 and December 2012. In those with an isolated anti-HBc and negative anti-HBe, a second anti-HBc test was carried out using a different assay. Samples were also screened for HBV DNA. The anti-retroviral regimens at time of screening were documented. 101/539 had an isolated anti-HBc. Of these, 32 (32%) had a positive anti-HBe (including 1 equivocal) and 69(68%) were anti-HBe negative. Of those negative for anti-HBe, 32 were tested for both DNA and a second anti-HBc. Of these 26 (81%) were on cART at time of HBV testing, with 25 (78%) on ART with anti-HBV activity. The prevalence of isolated anti-HBc was 19%. Only 32% were also anti-HBe positive, whereas 97% of those anti-HBe negative were positive on a second anti-HBc assay suggesting lack of utility of anti-HBe in resolving serological quandaries. One subject (3%) had a false positive anti-HBc. There was no evidence of chronic HBV but 78% patients were on HBV-suppressive combination anti-retroviral therapy. PMID:25174739

  20. HBV Genotypic Variability in Cuba

    PubMed Central

    Loureiro, Carmen L.; Aguilar, Julio C.; Aguiar, Jorge; Muzio, Verena; Pentón, Eduardo; Garcia, Daymir; Guillen, Gerardo; Pujol, Flor H.

    2015-01-01

    The genetic diversity of HBV in human population is often a reflection of its genetic admixture. The aim of this study was to explore the genotypic diversity of HBV in Cuba. The S genomic region of Cuban HBV isolates was sequenced and for selected isolates the complete genome or precore-core sequence was analyzed. The most frequent genotype was A (167/250, 67%), mainly A2 (149, 60%) but also A1 and one A4. A total of 77 isolates were classified as genotype D (31%), with co-circulation of several subgenotypes (56 D4, 2 D1, 5 D2, 7 D3/6 and 7 D7). Three isolates belonged to genotype E, two to H and one to B3. Complete genome sequence analysis of selected isolates confirmed the phylogenetic analysis performed with the S region. Mutations or polymorphisms in precore region were more common among genotype D compared to genotype A isolates. The HBV genotypic distribution in this Caribbean island correlates with the Y lineage genetic background of the population, where a European and African origin prevails. HBV genotypes E, B3 and H isolates might represent more recent introductions. PMID:25742179

  1. HBV genotypic variability in Cuba.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Carmen L; Aguilar, Julio C; Aguiar, Jorge; Muzio, Verena; Pentón, Eduardo; Garcia, Daymir; Guillen, Gerardo; Pujol, Flor H

    2015-01-01

    The genetic diversity of HBV in human population is often a reflection of its genetic admixture. The aim of this study was to explore the genotypic diversity of HBV in Cuba. The S genomic region of Cuban HBV isolates was sequenced and for selected isolates the complete genome or precore-core sequence was analyzed. The most frequent genotype was A (167/250, 67%), mainly A2 (149, 60%) but also A1 and one A4. A total of 77 isolates were classified as genotype D (31%), with co-circulation of several subgenotypes (56 D4, 2 D1, 5 D2, 7 D3/6 and 7 D7). Three isolates belonged to genotype E, two to H and one to B3. Complete genome sequence analysis of selected isolates confirmed the phylogenetic analysis performed with the S region. Mutations or polymorphisms in precore region were more common among genotype D compared to genotype A isolates. The HBV genotypic distribution in this Caribbean island correlates with the Y lineage genetic background of the population, where a European and African origin prevails. HBV genotypes E, B3 and H isolates might represent more recent introductions.

  2. Elucidation of the early infection machinery of hepatitis B virus by using bio-nanocapsule

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiushi; Somiya, Masaharu; Kuroda, Shun’ichi

    2016-01-01

    Currently, hepatitis B virus (HBV), upon attaching to human hepatocytes, is considered to interact first with heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) via an antigenic loop of HBV envelope S protein. Then, it is promptly transferred to the sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) via the myristoylated N-terminal sequence of pre-S1 region (from Gly-2 to Gly-48, HBV genotype D), and it finally enters the cell by endocytosis. However, it is not clear how HSPG passes HBV to NTCP and how NTCP contributes to the cellular entry of HBV. Owing to the poor availability and the difficulty of manipulations, including fluorophore encapsulation, it has been nearly impossible to perform biochemical and cytochemical analyses using a substantial amount of HBV. A bio-nanocapsule (BNC), which is a hollow nanoparticle consisting of HBV envelope L protein, was efficiently synthesized in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Since BNC could encapsulate payloads (drugs, genes, proteins) and specifically enter human hepatic cells utilizing HBV-derived infection machinery, it could be used as a model of HBV infection to elucidate the early infection machinery. Recently, it was demonstrated that the N-terminal sequence of pre-S1 region (from Asn-9 to Gly-24) possesses low pH-dependent fusogenic activity, which might play a crucial role in the endosomal escape of BNC payloads and in the uncoating process of HBV. In this minireview, we describe a model in which each domain of the HBV L protein contributes to attachment onto human hepatic cells through HSPG, initiation of endocytosis, interaction with NTCP in endosomes, and consequent provocation of membrane fusion followed by endosomal escape. PMID:27784961

  3. Prophylactic managements of hepatitis B viral infection in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Onoe, Takashi; Tahara, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Yuka; Ohdan, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is a considerably effective treatment for patients with end-stage hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related liver disease. However, HBV infection often recurs after LT without prophylaxis. Since the 1990s, the treatment for preventing HBV reinfection after LT has greatly progressed with the introduction of hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) and nucleos(t)ide analogues (NAs), resulting in improved patient survival. The combination therapy consisting of high-dose HBIG and lamivudine is highly efficacious for preventing the recurrence of HBV infection after LT and became the standard prophylaxis for HBV recurrence. However, mainly due to the high cost of HBIG treatment, an alternative protocol for reducing the dose and duration of HBIG has been evaluated. Currently, combination therapy using low-dose HBIG and NAs is considered as the most efficacious and cost-effective prophylaxis for post-LT HBV reinfection. Recently, NA monotherapy and withdrawal of HBIG from combination therapy, along with the development of new, potent high genetic barrier NAs, have provided promising efficacy, especially for low-risk recipients. This review summarizes the prophylactic protocol and their efficacy including prophylaxis of de novo HBV infection from anti-HBc antibody-positive donors. In addition, challenging approaches such as discontinuation of all prophylaxis and active immunity through hepatitis B vaccination are discussed. PMID:26755868

  4. Broad Range of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Patterns, Dual Circulation of Quasi-Subgenotype A3 and HBV/E and Heterogeneous HBV Mutations in HIV-Positive Patients in Gabon.

    PubMed

    Bivigou-Mboumba, Berthold; François-Souquière, Sandrine; Deleplancque, Luc; Sica, Jeanne; Mouinga-Ondémé, Augustin; Amougou-Atsama, Marie; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Njouom, Richard; Rouet, François

    2016-01-01

    Integrated data on hepatitis B virus (HBV) patterns, HBV genotypes and mutations are lacking in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) co-infected patients from Africa. This survey was conducted in 2010-2013 among 762 HIV-1-positive adults from Gabon who were predominantly treated with 3TC-based antiretroviral treatment. HBV patterns were identified using immunoassays detecting total antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAb), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), IgM HBcAb, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), antibody to HBsAg (HBsAb) and an in-house real-time PCR test for HBV DNA quantification. Occult hepatitis B (OBI) was defined by the presence of isolated anti-HBc with detectable serum HBV DNA. HBV genotypes and HBV mutations were analyzed by PCR-direct sequencing method. Seventy-one (9.3%) patients tested positive for HBsAg, including one with acute hepatitis B (0.1%; 95% CI, 0.0%-0.2%), nine with HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B (CHB) (1.2%; 95% CI, 0.6%-2.2%), 16 with HBeAg-negative CHB (2.1%; 95% CI, 1.2%-3.3%) and 45 inactive HBV carriers (5.9%; 95% CI, 4.4%-7.8%). Sixty-one (8.0%; 95% CI, 6.2%-10.1%) patients showed OBI. Treated patients showed similar HBV DNA levels to those obtained in untreated patients, regardless of HBV patterns. Around 15.0% of OBI patients showed high (>1,000 UI/mL) viremia. The mutation M204V/I conferring resistance to 3TC was more common in HBV/A (47.4%) than in HBV/E isolates (0%) (P = .04). Our findings encouraged clinicians to promote HBV vaccination in patients with no exposure to HBV and to switch 3TC to universal TDF in those with CHB.

  5. Broad Range of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Patterns, Dual Circulation of Quasi-Subgenotype A3 and HBV/E and Heterogeneous HBV Mutations in HIV-Positive Patients in Gabon

    PubMed Central

    Bivigou-Mboumba, Berthold; François-Souquière, Sandrine; Deleplancque, Luc; Sica, Jeanne; Mouinga-Ondémé, Augustin; Amougou-Atsama, Marie; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Njouom, Richard; Rouet, François

    2016-01-01

    Integrated data on hepatitis B virus (HBV) patterns, HBV genotypes and mutations are lacking in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) co-infected patients from Africa. This survey was conducted in 2010–2013 among 762 HIV-1-positive adults from Gabon who were predominantly treated with 3TC-based antiretroviral treatment. HBV patterns were identified using immunoassays detecting total antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAb), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), IgM HBcAb, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), antibody to HBsAg (HBsAb) and an in-house real-time PCR test for HBV DNA quantification. Occult hepatitis B (OBI) was defined by the presence of isolated anti-HBc with detectable serum HBV DNA. HBV genotypes and HBV mutations were analyzed by PCR-direct sequencing method. Seventy-one (9.3%) patients tested positive for HBsAg, including one with acute hepatitis B (0.1%; 95% CI, 0.0%-0.2%), nine with HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B (CHB) (1.2%; 95% CI, 0.6%–2.2%), 16 with HBeAg-negative CHB (2.1%; 95% CI, 1.2%–3.3%) and 45 inactive HBV carriers (5.9%; 95% CI, 4.4%–7.8%). Sixty-one (8.0%; 95% CI, 6.2%–10.1%) patients showed OBI. Treated patients showed similar HBV DNA levels to those obtained in untreated patients, regardless of HBV patterns. Around 15.0% of OBI patients showed high (>1,000 UI/mL) viremia. The mutation M204V/I conferring resistance to 3TC was more common in HBV/A (47.4%) than in HBV/E isolates (0%) (P = .04). Our findings encouraged clinicians to promote HBV vaccination in patients with no exposure to HBV and to switch 3TC to universal TDF in those with CHB. PMID:26764909

  6. Broad Range of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Patterns, Dual Circulation of Quasi-Subgenotype A3 and HBV/E and Heterogeneous HBV Mutations in HIV-Positive Patients in Gabon.

    PubMed

    Bivigou-Mboumba, Berthold; François-Souquière, Sandrine; Deleplancque, Luc; Sica, Jeanne; Mouinga-Ondémé, Augustin; Amougou-Atsama, Marie; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Njouom, Richard; Rouet, François

    2016-01-01

    Integrated data on hepatitis B virus (HBV) patterns, HBV genotypes and mutations are lacking in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) co-infected patients from Africa. This survey was conducted in 2010-2013 among 762 HIV-1-positive adults from Gabon who were predominantly treated with 3TC-based antiretroviral treatment. HBV patterns were identified using immunoassays detecting total antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAb), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), IgM HBcAb, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), antibody to HBsAg (HBsAb) and an in-house real-time PCR test for HBV DNA quantification. Occult hepatitis B (OBI) was defined by the presence of isolated anti-HBc with detectable serum HBV DNA. HBV genotypes and HBV mutations were analyzed by PCR-direct sequencing method. Seventy-one (9.3%) patients tested positive for HBsAg, including one with acute hepatitis B (0.1%; 95% CI, 0.0%-0.2%), nine with HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B (CHB) (1.2%; 95% CI, 0.6%-2.2%), 16 with HBeAg-negative CHB (2.1%; 95% CI, 1.2%-3.3%) and 45 inactive HBV carriers (5.9%; 95% CI, 4.4%-7.8%). Sixty-one (8.0%; 95% CI, 6.2%-10.1%) patients showed OBI. Treated patients showed similar HBV DNA levels to those obtained in untreated patients, regardless of HBV patterns. Around 15.0% of OBI patients showed high (>1,000 UI/mL) viremia. The mutation M204V/I conferring resistance to 3TC was more common in HBV/A (47.4%) than in HBV/E isolates (0%) (P = .04). Our findings encouraged clinicians to promote HBV vaccination in patients with no exposure to HBV and to switch 3TC to universal TDF in those with CHB. PMID:26764909

  7. Anti-hepatitis B virus activities of Geranium carolinianum L. extracts and identification of the active components.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiyang; Huang, Hai; Zhou, Wei; Feng, Meiqing; Zhou, Pei

    2008-04-01

    The ethanol extract of Geranium carolinianum L., a domestic plant grown in China, was subjected to sequential extractions with different organic solvents. The extracts were assayed for anti-hepatitis B virus (HBV) activities. The ethyl acetate fraction was found to contain the highest level of anti-HBV activity. In order to identify the active ingredients, the ethyl acetate fraction was further fractionated by column chromatography. Seven compounds were identified including ellagic acid, geraniin, quercitrin, hyperin, hirsutrin, quercetin, and kaempferol, whose structures were determined by NMR. The presence of the anti-HBV compounds geraniin, ellagic acid and hyperin in G. carolinianum L. may account for the effectiveness of this folk medicine in the treatment of HBV infections. Geraniin inhibited hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) secretion by more than 85.8% and 63.7%, respectively, at the non-cytotoxic concentration of 200 microg/ml. The inhibitions of HBsAg and HBeAg secretion by geraniin were higher than the inhibition by the positive control Lamivudine, 33.5% and 32.2% respectively, at the same concentration. Since HBeAg is involved in immune tolerance during HBV infection, the newly identified anti-HBV compound geraniin might be a candidate agent to overcome the immune tolerance in HBV-infected individuals. This is the first report of the anti-HBV effects of geraniin and hyperin, the active substances derived from G. carolinianum L.

  8. Hepatic expression of tumour necrosis factor-alpha in chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M J; Lau, J Y; Williams, R; Vergani, D

    1994-01-01

    AIM--To determine the hepatic expression of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. METHODS--Frozen liver biopsy sections from 19 patients with chronic HBV infection were studied, 12 of whom were HBeAg positive and 10 serum HBV DNA positive. Hepatic expression of TNF alpha was determined using immunohistochemistry. RESULTS--Only infiltrating mononuclear cells showed immunoreactive staining for TNF alpha (median 2, range 0-3; n = 19) which appeared as diffuse positive staining material in the cytoplasm. Patients with active liver disease, assessed histologically and biochemically, had a higher level of expression, both in the number of TNF alpha positive cells and the proportion of TNF alpha positive infiltrating mononuclear cells. There was no correlation between the expression of TNF alpha and serological parameters of viral infection (HBeAg and HBV DNA status and HBV DNA concentrations). CONCLUSION--Hepatic expression of TNF alpha is increased in chronic HBV infection and is related to the activity of liver disease and not to the level of HBV replication. Images PMID:7876386

  9. Efficient Inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus Infection by Acylated Peptides Derived from the Large Viral Surface Protein†

    PubMed Central

    Gripon, Philippe; Cannie, Isabelle; Urban, Stephan

    2005-01-01

    The lack of an appropriate in vitro infection system for the major human pathogen hepatitis B virus (HBV) has prevented a molecular understanding of the early infection events of HBV. We used the novel HBV-infectible cell line HepaRG and primary human hepatocytes to investigate the interference of infection by HBV envelope protein-derived peptides. We found that a peptide consisting of the authentically myristoylated N-terminal 47 amino acids of the pre-S1 domain of the large viral envelope protein (L protein) specifically prevented HBV infection, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 8 nM. The replacement of myristic acid with other hydrophobic moieties resulted in changes in the inhibitory activity, most notably by a decrease in the IC50 to picomolar concentrations for longer unbranched fatty acids. The obstruction of HepaRG cell susceptibility to HBV infection after short preincubation times with the peptides suggested that the peptides efficiently target and inactivate a receptor at the hepatocyte surface. Our data both shed light on the molecular mechanism of HBV entry into hepatocytes and provide a basis for the development of potent hepadnaviral entry inhibitors as a novel therapeutic concept for the treatment of hepatitis Β. PMID:15650187

  10. Urine from chronic hepatitis B virus carriers: implications for infectivity.

    PubMed

    Knutsson, M; Kidd-Ljunggren, K

    2000-01-01

    Horizontal transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) without apparent sexual or parenteral exposure is common in hyperendemic areas. In most cases, the route of transmission is unknown. To investigate urine as a potential source of infection, serum and urine from 56 chronic hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) carriers were examined for the presence of HBV DNA using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Thirty-four of the patients were anti-hepatitis B e antigen (anti-HBe) positive and 22 were hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) positive. HBV DNA was detected in serum from 46 patients (82%) and in urine from 28 patients (50%). Most HBeAg-positive patients had HBV DNA detectable in urine (91%), whereas urine samples from anti-HBe-positive patients were found to contain HBV DNA to a lesser extent (24%). When comparing HBV DNA from serum and urine by an end-point titration PCR, a titration difference averaging 10(3) was found between serum and urine. A significant female predominance was also noted among the positive urine samples (P < 0.05), which was not correlated to the presence of haematuria. Detection of HBV DNA may indicate active viral replication, and thereby infectivity. Because a high proportion of chronic HBV carriers were found to have HBV DNA in urine, it is suggested that irrespective of HBeAg/anti-HBe status, urine should be regarded as a potential route of transmission and therefore be investigated further as a means of horizontal and nosocomial transmission of HBV.

  11. Therapeutic vaccines in HBV: lessons from HCV.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Eleanor

    2015-02-01

    Currently, millions of people infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) are committed to decades of treatment with anti-viral therapy to control viral replication. However, new tools for immunotherapy that include both viral vectors and molecular checkpoint inhibitors are now available. This has led to a resurgence of interest in new strategies to develop immunotherapeutic strategies with the aim of inducing HBeAg seroconversion--an end-point that has been associated with a decrease in the rates of disease progression. Ultimately, a true cure will involve the elimination of covalently closed circular DNA which presents a greater challenge for immunotherapy. In this manuscript, I describe the development of immunotherapeutic strategies for HBV that are approaching or currently in clinical studies, and draw on observations of T cell function in natural infection supported by recent animal studies that may lead to additional rational vaccine strategies using checkpoint inhibitors. I also draw on our recent experience in developing potent vaccines for HCV prophylaxis based on simian adenoviral and MVA vectors used in prime-boost strategies in both healthy volunteers and HCV infected patients. I have shown that the induction of T cell immune responses is markedly attenuated when administered to people with persistent HCV viremia. These studies and recently published animal studies using the woodchuck model suggest that potent vaccines based on DNA or adenoviral vectored vaccination represent a rational way forward. However, combining these with drugs to suppress viral replication, alongside checkpoint inhibitors may be required to induce long-term immune control.

  12. Therapeutic vaccines in HBV: lessons from HCV.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Eleanor

    2015-02-01

    Currently, millions of people infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) are committed to decades of treatment with anti-viral therapy to control viral replication. However, new tools for immunotherapy that include both viral vectors and molecular checkpoint inhibitors are now available. This has led to a resurgence of interest in new strategies to develop immunotherapeutic strategies with the aim of inducing HBeAg seroconversion--an end-point that has been associated with a decrease in the rates of disease progression. Ultimately, a true cure will involve the elimination of covalently closed circular DNA which presents a greater challenge for immunotherapy. In this manuscript, I describe the development of immunotherapeutic strategies for HBV that are approaching or currently in clinical studies, and draw on observations of T cell function in natural infection supported by recent animal studies that may lead to additional rational vaccine strategies using checkpoint inhibitors. I also draw on our recent experience in developing potent vaccines for HCV prophylaxis based on simian adenoviral and MVA vectors used in prime-boost strategies in both healthy volunteers and HCV infected patients. I have shown that the induction of T cell immune responses is markedly attenuated when administered to people with persistent HCV viremia. These studies and recently published animal studies using the woodchuck model suggest that potent vaccines based on DNA or adenoviral vectored vaccination represent a rational way forward. However, combining these with drugs to suppress viral replication, alongside checkpoint inhibitors may be required to induce long-term immune control. PMID:25573348

  13. Reactive oxygen species promote heat shock protein 90-mediated HBV capsid assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoon Sik Seo, Hyun Wook Jung, Guhung

    2015-02-13

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and has been associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). ROS are also an important factor in HCC because the accumulated ROS leads to abnormal cell proliferation and chromosome mutation. In oxidative stress, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and glutathione (GSH) function as part of the defense mechanism. Hsp90 prevents cellular component from oxidative stress, and GSH acts as antioxidants scavenging ROS in the cell. However, it is not known whether molecules regulated by oxidative stress are involved in HBV capsid assembly. Based on the previous study that Hsp90 facilitates HBV capsid assembly, which is an important step for the packing of viral particles, here, we show that ROS enrich Hsp90-driven HBV capsid formation. In cell-free system, HBV capsid assembly was facilitated by ROS with Hsp90, whereas it was decreased without Hsp90. In addition, GSH inhibited the function of Hsp90 to decrease HBV capsid assembly. Consistent with the result of cell-free system, ROS and buthionine sulfoximine (BS), an inhibitor of GSH synthesis, increased HBV capsid formation in HepG2.2.15 cells. Thus, our study uncovers the interplay between ROS and Hsp90 during HBV capsid assembly. - Highlights: • We examined H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH modulate HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} facilitates HBV capsid assembly in the presence of Hsp90. • GSH inhibits function of Hsp90 in facilitating HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH induce conformation change of Hsp90.

  14. Integration of tumour and viral genomic characterisations in HBV-related hepatocellular carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Amaddeo, Giuliana; Cao, Qian; Ladeiro, Yannick; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Nault, Jean-Charles; Jaoui, Daphne; Gaston Mathe, Yann; Laurent, Christophe; Laurent, Alexis; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Calderaro, Julien; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common liver cancer. We characterised HCC associated with infection compared with non-HBV-related HCC to understand interactions between viral and hepatocyte genomic alterations and their relationships with clinical features. Methods Frozen HBV (n=86) or non-HBV-related (n=90) HCC were collected in two French surgical departments. Viral characterisation was performed by sequencing HBS and HBX genes and quantifying HBV DNA and cccDNA. Nine genes were screened for somatic mutations and expression profiling of 37 genes involved in hepatocarcinogenesis was studied. Results HBX revealed frequent non-sense, frameshift and deletions in tumours, suggesting an HBX inactivation selected in HCC. The number of viral copies was frequently lower in tumour than in non-tumour tissues (p=0.0005) and patients with low HBV copies in the non-tumour liver tissues presented additional risk factor (HCV, alcohol or non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis, p=0.006). P53 was the most frequently altered pathway in HBV-related HCC (47%, p=0.001). Furthermore, TP53 mutations were associated with shorter survival only in HBV-related HCC (p=0.02) whereas R249S mutations were identified exclusively in migrants. Compared with other aetiologies, HBV-HCC were more frequently classified in tumours subgroups with upregulation of genes involved in cell-cycle regulation and a progenitor phenotype. Finally, in HBV-related HCC, transcriptomic profiles were associated with specific gene mutations (HBX, TP53, IRF2, AXIN1 and CTNNB1). Conclusions Integrated genomic characterisation of HBV and non-HBV-related HCC emphasised the immense molecular diversity of HCC closely related to aetiologies that could impact clinical care of HCC patients. PMID:25021421

  15. Production of Autoantibodies in Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection Is Associated with the Augmented Function of Blood CXCR5+CD4+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yu; Hu, Tingting; Song, Xiaofei; Nie, Hong; Chen, Min; Chen, Weixian; Zhou, Zhi; Zhang, Dazhi; Hu, Huaidong; Hu, Peng; Ren, Hong

    2016-01-01

    T follicular helper cells (Tfh) provide help to B cells to support their activation, expansion and differentiation. However, the role of Tfh cells in chronic HBV infection is poorly defined. The aim of this research was to examine the function of Tfh cells and whether they are involved in HBV related disease. Blood CXCR5+CD4+T cells and B cells in 85 patients with chronic HBV infection (HBV patients) and health controls (HC) were examined by flow cytometry. The molecule expression in blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells was detected by real-time PCR. Blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells and B cells were co-cultured and the production of Ig and cytokines was detected by ELISA. Autoantibodies were detected by indirect immunofluorescence and immunospot assay. We found that blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells in patients with chronic HBV infection (HBV patients) expressed higher level of activation related molecules and cytokines than that from health controls (HC).In HBV patients, the frequency of blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells was significantly correlated with serum ALT and AST. We also found that blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells from HBV patients could induce B cells to secret higher level of immunoglobulin than that from HC. Several autoantibodies, including ANA, ss-A, ss-B, Scl-70, Jo-1, ect, were indeed positive in 65% HBV patients. Among HBV patients, expression of function related molecules was significantly higher in blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells from patients with autoantibodies than that without autoantibodies. Our research indicated that blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells from HBV patients were over activated and show augmented capacity to help B cells for antibody secreting, which might correlated with liver inflammation and the production of autoantibodies in extrahepatic manifestations. PMID:27612199

  16. Production of Autoantibodies in Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection Is Associated with the Augmented Function of Blood CXCR5+CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yu; Hu, Tingting; Song, Xiaofei; Nie, Hong; Chen, Min; Chen, Weixian; Zhou, Zhi; Zhang, Dazhi; Hu, Huaidong; Hu, Peng; Ren, Hong

    2016-01-01

    T follicular helper cells (Tfh) provide help to B cells to support their activation, expansion and differentiation. However, the role of Tfh cells in chronic HBV infection is poorly defined. The aim of this research was to examine the function of Tfh cells and whether they are involved in HBV related disease. Blood CXCR5+CD4+T cells and B cells in 85 patients with chronic HBV infection (HBV patients) and health controls (HC) were examined by flow cytometry. The molecule expression in blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells was detected by real-time PCR. Blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells and B cells were co-cultured and the production of Ig and cytokines was detected by ELISA. Autoantibodies were detected by indirect immunofluorescence and immunospot assay. We found that blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells in patients with chronic HBV infection (HBV patients) expressed higher level of activation related molecules and cytokines than that from health controls (HC).In HBV patients, the frequency of blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells was significantly correlated with serum ALT and AST. We also found that blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells from HBV patients could induce B cells to secret higher level of immunoglobulin than that from HC. Several autoantibodies, including ANA, ss-A, ss-B, Scl-70, Jo-1, ect, were indeed positive in 65% HBV patients. Among HBV patients, expression of function related molecules was significantly higher in blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells from patients with autoantibodies than that without autoantibodies. Our research indicated that blood CXCR5+CD4+ T cells from HBV patients were over activated and show augmented capacity to help B cells for antibody secreting, which might correlated with liver inflammation and the production of autoantibodies in extrahepatic manifestations. PMID:27612199

  17. HBV pathogenesis in animal models: recent advances on the role of platelets.

    PubMed

    Iannacone, Matteo; Sitia, Giovanni; Ruggeri, Zaverio M; Guidotti, Luca G

    2007-04-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes acute and chronic necroinflammatory liver diseases and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HBV replicates noncytopathically in the hepatocyte, and most of the liver injury associated with this infection reflects the immune response. While the innate immune response may not contribute significantly to the pathogenesis of liver disease or viral clearance, the adaptive immune response, particularly the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response, contributes to both. Recent observations also reveal that antigen-nonspecific inflammatory cells enhance CTL-induced liver pathology and, more surprisingly, that platelets facilitate the intrahepatic accumulation of CTLs, suggesting that the host response to HBV infection is a highly complex but coordinated process. The notion that platelets contribute to liver disease and viral clearance by promoting the recruitment of virus-specific CTLs into the liver is a new concept in viral pathogenesis, which may prove useful to implement treatments of chronic HBV infection in man.

  18. [Occult hepatitis B virus infection and hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Joon; Kwon, Oh Sang

    2013-09-01

    Many studies have suggested that occult HBV infection has a substantial clinical relevance to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Occult HBV infection is an important risk factor for the development of cirrhosis and HCC in patients without HBsAg. As a matter of fact, occult HBV infection is one of the most common causes of crytogenic HCC in endemic areas of HBV. However, there still are controversial issues about the association between occult HBV infection and HCC according to the underlying liver disease. In alcoholic cirrhosis, occult HBV infection may exert synergistic effect on the development of HCC. However, there is insufficient evidence to relate occult HBV infection to hepatocarcinogenesis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. In cryptogenic HCC, occult HBV infection may play a direct role in the development of HCC. In order to elucidate the assocciation between occult HBV infection and HCC, underlying liver disease must be specified and larger number of cases must be included in future studies.

  19. [Investigation of occult hepatitis B in HIV infected patients].

    PubMed

    Altınbaş, Akif; Ergünay, Koray; Calık Başaran, Nursel; Alp, Alpaslan; Turgut, Didem; Hasçelik, Gülşen; Uzun, Ömrüm; Unal, Serhat

    2011-04-01

    Due to their shared transmission route, hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infections can be observed in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected cases and are associated with more severe clinical courses. The detection of HBV DNA despite HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) seronegativity is defined as occult HBV infections. According to the current seroepidemiological data, Turkey is classified as an intermediate HBV, low HIV endemic region. Occult HBV infections have previously been reported from Turkey but has not been investigated previously in HIV infected cohorts. The aim of this study was to identify occult HBV infections in HIV-infected persons. Twenty-eight HIV-positive cases followed-up at Hacettepe University Hospital, Infectious Diseases Unit were included in the study after informed consent. For the detection of HBsAg, anti-HBs and anti-HCV, commercial ELISA tests (Architect System, Abbott Diagnostics, USA) were employed. Absolute CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell counts were determined via flow cytometry. HIV viral load was calculated via COBAS TaqMan HIV-1 Real-time PCR (Roche Diagnostics, USA) and the presence of HBV DNA was evaluated via COBAS TaqMan HBV Real-time PCR (Roche Diagnostics, USA), in addition to a nested PCR assay targeting HBV S gene. The mean age of the study group was 43.2 (range between 27-65) years, 64.3% (18/28) of them were males and the mean duration of HIV infection was 4.2 (2-11) years. Mean CD4+ ve CD8+ T-cell counts were 414 ± 267 cells/mm3 and 854 ± 293 cells/mm3, respectively. Twenty-six (92.8%) cases were under highly-active anti-retroviral therapy at the time of the study, 88.5% of which included HBV-active drugs (lamivudine or tenofovir). HIV RNA were found negative in 11 (39.3%) patients, of those nine (81.8%) were the cases who treated with HBV-active antiretroviral therapy. HBsAg were negative in all of the 28 patients, while the positivity rates of anti-HBs and anti-HCV were 39.3% (11/28) and 3.6% (1

  20. Evolutionary dynamics of HBV-D1 genotype epidemic in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ciccozzi, Massimo; Ciccaglione, Anna Rita; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Equestre, Michele; Cella, Eleonora; Ebranati, Erika; Gabanelli, Elena; Villano, Umbertina; Bruni, Roberto; Yalcinkaya, Tulay; Tanzi, Elisabetta; Zehender, Gianguglielmo

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV), is the leading cause of liver diseases infecting an estimated 240 million persons worldwide. The HBV prevalence rates are variables between different countries, with an high level of endemicity in the south-eastern part of Europe. Seven main HBV-D subgenotypes have been described until now (D1-D7). Turkey, seems to have played an important role in the penetration of HBV-D1 in the Mediterranean area. The importance of Turkey in the European epidemiology of HBV is also suggested by the observation that the highest spread of HBV infection in the Continent are reported in Turkey with Romania, Bulgaria, Greece, Albania and some southern regions of Italy. In this paper the molecular epidemiology and the epidemiological history of HBV-D in Turkey was studied, by characterizing 34 new Turkish isolates and performing a phylogeographic reconstruction. By using a phylodynamic and phylogeographic Bayesian approach, the analysis suggested that HBV-D1 originated in Turkey about in the early 1940s. The large prevalence of D1 in comparison to the other subgenotypes in Turkey confirms the importance of this Country as epidemiological reservoir of HBV-D1 dispersion. The phylogeny suggests that after each initial introduction of the virus in a specific population, separate transmission clusters have been evolving along independent phylogenetic lineages. Better characterization and continuous monitoring of such groups are going to be crucial to understand in detail the epidemiology of HBV-D1 subgenotype in Turkey and to assess the efficacy of prevention, vaccination and therapy in controlling the epidemic.

  1. Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Virion and Covalently Closed Circular DNA Formation in Primary Tupaia Hepatocytes and Human Hepatoma Cell Lines upon HBV Genome Transduction with Replication-Defective Adenovirus Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Shaotang; Nassal, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV), the causative agent of B-type hepatitis in humans, is a hepatotropic DNA-containing virus that replicates via reverse transcription. Because of its narrow host range, there is as yet no practical small-animal system for HBV infection. The hosts of the few related animal viruses, including woodchuck hepatitis B virus and duck hepatitis B virus, are either difficult to keep or only distantly related to humans. Some evidence suggests that tree shrews (tupaias) may be susceptible to infection with human HBV, albeit with low efficiency. Infection efficiency depends on interactions of the virus with factors on the surface and inside the host cell. To bypass restrictions during the initial entry phase, we used recombinant replication-defective adenovirus vectors, either with or without a green fluorescent protein marker gene, to deliver complete HBV genomes into primary tupaia hepatocytes. Here we show that these cells, like the human hepatoma cell lines HepG2 and Huh7, are efficiently transduced by the vectors and produce all HBV gene products required to generate the secretory antigens HBsAg and HBeAg, replication-competent nucleocapsids, and enveloped virions. We further demonstrate that covalently closed circular HBV DNA is formed. Therefore, primary tupaia hepatocytes support all steps of HBV replication following deposition of the genome in the nucleus, including the intracellular amplification cycle. These data provide a rational basis for in vivo experiments aimed at developing tupaias into a useful experimental animal system for HBV infection. PMID:11152483

  2. Circulating CD56dim natural killer cells and CD56+ T cells that produce interferon-γ or interleukin-10 are expanded in asymptomatic, E antigen-negative patients with persistent hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Conroy, M J; Mac Nicholas, R; Grealy, R; Taylor, M; Otegbayo, J A; O'Dea, S; Mulcahy, F; Ryan, T; Norris, S; Doherty, D G

    2015-03-01

    Infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) can result in spontaneous resolution or chronic infection, which can remain asymptomatic or can progress to cirrhosis and/or hepatocellular carcinoma. The host immune response is thought to be a major determinant of the outcome of HBV infection and virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) can mediate immunity against the virus and cause liver pathology. Antigen-nonspecific innate lymphocytes may also contribute to HBV infection and liver disease, therefore, we examined the frequencies, phenotypes, cytolytic activities and cytokine profiles of circulating natural killer (NK) cells, CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and CD56(+) T cells in 102 asymptomatic HBV-infected patients and compared them with those in 66 uninfected control subjects. NK cells expressing low levels of CD56 (CD56(dim)) and CD56(+) T cells were significantly expanded in the circulation of HBV-infected patients compared with control subjects. CD1d expression and iNKT cell frequencies were similar in both groups. Despite these expansions, we did not detect augmented natural or cytokine-induced cytotoxicity in the HBV-infected subjects. All lymphocyte populations studied produced interferon-γ (IFN-γ) significantly more frequently when taken from HBV-infected patients compared with when taken from healthy controls. Additionally, NK cells from the patients more frequently produced interleukin-10. As our HBV-infected cohort consisted of asymptomatic patients with low viral loads, we propose that CD56(dim) NK cells and CD56(+) T cells control HBV infection by noncytolytic mechanisms.

  3. CRISPR/Cas9-based tools for targeted genome editing and replication control of HBV.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng; Lu, Mengji; Yang, Dongliang

    2015-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major global health problem because current therapies rarely eliminate HBV infections to achieve a complete cure. A different treatment paradigm to effectively clear HBV infection and eradicate latent viral reservoirs is urgently required. In recent years, the development of a new RNA-guided gene-editing tool, the CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated nuclease 9) system, has greatly facilitated site-specific mutagenesis and represents a very promising potential therapeutic tool for diseases, including for eradication of invasive pathogens such as HBV. Here, we review recent advances in the use of CRISPR/Cas9, which is designed to target HBV specific DNA sequences to inhibit HBV replication and to induce viral genome mutation, in cell lines or animal models. Advantages, limitations and possible solutions, and proposed directions for future research are discussed to highlight the opportunities and challenges of CRISPR/Cas9 as a new, potentially curative therapy for chronic hepatitis B infection.

  4. Synthesis and activity against HBV of novel Tetra-seconucleoside analogues of dyphlline having the acyclic chains of ACV and HBG.

    PubMed

    El Ashry, El Sayed H; Awad, Laila F; Rashed, Nagwa; Abdelrahman, Adel; Rasheed, Hana A

    2008-03-01

    Selective alkylation of dyphylline (1) with (2-acetoxyethoxy)methyl bromide (2a) or 4-acetoxybutyl bromide (2b) afforded 3'-O-[(acetoxyethoxy)methyl]dyphylline (3a) and 3'-O-(4-acetoxybutyl)-dyphylline (3b), respectively. A trans esterification process rather than alkylation of the dihydroxy-propyl side chain in 1 had taken place during the reaction with 2-p-toluoyloxy)ethyl chloride (5) to afford the respective 3'-toluoyloxy derivative 7 and not the anticipated 3'-O-[(p-toluoyloxy)ethyl]-dyphylline (6). Deacylation of 3a,b and 7 afforded 4a,b and 1, respectively. Viral screening of selected compounds against HBV has been investigated.

  5. Management of psoriasis patients with hepatitis B or hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Bonifati, Claudio; Lora, Viviana; Graceffa, Dario; Nosotti, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    The systemic therapies available for the management of Psoriasis (PsO) patients who cannot be treated with more conservative options, such as topical agents and/or phototherapy, with the exception of acitretin, can worsen or reactivate a chronic infection. Therefore, before administering immunosuppressive therapies with either conventional disease-modifying drugs (cDMARDs) or biological ones (bDMARDs) it is mandatory to screen patients for some infections, including hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). In particular, the patients eligible to receive an immunosuppressive drug must be screened for the following markers: antibody to hepatitis B core, antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBsAg), HBsAg, and antibody to HCV (anti-HCV). In case HBV or HCV infection is diagnosed, a close collaboration with a consultant hepatologist is needed before and during an immunosuppressive therapy. Concerning therapy with immunosuppressive drugs in PsO patients with HBV or HCV infection, data exist mainly for cyclosporine a (CyA) or bDMARDs (etanercept, adalimumab, infliximab, ustekinumab). The natural history of HBV and HCV infection differs significantly as well as the effect of immunosuppression on the aforementioned infectious diseases. As a rule, in the case of active HBV infection, systemic immunosuppressive antipsoriatic therapies must be deferred until the infection is controlled with an adequate antiviral treatment. Inactive carriers need to receive antiviral prophylaxis 2-4 wk before starting immunosuppressive therapy, to be continued after 6-12 mo from its suspension. Due to the risk of HBV reactivation, these patients should be monitored monthly for the first 3 mo and then every 3 mo for HBV DNA load together with transaminases levels. Concerning the patients who are occult HBV carriers, the risk of HBV reactivation is very low. Therefore, these patients generally do not need antiviral prophylaxis and the sera HBsAg and transaminases dosing can

  6. Management of psoriasis patients with hepatitis B or hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Bonifati, Claudio; Lora, Viviana; Graceffa, Dario; Nosotti, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    The systemic therapies available for the management of Psoriasis (PsO) patients who cannot be treated with more conservative options, such as topical agents and/or phototherapy, with the exception of acitretin, can worsen or reactivate a chronic infection. Therefore, before administering immunosuppressive therapies with either conventional disease-modifying drugs (cDMARDs) or biological ones (bDMARDs) it is mandatory to screen patients for some infections, including hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). In particular, the patients eligible to receive an immunosuppressive drug must be screened for the following markers: antibody to hepatitis B core, antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBsAg), HBsAg, and antibody to HCV (anti-HCV). In case HBV or HCV infection is diagnosed, a close collaboration with a consultant hepatologist is needed before and during an immunosuppressive therapy. Concerning therapy with immunosuppressive drugs in PsO patients with HBV or HCV infection, data exist mainly for cyclosporine a (CyA) or bDMARDs (etanercept, adalimumab, infliximab, ustekinumab). The natural history of HBV and HCV infection differs significantly as well as the effect of immunosuppression on the aforementioned infectious diseases. As a rule, in the case of active HBV infection, systemic immunosuppressive antipsoriatic therapies must be deferred until the infection is controlled with an adequate antiviral treatment. Inactive carriers need to receive antiviral prophylaxis 2-4 wk before starting immunosuppressive therapy, to be continued after 6-12 mo from its suspension. Due to the risk of HBV reactivation, these patients should be monitored monthly for the first 3 mo and then every 3 mo for HBV DNA load together with transaminases levels. Concerning the patients who are occult HBV carriers, the risk of HBV reactivation is very low. Therefore, these patients generally do not need antiviral prophylaxis and the sera HBsAg and transaminases dosing can

  7. Management of psoriasis patients with hepatitis B or hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bonifati, Claudio; Lora, Viviana; Graceffa, Dario; Nosotti, Lorenzo

    2016-07-28

    The systemic therapies available for the management of Psoriasis (PsO) patients who cannot be treated with more conservative options, such as topical agents and/or phototherapy, with the exception of acitretin, can worsen or reactivate a chronic infection. Therefore, before administering immunosuppressive therapies with either conventional disease-modifying drugs (cDMARDs) or biological ones (bDMARDs) it is mandatory to screen patients for some infections, including hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). In particular, the patients eligible to receive an immunosuppressive drug must be screened for the following markers: antibody to hepatitis B core, antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBsAg), HBsAg, and antibody to HCV (anti-HCV). In case HBV or HCV infection is diagnosed, a close collaboration with a consultant hepatologist is needed before and during an immunosuppressive therapy. Concerning therapy with immunosuppressive drugs in PsO patients with HBV or HCV infection, data exist mainly for cyclosporine a (CyA) or bDMARDs (etanercept, adalimumab, infliximab, ustekinumab). The natural history of HBV and HCV infection differs significantly as well as the effect of immunosuppression on the aforementioned infectious diseases. As a rule, in the case of active HBV infection, systemic immunosuppressive antipsoriatic therapies must be deferred until the infection is controlled with an adequate antiviral treatment. Inactive carriers need to receive antiviral prophylaxis 2-4 wk before starting immunosuppressive therapy, to be continued after 6-12 mo from its suspension. Due to the risk of HBV reactivation, these patients should be monitored monthly for the first 3 mo and then every 3 mo for HBV DNA load together with transaminases levels. Concerning the patients who are occult HBV carriers, the risk of HBV reactivation is very low. Therefore, these patients generally do not need antiviral prophylaxis and the sera HBsAg and transaminases dosing can

  8. Sleeping Beauty transposon-based system for rapid generation of HBV-replicating stable cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yong; Zhang, Tian-Ying; Fang, Lin-Lin; Chen, Zi-Xuan; Song, Liu-Wei; Cao, Jia-Li; Yang, Lin; Yuan, Quan; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2016-08-01

    The stable HBV-replicating cell lines, which carry replication-competent HBV genome stably integrated into the genome of host cell, are widely used to evaluate the effects of antiviral agents. However, current methods to generate HBV-replicating cell lines, which are mostly dependent on random integration of foreign DNA via plasmid transfection, are less-efficient and time-consuming. To address this issue, we constructed an all-in-one Sleeping Beauty transposon system (denoted pTSMP-HBV vector) for robust generation of stable cell lines carrying replication-competent HBV genome of different genotype. This vector contains a Sleeping Beauty transposon containing HBV 1.3-copy genome with an expression cassette of the SV40 promoter driving red fluorescent protein (mCherry) and self-cleaving P2A peptide linked puromycin resistance gene (PuroR). In addition, a PGK promoter-driven SB100X hyperactive transposase cassette is placed in the outside of the transposon in the same plasmid.The HBV-replicating stable cells could be obtained from pTSMP-HBV transfected HepG2 cells by red fluorescence-activated cell sorting and puromycin resistant cell selection within 4-week. Using this system, we successfully constructed four cell lines carrying replication-competent HBV genome of genotypes A-D. The replication and viral protein expression profiles of these cells were systematically characterized. In conclusion, our study provides a high-efficiency strategy to generate HBV-replicating stable cell lines, which may facilitate HBV-related virological study.

  9. Sleeping Beauty transposon-based system for rapid generation of HBV-replicating stable cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yong; Zhang, Tian-Ying; Fang, Lin-Lin; Chen, Zi-Xuan; Song, Liu-Wei; Cao, Jia-Li; Yang, Lin; Yuan, Quan; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2016-08-01

    The stable HBV-replicating cell lines, which carry replication-competent HBV genome stably integrated into the genome of host cell, are widely used to evaluate the effects of antiviral agents. However, current methods to generate HBV-replicating cell lines, which are mostly dependent on random integration of foreign DNA via plasmid transfection, are less-efficient and time-consuming. To address this issue, we constructed an all-in-one Sleeping Beauty transposon system (denoted pTSMP-HBV vector) for robust generation of stable cell lines carrying replication-competent HBV genome of different genotype. This vector contains a Sleeping Beauty transposon containing HBV 1.3-copy genome with an expression cassette of the SV40 promoter driving red fluorescent protein (mCherry) and self-cleaving P2A peptide linked puromycin resistance gene (PuroR). In addition, a PGK promoter-driven SB100X hyperactive transposase cassette is placed in the outside of the transposon in the same plasmid.The HBV-replicating stable cells could be obtained from pTSMP-HBV transfected HepG2 cells by red fluorescence-activated cell sorting and puromycin resistant cell selection within 4-week. Using this system, we successfully constructed four cell lines carrying replication-competent HBV genome of genotypes A-D. The replication and viral protein expression profiles of these cells were systematically characterized. In conclusion, our study provides a high-efficiency strategy to generate HBV-replicating stable cell lines, which may facilitate HBV-related virological study. PMID:27091097

  10. The prevalence of fibromyalgia among patients with hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Ozsahin, Mustafa; Gonen, Ibak; Ermis, Fatih; Oktay, Murat; Besir, Fahri Halit; Kutlucan, Ali; Sahin, Ahmet; Ataoglu, Safinaz

    2013-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a syndrome characterized by widespread and chronic musculoskeletal pain, fatigue, morning stiffness, and sleep disturbance. However, the etiopathogenesis of FM remains unclear. Various etiological factors have been suggested to trigger FM. These include systemic rheumatismal disease, physical trauma, psychological disorders, and chronic infections. We determined the prevalence of FM in patients with chronic active hepatitis B virus (HBV) and inactive hepatitis B carriers, compared with matched healthy controls. Seventy-seven HBV patients (39 HBV carriers and 38 with chronic active hepatitis), were evaluated for FM syndrome. Seventy-seven HBsAg-negative healthy subjects were enrolled as a control group. We found that FM was very prevalent in patients with HBV infections (22% of the total). We found no difference in FM prevalence when patients with chronic active hepatitis B infections (21% FM prevalence) and those who were inactive hepatitis B carriers (23% FM prevalence) were compared. FM was not associated with the levels of HBV-DNA, ALT, or AST. Recognition and management of FM in HBsAg-positive patients will aid in improvement of quality-of-life. We fully accept that our preliminary results require confirmation in studies including larger numbers of patients. More work is needed to allow us to understand the role played by, and the relevance of, infections (including HBV) in FM syndrome pathogenesis. PMID:24179575

  11. Occult hepatitis B virus infection and S gene escape mutants in HIV-infected patients after hepatitis B virus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Aghakhani, Arezoo; Mohraz, Minoo; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Banifazl, Mohammad; Vahabpour, Rouhollah; Karami, Afsaneh; Foroughi, Maryam; Ramezani, Amitis

    2016-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination is recommended for HIV patients. Despite the relative success of HBV vaccination, breakthrough infections can occur infrequently in patients, and it can be due to occult HBV infection, vaccine unresponsiveness and/or emergence of escape mutants. This study assessed the presence of occult HBV infection and S gene escape mutants in HIV-positive patients after HBV vaccination. Ninety-two HIV-positive patients were enrolled in this study, including 52 responders to HBV vaccine and 40 non-responders. All of the cases received HBV vaccine according to routine HBV vaccination protocols. The presence of HBV-DNA was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In HBV-DNA positive samples, the most conserved regions of S gene sequences were amplified by nested PCR and PCR products were sequenced. Occult HBV infection was detected in two cases. Glycine to arginine mutation at residue 145 (G145R) within the 'a' region of the S gene was detected in one of the occult HBV infection cases who was in the non-responder group. This study showed that the prevalence of occult HBV infection and vaccine escape mutants was low in our HBV-vaccinated HIV-positive patients in both responder and non-responder groups, so there was no alarming evidence indicating breakthrough HBV infection in our vaccinated HIV-positive cases.

  12. Infection by hepatitis B and C virus in female and transsexual Greek prostitutes with serological evidence of active syphilis.

    PubMed

    Tsakris, A; Kyriakis, K P; Chryssou, S; Papoutsakis, G

    1997-11-01

    Two hundred and thirty female and 43 male-to-female transsexual Greek prostitutes were screened for serological evidence of active syphilis as judged by positivity in both rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test and treponemal (FTA-ABS and TPHA) tests. The rate of active syphilis was 20.9% in the male-to-female transsexual prostitutes and 4.3% in the female ones (P < 0.001, odds ratio = 5.82). In the former group 65.1% had evidence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, and 4.7% of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection while the respective rates among the latter group were 50.4% and 3.9%. There was no correlation of viral hepatitis marker prevalence with positive syphilis serology.

  13. Hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency virus co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Phung, Bao-Chau; Sogni, Philippe; Launay, Odile

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency virus (HBV and HIV) infection share transmission patterns and risk factors, which explains high prevalence of chronic HBV infection in HIV infected patients. The natural course of HBV disease is altered by the HIV infection with less chance to clear acute HBV infection, faster progression to cirrhosis and higher risk of liver-related death in HIV-HBV co-infected patients than in HBV mono-infected ones. HIV infected patients with chronic hepatitis B should be counseled for liver damage and surveillance of chronic hepatitis B should be performed to screen early hepatocellular carcinoma. Noninvasive tools are now available to evaluate liver fibrosis. Isolated hepatitis B core antibodies (anti-HBc) are a good predictive marker of occult HBV infection. Still the prevalence and significance of occult HBV infection is controversial, but its screening may be important in the management of antiretroviral therapy. Vaccination against HBV infection is recommended in non-immune HIV patients. The optimal treatment for almost all HIV-HBV co-infected patients should contain tenofovir plus lamivudine or emtricitabine and treatment should not be stopped to avoid HBV reactivation. Long term tenofovir therapy may lead to significant decline in hepatitis B surface Antigen. The emergence of resistant HBV strains may compromise the HBV therapy and vaccine therapy. PMID:25516647

  14. Genetic polymorphism of interleukin-6 influences susceptibility to HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma in a male Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shengli; Yuan, Yufeng; He, Yueming; Pan, Dingyu; Zhang, Yongxi; Liu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Quanyan; Zhang, Zhonglin; Liu, Zhisu

    2014-04-01

    As a multifunctional cytokine, interleukin-6 (IL-6) plays a key role in chronic inflammation as well as tumor growth and progression of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Recent studies have implicated that single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) -572C>G (rs1800796) located within the promoter region of IL-6 gene was associated with susceptibility to several diseases. Here, a case-control study was undertaken to investigate the association between this polymorphism and HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) susceptibility in a Chinese Han population. A total of 900 patients with chronic HBV infection, including 505 HBV-related HCC patients and 395 HBV infected patients without HCC were enrolled, and rs1800796 polymorphism was genotyped by the TaqMan method and DNA sequencing technology. The results indicated no significant association between rs1800796 polymorphism and the risk of HBV-related HCC in all subjects; however, a significant difference was identified in male subjects. Under the dominant model, male subjects with the G allele (CG/GG) have higher susceptibility to HBV-related HCC than those with CC genotype after adjusting confounding factors (P=0.012, odds ratio [OR] 1.68, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.15-2.42). Our results suggested that rs1800796 polymorphism of IL-6 gene was associated with susceptibility to HBV-related HCC in a male Chinese Han population.

  15. The HBV Drugs Work: Now What?

    PubMed

    Pruett, Timothy L

    2016-09-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents for Hepatitis B virus (HBV) suppression work, but only when administered to the patient. They do not appear to promote durable, long-term immunological control. After 3 years of effective anti-HBV therapy, a small percentage of patients maintained good control, manifest by controlled serum liver enzymes, low-level HBV-DNA, and controlled HBsAg concentrations. However, this did not occur in the majority of patients. We need a better understanding of the defects in HBV immunity and how to induce effective reconstitution that will maintain viral suppression, albeit either through innate or adaptive immunity. PMID:27580778

  16. Prevalence and risk factors of hepatitis B virus infection in Bahrain, 2000 through 2010.

    PubMed

    Janahi, Essam M

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B infection is one of the world's major infectious diseases with about 350 million chronic carriers. Because no data is published on the prevalence and risk factors of this important disease in Bahrain, this article evaluates the available data from 2000 to 2010 to estimate the prevalence of the infection and to evaluate the risk factors. Epidemiologic data on HBV cases were collected from the major hospitals and health centers in Bahrain and statistically analyzed. Over this indicated decade, 877,892 individuals were screened for HBV infection and 5055 positive cases were reported in Bahrain. The prevalence of HBV infection during that period was 0.58%. Although there was no significant difference in the prevalence over the period of 10 years, the actual number of positive cases has almost doubled in the later years especially in 2007 and 2008. The prevalence was significantly higher among males (62.3%; P<0.01). Most cases were associated with non Bahrainis and the prevalence was significantly higher among them (68.3%; P<0.01) than it was among Bahrainis (31.7%). Seventy eight percent (2877/3690) of non Bahraini cases were for citizens of six countries which are highly endemic for HBV, namely India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Philippines, Indonesia and Ethiopia. Dental procedures and surgical operations were the main risk factors of infection as 37.2% and 35.6% of the patients were probably infected through this route. The prevalence of hepatitis B virus infection in Bahrain indicates that Bahrain had low HBV endemicity for the last 10 years (2000-2010). Our study verifies the significant role played by expatriates/immigrants in the present epidemiology of hepatitis B in Bahrain. Increasing HBV vaccination of high risk groups, active educational and media campaign, screening HBV infection during pregnancy, and surveillance of hepatitis B infected individuals will further decrease the prevalence of the disease in Bahrain.

  17. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Bahrain, 2000 through 2010

    PubMed Central

    Janahi, Essam M.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B infection is one of the world's major infectious diseases with about 350 million chronic carriers. Because no data is published on the prevalence and risk factors of this important disease in Bahrain, this article evaluates the available data from 2000 to 2010 to estimate the prevalence of the infection and to evaluate the risk factors. Epidemiologic data on HBV cases were collected from the major hospitals and health centers in Bahrain and statistically analyzed. Over this indicated decade, 877,892 individuals were screened for HBV infection and 5055 positive cases were reported in Bahrain. The prevalence of HBV infection during that period was 0.58%. Although there was no significant difference in the prevalence over the period of 10 years, the actual number of positive cases has almost doubled in the later years especially in 2007 and 2008. The prevalence was significantly higher among males (62.3%; P<0.01). Most cases were associated with non Bahrainis and the prevalence was significantly higher among them (68.3%; P<0.01) than it was among Bahrainis (31.7%). Seventy eight percent (2877/3690) of non Bahraini cases were for citizens of six countries which are highly endemic for HBV, namely India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Philippines, Indonesia and Ethiopia. Dental procedures and surgical operations were the main risk factors of infection as 37.2% and 35.6% of the patients were probably infected through this route. The prevalence of hepatitis B virus infection in Bahrain indicates that Bahrain had low HBV endemicity for the last 10 years (2000–2010). Our study verifies the significant role played by expatriates/immigrants in the present epidemiology of hepatitis B in Bahrain. Increasing HBV vaccination of high risk groups, active educational and media campaign, screening HBV infection during pregnancy, and surveillance of hepatitis B infected individuals will further decrease the prevalence of the disease in Bahrain. PMID:24498341

  18. Complete Spectrum of CRISPR/Cas9-induced Mutations on HBV cccDNA.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Christoph; Sohn, Ji A

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes chronic infections that cannot yet be cured. The virus persists in infected hepatocytes, because covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), the template for the transcription of viral RNAs, is stable in nondividing cells. Antiviral therapies with nucleoside analogues inhibit HBV DNA synthesis in capsids in the cytoplasm of infected hepatocytes, but do not destroy nuclear cccDNA. Because over 200 million people are still infected, a cure for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) has become one of the major challenges in antiviral therapy. As a first step toward the development of curative therapies, we previously demonstrated that the CRISPR/Cas9 system can be used to functionally inactivate cccDNA derived from infectious HBV. Moreover, some evidence suggests that certain cytokines might induce an APOBEC-mediated cascade leading to the destruction of cccDNA. In this report we investigated whether a combination of the two mechanisms could act synergistically to inactivate cccDNA. Using next generation sequencing (NGS), we determined the complete spectrum of mutations in cccDNA following Cas9 cleavage and repair by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). We found that over 90% of HBV DNA was cleaved by Cas9. In addition our results showed that editing of HBV DNA after Cas9 cleavage is at least 15,000 times more efficient that APOBEC-mediated cytosine deamination following treatment of infected cells with interferon alpha (IFNα). We also found that a previously used method to detect cytosine deaminated DNA, termed 3D-PCR, overestimates the amount and frequency of edited HBV DNA. Taken together, our results demonstrated that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is so far the best method to functionally inactivate HBV cccDNA and provide a cure for CHB. PMID:27203444

  19. Complete Spectrum of CRISPR/Cas9-induced Mutations on HBV cccDNA

    PubMed Central

    Seeger, Christoph; Sohn, Ji A

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes chronic infections that cannot yet be cured. The virus persists in infected hepatocytes, because covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), the template for the transcription of viral RNAs, is stable in nondividing cells. Antiviral therapies with nucleoside analogues inhibit HBV DNA synthesis in capsids in the cytoplasm of infected hepatocytes, but do not destroy nuclear cccDNA. Because over 200 million people are still infected, a cure for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) has become one of the major challenges in antiviral therapy. As a first step toward the development of curative therapies, we previously demonstrated that the CRISPR/Cas9 system can be used to functionally inactivate cccDNA derived from infectious HBV. Moreover, some evidence suggests that certain cytokines might induce an APOBEC-mediated cascade leading to the destruction of cccDNA. In this report we investigated whether a combination of the two mechanisms could act synergistically to inactivate cccDNA. Using next generation sequencing (NGS), we determined the complete spectrum of mutations in cccDNA following Cas9 cleavage and repair by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). We found that over 90% of HBV DNA was cleaved by Cas9. In addition our results showed that editing of HBV DNA after Cas9 cleavage is at least 15,000 times more efficient that APOBEC-mediated cytosine deamination following treatment of infected cells with interferon alpha (IFNα). We also found that a previously used method to detect cytosine deaminated DNA, termed 3D-PCR, overestimates the amount and frequency of edited HBV DNA. Taken together, our results demonstrated that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is so far the best method to functionally inactivate HBV cccDNA and provide a cure for CHB. PMID:27203444

  20. Pokemon siRNA Delivery Mediated by RGD-Modified HBV Core Protein Suppressed the Growth of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jing; Liu, Xiaoping; Jia, Jianbo; Wu, Jinsheng; Wu, Ning; Chen, Jun; Fang, Fang

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a deadly human malignant tumor that is among the most common cancers in the world, especially in Asia. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has been well established as a high risk factor for hepatic malignance. Studies have shown that Pokemon is a master oncogene for HCC growth, suggesting it as an ideal therapeutic target. However, efficient delivery system is still lacking for Pokemon targeting treatment. In this study, we used core proteins of HBV, which is modified with RGD peptides, to construct a biomimetic vector for the delivery of Pokemon siRNAs (namely, RGD-HBc-Pokemon siRNA). Quantitative PCR and Western blot assays revealed that RGD-HBc-Pokemon siRNA possessed the highest efficiency of Pokemon suppression in HCC cells. In vitro experiments further indicated that RGD-HBc-Pokemon-siRNA exerted a higher tumor suppressor activity on HCC cell lines, evidenced by reduced proliferation and attenuated invasiveness, than Pokemon-siRNA or RGD-HBc alone. Finally, animal studies demonstrated that RGD-HBc-Pokemon siRNA suppressed the growth of HCC xenografts in mice by a greater extent than Pokemon-siRNA or RGD-HBc alone. Based on the above results, Pokemon siRNA delivery mediated by RGD-modified HBV core protein was shown to be an effective strategy of HCC gene therapy. PMID:26356810

  1. Pokemon siRNA Delivery Mediated by RGD-Modified HBV Core Protein Suppressed the Growth of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jing; Liu, Xiaoping; Jia, Jianbo; Wu, Jinsheng; Wu, Ning; Chen, Jun; Fang, Fang

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a deadly human malignant tumor that is among the most common cancers in the world, especially in Asia. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has been well established as a high risk factor for hepatic malignance. Studies have shown that Pokemon is a master oncogene for HCC growth, suggesting it as an ideal therapeutic target. However, efficient delivery system is still lacking for Pokemon targeting treatment. In this study, we used core proteins of HBV, which is modified with RGD peptides, to construct a biomimetic vector for the delivery of Pokemon siRNAs (namely, RGD-HBc-Pokemon siRNA). Quantitative PCR and Western blot assays revealed that RGD-HBc-Pokemon siRNA possessed the highest efficiency of Pokemon suppression in HCC cells. In vitro experiments further indicated that RGD-HBc-Pokemon-siRNA exerted a higher tumor suppressor activity on HCC cell lines, evidenced by reduced proliferation and attenuated invasiveness, than Pokemon-siRNA or RGD-HBc alone. Finally, animal studies demonstrated that RGD-HBc-Pokemon siRNA suppressed the growth of HCC xenografts in mice by a greater extent than Pokemon-siRNA or RGD-HBc alone. Based on the above results, Pokemon siRNA delivery mediated by RGD-modified HBV core protein was shown to be an effective strategy of HCC gene therapy.

  2. Human Papillomavirus Infections in Nonsexually Active Perinatally HIV Infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Puga, Ana; Farhat, Sepideh; Ma, Yifei

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Although human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are common in HIV-infected adults, little is known about children. Our objective was to examine the prevalence of and risks for HPV of the oral mucosal and external genital areas in nonsexually active (NSA) perinatally (P) HIV+ children and compare with HIV-exposed but uninfected (HEU) children. A convenience sample attending a pediatric clinic were enrolled. Samples for HPV were obtained from the oral and anogenital areas and tested for one of 37 HPV types. The mean age of the 48 PHIV+ children was 14.3±3.9 years vs. 6.2±4.8 for the 52 HEU (p<0.001). Of the 23 PHIV+ girls, 30.4% had anogenital and 17% had oral HPV, and of the 27 HEU girls, 2 (7.4%) anogenital and 0 had oral HPV. Of the boys, 4/23 (17.4%) and 1/25 (4%) PHIV+ had anogenital and oral HPV, respectively, and 3/24 (12.5%) and 1/25 (4%) HEU had anogenital and oral HPV, respectively. Rates of HPV did not differ by age among the PHIV+, whereas older HEU were more likely to have HPV than younger HEU (p=0.07). This large age gap precluded statistical comparison by HIV status. The presence of HPV in NSA PHIV+ children may have implications regarding HPV vaccination efficacy. PMID:24460009

  3. Genetic variants in the regulatory region of SLC10A1 are not associated with the risk of hepatitis B virus infection and clearance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueqin; Wang, Ying; Chen, Xiaohua; Cheng, Kailiang; Li, Jiaoyuan; Lou, Jiao; Ke, Juntao; Yang, Yang; Gong, Yajie; Zhu, Ying; Wang, Li; Zhong, Rong

    2016-10-01

    The Na/taurocholate cotransporter NTCP (encoded by SLC10A1) was identified as a cellular entry receptor for the human hepatitis B virus (HBV), advancing our understanding of the molecular mechanism of HBV infection. An alternative hypothesis was put forward that regulatory variants in SLC10A1 might play an important role in HBV susceptibility by potentially influencing expression levels of NTCP. The three regulatory SNPs (rs8011311, rs7154439, rs111409076) were genotyped in 1023 HBV-persistent carriers, 735 subjects with HBV natural clearance and 732 HBV marker-negative subjects in a Han Chinese population. Real-time reverse transcription PCR analysis and luciferase assays have been performed to dissect the potential functionality. In logistic regression analysis, when subjects with HBV natural clearance were compared with HBV marker-negative subjects, no significant associations with the risk of HBV infection were observed for any of the three SNPs after adjusting for age, sex, smoking status and alcohol consumption (P>0.05). Similar negative results were also found for the three SNPs when HBV-persistent carriers were compared with HBV marker-negative subjects. Likewise, no significant associations with the risk of HBV clearance were observed when HBV-persistent carriers were compared with subjects with HBV natural clearance (P>0.05). Quantitative RT/PCR showed no significant difference in NTCP expression levels in normal liver tissue amongst individuals with different rs111409076 genotypes (P=0.317 for the general linear model). Moreover, no evident effect of the SLC10A1 rs111409076 AACA/- polymorphism on transcriptional activity was found by luciferase assay in either HepG2 (P=0.161) or Hep3b (P=0.129) cell lines. The present study indicated that the common variants in the regulatory region of SLC10A1 may not influence the expression of NTCP at the level of transcriptional regulation, and ultimately may not be associated with HBV susceptibility in this Chinese

  4. HBV-DNA levels predict overall mortality in HIV/HBV coinfected individuals.

    PubMed

    Nikolopoulos, Georgios K; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Psichogiou, Mina; Hatzakis, Angelos

    2016-03-01

    The coinfection of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been associated with increased death rates. However, the relevant research has mostly relied on serologic HBV testing [HBV surface antigen (HBsAg)]. The aim of this work was to explore the relationship of HBV viraemia with overall mortality among HIV/HBV coinfected individuals. The analysis included 1,609 HIV seropositives of a previously described cohort (1984-2003) with limited exposure to tenofovir (12%) and a median follow-up of approximately 5 years. Those with persistent expression of HBsAg were further tested for HBV-DNA. The data were analyzed using Poisson regression models. Totally, 101 participants were chronic carriers of HBsAg (6.28%). Of these, 81 were tested for HBV-DNA. The median HBV-DNA levels were 3.81 log (base-10) International Units (IU)/ml. A third (31%) of those tested for HBV-DNA had received tenofovir. Before developing acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), the adjusted incidence rate ratio (IRR) for all-cause mortality of coinfected patients with HBV viraemia above the median value versus the HIV monoinfected group was 3.44 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05-11.27]. Multivariable regressions in the coinfected group only (n = 81) showed that one log-10 increase in HBV-DNA levels was associated with an elevated risk for death (IRR: 1.24, 95%CI: 1.03-1.49). HBV-DNA levels predict overall mortality in the setting of HIV/HBV coinfection, especially during the period before developing AIDS, and could thus help prioritize needs and determine the frequency of medical monitoring.

  5. Occult hepatitis B virus infection in liver transplant patients in a Brazilian referral center

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, T.C.A.; Xavier, M.A.P.; Vidigal, P.V.T.; Amaral, N.S.; Diniz, P.A.; Resende, A.P.; Miranda, D.M.; Faria, A.C.; Lima, A.S.; Faria, L.C.

    2014-01-01

    Estimates of occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection prevalence varies among different studies depending on the prevalence of HBV infection in the study population and on the sensitivity of the assay used to detect HBV DNA. We investigated the prevalence of occult HBV infection in cirrhotic patients undergoing liver transplantation in a Brazilian referral center. Frozen liver samples from 68 adults were analyzed using a nested polymerase chain reaction assay for HBV DNA. The specificity of the amplified HBV sequences was confirmed by direct sequencing of the amplicons. The patient population comprised 49 (72.1%) males and 19 (27.9%) females with a median age of 53 years (range=18-67 years). Occult HBV infection was diagnosed in three (4.4%) patients. The etiologies of the underlying chronic liver disease in these cases were alcohol abuse, HBV infection, and cryptogenic cirrhosis. Two of the patients with cryptic HBV infection also presented hepatocellular carcinoma. Markers of previous HBV infection were available in two patients with occult HBV infection and were negative in both. In conclusion, using a sensitive nested polymerase chain reaction assay to detect HBV DNA in frozen liver tissue, we found a low prevalence of occult HBV infection in cirrhotic patients undergoing liver transplant, probably due to the low prevalence of HBV infection in our population. PMID:25296362

  6. Occult hepatitis B virus infection in liver transplant patients in a Brazilian referral center.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, T C A; Xavier, M A P; Vidigal, P V T; Amaral, N S; Diniz, P A; Resende, A P; Miranda, D M; Faria, A C; Lima, A S; Faria, L C

    2014-11-01

    Estimates of occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection prevalence varies among different studies depending on the prevalence of HBV infection in the study population and on the sensitivity of the assay used to detect HBV DNA. We investigated the prevalence of occult HBV infection in cirrhotic patients undergoing liver transplantation in a Brazilian referral center. Frozen liver samples from 68 adults were analyzed using a nested polymerase chain reaction assay for HBV DNA. The specificity of the amplified HBV sequences was confirmed by direct sequencing of the amplicons. The patient population comprised 49 (72.1%) males and 19 (27.9%) females with a median age of 53 years (range=18-67 years). Occult HBV infection was diagnosed in three (4.4%) patients. The etiologies of the underlying chronic liver disease in these cases were alcohol abuse, HBV infection, and cryptogenic cirrhosis. Two of the patients with cryptic HBV infection also presented hepatocellular carcinoma. Markers of previous HBV infection were available in two patients with occult HBV infection and were negative in both. In conclusion, using a sensitive nested polymerase chain reaction assay to detect HBV DNA in frozen liver tissue, we found a low prevalence of occult HBV infection in cirrhotic patients undergoing liver transplant, probably due to the low prevalence of HBV infection in our population.

  7. Occult hepatitis B virus infection in liver transplant patients in a Brazilian referral center.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, T C A; Xavier, M A P; Vidigal, P V T; Amaral, N S; Diniz, P A; Resende, A P; Miranda, D M; Faria, A C; Lima, A S; Faria, L C

    2014-08-29

    Estimates of occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection prevalence varies among different studies depending on the prevalence of HBV infection in the study population and on the sensitivity of the assay used to detect HBV DNA. We investigated the prevalence of occult HBV infection in cirrhotic patients undergoing liver transplantation in a Brazilian referral center. Frozen liver samples from 68 adults were analyzed using a nested polymerase chain reaction assay for HBV DNA. The specificity of the amplified HBV sequences was confirmed by direct sequencing of the amplicons. The patient population comprised 49 (72.1%) males and 19 (27.9%) females with a median age of 53 years (range=18-67 years). Occult HBV infection was diagnosed in three (4.4%) patients. The etiologies of the underlying chronic liver disease in these cases were alcohol abuse, HBV infection, and cryptogenic cirrhosis. Two of the patients with cryptic HBV infection also presented hepatocellular carcinoma. Markers of previous HBV infection were available in two patients with occult HBV infection and were negative in both. In conclusion, using a sensitive nested polymerase chain reaction assay to detect HBV DNA in frozen liver tissue, we found a low prevalence of occult HBV infection in cirrhotic patients undergoing liver transplant, probably due to the low prevalence of HBV infection in our population.

  8. One single nucleotide difference alters the differential expression of spliced RNAs between HBV genotypes A and D.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Chiao; Kuo, Tzer-Min; Yeh, Chau-Ting; Hu, Cheng-Po; Chen, Ya-Ling; Tsai, Yue-Lin; Chen, Mong-Liang; Chou, Yu-Chi; Chang, Chungming

    2013-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is generally classified into eight genotypes (A to H) based on genomic sequence divergence. The sequence variation among the different HBV genotypes suggests that the spliced RNAs should be different from genotype to genotype. However, the cis-acting element involved in the modulation of the distinct expression profiles of spliced HBV RNAs remains unidentified. Moreover, the biological role of splicing in the life cycle of HBV is not yet understood. In this study, spliced RNAs generated from genotypes A and D were carefully characterized in transfected HepG2 cells. The species and frequency of the spliced RNAs were dramatically different in the two genotypes. Of note, a population of multiply spliced RNAs with intron 2067-2350 excision was identified in HBV genotype A-transfected HepG2 cells, but not in genotype D transfected HepG2 cells. Further, we found a single nucleotide difference (2335) located within the polypyrimidine tract of the splice acceptor site 2350 between the two genotypes, and a single base substitution at 2335 was able to convert the splicing pattern of genotype D (or genotype A) to that of genotype A (or genotype D). These findings suggest that different unique splice sites may be preferentially used in different HBV genotypes resulting in distinct populations of spliced RNAs. The possible significance of the distinct spliced RNAs generated from the different HBV genotypes in HBV infection is discussed.

  9. Targeting Hepatitis B Virus-Infected Cells with a T-Cell Receptor-Like Antibody▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sastry, Konduru S. R.; Too, Chien Tei; Kaur, Kaval; Gehring, Adam J.; Low, Lionel; Javiad, Alia; Pollicino, Teresa; Li, Li; Kennedy, Patrick T. F.; Lopatin, Uri; Macary, Paul A.; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Virus-specific CD8 T cells are activated when their T-cell receptors (TCRs) recognize the specific viral peptide/major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I (pMHC) complexes present on the surface of infected cells. Antibodies able to recognize the specific pMHC can mimic TCR specificity and both represent a valuable biological tool to visualize pMHC complexes on infected cells and serve as a delivery system for highly targeted therapies. To evaluate these possibilities, we created a monoclonal antibody able to specifically recognize a hepatitis B virus (HBV) envelope epitope (Env at positions 183 to 91 [Env183-91]) presented by the HLA-A201 molecule, and we tested its ability to recognize HBV-infected hepatocytes and to deliver a cargo to a specific target. We demonstrate that this antibody detects and visualizes the processed product of HBV proteins produced in naturally HBV-infected cells, is not inhibited by soluble HBV proteins present in patient sera, and mediates the intracellular delivery of a fluorescent molecule to target cells. Additionally, compared to CD8 T cells specific for the same HBV epitope, the TCR-like antibody has both a superior sensitivity and a specificity focused on distinct amino acids within the epitope. These data demonstrate that a T-cell receptor-like antibody can be used to determine the quantitative relationship between HBV replication and specific antigen presentation to CD8 T cells and serves as a novel therapeutic delivery platform for personalized health care for HBV-infected patients. PMID:21159876

  10. Liver stiffness is associated with monocyte activation in HIV-infected Ugandans without viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Redd, Andrew D; Wendel, Sarah K; Grabowski, Mary K; Ocama, Ponsiano; Kiggundu, Valerian; Bbosa, Francis; Boaz, Iga; Balagopal, Ashwin; Reynolds, Steven J; Gray, Ronald H; Serwadda, David; Kirk, Gregory D; Quinn, Thomas C; Stabinski, Lara

    2013-07-01

    A high prevalence of liver stiffness, as determined by elevated transient elastography liver stiffness measurement, was previously found in a cohort of HIV-infected Ugandans in the absence of chronic viral hepatitis. Given the role of immune activation and microbial translocation in models of liver disease, a shared immune mechanism was hypothesized in the same cohort without other overt causes of liver disease. This study examined whether HIV-related liver stiffness was associated with markers of immune activation or microbial translocation (MT). A retrospective case-control study of subjects with evidence of liver stiffness as defined by a transient elastography stiffness measurement ≥9.3 kPa (cases=133) and normal controls (n=133) from Rakai, Uganda was performed. Cases were matched to controls by age, gender, HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV), and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) status. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), endotoxin IgM antibody, soluble CD14 (sCD14), C-reactive protein (CRP), and D-dimer levels were measured. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted matched odds ratios (adjMOR) and 95% confidence intervals. Higher sCD14 levels were associated with a 19% increased odds of liver stiffness (adjMOR=1.19, p=0.002). In HIV-infected individuals, higher sCD14 levels were associated with a 54% increased odds of having liver stiffness (adjMOR=1.54, p<0.001); however, the opposite was observed in HIV-negative individuals (adjMOR=0.57, p=0.001). No other biomarker was significantly associated with liver stiffness, and only one subject was found to have detectable LPS. Liver stiffness in HIV-infected Ugandans is associated with increased sCD14 indicative of monocyte activation in the absence of viral hepatitis or microbial translocation, and suggests that HIV may be directly involved in liver disease.

  11. Liver Stiffness Is Associated With Monocyte Activation in HIV-Infected Ugandans Without Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wendel, Sarah K.; Grabowski, Mary K.; Ocama, Ponsiano; Kiggundu, Valerian; Bbosa, Francis; Boaz, Iga; Balagopal, Ashwin; Reynolds, Steven J.; Gray, Ronald H.; Serwadda, David; Kirk, Gregory D.; Quinn, Thomas C.; Stabinski, Lara

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A high prevalence of liver stiffness, as determined by elevated transient elastography liver stiffness measurement, was previously found in a cohort of HIV-infected Ugandans in the absence of chronic viral hepatitis. Given the role of immune activation and microbial translocation in models of liver disease, a shared immune mechanism was hypothesized in the same cohort without other overt causes of liver disease. This study examined whether HIV-related liver stiffness was associated with markers of immune activation or microbial translocation (MT). A retrospective case-control study of subjects with evidence of liver stiffness as defined by a transient elastography stiffness measurement ≥9.3 kPa (cases=133) and normal controls (n=133) from Rakai, Uganda was performed. Cases were matched to controls by age, gender, HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV), and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) status. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), endotoxin IgM antibody, soluble CD14 (sCD14), C-reactive protein (CRP), and D-dimer levels were measured. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted matched odds ratios (adjMOR) and 95% confidence intervals. Higher sCD14 levels were associated with a 19% increased odds of liver stiffness (adjMOR=1.19, p=0.002). In HIV-infected individuals, higher sCD14 levels were associated with a 54% increased odds of having liver stiffness (adjMOR=1.54, p<0.001); however, the opposite was observed in HIV-negative individuals (adjMOR=0.57, p=0.001). No other biomarker was significantly associated with liver stiffness, and only one subject was found to have detectable LPS. Liver stiffness in HIV-infected Ugandans is associated with increased sCD14 indicative of monocyte activation in the absence of viral hepatitis or microbial translocation, and suggests that HIV may be directly involved in liver disease. PMID:23548102

  12. The metabolic activator FOXO1 binds hepatitis B virus DNA and activates its transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Shlomai, Amir; Shaul, Yosef

    2009-04-17

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a small DNA virus that targets the liver and infects humans worldwide. Recently we have shown that the metabolic regulator PGC-1{alpha} coactivates HBV transcription thereby rendering the virus susceptible to fluctuations in the nutritional status of the liver. PGC-1{alpha} coactivation of HBV is mediated through the liver-enriched nuclear receptor HNF4{alpha} and through another yet unknown transcription factor(s). Here we show that the forkhead transcription factor FOXO1, a known target for PGC-1{alpha} coactivation and a central mediator of glucose metabolism in the liver, binds HBV core promoter and activates its transcription. This activation is further enhanced in the presence of PGC-1{alpha}, implying that FOXO1 is a target for PGC-1{alpha} coactivation of HBV transcription. Thus, our results identify another key metabolic regulator as an activator of HBV transcription, thereby supporting the principle that HBV gene expression is regulated in a similar way to key hepatic metabolic genes.

  13. Therapeutic Strategies and New Intervention Points in Chronic Hepatitis Delta Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhimin; King, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis delta virus infection (CHD) is a condition arising from super-infection of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected patients, resulting in a more rapid advance in liver pathology and hepatocellular carcinoma than is observed for HBV mono-infection. Although hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is structurally simple, its life cycle involves the complex participation of host enzymes, HBV-derived surface antigen (HBsAg), and HDV-auto-ribozyme and hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg) activities. Unsatisfactory clinical trial results with interferon-based therapies are motivating researchers to adjust and redirect the approach to CHD drug development. This new effort will likely require additional structural and functional studies of the viral and cellular/host components involved in the HDV replication cycle. This review highlights recent work aimed at new drug interventions for CHD, with interpretation of key pre-clinical- and clinical trial outcomes and a discussion of promising new technological approaches to antiviral drug design. PMID:26295228

  14. Trypsin activation pathway of rotavirus infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Arias, C F; Romero, P; Alvarez, V; López, S

    1996-01-01

    The infectivity of rotaviruses is increased by and most probably is dependent on trypsin treatment of the virus. This proteolytic treatment specifically cleaves VP4, the protein that forms the spikes on the surface of the virions, to polypeptides VP5 and VP8. This cleavage has been reported to occur in rotavirus SA114fM at two conserved, closely spaced arginine residues located at VP4 amino acids 241 and 247. In this work, we have characterized the VP4 cleavage products of rotavirus SA114S generated by in vitro treatment of the virus with increasing concentrations of trypsin and with proteases AspN and alpha-chymotrypsin. The VP8 and VP5 polypeptides were analyzed by gel electrophoresis and by Western blotting (immunoblotting) with antibodies raised to synthetic peptides that mimic the terminal regions of VP4 generated by the trypsin cleavage. It was shown that in addition to arginine residues 241 and 247, VP4 is cleaved at arginine residue 231. These three sites were found to have different susceptibilities to trypsin, Arg-241 > Arg-231 > Arg-247, with the enhancement of infectivity correlating with cleavage at Arg-247 rather than at Arg-231 or Arg-241. Proteases AspN and alpha-chymotrypsin cleaved VP4 at Asp-242 and Tyr-246, respectively, with no significant enhancement of infectivity, although this enhancement could be achieved by further treatment of the virus with trypsin. The VP4 end products of trypsin treatment were a homogeneous VP8 polypeptide comprising VP4 amino acids 1 to 231 and a heterogeneous VP5, which is formed by two polypeptide species (present at a ratio of approximately 1:5) as a result of cleavage at either Arg-241 or Arg-247. A pathway for the trypsin activation of rotavirus infectivity is proposed. PMID:8709201

  15. Anti-hepatitis B activity of isoquinoline alkaloids of plant origin.

    PubMed

    Aljofan, Mohamad; Netter, Hans J; Aljarbou, Ahmed N; Hadda, Taibi Ben; Orhan, Ilkay Erdogan; Sener, Bilge; Mungall, Bruce A

    2014-05-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the causative agent of B-type hepatitis in humans, a vaccine-preventable disease. Despite the availability of effective vaccines, globally, 2 billion people show evidence of past or current HBV infection, of which 350 million people are persistently infected, with an estimated annual increase of 1 million. There is no cure for chronic HBV infections, which are associated with cirrhotic liver failure and with an increased risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatitis antiviral research has focused primarily on the development of inhibitors of viral polymerase through the use of nucleoside analogues. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of non-nucleoside compounds to be used as an alternative or to complement the current therapy. To address this need, 18 isoquinoline alkaloids were evaluated for their potential antiviral activity against HBV in vitro.

  16. Hepatitis B virus coinfection in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hsin-Yun; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Tsai, Mao-Song; Lee, Kuan-Yeh; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Hung, Chien-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a leading cause of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Due to the shared modes of transmission, coinfection with HBV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is not uncommon. It is estimated that 10% of HIV-infected patients worldwide are coinfected with HBV. In areas where an HBV vaccination program is implemented, the HBV seroprevalence has declined significantly. In HIV/HBV-coinfected patients, HBV coinfection accelerates immunologic and clinical progression of HIV infection and increases the risk of hepatotoxicity when combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is initiated, while HIV infection increases the risk of hepatitis events, cirrhosis, and end-stage liver disease related to chronic HBV infection. With the advances in antiviral therapy, concurrent, successful long-term suppression of HIV and HBV replication can be achieved in the cART era. To reduce the disease burden of HBV infection among HIV-infected patients, adoption of safe sex practices, avoidance of sharing needles and diluent, HBV vaccination and use of cART containing tenofovir disoproxil fumarate plus emtricitabine or lamivudine are the most effective approaches. However, due to HIV-related immunosuppression, using increased doses of HBV vaccine and novel approaches to HBV vaccination are needed to improve the immunogenicity of HBV vaccine among HIV-infected patients. PMID:25356024

  17. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus (HBV) by LNA-mediated nuclear interference with HBV DNA transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Zhen; Xiang, Wenqing; Guo, Yajuan; Chen, Zhi; Liu, Wei; Lu, Daru

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} LNA-modified oligonucleotides can pass through the plasma membrane of cultured cells even without using transfection machinery. {yields} LNA-modified oligonucleotides passed efficiently across the cell membrane, and lipid-coating facilitated translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. {yields} LNA-oligonucleotide designed to target nuclear HBV DNA efficiently suppresses HBV replication and transcription in cultured hepatic cells. -- Abstract: Silencing target genes with small regulatory RNAs is widely used to investigate gene function and therapeutic drug development. Recently, triplex-based approaches have provided another attractive means to achieve targeted gene regulation and gene manipulation at the molecular and cellular levels. Nuclear entry of oligonucleotides and enhancement of their affinity to the DNA targets are key points of such approaches. In this study, we developed lipid-based transport of a locked-nucleic-acid (LNA)-modified oligonucleotide for hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA interference in human hepatocytes expressing HBV genomic DNA. In these cells, the LNA-modified oligonucleotides passed efficiently across the cell membrane, and lipid-coating facilitated translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. The oligonucleotide specifically targeting HBV DNA clearly interfered with HBV DNA transcription as shown by a block in pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) production. The HBV DNA-targeted oligonucleotide suppressed HBV DNA replication and HBV protein production more efficiently than small interfering RNAs directed to the pgRNA. These results demonstrate that fusion with lipid can carry LNA-modified oligonucleotides to the nucleus where they regulate gene expression. Interfering with HBV DNA transcription by LNA-modified oligonucleotides has strong potential as a new strategy for HBV inhibition.

  18. Hepatitis B virus DNA in blood donors with anti-HBc as a possible indicator of active hepatitis B virus infection in Yucatan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    García-Montalvo, B M; Farfán-Ale, J A; Acosta-Viana, K Y; Puerto-Manzano, F I

    2005-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) may be present in serum even when negative for HBV surface antigen (HBsAg). If routine screening of sera for anti-HBV core antigen (anti-HBc) is not done, low-level HBV viraemia may not be identified. A study was done on the presence of HBV DNA in serum samples from Mexican blood donors negative for HBsAg. Sera from 158 volunteer blood donors, negative for HBsAg and anti-HBs, but positive for anti-HBc, were analysed using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). HBV DNA was detected in sera from 13 (8.23%) of the 158. Specificity of the PCR-amplified products was corroborated using Southern blot. Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis showed identical SSCP-banding patterns for all 13 PCR products, suggesting similar cDNA sequences. Occult HBV infection was observed in approximately 8% of anti-HBc only donors. The absence of HBsAg in the blood of apparently healthy individuals may not be sufficient to ensure lack of circulating HBV, and blood containing anti-HBc only may be infectious until proven otherwise.

  19. Update on occult hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Makvandi, Manoochehr

    2016-01-01

    The event of mutations in the surface antigen gene of hepatitis B virus (HBV) results in undetectable hepatitis B surface antigen with positive/negative anti-hepatitis B core (anti-HBc) antibody status in serum and this phenomenon is named occult hepatitis B infection (OBI). The presence of anti-HBc antibody in serum is an important key for OBI tracking, although about 20% of OBI cases are negative for anti-HBc antibody. The diagnosis of OBI is mainly based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR assays. However, real-time PCR is a more reliable method than PCR. OBI is a great issue for the public health problem and a challenge for the clinical entity worldwide. The persistence of OBI may lead to the development of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. With regard to OBI complications, the screening of HBV DNA by the highly sensitive molecular means should be implemented for: (1) patients with a previous history of chronic or acute HBV infection; (2) patients co-infected with hepatitis C virus/human immunodeficiency virus; (3) patients undergoing chemotherapy or anti-CD20 therapy; (4) recipients of organ transplant; (5) blood donors; (6) organ transplant donors; (7) thalassemia and hemophilia patients; (8) health care workers; (9) patients with liver related disease (cryptogenic); (10) hemodialysis patients; (11) patients undergoing lamivudine or interferon therapy; and (12) children in time of HBV vaccination especially in highly endemic areas of HBV. Active HBV vaccination should be implemented for the close relatives of patients who are negative for OBI markers. Thus, the goal of this review is to evaluate the rate of OBI with a focus on status of high risk groups in different regions of the world.

  20. Current treatments for chronic hepatitis B virus infections.

    PubMed

    Zoulim, Fabien; Lebossé, Fanny; Levrero, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    Over 240 million people worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and although a prophylactic vaccine and effective antiviral therapies are available, no cure exists. Curative regimens are urgently needed because up to one million deaths per year are caused by HBV-related liver cancer and end-stage liver disease. HBV is an hepatotropic virus which belongs to the Hepadnaviridae family and replicates its DNA genome via a reverse transcriptase mechanism. Effective therapies have been developed for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection in the last two decades. They rely on the use of interferon alpha and its pegylated formulation, and on nucleos(t)ide analogs that inhibit viral polymerase activity. Their results are discussed in this review as well as future perspectives. PMID:27318098

  1. Seroprevalence survey of Egyptian tourism workers for hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, human immunodeficiency virus, and Treponema pallidum infections: association of hepatitis C virus infections with specific regions of Egypt.

    PubMed

    el-Sayed, N M; Gomatos, P J; Rodier, G R; Wierzba, T F; Darwish, A; Khashaba, S; Arthur, R R

    1996-08-01

    Blood samples from 740 Egyptian Nationals working in the tourism industry at two sites in the South Sinai governorate were screened for markers of infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and Treponema pallidum. Study subjects included 467 individuals from a rural seashore tourist village and 273 persons at two hotels in a well-established resort town. Subjects' ages ranged from 15 to 70 years; 99.3% were male. The prevalence of serologic markers for currently asymptomatic or past HBV infection alone was 20.7% (n = 153), of markers for past or chronic HCV infection alone was 7.4% (n = 55), and of markers for both HBV and HCV was 6.9% (n = 51). Of the 204 individuals positive for anti-HBV core antibody, 12 (5.9%) were also positive for hepatitis B surface antigen. Two individuals (0.3%) had a serologic market suggestive of an active syphilitic infection. No subject was found to be HIV-seropositive. History of prior injections and number of injections were associated with infection with HCV. Primary residence in the Nile delta and valley areas where schistosomiasis is highly endemic, was also a statistically significant risk factor for HCV, but not HBV infection.

  2. Clinical cancer chemoprevention: From the hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine to the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Horng-Jyh

    2015-04-01

    Approximately 2 million new cancer cases are attributed to infectious agents each year worldwide. Vaccines for the hepatitis B virus (HBV), a risk factor of hepatocellular cancer, and human papillomavirus (HPV), a risk factor of cervical cancer, are considered major successes in clinical chemoprevention of cancer. In Taiwan, the first evidence of cancer prevention through vaccinations was provided by HBV vaccination data in infants. The Taiwanese HBV vaccination program has since become a model immunization schedule for newborns worldwide. Persistent infection with high-risk HPV is generally accepted as prerequisite for cervical cancer diagnosis; however, cervical cancer is a rare complication of HPV infections. This is due to the fact that such infections tend to be transient. The safety and efficacy of both available HPV quadrivalent vaccine and bivalent vaccine are not in doubt at the present time. Until a human cytomegalovirus (CMV) vaccine becomes available, simple hygienic practices, such as hand washing, can prevent CMV infection both before and during pregnancy. Each country should establish her official guidelines regarding which vaccines should be used to treat various conditions, the target population (i.e., universal or limited to a selected population), and the immunization schedules. After a vaccine is recommended, decisions regarding reimbursement by the public health care fund are evaluated. The guidelines become part of the immunization schedule, which is updated annually and published in the official bulletin. In conclusion, both HBV and HPV vaccines are considered major successes in the chemoprevention of cancer.

  3. Detection of EBV, HBV, HCV, HIV-1, HTLV-I and -II, and SMRV in Human and Other Primate Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Uphoff, Cord C.; Denkmann, Sabine A.; Steube, Klaus G.; Drexler, Hans G.

    2010-01-01

    The high prevalence of contaminated cell cultures suggests that viral contaminations might be distributed among cultures. We investigated more than 460 primate cell lines for Epstein-Barr (EBV), hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus I and II (HTLV-I/-II), and squirrel monkey retrovirus (SMRV) infections for risk assessment. None of the cell lines were infected with HCV, HIV-1, or HTLV-I/-II. However, one cell line displayed reverse transcriptase activity. Thirty-nine cell lines harbored EBV DNA sequences. Studies on the lytic phase of EBV revealed that five cell lines produce EBV particles and six further cell lines produced EBV upon stimulation. One cell line contained an integrated HBV genome fragment but showed no virus production. Six cell lines were SMRV-infected. Newly established cell lines should be tested for EBV infections to detect B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCL). B-LCLs established with EBV from cell line B95-8 should be tested for SMRV infections. PMID:20454443

  4. [Occult hepatitis B virus infection in chronic hepatitis C].

    PubMed

    Jang, Jae Young; Park, Eui Ju

    2013-09-01

    Occult HBV infection is defined as the presence of HBV DNA in the liver (with or without detectable or undetectable HBV DNA in the serum) of individuals testing negative for HBsAg. Studies on occult HBV infection in hepatitis C patients have reported highly variable prevalence, because the prevalence of occult HBV infection varies depending on the hepatitis B risk factors and methodological approaches. The most reliable diagnostic approach for detecting occult HBV detection is through examination of liver DNA extracts. HCV has been suspected to strongly suppress HBV replication up to the point where it may be directly responsible for occult HBV infection development. However, more data are needed to arrive at a definitive conclusion regarding the role of HCV in inducing occult HBV infection. Occult HBV infection in chronic hepatitis C patients is a complex biological entity with possible relevant clinical implications. Influence of occult HBV infection on the clinical outcomes of chronic hepatitis C may be considered negative. However, recent studies have shown that occult HBV infection could be associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma and contribute to the worsening of the course of chronic liver disease over time in chronic hepatitis C patients. Nevertheless, the possible role of occult HBV infection in chronic hepatitis C is still unresolved and no firm conclusion has been made up until now. It still remains unclear how occult HBV infection affects the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. Therefore, in order to resolve current controversies and understand the pathogenic role and clinical impacts of occult HBV infection in chronic hepatitis C patients, well-designed clinical studies are needed.

  5. Challenges and priorities in the management of HIV/HBV and HIV/HCV coinfection in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Easterbrook, Philippa; Sands, Anita; Harmanci, Hande

    2012-05-01

    Liver disease due to chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is now emerging as an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus- (HIV-) infected persons in resource-limited settings (RLS). Existing management guidelines have generally focused on care in tertiary level facilities in developed countries. Less than half of low-income countries have guidance, and in those that do, there are important omissions or disparities in recommendations. There are multiple challenges to delivery of effective hepatitis care in RLS, but the most important remains the limited access to antiviral drugs and diagnostic tests. In 2010, the World Health Assembly adopted a resolution calling for a comprehensive approach for the prevention, control, and management of viral hepatitis. We describe activities at the World Health Organization (WHO) in three key areas: the establishment of a global hepatitis Program and interim strategy; steps toward the development of global guidance on management of coinfection for RLS; and the WHO prequalification program of HBV and HCV diagnostic assays. We highlight key research gaps and the importance of applying the lessons learned from the public health scale-up of ART to hepatitis care.

  6. New susceptibility and resistance HLA-DP alleles to HBV-related diseases identified by a trans-ethnic association study in Asia.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Nao; Sawai, Hiromi; Kashiwase, Koichi; Minami, Mutsuhiko; Sugiyama, Masaya; Seto, Wai-Kay; Yuen, Man-Fung; Posuwan, Nawarat; Poovorawan, Yong; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Matsuura, Kentaro; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Kurosaki, Masayuki; Asahina, Yasuhiro; Izumi, Namiki; Kang, Jong-Hon; Hige, Shuhei; Ide, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Kazuhide; Sakaida, Isao; Murawaki, Yoshikazu; Itoh, Yoshito; Tamori, Akihiro; Orito, Etsuro; Hiasa, Yoichi; Honda, Masao; Kaneko, Shuichi; Mita, Eiji; Suzuki, Kazuyuki; Hino, Keisuke; Tanaka, Eiji; Mochida, Satoshi; Watanabe, Masaaki; Eguchi, Yuichiro; Masaki, Naohiko; Murata, Kazumoto; Korenaga, Masaaki; Mawatari, Yoriko; Ohashi, Jun; Kawashima, Minae; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Mizokami, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed the association between SNPs located on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II genes, including HLA-DP and HLA-DQ, and chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, mainly in Asian populations. HLA-DP alleles or haplotypes associated with chronic HBV infection or disease progression have not been fully identified in Asian populations. We performed trans-ethnic association analyses of HLA-DPA1, HLA-DPB1 alleles and haplotypes with hepatitis B virus infection and disease progression among Asian populations comprising Japanese, Korean, Hong Kong, and Thai subjects. To assess the association between HLA-DP and chronic HBV infection and disease progression, we conducted high-resolution (4-digit) HLA-DPA1 and HLA-DPB1 genotyping in a total of 3,167 samples, including HBV patients, HBV-resolved individuals and healthy controls. Trans-ethnic association analyses among Asian populations identified a new risk allele HLA-DPB1*09 ∶ 01 (P = 1.36 × 10(-6); OR= 1.97; 95% CI, 1.50-2.59) and a new protective allele DPB1*02 ∶ 01 (P = 5.22 × 10(-6); OR = 0.68; 95% CI, 0.58-0.81) to chronic HBV infection, in addition to the previously reported alleles. Moreover, DPB1*02 ∶ 01 was also associated with a decreased risk of disease progression in chronic HBV patients among Asian populations (P = 1.55 × 10(-7); OR = 0.50; 95% CI, 0.39-0.65). Trans-ethnic association analyses identified Asian-specific associations of HLA-DP alleles and haplotypes with HBV infection or disease progression. The present findings will serve as a base for future functional studies of HLA-DP molecules in order to understand the pathogenesis of HBV infection and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:24520320

  7. Inflammation Promotes Expression of Stemness-Related Properties in HBV-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chang, Te-Sheng; Chen, Chi-Long; Wu, Yu-Chih; Liu, Jun-Jen; Kuo, Yung Che; Lee, Kam-Fai; Lin, Sin-Yi; Lin, Sey-En; Tung, Shui-Yi; Kuo, Liang-Mou; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Huang, Yen-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The expression of cancer stemness is believed to reduce the efficacy of current therapies against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Understanding of the stemness-regulating signaling pathways incurred by a specific etiology can facilitate the development of novel targets for individualized therapy against HCC. Niche environments, such as virus-induced inflammation, may play a crucial role. However, the mechanisms linking inflammation and stemness expression in HCC remain unclear. Here we demonstrated the distinct role of inflammatory mediators in expressions of stemness-related properties involving the pluripotent octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4) in cell migration and drug resistance of hepatitis B virus-related HCC (HBV-HCC). We observed positive immunorecognition for macrophage chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1)/CD68 and OCT4/NANOG in HBV-HCC tissues. The inflammation-conditioned medium (inflamed-CM) generated by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated U937 human leukemia cells significantly increased the mRNA and protein levels of OCT4/NANOG preferentially in HBV-active (HBV+HBsAg+) HCC cells. The inflamed-CM also increased the side population (SP) cell percentage, green fluorescent protein (GFP)-positive cell population, and luciferase activity of OCT4 promoter-GFP/luciferase in HBV-active HCC cells. Furthermore, the inflamed-CM upregulated the expressions of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I)/IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) and activated IGF-IR/Akt signaling in HBV-HCC. The IGF-IR phosphorylation inhibitor picropodophyllin (PPP) suppressed inflamed-CM-induced OCT4 and NANOG levels in HBV+HBsAg+ Hep3B cells. Forced expression of OCT4 significantly increased the secondary sphere formation and cell migration, and reduced susceptibility of HBV-HCC cells to cisplatin, bleomycin, and doxorubicin. Taking together, our results show that niche inflammatory mediators play critical roles in inducing the expression of stemness-related properties involving IGF-IR activation, and

  8. Role natural killer group 2D-ligand interactions in hepatitis B infection

    PubMed Central

    Pollicino, Teresa; Koumbi, Lemonica

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is the leading cause of liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) worldwide, in spite of prophylactic vaccination and antiviral treatment modalities. The immunopathogenesis of HBV infection has been intensively studied and is propelled by complex interactions between the virus and the host immune system. Natural killer group 2D (NKG2D) is a well-characterized activating receptor, expressed on natural killer (NK) cells, NK T cells and CD8+ cytotoxic T cells. This receptor is present in both humans and mice and binds to a diverge family of ligands that resemble the MHC-class I molecules. Increasing evidence shows that NKG2D-ligand interactions are critical in the establishment of HBV persistence and the development of liver injury and HCC. The expression of NKG2D ligands depends on the presence of several polymorphisms and is also modulated post-transcriptionally by HBV. While it is known that HBV circumvents host’s innate immunity via the NKG2D pathway but the exact mechanisms involved are still elusive. This letter discusses previous accomplishments on the role of NKG2D ligand regulation in the development of chronic HBV, liver injury and HCC. PMID:25937859

  9. Effect of hepatitis B virus infection on trophoblast cell line (HTR-8/SVneo) and choriocarcinoma cell line (JEG3) is linked to CD133-2 (AC141) expression.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hong; Chen, Jing; Na, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Mother-to-infant transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) plays an important role in the chronic carrier state in China. In our studies, the response of trophoblast cell and choriocarcinoma cell to HBV infection regarding the expression of CD133-2 (AC141) was evaluated. Western blot and RT-PCR showed that a high level of CD133-2 protein and mRNA in HTR-8/SVneo cells, but a low level in JEG-3 cells. Lower proliferation and mobility, and higher apoptosis were observed in HTR-8/SVneo cells and JEG-3-CD133-2(+) cells after HBV infection than those in HTR-8-CD133-2(-) cells and JEG-3 cells. Our main finding is that CD133-negative cells (HTR-8-CD133-2(-) and JEG-3) are prone to HBV infection. In the last, our data indicated that the activation of Smad signaling pathway and the induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in CD133-negative cells after HBV infection. In summary, our study demonstrated that CD133 is a key factor that mediated HBV infection to trophoblast cell and choriocarcinoma cell. PMID:27508045

  10. HBV Induced HCC: Major Risk Factors from Genetic to Molecular Level

    PubMed Central

    Ayub, Ambreen; Ashfaq, Usman Ali; Haque, Asma

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a deadly and emerging disease leading to death in Asian countries. High hepatitis B virus (HBV) load and chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection increase the risk of developing HCC. HBV is a DNA virus that can integrate DNA into host genome thereby increase the yield of transactivator protein HBxAg that may deregulate many pathways involving in metabolism of cells. Several monogenic and polygenic risk factors are also involved in HCC development. This review summarizes the mechanism involved in HCC development and discusses some promising therapies to make HCC curative. PMID:23991421

  11. Hepatitis B Virus Infection and Immunizations among Asian American College Students: Infection, Exposure, and Immunity Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Haeok; Kiang, Peter; Watanabe, Paul; Halon, Patricia; Shi, Ling; Church, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, exposure, and immunity among Asian American college students as a basis for evaluating HBV screening and vaccination policy. Participants and Methods: Self-identified Asian American college students aged 18 years or older were examined. Serological tests of HBV surface…

  12. Two cases of malignant lymphoma with reactivation of resolved hepatitis B virus infection after bendamustine hydrochloride monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hiraki, Yoshiki; Kawano, Akira; Shigematsu, Hirohisa; Miki, Koichiro; Nomura, Hideyuki; Shimoda, Shinji

    2016-09-01

    A 63-year-old female and a 63-year-old male with resolved HBV infection suffered a relapse of malignant lymphoma. After bendamustine hydrochloride monotherapy, HBV reactivation occurred. Entecavir treatment was commenced immediately, with tests for HBV DNA negative without development of hepatitis. Regular monitoring of HBV DNA based on the guidelines from the Japan Society of Hepatology was useful. PMID:27593368

  13. HIV, HBV and HCV Coinfection Prevalence in Iran - A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri Amiri, Fahimeh; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Mirzazadeh, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background worldwide, hepatitis C and B virus infections (HCV and HCV), are the two most common coinfections with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and has become a major threat to the survival of HIV-infected persons. The review aimed to estimate the prevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV, HIV/HCV and HIV/HBV and triple coinfections in different subpopulations in Iran. Method Following PRISMA guidelines, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of reports on prevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV and HIV coinfections in different subpopulations in Iran. We systematically reviewed the literature to identify eligible studies from January 1996 to March 2012 in English or Persian/Farsi databases. We extracted the prevalence of HIV antibodies (diagnosed by Elisa confirmed with Western Blot test), HCV antibodies and HBsAg (with confirmatory laboratory test) as the main primary outcome. We reported the prevalence of the three infections and coinfections as point and 95% confidence intervals. Findings HIV prevalence varied from %0.00 (95% CI: 0.00–0.003) in the general population to %17.25 (95% CI: 2.94–31.57) in people who inject drugs (PWID). HBV prevalence ranged from % 0.00 (95% CI: 0.00–7.87) in health care workers to % 30.9 (95% CI: 27.88–33.92) in PWID. HCV prevalence ranged from %0.19 (95% CI: 0.00–0.66) in health care workers to %51.46 (95% CI: 34.30–68.62) in PWID. The coinfection of HIV/HBV and also HIV/HCV in the general population and in health care workers was zero, while the most common coinfections were HIV/HCV (10.95%), HIV/HBV (1.88%) and triple infections (1.25%) in PWID. Conclusions We found that PWID are severely and disproportionately affected by HIV and the other two infections, HCV and HBV. Screenings of such coinfections need to be reinforced to prevent new infections and also reduce further transmission in their community and to others. PMID:27031352

  14. [The clinical analysis of fulminant Wilson's disease in patients with hepatitis B virus infection: a report of 13 cases].

    PubMed

    Deng, H H; Xu, M

    2016-08-01

    To analyze the clinical features and prognosis of fulminant Wilson's disease (FWD) in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Twenty-seven patients were enrolled in Guangzhou Eighth People's Hospital from 2005 to 2015, including 13 FWD patients with HBV infection and 14 FWD patients without HBV infection. Clinical efficacy and survival rate were evaluated. Baseline biochemical data in two groups were comparable(P>0.05), including total bilirubin, prothrombin activity, serum albumin, alpha fetal protein, alanine transaminase, ceruloplasmin and 24 hours urine copper .Treatment in FWD group with HBV infection was ineffective, including 9(9/13) deaths and 4(4/13) patients receiveing liver transplants. However, 7(7/14)cases in the other group did not response to the treatment, including 6(6/14)deaths and 1(1/14)patient receiving liver transplant. The prognosis in the two groups is significantly different(P=0.006), which is much worse in FWD patients with HBV infection.

  15. [The clinical analysis of fulminant Wilson's disease in patients with hepatitis B virus infection: a report of 13 cases].

    PubMed

    Deng, H H; Xu, M

    2016-08-01

    To analyze the clinical features and prognosis of fulminant Wilson's disease (FWD) in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Twenty-seven patients were enrolled in Guangzhou Eighth People's Hospital from 2005 to 2015, including 13 FWD patients with HBV infection and 14 FWD patients without HBV infection. Clinical efficacy and survival rate were evaluated. Baseline biochemical data in two groups were comparable(P>0.05), including total bilirubin, prothrombin activity, serum albumin, alpha fetal protein, alanine transaminase, ceruloplasmin and 24 hours urine copper .Treatment in FWD group with HBV infection was ineffective, including 9(9/13) deaths and 4(4/13) patients receiveing liver transplants. However, 7(7/14)cases in the other group did not response to the treatment, including 6(6/14)deaths and 1(1/14)patient receiving liver transplant. The prognosis in the two groups is significantly different(P=0.006), which is much worse in FWD patients with HBV infection. PMID:27480558

  16. Leukocyte Telomere Length-Related rs621559 and rs398652 Genetic Variants Influence Risk of HBV-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Juan; Lu, Chao; Wei, Jinyu; Li, Lichao; Zhou, Changchun; Yuan, Qipeng; Zhou, Liqing; Yang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified eleven leukocyte telomere length (LTL)-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Since LTL has been associated with risk of many malignancies, LTL-related SNPs may contribute to cancer susceptibility. To test this hypothesis in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we genotyped these eleven LTL-related SNPs in a case-control set including 1186 HBV-related HCC cases, 508 chronic HBV carriers and 1308 healthy controls at the discovery stage. The associations of HCC risk with these SNPs were further confirmed in an independent case-control set. We found that 1p34.2 rs621559 and 14q21 rs398652 were significantly associated with HBV-related HCC risk (both P<0.005 after Bonferroni corrections). There was no significant difference of either rs621559 or rs398652 genotypes between chronic HBV carriers and healthy controls, demonstrating that the association was not due to predisposition to HBV infection. In the pooled analyses (1806 HBV-related HCC cases and 1954 controls), we observed a decreased HCC risk, 0.72-times, associated with the 1p34.2 rs621559 AA genotype compared to the GG genotype (P = 1.6×10−6). Additionally, there was an increased HCC risk, 1.27-fold, associated with the rs398652 GG genotype (P = 3.3×10−6). A statistical joint effect between the rs621559 GG and rs398652 GG genotypes may exist in elevating risk of HBV-related HCC. We show, for the first time, that rs398652 and rs621559 might be marker genetic variants for risk of HBV-related HCC in the Chinese population. PMID:25365256

  17. Sexually transmitted infections among married women in Dhaka, Bangladesh: unexpected high prevalence of herpes simplex type 2 infection

    PubMed Central

    Bogaerts, J; Ahmed, J; Akhter, N; Begum, N; Rahman, M; Nahar, S; Van Ranst, M; Verhaegen, J

    2001-01-01

    Objectives: To document the prevalence of reproductive tract infections (RTI) and sexually transmitted infections (STI) among women attending a basic healthcare clinic in Dhaka, Bangladesh, to identify risk factors associated with the diseases and to estimate the incidence of syphilis, hepatitis C (HCV), hepatitis B (HBV), and herpes simplex type 2 (HSV-2) infection. Methods: A cross sectional sample of 2335 consecutive women was examined during 1996–8. Women were interviewed about risk factors for RTI/STI and tested for Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Trichomonas vaginalis, Treponema pallidum, HIV, HCV, HBV, HSV-1 and HSV-2 infection as well as vaginal candidosis and bacterial vaginosis. Women with antibodies to T pallidum were retested at regular intervals. One year after ending the study seroconversion for syphilis, HBV, HCV, and HSV-2 infection was detected among women initially negative for the respective diseases. Results: The overall prevalence rate of N gonorrhoeae, C trachomatis, T vaginalis, and T pallidum infection was 0.5%, 1.9%, 2.0%, and 2.9% respectively. Overall, 35% of the women had antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen, 0.9% had HCV, and 12% HSV-2 infection. Risk factors for gonorrhoea/C trachomatis infection were a husband not living at home or suspected of being unfaithful. HSV-2 infection was associated with the same risk factors and with a polygamous marriage. The prevalence of HSV-2 infection among women "at risk" was 23%. HIV infection was not diagnosed. Repeated serological examination indicated that only 32% of women with serological evidence of syphilis had active disease. The seroincidences of HBV, HCV, and HSV-2 were 0.03, 0.007, and 0.009 per person year. Seroconversion for syphilis was not observed. Key Words: sexually transmitted infections; genital herpes; Bangladesh PMID:11287690

  18. Sustained inhibition of hepatitis B virus replication in vivo using RNAi-activating lentiviruses.

    PubMed

    Ivacik, D; Ely, A; Ferry, N; Arbuthnot, P

    2015-02-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) puts individuals at high risk for complicating cirrhosis and liver cancer, but available treatment to counter the virus rarely eliminates infection. Although harnessing RNA interference (RNAi) to silence HBV genes has shown the potential, achieving efficient and durable silencing of viral genes remains an important goal. Here we report on the propagation of lentiviral vectors (LVs) that successfully deliver HBV-targeting RNAi activators to liver cells. Mono- and tricistronic artificial primary microRNAs (pri-miRs) derived from pri-miR-31, placed under transcriptional control of the liver-specific modified murine transthyretin (mTTR) promoter, caused efficient inhibition of HBV replication markers. The tricistronic cassette was capable of silencing a mutant viral target and the effects were observed without disrupting the function of an endogenous miR (miR-16). The mTTR promoter stably expressed a reporter transgene in mouse livers over a study period of 1 year. Good silencing of HBV genes, without evidence of toxicity, was demonstrated following intravenous injection of LVs into neonatal HBV transgenic mice. Collectively, these data indicate that LVs may achieve sustained inhibition of HBV replication that is appealing for their therapeutic use.

  19. Insights into human immunodeficiency virus-hepatitis B virus co-infection in India

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Runu; Pal, Ananya

    2015-01-01

    Shared routes of transmission lead to frequent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-hepatitis B virus (HBV) co-infection in a host which results in about 10% of HIV positive individuals to have chronic hepatitis B infection worldwide. In post-antiretroviral therapy era, liver diseases have emerged as the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected individuals and HBV co-infection have become the major health issue among this population particularly from the regions with endemic HBV infection. In setting of HIV-HBV co-infection, HIV significantly impacts the natural history of HBV infection, its disease profile and the treatment outcome in negative manner. Moreover, the epidemiological pattern of HBV infection and the diversity in HBV genome (genotypic and phenotypic) are also varied in HIV co-infected subjects as compared to HBV mono-infected individuals. Several reports on the abovementioned issues are available from developed parts of the world as well as from sub-Saharan African countries. In contrast, most of these research areas remained unexplored in India despite having considerable burden of HIV and HBV infections. This review discusses present knowledge from the studies on HIV-HBV co-infection in India and relevant reports from different parts of the world. Issues needed for the future research relevant to HIV-HBV co-infection in India are also highlighted here, including a call for further investigations on this field of study. PMID:26279986

  20. Alteration of liver glycopatterns during cirrhosis and tumor progression induced by HBV.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yannan; Zhong, Yaogang; Ma, Tianran; Wu, Fei; Wu, Haoxiang; Yu, Hanjie; Huang, Chen; Li, Zheng

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is closely correlated with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-induced liver cirrhosis. Structural changes in the glycans of serum and tissue proteins are reliable indicators of liver damage. However, little is known about the alteration of liver glycopatterns during cirrhosis and tumor progression induced by HBV infection. This study compared the differential expression of liver glycopatterns in 7 sets of normal pericarcinomatous tissues (PCTs), cirrhotic, and tumor tissues from patients with liver cirrhosis and HCC induced by HBV using lectin microarrays. Fluorescence-based lectin histochemistry and lectin blotting were further utilized to validate and assess the expression and distribution of certain glycans in 9 sets of corresponding liver tissue sections. Eight lectins (e.g., Jacalin and AAL) revealed significant difference in cirrhotic tissues versus PCTs. Eleven lectins (e.g., EEL and SJA) showed significant alteration during cirrhotic and tumor progression. The expression of Galα1-3(Fucα1-2)Gal (EEL) and fucosyltransferase 1 was mainly increasing in the cytoplasm of hepatocytes during PCTs-cirrhotic-tumor tissues progression, while the expression of T antigen (ACA and PNA) was decreased sharply in cytoplasm of tumor hepatocytes. Understanding the precision alteration of liver glycopatterns related to the development of hepatitis, cirrhosis, and tumor induced by HBV infection may help elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the progression of chronic liver diseases and develop new antineoplastic therapeutic strategies. PMID:26833199

  1. In vivo hepatitis B virus-neutralizing activity of an anti-HBsAg humanized antibody in chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se Ho; Oh, Han Kyu; Ryu, Chun Jeih; Park, Song Yong

    2008-01-01

    Previously, we constructed a humanized antibody (HuS10) that binds to the common a antigenic determinant on the S protein of HBV. In this study, we evaluated its HBV-neutralizing activity in chimpanzees. A study chimpanzee was intravenously administered with a single dose of HuS10, followed by intravenous challenge with the adr subtype of HBV, while a control chimpanzee was only challenged with the virus. The result showed that the control chimpanzee was infected by the virus, and thus serum HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) became positive from the 14th to 20th week and actively acquired serum anti-HBc and anti-HBs antibodies appeared from the 19th and 23rd week, respectively. However, in the case of the study chimpanzee, serum HBsAg became positive from the 34th to 37th week, while actively acquired serum anti-HBc and anti-HBs antibodies appeared from the 37th and 40th week, respectively, indicating that HuS10 neutralized the virus in vivo and thus delayed the HBV infection. This novel humanized antibody will be useful in the immunoprophylaxis of HBV infection. PMID:18305407

  2. Evolutionary analysis of HBV "S" antigen genetic diversity in Iranian blood donors: a nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Pourkarim, Mahmoud Reza; Sharifi, Zohre; Soleimani, Ali; Amini-Bavil-Olyaee, Samad; Elsadek Fakhr, Ahmed; Sijmons, Steven; Vercauteren, Jurgen; Karimi, Gharib; Lemey, Philippe; Maes, Piet; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Van Ranst, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The genetic diversity of the HBV S gene has a significant impact on the prophylaxis and treatment of hepatitis B infection. The effect of selective pressure on this genetic alteration has not yet been studied in Iranian blood donors. To explore HBV evolution and to analyze the effects and patterns of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) mutations on blood screening assays, 358 Iranian blood donors diagnosed as asymptomatic HBV carriers were enrolled in this nationwide study. Large S and partial S genes were amplified and sequenced. HBV (sub) genotypes and synonymous and nonsynonymous mutations were investigated. The impact of naturally occurring mutations on HBsAg ELISA results was explored. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that isolated strains were of genotype D. The dominant subgenotype/subtype was D1/ayw2. Deletions and naturally occurring stop codons in the pre-S1 and major hydrophilic region (MHR) were identified. In total, 32.8% of the studied strains harbored 195 single or multiple mutations in the MHR, the majority of which were located at the first loop of the "a determinant" domain. The ayw2 subtype showed a significant effect on the ELISA signal/cut-off value and carried fewer mutations in the MHR. Nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution value indicated that negative selection was the dominant evolutionary force in the HBV S gene. This nationwide study revealed that mutation frequency of HBsAg among Iranian blood donors was much higher than previous reports from the different local regions. These findings regarding the significant differences in reactivity of ELISA among different subtypes of HBV and its correlation with the number of mutations at the MHR will be valuable to public health authorities. PMID:24150816

  3. Inhibitory effect of emodin and Astragalus polysaccharide on the replication of HBV

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Shuang-Suo; Jia, Xiao-Li; Song, Ping; Cheng, Yan-An; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Ming-Zhu; Liu, En-Qi

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the anti-viral effect of emodin plus Astragalus polysaccharide (APS) in hepatitis B virus (HBV) transgenic mice. METHODS: Sixty HBV transgenic mice (HBV TGM) whose weight varied between 18 and 24 g were randomly divided into 3 groups, with 20 mice in each group. Group A was the normal control, where the mice were treated with physiological saline; group B was the positive control where the mice were treated with lamivudine solution (100 mL/kg per day). Group C was the experimental group where the mice were treated with physiological saline containing emodin and APS (57.59 mg/kg per day and 287.95 mg/kg per day, respectively). The mice were treated daily for 3 wk. After 1 wk recovery time, the mice were sacrificed and serum as well as liver tissues were collected for ELISA and histological examination. RESULTS: After 21 d treatment, HBV DNA levels in group B and group C significantly declined when compared with group A (P < 0.05). However, a significant increase in HBV DNA content was observed in group B, whereas this phenomenon was not observed in group C. A reduction in the contents of HBsAg, HBeAg and HBcAg in the mice from group B and C was observed when compared with group A. CONCLUSION: Emodin and APS have a weak but persistent inhibitory effect on HBV replication in vivo, which may function as a supplementary modality in the treatment of hepatitis B infection. PMID:19960563

  4. The combination of tacrolimus and entecavir improves the remission of HBV-associated glomerulonephritis without enhancing viral replication

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lifen; Ye, Zhiming; Liang, Huaban; Zhang, Bin; Xu, Lixia; Feng, Zhonglin; Liu, Shuangxin; Shi, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tacrolimus inhibits hepatitis B virus entry into hepatocytes through targeting the HBV receptor, sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide. This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Tacrolimus combined with entecavir antiviral therapy for HBV-associated glomerulonephritis patients with biopsy-proven membranous nephropathy. Method: A cohort of 42 patients was enrolled in this retrospective study. Twenty-three patients received Tacrolimus (0.05 mg/kg/day) in combination entecavir over 24 weeks, whereas the other 19 patients only received entecavir monotherapy. Results: The probability of proteinuria remission in the Tacrolimus+entecavir group was 69 and 87% after 12 and 24 weeks, whereas was only 26 and 42%, respectively, in the entecavir group. The mean time to partial or complete remission was 18.6 weeks in the Tacrolimus+entecavir group and 34.3 weeks in the entecavir group (P<0.001). A decrease in the HBV DNA titer was observed in all patients with active HBV replication. None of the HBV carriers in the Tacrolimus+entecavir group showed evidence of HBV reactivation. The serum creatinine and alanine aminotransferase levels remained stable in both groups. The Tacrolimus target trough concentration was 5-10 ng/mL. Conclusion: Tacrolimus combined with entecavir rapidly and effectively induced remission of HBV-GN in Chinese adults. Furthermore, Tacrolimus may have a synergistic antiviral effect with entecavir. PMID:27186284

  5. MAIT cells are activated during human viral infections.

    PubMed

    van Wilgenburg, Bonnie; Scherwitzl, Iris; Hutchinson, Edward C; Leng, Tianqi; Kurioka, Ayako; Kulicke, Corinna; de Lara, Catherine; Cole, Suzanne; Vasanawathana, Sirijitt; Limpitikul, Wannee; Malasit, Prida; Young, Duncan; Denney, Laura; Moore, Michael D; Fabris, Paolo; Giordani, Maria Teresa; Oo, Ye Htun; Laidlaw, Stephen M; Dustin, Lynn B; Ho, Ling-Pei; Thompson, Fiona M; Ramamurthy, Narayan; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Willberg, Christian B; Screaton, Gavin R; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are abundant in humans and recognize bacterial ligands. Here, we demonstrate that MAIT cells are also activated during human viral infections in vivo. MAIT cells activation was observed during infection with dengue virus, hepatitis C virus and influenza virus. This activation-driving cytokine release and Granzyme B upregulation-is TCR-independent but dependent on IL-18 in synergy with IL-12, IL-15 and/or interferon-α/β. IL-18 levels and MAIT cell activation correlate with disease severity in acute dengue infection. Furthermore, HCV treatment with interferon-α leads to specific MAIT cell activation in vivo in parallel with an enhanced therapeutic response. Moreover, TCR-independent activation of MAIT cells leads to a reduction of HCV replication in vitro mediated by IFN-γ. Together these data demonstrate MAIT cells are activated following viral infections, and suggest a potential role in both host defence and immunopathology. PMID:27337592

  6. Co-incubation with core proteins of HBV and HCV leads to modulation of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Amogh; Samrat, Subodh K; Agrawal, Babita; Tyrrell, D Lorne J; Kumar, Rakesh

    2014-10-01

    Hepatitis B and C (HBV and HCV) are hepatotropic viruses in humans with approximately 350 and 170 million chronic carriers respectively. Since both viruses have similar modes of transmission, many people are co-infected. Co-infection is common in intravenous drug users, HIV-positive individuals, and transplant recipients. Compared to mono-infected patients, co-infected patients exhibit exacerbated liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver failure. Some of the pathogenic effects may be attributed in part to the structural core proteins of both viruses-ones that have displayed immunomodulatory properties. Yet, the effects of their combined interaction on the human immune system remain a mystery. We aimed to elucidate the combined effects of HBV and HCV core proteins on human dendritic cells' (DCs) ability to present antigens and stimulate antigen-specific T-cells. We observed that when DCs, differentiated from human peripheral blood monocytes, were co-incubated with both core proteins, IL-10 production was dramatically enhanced, IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-12 production was significantly reduced, and HLA-DR expression was downregulated. This instant functional and phenotypic modulation of DCs induced by a combination of HBV and HCV core proteins can allow them to behave like tolerizing DCs, inefficiently presenting antigens to CD4+ T-cells and even suppressing induction of the cellular immune response. These results reveal an important mechanism by which HBV and HCV synergistically induce immune tolerance early in infection that may be instrumental in establishing chronic, persistent infections.

  7. Increased regulatory T cell counts in HIV-infected nonresponders to hepatitis B virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    del Pozo Balado, María del Mar; Leal, Manuel; Méndez Lagares, Gema; Mata, Rosario C; López-Cortés, Luis F; Viciana, Pompeyo; Pacheco, Yolanda M

    2010-08-15

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfection is a main cause of liver-related mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected subjects. Unfortunately, HIV-infected subjects show a low rate of response to standard HBV vaccination (23%-56%), in contrast to rates >90% found in the general population, and the underlying causes (particularly cellular and molecular causes) are still unknown. We hypothesized that an increased frequency of regulatory T (T(reg)) cells could be involved in the low rate of seroconversion in HIV-infected subjects. Forty HIV-infected subjects were enrolled in the Assistance Vaccination Program against HBV of the Infectious Diseases Service from the Virgen del Rocío University Hospital, Seville, Spain. Freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from baseline were immunophenotyped for T(reg) cells, CD4, and CD8 T cells in both naive and memory subpopulations and activation degree, as well as recent thymic emigrants. Baseline T(reg) cell frequency was found independently associated with the final nonresponse to HBV vaccine in HIV-infected subjects. Furthermore, a negative correlation between baseline frequency of T(reg) cells and antibody titers in the final response was found. These findings suggest an active role played by T(reg) cells on the immunization antigen-specific T and/or B cell responses with the final consequence of a B cell anti-HBs lower production.

  8. MAIT cells are activated during human viral infections

    PubMed Central

    van Wilgenburg, Bonnie; Scherwitzl, Iris; Hutchinson, Edward C.; Leng, Tianqi; Kurioka, Ayako; Kulicke, Corinna; de Lara, Catherine; Cole, Suzanne; Vasanawathana, Sirijitt; Limpitikul, Wannee; Malasit, Prida; Young, Duncan; Denney, Laura; Barnes, Eleanor; Ball, Jonathan; Burgess, Gary; Cooke, Graham; Dillon, John; Gore, Charles; Foster, Graham; Guha, Neil; Halford, Rachel; Herath, Cham; Holmes, Chris; Howe, Anita; Hudson, Emma; Irving, William; Khakoo, Salim; Koletzki, Diana; Martin, Natasha; Mbisa, Tamyo; McKeating, Jane; McLauchlan, John; Miners, Alec; Murray, Andrea; Shaw, Peter; Simmonds, Peter; Spencer, Chris; Targett-Adams, Paul; Thomson, Emma; Vickerman, Peter; Zitzmann, Nicole; Moore, Michael D.; Fabris, Paolo; Giordani, Maria Teresa; Oo, Ye Htun; Laidlaw, Stephen M.; Dustin, Lynn B.; Ho, Ling-Pei; Thompson, Fiona M.; Ramamurthy, Narayan; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Willberg, Christian B.; Screaton, Gavin R.; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are abundant in humans and recognize bacterial ligands. Here, we demonstrate that MAIT cells are also activated during human viral infections in vivo. MAIT cells activation was observed during infection with dengue virus, hepatitis C virus and influenza virus. This activation—driving cytokine release and Granzyme B upregulation—is TCR-independent but dependent on IL-18 in synergy with IL-12, IL-15 and/or interferon-α/β. IL-18 levels and MAIT cell activation correlate with disease severity in acute dengue infection. Furthermore, HCV treatment with interferon-α leads to specific MAIT cell activation in vivo in parallel with an enhanced therapeutic response. Moreover, TCR-independent activation of MAIT cells leads to a reduction of HCV replication in vitro mediated by IFN-γ. Together these data demonstrate MAIT cells are activated following viral infections, and suggest a potential role in both host defence and immunopathology. PMID:27337592

  9. Establishment of a simple model for hepatitis B virus infection status based on trait marker from quantitative measurement of serum markers.

    PubMed

    Ningyu, Zhang; Ying, Zhang; Hui, Liu

    2015-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to establish a simple model based on quantitative serum markers of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection to understand the complex immune response to HBV. Patients samples were obtained from individuals with active HBV infection (alanine transaminase [ALT]-positive, aspartate aminotransferase [AST]-positive and HBsAg-positive), or patients who had recovered from infection (ALT-negative, AST-negative, anti-HBs-positive and either HBsAg, HBeAg, anti-HBe or anti-HBc positive). HBV quantitative markers, including HBsAg, anti-HBs, HBeAg, anti-HBe, and anti-HBc, were measured using a chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay. Based on cut-off values, anti-HBs levels were converted to a ratio (sample value/cut-off value, RV). Anti-HBe and anti-HBc levels were determined using a competition method, resulting in the use of a ratio (cut-off value/sample value, RV) for determination of anti-HBe and anti-HBc values. The greater RV value in a patient was considered as a trait marker for HBV infection (TMHB) of this patient. Patients with TMHB including HBsAg or HBeAg were defined as TMHB-Ag; and patients with TMHB including anti-HBs, anti-HBe, or anti-HBc TMHB were defined as TMHB-Ab. The percentage of patients determined to be TMHB-Ag was 96.3% in the HBV group. The percentage of patients determined to be TMHB-Ab was 94.7% in recovery group. TMHBs could be used to analyze different status of HBV infection.

  10. High prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus genotype H infection among children with clinical hepatitis in west Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Escobedo-Melendez, Griselda; Panduro, Arturo; Fierro, Nora A; Roman, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Studies on the prevalence of infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) among children are scarce in Latin American countries, especially in Mexico. This study was aimed to investigate the prevalence of HBV infection, occult hepatitis B infection (OBI) and HBV genotypes among children with clinical hepatitis. In total, 215 children with clinical hepatitis were evaluated for HBV infection. HBV serological markers and HBV DNA were analysed. OBI diagnosis and HBV genotyping was performed. HBV infection was found in 11.2% of children with clinical hepatitis. Among these HBV DNA positive-infected children, OBI was identified in 87.5% (n = 21/24) of the cases and 12.5% (n = 3/24) were positive for both HBV DNA and hepatitis B surface antigen. OBI was more frequent among children who had not been vaccinated against hepatitis B (p < 0.05) than in those who had been vaccinated. HBV genotype H was prevalent in 71% of the children followed by genotype G (8%) and genotype A (4%). In conclusion, OBI is common among Mexican children with clinical hepatitis and is associated with HBV genotype H. The results show the importance of the molecular diagnosis of HBV infection in Mexican paediatric patients with clinical hepatitis and emphasise the necessity of reinforcing hepatitis B vaccination in children. PMID:25099333

  11. High prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus genotype H infection among children with clinical hepatitis in west Mexico.

    PubMed

    Escobedo-Melendez, Griselda; Panduro, Arturo; Fierro, Nora A; Roman, Sonia

    2014-09-01

    Studies on the prevalence of infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) among children are scarce in Latin American countries, especially in Mexico. This study was aimed to investigate the prevalence of HBV infection, occult hepatitis B infection (OBI) and HBV genotypes among children with clinical hepatitis. In total, 215 children with clinical hepatitis were evaluated for HBV infection. HBV serological markers and HBV DNA were analysed. OBI diagnosis and HBV genotyping was performed. HBV infection was found in 11.2% of children with clinical hepatitis. Among these HBV DNA positive-infected children, OBI was identified in 87.5% (n = 21/24) of the cases and 12.5% (n = 3/24) were positive for both HBV DNA and hepatitis B surface antigen. OBI was more frequent among children who had not been vaccinated against hepatitis B (p < 0.05) than in those who had been vaccinated. HBV genotype H was prevalent in 71% of the children followed by genotype G (8%) and genotype A (4%). In conclusion, OBI is common among Mexican children with clinical hepatitis and is associated with HBV genotype H. The results show the importance of the molecular diagnosis of HBV infection in Mexican paediatric patients with clinical hepatitis and emphasise the necessity of reinforcing hepatitis B vaccination in children.

  12. Epidemiology and Molecular Characterization of Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Isolated Villages in the Western Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Castilho, Márcia da Costa; Costa de Oliveira, Cintia Mara; Gimaque, João Bosco de Lima; Leão, Jorge Di Tommaso; Braga, Wornei Silva Miranda

    2012-01-01

    Individuals from three isolated, rural communities in the western Brazilian Amazon were evaluated for serological markers of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, HBV genotype, and the presence of risk factors for infection and transmission. Of the 225 individuals studied, 79.1% had serological evidence of HBV infection; 10.2% individuals were chronic carriers for HBV surface antigen (HBsAg-positive). Analysis of risk factors indicates that HBV is transmitted mainly horizontally within the family from a chronic “active” carrier for hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg-positive), though a strong possibility of vertical transmission remains. The predominance of HBV genotype F, with a higher genomic similarity between the isolates, indicated a relatively recent introduction of HBV, from a common source, to the area. This study sheds light on the HBV epidemiology in the Brazilian Amazon region and highlights the need for greater emphasis on HBV control and immunization programs. PMID:22908032

  13. Screening and identification of compounds with antiviral activity against hepatitis B virus using a safe compound library and novel real-time immune-absorbance PCR-based high throughput system.

    PubMed

    Lamontagne, Jason; Mills, Courtney; Mao, Richeng; Goddard, Cally; Cai, Dawei; Guo, Haitao; Cuconati, Andy; Block, Timothy; Lu, Xuanyong

    2013-04-01

    There are now seven nucleoside/tide analogues, along with interferon-α, that are approved by the FDA for the management of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, a disease affecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide. These medications, however, are limited in usefulness, and significant side effects and the emergence of viral escape mutants make the development of novel and updated therapeutics a pressing need in the treatment of HBV. With this in mind, a library containing 2000 compounds already known to be safe in both humans and mice with known mechanisms of action in mammalian cells were tested for the possibility of either antiviral activity against HBV or selective toxicity in HBV producing cell lines. A modified real-time immune-absorbance-polymerase chain reaction (IA-PCR) assay was developed for this screen, utilizing cells that produce and secrete intact HBV virions. In this procedure, viral particles are first captured by an anti-HBs antibody immobilized on a plate. The viral load is subsequently assessed by real-time PCR directly on captured particles. Using this assay, eight compounds were shown to consistently reduce the amount of secreted HBV viral particles in the culture medium under conditions that had no detectable impact on cell viability. Two compounds, proparacaine and chlorophyllide, were shown to reduce HBV levels 4- to 6-fold with an IC₅₀ of 1 and 1.5 μM, respectively, and were selected for further study. The identification of these compounds as promising antiviral drug candidates against HBV, despite a lack of previous recognition of HBV antiviral activity, supports the validity and utility of testing known compounds for "off-pathogen target" activity against HBV, and also validates this IA-PCR assay as an important tool for the detection of anti-viral activity against enveloped viruses.

  14. Response to antiretroviral therapy in occult hepatitis B and HIV co-infection in West Africa.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, David; Stanley, Alastair; Sarfo, Stephen; Appiah, Lambert; Ankcorn, Michael; Foster, Geraldine; Schwab, Uli; Phillips, Richard; Geretti, Anna M

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the outcome of first-line antiretroviral therapy among 35 Ghanaians with occult HBV/HIV co-infection, comparing them over 2 years to 120 patients with HBsAg+ HBV/HIV co-infection and 230 patients without HBV co-infection. Increases in CD4 cell count and BMI were similar, whereas elevations of hepatic transaminases were more frequent in both the occult HBV and HBsAg+ patients. Occult HBV/HIV co-infection appears not to impact adversely on response to antiretroviral therapy in Ghana. PMID:22874516

  15. Blocking peptides against HBV: PreS1 protein selected from a phage display library

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Yang; Zu, Xiangyang; Jin, Rui; Xiao, Gengfu

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Successfully selected specific PreS1-interacting peptides by using phage displayed library. {yields} Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a consensus PreS1 binding motif. {yields} A highly enriched peptide named P7 had a strong binding ability for PreS1. {yields} P7 could block PreS1 attachment. -- Abstract: The PreS1 protein is present on the outermost part of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface and has been shown to have a pivotal function in viral infectivity and assembly. The development of reagents with high affinity and specificity for PreS1 is of great significance for early diagnosis and treatment of HBV infection. A phage display library of dodecapeptide was screened for interactions with purified PreS1 protein. Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a putative consensus PreS1 binding motif of HX{sub n}HX{sub m}HP/R. Moreover, a peptide named P7 (KHMHWHPPALNT) was highly enriched and occurred with a surprisingly high frequency of 72%. A thermodynamic study revealed that P7 has a higher binding affinity to PreS1 than the other peptides. Furthermore, P7 was able to abrogate the binding of HBV virions to the PreS1 antibody, suggesting that P7 covers key functional sites on the native PreS1 protein. This newly isolated peptide may, therefore, be a new therapeutic candidate for the treatment of HBV. The consensus motif could be modified to deliver imaging, diagnostic, and therapeutic agents to tissues affected by HBV.

  16. Hepatitis B virus infection in immigrant populations

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Nicola; Alessio, Loredana; Pisaturo, Mariantonietta; Macera, Margherita; Sagnelli, Caterina; Zampino, Rosa; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the most common cause of hepatitis worldwide, with nearly 350 million people chronically infected and 600000 deaths per year due to acute liver failure occurring during acute hepatitis or, more frequently, in HBV-related liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. Ongoing immigration from countries with a high HBV endemicity to those with a low HBV endemicity warrants particular attention to prevent the spread of HBV infection to the native population. This review article analyzes the epidemiology and virological and clinical characteristics of HBV infection in immigrant populations and in their host countries, and suggests prophylactic measures to prevent the spread of this infection. Among the immigrants from different geographical areas, those from South East Asia and sub-Saharan Africa show the highest prevalences of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) carriers, in accordance with the high endemicity of the countries of origin. The molecular characteristics of HBV infection in immigrants reflect those of the geographical areas of origin: HBV genotype A and D predominate in immigrants from Eastern Europe, B and C in those from Asia and genotype E in those from Africa. The literature data on the clinical course and treatment of HBsAg-positive immigrants are scanty. The management of HBV infection in immigrant populations is difficult and requires expert personnel and dedicated structures for their assistance. The social services, voluntary operators and cultural mediators are essential to achieve optimized psychological and clinical intervention. PMID:26730274

  17. Activation of Complement by Cells Infected with Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Thomas F.; Mcintosh, Kenneth; Fishaut, Mark; Henson, Peter M.

    1981-01-01

    The ability of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-infected HEp-2 cells in culture to activate complement was investigated. After incubation of cells with various complement sources and buffer, binding of C3b to surfaces of infected cells was demonstrated by immunofluorescence with a double-staining technique. Nonsyncytial and syncytial (i.e., fused, multinucleated) cells were separately enumerated. Also, lysis of RSV-infected cells was assessed by lactic dehydrogenase release. In this system only RSV-infected cells stained for C3b, and they did so only after incubation with functionally active complement. Blocking of classical pathway activation with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid diminished the number of infected nonsyncytial cells positively stained for C3b, but had no effect on staining of syncytial cells. Blocking of alternative pathway activation with either zymosan incubation or heat treatment decreased the number of both syncytial and nonsyncytial cells stained for C3b. Decreasing immunoglobulin concentration of the serum used as the complement source also decreased numbers of both cell types stained for C3b. Eliminating specific anti-RSV antibody diminished numbers of both cell types stained for C3b, but staining was not eliminated. Lastly, incubation with functionally active complement markedly increased lactic dehydrogenase release from infected cells. This study demonstrated that RSV-infected nonsyncytial and syncytial cells are able to activate complement by both classical and alternative pathways. Activation of complement by syncytial cells appears to be less dependent on the classical pathway than is activation by nonsyncytial cells, and activation by syncytial cells may require immunoglobulin but not specific antibody. These experiments suggest the possibility of complement activation during respiratory tract infection by RSV. Implications of this are discussed. Images PMID:7263071

  18. Hepatitis B virus infection in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Yoshihiko; Utsumi, Takako; Lusida, Maria Inge; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 240 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), 75% of whom reside in Asia. Approximately 600000 of infected patients die each year due to HBV-related diseases or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The endemicity of hepatitis surface antigen in Indonesia is intermediate to high with a geographical difference. The risk of HBV infection is high in hemodialysis (HD) patients, men having sex with men, and health care workers. Occult HBV infection has been detected in various groups such as blood donors, HD patients, and HIV-infected individuals and children. The most common HBV subgenotype in Indonesia is B3 followed by C1. Various novel subgenotypes of HBV have been identified throughout Indonesia, with the novel HBV subgenotypes C6-C16 and D6 being successfully isolated. Although a number of HBV subgenotypes have been discovered in Indonesia, genotype-related pathogenicity has not yet been elucidated in detail. Therefore, genotype-related differences in the prognosis of liver disease and their effects on treatments need to be determined. A previous study conducted in Indonesia revealed that hepatic steatosis was associated with disease progression. Pre-S2 mutations and mutations at C1638T and T1753V in HBV/B3 have been associated with advanced liver diseases including HCC. However, drug resistance to lamivudine, which is prominent in Indonesia, remains obscure. Although the number of studies on HBV in Indonesia has been increasing, adequate databases on HBV infection are limited. We herein provided an overview of the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of HBV infection in Indonesia. PMID:26478663

  19. Hepatitis B virus infection in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Yano, Yoshihiko; Utsumi, Takako; Lusida, Maria Inge; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2015-10-14

    Approximately 240 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), 75% of whom reside in Asia. Approximately 600000 of infected patients die each year due to HBV-related diseases or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The endemicity of hepatitis surface antigen in Indonesia is intermediate to high with a geographical difference. The risk of HBV infection is high in hemodialysis (HD) patients, men having sex with men, and health care workers. Occult HBV infection has been detected in various groups such as blood donors, HD patients, and HIV-infected individuals and children. The most common HBV subgenotype in Indonesia is B3 followed by C1. Various novel subgenotypes of HBV have been identified throughout Indonesia, with the novel HBV subgenotypes C6-C16 and D6 being successfully isolated. Although a number of HBV subgenotypes have been discovered in Indonesia, genotype-related pathogenicity has not yet been elucidated in detail. Therefore, genotype-related differences in the prognosis of liver disease and their effects on treatments need to be determined. A previous study conducted in Indonesia revealed that hepatic steatosis was associated with disease progression. Pre-S2 mutations and mutations at C1638T and T1753V in HBV/B3 have been associated with advanced liver diseases including HCC. However, drug resistance to lamivudine, which is prominent in Indonesia, remains obscure. Although the number of studies on HBV in Indonesia has been increasing, adequate databases on HBV infection are limited. We herein provided an overview of the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of HBV infection in Indonesia.

  20. HBV epidemiology in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Paraná, Raymundo; Almeida, Delvone

    2005-12-01

    In Latin America, despite the paucity of population studies, hepatitis B is considered endemic. The western Amazonia is a highly endemic area where hepatitis D is also prevalent. In this area, outbreaks of fulminant hepatitis due to H13V and HDV are frequently reported. Non-safe sexual activity seems to be the most important transmission route, but intrafamilial transmission, during early childhood, is extremely significant in Amazonia. The H13V genotype distribution is heterogeneous with a high prevalence of genotype F in the Amazonian region and genotype A in all other areas. In the region where Asian and Italian immigration occurred, genotypes B, C and D are also described.

  1. Hepatitis B core-related antigen (HBcrAg) levels in the natural history of hepatitis B virus infection in a large European cohort predominantly infected with genotypes A and D.

    PubMed

    Maasoumy, B; Wiegand, S B; Jaroszewicz, J; Bremer, B; Lehmann, P; Deterding, K; Taranta, A; Manns, M P; Wedemeyer, H; Glebe, D; Cornberg, M

    2015-06-01

    Hepatitis B core-related antigen (HBcrAg) has been suggested as an additional marker of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. HBcrAg combines the antigenic reactivity resulting from denatured hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), HBV core antigen and an artificial core-related protein (p22cr). In Asian patients, high levels of HBcrAg have been suggested to be an independent risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma, while low levels could guide safe cessation of treatment with nucleos(t)ide analogues. We here studied HBcrAg levels in different phases of HBV infection in a large European cohort predominantly infected with genotypes A and D: HBeAg-positive immune tolerance (n = 30), HBeAg-positive immune clearance (IC) (n = 60), HBeAg-negative hepatitis (ENH) (n = 50), HBeAg-negative inactive/quiescent carrier phase (c) (n = 109) and acute hepatitis B (n = 8). Median HBcrAg levels were high in the immune tolerance and immune clearance phases (8.41 and 8.11 log U/mL, respectively), lower in ENH subjects (4.82 log U/mL) but only 2.00 log U/mL in ENQ subjects. Correlation between HBcrAg and HBV DNA varied among the different phases of HBV infection, while HBcrAg moderately correlated with hepatitis B surface antigen in all phases. ENQ patients had HBcrAg levels <3 log U/mL in 79%, in contrast to only 12% in the ENH group. HBcrAg levels vary significantly during the different phases of HBV infection. HBcrAg may serve as valuable marker for virus replication and reflect the transcriptional activity of intrahepatic cccDNA. In HBeAg-negative patients, HBcrAg may help to distinguish between inactive carriers (ENQ) and those with active disease (ENH).

  2. Prevalence of occult HBV among hemodialysis patients in two districts in the northern part of the West Bank, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Dumaidi, Kamal; Al-Jawabreh, Amer

    2014-10-01

    Occult hepatitis B infection is the case with undetectable HBsAg, but positive for HBV DNA in liver tissue and/or serum. Occult hepatitis B infection among hemodialysis patients in Palestine has been understudied. In this study, 148 hemodialysis patients from 2 northern districts in Palestine, Jenin (89) and Tulkarem (59), were investigated for occult hepatitis B, HBV, HCV infections with related risk factors. ELISA and PCR were used for the detection of anti-HBc and viral DNA, respectively. The overall prevalence of occult hepatitis B infection among the study group was 12.5% (16/128). Occult hepatitis B infection is more prevalent among males with most cases (15/16) from Jenin District. About one-third (42/132) of the hemodialysis patients were anti-HBc positive. Approximately 27% of the hemodialysis patients were infected with HCV. Around 20% (28/140) were positive for HBV DNA, but only 8.2% (12/146) of the hemodialysis patients were positive for HBsAg. The comparison between hemodialysis patients with occult hepatitis B infection and those without occult hepatitis B infection for selected risk factors and parameters as liver Enzyme, age, sex, HCV infection, blood transfusion, kidney transplant, anti-HBc, and vaccination showed no statistical significance between both categories. Duration of hemodialysis significantly affected the rate of HCV infection. HCV is significantly higher in hemodialysis patients with both Diabetes mellitus and hypertension. The prevalence of occult hepatitis B infection among hemodialysis patients is high; requiring stringent control policies. HBsAg assay is insufficient test for accurate diagnosis of HBV infection among hemodialysis patients.

  3. Modeling and Analyzing the Transmission Dynamics of HBV Epidemic in Xinjiang, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tailei; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Xueliang

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B is an infectious disease caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV) which affects livers. In this paper, we formulate a hepatitis B model to study the transmission dynamics of hepatitis B in Xinjiang, China. The epidemic model involves an exponential birth rate and vertical transmission. For a better understanding of HBV transmission dynamics, we analyze the dynamic behavior of the model. The modified reproductive number σ is obtained. When σ < 1, the disease-free equilibrium is locally asymptotically stable, when σ > 1, the disease-free equilibrium is unstable and the disease is uniformly persistent. In the simulation, parameters are chosen to fit public data in Xinjiang. The simulation indicates that the cumulated HBV infection number in Xinjiang will attain about 600,000 cases unless there are stronger or more effective control measures by the end of 2017. Sensitive analysis results show that enhancing the vaccination rate for newborns in Xinjiang is very effective to stop the transmission of HBV. Hence, we recommend that all infants in Xinjiang receive the hepatitis B vaccine as soon as possible after birth. PMID:26422614

  4. Hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mei-Hwei

    2007-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a worldwide health problem and may cause acute, fulminant, chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, or hepatocelullar carcinoma (HCC). Infection with HBV in infancy or early childhood may lead to a high rate of persistent infection (25-90%), while the rates are lower if infection occurs during adulthood (5-10%). In most endemic areas, infection occurs mainly during early childhood and mother-to-infant transmission accounts for approximately 50% of the chronic infection cases. Hepatitis B during pregnancy does not increase maternal mortality or morbidity or the risk of fetal complications. Approximately 90% of the infants of HBsAg carrier mothers with positive hepatitis B e-antigen (HBeAg) will become carriers if no immunoprophylaxis is given. Transplacental HBeAg may induce a specific non-responsiveness of helper T cells and HBcAg. Spontaneous HBeAg seroconversion to anti-HBe may develop with time but liver damage may occur during the process of the immune clearance of HBV and HBeAg. Mother-to-infant transmission of HBV from HBeAg negative but HBsAg positive mothers is the most important cause of acute or fulminant hepatitis B in infancy. Although antiviral agents are available to treat and avoid the complications of chronic hepatitis B, prevention of HBV infection is the best way for control. Screening for maternal HBsAg with/without HBeAg, followed by three to four doses of HBV vaccine in infancy and hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) within 24h of birth is the most effective way to prevent HBV infection. In areas with a low prevalence of HBV infection or with limited resources, omitting maternal screening but giving three doses of HBV vaccine universally in infancy can also produce good protective efficacy. The first universal HBV immunisation programme in the world was launched in Taiwan 22 years ago. HBV infection rates, chronicity rates, incidence of HCC and incidence of fulminant hepatitis in children have been effectively

  5. Hepatitis B virus infection among HIV-infected pregnant women in Malawi and transmission to infants

    PubMed Central

    Chasela, Charles S.; Kourtis, Athena P.; Wall, Patrick; Drobeniuc, Jan; King, Caroline C.; Thai, Hong; Teshale, Eyasu H.; Hosseinipour, Mina; Ellington, Sascha; Codd, Mary B.; Jamieson, Denise J.; Knight, Rod; Fitzpatrick, Patricia; Kamili, Saleem; Hoffman, Irving; Kayira, Dumbani; Mumba, Noel; Kamwendo, Deborah D.; Martinson, Francis; Powderly, William; Teo, Chong-Gee; van der Horst, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims The extent of HBV infection to infants of HBV/HIV-coinfected pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess prevalence of HBV infection among antiretroviral-naïve, HIV-infected pregnant women in Malawi and examine HBV transmission to their infants. Methods Plasma from 2048 HIV-infected, Malawian women and their infants were tested for markers of HBV infection. Study participants were provided standard-of-care health services, which included administration of pentavalent vaccine to infants at 6, 10, and 14 weeks of age. Results One-hundred and three women (5%) were HBsAg-positive; 70 of these HBsAg-positive women were also HBV-DNA-positive. Sixteen women (0.8%) were HBV-DNA-positive but HBsAg-negative. Five of 51 infants (9.8%) born to HBsAg-positive and/or HBV-DNA-positive women were HBV-DNA-positive by 48 weeks of age. HBV DNA concentrations of two infants of mothers who received extended lamivudine-containing anti-HIV prophylaxis were <4 log10 IU/ml compared to ≥8 log10 IU/ml in three infants of mothers who did not. Conclusions HBV DNA was detected in nearly 10% of infants born to HBV/HIV-coinfected women. Antenatal testing for HIV and HBV, if instituted, can facilitate implementation of prophylactic measures against infant infection by both viruses. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of the European Association for the Study of the Liver. PMID:24211737

  6. Assembly-directed antivirals differentially bind quasi-equivalent pockets to modify HBV capsid tertiary and quaternary structure

    PubMed Central

    Katen, Sarah P.; Tan, Zhenning; Chirapu, Srinivas Reddy; Finn, MG; Zlotnick, Adam

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) is a major cause of liver disease. Assembly of the HBV capsid is a critical step in virus production and an attractive target for new antiviral therapies. We determined the structure of HBV capsid in complex with AT-130, a member of the phenylpropenamide family of assembly effectors. AT-130 causes tertiary and quaternary structural changes, but does not disrupt capsid structure. AT-130 binds a hydrophobic pocket that also accommodates the previously characterized HAP compounds, but favors a unique quasi-equivalent location on the capsid surface. Thus, this pocket is a promiscuous drug binding site and a likely target for different assembly effectors with a broad range of mechanisms of activity. That AT-130 successfully decreases virus production by increasing capsid assembly rate without disrupting capsid structure delineates a new paradigm in antiviral design, that disrupting reaction timing is a viable strategy for assembly effectors of HBV and other viruses. PMID:23871485

  7. Genetic variants in IL12 influence both hepatitis B virus clearance and HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma development in a Chinese male population.

    PubMed

    Tan, Aihua; Gao, Yong; Yao, Ziting; Su, Shining; Jiang, Yonghua; Xie, Yuanliang; Xian, Xiaoying; Mo, Zengnan

    2016-05-01

    IL12 plays a major role not only in inducing appropriate immune responses against viral infections (including HBV) but also in the antitumor immune response. This study was conducted to investigate the relationships of genetic variants in IL12 with hepatitis B virus (HBV) clearance and development of HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We genotyped three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the IL12A (rs568406 and rs2243115) and IL12B (rs3212227) in 395 HBV-positive HCC patients, 293 persistent HBV carriers and 686 subjects with HBV natural clearance from southern China, using the improved multiplex ligase detection reaction (iMLDR) method. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, smoking, and alcohol consumption status showed that rs568408 variant genotypes were significantly associated with host HBV-related HCC risk when compared with persistent HBV carriers, and carriers of the GA + AA genotype decreased the HCC risk in comparison with GG carriers (adjusted OR = 0.53, 95 % CI 0.35-0.80, P = 0.002). No relationships between the rs2243115 and rs3212227 SNPs and HCC risk were observed (all P > 0.05). Besides, rs568408 showed an approaching significant effect on susceptibility to HBV persistent infection (adjusted OR = 1.34, 95 % CI 0.99-1.81, P = 0.057 in dominant genetic models). Furthermore, the TG haplotype was observed to be associated with a significantly increased risk of HBV-related HCC (OR = 1.42, 95 % CI 1.10-1.83, P = 0.006), while TA haplotype was associated with a decreased risk of HBV-related HCC (OR = 0.61, 95 % CI 0.45-0.83, P = 0.002). Our results reveal that the IL12A rs568408 variant may be a marker SNP for risk of both HBV clearance and HBV-related HCC development.

  8. Limited hepatitis B virus replication space in the chronically hepatitis C virus-infected liver.

    PubMed

    Wieland, S F; Asabe, S; Engle, R E; Purcell, R H; Chisari, F V

    2014-05-01

    We compared the kinetics and magnitude of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-naive and chronically HCV-infected chimpanzees in whose livers type I interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) expression is strongly induced. HBV infection was delayed and attenuated in the HCV-infected animals, and the number of HBV-infected hepatocytes was drastically reduced. These results suggest that establishment of HBV infection and its replication space is limited by the antiviral effects of type I interferon in the chronically HCV-infected liver.

  9. [Nosocomial transfer of HBV and HCV by public health workers].

    PubMed

    Fischer, F; Nauert, T

    2003-04-01

    Transmission of HBV and HCV from people who work in medical professions to their patients is still an unsolved hygienic and legal problem. In Germany, cases of nosocomial hepatitis virus infection in health care units have received great public interest. Medical examinations of the employees according to occupational safety regulations aim at the employees only. Legal regulations including regulations of the European Union limit the purpose of these examinations on safety and health of the employees. These examinations do not serve the safety of patients. Protection against infections is regulated by the relevant German public health law, however regulations--especially those that concern the protection of the public--are incomplete. In Germany it is mandatory to inform the public health departments only in cases of acute hepatitis. Doctors do not need to give information about chronic liver infections. This may lead to the situation that a health care worker is unaware of a chronic, potentially infectious condition and his immunological status may remain unknown for a long period. Examinations in occupational medicine cannot solve this problem. In order to improve the protection of the public, there is a need to extend the regulations concerning the notification of chronic hepatitis and to implement solutions for this difficult and sensible problem in Germany. PMID:12751011

  10. Is there an association of hepatitis B virus infection with minimal change disease of nephrotic syndrome? A clinical observational report.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tian-Biao; Jiang, Zong-Pei

    2015-04-01

    The rate of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is high in the Chinese population, and the implications of HBV infection are widely recognized, and membranous nephropathy is the most common renal lesion to be associated with HBV infection. Minimal change disease (MCD) is one of the most important histopathological characteristics in patients with nephrotic syndrome. There is no any study to report that HBV infection is associated with the etiology of MCD. Herein, we report four MCD patients with HBV infection and speculate that there is an association of HBV infection with the pathological type of MCD. In this study, we also reported the treatment schedule for these four MCD patients, and found that the anti-virus alone and combination of anti-virus with immunosuppressive agent could obtain a benefit for MCD patients with HBV infection. However, a well-designed study should be performed to confirm this association.

  11. Genomic and oncogenic preference of HBV integration in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ling-Hao; Liu, Xiao; Yan, He-Xin; Li, Wei-Yang; Zeng, Xi; Yang, Yuan; Zhao, Jie; Liu, Shi-Ping; Zhuang, Xue-Han; Lin, Chuan; Qin, Chen-Jie; Zhao, Yi; Pan, Ze-Ya; Huang, Gang; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Ruo-Yu; Yang, Yun; Wen, Wen; Lv, Gui-Shuai; Zhang, Hui-Lu; Wu, Han; Huang, Shuai; Wang, Ming-Da; Tang, Liang; Cao, Hong-Zhi; Wang, Ling; Lee, T.P.; Jiang, Hui; Tan, Ye-Xiong; Yuan, Sheng-Xian; Hou, Guo-Jun; Tao, Qi-Fei; Xu, Qin-Guo; Zhang, Xiu-Qing; Wu, Meng-Chao; Xu, Xun; Wang, Jun; Yang, Huan-Ming; Zhou, Wei-Ping; Wang, Hong-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) can integrate into the human genome, contributing to genomic instability and hepatocarcinogenesis. Here by conducting high-throughput viral integration detection and RNA sequencing, we identify 4,225 HBV integration events in tumour and adjacent non-tumour samples from 426 patients with HCC. We show that HBV is prone to integrate into rare fragile sites and functional genomic regions including CpG islands. We observe a distinct pattern in the preferential sites of HBV integration between tumour and non-tumour tissues. HBV insertional sites are significantly enriched in the proximity of telomeres in tumours. Recurrent HBV target genes are identified with few that overlap. The overall HBV integration frequency is much higher in tumour genomes of males than in females, with a significant enrichment of integration into chromosome 17. Furthermore, a cirrhosis-dependent HBV integration pattern is observed, affecting distinct targeted genes. Our data suggest that HBV integration has a high potential to drive oncogenic transformation. PMID:27703150

  12. The Safety of Tenofovir–Emtricitabine for HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) in Individuals With Active Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Schechter, Mauro; Liu, Albert Y.; McManhan, Vanessa M.; Guanira, Juan V.; Hance, Robert J.; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Grant, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with daily oral emtricitabine and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (FTC/TDF) prevents HIV infection. The safety and feasibility of HIV PrEP in the setting of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection were evaluated. Methods: The Iniciativa Profilaxis Pre-Exposición study randomized 2499 HIV-negative men and transgender women who have sex with men to once-daily oral FTC/TDF versus placebo. Hepatitis serologies and transaminases were obtained at screening and at the time PrEP was discontinued. HBV DNA was assessed by polymerase chain reaction, and drug resistance was assessed by population sequencing. Vaccination was offered to individuals susceptible to HBV infection. Results: Of the 2499 participants, 12 (0.5%; including 6 randomized to FTC/TDF) had chronic HBV infection. After stopping FTC/TDF, 5 of the 6 participants in the active arm had liver function tests performed at follow-up. Liver function tests remained within normal limits at post-stop visits except for a grade 1 elevation in 1 participant at post-stop week 12 (alanine aminotransferase = 90, aspartate aminotransferase = 61). There was no evidence of hepatic flares. Polymerase chain reaction of stored samples showed that 2 participants in the active arm had evidence of acute HBV infection at enrollment. Both had evidence of grade 4 transaminase elevations with subsequent resolution. Overall, there was no evidence of TDF or FTC resistance among tested genotypes. Of 1633 eligible for vaccination, 1587 (97.2%) received at least 1 vaccine; 1383 (84.7%) completed the series. Conclusions: PrEP can be safely provided to individuals with HBV infection if there is no evidence of cirrhosis or substantial transaminase elevation. HBV vaccination rates at screening were low globally, despite recommendations for its use, yet uptake and efficacy were high when offered. PMID:26413853

  13. Titration of the infectivity of hepatitis D virus in chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Ponzetto, A; Hoyer, B H; Popper, H; Engle, R; Purcell, R H; Gerin, J L

    1987-01-01

    The infectivity of hepatitis D virus (HDV) was evaluated by intravenous inoculation of chimpanzees. HDV was present in the inoculum at a titer of 10(11) chimpanzee infectious doses (CID). In contrast, the titer of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in the same inoculum was 10(6) CID. All HBV-infected chimpanzees inoculated with less than or equal to 10(-11) dilutions of the HDV-positive plasma were superinfected; an animal receiving a 10(-12) dilution did not develop markers of HDV replication in serum or liver. All HDV-infected chimpanzees had marked elevations of serum alanine aminotransferase activities. The incubation period from exposure to development of hepatitis was inversely related to the dose of HDV inoculum, although the severity and duration of hepatitis were independent of it. All animals recovered and rapidly developed antibody to hepatitis D antigen.

  14. EGFR regulates macrophage activation and function in bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Hardbower, Dana M; Singh, Kshipra; Asim, Mohammad; Verriere, Thomas G; Olivares-Villagómez, Danyvid; Barry, Daniel P; Allaman, Margaret M; Washington, M Kay; Peek, Richard M; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Wilson, Keith T

    2016-09-01

    EGFR signaling regulates macrophage function, but its role in bacterial infection has not been investigated. Here, we assessed the role of macrophage EGFR signaling during infection with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that causes persistent inflammation and gastric cancer. EGFR was phosphorylated in murine and human macrophages during H. pylori infection. In human gastric tissues, elevated levels of phosphorylated EGFR were observed throughout the histologic cascade from gastritis to carcinoma. Deleting Egfr in myeloid cells attenuated gastritis and increased H. pylori burden in infected mice. EGFR deficiency also led to a global defect in macrophage activation that was associated with decreased cytokine, chemokine, and NO production. We observed similar alterations in macrophage activation and disease phenotype in the Citrobacter rodentium model of murine infectious colitis. Mechanistically, EGFR signaling activated NF-κB and MAPK1/3 pathways to induce cytokine production and macrophage activation. Although deletion of Egfr had no effect on DC function, EGFR-deficient macrophages displayed impaired Th1 and Th17 adaptive immune responses to H. pylori, which contributed to decreased chronic inflammation in infected mice. Together, these results indicate that EGFR signaling is central to macrophage function in response to enteric bacterial pathogens and is a potential therapeutic target for infection-induced inflammation and associated carcinogenesis.

  15. EGFR regulates macrophage activation and function in bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Hardbower, Dana M; Singh, Kshipra; Asim, Mohammad; Verriere, Thomas G; Olivares-Villagómez, Danyvid; Barry, Daniel P; Allaman, Margaret M; Washington, M Kay; Peek, Richard M; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Wilson, Keith T

    2016-09-01

    EGFR signaling regulates macrophage function, but its role in bacterial infection has not been investigated. Here, we assessed the role of macrophage EGFR signaling during infection with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that causes persistent inflammation and gastric cancer. EGFR was phosphorylated in murine and human macrophages during H. pylori infection. In human gastric tissues, elevated levels of phosphorylated EGFR were observed throughout the histologic cascade from gastritis to carcinoma. Deleting Egfr in myeloid cells attenuated gastritis and increased H. pylori burden in infected mice. EGFR deficiency also led to a global defect in macrophage activation that was associated with decreased cytokine, chemokine, and NO production. We observed similar alterations in macrophage activation and disease phenotype in the Citrobacter rodentium model of murine infectious colitis. Mechanistically, EGFR signaling activated NF-κB and MAPK1/3 pathways to induce cytokine production and macrophage activation. Although deletion of Egfr had no effect on DC function, EGFR-deficient macrophages displayed impaired Th1 and Th17 adaptive immune responses to H. pylori, which contributed to decreased chronic inflammation in infected mice. Together, these results indicate that EGFR signaling is central to macrophage function in response to enteric bacterial pathogens and is a potential therapeutic target for infection-induced inflammation and associated carcinogenesis. PMID:27482886

  16. Schistosoma mansoni, nematode infections, and progression to active tuberculosis among HIV-1-infected Ugandans.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael; Miiro, George; Nkurunziza, Peter; Watera, Christine; Quigley, Maria A; Dunne, David W; Whitworth, James A G; Elliott, Alison M

    2006-05-01

    Rates of tuberculosis (TB) in Africa are highest among people infected with HIV. Searching for additional risk factors in a cohort of HIV-infected Ugandan adults, we previously found that a type 2 cytokine bias and eosinophilia were associated with progression to active TB. A possible role for helminth infection was assessed in this study. We analyzed TB incidence in 462 members of this cohort who were screened for filarial infections, gastrointestinal nematodes, and schistosomiasis. Progression to TB was not associated with gastrointestinal nematodes (rate ratio [RR], 1.18; confidence intervals [CIs], 0.66-2.10) or Mansonella perstans (RR, 0.42; CI, 0.13-1.34). A weak association between Schistosoma mansoni infection and TB was found (RR, 1.42; CI, 0.86-2.34); after adjusting for potential explanatory variables and using more stringent diagnostic criteria, the association was strengthened (RR, 2.31; 1.00-5.33). This analysis suggests an effect of S. mansoni infection on progression to active TB among HIV-1-infected Ugandans. PMID:16687687

  17. Breaking B and T cell tolerance using cationic lipid--DNA complexes (CLDC) as a vaccine adjuvant with hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen in transgenic mice expressing HBV.

    PubMed

    Morrey, John D; Motter, Neil E; Chang, Stella; Fairman, Jeffery

    2011-06-01

    Cationic lipid DNA complexes (CLDC), referred to here as JVRS-100, were evaluated as an adjuvant for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) for eliciting B and T cell responses in transgenic mice expressing hepatitis B virus (HBV). To confirm the immunogenicity of HBsAg+JVRS-1000, a study was conducted in C57BL/6 mice, the genetic background of the HBV transgenic mice used in the study. HBsAg+JVRS-100 elicited a T cell response and B cell response as evidenced by interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) secretion by re-stimulated splenocytes and anti-HBsAg IgG induction, respectively, whereas, HBsAg only elicited a B cell response. In HBV transgenic mice, HBsAg did not elicit either T or B cell responses, unlike the HBsAg+JVRS-100 that elicited both. Energix-B vaccine did perform better than the HBsAg by eliciting a B cell response in the transgenic mice, but it did not perform as HBsAg+JVRS-100 since it did not elicit a T cell response. The response by HBsAg+JVRS-100 was not sufficient to cause destruction of infected liver cells, but it did suppress HBV DNA non-cytolytically. From these results, JVRS-100 might be considered for further development as an adjuvant for HBV therapeutic vaccines. PMID:21545812

  18. Tissue culture system for infection with human hepatitis delta virus.

    PubMed Central

    Sureau, C; Jacob, J R; Eichberg, J W; Lanford, R E

    1991-01-01

    An in vitro culture system was developed for assaying the infectivity of the human hepatitis delta virus (HDV). Hepatocytes were isolated from chimpanzee liver and grown in a serum-free medium. Cells were shown to be infectible by HDV and to remain susceptible to infection for at least 3 weeks in culture, as evidenced by the appearance of RNA species characteristic of HDV replication as early as 6 days postinfection. When repeated experiments were carried out on cells derived from an animal free of hepatitis B virus (HBV), HDV infection occurred in a consistent fashion but there was no indication of infection with the HBV that was present in the inoculum. Despite numerous attempts with different sources of HBV inocula free of HDV, there was no evidence that indicated susceptibility of these cells to HBV infection. This observation may indicate that HBV and HDV use different modes of entry into hepatocytes. When cells derived from an HBV-infected animal were exposed to HDV, synthesis and release of progeny HDV particles were obtained in addition to HBV replication and production of Dane particles. Although not infectible with HBV, primary cultures of chimpanzee hepatocytes are capable of supporting part of the life cycle of HBV and the entire life cycle of HDV. Images PMID:2041075

  19. Prevalence of Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Kenya, 2007.

    PubMed

    Ly, Kathleen N; Kim, Andrea A; Umuro, Mamo; Drobenuic, Jan; Williamson, John M; Montgomery, Joel M; Fields, Barry S; Teshale, Eyasu H

    2016-08-01

    Current estimates put the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in Kenya at 5-8%. We determined the HBV infection prevalence in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative Kenyan adult and adolescent population based on samples collected from a national survey. We analyzed data from HIV-negative participants in the 2007 Kenya AIDS Indicator Survey to estimate the HBV infection prevalence. We defined past or present HBV infection as presence of total hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb), and chronic HBV infection (CHBI) as presence of both total HBcAb and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). We calculated crude and adjusted odds of HBV infection by demographic characteristics and risk factors using logistic regression analyses. Of 1,091 participants aged 15-64 years, approximately 31.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 28.0-35.3%) had exposure to HBV, corresponding to approximately 6.1 million (CI = 5.4-6.8 million) with past or present HBV infection. The estimated prevalence of CHBI was 2.1% (95% CI = 1.4-3.1%), corresponding to approximately 398,000 (CI = 261,000-602,000) with CHBI. CHBI is a major public health problem in Kenya, affecting approximately 400,000 persons. Knowing the HBV infection prevalence at baseline is important for planning and public health policy decision making and for monitoring the impact of viral hepatitis prevention programs.

  20. Active hepatic capsulitis caused by Paragonimus westermani infection.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Michiro; Kamiyama, Takuro; Yano, Takeshi; Nakamura-Uchiyama, Fukumi; Nawa, Yukifumi

    2002-08-01

    Paragonimiasis is an important re-emerging parasitosis in Japan. Although the lungs and pleural cavity are the principal sites affected with the parasite, ectopic infection can occur in unexpected sites such as skin and brain. This case report describes a patient with active hepatic capsulitis due to Paragonimus westermani infection. The patient was successfully treated with praziquantel at the dose of 75 mg/kg/day for 3 days.

  1. Differential Expression of CX3CL1 in Hepatitis B Virus-Replicating Hepatoma Cells Can Affect the Migration Activity of CX3CR1+ Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Osamu; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Ninomiya, Masashi; Iwata, Tomoaki; Kogure, Takayuki; Inoue, Jun; Sugiyama, Masaya; Morosawa, Tatsuki; Fujisaka, Yasuyuki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In addition to stellate cells and immune cells, inflamed hepatocytes and hepatoma cells express various kinds of chemokines that attract various kinds of immune cells. Previously, we reported that hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication can induce physiological stress. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of chemokines produced by HBV-infected hepatocytes and hepatoma cells. A real-time PCR array targeting genes related to chemokines and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were carried out to detect the specific chemokines produced by Huh7 cells and HepG2 cells infected with various HBV genotypes. A migration assay, flow cytometry analysis, and immunohistochemistry were carried out to analyze the candidate immune cells that can affect the immunopathogenesis of HBV infection. The expressions of CX3CL1 mRNA and protein were significantly different among HBV genotypes A, B, and C and control cells (mock) (P < 0.05). CD56+ NK cells and CD8+ T cells migrated to the hepatoma cells with HBV replication. Moreover, the migration activity of both immune cells was partially cancelled after the treatment of CX3CL1 neutralizing antibody. The expression level of NKG2D on CX3CR1+ NK cells in HCC with HBV infection was significantly lower than that in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with HCV infection and chronic hepatitis B and C patients (P < 0.05). On the other hand, the frequency of PD-1high CX3CR1+ CD8+ T cells in HCC with HBV infection was significantly higher than that in HCC with HCV infection and chronic hepatitis B and C (P < 0.05). The expression of CX3CL1 in HBV-replicating hepatocytes and hepatoma cells could contribute to the immunopathogenesis of HBV infection. IMPORTANCE The progressions of the disease are significantly different among HBV genotypes. However, it has not been clear that how different HBV genotypes could induce different inflammatory responses. Here, we first report that the levels of expression of CX3CL1 mRNA and protein were

  2. Immune activation and microbial translocation in liver disease progression in HIV/hepatitis co-infected patients: results from the Icona Foundation study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We evaluated whether immune activation (IA) and microbial translocation (MT) might play a role in accelerating liver disease progression in HIV-HBV/HCV co-infected patients. Methods ART-naïve HIV/viral hepatitis co-infected patients from Icona with a CD4 cell count >200/μl and with a known date of prior HIV neg/pos tests and ≥1 plasma sample stored were included in the study. Plasma MT (LPS, sCD14) and IA (IL-6,TNFα) were measured using ELISA while activated CD8 + CD38 + HLA-DR + were measured by flow cytometry, with one measurement being performed for all patients and two measurements for a smaller group of subjects. The association between these biomarkers and the time to i) a single ALT >200 IU/l and ii) a Fib-4 >1.45 was also investigated. A standard survival analysis with robust standard errors was used for all evaluations. Follow-up was censored at patients’ last clinical follow-up. Results We studied 127 HIV-infected hepatitis viruses co-infected patients (118 HCV, 9 HBV). Overall median (IQR) CD4, VL, age were 596/μl (208–1303), 3.8 log10cp/mL (3–4.3), 34 years (22–56). While heightened TNF-α was associated with a 13-fold increased risk of Fib-4 > 1.45 (RH 13.05, 95% CI 2.43-70; p = 0.003), markers of MT did not show an association with liver illness. Interestingly, higher sCD14 was associated with a decreased risk of Fib-4 > 1.45, independently of other biomarkers considered (RH 0.20, 95% CI 0.04-0,9; p = 0.04). Conclusions In HIV/hepatitis virus co-infected ART-naive patients, higher TNF-α plasma levels were associated with a 13-fold increase in the risk of progression to a Fib-4 >1.45, suggesting that the pro-inflammatory status in HIV infection might hasten the course of HCV. In view of the fact that sCD14 may hinder the interaction between LPS and the phagocyte membrane CD14, we herewith propose a model which aims to demonstrate that high sCD14 levels might contribute to shelter liver function

  3. Immune parameters differentiating active from latent tuberculosis infection in humans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yeon; Jung, Young Won; Jeong, Ina; Joh, Joon-Sung; Sim, Soo Yeon; Choi, Boram; Jee, Hyeon-Gun; Lim, Dong-Gyun

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis remains a highly prevalent infectious disease worldwide. Identification of the immune parameters that differentiate active disease from latent infection will facilitate the development of efficient control measures as well as new diagnostic modalities for tuberculosis. Here, we investigated the cytokine production profiles of monocytes and CD4(+) T lymphocytes upon encountering mycobacterial antigens. In addition, cytokines and lipid mediators with immune-modulating activities were examined in plasma samples ex vivo. Comparison of these parameters in active tuberculosis patients and healthy subjects with latent infection revealed that, active tuberculosis was associated with diminished Th1-type cytokine secretion from CD4(+) T cells and less augmented inflammatory cytokine secretion from monocytes induced by IFN-γ than that in latent tuberculosis infection. In addition, a higher plasma concentration of lipoxin A4 and lower ratio of prostaglandin E2 to lipoxin A4 were observed in active cases than in latent infections. These findings have implications for preparing new therapeutic strategies and for differential diagnosis of the two types of tuberculosis infection.

  4. Acute hepatitis B caused by a vaccine-escape HBV strain in vaccinated subject: sequence analysis and therapeutic strategy.

    PubMed

    Luongo, Monica; Critelli, Rosina; Grottola, Antonella; Gitto, Stefano; Bernabucci, Veronica; Bevini, Mirco; Vecchi, Chiara; Montagnani, Giuliano; Villa, Erica

    2015-01-01

    HBV vaccine contains the 'a' determinant region, the major immune-target of antibodies (anti-HBs). Failure of immunization may be caused by vaccine-induced or spontaneous 'a' determinant surface gene mutants. Here, we evaluate the possible lack of protection by HBV vaccine, describing the case of an acute hepatitis B diagnosed in a 55-year-old Caucasian male unpaid blood donor, vaccinated against HBV. Sequencing data for preS-S region revealed multiple point mutations. Of all the substitutions found, Q129H, located in the "a" determinant region of HBsAg, can alter antigenicity, leading to mutants. This mutant may cause vaccine failure especially when associated with high viremia of infecting source.

  5. Hepatitis D Virus Infection Among Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Carriers and in “Isolated anti-HBc” Antibodies Profile in Central Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Mhalla, Salma; Kadri, Yosr; Alibi, Sana; Letaief, Amel; Boukadida, Jalel; Hannachi, Naila

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis D Virus (HDV) causes accelerated liver diseases in patients with Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) infection. There is lack of data about its prevalence, related risk factors and interaction with HBV carriers in our country. Objectives: The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of hepatitis delta and associated risk factors among Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and “isolated anti-HBc” profile carriers in central Tunisia. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 540 patients with positive HBsAg and 109 “isolated anti-HBc” profile receiving care in a teaching hospital were tested for the presence of HDV serum-markers using commercially available enzyme immunoassay kit. HBV-DNA was detected by nested PCR in “isolated anti-HBc” profile group. Results: Prevalence of HDV was 8.1% in HBsAg carriers group, but it was significantly higher in active than inactive hepatitis (30.2% and 4.5%, respectively, OR = 9, 95% CI: [4.48-18.58]). There was no significant association between studied risk factors and HDV infection. In the “isolated anti-HBc” profile group, prevalence of HDV was 4.6% and HBV-DNA had negative result in all patients with positive results for HDV. Conclusions: Although HDV had low prevalence in our area, it is vital to plan preventive strategies for HDV spread as well as HBV prevention. It is particularly important to suspect HDV infection in active HBV carriers to manage a particularly severe dual infection. HDV infection should be suspected even in negative HBsAg patients having “isolated anti-HBc” profile. PMID:27110257

  6. IL-17 and IL-22 genetic polymorphisms in HBV vaccine non- and low-responders among healthcare workers

    PubMed Central

    Borzooy, Zohreh; Streinu-Cercel, Adrian; Mirshafiey, Abbass; Khamseh, Azam; Mahmoudie, Masoud Karkhaneh; Navabi, Shadi Sadat; Nosrati, Marjan; Najafi, Zahra; Hosseini, Mostafa; Jazayeri, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background Healthcare workers constitute a population at high risk for HBV infection. Efficient vaccination options are available; however, the individual response to HBV vaccination may vary widely between subjects, potentially due to cytokine profiles and genetic variations. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between IL-17 and IL-22 gene polymorphisms versus non- and low-responsiveness to HBV vaccination in healthcare workers. Methods We selected the following IL-17 and IL-22 polymorphisms: rs4711998 (A/G) from IL-17 and rs2227501 (A/T), rs2227503 (A/G), rs1026786 (A/G) from IL-22 sequences genes. These were determined by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphisms. Results The IL-17 rs4711998 GG genotype had a significantly lower frequency in non-responders compared to low-responders (p=0.025). However, we did not identify a relationship between IL-22 rs1026780, rs2227501 and rs2227503 genotypes and the anti-HBs response following HBV vaccination. Conclusion These data suggest that genetic variation in rs4711998 polymorphisms in the IL-17 cytokine may influence vaccine-induced immune responses to HBV vaccine in healthcare workers. PMID:27019828

  7. Epidemiology study of HBV genotypes and antiviral drug resistance in multi-ethnic regions from Western China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Liao, Yun; Chen, Jie; Cai, Bei; Su, Zhenzhen; Ying, Binwu; Lu, Xiaojun; Tao, Chuanmin; Wang, Lanlan

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a critical global health issue and moderately epidemic in Western China, but HBV molecular epidemiology characteristics are still limited. We conducted this study to investigate HBV genotypes and antiviral resistant mutations in this multi-ethnic area. A total of 1316 HBV patients were recruited from four ethnic groups from 2011 to 2013. Genotypes and resistant mutations were determined by Sanger sequencing. Four genotypes (B, C, D and C/D) were identified. Genotype B and C were common in Han population, while genotype D was predominant in Uygurs. Genotype C was the major genotype in both Tibetans and Yis, and recombinant C/D was found in Tibetans only. Lamivudine resistance was common in all populations, especially in Hans with prevalence of 42.8%. Entecavir resistance was barely observed regardless of ethnicity. Genotype C isolates had higher rates of rtA181T/V than genotype B (13.5% vs. 5.1%, P < 0.001), in accordance with higher prevalence of resistance to adefovir (20.0% vs. 9.5%, P < 0.001). While incidence of resistant mutations to other drugs and clinical factors showed no difference among different genotypes. HBV genotypes and resistance-conferring mutations had different geographic and demographic distributions in Western China, which provided molecular epidemiology data for clinical management. PMID:26612031

  8. [Whole-sequence Analyses for 12 HBV C/D Recombinants from a Population in Tibet (China)].

    PubMed

    Liu, Tiezhu; Shen, Liping; Yin, Wenjiao; Wang, Feng; Wang, Fuzhen; Zhang, Guomin; Zheng, Hui; Dunzhu, Duoji; Bi, Shengli; Cui, Fuqiang

    2016-03-01

    We wished to undertake molecular genetic typing and evaluate recombinants of the hepatitis-B virus (HBV) in Tibet (China). Multistage random sampling was used to collect HBsAg-positive samples. Nested polymerase chain reactions were used to amplify the whole sequence of the HBV. DNAstar, MEGA6 and SimPlot were used to assemble sequences, create phylogenetic trees, and undertake recombination analyses. Twelve whole sequences of the HBV of a Tibetan population were collected using these methods. Results showed that all 12 strains were C/D recombinants. Nine of the recombinations were at nt750, and the other three at nt1526. Therefore, the 12 strains could be divided into two types of recombinants: C/Da and C/Db. Analyses of the sequence of the whole genome revealed that the 12 strains belonged to genotype C, and that the nucleotide distance was > 4% between the 12 strains and sub-genotypes C1 to C15 in Genbank. The most likely sub-genotype was C1. Individuals with C/Da were from central and northern Tibet (e.g., Lasa, Linzhi, Ali) and those with C/Db recombinants were from Shannan in southern Tibet. These data suggest that the two types of recombinants had a good distribution in Tibet. Also, they can provide important information for studies on HBV recombination, gene features, virus evolution, as well as the control and prevention of HBV infection in Tibet.

  9. Successful treatment of HCV/HBV/HDV-coinfection with pegylated interferon and ribavirin

    PubMed Central

    Hartl, Janine; Ott, Claudia; Kirchner, Gabriele; Salzberger, Bernd; Wiest, Reiner

    2012-01-01

    Dual and triple infections with hepatitis virus C (HCV), B (HBV) and D (HDV) frequently lead to severe liver damage. Hereby we describe a 38-year-old Caucasian male coinfected with HCV (genotype 3a), HBV [positive hepatitis B surface antigen (HbsAg) and antibody to hepatitis B core antigen; negative hepatitis B e antigen (HbeAg) and antibody to hepatitis B e antigen (anti-HBe)] and HDV. Laboratory diagnostics revealed increased liver enzymes and histological examination of the liver showed signs of fibrosis with moderate inflammation. On therapy with pegIFN-α2b and ribavirin HCV-RNA was undetectable at week 8. After week 24 the antiviral therapy was stopped because of a HBs-seroconversion, the loss of HbeAg and the detection of anti-HBe. Furthermore the HCV-RNA was negative. Six months after successful treatment of the triple-infection, HCV- and HDV-RNA and HbsAg remained negative and the liver enzymes had been completely normalized. In conclusion, pegylated-interferon plus ribavirin may be an effective therapy for HCV, HBV and HDV-coinfected patients. PMID:24765463

  10. Characterization of antiviral activity of entecavir in transgenic mice expressing hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Julander, Justin G; Colonno, Richard J; Sidwell, Robert W; Morrey, John D

    2003-08-01

    Entecavir (ETV), a cyclopentyl guanosine nucleoside analog, was evaluated in transgenic mice expressing hepatitis B virus (HBV). ETV administered orally once daily for 10 days at a dosage of 3.2mg/kg significantly (PHBV DNA in female mice from 5.9 to <0.82 pg of HBV DNA per microg of cellular DNA, and from 8.3 to <1.1 pg/microg in male mice. To compare the efficacy of ETV with other compounds previously evaluated in this model and with ETV activities in other animal models, the efficacy of serial one-half log dilutions of ETV were evaluated in both male and female mice to determine the minimal effective dose. End-point titration experiments resulted in a statistically significant HBV DNA reduction in the liver at concentrations of 0.032 and 0.1mg/kg per day in female and male mice, respectively. Viral liver RNA, and serum e (HBeAg), serum surface (HBsAg), and liver core antigens (HBcAg) were not affected by ETV treatment presumably because the antiviral target was viral polymerase activity and the HBV produced from the transgene was not capable of secondary rounds of infection in the mouse. ETV was well tolerated and no morbidity or mortality was observed during the 10-day study. Similar to other animal models, ETV displayed potent anti-HBV activity in this transgenic mouse model.

  11. Cooperative effects of hepatitis B virus and TNF may play important roles in the activation of metabolic pathways through the activation of NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuang; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Jiang, Xia; Nakamura, Masato; Sasaki, Reina; Haga, Yuki; Shirasawa, Hiroshi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-1β are often observed in the sera of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected patients. It is well known that these cytokines activate nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-signaling, and are associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We investigated whether HBV or HBV X protein (HBx) enhanced the activation of NF-κB in the presence of TNF and/or IL-1β, and their effects on the expression of metabolic pathway-associated genes. We examined whether HBV or HBx enhanced cytokine-induced activation of NF-κB in hepatocytes, using a reporter assay, in the presence or absence of TNF and/or IL-1β. The expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP1), one of the NF-κB target genes was also examined. The expression of metabolic pathway-associated genes in HepG2 and HepG2.2.15 cells in the presence or absence of TNF was evaluated by RT-qPCR. Human hepatocytes expressed TNF receptors and IL-1 receptors. NF-κB was activated by cooperation between HBx and TNF in human hepatocytes. We observed IGFBP1 expression in HBV infection and that a number of metabolic pathway-associated genes were upregulated in HepG2.2.15 cells, compared with HepG2 cells with or without TNF treatment. We observed the cooperative effects of HBV and TNF which enhanced the activation of NF-κB as well as upregulated the expression of metabolic pathway-associated genes in hepatocytes. These effects may be important in the development of HBV-associated metabolic syndrome. PMID:27315566

  12. Bloodborne Pathogens: HIV and HBV Contagion Risks at Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaros, Susan

    1996-01-01

    AIDS and hepatitis B are diseases caused by the viruses HIV and HBV, respectively, which are spread in blood and body fluids. HBV is 100 times more contagious than HIV. Diligent implementation of universal precautions, an exposure control plan, use of personal protective equipment, a vaccination program, and ongoing staff and camper education can…

  13. The Molecular and Structural Basis of HBV-resistance to Nucleos(t)ide Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nidhi; Goyal, Milky; Wu, Catherine H.; Wu, George Y.

    2014-01-01

    Infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a worldwide health problem. Chronic hepatitis B can lead to fibrosis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Management of the latter two conditions often requires liver transplantation. Treatment with conventional interferon or pegylated interferon alpha can clear the virus, but the rates are very low. The likelihood, however, of viral resistance to interferon is minimal. The main problems with this therapy are the frequency and severity of side effects. In contrast, nucleos(t)ide analogs (NAs) have significantly lower side effects, but require long term treatment as sustained virological response rates are extremely low. However, long term treatment with NAs increases the risk for the development of anti-viral drug resistance. Only by understanding the molecular basis of resistance and using agents with multiple sites of action can drugs be designed to optimally prevent the occurrence of HBV antiviral resistance. PMID:26357626

  14. A false occult hepatitis B virus infection developed in a patient with psoriatic arthritis under infliximab and methotrexate therapy.

    PubMed

    Notarnicola, A; Iannone, F; Lopalco, G; Covelli, M; Lapadula, G

    2013-01-01

    Despite lacking of international guidelines about the management of patients with occult hepatitis B virus infection (OBI) starting TNF-α blockers, there is some evidence from real life settings that these drugs are safe in OBI patients with rheumatic diseases. On the contrary, the management of the so-called false OBI patients appears still undefined. We describe a case of acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection occurred in an anti-HBs and anti- HBc positive patient affected by psoriatic arthritis, who had been treated for five years with infliximab. Baseline HBV-DNA analysis had not been performed. Although HBs Ag was still negative and the transaminases in the normal range, HBV-DNA serum analysis surprisingly showed high replication rate. Entecavir was added, and three months later HBV-DNA was no longer detectable. Even if HBs Ag is persistently negative, the assessment of HBV-DNA should be recommended at least at baseline in order to rule out hidden active necro-inflammatory liver disease.

  15. TG1050, an immunotherapeutic to treat chronic hepatitis B, induces robust T cells and exerts an antiviral effect in HBV-persistent mice

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Perrine; Dubois, Clarisse; Jacquier, Emilie; Dion, Sarah; Mancini-Bourgine, Maryline; Godon, Ophélie; Kratzer, Roland; Lelu-Santolaria, Karine; Evlachev, Alexei; Meritet, Jean-François; Schlesinger, Yasmin; Villeval, Dominique; Strub, Jean-Marc; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Marchand, Jean-Baptiste; Geist, Michel; Brandely, Renée; Findeli, Annie; Boukhebza, Houda; Menguy, Thierry; Silvestre, Nathalie; Michel, Marie-Louise; Inchauspé, Geneviève

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess a new adenovirus-based immunotherapy as a novel treatment approach to chronic hepatitis B (CHB). Methods TG1050 is a non-replicative adenovirus serotype 5 encoding a unique large fusion protein composed of a truncated HBV Core, a modified HBV Polymerase and two HBV Envelope domains. We used a recently described HBV-persistent mouse model based on a recombinant adenovirus-associated virus encoding an over length genome of HBV that induces the chronic production of HBsAg, HBeAg and infectious HBV particles to assess the ability of TG1050 to induce functional T cells in face of a chronic status. Results In in vitro studies, TG1050 was shown to express the expected large polyprotein together with a dominant, smaller by-product. Following a single administration in mice, TG1050 induced robust, multispecific and long-lasting HBV-specific T cells detectable up to 1 year post-injection. These cells target all three encoded immunogens and display bifunctionality (ie, capacity to produce both interferon γ and tumour necrosis factor α as well as cytolytic functions). In addition, control of circulating levels of HBV DNA and HBsAg was observed while alanine aminotransferase levels remain in the normal range. Conclusions Injection of TG1050 induced both splenic and intrahepatic functional T cells producing cytokines and displaying cytolytic activity in HBV-naïve and HBV-persistent mouse models together with significant reduction of circulating viral parameters. These results warrant clinical evaluation of TG1050 in the treatment of CHB. PMID:25429051

  16. Optimization of competitively differentiated polymerase chain reaction in detection of HBV basal core promoter mutation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xiao-Mou; Gu, Lin; Chen, Xue-Juan; Li, Jian-Guo; Huang, Yang-Su; Gao, Zhi-Liang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To improve competitively differentiated polymerase chain reaction (CD-PCR) in detection of HBV basal core promoter mutation. METHODS: Recombinant plasmid of double point mutation A1762T/G1764A in basal core promoter of HBV constructed by site-directed mutagenesis was used as mutant control. To reveal the deficiency mechanism of CD-PCR, relationship between the circle number of PCR and the increased speed of products of each competitive primer was comparatively studied. Diversified amount of dNTPs and mutual primer of the competitive primers were tried to optimize CD-PCR. Optimized CD-PCR was evaluated by detecting A1762T/G1764A mutation in recombinant plasmids and clinical sera from patients with HBV infection. RESULTS: The deficiency mechanism of CD-PCR was that the products of mismatched competitive primer grew fast when the amplification of matched primer entered into plateau stage, which led to decrease in or disappearance of the difference in the amount of their products. This phenomenon could be eliminated by reducing dNTPs to 10 μmol/L and mutual primer to about 100 nmol/L. Optimized CD-PCR could detect both mutant and wild strain indepe-ndent of the amount of templates and the number of PCR cycles. Its detection limit was 103 copies/mL, about 50 copies/reaction. About 10% of mutant DNAs among wild type DNAs could be detected. A1762T/G1764A mutant was detected in 41.8% (51/122) of patients with HBV infection, but not detected in controls with negative HBsAg. CONCLUSION: Optimized CD-PCR can detect mutation independent of the amount of initial templates and the number of PCR cycles. PMID:15962387

  17. New Susceptibility and Resistance HLA-DP Alleles to HBV-Related Diseases Identified by a Trans-Ethnic Association Study in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwase, Koichi; Minami, Mutsuhiko; Sugiyama, Masaya; Seto, Wai-Kay; Yuen, Man-Fung; Posuwan, Nawarat; Poovorawan, Yong; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Matsuura, Kentaro; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Kurosaki, Masayuki; Asahina, Yasuhiro; Izumi, Namiki; Kang, Jong-Hon; Hige, Shuhei; Ide, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Kazuhide; Sakaida, Isao; Murawaki, Yoshikazu; Itoh, Yoshito; Tamori, Akihiro; Orito, Etsuro; Hiasa, Yoichi; Honda, Masao; Kaneko, Shuichi; Mita, Eiji; Suzuki, Kazuyuki; Hino, Keisuke; Tanaka, Eiji; Mochida, Satoshi; Watanabe, Masaaki; Eguchi, Yuichiro; Masaki, Naohiko; Murata, Kazumoto; Korenaga, Masaaki; Mawatari, Yoriko; Ohashi, Jun; Kawashima, Minae; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Mizokami, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed the association between SNPs located on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II genes, including HLA-DP and HLA-DQ, and chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, mainly in Asian populations. HLA-DP alleles or haplotypes associated with chronic HBV infection or disease progression have not been fully identified in Asian populations. We performed trans-ethnic association analyses of HLA-DPA1, HLA-DPB1 alleles and haplotypes with hepatitis B virus infection and disease progression among Asian populations comprising Japanese, Korean, Hong Kong, and Thai subjects. To assess the association between HLA-DP and chronic HBV infection and disease progression, we conducted high-resolution (4-digit) HLA-DPA1 and HLA-DPB1 genotyping in a total of 3,167 samples, including HBV patients, HBV-resolved individuals and healthy controls. Trans-ethnic association analyses among Asian populations identified a new risk allele HLA-DPB1*09∶01 (P = 1.36×10−6; OR = 1.97; 95% CI, 1.50–2.59) and a new protective allele DPB1*02∶01 (P = 5.22×10−6; OR = 0.68; 95% CI, 0.58–0.81) to chronic HBV infection, in addition to the previously reported alleles. Moreover, DPB1*02∶01 was also associated with a decreased risk of disease progression in chronic HBV patients among Asian populations (P = 1.55×10−7; OR = 0.50; 95% CI, 0.39–0.65). Trans-ethnic association analyses identified Asian-specific associations of HLA-DP alleles and haplotypes with HBV infection or disease progression. The present findings will serve as a base for future functional studies of HLA-DP molecules in order to understand the pathogenesis of HBV infection and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:24520320

  18. GS-9620, an Oral Agonist of Toll-Like Receptor-7, Induces Prolonged Suppression of Hepatitis B Virus in Chronically Infected Chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Lanford, Robert E.; Guerra, Bernadette; Chavez, Deborah; Giavedoni, Luis; Hodara, Vida L.; Brasky, Kathleen M.; Fosdick, Abigail; Frey, Christian R.; Zheng, Jim; Wolfgang, Grushenka; Halcomb, Randall L.; Tumas, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Direct-acting anti-viral agents suppress hepatitis B virus (HBV) load but must be given lifelong. Stimulation of the innate immune system could increase its ability to control the virus and have long lasting effects, after a finite regimen. We investigated the effects of immune activation with GS-9620—a potent and selective orally active small molecule agonist of Toll-Like Receptor (TLR)7—in chimpanzees with chronic HBV infection. Methods GS-9620 was administered to chimpanzees every other day (3 times each week) for 4 weeks at 1 mg/kg and, after a 1 week rest, for 4 weeks at 2 mg/kg. We measured viral load in plasma and liver samples, the pharmacokinetics of GS-9620, and the following pharmacodynamics parameters: interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene expression, cytokine and chemokine levels, lymphocyte and natural killer cell activation, and viral antigen expression. Clinical pathology parameters were monitored to determine the safety and tolerability of GS-9620. Results Short-term oral administration of GS-9620 provided long-term suppression of serum and liver HBV DNA. The mean maximum reduction of viral DNA was 2.2 logs, which occurred within 1 week of the end of GS-9620 administration; reductions of greater than 1 log persisted for months. Serum levels of HB surface antigen and HB e antigen, and numbers of HBV antigen-positive hepatocytes, were reduced as hepatocyte apoptosis increased. GS-9620 administration induced production of IFN-α and other cytokines and chemokines, and activated ISGs, natural killer cells, and lymphocyte subsets. Conclusions The small molecule GS-9620 activates TLR-7 signaling in immune cells of chimpanzees to induce clearance of HBV-infected cells. This reagent might be developed for treatment of patients with chronic HBV infection. PMID:23415804

  19. LL-37 immunomodulatory activity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Torres-Juarez, Flor; Cardenas-Vargas, Albertina; Montoya-Rosales, Alejandra; González-Curiel, Irma; Garcia-Hernandez, Mariana H; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A; Hancock, Robert E W; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. The susceptibility to this disease depends to a great extent on the innate immune response against mycobacteria. Host defense peptides (HDP) are one of the first barriers to counteract infection. Cathelicidin (LL-37) is an HDP that has many immunomodulatory effects besides its weak antimicrobial activity. Despite advances in the study of the innate immune response in tuberculosis, the immunological role of LL-37 during M. tuberculosis infection has not been clarified. Monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv and then treated with 1, 5, or 15 μg/ml of exogenous LL-37 for 4, 8, and 24 h. Exogenous LL-37 decreased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) while inducing anti-inflammatory IL-10 and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) production. Interestingly, the decreased production of anti-inflammatory cytokines did not reduce antimycobacterial activity. These results are consistent with the concept that LL-37 can modulate the expression of cytokines during mycobacterial infection and this activity was independent of the P2X7 receptor. Thus, LL-37 modulates the response of macrophages during infection, controlling the expression of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines.

  20. LL-37 Immunomodulatory Activity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Juarez, Flor; Cardenas-Vargas, Albertina; Montoya-Rosales, Alejandra; González-Curiel, Irma; Garcia-Hernandez, Mariana H.; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A.; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. The susceptibility to this disease depends to a great extent on the innate immune response against mycobacteria. Host defense peptides (HDP) are one of the first barriers to counteract infection. Cathelicidin (LL-37) is an HDP that has many immunomodulatory effects besides its weak antimicrobial activity. Despite advances in the study of the innate immune response in tuberculosis, the immunological role of LL-37 during M. tuberculosis infection has not been clarified. Monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv and then treated with 1, 5, or 15 μg/ml of exogenous LL-37 for 4, 8, and 24 h. Exogenous LL-37 decreased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) while inducing anti-inflammatory IL-10 and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) production. Interestingly, the decreased production of anti-inflammatory cytokines did not reduce antimycobacterial activity. These results are consistent with the concept that LL-37 can modulate the expression of cytokines during mycobacterial infection and this activity was independent of the P2X7 receptor. Thus, LL-37 modulates the response of macrophages during infection, controlling the expression of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:26351280

  1. [Occult hepatitis B virus infection: a new challenge for hepatitis B vaccine to block mother-to-child transmission].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yalin; Lu, Ying; Li, Jie

    2016-02-01

    Occult hepatitis B virus infection (OBI) could occur in infants born to HBsAg-positive mothers after active and passive immunization, even though their serological patterns suggested successful protection from HBV mother-to-infant transmission according to the current criteria of being HBsAg-negative and anti-HBs positive. We should take into account its potential clinical impact and reconsider the effectiveness of the present immunoprophylaxis against HBV in this population. This review will focus on topics including the prevalence, serological features and probable risk factors underlying the phenomenon of OBI in infants with HBsAg carrier mothers after immunization. PMID:26983489

  2. Toxoplasma gondii Actively Inhibits Neuronal Function in Chronically Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Haroon, Fahad; Händel, Ulrike; Angenstein, Frank; Goldschmidt, Jürgen; Kreutzmann, Peter; Lison, Holger; Fischer, Klaus-Dieter; Scheich, Henning; Wetzel, Wolfram; Schlüter, Dirk; Budinger, Eike

    2012-01-01

    Upon infection with the obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii, fast replicating tachyzoites infect a broad spectrum of host cells including neurons. Under the pressure of the immune response, tachyzoites convert into slow-replicating bradyzoites, which persist as cysts in neurons. Currently, it is unclear whether T. gondii alters the functional activity of neurons, which may contribute to altered behaviour of T. gondii–infected mice and men. In the present study we demonstrate that upon oral infection with T. gondii cysts, chronically infected BALB/c mice lost over time their natural fear against cat urine which was paralleled by the persistence of the parasite in brain regions affecting behaviour and odor perception. Detailed immunohistochemistry showed that in infected neurons not only parasitic cysts but also the host cell cytoplasm and some axons stained positive for Toxoplasma antigen suggesting that parasitic proteins might directly interfere with neuronal function. In fact, in vitro live cell calcium (Ca2+) imaging studies revealed that tachyzoites actively manipulated Ca2+ signalling upon glutamate stimulation leading either to hyper- or hypo-responsive neurons. Experiments with the endoplasmatic reticulum Ca2+ uptake inhibitor thapsigargin indicate that tachyzoites deplete Ca2+ stores in the endoplasmatic reticulum. Furthermore in vivo studies revealed that the activity-dependent uptake of the potassium analogue thallium was reduced in cyst harbouring neurons indicating their functional impairment. The percentage of non-functional neurons increased over time In conclusion, both bradyzoites and tachyzoites functionally silence infected neurons, which may significantly contribute to the altered behaviour of the host. PMID:22530040

  3. Disseminated rhodococcus equi infection in HIV infection despite highly active antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rhodococcus equi (R.equi) is an acid fast, GRAM + coccobacillus, which is widespread in the soil and causes pulmonary and extrapulmonary infections in immunocompromised people. In the context of HIV infection, R.equi infection (rhodococcosis) is regarded as an opportunistic disease, and its outcome is influenced by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Case presentation We report two cases of HIV-related rhodococcosis that disseminated despite suppressive HAART and anti-rhodococcal treatment; in both cases there was no immunological recovery, with CD4+ cells count below 200/μL. In the first case, pulmonary rhodococcosis presented 6 months after initiation of HAART, and was followed by an extracerebral intracranial and a cerebral rhodococcal abscess 1 and 8 months, respectively, after onset of pulmonary infection. The second case was characterized by a protracted course with spread of infection to various organs, including subcutaneous tissue, skin, colon and other intra-abdominal tissues, and central nervous system; the spread started 4 years after clinical resolution of a first pulmonary manifestation and progressed over a period of 2 years. Conclusions Our report highlights the importance of an effective immune recovery, despite fully suppressive HAART, along with anti-rhodococcal therapy, in order to clear rhodococcal infection. PMID:22168333

  4. LAG3 Expression in Active Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infections

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Bonnie L.; Mehra, Smriti; Ahsan, Muhammad H.; Selman, Moises; Khader, Shabaana A.; Kaushal, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a highly successful pathogen because of its ability to persist in human lungs for long periods of time. MTB modulates several aspects of the host immune response. Lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG3) is a protein with a high affinity for the CD4 receptor and is expressed mainly by regulatory T cells with immunomodulatory functions. To understand the function of LAG3 during MTB infection, a nonhuman primate model of tuberculosis, which recapitulates key aspects of natural human infection in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), was used. We show that the expression of LAG3 is highly induced in the lungs and particularly in the granulomatous lesions of macaques experimentally infected with MTB. Furthermore, we show that LAG3 expression is not induced in the lungs and lung granulomas of animals exhibiting latent tuberculosis infection. However, simian immunodeficiency virus–induced reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection results in an increased expression of LAG3 in the lungs. This response is not observed in nonhuman primates infected with non-MTB bacterial pathogens, nor with simian immunodeficiency virus alone. Our data show that LAG3 was expressed primarily on CD4+ T cells, presumably by regulatory T cells but also by natural killer cells. The expression of LAG3 coincides with high bacterial burdens and changes in the host type 1 helper T-cell response. PMID:25549835

  5. LAG3 expression in active Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Bonnie L; Mehra, Smriti; Ahsan, Muhammad H; Selman, Moises; Khader, Shabaana A; Kaushal, Deepak

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a highly successful pathogen because of its ability to persist in human lungs for long periods of time. MTB modulates several aspects of the host immune response. Lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG3) is a protein with a high affinity for the CD4 receptor and is expressed mainly by regulatory T cells with immunomodulatory functions. To understand the function of LAG3 during MTB infection, a nonhuman primate model of tuberculosis, which recapitulates key aspects of natural human infection in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), was used. We show that the expression of LAG3 is highly induced in the lungs and particularly in the granulomatous lesions of macaques experimentally infected with MTB. Furthermore, we show that LAG3 expression is not induced in the lungs and lung granulomas of animals exhibiting latent tuberculosis infection. However, simian immunodeficiency virus-induced reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection results in an increased expression of LAG3 in the lungs. This response is not observed in nonhuman primates infected with non-MTB bacterial pathogens, nor with simian immunodeficiency virus alone. Our data show that LAG3 was expressed primarily on CD4(+) T cells, presumably by regulatory T cells but also by natural killer cells. The expression of LAG3 coincides with high bacterial burdens and changes in the host type 1 helper T-cell response.

  6. Reducing implant-related infections: active release strategies.

    PubMed

    Hetrick, Evan M; Schoenfisch, Mark H

    2006-09-01

    Despite sterilization and aseptic procedures, bacterial infection remains a major impediment to the utility of medical implants including catheters, artificial prosthetics, and subcutaneous sensors. Indwelling devices are responsible for over half of all nosocomial infections, with an estimate of 1 million cases per year (2004) in the United States alone. Device-associated infections are the result of bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation at the implantation site. Although useful for relieving associated systemic infections, conventional antibiotic therapies remain ineffective against biofilms. Unfortunately, the lack of a suitable treatment often leaves extraction of the contaminated device as the only viable option for eliminating the biofilm. Much research has focused on developing polymers that resist bacterial adhesion for use as medical device coatings. This tutorial review focuses on coatings that release antimicrobial agents (i.e., active release strategies) for reducing the incidence of implant-associated infection. Following a brief introduction to bacteria, biofilms, and infection, the development and study of coatings that slowly release antimicrobial agents such as antibiotics, silver ions, antibodies, and nitric oxide are covered. The success and limitations of these strategies are highlighted.

  7. Activity of a phenolic dibenzylsulfide against New World arenavirus infections

    PubMed Central

    Gowen, Brian B; Jung, Kie-Hoon; Sefing, Eric J; Wong, Min-Hui; Westover, Jonna B; Smee, Donald F

    2013-01-01

    Background Junín virus (JUNV) and several other Clade B New World arenaviruses cause human disease ranging from mild febrile illness to severe viral hemorrhagic fever (HF). These viruses pose a significant threat to national security and safe and effective therapies are limited outside of Argentina, where immune plasma is the standard of care for treating JUNV infection in cases of Argentine HF. Methods An in vitro screen of the Chemtura library identified several compounds with activity against Tacaribe virus (TCRV), a Clade B arenavirus closely related to JUNV. Of these compounds, D746, a phenolic dibenzylsulfide, was further pursued for additional in vitro studies and evaluated in the AG129 mouse TCRV infection model. Results D746 was found to act during an early to intermediate stage of the TCRV replication cycle and micromolar range activity was confirmed by virus yield reduction assays with both TCRV and JUNV. Although intraperitoneal twice daily treatment regimens were found to be highly effective when started 2 hours prior to TCRV challenge in AG129 mice, post-exposure treatment initiated 3 days after infection was not efficacious. Interestingly, despite the pre-exposure treatment success, D746 did not reduce serum or tissue virus titers during the acute infection. Moreover, D746 elicited ascites fluid accumulation in mice during, as well as independent of, infection. Conclusions Our findings suggest that D746 may be altering the host response to TCRV infection in AG129 mice in a way that limits pathogenesis and thereby protects mice from otherwise lethal infection in the absence of measurable reductions in viral burden. PMID:23337126

  8. Overt and occult hepatitis B virus infection among treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marina Pedroso; Lemes, Pollyanne Sousa; Matos, Márcia Alves Dias; Del-Rios, Nativa Helena Alves; Carneiro, Megmar Aparecida Santos; Silva, Ágabo Macedo Costa; Lopes, Carmen Luci Rodrigues; Teles, Sheila Araújo; Aires, Rodrigo Sebba; Lago, Bárbara Vieira; Araujo, Natalia Motta; Martins, Regina Maria Bringel

    2016-07-01

    Although hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection is common, only few data are available on HBV among HIV patients including occult hepatitis B infection (OBI), regardless of serological markers. This study aims to determine the prevalence of OBI and overall HBV infection, associated factors, HBV genotypes, and surface (S) gene mutations in a population of treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients in Brazil. A cross-sectional study was conducted in treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients in Central Brazil. All samples were tested for HBV serological markers and HBV DNA. Sequence analysis of the S gene and overlapping polymerase gene was preformed. Overall, 25.1% (127/505) of the patients had markers of current or previous HBV infection, which was associated with age over 40 years, history of injection drug use, and homosexual sex. The hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) seroprevalence was 4.9% (25/505). HBV DNA was detected in 39 out of 505 patients: 20 of them were HBsAg-positive and 19 were HBsAg-negative, resulting in an OBI prevalence of 3.8%. Patients with OBI had significantly higher HCV seropositivity rate compared to HBsAg-positive patients. Sequencing of the S gene revealed Y100C, T131N, and D144A mutations. One patient had the M204I and L180M drug-resistance mutations (polymerase). HBV genotypes A (A1, A2), D (D2, D3), and F (F2) were identified. In conclusion, OBI represented almost half of all HBV infections with detectable HBV DNA, suggesting that hepatitis B diagnosis in HIV patients should include in addition to serological markers the detection of HBV DNA. PMID:27061406

  9. Overt and occult hepatitis B virus infection among treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marina Pedroso; Lemes, Pollyanne Sousa; Matos, Márcia Alves Dias; Del-Rios, Nativa Helena Alves; Carneiro, Megmar Aparecida Santos; Silva, Ágabo Macedo Costa; Lopes, Carmen Luci Rodrigues; Teles, Sheila Araújo; Aires, Rodrigo Sebba; Lago, Bárbara Vieira; Araujo, Natalia Motta; Martins, Regina Maria Bringel

    2016-07-01

    Although hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection is common, only few data are available on HBV among HIV patients including occult hepatitis B infection (OBI), regardless of serological markers. This study aims to determine the prevalence of OBI and overall HBV infection, associated factors, HBV genotypes, and surface (S) gene mutations in a population of treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients in Brazil. A cross-sectional study was conducted in treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients in Central Brazil. All samples were tested for HBV serological markers and HBV DNA. Sequence analysis of the S gene and overlapping polymerase gene was preformed. Overall, 25.1% (127/505) of the patients had markers of current or previous HBV infection, which was associated with age over 40 years, history of injection drug use, and homosexual sex. The hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) seroprevalence was 4.9% (25/505). HBV DNA was detected in 39 out of 505 patients: 20 of them were HBsAg-positive and 19 were HBsAg-negative, resulting in an OBI prevalence of 3.8%. Patients with OBI had significantly higher HCV seropositivity rate compared to HBsAg-positive patients. Sequencing of the S gene revealed Y100C, T131N, and D144A mutations. One patient had the M204I and L180M drug-resistance mutations (polymerase). HBV genotypes A (A1, A2), D (D2, D3), and F (F2) were identified. In conclusion, OBI represented almost half of all HBV infections with detectable HBV DNA, suggesting that hepatitis B diagnosis in HIV patients should include in addition to serological markers the detection of HBV DNA.

  10. Activated mouse eosinophils protect against lethal respiratory virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Percopo, Caroline M.; Dyer, Kimberly D.; Ochkur, Sergei I.; Luo, Janice L.; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Lee, James J.; Lee, Nancy A.; Domachowske, Joseph B.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils are recruited to the airways as a prominent feature of the asthmatic inflammatory response where they are broadly perceived as promoting pathophysiology. Respiratory virus infections exacerbate established asthma; however, the role of eosinophils and the nature of their interactions with respiratory viruses remain uncertain. To explore these questions, we established acute infection with the rodent pneumovirus, pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), in 3 distinct mouse models of Th2 cytokine–driven asthmatic inflammation. We found that eosinophils recruited to the airways of otherwise naïve mice in response to Aspergillus fumigatus, but not ovalbumin sensitization and challenge, are activated by and degranulate specifically in response to PVM infection. Furthermore, we demonstrate that activated eosinophils from both Aspergillus antigen and cytokine-driven asthma models are profoundly antiviral and promote survival in response to an otherwise lethal PVM infection. Thus, although activated eosinophils within a Th2-polarized inflammatory response may have pathophysiologic features, they are also efficient and effective mediators of antiviral host defense. PMID:24297871

  11. Marine Peptides and Their Anti-Infective Activities

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hee Kyoung; Seo, Chang Ho; Park, Yoonkyung

    2015-01-01

    Marine bioresources are a valuable source of bioactive compounds with industrial and nutraceutical potential. Numerous clinical trials evaluating novel chemotherapeutic agents derived from marine sources have revealed novel mechanisms of action. Recently, marine-derived bioactive peptides have attracted attention owing to their numerous beneficial effects. Moreover, several studies have reported that marine peptides exhibit various anti-infective activities, such as antimicrobial, antifungal, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, anti-tuberculosis, and antiviral activities. In the last several decades, studies of marine plants, animals, and microbes have revealed tremendous number of structurally diverse and bioactive secondary metabolites. However, the treatments available for many infectious diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, and viruses are limited. Thus, the identification of novel antimicrobial peptides should be continued, and all possible strategies should be explored. In this review, we will present the structures and anti-infective activity of peptides isolated from marine sources (sponges, algae, bacteria, fungi and fish) from 2006 to the present. PMID:25603351

  12. Hepatitis B Vaccination and Risk of Hepatitis B Infection in HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Landrum, Michael L.; Hullsiek, Katherine Huppler; Ganesan, Anuradha; Weintrob, Amy C.; Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F.; Barthel, Vincent R.; O’Connell, Robert J.; Fieberg, Ann; Chun, Helen M.; Marconi, Vincent C.; Dolan, Matthew J.; Agan, Brian K.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the association of HBV vaccination with risk of HBV infection among HIV-infected patients and HBV infection risk factors among vaccinees. Design Observational cohort study Methods Participants enrolled from 1986 through 2004, unvaccinated and serologically negative for HBV infection at the time of HIV diagnosis, were followed longitudinally through 2007 for the occurrence of HBV infection. Risk factors for HBV infection were evaluated using time to event methods, including Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Cox proportional hazards models. Results During 11,632 person-years of follow-up, the rate of HBV infection was 2.01 (95% CI 1.75–2.27) /100 person-years. Receipt of at least one dose of vaccine was not associated with reduced risk of HBV (unadjusted HR 0.86, 95% CI 0.7–1.1; adjusted HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.8–1.4). Receipt of three or more doses of vaccine was also not associated with reduced risk (HR 0.96; 95% CI 0.56–1.64). Among 409 vaccinees with HBsAb <10 IU/L, 46 (11.2%) developed HBV infection compared to 11 of 217 (5.1%) vaccinees with HBsAb ≥10 IU/L (HR 0.51; 95% CI 0.3–1.0). In participants with initial HBsAb <10 IU/L, 16/46 (35%) infections were chronic, compared to 0/11 in those with initial HBsAb ≥10 IU/L (p=0.02). Conclusion Overall, HBV vaccination was not associated with reduced risk of HBV infection in our cohort of HIV-infected individuals. However, the small subset of vaccinees with a positive vaccine response may have had reduced HBV infection risk, including chronic disease. Improvements in vaccine delivery and immunogenicity are needed to increase HBV vaccine effectiveness in HIV-infected patients. PMID:19487908

  13. HBx M130K and V131I (T-A) mutations in HBV genotype F during a follow-up study in chronic carriers

    PubMed Central

    León, Bernal; Taylor, Lizeth; Vargas, Minor; Luftig, Ronald B; Albertazzi, Federico; Herrero, Libia; Visona, Kirsten

    2005-01-01

    Background Around 400 million people worldwide are chronically infected with Hepatitis B virus (HBV). An estimated 10% of these chronic patients develop progressive liver damage including cirrhosis and Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC). The HBx gene encodes a protein of 154 amino acids which is a transactivator and has been associated with HBV pathogenesis. A change in the amino acid sequences at positions 130 and 131 in the HBV-X protein (M130K and V131I) produced by T-A point mutations at the nucleic acids level has been associated with severe liver damage and HCC in patients from China and Africa. Further, such changes have been proposed as a prognostic marker for progressive liver damage and HCC. The purpose of this study was to determine if T-A mutations are present in HBV chronic carriers with genotype F (the major genotype in Costa Rica) and further, if these mutations are associated with HBV disease progression in Costa Rica HBV patients from 1972 to 1985. Results Serum samples from 50 HBV positive individuals were amplified and directly sequenced, 48 belonged to genotype F, 1 from genotype D and another was classified as D or E. T-;A mutations were absent in 17 acute patients who recovered, but was present in 12 of 29 chronic carrier samples (42.8%), in one sample the T-A mutations were detected as early as 29 days after clinical onset of disease. In 17 carriers with available liver biopsies, T-;A mutations were found in 8 sera of 13 (61.5%) classified as moderate or severe, and none in 4 biopsies with mild liver damage. However, it was not possible to demonstrate a statistical association between the presence of T-A mutations and moderate/severe liver damage, using a Fischer exact test, 1 tail, p = 0.05. In 4 patients HCC was diagnosed, and 2 of them presented the T-A mutations in their sera. Conclusion T-A mutations were found in HBV genotype F in chronic carriers but not in patients who recovered from acute infection. These mutations could be developing

  14. Diagnostic value of serum Golgi protein 73 for HBV-related primary hepatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Guosheng; Dong, Feibo; Xu, Xiaozhen; Hu, Airong; Hu, Yaoren

    2015-01-01

    Background: Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels are routinely used for diagnosis and monitoring of hepatic diseases, but it has a limited value. Golgi protein 73 (GP73) has been suggested as a new marker for hepatic diseases. Objective: To explore the clinical value of serum GP73 in different diseases associated with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Method: Between January 2010 and August 2014, serum samples from 88 patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), 78 patients with HBV-related liver cirrhosis (LC), and 194 patients with HBV-related primary hepatic cancer (PHC) were collected. Serum samples from 30 healthy volunteers were used as controls. ELISA and microparticle enzyme immunoassay were used to measure serum GP73 and AFP levels. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to analyze the diagnostic value of serum GP73 and AFP for PHC. Results: For the diagnosis of PHC, GP73 showed a sensitivity of 65.5% and specificity of 66.3%, while AFP levels showed sensitivity of 64.4% and specificity of 76.5%. Serial testing (both tests are positive) could increase the specificity (sensitivity of 45.9% and specificity of 85.5%) while parallel testing (any single positive test result) could increase the sensitivity (sensitivity of 84.0% and specificity of 57.2%). Serum GP73 and AFP levels were significantly different between Child-Pugh grades (P<0.001 for GP73 and P=0.044 for AFP). Significant differences in serum GP73 and AFP were found between TNM stages (all P<0.001). Conclusion: Serum GP73 had limited diagnostic value for HBV-related PHC. The combined use of serum GP73 and AFP levels improved the diagnostic efficacy. PMID:26617863

  15. HBV-Related Health Behaviors in a Socio-Cultural Context: Perspectives from Khmers and Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Haeok; Kiang, Peter; Chea, Phala; Peou, Sonith; Tang, Shirley S.; Yang, JinHwang; Fawcett, Jacqueline; Hann, Hie-Won

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To explore factors influencing health and health care within the sociocultural context of Cambodian Americans (CAs or Khmers) and Korean Americans (KA) and to examine intergroup similarities and differences between CAs and KAs, focusing on hepatitis B virus (HBV) and liver cancer prevention behaviors. Methods The study used a qualitative design guided by the revised Network Episode Model (NEM) and informed by ethnographic analysis. Focus group interviews with key informants among CA community health leaders (CHLs, n=14) and individual interviews with key informants of KA CHLs (n=9) were audiotaped and transcribed. Results Three categories that influenced HBV and liver cancer prevention emerged from both CAs and KAs: the socio-cultural, individual, and behavioral. Four additional sub-categories (sub-themes) of sociocultural were identified as socio-history, socio-medicine, socio-linguistic, and socio-health resources. Both CAs and KAs, however, have low levels of knowledge and significant misunderstandings about HBV infection. Conclusions The study identifies and compares the social-cultural determinant for HBV and liver cancer and highlights the factors of education, intercultural communication, and interactions within socio-cultural contexts of CA and KA subgroups. In general, conceptual overlaps are apparent between Khmers (from now on, the terms, CA and Khmer, will be used interchangeably) and Koreans except for the sub-theme of socio-history. However, differences in concept-specific attributes point to the need to account for differing conceptualizations and implications of specific ethnic groups’ sociocultural contexts, and to design contextually-relevant outreach and educational interventions for targeted AAPI subgroups. PMID:24355416

  16. Hepatic necroinflammation and severe liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B with undetectable HBV DNA and persistently normal alanine aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Alam, M M; Mahtab, M A; Akbar, S M F; Kamal, M; Rahman, S

    2014-12-01

    Both consensus and controversy remains regarding surrogacy of hepatitis B virus (HBV) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), however, these markers are used to ascertain the extent of liver damages and to guide therapeutic options in patients with chronic hepatitis B. However, little is known about liver histology of patients with chronic hepatitis B with undetectable HBV DNA and persistently normal ALT. Thirty-five incidentally-detected patients with chronic HBV infection (assessed by expression of hepatitis B surface antigen for more than 6 months) with undetectable HBV DNA and normal serum ALT were enrolled in this study. Liver biopsy specimens were taken from all patients and the extent of hepatic necroinflammation and liver fibrosis were evaluated. Moderate degree of hepatic necroinflammation was detected in 2 of 35 patients and severe hepatic fibrosis was seen in 6 of 35 patients. Two patients with undetectable HBV DNA and sustained normal ALT had moderate hepatic necroinflammation and severe hepatic fibrosis. In spite of undetectable HBV DNA for prolonged period and persistently normal ALT, some patients with chronic hepatitis B express evidences of progressive liver diseases. Large scale studies in different races and geographical regions should be accomplished to develop insights about management of these patients. Studies about extent of liver diseases in these patients should be accomplished in Treatment recommendation and management strategies should be developed for these patients. PMID:26402972

  17. In vitro activation of woodchuck lymphocytes measured by radiopurine incorporation and interleukin-2 production: implications for modeling immunity and therapy in hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cote, P J; Gerin, J L

    1995-09-01

    Cellular immune responses to hepatitis B virus (HBV) play an important role in the resolution of acute infection. They also influence the course of chronic infection and disease but are inadequate to completely clear the infection. Woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) infection of the woodchuck can provide a model to study these processes. Lymphocyte responses of woodchucks were assessed by in vitro proliferation and/or interleukin (IL)-2 assays using mitogen (Concanavalin A [ConA]), cytokine (IL-2), superantigen (Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B [SEB]), major histocompatibility complex (MHC) allo-antigen (mixed lymphocyte reaction [MLR]), and viral antigens (woodchuck hepatitis virus core antigen [WHcAg] and woodchuck hepatitis virus surface antigen [WHsAg]). ConA-stimulated woodchuck lymphocytes underwent cell division based on cell counting experiments and produced IL-2 as detected using an IL-2-dependent murine cell line but failed to incorporate sufficient tritiated thymidine; however, they did incorporate sufficient tritiated adenosine and deoxyadenosine to permit development of a meaningful proliferation assay. The IL-2 assay was sensitive and specific for detection of woodchuck IL-2 induced by mitogen, superantigen, and MLR, as shown by quantitative titration analysis and anti-body neutralization of ConA-supernatant activity. Cyclosporin A and FK506 specifically inhibited ConA- and SEB-induced IL-2 production by woodchuck lymphocytes. Positive two-way MLRs were detected by IL-2 production and proliferation assay between woodchucks from different geographic regions, thus indicating divergence among MHC molecules; however, occasional negative MLR reactions among indigenous pairs of woodchucks indicated that some woodchucks were mutually immunocompatible to some degree. The radioadenosine proliferation assay was sensitive for detecting peripheral blood lymphocyte responses to WHcAg and WHsAg in adult woodchucks with recently resolved acute infections. The above

  18. Infection and Cancer: The Case of Hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Chan, Stephen L; Wong, Vincent W S; Qin, Shukui; Chan, Henry L Y

    2016-01-01

    Infection is a well-described cause of cancer in humans. Being one of the most common infections worldwide, hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the leading cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), particularly in Asian countries. The etiological link between HBV and HCC provides an important opportunity for health care policy makers and clinicians to intervene with HBV infection to prevent cancer development and improve the outcomes of cancer. This review aims to use HBV as an example to illustrate the potential of tackling infection-related conditions to help improve cancer outcomes. This article is divided into four parts: In the first part, an overview is given on the epidemiologic data and risk factors of HCC development in patients with chronic hepatitis B. In the second part, recent progress on the anti-HBV strategies for preventing HCC is updated. In the third part, approaches to improve the outcomes of established HBV-related HCC are covered. These methods include surveillance strategies to identify asymptomatic HCC among patients with chronic HBV infection, and use of antiviral treatment to avoid HBV reactivation during treatment for HCC and reduce the recurrence of HCC after curative treatment. Finally, the status of the development of targeted drugs specifically for HBV-related HCC is discussed in the section on future development. PMID:26578611

  19. Effects of atrazine on cercarial longevity, activity, and infectivity.

    PubMed

    Koprivnikar, Janet; Forbes, Mark R; Baker, Robert L

    2006-04-01

    Susceptibility of free-living infective stages of parasites to contaminants is relatively understudied compared with independent effects on measures of host health or immunity, but may be important in affecting prevalence and intensity of parasite infections. We investigated whether atrazine, an herbicide commonly used in North America, affected the cercariae of 4 different species of digenetic trematodes, and found that effects of atrazine concentration on mortality and activity of cercariae varied among species. Mortality of Echinostoma trivolvis increased in a 200 microg/L atrazine solution, and a species of Alaria showed both decreased activity and increased mortality. We also examined whether the ability of E. trivolvis to infect the second intermediate host, larval amphibians, was compromised by atrazine exposure. Longevity and prevalence of E. trivolvis cercariae was affected at 200 microg/L atrazine, whereas intensity of infection in Rana clamitans tadpoles was reduced at both 20 microg/L and 200 microg/L atrazine. Our results indicate that the viability of cercariae of some species is compromised by exposure to atrazine, emphasizing the importance of considering the influence of contaminants on free-living stages of parasites in addressing how environmental degradation may relate to host parasitism.

  20. HBV-DNA, HBeAg/anti-HBe serological status in hepatitis B chronic individuals from central Italy.

    PubMed Central

    Rapicetta, M.; di Nardo, V.; Rozera, C.; Marinucci, G.; Francisci, D.; Sarrecchia, B.; Ricci, C.; Albertoni, F.

    1990-01-01

    A population of 488 HBsAg carrier individuals, from central Italy, classified on the basis of biochemical, clinical and histological parameters, was analysed for the presence of HBV-DNA in serum and its relationship with HBeAg/anti-HBe markers. The prevalence of HBV-DNA was 32.8% in chronic patients with biopsy-proven liver disease, and 20 and 4.3% respectively in asymptomatic carriers with and without altered ALT levels. The values in chronic patients were correlated with the histological activity. Concordance of HBV-DNA presence and HBeAg positivity was observed in only 61.4% of cases. However HBV-DNA prevalence in sera of anti-HBe positive individuals was very low in asymptomatic carriers with normal ALT levels (2.5%). Higher values were observed in anti-HBe positive chronic patients (15.8%) and in carriers occasionally found with changes in ALT without any other clinical sign of illness (16.7%). These data would indicate that HBV-DNA is the serological marker which is most closely related to liver disease. PMID:2347388

  1. New horizon for radical cure of chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Tajiri, Kazuto; Shimizu, Yukihiro

    2016-07-28

    About 250 to 350 million people worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), and about 700000 patients per year die of HBV-related cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Several anti-viral agents, such as interferon and nucleos(t)ide analogues (NAs), have been used to treat this disease. NAs especially have been shown to strongly suppress HBV replication, slowing the progression to cirrhosis and the development of HCC. However, reactivation of HBV replication often occurs after cessation of treatment, because NAs alone cannot completely remove covalently-closed circular DNA (cccDNA), the template of HBV replication, from the nuclei of hepatocytes. Anti-HBV immune responses, in conjunction with interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α, were found to eliminate cccDNA, but complete eradication of cccDNA by immune response alone is difficult, as shown in patients who recover from acute HBV infection but often show long-term persistence of small amounts of HBV-DNA in the blood. Several new drugs interfering with the life cycle of HBV in hepatocytes have been developed, with drugs targeting cccDNA theoretically the most effective for radical cure of chronic HBV infection. However, the safety of these drugs should be extensively examined before application to patients, and combinations of several approaches may be necessary for radical cure of chronic HBV infection. PMID:27478536

  2. New horizon for radical cure of chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Tajiri, Kazuto; Shimizu, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    About 250 to 350 million people worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), and about 700000 patients per year die of HBV-related cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Several anti-viral agents, such as interferon and nucleos(t)ide analogues (NAs), have been used to treat this disease. NAs especially have been shown to strongly suppress HBV replication, slowing the progression to cirrhosis and the development of HCC. However, reactivation of HBV replication often occurs after cessation of treatment, because NAs alone cannot completely remove covalently-closed circular DNA (cccDNA), the template of HBV replication, from the nuclei of hepatocytes. Anti-HBV immune responses, in conjunction with interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α, were found to eliminate cccDNA, but complete eradication of cccDNA by immune response alone is difficult, as shown in patients who recover from acute HBV infection but often show long-term persistence of small amounts of HBV-DNA in the blood. Several new drugs interfering with the life cycle of HBV in hepatocytes have been developed, with drugs targeting cccDNA theoretically the most effective for radical cure of chronic HBV infection. However, the safety of these drugs should be extensively examined before application to patients, and combinations of several approaches may be necessary for radical cure of chronic HBV infection. PMID:27478536

  3. Gelsolin activity controls efficient early HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV-1 entry into target lymphocytes requires the activity of actin adaptors that stabilize and reorganize cortical F-actin, like moesin and filamin-A. These alterations are necessary for the redistribution of CD4-CXCR4/CCR5 to one pole of the cell, a process that increases the probability of HIV-1 Envelope (Env)-CD4/co-receptor interactions and that generates the tension at the plasma membrane necessary to potentiate fusion pore formation, thereby favouring early HIV-1 infection. However, it remains unclear whether the dynamic processing of F-actin and the amount of cortical actin available during the initial virus-cell contact are required to such events. Results Here we show that gelsolin restructures cortical F-actin during HIV-1 Env-gp120-mediated signalling, without affecting cell-surface expression of receptors or viral co-receptor signalling. Remarkably, efficient HIV-1 Env-mediated membrane fusion and infection of permissive lymphocytes were impaired when gelsolin was either overexpressed or silenced, which led to a loss or gain of cortical actin, respectively. Indeed, HIV-1 Env-gp120-induced F-actin reorganization and viral receptor capping were impaired under these experimental conditions. Moreover, gelsolin knockdown promoted HIV-1 Env-gp120-mediated aberrant pseudopodia formation. These perturbed-actin events are responsible for the inhibition of early HIV-1 infection. Conclusions For the first time we provide evidence that through its severing of cortical actin, and by controlling the amount of actin available for reorganization during HIV-1 Env-mediated viral fusion, entry and infection, gelsolin can constitute a barrier that restricts HIV-1 infection of CD4+ lymphocytes in a pre-fusion step. These findings provide important insights into the complex molecular and actin-associated dynamics events that underlie early viral infection. Thus, we propose that gelsolin is a new factor that can limit HIV-1 infection acting at a pre-fusion step

  4. Trans-activation function of a 3 prime truncated X gene-cell fusion product from integrated hepatitis B virus DNA in chronic hepatitis tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Takada, Shinako; Koike, Katsuro )

    1990-08-01

    To investigate the expression and transactivation function of the X gene in integrated hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA from chronic hepatitis tissues, a series of transfectants containing cloned integrated HBV DNAs was made and analyzed for X mRNA expression and trans-activation activity by using a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assay. Most of the integrated HBV DNAs expressed X mRNA and encoded a product with trans-activation activity in spite of the loss of the 3{prime} end region of the X gene due to integration. From cDNA cloning and sequence analysis of X mRNA transcribed from native or integrated HBV DNA, the X protein was found to be translated from the X open reading frame without splicing. For integrated HBV DNA, transcription was extended to a cellular flanking DNA and an X gene-cell fusion transcript was terminated by using a cellular poly(A) signal. The amino acid sequence deduced from an X-cell fusion transcript indicated truncation of the carboxyl-terminal five amino acids, but the upstream region of seven amino acids conserved among hepadnaviruses was retained in the integrated HBV DNA, suggesting that this conserved region is essential for the transactivation function of the X protein. These findings support the following explanation for hepatocarcinogenesis by HBV DNA integration: the expression of a cellular oncogene(s) is transactivated at the time of chronic infection by the increasing amounts of the integrated HBV gene product(s), such as the X-cell fusion product.

  5. The Effect of Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection on BDCA3+ Dendritic Cell Frequency and Function

    PubMed Central

    van der Aa, Evelyn; Buschow, Sonja I.; Biesta, Paula J.; Janssen, Harry L. A.; Woltman, Andrea M.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection results from inadequate HBV-specific immunity. BDCA3+ dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen presenting cells considered to be important for antiviral responses because of specific characteristics, including high interferon-λ production. BDCA3+ DCs may thus also have a role in the immune response against HBV, and immunotherapeutic strategies aiming to activate DCs, including BDCA3+ DCs, in patient livers may represent an interesting treatment option for chronic HBV. However, neither the effect of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection on the frequency and function of BDCA3+ DCs in liver and blood, nor the effect of the viral surface protein (HBsAg) that is abundantly present in blood of infected individuals are known. Here, we provide an overview of BDCA3+ DC frequency and functional capacity in CHB patients. We find that intrahepatic BDCA3+ DC numbers are increased in CHB patients. BDCA3+ DCs from patient blood are not more mature at steady state, but display an impaired capacity to mature and to produce interferon-λ upon polyI:C stimulation. Furthermore, in vitro experiments exposing blood and intrahepatic BDCA3+ DCs to the viral envelope protein HBsAg demonstrate that HBsAg does not directly induce phenotypical maturation of BDCA3+ DCs, but may reduce IFN-λ production via an indirect unknown mechanism. These results suggest that BDCA3+ DCs are available in the blood and on site in HBV infected livers, but measures may need to be taken to revive their function for DC-targeted therapy. PMID:27529176

  6. Nosocomial outbreak of hepatitis B virus infection involving two hospitals in the Republic of Ireland.

    PubMed

    Burns, K; Heslin, J; Crowley, B; Thornton, L; Laoi, B Ni; Kelly, E; Ward, E; Doody, B; Hickey, M M

    2011-08-01

    The routes of nosocomial hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission have changed over the years. Initiatives to prevent transfusion-associated HBV and healthcare worker-to-patient transmission have had a positive impact on these transmission routes. Recent reports of outbreaks of nosocomial HBV have implicated breaches in standard precautions as important causes of HBV transmission. This report describes a nosocomial outbreak of HBV infection in the Republic of Ireland, which occurred between January 2005 and March 2006. The outbreak was detected following identification of a case of acute HBV infection in a patient whose only risk factor was a recent surgical procedure. The extensive multi-agency investigation that followed revealed that the patient was one of five cases of acute HBV infection and that four separate transmission events between infectious cases had occurred in two different hospitals over a 15-month period. A definitive cause for each transmission event was not identified, although lapses in adherence to standard precautions, safe injection and phlebotomy practices could not be ruled out. Two secondary cases of acute HBV infection in community contacts of two of the nosocomial cases were identified. Phylogenetic analysis proved a useful tool in confirming infection with a pre-core HBV mutant and viral transmission between the seven patients. A patient notification exercise involving 1028 potentially exposed patients found no evidence of additional cases of nosocomial HBV infection. These findings highlight the importance of consistent application of standard precautions. PMID:21530000

  7. RNAi for Treating Hepatitis B Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Cheng, Guofeng

    2007-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is one of the leading causes of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Current treatment strategies of HBV infection including the use of interferon (IFN)-α and nucleotide analogues such as lamivudine and adefovir have met with only partial success. Therefore, it is necessary to develop more effective antiviral therapies that can clear HBV infection with fewer side effects. RNA interference (RNAi), by which a small interfering RNA (siRNA) induces the gene silence at a post-transcriptional level, has the potential of treating HBV infection. The successful use of chemically synthesized siRNA, endogenous expression of small hairpin RNA (shRNA) or microRNA (miRNA) to silence the target gene make this technology towards a potentially rational therapeutics for HBV infection. However, several challenges including poor siRNA stability, inefficient cellular uptake, widespread biodistribution and non-specific effects need to be overcome. In this review, we discuss several strategies for improving the anti-HBV therapeutic efficacy of siRNAs, while avoiding their off-target effects and immunostimulation. There is an in-depth discussion on the (1) mechanisms of RNAi, (2) methods for siRNA/shRNA production, (3) barriers to RNAi-based therapies, and (4) delivery strategies of siRNA for treating HBV infection. PMID:18074201

  8. Macrophage Activation by Ursolic and Oleanolic Acids during Mycobacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    López-García, Sonia; Castañeda-Sanchez, Jorge Ismael; Jiménez-Arellanes, Adelina; Domínguez-López, Lilia; Castro-Mussot, Maria Eugenia; Hernández-Sanchéz, Javier; Luna-Herrera, Julieta

    2015-08-06

    Oleanolic (OA) and ursolic acids (UA) are triterpenes that are abundant in vegetables, fruits and medicinal plants. They have been described as active moieties in medicinal plants used for the treatment of tuberculosis. In this study, we analyzed the effects of these triterpenes on macrophages infected in vitro with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). We evaluated production of nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cytokines (TNF-α and TGF-β) as well as expression of cell membrane receptors (TGR5 and CD36) in MTB-infected macrophages following treatment with OA and UA. Triterpenes caused reduced MTB growth in macrophages, stimulated production of NO and ROS in the early phase, stimulated TNF-α, suppressed TGF-β and caused over-expression of CD36 and TGR5 receptors. Thus, our data suggest immunomodulatory properties of OA and UA on MTB infected macrophages. In conclusion, antimycobacterial effects induced by these triterpenes may be attributable to the conversion of macrophages from stage M2 (alternatively activated) to M1 (classically activated).

  9. Localised mitogenic activity in horses following infection with Streptococcus equi.

    PubMed

    McLean, R; Rash, N L; Robinson, C; Waller, A S; Paillot, R

    2015-06-01

    Streptococcus equi subspecies equi (S. equi) is the causative agent of strangles, a highly contagious upper respiratory disease of equids. Streptococcus equi produces superantigens (sAgs), which are thought to contribute to strangles pathogenicity through non-specific T-cell activation and pro-inflammatory response. Streptococcus equi infection induces abscesses in the lymph nodes of the head and neck. In some individuals, some abscess material remains into the guttural pouch and inspissates over time to form chondroids which can harbour live S. equi. The aim of this study was to determine the sites of sAg production during infection and therefore improve our understanding of their role. Abscess material, chondroids and serum collected from Equidae with signs of strangles were tested in mitogenic assays. Mitogenic sAg activity was only detected in abscess material and chondroids. Our data support the localised in vivo activity of sAg during both acute and carrier phases of S. equi infection.

  10. Macrophage Activation by Ursolic and Oleanolic Acids during Mycobacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    López-García, Sonia; Castañeda-Sanchez, Jorge Ismael; Jiménez-Arellanes, Adelina; Domínguez-López, Lilia; Castro-Mussot, Maria Eugenia; Hernández-Sanchéz, Javier; Luna-Herrera, Julieta

    2015-01-01

    Oleanolic (OA) and ursolic acids (UA) are triterpenes that are abundant in vegetables, fruits and medicinal plants. They have been described as active moieties in medicinal plants used for the treatment of tuberculosis. In this study, we analyzed the effects of these triterpenes on macrophages infected in vitro with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). We evaluated production of nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cytokines (TNF-α and TGF-β) as well as expression of cell membrane receptors (TGR5 and CD36) in MTB-infected macrophages following treatment with OA and UA. Triterpenes caused reduced MTB growth in macrophages, stimulated production of NO and ROS in the early phase, stimulated TNF-α, suppressed TGF-β and caused over-expression of CD36 and TGR5 receptors. Thus, our data suggest immunomodulatory properties of OA and UA on MTB infected macrophages. In conclusion, antimycobacterial effects induced by these triterpenes may be attributable to the conversion of macrophages from stage M2 (alternatively activated) to M1 (classically activated). PMID:26287131

  11. Analysis of HBV genotype, drug resistant mutations, and pre-core/basal core promoter mutations in Korean patients with acute hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Ho; Hong, Sun Pyo; Jang, Eun Sun; Park, Sang Jong; Hwang, Seong Gyu; Kang, Sook-Kyoung; Jeong, Sook-Hyang

    2015-06-01

    Acute hepatitis B, caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV) strains with drug resistant mutations or pre-core/basal core promoter (PC/BCP) mutations, is a public health concern, because this infection is often associated with poor disease outcome or difficulty in therapeutic choice. The HBV genotype, the prevalence of drug resistant mutations, and PC/BCP mutations in Korean patients with acute hepatitis B were studied. From 2006 to 2008, 36 patients with acute hepatitis B were enrolled prospectively in four general hospitals. Among them, 20 showed detectable HBV DNA (median value was 4.8 log copies/mL). HBV genotyping and analysis of HBV mutations that conferred resistance against lamivudine, adefovir, or entecavir and of PC/BCP mutations were performed using highly sensitive restriction fragment mass polymorphism (RFMP) analysis. All 20 patients were infected with HBV genotype C, which causes almost all cases of chronic hepatitis B in Korea. No patient showed mutations that conferred resistance against lamivudine (L180M, M204V/I), adefovir (A181T, N236S), or entecavir (I169M, A184T/V, S202I/G, M250V/I/L). However, four patients had BCP mutations, and two had PC mutations. Platelet counts were significantly lower in the four patients with PC/BCP mutations compared to those with wild type. In this study, all acute hepatitis B patients had genotype C HBV strains with no drug resistant mutations. However, 20% showed PC/BCP mutations. This highlights the need for further study on the significance of PC/BCP mutations.

  12. Liver Gene Expression Profiles Correlate with Virus Infection and Response to Interferon Therapy in Chronic Hepatitis B Patients.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Lin; Hsiao, Tzu-Hung; Chen, Pei-Jer; Wong, Siao-Han; Kao, Jia-Horng; Chen, Ding-Shinn; Lu, Jo-Yang; Lu, Tzu-Pin; Chen, Yidong; Chuang, Eric Y; Tu, Hui-Chu; Liu, Chun-Jen

    2016-01-01

    The natural course of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection and treatment response are determined mainly by the genomic characteristics of the individual. We investigated liver gene expression profiles to reveal the molecular basis associated with chronic hepatitis B and IFN-alpha (IFNα) treatment response in CHB patients. Expression profiles were compared between seven paired liver biopsy samples taken before and 6 months after successful IFNα treatment or between pretreatment biopsy samples of 11 IFNα responders and 11 non-responders. A total of 132 differentially up-regulated and 39 down-regulated genes were identified in the pretreated livers of CHB patients. The up-regulated genes were mainly related to cell proliferation and immune response, with IFNγ and B cell signatures significantly enriched. Lower intrahepatic HBV pregenomic RNA levels and 25 predictive genes were identified in IFNα responders. The predictive gene set in responders significantly overlapped with the up-regulated genes associated with the pretreated livers of CHB patients. The mechanisms responsible for IFNα treatment responses are different between HBV and HCV patients. HBV infection evokes significant immune responses even in chronic infection. The up-regulated genes are predictive of responsiveness to IFNα therapy, as are lower intrahepatic levels of HBV pregenomic RNA and pre-activated host immune responses. PMID:27546197

  13. Liver Gene Expression Profiles Correlate with Virus Infection and Response to Interferon Therapy in Chronic Hepatitis B Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hui-Lin; Hsiao, Tzu-Hung; Chen, Pei-Jer; Wong, Siao-Han; Kao, Jia-Horng; Chen, Ding-Shinn; Lu, Jo-Yang; Lu, Tzu-Pin; Chen, Yidong; Chuang, Eric Y.; Tu, Hui-Chu; Liu, Chun-Jen

    2016-01-01

    The natural course of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection and treatment response are determined mainly by the genomic characteristics of the individual. We investigated liver gene expression profiles to reveal the molecular basis associated with chronic hepatitis B and IFN-alpha (IFNα) treatment response in CHB patients. Expression profiles were compared between seven paired liver biopsy samples taken before and 6 months after successful IFNα treatment or between pretreatment biopsy samples of 11 IFNα responders and 11 non-responders. A total of 132 differentially up-regulated and 39 down-regulated genes were identified in the pretreated livers of CHB patients. The up-regulated genes were mainly related to cell proliferation and immune response, with IFNγ and B cell signatures significantly enriched. Lower intrahepatic HBV pregenomic RNA levels and 25 predictive genes were identified in IFNα responders. The predictive gene set in responders significantly overlapped with the up-regulated genes associated with the pretreated livers of CHB patients. The mechanisms responsible for IFNα treatment responses are different between HBV and HCV patients. HBV infection evokes significant immune responses even in chronic infection. The up-regulated genes are predictive of responsiveness to IFNα therapy, as are lower intrahepatic levels of HBV pregenomic RNA and pre-activated host immune responses. PMID:27546197

  14. Characteristics of occult hepatitis B virus infection in the Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Takako; Yano, Yoshihiko; Truong, Bui Xuan; Kawabata, Masato; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2011-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is highly endemic in the Solomon Islands. However, little is known about the status of occult HBV infection in the Solomon Islands. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of occult HBV infection and its clinical and virological features in the community of Solomon Islands. Blood samples were collected from a total of 564 asymptomatic individuals aged over 18 years in the Western province. The samples used in the present study consisted of 200 samples from 108 males and 92 females (mean age, 37.4 years; range, 18-71 years) that were randomly selected among the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative samples from all the participants enrolled in this study. HBV-DNA was detected by real-time PCR in 25 (12.5%) of the 200 HBsAg-negative samples. Most of the HBV-DNA-positive individuals were infected with wild-type HBV, and only 3 strains demonstrated specific amino acid substitutions (P121X, T123N, C138S, P142S and D144E) in the α determinant region. In conclusion, occult HBV infection was documented in 12.5% of individuals that demonstrated serologic evidence of resolved HBV infection in this study. The prevalence of occult infection was also influenced by ethnicity; it was more prevalent in Melanesians than Micronesians. In addition, occult HBV infection demonstrated a weak association with the S-variants. PMID:21455562

  15. Naturally occurring hepatitis B virus (HBV) variants with primary resistance to antiviral therapy and S-mutants with potential primary resistance to adefovir in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Cuestas, María L; Rivero, Cintia W; Minassian, María L; Castillo, Amalia I; Gentile, Emiliano A; Trinks, Julieta; León, Liliana; Daleoso, Graciela; Frider, Bernardo; Lezama, Carol; Galoppo, Marcela; Giacove, Gisela; Mathet, Verónica L; Oubiña, José R

    2010-07-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) variants may either emerge in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) as a result of positive selection pressure exerted by their own immune response, or during therapy with nucleos(t)ide analogues (NAs). Naturally occurring HBV variants with primary antiviral resistance are rarely observed. The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze the (eventual) circulation of HBV variants with natural resistance to NAs currently used as therapy for CHB in Argentina. This study reports 13 cases of CHB-infected patients with natural antiviral resistance to at least one NA. Five of them were also carriers of S-variants that might escape the humoral immune system recognition with potential resistance to adefovir. In addition to the already reported A2 HBV subgenotype association to NAs natural resistance, E and F genotypes association to such resistance is described for the first time. These findings suggest that sequence analysis of the HBV reverse transcriptase might be an essential tool before starting antiviral therapy, in order to choose the proper NAs for optimizing the therapeutic management of chronically infected patients. Moreover, the circulation and transmission of S-mutants with resistance to such antiviral drugs should be of public health concern as they may represent an additional risk for the community.

  16. Naturally occurring hepatitis B virus (HBV) variants with primary resistance to antiviral therapy and S-mutants with potential primary resistance to adefovir in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Cuestas, María L; Rivero, Cintia W; Minassian, María L; Castillo, Amalia I; Gentile, Emiliano A; Trinks, Julieta; León, Liliana; Daleoso, Graciela; Frider, Bernardo; Lezama, Carol; Galoppo, Marcela; Giacove, Gisela; Mathet, Verónica L; Oubiña, José R

    2010-07-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) variants may either emerge in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) as a result of positive selection pressure exerted by their own immune response, or during therapy with nucleos(t)ide analogues (NAs). Naturally occurring HBV variants with primary antiviral resistance are rarely observed. The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze the (eventual) circulation of HBV variants with natural resistance to NAs currently used as therapy for CHB in Argentina. This study reports 13 cases of CHB-infected patients with natural antiviral resistance to at least one NA. Five of them were also carriers of S-variants that might escape the humoral immune system recognition with potential resistance to adefovir. In addition to the already reported A2 HBV subgenotype association to NAs natural resistance, E and F genotypes association to such resistance is described for the first time. These findings suggest that sequence analysis of the HBV reverse transcriptase might be an essential tool before starting antiviral therapy, in order to choose the proper NAs for optimizing the therapeutic management of chronically infected patients. Moreover, the circulation and transmission of S-mutants with resistance to such antiviral drugs should be of public health concern as they may represent an additional risk for the community. PMID:20403388

  17. Hepatitis B infection in Vietnam: current issues and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van T T

    2012-03-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major public health problem in Vietnam. Recent studies have found that prevalence of current HBV infection (HBsAg+) ranges from 10% to 20% in the general population and 20% to 40% among injecting drug users and HIV+ patients. However, HBV prevention and control in Vietnam relies heavily on universal infant vaccination program and HBsAg screening for blood donors. Currently, HBV prevention and control is underfunded by the government and receives little support from international agencies. HBV-related liver disease will continue to create a heavy burden for public health in Vietnam in the next several decades unless appropriate interventions are undertaken urgently. Establishment of a national strategy for HBV prevention and control is crucial to develop and implement effective interventions.

  18. Human Ebola virus infection results in substantial immune activation.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Anita K; Akondy, Rama S; Davis, Carl W; Ellebedy, Ali H; Mehta, Aneesh K; Kraft, Colleen S; Lyon, G Marshall; Ribner, Bruce S; Varkey, Jay; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Campbell, Shelley; Ströher, Ute; Damon, Inger; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Ahmed, Rafi

    2015-04-14

    Four Ebola patients received care at Emory University Hospital, presenting a unique opportunity to examine the cellular immune responses during acute Ebola virus infection. We found striking activation of both B and T cells in all four patients. Plasmablast frequencies were 10-50% of B cells, compared with less than 1% in healthy individuals. Many of these proliferating plasmablasts were IgG-positive, and this finding coincided with the presence of Ebola virus-specific IgG in the serum. Activated CD4 T cells ranged from 5 to 30%, compared with 1-2% in healthy controls. The most pronounced responses were seen in CD8 T cells, with over 50% of the CD8 T cells expressing markers of activation and proliferation. Taken together, these results suggest that all four patients developed robust immune responses during the acute phase of Ebola virus infection, a finding that would not have been predicted based on our current assumptions about the highly immunosuppressive nature of Ebola virus. Also, quite surprisingly, we found sustained immune activation after the virus was cleared from the plasma, observed most strikingly in the persistence of activated CD8 T cells, even 1 mo after the patients' discharge from the hospital. These results suggest continued antigen stimulation after resolution of the disease. From these convalescent time points, we identified CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses to several Ebola virus proteins, most notably the viral nucleoprotein. Knowledge of the viral proteins targeted by T cells during natural infection should be useful in designing vaccines against Ebola virus. PMID:25775592

  19. Human Ebola virus infection results in substantial immune activation.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Anita K; Akondy, Rama S; Davis, Carl W; Ellebedy, Ali H; Mehta, Aneesh K; Kraft, Colleen S; Lyon, G Marshall; Ribner, Bruce S; Varkey, Jay; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Campbell, Shelley; Ströher, Ute; Damon, Inger; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Ahmed, Rafi

    2015-04-14

    Four Ebola patients received care at Emory University Hospital, presenting a unique opportunity to examine the cellular immune responses during acute Ebola virus infection. We found striking activation of both B and T cells in all four patients. Plasmablast frequencies were 10-50% of B cells, compared with less than 1% in healthy individuals. Many of these proliferating plasmablasts were IgG-positive, and this finding coincided with the presence of Ebola virus-specific IgG in the serum. Activated CD4 T cells ranged from 5 to 30%, compared with 1-2% in healthy controls. The most pronounced responses were seen in CD8 T cells, with over 50% of the CD8 T cells expressing markers of activation and proliferation. Taken together, these results suggest that all four patients developed robust immune responses during the acute phase of Ebola virus infection, a finding that would not have been predicted based on our current assumptions about the highly immunosuppressive nature of Ebola virus. Also, quite surprisingly, we found sustained immune activation after the virus was cleared from the plasma, observed most strikingly in the persistence of activated CD8 T cells, even 1 mo after the patients' discharge from the hospital. These results suggest continued antigen stimulation after resolution of the disease. From these convalescent time points, we identified CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses to several Ebola virus proteins, most notably the viral nucleoprotein. Knowledge of the viral proteins targeted by T cells during natural infection should be useful in designing vaccines against Ebola virus.

  20. Significance of hepatitis virus infection in the oncogenic initiation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sukowati, Caecilia HC; El-Khobar, Korri E; Ie, Susan I; Anfuso, Beatrice; Muljono, David H; Tiribelli, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Chronic infection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major risk factor in the development of the HCC, independently from excessive alcohol abuse and metabolic disease. Since the biology of HBV and HCV is different, their oncogenic effect may go through different mechanisms, direct and/or indirect. Viral hepatitis infection is associated with cellular inflammation, oxidative stress, and DNA damage, that may lead to subsequent hepatic injuries such as chronic hepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and finally HCC. Direct oncogenic properties of these viruses are related with their genotypic characteristics and the ability of viral proteins to interact with host proteins, thus altering the molecular pathways balance of the cells. In addition, the integration of HBV DNA, especially the gene S and X, in a particular site of the host genome can disrupt chromosomal stability and may activate various oncogenic mechanisms, including those in hematopoietic cells. Recently, several studies also had demonstrated that viral hepatitis could trigger the population of hepatic cancer stem cells. This review summarize available pre-clinical and clinical data in literature regarding oncogenic properties of HBV and HCV in the early initiation of HCC. PMID:26819517

  1. Significance of hepatitis virus infection in the oncogenic initiation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sukowati, Caecilia H C; El-Khobar, Korri E; Ie, Susan I; Anfuso, Beatrice; Muljono, David H; Tiribelli, Claudio

    2016-01-28

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Chronic infection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major risk factor in the development of the HCC, independently from excessive alcohol abuse and metabolic disease. Since the biology of HBV and HCV is different, their oncogenic effect may go through different mechanisms, direct and/or indirect. Viral hepatitis infection is associated with cellular inflammation, oxidative stress, and DNA damage, that may lead to subsequent hepatic injuries such as chronic hepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and finally HCC. Direct oncogenic properties of these viruses are related with their genotypic characteristics and the ability of viral proteins to interact with host proteins, thus altering the molecular pathways balance of the cells. In addition, the integration of HBV DNA, especially the gene S and X, in a particular site of the host genome can disrupt chromosomal stability and may activate various oncogenic mechanisms, including those in hematopoietic cells. Recently, several studies also had demonstrated that viral hepatitis could trigger the population of hepatic cancer stem cells. This review summarize available pre-clinical and clinical data in literature regarding oncogenic properties of HBV and HCV in the early initiation of HCC. PMID:26819517

  2. Antiviral activity of lanatoside C against dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Yan Yi; Chen, Karen Caiyun; Chen, Huixin; Seng, Eng Khuan; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2014-11-01

    Dengue infection poses a serious threat globally due to its recent rapid spread and rise in incidence. Currently, there is no approved vaccine or effective antiviral drug for dengue virus infection. In response to the urgent need for the development of an effective antiviral for dengue virus, the US Drug Collection library was screened in this study to identify compounds with anti-dengue activities. Lanatoside C, an FDA approved cardiac glycoside was identified as a candidate anti-dengue compound. Our data revealed that lanatoside C has an IC50 of 0.19μM for dengue virus infection in HuH-7 cells. Dose-dependent reduction in dengue viral RNA and viral proteins synthesis were also observed upon treatment with increasing concentrations of lanatoside C. Time of addition study indicated that lanatoside C inhibits the early processes of the dengue virus replication cycle. Furthermore, lanatoside C can effectively inhibit all four serotypes of dengue virus, flavivirus Kunjin, alphavirus Chikungunya and Sindbis virus as well as the human enterovirus 71. These findings suggest that lanatoside C possesses broad spectrum antiviral activity against several groups of positive-sense RNA viruses.

  3. High prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus infection in patients with B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Huang; Hsiao, Liang-Tsai; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye; Liu, Jin-Hwang; Gau, Jyh-Pyng; Teng, Hao-Wei; Wang, Wei-Shu; Chao, Ta-Chung; Yen, Chueh-Chuan; Chen, Po-Min

    2008-06-01

    Several reports recently found that patients with B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) had a higher carrier rate of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). The current study aimed to examine the hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection status of NHL patients in Taiwan, an HBV-endemic area. Serum HBV and serum hepatitis C virus were measured in 471 NHL patients and 1,013 non-lymphoma cancer patients enrolled between February 2000 and March 2007. Furthermore, nested polymerase chain reaction of HBV-DNA was used to examine the sera from selected patients in these two populations and healthy volunteers for the presence of occult HBV infection. The infection rates (as indicated by the rates of HBsAg and occult HBV) were compared between different groups. There was a higher incidence of HBV infection in B cell NHL patients (23.5%), especially patients with diffuse large B lymphoma, than solid tumor patients (15.6%, P = 0.001). Among HbsAg-negative patients, those with B cell NHL had a higher prevalence of occult HBV infection (6%) than those with non-lymphoma solid tumors and healthy volunteers, 0% and 0.9%, respectively (P = 0.005). B cell NHL patients, even HBsAg-negative B cell NHL patients, but not T cell NHL patients, have a higher incidence of HBV infection than patients with solid tumors. Our findings support the etiologic role of HBV infection in B cell NHL. PMID:18327583

  4. Prevalence of Sexually Transmitted Viral and Bacterial Infections in HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Men Who Have Sex with Men in Toronto

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juan; Loutfy, Mona R.; Tharao, Wangari; Rebbapragada, Anuradha; Huibner, Sanja; Kesler, Maya; Halpenny, Roberta; Grennan, Troy; Brunetta, Jason; Smith, Graham; Reko, Tatjana; Kaul, Rupert

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV) and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) have been associated with HIV transmission risk and disease progression among gay men and other men who have sex with men (MSM), but the frequency and distribution of STIs in this community in Canada has not been extensively studied. Methods We recruited MSM living with and without HIV from a large primary care clinic in Toronto. Participants completed a detailed socio-behavioural questionnaire using ACASI and provided blood for syphilis, HIV, HBV and HCV, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and type 2 (HSV-2), and human cytomegalovirus (CMV) serology, urine for chlamydia and gonorrhea, and a self-collected anal swab for human papillomavirus (HPV) molecular diagnostics. Prevalences were expressed as a proportion and compared using chi-square. Results 442 MSM were recruited, 294 living with HIV and 148 without. Active syphilis (11.0% vs. 3.4%), ever HBV (49.4% vs. 19.1%), HCV (10.4% vs. 3.4%), HSV-2 (55.9% vs. 38.2%), CMV (98.3% vs. 80.3%) and high-risk (HR) anal HPV (67.6% vs. 51.7%) infections were significantly more common in men living with HIV. Chlamydia and gonorrhea were infrequent in both groups. Regardless of HIV infection status, age and number of lifetime male sexual partners were associated with HBV infection and lifetime injection drug use with HCV infection. Conclusions Syphilis and viral infections, including HBV, HCV, HSV-2, CMV, and HR-HPV, were common in this clinic-based population of MSM in Toronto and more frequent among MSM living with HIV. This argues for the implementation of routine screening, vaccine-based prevention, and education programs in this high-risk population. PMID:27391265

  5. Prevalence of Hepatitis B Co-Infection among HIV Positive Patients: Narrative Review Article

    PubMed Central

    ASKARI, Azam; HAKIMI, Hamid; NASIRI AHMADABADI, Behzad; HASSANSHAHI, Gholamhossein; KAZEMI ARABABADI, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the most prevalent viral infection and is among the leading causes of human liver diseases. Nearly 360 millions of people are world widely infected with prolonged forms of hepatitis B including active and inactive chronic forms. Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) is associated with cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients suffering from congenital and/or acquired immunodeficiency and also following immunosuppressive therapy. The target cell of human acquired immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is CD4 positive T cells. These cells play central role(s) in both cellular and humoral immunity so that the HIV attack of CD4 positive T cells causes suppression of both cell-mediated and humoral immune responses. One of the frequent complications in HIV positive patients is HBV co-infection and as a result, the co-transmission of these viral diseases is common. Due to the paramount importance of the co-infection of HBV and HIV, it is noteworthy to investigate the prevalence of hepatitis B in these patients for planning of an effective therapeutic strategy. Based on these considerations, the main aim of this review article was to collect and analyze the recent and relevant studies regarding the prevalence rate of hepatitis B co-infection among HIV positive patients world widely. PMID:26110141

  6. Virological Characteristics of Acute Hepatitis B in Eastern India: Critical Differences with Chronic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Neelakshi; Pal, Ananya; Das, Dipanwita; Saha, Debraj; Biswas, Avik; Bandopadhayay, Bhaswati; Chakraborti, Mandira; Ghosh, Mrinmoy; Chakravarty, Runu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) manifests high genetic variability and is classifiable into ten genotypes (A-J). HBV infection can lead to variable clinical outcomes, ranging from self-limiting acute hepatitis to active chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The present study characterizes HBV strains circulating among patients with acute (AHB) and chronic HBV infection (CHB). Among a total of 653 HBsAg positive cases, 40 manifested acute infection. After sequencing the surface(S), basal core promoter/pre-core(BCP/PC) and the X gene regions, phylogenetic tree was constructed using MEGA4 by neighbor-joining method. Statistical robustness was established with bootstrap analysis. Nucleotide diversity was determined by Shannon entropy per site using the Entropy program of the Los Alamos National Laboratories. Analyses of acute patients revealed that HBV/D2 is the major circulating sub-genotype and commonly associated with sexual promiscuity and the age group between15-30 years. Comparison of AHB and CHB patients revealed that HBeAg positivity, ALT levels and genotype D were significantly high in AHB, whereas CHB patients were predominantly male, had a high viral load, and were commonly associated with genotype C. The frequencies of mutations in the S, BCP/PC, and X gene were low in AHB as compared to CHB. Drug resistant mutations were not detectable in the polymerase gene of AHB. Average nucleotide diversity in AHB was considerably low as compared to CHB. Further, the highest average ΔH (average difference in entropy between chronic and acute infection) was observed in the BCP/PC region implying that this region was most vulnerable to mutations upon HBV persistence, especially in case of genotype C. Additionally, among all substitutions, the A1762T and G1764A BCP mutations were the strongest indicators of chronicity. In conclusion, the study exhibits a general portrait of HBV strains circulating among acute hepatitis B patients in Eastern India and their

  7. Naturally occurring basal core promoter A1762T/G1764A dual mutations increase the risk of HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zongguo; Zhuang, Liping; Lu, Yunfei; Xu, Qingnian; Tang, Bozong; Chen, Xiaorong

    2016-03-15

    Basal core promoter (BCP) A1762T/G1764A dual mutations in hepatocarcinogenesis remain controversial. Published studies up to June 1, 2015 investigating the frequency of A1762T/G1764A dual mutations from chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), were systematically identified. A total of 10,240 patients with chronic HBV infection, including 3729 HCC cases, were included in 52 identified studies. HCC patients had a higher frequency of BCP A1762T/G1764A dual mutations compared with asymptomatic HBsAg carriers (ASC) and patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and liver cirrhosis (LC) (OR = 5.59, P < 0.00001; OR = 2.87, P < 0.00001; OR = 1.55, P = 0.02, respectively). No statistically significant difference was observed in the frequency of A1762T/G1764A dual mutations in cirrhotic HCC versus non-cirrhotic HCC patients (OR = 2.06, P = 0.05). Chronic HBV-infected patients and HCC patients with genotype B had a significantly lower risk of A1762T/G1764A dual mutations compared with patients with genotype C (OR = 0.30, P < 0.0001 and OR = 0.34, P = 0.04, respectively). In HBV genotype C subjects, A1762T/G1764A dual mutations contributed to significantly higher risk for HCC developing compared with non-mutation ones (OR = 3.47, P < 0.00001). In conclusion, A1762T/G1764A dual mutations increase the risk of HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma, particularly in an HBV genotype C population, even without progression to cirrhosis.

  8. Are Serum Quantitative Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Levels, Liver Histopathology and Viral Loads Related in Chronic Hepatitis B-infected Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Balkan, Ayhan; Namıduru, Mustafa; Balkan, Yasemin; Mete, Ayşe Özlem; Karaoğlan, İlkay; Boşnak, Vuslat Keçik

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Fluctuations in hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA and alanine transaminase (ALT) levels complicate assessment of the phases of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection and correct identification of the inactive HBV carrier state. In this study, we aimed to examine the role of HBsAg quantification (qHBsAg) in the identification of the phases of HBV and to evaluate its association with liver histopathology. Patients and Methods: Inactive HBV carriers (IC) (n = 104) and CHB patients (n = 100) were enrolled in the study. Demographic characteristics of patients were evaluated; biochemical parameters and serum qHBsAg levels were studied, and liver biopsy and histopathology were assessed. Results: Serum qHBsAg levels were found to be significantly low in IC (5150.78 ± 8473.16 IU/mL) compared with the HBeAg-negative CHB (7503.21 ± 8101.41 IU/mL) (P = 0.001) patients. The diagnostic accuracy of qHBsAg to differentiate HBeAg-negative CHB from IC was found to be moderate (c-statistic: 0.695) and the cutoff level for qHBsAg in diagnosis was found as 1625 IU/mL (specificity: 80%; sensitivity: 49%). No correlation was noted between serum qHBsAg level and ALT, histologic activity index (HAI), and fibrosis in IC and CHB. A moderate and positive correlation was observed between the serum qHBsAg level and HBV-DNA in HBeAg-positive CHB patients. Conclusions: Serum qHBsAg levels may prove to be useful in the differentiation between IC and HBeAg-negative CHB when used in conjunction with HBV DNA. Furthermore, patients diagnosed solely on the basis of HBV DNA and ALT may present with higher grade and stage of liver histopathology than expected. PMID:27184639

  9. Massive Activation of Archaeal Defense Genes during Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Voet, Marleen; Sismeiro, Odile; Dillies, Marie-Agnes; Jagla, Bernd; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Sezonov, Guennadi; Forterre, Patrick; van der Oost, John; Lavigne, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Archaeal viruses display unusually high genetic and morphological diversity. Studies of these viruses proved to be instrumental for the expansion of knowledge on viral diversity and evolution. The Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2 (SIRV2) is a model to study virus-host interactions in Archaea. It is a lytic virus that exploits a unique egress mechanism based on the formation of remarkable pyramidal structures on the host cell envelope. Using whole-transcriptome sequencing, we present here a global map defining host and viral gene expression during the infection cycle of SIRV2 in its hyperthermophilic host S. islandicus LAL14/1. This information was used, in combination with a yeast two-hybrid analysis of SIRV2 protein interactions, to advance current understanding of viral gene functions. As a consequence of SIRV2 infection, transcription of more than one-third of S. islandicus genes was differentially regulated. While expression of genes involved in cell division decreased, those genes playing a role in antiviral defense were activated on a large scale. Expression of genes belonging to toxin-antitoxin and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas systems was specifically pronounced. The observed different degree of activation of various CRISPR-Cas systems highlights the specialized functions they perform. The information on individual gene expression and activation of antiviral defense systems is expected to aid future studies aimed at detailed understanding of the functions and interplay of these systems in vivo. PMID:23698312

  10. Intrapleural tissue plasminogen activator and deoxyribonuclease therapy for pleural infection.

    PubMed

    Piccolo, Francesco; Popowicz, Natalia; Wong, Donny; Lee, Yun Chor Gary

    2015-06-01

    Pleural infection remains a global health burden associated with significant morbidity. Drainage of the infected pleural fluid is important but can often be hindered by septations and loculations. Intrapleural fibrinolytic therapy alone, to break pleural adhesions, has shown no convincing advantages over placebo in improving clinical outcome. Deoxyribonucleoprotein from degradation of leukocytes contributes significantly to high viscosity of infected pleural fluid. Recombinant deoxyribonuclease (DNase) is effective in reducing pleural fluid viscosity in pre-clinical studies. The combination of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and DNase was effective in animal model experiments of empyema. The benefits were established in a randomized clinical trial: those (n=48) treated with tPA/DNase had significantly improved radiological outcomes and reduced need of surgery and duration of hospital stay. A longitudinal observational series of 107 patients further confirmed the effectiveness and safety of tPA/DNase therapy, including its use as 'rescue therapy' when patients failed to respond to antibiotics and chest tube drainage. Overall, a short course of intrapleural tPA (10 mg) and DNase (5 mg) therapy provides a cure in over 90% of patients without requiring surgery. The treatment stimulates pleural fluid formation, enhances radiographic clearance and resolution of systemic inflammation. Serious complications are uncommon; pleural bleeding requiring transfusion occurred in ~2% of cases. Pain can occur, especially with the first dose. Treatment is contraindicated in those with significant bleeding diathesis or a bronchopleural fistula. Future research is required to optimize dosing regimens and in refining patient selection. PMID:26150913

  11. Seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis in blood donors in Southern Haryana.

    PubMed

    Arora, Dimple; Arora, Bharti; Khetarpal, Anshul

    2010-01-01

    Blood transfusion is an important mode of transmission of infections to recipients. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of transfusion-transmissible infections among blood donors. For this, a 3.5-year retrospective study, from October 2002 to April 2006 was conducted at the blood transfusion centre of Maharaja Agrasen Medical College, Agroha (Hisar) Haryana. Donors were screened for seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis. A total of 5849 donors were tested, out of which 4010 (68.6%) were replacement donors and 1839 (31.4%) were voluntary donors. The seroprevalence of HIV was 0.3% in the donors. No voluntary donor was found to be positive for HIV. The low sero-positivity among donors is attributed to pre-donation counseling in donor selection. The seroprevalence of HBV, HCV and syphilis was 1.7%, 1.0% and 0.9% respectively in total donors. The seroprevalence of hepatitis and syphilis was more in replacement donors as compared to voluntary donors. PMID:20551540

  12. Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Impact of Isolated Antibody to Hepatitis B Core Antigen and Occult Hepatitis B Virus Infection in HIV-1–Infected Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Khamduang, Woottichai; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Gaudy-Graffin, Catherine; Jourdain, Gonzague; Suwankornsakul, Weerapong; Jarupanich, Tapnarong; Chalermpolprapa, Veeradate; Nanta, Sirisak; Puarattana-aroonkorn, Noossara; Tonmat, Sakchai; Lallemant, Marc; Goudeau, Alain; Sirirungsi, Wasna

    2013-01-01

    Background. Prevalence and risk factors for isolated antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc) and occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection are not well known in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)–infected pregnant women. It is unclear if women with occult infections are at risk of transmitting HBV to their infants. Methods. HIV-1–infected and HBV surface antigen (HBsAg)–negative pregnant women were tested for antibody to HBsAg (anti-HBs) and anti-HBc using enzyme immunoassay. Women with isolated anti-HBc were assessed for occult HBV infection, defined as HBV DNA levels >15 IU/mL, using the Abbott RealTime HBV DNA assay. Infants born to women with isolated anti-HBc and detectable HBV DNA were tested at 4 months of age for HBV DNA. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with isolated anti-HBc and occult HBV infection. Results. Among 1812 HIV-infected pregnant women, 1682 were HBsAg negative. Fourteen percent (95% confidence interval [CI], 12%–15%) of HBsAg-negative women had an isolated anti-HBc that was independently associated with low CD4 count, age >35 years, birth in northern Thailand, and positive anti–hepatitis C virus serology. Occult HBV infection was identified in 24% (95% CI, 18%–30%) of women with isolated anti-HBc, representing 2.6% (95% CI, 1.9%–3.5%) of HIV-1–infected pregnant women, and was inversely associated with HIV RNA levels. None of the women with isolated anti-HBc and occult HBV infection transmitted HBV to their infants. Conclusions. HIV-1–infected pregnant women with isolated anti-HBc and occult HBV infection have very low HBV DNA levels and are thus at very low risk to transmit HBV to their infants. PMID:23487379

  13. Mitral valve repair for active culture positive infective endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Doukas, G; Oc, M; Alexiou, C; Sosnowski, A W; Samani, N J; Spyt, T J

    2006-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical and echocardiographic outcome after mitral valve (MV) repair for active culture positive infective MV endocarditis. Patients and methods Between 1996 and 2004, 36 patients (mean (SD) age 53 (18) years) with positive blood culture up to three weeks before surgery (or positive culture of material removed at operation) and intraoperative evidence of endocarditis underwent MV repair. Staphylococci and streptococci were the most common pathogens. All patients had moderate or severe mitral regurgitation (MR). Mean New York Heart Association (NYHA) class was 2.3 (1.0). Follow up was complete (mean 38 (19) months). Results Operative mortality was 2.8% (one patient). At follow up, endocarditis has not recurred. One patient developed severe recurrent MR and underwent valve replacement and one patient had moderate MR. There were two late deaths, both non‐cardiac. Kaplan‐Meier five year freedom from recurrent moderate to severe MR, freedom from repeat operation, and survival were 94 (4)%, 97 (3)%, and 93 (5)%, respectively. At the most recent review the mean NYHA class was 1.17 (0.3) (p < 0.0001). At the latest echocardiographic evaluation, left atrial diameters, left ventricular end diastolic diameter, and MV diameter were significantly reduced (p < 0.05) compared with preoperative values. Conclusions MV repair for active culture positive endocarditis is associated with low operative mortality and provides satisfactory freedom from recurrent infection, freedom from repeat operation, and survival. Hence, every effort should be made to repair infected MVs and valves should be replaced only when repair is not possible. PMID:15951395

  14. Antimicrobial activity of Lactobacillus against microbial flora of cervicovaginal infections

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Subramanyam; Shouri, Raju Naidu Devanaboyaina; Wudayagiri, Rajendra; Valluru, Lokanatha

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the probiotic nature of Lactobacillus in preventing cervical pathogens by studying the effectiveness of antimicrobial activity against vaginal pathogens. Methods Lactobacilli were isolated from healthy vaginal swabs on selective media and different pathogenic bacteria were isolated by using different selective media. The Lactobacillus strains were tested for the production of hydrogen peroxide and antimicrobial compounds along with probiotic properties. Results Of the 10 isolated Lactobacillus strains, strain 1, 3 and 6 are high hydrogen peroxide producers and the rest were low producers. Results of pH and amines tests indicated that pH increased with fishy odour in the vaginal fluids of cervicovaginal infection patients when compared with vaginal fluids of healthy persons. The isolates were found to be facultative anaerobic, Gram-positive, non-spore-forming, non-capsule forming and catalase-negative bacilli. The results of antimicrobial activity of compounds indicated that 280 and 140 µg/mL was the minimum concentration to inhibit the growth of both pathogens and test organisms respectively. Conclusions The results demonstrated that Lactobacillus producing antimicrobial compounds inhibits the growth of cervical pathogens, revealing that the hypothesis of preventing vaginal infection by administering probiotic organisms has a great appeal to patients, which colonize the vagina to help, restore and maintain healthy vagina.

  15. Enzymatic amplification of hepatitis B virus DNA in serum compared with infectivity testing in chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, P P; Bhat, R A; Seto, B; Mack, D; Sninsky, J; Vyas, G N

    1989-07-01

    The in vivo infectivity titration of hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been biologically standardized in terms of chimpanzee infectious dose (CID50). The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used for in vitro enzymatic amplification of HBV DNA and comparison with CID50. Serial dilutions of human serum specimens containing HBV adw (CID50 10(-7] and ayw (CID50 10(-7.5] were tested to determine the reproducibility and sensitivity of PCR for the detection of HBV DNA. The detection limit of HBV DNA in serum using PCR was 10(-8) for either amplification of HBV DNA extracted from serum or direct amplification of HBV DNA in proteolyzed serum. The amplification efficiency of PCR in proteolysates was not significantly reduced by using a 0.25% concentration (vol/vol) of nonionic detergents and 2.5% concentration (vol/vol) of digested human serum. Thus, PCR is a specific and rapid method for in vitro detection of HBV DNA that is more sensitive than the in vivo infectivity titration of HBV by chimpanzee inoculation. Therefore, if HBV-related DNA cannot be detected by PCR in specimens or biologic products, they probably do not contain infectious HBV.

  16. Occult hepatitis B virus infection of hemodialysis patients: a cross-sectional study in a hepatitis B virus-endemic region.

    PubMed

    Kim, So Mi; Kim, Hyun Woo; Lee, Ji Eun; Lee, Eun Kyoung; Shin, Hyun Deok; Song, Il Han

    2015-01-01

    Occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is defined as the presence of HBV DNA in the liver tissue and/or serum of subjects seronegative for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Occult HBV infection of hemodialysis (HD) patients is informative in terms of virus transmission, reactivation after kidney transplantation, and the progression of liver disease. However, there is little detailed information about occult HBV infection in the context of virus endemicity. We tried to investigate the seroprevalence and clinical features of occult HBV infection in HD patients in HBV-endemic regions. We enrolled a total of 159 HD patients and 121 apparently healthy subjects at Dankook University Hospital and Jeju National University Hospital in Korea. HBsAg, anti-HBs, anti-HBc, and anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Serum levels of HBV DNA were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The seroprevalence of occult HBV infection was 1.3% in HD patients and 2.5% in the healthy controls. This difference was not significant. The HBV load in all subjects with occult infection was <116 copies/mL, and all were positive for IgG anti-HBc, regardless of the presence of anti-HBs. None of the occult HBV-infected subjects were co-infected with HCV. One of the 2 HD patients with occult HBV infection had no history of blood transfusion. In this HBV-endemic region, the seroprevalence of occult HBV infection in HD patients with a very low viral load was not significantly different from that in apparently healthy subjects.

  17. CCR5 on the NK Cells and its Ligand (RANTES) Expressions are Disrupted in South-Eastern Iranian Patients With Chronic Hepatitis B Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaee, Vahid; Shahriari, Jahanbano; Hajghani, Masomeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: CCR5 is a receptor for CCL3 (MIP-1 α), CCL4 (MIP-1 α) and CCL5 (regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES)) and play important roles in recruitment of NK cells to the HBV infected liver. Objectives: The main purpose of this study was to investigate the expression levels of CCR5 on the NK cells and also serum levels of RANTES in chronic HBV infected (CHI) patients. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study 63 CHI patients and 96 healthy controls were evaluated regarding CCR5 expression on the NK cells and serum levels of RANTES using flow cytometry and ELISA techniques, respectively. Real-Time PCR technique also was used for HBV-DNA quantification. Results: The results revealed that CCR5 expressing NK cells and serum levels of RANTES were decreased significantly in the CHI patients in compare to healthy control. Conclusions: Based on the results it can be concluded that NK cells of Iranian CHI patients are unable to express adequate levels of CCR5 and expression levels of RANTES by immune cells also are defected in CHI patients, hence, the migration of NK cells to the infected hepatocytes and HBV eradication from the cells is interrupted. PMID:24910790

  18. Seroepidemiology and occult hepatitis B virus infection in young adults in Banjarmasin, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Darmawan, Erica; Turyadi; El-Khobar, Korri E; Nursanty, Ni Ketut Dias; Thedja, Meta D; Muljono, David Handojo

    2015-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a public health problem in Indonesia. There has been limited data regarding HBV infection in young adult population. This study aimed to evaluate the seroepidemiology of HBV infection and characterize occult HBV variants in healthy young adults in Banjarmasin, Indonesia, who were born before the implementation of the universal infant hepatitis B vaccination. Serum samples of 195 healthy young adults were tested for HBsAg, anti-HBc, and anti-HBs. The prevalence of HBsAg, anti-HBc, and anti-HBs was 9 (4.6%), 62 (31.8%), and 96 (49.2%), respectively. Seventy four (37.9%) samples were seronegative for all three parameters, indicating the susceptibility to HBV infection. Among 66 samples positive for HBsAg and/or anti-HBc, 13 (19.7%) were HBV DNA positive; of these, four were HBsAg positive and nine were HBsAg negative, and categorized as occult HBV infection. Most occult HBV cases had high-level anti-HBs (>100 IU/l), suggesting that blood with positive anti-HBs and anti-HBc could not be regarded as noninfectious. Thirteen amino acid substitutions were identified: T126S, P127S, Q129R, T131N, M133T, and Y161S in the HBsAg-positive group; P120T, T126I, G145S, Y161F, E164V, and V168F in the occult-HBV group; and T143S in both groups. More studies are required to provide data on the prevalence and characteristics of mutants to ensure reliable diagnosis. The occult HBV infection, combined with the HBsAg prevalence, could indicate the high HBV carriage among young adults in this area. The high percentage of individuals susceptible to HBV infection reiterates the need for catch-up immunization strategies targeted at young adults.

  19. A unique seroepidemiological pattern of HBV, HCV and HTLV-I in Nenets and Komi in northwestern Russia.

    PubMed

    Dobrodeeva, Liliya K; Kornienko, Elena B; Petrenya, Nataliya N; Lutfalieva, Gulnara T; Schegoleva, Lyubov S; Demeneva, Ludmila V; Duberman, Boris L; Tkachev, Anatolij V; Chiba, Hitoshi; Senoo, Haruki; Ito, Keiko; Mizoguchi, Emi; Yoshida, Shigeru; Tajima, Kazuo

    2005-01-01

    An epidemiological study of hepatitis viruses type B (HBV) and type C (HCV) and human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) was carried out among 105 residents (male:female=19:86) regarded as Nenets partly mixed with Komi, in the region of Krasnoe, the Nenets Autonomous District of the Arkhangelsk Region, in northwestern Russia in 2004. Blood was drawn from apparently healthy volunteers at ages of 41.6+/-16.5 (range 14-85) years. HBsAg, HBsAb, HBcAb, HBeAb and HCV Ab were measured by microparticle enzyme-immunoassay, and HTLV-I Ab was measured by particle agglutination. Prevalences of HBsAg(+), HBsAb(+), HBcAb(+) and HBeAb(+) were 0.0%, 29.5.%, 20.0% and 7.6%, respectively. The overall HBV infection rate (positive HBsAb or HBcAb) was 34.3%, while no positive HCV or HTLV-I Abs could be detected. A serological subgroup with positive HBsAb and negative HBcAb, consisting of 15(14.3%) females, contrasted sharply to other serological subgroups in sex, age, parent's ethnicity, positive HBeAb rate, and HBcAb inhibition%. We conclude that HBV is prevalent with unique serological patterns among the Nenets, while HCV and HTLV-I infections are negligible.

  20. Molecular alterations in hepatocellular carcinoma associated with hepatitis B and hepatitis C infections

    PubMed Central

    Izzo, Francesco; Buonaguro, Franco M.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic infections with hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C viruses (HCV) are the leading cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) worldwide. Both viruses encode multifunctional regulatory proteins activating several oncogenic pathways, which induce accumulation of multiple genetic alterations in the infected hepatocytes. Gene mutations in HBV- and HCV-induced HCCs frequently impair the TP53, Wnt/b-catenin, RAS/RAF/MAPK kinase and AKT/mTOR pathways, which represent important anti-cancer targets. In this review, we highlight the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of primary liver cancer, with particular emphasis on the host genetic variations identified by high-throughput technologies. In addition, we discuss the importance of genetic alterations, such as mutations in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter, for the diagnosis, prognosis, and tumor stratification for development of more effective treatment approaches. PMID:26943571

  1. Mechanism of Adefovir, Tenofovir and Entecavir Resistance: Molecular Modeling Studies of How A Novel Anti-HBV Agent (FMCA) Can Overcome the Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Rawal, R K; Konreddy, A K; Chu, C K

    2015-01-01

    Regardless of significant improvement in the area of anti-HBV therapy, resistance and cross-resistance against available therapeutic agents are the major consideration in drug discovery of new agents. The present study is to obtain the insight of the molecular basis of drug resistance conferred by the B and C domain mutations of HBV-polymerase on the binding affinity of four anti-HBV agents [Adefovir (ADV), Tenofovir (TNF), Entecavir (ETV) & 2'-Fluoro-6'-methylene-carbocyclic adenosine (FMCA)]. In this regard, homology modeled structure of HBV polymerase was used for minimization, conformational search and Glide XP docking followed by binding energy calculation on wild-type as well as on mutant HBV-polymerases (N236T, L180M+M204V+S202G & A194T). Our studies suggest a significant correlation between the fold resistances and the binding affinity of anti-HBV nucleosides. The domain B residue, L180 is indirectly associated with other active-site hydrophobic residues such as A87, F88 and M204, whereas the domain C residue, M204 is closely associated with sugar/pseudosugar ring positioning in the active site. These hydrophobic residues can directly influence the interaction of the incoming nucleoside triphosphates and change the binding efficacy. The carbohydrate ring part of natural substrate dATP, dGTP, FMCA and ETV, are occupied in similar passion in the grooves of HBV polymerase active site. The exocyclic double bond of Entecavir and FMCA occupies in the backside hydrophobic pocket (made by residues A87, F88, L180and M204), which enhances the overall binding affinity. Additional hydrogen bonding interaction of 2'-fluorine of FMCA with R41 residue of polymerase promotes a positive binding in wild-type as well as in ADVr, ETVr and TNFr with respect to that of entecavir. PMID:26336997

  2. The X protein of hepatitis B virus activates hepatoma cell proliferation through repressing melanoma inhibitory activity 2 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yilin; Yang, Yang; Cai, Yanyan; Liu, Fang; Liu, Yingle; Zhu, Ying; Wu, Jianguo

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrated that HBV represses MIA2 gene expression both invitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The X protein of HBV plays a major role in such regulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knock-down of MIA2 in HepG2 cells activates cell growth and proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBx activates cell proliferation, over-expression of MIA2 impaired such regulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBx activates hepatoma cell proliferation through repressing MIA2 expression. -- Abstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths globally. Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection accounts for over 75% of all HCC cases; however, the molecular pathogenesis of HCC is not well understood. In this study, we found that the expression of the newly identified gene melanoma inhibitory activity 2 (MIA2) was reduced by HBV infection invitro and invivo, and that HBV X protein (HBx) plays a major role in this regulation. Recent studies have revealed that MIA2 is a potential tumor suppressor, and that, in most HCCs, MIA2 expression is down-regulated or lost. We found that the knock-down of MIA2 in HepG2 cells activated cell growth and proliferation, suggesting that MIA2 inhibits HCC cell growth and proliferation. In addition, the over-expression of HBx alone induced cell proliferation, whereas MIA2 over-expression impaired the HBx-mediated induction of proliferation. Taken together, our results suggest that HBx activates hepatoma cell growth and proliferation through repression of the potential tumor suppressor MIA2.

  3. Activation of a Pollenin Promoter upon Nematode Infection

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, M.; de Oliveira Manes, C.-L.; Van Montagu, M.; Gheysen, G.

    2002-01-01

    Three glycine-rich protein genes of Arabidopsis thaliana (Atgrp-6, Atgrp-7, and Atgrp-8) that correspond to putative genes coding for pollenins (AtolnB;2, AtolnB;3, and AtolnB;4, respectively) are expressed predominantly in the anthers and, more specifically, in the tapetum layer. Tapetal cells are responsible for nutrition of developing pollen grains and show some functional similarities to nematode feeding sites (NFS) induced in plant roots by sedentary parasitic nematodes. The aim of this study was to analyze promoter activity of the Atgrp genes in NFS. Transformed Arabidopsis plants containing a promoter-ß-glucuronidase (gus) fusion of the Atgrp-7 gene were inoculated with the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita and the cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii. GUS assays were performed at different time points after infection. Histochemical analysis revealed an up-regulation of Atgrp-7-gus expression 3 days after inoculation in the feeding sites of both nematodes. Maximal Atgrp-7-gus staining levels in NFS were observed 1 week after nematode infection. PMID:19265912

  4. Distribution of Hepatitis B Virus Genotypes in Azerbaijani Patients With Chronic Hepatitis B Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Keyvani, Hossein; Monavari, Seyed Hamidreza; Esghaei, Maryam; Fakhim, Shahin; Ataei Pirkooh, Angila; Behnava, Bita

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been classified into ten genotypes (A-J) based on genome sequence divergence, which is very important for etiological and clinical investigations. HBV genotypes have distinct geographical distributions worldwide. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of HBV genotypes among Azerbaijani patients with chronic hepatitis B, came from the Republic of Azerbaijan country to Iran to receive medical care. Patients and Methods: One hundred and three patients with chronic HBV infection, referred to hospitals related to Iran University of Medical Sciences and Tehran Hepatitis Center from August 2011 to July 2014, were enrolled in this cross sectional study. About 3-milliliter of peripheral blood was taken from each patient. After viral DNA extraction, HBV genotypes were tested using the INNO-LiPA™ HBV kit (Innogenetics, Ghent, Belgium). HBV genotyping was confirmed using sequencing of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and polymerase (pol) regions of HBV. Results: The mean age of patients was 35.9 ± 11.7 years (19-66). Of 103 patients, 72 (69.9%) were male. In the present study, the predominant HBV genotype was D (93.2%) followed by genotype A (5.8%) and concurrent infection with A and D genotypes (0.97%). Conclusions: The main and frequent HBV genotype among Azerbaijani patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection was genotype D followed by genotype A. PMID:25685166

  5. Hepatitis B Virus Infection Does Not Significantly Influence Plasmodium Parasite Density in Asymptomatic Infections in Ghanaian Transfusion Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Freimanis, Graham Lee; Owusu-Ofori, Shirley; Allain, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Background Areas endemic for malaria and Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection largely overlap geographically. A recent study has suggested the existence of an interaction between the two pathogens in symptomatic co-infected individuals on the South-American continent. We examined this issue in a hyperendemic area for both pathogens in sub-Saharan Africa. Methodology and Findings Pre-transfusion samples from a retrospective cohort of 154 blood transfusion recipients were screened for both serological and molecular markers of HBV and Plasmodium genomes using species-specific nested PCR and quantitative real-time PCR. Thirty-seven individuals met exclusion criteria and were subsequently eliminated from further analysis. Of 117 participants, 90% of recipients exhibited evidence of exposure to HBV, 42% with HBsAg and/or HBV DNA and 48% anti-HBc reactive without detectable HBV DNA. Plasmodium genome prevalence by NAT was 50%. Parasitemic individuals were significantly younger than non-parasitemic individuals (P = 0.04). Parasitemia level was not significantly lower in individuals with HBV DNA positive infections compared to those with HBV DNA negative exposures. HBV DNA load was not significantly different in parasitemic and non-parasitemic individuals. Conclusion The data presented suggests that, in sub-Saharan Africa, asymptomatic co-infections with these two ubiquitous pathogens do not appear to significantly affect each other and evolve independently. PMID:23185500

  6. Long-Term Serologic Follow-Up of Isolated Hepatitis B Core Antibody in HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Women

    PubMed Central

    French, Audrey L.; Lin, Michael Y.; Evans, Charlesnika T.; Benning, Lorie; Glesby, Marshall J.; Young, Mary A.; Operskalski, Eva A.; Augenbraun, Michael; Peters, Marion

    2009-01-01

    Background Isolated antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc) is a common serologic finding in persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but the outcome and clinical significance are uncertain. Methods We performed repeated hepatitis B virus (HBV) serologic tests on women who participated in the Women’s Interagency HIV Study and who had isolated anti-HBc at study entry. Results Repeated serologic tests were performed for 322 women (282 HIV-infected and 40 HIV-uninfected) at a median of 7.5 years after study entry. Seventy-one percent of women retained isolated anti-HBc serologic status, 20% acquired antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs), and 2% acquired hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). In unadjusted analysis, increasing age, injection drug use, and hepatitis C viremia were negatively associated with acquisition of anti-HBs. For HIV-infected women, predictors of acquisition of anti-HBs were an increase in CD4 cell count and the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Receipt of drugs with activity against HBV and self-reported HBV vaccination did not predict anti-HBs acquisition. In the multivariable regression model, HAART use remained a significant predictor of anti-HBs acquisition, whereas women with hepatitis C viremia were more likely to retain isolated anti-HBc serologic status. Conclusions Isolated anti-HBc status remained stable over time for the majority of women, especially women with chronic hepatitis C virus infection. Development of anti-HBs was predicted by HAART use and an increase in CD4 cell count. We conclude that a proportion of HIV-infected women with isolated anti-HBc have prior natural HBV infection with anti-HBs that is at an undetectable level because of immune dysfunction. Isolated anti-HBc in the presence of chronic hepatitis C virus infection may be attributable to a different phenomenon, such as dysfunctional antibody production. PMID:19480573

  7. T cell receptor-therapy in HBV-related hepatocellularcarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bertoletti, Antonio; Brunetto, Maurizia; Maini, Mala K; Bonino, Ferruccio; Qasim, Waseem; Stauss, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of lymphocytes expressing engineered T cell receptors (TCR) is a promising option for cancer treatment and could include hepatocellularcarcinoma (HCC), where therapeutic options are limited. We have recently investigated whether hepatitis B viral antigens can act as a HCC-specific antigen and thus be targeted by adoptively transferred HBV-specific TCR redirected T cells. PMID:26155416

  8. New universal primers for genotyping and resistance detection of low HBV DNA levels.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yongqing; Liu, Bei; Liu, Hui; Zheng, Hongyun; Gu, Jian; Liu, Hang; Lin, Min; Ding, Yali; Song, Chunhua; Li, Yan

    2016-08-01

    HBV (hepatitis B virus) genotyping is important in determining the clinical manifestation of disease and treatment response, particularly, in patients with low viral loads. Also, sensitive detection of HBV antiviral drug resistance mutations is essential for monitoring therapy response.Asensitive direct sequencing method for genotyping and the drug resistance mutation detection of low levels of HBV DNA in patients' plasma is developed by PCR amplification of the DNA with novel universal primers.The novel, common, and universal primers were identified by alignment of RT region of all the HBV DNA sequences in databases. These primers could efficiently amplify the RT region of HBV virus at low DNA levels by directly sequencing the resulting PCR products, and mapping with the reference sequence made it possible to clearly obtain the HBV subtypes and identify the resistance mutations in the samples with HBV DNA level as low as 20 IU/mL. We examined the reliability of the method in clinical samples, and found it could detect the HBV subtypes and drug resistance mutations in 80 clinical HBV samples with low HBV DNA levels ranging from 20 to 200 IU/mL.This method is a sensitive and reliable direct sequencing method for HBV genotyping and antiviral drug resistance mutation detection, and is helpful for efficiently monitoring the response to therapy in HBV patients. PMID:27537600

  9. New universal primers for genotyping and resistance detection of low HBV DNA levels.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yongqing; Liu, Bei; Liu, Hui; Zheng, Hongyun; Gu, Jian; Liu, Hang; Lin, Min; Ding, Yali; Song, Chunhua; Li, Yan

    2016-08-01

    HBV (hepatitis B virus) genotyping is important in determining the clinical manifestation of disease and treatment response, particularly, in patients with low viral loads. Also, sensitive detection of HBV antiviral drug resistance mutations is essential for monitoring therapy response.Asensitive direct sequencing method for genotyping and the drug resistance mutation detection of low levels of HBV DNA in patients' plasma is developed by PCR amplification of the DNA with novel universal primers.The novel, common, and universal primers were identified by alignment of RT region of all the HBV DNA sequences in databases. These primers could efficiently amplify the RT region of HBV virus at low DNA levels by directly sequencing the resulting PCR products, and mapping with the reference sequence made it possible to clearly obtain the HBV subtypes and identify the resistance mutations in the samples with HBV DNA level as low as 20 IU/mL. We examined the reliability of the method in clinical samples, and found it could detect the HBV subtypes and drug resistance mutations in 80 clinical HBV samples with low HBV DNA levels ranging from 20 to 200 IU/mL.This method is a sensitive and reliable direct sequencing method for HBV genotyping and antiviral drug resistance mutation detection, and is helpful for efficiently monitoring the response to therapy in HBV patients.

  10. The stability analysis of a general viral infection model with distributed delays and multi-staged infected progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinliang; Liu, Shengqiang

    2015-01-01

    We investigate an in-host model with general incidence and removal rate, as well as distributed delays in virus infections and in productions. By employing Lyapunov functionals and LaSalle's invariance principle, we define and prove the basic reproductive number R0 as a threshold quantity for stability of equilibria. It is shown that if R0 > 1 , then the infected equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable, while if R0 ⩽ 1 , then the infection free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable under some reasonable assumptions. Moreover, n + 1 distributed delays describe (i) the time between viral entry and the transcription of viral RNA, (ii) the n - 1 -stage time needed for activated infected cells between viral RNA transcription and viral release, and (iii) the time necessary for the newly produced viruses to be infectious (maturation), respectively. The model can describe the viral infection dynamics of many viruses such as HIV-1, HCV and HBV.

  11. High occurrence of HBV among STD clinic attenders in Bombay, India.

    PubMed

    Kura, M M; Hira, S; Kohli, M; Dalal, P J; Ramnani, V K; Jagtap, M R

    1998-04-01

    The pattern of sexually transmitted disease (STD) is the basis for designing surveillance of specific STD, their trends and syndromic management protocols. Two hundred and fifteen consecutive first-time STD clinic attenders at a teaching hospital in Bombay were recruited for the study in October 1995. Thorough clinical examination and the following investigations were done: wet mount, Gram stain, Giemsa stain, modified Thayer-Martin (MTM) medium culture, Fontana stain, Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL), Treponema pallidium haemagglutination test (TPHA), HBsAg and HIV. Ulcerative STD constituted 73.5% of total STD while 15.8% were discharges and 10.2% were genital growths. Ulcers in decreasing order of frequency were chancroid (51.9%), genital herpes (29.1%) and syphilis (14.5). 76.5% of genital discharges were due to gonococcal infection. The high rate of ulcerative STD is possibly an important co-factor for the high HIV prevalence of 31.2% in Bombay. Of 182 patients tested for HBV, 16 (8.8%) were reactive for HBsAg, revealing a high prevalence among STD attenders. A high co-relation of HBsAg positive with either HIV or VDRL requires urgent attention for HBV intervention strategies in this population. PMID:9598752

  12. Chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    All providers, regardless of specialty, should perform screening for HBV on high-risk persons, especially those born in endemic countries. The primary care physician can perform the initial evaluation and follow-up of patients with chronic HBV by following the algorithm in this article and consulting with specialists when appropriate. Chronically infected patients should be followed on a regular basis, preferably every 6 months, with liver function tests, and when appropriate, HBV DNA levels. Those who meet the criteria for high risk for HCC should undergo liver ultrasound every 6 months. Powerful antiviral medications are available that can suppress but not cure HBV and result in resolution of liver inflammation and fibrosis, even cirrhosis, as well as decrease the risk of developing HCC. They should be used in those patients who meet the criteria outlined in the practice guidelines of the major liver societies. PMID:24266913

  13. Chronic hepatitis B virus infection and rubella susceptibility in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Lao, T T-H; Sahota, D S; Suen, S S H; Lau, T K; Leung, T Y

    2010-10-01

    Increased rubella susceptibility has been shown in subjects from the Asian-Pacific region where chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is endemic. This study was performed to explore the relationship between chronic HBV infection and rubella susceptibility in the obstetric population. We conducted a retrospective cohort study on 50556 pregnant women delivered in a university obstetric unit from January 1998 to June 2008. The incidence of rubella susceptibility according to maternal HBV carrier status was examined. HBV infection and rubella susceptibility were found in 5105 (10.1%) and 6102 (12.1%) women, respectively. Rubella susceptibility was more common in women with HBV (13.1%vs 12.0%, P = 0.017), even after adjusting for other confounding factors (odds ratio 1.11, 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.21). Advancing age was associated with progressively decreasing odds of rubella susceptibility, from 0.48 at age 20-24 years to 0.34 at age ≥ 40 years in women without HBV infection, but had no effect in women with hepatitis B. In conclusion, our study is the first to demonstrate an association between chronic HBV infection with rubella susceptibility. Further studies are warranted to confirm whether chronic HBV infection, especially that acquired by vertical transmission, may impair the immune response to rubella vaccine or natural infection throughout the reproductive age. PMID:20002301

  14. Genotyping hepatitis B virus dual infections using population-based sequence data.

    PubMed

    Beggel, Bastian; Neumann-Fraune, Maria; Döring, Matthias; Lawyer, Glenn; Kaiser, Rolf; Verheyen, Jens; Lengauer, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) is classified into distinct genotypes A-H that are characterized by different progression of hepatitis B and sensitivity to interferon treatment. Previous computational genotyping methods are not robust enough regarding HBV dual infections with different genotypes. The correct classification of HBV sequences into the present genotypes is impaired due to multiple ambiguous sequence positions. We present a computational model that is able to identify and genotype inter- and intragenotype dual infections using population-based sequencing data. Model verification on synthetic data showed 100 % accuracy for intergenotype dual infections and 36.4 % sensitivity in intragenotype dual infections. Screening patient sera (n = 241) revealed eight putative cases of intergenotype dual infection (one A-D, six A-G and one D-G) and four putative cases of intragenotype dual infection (one A-A, two D-D and one E-E). Clonal experiments from the original patient material confirmed three out of three of our predictions. The method has been integrated into geno2pheno([hbv]), an established web-service in clinical use for analysing HBV sequence data. It offers exact and detailed identification of HBV genotypes in patients with dual infections that helps to optimize antiviral therapy regimens. geno2pheno([hbv]) is available under http://www.genafor.org/g2p_hbv/index.php.

  15. Transcriptional activation of homologous and heterologous genes by the hepatitis B virus X gene product in cells permissive for viral replication.

    PubMed Central

    Colgrove, R; Simon, G; Ganem, D

    1989-01-01

    The potential of the hepadnavirus X gene product to activate gene expression in trans was tested through a series of cotransfections of X expression vectors with a variety of potential targets for transactivation. The X gene products from human hepatitis B virus (HBV), woodchuck hepatitis virus, and ground squirrel hepatitis virus are all equally active in augmenting the expression of a wide array of target promoters in both permissive and nonpermissive cells. Using the HBV genome itself as the source of X protein, we demonstrate that transactivation of HBV and heterologous genes occurs when X protein is expressed in its native state during productive infection of permissive cells. Run-on transcription analysis indicates that this transactivation occurs at the level of primary transcription. Images PMID:2788226

  16. Humic acid inhibits HBV-induced autophagosome formation and induces apoptosis in HBV-transfected Hep G2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Kishor; Yadav, Ajay K.; Gupta, Parul; Rathore, Abhishek Singh; Nayak, Baibaswata; Venugopal, Senthil K.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) utilizes several mechanisms to survive in the host cells and one of the main pathways being autophagosome formation. Humic acid (HA), one of the major components of Mineral pitch, is an Ayurvedic medicinal food, commonly used by the people of the Himalayan regions of Nepal and India for various body ailments. We hypothesized that HA could induce cell death and inhibit HBV-induced autophagy in hepatic cells. Incubation of Hep G2.2.1.5 cells (HepG2 cells stably expressing HBV) with HA (100 μM) inhibited both cell proliferation and autophagosome formation significantly, while apoptosis induction was enhanced. Western blot results showed that HA incubation resulted in decreased levels of beclin-1, SIRT-1 and c-myc, while caspase-3 and β-catenin expression were up-regulated. Western blot results showed that HA significantly inhibited the expression of HBx (3-fold with 50 μM and 5-fold with 100 μM) compared to control cells. When HA was incubated with HBx-transfected Hep G2 cells, HBx-induced autophagosome formation and beclin-1 levels were decreased. These data showed that HA induced apoptosis and inhibited HBV-induced autophagosome formation and proliferation in hepatoma cells. PMID:27708347

  17. Infection.

    PubMed

    Miclau, Theodore; Schmidt, Andrew H; Wenke, Joseph C; Webb, Lawrence X; Harro, Janette M; Prabhakara, Ranjani; Shirtliff, Mark E

    2010-09-01

    Musculoskeletal infection is a clinical problem with significant direct healthcare costs. The prevalence of infection after closed, elective surgery is frequently estimated to be less than 2%, but in severe injuries, posttraumatic infection rates have been reported as 10% or greater. Although clinical infections are found outside the realm of medical devices, it is clear that the enormous increase of infections associated with the use of implants presents a major challenge worldwide. This review summarizes recent advances in the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of musculoskeletal infections.

  18. Infection of lymphocytes by a virus that aborts cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity and establishes persistent infection

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    For viruses to establish persistent infections in their hosts, they must possess some mechanism for evading clearance by the immune system. When inoculated into adult immunocompetent mice, wild-type lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV ARM) induces a CD8(+)-mediated cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response that clears the infection within 7-14 d (CTL+ [P-]). By contrast, variant viruses isolated from lymphoid tissues of persistently infected mice fail to induce a CTL response and are thus able to establish a persistent infection in adult mice (CTL- [P+]). This report compares the interaction of CTL+ (P-) and CTL- (P+) viruses with cells of the immune system. Both types of virus initially bind to 2-4% of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes and replicate within cells of both subsets. The replication of CTL- (P+) and CTL+ (P-) viruses in lymphocytes in vivo is similar for the first 5 d after initiating infection. Thereafter, in mice infected with CTL- (P+) variants, lymphocytes retain viral genetic information, and infectious virus can be recovered throughout the animals' lives. In contrast, when adult mice are infected with wild-type CTL+ (P-) LCMV ARM, virus is not recovered from lymphocytes for greater than 7 d after infection. A CD8(+)-mediated anti-LCMV CTL response is induced in such mice. Clearance of infected lymphocytes is produced by these LCMV-specific CTLs, as shown by their ability to lyse lymphocytes expressing LCMV determinants in vitro and the fact that depletion of CD8+ lymphocytes before infection with CTL+ (P-) viruses results in levels of infected lymphocytes similar to those found in undepleted CTL- (P+)-infected mice. Hence, CTL-mediated lysis of T lymphocytes carrying infectious virus is a critical factor determining whether virus persists or the infection is terminated. PMID:1905339

  19. MicroRNA-122 as a predictor of HBsAg seroclearance in hepatitis B and C dual infected patients treated with interferon and ribavirin

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Yi-Hao; Huang, Chao-Min; Wei, Kuo-Liang; Wang, Jing-Houng; Lu, Sheng-Nan; Lee, Chuan-Mo; Hung, Chao-Hung; Chen, Chien-Hung; Tseng, Po-Lin; Chang, Kuo-Chin; Tsai, Ming-Chao; Lin, Ming-Tsung; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Yang, Cheng-Hong; Moi, Sin-Hua; Cho, Chung-Lung; Hu, Tsung-Hui

    2016-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that microRNA-122 (miR-122) plays key roles in the modulation of hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication. This study examined the role of miR-122 in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-HBV dual infection with active hepatitis C who received pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin dual therapy. We enrolled 121 patients with HCV-HBV dual infection after dual therapy. Stored serum was collected before treatment. RT-PCR was used to analyze miR-122. HBsAg seroclearance was noted in 37 (30.1%) cases during a median follow-up period of 5.4 years. miR-122 was significantly lower in HBsAg seroclearance patients than in non-HBsAg seroclearance patients (P < 0.014). Multivariate analysis showed that miR-122 was an independent factor of HBsAg seroclearance (OR: 0.30, 95% CI: 0.09–0.98, P = 0.046). miR-122 was significantly higher in patients who were qHBsAg > 100 IU/mL versus ≤100 IU/mL (P < 0.001). We concluded that in patients with HBV-HCV dual infection with active hepatitis C, miR-122 was associated with HBsAg seroclearance after therapy and qHBsAg level before therapy, indicating that miR-122 plays key roles in modulating HBV replication. PMID:27665934

  20. How the heterogeneous infection rate effect on the epidemic spreading in activity-driven network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dun; Li, Dandan; Chen, Chao; Sun, Mei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we research the impact of the heterogeneous infection rate on the epidemic spread in the activity-driven networks. By using the mean field approximation, the epidemic threshold is theoretically obtained. Several immunization strategies that could curb the epidemic spread are presented. Based on the theoretical analysis and simulation results, we obtain that the epidemic would be prevented effectively if the infection rate strongly correlates with the individual activity. However, if infection rate has a little correlation with the individual activity, most of the individuals may be infected. In addition, the epidemic can be suppressed soon if the individuals with high activity are immunized preferentially.

  1. Hepatitis B virus efficiently infects non-adherent hepatoma cells via human sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide

    PubMed Central

    Okuyama-Dobashi, Kaori; Kasai, Hirotake; Tanaka, Tomohisa; Yamashita, Atsuya; Yasumoto, Jun; Chen, Wenjia; Okamoto, Toru; Maekawa, Shinya; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Ryo, Akihide; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Moriishi, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) has been reported as a functional receptor for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. However, HBV could not efficiently infect HepG2 cells expressing NTCP (NTCP-HepG2 cells) under adherent monolayer-cell conditions. In this study, NTCP was mainly detected in the basolateral membrane region, but not the apical site, of monolayer NTCP-HepG2 cells. We hypothesized that non-adherent cell conditions of infection would enhance HBV infectivity. Non-adherent NTCP-HepG2 cells were prepared by treatment with trypsin and EDTA, which did not degrade NTCP in the membrane fraction. HBV successfully infected NTCP-HepG2 cells at a viral dose 10 times lower in non-adherent phase than in adherent phase. Efficient infection of non-adherent NTCP-HepG2 cells with blood-borne or cell-culture-derived HBV was observed and was remarkably impaired in the presence of the myristoylated preS1 peptide. HBV could also efficiently infect HepaRG cells under non-adherent cell conditions. We screened several compounds using our culture system and identified proscillaridin A as a potent anti-HBV agent with an IC50 value of 7.2 nM. In conclusion, non-adherent host cell conditions of infection augmented HBV infectivity in an NTCP-dependent manner, thus providing a novel strategy to identify anti-HBV drugs and investigate the mechanism of HBV infection. PMID:26592202

  2. Hepatitis B virus efficiently infects non-adherent hepatoma cells via human sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Okuyama-Dobashi, Kaori; Kasai, Hirotake; Tanaka, Tomohisa; Yamashita, Atsuya; Yasumoto, Jun; Chen, Wenjia; Okamoto, Toru; Maekawa, Shinya; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Ryo, Akihide; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Moriishi, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) has been reported as a functional receptor for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. However, HBV could not efficiently infect HepG2 cells expressing NTCP (NTCP-HepG2 cells) under adherent monolayer-cell conditions. In this study, NTCP was mainly detected in the basolateral membrane region, but not the apical site, of monolayer NTCP-HepG2 cells. We hypothesized that non-adherent cell conditions of infection would enhance HBV infectivity. Non-adherent NTCP-HepG2 cells were prepared by treatment with trypsin and EDTA, which did not degrade NTCP in the membrane fraction. HBV successfully infected NTCP-HepG2 cells at a viral dose 10 times lower in non-adherent phase than in adherent phase. Efficient infection of non-adherent NTCP-HepG2 cells with blood-borne or cell-culture-derived HBV<