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Sample records for active heat production

  1. The Chemistry of Self-Heating Food Products: An Activity for Classroom Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.; Pinto, Gabriel; Llorens-Molina, Juan Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Two commercial self-heating food products have been used to apply chemical concepts such as stoichiometry, enthalpies of reactions and solutions, and heat transfer in a classroom activity. These products are the self-heating beverages sold in Europe and the Meals, Ready to Eat or MREs used primarily by the military in the United States. The main…

  2. Hyperthyroidism increases the uncoupled ATPase activity and heat production by the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Ana Paula; Da-Silva, Wagner S; Carvalho, Denise P; De Meis, Leopoldo

    2003-01-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase is able to modulate the distribution of energy released during ATP hydrolysis, so that a portion of energy is used for Ca2+ transport (coupled ATPase activity) and a portion is converted into heat (uncoupled ATPase activity). In this report it is shown that T4 administration to rabbits promotes an increase in the rates of both the uncoupled ATPase activity and heat production in sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles, and that the degree of activation varies depending on the muscle type used. In white muscles hyperthyroidism promotes a 0.8-fold increase of the uncoupled ATPase activity and in red muscle a 4-fold increase. The yield of vesicles from hyperthyroid muscles is 3-4-fold larger than that obtained from normal muscles; thus the rate of heat production by the Ca2+-ATPase expressed in terms of g of muscle in hyperthyroidism is increased by a factor of 3.6 in white muscles and 12.0 in red muscles. The data presented suggest that the Ca2+-ATPase uncoupled activity may represent one of the heat sources that contributes to the enhanced thermogenesis noted in hyperthyroidism. PMID:12887329

  3. Enhancing methane production from waste activated sludge using combined free nitrous acid and heat pre-treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qilin; Jiang, Guangming; Ye, Liu; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2014-10-15

    Methane production from anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) is often limited by the slow degradation and poor substrate availability of WAS. Our previous study revealed that WAS pre-treatment using free nitrous acid (FNA, i.e. HNO2) is an economically feasible and environmentally friendly method for promoting methane production. In order to further improve methane production from WAS, this study presents a novel strategy based on combined FNA and heat pre-treatment. WAS from a full-scale plant was treated for 24 h with FNA alone (0.52-1.43 mg N/L at 25 °C), heat alone (35, 55 and 70 °C), and FNA (0.52-1.11 mg N/L) combined with heat (35, 55 and 70 °C). The pre-treated WAS was then used for biochemical methane potential tests. Compared to the control (no FNA or heat pre-treatment of WAS), biochemical methane potential of the pre-treated WAS was increased by 12-16%, 0-6%, 17-26%, respectively; hydrolysis rate was improved by 15-25%, 10-25%, 20-25%, respectively, for the three types of pre-treatment. Heat pre-treatment at 55 and 70 °C, independent of the presence or absence of FNA, achieved approximately 4.5 log inactivation of pathogens (in comparison to ∼1 log inactivation with FNA treatment alone), thus capable of producing Class A biosolids. The combined FNA and heat pre-treatment is an economically and environmentally attractive technology for the pre-treatment of WAS prior to anaerobic digestion, particularly considering that both FNA and heat can be produced as by-products of anaerobic sludge digestion.

  4. Active microchannel heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Roberts, Gary L [West Richland, WA; Call, Charles J [Pasco, WA; Wegeng, Robert S [Richland, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an active microchannel heat exchanger with an active heat source and with microchannel architecture. The microchannel heat exchanger has (a) an exothermic reaction chamber; (b) an exhaust chamber; and (c) a heat exchanger chamber in thermal contact with the exhaust chamber, wherein (d) heat from the exothermic reaction chamber is convected by an exothermic reaction exhaust through the exhaust chamber and by conduction through a containment wall to the working fluid in the heat exchanger chamber thereby raising a temperature of the working fluid. The invention is particularly useful as a liquid fuel vaporizer and/or a steam generator for fuel cell power systems, and as a heat source for sustaining endothermic chemical reactions and initiating exothermic reactions.

  5. Activation of Heat Shock and Antioxidant Responses by the Natural Product Celastrol: Transcriptional Signatures of a Thiol-targeted Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Trott, Amy; West, James D.; Klaić, Lada; Westerheide, Sandy D.; Silverman, Richard B.; Morimoto, Richard I.

    2008-01-01

    Stress response pathways allow cells to sense and respond to environmental changes and adverse pathophysiological states. Pharmacological modulation of cellular stress pathways has implications in the treatment of human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. The quinone methide triterpene celastrol, derived from a traditional Chinese medicinal herb, has numerous pharmacological properties, and it is a potent activator of the mammalian heat shock transcription factor HSF1. However, its mode of action and spectrum of cellular targets are poorly understood. We show here that celastrol activates Hsf1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae at a similar effective concentration seen in mammalian cells. Transcriptional profiling revealed that celastrol treatment induces a battery of oxidant defense genes in addition to heat shock genes. Celastrol activated the yeast Yap1 oxidant defense transcription factor via the carboxy-terminal redox center that responds to electrophilic compounds. Antioxidant response genes were likewise induced in mammalian cells, demonstrating that the activation of two major cell stress pathways by celastrol is conserved. We report that celastrol's biological effects, including inhibition of glucocorticoid receptor activity, can be blocked by the addition of excess free thiol, suggesting a chemical mechanism for biological activity based on modification of key reactive thiols by this natural product. PMID:18199679

  6. Pulsed nanosecond discharge in air at high specific deposited energy: fast gas heating and active particle production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, N. A.

    2016-08-01

    The results of a numerical study on kinetic processes initiated by a pulsed nanosecond discharge in air at high specific deposited energy, when the dissociation degree of oxygen molecules is high, are presented. The calculations of the temporal dynamics of the electron concentration, density of atomic oxygen, vibrational distribution function of nitrogen molecules, and gas temperature agree with the experimental data. It is shown that quenching of electronically excited states of nitrogen N2(B3Πg), N2(C3Πu), N2(a‧1 Σ \\text{u}- ) by oxygen molecules leads to the dissociation of O2. This conclusion is based on the comparison of calculated dynamics of atomic oxygen in air, excited by a pulsed nanosecond discharge, with experimental data. In air plasma at a high dissociation degree of oxygen molecules ([O]/[O2] > 10%), relaxation of the electronic energy of atoms and molecules in reactions with O atoms becomes extremely important. Active production of NO molecules and fast gas heating in the discharge plasma due to the quenching of electronically excited N2(B3Πg, C3Πu, a‧1 Σ \\text{u}- ) molecules by oxygen atoms is notable. Owing to the high O atom density, electrons are effectively detached from negative ions in the discharge afterglow. As a result, the decay of plasma in the afterglow is determined by electron-ion recombination, and the electron density remains relatively high between the pulses. An increase in the vibrational temperature of nitrogen molecules at the periphery of the plasma channel at time delay t = 1-30 μs after the discharge is obtained. This is due to intense gas heating and, as a result, gas-dynamic expansion of a hot gas channel. Vibrationally excited N2(v) molecules produced near the discharge axis move from the axial region to the periphery. Consequently, at the periphery the vibrational temperature of nitrogen molecules is increased.

  7. Effects of two different dietary fermentable carbohydrates on activity and heat production in group-housed growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Rijnen, M M J A; Verstegen, M W A; Heetkamp, M J W; Schrama, J W

    2003-05-01

    The effects of two sources of dietary fiber (DF) on behavior and heat production (HP) in group-housed growing pigs were studied. Twenty clusters of 14 barrows (50 kg) were fed one of 10 diets. Diets differed mainly in type and content of fermentable DF (fDF) and in content of digestible starch. Five diets contained solvent-extracted coconut meal (SECM) and five diets contained soybean hulls (SBH) as the main fDF source. On an as-fed basis, pigs received 3.5, 13.2, 23.0, 32.7, or 42.4 g x kg(-0.75) x d(-1) of SECM or SBH. A total of 280 crossbred growing pigs were used, divided into clusters of 14 pigs each. Pigs were group-housed and fed at 2.5 times the assumed maintenance energy requirements. All clusters were fed similar amounts of NE, ileal-digestible protein and amino acids, vitamins, and minerals. Consequently, DMI differed among diets because NE content decreased with increasing DF content. After a 32-d preliminary period, HP was measured per cluster during a 7-d experimental period in environmentally controlled respiration chambers. Behavior of the pigs was recorded using time-lapse video recordings during two different days within the experimental period. Intake of digestible starch and fDF was different (P < 0.001) among diets, whereas intake of digestible CP was similar among diets. On average, pigs spent 153 min standing, 42 min sitting, 202 min lying on their chest, and 1,043 min lying on their flanks each day. Pigs fed SECM diets spent, on average, less time (P < 0.05) lying on their chest than pigs fed SBH diets. Total time spent on physical activity (i.e., standing plus sitting, 195 min/d) was not affected by diet. Total HP and resting HP were affected by diet and were on average lower (P < 0.01) for pigs fed SECM diets than for pigs fed SBH diets. Activity-related heat production (AHP) averaged 65 kJ x kg(-0.75) x d(-1) and was not affected by diet. There was a linear relationship (P < 0.001) between fDF intake and HP, but there was no relationship

  8. Radiogenic heat production in the continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaupart, Claude; Mareschal, Jean-Claude; Iarotsky, Lidia

    2016-10-01

    , suggesting an intrinsic thermal control on crustal thickness and heat production distribution. Crustal thickening by more than about 10 km above this mean value induces changes of gravitational potential energy that exceed the strength of the lithosphere. For several provinces where strong constraints on heat production are available, it is shown that, prior to intracrustal fractionation, only modest amounts of thickening were needed to generate the conditions of ultra-high temperature metamorphism. The tell-tale signature of crustal heat production is anatectic and metamorphic events that lag the cessation of orogenic activity by several tens of million years. Crustal heat production is decreasing with time because it is due to the radioactive decay of Uranium Thorium and Potassium. Its rundown is responsible for the secular cooling of lithospheric roots at a typical rate of about 100 K Gy - 1, implying complex thermal interactions with a convecting mantle that is not cooling at the same rate.

  9. Inhibitory effects of sesquiterpenes from bay leaf on nitric oxide production in lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages: structure requirement and role of heat shock protein induction.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, H; Kagerura, T; Toguchida, I; Ueda, H; Morikawa, T; Yoshikawa, M

    2000-04-21

    The methanolic extract from the leaves of Laurus nobilis (bay leaf, laurel) was found to inhibit nitric oxide (NO) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated mouse peritoneal macrophages. Through bioassay-guided separation, fourteen known sesquiterpenes were isolated from the active fraction and were examined for ability to inhibit the NO production. Seven sesquiterpene lactones (costunolide, dehydrocostus lactone, eremanthine, zaluzanin C, magnolialide, santamarine and spirafolide) potently inhibited LPS-induced NO production (IC50 = 1.2 approximately 3.8 microM). Other sesquiterpene constituents also showed the inhibitory activity (IC50 > or = 21 microM), but their inhibitory activities were less than those of sesquiterpene lactones. Alpha-methylene-gamma-butyrolactone also showed inhibitory activity (IC50 = 9.6 microM), while mokko lactone and watsonol A etc., reductants of the alpha-methylene-gamma-butyrolactone moiety by NaBH4 or DIBAL, and a 2-mercaptoethanol adduct of dehydrocostus lactone showed little activity (IC50 > or = 18 microM). These results indicated that the alpha-methylene-gamma-butyrolactone moiety is important for the activity. Furthermore, costunolide and dehydrocostus lactone inhibited inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) induction in accordance with induction of heat shock protein 72 (HSP 72). These results suggested that, as one of their mechanisms of action, sesquiterpene lactones induce HSP 72 thereby preventing nuclear factor-kappaB activation followed by iNOS induction.

  10. Fusion production of solid dispersions containing a heat-sensitive active ingredient by hot melt extrusion and Kinetisol dispersing.

    PubMed

    Dinunzio, James C; Brough, Chris; Hughey, Justin R; Miller, Dave A; Williams, Robert O; McGinity, James W

    2010-02-01

    Many techniques for the production of solid dispersions rely on elevated temperatures and prolonged material residence times, which can result in decomposition of temperature-sensitive components. In this study, hydrocortisone was used as a model temperature-sensitive active ingredient to study the effect of formulation and processing techniques as well as to characterize the benefits of KinetiSol Dispersing for the production of solid dispersions. Preformulation studies were conducted using differential scanning calorimetry and hot stage microscopy to identify optimum carriers for the production of amorphous solid dispersions. After identification, solid dispersions were prepared by hot melt extrusion and KinetiSol Dispersing, with material characterized by X-ray diffraction, dissolution and potency testing to evaluate physicochemical properties. Results from the preformulation studies showed that vinylacetate:vinylpyrrolidone (PVPVA) copolymer allowed for hydrocortisone dissolution within the carrier at temperatures as low as 160 degrees C, while hydroxypropyl methylcellulose required temperatures upward of 180 degrees C to facilitate solubilization. Low substituted hydroxypropyl cellulose, a high glass transition temperature control, showed that the material was unable to solubilize hydrocortisone. Manufacturing process control studies using hot melt extruded compositions of hydrocortisone and PVPVA showed that increased temperatures and residence times negatively impacted product potency due to decomposition. Using KinetiSol Dispersing to reduce residence time and to facilitate lower temperature processing, it was possible to produce solid dispersions with improved product potency. This study clearly demonstrated the importance of carrier selection to facilitate lower temperature processing, as well as the effect of residence time on product potency. Furthermore, KinetiSol Dispersing provided significant advantages over hot melt extrusion due to the reduced

  11. Activation heat, activation metabolism and tension-related heat in frog semitendinosus muscles

    PubMed Central

    Homsher, E.; Mommaerts, W. F. H. M.; Ricchiuti, N. V.; Wallner, A.

    1972-01-01

    1. Frog semitendinosus muscles were stretched to various lengths beyond the rest length (l0) and their initial heat and isometric tension production were measured. 2. As the overlap between the thick and thin filaments is reduced, the initial twitch heat and tension decline in a linear manner. At a point at which the twitch tension approaches zero, the initial heat is 30% of that seen at l0. It is concluded that this heat is the activation heat and reflects the energetics of calcium release and reaccumulation. The initial heat at shorter sarcomere lengths appears to be the sum of the activation heat plus a heat production associated with the interaction of the thick and thin filaments. 3. A similar relationship between heat and tension production is seen in tetanic contractions. 4. The time course of activation heat production in a twitch can be resolved into two phases: a temperature insensitive (Q10 < 1·3) `fast' phase (with a time constant of 45 msec) and a temperature sensitive (Q10 = 2·8) `slow' phase (with a time constant of 330 msec at 0° C). 5. Measurements of the creatine phosphate (PC) hydrolysis by muscles contracting isometrically at various muscle lengths at and beyond l0, indicate an enthalpy change of -11·2 kcal/mole PC hydrolysed. The enthalpy change for the ATP hydrolysis by muscles stretched so that little or no tension was produced with stimulation was -9·9 kcal/mole ATP hydrolysed. It is concluded that the net activation heat is produced by the hydrolysis of PC or ATP. PMID:4536938

  12. Fractal behavior in continental crustal heat production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedanti, N.; Srivastava, R. P.; Pandey, O. P.; Dimri, V. P.

    2011-02-01

    The distribution of crustal heat production, which is the most important component in the elucidation of continental thermal structure, still remains a theoretical assumption. In general the heat production values must decrease with depth, but the form of decrease of heat production in the crust is not well understood. The commonly used heat production models are: "block model", in which heat production is constant from the surface to a given depth and the "exponential model", in which heat production diminishes as an exponential function of depth. The exponential model is more widely used wherein sources of the errors are heterogeneity of rock and long wavelength changes due to changes in lithology and tectonic elements, and as such exponential distribution does not work satisfactorily for the entire crust. In the present study, we analyze for the first time, deep crustal heat production data of six global areas namely Dharwar craton (India), Kaapvaal craton (South Africa), Baltic shield (Kola, Russia), Hidaka metamorphic belt (Japan), Nissho pluton (Japan) and Continental Deep Drilling site (KTB, Germany). The power spectrum of all the studied data sets exhibits power law behaviour. This would mean slower decay of heat production with depth, which conforms to the known geologic composition of the crust. Minimum value of the scaling exponent has been found for the KTB borehole, which is apparently related to higher heat production of gneisses, however for other study areas, scaling exponent is almost similar. We also found that the lower values of scaling exponents are related to higher heat production in the crust as is the case in KTB. Present finding has a direct relevance in computation of temperature-depth profiles in continental regions.

  13. Cascade heat recovery with coproduct gas production

    DOEpatents

    Brown, William R.; Cassano, Anthony A.; Dunbobbin, Brian R.; Rao, Pradip; Erickson, Donald C.

    1986-01-01

    A process for the integration of a chemical absorption separation of oxygen and nitrogen from air with a combustion process is set forth wherein excess temperature availability from the combustion process is more effectively utilized to desorb oxygen product from the absorbent and then the sensible heat and absorption reaction heat is further utilized to produce a high temperature process stream. The oxygen may be utilized to enrich the combustion process wherein the high temperature heat for desorption is conducted in a heat exchange preferably performed with a pressure differential of less than 10 atmospheres which provides considerable flexibility in the heat exchange.

  14. Cascade heat recovery with coproduct gas production

    DOEpatents

    Brown, W.R.; Cassano, A.A.; Dunbobbin, B.R.; Rao, P.; Erickson, D.C.

    1986-10-14

    A process for the integration of a chemical absorption separation of oxygen and nitrogen from air with a combustion process is set forth wherein excess temperature availability from the combustion process is more effectively utilized to desorb oxygen product from the absorbent and then the sensible heat and absorption reaction heat is further utilized to produce a high temperature process stream. The oxygen may be utilized to enrich the combustion process wherein the high temperature heat for desorption is conducted in a heat exchange preferably performed with a pressure differential of less than 10 atmospheres which provides considerable flexibility in the heat exchange. 4 figs.

  15. Heating production fluids in a wellbore

    DOEpatents

    Orrego, Yamila; Jankowski, Todd A.

    2016-07-12

    A method for heating a production fluid in a wellbore. The method can include heating, using a packer fluid, a working fluid flowing through a first medium disposed in a first section of the wellbore, where the first medium transfers heat from the packer fluid to the working fluid. The method can also include circulating the working fluid into a second section of the wellbore through a second medium, where the second medium transfers heat from the working fluid to the production fluid. The method can further include returning the working fluid to the first section of the wellbore through the first medium.

  16. Heat and moisture production of modern swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The heat and moisture production (HP and MP) values that are currently published in the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) standards are from data collected in either the 1970’s (nursery piglets) or the 1950’s (growing-finishing pigs). This series of ...

  17. Heat-stable Escherichia coli enterotoxin production in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Whipp, S C; Moon, H W; Lyon, N C

    1975-01-01

    Hysterectomy-derived, colostrum-deprived piglets were infected with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli on day 4 of life. Samples of feces and intestinal contents were collected and tested in infant mice for enterotoxic activity. Positive enterotoxic responses were observed in mice given filtrates of feces and intestinal contents from piglets infected withe enterotoxigenic E. coli known to produce heat-stable enterotoxin but not heat-liabile enterotoxin in vitro. It is concluded that heat-stable enterotoxigenic E. coli induce diarrhea by production of heat-stable enterotoxin in vivo. PMID:1097335

  18. Arkoma exploration heats production builds

    SciTech Connect

    Petzet, G.A.

    1991-01-21

    This paper reports that exploratory drilling continues with fervor to Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle targets, especially in Arkansas. Pennsylvanian zones continue to yield significant gas discoveries. Gas production from Arkoma basin counties in both states has been rising and stands to climb even further with startup of several new pipelines, assuming gas prices and takes hold up.

  19. Heat production of nursery and growing piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat and moisture production (HMP) values are used to size ventilation fans in animal housing. The HMP values that are currently published in the ASABE standards were from data published in 1975. This study is one of a series of studies being conducted to update the HMP values for the ASABE and ASHR...

  20. Constraints on Crustal Heat Production from Heat Flow Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaupart, C.; Mareschal, J.-C.

    2003-12-01

    between variations in heat flow and crustal heat production has been investigated systematically ( England et al., 1980; Jaupart, 1983a; Vasseur and Singh, 1986; Ketcham, 1996; Jaupart and Mareschal, 1999). Heat flow determinations on continents have been multiplied by almost a factor of 10 between the compilations by Jessop et al. (1976) and Pollack et al. (1993). Since the last compilation, a large number of high-quality data have been obtained for the poorly studied Precambrian Shield areas of Canada and India ( Mareschal et al., 2000a, b; Roy and Rao, 2000; Rolandone et al., 2002; Lewis et al., 2003).

  1. Market assessment for active solar heating and cooling products. Category B: a survey of decision-makers in the HVAC marketplace. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    A comprehensive evaluation of the market for solar heating and cooling products for new and retrofit markets is reported. The emphasis is on the analysis of solar knowledge among HVAC decision makers and a comprehensive evaluation of their solar attitudes and behavior. The data from each of the following sectors are described and analyzed: residential consumers, organizational and manufacturing buildings, HVAC engineers and architects, builders/developers, and commercial/institutional segments. (MHR)

  2. Heat production during contraction in skeletal muscle of hypothyroid mice

    SciTech Connect

    Leijendekker, W.J.; van Hardeveld, C.; Elzinga, G. )

    1987-08-01

    The effect of hypothyroidism on tension-independent and -dependent heat produced during a twitch and a tetanic contraction of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscle of mice was examined. The amount of heat produced during a twitch and the rate of heat development during a tetanus of EDL and soleus were measured at and above optimal length. The effect of hypothyroidism on force production was <30%. Straight lines were used to fit the relation between heat production and force. Hypothyroidism significantly decreases tension-independent heat during contraction of EDL and soleus muscle. Because the tension-independent heat is considered to be related to the Ca{sup 2+} cycling, these findings suggest that ATP splitting due to the Ca{sup 2+} cycling is reduced in hypothyroid mice. This conclusion was strengthened by the observation that the oxalate-supported {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+}-uptake activity and {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+}-loading capacity of muscle homogenates from hypothyroid mice were reduced, respectively, to 51 and to 65% in soleus and to 63 and 73% in EDL muscle as compared with euthyroid mice. The tension-dependent rate of heat development during a tetanus was also decreased in soleus muscle of hypothyroid mice. This suggests a lower rate of ATP hydrolysis related to cross-bridge cycling in this muscle due to the hypothyroid state.

  3. Determinants of heat production in newborn lambs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eales, F. A.; Small, J.

    1980-06-01

    Measurement of summit metabolism (the maximum rate of heat production) in lambs aged 1 or 4h revealed considerable between animal variation. Summit metabolism per unit body weight decreased as body weight increased whereas summit metabolism per unit body surface area was independent of body weight. Severe pre-partum hypoxia was apparently associated with a low summit metabolism at 1 or 4h of age which made such lambs very susceptible to hypothermia. This deficiency in heat production capacity did not appear to be a permanent featuresince most lambs so affected recovered full thermoregulatory ability by 12h of age. Feeding of colostrum conferred an immediate 18% increase in summit metabolism. The significance of these findings to the prevention of hypothermia in the newborn lamb is discussed.

  4. Heat-activated heat-pump development and potential application of Stirling-engine technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairchild, P. D.; West, C. D.

    1982-06-01

    Presented is a brief overview of the heat-activated heat pump technology development program being carried out with emphasis on the Stirling engine technology projects. The major projects are reviewed as they were formulated and carried out under the previous product development guidelines. The revised technology development focus and current status of those major hardware projects are discussed. The key issues involved in applying Stirling engine technology to heat pump equipment are assessed. The approach and planned future activities to address those issues are described. Also included are brief descriptions of two projects in this area supported by the Gas Research Institute.

  5. Gap between active and passive solar heating

    SciTech Connect

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    The gap between active and passive solar could hardly be wider. The reasons for this are discussed and advantages to narrowing the gap are analyzed. Ten years of experience in both active and passive systems are reviewed, including costs, frequent problems, performance prediction, performance modeling, monitoring, and cooling concerns. Trends are analyzed, both for solar space heating and for service water heating. A tendency for the active and passive technologies to be converging is observed. Several recommendations for narrowing the gap are presented.

  6. Alterations in heat loss and heat production mechanisms in rat exposed to hypergravic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, J. M.; Horwitz, B. A.; Oyama, J.

    1982-01-01

    A review of studies investigating the thermal response of rats exposed to hypergravic fields well below maximum tolerance levels is presented. It is concluded that several lines of evidence indicate that the neural switching network for temperature regulation and cardiovascular channeling of blood flow is transiently affected during the first hour a rat is exposed to hypergravity. Moreover, even after one hour of exposure, when the core temperature has fallen several degrees, shivering and nonshivering thermogenesis are not fully activated. Only after prolonged exposure to hypergravic fields do heat production mechanisms recover sufficiently to bring the core temperature back to a normal level. Thus, the data indicate a more rapid recovery of effector mechanisms for heat loss than for heat production.

  7. High temperature active heat exchanger research for latent heat storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alario, J.; Haslett, R.

    1982-02-01

    An active heat exchange method in a latent heat (salt) thermal energy storage system that prevents a low conductivity solid salt layer from forming on heat transfer surfaces was developed. An evaluation of suitable media with melting points in the temperature range of interest (250 to 400 C) limited the candidates to molten salts from the chloride, hydroxide and nitrate families, based on high storage capacity, good corrosion characteristics and availability in large quantities at reasonable cost. The specific salt recommended for laboratory tests was a choride eutectic (20.5KCL o 24.5NaCL o 55.MgCl2% by wt.), with a nominal melting point of 385 C. Various active heat exchange concepts were given a technical and economic comparison to a passive tube shell design for a reference application (300 MW sub t for 6 hours). Test hardware was then built for the most promising concept: a direct contact heat exchanger in which molten salt droplets are injected into a cooler counter flowing stream of liquid metal carrier fluid (lead/Bismuth).

  8. Scientists Design Heat-Activated Penis Implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... implant, Le used a heat-activated exoskeleton of nitinol, a metal known for its elasticity. A urologist could do a simplified operation to insert the nitinol implant, which would remain flaccid at body temperature ...

  9. Dual Active Surface Heat Flux Gage Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1995-01-01

    A unique plug-type heat flux gage probe was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 2x9 turbulent flow duct facility. The probe was fabricated by welding a miniature dual active surface heat flux gage body to the end of a hollow metal cylindrical bolt containing a metal inner tube. Cooling air flows through the inner tube, impinges onto the back of the gage body and then flows out through the annulus formed between the inner tube and the hollow bolt wall. Heat flux was generated in the duct facility with a Huels arc heater. The duct had a rectangular cross section and one wall was fabricated from 2.54 centimeter thick thermal insulation rigid surface material mounted onto an aluminum plate. To measure heat flux, the probe was inserted through the plate and insulating materials with the from of the gage located flush with the hot gas-side insulation surface. Absorbed heat fluxes measured with the probe were compared with absorbed heat fluxes measured with six water-cooled reference calorimeters. These calorimeters were located in a water-cooled metal duct wall which was located across from the probe position. Correspondence of transient and steady heat fluxes measured with the reference calorimeters and heat flux gage probe was generally within a satisfactory plus or minus 10 percent. This good correspondence was achieved even though the much cooler probe caused a large surface temperature disruption of 1000K between the metal gage and the insulation. However, this temperature disruption did not seriously effect the accuracy of the heat flux measurement. A current application for dual active surface heat flux gages is for transient and steady absorbed heat flux, surface temperature and heat transfer coefficient measurements on the surface of an oxidizer turbine inlet deflector operating in a space shuttle test bed engine.

  10. Dual active surface heat flux gage probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1995-02-01

    A unique plug-type heat flux gage probe was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 2x9 turbulent flow duct facility. The probe was fabricated by welding a miniature dual active surface heat flux gage body to the end of a hollow metal cylindrical bolt containing a metal inner tube. Cooling air flows through the inner tube, impinges onto the back of the gage body and then flows out through the annulus formed between the inner tube and the hollow bolt wall. Heat flux was generated in the duct facility with a Huels arc heater. The duct had a rectangular cross section and one wall was fabricated from 2.54 centimeter thick thermal insulation rigid surface material mounted onto an aluminum plate. To measure heat flux, the probe was inserted through the plate and insulating materials with the from of the gage located flush with the hot gas-side insulation surface. Absorbed heat fluxes measured with the probe were compared with absorbed heat fluxes measured with six water-cooled reference calorimeters. These calorimeters were located in a water-cooled metal duct wall which was located across from the probe position. Correspondence of transient and steady heat fluxes measured with the reference calorimeters and heat flux gage probe was generally within a satisfactory plus or minus 10 percent. This good correspondence was achieved even though the much cooler probe caused a large surface temperature disruption of 1000K between the metal gage and the insulation. However, this temperature disruption did not seriously effect the accuracy of the heat flux measurement. A current application for dual active surface heat flux gages is for transient and steady absorbed heat flux, surface temperature and heat transfer coefficient measurements on the surface of an oxidizer turbine inlet deflector operating in a space shuttle test bed engine.

  11. Production Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Ann, Ed.

    This production systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, domains and objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 30 modules on the following topics: production…

  12. Intraventricular administration of isoproterenol inhibits both heat production and heat loss mechanisms in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, M T; Chandra, A; Fan, Y C; Sun, R

    1980-07-15

    At an ambient temperature (Ta) of 8 degrees C, intraventricular administration of isoproterenol inhibited metabolic heat production and led to hypothermia in rats. In contrast, at a Ta of 22 degrees C and of 30 degrees C, isoproterenol decreased cutaneous circulation and led to hyperthermia. The data indicate that isoproterenol inhibits both heat production and heat loss mechanisms in rats.

  13. Heat dissipation guides activation in signaling proteins

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Jeffrey K.; Shukla, Diwakar; Pande, Vijay S.

    2015-01-01

    Life is fundamentally a nonequilibrium phenomenon. At the expense of dissipated energy, living things perform irreversible processes that allow them to propagate and reproduce. Within cells, evolution has designed nanoscale machines to do meaningful work with energy harnessed from a continuous flux of heat and particles. As dictated by the Second Law of Thermodynamics and its fluctuation theorem corollaries, irreversibility in nonequilibrium processes can be quantified in terms of how much entropy such dynamics produce. In this work, we seek to address a fundamental question linking biology and nonequilibrium physics: can the evolved dissipative pathways that facilitate biomolecular function be identified by their extent of entropy production in general relaxation processes? We here synthesize massive molecular dynamics simulations, Markov state models (MSMs), and nonequilibrium statistical mechanical theory to probe dissipation in two key classes of signaling proteins: kinases and G-protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). Applying machinery from large deviation theory, we use MSMs constructed from protein simulations to generate dynamics conforming to positive levels of entropy production. We note the emergence of an array of peaks in the dynamical response (transient analogs of phase transitions) that draw the proteins between distinct levels of dissipation, and we see that the binding of ATP and agonist molecules modifies the observed dissipative landscapes. Overall, we find that dissipation is tightly coupled to activation in these signaling systems: dominant entropy-producing trajectories become localized near important barriers along known biological activation pathways. We go on to classify an array of equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular switches that harmonize to promote functional dynamics. PMID:26240354

  14. Heat production in an Archean crustal profile and implications for heat flow and mobilization of heat-producing elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashwal, L. D.; Morgan, P.; Kelley, S. A.; Percival, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    Concentrations of heat producing elements (Th, U, and K) in 58 samples representative of the main lithologies in a 100-km transect of the Superior Province of the Canadian Shield have been obtained. The relatively large variation in heat production found among the silicic plutonic rocks is shown to correlate with modal abundances of accessory minerals, and these variations are interpreted as premetamorphic. The present data suggest fundamental differences in crustal radioactivity distributions between granitic and more mafic terrains, and indicate that a previously determined apparently linear heat flow-heat production relationship for the Kapuskasing area does not relate to the distribution of heat production with depth.

  15. The global joule heat production rate and the AE index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, S.; Ahn, B.-H.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1985-01-01

    The degree of accuracy with which the AE index may be used as a measure of the joule heat production rate is evaluated for a typical substorm event on March 18, 1978, by estimating the global joule heat production rate as a function of time on the basis of data obtained from the IMS's six meridian chains. It is found that, although the AE index is statistically linearly related to the global joule heat production rate, caution is required when one assumes that details of AE index time variations during individual events are representative of those of the joule heat production rate.

  16. PRODUCTS OF ACTIVATED LYMPHOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Sorg, Clemens; Bloom, Barry R.

    1973-01-01

    General methods were developed and applied to the biosynthesis and purification of products of activated lymphocytes available in minute quantities. The activity studied here was the migration inhibitory factor (MIF) produced by purified protein derivative (PPD)- or concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated lymphocytes obtained from one guinea pig or less. The methods selected yielded results in terms of two chemical parameters characteristic of the molecules involved, namely Kd on Sephadex G-75 and isoionic point, pI, on isoelectric focusing. When supernatants were fractionated on G-75 columns, there were several areas even in control supernatants which produced migration inhibition relative to medium controls. However, in PPD- and Con A-stimulated supernatants, at least one peak of MIF activity was found solely in the stimulated cultures, with a Kd of 0.15. A double-labeling technique was used to characterize the proteins of this peak. Control, unstimulated cultures were labeled with [14C]leucine and stimulated cultures were labeled with [3H]leucine. After mixing the supernatants and G-75 filtration, a major "ratiolabeled" broad peak. i.e. one with increased 3H/14C ratio, was found. When a narrow portion of this peak about Kd 0.15, containing most of the MIF activity, was subjected to analytical isoelectric focusing, all of the label was associated with proteins of lower net charge than albumin. A unique ratiolabeled peak was found in PPD- and Con A-stimulated fractions with a pI of approx. 5.3. A micropreparative isoelectric focusing technique was developed and yielded MIF activity in the same region as the major ratiolabeled peak. Further study will be required to ascertain whether the ratiolabeled protein is MIF. By following the Kd, pI, and 3H/14C labeling ratio, at least 14 products of activated lymphocytes, synthesized either de novo or in increased amounts, could be distinguished. PMID:4688317

  17. Short-term heating reduces the anti-inflammatory effects of fresh raw garlic extracts on the LPS-induced production of NO and pro-inflammatory cytokines by downregulating allicin activity in RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jung-Hye; Ryu, Ji Hyeon; Kang, Min Jung; Hwang, Cho Rong; Han, Jaehee; Kang, Dawon

    2013-08-01

    Garlic has a variety of biologic activities, including anti-inflammatory properties. Although garlic has several biologic activities, some people dislike eating fresh raw garlic because of its strong taste and smell. Therefore, garlic formulations involving heating procedures have been developed. In this study, we investigated whether short-term heating affects the anti-inflammatory properties of garlic. Fresh and heated raw garlic extracts (FRGE and HRGE) were prepared with incubation at 25 °C and 95 °C, respectively, for 2 h. Treatment with FRGE and HRGE significantly reduced the LPS-induced increase in the pro-inflammatory cytokine concentration (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) and NO through HO-1 upregulation in RAW 264.7 macrophages. The anti-inflammatory effect was greater in FRGE than in HRGE. The allicin concentration was higher in FRGE than in HRGE. Allicin treatment showed reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and NO and increased HO-1 activity. The results show that the decrease in LPS-induced NO and pro-inflammatory cytokines in RAW 264.7 macrophages through HO-1 induction was greater for FRGE compared with HRGE. Additionally, the results indicate that allicin is responsible for the anti-inflammatory effect of FRGE. Our results suggest a potential therapeutic use of allicin in the treatment of chronic inflammatory disease.

  18. Technologies for Production of Heat and Electricity

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Kara G. Cafferty

    2014-04-01

    Biomass is a desirable source of energy because it is renewable, sustainable, widely available throughout the world, and amenable to conversion. Biomass is composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin components. Cellulose is generally the dominant fraction, representing about 40 to 50% of the material by weight, with hemicellulose representing 20 to 50% of the material, and lignin making up the remaining portion [4,5,6]. Although the outward appearance of the various forms of cellulosic biomass, such as wood, grass, municipal solid waste (MSW), or agricultural residues, is different, all of these materials have a similar cellulosic composition. Elementally, however, biomass varies considerably, thereby presenting technical challenges at virtually every phase of its conversion to useful energy forms and products. Despite the variances among cellulosic sources, there are a variety of technologies for converting biomass into energy. These technologies are generally divided into two groups: biochemical (biological-based) and thermochemical (heat-based) conversion processes. This chapter reviews the specific technologies that can be used to convert biomass to energy. Each technology review includes the description of the process, and the positive and negative aspects.

  19. Antiviral activities of heated dolomite powder.

    PubMed

    Motoike, Koichi; Hirano, Shozo; Yamana, Hideaki; Onda, Tetsuhiko; Maeda, Takayoshi; Ito, Toshihiro; Hayakawa, Motozo

    2008-12-01

    The effect of the heating conditions of dolomite powder on its antiviral activity was studied against the H5N3 avian influenza virus. Calcium oxide (CaO) and magnesium oxide (MgO), obtained by the thermal decomposition of dolomite above 800 degrees C, were shown to have strong antiviral activity, but the effect was lessened when the heating temperature exceeded 1400 degrees C. Simultaneous measurement of the crystallite size suggested that the weakening of the activity was due to the considerable grain growth of the oxides. It was found that the presence of Mg in dolomite contributed to the deterrence of grain growth of the oxides during the heating process. Although both CaO and MgO exhibited strong antiviral activity, CaO had the stronger activity but quickly hydrated in the presence of water. On the other hand, the hydration of MgO took place gradually under the same conditions. Separate measurements using MgO and Mg(OH)2 revealed that MgO had a higher antiviral effect than Mg(OH)2. From the overall experiments, it was suggested that the strong antiviral activity of dolomite was related to the hydration reaction of CaO.

  20. Martian surface heat production and crustal heat flow from Mars Odyssey Gamma-Ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, B. C.; McLennan, S. M.; Klein, E. C.

    2011-07-01

    Martian thermal state and evolution depend principally on the radiogenic heat-producing element (HPE) distributions in the planet's crust and mantle. The Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft has mapped the surface abundances of HPEs across Mars. From these data, we produce the first models of global and regional surface heat production and crustal heat flow. As previous studies have suggested that the crust is a repository for approximately 50% of the radiogenic elements on Mars, these models provide important, directly measurable constraints on Martian heat generation. Our calculations show considerable geographic and temporal variations in crustal heat flow, and demonstrate the existence of anomalous heat flow provinces. We calculate a present day average surface heat production of 4.9 ± 0.3 × 10-11 W · kg-1. We also calculate the average crustal component of heat flow of 6.4 ± 0.4 mW · m-2. The crustal component of radiogenically produced heat flow ranges from <1 mW · m-2 in the Hellas Basin and Utopia Planitia regions to ˜13 mW · m-2 in the Sirenum Fossae region. These heat production and crustal heat flow values from geochemical measurements support previous heat flow estimates produced by different methodologies.

  1. Heat transfer during heat sterilization and cooling processes of canned products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dincer, I.

    In this paper, an analysis of transient heat transfer during heat sterilization and cooling processes of a cylindrical canned product is presented. In the analysis, most practical case including the boundary condition of third kind (i.e., convection boundary condition, leading to 0.1 <= Bi <= 100) was employed. A simple analytical model for determining effective heat transfer coefficients for such products is developed. For the heat sterilization process, heating coefficient is incorporated into heat transfer coefficient model. An experimental study was performed to measure the thermal center temperatures of the short-cylindrical canned products (i.e., Tuna fish) during heat sterilization at the retort medium temperatures of 115∘C and 121∘C, and during cooling process at 16∘C. The effective heat transfer coefficient model used the experimental temperature data. Using these effective heat transfer coefficients the center temperature distributions were calculated and compared with the experimental temperature distributions. Agreement was found considerably high. The results of the present study indicate that the heat-transfer analysis technique and heat-transfer coefficient model are reliable, and can provide accurate results for such problems.

  2. Heat flow-heat production relationship not found: what drives heat flow variability of the Western Canadian foreland basin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majorowicz, Jacek A.

    2016-06-01

    Heat flow high -80 ± 10 mW/m2 in the northern western parts of the Western Canadian foreland basin is in large contrast to low heat flow to the south and east (50 ± 7 mW/m2) of the same basin with the same old 2E09 year's Precambrian basement and some 200-km-thick lithosphere. Over-thrusted and flat-laying sedimentary units are heated from below by heat flow from the old craton' crust and low 15 ± 5 mW/m2 mantle contribution. The heat flow vs. radiogenic heat production statistical relationship is not found for this area. To account for this large heat flow contrast and to have 200-km-thick lithosphere, we would need to assume that high heat production layer of the upper crust varies in thickness as much as factor of 2 and/or that the measured heat production at top of Precambrian basement is not representative for deeper rocks. The other explanation proposed before that heat in the basin is redistributed by the regional fluid flow systems driven from high hydraulic head areas close to the foothills of the Rocky Mountains toward low elevation areas to the east and north cannot be explained by observed low Darcy fluid velocities and the geometry of the basin.

  3. Estimated Metabolic Heat Production of Helicopter Aircrew Members during Operations in Iraq and Afghanistan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    individual performed. Metabolic heat was estimated using a mechanical efficiency of 20% for human movement and a standardized conversion to watts (W...various activities an individual performed. Metabolic heat was estimated using a mechanical efficiency of 20% for human movement and a standardized...expenditure for that hour. To calculate metabolic heat production, a mechanical efficiency of muscular work of 20% was assumed (21, 23). Therefore

  4. Market assessment for active solar heating and cooling products. Category B: A survey of decision makers in the HVAC market place. Survey instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Lilien, G. L.; Johnston, P. E.

    1980-09-01

    Telephone screener questionnaires and mail-out questionnaires for marketing surveys for solar heating and cooling equipment are presented. Questionnaires are included for the residential segment, industrial segment, HVAC professionals segment, builder/developer segment, and the commercial segment. No results are reported. (WHK)

  5. Flat plate heat exchangers for the new production reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ondrejcin, R.S.

    1988-12-07

    The New Production Reactor (NPR) will require heat exchangers (HX) as part of the ancillary equipment. The most common type of heat exchanger in the US is the shell and tube, the type presently in SRP reactor service. This type of design is the one that is normally described in detail in heat transfer texts. Other designs are more efficient, and there was a period when these designs were actively modified. The largest driving force for higher efficiency HX was the OPEC produced energy shortage of the early 1970's. Several comments were made by B.S. Spangler about flat plate HX for the NPR after my initial comparison between shell and tube and flat plate HX (DPST-88-729). Since answers were not readily available, Philippe Marchal of Packinox (Louveciennes, France) agreed to visit SRL. This report contains a series of answers to all comments raised in DPST-88-743 and some general statements comparing flat plate HX to shell and tube HX. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  6. Effect of heat stress on production parameters and immune responses of commercial laying hens.

    PubMed

    Mashaly, M M; Hendricks, G L; Kalama, M A; Gehad, A E; Abbas, A O; Patterson, P H

    2004-06-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the adverse effects of high temperature and humidity not only on live performance and egg quality but also on immune function in commercial laying hens. One hundred eighty 31-wk-old laying hens at peak production were used in this study. Hens were housed in cages (15 cages of 4 birds/cage) in each of 3 environmental chambers and received 1 of 3 treatments. The 3 treatments were control (average temperature and relative humidity), cyclic (daily cyclic temperature and humidity), and heat stress (constant heat and humidity) for 5 wk. Different production and immune parameters were measured. Body weight and feed consumption were significantly reduced in hens in the heat stress group. Egg production, egg weight, shell weight, shell thickness, and specific gravity were significantly inhibited among hens in the heat stress group. Likewise, total white blood cell (WBC) counts and antibody production were significantly inhibited in hens in the heat stress group. In addition, mortality was higher in the heat stress group compared to the cyclic and control groups. Even though T- and B-lymphocyte activities were not significantly affected by any of the treatments, lymphocytes from hens in the heat stress group had the least activity at 1 wk following treatment. These results indicate that heat stress not only adversely affects production performance but also inhibits immune function.

  7. Metabolic heat production by human and animal populations in cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Iain D.; Kennedy, Chris A.

    2016-12-01

    Anthropogenic heating from building energy use, vehicle fuel consumption, and human metabolism is a key term in the urban energy budget equation. Heating from human metabolism, however, is often excluded from urban energy budgets because it is widely observed to be negligible. Few reports for low-latitude cities are available to support this observation, and no reports exist on the contribution of domestic animals to urban heat budgets. To provide a more comprehensive view of metabolic heating in cities, we quantified all terms of the anthropogenic heat budget at metropolitan scale for the world's 26 largest cities, using a top-down statistical approach. Results show that metabolic heat release from human populations in mid-latitude cities (e.g. London, Tokyo, New York) accounts for 4-8% of annual anthropogenic heating, compared to 10-45% in high-density tropical cities (e.g. Cairo, Dhaka, Kolkata). Heat release from animal populations amounts to <1% of anthropogenic heating in all cities. Heat flux density from human and animal metabolism combined is highest in Mumbai—the world's most densely populated megacity—at 6.5 W m-2, surpassing heat production by electricity use in buildings (5.8 W m-2) and fuel combustion in vehicles (3.9 W m-2). These findings, along with recent output from global climate models, suggest that in the world's largest and most crowded cities, heat emissions from human metabolism alone can force measurable change in mean annual temperature at regional scale.

  8. RF heating for fusion product studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hellsten, T. Johnson, T.; Sharapov, S. E.; Kiptily, V.; Rimini, F.; Eriksson, J.; Mantsinen, M.; Schneider, M.; Tsalas, M.

    2015-12-10

    Third harmonic cyclotron heating is an effective tool for accelerating deuterium (D) beams to the MeV energy range, suitable for studying ITER relevant fast particle physics in plasmas without significant tritium content. Such experiments were recently conducted in JET with an ITER like wall in D plasmas with {sup 3}He concentrations up to 30% in order to boost the fusion reactivity by D-{sup 3}He reactions. The harmonic cyclotron heating produces high-energy tails in the MeV range of D ions by on-axis heating and of {sup 3}He ions by tangential off-axis heating. The discharges are characterized by long sawtooth free periods and a rich spectrum of MHD modes excited by the fast D and {sup 3}He ions. The partitions of the power, which depend on the distribution function of D, vary strongly over several slowing down times. Self-consistent modelling of the distribution function with the SELFO-light code are presented and compared with experimental data from fast particle diagnostics.

  9. Rubisco activase and wheat productivity under heat stress conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rubisco activase (RCA) constrains the photosynthetic potential of plants at high temperature (heat stress). We hypothesized that endogenous levels of RCA could serve as an important determinant of plant productivity under heat stress conditions. In this study, we investigated the possible relation...

  10. NGNP Process Heat Applications: Hydrogen Production Accomplishments for FY2010

    SciTech Connect

    Charles V Park

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes FY10 accomplishments of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Engineering Process Heat Applications group in support of hydrogen production technology development. This organization is responsible for systems needed to transfer high temperature heat from a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) reactor (being developed by the INL NGNP Project) to electric power generation and to potential industrial applications including the production of hydrogen.

  11. Working in Australia's heat: health promotion concerns for health and productivity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sudhvir; Hanna, Elizabeth G; Kjellstrom, Tord

    2015-06-01

    This exploratory study describes the experiences arising from exposure to extreme summer heat, and the related health protection and promotion issues for working people in Australia. Twenty key informants representing different industry types and occupational groups or activities in Australia provided semi-structured interviews concerning: (i) perceptions of workplace heat exposure in the industry they represented, (ii) reported impacts on health and productivity, as well as (iii) actions taken to reduce exposure or effects of environmental heat exposure. All interviewees reported that excessive heat exposure presents a significant challenge for their industry or activity. People working in physically demanding jobs in temperatures>35°C frequently develop symptoms, and working beyond heat tolerance is common. To avoid potentially dangerous health impacts they must either slow down or change their work habits. Such health-preserving actions result in lost work capacity. Approximately one-third of baseline work productivity can be lost in physically demanding jobs when working at 40°C. Employers and workers consider that heat exposure is a 'natural hazard' in Australia that cannot easily be avoided and so must be accommodated or managed. Among participants in this study, the locus of responsibility for coping with heat lay with the individual, rather than the employer. Heat exposure during Australian summers commonly results in adverse health effects and productivity losses, although quantification studies are lacking. Lack of understanding of the hazardous nature of heat exposure exacerbates the serious risk of heat stress, as entrenched attitudinal barriers hamper amelioration or effective management of this increasing occupational health threat. Educational programmes and workplace heat guidelines are required. Without intervention, climate change in hot countries, such as Australia, can be expected to further exacerbate heat-related burden of disease and loss

  12. Proteasome activator 200: the heat is on...

    PubMed

    Savulescu, Anca F; Glickman, Michael H

    2011-05-01

    Proteasomes play a key regulatory role in all eukaryotic cells by removing proteins in a timely manner. There are two predominant forms: The 20S core particle (CP) can hydrolyze peptides and certain unstructured proteins, and the 26S holoenzyme is able to proteolyse most proteins conjugated to ubiquitin. The 26S complex consists of a CP barrel with a 19S regulatory particle (RP; a.k.a PA700) attached to its outer surface. Several studies purified another proteasome activator with a MW of 200 kDa (PA200) that attaches to the same outer ring of the CP. A role for PA200 has been demonstrated in spermatogenesis, in response to DNA repair and in maintenance of mitochondrial inheritance. Enhanced levels of PA200-CP complexes are observed under conditions in which either activated or disrupted CP prevail, suggesting it participates in regulating overall proteolytic activity. PA200, or its yeast ortholog Blm10, may also incorporate into 26S proteasomes yielding PA200-CP-RP hybrids. A three-dimensional molecular structure determined by x-ray crystallography of Blm10-CP provides a model for activation. The carboxy terminus of Blm10 inserts into a dedicated pocket in the outer ring of the CP surface, whereas multiple HEAT-like repeats fold into an asymmetric solenoid wrapping around the central pore to stabilize a partially open conformation. The resulting hollow domelike structure caps the entire CP surface. This asymmetric structure may provide insight as to how the 19S RP, with two HEAT repeatlike subunits (Rpn1, Rpn2) alongside six ATPases (Rpt1-6), attaches to the same surface of the CP ring, and likewise, induces pore opening.

  13. Development and testing of heat transport fluids for use in active solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Work on heat transport fluids for use with active solar heating and cooling systems is described. Program objectives and how they were accomplished including problems encountered during testing are discussed.

  14. Enthalphyand Heat Capacity of Several Candy Products,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    They are three types of chocolate : ’Extra with Milk,’ ’Sport,’ and ’Soy Bean’ without ground nuts and sugar. For a caloric investigation of the candy products an adiabatic calorimeter was used.

  15. Development and demonstration of a Stirling/Rankine heat activated heat pump. Phase 3B: Engine technology development testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-11-01

    The results of the Phase 3B Stirling/Rankine Heat Activated Heat Pump product development program are given. Results of the Phase 2 program indicated deficiencies in the performance of the free-piston Stirling engine and mismatching of the dynamic characteristics of the engine and the compressor. These deficiencies were further investigated during in-depth diagnostic testing of the engine/compressor unit in the Phase 3B and indicated appropriate engine/compressor matching criteria.

  16. Preliminary design activities for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Information on the development of solar heating and cooling systems is presented. The major emphasis is placed on program organization, system size definition, site identification, system approaches, heat pump and equipment design, collector procurement, and other preliminary design activities.

  17. Heat stress causes substantial labour productivity loss in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zander, Kerstin K.; Botzen, Wouter J. W.; Oppermann, Elspeth; Kjellstrom, Tord; Garnett, Stephen T.

    2015-07-01

    Heat stress at the workplace is an occupational health hazard that reduces labour productivity. Assessment of productivity loss resulting from climate change has so far been based on physiological models of heat exposure. These models suggest productivity may decrease by 11-27% by 2080 in hot regions such as Asia and the Caribbean, and globally by up to 20% in hot months by 2050. Using an approach derived from health economics, we describe self-reported estimates of work absenteeism and reductions in work performance caused by heat in Australia during 2013/2014. We found that the annual costs were US$655 per person across a representative sample of 1,726 employed Australians. This represents an annual economic burden of around US$6.2 billion (95% CI: 5.2-7.3 billion) for the Australian workforce. This amounts to 0.33 to 0.47% of Australia’s GDP. Although this was a period when many Australians experienced what is at present considered exceptional heat, our results suggest that adaptation measures to reduce heat effects should be adopted widely if severe economic impacts from labour productivity loss are to be avoided if heat waves become as frequent as predicted.

  18. Light masking of circadian rhythms of heat production, heat loss, and body temperature in squirrel monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, E. L.; Fuller, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    Whole body heat production (HP) and heat loss (HL) were examined to determine their relative contributions to light masking of the circadian rhythm in body temperature (Tb). Squirrel monkey metabolism (n = 6) was monitored by both indirect and direct calorimetry, with telemetered measurement of body temperature and activity. Feeding was also measured. Responses to an entraining light-dark (LD) cycle (LD 12:12) and a masking LD cycle (LD 2:2) were compared. HP and HL contributed to both the daily rhythm and the masking changes in Tb. All variables showed phase-dependent masking responses. Masking transients at L or D transitions were generally greater during subjective day; however, L masking resulted in sustained elevation of Tb, HP, and HL during subjective night. Parallel, apparently compensatory, changes of HL and HP suggest action by both the circadian timing system and light masking on Tb set point. Furthermore, transient HL increases during subjective night suggest that gain change may supplement set point regulation of Tb.

  19. Commercial Product Activation Using RFID

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedrey, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Radio-frequency identification (RFID) would be used for commercial product activation, according to a proposal. What is new here is the concept of combining RFID with activation - more specifically, using RFID for activating commercial products (principally, electronic ones) and for performing such ancillary functions as tracking individual product units on production lines, tracking shipments, and updating inventories. According to the proposal, an RFID chip would be embedded in each product. The information encoded in the chip would include a unique number for identifying the product. An RFID reader at the point of sale would record the number of the product and would write digital information to the RFID chip for either immediate activation of the product or for later interrogation and processing. To be practical, an RFID product-activation system should satisfy a number of key requirements: the system should be designed to be integrable into the inventory-tracking and the data-processing and -communication infrastructures of businesses along the entire supply chain from manufacture to retail; the system should be resistant to sophisticated hacking; activation codes should be made sufficiently complexity to minimize the probability of activating stolen products; RFID activation equipment at points of sale must be capable to two-way RF communication for the purposes of reading information from, and writing information to, embedded RFID chips; the equipment at points of sale should be easily operable by sales clerks with little or no training; the point-of-sale equipment should verify activation and provide visible and/or audible signals indicating verification or lack thereof; and, the system should be able to handle millions of products per year with minimal human intervention, among other requirements.

  20. Glass transition temperatures and fermentative activity of heat-treated commercial active dry yeasts.

    PubMed

    Schebor, C; Galvagno, M; del Pilar Buera, M; Chirife, J

    2000-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry thermograms of various samples of commercial instant active dry yeasts revealed a clear glass transition typical of amorphous carbohydrates and sugars. The resulting glass transition temperatures were found to decrease with increasing moisture content. The observed glass curve was similar to that of pure trehalose, which is known to accumulate in large amounts in baker's yeast. The effect of heat treatment at various temperatures on the fermentative activity (as measured by the metabolic production of CO(2)) of dry yeast was studied. First-order plots were obtained representing the loss of fermentative activity as a function of heating time at the various temperatures assayed. Significant losses of fermentative activity were observed in vitrified yeast samples. The dependence of rate constants with temperature was found to follow Arrhenius behavior. The relationship between the loss of fermentative activity and glass transition was not verified, and the glass transition was not reflected on the temperature dependence of fermentative activity loss.

  1. Metabolic heat production by human and animal populations in cities.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Iain D; Kennedy, Chris A

    2016-12-26

    Anthropogenic heating from building energy use, vehicle fuel consumption, and human metabolism is a key term in the urban energy budget equation. Heating from human metabolism, however, is often excluded from urban energy budgets because it is widely observed to be negligible. Few reports for low-latitude cities are available to support this observation, and no reports exist on the contribution of domestic animals to urban heat budgets. To provide a more comprehensive view of metabolic heating in cities, we quantified all terms of the anthropogenic heat budget at metropolitan scale for the world's 26 largest cities, using a top-down statistical approach. Results show that metabolic heat release from human populations in mid-latitude cities (e.g. London, Tokyo, New York) accounts for 4-8% of annual anthropogenic heating, compared to 10-45% in high-density tropical cities (e.g. Cairo, Dhaka, Kolkata). Heat release from animal populations amounts to <1% of anthropogenic heating in all cities. Heat flux density from human and animal metabolism combined is highest in Mumbai-the world's most densely populated megacity-at 6.5 W m(-2), surpassing heat production by electricity use in buildings (5.8 W m(-2)) and fuel combustion in vehicles (3.9 W m(-2)). These findings, along with recent output from global climate models, suggest that in the world's largest and most crowded cities, heat emissions from human metabolism alone can force measurable change in mean annual temperature at regional scale.

  2. Activation Cascading in Sign Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navarrete, Eduardo; Peressotti, Francesca; Lerose, Luigi; Miozzo, Michele

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how activation unfolds in sign production by examining whether signs that are not produced have their representations activated by semantics (cascading of activation). Deaf signers were tested with a picture-picture interference task. Participants were presented with pairs of overlapping pictures and named the green…

  3. Ohmic heated sheet for the Ca ion beam production

    SciTech Connect

    Efremov, A.; Bogomolov, S.; Kazarinov, N.; Kochagov, O.; Loginov, V.

    2008-02-15

    The production of intense accelerated {sup 48}Ca ion beams is the key problem in the experiments on the synthesis of new superheavy nuclei. For this purpose in the FLNR (JINR), an electron cyclotron resonance ion source is used at the U-400 cyclotron. The combination of a micro oven with a hot tantalum sheet inside the discharge chamber allowed the production of the intense {sup 48}Ca{sup 5+} ion beam at the {sup 48}Ca consumption of about 0.5 mg/h. In this case, the tantalum sheet is heated by microwaves and plasma electrons. The microwave power of up to 500 W is required to heat the sheet to the temperature of about 500 deg. C. To decrease the required microwave power, a new sheet with a direct Ohmic heating was designed. The present paper describes the method, technique, and preliminary experimental results on the production of the Ca ion beam.

  4. Heat production in chemically skinned smooth muscle of guinea-pig taenia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Lönnbro, P; Hellstrand, P

    1991-01-01

    1. The rate of heat production of chemically skinned guinea-pig taenia coli smooth muscle at 25 degrees C was measured using microcalorimetric techniques. 2. Muscle strips were mounted isometrically and incubated in solutions containing MgATP (3.2 mM) and phosphocreatine (PCr, 12 mM), pH 6.9. Activation was obtained by the injection of Ca2+ into the sample compartment of the calorimeter. 3. The heat production rate of the resting preparation (pCa 9) was 0.40 +/- 0.03 mW g-1 wet weight (n = 23). During maximal activation (pCa 4.8) the heat rate increased to 1.12 +/- 0.07 mW g-1 (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 15). With stepwise increase in [Ca2+] from pCa 9 to 4.8 the energetic cost of force maintenance tended to increase at higher [Ca2+]. 4. After activation by Ca2+, the heat production rate reached its maximum while force was still increasing. 5. Changing ionic strength from 90 to 150 mM had no effect on either basal or activated heat rate. Oligomycin, amphotericin B and the adenylate kinase inhibitor Ap5A had no effect on the basal heat rate. 6. Exchanging ATP in the incubation medium for inosine triphosphate (ITP) reduced the force and heat production after injection of Ca2+. The basal heat production was not lowered when ATP was exchanged for ITP. 7. The observed enthalpy change for PCr splitting at 25 degrees C (pH 6.9, ionic strength 90 mM) was -28 +/- 3 kJ mol-1 (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 9). After correction for the phosphate equilibrium, buffer reactions, and Mg2+ binding to PCr and HPO42-, the net enthalpy change is calculated to be -39 +/- 3 kJ mol-1. 8. Heat production in the skinned smooth muscle consists of one basal component present in relaxed muscle, and one component associated with contraction. The nature of the basal heat production is unclear but does not seem to involve turnover of phosphate on the myosin light chains. The increase in the energetic tension cost with increasing activation by Ca2+ has implications for the understanding of the contractile

  5. United States Department of Energy Thermally Activated Heat Pump Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fiskum, R.J.; Adcock, P.W.; DeVault, R.C.

    1996-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is working with partners from the gas heating and cooling industry to improve energy efficiency using advance absorption technologies, to eliminate chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), to reduce global warming through more efficient combustion of natural gas, and to impact electric peak demand of air conditioning. To assist industry in developing these gas heating and cooling absorption technologies, the US DOE sponsors the Thermally Activated Heat Pump Program. It is divided into five key activities, addressing residential gas absorption heat pumps, large commercial chillers, advanced absorption fluids, computer-aided design, and advanced ``Hi-Cool`` heat pumps.

  6. Decomposition products of glycidyl esters of fatty acids by heating.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Wataru; Endo, Yasushi

    2017-03-01

    In this study, decomposition products of glycidyl palmitate (GP) of fatty acids heated at high temperature such as deep frying were investigated. When GP and tripalmitin (TP) were heated at 180 and 200 °C, they were decreased with heating time. The weight of GP was less than that of TP, although both GP and TP were converted to polar compounds after heating. The decomposition rate of GP was higher than TP. Both GP and TP produced considerable amounts of hydrocarbons and aldehydes during heating. Aldehydes produced from GP and TP included saturated aldehydes with carbon chain length of 3-10, while hydrocarbons consisted of carbon chain length of 8-15. It was observed that major hydrocarbons produced from GP during heating were pentadecane. Moreover, the level of carbon dioxide (CO2) released from GP was higher than that of TP. It was suggested that fatty acids in GE might be susceptible to decarboxylation. From these results, GP might be quickly decomposed to hydrocarbons, aldehydes and CO2 besides polar compounds by heating, in comparison with TP.

  7. Heat transport in active harmonic chains

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Mei C.; Ellis, Fred M.; Kottos, Tsampikos; Fleischmann, Ragnar; Geisel, Theo; Prosen, Tomaz

    2011-08-15

    We show that a harmonic lattice model with amplifying and attenuating elements, when coupled to two thermal baths, exhibits unique heat transport properties. Some of these novel features include anomalous nonequilibrium steady-state heat currents, negative differential thermal conductance, as well as nonreciprocal heat transport. We find that when these elements are arranged in a PT-symmetric manner, the domain of existence of the nonequilibrium steady state is maximized. We propose an electronic experimental setup based on resistive-inductive-capacitive (RLC) transmission lines, where our predictions can be tested.

  8. On the increase in rate of heat production caused by stretch in frog's skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Clinch, N. F.

    1968-01-01

    1. The increase in rate of heat production caused by stretch in the unstimulated frog's sartorius (stretch response) has been measured using a conventional thermopile technique. 2. The rate of heat production was found constant between l0 (the distance in vivo between the tendons when the legs were in a straight line) and 1·2 l0, and rose rapidly above this length to reach 3-5 times the basal rate at 1·3 l0. Stretching to greater lengths appeared to damage the muscles. 3. The stretch response is increased by several substances which increase the duration of the active state. 4. Unlike the rate of heat production at l0, the stretch response is increased by procaine; while the presence of CO2 greatly reduces it. 5. Evidence is presented supporting the hypothesis that the stretch response is associated with the appearance of tension in the sarcolemma. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:5652883

  9. Influence of heat shock on glycerol production in alcohol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Berovic, Marin; Pivec, Aleksandra; Kosmerl, Tatjana; Wondra, Mojmir; Celan, Stefan

    2007-02-01

    The influence of single and double heat shocks induced during the exponential growth phase of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation of cultivar Sauvignon Blanc grape must was examined. Rapid temperature changes from 18 degrees C to 34 degrees C have been applied. The effect of the duration of exposure to a high temperature has been analyzed. By the applications of a single heat shock and a double heat shock, up to 8.2 g l(-1) and 11.0 g l(-1) glycerol have been produced, respectively. To prevent the evaporation of fine wine bouquet compounds during the temperature changes, reflux coolers on the top of bioreactors have been employed. By using this method, glycerol production was increased by up to 65%.

  10. The prolactin responses to active and passive heating in man.

    PubMed

    Low, David; Purvis, Alison; Reilly, Thomas; Cable, N Tim

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the prolactin and blood pressure responses at identical core temperatures during active and passive heat stresses, using prolactin as an indirect marker of central fatigue. Twelve male subjects cycled to exhaustion at 60% maximal oxygen uptake (VO2peak) in a room maintained at 33 degrees C (active). In a second trial they were passively heated (passive) in a water bath (41.56 +/- 1.65 degrees C) until core temperature was equal to the core temperature observed at exhaustion during the active trial. Blood samples were taken from an indwelling venous cannula for the determination of serum prolactin during active heating and at corresponding core temperatures during passive heating. Core temperature was not significantly different between the two methods of heating and averaged 38.81 +/- 0.53 and 38.82 +/- 0.70 degrees C (data expressed as means +/- s.d.) at exhaustion during active heating and at the end of passive heating, respectively (P > 0.05). Mean arterial blood pressure was significantly lower throughout passive heating (active, 73 +/- 9 mmHg; passive, 62 +/- 12 mmHg; P < 0.01). Despite the significantly reduced blood pressure responses during passive heating, during both forms of heating the prolactin response was the same (active, 14.9 +/- 12.6 ng ml(-1); passive, 13.3 +/- 9.6 ng ml(-1); n.s.). These results suggest that thermoregulatory, i.e. core temperature, and not cardiovascular afferents provide the key stimulus for the release of prolactin, an indirect marker of central fatigue, during exercise in the heat.

  11. Quality assessment of palm products upon prolonged heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Tarmizi, Azmil Haizam Ahmad; Lin, Siew Wai

    2008-01-01

    Extending the frying-life of oils is of commercial and economic importance. Due to this fact, assessment on the thermal stability of frying oils could provide considerable savings to the food processors. In this study, the physico-chemical properties of five palm products mainly palm oil, single-fractionated palm olein, double-fractionated palm olein, red palm olein and palm-based shortening during 80 hours of heating at 180 degrees C were investigated. Heating properties of these products were then compared with that of high oleic sunflower oil, which was used as reference oil. The indices applied in evaluating the quality changes of oils were free fatty acid, smoke point, p-anisidine value, tocols, polar and polymer compounds. Three palm products i.e. palm oil, single-fractionated palm olein and double-fractionated palm olein were identified to be the most stable in terms of lower formation of free fatty acid, polar and polymer compounds as well as preserving higher smoke point and tocols content compared to the other three oils. The low intensity of hydrolytic and oxidative changes due to prolonged heating, suggests that these palm products are inherently suitable for frying purposes.

  12. Mutagenic activity and heterocyclic amine content of heated foods

    SciTech Connect

    Knize, M.G.; Johansson, M.; Jones, A.L.; Blakley, M.; Felton, J.S.

    1994-12-31

    Cooked foods were extracted and analyzed for mutagenic activity and assayed for known heterocyclic amines (HAs) by the Ames/Salmonella test and HPLC, respectively. Fried meats contain HAs (predominantly PhIP, MeIQx, DiMeIQx, and A{alpha}C) that are potent promutagens in bacteria, mutagenic in cultured mammalian cells, and carcinogenic in rodents and in nonhuman primates. Meats contain levels ranging from undetectable (< 0.1 ppb) to 50 ppb of known HAs when fried at temperatures from 190 to 250{degrees}C. These identified compounds are responsible for ca 75% of the measured mutagenic activity in Salmonella strain TA98. Barbecued beef and chicken have up to several thousand TA98 revertants per gram (rev/g) of cooked meat, with only ca 30% of the mutagenic activity accounted for by known heterocyclic amines. Some heated nonmeat foods also contain potent mutagenic activity. Toasted breads, cereals and snack foods have 0 to 10 TA98 rev/g, but overtoasting yields up to 40 rev/g, wheat and gluten-containing products are associated with higher activity. Grain-based coffee-substitute powders and instant coffees have 190 to 380 rev/g in TA98, and 1100 to 4000 rev/g in strain YG1024. The identify of the compounds responsible for the mutagenic activity are unknown in these non-meat foods. Toasted grain-based foods probably contribute less than 10% of the total mutagenic activity of the diet, with meat products responsible for the reminder. The finding of varying amounts of known and unknown mutagens in some cooked foods may be responsible for the poorly understood variation in human cancer incidence worldwide.

  13. Birch's Crustal Heat Production-Heat Flow Law: Key to Quantifying Mantle Heat Flow as a function of time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, D. D.; Thakur, M.

    2007-12-01

    Birch (1968) first showed the linear correlation of surface heat flow and radioactive heat production (Qs = Qo + bAs ) in granites in New England, USA and discussed implications to the vertical scale of radioactive heat generation in the crust. Subsequently similar relationships have been found worldwide and numerous papers written describing more details and expanding the implications of Birch's Law. The results are a powerful contribution from heat flow research to the understanding of the lithosphere and its evolution. Models are both well constrained experimentally and simple in implications. However, there still exist thermal models of the crust and lithosphere that do not have the same firm foundation and involve unnecessary ad hoc assumptions. A main point of confusion has been that the several of the original relationships were so low in error as to be considered by some to be "fortuitous". Interestingly a "similar" relationship has been proposed based on regional scale averaging of Qs -As data. A second point of confusion is that one admissible crustal radioactivity distribution model (the constant heat generation to depth b) has been criticized as unrealistic for a number of reasons, including the effect of erosion. However, it is appropriate to refer to the Qs -As relationship as a law because in fact the relationship holds as long as the vertical distribution is "geologically realistic." as will be demonstrated in this paper. All geologic and geophysical models of the continental crust imply decreasing heat production as a function of depth (i.e. the seismic layering for example) except in very special cases. This general decrease with depth is the only condition required for the existence of a "linear" Qs -As relationship. A comparison of all the Qs -As relationships proposed for terrains not affected by thermal events over the last 150 to 200 Ma shows a remarkably uniformity in slope (10 ± 3 km) and intercept value (30 ± 5 mWm-2 ). Therefore these

  14. Annual DOE Active Solar Heating and Cooling Contractors Review meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-09-01

    Ninety three project summaries dicussing the following aspects of active solar heating and cooling are presented: Rankine solar cooling systems; absorption solar cooling systems; desiccant solar cooling systems; solar heat pump systems; solar hot water systems; special projects (such as the National Solar Data Network, hybrid solar thermal/photovoltaic applications, and heat transfer and water migration in soils); administrative/management support; and solar collector, storage, controls, analysis, and materials technology.

  15. A New Model for Heat Flow in Extensional Basins: Estimating Radiogenic Heat Production

    SciTech Connect

    Waples, Douglas W.

    2002-06-15

    Radiogenic heat production (RHP) represents a significant fraction of surface heat flow, both on cratons and in sedimentary basins. RHP within continental crust-especially the upper crust-is high. RHP at any depth within the crust can be estimated as a function of crustal age. Mantle RHP, in contrast, is always low, contributing at most 1 to 2 mW/m{sup 2} to total heat flow. Radiogenic heat from any noncrystalline basement that may be present also contributes to total heat flow. RHP from metamorphic rocks is similar to or slightly lower than that from their precursor sedimentary rocks. When extension of the lithosphere occurs-as for example during rifting-the radiogenic contribution of each layer of the lithosphere and noncrystalline basement diminishes in direct proportion to the degree of extension of that layer. Lithospheric RHP today is somewhat less than in the distant past, as a result of radioactive decay. In modeling, RHP can be varied through time by considering the half lives of uranium, thorium, and potassium, and the proportional contribution of each of those elements to total RHP from basement. RHP from sedimentary rocks ranges from low for most evaporites to high for some shales, especially those rich in organic matter. The contribution to total heat flow of radiogenic heat from sediments depends strongly on total sediment thickness, and thus differs through time as subsidence and basin filling occur. RHP can be high for thick clastic sections. RHP in sediments can be calculated using ordinary or spectral gamma-ray logs, or it can be estimated from the lithology.

  16. Geothermal Energy Production With Innovative Methods Of Geothermal Heat Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, Allen; Darlow, Rick; Sanchez, Angel; Pierce, Michael; Sellers, Blake

    2014-12-19

    The ThermalDrive™ Power System (“TDPS”) offers one of the most exciting technological advances in the geothermal power generation industry in the last 30 years. Using innovations in subsurface heat recovery methods, revolutionary advances in downhole pumping technology and a distributed approach to surface power production, GeoTek Energy, LLC’s TDPS offers an opportunity to change the geothermal power industry dynamics.

  17. Hanford production reactor heat releases 1951--1971

    SciTech Connect

    Kannberg, L.D.

    1992-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to document and detail the thermal releases from the Hanford nuclear production reactors during the period 1951 through 1971, and to put these releases in historical perspective with respect to changing Columbia River flows and temperatures. This information can also be used as a foundation for further ecological evaluations. When examining Hanford production reactor thermal releases to the Columbia River all related factors affecting the releases and the characteristics of the river should be considered. The major considerations in the present study were the characteristics of the releases themselves (primarily coolant flow rate, temperatures, discharge facilities, period of operation, and level of operation) and the characteristics of the river in that reach (primarily flow rate, temperature and mixing characteristics; the effects of dam construction were also taken into account). In addition, this study addressed ecological effects of thermal releases on aquatic species. Accordingly, this report includes discussion of the reactor cooling system, historical heat releases, thermal mixing and transport studies, hydroelectric power development, and ecologic effects of Hanford production reactor heat releases on salmon and trout. Appendix A contains reactor operating statistics, and Appendix B provide computations of heat added to the Columbia River between Priest Rapids Dam and Richland, Washington.

  18. Active solar heating and cooling information user study

    SciTech Connect

    Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on active solar heating and cooling (SHAC). An earlier study identified the information user groups in the solar community and the priority (to accelerate solar energy commercialization) of getting information to each group. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from 19 SHAC groups respondents are analyzed in this report: DOE-Funded Researchers, Non-DOE-Funded Researchers, Representatives of Manufacturers (4 groups), Distributors, Installers, Architects, Builders, Planners, Engineers (2 groups), Representatives of Utilities, Educators, Cooperative Extension Service County Agents, Building Owners/Managers, and Homeowners (2 groups). The data will be used as input to the determination of information products and services the Solar Energy Research Institute, the Solar Energy Information Data Bank Network, and the entire information outreach community should be preparing and disseminating.

  19. Calcium promotes activity and confers heat stability on plant peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Plieth, Christoph; Vollbehr, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate how peroxidase (PO) activities and their heat stability correlate with the availability of free Ca2+ ions. Calcium ions work as a molecular switch for PO activity and exert a protective function, rendering POs heat stable. The concentration ranges of these two activities differ markedly. POs are activated by µM Ca2+ concentration ranges, whereas heat stabilization is observed in the nM range. This suggests the existence of different Ca2+ binding sites. The heat stability of POs depends on the source plant species. Terrestrial plants have POs that exhibit higher temperature stability than those POs from limnic and marine plants. Different POs from a single species can differ in terms of heat stability. The abundance of different POs within a plant is dependent on age and developmental stage. The heat stability of a PO does not necessarily correlate with the maximum temperature the source species is usually exposed to in its natural habitat. This raises questions on the role of POs in the heat tolerance of plants. Consequently, detailed investigations are needed to identify and characterize individual POs, with regard to their genetic origin, subcellular expression, tissue abundance, developmental emergence and their functions in innate and acquired heat tolerance. PMID:22580695

  20. Calcium promotes activity and confers heat stability on plant peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Plieth, Christoph; Vollbehr, Sonja

    2012-06-01

    In this paper we demonstrate how peroxidase (PO) activities and their heat stability correlate with the availability of free Ca(2+) ions. Calcium ions work as a molecular switch for PO activity and exert a protective function, rendering POs heat stable. The concentration ranges of these two activities differ markedly. POs are activated by µM Ca(2+) concentration ranges, whereas heat stabilization is observed in the nM range. This suggests the existence of different Ca(2+) binding sites. The heat stability of POs depends on the source plant species. Terrestrial plants have POs that exhibit higher temperature stability than those POs from limnic and marine plants. Different POs from a single species can differ in terms of heat stability. The abundance of different POs within a plant is dependent on age and developmental stage. The heat stability of a PO does not necessarily correlate with the maximum temperature the source species is usually exposed to in its natural habitat. This raises questions on the role of POs in the heat tolerance of plants. Consequently, detailed investigations are needed to identify and characterize individual POs, with regard to their genetic origin, subcellular expression, tissue abundance, developmental emergence and their functions in innate and acquired heat tolerance.

  1. Active latent heat storage with a screw heat exchanger - experimental results for heat transfer and concept for high pressure steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipf, Verena; Willert, Daniel; Neuhäuser, Anton

    2016-05-01

    An innovative active latent heat storage concept was invented and developed at Fraunhofer ISE. It uses a screw heat exchanger (SHE) for the phase change during the transport of a phase change material (PCM) from a cold to a hot tank or vice versa. This separates heat transfer and storage tank in comparison to existing concepts. A test rig has been built in order to investigate the heat transfer coefficients of the SHE during melting and crystallization of the PCM. The knowledge of these characteristics is crucial in order to assess the performance of the latent heat storage in a thermal system. The test rig contains a double shafted SHE, which is heated or cooled with thermal oil. The overall heat transfer coefficient U and the convective heat transfer coefficient on the PCM side hPCM both for charging and discharging have been calculated based on the measured data. For charging, the overall heat transfer coefficient in the tested SHE was Uch = 308 W/m2K and for discharging Udis = 210 W/m2K. Based on the values for hPCM the overall heat transfer coefficients for a larger SHE with steam as heat transfer fluid and an optimized geometry were calculated with Uch = 320 W/m2K for charging and Udis = 243 W/m2K for discharging. For pressures as high as p = 100 bar, an SHE concept has been developed, which uses an organic fluid inside the flight of the SHE as working media. With this concept, the SHE can also be deployed for very high pressure, e.g. as storage in solar thermal power plants.

  2. Heat of Hydration of Low Activity Cementitious Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Nasol, D.

    2015-07-23

    During the curing of secondary waste grout, the hydraulic materials in the dry mix react exothermally with the water in the secondary low-activity waste (LAW). The heat released, called the heat of hydration, can be measured using a TAM Air Isothermal Calorimeter. By holding temperature constant in the instrument, the heat of hydration during the curing process can be determined. This will provide information that can be used in the design of a waste solidification facility. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), the heat of hydration and other physical properties are being collected on grout prepared using three simulants of liquid secondary waste generated at the Hanford Site. From this study it was found that both the simulant and dry mix each had an effect on the heat of hydration. It was also concluded that the higher the cement content in the dry materials mix, the greater the heat of hydration during the curing of grout.

  3. Balloons and Bottles: Activities on Air-Sea Heat Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphree, Tom

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity designed to demonstrate how heating and cooling an air mass affects its temperature, volume, density, and pressure. Illustrates how thermal energy can cause atmospheric motion such as expansion, contraction, and winds. (Author/WRM)

  4. Oxidative Activity of Heated Coal Affected by Antypirogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torosyan, V. F.; Torosyan, E. S.; Borovikov, I. F.; Yakutova, V. A.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of antypirogens on chemical activity of heated coal is studied. It is proved that ammonium sulfate, calcium phosphate, calcium chloride, calcium nitrate and acid fluoride are the most effective antypirogens.

  5. Active heat exchange system development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefrois, R. T.; Knowles, G. R.; Mathur, A. K.; Budimir, J.

    1979-01-01

    Active heat exchange concepts for use with thermal energy storage systems in the temperature range of 250 C to 350 C, using the heat of fusion of molten salts for storing thermal energy are described. Salt mixtures that freeze and melt in appropriate ranges are identified and are evaluated for physico-chemical, economic, corrosive and safety characteristics. Eight active heat exchange concepts for heat transfer during solidification are conceived and conceptually designed for use with selected storage media. The concepts are analyzed for their scalability, maintenance, safety, technological development and costs. A model for estimating and scaling storage system costs is developed and is used for economic evaluation of salt mixtures and heat exchange concepts for a large scale application. The importance of comparing salts and heat exchange concepts on a total system cost basis, rather than the component cost basis alone, is pointed out. The heat exchange concepts were sized and compared for 6.5 MPa/281 C steam conditions and a 1000 MW(t) heat rate for six hours. A cost sensitivity analysis for other design conditions is also carried out.

  6. 77 FR 74027 - Certain Integrated Circuit Packages Provided with Multiple Heat-Conducting Paths and Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Integrated Circuit Packages Provided with Multiple Heat- Conducting Paths and Products... integrated circuit packages provided with multiple heat-conducting paths and products containing same...

  7. Solar production of intermediate temperature process heat, phase 1 design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-08-01

    The system consists of 42,420 sq ft of parabolic trough, single axis tracking, concentrating solar collectors. The collectors are oriented in a North-South configuration and track East-West. A heat transfer fluid (Gulf Synfluid 4cs) is circulated in a closed loop fashion through the solar collectors and a series of heat exchangers. The inlet and outlet fluid temperatures for the collectors are 370 F and 450 F respectively. These temperatures are constantly maintained via a variable flow rate through the collectors (the flow rate varies in direct proportion to the level of insolation). Superheated steam is the final product of the solar energy system. Final steam quality at the steam generator is 420 F and 165 Psia.

  8. Hydrogen production from coal using a nuclear heat source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quade, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    A strong candidate for hydrogen production in the intermediate time frame of 1985 to 1995 is a coal-based process using a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as a heat source. Expected process efficiencies in the range of 60 to 70% are considerably higher than all other hydrogen production processes except steam reforming of a natural gas. The process involves the preparation of a coal liquid, hydrogasification of that liquid, and steam reforming of the resulting gaseous or light liquid product. A study showing process efficiency and cost of hydrogen vs nuclear reactor core outlet temperature has been completed, and shows diminishing returns at process temperatures above about 1500 F. A possible scenario combining the relatively abundant and low-cost Western coal deposits with the Gulf Coast hydrogen users is presented which provides high-energy density transportation utilizing coal liquids and uranium.

  9. Molecular responses of Escherichia coli caused by heat stress and recombinant protein production during temperature induction.

    PubMed

    Valdez-Cruz, Norma A; Ramírez, Octavio T; Trujillo-Roldán, Mauricio A

    2011-01-01

    In a recent review, we discussed the extensively used temperature-inducible expression system, based on the pL and/or pR phage lambda promoters that are finely regulated by the thermo-labile cI857 repressor. In this system, an increase in temperature induces the heterologous protein production and activates the heat shock response, as well as the stringent and SOS responses. The same responses are activated just by the overproduction of recombinant protein. All such responses result in a metabolic burden to the cells, a decrease in the specific growth rate, and alterations in the central carbon metabolism. Altogether, these effects can alter the quantity and quality of the produced foreign protein. Here, we compare and discuss the transcription of selected genes, and the concomitant synthesis of heat-shock proteins (hsp) soon after thermal induction, in relation to the responses that occur in other expression systems that also trigger the heat-shock response.

  10. Heat Resistance of Salmonella in Various Egg Products

    PubMed Central

    Garibaldi, J. A.; Straka, R. P.; Ijichi, K.

    1969-01-01

    The heat-resistance characteristics of Salmonella typhimurium Tm-1, a reference strain in the stationary phase of growth, were determined at several temperatures in the major types of products produced by the egg industry. The time required to kill 90% of the population (D value) at a given temperature in specific egg products was as follows: at 60 C (140 F), D = 0.27 min for whole egg; D = 0.60 min for whole egg plus 10% sucrose; D = 1.0 min for fortified whole egg; D = 0.20 min for egg white (pH 7.3), stabilized with aluminum; D = 0.40 min for egg yolk; D = 4.0 min for egg yolk plus 10% sucrose; D = 5.1 min for egg yolk plus 10% NaCl; D = 1.0 min for scrambled egg mix; at 55 C (131 F), D = 0.55 min for egg white (pH 9.2); D = 1.2 min for egg white (pH 9.2) plus 10% sucrose. The average Z value (number of degrees, either centigrade or fahrenheit, for a thermal destruction time curve to traverse one logarithmic cycle) was 4.6 C (8.3 F) with a range from 4.2 to 5.3 C. Supplementation with 10% sucrose appeared to have a severalfold greater effect on the heat stabilization of egg white proteins than on S. typhimurium Tm-1. This information should be of value in the formulation of heat treatments to insure that all egg products be free of viable salmonellae. Images PMID:4890741

  11. Heat exposure, cardiovascular stress and work productivity in rice harvesters in India: implications for a climate change future.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Subhashis; Sett, Moumita; Kjellstrom, Tord

    2013-01-01

    Excessive workplace heat exposures create well-known risks of heat stroke, and it limits the workers' capacity to sustain physical activity. There is very limited evidence available on how these effects reduce work productivity, while the quantitative relationship between heat and work productivity is an essential basis for climate change impact assessments. We measured hourly heat exposure in rice fields in West Bengal and recorded perceived health problems via interviews of 124 rice harvesters. In a sub-group (n = 48) heart rate was recorded every minute in a standard work situation. Work productivity was recorded as hourly rice bundle collection output. The hourly heat levels (WBGT = Wet Bulb Globe Temperature) were 26-32°C (at air temperatures of 30-38°C), exceeding international standards. Most workers reported exhaustion and pain during work on hot days. Heart rate recovered quickly at low heat, but more slowly at high heat, indicating cardiovascular strain. The hourly number of rice bundles collected was significantly reduced at WBGT>26°C (approximately 5% per°C of increased WBGT). We conclude that high heat exposure in agriculture caused heat strain and reduced work productivity. This reduction will be exacerbated by climate change and may undermine the local economy.

  12. Heat stress impairs the nutritional metabolism and reduces the productivity of egg-laying ducks.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xianyong; Lin, Yingcai; Zhang, Hanxing; Chen, Wei; Wang, Shang; Ruan, Dong; Jiang, Zongyong

    2014-03-01

    This research was conducted to determine the effect of heat stress on the nutritional metabolism and productivity of egg-laying shelducks. Healthy shelducks (n=120) in the early laying stage (uniform body weights and normal feed intakes) were randomly assigned to two identical climate chambers and exposed to constant high temperature (34°C) or control temperature (23°C) for 28d. The heat-exposed ducks had reduced feed intakes and laying rates (P<0.05), increased frequency of panting and spreading wings and dull featheration; egg weight, eggshell thickness and strength, and Haugh unit also decreased and malondialdehyde (MDA) content of egg yolk increased (P<0.05). Compared with the control ducks, the plasma concentrations of HCO3(-), phosphorus, glucose, thyroxine and activities of glutamic-pyruvic transaminase and glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase were decreased, while there were increased concentrations of corticosterone (P<0.05). The content of MDA and lactate in plasma and liver was greater in heat-exposed than in control ducks, but superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), total antioxidant enzymes (T-AOC) activities and glutathione (GSH) contents were less. The expression of HSP70 gene expression in the liver was increased in heat-stressed ducks. The relative weight of oviduct, number of large ovarian follicles, length of the oviduct all decreased (P<0.05) in heat-treated ducks, as did expression of carbonic anhydrase and calcium binding protein genes in the shell gland as a result of heat stress. In summary, heat stress decreased the productivity of ducks, which related to reduced feed intake, protein synthesis, endocrine dysfunction, less antioxidant capacity, and derangement of calcium and phosphorous balance.

  13. Laser production and heating of plasma for MHD application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments have been made on the production and heating of plasmas by the absorption of laser radiation. These experiments were performed to ascertain the feasibility of using laser-produced or laser-heated plasmas as the input for a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator. Such a system would have a broad application as a laser-to-electricity energy converter for space power transmission. Experiments with a 100-J-pulsed CO2 laser were conducted to investigate the breakdown of argon gas by a high-intensity laser beam, the parameters (electron density and temperature) of the plasma produced, and the formation and propagation of laser-supported detonation (LSD) waves. Experiments were also carried out using a 1-J-pulsed CO2 laser to heat the plasma produced in a shock tube. The shock-tube hydrogen plasma reached electron densities of approximately 10 to the 17th/cu cm and electron temperatures of approximately 1 eV. Absorption of the CO2 laser beam by the plasma was measured, and up to approximately 100 percent absorption was observed. Measurements with a small MHD generator showed that the energy extraction efficiency could be very large with values up to 56 percent being measured.

  14. Active heat exchange system development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefrois, R. T.; Mathur, A. K.

    1980-01-01

    Five tasks to select, design, fabricate, test and evaluate candidate active heat exchanger modules for future applications to solar and conventional utility power plants were discussed. Alternative mechanizations of active heat exchange concepts were analyzed for use with heat of fusion phase change materials (PCMs) in the temperature range of 250 to 350 C. Twenty-six heat exchange concepts were reviewed, and eight were selected for detailed assessment. Two candidates were selected for small-scale experimentation: a coated tube and shell heat exchanger and a direct contact reflux boiler. A dilute eutectic mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium hydroxide was selected as the PCM from over 50 candidate inorganic salt mixtures. Based on a salt screening process, eight major component salts were selected initially for further evaluation. The most attractive major components in the temperature range of 250 to 350 C appeared to be NaNO3, NaNO2, and NaOH. Sketches of the two active heat exchange concepts selected for test are given.

  15. Active heat exchange system development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefrois, R. T.; Mathur, A. K.

    1980-04-01

    Five tasks to select, design, fabricate, test and evaluate candidate active heat exchanger modules for future applications to solar and conventional utility power plants were discussed. Alternative mechanizations of active heat exchange concepts were analyzed for use with heat of fusion phase change materials (PCMs) in the temperature range of 250 to 350 C. Twenty-six heat exchange concepts were reviewed, and eight were selected for detailed assessment. Two candidates were selected for small-scale experimentation: a coated tube and shell heat exchanger and a direct contact reflux boiler. A dilute eutectic mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium hydroxide was selected as the PCM from over 50 candidate inorganic salt mixtures. Based on a salt screening process, eight major component salts were selected initially for further evaluation. The most attractive major components in the temperature range of 250 to 350 C appeared to be NaNO3, NaNO2, and NaOH. Sketches of the two active heat exchange concepts selected for test are given.

  16. Plasmodium falciparum heat shock protein 70 lacks immune modulatory activity.

    PubMed

    Pooe, Ofentse Jacob; Köllisch, Gabriele; Heine, Holger; Shonhai, Addmore

    2017-02-14

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) family are conserved molecules that constitute a major part of the cell's protein folding machinery. The role of Hsp70s of parasitic origin in host cell immune modulation has remained contentious. This is largely due to the fact that several studies implicating Hsp70 in immune modulation rely on the use of recombinant protein derived from bacteria which is often fraught contamination. Thus, in the current study, we expressed recombinant Plasmodium falciparum Hsp70 (PfHsp70) using in three bacterial expression hosts: E. coli XL1 Blue, E. coli ClearColi BL21 and Brevibacillus choshinensis, respectively. We further investigated the immunostimulatory capability of the protein by assessing cytokine production by murine immune cells cultured in the presence of the protein. Recombinant PfHsp70 obtained from E. coli XL1 Blue expression host induced IL6 and IL8 cytokines. On the other hand, PfHsp70 produced in E. coli ClearColi and B. choshinensis expression systems was associated with no detectable traces of LPS and exhibited no immunomodulatory activity. Our findings suggest that PfHsp70 does not possess immunomodulatory function. Furthermore, our study suggests that E. coli ClearColi and B. choshinensis are versatile for the production of recombinant protein for use in immunomodulatory studies.

  17. Temperature-gated thermal rectifier for active heat flow control.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jia; Hippalgaonkar, Kedar; Shen, Sheng; Wang, Kevin; Abate, Yohannes; Lee, Sangwook; Wu, Junqiao; Yin, Xiaobo; Majumdar, Arun; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-08-13

    Active heat flow control is essential for broad applications of heating, cooling, and energy conversion. Like electronic devices developed for the control of electric power, it is very desirable to develop advanced all-thermal solid-state devices that actively control heat flow without consuming other forms of energy. Here we demonstrate temperature-gated thermal rectification using vanadium dioxide beams in which the environmental temperature actively modulates asymmetric heat flow. In this three terminal device, there are two switchable states, which can be regulated by global heating. In the "Rectifier" state, we observe up to 28% thermal rectification. In the "Resistor" state, the thermal rectification is significantly suppressed (<1%). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of solid-state active-thermal devices with a large rectification in the Rectifier state. This temperature-gated rectifier can have substantial implications ranging from autonomous thermal management of heating and cooling systems to efficient thermal energy conversion and storage.

  18. Diagnostics of Coronal Heating in Active-region Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fludra, A.; Hornsey, C.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding coronal heating remains a central problem in solar physics. Many mechanisms have been proposed to explain how energy is transferred to and deposited in the corona. We summarize past observational studies that attempted to identify the heating mechanism and point out the difficulties in reproducing the observations of the solar corona from the heating models. The aim of this paper is to study whether the observed extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission in individual coronal loops in solar active regions can provide constraints on the volumetric heating function, and to develop a diagnostic for the heating function for a subset of loops that are found close to static thermal equilibrium. We reconstruct the coronal magnetic field from Solar Dynamics Observatory/HMI data using a nonlinear force-free magnetic field model. We model selected loops using a one-dimensional stationary model, with a heating rate dependent locally on the magnetic field strength along the loop, and we calculate the emission from these loops in various EUV wavelengths for different heating rates. We present a method to measure a power index β defining the dependence of the volumetric heating rate EH on the magnetic field, {E}H\\propto {B}β , and controlling also the shape of the heating function: concentrated near the loop top, uniform and concentrated near the footpoints. The diagnostic is based on the dependence of the electron density on the index β. This method is free from the assumptions of the loop filling factor but requires spectroscopic measurements of the density-sensitive lines. The range of applicability for loops of different length and heating distributions is discussed, and the steps to solving the coronal heating problem are outlined.

  19. CME Productivity of Active Regions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J.; Shen, C.; Ye, P.; Zhang, Q.; Liu, R.; Wang, S.

    2015-12-01

    Solar active regions (ARs) are the major sources of two kinds of the most violent solar eruptions, namely flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Although they are believed to be two phenomena in the same eruptive process, the productivity of them could be quiet different for various ARs. Why is an AR productive? And why is a flare-rich AR CME-poor? To answer these questions, we compared the recent super flare-rich but CME-poor AR 12192, with other four ARs; two were productive in both flares and CMEs and the other two were inert to produce any M-class or intenser flares or CMEs. By investigating the photospheric parameters based on the SDO/HMI vector magnetogram, we find the three productive ARs have larger magnetic flux, current and free magnetic energy than the inert ARs. Furthermore, the two ARs productive in both flares and CMEs contain higher current helicity, concentrating along both sides of the flaring neutral lines, indicating the presence of a seed magnetic structure( that is highly sheared or twisted) of a CME; they also have higher decay index in the low corona, showing weak constraint. The results suggest that productive ARs are always large and have strong current system and sufficient free energy to power flares, and more importantly whether or not a flare is accompanied by a CME is seemingly related to (1) if there is significant sheared or twisted core field serving as the seed of the CME and (2) if the constraint of the overlying arcades is weak enough. Moreover, some productive ARs may frequently produce more than one CME. How does this happen? We do a statistical investigation of waiting times of quasi-homologous CMEs ( CME ssuccessive originating from the same ARs within short intervals) from super ARs in solar cycle 23 to answer this question. The waiting times of quasi-homologous CMEs have a two-component distribution with a separation at about 18 hours, the first component peaks at 7 hours. The correlation analysis among CME waiting times

  20. Optical investigation of heat release and NOx production in combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmerman, B. H.; Patel, S.; Dunkley, P.; Bryanston-Cross, P. J.

    2005-08-01

    Two passive optical techniques are described to investigate combustion. Optical Emission Tomography (OET) is used for non-intrusive study of heat release through the detection of chemiluminescence by the hydroxyl radical that is generated in the burning process. The OET technique described here is based on a passive fibre-optic detection system, which allows spatially resolved high-frequency detection of the flame front in a combustion flame, where all fibres detect the emission signals simultaneously. The system withstands the high pressures and temperatures typically encountered in the harsh environments of gas turbine combustors and IC engines. The sensor-array is non-intrusive, low-cost, compact, simple to configure and can be quickly set up around a combustion field. The maximum acquisition rate is 2 kHz. This allows spatially resolved study of the fast phenomena in combustion. Furthermore, the production of NOx is investigated through the emission of green light as a result of adding tri-methyl-borate to a flame. In combustion, the tri-methyl-borate produces green luminescence in locations where NOx would be produced. Combining the green luminescence visualisation with OET detection of the hydroxyl radical allows monitoring of heat release and of NOx production areas, thus giving a means of studying both the burning process and the resulting NOx pollution.

  1. Activated-Carbon Sorbent With Integral Heat-Transfer Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.; Yavrouian, Andre

    1996-01-01

    Prototype adsorption device used, for example, in adsorption heat pump, to store natural gas to power automobile, or to separate components of fluid mixtures. Device includes activated carbon held together by binder and molded into finned heat-transfer device providing rapid heating or cooling to enable rapid adsorption or desorption of fluids. Concepts of design and fabrication of device equally valid for such other highly thermally conductive devices as copper-finned tubes, and for such other high-surface-area sorbents as zeolites or silicates.

  2. Stellar activity and coronal heating: an overview of recent results

    PubMed Central

    Testa, Paola; Saar, Steven H.; Drake, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    Observations of the coronae of the Sun and of solar-like stars provide complementary information to advance our understanding of stellar magnetic activity, and of the processes leading to the heating of their outer atmospheres. While solar observations allow us to study the corona at high spatial and temporal resolution, the study of stellar coronae allows us to probe stellar activity over a wide range of ages and stellar parameters. Stellar studies therefore provide us with additional tools for understanding coronal heating processes, as well as the long-term evolution of solar X-ray activity. We discuss how recent studies of stellar magnetic fields and coronae contribute to our understanding of the phenomenon of activity and coronal heating in late-type stars. PMID:25897087

  3. Stellar activity and coronal heating: an overview of recent results.

    PubMed

    Testa, Paola; Saar, Steven H; Drake, Jeremy J

    2015-05-28

    Observations of the coronae of the Sun and of solar-like stars provide complementary information to advance our understanding of stellar magnetic activity, and of the processes leading to the heating of their outer atmospheres. While solar observations allow us to study the corona at high spatial and temporal resolution, the study of stellar coronae allows us to probe stellar activity over a wide range of ages and stellar parameters. Stellar studies therefore provide us with additional tools for understanding coronal heating processes, as well as the long-term evolution of solar X-ray activity. We discuss how recent studies of stellar magnetic fields and coronae contribute to our understanding of the phenomenon of activity and coronal heating in late-type stars.

  4. Modelling of labour productivity loss due to climate change: HEAT-SHIELD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjellstrom, Tord; Daanen, Hein

    2016-04-01

    Climate change will bring higher heat levels (temperature and humidity combined) to large parts of the world. When these levels reach above thresholds well defined by human physiology, the ability to maintain physical activity levels decrease and labour productivity is reduced. This impact is of particular importance in work situations in areas with long high intensity hot seasons, but also affects cooler areas during heat waves. Our modelling of labour productivity loss includes climate model data of the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Inter-comparison Project (ISI-MIP), calculations of heat stress indexes during different months, estimations of work capacity loss and its annual impacts in different parts of the world. Different climate models will be compared for the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) and the outcomes of the 2015 Paris Climate Conference (COP21) agreements. The validation includes comparisons of modelling outputs with actual field studies using historical heat data. These modelling approaches are a first stage contribution to the European Commission funded HEAT-SHIELD project.

  5. Effects of heating rate on slow pyrolysis behavior, kinetic parameters and products properties of moso bamboo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dengyu; Zhou, Jianbin; Zhang, Qisheng

    2014-10-01

    Effects of heating rate on slow pyrolysis behaviors, kinetic parameters, and products properties of moso bamboo were investigated in this study. Pyrolysis experiments were performed up to 700 °C at heating rates of 5, 10, 20, and 30 °C/min using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and a lab-scale fixed bed pyrolysis reactor. The results show that the onset and offset temperatures of the main devolatilization stage of thermogravimetry/derivative thermogravimetry (TG/DTG) curves obviously shift toward the high-temperature range, and the activation energy values increase with increasing heating rate. The heating rate has different effects on the pyrolysis products properties, including biochar (element content, proximate analysis, specific surface area, heating value), bio-oil (water content, chemical composition), and non-condensable gas. The solid yields from the fixed bed pyrolysis reactor are noticeably different from those of TGA mainly because the thermal hysteresis of the sample in the fixed bed pyrolysis reactor is more thorough.

  6. DOE Solar Process Heat Program: FY1991 Solar Process Heat Prefeasibility Studies activity

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, R.

    1992-11-01

    During fiscal year (FY) 1991, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Process Heat Program implemented a Solar Process Heat Prefeasibility Studies activity. For Program purposes, a prefeasibility study is an engineering assessment that investigates the technical and economic feasibility of a solar system for a specific application for a specific end-user. The study includes an assessment of institutional issues (e.g., financing, availability of insurance, etc.) that impact the feasibility of the proposed solar project. Solar process heat technology covers solar thermal energy systems (utilizing flat plate or concentrating solar Collectors) for water heating, water preheating, cooling/refrigeration, steam generation, ventilation air heating/preheating, etc. for applications in industry, commerce, and government. The studies are selected for funding through a competitive solicitation. For FY 1991, six projects were selected for funding. As of August 31, 1992, three teams had completed their studies. This paper describes the prefeasibility studies activity, presents the results from the study performed by United Solar Technologies, and summarizes the conclusions from the studies that have been completed to date and their implications for the Solar Process Heat Program.

  7. Department of Energy solar process heat program: FY 1991 solar process heat prefeasibility studies activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewett, R.

    1992-11-01

    During fiscal year (FY) 1991, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Process Heat Program implemented a Solar Process Heat Prefeasibility Studies activity. For Program purposes, a prefeasibility study is an engineering assessment that investigates the technical and economic feasibility of a solar system for a specific application for a specific end-user. The study includes an assessment of institutional issues (e.g., financing, availability of insurance, etc.) that impact the feasibility of the proposed solar project. Solar process heat technology covers solar thermal energy systems (utilizing flat plate or concentrating solar collectors) for water heating, water preheating, cooling/refrigeration, steam generation, ventilation air heating/preheating, etc., for applications in industry, commerce, and government. The studies are selected for funding through a competitive solicitation. For FY-91, six projects were selected for funding. As of 31 Aug. 1992, three teams had completed their studies. This paper describes the prefeasibility studies activity, presents the results from the study performed by United Solar Technologies, and summarizes the conclusions from the studies that have been completed to date and their implications for the Solar Process Heat Program.

  8. Characterization of Heat Melt Compactor (HMC) Product Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Linden; Wignarajah, Kanapathipi; Alba, Richard Gilbert; Pace, Gregory S.; Fisher, John W.

    2013-01-01

    The Heat Melt Compactor (HMC) is designed to sterilize and process wastes produced during space missions. Benefits of the HMC include reduction of biohazards to the crew, reduction in volume of wastes that would otherwise require storage, production of radiation shielding tiles, and recovery of water and other resources. Water reuse is critical onboard spacecrafts; it reduces the need for resupply missions and saves valuable storage space. The main sources of water in HMC batches are food, beverages, shampoo, disinfecting wipes, toothpaste, and diapers. Water reclaimed by the HMC was analyzed for concentrations of Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-­-, NO2-­-, Br-­-, NO3-­-, PO43-­-, SO42-­-, total organic carbon (TOC), total inorganic carbon (TIC), % total solids, and pH. The data are discussed in relation to the current water input characteristics established for the International Space Station Water Processor Assembly system. Batches with higher than average amounts of food produced HMC product water with higher sulfate content, and batches with higher proportions of disinfectant wipes and food yielded HMC product water with higher ammonium concentration. We also compared theoretical chemical composition of HMC product water based on food labels and literature values to experimental results.

  9. Investigations about the quantitative changes of carbon dioxide production in humans. Report 2: Carbon dioxide production during fever and its relationship with heat production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebermeister, C.

    1978-01-01

    Investigations are cited and explained for carbon dioxide production during fever and its relationship with heat production. The general topics of discussion are: (1) carbon dioxide production for alternating fever attacks; (2) heat balance during the perspiration phase; (3) heat balance during the chill phase; (4) the theory of fever; and (5) chill phase for other fever attacks.

  10. Heat shock factor 2 is activated during mouse heart development.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, M; Jokinen, E; Sistonen, L; Leppä, S

    2000-08-01

    Two members of the heat shock transcription factor family, HSF1 and HSF2, have been identified as activators of mammalian heat shock gene expression. HSF1 acts as a classical stress-responsive factor, whereas HSF2 might play a role in embryogenesis, since it is active during pre- and post-implantation periods up to 15.5 days of mouse embryonic development. In this study, we analyzed HSF1 and HSF2 expression and activation during mouse heart formation. Our results show an abundant expression of HSF1 throughout heart development. In contrast, expression of the alternatively spliced HSF2-alpha and HSF2-beta, and an additional higher molecular weight isoform is strongly upregulated in the developing mouse heart at E11.5-12.5, a stage after which tubular heart has looped and chambers formed, and the myocardial walls are maturating and the valves differentiating. At the same developmental stage, HSF2 DNA-binding activity is transiently induced, whereas the weak HSE-binding activity, which is detected throughout heart development, consists primarily of HSF1. Interestingly, heat shock gene expression shows no temporal or spatial correlation with HSF2 expression and activation. Taken together, our results indicate that HSF2 activation is associated with specific stages of heart formation but is not involved in the regulation of inducible heat shock gene expression.

  11. Singlet oxygen production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Ankush; Ferretti, Ursula; Sedlářová, Michaela; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, singlet oxygen formation by lipid peroxidation induced by heat stress (40 °C) was studied in vivo in unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Primary and secondary oxidation products of lipid peroxidation, hydroperoxide and malondialdehyde, were generated under heat stress as detected using swallow-tailed perylene derivative fluorescence monitored by confocal laser scanning microscopy and high performance liquid chromatography, respectively. Lipid peroxidation was initiated by enzymatic reaction as inhibition of lipoxygenase by catechol and caffeic acid prevented hydroperoxide formation. Ultra-weak photon emission showed formation of electronically excited species such as triplet excited carbonyl, which, upon transfer of excitation energy, leads to the formation of either singlet excited chlorophyll or singlet oxygen. Alternatively, singlet oxygen is formed by direct decomposition of hydroperoxide via Russell mechanisms. Formation of singlet oxygen was evidenced by the nitroxyl radical 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping spectroscopy and the imaging of green fluorescence of singlet oxygen sensor green detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Suppression of singlet oxygen formation by lipoxygenase inhibitors indicates that singlet oxygen may be formed via enzymatic lipid peroxidation initiated by lipoxygenase. PMID:26831215

  12. A Fresnel collector process heat experiment at Capitol Concrete Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauger, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment is planned, conducted and evaluated to determine the feasibility of using a Power Kinetics' Fresnel concentrator to provide process heat in an industrial environment. The plant provides process steam at 50 to 60 psig to two autoclaves for curing masonry blocks. When steam is not required, the plant preheats hot water for later use. A second system is installed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory parabolic dish test site for hardware validation and experiment control. Experiment design allows for the extrapolation of results to varying demands for steam and hot water, and includes a consideration of some socio-technical factors such as the impact on production scheduling of diurnal variations in energy availability.

  13. The reliability of a heat acclimation state test prescribed from metabolic heat production intensities.

    PubMed

    Willmott, A G B; Hayes, M; Dekerle, J; Maxwell, N S

    2015-10-01

    Acclimation state indicates an individual's phenotypic response to a thermally stressful environment, where changes in heat dissipation capacity are determined during a heat acclimation state test (HAST). Variations in thermoregulatory and sudomotor function are reported while exercising at intensities relative to maximal oxygen uptake. This inter-individual variation is not true when intensity is prescribed to elicit a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (Ḣprod). This study investigated the reliability of peak Tre and two composite measures (sweat gain and sweat setpoint) derived from indices of thermosensitivity during a HAST prescribed from Ḣprod intensities. Fourteen participants (mean±SD; age 23±3 years, stature 174±7cm, body mass 75.0±9.4kg, body surface area 1.9±0.1m(2), peak oxygen consumption [V̇O2peak] 3.49±0.53Lmin(-1)) completed a lactate threshold-V̇O2peak test and two duplicate Ḣprod HASTs on a cycle ergometer. The HAST consisted of three, 30-min periods of exercise at fixed Ḣprod intensities relative to body mass (3, 4.5 and 6Wkg(-1)), within hot dry conditions (44.7±1.8°C and 18.1±4.7% relative humidity). Peak Tre (38.20±0.36 vs. 38.16±0.42°C, p=0.54), sweat setpoint (36.76±0.34 and 36.79±0.38°C, p=0.68) and sweat gain (0.37±0.14 and 0.40±0.18gs(-1)°C(-1), p=0.40) did not differ between HASTs. Typical error of measurement (TEM), coefficient variation (CV) and intra-class coefficient of correlation (ICC) were 0.19°C, 0.5% and 0.80 for peak Tre, 0.21°C, 0.6% and 0.65 for sweat setpoint and 0.09gs(-1)°C(-1), 28% and 0.68 for sweat gain, respectively. The use of fixed Ḣprod intensities relative to body mass is a reliable method for measuring Tre and ascertaining sweat setpoint during a HAST, whereas, sweat gain displays greater variability. A Ḣprod HAST appears sufficiently reliable for quantifying heat acclimation state, where TEM in peak Tre and sweat setpoint are small enough to identify physiologically

  14. Heating decreases epithiospecifier protein activity and increases sulforaphane formation in broccoli.

    PubMed

    Matusheski, Nathan V; Juvik, John A; Jeffery, Elizabeth H

    2004-05-01

    Sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate from broccoli, is one of the most potent food-derived anticarcinogens. This compound is not present in the intact vegetable, rather it is formed from its glucosinolate precursor, glucoraphanin, by the action of myrosinase, a thioglucosidase enzyme, when broccoli tissue is crushed or chewed. However, a number of studies have demonstrated that sulforaphane yield from glucoraphanin is low, and that a non-bioactive nitrile analog, sulforaphane nitrile, is the primary hydrolysis product when plant tissue is crushed at room temperature. Recent evidence suggests that in Arabidopsis, nitrile formation from glucosinolates is controlled by a heat-sensitive protein, epithiospecifier protein (ESP), a non-catalytic cofactor of myrosinase. Our objectives were to examine the effects of heating broccoli florets and sprouts on sulforaphane and sulforaphane nitrile formation, to determine if broccoli contains ESP activity, then to correlate heat-dependent changes in ESP activity, sulforaphane content and bioactivity, as measured by induction of the phase II detoxification enzyme quinone reductase (QR) in cell culture. Heating fresh broccoli florets or broccoli sprouts to 60 degrees C prior to homogenization simultaneously increased sulforaphane formation and decreased sulforaphane nitrile formation. A significant loss of ESP activity paralleled the decrease in sulforaphane nitrile formation. Heating to 70 degrees C and above decreased the formation of both products in broccoli florets, but not in broccoli sprouts. The induction of QR in cultured mouse hepatoma Hepa lclc7 cells paralleled increases in sulforaphane formation.

  15. Storage-stable foamable polyurethane is activated by heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Polyurethane foamable mixture remains inert in storage unit activated to produce a rapid foaming reaction. The storage-stable foamable composition is spread as a paste on the surface of an expandable structure and, when heated, yields a rigid open-cell polyurethane foam that is self-bondable to the substrate.

  16. Active heat exchange: System development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alario, J.; Haslett, R.

    1981-03-01

    An active heat exchange method in a latent heat (salt) thermal energy storage system that prevents a low conductivity solid salt layer from forming on heat transfer surfaces was developed. An evaluation of suitable media with melting points in the temperature range of interest (250 to 400 C) limited the candidates to molten salts from the chloride, hydroxide, and nitrate families, based on high storage capacity, good corrosion characteristics, and availability in large quantities at reasonable cost. The specific salt recommended for laboratory tests was a choride eutectic (20.5KCl, 24.5NaCl, 55.0MgCl2 percent by wt.), with a nominal melting point of 385 C.

  17. Active heat exchange system development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefrois, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    Alternative mechanizations of active heat exchange concepts were analyzed for use with heat of fusion Phase Change Materials (PCM's) in the temperature range of 250 C to 350 C for solar and conventional power plant applications. Over 24 heat exchange concepts were reviewed, and eight were selected for detailed assessment. Two candidates were chosen for small-scale experimentation: a coated tube and shell that exchanger, and a direct contact reflux boiler. A dilute eutectic mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium hydroxide was selected as the PCM from over fifty inorganic salt mixtures investigated. Preliminary experiments with various tube coatings indicated that a nickel or chrome plating of Teflon or Ryton coating had promise of being successful. An electroless nickel plating was selected for further testing. A series of tests with nickel-plated heat transfer tubes showed that the solidifying sodium nitrate adhered to the tubes and the experiment failed to meet the required discharge heat transfer rate of 10 kW(t). Testing of the reflux boiler is under way.

  18. Active heat exchange system development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefrois, R. T.

    1980-03-01

    Alternative mechanizations of active heat exchange concepts were analyzed for use with heat of fusion Phase Change Materials (PCM's) in the temperature range of 250 C to 350 C for solar and conventional power plant applications. Over 24 heat exchange concepts were reviewed, and eight were selected for detailed assessment. Two candidates were chosen for small-scale experimentation: a coated tube and shell that exchanger, and a direct contact reflux boiler. A dilute eutectic mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium hydroxide was selected as the PCM from over fifty inorganic salt mixtures investigated. Preliminary experiments with various tube coatings indicated that a nickel or chrome plating of Teflon or Ryton coating had promise of being successful. An electroless nickel plating was selected for further testing. A series of tests with nickel-plated heat transfer tubes showed that the solidifying sodium nitrate adhered to the tubes and the experiment failed to meet the required discharge heat transfer rate of 10 kW(t). Testing of the reflux boiler is under way.

  19. Active heat exchange system development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alario, J.; Kosson, R.; Haslett, R.

    1980-01-01

    Various active heat exchange concepts were identified from among three generic categories: scrapers, agitators/vibrators and slurries. The more practical ones were given a more detailed technical evaluation and an economic comparison with a passive tube-shell design for a reference application (300 MW sub t storage for 6 hours). Two concepts were selected for hardware development: (1) a direct contact heat exchanger in which molten salt droplets are injected into a cooler counterflowing stream of liquid metal carrier fluid, and (2) a rotating drum scraper in which molten salt is sprayed onto the circumference of a rotating drum, which contains the fluid salt is sprayed onto the circumference of a rotating drum, which contains the fluid heat sink in an internal annulus near the surface. A fixed scraper blade removes the solidified salt from the surface which was nickel plated to decrease adhesion forces. In addition to improving performance by providing a nearly constant transfer rate during discharge, these active heat exchanger concepts were estimated to cost at least 25% less than the passive tube-shell design.

  20. Transient fluid flow and heat transfer in petroleum production systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Dongqing

    Heat transfer is an important phenomenon in both wellbore and reservoir. The pertinent temperature distribution can provide a valuable perspective in analyzing and optimizing the oil production. In this work, two kinds of co-production, production fluid through the annulus and tubing, and through two independent tubings, have been modeled using steady state analysis. The fluid temperatures in the production string and annulus have been solved analytically in both cases. Furthermore, we extended the theory of steady state energy transport to remedy asphaltene deposition problem by circulating the cooling fluid in the annulus. Due to the complex nature of two-phase flow in the oil/gas production, more reliable mechanistic modeling approaches have been developed since early 1980's. Rooted in Hasan-Kabir model, we have developed a wellbore/reservoir coupling simulator for the transient non-Darcy two-phase flow in the flow-after-flow well test. The entire historical flow behavior has been modeled using superposition method and validated with field data. Our second simulation is for the investigation of a blowout well, which is a great concern in the oil field. When the pressure in the wellbore is sufficiently high, the fluids will attain sonic velocity at the wellhead. We presented a computational algorithm to estimate the blowout rate in a given wellbore/reservoir system and examined four major parameters, such as formation permeability, Gas-Oil-Ratio (GOR), reservoir pressure and tubing diameter. The transient nature of this approach also illustrates the evolution process of a blowout. We have also developed a transient simulator to determine the location and severity of a blockage in a gas pipeline based on the theory of two-phase flow and pressure transient analysis. The presence of a sizeable blockage will affect the outlet gas pressure response by decreasing the available pipe volume and increasing the friction loss of the fluid flow. The simulator solves for the

  1. Relation between cell death progression, reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial membrane potential in fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells under heat-shock conditions.

    PubMed

    Pyatrikas, Darya V; Fedoseeva, Irina V; Varakina, Nina N; Rusaleva, Tatyana M; Stepanov, Alexei V; Fedyaeva, Anna V; Borovskii, Gennadii B; Rikhvanov, Eugene G

    2015-06-01

    Moderate heat shock increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production that led to cell death in glucose-grown Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Conditions that disturb mitochondrial functions such as treatment by uncouplers and petite mutation were shown to inhibit ROS production and protects cell from thermal death. Hence, mitochondria are responsible for ROS production and play an active role in cell death. An increase in ROS production was accompanied by hyperpolarization of inner mitochondrial membrane. All agents suppressing hyperpolarization also suppressed heat-induced ROS production. It was supposed that generation of ROS under moderate heat shock in glucose-grown S. cerevisiae cells is driven by the mitochondrial membrane potential.

  2. Circadian fluctuation in heat production of young calves at different ambient temperatures in relation to posture.

    PubMed

    Schrama, J W; Noordhuizen, J P; Arieli, A; Brandsma, H A; van der Linden, J M; Verstegen, M W

    1994-03-01

    Circadian fluctuations in the effect of ambient temperature (Ta) on heat production (Htot) and its relation to posture were investigated in young calves in this study. Twenty-three 6-d-old Holstein-Friesian male calves were assigned to one of four Ta treatments: 5, 9, 13, or 18 degrees C. Heat production was measured per calf continuously every 9 min by indirect calorimetry for 5 d. The posture during these 9-min periods was derived from physical activity measurements by Doppler-radar meters. Heat production varied within a day; it was highest when calves were drinking (milk or water). The influence of Ta on Htot was larger for the light (including feeding periods) than for the dark phase of the day, being related to the larger Ta effect during the feeding periods. Lower critical temperatures (LCT) were 14.1, 15.2, and 16.8 degrees C and extra thermal heat productions below LCT (ETH) were 8.48, 8.28, and 11.55 kJ.kg-.75.d-1.C degrees-1 for the dark, the light (excluding feeding periods), and the feeding phase during the day, respectively. Time spent standing was not affected by Ta but varied during the day (24-h period). Averaged over Ta, 51% of the within day variation in Htot was accounted for by the calf's posture. Correction of Htot for the time spent standing reduced the difference in both ETH and LCT between phases of the day. The present study demonstrates that circadian fluctuations exist in the thermal requirements of young calves. Part of these fluctuations are related to within-day variation in time spent standing.

  3. Differential heat shock tolerance and expression of heat shock inducible proteins in two stored-product psocids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recent recognition of psocid infestations as a major concern in stored products, where their management with fumigants and conventional insecticides has proven difficult, and also the recent reemergence of heat treatment as a potential tactic for control of stored-product insects led to the pres...

  4. Constructing a model of 3D radiogenic heat production in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmot Noller, N. M.; Daly, J. S.

    2012-04-01

    Heat production values in the crust and mantle rock inform heat flow density data to provide crucial information about the structure of the Earth's lithosphere. In addition, accurate models of horizontal and vertical distribution of heat production can help to define geothermal exploration targets. Low-enthalpy district scale space heating and Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) using hot, dry rock may provide sustainable energy resources in regions currently perceived as having low geothermal energy potential. Ireland is located within stable lithosphere, unaffected by recent tectonism and volcanism, and has an estimated heat flow range below the measured global continental average. Nevertheless, borehole data indicate that heat production is variable across the island, with anomalously high rates observed, for example, in Cavan, Meath and Antrim. Data coverage is, however, poor. Radioactive isotopic decay generates heat in rock. By using established heat production constants and known concentrations of unstable isotopes of uranium, thorium and potassium, along with rock density values, a heat production rate in μW m -3 is obtained. With the objective of compiling the first comprehensive database of information about the Irish lithosphere, in three dimensions, the authors present here initial results obtained from published and unpublished whole-rock major and trace element analyses. The presence of systematic trends correlating heat production to properties such as age and lithology are also investigated. Offering insight into the vertical component of heat production distribution, Irish xenoliths emplaced in Lower Carboniferous volcanics are regarded as a reliable proxy for the present-day lower crust. Their geochemical composition gives heat production values that are higher than expected for the depths indicated by their thermobarometric data, suggesting that heat production rates do not simply reduce with depth.

  5. Symmetric miniaturized heating system for active microelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCracken, Michael; Mayer, Michael; Jourard, Isaac; Moon, Jeong-Tak; Persic, John

    2010-07-01

    To qualify interconnect technologies such as microelectronic fine wire bonds for mass production of integrated circuit (IC) packages, it is necessary to perform accelerated aging tests, e.g., to age a device at an elevated temperature or to subject the device to thermal cycling and measure the decrease of interconnect quality. There are downsides to using conventional ovens for this as they are relatively large and have relatively slow temperature change rates, and if electrical connections are required between monitoring equipment and the device being heated, they must be located inside the oven and may be aged by the high temperatures. Addressing these downsides, a miniaturized heating system (minioven) is presented, which can heat individual IC packages containing the interconnects to be tested. The core of this system is a piece of copper cut from a square shaped tube with high resistance heating wire looped around it. Ceramic dual in-line packages are clamped against either open end of the core. One package contains a Pt100 temperature sensor and the other package contains the device to be aged placed in symmetry to the temperature sensor. According to the temperature detected by the Pt100, a proportional-integral-derivative controller adjusts the power supplied to the heating wire. The system maintains a dynamic temperature balance with the core hot and the two symmetric sides with electrical connections to the device under test at a cooler temperature. Only the face of the package containing the device is heated, while the socket holding it remains below 75 °C when the oven operates at 200 °C. The minioven can heat packages from room temperature up to 200 °C in less than 5 min and maintain this temperature at 28 W power. During long term aging, a temperature of 200 °C was maintained for 1120 h with negligible resistance change of the heating wires after 900 h (heating wire resistance increased 0.2% over the final 220 h). The device is also subjected to

  6. Symmetric miniaturized heating system for active microelectronic devices.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Michael; Mayer, Michael; Jourard, Isaac; Moon, Jeong-Tak; Persic, John

    2010-07-01

    To qualify interconnect technologies such as microelectronic fine wire bonds for mass production of integrated circuit (IC) packages, it is necessary to perform accelerated aging tests, e.g., to age a device at an elevated temperature or to subject the device to thermal cycling and measure the decrease of interconnect quality. There are downsides to using conventional ovens for this as they are relatively large and have relatively slow temperature change rates, and if electrical connections are required between monitoring equipment and the device being heated, they must be located inside the oven and may be aged by the high temperatures. Addressing these downsides, a miniaturized heating system (minioven) is presented, which can heat individual IC packages containing the interconnects to be tested. The core of this system is a piece of copper cut from a square shaped tube with high resistance heating wire looped around it. Ceramic dual in-line packages are clamped against either open end of the core. One package contains a Pt100 temperature sensor and the other package contains the device to be aged placed in symmetry to the temperature sensor. According to the temperature detected by the Pt100, a proportional-integral-derivative controller adjusts the power supplied to the heating wire. The system maintains a dynamic temperature balance with the core hot and the two symmetric sides with electrical connections to the device under test at a cooler temperature. Only the face of the package containing the device is heated, while the socket holding it remains below 75 degrees C when the oven operates at 200 degrees C. The minioven can heat packages from room temperature up to 200 degrees C in less than 5 min and maintain this temperature at 28 W power. During long term aging, a temperature of 200 degrees C was maintained for 1120 h with negligible resistance change of the heating wires after 900 h (heating wire resistance increased 0.2% over the final 220 h). The

  7. Rotating single cycle two-phase thermally activated heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Fabris, G.

    1993-06-08

    A thermally activated heat pump is described which utilizes single working fluid which as a whole passes consecutively through all parts of the apparatus in a closed loop series; the working fluid in low temperature saturated liquid state at condensation is pumped to higher pressure with a pump; subsequently heat is added to the liquid of increased pressure, the liquid via the heating is brought to a high temperature saturated liquid state; the high temperature liquid passes and flashes subsequently in form of two-phase flow through a rotating two-phase flow turbine; in such a way the working fluid performs work on the two-phase turbine which in turn powers the liquid pump and a lower compressor; two-phase flow exiting the two-phase turbine separated by impinging tangentially on housing of the turbine; low temperature heat is added to the housing in such a way evaporating the separated liquid on the housing; in such a way the liquid is fully vaporized the vapor then enters a compressor, the compressor compresses the vapor to a higher condensation pressure and corresponding increased temperature, the vapor at the condensation pressure enters a condenser whereby heat is rejected and the vapor is fully condensed into state of saturated liquid, mid saturated liquid enters the pump and repeats the cycle.

  8. Retrieved Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release Using TRMM Rainfall Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Olson, W. S.; Meneghini, R.; Yang, S.; Simpson, J.; Kummerow, C.; Smith, E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper represents the first attempt to use TRMM rainfall information to estimate the four dimensional latent heating structure over the global tropics for February 1998. The mean latent heating profiles over six oceanic regions (TOGA COARE IFA, Central Pacific, S. Pacific Convergence Zone, East Pacific, Indian Ocean and Atlantic Ocean) and three continental regions (S. America, Central Africa and Australia) are estimated and studied. The heating profiles obtained from the results of diagnostic budget studies over a broad range of geographic locations are used to provide comparisons and indirect validation for the heating algorithm estimated heating profiles. Three different latent heating algorithms, the Goddard Convective-Stratiform (CSH) heating, the Goddard Profiling (GPROF) heating, and the Hydrometeor heating (HH) are used and their results are intercompared. The horizontal distribution or patterns of latent heat release from the three different heating retrieval methods are quite similar. They all can identify the areas of major convective activity (i.e., a well defined ITCZ in the Pacific, a distinct SPCZ) in the global tropics. The magnitude of their estimated latent heating release is also not in bad agreement with each other and with those determined from diagnostic budget studies. However, the major difference among these three heating retrieval algorithms is the altitude of the maximum heating level. The CSH algorithm estimated heating profiles only show one maximum heating level, and the level varies between convective activity from various geographic locations. These features are in good agreement with diagnostic budget studies. By contrast, two maximum heating levels were found using the GPROF heating and HH algorithms. The latent heating profiles estimated from all three methods can not show cooling between active convective events. We also examined the impact of different TMI (Multi-channel Passive Microwave Sensor) and PR (Precipitation Radar

  9. Body heat transfer during hip surgery using active core warming.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, P; Webster, J; Carli, F

    1995-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of core warming on heat redistribution from the core to the periphery as manifested by changes in core, mean skin temperature and mean body heat, investigated in a group of 30 patients undergoing total hip replacement. The control group (n = 10) had no active warming. Core warming was achieved in the humidifier group (n = 10) by using humidified and warmed gases at 40 degrees C, whilst in the oesophageal group (n = 10), an oesophageal heat exchanger was used to achieve active warming. Operating room temperature and relative humidity was standardised. Aural canal and skin temperatures (15 sites) were measured before induction of anaesthesia, at the end of surgery and one hour of recovery after anaesthesia. Mean skin temperatures were calculated for a weighted four and unweighted 15 points, and mean body heat were calculated to quantify the distribution of body heat. Core temperature decreased in the control and the oesophageal groups, but not in the humidifier group at the end of surgery; by mean values +/- SD of 1.9 degrees C +/- 0.6, 1.2 degrees C +/- 0.6 and 0.4 degree C +/- 0.2 degree C, respectively (P < 0.01). Mean skin temperature (MST15) decreased in the control group by 1.0 degree C +/- 1.0, but not in the actively warmed groups where the mean increased by 0.1 degree C +/- 1.4 and 0.2 degree C +/- 0.2 in the oesophageal and humidifier groups, respectively (P < 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Pref-1 preferentially inhibits heat production in brown adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Koppen, Arjen; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2012-05-01

    In mammals there are two types of adipocytes with opposing functions. Brown adipocytes are characterized by a high number of mitochondria and are specialized for heat production (thermogenesis), expressing thermogenic genes such as UCP1 (uncoupling protein 1). White adipocytes, on the other hand, store energy. Although many key regulators in the differentiation of white adipocytes have been established, our current knowledge on the same proteins in brown adipogenesis is lagging behind. One example is Pref-1 (pre-adipocyte factor-1), which maintains white pre-adipocytes in an undifferentiated state, but is only poorly characterized in the brown pre-adipocyte lineage. In this issue of the Biochemical Journal, Armengol et al. now shed new light on the role and regulation of Pref-1 in brown pre-adipocytes. First, Pref-1 specifically inhibits the thermogenic gene programme in brown pre-adipocytes. Secondly, they identified the transcription factor C/EBPδ (CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein δ) as a direct positive regulator of Pref-1 expression, whereas this protein does not fulfil this role in white adipogenesis. Taken together, these findings indicate that specific manipulation of brown adipocyte differentiation and/or function without interfering with their white adipocyte counterparts may be possible, which may open up new therapeutic ways to combat obesity-associated health problems.

  11. Climate change, workplace heat exposure, and occupational health and productivity in Central America.

    PubMed

    Kjellstrom, Tord; Crowe, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Climate change is increasing heat exposure in places such as Central America, a tropical region with generally hot/humid conditions. Working people are at particular risk of heat stress because of the intrabody heat production caused by physical labor. This article aims to describe the risks of occupational heat exposure on health and productivity in Central America, and to make tentative estimates of the impact of ongoing climate change on these risks. A review of relevant literature and estimation of the heat exposure variable wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) in different locations within the region were used to estimate the effects. We found that heat stress at work is a real threat. Literature from Central America and heat exposure estimates show that some workers are already at risk under current conditions. These conditions will likely worsen with climate change, demonstrating the need to create solutions that will protect worker health and productivity.

  12. Visible light active photocatalyst from recycled disposable heating pads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Meng-Chien; Wang, Chun-Yu; Chen, Che-Chin; Wang, Chih-Ming; Hsiao, Ta-Chih; Tsai, Din Ping

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-Fe2O3 (α-Fe2O3) is cheap and abundant and has potential to be a highly efficient photocatalyst for water splitting. According to the report, there are a huge amount of disposable heating pads being created every year, and the pads are used one time then thrown away. We found that the main product of used heating pads is α-Fe2O3. Here, we collect and purify the α-Fe2O3 powder in the used heating pads using low power consumption processes. It is shown that the recycled heating pads can be used as a cost-effective photocatalyst for H2 energy and for decomposition of organic pollutants as well. Additionally, the plasmonic enhanced photocatalysis reaction of α-Fe2O3 is also investigated. It is found that H2 evolution rate can be enhanced 15% using α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles coated with a thin Au layer. The degradation of methylene blue can also enhance 12% compared to photocatalyst α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles coated without Au layer.

  13. Thermal Gains Through Collective Metabolic Heat Production in Social Caterpillars of Eriogaster lanestris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruf, C.; Fiedler, K.

    We investigated thermal characteristics of aggregations of social, tent-building caterpillars of the small eggar moth Eriogaster lanestris (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae). The highly synchronous behavior of individuals of the colony has important consequences for their thermal ecology. Air temperature in the tent fluctuates according to the caterpillars' activity: air temperature slowly rises about 2.5-3 °C above the surroundings when caterpillars aggregate in the tent after feeding and decreases rapidly when the larvae leave the tent. Thermal energy can be stored for a few hours when ambient temperature drops. Experiments show that metabolic heat production sufficiently explains this effect. As even minor additional heat gain may reduce developmental time, aggregating in the tent may thus confer selective advantages under overcast weather or at night, when behavioral thermoregulation through basking is not possible.

  14. Heated Proteins are Still Active in a Functionalized Nanoporous Support

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baowei; Qi, Wen N.; Li, Xiaolin; Lei, Chenghong; Liu, Jun

    2013-07-08

    We report that even under the heated condition, the conformation and activity of a protein can be hoarded in a functionalized nanoporous support via non-covalent interaction, although the hoarded protein was not exhibiting the full protein activity, the protein released subsequently still maintained its native conformation and activity. Glucose oxidase (GOX) was spontaneously and largely entrapped in aminopropyl-functionalized mesoporous silica (NH2-FMS) at 20 oC via a dominant electrostatic interaction. Although FMS-GOX displayed 45% activity of the free enzyme in solution, the GOX released from FMS exhibited its 100% activity prior to the entrapment. Surprisingly, the released GOX from FMS still maintained 89% of its initial activity prior to the entrapment after FMS-GOX was incubated at 60 oC for 1 h prior to release, while the free GOX in solution lost nearly all activity under the same incubation. Intrinsic fluorescence emission of GOX and native electrophoresis demonstrated that the heating resulted in significant conformational changes and oligomeric structures of the free GOX, but FMS efficiently maintained the thermal stability of GOX therein and resisted the thermal denaturation and oligomeric aggregation.

  15. The recovery heat production in non-myelinated garfish olfactory nerve fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Howarth, J V; Ritchie, J M

    1979-01-01

    1. The recovery heat production of the non-myelinated fibres of garfish olfactory nerve has been measured. 2. At about 20 degrees C the total recovery heat was 381 +/- 26 microcal g-1 impulse-1 at a stimulation frequency of 2 sec-1. 3. The time constant of decay of the recovery heat production after a brief period of stimulation was 78.7 +/- 3.1 sec at about 20 degrees C. 4. Changing the temperature (by +/- 5 degress C) had little effect on the total recovery heat produced. 5. However, lowering the temperature reduced both the rate of rise, and the maximum rate of recovery heat production whereas the time constant of decay was increased. Raising the temperature produced corresponding changes in the opposite direction. 6. the recovery heat production measured in the present experiments is consistent with the previously measured oxygen consumption in the same preparation. PMID:490341

  16. Effects of heat stress on serum insulin, adipokines, AMP-activated protein kinase, and heat shock signal molecules in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Min, Li; Cheng, Jian-bo; Shi, Bao-lu; Yang, Hong-jian; Zheng, Nan; Wang, Jia-qi

    2015-06-01

    Heat stress affects feed intake, milk production, and endocrine status in dairy cows. The temperature-humidity index (THI) is employed as an index to evaluate the degree of heat stress in dairy cows. However, it is difficult to ascertain whether THI is the most appropriate measurement of heat stress in dairy cows. This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of heat stress on serum insulin, adipokines (leptin and adiponectin), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and heat shock signal molecules (heat shock transcription factor (HSF) and heat shock proteins (HSP)) in dairy cows and to research biomarkers to be used for better understanding the meaning of THI as a bioclimatic index. To achieve these objectives, two experiments were performed. The first experiment: eighteen lactating Holstein dairy cows were used. The treatments were: heat stress (HS, THI average=81.7, n=9) and cooling (CL, THI average=53.4, n=9). Samples of HS were obtained on August 16, 2013, and samples of CL were collected on April 7, 2014 in natural conditions. The second experiment: HS treatment cows (n=9) from the first experiment were fed for 8 weeks from August 16, 2013 to October 12, 2013. Samples for moderate heat stress, mild heat stress, and no heat stress were obtained, respectively, according to the physical alterations of the THI. Results showed that heat stress significantly increased the serum adiponectin, AMPK, HSF, HSP27, HSP70, and HSP90 (P<0.05). Adiponectin is strongly associated with AMPK. The increases of adiponectin and AMPK may be one of the mechanisms to maintain homeostasis in heat-stressed dairy cows. When heat stress treatment lasted 8 weeks, a higher expression of HSF and HSP70 was observed under moderate heat stress. Serum HSF and HSP70 are sensitive and accurate in heat stress and they could be potential indicators of animal response to heat stress. We recommend serum HSF and HSP70 as meaningful biomarkers to supplement the THI and evaluate moderate heat

  17. Effects of heat stress on serum insulin, adipokines, AMP-activated protein kinase, and heat shock signal molecules in dairy cows*

    PubMed Central

    Min, Li; Cheng, Jian-bo; Shi, Bao-lu; Yang, Hong-jian; Zheng, Nan; Wang, Jia-qi

    2015-01-01

    Heat stress affects feed intake, milk production, and endocrine status in dairy cows. The temperature-humidity index (THI) is employed as an index to evaluate the degree of heat stress in dairy cows. However, it is difficult to ascertain whether THI is the most appropriate measurement of heat stress in dairy cows. This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of heat stress on serum insulin, adipokines (leptin and adiponectin), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and heat shock signal molecules (heat shock transcription factor (HSF) and heat shock proteins (HSP)) in dairy cows and to research biomarkers to be used for better understanding the meaning of THI as a bioclimatic index. To achieve these objectives, two experiments were performed. The first experiment: eighteen lactating Holstein dairy cows were used. The treatments were: heat stress (HS, THI average=81.7, n=9) and cooling (CL, THI average=53.4, n=9). Samples of HS were obtained on August 16, 2013, and samples of CL were collected on April 7, 2014 in natural conditions. The second experiment: HS treatment cows (n=9) from the first experiment were fed for 8 weeks from August 16, 2013 to October 12, 2013. Samples for moderate heat stress, mild heat stress, and no heat stress were obtained, respectively, according to the physical alterations of the THI. Results showed that heat stress significantly increased the serum adiponectin, AMPK, HSF, HSP27, HSP70, and HSP90 (P<0.05). Adiponectin is strongly associated with AMPK. The increases of adiponectin and AMPK may be one of the mechanisms to maintain homeostasis in heat-stressed dairy cows. When heat stress treatment lasted 8 weeks, a higher expression of HSF and HSP70 was observed under moderate heat stress. Serum HSF and HSP70 are sensitive and accurate in heat stress and they could be potential indicators of animal response to heat stress. We recommend serum HSF and HSP70 as meaningful biomarkers to supplement the THI and evaluate moderate heat

  18. Computer simulation for improving radio frequency (RF) heating uniformity of food products: a review.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhi; Marra, Francesco; Subbiah, Jeyamkondan; Wang, Shaojin

    2016-11-28

    Radio frequency (RF) heating has great potential for achieving rapid and volumetric heating in foods, providing safe and high quality food products due to deep penetration depth, moisture self-balance effects, and leaving no chemical residues. However, the non-uniform heating problem (usually resulting in hot and cold spots in the heated product) needs to be resolved. The inhomogeneous temperature distribution not only affects the quality of the food but also raises the issue of food safety when the microorganisms or insects may not be controlled in the cold spots. The mathematical modelling for RF heating processes has been extensively studied in a wide variety of agricultural products recently. This paper presents a comprehensive review of recent progresses in computer simulation for RF heating uniformity improvement and the offered solutions to reduce the heating non-uniformity. It provides a brief introduction on the basic principle of RF heating technology, analyzes the applications of numerical simulation, and discusses the factors influencing the RF heating uniformity and the possible methods to improve heating uniformity. Mathematical modelling improves the understanding of RF heating of food and is essential to optimize the RF treatment protocol for pasteurization and disinfestation applications. Recommendations for future research have been proposed to further improve the accuracy of numerical models, by covering both heat and mass transfers in the model, validating these models with sample movement and mixing, and identifying the important model parameters by sensitivity analysis.

  19. Determination of the Maillard product oxalic acidmonolysinylamide (OMA) in heated milk products by ELISA.

    PubMed

    Hasenkopf, K; Ubel, B; Bordiehn, T; Pischetsrieder, M

    2001-06-01

    Oxalic acid monolysinylamide (OMA), a Maillard product which had initially been identified as a reaction product of L-ascorbic acid, was formed, dependent on the reaction conditions, also from other carbohydrate sources. At elevated temperatures and in the presence of oxygen, the reaction of lactose with proteins resulted in the formation of relatively high amounts of OMA. Using a polyclonal antibody, which bound with high specificity and affinity to OMA-modified proteins, a competitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to measure OMA formation in heat-treated milk products. The assay performance was characterized for OMA-modified beta-lactoglobulin diluted in buffer or pasteurized milk. For the latter, the least detectable dose was determined as 1.4 ng/ml with a linear range for quantification between 2 ng/ml and 200 ng/ml. For some samples intra- and interassay variation were determined. The ELISA was used to measure OMA-formation in heated milk and commercially available infant formula.

  20. Radiogenic heat production in sedimentary rocks of the Gulf of Mexico Basin, south Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenna, T.E.; Sharp, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Radiogenic heat production within the sedimentary section of the Gulf of Mexico basin is a significant source of heat. Radiogenic heat should be included in thermal models of this basin (and perhaps other sedimentary basins). We calculate that radiogenic heat may contribute up to 26% of the overall surface heat-flow density for an area in south Texas. Based on measurements of the radioactive decay rate of ??-particles, potassium concentration, and bulk density, we calculate radiogenic heat production for Stuart City (Lower Cretaceous) limestones, Wilcox (Eocene) sandstones and mudrocks, and Frio (Oligocene) sandstones and mudrocks from south Texas. Heat production rates range from a low of 0.07 ?? 0.01 ??W/m3 in clean Stuart City limestones to 2.21 ?? 0.24??W/m3 in Frio mudrocks. Mean heat production rates for Wilcox sandstones, Frio sandstones, Wilcox mudrocks, and Frio mudrocks are 0.88, 1.19, 1.50, and 1.72 ??W/m3, respectively. In general, the mudrocks produce about 30-40% more heat than stratigraphically equivalent sandstones. Frio rocks produce about 15% more heat than Wilcox rocks per unit volume of clastic rock (sandstone/mudrock). A one-dimensional heat-conduction model indicates that this radiogenic heat source has a significant effect on subsurface temperatures. If a thermal model were calibrated to observed temperatures by optimizing basal heat-flow density and ignoring sediment heat production, the extrapolated present-day temperature of a deeply buried source rock would be overestimated.Radiogenic heat production within the sedimentary section of the Gulf of Mexico basin is a significant source of heat. Radiogenic heat should be included in thermal models of this basin (and perhaps other sedimentary basins). We calculate that radiogenic heat may contribute up to 26% of the overall surface heat-flow density for an area in south Texas. Based on measurements of the radioactive decay rate of ??-particles, potassium concentration, and bulk density, we

  1. Differential heat shock tolerance and expression of heat-inducible proteins in two stored-product psocids.

    PubMed

    Guedes, R N C; Zhu, K Y; Opit, G P; Throne, J E

    2008-12-01

    The recent recognition of psocids as a major concern in stored products and also the reemergence of heat treatment as a control tactic of stored-product insects led to the present investigation. The objectives of this study were to determine whether there are differences in heat shock tolerance of two species of stored-product psocids--Lepinotus reticulatus Enderlein (Trogiidae) and Liposcelis entomophila (Enderlein) (Liposcelididae)--and to determine whether heat shock proteins (HSPs) underlay such tolerance. Time-response bioassays were therefore carried out at increasing temperatures for both psocids. The lethal time (LT)50 and LT95 estimates were correlated with the expression of heat shock proteins after exposure at the same range of temperatures for 30 min. The expression of HSP was determined through Western blot analyses using HSP 70 antibody. Liposcelis entomophila was more than two-fold more tolerant than L. reticulatus for nearly all of the range of temperatures (> or = 40.0 degrees C). Expression of HSP 70 was not observed for either of the psocid species, but the expression of two low-molecular-mass heat-inducible proteins (HIPs; 23 and 27 kDa) was observed in L. entomophila. The expression of these small proteins was induced by exposure to higher temperatures, and the trend was particularly strong for HIP 27. In contrast, no expression of small heat-inducible proteins was detected in L. reticulatus, reflecting its higher susceptibility to heat treatments. The relatively high heat tolerance of L. entomophila might help explain its more common occurrence in grain stored in warmer regions of the world.

  2. Evaluation of the isosteric heat of adsorption at zero coverage for hydrogen on activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohnke, E.; Beckner, M.; Romanos, J.; Olsen, R.; Wexler, C.; Pfeifer, P.

    2011-03-01

    Activated carbons made from corn cob show promise as materials for high-capacity hydrogen storage. As part of our characterization of these materials, we are interested in learning how different production methods affect the adsorption energies. In this talk, we will show how hydrogen adsorption isotherms may be used to calculate these adsorption energies at zero coverage using Henry's law. We will additionally discuss differences between the binding energy and the isosteric heat of adsorption by applying this analysis at different temperatures.

  3. Heat production in Littorina saxatilis Olivi and Littorina neritoides L. (gastropoda: Prosobranchia) during an experimental exposure to air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronberg, Inge

    1990-06-01

    The adaptation of littorinid molluscs to prolonged aerial exposure was investigated by the determination of heat production. Littorina saxatilis, inhabiting the upper eulittoral, reached a maximum metabolic activity during submersion (heat production: 3.26×10-3J s-1 (gadw)-1. On the first three days of desiccation, the heat production was continuously reduced to 40% of the submersed value. A prolonged aerial exposure was lethal for this species. In the supralittoral L. neritoides, three stages of energy metabolism could be observed: An intermediate heat production during submersion (1.97×10-3Js-1 (gadw)-1), an increased metabolism during the first hour of aerial exposure (heat production 204% of submersed value), and a minimal metabolism (39% of the submersed value and 19% of maximum value) during the following days and weeks of desiccation. Recovery depended on water salinity; L. saxatilis proved to be less euryhaline than L. neritoides. Thus, the metabolic adaptations correlate with the level of littoral habitat; inactivity combined with a drastically reduced energy consumption is a metabolically economic way to survive in periodically dry environments.

  4. Diesel driven low capacity heat pump for heating and hot water production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefler, P.

    1982-08-01

    Heat pumps that reduce primary energy consumption for heating needs when they are driven by an internal combustion motor were studied. The heat produced as well from the heat pump as from the combustion in the diesel motor was used for home heating and hot water preparation. The objective was a 25kW capacity for a one familiy house. Material used should be standard, so a special design diesel motor or heat pump was not considered. An air/water cooled type diesel motor was coupled to a 12kW capacity heat pump for an outdoor temperature of 3 C using R12 freon as refrigerant. Description of all elements is given. Tests were in the laboratory and in a one family house. The expected efficiency factor of 1.34 could not be confirmed and an average annual value of only 1.05 is assumed. The diesel driven heat pump can not produce the energy savings hoped for.

  5. New industrial heat pump applications to textile production

    SciTech Connect

    1990-12-01

    Application of pinch technology to the US industries in an early screening study has identified potential for heat pumps in several standard processes such as distillation and drying processes. Due to lack process information, the previous study was not able to draw any definite conclusion concerning the heat pump application potential in textile process. However, the commonly encountered drying process in the finishing section of textile plant has been shown to create opportunities for heat pump placement. The site selected for this study is a textile plant in North Carolina and the participating utility is Duke Power Company. The objective of this study is to further identify the energy savings potential through advanced heat pumps and other energy conservation methods developed in the context of pinch technology. The key findings of this study are as follows. The previously unrecoverable waste heat from the exhaust air can now be reclaimed through a spray type air washer and heat pump system. The recommended heat pump system recovers heat from the looper exhaust and use it to preheat the air in the gas tenter. A reduction of 50% of the gas consumption in the tenter can be achieved. The removal of lint from the exhaust air reduced the potential of air pollution. The collected lint can be burned in the boiler as a supplemental fuel source to reduce the fuel consumption in the plant. With fuel price predicted to go up and electricity price remain relatively stable in the future, the heat pump system can payback in less than three years. 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Capsaicinoids improve egg production by regulating ovary nuclear transcription factors against heat stress in quail.

    PubMed

    Sahin, N; Orhan, C; Tuzcu, M; Juturu, V; Sahin, K

    2016-12-12

    To examine the molecular mechanism of capsaicinoid supplementation from capsicum extract, laying Japanese quail (n = 180, 5 weeks old) were reared either at 22°C for 24 h/d (thermoneutral, TN) or at 34°C for 8 h/d (heat stress, HS) and fed on one of three diets containing 0, 25 or 50 mg of capsaicinoids per kilogram for 12 weeks (2 × 3 factorial arrangement). The results revealed that exposure to HS decreased feed consumption by 10.7% and egg production by 13.6%, increased serum and ovary malondialdehyde (MDA) levels by 66.9% and 88.1%, respectively, and reduced ovary superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities by 28.3%, 48.7% and 43.8%, respectively. There were magnifications in the ovary nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cell (NF-κB) levels by 42.4% and suppressions in nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), protein kinase B (Akt) and haem-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) levels by 29.2%, 38.2% and 30.7%, respectively, in heat-stressed quail. With increasing supplemental capsaicinoids, there were linear increases in egg production, antioxidant enzyme activity, linear decreases in ovary MDA and NF-κB levels and linear increases in ovary Nrf2, Akt and HO-1 levels at a greater extent in quail reared under TN condition than those reared under HS condition. Two-way treatment interactions showed that the degree of restorations in all response variables was more notable under the HS environment than under the TN environment as supplemental capsaicinoid level was increased. In conclusion, capsaicinoid supplementation alleviates oxidative stress through regulating the ovary nuclear transcription factors in heat-stressed quail.

  7. Effect of heating system using a geothermal heat pump on the production performance and housing environment of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Choi, H C; Salim, H M; Akter, N; Na, J C; Kang, H K; Kim, M J; Kim, D W; Bang, H T; Chae, H S; Suh, O S

    2012-02-01

    A geothermal heat pump (GHP) is a potential heat source for the economic heating of broiler houses with optimum production performance. An investigation was conducted to evaluate the effect of a heating system using a GHP on production performance and housing environment of broiler chickens. A comparative analysis was also performed between the GHP system and a conventional heating system that used diesel for fuel. In total, 34,000 one-day-old straight run broiler chicks were assigned to 2 broiler houses with 5 replicates in each (3,400 birds/replicate pen) for 35 d. Oxygen(,) CO(2), and NH(3) concentrations in the broiler house, energy consumption and cost of heating, and production performance of broilers were evaluated. Results showed that the final BW gain significantly (P < 0.05) increased when chicks were reared in the GHP broiler house compared with that of chicks reared in the conventional broiler house (1.73 vs. 1.62 kg/bird). The heating system did not affect the mortality of chicks during the first 4 wk of the experimental period, but the mortality markedly increased in the conventional broiler house during the last wk of the experiment. Oxygen content in the broiler house during the experimental period was not affected by the heating system, but the CO(2) and NH(3) contents significantly increased (P < 0.05) in the conventional broiler house compared with those in the GHP house. Fuel consumption was significantly reduced (P < 0.05) and electricity consumption significantly increased (P < 0.05) in the GHP house compared with the consumption in the conventional house during the experiment. The total energy cost of heating the GHP house was significantly lower (P < 0.05) compared with that of the conventional house. It is concluded that a GHP system could increase the production performance of broiler chicks due to increased inside air quality of the broiler house. The GHP system had lower CO(2) and NH(3) emissions with lower energy cost than the

  8. The equivalence of minimum entropy production and maximum thermal efficiency in endoreversible heat engines.

    PubMed

    Haseli, Y

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the thermal efficiency and power production of typical models of endoreversible heat engines at the regime of minimum entropy generation rate. The study considers the Curzon-Ahlborn engine, the Novikov's engine, and the Carnot vapor cycle. The operational regimes at maximum thermal efficiency, maximum power output and minimum entropy production rate are compared for each of these engines. The results reveal that in an endoreversible heat engine, a reduction in entropy production corresponds to an increase in thermal efficiency. The three criteria of minimum entropy production, the maximum thermal efficiency, and the maximum power may become equivalent at the condition of fixed heat input.

  9. Relationship between typhoon activity and upper ocean heat content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, A.; Chan, J. C. L.

    2008-09-01

    A 44-year mean distribution of tropical cyclone heat potential (TCHP), a measure of the oceanic heat content from the surface to the 26°C-isotherm depth, shows that TCHP is locally high in the western North Pacific (WNP). TCHP varies on interannual time scales and has a relationship with tropical cyclone (TC) activity. The third mode of an empirical orthogonal function analysis of TCHP shows that an increase in the total number of TCs is accompanied with a warm central Pacific and cool WNP. Negative TCHP anomalies in the WNP suggest that an increase in total number of TCs results in cooling due to their passages. On the other hand, the first mode shows that the number of super typhoons increases in mature El Niño years. An increase in accumulated TCHP is related to the increase in the number of super typhoons due to long duration.

  10. Active heat exchange system development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alario, J.; Haslett, R.

    1980-01-01

    Various active heat exchange concepts were identified from among three generic categories: scrapers, agitators/vibrators and slurries. The more practical ones were given a more detailed technical evaluation and an economic comparison with a passive tube-shell design for a reference application. Two concepts selected for hardware development are a direct contact heat exchanger in which molten salt droplets are injected into a cooler counterflowing stream of liquid metal carrier fluid, and a rotating drum scraper in which molten salt is sprayed onto the circumference of a rotating drum, which contains the fluid heat sink in an internal annulus near the surface. A fixed scraper blade removes the solidified salt from the surface which has been nickel plated to decrease adhesion forces. Suitable phase change material (PCM) storage media with melting points in the temperature range of interest (250 C to 400 C) were investigated. The specific salt recommended for laboratory tests was a chloride eutectic (20.5KCl-24/5 NaCl-55.0MgCl 2% by wt.), with a nominal melting point of 385 C.

  11. Active heat exchange system development for latent heat thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alario, J.; Haslett, R.

    1980-03-01

    Various active heat exchange concepts were identified from among three generic categories: scrapers, agitators/vibrators and slurries. The more practical ones were given a more detailed technical evaluation and an economic comparison with a passive tube-shell design for a reference application. Two concepts selected for hardware development are a direct contact heat exchanger in which molten salt droplets are injected into a cooler counterflowing stream of liquid metal carrier fluid, and a rotating drum scraper in which molten salt is sprayed onto the circumference of a rotating drum, which contains the fluid heat sink in an internal annulus near the surface. A fixed scraper blade removes the solidified salt from the surface which has been nickel plated to decrease adhesion forces. Suitable phase change material (PCM) storage media with melting points in the temperature range of interest (250 C to 400 C) were investigated. The specific salt recommended for laboratory tests was a chloride eutectic (20.5KCl-24/5 NaCl-55.0MgCl 2% by wt.), with a nominal melting point of 385 C.

  12. Effects of heat-stress on production in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    West, J W

    2003-06-01

    The southeastern United States is characterized as humid subtropical and is subject to extended periods of high ambient temperature and relative humidity. Because the primary nonevaporative means of cooling for the cow (radiation, conduction, convection) become less effective with rising ambient temperature, the cow becomes increasingly reliant upon evaporative cooling in the form of sweating and panting. High relative humidity compromises evaporative cooling, so that under hot, humid conditions common to the Southeast in summer the dairy cow cannot dissipate sufficient body heat to prevent a rise in body temperature. Increasing air temperature, temperature-humidity index and rising rectal temperature above critical thresholds are related to decreased dry matter intake (DMI) and milk yield and to reduced efficiency of milk yield. Modifications including shade, barns which enhance passive ventilation, and the addition of fans and sprinklers increase body heat loss, lowering body temperature and improving DMI. New technologies including tunnel ventilation are being investigated to determine if they offer cooling advantages. Genetic selection for heat tolerance may be possible, but continued selection for greater performance in the absence of consideration for heat tolerance will result in greater susceptibility to heat stress. The nutritional needs of the cow change during heat stress, and ration reformulation to account for decreased DMI, the need to increase nutrient density, changing nutrient requirements, avoiding nutrient excesses and maintenance of normal rumen function is necessary. Maintaining cow performance in hot, humid climatic conditions in the future will likely require improved cooling capability, continued advances in nutritional formulation, and the need for genetic advancement which includes selection for heat tolerance or the identification of genetic traits which enhance heat tolerance.

  13. Turbokon scientific and production implementation company—25 years of activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favorskii, O. N.; Leont'ev, A. I.; Milman, O. O.

    2016-05-01

    The main results of studies performed at ZAO Turbokon NPVP in cooperation with leading Russian scientific organizations during 25 years of its activity in the field of development of unique ecologically clean electric power and heat production technologies are described. They include the development and experimental verification using prototypes and full-scale models of highly efficient air-cooled condensers for steam turbines, a high temperature gas steam turbine for stationary and transport power engineering, a nonfuel technology of electric power production using steam turbine installations with a unit power of 4-20 MW at gas-main pipelines and industrial boiler houses and heat stations. The results of efforts in the field of reducing vibroactivity of power equipment for transport installations are given. Basic directions of further research for increasing the efficiency and ecological safety of home power engineering are discussed.

  14. Production of activated carbon from TCR char

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, Fabian; Heberlein, Markus; Klinner, Tobias; Hornung, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The utilization of char for adsorptive purposes is known since the 18th century. At that time the char was made of wood or bones and used for decoloration of fluids. In the 20th century the production of activated carbon in an industrial scale was started. The today's raw materials for activated carbon production are hard coal, peat, wood or coconut shells. All these materials entail costs especially the latter. Thus, the utilization of carbon rich residues (biomass) is an interesting economic opportunity because it is available for no costs or even can create income. The char is produced by thermo-catalytic reforming (TCR®). This process is a combination of an intermediate pyrolysis and subsequently a reforming step. During the pyrolysis step the material is decomposed in a vapor and a solid carbon enriched phase. In the second step the vapor and the solid phase get in an intensive contact and the quality of both materials is improved via the reforming process. Subsequently, the condensables are precipitated from the vapor phase and a permanent gas as well as oil is obtained. Both are suitable for heat and power production which is a clear advantage of the TCR® process. The obtained biochar from the TCR® process has special properties. This material has a very low hydrogen and oxygen content. Its stability is comparable to hard coal or anthracite. Therefore it consists almost only of carbon and ash. The latter depends from input material. Furthermore the surface structure and area can be influenced during the reforming step. Depending from temperature and residence time the number of micro pores and the surface area can be increased. Preliminary investigations with methylene blue solution have shown that a TCR® char made of digestate from anaerobic digestion has adsorptive properties. The decoloration of the solution was achieved. A further influencing factor of the adsorption performance is the particle size. Based on the results of the preliminary tests a

  15. Heat stress and antioxidant enzyme activity in bubaline ( Bubalus bubalis) oocytes during in vitro maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waiz, Syma Ashraf; Raies-ul-Haq, Mohammad; Dhanda, Suman; Kumar, Anil; Goud, T. Sridhar; Chauhan, M. S.; Upadhyay, R. C.

    2016-09-01

    In vitro environments like heat stress usually increase the production of reactive oxygen species in bubaline oocytes which have been implicated as one of the major causes for reduced developmental competence. Oocytes during meiotic maturation are sensitive to oxidative stress, and heat stress accelerates cellular metabolism, resulting in the higher production of free radicals. Therefore, the aim of present work was to assess the impact of heat stress during meiotic maturation on bubaline cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC), denuded oocytes (DO), and cumulus cell mass in terms of their oxidative status. Accordingly, for control group, COC were matured at 38.5 °C for complete 24 h of meiotic maturation and heat stress of 40.5 and 41.5 °C was applied to COC during the first 12 h of maturation and then moved to 38.5 °C for rest of the 12 h. In another group, COC after maturation were denuded from the surrounding cumulus cells by manual pipetting. Results indicated that the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxides, and nitric oxide (NO) was significantly ( P < 0.05) higher in the oocytes subjected to heat stress (40.5 and 41.5 °C) during meiotic maturation compared to the oocytes matured under standard in vitro culture conditions (38.5 °C). Also, the antioxidant enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase were significantly ( P < 0.05) increased in all the treatment groups compared to the control group. Therefore, the present study clearly establishes that heat stress ensues oxidative stress in bubaline oocytes which triggers the induction of antioxidant enzymatic defense system for scavenging the ROS.

  16. Production of coagulase, deoxyribonuclease and heat-stable deoxyribonuclease by canine isolates of staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Wierup, M

    1978-12-01

    Staphylococci isolated from different infections in dogs have been investigated for production of coagulase, deoxyribonuclease (DNase) and heat-stable DNase. Alll coagulase-positive strains (220) also produced DNase and heat-stable nuclease. However, 4 out of 15 coagulase-negative strains were also positive in both the DNase and the heat-stable DNase tests. Several tests for DNase and heat-stable DNase were evaluated. No strains were DNase-positive, heat-stable DNase-negative, or vice-versa.

  17. Carbonaceous material for production of hydrogen from low heating value fuel gases

    DOEpatents

    Koutsoukos, Elias P.

    1989-01-01

    A process for the catalytic production of hydrogen, from a wide variety of low heating value fuel gases containing carbon monoxide, comprises circulating a carbonaceous material between two reactors--a carbon deposition reactor and a steaming reactor. In the carbon deposition reactor, carbon monoxide is removed from a fuel gas and is deposited on the carbonaceous material as an active carbon. In the steaming reactor, the reactive carbon reacts with steam to give hydrogen and carbon dioxide. The carbonaceous material contains a metal component comprising from about 75% to about 95% cobalt, from about 5% to about 15% iron, and up to about 10% chromium, and is effective in suppressing the production of methane in the steaming reactor.

  18. r-process Lanthanide Production and Heating Rates in Kilonovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippuner, Jonas; Roberts, Luke F.

    2015-12-01

    r-process nucleosynthesis in material ejected during neutron star mergers may lead to radioactively powered transients called kilonovae. The timescale and peak luminosity of these transients depend on the composition of the ejecta, which determines the local heating rate from nuclear decays and the opacity. Kasen et al. and Tanaka & Hotokezaka pointed out that lanthanides can drastically increase the opacity in these outflows. We use the new general-purpose nuclear reaction network SkyNet to carry out a parameter study of r-process nucleosynthesis for a range of initial electron fractions Ye, initial specific entropies s, and expansion timescales τ. We find that the ejecta is lanthanide-free for Ye ≳ 0.22-0.30, depending on s and τ. The heating rate is insensitive to s and τ, but certain, larger values of Ye lead to reduced heating rates, due to individual nuclides dominating the heating. We calculate approximate light curves with a simplified gray radiative transport scheme. The light curves peak at about a day (week) in the lanthanide-free (-rich) cases. The heating rate does not change much as the ejecta becomes lanthanide-free with increasing Ye, but the light-curve peak becomes about an order of magnitude brighter because it peaks much earlier when the heating rate is larger. We also provide parametric fits for the heating rates between 0.1 and 100 days, and we provide a simple fit in Ye, s, and τ to estimate whether or not the ejecta is lanthanide-rich.

  19. r-PROCESS LANTHANIDE PRODUCTION AND HEATING RATES IN KILONOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Lippuner, Jonas; Roberts, Luke F.

    2015-12-20

    r-process nucleosynthesis in material ejected during neutron star mergers may lead to radioactively powered transients called kilonovae. The timescale and peak luminosity of these transients depend on the composition of the ejecta, which determines the local heating rate from nuclear decays and the opacity. Kasen et al. and Tanaka and Hotokezaka pointed out that lanthanides can drastically increase the opacity in these outflows. We use the new general-purpose nuclear reaction network SkyNet to carry out a parameter study of r-process nucleosynthesis for a range of initial electron fractions Y{sub e}, initial specific entropies s, and expansion timescales τ. We find that the ejecta is lanthanide-free for Y{sub e} ≳ 0.22−0.30, depending on s and τ. The heating rate is insensitive to s and τ, but certain, larger values of Y{sub e} lead to reduced heating rates, due to individual nuclides dominating the heating. We calculate approximate light curves with a simplified gray radiative transport scheme. The light curves peak at about a day (week) in the lanthanide-free (-rich) cases. The heating rate does not change much as the ejecta becomes lanthanide-free with increasing Y{sub e}, but the light-curve peak becomes about an order of magnitude brighter because it peaks much earlier when the heating rate is larger. We also provide parametric fits for the heating rates between 0.1 and 100 days, and we provide a simple fit in Y{sub e}, s, and τ to estimate whether or not the ejecta is lanthanide-rich.

  20. Activation of thermosensitive RNA splicing and production of a heat-labile P85gag-mos kinase by the introduction of a specific deletion in murine sarcoma virus-124 DNA.

    PubMed Central

    de Mars, M; Cizdziel, P E; Murphy, E C

    1988-01-01

    Murine sarcoma virus ts110 (MuSVts110) is a conditionally transformation-defective MuSV mutant lacking 1,487 bases found in its wild-type parent, MuSV-349 (MuSV-124). Expression of the MuSVts110 v-mos gene product, P85gag-mos, requires splicing of the viral transcript to align the gag and mos genes in frame. However, this splice event is restricted to growth temperatures of 33 degrees C or lower. No splicing of the viral RNA, no production of P85gag-mos, and, hence, no cell transformation is observed at growth temperatures above 33 degrees C. To determine whether thermosensitive splicing is an intrinsic property of To determine whether thermosensitive splicing is an intrinsic property of MuSVts110 RNA specified by the 1,487-base deletion or a result of a cellular defect, we examined an "equivalent" or MuSVts110 DNA (designated ts32 DNA) constructed by combining wild-type MuSV-124 DNA fragments with a synthetic oligonucleotide to yield an otherwise wild-type viral DNA containing the same 1,487-base deletion as authentic MuSVts110. As observed in control cells (6m2 cells) infected with the authentic MuSVts110 virus, NIH 3T3 cells transfected with ts32 DNA appeared morphologically transformed when grown at 33 degrees C, but were converted to a more normal, flattened shape within a few hours of a shift to 39 degrees C. In concert with these morphological changes, both the processing of the ts32 RNA transcripts and the production of ts32 p85gag-mos kinase were found to be optimal at growth temperatures from 28 to 33 degrees C, but dramatically reduced at 37 to 41 degrees C. Like authentic P85gag-mos, the ts32 P85gag-mos kinase activity was rapidly inactivated by brief exposure to 39 degrees C. These results suggested that the MuSVts110 equivalent is functionally indistinguishable from authentic MuSVts110 and that the novel temperature-sensitive splicing of MuSVts110 transcripts is specified by an intrinsic property of the viral RNA. Images PMID:2835496

  1. Geoneutrinos and Heat Production in the Earth: Constraints and Implications

    ScienceCinema

    McDonough, Bill [University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, United States

    2016-07-12

    Recent results from antineutrino (geoneutrino) studies at KamLAND are coincident with geochemical models of Th and U in the Earth.  KamLAND and Borexino detectors are on line, thus uncertainties in counting statistics will be reduced as data are accumulated.  The SNO+ detector, situated in the middle of the North American plate will come on line in ~3 yrs and will be best suited to yield a precise estimate of the continental contribution to the Earth’s Th & U budget.  The distribution of heat producing elements in the Earth drives convection and plate tectonics.  Geochemical models posit that ~40% of the heat producing elements are in the continental crust, with the remainder in the mantle.  Although models of core formation allow for the incorporation of heat producing elements, the core contribution of radiogenic heating is considered to be negligible.  Most parameterized convection models for the Earth require significant amounts of radiogenic heating of the Earth, a factor of two greater than geochemical models predict.  The initial KamLAND results challenge these geophysical models and support geochemical models calling for a significant contribution from secular cooling of the mantle.

  2. Geoneutrinos and Heat Production in the Earth: Constraints and Implications

    SciTech Connect

    McConough, Bill

    2008-07-02

    Recent results from antineutrino (geoneutrino) studies at KamLAND are coincident with geochemical models of Th and U in the Earth. KamLAND and Borexino detectors are on line, thus uncertainties in counting statistics will be reduced as data are accumulated. The SNO+ detector, situated in the middle of the North American plate will come on line in {approx}3 yrs and will be best suited to yield a precise estimate of the continental contribution to the Earth's Th & U budget. The distribution of heat producing elements in the Earth drives convection and plate tectonics. Geochemical models posit that {approx}40% of the heat producing elements are in the continental crust, with the remainder in the mantle. Although models of core formation allow for the incorporation of heat producing elements, the core contribution of radiogenic heating is considered to be negligible. Most parameterized convection models for the Earth require significant amounts of radiogenic heating of the Earth, a factor of two greater than geochemical models predict. The initial KamLAND results challenge these geophysical models and support geochemical models calling for a significant contribution from secular cooling of the mantle.

  3. Geoneutrinos and Heat Production in the Earth: Constraints and Implications

    SciTech Connect

    McDonough, Bill

    2008-07-02

    Recent results from antineutrino (geoneutrino) studies at KamLAND are coincident with geochemical models of Th and U in the Earth.  KamLAND and Borexino detectors are on line, thus uncertainties in counting statistics will be reduced as data are accumulated.  The SNO+ detector, situated in the middle of the North American plate will come on line in ~3 yrs and will be best suited to yield a precise estimate of the continental contribution to the Earth’s Th & U budget.  The distribution of heat producing elements in the Earth drives convection and plate tectonics.  Geochemical models posit that ~40% of the heat producing elements are in the continental crust, with the remainder in the mantle.  Although models of core formation allow for the incorporation of heat producing elements, the core contribution of radiogenic heating is considered to be negligible.  Most parameterized convection models for the Earth require significant amounts of radiogenic heating of the Earth, a factor of two greater than geochemical models predict.  The initial KamLAND results challenge these geophysical models and support geochemical models calling for a significant contribution from secular cooling of the mantle.

  4. Nanovalve-Controlled Cargo Release Activated by Plasmonic Heating

    PubMed Central

    Croissant, Jonas; Zink, Jeffrey I.

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis and operation of a light-operated nanovalve that controls the pore openings of mesoporous silica nanoparticles containing gold cores nanoparticles is described. The nanoparticles, consisting of 20 nm gold cores inside ~150 nm mesoporous silica spheres, were synthesized using a unique one-pot method. The nanovalves are comprised of cucurbit[6]uril rings encircling stalks that are attached to the ~2 nm pore openings. Plasmonic heating of the gold core raises the local temperature and decreases the ring-stalk binding constant, thereby unblocking the pore and releasing the cargo molecules that were preloaded inside. Bulk heating of the suspended particles to 60 °C is required to release the cargo, but no bulk temperature change was observed in the plasmonic heating release experiment. High intensity irradiation caused thermal damage to the silica particles, but low intensity illumination caused a sufficient local temperature increase to operate the valves without damaging the nanoparticles containers. These light-stimulated, thermally activated mechanized nanoparticles demonstrate a new system with potential utility for on-command drug release. PMID:22540671

  5. EVIDENCE OF IMPULSIVE HEATING IN ACTIVE REGION CORE LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, Durgesh; Mason, Helen E.; Klimchuk, James A.

    2010-11-01

    Using a full spectral scan of an active region from the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) we have obtained emission measure EM(T) distributions in two different moss regions within the same active region. We have compared these with theoretical transition region EMs derived for three limiting cases, namely, static equilibrium, strong condensation, and strong evaporation from Klimchuk et al. The EM distributions in both the moss regions are strikingly similar and show a monotonically increasing trend from log T[K] = 5.15-6.3. Using photospheric abundances, we obtain a consistent EM distribution for all ions. Comparing the observed and theoretical EM distributions, we find that the observed EM distribution is best explained by the strong condensation case (EM{sub con}), suggesting that a downward enthalpy flux plays an important and possibly dominant role in powering the transition region moss emission. The downflows could be due to unresolved coronal plasma that is cooling and draining after having been impulsively heated. This supports the idea that the hot loops (with temperatures of 3-5 MK) seen in the core of active regions are heated by nanoflares.

  6. Fasting heat production and metabolic BW in group-housed broilers.

    PubMed

    Noblet, J; Dubois, S; Lasnier, J; Warpechowski, M; Dimon, P; Carré, B; van Milgen, J; Labussière, E

    2015-07-01

    Fasting heat production (FHP) is used for characterizing the basal metabolic rate of animals and the corresponding maintenance energy requirements and in the calculation of net energy value of feeds. In broilers, the most recent FHP estimates were obtained in the 1980s in slow-growing and fatter birds than nowadays. The FHP values (n=73; six experiments) measured in 3 to 6-week-old modern lines of broilers weighing 0.6 to 2.8 kg and growing at 80 to 100 g/day were used to update these literature values. Each measurement was obtained in a group of fasting broilers (5 to 14 birds) kept in a respiration chamber for at least 24 h. The FHP estimate corresponds to the asymptotic heat production corrected for zero physical activity obtained by modeling the decrease in heat production during the fasting day. The compilation of these data indicates that FHP was linearly related to the BW(0.70) (in kg), which can be considered as the metabolic BW of modern broilers. The 0.70 exponent differs from the conventional value of 0.75 used for mature animals. The FHP per kg of BW(0.70) ranged between 410 and 460 kJ/day according to the experiment (P<0.01). An experiment conducted with a shorter duration of fasting (16 h) indicated that FHP values are higher than those obtained over at least 24 h of fasting. Our values are similar to those obtained previously on fatter and slow-growing birds, even though the comparison is difficult since measurement conditions and methodologies have changed during the last 30 years. The FHP values obtained in our trials represent a basis for energy nutrition of modern broilers.

  7. Emission Measure Distribution and Heating of Two Active Region Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, Durgesh; Klimchuk, James A.; Mason, Helen E.

    2011-01-01

    Using data from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer aboard Hinode, we have studied the coronal plasma in the core of two active regions. Concentrating on the area between opposite polarity moss, we found emission measure distributions having an approximate power-law form EM/T(exp 2.4) from log T = 5.55 up to a peak at log T = 6.57. The observations are explained extremely well by a simple nanoflare model. However, in the absence of additional constraints, the observations could possibly also be explained by steady heating.

  8. The effect of Peltier heat during current activated densification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, A.; Angst, S.; Schmitz, A.; Engenhorst, M.; Stoetzel, J.; Gautam, D.; Wiggers, H.; Wolf, D. E.; Schierning, G.; Schmechel, R.

    2012-07-01

    It is shown that current-activated pressure-assisted densification (CAPAD) is sensitive to the Peltier effect. Under CAPAD, the Peltier effect leads to a significant redistribution of heat within the sample during the densification. The densification of highly p-doped silicon nanoparticles during CAPAD and the properties of the obtained samples are investigated experimentally and by computer simulation. Both, simulation and experiments, indicate clearly a higher temperature on the cathode side and a decreasing temperature from the center to the outer shell. Furthermore, computer simulations provide additional insights into the temperature profile which explain the anisotropic properties of the measured sample.

  9. The effect of hyperosmolality on the rate of heat production of quiescent trabeculae isolated from the rat heart

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    We have measured the rate of heat production of isolated, quiescent, right ventricular trabeculae of the rat under isosmotic and hyperosmotic conditions, using a microcalorimetric technique. In parallel experiments, we measured force production and intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). The rate of resting heat production under isosmotic conditions (mean +/- SEM, n = 32) was 100 +/- 7 mW (g dry wt)-1; it increased sigmoidally with osmolality, reaching a peak that was about four times the isosmotic value at about twice normal osmotic pressure. The hyperosmotic thermal response was: (a) abolished by anoxia, (b) attenuated by procaine, (c) insensitive to verapamil, ouabain, and external calcium concentration, and (d) absent in chemically skinned trabeculae bathed in low-Ca2+ "relaxing solution." Active force production was inhibited at all osmolalities above isosmotic. Passive (tonic) force increased to, at most, 15% of the peak active force developed under isosmotic conditions while [Ca2+]i increased, at most, 30% above its isosmotic value. We infer that hyperosmotic stimulation of resting cardiac heat production reflects, in large part, greatly increased activity of the sarcoplasmic reticular Ca2+ ATPase in the face of increased efflux via a procaine-inhibitable Ca(2+)-release channel. PMID:8972388

  10. Biodiesel production from waste frying oil using waste animal bone and solar heat.

    PubMed

    Corro, Grisel; Sánchez, Nallely; Pal, Umapada; Bañuelos, Fortino

    2016-01-01

    A two-step catalytic process for the production of biodiesel from waste frying oil (WFO) at low cost, utilizing waste animal-bone as catalyst and solar radiation as heat source is reported in this work. In the first step, the free fatty acids (FFA) in WFO were esterified with methanol by a catalytic process using calcined waste animal-bone as catalyst, which remains active even after 10 esterification runs. The trans-esterification step was catalyzed by NaOH through thermal activation process. Produced biodiesel fulfills all the international requirements for its utilization as a fuel. A probable reaction mechanism for the esterification process is proposed considering the presence of hydroxyapatite at the surface of calcined animal bones.

  11. Effect of Water Activities of Heating and Recovery Media on Apparent Heat Resistance of Bacillus cereus Spores

    PubMed Central

    Coroller, Louis; Leguérinel, Ivan; Mafart, Pierre

    2001-01-01

    Spores of Bacillus cereus were heated and recovered in order to investigate the effect of water activity of media on the estimated heat resistance (i.e., the D value) of spores. The water activity (ranging from 0.9 to 1) of the heating medium was first successively controlled with three solutes (glycerol, glucose, and sucrose), while the water activity of the recovery medium was kept near 1. Reciprocally, the water activity of the heating medium was then kept at 1, while the water activity of the recovery medium was controlled from 0.9 to 1 with the same depressors. Lastly, in a third set of experiments, the heating medium and the recovery medium were adjusted to the same activity. As expected, added depressors caused an increase of the heat resistance of spores with a greater efficiency of sucrose with respect to glycerol and glucose. In contrast, when solutes were added to the recovery medium, under an optimal water activity close to 0.98, a decrease of water activity caused a decrease in the estimated D values. This effect was more pronounced when sucrose was used as a depressor instead of glycerol or glucose. When the heating and the recovery media were adjusted to the same water activity, a balancing effect was observed between the protective influence of the solutes during heat treatment and their negative effect during the recovery of injured cells, so that the overall effect of water activity was reduced, with an optimal value near 0.96. The difference between the efficiency of depressors was also less pronounced. It may then be concluded that the overall protective effect of a decrease in water activity is generally overestimated. PMID:11133461

  12. Sequential activation of multiple grounding pads reduces skin heating.

    PubMed

    Schutt, D J; Haemmerich, D

    2006-01-01

    Radio frequency (RF) tumor ablation has become an accepted treatment modality for tumors not amenable to surgery. The need for larger ablation zones has required increase in RF generator power, with current generation devices delivering 200-250 W. Skin burns due to ground pad heating have become a common complication and are now a limiting factor for further increase in ablation zone and generator power. We performed ex vivo experiments with three ground pads (5 x 5 cm) placed on a tissue phantom. We applied 100 W of power for 12 min between the pads, and an RF electrode while we measured leading edge temperature below each pad, and temperature profile on the pads using temperature-sensitive LCD-paper. We compared conventional operation (i.e. simultaneous connection of all three pads) to sequential activation of the pads where each pad is only active for approximately 0.5 s. The timing during sequential activation was adjusted to keep leading edge temperature equal between the pads. Temperature rise below the leading edge for proximal, middle and distal ground pad was 10.7 +/- 1.04, 1.0 +/- 0.15 and 0.3 +/- 0.07 degrees C for conventional operation, and 4.8 +/- 0.16, 4.4 +/- 0.20 and 4.5 +/- 0.35 degrees C for sequentially activated operation. The maximum leading edge temperature rise was more than twice as high for conventional compared to switched operation (p<0.001). Sequential activation of multiple ground pads resulted in reduced maximum leading edge temperature, and allows control of each pad such that leading edge temperature of all pads is the same. This may reduce the incidence of ground pad burns by allowing each pad to reach same temperatures independent of location, and may allow higher power RF generators due to reduced skin heating.

  13. Selective disruption of high sensitivity heat activation but not capsaicin activation of TRPV1 channels by pore turret mutations.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yuanyuan; Yang, Fan; Cao, Xu; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Wang, KeWei; Zheng, Jie

    2012-04-01

    The capsaicin receptor transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV)1 is a highly heat-sensitive ion channel. Although chemical activation and heat activation of TRPV1 elicit similar pungent, painful sensation, the molecular mechanism underlying synergistic activation remains mysterious. In particular, where the temperature sensor is located and whether heat and capsaicin share a common activation pathway are debated. To address these fundamental issues, we searched for channel mutations that selectively affected one form of activation. We found that deletion of the first 10 amino acids of the pore turret significantly reduced the heat response amplitude and shifted the heat activation threshold, whereas capsaicin activation remained unchanged. Removing larger portions of the turret disrupted channel function. Introducing an artificial sequence to replace the deleted region restored sensitive capsaicin activation in these nonfunctional channels. The heat activation, however, remained significantly impaired, with the current exhibiting diminishing heat sensitivity to a level indistinguishable from that of a voltage-gated potassium channel, Kv7.4. Our results demonstrate that heat and capsaicin activation of TRPV1 are structurally and mechanistically distinct processes, and the pore turret is an indispensible channel structure involved in the heat activation process but is not part of the capsaicin activation pathway. Synergistic effect of heat and capsaicin on TRPV1 activation may originate from convergence of the two pathways on a common activation gate.

  14. Near-surface Heating of Young Rift Sediment Causes Mass Production and Discharge of Reactive Dissolved Organic Matter

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Shih; Koch, Boris P.; Feseker, Tomas; Ziervogel, Kai; Goldhammer, Tobias; Schmidt, Frauke; Witt, Matthias; Kellermann, Matthias Y.; Zabel, Matthias; Teske, Andreas; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2017-01-01

    Ocean margin sediments have been considered as important sources of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to the deep ocean, yet the contribution from advective settings has just started to be acknowledged. Here we present evidence showing that near-surface heating of sediment in the Guaymas Basin, a young extensional depression, causes mass production and discharge of reactive dissolved organic matter (DOM). In the sediment heated up to ~100 °C, we found unexpectedly low DOC concentrations in the pore waters, reflecting the combined effect of thermal desorption and advective fluid flow. Heating experiments suggested DOC production to be a rapid, abiotic process with the DOC concentration increasing exponentially with temperature. The high proportions of total hydrolyzable amino acids and presence of chemical species affiliated with activated hydrocarbons, carbohydrates and peptides indicate high reactivity of the DOM. Model simulation suggests that at the local scale, near-surface heating of sediment creates short and massive DOC discharge events that elevate the bottom-water DOC concentration. Because of the heterogeneous distribution of high heat flow areas, the expulsion of reactive DOM is spotty at any given time. We conclude that hydrothermal heating of young rift sediments alter deep-ocean budgets of bioavailable DOM, creating organic-rich habitats for benthic life. PMID:28327661

  15. Near-surface Heating of Young Rift Sediment Causes Mass Production and Discharge of Reactive Dissolved Organic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Shih; Koch, Boris P.; Feseker, Tomas; Ziervogel, Kai; Goldhammer, Tobias; Schmidt, Frauke; Witt, Matthias; Kellermann, Matthias Y.; Zabel, Matthias; Teske, Andreas; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2017-03-01

    Ocean margin sediments have been considered as important sources of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to the deep ocean, yet the contribution from advective settings has just started to be acknowledged. Here we present evidence showing that near-surface heating of sediment in the Guaymas Basin, a young extensional depression, causes mass production and discharge of reactive dissolved organic matter (DOM). In the sediment heated up to ~100 °C, we found unexpectedly low DOC concentrations in the pore waters, reflecting the combined effect of thermal desorption and advective fluid flow. Heating experiments suggested DOC production to be a rapid, abiotic process with the DOC concentration increasing exponentially with temperature. The high proportions of total hydrolyzable amino acids and presence of chemical species affiliated with activated hydrocarbons, carbohydrates and peptides indicate high reactivity of the DOM. Model simulation suggests that at the local scale, near-surface heating of sediment creates short and massive DOC discharge events that elevate the bottom-water DOC concentration. Because of the heterogeneous distribution of high heat flow areas, the expulsion of reactive DOM is spotty at any given time. We conclude that hydrothermal heating of young rift sediments alter deep-ocean budgets of bioavailable DOM, creating organic-rich habitats for benthic life.

  16. Heat stress control in the TMI-2 (Three Mile Island Unit 2) defueling and decontamination activities

    SciTech Connect

    Schork, J.S.; Parfitt, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    During the initial stages of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) defueling and decontamination activities for the reactor building, it was realized that the high levels of loose radioactive contamination would require the use of extensive protective clothing by entry personnel. While there was no doubt that layered protective clothing protects workers from becoming contaminated, it was recognized that these same layers of clothing would impose a very significant heat stress burden. To prevent the potentially serious consequences of a severe reaction to heat stress by workers in the hostile environment of the TMI-2 reactor building and yet maintain the reasonable work productivity necessary to perform the recovery adequately, an effective program of controlling worker exposure to heat stress had to be developed. Body-cooling devices produce a flow of cool air, which is introduced close to the skin to remove body heat through convection and increased sweat evaporation. The cooling effect produced by the Vortex tube successfully protected the workers from heat stress, however, there were several logistical and operational problems that hindered extensive use of these devices. The last type of cooling garment examined was the frozen water garment (FWG) developed by Elizier Kamon at the Pennsylvania State University as part of an Electric Power Research Institute research grant. Personal protection, i.e., body cooling, engineering controls, and administrative controls, have been implemented successfully.

  17. Salicylic acid alleviates adverse effects of heat stress on photosynthesis through changes in proline production and ethylene formation.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Iqbal R; Iqbal, Noushina; Masood, Asim; Per, Tasir S; Khan, Nafees A

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the potential of salicylic acid (SA) in alleviating the adverse effects of heat stress on photosynthesis in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cv WH 711. Activity of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco), photosynthetic-nitrogen use efficiency (NUE), and net photosynthesis decreased in plants subjected to heat stress (40 °C for 6 h), but proline metabolism increased. SA treatment (0.5 mM) alleviated heat stress by increasing proline production through the increase in γ-glutamyl kinase (GK) and decrease in proline oxidase (PROX) activity, resulting in promotion of osmotic potential and water potential necessary for maintaining photosynthetic activity. Together with this, SA treatment restricted the ethylene formation in heat-stressed plants to optimal range by inhibiting activity of 1-aminocyclopropane carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase (ACS). This resulted in improved proline metabolism, N assimilation and photosynthesis. The results suggest that SA interacts with proline metabolism and ethylene formation to alleviate the adverse effects of heat stress on photosynthesis in wheat.

  18. Virtual Grower: Software to Calculate Heating Costs of Greenhouse Production in the US

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Greenhouses are used in many climates either for season extension or year-round production, and can be expensive to heat. Greenhouse users and growers are often faced with management decisions that rely on an understanding of how temperature settings, heating systems, fuel types, and construction d...

  19. Performance evaluation of adding ethanol production into an existing combined heat and power plant.

    PubMed

    Starfelt, F; Thorin, E; Dotzauer, E; Yan, J

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the configuration and performance of a polygeneration system are studied by modelling the integration of a lignocellulosic wood-to-ethanol process with an existing combined heat and power (CHP) plant. Data from actual plants are applied to validate the simulation models. The integrated polygeneration system reaches a total efficiency of 50%, meeting the heating load in the district heating system. Excess heat from the ethanol production plant supplies 7.9 MW to the district heating system, accounting for 17.5% of the heat supply at full heating load. The simulation results show that the production of ethanol from woody biomass is more efficient when integrated with a CHP plant compared to a stand-alone production plant. The total biomass consumption is reduced by 13.9% while producing the same amounts of heat, electricity and ethanol fuel as in the stand-alone configurations. The results showed that another feature of the integrated polygeneration system is the longer annual operating period compared to existing cogeneration. Thus, the renewable electricity production is increased by 2.7% per year.

  20. Zero-valent iron enhanced methanogenic activity in anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge after heat and alkali pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaobin; Feng, Yinghong; Quan, Xie

    2015-04-01

    Heat or alkali pretreatment is the effective method to improve hydrolysis of waste sludge and then enhance anaerobic sludge digestion. However the pretreatment may inactivate the methanogens in the sludge. In the present work, zero-valent iron (ZVI) was used to enhance the methanogenic activity in anaerobic sludge digester under two methanogens-suppressing conditions, i.e. heat-pretreatment and alkali condition respectively. With the addition of ZVI, the lag time of methane production was shortened, and the methane yield increased by 91.5% compared to the control group. The consumption of VFA was accelerated by ZVI, especially for acetate, indicating that the acetoclastic methanogenesis was enhanced. In the alkali-condition experiment, the hydrogen produced decreased from 27.6 to 18.8 mL when increasing the ZVI dosage from 0 to 10 g/L. Correspondingly, the methane yield increased from 1.9 to 32.2 mL, which meant that the H2-utilizing methanogenes was enriched. These results suggested that the addition of ZVI into anaerobic digestion of sludge after pretreated by the heat or alkali process could efficiently recover the methanogenic activity and increase the methane production and sludge reduction.

  1. Magnetic Influences on Turbulent Heating and Jet Production in Coronal Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolsey, L. N.; Cranmer, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    The heating of the solar wind from open-field regions in the corona is the subject of an ongoing body of work in the solar physics community. We present recent progress to understand the role of Alfvén-wave-driven turbulence in flux tubes open to the heliosphere. Our models use three-dimensional, time-dependent forms of the reduced magnetohydrodynamics equations to find the resulting properties of the solar wind. We use the BRAID model (van Ballegooijen et al., 2011) on open flux tubes that epitomize the most common magnetic structures in the corona: a polar coronal hole, an open flux tube on the boundary of an equatorial streamer, and one that neighbors a strong active region. Our results agree with prior work using the time-steady, one-dimensional ZEPHYR model (Cranmer et al., 2007; Woolsey and Cranmer, 2014). In addition, the time dependence in BRAID lets us explore the bursty, nanoflare-like nature of the heating in these flux tubes. We find that the transient heating can be captured into separate events with an average energy of 1022 erg, with a maximum energy of 1025 erg. The bursty heating lead us to pursue a better understanding of the physical processes responsible for the network jets seen in IRIS data (see e.g. Tian et al., 2014). We search for correlations between the supergranular magnetic field properties—using the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager aboard SDO—and jet productivity to make better estimates of the mass and energy budget of these small-scale features and to find evidence of the mechanisms responsible for the network jets.

  2. Suomi NPP VIIRS active fire product status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellicott, E. A.; Csiszar, I. A.; Schroeder, W.; Giglio, L.; Wind, B.; Justice, C. O.

    2012-12-01

    We provide an overview of the evaluation and development of the Active Fires product derived from the Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensor on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite during the first year of on-orbit data. Results from the initial evaluation of the standard SNPP Active Fires product, generated by the SNPP Interface Data Processing System (IDPS), supported the stabilization of the VIIRS Sensor Data Record (SDR) product. This activity focused in particular on the processing of the dual-gain 4 micron VIIRS M13 radiometric measurements into 750m aggregated data, which are fundamental for active fire detection. Following the VIIRS SDR product's Beta maturity status in April 2012, correlative analysis between VIIRS and near-simultaneous fire detections from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the NASA Earth Observing System Aqua satellite confirmed the expected relative detection rates driven primarily by sensor differences. The VIIRS Active Fires Product Development and Validation Team also developed a science code that is based on the latest MODIS Collection 6 algorithm and provides a full spatially explicit fire mask to replace the sparse array output of fire locations from a MODIS Collection 4 equivalent algorithm in the current IDPS product. The Algorithm Development Library (ADL) was used to support the planning for the transition of the science code into IDPS operations in the future. Product evaluation and user outreach was facilitated by a product website that provided end user access to fire data in user-friendly format over North America as well as examples of VIIRS-MODIS comparisons. The VIIRS fire team also developed an experimental product based on 375m VIIRS Imagery band measurements and provided high quality imagery of major fire events in US. By August 2012 the IDPS product achieved Beta maturity, with some known and documented shortfalls related to the processing of

  3. 77 FR 33486 - Certain Integrated Circuit Packages Provided With Multiple Heat-Conducting Paths and Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ... COMMISSION Certain Integrated Circuit Packages Provided With Multiple Heat- Conducting Paths and Products.... International Trade Commission has received a complaint entitled Certain Integrated Circuit Packages Provided... sale within the United States after importation of certain integrated circuit packages provided...

  4. Temperature and heat production patterns inside organism clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyaw Tha Paw, U.

    1988-06-01

    Clustering of organisms under cold air temperature conditions is modelled with a finite-difference method. Metabolic functions of temperature are used to simulate completely ectothermic, completely endothermic, and other organisms. To adequately match real conditions, the core temperature is kept constant at a high level, while the periphery of the organism cluster is assigned a lower temperature representing the cold conditions under which clustering is observed for organisms. The numerical model reasonably predicts the observed temperature distribution in honeybee clusters. The results do not support suggestions that organisms could overheat in the core of a cluster if they do not use thermoregulatory mechanisms to cool down. Endothermic organisms are not as efficient as ectothermic ones in heating a cluster core temperature to a given level. The general ectothermic metabolic rate function exhibited one of the highest efficiencies for heating the cluster.

  5. Wasp hawking induces endothermic heat production in guard bees.

    PubMed

    Tan, K; Li, H; Yang, M X; Hepburn, H R; Radloff, S E

    2010-01-01

    When vespine wasps, Vespa velutina Lepeletier (Hymenoptera: Vespidae), hawk (capture) bees at their nest entrances alerted and poised guards of Apis cerana cerana F. and Apis mellifera ligustica Spinola (Hymenoptera: Apidae) have average thoracic temperatures slightly above 24° C. Many additional worker bees of A. cerana, but not A. mellifera, are recruited to augment the guard bee cohort and begin wing-shimmering and body-rocking, and the average thoracic temperature rises to 29.8 ± 1.6° C. If the wasps persist hawking, about 30 guard bees of A. cerana that have raised their thoracic temperatures to 31.4 ± 0.9° C strike out at a wasp and form a ball around it. Within about three minutes the core temperature of the heat-balling A. cerana guard bees reaches about 46° C, which is above the lethal limit of the wasps, which are therefore killed. Although guard bees of A. mellifera do not exhibit the serial behavioural and physiological changes of A. cerana, they may also heat-ball hawking wasps. Here, the differences in the sequence of changes in the behaviour and temperature during "resting" and "heat-balling" by A. cerana and A. mellifera are reported.

  6. Infrared micro-thermography of an actively heated preconcentrator device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furstenberg, Robert; Kendziora, C. A.; Stepnowski, Stanley V.; Mott, David R.; McGill, R. Andrew

    2008-03-01

    We report infrared micro-thermography measurements and analysis of static and transient temperature maps of an actively heated micro-fabricated preconcentrator device that incorporates a dual serpentine platinum heater trace deposited on a perforated polyimide membrane and suspended over a silicon frame. The sorbent coated perforated membrane is used to collect vapors and gases that flow through the preconcentrator. After heating, a concentrated pulse of analyte is released into the detector. Due to its small thermal mass, precise thermal management of the preconcentrator is critical to its performance. The sizes of features, the semi-transparent membrane, the need to flow air through the device, and changes in surface emissivity on a micron scale present many challenges for traditional infrared micro-thermography. We report an improved experimental test-bed. The hardware incorporates a custom-designed miniature calibration oven which, in conjunction with spatial filtering and a simple calibration algorithm, allows accurate temperature maps to be obtained. The test-bed incorporates a micro-bolometer array as the infrared imager. Instrumentation design, calibration and image processing algorithms are discussed and analyzed. The procedure does not require prior knowledge of the emissivity. We show that relatively inexpensive uncooled bolometers arrays can be used in certain radiometric applications. Heating profiles were examined with both uniform and non-uniform air flow through the device. The conclusions from this study provide critical information for optimal integration of the preconcentrator within a detection system, and in the design of the heater trace layout to achieve a more even temperature distribution across the device.

  7. A comparison of microwave versus direct solar heating for lunar brick production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yankee, S. J.; Strenski, D. G.; Pletka, B. J.; Patil, D. S.; Mutsuddy, B. C.

    1990-01-01

    Two processing techniques considered suitable for producing bricks from lunar regolith are examined: direct solar heating and microwave heating. An analysis was performed to compare the two processes in terms of the amount of power and time required to fabricate bricks of various sizes. Microwave heating was shown to be significantly faster than solar heating for rapid production of realistic-size bricks. However, the relative simplicity of the solar collector(s) used for the solar furnace compared to the equipment necessary for microwave generation may present an economic tradeoff.

  8. Induction of heat shock protein 72 in C6 glioma cells by methyl jasmonate through ROS-dependent heat shock factor 1 activation.

    PubMed

    Oh, Su Young; Kim, Ji Hye; Park, Min Jung; Kim, Sun Mi; Yoon, Chang Shin; Joo, Young Mi; Park, Jang Su; Han, Song Iy; Park, Hye Gyeong; Kang, Ho Sung

    2005-11-01

    Salicylate and jasmonates are two different types of plant hormone that play critical roles in plant defense responses against insect herbivores and microbial pathogens, through activating defense genes. These two natural products have been shown to have similar activities in animal cells: the compounds are able to induce cell cycle arrest or apoptosis in a variety of human cancer cells including those of colon, prostate, breast, and leukemia, suggesting the chemicals may potentially be a novel class of anti-cancer drugs. Since sodium salicylate can induce the heat shock response in animals, we examined the effects of jasmonates on the heat shock response in C6 glioma cells. Here, we show that brief exposure to methyl jasmonate (MeJA), but not to jasmonic acid, induces heat shock protein 72 (HSP72), but not HSP73 and HSP90, via heat shock factor I (HSF1) activation in C6 glioma cells without affecting cell viability. Intracellular H2O2 and O2-, and mitochondrial ROS were prominently increased in response to 5 mM MeJA in C6 cells. MeJA-induced HSP72 expression, HSF1 DNA binding, and human HSP70 promoter-driven CAT activity were prevented by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (a general antioxidant), catalase (a specific antioxidant for H2O2), and sodium formate (an inhibitor of OH.), but not by Rac1 dominant negative mutant Rac1N17 and diphenyleneiodonium (a NADPH oxidase inhibitor), indicating that MeJA induces HSP72 expression though HSF1 that is activated via Rac1-NADPH oxidase-independent ROS production pathway. These results suggest that the plant stress hormones share the ability to induce heat shock response in animal cells.

  9. Ion Heating Anisotropy during Dynamo Activity in the MST RFP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Hartog, D. J.; Chapman, J. T.; Craig, D.; Fiksel, G.; Fontana, P. W.

    1999-11-01

    MHD dynamo activity is large in the MST Reversed-Field Pinch during sawtooth crashes, and small otherwise. During a sawtooth crash, ion temperature increases rapidly to a level several times as high as the temperature between sawteeth, which itself can be larger than the electron temperature. Several theories have been developed to explain this ion heating, some indicating a possible asymmetry in perpendicular to parallel heating [C. G. Gimblett, Europhys. Lett. 11, 541 (1990); Z. Yoshida, Nucl. Fusion 31, 386 (1991); N. Mattor, P. W. Terry, and S. C. Prager, Comments Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 15, 65 (1992)]. In standard MST discharges, impurity ion temperature measured perpendicular to the magnetic field (T_⊥) is higher than impurity ion temperature parallel to the magnetic field (T_allel) during a sawtooth crash. Throughout the rest of the sawtooth cycle, T_⊥ <= T_allel. This is in contrast to results obtained on the EXTRAP-T2 RFP which showed T_⊥ < T_allel throughout the discharge [K. Sasaki et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 39, 333 (1997)

  10. Achievement of thermal stability by varying metabolic heat production in flying honeybees.

    PubMed

    Harrison, J F; Fewell, J H; Roberts, S P; Hall, H G

    1996-10-04

    Thermoregulation of the thorax allows endothermic insects to achieve power outputs during flight that are among the highest in the animal kingdom. Flying endothermic insects, including the honeybee Apis mellifera, are believed to thermoregulate almost exclusively by varying heat loss. Here it is shown that a rise in air temperature from 20 degrees to 40 degrees C causes large decreases in metabolic heat production and wing-beat frequency in honeybees during hovering, agitated, or loaded flight. Thus, variation in heat production may be the primary mechanism for achieving thermal stability in flying honeybees, and this mechanism may occur commonly in endothermic insects.

  11. Thermal design for areas of interference heating on actively cooled hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, R. L.; Stone, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    Numerous actively cooled panel design alternatives for application in regions on high speed aircraft that are subject to interference heating effects were studied. Candidate design concepts were evaluated using mass, producibility, reliability and inspectability/maintainability as figures of merit. Three design approaches were identified as superior within certain regimes of the matrix of design heating conditions considered. Only minor modifications to basic actively cooled panel design are required to withstand minor interference heating effects. Designs incorporating internally finned coolant tubes to augment heat transfer are recommended for moderate design heating conditions. At severe heating conditions, an insulated panel concept is required.

  12. Correlations in quantum thermodynamics: Heat, work, and entropy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipour, S.; Benatti, F.; Bakhshinezhad, F.; Afsary, M.; Marcantoni, S.; Rezakhani, A. T.

    2016-10-01

    We provide a characterization of energy in the form of exchanged heat and work between two interacting constituents of a closed, bipartite, correlated quantum system. By defining a binding energy we derive a consistent quantum formulation of the first law of thermodynamics, in which the role of correlations becomes evident, and this formulation reduces to the standard classical picture in relevant systems. We next discuss the emergence of the second law of thermodynamics under certain—but fairly general—conditions such as the Markovian assumption. We illustrate the role of correlations and interactions in thermodynamics through two examples.

  13. Correlations in quantum thermodynamics: Heat, work, and entropy production.

    PubMed

    Alipour, S; Benatti, F; Bakhshinezhad, F; Afsary, M; Marcantoni, S; Rezakhani, A T

    2016-10-21

    We provide a characterization of energy in the form of exchanged heat and work between two interacting constituents of a closed, bipartite, correlated quantum system. By defining a binding energy we derive a consistent quantum formulation of the first law of thermodynamics, in which the role of correlations becomes evident, and this formulation reduces to the standard classical picture in relevant systems. We next discuss the emergence of the second law of thermodynamics under certain-but fairly general-conditions such as the Markovian assumption. We illustrate the role of correlations and interactions in thermodynamics through two examples.

  14. Correlations in quantum thermodynamics: Heat, work, and entropy production

    PubMed Central

    Alipour, S.; Benatti, F.; Bakhshinezhad, F.; Afsary, M.; Marcantoni, S.; Rezakhani, A. T.

    2016-01-01

    We provide a characterization of energy in the form of exchanged heat and work between two interacting constituents of a closed, bipartite, correlated quantum system. By defining a binding energy we derive a consistent quantum formulation of the first law of thermodynamics, in which the role of correlations becomes evident, and this formulation reduces to the standard classical picture in relevant systems. We next discuss the emergence of the second law of thermodynamics under certain—but fairly general—conditions such as the Markovian assumption. We illustrate the role of correlations and interactions in thermodynamics through two examples. PMID:27767124

  15. Biodiesel production process from microalgae oil by waste heat recovery and process integration.

    PubMed

    Song, Chunfeng; Chen, Guanyi; Ji, Na; Liu, Qingling; Kansha, Yasuki; Tsutsumi, Atsushi

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the optimization of microalgae oil (MO) based biodiesel production process is carried out by waste heat recovery and process integration. The exergy analysis of each heat exchanger presented an efficient heat coupling between hot and cold streams, thus minimizing the total exergy destruction. Simulation results showed that the unit production cost of optimized process is 0.592$/L biodiesel, and approximately 0.172$/L biodiesel can be avoided by heat integration. Although the capital cost of the optimized biodiesel production process increased 32.5% and 23.5% compared to the reference cases, the operational cost can be reduced by approximately 22.5% and 41.6%.

  16. Adaptation to hot climate and strategies to alleviate heat stress in livestock production.

    PubMed

    Renaudeau, D; Collin, A; Yahav, S; de Basilio, V; Gourdine, J L; Collier, R J

    2012-05-01

    Despite many challenges faced by animal producers, including environmental problems, diseases, economic pressure, and feed availability, it is still predicted that animal production in developing countries will continue to sustain the future growth of the world's meat production. In these areas, livestock performance is generally lower than those obtained in Western Europe and North America. Although many factors can be involved, climatic factors are among the first and crucial limiting factors of the development of animal production in warm regions. In addition, global warming will further accentuate heat stress-related problems. The objective of this paper was to review the effective strategies to alleviate heat stress in the context of tropical livestock production systems. These strategies can be classified into three groups: those increasing feed intake or decreasing metabolic heat production, those enhancing heat-loss capacities, and those involving genetic selection for heat tolerance. Under heat stress, improved production should be possible through modifications of diet composition that either promotes a higher intake or compensates the low feed consumption. In addition, altering feeding management such as a change in feeding time and/or frequency, are efficient tools to avoid excessive heat load and improve survival rate, especially in poultry. Methods to enhance heat exchange between the environment and the animal and those changing the environment to prevent or limit heat stress can be used to improve performance under hot climatic conditions. Although differences in thermal tolerance exist between livestock species (ruminants > monogastrics), there are also large differences between breeds of a species and within each breed. Consequently, the opportunity may exist to improve thermal tolerance of the animals using genetic tools. However, further research is required to quantify the genetic antagonism between adaptation and production traits to evaluate

  17. Contrasting Metamorphic Record of Heat Production Anomalies in the Penokean Orogen of Northern Michigan.

    PubMed

    Attoh

    2000-05-01

    It is proposed that the contrasting metamorphic mineral assemblages of the isolated amphibolite facies metamorphic highs in the Penokean orogen of northern Michigan may be caused by different heat production rates in the Archean basement. This hypothesis is based on concentrations of K, U, and Th in the Archean basement gneisses and Paleoproterozoic metasediments that indicate significant contribution of radiogenic heating during Penokean metamorphism. Heat production was anomalously high ( approximately 10.6 µWm-3) where andalusite-bearing mineral assemblages indicate that high temperatures were attained at shallow crustal levels ( approximately 550 degrees -600 degrees C at approximately 3 kbar). In contrast, where exposed metamorphic rocks indicate peak temperatures of 600 degrees -650 degrees C at 6-7 kbar, heat production in the Archean basement was lower ( approximately 3.7 µWm-3). The effect of heat production rates on the metamorphic pressure-temperature paths was tested with numerical thermal models. The calculations show (1) that if the heat production rate, where andalusite-bearing assemblages formed, was significantly <6.0 µWm-3, the estimated pressure at peak temperatures (PTmax) would be much higher and lie in the sillimanite or kyanite stability fields; and (2) differences between PTmax estimates for the metamorphic highs based on thermobarometry can be reproduced if thermal history involved significant crustal thickening as well as moderate unroofing rates.

  18. Energy-Storage Modules for Active Solar Heating and Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    34 page report describes a melting salt hydrate that stores 12 times as much heat as rocks and other heavy materials. Energy is stored mostly as latent heat; that is, heat that can be stored and recovered without any significant change in temperature. Report also describes development, evaluation and testing of permanently sealed modules containing salt hydrate mixture.

  19. Biologically active proteins from natural product extracts.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, B R

    2001-10-01

    The term "biologically active proteins" is almost redundant. All proteins produced by living creatures are, by their very nature, biologically active to some extent in their homologous species. In this review, a subset of these proteins will be discussed that are biologically active in heterologous systems. The isolation and characterization of novel proteins from natural product extracts including those derived from microorganisms, plants, insects, terrestrial vertebrates, and marine organisms will be reviewed and grouped into several distinct classes based on their biological activity and their structure.

  20. Study of heat production and transfer in shredded tires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellassie, Kassahun G.

    The purpose of this study is to determine the cause(s) of initial exothermic reactions in shredded tire. The primary hypothesis was that the oxidation of exposed steel wires, the oxidation of rubber, or sulfur causes the exothermic reactions in shredded tire. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the heat transfer properties of the shredded tires by using a hot-plate apparatus. The experiments were conducted by varying the physical and environmental conditions as follows: (1) Tire size, (2) Wire content, (3) Water content, (4) Effective stress, (5) Air supply, (6) pH, (7) Humic Acid. First, laboratory testing was conducted to determine the effects of tire size on the heat transfer properties of shredded tires. The heat coefficient and diffusivity ranged from 3.0 to 3.5 W/m-K and 0.0002 to 0.00084 m 2/hour, respectively. Next, experiments were conducted to determine the effects of wire content on the exothermic reaction rate of tire shreds. When various amounts of wire (i.e., 5% to 15%) were exposed, the reaction rate increased, 2800 Btu for every lb of iron that is oxidized. In comparison, tire shreds with no wire were also tested under the same experimental conditions as above, however, no exothermic reaction occurred. These tests (i.e., with no wire) illustrate that carbon black in rubber molecule considers not oxidize. It was postulated that the reaction between iron in the wire and sulfur in the tire may be a potential cause of the exothermic reaction under low oxygen conditions. Experiments without air supply yielded no exothermic reaction. Thus, sulfur did not cause exotherm, because it is at low energy level and immobilized in the vulcanization process. In addition, experiments were conducted as the air supply was varied from 0 to 4 psi. With air pressure of less than 4-psi, no reaction occurred until 4-psi air was provided for the experiment. In conclusion, the design of an embankment with tire shreds should include shredded tires of bigger size

  1. System for vaporizing carbon dioxide utilizing the heat by-product of the refrigeration system as a heat source

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, H.L.

    1980-12-23

    The present invention is directed to a carbonation and refrigeration system wherein the heat of the refrigerant output side of the refrigeration compressor is utilized to vaporize liquid carbon dioxide into CO/sub 2/ gas which is introduced into a liquid product. The carbonation and refrigeration system successfully utilizes the heat of the refrigerant to vaporize the CO/sub 2/ liquid regardless of the cooling demand of the system caused by seasonal temperature variations. For example during the winter months when the cooling demand is as low as 10% of the cooling demand in the summer, the carbonation and refrigeration system operates effectively to vaporize the CO/sub 2/ liquid by means of a heat exchanger and a desuperheater which are connected in communication with the superheated vapor emerging from the output side of a refrigeration compressor. In addition, the carbonation and refrigeration system of the present invention cools more efficiently by extracting some of the heat from the condensed refrigerant entering the receiver of the refrigeration system. In this manner, the refrigeration compressor can operate more efficiently.

  2. Heat Production During Countermeasure Exercises Planned for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapley, Michael G.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Guilliams, Mark E.; Greenisen, Michael C.; Schneider, Suzanne M.

    2004-01-01

    This investigation's purpose was to determine the amount of heat produced when performing aerobic and resistance exercises planned as part of the exercise countermeasures prescription for the ISS. These data will be used to determine thermal control requirements of the Node 1 and other modules where exercise hardware might reside. To determine heat production during resistive exercise, 6 subjects using the iRED performed 5 resistance exercises which form the core exercises of the current ISS resistive exercise countermeasures. Each exerciser performed a warm-up set at 50% effort, then 3 sets of increasing resistance. We measured oxygen consumption and work during each exercise. Heat loss was calculated as the difference between the gross energy expenditure (minus resting metabolism) and the work performed. To determine heat production during aerobic exercise, 14 subjects performed an interval, cycle exercise protocol and 7 subjects performed a continuous, treadmill protocol. Each 30-min. exercise is similar to exercises planned for ISS. Oxygen consumption monitored continuously during the exercises was used to calculate the gross energy expenditure. For cycle exercise, work performed was calculated based on the ergometer's resistance setting and pedaling frequency. For treadmill, total work was estimated by assuming 25% work efficiency and subtracting the calculated heat production and resting metabolic rate from the gross energy expenditure. This heat production needs to be considered when determining the location of exercise hardware on ISS and designing environmental control systems. These values reflect only the human subject s produced heat; heat produced by the exercise hardware also will contribute to the heat load.

  3. Genetic interactions for heat stress and production level: predicting foreign from domestic data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic by environmental interactions were estimated from U.S. national data by separately adding random regressions for heat stress (HS) and herd production level (HL) to the all-breed animal model to improve predictions of future records and rankings in other climate and production situations. Yie...

  4. Fluid flow and heat convection studies for actively cooled airframes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, A. F.

    This report details progress made on the jet impingement - liquid crystal - digital imaging experiment. With the design phase complete, the experiment is currently in the construction phase. In order to reach this phase two design related issues were resolved. The first issue was to determine NASP leading edge active cooling design parameters. Meetings were arranged with personnel at SAIC International, Torrance, CA in order to obtain recent publications that characterized expected leading edge heat fluxes as well as other details of NASP operating conditions. The information in these publications was used to estimate minimum and maximum jet Reynolds numbers needed to accomplish the required leading edge cooling, and to determine the parameters of the experiment. The details of this analysis are shown in Appendix A. One of the concerns for the NASP design is that of thermal stress due to large surface temperature gradients. Using a series of circular jets to cool the leading edge will cause a non-uniform temperature distribution and potentially large thermal stresses. Therefore it was decided to explore the feasibility of using a slot jet to cool the leading edge. The literature contains many investigations into circular jet heat transfer but few investigations of slot jet heat transfer. The first experiments will be done on circular jets impinging on a fiat plate and results compared to previously published data to establish the accuracy of the method. Subsequent experiments will be slot jets impinging on full scale models of the NASP leading edge. Table 1 shows the range of parameters to be explored. Next a preliminary design of the experiment was done. Previous papers which used a similar experimental technique were studied and elements of those experiments adapted to the jet impingement study. Trade-off studies were conducted to determine which design was the least expensive, easy to construct, and easy to use. Once the final design was settled, vendors were

  5. Fluid flow and heat convection studies for actively cooled airframes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, A. F.

    1993-01-01

    This report details progress made on the jet impingement - liquid crystal - digital imaging experiment. With the design phase complete, the experiment is currently in the construction phase. In order to reach this phase two design related issues were resolved. The first issue was to determine NASP leading edge active cooling design parameters. Meetings were arranged with personnel at SAIC International, Torrance, CA in order to obtain recent publications that characterized expected leading edge heat fluxes as well as other details of NASP operating conditions. The information in these publications was used to estimate minimum and maximum jet Reynolds numbers needed to accomplish the required leading edge cooling, and to determine the parameters of the experiment. The details of this analysis are shown in Appendix A. One of the concerns for the NASP design is that of thermal stress due to large surface temperature gradients. Using a series of circular jets to cool the leading edge will cause a non-uniform temperature distribution and potentially large thermal stresses. Therefore it was decided to explore the feasibility of using a slot jet to cool the leading edge. The literature contains many investigations into circular jet heat transfer but few investigations of slot jet heat transfer. The first experiments will be done on circular jets impinging on a fiat plate and results compared to previously published data to establish the accuracy of the method. Subsequent experiments will be slot jets impinging on full scale models of the NASP leading edge. Table 1 shows the range of parameters to be explored. Next a preliminary design of the experiment was done. Previous papers which used a similar experimental technique were studied and elements of those experiments adapted to the jet impingement study. Trade-off studies were conducted to determine which design was the least expensive, easy to construct, and easy to use. Once the final design was settled, vendors were

  6. Mitigation of heat stress-related complications by a yeast fermentate product.

    PubMed

    Giblot Ducray, Henri Alexandre; Globa, Ludmila; Pustovyy, Oleg; Reeves, Stuart; Robinson, Larry; Vodyanoy, Vitaly; Sorokulova, Iryna

    2016-08-01

    Heat stress results in a multitude of biological and physiological responses which can become lethal if not properly managed. It has been shown that heat stress causes significant adverse effects in both human and animals. Different approaches have been proposed to mitigate the adverse effects caused by heat stress, among which are special diet and probiotics. We characterized the effect of the yeast fermentate EpiCor (EH) on the prevention of heat stress-related complications in rats. We found that increasing the body temperature of animals from 37.1±0.2 to 40.6±0.2°C by exposure to heat (45°C for 25min) resulted in significant morphological changes in the intestine. Villi height and total mucosal thickness decreased in heat-stressed rats pre-treated with PBS in comparison with control animals not exposed to the heat. Oral treatment of rats with EH before heat stress prevented the traumatic effects of heat on the intestine. Changes in intestinal morphology of heat-stressed rats, pre-treated with PBS resulted in significant elevation of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) level in the serum of these animals. Pre-treatment with EH was effective in the prevention of LPS release into the bloodstream of heat-stressed rats. Our study revealed that elevation of body temperature also resulted in a significant increase of the concentration of vesicles released by erythrocytes in rats, pre-treated with PBS. This is an indication of a pathological impact of heat on the erythrocyte structure. Treatment of rats with EH completely protected their erythrocytes from this heat-induced pathology. Finally, exposure to heat stress conditions resulted in a significant increase of white blood cells in rats. In the group of animals pre-treated with EH before heat stress, the white blood cell count remained the same as in non-heated controls. These results showed the protective effect of the EH product in the prevention of complications, caused by heat stress.

  7. Optimization of activator solution and heat treatment of ground lignite type fly ash geopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnár, Z.; Szabó, R.; Rácz, Á.; Lakatos, J.; Debreczeni, Á.; Mucsi, G.

    2017-02-01

    Geopolymers are inorganic polymers which can be produced by the reaction between silico aluminate oxides and alkali silicates in alkaline medium. Materialscontaining silica and alumina compounds are suitable for geopolymer production. These can beprimary materials or industrial wastes, i. e. fly ash, metallurgical slag and red mud. In this paper, the results of the systematic experimental series are presented which were carried out in order to optimize the geopolymer preparation process. Fly ash was ground for different residence time (0, 5, 10, 30, 60 min) in order to investigate the optimal specific surface area. NaOH activator solution concentration also varied (6, 8, 10, 12, 14 M). Furthermore, sodium silicate was added to NaOH as a network builder solution. In this last serie different heat curing temperatures (30, 60, 90°C) were also applied. After seven days of ageing the physical properties of the geopolymer(compressive strength and specimen density)were measured. Chemical leaching tests on the rawmaterial and the geopolymers were carried out to determine the elements which can be mobilized by different leaching solutions. It was found that the above mentioned parameters (fly ash fineness, molar concentration and composition of activator solution, heat curing) has great effect on the physical and chemical properties of geopolymer specimens. Optimal conditions were as follows: specific surface area of the fly ash above 2000 cm2/g, 10 M NaOH, 30°C heat curing temperature which resulted in 21 MPa compressive strength geopolymer.

  8. Local entropy production in turbulent shear flows: A tool for evaluating heat transfer performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herwig, H.; Kock, F.

    2006-06-01

    Performance evaluation of heat transfer devices can be based on the overall entropy production in these devices. In our study we therefore provide equations for the systematic and detailed determination of local entropy production due to dissipation of mechanical energy and due to heat conduction, both in turbulent flows. After turbulence modeling has been incorporated for the fluctuating parts the overall entropy production can be determined by integration with respect to the whole flow domain. Since, however, entropy production rates show very steep gradients close to the wall, numerical solutions are far more effective with wall functions for the entropy production terms. These wall functions are mandatory when high Reynolds number turbulence models are used. For turbulent flow in a pipe with an inserted twisted tape as heat transfer promoter it is shown that based on the overall entropy production rate a clear statement from a thermodynamic point of view is possible. For a certain range of twist strength there is a decrease in overall entropy production compared to the case without insert. Also, the optimum twist strength can be determined. This information is unavailable when only pressure drop and heat transfer data are given.

  9. Degradation of Biochemical Activity in Soil Sterilized by Dry Heat and Gamma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, K. L.; Souza, K. A.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of soil sterilization by dry heat (0.08% relative humidity), gamma radiation, or both on soil phosphatase, urease, and decarboxylase activity was studied. Soil sterilized by a long exposure to dry heat at relatively low temperatures (eight weeks at 100.5 C) retained higher activities than did soil exposed to a higher temperature (two weeks at 124.5 C), while all activity was destroyed by four days at 148.5 C. Sterilization with 7.5 Mrads destroyed less activity than did heat sterilization. The effect of several individually nonsterizing doses of heat radiation is described.

  10. Theoretical Design of a Thermosyphon for Efficient Process Heat Removal from Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) for Production of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Fred Gunnerson; Akira Tokuhiro; Vivek Utgiker; Kevan Weaver; Steven Sherman

    2007-10-01

    The work reported here is the preliminary analysis of two-phase Thermosyphon heat transfer performance with various alkali metals. Thermosyphon is a device for transporting heat from one point to another with quite extraordinary properties. Heat transport occurs via evaporation and condensation, and the heat transport fluid is re-circulated by gravitational force. With this mode of heat transfer, the thermosyphon has the capability to transport heat at high rates over appreciable distances, virtually isothermally and without any requirement for external pumping devices. For process heat, intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) are required to transfer heat from the NGNP to the hydrogen plant in the most efficient way possible. The production of power at higher efficiency using Brayton Cycle, and hydrogen production requires both heat at higher temperatures (up to 1000oC) and high effectiveness compact heat exchangers to transfer heat to either the power or process cycle. The purpose for selecting a compact heat exchanger is to maximize the heat transfer surface area per volume of heat exchanger; this has the benefit of reducing heat exchanger size and heat losses. The IHX design requirements are governed by the allowable temperature drop between the outlet of the NGNP (900oC, based on the current capabilities of NGNP), and the temperatures in the hydrogen production plant. Spiral Heat Exchangers (SHE’s) have superior heat transfer characteristics, and are less susceptible to fouling. Further, heat losses to surroundings are minimized because of its compact configuration. SHEs have never been examined for phase-change heat transfer applications. The research presented provides useful information for thermosyphon design and Spiral Heat Exchanger.

  11. Subtask 12D1: Impact properties of production heat of V-4Cr-4Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Nowicki, L.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    Following previous reports of excellent properties of a laboratory heat of V-4Cr-4Ti, the alloy identified as the primary vanadium-based candidate for application as fusion reactor structural components, a large production-scale (500-kg) heat of the alloy was fabricated successfully. Since impact toughness has been known to be most sensitive to alloy composition and microstructure, impact testing of the production-scale heat was conducted in this work between -200{degrees}C and +200{degrees}C. A 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti, an alloy identified previously as the primary vanadium-based candidate alloy for application as fusion reactor structural components, has been produced successfully. Impact tests were conducted at -196{degrees}C to 150{degrees}C on 1/3-size Charpy specimens of the scale-up heat in as-rolled condition and after annealing for 1 h at 950, 1000, and 1050{degrees}C in high-quality vacuum. The annealed material remained ductile at all test temperatures; the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) was lower than -200{degrees}C. The upper-shelf energy of the production-scale heat was similar to that of the laboratory-scale ({approx}30-kg) heat of V-4Cr-4Ti investigated previously. Effect of annealing temperature was not significant; however, annealing at 1000{degrees}C for 1 h not only produces best impact properties but also ensures a sufficient tolerance to effect of temperature inhomogeneity expected when annealing large components. Effect of notch geometry was also investigated on the production heat. When annealed properly (e.g., at 1000{degrees}C for 1 h), impact properties were not sensitive to notch geometry (45{degrees}-notch, root radius 0.25 mm; and 300-notch, root radius 0.08 mm). 11 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Chromium-histidinate ameliorates productivity in heat-stressed Japanese quails through reducing oxidative stress and inhibiting heat-shock protein expression.

    PubMed

    Akdemir, F; Sahin, N; Orhan, C; Tuzcu, M; Sahin, K; Hayirli, A

    2015-04-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of a histidine complex of chromium (chromium histidinate, CrHis) on egg production, lipid peroxidation and the expression of hepatic nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and heat-shock proteins (HSPs) in Japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica) exposed to heat stress (HS). A total of 180 5-week-old female quails were reared either at 22°C for 24 h/d (thermoneutral, TN) or 34°C for 8 h/d (heat stress, HS) for 12 weeks. Birds in both environments were randomly given one of three diets: basal diet and basal diet supplemented with 400 or 800 µg of elemental Cr as CrHis per kg of diet. Blood, egg yolk and liver samples collected at the end of the trial were analysed to determine concentrations of cholesterol and malondialdehyde (MDA) and expressions of transcription and heat-shock proteins. Exposure to HS caused reductions in feed intake (-8.1%) and egg production (-15.8%), elevations in serum (14.8%) and egg-yolk (29.0%) cholesterol concentrations, decreases in serum (113%) and egg-yolk (73.0%) MDA concentrations and increases in the expressions of hepatic NF-κB (52.3%) and HSPs (averaging 53.6%). The effects of increasing supplemental CrHis on the response variables were more notable in the HS environment than in the TN environment. There were considerable improvements in feed intake and egg production, decreases in serum and egg-yolk cholesterol concentrations and suppressions in the expressions of hepatic nuclear protein and HSPs in response to increasing supplemental CrHis concentration in the diet of quails reared under the HS environment. In conclusion, supplemental CrHis improves productivity through alleviating oxidative stress and modulating the expressions of hepatic NF-κB and HSPs in heat-stressed quails.

  13. Subcontracted activities related to TES for building heating and cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J.

    1980-01-01

    The subcontract program elements related to thermal energy storage for building heating and cooling systems are outlined. The following factors are included: subcontracts in the utility load management application area; life and stability testing of packaged low cost energy storage materials; and development of thermal energy storage systems for residential space cooling. Resistance storage heater component development, demonstration of storage heater systems for residential applications, and simulation and evaluation of latent heat thermal energy storage (heat pump systems) are also discussed. Application of thermal energy storage for solar application and twin cities district heating are covered including an application analysis and technology assessment of thermal energy storage.

  14. Subcontracted activities related to TES for building heating and cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J.

    1980-03-01

    The subcontract program elements related to thermal energy storage for building heating and cooling systems are outlined. The following factors are included: subcontracts in the utility load management application area; life and stability testing of packaged low cost energy storage materials; and development of thermal energy storage systems for residential space cooling. Resistance storage heater component development, demonstration of storage heater systems for residential applications, and simulation and evaluation of latent heat thermal energy storage (heat pump systems) are also discussed. Application of thermal energy storage for solar application and twin cities district heating are covered including an application analysis and technology assessment of thermal energy storage.

  15. Vacuum evaporation treatment of digestate: full exploitation of cogeneration heat to process the whole digestate production.

    PubMed

    Guercini, S; Castelli, G; Rumor, C

    2014-01-01

    Vacuum evaporation represents an interesting and innovative solution for managing animal waste surpluses in areas with high livestock density. To reduce operational costs, a key factor is the availability of an inexpensive source of heat, such as that coming from an anaerobic digestion (AD) plant. The aim of this study was to test vacuum evaporation for the treatment of cattle slurry digestate focusing on heat exploitation. Tests were performed with a pilot plant fed with the digestate from a full-scale AD plant. The results were used to evaluate if and how cogeneration heat can support both the AD plant and the subsequent evaporation of the whole daily digestate production in a full-scale plant. The concentrate obtained (12% total solids) represents 40-50% of the influent. The heat requirement is 0.44 kWh/kg condensate. Heat power availability exceeding the needs of the digestor ranges from 325 (in winter) to 585 kW (in summer) versus the 382 kW required for processing the whole digestate production. To by-pass fluctuations, we propose to use the heat coming from the cogenerator directly in the evaporator, tempering the digestor with the latent heat of distillation vapor.

  16. Greenhouse soil heating for improved production and energy conservation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Roller, W.L.; Elwell, D.L.

    1981-09-01

    A three-year study of the beneficial use of simulated power plant reject heat for soil heating in greenhouses is described. The effect of 25, 30, 35, and 40/sup 0/C warm water on the temperature of and moisture distribution in three diverse, greenhouse soils was studied, and the growth response of variety HR-5 lettuce in this environment was determined. Detailed information on soil temperature and moisture distribution, heat transfer rates, and lettuce production yield under various operating conditions was obtained.

  17. Active region emission measure distributions and implications for nanoflare heating

    SciTech Connect

    Cargill, P. J.

    2014-03-20

    The temperature dependence of the emission measure (EM) in the core of active regions coronal loops is an important diagnostic of heating processes. Observations indicate that EM(T) ∼ T{sup a} below approximately 4 MK, with 2 < a < 5. Zero-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of nanoflare trains are used to demonstrate the dependence of a on the time between individual nanoflares (T{sub N} ) and the distribution of nanoflare energies. If T{sub N} is greater than a few thousand seconds, a < 3. For smaller values, trains of equally spaced nanoflares cannot account for the observed range of a if the distribution of nanoflare energies is either constant, randomly distributed, or a power law. Power law distributions where there is a delay between consecutive nanoflares proportional to the energy of the second nanoflare do lead to the observed range of a. However, T{sub N} must then be of the order of hundreds to no more than a few thousand seconds. If a nanoflare leads to the relaxation of a stressed coronal field to a near-potential state, the time taken to build up the required magnetic energy is thus too long to account for the EM measurements. Instead, it is suggested that a nanoflare involves the relaxation from one stressed coronal state to another, dissipating only a small fraction of the available magnetic energy. A consequence is that nanoflare energies may be smaller than previously envisioned.

  18. Active Region Emission Measure Distributions and Implications for Nanoflare Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cargill, P. J.

    2014-03-01

    The temperature dependence of the emission measure (EM) in the core of active regions coronal loops is an important diagnostic of heating processes. Observations indicate that EM(T) ~ Ta below approximately 4 MK, with 2 < a < 5. Zero-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of nanoflare trains are used to demonstrate the dependence of a on the time between individual nanoflares (TN ) and the distribution of nanoflare energies. If TN is greater than a few thousand seconds, a < 3. For smaller values, trains of equally spaced nanoflares cannot account for the observed range of a if the distribution of nanoflare energies is either constant, randomly distributed, or a power law. Power law distributions where there is a delay between consecutive nanoflares proportional to the energy of the second nanoflare do lead to the observed range of a. However, TN must then be of the order of hundreds to no more than a few thousand seconds. If a nanoflare leads to the relaxation of a stressed coronal field to a near-potential state, the time taken to build up the required magnetic energy is thus too long to account for the EM measurements. Instead, it is suggested that a nanoflare involves the relaxation from one stressed coronal state to another, dissipating only a small fraction of the available magnetic energy. A consequence is that nanoflare energies may be smaller than previously envisioned.

  19. An evaluation of alternate production methods for Pu-238 general purpose heat source pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Borland; Steve Frank

    2009-06-01

    For the past half century, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has used Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) to power deep space satellites. Fabricating heat sources for RTGs, specifically General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHSs), has remained essentially unchanged since their development in the 1970s. Meanwhile, 30 years of technological advancements have been made in the applicable fields of chemistry, manufacturing and control systems. This paper evaluates alternative processes that could be used to produce Pu 238 fueled heat sources. Specifically, this paper discusses the production of the plutonium-oxide granules, which are the input stream to the ceramic pressing and sintering processes. Alternate chemical processes are compared to current methods to determine if alternative fabrication processes could reduce the hazards, especially the production of respirable fines, while producing an equivalent GPHS product.

  20. HEAT INPUT AND POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT EFFECTS ON REDUCED-ACTIVATION FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEEL FRICTION STIR WELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Wei; Chen, Gaoqiang; Chen, Jian; Yu, Xinghua; Frederick, David Alan; Feng, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are an important class of structural materials for fusion reactor internals developed in recent years because of their improved irradiation resistance. However, they can suffer from welding induced property degradations. In this paper, a solid phase joining technology friction stir welding (FSW) was adopted to join a RAFM steel Eurofer 97 and different FSW parameters/heat input were chosen to produce welds. FSW response parameters, joint microstructures and microhardness were investigated to reveal relationships among welding heat input, weld structure characterization and mechanical properties. In general, FSW heat input results in high hardness inside the stir zone mostly due to a martensitic transformation. It is possible to produce friction stir welds similar to but not with exactly the same base metal hardness when using low power input because of other hardening mechanisms. Further, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) is a very effective way to reduce FSW stir zone hardness values.

  1. Production and physiological responses of heat-stressed lactating dairy cattle to conductive cooling.

    PubMed

    Perano, Kristen M; Usack, Joseph G; Angenent, Largus T; Gebremedhin, Kifle G

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this research was to test the effectiveness of conductive cooling in alleviating heat stress of lactating dairy cows. A conductive cooling system was built with waterbeds (Dual Chamber Cow Waterbeds, Advanced Comfort Technology Inc., Reedsburg, WI) modified to circulate chilled water. The experiment lasted 7 wk. Eight first-lactation Holstein cows producing 34.4±3.7kg/d of milk at 166±28 d in milk were used in the study. Milk yield, dry matter intake (DMI), and rectal temperature were recorded twice daily, and respiration rate was recorded 5 times per day. During wk 1, the cows were not exposed to experimental heat stress or conductive cooling. For the remaining 6 wk, the cows were exposed to heat stress from 0900 to 1700h each day. During these 6 wk, 4 of the 8 cows were cooled with conductive cooling (experimental cows), and the other 4 were not cooled (control cows). The study consisted of 2 thermal environment exposures (temperature-humidity index mean ± standard deviation of 80.7±0.9 and 79.0±1.0) and 2 cooling water temperatures (circulating water through the water mattresses at temperatures of 4.5°C and 10°C). Thus, a total of 4 conductive cooling treatments were tested, with each treatment lasting 1 wk. During wk 6, the experimental and control cows were switched and the temperature-humidity index of 79.0±1.0 with 4.5°C cooling water treatment was repeated. During wk 7, waterbeds were placed directly on concrete stalls without actively cooling the water. Least squares means and P-values for the different treatments were calculated with multivariate mixed models. Conductively cooling the cows with 4.5°C water decreased rectal temperature by 1.0°C, decreased respiration rate by 18 breaths/min, increased milk yield by 5%, and increased DMI by 14% compared with the controls. When the results from the 2 cooling water temperatures (4.5°C and 10°C circulating water) were compared, we found that the rectal temperature from 4.5

  2. Production Of High Specific Activity Copper-67

    DOEpatents

    Jamriska, Sr., David J.; Taylor, Wayne A.; Ott, Martin A.; Fowler, Malcolm; Heaton, Richard C.

    2003-10-28

    A process for the selective production and isolation of high specific activity Cu.sup.67 from proton-irradiated enriched Zn.sup.70 target comprises target fabrication, target irradiation with low energy (<25 MeV) protons, chemical separation of the Cu.sup.67 product from the target material and radioactive impurities of gallium, cobalt, iron, and stable aluminum via electrochemical methods or ion exchange using both anion and cation organic ion exchangers, chemical recovery of the enriched Zn.sup.70 target material, and fabrication of new targets for re-irradiation is disclosed.

  3. Production Of High Specific Activity Copper-67

    DOEpatents

    Jamriska, Sr., David J.; Taylor, Wayne A.; Ott, Martin A.; Fowler, Malcolm; Heaton, Richard C.

    2002-12-03

    A process for the selective production and isolation of high specific activity cu.sup.67 from proton-irradiated enriched Zn.sup.70 target comprises target fabrication, target irradiation with low energy (<25 MeV) protons, chemical separation of the Cu.sup.67 product from the target material and radioactive impurities of gallium, cobalt, iron, and stable aluminum via electrochemical methods or ion exchange using both anion and cation organic ion exchangers, chemical recovery of the enriched Zn.sup.70 target material, and fabrication of new targets for re-irradiation is disclosed.

  4. Microwave heated resin injector for advanced composite production.

    PubMed

    Stanculovic, Sebastijan; Feher, Lambert

    2008-01-01

    A novel microwave (MW) injector at 2.45 GHz for resin infiltration has been developed at the Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology (IHM), Research Center Karlsruhe (FZK), Germany. Resin injection is an essential step in the production of carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) for aerospace applications. A compact, low-cost and automated MW injector provides an efficient and safe energy transfer from the MW source to the resin and supports an appropriate electromagnetic field structure for homogeneous infiltration. The system provides temperature monitoring and an automatized MW power switching, which ensures a fast response of the MW system to rapid changes in the temperature for high flow rates of the resin. In low power measurements with a vector network analyzer, the geometry of the injector cavity has been adjusted to provide an efficient system. The MW injector has been tested for specific resin systems infiltrations.

  5. Nitric oxide induces heat-shock protein 70 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells via activation of heat shock factor 1.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Q; Hu, Y; Kleindienst, R; Wick, G

    1997-01-01

    Current data suggest that nitric oxide (NO) is a double-edged sword that could result in relaxation and/or cytotoxicity of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) via cGMP- dependent or -independent signal pathways. Stress or heat shock proteins (hsps) have been shown to be augmented in arterial SMCs during acute hypertension and atherosclerosis, both conditions that are believed to correlate with disturbed NO production. In the present study, we demonstrate that NO generated from sodium nitroprusside (SNP), S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine, and spermine/nitric oxide complex leads to hsp70 induction in cultured SMCs. Western blot analysis demonstrated that hsp70 protein expression peaked between 6 and 12 h after treatment with SNP, and elevated protein levels were preceded by induction of hsp70 mRNA within 3 h. Induction of hsp70 mRNA was associated with the activation of heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1), suggesting that the response was regulated at the transcriptional level. HSF1 activation was completely blocked by hemoglobin, dithiothreitol, and cycloheximide, suggesting that the protein damage and nascent polypeptide formation induced by NO may initiate this activation. Furthermore, SMCs pretreated with heat shock (42 degrees C) for 30 min were significantly protected from death induced by NO. Thus, we provide evidence that NO induces hsp70 expression in SMCs via HSF1 activation. Induction of hsp70 could be important in protecting SMCs from injury resulting from NO stimulation. PMID:9276725

  6. Trypanocidal Activity of Marine Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Amy J.; Grkovic, Tanja; Sykes, Melissa L.; Avery, Vicky M.

    2013-01-01

    Marine natural products are a diverse, unique collection of compounds with immense therapeutic potential. This has resulted in these molecules being evaluated for a number of different disease indications including the neglected protozoan diseases, human African trypanosomiasis and Chagas disease, for which very few drugs are currently available. This article will review the marine natural products for which activity against the kinetoplastid parasites; Trypanosoma brucei brucei, T.b. rhodesiense and T. cruzi has been reported. As it is important to know the selectivity of a compound when evaluating its trypanocidal activity, this article will only cover molecules which have simultaneously been tested for cytotoxicity against a mammalian cell line. Compounds have been grouped according to their chemical structure and representative examples from each class were selected for detailed discussion. PMID:24152565

  7. Drosophila painless is a Ca2+-requiring channel activated by noxious heat.

    PubMed

    Sokabe, Takaaki; Tsujiuchi, Seiya; Kadowaki, Tatsuhiko; Tominaga, Makoto

    2008-10-01

    Thermal changes activate some members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel super family. They are primary sensors for detecting environmental temperatures. The Drosophila TRP channel Painless is believed responsible for avoidance of noxious heat because painless mutant flies display defects in heat sensing. However, no studies have proven its heat responsiveness. We show that Painless expressed in human embryonic kidney-derived 293 (HEK293) cells is a noxious heat-activated, Ca(2+)-permeable channel, and the function is mostly dependent on Ca(2+). In Ca(2+)-imaging, Painless mediated a robust intracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)(i)) increase during heating, and it showed heat-evoked inward currents in whole-cell patch-clamp mode. Ca(2+) permeability was much higher than that of other cations. Heat-evoked currents were negligible in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)(o)) and Ca(2+)(i), whereas 200 nm Ca(2+)(i) enabled heat activation of Painless. Activation kinetics were significantly accelerated in the presence of Ca(2+)(i). The temperature threshold for Painless activation was 42.6 degrees C in the presence of Ca(2+)(i), whereas the threshold was significantly increased to 44.1 degrees C when only Ca(2+)(o) was present. Temperature thresholds were further reduced after repetitive heating in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Ca(2+)-dependent heat activation of Painless was observed at the single-channel level in excised membranes. We found that a Ca(2+)-regulatory site is located in the N-terminal region of Painless. Painless-expressing HEK293 cells were insensitive to various thermosensitive TRP channel activators including allyl isothiocyanate, whereas mammalian TRPA1 inhibitors, ruthenium red, and camphor, reversibly blocked heat activation of Painless. Our results demonstrate that Painless is a direct sensor for noxious heat in Drosophila.

  8. Large-Scale Coronal Heating from "Cool" Activity in the Solar Magnetic Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.; Hathaway, D. H.

    1999-01-01

    In Fe XII images from SOHO/EIT, the quiet solar corona shows structure on scales ranging from sub-supergranular (i.e., bright points and coronal network) to multi-supergranular (large-scale corona). In Falconer et al 1998 (Ap.J., 501, 386) we suppressed the large-scale background and found that the network-scale features are predominantly rooted in the magnetic network lanes at the boundaries of the supergranules. Taken together, the coronal network emission and bright point emission are only about 5% of the entire quiet solar coronal Fe XII emission. Here we investigate the relationship between the large-scale corona and the network as seen in three different EIT filters (He II, Fe IX-X, and Fe XII). Using the median-brightness contour, we divide the large-scale Fe XII corona into dim and bright halves, and find that the bright-half/dim half brightness ratio is about 1.5. We also find that the bright half relative to the dim half has 10 times greater total bright point Fe XII emission, 3 times greater Fe XII network emission, 2 times greater Fe IX-X network emission, 1.3 times greater He II network emission, and has 1.5 times more magnetic flux. Also, the cooler network (He II) radiates an order of magnitude more energy than the hotter coronal network (Fe IX-X, and Fe XII). From these results we infer that: 1) The heating of the network and the heating of the large-scale corona each increase roughly linearly with the underlying magnetic flux. 2) The production of network coronal bright points and heating of the coronal network each increase nonlinearly with the magnetic flux. 3) The heating of the large-scale corona is driven by widespread cooler network activity rather than by the exceptional network activity that produces the network coronal bright points and the coronal network. 4) The large-scale corona is heated by a nonthermal process since the driver of its heating is cooler than it is. This work was funded by the Solar Physics Branch of NASA's office of

  9. Modulation of heat-shock protein 27 (Hsp27) anti-apoptotic activity by methylglyoxal modification.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Mashima, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Tsuruo, Takashi

    2002-11-29

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is one of the side-products in glycolysis, and it reacts with proteins under physiological conditions. Here, we identified heat-shock protein 27 (Hsp27) as a major MG-modified protein in cells. MG modification of Hsp27 selectively occurs at Arg-188 to form argpyrimidine, and mutation in the residue represses the formation of a large oligomer. This modification process is essential to its repressing activity for cytochrome c-mediated caspase activation. Inhibition of MG modification of Hsp27 causes sensitization of the cells to anti-tumor drug-induced apoptosis. Thus, MG is a novel modulator of cell survival by directly incorporating with the specific protein residue.

  10. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production by fish muscle mitochondria: Potential role in acute heat-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Banh, Sheena; Wiens, Lilian; Sotiri, Emianka; Treberg, Jason R

    2016-01-01

    Acute heat challenge is known to induce cell-level oxidative stress in fishes. Mitochondria are well known for the capacity to make reactive oxygen species (ROS) and as such are often implicated as a source of the oxidants associated with this thermally-induced oxidative stress. This implication is often asserted, despite little direct data for mitochondrial ROS metabolism in fishes. Here we characterize mitochondrial ROS metabolism in three Actinopterygian fish species at two levels, the capacity for superoxide/H2O2 production and the antioxidant thiol-reductase enzyme activities. We find that red muscle mitochondria from all three species have measurable ROS production and respond to different assay conditions consistent with what might be anticipated; assuming similar relative contributions from difference ROS producing sites as found in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria. Although there are species and assay specific exceptions, fish mitochondria may have a greater capacity to produce ROS than that found in the rat when either normalized to respiratory capacity or determined at a common assay temperature. The interspecific differences in ROS production are not correlated with thiol-based antioxidant reductase activities. Moreover, mimicking an acute in vivo heat stress by comparing the impact of increasing assay temperature on these processes in vitro, we find evidence supporting a preferential activation of mitochondrial H2O2 production relative to the increase in the capacity of reductase enzymes to supply electrons to the mitochondrial matrix peroxidases. This supports the contention that mitochondria may be, at least in part, responsible for the ROS that lead to oxidative stress in fish tissues exposed to acute heat challenge.

  11. Detection of heat wave using Kalpana-1 VHRR land surface temperature product over India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Dhiraj; Pandya, Mehul R.; Pathak, Vishal N.; Darji, Nikunj P.; Trivedi, Himanshu J.

    2016-05-01

    Heat Waves can have notable impacts on human mortality, ecosystem, economics and energy supply. The effect of heat wave is much more intense during summer than the other seasons. During the period of April to June, spells of very hot weather occur over certain regions of India and global warming scenario may result in further increases of such temperature anomalies and corresponding heat waves conditions. In this paper, satellite observations have been used to detect the heat wave conditions prevailing over India for the period of May-June 2015. The Kalpana-1 VHRR derived land surface temperature (LST) products have been used in the analysis to detect the heat wave affected regions over India. Results from the analysis shows the detection of heat wave affected pixels over Indian land mass. It can be seen that during the study period the parts of the west India, Indo-gangetic plane, Telangana and part of Vidarbh was under severe heat wave conditions which is also confirmed with Automatic Weather Station (AWS) air temperature observations.

  12. Nuclear data production, calculation and measurement: a global overview of the gamma heating issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombier, A.-C.; Amharrak, H.; Fourmentel, D.; Ravaux, S.; Régnier, D.; Gueton, O.; Hudelot, J.-P.; Lemaire, M.

    2013-03-01

    The gamma heating evaluation in different materials found in current and future generations of nuclear reactor (EPRTM, GENIV, MTR-JHR), is becoming an important issue especially for the design of many devices (control rod, heavy reflector, in-core & out-core experiments…). This paper deals with the works started since 2009 in the Reactor Studies Department of CEA Cadarache in ordre to answer to several problematic which have been identified as well for nuclear data production and calculation as for experimental measurement methods. The selected subjects are: Development of a Monte Carlo code (FIFRELIN) to simulate the prompt fission gamma emission which represents the major part of the gamma heating production inside the core Production and qualification of new evaluations of nuclear data especially for radiative capture and inelastic neutron scattering which are the main sources of gamma heating out-core Development and qualification of a recommended method for the total gamma heating calculation using the Monte Carlo simulation code TRIPOLI-4 Development, test and qualification of new devices dedicated to the in-core gamma heating measurement as well in MTR-JHR as in zero power facilities (EOLE-MINERVE) of CEA, Cadarache to increase the experimental measurement accuracy.

  13. Effects of heat treatment on microbial communities of granular sludge for biological hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Luca; Favaro, Lorenzo; Lavagnolo, Maria Cristina; Basaglia, Marina; Casella, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Dark fermentation shares many features with anaerobic digestion with the exception that to maximize hydrogen production, methanogens and hydrogen-consuming bacteria should be inhibited. Heat treatment is widely applied as an inoculum pre-treatment due to its effectiveness in inhibiting methanogenic microflora but it may not exclusively select for hydrogen-producing bacteria. This work evaluated the effects of heat treatment on microbial viability and structure of anaerobic granular sludge. Heat treatment was carried out on granular sludge at 100 °C with four residence times (0.5, 1, 2 and 4 h). Hydrogen production of treated sludges was studied from glucose by means of batch test at different pH values. Results indicated that each heat treatment strongly influenced the granular sludge resulting in microbial communities having different hydrogen productions. The highest hydrogen yields (2.14 moles of hydrogen per mole of glucose) were obtained at pH 5.5 using the sludge treated for 4 h characterized by the lowest CFU concentration (2.3 × 10(3)CFU/g sludge). This study demonstrated that heat treatment should be carefully defined according to the structure of the sludge microbial community, allowing the selection of highly efficient hydrogen-producing microbes.

  14. Potential techniques and development activities in diver suit heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlosinger, A. P.

    1972-01-01

    A prototype compact reactor suitable for combustion of propane with oxygen under shallow as well as submerged deep submergence diving conditions is reported. The device is used to heat the circulating water in a water tube-type diving suit.

  15. Preparation of high surface area activated carbon from coconut shells using microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kunbin; Peng, Jinhui; Srinivasakannan, C; Zhang, Libo; Xia, Hongying; Duan, Xinhui

    2010-08-01

    The present study attempts to utilize coconut shell to prepare activated carbon using agents such as steam, CO(2) and a mixture of steam-CO(2) with microwave heating. Experimental results show that the BET surface area of activated carbons irrespective of the activation agent resulted in surface area in excess of 2000 m(2)/g. The activation time using microwave heating is very much shorter, while the yield of the activated carbon compares well with the conventional heating methods. The activated carbon prepared using CO(2) activation has the largest BET surface area, however the activation time is approximately 2.5 times higher than the activation using steam or mixture of steam-CO(2). The chemical structure of activated carbons examined using Fourier transformed infra-red spectra (FTIR) did not show any variation in the surface functional groups of the activated carbon prepared using different activation agents.

  16. Performance of active solar space-heating systems, 1980-1981 heating season

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, K.; Kendall, P.; Pakkala, P.; Cramer, M.

    1981-01-01

    Data are provided on 32 solar heating sites in the National Solar Data Network (NSDN). Of these, comprehensive data are included for 14 sites which cover a range of system types and solar applications. A brief description of the remaining sites is included along with system problems experienced which prevented comprehensive seasonal analyses. Tables and discussions of individual site parameters such as collector areas, storage tank sizes, manufacturers, building dimensions, etc. are provided. Tables and summaries of 1980-1981 heating season data are also provided. Analysis results are presented in graphic form to highlight key summary information. Performance indices are graphed for two major groups of collectors - liquid and air. Comparative results of multiple NSDN systems' operation for the 1980-1981 heating season are summarized with discussions of specific cases and conclusions which may be drawn from the data. (LEW)

  17. The Biodiversity of the Microbiota Producing Heat-Resistant Enzymes Responsible for Spoilage in Processed Bovine Milk and Dairy Products.

    PubMed

    Machado, Solimar G; Baglinière, François; Marchand, Sophie; Van Coillie, Els; Vanetti, Maria C D; De Block, Jan; Heyndrickx, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Raw bovine milk is highly nutritious as well as pH-neutral, providing the ideal conditions for microbial growth. The microbiota of raw milk is diverse and originates from several sources of contamination including the external udder surface, milking equipment, air, water, feed, grass, feces, and soil. Many bacterial and fungal species can be found in raw milk. The autochthonous microbiota of raw milk immediately after milking generally comprises lactic acid bacteria such as Lactococcus, Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, and Leuconostoc species, which are technologically important for the dairy industry, although they do occasionally cause spoilage of dairy products. Differences in milking practices and storage conditions on each continent, country and region result in variable microbial population structures in raw milk. Raw milk is usually stored at cold temperatures, e.g., about 4°C before processing to reduce the growth of most bacteria. However, psychrotrophic bacteria can proliferate and contribute to spoilage of ultra-high temperature (UHT) treated and sterilized milk and other dairy products with a long shelf life due to their ability to produce extracellular heat resistant enzymes such as peptidases and lipases. Worldwide, species of Pseudomonas, with the ability to produce these spoilage enzymes, are the most common contaminants isolated from cold raw milk although other genera such as Serratia are also reported as important milk spoilers, while for others more research is needed on the heat resistance of the spoilage enzymes produced. The residual activity of extracellular enzymes after high heat treatment may lead to technological problems (off flavors, physico-chemical instability) during the shelf life of milk and dairy products. This review covers the contamination patterns of cold raw milk in several parts of the world, the growth potential of psychrotrophic bacteria, their ability to produce extracellular heat-resistant enzymes and the consequences for

  18. The Biodiversity of the Microbiota Producing Heat-Resistant Enzymes Responsible for Spoilage in Processed Bovine Milk and Dairy Products

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Solimar G.; Baglinière, François; Marchand, Sophie; Van Coillie, Els; Vanetti, Maria C. D.; De Block, Jan; Heyndrickx, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Raw bovine milk is highly nutritious as well as pH-neutral, providing the ideal conditions for microbial growth. The microbiota of raw milk is diverse and originates from several sources of contamination including the external udder surface, milking equipment, air, water, feed, grass, feces, and soil. Many bacterial and fungal species can be found in raw milk. The autochthonous microbiota of raw milk immediately after milking generally comprises lactic acid bacteria such as Lactococcus, Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, and Leuconostoc species, which are technologically important for the dairy industry, although they do occasionally cause spoilage of dairy products. Differences in milking practices and storage conditions on each continent, country and region result in variable microbial population structures in raw milk. Raw milk is usually stored at cold temperatures, e.g., about 4°C before processing to reduce the growth of most bacteria. However, psychrotrophic bacteria can proliferate and contribute to spoilage of ultra-high temperature (UHT) treated and sterilized milk and other dairy products with a long shelf life due to their ability to produce extracellular heat resistant enzymes such as peptidases and lipases. Worldwide, species of Pseudomonas, with the ability to produce these spoilage enzymes, are the most common contaminants isolated from cold raw milk although other genera such as Serratia are also reported as important milk spoilers, while for others more research is needed on the heat resistance of the spoilage enzymes produced. The residual activity of extracellular enzymes after high heat treatment may lead to technological problems (off flavors, physico-chemical instability) during the shelf life of milk and dairy products. This review covers the contamination patterns of cold raw milk in several parts of the world, the growth potential of psychrotrophic bacteria, their ability to produce extracellular heat-resistant enzymes and the consequences for

  19. Use of geothermal heat to recover alcohol and other valuable products

    SciTech Connect

    La Mori, P.N.; Zahradnik, R.L.

    1982-11-02

    Method for the use of heat, especially ''waste heat'', from geothermal steam or brines for the manufacture of chemicals such as alcohol, which comprises, according to one embodiment, flashing the brine to produce steam, passing the steam to a turbine for electrical energy generation, and employing the steam from the turbine discharge and/or the flashed brine to provide some or all of the heat requirements for the fermentation distillation process for production of alcohols, e.g. (methanol and/or ethanol) from agricultural wastes. The method can also be utilized for the production by distillation and/or by industrial fermentation and/or by hydrolysis of other chemicals (such as furfural and acetone).

  20. Induction of the heat shock regulon of Escherichia coli markedly increases production of bacterial viruses at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wiberg, J.S.; Mowrey-Mckee, M.F.; Stevens, E.J.

    1988-01-01

    Production of bacteriophages T2, T4, and T6 at 42.8 to 44/sup 0/C was increased from 8- to 260-fold by adapting the Escherichia coli host (grown at 30/sup 0/C) to growth at the high temperature for 8 min before infection; this increase was abolished if the host htpR (rpoH) gene was inactive. Others have shown that the htpR protein increases or activates the synthesis of at least 17 E. coli heat shock proteins upon raising the growth temperature above a certain level. At 43.8 to 44/sup 0/C in T4-infected, unadapted cells, the rates of RNA, DNA, and protein synthesis were about 100, 70 and 70%, respectively, of those in T4-infected, adapted cells. Production of the major processed capsid protein, gp23, was reduced significantly more than that of most other T4 proteins in unadapted cells relative to adapted cells. Only 4.6% of the T4 DNA made in unadapted cells was resistant to micrococcal nuclease, versus 50% in adapted cells. Thus, defective maturation of T4 heads appears to explain the failure of phage production in unadapted cells. Overproduction of the heat shock protein GroEL from plasmids restored T4 production in unadapted cells to about 50% of that seen in adapted cells. T4-infected, adapted E. coli B at around 44/sup 0/C exhibited a partial tryptophan deficiency. Production of bacteriophage T7 at 44/sup 0/C was increased two- to fourfold by adapting the host to 44/sup 0/C before infection; evidence against involvement of the htpR (rpoH) gene is presented. This work and recent work with bacteriophage delta appear to represent the first demonstrations for any virus that expression of the heat shock regulon of a host is necessary for virus production at high temperature.

  1. Volatile production during preignition heating. Final technical report, 15 September 1980-30 September 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Ballantyne, A.; Chou, H.; Flusberg, A.; Neoh, K.; Orozco, N.; Stickler, D.

    1983-10-01

    Pulverized coal particles, in a flowing inert nitrogen stream, have been heated by high power Carbon Dioxide Laser. The consequence of such an irradiation have proved to be both novel and surprising as a result of the rapid quenching of primary coal products. It ahs been found that the gas phase yield from such heating (typically, temperatures in excess of 1400 K at rates approx. 2 x 10/sup 5/ K/s) is very small (< 0.2 percent of coal carbon and hydrogen). Analysis of the solid residue has shown the presence of fine lacy particulate chains of material of 0.1 ..mu..m diameter, which appears to be soluble in tetrahydrofuran. The yields of solute were significantly much higher than for raw coals. Molecular weight of the solute material was high, being in the range of 600 to 3000. The above and substantiating evidence point to a new mechanism of high heating rate pyrolysis in which only tar-like materials are produced as primary products from the coal. It is hypothesized that gas phase products are primarily the result of secondary reactions of these primary products in the hot gas environments usually employed by other heating techniques.

  2. Heat and moisture production of growing-finishing gilts as affected by environmental temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat and moisture production (HMP) values are used to size ventilation fans in animal housing. The HMP values that are currently published in the ASABE (American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers) standards were from data collected in the early 1950. This study is one of a series of...

  3. Alteration of fasting heat production during fescue toxicosis in Holstein steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to examine alteration of fasting heat production (FHP) during fescue toxicosis. Six ruminally cannulated Holstein steers (BW=348 ±13 kg) were weight-matched into pairs and utilized in a two period crossover design experiment. Each period consisted of two temperature segments,...

  4. Alteration of fasting heat production during fescue toxicosis in Holstein steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to examine alteration of fasting heat production (FHP) during fescue toxicosis. Six ruminally cannulated Holstein steers (BW = 348±26kg) were weight matched into pairs and utilized in a two period crossover design experiment. Each period consisted of two segments, one each at...

  5. Assessment of heat treatment of dairy products by MALDI-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Meltretter, Jasmin; Birlouez-Aragon, Inès; Becker, Cord-Michael; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2009-12-01

    The formation of the Amadori product from lactose (protein lactosylation) is a major parameter to evaluate the quality of processed milk. Here, MALDI-TOF-MS was used for the relative quantification of lactose-adducts in heated milk. Milk was heated at a temperature of 70, 80, and 100 degrees C between 0 and 300 min, diluted, and subjected directly to MALDI-TOF-MS. The lactosylation rate of alpha-lactalbumin increased with increasing reaction temperature and time. The results correlated well with established markers for heat treatment of milk (concentration of total soluble protein, soluble alpha-lactalbumin and beta-lactoglobulin at pH 4.6, and fluorescence of advanced Maillard products and soluble tryptophan index; r=0.969-0.997). The method was also applied to examine commercially available dairy products. In severely heated products, protein pre-purification by immobilized metal affinity chromatography improved spectra quality. Relative quantification of protein lactosylation by MALDI-TOF-MS proved to be a very fast and reliable method to monitor early Maillard reaction during milk processing.

  6. Heat production, respiratory quotient, and methane loss subsequent to LPS challenge in beef heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiration calorimetry was used to measure energy utilization during an acute phase response (APR) to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Eight Angus heifers (208 +/- 29.2 kg) were randomly assigned to one of two calorimeters in four 2-day periods for measurement of heat production (HP), methane (CH4), and r...

  7. Heat Pipe Solar Receiver Development Activities at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, D.R.; Andraka, C.E.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.; Rawlinson, K.S.; Showalter, S.K.

    1999-01-08

    Over the past decade, Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in the development of receivers to transfer energy from the focus of a parabolic dish concentrator to the heater tubes of a Stirling engine. Through the isothermal evaporation and condensation of sodium. a heat-pipe receiver can efficiently transfer energy to an engine's working fluid and compensate for irregularities in the flux distribution that is delivered by the concentrator. The operation of the heat pipe is completely passive because the liquid sodium is distributed over the solar-heated surface by capillary pumping provided by a wick structure. Tests have shown that using a heat pipe can boost the system performance by twenty percent when compared to directly illuminating the engine heater tubes. Designing heat pipe solar receivers has presented several challenges. The relatively large area ({approximately}0.2 m{sup 2}) of the receiver surface makes it difficult to design a wick that can continuously provide liquid sodium to all regions of the heated surface. Selecting a wick structure with smaller pores will improve capillary pumping capabilities of the wick, but the small pores will restrict the flow of liquid and generate high pressure drops. Selecting a wick that is comprised of very tine filaments can increase the permeability of the wick and thereby reduce flow losses, however, the fine wick structure is more susceptible to corrosion and mechanical damage. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the issues encountered in the design of heat pipe solar receivers and solutions to problems that have arisen. Topics include: flow characterization in the receiver, the design of wick systems. the minimization of corrosion and dissolution of metals in sodium systems. and the prevention of mechanical failure in high porosity wick structures.

  8. Muscle heat production and anaerobic energy turnover during repeated intense dynamic exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    Krustrup, Peter; González-Alonso, José; Quistorff, Bjørn; Bangsbo, Jens

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine muscle heat production, oxygen uptake and anaerobic energy turnover throughout repeated intense exercise to test the hypotheses that (i) energy turnover is reduced when intense exercise is repeated and (ii) anaerobic energy production is diminished throughout repeated intense exercise. Five subjects performed three 3 min intense one-legged knee-extensor exercise bouts (EX1, EX2 and EX3) at a power output of 65 ± 5 W (mean ±s.e.m.), separated by 6 min rest periods. Muscle, femoral arterial and venous temperatures were measured continuously during exercise for the determination of muscle heat production. In addition, thigh blood flow was measured and femoral arterial and venous blood were sampled frequently during exercise for the determination of muscle oxygen uptake. Anaerobic energy turnover was estimated as the difference between total energy turnover and aerobic energy turnover. Prior to exercise, the temperature of the quadriceps muscle was passively elevated to 37.02 ± 0.12 °C and it increased 0.97 ± 0.08 °C during EX1, which was higher (P < 0.05) than during EX2 (0.79 ± 0.05 °C) and EX3 (0.77 ± 0.06 °C). In EX1 the rate of muscle heat accumulation was higher (P < 0.05) during the first 120 s compared to EX2 and EX3, whereas the rate of heat release to the blood was greater (P < 0.05) throughout EX2 and EX3 compared to EX1. The rate of heat production, determined as the sum of heat accumulation and release, was the same in EX1, EX2 and EX3, and it increased (P < 0.05) from 86 ± 8 during the first 15 s to 157 ± 7 J s−1 during the last 15 s of EX1. Oxygen extraction was higher during the first 60 s of EX2 and EX3 than in EX 1 and thigh oxygen uptake was elevated (P < 0.05) during the first 120 s of EX2 and throughout EX3 compared to EX1. The anaerobic energy production during the first 105 s of EX2 and 150 s of EX3 was lower (P < 0.05) than in EX1. The present study demonstrates that when intense exercise

  9. Oral immunization of mice with attenuated Salmonella enteritidis containing a recombinant plasmid which codes for production of the B subunit of heat-labile Escherichia coli enterotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Clements, J D; Lyon, F L; Lowe, K L; Farrand, A L; el-Morshidy, S

    1986-01-01

    We used Salmonella enteritidis serotype dublin strain SL1438, a nonreverting, aromatic-dependent, histidine-requiring mutant, as a recipient for a recombinant plasmid coding for production of the nontoxic B subunit of the heat-labile Escherichia coli enterotoxin. The S. enteritidis derivative EL23 produced heat-labile enterotoxin subunit B that was indistinguishable from heat-labile enterotoxin subunit B produced by strains of E. coli or Salmonella typhi harboring the same plasmid. Mice immunized orally with strain EL23 developed progressively increasing mucosal and serum antibody responses to both heat-labile enterotoxin subunit B and to the lipopolysaccharide of the vaccine strain. The mucosal antibody response was shown to be immunoglobulin A specific and to be capable of neutralizing the biological activities of both E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin and cholera enterotoxin in vitro. Images PMID:3527989

  10. Origin, distribution and glaciological implications of Jurassic high heat production granites in the Weddell Sea rift, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leat, Phil T.; Jordan, Tom A. R. M.; Ferraccioli, Fausto; Flowerdew, Michael; R, Riley, Teal; Vaughan, Alan P. M.; Whitehouse, Martin

    2013-04-01

    The distribution of heat flow in Antarctic continental crust is critical to understanding ice sheet nucleation, growth and basal rheology and hydrology. We identify a group of High Heat Production granites intruded into Palaeozoic sedimentary sequences which may contribute to locally high heat flow beneath the central part of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Four of the granite plutons are exposed above ice sheet level at Pagano Nunatak, Pirrit Hills, Nash Hills and Whitmore Mountains. A new U-Pb zircon age from Pirrit Hills of 177.9 ± 2.3 Ma confirms earlier Rb-Sr dating that suggested an Early-Middle Jurassic age for the granites, coincident with the Karoo-Ferrar large igneous province and the first stage of Gondwana break-up. Our recently-acquired aerogeophysical data indicate that the plutons are distributed unevenly over 1000 km2 and were intruded into the actively extending, locally transcurrent, Jurassic Weddell Sea Rift [1]. In the NW part of the rift, the Pirrit Hills, Nash Hills and Whitmore Mountains granites form small isolated intrusions within weakly deformed upper crust. In the SE part of the rift, where granite intrusion was strongly structurally controlled within transtensional structures, the Pagano Nunatak granite is the only outcrop of a probably multiphase, ca 180 km long granite intrusion. The granites are weakly peraluminous, S-type and have Th and U abundances up to 61 and 19 ppm respectively. Heat production of analysed granite samples is ca. 2.9-9.1 µWm-3, toward the upper limit of values for High Heat Production granites globally. The granites are thought to have been generated during mafic underplating of the Weddell Rift during eruption of the contemporaneous Karoo-Ferrar magmatism [2]. The high Th and U abundances may be related to fractionation of the high Th-U Ferrar basaltic magmas combined with assimilation of pelitic sedimentary rocks. The granites correspond to an area of West Antarctica that may have heat flow significantly above

  11. Joule-Heated Molten Regolith Electrolysis Reactor Concepts for Oxygen and Metals Production on the Moon and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibille, Laurent; Dominques, Jesus A.

    2012-01-01

    The maturation of Molten Regolith Electrolysis (MRE) as a viable technology for oxygen and metals production on explored planets relies on the realization of the self-heating mode for the reactor. Joule heat generated during regolith electrolysis creates thermal energy that should be able to maintain the molten phase (similar to electrolytic Hall-Heroult process for aluminum production). Self-heating via Joule heating offers many advantages: (1) The regolith itself is the crucible material, it protects the vessel walls (2) Simplifies the engineering of the reactor (3) Reduces power consumption (no external heating) (4) Extends the longevity of the reactor. Predictive modeling is a tool chosen to perform dimensional analysis of a self-heating reactor: (1) Multiphysics modeling (COMSOL) was selected for Joule heat generation and heat transfer (2) Objective is to identify critical dimensions for first reactor prototype.

  12. Heat-activated Plasmonic Chemical Sensors for Harsh Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, Michael; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2015-12-01

    A passive plasmonics based chemical sensing system to be used in harsh operating environments was investigated and developed within this program. The initial proposed technology was based on combining technologies developed at the SUNY Polytechnic Institute Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) and at the University of Minnesota (UM). Specifically, a passive wireless technique developed at UM was to utilize a heat-activated plasmonic design to passively harvest the thermal energy from within a combustion emission stream and convert this into a narrowly focused light source. This plasmonic device was based on a bullseye design patterned into a gold film using focused ion beam methods (FIB). Critical to the design was the use of thermal stabilizing under and overlayers surrounding the gold film. These stabilizing layers were based on both atomic layer deposited films as well as metal laminate layers developed by United Technologies Aerospace Systems (UTAS). While the bullseye design was never able to be thermally stabilized for operating temperatures of 500oC or higher, an alternative energy harvesting design was developed by CNSE within this program. With this new development, plasmonic sensing results are presented where thermal energy is harvested using lithographically patterned Au nanorods, replacing the need for an external incident light source. Gas sensing results using the harvested thermal energy are in good agreement with sensing experiments, which used an external incident light source. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the wavelength parameter space from 665 variables down to 4 variables with similar levels of demonstrated selectivity. The method was further improved by patterning rods which harvested energy in the near infrared, which led to a factor of 10 decrease in data acquisition times as well as demonstrated selectivity with a reduced wavelength data set. The combination of a plasmonic-based energy harvesting

  13. Detection of seal contamination in heat-sealed food packaging based on active infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'huys, Karlien; Saeys, Wouter; De Ketelaere, Bart

    2015-05-01

    In the food industry packaging is often applied to protect the product from the environment, assuring quality and safety throughout shelf life if properly performed. Packaging quality depends on the material used and the closure (seal). The material is selected based on the specific needs of the food product to be wrapped. However, proper closure of the package is often harder to achieve. One problem possibly jeopardizing seal quality is the presence of food particles between the seal. Seal contamination can cause a decreased seal strength and thus an increased packaging failure risk. It can also trigger the formation of microchannels through which air and microorganisms can enter and spoil the enclosed food. Therefore, early detection and removal of seal-contaminated packages from the production chain is essential. In this work, a pulsed-type active thermography method using the heat of the sealing bars as an excitation source was studied for detecting seal contamination. The cooling profile of contaminated seals was recorded. The detection performance of four processing methods (based on a single frame, a fit of the cooling profile, pulsed phase thermography and a matched filter) was compared. High resolution digital images served as a reference to quantify contamination. The lowest detection limit (equivalent diameter of 0.63 mm) and the lowest processing time (0.42 s per sample) were obtained for the method based on a single frame. Presumably, practical limitations in the recording stage prevented the added value of active thermography to be fully reflected in this application.

  14. Production of high specific activity silicon-32

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D.R.; Brzezinski, M.A.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project (LDRD) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). There were two primary objectives for the work performed under this project. The first was to take advantage of capabilities and facilities at Los Alamos to produce the radionuclide {sup 32}Si in unusually high specific activity. The second was to combine the radioanalytical expertise at Los Alamos with the expertise at the University of California to develop methods for the application of {sup 32}Si in biological oceanographic research related to global climate modeling. The first objective was met by developing targetry for proton spallation production of {sup 32}Si in KCl targets and chemistry for its recovery in very high specific activity. The second objective was met by developing a validated field-useable, radioanalytical technique, based upon gas-flow proportional counting, to measure the dynamics of silicon uptake by naturally occurring diatoms.

  15. Force-dependent and force-independent heat production in single slow- and fast-twitch muscle fibres from Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Buschman, H P; van der Laarse, W J; Stienen, G J; Elzinga, G

    1996-10-15

    1. The origin of labile heat production, i.e. a heat component which rapidly decays after the onset of stimulation, and of stable (maintenance) heat production was investigated in intact single fast-twitch (type 1) and slow-twitch (type 3) iliofibularis muscle fibres from Xenopus laevis, at 20 degrees C, by varying stimulation frequency and by varying sarcomere length and the concentration of 2,3-butanedione 2-monoxime (BDM) added. 2. The labile heat produced consisted of a force-independent and a force-dependent part. The average parvalbumin (PA) content found in type 1 fibre bundles (0.84 +/- 0.08 mM; mean +/- S.E.M.; n = 5) and in type 3 fibre bundles (0.12 +/- 0.02 mM; n = 5) indicates that the force-independent labile heat is explained by Ca(2+)-Mg2+ exchange on PA, and amounts to a molar enthalpy change of -78 kJ (molPA)-1. 3. Force-dependent labile heat during fused contractions was similar to the calculated heat production resulting from the formation of force-generating cross-bridges, assuming an enthalpy change associated with cross-bridge formation of -30 kJ mol-1. 4. Activation heat, i.e. the part of the total stable heat that is not related to the contractile apparatus, and of which the calcium sequestration by the sarcoplasmic reticulum is the most important contributor, determined by varying sarcomere length or BDM concentration, was identical. For fused contractions the fraction activation heat of the stable maintenance rate of heat production was 34 +/- 4% (mean +/- S.E.M.; n = 13) in type 1 fibres, and 52 +/- 4% (n = 15) in type 3 fibres. In unfused contractions this was 48 +/- 5% (n = 13) in type 1 fibres, and 35 +/- 2% (n = 11) in type 3 fibres. 5. From the force-dependent stable rate of heat production the economy of cross-bridge cycling, expressed as the force-time integral for a single myosin head per ATP molecule hydrolysed, was calculated. It followed that cross-bridge interaction in type 3 fibres is more economical than in type 1 fibres

  16. Heat of Combustion of the Product Formed by the Reaction of Acetylene, Ethylene, and Diborane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannenbaum, Stanley

    1957-01-01

    The net heat of combustion of the product formed by the reaction of diborane with a mixture of acetylene and ethylene was found to be 20,440 +/- 150 Btu per pound for the reaction of liquid fuel to gaseous carbon dioxide, gaseous water, and solid boric oxide. The measurements were made in a Parr oxygen-bomb calorimeter, and the combustion was believed to be 98 percent complete. The estimated net-heat of combustion for complete combustion would therefore be 20,850 +/- 150 Btu per pound.

  17. Spectral characteristics of skin sympathetic nerve activity in heat-stressed humans.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Sathishkumar, Mithra; Wilson, Thad E; Shibasaki, Manabu; Davis, Scott L; Crandall, Craig G

    2006-04-01

    Skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA) exhibits low- and high-frequency spectral components in normothermic subjects. However, spectral characteristics of SSNA in heat-stressed subjects are unknown. Because the main components of the integrated SSNA during heat stress (sudomotor/vasodilator activities) are different from those during normothermia and cooling (vasoconstrictor activity), we hypothesize that spectral characteristics of SSNA in heat-stressed subjects will be different from those in subjects subjected to normothermia or cooling. In 17 healthy subjects, SSNA, electrocardiogram, arterial blood pressure (via Finapres), respiratory activity, and skin blood flow were recorded during normothermia and heat stress. In 7 of the 17 subjects, these variables were also recorded during cooling. Spectral characteristics of integrated SSNA, R-R interval, beat-by-beat mean blood pressure, skin blood flow variability, and respiratory excursions were assessed. Heat stress and cooling significantly increased total SSNA. SSNA spectral power in the low-frequency (0.03-0.15 Hz), high-frequency (0.15-0.45 Hz), and very-high-frequency (0.45-2.5 Hz) regions was significantly elevated by heat stress and cooling. Interestingly, heat stress caused a greater relative increase of SSNA spectral power within the 0.45- to 2.5-Hz region than in the other spectral ranges; cooling did not show this effect. Differences in the SSNA spectral distribution between normothermia/cooling and heat stress may reflect different characteristics of central modulation of vasoconstrictor and sudomotor/vasodilator activities.

  18. Effects of heat shocks on microbial community structure and microbial activity of a methanogenic enrichment degrading benzoate.

    PubMed

    Mei, R; Narihiro, T; Nobu, M K; Liu, W-T

    2016-11-01

    In anaerobic digesters, temperature fluctuation could lead to process instability and failure. It is still not well understood how digester microbiota as a whole respond to heat shock, and what specific organisms are vulnerable to perturbation or responsible for process recovery after perturbation. To address these questions, a mesophilic benzoate-degrading methanogenic culture enriched from digester was subjected to different levels of heat shock. Three types of methane production profiles after perturbation were observed in comparison to the control: uninhibited, inhibited with later recovery, and inhibited without recovery. These responses were correlated with the microbial community compositions based on the analyses of 16S rRNA and 16S rRNA gene. Specifically, the primary benzoate-degrading syntroph was highly affected by heat shock, and its abundance and activity were both crucial to the restoration of benzoate degradation after heat shock. In contrast, methanogens were stable regardless whether methane production was inhibited. Populations related to 'Candidatus Cloacimonetes' and Firmicutes showed stimulated growth. These observations indicated distinct physiological traits and ecological niches associated with individual microbial groups. The results obtained after exposure to heat shock can be critical to more comprehensive characterization of digester ecology under perturbations.

  19. Annual DOE active solar heating and cooling contractors' review meeting. Premeeting proceedings and project summaries

    SciTech Connect

    None,

    1981-09-01

    Ninety-three project summaries are presented which discuss the following aspects of active solar heating and cooling: Rankine solar cooling systems; absorption solar cooling systems; desiccant solar cooling systems; solar heat pump systems; solar hot water systems; special projects (such as the National Solar Data Network, hybrid solar thermal/photovoltaic applications, and heat transfer and water migration in soils); administrative/management support; and solar collector, storage, controls, analysis, and materials technology. (LEW)

  20. Integrated bioenergy complex for the production of power, heat and bio-ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Taviani, M.; Chiaramonti, D.; Tondi, G.; Grassi, G.

    1998-07-01

    In this paper an integrated bioenergy complex for the production of power, heat and bio-ethanol is presented. Ethanol, in fact, has been recognized as a high-quality transportation fuel. The reduction of petroleum consumption, especially for transport, is a strategic goal especially for those countries that already have or will experience an intensive industrial development in the next future. For these motivations, the production of bio-ethanol from Sweet Sorghum (which is now one of the most promising crop for this application in term of productivity, inputs demand, and flexibility) is of great interest in most of countries. The proposed integrated complex produces power, heat and bio-ethanol: the produced power and heat are partly used for bio-ethanol processing and biomass pre-treatment, partly to be sold to the market. This system has important innovations allowing a decentralized energy and ethanol production and creating new local jobs. The small power plant is based upon a steam cycle with an advanced low emission combustor, capable of burning different biomass resources with a modest decrease in the efficiency value. The Bioenergy Complex, suitable to satisfy the needs of a 3,000 inhabitants village, is composed by the following sub-systems: (1) Sweet Sorghum plantation (250 ha); the main products are: dry bagasse (approximately 3,900 Ton/year), grains (1,300 Ton/y) and sugar (1,850 Ton/y); (2) Cane crushing--sugar juice extraction system; (3) Sugar juice fermentation and distillation ethanol production (approx. 835 Ton/y); (4) Biomass pre-treatment components (grinding, drying, briquetting, storage, etc.); and (5) Cogeneration unit--the expansion unit is constituted by a last generation reciprocating steam engine, coupled with a 500 kWe alternator; the heat of the expanded flow is removed in the condenser, with an available thermal power of approximately 2,000 kWt.

  1. Process for producing an activated carbon adsorbent with integral heat transfer apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor); Yavrouian, Andre H. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A process for producing an integral adsorbent-heat exchanger apparatus useful in ammonia refrigerant heat pump systems. In one embodiment, the process wets an activated carbon particles-solvent mixture with a binder-solvent mixture, presses the binder wetted activated carbon mixture on a metal tube surface and thereafter pyrolyzes the mixture to form a bonded activated carbon matrix adjoined to the tube surface. The integral apparatus can be easily and inexpensively produced by the process in large quantities.

  2. Relationship of thermal status to productivity in heat-stressed dairy cows given recombinant bovine somatotropin.

    PubMed

    Settivari, R S; Spain, J N; Ellersieck, M R; Byatt, J C; Collier, R J; Spiers, D E

    2007-03-01

    The responses of lactating Holstein cows to daily administration of bovine somatotropin (bST) were measured at thermoneutrality (Tn) and under both constant and cycled heat-stress conditions to determine the relationship between thermal status and bST-induced shifts in milk production. All tests included a 5-d acclimation period at Tn (18 degrees C), followed by a 2-d increase in ambient temperature to 28.5 degrees C. After d 3, ambient temperature was cycled between 28.5 (day) and 25.5 degrees C (night) for 4 d. Daily injections with either 31 mg of bST or saline began on d 1 of the experiment. Milk production, feed intake, and respiratory rate (RR) were measured daily. Intraperitoneal, telemetric temperature transmitters were used for a continuous measure of core body temperature (T(core)). Blood samples were collected during each phase to evaluate the changes in serum chemistry in response to bST and heat stress. Following a 15-d recovery, cows were switched across injection treatments and the study was repeated. Milk production decreased by approximately 18.4% below the initial yield at Tn by the end of 7 d of heat challenge. Although a reduction in milk production occurred during heat stress in both groups, milk production was higher in bST-treated cows compared with control cows during periods of constant and cyclic heat. Likewise, bST treatment during the entire period increased the milk-to-feed ratio over the control level by approximately 11.3%. Plasma insulin-like growth factor 1 and serum nonesterified fatty acids accompanied the increased growth hormone level with bST treatment (approximately 122.0 and 88.8%, respectively), whereas plasma urea nitrogen was reduced by approximately 13.3% to reflect the shift to lipid metabolism. There was no difference in T(core) of the treatment and control groups at Tn. Both bST and control cows increased RR and T(core) above the Tn level by approximately 94.8 and 2.9%, respectively, during constant heat, with a

  3. Heat-resistance of Hamigera avellanea and Thermoascus crustaceus isolated from pasteurized acid products.

    PubMed

    Scaramuzza, Nicoletta; Berni, Elettra

    2014-01-03

    Products containing sugar or fruit derivatives are usually subjected to a pasteurization process that can anyway be ineffective to kill ascospores from heat-resistant molds. Although the most occurring and economically relevant heat-resistant species belong to Byssochlamys, Neosartorya, Talaromyces, and Eupenicillium genera, an increasing number of uncommon heat-resistant isolates have been recently detected as spoiling microorganisms in such products. Since Hamigera spp. and Thermoascus spp. were those more frequently isolated at SSICA, heat resistance of Hamigera avellanea and Thermoascus crustaceus strains from pasteurized acid products was studied in apple juice, in blueberry and grape juice and in a buffered glucose solution. Data obtained from thermal death curves and statistical elaboration of raw data showed that D values of H. avellanea may vary between 11.11 and 66.67 min at 87°C, between 4.67 and 13.51 at 90°C, and between 0.43 and 1.52 min at 95°C. Similarly, D values of T. crustaceus may vary between 18.52 and 90.91 min at 90°C, between 2.79 and 19.23 at 93°C, and between 1.11 and 2.53 min at 95°C. For both strains studied, the z-values calculated from the decimal reduction time curves did not prove to be significantly influenced by the heating medium, that being 4.35°C, 5.39°C or 5.27°C for H. avellanea and 4.42°C, 3.69°C or 3.37°C for T. crustaceus, respectively in apple juice, in blueberry and grape juice or in the buffered glucose solution. Considering the pasteurization treatments industrially applied to fruit-based foods, the variation of thermal parameters does not seem to be a possible way to avoid product spoilage by these two species and only good practices applied to reduce the original load of heat-resistant fungi can help producers to prevent losses in contaminated finished products, as usually happens for other heat resistant molds.

  4. Experimental evidence in support of Joule heating associated with geomagnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devries, L. L.

    1971-01-01

    High resolution accelerometer measurements in the altitude region 140 to 300 km from a satellite in a near-polar orbit during a period of extremely high geomagnetic activity indicate that Joule heating is the primary source of energy for atmospheric heating associated with geomagnetic activity. This conclusion is supported by the following observational evidence: (1) There is an atmospheric response in the auroral zone which is nearly simulataneous with the onset of geomagnetic activity, with no significant response in the equatorial region until several hours later; (2) The maximum heating occurs at geographic locations near the maximum current of the auroral electrojet; and (3) There is evidence of atmospheric waves originating near the auroral zone at altitudes where Joule heating would be expected to occur. An analysis of atmospheric response time to this heat shows time delays are apparently independent of altitude but are strongly dependent upon geomagnetic latitude.

  5. How Vial Geometry Variability Influences Heat Transfer and Product Temperature During Freeze-Drying.

    PubMed

    Scutellà, Bernadette; Passot, Stéphanie; Bourlés, Erwan; Fonseca, Fernanda; Tréléa, Ioan Cristian

    2017-03-01

    Vial design features can play a significant role in heat transfer between the shelf and the product and, consequently, in the final quality of the freeze-dried product. Our objective was to investigate the impact of the variability of some geometrical dimensions of a set of tubing vials commonly used for pharmaceuticals production on the distribution of the vial heat transfer coefficients (Kv) and its potential consequence on product temperature. Sublimation tests were carried out using pure water and 8 combinations of chamber pressure (4-50 Pa) and shelf temperature (-40°C and 0°C) in 2 freeze-dryers. Kv values were individually determined for 100 vials located in the center of the shelf. Vial bottom curvature depth and contact area between the vial and the shelf were carefully measured for 120 vials and these data were used to calculate Kv distribution due to variability in vial geometry. At low pressures commonly used for sensitive products (below 10 Pa), the vial-shelf contact area appeared crucial for explaining Kv heterogeneity and was found to generate, in our study, a product temperature distribution of approximately 2°C during sublimation. Our approach provides quantitative guidelines for defining vial geometry tolerance specifications and product temperature safety margins.

  6. Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities after heat injury of listeria monocytogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Dallmier, A.W.; Martin, S.E.

    1988-02-01

    Four strains of Listeria monocytogenes were examined for catalase (CA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. The two strains having the highest CA activities (LCDC and Scott A) also possessed the highest SOD activities. The CA activity of heated cell extracts of all four strains examined decreased sharply between 55 and 60/sup 0/C. SOD was more heat labile than CA. Two L. monocytogenes strains demonstrated a decline in SOD activity after heat treatment at 45/sup 0/C, whereas the other two strains demonstrated a decline at 50/sup 0/C. Sublethal heating of the cells at 55/sup 0/C resulted in increased sensitivity to 5.5% NaCl. Exogenous hydrogen peroxide was added to suspensions of L. monocytogenes; strains producing the highest CA levels showed the greatest H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ resistance.

  7. Heat production and error probability relation in Landauer reset at effective temperature

    PubMed Central

    Neri, Igor; López-Suárez, Miquel

    2016-01-01

    The erasure of a classical bit of information is a dissipative process. The minimum heat produced during this operation has been theorized by Rolf Landauer in 1961 to be equal to kBT ln2 and takes the name of Landauer limit, Landauer reset or Landauer principle. Despite its fundamental importance, the Landauer limit remained untested experimentally for more than fifty years until recently when it has been tested using colloidal particles and magnetic dots. Experimental measurements on different devices, like micro-mechanical systems or nano-electronic devices are still missing. Here we show the results obtained in performing the Landauer reset operation in a micro-mechanical system, operated at an effective temperature. The measured heat exchange is in accordance with the theory reaching values close to the expected limit. The data obtained for the heat production is then correlated to the probability of error in accomplishing the reset operation. PMID:27669898

  8. Heat production and error probability relation in Landauer reset at effective temperature.

    PubMed

    Neri, Igor; López-Suárez, Miquel

    2016-09-27

    The erasure of a classical bit of information is a dissipative process. The minimum heat produced during this operation has been theorized by Rolf Landauer in 1961 to be equal to kBT ln2 and takes the name of Landauer limit, Landauer reset or Landauer principle. Despite its fundamental importance, the Landauer limit remained untested experimentally for more than fifty years until recently when it has been tested using colloidal particles and magnetic dots. Experimental measurements on different devices, like micro-mechanical systems or nano-electronic devices are still missing. Here we show the results obtained in performing the Landauer reset operation in a micro-mechanical system, operated at an effective temperature. The measured heat exchange is in accordance with the theory reaching values close to the expected limit. The data obtained for the heat production is then correlated to the probability of error in accomplishing the reset operation.

  9. Expression profile of heat shock response factors during hookworm larval activation and parasitic development.

    PubMed

    Gelmedin, Verena; Delaney, Angela; Jennelle, Lucas; Hawdon, John M

    2015-07-01

    When organisms are exposed to an increase in temperature, they undergo a heat shock response (HSR) regulated by the transcription factor heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1). The heat shock response includes the rapid changes in gene expression initiated by binding of HSF-1 to response elements in the promoters of heat shock genes. Heat shock proteins function as molecular chaperones to protect proteins during periods of elevated temperature and other stress. During infection, hookworm infective third stage larvae (L3) undergo a temperature shift from ambient to host temperature. This increased temperature is required for the resumption of feeding and activation of L3, but whether this increase initiates a heat shock response is unknown. To investigate the role of the heat shock in hookworm L3 activation and parasitic development, we identified and characterized the expression profile of several components of the heat shock response in the hookworm Ancylostoma caninum. We cloned DNAs encoding an hsp70 family member (Aca-hsp-1) and an hsp90 family member (Aca-daf-21). Exposure to a heat shock of 42°C for one hour caused significant up-regulation of both genes, which slowly returned to near baseline levels following one hour attenuation at 22°C. Neither gene was up-regulated in response to host temperature (37°C). Conversely, levels of hsf-1 remained unchanged during heat shock, but increased in response to incubation at 37°C. During activation, both hsp-1 and daf-21 are down regulated early, although daf-21 levels increase significantly in non-activated control larvae after 12h, and slightly in activated larvae by 24h incubation. The heat shock response modulators celastrol and KNK437 were tested for their effects on gene expression during heat shock and activation. Pre-incubation with celastrol, an HSP90 inhibitor that promotes heat shock gene expression, slightly up-regulated expression of both hsp-1 and daf-21 during heat shock. KNK437, an inhibitor of heat shock

  10. Repairing Student Misconceptions in Heat Transfer Using Inquiry-Based Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince, Michael; Vigeant, Margot; Nottis, Katharyn

    2016-01-01

    Eight inquiry-based activities, described here in sufficient detail for faculty to adopt in their own courses, were designed to teach students fundamental concepts in heat transfer. The concept areas chosen were (1) factors affecting the rate vs. amount of heat transfer, (2) temperature vs. perceptions of hot and cold, (3) temperature vs. energy…

  11. Inducible Transposition of a Heat-Activated Retrotransposon in Tissue Culture.

    PubMed

    Masuta, Yukari; Nozawa, Kosuke; Takagi, Hiroki; Yaegashi, Hiroki; Tanaka, Keisuke; Ito, Tasuku; Saito, Hideyuki; Kobayashi, Hisato; Matsunaga, Wataru; Masuda, Seiji; Kato, Atsushi; Ito, Hidetaka

    2016-12-23

    A transposition of a heat-activated retrotransposon named ONSEN required compromise of a small RNA-mediated epigenetic regulation that includes RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) machinery after heat treatment. In the current study, we analyzed the transcriptional and transpositional activation of ONSEN to better understand the underlying molecular mechanism involved in the maintenance and/or induction of transposon activation in plant tissue culture. We found the transposition of heat-primed ONSEN during tissue culture independently of RdDM mutation. The heat activation of ONSEN transcripts was not significantly up-regulated in tissue culture compared with that in heat-stressed seedlings, indicating that the transposition of ONSEN was regulated independently of the transcript level. RdDM-related genes were up-regulated by heat stress in both tissue culture and seedlings. The level of DNA methylation of ONSEN did not show any change in tissue culture, and the amount of ONSEN-derived small RNAs was not affected by heat stress. The results indicated that the transposition of ONSEN was regulated by an alternative mechanism in addition to the RdDM-mediated epigenetic regulation in tissue culture. We applied the tissue culture-induced transposition of ONSEN to Japanese radish, an important breeding species of the family Brassicaceae. Several new insertions were detected in a regenerated plant derived from heat-stressed tissues and its self-fertilized progeny, revealing the possibility of molecular breeding without genetic modification.

  12. PCR-SSCP-based reconstruction of the original fungal flora of heat-processed meat products.

    PubMed

    Dorn-In, Samart; Hölzel, Christina S; Janke, Tobias; Schwaiger, Karin; Balsliemke, Joachim; Bauer, Johann

    2013-03-01

    Food processing of spoiled meat is prohibited by law, since it is a deception and does not comply with food safety aspects. In general, spoilage of meat is mostly caused by bacteria. However, a high contamination level of fungi could be also found in some meat or meat products with certain preserving conditions. In case that unhygienic meat is used to produce heat processed products, the microorganisms will be deactivated by heat, so that they cannot be detected by a standard cultivation method. Therefore, this study aimed to develop and apply a molecular biological method--polymerase chain reaction and single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP)--to reconstruct the original fungal flora of heat processed meat. Twenty primer pairs were tested for their specificity for fungal DNA. Since none of them fully complied with all study criteria (such as high specificity and sensitivity for fungal DNA; suitability of the products for PCR-SSCP) in the matrix "meat", we designed a new reverse primer, ITS5.8R. The primer pair ITS1/ITS5.8R amplified DNA from all tested fungal species, but not DNA from meat-producing animals or from ingredients of plant origin (spices). For the final test, 32 DNA bands in acrylamide gel from 15 meat products and 1 soy sauce were sequenced-all originating from fungal species, which were, in other studies, reported to contaminate meat e.g. Alternaria alternata, Aureobasidium pullulans, Candida rugosa, C. tropicalis, C. zeylanoides, Eurotium amstelodami and Pichia membranifaciens, and/or spices such as Botrytis aclada, Guignardia mangiferae, Itersonilia perplexans, Lasiodiplodia theobromae, Lewia infectoria, Neofusicoccum parvum and Pleospora herbarum. This confirms the suitability of PCR-SSCP to specifically detect fungal DNA in heat processed meat products, and thus provides an overview of fungal species contaminating raw material such as meat and spices.

  13. Dissipated energy and entropy production for an unconventional heat engine: the stepwise `circular cycle'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Liberto, Francesco; Pastore, Raffaele; Peruggi, Fulvio

    2011-05-01

    When some entropy is transferred, by means of a reversible engine, from a hot heat source to a colder one, the maximum efficiency occurs, i.e. the maximum available work is obtained. Similarly, a reversible heat pumps transfer entropy from a cold heat source to a hotter one with the minimum expense of energy. In contrast, if we are faced with non-reversible devices, there is some lost work for heat engines, and some extra work for heat pumps. These quantities are both related to entropy production. The lost work, i.e. ? , is also called 'degraded energy' or 'energy unavailable to do work'. The extra work, i.e. ? , is the excess of work performed on the system in the irreversible process with respect to the reversible one (or the excess of heat given to the hotter source in the irreversible process). Both quantities are analysed in detail and are evaluated for a complex process, i.e. the stepwise circular cycle, which is similar to the stepwise Carnot cycle. The stepwise circular cycle is a cycle performed by means of N small weights, dw, which are first added and then removed from the piston of the vessel containing the gas or vice versa. The work performed by the gas can be found as the increase of the potential energy of the dw's. Each single dw is identified and its increase, i.e. its increase in potential energy, evaluated. In such a way it is found how the energy output of the cycle is distributed among the dw's. The size of the dw's affects entropy production and therefore the lost and extra work. The distribution of increases depends on the chosen removal process.

  14. Development of Naphthalene PLIF for Visualizing Ablation Products From a Space Capsule Heat Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combs, C. S.; Clemens, N. T.; Danehy, P. M.

    2014-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) will use an ablative heat shield. To better design this heat shield and others that will undergo planetary entry, an improved understanding of the ablation process would be beneficial. Here, a technique developed at The University of Texas at Austin that uses planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of a low-temperature sublimating ablator (naphthalene) to enable visualization of the ablation products in a hypersonic flow is applied. Although high-temperature ablation is difficult and expensive to recreate in a laboratory environment, low-temperature sublimation creates a limited physics problem that can be used to explore ablation-product transport in a hypersonic flow-field. In the current work, a subscale capsule reentry vehicle model with a solid naphthalene heat shield has been tested in a Mach 5 wind tunnel. The PLIF technique provides images of the spatial distribution of sublimated naphthalene in the heat-shield boundary layer, separated shear layer, and backshell recirculation region. Visualizations of the capsule shear layer using both naphthalene PLIF and Schlieren imaging compared favorably. PLIF images have shown high concentrations of naphthalene in the capsule separated flow region, intermittent turbulent structures on the heat shield surface, and interesting details of the capsule shear layer structure. It was shown that, in general, the capsule shear layer appears to be more unsteady at lower angels of attack. The PLIF images demonstrated that during a wind tunnel run, as the model heated up, the rate of naphthalene ablation increased, since the PLIF signal increased steadily over the course of a run. Additionally, the shear layer became increasingly unsteady over the course of a wind tunnel run, likely because of increased surface roughness but also possibly because of the increased blowing. Regions with a relatively low concentration of naphthalene were also identified in the capsule backshell

  15. Measurements of bremsstrahlung production and x-ray cryostat heating in VENUS

    SciTech Connect

    Lyneis, C.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D.; Virostek, S.; Loew, T.; Heinen, A.; Tarvainen, O.

    2006-03-15

    The VENUS superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is designed to operate at 28 GHz with up to 10 kW of rf power. Most of this power is absorbed by the plasma electrons and then dumped onto the plasma chamber wall. The distribution of heating and bremsstrahlung production is highly nonuniform and reflects the geometry of the magnetic confinement fields. The nonuniform distribution of electron losses to the wall results in localized heating on the aluminum chamber walls, which can lead to burnout. In addition, part of the bremsstrahlung produced by the collision of the hot-electrons with the walls is absorbed by the cold mass of the superconducting magnet leading to an additional heat load in the cryostat in the order of several watts. Therefore a new plasma chamber has been installed that incorporates a high-Z tantalum shield to reduce the cryostat heating and enhance water cooling to minimize the chance of burnout. In order to better understand the heat load, the spectrum of the bremsstrahlung has been carefully measured as a function of rf power, magnetic confinement, and rf frequency. In addition, the distribution of electron heating in VENUS magnetic field has been simulated with a three-dimensional computer code [H. Heinen and H. J. Andra, Proceedings of the 14th International Workshop on ECR Sources (CERN, Geneva, 1999), 224; H. J. Andra and A. Heinen, Proceedings of the 15th International Workshop on ECR lon Sources, ECRIS'02 (Jyvaeskylae, Finland 2002), 85.] to better understand the heat load distribution on the plasma chamber wall. The new plasma chamber design, results of the bremsstrahlung measurements, and the effectiveness of the high-Z shielding are described.

  16. Subtask 12A1: Fabrication of production-scale heat of V-4Cr-4Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Tsai, H.C.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    On the basis of excellent properties that were determined for a laboratory-scale heat, V-4Cr-4Ti has been identified previously as the most promising vanadium-based candidate alloy for application in fusion reactor structural components. The objective of this work is to produce a large-scale (500-kg) ingot of the alloy and fabricate various plates and sheets from the ingot, thereby demonstrating a reliable method of fabricating an industrial-scale heat of V-4Cr-4Ti that exhibits excellent properties. A 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti, an alloy identified previously as the most promising vanadium-based candidate alloy for application in fusion reactor structural components, has been produced. The ingot was produced by multiple vacuum-arc melting using screened high-quality raw materials of vanadium, chrome, and titanium. Several long bars {approx}64 mm in thickness and {approx}200 mm in width were extruded from the ingot, and plates and sheets of various thicknesses ranging from 1.0 to 29.2 mm were fabricated successfully from the extruded bars. The chemical composition of the ingot and the secondary fabrication procedures, specified on the basis of the experience and knowledge gained from fabrication, testing, and microstructural characterization of a laboratory-scale heat, were found to be satisfactory. Charpy-impact tests showed that mechanical properties of the production-scale heat are as good as those of the laboratory-scale heat. This demonstrates a method of reliable fabrication of industrial-scale heats of V-4Cr-4Ti that exhibit excellent properties. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. Reducing the formation of glucose degradation products in peritoneal dialysis solutions by ultrahigh temperature ohmic heating.

    PubMed

    Shapira, Alina; Shazman, Asher; Ungar, Yael; Shimoni, Eyal

    2007-04-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is commonly performed by using preprepared dialysis solutions containing glucose, which are thermally treated to achieve commercial sterilization. A series of glucose degradation products (GDPs) are being formed, which react with the tissue during the dialysis procedure, thus baring a negative effect on the patient and the dialysis process. The present study tested the efficacy of ohmic heating as an alternative thermal treatment for continuous sterilization of PD solutions. The process was compared to conventional retort treatment, and GDPs accumulation was measured. Thermal treatments using the ohmic heating system were performed at three temperatures (105, 125, and 150 degrees C) with residence time at each temperature ranging from 0.84 to 12.0 s. The resulting concentrations of glyoxal (GO), methylglyoxal (MGO), and 3-deoxyglucosone (3-DG) in the PD solutions were measured. None of these GDPs were found in PD fluids treated by ohmic heating at 105 degrees C. The concentration of 3-DG, after a standard sterilization treatment (121 degrees C, 20 or 40 min) was one order of magnitude higher (approximately 140 and 242 microM) than after ohmic heating treatment at 125 degrees C. The results of the present study suggest that this technique can be used to produce solutions with much lower content of GDPs. It also demonstrates the advantage of using the ohmic heating technology as a tool for high temperature short time treatment of PD fluids.

  18. Dissolved gas exsolution to enhance gas production and transport during bench-scale electrical resistance heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegele, P. R.; Mumford, K. G.

    2015-05-01

    Condensation of volatile organic compounds in colder zones can be detrimental to the performance of an in situ thermal treatment application for the remediation of chlorinated solvent source zones. A novel method to increase gas production and limit convective heat loss in more permeable, potentially colder, zones involves the injection and liberation of dissolved gas from solution during heating. Bench-scale electrical resistance heating experiments were performed with a dissolved carbon dioxide and sodium chloride solution to investigate exsolved gas saturations and transport regimes at elevated, but sub-boiling, temperatures. At sub-boiling temperatures, maximum exsolved gas saturations of Sg = 0.12 were attained, and could be sustained when the carbon dioxide solution was injected during heating rather than emplaced prior to heating. This gas saturation was estimated to decrease groundwater relative permeability to krw = 0.64. Discontinuous gas transport was observed above saturations of Sg = 0.07, demonstrating the potential of exsolved CO2 to bridge vertical gas transport through colder zones.

  19. Revisiting the global surface energy budgets with maximum-entropy-production model of surface heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shih-Yu; Deng, Yi; Wang, Jingfeng

    2016-10-01

    The maximum-entropy-production (MEP) model of surface heat fluxes, based on contemporary non-equilibrium thermodynamics, information theory, and atmospheric turbulence theory, is used to re-estimate the global surface heat fluxes. The MEP model predicted surface fluxes automatically balance the surface energy budgets at all time and space scales without the explicit use of near-surface temperature and moisture gradient, wind speed and surface roughness data. The new MEP-based global annual mean fluxes over the land surface, using input data of surface radiation, temperature data from National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (NASA CERES) supplemented by surface specific humidity data from the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), agree closely with previous estimates. The new estimate of ocean evaporation, not using the MERRA reanalysis data as model inputs, is lower than previous estimates, while the new estimate of ocean sensible heat flux is higher than previously reported. The MEP model also produces the first global map of ocean surface heat flux that is not available from existing global reanalysis products.

  20. Plants contain a novel multi-member class of heat shock factors without transcriptional activator potential.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka-Verner, E; Yuan, C X; Scharf, K D; Englich, G; Gurley, W B

    2000-07-01

    Based on phylogeny of DNA-binding domains and the organization of hydrophobic repeats, two families of heat shock transcription factors (HSFs) exist in plants. Class A HSFs are involved in the activation of the heat shock response, but the role of class B HSFs is not clear. When transcriptional activities of full-length HSFs were monitored in tobacco protoplasts, no class B HSFs from soybean or Arabidopsis showed activity under control or heat stress conditions. Additional assays confirmed the finding that the class B HSFs lacked the capacity to activate transcription. Fusion of a heterologous activation domain from human HSF1 (AD2) to the C-terminus of GmHSFB1-34 gave no evidence of synergistic enhancement of AD2 activity, which would be expected if weak activation domains were present. Furthermore, activity of AtHSFB1-4 (class B) was not rescued by coexpression with AtHSFA4-21 (class A) indicating that the class A HSF was not able to provide a missing function required for class B activity. The transcriptional activation potential of Arabidopsis AtHSFA4-21 was mapped primarily to a 39 amino acid fragment in the C-terminus enriched in bulky hydrophobic and acidic residues. Deletion mutagenesis of the C-terminal activator regions of tomato and Arabidopsis HSFs indicated that these plant HSFs lack heat-inducible regulatory regions analogous to those of mammalian HSF1. These findings suggest that heat shock regulation in plants may differ from metazoans by partitioning negative and positive functional domains onto separate HSF proteins. Class A HSFs are primarily responsible for stress-inducible activation of heat shock genes whereas some of the inert class B HSFs may be specialized for repression, or down-regulation, of the heat shock response.

  1. Heat production rate from radioactive elements in igneous and metamorphic rocks in Eastern Desert, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abbady, Adel G E; El-Arabi, A M; Abbady, A

    2006-01-01

    Radioactive heat-production data of Igneous and Metamorphic outcrops in the Eastern Desert are presented. Samples were analysed using a low level gamma-ray spectrometer (HPGe) in the laboratory. A total of 205 rock samples were investigated, covering all major rock types of the area. The heat-production rate of igneous rocks ranges from 0.11 (basalt) to 9.53 microWm(-3) (granite). In metamorphic rocks it varies from 0.28 (serpentinite ) to 0.91 microWm(-3) (metagabbro). The contribution due to U is about 51%, as that from Th is 31% and 18% from K. The corresponding values in igneous rocks are 76%, 19% and 5%, respectively. The calculated values showed good agreement with global values except in some areas containing granites.

  2. The reduction of heat production in exercising pigeons after L-carnitine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Janssens, G P; Buyse, J; Seynaeve, M; Decuypere, E; De Wilde, R

    1998-04-01

    Four groups (CS,CR,PS,PR) of nine trained male racing pigeons were deprived of feed for 1 d and then subjected to a respiration chamber test in order to study the effect of oral 1-carnitine supplementation on the energy metabolism during flight. One week before, groups CS and CR were orally supplemented with 90 mg of 1-carnitine daily, whereas PS and PR were given a placebo. Groups CS and PS underwent flight simulation by electrostimulation of the breast muscles. Flight simulation increased heat production, kept respiratory quotient from decreasing, decreased thyroxine levels, and increased weight loss. L-Carnitine decreased the rise in heat production during electrostimulation but did not influence respiratory quotient, weight loss, or thyroid hormones. L-Carnitine supplementation in pigeons improves fatty acid combustion efficiency during heavy exercise.

  3. Monascus secondary metabolites: production and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Patakova, Petra

    2013-02-01

    The genus Monascus, comprising nine species, can reproduce either vegetatively with filaments and conidia or sexually by the formation of ascospores. The most well-known species of genus Monascus, namely, M. purpureus, M. ruber and M. pilosus, are often used for rice fermentation to produce red yeast rice, a special product used either for food coloring or as a food supplement with positive effects on human health. The colored appearance (red, orange or yellow) of Monascus-fermented substrates is produced by a mixture of oligoketide pigments that are synthesized by a combination of polyketide and fatty acid synthases. The major pigments consist of pairs of yellow (ankaflavin and monascin), orange (rubropunctatin and monascorubrin) and red (rubropunctamine and monascorubramine) compounds; however, more than 20 other colored products have recently been isolated from fermented rice or culture media. In addition to pigments, a group of monacolin substances and the mycotoxin citrinin can be produced by Monascus. Various non-specific biological activities (antimicrobial, antitumor, immunomodulative and others) of these pigmented compounds are, at least partly, ascribed to their reaction with amino group-containing compounds, i.e. amino acids, proteins or nucleic acids. Monacolins, in the form of β-hydroxy acids, inhibit hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis in animals and humans.

  4. Production of high specific activity silicon-32

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.; Brzezinski, Mark A.

    1994-01-01

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provide and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution to from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidization state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  5. Effect of Sodium Carboxymethyl Celluloses on Water-catalyzed Self-degradation of 200-degree C-heated Alkali-Activated Cement

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the usefulness of sodium carboxymethyl celluloses (CMC) in promoting self-degradation of 200°C-heated sodium silicate-activated slag/Class C fly ash cementitious material after contact with water. CMC emitted two major volatile compounds, CO2 and acetic acid, creating a porous structure in cement. CMC also reacted with NaOH from sodium silicate to form three water-insensitive solid reaction products, disodium glycolate salt, sodium glucosidic salt, and sodium bicarbonate. Other water-sensitive solid reaction products, such as sodium polysilicate and sodium carbonate, were derived from hydrolysates of sodium silicate. Dissolution of these products upon contact with water generated heat that promoted cement’s self-degradation. Thus, CMC of high molecular weight rendered two important features to the water-catalyzed self-degradation of heated cement: One was the high heat energy generated in exothermic reactions in cement; the other was the introduction of extensive porosity into cement.

  6. Activation, decay heat, and waste classification studies of the European DEMO concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, M. R.; Eade, T.; Bachmann, C.; Fischer, U.; Taylor, N. P.

    2017-04-01

    Inventory calculations have a key role to play in designing future fusion power plants because, for a given irradiation field and material, they can predict the time evolution in chemical composition, activation, decay heat, gamma-dose, gas production, and even damage (dpa) dose. For conceptual designs of the European DEMO fusion reactor such calculations provide information about the neutron shielding requirements, maintenance schedules, and waste disposal prospects; thereby guiding future development. Extensive neutron-transport and inventory calculations have been performed for a reference DEMO reactor model with four different tritium-breeding blanket concepts. The results have been used to chart the post-operation variation in activity and decay heat from different vessel components, demonstrating that the shielding performance of the different blanket concepts—for a given blanket thickness—varies significantly. Detailed analyses of the simulated nuclide inventories for the vacuum vessel (VV) and divertor highlight the most dominant radionuclides, potentially suggesting how changes in material composition could help to reduce activity. Minor impurities in the raw composition of W used in divertor tiles, for example, are shown to produce undesirable long-lived radionuclides. Finally, waste classifications, based on UK regulations, and a recycling potential limit, have been applied to estimate the time-evolution in waste masses for both the entire vessel (including blanket modules, VV, divertor, and some ex-vessel components) and individual components, and also to suggest when a particular component might be suitable for recycling. The results indicate that the large mass of the VV will not be classifiable as low level waste on the 100 year timescale, but the majority of the divertor will be, and that both components will be potentially recyclable within that time.

  7. Active control of near-field radiative heat transfer between graphene-covered metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qimei; Zhou, Ting; Wang, Tongbiao; Liu, Wenxing; Liu, Jiangtao; Yu, Tianbao; Liao, Qinghua; Liu, Nianhua

    2017-04-01

    In this study, the near-field radiative heat transfer between graphene-covered metamaterials is investigated. The electric surface plasmons (SPs) supported by metamaterials can be coupled with the SPs supported by graphene. The near-field heat transfer between the graphene-covered metamaterials is significantly larger than that between metamaterials because of the strong coupling in our studied frequency range. The relationship between heat flux and chemical potential is studied for different vacuum gaps. Given that the chemical potential of graphene can be tuned by the external electric field, heat transfer can be actively controlled by modulating the chemical potential. The heat flux for certain vacuum gaps can reach a maximum value when the chemical potential is at a particular value. The results of this study are beneficial for actively controlling energy transfer.

  8. Influence of the hypothalamus on the midbrain tonic inhibitory mechanism on metabolic heat production in rats.

    PubMed

    Uno, Tadashi; Roth, Joachim; Shibata, Masaaki

    2003-07-15

    Influence of the hypothalamus on increased body temperature was examined in male rats. Body temperature was increased by removing the midbrain tonic inhibitory mechanism (TIM) on heat production from brown adipose tissue (BAT) by microinjections of a local anesthetic, procaine, into the midbrain. Procaine microinjections in unanesthetized rats increased rectal temperature that was followed by a strong tail skin temperature rise. Procaine microinjections in unanesthetized and decerebrated rats also increased rectal temperature but without skin temperature rise. These decerebrated animals fatally developed hyperthermia. In anesthetized rats, procaine microinjections increased temperature of the interscapular BAT (IBAT) higher with shorter onset for temperature rise than rectal temperature. Increased IBAT temperature by procaine microinjections in anesthetized rats was attenuated during hypothalamic warming, and enhanced during hypothalamic cooling when compared with that observed during thermoneutral hypothalamic temperature. These results suggest that the midbrain TIM is able to function in unanesthetized conscious rats, and that the integrity of the midbrain mechanism to tonically inhibit metabolic heat production does not require the presence of intact hypothalamus. These results also suggest that the hypothalamus modulates directly or indirectly IBAT heat production that was induced by removal of the midbrain TIM.

  9. Production of pyrolytic liquids from industrial sewage sludges in an induction-heating reactor.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Tien; Chang, Jeng-Hung; Hsien, Kuo-Jung; Chang, Yuan-Ming

    2009-01-01

    With the application of induction-heating, the pyrolytic experiments have been carried out for three sewage sludges from the food processing factories in an externally heated fixed-bed reactor. The thermochemical characteristics of sludge samples were first analyzed. The results indicated that the calorific value had about 15 MJ/kg on an average, suggesting that it had a potential for biomass energy source. However, its nitrogen concentration was relatively high. From the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) curves, it showed that the pyrolysis reaction can be almost finished in the temperature range of 450-750 degrees C. The yields of resulting liquid and char products from the pyrolysis of sewage sludge were discussed for examining the effects of pyrolysis temperature (500-800 degrees C), heating rate (200-500 degrees C/min), and holding time (1-8 min). Overall, the variation of yield was not so significant in the experimental conditions for three sewage sludges. All results of the resulting liquid products analyzed by elemental analyzer, pH meter, Karl-Fischer moisture titrator and bomb calorimeter were in consistence with those analyses by FTIR spectroscopy. Furthermore, the pyrolysis liquid products contained large amounts of water (>73% by weight) mostly derived from the bound water in the biosludge feedstocks and the condensation reactions during the pyrolysis reaction, and fewer contents of oxygenated hydrocarbons composing of carbonyl and nitrogen-containing groups, resulting in low pH and low calorific values.

  10. Isolation and identification of oxidation products of syringol from brines and heated meat matrix.

    PubMed

    Bölicke, Sarah-Maria; Ternes, Waldemar

    2016-08-01

    In this study we developed new extraction and detection methods (using HPLC-UV and LC-MS), making it possible to analyze the smoke phenol syringol and its oxidation products nitrososyringol, nitrosyringol, and the syringol dimer 3,3',5,5'-tetramethoxy-1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diol, which were identified in heated meat for the first time. Preliminary brine experiments performed with different concentrations of ascorbic acid showed that high amounts of this antioxidant also resulted in almost complete degradation of syringol and to formation of the oxidation products when the brines were heated at low pH values. Heat treatment (80°C) and subsequent simulated digestion applied to meat samples containing syringol, ascorbic acid and different concentrations of sodium nitrite produced 3,3',5,5'-tetramethoxy-1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diol even at a low nitrite level in the meat matrix, while nitroso- and nitrosyringol were isolated only after the digestion experiments. Increasing amounts of oxygen in the meat matrix decreased the syringol concentration and enhanced the formation of the reaction products in comparison to the samples without added oxygen.

  11. Technological Alternatives or Use of Wood Fuel in Combined Heat and Power Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusanova, Jekaterina; Markova, Darja; Bazbauers, Gatis; Valters, Kārlis

    2013-12-01

    Abstract Latvia aims for 40% share of renewable energy in the total final energy use. Latvia has large resources of biomass and developed district heating systems. Therefore, use of biomass for heat and power production is an economically attractive path for increase of the share of renewable energy. The optimum technological solution for use of biomass and required fuel resources have to be identified for energy planning and policy purposes. The aim of this study was to compare several wood fuel based energy conversion technologies from the technical and economical point of view. Three biomass conversion technologies for combined heat and electricity production (CHP) were analyzed: • CHP with steam turbine technology; • gasification CHP using gas engine; • bio-methane combined cycle CHP. Electricity prices for each alternative are presented. The results show the level of support needed for the analyzed renewable energy technologies and time period needed to reach price parity with the natural gas - fired combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) CHPss. The results also show that bio-methane technology is most competitive when compared with CCGT among the considered technologies regarding fuel consumption and electricity production, but it is necessary to reduce investment costs to reach the electricity price parity with the natural gas CCGT.

  12. Supramaximal heat production induced by aminophylline in temperature-acclimated rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. C. H.

    1985-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that aminophylline, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor (thereby increasing intracellular cyclic AMP concentration) elicits supramaximal heat production and improves cold tolerance in rats acclimated to 22°C. To test whether aminophylline-stimulated supramaximal thermogenesis is independent of both the thermogenic capacity (i.e. aerobic fitness) and the mode of thermogenesis (shivering vs. non-shivering), rats (adult male Sprague-Dawley, approximately 400 g) of two different ages (4 11 month and 9 17 month, n=12 for each) were acclimated to 5, 15, and 25°C in succession and their thermogenic responses to aminophylline subsequently assessed. Aminophylline elicited supramaximal thermogenesis and improved cold tolerance regardless of age or acclimating temperatures. Further, the absolute net increase in heat production stimulated by aminophylline was also similar for all acclimating temperatures. After acclimating to 15°C, a single injection of aminophylline in the older rats elicited thermogenesis greater than that of the controls acclimated to 5°C; in the younger rats, aminophylline duplicated 46% of the increase in thermogenesis observed after acclimating to 5°C. These results indicated that the aminophylline-stimulated extra heat production is independent of both the thermogenic capacity and the mode of thermogenesis. It is possible that an enhanced substrate mobilization consequent to increased intracellular cyclic AMP concentration by aminophylline underlies the common mechanism via which supramaximal thermogenesis is elicited in temperature-acclimated rats.

  13. NF-κB signaling pathway is inhibited by heat shock independently of active transcription factor HSF1 and increased levels of inducible heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Janus, Patryk; Pakuła-Cis, Małgorzata; Kalinowska-Herok, Magdalena; Kashchak, Natalia; Szołtysek, Katarzyna; Pigłowski, Wojciech; Widlak, Wieslawa; Kimmel, Marek; Widlak, Piotr

    2011-12-01

    NF-κB transcription factor regulates numerous genes important for inflammation, immune responses and cell survival. HSF1 is the primary transcription factor activated under stress conditions that is responsible for induction of genes encoding heat shock proteins. Previous studies have shown that the NF-κB activation pathway is blocked by heat shock possibly involving heat shock proteins. Here, we investigate whether active HSF1 inhibited this pathway in the absence of stress conditions. Activation of the NF-κB pathway and expression of NF-κB-dependent genes were analyzed in TNFα-stimulated U-2 OS human osteosarcoma cells that were either heat-shocked or engineered to express a constitutively active form of HSF1 in the absence of heat shock. As expected, heat shock resulted in a general blockade in the degradation of the IκBα inhibitor, nuclear translocation of NF-κB and expression of NF-κB-dependent target genes. In marked contrast, the presence of constitutively active HSF1 did not block TNFα-induced activation of the NF-κB pathway or expression of a set of the NF-κB-dependent genes. We conclude that in the absence of heat shock, the NF-κB activation pathway is inhibited by neither active HSF1 transcription factor nor by increased levels of HSF1-induced heat shock proteins.

  14. Studies of the use of high-temperature nuclear heat from an HTGR for hydrogen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterman, D. D.; Fontaine, R. W.; Quade, R. N.; Halvers, L. J.; Jahromi, A. M.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a study which surveyed various methods of hydrogen production using nuclear and fossil energy are presented. A description of these methods is provided, and efficiencies are calculated for each case. The process designs of systems that utilize the heat from a general atomic high temperature gas cooled reactor with a steam methane reformer and feed the reformer with substitute natural gas manufactured from coal, using reforming temperatures, are presented. The capital costs for these systems and the resultant hydrogen production price for these cases are discussed along with a research and development program.

  15. Role of HSF activation for resistance to heat, cold and high-temperature knock-down.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Morten Muhlig; Overgaard, Johannes; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Holmstrup, Martin; Justesen, Just; Loeschcke, Volker

    2005-12-01

    Regulation of heat shock proteins (Hsps) by the heat shock factor (HSF) and the importance of these proteins for resistance to heat stress is well documented. Less characterized is the importance of Hsps for cold stress resistance although Hsp70 is known to be induced following long-term cold exposure in Drosophila melanogaster. In this study, a temperature-sensitive HSF mutant line was used to investigate the role of HSF activation following heat hardening, rapid cold hardening (RCH) and long-term cold acclimation (LTCA) on heat and cold resistance, and this was correlated with Hsp70 expression. In addition, the effect of HSF activation on high-temperature knock-down resistance was evaluated. We found a significantly decreased HSF activation in the mutant line as compared to a corresponding control line following heat hardening, and this was correlated with decreased heat resistance of the mutant line. However, we did not find this difference in HSF activity to be important for resistance to cold stress or high-temperature knock-down. The findings indicate that induction of stress genes regulated by HSF, such as Hsps, although occurring following LTCA, are not of major importance for cold stress resistance and neither for RCH nor high-temperature knock-down resistance in D. melanogaster.

  16. Heat-and-mass transfer analysis from vegetable and fruit products stored in cold conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashtoush, B.

    Heat and mass transfer process taking place during fruit and vegetable products in cold storage are studied. A mathematical model describing these processes is presented and the resulting governing equations are solved for different storing conditions. The relative humidity of the ventilating air and the temperature of the stored product bulk are found for different initial air relative humidity and airflow rates. As the product bulk depth increased up to 4.2m, the relative humidity of the ventilating air approaches the steady state value. When the relative humidity is larger than the equilibrium relative humidity value, an increase in the ventilating air rate reduces the losses of the product during the period of its storage, while larger losses occur when the relative humidity values are lower than the equilibrium ones.

  17. Heat transfer properties, moisture loss, product yield, and soluble proteins in chicken breast patties during air convection cooking.

    PubMed

    Murphy, R Y; Johnson, E R; Duncan, L K; Clausen, E C; Davis, M D; March, J A

    2001-04-01

    Chicken breast patties were processed in an air convection oven at air temperatures of 149 to 218 C, air velocities of 7.1 to 12.7 m3/min, and air relative humidities of 40 to 95%. The air humidity was controlled via introducing steam into the oven. The patties were processed to a final center temperature of 50 to 80 C. Heat flux, heat transfer coefficient, moisture loss in the cooked chicken patties, the product yield, and the changes of soluble proteins in the product were evaluated for the cooking system. During cooking, heat flux varied with the processing time. Heat flux increased with increasing air humidity. The effective heat transfer coefficient was obtained for different cooking conditions. Air humidity in the oven affected the heat transfer coefficient. The moisture loss in the cooked products increased with increasing the final product temperature and the oven air temperature. The soluble proteins in the cooked patties decreased with increasing the final product temperature. Increasing humidity increased heat transfer coefficient and therefore reduced cooking time. Reducing oven temperature, reducing internal temperature, and increasing air humidity increased the product yield. Soluble proteins might be used as an indicator for the degree of cooking. The results from this study are important for evaluating commercial thermal processes and improving product yields.

  18. Arabidopsis HEAT SHOCK TRANSCRIPTION FACTORA1b overexpression enhances water productivity, resistance to drought, and infection

    PubMed Central

    Richard, François; Bowden, Laura; Morison, James I.L.; Mullineaux, Philip M.

    2013-01-01

    Heat-stressed crops suffer dehydration, depressed growth, and a consequent decline in water productivity, which is the yield of harvestable product as a function of lifetime water consumption and is a trait associated with plant growth and development. Heat shock transcription factor (HSF) genes have been implicated not only in thermotolerance but also in plant growth and development, and therefore could influence water productivity. Here it is demonstrated that Arabidopsis thaliana plants with increased HSFA1b expression showed increased water productivity and harvest index under water-replete and water-limiting conditions. In non-stressed HSFA1b-overexpressing (HSFA1bOx) plants, 509 genes showed altered expression, and these genes were not over-represented for development-associated genes but were for response to biotic stress. This confirmed an additional role for HSFA1b in maintaining basal disease resistance, which was stress hormone independent but involved H2O2 signalling. Fifty-five of the 509 genes harbour a variant of the heat shock element (HSE) in their promoters, here named HSE1b. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR confirmed binding of HSFA1b to HSE1b in vivo, including in seven transcription factor genes. One of these is MULTIPROTEIN BRIDGING FACTOR1c (MBF1c). Plants overexpressing MBF1c showed enhanced basal resistance but not water productivity, thus partially phenocopying HSFA1bOx plants. A comparison of genes responsive to HSFA1b and MBF1c overexpression revealed a common group, none of which harbours a HSE1b motif. From this example, it is suggested that HSFA1b directly regulates 55 HSE1b-containing genes, which control the remaining 454 genes, collectively accounting for the stress defence and developmental phenotypes of HSFA1bOx. PMID:23828547

  19. High productivity cultivation of a heat-resistant microalga Chlorella sorokiniana for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingting; Zheng, Yubin; Yu, Liang; Chen, Shulin

    2013-03-01

    To augment biomass and lipid productivities of heterotrophic cultured microalgae Chlorella sorokiniana, the influence of environmental temperature and medium factors, such as carbon source, nitrogen source, and their initial concentrations was investigated in this study. The microalga C. sorokiniana could tolerate up to 42°C and showed the highest growth rate of 1.60d(-1) at 37°C. The maximum dry cell weight (DCW) and corresponding lipid concentration was obtained with 80gL(-1) of initial glucose and 4gL(-1) of initial KNO3 at 37°C. In 5-L batch fermentation, the DCW increased dramatically from 0.9gL(-1) to 37.6gL(-1) in the first 72h cultivation, with the DCW productivity of 12.2gL(-1)d(-1). The maximum lipid content of 31.5% was achieved in 96h and the lipid productivity was 2.9gL(-1)d(-1). The results showed C. sorokiniana could be a promising strain for biofuel production.

  20. Evidence for Steady Heating: Observations of an Active Region Core with Hinode and TRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Harry P.; Winebarger, Amy R.; Brooks, David H.

    2010-03-01

    The timescale for energy release is an important parameter for constraining the coronal heating mechanism. Observations of "warm" coronal loops (~1 MK) have indicated that the heating is impulsive and that coronal plasma is far from equilibrium. In contrast, observations at higher temperatures (~3 MK) have generally been consistent with steady heating models. Previous observations, however, have not been able to exclude the possibility that the high temperature loops are actually composed of many small-scale threads that are in various stages of heating and cooling and only appear to be in equilibrium. With new observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer and X-ray Telescope (XRT) on Hinode we have the ability to investigate the properties of high temperature coronal plasma in extraordinary detail. We examine the emission in the core of an active region and find three independent lines of evidence for steady heating. We find that the emission observed in XRT is generally steady for hours, with a fluctuation level of approximately 15% in an individual pixel. Short-lived impulsive heating events are observed, but they appear to be unrelated to the steady emission that dominates the active region. Furthermore, we find no evidence for warm emission that is spatially correlated with the hot emission, as would be expected if the high temperature loops are the result of impulsive heating. Finally, we also find that intensities in the "moss," the footpoints of high temperature loops, are consistent with steady heating models provided that we account for the local expansion of the loop from the base of the transition region to the corona. In combination, these results provide strong evidence that the heating in the core of an active region is effectively steady, that is, the time between heating events is short relative to the relevant radiative and conductive cooling times.

  1. Feel the heat: activation, orientation and feeding responses of bed bugs to targets at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    DeVries, Zachary C; Mick, Russell; Schal, Coby

    2016-12-01

    Host location in bed bugs is poorly understood. Of the primary host-associated cues known to attract bed bugs - CO2, odors, heat - heat has received little attention as an independent stimulus. We evaluated the effects of target temperatures ranging from 23 to 48°C on bed bug activation, orientation and feeding. Activation and orientation responses were assessed using a heated target in a circular arena. All targets heated above ambient temperature activated bed bugs (initiated movement) and elicited oriented movement toward the target, with higher temperatures generally resulting in faster activation and orientation. The distance over which bed bugs could orient toward a heat source was measured using a 2-choice T-maze assay. Positive thermotaxis was limited to distances <3 cm. Bed bug feeding responses on an artificial feeding system increased with feeder temperature up to 38 and 43°C, and declined precipitously at 48°C. In addition, bed bugs responded to the relative difference between ambient and feeder temperatures. These results highlight the wide range of temperatures that elicit activation, orientation and feeding responses in bed bugs. In contrast, the ability of bed bugs to correctly orient towards a heated target, independently of other cues, is limited to very short distances (<3 cm). Finally, bed bug feeding is shown to be relative to ambient temperature, not an absolute response to feeder blood temperature.

  2. Heat removal from high temperature tubular solid oxide fuel cells utilizing product gas from coal gasifiers.

    SciTech Connect

    Parkinson, W. J. ,

    2003-01-01

    In this work we describe the results of a computer study used to investigate the practicality of several heat exchanger configurations that could be used to extract heat from tubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) . Two SOFC feed gas compositions were used in this study. They represent product gases from two different coal gasifier designs from the Zero Emission Coal study at Los Alamos National Laboratory . Both plant designs rely on the efficient use of the heat produced by the SOFCs . Both feed streams are relatively rich in hydrogen with a very small hydrocarbon content . One feed stream has a significant carbon monoxide content with a bit less hydrogen . Since neither stream has a significant hydrocarbon content, the common use of the endothermic reforming reaction to reduce the process heat is not possible for these feed streams . The process, the method, the computer code, and the results are presented as well as a discussion of the pros and cons of each configuration for each process .

  3. Volatile production during preignition coal heating. Quarterly progress report, April 1981 - June 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    The goal of this program is to determine the characteristic pyrolysis behavior of representative coals under laser heating. The use of a CO/sub 2/ laser enables a controllable heating rate to be given to the coal particles as they pass through the laser beam. The development of such a laser heating diagnostic should prove to be an extremely valuable tool for generation of a data base necessary for the future design of coal burning facilities. The experimental configuration is illustrated. A dilute coal/gas stream, surrounded aby an inert shield flow is passed through a laser beam from an Avco HPL CO/sub 2/ laser. Under a prescribed flux density, and thus heating rate, the particle pyrolyse. The gaseous products are sampled and subsequently analyzed (primarily by gas chromatography) for carbon conversion. Particle temperature is to be monitored by a two-color pyrometer and particle velocity by laser Doppler velocimeter, by which means, evolution of the pyrolysis process can be determined.

  4. Effect of Ligustrum lucidum and Schisandra chinensis on the egg production, antioxidant status and immunity of laying hens during heat stress.

    PubMed

    Ma, Deying; Shan, Anshan; Chen, Zhihui; Du, Juan; Song, Kai; Li, Jianping; Xu, Qiyou

    2005-12-01

    The experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of two plants belonging to Chinese herbal medicines, Ligustrum lucidum (LL) and Schisandra chinensis (SC), on the laying performance, antioxidant status and immunity of hens during heat stress. The results showed that diets supplement with 1% of either LL or SC had beneficial effects on egg production and FCR of hens during heat stress (p < 0.05), compared with the control group. Either LL or SC significantly reduced malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration of heart, liver, sera and egg yolk. In addition, glutathione reductase (GR) activity of tissues and sera of the birds was significantly elevated by supplementation LL or SC. Furthermore, LL or SC supplementation significantly elevated lymphoblastogenese of the birds and the antibody values against Newcastle disease virus (NDV). The results suggest that diets supplement with 1% of either LL or SC may enhance egg production, immune function, and antioxidant status of hens during heat stress.

  5. Heat exposure and productivity in orchards: Implications for climate change research.

    PubMed

    Quiller, Grant; Krenz, Jennifer; Ebi, Kristie; Hess, Jeremy J; Fenske, Richard A; Sampson, Paul D; Pan, Mengjie; Spector, June T

    2017-01-31

    Recent studies suggest that heat exposure degrades work productivity, but such studies have not considered individual- and workplace-level factors. Forty-six tree fruit harvesters (98% Latino/a) from six orchards participated in a cross-sectional study in Central/Eastern Washington in 2015. The association between maximum measured work-shift Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGTmax) and productivity (total weight of fruit bins collected per time worked) was estimated using linear mixed effects models, adjusting for relevant confounders. The mean (standard deviation) WBGTmax was 27.9 (3.6)°C in August and 21.2 (2.0)°C in September. There was a trend of decreasing productivity with increasing WBGTmax, but this association was not statistically significant. When individual- and workplace-level factors were included in the model, the association approached the null. Not considering individual, work, and economic factors that affect rest and recovery in projections of the impacts of climate change could result in overestimates of reductions in future productivity and underestimate risk of heat illness.

  6. Fluctuation Theorems for Entropy Production and Heat Dissipation in Periodically Driven Markov Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shargel, Benjamin Hertz; Chou, Tom

    2009-10-01

    Asymptotic fluctuation theorems are statements of a Gallavotti-Cohen symmetry in the rate function of either the time-averaged entropy production or heat dissipation of a process. Such theorems have been proved for various general classes of continuous-time deterministic and stochastic processes, but always under the assumption that the forces driving the system are time independent, and often relying on the existence of a limiting ergodic distribution. In this paper we extend the asymptotic fluctuation theorem for the first time to inhomogeneous continuous-time processes without a stationary distribution, considering specifically a finite state Markov chain driven by periodic transition rates. We find that for both entropy production and heat dissipation, the usual Gallavotti-Cohen symmetry of the rate function is generalized to an analogous relation between the rate functions of the original process and its corresponding backward process, in which the trajectory and the driving protocol have been time-reversed. The effect is that spontaneous positive fluctuations in the long time average of each quantity in the forward process are exponentially more likely than spontaneous negative fluctuations in the backward process, and vice-versa, revealing that the distributions of fluctuations in universes in which time moves forward and backward are related. As an additional result, the asymptotic time-averaged entropy production is obtained as the integral of a periodic entropy production rate that generalizes the constant rate pertaining to homogeneous dynamics.

  7. Species production and heat release rates in two-layered natural gas fires

    SciTech Connect

    Zukoski, E.E.; Morehart, J.H.; Kubota, T.; Toner, S.J. )

    1991-02-01

    A fire burning in an enclosure with restricted ventilation will result in the accumulation of a layer of warm products of combustion mixed with entrained air adjacent to the ceiling. For many conditions, the depth of this layer will extend to occupy a significant fraction of the volume of the room. Eventually, the interface between this vitiated ceiling layer and the uncontaminated environment below will position itself so that a large portion of the combustion processes occur in this vitiated layer. A description is given of experimental work concerning the rates of formation of product species and heat release in a turbulent, buoyant natural gas diffusion flame burning in this two-layered configuration. The enclosure was modeled by placing a hood above a burner so that it accumulated the plume gases, and the unsteady development of the ceiling layer was modeled by the direct addition of air into the upper portion of the hood. Measurements of the composition of these gases allowed the computation of stoichiometries and heat release rates. These investigations showed that the species produced in the flame depend primarily on the stoichiometry of the gases present in the ceiling layer and weakly on the temperature of the layer, but are independent of the fuel pair ratio of the mass transported into the layer by the plume. Heat release rates in the fires were compared to a theoretical limit based on a stoichiometric reaction of fuel and air with excess components left unchanged by the combustion.

  8. [Effect of August 2003 heat wave in France on a hospital biochemistry laboratory activity in Paris].

    PubMed

    Mario, N; Pernet, P; Lasnier, E; Hermand, C; Vaubourdolle, M

    2004-01-01

    In August 2003, France sustained an exceptional heat wave. Heat-generated pathologies (dehydratation, heat stroke, cardio-vascular diseases) were responsible for additional biological analysis orders at the Saint-Antoine Hospital biochemistry laboratory in Paris from 4 to 18 august, compared to the same period in 2002. Variations were: + 17.6% for analysis orders, + 30.1% for ionograms, + 28.9% for plasma troponins I and + 58.6% for blood gazes analysis. Women and patients older than 75 years ratios were higher in august 2003. Biochemistry results analysis showed higher frequency of elevated plasma sodium, creatinine and troponin in 2003, confirming that most of patients admitted during heat wave were affected by heat-related diseases. Finally, laboratory excess activity was performed and quality was maintained, in spite of reduced staff and unusual climatic conditions.

  9. Puerarin ameliorates heat stress-induced oxidative damage and apoptosis in bovine Sertoli cells by suppressing ROS production and upregulating Hsp72 expression.

    PubMed

    Cong, Xia; Zhang, Qian; Li, Huatao; Jiang, Zhongling; Cao, Rongfeng; Gao, Shansong; Tian, Wenru

    2017-01-15

    Puerarin, a bioactive isoflavone glucoside extracted from radix Puerariae, has been proven to possess many biological activities. However, the role of puerarin in protecting bovine Sertoli cells (bSCs) under heat stress conditions remains to be clarified. The present study aimed to explore the possible protective mechanism of puerarin for primary cultured bSCs subjected to heat stress. Bovine Sertoli cells were treated with 15 μM of puerarin before they were exposed to 42 °C for 1 hour. The dose of puerarin (15 μM) was determined on the basis of cell viability. The results showed that puerarin treatment suppressed the production of reactive oxygen species and decreased the oxidative damage of the bSCs subjected to heat stress, as indicated by changes in superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities and malondialdehyde content. Moreover, puerarin treatment also suppressed the initiation of mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway, as revealed by changes in Bax to Bcl-2 ratio, mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome C release, caspase-3 activation, and apoptotic rate compared with the heat stress group. In addition, puerarin treatment increased Hsp72 expression in the bSCs with no apparent cellular cytotoxicity compared with the control group. Furthermore, increased Hsp72 was detected in the heat stress plus puerarin group compared with the heat stress group. In conclusion, puerarin attenuates heat stress-induced oxidative damage and apoptosis of bSCs by suppressing reactive oxygen species production and upregulating Hsp72 expression.

  10. Prosequence switching: an effective strategy to produce biologically active E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin STh.

    PubMed

    Weiglmeier, Philipp R; Berkner, Hanna; Seebahn, Angela; Vogel, Nico; Schreiber, Rainer; Wöhrl, Birgitta M; Schwarzinger, Stephan; Rösch, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infections account for the majority of cases of acute secretory diarrhea. The causative agents are enterotoxins secreted by ETEC, among them is the heat-stable enterotoxin, STh. STh is a 19-amino acid peptide containing three disulfide bonds that stimulates fluid secretion in the bowel by binding to the receptor domain of intestinal guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C). Since GC-C agonists have pharmacologic potential for diagnosis and treatment of disorders such as constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-C), chronic constipation, and colorectal carcinoma, it is crucial to develop methods for the large-scale production of STh and related peptides. Here, we present a strategy for recombinant expression of STh that relies on the use of the prosequence of human uroguanylin to support proper folding and disulfide bond formation. The chimeric protein CysCys-STh consisting of the propeptide of uroguanylin as N-terminus and the STh peptide as C-terminus was expressed in E. coli, and an efficient purification protocol was developed. Trypsin digestion of this protein released the enterotoxin which could be obtained in high purity. NMR and mass spectrometry confirmed the identity and homogeneity of the toxin, and its biological activity was confirmed by a cell-based in vivo assay. The expression scheme introduced here represents a cost-efficient and scalable way of STh production.

  11. Comment on 'A reinterpretation of the linear heat flow and heat production relationship for the exponential model of the heat production in the crust' by R.N. Singh & J.G. Negi.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lachenbruch, A.H.

    1980-01-01

    In their recent paper, Singh & Negi, (This journal, 57, 741-744) contend that if thd slope of the empirical linear relation between heat flow and heat production is interpreted as the decay-length of an exponential depth-distribution of sources, a discrepancy rises, whereas if it is interpreted as the depth of a step distribution, it does not. I should like to point out that their discrepancy follows from their arbitrary assumption of one of a range of physical possibilities unconstrained by the observations; with an equally valid alternate assumption (Lachenbruch 1970) the discrepancy disappears. In any case such discrepancies are probably minor compared to physical difficulties that arise from the step model, and to uncertainties introduced by other assumptions in any simple model.-Author

  12. Additional paper waste in pulping sludge for biohydrogen production by heat-shocked sludge.

    PubMed

    Chairattanamanokorn, Prapaipid; Tapananont, Supachok; Detjaroen, Siriporn; Sangkhatim, Juthatip; Anurakpongsatorn, Patana; Sirirote, Pramote

    2012-01-01

    Dark anaerobic fermentation is an interesting alternative method for producing biohydrogen (H(2)) as a renewable fuel because of its low cost and various usable organic substrates. Pulping sludge from wastewater treatment containing plentiful cellulosic substrate could be feasibly utilized for H(2) production by dark fermentation. The objective of this study was to investigate the optimal proportion of pulping sludge to paper waste, the optimal initial pH, and the optimal ratio of carbon and nitrogen (C/N) for H(2) production by anaerobic seed sludge pretreated with heat. The pulping sludge was pretreated with NaOH solution at high temperature and further hydrolyzed with crude cellulase. Pretreatment of the pulping sludge with 3% NaOH solution under autoclave at 121 °C for 2 h, hydrolysis with 5 FPU crude cellulase at 50 °C, and pH 4.8 for 24 h provided the highest reducing sugar production yield (229.68 ± 2.09 mg/g(TVS)). An initial pH of 6 and a C/N ratio of 40 were optimal conditions for H(2) production. Moreover, the supplement of paper waste in the pulping sludge enhanced the cumulative H(2) production yield. The continuous hydrogen production was further conducted in a glass reactor with nylon pieces as supporting media and the maximum hydrogen production yield was 151.70 ml/g(TVS).

  13. Induction of the heat shock regulon of Escherichia coli markedly increases production of bacterial viruses at high temperatures.

    PubMed Central

    Wiberg, J S; Mowrey-McKee, M F; Stevens, E J

    1988-01-01

    Production of bacteriophages T2, T4, and T6 at 42.8 to 44 degrees C was increased from 8- to 260-fold by adapting the Escherichia coli host (grown at 30 degrees C) to growth at the high temperature for 8 min before infection; this increase was abolished if the host htpR (rpoH) gene was inactive. Others have shown that the htpR protein increases or activates the synthesis of at least 17 E. coli heat shock proteins upon raising the growth temperature above a certain level. At 43.8 to 44 degrees C in T4-infected, unadapted cells, the rates of RNA, DNA, and protein synthesis were about 100, 70, and 70%, respectively, of those in T4-infected, adapted cells. Production of the major processed capsid protein, gp23, was reduced significantly more than that of most other T4 proteins in unadapted cells relative to adapted cells. Only 4.6% of the T4 DNA made in unadapted cells was resistant to micrococcal nuclease, versus 50% in adapted cells. Thus, defective maturation of T4 heads appears to explain the failure of phage production in unadapted cells. Overproduction of the heat shock protein GroEL from plasmids restored T4 production in unadapted cells to about 50% of that seen in adapted cells. T4-infected, adapted E. coli B at around 44 degrees C exhibited a partial tryptophan deficiency; this correlated with reduced uptake of uracil that is probably caused by partial induction of stringency. Production of bacteriophage T7 at 44 degrees C was increased two- to fourfold by adapting the host to 44 degrees C before infection; evidence against involvement of the htpR (rpoH) gene is presented. This work and recent work with bacteriophage lambda (C. Waghorne and C.R. Fuerst, Virology 141:51-64, 1985) appear to represent the first demonstrations for any virus that expression of the heat shock regulon of a host is necessary for virus production at high temperature. Images PMID:2446014

  14. Effect of Catalytic Pyrolysis Conditions Using Pulse Current Heating Method on Pyrolysis Products of Wood Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Honma, Sensho; Hata, Toshimitsu; Watanabe, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The influence of catalysts on the compositions of char and pyrolysis oil obtained by pyrolysis of wood biomass with pulse current heating was studied. The effects of catalysts on product compositions were analyzed using GC-MS and TEM. The compositions of some aromatic compounds changed noticeably when using a metal oxide species as the catalyst. The coexistence or dissolution of amorphous carbon and iron oxide was observed in char pyrolyzed at 800°C with Fe3O4. Pyrolysis oil compositions changed remarkably when formed in the presence of a catalyst compared to that obtained from the uncatalyzed pyrolysis of wood meal. We observed a tendency toward an increase in the ratio of polyaromatic hydrocarbons in the pyrolysis oil composition after catalytic pyrolysis at 800°C. Pyrolysis of biomass using pulse current heating and an adequate amount of catalyst is expected to yield a higher content of specific polyaromatic compounds. PMID:25614894

  15. Demand for waste as fuel in the swedish district heating sector: a production function approach.

    PubMed

    Furtenback, Orjan

    2009-01-01

    This paper evaluates inter-fuel substitution in the Swedish district heating industry by analyzing almost all the district heating plants in Sweden in the period 1989-2003, specifically those plants incinerating waste. A multi-output plant-specific production function is estimated using panel data methods. A procedure for weighting the elasticities of factor demand to produce a single matrix for the whole industry is introduced. The price of waste is assumed to increase in response to the energy and CO2 tax on waste-to-energy incineration that was introduced in Sweden on 1 July 2006. Analysis of the plants involved in waste incineration indicates that an increase in the net price of waste by 10% is likely to reduce the demand for waste by 4.2%, and increase the demand for bio-fuels, fossil fuels, other fuels and electricity by 5.5%, 6.0%, 6.0% and 6.0%, respectively.

  16. Crustal radiogenic heat production and the selective survival of ancient continental crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, P.

    1985-01-01

    It is pointed out that the oldest terrestrial rocks have so far revealed no evidence of the impact phase of Earth evolution. This observation suggests that processes other than impact were dominant at the time of stabilization of these units. However, a use of the oldest terrestrial rocks as a sample of the early terrestrial crust makes it necessary to consider the possibility that these rocks may represent a biased sample. In the present study, the global continental heat flow data set is used to provide further evidence that potassium, uranium, and thorium abundances are, on the average, low in surviving Archean crust relative to younger continental crust. An investigation is conducted of the implications of relatively low crustal radiogenic heat production to the stabilization of early continental crust, and possible Archean crustal stabilization models are discussed.

  17. Crustal radiogenic heat production and the selective survival of ancient continental crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, P.

    1985-01-01

    It is pointed out that the oldest terrestrial rocks have so far revealed no evidence of the impact phase of earth evolution. This observation suggests that processes other than impact were dominant at the time of stabilization of these units. However, a use of the oldest terrestrial rocks as a sample of the early terrestrial crust makes it necessary to consider the possibility that these rocks may represent a biased sample. In the present study, the global continental heat flow data set is used to provide further evidence that potassium, uranium, and thorium abundances are, on the average, low in surviving Archean crust relative to younger continental crust. An investigation is conducted of the implications of relatively low crustal radiogenic heat production to the stabilization of early continental crust, and possible Archean crustal stabilization models are discussed.

  18. A novel heat flux study of a geothermally active lake - Lake Rotomahana, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tivey, Maurice A.; de Ronde, Cornel E. J.; Tontini, Fabio Caratori; Walker, Sharon L.; Fornari, Daniel J.

    2016-03-01

    A new technique for measuring conductive heat flux in a lake was adapted from the marine environment to allow for multiple measurements to be made in areas where bottom sediment cover is sparse, or even absent. This thermal blanket technique, pioneered in the deep ocean for use in volcanic mid-ocean rift environments, was recently used in the geothermally active Lake Rotomahana, New Zealand. Heat flow from the lake floor propagates into the 0.5 m diameter blanket and establishes a thermal gradient across the known blanket thickness and thereby provides an estimate of the conductive heat flux of the underlying terrain. This approach allows conductive heat flux to be measured over a spatially dense set of stations in a relatively short period of time. We used 10 blankets and deployed them for 1 day each to complete 110 stations over an 11-day program in the 6 × 3 km lake. Results show that Lake Rotomahana has a total conductive heat flux of about 47 MW averaging 6 W/m2 over the geothermally active lake. The western half of the lake has two main areas of high heat flux; 1) a high heat flux area averaging 21.3 W/m2 along the western shoreline, which is likely the location of the pre-existing geothermal system that fed the famous Pink Terraces, mostly destroyed during the 1886 eruption 2) a region southwest of Patiti Island with a heat flux averaging 13.1 W/m2 that appears to be related to the explosive rift that formed the lake in the 1886 Tarawera eruption. A small rise in bottom water temperature over the survey period of 0.01 °C/day suggests the total thermal output of the lake is ~ 112-132 MW and when compared to the conductive heat output suggests that 18-42% of the total thermal energy is by conductive heat transfer.

  19. Calorimetric Determinations of the Heat and Products of Detonation for Explosives: October 1961 to April 1982

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ornellas, D. L.

    1982-04-01

    This report is a compilation of heat-of-detonation and product-composition data obtained at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during the last 21 years. In each determination, a 25-g high-explosive charge was detonated in a bomb calorimeter; a complete calorimetric measurement was made in 1 to 2 h with a precision of 0.3%. Data were interpreted using thermodynamic and hydrodynamic computer calculations. For unconfined or lightly confined charges, the released energy is largely retained in the products, which are subsequently shocked considerably off the Chapman-Jouguet isentrope by reflections from the bomb wall. For heavily confined charges, the detonation energy is largely converted to kinetic and internal energy of the confining case, and the products expand with minimal reshock along the Chapman-Jouguet isentrope.

  20. Heat shock protein 70 down-regulates the production of toll-like receptor-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines by a heat shock factor-1/constitutive heat shock element-binding factor-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is an intracellular chaperone protein with regulatory and cytoprotective functions. Hsp70 can also be found in the extracellular milieu, as a result of active secretion or passive release from damaged cells. The role of extracellular Hsp70 is not fully understood. Some studies report that it activates monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells through innate immune receptors (such as Toll-like receptors, TLRs), while others report that Hsp70 is a negative regulator of the inflammatory response. In order to address this apparent inconsistency, in this study we evaluated the response of human monocytes to a highly purified recombinant Hsp70. Methods Human peripheral blood monocytes were stimulated with Hsp70, alone or in combination with TLR agonists. Cytokines were quantified in culture supernatants, their mRNAs were measured by RT-PCR, and the binding of transcription factors was evaluated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Kruskal-Wallis test or one-way or two-way ANOVA were used to analyze the data. Results The addition of Hsp70 to TLR-activated monocytes down-regulated TNF-α as well as IL-6 levels. This effect was independent of a physical interaction between Hsp70 and TLR agonists; instead it resulted of changes at the TNF-α gene expression level. The decrease in TNF-α expression correlated with the binding of HSF-1 (heat shock transcription factor 1, a transcription factor activated in response to Hsp70) and CHBF (constitutive HSE-binding factor) to the TNF-α gene promoter. Conclusion Extracellular Hsp70 negatively regulates the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines of monocytes exposed to TLR agonists and contributes to dampen the inflammatory response. PMID:25053922

  1. Citrate-capped gold nanoparticle electrophoretic heat production in response to a time-varying radiofrequency electric-field

    PubMed Central

    Corr, Stuart J.; Raoof, Mustafa; Mackeyev, Yuri; Phounsavath, Sophia; Cheney, Matthew A.; Cisneros, Brandon T.; Shur, Michael; Gozin, Michael; McNally, Patrick J.; Wilson, Lon J.; Curley, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    The evaluation of heat production from gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) irradiated with radiofrequency (RF) energy has been problematic due to Joule heating of their background ionic buffer suspensions. Insights into the physical heating mechanism of nanomaterials under RF excitations must be obtained if they are to have applications in fields such as nanoparticle-targeted hyperthermia for cancer therapy. By developing a purification protocol which allows for highly-stable and concentrated solutions of citrate-capped AuNPs to be suspended in high-resistivity water, we show herein, for the first time, that heat production is only evident for AuNPs of diameters ≤ 10 nm, indicating a unique size-dependent heating behavior not previously observed. Heat production has also shown to be linearly dependent on both AuNP concentration and total surface area, and severely attenuated upon AuNP aggregation. These relationships have been further validated using permittivity analysis across a frequency range of 10 MHz to 3 GHz, as well as static conductivity measurements. Theoretical evaluations suggest that the heating mechanism can be modeled by the electrophoretic oscillation of charged AuNPs across finite length scales in response to a time-varying electric field. It is anticipated these results will assist future development of nanoparticle-assisted heat production by RF fields for applications such as targeted cancer hyperthermia. PMID:23795228

  2. Cardiopulmonary baroreceptor control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity in heat-stressed humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.; Etzel, R. A.; Farr, D. B.

    1999-01-01

    Whole body heating decreases central venous pressure (CVP) while increasing muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). In normothermia, similar decreases in CVP elevate MSNA, presumably via cardiopulmonary baroreceptor unloading. The purpose of this project was to identify whether increases in MSNA during whole body heating could be attributed to cardiopulmonary baroreceptor unloading coincident with the thermal challenge. Seven subjects were exposed to whole body heating while sublingual temperature, skin blood flow, heart rate, arterial blood pressure, and MSNA were monitored. During the heat stress, 15 ml/kg warmed saline was infused intravenously over 7-10 min to increase CVP and load the cardiopulmonary baroreceptors. We reported previously that this amount of saline was sufficient to return CVP to pre-heat stress levels. Whole body heating increased MSNA from 25 +/- 3 to 39 +/- 3 bursts/min (P < 0. 05). Central blood volume expansion via rapid saline infusion did not significantly decrease MSNA (44 +/- 4 bursts/min, P > 0.05 relative to heat stress period) and did not alter mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) or pulse pressure. To identify whether arterial baroreceptor loading decreases MSNA during heat stress, in a separate protocol MAP was elevated via steady-state infusion of phenylephrine during whole body heating. Increasing MAP from 82 +/- 3 to 93 +/- 4 mmHg (P < 0.05) caused MSNA to decrease from 36 +/- 3 to 15 +/- 4 bursts/min (P < 0.05). These data suggest that cardiopulmonary baroreceptor unloading during passive heating is not the primary mechanism resulting in elevations in MSNA. Moreover, arterial baroreceptors remain capable of modulating MSNA during heat stress.

  3. Influence of heat treatment of rayon-based activated carbon fibers on the adsorption of formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Rong, Haiqin; Ryu, Zhenyu; Zheng, Jingtang; Zhang, Yuanli

    2003-05-15

    The influence of heat treatment of rayon-based activated carbon fibers on the adsorption behavior of formaldehyde was studied. Heat treatment in an inert atmosphere of nitrogen for rayon-based activated carbon fibers (ACFs) resulted in a significant increase in the adsorption capacities and prolongation of breakthrough time on removing of formaldehyde. The effect of different heat-treatment conditions on the adsorption characteristics was investigated. The porous structure parameters of the samples under study were investigated using nitrogen adsorption at the low temperature 77.4 K. The pore size distributions of the samples under study were calculated by density functional theory. With the aid of these analyses, the relationship between structure and adsorption properties of rayon-based ACFs for removing formaldehyde was revealed. Improvement of their performance in terms of adsorption selectivity and adsorption rate for formaldehyde were achieved by heat post-treatment in an inert atmosphere of nitrogen.

  4. Practical considerations for maximizing heat production in a novel thermobrachytherapy seed prototype

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Bhoj; Warrell, Gregory; Shvydka, Diana; Subramanian, Manny; Ishmael Parsai, E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A combination of hyperthermia and radiation in the treatment of cancer has been proven to provide better tumor control than radiation administered as a monomodality, without an increase in complications or serious toxicities. Moreover, concurrent administration of hyperthermia and radiation displays synergistic enhancement, resulting in greater tumor cell killing than hyperthermia and radiation delivered separately. The authors have designed a new thermobrachytherapy (TB) seed, which serves as a source of both radiation and heat for concurrent brachytherapy and hyperthermia treatments when implanted in solid tumors. This innovative seed, similar in size and geometry to conventional seeds, will have self-regulating thermal properties. Methods: The new seed's geometry is based on the standard BEST Model 2301 125I seed, resulting in very similar dosimetric properties. The TB seed generates heat when placed in an oscillating magnetic field via induction heating of a ferromagnetic Ni–Cu alloy core that replaces the tungsten radiographic marker of the standard Model 2301. The alloy composition is selected to undergo a Curie transition near 50 °C, drastically decreasing power production at higher temperatures and providing for temperature self-regulation. Here, the authors present experimental studies of the magnetic properties of Ni–Cu alloy material, the visibility of TB seeds in radiographic imaging, and the ability of seed prototypes to uniformly heat tissue to a desirable temperature. Moreover, analyses are presented of magnetic shielding and thermal expansion of the TB seed, as well as matching of radiation dose to temperature distributions for a short interseed distance in a given treatment volume. Results: Annealing the Ni–Cu alloy has a significant effect on its magnetization properties, increasing the sharpness of the Curie transition. The TB seed preserves the radiographic properties of the BEST 2301 seed in both plain x rays and CT images

  5. Practical considerations for maximizing heat production in a novel thermobrachytherapy seed prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Gautam, Bhoj; Warrell, Gregory; Shvydka, Diana; Ishmael Parsai, E.; Subramanian, Manny

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: A combination of hyperthermia and radiation in the treatment of cancer has been proven to provide better tumor control than radiation administered as a monomodality, without an increase in complications or serious toxicities. Moreover, concurrent administration of hyperthermia and radiation displays synergistic enhancement, resulting in greater tumor cell killing than hyperthermia and radiation delivered separately. The authors have designed a new thermobrachytherapy (TB) seed, which serves as a source of both radiation and heat for concurrent brachytherapy and hyperthermia treatments when implanted in solid tumors. This innovative seed, similar in size and geometry to conventional seeds, will have self-regulating thermal properties. Methods: The new seed's geometry is based on the standard BEST Model 2301{sup 125}I seed, resulting in very similar dosimetric properties. The TB seed generates heat when placed in an oscillating magnetic field via induction heating of a ferromagnetic Ni–Cu alloy core that replaces the tungsten radiographic marker of the standard Model 2301. The alloy composition is selected to undergo a Curie transition near 50 °C, drastically decreasing power production at higher temperatures and providing for temperature self-regulation. Here, the authors present experimental studies of the magnetic properties of Ni–Cu alloy material, the visibility of TB seeds in radiographic imaging, and the ability of seed prototypes to uniformly heat tissue to a desirable temperature. Moreover, analyses are presented of magnetic shielding and thermal expansion of the TB seed, as well as matching of radiation dose to temperature distributions for a short interseed distance in a given treatment volume. Results: Annealing the Ni–Cu alloy has a significant effect on its magnetization properties, increasing the sharpness of the Curie transition. The TB seed preserves the radiographic properties of the BEST 2301 seed in both plain x rays and CT

  6. Effects of Different Heat Processing on Fucoxanthin, Antioxidant Activity and Colour of Indonesian Brown Seaweeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susanto, Eko; Suhaeli Fahmi, A.; Winarni Agustini, Tri; Rosyadi, Septian; Dita Wardani, Ayunda

    2017-02-01

    Fucoxanthin (Fx) is major carotenoids in brown algae. It showed many health beneficial effects for oxidative stress. Fucoxanthin is lower stability which may cause problem in the application for functional food. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of various heat processing on Fx, antioxidant activity (IC50), total phenolic content, and colour stability of Sargassum ilicifolium. The various heat processing methods showed were not significantly affected to fucoxanthin and antioxidant activities however all treatments lower affected to brown seaweeds colour. Moreover, this study showed a useful proved in the design of brown seaweeds processing which minimize Fx, antioxidant activity and colour changes.

  7. Evaluation of thermal energy storage for the proposed Twin Cities District Heating system. [using cogeneration heat production and aquifiers for heat storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, C. F.

    1980-01-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of incorporating thermal energy storage components into the proposed Twin Cities District heating project was evaluated. The technical status of the project is reviewed and conceptual designs of district heating systems with and without thermal energy storage were compared in terms of estimated capital requirements, fuel consumption, delivered energy cost, and environmental aspects. The thermal energy storage system is based on cogeneration and the storage of heat in aquifers.

  8. Using flowering and heat-loss models for improving greenhouse energy-use efficiency in annual bedding plant production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In temperate climates, annual bedding plants are typically produced in heated greenhouses from late winter through early summer. Temperature, photoperiod, light intensity, and transplant date are commonly manipulated during commercial production so that plants are in flower for predetermined market ...

  9. A JOULE-HEATED MELTER TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    KELLY SE

    2011-04-07

    This report is one of four reports written to provide background information regarding immobilization technologies remaining under consideration for supplemental immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste. This paper provides the reader a general understanding of joule-heated ceramic lined melters and their application to Hanford's low-activity waste.

  10. A pain-inducing centipede toxin targets the heat activation machinery of nociceptor TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shilong; Yang, Fan; Wei, Ningning; Hong, Jing; Li, Bowen; Luo, Lei; Rong, Mingqiang; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Zheng, Jie; Wang, KeWei; Lai, Ren

    2015-09-30

    The capsaicin receptor TRPV1 ion channel is a polymodal nociceptor that responds to heat with exquisite sensitivity through an unknown mechanism. Here we report the identification of a novel toxin, RhTx, from the venom of the Chinese red-headed centipede that potently activates TRPV1 to produce excruciating pain. RhTx is a 27-amino-acid small peptide that forms a compact polarized molecule with very rapid binding kinetics and high affinity for TRPV1. We show that RhTx targets the channel's heat activation machinery to cause powerful heat activation at body temperature. The RhTx-TRPV1 interaction is mediated by the toxin's highly charged C terminus, which associates tightly to the charge-rich outer pore region of the channel where it can directly interact with the pore helix and turret. These findings demonstrate that RhTx binding to the outer pore can induce TRPV1 heat activation, therefore providing crucial new structural information on the heat activation machinery.

  11. A pain-inducing centipede toxin targets the heat activation machinery of nociceptor TRPV1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shilong; Yang, Fan; Wei, Ningning; Hong, Jing; Li, Bowen; Luo, Lei; Rong, Mingqiang; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Zheng, Jie; Wang, Kewei; Lai, Ren

    2015-09-01

    The capsaicin receptor TRPV1 ion channel is a polymodal nociceptor that responds to heat with exquisite sensitivity through an unknown mechanism. Here we report the identification of a novel toxin, RhTx, from the venom of the Chinese red-headed centipede that potently activates TRPV1 to produce excruciating pain. RhTx is a 27-amino-acid small peptide that forms a compact polarized molecule with very rapid binding kinetics and high affinity for TRPV1. We show that RhTx targets the channel's heat activation machinery to cause powerful heat activation at body temperature. The RhTx-TRPV1 interaction is mediated by the toxin's highly charged C terminus, which associates tightly to the charge-rich outer pore region of the channel where it can directly interact with the pore helix and turret. These findings demonstrate that RhTx binding to the outer pore can induce TRPV1 heat activation, therefore providing crucial new structural information on the heat activation machinery.

  12. A pain-inducing centipede toxin targets the heat activation machinery of nociceptor TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shilong; Yang, Fan; Wei, Ningning; Hong, Jing; Li, Bowen; Luo, Lei; Rong, Mingqiang; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Zheng, Jie; Wang, KeWei; Lai, Ren

    2015-01-01

    The capsaicin receptor TRPV1 ion channel is a polymodal nociceptor that responds to heat with exquisite sensitivity through an unknown mechanism. Here we report the identification of a novel toxin, RhTx, from the venom of the Chinese red-headed centipede that potently activates TRPV1 to produce excruciating pain. RhTx is a 27-amino-acid small peptide that forms a compact polarized molecule with very rapid binding kinetics and high affinity for TRPV1. We show that RhTx targets the channel's heat activation machinery to cause powerful heat activation at body temperature. The RhTx–TRPV1 interaction is mediated by the toxin's highly charged C terminus, which associates tightly to the charge-rich outer pore region of the channel where it can directly interact with the pore helix and turret. These findings demonstrate that RhTx binding to the outer pore can induce TRPV1 heat activation, therefore providing crucial new structural information on the heat activation machinery. PMID:26420335

  13. Is Catalytic Activity of Chaperones a Selectable Trait for the Emergence of Heat Shock Response?

    PubMed Central

    Çetinbaş, Murat; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2015-01-01

    Although heat shock response is ubiquitous in bacterial cells, the underlying physical chemistry behind heat shock response remains poorly understood. To study the response of cell populations to heat shock we employ a physics-based ab initio model of living cells where protein biophysics (i.e., folding and protein-protein interactions in crowded cellular environments) and important aspects of proteins homeostasis are coupled with realistic population dynamics simulations. By postulating a genotype-phenotype relationship we define a cell division rate in terms of functional concentrations of proteins and protein complexes, whose Boltzmann stabilities of folding and strengths of their functional interactions are exactly evaluated from their sequence information. We compare and contrast evolutionary dynamics for two models of chaperon action. In the active model, foldase chaperones function as nonequilibrium machines to accelerate the rate of protein folding. In the passive model, holdase chaperones form reversible complexes with proteins in their misfolded conformations to maintain their solubility. We find that only cells expressing foldase chaperones are capable of genuine heat shock response to the increase in the amount of unfolded proteins at elevated temperatures. In response to heat shock, cells’ limited resources are redistributed differently for active and passive models. For the active model, foldase chaperones are overexpressed at the expense of downregulation of high abundance proteins, whereas for the passive model; cells react to heat shock by downregulating their high abundance proteins, as their low abundance proteins are upregulated. PMID:25606691

  14. Is catalytic activity of chaperones a selectable trait for the emergence of heat shock response?

    PubMed

    Çetinbaş, Murat; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2015-01-20

    Although heat shock response is ubiquitous in bacterial cells, the underlying physical chemistry behind heat shock response remains poorly understood. To study the response of cell populations to heat shock we employ a physics-based ab initio model of living cells where protein biophysics (i.e., folding and protein-protein interactions in crowded cellular environments) and important aspects of proteins homeostasis are coupled with realistic population dynamics simulations. By postulating a genotype-phenotype relationship we define a cell division rate in terms of functional concentrations of proteins and protein complexes, whose Boltzmann stabilities of folding and strengths of their functional interactions are exactly evaluated from their sequence information. We compare and contrast evolutionary dynamics for two models of chaperon action. In the active model, foldase chaperones function as nonequilibrium machines to accelerate the rate of protein folding. In the passive model, holdase chaperones form reversible complexes with proteins in their misfolded conformations to maintain their solubility. We find that only cells expressing foldase chaperones are capable of genuine heat shock response to the increase in the amount of unfolded proteins at elevated temperatures. In response to heat shock, cells' limited resources are redistributed differently for active and passive models. For the active model, foldase chaperones are overexpressed at the expense of downregulation of high abundance proteins, whereas for the passive model; cells react to heat shock by downregulating their high abundance proteins, as their low abundance proteins are upregulated.

  15. Evaluation of the heat-storage capability of shallow aquifers using active heat tracer tests and Fiber-Optics Distributed-Temperature-Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suibert Oskar Seibertz, Klodwig; Chirila, Marian Andrei; Bumberger, Jan; Dietrich, Peter; Vienken, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    In the course of the energy transition, geothermal energy storage and heat generation and cooling have proven to be environmental friendly alternatives to conventional energy. However, to ensure sustain usage, the heat transport behavior of aquifers and its distribution has to be studied. A tool to achieve this is the active heat tracer test, eg. Leaf et al. (2012). If active heat tracer tests are combined with in aquifer heat testing via electric heating-cables, eg. Liu et al. (2013), it is possible to observe heat transport and temperature signal decay without disturbing the original pressure field within the aquifer. In this field study a two channel High-Resolution-Fiber-Optic-Distributed-Temperature-Sensing and Pt100 were used to measure temperature signals within in two wells of 1.4 m distance, where the temperature difference was generated using a self regulating heating cable in the upstream well. High resolution Distributed-Temperature-Sensing measurements were achieved by coiling the fiber around screened plastic tubes. The upstream well was also used to observe heating (Δ Tmax approx. 24K) and temperature signal decay, while the downstream well was used to observe heat transport between both wells. The data was analyzed and compared to thermal conductivity of soil samples and Direct-Push (DP) Electrical-Conductivity-Logging and DP Hydraulic-Profiling results. The results show good agreement between DP data and temperature measurements proving the active heat tracer test is a suitable tool for providing reliable information on aquifer heat-storage capability. References Leaf, A.T., Hart, D.J., Bahr, J.M.: Active Thermal Tracer Tests for Improved Hydrostratigraphic Characterization. Ground Water, vol. 50, 2012 Liu, G., Knobbe, S., Butler, J.J.Jr.: Resolving centimeter-scale flows in aquifers and their hydrostratigraphic controls. Geophysical Research Letters, vol. 40, 2013

  16. Productive activity and life satisfaction in Korean elderly women.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explain the effect of participation in productive activities on life satisfaction and its implications for social evaluation of productive aging. This study uses data collected from 1,250 elderly women living in urban areas. The regression model was used to examine the influence of elderly women's participation in productive activities on their life satisfaction. Elderly women who participate in volunteer work, learning, and social group activities commonly recognized their activities as meaningful, feeling like worthwhile members of society, and evaluated such activities as very positive. In contrast, elderly women who participated in household chores and family care activities expressed a negative life satisfaction. The difference in life satisfaction regarding productive activities stems not only from the physical and environmental differences but also from the gap between the official social value underpinned by the recognition of surrounding people, their support, and the value of productive activities.

  17. Production of Heat Resistant Composite based on Siloxane Elastomer and Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessonov, I. V.; Karelina, N. V.; Kopitsyna, M. N.; Morozov, A. S.; Reznik, S. V.; Skidchenko, V. Yu.

    2016-02-01

    Development of a new generation of composite with unique thermal properties is an important task in the fields of science and technology where material is operated at high temperatures and exposure to a short-wave radiation. Recent studies show that carbon nanomaterials (fullerenes and carbon nanotubes) could improve the thermal, radiation and thermal-oxidative stability of the polymer matrix. In this article the development of a new heat resistant composite based on elastomer and carbon nanotubes (CNT) was performed and physicochemical properties of final product were evaluated.

  18. Production and properties of heat-stable extracellular hemolysin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, M K; Boese-Marrazzo, D

    1980-01-01

    Of 12 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 were found to produce heat-stable extracellular hemolysin in highly aerated peptone broth supplemented with glycerol, fructose, or mannitol. Glucose supported good hemolysin production only in medium that was highly buffered. The yield of both cells and hemolysin was lower with organic acids as supplement. Growth-limiting phosphate concentrations produced maximum hemolysin levels. Purified hemolysin preparations contained two hemolytic glycolipids. The kinetics of hemolysis at various levels of purified lysin and the effects of variation in lysin and erythrocyte concentration are described. Images Fig. 3 PMID:6776058

  19. Studying regimes of convective heat transfer in the production of high-temperature silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volokitin, O. G.; Sheremet, M. A.; Shekhovtsov, V. V.; Bondareva, N. S.; Kuzmin, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    The article presents the results of theoretical and experimental studies of the production of high-temperature silicate melts using the energy of low-temperature plasma in a conceptually new setup. A mathematical model of unsteady regimes of convective heat and mass transfer is developed and numerically implemented under the assumption of non-Newtonian nature of flow in the melting furnace with plasma-chemical synthesis of high-temperature silicate melts. Experiments on melting silicate containing materials were carried out using the energy of low-temperature plasma. The dependence of dynamic viscosity of various silicate materials (basalt, ash, waste of oil shale) was found experimentally.

  20. Class and Home Problems. Identify-Solve-Broadcast Your Own Transport Phenomenon: Student-Created YouTube Videos to Foster Active Learning in Mass and Heat Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wen, Fei; Khera, Eshita

    2016-01-01

    Despite the instinctive perception of mass and heat transfer principles in daily life, productive learning in this course continues to be one of the greatest challenges for undergraduate students in chemical engineering. In an effort to enhance student learning in classroom, we initiated an innovative active-learning method titled…

  1. Electric currents and coronal heating in NOAA active region 6952

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, T. R.; Canfield, R. C.; Hudson, H. S.; Mickey, D. L.; Wulser, J. -P.; Martens, P. C. H.; Tsuneta, S.

    1994-01-01

    We examine the spatial and temporal relationship between coronal structures observed with the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on board the Yohkoh spacecraft and the vertical electric current density derived from photospheric vector magnetograms obtained using the Stokes Polarimeter at the Mees Solar Observatory. We focus on a single active region: AR 6952 which we observed on 7 days during 1991 December. For 11 independent maps of the vertical electric current density co-aligned with non-flaring X-ray images, we search for a morphological relationship between sites of high vertical current density in the photosphere and enhanced X-ray emission in the overlying corona. We find no compelling spatial or temporal correlation between the sites of vertical current and the bright X-ray structures in this active region.

  2. Modelling Hydraulic and Thermal Responses in a Benchmark for Deep Geothermal Heat Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzbecher, E.; Oberdorfer, P.

    2012-04-01

    Geothermal heat production from deep reservoirs (5000-7000 m) is currently examined within the collaborative research program "Geothermal Energy and High-Performance Drilling" (gebo), funded by the Ministry of Science and Culture of Lower Saxony (Germany) and Baker Hughes. The projects concern exploration and characterization of geothermal reservoirs as well as production. They are gathered in the four major topic fields: geosystem, drilling, materials, technical system. We present modelling of a benchmark set-up concerning the geothermal production itself. The benchmark model "Horstberg" was originally created by J. Löhken and is based on geological data, concerning the Horstberg site in Lower Saxony. The model region consists of a cube with a side length of 5 km, in which 13 geological layers are included. A fault zone splits the region into two parts with shifted layering. A well is implemented, reaching from the top to an optional depth crossing all layers including the fault zone. The original geological model was rebuilt and improved in COMSOL Multiphysics Version 4.2a. The heterogeneous and detailed configuration makes the model interesting for benchmarking hydrogeological and geothermal applications. It is possible to inject and pump at any level in the well and to study the hydraulic and thermal responses of the system. The hydraulic and thermal parameters can be varied, and groundwater flow can be introduced. Moreover, it is also possible to examine structural mechanical responses to changes in the stress field (which is not further examined here). The main purpose of the presented study is to examine the dynamical flow characteristics of a hydraulic high conductive zone (Detfurth) in connection to a high conductive fault. One example is the fluid injection in the Detfurth zone and production in the fault. The high conductive domains can provide a hydraulic connection between the well screens and the initiated flow circuit could be used for geothermal

  3. FLOWS AND MOTIONS IN MOSS IN THE CORE OF A FLARING ACTIVE REGION: EVIDENCE FOR STEADY HEATING

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, David H.; Warren, Harry P.

    2009-09-20

    We present new measurements of the time variability of intensity, Doppler, and nonthermal velocities in moss in an active region core observed by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode in 2007 June. The measurements are derived from spectral profiles of the Fe XII 195 A line. Using the 2'' slit, we repeatedly scanned 150'' by 150'' in a few minutes. This is the first time it has been possible to make such velocity measurements in the moss, and the data presented are the highest cadence spatially resolved maps of moss Doppler and nonthermal velocities ever obtained in the corona. The observed region produced numerous C- and M-class flares with several occurring in the core close to the moss. The magnetic field was therefore clearly changing in the active region core, so we ought to be able to detect dynamic signatures in the moss if they exist. Our measurements of moss intensities agree with previous studies in that a less than 15% variability is seen over a period of 16 hr. Our new measurements of Doppler and nonthermal velocities reveal no strong flows or motions in the moss, nor any significant variability in these quantities. The results confirm that moss at the bases of high temperature coronal loops is heated quasi-steadily. They also show that quasi-steady heating can contribute significantly even in the core of a flare productive active region. Such heating may be impulsive at high frequency, but if so it does not give rise to large flows or motions.

  4. Closeout Report for the Refractory Metal Accelerated Heat Pipe Life Test Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J.; Reid, R.; Stewart, E.; Hickman, R.; Mireles, O.

    2013-01-01

    With the selection of a gas-cooled reactor, this heat pipe accelerated life test activity was closed out and its resources redirected. The scope of this project was to establish the long-term aging effects on Mo-44.5%Re sodium heat pipes when subjected to space reactor temperature and mass fluences. To date, investigators have demonstrated heat pipe life tests of alkali metal systems up to .50,000 hours. Unfortunately, resources have not been available to examine the effect of temperature, mass fluence, or impurity level on corrosion or to conduct post-test forensic examination of heat pipes. The key objective of this effort was to establish a cost/time effective method to systematically test alkali metal heat pipes with both practical and theoretical benefits. During execution of the project, a heat pipe design was established, a majority of the laboratory test equipment systems specified, and operating and test procedures developed. Procurements for the heat pipe units and all major test components were underway at the time the stop work order was issued. An extremely important outcome was the successful fabrication of an annular wick from Mo-5%Re screen (the single, most difficult component to manufacture) using a hot isostatic pressing technique. This Technical Publication (TP) includes specifics regarding the heat pipe calorimeter water-cooling system, vendor design for the radio frequency heating system, possible alternative calorimeter designs, and progress on the vanadium equilibration technique. The methods provided in this TP and preceding project documentation would serve as a good starting point to rapidly implement an accelerated life test. Relevant test data can become available within months, not years, and destructive examination of the first life test heat pipe might begin within 6 months of test initiation. Final conclusions could be drawn in less than a quarter of the mission duration for a long-lived, fission-powered, deep space probe.

  5. Effects of microwave heating on porous structure of regenerated powdered activated carbon used in xylose.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wang, Xinying; Peng, Jinhui

    2014-01-01

    The regeneration of spent powdered activated carbons used in xylose decolourization by microwave heating was investigated. Effects of microwave power and microwave heating time on the adsorption capacity of regenerated activated carbons were evaluated. The optimum conditions obtained are as follows: microwave power 800W; microwave heating time 30min. Regenerated activated carbon in this work has high adsorption capacities for the amount of methylene blue of 16 cm3/0.1 g and the iodine number of 1000.06mg/g. The specific surface areas of fresh commercial activated carbon, spent carbon and regenerated activated carbon were calculated according to the Brunauer, Emmett and Teller method, and the pore-size distributions of these carbons were characterized by non-local density functional theory (NLDFT). The results show that the specific surface area and the total pore volume of regenerated activated carbon are 1064 m2/g and 1.181 mL/g, respectively, indicating the feasibility of regeneration of spent powdered activated carbon used in xylose decolourization by microwave heating. The results of surface fractal dimensions also confirm the results of isotherms and NLDFT.

  6. Space shuttle/food system study. Volume 2, Appendix A: Active heating system-screening analysis. Appendix B: Reconstituted food heating techniques analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Technical data are presented which were used to evaluate active heating methods to be incorporated into the space shuttle food system design, and also to evaluate the relative merits and penalties associated with various approaches to the heating of rehydrated food during space flight. Equipment heating candidates were subject to a preliminary screening performed by a selection rationale process which considered the following parameters; (1) gravitational effect; (2) safety; (3) operability; (4) system compatibility; (5) serviceability; (6) crew acceptability; (7) crew time; (8) development risk; and (9) operating cost. A hot air oven, electrically heated food tray, and microwave oven were selected for further consideration and analysis. Passive, semi-active, and active food preparation approaches were also studied in an effort to determine the optimum method for heating rehydrated food. Potential complexity, cost, vehicle impact penalties, and palatability were considered in the analysis. A summary of the study results is provided along with cost estimates for each of the potential sytems

  7. Radiogenic Heat Production in the Gölcük Caldera and Direkli, Isparta Angle (Southwest Anatolia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayten Uyanık, Nurten; Öncü, Ziya; Akkurt, İskender

    2016-04-01

    The radiogenic heat is one of the important parameter due to the radioactivity has existed since beginning of universe as prediction of Big-Bang theory. In this study the radiogenic heat production of the Gölcük caldera and Direkli fields of the Isparta-Turkey, has been investigated. Total of 1390 data were obtained in the study area. The study area is included of the Gölcük volcanism and its around that is located in Isparta province of Turkey's Mediterranean region. The Gölcük volcanism is a young volcanism. Around this volcanism the andesite, trachy andesite, tuff, pumice and such a geological units is available. The data were collected using in-situ measurements with gamm-ray spectrometer. These measurements were covered natural radioactive elements (Uranium U, Thorium Th and Potassium K). Radiogenic heat production values were calculated using the literature relationships and in-situ measurement values of these radioactive elements. Radiogenic heat map of study area were obtained using radiogenic heat production values. In the map the red zone areas shows highest heat values while green zones areas of the map presents lowest heat values. Key words: Radioactive elements, radiogenic heat, map, Gölcük-Direkli(Isparta), Turkey

  8. Effects of pulse-modulated microwave radiation and conventional heating on sperm production

    SciTech Connect

    Lebovitz, R.M.; Johnson, L.; Samson, W.K.

    1987-01-01

    The effects on testicular function of pulse-modulated microwave radiation (PM MWR, 1.3 GHz) and of conventional heating were studied in the rat. Anesthetized adult males (Sprague-Dawley, 400-500 g) were treated then killed at specific intervals with respect to the 13-day cycle of the seminiferous epithelium. PM MWR at 7.7 mW/g (90 min) yielded a modest decline in daily sperm production (DSP) that derived primarily from effects on primary spermatocytes. PM MWR at 4.2 mW/g was ineffective. The mean intratesticular temperature during the former reached 40 degrees C and did not exceed 38 degrees C during the latter. MWR considerably in excess of 7.7 mW/g yielded decrements in virtually all germ cell types, with primary spermatocytes again being most markedly affected. Using conventional heating, intratesticular temperatures in excess of 39 degrees C for 60 min were required for significant decrements in DSP. Levels of circulating follicle-stimulating hormone and of leutinizing hormone were resistant to either treatment. We conclude that the damage threshold and the differential sensitivity of immature germ cells to PM MWR can be adequately explained by the consequent macroscopic heating.

  9. Polyamine regulation of heat-shock-induced spermidine N1-acetyltransferase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, D J; Carper, S W; Clay, L; Chen, J R; Gerner, E W

    1990-01-01

    The enzyme spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (N1-SAT) is rapidly induced by heat shock in CHO and A549 cells, with activity declining by 24 h. Depletion of intracellular polyamines by alpha-difluoromethylornithine, an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, blocks this induction. Re-addition of putrescine to these cultures restores the response to heat shock, with a concomitant increase in intracellular N1-acetylspermidine. Diaminopropane is more than twice as effective as the naturally occurring diamine putrescine, suggesting that the propylamine moiety of spermidine is involved in the regulation of N1-SAT induction. Inhibitor studies indicate transcriptional activation and that the enzyme has an apparent half-life of 30-60 min. A second heat shock rapidly inhibits induced N1-SAT activity, which decays with a half-life of 2-3 min. Despite its induction by heat, N1-SAT is not a stable enzyme, suggesting that the activity observed is not due to a modification of an existing peptide, but is due to a transcriptional event, which may justify the inclusion of this enzyme in the family of heat-shock proteins. Images Fig. 2. PMID:2111132

  10. Development and optimization of a two-stage gasifier for heat and power production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosov, V. V.; Zaichenko, V. M.

    2016-11-01

    The major methods of biomass thermal conversion are combustion in excess oxygen, gasification in reduced oxygen, and pyrolysis in the absence of oxygen. The end products of these methods are heat, gas, liquid and solid fuels. From the point of view of energy production, none of these methods can be considered optimal. A two-stage thermal conversion of biomass based on pyrolysis as the first stage and pyrolysis products cracking as the second stage can be considered the optimal method for energy production that allows obtaining synthesis gas consisting of hydrogen and carbon monoxide and not containing liquid or solid particles. On the base of the two stage cracking technology, there was designed an experimental power plant of electric power up to 50 kW. The power plant consists of a thermal conversion module and a gas engine power generator adapted for operation on syngas. Purposes of the work were determination of an optimal operation temperature of the thermal conversion module and an optimal mass ratio of processed biomass and charcoal in cracking chamber of the thermal conversion module. Experiments on the pyrolysis products cracking at various temperatures show that the optimum cracking temperature is equal to 1000 °C. From the results of measuring the volume of gas produced in different mass ratios of charcoal and wood biomass processed, it follows that the maximum volume of the gas in the range of the mass ratio equal to 0.5-0.6.

  11. Baroreflex modulation of sympathetic nerve activity to muscle in heat-stressed humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cui, Jian; Wilson, Thad E.; Crandall, Craig G.

    2002-01-01

    To identify whether whole body heating alters arterial baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), MSNA and beat-by-beat arterial blood pressure were recorded in seven healthy subjects during acute hypotensive and hypertensive stimuli in both normothermic and heat stress conditions. Whole body heating significantly increased sublingual temperature (P < 0.01), MSNA (P < 0.01), heart rate (P < 0.01), and skin blood flow (P < 0.001), whereas mean arterial blood pressure did not change significantly (P > 0.05). During both normothermic and heat stress conditions, MSNA increased and then decreased significantly when blood pressure was lowered and then raised via intravenous bolus infusions of sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine HCl, respectively. The slope of the relationship between MSNA and diastolic blood pressure during heat stress (-128.3 +/- 13.9 U x beats(-1) x mmHg(-1)) was similar (P = 0.31) with normothermia (-140.6 +/- 21.1 U x beats(-1) x mmHg(-1)). Moreover, no significant change in the slope of the relationship between heart rate and systolic blood pressure was observed. These data suggest that arterial baroreflex modulation of MSNA and heart rate are not altered by whole body heating, with the exception of an upward shift of these baroreflex curves to accommodate changes in these variables that occur with whole body heating.

  12. On the relationship between photospheric footpoint motions and coronal heating in solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Asgari-Targhi, M.; Berger, M. A.

    2014-05-20

    Coronal heating theories can be classified as either direct current (DC) or alternating current (AC) mechanisms, depending on whether the coronal magnetic field responds quasi-statically or dynamically to the photospheric footpoint motions. In this paper we investigate whether photospheric footpoint motions with velocities of 1-2 km s{sup –1} can heat the corona in active regions, and whether the corona responds quasi-statically or dynamically to such motions (DC versus AC heating). We construct three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic models for the Alfvén waves and quasi-static perturbations generated within a coronal loop. We find that in models where the effects of the lower atmosphere are neglected, the corona responds quasi-statically to the footpoint motions (DC heating), but the energy flux into the corona is too low compared to observational requirements. In more realistic models that include the lower atmosphere, the corona responds more dynamically to the footpoint motions (AC heating) and the predicted heating rates due to Alfvén wave turbulence are sufficient to explain the observed hot loops. The higher heating rates are due to the amplification of Alfvén waves in the lower atmosphere. We conclude that magnetic braiding is a highly dynamic process.

  13. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs. S. America ) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model. Review of other latent heating algorithms will be discussed in the workshop.

  14. Gas production and transport during bench-scale electrical resistance heating of water and trichloroethene.

    PubMed

    Hegele, P R; Mumford, K G

    2014-09-01

    The effective remediation of chlorinated solvent source zones using in situ thermal treatment requires successful capture of gas that is produced. Replicate electrical resistance heating experiments were performed in a thin bench-scale apparatus, where water was boiled and pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) trichloroethene (TCE) and water were co-boiled in unconsolidated silica sand. Quantitative light transmission visualization was used to assess gas production and transport mechanisms. In the water boiling experiments, nucleation, growth and coalescence of the gas phase into connected channels were observed at critical gas saturations of Sgc=0.233±0.017, which allowed for continuous gas transport out of the sand. In experiments containing a colder region above a target heated zone, condensation prevented the formation of steam channels and discrete gas clusters that mobilized into colder regions were trapped soon after discontinuous transport began. In the TCE-water experiments, co-boiling at immiscible fluid interfaces resulted in discontinuous gas transport above the DNAPL pool. Redistribution of DNAPL was also observed above the pool and at the edge of the vapor front that propagated upwards through colder regions. These results suggest that the subsurface should be heated to water boiling temperatures to facilitate gas transport from specific locations of DNAPL to extraction points and reduce the potential for DNAPL redistribution. Decreases in electric current were observed at the onset of gas phase production, which suggests that coupled electrical current and temperature measurements may provide a reliable metric to assess gas phase development.

  15. Gas production and transport during bench-scale electrical resistance heating of water and trichloroethene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegele, P. R.; Mumford, K. G.

    2014-09-01

    The effective remediation of chlorinated solvent source zones using in situ thermal treatment requires successful capture of gas that is produced. Replicate electrical resistance heating experiments were performed in a thin bench-scale apparatus, where water was boiled and pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) trichloroethene (TCE) and water were co-boiled in unconsolidated silica sand. Quantitative light transmission visualization was used to assess gas production and transport mechanisms. In the water boiling experiments, nucleation, growth and coalescence of the gas phase into connected channels were observed at critical gas saturations of Sgc = 0.233 ± 0.017, which allowed for continuous gas transport out of the sand. In experiments containing a colder region above a target heated zone, condensation prevented the formation of steam channels and discrete gas clusters that mobilized into colder regions were trapped soon after discontinuous transport began. In the TCE-water experiments, co-boiling at immiscible fluid interfaces resulted in discontinuous gas transport above the DNAPL pool. Redistribution of DNAPL was also observed above the pool and at the edge of the vapor front that propagated upwards through colder regions. These results suggest that the subsurface should be heated to water boiling temperatures to facilitate gas transport from specific locations of DNAPL to extraction points and reduce the potential for DNAPL redistribution. Decreases in electric current were observed at the onset of gas phase production, which suggests that coupled electrical current and temperature measurements may provide a reliable metric to assess gas phase development.

  16. Heat Production and Energy Efficiency of Broilers Infected With Necrotic Enteritis.

    PubMed

    M'Sadeq, Shawkat A; Wu, Shu-Biao; Choct, Mingan; Swick, Robert A

    2016-03-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) in poultry is the most important bacterial disease in terms of economic losses. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of an experimental challenge with necrotic enteritis on respiration and heat production in birds pretreated with dietary acylated starch or antibiotics (AB) zinc bacitracin (50 mg/kg) plus salinomycin (60 mg/kg). In total, 48 1-day-old Ross 308 male broilers were assigned to floor pens until day 10. On day 11, birds were randomly placed into 16 calorimetric chambers with four replicates of three birds per treatment. Treatments were: control, AB, acetylated high-amylose maize starch (SA), or butyrylated high-amylose maize starch (SB). Birds were NE challenged by inoculation with 5000 sporulated oocysts each of Eimeria maxima and Eimeria acervulina and 2500 sporulated oocysts of Eimeria brunetti on day 9 and Clostridium perfringens (3.8 × 10(8) colony-forming units) on day 14. The results showed that heat production (HP), respiratory quotient (RQ), heat increment, weight gain (WG), feed intake (FI), and livability (LV) of birds fed control, SA, and SB diets were lower than birds fed AB at 19 and 42 hr postinoculation (P < 0.05). At 65 hr postchallenge, increased FI and WG of birds were observed, indicating recovery from NE. During the entire period, from day 14 to day 17, birds fed control, SA, and SB had lower WG, FI, HP, RQ, metabolizable energy intake (MEI), and metabolizable energy (P < 0.01) than those fed AB. The data demonstrate that Eimeria sp. and C. perfringens challenge reduces growth performance, HP, RQ, metabolizable energy, and MEI of birds fed control, SA, and SB but not AB diets.

  17. Isolation and identification of oxidation products of guaiacol from brines and heated meat matrix.

    PubMed

    Bölicke, Sarah-Maria; Ternes, Waldemar

    2016-07-01

    In this study we investigated the formation of the oxidation products of guaiacol in brines and heated meat matrix: 6-nitrosoguaiacol, 4-nitroguaiacol and 6-nitroguaiacol. For this purpose we applied a newly developed HPLC-UV and LC-MS method. For the first time, 6-nitrosoguaiacol was determined in brine and meat (containing guaiacol and sodium nitrite), which had been heated to 80°C and subsequently subjected to simulated digestion. Application of 500mg/L ascorbic acid to the brines reduced guaiacol degradation at pH3 and simultaneously inhibited the formation of 6-nitrosoguaiacol compared to brines containing only 100mg/L of ASC. The oxidation products were isolated with a new extraction method from meat samples containing 400mg/kg sodium nitrite at pH3.6 following simulated digestion. When oxygen was added, 6-nitrosoguaiacol was determined even at legally allowed levels (150mg/kg) of the curing agent. Finally, we developed a new LC-MS method for the separation and qualitative determination of the four main smoke methoxyphenols.

  18. Fluxless Brazing and Heat Treatment of a Plate-Fin Sandwich Actively Cooled Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.

    1978-01-01

    The processes and techniques used to fabricate plate-fin sandwich actively cooled panels are presented. The materials were 6061 aluminum alloy and brazing sheet having clad brazing alloy. The panels consisted of small scale specimens, fatigue specimens, and a large 0.61 m by 1.22 m test panel. All panels were fluxless brazed in retorts in heated platen presses while exerting external pressure to assure intimate contact of details. Distortion and damage normally associated with that heat treatment were minimized by heat treating without fixtures and solution quenching in an organic polymer solution. The test panel is the largest fluxless brazed and heat treated panel of its configuration known to exist.

  19. Initial heats of H{sub 2}S adsorption on activated carbons: Effect of surface features

    SciTech Connect

    Bagreev, A.; Adib, F.; Bandosz, T.J.

    1999-11-15

    The sorption of hydrogen sulfide was studied on activated carbons of various origins by means of inverse gas chromatography at infinite dilution. The conditions of the experiment were dry and anaerobic. Prior to the experiments the surface of some carbon samples was oxidized using either nitric acid or ammonium persulfate. Then the structural parameters of carbons were evaluated from the sorption of nitrogen. From the IGC experiments at various temperatures, heats of adsorption were calculated. The results showed that the heat of H{sub 2}S adsorption under dry anaerobic conditions does not depend on surface chemistry. The dependence of the heat of adsorption on the characteristic energy of nitrogen adsorption calculated from the Dubinin-Raduskevich equation was found. This correlation can be used to predict the heat of H{sub 2}S adsorption based on the results obtained from nitrogen adsorption.

  20. "Hot" Non-flaring Plasmas in Active Region Cores Heated by Single Nanoflares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Will Thomas; Cargill, Peter; Bradshaw, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    We use hydrodynamic modeling tools, including a two-fluid development of the EBTEL code, to investigate the properties expected of "hot" (i.e. between 106.7 and 107.2 K) non-flaring plasmas due to nanoflare heating in active regions. Here we focus on single nanoflares and show that while simple models predict an emission measure distribution extending well above 10 MK that is consistent with cooling by thermal conduction, many other effects are likely to limit the existence and detectability of such plasmas. These include: differential heating between electrons and ions, ionization non-equilibrium and, for short nanoflares, the time taken for the coronal density to increase. The most useful temperature range to look for this plasma, often called the "smoking gun" of nanoflare heating, lies between 1 MK and 10 MK. Signatures of the actual heating may be detectable in some instances.

  1. Modelling nanoflares in active regions and implications for coronal heating mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Cargill, P. J.; Warren, H. P.; Bradshaw, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations from the Hinode and Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft have provided major advances in understanding the heating of solar active regions (ARs). For ARs comprising many magnetic strands or sub-loops heated by small, impulsive events (nanoflares), it is suggested that (i) the time between individual nanoflares in a magnetic strand is 500–2000 s, (ii) a weak ‘hot’ component (more than 106.6 K) is present, and (iii) nanoflare energies may be as low as a few 1023 ergs. These imply small heating events in a stressed coronal magnetic field, where the time between individual nanoflares on a strand is of order the cooling time. Modelling suggests that the observed properties are incompatible with nanoflare models that require long energy build-up (over 10 s of thousands of seconds) and with steady heating. PMID:25897093

  2. Modelling nanoflares in active regions and implications for coronal heating mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cargill, P J; Warren, H P; Bradshaw, S J

    2015-05-28

    Recent observations from the Hinode and Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft have provided major advances in understanding the heating of solar active regions (ARs). For ARs comprising many magnetic strands or sub-loops heated by small, impulsive events (nanoflares), it is suggested that (i) the time between individual nanoflares in a magnetic strand is 500-2000 s, (ii) a weak 'hot' component (more than 10(6.6) K) is present, and (iii) nanoflare energies may be as low as a few 10(23) ergs. These imply small heating events in a stressed coronal magnetic field, where the time between individual nanoflares on a strand is of order the cooling time. Modelling suggests that the observed properties are incompatible with nanoflare models that require long energy build-up (over 10 s of thousands of seconds) and with steady heating.

  3. The effects of heating and devitrification on the structure and biological activity of aluminosilicate refractory ceramic fibres.

    PubMed

    Brown, R C; Sara, E A; Hoskins, J A; Evans, C E; Young, J; Laskowski, J J; Acheson, R; Forder, S D; Rood, A P

    1992-04-01

    Three grades of ceramic fibre have been examined for their composition, structures and biological effect in several in vitro assay systems. The fibres were examined in the 'as-manufactured' state and after heating at 1200 and 1400 degrees C. Devitrification of the fibres at 1200 degrees C probably gave mullite crystals on the surface and caused the formation of the high-temperature form of cristobalite and, in zirconia grade fibres, the high-temperature, tetragonal form of zirconia as well. Further heating changed surface structure and led to zircon production in the zirconia fibres. Heating reduced the affinity of the fibres for the surface of V79-4 cells and lowered fibre toxicity toward these cells and towards macrophage-like cells. These changes in toxicity were not due to a reduction in the fibrous nature of the materials although they did become more brittle and powders prepared from them contained more isometric particles than those from as-manufactured materials. This suggests that the devitrification occurring during the use of these materials in high-temperature environments will not necessarily enhance their adverse biological activities despite the production of one phase of crystalline silica.

  4. Monitoring ground-surface heating during expansion of the Casa Diablo production well field at Mammoth Lakes, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergfeld, D.; Vaughan, R. Greg; Evans, William C.; Olsen, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The Long Valley hydrothermal system supports geothermal power production from 3 binary plants (Casa Diablo) near the town of Mammoth Lakes, California. Development and growth of thermal ground at sites west of Casa Diablo have created concerns over planned expansion of a new well field and the associated increases in geothermal fluid production. To ensure that all areas of ground heating are identified prior to new geothermal development, we obtained high-resolution aerial thermal infrared imagery across the region. The imagery covers the existing and proposed well fields and part of the town of Mammoth Lakes. Imagery results from a predawn flight on Oct. 9, 2014 readily identified the Shady Rest thermal area (SRST), one of two large areas of ground heating west of Casa Diablo, as well as other known thermal areas smaller in size. Maximum surface temperatures at 3 thermal areas were 26–28 °C. Numerous small areas with ground temperatures >16 °C were also identified and slated for field investigations in summer 2015. Some thermal anomalies in the town of Mammoth Lakes clearly reflect human activity.Previously established projects to monitor impacts from geothermal power production include yearly surveys of soil temperatures and diffuse CO2 emissions at SRST, and less regular surveys to collect samples from fumaroles and gas vents across the region. Soil temperatures at 20 cm depth at SRST are well correlated with diffuse CO2 flux, and both parameters show little variation during the 2011–14 field surveys. Maximum temperatures were between 55–67 °C and associated CO2 discharge was around 12–18 tonnes per day. The carbon isotope composition of CO2 is fairly uniform across the area ranging between –3.7 to –4.4 ‰. The gas composition of the Shady Rest fumarole however has varied with time, and H2S concentrations in the gas have been increasing since 2009.

  5. The Relationship between Physical Activity and Productivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    CONTINUED Aerobic exercises were the primary type of physical activity considered. The research focused on two specific objectives: (1) to review and... physical fitness and exercise activities . One of the priority objectives is to increase the proportion of adults (aged 18 to 65) participating in... physical activity will be used to encompass both aerobic fitness and exercise . This will allow consideration of the impact of varying levels of exercise

  6. Oral Vaccination with Heat Inactivated Mycobacterium bovis Activates the Complement System to Protect against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Joseba M.; Aranaz, Alicia; Sevilla, Iker; Villar, Margarita; Boadella, Mariana; Galindo, Ruth C.; Pérez de la Lastra, José M.; Moreno-Cid, Juan A.; Fernández de Mera, Isabel G.; Alberdi, Pilar; Santos, Gracia; Ballesteros, Cristina; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P.; Minguijón, Esmeralda; Romero, Beatriz; de Juan, Lucía; Domínguez, Lucas; Juste, Ramón; Gortazar, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a pandemic affecting billions of people worldwide, thus stressing the need for new vaccines. Defining the correlates of vaccine protection is essential to achieve this goal. In this study, we used the wild boar model for mycobacterial infection and TB to characterize the protective mechanisms elicited by a new heat inactivated Mycobacterium bovis vaccine (IV). Oral vaccination with the IV resulted in significantly lower culture and lesion scores, particularly in the thorax, suggesting that the IV might provide a novel vaccine for TB control with special impact on the prevention of pulmonary disease, which is one of the limitations of current vaccines. Oral vaccination with the IV induced an adaptive antibody response and activation of the innate immune response including the complement component C3 and inflammasome. Mycobacterial DNA/RNA was not involved in inflammasome activation but increased C3 production by a still unknown mechanism. The results also suggested a protective mechanism mediated by the activation of IFN-γ producing CD8+ T cells by MHC I antigen presenting dendritic cells (DCs) in response to vaccination with the IV, without a clear role for Th1 CD4+ T cells. These results support a role for DCs in triggering the immune response to the IV through a mechanism similar to the phagocyte response to PAMPs with a central role for C3 in protection against mycobacterial infection. Higher C3 levels may allow increased opsonophagocytosis and effective bacterial clearance, while interfering with CR3-mediated opsonic and nonopsonic phagocytosis of mycobacteria, a process that could be enhanced by specific antibodies against mycobacterial proteins induced by vaccination with the IV. These results suggest that the IV acts through novel mechanisms to protect against TB in wild boar. PMID:24842853

  7. Dynamics of potentiation and activation: GAGA factor and its role in heat shock gene regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, R C; Lis, J T

    1997-01-01

    GAGA factor (GAF) binds to specific DNA sequences and participates in a complex spectrum of chromosomal activities.Products of the Trithorax-like locus (Trl), which encodes multiple GAF isoforms, are required for homeotic gene expression and are essential for Drosophila development. While homozygous null mutations in Trl are lethal, heterozygotes display enhanced position effect variegation (PEV) indicative of the broad role of GAF in chromatin architecture and its positive role in gene expression.The distribution of GAF on chromosomes is complex, as it is associated with hundreds of chromosomal loci in euchromatin of salivary gland polytene chromosomes, however, it also displays a strong association with pericentric heterochromatin in diploid cells, where it appears to have roles in chromosome condensation and segregation. At higher resolution GAF binding sites have been identified in the regulatory regions of many genes. In some cases, the positive role of GAF in gene expression has been examined in detail using a variety of genetic, biochemical, and cytological approaches. Here we review what is currently known of GAF and, in the context of the heat shock genes of Drosophila, we examine the effects of GAF on multiple steps in gene expression. PMID:9321643

  8. DIAGNOSING THE TIME DEPENDENCE OF ACTIVE REGION CORE HEATING FROM THE EMISSION MEASURE. II. NANOFLARE TRAINS

    SciTech Connect

    Reep, J. W.; Bradshaw, S. J.; Klimchuk, J. A. E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu

    2013-02-20

    The time dependence of heating in solar active regions can be studied by analyzing the slope of the emission measure distribution coolward of the peak. In a previous study we showed that low-frequency heating can account for 0% to 77% of active region core emission measures. We now turn our attention to heating by a finite succession of impulsive events for which the timescale between events on a single magnetic strand is shorter than the cooling timescale. We refer to this scenario as a 'nanoflare train' and explore a parameter space of heating and coronal loop properties with a hydrodynamic model. Our conclusions are (1) nanoflare trains are consistent with 86% to 100% of observed active region cores when uncertainties in the atomic data are properly accounted for; (2) steeper slopes are found for larger values of the ratio of the train duration {Delta} {sub H} to the post-train cooling and draining timescale {Delta} {sub C}, where {Delta} {sub H} depends on the number of heating events, the event duration and the time interval between successive events ({tau} {sub C}); (3) {tau} {sub C} may be diagnosed from the width of the hot component of the emission measure provided that the temperature bins are much smaller than 0.1 dex; (4) the slope of the emission measure alone is not sufficient to provide information about any timescale associated with heating-the length and density of the heated structure must be measured for {Delta} {sub H} to be uniquely extracted from the ratio {Delta} {sub H}/{Delta} {sub C}.

  9. Collagenase Production by Endotoxin-Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Larry M.; Wahl, Sharon M.; Mergenhagen, Stephan E.; Martin, George R.

    1974-01-01

    Peritoneal exudate macrophages, when exposed to bacterial lipopolysaccharide in culture, were found to produce collagenase (EC 3.4.24.3). This enzyme was not detected in extracts of the macrophages or in media from nonstimulated macrophage cultures. Lipidcontaining fractions of the lipopolysaccharide, including a glycolipid from the rough mutant of Salmonella minnesota (R595) and lipid A, were potent stimulators of collagenase production. The lipid-free polysaccharide fraction had no effect. Cycloheximide prevented the production of collagenase by endotoxin-treated macrophages, suggesting that it was newly synthesized. Images PMID:4372628

  10. Tension and heat production during isometric contractions and shortening in the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, S H

    1978-09-01

    1. Tension and heat production were measured during phasic isometric contractions and isovelocity shortening in the anterior byssus retractor muscle (ABRM) of Mytilus edulis at 20 degrees C. 2. Isometric tension at lo was 550 +/- 40 mN/mm2 (S.D. for 173 observations in nine muscles), while the isometric maintenance heat rate was 1.0 +/- 0.2 mW/g wet wt. (S.D. for seventy-eight observations in eight muscles). 3. Isometric tension and heat production were measured as functions of muscle length over a range of 0.79--1.14 lo and were found to bear a linear relation to each other. 4. The force-velocity relation was determined in isovelocity releases imposed during tetanic stimulation and was found to fit the Hill equation with parameters alpha/Po = 0.07 +/- 0.01 and b/lo = 0.016 +/- 0.0007 sec-1 (S.E. from non-linear least-squares regression of the pooled data from seven experiments). 5. Heat production measured in the same experiments showed that shortening heat is produced with a shortening heat coefficient alpha/Po of 0.15. Shortening heat does not appear to be force-dependent, and separate experiments confirmed that it is a linear function of the amount of shortening.

  11. Evaluation of a Stochastic Inactivation Model for Heat-Activated Spores of Bacillus spp. ▿

    PubMed Central

    Corradini, Maria G.; Normand, Mark D.; Eisenberg, Murray; Peleg, Micha

    2010-01-01

    Heat activates the dormant spores of certain Bacillus spp., which is reflected in the “activation shoulder” in their survival curves. At the same time, heat also inactivates the already active and just activated spores, as well as those still dormant. A stochastic model based on progressively changing probabilities of activation and inactivation can describe this phenomenon. The model is presented in a fully probabilistic discrete form for individual and small groups of spores and as a semicontinuous deterministic model for large spore populations. The same underlying algorithm applies to both isothermal and dynamic heat treatments. Its construction does not require the assumption of the activation and inactivation kinetics or knowledge of their biophysical and biochemical mechanisms. A simplified version of the semicontinuous model was used to simulate survival curves with the activation shoulder that are reminiscent of experimental curves reported in the literature. The model is not intended to replace current models to predict dynamic inactivation but only to offer a conceptual alternative to their interpretation. Nevertheless, by linking the survival curve's shape to probabilities of events at the individual spore level, the model explains, and can be used to simulate, the irregular activation and survival patterns of individual and small groups of spores, which might be involved in food poisoning and spoilage. PMID:20453137

  12. Effects of steam pretreatment and co-production with ethanol on the energy efficiency and process economics of combined biogas, heat and electricity production from industrial hemp

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The study presented here has used the commercial flow sheeting program Aspen Plus™ to evaluate techno-economic aspects of large-scale hemp-based processes for producing transportation fuels. The co-production of biogas, district heat and power from chopped and steam-pretreated hemp, and the co-production of ethanol, biogas, heat and power from steam-pretreated hemp were analysed. The analyses include assessments of heat demand, energy efficiency and process economics in terms of annual cash flows and minimum biogas and ethanol selling prices (MBSP and MESP). Results Producing biogas, heat and power from chopped hemp has the highest overall energy efficiency, 84% of the theoretical maximum (based on lower heating values), providing that the maximum capacity of district heat is delivered. The combined production of ethanol, biogas, heat and power has the highest energy efficiency (49%) if district heat is not produced. Neither the inclusion of steam pretreatment nor co-production with ethanol has a large impact on the MBSP. Ethanol is more expensive to produce than biogas is, but this is compensated for by its higher market price. None of the scenarios examined are economically viable, since the MBSP (EUR 103–128 per MWh) is higher than the market price of biogas (EUR 67 per MWh). The largest contribution to the cost is the cost of feedstock. Decreasing the retention time in the biogas process for low solids streams by partly replacing continuous stirred tank reactors by high-rate bioreactors decreases the MBSP. Also, recycling part of the liquid from the effluent from anaerobic digestion decreases the MBSP. The production and prices of methane and ethanol influence the process economics more than the production and prices of electricity and district heat. Conclusions To reduce the production cost of ethanol and biogas from biomass, the use of feedstocks that are cheaper than hemp, give higher output of ethanol and biogas, or combined production with

  13. Excess Heat Production in Pd/D during Periodic Pulse Discharge Current in Various Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabut, A. B.

    2006-02-01

    Experimental data from low-energy nuclear reactions (LERN) in condensed media are presented. The nuclear reactions products were found in solid cathode media used in glow discharge. Apparently, the nuclear reactions were initiated when bombarding the cathode surface by plasma ions with the energy of 1.0-2.0 keV. Excess heat from a high current glow discharge reaction in D2, Xe, and Kr using cathodes already charged with preliminary deuterium-charged Pd and Ti cathode samples are given. Excess heat up to 10-15 W and efficiency up to 130% was recorded under the experiments for Pd cathode samples in D2 discharge. Excess heat up to 5 W and efficiency up to 150% was recorded for Pd cathodes that were charged with deuterium before the run, in Xe and Kr discharges. At the same time excess heat was not observed for pure Pd cathode samples in Xe and Kr discharges. The formation of impurity nuclides (7Li, 13C, 15N, 20Ne, 29Si, 44Ca, 48Ca, 56Fe, 57Fe, 59Co, 64Zn, 66Zn, 75As, 107Ag, 109Ag, 110Cg, 111Cg, 112Cg, 114Cg, and 115In) with the efficiency up to 1013 at./s was recorded. The isotopic ratios of these new nuclides ware quite different from the natural ratios. Soft X-ray radiation from the solid-state cathode with the intensity up to 0.01 Gy/s was recorded in experiments with discharges in H2, D2, Ar, Xe, and Kr. The X-ray radiation was observed in bursts of up to 106 photons, with up to 105 bursts per second while the discharge was formed and within 100 ms after turning off the discharge current. The results of the X-ray radiation registration showed that the exited energy levels have a lifetime up to 100 ms or more, and the energy of 1.2-2.5 keV. A possible mechanism for producing excess heat and nuclear transmutation reactions in the solid medium with the exited energy levels is considered.

  14. Dehydration, Heat Stroke, or Hyponatremia? The Recognition, Treatment, and Prevention of Hyponatremia Caused by High Exercise Outdoor Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Brent

    Hyponatremia (severe sodium depletion) has symptoms similar to heat exhaustion and heat stroke and can easily be misdiagnosed. The number of wilderness users and extreme adventure activities has increased in recent years, and more cases are being diagnosed. Given that a 1993 study found that 1 in 10 cases of heat-related illnesses were…

  15. The calcium-activated chloride channel anoctamin 1 acts as a heat sensor in nociceptive neurons.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hawon; Yang, Young Duk; Lee, Jesun; Lee, Byeongjoon; Kim, Tahnbee; Jang, Yongwoo; Back, Seung Keun; Na, Heung Sik; Harfe, Brian D; Wang, Fan; Raouf, Ramin; Wood, John N; Oh, Uhtaek

    2012-05-27

    Nociceptors are a subset of small primary afferent neurons that respond to noxious chemical, thermal and mechanical stimuli. Ion channels in nociceptors respond differently to noxious stimuli and generate electrical signals in different ways. Anoctamin 1 (ANO1 also known as TMEM16A) is a Ca(2+)-activated chloride channel that is essential for numerous physiological functions. We found that ANO1 was activated by temperatures over 44 °C with steep heat sensitivity. ANO1 was expressed in small sensory neurons and was highly colocalized with nociceptor markers, which suggests that it may be involved in nociception. Application of heat ramps to dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons elicited robust ANO1-dependent depolarization. Furthermore, knockdown or deletion of ANO1 in DRG neurons substantially reduced nociceptive behavior in thermal pain models. These results indicate that ANO1 is a heat sensor that detects nociceptive thermal stimuli in sensory neurons and possibly mediates nociception.

  16. An application of active surface heating for augmenting lift and reducing drag of an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio; Badavi, Forooz F.; Noonan, Kevin W.

    1988-01-01

    Application of active control to separated flow on the RC(6)-08 airfoil at high angle of attack by localized surface heating is numerically simulated by integrating the compressible 2-D nonlinear Navier-Stokes equation solver. Active control is simulated by local modification of the temperature boundary condition over a narrow strip of the upper surface of the airfoil. Both mean and perturbed profiles are favorably altered when excited with the same natural frequency of the shear layer by moderate surface heating for both laminar and turbulent separation. The shear layer is found to be very sensitive to localized surface heating in the vicinity of the separation point. The excitation field at the surface sufficiently altered both the local as well as the global circulation to cause a significant increase in lift and reduction in drag.

  17. Control of the boundary layer separation about an airfoil by active surface heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio; Badavi, Forooz F.; Noonan, Kevin W.

    1988-01-01

    Application of active control to separated flow on the RC(6)-08 airfoil at high angle of attack by localized surface heating is numerically simulated by integrating the compressible two-dimensional nonlinear Navier-Stokes equations solver. Active control is simulated by local modification of the temperature boundary condition over a narrow strip on the upper surface of the airfoil. Both mean and perturbed profiles are favorably altered when excited with the same natural frequency of the shear layer by moderate surface heating for both laminar and turbulent separation. The shear layer is found to be very sensitive to localized surface heating in the vicinity of the separation point. The excitation field at the surface sufficiently altered both the local as well as the global circulation to cause a significant increase in lift and reduction in drag.

  18. National commercial solar heating and cooling demonstration: purposes, program activities, and implications for future programs

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, R.; Genest, M.; Bryant, B.

    1980-05-01

    The Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration Act of 1974 created a set of activities to demonstrate the potential use of solar heating within a three-year period and of combined solar heating and cooling within a five-year period. This study assesses the Commercial Demonstration Program portion of the activity in terms of its stated goals and objectives. The primary data base was DOE contractor reports on commercial demonstration projects. It was concluded that the program did not provide data to support a positive decision for the immediate construction or purchase of commercial solar systems. However, the program may have contributed to other goals in the subsequent legislation; i.e., research and development information, stimulation of the solar industry, and more informed policy decisions.

  19. Heat-shock protein 70 from plant biofactories of recombinant antigens activate multiepitope-targeted immune responses.

    PubMed

    Buriani, Giampaolo; Mancini, Camillo; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Baschieri, Selene

    2012-04-01

    Although a physiological role of heat-shock proteins (HSP) in antigen presentation and immune response activation has not been directly demonstrated, their use as vaccine components is under clinical trial. We have previously demonstrated that the structure of plant-derived HSP70 (pHSP70) can be superimposed to the mammalian homologue and similarly to the mammalian counterpart, pHSP70-polypeptide complexes can activate the immune system. It is here shown that pHSP70 purified from plant tissues transiently expressing the influenza virus nucleoprotein are able to induce both the activation of major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted polyclonal T-cell responses and antibody production in mice of different haplotypes without the need of adjuvant co-delivery. These results indicate that pHSP70 derived from plants producing recombinant antigens may be used to formulate multiepitope vaccines.

  20. Assessment of heat tolerance and production performance of Aardi, Damascus, and their crossbred goats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samara, Emad Mohammed; Abdoun, Khalid Ahmed; Okab, Aly Bassunny; Al-Badwi, Mohammed Abdo; El-Zarei, Mohamed Fawzy; Al-Seaf, Ali Mohamed; Al-Haidary, Ahmed Abrahim

    2016-09-01

    The question of whether the adaptability and production performance in goats may be enhanced using a crossbreeding program between bucks of a native and heat-tolerant breed and does of an exotic and dual-purpose breed was approached and examined herein by comparing purebred Aardi and Damascus goats and their crossbred lines (i.e., 1/2 Aardi 1/2 Damascus (½A½D) and 1/4 Aardi 3/4 Damascus (¼A¾D)) reared in a region characterized by dry and hot bioclimatic conditions. Twenty-four male 6-month-old kids randomly segregated into four groups (six replicates/group) were used for the experiment. Climatic, thermo-physiological, biophysiological, metabolic, blood hematological, and biochemical measurements were all determined. The obtained results indicated that such a program was proven to be successful. This conclusion was demonstrated by the findings that crossbred goats (i.e., 1/2A1/2D and 1/4A3/4D) under such bioclimatic conditions were able to show ( P < 0.05) higher heat tolerance capabilities compared to purebred Damascus goats as well as manifested ( P < 0.05) higher production performance compared to the purebred Aardi goats. Accordingly, these evidences could emphasize that the crossbreeding may enable these animals to display a simultaneous improvement of both traits by the possible benefits that could arise from heterosis and breed complementarity. Researches dealing with this aspect may very well improve our understanding of goat's production and welfare under harsh environmental conditions. Future studies should include an economic analysis of traits that have the potential to impact the overall profitability to a vertically coordinated system.

  1. Augmentation of protein-derived acetic acid production by heat-alkaline-induced changes in protein structure and conformation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Li, Yanbo; Liu, Junxin; Ren, Nan-Qi; Qu, Jiuhui

    2016-01-01

    Waste-derived acetic acid (HAc) is an attractive feedstock for microbe-mediated biofuel production. However, fermentative conversion of HAc from waste-activated sludge (WAS) has low yield because of the high concentration of proteins not readily utilizable by microorganisms without prior hydrolysis. We investigated a combined technology for HAc augmentation during sludge protein fermentation. The maximal HAc yield increased over two-fold, reaching 0.502 ± 0.021 g/g protein (0.36 ± 0.01 g COD/g COD, ∼52% of the total volatile fatty acids) when synthetic sludge protein was heated at 120 °C for 30 min, treated at pH 12 for 24 h, and fermented at pH 9 for 72 h. Comprehensive analysis illustrated that the heat-alkaline pretreatment significantly induced protein fragmentation, simultaneously increasing the efficiency of protein biohydrolysis (from 35.5% to 85.9%) by inducing conformational changes indicative of protein unfolding. Consequently, the native α-helix content was decreased from 67.3% to 32.5% by conversion to an unordered shape, whose content increased from 27.5% to 45.5%; disulfide bonds were cleaved, whereas the main S-S stretching pattern was altered from gauche-gauche-gauche to gauche-gauche-trans, consequently causing increased protein susceptibility to proteolytic hydrolysis (76.3% vs. 47.0%). Economic analysis indicated that anaerobic fermentation with appropriate heat-alkaline pretreatment is a cost-effective approach for waste conversion to energy sources such as HAc.

  2. Polyphenols as active ingredients for cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Zillich, O V; Schweiggert-Weisz, U; Eisner, P; Kerscher, M

    2015-10-01

    Polyphenols are secondary plant metabolites with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial activity. They are ubiquitously distributed in the plant kingdom; high amounts contain, for example, green tea and grape seeds. Polyphenolic extracts are attractive ingredients for cosmetics and pharmacy due to their beneficial biological properties. This review summarizes the effects of polyphenols in the context of anti-ageing activity. We have explored in vitro studies, which investigate antioxidant activity, inhibition of dermal proteases and photoprotective activity, mostly studied using dermal fibroblasts or epidermal keratinocytes cell lines. Possible negative effects of polyphenols were also discussed. Further, some physicochemical aspects, namely the possible interactions with emulsifiers and the influence of the cosmetic formulation on the skin delivery, were reported. Finally, few clinical studies, which cover the anti-ageing action of polyphenols on the skin after topical application, were reviewed.

  3. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics Using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in straitform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMXX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM- LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  4. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics using TRMM rainfall products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2001. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DE 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs. west Pacific, Africa vs. S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in strtaiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  5. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release Over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model.

  6. Microbial production of sensory-active miraculin.

    PubMed

    Ito, Keisuke; Asakura, Tomiko; Morita, Yuji; Nakajima, Ken-ichiro; Koizumi, Ayako; Shimizu-Ibuka, Akiko; Masuda, Katsuyoshi; Ishiguro, Masaji; Terada, Tohru; Maruyama, Jun-ichi; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko; Misaka, Takumi; Abe, Keiko

    2007-08-24

    Miraculin (MCL), a tropical fruit protein, is unique in that it has taste-modifying activity to convert sourness to sweetness, though flat in taste at neutral pH. To obtain a sufficient amount of MCL to examine the mechanism involved in this sensory event at the molecular level, we transformed Aspergillus oryzae by introducing the MCL gene. Transformants were expressed and secreted a sensory-active form of MCL yielding 2 mg/L. Recombinant MCL resembled native MCL in the secondary structure and the taste-modifying activity to generate sweetness at acidic pH. Since the observed pH-sweetness relation seemed to reflect the imidazole titration curve, suggesting that histidine residues might be involved in the taste-modifying activity. H30A and H30,60A mutants were generated using the A. oryzae-mediated expression system. Both mutants found to have lost the taste-modifying activity. The result suggests that the histidine-30 residue is important for the taste-modifying activity of MCL.

  7. Enhanced immunomodulatory activity and stability in simulated digestive juices of Lactobacillus plantarum L-137 by heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Fujiki, Takashi; Hirose, Yoshitaka; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Murosaki, Shinji

    2012-01-01

    This study reports the effect of heat treating Lactobacillus plantarum L-137 on its in vitro cytokine-inducing activity, on the stability of this activity in simulated digestive juices, and on its in vivo immunomodulatory properties. L-137 cells were harvested at the stationary phase with or without the subsequent heat treatment and then lyophilized. Heat-killed L-137 cells stimulated mouse spleen cells to produce more interleukin-12p40 than unheated L-137. The interleukin-12p40-inducing activity of unheated L-137 was significantly lower when incubated with simulated intestinal juice, but the activity of heat-killed L-137 cells was maintained. Furthermore, heat-killed L-137 was more protective than unheated L-137 in a mouse model of dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis. A heat treatment may therefore be effective for enhancing the immunomodulatory activity of L-137 cells.

  8. Repression of the heat shock factor 1 transcriptional activation domain is modulated by constitutive phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Kline, M P; Morimoto, R I

    1997-01-01

    Heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) is constitutively expressed in mammalian cells and negatively regulated for DNA binding and transcriptional activity. Upon exposure to heat shock and other forms of chemical and physiological stress, these activities of HSF1 are rapidly induced. In this report, we demonstrate that constitutive phosphorylation of HSF1 at serine residues distal to the transcriptional activation domain functions to repress transactivation. Tryptic phosphopeptide analysis of a collection of chimeric GAL4-HSF1 deletion and point mutants identified a region of constitutive phosphorylation encompassing serine residues 303 and 307. The significance of phosphorylation at serines 303 and 307 in the regulation of HSF1 transcriptional activity was demonstrated by transient transfection and assay of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter construct. Whereas the transfected wild-type GAL4-HSF1 chimera is repressed for transcriptional activity and derepressed by heat shock, mutation of serines 303 and 307 to alanine results in derepression to a high level of constitutive activity. Similar results were obtained with mutation of these serine residues in the context of full-length HSF1. These data reveal that constitutive phosphorylation of serines 303 and 307 has an important role in the negative regulation of HSF1 transcriptional activity at control temperatures. PMID:9121459

  9. Mutagenic activity of disinfection by-products.

    PubMed Central

    Cognet, L; Courtois, Y; Mallevialle, J

    1986-01-01

    Data on raw water quality, disinfection treatment practices, and the resulting mutagenic properties of the treated water were compiled from pilot- and full-scale treatment experiments to evaluate that parameter which might produce variability in the results of a mutagenic study. Analysis of the data and comparison of treatment practices indicated that the measured mutagenic activity is strongly related to the characteristics of the organic matter in the raw water, the methodology used to sample and detect mutagens, the scale of the study both in terms of treatment flow and period of study, and the point at which and the conditions under which oxidants are added during treatment. Conclusions regarding disinfection systems in full-scale water treatment plants include the following: When raw water is pretreated and high concentrations of organics are present in the raw water, both ozonation and chlorination increased mutagenic activity. However, no significant difference in mutagenicity was found between the two oxidants. Both in the case of a nitrified groundwater and a clarified surface water, the mutagenic activity of the water after ozonation was related to its mutagenic activity before ozonation. With ozonation, mutagenic activity decreased after granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration. Thus, when GAC filtration follows ozone disinfection, early addition of oxidants may not be deleterious to the finished water quality. When chlorine or chlorine dioxide is added after GAC filtration, chlorine dioxide was found to produce a less mutagenic water than chlorine. Although these conclusions suggest means of controlling mutagenic activity during treatment, it must be stressed that the measurement of mutagenicity is a presumptive index of contamination level. PMID:3816721

  10. Mutagenic activity of disinfection by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Cognet, L.; Courtois, Y.; Mallevialle, J.

    1986-11-01

    Data on raw water quality, disinfection treatment practices, and the resulting mutagenic properties of the treated water were compiled from pilot- and full-scale treatment experiments to evaluate that parameter which might produce variability in the results of a mutagenic study. Analysis of the data and comparison of treatment practices indicated that the measured mutagenic activity is strongly related to the characteristics of the organic matter in the raw water, the methodology used to sample and detect mutagens, the scale of the study both in terms of treatment flow and period of study, and the point at which and the conditions under which oxidants are added during treatment. Conclusions regarding disinfection systems in full-scale water treatment plants include the following: When raw water is pretreated and high concentrations of organics are present in the raw water, both ozonation and chlorination increased mutagenic activity. However, no significant difference in mutagenicity was found between the two oxidants. Both in the case of a nitrified groundwater and a clarified surface water, the mutagenic activity of the water after ozonation was related to its mutagenic activity before ozonation. With ozonation, mutagenic activity decreased after granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration. Thus, when GAC filtration follows ozone disinfection, early addition of oxidants may not be deleterious to the finished water quality. When chlorine or chlorine dioxide is added after GAC filtration, chlorine dioxide was found to produce a less mutagenic water than chlorine. Although these conclusions suggest means of controlling mutagenic activity during treatment, it must be stressed that the measurement of mutagenicity is a presumptive index of contamination level.

  11. Physical Activity in the Heat: Important Considerations to Keep Your Students Safe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roetert, E. Paul; Richardson, Cheryl L.; Bergeron, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Although July and August tend to be the warmest months of the year, the months leading up to summer as well as the months just following summer can also be quite warm or even very hot. In this article, the authors share some important information to help prepare physical educators for overseeing activities in the heat and, just as importantly, to…

  12. Heat Reduces Nitric Oxide Production Required for Auxin-Mediated Gene Expression and Fate Determination in Tree Tobacco Guard Cell Protoplasts1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Robert A.; Anderson, David J.; Bufford, Jennifer L.; Tallman, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Tree tobacco (Nicotiana glauca) is an equatorial perennial with a high basal thermotolerance. Cultured tree tobacco guard cell protoplasts (GCPs) are useful for studying the effects of heat stress on fate-determining hormonal signaling. At lower temperatures (32°C or less), exogenous auxin (1-naphthalene acetic acid) and cytokinin (6-benzylaminopurine) cause GCPs to expand 20- to 30-fold, regenerate cell walls, dedifferentiate, reenter the cell cycle, and divide. At higher temperatures (34°C or greater), GCPs expand only 5- to 6-fold; they do not regenerate walls, dedifferentiate, reenter the cell cycle, or divide. Heat (38°C) suppresses activation of the BA auxin-responsive transgene promoter in tree tobacco GCPs, suggesting that inhibition of cell expansion and cell cycle reentry at high temperatures is due to suppressed auxin signaling. Nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in auxin signaling in other plant systems. Here, we show that heat inhibits NO accumulation by GCPs and that l-NG-monomethyl arginine, an inhibitor of NO production in animals and plants, mimics the effects of heat by limiting cell expansion and preventing cell wall regeneration; inhibiting cell cycle reentry, dedifferentiation, and cell division; and suppressing activation of the BA auxin-responsive promoter. We also show that heat and l-NG-monomethyl arginine reduce the mitotic indices of primary root meristems and inhibit lateral root elongation similarly. These data link reduced NO levels to suppressed auxin signaling in heat-stressed cells and seedlings of thermotolerant plants and suggest that even plants that have evolved to withstand sustained high temperatures may still be negatively impacted by heat stress. PMID:22730424

  13. Heat reduces nitric oxide production required for auxin-mediated gene expression and fate determination in tree tobacco guard cell protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Beard, Robert A; Anderson, David J; Bufford, Jennifer L; Tallman, Gary

    2012-08-01

    Tree tobacco (Nicotiana glauca) is an equatorial perennial with a high basal thermotolerance. Cultured tree tobacco guard cell protoplasts (GCPs) are useful for studying the effects of heat stress on fate-determining hormonal signaling. At lower temperatures (32°C or less), exogenous auxin (1-naphthalene acetic acid) and cytokinin (6-benzylaminopurine) cause GCPs to expand 20- to 30-fold, regenerate cell walls, dedifferentiate, reenter the cell cycle, and divide. At higher temperatures (34°C or greater), GCPs expand only 5- to 6-fold; they do not regenerate walls, dedifferentiate, reenter the cell cycle, or divide. Heat (38°C) suppresses activation of the BA auxin-responsive transgene promoter in tree tobacco GCPs, suggesting that inhibition of cell expansion and cell cycle reentry at high temperatures is due to suppressed auxin signaling. Nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in auxin signaling in other plant systems. Here, we show that heat inhibits NO accumulation by GCPs and that L-N(G)-monomethyl arginine, an inhibitor of NO production in animals and plants, mimics the effects of heat by limiting cell expansion and preventing cell wall regeneration; inhibiting cell cycle reentry, dedifferentiation, and cell division; and suppressing activation of the BA auxin-responsive promoter. We also show that heat and L-N(G)-monomethyl arginine reduce the mitotic indices of primary root meristems and inhibit lateral root elongation similarly. These data link reduced NO levels to suppressed auxin signaling in heat-stressed cells and seedlings of thermotolerant plants and suggest that even plants that have evolved to withstand sustained high temperatures may still be negatively impacted by heat stress.

  14. Activation of a heat-stable cytolytic protein associated with the surface membrane of Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed Central

    Lowrey, D M; McLaughlin, J

    1985-01-01

    Surface membrane-enriched fractions of Naegleria fowleri obtained after isopycnic centrifugation experiments contain a potent cytolytic activity as determined by hemolysis and 51Cr release assays. This surface membrane cytolysin was unaffected by a treatment at 75 degrees C for 30 min and accounted for 70 to 90% of cytolysis by whole-cell lysates of amoebae. This heat resistance as well as intimate membrane association distinguished the surface membrane cytolytic activity from a second heat-labile cytolytic activity which appears to be latent within lysosomes. The surface membrane cytolysin was found to be specifically activated by diluted samples of lysosomal fractions. The possible role of this surface membrane cytotoxin in the pathogenicity of N. fowleri is discussed. PMID:4055029

  15. Radioactive decay products in neutron star merger ejecta: heating efficiency and γ-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotokezaka, K.; Wanajo, S.; Tanaka, M.; Bamba, A.; Terada, Y.; Piran, T.

    2016-06-01

    The radioactive decay of the freshly synthesized r-process nuclei ejected in compact binary mergers powers optical/infrared macronovae (kilonovae) that follow these events. The light curves depend critically on the energy partition among the different decay products and it plays an important role in estimates of the amount of ejected r-process elements from a given observed signal. We show that 20-50 per cent of the total radioactive energy is released in γ-rays on time-scales from hours to a month. The number of emitted γ-rays per unit energy interval has roughly a flat spectrum between a few dozen keV and 1 MeV so that most of the energy is carried by ˜1 MeV γ-rays. However, at the peak of macronova emission the optical depth of the γ-rays is ˜0.02 and most of the γ-rays escape. The loss of these γ-rays reduces the heat deposition into the ejecta and hence reduces the expected macronova signals if those are lanthanides dominated. This implies that the ejected mass is larger by a factor of 2-3 than what was previously estimated. Spontaneous fission heats up the ejecta and the heating rate can increase if a sufficient amount of transuranic nuclei are synthesized. Direct measurements of these escaping γ-rays may provide the ultimate proof for the macronova mechanisms and an identification of the r-process nucleosynthesis sites. However, the chances to detect these signals are slim with current X-ray and γ-ray missions. New detectors, more sensitive by at least a factor of 10, are needed for a realistic detection rate.

  16. 24 CFR 200.950 - Building product standards and certification program for solar water heating system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... certification program for solar water heating system. 200.950 Section 200.950 Housing and Urban Development... solar water heating system. (a) Applicable standards. (1) All solar water heating systems shall be...) Document OG-300-93, Operating Guidelines and Minimum Standards for Certifying Solar Water Heating...

  17. 24 CFR 200.950 - Building product standards and certification program for solar water heating system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... certification program for solar water heating system. 200.950 Section 200.950 Housing and Urban Development... solar water heating system. (a) Applicable standards. (1) All solar water heating systems shall be...) Document OG-300-93, Operating Guidelines and Minimum Standards for Certifying Solar Water Heating...

  18. 24 CFR 200.950 - Building product standards and certification program for solar water heating system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... certification program for solar water heating system. 200.950 Section 200.950 Housing and Urban Development... solar water heating system. (a) Applicable standards. (1) All solar water heating systems shall be...) Document OG-300-93, Operating Guidelines and Minimum Standards for Certifying Solar Water Heating...

  19. Oxidation of bisphenol A in water by heat-activated persulfate.

    PubMed

    Potakis, Nikolaos; Frontistis, Zacharias; Antonopoulou, Maria; Konstantinou, Ioannis; Mantzavinos, Dionissios

    2016-05-27

    The heat-activated persulfate oxidation of bisphenol A (BPA), a representative endocrine disrupting compound, was investigated with respect to the effect of several process variables on degradation rates. The activation temperature appears to be the single most important parameter, i.e. a temperature increase from 40 to 70 °C results in an 80-fold rate increase. Regarding initial BPA concentration, the reaction follows a pseudo-first order rate expression, where the kinetic constant decreases from 11.5 10(-2) to 3.5 10(-2) min(-1) when BPA concentration increases from 110 to 440 μg/L. Reactions in actual water matrices, such as bottled water and secondary treated wastewater, are slower than in pure water since various organic/inorganic water constituents compete with BPA for being oxidized by the reactive oxidizing species; this was confirmed with experiments in pure water spiked with humic acid or bicarbonate. Interestingly though, the presence of chloride seems to promote BPA degradation. Furthermore, degradation is favored at near-neutral pH and increased sodium persulfate (SPS) concentrations. Experiments at an increased BPA concentration of 20 mg/L were performed to identify transformation by-products (TBPs), as well as assess the mineralization and toxicity of the treated samples. Liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOF-MS) revealed the formation of eleven TBPs of BPA and plausible pathways including hydroxylation, oxidation, cleavage and oligomerization reactions are proposed. Mineralization occurs slower than BPA degradation, while the toxicity to marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri increases during the early stages of the reaction but it progressively decreases thereafter.

  20. Thermoregulation of water foraging honeybees--balancing of endothermic activity with radiative heat gain and functional requirements.

    PubMed

    Kovac, Helmut; Stabentheiner, Anton; Schmaranzer, Sigurd

    2010-12-01

    Foraging honeybees are subjected to considerable variations of microclimatic conditions challenging their thermoregulatory ability. Solar heat is a gain in the cold but may be a burden in the heat. We investigated the balancing of endothermic activity with radiative heat gain and physiological functions of water foraging Apis mellifera carnica honeybees in the whole range of ambient temperatures (T(a)) and solar radiation they are likely to be exposed in their natural environment in Middle Europe. The mean thorax temperature (T(th)) during foraging stays was regulated at a constantly high level (37.0-38.5 °C) in a broad range of T(a) (3-30 °C). At warmer conditions (T(a)=30-39 °C) T(th) increased to a maximal level of 45.3 °C. The endothermic temperature excess (difference of T(body)-T(a) of living and dead bees) was used to assess the endogenously generated temperature elevation as a correlate of energy turnover. Up to a T(a) of ∼30 °C bees used solar heat gain for a double purpose: to reduce energetic expenditure and to increase T(th) by about 1-3 °C to improve force production of flight muscles. At higher T(a) they exhibited cooling efforts to get rid of excess heat. A high T(th) also allowed regulation of the head temperature high enough to guarantee proper function of the bees' suction pump even at low T(a). This shortened the foraging stays and this way reduced energetic costs. With decreasing T(a) bees also reduced arrival body weight and crop loading to do both minimize costs and optimize flight performance.

  1. Microbial biomass and activity in soils with different moisture content heated at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreiro, Ana; Lombao, Alba; Martin, Angela; Cancelo-González, Javier; Carballas, Tarsy; Díaz-Raviña, Montserrat

    2015-04-01

    It is well known that soil properties determining the thermal transmissivity (moisture, texture, organic matter, etc.) and the duration and temperatures reached during soil heating are key factors driving the fire-induced changes in soil microbial communities. However, despite its interest, the information about this topic is scarce. The aim of the present study is to analyze, under laboratory conditions, the impact of the thermal shock (infrared lamps reaching temperatures of 100 °C, 200 °C and 400 °C) on microbial communities of three acid soils under different moisture level (0 %, 25 % and 50 % per soil volume). Soil temperature was measured with thermocouples and the impact of soil heating was evaluated by means of the analysis of the temperature-time curves calculating the maximum temperature reached (Tmax) and the degree-hours (GH) as an estimation of the amount of heat supplied to the samples (fire severity). The bacterial growth (leucine incorporation) and the total microbial biomass (PLFA) were measured immediately after the heating and one month after the incubation of reinoculated soils. The results showed clearly the importance of moisture level in the transmission of heat through the soil and hence in the further direct impact of high temperatures on microorganisms living in soil. In general, the values of microbial parameters analyzed were low, particularly immediately after soil heating at higher temperatures; the bacterial activity measurements (leucine incorporation technique) being more sensitive to detect the thermal shock showed than total biomass measurements (PLFA). After 1 month incubation, soil microbial communities tend to recover due to the proliferation of surviving population using as substrate the dead microorganisms (soil sterilization). Thus, time elapsed after the heating was found to be decisive when examining the relationships between the microbial properties and the soil heating parameters (GH, Tmax). Analysis of results also

  2. Heat and Mass Transfer Measurements for Tray-Fermented Fungal Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jou, R.-Y.; Lo, C.-T.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, heat and mass transfer in static tray fermentation, which is widely used in solid-state fermentation (SSF) to produce fungal products, such as enzymes or koji, is investigated. Specifically, kinetic models of transport phenomena in the whole-tray chamber are emphasized. The effects of temperature, moisture, and humidity on microbial growth in large-scale static tray fermentation are essential to scale-up SSF and achieve uniform fermentation. In addition, heat and mass transfer of static tray fermentation of Trichoderma fungi with two tray setups—traditional linen coverings and stacks in a temperature-humidity chamber is examined. In both these setups, the following factors of fermentation were measured: air velocity, air temperature, illumination, pH, carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, and substrate temperature, and the effects of bed height, moisture of substrate, and relative humidity of air are studied. A thin (1 cm) bed at 28 °C and 95 % relative humidity is found to be optimum. Furthermore, mixing was essential for achieving uniform fermentation of Trichoderma fungi. This study has important applications in large-scale static tray fermentation of fungi.

  3. Production of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} heat sources for the Cassini mission

    SciTech Connect

    George, T.G.; Foltyn, E.M.

    1998-01-01

    NASA{close_quote}s Cassini mission to Saturn, scheduled to launch in October, 1997, is perhaps the most ambitious interplanetary explorer ever constructed. Electric power for the spacecraft{close_quote}s science instruments and on-board computers will be provided by three radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) powered by 216 {sup 238}PuO{sub 2}-fueled General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) capsules. In addition, critical equipment and instruments on the spacecraft and Huygens probe will be warmed by 128 Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Units (LWRHUs). Fabrication and assembly of the GPHS capsules and LWRHU heat sources was performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) between January 1994 and September 1996. During this production campaign, LANL pressed and sintered 315 GPHS fuel pellets and 181 LWRHU pellets. By October 1996, NMT-9 had delivered a total of 235 GPHS capsules to EG&G Mound Applied Technologies (EG&G MAT) in Miamisburg, Ohio. EG&G MAT conditioned the capsules for use, loaded the capsules into the Cassini RTGs, tested the RTGs, and coordinated transportation to Kennedy Space Center (KSC). LANL also fabricated and assembled a total of 180 LWRHUs. The LWRHUs required for the Cassini spacecraft were shipped to KSC in mid-1997. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Performance of a CEBAF production cavity after high-temperature heat treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kneisel, P.; Rao, M.

    1993-06-01

    CEBAF`s production cavities are tested in a vertical configuration after appropriate chemical surface treatment prior to installation into the accelerator. The performance of these cavities is excellent, often exceeding the specifications of E{sub acc}=5 MV/m at 2 K by factors of 2 to 3. In such cases the cavities are often limited by thermal-magnetic breakdown. A cavity that exhibited a limiting gradient of E{sub acc} {le} 16.4 MV/m has been heat-treated at 1400{degrees}C for 6 hours in the presence of titanium as a solid state gettering material to improve the thermal stability of the niobium. After the heat treatment a gradient of E{sub acc}=20.5 MV/m corresponding to a peak surface electric field of E{sub peak}=52 MV/m has been measured. In addition to the cavity results, data on thermal conductivity and tensile properties of samples which have undergone the same treatments as the cavity are reported.

  5. Changes in Quartz During Heating and the Possible Effects on Si Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringdalen, Eli

    2015-02-01

    In Si and FeSi production, the main Si source is SiO2, in the form of quartz. Reactions with SiO2 generate SiO gas that further reacts with SiC to Si. During heating, quartz will transform to other SiO2 modifications with cristobalite as the stable high-temperature phase. Transformation to cristobalite is a slow process. Its rate has been investigated for several industrial quartz sources and has been shown to vary considerably among the different quartz types. Other differences in behavior during heating between these quartz sources, such as softening temperature and volume expansion, have also been studied. The quartz-cristobalite ratio will affect the rate of reactions involving SiO2. The industrial consequences and other implications of the observed difference between quartz types are discussed. Initial studies of industrial quartz were published by Ringdalen et al. In the current work, a new experimental method has been developed, and an investigation of several new quartz sources has confirmed the earlier observed large variation between different sources. The repeatability of the data has been studied and the effect of gas atmosphere investigated. The results from the earlier work are included as a basis for the discussion.

  6. Dry period heat stress relief effects on prepartum progesterone, calf birth weight, and milk production.

    PubMed

    Wolfenson, D; Flamenbaum, I; Berman, A

    1988-03-01

    Effects of cooling high producing dairy cows during the dry period were examined in 84 pluriparous Israeli-Holstein cows. Cooling was by a combination of wetting and forced ventilation from 0600 to 1800 h until parturition and common management afterwards for both groups. Cooling maintained diurnal increase in rectal temperature within .2 degrees C as compared with .5 degrees C in control cows in warmer months, Mean rectal temperatures at 1400 h in control cows were moderate, within 39.2 degrees C. Cooling did not affect prepartum or postpartum body condition score or mean blood progesterone during the dry period. Results suggested a possible increase in blood progesterone in later pregnancy by cooling during hot weather. Cooling increased mean 150-d milk production by 3.6 kg/d (3.1 kg FCM/d). Prepartum cooling negatively affected first lactation month yield in cows calving in early summer. Prepartum cooling might prevent adaptation to heat and impair subsequent postpartum performance. Prepartum progesterone was not related to milk yield. Calves' birth weight increased by cooling, but the effect was mostly in older cows. Birth weight was related to milk yield, independently of cooling effect, mostly in older cows. Cooling during the dry period might increase milk yield as it does during lactation. Results indicate possible benefit of cooling dry cows even under mild heat stress.

  7. Heat shock modulates the subcellular localization, stability, and activity of HIPK2.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Mamta; Bhadauriya, Pratibha; Ganesh, Subramaniam

    2016-04-15

    The homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2) is a highly conserved serine/threonine kinase and is involved in transcriptional regulation. HIPK2 is a highly unstable protein, and is kept at a low level under normal physiological conditions. However, exposure of cells to physiological stress - such as hypoxia, oxidative stress, or UV damage - is known to stabilize HIPK2, leading to the HIPK2-dependent activation of p53 and the cell death pathway. Therefore HIPK2 is also known as a stress kinase and as a stress-activated pro-apoptotic factor. We demonstrate here that exposure of cells to heat shock results in the stabilization of HIPK2 and the stabilization is mediated via K63-linked ubiquitination. Intriguingly, a sub-lethal heat shock (42 °C, 1 h) results in the cytoplasmic localization of HIPK2, while a lethal heat shock (45 °C, 1 h) results in its nuclear localization. Cells exposed to the lethal heat shock showed significantly higher levels of the p53 activity than those exposed to the sub-lethal thermal stress, suggesting that both the level and the nuclear localization are essential for the pro-apoptotic activity of HIPK2 and that the lethal heat shock could retain the HIPK2 in the nucleus to promote the cell death. Taken together our study underscores the importance of HIPK2 in stress mediated cell death, and that the HIPK2 is a generic stress kinase that gets activated by diverse set of physiological stressors.

  8. Heat transfer and pressure distributions on hemisphere-cylinders in methane-air combustion products at Mach 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, I.

    1973-01-01

    Heat-transfer and pressure distributions were measured over the surfaces of three hemisphere-cylinder models tested at a nominal Mach number of 7 in the Langley 8-foot high-temperature structures tunnel which uses methane-air products of combustion as a test medium. The results showed that the heat-transfer and pressure distributions over the surface of the models were in good agreement with experimental data obtained in air and also with theoretical predictions.

  9. Experimental investigation of solid by-product as sensible heat storage material: Characterization and corrosion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Fernández, Iñigo; Faik, Abdessamad; Mani, Karthik; Rodriguez-Aseguinolaza, Javier; D'Aguanno, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    The experimental investigation of water cooled electrical arc furnace (EAF) slag used as filler material in the storage tank for sensible heat storage application was demonstrated in this study. The physicochemical and thermal properties of the tested slags were characterized by using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microcopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and laser flash analysis, respectively. In addition, the chemical compatibility between slags and molten nitrate salt (60 wt. % NaNO3 and 40 wt. % KNO3) was investigated at 565 °C for 500 hrs. The obtained results were clearly demonstrated that the slags showed a good corrosion resistance in direct contact with molten salt at elevated temperature. The present study was clearly indicated that a low-cost filler material used in the storage tank can significantly reduce the overall required quantities of the relatively higher cost molten salt and consequently reduce the overall cost of the electricity production.

  10. Heat of Combustion of the Product Formed by the Reaction of Diborane with 1,3-Butadiene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannenbaum, Stanley; Allen, Harrison, Jr.

    1953-01-01

    The net heat of combustion of the product formed by the reaction of diborane with 1,3-butadiene was found to be 18,700+/-150 Btu per pound for the reaction of liquid fuel to gaseous carbon dioxide, gaseous water, and solid boric oxide. The measurements were made in a Parr oxygen-bomb calorimeter, and the combustion was believed to be 98 percent complete. The estimated net heat of combustion for complete combustion would therefore be 19,075+/-150 Btu per pound. Since this value is approximately the same as the heat of combustion of butadiene, it seems certain that the material is partially oxidized.

  11. Hot Plasma from Solar Active Region Cores: a Test of AC and DC Coronal Heating Models?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Asgari-Targhi, M.; Christian, G. M.; Dhaliwal, R. S.; Pathak, S.

    2015-06-01

    Direct current (DC) models of solar coronal heating invoke magnetic reconnection to convert magnetic free energy into heat, whereas alternating current (AC) models invoke wave dissipation. In both cases the energy is supplied by photospheric footpoint motions. For a given footpoint velocity amplitude, DC models predict lower average heating rates but greater temperature variability when compared to AC models. Therefore, evidence of hot plasma (T > 5 MK) in the cores of active regions could be one of the ways for current observations to distinguish between AC and DC models. We have analyzed data from the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly for 12 quiescent active region cores, all of which were observed in the XRT Be_thick channel. We did Differential Emission Measure (DEM) analysis and achieved good fits for each data set. We then artificially truncated the hot plasma of the DEM model at 5 MK and examined the resulting fits to the data. For some regions in our sample, the XRT intensities continued to be well-matched by the DEM predictions, even without the hot plasma. This truncation, however, resulted in unacceptable fits for the other regions. This result indicates that the hot plasma is present in these regions, even if the precise DEM distribution cannot be determined with the data available. We conclude that reconnection may be heating the hot plasma component of these active regions.

  12. HOT PLASMA FROM SOLAR ACTIVE REGION CORES: A TEST OF AC AND DC CORONAL HEATING MODELS?

    SciTech Connect

    Schmelz, J. T.; Christian, G. M.; Dhaliwal, R. S.; Pathak, S.; Asgari-Targhi, M.

    2015-06-20

    Direct current (DC) models of solar coronal heating invoke magnetic reconnection to convert magnetic free energy into heat, whereas alternating current (AC) models invoke wave dissipation. In both cases the energy is supplied by photospheric footpoint motions. For a given footpoint velocity amplitude, DC models predict lower average heating rates but greater temperature variability when compared to AC models. Therefore, evidence of hot plasma (T > 5 MK) in the cores of active regions could be one of the ways for current observations to distinguish between AC and DC models. We have analyzed data from the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly for 12 quiescent active region cores, all of which were observed in the XRT Be-thick channel. We did Differential Emission Measure (DEM) analysis and achieved good fits for each data set. We then artificially truncated the hot plasma of the DEM model at 5 MK and examined the resulting fits to the data. For some regions in our sample, the XRT intensities continued to be well-matched by the DEM predictions, even without the hot plasma. This truncation, however, resulted in unacceptable fits for the other regions. This result indicates that the hot plasma is present in these regions, even if the precise DEM distribution cannot be determined with the data available. We conclude that reconnection may be heating the hot plasma component of these active regions.

  13. Active PZT fibers: a commercial production process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strock, Harold B.; Pascucci, Marina R.; Parish, Mark V.; Bent, Aaron A.; Shrout, Thomas R.

    1999-07-01

    Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) active fibers, from 80 to 250 micrometers in diameter, are produced for the AFOSR/DARPA funded Active Fiber Composites Consortium (AFCC) Program and commercial customers. CeraNova has developed a proprietary ceramics-based technology to produce PZT mono-filaments of the required purity, composition, straightness, and piezoelectric properties for use in active fiber composite structures. CeraNova's process begins with the extrusion of continuous lengths of mono-filament precursor fiber from a plasticized mix of PZT-5A powder. The care that must be taken to avoid mix contamination is described using illustrations form problems experiences with extruder wear and metallic contamination. Corrective actions are described and example microstructures are shown. The consequences of inadequate lead control are also shown. Sintered mono- filament mechanical strength and piezoelectric properties data approach bulk values but the validity of such a benchmark is questioned based on variable correlation with composite performance measures. Comb-like ceramic preform structures are shown that are being developed to minimize process and handling costs while maintaining the required mono-filament straightness necessary for composite fabrication. Lastly, actuation performance data are presented for composite structures fabricated and tested by Continuum Control Corporation. Free strain actuation in excess of 2000 microstrain are observed.

  14. Antibacterial and Antidiarrheal Activities of Plant Products against Enterotoxinogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Dubreuil, J. Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) produces two types of enterotoxins: heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (STa and STb). These molecules are involved in the induction of secretory diarrhea in animals including humans. This condition is currently treated using a fluid replacement therapy and antibiotics. This treatment is often not available to people in developing countries, and several die from the condition provoke by ETEC. Over the years, plants and plant extracts have been use as traditional medicine to treat various gastrointestinal ailments including diarrhea. Many of these plant products have been claimed to be active against diarrhea, however few have been extensively studied. The main objective of this review was to gather the scattered information on the antidiarrheal activities reported for various plant products on ETEC. This includes two major effects: (1) The inhibitory effect on bacterial growth or viability and (2) The interference with ETEC enterotoxins activity upon the intestinal epithelium. We will focus on plant products and extracts for which we have major indications of their biological activity against ETEC and their enterotoxins. Because Vibrio cholerae toxin (CT) is structurally, antigenically and mechanistically related to LT, it will also be discussed in this review. PMID:24212181

  15. Evaluation of a large capacity heat pump concept for active cooling of hypersonic aircraft structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagel, L. L.; Herring, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Results of engineering analyses assessing the conceptual feasibility of a large capacity heat pump for enhancing active cooling of hypersonic aircraft structure are presented. A unique heat pump arrangement which permits cooling the structure of a Mach 6 transport to aluminum temperatures without the aid of thermal shielding is described. The selected concept is compatible with the use of conventional refrigerants, with Freon R-11 selected as the preferred refrigerant. Condenser temperatures were limited to levels compatible with the use of conventional refrigerants by incorporating a unique multipass condenser design, which extracts mechanical energy from the hydrogen fuel, prior to each subsequent pass through the condenser. Results show that it is technically feasible to use a large capacity heat pump in lieu of external shielding. Additional analyses are required to optimally apply this concept.

  16. Rewiring host activities for synthetic circuit production: a translation view.

    PubMed

    Avcilar-Kucukgoze, Irem; Ignatova, Zoya

    2017-01-01

    The expression of synthetic circuits in host organisms, or chassis, is a key aspect of synthetic biology. Design adjustments made for maximal production may negatively affect the central metabolism and biosynthetic activities of the chassis host. Here, we review recent attempts to modulate synthetic circuit design for optimal production and present models that precisely capture the trade-off between circuit production and chassis growth. We also present emerging concepts for full orthogonalization of synthetic productivity and its decoupling from the endogenous biosynthetic activities of the cell, opening new routes towards robust synthetic circuit expression.

  17. Heat shock induces production of reactive oxygen species and increases inner mitochondrial membrane potential in winter wheat cells.

    PubMed

    Fedyaeva, A V; Stepanov, A V; Lyubushkina, I V; Pobezhimova, T P; Rikhvanov, E G

    2014-11-01

    Heat shock leads to oxidative stress. Excessive ROS (reactive oxygen species) accumulation could be responsible for expression of genes of heat-shock proteins or for cell death. It is known that in isolated mammalian mitochondria high protonic potential on the inner membrane actuates the production of ROS. Changes in viability, ROS content, and mitochondrial membrane potential value have been studied in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultured cells under heat treatment. Elevation of temperature to 37-50°C was found to induce elevated ROS generation and increased mitochondrial membrane potential, but it did not affect viability immediately after treatment. More severe heat exposure (55-60°C) was not accompanied by mitochondrial potential elevation and increased ROS production, but it led to instant cell death. A positive correlation between mitochondrial potential and ROS production was observed. Depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane by the protonophore CCCP inhibited ROS generation under the heating conditions. These data suggest that temperature elevation leads to mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization in winter wheat cultured cells, which in turn causes the increased ROS production.

  18. Active Distributed Temperature Sensing to Characterise Soil Moisture and Heat Dynamics of a Vegetated Hillslope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciocca, F.; Krause, S.; Chalari, A.; Hannah, D. M.; Mondanos, M.

    2015-12-01

    Complex correlated water and heat dynamics characterise the land surface and shallow subsurface, as consequence of the concurrent action of multiple transport processes. Point sensors and/or remote techniques show limitations in providing precise measurements of key indicators of soil heat and water transport such as soil temperature and moisture, at both high spatiotemporal resolution and large areal coverage. Fibre optics Distributed Temperature Sensors (DTS) allow for precise temperature measurement along optical cables of up to several kilometres, sampling at resolutions of up to few centimetres in space and seconds in time. The optical cable is the sensor and can be buried in the soil with minimum disturbance, to construct soil temperature profiles, over large surveying areas. Soil moisture can be obtained from the analysis of both heating and cooling rates measured by the DTS, when copper conductors embedded in the optical cable are electrically heated (technique known as Active DTS). In July 2015, three loops of optical cable of 500m each have been buried in the soil at different depths (0.05m, 0.25m and 0.40m), along an inclined recently vegetated field in the Birmingham area, UK. Active DTS tests have been set with the aim to characterize the soil temperature and moisture regimes of the field at high spatial resolution, in response to both sporadic events such as showers or scheduled irrigation, and diurnal fluctuations induced by atmospheric forcing. Spatiotemporal variations of the aforementioned regimes will be used to trace vertical and horizontal soil heat and water movements. Finally, assumptions on the possibility to correlate soil heat and water dynamics to a specific process such as precipitation, evapotranspiration, soil inclination, will be discussed. This research is part of the Marie Curie Initial Training Network (ITN) INTERFACES project and is realised in the context of the Free Air Carbon Enrichment (FACE) experiment, in collaboration with

  19. Activated platelets release sphingosine 1-phosphate and induce hypersensitivity to noxious heat stimuli in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Weth, Daniela; Benetti, Camilla; Rauch, Caroline; Gstraunthaler, Gerhard; Schmidt, Helmut; Geisslinger, Gerd; Sabbadini, Roger; Proia, Richard L.; Kress, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    At the site of injury activated platelets release various mediators, one of which is sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). It was the aim of this study to explore whether activated human platelets had a pronociceptive effect in an in vivo mouse model and whether this effect was based on the release of S1P and subsequent activation of neuronal S1P receptors 1 or 3. Human platelets were prepared in different concentrations (105/μl, 106/μl, 107/μl) and assessed in mice with different genetic backgrounds (WT, S1P1fl/fl, SNS-S1P1−/−, S1P3−/−). Intracutaneous injections of activated human platelets induced a significant, dose-dependent hypersensitivity to noxious thermal stimulation. The degree of heat hypersensitivity correlated with the platelet concentration as well as the platelet S1P content and the amount of S1P released upon platelet activation as measured with LC MS/MS. Despite the significant correlations between S1P and platelet count, no difference in paw withdrawal latency (PWL) was observed in mice with a global null mutation of the S1P3 receptor or a conditional deletion of the S1P1 receptor in nociceptive primary afferents. Furthermore, neutralization of S1P with a selective anti-S1P antibody did not abolish platelet induced heat hypersensitivity. Our results suggest that activated platelets release S1P and induce heat hypersensitivity in vivo. However, the platelet induced heat hypersensitivity was caused by mediators other than S1P. PMID:25954148

  20. Experimental investigation on the thermal performance of heat storage walls coupled with active solar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chunyu; You, Shijun; Zhu, Chunying; Yu, Wei

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation of the performance of a system combining a low-temperature water wall radiant heating system and phase change energy storage technology with an active solar system. This system uses a thermal storage wall that is designed with multilayer thermal storage plates. The heat storage material is expanded graphite that absorbs a mixture of capric acid and lauric acid. An experiment is performed to study the actual effect. The following are studied under winter conditions: (1) the temperature of the radiation wall surface, (2) the melting status of the thermal storage material in the internal plate, (3) the density of the heat flux, and (4) the temperature distribution of the indoor space. The results reveal that the room temperature is controlled between 16 and 20 °C, and the thermal storage wall meets the heating and temperature requirements. The following are also studied under summer conditions: (1) the internal relationship between the indoor temperature distribution and the heat transfer within the regenerative plates during the day and (2) the relationship between the outlet air temperature and inlet air temperature in the thermal storage wall in cooling mode at night. The results indicate that the indoor temperature is approximately 27 °C, which satisfies the summer air-conditioning requirements.

  1. Deubiquitinase activity is required for the proteasomal degradation of misfolded cytosolic proteins upon heat-stress

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Nancy N.; Zhu, Mang; Rose, Amalia; Wu, Kuen-Phon; Mayor, Thibault

    2016-01-01

    Elimination of misfolded proteins is crucial for proteostasis and to prevent proteinopathies. Nedd4/Rsp5 emerged as a major E3-ligase involved in multiple quality control pathways that target misfolded plasma membrane proteins, aggregated polypeptides and cytosolic heat-induced misfolded proteins for degradation. It remained unclear how in one case cytosolic heat-induced Rsp5 substrates are destined for proteasomal degradation, whereas other Rsp5 quality control substrates are otherwise directed to lysosomal degradation. Here we find that Ubp2 and Ubp3 deubiquitinases are required for the proteasomal degradation of cytosolic misfolded proteins targeted by Rsp5 after heat-shock (HS). The two deubiquitinases associate more with Rsp5 upon heat-stress to prevent the assembly of K63-linked ubiquitin on Rsp5 heat-induced substrates. This activity was required to promote the K48-mediated proteasomal degradation of Rsp5 HS-induced substrates. Our results indicate that ubiquitin chain editing is key to the cytosolic protein quality control under stress conditions. PMID:27698423

  2. Extracellular heat shock protein 90 binding to TGFβ receptor I participates in TGFβ-mediated collagen production in myocardial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    García, Raquel; Merino, David; Gómez, Jenny M; Nistal, J Francisco; Hurlé, María A; Cortajarena, Aitziber L; Villar, Ana V

    2016-10-01

    The pathological remodeling heart shows an increase in left ventricular mass and an excess of extracellular matrix deposition that can over time cause heart failure. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) is the main cytokine controlling this process. The molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) has been shown to play a critical role in TGFβ signaling by stabilizing the TGFβ signaling cascade. We detected extracellular Hsp90 in complex with TGFβ receptor I (TGFβRI) in fibroblasts and determined a close proximity between both proteins suggesting a potential physical interaction between the two at the plasma membrane. This was supported by in silico studies predicting Hsp90 dimers and TGFβRI extracellular domain interaction. Both, Hsp90aa1 and Hsp90ab1 isoforms participate in TGFβRI complex. Extracellular Hsp90 inhibition lessened the yield of collagen production as well as the canonical TGFβ signaling cascade, and collagen protein synthesis was drastically reduced in Hsp90aa1 KO mice. These observations together with the significant increase in activity of Hsp90 at the plasma membrane pointed to a functional cooperative partnership between Hsp90 and TGFβRI in the fibrotic process. We propose that a surface population of Hsp90 extracellularly binds TGFβRI and this complex behaves as an active participant in collagen production in TGFβ-activated fibroblasts. We also offer an in vivo insight into the role of Hsp90 and its isoforms during cardiac remodeling in murine aortic banding model suffering from pathological cardiac remodeling and detect circulating Hsp90 overexpressed in remodeling mice.

  3. Partitioning of heat production in growing pigs as a tool to improve the determination of efficiency of energy utilization

    PubMed Central

    Labussière, Etienne; Dubois, Serge; van Milgen, Jaap; Noblet, Jean

    2013-01-01

    In growing pigs, the feed cost accounts for more than 60% of total production costs. The determination of efficiency of energy utilization through calorimetry measurements is of importance to sustain suitable feeding practice. The objective of this paper is to describe a methodology to correct daily heat production (HP) obtained from measurements in respiration chamber for the difference in energy expenditure related to physical activity between animals. The calculation is based on a preliminary published approach for partitioning HP between HP due to physical activity (AHP), thermic effect of feeding (TEF) and basal metabolic rate (fasting HP; FHP). Measurements with male growing pigs [mean body weight (BW): 115 kg] which were surgically castrated (SC), castrated through immunization against GnRH (IC), or kept as entire male (EM) were used as an example. Animals were fed the same diet ad-libitum and were housed individually in two 12-m3 open-circuit respiration chambers during 6 days when fed ad-libitum and one supplementary day when fasted. Physical activity was recorded through interruption of an infrared beam to detect standing and lying positions and with force transducers that recorded the mechanical force the animal exerted on the floor of the cage. Corrected AHP (AHPc), TEF (TEFc), and HP (HPc) were calculated to standardize the level of AHP between animals, assuming that the ratio between AHPc and ME intake should be constant. Inefficiency of energy utilization (sum of AHPc and TEFc) was lower than the inefficiency estimated from the slope of the classical relationship between HPc and ME intake but was associated with higher requirements for maintenance. Results indicate that EM pigs had higher FHP but lower TEFc than IC and SC pigs. These results agree with the higher contents in viscera of EM pigs that stimulate their basal metabolic rate and with the reduced utilization of dietary protein to provide energy for maintenance energy requirements and fat

  4. Influences of dietary protein level, amino acid supplementation and environmental temperature on performance, body composition, organ weights and total heat production of growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Kerr, B J; Yen, J T; Nienaber, J A; Easter, R A

    2003-08-01

    The study was conducted to determine the effects of feeding a 16% CP diet, a 12% CP diet, or a 12% CP diet supplemented with crystalline Lys, Trp, and Thr (12% CP + AA diet) in a thermal-neutral (23 degrees C) or heat-stressed (33 degrees C) environment on various body and physiological measurements in growing pigs. Heat-stressed pigs were given a 15% lower daily feed allowance than thermal-neutral pigs to remove the confounding effect of feed intake caused by high temperature. No diet x temperature interaction was observed for any variables (P > 0.09) except for pig activity and pancreas weight. At 33 degrees C, pig activity and pancreas weight did not differ among dietary treatments (P > 0.05). In contrast, at 23 degrees C, pigs fed the 12% CP diet had greater activity than those fed the 16% CP diet or the 12% CP + AA diet (P < 0.05). Pancreas weight was greater for pigs fed the 12% CP + AA diet than those fed the 12% CP diet (P < 0.05) when maintained at 23 degrees C. Compared with 23 degrees C, the 33 degrees C temperature decreased pig activity, heat production, daily gain, feed efficiency, and affected the concentration and accretion of empty body protein and ash, as well as weights of heart, pancreas, stomach, and large intestine (P < 0.05). Pigs fed the 12% CP + AA diet attained similar levels of performance and rates of empty body water, protein, lipid, and ash deposition as pigs fed the 16% CP diet (P > 0.10). Pigs fed the 12% CP + AA diet had lower serum urea plus ammonia nitrogen concentrations (P < 0.01) and total heat production (P < 0.05) compared with those fed the 16% CP diet or the 12% CP diet. These results confirm that, with crystalline AA supplementation, growing pigs fed a 12% CP diet will perform similar to pigs fed a 16% CP diet. The data further indicate that lowering dietary CP and supplementing crystalline AA will decrease total heat production in growing pigs whether they are housed in a thermal-neutral or heat-stressed environment.

  5. RBSE: Product development team research activity deliverables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The GHG Functions and Extensions to be added to the NASA Electronic Library System (NELS) 1.1 product are described. These functions will implement the 'output request' capability within the Object Browser. The functions will be implemented in two parts. The first part is a code to be added to the Object Browser (X version) to implement menus allowing the user to request that objects be copied to specific media, or that objects be downloaded to the user's system following a specific protocol, or that the object be printed to one of the printers attached to the host system. The second part is shell scripts which support the various menu selections. Additional scripts to support functions within the GHG shell (X version) will also be created along with the X version of the GHG Shell as initial capability for the 27 Mar. prototype. The scripts will be composed of C shell routines that will accept parameters (primary file pathways). Certain limitations in functionality will invoke Mail instead of Oracle Mail since that has yet to be delivered and the NELS invocation will default to the X-Windows version instead of the ASCII version.

  6. Degradation of toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene using heat and chelated-ferrous iron activated persulfate oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, P.; Sleep, B.

    2014-12-01

    Toluene, ethylbenze, and xylene (TEX) are common contaminants in the subsurface. Activated persulfate has shown promise for degrading a wide variety of organic compounds. However, studies of persulfate application for in situ degradation of TEX and effects on the subsequent bioremediation are limited. In this work, degradation studies of TEX in aqueous media and soil are being conducted using heat activated and chelated-ferrous iron activated persulfate oxidation in batch and flow-through column experiments. In the batch experiments, sodium persulfate is being used at different concentrations to provide an initial persulfate to TEX molar ratios between 10:1 and 100:1. Sodium persulfate solutions are being activated at 20, 37, 60, and 80 oC temperatures for the heat activated oxidation. For the chelated-ferrous iron activated oxidation, ferrous iron and citric acid, both are being used at concentration of 5 mM. In the experiments with soil slurry, a soil to water ratio of 1 to 5 is being used. Flow through water saturated column experiments are being conducted with glass columns (45 cm in length and 4 cm in diameter) uniformly packed with soils, and equilibrated with water containing TEX at the target concentrations. Both the heat activation and chelated-ferrous iron activation of persulfate are being employed in the column experiments. Future experiments are planned to determine the suitability of persulfate oxidation of TEX on the subsequent biodegradation using batch microcosms containing TEX degrading microbial cultures. In these experiments, the microbial biomass will be monitored using total phospholipids, and the microbial community will be determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) on the extracted DNA. This study is expected to provide suitable operating conditions for in situ chemical oxidation of TEX with activated persulfate followed by bioremediation.

  7. Heat of Combustion of the Product Formed by the Reaction of Acetylene and Diborane (LFPL-CZ-3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Harrison, Jr.; Tannenbaum, Stanley

    1957-01-01

    The heat of combustion of the product formed by the reaction acetylene and diborane was found to be 20,100 +/- 100 Btu per pound for the reaction of liquid fuel to gaseous carbon dioxide, gaseous water, and solid boric oxide. The measurements were made in a Parr oxygen-bomb calorimeter, and chemical analyses both of the sample and of the combustion products indicated combustion in the bomb calorimeter to have been 97 percent complete. The estimated net heat of combustion for complete combustion would therefore be 20,700 +/- 100 Btu per pound.

  8. Influence of thermal treatment on color, enzyme activities, and antioxidant capacity of innovative pastelike parsley products.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Andrea; Brinkmann, Maike; Carle, Reinhold; Kammerer, Dietmar R

    2012-03-28

    Conventional spice powders are often characterized by low sensory quality and high microbial loads. Furthermore, genuine enzymes are only inhibited but not entirely inactivated upon drying, so that they may regain their activity upon rehydration of dried foods. To overcome these problems, initial heating was applied in the present study as the first process step for the production of innovative pastelike parsley products. For this purpose, fresh parsley was blanched (80, 90, and 100 °C for 1-10 min) and subsequently comminuted to form a paste. Alternatively, mincing was carried out prior to heat treatment. Regardless of temperature, the color of the latter product did not show any change after heating for 1 min. With progressing exposure time the green color turned to olive hues due to marked pheophytin formation. Inactivation of genuine peroxidase (POD) and polyphenol oxidase (PPO) was achieved at all temperature-time regimes applied. In contrast, the parsley products obtained after immediate water-blanching were characterized by brighter green colors and enhanced pigment retention. With the exception of the variants water-blanched at 80 °C, POD and PPO were completely inactivated at any of the thermal treatments. Furthermore, in water-blanched samples, antioxidant capacities as determined by the TEAC and FRAP assays were even enhanced compared to unheated parsley, whereas a decrease of phenolic contents could not be prevented. Consequently, the innovative process presented in this study allows the production of novel herb and spice products characterized by improved sensory quality as compared to conventional spice products.

  9. Uncoupling Stress-Inducible Phosphorylation of Heat Shock Factor 1 from Its Activation

    PubMed Central

    Budzyński, Marek A.; Puustinen, Mikael C.; Joutsen, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    In mammals the stress-inducible expression of genes encoding heat shock proteins is under the control of the heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1). Activation of HSF1 is a multistep process, involving trimerization, acquisition of DNA-binding and transcriptional activities, which coincide with several posttranslational modifications. Stress-inducible phosphorylation of HSF1, or hyperphosphorylation, which occurs mainly within the regulatory domain (RD), has been proposed as a requirement for HSF-driven transcription and is widely used for assessing HSF1 activation. Nonetheless, the contribution of hyperphosphorylation to the activity of HSF1 remains unknown. In this study, we generated a phosphorylation-deficient HSF1 mutant (HSF1Δ∼PRD), where the 15 known phosphorylation sites within the RD were disrupted. Our results show that the phosphorylation status of the RD does not affect the subcellular localization and DNA-binding activity of HSF1. Surprisingly, under stress conditions, HSF1Δ∼PRD is a potent transactivator of both endogenous targets and a reporter gene, and HSF1Δ∼PRD has a reduced activation threshold. Our results provide the first direct evidence for uncoupling stress-inducible phosphorylation of HSF1 from its activation, and we propose that the phosphorylation signature alone is not an appropriate marker for HSF1 activity. PMID:25963659

  10. Experimental investigations on active cooling thermal protection structure of hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustor in arc heated facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianqiang, Tu; Jinlong, Peng; Xianning, Yang; Lianzhong, Chen

    2016-10-01

    The active cooling thermal protection technology is the efficient method to resolve the long-duration work and reusable problems of hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustor, where worst thermo-mechanical loads occur. The fuel is passed through coolant channels adjacent to the heated surfaces to absorb heat from the heating exchanger panels, prior to injection into the combustor. The heating exchanger both cooled down the wall temperature of the combustor wall and heats and cracks the hydrocarbon fuel inside the panel to permit an easier combustion and satisfying combustion efficiency. The subscale active cooling metallic panels, with dimensions of 100×100 mm and different coolant channel sizes, have been tested under typical combustion thermal environment produced by arc heated Turbulent Flow Duct (TFD). The heat exchange ability of different coolant channel sizes has been obtained. The big-scale active cooling metallic panel, with dimensions of 100 × 750 mm and the coolant channel sizes of better heating exchange performance, has been made and tested in the big-scale arc heated TFD facility. The test results show that the local superheated ablation is easy to happen for the cooling fuel assigned asymmetrically in the bigscale active cooling metallic panel, and the cooling fuel rate can reduce 8%˜10% after spraying the Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) in the heating surface.

  11. Physiological and production responses to feeding schedule in lactating dairy cows exposed to short-term, moderate heat stress.

    PubMed

    Ominski, K H; Kennedy, A D; Wittenberg, K M; Moshtaghi Nia, S A

    2002-04-01

    The objective of this research was to characterize the production responses of lactating dairy cows during and after short-term, moderate heat exposure, and to determine whether evening (p.m.) feeding would alleviate the associated production losses. In a two-period, cross-over design, eight mature lactating cows were fed a total mixed ration at either 0830 or 2030 h. Each 15-d period consisted of a 5-d thermoneutral phase, a 5-d heat stress phase and a 5-d thermoneutral recovery phase. Mean daily vaginal temperature and respiration rate increased by 0.6 +/- 0.04 degrees C and 27 +/- 1.3 breaths/min, respectively, during short-term heat exposure. Daily dry matter intake, milk yield and solids-not-fat were depressed by 1.4 +/- 0.13 kg, 1.7 +/- 0.32 kg and 0.07 +/- 0.023%, respectively, during heat exposure. During the recovery phase, dry matter intake remained depressed, milk protein declined by 0.05 +/- 0.020%, and daily milk yield exhibited a further decline of 1.2 +/- 0.32 kg. Time of feeding had no effect on vaginal temperature, respiration rate, dry matter intake, water intake, milk yield, fat-corrected milk, protein percent, solids-non-fat percent or somatic cell count during heat exposure or during the recovery period that followed. Fat percent was, however, significantly lower in p.m.-fed animals. These data indicate that short-term, moderate heat stress, which occurs during the spring and summer months in Canada and the Northern United States, will significantly decrease production in the lactating cow. Shifting from morning to evening feeding did not alleviate production losses associated with this type of heat stress.

  12. Co-composting of eggshell waste in self-heating reactors: monitoring and end product quality.

    PubMed

    Soares, Micaela A R; Quina, Margarida M J; Quinta-Ferreira, Rosa M

    2013-11-01

    Industrial eggshell waste (ES) is classified as an animal by-product not intended to human consumption. For reducing pathogen spreading risk due to soil incorporation of ES, sanitation by composting is a pre-treatment option. This work aims to evaluate eggshell waste recycling in self-heating composting reactors and investigate ES effect on process evolution and end product quality. Potato peel, grass clippings and rice husks were the starting organic materials considered. The incorporation of 30% (w/w) ES in a composting mixture did not affect mixture biodegradability, nor its capacity to reach sanitizing temperatures. After 25 days of composting, ES addition caused a nitrogen loss of about 10 g N kg(-1) of initial volatile solids, thus reducing nitrogen nutritional potential of the finished compost. This study showed that a composting mixture with a significant proportion of ES (30% w/w) may be converted into calcium-rich marketable compost to neutralize soil acidity and/or calcium deficiencies.

  13. Detection of horse meat contamination in raw and heat-processed meat products.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yun-Hwa P; Ofori, Jack A

    2014-12-31

    Europe's recent problems with the adulteration of beef products with horse meat highlight the need for a reliable method for detecting horse meat in food for human consumption. The objective of this study was therefore to develop a reliable monoclonal antibody (mAb) based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for horse meat detection. Two mAbs, H3E3 (IgG2b) and H4E7 (IgG2a), were characterized as horse-selective, and competitive ELISAs (cELISAs) employing these mAbs were developed. The cELISAs were found to be capable of detecting levels as low as 1% of horse meat in raw, cooked, and autoclaved ground beef or pork, being useful analytical tools for addressing the health, economic, and ethical concerns associated with adulterating meat products with horse meat. However, due to cross-reaction with raw poultry meat, it is recommended that samples be heated (100 °C for 15 min) prior to analysis to eliminate possible false-positive results.

  14. Heat Shock Factor 1 Is a Substrate for p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Dayalan Naidu, Sharadha; Sutherland, Calum; Zhang, Ying; Risco, Ana; de la Vega, Laureano; Caunt, Christopher J.; Hastie, C. James; Lamont, Douglas J.; Torrente, Laura; Chowdhry, Sudhir; Benjamin, Ivor J.; Keyse, Stephen M.; Cuenda, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) monitors the structural integrity of the proteome. Phosphorylation at S326 is a hallmark for HSF1 activation, but the identity of the kinase(s) phosphorylating this site has remained elusive. We show here that the dietary agent phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) inhibits heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), the main negative regulator of HSF1; activates p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK); and increases S326 phosphorylation, trimerization, and nuclear translocation of HSF1, and the transcription of a luciferase reporter, as well as the endogenous prototypic HSF1 target Hsp70. In vitro, all members of the p38 MAPK family rapidly and stoichiometrically catalyze the S326 phosphorylation. The use of stable knockdown cell lines and inhibitors indicated that among the p38 MAPKs, p38γ is the principal isoform responsible for the phosphorylation of HSF1 at S326 in cells. A protease-mass spectrometry approach confirmed S326 phosphorylation and unexpectedly revealed that p38 MAPK also catalyzes the phosphorylation of HSF1 at S303/307, previously known repressive posttranslational modifications. Thus, we have identified p38 MAPKs as highly efficient catalysts for the phosphorylation of HSF1. Furthermore, our findings suggest that the magnitude and persistence of activation of p38 MAPK are important determinants of the extent and duration of the heat shock response. PMID:27354066

  15. Magnetic Characteristics of Active Region Heating Observed with TRACE, SOHO/EIT, and Yohkoh/SXT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, J. G.; Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Over the past several years, we have reported results from studies that have compared the magnetic structure and heating of the transition region and corona (both in active regions and in the quiet Sun) by combining X-ray and EUV images from Yohkoh and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) with photospheric magnetograms from ground-based observatories. Our findings have led us to the hypothesis that most heating throughout the corona is driven from near and below the base of the corona by eruptive microflares occurring in compact low-lying "core magnetic fields (i.e., fields rooted along and closely enveloping polarity inversion lines in the photospheric magnetic flux). We now extend these studies, comparing sequences of UV images from Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) with longitudinal magnetograms from Kitt Peak and vector magnetograms from MUSIC. These comparisons confirm the previous results regarding the importance of core-field activity to active region heating. Activity in fields associated with satellite polarity inclusions and/or magnetically sheared configurations is especially prominent. This work is funded by NASA's Office of Space Science through the Sun-Earth Connection Guest Investigator Program and the Solar Physics Supporting Research and Technology Program.

  16. A novel technique for active fibre production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner-Erny, Ruth; Di Labio, Loredana; Lüthy, Willy

    2007-04-01

    Active fibre devices are conventionally manufactured using MCVD technique. Recently it has been shown that nearly equivalent results can also be obtained with sol-gel technology. Now we present a novel technique allowing simplification of the manufacturing process even more. The required constituents are mixed in the form of dry micro- and nano-sized particles. A silica glass tube forming the future core region of a fibre preform is filled with a powder mix of SiO 2, 1% Nd (as Nd 2O 3) and 10% Al (as Al 2O 3). This tube is mounted in the centre of a larger tube forming the future cladding. The empty space between the two tubes is filled with SiO 2 powder. After preheating, the evacuated preform is drawn to a fibre. A length of 45 cm, cladding-pumped with a diode laser at 808 nm as well as a core-pumped fibre of 5.1 cm length showed laser action between 1.05 and 1.1 μm.

  17. Elemental analysis of combustion products by neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Heft, R.E.; Koszykowski, R.F.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives a brief description of the neutron activation analysis method, which is being used to determine the elemental profile of combustion products from coal-fired power plants, oil shale retorting, and underground coal gasification. (DLC)

  18. On the existence of another source of heat production for the earth and planets, and its connection with gravitomagnetism.

    PubMed

    Elbeze, Alexandre Chaloum

    2013-01-01

    Recent revised estimates of the Earth's surface heat flux are in the order of 47 TW. Given that its internal radiogenic (mantle and crust) heat production is estimated to be around 20 TW, the Earth has a thermal deficit of around 27 TW. This article will try to show that the action of the gravitational field of the Sun on the rotating masses of the Earth is probably the source of another heat production in order of 54TW, which would satisfy the thermal balance of our celestial body and probably explain the reduced heat flow Qo. We reach this conclusion within the framework of gravitation implied by Einstein's special and general relativity theory (SR, GR). Our results show that it might possible, in principle, to calculate the heat generated by the action of the gravitational field of celestial bodies on the Earth and planets of the Solar System (a phenomenon that is different to that of the gravitational tidal effect from the Sun and the Moon). This result should help physicists to improve and develop new models of the Earth's heat balance, and suggests that contrary to cooling, the Earth is in a phase of thermal balance, or even reheating.

  19. Heat Exchange System Improvement Saves Energy and Improves Production at a Winery

    SciTech Connect

    2001-08-01

    In 2000, Fetzer Vineyards implemented a project to improve its process heating cycle at its Hopland Winery in Hopland, California. In an effort to reduce expenditures on natural gas, Fetzer reviewed their wine process heating cycle and discovered that they could reduce their natural gas purchases and improve efficiency by installing a heat exchanger.

  20. 78 FR 63410 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Direct Heating Equipment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE), American Gas Association (AGA), Air-Conditioning, Heating, and... Heating Equipment and Pool Heaters AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of... (DOE) proposes to revise its test procedures for direct heating equipment and pool heaters...

  1. Combustion instability and active control: Alternative fuels, augmentors, and modeling heat release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sammy Ace

    Experimental and analytical studies were conducted to explore thermo-acoustic coupling during the onset of combustion instability in various air-breathing combustor configurations. These include a laboratory-scale 200-kW dump combustor and a 100-kW augmentor featuring a v-gutter flame holder. They were used to simulate main combustion chambers and afterburners in aero engines, respectively. The three primary themes of this work includes: 1) modeling heat release fluctuations for stability analysis, 2) conducting active combustion control with alternative fuels, and 3) demonstrating practical active control for augmentor instability suppression. The phenomenon of combustion instabilities remains an unsolved problem in propulsion engines, mainly because of the difficulty in predicting the fluctuating component of heat release without extensive testing. A hybrid model was developed to describe both the temporal and spatial variations in dynamic heat release, using a separation of variables approach that requires only a limited amount of experimental data. The use of sinusoidal basis functions further reduced the amount of data required. When the mean heat release behavior is known, the only experimental data needed for detailed stability analysis is one instantaneous picture of heat release at the peak pressure phase. This model was successfully tested in the dump combustor experiments, reproducing the correct sign of the overall Rayleigh index as well as the remarkably accurate spatial distribution pattern of fluctuating heat release. Active combustion control was explored for fuel-flexible combustor operation using twelve different jet fuels including bio-synthetic and Fischer-Tropsch types. Analysis done using an actuated spray combustion model revealed that the combustion response times of these fuels were similar. Combined with experimental spray characterizations, this suggested that controller performance should remain effective with various alternative fuels

  2. Isocoumarins, miraculous natural products blessed with diverse pharmacological activities.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Aamer

    2016-06-30

    Isocoumarins are lactonic natural products abundant in microbes and higher plants. These are considered an amazing scaffold consecrated with more or less all types of pharmacological applications. This review is complementary to the earlier reviews and aims to focus the overlooked aspects of their fascinating chemistry with special emphasis on their classification and diverse biological activities with some SAR conclusions. The most recent available literature on the structural diversity and biological activity of these natural products has been reviewed.

  3. Heat changes during transient tension responses to small releases in active frog muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, S H; Ford, L E

    1988-01-01

    Tension and heat production were measured in frog sartorius muscles in response to small shortening ramps (releases) at high and moderate speed. Transient tension responses to fast releases (0.1 to 0.4 mm in 1 or 4 ms) were similar to the tension transients length-clamped single fibers. Tension time courses during releases at 25 mm/s were like fiber responses calculated from the first two phases of the step responses (Ford et al., 1977). We conclude that similar crossbridge transitions produce tension transients observed in whole muscles and single fibers. Heat was absorbed during rapid tension recovery after fast releases and during the later part of releases at 25 mm/s. Variation of heat absorption with release size was compared with that of crossbridge movement predicted by the Huxley-Simmons hypothesis of force generation (Huxley and Simmons, 1971). Agreement between the two supports the conclusion that heat is absorbed by the crossbridge transitions responsible for rapid tension recovery after release. The results indicate that the entropy change of these transitions is positive. PMID:3265639

  4. Exergy analysis of an integrated solid oxide fuel cell and organic Rankine cycle for cooling, heating and power production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sulaiman, Fahad A.; Dincer, Ibrahim; Hamdullahpur, Feridun

    The study examines a novel system that combined a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) for cooling, heating and power production (trigeneration) through exergy analysis. The system consists of an SOFC, an ORC, a heat exchanger and a single-effect absorption chiller. The system is modeled to produce a net electricity of around 500 kW. The study reveals that there is 3-25% gain on exergy efficiency when trigeneration is used compared with the power cycle only. Also, the study shows that as the current density of the SOFC increases, the exergy efficiencies of power cycle, cooling cogeneration, heating cogeneration and trigeneration decreases. In addition, it was shown that the effect of changing the turbine inlet pressure and ORC pump inlet temperature are insignificant on the exergy efficiencies of the power cycle, cooling cogeneration, heating cogeneration and trigeneration. Also, the study reveals that the significant sources of exergy destruction are the ORC evaporator, air heat exchanger at the SOFC inlet and heating process heat exchanger.

  5. The composite reinforcement production in digital manufacturing: experimental validation of the heat transfer and cure modeling results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, I.; Krasnovskii, A.; Kutin, A.

    2017-02-01

    The experimental validation of the heat transfer and cure modeling results for 8-mm fiber-reinforced thermosetting composite reinforcement is reported in this article. The temperature and degree of cure of composite reinforcement are predicted using a two-dimensional heat transfer and curing model. The model uses the infrared radiant heating theory and takes into account the heat transfer between the composite rod and the surrounding air. The implicit finite difference method was used to solve the system of governing equations. The results obtained using mathematical model was compared to experimental data: the temperature field inside the composite reinforcement was measured by means of naked thermocouple; Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) was used to measure the degree of cure of the final product. Calculated and measured temperature and degree of cure fields were in good agreement.

  6. Convective heat transfer behavior of the product slurry of the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process

    SciTech Connect

    Muguercia, I.; Yang, G.; Ebadian, M.A.; Lee, D.D.; Mattus, A.J.; Hunt, R.D.

    1995-12-01

    The Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic (NAC) process is an innovative technology for immobilizing liquid form low level radioactive waste (LLW). An experimental study has been conducted to measure the heat transfer properties of the NAC product slurry. The results indicate that the heat transfer coefficient for both concentration slurries is much higher than that of pure water, which may be due to the higher conductivity of the gibbsite powder. For the 20% concentration slurry, the heat transfer coefficient increased as the generalized Reynolds number and slurry temperature increased. The heat transfer coefficient of 40% is a function of the Reynolds number only. The test results also indicate that the thermal entrance region can be observed only when the generalized Reynolds number is smaller than 1,000. The correlation equation is also developed based on the experimental data in this paper.

  7. Particle size distribution and morphological changes in activated carbon-metal oxide hybrid catalysts prepared under different heating conditions.

    PubMed

    Barroso-Bogeat, A; Alexandre-Franco, M; Fernández-González, C; Gómez-Serrano, V

    2016-03-01

    In catalysis processes, activated carbon (AC) and metal oxides (MOs) are widely used either as catalysts or as catalyst supports because of their unique properties. A combination of AC and a MO in a single hybrid material entails changes not only in the composition, microstructure and texture but also in the morphology, which may largely influence the catalytic behaviour of the resulting product. This work is aimed at investigating the modifications in the morphology and particle size distribution (PSD) for AC-MO hybrid catalysts as a result of their preparation under markedly different heating conditions. From a commercial AC and six MO (Al2O3, Fe2O3, ZnO, SnO2, TiO2 and WO3) precursors, two series of such catalysts are prepared by wet impregnation, oven-drying at 120 ºC, and subsequent heat treatment at 200 ºC or 850 ºC in inert atmosphere. The resulting samples are characterized in terms of their morphology and PSD by scanning electron microscopy and ImageJ processing program. Obtained results indicate that the morphology, PSD and degree of dispersion of the supported catalysts are strongly dependent both on the MO precursor and the heat treatment temperature. With the temperature rise, trends are towards the improvement of crystallinity, the broadening of the PSD and the increase in the average particle size, thus suggesting the involvement of sintering mechanisms. Such effects are more pronounced for the Fe, Sn and W catalysts due to the reduction of the corresponding MOs by AC during the heat treatment at 850 ºC.

  8. THERM 2.0: a PC Program for Analyzing Two-Dimensional HeatTransfer through Building Products

    SciTech Connect

    Windows and Daylighting Group

    1997-12-08

    THERM is a state-of-the-art, Microsoft Windows{trademark}-based computer program developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for use by building component manufacturers, engineers, educators, students, architects, and others interested in heat transfer. Using THERM, you can model two-dimensional heat-transfer effects in building components such as windows, walls, foundations, roofs, and doors; appliances; and other products where thermal bridges are of concern. THERM's heat-transfer analysis allows you to evaluate a product's energy efficiency and local temperature patterns, which may relate directly to problems with condensation, moisture damage, and structural integrity. THERM's two-dimensional conduction heat-transfer analysis is based on the finite-element method, which can model the complicated geometries of building products. The program's graphic interface allows you to draw cross sections of products or components to be analyzed. To create the cross sections, you can trace imported files in DXF or bitmap format, or input the geometry from known dimensions. Each cross section is represented by a combination of polygons. You define the material properties for each polygon and introduce the environmental conditions to which the component is exposed by defining the boundary conditions surrounding the cross section. Once the model is created, the remaining analysis (mesher and heat transfer) is automatic. You can view results from THERM in several forms, including U-factors, isotherms, heat-flux vectors, and local temperatures. This version of THERM includes several new technical and user interface features; the most significant is a radiation view-factor algorithm. This feature increases the accuracy of calculations in situations where you are analyzing non-planar surfaces that have different temperatures and exchange energy through radiation heat transfer. This heat-transfer mechanism is important in greenhouse windows, hollow cavities, and some

  9. Ste20-like kinase, SLK, activates the heat shock factor 1 - Hsp70 pathway.

    PubMed

    Cybulsky, Andrey V; Guillemette, Julie; Papillon, Joan

    2016-09-01

    Expression and activation of SLK increases during renal ischemia-reperfusion injury. When highly expressed, SLK signals via c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 to induce apoptosis, and it exacerbates apoptosis induced by ischemia-reperfusion injury. Overexpression of SLK in glomerular epithelial cells (GECs)/podocytes in vivo induces injury and proteinuria. In response to various stresses, cells enhance expression of chaperones or heat shock proteins (e.g. Hsp70), which are involved in the folding and maturation of newly synthesized proteins, and can refold denatured or misfolded proteins. We address the interaction of SLK with the heat shock factor 1 (HSF1)-Hsp70 pathway. Increased expression of SLK in GECs (following transfection) induced HSF1 transcriptional activity. Moreover, HSF1 transcriptional activity was increased by in vitro ischemia-reperfusion injury (chemical anoxia/recovery) and heat shock, and in both instances was amplified further by SLK overexpression. HSF1 binds to promoters of target genes, such as Hsp70 and induces their transcription. By analogy to HSF1, SLK stimulated Hsp70 expression. Hsp70 was also enhanced by anoxia/recovery and was further amplified by SLK overexpression. Induction of HSF1 and Hsp70 was dependent on the kinase activity of SLK, and was mediated via polo-like kinase-1. Transfection of constitutively active HSF1 enhanced Hsp70 expression and inhibited SLK-induced apoptosis. Conversely, the proapoptotic action of SLK was augmented by HSF1 shRNA, or the Hsp70 inhibitor, pifithrin-μ. In conclusion, increased expression/activity of SLK activates the HSF1-Hsp70 pathway. Hsp70 attenuates the primary proapoptotic effect of SLK. Modulation of chaperone expression may potentially be harnessed as cytoprotective therapy in renal cell injury.

  10. Strong antiviral activity of heated and hydrated dolomite--preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Yamana, Hideaki; Ito, Hiroshi; Ito, Toshihiro; Murase, Toshiyuki; Motoike, Koichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuo; Otsuki, Koichi

    2007-02-01

    Heated and hydrated naturally occurring dolomite showed very strong antiviral activity. Infectivity of avian and human influenza, avian infectious bronchitis (coronavirus), Newcastle disease (paramyxovirus) and avian laryngotracheitis (herpesvirus) viruses dropped at least 1,000 fold following contact with the dolomite for five minutes at 4 degrees C. Dolomite is expected to be useful to inhibit the incidence of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases.

  11. A vascular injury model using focal heat-induced activation of endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Sylman, J.L.; Artzer, D.T.; Rana, K.; Neeves, K.B.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) both inhibit and promote platelet function depending on their activation state. Quiescent EC inhibit platelet activation by constitutive secretion of platelet inhibitors. Activated EC promote platelet adhesion by secretion of von Willebrand factor (vWF). EC also secrete an extracellular matrix that support platelet adhesion when exposed following vascular injury. Previous studies of EC-platelet interactions under flow activate entire monolayers of cells by chemical activation. In this study, EC cultured in microfluidic channels were focally activated by heat from an underlying microelectrode. Based on finite element modeling, microelectrodes induced peak temperature increases of 10–40 °C above 37 °C after applying 5–9 V for 30 s resulting in three zones: (1) A quiescent zone corresponded to peak temperatures of less than 15 °C characterized by no EC activation or platelet accumulation. (2) An activation zone corresponding to an increase of 16–22 °C yielded EC that were viable, secreted elevated levels of vWF, and were P-selectin positive. Platelets accumulated in the retracted spaces between EC in the activation zone at a wall shear rate of 150 s−1. Experiments with blocking antibodies show that platelets adhere via GPIbα-vWF and α6β1-laminin interactions. (3) A kill zone corresponded to peak temperatures of greater than 23 °C where EC were not viable and did not support platelet adhesion. These data define heating conditions for the activation of EC, causing the secretion of vWF and the exposure of a subendothelial matrix that support platelet adhesion and aggregation. This model provides for spatially defined zones of EC activation that could be a useful tool for measuring the relative roles of anti- and prothrombotic roles of EC at the site of vascular injury. PMID:26087748

  12. Heat shock and genetic activation of HSF-1 enhance immunity to bacteria.

    PubMed

    Singh, Varsha; Aballay, Alejandro

    2006-11-01

    The relationship between fever and microbial infections has been known for a number of years, as well as several key mediators involved in its elicitation. However, the mechanisms by which fever confers protection to infected hosts are less clear. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, which has been extensively used in recent years to study microbial infections and innate immune responses, has recently been used to study the effect of increased temperature in immunity. Upon heat shock exposure, nematodes become more resistant to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the enhanced resistance to the pathogen requires heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF-1) and a system of small and 90 kDa heat shock proteins (HSPs). Experiments using additional Gram negative and Gram positive pathogens show that HSF-1 is part of a multipathogen defense pathway. In addition, C. elegans innate immunity can be activated enhancing HSF-1 activity by directly overexpressing HSF-1 or by overexpressing DAF-16, which is a forkhead transcription factor that acts upstream HSF-1 in aging and immunity. Blocking the inhibitory signal of the DAF-2 insulin like receptor, which acts upstream DAF-16, also results in an enhanced HSF-1 dependent immunity. In addition, mutations that affect DAF-21, C. elegans homologue of Hsp90 which forms an inhibitory complex with HSF-1, appear to boost immunity by activating the HSF-1 pathway. The role of the HSF-1 pathway in innate immunity and immunosenescence is discussed.

  13. Deep Production Well for Geothermal Direct-Use Heating of A Large Commercial Greenhouse, Radium Springs, Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    James C. Witcher

    2002-01-02

    Expansion of a large commercial geothermally-heated greenhouse is underway and requires additional geothermal fluid production. This report discusses the results of a cost-shared U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and A.R. Masson, Inc. drilling project designed to construct a highly productive geothermal production well for expansion of the large commercial greenhouse at Radium Springs. The well should eliminate the potential for future thermal breakthrough from existing injection wells and the inducement of inflow from shallow cold water aquifers by geothermal production drawdown in the shallow reservoir. An 800 feet deep production well, Masson 36, was drilled on a US Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Geothermal Lease NM-3479 at Radium Springs adjacent to the A. R. Masson Radium Springs Farm commercial greenhouse 15 miles north of Las Cruces in Dona Ana County, New Mexico just west of Interstate 25 near the east bank of the Rio Grande. The area is in the Rio Grande rift, a tectonically-active region with high heat flow, and is one of the major geothermal provinces in the western United State.

  14. Effects of Heat Shock on Photosynthetic Properties, Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, and Downy Mildew of Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Ting; Jin, Haijun; Zhang, Hongmei; He, Lizhong; Zhou, Qiang; Huang, Danfeng; Hui, Dafeng; Yu, Jizhu

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock is considered an abiotic stress for plant growth, but the effects of heat shock on physiological responses of cucumber plant leaves with and without downy mildew disease are still not clear. In this study, cucumber seedlings were exposed to heat shock in greenhouses, and the responses of photosynthetic properties, carbohydrate metabolism, antioxidant enzyme activity, osmolytes, and disease severity index of leaves with or without the downy mildew disease were measured. Results showed that heat shock significantly decreased the net photosynthetic rate, actual photochemical efficiency, photochemical quenching coefficient, and starch content. Heat shock caused an increase in the stomatal conductance, transpiration rate, antioxidant enzyme activities, total soluble sugar content, sucrose content, soluble protein content and proline content for both healthy leaves and downy mildew infected leaves. These results demonstrate that heat shock activated the transpiration pathway to protect the photosystem from damage due to excess energy in cucumber leaves. Potential resistance mechanisms of plants exposed to heat stress may involve higher osmotic regulation capacity related to an increase of total accumulations of soluble sugar, proline and soluble protein, as well as higher antioxidant enzymes activity in stressed leaves. Heat shock reduced downy mildew disease severity index by more than 50%, and clearly alleviated downy mildew development in the greenhouses. These findings indicate that cucumber may have a complex physiological change to resist short-term heat shock, and suppress the development of the downy mildew disease. PMID:27065102

  15. Effects of Heat Shock on Photosynthetic Properties, Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, and Downy Mildew of Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaotao; Jiang, Yuping; Hao, Ting; Jin, Haijun; Zhang, Hongmei; He, Lizhong; Zhou, Qiang; Huang, Danfeng; Hui, Dafeng; Yu, Jizhu

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock is considered an abiotic stress for plant growth, but the effects of heat shock on physiological responses of cucumber plant leaves with and without downy mildew disease are still not clear. In this study, cucumber seedlings were exposed to heat shock in greenhouses, and the responses of photosynthetic properties, carbohydrate metabolism, antioxidant enzyme activity, osmolytes, and disease severity index of leaves with or without the downy mildew disease were measured. Results showed that heat shock significantly decreased the net photosynthetic rate, actual photochemical efficiency, photochemical quenching coefficient, and starch content. Heat shock caused an increase in the stomatal conductance, transpiration rate, antioxidant enzyme activities, total soluble sugar content, sucrose content, soluble protein content and proline content for both healthy leaves and downy mildew infected leaves. These results demonstrate that heat shock activated the transpiration pathway to protect the photosystem from damage due to excess energy in cucumber leaves. Potential resistance mechanisms of plants exposed to heat stress may involve higher osmotic regulation capacity related to an increase of total accumulations of soluble sugar, proline and soluble protein, as well as higher antioxidant enzymes activity in stressed leaves. Heat shock reduced downy mildew disease severity index by more than 50%, and clearly alleviated downy mildew development in the greenhouses. These findings indicate that cucumber may have a complex physiological change to resist short-term heat shock, and suppress the development of the downy mildew disease.

  16. Summary of channel catfish and rainbow trout production at the Gallatin Waste Heat Aquaculture Facility, 1979-1980

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, C.M.; Schweinforth, R.L.; Burton, G.L.

    1984-02-01

    These studies have indicated that channel catfish and rainbow trout can be intensively cultured in concrete raceways using waste heat effluent water from the Gallatin Steam Plant. Optimum production was attained, especially with channel catfish, when desirable water temperatures and proper environmental conditions occurred. High density culture is possible during the winter and early spring months.

  17. Validation and recovery rates of an indirect calorimetry headbox system used to measure heat production of cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A headbox system was constructed at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln to determine heat production from dairy cattle using indirect calorimetry. The system was designed for use in a tie-stall barn to allow the animal to be comfortable and was mounted on wheels to transport between animals between s...

  18. Effect of intake on fasting heat production, respiratory quotient and plasma metabolites measured using the washed rumen technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to investigate the effect of intake prior to fasting on concentrations of metabolites and hormones, respiratory quotient (RQ) and fasting heat production (HP) using the washed rumen technique and to compare these values with those from the fed state. Six Holstein steers (360 ± 22 k...

  19. Evaluation of a rapid determination of heat production and respiratory quotient in holstein steers using the washed rumen technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to validate use of the washed rumen technique for rapid measurement of fasting heat production (FHP) and RQ, and to compare this with heart rate (HR) and core temperature (CT). Eight Holstein steers (322 ± 30 kg) were maintained in a controlled temperature (21°C) envi...

  20. Evaluation of a rapid determination of heat production and respiratory quotient in Holstein steers using the washed rumen technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to validate use of the washed rumen technique for rapid measurement of fasting heat production (FHP) and respiratory quotient (RQ), and compare this with heart rate (HR) and core temperature (CT). The experiment used 8 Holstein steers (322±30 kg) under controlled temp...

  1. Transcriptional Activation Domains of Human Heat Shock Factor 1 Recruit Human SWI/SNF

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, E. Kelly; Weirich, Christine S.; Guyon, Jeffrey R.; Sif, Saïd; Kingston, Robert E.

    2001-01-01

    Chromatin remodeling complexes such as SWI/SNF use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to remodel nucleosomal DNA and increase transcription of nucleosomal templates. Human heat shock factor one (hHSF1) is a tightly regulated activator that stimulates transcriptional initiation and elongation using different portions of its activation domains. Here we demonstrate that hHSF1 associates with BRG1, the ATPase subunit of human SWI/SNF (hSWI/SNF) at endogenous protein concentrations. We also show that hHSF1 activation domains recruit hSWI/SNF to a chromatin template in a purified system. Mutation of hHSF1 residues responsible for activation of transcriptional elongation has the most severe effect on recruitment of SWI/SNF and association of hHSF1 with BRG1, suggesting that recruitment of chromatin remodeling activity might play a role in stimulation of elongation. PMID:11486022

  2. Which Words Are Activated during Bilingual Word Production?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colome, Angels; Miozzo, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Whether words are or are not activated within the lexicon of the nonused language is an important question for accounts of bilingual word production. Prior studies have not led to conclusive results, either because alternative accounts could be proposed for their findings or because activation could have been artificially induced by the…

  3. [Cytogenetic activity of the butylcaptax defoliant transformation product].

    PubMed

    Vesmanova, O Ia; Semykina, E E; Koblov, R K; Ergashev

    1989-01-01

    Cytogenetical activity of the product of metabolitic butylcaptax transformations in cells of cotton plants G. barbadense has been studied. It is shown that butylcaptax, with a significant mutagenicity, looses its mutagenic activity, metabolizing in low mutagenic 2-oxyamylthiobenzthiazole. Low water solubility prevents its concentration to exceed 0.005% in tissue liquids and to exert a mutagenic action on cotton plants.

  4. Assessment of activation products in the Savannah River Site environment

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, W.H.; Denham, M.

    1996-07-01

    This document assesses the impact of radioactive activation products released from SRS facilities since the first reactor became operational late in 1953. The isotopes reported here are those whose release resulted in the highest dose to people living near SRS: {sup 32}P, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 60}C, and {sup 65}Zn. Release pathways, emission control features, and annual releases to the aqueous and atmospheric environments are discussed. No single incident has resulted in a major acute release of activation products to the environment. The releases were the result of normal operations of the reactors and separations facilities. Releases declined over the years as better controls were established and production was reduced. The overall radiological impact of SRS activation product atmospheric releases from 1954 through 1994 on the offsite maximally exposed individual can be characterized by a total dose of 0.76 mrem. During the same period, such an individual received a total dose of 14,400 mrem from non-SRS sources of ionizing radiation present in the environment. SRS activation product aqueous releases between 1954 and 1994 resulted in a total dose of 54 mrem to the offsite maximally exposed individual. The impact of SRS activation product releases on offsite populations also has been evaluated.

  5. Heat-processed Panax ginseng and diabetic renal damage: active components and action mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ki Sung; Ham, Jungyeob; Kim, Young-Joo; Park, Jeong Hill; Cho, Eun-Ju; Yamabe, Noriko

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is one of the serious complications in patients with either type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus but current treatments remain unsatisfactory. Results of clinical research studies demonstrate that Panax ginseng can help adjust blood pressure and reduce blood sugar and may be advantageous in the treatment of tuberculosis and kidney damage in people with diabetes. The heat-processing method to strengthen the efficacy of P. ginseng has been well-defined based on a long history of ethnopharmacological evidence. The protective effects of P. ginseng on pathological conditions and renal damage associated with diabetic nephropathy in the animal models were markedly improved by heat-processing. The concentrations of less-polar ginsenosides (20(S)-Rg3, 20(R)-Rg3, Rg5, and Rk1) and maltol in P. ginseng were significantly increased in a heat-processing temperature-dependent manner. Based on researches in animal models of diabetes, ginsenoside 20(S)-Rg3 and maltol were evaluated to have therapeutic potential against diabetic renal damage. These effects were achieved through the inhibition of inflammatory pathway activated by oxidative stress and advanced glycation endproducts. These findings indicate that ginsenoside 20(S)-Rg3 and maltol are important bioactive constituents of heat-processed ginseng in the control of pathological conditions associated with diabetic nephropathy. PMID:24233065

  6. Whole body heating reduces the baroreflex response of sympathetic nerve activity during Valsalva straining.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Fumio; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Tsutsui, Yuka; Endo, Yutaka; Sagawa, Sueko; Shiraki, Keizo

    2003-01-31

    The present experiment was carried out to examine the possible effects of whole body heating on the baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and heart rate (HR). Nine healthy male volunteers underwent the Valsalva maneuver during exposure to heat stress using a hot water-perfused suit. To exclude an effect from the unloading of the cardiopulmonary baroreceptors during hyperthermia, the central hypovolemia was counterbalanced by head-down tilt (HDT) at 8 degrees. The baroreflex slopes of MSNA and HR against mean arterial pressure were determined by regression analysis during the early phase II (falling blood pressure period) of the Valsalva maneuver. The core temperature increased from 36.9 +/- 0.1 degrees C at thermoneutral to 37.7 +/- 0.1 degrees C during heat exposure, whereas the left atrial diameter (LAD) decreased. Both the MSNA and HR increased (P < 0.05) during hyperthermia. The baroreflex slopes of MSNA and HR in the phase II decreased 30 +/- 8% (P < 0.05) and 24 +/- 9% (P < 0.05), respectively, during hyperthermia. The HDT increased LAD, but there was no change in HR, arterial pressure and the baroreflex slopes. These results suggest that hyperthermia reduces the baroreflex responses of MSNA and HR during a transient falling period of blood pressure. These reduced baroreflex responses may not be attributable to an unloading of the cardiopulmonary baroreceptors during heat stress.

  7. Milk kefir: composition, microbial cultures, biological activities, and related products

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Maria R.; Blandón, Lina Marcela; Vandenberghe, Luciana P. S.; Rodrigues, Cristine; Castro, Guillermo R.; Thomaz-Soccol, Vanete; Soccol, Carlos R.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a strong focus on beneficial foods with probiotic microorganisms and functional organic substances. In this context, there is an increasing interest in the commercial use of kefir, since it can be marketed as a natural beverage that has health promoting bacteria. There are numerous commercially available kefir based-products. Kefir may act as a matrix in the effective delivery of probiotic microorganisms in different types of products. Also, the presence of kefir’s exopolysaccharides, known as kefiran, which has biological activity, certainly adds value to products. Kefiran can also be used separately in other food products and as a coating film for various food and pharmaceutical products. This article aims to update the information about kefir and its microbiological composition, biological activity of the kefir’s microflora and the importance of kefiran as a beneficial health substance. PMID:26579086

  8. Dependence of heating rates of thermal activation on thermal activation characteristics of 110 °C TL peak of quartz: A simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oniya, Ebenezer O.

    2015-10-01

    This work was undertaken to investigate heating rates effect of thermal activation on the thermal activation characteristic (TAC) by a way of numerical simulation of an existing model. This was done by monitoring charge distributions among trapping states (electron and hole traps), both immediately after thermal activation and after irradiation of test dose. Previously observed 'early activation' and 'late activation' of TACs have been numerically observed in this work by following the exact experimental procedures of varying heating rates of thermal activation that produced them. Indirect thermal transfer signal from high temperature-TL peak at the end of thermal activation was observed to also contribute to the sensitization in the TACs, apart from the popular pre-dose effect. This contribution to the TACs from indirect thermal transfer signal from high temperature-TL peak increases with heating rate utilised for thermal activation. Recombination rate of evicted electron from high temperature-TL peak with holes during the thermal activation resulted into (i) increased sensitization with heating rates of thermal activation and (ii) direct dependence of temperature at glow-peak maximum intensity (Tm) of high temperature TL peak and heating rates of thermal activation on the peak position of the TACs peak. The impact of the electrons loss to recombination during the short irradiation increases with the heating rates of the thermal activation. The overall results have been employed to shed more light on the pre-dose phenomenon and its applications in dating.

  9. Methods for determining enzymatic activity comprising heating and agitation of closed volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David Neil; Henriksen, Emily DeCrescenzo; Reed, David William; Jensen, Jill Renee

    2016-03-15

    Methods for determining thermophilic enzymatic activity include heating a substrate solution in a plurality of closed volumes to a predetermined reaction temperature. Without opening the closed volumes, at least one enzyme is added, substantially simultaneously, to the closed volumes. At the predetermined reaction temperature, the closed volumes are agitated and then the activity of the at least one enzyme is determined. The methods are conducive for characterizing enzymes of high-temperature reactions, with insoluble substrates, with substrates and enzymes that do not readily intermix, and with low volumes of substrate and enzyme. Systems for characterizing the enzymes are also disclosed.

  10. Comparison of conventional and solar-water-heating products and industries report

    SciTech Connect

    Noreen, D; LeChevalier, R; Choi, M; Morehouse, J

    1980-07-11

    President Carter established a goal that would require installation of at least one million solar water heaters by 1985 and 20 million water-heating systems by the year 2000. The goals established require that the solar industry be sufficiently mature to provide cost-effective, reliable designs in the immediate future. The objective of this study was to provide the Department of Energy with quantified data that can be used to assess and redirect, if necessary, the program plans to assure compliance with the President's goals. Results deal with the product, the industry, the market, and the consumer. All issues are examined in the framework of the conventional-hot-water industry. Based on the results of this solar hot water assessment study, there is documented proof that the solar industry is blessed with over 20 good solar hot water systems. A total of eight generic types are currently being produced, but a majority of the systems being sold are included in only five generic types. The good systems are well-packaged for quality, performance and installation ease. These leading systems are sized and designed to fit the requirements of the consumer in every respect. This delivery end also suffers from a lack of understanding of the best methods for selling the product. At the supplier end, there are problems also, including: some design deficiencies, improper materials selection and, occasionally, the improper selection of components and subsystems. These, in total, are not serious problems in the better systems and will be resolved as this industry matures.

  11. Combined heat treatment and acid hydrolysis of cassava grate waste (CGW) biomass for ethanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Agu, R.C.; Amadife, A.E.; Ude, C.M.; Onyia, A.; Ogu, E.O.; Okafor, M.; Ezejiofor, E.

    1997-12-31

    The effect of combined heat treatment and acid hydrolysis (various concentrations) on cassava grate waste (CGW) biomass for ethanol production was investigated. At high concentrations of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (1--5 M), hydrolysis of the CGW biomass was achieved but with excessive charring or dehydration reaction. At lower acid concentrations, hydrolysis of CGW biomass was also achieved with 0.3--0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, while partial hydrolysis was obtained below 0.3 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (the lowest acid concentration that hydrolyzed CGW biomass) at 120 C and 1 atm pressure for 30 min. A 60% process efficiency was achieved with 0.3 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in hydrolyzing the cellulose and lignin materials present in the CGW biomass. High acid concentration is therefore not required for CGW biomass hydrolysis. The low acid concentration required for CGW biomass hydrolysis, as well as the minimal cost required for detoxification of CGW biomass because of low hydrogen cyanide content of CGW biomass would seem to make this process very economical. From three liters of the CGW biomass hydrolysate obtained from hydrolysis with 0.3M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, ethanol yield was 3.5 (v/v%) after yeast fermentation. However, although the process resulted in gainful utilization of CGW biomass, additional costs would be required to effectively dispose new by-products generated from CGW biomass processing.

  12. Characterization of Hydraulic Active Fractures in a Dolostone Aquifer Using Heat and Contaminants As Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldaner, C. H.; Coleman, T. I.; Parker, B. L.; Cherry, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    The number of hydraulically active fractures serving as advective contaminant migration pathways facilitating plume migration in fractured rock aquifers cannot be determined with confidence from indirect means such as visual inspection of core, borehole geophysics, and is only inferred from hydraulic tests. However, the position of depth-discrete hydraulic activity may be determined using contaminants or heat as tracers yet spatially detailed profile measurement techniques are required without imparting measurement bias of an open borehole. Contaminant concentration profiles from numerous samples along continuous core from a site contaminated since the early 1980's and heat injection in the sealed boreholes with high resolution profile monitoring are used to characterize the fracture network . Heat pulse tests using active distributed temperature sensing (DTS) were conducted in coreholes sealed with an impermeable flexible liner manufactured by FLUTe (Santa Fe, NM) to detect hydraulically active fracture zones. Using a Silixa ULTIMA-HSTM DTS, temperature data was acquired every 12.6 cm along an optic fiber cable with a spatial resolution of 29 cm. Temperature precision is on the order of 0.02°C for averaged measurements collected over 5 minute intervals. The test consisted of heating the measurement cable for 4 hours and monitoring the cooling process for over 8 hours. The resulting dataset consists of high-resolution temperature profiles at five-minute time steps during the test period. Dolostone rock composes most of the lithology units of the corehole, therefore it is unlikely that there are significant variations in rock thermal diffusivity. Multiple, successive temperature profiles were used to identify depth-discrete, hydraulically active flow zones with varying transmissivity based on different rates of heat dissipation. These variations were then compared with independent datasets including detected concentrations of contaminants in numerous rock core

  13. Tracking heat-resistant, cold-thriving fluid milk spoilage bacteria from farm to packaged product.

    PubMed

    Huck, J R; Sonnen, M; Boor, K J

    2008-03-01

    Control of psychrotolerant endospore-forming spoilage bacteria, particularly Bacillus and Paenibacillus spp., is economically important to the dairy industry. These microbes form endospores that can survive high-temperature, short-time pasteurization; hence, their presence in raw milk represents a major potential cause of milk spoilage. A previously developed culture-dependent selection strategy and an rpoB sequence-based subtyping method were applied to bacterial isolates obtained from environmental samples collected on a New York State dairy farm. A total of 54 different rpoB allelic types putatively identified as Bacillus (75% of isolates), Paenibacillus (24%), and Sporosarcina spp. (1%) were identified among 93 isolates. Assembly of a broader data set, including 93 dairy farm isolates, 57 raw milk tank truck isolates, 138 dairy plant storage silo isolates, and 336 pasteurized milk isolates, identified a total of 154 rpoB allelic types, representing an extensive diversity of Bacillus and Paenibacillus spp. Our molecular subtype data clearly showed that certain endospore-forming bacterial subtypes are present in the dairy farm environment as well as in the processing plant. The potential for entry of these ubiquitous heat-resistant spoilage organisms into milk production and processing systems, from the dairy farm to the processing plant, represents a considerable challenge that will require a comprehensive farm-to-table approach to fluid milk quality.

  14. Heat Production in the Voodoo Lily (Sauromatum guttatum) as Monitored by Infrared Thermography.

    PubMed

    Skubatz, H; Nelson, T A; Meeuse, B J; Bendich, A J

    1991-04-01

    The pattern of surface temperatures of the inflorescence of Sauromatum guttatum was investigated by using an infrared camera. The male flowers are weakly thermogenic on the first day of inflorescence opening (D-day) as well as on the next day (D + 1), reaching 0.5 to 1 degrees C above ambient temperature. The appendix (the upper sterile part of the inflorescence) is highly thermogenic on D-day, reaching 32 degrees C, and is faintly thermogenic on D + 1, reaching 1 degrees C above ambient temperature. The lower part of the spadix, close to the female flowers, is also thermogenic on D-day and D + 1, reaching a temperature similar to that of the appendix only on D + 1. Salicylic acid does not induce heat production in the lower part of the spadix, as it does in the appendix. Respiration of tissue slices obtained from the appendix shows that the capacity for cyanide-insensitive respiration is present in young and mature appendices. This alternative respiratory pathway is not, however, utilized in young appendix tissue, but is engaged during the maturation of that tissue.

  15. The influence of metabolic heat production on body temperature of a small lizard, Anolis carolinensis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Richard P; Au, Timothy

    2009-06-01

    Little is known about the impact of increased metabolism on body temperatures of small ectotherms. We found that postprandial metabolic rates of 5 g Anolis carolinensis lizards were elevated by factorial increases of 2.3+/-1.0 (mean+/-S.E.) at 26 degrees C and 3.8+/-2.1 at 30 degrees C over their fasting rates. Cloacal body temperatures exceeded environmental temperatures by a small amount in fasted individuals (26 degrees C: 0.3+/-0.02 degrees C, 30 degrees C: 0.3+/-0.02 degrees C), and by a significantly larger amount in fed individuals (26 degrees C: 1.0+/-0.06 degrees C, 30 degrees C: 0.8+/-0.08 degrees C). We conclude that an increased metabolic rate due to specific dynamic action leads to a small but significant elevation of body temperature in this species. Comparisons with thermal increments reported for a large (750 g) varanid lizard suggest that body size has only a minor influence on body-air temperature differentials of ectotherms. This is consistent with theoretical predictions. Finally, endogenous heat production could help elevate body temperatures in the wild and therefore play a minor role in thermoregulation.

  16. The critical role of extreme heat for maize production in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobell, David B.; Hammer, Graeme L.; McLean, Greg; Messina, Carlos; Roberts, Michael J.; Schlenker, Wolfram

    2013-05-01

    Statistical studies of rainfed maize yields in the United States and elsewhere have indicated two clear features: a strong negative yield response to accumulation of temperatures above 30°C (or extreme degree days (EDD)), and a relatively weak response to seasonal rainfall. Here we show that the process-based Agricultural Production Systems Simulator (APSIM) is able to reproduce both of these relationships in the Midwestern United States and provide insight into underlying mechanisms. The predominant effects of EDD in APSIM are associated with increased vapour pressure deficit, which contributes to water stress in two ways: by increasing demand for soil water to sustain a given rate of carbon assimilation, and by reducing future supply of soil water by raising transpiration rates. APSIM computes daily water stress as the ratio of water supply to demand, and during the critical month of July this ratio is three times more responsive to 2°C warming than to a 20% precipitation reduction. The results suggest a relatively minor role for direct heat stress on reproductive organs at present temperatures in this region. Effects of elevated CO2 on transpiration efficiency should reduce yield sensitivity to EDD in the coming decades, but at most by 25%.

  17. Mass production of two-dimensional oxides by rapid heating of hydrous chlorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chunsong; Zhang, Haitian; Si, Wenjie; Wu, Hui

    2016-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanoscale oxides have attracted research interest owing to their electronic, magnetic optical and catalytic properties. If they could be manufactured on a large scale, 2D oxides would be attractive for applications ranging from electronics to energy conversion and storage. Herein, we report facile fabrication of oxide nanosheets by rapid thermal annealing of corresponding hydrous-chloride compounds. By heating CrCl3.6H2O, ZrOCl2.8H2O, AlCl3.6H2O and YCl3.6H2O crystals as precursors, we immediately collect large quantities of ultrathin Cr2O3, ZrO2, Al2O3 and Y2O3 nanosheets, respectively. The formation of layered nanosheets relies on exfoliation driven by rapid evaporation of water and/or other gas molecules generated under annealing. Our route allows simple, efficient and inexpensive production of 2D oxides. As a demonstration, we evaluate Cr2O3 nanosheets prepared by our method as anodes in lithium-ion batteries and find superior performance in comparison with their microcrystalline counterparts.

  18. Lunar South Pole ice as heat sink for Lunar cryofuel production system

    SciTech Connect

    Zuppero, A.; Stanley, M.; Modro, S.M.; Whitman, P.

    1995-03-01

    Recent Clementine bistatic radar data suggest that water ice may be present in a {open_quotes}forever shaded{close_quotes} depression or crater at the South Pole of the Moon. The ice is a feedstock for the electrolysis production of cryogenic oxygen and hydrogen rocket fuels for a transportation system on the moon and for leaving and descending on to the moon. The ice also provides a convective heat sink critical to the practical implementation of high throughput electric power generators and refrigerators that liquefy and cool the oxygen and hydrogen into cryogenic rocket fuel. This brief analysis shows that about a hundred tonnes of hardware delivered to the lunar surface can produce tens of thousands of tonnes of rocket fuel per year, on the moon. And it makes the point that if convective cooling is used instead of radiative cooling, then power and processing systems can be used that exist and have been tested already. This shortens the time by an order of magnitude to develop lunar operations. Quick deployment of a chemical cryofuel energy source is a key factor in the economics of lunar development.

  19. Mass production of two-dimensional oxides by rapid heating of hydrous chlorides

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chunsong; Zhang, Haitian; Si, Wenjie; Wu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanoscale oxides have attracted research interest owing to their electronic, magnetic optical and catalytic properties. If they could be manufactured on a large scale, 2D oxides would be attractive for applications ranging from electronics to energy conversion and storage. Herein, we report facile fabrication of oxide nanosheets by rapid thermal annealing of corresponding hydrous-chloride compounds. By heating CrCl3·6H2O, ZrOCl2·8H2O, AlCl3·6H2O and YCl3·6H2O crystals as precursors, we immediately collect large quantities of ultrathin Cr2O3, ZrO2, Al2O3 and Y2O3 nanosheets, respectively. The formation of layered nanosheets relies on exfoliation driven by rapid evaporation of water and/or other gas molecules generated under annealing. Our route allows simple, efficient and inexpensive production of 2D oxides. As a demonstration, we evaluate Cr2O3 nanosheets prepared by our method as anodes in lithium-ion batteries and find superior performance in comparison with their microcrystalline counterparts. PMID:27610589

  20. Expression profile of six stress-related genes and productive performances of fast and slow growing broiler strains reared under heat stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Rimoldi, Simona; Lasagna, Emiliano; Sarti, Francesca Maria; Marelli, Stefano Paolo; Cozzi, Maria Cristina; Bernardini, Giovanni; Terova, Genciana

    2015-12-01

    High temperature is one of the prominent environmental factors causing economic losses to the poultry industry as it negatively affects growth and production performance in broiler chickens. We used One Step TaqMan real time RT-PCR (reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction) technology to study the effects of chronic heat stress on the expression of genes codifying for the antioxidative enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT), as well as for heat shock protein (HSP) 70, HSP90, glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1), and caspase 6 (CASP6) in the liver of two different broiler genetic strains: Red JA Cou Nu Hubbard (CN) and Ross 508 Aviagen (RO). CN is a naked neck slow growing broiler intended for the free range and/or organic markets, whereas RO is selected for fast growing. We also analysed the effect of chronic heat stress on productive performances, and plasma corticosterone levels as well as the association between transcriptomic response and specific SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) in each genetic strain of broiler chickens. RO and CN broilers, 4 weeks of age, were maintained for 4 weeks at either 34 °C or 22 °C. The results demonstrated that there was a genotype and a temperature main effect on the broilers' growth from the 4th to the 8th week of age, but the interaction effect between genotype and temperature resulted not statistically significant. By considering the genotype effect, fast growing broilers (RO) grew more than the slow growing ones (CN), whereas by considering the temperature effect, broilers in unheated conditions grew more than the heat stressed ones. Corticosterone levels increased significantly in the blood of heat stressed broilers, due to the activation of the HPA (hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis). Carcass yield at slaughter was of similar values in the 4 cohorts (genotype/temperature combinations or treatment groups), ranging from 86.5 to 88.6%, whereas carcass weight was negatively influenced by

  1. Expression profile of six stress-related genes and productive performances of fast and slow growing broiler strains reared under heat stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rimoldi, Simona; Lasagna, Emiliano; Sarti, Francesca Maria; Marelli, Stefano Paolo; Cozzi, Maria Cristina; Bernardini, Giovanni; Terova, Genciana

    2015-01-01

    High temperature is one of the prominent environmental factors causing economic losses to the poultry industry as it negatively affects growth and production performance in broiler chickens. We used One Step TaqMan real time RT-PCR (reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction) technology to study the effects of chronic heat stress on the expression of genes codifying for the antioxidative enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT), as well as for heat shock protein (HSP) 70, HSP90, glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1), and caspase 6 (CASP6) in the liver of two different broiler genetic strains: Red JA Cou Nu Hubbard (CN) and Ross 508 Aviagen (RO). CN is a naked neck slow growing broiler intended for the free range and/or organic markets, whereas RO is selected for fast growing. We also analysed the effect of chronic heat stress on productive performances, and plasma corticosterone levels as well as the association between transcriptomic response and specific SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) in each genetic strain of broiler chickens. RO and CN broilers, 4 weeks of age, were maintained for 4 weeks at either 34 °C or 22 °C. The results demonstrated that there was a genotype and a temperature main effect on the broilers' growth from the 4th to the 8th week of age, but the interaction effect between genotype and temperature resulted not statistically significant. By considering the genotype effect, fast growing broilers (RO) grew more than the slow growing ones (CN), whereas by considering the temperature effect, broilers in unheated conditions grew more than the heat stressed ones. Corticosterone levels increased significantly in the blood of heat stressed broilers, due to the activation of the HPA (hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenocortical axis). Carcass yield at slaughter was of similar values in the 4 cohorts (genotype/temperature combinations or treatment groups), ranging from 86.5 to 88.6%, whereas carcass weight was negatively influenced

  2. Activation of human heat shock genes is accompanied by oligomerization, modification, and rapid translocation of heat shock transcription factor HSF1.

    PubMed Central

    Baler, R; Dahl, G; Voellmy, R

    1993-01-01

    Transcriptional activity of heat shock (hsp) genes is controlled by a heat-activated, group-specific transcription factor(s) recognizing arrays of inverted repeats of the element NGAAN. To date genes for two human factors, HSF1 and HSF2, have been isolated. To define their properties as well as the changes they undergo during heat stress activation, we prepared polyclonal antibodies to these factors. Using these tools, we have shown that human HeLa cells constitutively synthesize HSF1, but we were unable to detect HSF2. In unstressed cells HSF1 is present mainly in complexes with an apparent molecular mass of about 200 kDa, unable to bind to DNA. Heat treatment induces a shift in the apparent molecular mass of HSF1 to about 700 kDa, concomitant with the acquisition of DNA-binding ability. Cross-linking experiments suggest that this change in complex size may reflect the trimerization of monomeric HSF1. Human HSF1 expressed in Xenopus oocytes does not bind DNA, but derepression of DNA-binding activity, as well as oligomerization of HSF1, occurs during heat treatment at the same temperature at which hsp gene expression is induced in this organism, suggesting that a conserved Xenopus protein(s) plays a role in this regulation. Inactive HSF1 resides in the cytoplasm of human cells; on activation it rapidly translocates to a soluble nuclear fraction, and shortly thereafter it becomes associated with the nuclear pellet. On heat shock, activatable HSF1, which might already have been posttranslationally modified in the unstressed cell, undergoes further modification. These different process provide multiple points of regulation of hsp gene expression. Images PMID:8455624

  3. The hea