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Sample records for active histone modifications

  1. Readers of histone modifications

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Miyong; Wu, Jun; Workman, Jerry L; Li, Bing

    2011-01-01

    Histone modifications not only play important roles in regulating chromatin structure and nuclear processes but also can be passed to daughter cells as epigenetic marks. Accumulating evidence suggests that the key function of histone modifications is to signal for recruitment or activity of downstream effectors. Here, we discuss the latest discovery of histone-modification readers and how the modification language is interpreted. PMID:21423274

  2. Chatting histone modifications in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Izzo, Annalisa

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromatin can be highly dynamic and can continuously exchange between an open transcriptionally active conformation and a compacted silenced one. Post-translational modifications of histones have a pivotal role in regulating chromatin states, thus influencing all chromatin dependent processes. Methylation is currently one of the best characterized histone modification and occurs on arginine and lysine residues. Histone methylation can regulate other modifications (e.g. acetylation, phosphorylation and ubiquitination) in order to define a precise functional chromatin environment. In this review we focus on histone methylation and demethylation, as well as on the enzymes responsible for setting these marks. In particular we are describing novel concepts on the interdependence of histone modifications marks and discussing the molecular mechanisms governing this cross-talks. PMID:21266346

  3. The histone modification pattern of active genes revealed through genome-wide chromatin analysis of a higher eukaryote

    PubMed Central

    Schübeler, Dirk; MacAlpine, David M.; Scalzo, David; Wirbelauer, Christiane; Kooperberg, Charles; van Leeuwen, Fred; Gottschling, Daniel E.; O'Neill, Laura P.; Turner, Bryan M.; Delrow, Jeffrey; Bell, Stephen P.; Groudine, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The covalent modification of nucleosomal histones has emerged as a major determinant of chromatin structure and gene activity. To understand the interplay between various histone modifications, including acetylation and methylation, we performed a genome-wide chromatin structure analysis in a higher eukaryote. We found a binary pattern of histone modifications among euchromatic genes, with active genes being hyperacetylated for H3 and H4 and hypermethylated at Lys 4 and Lys 79 of H3, and inactive genes being hypomethylated and deacetylated at the same residues. Furthermore, the degree of modification correlates with the level of transcription, and modifications are largely restricted to transcribed regions, suggesting that their regulation is tightly linked to polymerase activity. PMID:15175259

  4. Combined oral contraceptive synergistically activates mineralocorticoid receptor through histone code modifications.

    PubMed

    Igunnu, Adedoyin; Seok, Young-Mi; Olatunji, Lawrence A; Kang, Seol-Hee; Kim, Inkyeom

    2015-12-15

    Clinical studies have shown that the use of combined oral contraceptive in pre-menopausal women is associated with fluid retention. However, the molecular mechanism is still elusive. We hypothesized that combined oral contraceptive (COC) ethinyl estradiol (EE) and norgestrel (N) synergistically activates mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) through histone code modifications. Twelve-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with olive oil (control), a combination of 0.1µg EE and 1.0µg N (low COC) or 1.0µg EE and 10.0µg N (high COC) as well as 0.1 or 1.0µg EE and 1.0 or 10.0µg N daily for 6 weeks. Expression of MR target genes in kidney cortex was determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. MR was quantified by western blot. Recruitment of MR and RNA polymerase II (Pol II) on promoters of target genes as well as histone code modifications was analyzed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Treatment with COC increased renal cortical expression of MR target genes such as serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 (Sgk-1), glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (Gilz), epithelial Na(+)channel (Enac) and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase subunit α1 (Atp1a1). Although COC increased neither serum aldosterone nor MR expression in kidney cortex, it increased recruitment of MR and Pol II in parallel with increased H3Ac and H3K4me3 on the promoter regions of MR target genes. However, treatment with EE or N alone did not affect renal cortical expression of Sgk-1, Gilz, Enac or Atp1a1. These results indicate that COC synergistically activates MR through histone code modifications.

  5. Epigenetic Modifications of Histones in Periodontal Disease.

    PubMed

    Martins, M D; Jiao, Y; Larsson, L; Almeida, L O; Garaicoa-Pazmino, C; Le, J M; Squarize, C H; Inohara, N; Giannobile, W V; Castilho, R M

    2016-02-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic infectious disease driven by dysbiosis, an imbalance between commensal bacteria and the host organism. Periodontitis is a leading cause of tooth loss in adults and occurs in about 50% of the US population. In addition to the clinical challenges associated with treating periodontitis, the progression and chronic nature of this disease seriously affect human health. Emerging evidence suggests that periodontitis is associated with mechanisms beyond bacteria-induced protein and tissue degradation. Here, we hypothesize that bacteria are able to induce epigenetic modifications in oral epithelial cells mediated by histone modifications. In this study, we found that dysbiosis in vivo led to epigenetic modifications, including acetylation of histones and downregulation of DNA methyltransferase 1. In addition, in vitro exposure of oral epithelial cells to lipopolysaccharides resulted in histone modifications, activation of transcriptional coactivators, such as p300/CBP, and accumulation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Given that oral epithelial cells are the first line of defense for the periodontium against bacteria, we also evaluated whether activation of pathogen recognition receptors induced histone modifications. We found that activation of the Toll-like receptors 1, 2, and 4 and the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain protein 1 induced histone acetylation in oral epithelial cells. Our findings corroborate the emerging concept that epigenetic modifications play a role in the development of periodontitis.

  6. H3K36ac Is an Evolutionary Conserved Plant Histone Modification That Marks Active Genes1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Arellano, Minerva Susana Trejo; Shu, Huan; Gruissem, Wilhelm

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, histones are subject to a large number of posttranslational modifications whose sequential or combinatorial action affects chromatin structure and genome function. We identified acetylation at Lys-36 in histone H3 (H3K36ac) as a new chromatin modification in plants. The H3K36ac modification is evolutionary conserved in seed plants, including the gymnosperm Norway spruce (Picea abies) and the angiosperms rice (Oryza sativa), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In Arabidopsis, H3K36ac is highly enriched in euchromatin but not in heterochromatin. Genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing experiments revealed that H3K36ac peaks at the 5′ end of genes, mainly on the two nucleosomes immediately distal to the transcription start site, independently of gene length. H3K36ac overlaps with H3K4me3 and the H2A.Z histone variant. The histone acetyl transferase GCN5 and the histone deacetylase HDA19 are required for H3K36ac homeostasis. H3K36ac and H3K36me3 show negative crosstalk, which is mediated by GCN5 and the histone methyl transferase SDG8. Although H3K36ac is associated with gene activity, we did not find a linear relationship between H3K36ac and transcript levels, suggesting that H3K36ac is a binary indicator of transcription. PMID:26764380

  7. Detection of histone modifications in plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Jaskiewicz, Michal; Peterhansel, Christoph; Conrath, Uwe

    2011-09-23

    Chromatin structure is important for the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes. In this process, chromatin remodeling, DNA methylation, and covalent modifications on the amino-terminal tails of histones H3 and H4 play essential roles(1-2). H3 and H4 histone modifications include methylation of lysine and arginine, acetylation of lysine, and phosphorylation of serine residues(1-2). These modifications are associated either with gene activation, repression, or a primed state of gene that supports more rapid and robust activation of expression after perception of appropriate signals (microbe-associated molecular patterns, light, hormones, etc.)(3-7). Here, we present a method for the reliable and sensitive detection of specific chromatin modifications on selected plant genes. The technique is based on the crosslinking of (modified) histones and DNA with formaldehyde(8,9), extraction and sonication of chromatin, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with modification-specific antibodies(9,10), de-crosslinking of histone-DNA complexes, and gene-specific real-time quantitative PCR. The approach has proven useful for detecting specific histone modifications associated with C(4;) photosynthesis in maize(5,11) and systemic immunity in Arabidopsis(3).

  8. HHMD: the human histone modification database.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Lv, Jie; Liu, Hongbo; Zhu, Jiang; Su, Jianzhong; Wu, Qiong; Qi, Yunfeng; Wang, Fang; Li, Xia

    2010-01-01

    Histone modifications play important roles in chromatin remodeling, gene transcriptional regulation, stem cell maintenance and differentiation. Alterations in histone modifications may be linked to human diseases especially cancer. Histone modifications including methylation, acetylation and ubiquitylation probed by ChIP-seq, ChIP-chip and qChIP have become widely available. Mining and integration of histone modification data can be beneficial to novel biological discoveries. There has been no comprehensive data repository that is exclusive for human histone modifications. Therefore, we developed a relatively comprehensive database for human histone modifications. Human Histone Modification Database (HHMD, http://bioinfo.hrbmu.edu.cn/hhmd) focuses on the storage and integration of histone modification datasets that were obtained from laboratory experiments. The latest release of HHMD incorporates 43 location-specific histone modifications in human. To facilitate data extraction, flexible search options are built in HHMD. It can be searched by histone modification, gene ID, functional categories, chromosome location and cancer name. HHMD also includes a user-friendly visualization tool named HisModView, by which genome-wide histone modification map can be shown. HisModView facilitates the acquisition and visualization of histone modifications. The database also has manually curated information of histone modification dysregulation in nine human cancers.

  9. Epigenomic landscape modified by histone modification correlated with activation of IGF2 gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The links of histone post-translational modifications and chromatin structure to cell cycle progression, DNA replication, and overall chromosome functions are very clear. The modulation of genome expression as a consequence of chromatin structural changes is most likely a basic mechanism. The epige...

  10. Butyrate induced IGF2 activation correlated with distinct chromatin landscapes due to histone modification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Histone modification has emerged as a very important mechanism regulating the transcriptional status of the genome. Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) is a peptide hormone controlling various cellular processes such as proliferation and apoptosis. IGF2 and H19 are reciprocally regulated imprinted ...

  11. Modeling the dynamics of bivalent histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Ku, Wai Lim; Girvan, Michelle; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Sorrentino, Francesco; Ott, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications to histones may promote either activation or repression of the transcription of nearby genes. Recent experimental studies show that the promoters of many lineage-control genes in stem cells have "bivalent domains" in which the nucleosomes contain both active (H3K4me3) and repressive (H3K27me3) marks. It is generally agreed that bivalent domains play an important role in stem cell differentiation, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we formulate a mathematical model to investigate the dynamic properties of histone modification patterns. We then illustrate that our modeling framework can be used to capture key features of experimentally observed combinatorial chromatin states.

  12. Bivalent histone modifications in early embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vastenhouw, Nadine L; Schier, Alexander F

    2012-06-01

    Histone modifications influence the interactions of transcriptional regulators with chromatin. Studies in embryos and embryonic stem (ES) cells have uncovered histone modification patterns that are diagnostic for different cell types and developmental stages. For example, bivalent domains consisting of regions of H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) and H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) mark lineage control genes in ES cells and zebrafish blastomeres. Such bivalent domains have garnered attention because the H3K27me3 mark might help repress lineage-regulatory genes during pluripotency while the H3K4me3 mark could poise genes for activation upon differentiation. Despite the prominence of the bivalent domain concept, studies in other model organisms have questioned its universal nature, and the function of bivalent domains has remained unclear. Histone marks are also associated with developmental regulatory genes in sperm. These observations have raised the possibility that specific histone modification patterns might persist from parent to offspring, but it is unclear whether histone marks are inherited or formed de novo. Here, we review the potential roles of H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 marks in embryos and ES cells and discuss how histone marks might be established, maintained and resolved during embryonic development.

  13. Uncoupling histone turnover from transcription-associated histone H3 modifications.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Paolo; Strubin, Michel

    2015-04-30

    Transcription in eukaryotes is associated with two major changes in chromatin organization. Firstly, nucleosomal histones are continuously replaced by new histones, an event that in yeast occurs predominantly at transcriptionally active promoters. Secondly, histones become modified post-translationally at specific lysine residues. Some modifications, including histone H3 trimethylation at lysine 4 (H3K4me3) and acetylation at lysines 9 (H3K9ac) and 14 (H3K14ac), are specifically enriched at active promoters where histones exchange, suggesting a possible causal relationship. Other modifications accumulate within transcribed regions and one of them, H3K36me3, is thought to prevent histone exchange. Here we explored the relationship between these four H3 modifications and histone turnover at a few selected genes. Using lysine-to-arginine mutants and a histone exchange assay, we found that none of these modifications plays a major role in either promoting or preventing histone turnover. Unexpectedly, mutation of H3K56, whose acetylation occurs prior to chromatin incorporation, had an effect only when introduced into the nucleosomal histone. Furthermore, we used various genetic approaches to show that histone turnover can be experimentally altered with no major consequence on the H3 modifications tested. Together, these results suggest that transcription-associated histone turnover and H3 modification are two correlating but largely independent events.

  14. Metabolic regulation of histone post-translational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jing; Krautkramer, Kimberly A.; Feldman, Jessica L.; Denu, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Histone post-translational modifications regulate transcription and other DNA-templated functions. This process is dynamically regulated by specific modifying enzymes whose activities require metabolites that either serve as co-substrates or act as activators/inhibitors. Therefore, metabolism can influence histone modification by changing local concentrations of key metabolites. Physiologically, the epigenetic response to metabolism is important for nutrient sensing and environment adaption. In pathologic states, the connection between metabolism and histone modification mediates epigenetic abnormality in complex disease. In this review, we summarize recent studies of the molecular mechanisms involved in metabolic regulation of histone modifications and discuss their biological significance. PMID:25562692

  15. Transcriptomic sequencing reveals a set of unique genes activated by butyrate-induced histone modification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes induced by butyrate in the bovine epithelial cell using deep RNA-sequencing technology (RNA-seq), a set of unique gen...

  16. Occupancy by key transcription factors is a more accurate predictor of enhancer activity than histone modifications or chromatin accessibility

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Nergiz; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christapher S.; Chen, Kuan-Bei; Stonestrom, Aaron; Long, Maria; Keller, Cheryl A.; Cheng, Yong; Jain, Deepti; Visel, Axel; Pennacchio, Len A.; Weiss, Mitchell J.; Blobel, Gerd A.; Hardison, Ross C.

    2015-04-23

    Regulated gene expression controls organismal development, and variation in regulatory patterns has been implicated in complex traits. Thus accurate prediction of enhancers is important for further understanding of these processes. Genome-wide measurement of epigenetic features, such as histone modifications and occupancy by transcription factors, is improving enhancer predictions, but the contribution of these features to prediction accuracy is not known. Given the importance of the hematopoietic transcription factor TAL1 for erythroid gene activation, we predicted candidate enhancers based on genomic occupancy by TAL1 and measured their activity. Contributions of multiple features to enhancer prediction were evaluated based on the results of these and other studies. Results: TAL1-bound DNA segments were active enhancers at a high rate both in transient transfections of cultured cells (39 of 79, or 56%) and transgenic mice (43 of 66, or 65%). The level of binding signal for TAL1 or GATA1 did not help distinguish TAL1-bound DNA segments as active versus inactive enhancers, nor did the density of regulation-related histone modifications. A meta-analysis of results from this and other studies (273 tested predicted enhancers) showed that the presence of TAL1, GATA1, EP300, SMAD1, H3K4 methylation, H3K27ac, and CAGE tags at DNase hypersensitive sites gave the most accurate predictors of enhancer activity, with a success rate over 80% and a median threefold increase in activity. Chromatin accessibility assays and the histone modifications H3K4me1 and H3K27ac were sensitive for finding enhancers, but they have high false positive rates unless transcription factor occupancy is also included. Conclusions: Occupancy by key transcription factors such as TAL1, GATA1, SMAD1, and EP300, along with evidence of transcription, improves the accuracy of enhancer predictions based on epigenetic features.

  17. Occupancy by key transcription factors is a more accurate predictor of enhancer activity than histone modifications or chromatin accessibility

    DOE PAGES

    Dogan, Nergiz; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christapher S.; ...

    2015-04-23

    Regulated gene expression controls organismal development, and variation in regulatory patterns has been implicated in complex traits. Thus accurate prediction of enhancers is important for further understanding of these processes. Genome-wide measurement of epigenetic features, such as histone modifications and occupancy by transcription factors, is improving enhancer predictions, but the contribution of these features to prediction accuracy is not known. Given the importance of the hematopoietic transcription factor TAL1 for erythroid gene activation, we predicted candidate enhancers based on genomic occupancy by TAL1 and measured their activity. Contributions of multiple features to enhancer prediction were evaluated based on the resultsmore » of these and other studies. Results: TAL1-bound DNA segments were active enhancers at a high rate both in transient transfections of cultured cells (39 of 79, or 56%) and transgenic mice (43 of 66, or 65%). The level of binding signal for TAL1 or GATA1 did not help distinguish TAL1-bound DNA segments as active versus inactive enhancers, nor did the density of regulation-related histone modifications. A meta-analysis of results from this and other studies (273 tested predicted enhancers) showed that the presence of TAL1, GATA1, EP300, SMAD1, H3K4 methylation, H3K27ac, and CAGE tags at DNase hypersensitive sites gave the most accurate predictors of enhancer activity, with a success rate over 80% and a median threefold increase in activity. Chromatin accessibility assays and the histone modifications H3K4me1 and H3K27ac were sensitive for finding enhancers, but they have high false positive rates unless transcription factor occupancy is also included. Conclusions: Occupancy by key transcription factors such as TAL1, GATA1, SMAD1, and EP300, along with evidence of transcription, improves the accuracy of enhancer predictions based on epigenetic features.« less

  18. Histone code or not? Combinatorial pattern analyses of histone modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Chongzhi; Peng, Weiqun; Wang, Zhibin; Schones, Dustin E.; Barski, Artem; Cuddapah, Suresh; Cui, Kairong; Roh, Tae-Young; Zhao, Keji; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Zhang, Michael

    2008-03-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are organized into chromatin, the structure of which plays critical role in the program of gene expression. Chromatin structure and function is regulated by a myriad of posttranslational modifications on histone tails of the nucleosomes, the fundamental unit of chromatin. It remains unclear how different modifications interact. Based on high- resolution genomic maps of close to 40 histone methylations and acetylations in human T-cells obtained experimentally by ChIP- Seq technique, we investigated the combinatorial patterns of histone modifications at gene promoter regions. We found that a very limited number of patterns dominate. Modifications within a pattern are strongly correlated and each pattern is associated with a distinct gene expression distribution. Our results suggest that it is the patterns rather than the individual modifications that affect the downstream readout.

  19. Histone Modifications and Nuclear Architecture: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Bártová, Eva; Krejčí, Jana; Harničarová, Andrea; Galiová, Gabriela; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2008-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications, such as acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, ubiquitination, and ADP ribosylation, of the highly conserved core histones, H2A, H2B, H3, and H4, influence the genetic potential of DNA. The enormous regulatory potential of histone modification is illustrated in the vast array of epigenetic markers found throughout the genome. More than the other types of histone modification, acetylation and methylation of specific lysine residues on N-terminal histone tails are fundamental for the formation of chromatin domains, such as euchromatin, and facultative and constitutive heterochromatin. In addition, the modification of histones can cause a region of chromatin to undergo nuclear compartmentalization and, as such, specific epigenetic markers are non-randomly distributed within interphase nuclei. In this review, we summarize the principles behind epigenetic compartmentalization and the functional consequences of chromatin arrangement within interphase nuclei. (J Histochem Cytochem 56:711–721, 2008) PMID:18474937

  20. Liganded thyroid hormone receptor induces nucleosome removal and histone modifications to activate transcription during larval intestinal cell death and adult stem cell development.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Kazuo; Fujimoto, Kenta; Fu, Liezhen; Shi, Yun-Bo

    2012-02-01

    Thyroid hormone (T(3)) plays an important role in regulating multiple cellular and metabolic processes, including cell proliferation, cell death, and energy metabolism, in vertebrates. Dysregulation of T(3) signaling results in developmental abnormalities, metabolic defects, and even cancer. We used T(3)-dependent Xenopus metamorphosis as a model to study how T(3) regulates transcription during vertebrate development. T(3) exerts its metamorphic effects through T(3) receptors (TR). TR recruits, in a T(3)-dependent manner, cofactor complexes that can carry out chromatin remodeling/histone modifications. Whether and how histone modifications change upon gene regulation by TR during vertebrate development is largely unknown. Here we analyzed histone modifications at T(3) target genes during intestinal metamorphosis, a process that involves essentially total apoptotic degeneration of the simple larval epithelium and de novo development of the adult epithelial stem cells, followed by their proliferation and differentiation into the complex adult epithelium. We demonstrated for the first time in vivo during vertebrate development that TR induces the removal of core histones at the promoter region and the recruitment of RNA polymerase. Furthermore, a number of histone activation and repression marks have been defined based on correlations with mRNA levels in cell cultures. Most but not all correlate with gene expression induced by liganded TR during development, suggesting that tissue and developmental context influences the roles of histone modifications in gene regulation. Our findings provide important mechanistic insights on how chromatin remodeling affects developmental gene regulation in vivo.

  1. Alterations of histone modifications by cobalt compounds

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qin; Ke, Qingdong; Costa, Max

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the effects of CoCl2 on multiple histone modifications at the global level. We found that in both human lung carcinoma A549 cells and human bronchial epithelial Beas-2B cells, exposure to CoCl2 (≥200 μM) for 24 h increased H3K4me3, H3K9me2, H3K9me3, H3K27me3, H3K36me3, uH2A and uH2B but decreased acetylation at histone H4 (AcH4). Further investigation demonstrated that in A549 cells, the increase in H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 by cobalt ions exposure was probably through enhancing histone methylation processes, as methionine-deficient medium blocked the induction of H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 by cobalt ions, whereas cobalt ions increased H3K9me3 and H3K36me3 by directly inhibiting JMJD2A demethylase activity in vitro, which was probably due to the competition of cobalt ions with iron for binding to the active site of JMJD2A. Furthermore, in vitro ubiquitination and deubiquitination assays revealed that the cobalt-induced histone H2A and H2B ubiquitination is the result of inhibition of deubiquitinating enzyme activity. Microarray data showed that exposed to 200 μM of CoCl2 for 24 h, A549 cells not only increased but also decreased expression of hundreds of genes involved in different cellular functions, including tumorigenesis. This study is the first to demonstrate that cobalt ions altered epigenetic homeostasis in cells. It also sheds light on the possible mechanisms involved in cobalt-induced alteration of histone modifications, which may lead to altered programs of gene expression and carcinogenesis since cobalt at higher concentrations is a known carcinogen. PMID:19376846

  2. SET1 and p300 Act Synergistically, through Coupled Histone Modifications, in Transcriptional Activation by p53

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhanyun; Chen, Wei-Yi; Shimada, Miho; Nguyen, Uyen T.T.; Kim, Jaehoon; Sun, Xiao-Jian; Sengoku, Toru; McGinty, Robert K.; Fernandez, Joseph P.; Muir, Tom W.; Roeder, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The H3K4me3 mark in chromatin is closely correlated with actively transcribed genes, although the mechanisms involved in its generation and function are not fully understood. In vitro studies with recombinant chromatin and purified human factors demonstrate a robust SET1 complex (SET1C)-mediated H3K4 trimethylation that is dependent upon p53- and p300-mediated H3 acetylation, a corresponding SET1C-mediated enhancement of p53- and p300-dependent transcription that reflects a primary effect of SET1C through H3K4 trimethylation, and direct SET1C-p53 and SET1C-p300 interactions indicative of a targeted recruitment mechanism. Complementary cell-based assays demonstrate a DNA-damage-induced p53-SET1C interaction, a corresponding enrichment of SET1C and H3K4me3 on a p53 target gene (p21/WAF1), and a corresponding codependency of H3K4 trimethylation and transcription upon p300 and SET1C. These results establish a mechanism in which SET1C and p300 act cooperatively, through direct interactions and coupled histone modifications, to facilitate the function of p53. PMID:23870121

  3. Histones and histone modifications in perinuclear chromatin anchoring: from yeast to man.

    PubMed

    Harr, Jennifer C; Gonzalez-Sandoval, Adriana; Gasser, Susan M

    2016-02-01

    It is striking that within a eukaryotic nucleus, the genome can assume specific spatiotemporal distributions that correlate with the cell's functional states. Cell identity itself is determined by distinct sets of genes that are expressed at a given time. On the level of the individual gene, there is a strong correlation between transcriptional activity and associated histone modifications. Histone modifications act by influencing the recruitment of non-histone proteins and by determining the level of chromatin compaction, transcription factor binding, and transcription elongation. Accumulating evidence also shows that the subnuclear position of a gene or domain correlates with its expression status. Thus, the question arises whether this spatial organization results from or determines a gene's chromatin status. Although the association of a promoter with the inner nuclear membrane (INM) is neither necessary nor sufficient for repression, the perinuclear sequestration of heterochromatin is nonetheless conserved from yeast to man. How does subnuclear localization influence gene expression? Recent work argues that the common denominator between genome organization and gene expression is the modification of histones and in some cases of histone variants. This provides an important link between local chromatin structure and long-range genome organization in interphase cells. In this review, we will evaluate how histones contribute to the latter, and discuss how this might help to regulate genes crucial for cell differentiation.

  4. Regulation of Cellular Immune Responses in Sepsis by Histone Modifications.

    PubMed

    Carson, W F; Kunkel, S L

    2017-01-01

    Severe sepsis, septic shock, and related inflammatory syndromes are driven by the aberrant expression of proinflammatory mediators by immune cells. During the acute phase of sepsis, overexpression of chemokines and cytokines drives physiological stress leading to organ failure and mortality. Following recovery from sepsis, the immune system exhibits profound immunosuppression, evidenced by an inability to produce the same proinflammatory mediators that are required for normal responses to infectious microorganisms. Gene expression in inflammatory responses is influenced by the transcriptional accessibility of the chromatin, with histone posttranslational modifications determining whether inflammatory gene loci are set to transcriptionally active, repressed, or poised states. Experimental evidence indicates that histone modifications play a central role in governing the cytokine storm of severe sepsis, and that aberrant chromatin modifications induced during the acute phase of sepsis may mediate chronic immunosuppression in sepsis survivors. This review will focus on the role of histone modifications in governing immune responses in severe sepsis, with an emphasis on specific leukocyte subsets and the histone modifications observed in these cells during chronic stages of sepsis. Additionally, the expression and function of chromatin-modifying enzymes (CMEs) will be discussed in the context of severe sepsis, as potential mediators of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in sepsis responses. In summary, this review will argue for the use of chromatin modifications and CME expression in leukocytes as potential biomarkers of immunosuppression in patients with severe sepsis.

  5. The role of MyoD1 and histone modifications in the activation of muscle enhancers.

    PubMed

    Blum, Roy; Dynlacht, Brian D

    2013-08-01

    MyoD1 is a key regulator that orchestrates skeletal muscle differentiation through the regulation of gene expression. Although many studies have focused on its role in transcriptional control at gene promoters, less is known regarding the role of MyoD1 in the assembly of active enhancers. Here, we discuss novel data that point to the ability of MyoD1 to mediate the assembly of active enhancers that augment the transcription of genes essential for muscle development and lineage specification. Based on genome-wide studies of epigenetic marks that typify active enhancers, we recently identified the compendium of distal regulatory elements that dictate transcriptional programs during myogenesis. Superimposition of MyoD1 binding sites upon the locations of muscle enhancers revealed its unequivocal binding to a core region of nearly a third of condition-specific muscle enhancers. Further studies exploring deposition of enhancer-related epigenetic marks in myoblasts lacking MyoD1 demonstrate the dependence of muscle enhancer assembly on the presence of MyoD1. We propose a model wherein MyoD1 mediates recruitment of Set7, H3K4me1, H3K27ac, p300, and RNAP II to MyoD1-bound enhancers to establish condition-specific activation of muscle genes. Moreover, muscle enhancers are modulated through coordinated binding of transcription factors, including c-Jun, Jdp2, Meis, and Runx1, which are recruited to muscle enhancers in a MyoD1-dependent manner. Thus, MyoD1 and enhancer-associated transcription factors function coordinately to assemble and regulate enhancers, thereby augmenting expression of muscle-related genes.

  6. Histone-modifying enzymes, histone modifications and histone chaperones in nucleosome assembly: Lessons learned from Rtt109 histone acetyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Dahlin, Jayme L; Chen, Xiaoyue; Walters, Michael A.; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    During DNA replication, nucleosomes ahead of replication forks are disassembled to accommodate replication machinery. Following DNA replication, nucleosomes are then reassembled onto replicated DNA using both parental and newly synthesized histones. This process, termed DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly (RCNA), is critical for maintaining genome integrity and for the propagation of epigenetic information, dysfunctions of which have been implicated in cancers and aging. In recent years, it has been shown that RCNA is carefully orchestrated by a series of histone modifications, histone chaperones and histone-modifying enzymes. Interestingly, many features of RCNA are also found in processes involving DNA replication-independent nucleosome assembly like histone exchange and gene transcription. In yeast, histone H3 lysine K56 acetylation (H3K56ac) is found in newly synthesized histone H3 and is critical for proper nucleosome assembly and for maintaining genomic stability. The histone acetyltransferase (HAT) regulator of Ty1 transposition 109 (Rtt109) is the sole enzyme responsible for H3K56ac in yeast. Much research has centered on this particular histone modification and histone-modifying enzyme. This Critical Review summarizes much of our current understanding of nucleosome assembly and highlights many important insights learned from studying Rtt109 HATs in fungi. We highlight some seminal features in nucleosome assembly conserved in mammalian systems and describe some of the lingering questions in the field. Further studying fungal and mammalian chromatin assembly may have important public health implications, including deeper understandings of human cancers and aging as well as the pursuit of novel anti-fungal therapies. PMID:25365782

  7. The genomic landscape of histone modifications in human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Tae-Young; Cuddapah, Suresh; Cui, Kairong; Zhao, Keji

    2006-01-01

    To understand the molecular basis that supports the dynamic gene expression programs unique to T cells, we investigated the genomic landscape of activating histone modifications, including histone H3 K9/K14 diacetylation (H3K9acK14ac), H3 K4 trimethylation (H3K4me3), and the repressive histone modification H3 K27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) in primary human T cells. We show that H3K9acK14ac and H3K4me3 are associated with active genes required for T cell function and development, whereas H3K27me3 is associated with silent genes that are involved in development in other cell types. Unexpectedly, we find that 3,330 gene promoters are associated with all of these histone modifications. The gene expression levels are correlated with both the absolute and relative levels of the activating H3K4me3 and the repressive H3K27me3 modifications. Our data reveal that rapidly inducible genes are associated with the H3 acetylation and H3K4me3 modifications, suggesting they assume a chromatin structure poised for activation. In addition, we identified a subpopulation of chromatin regions that are associated with high levels of H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 but low levels of H3K9acK14ac. Therefore, these regions have a distinctive chromatin modification pattern and thus may represent a distinct class of chromatin domains. PMID:17043231

  8. Bivalent histone modifications during tooth development.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li-Wei; Zhang, Bin-Peng; Xu, Ruo-Shi; Xu, Xin; Ye, Ling; Zhou, Xue-Dong

    2014-12-01

    Histone methylation is one of the most widely studied post-transcriptional modifications. It is thought to be an important epigenetic event that is closely associated with cell fate determination and differentiation. To explore the spatiotemporal expression of histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) and histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) epigenetic marks and methylation or demethylation transferases in tooth organ development, we measured the expression of SET7, EZH2, KDM5B and JMJD3 via immunohistochemistry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis in the first molar of BALB/c mice embryos at E13.5, E15.5, E17.5, P0 and P3, respectively. We also measured the expression of H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 with immunofluorescence staining. During murine tooth germ development, methylation or demethylation transferases were expressed in a spatial-temporal manner. The bivalent modification characterized by H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 can be found during the tooth germ development, as shown by immunofluorescence. The expression of SET7, EZH2 as methylation transferases and KDM5B and JMJD3 as demethylation transferases indicated accordingly with the expression of H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 respectively to some extent. The bivalent histone may play a critical role in tooth organ development via the regulation of cell differentiation.

  9. Calcium-mediated histone modifications regulate alternative splicing in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Alok; Nguyen, Hieu; Geng, Cuiyu; Hinman, Melissa N; Luo, Guangbin; Lou, Hua

    2014-11-18

    In cardiomyocytes, calcium is known to control gene expression at the level of transcription, whereas its role in regulating alternative splicing has not been explored. Here we report that, in mouse primary or embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes, increased calcium levels induce robust and reversible skipping of several alternative exons from endogenously expressed genes. Interestingly, we demonstrate a calcium-mediated splicing regulatory mechanism that depends on changes of histone modifications. Specifically, the regulation occurs through changes in calcium-responsive kinase activities that lead to alterations in histone modifications and subsequent changes in the transcriptional elongation rate and exon skipping. We demonstrate that increased intracellular calcium levels lead to histone hyperacetylation along the body of the genes containing calcium-responsive alternative exons by disrupting the histone deacetylase-to-histone acetyltransferase balance in the nucleus. Consequently, the RNA polymerase II elongation rate increases significantly on those genes, resulting in skipping of the alternative exons. These studies reveal a mechanism by which calcium-level changes in cardiomyocytes impact on the output of gene expression through altering alternative pre-mRNA splicing patterns.

  10. Epigenetic Control of Reprogramming and Transdifferentiation by Histone Modifications.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hua; Zhao, Andong; Zhang, Cuiping; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-12-01

    Somatic cells can be reprogrammed to pluripotent stem cells or transdifferentiate to another lineage cell type. Much efforts have been made to unravel the epigenetic mechanisms underlying the cell fate conversion. Histone modifications as the major epigenetic regulator are implicated in various aspects of reprogramming and transdifferentiation. Here, we discuss the roles of histone modifications on reprogramming and transdifferentiation and hopefully provide new insights into induction and promotion of the cell fate conversion by modulating histone modifications.

  11. Exercise-induced histone modifications in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    McGee, Sean L; Fairlie, Erin; Garnham, Andrew P; Hargreaves, Mark

    2009-12-15

    Skeletal muscle adaptations to exercise confer many of the health benefits of physical activity and occur partly through alterations in skeletal muscle gene expression. The exact mechanisms mediating altered skeletal muscle gene expression in response to exercise are unknown. However, in recent years, chromatin remodelling through epigenetic histone modifications has emerged as a key regulatory mechanism controlling gene expression in general. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of exercise on global histone modifications that mediate chromatin remodelling and transcriptional activation in human skeletal muscle in response to exercise. In addition, we sought to examine the signalling mechanisms regulating these processes. Following 60 min of cycling, global histone 3 acetylation at lysine 9 and 14, a modification associated with transcriptional initiation, was unchanged from basal levels, but was increased at lysine 36, a site associated with transcriptional elongation. We examined the regulation of the class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs), which are enzymes that suppress histone acetylation and have been implicated in the adaptations to exercise. While we found no evidence of proteasomal degradation of the class IIa HDACs, we found that HDAC4 and 5 were exported from the nucleus during exercise, thereby removing their transcriptional repressive function. We also observed activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and the calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in response to exercise, which are two kinases that induce phosphorylation-dependent class IIa HDAC nuclear export. These data delineate a signalling pathway that might mediate skeletal muscle adaptations in response to exercise.

  12. Theoretical framework for the histone modification network: modifications in the unstructured histone tails form a robust scale-free network.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yohei; Senda, Toshiya; Sano, Norihiko; Horikoshi, Masami

    2009-07-01

    A rapid increase in research on the relationship between histone modifications and their subsequent reactions in the nucleus has revealed that the histone modification system is complex, and robust against point mutations. The prevailing theoretical framework (the histone code hypothesis) is inadequate to explain either the complexity or robustness, making the formulation of a new theoretical framework both necessary and desirable. Here, we develop a model of the regulatory network of histone modifications in which we encode histone modifications as nodes and regulatory interactions between histone modifications as links. This network has scale-free properties and subnetworks with a pseudo-mirror symmetry structure, which supports the robustness of the histone modification network. In addition, we show that the unstructured tail regions of histones are suitable for the acquisition of this scale-free property. Our model and related insights provide the first framework for an overall architecture of a histone modification network system, particularly with regard to the structural and functional roles of the unstructured histone tail region. In general, the post-translational "modification webs" of natively unfolded regions (proteins) may function as signal routers for the robust processing of the large amounts of signaling information.

  13. The interplay of histone modifications – writers that read

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianyi; Cooper, Sarah; Brockdorff, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Histones are subject to a vast array of posttranslational modifications including acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation, and ubiquitylation. The writers of these modifications play important roles in normal development and their mutation or misregulation is linked with both genetic disorders and various cancers. Readers of these marks contain protein domains that allow their recruitment to chromatin. Interestingly, writers often contain domains which can read chromatin marks, allowing the reinforcement of modifications through a positive feedback loop or inhibition of their activity by other modifications. We discuss how such positive reinforcement can result in chromatin states that are robust and can be epigenetically maintained through cell division. We describe the implications of these regulatory systems in relation to modifications including H3K4me3, H3K79me3, and H3K36me3 that are associated with active genes and H3K27me3 and H3K9me3 that have been linked to transcriptional repression. We also review the crosstalk between active and repressive modifications, illustrated by the interplay between the Polycomb and Trithorax histone-modifying proteins, and discuss how this may be important in defining gene expression states during development. PMID:26474904

  14. Histone modifications: Targeting head and neck cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Le, John M; Squarize, Cristiane H; Castilho, Rogerio M

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide, and is responsible for a quarter of a million deaths annually. The survival rate for HNSCC patients is poor, showing only minor improvement in the last three decades. Despite new surgical techniques and chemotherapy protocols, tumor resistance to chemotherapy remains a significant challenge for HNSCC patients. Numerous mechanisms underlie chemoresistance, including genetic and epigenetic alterations in cancer cells that may be acquired during treatment and activation of mitogenic signaling pathways, such as nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer-of activated B cell, that cause reduced apoptosis. In addition to dysfunctional molecular signaling, emerging evidence reveals involvement of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in tumor development and in tumor resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. These observations have sparked interest in understanding the mechanisms involved in the control of CSC function and fate. Post-translational modifications of histones dynamically influence gene expression independent of alterations to the DNA sequence. Recent findings from our group have shown that pharmacological induction of post-translational modifications of tumor histones dynamically modulates CSC plasticity. These findings suggest that a better understanding of the biology of CSCs in response to epigenetic switches and pharmacological inhibitors of histone function may directly translate to the development of a mechanism-based strategy to disrupt CSCs. In this review, we present and discuss current knowledge on epigenetic modifications of HNSCC and CSC response to DNA methylation and histone modifications. In addition, we discuss chromatin modifications and their role in tumor resistance to therapy. PMID:25426249

  15. Production and Purification of Antibodies Against Histone Modifications.

    PubMed

    Guillemette, Benoit; Hammond-Martel, Ian; Wurtele, Hugo; Verreault, Alain

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies that recognize specific histone modifications are invaluable tools to study chromatin structure and function. There are numerous commercially available antibodies that recognize a remarkable diversity of histone modifications. Unfortunately, many of them fail to work in certain applications or lack the high degree of specificity required of these reagents. The production of affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies against histone modifications demands a little effort but, in return, provides extremely valuable tools that overcome many of the concerns and limitations of commercial antibodies. We present a series of protocols and guidelines for the production and use of large amounts of polyclonal antibodies that recognize modifications of canonical histones. Our protocols can be applied to obtain antibodies that occur in histone variants and proteins other than histones. In addition, some of our protocols are compatible with the production of monoclonal or recombinant antibodies.

  16. Structure of the histone chaperone CIA/ASF1-double bromodomain complex linking histone modifications and site-specific histone eviction.

    PubMed

    Akai, Yusuke; Adachi, Naruhiko; Hayashi, Yohei; Eitoku, Masamitsu; Sano, Norihiko; Natsume, Ryo; Kudo, Norio; Tanokura, Masaru; Senda, Toshiya; Horikoshi, Masami

    2010-05-04

    Nucleosomes around the promoter region are disassembled for transcription in response to various signals, such as acetylation and methylation of histones. Although the interactions between histone-acetylation-recognizing bromodomains and factors involved in nucleosome disassembly have been reported, no structural basis connecting histone modifications and nucleosome disassembly has been obtained. Here, we determined at 3.3 A resolution the crystal structure of histone chaperone cell cycle gene 1 (CCG1) interacting factor A/antisilencing function 1 (CIA/ASF1) in complex with the double bromodomain in the CCG1/TAF1/TAF(II)250 subunit of transcription factor IID. Structural, biochemical, and biological studies suggested that interaction between double bromodomain and CIA/ASF1 is required for their colocalization, histone eviction, and pol II entry at active promoter regions. Furthermore, the present crystal structure has characteristics that can connect histone acetylation and CIA/ASF1-mediated histone eviction. These findings suggest that the molecular complex between CIA/ASF1 and the double bromodomain plays a key role in site-specific histone eviction at active promoter regions. The model we propose here is the initial structure-based model of the biological signaling from histone modifications to structural change of the nucleosome (hi-MOST model).

  17. Targeting post-translational modifications of histones for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Y-C; Hsieh, Y-H; Liao, C-C; Chong, L-W; Lee, C-Y; Yu, Y-L; Chou, R-H

    2015-10-30

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) on histones including acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation, citrullination, ubiquitination, ADP ribosylation, and sumoylation, play important roles in different biological events including chromatin dynamics, DNA replication, and transcriptional regulation. Aberrant histones PTMs leads to abnormal gene expression and uncontrolled cell proliferation, followed by development of cancers. Therefore, targeting the enzymes required for specific histone PTMs holds a lot of potential for cancer treatment. In this review article, we retrospect the latest studies in the regulations of acetylation, methylation, and phosphorylation of histones. We also summarize inhibitors/drugs that target these modifications for cancer treatment.

  18. Chromatin remodeling and bivalent histone modifications in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Harikumar, Arigela; Meshorer, Eran

    2015-12-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are characterized by distinct epigenetic features including a relative enrichment of histone modifications related to active chromatin. Among these is tri-methylation of lysine 4 on histone H3 (H3K4me3). Several thousands of the H3K4me3-enriched promoters in pluripotent cells also contain a repressive histone mark, namely H3K27me3, a situation referred to as "bivalency". While bivalent promoters are not unique to pluripotent cells, they are relatively enriched in these cell types, largely marking developmental and lineage-specific genes which are silent but poised for immediate action. The H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 modifications are catalyzed by lysine methyltransferases which are usually found within, although not entirely limited to, the Trithorax group (TrxG) and Polycomb group (PcG) protein complexes, respectively, but these do not provide selective bivalent specificity. Recent studies highlight the family of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling proteins as regulators of bivalent domains. Here, we discuss bivalency in general, describe the machineries that catalyze bivalent chromatin domains, and portray the emerging connection between bivalency and the action of different families of chromatin remodelers, namely INO80, esBAF, and NuRD, in pluripotent cells. We posit that chromatin remodeling proteins may enable "bivalent specificity", often selectively acting on, or selectively depleted from, bivalent domains.

  19. Lateral Thinking: How Histone Modifications Regulate Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Moyra; Daujat, Sylvain; Schneider, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The DNA of each cell is wrapped around histone octamers, forming so-called 'nucleosomal core particles'. These histone proteins have tails that project from the nucleosome and many residues in these tails can be post-translationally modified, influencing all DNA-based processes, including chromatin compaction, nucleosome dynamics, and transcription. In contrast to those present in histone tails, modifications in the core regions of the histones had remained largely uncharacterised until recently, when some of these modifications began to be analysed in detail. Overall, recent work has shown that histone core modifications can not only directly regulate transcription, but also influence processes such as DNA repair, replication, stemness, and changes in cell state. In this review, we focus on the most recent developments in our understanding of histone modifications, particularly those on the lateral surface of the nucleosome. This region is in direct contact with the DNA and is formed by the histone cores. We suggest that these lateral surface modifications represent a key insight into chromatin regulation in the cell. Therefore, lateral surface modifications form a key area of interest and a focal point of ongoing study in epigenetics.

  20. Nucleosome-specific, time-dependent changes in histone modifications during activation of the early growth response 1 (Egr1) gene.

    PubMed

    Riffo-Campos, Ángela L; Castillo, Josefa; Tur, Gema; González-Figueroa, Paula; Georgieva, Elena I; Rodríguez, José L; López-Rodas, Gerardo; Rodrigo, M Isabel; Franco, Luis

    2015-01-02

    Histone post-translational modifications and nucleosome remodeling are coordinate events involved in eukaryotic transcriptional regulation. There are relatively few data on the time course with which these events occur in individual nucleosomes. As a contribution to fill this gap, we first describe the nature and time course of structural changes in the nucleosomes -2, -1, and +1 of the murine Egr1 gene upon induction. To initiate the transient activation of the gene, we used the stimulation of MLP29 cells with phorbol esters and the in vivo activation after partial hepatectomy. In both models, nucleosomes -1 and +1 are partially evicted, whereas nucleosomes +1 and -2 slide downstream during transcription. The sliding of the latter nucleosome allows the EGR1 protein to bind its site, resulting in the repression of the gene. To decide whether EGR1 is involved in the sliding of nucleosome -2, Egr1 was knocked down. In the absence of detectable EGR1, the nucleosome still slides and remains downstream longer than in control cells, suggesting that the product of the gene may be rather involved in the returning of the nucleosome to the basal position. Moreover, the presence of eight epigenetic histone marks has been determined at a mononucleosomal level in that chromatin region. H3S10phK14ac, H3K4me3, H3K9me3, and H3K27me3 are characteristic of nucleosome +1, and H3K9ac and H4K16ac are mainly found in nucleosome -1, and H3K27ac predominates in nucleosomes -2 and -1. The temporal changes in these marks suggest distinct functions for some of them, although changes in H3K4me3 may result from histone turnover.

  1. Histone deacetylases: salesmen and customers in the post-translational modification market.

    PubMed

    Brandl, André; Heinzel, Thorsten; Krämer, Oliver H

    2009-04-01

    HDACs (histone deacetylases) are enzymes that remove the acetyl moiety from N-epsilon-acetylated lysine residues in histones and non-histone proteins. In recent years, it has turned out that HDACs themselves are also subject to post-translational modification. Such structural alterations can determine the stability, localization, activity and protein-protein interactions of HDACs. This subsequently affects the modification of their substrates and the co-ordination of cellular signalling networks. Intriguingly, physiologically relevant non-histone proteins are increasingly found to be deacetylated by HDACs, and aberrant deacetylase activity contributes to several severe human diseases. Targeting the catalytic activity of these enzymes and their post-translational modifications are therefore attractive targets for therapeutical intervention strategies. To achieve this ambitious goal, details on the molecular mechanisms regulating post-translational modifications of HDACs are required. This review summarizes aspects of the current knowledge on the biological role and enzymology of the phosphorylation, acetylation, ubiquitylation and sumoylation of HDACs.

  2. Histone tail modifications and noncanonical functions of histones: perspectives in cancer epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Hadnagy, Annamaria; Beaulieu, Raymond; Balicki, Danuta

    2008-04-01

    Over the past few years, the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have occupied an important place in the effort to develop novel, but less toxic, anticancer therapy. HDAC inhibitors block HDACs, which are the enzymes responsible for histone deacetylation, and therefore they modulate gene expression. The cellular effects of HDAC inhibitors include growth arrest and the induction of differentiation. Early successes in cancer therapeutics obtained using these drugs alone or in combination with other anticancer drugs emphasize the important place of posttranslational modifications of histones in cancer therapy. Histone tail modifications along with DNA methylation are the most studied epigenetic events related to cancer progression. Moreover, extranuclear functions of histones have also been described. Because HDAC inhibitors block HDACs and thereby increase histone acetylation, we propose a model wherein exogenous acetylated histones or other related acetylated proteins that are introduced into the nucleus become HDAC substrates and thereby compete with endogenous histones for HDACs. This competition may lead to the increased acetylation of the endogenous histones, as in the case of HDAC inhibitor therapy. Moreover, other mechanisms of action, such as binding to chromatin and modulating gene expression, are also possible for exogenously introduced histones.

  3. Novel types and sites of histone modifications emerge as players in the transcriptional regulation contest.

    PubMed

    Kebede, Adam F; Schneider, Robert; Daujat, Sylvain

    2015-05-01

    N-terminal tails of histones are easily accessible outside of the nucleosomal core particle and post-translational modifications (PTMs) of these tails have been the focus of attention in the past 15-20 years. By recruiting (or excluding) specific readers, histone modifications can regulate chromatin dynamics and, by extension, DNA-dependent processes. However, until very recently, the direct impact of histone PTMs on nucleosome structure and thus on chromatin function has remained somewhat elusive. Recent findings of novel sites and types of histone PTMs located within the globular domain of histones and, in particular, on the lateral surface of the histone octamer have changed this. As a result of their structurally important location in close proximity to the DNA molecule, this new class of histone PTMs can have a direct impact on chromatin function. Depending on their precise position at the nucleosome lateral surface (e.g. near the DNA entry/exit sites or in the dyad region), histone PTMs can regulate nucleosome structure and/or stability differently. We review recent progress on how histone PTMs can influence DNA unwrapping and/or nucleosome disassembly and shed light on how these types of novel modifications contribute mechanistically to the regulation of transcriptional activity.

  4. Physicochemical modifications of histones and their impact on epigenomics.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, Federico; Del Rio, Alberto

    2014-09-01

    The study of histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) has made extraordinary progress over the past few years and many epigenetic modifications have been identified and found to be associated with fundamental biological processes and pathological conditions. Most histone-modifying enzymes produce specific covalent modifications on histone tails that, taken together, elicit complex and concerted processes. An even higher level of complexity is generated by the action of small molecules that are able to modulate pharmacologically epigenetic enzymes and interfere with these biochemical mechanisms. In this article, we provide an overview of histone PTMs by reviewing and discussing them in terms of their physicochemical properties, emphasizing these concepts in view of recent research efforts to elucidate epigenetic mechanisms and devise future epigenetic drugs.

  5. Balancing chromatin remodeling and histone modifications in transcription

    PubMed Central

    Petty, Emily; Pillus, Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin remodelers use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to reposition or evict nucleosomes or to replace canonical histones with histone variants. By regulating nucleosome dynamics, remodelers gate access to the underlying DNA for replication, repair, and transcription. Nucleosomes are subject to extensive post-translational modifications that can recruit regulatory proteins or alter the local chromatin structure. Just as extensive cross-talk has been observed between different histone post-translational modifications, there is growing evidence for both coordinated and antagonistic functional relationships between nucleosome remodeling and modifying machineries. Defining the combined functions of the complexes that alter nucleosome interactions, position, and stability is key to understanding processes that require access to DNA, particularly with growing appreciation of their contributions to human health and disease. Here, we highlight recent advances in the interactions between histone modifications and the ISWI and CHD1 chromatin remodelers from studies in budding yeast, fission yeast, flies, and mammalian cells, with a focus on yeast. PMID:23870137

  6. A genetic system to assess in vivo the functions of histones and histone modifications in higher eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Günesdogan, Ufuk; Jäckle, Herbert; Herzig, Alf

    2010-10-01

    Despite the fundamental role of canonical histones in nucleosome structure, there is no experimental system for higher eukaryotes in which basic questions about histone function can be directly addressed. We developed a new genetic tool for Drosophila melanogaster in which the canonical histone complement can be replaced with multiple copies of experimentally modified histone transgenes. This new histone-replacement system provides a well-defined and direct cellular assay system for histone function with which to critically test models in chromatin biology dealing with chromatin assembly, variant histone functions and the biological significance of distinct histone modifications in a multicellular organism.

  7. Dynamic and distinct histone modifications modulate the expression of key adipogenesis regulatory genes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiongyi; Ramlee, Muhammad Khairul; Brunmeir, Reinhard; Villanueva, Claudio J; Halperin, Daniel; Xu, Feng

    2012-12-01

    Histone modifications and their modifying enzymes are fundamentally involved in the epigenetic regulation of adipogenesis. This study aimed to define the roles of various histone modifications and their "division of labor" in fat cell differentiation. To achieve these goals, we examined the distribution patterns of eight core histone modifications at five key adipogenic regulatory genes, Pref-1, C/EBPβ, C/EBPα, PPARγ2 and aP2, during the adipogenesis of C3H 10T1/2 mouse mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. We found that the examined histone modifications are globally stable throughout adipogenesis but show distinct and highly dynamic distribution patterns at specific genes. For example, the Pref-1 gene has lower levels of active chromatin markers and significantly higher H3 K27 tri-methylation in MSCs compared with committed preadipocytes; the C/EBPβ gene is enriched in active chromatin markers at its 3'-UTR; the C/EBPα gene is predominantly marked by H3 K27 tri-methylation in adipogenic precursor cells, and this repressive marker decreases dramatically upon induction; the PPARγ2 and aP2 genes show increased histone acetylation on both H3 and H4 tails during adipogenesis. Further functional studies revealed that the decreased level of H3 K27 tri-methylation leads to de-repression of Pref-1 gene, while the increased level of histone acetylation activates the transcription of PPARγ2 and aP2 genes. Moreover, the active histone modification-marked 3'-UTR of C/EBPβ gene was demonstrated as a strong enhancer element by luciferase assay. Our results indicate that histone modifications are gene-specific at adipogenic regulator genes, and they play distinct roles in regulating the transcriptional network during adipogenesis.

  8. The relationship between gene transcription and combinations of histone modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiangjun; Li, Hong; Luo, Liaofu

    2012-09-01

    Histone modification is an important subject of epigenetics which plays an intrinsic role in transcriptional regulation. It is known that multiple histone modifications act in a combinatorial fashion. In this study, we demonstrated that the pathways within constructed Bayesian networks can give an indication for the combinations among 12 histone modifications which have been studied in the TSS+1kb region in S. cerevisiae. After Bayesian networks for the genes with high transcript levels (H-network) and low transcript levels (L-network) were constructed, the combinations of modifications within the two networks were analyzed from the view of transcript level. The results showed that different combinations played dissimilar roles in the regulation of gene transcription when there exist differences for gene expression at transcription level.

  9. The Role of Histone Protein Modifications and Mutations in Histone Modifiers in Pediatric B-Cell Progenitor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Janczar, Szymon; Janczar, Karolina; Pastorczak, Agata; Harb, Hani; Paige, Adam J. W.; Zalewska-Szewczyk, Beata; Danilewicz, Marian; Mlynarski, Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    While cancer has been long recognized as a disease of the genome, the importance of epigenetic mechanisms in neoplasia was acknowledged more recently. The most active epigenetic marks are DNA methylation and histone protein modifications and they are involved in basic biological phenomena in every cell. Their role in tumorigenesis is stressed by recent unbiased large-scale studies providing evidence that several epigenetic modifiers are recurrently mutated or frequently dysregulated in multiple cancers. The interest in epigenetic marks is especially due to the fact that they are potentially reversible and thus druggable. In B-cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) there is a relative paucity of reports on the role of histone protein modifications (acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation) as compared to acute myeloid leukemia, T-cell ALL, or other hematologic cancers, and in this setting chromatin modifications are relatively less well studied and reviewed than DNA methylation. In this paper, we discuss the biomarker associations and evidence for a driver role of dysregulated global and loci-specific histone marks, as well as mutations in epigenetic modifiers in BCP-ALL. Examples of chromatin modifiers recurrently mutated/disrupted in BCP-ALL and associated with disease outcomes include MLL1, CREBBP, NSD2, and SETD2. Altered histone marks and histone modifiers and readers may play a particular role in disease chemoresistance and relapse. We also suggest that epigenetic regulation of B-cell differentiation may have parallel roles in leukemogenesis. PMID:28054944

  10. The Histone Modification Code in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are chronic inflammatory disorders caused by a loss of self-tolerance, which is characterized by the appearance of autoantibodies and/or autoreactive lymphocytes and the impaired suppressive function of regulatory T cells. The pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases is extremely complex and remains largely unknown. Recent advances indicate that environmental factors trigger autoimmune diseases in genetically predisposed individuals. In addition, accumulating results have indicated a potential role of epigenetic mechanisms, such as histone modifications, in the development of autoimmune diseases. Histone modifications regulate the chromatin states and gene transcription without any change in the DNA sequence, possibly resulting in phenotype alteration in several different cell types. In this paper, we discuss the significant roles of histone modifications involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, primary biliary cirrhosis, and type 1 diabetes. PMID:28127155

  11. Heterochromatin, histone modifications, and nuclear architecture in disease vectors

    PubMed Central

    Sharakhov, Igor V.; Sharakhova, Maria V.

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between a pathogen and a vector are plastic and dynamic. Such interactions can be more rapidly accommodated by epigenetic changes than by genetic mutations. Gene expression can be affected by the proximity to the heterochromatin, by local histone modifications, and by the three-dimensional position within the nucleus. Recent studies of disease vectors indicate that gene regulation by these factors can be important for susceptibility to pathogens, reproduction, immunity, development, and longevity. Knowledge about heterochromatin, histone modifications, and nuclear architecture will help our understanding of epigenetic mechanisms that control gene function at traits related to vectorial capacity. PMID:26097808

  12. High-resolution genome-wide mapping of histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Roh, Tae-young; Ngau, Wing Chi; Cui, Kairong; Landsman, David; Zhao, Keji

    2004-08-01

    The expression patterns of eukaryotic genomes are controlled by their chromatin structure, consisting of nucleosome subunits in which DNA of approximately 146 bp is wrapped around a core of 8 histone molecules. Post-translational histone modifications play an essential role in modifying chromatin structure. Here we apply a combination of SAGE and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) protocols to determine the distribution of hyperacetylated histones H3 and H4 in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. We call this approach genome-wide mapping technique (GMAT). Using GMAT, we find that the highest acetylation levels are detected in the 5' end of a gene's coding region, but not in the promoter. Furthermore, we show that the histone acetyltransferase, GCN5p, regulates H3 acetylation in the promoter and 5' end of the coding regions. These findings indicate that GMAT should find valuable applications in mapping target sites of chromatin-modifying enzymes.

  13. The proteasome and epigenetics: zooming in on histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Bach, Svitlana V; Hegde, Ashok N

    2016-08-01

    The proteasome is a structural complex of many proteins that degrades substrates marked by covalent linkage to ubiquitin. Many years of research has shown a role for ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated proteolysis in synaptic plasticity and memory mainly in degrading synaptic, cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins. Recent work indicates that the proteasome has wider proteolytic and non-proteolytic roles in processes such as histone modifications that affect synaptic plasticity and memory. In this review, we assess the evidence gathered from neuronal as well as non-neuronal cell types regarding the function of the proteasome in positive or negative regulation of posttranslational modifications of histones, such as acetylation, methylation and ubiquitination. We discuss the critical roles of the proteasome in clearing excess histone proteins in various cellular contexts and the possible non-proteolytic functions in regulating transcription of target genes. In addition, we summarize the current literature on diverse chromatin-remodeling machineries, such as histone acetyltransferases, deacetylates, methyltransferases and demethylases, as targets for proteasomal degradation across experimental models. Lastly, we provide a perspective on how proteasomal regulation of histone modifications may modulate synaptic plasticity in the nervous system.

  14. The landscape of histone modifications across 1% of the human genome in five human cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Christoph M.; Andrews, Robert M.; Flicek, Paul; Dillon, Shane C.; Karaöz, Ulaş; Clelland, Gayle K.; Wilcox, Sarah; Beare, David M.; Fowler, Joanna C.; Couttet, Phillippe; James, Keith D.; Lefebvre, Gregory C.; Bruce, Alexander W.; Dovey, Oliver M.; Ellis, Peter D.; Dhami, Pawandeep; Langford, Cordelia F.; Weng, Zhiping; Birney, Ewan; Carter, Nigel P.; Vetrie, David; Dunham, Ian

    2007-01-01

    We generated high-resolution maps of histone H3 lysine 9/14 acetylation (H3ac), histone H4 lysine 5/8/12/16 acetylation (H4ac), and histone H3 at lysine 4 mono-, di-, and trimethylation (H3K4me1, H3K4me2, H3K4me3, respectively) across the ENCODE regions. Studying each modification in five human cell lines including the ENCODE Consortium common cell lines GM06990 (lymphoblastoid) and HeLa-S3, as well as K562, HFL-1, and MOLT4, we identified clear patterns of histone modification profiles with respect to genomic features. H3K4me3, H3K4me2, and H3ac modifications are tightly associated with the transcriptional start sites (TSSs) of genes, while H3K4me1 and H4ac have more widespread distributions. TSSs reveal characteristic patterns of both types of modification present and the position relative to TSSs. These patterns differ between active and inactive genes and in particular the state of H3K4me3 and H3ac modifications is highly predictive of gene activity. Away from TSSs, modification sites are enriched in H3K4me1 and relatively depleted in H3K4me3 and H3ac. Comparison between cell lines identified differences in the histone modification profiles associated with transcriptional differences between the cell lines. These results provide an overview of the functional relationship among histone modifications and gene expression in human cells. PMID:17567990

  15. Structural cooperativity in histone H3 tail modifications.

    PubMed

    Sanli, Deniz; Keskin, Ozlem; Gursoy, Attila; Erman, Burak

    2011-12-01

    Post-translational modifications of histone H3 tails have crucial roles in regulation of cellular processes. There is cross-regulation between the modifications of K4, K9, and K14 residues. The modifications on these residues drastically promote or inhibit each other. In this work, we studied the structural changes of the histone H3 tail originating from the three most important modifications; tri-methylation of K4 and K9, and acetylation of K14. We performed extensive molecular dynamics simulations of four types of H3 tails: (i) the unmodified H3 tail having no chemical modification on the residues, (ii) the tri-methylated lysine 4 and lysine 9 H3 tail (K4me3K9me3), (iii) the tri-methylated lysine 4 and acetylated lysine 14 H3 tail (K4me3K14ace), and (iv) tri-methylated lysine 9 and acetylated lysine 14 H3 tail (K9me3K14ace). Here, we report the effects of K4, K9, and K14 modifications on the backbone torsion angles and relate these changes to the recognition and binding of histone modifying enzymes. According to the Ramachandran plot analysis; (i) the dihedral angles of K4 residue are significantly affected by the addition of three methyl groups on this residue regardless of the second modification, (ii) the dihedral angle values of K9 residue are similarly altered majorly by the tri-methylation of K4 residue, (iii) different combinations of modifications (tri-methylation of K4 and K9, and acetylation of K14) have different influences on phi and psi values of K14 residue. Finally, we discuss the consequences of these results on the binding modes and specificity of the histone modifying enzymes such as DIM-5, GCN5, and JMJD2A.

  16. Chromatin dynamics: Interplay between remodeling enzymes and histone modifications

    PubMed Central

    Swygert, Sarah G.; Peterson, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin dynamics play an essential role in regulating the accessibility of genomic DNA for a variety of nuclear processes, including gene transcription and DNA repair. The posttranslational modification of the core histones and the action of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes represent two primary mechanisms by which chromatin dynamics are controlled and linked to nuclear events. Although there are examples in which a histone modification or a remodeling enzyme may be sufficient to drive a chromatin transition, these mechanisms typically work in concert to integrate regulatory inputs, leading to a coordinated alteration in chromatin structure and function. Indeed, site-specific histone modifications can facilitate the recruitment of chromatin remodeling enzymes to particular genomic regions, or they can regulate the efficiency or the outcome of a chromatin remodeling reaction. Conversely, chromatin remodeling enzymes can also influence, and sometimes directly modulate, the modification state of histones. These functional interactions are generally complex, frequently transient, and often require the association of myriad additional factors. PMID:24583555

  17. Histone Ketoamide Adduction by 4-Oxo-2-nonenal Is a Reversible Posttranslational Modification Regulated by Sirt2.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yiwen; Li, Xin; Lin, Jianwei; Hao, Quan; Li, Xiang David

    2017-01-20

    Lipid-derived electrophiles (LDEs) directly modify proteins to modulate cellular signaling pathways in response to oxidative stress. One such LDE, 4-oxo-2-nonenal (4-ONE), has recently been found to target histones and interfere with histone assembly into nucleosomes. Unlike other LDEs that preferentially modify cysteine via nucleophilic Michael addition, 4-ONE reacts with histone lysine residues to form a new histone modification, gamma-oxononanoylation (Kgon). However, it remains unclear whether Kgon can cause irreversible damage or be regulated by enzymes "erasing" this nonenzymatic modification. Here, we report that human Sirt2 catalyzes the removal of histone Kgon. Among the tested human sirtuins, Sirt2 showed robust deacylase activity toward the Kgon-carrying histone peptides in vitro. We use alkynyl-4-ONE as a chemical reporter for Kgon to demonstrate that Sirt2 is responsible for removing histone Kgon in cells. Furthermore, we develop a ketone-reactive chemical probe to detect histones modified by endogenous 4-ONE in macrophages in response to inflammatory stimulation. Using this probe, we show Sirt2 as a deacylase able to control histone Kgon in stimulated macrophages. This study unravels a new mechanism for the regulation of LDE-derived protein posttranslational modifications, as well as a novel role played by Sirt2 as a histone Kgon deacylase in cytoprotective signaling responses.

  18. Oxidative stress alters global histone modification and DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yingmei; DesMarais, Thomas L; Tong, Zhaohui; Yao, Yixin; Costa, Max

    2015-05-01

    The JmjC domain-containing histone demethylases can remove histone lysine methylation and thereby regulate gene expression. The JmjC domain uses iron Fe(II) and α-ketoglutarate (αKG) as cofactors in an oxidative demethylation reaction via hydroxymethyl lysine. We hypothesize that reactive oxygen species will oxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III), thereby attenuating the activity of JmjC domain-containing histone demethylases. To minimize secondary responses from cells, extremely short periods of oxidative stress (3h) were used to investigate this question. Cells that were exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for 3h exhibited increases in several histone methylation marks including H3K4me3 and decreases of histone acetylation marks including H3K9ac and H4K8ac; preincubation with ascorbate attenuated these changes. The oxidative stress level was measured by generation of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein, GSH/GSSG ratio, and protein carbonyl content. A cell-free system indicated that H2O2 inhibited histone demethylase activity where increased Fe(II) rescued this inhibition. TET protein showed a decreased activity under oxidative stress. Cells exposed to a low-dose and long-term (3 weeks) oxidative stress also showed increased global levels of H3K4me3 and H3K27me3. However, these global methylation changes did not persist after washout. The cells exposed to short-term oxidative stress also appeared to have higher activity of class I/II histone deacetylase (HDAC) but not class III HDAC. In conclusion, we have found that oxidative stress transiently alters the epigenetic program process through modulating the activity of enzymes responsible for demethylation and deacetylation of histones.

  19. Human linker histones: interplay between phosphorylation and O-β-GlcNAc to mediate chromatin structural modifications

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromatin is a combination of DNA and histone proteins. It is established fact that epigenetic mechanisms are associated with DNA and histones. Initial studies emphasize on core histones association with DNA, however later studies prove the importance of linker histone H1 epigenetic. There are many types of linker histone H1 found in mammals. These subtypes are cell specific and their amount in different types of cells varies as the cell functions. Many types of post-translational modifications which occur on different residues in each subtype of linker histone H1 induce conformational changes and allow the different subtypes of linker histone H1 to interact with chromatin at different stages during cell cycle which results in the regulation of transcription and gene expression. Proposed O-glycosylation of linker histone H1 promotes condensation of chromatin while phosphorylation of linker histone H1 is known to activate transcription and gene regulation by decondensation of chromatin. Interplay between phosphorylation and O-β-GlcNAc modification on Ser and Thr residues in each subtype of linker histone H1 in Homo sapiens during cell cycle may result in diverse functional regulation of proteins. This in silico study describes the potential phosphorylation, o-glycosylation and their possible interplay sites on conserved Ser/Thr residues in various subtypes of linker histone H1 in Homo sapiens. PMID:21749719

  20. Post-Translational Modifications of Histones in Human Sperm.

    PubMed

    Krejčí, Jana; Stixová, Lenka; Pagáčová, Eva; Legartová, Soňa; Kozubek, Stanislav; Lochmanová, Gabriela; Zdráhal, Zbyněk; Sehnalová, Petra; Dabravolski, Siarhei; Hejátko, Jan; Bártová, Eva

    2015-10-01

    We examined the levels and distribution of post-translationally modified histones and protamines in human sperm. Using western blot immunoassay, immunofluorescence, mass spectrometry (MS), and FLIM-FRET approaches, we analyzed the status of histone modifications and the protamine P2. Among individual samples, we observed variability in the levels of H3K9me1, H3K9me2, H3K27me3, H3K36me3, and H3K79me1, but the level of acetylated (ac) histones H4 was relatively stable in the sperm head fractions, as demonstrated by western blot analysis. Sperm heads with lower levels of P2 exhibited lower levels of H3K9ac, H3K9me1, H3K27me3, H3K36me3, and H3K79me1. A very strong correlation was observed between the levels of P2 and H3K9me2. FLIM-FRET analysis additionally revealed that acetylated histones H4 are not only parts of sperm chromatin but also appear in a non-integrated form. Intriguingly, H4ac and H3K27me3 were detected in sperm tail fractions via western blot analysis. An appearance of specific histone H3 and H4 acetylation and H3 methylation in sperm tail fractions was also confirmed by both LC-MS/MS and MALDI-TOF MS analysis. Taken together, these data indicate that particular post-translational modifications of histones are uniquely distributed in human sperm, and this distribution varies among individuals and among the sperm of a single individual.

  1. Epigenetic histone modification regulates developmental lead exposure induced hyperactivity in rats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Man; Xu, Yi; Cai, Rong; Tang, Yuqing; Ge, Meng-Meng; Liu, Zhi-Hua; Xu, Li; Hu, Fan; Ruan, Di-Yun; Wang, Hui-Li

    2014-02-10

    Lead (Pb) exposure was commonly considered as a high environmental risk factor for the development of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the molecular basis of this pathological process still remains elusive. In light of the role of epigenetics in modulating the neurological disease and the causative environment, the alterations of histone modifications in the hippocampus of rats exposed by various doses of lead, along with concomitant behavioral deficits, were investigated in this study. According to the free and forced open field test, there showed that in a dosage-dependent manner, lead exposure could result in the increased locomotor activity of rats, that is, hyperactivity: a subtype of ADHD. Western blotting assays revealed that the levels of histone acetylation increased significantly in the hippocampus by chronic lead exposure, while no dramatic changes were detected in terms of expression yields of ADHD-related dopaminergic proteins, indicating that histone acetylation plays essential roles in this toxicant-involved pathogenesis. In addition, the increased level of histone acetylation might be attributed to the enzymatic activity of p300, a typical histone acetyltransferase, as the transcriptional level of p300 was significantly increased upon higher-dose Pb exposure. In summary, this study first discovered the epigenetic mechanism bridging the environmental influence (Pb) and the disease itself (ADHD) in the histone modification level, paving the way for the comprehensive understanding of ADHD's etiology and in further steps, establishing the therapy strategy of this widespread neurological disorder.

  2. Epigenetic modifications of histone h4 in lung neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Li, Faqian; Ye, Bo; Hong, Longsheng; Xu, Haodong; Fishbein, Michael C

    2011-10-01

    Global profiling of histone changes in some human cancers demonstrated that loss of histone H4 acetylation at lysine16 (H4KA16) and trimethylation at lysine 20 (H4KM20) was a common hallmark of cancer. It is not clear whether these epigenetic changes also exist in neuroendocrine carcinomas. We semiquantitatively analyzed 32 cases of lung neuroendocrine tumors (LNETs) immunohistochemically stained with H4KA16, H4KM20, and Ki67 antibodies by calculating cumulative scores based on the sum of the product of nuclear stain intensity (1-3) and percentages of positive cells in each category. H4KA16 and H4KM20 levels were compared among typical carcinoid (TC, 11), atypical carcinoid (AC, 6), large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC, 8), and small cell lung cancer (SCLC, 7) and correlated with histologic types and Ki67 labeling. Data were presented as mean±standard error of the mean and statistically analyzed by 1-way analysis of variance and Holm-Sidak method. Normal bronchiolar epithelium had relatively uniform and strong +3 positivity of H4KM20 and H4KA16, which was considered as internal positive controls. This uniformity, however, was gradually lost from low to high grades of LNETs. Semiquantitative analysis revealed that there were significant differences in cumulative scores of H4KA16 (TC, 2.36±0.03; AC, 2.04±0.08; LCNEC, 1.58±0.07; SCLC 1.32±0.05) among LNETs. For H4KM20, significant differences were only observed between low grade (TC, 2.49±0.05 and AC, 2.24±0.09) and high grade (LCNEC, 1.58±0.10 and SCLC 1.68±0.11) LNETs, but not within low or high grade LNETs. The Ki67 cumulative scores (TC, 0.06±0.02; AC, 0.41±0.08; LCNEC, 1.29±0.09; SCLC 1.83±0.06) were inversely correlated with both cumulative H4KA16 and H4KM20 scores by Pearson correlation. We conclude that progressive loss of H4KA16 and H4KM20 from low to high grade LNETs reflects the degree of differentiation and proliferative activity. These histone modifications may serve as tumor biomarkers

  3. Quantitative assessment of chromatin immunoprecipitation grade antibodies directed against histone modifications reveals patterns of co-occurring marks on histone protein molecules.

    PubMed

    Peach, Sally E; Rudomin, Emily L; Udeshi, Namrata D; Carr, Steven A; Jaffe, Jacob D

    2012-05-01

    The defining step in most chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays is the use of an antibody to enrich for a particular protein or histone modification state associated with segments of chromatin. The specificity of the antibody is critical to the interpretation of the experiment, yet this property is rarely reported. Here, we present a quantitative method using mass spectrometry to characterize the specificity of key histone H3 modification-targeting antibodies that have previously been used to characterize the "histone code." We further extend the use of these antibody reagents to the observation of long range correlations among disparate histone modifications. Using purified human histones representing the mixture of chromatin states present in living cells, we were able to quantify the degree of target enrichment and the specificity of several commonly used, commercially available ChIP grade antibodies. We found significant differences in enrichment efficiency among various reagents directed against four frequently studied chromatin marks: H3K4me2, H3K4me3, H3K9me3, and H3K27me3. For some antibodies, we also detected significant off target enrichment of alternate modifications at the same site (i.e., enrichment of H3K4me2 by an antibody directed against H3K4me3). Through cluster analysis, we were able to recognize patterns of co-enrichment of marks at different sites on the same histone protein. Surprisingly, these co-enrichments corresponded well to "canonical" chromatin states that are exemplary of activated and repressed regions of chromatin. Altogether, our findings suggest that 1) the results of ChIP experiments need to be evaluated with caution given the potential for cross-reactivity of the commonly used histone modification recognizing antibodies, 2) multiple marks with consistent biological interpretation exist on the same histone protein molecule, and 3) some components of the histone code may be transduced on single proteins in living cells.

  4. Heterochromatic histone modifications at transposons in Xenopus tropicalis embryos.

    PubMed

    van Kruijsbergen, Ila; Hontelez, Saartje; Elurbe, Dei M; van Heeringen, Simon J; Huynen, Martijn A; Veenstra, Gert Jan C

    2016-09-14

    Transposable elements are parasitic genomic elements that can be deleterious for host gene function and genome integrity. Heterochromatic histone modifications are involved in the repression of transposons. However, it remains unknown how these histone modifications mark different types of transposons during embryonic development. Here we document the variety of heterochromatic epigenetic signatures at parasitic elements during development in Xenopus tropicalis, using genome-wide ChIP-sequencing data and ChIP-qPCR analysis. We show that specific subsets of transposons in various families and subfamilies are marked by different combinations of the heterochromatic histone modifications H4K20me3, H3K9me2/3 and H3K27me3. Many DNA transposons are marked at the blastula stage already, whereas at retrotransposons the histone modifications generally accumulate at the gastrula stage or later. Furthermore, transposons marked by H3K9me3 and H4K20me3 are more prominent in gene deserts. Using intra-subfamily divergence as a proxy for age, we show that relatively young DNA transposons are preferentially marked by early embryonic H4K20me3 and H3K27me3. In contrast, relatively young retrotransposons are marked by increasing H3K9me3 and H4K20me3 during development, and are also linked to piRNA-sized small non-coding RNAs. Our results implicate distinct repression mechanisms that operate in a transposon-selective and developmental stage-specific fashion.

  5. Histone modifications and regeneration in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea.

    PubMed

    Robb, Sofia M C; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    The freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea has emerged as a powerful model system for studying regeneration and adult stem cell (ASC) biology. This is largely due to the developmental plasticity of these organisms and the abundant distribution and experimental accessibility of their ASCs. Techniques such as whole mount in situ hybridization, dsRNA-mediated interference, halogenated thymidine analogs for defining cell lineages, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting among other methods, have allowed researchers to interrogate the biology and attendant pluripotent stem cells of these animals in great detail. Therefore, it has now become possible to interrogate and define the roles that epigenetic states may play in regulating ASCs, and by extension, regeneration proper. Here, we provide a primer on the types and number of histone families found in S. mediterranea, known as epigenetic marks of these molecules and a survey of epigenetic modifying enzymes encoded by the planarian genome. We also review experimental evidence indicating that such modifications may in fact play key roles in determining the activities of planarian stem cells.

  6. Correlating Histone Modification Patterns with Gene Expression Data During Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Gangqing; Zhao, Keji

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in mammals are an ideal system to study differentiation. While transcription factors (TFs) control the differentiation of HSCs to distinctive terminal blood cells, accumulating evidence suggests that chromatin structure and modifications constitute another critical layer of gene regulation. Recent genome-wide studies based on next-generation sequencing reveal that histone modifications are linked to gene expression and contribute to hematopoiesis. Here, we briefl y review the bioinformatics aspects for ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq data analysis with applications to the epigenetic studies of hematopoiesis and provide a practical guide to several basic data analysis methods. PMID:24743998

  7. Modification of histones by sugar β-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) occurs on multiple residues, including histone H3 serine 10, and is cell cycle-regulated.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suisheng; Roche, Kevin; Nasheuer, Heinz-Peter; Lowndes, Noel Francis

    2011-10-28

    The monosaccharide, β-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), can be added to the hydroxyl group of either serines or threonines to generate an O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) residue (Love, D. C., and Hanover, J. A. (2005) Sci. STKE 2005 312, 1-14; Hart, G. W., Housley, M. P., and Slawson, C. (2007) Nature 446, 1017-1022). This post-translational protein modification, termed O-GlcNAcylation, is reversible, analogous to phosphorylation, and has been implicated in many cellular processes. Here, we present evidence that in human cells all four core histones of the nucleosome are substrates for this glycosylation in the relative abundance H3, H4/H2B, and H2A. Increasing the intracellular level of UDP-GlcNAc, the nucleotide sugar donor substrate for O-GlcNAcylation enhanced histone O-GlcNAcylation and partially suppressed phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10 (H3S10ph). Expression of recombinant H3.3 harboring an S10A mutation abrogated histone H3 O-GlcNAcylation relative to its wild-type version, consistent with H3S10 being a site of histone O-GlcNAcylation (H3S10glc). Moreover, O-GlcNAcylated histones were lost from H3S10ph immunoprecipitates, whereas immunoprecipitation of either H3K4me3 or H3K9me3 (active or inactive histone marks, respectively) resulted in co-immunoprecipitation of O-GlcNAcylated histones. We also examined histone O-GlcNAcylation during cell cycle progression. Histone O-GlcNAcylation is high in G(1) cells, declines throughout the S phase, increases again during late S/early G(2), and persists through late G(2) and mitosis. Thus, O-GlcNAcylation is a novel histone post-translational modification regulating chromatin conformation during transcription and cell cycle progression.

  8. Histone chaperone specificity in Rtt109 activation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Jun; Sudhoff, Keely B; Andrews, Andrew J; Stargell, Laurie A; Luger, Karolin

    2008-01-01

    Rtt109 is a histone acetyltransferase that requires a histone chaperone for the acetylation of histone 3 at lysine 56 (H3K56). Rtt109 forms a complex with the chaperone Vps75 in vivo and is implicated in DNA replication and repair. Here we show that both Rtt109 and Vps75 bind histones with high affinity, but only the complex is efficient for catalysis. The C-terminal acidic domain of Vps75 contributes to activation of Rtt109 and is necessary for in vivo functionality of Vps75, but it is not required for interaction with either Rtt109 or histones. We demonstrate that Vps75 is a structural homolog of yeast Nap1 by solving its crystal structure. Nap1 and Vps75 interact with histones and Rtt109 with comparable affinities. However, only Vps75 stimulates Rtt109 enzymatic activity. Our data highlight the functional specificity of Vps75 in Rtt109 activation. PMID:19172749

  9. DNA methylation and histone modification in onion chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Go; Shiomi, Maho; Morihana, Sayuri; Yamamoto, Maki; Mukai, Yasuhiko

    2010-01-01

    Onion, Allium cepa, is a model plant for experimental observation of somatic cell division, whose mitotic chromosome is extremely large, and contains the characteristic terminal heterochromatin. Epigenetic status of the onion chromosome is a matter of deep interest from a molecular cytogenetic point of view, because epigenetic marks regulate chromatin structure and gene expression. Here we examined chromosomal distribution of DNA methylation and histone modification in A. cepa in order to reveal the chromatin structure in detail. Immunodetection of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and in situ nick-translation analysis showed that onion genomic DNA was highly methylated, and the methylated CG dinucleotides were distributed in entire chromosomes. In addition, distributions of histone methylation codes, which occur in close association with DNA methylation, were similar to those of other large genome species. From these results, a highly heterochromatic and less euchromatic state of large onion chromosomes were demonstrated at an epigenetic level.

  10. The Oncoprotein BRD4-NUT Generates Aberrant Histone Modification Patterns.

    PubMed

    Zee, Barry M; Dibona, Amy B; Alekseyenko, Artyom A; French, Christopher A; Kuroda, Mitzi I

    2016-01-01

    Defects in chromatin proteins frequently manifest in diseases. A striking case of a chromatin-centric disease is NUT-midline carcinoma (NMC), which is characterized by expression of NUT as a fusion partner most frequently with BRD4. ChIP-sequencing studies from NMC patients revealed that BRD4-NUT (B4N) covers large genomic regions and elevates transcription within these domains. To investigate how B4N modulates chromatin, we performed affinity purification of B4N when ectopically expressed in 293-TREx cells and quantified the associated histone posttranslational modifications (PTM) using proteomics. We observed significant enrichment of acetylation particularly on H3 K18 and of combinatorial patterns such as H3 K27 acetylation paired with K36 methylation. We postulate that B4N complexes override the preexisting histone code with new PTM patterns that reflect aberrant transcription and that epigenetically modulate the nucleosome environment toward the NMC state.

  11. The Oncoprotein BRD4-NUT Generates Aberrant Histone Modification Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Zee, Barry M.; Dibona, Amy B.; Alekseyenko, Artyom A.; French, Christopher A.; Kuroda, Mitzi I.

    2016-01-01

    Defects in chromatin proteins frequently manifest in diseases. A striking case of a chromatin-centric disease is NUT-midline carcinoma (NMC), which is characterized by expression of NUT as a fusion partner most frequently with BRD4. ChIP-sequencing studies from NMC patients revealed that BRD4-NUT (B4N) covers large genomic regions and elevates transcription within these domains. To investigate how B4N modulates chromatin, we performed affinity purification of B4N when ectopically expressed in 293-TREx cells and quantified the associated histone posttranslational modifications (PTM) using proteomics. We observed significant enrichment of acetylation particularly on H3 K18 and of combinatorial patterns such as H3 K27 acetylation paired with K36 methylation. We postulate that B4N complexes override the preexisting histone code with new PTM patterns that reflect aberrant transcription and that epigenetically modulate the nucleosome environment toward the NMC state. PMID:27698495

  12. SILAC-Based Quantitative Strategies for Accurate Histone Posttranslational Modification Profiling Across Multiple Biological Samples.

    PubMed

    Cuomo, Alessandro; Soldi, Monica; Bonaldi, Tiziana

    2017-01-01

    Histone posttranslational modifications (hPTMs) play a key role in regulating chromatin dynamics and fine-tuning DNA-based processes. Mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as a versatile technology for the analysis of histones, contributing to the dissection of hPTMs, with special strength in the identification of novel marks and in the assessment of modification cross talks. Stable isotope labeling by amino acid in cell culture (SILAC), when adapted to histones, permits the accurate quantification of PTM changes among distinct functional states; however, its application has been mainly confined to actively dividing cell lines. A spike-in strategy based on SILAC can be used to overcome this limitation and profile hPTMs across multiple samples. We describe here the adaptation of SILAC to the analysis of histones, in both standard and spike-in setups. We also illustrate its coupling to an implemented "shotgun" workflow, by which heavy arginine-labeled histone peptides, produced upon Arg-C digestion, are qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed in an LC-MS/MS system that combines ultrahigh-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) with new-generation Orbitrap high-resolution instrument.

  13. Nitric oxide regulates gene expression in cancers by controlling histone posttranslational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Divya; Hickok, Jason R.; Bovee, Rhea C.; Pham, Vy; Mantell, Lin L.; Bahroos, Neil; Kanabar, Pinal; Cao, Xing-Jun; Maienschein-Cline, Mark; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Thomas, Douglas D.

    2015-01-01

    Altered nitric oxide (•NO) metabolism underlies cancer pathology, but mechanisms explaining many •NO-associated phenotypes remain unclear. We have found that cellular exposure to •NO changes histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs) by directly inhibiting the catalytic activity of JmjC-domain containing histone demethylases. Herein, we describe how •NO exposure links modulation of histone PTMs to gene expression changes that promote oncogenesis. Through high-resolution mass spectrometry, we generated an extensive map of •NO-mediated histone PTM changes at 15 critical lysine residues on the core histones H3 and H4. Concomitant microarray analysis demonstrated that exposure to physiologic •NO resulted in the differential expression of over 6,500 genes in breast cancer cells. Measurements of the association of H3K9me2 and H3K9ac across genomic loci revealed that differential distribution of these particular PTMs correlated with changes in the level of expression of numerous oncogenes, consistent with epigenetic code. Our results establish that •NO functions as an epigenetic regulator of gene expression mediated by changes in histone PTMs. PMID:26542213

  14. Post-Translational Modifications of Histones in Vertebrate Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mitrousis, Nikolaos; Tropepe, Vincent; Hermanson, Ola

    2015-01-01

    The process of neurogenesis, through which the entire nervous system of an organism is formed, has attracted immense scientific attention for decades. How can a single neural stem cell give rise to astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and neurons? Furthermore, how is a neuron led to choose between the hundreds of different neuronal subtypes that the vertebrate CNS contains? Traditionally, niche signals and transcription factors have been on the spotlight. Recent research is increasingly demonstrating that the answer may partially lie in epigenetic regulation of gene expression. In this article, we comprehensively review the role of post-translational histone modifications in neurogenesis in both the embryonic and adult CNS. PMID:26733796

  15. Compendium of aberrant DNA methylation and histone modifications in cancer.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Naoko; Ushijima, Toshikazu

    2014-12-05

    Epigenetics now refers to the study or research field related to DNA methylation and histone modifications. Historically, global DNA hypomethylation was first revealed in 1983, and, after a decade, silencing of a tumor suppressor gene by regional DNA hypermethylation was reported. After the proposal of the histone code in the 2000s, alterations of histone methylation were also identified in cancers. Now, it is established that aberrant epigenetic alterations are involved in cancer development and progression, along with mutations and chromosomal losses. Recent cancer genome analyses have revealed a large number of mutations of epigenetic modifiers, supporting their important roles in cancer pathogenesis. Taking advantage of the reversibility of epigenetic alterations, drugs targeting epigenetic regulators and readers have been developed for restoration of normal pattern of the epigenome, and some have already demonstrated clinical benefits. In addition, DNA methylation of specific marker genes can be used as a biomarker for cancer diagnosis, including risk diagnosis, detection of cancers, and pathophysiological diagnosis. In this paper, we will summarize the major concepts of cancer epigenetics, placing emphasis on history.

  16. Nuclear lactate dehydrogenase modulates histone modification in human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Castonguay, Zachary; Auger, Christopher; Thomas, Sean C.; Chahma, M’hamed; Appanna, Vasu D.

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Nuclear LDH is up-regulated under oxidative stress. • SIRT1 is co-immunoprecipitated bound to nuclear LDH. • Nuclear LDH is involved in histone deacetylation and epigenetics. - Abstract: It is becoming increasingly apparent that the nucleus harbors metabolic enzymes that affect genetic transforming events. Here, we describe a nuclear isoform of lactate dehydrogenase (nLDH) and its ability to orchestrate histone deacetylation by controlling the availability of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}), a key ingredient of the sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) deacetylase system. There was an increase in the expression of nLDH concomitant with the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in the culture medium. Under oxidative stress, the NAD{sup +} generated by nLDH resulted in the enhanced deacetylation of histones compared to the control hepatocytes despite no discernable change in the levels of SIRT1. There appeared to be an intimate association between nLDH and SIRT1 as these two enzymes co-immunoprecipitated. The ability of nLDH to regulate epigenetic modifications by manipulating NAD{sup +} reveals an intricate link between metabolism and the processing of genetic information.

  17. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha enhances neutrophil adhesiveness: induction of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 via activation of Akt and CaM kinase II and modifications of histone acetyltransferase and histone deacetylase 4 in human tracheal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chiang-Wen; Lin, Chih-Chung; Luo, Shue-Fen; Lee, Hui-Chun; Lee, I-Ta; Aird, William C; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2008-05-01

    Up-regulation of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) involves adhesions between both circulating and resident leukocytes and the human tracheal smooth muscle cells (HTSMCs) during airway inflammatory reaction. We have demonstrated previously that tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-induced VCAM-1 expression is regulated by mitogen-activated protein kinases, nuclear factor-kappaB, and p300 activation in HTSMCs. In addition to this pathway, phosphorylation of Akt and CaM kinase II has been implicated in histone acetyltransferase and histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) activation. Here, we investigated whether these different mechanisms participated in TNF-alpha-induced VCAM-1 expression and enhanced neutrophil adhesion. TNF-alpha significantly increased HTSMC-neutrophil adhesions, and this effect was associated with increased expression of VCAM-1 on the HTSMCs and was blocked by the selective inhibitors of Src [4-amino-5-(4-methylphenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]-pyrimidine (PP1)], epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR; 4-(3'-chloroanilino)-6,7-dimethoxy-quinazoline, (AG1478)], phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) [2-(4-morpholinyl)-8-phenyl-1(4H)-benzopyran-4-one hydrochloride(LY294002) and wortmannin],calcium[1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethyl ester; BAPTA-AM], phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C (PLC) [1-[6-[[17beta-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl]amino]hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione (U73122)], protein kinase C (PKC) [12-(2-cyanoethyl)-6,7,12, 13-tetrahydro-13-methyl-5-oxo-5H-indolo(2,3-a)pyrrolo(3,4-c)-carbazole (Gö6976), rottlerin, and 3-1-[3-(amidinothio)propyl-1H-indol-3-yl]-3-(1-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl) maleimide (bisindolylmaleimide IX) (Ro 31-8220)], CaM (calmidazolium chloride), CaM kinase II [(8R(*),9S(*),11S(*))-(-)-9-hydroxy-9-methoxycarbonyl-8-methyl-14-n-propoxy-2,3,9, 10-tetrahydro-8,11-epoxy, 1H,8H, 11H-2,7b,11a-triazadibenzo[a,g]cycloocta[cde]trinden-1-one (KT5926) and 1-[N,O-bis(5-isoquinolinesulfonyl

  18. Global histone post-translational modifications and cancer: Biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shafqat Ali; Reddy, Divya; Gupta, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Global alterations in epigenetic landscape are now recognized as a hallmark of cancer. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modifications, nucleosome positioning and non-coding RNAs are proven to have strong association with cancer. In particular, covalent post-translational modifications of histone proteins are known to play an important role in chromatin remodeling and thereby in regulation of gene expression. Further, histone modifications have also been associated with different aspects of carcinogenesis and have been studied for their role in the better management of cancer patients. In this review, we will explore and discuss how histone modifications are involved in cancer diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. PMID:26629316

  19. A novel, enigmatic histone modification: biotinylation of histones by holocarboxylase synthetase.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Yousef I; Zempleni, Janos

    2008-12-01

    Holocarboxylase synthetase catalyzes the covalent binding of biotin to histones in humans and other eukaryotes. Eleven biotinylation sites have been identified in histones H2A, H3, and H4. K12-biotinylated histone H4 is enriched in heterochromatin, repeat regions, and plays a role in gene repression. About 30% of the histone H4 molecules are biotinylated at K12 in histone H4 in human fibroblast telomeres. The abundance of biotinylated histones at distinct genomic loci depends on biotin availability. Decreased histone biotinylation decreases life span and stress resistance in Drosophila. Low enrichment of biotinylated histones at transposable elements impairs repression of these elements.

  20. Comparison of peptide mass mapping and electron capture dissociation as assays for histone posttranslational modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liwen; Freitas, Michael A.

    2004-05-01

    Posttranslational modifications of core histones play a critical role in the structure of chromatin and the regulation of gene activities. Improved techniques for determining these modification sites may lead to a better understanding of histone regulation at the molecular level. LC-MS peptide mass mapping was performed on pepsin, trypsin and Glu-C digests of bovine thymus H4 using a QqTOF instrument. The well established modification sites of H4 (acetylation of K8, 12, 16 and methylation of K20) were observed in addition to several recently discovered modifications including: methylation of K31, 44, 59 and acetylation of K20, 77, 79. For comparison, electron capture dissociation (ECD) was performed on intact H4 along with several peptides from enzymatic digestion. The results from the ECD experiments of histone H4 indicated the acetylation of K5, 12, 16, 31, 91 and the methylation of K20 and 59 in good agreement with the result from peptide mapping. The work is dedicated to Alan G. Marshall on his 60th birthday. His endeavors in the advancement of FT-ICR facilitated experiments reported herein.

  1. Mass spectrometry-based strategies for characterization of histones and their post-translational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiaodan; Ren, Chen; Freitas, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    Due to the intimate interactions between histones and DNA, the characterization of histones has become the focus of great attention. A series of mass spectrometry-based technologies have been dedicated to the characterization and quantitation of different histone forms. This review focuses on the discussion of mass spectrometry-based strategies used for the characterization of histones and their post-translational modifications. PMID:17425457

  2. Tracking epigenetic histone modifications in single cells using Fab-based live endogenous modification labeling.

    PubMed

    Hayashi-Takanaka, Yoko; Yamagata, Kazuo; Wakayama, Teruhiko; Stasevich, Timothy J; Kainuma, Takashi; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Tachibana, Makoto; Shinkai, Yoichi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Nozaki, Naohito; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2011-08-01

    Histone modifications play an important role in epigenetic gene regulation and genome integrity. It remains largely unknown, however, how these modifications dynamically change in individual cells. By using fluorescently labeled specific antigen binding fragments (Fabs), we have developed a general method to monitor the distribution and global level of endogenous histone H3 lysine modifications in living cells without disturbing cell growth and embryo development. Fabs produce distinct nuclear patterns that are characteristic of their target modifications. H3K27 trimethylation-specific Fabs, for example, are concentrated on inactive X chromosomes. As Fabs bind their targets transiently, the ratio of bound and free molecules depends on the target concentration, allowing us to measure changes in global modification levels. High-affinity Fabs are suitable for mouse embryo imaging, so we have used them to monitor H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation levels in mouse preimplantation embryos produced by in vitro fertilization and somatic cell nuclear transfer. The data suggest that a high level of H3K27 acetylation is important for normal embryo development. As Fab-based live endogenous modification labeling (FabLEM) is broadly useful for visualizing any modification, it should be a powerful tool for studying cell signaling and diagnosis in the future.

  3. Post-translational modifications of linker histone H1 variants in mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkova, T. Yu; Polyanichko, A. M.; Artamonova, T. O.; Khodorkovskii, M. A.; Kostyleva, E. I.; Chikhirzhina, E. V.; Tomilin, A. N.

    2017-02-01

    The covalent modifications of the linker histone H1 and the core histones are thought to play an important role in the control of chromatin functioning. Histone H1 variants from K562 cell line (hH1), mouse (mH1) and calf (cH1) thymi were studied by matrix-activated laser desorption/ionization fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass-spectroscopy (MALDI-FT-ICR-MS). The proteomics analysis revealed novel post-translational modifications of the histone H1, such as meK34-mH1.4, meK35-cH1.1, meK35-mH1.1, meK75-hH1.2, meK75-hH1.3, acK26-hH1.4, acK26-hH1.3 and acK17-hH1.1. The comparison of the hH1, mH1 and cH1 proteins has demonstrated that the types and positions of the post-translational modifications of the globular domains of the H1.2–H1.4 variants are very conservative. However, the post-translational modifications of the N- and C-terminal tails of H1.2, H1.3 and H1.4 are different. The differences of post-translational modifications in the N- and C-terminal tails of H1.2, H1.3 and H1.4 likely lead to the differences in DNA-H1 and H1-protein interactions.

  4. Post-translational modifications of linker histone H1 variants in mammals.

    PubMed

    Starkova, T Yu; Polyanichko, A M; Artamonova, T O; Khodorkovskii, M A; Kostyleva, E I; Chikhirzhina, E V; Tomilin, A N

    2017-02-16

    The covalent modifications of the linker histone H1 and the core histones are thought to play an important role in the control of chromatin functioning. Histone H1 variants from K562 cell line (hH1), mouse (mH1) and calf (cH1) thymi were studied by matrix-activated laser desorption/ionization fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass-spectroscopy (MALDI-FT-ICR-MS). The proteomics analysis revealed novel post-translational modifications of the histone H1, such as meK34-mH1.4, meK35-cH1.1, meK35-mH1.1, meK75-hH1.2, meK75-hH1.3, acK26-hH1.4, acK26-hH1.3 and acK17-hH1.1. The comparison of the hH1, mH1 and cH1 proteins has demonstrated that the types and positions of the post-translational modifications of the globular domains of the H1.2-H1.4 variants are very conservative. However, the post-translational modifications of the N- and C-terminal tails of H1.2, H1.3 and H1.4 are different. The differences of post-translational modifications in the N- and C-terminal tails of H1.2, H1.3 and H1.4 likely lead to the differences in DNA-H1 and H1-protein interactions.

  5. Chromatin Proteomics Reveals Variable Histone Modifications during the Life Cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    de Jesus, Teresa Cristina Leandro; Nunes, Vinícius Santana; Lopes, Mariana de Camargo; Martil, Daiana Evelin; Iwai, Leo Kei; Moretti, Nilmar Silvio; Machado, Fabrício Castro; de Lima-Stein, Mariana L; Thiemann, Otavio Henrique; Elias, Maria Carolina; Janzen, Christian; Schenkman, Sergio; da Cunha, Julia Pinheiro Chagas

    2016-06-03

    Histones are well-conserved proteins that form the basic structure of chromatin in eukaryotes and undergo several post-translational modifications, which are important for the control of transcription, replication, DNA damage repair, and chromosome condensation. In early branched organisms, histones are less conserved and appear to contain alternative sites for modifications, which could reveal evolutionary unique functions of histone modifications in gene expression and other chromatin-based processes. Here, by using high-resolution mass spectrometry, we identified and quantified histone post-translational modifications in two life cycle stages of Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas disease. We detected 44 new modifications, namely: 18 acetylations, seven monomethylations, seven dimethylations, seven trimethylations, and four phosphorylations. We found that replicative (epimastigote stage) contains more histone modifications than nonreplicative and infective parasites (trypomastigote stage). Acetylations of lysines at the C-terminus of histone H2A and methylations of lysine 23 of histone H3 were found to be enriched in trypomastigotes. In contrast, phosphorylation in serine 23 of H2B and methylations of lysine 76 of histone H3 predominates in proliferative states. The presence of one or two methylations in the lysine 76 was found in cells undergoing mitosis and cytokinesis, typical of proliferating parasites. Our findings provide new insights into the role of histone modifications related to the control of gene expression and cell-cycle regulation in an early divergent organism.

  6. Barrier-to-Autointegration Factor influences specific histone modifications

    PubMed Central

    Montes de Oca, Rocío; Andreassen, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Defects in the nuclear envelope or nuclear ‘lamina’ networks cause disease and can perturb histone posttranslational (epigenetic) regulation. Barrier-to-Autointegration Factor (BAF) is an essential but enigmatic lamina component that binds lamins, LEM-domain proteins, DNA and histone H3 directly. We report that BAF copurified with nuclease-digested mononucleosomes and associated with modified histones in vivo. BAF overexpression significantly reduced global histone H3 acetylation by 18%. In cells that stably overexpressed BAF 3-fold, silencing mark H3-K27-Me1/3 and active marks H4-K16-Ac and H4-Ac5 decreased significantly. Significant increases were also seen for silencing mark H3-K9-Me3, active marks H3-K4-Me2, H3-K9/K14-Ac and H4-K5-Ac and a mark (H3-K79-Me2) associated with both active and silent chromatin. Other increases (H3-S10-P, H3-S28-P and silencing mark H3-K9-Me2) did not reach statistical significance. BAF overexpression also significantly influenced cell cycle distribution. Moreover, BAF associated in vivo with SET/I2PP2A (protein phosphatase 2A inhibitor; blocks H3 dephosphorylation) and G9a (H3-K9 methyltransferase), but showed no detectable association with HDAC1 or HATs. These findings reveal BAF as a novel epigenetic regulator and are discussed in relation to BAF deficiency phenotypes, which include a hereditary progeria syndrome and loss of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells. PMID:22127260

  7. Barrier-to-Autointegration Factor influences specific histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Montes de Oca, Rocío; Andreassen, Paul R; Wilson, Katherine L

    2011-01-01

    Defects in the nuclear envelope or nuclear 'lamina' networks cause disease and can perturb histone posttranslational (epigenetic) regulation. Barrier-to-Autointegration Factor (BAF) is an essential but enigmatic lamina component that binds lamins, LEM-domain proteins, DNA and histone H3 directly. We report that BAF copurified with nuclease-digested mononucleosomes and associated with modified histones in vivo. BAF overexpression significantly reduced global histone H3 acetylation by 18%. In cells that stably overexpressed BAF 3-fold, silencing mark H3-K27-Me1/3 and active marks H4-K16-Ac and H4-Ac5 decreased significantly. Significant increases were also seen for silencing mark H3-K9-Me3, active marks H3-K4-Me2, H3-K9/K14-Ac and H4-K5-Ac and a mark (H3-K79-Me2) associated with both active and silent chromatin. Other increases (H3-S10-P, H3-S28-P and silencing mark H3-K9-Me2) did not reach statistical significance. BAF overexpression also significantly influenced cell cycle distribution. Moreover, BAF associated in vivo with SET/I2PP2A (protein phosphatase 2A inhibitor; blocks H3 dephosphorylation) and G9a (H3-K9 methyltransferase), but showed no detectable association with HDAC1 or HATs. These findings reveal BAF as a novel epigenetic regulator and are discussed in relation to BAF deficiency phenotypes, which include a hereditary progeria syndrome and loss of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells.

  8. ChIPnorm: A Statistical Method for Normalizing and Identifying Differential Regions in Histone Modification ChIP-seq Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Bucher, Philipp; Moret, Bernard M. E.

    2012-01-01

    The advent of high-throughput technologies such as ChIP-seq has made possible the study of histone modifications. A problem of particular interest is the identification of regions of the genome where different cell types from the same organism exhibit different patterns of histone enrichment. This problem turns out to be surprisingly difficult, even in simple pairwise comparisons, because of the significant level of noise in ChIP-seq data. In this paper we propose a two-stage statistical method, called ChIPnorm, to normalize ChIP-seq data, and to find differential regions in the genome, given two libraries of histone modifications of different cell types. We show that the ChIPnorm method removes most of the noise and bias in the data and outperforms other normalization methods. We correlate the histone marks with gene expression data and confirm that histone modifications H3K27me3 and H3K4me3 act as respectively a repressor and an activator of genes. Compared to what was previously reported in the literature, we find that a substantially higher fraction of bivalent marks in ES cells for H3K27me3 and H3K4me3 move into a K27-only state. We find that most of the promoter regions in protein-coding genes have differential histone-modification sites. The software for this work can be downloaded from http://lcbb.epfl.ch/software.html. PMID:22870189

  9. Quantitative Assessment of Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Grade Antibodies Directed against Histone Modifications Reveals Patterns of Co-occurring Marks on Histone Protein Molecules*

    PubMed Central

    Peach, Sally E.; Rudomin, Emily L.; Udeshi, Namrata D.; Carr, Steven A.; Jaffe, Jacob D.

    2012-01-01

    The defining step in most chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays is the use of an antibody to enrich for a particular protein or histone modification state associated with segments of chromatin. The specificity of the antibody is critical to the interpretation of the experiment, yet this property is rarely reported. Here, we present a quantitative method using mass spectrometry to characterize the specificity of key histone H3 modification-targeting antibodies that have previously been used to characterize the “histone code.” We further extend the use of these antibody reagents to the observation of long range correlations among disparate histone modifications. Using purified human histones representing the mixture of chromatin states present in living cells, we were able to quantify the degree of target enrichment and the specificity of several commonly used, commercially available ChIP grade antibodies. We found significant differences in enrichment efficiency among various reagents directed against four frequently studied chromatin marks: H3K4me2, H3K4me3, H3K9me3, and H3K27me3. For some antibodies, we also detected significant off target enrichment of alternate modifications at the same site (i.e., enrichment of H3K4me2 by an antibody directed against H3K4me3). Through cluster analysis, we were able to recognize patterns of co-enrichment of marks at different sites on the same histone protein. Surprisingly, these co-enrichments corresponded well to “canonical” chromatin states that are exemplary of activated and repressed regions of chromatin. Altogether, our findings suggest that 1) the results of ChIP experiments need to be evaluated with caution given the potential for cross-reactivity of the commonly used histone modification recognizing antibodies, 2) multiple marks with consistent biological interpretation exist on the same histone protein molecule, and 3) some components of the histone code may be transduced on single proteins in living

  10. Histone Posttranslational Modifications of CD4+ T Cell in Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zijun; Yin, Heng; Lau, Chak Sing; Lu, Qianjin

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of immune system is tempered by precise regulation to maintain stabilization when exposed to various conditions. A subtle change in gene expression may be magnified when drastic changes are brought about in cellular development and function. Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) timely alter the functional activity of immune system, and work proceeded in these years has begun to throw light upon it. Posttranslational modifications of histone tails have been mentioned in a large scale of biological developments and disease progression, thereby making them a central field to investigate. Conventional assessments of these changes are centered on the transcription factors and cytokines in T cells regulated by variable histone codes to achieve chromatin remodeling, as well as involved in many human diseases, especially autoimmune diseases. We here put forward an essential review of core posttranslational modulations that regulate T cell function and differentiation in the immune system, with a special emphasis on histone modifications in different T helper cell subsets as well as in autoimmune diseases. PMID:27669210

  11. Transcriptional regulation by histone modifications: towards a theory of chromatin re-organization during stem cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Hans; Steiner, Lydia; Przybilla, Jens; Rohlf, Thimo; Prohaska, Sonja; Galle, Jörg

    2013-04-01

    Chromatin-related mechanisms, as e.g. histone modifications, are known to be involved in regulatory switches within the transcriptome. Only recently, mathematical models of these mechanisms have been established. So far they have not been applied to genome-wide data. We here introduce a mathematical model of transcriptional regulation by histone modifications and apply it to data of trimethylation of histone 3 at lysine 4 (H3K4me3) and 27 (H3K27me3) in mouse pluripotent and lineage-committed cells. The model describes binding of protein complexes to chromatin which are capable of reading and writing histone marks. Molecular interactions of the complexes with DNA and modified histones create a regulatory switch of transcriptional activity. The regulatory states of the switch depend on the activity of histone (de-) methylases, the strength of complex-DNA-binding and the number of nucleosomes capable of cooperatively contributing to complex-binding. Our model explains experimentally measured length distributions of modified chromatin regions. It suggests (i) that high CpG-density facilitates recruitment of the modifying complexes in embryonic stem cells and (ii) that re-organization of extended chromatin regions during lineage specification into neuronal progenitor cells requires targeted de-modification. Our approach represents a basic step towards multi-scale models of transcriptional control during development and lineage specification.

  12. Transcriptional regulation by histone modifications: towards a theory of chromatin re-organization during stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Binder, Hans; Steiner, Lydia; Przybilla, Jens; Rohlf, Thimo; Prohaska, Sonja; Galle, Jörg

    2013-04-01

    Chromatin-related mechanisms, as e.g. histone modifications, are known to be involved in regulatory switches within the transcriptome. Only recently, mathematical models of these mechanisms have been established. So far they have not been applied to genome-wide data. We here introduce a mathematical model of transcriptional regulation by histone modifications and apply it to data of trimethylation of histone 3 at lysine 4 (H3K4me3) and 27 (H3K27me3) in mouse pluripotent and lineage-committed cells. The model describes binding of protein complexes to chromatin which are capable of reading and writing histone marks. Molecular interactions of the complexes with DNA and modified histones create a regulatory switch of transcriptional activity. The regulatory states of the switch depend on the activity of histone (de-) methylases, the strength of complex-DNA-binding and the number of nucleosomes capable of cooperatively contributing to complex-binding. Our model explains experimentally measured length distributions of modified chromatin regions. It suggests (i) that high CpG-density facilitates recruitment of the modifying complexes in embryonic stem cells and (ii) that re-organization of extended chromatin regions during lineage specification into neuronal progenitor cells requires targeted de-modification. Our approach represents a basic step towards multi-scale models of transcriptional control during development and lineage specification.

  13. Application of histone modification-specific interaction domains as an alternative to antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Kungulovski, Goran; Kycia, Ina; Tamas, Raluca; Jurkowska, Renata Z.; Kudithipudi, Srikanth; Henry, Chisato; Reinhardt, Richard; Labhart, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histones constitute a major chromatin indexing mechanism, and their proper characterization is of highest biological importance. So far, PTM-specific antibodies have been the standard reagent for studying histone PTMs despite caveats such as lot-to-lot variability of specificity and binding affinity. Herein, we successfully employed naturally occurring and engineered histone modification interacting domains for detection and identification of histone PTMs and ChIP-like enrichment of different types of chromatin. Our results demonstrate that histone interacting domains are robust and highly specific reagents that can replace or complement histone modification antibodies. These domains can be produced recombinantly in Escherichia coli at low cost and constant quality. Protein design of reading domains allows for generation of novel specificities, addition of affinity tags, and preparation of PTM binding pocket variants as matching negative controls, which is not possible with antibodies. PMID:25301795

  14. Association analysis between the distributions of histone modifications and gene expression in the human embryonic stem cell.

    PubMed

    Su, Wen-Xia; Li, Qian-Zhong; Zuo, Yong-Chun; Zhang, Lu-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that histone modifications are associated with gene expression. In order to further study this relationship, 16 kinds of Chip-seq histone modification data and mRNA-seq data of the human embryonic stem cell H1 are chosen. The distributions of histone modifications in the regions flanking transcription start sites (TSSs) for highly expressed and lowly expressed genes are computed, respectively. And four types of distributions of histone modifications in regions flanking TSSs and the spatial patterning of the correlations between histone modifications and gene expression are detected. Our results suggest that the correlations between the regions overlapped by peaks are higher than the non-overlapped ones for each histone modification. In addition, to obtain the effect of the cooperative action of histone modification on gene expression, five histone modification clusters are found in highly expressed and lowly expressed genes, histone modification and gene expression interaction network is constructed. To further explore which region is the main target region for the specific histone modification, the human genes are divided into five functional regions. The results indicate that histone modifications are mostly located in the promoters of highly expressed genes versus the exons of lowly expressed genes, and exons have a smaller range of normalized tag counts than other gene elements in the two groups of genes. Finally, the type specificity and regional bias of histone modifications for 11 key transcription factor genes regulating the stem cell renewal are analyzed.

  15. Quantification of histone modifications by parallel-reaction monitoring: a method validation.

    PubMed

    Sowers, James L; Mirfattah, Barsam; Xu, Pei; Tang, Hui; Park, In Young; Walker, Cheryl; Wu, Ping; Laezza, Fernanda; Sowers, Lawrence C; Zhang, Kangling

    2015-10-06

    Abnormal epigenetic reprogramming is one of the major causes leading to irregular gene expression and regulatory pathway perturbations, in the cells, resulting in unhealthy cell development or diseases. Accurate measurements of these changes of epigenetic modifications, especially the complex histone modifications, are very important, and the methods for these measurements are not trivial. By following our previous introduction of PRM to targeting histone modifications (Tang, H.; Fang, H.; Yin, E.; Brasier, A. R.; Sowers, L. C.; Zhang, K. Multiplexed parallel reaction monitoring targeting histone modifications on the QExactive mass spectrometer. Anal. Chem. 2014, 86 (11), 5526-34), herein we validated this method by varying the protein/trypsin ratios via serial dilutions. Our data demonstrated that PRM with SILAC histones as the internal standards allowed reproducible measurements of histone H3/H4 acetylation and methylation in the samples whose histone contents differ at least one-order of magnitude. The method was further validated by histones isolated from histone H3 K36 trimethyltransferase SETD2 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) cells. Furthermore, histone acetylation and methylation in human neural stem cells (hNSC) treated with ascorbic acid phosphate (AAP) were measured by this method, revealing that H3 K36 trimethylation was significantly down-regulated by 6 days of treatment with vitamin C.

  16. Global Levels of Histone Modifications in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Subjects with Exposure to Nickel

    PubMed Central

    Arita, Adriana; Niu, Jingping; Qu, Qingshan; Zhao, Najuan; Ruan, Ye; Nadas, Arthur; Chervona, Yana; Wu, Fen; Sun, Hong; Hayes, Richard B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Occupational exposure to nickel (Ni) is associated with an increased risk for lung and nasal cancers. Ni compounds exhibit weak mutagenic activity, cause gene amplification, and disrupt cellular epigenetic homeostasis. However, the Ni-induced changes in global histone modification levels have only been tested in vitro. Objective: This study was conducted in a Chinese population to determine whether occupational exposure to Ni is associated with alterations of global histone modification levels and to evaluate the inter- and intraindividual variance of global histone modification levels. Method: Forty-five subjects with occupational exposure to Ni and 75 referents were recruited. Urinary Ni and global H3K4 trimethylation, H3K9 acetylation, and H3K9 dimethylation levels were measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of subjects. Results: H3K4me3 was elevated in Ni-exposed subjects (0.25% ± 0.11%) compared with referents (0.15% ± 0.04%; p = 0.0004), and H3K9me2 was decreased (Ni-exposed subjects, 0.11% ± 0.05%; referents, 0.15% ± 0.04%; p = 0.003). H3K4me3 was positively (r = 0.4, p = 0.0008) and H3K9ac was negatively (r = 0.1, p = 0.01) associated with urinary Ni. Interindividual variances of H3K4me3, H3K9ac, and H3K9me2 were larger compared with intraindividual variance in both exposure test groups, resulting in reliability coefficients (an estimate of consistency of a set of measurements) of 0.60, 0.67, and 0.79 for H3K4me3, H3K9ac, and H3K9me2, respectively, for Ni-exposed subjects and of 0.75, 0.74, and 0.97, respectively, for referent subjects. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that occupational exposure to Ni is associated with alterations of global histone modification levels and that measurements of global levels of histone modifications are relatively stable over time in human PBMCs. PMID:22024396

  17. Evaluation of proteomic search engines for the analysis of histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zuo-Fei; Lin, Shu; Molden, Rosalynn C; Garcia, Benjamin A

    2014-10-03

    Identification of histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) is challenging for proteomics search engines. Including many histone PTMs in one search increases the number of candidate peptides dramatically, leading to low search speed and fewer identified spectra. To evaluate database search engines on identifying histone PTMs, we present a method in which one kind of modification is searched each time, for example, unmodified, individually modified, and multimodified, each search result is filtered with false discovery rate less than 1%, and the identifications of multiple search engines are combined to obtain confident results. We apply this method for eight search engines on histone data sets. We find that two search engines, pFind and Mascot, identify most of the confident results at a reasonable speed, so we recommend using them to identify histone modifications. During the evaluation, we also find some important aspects for the analysis of histone modifications. Our evaluation of different search engines on identifying histone modifications will hopefully help those who are hoping to enter the histone proteomics field. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the data set identifier PXD001118.

  18. Evaluation of Proteomic Search Engines for the Analysis of Histone Modifications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Identification of histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) is challenging for proteomics search engines. Including many histone PTMs in one search increases the number of candidate peptides dramatically, leading to low search speed and fewer identified spectra. To evaluate database search engines on identifying histone PTMs, we present a method in which one kind of modification is searched each time, for example, unmodified, individually modified, and multimodified, each search result is filtered with false discovery rate less than 1%, and the identifications of multiple search engines are combined to obtain confident results. We apply this method for eight search engines on histone data sets. We find that two search engines, pFind and Mascot, identify most of the confident results at a reasonable speed, so we recommend using them to identify histone modifications. During the evaluation, we also find some important aspects for the analysis of histone modifications. Our evaluation of different search engines on identifying histone modifications will hopefully help those who are hoping to enter the histone proteomics field. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the data set identifier PXD001118. PMID:25167464

  19. The relationship between apoptosis, chromatin configuration, histone modification and competence of oocytes: A study using the mouse ovary-holding stress model

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Juan; Chen, Fei; Sun, Ming-Ju; Zhu, Jiang; Li, You-Wei; Pan, Liu-Zhu; Zhang, Jie; Tan, Jing-He

    2016-01-01

    The epigenetic factors causing competence differences between SN (surrounded nucleolus) and NSN (non-surrounded nucleolus) oocytes, the significance for the increased histone acetylation and methylation in SN oocytes, and whether chromatin configuration or histone modification determines oocyte competence, are unclear. This study has addressed these issues by using the ovary-holding (OH) stress models where oocyte SN configuration was uncoupled from histone modifications and developmental potential. Prepubertal mouse ovaries containing high percentages of NSN oocytes were preserved at 37 or 39 °C for 1 or 2 h before examination for oocyte chromatin configuration, developmental competence, histone modification and apoptosis. Whereas 1-h OH at 37 °C caused a moderate apoptosis with increased oocyte competence, improved histone modification and a normal NSN-to-SN transition, harsher OH conditions induced a severe apoptosis with decreased oocyte competence, impaired histone modification and a pseudo (premature) NSN-to-SN transition. Observations on Fas/FasL expression and using the gld (generalized lymphoproliferative disorder) mice harboring FasL mutations indicated that OH triggered oocyte apoptosis with activation of the Fas signaling. It was concluded that OH stress caused oocyte apoptosis with activation of the Fas/FasL system and that oocyte competence was more closely correlated with histone modification than with chromatin configuration. PMID:27321442

  20. Characterization of histone H3K27 modifications in the {beta}-globin locus

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yea Woon; Kim, AeRi

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} The {beta}-globin locus control region is hyperacetylated and monomethylated at histone H3K27. {yields} Highly transcribed globin genes are marked by H3K27ac, but H3K27me2 is remarkable at silent globin genes in erythroid K562 cells. {yields} Association of PRC2 subunits is comparable with H3K27me3 pattern. {yields} Modifications of histone H3K27 are established in an enhancer-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Histone H3K27 is acetylated or methylated in the environment of nuclear chromatin. Here, to characterize the modification pattern of H3K27 in locus control region (LCR) and to understand the correlation of various H3K27 modifications with transcriptional activity of genes, we analyzed the human {beta}-globin locus using the ChIP assay. The LCR of the human {beta}-globin locus was enriched by H3K27ac and H3K27me1 in erythroid K562 cells. The highly transcribed globin genes were hyperacetylated at H3K27, but the repressed globin genes were highly dimethylated at this lysine in these cells. However, in non-erythroid 293FT cells, the {beta}-globin locus was marked by a high level of H3K27me3. EZH2 and SUZ12, subunits of polycomb repressive complex 2, were comparably detected with the H3K27me3 pattern in K562 and 293FT cells. In addition, H3K27ac, H3K27me1 and H3K27me3 were established in an enhancer-dependent manner in a model minichromosomal locus containing an enhancer and its target gene. Taken together, these results show that H3K27 modifications have distinctive correlations with the chromatin state or transcription level of genes and are influenced by an enhancer.

  1. Characterization of individual histone post-translational modifications and their combinatorial patterns by mass spectrometry-based proteomics strategies

    PubMed Central

    Sidoli, Simone; Garcia, Benjamin A.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) play an essential role in chromatin biology, as they model chromatin structure and recruit enzymes involved in gene regulation, DNA repair and chromosome condensation. Such PTMs are mostly localized on histone N-terminal tails where, as single units or in a combinatorial manner, influence chromatin reader protein binding and fine-tune the abovementioned activities. Mass spectrometry (MS) is currently the most adopted strategy to characterize proteins and protein PTMs. We hereby describe the protocols to identify and quantify histone PTMs and their patterns using either bottom-up or middle-down proteomics. In the bottom-up strategy we obtain 5–20 aa peptides by derivatization with propionylation followed by trypsin digestion. The newly generated N-termini of histone peptides can be further derivatized with light or isotopically heavy propionyl groups to increase chromatographic retention and allow multiplexed analyses. Moreover, we describe how to perform derivatization and trypsin digestion of histones loaded into a gel, which is usually the final step of immunoprecipitation experiments. In the middle-down strategy we obtain intact histone tails of 50–60 aa by digestion with the enzyme GluC. This allows characterization of combinatorial histone PTMs on N-terminal tails. PMID:27854019

  2. Modulations of DNA Contacts by Linker Histones and Post-translational Modifications Determine the Mobility and Modifiability of Nucleosomal H3 Tails.

    PubMed

    Stützer, Alexandra; Liokatis, Stamatios; Kiesel, Anja; Schwarzer, Dirk; Sprangers, Remco; Söding, Johannes; Selenko, Philipp; Fischle, Wolfgang

    2016-01-21

    Post-translational histone modifications and linker histone incorporation regulate chromatin structure and genome activity. How these systems interface on a molecular level is unclear. Using biochemistry and NMR spectroscopy, we deduced mechanistic insights into the modification behavior of N-terminal histone H3 tails in different nucleosomal contexts. We find that linker histones generally inhibit modifications of different H3 sites and reduce H3 tail dynamics in nucleosomes. These effects are caused by modulations of electrostatic interactions of H3 tails with linker DNA and largely depend on the C-terminal domains of linker histones. In agreement, linker histone occupancy and H3 tail modifications segregate on a genome-wide level. Charge-modulating modifications such as phosphorylation and acetylation weaken transient H3 tail-linker DNA interactions, increase H3 tail dynamics, and, concomitantly, enhance general modifiability. We propose that alterations of H3 tail-linker DNA interactions by linker histones and charge-modulating modifications execute basal control mechanisms of chromatin function.

  3. ChIp-seq of bovine cells (MDBK) to study butyrate-induced histone modification with 10 datasets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Next-generation sequencing was combined with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) technology to analyze histone modification (acetylation) induced by butyrate and to map the epigenomic landscape of normal histone H3, H4 in rumen cells of the cow. Ten variants of histone H3 and H4 modification were m...

  4. RNF8-dependent histone modifications regulate nucleosome removal during spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lin-Yu; Wu, Jiaxue; Ye, Lin; Gavrilina, Galina B; Saunders, Thomas L; Yu, Xiaochun

    2010-03-16

    During spermatogenesis, global nucleosome removal occurs where histones are initially replaced by transition proteins and subsequently by protamines. This chromatin reorganization is thought to facilitate the compaction of the paternal genome into the sperm head and to protect the DNA from damaging agents. Histone ubiquitination has been suggested to be important for sex chromosome inactivation during meiotic prophase and nucleosome removal at postmeiotic stages. However, the mechanisms regulating these ubiquitin-mediated processes are unknown. In this study, we investigate the role of the ubiquitin ligase RNF8 during spermatogenesis and find that RNF8-deficient mice are proficient in meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) but deficient in global nucleosome removal. Moreover, we show that RNF8-dependent histone ubiquitination induces H4K16 acetylation, which may be an initial step in nucleosome removal. Thus, our results show that RNF8 plays an important role during spermatogenesis through histone ubiquitination, resulting in trans-histone acetylation and global nucleosome removal.

  5. Partial purification of histone H3 proteolytic activity from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Azad, Gajendra Kumar; Tomar, Raghuvir Singh

    2016-06-01

    The proteolytic clipping of histone tails has recently emerged as a novel form of irreversible post-translational modification (PTM) of histones. Histone clipping has been implicated as a regulatory process leading to the permanent removal of PTMs from histone proteins. However, there is scarcity of literature that describes the identification and characterization of histone-specific proteases. Here, we employed various biochemical methods to report histone H3-specific proteolytic activity from budding yeast. Our results demonstrate that H3 proteolytic activity was associated with sepharose bead matrices and activity was not affected by a variety of stress conditions. We have also identified the existence of an unknown protein that acts as a physiological inhibitor of the H3-clipping activity of yeast H3 protease. Moreover, through protease inhibition assays, we have also characterized yeast H3 protease as a serine protease. Interestingly, unlike glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), yeast H3 proteolytic activity was not inhibited by Stefin B. Together, our findings suggest the existence of a novel H3 protease in yeast that is different from other reported histone H3 proteases. The presence of histone H3 proteolytic activity, along with the physiological inhibitor in yeast, suggests an interesting molecular mechanism that regulates the activity of histone proteases. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Epigenetic engineering reveals a balance between histone modifications and transcription in kinetochore maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Oscar; Vargiu, Giulia; Abad, Maria Alba; Zhiteneva, Alisa; Jeyaprakash, A. Arockia; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Kouprina, Natalay; Larionov, Vladimir; Earnshaw, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Centromeres consist of specialized centrochromatin containing CENP-A nucleosomes intermingled with H3 nucleosomes carrying transcription-associated modifications. We have designed a novel synthetic biology ‘in situ epistasis' analysis in which H3 dimethylated on lysine 4 (H3K4me2) demethylase LSD2 plus synthetic modules with competing activities are simultaneously targeted to a synthetic alphoidtetO HAC centromere. This allows us to uncouple transcription from histone modifications at the centromere. Here, we report that H3K4me2 loss decreases centromeric transcription, CENP-A assembly and stability and causes spreading of H3K9me3 across the HAC, ultimately inactivating the centromere. Surprisingly, CENP-28/Eaf6-induced transcription of the alphoidtetO array associated with H4K12 acetylation does not rescue the phenotype, whereas p65-induced transcription associated with H3K9 acetylation does rescue. Thus mitotic transcription plus histone modifications including H3K9ac constitute the ‘epigenetic landscape' allowing CENP-A assembly and centrochromatin maintenance. H3K4me2 is required for the transcription and H3K9ac may form a barrier to prevent heterochromatin spreading and kinetochore inactivation at human centromeres. PMID:27841270

  7. Characterization of antimicrobial histone sequences and posttranslational modifications by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ouvry-Patat, Séverine A; Schey, Kevin L

    2007-05-01

    Histones typically play a role in DNA packaging and transcription regulation. These proteins are heavily modified by acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation and/or ubiquitination, and various combinations of these modifications alter histone functions and form the basis of the histone code. Furthermore, histones, including those found in shrimp, have recently been found to possess antimicrobial properties; however, the sequences and posttranslational modifications of shrimp histones are largely unknown. In this study mass spectrometry was used to characterize the primary structure of the shrimp antimicrobial histone. A combination of in-solution digestion and in-gel propionylation/digestion followed by LC-MS-MS and MALDI-TOF-TOF analysis was used. Over 80% of each histone sequence was obtained by in-solution digestion; however, none of the N-terminal domains was sequenced with this method. An in-gel propionylation method was optimized to recover and sequence the extremely hydrophilic histone N-termini. This method was then applied to shrimp hemocyte lysates separated on a 1-D SDS-PAGE gel. Overall, 95% coverage was obtained for the histone sequences as well as the identification of posttranslational sites such as acetylation, methylation and phosphorylation.

  8. Early life stress triggers sustained changes in histone deacetylase expression and histone H4 modifications that alter responsiveness to adolescent antidepressant treatment

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Amir; Worrell, Trent R.; Zimnisky, Ross; Schmauss, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Early life stress can elicit long-lasting changes in gene expression and behavior. Recent studies on rodents suggest that these lasting effects depend on the genetic background. Whether epigenetic factors also play a role remains to be investigated. Here we exposed the stress-susceptible mouse strain Balb/c and the more resilient strain C57Bl/6 to a powerful early life stress paradigm, infant maternal separation. In Balb/c mice, infant maternal separation led to decreased expression of mRNA encoding the histone deacetylases (HDACs) 1, 3, 7, 8, and 10 in the forebrain neocortex in adulthood, an effect accompanied by increased expression of acetylated histone H4 proteins, especially acetylated H4K12 protein. These changes in HDAC expression and histone modifications were not detected in C57Bl/6 mice exposed to early life stress. Moreover, a reversal of the H4K12 hyperacetylation detected in infant maternally separated Balb/c mice (achieved with chronic adolescent treatment with a low dose of theophylline that only activates HDACs) worsened the abnormal emotional phenotype resulting from this early life stress exposure. In contrast, fluoxetine, a drug with potent antidepressant efficacy in infant maternally separated Balb/c mice, potentiated all histone modifications triggered by early life stress. Moreover, in non-stressed Balb/c mice, co-administration of an HDAC inhibitor and fluoxetine, but not fluoxetine alone, elicited antidepressant effects and also triggered changes in histone H4 expression that were similar to those provoked by fluoxetine treatment of mice exposed to early life stress. These results suggest that Balb/c mice develop epigenetic modifications after early life stress exposure that, in terms of the emotive phenotype, are of adaptive nature, and that enhance the efficacy of antidepressant drugs. PMID:21964251

  9. Synergistic Modification Induced Specific Recognition between Histone and TRIM24 via Fluctuation Correlation Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinmai; Luo, Huajie; Liu, Hao; Ye, Wei; Luo, Ray; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Histone modification plays a key role in gene regulation and gene expression. TRIM24 as a histone reader can recognize histone modification. However the specific recognition mechanism between TRIM24 and histone modification is unsolved. Here, systems biology method of dynamics correlation network based on molecular dynamics simulation was used to answer the question. Our network analysis shows that the dynamics correlation network of H3K23ac is distinctly different from that of wild type and other modifications. A hypothesis of “synergistic modification induced recognition” is then proposed to link histone modification and TRIM24 binding. These observations were further confirmed from community analysis of networks with mutation and network perturbation. Finally, a possible recognition pathway is also identified based on the shortest path search for H3K23ac. Significant difference of recognition pathway was found among different systems due to methylation and acetylation modifications. The analysis presented here and other studies show that the dynamic network-based analysis might be a useful general strategy to study the biology of protein post-translational modification and associated recognition. PMID:27079666

  10. Synergistic Modification Induced Specific Recognition between Histone and TRIM24 via Fluctuation Correlation Network Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinmai; Luo, Huajie; Liu, Hao; Ye, Wei; Luo, Ray; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2016-04-01

    Histone modification plays a key role in gene regulation and gene expression. TRIM24 as a histone reader can recognize histone modification. However the specific recognition mechanism between TRIM24 and histone modification is unsolved. Here, systems biology method of dynamics correlation network based on molecular dynamics simulation was used to answer the question. Our network analysis shows that the dynamics correlation network of H3K23ac is distinctly different from that of wild type and other modifications. A hypothesis of “synergistic modification induced recognition” is then proposed to link histone modification and TRIM24 binding. These observations were further confirmed from community analysis of networks with mutation and network perturbation. Finally, a possible recognition pathway is also identified based on the shortest path search for H3K23ac. Significant difference of recognition pathway was found among different systems due to methylation and acetylation modifications. The analysis presented here and other studies show that the dynamic network-based analysis might be a useful general strategy to study the biology of protein post-translational modification and associated recognition.

  11. Assessment of Histone Tail Modifications and Transcriptional Profiling During Colon Cancer Progression Reveals a Global Decrease in H3K4me3 Activity.

    PubMed

    Triff, Karen; McLean, Mathew W; Konganti, Kranti; Pang, Jiahui; Callaway, Evelyn; Zhou, Beiyan; Ivanov, Ivan; Chapkin, Robert S

    2017-03-15

    During colon cancer, epigenetic alterations contribute to the dysregulation of major cellular functions and signaling pathways. Modifications in chromatin signatures such as H3K4me3 and H3K9ac, which are associated with transcriptionally active genes, can lead to genomic instability and perturb the expression of gene sets associated with oncogenic processes. In order to further elucidate early pre-tumorigenic epigenetic molecular events driving CRC, we integrated diverse, genome-wide, epigenetic inputs (by high throughput sequencing of RNA, H3K4me3, and H3K9ac) and compared differentially expressed transcripts (DE) and enriched regions (DER) in an in-vivo rat colon cancer progression model. Carcinogen (AOM) effects were detected genome-wide at the RNA (116 DE genes), K9ac (49 DERs including 24 genes) and K4me3 (7678 DERs including 3792 genes) level. RNA-seq differential expression and pathway analysis indicated that interferon-associated innate immune responses were impacted by AOM exposure. Despite extensive associations between K4me3 DERs and colon tumorigenesis (1210 genes were linked to colorectal carcinoma) including FOXO3, GNAI2, H2AFX, MSH2, NR3C1, PDCD4 and VEGFA, these changes were not reflected at the RNA gene expression level during early cancer progression. Collectively, our results indicate that carcinogen-induced changes in gene K4me3 DERs are harbingers of future transcriptional events, which drive malignant transformation of the colon.

  12. Differences in histone modifications between slow- and fast-twitch muscle of adult rats and following overload, denervation, or valproic acid administration.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Fuminori; Nimura, Keisuke; Ishino, Saki; Nakai, Naoya; Nakata, Ken; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2015-11-15

    Numerous studies have reported alterations in skeletal muscle properties and phenotypes in response to various stimuli such as exercise, unloading, and gene mutation. However, a shift in muscle fiber phenotype from fast twitch to slow twitch is not completely induced by stimuli. This limitation is hypothesized to result from the epigenetic differences between muscle types. The main purpose of the present study was to identify the differences in histone modification for the plantaris (fast) and soleus (slow) muscles of adult rats. Genome-wide analysis by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by DNA sequencing revealed that trimethylation at lysine 4 and acetylation of histone 3, which occurs at transcriptionally active gene loci, was less prevalent in the genes specific to the slow-twitch soleus muscle. Conversely, gene loci specific to the fast-twitch plantaris muscle were associated with the aforementioned histone modifications. We also found that upregulation of slow genes in the plantaris muscle, which are related to enhanced muscular activity, is not associated with activating histone modifications. Furthermore, silencing of muscle activity by denervation caused the displacement of acetylated histone and RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in 5' ends of genes in plantaris, but minor effects were observed in soleus. Increased recruitment of Pol II induced by forced acetylation of histone was also suppressed in valproic acid-treated soleus. Our present data indicate that the slow-twitch soleus muscle has a unique set of histone modifications, which may relate to the preservation of the genetic backbone against physiological stimuli.

  13. Modeling the Dynamics of Bivalent Histone Modifications in Embryonic Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Wai; Yuan, Guo; Sorrentino, Francesco; Girvan, Michelle; Ott, Edward

    2013-03-01

    Epigenetic modifications to histones may either promote the activation or repression of the transcription of nearby genes. Recent experiments have discovered bivalent domains of nucleosomes in which the domain as a whole contains both active and repressive marks. These domains occur in the promoters of most lineage-control genes in embryonic stem cells. It is generally agreed that bivalent domains play an important role in stem cell differentiation, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here we propose and study a dynamical model of histone modification which, unlike previous models, captures the general features of the bivalent domains observed in experiments. A key feature of our model is the existence of ``A/R states,'' by which we mean states in which there are a significant number of nucleosomes each of which individually has both active and repressive marks. We use our model to investigate the formation and decay of A/R states, the localization of A/R nucleosomes, and the effect of DNA replication on the stability of A/R states. The goals of our model are to help understand the underlying principles and mechanisms of bivalent domain dynamics and to suggest directions for future experiments.

  14. Histone modifications silence the GATA transcription factor genes in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Caslini, C; Capo-chichi, C D; Roland, I H; Nicolas, E; Yeung, A T; Xu, X-X

    2006-08-31

    Altered expression of GATA factors was found and proposed as the underlying mechanism for dedifferentiation in ovarian carcinogenesis. In particular, GATA6 is lost or excluded from the nucleus in 85% of ovarian tumors and GATA4 expression is absent in majority of ovarian cancer cell lines. Here, we evaluated their DNA and histone epigenetic modifications in five ovarian epithelial and carcinoma cell lines (human 'immortalized' ovarian surface epithelium (HIO)-117, HIO-114, A2780, SKOV3 and ES2). GATA4 and GATA6 gene silencing was found to correlate with hypoacetylation of histones H3 and H4 and loss of histone H3/lysine K4 tri-methylation at their promoters in all lines. Conversely, histone H3/lysine K9 di-methylation and HP1gamma association were not observed, excluding reorganization of GATA genes into heterochromatic structures. The histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A, but not the DNA methylation inhibitor 5'-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, re-established the expression of GATA4 and/or GATA6 in A2780 and HIO-114 cells, correlating with increased histone H3 and H4 acetylation, histone H3 lysine K4 methylation and DNase I sensitivity at the promoters. Therefore, altered histone modification of the promoter loci is one mechanism responsible for the silencing of GATA transcription factors and the subsequent loss of a target gene, the tumor suppressor Disabled-2, in ovarian carcinogenesis.

  15. Therapeutic Targeting of Histone Modifications in Adult and Pediatric High-Grade Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Maria J.; Singleton, Will G. B.; Lowis, Stephen P.; Malik, Karim; Kurian, Kathreena M.

    2017-01-01

    Recent exciting work partly through The Cancer Genome Atlas has implicated epigenetic mechanisms including histone modifications in the development of both pediatric and adult high-grade glioma (HGG). Histone lysine methylation has emerged as an important player in regulating gene expression and chromatin function. Lysine (K) 27 (K27) is a critical residue in all seven histone 3 variants and the subject of posttranslational histone modifications, as it can be both methylated and acetylated. In pediatric HGG, two critical single-point mutations occur in the H3F3A gene encoding the regulatory histone variant H3.3. These mutations occur at lysine (K) 27 (K27M) and glycine (G) 34 (G34R/V), both of which are involved with key regulatory posttranscriptional modifications. Therefore, these mutations effect gene expression, cell differentiation, and telomere maintenance. In recent years, alterations in histone acetylation have provided novel opportunities to explore new pharmacological targeting, with histone deacetylase (HDAC) overexpression reported in high-grade, late-stage proliferative tumors. HDAC inhibitors have shown promising therapeutic potential in many malignancies. This review focuses on the epigenetic mechanisms propagating pediatric and adult HGGs, as well as summarizing the current advances in clinical trials using HDAC inhibitors.

  16. Metabolic Diseases Downregulate the Majority of Histone Modification Enzymes, Making a Few Upregulated Enzymes Novel Therapeutic Targets--"Sand Out and Gold Stays".

    PubMed

    Shao, Ying; Chernaya, Valeria; Johnson, Candice; Yang, William Y; Cueto, Ramon; Sha, Xiaojin; Zhang, Yi; Qin, Xuebin; Sun, Jianxin; Choi, Eric T; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-feng

    2016-02-01

    To determine whether the expression of histone modification enzymes is regulated in physiological and pathological conditions, we took an experimental database mining approach pioneered in our labs to determine a panoramic expression profile of 164 enzymes in 19 human and 17 murine tissues. We have made the following significant findings: (1) Histone enzymes are differentially expressed in cardiovascular, immune, and other tissues; (2) our new pyramid model showed that heart and T cells are among a few tissues in which histone acetylation/deacetylation, and histone methylation/demethylation are in the highest varieties; and (3) histone enzymes are more downregulated than upregulated in metabolic diseases and regulatory T cell (Treg) polarization/ differentiation, but not in tumors. These results have demonstrated a new working model of "Sand out and Gold stays," where more downregulation than upregulation of histone enzymes in metabolic diseases makes a few upregulated enzymes the potential novel therapeutic targets in metabolic diseases and Treg activity.

  17. Histone modifications change with age, dietary restriction and rapamycin treatment in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Huan; Qian, Hong; Ertl, Robin; Astle, Clinton M.; Wang, Gang G.; Harrison, David E.; Xu, Xiangru

    2015-01-01

    The risk of developing neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) increases dramatically with age. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of brain aging is crucial for developing preventative and/or therapeutic approaches for age-associated neurological diseases. Recently, it has been suggested that epigenetic factors, such as histone modifications, maybe be involved in brain aging and age-related neurodegenerations. In this study, we investigated 14 histone modifications in brains of a cohort of young (3 months), old (22 months), and old age-matched dietary restricted (DR) and rapamycin treated BALB/c mice. Results showed that 7 out of all measured histone markers were changed drastically with age. Intriguingly, histone methylations in brain tissues, including H3K27me3, H3R2me2, H3K79me3 and H4K20me2 tend to disappear with age but can be partially restored by both DR and rapamycin treatment. However, both DR and rapamycin treatment also have a significant impact on several other histone modifications such as H3K27ac, H4K16ac, H4R3me2, and H3K56ac, which do not change as animal ages. This study provides the first evidence that a broad spectrum of histone modifications may be involved in brain aging. Besides, this study suggests that both DR and rapamycin may slow aging process in mouse brain via these underlying epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:26021816

  18. Bioorthogonal Chemistry for the Isolation and Study of Newly Synthesized Histones and Their Modifications.

    PubMed

    Arnaudo, Anna M; Link, A James; Garcia, Benjamin A

    2016-03-18

    The nucleosome is an octamer containing DNA wrapped around one histone H3-H4 tetramer and two histone H2A-H2B dimers. Within the nucleosome, histones are decorated with post-translational modifications. Previous studies indicate that the H3-H4 tetramer is conserved during DNA replication, suggesting that old tetramers serve as a template for the modification of newly synthesized tetramers. Here, we present a method that merges bioorthogonal chemistry with mass spectrometry for the study of modifications on newly synthesized histones in mammalian cells. HeLa S3 cells are dually labeled with the methionine analog azidohomoalanine and heavy (13)C6,(15)N4 isotope labeled arginine. Heavy amino acid labeling marks newly synthesized histones while azidohomoalanine incorporation allows for their isolation using bioorthogonal ligation. Labeled mononucleosomes were covalently linked via a copper catalyzed reaction to a FLAG-GGR-alkyne peptide, immunoprecipitated, and subjected to mass spectrometry for quantitative modification analysis. Mononucleosomes containing new histones were successfully isolated using this approach. Additionally, the development of this method highlights the potential deleterious effects of azidohomoalanine labeling on protein PTMs and cell cycle progression, which should be considered for future studies utilizing bioorthogonal labeling strategies in mammalian cells.

  19. The Role of Sulforaphane in Epigenetic Mechanisms, Including Interdependence between Histone Modification and DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman-Szymczyk, Agnieszka; Majewski, Grzegorz; Lubecka-Pietruszewska, Katarzyna; Fabianowska-Majewska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Carcinogenesis as well as cancer progression result from genetic and epigenetic changes of the genome that leads to dysregulation of transcriptional activity of genes. Epigenetic mechanisms in cancer cells comprise (i) post-translation histone modification (i.e., deacetylation and methylation); (ii) DNA global hypomethylation; (iii) promoter hypermethylation of tumour suppressor genes and genes important for cell cycle regulation, cell differentiation and apoptosis; and (iv) posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression by noncoding microRNA. These epigenetic aberrations can be readily reversible and responsive to both synthetic agents and natural components of diet. A source of one of such diet components are cruciferous vegetables, which contain high levels of a number of glucosinolates and deliver, after enzymatic hydrolysis, sulforaphane and other bioactive isothiocyanates, that are involved in effective up-regulation of transcriptional activity of certain genes and also in restoration of active chromatin structure. Thus a consumption of cruciferous vegetables, treated as a source of isothiocyanates, seems to be potentially useful as an effective cancer preventive factor or as a source of nutrients improving efficacy of standard chemotherapies. In this review an attempt is made to elucidate the role of sulforaphane in regulation of gene promoter activity through a direct down-regulation of histone deacetylase activity and alteration of gene promoter methylation in indirect ways, but the sulforaphane influence on non-coding micro-RNA will not be a subject of this review. PMID:26703571

  20. Histone modifications and skeletal muscle metabolic gene expression.

    PubMed

    McGee, Sean L; Hargreaves, Mark

    2010-03-01

    1. Skeletal muscle oxidative function and metabolic gene expression are co-ordinately downregulated in metabolic diseases such as insulin resistance, obesity and Type 2 diabetes. Altering skeletal muscle metabolic gene expression to favour enhanced energy expenditure is considered a potential therapy to combat these diseases. 2. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are chromatin-remodelling enzymes that repress gene expression. It has been shown that HDAC4 and 5 co-operatively regulate a number of genes involved in various aspects of metabolism. Understanding how HDACs are regulated provides insights into the mechanisms regulating skeletal muscle metabolic gene expression. 3. Multiple kinases control phosphorylation-dependent nuclear export of HDACs, rendering them unable to repress transcription. We have found a major role for the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in response to energetic stress, yet metabolic gene expression is maintained in the absence of AMPK activity. Preliminary evidence suggests a potential role for protein kinase D, also a Class IIa HDAC kinase, in this response. 4. The HDACs are also regulated by ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation, although the exact mediators of this process have not been identified. 5. Because HDACs appear to be critical regulators of skeletal muscle metabolic gene expression, HDAC inhibition could be an effective therapy to treat metabolic diseases. 6. Together, these data show that HDAC4 and 5 are critical regulators of metabolic gene expression and that understanding their regulation could provide a number of points of intervention for therapies designed to treat metabolic diseases, such as insulin resistance, obesity and Type 2 diabetes.

  1. Methylated H3K4, a transcription-associated histone modification, is involved in the DNA damage response pathway.

    PubMed

    Faucher, David; Wellinger, Raymund J

    2010-08-26

    Eukaryotic genomes are associated with a number of proteins such as histones that constitute chromatin. Post-translational histone modifications are associated with regulatory aspects executed by chromatin and all transactions on genomic DNA are dependent on them. Thus, it will be relevant to understand how histone modifications affect genome functions. Here we show that the mono ubiquitylation of histone H2B and the tri-methylation of histone H3 on lysine 4 (H3K4me3), both known for their involvement in transcription, are also important for a proper response of budding yeast cells to DNA damaging agents and the passage through S-phase. Cells that cannot methylate H3K4 display a defect in double-strand break (DSB) repair by non-homologous end joining. Furthermore, if such cells incur DNA damage or encounter a stress during replication, they very rapidly lose viability, underscoring the functional importance of the modification. Remarkably, the Set1p methyltransferase as well as the H3K4me3 mark become detectable on a newly created DSB. This recruitment of Set1p to the DSB is dependent on the presence of the RSC complex, arguing for a contribution in the ensuing DNA damage repair process. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Set1p and its substrate H3K4me3, which has been reported to be important for the transcription of active genes, also plays an important role in genome stability of yeast cells. Given the high degree of conservation for the methyltransferase and the histone mark in a broad variety of organisms, these results could have similar implications for genome stability mechanisms in vertebrate and mammalian cells.

  2. Brownian dynamics simulation of the effect of histone modification on nucleosome structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Xie, Ping; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2007-05-01

    Using Brownian dynamics we simulate the effect of histone modification, such as phosphorylation, acetylation, and methylation, on nucleosome structure by varying the interaction force between DNA and the histone octamer. The simulation shows that the structural stability of nucleosome is very sensitive to the interaction force, and the DNA unwrapping from the modified histone octamer usually occurs turn by turn. Furthermore, the effects of temperature and DNA break as well as the competition between modified and normal histone octamers are investigated, with the simulation results being in agreement with the experimental observation that phosphorylated nucleosomes near DNA breaks are more easily depleted. Though the simulation study may only give a coarse grained view of the DNA unwrapping process for the modified histone octamer, it may provide insight into the mechanism of DNA repair.

  3. Characterization of histone modifications associated with DNA damage repair genes upon exposure to gamma rays in Arabidopsis seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Suvendu; Go, Young Sam; Lee, Seung Sik; Chung, Byung Yeoup; Kim, Jin-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic histone modifications play an important role in controlling gene expression in response to various environmental cues. This mechanism of regulation of gene expression is important for sessile organisms, like land plants. We have previously reported consistent upregulation of various marker genes in response to gamma rays at various post-irradiation times. In the present study, we performed various chromatin modification analyses at selected loci using the standard chromatin immunoprecipitation procedure, and demonstrate that upregulation of these genes is associated with histone H3 lysine 4 tri-methylation (H3K4me3) at the gene body or transcription start sites of these loci. Further, at specific AtAgo2 loci, both H3K4me3 and histone H3 lysine 9 acetylation (H3K9ac) are important in controlling gene expression in response to gamma irradiation. There was no change in DNA methylation in these selected loci. We conclude that specific histone modification such as H3K4me3 and H3K9ac may be more important in activating gene expression in these selected loci in response to gamma irradiation than a change in DNA methylation. PMID:27534791

  4. Complete Workflow for Analysis of Histone Post-translational Modifications Using Bottom-up Mass Spectrometry: From Histone Extraction to Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sidoli, Simone; Bhanu, Natarajan V.; Karch, Kelly R.; Wang, Xiaoshi; Garcia, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosomes are the smallest structural unit of chromatin, composed of 147 base pairs of DNA wrapped around an octamer of histone proteins. Histone function is mediated by extensive post-translational modification by a myriad of nuclear proteins. These modifications are critical for nuclear integrity as they regulate chromatin structure and recruit enzymes involved in gene regulation, DNA repair and chromosome condensation. Even though a large part of the scientific community adopts antibody-based techniques to characterize histone PTM abundance, these approaches are low throughput and biased against hypermodified proteins, as the epitope might be obstructed by nearby modifications. This protocol describes the use of nano liquid chromatography (nLC) and mass spectrometry (MS) for accurate quantification of histone modifications. This method is designed to characterize a large variety of histone PTMs and the relative abundance of several histone variants within single analyses. In this protocol, histones are derivatized with propionic anhydride followed by digestion with trypsin to generate peptides of 5 - 20 aa in length. After digestion, the newly exposed N-termini of the histone peptides are derivatized to improve chromatographic retention during nLC-MS. This method allows for the relative quantification of histone PTMs spanning four orders of magnitude. PMID:27286567

  5. Enhanced top-down characterization of histone post-translational modifications

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Zhixin; Tolić, Nikola; Zhao, Rui; Moore, Ronald J.; Hengel, Shawna M.; Robinson, Errol W.; Stenoien, David L.; Wu, Si; Smith, Richard D.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2012-01-01

    Background: Multiple post-translational modifications (PTMs) on core histones often work synergistically to fine tune chromatin structure and functions, generating a “histone code” that can be interpreted by a variety of chromatin interacting proteins. Although previous bottom-up and middle-down proteomic approaches have been developed for limited characterization of PTMs on histone N-terminal tails, high-throughput methods for comprehensive identification of PTMs distributed along the entire primary amino acid sequence are yet to be implemented. Results: Here we report a novel online two-dimensional liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (2D LC–MS/MS) platform for high-throughput and sensitive characterization of histone PTMs at the intact protein level. The metal-free LC system with reverse phase separation followed by weak cation exchange – hydrophilic interaction chromatography (WCX-HILIC) and online Orbitrap Velos tandem mass spectrometry allowed for unambiguous identification of over 700 histone isoforms from a single 2D LC–MS/MS analysis of 7.5 µg of purified core histones. In comparison with previous offline top-down analysis of H4, this online study identified 100 additional isoforms from 100-fold less sample. This platform enabled comprehensive characterization of histone modifications, including those beyond tail regions, with dramatically improved throughput and sensitivity compared to more traditional platforms. Isoforms identified included those with combinatorial PTMs extending well beyond the N-terminal tail regions as well as a large number of phosphorylated isoforms.

  6. Nickel compounds induce histone ubiquitination by inhibiting histone deubiquitinating enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ke Qingdong; Ellen, Thomas P.; Costa, Max

    2008-04-15

    Nickel (Ni) compounds are known carcinogens but underlying mechanisms are not clear. Epigenetic changes are likely to play an important role in nickel ion carcinogenesis. Previous studies have shown epigenetic effects of nickel ions, including the loss of histone acetylation and a pronounced increase in dimethylated H3K9 in nickel-exposed cells. In this study, we demonstrated that both water-soluble and insoluble nickel compounds induce histone ubiquitination (uH2A and uH2B) in a variety of cell lines. Investigations of the mechanism by which nickel increases histone ubiquitination in cells reveal that nickel does not affect cellular levels of the substrates of this modification, i.e., ubiquitin, histones, and other non-histone ubiquitinated proteins. In vitro ubiquitination and deubiquitination assays have been developed to further investigate possible effects of nickel on enzymes responsible for histone ubiquitination. Results from the in vitro assays demonstrate that the presence of nickel did not affect the levels of ubiquitinated histones in the ubiquitinating assay. Instead, the addition of nickel significantly prevents loss of uH2A and uH2B in the deubiquitinating assay, suggesting that nickel-induced histone ubiquitination is the result of inhibition of (a) putative deubiquitinating enzyme(s). Additional supporting evidence comes from the comparison of the response to nickel ions with a known deubiquitinating enzyme inhibitor, iodoacetamide (IAA). This study is the first to demonstrate such effects of nickel ions on histone ubiquitination. It also sheds light on the possible mechanisms involved in altering the steady state of this modification. The study provides further evidence that supports the notion that nickel ions alter epigenetic homeostasis in cells, which may lead to altered programs of gene expression and carcinogenesis.

  7. Plasticity in patterns of histone modifications and chromosomal proteins in Drosophila heterochromatin.

    PubMed

    Riddle, Nicole C; Minoda, Aki; Kharchenko, Peter V; Alekseyenko, Artyom A; Schwartz, Yuri B; Tolstorukov, Michael Y; Gorchakov, Andrey A; Jaffe, Jacob D; Kennedy, Cameron; Linder-Basso, Daniela; Peach, Sally E; Shanower, Gregory; Zheng, Haiyan; Kuroda, Mitzi I; Pirrotta, Vincenzo; Park, Peter J; Elgin, Sarah C R; Karpen, Gary H

    2011-02-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are packaged in two basic forms, euchromatin and heterochromatin. We have examined the composition and organization of Drosophila melanogaster heterochromatin in different cell types using ChIP-array analysis of histone modifications and chromosomal proteins. As anticipated, the pericentric heterochromatin and chromosome 4 are on average enriched for the "silencing" marks H3K9me2, H3K9me3, HP1a, and SU(VAR)3-9, and are generally depleted for marks associated with active transcription. The locations of the euchromatin-heterochromatin borders identified by these marks are similar in animal tissues and most cell lines, although the amount of heterochromatin is variable in some cell lines. Combinatorial analysis of chromatin patterns reveals distinct profiles for euchromatin, pericentric heterochromatin, and the 4th chromosome. Both silent and active protein-coding genes in heterochromatin display complex patterns of chromosomal proteins and histone modifications; a majority of the active genes exhibit both "activation" marks (e.g., H3K4me3 and H3K36me3) and "silencing" marks (e.g., H3K9me2 and HP1a). The hallmark of active genes in heterochromatic domains appears to be a loss of H3K9 methylation at the transcription start site. We also observe complex epigenomic profiles of intergenic regions, repeated transposable element (TE) sequences, and genes in the heterochromatic extensions. An unexpectedly large fraction of sequences in the euchromatic chromosome arms exhibits a heterochromatic chromatin signature, which differs in size, position, and impact on gene expression among cell types. We conclude that patterns of heterochromatin/euchromatin packaging show greater complexity and plasticity than anticipated. This comprehensive analysis provides a foundation for future studies of gene activity and chromosomal functions that are influenced by or dependent upon heterochromatin.

  8. Control of human cytomegalovirus gene expression by differential histone modifications during lytic and latent infection of a monocytic cell line.

    PubMed

    Ioudinkova, Elena; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Rynditch, Alla; De Conto, Flora; Motta, Federica; Covan, Silvia; Pinardi, Federica; Razin, Sergey V; Chezzi, Carlo

    2006-12-15

    Non-differentiated THP-1 cells can be infected by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) Towne strain, which persists in these cells in a non-active (latent) form without undergoing a productive cycle. The same cells become permissive for HCMV lytic infection after induction of cell differentiation by treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. We used this cellular model to study the possible role of histone modifications in the control of HCMV latency. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation with antibodies against histone H3 acetylated or dimethylated in position K9, we demonstrated that in lytically infected cells the HCMV enhancer was associated with heavy acetylated but not dimethylated H3. In the case of latent infection, the HCMV enhancer was associated with neither acetylated nor dimethylated H3. HCMV genes encoding DNA polymerase (early), pp65 (early-late) and pp150 (late) proteins were associated preferentially with acetylated H3 in lytically infected cells and with dimethylated H3 in latently infected cells. These data strongly suggest that K9 methylation of H3 is involved in HCMV gene repression, while association of the above genes with acetylated histones is likely to be necessary for active transcription. It can be postulated that the same histone modifications are used to mark active and repressed genes in both cellular and viral chromatin.

  9. Statistical Mechanics Model for the Dynamics of Collective Epigenetic Histone Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hang; Tian, Xiao-Jun; Mukhopadhyay, Abhishek; Kim, K. S.; Xing, Jianhua

    2014-02-01

    Epigenetic histone modifications play an important role in the maintenance of different cell phenotypes. The exact molecular mechanism for inheritance of the modification patterns over cell generations remains elusive. We construct a Potts-type model based on experimentally observed nearest-neighbor enzyme lateral interactions and nucleosome covalent modification state biased enzyme recruitment. The model can lead to effective nonlocal interactions among nucleosomes suggested in previous theoretical studies, and epigenetic memory is robustly inheritable against stochastic cellular processes.

  10. Plasticity in patterns of histone modifications and chromosomal proteins in Drosophila heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Riddle, Nicole C.; Minoda, Aki; Kharchenko, Peter V.; Alekseyenko, Artyom A.; Schwartz, Yuri B.; Tolstorukov, Michael Y.; Gorchakov, Andrey A.; Jaffe, Jacob D.; Kennedy, Cameron; Linder-Basso, Daniela; Peach, Sally E.; Shanower, Gregory; Zheng, Haiyan; Kuroda, Mitzi I.; Pirrotta, Vincenzo; Park, Peter J.; Elgin, Sarah C.R.; Karpen, Gary H.

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are packaged in two basic forms, euchromatin and heterochromatin. We have examined the composition and organization of Drosophila melanogaster heterochromatin in different cell types using ChIP-array analysis of histone modifications and chromosomal proteins. As anticipated, the pericentric heterochromatin and chromosome 4 are on average enriched for the “silencing” marks H3K9me2, H3K9me3, HP1a, and SU(VAR)3-9, and are generally depleted for marks associated with active transcription. The locations of the euchromatin–heterochromatin borders identified by these marks are similar in animal tissues and most cell lines, although the amount of heterochromatin is variable in some cell lines. Combinatorial analysis of chromatin patterns reveals distinct profiles for euchromatin, pericentric heterochromatin, and the 4th chromosome. Both silent and active protein-coding genes in heterochromatin display complex patterns of chromosomal proteins and histone modifications; a majority of the active genes exhibit both “activation” marks (e.g., H3K4me3 and H3K36me3) and “silencing” marks (e.g., H3K9me2 and HP1a). The hallmark of active genes in heterochromatic domains appears to be a loss of H3K9 methylation at the transcription start site. We also observe complex epigenomic profiles of intergenic regions, repeated transposable element (TE) sequences, and genes in the heterochromatic extensions. An unexpectedly large fraction of sequences in the euchromatic chromosome arms exhibits a heterochromatic chromatin signature, which differs in size, position, and impact on gene expression among cell types. We conclude that patterns of heterochromatin/euchromatin packaging show greater complexity and plasticity than anticipated. This comprehensive analysis provides a foundation for future studies of gene activity and chromosomal functions that are influenced by or dependent upon heterochromatin. PMID:21177972

  11. Epigenetic regulation of GATA4 expression by histone modification in AFP-producing gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Nobuhisa; Kishimoto, Takashi

    2012-08-01

    AFP-producing adenocarcinoma is a variant of adenocarcinoma with high malignancy. Production of AFP suggests enteroblastic or hepatoid differentiation of cancer cells. GATA4 is a key molecule involved in the prenatal development of the stomach and liver. GATA4 is epigenetically silenced by hypermethylation of primer region in many types of cancers including gastric cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression and epigenetic regulation of GATA4 in AFP-producing adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that GATA4 was positive in 3/8 cases of AFP-producing gastric adenocarcinomas and in 28/30 cases of common type adenocarcinomas. Epigenetic modification of GATA4 promoter region was investigated with 3 AFP-producing and 4 common-type gastric cancer cell lines. GATA4 mRNA was detected in 1/3 of AFP-producing and 2/4 of common-type gastric cancer cell lines by RT-PCR. Methylation-specific PCR revealed no GATA4 methylation in any of the AFP-producing gastric cancers, whereas methylation was consistent with GATA4 expression in the common-type gastric cancers. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay for AFP-producing gastric cancers revealed that histones H3 and H4 were hypoacetylated in the GATA4-negative cells, while they were hyperacetylated in the GATA4-positive cells. Treatment with trichostain A, an inhibitor for histone deacetylase, induced acetylation of histones H3 and H4, and tri-methylation of lysine 4 of histone H3, which was associated with the active transcription of GATA4 in GATA4-negative AFP-producing cells. These results indicated that histone deacetylation is a silencing mechanism for GATA4 expression in AFP-producing gastric cancer cells. Differences between AFP-producing gastric cancer and common-type gastric cancer in terms of the mechanism of GATA4 regulation may be reflected in the phenotypic deviation of AFP-producing gastric cancer from common-type gastric cancer.

  12. Histone modifications associated with drought tolerance in the desert plant Zygophyllum dumosum Boiss.

    PubMed

    Granot, Gila; Sikron-Persi, Noga; Gaspan, Ofer; Florentin, Assa; Talwara, Susheela; Paul, Laju K; Morgenstern, Yaakov; Granot, Yigal; Grafi, Gideon

    2009-12-01

    Zygophyllum dumosum Boiss. is a perennial Saharo-Arabian phytogeographical element and a dominant shrub on the rocky limestone southeast-facing slopes of the Negev desert. The plant is highly active during the winter, and semideciduous during the dry summer, i.e., it sheds its leaflets, while leaving the thick, fleshy petiole green and rather active during the dry season. Being resistant to extreme perennial drought, Z. dumosum appears to provide an intriguing model plant for studying epigenetic mechanisms associated with drought tolerance in natural habitats. The transition from the wet to the dry season was accompanied by a significant decrease in nuclear size and with posttranslational modifications of histone H3 N-terminal tail. Dimethylation of H3 at lysine 4 (H3K4)--a modification associated with active gene expression--was found to be high during the wet season but gradually diminished on progression to the dry season. Unexpectedly, H3K9 di- and trimethylation as well as H3K27 di- and trimethylation could not be detected in Z. dumosum; H3K9 monomethylation appears to be prominent in Z. dumosum during the wet but not during the dry season. Contrary to Z. dumosum, H3K9 dimethylation was detected in other desert plants, including Artemisia sieberi, Anabasis articulata and Haloxylon scoparium. Taken together, our results demonstrate dynamic genome organization and unique pattern of histone H3 methylation displayed by Z. dumosum, which could have an adaptive value in variable environments of the Negev desert.

  13. Potential role of adolescent alcohol exposure-induced amygdaloid histone modifications in anxiety and alcohol intake during adulthood.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Subhash C; Sakharkar, Amul J; Tang, Lei; Zhang, Huaibo

    2015-10-01

    Binge drinking is common during adolescence and can lead to the development of psychiatric disorders, including alcoholism in adulthood. Here, the role and persistent effects of histone modifications during adolescent intermittent ethanol (AIE) exposure in the development of anxiety and alcoholism in adulthood were investigated. Rats received intermittent ethanol exposure during post-natal days 28-41, and anxiety-like behaviors were measured after 1 and 24 h of the last AIE. The effects of AIE on anxiety-like and alcohol-drinking behaviors in adulthood were measured with or without treatment with the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, trichostatin A (TSA). Amygdaloid brain regions were collected to measure HDAC activity, global and gene-specific histone H3 acetylation, expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated (Arc) protein and dendritic spine density (DSD). Adolescent rats displayed anxiety-like behaviors after 24 h, but not 1 h, of last AIE with a concomitant increase in nuclear and cytosolic amygdaloid HDAC activity and HDAC2 and HDAC4 levels leading to deficits in histone (H3-K9) acetylation in the central (CeA) and medial (MeA), but not in basolateral nucleus of amygdala (BLA). Interestingly, some of AIE-induced epigenetic changes such as, increased nuclear HDAC activity, HDAC2 expression, and decreased global histone acetylation persisted in adulthood. In addition, AIE decreased BDNF exons I and IV and Arc promoter specific histone H3 acetylation that was associated with decreased BDNF, Arc expression and DSD in the CeA and MeA during adulthood. AIE also induced anxiety-like behaviors and enhanced ethanol intake in adulthood, which was attenuated by TSA treatment via normalization of deficits in histone H3 acetylation of BDNF and Arc genes. These novel results indicate that AIE induces long-lasting effects on histone modifications and deficits in synaptic events in the amygdala, which are

  14. Global histone modification fingerprinting in human cells using epigenetic reverse phase protein array

    PubMed Central

    Partolina, Marina; Thoms, Hazel C; MacLeod, Kenneth G; Rodriguez-Blanco, Giovanny; Clarke, Matthew N; Venkatasubramani, Anuroop V; Beesoo, Rima; Larionov, Vladimir; Neergheen-Bhujun, Vidushi S; Serrels, Bryan; Kimura, Hiroshi; Carragher, Neil O; Kagansky, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The balance between acetylation and deacetylation of histone proteins plays a critical role in the regulation of genomic functions. Aberrations in global levels of histone modifications are linked to carcinogenesis and are currently the focus of intense scrutiny and translational research investments to develop new therapies, which can modify complex disease pathophysiology through epigenetic control. However, despite significant progress in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of epigenetic machinery in various genomic contexts and cell types, the links between epigenetic modifications and cellular phenotypes are far from being clear. For example, enzymes controlling histone modifications utilize key cellular metabolites associated with intra- and extracellular feedback loops, adding a further layer of complexity to this process. Meanwhile, it has become increasingly evident that new assay technologies which provide robust and precise measurement of global histone modifications are required, for at least two pressing reasons: firstly, many approved drugs are known to influence histone modifications and new cancer therapies are increasingly being developed towards targeting histone deacetylases (HDACs) and other epigenetic readers and writers. Therefore, robust assays for fingerprinting the global effects of such drugs on preclinical cell, organoid and in vivo models is required; and secondly, robust histone-fingerprinting assays applicable to patient samples may afford the development of next-generation diagnostic and prognostic tools. In our study, we have used a panel of monoclonal antibodies to determine the relative changes in the global abundance of post-translational modifications on histones purified from cancer cell lines treated with HDAC inhibitors using a novel technique, called epigenetic reverse phase protein array. We observed a robust increase in acetylation levels within 2–24 h after inhibition of HDACs in different cancer cell lines

  15. Mass Spectrometric Quantification of Histone Post-translational Modifications by a Hybrid Chemical Labeling Method

    PubMed Central

    Maile, Tobias M.; Izrael-Tomasevic, Anita; Cheung, Tommy; Guler, Gulfem D.; Tindell, Charles; Masselot, Alexandre; Liang, Jun; Zhao, Feng; Trojer, Patrick; Classon, Marie; Arnott, David

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is a powerful alternative to antibody-based methods for the analysis of histone post-translational modifications (marks). A key development in this approach was the deliberate propionylation of histones to improve sequence coverage across the lysine-rich and hydrophilic tails that bear most modifications. Several marks continue to be problematic however, particularly di- and tri-methylated lysine 4 of histone H3 which we found to be subject to substantial and selective losses during sample preparation and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. We developed a new method employing a “one-pot” hybrid chemical derivatization of histones, whereby an initial conversion of free lysines to their propionylated forms under mild aqueous conditions is followed by trypsin digestion and labeling of new peptide N termini with phenyl isocyanate. High resolution mass spectrometry was used to collect qualitative and quantitative data, and a novel web-based software application (Fishtones) was developed for viewing and quantifying histone marks in the resulting data sets. Recoveries of 53 methyl, acetyl, and phosphoryl marks on histone H3.1 were improved by an average of threefold overall, and over 50-fold for H3K4 di- and tri-methyl marks. The power of this workflow for epigenetic research and drug discovery was demonstrated by measuring quantitative changes in H3K4 trimethylation induced by small molecule inhibitors of lysine demethylases and siRNA knockdown of epigenetic modifiers ASH2L and WDR5. PMID:25680960

  16. Regulation of RNA polymerase II activation by histone acetylation in single living cells.

    PubMed

    Stasevich, Timothy J; Hayashi-Takanaka, Yoko; Sato, Yuko; Maehara, Kazumitsu; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Sakata-Sogawa, Kumiko; Tokunaga, Makio; Nagase, Takahiro; Nozaki, Naohito; McNally, James G; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2014-12-11

    In eukaryotic cells, post-translational histone modifications have an important role in gene regulation. Starting with early work on histone acetylation, a variety of residue-specific modifications have now been linked to RNA polymerase II (RNAP2) activity, but it remains unclear if these markers are active regulators of transcription or just passive byproducts. This is because studies have traditionally relied on fixed cell populations, meaning temporal resolution is limited to minutes at best, and correlated factors may not actually be present in the same cell at the same time. Complementary approaches are therefore needed to probe the dynamic interplay of histone modifications and RNAP2 with higher temporal resolution in single living cells. Here we address this problem by developing a system to track residue-specific histone modifications and RNAP2 phosphorylation in living cells by fluorescence microscopy. This increases temporal resolution to the tens-of-seconds range. Our single-cell analysis reveals histone H3 lysine-27 acetylation at a gene locus can alter downstream transcription kinetics by as much as 50%, affecting two temporally separate events. First acetylation enhances the search kinetics of transcriptional activators, and later the acetylation accelerates the transition of RNAP2 from initiation to elongation. Signatures of the latter can be found genome-wide using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing. We argue that this regulation leads to a robust and potentially tunable transcriptional response.

  17. Glutamine methylation in histone H2A is an RNA-polymerase-I-dedicated modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessarz, Peter; Santos-Rosa, Helena; Robson, Sam C.; Sylvestersen, Kathrine B.; Nelson, Christopher J.; Nielsen, Michael L.; Kouzarides, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Nucleosomes are decorated with numerous post-translational modifications capable of influencing many DNA processes. Here we describe a new class of histone modification, methylation of glutamine, occurring on yeast histone H2A at position 105 (Q105) and human H2A at Q104. We identify Nop1 as the methyltransferase in yeast and demonstrate that fibrillarin is the orthologue enzyme in human cells. Glutamine methylation of H2A is restricted to the nucleolus. Global analysis in yeast, using an H2AQ105me-specific antibody, shows that this modification is exclusively enriched over the 35S ribosomal DNA transcriptional unit. We show that the Q105 residue is part of the binding site for the histone chaperone FACT (facilitator of chromatin transcription) complex. Methylation of Q105 or its substitution to alanine disrupts binding to FACT in vitro. A yeast strain mutated at Q105 shows reduced histone incorporation and increased transcription at the ribosomal DNA locus. These features are phenocopied by mutations in FACT complex components. Together these data identify glutamine methylation of H2A as the first histone epigenetic mark dedicated to a specific RNA polymerase and define its function as a regulator of FACT interaction with nucleosomes.

  18. Regulation of NuA4 histone acetyltransferase activity in transcription and DNA repair by phosphorylation of histone H4.

    PubMed

    Utley, Rhea T; Lacoste, Nicolas; Jobin-Robitaille, Olivier; Allard, Stéphane; Côté, Jacques

    2005-09-01

    The NuA4 complex is a histone H4/H2A acetyltransferase involved in transcription and DNA repair. While histone acetylation is important in many processes, it has become increasingly clear that additional histone modifications also play a crucial interrelated role. To understand how NuA4 action is regulated, we tested various H4 tail peptides harboring known modifications in HAT assays. While dimethylation at arginine 3 (R3M) had little effect on NuA4 activity, phosphorylation of serine 1 (S1P) strongly decreased the ability of the complex to acetylate H4 peptides. However, R3M in combination with S1P alleviates the repression of NuA4 activity. Chromatin from cells treated with DNA damage-inducing agents shows an increase in phosphorylation of serine 1 and a concomitant decrease in H4 acetylation. We found that casein kinase 2 phosphorylates histone H4 and associates with the Rpd3 deacetylase complex, demonstrating a physical connection between phosphorylation of serine 1 and unacetylated H4 tails. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments also link local phosphorylation of H4 with its deacetylation, during both transcription and DNA repair. Time course chromatin immunoprecipitation data support a model in which histone H4 phosphorylation occurs after NuA4 action during double-strand break repair at the step of chromatin restoration and deacetylation. These findings demonstrate that H4 phospho-serine 1 regulates chromatin acetylation by the NuA4 complex and that this process is important for normal gene expression and DNA repair.

  19. Nuclear levels and patterns of histone H3 modification and HP1 proteins after inhibition of histone deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Bártová, Eva; Pacherník, Jirí; Harnicarová, Andrea; Kovarík, Ales; Kovaríková, Martina; Hofmanová, Jirina; Skalníková, Magdalena; Kozubek, Michal; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2005-11-01

    The effects of the histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) trichostatin A (TSA) and sodium butyrate (NaBt) were studied in A549, HT29 and FHC human cell lines. Global histone hyperacetylation, leading to decondensation of interphase chromatin, was characterized by an increase in H3(K9) and H3(K4) dimethylation and H3(K9) acetylation. The levels of all isoforms of heterochromatin protein, HP1, were reduced after HDAC inhibition. The observed changes in the protein levels were accompanied by changes in their interphase patterns. In control cells, H3(K9) acetylation and H3(K4) dimethylation were substantially reduced to a thin layer at the nuclear periphery, whereas TSA and NaBt caused the peripheral regions to become intensely acetylated at H3(K9) and dimethylated at H3(K4). The dispersed pattern of H3(K9) dimethylation was stable even at the nuclear periphery of HDACi-treated cells. After TSA and NaBt treatment, the HP1 proteins were repositioned more internally in the nucleus, being closely associated with interchromatin compartments, while centromeric heterochromatin was relocated closer to the nuclear periphery. These findings strongly suggest dissociation of HP1 proteins from peripherally located centromeres in a hyperacetylated and H3(K4) dimethylated environment. We conclude that inhibition of histone deacetylases caused dynamic reorganization of chromatin in parallel with changes in its epigenetic modifications.

  20. Histone chaperones link histone nuclear import and chromatin assembly.

    PubMed

    Keck, Kristin M; Pemberton, Lucy F

    2013-01-01

    Histone chaperones are proteins that shield histones from nonspecific interactions until they are assembled into chromatin. After their synthesis in the cytoplasm, histones are bound by different histone chaperones, subjected to a series of posttranslational modifications and imported into the nucleus. These evolutionarily conserved modifications, including acetylation and methylation, can occur in the cytoplasm, but their role in regulating import is not well understood. As part of histone import complexes, histone chaperones may serve to protect the histones during transport, or they may be using histones to promote their own nuclear localization. In addition, there is evidence that histone chaperones can play an active role in the import of histones. Histone chaperones have also been shown to regulate the localization of important chromatin modifying enzymes. This review is focused on the role histone chaperones play in the early biogenesis of histones, the distinct cytoplasmic subcomplexes in which histone chaperones have been found in both yeast and mammalian cells and the importins/karyopherins and nuclear localization signals that mediate the nuclear import of histones. We also address the role that histone chaperone localization plays in human disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Histone chaperones and chromatin assembly.

  1. DNA methylation and histone modifications cause silencing of Wnt antagonist gene in human renal cell carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Ken; Hirata, Hiroshi; Kikuno, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2008-08-01

    Secreted frizzled-related protein 2 (sFRP2) is a negative modulator of the Wingless-type (Wnt) signaling pathway, and shown to be inactivated in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, the molecular mechanism of silencing of sFRP2 is not fully understood. Our study was designed to elucidate the silencing mechanism of sFRP2 in RCC. Expression of sFRP2 was examined in 20 pairs of primary cancers by immunohistochemistry. Kidney cell lines (HK-2, Caki-1, Caki-2, A-498 and ACHN) were analyzed for sFRP2 expression using real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting. The methylation status at 46 CpG sites of the 2 CpG islands in the sFRP2 promoter was characterized by bisulfite DNA sequencing. Histone modifications were assessed by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay using antibodies against AcH3, AcH4, H3K4 and H3K9. sFRP2 was frequently repressed in primary cancers and in RCC cells. The majority of sFRP2 negative cells had a methylated promoter. Meanwhile, sFRP2 expression was repressed by a hypomethylated promoter in Caki-1 cells, and these cells had a repressive histone modification at the promoter. In Caki-1 cells, sFRP2 was reactivated by trichostatin A (TSA). Repressive histone modifications were also observed in RCC cells with hypermethylated promoters, but sFRP2 was reactivated only by 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC) and not by TSA. However, the activation of the silenced sFRP2 gene could be achieved in all cells using a combination of DAC and TSA. This is the first report indicating that aberrant DNA methylation and histone modifications work together to silence the sFRP2 gene in RCC cells.

  2. Comprehensive profiling of histone modifications using a label-free approach and its applications in determining structure-function relationships.

    PubMed

    Drogaris, Paul; Wurtele, Hugo; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Verreault, Alain; Thibault, Pierre

    2008-09-01

    A two-pronged approach using specialized peptide detection and clustering tools was developed to profile changes in histone post-translational modifications (PTMs). The extent and nature of modification was inferred by comparing the mass profiles of intact core histones from nano LC-MS experiments. Histones displaying changes in their intact mass profiles were fractionated, derivatized with propionic anhydride, and digested with trypsin prior to nano LC-MS analyses. Our methodology was validated by comparing the abundance of histone PTMs in wild type and mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking the histone acetyltransferase Rtt109 and a nucleosome assembly factor known as Asf1. Both Rtt109 and Asf1 were previously found to be essential for acetylation of histone H3 lysine 56 (H3K56ac), a modification that plays an important role in the response to genotoxic agents that interfere with DNA replication. The generation of ion abundance distribution plots enabled a rapid and comprehensive profiling of histone peptides. Our analytical methodology and data mining approach showed that most common histone PTMs were unaffected in mutant yeast cells lacking Rtt109 and Asf1. However, a subpopulation representing 17% of all H3 histones in wild type cells showed an acetylated K56 residue that was significantly reduced in both mutant strains. Our generic strategy for histone PTM profiling can be applied to assess global changes in histone PTMs across sample sets and to establish structure-function relationships.

  3. In-gel NHS-propionate derivatization for histone post-translational modifications analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiajia; Gao, Jun; Peng, Maolin; Wang, Yi; Yu, Yanyan; Yang, Pengyuan; Jin, Hong

    2015-07-30

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) on histone are highly correlated with genetic and epigenetic regulation of gene expression from chromatin. Mass spectrometry (MS) has developed to be an optimal tool for the identification and quantification of histone PTMs. Derivatization of histones with chemicals such as propionic anhydride, N-hydroxysuccinimide ester (NHS-propionate) has been widely used in histone PTMs analysis in bottom-up MS strategy, which requires high purity for histone samples. However, biological samples are not always prepared with high purity, containing detergents or other interferences in most cases. As an alternative approach, an adaptation of in gel derivatization method, termed In-gel NHS, is utilized for a broader application in histone PTMs analysis and it is shown to be a more time-saving preparation method. The proposed method was optimized for a better derivatization efficiency and displayed high reproducibility, indicating quantification of histone PTMs based on In-gel NHS was achievable. Without any traditional fussy histone purification procedures, we succeeded to quantitatively profile the histone PTMs from Arabidopsis with selective knock down of CLF (clf-29) and the original parental (col) with In-gel NHS method in a rapid way, which indicated the high specificity of CLF on H3K27me3 in Arabidopsis. In-gel NHS quantification results also suggest distinctive histone modification patterns in plants, which is invaluable foundation for future studies on histone modifications in plants.

  4. Coordination of cell signaling, chromatin remodeling, histone modifications, and regulator recruitment in human matrix metalloproteinase 9 gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhendong; Shah, Reesha C; Chang, Mi Jung; Benveniste, Etty N

    2004-06-01

    Transcriptional activation of eukaryotic genes depends on the precise and ordered recruitment of activators, chromatin modifiers/remodelers, coactivators, and general transcription factors to the promoters of target genes. Using the human matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) gene as a model system, we investigated the sequential assembly and dynamic formation of transcription complexes on a human promoter under the influence of mitogen signaling. We find that, coincident with activation of the MMP-9 gene, activators, chromatin remodeling complexes, and coactivators are recruited to the preassembled MMP-9 promoter in a stepwise and coordinated order, which is dependent on activation of MEK-1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase and NF-kappa B signaling pathways. Conversely, corepressor complexes are released from the MMP-9 promoter after transcriptional activation. Histone modifications shift from repressive to permissive modifications concurrent with activation of the MMP-9 gene. Chromatin remodeling induced by Brg-1 is required for MMP-9 gene transcription, which is concomitant with initiation of transcription. Therefore, coordination of cell signaling, chromatin remodeling, histone modifications, and stepwise recruitment of transcription regulators is critical to precisely regulate MMP-9 gene transcription in a temporally and spatially dependent manner. Given the important role of MMP-9 in both normal development and pathological conditions, understanding MMP-9 gene regulation is of great relevance.

  5. Large scale analysis of co-existing post-translational modifications in histone tails reveals global fine structure of cross-talk.

    PubMed

    Schwämmle, Veit; Aspalter, Claudia-Maria; Sidoli, Simone; Jensen, Ole N

    2014-07-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for the identification and quantification of co-existing post-translational modifications in histone proteins. One of the most important challenges in current chromatin biology is to characterize the relationships between co-existing histone marks, the order and hierarchy of their deposition, and their distinct biological functions. We developed the database CrossTalkDB to organize observed and reported co-existing histone marks as revealed by MS experiments of histone proteins and their derived peptides. Statistical assessment revealed sample-specific patterns for the co-frequency of histone post-translational modifications. We implemented a new method to identify positive and negative interplay between pairs of methylation and acetylation marks in proteins. Many of the detected features were conserved between different cell types or exist across species, thereby revealing general rules for cross-talk between histone marks. The observed features are in accordance with previously reported examples of cross-talk. We observed novel types of interplay among acetylated residues, revealing positive cross-talk between nearby acetylated sites but negative cross-talk for distant ones, and for discrete methylation states at Lys-9, Lys-27, and Lys-36 of histone H3, suggesting a more differentiated functional role of methylation beyond the general expectation of enhanced activity at higher methylation states.

  6. Dynamic changes in histone modifications precede de novo DNA methylation in oocytes.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Kathleen R; Veselovska, Lenka; Kim, Jeesun; Huang, Jiahao; Saadeh, Heba; Tomizawa, Shin-ichi; Smallwood, Sébastien A; Chen, Taiping; Kelsey, Gavin

    2015-12-01

    Erasure and subsequent reinstatement of DNA methylation in the germline, especially at imprinted CpG islands (CGIs), is crucial to embryogenesis in mammals. The mechanisms underlying DNA methylation establishment remain poorly understood, but a number of post-translational modifications of histones are implicated in antagonizing or recruiting the de novo DNA methylation complex. In mouse oogenesis, DNA methylation establishment occurs on a largely unmethylated genome and in nondividing cells, making it a highly informative model for examining how histone modifications can shape the DNA methylome. Using a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and genome-wide sequencing (ChIP-seq) protocol optimized for low cell numbers and novel techniques for isolating primary and growing oocytes, profiles were generated for histone modifications implicated in promoting or inhibiting DNA methylation. CGIs destined for DNA methylation show reduced protective H3K4 dimethylation (H3K4me2) and trimethylation (H3K4me3) in both primary and growing oocytes, while permissive H3K36me3 increases specifically at these CGIs in growing oocytes. Methylome profiling of oocytes deficient in H3K4 demethylase KDM1A or KDM1B indicated that removal of H3K4 methylation is necessary for proper methylation establishment at CGIs. This work represents the first systematic study performing ChIP-seq in oocytes and shows that histone remodeling in the mammalian oocyte helps direct de novo DNA methylation events.

  7. Oncogenic RAS alters the global and gene-specific histone modification pattern during epithelial-mesenchymal transition in colorectal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Peláez, Ignacio Mazón; Kalogeropoulou, Margarita; Ferraro, Angelo; Voulgari, Angeliki; Pankotai, Tibor; Boros, Imre; Pintzas, Alexander

    2010-06-01

    The presence of different forms of histone covalent modifications, such as phosphorylation, acetylation and methylation in localized promoter regions are markers for chromatin packing and transcription. Activation of RAS signalling pathways through oncogenic RAS mutations is a hallmark of colorectal cancer. Overexpression of Harvey-Ras oncogene induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in Caco-2 cells. We focused on the role of epigenetic modifications of histone H3 and its dependence on RAS signal transduction pathways and oncogenic transformation. Using cell lines stably overexpressing oncogenic Harvey-RAS with EMT phenotype, we studied the acquired changes in the H3 histone modification patterns. Two genes show inverse protein expression patterns after Ha-RAS overexpression: Cyclin D1, a cell cycle-related gene, and the EMT marker-gene E-cadherin. We report that these two genes demonstrate matching inverse histone repression patterns on their promoter, while histone markers associated with an active state of genes were affected by the RAS-activated signalling pathway MEK-ERK-MSK1. Furthermore, we show that though the level of methyltransferases enzymes was increased, the status of H3 three-methylation at lysine 27 (H3K27me(3)), associated with gene repression on the promoter of Cyclin D1, was lower. Together, these results suggest that histone covalent modifications can be affected by oncogenic RAS pathways to regulate the expression of target genes like Cyclin D1 or E-cadherin and that the dynamic balance of opposing histone-modifying enzymes is critical for the regulation of cell proliferation.

  8. Profiling Analysis of Histone Modifications and Gene Expression in Lewis Lung Carcinoma Murine Cells Resistant to Anti-VEGF Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yanhua; Chen, Kaiming; Liu, Zhenping; Li, Bing; Li, Jie; Tao, Fei; Gu, Hua; Jiang, Cizhong; Fang, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells become resistant after long-term use of anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) agents. Our previous study shows that treatment with a VEGF inhibitor (VEGF-Trap) facilitates to develop tumor resistance through regulating angiogenesis-related genes. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Histone modifications as a key epigenetic factor play a critical role in regulation of gene expression. Here, we explore the potential epigenetic gene regulatory functions of key histone modifications during tumor resistance in a mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cell line. We generated high resolution genome-wide maps of key histone modifications in sensitive tumor sample (LLC-NR) and resistant tumor sample (LLC-R) after VEGF-Trap treatment. Profiling analysis of histone modifications shows that histone modification levels are effectively predictive for gene expression. Composition of promoters classified by histone modification state is different between LLC-NR and LLC-R cell lines regardless of CpG content. Histone modification state change between LLC-NR and LLC-R cell lines shows different patterns in CpG-rich and CpG-poor promoters. As a consequence, genes with different level of CpG content whose gene expression level are altered are enriched in distinct functions. Notably, histone modification state change in promoters of angiogenesis-related genes consists with their expression alteration. Taken together, our findings suggest that treatment with anti-VEGF therapy results in extensive histone modification state change in promoters with multiple functions, particularly, biological processes related to angiogenesis, likely contributing to tumor resistance development. PMID:27362259

  9. Analysis of Histones H3 and H4 Reveals Novel and Conserved Post-Translational Modifications in Sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Izabel; Yuan, Zuo-Fei; Liu, Shichong; Souza, Glaucia Mendes; Garcia, Benjamin A; Casas-Mollano, J Armando

    2015-01-01

    Histones are the main structural components of the nucleosome, hence targets of many regulatory proteins that mediate processes involving changes in chromatin. The functional outcome of many pathways is "written" in the histones in the form of post-translational modifications that determine the final gene expression readout. As a result, modifications, alone or in combination, are important determinants of chromatin states. Histone modifications are accomplished by the addition of different chemical groups such as methyl, acetyl and phosphate. Thus, identifying and characterizing these modifications and the proteins related to them is the initial step to understanding the mechanisms of gene regulation and in the future may even provide tools for breeding programs. Several studies over the past years have contributed to increase our knowledge of epigenetic gene regulation in model organisms like Arabidopsis, yet this field remains relatively unexplored in crops. In this study we identified and initially characterized histones H3 and H4 in the monocot crop sugarcane. We discovered a number of histone genes by searching the sugarcane ESTs database. The proteins encoded correspond to canonical histones, and their variants. We also purified bulk histones and used them to map post-translational modifications in the histones H3 and H4 using mass spectrometry. Several modifications conserved in other plants, and also novel modified residues, were identified. In particular, we report O-acetylation of serine, threonine and tyrosine, a recently identified modification conserved in several eukaryotes. Additionally, the sub-nuclear localization of some well-studied modifications (i.e., H3K4me3, H3K9me2, H3K27me3, H3K9ac, H3T3ph) is described and compared to other plant species. To our knowledge, this is the first report of histones H3 and H4 as well as their post-translational modifications in sugarcane, and will provide a starting point for the study of chromatin regulation in

  10. Butyrate, an HDAC inhibitor, stimulates interplay between different posttranslational modifications of histone H3 and differently alters G1-specific cell cycle proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Omana P; Ranganna, Kasturi; Yatsu, Frank M

    2010-12-01

    HDACs and HATs regulate histone acetylation, an epigenetic modification that controls chromatin structure and through it, gene expression. Butyrate, a dietary HDAC inhibitor, inhibits VSMC proliferation, a crucial factor in atherogenesis, and the principle mechanism in arterial and in-stent restenosis. Here, the link between antiproliferation action of butyrate and the portraits of global covalent modifications of histone H3 that it induces are characterized to understand the mechanics of butyrate-arrested VSMC proliferation. Analysis of histone H3 modifications specific to butyrate arrested VSMC proliferation display induction of histone H3-Lysine9 acetylation, inhibition of histone H3-Serine10 phosphorylation, reduction of histone H3-Lysine9 dimethylation and stimulation of histone H3-Lysine4 di-methylation, which is linked to transcriptional activation, cell cycle/mitosis, transcriptional suppression and activation, respectively. Conversely, untreated VSMCs exhibit inhibition of H3-Lysine9 acetylation, induction of H3-Serine10 phosphorylation, stimulation of H3-Lysine9 di-methylation and reduction in H3-Lysine4 di-methylation. Butyrate's cooperative effects on H3-Lysine9 acetylation and H3-Serine10 phosphorylation, and contrasting effects on di-methylation of H3-Lysine9 and H3-Lysine4 suggests that the interplay between these site-specific modifications cause distinct chromatin alterations that allow cyclin D1 and D3 induction, G1-specific cdk4, cdk6 and cdk2 downregulation, and upregulation of cdk inhibitors, p15INK4b and p21Cip1. Regardless of butyrate's effect on D-type cyclins, downregulation of G1-specific cdks and upregulation of cdk inhibitors by butyrate prevents cell cycle progression by failing to inactivate Rb. Overall, through chromatin remodeling, butyrate appears to differentially alter G1-specific cell cycle proteins to ensure proliferation arrest of VSMCs, a crucial cellular component of blood vessel wall.

  11. A combination of maternal histone variants and chaperones promotes paternal genome activation and boosts somatic cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Peng; Wu, Warren; Macfarlan, Todd S.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian egg employs a wide spectrum of epigenome modification machinery to reprogram the sperm nucleus shortly after fertilization. This event is required for transcriptional activation of the paternal/zygotic genome and progression through cleavage divisions. Reprogramming of paternal nuclei requires replacement of sperm protamines with canonical and non-canonical histones, covalent modification of histone tails, and chemical modification of DNA (notably oxidative demethylation of methylated cytosines). In this essay we highlight the role maternal histone variants play during developmental reprogramming following fertilization. We discuss how reduced maternal histone variant incorporation in somatic nuclear transfer experiments may explain the reduced viability of resulting embryos and how knowledge of repressive and activating maternal factors may be used to improve somatic cell reprogramming. PMID:25328107

  12. Aberrant histone modification in CD19+ B cells of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Keshu; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Yanyan; Xiong, Yuanyuan; Wu, Shengsheng; Yang, Jingke; Zhou, Hu; Liu, Xinjian; Wei, Xudong; Song, Yongping

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to detect the alterations in histone methylation and acetylation in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Global histone H3/H4 acetylation and H3K4/H3K9 methylation were detected by the EpiQuik™ global histone H3/H4 acetylation and H3K4/H3K9 methylation assay kits. The mRNA expression of selected chromatin modifier genes was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Our results found that the global histone H3/H4 hypoacetylation in the CD19+ B cells of patients with CLL (P=0.028 and P=0.03, respectively) and the global histone H3K9 methylation in patients with CLL were significantly increased compared with controls (P=0.02), while there was no significant difference in the global histone H3K4 methylation between the two groups. The level of SIRT1 and EZH2 mRNA expression was upregulated in patients with CLL (P=0.03 and P=0.02, respectively), which increased significantly with progression from Binet stage A to stage C (P=0.015 and P=0.01, respectively) and Rai good to high risk stage (P=0.007 and P=0.008, respectively). The level of HDAC1 and HDAC7 mRNA expression was significantly increased (P=0.02 and P=0.008, respectively) and HDAC2 and P300 mRNA expression was reduced in patients with CLL (P=0.002 and P=0.001, respectively). In conclusion, it is observed that the aberrant histone modification plays an important role in the pathogenesis of CLL. PMID:28260932

  13. Immune activation by histones: plusses and minuses in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pisetsky, David S

    2013-12-01

    Histones are highly cationic proteins that are essential components of the cell nucleus, interacting with DNA to form the nucleosome and regulating transcription. Histones, however, can transit from the cell nucleus during cell death and, once in an extracellular location, can serve as danger signals and activate immune cells. An article in this issue of the European Journal of Immunology [Eur. J. Immunol. 2013. 43: 3336-3342] reports that histones can activate monocyte-derived DCs via the NRLP3 inflammasome to induce the production of IL-1β. As such, histones, which can also stimulate TLRs, may drive events in the immunopathogenesis of a wide range of acute and chronic diseases marked by sterile inflammation. While the mechanism of this stimulation is not known, the positive charge of histones may provide a structural element to promote interaction with cells and activation of downstream signaling systems.

  14. Recognition of a Mononucleosomal Histone Modification Pattern by BPTF via Multivalent Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ruthenburg, Alexander J.; Li, Haitao; Milne, Thomas A.; Dewell, Scott; McGinty, Robert K.; Yuen, Melanie; Ueberheide, Beatrix; Dou, Yali; Muir, Tom W.; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Allis, C. David

    2011-09-20

    Little is known about how combinations of histone marks are interpreted at the level of nucleosomes. The second PHD finger of human BPTF is known to specifically recognize histone H3 when methylated on lysine 4 (H3K4me2/3). Here, we examine how additional heterotypic modifications influence BPTF binding. Using peptide surrogates, three acetyllysine ligands are indentified for a PHD-adjacent bromodomain in BPTF via systematic screening and biophysical characterization. Although the bromodomain displays limited discrimination among the three possible acetyllysines at the peptide level, marked selectivity is observed for only one of these sites, H4K16ac, in combination with H3K4me3 at the mononucleosome level. In support, these two histone marks constitute a unique trans-histone modification pattern that unambiguously resides within a single nucleosomal unit in human cells, and this module colocalizes with these marks in the genome. Together, our data call attention to nucleosomal patterning of covalent marks in dictating critical chromatin associations.

  15. Recognition of a Mononucleosomal Histone Modification Pattern by BPTF via Multivalent Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    A Ruthenburg; H Li; T Milne; S Dewell; R McGinty; M Yuen; B Ueberheide; Y Dou; T Muir; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Little is known about how combinations of histone marks are interpreted at the level of nucleosomes. The second PHD finger of human BPTF is known to specifically recognize histone H3 when methylated on lysine 4 (H3K4me2/3). Here, we examine how additional heterotypic modifications influence BPTF binding. Using peptide surrogates, three acetyllysine ligands are indentified for a PHD-adjacent bromodomain in BPTF via systematic screening and biophysical characterization. Although the bromodomain displays limited discrimination among the three possible acetyllysines at the peptide level, marked selectivity is observed for only one of these sites, H4K16ac, in combination with H3K4me3 at the mononucleosome level. In support, these two histone marks constitute a unique trans-histone modification pattern that unambiguously resides within a single nucleosomal unit in human cells, and this module colocalizes with these marks in the genome. Together, our data call attention to nucleosomal patterning of covalent marks in dictating critical chromatin associations.

  16. Cell cycle-dependent O-GlcNAc modification of tobacco histones and their interaction with the tobacco lectin.

    PubMed

    Delporte, Annelies; De Zaeytijd, Jeroen; De Storme, Nico; Azmi, Abdelkrim; Geelen, Danny; Smagghe, Guy; Guisez, Yves; Van Damme, Els J M

    2014-10-01

    The Nicotiana tabacum agglutinin or Nictaba is a nucleocytoplasmic lectin that is expressed in tobacco after the plants have been exposed to jasmonate treatment or insect herbivory. Nictaba specifically recognizes GlcNAc residues. Recently, it was shown that Nictaba is interacting in vitro with the core histone proteins from calf thymus. Assuming that plant histones - similar to their animal counterparts - undergo O-GlcNAcylation, this interaction presumably occurs through binding of the lectin to the O-GlcNAc modification present on the histones. Hereupon, the question was raised whether this modification also occurs in plants and if it is cell cycle dependent. To this end, histones were purified from tobacco BY-2 suspension cells and the presence of O-GlcNAc modifications was checked. Concomitantly, O-GlcNAcylation of histone proteins was studied. Our data show that similar to animal histones plant histones are modified by O-GlcNAc in a cell cycle-dependent fashion. In addition, the interaction between Nictaba and tobacco histones was confirmed using lectin chromatography and far Western blot analysis. Collectively these findings suggest that Nictaba can act as a modulator of gene transcription through its interaction with core histones.

  17. Histone H3K9 modifications are a local chromatin event involved in ethanol-induced neuroadaptation of the NR2B gene.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Mei; Denny, Ashley; Lieu, Mai; Carreon, Stephanie; Li, Ji

    2011-09-01

    Expression of the NMDA receptor 2B (NR2B) gene is upregulated following chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) treatment and withdrawal, which underlies behavioral alterations in addiction. The goal of this study was to characterize the changes of histone modifications induced by CIE treatment and its subsequent removal associated to the upregulation of NR2B gene transcription. To investigate the involvement of histone acetylation in the effect of ethanol on the NR2B gene, we examined the influence of CIE on histone acetylation in the 5' regulatory region of NR2B using a qChIP assay. CIE treatment and its subsequent removal produced a remarkable and selected increase in histone H3K9 acetylation. Interestingly, the majority of the increased H3K9 acetylation occurred after ethanol removal, which was coincident with a decrease in H3K9 methylation in the same time duration. Further examination of the mechanisms of ethanol-induced alterations on the histone modifications revealed that CIE-induced acetylation of H3K9 was not due to the changes in global enzyme activities or the expression of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and deacetylase (HDACs). Instead, we found a significant downregulation in some histone methyltransferases (HMTs) at both the global level and the local chromatin of the NR2B gene following CIE treatment. Moreover, our experiments also indicated a decrease of G9a, Suv39 h1 and HDAC1-3 in the chromatin of the NR2B gene promoter, which may be responsible for the altered H3K9 modifications. Taken together, the findings suggest a mechanism where the changes in H3K9 modifications in the local chromatin of the NR2B gene underlie alcohol-induced neuroadaptation.

  18. Preferential occupancy of histone variant H2AZ at inactive promoters influences local histone modifications and chromatin remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Pattenden, Samantha G.; Lee, Daeyoup; Gutiérrez, José; Chen, Jie; Seidel, Chris; Gerton, Jennifer; Workman, Jerry L.

    2005-01-01

    The yeast histone variant H2AZ (Htz1) is implicated in transcription activation, prevention of the ectopic spread of heterochromatin, and genome integrity. Our genome-wide localization analysis revealed that Htz1 is widely, but nonrandomly, distributed throughout the genome in an SWR1-dependent manner. We found that Htz1 is enriched in intergenic regions compared with coding regions. Its occupancy is inversely proportional to transcription rates and the enrichment of the RNA polymerase II under different growth conditions. However, Htz1 does not seem to directly regulate transcription repression genome-wide; instead, the presence of Htz1 under the inactivated condition is essential for optimal activation of a subset of genes. In addition, Htz1 is not generally responsible for nucleosome positioning, even at those promoters where Htz1 is highly enriched. Finally, using a biochemical approach, we demonstrate that incorporation of Htz1 into nucleosomes inhibits activities of histone modifiers associated with transcription, Dot1, Set2, and NuA4 and reduces the nucleosome mobilization driven by chromatin remodeling complexes. These lines of evidence collectively suggest that Htz1 may serve to mark quiescent promoters for proper activation. PMID:16344463

  19. Phosphorylation of histone H3 is functionally linked to retinoic acid receptor β promoter activation

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Bruno; Ozato, Keiko; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2002-01-01

    Ligand-dependent transcriptional activation of retinoic acid receptors (RARs) is a multistep process culminating in the formation of a multimeric co-activator complex on regulated promoters. Several co-activator complexes harbor an acetyl transferase activity, which is required for retinoid-induced transcription of reporter genes. Using murine P19 embryonal carcinoma cells, we examined the relationship between histone post-translational modifications and activation of the endogenous RARβ2 promoter, which is under the control of a canonical retinoic acid response element and rapidly induced upon retinoid treatment. While histones H3 and H4 were constitutively acetylated at this promoter, retinoid agonists induced a rapid phosphorylation at Ser10 of histone H3. A retinoid antagonist, whose activity was independent of co-repressor binding to RAR, could oppose this agonist-induced H3 phosphorylation. Since such post-translational modifications were not observed at several other promoters, we conclude that histone H3 phosphorylation may be a molecular signature of the activated, retinoid-controlled mRARβ2 gene promoter. PMID:11897660

  20. Effect of histone acetylation modification with MGCD0103, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, on nuclear reprogramming and the developmental competence of porcine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos.

    PubMed

    Jin, Long; Zhu, Hai-Ying; Guo, Qing; Li, Xiao-Chen; Zhang, Yu-Chen; Cui, Cheng-Du; Li, Wen-Xue; Cui, Zheng-Yun; Yin, Xi-Jun; Kang, Jin-Dan

    2017-01-01

    Cloning remains as an important technique to enhance the reconstitution and distribution of animal population with high-genetic merit. One of the major detrimental factors of this technique is the abnormal epigenetic modifications. MGCD0103 is known as a histone deacetylase inhibitor. In this study, we investigated the effect of MGCD0103 on the in vitro blastocyst formation rate in porcine somatic cell nuclear transferred (SCNT) embryos and expression in acetylation of the histone H3 lysine 9 and histone H4 lysine 12. We compared the in vitro embryonic development of SCNT embryos treated with different concentrations of MGCD0103 for 24 hours. Our results reported that treating with 0.2-μM MGCD0103 for 24 hours effectively improved the development of SCNT embryos, in comparison to the control group (blastocyst formation rate, 25.5 vs. 10.7%, P < 0.05). Then we tested the in vitro development of SCNT embryos treated with 0.2-μM MGCD0103 for various intervals after activation. Treatment for 6 hours significantly improved the development of pig SCNT embryos, compared with the control group (blastocyst formation rate, 21.2 vs. 10.5%, P < 0.05). Furthermore, MGCD0103 supplementation significantly (P < 0.05) increases the average fluorescence intensity of AcH3K9 and AcH4K12 in embryos at the pseudo-pronuclear stage. To examine the in vivo development, MGCD0103-treated SCNT embryos were transferred into two surrogate sows, one of whom became pregnant and three fetuses developed. These results suggest that MGCD0103 can enhance the nuclear reprogramming and improve in vitro developmental potential of porcine SCNT embryos.

  1. Influences of the Gut Microbiota on DNA Methylation and Histone Modification.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jianzhong; Wu, Wenrui; Li, Yating; Li, Lanjuan

    2017-03-24

    The gut microbiota is a vast ensemble of microorganisms inhabiting the mammalian gastrointestinal tract that can impact physiologic and pathologic processes. However, our understanding of the underlying mechanism for the dynamic interaction between host and gut microbiota is still in its infancy. The highly evolved epigenetic modifications allow hosts to reprogram the genome in response to environmental stimuli, which may play a key role in triggering multiple human diseases. In spite of increasing studies in gut microbiota and epigenetic modifications, the correlation between them has not been well elaborated. Here, we review current knowledge of gut microbiota impacts on epigenetic modifications, the major evidence of which centers on DNA methylation and histone modification of the immune system.

  2. Histone modifications are associated with the persistence or silencing of vector-mediated transgene expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Riu, Efren; Chen, Zhi-Ying; Xu, Hui; He, Chen-Yi; Kay, Mark A

    2007-07-01

    One of the major obstacles to success in non-viral gene therapy is transcriptional silencing of the DNA vector. The mechanisms underlying gene silencing/repression in mammalian cells are complex and remain unclear. Because changes in chromatin structure and, in particular, histone modifications are involved in transcriptional regulation of endogenous genes, we hypothesized that changes in the pattern of histone modifications were related to the observed transcriptional silencing of exogenous DNA vectors. We used antibodies against specific modified histones to perform chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analyses on liver lysates from mice transfected with two types of plasmids: (i) DNA minicircles (MCs) devoid of bacterial plasmid backbone DNA, which showed marked persistence of transgene expression, and (ii) their parental plasmids, which were silenced over time. Silencing of the transgene from the parental vectors was accompanied by an increase in heterochromatin-associated histone modifications and a decrease in modifications typically associated with euchromatin. Conversely, the pattern of histone modifications on the MC DNA was consistent with euchromatin. Our data indicates that (i) episomal vectors undergo chromatinization in vivo, and (ii) both persistence and silencing of transgene expression are associated with specific histone modifications.

  3. WaveSeq: A Novel Data-Driven Method of Detecting Histone Modification Enrichments Using Wavelets

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Apratim; Song, Jiuzhou

    2012-01-01

    Background Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next-generation sequencing is a genome-wide analysis technique that can be used to detect various epigenetic phenomena such as, transcription factor binding sites and histone modifications. Histone modification profiles can be either punctate or diffuse which makes it difficult to distinguish regions of enrichment from background noise. With the discovery of histone marks having a wide variety of enrichment patterns, there is an urgent need for analysis methods that are robust to various data characteristics and capable of detecting a broad range of enrichment patterns. Results To address these challenges we propose WaveSeq, a novel data-driven method of detecting regions of significant enrichment in ChIP-Seq data. Our approach utilizes the wavelet transform, is free of distributional assumptions and is robust to diverse data characteristics such as low signal-to-noise ratios and broad enrichment patterns. Using publicly available datasets we showed that WaveSeq compares favorably with other published methods, exhibiting high sensitivity and precision for both punctate and diffuse enrichment regions even in the absence of a control data set. The application of our algorithm to a complex histone modification data set helped make novel functional discoveries which further underlined its utility in such an experimental setup. Conclusions WaveSeq is a highly sensitive method capable of accurate identification of enriched regions in a broad range of data sets. WaveSeq can detect both narrow and broad peaks with a high degree of accuracy even in low signal-to-noise ratio data sets. WaveSeq is also suited for application in complex experimental scenarios, helping make biologically relevant functional discoveries. PMID:23029045

  4. Novel chemokine-like activities of histones in tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ruochan; Xie, Yangchun; Zhong, Xiao; Fu, Yongmin; Huang, Yan; Zhen, Yixiang; Pan, Pinhua; Wang, Haichao; Bartlett, David L.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Lotze, Michael T.; Zeh, Herbert J.; Fan, Xue-Gong; Tang, Daolin; Kang, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Histones are intracellular nucleosomal components and extracellular damage-associated molecular pattern molecules that modulate chromatin remodeling, as well as the immune response. However, their extracellular roles in cell migration and invasion remain undefined. Here, we demonstrate that histones are novel regulators of tumor metastasis with chemokine-like activities. Indeed, exogenous histones promote both hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell migration and invasion through toll-like receptor (TLR)4, but not TLR2 or the receptor for advanced glycosylation end product. TLR4-mediated activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is required for histone-induced chemokine (e.g., C-C motif ligand 9/10) production. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of TLR4-ERK-NF-κB signaling impairs histone-induced chemokine production and HCC cell migration. Additionally, TLR4 depletion (by using TLR4−/− mice and TLR4-shRNA) or inhibition of histone release/activity (by administration of heparin and H3 neutralizing antibody) attenuates lung metastasis of HCC cells injected via the tail vein of mice. Thus, histones promote tumor metastasis of HCC cells through the TLR4-NF-κB pathway and represent novel targets for treating patients with HCC. PMID:27623211

  5. Radiation-induced alterations in histone modification patterns and their potential impact on short-term radiation effects

    PubMed Central

    Friedl, Anna A.; Mazurek, Belinda; Seiler, Doris M.

    2012-01-01

    Detection and repair of radiation-induced DNA damage occur in the context of chromatin. An intricate network of mechanisms defines chromatin structure, including DNA methylation, incorporation of histone variants, histone modifications, and chromatin remodeling. In the last years it became clear that the cellular response to radiation-induced DNA damage involves all of these mechanisms. Here we focus on the current knowledge on radiation-induced alterations in post-translational histone modification patterns and their effect on the chromatin accessibility, transcriptional regulation and chromosomal stability. PMID:23050241

  6. Bioinformatic dissecting of TP53 regulation pathway underlying butyrate-induced histone modification in epigenetic regulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate affects cell proliferation, differentiation and motility. Butyrate inhibits histone deacetylase (HDAC) activities and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. TP53 is one of the most active upstream regulators discovered by IPA in our RNA sequencing data set. The TP53 signaling pathway pl...

  7. Histone Modifications Define Expression Bias of Homoeologous Genomes in Allotetraploid Cotton1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Wenxue; Song, Qingxin; Zhang, Tianzhen

    2016-01-01

    Histone modifications regulate gene expression in eukaryotes, but their roles in gene expression changes in interspecific hybrids or allotetraploids are poorly understood. Histone modifications can be mapped by immunostaining of metaphase chromosomes at the single cell level and/or by chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) for analyzing individual genes. Here, we comparatively analyzed immunostained metaphase chromosomes and ChIP-seq of individual genes, which revealed a chromatin basis for biased homoeologous gene expression in polyploids. We examined H3K4me3 density and transcriptome maps in root-tip cells of allotetraploid cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). The overall H3K4me3 levels were relatively equal between A and D chromosomes, which were consistent with equal numbers of expressed genes between the two subgenomes. However, intensities per chromosomal area were nearly twice as high in the D homeologs as in the A homeologs. Consistent with the cytological observation, ChIP-seq analysis showed that more D homeologs with biased H3K4me3 levels than A homeologs with biased modifications correlated with the greater number of the genes with D-biased expression than that with A-biased expression in most homeologous chromosome pairs. Two chromosomes displayed different expression levels compared with other chromosomes, which correlate with known translocations and may affect the local chromatin structure and expression levels for the genes involved. This example of genome-wide histone modifications that determine expression bias of homeologous genes in allopolyploids provides a molecular basis for the evolution and domestication of polyploid species, including many important crops. PMID:27637746

  8. Robust methods for purification of histones from cultured mammalian cells with the preservation of their native modifications.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Collazo, Pedro; Leuba, Sanford H; Zlatanova, Jordanka

    2009-06-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histones play a role in modifying chromatin structure for DNA-templated processes in the eukaryotic nucleus, such as transcription, replication, recombination and repair; thus, histone PTMs are considered major players in the epigenetic control of these processes. Linking specific histone PTMs to gene expression is an arduous task requiring large amounts of highly purified and natively modified histones to be analyzed by various techniques. We have developed robust and complementary procedures, which use strong protein denaturing conditions and yield highly purified core and linker histones from unsynchronized proliferating, M-phase arrested and butyrate-treated cells, fully preserving their native PTMs without using enzyme inhibitors. Cell hypotonic swelling and lysis, nuclei isolation/washing and chromatin solubilization under mild conditions are bypassed to avoid compromising the integrity of histone native PTMs. As controls for our procedures, we tested the most widely used conventional methodologies and demonstrated that they indeed lead to drastic histone dephosphorylation. Additionally, we have developed methods for preserving acid-labile histone modifications by performing non-acid extractions to obtain highly purified H3 and H4. Importantly, isolation of histones H3, H4 and H2A/H2B is achieved without the use of HPLC. Functional supercoiling assays reveal that both hyper- and hypo-phosphorylated histones can be efficiently assembled into polynucleosomes. Notably, the preservation of fully phosphorylated mitotic histones and their assembly into polynucleosomes should open new avenues to investigate an important but overlooked question: the impact of mitotic phosphorylation in chromatin structure and function.

  9. Differential epigenetic modifications of histones at the myosin heavy chain genes in fast and slow skeletal muscle fibers and in response to muscle unloading.

    PubMed

    Pandorf, Clay E; Haddad, Fadia; Wright, Carola; Bodell, Paul W; Baldwin, Kenneth M

    2009-07-01

    Recent advances in chromatin biology have enhanced our understanding of gene regulation. It is now widely appreciated that gene regulation is dependent upon post-translational modifications to the histones which package genes in the nucleus of cells. Active genes are known to be associated with acetylation of histones (H3ac) and trimethylation of lysine 4 in histone H3 (H3K4me3). Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we examined histone modifications at the myosin heavy chain (MHC) genes expressed in fast vs. slow fiber-type skeletal muscle, and in a model of muscle unloading, which results in a shift to fast MHC gene expression in slow muscles. Both H3ac and H3K4me3 varied directly with the transcriptional activity of the MHC genes in fast fiber-type plantaris and slow fiber-type soleus. During MHC transitions with muscle unloading, histone H3 at the type I MHC becomes de-acetylated in correspondence with down-regulation of that gene, while upregulation of the fast type IIx and IIb MHCs occurs in conjunction with enhanced H3ac in those MHCs. Enrichment of H3K4me3 is also increased at the type IIx and IIb MHCs when these genes are induced with muscle unloading. Downregulation of IIa MHC, however, was not associated with corresponding loss of H3ac or H3K4me3. These observations demonstrate the feasibility of using the ChIP assay to understand the native chromatin environment in adult skeletal muscle, and also suggest that the transcriptional state of types I, IIx and IIb MHC genes are sensitive to histone modifications both in different muscle fiber-types and in response to altered loading states.

  10. Nuclear c-Abl-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation induces chromatin structural changes through histone modifications that include H4K16 hypoacetylation

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyama, Kazumasa; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Kubota, Sho; Morinaga, Takao; Horiike, Yasuyoshi; Yuki, Ryuzaburo; Takahashi, Akinori; Nakayama, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2011-12-10

    c-Abl tyrosine kinase, which is ubiquitously expressed, has three nuclear localization signals and one nuclear export signal and can shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. c-Abl plays important roles in cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and apoptosis. Recently, we developed a pixel imaging method for quantitating the level of chromatin structural changes and showed that nuclear Src-family tyrosine kinases are involved in chromatin structural changes upon growth factor stimulation. Using this method, we show here that nuclear c-Abl induces chromatin structural changes in a manner dependent on the tyrosine kinase activity. Expression of nuclear-targeted c-Abl drastically increases the levels of chromatin structural changes, compared with that of c-Abl. Intriguingly, nuclear-targeted c-Abl induces heterochromatic profiles of histone methylation and acetylation, including hypoacetylation of histone H4 acetylated on lysine 16 (H4K16Ac). The level of heterochromatic histone modifications correlates with that of chromatin structural changes. Adriamycin-induced DNA damage stimulates translocation of c-Abl into the nucleus and induces chromatin structural changes together with H4K16 hypoacetylation. Treatment with trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, blocks chromatin structural changes but not nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation by c-Abl. These results suggest that nuclear c-Abl plays an important role in chromatin dynamics through nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation-induced heterochromatic histone modifications.

  11. Poly(ADP-ribosylation) regulates chromatin organization through histone H3 modification and DNA methylation of the first cell cycle of mouse embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Osada, Tomoharu; Rydén, Anna-Margareta; Masutani, Mitsuko

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •Histone modification of the mouse pronuclei is regulated by poly(ADP-ribosylation). •Hypermethylation of the mouse female pronuclei is maintained by poly(ADP-ribosylation). •Parp1 is physically interacted with Suz12, which may function in the pronuclei. •Poly(ADP-ribosylation) affects ultrastructure of chromatin of the mouse pronucleus. -- Abstract: We examined the roles of poly(ADP-ribosylation) in chromatin remodeling during the first cell cycle of mouse embryos. Drug-based inhibition of poly(ADP-ribosylation) by a PARP inhibitor, PJ-34, revealed up-regulation of dimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 4 in male pronuclei and down-regulation of dimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 (H3K9) and lysine 27 (H3K27). Association of poly(ADP-ribosylation) with histone modification was suggested to be supported by the interaction of Suz12, a histone methyltransferase in the polycomb complex, with Parp1. PARP activity was suggested to be required for a proper localization and maintenance of Suz12 on chromosomes. Notably, DNA methylation level of female pronuclei in one-cell embryos was robustly decreased by PJ-34. Electron microscopic analysis showed a frequent appearance of unusual electron-dense areas within the female pronuclei, implying the disorganized and hypercondensed chromatin ultrastructure. These results show that poly(ADP-ribosylation) is important for the integrity of non-equivalent epigenetic dynamics of pronuclei during the first cell cycle of mouse embryos.

  12. Unraveling Site-Specific and Combinatorial Histone Modifications Using High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry in Histone Deacetylase Mutants of Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Abshiru, Nebiyu; Rajan, Roshan Elizabeth; Verreault, Alain; Thibault, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze the removal of acetylation marks from lysine residues on histone and nonhistone substrates. Their activity is generally associated with essential cellular processes such as transcriptional repression and heterochromatin formation. Interestingly, abnormal activity of HDACs has been reported in various types of cancers, which makes them a promising therapeutic target for cancer treatment. In the current study, we aim to understand the mechanisms underlying the function of HDACs using an in-depth quantitative analysis of changes in histone acetylation levels in Schizosaccharomyces pombe (S. pombe) lacking major HDAC activities. We employed a targeted quantitative mass spectrometry approach to profile changes of acetylation and methylation at multiple lysine residues on the N-terminal tail of histones H3 and H4. Our analyses identified a number of histone acetylation sites that are significantly affected by S. pombe HDAC mutations. We discovered that mutation of the Class I HDAC known as Clr6 causes a major increase in the abundance of triacetylated H4 molecules at K5, K8, and K12. A clr6-1 hypomorphic mutation also increased the abundance of multiple acetyl-lysines in histone H3. In addition, our study uncovered a few crosstalks between histone acetylation and methylation upon deletion of HDACs Hos2 and Clr3. We anticipate that the results from this study will greatly improve our current understanding of the mechanisms involved in HDAC-mediated gene regulation and heterochromatin assembly.

  13. DNA methylation and histone H3-K9 modifications contribute to MUC17 expression.

    PubMed

    Kitamoto, Sho; Yamada, Norishige; Yokoyama, Seiya; Houjou, Izumi; Higashi, Michiyo; Goto, Masamichi; Batra, Surinder K; Yonezawa, Suguru

    2011-02-01

    MUC17 glycoprotein is a membrane-associated mucin that is mainly expressed in the digestive tract. It has been suggested that MUC17 expression is correlated with the malignancy potential of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs). In the present study, we provided the first report of the MUC17 gene expression through epigenetic regulation such as promoter methylation, histone modification and microRNA (miRNA) expression. Near the transcriptional start site, the DNA methylation level of MUC17-negative cancer cell lines (e.g. PANC1) was high, whereas that of MUC17-positive cells (e.g. AsPC-1) was low. Histone H3-K9 (H3-K9) modification status was also closely related to MUC17 expression. Our results indicate that DNA methylation and histone H3-K9 modification in the 5' flanking region play a critical role in MUC17 expression. Furthermore, the hypomethylation status was observed in patients with PDAC. This indicates that the hypomethylation status in the MUC17 promoter could be a novel epigenetic marker for the diagnosis of PDAC. In addition, the result of miRNA microarray analysis showed that five potential miRNA candidates existed. It is also possible that the MUC17 might be post-transcriptionally regulated by miRNA targeting to the 3'-untranslated region of its mRNA. These understandings of the epigenetic changes of MUC17 may be of importance for the diagnosis of carcinogenic risk and the prediction of outcomes for cancer patients.

  14. Promoter methylation and histone modifications affect the expression of the exogenous DsRed gene in transgenic goats.

    PubMed

    Nuo, M T; Yuan, J L; Yang, W L; Gao, X Y; He, N; Liang, H; Cang, M; Liu, D J

    2016-08-29

    Transgene silencing, which is common in transgenic plants and animals, limits the generation and application of genetically modified organisms, and is associated with the exogenous gene copy number, the methylation status of its promoters, and histone modification abnormalities. Here, we analyzed the expression of the exogenous gene DsRed and the methylation status of its cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter in six healthy transgenic cashmere goats and transgenic nuclear donor cells. The CMV promoter exhibited high methylation levels (74.4-88.2%) in four of the goats, a moderate methylation level (58.7%) in one, and a low methylation level (21.2%) in one, while the methylation level of the transgenic nuclear donor cells was comparatively low (14.3%). DsRed expression was negatively correlated with promoter methylation status. Transgenic cashmere goats carried one to three copies of the CMV promoter fragment and one to six copies of the DsRed fragment, but copy number showed no obvious correlation with DsRed expression. After treatment with the methylation inhibitor 5-azacytidine, DsRed expression in transgenic goat cells significantly increased and CMV promoter methylation significantly decreased; this indicated an inverse correlation between promoter methylation status and DsRed expression. After treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A, DsRed expression increased, indicating that an abnormal histone modification in transgenic goats is also involved in exogenous gene silencing. These findings indicate the potential of trichostatin A and 5-azacytidine to rescue the biological activity of silenced exogenous transgenes in adult-derived transgenic cells under culture conditions.

  15. Crx activates opsin transcription by recruiting HAT-containing co-activators and promoting histone acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Guang-Hua; Chen, Shiming

    2008-01-01

    The homeodomain transcription factor Crx is required for expression of many photoreceptor genes in the mammalian retina. The mechanism by which Crx activates transcription remains to be determined. Using protein–protein interaction assays, Crx was found to interact with three co-activator proteins (complexes): STAGA, Cbp and p300, all of which possess histone acetyl-transferase (HAT) activity. To determine the role of Crx–HAT interactions in target gene chromatin modification and transcriptional activation, quantitative RT–PCR and chromatin immunoprecipitation were performed on Crx target genes, rod and cone opsins, in developing mouse retina. Although cone opsins are transcribed earlier than rhodopsin during development, the transcription of each gene is preceded by the same sequence of events in their promoter and enhancer regions: (i) binding of Crx, followed by (ii) binding of HATs, (iii) the acetylation of histone H3, then (iv) binding of other photoreceptor transcription factors (Nrl and Nr2e3) and RNA polymerase II. In Crx knockout mice (Crx−/−), the association of HATs and AcH3 with target promoter/enhancer regions was significantly decreased, which correlates with aberrant opsin transcription and photoreceptor dysfunction in these mice. Similar changes to the opsin chromatin were seen in Y79 retinoblastoma cells, where opsin genes are barely transcribed. These defects in Y79 cells can be reversed by expressing a recombinant Crx or applying histone deacetylase inhibitors. Altogether, these results suggest that one mechanism for Crx-mediated transcriptional activation is to recruit HATs to photoreceptor gene chromatin for histone acetylation, thereby inducing and maintaining appropriate chromatin configurations for transcription. PMID:17656371

  16. Tandem affinity purification of histones, coupled to mass spectrometry, identifies associated proteins and new sites of post-translational modification in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Valero, M Luz; Sendra, Ramon; Pamblanco, Mercè

    2016-03-16

    Histones and their post-translational modifications contribute to regulating fundamental biological processes in all eukaryotic cells. We have applied a conventional tandem affinity purification strategy to histones H3 and H4 of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mass spectrometry analysis of the co-purified proteins revealed multiple associated proteins, including core histones, which indicates that tagged histones may be incorporated to the nucleosome particle. Among the many other co-isolated proteins there are histone chaperones, elements of chromatin remodeling, of nucleosome assembly/disassembly, and of histone modification complexes. The histone chaperone Rtt106p, two members of chromatin assembly FACT complex and Psh1p, an ubiquitin ligase, were the most abundant proteins obtained with both H3-TAP and H4-TAP, regardless of the cell extraction medium stringency. Our mass spectrometry analyses have also revealed numerous novel post-translational modifications, including 30 new chemical modifications in histones, mainly by ubiquitination. We have discovered not only new sites of ubiquitination but that, besides lysine, also serine and threonine residues are targets of ubiquitination on yeast histones. Our results show the standard tandem affinity purification procedure is suitable for application to yeast histones, in order to isolate and characterize histone-binding proteins and post-translational modifications, avoiding the bias caused by histone purification from a chromatin-enriched fraction.

  17. Streamlined discovery of cross-linked chromatin complexes and associated histone modifications by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zee, Barry M; Alekseyenko, Artyom A; McElroy, Kyle A; Kuroda, Mitzi I

    2016-02-16

    Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) are key contributors to chromatin function. The ability to comprehensively link specific histone PTMs with specific chromatin factors would be an important advance in understanding the functions and genomic targeting mechanisms of those factors. We recently introduced a cross-linked affinity technique, BioTAP-XL, to identify chromatin-bound protein interactions that can be difficult to capture with native affinity techniques. However, BioTAP-XL was not strictly compatible with similarly comprehensive analyses of associated histone PTMs. Here we advance BioTAP-XL by demonstrating the ability to quantify histone PTMs linked to specific chromatin factors in parallel with the ability to identify nonhistone binding partners. Furthermore we demonstrate that the initially published quantity of starting material can be scaled down orders of magnitude without loss in proteomic sensitivity. We also integrate hydrophilic interaction chromatography to mitigate detergent carryover and improve liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric performance. In summary, we greatly extend the practicality of BioTAP-XL to enable comprehensive identification of protein complexes and their local chromatin environment.

  18. Synergetic effects of DNA methylation and histone modification during mouse induced pluripotent stem cell generation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guiying; Weng, Rong; Lan, Yuanyuan; Guo, Xudong; Liu, Qidong; Liu, Xiaoqin; Lu, Chenqi; Kang, Jiuhong

    2017-01-01

    DNA methylation and histone methylation (H3K27me3) have been reported as major barriers to induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) generation using four core transcription factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc, termed OSKM). Here, to illustrate the possibility of deriving iPSCs via demethylation, as well as the exact effects of DNA methylation and histone modification on gene expression regulation, we performed RNA sequencing to characterize the transcriptomes of ES cells and iPSCs derived by demethylation with miR-29b or shDnmt3a, and carried out integrated analyses. Results showed that OSKM + miR-29b-iPSC was more close to ES cells than the others, and up-regulated genes typically presented with methylated CpG-dense promoters and H3K27me3-enriched regions. The differentially expressed genes caused by introduction of DNA demethylation during somatic cell reprogramming mainly focus on stem cell associated GO terms and KEGG signaling pathways, which may decrease the tumorigenesis risk of iPSCs. These findings indicated that DNA methylation and histone methylation have synergetic effects on regulating gene expression during iPSC generation, and demethylation by miR-29b is better than shDnmt3a for iPSC quality. Furthermore, integrated analyses are superior for exploration of slight differences as missed by individual analysis. PMID:28155862

  19. Evaluating the Role of Epigenetic Histone Modifications in the Metabolic Memory of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Feng; Chen, Zhuo; Genuth, Saul; Paterson, Andrew; Zhang, Lingxiao; Wu, Xiwei; Li, Sierra Min; Cleary, Patricia; Riggs, Arthur; Harlan, David M.; Lorenzi, Gayle; Kolterman, Orville; Sun, Wanjie; Lachin, John M.; Natarajan, Rama

    2014-01-01

    We assessed whether epigenetic histone posttranslational modifications are associated with the prolonged beneficial effects (metabolic memory) of intensive versus conventional therapy during the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) on the progression of microvascular outcomes in the long-term Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) study. We performed chromatin immunoprecipitation linked to promoter tiling arrays to profile H3 lysine-9 acetylation (H3K9Ac), H3 lysine-4 trimethylation (H3K4Me3), and H3K9Me2 in blood monocytes and lymphocytes obtained from 30 DCCT conventional treatment group subjects (case subjects: mean DCCT HbA1c level >9.1% [76 mmol/mol] and progression of retinopathy or nephropathy by EDIC year 10 of follow-up) versus 30 DCCT intensive treatment subjects (control subjects: mean DCCT HbA1c level <7.3% [56 mmol/mol] and without progression of retinopathy or nephropathy). Monocytes from case subjects had statistically greater numbers of promoter regions with enrichment in H3K9Ac (active chromatin mark) compared with control subjects (P = 0.0096). Among the patients in the two groups combined, monocyte H3K9Ac was significantly associated with the mean HbA1c level during the DCCT and EDIC (each P < 2.2E-16). Of note, the top 38 case hyperacetylated promoters (P < 0.05) included >15 genes related to the nuclear factor-κB inflammatory pathway and were enriched in genes related to diabetes complications. These results suggest an association between HbA1c level and H3K9Ac, and a possible epigenetic explanation for metabolic memory in humans. PMID:24458354

  20. Pathology Tissue-quantitative Mass Spectrometry Analysis to Profile Histone Post-translational Modification Patterns in Patient Samples.

    PubMed

    Noberini, Roberta; Uggetti, Andrea; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Minucci, Saverio; Bonaldi, Tiziana

    2016-03-01

    Histone post-translational modifications (hPTMs) generate a complex combinatorial code that has been implicated with various pathologies, including cancer. Dissecting such a code in physiological and diseased states may be exploited for epigenetic biomarker discovery, but hPTM analysis in clinical samples has been hindered by technical limitations. Here, we developed a method (PAThology tissue analysis of Histones by Mass Spectrometry - PAT-H-MS) that allows to perform a comprehensive, unbiased and quantitative MS-analysis of hPTM patterns on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples. In pairwise comparisons, histone extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues showed patterns similar to fresh frozen samples for 24 differentially modified peptides from histone H3. In addition, when coupled with a histone-focused version of the super-SILAC approach, this method allows the accurate quantification of modification changes among breast cancer patient samples. As an initial application of the PAThology tissue analysis of Histones by Mass Spectrometry method, we analyzed breast cancer samples, revealing significant changes in histone H3 methylation patterns among Luminal A-like and Triple Negative disease subtypes. These results pave the way for retrospective epigenetic studies that combine the power of MS-based hPTM analysis with the extensive clinical information associated with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archives.

  1. Insulin induced alteration in post-translational modifications of histone H3 under a hyperglycemic condition in L6 skeletal muscle myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kabra, Dhiraj G; Gupta, Jeena; Tikoo, Kulbhushan

    2009-06-01

    Chromatin remodelling events, especially histone modifications are proposed to form the mainstay for most of the biological processes. However, the role of these histone modifications in the progression of diabetes is still unknown. Hyperglycemia plays a major role in diabetes and its complications. The present study was undertaken to check the effect of insulin on alterations in post-translational modifications of histone H3 in L6 myoblasts under a hyperglycemic condition. We provide first evidence that insulin under hyperglycemic condition alters multiple histone modifications by enhanced production of reactive oxygen species. Insulin induces dose dependent changes in Lysine 4 and 9 methylation, Ser 10 phosphorylation and acetylation of histone H3. Interestingly, insulin induced generation of reactive oxygen species induces dephosphorylation and deacetylation of histone H3. Preincubation with catalase and DPI prevents these changes in post-translational modifications of histone H3. Furthermore, changes in histone H3 phosphorylation was found to be independent of ERK, p38, RSK2 and MSK1. Moreover, serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor, okadaic acid attenuates insulin induced dephosphorylation and deacetylation of histone H3, suggesting a role of serine/threonine phosphatases in altering modifications of histone H3. These changes in epigenetic modifications can provide new insights into pathogenesis of diabetes.

  2. Arabidopsis MRG domain proteins bridge two histone modifications to elevate expression of flowering genes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yifeng; Gan, Eng-Seng; Zhou, Jie; Wee, Wan-Yi; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Ito, Toshiro

    2014-01-01

    Trimethylation of lysine 36 of histone H3 (H3K36me3) is found to be associated with various transcription events. In Arabidopsis, the H3K36me3 level peaks in the first half of coding regions, which is in contrast to the 3′-end enrichment in animals. The MRG15 family proteins function as ‘reader’ proteins by binding to H3K36me3 to control alternative splicing or prevent spurious intragenic transcription in animals. Here, we demonstrate that two closely related Arabidopsis homologues (MRG1 and MRG2) are localised to the euchromatin and redundantly ensure the increased transcriptional levels of two flowering time genes with opposing functions, FLOWERING LOCUS C and FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT). MRG2 directly binds to the FT locus and elevates the expression in an H3K36me3-dependent manner. MRG1/2 binds to H3K36me3 with their chromodomain and interact with the histone H4-specific acetyltransferases (HAM1 and HAM2) to achieve a high expression level through active histone acetylation at the promoter and 5′ regions of target loci. Together, this study presents a mechanistic link between H3K36me3 and histone H4 acetylation. Our data also indicate that the biological functions of MRG1/2 have diversified from their animal homologues during evolution, yet they still maintain their conserved H3K36me3-binding molecular function. PMID:25183522

  3. Arsenic alters global histone modifications in lymphocytes in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pournara, Angeliki; Kippler, Maria; Holmlund, Teresa; Ceder, Rebecca; Grafström, Roland; Vahter, Marie; Broberg, Karin; Wallberg, Annika E

    2016-08-01

    Arsenic, an established carcinogen and toxicant, occurs in drinking water and food and affects millions of people worldwide. Arsenic appears to interfere with gene expression through epigenetic processes, such as DNA methylation and post-translational histone modifications. We investigated the effects of arsenic on histone residues in vivo as well as in vitro. Analysis of H3K9Ac and H3K9me3 in CD4+ and CD8+ sorted blood cells from individuals exposed to arsenic through drinking water in the Argentinean Andes showed a significant decrease in global H3K9me3 in CD4+ cells, but not CD8+ cells, with increasing arsenic exposure. In vitro studies of inorganic arsenic-treated T lymphocytes (Jurkat and CCRF-CEM, 0.1, 1, and 100 μg/L) showed arsenic-related modifications of H3K9Ac and changes in the levels of the histone deacetylating enzyme HDAC2 at very low arsenic concentrations. Further, in vitro exposure of kidney HEK293 cells to arsenic (1 and 5 μM) altered the protein levels of PCNA and DNMT1, parts of a gene expression repressor complex, as well as MAML1. MAML1 co-localized and interacted with components of this complex in HEK293 cells, and in silico studies indicated that MAML1 expression correlate with HDAC2 and DNMT1 expression in kidney cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that arsenic exposure may lead to changes in the global levels of H3K9me3 and H3K9Ac in lymphocytes. Also, we show that arsenic exposure affects the expression of PCNA and DNMT1-proteins that are part of a gene expression silencing complex.

  4. Myogenic transcriptional activation of MyoD mediated by replication-independent histone deposition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jae-Hyun; Song, Yunkyoung; Seol, Ja-Hwan; Park, Jin Young; Yang, Yong-Jin; Han, Jeung-Whan; Youn, Hong-Duk; Cho, Eun-Jung

    2011-01-01

    In mammals, the canonical histone H3 and the variant H3.3 are assembled into chromatin through replication-coupled and replication-independent (RI) histone deposition pathways, respectively, to play distinct roles in chromatin function. H3.3 is largely associated with transcriptionally active regions via the activity of RI histone chaperone, HIRA. However, the precise role of the RI pathway and HIRA in active transcription and the mechanisms by which H3.3 affects gene activity are not known. In this study, we show that HIRA is an essential factor for muscle development by establishing MyoD activation in myotubes. HIRA and Asf1a, but not CHD1 or Asf1b, mediate H3.3 incorporation in the promoter and the critical upstream regulatory regions of the MyoD gene. HIRA and H3.3 are required for epigenetic transition into the more permissive chromatin structure for polymerase II recruitment to the promoter, regardless of transcription-associated covalent modification of histones. Our results suggest distinct epigenetic management of the master regulator with RI pathway components for cellular differentiation. PMID:21173268

  5. Discovery of histone modification crosstalk networks by stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture mass spectrometry (SILAC MS).

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiaoyan; Rastogi, Neha; Parthun, Mark R; Freitas, Michael A

    2013-08-01

    In this paper we describe an approach that combines stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cells culture, high mass accuracy liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and a novel data analysis approach to accurately determine relative peptide post-translational modification levels. This paper describes the application of this approach to the discovery of novel histone modification crosstalk networks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast histone mutants were generated to mimic the presence/absence of 44 well-known modifications on core histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4. In each mutant strain the relative change in H3 K79 methylation and H3 K56 acetylation were determined using stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cells culture. This approach showed relative changes in H3 K79 methylation and H3 K56 acetylation that are consistent with known histone crosstalk networks. More importantly, this study revealed additional histone modification sites that affect H3 K79 methylation and H3 K56 acetylation.

  6. Chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment is associated with decreases in cell proliferation and histone modifications

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In this study, we examined the effects of cyclophosphamide, methothrexate, and 5-Fluorouracil (CMF) drug combination on various aspects of learning and memory. We also examined the effects of CMF on cell proliferation and chromatin remodeling as possible underlying mechanisms to explain chemotherapy-associated cognitive dysfunction. Twenty-four adult female Wistar rats were included in the study and had minimitter implantation for continuous activity monitoring two weeks before the chemotherapy regimen was started. Once baseline activity data were collected, rats were randomly assigned to receive either CMF or saline injections given intraperitoneally. Treatments were given once a week for a total of 4 weeks. Two weeks after the last injection, rats were tested in the water maze for spatial learning and memory ability as well as discrimination learning. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) injection was given at 100 mg/Kg intraperitoneally 4 hours prior to euthanasia to determine hippocampal cell proliferation while histone acetylation and histone deacetylase activity was measured to determine CMF effects on chromatin remodeling. Results Our data showed learning and memory impairment following CMF administration independent of the drug effects on physical activity. In addition, CMF-treated rats showed decreased hippocampal cell proliferation, associated with increased histone acetylation and decreased histone deacetylase activity. Conclusions These results suggest the negative consequences of chemotherapy on brain function and that anti-cancer drugs can adversely affect the self-renewal potential of neural progenitor cells and also chromatin remodeling in the hippocampus. The significance of our findings lie on the possible usefulness of animal models in addressing the clinical phenomenon of 'chemobrain.' PMID:22152030

  7. Histones trigger sterile inflammation by activating the NLRP3 inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Allam, Ramanjaneyulu; Darisipudi, Murthy Narayana; Tschopp, Jurg; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2013-12-01

    Sterile cell death mediated inflammation is linked to several pathological disorders and involves danger recognition of intracellular molecules released by necrotic cells that activate different groups of innate pattern recognition receptors. Toll-like receptors directly interact with their extrinsic or intrinsic agonists and induce multiple proinflammatory mediators. In contrast, the NLRP3 inflammasome is rather thought to represent a downstream element integrating various indirect stimuli into proteolytic cleavage of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. Here, we report that histones released from necrotic cells induce IL-1β secretion in an NLRP3-ASC-caspase-1-dependent manner. Genetic deletion of NLRP3 in mice significantly attenuated histone-induced IL-1β production and neutrophil recruitment. Furthermore, necrotic cells induced neutrophil recruitment, which was significantly reduced by histone-neutralizing antibodies or depleting extracellular histones via enzymatic degradation. These results identify cytosolic uptake of necrotic cell-derived histones as a triggering mechanism of sterile inflammation, which involves NLRP3 inflammasome activation and IL-1β secretion via oxidative stress.

  8. Specific post-translational histone modifications of neutrophil extracellular traps as immunogens and potential targets of lupus autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Autoreactivity to histones is a pervasive feature of several human autoimmune disorders, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Specific post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histones within neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) may potentially drive the process by which tolerance to these chromatin-associated proteins is broken. We hypothesized that NETs and their unique histone PTMs might be capable of inducing autoantibodies that target histones. Methods We developed a novel and efficient method for the in vitro production, visualization, and broad profiling of histone-PTMs of human and murine NETs. We also immunized Balb/c mice with murine NETs and profiled their sera on autoantigen and histone peptide microarrays for evidence of autoantibody production to their immunogen. Results We confirmed specificity toward acetyl-modified histone H2B as well as to other histone PTMs in sera from patients with SLE known to have autoreactivity against histones. We observed enrichment for distinctive histone marks of transcriptionally silent DNA during NETosis triggered by diverse stimuli. However, NETs derived from human and murine sources did not harbor many of the PTMs toward which autoreactivity was observed in patients with SLE or in MRL/lpr mice. Further, while murine NETs were weak autoantigens in vivo, there was only partial overlap in the immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM autoantibody profiles induced by vaccination of mice with NETs and those seen in patients with SLE. Conclusions Isolated in vivo exposure to NETs is insufficient to break tolerance and may involve additional factors that have yet to be identified. PMID:22300536

  9. A histone modification identifies a DNA element controlling slo BK channel gene expression in muscle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaolei; Ghezzi, Alfredo; Krishnan, Harish R.; Pohl, Jascha B.; Bohm, Arun Y.; Atkinson, Nigel S.

    2016-01-01

    The slo gene encodes BK type Ca2+-activated K+ channels. In Drosophila, expression of slo is induced by organic solvent sedation (benzyl alcohol and ethanol) and this increase in neural slo expression contributes to the production of functional behavioral tolerance (inducible resistance) to these drugs. Within the slo promoter region, we observed that benzyl alcohol sedation produces a localized spike of histone acetylation over a 65 n conserved DNA element called 55b. Changes in histone acetylation are commonly the consequence of transcription factor activity and previously, a localized histone acetylation spike was used to successfully map a DNA element involved in benzyl alcohol-induced slo expression. To determine whether the 55b element was also involved in benzyl alcohol-induced neural expression of slo we deleted it from the endogenous slo gene by homologous recombination. Flies lacking the 55b element were normal with respect to basal and benzyl alcohol-induced neural slo expression, the capacity to acquire and maintain functional tolerance, their threshold for electrically-induced seizures and most slo-related behaviors. Removal of the 55b element did however increase the level of basal expression from the muscle/tracheal cell-specific slo core promoter and produced a slight increase in overall locomotor activity. We conclude that the 55b element is involved in control of slo expression from the muscle and tracheal-cell promoter but is not involved in the production of functional benzyl alcohol tolerance. PMID:25967280

  10. Profiling of Histone Post-Translational Modifications in Mouse Brain with High-Resolution Top-Down Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mowei; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Stenoien, David L

    2017-02-03

    As histones play central roles in most chromosomal functions including regulation of DNA replication, DNA damage repair, and gene transcription, both their basic biology and their roles in disease development have been the subject of intense study. Because multiple post-translational modifications (PTMs) along the entire protein sequence are potential regulators of histones, a top-down approach, where intact proteins are analyzed, is ultimately required for complete characterization of proteoforms. However, significant challenges remain for top-down histone analysis primarily because of deficiencies in separation/resolving power and effective identification algorithms. Here we used state-of-the-art mass spectrometry and a bioinformatics workflow for targeted data analysis and visualization. The workflow uses ProMex for intact mass deconvolution, MSPathFinder as a search engine, and LcMsSpectator as a data visualization tool. When complemented with the open-modification tool TopPIC, this workflow enabled identification of novel histone PTMs including tyrosine bromination on histone H4 and H2A, H3 glutathionylation, and mapping of conventional PTMs along the entire protein for many histone subunits.

  11. Profiling of Histone Post-Translational Modifications in Mouse Brain with High-Resolution Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Mowei; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Stenoien, David L.

    2016-12-21

    Histones play central roles in most chromosomal functions and both their basic biology and roles in disease have been the subject of intense study. Since multiple PTMs along the entire protein sequence are potential regulators of histones, a top-down approach, where intact proteins are analyzed, is ultimately required for complete characterization of proteoforms. However, significant challenges remain for top-down histone analysis primarily because of deficiencies in separation/resolving power and effective identification algorithms. Here, we used state of the art mass spectrometry and a bioinformatics workflow for targeted data analysis and visualization. The workflow uses ProMex for intact mass deconvolution, MSPathFinder as search engine, and LcMsSpectator as a data visualization tool. ProMex sums across retention time to maximize sensitivity and accuracy for low abundance species in MS1deconvolution. MSPathFinder searches the MS2 data against protein sequence databases with user-defined modifications. LcMsSpectator presents the results from ProMex and MSPathFinder in a format that allows quick manual evaluation of critical attributes for high-confidence identifications. When complemented with the open-modification tool TopPIC, this workflow enabled identification of novel histone PTMs including tyrosine bromination on histone H4 and H2A, H3 glutathionylation, and mapping of conventional PTMs along the entire protein for many histone subunits.

  12. Romidepsin reduces histone deacetylase activity, induces acetylation of histones, inhibits proliferation, and activates apoptosis in immortalized epithelial endometriotic cells.

    PubMed

    Imesch, Patrick; Fink, Daniel; Fedier, André

    2010-12-01

    Romidepsin inhibited HDAC activity, produced acetylation of the histone proteins, up-regulated p21, and down-regulated cyclins B1 and D1, resulting in proliferation inhibition and apoptosis activation in 11z immortalized epithelial endometriotic cells. Our findings provide evidence that endometriotic cells are sensitive to the epigenetic effects of romidepsin and suggest that endometriosis may be therapeutically targeted by romidepsin.

  13. Arabidopsis flowering locus D influences systemic-acquired-resistance- induced expression and histone modifications of WRKY genes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijayata; Roy, Shweta; Singh, Deepjyoti; Nandi, Ashis Kumar

    2014-03-01

    A plant that is in part infected by a pathogen is more resistant throughout its whole body to subsequent infections--a phenomenon known as systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Mobile signals are synthesized at the site of infection and distributed throughout the plant through vascular tissues. Mechanism of SAR development subsequent to reaching the mobile signal in the distal tissue is largely unknown. Recently we showed that flowering locus D (FLD) gene of Arabidopsis thaliana is required in the distal tissue to activate SAR. FLD codes for a homologue of human-lysine-specific histone demethylase. Here we show that FLD function is required for priming (SAR induced elevated expression during challenge inoculation) of WRKY29 and WRKY6 genes. FLD also differentially influences basal and SAR-induced expression of WRKY38, WRKY65 and WRKY53 genes. In addition, we also show that FLD partly localizes in nucleus and influences histone modifications at the promoters of WRKY29 and WRKY6 genes. The results altogether indicate to the possibility of FLD's involvement in epigenetic regulation of SAR.

  14. Quantitative analysis of histone H3 and H4 post-translational modifications in doxorubicin-resistant leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Guo, Qingcheng; Guo, Huaizu; Hou, Sheng; Li, Jing; Wang, Hao

    2016-04-01

    The epigenetic remodeling of chromatin through histone modifications has been widely implicated in drug resistance of cancer cells. However, whether epigenetic mechanisms contribute specifically to doxorubicin resistance in leukemia has not been carefully examined. Using a stable and sensitive workflow based on LC-MS, we quantitatively compared the extents of methylation and acetylation of histone H3 and H4 in acute leukemia cell line HL60 and its doxorubicin-resistant derivative, HL60/ADR, as well as the chronic leukemia cell line K562 and its doxorubicin-resistant derivative, K562/ADR. We found that increased levels of H3K9 methylation, H3K14, H3K18 and H3K23 acetylation, and potentially H4K20 methylation, are associated with drug resistance in both cells. Our results demonstrated that the doxorubicin-resistant acute and chronic leukemia cell lines may share a common epigenetic mechanism that involves a combination of transcriptional activation and silencing.

  15. Mapping and expression analyses during porcine foetal muscle development of 12 genes involved in histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Peng, Y B; Yerle, M; Liu, B

    2009-04-01

    Histone modifications (methylation and demethylation) regulate gene expression and play a role in cell proliferation and differentiation by their actions on chromatin structure. In this context, we studied the temporal expression profiles of genes acting on histone methylation and demethylation during skeletal muscle proliferation and differentiation. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to quantify the mRNA levels of CARM1, JARID1A, JMJD2A, LSD1, PRMT2, PRMT5, SMYD1, SMYD2, SMYD3, SETDB1, Suv39h2 and SUZ12 in foetal skeletal muscle. Our results showed that CARM1, JARID1A, JMJD2A, SMYD1 and SMYD2 were differentially expressed in embryonic muscles of 33 days post-conception (dpc), 65 dpc and 90 dpc. These 12 genes were mapped to porcine chromosomes (SSC) 2q21-24, 5q25, 6q35, 6q12-21, 6p15, 7q21, 3q21-27, 9q26, 10p16, 4q15-16, 10q14-16 and 12p12 respectively. Taking into account the reported QTL mapping results, gene expression analysis and radiation hybrid mapping results, these results suggest that five genes (CARM1, JARID1A, JMJD2A, SMYD1 and SMYD2) could be good candidate genes for growth and backfat thickness traits.

  16. DNA Methylation and Histone Modifications Are the Molecular Lock in Lentivirally Transduced Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ngai, Siew Ching; Rosli, Rozita; Al Abbar, Akram

    2015-01-01

    Stable introduction of a functional gene in hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) has appeared to be an alternative approach to correct genetically linked blood diseases. However, it is still unclear whether lentiviral vector (LV) is subjected to gene silencing in HPCs. Here, we show that LV carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene driven by cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter was subjected to transgene silencing after transduction into HPCs. This phenomenon was not due to the deletion of proviral copy number. Study using DNA demethylating agent and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor showed that the drugs could either prevent or reverse the silencing effect. Using sodium bisulfite sequencing and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay, we demonstrated that DNA methylation occurred soon after LV transduction. At the highest level of gene expression, CMV promoter was acetylated and was in a euchromatin state, while GFP reporter gene was acetylated but was strangely in a heterochromatin state. When the expression declined, CMV promoter underwent transition from acetylated and euchromatic state to a heterochromatic state, while the GFP reporter gene was in deacetylated and heterochromatic state. With these, we verify that DNA methylation and dynamic histone modifications lead to transgene silencing in HPCs transduced with LV. PMID:25961011

  17. Cyclical DNA Methylation and Histone Changes Are Induced by LPS to Activate COX-2 in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brancaccio, Mariarita; Coretti, Lorena; Florio, Ermanno; Pezone, Antonio; Calabrò, Viola; Falco, Geppino; Keller, Simona; Lembo, Francesca; Avvedimento, Vittorio Enrico; Chiariotti, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces release of inflammatory mediators both in immune and epithelial cells. We investigated whether changes of epigenetic marks, including selected histone modification and DNA methylation, may drive or accompany the activation of COX-2 gene in HT-29 human intestinal epithelial cells upon exposure to LPS. Here we describe cyclical histone acetylation (H3), methylation (H3K4, H3K9, H3K27) and DNA methylation changes occurring at COX-2 gene promoter overtime after LPS stimulation. Histone K27 methylation changes are carried out by the H3 demethylase JMJD3 and are essential for COX-2 induction by LPS. The changes of the histone code are associated with cyclical methylation signatures at the promoter and gene body of COX-2 gene. PMID:27253528

  18. Epigenetic regulation of BMP2 by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 through DNA methylation and histone modification.

    PubMed

    Fu, Baisheng; Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Jinhua; Barouhas, Ivana; Liu, Wanqing; Shuboy, Adam; Bushinsky, David A; Zhou, Dongsheng; Favus, Murray J

    2013-01-01

    Genetic hypercalciuric stone-forming (GHS) rats have increased intestinal Ca absorption, decreased renal tubule Ca reabsorption and low bone mass, all of which are mediated at least in part by elevated tissue levels of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Both 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) are critical for normal maintenance of bone metabolism and bone formation, respectively. The complex nature of bone cell regulation suggests a potential interaction of these two important regulators in GHS rats. In the present study, BMP2 expression is suppressed by the VDR-1,25(OH)2D3 complex in Bone Marrow Stromal Cells (BMSCs) from GHS and SD rat and in UMR-106 cell line. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays to identify VDR binding to only one of several potential binding sites within the BMP2 promoter regions. This negative region also mediates suppressor reporter gene activity. The molecular mechanisms underlying the down-regulation of BMP2 by 1,25(OH)2D3 were studied in vitro in BMSCs and UMR-106 cells using the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC) and the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA). Both DAC and TSA activate BMP2 expression in combination with 1,25(OH)2D3. Bisulfite DNA pyrosequencing reveals 1,25(OH)2D3 to completely hypermethylate a single CpG site in the same BMP2 promoter region identified by the ChIP and reporter gene assays. ChIP assays also show that 1,25(OH)2D3 can increase the repressive histone mark H3K9me2 and reduce the acetylation of histone H3 at the same BMP2 promoter region. Taken together, our results indicate that 1,25(OH)2D3 binding to VDR down-regulates BMP2 gene expression in BMSCs and osteoblast-like UMR-106 cells by binding to the BMP2 promoter region. The mechanism of this 1,25(OH)2D3-induced transcriptional repression of BMP2 involves DNA methylation and histone modification. The study provides novel evidence that 1,25(OH)2D3 represses bone

  19. Concerted Flexibility of Chromatin Structure, Methylome, and Histone Modifications along with Plant Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Ana Paula; Ferreira, Liliana J.; Oliveira, M. Margarida

    2017-01-01

    The spatial organization of chromosome structure within the interphase nucleus, as well as the patterns of methylome and histone modifications, represent intersecting layers that influence genome accessibility and function. This review is focused on the plastic nature of chromatin structure and epigenetic marks in association to stress situations. The use of chemical compounds (epigenetic drugs) or T-DNA-mediated mutagenesis affecting epigenetic regulators (epi-mutants) are discussed as being important tools for studying the impact of deregulated epigenetic backgrounds on gene function and phenotype. The inheritability of epigenetic marks and chromatin configurations along successive generations are interpreted as a way for plants to “communicate” past experiences of stress sensing. A mechanistic understanding of chromatin and epigenetics plasticity in plant response to stress, including tissue- and genotype-specific epigenetic patterns, may help to reveal the epigenetics contributions for genome and phenotype regulation. PMID:28275209

  20. Histone modifications as regulators of life and death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Fahrenkrog, Birthe

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis or programmed cell death is an integrated, genetically controlled suicide program that not only regulates tissue homeostasis of multicellular organisms, but also the fate of damaged and aged cells of lower eukaryotes, such as the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Recent years have revealed key apoptosis regulatory proteins in yeast that play similar roles in mammalian cells. Apoptosis is a process largely defined by characteristic structural rearrangements in the dying cell that include chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation. The mechanism by which chromosomes restructure during apoptosis is still poorly understood, but it is becoming increasingly clear that altered epigenetic histone modifications are fundamental parameters that influence the chromatin state and the nuclear rearrangements within apoptotic cells. The present review will highlight recent work on the epigenetic regulation of programmed cell death in budding yeast. PMID:28357312

  1. Profiles of Epigenetic Histone Post-translational Modifications at Type 1 Diabetes Susceptible Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Feng; Chen, Zhuo; Zhang, Lingxiao; Liu, Zheng; Wu, Xiwei; Yuan, Yate-Ching; Natarajan, Rama

    2012-01-01

    Both genetic and environmental factors are implicated in type 1 diabetes (T1D). Because environmental factors can trigger epigenetic changes, we hypothesized that variations in histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) at the promoter/enhancer regions of T1D susceptible genes may be associated with T1D. We therefore evaluated histone PTM variations at known T1D susceptible genes in blood cells from T1D patients versus healthy nondiabetic controls, and explored their connections to T1D. We used the chromatin immunoprecipitation-linked to microarray approach to profile key histone PTMs, including H3-lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3), H3K27me3, H3K9me3, H3K9 acetylation (H3K9Ac), and H4K16Ac at genes within the T1D susceptible loci in lymphocytes, and H3K4me3, H3K9me2, H3K9Ac, and H4K16Ac at the insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus 1 region in monocytes of T1D patients and healthy controls separately. We screened for potential variations in histone PTMs using computational methods to compare datasets from T1D and controls. Interestingly, we observed marked variations in H3K9Ac levels at the upstream regions of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 within the insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus 1 locus in T1D monocytes relative to controls. Additional experiments with THP-1 monocytes demonstrated increased expression of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 in response to interferon-γ and TNF-α treatment that were accompanied by changes in H3K9Ac at the same promoter regions as that seen in the patient monocytes. These results suggest that the H3K9Ac status of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1, two genes highly associated with T1D, may be relevant to their regulation and transcriptional response toward external stimuli. Thus, the promoter/enhancer architecture and chromatin status of key susceptible loci could be important determinants in their functional association to T1D susceptibility. PMID:22431725

  2. The Role of DNA Methylation and Histone Modifications in Neurodegenerative Diseases: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    El-Khodor, Bassem; Dhana, Klodian; Nano, Jana; Pulido, Tammy; Kraja, Bledar; Zaciragic, Asija; Bramer, Wichor M.; Troup, John; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Ikram, M. Arfam; Dehghan, Abbas; Muka, Taulant; Franco, Oscar H.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Epigenetic modifications of the genome, such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, have been reported to play a role in neurodegenerative diseases (ND) such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD). Objective To systematically review studies investigating epigenetic marks in AD or PD. Methods Eleven bibliographic databases (Embase.com, Medline (Ovid), Web-of-Science, Scopus, PubMed, Cinahl (EBSCOhost), Cochrane Central, ProQuest, Lilacs, Scielo and Google Scholar) were searched until July 11th 2016 to identify relevant articles. We included all randomized controlled trials, cohort, case-control and cross-sectional studies in humans that examined associations between epigenetic marks and ND. Two independent reviewers, with a third reviewer available for disagreements, performed the abstract and full text selection. Data was extracted using a pre-designed data collection form. Results Of 6,927 searched references, 73 unique case-control studies met our inclusion criteria. Overall, 11,453 individuals were included in this systematic review (2,640 AD and 2,368 PD outcomes). There was no consistent association between global DNA methylation pattern and any ND. Studies reported epigenetic regulation of 31 genes (including cell communication, apoptosis, and neurogenesis genes in blood and brain tissue) in relation to AD and PD. Methylation at the BDNF, SORBS3 and APP genes in AD were the most consistently reported associations. Methylation of α-synuclein gene (SNCA) was also found to be associated with PD. Seven studies reported histone protein alterations in AD and PD. Conclusion Many studies have investigated epigenetics and ND. Further research should include larger cohort or longitudinal studies, in order to identify clinically significant epigenetic changes. Identifying relevant epigenetic changes could lead to interventional strategies in ND. PMID:27973581

  3. N-formylation of lysine in histone proteins as a secondary modification arising from oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Zhou, Xinfeng; Taghizadeh, Koli; Dong, Min; Dedon, Peter C

    2007-01-02

    The posttranslational modification of histone and other chromatin proteins has a well recognized but poorly defined role in the physiology of gene expression. With implications for interfering with these epigenetic mechanisms, we now report the existence of a relatively abundant secondary modification of chromatin proteins, the N(6)-formylation of lysine that appears to be uniquely associated with histone and other nuclear proteins. Using both radiolabeling and sensitive bioanalytical methods, we demonstrate that the formyl moiety of 3'-formylphosphate residues arising from 5'-oxidation of deoxyribose in DNA, caused by the enediyne neocarzinostatin, for example, acylate the N(6)-amino groups of lysine side chains. A liquid chromatography (LC)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS) method was developed to quantify the resulting N(6)-formyl-lysine residues, which were observed to be present in unperturbed cells and all sources of histone proteins to the extent of 0.04-0.1% of all lysines in acid-soluble chromatin proteins including histones. Cells treated with neocarzinostatin showed a clear dose-response relationship for the formation of N(6)-formyl-lysine, with this nucleosome linker-selective DNA-cleaving agent causing selective N(6)-formylation of the linker histone H1. The N(6)-formyl-lysine residue appears to represent an endogenous histone secondary modification, one that bears chemical similarity to lysine N(6)-acetylation recognized as an important determinant of gene expression in mammalian cells. The N(6)-formyl modification of lysine may interfere with the signaling functions of lysine acetylation and methylation and thus contribute to the pathophysiology of oxidative and nitrosative stress.

  4. Histone modification and signalling cascade of the dormancy-associated MADS-box gene, PpMADS13-1, in Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia) during endodormancy.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takanori; Bai, Songling; Imai, Tsuyoshi; Ito, Akiko; Nakajima, Ikuko; Moriguchi, Takaya

    2015-06-01

    Dormancy-associated MADS-box (DAM) genes play an important role in endodormancy phase transition. We investigated histone modification in the DAM homolog (PpMADS13-1) from Japanese pear, via chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative PCR, to understand the mechanism behind the reduced expression of the PpMADS13-1 gene towards endodormancy release. Our results indicated that the reduction in the active histone mark by trimethylation of the histone H3 tail at lysine 4 contributed to the reduction of PpMADS13-1 expression towards endodormancy release. In contrast, the inactive histone mark by trimethylation of the histone H3 tail at lysine 27 in PpMADS13-1 locus was quite low, and these levels were more similar to a negative control [normal mouse immunoglobulin G (IgG)] than to a positive control (AGAMOUS) in endodormancy phase transition. The loss of histone variant H2A.Z also coincided with the down-regulation of PpMADS13-1. Subsequently, we investigated the PpMADS13-1 signalling cascade and found that PpCBF2, a pear C-repeated binding factor, regulated PpMADS13-1 expression via interaction of PpCBF2 with the 5'-upstream region of PpMADS13-1 by transient reporter assay. Furthermore, transient reporter assay confirmed no interaction between the PpMADS13-1 protein and the pear FLOWERING LOCUS T genes. Taken together, our results enhance understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying endodormancy phase transition in Japanese pear.

  5. Role of the Tumor Suppressor PTEN in Antioxidant Responsive Element-mediated Transcription and Associated Histone Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Kensuke; Iwasaki, Kenta; Sugiyama, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Coordinated regulation of PI3-kinase (PI3K) and the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) plays a pivotal role in various cell functions. PTEN is deficient in many cancer cells, including Jurkat human leukemia. Here, we demonstrate that the status of PTEN determines cellular susceptibility to oxidative stress through antioxidant-responsive element (ARE)-mediated transcription of detoxification genes. We found that ferritin H transcription was robustly induced in tert-butylhydroquinone (t-BHQ)-treated Jurkat cells via an ARE, and it was due to PTEN deficiency. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that p300/CREB-binding protein (CBP) histone acetyltransferases and Nrf2 recruitment to the ARE and Bach1 release were blocked by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002, along with the partial inhibition of Nrf2 nuclear accumulation. Furthermore, acetylations of histone H3 Lys9 and Lys18, and deacetylation of Lys14 were associated with the PI3K-dependent ARE activation. Consistently, PTEN restoration in Jurkat cells inhibited t-BHQ–mediated expression of ferritin H and another ARE-regulated gene NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1. Conversely, PTEN knockdown in K562 cells enhanced the response to t-BHQ. The PTEN status under t-BHQ treatment affected hydrogen peroxide-mediated caspase-3 cleavage. The PI3K-dependent ferritin H induction was observed by treatment with other ARE-activating agents ethoxyquin and hemin. Collectively, the status of PTEN determines chromatin modifications leading to ARE activation. PMID:19158375

  6. Exposure of Human Prostaspheres to Bisphenol A Epigenetically Regulates SNORD Family Noncoding RNAs via Histone Modification

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Ana; Lam, Hung-Ming; Hu, Wen-Yang; Shi, Guang-Bin; Zhu, Xuegong; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Xiang; Medvedovic, Mario; Leung, Yuet-Kin; Prins, Gail S.

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a ubiquitous endocrine disruptor exerting lifelong effects on gene expression in rodent prostate cancer (PCa) models. Here, we aimed to determine whether epigenetic events mediating the action of BPA on human prostaspheres enriched in epithelial stem-like/progenitor cells is linked to PCa. We performed genome-wide transcriptome and methylome analyses to identify changes in prostaspheres treated with BPA (10nM, 200nM, and 1000nM) or estradiol-17β (E2) (0.1nM) for 7 days and validated changes in expression, methylation, and histone marks in parallel-treated prostaspheres. BPA/E2-treatment altered expression of 91 genes but not the methylation status of 485 000 CpG sites in BPA/E2-treated prostaspheres. A panel of 26 genes was found repressed in all treatment groups. Fifteen of them were small nucleolar RNAs with C/D motif (SNORDs), which are noncoding, small nucleolar RNAs known to regulate ribosomal RNA assembly and function. Ten of the most down-regulated SNORDs were further studied. All 10 were confirmed repressed by BPA, but only 3 ratified as E2-repressed. SNORD suppression showed no correlation with methylation status changes in CpG sites in gene regulatory regions. Instead, BPA-induced gene silencing was found to associate with altered recruitments of H3K9me3, H3K4me3, and H3K27me3 to 5′-regulatory/exonic sequences of 5 SNORDs. Expression of 4 out of these 5 SNORDs (SNORD59A, SNORD82, SNORD116, and SNORD117) was shown to be reduced in PCa compared with adjacent normal tissue. This study reveals a novel and unique action of BPA in disrupting expression of PCa-associated SNORDs and a putative mechanism for reprogramming the prostasphere epigenome via histone modification. PMID:26248216

  7. Histone Modifications in a Mouse Model of Early Adversities and Panic Disorder: Role for Asic1 and Neurodevelopmental Genes

    PubMed Central

    Cittaro, Davide; Lampis, Valentina; Luchetti, Alessandra; Coccurello, Roberto; Guffanti, Alessandro; Felsani, Armando; Moles, Anna; Stupka, Elia; D’ Amato, Francesca R.; Battaglia, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Hyperventilation following transient, CO2-induced acidosis is ubiquitous in mammals and heritable. In humans, respiratory and emotional hypersensitivity to CO2 marks separation anxiety and panic disorders, and is enhanced by early-life adversities. Mice exposed to the repeated cross-fostering paradigm (RCF) of interference with maternal environment show heightened separation anxiety and hyperventilation to 6% CO2-enriched air. Gene-environment interactions affect CO2 hypersensitivity in both humans and mice. We therefore hypothesised that epigenetic modifications and increased expression of genes involved in pH-detection could explain these relationships. Medullae oblongata of RCF- and normally-reared female outbred mice were assessed by ChIP-seq for H3Ac, H3K4me3, H3K27me3 histone modifications, and by SAGE for differential gene expression. Integration of multiple experiments by network analysis revealed an active component of 148 genes pointing to the mTOR signalling pathway and nociception. Among these genes, Asic1 showed heightened mRNA expression, coherent with RCF-mice’s respiratory hypersensitivity to CO2 and altered nociception. Functional enrichment and mRNA transcript analyses yielded a consistent picture of enhancement for several genes affecting chemoception, neurodevelopment, and emotionality. Particularly, results with Asic1 support recent human findings with panic and CO2 responses, and provide new perspectives on how early adversities and genes interplay to affect key components of panic and related disorders. PMID:27121911

  8. Histone Modifications in a Mouse Model of Early Adversities and Panic Disorder: Role for Asic1 and Neurodevelopmental Genes.

    PubMed

    Cittaro, Davide; Lampis, Valentina; Luchetti, Alessandra; Coccurello, Roberto; Guffanti, Alessandro; Felsani, Armando; Moles, Anna; Stupka, Elia; D' Amato, Francesca R; Battaglia, Marco

    2016-04-28

    Hyperventilation following transient, CO2-induced acidosis is ubiquitous in mammals and heritable. In humans, respiratory and emotional hypersensitivity to CO2 marks separation anxiety and panic disorders, and is enhanced by early-life adversities. Mice exposed to the repeated cross-fostering paradigm (RCF) of interference with maternal environment show heightened separation anxiety and hyperventilation to 6% CO2-enriched air. Gene-environment interactions affect CO2 hypersensitivity in both humans and mice. We therefore hypothesised that epigenetic modifications and increased expression of genes involved in pH-detection could explain these relationships. Medullae oblongata of RCF- and normally-reared female outbred mice were assessed by ChIP-seq for H3Ac, H3K4me3, H3K27me3 histone modifications, and by SAGE for differential gene expression. Integration of multiple experiments by network analysis revealed an active component of 148 genes pointing to the mTOR signalling pathway and nociception. Among these genes, Asic1 showed heightened mRNA expression, coherent with RCF-mice's respiratory hypersensitivity to CO2 and altered nociception. Functional enrichment and mRNA transcript analyses yielded a consistent picture of enhancement for several genes affecting chemoception, neurodevelopment, and emotionality. Particularly, results with Asic1 support recent human findings with panic and CO2 responses, and provide new perspectives on how early adversities and genes interplay to affect key components of panic and related disorders.

  9. Neutrophil histone modification by peptidylarginine deiminase 4 is critical for deep vein thrombosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Martinod, Kimberly; Demers, Melanie; Fuchs, Tobias A; Wong, Siu Ling; Brill, Alexander; Gallant, Maureen; Hu, Jing; Wang, Yanming; Wagner, Denisa D

    2013-05-21

    Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism are major health problems associated with high mortality. Recently, DNA-based neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) resulting from the release of decondensed chromatin, were found to be part of the thrombus scaffold and to promote coagulation. However, the significance of nuclear decondensation and NET generation in thrombosis is largely unknown. To address this, we adopted a stenosis model of deep vein thrombosis and analyzed venous thrombi in peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4)-deficient mice that cannot citrullinate histones, a process required for chromatin decondensation and NET formation. Intriguingly, less than 10% of PAD4(-/-) mice produced a thrombus 48 h after inferior vena cava stenosis whereas 90% of wild-type mice did. Neutrophils were abundantly present in thrombi formed in both groups, whereas extracellular citrullinated histones were seen only in thrombi from wild-type mice. Bone marrow chimera experiments indicated that PAD4 in hematopoietic cells was the source of the prothrombotic effect in deep vein thrombosis. Thrombosis could be rescued by infusion of wild-type neutrophils, suggesting that neutrophil PAD4 was important and sufficient. Endothelial activation and platelet aggregation were normal in PAD4(-/-) mice, as was hemostatic potential determined by bleeding time and platelet plug formation after venous injury. Our results show that PAD4-mediated chromatin decondensation in the neutrophil is crucial for pathological venous thrombosis and present neutrophil activation and PAD4 as potential drug targets for deep vein thrombosis.

  10. Quantitative High-Throughput Screening Identifies 8-Hydroxyquinolines as Cell-Active Histone Demethylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Akane; Rose, Nathan R.; Ng, Stanley S.; Quinn, Amy M.; Rai, Ganesha; Mott, Bryan T.; Beswick, Paul; Klose, Robert J.; Oppermann, Udo; Jadhav, Ajit; Heightman, Tom D.; Maloney, David J.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Simeonov, Anton

    2010-01-01

    Background Small molecule modulators of epigenetic processes are currently sought as basic probes for biochemical mechanisms, and as starting points for development of therapeutic agents. Nε-Methylation of lysine residues on histone tails is one of a number of post-translational modifications that together enable transcriptional regulation. Histone lysine demethylases antagonize the action of histone methyltransferases in a site- and methylation state-specific manner. Nε-Methyllysine demethylases that use 2-oxoglutarate as co-factor are associated with diverse human diseases, including cancer, inflammation and X-linked mental retardation; they are proposed as targets for the therapeutic modulation of transcription. There are few reports on the identification of templates that are amenable to development as potent inhibitors in vivo and large diverse collections have yet to be exploited for the discovery of demethylase inhibitors. Principal Findings High-throughput screening of a ∼236,000-member collection of diverse molecules arrayed as dilution series was used to identify inhibitors of the JMJD2 (KDM4) family of 2-oxoglutarate-dependent histone demethylases. Initial screening hits were prioritized by a combination of cheminformatics, counterscreening using a coupled assay enzyme, and orthogonal confirmatory detection of inhibition by mass spectrometric assays. Follow-up studies were carried out on one of the series identified, 8-hydroxyquinolines, which were shown by crystallographic analyses to inhibit by binding to the active site Fe(II) and to modulate demethylation at the H3K9 locus in a cell-based assay. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that diverse compound screening can yield novel inhibitors of 2OG dependent histone demethylases and provide starting points for the development of potent and selective agents to interrogate epigenetic regulation. PMID:21124847

  11. H3K23me1 is an evolutionary conserved histone modification associated with CG DNA methylation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Trejo-Arellano, Minerva S; Mahrez, Walid; Nakamura, Miyuki; Moreno-Romero, Jordi; Nanni, Paolo; Köhler, Claudia; Hennig, Lars

    2017-02-09

    Amino-terminal tails of histones are targets for diverse post-translational modifications whose combinatorial action may constitute a code that will be read and interpreted by cellular proteins to define particular transcriptional states. Here, we describe monomethylation of histone H3 lysine 23 (H3K23me1) as a histone modification not previously described in plants. H3K23me1 is an evolutionary conserved mark in diverse flowering plant species. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing in Arabidopsis thaliana showed that H3K23me1 was highly enriched in pericentromeric regions and depleted from chromosome arms. In transposable elements, it co-localized with CG, CHG and CHH DNA methylation as well as with the heterochromatic histone mark H3K9me2. Transposable elements are often rich in H3K23me1 but different families vary in their enrichment: LTR-Gypsy elements are most enriched and RC/Helitron elements are least enriched. The histone methyltransferase KRYPTONITE and normal DNA methylation were required for normal levels of H3K23me1 on transposable elements. Immunostaining experiments confirmed the pericentromeric localization and also showed mild enrichment in less condensed regions. Accordingly, gene bodies of protein coding genes had intermediate H3K23me1 levels, which coexisted with CG DNA methylation. Enrichment of H3K23me1 along gene bodies did not correlate with transcription levels. Together, this work establishes H3K23me1 as a not previously described component of the plant histone code. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Functional interaction of Rpb1 and Spt5 C-terminal domains in co-transcriptional histone modification

    PubMed Central

    Mbogning, Jean; Pagé, Viviane; Burston, Jillian; Schwenger, Emily; Fisher, Robert P.; Schwer, Beate; Shuman, Stewart; Tanny, Jason C.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) is accompanied by a conserved pattern of histone modifications that plays important roles in regulating gene expression. The establishment of this pattern requires phosphorylation of both Rpb1 (the largest RNAPII subunit) and the elongation factor Spt5 on their respective C-terminal domains (CTDs). Here we interrogated the roles of individual Rpb1 and Spt5 CTD phospho-sites in directing co-transcriptional histone modifications in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Steady-state levels of methylation at histone H3 lysines 4 (H3K4me) and 36 (H3K36me) were sensitive to multiple mutations of the Rpb1 CTD repeat motif (Y1S2P3T4S5P6S7). Ablation of the Spt5 CTD phospho-site Thr1 reduced H3K4me levels but had minimal effects on H3K36me. Nonetheless, Spt5 CTD mutations potentiated the effects of Rpb1 CTD mutations on H3K36me, suggesting overlapping functions. Phosphorylation of Rpb1 Ser2 by the Cdk12 orthologue Lsk1 positively regulated H3K36me but negatively regulated H3K4me. H3K36me and histone H2B monoubiquitylation required Rpb1 Ser5 but were maintained upon inactivation of Mcs6/Cdk7, the major kinase for Rpb1 Ser5 in vivo, implicating another Ser5 kinase in these regulatory pathways. Our results elaborate the CTD ‘code’ for co-transcriptional histone modifications. PMID:26275777

  13. Effects of Wutou Decoction on DNA Methylation and Histone Modifications in Rats with Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Cai-Yu-Zhu; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Yu; Huang, Ying; Hu, Yong-Hong; Tu, Sheng-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wutou decoction (WTD) has been wildly applied in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and experimental arthritis in rats for many years. Epigenetic deregulation is associated with the aetiology of rheumatoid arthritis; however, the effects of WTD on epigenetic changes are unclear. This study is set to explore the effects of WTD on DNA methylation and histone modifications in rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Methods. The CIA model was established by the stimulation of collagen and adjuvant. The knee synovium was stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and methylated CpG binding domain 2 (MBD2) expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were determined by Real-Time PCR. The global DNA histone H3-K4/H3-K27 methylation and total histones H3 and H4 acetylation of PBMCs were detected. Results. Our data demonstrated that the DNMT1 mRNA expression was significantly lowered in group WTD compared to that in group CIA (P < 0.05). The DNA methylation level was significantly reduced in group WTD compared to that in group CIA (P < 0.05). Moreover, H3 acetylation of PBMCs was overexpressed in WTD compared with CIA (P < 0.05). Conclusions. WTD may modulate DNA methylation and histone modifications, functioning as anti-inflammatory potential. PMID:27042192

  14. Serine and SAM Responsive Complex SESAME Regulates Histone Modification Crosstalk by Sensing Cellular Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanshan; Swanson, Selene K; Gogol, Madelaine; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P; Workman, Jerry L; Suganuma, Tamaki

    2015-11-05

    Pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) is a key enzyme for glycolysis and catalyzes the conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to pyruvate, which supplies cellular energy. PKM2 also phosphorylates histone H3 threonine 11 (H3T11); however, it is largely unknown how PKM2 links cellular metabolism to chromatin regulation. Here, we show that the yeast PKM2 homolog, Pyk1, is a part of a novel protein complex named SESAME (Serine-responsive SAM-containing Metabolic Enzyme complex), which contains serine metabolic enzymes, SAM (S-adenosylmethionine) synthetases, and an acetyl-CoA synthetase. SESAME interacts with the Set1 H3K4 methyltransferase complex, which requires SAM synthesized from SESAME, and recruits SESAME to target genes, resulting in phosphorylation of H3T11. SESAME regulates the crosstalk between H3K4 methylation and H3T11 phosphorylation by sensing glycolysis and glucose-derived serine metabolism. This leads to auto-regulation of PYK1 expression. Thus, our study provides insights into the mechanism of regulating gene expression, responding to cellular metabolism via chromatin modifications.

  15. Arginine-rich histones have strong antiviral activity for influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Hoeksema, Marloes; Tripathi, Shweta; White, Mitchell; Qi, Li; Taubenberger, Jeffery; van Eijk, Martin; Haagsman, Henk; Hartshorn, Kevan L

    2015-10-01

    While histones are best known for DNA binding and transcription-regulating properties, they also have antimicrobial activity against a broad range of potentially pathogenic organisms. Histones are abundant in neutrophil extracellular traps, where they play an important role in NET-mediated antimicrobial killing. Here, we show anti-influenza activity of histones against both seasonal H3N2 and H1N1, but not pandemic H1N1. The arginine rich histones, H3 and H4, had greater neutralizing and viral aggregating activity than the lysine rich histones, H2A and H2B. Of all core histones, histone H4 is most potent in neutralizing IAV, and incubation with IAV with histone H4 results in a decrease in uptake and viral replication by epithelial cells when measured by qRT-PCR. The antiviral activity of histone H4 is mediated principally by direct effects on viral particles. Histone H4 binds to IAV as assessed by ELISA and co-sedimentation of H4 with IAV. H4 also induces aggregation, as assessed by confocal microscopy and light transmission assays. Despite strong antiviral activity against the seasonal IAV strains, H4 was inactive against pandemic H1N1. These findings indicate a possible role for histones in the innate immune response against IAV.

  16. EGFR promoter exhibits dynamic histone modifications and binding of ASH2L and P300 in human germinal matrix and gliomas.

    PubMed

    Erfani, Parsa; Tome-Garcia, Jessica; Canoll, Peter; Doetsch, Fiona; Tsankova, Nadejda M

    2015-01-01

    Several signaling pathways important for the proliferation and growth of brain cells are pathologically dysregulated in gliomas, including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Expression of EGFR is high in neural progenitors during development and in gliomas but decreases significantly in most adult brain regions. Here we show that EGFR expression is maintained in the astrocyte ribbon of the adult human subventricular zone. The transcriptional regulation of EGFR expression is poorly understood. To investigate the role of epigenetics on EGFR regulation in the contexts of neural development and gliomagenesis, we measured levels of DNA methylation and histone H3 modifications at the EGFR promoter in human brain tissues, glioma specimens, and EGFR-expressing neural cells, acutely isolated from their native niche. While DNA was constitutively hypomethylated in non-neoplastic and glioma samples, regardless of their EGFR-expression status, the activating histone modifications H3K27ac and H3K4me3 were enriched only when EGFR is highly expressed (developing germinal matrix and gliomas). Conversely, repressive H3K27me3 marks predominated in adult white matter where EGFR is repressed. Furthermore, the histone methyltransferase core enzyme ASH2L was bound at EGFR in the germinal matrix and in gliomas where levels of H3K4me3 are high, and the histone acetyltransferase P300 was bound in samples with H3K27ac enrichment. Our studies use human cells and tissues undisturbed by cell-culture artifact, and point to an important, locus-specific role for chromatin remodeling in EGFR expression in human neural development that may be dysregulated during gliomagenesis, unraveling potential novel targets for future drug therapy.

  17. EGFR promoter exhibits dynamic histone modifications and binding of ASH2L and P300 in human germinal matrix and gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Erfani, Parsa; Tome-Garcia, Jessica; Canoll, Peter; Doetsch, Fiona; Tsankova, Nadejda M

    2015-01-01

    Several signaling pathways important for the proliferation and growth of brain cells are pathologically dysregulated in gliomas, including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Expression of EGFR is high in neural progenitors during development and in gliomas but decreases significantly in most adult brain regions. Here we show that EGFR expression is maintained in the astrocyte ribbon of the adult human subventricular zone. The transcriptional regulation of EGFR expression is poorly understood. To investigate the role of epigenetics on EGFR regulation in the contexts of neural development and gliomagenesis, we measured levels of DNA methylation and histone H3 modifications at the EGFR promoter in human brain tissues, glioma specimens, and EGFR-expressing neural cells, acutely isolated from their native niche. While DNA was constitutively hypomethylated in non-neoplastic and glioma samples, regardless of their EGFR-expression status, the activating histone modifications H3K27ac and H3K4me3 were enriched only when EGFR is highly expressed (developing germinal matrix and gliomas). Conversely, repressive H3K27me3 marks predominated in adult white matter where EGFR is repressed. Furthermore, the histone methyltransferase core enzyme ASH2L was bound at EGFR in the germinal matrix and in gliomas where levels of H3K4me3 are high, and the histone acetyltransferase P300 was bound in samples with H3K27ac enrichment. Our studies use human cells and tissues undisturbed by cell-culture artifact, and point to an important, locus-specific role for chromatin remodeling in EGFR expression in human neural development that may be dysregulated during gliomagenesis, unraveling potential novel targets for future drug therapy. PMID:25996283

  18. A non-isotopic assay for histone deacetylase activity.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, K; Brosch, G; Loidl, P; Jung, M

    1999-05-01

    Inhibitors of histone deacetylase (HD) bear great potential as new drugs due to their ability to modulate transcription and to induce apoptosis or differentiation in cancer cells. To study the activity of HD and the effect of potential inhibitors in vitro so far only radio-active assays have existed. For the search of new inhibitors and for the use in HD identification and purification we established a simple, non-radioactive assay that allows screening of large numbers of compounds. The assay is based on an aminocoumarin derivative of an Omega-acetylated lysine as enzyme substrate.

  19. Genome-wide identification of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) histone modification gene families and their expression analysis during the fruit development and fruit-blue mold infection process

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jidi; Xu, Haidan; Liu, Yuanlong; Wang, Xia; Xu, Qiang; Deng, Xiuxin

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, histone acetylation and methylation have been known to be involved in regulating diverse developmental processes and plant defense. These histone modification events are controlled by a series of histone modification gene families. To date, there is no study regarding genome-wide characterization of histone modification related genes in citrus species. Based on the two recent sequenced sweet orange genome databases, a total of 136 CsHMs (Citrus sinensis histone modification genes), including 47 CsHMTs (histone methyltransferase genes), 23 CsHDMs (histone demethylase genes), 50 CsHATs (histone acetyltransferase genes), and 16 CsHDACs (histone deacetylase genes) were identified. These genes were categorized to 11 gene families. A comprehensive analysis of these 11 gene families was performed with chromosome locations, phylogenetic comparison, gene structures, and conserved domain compositions of proteins. In order to gain an insight into the potential roles of these genes in citrus fruit development, 42 CsHMs with high mRNA abundance in fruit tissues were selected to further analyze their expression profiles at six stages of fruit development. Interestingly, a numbers of genes were expressed highly in flesh of ripening fruit and some of them showed the increasing expression levels along with the fruit development. Furthermore, we analyzed the expression patterns of all 136 CsHMs response to the infection of blue mold (Penicillium digitatum), which is the most devastating pathogen in citrus post-harvest process. The results indicated that 20 of them showed the strong alterations of their expression levels during the fruit-pathogen infection. In conclusion, this study presents a comprehensive analysis of the histone modification gene families in sweet orange and further elucidates their behaviors during the fruit development and the blue mold infection responses. PMID:26300904

  20. Genome-wide identification of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) histone modification gene families and their expression analysis during the fruit development and fruit-blue mold infection process.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jidi; Xu, Haidan; Liu, Yuanlong; Wang, Xia; Xu, Qiang; Deng, Xiuxin

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, histone acetylation and methylation have been known to be involved in regulating diverse developmental processes and plant defense. These histone modification events are controlled by a series of histone modification gene families. To date, there is no study regarding genome-wide characterization of histone modification related genes in citrus species. Based on the two recent sequenced sweet orange genome databases, a total of 136 CsHMs (Citrus sinensis histone modification genes), including 47 CsHMTs (histone methyltransferase genes), 23 CsHDMs (histone demethylase genes), 50 CsHATs (histone acetyltransferase genes), and 16 CsHDACs (histone deacetylase genes) were identified. These genes were categorized to 11 gene families. A comprehensive analysis of these 11 gene families was performed with chromosome locations, phylogenetic comparison, gene structures, and conserved domain compositions of proteins. In order to gain an insight into the potential roles of these genes in citrus fruit development, 42 CsHMs with high mRNA abundance in fruit tissues were selected to further analyze their expression profiles at six stages of fruit development. Interestingly, a numbers of genes were expressed highly in flesh of ripening fruit and some of them showed the increasing expression levels along with the fruit development. Furthermore, we analyzed the expression patterns of all 136 CsHMs response to the infection of blue mold (Penicillium digitatum), which is the most devastating pathogen in citrus post-harvest process. The results indicated that 20 of them showed the strong alterations of their expression levels during the fruit-pathogen infection. In conclusion, this study presents a comprehensive analysis of the histone modification gene families in sweet orange and further elucidates their behaviors during the fruit development and the blue mold infection responses.

  1. Ezh2 regulates differentiation and function of natural killer cells through histone methyltransferase activity

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jie; Leavenworth, Jianmei W.; Li, Yang; Luo, Qi; Xie, Huafeng; Liu, Xinhua; Huang, Shan; Yan, Han; Fu, Zheng; Zhang, Liyun Y.; Zhang, Litao; Hao, Junwei; Wu, Xudong; Deng, Xianming; Roberts, Charles W. M.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Cantor, Harvey; Wang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Changes of histone modification status at critical lineage-specifying gene loci in multipotent precursors can influence cell fate commitment. The contribution of these epigenetic mechanisms to natural killer (NK) cell lineage determination from common lymphoid precursors is not understood. Here we investigate the impact of histone methylation repressive marks (H3 Lys27 trimethylation; H3K27me3) on early NK cell differentiation. We demonstrate that selective loss of the histone-lysine N-methyltransferase Ezh2 (enhancer of zeste homolog 2) or inhibition of its enzymatic activity with small molecules unexpectedly increased generation of the IL-15 receptor (IL-15R) CD122+ NK precursors and mature NK progeny from both mouse and human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that enhanced NK cell expansion and cytotoxicity against tumor cells were associated with up-regulation of CD122 and the C-type lectin receptor NKG2D. Moreover, NKG2D deficiency diminished the positive effects of Ezh2 inhibitors on NK cell commitment. Identification of the contribution of Ezh2 to NK lineage specification and function reveals an epigenetic-based mechanism that regulates NK cell development and provides insight into the clinical application of Ezh2 inhibitors in NK-based cancer immunotherapies. PMID:26668377

  2. Ezh2 regulates differentiation and function of natural killer cells through histone methyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jie; Leavenworth, Jianmei W; Li, Yang; Luo, Qi; Xie, Huafeng; Liu, Xinhua; Huang, Shan; Yan, Han; Fu, Zheng; Zhang, Liyun Y; Zhang, Litao; Hao, Junwei; Wu, Xudong; Deng, Xianming; Roberts, Charles W M; Orkin, Stuart H; Cantor, Harvey; Wang, Xi

    2015-12-29

    Changes of histone modification status at critical lineage-specifying gene loci in multipotent precursors can influence cell fate commitment. The contribution of these epigenetic mechanisms to natural killer (NK) cell lineage determination from common lymphoid precursors is not understood. Here we investigate the impact of histone methylation repressive marks (H3 Lys27 trimethylation; H3K27(me3)) on early NK cell differentiation. We demonstrate that selective loss of the histone-lysine N-methyltransferase Ezh2 (enhancer of zeste homolog 2) or inhibition of its enzymatic activity with small molecules unexpectedly increased generation of the IL-15 receptor (IL-15R) CD122(+) NK precursors and mature NK progeny from both mouse and human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that enhanced NK cell expansion and cytotoxicity against tumor cells were associated with up-regulation of CD122 and the C-type lectin receptor NKG2D. Moreover, NKG2D deficiency diminished the positive effects of Ezh2 inhibitors on NK cell commitment. Identification of the contribution of Ezh2 to NK lineage specification and function reveals an epigenetic-based mechanism that regulates NK cell development and provides insight into the clinical application of Ezh2 inhibitors in NK-based cancer immunotherapies.

  3. Autoantibodies against Modified Histone Peptides in SLE Patients Are Associated with Disease Activity and Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Dieker, Jürgen; Berden, Jo H.; Bakker, Marinka; Briand, Jean-Paul; Muller, Sylviane; Voll, Reinhard; Sjöwall, Christopher; Herrmann, Martin; Hilbrands, Luuk B.; van der Vlag, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Persistent exposure of the immune system to death cell debris leads to autoantibodies against chromatin in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Deposition of anti-chromatin/chromatin complexes can instigate inflammation in multiple organs including the kidney. Previously we identified specific cell death-associated histone modifications as targets of autoantibodies in SLE. In this study we addressed, in a large cohort of SLE patients and controls, the question whether plasma reactivities with specific histone peptides associated with serology and clinical features. Plasma from SLE patients with and without lupus nephritis, disease controls, and healthy controls, were tested in ELISA with histone H4 peptide acetylated at lysines 8, 12 and 16 (H4pac), H2B peptide acetylated at lysine 12 (H2Bpac), H3 peptide trimethylated at lysine 27 (H3pme), and their unmodified equivalents. SLE patients displayed a higher reactivity with the modified equivalent of each peptide. Reactivity with H4pac showed both a high sensitivity (89%) and specificity (91%) for SLE, while H2Bpac exhibited a high specificity (96%) but lower sensitivity (69%). Reactivity with H3pme appeared not specific for SLE. Anti-H4pac and anti-H2Bpac reactivity demonstrated a high correlation with disease activity. Moreover, patients reacting with multiple modified histone peptides exhibited higher SLEDAI and lower C3 levels. SLE patients with renal involvement showed higher reactivity with H2B/H2Bpac and a more pronounced reactivity with the modified equivalent of H3pme and H2Bpac. In conclusion, reactivity with H4pac and H2Bpac is specific for SLE patients and correlates with disease activity, whereas reactivity with H2Bpac is in particular associated with lupus nephritis. PMID:27780265

  4. Pathway analysis of whole exome sequence data provides further support for the involvement of histone modification in the aetiology of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Curtis, David

    2016-10-01

    Weighted burden pathway analysis was applied to whole exome sequence data for 2045 schizophrenic patients and 2045 controls. Overall, there was a statistically significant excess of pathways with more rare, functional variants in cases than in controls. Among the highest ranked were pathways relating to histone modification, as well as neuron differentiation and membrane and vesicle function. This bolsters the evidence from previous studies that histone modification pathways may be important in the aetiology of schizophrenia.

  5. GATA2 regulates GATA1 expression through LSD1-mediated histone modification

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yidi; Fu, Xueqi; Huo, Bo; Wang, Yongsen; Sun, Jing; Meng, Lingyuan; Hao, Tian; Zhao, Zhizhuang Joe; Hu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic and reversed expression of GATA1 and GATA2 are essential for proper erythroid differentiation. Our previous work demonstrates that LSD1, a histone H3K4 demethylase, represses GATA2 expression at late stage of erythroid differentiation. K562 and MEL cells were used and cultured in Roswell Park Memorial Institute-1640 medium (RPMI) and Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium (DMEM), respectively. Western blot assay was used to examine the GATA1, GATA2, TAL1, HDAC1, HDAC2, CoREST and β-actin protein. The immunoprecipitation assay and GST pull-down assay were employed to detect the precipitated protein complexes and investigate the interaction between the proteins. The small interfering RNA (siRNA) and nonspecific control siRNA were synthesized to silence the target genes. Double fluorescence immunostaining was used to observe the association of LSD1 with GATA2 in K562 cells. The results indicated that knockdown of LSD1 in K562 cell causes increased H3K4 di-methylation at GATA1 locus and activates GATA1 expression, demonstrating that LSD1 represses GATA1 expression through LSD1-mediated histone demethylation. Upon induced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells, the interaction between GATA2 and LSD1 is decreased, consistent with a de-repression of GATA1 expression. Meanwhile, the interaction between TAL1 and LSD1 is increased, which forms a complex that efficiently suppresses GATA2 expression. In conclusion, these observations reveal an elegant mechanism to modulate GATA1 and GATA2 expression during erythroid differentiation. While LSD1 mainly forms complex with GATA2 to repress GATA1 expression in hematopoietic progenitor cells, it mostly forms complex with TAL1 to repress GATA2 expression in differentiated cells. PMID:27347333

  6. In silico modification of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) as potential inhibitor for class II histone deacetylase (HDAC)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The cervical cancer is the second most prevalent cancer for the woman in the world. It is caused by the oncogenic human papilloma virus (HPV). The inhibition activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) is a potential strategy for cancer therapy. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is widely known as a low toxicity HDAC inhibitor. This research presents in silico SAHA modification by utilizing triazole, in order to obtain a better inhibitor. We conducted docking of the SAHA inhibitor and 12 modified versions to six class II HDAC enzymes, and then proceeded with drug scanning of each one of them. Results The docking results show that the 12 modified inhibitors have much better binding affinity and inhibition potential than SAHA. Based on drug scan analysis, six of the modified inhibitors have robust pharmacological attributes, as revealed by drug likeness, drug score, oral bioavailability, and toxicity levels. Conclusions The binding affinity, free energy and drug scan screening of the best inhibitors have shown that 1c and 2c modified inhibitors are the best ones to inhibit class II HDAC. PMID:22373132

  7. Developmentally arrested Austrofundulus limnaeus embryos have changes in post-translational modifications of histone H3.

    PubMed

    Toni, Lee S; Padilla, Pamela A

    2016-02-01

    Although vertebrate embryogenesis is typically a continuous and dynamic process, some embryos have evolved mechanisms to developmentally arrest. The embryos of Austrofundulus limnaeus, a killifish that resides in ephemeral ponds, routinely enter diapause II (DII), a reversible developmental arrest promoted by endogenous cues rather than environmental stress. DII, which starts at 24-26 days post-fertilization and can persist for months, is characterized by a significant decline in heart rate and an arrest of development and differentiation. Thus, A. limnaeus is a unique model to study epigenetic features associated with embryonic arrest. To investigate chromosome structures associated with mitosis or gene expression, we examined the post-translational modifications of histone H3 (phosphorylation of serine 10, mono-, di- and tri-methylation of lysine 4 or 27) in preDII, DII and postDII embryos. As seen by microscopy analysis, DII embryos have a significant decrease in the H3S10P marker for mitotic nuclei and an inner nuclear membrane localization of the H3K27me2 marker associated with silencing of gene expression. ELISA experiments reveal that the levels of methylation at H3K4 and H3K27 are significantly different between preDII, DII and postDII embryos, indicating that there are molecular differences between embryos of different chronological age and stage of development. Furthermore, in DII embryos relative to preDII embryos, there are differences in the level of H3K27me3 and H3K4me3, which may reflect critical chromatin remodeling that occurs prior to arrest of embryogenesis. This work helps lay a foundation for chromatin analysis of vertebrate embryo diapause, an intriguing yet greatly understudied phenomenon.

  8. Histones Differentially Modulate the Anticoagulant and Profibrinolytic Activities of Heparin, Heparin Derivatives, and Dabigatran.

    PubMed

    Ammollo, Concetta Tiziana; Semeraro, Nicola; Carratù, Maria Rosaria; Colucci, Mario; Semeraro, Fabrizio

    2016-02-01

    The antithrombin activity of unfractionated heparin (UFH) is offset by extracellular histones, which, along with DNA, represent a novel mediator of thrombosis and a structural component of thrombi. Here, we systematically evaluated the effect of histones, DNA, and histone-DNA complexes on the anticoagulant and profibrinolytic activities of UFH, its derivatives enoxaparin and fondaparinux, and the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran. Thrombin generation was assessed by calibrated automated thrombinography, inhibition of factor Xa and thrombin by synthetic substrates, tissue plasminogen activator-mediated clot lysis by turbidimetry, and thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) activation by a functional assay. Histones alone delayed coagulation and slightly stimulated fibrinolysis. The anticoagulant activity of UFH and enoxaparin was markedly inhibited by histones, whereas that of fondaparinux was enhanced. Histones neutralized both the anti-Xa and anti-IIa activities of UFH and preferentially blocked the anti-IIa activity of enoxaparin. The anti-Xa activity of fondaparinux was not influenced by histones when analyzed by chromogenic substrates, but was potentiated in a plasma prothrombinase assay. Histones inhibited the profibrinolytic activity of UFH and enoxaparin and enhanced that of fondaparinux by acting on the modulation of TAFI activation by anticoagulants. Histone H1 was mainly responsible for these effects. Histone-DNA complexes, as well as intact neutrophil extracellular traps, impaired the activities of UFH, enoxaparin, and fondaparinux. Dabigatran was not noticeably affected by histones and/or DNA, whatever the assay performed. In conclusion, histones and DNA present in the forming clot may variably influence the antithrombotic activities of anticoagulants, suggesting a potential therapeutic advantage of dabigatran and fondaparinux over heparins.

  9. The chromatin remodeling complex NuRD establishes the poised state of rRNA genes characterized by bivalent histone modifications and altered nucleosome positions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wenbing; Ling, Te; Zhou, Yonggang; Feng, Weijun; Zhu, Qiaoyun; Stunnenberg, Henk G; Grummt, Ingrid; Tao, Wei

    2012-05-22

    rRNA genes (rDNA) exist in two distinct epigenetic states, active promoters being unmethylated and marked by euchromatic histone modifications, whereas silent ones are methylated and exhibit heterochromatic features. Here we show that the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylation (NuRD) complex establishes a specific chromatin structure at rRNA genes that are poised for transcription activation. The promoter of poised rRNA genes is unmethylated, associated with components of the preinitiation complex, marked by bivalent histone modifications and covered by a nucleosome in the "off" position, which is refractory to transcription initiation. Repression of rDNA transcription in growth-arrested and differentiated cells correlates with elevated association of NuRD and increased levels of poised rRNA genes. Reactivation of transcription requires resetting the promoter-bound nucleosome into the "on" position by the DNA-dependent ATPase CSB (Cockayne syndrome protein B). The results uncover a unique mechanism by which ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes with opposing activities establish a specific chromatin state and regulate transcription.

  10. Pask integrates hormonal signaling with histone modification via Wdr5 phosphorylation to drive myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kikani, Chintan K; Wu, Xiaoying; Paul, Litty; Sabic, Hana; Shen, Zuolian; Shakya, Arvind; Keefe, Alexandra; Villanueva, Claudio; Kardon, Gabrielle; Graves, Barbara; Tantin, Dean; Rutter, Jared

    2016-01-01

    PAS domain containing protein kinase (Pask) is an evolutionarily conserved protein kinase implicated in energy homeostasis and metabolic regulation across eukaryotic species. We now describe an unexpected role of Pask in promoting the differentiation of myogenic progenitor cells, embryonic stem cells and adipogenic progenitor cells. This function of Pask is dependent upon its ability to phosphorylate Wdr5, a member of several protein complexes including those that catalyze histone H3 Lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) during transcriptional activation. Our findings suggest that, during myoblast differentiation, Pask stimulates the conversion of repressive H3K4me1 to activating H3K4me3 marks on the promoter of the differentiation gene myogenin (Myog) via Wdr5 phosphorylation. This enhances accessibility of the MyoD transcription factor and enables transcriptional activation of the Myog promoter to initiate muscle differentiation. Thus, as an upstream kinase of Wdr5, Pask integrates signaling cues with the transcriptional network to regulate the differentiation of progenitor cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17985.001 PMID:27661449

  11. The progeny of Arabidopsis thaliana plants exposed to salt exhibit changes in DNA methylation, histone modifications and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Bilichak, Andriy; Ilnystkyy, Yaroslav; Hollunder, Jens; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2012-01-01

    Plants are able to acclimate to new growth conditions on a relatively short time-scale. Recently, we showed that the progeny of plants exposed to various abiotic stresses exhibited changes in genome stability, methylation patterns and stress tolerance. Here, we performed a more detailed analysis of methylation patterns in the progeny of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants exposed to 25 and 75 mM sodium chloride. We found that the majority of gene promoters exhibiting changes in methylation were hypermethylated, and this group was overrepresented by regulators of the chromatin structure. The analysis of DNA methylation at gene bodies showed that hypermethylation in the progeny of stressed plants was primarily due to changes in the 5' and 3' ends as well as in exons rather than introns. All but one hypermethylated gene tested had lower gene expression. The analysis of histone modifications in the promoters and coding sequences showed that hypermethylation and lower gene expression correlated with the enrichment of H3K9me2 and depletion of H3K9ac histones. Thus, our work demonstrated a high degree of correlation between changes in DNA methylation, histone modifications and gene expression in the progeny of salt-stressed plants.

  12. Role of histone modifications and DNA methylation in the regulation of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase gene expression in human stomach cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, Chun-Feng; Zhu, Xin-Jiang; Peng, Guo; Dai, Dong-Qiu

    2010-05-01

    To determine a possible function of histone modifications in stomach carcinogenesis, we analyzed global and MGMT-promoter levels of di-methyl-H3-K9, di-methyl-H3-K4 and acetyl-H3-K9, as well as MGMT DNA methylation and mRNA expression following treatment with 5-aza-2' -deoxycytidine and/or Trichostatin A. We found that histone H3-K9 di-methylation, H3-K4 di-methylation, H3-K9 acetylation and DNA methylation work in combination to silence MGMT. The results indicate that histone modifications as well as DNA methylation may be involved in stomach carcinogenesis. In addition to its effect on DNA methylation, 5-aza-2' -deoxycytidine can act at histone modification level to reactivate MGMT expression in a region-specific and DNA methylation-dependent manner.

  13. Histone methyltransferase Ash1L mediates activity-dependent repression of neurexin-1α

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Τao; Liang, Chen; Li, Dongdong; Tian, Miaomiao; Liu, Sanxiong; Gao, Guanjun; Guan, Ji-Song

    2016-01-01

    Activity-dependent transcription is critical for the regulation of long-term synaptic plasticity and plastic rewiring in the brain. Here, we report that the transcription of neurexin1α (nrxn1α), a presynaptic adhesion molecule for synaptic formation, is regulated by transient neuronal activation. We showed that 10 minutes of firing at 50 Hz in neurons repressed the expression of nrxn1α for 24 hours in a primary cortical neuron culture through a transcriptional repression mechanism. By performing a screening assay using a synthetic zinc finger protein (ZFP) to pull down the proteins enriched near the nrxn1α promoter region in vivo, we identified that Ash1L, a histone methyltransferase, is enriched in the nrxn1α promoter. Neuronal activity triggered binding of Ash1L to the promoter and enriched the histone marker H3K36me2 at the nrxn1α promoter region. Knockout of Ash1L in mice completely abolished the activity-dependent repression of nrxn1α. Taken together, our results reveal that a novel process of activity-dependent transcriptional repression exists in neurons and that Ash1L mediates the long-term repression of nrxn1α, thus implicating an important role for epigenetic modification in brain functioning. PMID:27229316

  14. Antimicrobial activity of histones from hemocytes of the Pacific white shrimp.

    PubMed

    Patat, Séverine A; Carnegie, Ryan B; Kingsbury, Celia; Gross, Paul S; Chapman, Robert; Schey, Kevin L

    2004-12-01

    The role of vertebrate histone proteins or histone derived peptides as innate immune effectors has only recently been appreciated. In this study, high levels of core histone proteins H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 were found in hemocytes from the Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei. The proteins were identified by in-gel digestion, mass spectrometry analysis, and homology searching. The L. vannamei histone proteins were found to be highly homologous to histones of other species. Based on this homology, histone H2A was cloned and its N-terminus was found to resemble the known antimicrobial histone peptides buforin I, parasin, and hipposin. Consequently, a 38 amino acid synthetic peptide identical to the N-terminus of shrimp H2A was synthesized and assayed, along with endogenous histones H2A, H2B, and H4, for growth inhibition against Micrococcus luteus. Histone H2A, purified to homogeneity, completely inhibited growth of the Gram-positive bacterium at 4.5 microm while a mixture of histones H2B and H4 was active at 3 microm. In addition, a fraction containing a fragment of histone H1 was also found to be active. The synthetic peptide similar to buforin was active at submicromolar concentrations. These data indicate, for the first time, that shrimp hemocyte histone proteins possess antimicrobial activity and represent a defense mechanism previously unreported in an invertebrate. Histones may be a component of innate immunity more widely conserved, and of earlier origin, than previously thought.

  15. Chromatin modifications that support acetylcholine receptor gene activation are established during muscle cell determination and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Carter A; Snell, Jeff; Fromm, Larry

    2011-02-01

    Localization of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) to the postsynaptic region of muscle is mediated in part by transcriptional mechanisms. An important way of regulating transcription is through targeting histone modifications on chromatin to distinct gene loci. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we examined the developmental regulation of certain histone modifications at the AChR epsilon subunit locus, including methylations at lysine residues K4 and K27 and acetylations at K9 and K14. We modeled various stages of muscle development in cell culture, including pre-determined cells, committed but undifferentiated myoblasts, and differentiated myotubes, and modeled synaptic myotube nuclei by stimulating myotubes with neuregulin (NRG) 1. We found that a pattern of histone modifications associated with transcriptional activation is targeted to the AChR epsilon subunit locus in myotubes prior to stimulation with NRG1 and does not change upon addition of NRG1. Instead, we found that during muscle cell determination and differentiation, specific histone modifications are targeted to the AChR epsilon subunit locus. Within the gene, at K4, dimethylation is induced during muscle cell determination, while trimethylation is induced during differentiation. At K27, loss of trimethylation and appearance of monomethylation occurs during determination and differentiation. In addition, in a region upstream of the gene, K4 di- and trimethylation, and K9/14 acetylation are induced in a distinct developmental pattern, which may reflect a functional regulatory element. These results suggest synaptic signaling does not directly target histone modifications but rather the histone modification pattern necessary for transcriptional activation is previously established in a series of steps during muscle development.

  16. Histone modifications patterns in tissues and tumours from acute promyelocytic leukemia xenograft model in response to combined epigenetic therapy.

    PubMed

    Valiulienė, Giedrė; Treigytė, Gražina; Savickienė, Jūratė; Matuzevičius, Dalius; Alksnė, Milda; Jarašienė-Burinskaja, Rasa; Bukelskienė, Virginija; Navakauskas, Dalius; Navakauskienė, Rūta

    2016-04-01

    Xenograft models are suitable for in vivo study of leukemia's pathogenesis and the preclinical development of anti-leukemia agents but understanding of epigenetic regulatory mechanisms linking to adult cell functions in pathological conditions during different in vivo treatments is yet unknown. In this study, for the first time epigenetic chromatin modifications were characterized in tissues and tumours from murine xenograft model generated using the human acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) NB4 cells engrafted in immunodeficient NOG mice. Xenografts were subjected to combined epigenetic treatment by histone deacetylase inhibitor Belinostat, histone methyltransferase inhibitor 3-DZNeaplanocin A and all-trans-retinoic acid based on in vitro model, where such combination inhibited NB4 cell growth and enhanced retinoic acid-induced differentiation to granulocytes. Xenotransplantation was assessed by peripheral blood cells counts, the analysis of cell surface markers (CD15, CD33, CD45) and the expression of certain genes (PML-RAR alpha, CSF3, G-CSFR, WT1). The combined treatment prolonged APL xenograft mice survival and prevented tumour formation. The analysis of the expression of histone marks such as acetylation of H4, trimethylation of H3K4, H3K9 and H3K27 in APL xenograft mice tumours and tissues demonstrated tissue-specific changes in the level of histone modifications and the APL prognostic mark, WT1 protein. In summary, the effects of epigenetic agents used in this study were positive for leukemia prevention and linked to a modulation of the chromatin epigenetic environment in adult tissues of malignant organism.

  17. Nicotine Suppressed Fetal Adrenal StAR Expression via YY1 Mediated-Histone Deacetylation Modification Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lian; Wang, Jian-Fei; Fan, Jie; Rao, Yi-Song; Liu, Fang; Yan, You-E; Wang, Hui

    2016-09-03

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein plays a pivotal role in steroidogenesis. Previously, we have demonstrated that prenatal nicotine exposure suppressed fetal adrenal steroidogenesis via steroidogenic factor 1 deacetylation. This study further explored the potential role of the transcriptional repressor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) in nicotine-mediated StAR inhibition. Nicotine was subcutaneously administered (1.0 mg/kg) to pregnant rats twice per day and NCI-H295A cells were treated with nicotine. StAR and YY1 expression were analyzed by real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. Histone modifications and the interactions between the YY1 and StAR promoter were assessed using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Prenatal nicotine exposure increased YY1 expression and suppressed StAR expression. ChIP assay showed that there was a decreasing trend for histone acetylation at the StAR promoter in fetal adrenal glands, whereas H3 acetyl-K14 at the YY1 promoter presented an increasing trend following nicotine exposure. Furthermore, in nicotine-treated NCI-H295A cells, nicotine enhanced YY1 expression and inhibited StAR expression. ChIP assay showed that histone acetylation decreased at the StAR promoter in NCI-H295A cells and that the interaction between the YY1 and StAR promoter increased. These data indicated that YY1-medicated histone deacetylation modification in StAR promoters might play an important role in the inhibitory effect of nicotine on StAR expression.

  18. Nicotine Suppressed Fetal Adrenal StAR Expression via YY1 Mediated-Histone Deacetylation Modification Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lian; Wang, Jian-Fei; Fan, Jie; Rao, Yi-Song; Liu, Fang; Yan, You-E; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein plays a pivotal role in steroidogenesis. Previously, we have demonstrated that prenatal nicotine exposure suppressed fetal adrenal steroidogenesis via steroidogenic factor 1 deacetylation. This study further explored the potential role of the transcriptional repressor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) in nicotine-mediated StAR inhibition. Nicotine was subcutaneously administered (1.0 mg/kg) to pregnant rats twice per day and NCI-H295A cells were treated with nicotine. StAR and YY1 expression were analyzed by real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. Histone modifications and the interactions between the YY1 and StAR promoter were assessed using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Prenatal nicotine exposure increased YY1 expression and suppressed StAR expression. ChIP assay showed that there was a decreasing trend for histone acetylation at the StAR promoter in fetal adrenal glands, whereas H3 acetyl-K14 at the YY1 promoter presented an increasing trend following nicotine exposure. Furthermore, in nicotine-treated NCI-H295A cells, nicotine enhanced YY1 expression and inhibited StAR expression. ChIP assay showed that histone acetylation decreased at the StAR promoter in NCI-H295A cells and that the interaction between the YY1 and StAR promoter increased. These data indicated that YY1-medicated histone deacetylation modification in StAR promoters might play an important role in the inhibitory effect of nicotine on StAR expression. PMID:27598153

  19. Novel Antiproliferative Chimeric Compounds with Marked Histone Deacetylase Inhibitory Activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Given our interest in finding potential antitumor agents and in view of the multifactorial mechanistic nature of cancer, in the present work, taking advantage of the multifunctional ligands approach, new chimeric molecules were designed and synthesized by combining in single chemical entities structural features of SAHA, targeting histone deacetylases (HDACs), with substituted stilbene or terphenyl derivatives previously obtained by us and endowed with antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic activity. The new chimeric derivatives were characterized with respect to their cytotoxic activity and their effects on cell cycle progression on different tumor cell lines, as well as their HDACs inhibition. Among the other, trans-6 showed the most interesting biological profile, as it exhibited a strong pro-apoptotic activity in tumor cell lines in comparison with both of its parent compounds and a marked HDAC inhibition. PMID:25221651

  20. Histone variants: key players of chromatin.

    PubMed

    Biterge, Burcu; Schneider, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Histones are fundamental structural components of chromatin. Eukaryotic DNA is wound around an octamer of the core histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4. Binding of linker histone H1 promotes higher order chromatin organization. In addition to their structural role, histones impact chromatin function and dynamics by, e.g., post-translational histone modifications or the presence of specific histone variants. Histone variants exhibit differential expression timings (DNA replication-independent) and mRNA characteristics compared to canonical histones. Replacement of canonical histones with histone variants can affect nucleosome stability and help to create functionally distinct chromatin domains. In line with this, several histone variants have been implicated in the regulation of cellular processes such as DNA repair and transcriptional activity. In this review, we focus on recent progress in the study of core histone variants H2A.X, H2A.Z, macroH2A, H3.3, and CENP-A, as well as linker histone H1 variants, their functions and their links to development and disease.

  1. Social exclusion changes histone modifications H3K4me3 and H3K27ac in liver tissue of wild house mice.

    PubMed

    Krause, Linda; Haubold, Bernhard; Börsch-Haubold, Angelika G

    2015-01-01

    Wild house mice form social hierarchies with aggressive males defending territories, in which females, young mice and submissive adult males share nests. In contrast, socially excluded males are barred from breeding groups, have numerous bite wounds and patches of thinning fur. Since their feeding times are often disrupted, we investigated whether social exclusion leads to changes in epigenetic marks of metabolic genes in liver tissue. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation and quantitative PCR to measure enrichment of two activating histone marks at 15 candidate loci. The epigenetic profiles of healthy males sampled from nest boxes differed significantly from the profiles of ostracized males caught outside of nests and showing bite wounds indicative of social exclusion. Enrichment of histone-3 lysine-4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) changed significantly at genes Cyp4a14, Gapdh, Nr3c1, Pck1, Ppara, and Sqle. Changes at histone-3 lysine-27 acetylation (H3K27ac) marks were detected at genes Fasn, Nr3c1, and Plin5. A principal components analysis separated the socialized from the ostracized mice. This was independent of body weight for the H3K4me3 mark, and partially dependent for H3K27ac. There was no separation, however, between healthy males that had been sampled from two different nests. A hierarchical cluster analysis also separated the two phenotypes, which was independent of body weight for both markers. Our study shows that a period of social exclusion during adult life leads to quantitative changes in histone modification patterns in mouse liver tissue. Similar epigenetic changes might occur during the development of stress-induced metabolic disorders in humans.

  2. Protocol: Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) methodology to investigate histone modifications in two model diatom species

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this report we describe a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) protocol for two fully sequenced model diatom species Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana. This protocol allows the extraction of satisfactory amounts of chromatin and gives reproducible results. We coupled the ChIP assay with real time quantitative PCR. Our results reveal that the two major histone marks H3K4me2 and H3K9me2 exist in P. tricornutum and T. pseudonana. As in other eukaryotes, H3K4me2 marks active genes whereas H3K9me2 marks transcriptionally inactive transposable elements. Unexpectedly however, T. pseudonana housekeeping genes also show a relative enrichment of H3K9me2. We also discuss optimization of the procedure, including growth conditions, cross linking and sonication. Validation of the protocol provides a set of genes and transposable elements that can be used as controls for studies using ChIP in each diatom species. This protocol can be easily adapted to other diatoms and eukaryotic phytoplankton species for genetic and biochemical studies. PMID:23217141

  3. Design and synthesis of a tetrahydroisoquinoline-based hydroxamate derivative (ZYJ-34v), an oral active histone deacetylase inhibitor with potent antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingjie; Liu, Chunxi; Chou, C James; Wang, Xuejian; Jia, Yuping; Xu, Wenfang

    2013-08-01

    In our previous study, we developed a novel series of tetrahydroisoquinoline-based hydroxamic acid derivatives as histone deacetylase inhibitors (Bioorg Med Chem, 2010, 18, 1761-1772; J Med Chem, 2011, 54, 2823-2838), among which, compound ZYJ-34c (1) was identified and validated as the most potent one with marked in vitro and in vivo antitumor potency (J Med Chem, 2011, 54, 5532-5539.). Herein, further modification in 1 afforded another oral active analog ZYJ-34v (2) with simplified structure and lower molecular weight. Biological evaluation of compound 2 showed efficacious inhibition against histone deacetylase 1, 2, 3, and 6, which was confirmed by Western blot analysis results. Most importantly, compound 2 exhibited similar even more potent in vitro and in vivo antitumor activities relative to the approved histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA.

  4. Alteration in inflammatory/apoptotic pathway and histone modifications by nordihydroguaiaretic acid prevents acute pancreatitis in swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Ujwal Mukund; Gupta, Chanchal; Wagh, Preshit Ravindra; Karpe, Pinakin Arun; Tikoo, Kulbhushan

    2011-11-01

    Reactive oxygen radicals, pro-inflammatory mediators and cytokines have been implicated in caerulein induced acute pancreatitis. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a plant lignin, has marked anti-inflammatory properties. The present study aimed to investigate the possible protective effect of NDGA against caerulein induced pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis was induced by intraperitoneal administration of eight doses of caerulein in male swiss albino mice. NDGA was administered after 9 h of acute pancreatitis induction. Pancreatic damage and the protective effect of NDGA were assessed by oxidative stress parameters and histopathology of pancreas. The mRNA expression of heat shock proteins (DNAJ C15 and HSPD1) was examined by real-time RT-PCR analysis. Expression of HSP 27, NF-κB, TNF-α, p-p38, Bcl-2, p-PP2A, procaspase-3, caspase-3 and histone modifications were examined by western blotting. NDGA attenuated the oxidative stress, led to increased plasma α-amylase and decreased IGF-1 in AP mice. It modulated the mRNA and protein levels of heat shock proteins and reduced the expression of NF-κB, TNF-α and p-p38. It increased the number of TUNEL positive apoptotic cells in the pancreas of AP mice. In addition, NDGA prevented the changes in modifications of histone H3 in acute pancreatitis. To best of our knowledge, this is the first report which suggests that NDGA prevents the progression of acute pancreatitis by involving alteration of histone H3 modifications and modulating the expression of genes involved in inflammatory/apoptotic cascade, which may be responsible for decreased necrosis and increased apoptosis in this model of acute pancreatitis.

  5. The Histone Modification Domain of Paf1 Complex Subunit Rtf1 Directly Stimulates H2B Ubiquitylation through an Interaction with Rad6

    SciTech Connect

    Van Oss, S. Branden; Shirra, Margaret K.; Bataille, Alain R.; Wier, Adam D.; Yen, Kuangyu; Vinayachandran, Vinesh; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Cucinotta, Christine E.; Héroux, Annie; Jeon, Jongcheol; Kim, Jaehoon; VanDemark, Andrew P.; Pugh, B. Franklin; Arndt, Karen M.

    2016-11-10

    The five-subunit yeast Paf1 Complex (Paf1C) regulates all stages of transcription and is critical for the monoubiquitylation of histone H2B (H2Bub), a modification that broadly influences chromatin structure and eukaryotic transcription. Here we show that the histone modification domain (HMD) of Paf1C subunit Rtf1 directly interacts with the ubiquitin conjugase Rad6 and stimulates H2Bub independently of transcription. We present the crystal structure of the Rtf1 HMD and use site-specific, in vivo crosslinking to identify a conserved Rad6 interaction surface. Utilizing ChIP-exo analysis, we define the localization patterns of the H2Bub machinery at high resolution and demonstrate the importance of Paf1C in targeting the Rtf1 HMD, and thereby H2Bub, to its appropriate genomic locations. Finally, we observe HMD-dependent stimulation of H2Bub in a transcription-free, reconstituted in vitro system. Taken together, our results argue for an active role for Paf1C in promoting H2Bub and ensuring its proper localization in vivo.

  6. The Histone Modification Domain of Paf1 Complex Subunit Rtf1 Directly Stimulates H2B Ubiquitylation through an Interaction with Rad6

    DOE PAGES

    Van Oss, S. Branden; Shirra, Margaret K.; Bataille, Alain R.; ...

    2016-11-10

    The five-subunit yeast Paf1 Complex (Paf1C) regulates all stages of transcription and is critical for the monoubiquitylation of histone H2B (H2Bub), a modification that broadly influences chromatin structure and eukaryotic transcription. Here we show that the histone modification domain (HMD) of Paf1C subunit Rtf1 directly interacts with the ubiquitin conjugase Rad6 and stimulates H2Bub independently of transcription. We present the crystal structure of the Rtf1 HMD and use site-specific, in vivo crosslinking to identify a conserved Rad6 interaction surface. Utilizing ChIP-exo analysis, we define the localization patterns of the H2Bub machinery at high resolution and demonstrate the importance of Paf1Cmore » in targeting the Rtf1 HMD, and thereby H2Bub, to its appropriate genomic locations. Finally, we observe HMD-dependent stimulation of H2Bub in a transcription-free, reconstituted in vitro system. Taken together, our results argue for an active role for Paf1C in promoting H2Bub and ensuring its proper localization in vivo.« less

  7. Rapid Histone-Catalyzed DNA Lesion Excision and Accompanying Protein Modification in Nucleosomes and Nucleosome Core Particles.

    PubMed

    Weng, Liwei; Greenberg, Marc M

    2015-09-02

    C5'-Hydrogen atoms are frequently abstracted during DNA oxidation. The oxidized abasic lesion 5'-(2-phosphoryl-1,4-dioxobutane) (DOB) is an electrophilic product of the C5'-radical. DOB is a potent irreversible inhibitor of DNA polymerase β, and forms interstrand cross-links in free DNA. We examined the reactivity of DOB within nucleosomes and nucleosome core particles (NCPs), the monomeric component of chromatin. Depending upon the position at which DOB is generated within a NCP, it is excised from nucleosomal DNA at a rate 275-1500-fold faster than that in free DNA. The half-life of DOB (7.0-16.8 min) in NCPs is shorter than any other abasic lesion. DOB's lifetime in NCPs is also significantly shorter than the estimated lifetime of an abasic site within a cell, suggesting that the observed chemistry would occur intracellularly. Histones also catalyze DOB excision when the lesion is present in the DNA linker region of a nucleosome. Schiff-base formation between DOB and histone proteins is detected in nucleosomes and NCPs, resulting in pyrrolone formation at the lysine residues. The lysines modified by DOB are often post-translationally modified. Consequently, the histone modifications described herein could affect the regulation of gene expression and may provide a chemical basis for the cytotoxicity of the DNA damaging agents that produce this lesion.

  8. Epigenomic Modifications Predict Active Promoters and Gene Structure in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Gissot, Mathieu; Kelly, Krystyna A; Ajioka, James W; Greally, John M; Kim, Kami

    2007-01-01

    Mechanisms of gene regulation are poorly understood in Apicomplexa, a phylum that encompasses deadly human pathogens like Plasmodium and Toxoplasma. Initial studies suggest that epigenetic phenomena, including histone modifications and chromatin remodeling, have a profound effect upon gene expression and expression of virulence traits. Using the model organism Toxoplasma gondii, we characterized the epigenetic organization and transcription patterns of a contiguous 1% of the T. gondii genome using custom oligonucleotide microarrays. We show that methylation and acetylation of histones H3 and H4 are landmarks of active promoters in T. gondii that allow us to deduce the position and directionality of gene promoters with >95% accuracy. These histone methylation and acetylation “activation” marks are strongly associated with gene expression. We also demonstrate that the pattern of histone H3 arginine methylation distinguishes certain promoters, illustrating the complexity of the histone modification machinery in Toxoplasma. By integrating epigenetic data, gene prediction analysis, and gene expression data from the tachyzoite stage, we illustrate feasibility of creating an epigenomic map of T. gondii tachyzoite gene expression. Further, we illustrate the utility of the epigenomic map to empirically and biologically annotate the genome and show that this approach enables identification of previously unknown genes. Thus, our epigenomics approach provides novel insights into regulation of gene expression in the Apicomplexa. In addition, with its compact genome, genetic tractability, and discrete life cycle stages, T. gondii provides an important new model to study the evolutionarily conserved components of the histone code. PMID:17559302

  9. Top-down and Middle-down Protein Analysis Reveals that Intact and Clipped Human Histones Differ in Post-translational Modification Patterns.

    PubMed

    Tvardovskiy, Andrey; Wrzesinski, Krzysztof; Sidoli, Simone; Fey, Stephen J; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Jensen, Ole N

    2015-12-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histone proteins play a fundamental role in regulation of DNA-templated processes. There is also growing evidence that proteolytic cleavage of histone N-terminal tails, known as histone clipping, influences nucleosome dynamics and functional properties. Using top-down and middle-down protein analysis by mass spectrometry, we report histone H2B and H3 N-terminal tail clipping in human hepatocytes and demonstrate a relationship between clipping and co-existing PTMs of histone H3. Histones H2B and H3 undergo proteolytic processing in primary human hepatocytes and the hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2/C3A when grown in spheroid (3D) culture, but not in a flat (2D) culture. Using tandem mass spectrometry we localized four different clipping sites in H3 and one clipping site in H2B. We show that in spheroid culture clipped H3 proteoforms are mainly represented by canonical histone H3, whereas in primary hepatocytes over 90% of clipped H3 correspond to the histone variant H3.3. Comprehensive analysis of histone H3 modifications revealed a series of PTMs, including K14me1, K27me2/K27me3, and K36me1/me2, which are differentially abundant in clipped and intact H3. Analysis of co-existing PTMs revealed negative crosstalk between H3K36 methylation and H3K23 acetylation in clipped H3. Our data provide the first evidence of histone clipping in human hepatocytes and demonstrate that clipped H3 carry distinct co-existing PTMs different from those in intact H3.

  10. Top-down and Middle-down Protein Analysis Reveals that Intact and Clipped Human Histones Differ in Post-translational Modification Patterns*

    PubMed Central

    Tvardovskiy, Andrey; Wrzesinski, Krzysztof; Sidoli, Simone; Fey, Stephen J.; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Jensen, Ole N.

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histone proteins play a fundamental role in regulation of DNA-templated processes. There is also growing evidence that proteolytic cleavage of histone N-terminal tails, known as histone clipping, influences nucleosome dynamics and functional properties. Using top-down and middle-down protein analysis by mass spectrometry, we report histone H2B and H3 N-terminal tail clipping in human hepatocytes and demonstrate a relationship between clipping and co-existing PTMs of histone H3. Histones H2B and H3 undergo proteolytic processing in primary human hepatocytes and the hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2/C3A when grown in spheroid (3D) culture, but not in a flat (2D) culture. Using tandem mass spectrometry we localized four different clipping sites in H3 and one clipping site in H2B. We show that in spheroid culture clipped H3 proteoforms are mainly represented by canonical histone H3, whereas in primary hepatocytes over 90% of clipped H3 correspond to the histone variant H3.3. Comprehensive analysis of histone H3 modifications revealed a series of PTMs, including K14me1, K27me2/K27me3, and K36me1/me2, which are differentially abundant in clipped and intact H3. Analysis of co-existing PTMs revealed negative crosstalk between H3K36 methylation and H3K23 acetylation in clipped H3. Our data provide the first evidence of histone clipping in human hepatocytes and demonstrate that clipped H3 carry distinct co-existing PTMs different from those in intact H3. PMID:26424599

  11. Implication of DNA demethylation and bivalent histone modification for selective gene regulation in mouse primordial germ cells.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Kentaro; Tachibana, Makoto; Saitou, Mitinori; Tokitake, Yuko; Matsui, Yasuhisa

    2012-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) sequentially induce specific genes required for their development. We focused on epigenetic changes that regulate PGC-specific gene expression. mil-1, Blimp1, and Stella are preferentially expressed in PGCs, and their expression is upregulated during PGC differentiation. Here, we first determined DNA methylation status of mil-1, Blimp1, and Stella regulatory regions in epiblast and in PGCs, and found that they were hypomethylated in differentiating PGCs after E9.0, in which those genes were highly expressed. We used siRNA to inhibit a maintenance DNA methyltransferase, Dnmt1, in embryonic stem (ES) cells and found that the flanking regions of all three genes became hypomethylated and that expression of each gene increased 1.5- to 3-fold. In addition, we also found 1.5- to 5-fold increase of the PGC genes in the PGCLCs (PGC-like cells) induced form ES cells by knockdown of Dnmt1. We also obtained evidence showing that methylation of the regulatory region of mil-1 resulted in 2.5-fold decrease in expression in a reporter assay. Together, these results suggested that DNA demethylation does not play a major role on initial activation of the PGC genes in the nascent PGCs but contributed to enhancement of their expression in PGCs after E9.0. However, we also found that repression of representative somatic genes, Hoxa1 and Hoxb1, and a tissue-specific gene, Gfap, in PGCs was not dependent on DNA methylation; their flanking regions were hypomethylated, but their expression was not observed in PGCs at E13.5. Their promoter regions showed the bivalent histone modification in PGCs, that may be involved in repression of their expression. Our results indicated that epigenetic status of PGC genes and of somatic genes in PGCs were distinct, and suggested contribution of epigenetic mechanisms in regulation of the expression of a specific gene set in PGCs.

  12. SUMO modification of a heterochromatin histone demethylase JMJD2A enables viral gene transactivation and viral replication

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wan-Shan; Campbell, Mel

    2017-01-01

    Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) modification of chromatin has profound effects on transcription regulation. By using Kaposi’s sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) as a model, we recently demonstrated that epigenetic modification of viral chromatin by SUMO-2/3 is involved in regulating gene expression and viral reactivation. However, how this modification orchestrates transcription reprogramming through targeting histone modifying enzymes remains largely unknown. Here we show that JMJD2A, the first identified Jumonji C domain-containing histone demethylase, is the histone demethylase responsible for SUMO-2/3 enrichment on the KSHV genome during viral reactivation. Using in vitro and in vivo SUMOylation assays, we found that JMJD2A is SUMOylated on lysine 471 by KSHV K-bZIP, a viral SUMO-2/3-specific E3 ligase, in a SUMO-interacting motif (SIM)-dependent manner. SUMOylation is required for stabilizing chromatin association and gene transactivation by JMJD2A. These finding suggest that SUMO-2/3 modification plays an essential role in the epigenetic regulatory function of JMJD2A. Consistently, hierarchical clustering analysis of RNA-seq data showed that a SUMO-deficient mutant of JMJD2A was more closely related to JMJD2A knockdown than to wild-type. Our previous report demonstrated that JMJD2A coated and maintained the “ready to activate” status of the viral genome. Consistent with our previous report, a SUMO-deficient mutant of JMJD2A reduced viral gene expression and virion production. Importantly, JMJD2A has been implicated as an oncogene in various cancers by regulating proliferation. We therefore further analyzed the role of SUMO modification of JMJD2A in regulating cell proliferation. Interestingly, the SUMO-deficient mutant of JMJD2A failed to rescue the proliferation defect of JMJD2A knockdown cells. Emerging specific inhibitors of JMJD2A have been generated for evaluation in cancer studies. Our results revealed that SUMO conjugation mediates an

  13. Changes in histone modification and DNA methylation of the StAR and Cyp19a1 promoter regions in granulosa cells undergoing luteinization during ovulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lifa; Asada, Hiromi; Kizuka, Fumie; Tamura, Isao; Maekawa, Ryo; Taketani, Toshiaki; Sato, Shun; Yamagata, Yoshiaki; Tamura, Hiroshi; Sugino, Norihiro

    2013-01-01

    The ovulatory LH surge induces rapid up-regulation of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein and rapid down-regulation of aromatase (Cyp19a1) in granulosa cells (GCs) undergoing luteinization during ovulation. This study investigated in vivo whether epigenetic mechanisms including histone modifications are involved in the rapid changes of StAR and Cyp19a1 gene expression. GCs were obtained from rats treated with equine chorionic gonadotropin (CG) before (0 h) and after human (h)CG injection. StAR mRNA levels rapidly increased after hCG injection, reached a peak at 4 h, and then remained higher compared with 0 h until 12 h. Cyp19a1 mRNA levels gradually decreased after hCG injection and reached their lowest level at 12 h. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that levels of histone-H4 acetylation (Ac-H4) and trimethylation of histone-H3 lysine-4 (H3K4me3) increased whereas H3K9me3 and H3K27me3 decreased in the StAR promoter after hCG injection. On the other hand, the levels of Ac-H3 and -H4 and H3K4me3 decreased, and H3K27me3 increased in the Cyp19a1 promoter after hCG injection. Chromatin condensation, which was analyzed using deoxyribonuclease I, decreased in the StAR promoter and increased in the Cyp19a1 promoter after hCG injection. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay also showed that binding activities of CAATT/enhancer-binding protein β to the StAR promoter increased and binding activities of phosphorylated-cAMP response element binding protein to the Cyp19a1 promoter decreased after hCG injection. These results provide in vivo evidence that histone modifications are involved in the rapid changes of StAR and Cyp19a1 gene expression by altering chromatin structure of the promoters in GCs undergoing luteinization during ovulation.

  14. Maternal Betaine Supplementation throughout Gestation and Lactation Modifies Hepatic Cholesterol Metabolic Genes in Weaning Piglets via AMPK/LXR-Mediated Pathway and Histone Modification.

    PubMed

    Cai, Demin; Yuan, Mengjie; Liu, Haoyu; Pan, Shifeng; Ma, Wenqiang; Hong, Jian; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-10-18

    Betaine serves as an animal and human nutrient which has been heavily investigated in glucose and lipid metabolic regulation, yet the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. In this study, feeding sows with betaine-supplemented diets during pregnancy and lactation increased cholesterol content and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) gene expression, but decreasing bile acids content and cholesterol-7a-hydroxylase (CYP7a1) expression in the liver of weaning piglets. This was associated with the significantly elevated serum betaine and methionine levels and hepatic S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) content. Concurrently, the hepatic nuclear transcription factor liver X receptor LXR was downregulated along with activated signal protein AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Moreover, a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed lower LXR binding on CYP7a1 gene promoter and more enriched activation histone marker H3K4me3 on LDLR and SR-BI promoters. These results suggest that gestational and lactational betaine supplementation modulates hepatic gene expression involved in cholesterol metabolism via an AMPK/LXR pathway and histone modification in the weaning offspring.

  15. Maternal Betaine Supplementation throughout Gestation and Lactation Modifies Hepatic Cholesterol Metabolic Genes in Weaning Piglets via AMPK/LXR-Mediated Pathway and Histone Modification

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Demin; Yuan, Mengjie; Liu, Haoyu; Pan, Shifeng; Ma, Wenqiang; Hong, Jian; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-01-01

    Betaine serves as an animal and human nutrient which has been heavily investigated in glucose and lipid metabolic regulation, yet the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. In this study, feeding sows with betaine-supplemented diets during pregnancy and lactation increased cholesterol content and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) gene expression, but decreasing bile acids content and cholesterol-7a-hydroxylase (CYP7a1) expression in the liver of weaning piglets. This was associated with the significantly elevated serum betaine and methionine levels and hepatic S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) content. Concurrently, the hepatic nuclear transcription factor liver X receptor LXR was downregulated along with activated signal protein AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Moreover, a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed lower LXR binding on CYP7a1 gene promoter and more enriched activation histone marker H3K4me3 on LDLR and SR-BI promoters. These results suggest that gestational and lactational betaine supplementation modulates hepatic gene expression involved in cholesterol metabolism via an AMPK/LXR pathway and histone modification in the weaning offspring. PMID:27763549

  16. Stability of single copy transgene expression in CHOK1 cells is affected by histone modifications but not by DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Shawal; Gugliotta, Agustina; Koenitzer, Jennifer; Hauser, Hansjörg; Wirth, Dagmar

    2015-02-10

    Intraclonal heterogeneity of genetically modified mammalian cells has been observed as a phenomenon that has a strong impact on overall transgene expression levels and that limits the predictability of transgene expression in genetically modified cells, thereby hampering single cell based screening approaches. The underlying mechanism(s) leading to this variance are poorly understood. To study the dynamics and mechanisms of heterogeneity of early stage silencing we analyzed the expression in more than 100 independent clones of CHOK1 cells that harbour genetically stable integrates of single copy reporter cassettes driven by EF1α and CMV promoters. Single cell analysis showed intraclonal variability with heterogeneity in expression in genetically uniform populations. DNA methylation is a well known mechanism responsible for silencing of gene expression. Interestingly, loss of expression was not associated with DNA methylation of the CMV promoter. However, in most of the clonal populations expression could be increased by inhibitors of the histone deacetylases (HDACi) suggesting that heterogeneity of transgene expression is crucially governed by histone modifications. Further, to determine if the epigenetic status of transgene expression is governed by the chromosomal integration locus we targeted heterologous expression cassettes into two chromosomal sites using recombinase mediated cassette exchange (RMCE). The expression status of a particular clone was faithfully re-established when the same promoter used. In this way the problem of early stage cell clone instability can be bypassed. However, upon introduction of an unrelated promoter methylation-independent silencing was observed. Together, these results suggest that histone modifications are the relevant mechanisms by which epigenetic modulation of transgene expression cassettes is governed in the early phase of clone generation.

  17. Differential Promoter Methylation and Histone Modification Contribute to the Brain Specific Expression of the Mouse Mbu-1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byungtak; Kang, Seongeun; Kim, Sun Jung

    2012-01-01

    Mbu-1 (Csrnp-3) is a mouse gene that was identified in our previous study as showing highly restricted expression to the central nervous system. In this study, to elucidate the regulatory mechanism for tissue specificity of the gene, epigenetic approaches that identify the profiles of CpG methylation, as well as histone modifications at the promoter region were conducted. Methylation-specific PCR revealed that the CpG sites in brain tissues from embryo to adult stages showed virtually no methylation (0.052–0.67%). Lung (9.0%) and pancreas (3.0%) also showed lower levels. Other tissues such as liver, kidney, and heart showed much higher methylation levels ranging from approximately 39–93%. Treatment of 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-dC) significantly decreased promoter methylation, reactivating Mbu-1 expression in NG108-15 and Neuro-2a neuronal cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that 5-Aza-dC decreased levels of acetylated H3K9 and methylated H3K4, and increased methylated H3K9. This result indicates that CpG methylation converses with histone modifications in an opposing sense of regulating Mbu-1 expression. PMID:23076708

  18. Replication-dependent histone genes are actively transcribed in differentiating and aging retinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Banday, Abdul Rouf; Baumgartner, Marybeth; Al Seesi, Sahar; Karunakaran, Devi Krishna Priya; Venkatesh, Aditya; Congdon, Sean; Lemoine, Christopher; Kilcollins, Ashley M; Mandoiu, Ion; Punzo, Claudio; Kanadia, Rahul N

    2014-01-01

    In the mammalian genome, each histone family contains multiple replication-dependent paralogs, which are found in clusters where their transcription is thought to be coupled to the cell cycle. Here, we wanted to interrogate the transcriptional regulation of these paralogs during retinal development and aging. We employed deep sequencing, quantitative PCR, in situ hybridization (ISH), and microarray analysis, which revealed that replication-dependent histone genes were not only transcribed in progenitor cells but also in differentiating neurons. Specifically, by ISH analysis we found that different histone genes were actively transcribed in a subset of neurons between postnatal day 7 and 14. Interestingly, within a histone family, not all paralogs were transcribed at the same level during retinal development. For example, expression of Hist1h1b was higher embryonically, while that of Hist1h1c was higher postnatally. Finally, expression of replication-dependent histone genes was also observed in the aging retina. Moreover, transcription of replication-dependent histones was independent of rapamycin-mediated mTOR pathway inactivation. Overall, our data suggest the existence of variant nucleosomes produced by the differential expression of the replication-dependent histone genes across retinal development. Also, the expression of a subset of replication-dependent histone isotypes in senescent neurons warrants re-examining these genes as "replication-dependent." Thus, our findings underscore the importance of understanding the transcriptional regulation of replication-dependent histone genes in the maintenance and functioning of neurons.

  19. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Equipped with Estrogen Receptor Modulation Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gryder, Berkley E.; Rood, Michael K.; Johnson, Kenyetta A.; Patil, Vishal; Raftery, Eric D.; Yao, Li-Pan D.; Rice, Marcie; Azizi, Bahareh; Doyle, Donald F.; Oyelere, Adegboyega K.

    2013-01-01

    We described a set of novel histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) equipped with either an antagonist or an agonist of the estrogen receptor (ER) to confer selective activity against breast cancers. These bifunctional compounds potently inhibit HDAC at nanomolar concentrations, and either agonize or antagonize ERα and ERβ. The ER antagonist activities of tamoxifen-HDACi conjugates (Tam-HDACi) are nearly identical to those of tamoxifen. Conversely, ethynyl-estradiol HDACi conjugates (EED-HDACi) have attenuated ER agonist activities relative to the parent ethynyl-estradiol. In silico docking analysis provides structural basis for the trends of ER agonism/antagonism and ER subtype selectivity. Excitingly, lead Tam-HDACi conjugates show anticancer activity that is selectively more potent against MCF-7 (ERα positive breast) compared to MDA-MB-231 (triple negative breast cancer), DU145 (prostate cancer) or Vero (non-cancerous cell line). This dual-targeting approach illustrates the utility of designing small molecules with an emphasis on cell-type selectivity, not merely improved potency, working towards a higher therapeutic index at the earliest stages of drug development. PMID:23786452

  20. Tissue-Specific Expression and Posttranslational Modification of Histone H3 Variants

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Benjamin A.; Thomas, C. Eric; Kelleher, Neil L.; Mizzen, Craig A.

    2008-01-01

    Analyses of histone H3 from ten rat tissues using a Middle Down proteomics platform revealed tissue-specific differences in their expression and global PTM abundance. ESI/FTMS with electron capture dissociation showed that, in general, these proteins were hypomodified in heart, liver and testes. H3.3 was hypermodified compared to H3.2 in some, but not all tissues. In addition, a novel rat testes-specific H3 protein was identified with this approach. PMID:18700791

  1. Quick Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization Protocol for Xist RNA Combined with Immunofluorescence of Histone Modification in X-chromosome Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Norishige; Ogawa, Akiyo; Ogawa, Yuya

    2014-01-01

    Combining RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with immunofluorescence (immuno-FISH) creates a technique that can be employed at the single cell level to detect the spatial dynamics of RNA localization with simultaneous insight into the localization of proteins, epigenetic modifications and other details which can be highlighted by immunofluorescence. X-chromosome inactivation is a paradigm for long non-coding RNA (lncRNA)-mediated gene silencing. X-inactive specific transcript (Xist) lncRNA accumulation (called an Xist cloud) on one of the two X-chromosomes in mammalian females is a critical step to initiate X-chromosome inactivation. Xist RNA directly or indirectly interacts with various chromatin-modifying enzymes and introduces distinct epigenetic landscapes to the inactive X-chromosome (Xi). One known epigenetic hallmark of the Xi is the Histone H3 trimethyl-lysine 27 (H3K27me3) modification. Here, we describe a simple and quick immuno-FISH protocol for detecting Xist RNA using RNA FISH with multiple oligonucleotide probes coupled with immunofluorescence of H3K27me3 to examine the localization of Xist RNA and associated epigenetic modifications. Using oligonucleotide probes results in a shorter incubation time and more sensitive detection of Xist RNA compared to in vitro transcribed RNA probes (riboprobes). This protocol provides a powerful tool for understanding the dynamics of lncRNAs and its associated epigenetic modification, chromatin structure, nuclear organization and transcriptional regulation. PMID:25489864

  2. Quick fluorescent in situ hybridization protocol for Xist RNA combined with immunofluorescence of histone modification in X-chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Yue, Minghui; Charles Richard, John Lalith; Yamada, Norishige; Ogawa, Akiyo; Ogawa, Yuya

    2014-11-26

    Combining RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with immunofluorescence (immuno-FISH) creates a technique that can be employed at the single cell level to detect the spatial dynamics of RNA localization with simultaneous insight into the localization of proteins, epigenetic modifications and other details which can be highlighted by immunofluorescence. X-chromosome inactivation is a paradigm for long non-coding RNA (lncRNA)-mediated gene silencing. X-inactive specific transcript (Xist) lncRNA accumulation (called an Xist cloud) on one of the two X-chromosomes in mammalian females is a critical step to initiate X-chromosome inactivation. Xist RNA directly or indirectly interacts with various chromatin-modifying enzymes and introduces distinct epigenetic landscapes to the inactive X-chromosome (Xi). One known epigenetic hallmark of the Xi is the Histone H3 trimethyl-lysine 27 (H3K27me3) modification. Here, we describe a simple and quick immuno-FISH protocol for detecting Xist RNA using RNA FISH with multiple oligonucleotide probes coupled with immunofluorescence of H3K27me3 to examine the localization of Xist RNA and associated epigenetic modifications. Using oligonucleotide probes results in a shorter incubation time and more sensitive detection of Xist RNA compared to in vitro transcribed RNA probes (riboprobes). This protocol provides a powerful tool for understanding the dynamics of lncRNAs and its associated epigenetic modification, chromatin structure, nuclear organization and transcriptional regulation.

  3. RNF8 regulates active epigenetic modifications and escape gene activation from inactive sex chromosomes in post-meiotic spermatids

    PubMed Central

    Sin, Ho-Su; Barski, Artem; Zhang, Fan; Kartashov, Andrey V.; Nussenzweig, Andre; Chen, Junjie; Andreassen, Paul R.; Namekawa, Satoshi H.

    2012-01-01

    Sex chromosomes are uniquely subject to chromosome-wide silencing during male meiosis, and silencing persists into post-meiotic spermatids. Against this background, a select set of sex chromosome-linked genes escapes silencing and is activated in post-meiotic spermatids. Here, we identify a novel mechanism that regulates escape gene activation in an environment of chromosome-wide silencing in murine germ cells. We show that RNF8-dependent ubiquitination of histone H2A during meiosis establishes active epigenetic modifications, including dimethylation of H3K4 on the sex chromosomes. RNF8-dependent active epigenetic memory, defined by dimethylation of H3K4, persists throughout meiotic division. Various active epigenetic modifications are subsequently established on the sex chromosomes in post-meiotic spermatids. These RNF8-dependent modifications include trimethylation of H3K4, histone lysine crotonylation (Kcr), and incorporation of the histone variant H2AFZ. RNF8-dependent epigenetic programming regulates escape gene activation from inactive sex chromosomes in post-meiotic spermatids. Kcr accumulates at transcriptional start sites of sex-linked genes activated in an RNF8-dependent manner, and a chromatin conformational change is associated with RNF8-dependent epigenetic programming. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this RNF8-dependent pathway is distinct from that which recognizes DNA double-strand breaks. Our results establish a novel connection between a DNA damage response factor (RNF8) and epigenetic programming, specifically in establishing active epigenetic modifications and gene activation. PMID:23249736

  4. Histone deacetylase inhibitors decrease Toll-like receptor-mediated activation of proinflammatory gene expression by impairing transcription factor recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Konrad A; Schroder, Kate; Hume, David A; Ravasi, Timothy; Heeg, Klaus; Sweet, Matthew J; Dalpke, Alexander H

    2007-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of histone proteins are major mechanisms that modify chromatin structure and regulate gene expression in eukaryotes. Activation of histone acetyltransferases or inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) is generally believed to allow chromatin to assume a more open state, permitting transcriptional activity. We report here the surprising observation that treatment of murine dendritic cells with the HDAC inhibitors trichostatin A (TSA) or suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) in non-apoptotic concentrations strongly inhibited induction of both interleukin-12 protein p40 (IL-12p40) mRNA and protein upon stimulation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Moreover, TLR-mediated up-regulation of costimulatory molecules was also inhibited. Up-regulation of tumour necrosis factor-α mRNA and protein in response to TLR agonists was only affected upon prolonged exposure to HDAC inhibitors and regulation of IL-1β was not affected. Similar effects were apparent in murine and human macrophages. Regarding the mode of action, HDAC inhibition increased the acetylation status at the IL-12p40 locus. Nevertheless, IL-12p40 chromatin remodelling, binding of Rel-A and IRF1 to the IL-12p40 promoter and transcriptional activation were abrogated. In contrast, HDAC inhibitors had no effects on upstream nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. Thus HDACs positively regulate the expression of a subset of cytokine genes by enabling transcription factor recruitment. PMID:17635610

  5. Cell-based assays to support the profiling of small molecules with histone methyltransferase and demethylase modulatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Natalia J.; Simeonov, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Histone methylation is a prevalent and dynamic chromatin modification, executed by the action of histone methyltransferases (HMTs) and demethylases (HDMs). Aberrant activity of many of these enzymes is associated with human disease, hence, there is a growing interest in identifying corresponding small molecule inhibitors with therapeutic potential. To date, most of the technologies supporting the identification of these inhibitors constitute in vitro biochemical assays which, although robust and sensitive, do not study HMTs and HDMs in their native cellular state nor provide information of inhibitor’s cell permeability and toxicity. The evident need for complementary cellular approaches has recently propelled the development of cell-based assays that enable screening of HMT and HDM enzymes in a more relevant environment. Here, we highlight current cellular methodologies for HMT and HDM drug discovery support. We anticipate that implementation of these cell-based assays will positively impact the discovery of pharmacologically potent HMT and HDM inhibitors. PMID:26723887

  6. Protein restriction during gestation alters histone modifications at the glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) promoter region and induces GLUT4 expression in skeletal muscle of female rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shasha; Rollet, Michelle; Pan, Yuan-Xiang

    2012-09-01

    Maternal nutrition during pregnancy is an intrauterine factor that results in alteration of the offspring genome and associates with disease risk in the offspring. We investigated the impact of a maternal low-protein (LP) diet on the expression of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) in offspring skeletal muscle. GLUT4 is an insulin-regulated glucose transporter involved in insulin sensitivity and carbohydrate metabolism in muscle cells. We observed sex-dependent GLUT4 mRNA expression and increased GLUT4 protein content in female pup skeletal muscle with maternal LP. Analysis of transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of increased skeletal muscle GLUT4 expression in offspring rats revealed the regulatory mechanisms involved. The protein level of myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A), which has been known as an activator of GLUT4 transcription via the ability to carry out specific binding to the GLUT4 MEF2 binding sequence, increased in female pups whose mothers were fed a LP diet. Modifications of chromatin structure, including acetylated histone H3, acetylated histone H4 and di-methylated histone H3 at lysine 4, were detected at a significantly increased level at the GLUT4 promoter region in female pup muscle following a maternal LP diet. Glycogen content was also detected as up-regulated, accompanied by increased glycogen synthase in LP female offspring muscle. These results document that maternal protein restriction during pregnancy induces GLUT4 expression in female offspring skeletal muscle but not in males, which may indicate sex-dependent adaptation of glucose metabolism to a maternal LP diet.

  7. Histone deacetylase inhibitor-induced cell death in bladder cancer is associated with chromatin modification and modifying protein expression: A proteomic approach

    PubMed Central

    LI, QINGDI QUENTIN; HAO, JIAN-JIANG; ZHANG, ZHENG; HSU, IAWEN; LIU, YI; TAO, ZHEN; LEWI, KEIDREN; METWALLI, ADAM R.; AGARWAL, PIYUSH K.

    2016-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project recently identified the importance of mutations in chromatin remodeling genes in human carcinomas. These findings imply that epigenetic modulators might have a therapeutic role in urothelial cancers. To exploit histone deacetylases (HDACs) as targets for cancer therapy, we investigated the HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs) romidepsin, trichostatin A, and vorinostat as potential chemotherapeutic agents for bladder cancer. We demonstrate that the three HDACIs suppressed cell growth and induced cell death in the bladder cancer cell line 5637. To identify potential mechanisms associated with the anti-proliferative and cytotoxic effects of the HDACIs, we used quantitative proteomics to determine the proteins potentially involved in these processes. Our proteome studies identified a total of 6003 unique proteins. Of these, 2472 proteins were upregulated and 2049 proteins were downregulated in response to HDACI exposure compared to the untreated controls (P<0.05). Bioinformatic analysis further revealed that those differentially expressed proteins were involved in multiple biological functions and enzyme-regulated pathways, including cell cycle progression, apoptosis, autophagy, free radical generation and DNA damage repair. HDACIs also altered the acetylation status of histones and non-histone proteins, as well as the levels of chromatin modification proteins, suggesting that HDACIs exert multiple cytotoxic actions in bladder cancer cells by inhibiting HDAC activity or altering the structure of chromatin. We conclude that HDACIs are effective in the inhibition of cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis in the 5637 bladder cancer cells through multiple cell death-associated pathways. These observations support the notion that HDACIs provide new therapeutic options for bladder cancer treatment and thus warrant further preclinical exploration. PMID:27082124

  8. Association of global levels of histone modifications with recurrence-free survival in stage IIB and III esophageal squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    I, Hoseok; Ko, Eunkyung; Kim, Yujin; Cho, Eun Yoon; Han, Joungho; Park, Joobae; Kim, Kwhanmien; Kim, Duk-Hwan; Shim, Young Mog

    2010-02-01

    This study was aimed at understanding the effects of histone modifications on recurrence-free survival (RFS) after esophagectomy in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). The acetylation of histone H3 lysine (H3K9Ac), histone H3 lysine 18 (H3K18Ac), and histone H4 lysine 12 (H4K12Ac), and the dimethylation of histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9diMe) and histone H4 arginine 3 (H4R3diMe) were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 237 ESCCs. The K-means clustering algorithm was used to identify unique patterns of histone modifications. At a median follow-up of 5.1 years, 109 (46%) of 237 patients had developed recurrence of disease. Mean global levels of H3K9Ac, H3K18Ac, H3K9diMe, H4K12Ac, and H4R3diMe were 81.5%, 65.1%, 80.3%, 45.9%, and 27.4%, respectively. In the analysis of individual histones, a 1% increase in the global level of H3K18Ac in pathologic stage III worsened RFS at 1.009 times [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.001-1.016; P = 0.03], after adjusting for age, sex, and operative method. Cluster analysis also showed significant effects of histone modifications on RFS. For stage IIB cancers, Cox proportional hazards analysis showed that RFS of cluster 1, with high global levels of H3K18Ac and H4R3diMe, was 2.79 times poorer (95% CI, 1.14-6.27; P = 0.008) than that of cluster 2, with low levels. RFS for stage III cancers was also poorer in cluster 1 than cluster 2 (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.42; 95% CI, 1.10-5.34; P = 0.02). In conclusion, the present study suggests that global levels of histone modifications in ESCC may be an independent prognostic factor of RFS.

  9. Jarid2 (Jumonji, AT Rich Interactive Domain 2) Regulates NOTCH1 Expression via Histone Modification in the Developing Heart*

    PubMed Central

    Mysliwiec, Matthew R.; Carlson, Clayton D.; Tietjen, Josh; Hung, Holly; Ansari, Aseem Z.; Lee, Youngsook

    2012-01-01

    Jarid2/Jumonji, the founding member of the Jmj factor family, critically regulates various developmental processes, including cardiovascular development. The Jmj family was identified as histone demethylases, indicating epigenetic regulation by Jmj proteins. Deletion of Jarid2 in mice resulted in cardiac malformation and increased endocardial Notch1 expression during development. Although Jarid2 has been shown to occupy the Notch1 locus in the developing heart, the precise molecular role of Jarid2 remains unknown. Here we show that deletion of Jarid2 results in reduced methylation of lysine 9 on histone H3 (H3K9) at the Notch1 genomic locus in embryonic hearts. Interestingly, SETDB1, a histone H3K9 methyltransferase, was identified as a putative cofactor of Jarid2 by yeast two-hybrid screening, and the physical interaction between Jarid2 and SETDB1 was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Concurrently, accumulation of SETDB1 at the site of Jarid2 occupancy was significantly reduced in Jarid2 knock out (KO) hearts. Employing genome-wide approaches, putative Jarid2 target genes regulated by SETDB1 via H3K9 methylation were identified in the developing heart by ChIP-chip. These targets are involved in biological processes that, when dysregulated, could manifest in the phenotypic defects observed in Jarid2 KO mice. Our data demonstrate that Jarid2 functions as a transcriptional repressor of target genes, including Notch1, through a novel process involving the modification of H3K9 methylation via specific interaction with SETDB1 during heart development. Therefore, our study provides new mechanistic insights into epigenetic regulation by Jarid2, which will enhance our understanding of the molecular basis of other organ development and biological processes. PMID:22110129

  10. Jarid2 (Jumonji, AT rich interactive domain 2) regulates NOTCH1 expression via histone modification in the developing heart.

    PubMed

    Mysliwiec, Matthew R; Carlson, Clayton D; Tietjen, Josh; Hung, Holly; Ansari, Aseem Z; Lee, Youngsook

    2012-01-06

    Jarid2/Jumonji, the founding member of the Jmj factor family, critically regulates various developmental processes, including cardiovascular development. The Jmj family was identified as histone demethylases, indicating epigenetic regulation by Jmj proteins. Deletion of Jarid2 in mice resulted in cardiac malformation and increased endocardial Notch1 expression during development. Although Jarid2 has been shown to occupy the Notch1 locus in the developing heart, the precise molecular role of Jarid2 remains unknown. Here we show that deletion of Jarid2 results in reduced methylation of lysine 9 on histone H3 (H3K9) at the Notch1 genomic locus in embryonic hearts. Interestingly, SETDB1, a histone H3K9 methyltransferase, was identified as a putative cofactor of Jarid2 by yeast two-hybrid screening, and the physical interaction between Jarid2 and SETDB1 was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Concurrently, accumulation of SETDB1 at the site of Jarid2 occupancy was significantly reduced in Jarid2 knock out (KO) hearts. Employing genome-wide approaches, putative Jarid2 target genes regulated by SETDB1 via H3K9 methylation were identified in the developing heart by ChIP-chip. These targets are involved in biological processes that, when dysregulated, could manifest in the phenotypic defects observed in Jarid2 KO mice. Our data demonstrate that Jarid2 functions as a transcriptional repressor of target genes, including Notch1, through a novel process involving the modification of H3K9 methylation via specific interaction with SETDB1 during heart development. Therefore, our study provides new mechanistic insights into epigenetic regulation by Jarid2, which will enhance our understanding of the molecular basis of other organ development and biological processes.

  11. Genistein downregulates onco-miR-1260b and upregulates sFRP1 and Smad4 via demethylation and histone modification in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, H; Hinoda, Y; Shahryari, V; Deng, G; Tanaka, Y; Tabatabai, Z L; Dahiya, R

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recently several microRNAs (miRNAs) have been found to be regulated by genistein in cancer cells. In this study, we focused on the gene regulatory effect of genistein on microRNA and its target genes in prostate cancer (PC). Methods: Initially, we investigated the effect of genistein on prostate cancer cells and identified that the expression of miRNA-1260b was decreased by genistein. We performed functional analyses and investigated the relationship between miRNA-1260b expression and prostate cancer patient outcomes. Two target genes (sFRP1 and Smad4) of miR-1260b were identified based on computer algorithm and 3′UTR luciferase assay was carried out to determine direct miRNA regulation of the genes. Results: Genistein promoted apoptosis while inhibiting prostate cancer cell proliferation, invasion and TCF reporter activity in PC cells. MiR-1260b was highly expressed in prostate cancer tissues and significantly downregulated by genistein in PC cells. After knocking down miR-1260b, cell proliferation, invasion, migration and TCF reporter activity were decreased in PC cells. Western analysis and 3′UTR luciferase assay showed that the two target genes (sFRP1 and Smad4) were directly regulated by miR-1260b. The expression of sFRP1 and Smad4 was significantly decreased in prostate cancer tissues. Genistein also increased expression of these two genes via DNA demethylation and histone modifications. Conclusions: Our data suggest that genistein exerts its anti-tumour effect via downregulation of miR-1260b that targeted sRRP1 and Smad4 genes in prostate cancer cells. The expression of sFRP1 and Smad4 was also modulated by genistein via DNA methylation or histone modifications in PC cell lines. PMID:24504368

  12. Characterization of post‐translational modifications on lysine 9 of histone H3 variants in mouse testis using matrix‐assisted laser desorption/ionization in‐source decay

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Ho‐Geun

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Post‐translational modifications (PTMs) of histones result in changes to transcriptional activities and chromatin remodeling. Lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9) is subject to PTMs, such as methylation and acetylation, which influence histone activity during spermatogenesis. Characterization strategies for studying PTMs on H3K9 have been developed to provide epigenetic and proteomic information. Proteomic analysis has been used to limited success to study PTMs on H3K9; however, a comprehensive analytical approach is required to elucidate global patterns of PTMs of H3 variants during spermatogenesis. Methods Intact H3 variants in mouse testis were separated by high‐performance liquid chromatography on a reversed‐phase column with an ion‐pairing reagent. Modifications to H3K9 were identified via top‐down analysis using matrix‐assisted laser desorption/ionization in source decay (MALDI‐ISD). Results Mono‐, di‐, and tri‐methylations were identified at H3K9 in mouse testis and epididymis. These modifications were also observed in testis‐specific histone H3 (H3t). Specifically, tri‐methylation was more abundant on H3tK9 than on K9 of other H3 variants. Conclusions We introduce a method for rapid, simple, and comprehensive characterization of PTMs on the N‐termini of H3 variants using MALDI‐ISD. This approach provides novel and useful information, including K9 modifications on H3t, which would benefit epigenetic and proteomic research. © 2016 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27643486

  13. [Proteolytic activity of IgG-antibodies of mice, immunized by calf thymus histones].

    PubMed

    Kit, Iu Ia; Korniĭ, N; Kril', I Ĭ; Mahorivs'ka, I B; Tkachenko, V; Bilyĭ, R O; Stoĭka, R S

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of the study was to determine the ability of histones to induce production of the proteolytically active IgG-antibodies in BALB/c mice. In order to perform this study 8 mice were immunized with the fraction of total calf thymus histones. IgGs were isolated from the serum of the immunized and not immunized animals by means of precipitation with 33% ammonium sulfate, followed by affinity chromatography on protein G-Sepharose column. Histones, myelin basic protein (MBP), lysozyme, BSA, ovalbumin, macroglobulin, casein and cytochrome c served as substrates for determining the proteolytic activity. It was found that IgGs from the blood serum of immunized mice are capable of hydrolyzing histone H1, core histone and MBP. On the contrary, the proteolytic activity of IgGs from the blood serum of not immunized mice was not detected. The absence of proteolytical enzymes in the fraction of IgGs was proven by HPLC chromatography. High levels of proteolytic activity toward histones have been also detected in affinity purified IgGs from blood serum of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but not in healthy donors. These data indicate that eukaryotic histones may induce production of protabzymes in mammals. The possible origin of these protabzymes and their potential biological role in mammalians is discussed.

  14. Bivalent histone modifications in stem cells poise miRNA loci for CpG island hypermethylation in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Iliou, Maria S; Lujambio, Amaia; Portela, Anna; Brüstle, Oliver; Koch, Philipp; Andersson-Vincent, Per Henrik; Sundström, Erik; Hovatta, Outi; Esteller, Manel

    2011-11-01

    It has been proposed that the existence of stem cell epigenetic patterns confer a greater likelihood of CpG island hypermethylation on tumor suppressor-coding genes in cancer. The suggested mechanism is based on the Polycomb-mediated methylation of K27 of histone H3 and the recruitment of DNA methyltransferases on the promoters of tumor suppressor genes in cancer cells, when those genes are preferentially pre-marked in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) with bivalent chromatin domains. On the other hand, miRNAs appear to be dysregulated in cancer, with many studies reporting silencing of miRNA genes due to aberrant hypermethylation of their promoter regions. We wondered whether a pre-existing histone modification profile in stem cells might also contribute to the DNA methylation-associated silencing of miRNA genes in cancer. To address this, we examined a group of tumor suppressor miRNA genes previously reported to become hypermethylated and inactivated specifically in cancer cells. We analyzed the epigenetic events that take place along their promoters in human embryonic stem cells and in transformed cells. Our results suggest that there is a positive correlation between the existence of bivalent chromatin domains on miRNA promoters in ESCs and the hypermethylation of those genes in cancer, leading us to conclude that this epigenetic mark could be a mechanism that prepares miRNA promoters for further DNA hypermethylation in human tumors.

  15. DNMT1 and DNMT3B modulate distinct polycomb-mediated histone modifications in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Jin, Bilian; Yao, Bing; Li, Jian-Liang; Fields, C Robert; Delmas, Amber L; Liu, Chen; Robertson, Keith D

    2009-09-15

    DNA methylation patterns are established and maintained by three DNA methyltransferases (DNMT): DNMT1, DNMT3A, and DNMT3B. Although essential for development, methylation patterns are frequently disrupted in cancer and contribute directly to carcinogenesis. Recent studies linking polycomb group repression complexes (PRC1 and PRC2) to the DNMTs have begun to shed light on how methylation is targeted. We identified previously a panel of genes regulated by DNMT3B. Here, we compare these with known polycomb group targets to show that approximately 47% of DNMT3B regulated genes are also bound by PRC1 or PRC2. We chose 44 genes coregulated by DNMT3B and PRC1/PRC2 to test whether these criteria would accurately identify novel targets of epigenetic silencing in colon cancer. Using reverse transcription-PCR, bisulfite genomic sequencing, and pyrosequencing, we show that the majority of these genes are frequently silenced in colorectal cancer cell lines and primary tumors. Some of these, including HAND1, HMX2, and SIX3, repressed cell growth. Finally, we analyzed the histone code, DNMT1, DNMT3B, and PRC2 binding by chromatin immunoprecipitation at epigenetically silenced genes to reveal a novel link between DNMT3B and the mark mediated by PRC1. Taken together, these studies suggest that patterns of epigenetic modifiers and the histone code influence the propensity of a gene to become hypermethylated in cancer and that DNMT3B plays an important role in regulating PRC1 function.

  16. The effect of epigenetic modifications on the secondary structures and possible binding positions of the N-terminal tail of histone H3 in the nucleosome: a computational study.

    PubMed

    du Preez, Louis L; Patterton, Hugh-G

    2017-04-01

    The roles of histone tails as substrates for reversible chemical modifications and dynamic cognate surfaces for the binding of regulatory proteins are well established. Despite these crucial roles, experimentally derived knowledge of the structure and possible binding sites of histone tails in chromatin is limited. In this study, we utilized molecular dynamics of isolated histone H3 N-terminal peptides to investigate its structure as a function of post-translational modifications that are known to be associated with defined chromatin states. We observed a structural preference for α-helices in isoforms associated with an inactive chromatin state, while isoforms associated with active chromatin states lacked α-helical content. The physicochemical effect of the post-translational modifications was highlighted by the interaction of arginine side-chains with the phosphorylated serine residues in the inactive isoform. We also showed that the isoforms exhibit different tail lengths, and, using molecular docking of the first 15 N-terminal residues of an H3 isoform, identified potential binding sites between the superhelical gyres on the octamer surface, close to the site of DNA entry/exit in the nucleosome. We discuss the possible functional role of the binding of the H3 tail within the nucleosome on both nucleosome and chromatin structure and stability.

  17. Histone chaperone activity of Arabidopsis thaliana NRP1 is blocked by cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    González-Arzola, Katiuska; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Rivero-Rodríguez, Francisco; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Díaz-Moreno, Irene

    2016-12-06

    Higher-order plants and mammals use similar mechanisms to repair and tolerate oxidative DNA damage. Most studies on the DNA repair process have focused on yeast and mammals, in which histone chaperone-mediated nucleosome disassembly/reassembly is essential for DNA to be accessible to repair machinery. However, little is known about the specific role and modulation of histone chaperones in the context of DNA damage in plants. Here, the histone chaperone NRP1, which is closely related to human SET/TAF-Iβ, was found to exhibit nucleosome assembly activity in vitro and to accumulate in the chromatin of Arabidopsis thaliana after DNA breaks. In addition, this work establishes that NRP1 binds to cytochrome c, thereby preventing the former from binding to histones. Since NRP1 interacts with cytochrome c at its earmuff domain, that is, its histone-binding domain, cytochrome c thus competes with core histones and hampers the activity of NRP1 as a histone chaperone. Altogether, the results obtained indicate that the underlying molecular mechanisms in nucleosome disassembly/reassembly are highly conserved throughout evolution, as inferred from the similar inhibition of plant NRP1 and human SET/TAF-Iβ by cytochrome c during DNA damage response.

  18. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for natural and radiation-induced modifications in histone proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Edmonds, C.G.; Fuciarelli, A.F.; Thrall, B.D.; Springer, D.L.

    1992-05-01

    Chick erythrocyle histone H2B was irradiated in the presence of thymine, the principle cross-linking base recognized in earlier studies, and the products were examined directly by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Following exposure to 5 Gy of ionizing radiation the relative abundance of two unique species were increased by nearly 50% in irradiated samples over background response at the same m/z. The first corresponds to a mass increment increase similar to the expected value for thymine-H2B adduct formation (126.1 Da measured, 125.1 Da calculated). The mass increment increase for the second component (140.7 Da) was less easily explained. Additional dose-yield data are needed to confirm the significance of these changes.

  19. Development of primer sets that can verify the enrichment of histone modifications, and their application to examining vernalization-mediated chromatin changes in Brassica rapa L.

    PubMed

    Kawanabe, Takahiro; Osabe, Kenji; Itabashi, Etsuko; Okazaki, Keiichi; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Fujimoto, Ryo

    2016-07-20

    Epigenetic regulation is crucial for the development of plants and for adaptation to a changing environment. Recently, genome-wide profiles of histone modifications have been determined by a combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and genomic tiling arrays (ChIP on chip) or ChIP and high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) in species including Arabidopsis thaliana, rice and maize. Validation of ChIP analysis by PCR or qPCR using positive and negative regions of histone modification is necessary. In contrast, information about histone modifications is limited in Chinese cabbage, Brassica rapa. The aim of this study was to develop positive and negative control primer sets for H3K4me3 (trimethylation of the 4(th) lysine of H3), H3K9me2, H3K27me3 and H3K36me3 in B. rapa. The expression and histone modification of four FLC paralogs in B. rapa, before and after vernalization, were examined using the method developed here. After vernalization, expression of all four BrFLC genes was reduced, and accumulation of H3K27me3 was observed in three of them. As with A. thaliana, the vernalization response and stability of FLC repression correlated with the accumulation of H3K27me3. These results suggest that the epigenetic state during vernalization is important for high bolting resistance in B. rapa. The positive and negative control primer sets developed here revealed positive and negative histone modifications in B. rapa that can be used as a control for future studies.

  20. The distribution of repressive histone modifications on silenced FMR1 alleles provides clues to the mechanism of gene silencing in fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Daman; Usdin, Karen

    2010-12-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common heritable cause of intellectual disability and the most common known cause of autism. Most cases of FXS result from the expansion of a CGG·CCG repeat in the 5' UTR of the FMR1 gene that leads to gene silencing. It has previously been shown that silenced alleles are associated with histone H3 dimethylated at lysine 9 (H3K9Me2) and H3 trimethylated at lysine 27 (H3K27Me3), modified histones typical of developmentally repressed genes. We show here that these alleles are also associated with elevated levels of histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 9 (H3K9Me3) and histone H4 trimethylated at lysine 20 (H4K20Me3). All four of these modified histones are present on exon 1 of silenced alleles at levels comparable to that seen on pericentric heterochromatin. The two groups of histone modifications show a different distribution on fragile X alleles: H3K9Me2 and H3K27Me3 have a broad distribution, whereas H3K9Me3 and H4K20Me3 have a more focal distribution with the highest level of these marks being present in the vicinity of the repeat. This suggests that the trigger for gene silencing may be local to the repeat itself and perhaps involves a mechanism similar to that involved in the formation of pericentric heterochromatin.

  1. Study on the effects of blueberry treatment on histone acetylation modification of CCl4-induced liver disease in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhan, W; Liao, X; Tian, T; Yu, L; Liu, X; Li, B; Liu, J; Han, B; Xie, R J; Ji, Q H; Yang, Q

    2017-02-16

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of blueberry treatment on histone acetylation modification of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver disease in rats. Laboratory rats were randomly divided into control, hepatic fibrosis, blueberry treatment, blueberry intervention, and natural recovery groups. Rats in the model groups were treated with CCl4 administered subcutaneously at 4- and 8-week intervals, and then executed. Both the 4- and 8-week treatment groups were treated with blueberry juice for 8 weeks, and then executed after 12 and 16 weeks, respectively. Following the experiment, four liver function and hepatic fibrosis indices were measured. Liver index was calculated, hematoxylin-eosin staining was conducted, and H3K9, H3K14, and H3K18 expressions were evaluated among the nuclear proteins of the liver tissues. No differences in alanine transaminase were noted between the control and intervention groups, but significant differences were detected among the model, treatment, and natural recovery groups (P < 0.01). Significant differences were also observed in aspartate transaminase, hyaluronic acid, and collagen IV among the model, treatment, intervention, and natural recovery groups (P < 0.01, P < 0.01, P < 0.01). Liver index, and H3K9 and H3K14 expression were significantly different among the model groups (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01), whereas H3K18 expression was dramatically different among model, treatment, intervention, and natural recovery groups (P < 0.01). Following blueberry treatment, rat liver function and hepatic fibrosis improved, potentially indicating that blueberry components could regulate histone acetylation and improve liver pathologic changes in rats with CCl4-induced disease.

  2. Platelet-Activating Factor Induces Epigenetic Modifications in Human Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Elisabetta; Puebla-Osorio, Nahum; Gorbea, Enrique; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2015-12-01

    UV radiation-induced systemic immune suppression is a major risk factor for skin cancer induction. The migration of dermal mast cells from the skin to the draining lymph nodes has a prominent role in activating systemic immune suppression. UV-induced keratinocyte-derived platelet-activating factor (PAF) activates mast cell migration, in part by upregulating the expression of CXCR4 on the surface of mast cells. Others have indicated that epigenetic mechanisms regulate CXCR4 expression; therefore, we asked whether PAF activates epigenetic mechanisms in mast cells. Human mast cells were treated with PAF, and the effect on DNA methylation and/or acetylation was measured. PAF suppressed the expression of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 1 and 3b. On the other hand, PAF increased p300 histone acetyltransferase expression, and the acetylation of histone H3, which coincided with a decreased expression of the histone deacetylase HDAC2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that PAF treatment activated the acetylation of the CXCR4 promoter. Finally, inhibiting histone acetylation blocked p300 upregulation and suppressed PAF-induced surface expression of CXCR4. Our findings suggest a novel molecular mechanism for PAF, activation of epigenetic modifications. We suggest that PAF may serve as an endogenous molecular mediator that links the environment (UV radiation) with the epigenome.

  3. Platelet-Activating Factor Induces Epigenetic Modifications in Human Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gorbea, Enrique; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced systemic immune suppression is a major risk factor for skin cancer induction. The migration of dermal mast cells from the skin to the draining lymph nodes plays a prominent role in activating systemic immune suppression. UV-induced keratinocyte-derived platelet-activating factor (PAF) activates mast cell migration, in part by up regulating the expression of CXCR4 on the surface of mast cells. Others have indicated that epigenetic mechanisms regulate CXCR4 expression, so we asked whether PAF activates epigenetic mechanisms in mast cells. Human mast cells were treated with PAF and the effect on DNA methylation and/or acetylation was measured. PAF suppressed the expression of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 1 and 3b. On the other hand, PAF increased p300 histone acetyltransferase expression, and the acetylation of histone H3, which coincided with a decreased expression of the histone deacetylase HDAC2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that PAF-treatment activated the acetylation of the CXCR4 promoter. Finally, inhibiting histone acetylation blocked p300 up-regulation and suppressed PAF-induced surface expression of CXCR4. Our findings suggest a novel molecular mechanism for PAF, activation of epigenetic modifications. We suggest that PAF may serve as an endogenous molecular mediator that links the environment (UV radiation) with the epigenome. PMID:26316070

  4. Prenatal dexamethasone exposure in rats results in long-term epigenetic histone modifications and tumour necrosis factor-α production decrease.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong-Ren; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Tiao, Mao-Meng; Chen, Yu-Chieh; Chang, Kow-Aung; Tain, You-Lin; Huang, Li-Tung

    2014-12-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) is often given when preterm delivery is expected. This treatment is successful in stimulating the development of the fetal lung. However, reports and related research regarding the prolonged effects of prenatal GC on the development of immunity are very limited. Some data, derived from infants whose mothers were given immunosuppressants during pregnancy for the treatment of autoimmune disorders, suggest that prenatal exposure to GC may have only a limited effect on the development of the immune system. What is unknown is whether the immune modulation effects of prenatal GC might appear at a later childhood stage and beyond. Here we evaluated the immune programming influenced by prenatal GC. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats received dexamethasone (DEX; 0.1 mg/kg/day) or saline at gestational days 14-20. Male offspring were killed at day 7 or day 120 after birth. Spleens were collected for immune study. Of the inflammation mediators, matrix metalloproteinase-9, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor mRNAs decreased in the prenatal DEX group at an early stage after birth. Upon concanavalin A stimulation, prenatal DEX treatment reduced TNF-α production, but not interferon-γ production, by splenocytes at day 120 after birth compared with the vehicle group. Decreased levels of active chromatin signs (acetylation of histone H3 lysines, H3K4me1/3, and H3K36me3) in TNF-α promoter were compatible with the expressions of TNF-α. Our results suggest that prenatal DEX has a profound and lasting impact on the developing immune system even to the adult stage. Epigenetic histone modifications regulate TNF-α expression following prenatal DEX in rats.

  5. Protein profiling and histone deacetylation activities in somaclonal variants of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.).

    PubMed

    Yaacob, Jamilah Syafawati; Loh, Hwei-San; Mat Taha, Rosna

    2013-01-01

    Mantled fruits as a result of somaclonal variation are often observed from the oil palm plantlets regenerated via tissue culture. The mantling of fruits with finger-like and thick outer coating phenotypes significantly reduces the seed size and oil content, posing a threat to oil palm planters, and may jeopardize the economic growth of countries that depend particularly on oil palm plantation. The molecular aspects of the occurrence of somaclonal variations are yet to be known, possibly due to gene repression such as DNA methylation, histone methylation and histone deacetylation. Histone deacetylases (HDACs), involved in eukaryotic gene regulation by catalyzing the acetyl groups are removal from lysine residues on histone, hence transcriptionally repress gene expression. This paper described the total protein polymorphism profiles of somaclonal variants of oil palm and the effects of histone deacetylation on this phenomenon. Parallel to the different phenotypes, the protein polymorphism profiles of the mantled samples (leaves, fruits, and florets) and the phenotypically normal samples were proven to be different. Higher HDAC activity was found in mantled leaf samples than in the phenotypically normal leaf samples, leading to a preliminary conclusion that histone deacetylation suppressed gene expression and contributed to the development of somaclonal variants.

  6. Group A Streptococcal M1 Protein Provides Resistance against the Antimicrobial Activity of Histones

    PubMed Central

    Döhrmann, Simon; LaRock, Christopher N.; Anderson, Ericka L.; Cole, Jason N.; Ryali, Brinda; Stewart, Chelsea; Nonejuie, Poochit; Pogliano, Joe; Corriden, Ross; Ghosh, Partho; Nizet, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Histones are essential elements of chromatin structure and gene regulation in eukaryotes. An unexpected attribute of these nuclear proteins is their antimicrobial activity. A framework for histone release and function in host defense in vivo was revealed with the discovery of neutrophil extracellular traps, a specialized cell death process in which DNA-based structures containing histones are extruded to ensnare and kill bacteria. Investigating the susceptibility of various Gram-positive pathogens to histones, we found high-level resistance by one leading human pathogen, group A Streptococcus (GAS). A screen of isogenic mutants revealed that the highly surface-expressed M1 protein, a classical GAS virulence factor, was required for high-level histone resistance. Biochemical and microscopic analyses revealed that the N-terminal domain of M1 protein binds and inactivates histones before they reach their cell wall target of action. This finding illustrates a new pathogenic function for this classic GAS virulence factor, and highlights a potential innate immune evasion strategy that may be employed by other bacterial pathogens. PMID:28220899

  7. Protein Profiling and Histone Deacetylation Activities in Somaclonal Variants of Oil Palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.)

    PubMed Central

    Yaacob, Jamilah Syafawati; Loh, Hwei-San; Mat Taha, Rosna

    2013-01-01

    Mantled fruits as a result of somaclonal variation are often observed from the oil palm plantlets regenerated via tissue culture. The mantling of fruits with finger-like and thick outer coating phenotypes significantly reduces the seed size and oil content, posing a threat to oil palm planters, and may jeopardize the economic growth of countries that depend particularly on oil palm plantation. The molecular aspects of the occurrence of somaclonal variations are yet to be known, possibly due to gene repression such as DNA methylation, histone methylation and histone deacetylation. Histone deacetylases (HDACs), involved in eukaryotic gene regulation by catalyzing the acetyl groups are removal from lysine residues on histone, hence transcriptionally repress gene expression. This paper described the total protein polymorphism profiles of somaclonal variants of oil palm and the effects of histone deacetylation on this phenomenon. Parallel to the different phenotypes, the protein polymorphism profiles of the mantled samples (leaves, fruits, and florets) and the phenotypically normal samples were proven to be different. Higher HDAC activity was found in mantled leaf samples than in the phenotypically normal leaf samples, leading to a preliminary conclusion that histone deacetylation suppressed gene expression and contributed to the development of somaclonal variants. PMID:23844406

  8. All-Trans Retinoic Acid and Sodium Butyrate Enhance Natriuretic Peptide Receptor A Gene Transcription: Role of Histone Modification

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prerna; Periyasamy, Ramu; Das, Subhankar; Neerukonda, Smitha; Mani, Indra

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to delineate the mechanisms of GC-A/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) gene (Npr1) expression in vivo. We used all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, sodium butyrate (NaBu) to examine the expression and function of Npr1 using gene-disrupted heterozygous (1-copy; +/−), wild-type (2-copy; +/+), and gene-duplicated heterozygous (3-copy; ++/+) mice. Npr1+/− mice exhibited increased renal HDAC and reduced histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity; on the contrary, Npr1++/+ mice showed decreased HDAC and enhanced HAT activity compared with Npr1+/+ mice. ATRA and NaBu promoted global acetylation of histones H3-K9/14 and H4-K12, reduced methylation of H3-K9 and H3-K27, and enriched accumulation of active chromatin marks at the Npr1 promoter. A combination of ATRA-NaBu promoted recruitment of activator-complex containing E26 transformation–specific 1, retinoic acid receptor α, and HATs (p300 and p300/cAMP response element–binding protein-binding protein–associated factor) at the Npr1 promoter, and significantly increased renal NPRA expression, GC activity, and cGMP levels. Untreated 1-copy mice showed significantly increased systolic blood pressure and renal expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) compared with 2- and 3-copy mice. Treatment with ATRA and NaBu synergistically attenuated the expression of α-SMA and PCNA and reduced systolic blood pressure in Npr1+/− mice. Our findings demonstrate that epigenetic upregulation of Npr1 gene transcription by ATRA and NaBu leads to attenuation of renal fibrotic markers and systolic blood pressure in mice with reduced Npr1 gene copy number, which will have important implications in prevention and treatment of hypertension-related renal pathophysiological conditions. PMID:24714214

  9. Histone deacetylase activators: N-acetylthioureas serve as highly potent and isozyme selective activators for human histone deacetylase-8 on a fluorescent substrate.

    PubMed

    Singh, Raushan K; Mandal, Tanmay; Balsubramanian, Narayanaganesh; Viaene, Tajae; Leedahl, Travis; Sule, Nitesh; Cook, Gregory; Srivastava, D K

    2011-10-01

    We report, for the first time, that certain N-acetylthiourea derivatives serve as highly potent and isozyme selective activators for the recombinant form of human histone deacetylase-8 in the assay system containing Fluor-de-Lys as a fluorescent substrate. The experimental data reveals that such activating feature is manifested via decrease in the K(m) value of the enzyme's substrate and increase in the catalytic turnover rate of the enzyme.

  10. Evidences of two different sets of histone genes active during embryogenesis of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

    PubMed Central

    Spinelli, G; Gianguzza, F; Casano, C; Acierno, P; Burckhardt, J

    1979-01-01

    Histone mRNAs at different stages of development were purified by hybridization with the cloned homologous histone genes. The electrophoretic patterns of oocytes, 2-4 blastomeres, 64 cells and morula histone mRNAs was found to be identical, whereas the electrophoretic pattern of mesenchyme blastula histone mRNA was markedly different. The cloned histone DNA of P.lividus was hybridized with the RNA of each stage. The Tm was 74 degrees C in all cases except for the mesenchyme histone mRNAs whose Tm was 59 degrees C, thus suggesting that at least two different clusters of histone genes are active in the course of the sea urchin development. Images PMID:424304

  11. Genistein affects histone modifications on Dickkopf-related protein 1 (DKK1) gene in SW480 human colon cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Li, Qian; Chen, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Genistein (GEN) is a plant-derived isoflavone and can block uncontrolled cell growth in colon cancer by inhibiting the WNT signaling pathway. This study aimed to test the hypothesis that the enhanced gene expression of the WNT signaling pathway antagonist, DKK1 by genistein treatment is associated with epigenetic modifications of the gene in colon cancer cells. Genistein treatment induced a concentration-dependent G2 phase arrest in the human colon cancer cell line SW480 and reduced cell proliferation. Results from several other human colon cancer cell lines confirmed the growth inhibitory effects of genistein. Overexpression of DKK1 confirmed its involvement in growth inhibition. Knockdown of DKK1 expression by siRNA slightly induced cell growth. DKK1 gene expression was increased by genistein in SW480 and HCT15 cells. DNA methylation at the DKK1 promoter was not affected by genistein treatment in all the cell lines tested. On the other hand, genistein induced histone H3 acetylation of the DKK1 promoter region in SW480 and HCT15 cells. This indicates that increased histone acetylation is associated with the genistein-induced DKK1 expression. The association between histone acetylation and DKK1 gene expression is confirmed by the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) treatment. In conclusion, genistein treatment decreases cell growth and proliferation in colon cancer cell lines. The effect is associated with the increased DKK1 expression through the induction of histone acetylation at the DKK1 promoter region.

  12. Combined bottom-up and top-down mass spectrometry analyses of the pattern of post-translational modifications of Drosophila melanogaster linker histone H1.

    PubMed

    Bonet-Costa, Carles; Vilaseca, Marta; Diema, Claudio; Vujatovic, Olivera; Vaquero, Alejandro; Omeñaca, Núria; Castejón, Lucía; Bernués, Jordi; Giralt, Ernest; Azorín, Fernando

    2012-07-16

    Linker histone H1 is a major chromatin component that binds internucleosomal DNA and mediates the folding of nucleosomes into a higher-order structure, namely the 30-nm chromatin fiber. Multiple post-translational modifications (PTMs) of core histones H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 have been identified and their important contribution to the regulation of chromatin structure and function is firmly established. In contrast, little is known about histone H1 modifications and their function. Here we address this question in Drosophila melanogaster, which, in contrast to most eukaryotic species, contains a single histone H1 variant, dH1. For this purpose, we combined bottom-up and top-down mass-spectrometry strategies. Our results indicated that dH1 is extensively modified by phosphorylation, methylation, acetylation and ubiquitination, with most PTMs falling in the N-terminal domain. Interestingly, several dH1 N-terminal modifications have also been reported in specific human and/or mouse H1 variants, suggesting that they have conserved functions. In this regard, we also provide evidence for the contribution of one of such conserved PTMs, dimethylation of K27, to heterochromatin organization during mitosis. Furthermore, our results also identified multiple dH1 isoforms carrying several phosphorylations and/or methylations, illustrating the high structural heterogeneity of dH1. In particular, we identified several non-CDK sites at the N-terminal domain that appear to be hierarchically phosphorylated. This study provides the most comprehensive PTM characterization of any histone H1 variant to date.

  13. Histone H1 Variants in Arabidopsis Are Subject to Numerous Post-Translational Modifications, Both Conserved and Previously Unknown in Histones, Suggesting Complex Functions of H1 in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Kotliński, Maciej; Rutowicz, Kinga; Kniżewski, Łukasz; Palusiński, Antoni; Olędzki, Jacek; Fogtman, Anna; Rubel, Tymon; Koblowska, Marta; Dadlez, Michał; Ginalski, Krzysztof; Jerzmanowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Linker histones (H1s) are conserved and ubiquitous structural components of eukaryotic chromatin. Multiple non-allelic variants of H1, which differ in their DNA/nucleosome binding properties, co-exist in animal and plant cells and have been implicated in the control of genetic programs during development and differentiation. Studies in mammals and Drosophila have revealed diverse post-translational modifications of H1s, most of which are of unknown function. So far, it is not known how this pattern compares with that of H1s from other major lineages of multicellular Eukaryotes. Here, we show that the two main H1variants of a model flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana are subject to a rich and diverse array of post-translational modifications. The distribution of these modifications in the H1 molecule, especially in its globular domain (GH1), resembles that occurring in mammalian H1s, suggesting that their functional significance is likely to be conserved. While the majority of modifications detected in Arabidopsis H1s, including phosphorylation, acetylation, mono- and dimethylation, formylation, crotonylation and propionylation, have also been reported in H1s of other species, some others have not been previously identified in histones. PMID:26820416

  14. Histone H1 Variants in Arabidopsis Are Subject to Numerous Post-Translational Modifications, Both Conserved and Previously Unknown in Histones, Suggesting Complex Functions of H1 in Plants.

    PubMed

    Kotliński, Maciej; Rutowicz, Kinga; Kniżewski, Łukasz; Palusiński, Antoni; Olędzki, Jacek; Fogtman, Anna; Rubel, Tymon; Koblowska, Marta; Dadlez, Michał; Ginalski, Krzysztof; Jerzmanowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Linker histones (H1s) are conserved and ubiquitous structural components of eukaryotic chromatin. Multiple non-allelic variants of H1, which differ in their DNA/nucleosome binding properties, co-exist in animal and plant cells and have been implicated in the control of genetic programs during development and differentiation. Studies in mammals and Drosophila have revealed diverse post-translational modifications of H1s, most of which are of unknown function. So far, it is not known how this pattern compares with that of H1s from other major lineages of multicellular Eukaryotes. Here, we show that the two main H1variants of a model flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana are subject to a rich and diverse array of post-translational modifications. The distribution of these modifications in the H1 molecule, especially in its globular domain (GH1), resembles that occurring in mammalian H1s, suggesting that their functional significance is likely to be conserved. While the majority of modifications detected in Arabidopsis H1s, including phosphorylation, acetylation, mono- and dimethylation, formylation, crotonylation and propionylation, have also been reported in H1s of other species, some others have not been previously identified in histones.

  15. Defective histone supply causes condensin-dependent chromatin alterations, SAC activation and chromosome decatenation impairment

    PubMed Central

    Murillo-Pineda, Marina; Cabello-Lobato, María J.; Clemente-Ruiz, Marta; Monje-Casas, Fernando; Prado, Félix

    2014-01-01

    The structural organization of chromosomes is essential for their correct function and dynamics during the cell cycle. The assembly of DNA into chromatin provides the substrate for topoisomerases and condensins, which introduce the different levels of superhelical torsion required for DNA metabolism. In particular, Top2 and condensin are directly involved in both the resolution of precatenanes that form during replication and the formation of the intramolecular loop that detects tension at the centromeric chromatin during chromosome biorientation. Here we show that histone depletion activates the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) and impairs sister chromatid decatenation, leading to chromosome mis-segregation and lethality in the absence of the SAC. We demonstrate that histone depletion impairs chromosome biorientation and activates the Aurora-dependent pathway, which detects tension problems at the kinetochore. Interestingly, SAC activation is suppressed by the absence of Top2 and Smc2, an essential component of condensin. Indeed, smc2-8 suppresses catenanes accumulation, mitotic arrest and growth defects induced by histone depletion at semi-permissive temperature. Remarkably, SAC activation by histone depletion is associated with condensin-mediated alterations of the centromeric chromatin. Therefore, our results reveal the importance of a precise interplay between histone supply and condensin/Top2 for pericentric chromatin structure, precatenanes resolution and centromere biorientation. PMID:25300489

  16. Genetic alterations of JAK/STAT cascade and histone modification in extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma nasal type

    PubMed Central

    Kang, So Young; Kim, Seok Jin; Hwang, Jinha; Lee, Seungho; Kwak, Soo Heon; Park, Kyong Soo; Yoo, Hae Yong

    2015-01-01

    Extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma nasal type (ENKL) is a rare type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that more frequently occurs in East Asia and Latin America. Even though its molecular background has been discussed in the last few years, the current knowledge does not explain the disease pathogenesis in most cases of ENKL. Here, we performed multiple types of next-generation sequencing on 34 ENKL samples, including whole-exome sequencing (9 cancer tissues and 4 cancer cell lines), targeted sequencing (21 cancer tissues), and RNA sequencing (3 cancer tissues and 4 cancer cell lines). Mutations were found most frequently in 3 genes, STAT3, BCOR, and MLL2 (which were present in 9, 7, and 6 cancer samples, respectively), whereas there were only 2 cases of JAK3 mutation. In total, JAK/STAT pathway- and histone modification-related genes accounted for 55.9% and 38.2% of cancer samples, respectively, and their involvement in ENKL pathogenesis was also supported by gene expression analysis. In addition, we provided 177 genes upregulated only in cancer tissues, which appear to be linked with angiocentric and angiodestructive growth of ENKL. In this study, we propose several novel driver genes of ENKL, and show that these genes and their functional groups may be future therapeutic targets of this disease. PMID:25980440

  17. Middle-down hybrid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry workflow for characterization of combinatorial post-translational modifications in histones.

    PubMed

    Sidoli, Simone; Schwämmle, Veit; Ruminowicz, Chrystian; Hansen, Thomas A; Wu, Xudong; Helin, Kristian; Jensen, Ole N

    2014-10-01

    We present an integrated middle-down proteomics platform for sensitive mapping and quantification of coexisting PTMs in large polypeptides (5-7 kDa). We combined an RP trap column with subsequent weak cation exchange-hydrophilic interaction LC interfaced directly to high mass accuracy ESI MS/MS using electron transfer dissociation. This enabled automated and efficient separation and sequencing of hypermodified histone N-terminal tails for unambiguous localization of combinatorial PTMs. We present Histone Coder and IsoScale software to extract, filter, and analyze MS/MS data, including quantification of cofragmenting isobaric polypeptide species. We characterized histone tails derived from murine embryonic stem cells knockout in suppressor of zeste12 (Suz12(-/-) ) and quantified 256 combinatorial histone marks in histones H3, H4, and H2A. Furthermore, a total of 713 different combinatorial histone marks were identified in purified histone H3. We measured a seven-fold reduction of H3K27me2/me3 (where me2 and me3 are dimethylation and trimethylation, respectively) in Suz12(-) (/) (-) cells and detected significant changes of the relative abundance of 16 other single PTMs of histone H3 and other combinatorial marks. We conclude that the inactivation of Suz12 is associated with changes in the abundance of not only H3K27 methylation but also multiple other PTMs in histone H3 tails.

  18. Histone H4 Lys 20 methyltransferase SET8 promotes androgen receptor-mediated transcription activation in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Lushuai; Li, Yanyan; Du, Fengxia; Han, Xiao; Li, Xiaohua; Niu, Yuanjie; Ren, Shancheng; Sun, Yingli

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Dihydrotestosterone stimulates H4K20me1 enrichment at the PSA promoter. • SET8 promotes AR-mediated transcription activation. • SET8 interacts with AR and promotes cell proliferation. - Abstract: Histone methylation status in different lysine residues has an important role in transcription regulation. The effect of H4K20 monomethylation (H4K20me1) on androgen receptor (AR)-mediated gene transcription remains unclear. Here we show that AR agonist stimulates the enrichment of H4K20me1 and SET8 at the promoter of AR target gene PSA in an AR dependent manner. Furthermore, SET8 is crucial for the transcription activation of PSA. Co-immunoprecipitation analyses demonstrate that SET8 interacts with AR. Therefore, we conclude that SET8 is involved in AR-mediated transcription activation, possibly through its interaction with AR and H4K20me1 modification.

  19. The D-isoAsp-25 variant of histone H2B is highly enriched in active chromatin: potential role in the regulation of gene expression?

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhenxia; Zhu, Jeff X; Aswad, Dana W

    2016-02-01

    Approximately 12 % of histone H2B in mammalian brain contains an unusual D-aspartate residue in its N-terminal tail. Most of this D-aspartate is linked to the C-flanking glycine via an isopeptide bond. To explore the possible significance of these modifications, we generated an antibody to the D-isoaspartyl form of H2B, and used it to assess its levels in H2B associated with "active" vs. "silent" chromatin. We found that the D-isoaspartyl form of H2B appears to be highly enriched in the former. This irreversible modification could serve a novel regulatory function in gene expression.

  20. Histone hypoacetylation-activated genes are repressed by acetyl-CoA- and chromatin-mediated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, Swati; Galdieri, Luciano; Zhang, Tiantian; Zhang, Man; Pemberton, Lucy F.; Vancura, Ales

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional activation is typically associated with increased acetylation of promoter histones. However, this paradigm does not apply to transcriptional activation of all genes. In this study we have characterized a group of genes that are repressed by histone acetylation. These histone hypoacetylation-activated genes (HHAAG) are normally repressed during exponential growth, when the cellular level of acetyl-CoA is high and global histone acetylation is also high. The HHAAG are induced during diauxic shift, when the levels of acetyl-CoA and global histone acetylation decrease. The histone hypoacetylation-induced activation of HHAAG is independent of Msn2/Msn4. The repression of HSP12, one of the HHAAG, is associated with well-defined nucleosomal structure in the promoter region, while histone hypoacetylation-induced activation correlates with delocalization of positioned nucleosomes or with reduced nucleosome occupancy. Correspondingly, unlike the majority of yeast genes, HHAAG are transcriptionally upregulated when expression of histone genes is reduced. Taken together, these results suggest a model in which histone acetylation is required for proper positioning of promoter nucleosomes and repression of HHAAG. PMID:24907648

  1. Effect of high mobility group nonhistone proteins HMG-20 (ubiquitin) and HMG-17 on histone deacetylase activity assayed in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Mezquita, J; Chiva, M; Vidal, S; Mezquita, C

    1982-01-01

    We have used a method previously described by Reeves and Candido (1) to partially release histone deacetylase from cell nuclei together with putative regulators of the enzyme. Histone deacetylase released from testis cell nuclei and its putative regulators were separated by gel filtration in Sepharose 6B. A peak of low molecular weight contains a heat-stable factor that stimulate histone deacetylase in vitro. Many of the properties of the activator coincide with those of the protein HMG-20 (ubiquitin). Ubiquitin isolated from testis cell nuclei stimulated histone deacetylase in vitro. It has been suggested that HMG-17 partially inhibits histone deacetylase in Fried cell nuclei (2). In our system, HMG-17 shows no inhibitory effect on histone deacetylase activity Images PMID:6280157

  2. Posttranslational modification of Sirt6 activity by peroxynitrite.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shuqun; Liu, Hua; Ha, Yonju; Luo, Xuemei; Motamedi, Massoud; Gupta, Mahesh P; Ma, Jian-Xing; Tilton, Ronald G; Zhang, Wenbo

    2015-02-01

    The mammalian sirtuin 6 (Sirt6) is a site-specific histone deacetylase that regulates chromatin structure and many fundamental biological processes. It inhibits endothelial cell senescence and inflammation, prevents development of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, modulates glucose metabolism, and represses tumor growth. The basic molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of Sirt6 enzymatic function are largely unknown. Here we hypothesized that Sirt6 function can be regulated via posttranslational modification, focusing on the role of peroxynitrite, one of the major reactive nitrogen species formed by excessive nitric oxide and superoxide generated during disease processes. We found that incubation of purified recombinant Sirt6 protein with 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1; a peroxynitrite donor that generates nitric oxide and superoxide simultaneously) increased Sirt6 tyrosine nitration and decreased its intrinsic catalytic activity. Similar results were observed in SIN-1-treated Sirt6, which was overexpressed in HEK293 cells, and in endogenous Sirt6 when human retinal microvascular endothelial cells were treated with SIN-1. To further investigate whether Sirt6 nitration occurs under pathological conditions, we determined Sirt6 nitration and activity in retina using a model of endotoxin-induced retinal inflammation. Our data showed that Sirt6 nitration was increased, whereas its activity was decreased, in this model. With mass spectrometry, we identified that tyrosine 257 in Sirt6 was nitrated after SIN-1 treatment. Mutation of tyrosine 257 to phenylalanine caused loss of Sirt6 activity and abolished SIN-1-induced nitration and decrease in its activity. Mass spectrometry analysis also revealed oxidation of methionine and tryptophan in Sirt6 after SIN-1 treatment. Our results demonstrate a novel regulatory mechanism controlling Sirt6 activity through reactive nitrogen species-mediated posttranslational modification under oxidative and nitrosative stress.

  3. Posttranslational Modification of Sirt6 Activity by Peroxynitrite

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shuqun; Liu, Hua; Ha, Yonju; Luo, Xuemei; Motamedi, Massoud; Gupta, Mahesh P.; Ma, Jian-Xing; Tilton, Ronald G.; Zhang, Wenbo

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian sirtuin 6 (Sirt6) is a site-specific histone deacetylase that regulates chromatin structure and many fundamental biological processes. It inhibits endothelial cell senescence and inflammation, prevents development of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, modulates glucose metabolism, and represses tumor growth. The basic molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of Sirt6 enzymatic function are largely unknown. Here we hypothesized that Sirt6 function can be regulated via posttranslational modification, focusing on the role of peroxynitrite, one of the major reactive nitrogen species formed by excessive nitric oxide and superoxide generated during disease processes. We found that incubation of purified recombinant Sirt6 protein with 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1, a peroxynitrite donor that generates nitric oxide and superoxide simultaneously) increased Sirt6 tyrosine nitration and decreased its intrinsic catalytic activity. Similar results were observed in SIN-1-treated Sirt6 which was overexpressed in HEK293 cells, and on endogenous Sirt6 when human retinal microvascular endothelial cells were treated with SIN-1. To further investigate whether Sirt6 nitration occurs under pathological conditions, we determined Sirt6 nitration and activity in retina using a model of endotoxin-induced retinal inflammation. Our data showed that Sirt6 nitration was increased while its activity was decreased in this model. With mass spectrometry, we identified that tyrosine 257 in Sirt6 was nitrated after SIN-1 treatment. Mutation of tyrosine 257 to phenylalanine caused loss of Sirt6 activity, and abolished SIN-1-induced nitration and decrease in its activity. Mass spectrometry analysis also revealed oxidation of methionine and tryptophan in Sirt6 after SIN-1 treatment. Our results demonstrate a novel regulatory mechanism controlling Sirt6 activity through reactive nitrogen species-mediated post-translational modification under oxidative and nitrosative stress. PMID

  4. Combinatorial patterns of histone acetylations and methylations in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhibin; Zang, Chongzhi; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey A; Schones, Dustin E; Barski, Artem; Cuddapah, Suresh; Cui, Kairong; Roh, Tae-Young; Peng, Weiqun; Zhang, Michael Q; Zhao, Keji

    2008-01-01

    Histones are characterized by numerous posttranslational modifications that influence gene transcription1,2. However, because of the lack of global distribution data in higher eukaryotic systems3, the extent to which gene-specific combinatorial patterns of histone modifications exist remains to be determined. Here, we report the patterns derived from the analysis of 39 histone modifications in human CD4+ T cells. Our data indicate that a large number of patterns are associated with promoters and enhancers. In particular, we identify a common modification module consisting of 17 modifications detected at 3,286 promoters. These modifications tend to colocalize in the genome and correlate with each other at an individual nucleosome level. Genes associated with this module tend to have higher expression, and addition of more modifications to this module is associated with further increased expression. Our data suggest that these histone modifications may act cooperatively to prepare chromatin for transcriptional activation. PMID:18552846

  5. The U4/U6 Recycling Factor SART3 Has Histone Chaperone Activity and Associates with USP15 to Regulate H2B Deubiquitination*

    PubMed Central

    Long, Lindsey; Thelen, Joseph P.; Furgason, Melonnie; Haj-Yahya, Mahmood; Brik, Ashraf; Cheng, Dongmei; Peng, Junmin; Yao, Tingting

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of histone proteins produce dynamic signals that regulate the structure and function of chromatin. Mono-ubiquitination of H2B in the histone tail (at Lys-123 in yeast or Lys-120 in humans) is a conserved modification that has been implicated in the regulation of transcription, replication, and DNA repair processes. In a search for direct effectors of ubH2B, we identified a deubiquitinating enzyme, Usp15, through affinity purification with a nonhydrolyzable ubH2B mimic. In the nucleus, Usp15 indirectly associates with the ubH2B E3 ligase, RNF20/RNF40, and directly associates with a component of the splicing machinery, SART3 (also known as TIP110 or p110). These physical interactions place Usp15 in the vicinity of actively transcribed DNA. Importantly we found that SART3 has previously unrecognized histone chaperone activities. SART3, but not the well-characterized histone chaperone Nap1, enhances Usp15 binding to ubH2B and facilitates deubiquitination of ubH2B in free histones but not in nucleosomes. These results suggest that SART3 recruits ubH2B, which may be evicted from DNA during transcription, for deubiquitination by Usp15. In light of the function played by SART3 in U4/U6 di-snRNP formation, our discovery points to a direct link between eviction-coupled erasure of the ubiquitin mark from ubH2B and co-transcriptional pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:24526689

  6. Demonstration of separate phosphotyrosyl- and phosphoseryl- histone phosphatase activities in the plasma membranes of a human astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Leis, J F; Knowles, A F; Kaplan, N O

    1985-06-01

    A plasma membrane preparation from a human astrocytoma contained p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP), phosphotyrosyl histone, and phosphoseryl histone hydrolysis activities. The pNPPase and phosphotyrosyl histone phosphatase activities were inhibited by vanadate, whereas the phosphoseryl histone phosphatase activity was not; the latter activity was inhibited by pyrophosphate and nucleoside di- and triphosphates. When the membranes were solubilized by Triton X-100 and the solubilized proteins were subjected to column chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex, Sepharose 6B-C1, and wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose 4B columns, the pNPPase activity from the phosphoseryl histone phosphatase activity. The results from column chromatography also indicated that there may be multiple phosphotyrosyl and phosphoseryl protein phosphatases in the plasma membranes.

  7. Methods for Activity Analysis of the Proteins that Regulate Histone Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Amy M; Simeonov, Anton

    2011-01-01

    The enzymes that regulate histone methylation states and the protein domains that recognize methylated histone residues have been implicated in a number of human diseases, including cancer, as a result of their ability to affect transcriptional changes by altering chromatin structure. These proteins are recognized as potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of diseases associated with epigenetic disruption; however, few inhibitors of their activity have been identified. The majority of histone demethylase and methyltransferase enzyme inhibitors have been discovered on the basis of their structural similarity to substrates or known inhibitors of enzymes with analogous mechanisms. The general lack of potency and specificity of these compounds indicates that novel chemotypes are needed to address the large number of recently discovered histone-modifying enzymes. High-throughput screening (HTS) allows rapid testing of chemically diverse small molecule libraries, provided assays amenable to HTS exist. Here we review the biochemical and cellular assays available for testing the proteins and enzymes that regulate histone methylation. Progress in the development of high-throughput, sensitive, and robust assays will enable discovery of small molecules for epigenetic therapy. PMID:21966349

  8. FAF and SufA: proteins of Finegoldia magna that modulate the antibacterial activity of histones.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Elizabeth C; Mohanty, Tirthankar; Frick, Inga-Maria

    2014-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens have developed methods to overcome the defences of the host innate immune system. One such defence is the release of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Histones have been found to function as AMPs, in addition to their main biological function of packaging and organising DNA into nucleosomes. In this study, the Gram-positive anaerobic coccus Finegoldia magna was found to bind histones by Western blot and immunoprecipitation analysis. F. magna, which is normally a commensal of the skin and mucous membranes, is also known to act as an opportunistic pathogen and has been isolated from various clinical infection sites. It was found to bind to histones extracted from human skin epidermis through its surface and extracellular adhesion protein FAF. Through FAF binding, F. magna was protected from histone bactericidal activity. Furthermore, the histones were found to be degraded by SufA, a subtilisin-like extracellular serine protease of F. magna. Hence, the results of the present study will give more insight into how F. magna persists both as a commensal organism at the basement membrane of the skin and as an opportunistic pathogen during infection.

  9. Mapping post-translational modifications of mammalian testicular specific histone variant TH2B in tetraploid and haploid germ cells and their implications on the dynamics of nucleosome structure.

    PubMed

    Pentakota, Satya Krishna; Sandhya, Sankaran; P Sikarwar, Arun; Chandra, Nagasuma; Satyanarayana Rao, Manchanahalli R

    2014-12-05

    Histones regulate a variety of chromatin templated events by their post-translational modifications (PTMs). Although there are extensive reports on the PTMs of canonical histones, the information on the histone variants remains very scanty. Here, we report the identification of different PTMs, such as acetylation, methylation, and phosphorylation of a major mammalian histone variant TH2B. Our mass spectrometric analysis has led to the identification of both conserved and unique modifications across tetraploid spermatocytes and haploid spermatids. We have also computationally derived the 3-dimensional model of a TH2B containing nucleosome in order to study the spatial orientation of the PTMs identified and their effect on nucleosome stability and DNA binding potential. From our nucleosome model, it is evident that substitution of specific amino acid residues in TH2B results in both differential histone-DNA and histone-histone contacts. Furthermore, we have also observed that acetylation on the N-terminal tail of TH2B weakens the interactions with the DNA. These results provide direct evidence that, similar to somatic H2B, the testis specific histone TH2B also undergoes multiple PTMs, suggesting the possibility of chromatin regulation by such covalent modifications in mammalian male germ cells.

  10. Histone H1 chaperone activity of TAF-I is regulated by its subtype-dependent intramolecular interaction.

    PubMed

    Kajitani, Kaori; Kato, Kohsuke; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2017-03-02

    Linker histone H1 is involved in the regulation of gene activity through the maintenance of higher-order chromatin structure. Previously, we have shown that template activating factor-I (TAF-I or protein SET) is involved in linker histone H1 dynamics as a histone H1 chaperone. In human and murine cells, two TAF-I subtypes exist, namely TAF-Iα and TAF-Iβ. TAF-I has a highly acidic amino acid cluster in its C-terminal region and forms homo- or heterodimers through its dimerization domain. Both dimer formation and the C-terminal region of TAF-I are essential for the histone chaperone activity. TAF-Iα exhibits less histone chaperone activity compared with TAF-Iβ even though TAF-Iα and β differ only in their N-terminal regions. However, it is unclear how subtype-specific TAF-I activities are regulated. Here, we have shown that the N-terminal region of TAF-Iα autoinhibits its histone chaperone activity via intramolecular interaction with its C-terminal region. When the interaction between the N- and C-terminal regions of TAF-Iα is disrupted, TAF-Iα shows a histone chaperone activity similar to that of TAF-Iβ. Taken together, these results provide mechanistic insights into the concept that fine tuning of TAF-I histone H1 chaperone activity relies on the subtype compositions of the TAF-I dimer.

  11. Histone Deacetylases

    PubMed Central

    Parbin, Sabnam; Kar, Swayamsiddha; Shilpi, Arunima; Sengupta, Dipta; Deb, Moonmoon; Rath, Sandip Kumar

    2014-01-01

    In the current era of genomic medicine, diseases are identified as manifestations of anomalous patterns of gene expression. Cancer is the principal example among such maladies. Although remarkable progress has been achieved in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the genesis and progression of cancer, its epigenetic regulation, particularly histone deacetylation, demands further studies. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are one of the key players in the gene expression regulation network in cancer because of their repressive role on tumor suppressor genes. Higher expression and function of deacetylases disrupt the finely tuned acetylation homeostasis in both histone and non-histone target proteins. This brings about alterations in the genes implicated in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and other cellular processes. Moreover, the reversible nature of epigenetic modulation by HDACs makes them attractive targets for cancer remedy. This review summarizes the current knowledge of HDACs in tumorigenesis and tumor progression as well as their contribution to the hallmarks of cancer. The present report also describes briefly various assays to detect histone deacetylase activity and discusses the potential role of histone deacetylase inhibitors as emerging epigenetic drugs to cure cancer. PMID:24051359

  12. Histones from Avian Erythrocytes Exhibit Antibiofilm activity against methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Rose-Martel, Megan; Kulshreshtha, Garima; Ahferom Berhane, Nahom; Jodoin, Joelle; Hincke, Maxwell T.

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a human pathogen associated with many illnesses and post-surgical infections, can resist treatment due to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains and through biofilm formation. The current treatments for chronic biofilm infections are antibiotics and/or surgical removal of the contaminated medical device. Due to higher morbidity and mortality rates associated with overuse/misuse of antibiotics, alternate treatments are essential. This study reports the antibiofilm activity of avian erythrocyte histones against methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy revealed membrane damage to bacteria in histone-treated biofilms. Histones and indolicidin (positive control) increased the expression of apsS and apsR, which are associated with the Antimicrobial Peptide (AMP) sensor/regulator system in S. aureus. The expression of dltB, and vraF, associated with AMP resistance mechanisms, were under histone inducible control in the biofilm-embedded bacterial cells. The time kill kinetics for histones against S. aureus revealed a rapid biocidal activity (<5 min). Purified erythrocyte-specific histone H5 possessed 3–4 fold enhanced antimicrobial activity against planktonic cells compared to the histone mixture (H1, H2A, H2B, H3, H4, H5). These results demonstrate the promise of histones and histone-like derivatives as novel antibiotics against pathogens in their planktonic and biofilm forms. PMID:28378802

  13. The Histone Database: an integrated resource for histones and histone fold-containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo; Levine, Kevin M; Morales, Mario; Zhang, Suiyuan; Moreland, R Travis; Baxevanis, Andreas D; Landsman, David

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromatin is composed of DNA and protein components-core histones-that act to compactly pack the DNA into nucleosomes, the fundamental building blocks of chromatin. These nucleosomes are connected to adjacent nucleosomes by linker histones. Nucleosomes are highly dynamic and, through various core histone post-translational modifications and incorporation of diverse histone variants, can serve as epigenetic marks to control processes such as gene expression and recombination. The Histone Sequence Database is a curated collection of sequences and structures of histones and non-histone proteins containing histone folds, assembled from major public databases. Here, we report a substantial increase in the number of sequences and taxonomic coverage for histone and histone fold-containing proteins available in the database. Additionally, the database now contains an expanded dataset that includes archaeal histone sequences. The database also provides comprehensive multiple sequence alignments for each of the four core histones (H2A, H2B, H3 and H4), the linker histones (H1/H5) and the archaeal histones. The database also includes current information on solved histone fold-containing structures. The Histone Sequence Database is an inclusive resource for the analysis of chromatin structure and function focused on histones and histone fold-containing proteins.

  14. Specific histone modifications play critical roles in the control of encystation and antigenic variation in the early-branching eukaryote Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Carranza, Pedro G; Gargantini, Pablo R; Prucca, César G; Torri, Alessandro; Saura, Alicia; Svärd, Staffan; Lujan, Hugo D

    2016-12-01

    During evolution, parasitic microorganisms have faced the challenges of adapting to different environments to colonize a variety of hosts. Giardia lamblia, a common cause of intestinal disease, has developed fascinating strategies to adapt both outside and inside its host's intestine, such as trophozoite differentiation into cyst and the switching of its major surface antigens. How gene expression is regulated during these adaptive processes remains undefined. Giardia lacks some typical eukaryotic features, like canonical transcription factors, linker histone H1, and complex promoter regions; suggesting that post-transcriptional and translational control of gene expression is essential for parasite survival. However, epigenetic factors may also play critical roles at the transcriptional level. Here, we describe the most common post-translational histone modifications; characterize enzymes involved in these reactions, and analyze their association with the Giardia's differentiation processes. We present evidence that NAD(+)-dependent and NAD(+)-independent histone deacetylases regulate encystation; however, a unique NAD(+)-independent histone deacetylase modulate antigenic switching. The rates of acetylation of H4K8 and H4K16 are critical for encystation, whereas a decrease in acetylation of H4K8 and methylation of H3K9 occur preferentially during antigenic variation. These results show the complexity of the mechanisms regulating gene expression in this minimalistic protozoan parasite.

  15. Identification and characterization of lysine-methylated sites on histones and non-histone proteins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzong-Yi; Chang, Cheng-Wei; Lu, Cheng-Tzung; Cheng, Tzu-Hsiu; Chang, Tzu-Hao

    2014-06-01

    Protein methylation is a kind of post-translational modification (PTM), and typically takes place on lysine and arginine amino acid residues. Protein methylation is involved in many important biological processes, and most recent studies focused on lysine methylation of histones due to its critical roles in regulating transcriptional repression and activation. Histones possess highly conserved sequences and are homologous in most species. However, there is much less sequence conservation among non-histone proteins. Therefore, mechanisms for identifying lysine-methylated sites may greatly differ between histones and non-histone proteins. Nevertheless, this point of view was not considered in previous studies. Here we constructed two support vector machine (SVM) models by using lysine-methylated data from histones and non-histone proteins for predictions of lysine-methylated sites. Numerous features, such as the amino acid composition (AAC) and accessible surface area (ASA), were used in the SVM models, and the predictive performance was evaluated using five-fold cross-validations. For histones, the predictive sensitivity was 85.62% and specificity was 80.32%. For non-histone proteins, the predictive sensitivity was 69.1% and specificity was 88.72%. Results showed that our model significantly improved the predictive accuracy of histones compared to previous approaches. In addition, features of the flanking region of lysine-methylated sites on histones and non-histone proteins were also characterized and are discussed. A gene ontology functional analysis of lysine-methylated proteins and correlations of lysine-methylated sites with other PTMs in histones were also analyzed in detail. Finally, a web server, MethyK, was constructed to identify lysine-methylated sites. MethK now is available at http://csb.cse.yzu.edu.tw/MethK/.

  16. Peptidylarginine deiminase 2-catalyzed histone H3 arginine 26 citrullination facilitates estrogen receptor α target gene activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuesen; Bolt, Michael; Guertin, Michael J; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Sheng; Cherrington, Brian D; Slade, Daniel J; Dreyton, Christina J; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Bicker, Kevin L; Thompson, Paul R; Mancini, Michael A; Lis, John T; Coonrod, Scott A

    2012-08-14

    Cofactors for estrogen receptor α (ERα) can modulate gene activity by posttranslationally modifying histone tails at target promoters. Here, we found that stimulation of ERα-positive cells with 17β-estradiol (E2) promotes global citrullination of histone H3 arginine 26 (H3R26) on chromatin. Additionally, we found that the H3 citrulline 26 (H3Cit26) modification colocalizes with ERα at decondensed chromatin loci surrounding the estrogen-response elements of target promoters. Surprisingly, we also found that citrullination of H3R26 is catalyzed by peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) 2 and not by PAD4 (which citrullinates H4R3). Further, we showed that PAD2 interacts with ERα after E2 stimulation and that inhibition of either PAD2 or ERα strongly suppresses E2-induced H3R26 citrullination and ERα recruitment at target gene promoters. Collectively, our data suggest that E2 stimulation induces the recruitment of PAD2 to target promoters by ERα, whereby PAD2 then citrullinates H3R26, which leads to local chromatin decondensation and transcriptional activation.

  17. Impairment of preimplantation porcine embryo development by histone demethylase KDM5B knockdown through disturbance of bivalent H3K4me3-H3K27me3 modifications.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiaojiao; Zhang, Hongyong; Wang, Xianlong; Dobbs, Kyle B; Yao, Jing; Qin, Guosong; Whitworth, Kristin; Walters, Eric M; Prather, Randall S; Zhao, Jianguo

    2015-03-01

    KDM5B (JARID1B/PLU1) is a H3K4me2/3 histone demethylase that is implicated in cancer development and proliferation and is also indispensable for embryonic stem cell self-renewal, cell fate, and murine embryonic development. However, little is known about the role of KDM5B during preimplantation embryo development. Here we show that KDM5B is critical to porcine preimplantation development. KDM5B was found to be expressed in a stage-specific manner, consistent with demethylation of H3K4me3, with the highest expression being observed from the 4-cell to the blastocyst stages. Knockdown of KDM5B by morpholino antisense oligonucleotides injection impaired porcine embryo development to the blastocyst stage. The impairment of embryo development might be caused by increased expression of H3K4me3 at the 4-cell and blastocyst stages, which disturbs the balance of bivalent H3K4me3-H3K27me3 modifications at the blastocyst stage. Decreased abundance of H3K27me3 at blastocyst stage activates multiple members of homeobox genes (HOX), which need to be silenced for faithful embryo development. Additionally, the histone demethylase KDM6A was found to be upregulated by knockdown of KDM5B, which indicated it was responsible for the decreased abundance of H3K27me3 at the blastocyst stage. The transcriptional levels of Ten-Eleven Translocation gene family members (TET1, TET2, and TET3) are found to be increased by knockdown of KDM5B, which indicates cross talk between histone modifications and DNA methylation. The studies above indicate that KDM5B is required for porcine embryo development through regulating the balance of bivalent H3K4me3-H3K27me3 modifications.

  18. Histone deacetylases: unique players in shaping the epigenetic histone code.

    PubMed

    Thiagalingam, Sam; Cheng, Kuang-Hung; Lee, Hyunjoo J; Mineva, Nora; Thiagalingam, Arunthathi; Ponte, Jose F

    2003-03-01

    The epigenome is defined by DNA methylation patterns and the associated posttranslational modifications of histones. This histone code determines the expression status of individual genes dependent upon their localization on the chromatin. The silencing of gene expression is associated with deacetylated histones, which are often found to be associated with regions of DNA methylation as well as methylation at the lysine 4 residue of histone 3. In contrast, the activation of gene expression is associated with acetylated histones and methylation at the lysine 9 residue of histone 3. The histone deactylases play a major role in keeping the balance between the acetylated and deacetylated states of chromatin. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are divided into three classes: class I HDACs (HDACs 1, 2, 3, and 8) are similar to the yeast RPD3 protein and localize to the nucleus; class II HDACs (HDACs 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10) are homologous to the yeast HDA1 protein and are found in both the nucleus and cytoplasm; and class III HDACs form a structurally distinct class of NAD-dependent enzymes that are similar to the yeast SIR2 proteins. Since inappropriate silencing of critical genes can result in one or both hits of tumor suppressor gene (TSG) inactivation in cancer, theoretically the reactivation of affected TSGs could have an enormous therapeutic value in preventing and treating cancer. Indeed, several HDAC inhibitors are currently being developed and tested for their potency in cancer chemotherapy. Importantly, these agents are also potentially applicable to chemoprevention if their toxicity can be minimized. Despite the toxic side effects and lack of specificity of some of the inhibitors, progress is being made. With the elucidation of the structures, functions and modes of action of HDACs, finding agents that may be targeted to specific HDACs and potentially reactivate expression of only a defined set of affected genes in cancer will be more attainable.

  19. Nucleolin is a histone chaperone with FACT-like activity and assists remodeling of nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Angelov, Dimitar; Bondarenko, Vladimir A; Almagro, Sébastien; Menoni, Hervé; Mongélard, Fabien; Hans, Fabienne; Mietton, Flore; Studitsky, Vasily M; Hamiche, Ali; Dimitrov, Stefan; Bouvet, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Remodeling machines play an essential role in the control of gene expression, but how their activity is regulated is not known. Here we report that the nuclear protein nucleolin possesses a histone chaperone activity and that this factor greatly enhances the activity of the chromatin remodeling machineries SWI/SNF and ACF. Interestingly, nucleolin is able to induce the remodeling by SWI/SNF of macroH2A, but not of H2ABbd nucleosomes, which are otherwise resistant to remodeling. This new histone chaperone promotes the destabilization of the histone octamer, helping the dissociation of a H2A–H2B dimer, and stimulates the SWI/SNF-mediated transfer of H2A–H2B dimers. Furthermore, nucleolin facilitates transcription through the nucleosome, which is reminiscent of the activity of the FACT complex. This work defines new functions for histone chaperones in chromatin remodeling and regulation of transcription and explains how nucleolin could act on transcription. PMID:16601700

  20. A histone demethylase is necessary for regeneration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Scott; Tsun, Zhi-Yang; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2009-11-24

    Urodele amphibians and teleost fish regenerate amputated body parts via a process called epimorphic regeneration. A hallmark of this phenomenon is the reactivation of silenced developmental regulatory genes that previously functioned during embryonic patterning. We demonstrate that histone modifications silence promoters of numerous genes involved in zebrafish caudal fin regeneration. Silenced developmental regulatory genes contain bivalent me(3)K4/me(3)K27 H3 histone modifications created by the concerted action of Polycomb (PcG) and Trithorax histone methyltransferases. During regeneration, this silent, bivalent chromatin is converted to an active state by loss of repressive me(3)K27 H3 modifications, occurring at numerous genes that appear to function during regeneration. Loss-of-function studies demonstrate a requirement for a me(3)K27 H3 demethylase during fin regeneration. These results indicate that histone modifications at discreet genomic positions may serve as a crucial regulatory event in the initiation of fin regeneration.

  1. Recognition of enhancer element-specific histone methylation by TIP60 in transcriptional activation

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Kwang Won; Kim, Kyunghwan; Situ, Alan Jialun; Ulmer, Tobias S.; An, Woojin; Stallcup, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Many coregulator proteins are recruited by DNA-bound transcription factors to remodel chromatin and activate transcription. However, mechanisms for coordinating actions of multiple coregulator proteins are poorly understood. We demonstrate that multiple protein-protein interactions by protein acetyltransferase TIP60 are required for estrogen-induced transcription of a subset of estrogen receptor (ER) α target genes in human cells. Estrogen-induced recruitment of TIP60 requires direct binding of TIP60 to ERα and the action of chromatin remodeling ATPase BRG1, leading to increased recruitment of histone methyltransferase MLL1 and increased monomethylation of histone H3 at Lys4. TIP60 recruitment also requires preferential binding of the TIP60 chromodomain to histone H3 containing monomethylated Lys4, which marks active and poised enhancer elements. After recruitment, TIP60 increases acetylation of histone H2A at Lys5. Thus, complex cooperation of TIP60 with ERα and other chromatin remodeling enzymes is required for estrogen-induced transcription. PMID:22081016

  2. Compound K, a metabolite of ginseng saponin, inhibits colorectal cancer cell growth and induces apoptosis through inhibition of histone deacetylase activity.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyoung Ah; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Zheng, Jian; Yao, Cheng Wen; Cha, Ji Won; Kim, Hye Sun; Kim, Dong Hyun; Bae, Suk Chul; Hyun, Jin Won

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-proliferative effects of Compound K, with specific reference to histone modification. Exposure of HT-29 human colon cancer cells to Compound K resulted in time-dependent inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity, mRNA and protein expression. Compound K treatment induced unmethylation of the RUNX3 promoter region such as TSA treatment and an accumulation of acetylated histones H3 and H4 within the total cellular chromatin, resulting in an enhanced ability of these histones to bind to the promoter sequences of the tumor suppressor gene Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3). Treatment of cells with Compound K increased the mRNA and protein expression of RUNX3, as well as p21, a downstream target of RUNX3. These alterations were consistent with cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phases and induction of apoptosis. Our results provide new insights into the mechanisms of Compound K action in human colorectal cancer cells and suggest that HDAC inhibition presents a novel approach to prevent or treat colorectal cancer.

  3. Histone chaperones FACT and Spt6 prevent histone variants from turning into histone deviants.

    PubMed

    Jeronimo, Célia; Robert, François

    2016-05-01

    Histone variants are specialized histones which replace their canonical counterparts in specific nucleosomes. Together with histone post-translational modifications and DNA methylation, they contribute to the epigenome. Histone variants are incorporated at specific locations by the concerted action of histone chaperones and ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers. Recent studies have shown that the histone chaperone FACT plays key roles in preventing pervasive incorporation of two histone variants: H2A.Z and CenH3/CENP-A. In addition, Spt6, another histone chaperone, was also shown to be important for appropriate H2A.Z localization. FACT and Spt6 are both associated with elongating RNA polymerase II. Based on these two examples, we propose that the establishment and maintenance of histone variant genomic distributions depend on a transcription-coupled epigenome editing (or surveillance) function of histone chaperones.

  4. Characterisation of the in vitro activity of the depsipeptide histone deacetylase inhibitor spiruchostatin A.

    PubMed

    Crabb, Simon J; Howell, Melanie; Rogers, Helen; Ishfaq, Muhammad; Yurek-George, Alexander; Carey, Krystle; Pickering, Becky M; East, Phil; Mitter, Richard; Maeda, Satoko; Johnson, Peter W M; Townsend, Paul; Shin-ya, Kazuo; Yoshida, Minoru; Ganesan, A; Packham, Graham

    2008-08-15

    We recently completed the total synthesis of spiruchostatin A, a depsipeptide natural product with close structural similarities to FK228, a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor (HDI) currently being evaluated in clinical trials for cancer. Here we report a detailed characterisation of the in vitro activity of spiruchostatin A. Spiruchostatin A was a potent (sub-nM) inhibitor of class I HDAC activity in vitro and acted as a prodrug, requiring reduction for activity. Spiruchostatin A was a potent (low nM) inhibitor of the growth of various cancer cell lines. Spiruchostatin A-induced acetylation of specific lysine residues within histones H3 and H4, and increased the expression of p21(cip1/waf1), but did not induce acetylation of alpha-tubulin. Spiruchostatin A also induced cell cycle arrest, differentiation and cell death in MCF7 breast cancer cells. Like FK228, spiruchostatin A was both an inducer and substrate of the ABCB1 drug efflux pump. Whereas spiruchostatin A and FK228-induced protracted histone acetylation, hydroxamate HDI-induced short-lived histone acetylation. Using a subset of HDI-target genes identified by microarray analysis, we demonstrated that these differences in kinetics of histone acetylation between HDI correlated with differences in the kinetics of induction or repression of specific target genes. Our results demonstrate that spiruchostatin A is a potent inhibitor of class I HDACs and anti-cancer agent. Differences in the kinetics of action of HDI may be important for the clinical application of these compounds.

  5. Curcumin modulates the effect of histone modification on the expression of chemokines by type II alveolar epithelial cells in a rat COPD model

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lixing; Li, Chengye; Wang, Jian; Guo, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies have suggested that histone modification has a positive impact on various aspects associated with the progression of COPD. Histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) suppresses proinflammatory gene expression through deacetylation of core histones. Objective To investigate the effect of histone modification on the expression of chemokines in type II alveolar epithelial cells (AEC II) in a rat COPD model and regulation of HDAC2 expression by curcumin in comparison with corticosteroid. Materials and methods The rat COPD model was established by cigarette smoke exposure and confirmed by histology and pathophysioloy. AEC II were isolated and cultured in vitro from the COPD models and control animals. The cells were treated with curcumin, corticosteroid, or trichostatin A, and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and macrophage inflammatory protein-2α (MIP-2α) was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The expression of HDAC2 was measured by Western blot. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was used to detect H3/H4 acetylation and H3K9 methylation in the promoter region of three kinds of chemokine genes (IL-8, MCP-1, and MIP-2α). Results Compared to the control group, the mRNAs of MCP-1, IL-8, and MIP-2α were upregulated 4.48-fold, 3.14-fold, and 2.83-fold, respectively, in the AEC II from COPD model. The protein expression of HDAC2 in the AEC II from COPD model was significantly lower than from the control group (P<0.05). The decreased expression of HDAC2 was negatively correlated with the increased expression of IL-8, MCP-1, and MIP-2α mRNAs (all P<0.05). The level of H3/H4 acetylation was higher but H3K9 methylation in the promoter region of chemokine genes was lower in the cells from COPD model than from the control group (all P<0.05). Curcumin downregulated the expression of MCP-1, IL-8, and MIP-2α, and the expression was further enhanced in the presence of

  6. Linker histones in hormonal gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Vicent, G P; Wright, R H G; Beato, M

    2016-03-01

    In the present review, we summarize advances in our knowledge on the role of the histone H1 family of proteins in breast cancer cells, focusing on their response to progestins. Histone H1 plays a dual role in gene regulation by hormones, both as a structural component of chromatin and as a dynamic modulator of transcription. It contributes to hormonal regulation of the MMTV promoter by stabilizing a homogeneous nucleosome positioning, which reduces basal transcription whereas at the same time promoting progesterone receptor binding and nucleosome remodeling. These combined effects enhance hormone dependent gene transcription, which eventually requires H1 phosphorylation and displacement. Various isoforms of histone H1 have specific functions in differentiated breast cancer cells and compact nucleosomal arrays to different extents in vitro. Genome-wide studies show that histone H1 has a key role in chromatin dynamics of hormone regulated genes. A complex sequence of enzymatic events, including phosphorylation by CDK2, PARylation by PARP1 and the ATP-dependent activity of NURF, are required for H1 displacement and gene de-repression, as a prerequisite for further nucleosome remodeling. Similarly, during hormone-dependent gene repression a dedicated enzymatic mechanism controls H1 deposition at promoters by a complex containing HP1γ, LSD1 and BRG1, the ATPase of the BAF complex. Thus, a broader vision of the histone code should include histone H1, as the linker histone variants actively participate in the regulation of the chromatin structure. How modifications of the core histones tails affect H1 modifications and vice versa is one of the many questions that remains to be addressed to provide a more comprehensive view of the histone cross-talk mechanisms.

  7. A Placental Polypeptide Activator of a Membranous Protein Kinase and Its Relation to Histone 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Ghany, M.; Riegler, C.; Racker, E.

    1984-12-01

    Crude transforming growth factor preparations of placenta contain a polypeptide that is required for the activity of a protein kinase that has been purified from plasma membrane preparations of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells. The kinase activator has been separated from transforming growth factor β by reversed-phase HPLC and affinity chromatography. Like the transforming growth factor, it is heat stable and trypsin labile, but it is not inactivated by dithiothreitol. In sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis the purified preparation shows a major double band at about 31,000 daltons. Comparisons of electrophoretic mobility, protein kinase stimulatory activity, and cross-reactivity with an antibody against histone 1 suggest that the placental activator is identical with histone 1.

  8. Platelet activating factor-induced expression of p21 is correlated with histone acetylation.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Elisabetta; Puebla-Osorio, Nahum; Lege, Bree M; Liu, Jingwei; Neelapu, Sattva S; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2017-02-03

    Ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated keratinocytes secrete the lipid mediator of inflammation, platelet-activating factor (PAF). PAF plays an essential role in UV-induced immune suppression and skin cancer induction. Dermal mast cell migration from the skin to the draining lymph nodes plays a prominent role in activating systemic immune suppression. UV-induced PAF activates mast cell migration by up-regulating mast cell CXCR4 surface expression. Recent findings indicate that PAF up-regulates CXCR4 expression via histone acetylation. UV-induced PAF also activates cell cycle arrest and disrupts DNA repair, in part by increasing p21 expression. Do epigenetic alterations play a role in p21 up-regulation? Here we show that PAF increases Acetyl-CREB-binding protein (CBP/p300) histone acetyltransferase expression in a time and dose-dependent fashion. Partial deletion of the HAT domain in the CBP gene, blocked these effects. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that PAF-treatment activated the acetylation of the p21 promoter. PAF-treatment had no effect on other acetylating enzymes (GCN5L2, PCAF) indicating it is not a global activator of histone acetylation. This study provides further evidence that PAF activates epigenetic mechanisms to affect important cellular processes, and we suggest this bioactive lipid can serve as a link between the environment and the epigenome.

  9. Platelet activating factor-induced expression of p21 is correlated with histone acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Damiani, Elisabetta; Puebla-Osorio, Nahum; Lege, Bree M.; Liu, Jingwei; Neelapu, Sattva S.; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2017-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated keratinocytes secrete the lipid mediator of inflammation, platelet-activating factor (PAF). PAF plays an essential role in UV-induced immune suppression and skin cancer induction. Dermal mast cell migration from the skin to the draining lymph nodes plays a prominent role in activating systemic immune suppression. UV-induced PAF activates mast cell migration by up-regulating mast cell CXCR4 surface expression. Recent findings indicate that PAF up-regulates CXCR4 expression via histone acetylation. UV-induced PAF also activates cell cycle arrest and disrupts DNA repair, in part by increasing p21 expression. Do epigenetic alterations play a role in p21 up-regulation? Here we show that PAF increases Acetyl-CREB-binding protein (CBP/p300) histone acetyltransferase expression in a time and dose-dependent fashion. Partial deletion of the HAT domain in the CBP gene, blocked these effects. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that PAF-treatment activated the acetylation of the p21 promoter. PAF-treatment had no effect on other acetylating enzymes (GCN5L2, PCAF) indicating it is not a global activator of histone acetylation. This study provides further evidence that PAF activates epigenetic mechanisms to affect important cellular processes, and we suggest this bioactive lipid can serve as a link between the environment and the epigenome. PMID:28157211

  10. Histone Arginine Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Alessandra Di; Bedford, Mark T.

    2012-01-01

    Arginine methylation is a common posttranslational modification (PTM). This type of PTM occurs on both nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins, and is particularly abundant on shuttling proteins. In this review, we will focus on one aspect of this PTM: the diverse roles that arginine methylation of the core histone tails play in regulating chromatin function. A family of nine protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) catalyze methylation reactions, and a subset target histones. Importantly, arginine methylation of histone tails can promote or prevent the docking of key transcriptional effector molecules, thus playing a central role in the orchestration of the histone code. PMID:21074527

  11. Epigenetic targets and drug discovery Part 2: Histone demethylation and DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ke; Liu, Yanli; Lau, Johnathan L; Min, Jinrong

    2015-07-01

    Chromatin structure is dynamically modulated by various chromatin modifications, such as histone/DNA methylation and demethylation. We have reviewed histone methyltransferases and methyllysine binders in terms of small molecule screening and drug discovery in the first part of this review series. In this part, we will summarize recent progress in chemical probe and drug discovery of histone demethylases and DNA methyltransferases. Histone demethylation and DNA methylation have attracted a lot of attention regarding their biology and disease implications. Correspondingly, many small molecule compounds have been designed to modulate the activity of histone demethylases and DNA methyltransferases, and some of them have been developed into therapeutic drugs or put into clinical trials.

  12. Histone acetylation influences the transcriptional activation of POX in Beta vulgaris L. and Beta maritima L. under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Yolcu, Seher; Ozdemir, Filiz; Güler, Aybüke; Bor, Melike

    2016-03-01

    Acetylation of histone proteins is a type of chromatin modification which facilitates the activation of genes. Recent studies brought up the importance of this reversible and rapid process for the regulation of gene expression especially in plant defense against a variety of environmental stresses. Deciphering the exact mechanisms of chromatin modifications under abiotic stress conditions is important for improving crop plants' performance and yield. In a previous study we compared the salt stress responses of Beta vulgaris (sugar beet) and Beta maritima (wild beet). In accordance with those results we suggested that chromatin remodeling can be an active process in the regulation of genes related to salt stress tolerance of these plants. Therefore we performed ChIP assay in control and salt stressed (250 and 500 mM NaCl) plants and compared the enrichment of acetylation in the associated chromatin sites. We found that the transcriptional activation of one peroxidase (POX) encoding gene was associated with the elevated levels of acetylation in H3K9 and H3K27 sites. The acetylation patterns were remarkably different between two species in which the highest acetylation levels were found at H3K9 and H3K27 in wild beet and sugar beet respectively.

  13. The activity of the histone chaperone yeast Asf1 in the assembly and disassembly of histone H3/H4–DNA complexes

    PubMed Central

    Donham, Douglas C.; Scorgie, Jean K.; Churchill, Mair E. A.

    2011-01-01

    The deposition of the histones H3/H4 onto DNA to give the tetrasome intermediate and the displacement of H3/H4 from DNA are thought to be the first and the last steps in nucleosome assembly and disassembly, respectively. Anti-silencing function 1 (Asf1) is a chaperone of the H3/H4 dimer that functions in both of these processes. However, little is known about the thermodynamics of chaperone–histone interactions or the direct role of Asf1 in the formation or disassembly of histone–DNA complexes. Here, we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Asf1 shields H3/H4 from unfavorable DNA interactions and aids the formation of favorable histone–DNA interactions through the formation of disomes. However, Asf1 was unable to disengage histones from DNA for tetrasomes formed with H3/H4 and strong nucleosome positioning DNA sequences or tetrasomes weakened by mutant (H3K56Q/H4) histones or non-positioning DNA sequences. Furthermore, Asf1 did not associate with preformed tetrasomes. These results are consistent with the measured affinity of Asf1 for H3/H4 dimers of 2.5 nM, which is weaker than the association of H3/H4 for DNA. These studies support a mechanism by which Asf1 aids H3/H4 deposition onto DNA but suggest that additional factors or post-translational modifications are required for Asf1 to remove H3/H4 from tetrasome intermediates in chromatin. PMID:21447559

  14. Tandem Affinity Purification Approach Coupled to Mass Spectrometry to Identify Post-translational Modifications of Histones Associated with Chromatin-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Sophie; Robin, Philippe; Ait-Si-Ali, Slimane

    2017-01-01

    Protein purification by tandem affinity purification (TAP)-tag coupled to mass spectrometry analysis is usually used to reveal protein complex composition. Here we describe a TAP-tag purification of chromatin-bound proteins along with associated nucleosomes, which allow exhaustive identification of protein partners. Moreover, this method allows exhaustive identification of the post-translational modifications (PTMs) of the associated histones. Thus, in addition to partner characterization, this approach reveals the associated epigenetic landscape that can shed light on the function and properties of the studied chromatin-bound protein.

  15. Nocturnal activation of aurora C in rat pineal gland: its role in the norepinephrine-induced phosphorylation of histone H3 and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Price, D M; Kanyo, R; Steinberg, N; Chik, C L; Ho, A K

    2009-05-01

    We have shown previously that Ser10 phosphorylation of histone H3 occurs in rat pinealocytes after stimulation with norepinephrine (NE) and that histone modifications such as acetylation appear to play an important role in pineal gene transcription. Here we report the nocturnal phosphorylation of a Ser10 histone H3 kinase, Aurora C, in the rat pineal gland. The time profile of this phosphorylation parallels the increase in the level of phospho-Ser10 histone H3. Studies with cultured pinealocytes indicate that Aurora C phosphorylation is induced by NE and this induction can be blocked by cotreatment with propranolol or KT5720, a protein kinase A inhibitor. Moreover, only treatment with dibutyryl cAMP, but not other kinase activators, mimics the effect of NE on Aurora C phosphorylation. These results indicate that Aurora C is phosphorylated primarily by a beta-adrenergic/protein kinase A-mediated mechanism. Treatment with an Aurora C inhibitor reduces the NE-induced histone H3 phosphorylation and suppresses the NE-stimulated induction of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT), the rhythm-controlling enzyme of melatonin synthesis, and melatonin production. The effects of Aurora C inhibitors on adrenergic-induced genes in rat pinealocytes are gene specific: inhibitory for Aa-nat and inducible cAMP repressor but stimulatory for c-fos. Together our results support a role for the NE-stimulated phosphorylation of Aurora C and the subsequent remodeling of chromatin in NE-stimulated Aa-nat transcription. This phenomenon suggests that activation of this mitotic kinase can be induced by extracellular signals to participate in the transcriptional induction of a subset of genes in the rat pineal gland.

  16. Histone Acetyltransferase Complexes Can Mediate Transcriptional Activation by the Major Glucocorticoid Receptor Activation Domain

    PubMed Central

    Wallberg, Annika E.; Neely, Kristen E.; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Workman, Jerry L.; Wright, Anthony P. H.; Grant, Patrick A.

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the Ada adapter proteins are important for glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated gene activation in yeast. The N-terminal transactivation domain of GR, τ1, is dependent upon Ada2, Ada3, and Gcn5 for transactivation in vitro and in vivo. Using in vitro techniques, we demonstrate that the GR-τ1 interacts directly with the native Ada containing histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complex SAGA but not the related Ada complex. Mutations in τ1 that reduce τ1 transactivation activity in vivo lead to a reduced binding of τ1 to the SAGA complex and conversely, mutations increasing the transactivation activity of τ1 lead to an increased binding of τ1 to SAGA. In addition, the Ada-independent NuA4 HAT complex also interacts with τ1. GAL4-τ1-driven transcription from chromatin templates is stimulated by SAGA and NuA4 in an acetyl coenzyme A-dependent manner. Low-activity τ1 mutants reduce SAGA- and NuA4-stimulated transcription while high-activity τ1 mutants increase transcriptional activation, specifically from chromatin templates. Our results demonstrate that the targeting of native HAT complexes by the GR-τ1 activation domain mediates transcriptional stimulation from chromatin templates. PMID:10454542

  17. Histone Octamer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    1 mm histone octamer crystal grown on STS-81. A very dynamic structure which functions in many aspects of gene regulation from control of gene activity to the more subtle mechanisms of genetic imprinting. Principle Investigator is Dan Carter of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  18. Histone Octamer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This is a large 2 mm crystal of histone octamer, grown on STS-81. A very dynamic structure which functions in many aspects of gene regulation from control of gene activity to the more subtle mechanisms of genetic imprinting. Principle Investigator is Dan Carter of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  19. Bottom-up and middle-down proteomics have comparable accuracies in defining histone post-translational modification relative abundance and stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Sidoli, Simone; Lin, Shu; Karch, Kelly R; Garcia, Benjamin A

    2015-03-17

    Histone proteins are key components of chromatin. Their N-terminal tails are enriched in combinatorial post-translational modifications (PTMs), which influence gene regulation, DNA repair, and chromosome condensation. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based middle-down proteomics has emerged as a technique to analyze co-occurring PTMs, as it allows for the characterization of intact histone tails (>50 aa) rather than short (<20 aa) peptides analyzed by bottom-up. However, a demonstration of its reliability is still lacking. We compared results obtained with the middle-down and the bottom-up strategy in calculating PTM relative abundance and stoichiometry. Since bottom-up was proven to have biases in peptide signal detection such as uneven ionization efficiency, we performed an external correction using a synthetic peptide library with known peptide relative abundance. Corrected bottom-up data were used as reference. Calculated abundances of single PTMs showed similar deviations from the reference when comparing middle-down and uncorrected bottom-up results. Moreover, we show that the two strategies provided similar performance in defining accurate PTM stoichiometry. Collectively, we evidenced that the middle-down strategy is at least equally reliable to bottom-up in quantifying histone PTMs.

  20. Temperature Shift Alters DNA Methylation and Histone Modification Patterns in Gonadal Aromatase (cyp19a1) Gene in Species with Temperature-Dependent Sex Determination

    PubMed Central

    Hannigan, Brette; Crews, David

    2016-01-01

    The environment surrounding the embryos has a profound impact on the developmental process and phenotypic outcomes of the organism. In species with temperature-dependent sex determination, gonadal sex is determined by the incubation temperature of the eggs. A mechanistic link between temperature and transcriptional regulation of developmental genes, however, remains elusive. In this study, we examine the changes in DNA methylation and histone modification patterns of the aromatase (cyp19a1) gene in embryonic gonads of red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta) subjected to a temperature shift during development. Shifting embryos from a male-producing temperature (MPT) to a female-producing temperature (FPT) at the beginning of the temperature-sensitive period (TSP) resulted in an increase in aromatase mRNA expression while a shift from FPT to MPT resulted in decreased expression. DNA methylation levels at CpG sites in the promoter of the aromatase gene were high (70–90%) at the beginning of TSP, but decreased in embryos that were incubated at constant FPT and those shifted from MPT to the FPT. This decrease in methylation in the promoter inversely correlated with the expected increase in aromatase expression at the FPT. The active demethylation under the FPT was especially prominent at the CpG site upstream of the gonad-specific TATA box at the beginning of TSP and spread downstream of the gene including exon1 as the gonad development progressed. In embryos incubated at FPT, the promoter region was also labeled by canonical transcriptional activation markers, H3K4me3 and RNA polymerase II. A transcriptional repression marker, H3K27me3, was observed in temperature-shifted gonads of both temperature groups, but was not maintained throughout the development in either group. Our findings suggest that DNA hypomethylation and H3K4me3 modification at the aromatase promoter may be a primary mechanism that releases a transcriptional block of aromatase to initiate a

  1. Temperature Shift Alters DNA Methylation and Histone Modification Patterns in Gonadal Aromatase (cyp19a1) Gene in Species with Temperature-Dependent Sex Determination.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yuiko; Hannigan, Brette; Crews, David

    2016-01-01

    The environment surrounding the embryos has a profound impact on the developmental process and phenotypic outcomes of the organism. In species with temperature-dependent sex determination, gonadal sex is determined by the incubation temperature of the eggs. A mechanistic link between temperature and transcriptional regulation of developmental genes, however, remains elusive. In this study, we examine the changes in DNA methylation and histone modification patterns of the aromatase (cyp19a1) gene in embryonic gonads of red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta) subjected to a temperature shift during development. Shifting embryos from a male-producing temperature (MPT) to a female-producing temperature (FPT) at the beginning of the temperature-sensitive period (TSP) resulted in an increase in aromatase mRNA expression while a shift from FPT to MPT resulted in decreased expression. DNA methylation levels at CpG sites in the promoter of the aromatase gene were high (70-90%) at the beginning of TSP, but decreased in embryos that were incubated at constant FPT and those shifted from MPT to the FPT. This decrease in methylation in the promoter inversely correlated with the expected increase in aromatase expression at the FPT. The active demethylation under the FPT was especially prominent at the CpG site upstream of the gonad-specific TATA box at the beginning of TSP and spread downstream of the gene including exon1 as the gonad development progressed. In embryos incubated at FPT, the promoter region was also labeled by canonical transcriptional activation markers, H3K4me3 and RNA polymerase II. A transcriptional repression marker, H3K27me3, was observed in temperature-shifted gonads of both temperature groups, but was not maintained throughout the development in either group. Our findings suggest that DNA hypomethylation and H3K4me3 modification at the aromatase promoter may be a primary mechanism that releases a transcriptional block of aromatase to initiate a

  2. Substance P induces CCN1 expression via histone deacetylase activity in human colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Koon, Hon Wai; Shih, David Q; Hing, Tressia C; Chen, Jeremy; Ho, Samantha; Zhao, Dezheng; Targan, Stephan R; Pothoulakis, Charalabos

    2011-11-01

    We have shown that substance P (SP) and its neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R) regulate intestinal angiogenesis by increasing expression of protein CYR61 (the cysteine-rich angiogenic inducer 61, or CCN1) in colonic epithelial cells. However, the mechanism involved in SP-induced CCN1 expression has not been studied, and the outcome of increased CCN1 expression in the development of colitis is not fully understood. Because histone deacetylase (HDAC) modulates transcription of several genes involved in inflammation, we investigated participation of HDAC in SP-induced CCN1 expression in human colonic epithelial NCM460 cells overexpressing NK-1R (NCM460-NK-1R) and in primary colonocytes. SP increased HDAC activity with deacetylation and dephosphorylation of nucleosome protein histone H3 in NCM460-NK-1R and/or primary colonocytes. Histone deacetylation and dephosphorylation was observed in colonic mucosa from irritable bowel disease patients. Similarly, colonic mucosal tissues from mice exposed to dextran sulfate sodium showed histone H3 deacetylation and dephosphorylation and increased HDAC activity that was reversed by the NK-1R antagonist CJ-12255. SP-induced increased CCN1 expression in NCM460-NK-1R cells was abolished by pharmacological HDAC inhibition. HDAC overexpression activated basal and SP-induced CCN1 promoter activity. Intracolonic CCN1 overexpression significantly ameliorated dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis, with reduction of proinflammatory cytokine expression in mice. Thus, SP-mediated CCN1 expression in the inflamed human and mouse colon involves increased HDAC activity. Our results strongly suggest that increased CCN1 expression may be involved in mucosal healing during colitis.

  3. Post-translational modifications of the intrinsically disordered terminal domains of histone H1: effects on secondary structure and chromatin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Roque, A; Ponte, I; Suau, P

    2016-04-21

    H1 linker histones are involved both in the maintenance of chromatin higher-order structure and in gene regulation. H1 binds to linker DNA regions on the surface of the nucleosome. In higher eukaryotes, H1 contains three distinct domains: a short N-terminal domain (NTD), a central globular domain, and a long C-terminal domain (CTD). Terminal domains determine subtype specificity and to a large extent the linker DNA binding and chromatin condensing properties of histone H1. This review is focused on the recent numerous studies that have provided insights in the role of H1 terminal domains in chromatin dynamics. The N- and C-terminal domains behave as intrinsically disordered proteins with coupled binding and folding. We examine the potential kinetic advantages of intrinsic disorder in the recognition of the specific H1 binding sites in chromatin. As typical intrinsically disordered regions, H1 terminal domains are post-translationally modified. Post-translational modifications in the NTD determine the interaction of histone H1 with other proteins involved in heterochromatin formation and transcriptional regulation, while phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinases modulates the secondary structure of the CTD and chromatin condensation. We review the arguments in favor of the involvement of H1 hyperphosphorylation in metaphase chromatin condensation and of partial phosphorylation in interphase chromatin relaxation. In addition, the interplay of histone H1 and other chromatin architectural proteins, such as proteins of the high-mobility group, protamines, and MeCP2, is associated with changes in chromatin structure.

  4. Basal aurora kinase B activity is sufficient for histone H3 phosphorylation in prophase.

    PubMed

    Le, Ly-Thuy-Tram; Vu, Hong-Lien; Nguyen, Chi-Hung; Molla, Annie

    2013-04-15

    Histone H3 phosphorylation is the hallmark of mitosis deposited by aurora kinase B. Benzo[e]pyridoindoles are a family of potent, broad, ATP-competitive aurora kinase inhibitors. However, benzo[e]pyridoindole C4 only inhibits histone H3 phosphorylation in prophase but not in metaphase. Under the C4 treatment, the cells enter into mitosis with dephosphorylated histone H3, assemble chromosomes normally and progress to metaphase, and then to anaphase. C4 also induces lagging chromosome in anaphase but we demonstrated that these chromosome compaction defects are not related to the absence of H3 phosphorylation in prophase. As a result of C4 action, mitosis lasts longer and the cell cycle is slowed down. We reproduced the mitotic defects with reduced concentrations of potent pan aurora kinase as well as with a specific aurora B ATP-competitive inhibitor; we therefore propose that histone H3 phosphorylation and anaphase chromosome compaction involve the basal activity of aurora kinase B. Our data suggest that aurora kinase B is progressively activated at mitosis entry and at anaphase onset. The full activation of aurora kinase B by its partners, in prometaphase, induces a shift in the catalytic domain of aurora B that modifies its affinity for ATP. These waves of activation/deactivation of aurora B correspond to different conformations of the chromosomal complex revealed by FRAP. The presence of lagging chromosomes may have deleterious consequences on the daughter cells and, unfortunately, the situation may be encountered in patients receiving treatment with aurora kinase inhibitors.

  5. Crosstalk between NSL histone acetyltransferase and MLL/SET complexes: NSL complex functions in promoting histone H3K4 di-methylation activity by MLL/SET complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoming; Su, Jiaming; Wang, Fei; Liu, Da; Ding, Jian; Yang, Yang; Conaway, Joan W; Conaway, Ronald C; Cao, Lingling; Wu, Donglu; Wu, Min; Cai, Yong; Jin, Jingji

    2013-11-01

    hMOF (MYST1), a histone acetyltransferase (HAT), forms at least two distinct multiprotein complexes in human cells. The male specific lethal (MSL) HAT complex plays a key role in dosage compensation in Drosophila and is responsible for histone H4K16ac in vivo. We and others previously described a second hMOF-containing HAT complex, the non-specific lethal (NSL) HAT complex. The NSL complex has a broader substrate specificity, can acetylate H4 on K16, K5, and K8. The WD (tryptophan-aspartate) repeat domain 5 (WDR5) and host cell factor 1 (HCF1) are shared among members of the MLL/SET (mixed-lineage leukemia/set-domain containing) family of histone H3K4 methyltransferase complexes. The presence of these shared subunits raises the possibility that there are functional links between these complexes and the histone modifications they catalyze; however, the degree to which NSL and MLL/SET influence one another's activities remains unclear. Here, we present evidence from biochemical assays and knockdown/overexpression approaches arguing that the NSL HAT promotes histone H3K4me2 by MLL/SET complexes by an acetylation-dependent mechanism. In genomic experiments, we identified a set of genes including ANKRD2, that are affected by knockdown of both NSL and MLL/SET subunits, suggested they are co-regulated by NSL and MLL/SET complexes. In ChIP assays, we observe that depletion of the NSL subunits hMOF or NSL1 resulted in a significant reduction of both H4K16ac and H3K4me2 in the vicinity of the ANKRD2 transcriptional start site proximal region. However, depletion of RbBP5 (a core component of MLL/SET complexes) only reduced H3K4me2 marks, but not H4K16ac in the same region of ANKRD2, consistent with the idea that NSL acts upstream of MLL/SET to regulate H3K4me2 at certain promoters, suggesting coordination between NSL and MLL/SET complexes is involved in transcriptional regulation of certain genes. Taken together, our results suggest a crosstalk between the NSL and MLL

  6. von Hippel-Lindau partner Jade-1 is a transcriptional co-activator associated with histone acetyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Panchenko, Maria V; Zhou, Mina I; Cohen, Herbert T

    2004-12-31

    Jade-1 was identified as a protein partner of the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor pVHL. The interaction of Jade-1 and pVHL correlates with renal cancer risk. We have investigated the molecular function of Jade-1. Jade-1 has two zinc finger motifs called plant homeodomains (PHD). A line of evidence suggests that the PHD finger functions in chromatin remodeling and protein-protein interactions. We determined the cellular localization of Jade-1 and examined whether Jade-1 might have transcriptional and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) functions. Biochemical cell fractionation studies as well as confocal images of cells immunostained with a specific Jade-1 antibody revealed that endogenous Jade-1 is localized predominantly in the cell nucleus. Tethering of Gal4-Jade-1 fusion protein to Gal4-responsive promoters in co-transfection experiments activated transcription 5-6-fold, indicating that Jade-1 is a possible transcriptional activator. It was remarkable that overexpression of Jade-1 in cultured cells specifically increased levels of endogenous acetylated histone H4, but not histone H3, strongly suggesting that Jade-1 associates with HAT activity specific for histone H4. Deletion of the two PHD fingers completely abolished Jade-1 transcriptional and HAT activities, indicating that these domains are indispensable for Jade-1 nuclear functions. In addition, we demonstrated that TIP60, a known HAT with histone H4/H2A specificity, physically associates with Jade-1 and is able to augment Jade-1 HAT function in live cells, strongly suggesting that TIP60 might mediate Jade-1 HAT activity. Thus, Jade-1 is a novel candidate transcriptional co-activator associated with HAT activity and may play a key role in the pathogenesis of renal cancer and von Hippel-Lindau disease.

  7. Chromatin modification by PSC occurs at one PSC per nucleosome and does not require the acidic patch of histone H2A.

    PubMed

    Lo, Stanley M; McElroy, Kyle A; Francis, Nicole J

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin architecture is regulated through both enzymatic and non-enzymatic activities. For example, the Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins maintain developmental gene silencing using an array of chromatin-based mechanisms. The essential Drosophila PcG protein, Posterior Sex Combs (PSC), compacts chromatin and inhibits chromatin remodeling and transcription through a non-enzymatic mechanism involving nucleosome bridging. Nucleosome bridging is achieved through a combination of nucleosome binding and self-interaction. Precisely how PSC interacts with chromatin to bridge nucleosomes is not known and is the subject of this work. We determine the stoichiometry of PSC-chromatin interactions in compact chromatin (in which nucleosomes are bridged) using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM). We find that full compaction occurs with one PSC per nucleosome. In addition to compacting chromatin, we show that PSC oligomerizes nucleosome arrays. PSC-mediated oligomerization of chromatin occurs at similar stoichiometry as compaction suggesting it may also involve nucleosome bridging. Interactions between the tail of histone H4 and the acidic patch of histone H2A are important for chromatin folding and oligomerization, and several chromatin proteins bind the histone H2A acidic patch. However, mutation of the acidic patch of histone H2A does not affect PSC's ability to inhibit chromatin remodeling or bridge nucleosomes. In fact, PSC does not require nucleosomes for bridging activity but can bridge naked DNA segments. PSC clusters nucleosomes on sparsely assembled templates, suggesting it interacts preferentially with nucleosomes over bare DNA. This may be due to the ability of PSC to bind free histones. Our data are consistent with a model in which each PSC binds a nucleosome and at least one other PSC to directly bridge nucleosomes and compact chromatin, but also suggest that naked DNA can be included in compacted structures. We discuss how our data highlight the diversity

  8. Cyclic activation of histone H1 kinase during sea urchin egg mitotic divisions.

    PubMed

    Meijer, L; Pondaven, P

    1988-01-01

    Fertilized sea urchin eggs undergo a series of rapid and synchronized mitotic divisions. Extracts were made at various times throughout the first three mitotic divisions and assayed for phosphorylating activity toward histone H1. Histone H1 kinase (HH1K) undergoes a transient activation (8- to 10-fold increase) 20 min before each cleavage. The amplitude of the HH1K peak strongly depends on the synchrony of the egg population. Concomitant cytological observations show that the time-course of HH1K correlates with the time-course of nuclear envelope breakdown and of metaphase. This correlation is observed at each cell division cycle. HH1K from each of the three first mitoses show identical time- and concentration-dependence curves as well as identical dose-inhibition curves with 6-dimethylaminopurine and quercetin, suggesting that the same (group of) kinase(s) is (are) activated before each cleavage. Ionophore A23187 does not trigger, but inhibits, HH1K activation; however, partial activation of the eggs with ammonia at pH 9.0 (but not at pH 8.0) triggers the transient HH1K activation. Appearance of the HH1K cycle requires protein synthesis since it is completely abolished in emetine-treated eggs. Although cytochalasin B blocks egg cleavage, it does not inhibit HH1K activation nor nuclear divisions. A prolonged HH1K activation cycle is observed in eggs arrested in metaphase with colchicine or nocodazole. Despite the existence of a cycle in cAMP concentration during mitosis, forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase, does not modify the time-course of HH1K activation and of cell division. The cycling HH1K is independent of calcium-calmodulin, calcium-phospholipids, or cyclic AMP. It clearly resembles the mammalian "growth-associated histone kinase." The relationship between the transient activation of HH1K and the intracellular mitotic factors driving the cell cycle is discussed.

  9. Prenatal Dexamethasone and Postnatal High-Fat Diet Decrease Interferon Gamma Production through an Age-Dependent Histone Modification in Male Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong-Ren; Tain, You-Lin; Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Tiao, Mao-Meng; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Hung, Pi-Lien; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Huang, Li-Tung

    2016-01-01

    Overexposure to prenatal glucocorticoid (GC) disturbs hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis-associated neuroendocrine metabolism and susceptibility to metabolic syndrome. A high-fat (HF) diet is a major environmental factor that can cause metabolic syndrome. We aimed to investigate whether prenatal GC plus a postnatal HF diet could alter immune programming in rat offspring. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were given intraperitoneal injections of dexamethasone or saline at 14–21 days of gestation. Male offspring were then divided into four groups: vehicle, prenatal dexamethasone exposure, postnatal HF diet (VHF), and prenatal dexamethasone exposure plus a postnatal HF diet (DHF). The rats were sacrificed and adaptive immune function was evaluated. Compared to the vehicle, the DHF group had lower interferon gamma (IFN-γ) production by splenocytes at postnatal day 120. Decreases in H3K9 acetylation and H3K36me3 levels at the IFN-γ promoter correlated with decreased IFN-γ production. The impaired IFN-γ production and aberrant site-specific histone modification at the IFN-γ promoter by prenatal dexamethasone treatment plus a postnatal HF diet resulted in resilience at postnatal day 180. Prenatal dexamethasone and a postnatal HF diet decreased IFN-γ production through a site-specific and an age-dependent histone modification. These findings suggest a mechanism by which prenatal exposure to GC and a postnatal environment exert effects on fetal immunity programming. PMID:27669212

  10. Activation Domain-Specific and General Transcription Stimulation by Native Histone Acetyltransferase Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Keiko; Steger, David J.; Eberharter, Anton; Workman, Jerry L.

    1999-01-01

    Recent progress in identifying the catalytic subunits of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes has implicated histone acetylation in the regulation of transcription. Here, we have analyzed the function of two native yeast HAT complexes, SAGA (Spt-Ada-Gcn5 Acetyltransferase) and NuA4 (nucleosome acetyltransferase of H4), in activating transcription from preassembled nucleosomal array templates in vitro. Each complex was tested for the ability to enhance transcription driven by GAL4 derivatives containing either acidic, glutamine-rich, or proline-rich activation domains. On nucleosomal array templates, the SAGA complex selectively stimulates transcription driven by the VP16 acidic activation domain in an acetyl coenzyme A-dependent manner. In contrast, the NuA4 complex facilitates transcription mediated by any of the activation domains tested if allowed to preacetylate the nucleosomal template, indicating a general stimulatory effect of histone H4 acetylation. However, when the extent of acetylation by NuA4 is limited, the complex also preferentially stimulates VP16-driven transcription. SAGA and NuA4 interact directly with the VP16 activation domain but not with a glutamine-rich or proline-rich activation domain. These data suggest that recruitment of the SAGA and NuA4 HAT complexes by the VP16 activation domain contributes to HAT-dependent activation. In addition, extensive H4/H2B acetylation by NuA4 leads to a general activation of transcription, which is independent of activator-NuA4 interactions. PMID:9858608

  11. Histone H1.2 is a substrate for denitrase, an activity that reduces nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Irie, Yasuyuki; Saeki, Makio; Kamisaki, Yoshinori; Martin, Emil; Murad, Ferid

    2003-01-01

    Several reports have described an activity that modifies nitrotyrosine-containing proteins and their immunoreactivity to nitrotyrosine Abs. Without knowing the product of the reaction, this new activity has been called a “denitrase.” In those studies, some nonspecific proteins, which have multiple tyrosine residues, e.g., albumin, were used as a substrate. Therefore, the studies were based on an unknown mechanism of reaction and potentially a high background. To solve these problems, one of the most important things is to find a more suitable substrate for assay of the enzyme. We developed an assay strategy for determining the substrate for denitrase combining 2D-gel electrophoresis and an on-blot enzyme assay. The resulting substrate from RAW 264.7 cells was Histone H1.2, an isoform protein of linker histone. Histone H1.2 has only one tyrosine residue in the entire molecule, which ensures the exact position of the substrate to be involved. It has been reported that Histones are the most prominent nitrated proteins in cancer tissues. It was also demonstrated that tyrosine nitration of Histone H1 occurs in vivo. These findings lead us to the idea that Histone H1.2 might be an intrinsic substrate for denitrase. We nitrated recombinant and purified Histone H1.2 chemically and subjected it to an on-blot enzyme assay to characterize the activity. Denitrase activity behaved as an enzymatic activity because the reaction was time dependent and was destroyed by heat or trypsin treatment. The activity was shown to be specific for Histone H1.2, to differ from proteasome activity, and to require no additional cofactors. PMID:12719531

  12. Isothiazolones as inhibitors of PCAF and p300 histone acetyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Stimson, Lindsay; Rowlands, Martin G; Newbatt, Yvette M; Smith, Nicola F; Raynaud, Florence I; Rogers, Paul; Bavetsias, Vassilios; Gorsuch, Stephen; Jarman, Michael; Bannister, Andrew; Kouzarides, Tony; McDonald, Edward; Workman, Paul; Aherne, G Wynne

    2005-10-01

    Histone acetylation plays an important role in regulating the chromatin structure and is tightly regulated by two classes of enzyme, histone acetyltransferases (HAT) and histone deacetylases (HDAC). Deregulated HAT and HDAC activity plays a role in the development of a range of cancers. Consequently, inhibitors of these enzymes have potential as anticancer agents. Several HDAC inhibitors have been described; however, few inhibitors of HATs have been disclosed. Following a FlashPlate high-throughput screen, we identified a series of isothiazolone-based HAT inhibitors. Thirty-five N-substituted analogues inhibited both p300/cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein-binding protein-associated factor (PCAF) and p300 (1 to >50 micromol/L, respectively) and the growth of a panel of human tumor cell lines (50% growth inhibition, 0.8 to >50 micromol/L). CCT077791 and CCT077792 decreased cellular acetylation in a time-dependent manner (2-48 hours of exposure) and a concentration-dependent manner (one to five times, 72 hours, 50% growth inhibition) in HCT116 and HT29 human colon tumor cell lines. CCT077791 reduced total acetylation of histones H3 and H4, levels of specific acetylated lysine marks, and acetylation of alpha-tubulin. Four and 24 hours of exposure to the compounds produced the same extent of growth inhibition as 72 hours of continuous exposure, suggesting that growth arrest was an early event. Chemical reactivity of these compounds, as measured by covalent protein binding and loss of HAT inhibition in the presence of DTT, indicated that reaction with thiol groups might be important in their mechanism of action. As one of the first series of small-molecule inhibitors of HAT activity, further analogue synthesis is being pursued to examine the potential scope for reducing chemical reactivity while maintaining HAT inhibition.

  13. Histone acetylation in neurodevelopment.

    PubMed

    Contestabile, Antonio; Sintoni, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modification of histones is a primary mechanism through which epigenetic regulation of DNA transcription does occur. Among these modifications, regulation of histone acetylation state is an important tool to influence gene expression. Epigenetic regulation of neurodevelopment contributes to the structural and functional shaping of the brain during neurogenesis and continues to impact on neural plasticity lifelong. Alterations of these mechanisms during neurodevelopment may result in later occurrence of neuropsychatric disorders. The present paper reviews and discusses available data on histone modifications, in particular histone acetylation, in neurogenesis considering results obtained in culture systems of neural progenitors as well as in in vivo studies. Possible teratogenic effects of altered histone acetylation state during development are also considered. The use during pregnancy of drugs such as valproic acid, which acts as a histone deacetylase inhibitor, may result during postnatal development in autistic-like symptoms. The effect of gestational administration of the drug has been, therefore, tested on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in animals showing behavioral impairment as a consequence of the drug administration at a specific stage of pregnancy. These experimental results show that adult neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus is not quantitatively altered by gestational valproic acid administration. Future steps and goals of research on the role and mechanisms of histone acetylation in neurodevelopment are briefly discussed.

  14. Kdm5/Lid Regulates Chromosome Architecture in Meiotic Prophase I Independently of Its Histone Demethylase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhaunova, Liudmila; Ohkura, Hiroyuki; Breuer, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    During prophase of the first meiotic division (prophase I), chromatin dynamically reorganises to recombine and prepare for chromosome segregation. Histone modifying enzymes are major regulators of chromatin structure, but our knowledge of their roles in prophase I is still limited. Here we report on crucial roles of Kdm5/Lid, one of two histone demethylases in Drosophila that remove one of the trimethyl groups at Lys4 of Histone 3 (H3K4me3). In the absence of Kdm5/Lid, the synaptonemal complex was only partially formed and failed to be maintained along chromosome arms, while localisation of its components at centromeres was unaffected. Kdm5/Lid was also required for karyosome formation and homologous centromere pairing in prophase I. Although loss of Kdm5/Lid dramatically increased the level of H3K4me3 in oocytes, catalytically inactive Kdm5/Lid can rescue the above cytological defects. Therefore Kdm5/Lid controls chromatin architecture in meiotic prophase I oocytes independently of its demethylase activity. PMID:27494704

  15. Kdm5/Lid Regulates Chromosome Architecture in Meiotic Prophase I Independently of Its Histone Demethylase Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhaunova, Liudmila; Ohkura, Hiroyuki; Breuer, Manuel

    2016-08-01

    During prophase of the first meiotic division (prophase I), chromatin dynamically reorganises to recombine and prepare for chromosome segregation. Histone modifying enzymes are major regulators of chromatin structure, but our knowledge of their roles in prophase I is still limited. Here we report on crucial roles of Kdm5/Lid, one of two histone demethylases in Drosophila that remove one of the trimethyl groups at Lys4 of Histone 3 (H3K4me3). In the absence of Kdm5/Lid, the synaptonemal complex was only partially formed and failed to be maintained along chromosome arms, while localisation of its components at centromeres was unaffected. Kdm5/Lid was also required for karyosome formation and homologous centromere pairing in prophase I. Although loss of Kdm5/Lid dramatically increased the level of H3K4me3 in oocytes, catalytically inactive Kdm5/Lid can rescue the above cytological defects. Therefore Kdm5/Lid controls chromatin architecture in meiotic prophase I oocytes independently of its demethylase activity.

  16. Histone modification profiling reveals differential signatures associated with human embryonic stem cell self-renewal and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bhanu, Natarajan V.; Sidoli, Simone; Garcia, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we trace developmental stages using epigenome changes in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) treated with drugs modulating either self-renewal or differentiation. Based on microscopy, qPCR and flow cytometry, we classified the treatment outcome as inducing pluripotency (hESC, flurbiprofen and gatifloxacin), mesendoderm (sinomenine), differentiation (cyamarin, digoxin, digitoxin, selegeline and theanine) and lineage-commitment (RA). When we analyzed histone PTMs that imprinted these gene and protein expressions, the above classification was reassorted. Hyperacetylation at H3K4, 9, 14, 18, 56 and 122 as well as H4K5, 8, 12 and 16 emerged as the pluripotency signature of hESCs. Methylations especially of H3 at K9, K20, K27 and K36 characterized differentiation initiation as seen in no-drug control and fluribiprofen. Sinomenine-treated cells clustered close to “differentiation initiators”, consistent with flow cytometry where it induced mesendoderm, along with cyamarin and possibly selegnine. Neurectoderm, induced by RA and theanine manifested methylations on H3 shifts to H3.3. By both flow cytometry and histone PTM clustering, it appears that cells treated with gatifloxacin, flurbiprofen, digitoxin and digoxin were not yet lineage-committed or mixed cell types. Taken together, our moderate-throughput histone PTM profiling approach highlighted subtle epigenetic signatures that permitted us to predict divergent lineage progression even in differentiating cells with similar phenotype and gene expression. PMID:26631989

  17. Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Histone Proteoforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zuo-Fei; Arnaudo, Anna M.; Garcia, Benjamin A.

    2014-06-01

    Histones play important roles in chromatin, in the forms of various posttranslational modifications (PTMs) and sequence variants, which are called histone proteoforms. Investigating modifications and variants is an ongoing challenge. Previous methods are based on antibodies, and because they usually detect only one modification at a time, they are not suitable for studying the various combinations of modifications on histones. Fortunately, mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as a high-throughput technology for histone analysis and does not require prior knowledge about any modifications. From the data generated by mass spectrometers, both identification and quantification of modifications, as well as variants, can be obtained easily. On the basis of this information, the functions of histones in various cellular contexts can be revealed. Therefore, MS continues to play an important role in the study of histone proteoforms. In this review, we discuss the analysis strategies of MS, their applications on histones, and some key remaining challenges.

  18. The Taf14 YEATS domain is a reader of histone crotonylation

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Forest H.; Shinsky, Stephen A.; Shanle, Erin K.; Bridgers, Joseph B.; Gest, Anneliese; Tsun, Ian K.; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Shi, Xiaobing; Strahl, Brian D.; Kutateladze, Tatiana G.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of new histone modifications is unfolding at startling rates, however, the identification of effectors capable of interpreting these modifications has lagged behind. Here we report the YEATS domain as an effective reader of histone lysine crotonylation – an epigenetic signature associated with active transcription. We show that the Taf14 YEATS domain engages crotonyllysine via a unique π-π-π-stacking mechanism and that other YEATS domains have crotonyllysine binding activity. PMID:27089029

  19. Extracellular histones inhibit efferocytosis.

    PubMed

    Friggeri, Arnaud; Banerjee, Sami; Xie, Na; Cui, Huachun; De Freitas, Andressa; Zerfaoui, Mourad; Dupont, Hervé; Abraham, Edward; Liu, Gang

    2012-07-18

    The uptake and clearance of apoptotic cells by macrophages and other phagocytic cells, a process called efferocytosis, is a major component in the resolution of inflammation. Increased concentrations of extracellular histones are found during acute inflammatory states and appear to contribute to organ system dysfunction and mortality. In these studies, we examined the potential role of histones in modulating efferocytosis. We found that phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils or thymocytes by macrophages was significantly diminished in the presence of histones H3 or H4, but not histone H1. Histone H3 demonstrated direct binding to macrophages, an effect that was diminished by preincubation of macrophages with the opsonins growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6) and milk fat globule-epidermal growth factor (EGF) 8 (MFG-E8). Incubation of histone H3 with soluble α(v)β₅ integrin and Mer, but not with α(v)β₃, diminished its binding to macrophages. Phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by alveolar macrophages in vivo was diminished in the presence of histone H3. Incubation of histone H3 with activated protein C, a treatment that degrades histones, abrogated its inhibitory effects on efferocytosis under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. The present studies demonstrate that histones have inhibitory effects on efferocytosis, suggesting a new mechanism by which extracellular histones contribute to acute inflammatory processes and tissue injury.

  20. Genistein mediated histone acetylation and demethylation activates tumor suppressor genes in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kikuno, Nobuyuki; Shiina, Hiroaki; Urakami, Shinji; Kawamoto, Ken; Hirata, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Majid, Shahana; Igawa, Mikio; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2008-08-01

    Genistein is a phytoestrogen that has been reported to suppress the AKT signaling pathway in several malignancies. However, the molecular mechanism of genistein action is not known. We tested the hypothesis that genistein activates expression of several aberrantly silenced tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) that have unmethylated promoters such as PTEN, CYLD, p53 and FOXO3a. We report here that genistein activates TSGs through remodeling of the heterochromatic domains at promoters in prostate cancer cells by modulating histone H3-Lysine 9 (H3-K9) methylation and deacetylation. Genistein activation involved demethylation and acetylation of H3-K9 at the PTEN and the CYLD promoter, while acetylation of H3-K9 at the p53 and the FOXO3a promoter occurred through reduction of endogenous SIRT1 activity. There was a decrease of SIRT1 expression and accumulation of SIRT1 in the cytoplasm from the nucleus. Increased expression of these TSGs was also reciprocally related to attenuation of phosphorylated-AKT and NF-kappaB binding activity in prostate cancer cells. This is the first report describing a novel epigenetic pathway that activates TSGs by modulating either histone H3-Lysine 9 (H3-K9) methylation or deacetylation at gene promoters leading to inhibition of the AKT signaling pathway. These findings strengthen the understanding of how genistein may be chemoprotective in prostate cancer.

  1. MRG15 activates the cdc2 promoter via histone acetylation in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, AndreAna N.; Tominaga, Kaoru; Pereira-Smith, Olivia M.

    2011-07-01

    Chromatin remodeling is required for transcriptional activation and repression. MRG15 (MORF4L1), a chromatin modulator, is a highly conserved protein and is present in complexes containing histone acetyltransferases (HATs) as well as histone deacetylases (HDACs). Loss of expression of MRG15 in mice and Drosophila results in embryonic lethality and fibroblast and neural stem/progenitor cells cultured from Mrg15 null mouse embryos exhibit marked proliferative defects when compared with wild type cells. To determine the role of MRG15 in cell cycle progression we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation with an antibody to MRG15 on normal human fibroblasts as they entered the cell cycle from a quiescent state, and analyzed various cell cycle gene promoters. The results demonstrated a 3-fold increase in MRG15 occupancy at the cdc2 promoter during S phase of the cell cycle and a concomitant increase in acetylated histone H4. H4 lysine 12 was acetylated at 24 h post-serum stimulation while there was no change in acetylation of lysine 16. HDAC1 and 2 were decreased at this promoter during cell cycle progression. Over-expression of MRG15 in HeLa cells activated a cdc2 promoter-reporter construct in a dose-dependent manner, whereas knockdown of MRG15 resulted in decreased promoter activity. In order to implicate HAT activity, we treated cells with the HAT inhibitor anacardic acid and determined that HAT inhibition results in loss of expression of cdc2 mRNA. Further, chromatin immunoprecipitation with Tip60 localizes the protein to the same 110 bp stretch of the cdc2 promoter pulled down by MRG15. Additionally, we determined that cotransfection of MRG15 with the known associated HAT Tip60 had a cooperative effect in activating the cdc2 promoter. These results suggest that MRG15 is acting in a HAT complex involving Tip60 to modify chromatin via acetylation of histone H4 at the cdc2 promoter to activate transcription.

  2. Arabidopsis DNA methyltransferase AtDNMT2 associates with histone deacetylase AtHD2s activity

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yuan; Wu, Keqiang; Dhaubhadel, Sangeeta; An, Lizhe; Tian, Lining

    2010-05-28

    DNA methyltransferase2 (DNMT2) is always deemed to be enigmatic, because it contains highly conserved DNA methyltransferase motifs but lacks the DNA methylation catalytic capability. Here we show that Arabidopsis DNA methyltransferase2 (AtDNMT2) is localized in nucleus and associates with histone deacetylation. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and pull-down assays show AtDNMT2 interacts with type-2 histone deacetylases (AtHD2s), a unique type of histone deacetylase family in plants. Through analyzing the expression of AtDNMT2: ss-glucuronidase (GUS) fusion protein, we demonstrate that AtDNMT2 has the ability to repress gene expression at transcription level. Meanwhile, the expression of AtDNMT2 gene is altered in athd2c mutant plants. We propose that AtDNMT2 possibly involves in the activity of histone deacetylation and plant epigenetic regulatory network.

  3. Extracellular histone release in response to traumatic injury: implications for a compensatory role of activated Protein C

    PubMed Central

    Kutcher, Matthew E; Xu, Jun; Vilardi, Ryan F; Ho, Coral; Esmon, Charles T; Cohen, Mitchell Jay

    2013-01-01

    Background Tissue injury leads to release of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) that may drive a sterile inflammatory response; however, the role of extracellular histones after traumatic injury remains unexplored. We hypothesized that extracellular histones would be increased and associated with poor outcomes after traumatic injury. Methods In this prognostic study, plasma was prospectively collected from 132 critically injured trauma patients on arrival and 6h after admission to an urban level I trauma ICU. Circulating extracellular histone levels and plasma clotting factors were assayed, and linked to resuscitation and outcomes data. Results Of 132 patients, histone levels were elevated to a median of 14.0 absorbance units (AU) on arrival, declining to 6.4 AU by 6h. Patients with elevated admission histone levels had higher injury severity score, lower admission GCS, more days of mechanical ventilation, and higher incidences of multiorgan failure, acute lung injury, and mortality (all p ≤0.05). Histone levels correlated with prolonged INR and PTT, fibrinolytic markers D-dimer and tissue-type plasminogen activator, and anticoagulants tissue factor pathway inhibitor and activated Protein C (aPC; all p < 0.03). Increasing histone level from admission to 6h was a multivariate predictor of mortality (hazard ratio 1.005, p=0.013). When aPC level trends were included, the impact of histone level increase on mortality was abrogated (p=0.206) by a protective effect of increasing aPC levels (hazard ratio 0.900, p=0.020). Conclusions Extracellular histones are elevated in response to traumatic injury, and correlate with fibrinolysis and activation of anticoagulants. An increase in histone levels from admission to 6h is predictive of mortality, representing evidence of ongoing release of intracellular antigens similar to that seen in sepsis. Concomitant elevation of aPC abrogates this effect, suggesting a possible role for aPC in mitigating the sterile

  4. Toll-Like receptor-3 mediates HIV-1 transactivation via NFκB and JNK pathways and histone acetylation, but prolonged activation suppresses Tat and HIV-1 replication

    PubMed Central

    Bhargavan, Biju; Woollard, Shawna M.; Kanmogne, Georgette D.

    2016-01-01

    TLR3 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several viral infections, including SIV- and HIV-1-induced inflammation and AIDS. However the molecular mechanisms of these TLR3-mediated effects are not known, and it is not known whether HIV interacts with cellular TLR3 to affect disease process. Here we investigate the effects of TLR3 ligands on HIV-1 transactivation using both primary human macrophages and cells containing integrated copies of the HIV-1 promoter. We demonstrate that TLR3 activation induced upregulation of transcription factors such as c-Jun, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (CEBPA), signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-1, STAT-2, RELB, and nuclear factor kappa-B1 (NFκB1), most of which are known to regulate the HIV promoter activity. We also demonstrate that TLR3 activation increased HIV-1 transactivation via the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and NFκB pathways. This was associated with epigenetics modifications, including decreased histone deacetylase activity, increased histone acetyl transferase (HAT) activity, and increased acetylation of histones H3 and H4 at lysine residues in the nucleosome-0 and nucleosome-1 of the HIV-1 promoter. However, prolonged TLR3 activation decreased HIV-1 transactivation, decreased HAT activity and Tat transcription, and suppressed viral replication. Overall, data suggests TLR3 can acts as viral sensor to mediate viral transactivation, cellular signaling, innate immune response, and inflammation in HIV-infected humans. Our study provides novel insights into the molecular basis for these TLR3-mediated effects. PMID:26569339

  5. Dynamic Competing Histone H4 K5K8 Acetylation and Butyrylation Are Hallmarks of Highly Active Gene Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzi, Afsaneh; Zhang, Di; Huang, He; Barral, Sophie; Kwon, Oh Kwang; Qi, Shankang; Tang, Zhanyun; Buchou, Thierry; Vitte, Anne-Laure; He, Tieming; Cheng, Zhongyi; Montellier, Emilie; Gaucher, Jonathan; Curtet, Sandrine; Debernardi, Alexandra; Charbonnier, Guillaume; Puthier, Denis; Petosa, Carlo; Panne, Daniel; Rousseaux, Sophie; Roeder, Robert G.; Zhao, Yingming; Khochbin, Saadi

    2016-01-01

    Summary Recently discovered histone lysine acylation marks increase the functional diversity of nucleosomes well beyond acetylation. Here, we focus on histone butyrylation in the context of sperm cell differentiation. Specifically, we investigate the butyrylation of histone H4 lysine 5 and 8 at gene promoters where acetylation guides the binding of Brdt, a bromodomain-containing protein, thereby mediating stage-specific gene expression programs and post-meiotic chromatin reorganization. Genome-wide mapping data show that highly active Brdt-bound gene promoters systematically harbor competing histone acetylation and butyrylation marks at H4 K5 and H4 K8. Despite acting as a direct stimulator of transcription, histone butyrylation competes with acetylation, especially at H4 K5, to prevent Brdt binding. Additionally, H4 K5K8 butyrylation also marks retarded histone removal during late spermatogenesis. Hence, alternating H4 acetylation and butyrylation, while sustaining direct gene activation and dynamic bromodomain binding, could impact the final male epigenome features. PMID:27105113

  6. [Design, synthesis, and biological activities of histone deacetylase inhibitors with diketo ester as zinc binding group].

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Su, Hong; Yang, Bo; You, Qi-Dong

    2011-03-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) inhibition causes hyperacetylation of histones leading to growth arrest, differentiation and apoptosis of tumor cells, representing a new strategy in cancer therapy. Many of previously reported HDACs inhibitors are hydroxamic acid derivatives, which could chelate the zinc ion in the active site in a bidentate fashion. However, hydroxamic acids occasionally have produced problems such as poor pharmacokinetics, severe toxicity and low selectivity. Herein we describe the identification of a new series of non-hydroxamate HDACs inhibitors bearing diketo ester moieties as zinc binding group. HDACs inhibition assay and antiproliferation assays in vitro against multiple cancer cell lines were used for evaluation. These compounds displayed low antiproliferative activity against solid tumor cells, while good antiproliferative activity against human leukemic monocyte lymphoma cell line U937. Compound CPUYS707 is the best with GI50 value of 0.31 micromol x L(-1) against U937 cells, which is more potent than SAHA and MS-275. HDACs inhibition activity of these compounds is lower than that expected, further evaluation is needed.

  7. Mitotic Activation of a Novel Histone Deacetylase 3-Linker Histone H1.3 Protein Complex by Protein Kinase CK2.

    PubMed

    Patil, Hemangi; Wilks, Carrie; Gonzalez, Rhiannon W; Dhanireddy, Sudheer; Conrad-Webb, Heather; Bergel, Michael

    2016-02-12

    Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) and linker histone H1 are involved in both chromatin compaction and the regulation of mitotic progression. However, the mechanisms by which HDAC3 and H1 regulate mitosis and the factors controlling HDAC3 and H1 activity during mitosis are unclear. Furthermore, as of now, no association between class I, II, or IV (non-sirtuin) HDACs and linker histones has been reported. Here we describe a novel HDAC3-H1.3 complex containing silencing mediator of retinoic acid and thyroid hormone receptor (SMRT) and nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (N-CoR) that accumulated in synchronized HeLa cells in late G2 phase and mitosis. Nonetheless, the deacetylation activity by HDAC3 in the complex was evident only in mitotic complexes. HDAC3 associated with H1.3 was highly phosphorylated on Ser-424 only during mitosis. Isolation of inactive HDAC3-H1.3 complexes from late G2 phase cells, and phosphorylation of HDAC3 in the complexes at serine 424 by protein kinase CK2 (also known as casein kinase 2) activated the HDAC3 in vitro. In vivo, CK2α and CK2α' double knockdown cells demonstrated a significant decrease in HDAC3 Ser-424 phosphorylation during mitosis. HDAC3 and H1.3 co-localized in between the chromosomes, with polar microtubules and spindle poles during metaphase through telophase, and partially co-localized with chromatin during prophase and interphase. H1 has been reported previously to associate with microtubules and, therefore, could potentially function in targeting HDAC3 to the microtubules. We suggest that phosphorylation of HDAC3 in the complex by CK2 during mitosis activates the complex for a dual role: compaction of the mitotic chromatin and regulation of polar microtubules dynamic instability.

  8. Ubiquitination of Lysine 867 of the Human SETDB1 Protein Upregulates Its Histone H3 Lysine 9 (H3K9) Methyltransferase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ishimoto, Kenji; Kawamata, Natsuko; Uchihara, Yoshie; Okubo, Moeka; Fujimoto, Reiko; Gotoh, Eiko; Kakinouchi, Keisuke; Mizohata, Eiichi; Hino, Nobumasa; Okada, Yoshiaki; Mochizuki, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Toshiya; Hamakubo, Takao; Sakai, Juro; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Tachibana, Keisuke; Doi, Takefumi

    2016-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of proteins play a crucial role in regulating protein-protein interactions, enzyme activity, subcellular localization, and stability of the protein. SET domain, bifurcated 1 (SETDB1) is a histone methyltransferase that regulates the methylation of histone H3 on lysine 9 (H3K9), gene silencing, and transcriptional repression. The C-terminal region of SETDB1 is a key site for PTMs, and is essential for its enzyme activity in mammalian and insect cells. In this study, we aimed to evaluate more precisely the effect of PTMs on the H3K9 methyltransferase activity of SETDB1. Using mass spectrometry analysis, we show that the C-terminal region of human SETDB1 purified from insect cells is ubiquitinated. We also demonstrate that the ubiquitination of lysine 867 of the human SETDB1 is necessary for full H3K9 methyltransferase activity in mammalian cells. Finally, we show that SETDB1 ubiquitination regulates the expression of its target gene, serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade E, member 1 (SERPINE1) by methylating H3K9. These results suggest that the ubiquitination of SETDB1 at lysine 867 controls the expression of its target gene by activating its H3K9 methyltransferase activity. PMID:27798683

  9. Histone chaperone networks shaping chromatin function.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Colin M; Strømme, Caroline B; Huang, Hongda; Patel, Dinshaw J; Groth, Anja

    2017-03-01

    The association of histones with specific chaperone complexes is important for their folding, oligomerization, post-translational modification, nuclear import, stability, assembly and genomic localization. In this way, the chaperoning of soluble histones is a key determinant of histone availability and fate, which affects all chromosomal processes, including gene expression, chromosome segregation and genome replication and repair. Here, we review the distinct structural and functional properties of the expanding network of histone chaperones. We emphasize how chaperones cooperate in the histone chaperone network and via co-chaperone complexes to match histone supply with demand, thereby promoting proper nucleosome assembly and maintaining epigenetic information by recycling modified histones evicted from chromatin.

  10. Molecular functions of the histone acetyltransferase chaperone complex Rtt109-Vps75

    SciTech Connect

    Berndsen, Christopher E; Tsubota, Toshiaki; Lindner, Scott E; Lee, Susan; Holton, James M; Kaufman, Paul D; Keck, James L; Denu, John M

    2010-01-12

    Histone acetylation and nucleosome remodeling regulate DNA damage repair, replication and transcription. Rtt109, a recently discovered histone acetyltransferase (HAT) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, functions with the histone chaperone Asf1 to acetylate lysine K56 on histone H3 (H3K56), a modification associated with newly synthesized histones. In vitro analysis of Rtt109 revealed that Vps75, a Nap1 family histone chaperone, could also stimulate Rtt109-dependent acetylation of H3K56. However, the molecular function of the Rtt109-Vps75 complex remains elusive. Here we have probed the molecular functions of Vps75 and the Rtt109-Vps75 complex through biochemical, structural and genetic means. We find that Vps75 stimulates the kcat of histone acetylation by {approx}100-fold relative to Rtt109 alone and enhances acetylation of K9 in the H3 histone tail. Consistent with the in vitro evidence, cells lacking Vps75 showed a substantial reduction (60%) in H3K9 acetylation during S phase. X-ray structural, biochemical and genetic analyses of Vps75 indicate a unique, structurally dynamic Nap1-like fold that suggests a potential mechanism of Vps75-dependent activation of Rtt109. Together, these data provide evidence for a multifunctional HAT-chaperone complex that acetylates histone H3 and deposits H3-H4 onto DNA, linking histone modification and nucleosome assembly.

  11. Fine-tuning the stimulation of MLL1 methyltransferase activity by a histone H3-based peptide mimetic

    SciTech Connect

    Avdic, Vanja; Zhang, Pamela; Lanouette, Sylvain; Voronova, Anastassia; Skerjanc, Ilona; Couture, Jean-Francois

    2011-08-24

    The SET1 family of methyltransferases carries out the bulk of histone H3 Lys-4 methylation in vivo. One of the common features of this family is the regulation of their methyltransferase activity by a tripartite complex composed of WDR5, RbBP5, and Ash2L. To selectively probe the role of the SET1 family of methyltransferases, we have developed a library of histone H3 peptide mimetics and report herein the characterization of an N{alpha} acetylated form of histone H3 peptide (N{alpha}H3). Binding and inhibition studies reveal that the addition of an acetyl moiety to the N terminus of histone H3 significantly enhances its binding to WDR5 and prevents the stimulation of MLL1 methyltransferase activity by the WDR5-RbBP5-Ash2L complex. The crystal structure of N{alpha}H3 in complex with WDR5 reveals that a high-affinity hydrophobic pocket accommodates the binding of the acetyl moiety. These results provide the structural basis to control WDR5-RbBP5-Ash2L-MLL1 activity and a tool to manipulate stem cell differentiation programs.-Avdic, V., Zhang, P., Lanouette, S., Voronova, A., Skerjanc, I., Couture, J.-F. Fine-tuning the stimulation of MLL1 methyltransferase activity by a histone H3-based peptide mimetic.

  12. Chemical Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases 1 and 2 Induces Fetal Hemoglobin through Activation of GATA2.

    PubMed

    Shearstone, Jeffrey R; Golonzhka, Olga; Chonkar, Apurva; Tamang, David; van Duzer, John H; Jones, Simon S; Jarpe, Matthew B

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic intervention aimed at reactivation of fetal hemoglobin protein (HbF) is a promising approach for ameliorating sickle cell disease (SCD) and β-thalassemia. Previous studies showed genetic knockdown of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 1 or 2 is sufficient to induce HbF. Here we show that ACY-957, a selective chemical inhibitor of HDAC1 and 2 (HDAC1/2), elicits a dose and time dependent induction of γ-globin mRNA (HBG) and HbF in cultured primary cells derived from healthy individuals and sickle cell patients. Gene expression profiling of erythroid progenitors treated with ACY-957 identified global changes in gene expression that were significantly enriched in genes previously shown to be affected by HDAC1 or 2 knockdown. These genes included GATA2, which was induced greater than 3-fold. Lentiviral overexpression of GATA2 in primary erythroid progenitors increased HBG, and reduced adult β-globin mRNA (HBB). Furthermore, knockdown of GATA2 attenuated HBG induction by ACY-957. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and sequencing (ChIP-Seq) of primary erythroid progenitors demonstrated that HDAC1 and 2 occupancy was highly correlated throughout the GATA2 locus and that HDAC1/2 inhibition led to elevated histone acetylation at well-known GATA2 autoregulatory regions. The GATA2 protein itself also showed increased binding at these regions in response to ACY-957 treatment. These data show that chemical inhibition of HDAC1/2 induces HBG and suggest that this effect is mediated, at least in part, by histone acetylation-induced activation of the GATA2 gene.

  13. Chemical Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases 1 and 2 Induces Fetal Hemoglobin through Activation of GATA2

    PubMed Central

    Golonzhka, Olga; Chonkar, Apurva; Tamang, David; van Duzer, John H.; Jones, Simon S.; Jarpe, Matthew B.

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic intervention aimed at reactivation of fetal hemoglobin protein (HbF) is a promising approach for ameliorating sickle cell disease (SCD) and β-thalassemia. Previous studies showed genetic knockdown of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 1 or 2 is sufficient to induce HbF. Here we show that ACY-957, a selective chemical inhibitor of HDAC1 and 2 (HDAC1/2), elicits a dose and time dependent induction of γ-globin mRNA (HBG) and HbF in cultured primary cells derived from healthy individuals and sickle cell patients. Gene expression profiling of erythroid progenitors treated with ACY-957 identified global changes in gene expression that were significantly enriched in genes previously shown to be affected by HDAC1 or 2 knockdown. These genes included GATA2, which was induced greater than 3-fold. Lentiviral overexpression of GATA2 in primary erythroid progenitors increased HBG, and reduced adult β-globin mRNA (HBB). Furthermore, knockdown of GATA2 attenuated HBG induction by ACY-957. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and sequencing (ChIP-Seq) of primary erythroid progenitors demonstrated that HDAC1 and 2 occupancy was highly correlated throughout the GATA2 locus and that HDAC1/2 inhibition led to elevated histone acetylation at well-known GATA2 autoregulatory regions. The GATA2 protein itself also showed increased binding at these regions in response to ACY-957 treatment. These data show that chemical inhibition of HDAC1/2 induces HBG and suggest that this effect is mediated, at least in part, by histone acetylation-induced activation of the GATA2 gene. PMID:27073918

  14. Convergent evolution of chromatin modification by structurally distinct enzymes: comparative enzymology of histone H3 Lys²⁷ methylation by human polycomb repressive complex 2 and vSET.

    PubMed

    Swalm, Brooke M; Hallenbeck, Kenneth K; Majer, Christina R; Jin, Lei; Scott, Margaret Porter; Moyer, Mikel P; Copeland, Robert A; Wigle, Tim J

    2013-07-15

    H3K27 (histone H3 Lys27) methylation is an important epigenetic modification that regulates gene transcription. In humans, EZH (enhancer of zeste homologue) 1 and EZH2 are the only enzymes capable of catalysing methylation of H3K27. There is great interest in understanding structure-function relationships for EZH2, as genetic alterations in this enzyme are thought to play a causal role in a number of human cancers. EZH2 is challenging to study because it is only active in the context of the multi-subunit PRC2 (polycomb repressive complex 2). vSET is a viral lysine methyltransferase that represents the smallest protein unit capable of catalysing H3K27 methylation. The crystal structure of this minimal catalytic protein has been solved and researchers have suggested that vSET might prove useful as an EZH2 surrogate for the development of active site-directed inhibitors. To test this proposition, we conducted comparative enzymatic analysis of human EZH2 and vSET and report that, although both enzymes share similar preferences for methylation of H3K27, they diverge in terms of their permissiveness for catalysing methylation of alternative histone lysine sites, their relative preferences for utilization of multimeric macromolecular substrates, their active site primary sequences and, most importantly, their sensitivity to inhibition by drug-like small molecules. The cumulative data led us to suggest that EZH2 and vSET have very distinct active site structures, despite the commonality of the reaction catalysed by the two enzymes. Hence, the EZH2 and vSET pair of enzymes represent an example of convergent evolution in which distinct structural solutions have developed to solve a common catalytic need.

  15. Histone acetyltransferase activity of MOF is required for adult but not early fetal hematopoiesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Valerio, Daria G; Xu, Haiming; Eisold, Meghan E; Woolthuis, Carolien M; Pandita, Tej K; Armstrong, Scott A

    2017-01-05

    K(lysine) acetyltransferase 8 (KAT8, also known as MOF) mediates the acetylation of histone H4 at lysine 16 (H4K16ac) and is crucial for murine embryogenesis. Lysine acetyltransferases have been shown to regulate various stages of normal hematopoiesis. However, the function of MOF in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) development has not yet been elucidated. We set out to study the role of MOF in general hematopoiesis by using a Vav1-cre-induced conditional murine Mof knockout system and found that MOF is critical for hematopoietic cell maintenance and HSC engraftment capacity in adult hematopoiesis. Rescue experiments with a MOF histone acetyltransferase domain mutant illustrated the requirement for MOF acetyltransferase activity in the clonogenic capacity of HSCs and progenitors. In stark contrast, fetal steady-state hematopoiesis at embryonic day (E) 14.5 was not affected by homozygous Mof deletion despite dramatic loss of global H4K16ac. Hematopoietic defects start manifesting in late gestation at E17.5. The discovery that MOF and its H4K16ac activity are required for adult but not early and midgestational hematopoiesis supports the notion that multiple chromatin regulators may be crucial for hematopoiesis at varying stages of development. MOF is therefore a developmental-stage-specific chromatin regulator found to be essential for adult but not early fetal hematopoiesis.

  16. Suppression of Excessive Histone Deacetylases Activity in Diabetic Hearts Attenuates Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury via Mitochondria Apoptosis Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yang; Leng, Yan; Meng, Qingtao; Xue, Rui; Zhao, Bo; Zhan, Liying

    2017-01-01

    Background. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play a pivotal role in signaling modification and gene transcriptional regulation that are essential for cardiovascular pathophysiology. Diabetic hearts with higher HDACs activity were more vulnerable to myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R) injury compared with nondiabetic hearts. We are curious about whether suppression of excessive HDACs activity in diabetic heart protects against MI/R injury. Methods. Diabetic rats were subjected to 45 min of ischemia, followed by 3 h of reperfusion. H9C2 cardiomyocytes were exposed to high glucose for 24 h, followed by 4 h of hypoxia and 2 h of reoxygenation (H/R). Results. Both MI/R injury and diabetes mellitus elevated myocardium HDACs activity. MI/R induced apoptotic cell death was significantly decreased in diabetic rats treated with HDACs inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA). TSA administration markedly moderated dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential, protected the integrity of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), and decreased cell apoptosis. Notably, cotreatment with Akt inhibitor partly or absolutely inhibited the protective effect of TSA in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, TSA administration activated Akt/Foxo3a pathway, leading to Foxo3a cytoplasm translocation and attenuation proapoptosis protein Bim expression. Conclusions. Both diabetes mellitus and MI/R injury increased cardiac HDACs activity. Suppression of HDACs activity triggered protective effects against MI/R and H/R injury under hyperglycemia conditions through Akt-modulated mitochondrial apoptotic pathways via Foxo3a/Bim. PMID:28191472

  17. An RNA polymerase II-coupled function for histone H3K36 methylation in checkpoint activation and DSB repair.

    PubMed

    Jha, Deepak Kumar; Strahl, Brian D

    2014-06-09

    Histone modifications are major determinants of DNA double-strand break (DSB) response and repair. Here we elucidate a DSB repair function for transcription-coupled Set2 methylation at H3 lysine 36 (H3K36me). Cells devoid of Set2/H3K36me are hypersensitive to DNA-damaging agents and site-specific DSBs, fail to properly activate the DNA-damage checkpoint, and show genetic interactions with DSB-sensing and repair machinery. Set2/H3K36me3 is enriched at DSBs, and loss of Set2 results in altered chromatin architecture and inappropriate resection during G1 near break sites. Surprisingly, Set2 and RNA polymerase II are programmed for destruction after DSBs in a temporal manner--resulting in H3K36me3 to H3K36me2 transition that may be linked to DSB repair. Finally, we show a requirement of Set2 in DSB repair in transcription units--thus underscoring the importance of transcription-dependent H3K36me in DSB repair.

  18. Structural basis for inhibition of the histone chaperone activity of SET/TAF-Iβ by cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    González-Arzola, Katiuska; Díaz-Moreno, Irene; Cano-González, Ana; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Moreno-Beltrán, Blas; López-Rivas, Abelardo; De la Rosa, Miguel A

    2015-08-11

    Chromatin is pivotal for regulation of the DNA damage process insofar as it influences access to DNA and serves as a DNA repair docking site. Recent works identify histone chaperones as key regulators of damaged chromatin's transcriptional activity. However, understanding how chaperones are modulated during DNA damage response is still challenging. This study reveals that the histone chaperone SET/TAF-Iβ interacts with cytochrome c following DNA damage. Specifically, cytochrome c is shown to be translocated into cell nuclei upon induction of DNA damage, but not upon stimulation of the death receptor or stress-induced pathways. Cytochrome c was found to competitively hinder binding of SET/TAF-Iβ to core histones, thereby locking its histone-binding domains and inhibiting its nucleosome assembly activity. In addition, we have used NMR spectroscopy, calorimetry, mutagenesis, and molecular docking to provide an insight into the structural features of the formation of the complex between cytochrome c and SET/TAF-Iβ. Overall, these findings establish a framework for understanding the molecular basis of cytochrome c-mediated blocking of SET/TAF-Iβ, which subsequently may facilitate the development of new drugs to silence the oncogenic effect of SET/TAF-Iβ's histone chaperone activity.

  19. Structural basis for inhibition of the histone chaperone activity of SET/TAF-Iβ by cytochrome c

    PubMed Central

    González-Arzola, Katiuska; Díaz-Moreno, Irene; Cano-González, Ana; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Moreno-Beltrán, Blas; López-Rivas, Abelardo; De la Rosa, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin is pivotal for regulation of the DNA damage process insofar as it influences access to DNA and serves as a DNA repair docking site. Recent works identify histone chaperones as key regulators of damaged chromatin’s transcriptional activity. However, understanding how chaperones are modulated during DNA damage response is still challenging. This study reveals that the histone chaperone SET/TAF-Iβ interacts with cytochrome c following DNA damage. Specifically, cytochrome c is shown to be translocated into cell nuclei upon induction of DNA damage, but not upon stimulation of the death receptor or stress-induced pathways. Cytochrome c was found to competitively hinder binding of SET/TAF-Iβ to core histones, thereby locking its histone-binding domains and inhibiting its nucleosome assembly activity. In addition, we have used NMR spectroscopy, calorimetry, mutagenesis, and molecular docking to provide an insight into the structural features of the formation of the complex between cytochrome c and SET/TAF-Iβ. Overall, these findings establish a framework for understanding the molecular basis of cytochrome c-mediated blocking of SET/TAF-Iβ, which subsequently may facilitate the development of new drugs to silence the oncogenic effect of SET/TAF-Iβ’s histone chaperone activity. PMID:26216969

  20. Histone modifying enzymes: novel disease biomarkers and assay development.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fei; Zhang, Chun-yang

    2016-01-01

    Histones are the chief components of chromatin. When being catalyzed by a series of histone modifying enzymes, histones may undergo various post-translational modifications such as acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitylation and SUMOylation. The dysregulation of histone modifying enzymes will alter the histone post-modification patterns and cause diverse diseases including cancers. Consequently, the histone modifying enzymes have emerged as the promising biomarkers for disease diagnosis and prognosis. In this review, we summarize the recent researches about the histone modifying enzymes as the disease biomarkers, and highlight the development of methods for histone modifying enzyme assays.

  1. Histone deacetylase inhibitor activity in royal jelly might facilitate caste switching in bees.

    PubMed

    Spannhoff, Astrid; Kim, Yong Kee; Raynal, Noel J-M; Gharibyan, Vazganush; Su, Ming-Bo; Zhou, Yue-Yang; Li, Jia; Castellano, Sabrina; Sbardella, Gianluca; Issa, Jean-Pierre J; Bedford, Mark T

    2011-03-01

    Worker and queen bees are genetically indistinguishable. However, queen bees are fertile, larger and have a longer lifespan than their female worker counterparts. Differential feeding of larvae with royal jelly controls this caste switching. There is emerging evidence that the queen-bee phenotype is driven by epigenetic mechanisms. In this study, we show that royal jelly--the secretion produced by the hypopharyngeal and mandibular glands of worker bees--has histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) activity. A fatty acid, (E)-10-hydroxy-2-decenoic acid (10HDA), which accounts for up to 5% of royal jelly, harbours this HDACi activity. Furthermore, 10HDA can reactivate the expression of epigenetically silenced genes in mammalian cells. Thus, the epigenetic regulation of queen-bee development is probably driven, in part, by HDACi activity in royal jelly.

  2. Phosphorylated Histone 3 at Serine 10 Identifies Activated Spinal Neurons and Contributes to the Development of Tissue Injury-Associated Pain

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Pérez, Jose Vicente; Sántha, Péter; Varga, Angelika; Szucs, Peter; Sousa-Valente, Joao; Gaal, Botond; Sivadó, Miklós; Andreou, Anna P; Beattie, Sara; Nagy, Bence; Matesz, Klara; C. Arthur, J. Simon; Jancsó, Gábor; Nagy, Istvan

    2017-01-01

    Transcriptional changes in superficial spinal dorsal horn neurons (SSDHN) are essential in the development and maintenance of prolonged pain. Epigenetic mechanisms including post-translational modifications in histones are pivotal in regulating transcription. Here, we report that phosphorylation of serine 10 (S10) in histone 3 (H3) specifically occurs in a group of rat SSDHN following the activation of nociceptive primary sensory neurons by burn injury, capsaicin application or sustained electrical activation of nociceptive primary sensory nerve fibres. In contrast, brief thermal or mechanical nociceptive stimuli, which fail to induce tissue injury or inflammation, do not produce the same effect. Blocking N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors or activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2, or blocking or deleting the mitogen- and stress-activated kinases 1 and 2 (MSK1/2), which phosphorylate S10 in H3, inhibit up-regulation in phosphorylated S10 in H3 (p-S10H3) as well as fos transcription, a down-stream effect of p-S10H3. Deleting MSK1/2 also inhibits the development of carrageenan-induced inflammatory heat hyperalgesia in mice. We propose that p-S10H3 is a novel marker for nociceptive processing in SSDHN with high relevance to transcriptional changes and the development of prolonged pain. PMID:28120884

  3. The transcriptionally-active MMTV promoter is depleted of histone H1.

    PubMed Central

    Bresnick, E H; Bustin, M; Marsaud, V; Richard-Foy, H; Hager, G L

    1992-01-01

    We have used an ultraviolet light cross-linking and immunoadsorption assay to demonstrate that histones H1 and H2B are bound to the repressed MMTV promoter. Hormone activation results in reduced H1 content with little or no change in H2B. High resolution analysis of the glucocorticoid-inducible DNaseI hypersensitive region demonstrates an NF-1 footprint as well as specific sites of enhanced cleavage on nucleosome B and in the nucleosome B/nucleosome A linker. These results are consistent with a model in which binding of the glucocorticoid receptor to glucocorticoid regulatory elements on the surface of nucleosome B induces a chromatin transition that is necessary for transcription factor (NF-1 and TFIID) recruitment to the MMTV promoter. We hypothesize that association of histone H1 with important cis-elements on the promoter masks these sites, and glucocorticoid-induced displacement of H1 is necessary to expose factor binding sites at the 3' edge of nucleosome B, in the nucleosome B/nucleosome A linker and at the 5' edge of nucleosome A. Images PMID:1311071

  4. Mutant IDH1 Dysregulates the Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Association with Gene-Specific Histone Modifications to Cartilage- and Bone-Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Makoto; Tamaki, Sakura; Hineno, Sho; Matsunaga, Kazuhito; Woltjen, Knut; Kobayashi, Yukiko; Nagata, Sanae; Ikeya, Makoto; Kato, Tomohisa; Okamoto, Takeshi; Matsuda, Shuichi; Toguchida, Junya

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)1/2 genes endow encoding proteins with neomorphic activity to produce the potential oncometabolite, 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG), which induces the hypermethylation of histones and DNA. The incidence of IDH1/2 mutations in cartilaginous tumors was previously shown to be the highest among various types of tumors, except for those in the central nervous system. Mutations have been detected in both benign (enchondromas) and malignant (chondrosarcomas) types of cartilaginous tumors, whereas they have rarely been found in other mesenchymal tumors such as osteosarcomas. To address this unique tumor specificity, we herein examined the effects of IDH1 R132C, which is the most prevalent mutant in cartilaginous tumors, on the differentiation properties of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The induction of the IDH1 R132C gene into MSCs markedly increased the amount of 2-HG and up-regulated global histone methylation. The induction of IDH1 R132C promoted the chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs by enhancing the expression of SOX9 and COL2A1 genes in association with an increase in the active mark (H3K4me3), but disrupted cartilage matrix formation. On the other hand, IDH1 R132C inhibited expression of the ALPL gene in association with an increase in the repressive mark (H3K9me3), and subsequently inhibited the osteogenic properties of hMSCs and human osteosarcoma cells. Since osteogenic properties are an indispensable feature for the diagnosis of osteosarcoma, the inhibitory effects of IDH1 R132C on osteogenic properties may contribute to the lack of osteosarcomas with the IDH1 R132C mutation. These results suggested that IDH1 R132C contributed to the formation of cartilaginous tumors by dysregulating the chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs via gene-specific histone modulation. PMID:26161668

  5. Inhibition of Histone Deacetylase Activity in Human Endometrial Stromal Cells Promotes Extracellular Matrix Remodelling and Limits Embryo Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Stuart P.; Quiñonero, Alicia; Martínez, Sebastián; Pellicer, Antonio; Simón, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Invasion of the trophoblast into the maternal decidua is regulated by both the trophoectoderm and the endometrial stroma, and entails the action of tissue remodeling enzymes. Trophoblast invasion requires the action of metalloproteinases (MMPs) to degrade extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and in turn, decidual cells express tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs). The balance between these promoting and restraining factors is a key event for the successful outcome of pregnancy. Gene expression is post-transcriptionally regulated by histone deacetylases (HDACs) that unpacks condensed chromatin activating gene expression. In this study we analyze the effect of histone acetylation on the expression of tissue remodeling enzymes and activity of human endometrial stromal cells (hESCs) related to trophoblast invasion control. Treatment of hESCs with the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) increased the expression of TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 while decreased MMP-2, MMP-9 and uPA and have an inhibitory effect on trophoblast invasion. Moreover, histone acetylation is detected at the promoters of TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 genes in TSA-treated. In addition, in an in vitro decidualized hESCs model, the increase of TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 expression is associated with histone acetylation at the promoters of these genes. Our results demonstrate that histone acetylation disrupt the balance of ECM modulators provoking a restrain of trophoblast invasion. These findings are important as an epigenetic mechanism that can be used to control trophoblast invasion. PMID:22291969

  6. PARAQUAT TOLERANCE3 Is an E3 Ligase That Switches off Activated Oxidative Response by Targeting Histone-Modifying PROTEIN METHYLTRANSFERASE4b

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jin; Zhao, Tao-Lan; Wang, Peng-Fei; Zhao, Ping-Xia; Xie, Qi; Cao, Xiao-Feng; Xiang, Cheng-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is unavoidable for aerobic organisms. When abiotic and biotic stresses are encountered, oxidative damage could occur in cells. To avoid this damage, defense mechanisms must be timely and efficiently modulated. While the response to oxidative stress has been extensively studied in plants, little is known about how the activated response is switched off when oxidative stress is diminished. By studying Arabidopsis mutant paraquat tolerance3, we identified the genetic locus PARAQUAT TOLERANCE3 (PQT3) as a major negative regulator of oxidative stress tolerance. PQT3, encoding an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is rapidly down-regulated by oxidative stress. PQT3 has E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in ubiquitination assay. Subsequently, we identified PRMT4b as a PQT3-interacting protein. By histone methylation, PRMT4b upregulates the expression of APX1 and GPX1, encoding two key enzymes against oxidative stress. On the other hand, PRMT4b is recognized by PQT3 for targeted degradation via 26S proteasome. Therefore, we have identified PQT3 as an E3 ligase that acts as a negative regulator of activated response to oxidative stress and found that histone modification by PRMT4b at APX1 and GPX1 loci plays an important role in oxidative stress tolerance. PMID:27676073

  7. Elucidation of the Fanconi Anemia Protein Network in Meiosis and Its Function in the Regulation of Histone Modifications.

    PubMed

    Alavattam, Kris G; Kato, Yasuko; Sin, Ho-Su; Maezawa, So; Kowalski, Ian J; Zhang, Fan; Pang, Qishen; Andreassen, Paul R; Namekawa, Satoshi H

    2016-10-18

    Precise epigenetic regulation of the sex chromosomes is vital for the male germline. Here, we analyze meiosis in eight mouse models deficient for various DNA damage response (DDR) factors, including Fanconi anemia (FA) proteins. We reveal a network of FA and DDR proteins in which FA core factors FANCA, FANCB, and FANCC are essential for FANCD2 foci formation, whereas BRCA1 (FANCS), MDC1, and RNF8 are required for BRCA2 (FANCD1) and SLX4 (FANCP) accumulation on the sex chromosomes during meiosis. In addition, FA proteins modulate distinct histone marks on the sex chromosomes: FA core proteins and FANCD2 regulate H3K9 methylation, while FANCD2 and RNF8 function together to regulate H3K4 methylation independently of FA core proteins. Our data suggest that RNF8 integrates the FA-BRCA pathway. Taken together, our study reveals distinct functions for FA proteins and illuminates the male sex chromosomes as a model to dissect the function of the FA-BRCA pathway.

  8. Involvement of EARLY BUD-BREAK, an AP2/ERF Transcription Factor Gene, in Bud Break in Japanese Pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai) Lateral Flower Buds: Expression, Histone Modifications and Possible Target Genes.

    PubMed

    Anh Tuan, Pham; Bai, Songling; Saito, Takanori; Imai, Tsuyoshi; Ito, Akiko; Moriguchi, Takaya

    2016-05-01

    In the Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai) 'Kosui', three developmental stages of lateral flower buds have been proposed to occur during ecodormancy to the flowering phase, i.e. rapid enlargement, sprouting and flowering. Here, we report an APETALA2/ethylene-responsive factor (AP2/ERF) transcription factor gene, named pear EARLY BUD-BREAK (PpEBB), which was highly expressed during the rapid enlargement stage occurring prior to the onset of bud break in flower buds. Gene expression analysis revealed that PpEBB expression was dramatically increased during the rapid enlargement stage in three successive growing seasons. PpEBB transcript levels peaked 1 week prior to onset of bud break in 'Kosui' potted plants treated with hydrogen cyanamide or water under forcing conditions. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative PCR showed that higher levels of active histone modifications (trimethylation of the histone H3 tail at Lys4) in the 5'-upstream and start codon regions of the PpEBB gene were associated with the induced expression level of PpEBB during the rapid enlargement stage. In addition, we provide evidence that PpEBB may interact with and regulate pear four D-type cyclin (PpCYCD3) genes during bud break in 'Kosui' lateral flower buds. PpEBB significantly increased the promoter activities of four PpCYCD3 genes in a dual-luciferase assay using tobacco leaves. Taken together, our findings uncovered aspects of the bud break regulatory mechanism in the Japanese pear and provided further evidence that the EBB family plays an important role in bud break in perennial plants.

  9. Histone Gene Multiplicity and Position Effect Variegation in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Gerald D.; Sinclair, Donald A.; Grigliatti, Thomas A.

    1983-01-01

    The histone genes of wild-type Drosophila melanogaster are reiterated 100–150 times per haploid genome and are located in the segment of chromosome 2 that corresponds to polytene bands 39D2-3 to E1-2. The influence of altered histone gene multiplicity on chromatin structure has been assayed by measuring modification of the gene inactivation associated with position effect variegation in genotypes bearing deletions of the 39D-E segment. The proportion of cells in which a variegating gene is active is increased in genotypes that are heterozygous for a deficiency that removes the histone gene complex. Deletions that remove segments adjacent to the histone gene complex have no effect on the expression of variegating genes. Suppression of position effect variegation associated with reduction of histone gene multiplicity applies to both X-linked and autosomal variegating genes. Position effects exerted by both autosomal and sex-chromosome heterochromatin were suppressible by deletions of the histone gene complex. The suppression was independent of the presence of the Y chromosome. A deficiency that deletes only the distal portion of the histone gene complex also has the ability to suppress position effect variegation. Duplication of the histone gene complex did not enhance position effect variegation. Deletion or duplication of the histone gene complex in the maternal genome had no effect on the extent of variegation in progeny whose histone gene multiplicity was normal. These results are discussed with respect to current knowledge of the organization of the histone gene complex and control of its expression. PMID:17246163

  10. AURKA induces EMT by regulating histone modification through Wnt/β-catenin and PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xi; Li, Zhaoxia; Song, Yue; Wang, Rui; Han, Lei; Wang, Qixue; Jiang, Kui; Kang, Chunsheng; Zhang, Qingyu

    2016-05-31

    Gastric cancer, a highly invasive and aggressive malignancy, is the third leading cause of death from cancer worldwide. Genetic association studies have successfully revealed several important genes consistently associated with gastric cancer to date. However, these robust gastric cancer-associated genes do not fully elucidate the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of the disease. In the present study, we performed an alternative approach, a gene expression-based genome-wide association study (eGWAS) across 13 independent microarray experiments (including 251 gastric cancer cases and 428 controls), to identify top candidates (p<0.00001). Additionally, we conducted gene ontology analysis, pathway analysis and network analysis and identified aurora kinase A (AURKA) as our candidate. We observed that MLN8237, which is a specific inhibitor of AURKA, decreased the β-catenin and the phosphorylation of Akt1 and GSK-3β, as well as blocked the Akt and Wnt signaling pathways. Furthermore, MLN8237 arrested the cells in the G2/M phase. The activity of Wnt and Akt signaling pathways affected the level of histone methylation significantly, and we supposed that MLN8237 affected the level of histone methylation through these two signaling pathways. Additionally, the treatment of MLN8237 influenced the level of H3K4 me1/2/3 and H3K27 me1/2/3. Chip data on cell lines suggested that MLN8237 increases the level of H3K27 me3 on the promoter of Twist and inhibits EMT (epithelial-mesenchymal transition). In summary, AURKA is a potential therapeutic target in gastric cancer and induces EMT through histone methylation.

  11. Extracellular histones induce tissue factor expression in vascular endothelial cells via TLR and activation of NF-κB and AP-1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinyu; Li, Lin; Liu, Jin; Lv, Ben; Chen, Fangping

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular histones have been recognized recently as proinflammatory mediators; they are released from dying cells in response to inflammatory challenge, contributing to endothelial cell dysfunction, thrombin formation, organ failure, and death during sepsis. Clinical studies suggest that the plasma concentration of the histone-DNA complex is correlated with the severity of DIC and is a poor independent prognostic marker in sepsis. In addition, platelet activation stimulates thrombus formation. Whether histones contribute to procoagulant activity in other ways remains elusive. In this study, we confirmed that histones induce tissue factor (TF) expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and macrophages. However, histones did not affect TF pathway inhibitor expression. Moreover, blocking the cell surface receptors TLR4 and TLR2 with specific neutralizing antibodies significantly reduced histone-induced TF expression. Furthermore, histones enhanced the nuclear translocation of NF-κB (c-Rel/p65) and AP-1 expression in a time-dependent manner in ECs. Mutating NF-κB and AP-1 significantly reduced histone-induced TF expression. Altogether, our experiments suggest that histone induces TF expression in ECs via cell surface receptors TLR4 and TLR2, simultaneously depending on the activation of the transcription factors NF-κB and AP-1.

  12. Activation of p53 Transcriptional Activity by SMRT: a Histone Deacetylase 3-Independent Function of a Transcriptional Corepressor

    PubMed Central

    Adikesavan, Anbu Karani; Karmakar, Sudipan; Pardo, Patricia; Wang, Liguo; Liu, Shuang; Li, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The silencing mediator of retinoic acid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT) is an established histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3)-dependent transcriptional corepressor. Microarray analyses of MCF-7 cells transfected with control or SMRT small interfering RNA revealed SMRT regulation of genes involved in DNA damage responses, and the levels of the DNA damage marker γH2AX as well as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage were elevated in SMRT-depleted cells treated with doxorubicin. A number of these genes are established p53 targets. SMRT knockdown decreased the activity of two p53-dependent reporter genes as well as the expression of p53 target genes, such as CDKN1A (which encodes p21). SMRT bound directly to p53 and was recruited to p53 binding sites within the p21 promoter. Depletion of GPS2 and TBL1, components of the SMRT corepressor complex, but not histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) decreased p21-luciferase activity. p53 bound to the SMRT deacetylase activation domain (DAD), which mediates HDAC3 binding and activation, and HDAC3 could attenuate p53 binding to the DAD region of SMRT. Moreover, an HDAC3 binding-deficient SMRT DAD mutant coactivated p53 transcriptional activity. Collectively, these data highlight a biological role for SMRT in mediating DNA damage responses and suggest a model where p53 binding to the DAD limits HDAC3 interaction with this coregulator, thereby facilitating SMRT coactivation of p53-dependent gene expression. PMID:24449765

  13. Crebinostat: a novel cognitive enhancer that inhibits histone deacetylase activity and modulates chromatin-mediated neuroplasticity.

    PubMed

    Fass, Daniel M; Reis, Surya A; Ghosh, Balaram; Hennig, Krista M; Joseph, Nadine F; Zhao, Wen-Ning; Nieland, Thomas J F; Guan, Ji-Song; Kuhnle, Chelsea E Groves; Tang, Weiping; Barker, Douglas D; Mazitschek, Ralph; Schreiber, Stuart L; Tsai, Li-Huei; Haggarty, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    Long-term memory formation is known to be critically dependent upon de novo gene expression in the brain. As a consequence, pharmacological enhancement of the transcriptional processes mediating long-term memory formation provides a potential therapeutic strategy for cognitive disorders involving aberrant neuroplasticity. Here we focus on the identification and characterization of small molecule inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs) as enhancers of CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein)-regulated transcription and modulators of chromatin-mediated neuroplasticity. Using a CREB reporter gene cell line, we screened a library of small molecules structurally related to known HDAC inhibitors leading to the identification of a probe we termed crebinostat that produced robust activation of CREB-mediated transcription. Further characterization of crebinostat revealed its potent inhibition of the deacetylase activity of recombinant class I HDACs 1, 2, 3, and class IIb HDAC6, with weaker inhibition of the class I HDAC8 and no significant inhibition of the class IIa HDACs 4, 5, 7, and 9. In cultured mouse primary neurons, crebinostat potently induced acetylation of both histone H3 and histone H4 as well as enhanced the expression of the CREB target gene Egr1 (early growth response 1). Using a hippocampus-dependent, contextual fear conditioning paradigm, mice systemically administered crebinostat for a ten day time period exhibited enhanced memory. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms of memory enhancement by HDAC inhibitors, whole genome transcriptome profiling of cultured mouse primary neurons treated with crebinostat, combined with bioinformatic analyses of CREB-target genes, was performed revealing a highly connected protein-protein interaction network reflecting modules of genes important to synaptic structure and plasticity. Consistent with these findings, crebinostat treatment increased the density of synapsin-1 punctae along dendrites in cultured

  14. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-induced histone hyperacetylation contributes to its antiproliferative and differentiation-inducing activities.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Seungwan; Lee, Yong Gyu; Kim, Ji Hye; Byeon, Se Eun; Rho, Ho Sik; Cho, Jae Youl; Hong, Sungyoul

    2012-01-01

    Histone acetylation is linked to the control of chromatin remodeling, which is involved in cell growth, proliferation, and differentiation. It is not fully understood whether cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), a representative differentiation-inducing molecule, is able to modulate histone acetylation as part of its anticancer activity. In the present study, we aimed to address this issue using cell-permeable cAMP, i.e. dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP) and C6 glioma cells. As reported previously, under the conditions of our studies, treatment with dbcAMP clearly arrested C6 cell proliferation and altered their morphology. Its antiproliferative and differentiation-inducing activity in C6 glioma cells involved upregulation of p219WAF/CIP), p27(kip1), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and Cx43, as well as downregulation of vimentin. Furthermore, dbcAMP modulated the phosphorylation of ERK and Akt in a time-dependent manner and altered the colocalization pattern of phospho-Src and the actin cytoskeleton. Interestingly, dbcAMP upregulated the enzyme activity of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and, in parallel, enhanced cellular acetyllysine levels. Finally, the hyperacetylation-inducing compound, sodium butyrate (NaB), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, displayed similar anticancer activity to dbcAMP. Therefore, our data suggest that antiproliferative and differentiation-inducing activities of dbcAMP may be generated by its enhanced hyperacetylation function.

  15. Crystal structure of the nucleosome containing histone H3 with crotonylated lysine 122.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuya; Horikoshi, Naoki; Kato, Daiki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2016-01-15

    The crotonylation of histones is an important post-translational modification, and epigenetically functions in the regulation of genomic DNA activity. The histone modifications in the structured "histone-fold" domains are considered to have an especially important impact on the nucleosome structure and dynamics. In the present study, we reconstituted the human nucleosome containing histone H3.2 crotonylated at the Lys122 residue, and determined its crystal structure at 2.56 Å resolution. We found that the crotonylation of the H3 Lys122 residue does not affect the overall nucleosome structure, but locally impedes the formation of the water-mediated hydrogen bond with the DNA backbone. Consistently, thermal stability assays revealed that the H3 Lys122 crotonylation, as well as the H3 Lys122 acetylation, clearly reduced the histone-DNA association.

  16. Global and specific responses of the histone acetylome to systematic perturbation.

    PubMed

    Feller, Christian; Forné, Ignasi; Imhof, Axel; Becker, Peter B

    2015-02-05

    Regulation of histone acetylation is fundamental to the utilization of eukaryotic genomes in chromatin. Aberrant acetylation contributes to disease and can be clinically combated by inhibiting the responsible enzymes. Our knowledge of the histone acetylation system is patchy because we so far lacked the methodology to describe acetylation patterns and their genesis by integrated enzyme activities. We devised a generally applicable, mass spectrometry-based strategy to precisely and accurately quantify combinatorial modification motifs. This was applied to generate a comprehensive inventory of acetylation motifs on histones H3 and H4 in Drosophila cells. Systematic depletion of known or suspected acetyltransferases and deacetylases revealed specific alterations of histone acetylation signatures, established enzyme-substrate relationships, and unveiled an extensive crosstalk between neighboring modifications. Unexpectedly, overall histone acetylation levels remained remarkably constant upon depletion of individual acetyltransferases. Conceivably, the acetylation level is adjusted to maintain the global charge neutralization of chromatin and the stability of nuclei.

  17. Hyperglycemia Induces a Dynamic Cooperativity of Histone Methylase and Demethylase Enzymes Associated With Gene-Activating Epigenetic Marks That Coexist on the Lysine Tail

    PubMed Central

    Brasacchio, Daniella; Okabe, Jun; Tikellis, Christos; Balcerczyk, Aneta; George, Prince; Baker, Emma K.; Calkin, Anna C.; Brownlee, Michael; Cooper, Mark E.; El-Osta, Assam

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Results from the Diabetes Control Complications Trial (DCCT) and the subsequent Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) Study and more recently from the U.K. Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) have revealed that the deleterious end-organ effects that occurred in both conventional and more aggressively treated subjects continued to operate >5 years after the patients had returned to usual glycemic control and is interpreted as a legacy of past glycemia known as “hyperglycemic memory.” We have hypothesized that transient hyperglycemia mediates persistent gene-activating events attributed to changes in epigenetic information. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Models of transient hyperglycemia were used to link NFκB-p65 gene expression with H3K4 and H3K9 modifications mediated by the histone methyltransferases (Set7 and SuV39h1) and the lysine-specific demethylase (LSD1) by the immunopurification of soluble NFκB-p65 chromatin. RESULTS The sustained upregulation of the NFκB-p65 gene as a result of ambient or prior hyperglycemia was associated with increased H3K4m1 but not H3K4m2 or H3K4m3. Furthermore, glucose was shown to have other epigenetic effects, including the suppression of H3K9m2 and H3K9m3 methylation on the p65 promoter. Finally, there was increased recruitment of the recently identified histone demethylase LSD1 to the p65 promoter as a result of prior hyperglycemia. CONCLUSIONS These studies indicate that the active transcriptional state of the NFκB-p65 gene is linked with persisting epigenetic marks such as enhanced H3K4 and reduced H3K9 methylation, which appear to occur as a result of effects of the methyl-writing and methyl-erasing histone enzymes. PMID:19208907

  18. Loss of H3K9me3 Correlates with ATM Activation and Histone H2AX Phosphorylation Deficiencies in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haoyue; Sun, Linlin; Wang, Kun; Wu, Di; Trappio, Mason; Witting, Celeste; Cao, Kan

    2016-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that defective DNA damage response (DDR) plays a key role in the premature aging phenotypes in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). Studies document widespread alterations in histone modifications in HGPS cells, especially, the global loss of histone H3 trimethylated on lysine 9 (H3K9me3). In this study, we explore the potential connection(s) between H3K9me3 loss and the impaired DDR in HGPS. When cells are exposed to a DNA-damaging agent Doxorubicin (Dox), double strand breaks (DSBs) are generated that result in the phosphorylation of histone H2A variant H2AX (gammaH2AX) within an hour. We find that the intensities of gammaH2AX foci appear significantly weaker in the G0/G1 phase HGPS cells compared to control cells. This reduction is associated with a delay in the recruitment of essential DDR factors. We further demonstrate that ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is responsible for the amplification of gammaH2AX signals at DSBs during G0/G1 phase, and its activation is inhibited in the HGPS cells that display significant loss of H3K9me3. Moreover, methylene (MB) blue treatment, which is known to save heterochromatin loss in HGPS, restores H3K9me3, stimulates ATM activity, increases gammaH2AX signals and rescues deficient DDR. In summary, this study demonstrates an early DDR defect of attenuated gammaH2AX signals in G0/G1 phase HGPS cells and provides a plausible connection between H3K9me3 loss and DDR deficiency. PMID:27907109

  19. Loss of H3K9me3 Correlates with ATM Activation and Histone H2AX Phosphorylation Deficiencies in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haoyue; Sun, Linlin; Wang, Kun; Wu, Di; Trappio, Mason; Witting, Celeste; Cao, Kan

    2016-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that defective DNA damage response (DDR) plays a key role in the premature aging phenotypes in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). Studies document widespread alterations in histone modifications in HGPS cells, especially, the global loss of histone H3 trimethylated on lysine 9 (H3K9me3). In this study, we explore the potential connection(s) between H3K9me3 loss and the impaired DDR in HGPS. When cells are exposed to a DNA-damaging agent Doxorubicin (Dox), double strand breaks (DSBs) are generated that result in the phosphorylation of histone H2A variant H2AX (gammaH2AX) within an hour. We find that the intensities of gammaH2AX foci appear significantly weaker in the G0/G1 phase HGPS cells compared to control cells. This reduction is associated with a delay in the recruitment of essential DDR factors. We further demonstrate that ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is responsible for the amplification of gammaH2AX signals at DSBs during G0/G1 phase, and its activation is inhibited in the HGPS cells that display significant loss of H3K9me3. Moreover, methylene (MB) blue treatment, which is known to save heterochromatin loss in HGPS, restores H3K9me3, stimulates ATM activity, increases gammaH2AX signals and rescues deficient DDR. In summary, this study demonstrates an early DDR defect of attenuated gammaH2AX signals in G0/G1 phase HGPS cells and provides a plausible connection between H3K9me3 loss and DDR deficiency.

  20. A small molecule modulates Jumonji histone demethylase activity and selectively inhibits cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Chang, Jianjun; Varghese, Diana; Dellinger, Michael; Kumar, Subodh; Best, Anne M.; Ruiz, Julio; Bruick, Richard; Peña-Llopis, Samuel; Xu, Junjie; Babinski, David J.; Frantz, Doug E.; Brekken, Rolf A.; Quinn, Amy M.; Simeonov, Anton; Easmon, Johnny; Martinez, Elisabeth D.

    2013-01-01

    The pharmacological inhibition of general transcriptional regulators has the potential to block growth through targeting multiple tumorigenic signaling pathways simultaneously. Here, using an innovative cell-based screen, we identify a structurally unique small molecule (named JIB-04) which specifically inhibits the activity of the Jumonji family of histone demethylases in vitro, in cancer cells, and in tumors in vivo. Unlike known inhibitors, JIB-04 is not a competitive inhibitor of α-ketoglutarate. In cancer but not in patient-matched normal cells, JIB-04 alters a subset of transcriptional pathways and blocks viability. In mice, JIB-04 reduces tumor burden and prolongs survival. Importantly, we find that patients with breast tumors that overexpress Jumonji demethylases have significantly lower survival. Thus JIB-04, a novel inhibitor of Jumonji demethylases in vitro and in vivo, constitutes a unique potential therapeutic and research tool against cancer, and validates the use of unbiased cellular screens to discover chemical modulators with disease relevance. PMID:23792809

  1. Transdifferentiation. Sequential histone-modifying activities determine the robustness of transdifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Zuryn, Steven; Ahier, Arnaud; Portoso, Manuela; White, Esther Redhouse; Morin, Marie-Charlotte; Margueron, Raphaël; Jarriault, Sophie

    2014-08-15

    Natural interconversions between distinct somatic cell types have been reported in species as diverse as jellyfish and mice. The efficiency and reproducibility of some reprogramming events represent unexploited avenues in which to probe mechanisms that ensure robust cell conversion. We report that a conserved H3K27me3/me2 demethylase, JMJD-3.1, and the H3K4 methyltransferase Set1 complex cooperate to ensure invariant transdifferentiation (Td) of postmitotic Caenorhabditis elegans hindgut cells into motor neurons. At single-cell resolution, robust conversion requires stepwise histone-modifying activities, functionally partitioned into discrete phases of Td through nuclear degradation of JMJD-3.1 and phase-specific interactions with transcription factors that have conserved roles in cell plasticity and terminal fate selection. Our results draw parallels between epigenetic mechanisms underlying robust Td in nature and efficient cell reprogramming in vitro.

  2. The histone acetyltransferase MOF activates hypothalamic polysialylation to prevent diet-induced obesity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Brenachot, Xavier; Rigault, Caroline; Nédélec, Emmanuelle; Laderrière, Amélie; Khanam, Tasneem; Gouazé, Alexandra; Chaudy, Sylvie; Lemoine, Aleth; Datiche, Frédérique; Gascuel, Jean; Pénicaud, Luc; Benani, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Overfeeding causes rapid synaptic remodeling in hypothalamus feeding circuits. Polysialylation of cell surface molecules is a key step in this neuronal rewiring and allows normalization of food intake. Here we examined the role of hypothalamic polysialylation in the long-term maintenance of body weight, and deciphered the molecular sequence underlying its nutritional regulation. We found that upon high fat diet (HFD), reduced hypothalamic polysialylation exacerbated the diet-induced obese phenotype in mice. Upon HFD, the histone acetyltransferase MOF was rapidly recruited on the St8sia4 polysialyltransferase-encoding gene. Mof silencing in the mediobasal hypothalamus of adult mice prevented activation of the St8sia4 gene transcription, reduced polysialylation, altered the acute homeostatic feeding response to HFD and increased the body weight gain. These findings indicate that impaired hypothalamic polysialylation contribute to the development of obesity, and establish a role for MOF in the brain control of energy balance. PMID:25161885

  3. Identification of the KDM2/7 Histone Lysine Demethylase Subfamily Inhibitor and its Antiproliferative Activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Histone Nε-methyl lysine demethylases KDM2/7 have been identified as potential targets for cancer therapies. On the basis of the crystal structure of KDM7B, we designed and prepared a series of hydroxamate analogues bearing an alkyl chain. Enzyme assays revealed that compound 9 potently inhibits KDM2A, KDM7A, and KDM7B, with IC50s of 6.8, 0.2, and 1.2 μM, respectively. While inhibitors of KDM4s did not show any effect on cancer cells tested, the KDM2/7-subfamily inhibitor 9 exerted antiproliferative activity, indicating the potential for KDM2/7 inhibitors as anticancer agents. PMID:23964788

  4. Antimalarial activity of phenylthiazolyl-bearing hydroxamate-based histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dow, Geoffrey S; Chen, Yufeng; Andrews, Katherine T; Caridha, Diana; Gerena, Lucia; Gettayacamin, Montip; Johnson, Jacob; Li, Qigui; Melendez, Victor; Obaldia, Nicanor; Tran, Thanh N; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2008-10-01

    The antimalarial activity and pharmacology of a series of phenylthiazolyl-bearing hydroxamate-based histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) was evaluated. In in vitro growth inhibition assays approximately 50 analogs were evaluated against four drug resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum. The range of 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)s) was 0.0005 to >1 microM. Five analogs exhibited IC(50)s of <3 nM, and three of these exhibited selectivity indices of >600. The most potent compound, WR301801 (YC-2-88) was shown to cause hyperacetylation of P. falciparum histones, which is a marker for HDAC inhibition in eukaryotic cells. The compound also inhibited malarial and mammalian HDAC activity in functional assays at low nanomolar concentrations. WR301801 did not exhibit cures in P. berghei-infected mice at oral doses as high as 640 mg/kg/day for 3 days or in P. falciparum-infected Aotus lemurinus lemurinus monkeys at oral doses of 32 mg/kg/day for 3 days, despite high relative bioavailability. The failure of monotherapy in mice may be due to a short half-life, since the compound was rapidly hydrolyzed to an inactive acid metabolite by loss of its hydroxamate group in vitro (half-life of 11 min in mouse microsomes) and in vivo (half-life in mice of 3.5 h after a single oral dose of 50 mg/kg). However, WR301801 exhibited cures in P. berghei-infected mice when combined at doses of 52 mg/kg/day orally with subcurative doses of chloroquine. Next-generation HDACIs with greater metabolic stability than WR301801 may be useful as antimalarials if combined appropriately with conventional antimalarial drugs.

  5. A quantitative multiplexed mass spectrometry assay for studying the kinetic of residue-specific histone acetylation.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yin-Ming; Henry, Ryan A; Andrews, Andrew J

    2014-12-01

    Histone acetylation is involved in gene regulation and, most importantly, aberrant regulation of histone acetylation is correlated with major human diseases. Although many lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) have been characterized as being capable of acetylating multiple lysine residues on histones, how different factors such as enzyme complexes or external stimuli (e.g. KAT activators or inhibitors) alter KAT specificity remains elusive. In order to comprehensively understand how the homeostasis of histone acetylation is maintained, a method that can quantitate acetylation levels of individual lysines on histones is needed. Here we demonstrate that our mass spectrometry (MS)-based method accomplishes this goal. In addition, the high throughput, high sensitivity, and high dynamic range of this method allows for effectively and accurately studying steady-state kinetics. Based on the kinetic parameters from in vitro enzymatic assays, we can determine the specificity and selectivity of a KAT and use this information to understand what factors influence histone acetylation. These approaches can be used to study the enzymatic mechanisms of histone acetylation as well as be adapted to other histone modifications. Understanding the post-translational modification of individual residues within the histones will provide a better picture of chromatin regulation in the cell.

  6. Histone Acetylation near the Nucleosome Dyad Axis Enhances Nucleosome Disassembly by RSC and SWI/SNF

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Nilanjana; North, Justin A.; Dechassa, Mekonnen Lemma; Manohar, Mridula; Prasad, Rashmi; Luger, Karolin; Ottesen, Jennifer J.; Poirier, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Signaling associated with transcription activation occurs through posttranslational modification of histones and is best exemplified by lysine acetylation. Lysines are acetylated in histone tails and the core domain/lateral surface of histone octamers. While acetylated lysines in histone tails are frequently recognized by other factors referred to as “readers,” which promote transcription, the mechanistic role of the modifications in the lateral surface of the histone octamer remains unclear. By using X-ray crystallography, we found that acetylated lysines 115 and 122 in histone H3 are solvent accessible, but in biochemical assays they appear not to interact with the bromodomains of SWI/SNF and RSC to enhance recruitment or nucleosome mobilization, as previously shown for acetylated lysines in H3 histone tails. Instead, we found that acetylation of lysines 115 and 122 increases the predisposition of nucleosomes for disassembly by SWI/SNF and RSC up to 7-fold, independent of bromodomains, and only in conjunction with contiguous nucleosomes. Thus, in combination with SWI/SNF and RSC, acetylation of lateral surface lysines in the histone octamer serves as a crucial regulator of nucleosomal dynamics distinct from the histone code readers and writers. PMID:26416878

  7. Regulation of SOD2 in Cancer by Histone Modifications and CpG Methylation: Closing the Loop Between Redox Biology and Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Cyr, Anthony R.; Hitchler, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2), encoded by the nuclear gene SOD2, is a critical mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme whose activity has broad implications in health and disease. Thirty years ago, Oberley and Buettner elegantly folded SOD2 into cancer biology with the free radical theory of cancer, which was built on the observation that many human cancers had reduced SOD2 activity. In the original formulation, the loss of SOD2 in tumor cells produced a state of perpetual oxidative stress, which, in turn, drove genetic instability, leading to cancer development. Recent Advances: In the past two decades, research has established that SOD2 transcriptional activity is controlled, at least in part, via epigenetic mechanisms at different stages in the development of human cancer. These mechanisms, which include histone methylation, histone acetylation, and DNA methylation, are increasingly recognized as being aberrantly regulated in human cancer. Indeed, the epigenetic progenitor model proposed by Henikoff posits that epigenetic events are central governing agents of carcinogenesis. Important recent advances in epigenetics research have indicated that the loss of SOD activity itself may contribute to changes in epigenetic regulation, establishing a vicious cycle that drives further epigenetic instability. Critical Issues: With these observations in mind, we propose an epigenetic revision to the free radical theory of cancer: that loss of SOD activity promotes epigenetic aberrancies, driving the epigenetic instability in tumor cells which produces broad phenotypic effects. Future Directions: The development of next-generation sequencing technologies and novel approaches in systems biology and bioinformatics promise to make testing this exciting model a reality in the near future. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1946–1955. PMID:22946823

  8. Histone Methylation by Temozolomide; A Classic DNA Methylating Anticancer Drug

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, Amanda J.; Diaz, Anthony Joseph; Mura, Hugo; Nyuwen, Lila; Coello, Daniel; Sheva, Saif; Maria, Nava; Gallo, James M.; Wang, Tieli

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aim The alkylating agent, temozolomide (TMZ), is considered the standard-of-care for high-grade astrocytomas –known as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)– an aggressive type of tumor with poor prognosis. The therapeutic benefit of TMZ is attributed to formation of DNA adducts involving the methylation of purine bases in DNA. We investigated the effects of TMZ on arginine and lysine amino acids, histone H3 peptides and histone H3 proteins. Materials and Methods Chemical modification of amino acids, histone H3 peptide and protein by TMZ was performed in phosphate buffer at physiological pH. The reaction products were examined by mass spectrometry and western blot analysis. Results Our results showed that TMZ following conversion to a methylating cation, can methylate histone H3 peptide and histone H3 protein, suggesting that TMZ exerts its anticancer activity not only through its interaction with DNA, but also through alterations of protein post-translational modifications. Conclusion The possibility that TMZ can methylate histones involved with epigenetic regulation of protein indicates a potentially unique mechanism of action. The study will contribute to the understanding the anticancer activity of TMZ in order to develop novel targeted molecular strategies to advance the cancer treatment. PMID:27354585

  9. Histone acetylation: from code to web and router via intrinsically disordered regions.

    PubMed

    Horikoshi, Masami

    2013-01-01

    Structural changes of chromatin, which consists of nucleosomes and nucleosome-associated factors, lead to functional changes that are important determinants of eukaryotic gene regulation. These structural changes are regulated by modifications of histones and DNA, both of which are components of nucleosomes, as well as by replacement of histone variants and the actions of noncoding RNAs. In studies of chromatin modifications, a great deal of attention has been paid to histone acetylation. Progress in understanding this subject has been extensive, including i) elucidation of the relationship of histone acetylation and gene activity; ii) the first isolation of a histonemodifying enzyme; iii) the first identification of a factor that recognizes a modified site; iv) elucidation of the mechanism by which histone modification leads to structural changes in nucleosomes; and v) elucidation of the mechanism of border formation between euchromatin and heterochromatin. Histone acetylation is considered to be fundamental in several fields, including studies of a) the role of chromatin and epigenetics in higher-order biochemical systems such as transcription, DNA replication, and repair; b) biological phenomena such as cell proliferation and differentiation; and c) cancer and aging, potentially leading to clinical applications. In this review, I will discuss the histone code hypothesis, at one time believed to represent a unified theory regarding the functions of histone modification. In addition, I will describe the "modification web theory, " by which the problems in the histone code hypothesis can be overcome, as well as the "signal router theory, " which explains the mechanisms of formation, development, and evolution of the modification web from a structural viewpoint. Lastly, I will illustrate how these novel theories partially explain the robustness of biological systems against various perturbations, and elucidate the strategy that a cell employs to avoid fatal

  10. Anti-histone acetyltransferase activity from allspice extracts inhibits androgen receptor-dependent prostate cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoo-Hyun; Hong, Soon Won; Jun, Woojin; Cho, Hong Yon; Kim, Han-Cheon; Jung, Myung Gu; Wong, Jiemin; Kim, Ha-Il; Kim, Chang-Hoon; Yoon, Ho-Geun

    2007-11-01

    Histone acetylation depends on the activity of two enzyme families, histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and deacetylase (HDAC). In this study, we screened various plant extracts to find potent HAT inhibitors. Hot water extracts of allspice inhibited HAT activity, especially p300 and CBP (40% at 100 microg/ml). The mRNA levels of two androgen receptor (AR) regulated genes, PSA and TSC22, decreased with allspice treatment (100 microg/ml). Importantly, in IP western analysis, AR acetylation was dramatically decreased by allspice treatment.Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation indicated that the acetylation of histone H3 in the PSA and B2M promoter regions was also repressed. Finally, allspice treatment reduced the growth of human prostate cancer cells, LNCaP (50% growth inhibition at 200 microg/ml). Taken together, our data indicate that the potent HAT inhibitory activity of allspice reduced AR and histone acetylation and led to decreased transcription of AR target genes, resulting in inhibition of prostate cancer cell growth.

  11. Histone deacetylase inhibitors upregulate Rap1GAP and inhibit Rap activity in thyroid tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaoyun; Korch, Christopher; Meinkoth, Judy L

    2011-06-01

    Increases in Rap activity have been associated with tumor progression. Although activating mutations in Rap have not been described, downregulation of Rap1GAP is frequent in human tumors including thyroid carcinomas. In this study, we explored whether endogenous Rap1GAP expression could be restored to thyroid tumor cells. The effects of deacetylase inhibitors and a demethylating agent, individually and in combination, were examined in four differentiated and six anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) cell lines. Treatment with the structurally distinct histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, sodium butyrate and trichostatin A, increased Rap1GAP expression in all the differentiated thyroid carcinoma cell lines and in four of the six ATC cell lines. The demethylating agent, 5-aza-deoxycytidine, restored Rap1GAP expression in one anaplastic cell line and enhanced the effects of HDAC inhibitors in a second anaplastic cell line. Western blotting indicated that Rap2 was highly expressed in human thyroid cancer cells. Importantly, treatment with HDAC inhibitors impaired Rap2 activity in both differentiated and anaplastic tumor cell lines. The mechanism through which Rap activity is repressed appears to entail effects on the expression of multiple Rap regulators, including RapGEFs and RapGAPs. These results suggest that HDAC inhibitors may provide a tractable approach to impair Rap activity in human tumor cells.

  12. Ky-2, a Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, Enhances High-Salinity Stress Tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sako, Kaori; Kim, Jong-Myong; Matsui, Akihiro; Nakamura, Kotaro; Tanaka, Maho; Kobayashi, Makoto; Saito, Kazuki; Nishino, Norikazu; Kusano, Miyako; Taji, Teruaki; Yoshida, Minoru; Seki, Motoaki

    2016-04-01

    Adaptation to environmental stress requires genome-wide changes in gene expression. Histone modifications are involved in gene regulation, but the role of histone modifications under environmental stress is not well understood. To reveal the relationship between histone modification and environmental stress, we assessed the effects of inhibitors of histone modification enzymes during salinity stress. Treatment with Ky-2, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, enhanced high-salinity stress tolerance in Arabidopsis. We confirmed that Ky-2 possessed inhibition activity towards histone deacetylases by immunoblot analysis. To investigate how Ky-2 improved salt stress tolerance, we performed transcriptome and metabolome analysis. These data showed that the expression of salt-responsive genes and salt stress-related metabolites were increased by Ky-2 treatment under salinity stress. A mutant deficient in AtSOS1(Arabidopis thaliana SALT OVERLY SENSITIVE 1), which encodes an Na(+)/H(+)antiporter and was among the up-regulated genes, lost the salinity stress tolerance conferred by Ky-2. We confirmed that acetylation of histone H4 at AtSOS1 was increased by Ky-2 treatment. Moreover, Ky-2 treatment decreased the intracellular Na(+)accumulation under salinity stress, suggesting that enhancement of SOS1-dependent Na(+)efflux contributes to increased high-salinity stress tolerance caused by Ky-2 treatment.

  13. [Effect of gamma-radiation on the activity of proteases associated with spleen and brain nuclear histones of young and old rats].

    PubMed

    Kutsyĭ, M P

    2011-01-01

    It has been found that proteases specifically splitting histones are associated with histones from spleen and brain nuclei of 4- and 26-month-old rats. The activity ofproteases isolated together with histones increases after irradiation of rats with 10 Gy The activation degree of these proteases depends on the animal age and postradiation period. Activation ofhistone-associated proteases by means of gamma-radiation is more pronounced in spleen nuclei from old rats than from the young ones. Irradiation of animals has been found to reduce histone H1 and core histone contents in the spleen and brain nuclei of both young and old rats. The radiation-induced proteolysis ofhistone H1 and core histones in spleen and brain nuclei leads to chromatin deconden-sation and DNA degradation by nucleases. The activity of histone-associated proteases is substantially higher in the nuclei of intensively proliferating spleen cells than in the brain nuclei. The experimental data indicate that histone-associated proteases participate in the regulation of DNA transcription, replication, and degradation.

  14. [Cytochemical research on the matrix activity and status of the histone component of the neurocyte chromatin in the rat cerebellar cortex during postnatal differentiation].

    PubMed

    Grigor'eva, A V; Iarygin, V N

    1986-08-01

    Evident differences in the ammoniacal silver staining pattern of histones were demonstrated for neurones of different layers of adult rat cerebellar cortex. These differences were formed during postnatal differentiation. It has been also shown for Purkinje and granular cells that time-course of age-dependent changes in histone staining are not coincident with that for template activity of these cells.

  15. Enhancer of zeste homologue 2 plays an important role in neuroblastoma cell survival independent of its histone methyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Bate-Eya, Laurel T; Gierman, Hinco J; Ebus, Marli E; Koster, Jan; Caron, Huib N; Versteeg, Rogier; Dolman, M Emmy M; Molenaar, Jan J

    2017-04-01

    Neuroblastoma is predominantly characterised by chromosomal rearrangements. Next to V-Myc Avian Myelocytomatosis Viral Oncogene Neuroblastoma Derived Homolog (MYCN) amplification, chromosome 7 and 17q gains are frequently observed. We identified a neuroblastoma patient with a regional 7q36 gain, encompassing the enhancer of zeste homologue 2 (EZH2) gene. EZH2 is the histone methyltransferase of lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3K27me3) that forms the catalytic subunit of the polycomb repressive complex 2. H3K27me3 is commonly associated with the silencing of genes involved in cellular processes such as cell cycle regulation, cellular differentiation and cancer. High EZH2 expression correlated with poor prognosis and overall survival independent of MYCN amplification status. Unexpectedly, treatment of 3 EZH2-high expressing neuroblastoma cell lines (IMR32, CHP134 and NMB), with EZH2-specific inhibitors (GSK126 and EPZ6438) resulted in only a slight G1 arrest, despite maximum histone methyltransferase activity inhibition. Furthermore, colony formation in cell lines treated with the inhibitors was reduced only at concentrations much higher than necessary for complete inhibition of EZH2 histone methyltransferase activity. Knockdown of the complete protein with three independent shRNAs resulted in a strong apoptotic response and decreased cyclin D1 levels. This apoptotic response could be rescued by overexpressing EZH2ΔSET, a truncated form of wild-type EZH2 lacking the SET transactivation domain necessary for histone methyltransferase activity. Our findings suggest that high EZH2 expression, at least in neuroblastoma, has a survival function independent of its methyltransferase activity. This important finding highlights the need for studies on EZH2 beyond its methyltransferase function and the requirement for compounds that will target EZH2 as a complete protein.

  16. Developmental exposure to 50 parts-per-billion arsenic influences histone modifications and associated epigenetic machinery in a region- and sex-specific manner in the adult mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Christina R.; Hafez, Alexander K.; Solomon, Elizabeth R.; Allan, Andrea M.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies report that arsenic exposure via drinking water adversely impacts cognitive development in children and, in adults, can lead to greater psychiatric disease susceptibility, among other conditions. While it is known that arsenic toxicity alters the epigenome, very few studies have investigated its effects on chromatin architecture in the brain. We have previously demonstrated that exposure to a low level of arsenic (50 ppb) during all three trimesters of fetal/neonatal development induces deficits in adult hippocampal neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG), depressive-like symptoms, and alterations in gene expression in the adult mouse brain. As epigenetic processes control these outcomes, here we assess the impact of our developmental arsenic exposure (DAE) paradigm on global histone posttranslational modifications and expression of associated chromatin-modifying proteins in the dentate gyrus and frontal cortex (FC) of adult male and female mice. DAE influenced histone 3 K4 trimethylation with increased levels in the male DG and FC and decreased levels in the female DG (no change in female FC). The histone methyltransferase MLL exhibited a similar sex- and region- specific expression profile as H3K4me3 levels, while histone demethylase KDM5B expression trended in the opposite direction. DAE increased histone 3 K9 acetylation levels in the male DG along with histone acetyltransferase (HAT) expression of GCN5 and decreased H3K9ac levels in the male FC along with decreased HAT expression of GCN5 and PCAF. DAE decreased expression of histone deacetylase enzymes HDAC1 and HDAC2, which were concurrent with increased H3K9ac levels but only in the female DG. Levels of H3 and H3K9me3 were not influenced by DAE in either brain region of either sex. These findings suggest that exposure to a low, environmentally relevant level of arsenic during development induces alterations in the adult brain via histone modifications and chromatin modifiers a sex- and

  17. Tetraspanin CD9 modulates human lymphoma cellular proliferation via histone deacetylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Herr, Michael J.; Longhurst, Celia M.; Baker, Benjamin; Homayouni, Ramin; Speich, Henry E.; Kotha, Jayaprakash; Jennings, Lisa K.

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • CD9 is differentially expressed in human Burkitt’s lymphoma cells. • We found that CD9 expression promotes these cells proliferation. • CD9 expression also increases HDAC activity. • HDAC inhibition decreased both cell proliferation and importantly CD9 expression. • CD9 may dictate HDAC efficacy and play a role in HDAC regulation. - Abstract: Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) is a type of hematological malignancy that affects two percent of the overall population in the United States. Tetraspanin CD9 is a cell surface protein that has been thoroughly demonstrated to be a molecular facilitator of cellular phenotype. CD9 expression varies in two human lymphoma cell lines, Raji and BJAB. In this report, we investigated the functional relationship between CD9 and cell proliferation regulated by histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in these two cell lines. Introduction of CD9 expression in Raji cells resulted in significantly increased cell proliferation and HDAC activity compared to Mock transfected Raji cells. The increase in CD9–Raji cell proliferation was significantly inhibited by HDAC inhibitor (HDACi) treatment. Pretreatment of BJAB cells with HDAC inhibitors resulted in a significant decrease in endogenous CD9 mRNA and cell surface expression. BJAB cells also displayed decreased cell proliferation after HDACi treatment. These results suggest a significant relationship between CD9 expression and cell proliferation in human lymphoma cells that may be modulated by HDAC activity.

  18. Selective transcription and cellular proliferation induced by PDGF require histone deacetylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Catania, Annunziata; Iavarone, Carlo; Carlomagno, Stella M.; Chiariello, Mario . E-mail: chiariel@unina.it

    2006-05-05

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are key regulatory enzymes involved in the control of gene expression and their inhibition by specific drugs has been widely correlated to cell cycle arrest, terminal differentiation, and apoptosis. Here, we investigated whether HDAC activity was required for PDGF-dependent signal transduction and cellular proliferation. Exposure of PDGF-stimulated NIH3T3 fibroblasts to the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) potently repressed the expression of a group of genes correlated to PDGF-dependent cellular growth and pro-survival activity. Moreover, we show that TSA interfered with STAT3-dependent transcriptional activity induced by PDGF. Still, neither phosphorylation nor nuclear translocation and DNA-binding in vitro and in vivo of STAT3 were affected by using TSA to interfere with PDGF stimulation. Finally, TSA treatment resulted in the suppression of PDGF-dependent cellular proliferation without affecting cellular survival of NIH3T3 cells. Our data indicate that inhibition of HDAC activity antagonizes the mitogenic effect of PDGF, suggesting that these drugs may specifically act on the expression of STAT-dependent, PDGF-responsive genes.

  19. Regulation of eNOS enzyme activity by posttranslational modification.

    PubMed

    Heiss, Elke H; Dirsch, Verena M

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) employs multiple different cellular control mechanisms impinging on level and activity of the enzyme. This review aims at summarizing the current knowledge on the posttranslational modifications of eNOS, including acylation, nitrosylation, phosphorylation, acetylation, glycosylation and glutathionylation. Sites, mediators and impact on enzyme localization and activity of the single modifications will be discussed. Moreover, interdependence, cooperativity and competition between the different posttranslational modifications will be elaborated with special emphasis on the susceptibility of eNOS to metabolic cues.

  20. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition Activates Transgene Expression from Integration-Defective Lentiviral Vectors in Dividing and Non-Dividing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pelascini, Laetitia P.L.; Janssen, Josephine M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Integration-defective lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) are being increasingly deployed in both basic and preclinical gene transfer settings. Often, however, the IDLV transgene expression profile is muted when compared to that of their integration-proficient counterparts. We hypothesized that the episomal nature of IDLVs turns them into preferential targets for epigenetic silencing involving chromatin-remodeling histone deacetylation. Therefore, vectors carrying an array of cis-acting elements and transcriptional unit components were assembled with the aid of packaging constructs encoding either the wild-type or the class I mutant D116N integrase moieties. The transduction levels and transgene-product yields provided by each vector class were assessed in the presence and absence of the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors sodium butyrate and trichostatin A. To investigate the role of the target cell replication status, we performed experiments in growth-arrested human mesenchymal stem cells and in post-mitotic syncytial myotubes. We found that IDLVs are acutely affected by HDACs regardless of their genetic makeup or target cell replication rate. Interestingly, the magnitude of IDLV transgene expression rescue due to HDAC inhibition varied in a vector backbone– and cell type–dependent manner. Finally, investigation of histone modifications by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by quantitative PCR (ChIP-qPCR) revealed a paucity of euchromatin marks distributed along IDLV genomes when compared to those measured on isogenic integration-competent vector templates. These findings support the view that IDLVs constitute preferential targets for epigenetic silencing involving histone deacetylation, which contributes to dampening their full transcriptional potential. Our data provide leads on how to most optimally titrate and deploy these promising episomal gene delivery vehicles. PMID:23140481

  1. Suppression of p53 activity through the cooperative action of Ski and histone deacetylase SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yasumichi; Iemura, Shun-ichiro; Natsume, Tohru; Miyazawa, Keiji; Imamura, Takeshi

    2011-02-25

    Ski was originally identified as an oncogene based on the fact that Ski overexpression transformed chicken and quail embryo fibroblasts. Consistent with these proposed oncogenic roles, Ski is overexpressed in various human tumors. However, whether and how Ski functions in mammalian tumorigenesis has not been fully investigated. Here, we show that Ski interacts with p53 and attenuates the biological functions of p53. Ski overexpression attenuated p53-dependent transactivation, whereas Ski knockdown enhanced the transcriptional activity of p53. Interestingly, Ski bound to the histone deacetylase SIRT1 and stabilized p53-SIRT1 interaction to promote p53 deacetylation, which subsequently decreased the DNA binding activity of p53. Consistent with the ability of Ski to inactivate p53, overexpressing Ski desensitized cells to genotoxic drugs and Nutlin-3, a small-molecule antagonist of Mdm2 that stabilizes p53 and activates the p53 pathway, whereas knocking down Ski increased the cellular sensitivity to these agents. These results indicate that Ski negatively regulates p53 and suggest that the p53-Ski-SIRT1 axis is an attractive target for cancer therapy.

  2. Cryochemical modification, activity, and toxicity of dioxidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernaya, O. I.; Shabatin, V. P.; Shabatina, T. I.; Khvatov, D. I.; Semenov, A. M.; Yudina, T. P.; Danilov, V. S.

    2017-02-01

    Dioxidine nanoparticles are prepared via cryochemical modification of the pharmacopoeial dioxidine substance. The form of the cryomodified dioxidine is characterized by data from 1H NMR spectroscopy; X-ray diffraction analysis; such thermal analytical methods as TG and DSC; low-temperature argon adsorption; and transmission electron microscopy. It is shown that the cryomodified samples are synthesized in the form of dioxidine nanocrystals 50-300 nm in size, with a crystal structure differing from that of the initial pharmacopoeial substance. The prepared cryomodified dioxidine nanoparticles inhibit the growth of E. coli 52, S. aureus 144, M. cyaneum 98, and B. cereus 9 better than the initial pharmacopoeial substance, and have comparable chronic toxicity.

  3. Sodium arsenite represses the expression of myogenin in C2C12 mouse myoblast cells through histone modifications and altered expression of Ezh2, Glp, and Igf-1

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Gia-Ming

    2012-05-01

    Arsenic is a toxicant commonly found in water systems and chronic exposure can result in adverse developmental effects including increased neonatal death, stillbirths, and miscarriages, low birth weight, and altered locomotor activity. Previous studies indicate that 20 nM sodium arsenite exposure to C2C12 mouse myocyte cells delayed myoblast differentiation due to reduced myogenin expression, the transcription factor that differentiates myoblasts into myotubes. In this study, several mechanisms by which arsenic could alter myogenin expression were examined. Exposing differentiating C2C12 cells to 20 nM arsenic increased H3K9 dimethylation (H3K9me2) and H3K9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) by 3-fold near the transcription start site of myogenin, which is indicative of increased repressive marks, and reduced H3K9 acetylation (H3K9Ac) by 0.5-fold, indicative of reduced permissive marks. Protein expression of Glp or Ehmt1, a H3-K9 methyltransferase, was also increased by 1.6-fold in arsenic-exposed cells. In addition to the altered histone remodeling status on the myogenin promoter, protein and mRNA levels of Igf-1, a myogenic growth factor, were significantly repressed by arsenic exposure. Moreover, a 2-fold induction of Ezh2 expression, and an increased recruitment of Ezh2 (3.3-fold) and Dnmt3a (∼ 2-fold) to the myogenin promoter at the transcription start site (− 40 to + 42), were detected in the arsenic-treated cells. Together, we conclude that the repressed myogenin expression in arsenic-exposed C2C12 cells was likely due to a combination of reduced expression of Igf-1, enhanced nuclear expression and promoter recruitment of Ezh2, and altered histone remodeling status on myogenin promoter (− 40 to + 42). -- Highlights: ► Igf-1 expression is decreased in C2C12 cells after 20 nM arsenite exposure. ► Arsenic exposure alters histone remodeling on the myogenin promoter. ► Glp expression, a H3–K9 methyltransferase, was increased in arsenic-exposed cells. ► Ezh2

  4. Moderate increase in histone acetylation activates the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter and remodels its nucleosome structure.

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, J; Truss, M; Bode, J; Beato, M

    1996-01-01

    The mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter is regulated by steroid hormones through a hormone-responsive region that is organized in a positioned nucleosome. Hormone induction leads to a structural change of this nucleosome which makes its DNA more sensitive to cleavage by DNase I and enables simultaneous binding of all relevant transcription factors. In cells carrying either episomal or chromosomally integrated MMTV promoters, moderate acetylation of core histones, generated by treatment with low concentrations of the histone deacetylase inhibitors sodium butyrate or trichostatin A, enhances transcription from the MMTV promoter in the absence of hormone and potentiates transactivation by either glucocorticoids or progestins. At higher concentrations, histone deacetylase inhibitors reduce basal and hormone induced MMTV transcription. Inducing inhibitor concentrations lead to the same type of nucleosomal DNase I hypersensitivity as hormone treatment, suggesting that moderate acetylation of core histone activates the MMTV promoter by mechanisms involving chromatin remodeling similar to that generated by the inducing hormones. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8855250

  5. Characterization of Histone Modifications Associated with Inactive X-Chromosome in Trophoblast Stem Cells, eXtra-Embryonic Endoderm Cells and in In Vitro Derived Undifferentiated and Differentiated Epiblast Like Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maduro, Cheryl; Den Braanker, Hannah; Boers, Ruben; Kurek, Dorota; Gribnau, Joost

    2016-01-01

    In mouse, X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) can either be imprinted or random. Imprinted XCI (iXCI) is considered unstable and depending on continuous Xist expression, whereas random XCI (rXCI) is stably maintained even in the absence of Xist. Here we have systematically examined epigenetic modifications associated with the inactive X-chromosome (Xi) in Trophoblast Stem cells, eXtra-Embryonic Endoderm Cells, undifferentiated and differentiated Epiblast Like Stem Cells in order to understand intrinsic differences in epigenetic mechanisms involved in silencing of the inactive X-chromosome in lineages presenting iXCI and rXCI. Whereas euchromatic histone modifications are predominantly lost from the Xi territory in all cell types, the accumulation of heterochromatic modifications diverges in between the analysed cell lineages. Particularly, only the Xi of multipotent Trophoblast (iXCI) and Epiblast stem cells (rXCI) display a visible accumulation of Polycomb Repressive Complexes (PRCs), in contrast to the Xi in differentiated Epiblast Like Stem Cells and eXtra-embryonic Endoderm cells. Despite this, the histone modifications catalysed by PRCs, ubH2AK119 and H3K27me3, remain the best heterochromatic markers for the Xi in all assessed lineages. Heterochromatic chromatin modifications associated with the Xi are a reflection of the epigenetic landscape of the entire genome of the assessed cell regardless whether XCI is imprinted or random. PMID:27977710

  6. Histone Methylation and microRNA-dependent Regulation of Epigenetic Activities in Neural Progenitor Self-Renewal and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Cacci, Emanuele; Negri, Rodolfo; Biagioni, Stefano; Lupo, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Neural stem/progenitor cell (NSPC) self-renewal and differentiation in the developing and the adult brain are controlled by extra-cellular signals and by the inherent competence of NSPCs to produce appropriate responses. Stage-dependent responsiveness of NSPCs to extrinsic cues is orchestrated at the epigenetic level. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modifications and non-coding RNA-mediated regulation control crucial aspects of NSPC development and function, and are also implicated in pathological conditions. While their roles in the regulation of stem cell fate have been largely explored in pluripotent stem cell models, the epigenetic signature of NSPCs is also key to determine their multipotency as well as their progressive bias towards specific differentiation outcomes. Here we review recent developments in this field, focusing on the roles of histone methylation marks and the protein complexes controlling their deposition in NSPCs of the developing cerebral cortex and the adult subventricular zone. In this context, we describe how bivalent promoters, carrying antagonistic epigenetic modifications, feature during multiple steps of neural development, from neural lineage specification to neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, we discuss the emerging cross-talk between epigenetic regulators and microRNAs, and how the interplay between these different layers of regulation can finely tune the expression of genes controlling NSPC maintenance and differentiation. In particular, we highlight recent advances in the identification of astrocyte-enriched microRNAs and their function in cell fate choices of NSPCs differentiating towards glial lineages.

  7. Histone H3 Acetyl K9 and Histone H3 Tri Methyl K4 as Prognostic Markers for Patients with Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Susanne; Zhu, Junyan; Mayr, Doris; Kuhn, Christina; Schulze, Sandra; Hofmann, Simone; Dannecker, Christian; Jeschke, Udo; Kost, Bernd P.

    2017-01-01

    Chromatin remodeling alters gene expression in carcinoma tissue. Although cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women worldwide, a systematic study about the prognostic value of specific changes in the chromatin structure, such as histone acetylation or histone methylation, is missing. In this study, the expression of histone H3 acetyl K9, which is known to denote active regions at enhancers and promoters, and histone H3 tri methyl K4, which preferentially identifies active gene promoters, were examined as both show high metastatic potential. A panel of patients with cervical cancer was selected and the importance of the histone modifications concerning survival-time (overall survival and relapse-free survival) was analyzed in 250 cases. Histone H3 acetyl K9 staining was correlated with low grading, low FIGO (TNM classification and the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) status, negative N-status and low T-status in cervical cancer, showing a higher expression in adenocarcinoma than in squamous cell carcinoma. Cytoplasmic expression of histone H3 tri methyl K4 in a cervical cancer specimen was correlated with advanced T-status and poor prognosis. While cytoplasmic H3K4me3 expression seemed to be a marker of relapse-free survival, nuclear expression showed a correlation to poor prognosis in overall survival. Within this study, we analyzed the chemical modification of two histone proteins that are connected to active gene expression. Histone H3 acetyl K9 was found to be an independent marker of overall survival. Histone H3 tri methyl K4 was correlated with poor prognosis and it was found to be an independent marker of relapse-free survival. Therefore, we could show that chromatin remodeling plays an important role in cervical cancer biology. PMID:28241481

  8. Histone H3 Acetyl K9 and Histone H3 Tri Methyl K4 as Prognostic Markers for Patients with Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Susanne; Zhu, Junyan; Mayr, Doris; Kuhn, Christina; Schulze, Sandra; Hofmann, Simone; Dannecker, Christian; Jeschke, Udo; Kost, Bernd P

    2017-02-23

    Chromatin remodeling alters gene expression in carcinoma tissue. Although cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women worldwide, a systematic study about the prognostic value of specific changes in the chromatin structure, such as histone acetylation or histone methylation, is missing. In this study, the expression of histone H3 acetyl K9, which is known to denote active regions at enhancers and promoters, and histone H3 tri methyl K4, which preferentially identifies active gene promoters, were examined as both show high metastatic potential. A panel of patients with cervical cancer was selected and the importance of the histone modifications concerning survival-time (overall survival and relapse-free survival) was analyzed in 250 cases. Histone H3 acetyl K9 staining was correlated with low grading, low FIGO (TNM classification and the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) status, negative N-status and low T-status in cervical cancer, showing a higher expression in adenocarcinoma than in squamous cell carcinoma. Cytoplasmic expression of histone H3 tri methyl K4 in a cervical cancer specimen was correlated with advanced T-status and poor prognosis. While cytoplasmic H3K4me3 expression seemed to be a marker of relapse-free survival, nuclear expression showed a correlation to poor prognosis in overall survival. Within this study, we analyzed the chemical modification of two histone proteins that are connected to active gene expression. Histone H3 acetyl K9 was found to be an independent marker of overall survival. Histone H3 tri methyl K4 was correlated with poor prognosis and it was found to be an independent marker of relapse-free survival. Therefore, we could show that chromatin remodeling plays an important role in cervical cancer biology.

  9. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Trichostatin a Promotes the Apoptosis of Osteosarcoma Cells through p53 Signaling Pathway Activation

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhantao; Liu, Xiaozhou; Jin, Jiewen; Xu, Haidong; Gao, Qian; Wang, Yong; Zhao, Jianning

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the profile of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and expression in osteosarcoma cells and tissues from osteosarcoma patients and to examine the mechanism by which a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, Trichostatin A (TSA), promotes the apoptosis of osteosarcoma cells. Methods: HDAC activity and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity were determined in nuclear extracts of MG63 cells, hFOB 1.19 cells and tissues from 6 patients with primary osteosarcoma. The protein expression of Class I HDACs (1, 2, 3 and 8) and the activation of the p53 signaling pathway were examined by Western blot. Cell growth and apoptosis were determined by 3-(4, 5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and flow cytometry, respectively. Results: Nuclear HDAC activity and class I HDAC expression were significantly hig