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Sample records for active hormonal intake

  1. Central action of ELABELA reduces food intake and activates arginine vasopressin and corticotropin-releasing hormone neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus.

    PubMed

    Santoso, Putra; Maejima, Yuko; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Takenoshita, Seiichi; Shimomura, Kenju

    2015-09-30

    ELABELA (ELA) is a novel hormone consisting of 32 amino acid peptides found in humans as well as other vertebrates and is considered to play an important role in the circulatory system through the apelin receptor (APJ). However, whether ELA also acts in the central nervous system remains unknown. Here, we show that ELA functions as an anorexigenic hormone in adult mouse brain. An intracerebroventricular injection of ELA reduces food intake and activates arginine vasopressin (AVP) and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) neurons in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), a hypothalamic region that regulates food intake. Cytosolic calcium ([Ca]i) measurement shows that ELA dose dependently increases [Ca]i in single AVP and CRH-immunoreactive neurons isolated from the PVN. Our data suggest that ELA functions as an anorexigenic hormone through activation of AVP and CRH neurons in the PVN.

  2. Menstrual cycle hormones, food intake, and cravings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Food craving and intake are affected by steroid hormones during the menstrual cycle, especially in the luteal phase, when craving for certain foods has been reported to increase. However, satiety hormones such as leptin have also been shown to affect taste sensitivity, and therefore food ...

  3. Selected hormonal and neurotransmitter mechanisms regulating feed intake in sheep.

    PubMed

    Sartin, J L; Daniel, J A; Whitlock, B K; Wilborn, R R

    2010-11-01

    Appetite control is a major issue in normal growth and in suboptimal growth performance settings. A number of hormones, in particular leptin, activate or inhibit orexigenic or anorexigenic neurotransmitters within the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, where feed intake regulation is integrated. Examples of appetite regulatory neurotransmitters are the stimulatory neurotransmitters neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related protein (AgRP), orexin and melanin-concentrating hormone and the inhibitory neurotransmitter, melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH). Examination of messenger RNA (using in situ hybridization and real-time PCR) and proteins (using immunohistochemistry) for these neurotransmitters in ruminants has indicated that physiological regulation occurs in response to fasting for several of these critical genes and proteins, especially AgRP and NPY. Moreover, intracerebroventricular injection of each of the four stimulatory neurotransmitters can increase feed intake in sheep and may also regulate either growth hormone, luteinizing hormone, cortisol or other hormones. In contrast, both leptin and MSH are inhibitory to feed intake in ruminants. Interestingly, the natural melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) antagonist, AgRP, as well as NPY can prevent the inhibition of feed intake after injection of endotoxin (to model disease suppression of appetite). Thus, knowledge of the mechanisms regulating feed intake in the hypothalamus may lead to mechanisms to increase feed intake in normal growing animals and prevent the wasting effects of severe disease in animals.

  4. Hormonal control of feed intake in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Voluntary feed intake is controlled by a plethora of factors including, but not limited to, day length, social interactions, environmental conditions, oronasal sensory cues (i.e., taste, smell, texture), gastrointestinal fill, health status, metabolic status, dietary composition, drug interactions, ...

  5. Associations between dietary acrylamide intake and plasma sex hormone levels

    PubMed Central

    Hogervorst, Janneke G.; Fortner, Renee T.; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Eliassen, A. Heather; Hankinson, Susan E.; Wilson, Kathryn M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The rodent carcinogen acrylamide was discovered in 2002 in commonly consumed foods. Epidemiological studies have observed positive associations between acrylamide intake and endometrial, ovarian and breast cancer risks, which suggests that acrylamide may have sex-hormonal effects. Methods We cross-sectionally investigated the relationship between acrylamide intake and plasma levels of sex hormones and SHBG among 687 postmenopausal and 1300 premenopausal controls from nested case-control studies within the Nurses’ Health Studies. Results There were no associations between acrylamide and sex hormones or SHBG among premenopausal women overall or among never-smokers. Among normal-weight premenopausal women, acrylamide intake was statistically significantly positively associated with luteal total and free estradiol levels. Among postmenopausal women overall and among never-smokers, acrylamide was borderline statistically significantly associated with lower estrone sulfate levels but not with other estrogens, androgens, prolactin or SHBG. Among normal weight women, (borderline) statistically significant inverse associations were noted for estrone, free estradiol, estrone sulfate, DHEA, and prolactin, while statistically significant positive associations for testosterone and androstenedione were observed among overweight women. Conclusions Overall, this study did not show conclusive associations between acrylamide intake and sex hormones that would lend unequivocal biological plausibility to the observed increased risks of endometrial, ovarian and breast cancer. The association between acrylamide and sex hormones may differ by menopausal and overweight status. We recommend other studies investigate the relationship between acrylamide and sex hormones in women, specifically using acrylamide biomarkers. Impact The present study showed some interesting associations between acrylamide intake and sex hormones that urgently need confirmation. PMID:23983241

  6. Central administration of chicken growth hormone-releasing hormone decreases food intake in chicks.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Tetsuya; Sugimoto, Ikue; Ogino, Madoka; Khan, Md Sakirul Islam; Masuda, Keiko; Ukena, Kazuyoshi; Wang, Yajun

    2015-02-01

    Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is well known as a stimulator of growth hormone (GH) secretion. GHRH not only stimulates GH release but also modifies feeding behavior and energy homeostasis in rodents. In chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus), on the other hand, two types of GHRH, namely, chicken GHRH (cGHRH) and cGHRH-like peptide (cGHRH-LP), have been identified. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of central injection of cGHRH and cGHRH-LP on feeding behavior in chicks. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of both cGHRH and cGHRH-LP (0.04 to 1 nmol) significantly decreased food intake without any abnormal behavior in chicks. Furthermore, the feeding-inhibitory effect was not abolished by co-injection of the antagonist for pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) or corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) receptors, suggesting that the anorexigenic effect of cGHRH and cGHRH-LP might not be related to the PACAP and CRH systems in the brain of chicks. Finally, 24-h food deprivation increased mRNA expression of cGHRH but not cGHRH-LP in the diencephalon. These results suggest that central cGHRH is related to inhibiting feeding behavior and energy homeostasis in chicks.

  7. Soy milk intake in relation to serum sex hormone levels in British men.

    PubMed

    Allen, N E; Appleby, P N; Davey, G K; Key, T J

    2001-01-01

    Soy beans contain high levels of the isoflavones genistein and daidzein and their glycosides and have been implicated in the prevention of prostate cancer, possibly via their effects on sex hormone metabolism. The aim of this study was to assess the relation between dietary soy intake and sex hormone levels in a cross-sectional analysis of 696 men with a wide range of soy intakes. Soy milk intake was measured using a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire, and serum hormone concentrations were measured by immunoassay. Multiple regression was used to investigate the association between soy milk intake, an index of isoflavone intake, and hormone levels after adjustment for pertinent confounders. Soy milk intake was not associated with serum concentrations of testosterone, free testosterone, androstanediol glucuronide, sex hormone-binding globulin, or luteinizing hormone. These results suggest that soy milk intake, as a marker of isoflavone intake, is not associated with serum sex hormone concentrations among free-living Western men.

  8. Taste perception, associated hormonal modulation, and nutrient intake

    PubMed Central

    Loper, Hillary B.; La Sala, Michael; Dotson, Cedrick

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that taste perception influences food intake. After ingestion, gustatory receptors relay sensory signals to the brain, which segregates, evaluates, and distinguishes the stimuli, leading to the experience known as “flavor.” It is well accepted that five taste qualities – sweet, salty, bitter, sour, and umami – can be perceived by animals. In this review, the anatomy and physiology of human taste buds, the hormonal modulation of taste function, the importance of genetic chemosensory variation, and the influence of gustatory functioning on macronutrient selection and eating behavior are discussed. Individual genotypic variation results in specific phenotypes of food preference and nutrient intake. Understanding the role of taste in food selection and ingestive behavior is important for expanding our understanding of the factors involved in body weight maintenance and the risk of chronic diseases including obesity, atherosclerosis, cancer, diabetes, liver disease, and hypertension. PMID:26024495

  9. Food intake regulation of circulating thyroid hormones in domestic fowl.

    PubMed

    Klandorf, H; Harvey, S

    1985-11-01

    The relationship between food intake and thyroid function has been investigated in immature domestic fowl. Starvation delayed, but did not suppress, the triiodothyronine (T3) response to intravenously administered thyrotropin-releasing hormone (10 micrograms/kg). This probably resulted from a suppression of monodeiodinase activity, since the conversion of thyroxine (T4) to T3 in thyroidectomised birds following an intramuscular injection of T4 (10 micrograms/kg) was markedly reduced by starvation. Starvation, for 24 or 48 hr, lowered the circulating T3 level but increased the T4 concentration. When fasted birds were refed the T4 concentration was initially enhanced but subsequently declined as the T3 concentration progressively increased. The accompanying decline in the T4:T3 ratio in fasted-refed birds indicated that the rise in the T3 level resulted from the peripheral monodeiodination of T4. The increase in T3 concentration could be induced solely by carbohydrate; the intraperitoneal administration of glucose (2.0 g/kg) to fasted birds resulting in a slight, transient rise in the T3 concentration and a fall in the T4:T3 ratio. The generation of T3 was also energy dependent, in that the magnitude of the T3 response of fasted birds to refeeding was proportional to the amount of food consumed and to the metabolisable energy (ME) content of the diet. Moreover, when exogenous T4 (100 micrograms/kg) was intramuscularly administered to thyroidectomised birds fed a diet with a high ME content, the conversion of T4 to T4 was greater than that in birds fed a diet of lower ME content. These results demonstrate that nutritional stimuli are involved in the regulation of thyroid function in birds, particularly in the peripheral generation of T3.

  10. Triennial Growth Symposium: neural regulation of feed intake: modification by hormones, fasting, and disease.

    PubMed

    Sartin, J L; Whitlock, B K; Daniel, J A

    2011-07-01

    Appetite is a complex process that results from the integration of multiple signals at the hypothalamus. The hypothalamus receives neural signals; hormonal signals such as leptin, cholecystokinin, and ghrelin; and nutrient signals such as glucose, FFA, AA, and VFA. This effect is processed by a specific sequence of neurotransmitters beginning with the arcuate nucleus and orexigenic cells containing neuropeptide Y or agouti-related protein and anorexigenic cells containing proopiomelanocortin (yielding the neurotransmitter α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone) or cells expressing cocaine amphetamine-related transcript. These so-called first-order neurons act on second-order orexigenic neurons (containing either melanin-concentrating hormone or orexin) or act on anorexigenic neurons (e.g., expressing corticotropin-releasing hormone) to alter feed intake. In addition, satiety signals from the liver and gastrointestinal tract signal through the vagus nerve to the nucleus tractus solitarius to cause meal termination, and in combination with the hypothalamus, integrate the various signals to determine the feeding response. The activities of these neuronal pathways are also influenced by numerous factors such as nutrients, fasting, and disease to modify appetite and hence affect growth and reproduction. This review will begin with the central nervous system pathways and then discuss the ways in which hormones and metabolites may alter the process to affect feed intake with emphasis on farm animals.

  11. Tasting fat: cephalic phase hormonal responses and food intake in restrained and unrestrained eaters.

    PubMed

    Crystal, Susan R; Teff, Karen L

    2006-09-30

    Restrained eaters exhibit strict cognitive control over their food intake, primarily by limiting intake of high-fat foods. Earlier studies indicate a relationship between dietary restraint and cephalic phase insulin release, which is hypothesized to influence hunger and food intake. To compare cephalic phase hormonal responses to high- and low-fat stimuli and determine if the sensory experience of tasting fat alters hormonal responses and influences subsequent food intake in restrained and unrestrained eaters, normal weight women classified as unrestrained (n=11) or restrained (n=11) eaters were tested under 3 conditions: (1) fasting, (2) sham-feeding a non-fat cake, and (3) sham-feeding a high-fat cake. Following an overnight fast, arterialized venous blood was drawn prior to and for 30 min immediately following a 3-min sham feed. Plasma samples were analyzed for insulin, glucose, glucagon and pancreatic polypeptide (PP). Subjects were subsequently given a selection of high-fat and low-fat foods and allowed to select what they wished to eat. Cephalic phase PP was significantly greater following oral sensory stimulation by the high-fat food (205.4+/-83.6) compared to the fasting control (11.1+/-38.8, p=0.04). No significant differences in hormonal responses to the food stimuli were found between restrained and unrestrained eaters but the restrained eaters consumed more food after the high-fat condition (p<0.05) relative to the fasted condition and compared to the unrestrained group (p<0.05). In conclusion, the sensory experience of tasting fat increases food intake in restrained eaters and increases vagal efferent activity compared to a non-fat food in both populations.

  12. The ovarian hormone estradiol plays a crucial role in the control of food intake in females

    PubMed Central

    Eckel, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite a strong male bias in both basic and clinical research, it is becoming increasingly accepted that the ovarian hormone estradiol plays an important role in the control of food intake in females. Estradiol’s feeding inhibitory effect occurs in a variety of species, including women, but the underlying mechanism has been studied most extensively in rats and mice. Accordingly, much of the data reviewed here is derived from the rodent literature. Adult female rats display a robust decrease in food intake during estrus and ovariectomy promotes hyperphagia and weight gain, both of which can be prevented by a physiological regimen of estradiol treatment. Behavioral analyses have demonstrated that the feeding inhibitory effect of estradiol is mediated entirely by a decrease in meal size. In rats, estradiol appears to exert this action indirectly via interactions with peptide and neurotransmitter systems implicated in the direct control of meal size. Here, I summarize research examining the neurobiological mechanism underlying estradiol’s anorexigenic effect. Central estrogen receptors (ERs) have been implicated and activation of one ER subtype in particular, ERα, appears both sufficient and necessary for the estrogenic control of food intake. Future studies are necessary to identify the critical brain areas and intracellular signaling pathways responsible for estradiol’s anorexigenic effect. A clearer understanding of the estrogenic control of food intake is prerequisite to elucidating the biological factors that contribute to obesity and eating disorders, both of which are more prevalent in women, compared to men. PMID:21530561

  13. Fatty acid intake in relation to reproductive hormones and testicular volume among young healthy men

    PubMed Central

    Mínguez-Alarcón, Lidia; Chavarro, Jorge E; Mendiola, Jaime; Roca, Manuela; Tanrikut, Cigdem; Vioque, Jesús; Jørgensen, Niels; Torres-Cantero, Alberto M

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that dietary fats may influence testicular function. However, most of the published literature on this field has used semen quality parameters as the only proxy for testicular function. We examined the association of fat intake with circulating reproductive hormone levels and testicular volume among healthy young Spanish men. This is a cross-sectional study among 209 healthy male volunteers conducted between October 2010 and November 2011 in Murcia Region of Spain. Participants completed questionnaires on lifestyle, diet, and smoking, and each underwent a physical examination, and provided a blood sample. Linear regression was used to examine the association between each fatty acid type and reproductive hormone levels and testicular volumes. Monounsaturated fatty acids intake was inversely associated with serum blood levels of calculated free testosterone, total testosterone, and inhibin B. A positive association was observed between the intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids, particularly of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and luteinizing hormone concentrations. In addition, the intake of trans fatty acids was associated with lower total testosterone and calculated free testosterone concentrations (Ptrend = 0.01 and 0.02, respectively). The intake of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids was positively related to testicular volume while the intake of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids and trans fatty acids was inversely related to testicular volume. These data suggest that fat intake, and particularly intake of omega 3, omega 6, and trans fatty acids, may influence testicular function. PMID:27834316

  14. Dietary Fat, Fiber, and Carbohydrate Intake and Endogenous Hormone Levels in Premenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiaohui; Rosner, Bernard; Willett, Walter C; Hankinson, Susan E

    2011-01-01

    The authors conducted a cross-sectional study to investigate the associations of fat, fiber and carbohydrate intake with endogenous estrogen, androgen, and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) levels among 595 premenopausal women. Overall, no significant associations were found between dietary intake of these macronutrients and plasma sex steroid hormone levels. Dietary fat intake was inversely associated with IGF-I and IGF-binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) levels. When substituting 5% of energy from total fat for the equivalent amount of energy from carbohydrate or protein intake, the plasma levels of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 were 2.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.3, 5.3) and 1.6% (95% CI 0.4, 2.8) lower, respectively. Animal fat, saturated fat and monounsaturated fat intakes also were inversely associated with IGFBP-3 levels (P < 0.05). Carbohydrates were positively associated with plasma IGF-I level. When substituting 5% of energy from carbohydrates for the equivalent amount of energy from fat or protein intake, the plasma IGF-I level was 2.0% (95% CI 0.1, 3.9%) higher. No independent associations between fiber intake and hormone levels were observed. The results suggest that a low-fat/high-fiber or carbohydrate diet is not associated with endogenous levels of sex steroid hormones, but it may modestly increase IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels among premenopausal women. PMID:21761370

  15. Effects of intracerebroventricularly and intraperitoneally administered growth hormone on body weight and food intake in fa/fa Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Carla; Wieczorek, Ingo; Reschke, Kirsten; Lehnert, Hendrik

    2002-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) possesses multiple metabolic effects, in particular with regard to glucose and lipid homeostasis. Studies on the effects of GH on body weight and food and water intake are scarce and have yielded controversial results. We investigated the effects of different modes of GH administration on the parameters of body weight and food intake as well as on insulin and leptin concentrations in fa/fa Zucker rats. In control experiments, aqua pro injection was given. GH was administered over a time period of 11 days at a daily dose of 250 microg intraperitoneally (i.p.) and 25 microg intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.). While both food intake and body weight were found to be unaltered in the four groups after this observation period, there was an enhanced food intake and consecutively an increase in body weight over the day period when compared to the night period in the groups of rats that received GH i.c.v. or i.p. This tendency was also shown for water intake. Insulin and leptin concentrations were similar in all groups. Thus, injection of GH appears to modify food intake-related behavior, since the periods of enhanced food and water intake were shifted from night- to daytime. Thus, while in general the metabolic parameters remained unchanged, the activity pattern was clearly modified.

  16. Sex differences in diurnal rhythms of food intake in mice caused by gonadal hormones and complement of sex chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuqi; Wang, Lixin; Loh, Dawn; Colwell, Christopher; Taché, Yvette; Reue, Karen; Arnold, Arthur P.

    2015-01-01

    We measured diurnal rhythms of food intake, as well as body weight and composition, while varying three major classes of sex-biasing factors: activational and organizational effects of gonadal hormones, and sex chromosome complement (SCC). Four Core Genotypes (FCG) mice, comprising XX and XY gonadal males and XX and XY gonadal females, were either gonad-intact or gonadectomized (GDX) as adults (2.5 months); food intake was measured second-by-second for 7 days starting 5 weeks later, and body weight and composition were measured for 22 weeks thereafter. Gonadal males weighed more than females. GDX increased body weight/fat of gonadal females, but increased body fat and reduced body weight of males. After GDX, XX mice had greater body weight and more fat than XY mice. In gonad-intact mice, males had greater total food intake and more meals than females during the dark phase, but females had more food intake and meals and larger meals than males during the light phase. GDX reduced overall food intake irrespective of gonad type or SCC, and eliminated differences in feeding between groups with different gonads. Diurnal phase of feeding was influenced by all three sex-biasing variables. Gonad-intact females had earlier onset and acrophase (peak) of feeding relative to males. GDX caused a phase-advance of feeding, especially in XX mice, leading to an earlier onset of feeding in GDX XX vs. XY mice, but earlier acrophase in GDX males relative to females. Gonadal hormones and SCC interact in the control of diurnal rhythms of food intake. PMID:26226656

  17. Sex differences in diurnal rhythms of food intake in mice caused by gonadal hormones and complement of sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuqi; Wang, Lixin; Loh, Dawn H; Colwell, Christopher S; Taché, Yvette; Reue, Karen; Arnold, Arthur P

    2015-09-01

    We measured diurnal rhythms of food intake, as well as body weight and composition, while varying three major classes of sex-biasing factors: activational and organizational effects of gonadal hormones, and sex chromosome complement (SCC). Four Core Genotypes (FCG) mice, comprising XX and XY gonadal males and XX and XY gonadal females, were either gonad-intact or gonadectomized (GDX) as adults (2.5months); food intake was measured second-by-second for 7days starting 5weeks later, and body weight and composition were measured for 22weeks thereafter. Gonadal males weighed more than females. GDX increased body weight/fat of gonadal females, but increased body fat and reduced body weight of males. After GDX, XX mice had greater body weight and more fat than XY mice. In gonad-intact mice, males had greater total food intake and more meals than females during the dark phase, but females had more food intake and meals and larger meals than males during the light phase. GDX reduced overall food intake irrespective of gonad type or SCC, and eliminated differences in feeding between groups with different gonads. Diurnal phase of feeding was influenced by all three sex-biasing variables. Gonad-intact females had earlier onset and acrophase (peak) of feeding relative to males. GDX caused a phase-advance of feeding, especially in XX mice, leading to an earlier onset of feeding in GDX XX vs. XY mice, but earlier acrophase in GDX males relative to females. Gonadal hormones and SCC interact in the control of diurnal rhythms of food intake.

  18. Changes in satiety hormone concentrations and feed intake in rats in response to lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Forssten, Sofia D; Korczyńska, Marta Z; Zwijsen, Renate M L; Noordman, Wouter H; Madetoja, Mari; Ouwehand, Arthur C

    2013-12-01

    A negative energy balance can be accomplished by reducing the caloric intake which results in an increased feeling of hunger. This physiological state is regulated by secretion of satiety hormones. The secretion of these hormones can be influenced by ingestion of e.g. fat. Fat, dairy beverage and synbiotic mixture have been found to have satiety-inducing effects in humans and rats. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the change of satiety hormone concentration in rats in response to feeding of fermented milks containing lactic acid bacteria. Two studies were conducted with Wistar rats randomly allocated into groups receiving Lactobacillus fermented (2 L. acidophilus, L. bulgaricus, L. salivarius and L. rhamnosus) milk. A single isocaloric oral dose with the test item or control was given to the rats. Blood samples were taken after dosing with the test product and the satiety hormones were measured. For the test groups, significant changes could be detected in PYY concentrations after 60 min, although some groups had a significant lower feed intake. In conclusion, some probiotic Lactobacillus strains may modify satiety hormones production. However, more studies are needed to evaluate their potential of prolonging satiety.

  19. Hormone activation induces nucleosome positioning in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Belikov, Sergey; Gelius, Birgitta; Almouzni, Geneviève; Wrange, Örjan

    2000-01-01

    The mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter is induced by glucocorticoid hormone. A robust hormone- and receptor-dependent activation could be reproduced in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The homogeneous response in this system allowed a detailed analysis of the transition in chromatin structure following hormone activation. This revealed two novel findings: hormone activation led to the establishment of specific translational positioning of nucleosomes despite the lack of significant positioning in the inactive state; and, in the active promoter, a subnucleosomal particle encompassing the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-binding region was detected. The presence of only a single GR-binding site was sufficient for the structural transition to occur. Both basal promoter elements and ongoing transcription were dispensable. These data reveal a stepwise process in the transcriptional activation by glucocorticoid hormone. PMID:10698943

  20. Macronutrient Intake for Physical Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buford, Thomas

    Proper nutrition is an essential element of athletic performance, body composition goals, and general health. Although natural variability among persons makes it impossible to create a single diet that can be recommended to all; examining scientific principles makes it easier for athletes and other physically active persons to eat a diet that prepares them for successful training and/or athletic competition. A proper nutritional design incorporates these principles and is tailored to the individual. It is important for the sports nutritionist, coach, and athlete to understand the role that each of the macronutrients plays in an active lifestyle. In addition, keys to success include knowing how to determine how many calories to consume, the macronutrient breakdown of those calories, and proper timing to maximize the benefits needed for the individual's body type and activity schedule.

  1. 48-h glucose infusion in humans: effect on hormonal responses, hunger and food intake.

    PubMed

    Teff, Karen L; Petrova, Maja; Havel, Peter J; Townsend, Raymond R

    2007-04-23

    Experimentally-induced hyperglycemia by prolonged glucose infusion allows investigation of the effects of sustained stimulation of the pancreatic beta-cell on insulin secretion and sensitivity. Hormonal responses to a meal following prolonged glucose infusions have not been investigated. To determine if a 48-h glucose infusion alters hormonal responses to a test meal as well as food intake and hunger in normal weight individuals, 16 subjects (8 men, 8 women, age 18-30 years, mean BMI=21.7+/-1.6 kg/m2) were infused for 48 h with either saline (50 ml/h) or 15% glucose (200 mg/m2/min). Subjects ingested a 600 kcal mixed nutrient meal 3 h after infusion termination. Blood samples were taken during the 48 h and for 4 h following food ingestion. The 48-h glucose infusion elicited a metabolic profile of a glucose intolerant obese subjects, with increased plasma glucose, insulin and leptin (all P<0.01) and increased HOMA-IR (P<0.001). During meal ingestion, early insulin secretion was increased (P<0.05) but post-prandial glucose (P<0.01) and insulin (P<0.01) excursions were lower following the glucose infusion. Post-prandial plasma triglyceride concentrations were increased after glucose compared with saline. Food intake and hunger ratings were not different between the two conditions. Plasma leptin levels were inversely correlated with hunger (P<0.03) in both conditions and with food intake (P<0.003) during the glucose condition only. Thus, a 48-h glucose infusion does not impair post-prandial hormonal responses, alter food intake or hunger in normal weight subjects. The glucose-induced increases in plasma leptin result in a stronger inverse relationship between plasma leptin and hunger as well as food intake. These data are the first to demonstrate a relationship between leptin and hunger in normal weight, non-calorically restricted human subjects.

  2. Effects of acute exercise on appetite hormones and ad libitum energy intake in men and women.

    PubMed

    Hagobian, Todd Alan; Yamashiro, Megan; Hinkel-Lipsker, Jake; Streder, Katherine; Evero, Nero; Hackney, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Acute exercise suppresses relative energy intake; however, it remains unclear whether this occurs in both men and women exposed to the same relative exercise treatment. Eleven healthy men (22 ± 2 years; 16% ± 6% body fat (BF); 26 ± 4 body mass index (BMI); 42.9 ± 6.5 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1) peak oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text]O(2peak))) and 10 healthy women (21 ± 2 years; 24 ± 2 BMI; 23% ± 3% BF; 39.9 ± 5.5 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1) [Formula: see text]O(2peak)) rested for 60 min or exercised on a cycle ergometer at 70% [Formula: see text]O(2peak) until 30% of total daily energy expenditure was expended (men, expenditure = 975 ± 195 kcal in 82 ± 13 min; women, expenditure = 713 ± 86 kcal in 84 ± 17 min) in a counterbalanced, crossover fashion. Appetite hormones and appetite ratings were assessed in response to each condition. Forty minutes after both conditions, ad libitum total and relative energy intake (energy intake minus energy cost of exercise) were assessed at a buffet meal. There was no significant sex or condition effect in appetite hormones (PYY(3-36), acylated ghrelin, insulin) and appetite ratings (hunger, satisfaction, fullness). Total energy intake in men was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in exercise and rest conditions (1648 ± 950, 1216 ± 633 kcal, respectively) compared with women (591 ± 183, 590 ± 231 kcal, respectively). Relative energy intake was significantly lower (P < 0.05) after exercise compared with rest in men (672 ± 827, 1133 ± 619 kcal, respectively) and women (-121 ± 243, 530 ± 233 kcal, respectively). These data highlight the effectiveness of acute exercise to suppress relative energy intake regardless of sex.

  3. Fruit, Vegetable, and Animal Food Intake and Breast Cancer Risk by Hormone Receptor Status

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Ping-Ping; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Zheng, Ying; Cai, Hui; Ruan, Zhi-Xian; Gu, Kai; Su, Yinghao; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei; Lu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Background The effects of diet on breast cancer are controversial and whether the effects vary with hormone receptor status has not been well investigated. This study evaluated the associations of dietary factors with risk for breast cancer overall and by hormone receptor status of tumors among Chinese women. Methods The Shanghai Breast Cancer Study, a large, population-based, case-control study, enrolled 3,443 cases and 3,474 controls in 1996–1998 (phase I) and 2002–2004 (phase II); 2,676 cases had ER and PR data. Dietary intake was assessed using a validated, quantitative, food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were derived from multivariate, polychotomous, unconditional logistic regression models. Results Total vegetable intake was inversely related to breast cancer risk, with an adjusted OR for the highest quintile of 0.80 (95% CI = 0.67–0.95; P trend=0.02). Reduced risk was also related to high intake of allium vegetables (P trend = 0.01) and fresh legumes (P trend = 0.0008). High intake of citrus fruits and rosaceae fruits were inversely associated with breast cancer risk (P trend = 0.003 and P trend = 0.004, respectively), although no consistent association was seen for total fruit intake. Elevated risk was observed for all types of meat and fish intake (all P trend <0.05), while intakes of eggs and milk were associated with a decreased risk of breast cancer (both P trend <0.05). There was little evidence that associations with dietary intakes varied across the four tumor subtypes or between ER+/PR+ and ER−/PR− tumors (P for heterogeneity >0.05). Conclusion Our results suggest that high intake of total vegetables, certain fruits, milk, and eggs may reduce the risk of breast cancer, while high consumption of animal-source foods may increase risk. The dietary associations did not appear to vary by ER/PR status. PMID:22860889

  4. The ghrelin/obestatin balance in the physiological and pathological control of growth hormone secretion, body composition and food intake.

    PubMed

    Hassouna, R; Zizzari, P; Tolle, V

    2010-07-01

    Ghrelin and obestatin are two gastrointestinal peptides obtained by post-translational processing of a common precursor, preproghrelin. Ghrelin is an orexigenic and adipogenic peptide and a potent growth hormone secretagogue (GHS) modified by the enzyme ghrelin-O-acyl-transferase to bind and activate its receptor, the GHS-R. The ghrelin/GHS-R pathway is complex and the effects of ghrelin on GH secretion, adiposity and food intake appear to be relayed by distinct mechanisms involving different transduction signals and constitutive activity for the GH-R, different cofactors as modulators of endogenous ghrelin signalling and/or alternative ghrelin receptors. The discovery of obestatin in 2005 brought an additional level of complexity to this fascinating system. Obestatin was initially identified as an anorexigenic peptide and as the cognate ligand for GPR39, but its effect on food intake and its ability to activate GPR39 are still controversial. Although several teams failed to reproduce the anorexigenic actions of obestatin, this peptide has been shown to antagonise GH secretion and food intake induced by ghrelin and could be an interesting pharmacological tool to counteract the actions of ghrelin. Ghrelin and obestatin immunoreactivities are recovered in the blood with an ultradian pulsatility and their concentrations in plasma vary with the nutritional status of the body. It is still a matter of debate whether both hormones are regulated by independent mechanisms and whether obestatin is a physiologically relevant peptide. Nevertheless, a significant number of studies show that the ghrelin/obestatin ratio is modified in anorexia nervosa and obesity. This suggests that the ghrelin/obestatin balance could be essential to adapt the body's response to nutritional challenges. Although measuring ghrelin and obestatin in plasma is challenging because many forms of the peptides circulate, more sensitive and selective assays to detect the different preproghrelin

  5. A Hormonally Active Malignant Struma Ovarii

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Carolina; Salame, Latife; Padilla-Longoria, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Struma ovarii is a rare monodermal variant of ovarian teratoma that contains at least 50% thyroid tissue. Less than 8% of struma ovarii cases present with clinical and biochemical evidence of thyrotoxicosis due to ectopic production of thyroid hormone and only 5% undergo malignant transformation into a papillary thyroid carcinoma. Only isolated cases of hormonally active papillary thyroid carcinoma developing within a struma ovarii have been reported in the literature. We report the case of a 36-year-old woman who presented with clinical signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism as well as a left adnexal mass, which proved to be a thyroid hormone-producing, malignant struma ovarii. PMID:27882257

  6. The influence of photoperiod on body weight gain, body composition, nutrient intake and hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Tucker, H A; Petitclerc, D; Zinn, S A

    1984-12-01

    Increasing daily light exposure from 8 to 16 h increases average daily body weight gains of sheep and Holstein cattle but reduces gains of white-tailed doe fawns. Some of these effects on average daily gain in sheep are the result of increased gut fill and pelt weight. Increasing daily exposure to light increases feed intake when sheep or cattle are fed ad libitum. However, increased feed intake is not a prerequisite for the anabolic effects of long duration exposures to light because increased growth occurs in the animals given 16 h light:8 h dark (16L:8D) even when feed intake is restricted. The anabolic effects of increased duration photoperiods in sheep are independent of the gonads, whereas in cattle they are dependent on the gonads. Consistent increases in average daily gains of cattle in response to longer duration photoperiods have not always been achieved. The lack of consistency may be associated with sexual maturity or rate of fattening of the animal. For example, the stimulatory effects of 16L:8D photoperiods on live weight gain are not readily manifested in immature prepubertal heifers, but occur primarily during the peripubertal period. Short days are conducive to deposition of fat, which may account for the stimulatory effects of short days on live weight gain of white-tailed doe fawns and excessively fattened Holsteins. In contrast, long duration photoperiods stimulate protein accretion in cattle. The hormonal signals that mediate the anabolic effects of increasing exposure to light are not associated with change in insulin, thyroxine or growth hormone concentrations in the blood. Glucocorticoid concentrations in serum decrease with longer duration photoperiods which is consistent with an anabolic effect. Increasing daily light exposure to 16 h/d hastens the increase in concentrations of progesterone and testosterone in sera of peripubertal heifers and prepubertal bulls, respectively. Thus, change in secretion of reproductive hormones in the

  7. Gut hormone release and appetite regulation in healthy non-obese participants following oligofructose intake. A dose-escalation study.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Camilla; Lefevre, Solenne; Peters, Véronique; Patterson, Michael; Ghatei, Mohammad A; Morgan, Linda M; Frost, Gary S

    2013-07-01

    Prevention of weight gain in adults is a major public health target. Animal experiments have consistently demonstrated a relationship between fermentable carbohydrate intake, such as oligofructose, anorectic gut hormones, and appetite suppression and body weight control. This study was designed to determine the dose of oligofructose which would augment the release of anorectic gut hormones and reduce appetite consistently in non-obese humans. Twelve non-obese participants were recruited for a 5-week dose-escalation study. Following a 9-14-day run-in, participants increased their daily oligofructose intake every week from 15, 25, 35, 45, to 55 g daily. Subjective appetite and side effects were monitored daily. Three-day food diaries were completed every week. Appetite study sessions explored the acute effects of 0, 15, 35, and 55 g oligofructose on appetite-related hormones, glycaemia, subjective appetite, and energy intake. In the home environment, oligofructose suppressed hunger, but did not affect energy intake. Oligofructose dose-dependently increased peptide YY, decreased pancreatic polypeptide and tended to decrease ghrelin, but did not significantly affect appetite profile, energy intake, glucose, insulin, or glucagon-like peptide 1 concentrations during appetite study sessions. In conclusion, oligofructose supplementation at ≥ 35 g/day increased peptide YY and suppressed pancreatic polypeptide and hunger; however, energy intake did not change significantly.

  8. New active series of growth hormone secretagogues.

    PubMed

    Guerlavais, Vincent; Boeglin, Damien; Mousseaux, Delphine; Oiry, Catherine; Heitz, Annie; Deghenghi, Romano; Locatelli, Vittorio; Torsello, Antonio; Ghé, Corrado; Catapano, Filomena; Muccioli, Giampiero; Galleyrand, Jean-Claude; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Martinez, Jean

    2003-03-27

    New growth hormone secretagogue (GHS) analogues were synthesized and evaluated for growth hormone releasing activity. This series derived from EP-51389 is based on a gem-diamino structure. Compounds that exhibited higher in vivo GH-releasing potency than hexarelin in rat (subcutaneous administration) were then tested per os in beagle dogs and for their binding affinity to human pituitary GHS receptors and to hGHS-R 1a. Compound 7 (JMV 1843, H-Aib-(d)-Trp-(d)-gTrp-formyl) showed high potency in these tests and was selected for clinical studies.(1)

  9. Changes in Food Intake and Activity after Quitting Smoking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Sharon M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Evaluated changes in food intake and activity levels among 95 subjects who quit smoking. Found significant increases in calories, sucrose, and fats 2 weeks after quitting. Total sugars changes were less consistent. Activity levels did not change significantly. At week 26, caloric intake for abstinent women was approximately equal to baseline…

  10. Paradoxical sleep deprivation activates hypothalamic nuclei that regulate food intake and stress response.

    PubMed

    Galvão, Milene de Oliveira Lara; Sinigaglia-Coimbra, Rita; Kawakami, Suzi Emiko; Tufik, Sergio; Suchecki, Deborah

    2009-09-01

    A large body of evidence has shown that prolonged paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) results in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation, and in loss of body weight despite an apparent increase of food intake, reflecting increased energy expenditure. The flowerpot technique for PSD is an efficient paradigm for investigating the relationships among metabolic regulation and stress response. The purpose of the present study was to examine the mechanisms involved in the effects of 96 h of PSD on metabolism regulation, feeding behaviour and stress response by studying corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and orexin (ORX) immunoreactivity in specific hypothalamic nuclei. Once-daily assessments of body weight, twice-daily measurements of (spillage-corrected) food intake, and once-daily determinations of plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone were made throughout PSD or at corresponding times in control rats (CTL). Immunoreactivity for CRH in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and for ORX in the hypothalamic lateral area was evaluated at the end of the experimental period. PSD resulted in increased diurnal, but not nocturnal, food intake, producing no significant changes in global food intake. PSD augmented the immunoreactivity for CRH and plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels, characterizing activation of the HPA axis. PSD also markedly increased the ORX immunoreactivity. The average plasma level of corticosterone correlated negatively with body weight gain throughout PSD. These results indicate that augmented ORX and CRH immunoreactivity in specific hypothalamic nuclei may underlie some of the metabolic changes consistently described in PSD.

  11. Dietary intake, glucose metabolism and sex hormones in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) compared with women with non-PCOS-related infertility.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ya-Hui; Wang, Ting-Wen; Wei, Hsiao-Jui; Hsu, Chien-Yeh; Ho, Hsin-Jung; Chen, Wen-Hua; Young, Robert; Liaw, Chian-Mey; Chao, Jane C-J

    2013-06-28

    The present study investigated dietary intake, glucose metabolism and sex hormones in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). A total of forty-five women (aged 25–40 years) with PCOS and 161 control women (aged 25–43 years) with non-PCOS-related infertility were recruited. Anthropometry, glucose tolerance and sex hormones were determined and dietary intake was assessed. Women with PCOS had lower serum sex hormone-binding globulin and increased BMI, waist:hip ratio, luteinising hormone, ratio of luteinising hormone: follicle-stimulating hormone, testosterone and free androgen index (FAI). Postprandial glucose, fasting insulin and insulin resistance were elevated in women with PCOS. Women with PCOS had reduced energy and carbohydrate intake but higher fat intake. Serum sex hormone-binding globulin level was negatively associated with BMI in both groups and negatively correlated with macronutrient intake in the PCOS group with hyperandrogenism. However, FAI was positively correlated with BMI, waist circumference and glucose metabolic parameters in both groups. Therefore, women with PCOS consume lower energy and carbohydrate compared with those with non-PCOS-related infertility and macronutrient intake is only negatively associated with serum sex hormone-binding globulin level in the PCOS group with hyperandrogenism.

  12. Hormonal modulation of food intake in response to low leptin levels induced by hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, M. M.; Stein, T. P.; Wade, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    A loss in fat mass is a common response to centrifugation and it results in low circulating leptin concentrations. However, rats adapted to hypergravity are euphagic. The focus of this study was to examine leptin and other peripheral signals of energy balance in the presence of a hypergravity-induced loss of fat mass and euphagia. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were centrifuged for 14 days at gravity levels of 1.25, 1.5, or 2 G, or they remained stationary at 1 G. Urinary catecholamines, urinary corticosterone, food intake, and body mass were measured on Days 11 to 14. Plasma hormones and epididymal fat pad mass were measured on Day 14. Mean body mass of the 1.25, 1.5, and 2 G groups were significantly (P < 0.05) lower than controls, and no differences were found in food intake (g/day/100 g body mass) between the hypergravity groups and controls. Epididymal fat mass was 14%, 14%, and 21% lower than controls in the 1.25, 1.5, and 2.0 G groups, respectively. Plasma leptin was significantly reduced from controls by 46%, 45%, and 65% in the 1.25, 1.5, and 2 G groups, respectively. Plasma insulin was significantly lower in the 1.25, 1.5, and 2.0 G groups than controls by 35%, 38%, and 33%. No differences were found between controls and hypergravity groups in urinary corticosterone. Mean urinary epinephrine was significantly higher in the 1.5 and 2.0 G groups than in controls. Mean urinary norepinephrine was significantly higher in the 1.25, 1.5 and 2.0 G groups than in controls. Significant correlations were found between G load and body mass, fat mass, leptin, urinary epinephrine, and norepinephrine. During hypergravity exposure, maintenance of food intake is the result of a complex relationship between multiple pathways, which abates the importance of leptin as a primary signal.

  13. Investigation of the melanocyte stimulating hormones on food intake. Lack Of evidence to support a role for the melanocortin-3-receptor.

    PubMed

    Abbott, C R; Rossi, M; Kim, M; AlAhmed, S H; Taylor, G M; Ghatei, M A; Smith, D M; Bloom, S R

    2000-06-30

    The melanocortin receptors, melanocortin-3-receptor (MC3-R) and melanocortin-4-receptor (MC4-R), are expressed in many discrete medial hypothalamic nuclei implicated in feeding regulation. The pro-opiomelanocortin product alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH), an MC3/4-R agonist, decreases food intake following intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection in rats. MC4-R's involvement in feeding has been established although a function for the MC3-R is unclear. We investigated endogenous melanocortin ligand binding and activation at the MC3-R and MC4-R and their effects on feeding. We have shown that alpha-MSH, desacetyl-alpha-MSH and beta-MSH bound to the MC3-R and MC4-R with similar affinity and stimulated cAMP with similar potency in HEK 293 cells transfected with MC3-R and MC4-R. In contrast gamma(2)-MSH showed selectivity for the MC3-R over the MC4-R both in binding affinity and cAMP stimulation. alpha-MSH and beta-MSH injected ICV into fasted rats at doses of 1, 3 and 6 nmol resulted in a decrease in food intake, (2 h food intake: alpha-MSH 6 nmol, 1.7+/-0.3 g; beta-MSH 6 nmol, 1.5+/-0.3 g vs. saline 6.0+/-0.5 g, P<0.001). Desacetyl alpha-MSH did not reduce food intake at low doses but was significant at 25 nmol (2 h food intake: desacetyl-alpha-MSH 6.1+/-1.0 g vs. saline 9.5+/-1.4 g, P<0.05). In contrast, gamma(2)-MSH had no effect on food intake when administered ICV to fasted rats. We were unable to establish a role for the MC3-R in feeding regulation. Our evidence, however, strengthens the hypothesis that the melanocortin's effects on food intake are mediated via the MC4-R.

  14. Polychlorinated biphenyls as hormonally active structural analogues

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, J.D. ); Waller, C.L. )

    1994-03-01

    Among the environmental chemicals that may be able to disrupt the endocrine systems of animals and humans, the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a chemical class of considerable concern. One possible mechanism by which PCBs may interfere with endocrine function is their ability to mimic natural hormones. These actions reflect a close relationship between the physicochemical properties encoded in the PCB molecular structure and the responses they evoke in biological systems. These physiocochemical properties determine the molecular reactivities of PCBs and are responsible for their recognition as biological acceptors and receptors, as well as for triggering molecular mechanisms that lead to tissue response. [open quotes]Coplanarity[close quotes] of PCB phenyl rings and [open quotes]laterality[close quotes] of chlorine atoms are important structural features determining specific binding behavior with proteins and certain toxic responses in biological systems. We compare qualitative structure-activity relationships for PCBs with the limited information on the related non-coplanar chlorinated diphenyl ethers, providing further insights into the nature of the molecular recognition processes and support for the structural relationship of PCBs to thyroid hormones. Steriodlike activity requires conformational restriction and possibility hydroxylation. We offer some simple molecular recognition models to account for the importance of these different structural features in the structure-activity relationships that permit one to express PCB reactivities in terms of dioxin, thyroxine, and estradiol equivalents. The available data support the involvement of PCBs as mimics of thyroid and other steroidal hormones. The potential for reproductive and developmental toxicity associated with human exposure to PCBs is of particular concern. 53 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Structure-activity relationship of crustacean peptide hormones.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Hidekazu

    2016-01-01

    In crustaceans, various physiological events, such as molting, vitellogenesis, and sex differentiation, are regulated by peptide hormones. To understanding the functional sites of these hormones, many structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies have been published. In this review, the author focuses the SAR of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone-family peptides and androgenic gland hormone and describes the detailed results of our and other research groups. The future perspectives will be also discussed.

  16. [Trp3, Arg5]-ghrelin(1-5) stimulates growth hormone secretion and food intake via growth hormone secretagogue (GHS) receptor.

    PubMed

    Ohinata, Kousaku; Kobayashi, Kanako; Yoshikawa, Masaaki

    2006-07-01

    Ghrelin, a 28 amino acid peptide identified as an endogenous ligand for growth hormone secretagogue (GHS) receptor, stimulates food intake and growth hormone (GH) secretion. We designed low molecular weight peptides with affinity for the GHS receptor based on the primary structure of ghrelin. We found that [Trp3, Arg5]-ghrelin(1-5) (GSWFR), a novel pentapeptide composed of all L-amino acids, had affinity for the GHS receptor (IC50 = 10 microM). GSWFR stimulated GH secretion after intravenous or oral administration. Centrally administered GSWFR increased food intake in non-fasted mice. The orexigenic action of GSWFR was inhibited by a GHS receptor antagonist, [D-Lys3]-GH-releasing peptide-6, suggesting that GSWFR stimulated food intake through the GHS receptor. The orexigenic action of GSWFR was also inhibited by a neuropeptide Y (NPY) Y1 receptor antagonist, BIBO3304. These results suggest that the GSWFR-induced feeding is mediated by the NPY Y1 receptor.

  17. Dose-related effects of lauric acid on antropyloroduodenal motility, gastrointestinal hormone release, appetite, and energy intake in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Little, Tanya J; Feltrin, Kate L; Horowitz, Michael; Smout, Andre J P M; Rades, Thomas; Meyer, James H; Pilichiewicz, Amelia N; Wishart, Judith; Feinle-Bisset, Christine

    2005-10-01

    We recently reported that intraduodenal infusion of lauric acid (C12) (0.375 kcal/min, 106 mM) stimulates isolated pyloric pressure waves (IPPWs), inhibits antral and duodenal pressure waves (PWs), stimulates release of cholecystokinin (CCK) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and suppresses energy intake and that these effects are much greater than those seen in response to isocaloric decanoic acid (C10) infusion. Administration of C12 was, however, associated with nausea, confounding interpretation of the results. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different intraduodenal doses of C12 on antropyloroduodenal (APD) motility, plasma CCK and GLP-1 concentrations, appetite, and energy intake. Thirteen healthy males were studied on 4 days in double-blind, randomized fashion. APD pressures, plasma CCK and GLP-1 concentrations, and appetite perceptions were measured during 90-min ID infusion of C12 at 0.1 (14 mM), 0.2 (28 mM), or 0.4 (56 mM) kcal/min or saline (control; rate 4 ml/min). Energy intake was determined at a buffet meal immediately following infusion. C12 dose-dependently stimulated IPPWs, decreased antral and duodenal motility, and stimulated secretion of CCK and GLP-1 (r > 0.4, P < 0.05 for all). C12 (0.4 kcal/min) suppressed energy intake compared with control, C12 (0.1 kcal/min), and C12 (0.2 kcal/min) (P < 0.05). These effects were observed in the absence of nausea. In conclusion, intraduodenal C12 dose-dependently modulated APD motility and gastrointestinal hormone release in healthy male subjects, whereas effects on energy intake were only apparent with the highest dose infused (0.4 kcal/min), possibly because only at this dose was modulation of APD motility and gastrointestinal hormone secretion sufficient for a suppressant effect on energy intake.

  18. Appetite, appetite hormone and energy intake responses to two consecutive days of aerobic exercise in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Jessica A; King, James A; McFarlane, Ewan; Baker, Luke; Bradley, Chloe; Crouch, Nicole; Hill, David; Stensel, David J

    2015-09-01

    Single bouts of exercise do not cause compensatory changes in appetite, food intake or appetite regulatory hormones on the day that exercise is performed. It remains possible that such changes occur over an extended period or in response to a higher level of energy expenditure. This study sought to test this possibility by examining appetite, food intake and appetite regulatory hormones (acylated ghrelin, total peptide-YY, leptin and insulin) over two days, with acute bouts of exercise performed on each morning. Within a controlled laboratory setting, 15 healthy males completed two, 2-day long (09:00-16:00) experimental trials (exercise and control) in a randomised order. On the exercise trial participants performed 60 min of continuous moderate-high intensity treadmill running (day one: 70.1 ± 2.5% VO2peak, day two: 70.0 ± 3.2% VO2max (mean ± SD)) at the beginning of days one and two. Across each day appetite perceptions were assessed using visual analogue scales and appetite regulatory hormones were measured from venous blood samples. Ad libitum energy and macronutrient intakes were determined from meals provided two and six hours into each day and from a snack bag provided in-between trial days. Exercise elicited a high level of energy expenditure (total = 7566 ± 635 kJ across the two days) but did not produce compensatory changes in appetite or energy intake over two days (control: 29,217 ± 4006 kJ; exercise: 28,532 ± 3899 kJ, P > 0.050). Two-way repeated measures ANOVA did not reveal any main effects for acylated ghrelin or leptin (all P > 0.050). However a significant main effect of trial (P = 0.029) for PYY indicated higher concentrations on the exercise vs. control trial. These findings suggest that across a two day period, high volume exercise does not stimulate compensatory appetite regulatory changes.

  19. Ghrelin: much more than a hunger hormone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ghrelin is a multifaceted gut hormone that activates its receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). Ghrelin's hallmark functions are its stimulatory effects on growth hormone release, food intake and fat deposition. Ghrelin is famously known as the 'hunger hormone'. However, ample recen...

  20. Stimulation of food intake and weight gain in mature female rats by bovine prolactin and bovine growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Byatt, J C; Staten, N R; Salsgiver, W J; Kostelc, J G; Collier, R J

    1993-06-01

    Recombinant bovine prolactin (rbPRL) or bovine growth hormone (rbGH) was administered to mature female rats (10/treatment group) by daily subcutaneous injection for 10 days. Doses ranged from 7 to 5,000 micrograms/day (0.03-24 mg/kg body wt). Both rbPRL and rbGH increased body weight gain and food intake, but these parameters were increased at lower doses of rbPRL (7-63 micrograms/day) than rbGH (> 190 micrograms/day). Weight gain and food intake were maximally stimulated by 190 micrograms/day rbPRL, whereas maximal increased weight gain was obtained with the highest dose of rbGH (5,000 micrograms/day). Total carcass protein was increased by both hormones; however, protein as a percentage of body weight was unchanged. Similarly, neither rbPRL nor rbGH changed the percentage of carcass moisture. Percentage of body fat was increased by rbPRL but was decreased by rbGH. Weight of the gastrointestinal tract and kidneys was increased by both hormones, but increases were in proportion to body weight gain. These data confirm that ungulate prolactin is a hyperphagic agent in the female rat. In addition, they suggest that, while prolactin stimulates growth in mature female rats, this growth is probably not via a somatogenic mechanism.

  1. Food Restriction-Induced Changes in Gonadotropin-Inhibiting Hormone Cells are Associated with Changes in Sexual Motivation and Food Hoarding, but not Sexual Performance and Food Intake.

    PubMed

    Klingerman, Candice M; Williams, Wilbur P; Simberlund, Jessica; Brahme, Nina; Prasad, Ankita; Schneider, Jill E; Kriegsfeld, Lance J

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesized that putative anorectic and orexigenic peptides control the motivation to engage in either ingestive or sex behaviors, and these peptides function to optimize reproductive success in environments where energy fluctuates. Here, the putative orexigenic peptide, gonadotropin-inhibiting hormone (GnIH, also known as RFamide-related peptide-3), and the putative anorectic hormones leptin, insulin, and estradiol were examined during the course of food restriction. Groups of female Syrian hamsters were restricted to 75% of their ad libitum food intake or fed ad libitum for 4, 8, or 12 days. Two other groups were food-restricted for 12 days and then re-fed ad libitum for 4 or 8 days. After testing for sex and ingestive behavior, blood was sampled and assayed for peripheral hormones. Brains were immunohistochemically double-labeled for GnIH and the protein product of the immediate early gene, c-fos, a marker of cellular activation. Food hoarding, the number of double-labeled cells, and the percent of GnIH-Ir cells labeled with Fos-Ir were significantly increased at 8 and 12 days after the start of food restriction. Vaginal scent marking and GnIH-Ir cell number significantly decreased after the same duration of restriction. Food hoarding, but not food intake, was significantly positively correlated with cellular activation in GnIH-Ir cells. Vaginal scent marking was significantly negatively correlated with cellular activation in GnIH-Ir cells. There were no significant effects of food restriction on plasma insulin, leptin, estradiol, or progesterone concentrations. In the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) of energetically challenged females, strong projections from NPY-Ir cells were found in close apposition to GnIH-Ir cells. Together these results are consistent with the idea that metabolic signals influence sexual and ingestive motivation via NPY fibers that project to GnIH cells in the DMH.

  2. Food Restriction-Induced Changes in Gonadotropin-Inhibiting Hormone Cells are Associated with Changes in Sexual Motivation and Food Hoarding, but not Sexual Performance and Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Klingerman, Candice M.; Williams, Wilbur P.; Simberlund, Jessica; Brahme, Nina; Prasad, Ankita; Schneider, Jill E.; Kriegsfeld, Lance J.

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesized that putative anorectic and orexigenic peptides control the motivation to engage in either ingestive or sex behaviors, and these peptides function to optimize reproductive success in environments where energy fluctuates. Here, the putative orexigenic peptide, gonadotropin-inhibiting hormone (GnIH, also known as RFamide-related peptide-3), and the putative anorectic hormones leptin, insulin, and estradiol were examined during the course of food restriction. Groups of female Syrian hamsters were restricted to 75% of their ad libitum food intake or fed ad libitum for 4, 8, or 12 days. Two other groups were food-restricted for 12 days and then re-fed ad libitum for 4 or 8 days. After testing for sex and ingestive behavior, blood was sampled and assayed for peripheral hormones. Brains were immunohistochemically double-labeled for GnIH and the protein product of the immediate early gene, c-fos, a marker of cellular activation. Food hoarding, the number of double-labeled cells, and the percent of GnIH-Ir cells labeled with Fos-Ir were significantly increased at 8 and 12 days after the start of food restriction. Vaginal scent marking and GnIH-Ir cell number significantly decreased after the same duration of restriction. Food hoarding, but not food intake, was significantly positively correlated with cellular activation in GnIH-Ir cells. Vaginal scent marking was significantly negatively correlated with cellular activation in GnIH-Ir cells. There were no significant effects of food restriction on plasma insulin, leptin, estradiol, or progesterone concentrations. In the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) of energetically challenged females, strong projections from NPY-Ir cells were found in close apposition to GnIH-Ir cells. Together these results are consistent with the idea that metabolic signals influence sexual and ingestive motivation via NPY fibers that project to GnIH cells in the DMH. PMID:22649396

  3. Plant growth-promoting hormones activate mammalian guanylate cyclase activity.

    PubMed

    Vesely, D L; Hudson, J L; Pipkin, J L; Pack, L D; Meiners, S E

    1985-05-01

    In vivo injections of plant growth-promoting hormones increase the growth of animals as well as plants. Plant growth-promoting hormones and positive plant growth regulators are known to increase RNA and protein synthesis. Since cyclic GMP also increases RNA and protein synthesis, the object of the present investigation was to determine whether physiological levels of plant growth-promoting hormones and positive plant growth regulators have part of their mechanism(s) of action through stimulation of the guanylate cyclase (EC 4.6.1.2)-cyclic GMP system. Representatives of the three classes of growth-promoting hormones were investigated. Thus, auxins (indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-butyric acid, beta-naphthoxyacetic acid, and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxy acetic acid), gibberellins (gibberellic acid), and cytokinins [N6-benzyl adenine, kinetin (6-furfuryl aminopurine), and beta-(2-furyl) acrylic acid] all increased rat lung, small intestine, liver, and renal cortex guanylate cyclase activity 2- to 4-fold at the 1 microM concentration. Dose response curves revealed that maximal stimulation of guanylate cyclase by these plant growth regulators was at 1 microM; there was no augmented cyclase activity at 1 nM. The guanylate cyclase cationic cofactor manganese was not essential for augmentation of guanylate cyclase by these plant growth-promoting regulators. The antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene did not block the enhancement of guanylate cyclase by these plant growth-promoting factors. These data suggest that guanylate cyclase may play a role in the mechanism of action of plant growth-promoting hormones and even of positive plant regulators at the cellular level.

  4. Differential dietary nutrient intake according to hormone replacement therapy use: an underestimated confounding factor in epidemiologic studies?

    PubMed

    Vercambre, Marie-Noël; Fournier, Agnès; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Ringa, Virginie; Berr, Claudine

    2007-12-15

    Observational studies and randomized controlled trials have produced divergent results concerning the effect of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on cardiovascular disease and, to a lesser extent, dementia. Residual confounding (confounding that remains even after adjustment for various socioeconomic and lifestyle factors) is one explanation that has been offered for these divergent results. The authors used data collected between 1990 and 1995 from 6,697 French women aged 61-72 years participating in a prospective cohort study to explore the hypothesis that nutritional intake varies according to HRT use and thus may be a source of residual confounding. After the authors adjusted for health and lifestyle factors, HRT users, compared with never users, had significantly higher intakes of alcohol; omega3 fatty acids; vitamins B6, B12, and D; and phosphorus and a lower intake of starch. These differential nutrient intakes were related to differences in eating habits. In particular, HRT users in the studied sample, compared with nonusers, ate significantly more fish. Most of the dietary differences were seen in both early users and delayers of HRT. To limit residual confounding in observational studies, dietary factors may be important parameters to be taken into account in analyses of HRT use and health outcomes.

  5. Involvement of melatonin and thyroid hormones in the control of sleep, food intake and energy metabolism in the domestic fowl.

    PubMed Central

    Bermudez, F F; Forbes, J M; Injidi, M H

    1983-01-01

    Growing male domestic fowl of an egg-laying strain were fed ad libitum and injected intraperitoneally with melatonin or intramuscularly with triiodothyronine (T3) to study the effects on sleep, food intake, blood glucose, e.e.g., oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production. Melatonin caused a dose-related depression of food intake with sleep and aphagia lasting for 2 1/2 hr following 8 mg, drowsiness and greatly reduced intake following 4 and 2 mg and a slight reduction in food intake after 1 mg. T3 injection was followed by increased feeding within the range 50-200 micrograms. The higher dose (200 micrograms) completely prevented the effects of 10 mg melatonin injected simultaneously. Melatonin (10 mg) depressed plasma glucose levels whereas T3 (200 micrograms) elevated blood glucose. Either darkness or melatonin (10 mg) caused an increase in amplitude and a decrease in frequency of the e.e.g. Birds fasted for 3 hr before injection showed significantly lower oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production when given melatonin (10 mg); T3 had no effect within the 4 hr period after injection and did not modify the effects of melatonin. It is postulated that the rapid effects of melatonin and T3 which were observed result from direct effects of these hormones on the central nervous system. PMID:6410055

  6. Ghrelin increases food intake, swimming activity and growth in juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta).

    PubMed

    Tinoco, Ana B; Näslund, Joacim; Delgado, María J; de Pedro, Nuria; Johnsson, Jörgen I; Jönsson, Elisabeth

    2014-01-30

    Several key functions of ghrelin are well conserved through vertebrate phylogeny. However, some of ghrelin's effects are contradictory and among teleosts only a limited number of species have been used in functional studies on food intake and foraging-related behaviors. Here we investigated the long-term effects of ghrelin on food intake, growth, swimming activity and aggressive contest behavior in one year old wild brown trout (Salmo trutta) using intraperitoneal implants. Food intake and swimming activity were individually recorded starting from day 1, and aggressive behavior was tested at day 11, after ghrelin implantation. Body weight and growth rate were measured from the beginning to the end of the experiment. Triglycerides and lipase activity in muscle and liver; monoaminergic activity in the telencephalon and brainstem; and neuropeptide Y (NPY) mRNA levels in the hypothalamus were analyzed. Ghrelin treatment was found to increase food intake and growth without modifying lipid deposition or lipid metabolism in liver and muscle. Ghrelin treatment led to an increased foraging activity and a trend towards a higher swimming activity. Moreover, ghrelin-treated fish showed a tendency to initiate more conflicts, but this motivation was not reflected in a higher ability to win the conflicts. No changes were observed in monoaminergic activity and NPY mRNA levels in the brain. Ghrelin is therefore suggested to act as an orexigenic hormone regulating behavior in juvenile wild brown trout. These actions are accompanied with an increased growth without the alteration of liver and muscle lipid metabolism and they do not seem to be mediated by changes in brain monoaminergic activity or hypothalamic expression of NPY.

  7. Energy intake, physical activity, energy balance, and cancer: epidemiologic evidence.

    PubMed

    Pan, Sai Yi; DesMeules, Marie

    2009-01-01

    Energy intake, physical activity, and obesity are modifiable lifestyle factors. This chapter reviews and summarizes the epidemiologic evidence on the relation of energy intake, physical activity, and obesity to cancer. High energy intake may increase the risk of cancers of colon-rectum, prostate (especially advanced prostate cancer), and breast. However, because physical activity, body size, and metabolic efficiency are highly related to total energy intake and expenditure, it is difficult to assess the independent effect of energy intake on cancer risk. There are sufficient evidences to support a role of physical activity in preventing cancers of the colon and breast, whereas the association is stronger in men than in women for colon cancer and in postmenopausal than in premenopausal women for breast cancer. The evidence also suggests that physical activity likely reduces the risk of cancers of endometrium, lung, and prostate (to a lesser extent). On the other hand, there is little or no evidence that the risk of rectal cancer is related to physical activity, whereas the results have been inconsistent regarding the association between physical activity and the risks of cancers of pancreas, ovary and kidney. Epidemiologic studies provide sufficient evidence that obesity is a risk factor for both cancer incidence and mortality. The evidence supports strong links of obesity with the risk of cancers of the colon, rectum, breast (in postmenopausal women), endometrium, kidney (renal cell), and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. Epidemiologic evidence also indicates that obesity is probably related to cancers of the pancreas, liver, and gallbladder, and aggressive prostate cancer, while it seems that obesity is not associated with lung cancer. The role of obesity in other cancer risks is unclear.

  8. Endocrine factors in the hypothalamic regulation of food intake in females: a review of the physiological roles and interactions of ghrelin, leptin, thyroid hormones, oestrogen and insulin.

    PubMed

    Somogyi, V; Gyorffy, A; Scalise, T J; Kiss, D S; Goszleth, G; Bartha, T; Frenyo, V L; Zsarnovszky, A

    2011-06-01

    Controlling energy homeostasis involves modulating the desire to eat and regulating energy expenditure. The controlling machinery includes a complex interplay of hormones secreted at various peripheral endocrine endpoints, such as the gastrointestinal tract, the adipose tissue, thyroid gland and thyroid hormone-exporting organs, the ovary and the pancreas, and, last but not least, the brain itself. The peripheral hormones that are the focus of the present review (ghrelin, leptin, thyroid hormones, oestrogen and insulin) play integrated regulatory roles in and provide feedback information on the nutritional and energetic status of the body. As peripheral signals, these hormones modulate central pathways in the brain, including the hypothalamus, to influence food intake, energy expenditure and to maintain energy homeostasis. Since the growth of the literature on the role of various hormones in the regulation of energy homeostasis shows a remarkable and dynamic expansion, it is now becoming increasingly difficult to understand the individual and interactive roles of hormonal mechanisms in their true complexity. Therefore, our goal is to review, in the context of general physiology, the roles of the five best-known peripheral trophic hormones (ghrelin, leptin, thyroid hormones, oestrogen and insulin, respectively) and discuss their interactions in the hypothalamic regulation of food intake.

  9. Hormonal responses and test meal intake among obese teenagers before and after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding123

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, Michael J; Schebendach, Janet; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Zimmerli, Ellen; Korner, Judith; Yanovski, Jack A; Zitsman, Jeffrey L; Walsh, B Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Background: Relatively little is known about changes in eating behavior or hormonal responses to food after bariatric surgery in adolescents. Objective: This study compared eating behavior and hormones among adolescents in a bariatric surgery program with those in nonoverweight control adolescents and evaluated changes before and after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB). Design: Fasting leptin, peptide YY (PYY), and ghrelin concentrations were obtained, and postprandial ghrelin and PYY area under the curve (AUC) were assessed after a single-item breakfast. Intake from an ad libitum lunchtime multi-item meal was measured. Results: Compared with controls (n = 9), all presurgical candidates (n = 20) had significantly greater fasting leptin, lower fasting ghrelin, and lower AUC ghrelin but similar PYY and AUC PYY. Preoperative candidates did not differ from controls in total energy consumed during the test meal. Postoperatively, among the 11 participants with data both before and after surgery, BMI (in kg/m2) decreased by 3.5 (P < 0.001), significantly less energy was consumed in the test meal, and a smaller number of foods were selected. AUC ghrelin and PYY did not significantly change before or after LAGB. Conclusions: Few significant short-term changes were observed in appetitive hormones after LAGB. It is unclear whether objective measures of eating behavior will prove useful in evaluating the impact of bariatric surgery on outcomes. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as CT00764127. PMID:23985807

  10. Neonatal hormone changes and growth in lambs born to dams receiving differing nutritional intakes and selenium supplementation during gestation.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Leticia E; Meyer, Allison M; Neville, Tammi L; Hammer, Carolyn J; Redmer, Dale A; Reynolds, Lawrence P; Caton, Joel S; Vonnahme, Kimberly A

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the effects of maternal selenium (Se) supplementation and nutritional intake during gestation on hormone changes, percentage body weight (BW) change, and organ mass in neonatal lambs, ewes were allocated to differing Se levels (adequate Se (ASe, 11.5 μg/kg BW) or high Se (HSe, 77.0 μg/kg BW)) initiated at breeding and nutritional intake (60% (RES), 100% (CON), or 140% (HIGH) of NRC requirements) initiated at day 40 of gestation. At parturition, all lambs were removed from dams, fed common diets, and BW and blood samples were collected until day 19. There was a Se × nutritional intake × day interaction for percentage BW change from birth. Lambs born to ASe-HIGH ewes tended to have decreased BW change compared with ASe-CON and ASe-RES groups on day 7. Lambs from HSe-HIGH ewes tended to have increased BW change compared with HSe-RES and HSe-CON groups from days 7 to 19. At birth, there was a Se × sex of offspring interaction, in which male lambs from HSe ewes had decreased cortisol concentrations compared with all other lambs. By 24 h, lambs from RES ewes had decreased cortisol compared with those from HIGH ewes, with lambs from CON ewes being intermediate. Lambs from RES- and CON-fed ewes had greater thyroxine than HIGH ewes at 24 h. Organ masses on day 19 were mainly impacted by maternal nutritional intake and sex of the offspring. Birth weight alone did not predict growth performance during neonatal life. Moreover, despite a similar postnatal diet, maternal nutritional plane and Se status did impact neonatal endocrine profiles. Exact mechanisms of how neonatal endocrine status can influence later growth and development need to be determined.

  11. Osteoporosis Knowledge, Calcium Intake, and Weight-Bearing Physical Activity in Three Age Groups of Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrio, Kate; Auld, Garry W.

    2002-01-01

    Determined the extent and integration of osteoporosis knowledge in three age groups of women, comparing knowledge to calcium intake and weight bearing physical activity (WBPA). Overall calcium intake was relatively high. There were no differences in knowledge, calcium intake, or WBPA by age, nor did knowledge predict calcium intake and WBPA. None…

  12. Addition of crude glycerin to pig diets: sow and litter performance, and metabolic and feed intake regulating hormones.

    PubMed

    Hernández, F; Orengo, J; Villodre, C; Martínez, S; López, M J; Madrid, J

    2016-06-01

    The continued growth in biofuel production has led to a search for alternative value-added applications of its main by-product, crude glycerin. The surplus glycerin production and a higher cost of feedstuffs have increased the emphasis on evaluating its nutritive value for animal feeding. The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of the dietary addition of crude glycerin on sow and litter performance, and to determine the serum concentrations of hormones related to energy metabolism and feed intake in sows during gestation and lactation. A total of 63 sows were assigned randomly to one of three dietary treatments, containing 0, 3 or 6% crude glycerin (G0, G3 and G6, respectively) added to a barley-soybean meal-based diet. During gestation, none of the dietary treatments had an effect on performance, while during lactation, glycerin-fed sows consumed less feed than those fed the control diet (3.8 v. 4.2kg DM/day; P=0.007). Although lactating sows fed the G3 diet had a higher BW loss than those fed the control diet (���20.6 v. ���8.7 kg; P=0.002), this difference was not reflected in litter performance. In gestation, the inclusion of glycerin did not affect blood concentrations of insulin or cortisol. However, pregnant sows fed diets supplemented with glycerin showed lower concentrations of acyl-ghrelin and higher concentrations of leptin (���55 and +68%, respectively; P<0.001). In lactating sows, there were no differences between dietary treatments for any of the hormones measured. Pre-prandial acyl-ghrelin concentrations were positively correlated with cortisol concentrations during gestation (r=0.81; P=0.001) and lactation (r=0.61; P=0.015). In conclusion, the inclusion of up to 6% crude glycerin did not affect the performance of sows during the gestation period; however it had a negative effect on the feed intake and weight loss of lactating sows. Moreover, further research is needed to elucidate the potential relationship between

  13. Pre- and within-meal effects of fluid dairy products on appetite, food intake, glycemia, and regulatory hormones in children.

    PubMed

    Vien, Shirley; Luhovyy, Bohdan L; Patel, Barkha P; Panahi, Shirin; El Khoury, Dalia; Mollard, Rebecca C; Hamilton, Jill K; Anderson, G Harvey

    2017-03-01

    The effect of beverages commonly consumed by children in-between or with meals on short-term food intake (FI) and glycemic control has received little attention. Therefore, 2 experiments were conducted in 9- to 14-year-old children following a randomized repeated-measures design. Experiment 1 (n = 32) compared the effects of water (control) and isocaloric (130 kcal) amounts of 2% milk, chocolate milk, yogurt drink, and fruit punch on subjective appetite and FI. Experiment 2 (n = 20) compared the effects of isocaloric (130 kcal) amounts of 2% milk and fruit punch on subjective appetite, FI, and glycemic and appetite hormone responses. One serving of the beverages was given as a pre-meal drink at baseline (0 min) and a second serving 60 min later with an ad libitum pizza meal. Meal FI in experiment 1 was lower by 14% and 10%, respectively, after chocolate milk and yogurt drink (p < 0.001), but not milk, compared with water. Cumulative energy intake (beverages plus meal) was higher after caloric beverages than water. In experiment 2, no differences occurred in pre-meal but post-meal glucose was 83% higher in overweight/obese than normal-weight children (p = 0.02). Milk led to higher pre-meal glucagon-like peptide-1 and post-meal peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY) than fruit punch (p < 0.01) but insulin did not differ between treatments. In conclusion, dairy products consumed before and with a meal have more favourable effects on FI, appetite, and satiety hormones than a sugar-sweetened beverage, but all caloric beverages result in more cumulative calories than if water is the beverage.

  14. Soy product and isoflavone intake and breast cancer risk defined by hormone receptor status.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Caixia; Ho, Suzanne C; Lin, Fangyu; Cheng, Shouzhen; Fu, Jianhua; Chen, Yuming

    2010-02-01

    The association between soy food consumption and breast cancer risk has been inconsistent. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted to assess the relationship between soy food intake and breast cancer risk according to the estrogen receptor (ER) and/or progesterone receptor (PR) status of breast cancer in Chinese women residing in Guangdong province from June 2007 to August 2008. A total of 438 consecutively recruited cases with primary breast cancer were frequency matched to 438 controls by age (5-year interval) and residence (rural/urban). Dietary intake was assessed by face-to-face interviews using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were obtained by using multiple unconditional logistic regression adjusted for the potential confounders. We observed a statistically significant inverse association between soy isoflavone and soy protein intake with breast cancer risk. The multivariate ORs (95% CIs) of breast cancer risk for the highest quartile compared with the lowest quartile were 0.54 (0.34-0.84) for soy isoflavone and 0.62 (0.40-0.96) for soy protein, respectively. A preventive effect of soy food was found for all subtypes of ER and/or PR status of breast cancer. The inverse association was more evident among premenopausal women. This study suggests that consumption of soy food, soy isoflavone, is inversely associated with the risk of breast cancer. The protective effects of soy did not seem to differ by ER and PR breast cancer status.

  15. Intake of Phthalate-tainted Foods and Serum Thyroid Hormones in Taiwanese Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hui-Ju; Wu, Chia-Fang; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Huang, Po-Chin; Chen, Mei-Lien; Wang, Shu-Li; Chen, Bai-Hsiun; Chen, Chu-Chih; Wu, Wen-Chiu; Hsu, Pi-Shan; Hsiung, Chao A; Wu, Ming-Tsang

    2016-07-29

    On April-May, 2011, phthalates, mainly Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), were deliberately added to a variety of foodstuff as a substitute emulsifier in Taiwan. This study investigated the relationship between DEHP-tainted foodstuffs exposure and thyroid function in possibly affected children and adolescents. Two hundred fifty participants <18 years possibly exposed to DEHP were enrolled in this study between August 2012 and January 2013. Questionnaires were used to collect details on their past exposure to DEHP-tainted food items. Blood and urine samples were collected for biochemical workups to measure current exposure derived from three urinary DEHP metabolites using a creatinine excretion-based model. More than half of 250 participants were estimated to be exposed to DEHP-tainted foods found to exceed the recommend tolerable daily intake of DEHP established by the European Food Safety Authority (<50 μg/kg/day). The median daily DEHP intake (DDI) among those 250 participants was 46.52 μg/kg/day after multiple imputation. This value was ~10-fold higher than the current median DEHP intake (4.46 μg/kg/day, n = 240). Neither past nor current DEHP exposure intensity was significantly associated with serum thyroid profiles. Future studies may want to follow the long-term health effects of this food scandal in affected children and adolescents.

  16. Intake of Phthalate-tainted Foods and Serum Thyroid Hormones in Taiwanese Children and Adolescents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hui-Ju; Wu, Chia-Fang; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Huang, Po-Chin; Chen, Mei-Lien; Wang, Shu-Li; Chen, Bai-Hsiun; Chen, Chu-Chih; Wu, Wen-Chiu; Hsu, Pi-Shan; Hsiung, Chao A.; Wu, Ming-Tsang

    2016-07-01

    On April-May, 2011, phthalates, mainly Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), were deliberately added to a variety of foodstuff as a substitute emulsifier in Taiwan. This study investigated the relationship between DEHP-tainted foodstuffs exposure and thyroid function in possibly affected children and adolescents. Two hundred fifty participants <18 years possibly exposed to DEHP were enrolled in this study between August 2012 and January 2013. Questionnaires were used to collect details on their past exposure to DEHP-tainted food items. Blood and urine samples were collected for biochemical workups to measure current exposure derived from three urinary DEHP metabolites using a creatinine excretion-based model. More than half of 250 participants were estimated to be exposed to DEHP-tainted foods found to exceed the recommend tolerable daily intake of DEHP established by the European Food Safety Authority (<50 μg/kg/day). The median daily DEHP intake (DDI) among those 250 participants was 46.52 μg/kg/day after multiple imputation. This value was ~10-fold higher than the current median DEHP intake (4.46 μg/kg/day, n = 240). Neither past nor current DEHP exposure intensity was significantly associated with serum thyroid profiles. Future studies may want to follow the long-term health effects of this food scandal in affected children and adolescents.

  17. [Problem of oral surgical interventions during pregnancy, menstruation and under the intake of hormonal contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Stech, E

    1979-04-01

    Pregnancy, menstruation and hormonal contraceptives are no contraindications for necessary oral surgical procedures. If the pregnancy takes a normal course, surgical interventions with absolute indication are possible at any time. Surgical interventions with relative indication should be performed during the second trimester of pregnancy. The dental treatment of pregnant women should be terminated, as far as possible, by the 7th or 8th month of pregnancy. Metabolic imbalances, static loading and gingival changes deserve special attention.

  18. The stimulatory effect of neuropeptide Y on growth hormone expression, food intake, and growth in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    PubMed

    Li, Meijie; Tan, Xungang; Sui, Yulei; Jiao, Shuang; Wu, Zhihao; Wang, Lijuan; You, Feng

    2017-02-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a 36-amino acid peptide known to be a strong orexigenic (appetite-stimulating) factor in many species. In this study, we investigated the effect of NPY on food intake and growth in the olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus). Recombinant full-length NPY was injected intraperitoneally into olive flounder at the dose of 1 μg/g body weight; phosphate buffered saline was used as the negative control. In a long-term experiment, NPY and control groups were injected every fifth day over a period of 30 days. In a short-term experiment, NPY and control groups were given intraperitoneal injections and maintained for 24 h. Food intake and growth rates were significantly higher in fish injected with recombinant NPY than in the control fish (P < 0.05). Higher growth hormone (GH) and NPY mRNA transcript levels were observed in both experiments, indicating a stimulatory effect of NPY on GH release. These findings demonstrate that NPY is an effective appetite-stimulating factor in olive flounder with the potential to improve the growth of domestic fish species and enhance efficiency in aquaculture.

  19. Effects of n3 Intake on Plasma Phospholipid Fatty Acids and Sex Hormone Profiles in Postmenopausal Women: Potential for Breast Cancer Risk Reduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Breast cancer risk is associated with dietary fat intake. Omega-6 fatty acids (n6) promote while omega-3 fatty acids (n3) inhibit tumorigenesis. Increased sex hormone (SH) concentrations are associated with risk of breast cancer. The effects of total fat and n3 on SH and PLFA were assessed in a f...

  20. Effects of syndyphalin-33 on feed intake and circulating measures of growth hormone, cortisol, and immune cell populations in the recently-weaned pig

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The synthetic met-enkephalin syndyphalin-33 (SD-33) increases feed intake in sheep and transiently increases circulating growth hormone (GH) concentrations in sheep, rats, and pigs. Two experiments were performed to evaluate the effects of SD-33 on recently-weaned pigs. In a preliminary experiment, ...

  1. Trigger values for investigation of hormonal activity in drinking water and its sources using CALUX bioassays.

    PubMed

    Brand, Walter; de Jongh, Cindy M; van der Linden, Sander C; Mennes, Wim; Puijker, Leo M; van Leeuwen, Cornelis J; van Wezel, Annemarie P; Schriks, Merijn; Heringa, Minne B

    2013-05-01

    To screen for hormonal activity in water samples, highly sensitive in vitro CALUX bioassays are available which allow detection of estrogenic (ERα), androgenic (AR), progestagenic (PR), and glucocorticoid (GR) activities. This paper presents trigger values for the ERα, AR, PR, and GR CALUX bioassays for agonistic hormonal activities in (drinking) water, which define a level above which human health risk cannot be waived a priori and additional examination of specific endocrine activity may be warranted. The trigger values are based on 1) acceptable or tolerable daily intake (ADI/TDI) values of specific compounds, 2) pharmacokinetic factors defining their bioavailability, 3) estimations of the bioavailability of unknown compounds with equivalent hormonal activity, 4) relative endocrine potencies, and 5) physiological, and drinking water allocation factors. As a result, trigger values of 3.8ng 17β-estradiol (E2)-equivalents (eq)/L, 11ng dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-eq/L, 21ng dexamethasone (DEX)-eq/L, and 333ng Org2058-eq/L were derived. Benchmark Quotient (BQ) values were derived by dividing hormonal activity in water samples by the derived trigger using the highest concentrations detected in a recent, limited screening of Dutch water samples, and were in the order of (value) AR (0.41)>ERα (0.13)>GR (0.06)>PR (0.04). The application of trigger values derived in the present study can help to judge measured agonistic hormonal activities in water samples using the CALUX bioassays and help to decide whether further examination of specific endocrine activity followed by a subsequent safety evaluation may be warranted, or whether concentrations of such activity are of low priority with respect to health concerns in the human population. For instance, at one specific drinking water production site ERα and AR (but no GR and PR) activities were detected in drinking water, however, these levels are at least a factor 83 smaller than the respective trigger values, and

  2. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... affect many different processes, including Growth and development Metabolism - how your body gets energy from the foods you eat Sexual function Reproduction Mood Endocrine glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the ...

  3. Growth hormone (GH)-releasing activity of chicken GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) in chickens.

    PubMed

    Harvey, S; Gineste, C; Gaylinn, B D

    2014-08-01

    Two peptides with sequence similarities to growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) have been identified by analysis of the chicken genome. One of these peptides, chicken (c) GHRH-LP (like peptide) was previously found to poorly bind to chicken pituitary membranes or to cloned and expressed chicken GHRH receptors and had little, if any, growth hormone (GH)-releasing activity in vivo or in vitro. In contrast, a second more recently discovered peptide, cGHRH, does bind to cloned and expressed cGHRH receptors and increases cAMP activity in transfected cells. The possibility that this peptide may have in vivo GH-releasing activity was therefore assessed. The intravenous (i.v.) administration of cGHRH to immature chickens, at doses of 3-100 μg/kg, significantly increased circulating GH concentrations within 10 min of injection and the plasma GH levels remained elevated for at least 30 min after the injection of maximally effective doses. The plasma GH responses to cGHRH were comparable with those induced by human (h) or porcine (p) GHRH preparations and to that induced by thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH). In marked contrast, the i.v. injection of cGHRH-LP had no significant effect on circulating GH concentrations in immature chicks. GH release was also increased from slaughterhouse chicken pituitary glands perifused for 5 min with cGHRH at doses of 0.1 μg/ml or 1.0 μg/ml, comparable with GH responses to hGHRH1-44. In contrast, the perifusion of chicken pituitary glands with cGHRH-LP had no significant effect on GH release. In summary, these results demonstrate that cGHRH has GH-releasing activity in chickens and support the possibility that it is the endogenous ligand of the cGHRH receptor.

  4. Role of abnormal anterior pituitary hormones-growth hormone and prolactin in active systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaohua; Xu, Jinhua; Li, Shujuan; Huang, Wen; Li, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background: The role of anterior pituitary hormones in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) remains controversial. Aims and Objectives: We determined the expression levels of human growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and their receptors in subjects presenting with SLE, and modulation of disease severity. Materials and methods: Forty-seven subjects and ten healthy controls were assessed for possible association between SLE disease activity and levels of serum PRL, GH and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH). In peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), specific binding and mRNA expression of receptors for GH (GHR), and PRL (PRLR) were determined by receptor-ligand binding assay (RLBA) and RT-PCR. PBMC of recruited subjects were treated with hPRL and rhGH to assess IgG production and antibodies against dsDNA. Results: In active SLE subjects we found elevated PRL and GH levels. Study subject PBMCs displayed augmented GHR and PRLR protein and mRNA expression. Study subjects also showed a positive correlation in serum PRL levels and specific antibodies against dsDNA, SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), and proteinuria. However, a negative correlation was found between serum PRL levels and complement component C3. We found a positive correlation between specific binding rates of PRLR and GHR and both SLE activity and dsDNA antibody titers. Enhanced IgG and anti-dsDNA secretion was observed in cultured PBMC stimulated by PRL or GH with/without PHA, PWM, IL-2 or IL-10. In active SLE, a close association was found between augmented PRL and GH levels, expression and specific binding activities of PRLR and GHR, and changes in the specific titer of anti-dsDNA. Conclusion: Anterior pituitary hormones play an important role in the pathogenesis of SLE. High levels of growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) play a role in pathogenesis of SLE, which is correlated with SLE disease activity and antibodies against dsDNA. The mechanism of GH and PRL in SLE was complicated and should

  5. Risk of malignant melanoma in relation to drug intake, alcohol, smoking and hormonal factors.

    PubMed Central

    Westerdahl, J.; Olsson, H.; Måsbäck, A.; Ingvar, C.; Jonsson, N.

    1996-01-01

    In a population-based, matched case-control study from southern Sweden of 400 patients with a first diagnosis of malignant melanoma and 640 healthy control subjects aged 15-75 years, the association between commonly prescribed drugs, alcohol, smoking and malignant melanoma was evaluated. In addition, the relation between reproductive and hormonal factors and melanoma in women was studied. It was found that certain specific types of prescribed drugs, i.e. beta-blockers, hydralazines and benzodiazepines, may increase the risk of melanoma development. However, these associations were diminished, at least for benzodiazepines, after controlling for host factors. As these findings are unconfirmed, and may be due to chance or confounding, further studies are warranted. The risk of malignant melanoma was not influenced by alcohol consumption or smoking habits. Our results do not suggest an association between oral contraceptives and melanoma. Furthermore, reproductive factors were not independent risk factors for melanoma. However, increasing number of live births seemed to be protective (P for trend = 0.01). There is a need for further research to be able to draw firm conclusions on the relation between number of live births and melanoma. The results based on histopathological re-examinations and those based on tumour registry data were essentially the same. PMID:8624275

  6. Sex hormone activity in alcohol addiction: integrating organizational and activational effects.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Bernd; Müller, Christian P; Stoessel, Christina; Sperling, Wolfgang; Biermann, Teresa; Hillemacher, Thomas; Bleich, Stefan; Kornhuber, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    There are well-known sex differences in the epidemiology and etiopathology of alcohol dependence. Male gender is a crucial risk factor for the onset of alcohol addiction. A directly modifying role of testosterone in alcohol addiction-related behavior is well established. Sex hormones exert both permanent (organizational) and transient (activational) effects on the human brain. The sensitive period for these effects lasts throughout life. In this article, we present a novel early sex hormone activity model of alcohol addiction. We propose that early exposure to sex hormones triggers structural (organizational) neuroadaptations. These neuroadaptations affect cellular and behavioral responses to adult sex hormones, sensitize the brain's reward system to the reinforcing properties of alcohol and modulate alcohol addictive behavior later in life. This review outlines clinical findings related to the early sex hormone activity model of alcohol addiction (handedness, the second-to-fourth-finger length ratio, and the androgen receptor and aromatase) and includes clinical and preclinical literature regarding the activational effects of sex hormones in alcohol drinking behavior. Furthermore, we discuss the role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and -gonadal axes and the opioid system in mediating the relationship between sex hormone activity and alcohol dependence. We conclude that a combination of exposure to sex hormones in utero and during early development contributes to the risk of alcohol addiction later in life. The early sex hormone activity model of alcohol addiction may prove to be a valuable tool in the development of preventive and therapeutic strategies.

  7. Athletic Activity and Hormone Concentrations in High School Female Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Wojtys, Edward M.; Jannausch, Mary L.; Kreinbrink, Jennifer L.; Harlow, Siobán D.; Sowers, MaryFran R.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Physical activity may affect the concentrations of circulating endogenous hormones in female athletes. Understanding the relationship between athletic and physical activity and circulating female hormone concentrations is critical. Objective: To test the hypotheses that (1) the estradiol-progesterone profile of high school adolescent girls participating in training, conditioning, and competition would differ from that of physically inactive, age-matched adolescent girls throughout a 3-month period; and (2) athletic training and conditioning would alter body composition (muscle, bone), leading to an increasingly greater lean–body-mass to fat–body-mass ratio with accompanying hormonal changes. Design: Cohort study. Settings: Laboratory and participants' homes. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 106 adolescent girls, ages 14–18 years, who had experienced at least 3 menstrual cycles in their lifetime. Main Outcome Measure(s): Participants were prospectively monitored throughout a 13-week period, with weekly physical activity assessments and 15 urine samples for estrogen, luteinizing hormone, creatinine, and progesterone concentrations. Each girl underwent body-composition measurements before and after the study period. Results: Seventy-four of the 98 girls (76%) who completed the study classified themselves as athletes. Body mass index, body mass, and fat measures remained stable, and 17 teenagers had no complete menstrual cycle during the observation period. Mean concentrations of log(estrogen/creatinine) were slightly greater in nonathletes who had cycles of <24 or >35 days. Mean log(progesterone/creatinine) concentrations in nonathletes were less in the first half and greater in the second half of the cycle, but the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: A moderate level of athletic or physical activity did not influence urine concentrations of estrogen, progesterone, or luteinizing hormones. However, none of the

  8. Peptides and food intake.

    PubMed

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  9. Peptides and Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  10. Effects of sleeve gastrectomy and ileal transposition, alone and in combination, on food intake, body weight, gut hormones, and glucose metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Nausheen, S; Shah, I H; Pezeshki, A; Sigalet, D L; Chelikani, P K

    2013-08-15

    Bariatric surgeries are hypothesized to produce weight loss and improve diabetes control by multiple mechanisms including gastric restriction and lower gut stimulation; the relative importance of these mechanisms remains poorly understood. We compared the effects of a typical foregut procedure, sleeve gastrectomy, (SG) with a primarily hindgut surgery, ileal transposition (IT), alone and together (SGIT), or sham manipulations, on food intake, body weight, gut hormones, glucose tolerance, and key markers of glucose homeostasis in peripheral tissues of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (450-550 g, n = 7-9/group). SG, IT, and SGIT surgeries produced transient reduction in food intake and weight gain; the effects of SG and IT on intake and body weight were nonadditive. SG, IT, and SGIT surgeries resulted in increased tissue expression and plasma concentrations of the lower gut hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide YY and decreased plasma glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide, insulin, and leptin concentrations. Despite transient effects on intake and weight gain, the SG, IT, and SGIT surgeries produced a significant improvement in glucose tolerance. In support of glycemic improvements, the protein abundance of key markers of glucose metabolism (e.g., GLUT4, PKA, IRS-1) in muscle and adipose tissue were increased, whereas the expression of key gluconeogenic enzyme in liver (G-6-Pase) were decreased following the surgeries. Therefore, our data suggest that enhanced lower gut stimulation following SG, IT, and SGIT surgeries leads to transient reduction in food intake and weight gain together with enhanced secretion of lower gut hormones and improved glucose clearance by peripheral tissues.

  11. Coupling between Nutrient Availability and Thyroid Hormone Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Lartey, Lattoya J.; Werneck-de-Castro, João Pedro; O-Sullivan, InSug; Unterman, Terry G.; Bianco, Antonio C.

    2015-01-01

    The activity of the thyroid gland is stimulated by food availability via leptin-induced thyrotropin-releasing hormone/thyroid-stimulating hormone expression. Here we show that food availability also stimulates thyroid hormone activation by accelerating the conversion of thyroxine to triiodothyronine via type 2 deiodinase in mouse skeletal muscle and in a cell model transitioning from 0.1 to 10% FBS. The underlying mechanism is transcriptional derepression of DIO2 through the mTORC2 pathway as defined in rictor knockdown cells. In cells kept in 0.1% FBS, there is DIO2 inhibition via FOXO1 binding to the DIO2 promoter. Repression of DIO2 by FOXO1 was confirmed using its specific inhibitor AS1842856 or adenoviral infection of constitutively active FOXO1. ChIP studies indicate that 4 h after 10% FBS-containing medium, FOXO1 binding markedly decreases, and the DIO2 promoter is activated. Studies in the insulin receptor FOXO1 KO mouse indicate that insulin is a key signaling molecule in this process. We conclude that FOXO1 represses DIO2 during fasting and that derepression occurs via nutritional activation of the PI3K-mTORC2-Akt pathway. PMID:26499800

  12. A mathematical model of long-term renal sympathetic nerve activity inhibition during an increase in sodium intake

    PubMed Central

    Denizhan, Yagmur; Hester, Robert

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that renal nerves directly affect renal vascular resistance, tubular sodium reabsorption, and renin secretion. Inhibition of renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) decreases renal vascular resistance, tubular sodium reabsorption, and renin secretion, leading to an increase in sodium excretion. Although several studies show that inhibition of RSNA promotes sodium excretion during an acute blood volume expansion, there is limited research relating to the importance of RSNA inhibition that contributes to sodium homeostasis during a long-term increase in sodium intake. Therefore, to dissect the underlying mechanisms of sodium excretion, a mathematical model of a cardiovascular system consisting of two kidneys, each with an independent RSNA, was developed. Simulations were performed to determine the responses of RSNA and sodium excretion to an increased sodium intake. In these simulations, RSNA in the left kidney was fixed at its normal steady-state value, while RSNA in the contralateral kidney was allowed to change normally in response to the increased sodium intake. The results demonstrate that the fixed-RSNA kidney excretes less sodium than the intact-RSNA collateral kidney. Because each kidney is exposed to the same arterial pressure and circulatory hormones, the impaired sodium excretion in the absence of RSNA inhibition supports the hypothesis that RSNA inhibition contributes to natriuresis in response to a long-term increase in sodium intake. PMID:24285363

  13. Intracerebroventricular administration of C-type natriuretic peptide suppresses food intake via activation of the melanocortin system in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamada-Goto, Nobuko; Katsuura, Goro; Ebihara, Ken; Inuzuka, Megumi; Ochi, Yukari; Yamashita, Yui; Kusakabe, Toru; Yasoda, Akihiro; Satoh-Asahara, Noriko; Ariyasu, Hiroyuki; Hosoda, Kiminori; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2013-05-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and its receptor are abundantly distributed in the brain, especially in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the hypothalamus associated with regulating energy homeostasis. To elucidate the possible involvement of CNP in energy regulation, we examined the effects of intracerebroventricular administration of CNP on food intake in mice. The intracerebroventricular administration of CNP-22 and CNP-53 significantly suppressed food intake on 4-h refeeding after 48-h fasting. Next, intracerebroventricular administration of CNP-22 and CNP-53 significantly decreased nocturnal food intake. The increment of food intake induced by neuropeptide Y and ghrelin was markedly suppressed by intracerebroventricular administration of CNP-22 and CNP-53. When SHU9119, an antagonist for melanocortin-3 and melanocortin-4 receptors, was coadministered with CNP-53, the suppressive effect of CNP-53 on refeeding after 48-h fasting was significantly attenuated by SHU9119. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that intracerebroventricular administration of CNP-53 markedly increased the number of c-Fos-positive cells in the ARC, paraventricular nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamus, ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus, and lateral hypothalamus. In particular, c-Fos-positive cells in the ARC after intracerebroventricular administration of CNP-53 were coexpressed with α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone immunoreactivity. These results indicated that intracerebroventricular administration of CNP induces an anorexigenic action, in part, via activation of the melanocortin system.

  14. Comparison of dietary intake and physical activity between women with and without polycystic ovary syndrome: a review.

    PubMed

    Lin, Annie W; Lujan, Marla E

    2014-09-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a prevalent endocrine disorder affecting women of reproductive age worldwide. In addition to deleterious effects on fertility imparted by PCOS, women with PCOS are at increased risk of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, depression, and certain cancers. Hormonal and metabolic aberrations in PCOS have the potential to influence dietary intake and physical activity levels. There are emerging global data that women with PCOS have different baseline dietary energy intakes compared with women without PCOS. These alterations in diet may exacerbate clinical symptoms and compound risk of chronic disease in patients. Few studies have compared baseline physical activity levels between women with and without PCOS. Although comparisons between studies are confounded by several factors, the data point to no differences in activity levels among PCOS and non-PCOS groups. This review provides an assessment of the current literature on baseline dietary intake and physical activity levels in women with PCOS. Future recommendations to strengthen research in this area are provided, given the implications to aid in the development of effective nutrition-focused interventions for PCOS.

  15. Animal protein intakes during early life and adolescence differ in their relation to the growth hormone-insulin-like-growth-factor axis in young adulthood.

    PubMed

    Joslowski, Gesa; Remer, Thomas; Assmann, Karen E; Krupp, Danika; Cheng, Guo; Garnett, Sarah P; Kroke, Anja; Wudy, Stefan A; Günther, Anke L B; Buyken, Anette E

    2013-07-01

    Recent studies provide evidence that insulin-like-growth-factor I (IGF-I) and its binding proteins (IGFBP) IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 are related to the risk of several common cancers. It remains to be clarified whether their concentrations can be programmed by protein intake from different sources during growth. This study addressed the hypothesis that animal protein intakes during infancy, mid-childhood, and adolescence differ in their relevance for the growth-hormone (GH)-IGF-I axis in young adulthood. Data from the Dortmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed Study participants with at least 2 plausible 3-d weighed dietary records during adolescence (age: girls, 9-14 y; boys, 10-15 y; n = 213), around the adiposity rebound (age 4-6 y; n = 179) or early life (age 0.5-2 y; n = 130), and one blood sample in young adulthood were included in the study. Mean serum concentrations of IGF-I, IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2, and IGFBP-3 were compared between tertiles of habitual animal protein intake using multivariable regression analysis. Habitually higher animal protein intakes in females during puberty were related to higher IGF-I (P-trend = 0.005) and IGFBP-3 (P-trend = 0.01) and lower IGFBP-2 (P-trend = 0.04), but not to IGFBP-1 in young adulthood. In turn, IGF-I concentrations in young adulthood were inversely related to animal protein intakes in early life among males only (P-trend = 0.03), but not to animal protein intake around adiposity rebound (P-trend > 0.5). Our data suggest that, among females, a habitually higher animal protein intake during puberty may precipitate an upregulation of the GH-IGF-I axis, which is still discernible in young adulthood. By contrast, among males, higher animal protein intakes in early life may exert a long-term programming of the GH-IGF-I axis.

  16. Contributions of upper gut hormones and motility to the energy intake-suppressant effects of intraduodenal nutrients in healthy, lean men - a pooled-data analysis.

    PubMed

    Schober, Gudrun; Lange, Kylie; Steinert, Robert E; Hutchison, Amy T; Luscombe-Marsh, Natalie D; Landrock, Maria F; Horowitz, Michael; Seimon, Radhika V; Feinle-Bisset, Christine

    2016-09-01

    We have previously identified pyloric pressures and plasma cholecystokinin (CCK) concentrations as independent determinants of energy intake following administration of intraduodenal lipid and intravenous CCK. We evaluated in healthy men whether these parameters also determine energy intake in response to intraduodenal protein, and whether, across the nutrients, any predominant gastrointestinal (GI) factors exist, or many factors make small contributions. Data from nine published studies, in which antropyloroduodenal pressures, GI hormones, and GI /appetite perceptions were measured during intraduodenal lipid or protein infusions, were pooled. In all studies energy intake was quantified immediately after the infusions. Specific variables for inclusion in a mixed-effects multivariable model for determination of independent predictors of energy intake were chosen following assessment for collinearity, and within-subject correlations between energy intake and these variables were determined using bivariate analyses adjusted for repeated measures. In models based on all studies, or lipid studies, there were significant effects for amplitude of antral pressure waves, premeal glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and time-to-peak GLP-1 concentrations, GLP-1 AUC and bloating scores (P < 0.05), and trends for basal pyloric pressure (BPP), amplitude of duodenal pressure waves, peak CCK concentrations, and hunger and nausea scores (0.05 < P ≤ 0.094), to be independent determinants of subsequent energy intake. In the model including the protein studies, only BPP was identified as an independent determinant of energy intake (P < 0.05). No single parameter was identified across all models, and effects of the variables identified were relatively small. Taken together, while GI mechanisms contribute to the regulation of acute energy intake by lipid and protein, their contribution to the latter is much less. Moreover, the effects are likely to reflect small, cumulative

  17. Comparison of self-reported energy availability and metabolic hormones to assess adequacy of dietary energy intake in young elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Karsten; Achtzehn, Silvia; Braun, Hans; Mester, Joachim; Schaenzer, Wilhelm

    2013-07-01

    Previous intervention studies suggest that leptin, insulin, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and triiodthyronine (T3) are sensitive markers of inadequate energy intake in relation to exercise expenditures. Because of limitations in metabolic hormone measurements, self-reported energy availability (EA) based on food and activity records may present an alternative for characterizing energy status in young athletes. The purpose of the current study was to assess whether self-reported EA is related to leptin, insulin, IGF-1, and T3 in 352 young athletes. Sex, body composition, sport participation, and acute weight changes were considered as confounding variables. Multiple linear regression revealed that EA was negatively associated with leptin (p < 0.05) but not with insulin, IGF-1, or T3. Female athletes with low EA (<30 kcal·kg(-1) fat-free mass (FFM)) had higher leptin concentrations (5.0 ± 4.7 ng·mL(-1)) and more body fat (18.3% ± 5.1%) than did females with normal EA (leptin, 3.1 ± 2.4 ng·mL(-1); body fat, 15.8% ± 4.2%; both, p < 0.001). Athletes reporting acute weight loss (>1 kg·week(-1)) had a lower EA (18.9 ± 7.4 kcal·kg(-1) FFM) than did weight-stable athletes (30.0 ± 11.2 kcal·kg(-1) FFM) or athletes reporting weight gain (>1 kg; 49.7 ± 13.1 kcal·kg(-1) FFM). IGF-1 and T3 were also reduced in athletes who lost weight (p < 0.01). This cross-sectional study reveals a lack of association between self-reported EA and metabolic hormones indicative of energy status in young athletes. Further studies are needed to investigate whether self-reported EA and metabolic hormones are in better agreement when measured repeatedly.

  18. Leptin activates chicken growth hormone promoter without chicken STAT3 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Murase, Daisuke; Namekawa, Shoko; Ohkubo, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone that not only regulates food intake and energy homeostasis but also induces growth hormone (GH) mRNA expression and release, thereby controlling growth and metabolism in mammals. The molecular mechanism of leptin-induced regulation of GH gene transcription is unclear. The current study investigated the effects of leptin on the chicken GH (cGH) promoter and the molecular mechanism underlying leptin-induced cGH gene expression in vitro. Leptin activated the cGH promoter in the presence of chPit-1α in CHO cells stably expressing the chicken leptin receptor. Promoter activation did not require STAT-binding elements in the cGH promoter or STAT3 activity. However, JAK2 activation was required for leptin-dependent activity. JAK2-dependent pathways include p42/44 MAPK and PI3K, and inhibition of these pathways partially blocked leptin-induced cGH gene transcription. Although CK2 directly activates JAK2, a CK2 inhibitor blocked leptin-dependent activation of the cGH gene without affecting JAK2 phosphorylation. The CK2 inhibitor suppressed Erk1/2 and Akt phosphorylation. Additional data implicate Src family kinases in leptin-dependent cGH gene activation. These results suggest that leptin activates the cGH gene in the presence of chPit-1α via several leptin-activated kinases. Although further study is required, we suggest that the leptin-induced JAK2/p42/44 MAPK and JAK2/PI3K cascades are activated by Src-meditated CK2, leading to CBP phosphorylation and interaction with chPit-1α, resulting in transactivation of the cGH promoter.

  19. Regulation of feeding behavior and psychomotor activity by corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in fish

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Kouhei

    2013-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide belonging to a family of neuropeptides that includes urocortins, urotensin I, and sauvagine in vertebrates. CRH and urocortin act as anorexigenic factors for satiety regulation in fish. In a goldfish model, intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of CRH has been shown to affect not only food intake, but also locomotor and psychomotor activities. In particular, CRH elicits anxiety-like behavior as an anxiogenic neuropeptide in goldfish, as is the case in rodents. This paper reviews current knowledge of CRH and its related peptides derived from studies of teleost fish, as representative non-mammals, focusing particularly on the role of the CRH system, and examines its significance from a comparative viewpoint. PMID:23754974

  20. Regulation of feeding behavior and food intake by appetite-regulating peptides in wild-type and growth hormone-transgenic coho salmon.

    PubMed

    White, Samantha L; Volkoff, Helene; Devlin, Robert H

    2016-08-01

    Survival, competition, growth and reproductive success in fishes are highly dependent on food intake, food availability and feeding behavior and are all influenced by a complex set of metabolic and neuroendocrine mechanisms. Overexpression of growth hormone (GH) in transgenic fish can result in greatly enhanced growth rates, feed conversion, feeding motivation and food intake. The objectives of this study were to compare seasonal feeding behavior of non-transgenic wild-type (NT) and GH-transgenic (T) coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), and to examine the effects of intraperitoneal injections of the appetite-regulating peptides cholecystokinin (CCK-8), bombesin (BBS), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) on feeding behavior. T salmon fed consistently across all seasons, whereas NT dramatically reduced their food intake in winter, indicating the seasonal regulation of appetite can be altered by overexpression of GH in T fish. Intraperitoneal injections of CCK-8 and BBS caused a significant and rapid decrease in food intake for both genotypes. Treatment with either GLP-1 or α-MSH resulted in a significant suppression of food intake for NT but had no effect in T coho salmon. The differential response of T and NT fish to α-MSH is consistent with the melanocortin-4 receptor system being a significant pathway by which GH acts to stimulate appetite. Taken together, these results suggest that chronically increased levels of GH alter feeding regulatory pathways to different extents for individual peptides, and that altered feeding behavior in transgenic coho salmon may arise, in part, from changes in sensitivity to peripheral appetite-regulating signals.

  1. Food intake monitoring: an acoustical approach to automated food intake activity detection and classification of consumed food.

    PubMed

    Päßler, Sebastian; Wolff, Matthias; Fischer, Wolf-Joachim

    2012-06-01

    Obesity and nutrition-related diseases are currently growing challenges for medicine. A precise and timesaving method for food intake monitoring is needed. For this purpose, an approach based on the classification of sounds produced during food intake is presented. Sounds are recorded non-invasively by miniature microphones in the outer ear canal. A database of 51 participants eating seven types of food and consuming one drink has been developed for algorithm development and model training. The database is labeled manually using a protocol with introductions for annotation. The annotation procedure is evaluated using Cohen's kappa coefficient. The food intake activity is detected by the comparison of the signal energy of in-ear sounds to environmental sounds recorded by a reference microphone. Hidden Markov models are used for the recognition of single chew or swallowing events. Intake cycles are modeled as event sequences in finite-state grammars. Classification of consumed food is realized by a finite-state grammar decoder based on the Viterbi algorithm. We achieved a detection accuracy of 83% and a food classification accuracy of 79% on a test set of 10% of all records. Our approach faces the need of monitoring the time and occurrence of eating. With differentiation of consumed food, a first step toward the goal of meal weight estimation is taken.

  2. Limits to sustained energy intake. XVI. Body temperature and physical activity of female mice during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gamo, Yuko; Bernard, Amelie; Mitchell, Sharon E; Hambly, Catherine; Al Jothery, Aqeel; Vaanholt, Lobke M; Król, Elzbieta; Speakman, John R

    2013-06-15

    Lactation is the most energy-demanding phase of mammalian reproduction, and lactation performance may be affected by events during pregnancy. For example, food intake may be limited in late pregnancy by competition for space in the abdomen between the alimentary tract and fetuses. Hence, females may need to compensate their energy budgets during pregnancy by reducing activity and lowering body temperature. We explored the relationships between energy intake, body mass, body temperature and physical activity throughout pregnancy in the MF1 mouse. Food intake and body mass of 26 females were recorded daily throughout pregnancy. Body temperature and physical activity were monitored every minute for 23 h a day by implanted transmitters. Body temperature and physical activity declined as pregnancy advanced, while energy intake and body mass increased. Compared with a pre-mating baseline period, mice increased energy intake by 56% in late pregnancy. Although body temperature declined as pregnancy progressed, this served mostly to reverse an increase between baseline and early pregnancy. Reduced physical activity may compensate the energy budget of pregnant mice but body temperature changes do not. Over the last 3 days of pregnancy, food intake declined. Individual variation in energy intake in the last phase of pregnancy was positively related to litter size at birth. As there was no association between the increase in body mass and the decline in intake, we suggest the decline was not caused by competition for abdominal space. These data suggest overall reproductive performance is probably not constrained by events during pregnancy.

  3. "Monkey see, monkey do": Peers' behaviors predict preschoolers' physical activity and dietary intake in childcare centers.

    PubMed

    Ward, Stéphanie; Bélanger, Mathieu; Donovan, Denise; Boudreau, Jonathan; Vatanparast, Hassan; Muhajarine, Nazeem; Leis, Anne; Humbert, M Louise; Carrier, Natalie

    2017-04-01

    Preschoolers observe and imitate the behaviors of those who are similar to them. Therefore, peers may be role models for preschoolers' dietary intake and physical activity in childcare centers. This study examined whether peers' behaviors predict change in preschoolers' dietary intake and physical activity in childcare centers over 9months. A total of 238 preschoolers (3 to 5years old) from 23 childcare centers in two Canadian provinces provided data at the beginning (October 2013 and 2014) and the end (June 2014 and 2015) of a 9-month period for this longitudinal study. Dietary intake was collected at lunch using weighed plate waste and digital photography on two consecutive weekdays. Physical activity was assessed using accelerometers over five days. Multilevel linear regressions were used to estimate the influence of peers' behaviors on preschoolers' change in dietary intake and physical activity over 9months. Results showed that preschoolers whose dietary intake or physical activity level deviated the most from those of their peers at the beginning of the year demonstrated greater change in their intakes and activity levels over 9months, which enabled them to become more similar to their peers (all β 95% CI ranged from -0.835 to -0.074). This study suggests that preschoolers' dietary intake and physical activity may be influenced by the behaviors of their peers in childcare centers. Since peers could play an important role in promoting healthy eating behaviors and physical activity in childcare centers, future studies should test interventions based on positive role modeling by children.

  4. Activation of physiological stress responses by a natural reward: Novel vs. repeated sucrose intake.

    PubMed

    Egan, Ann E; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M

    2015-10-15

    Pharmacological rewards, such as drugs of abuse, evoke physiological stress responses, including increased heart rate and blood pressure, and activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. It is not clear to what extent the natural reward of palatable foods elicits similar physiological responses. In order to address this question, HPA axis hormones, heart rate, blood pressure and brain pCREB immunolabeling were assessed following novel and repeated sucrose exposure. Briefly, adult, male rats with ad libitum food and water were given either a single (day 1) or repeated (twice-daily for 14 days) brief (up to 30 min) exposure to a second drink bottle containing 4 ml of 30% sucrose drink vs. water (as a control for bottle presentation). Sucrose-fed rats drank more than water-fed on all days of exposure, as expected. On day 1 of exposure, heart rate, blood pressure, plasma corticosterone, and locomotion were markedly increased by presentation of the second drink bottle regardless of drink type. After repeated exposure (day 14), these responses habituated to similar extents regardless of drink type and pCREB immunolabeling in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) also did not vary with drink type, whereas basolateral amygdala pCREB was increased by sucrose intake. Taken together, these data suggest that while sucrose is highly palatable, physiological stress responses were evoked principally by the drink presentation itself (e.g., an unfamiliar intervention by the investigators), as opposed to the palatability of the offered drink.

  5. Increased food intake in growth hormone-transgenic common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) may be mediated by upregulating Agouti-related protein (AgRP).

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chengrong; Song, Yanlong; Wang, Yaping; Zhang, Tanglin; Duan, Ming; Li, Yongming; Liao, Lanjie; Zhu, Zuoyan; Hu, Wei

    2013-10-01

    In fish, food intake and feeding behavior are crucial for survival, competition, growth and reproduction. Growth hormone (GH)-transgenic common carp exhibit an enhanced growth rate, increased food intake and higher feed conversion rate. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of feeding regulation in GH-transgenic (TG) fish are not clear. In this study, we observed feeding behavior of TG and non-transgenic (NT) common carp, and analyzed the mRNA expression levels of NPY, AgRP I, orexin, POMC, CCK, and CART I in the hypothalamus and telencephalon after behavioral observation. We detected similar gene expression levels in the hypothalamus of TG and NT common carp, which had been cultured in the field at the same age. Furthermore, we tested the effects of GH on hypothalamus fragments in vitro to confirm our findings. We demonstrated that TG common carp displayed increased food intake and reduced food consumption time, which were associated with a marked increase in hypothalamic AgRP I mRNA expression. Our results suggest that elevated GH levels may influence food intake and feeding behavior by upregulating the hypothalamic orexigenic factor AgRP I in GH-transgenic common carp.

  6. Nicotinic α4 Receptor-Mediated Cholinergic Influences on Food Intake and Activity Patterns in Hypothalamic Circuits.

    PubMed

    García, Ana P; Aitta-aho, Teemu; Schaaf, Laura; Heeley, Nicholas; Heuschmid, Lena; Bai, Yunjing; Barrantes, Francisco J; Apergis-Schoute, John

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play an important role in regulating appetite and have been shown to do so by influencing neural activity in the hypothalamus. To shed light on the hypothalamic circuits governing acetylcholine's (ACh) regulation of appetite this study investigated the influence of hypothalamic nAChRs expressing the α4 subunit. We found that antagonizing the α4β2 nAChR locally in the lateral hypothalamus with di-hydro-ß-erythroidine (DHβE), an α4 nAChR antagonist with moderate affinity, caused an increase in food intake following free access to food after a 12 hour fast, compared to saline-infused animals. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that orexin/hypocretin (HO), oxytocin, and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-containing neurons in the A13 and A12 of the hypothalamus expressed the nAChR α4 subunit in varying amounts (34%, 42%, 50%, and 51%, respectively) whereas melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) neurons did not, suggesting that DHβE-mediated increases in food intake may be due to a direct activation of specific hypothalamic circuits. Systemic DHβE (2 mg/kg) administration similarly increased food intake following a 12 hour fast. In these animals a subpopulation of orexin/hypocretin neurons showed elevated activity compared to control animals and MCH neuronal activity was overall lower as measured by expression of the immediate early gene marker for neuronal activity cFos. However, oxytocin neurons in the paraventricular hypothalamus and TH-containing neurons in the A13 and A12 did not show differential activity patterns. These results indicate that various neurochemically distinct hypothalamic populations are under the influence of α4β2 nAChRs and that cholinergic inputs to the lateral hypothalamus can affect satiety signals through activation of local α4β2 nAChR-mediated transmission.

  7. Peripheral injections of melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 antagonist S38151 decrease food intake and body weight in rodent obesity models

    PubMed Central

    Della-Zuana, Odile; Audinot, Valérie; Levenez, Viviane; Ktorza, Alain; Presse, Françoise; Nahon, Jean-Louis; Boutin, Jean A.

    2012-01-01

    The compound S38151 is a nanomolar antagonist that acts at the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCH1). S38151 is more stable than its purely peptide counterpart, essentially because of the blockade of its N-terminus. Therefore, its action on various models of obesity was studied. Acute intra-cerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of S38151 in wild-type rats counteracted the effect of the stable precursor of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), NEI-MCH, in a dose-dependent manner (from 0.5 to 50 nmol/kg). In genetically obese Zucker fa/fa rats, daily i.c.v. administration of S38151 induced dose-dependent (5, 10, and 20 nmol/kg) inhibition of food intake, water intake, and body weight gain, as well as increased motility (maximal effect observed at 20 nmol/kg). In Zucker fa/fa rats, intraperitoneal injection of S38151 (30 mg/kg) induced complete inhibition of food consumption within 1 h. Daily intraperitoneal injection of S38151 (10 and 30 mg/kg) into genetically obese ob/ob mice or diet-induced obese mice is able to limit body weight gain. Furthermore, S38151 administration (10 and 30 mg/kg) does not affect food intake, water intake, or body weight gain in MCHR1-deleted mice, demonstrating that its effects are linked to its interaction with MCH1. These results validate MCH1 as a target of interest in obesity. S38151 cannot progress to the clinical phase because it is still too poorly stable in vivo. PMID:23267345

  8. Dietary flavonoid and lignan intake and breast cancer risk according to menopause and hormone receptor status in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Study.

    PubMed

    Zamora-Ros, Raul; Ferrari, Pietro; González, Carlos A; Tjønneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Bredsdorff, Lea; Overvad, Kim; Touillaud, Marina; Perquier, Florence; Fagherazzi, Guy; Lukanova, Annekatrin; Tikk, Kaja; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Dilis, Vardis; Masala, Giovanna; Sieri, Sabina; Mattiello, Amalia; Tumino, Rosario; Ricceri, Fulvio; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Peeters, Petra H M; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Skeie, Guri; Engeset, Dagrun; Menéndez, Virginia; Travier, Noémie; Molina-Montes, Esther; Amiano, Pilar; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Barricarte, Aurelio; Wallström, Peter; Sonestedt, Emily; Sund, Malin; Landberg, Rikard; Khaw, Kay-Thee; Wareham, Nicholas J; Travis, Ruth C; Scalbert, Augustin; Ward, Heather A; Riboli, Elio; Romieu, Isabelle

    2013-05-01

    Evidence on the association between dietary flavonoids and lignans and breast cancer (BC) risk is inconclusive, with the possible exception of isoflavones in Asian countries. Therefore, we investigated prospectively dietary total and subclasses of flavonoid and lignan intake and BC risk according to menopause and hormonal receptor status in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. The study included 334,850 women, mostly aged between 35 and 70 years from ten European countries. At baseline, country-specific validated dietary questionnaires were used. A flavonoid and lignan food composition database was developed from the US Department of Agriculture, the Phenol-Explorer and the UK Food Standards Agency databases. Cox regression models were used to analyse the association between dietary flavonoid/lignan intake and the risk of developing BC. During an average 11.5-year follow-up, 11,576 incident BC cases were identified. No association was observed between the intake of total flavonoids [hazard ratio comparing fifth to first quintile (HRQ5-Q1) 0.97, 95 % confidence interval (CI): 0.90-1.04; P trend = 0.591], isoflavones (HRQ5-Q1 1.00, 95 % CI: 0.91-1.10; P trend = 0.734), or total lignans (HRQ5-Q1 1.02, 95 % CI: 0.93-1.11; P trend = 0.469) and overall BC risk. The stratification of the results by menopausal status at recruitment or the differentiation of BC cases according to oestrogen and progesterone receptors did not affect the results. This study shows no associations between flavonoid and lignan intake and BC risk, overall or after taking into account menopausal status and BC hormone receptors.

  9. Parathyroid hormone is not an inhibitor of lipoprotein lipase activity.

    PubMed

    Arnadottir, M; Nilsson-Ehle, P

    1994-01-01

    The reduced lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activities in uraemia are reflected by increased serum triglyceride concentrations and reduced HDL cholesterol concentrations. Both hyperparathyroidism and circulating inhibitor(s) of LPL have been associated with the disturbances of lipid metabolism in uraemia. The aim of the present study was to investigate if parathyroid hormone (PTH) had an inhibitory effect on LPL activity. Plasma post-heparin LPL activities, plasma LPL inhibitory activities, serum PTHintact and serum PTHC-terminal concentrations were analysed in 20 patients on haemodialysis and 20 healthy controls. The effects of purified, human PTHintact and a carboxyterminal fragment of PTH (PTH39-84) on LPL activities in post-heparin plasma from healthy individuals and on the enzyme activity of purified, bovine milk LPL, activated with apolipoprotein CII, were studied. Patients had significantly higher plasma LPL inhibitory activities than controls, but there was no correlation between plasma LPL inhibitory activities and serum PTH concentrations. Neither PTHintact nor PTH39-84 had a significant effect on LPL activities in vitro. Thus there was no evidence of a direct inhibition of LPL activity by PTH under the present in-vivo or in-vitro conditions.

  10. Saturated fatty acid intake can influence increase in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in obese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Masquio, D C L; de Piano, A; Campos, R M S; Sanches, P L; Corgosinho, F C; Carnier, J; Oyama, L M; do Nascimento, C M P O; de Mello, M T; Tufik, S; Dâmaso, A R

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to verify if saturated fatty acid intake adjusted by tertiles can influence metabolic, inflammation, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in obese adolescents. Body mass, height, body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, and body composition of 108 obese adolescents were obtained. Fasting glucose, insulin, PAI-1, and CRP were determined. Insulin resistance was assessed by Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA-IR) and insulin sensitivity by Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI). Dietetic intake was estimated by a 3-day dietary record, and volunteers were divided according to consumption of saturated fatty acids: tertile 1 [Low Saturated Fatty Acid Intake (Low-SFA): ≤12.14 g], tertile 2 [Moderate Saturated Fatty Intake (Moderate SFA intake): 12.15-20.48 g], and tertile 3 [High Saturated Fatty Acid Intake (High-SFA Intake); >20.48 g]. Statistical analysis was performed using STATISTICA 7.0 software and the significance level was set at p<0.05. The most important finding in the present study is that Moderate and High-SFA intakes presented significantly higher values of PAI-1 than Low-SFA Intake. PAI-1 was positively associated with saturated fatty intake, waist circumference, mean blood pressure, and HOMA-IR. SFA intake was predictor of PAI-1 independent of body fat, HOMA-IR and total-cholesterol. In addition, PAI-1 was an independent predictor of blood pressure. HOMA-IR and QUICKI presented significantly higher and lower, respectively, in High-SFA compared to Moderate-SFA intake. High-SFA influenced cardiovascular disease risks, since it increased PAI-1 and insulin resistance, and decreased insulin sensibility, leading to vicious cycle among food ingestion, pro-thrombotic state, and cardiovascular risks in obese adolescents.

  11. Chronic ethanol intake modifies pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase activity in mouse frontal cortex synaptosomes under resting and K+ -stimulated conditions: role of calcium.

    PubMed

    Mayas, María Dolores; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús; García-López, María Jesús; Carrera, María Pilar; Martínez-Martos, José Manuel

    2008-07-04

    Pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase (Pcp) is an omega peptidase that removes pyroglutamyl N-terminal residues of peptides such as thyrotrophin-releasing hormone (TRH), which is one of the neuropeptides that has been localized into many areas of the brain and acts as an endogenous neuromodulator of several parameters related to ethanol (EtOH) consumption. In this study, we analysed the effects of chronic EtOH intake on Pcp activity on mouse frontal cortex synaptosomes and their corresponding supernatant under basal and K+ -stimulated conditions, in presence and absence of calcium (Ca2+) to know the regulation of Pcp on TRH. In basal conditions, chronic EtOH intake significantly decreased synaptosomes Pcp activity but only in absence of Ca2+. However, supernatant Pcp activity is also decreased in presence and absence of calcium. Under K+-stimulated conditions, chronic EtOH intake decreased synaptosomes Pcp activity but only in absence of Ca2+, whereas supernatant Pcp activity was significantly decreased only in presence of Ca2+. The general inhibitory effect of chronic EtOH intake on Pcp activity suggests an inhibition of TRH metabolism and an enhancement of TRH neurotransmitter/neuromodulator functions, which could be related to putative processes of tolerance to EtOH in which TRH has been involved. Our data may also indicate that active peptides and their degrading peptidases are released together to the synaptic cleft to regulate the neurotransmitter/neuromodulator functions of these peptides, through a Ca2+ -dependent mechanism.

  12. Neuro-hormonal effects of physical activity in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Femminella, Grazia D; de Lucia, Claudio; Iacotucci, Paola; Formisano, Roberto; Petraglia, Laura; Allocca, Elena; Ratto, Enza; D'Amico, Loreta; Rengo, Carlo; Pagano, Gennaro; Bonaduce, Domenico; Rengo, Giuseppe; Ferrara, Nicola

    2013-12-20

    Thanks to diagnostic and therapeutic advances, the elderly population is continuously increasing in the western countries. Accordingly, the prevalence of most chronic age-related diseases will increase considerably in the next decades, thus it will be necessary to implement effective preventive measures to face this epidemiological challenge. Among those, physical activity exerts a crucial role, since it has been proven to reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, obesity, cognitive impairment and cancer. The favorable effects of exercise on cardiovascular homeostasis can be at least in part ascribed to the modulation of the neuro-hormonal systems implicated in cardiovascular pathophysiology. In the elderly, exercise has been shown to affect catecholamine secretion and biosynthesis, to positively modulate the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and to reduce the levels of plasma brain natriuretic peptides. Moreover, drugs modulating the neuro-hormonal systems may favorably affect physical capacity in the elderly. Thus, efforts should be made to actually make physical activity become part of the therapeutic tools in the elderly.

  13. Biological activities of thionated thyrotropin-releasing hormone analogs.

    PubMed

    Lankiewicz, L; Bowers, C Y; Reynolds, G A; Labroo, V; Cohen, L A; Vonhof, S; Sirén, A L; Spatola, A F

    1992-04-15

    Analogs of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (Glp-His-Pro-NH2, TRH) have been prepared which contain thioamide moieties in the pyroglutamic acid ring, the carboxyamide proline terminus, and in both positions (dithio). These compounds have been tested for TSH-releasing activities (in vitro and in vivo), and for binding to TRH receptors in rat pituitary and cortex. The monothionated analogs showed no significant differences in TSH-releasing potency from TRH either in vitro or in vivo. However, with two thioamide replacements the potency decreases about 50%. Significantly, in terms of receptor selectivity, thionation has resulted in differentiation between brain receptors (pituitary and cortex). The Pro psi[CSNH2] and dithio analogs were more selective (higher affinity to pituitary receptors) than the parent hormone, while the analog containing a thioamide replacement in the pyroglutamyl ring had lower affinity and was not selective. These results suggest that the subtle exchange of sulphur for oxygen can have an important impact on both receptor selectivity and affinity within a biologically active peptide.

  14. Hormonal activity of polycyclic musks evaluated by reporter gene assay.

    PubMed

    Mori, Taiki; Iida, Mitsuru; Ishibashi, Hiroshi; Kohra, Shinya; Takao, Yuji; Takemasa, Takehiro; Arizono, Koji

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic musk fragrance compounds, such as polycyclic musks (PCMs), are a group of chemicals used extensively as personal care products, and can be found in the environment and the human body. PCMs, such as 1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-4,6,6,7,8,8-hexa-methylcyclopenta-gamma-2-benzopyran (HHCB) and 7-acetyl-1,1,3,4,4,6-hexamethyltetralin (AHTN), are known to have agonistic activities toward human estrogen receptor alpha (hERalpha) and hERbeta, and have antagonistic activity toward the human androgen receptor (hAR), as shown in several reporter gene assays. However, little is known about the interaction of PCMs with the human thyroid hormone receptor (hTR), and the hormonal effects of other PCMs except for HHCB and AHTN. In this study, we focus on the interactions of six PCMs, namely, HHCB, AHTN, 4-acetyl-1,1-dimethyl-6-tert-butyl-indan (ADBI), 6-acetyl-1,1,2,3,3,5-hexamethylindan (AHMI), 6,7-dihydro-1,1,2,3,3-pentamethyl-4(5H)-indanone (DPMI), and 5-acetyl-1,1,2,6-tetramethyl-3-isopropy-lindan (ATII) with hERalpha, hAR, and hTRbeta by in vitro reporter gene assay using Chinese hamster ovary cells. All the samples were found to be agonists toward hERalpha, whereas no agonistic activities of these PCMs for hAR and hTRbeta were observed. No antagonistic activities for hERalpha and hTRbeta were observed at the concentrations tested. However, several PCMs, namely, HHCB, AHTN, ATII, ADBI, and AHMI, showed dose-dependent antagonistic activities for hAR, and the IC50 values of these compounds were estimated to be 1.0 x 10(-7), 1.5 x 10(-7), 1.4 x 10(-7), 9.8 x 10(-6), and 1.4 x 10(-7) M, respectively. The results suggest that these PCMs interact with hERalpha and hAR but have no hormonal effect on hTRbeta. This is the first report on the agonistic and antagonistic activities of ATII, ADBI, AHMI, and DPMI for hERalpha and hAR as determined by in vitro reporter gene assay using stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells.

  15. Studies on the bioassayable growth hormone-like activity of plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S.; Vodian, M. A.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Evidence supporting the existence of bioassayable growth hormone-like activity in blood plasma distinct from the growth hormone measurable by radioimmunoassay and from somatomedin is presented. Tibial assays of the growth-hormone-like activity of injected, concentrated normal human and rat plasma in hypophysectomized rats reveal 200- and 50-fold activity excesses, respectively, with respect to the amount of growth hormone detected by radioimmunoassay. The origin of this bioassayable plasma hormone has been localized to the region of the pituitary, the origin of growth hormone, a distribution not followed by somatomedin C. Purification of the bioassayable agent indicates that is has a molecular weight of between 60,000 and 80,000, in contrast to that of growth hormone (20,000), and that the bioassayable activity is distinct from that of somatomedin C. Growth hormone-like activity detected in Cohn fraction IV as well as plasma activity, are found to be collectable on Dowex 50 resin, in contrast to somatomedin C and nonsuppressible insulin-like activity. The formation of bioassayable growth hormone-activity agents from radioimmunoassayable growth hormone and directly in the pituitary is suggested.

  16. GHRP-6 mimics ghrelin-induced stimulation of food intake and suppression of locomotor activity in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Yahashi, Satowa; Kang, Ki Sung; Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Kouhei

    2012-04-01

    Ghrelin was first identified and characterized from rat stomach as an endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue (GHS) receptor (GHS-R). Ghrelin also acts as an orexigenic factor and regulates energy balance in rodents. In goldfish, native ghrelin consists of 11 molecular variants, the major form being a 17-residue peptide with n-octanoic acid modification (n-octanoyl ghrelin17), and intraperitoneal (IP) administration of n-octanoyl ghrelin17 induces central actions such as stimulation of food intake and suppression of locomotor activity through capsaicin-sensitive afferents. Four types of GHS-Rs (1a-1, 1a-2, 2a-1 and 2a-2) have been identified in goldfish, and one GHS, GHRP-6, can activate only GHS-R2a-1 in vitro. However, there is no information about the effect of GHRP-6 on food intake and locomotor activity in goldfish in vivo. Therefore, in the present study, we examined whether IP-administered GHRP-6 would mimic the orexigenic action of n-octanoyl ghrelin17 and its suppression of locomotor activity. IP administration of GHRP-6 at 1pmol/g body weight (BW) stimulated food intake, and was equipotent to the orexigenic action of n-octanoyl ghrelin17 at 10 pmol/g BW. IP-injected GHRP-6 at 1 pmol/g BW also induced a significant decrease of locomotor activity, as was the case for IP-injected n-octanoyl ghrelin17 at 10 pmol/g BW. The action of GHRP-6 was blocked by IP-preinjected capsaicin at 160 nmol/g BW. These results suggest that the central action of GHRP-6 might be mediated via the GHS-R2a-1-signaling pathway, and subsequently through capsaicin-sensitive afferents in goldfish.

  17. The appetite suppressant d-fenfluramine reduces water intake, but not food intake, in activity-based anorexia.

    PubMed

    Hillebrand, J J G; Heinsbroek, A C M; Kas, M J H; Adan, R A H

    2006-02-01

    Biochemical, genetic and imaging studies support the involvement of the serotonin (5-HT) system in anorexia nervosa. Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is considered an animal model of anorexia nervosa, and combines scheduled feeding with voluntary running wheel activity (RWA). We investigated the effect of d-fenfluramine (d-FEN) treatment on development and propagation of ABA. d-FEN is an appetite suppressant and acts on 5-HT(2C) receptors that are located on pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. Since stimulation activation of the melanocortin system stimulates ABA, we hypothesized that d-FEN treatment enhances the development and propagation of ABA. Rats were exposed to the ABA model and chronically infused with d-FEN. Unexpectedly, d-FEN-treated ABA rats did not reduce food intake or increase wheel running as compared with vehicle-treated ABA rats. Furthermore d-FEN treatment did not affect body weight loss, hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis activation, or starvation-induced hypothermia in ABA rats. POMC mRNA levels in d-FEN-treated rats were not different from vehicle-treated rats after one week of exposure to the ABA paradigm. However, d-FEN-treated ABA rats showed hypodypsia and increased plasma osmolality and arginine-vasopressin expression levels in the hypothalamus. We conclude that d-FEN treatment does not enhance ABA under the experimental conditions of this study, but strongly reduces water intake in ABA rats.

  18. Smart phones are useful for food intake and physical activity surveys.

    PubMed

    Wohlers, Erica M; Sirard, John R; Barden, Charles M; Moon, Jon K

    2009-01-01

    Current self-report methods of recording food intake and Physical Activity (PA) are cumbersome and inaccurate. Food and activity surveys implemented on a smart phone will allow for immediate entry, data transfer to a researcher, and feedback to the user. Ten subjects followed a script, representative of one day, to enter food intake and PA on a smart phone. In the follow-up report, all subjects were interested in using the tested program to compare food intake with PA to predict weight gain and loss.

  19. Effect of thermal stress on physiological parameters, feed intake and plasma thyroid hormones concentration in Alentejana, Mertolenga, Frisian and Limousine cattle breeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Alfredo M. F.; Baccari, Flávio; Titto, Evaldo A. L.; Almeida, J. A. Afonso

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the heat tolerance of animals of two Portuguese (Alentejana and Mertolenga) and two exotic (Frisian and Limousine) cattle breeds, through the monitoring of physiological acclimatization reactions in different thermal situations characterized by alternate periods of thermoneutrality and heat stress simulated in climatic chambers. In the experiment, six heifers of the Alentejana, Frisian and Mertolenga breeds and four heifers of the Limousine breed were used. The increase in chamber temperatures had different consequences on the animals of each breed. When submitted to heat stress, the Frisian animals developed high thermal polypnea (more than 105 breath movements per minute), which did not prevent an increase in the rectal temperature (from 38.7°C to 40.0°C). However, only a slight depression in food intake and in blood thyroid hormone concentrations was observed under thermal stressful conditions. Under the thermal stressful conditions, Limousine animals decreased food intake by 11.4% and blood triiodothyronine (T3) hormone concentration decreased to 76% of the level observed in thermoneutral conditions. Alentejana animals had similar reactions. The Mertolenga cattle exhibited the highest capacity for maintaining homeothermy: under heat stressful conditions, the mean thermal polypnea increased twofold, but mean rectal temperature did not increase. Mean food intake decreased by only 2% and mean T3 blood concentration was lowered to 85,6% of the concentration observed under thermoneutral conditions. These results lead to the conclusion that the Frisian animals had more difficulty in tolerating high temperatures, the Limousine and Alentejana ones had an intermediate difficulty, and the Mertolenga animals were by far the most heat tolerant.

  20. APOA2 -256T>C polymorphism interacts with saturated fatty acids intake to affect anthropometric and hormonal variables in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Basiri, Marjan Ghane; Sotoudeh, Gity; Alvandi, Ehsan; Djalali, Mahmood; Eshraghian, Mohammad Reza; Noorshahi, Neda; Koohdani, Fariba

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have established the interaction between APOA2 -256T>C polymorphism and dietary saturated fatty acids intake in relation to obesity on healthy individuals. In the current study, we investigate the effects of this interaction on anthropometric variables and serum levels of leptin and ghrelin in patients with type 2 diabetes. In this cross-sectional study, 737 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (290 males and 447 females) were recruited from diabetes clinics in Tehran. The usual dietary intake of all participants during the last year was obtained by validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. APOA2 genotyping was performed by real-time PCR on genomic DNA. No significant relation was obtained by univariate analysis between anthropometric variables and APOA2 genotypes. However, after adjusting for age, gender, physical activity and total energy intake, we identified a significant interaction between APOA2-saturated fatty acids intake and body mass index (BMI). After adjusting for potential confounders, serum levels of ghrelin in CC genotype patients were significantly higher than T allele carriers (p = 0.03), whereas the case with leptin did not reveal a significant difference. The result of this study confirmed the interaction between APOA2 -256T>C polymorphism and SFAs intake with BMI in type 2 diabetic patients. In fact, homozygous patients for the C allele with high saturated fatty acids intake had higher BMI. The APOA2 -256T>C polymorphism was associated with elevated levels of serum ghrelin.

  1. Physical activity, food intake, and body weight regulation: insights from doubly labeled water studies.

    PubMed

    Westerterp, Klaas R

    2010-03-01

    Body weight and energy balance can be maintained by adapting energy intake to changes in energy expenditure and vice versa, whereas short-term changes in energy expenditure are mainly caused by physical activity. This review investigates whether physical activity is affected by over- and undereating, whether intake is affected by an increase or a decrease in physical activity, and whether being overweight affects physical activity. The available evidence is based largely on studies that quantified physical activity with doubly labeled water. Overeating does not affect physical activity, while undereating decreases habitual or voluntary physical activity. Thus, it is easier to gain weight than to lose weight. An exercise-induced increase in energy requirement is typically compensated by increased energy intake, while a change to a more sedentary routine does not induce an equivalent reduction of intake and generally results in weight gain. Overweight and obese subjects tend to have similar activity energy expenditures to lean people despite being more sedentary. There are two ways in which the general population trend towards increasing body weight can be reversed: reduce intake or increase physical activity. The results of the present literature review indicate that eating less is the most effective method for preventing weight gain, despite the potential for a negative effect on physical activity when a negative energy balance is reached.

  2. Reevaluation of lipolytic activity of growth hormone in rabbit adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Barenton, B; Batifol, V; Combarnous, Y; Dulor, J P; Durand, P; Vezinhet, A

    1984-07-18

    The lipolytic activities of porcine pituitary fractions and purified growth hormone (GH) from human (h), porcine (p), ovine (o) and rabbit (Rb) origin as well as ovine placental lactogen (oPL), were compared to that of ACTH on rabbit adipocytes. All the GH preparations and oPL were equivalent in inhibiting the binding of labelled oGH to liver plasma membranes from pregnant rabbits. ACTH, and to a lesser extent porcine pituitary fractions and hGH, stimulated free fatty acid production by isolated adipocytes. The sensitivity of the adipocytes to these factors was increased when adenosine deaminase was added to the incubation medium. But, RbGH, pGH, oGH and oPL had no effect. We conclude that GH is not directly involved in the control of lipolysis in rabbit adipocytes and that the effect of hGH is rather due to a contamination of this preparation by other pituitary factors.

  3. Thyroid hormone and vitamin D regulate VGF expression and promoter activity

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jo E; Brameld, John M; Hill, Phil; Wilson, Dana; Barrett, Perry; Ebling, Francis J P; Jethwa, Preeti H

    2016-01-01

    The Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus) survives winter by decreasing food intake and catabolizing abdominal fat reserves, resulting in a sustained, profound loss of body weight. Hypothalamic tanycytes are pivotal for this process. In these cells, short-winter photoperiods upregulate deiodinase 3, an enzyme that regulates thyroid hormone availability, and downregulate genes encoding components of retinoic acid (RA) uptake and signaling. The aim of the current studies was to identify mechanisms by which seasonal changes in thyroid hormone and RA signaling from tanycytes might ultimately regulate appetite and energy expenditure. proVGF is one of the most abundant peptides in the mammalian brain, and studies have suggested a role for VGF-derived peptides in the photoperiodic regulation of body weight in the Siberian hamster. In silico studies identified possible thyroid and vitamin D response elements in the VGF promoter. Using the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line, we demonstrate that RA increases endogenous VGF expression (P<0.05) and VGF promoter activity (P<0.0001). Similarly, treatment with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 increased endogenous VGF mRNA expression (P<0.05) and VGF promoter activity (P<0.0001), whereas triiodothyronine (T3) decreased both (P<0.01 and P<0.0001). Finally, intra-hypothalamic administration of T3 blocked the short day-induced increase in VGF expression in the dorsomedial posterior arcuate nucleus of Siberian hamsters. Thus, we conclude that VGF expression is a likely target of photoperiod-induced changes in tanycyte-derived signals and is potentially a regulator of seasonal changes in appetite and energy expenditure. PMID:26643910

  4. Impact of dietary intake, education, and physical activity on bone mineral density among North Indian women.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Mittal, Soniya; Orito, Seiya; Ishitani, Ken; Ohta, Hiroaki

    2010-03-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the relationship of dietary nutrients and bone mineral density (BMD) in North Indian women. This cross-sectional study was conducted from April 2006 to March 2008. Subjects included 255 healthy women, aged 20-69 years, who were relatives of patients being admitted in the hospital. Various demographic characteristics including socioeconomic status and serum parameters in relationship to BMD were evaluated. In addition, the daily dietary intake of energy, protein, fat, and calcium and the amount of physical activity were assessed. BMD at the lumbar spine, femoral neck, and Ward's triangle was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Body mass index (BMI), physical activity, and educational level were positively correlated with BMD. The daily intakes of energy (1563.4 +/- 267.2 kcal) and protein (48.7 +/- 8.7 g) were below the recommended dietary allowance. Daily dietary energy, protein, and calcium intakes were correlated with BMD at the lumbar spine. Stepwise multiple linear regression analyses showed that age, BMI, and physical activity were significant predictors for BMD at all sites. In addition, energy intake was also a predictor for BMD at the lumbar spine. The protein intake was associated with BMD at the spine (P = 0.02 and beta = 0.163) even after making adjustments for energy intake. Thus, dietary pattern coupled with higher education levels and greater physical activity favored bone health.

  5. Chronic delivery of α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone in rat hypothalamus using albumin-alginate microparticles: effects on food intake and body weight.

    PubMed

    Lucas, N; Legrand, R; Breton, J; Déchelotte, P; Edwards-Lévy, F; Fetissov, S O

    2015-04-02

    Chronic delivery of neuropeptides in the brain is a useful experimental approach to study their long-term effects on various biological parameters. In this work, we tested albumin-alginate microparticles, as a potential delivery system, to study if continuous release in the hypothalamus of α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), an anorexigenic neuropeptide, may result in a long-term decrease in food intake and body weight. The 2-week release of α-MSH from peptide-loaded particles was confirmed by an in vitro assay. Then, daily food intake and body weight were studied for 18 days in rats injected bilaterally into the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus with particles loaded or not with α-MSH. A decrease in body weight gain, persisting throughout the study, was found in rats injected with α-MSH-charged particles as compared with rats receiving non-charged particles and with rats injected with the same dose of α-MSH in solution. Food intake was significantly decreased for 3 days in rats receiving α-MSH-loaded particles and it was not followed by the feeding rebound effect which appears after food restriction. The presence of α-MSH-loaded particles in the hypothalamus was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. In conclusion, our study validates albumin-alginate microparticles as a new carrier system for long-term delivery of neuropeptides in the brain and demonstrates that chronic delivery of α-MSH in the hypothalamus results in a prolonged suppression of food intake and a decrease of body weight gain in rats.

  6. ON THE EFFECT OF NEUROHYPOPHYSIAL HORMONE ON THYROID ACTIVITY.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    THYROID GLAND, BIOCHEMISTRY, HORMONES , INJECTION, DRUGS, CARDIOVASCULAR AGENTS, SECRETION, THYROXINE, EXPOSURE(PHYSIOLOGY), THYROTROPIN, STIMULATION(PHYSIOLOGY), TEMPERATURE, BODY WEIGHT, PATHOLOGY, HISTOLOGY.

  7. Growth hormone biases amygdala network activation after fear learning

    PubMed Central

    Gisabella, B; Farah, S; Peng, X; Burgos-Robles, A; Lim, S H; Goosens, K A

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged stress exposure is a risk factor for developing posttraumatic stress disorder, a disorder characterized by the ‘over-encoding' of a traumatic experience. A potential mechanism by which this occurs is through upregulation of growth hormone (GH) in the amygdala. Here we test the hypotheses that GH promotes the over-encoding of fearful memories by increasing the number of neurons activated during memory encoding and biasing the allocation of neuronal activation, one aspect of the process by which neurons compete to encode memories, to favor neurons that have stronger inputs. Viral overexpression of GH in the amygdala increased the number of amygdala cells activated by fear memory formation. GH-overexpressing cells were especially biased to express the immediate early gene c-Fos after fear conditioning, revealing strong autocrine actions of GH in the amygdala. In addition, we observed dramatically enhanced dendritic spine density in GH-overexpressing neurons. These data elucidate a previously unrecognized autocrine role for GH in the regulation of amygdala neuron function and identify specific mechanisms by which chronic stress, by enhancing GH in the amygdala, may predispose an individual to excessive fear memory formation. PMID:27898076

  8. Eating habits and caloric intake of physically active young boys, ages 10 to 14 years.

    PubMed

    Thomson, M J; Cunningham, D A; Wearring, G A

    1980-03-01

    Eating habits of 104 male participants (ages 10 to 14 years) in organized ice hockey were compared across age groups and levels of competition. The boys were members of either a highly skilled and intensively active competitive league group (CL) or a less skilled, moderately active house league group (HL). Eating habits were recorded during a school day from a 24 hour recall questionnaire administered by a trained interviewer. The types and amounts of foods eaten were recorded and caloric intake was calculated. The total caloric intakes were not significantly different by age or competitive group. The boys had higher caloric intakes by age (200 kcal day-1) than reported by other studies but the caloric intake by kilogram of body weight was similar. There was a trend towards larger caloric intake by the CL boys (ages 10 and 11 years), however when divided by body weight the differences were not significant suggesting that this trend was due to a greater body weight of the CL boys and not a significantly increased caloric expenditure. The types of foods eaten (fruit, vegetables, dairy, meat, bread or "empty calories") were similar for the two activity groups and across ages 10 to 14 years. The caloric intakes of dairy and meat products of both groups were significantly higher than for the other food groups.

  9. Inverse associations of outdoor activity and vitamin D intake with the risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dan; Liu, Gui-you; Lv, Zheng; Wen, Shi-rong; Bi, Sheng; Wang, Wei-zhi

    2014-10-01

    Early studies had suggested that vitamin D intake was inversely associated with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis. However, the associations of vitamin D intake and outdoor activities with Parkinson's disease (PD) are still unclear, so this study is to evaluate these relationships from a case-control study in elderly Chinese. The study population involved 209 cases with new onsets of PD and 210 controls without neurodegenerative diseases. The data on dietary vitamin D and outdoor activities were collected using a food-frequency questionnaire and self-report questionnaire. Multivariable logistic regressions were used to examine the associations between dietary outdoor activities, vitamin D intake and PD. Adjustment was made for sex, age, smoking, alcohol use, education, and body mass index (BMI). Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for PD in quartiles for outdoor physical activity were 1 (reference), 0.739 (0.413, 1.321), 0.501 (0.282, 0.891), and 0.437 (0.241, 0.795), respectively (P=0.002 for trend). Adjusted ORs for PD in quartiles for total vitamin D intake were 1 (reference), 0.647 (0.357, 1.170), 0.571 (0.318, 1.022), and 0.538 (0.301, 0.960), respectively (P=0.011 for trend). Our study suggested that outdoor activity and total vitamin D intake were inversely associated with PD, and outdoor activity seems to be more significantly associated with decreased risk for PD.

  10. 21 CFR 201.316 - Drugs with thyroid hormone activity for human use; required warning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drugs with thyroid hormone activity for human use... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Specific Labeling Requirements for Specific Drug Products § 201.316 Drugs with thyroid hormone activity for human use; required warning. (a)...

  11. 21 CFR 201.316 - Drugs with thyroid hormone activity for human use; required warning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drugs with thyroid hormone activity for human use... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Specific Labeling Requirements for Specific Drug Products § 201.316 Drugs with thyroid hormone activity for human use; required warning. (a)...

  12. Antidepressant Use is Associated with Increased Energy Intake and Similar Levels of Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Jensen-Otsu, Elsbeth; Austin, Gregory L

    2015-11-20

    Antidepressants have been associated with weight gain, but the causes are unclear. The aims of this study were to assess the association of antidepressant use with energy intake, macronutrient diet composition, and physical activity. We used data on medication use, energy intake, diet composition, and physical activity for 3073 eligible adults from the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Potential confounding variables, including depression symptoms, were included in the models assessing energy intake, physical activity, and sedentary behavior. Antidepressant users reported consuming an additional (mean ± S.E.) 215 ± 73 kcal/day compared to non-users (p = 0.01). There were no differences in percent calories from sugar, fat, or alcohol between the two groups. Antidepressant users had similar frequencies of walking or biking, engaging in muscle-strengthening activities, and engaging in moderate or vigorous physical activity. Antidepressant users were more likely to use a computer for ≥2 h/day (OR 1.77; 95% CI: 1.09-2.90), but TV watching was similar between the two groups. These results suggest increased energy intake and sedentary behavior may contribute to weight gain associated with antidepressant use. Focusing on limiting food intake and sedentary behaviors may be important in mitigating the weight gain associated with antidepressant use.

  13. A Novel Wearable Device for Food Intake and Physical Activity Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Muhammad; Sazonov, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Presence of speech and motion artifacts has been shown to impact the performance of wearable sensor systems used for automatic detection of food intake. This work presents a novel wearable device which can detect food intake even when the user is physically active and/or talking. The device consists of a piezoelectric strain sensor placed on the temporalis muscle, an accelerometer, and a data acquisition module connected to the temple of eyeglasses. Data from 10 participants was collected while they performed activities including quiet sitting, talking, eating while sitting, eating while walking, and walking. Piezoelectric strain sensor and accelerometer signals were divided into non-overlapping epochs of 3 s; four features were computed for each signal. To differentiate between eating and not eating, as well as between sedentary postures and physical activity, two multiclass classification approaches are presented. The first approach used a single classifier with sensor fusion and the second approach used two-stage classification. The best results were achieved when two separate linear support vector machine (SVM) classifiers were trained for food intake and activity detection, and their results were combined using a decision tree (two-stage classification) to determine the final class. This approach resulted in an average F1-score of 99.85% and area under the curve (AUC) of 0.99 for multiclass classification. With its ability to differentiate between food intake and activity level, this device may potentially be used for tracking both energy intake and energy expenditure. PMID:27409622

  14. Stimulation of food intake after central administration of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone is similar in genetically selected low and high body weight lines of chickens.

    PubMed

    McConn, Betty R; Yi, Jiaqing; Gilbert, Elizabeth R; Siegel, Paul B; Chowdhury, Vishwajit S; Furuse, Mitsuhiro; Cline, Mark A

    2016-06-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), first isolated from the brain of the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica), when centrally administered exerts orexigenic effects in birds. However, the precise mechanisms mediating this effect are poorly understood and limited information is available on this effect in models of body weight dysfunction. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to investigate appetite-associated effects of GnIH in chicks from lines that have been selected for either low or high body weight, and are anorexic or become obese, respectively. Central GnIH injection increased food intake in both lines with a similar magnitude of response. There was no effect on water intake. Hypothalamic GnIH mRNA was greater in the low than high weight lines and was greater in the fasted than fed chicks. GnIH receptor mRNA was similarly expressed in both lines, and was greater in fed than fasted chicks. Thus, although selection for body weight did not alter the effect of GnIH on feeding, fasting increased GnIH mRNA in both lines implying that it is an innate hunger factor.

  15. The effect of supplementation of calcium, vitamin D, boron, and increased fluoride intake on bone mechanical properties and metabolic hormones in rat.

    PubMed

    Ghanizadeh, G; Babaei, M; Naghii, Mohammad Reza; Mofid, M; Torkaman, G; Hedayati, M

    2014-04-01

    Evidence indicates that optimal nutrition plays a role in bone formation and maintenance. Besides major components of mineralization such as calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D, other nutrients like boron and fluoride have beneficial role, too. In this study, 34 male Wistar rats were divided into five groups: control diet, fluoride, fluoride + boron, fluoride + calcium + vitamin D, and fluoride + boron + calcium + vitamin D. Boron equal to 1.23 mg, calcium and vitamin D equal to 210 mg + 55 IU and fluoride equal to 0.7 mg/rat/day was added to their drinking water for 8 weeks. Plasma blood samples and bones were collected. Findings are evidence that fluoride + boron intake revealed significant positive effects on bone mechanical properties and bone metabolic hormones. These findings suggest that combined intake of these two elements has beneficial effects on bone stiffness and breaking strength comparing to even calcium + vitamin D supplementation. This evidence dealing with health problems related to bone and skeletal system in humans should justify further investigation of the role of boron and fluoride with other elements in relation to bone.

  16. Agavins from Agave angustifolia and Agave potatorum affect food intake, body weight gain and satiety-related hormones (GLP-1 and ghrelin) in mice.

    PubMed

    Santiago-García, Patricia Araceli; López, Mercedes G

    2014-12-01

    Agavins act as a fermentable dietary fiber and have attracted attention due to their potential for reducing the risk of disease. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of supplementation using 10% agavins with a short-degree of polymerization (SDP) from Agave angustifolia Haw. (AASDP) or Agave potatorum Zucc. (APSDP) along with chicory fructans (RSE) as a reference for 5 weeks, on the energy intake, body weight gain, satiety-related hormones from the gut and blood (GLP-1 and ghrelin), blood glucose and lipids, and short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) from the gut of ad libitum-fed mice. We evaluated the energy intake daily and weight gain every week. At the end of the experiment, portal vein blood samples as well as intestinal segments and the stomach were collected to measure glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and ghrelin using RIA and ELISA kits, respectively. Colon SCFAs were measured using gas chromatography. The energy intake, body weight gain, and triglycerides were lower in the fructan-fed mice than in the STD-fed mice. The AASDP, APSDP, and RSE diets increased the serum levels of GLP-1 (40, 93, and 16%, respectively vs. STD) (P ≤ 0.05), whereas ghrelin was decreased (16, 38, and 42%, respectively) (P ≤ 0.05). Butyric acid increased significantly in the APSDP-fed mice (26.59 mmol g(-1), P ≤ 0.001) compared with that in the AASDP- and RSE-fed mice. We concluded that AASDP and APSDP are able to promote the secretion of the peptides involved in appetite regulation, which might help to control obesity and its associated metabolic disorder.

  17. Maternal coffee intake and associated risk factors: effects on fetal growth and activity.

    PubMed

    Conde, Ana; Teves, Cláudia; Figueiredo, Bárbara

    2011-01-01

    Empirical studies have shown that fetal growth and activity can be affected by several risk factors, such as maternal anxiety, depression and tobacco or alcohol consumption. Caffeine intake has received less attention in the literature, as well as the analysis of the mutual interplay of the range of such risk factors. This study aimed to examine effects of mother's coffee intake and associated risk factors during early pregnancy on fetal growth and activity. The sample involved 47 fetuses (51.1% male and 48.9% female) with gestational ages between 20-22 weeks whose mothers were recruited in a Portuguese antenatal obstetric unit. Repeated measures of mother's anxiety (STAI-S) and depression (EPDS) and information about socio-demographics and substances consumption were collected during the first and second trimesters of pregnancy. Fetal activity and biometry were measured during the 2(nd) trimester ultrasound. Results showed that 1) 23.4% of the pregnant women (N = 11) had regular coffee intake; 2) no significant differences were found neither on fetal growth nor on fetal movements considering mother's coffee intake; 3) when mother's socio-demographics and substances consumption were considered, tobacco consumption and anxiety at the 2(nd) trimester appeared as significant predictors of fetal growth and mother's coffee intake and anxiety symptoms at the 2(nd) trimester emerged as significant predictors of fetal movements. An adverse impact of maternal coffee intake during pregnancy was found on fetal activity but not on fetal growth. A deeper understanding of the multiple pathways by which these risk factors affect fetal growth and activity is needed.

  18. Scopolamine-induced convulsions in fasted mice after food intake: effects of glucose intake, antimuscarinic activity and anticonvulsant drugs.

    PubMed

    Enginar, Nurhan; Nurten, Asiye; Celik, Pinar Yamantürk; Açikmeşe, Bariş

    2005-09-01

    The present study was performed to further evaluate the contribution of antimuscarinic activity and hypoglycaemia to the development of scopolamine-induced convulsions in fasted mice after food intake. The effects of anticonvulsant drugs on convulsions were also evaluated. Antimuscarinic drugs atropine (3 mg/kg) and biperiden (10 mg/kg) were given intraperitoneally (i.p) to animals fasted for 48 h. Like scopolamine, both drugs induced convulsions after animals were allowed to eat ad libitum. Another group of animals was given glucose (5%) in drinking water during fasting. These animals, although they had normoglycaemic blood levels after fasting, also developed convulsions after treated with scopolamine i.p. (3 mg/kg), atropine (3 mg/kg) or biperiden (10 mg/kg) and allowed to eat ad libitum. Among the drugs studied, only valproate (340 mg/kg), gabapentin (50 mg/kg) and diazepam (2.5 and 5 mg/kg) markedly reduced the incidence of scopolamine-induced convulsions. The present results indicate that antimuscarinic activity, but not hypoglycaemia, underlies these convulsions which do not respond to most of the conventional anticonvulsant drugs.

  19. Effects of rabbit anti-α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) immunoglobulins on α-MSH signaling related to food intake control.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Nicolas; Legrand, Romain; Ouelaa, Wassila; Breton, Jonathan; Tennoune, Naouel; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Déchelotte, Pierre; Fetissov, Sergueï O

    2014-02-01

    Anti-α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) polyclonal antibodies have been used for α-MSH neutralization in functional studies, but the results are sometime inconsistent with the antibody expected blocking properties. The present study aimed to determine if rabbit (Rb) anti-α-MSH immunoglobulins (Ig) may inhibit or enhance α-MSH signaling on melanocortin receptor type 4 (MC4R) and α-MSH-induced anorexigenic effect if presented as immune complexes with α-MSH. Polyclonal Rb anti-α-MSH IgG were commercially available and their ability to bind α-MSH has been confirmed by the immunohistochemical detection of α-MSH neurons in the rat hypothalamus. In vitro assay of the cyclic-adenosine mono-phosphate (cAMP) secreted by cells transfected with MC4R was performed to analyze effect of Rb IgG on α-MSH-induced cAMP production. We found that adding Rb IgG to α-MSH resulted in stimulation of cAMP detected at lower peptide concentrations as compared to α-MSH alone. To determine effects of Rb IgG on food intake, rats were injected into the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus with either α-MSH, Rb IgG alone or Rb IgG preincubated with α-MSH. During 2 days after injections, food intake was increased in both groups of rats receiving Rb IgG. However, during following 4 days when food was restricted to 1h/day, only the Rb IgG group displayed higher food intake. Furthermore, after the refeeding, 24h food intake was lower in rats receiving Rb IgG - α-MSH immune complexes. This group of rats was also characterized by higher number of immunopositive neurons in the arcuate nucleus expressing α-MSH and agouti-related protein but not tyrosine hydroxylase. Taken together, these results show that Rb anti-α-MSH antisera, although efficient for immunohistochemical detection of α-MSH, does not always display α-MSH blocking properties but, in contrast, may enhance α-MSH binding to MC4R and increase α-MSH anorexigenic effects when presented as immune complexes with the peptide.

  20. Mechanism of activation of light-activated phosphodiesterase and evidence for homology with hormone-activated adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Bitensky, M.W.; Yamazaki, A.; Wheeler, M.A.; George, J.S.; Rasenick, M.M.

    1983-01-01

    Light-activated cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) is one of the effector proteins in the rod outer segments in vertebrate retina. The hydrolysis of cGMP in rod occurs with a speed and light sensitivity which suggests a role for this hydrolysis in visual transduction. In fact, there is electrophysiological data which supports the possibility that cGMP could regulate rod membrane voltage. PDE shows very rapid activation in the presence of photons and GTP. We have called attention to the intriguing analogy between light activated rod phosphodiesterase and hormone activated adenylate cyclase. A number of studies have implicated the binding of GTP to a GTP binding protein as a factor in the hormone dependent activation of adenylate cyclase. Moreover, Cassel and Selinger have shown that hydrolysis of GTP is a component in the inactivation of the hormone dependent adenylate cyclase. We review here recent additional data which provide specific molecular details of the mechanism of light activation of rod PDE as well as demonstrate the exchange of components between light activated PDE and hormone activated cyclase.

  1. Persistent Organochlorine Pollutants with Endocrine Activity and Blood Steroid Hormone Levels in Middle-Aged Men

    PubMed Central

    Emeville, Elise; Giton, Frank; Giusti, Arnaud; Oliva, Alejandro; Fiet, Jean; Thomé, Jean-Pierre; Blanchet, Pascal; Multigner, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies relating long-term exposure to persistent organochlorine pollutants (POPs) with endocrine activities (endocrine disrupting chemicals) on circulating levels of steroid hormones have been limited to a small number of hormones and reported conflicting results. Objective We examined the relationship between serum concentrations of dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, androstenedione, androstenediol, testosterone, free and bioavailable testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, estrone, estrone sulphate, estradiol, sex-hormone binding globulin, follicle-stimulating hormone, and luteinizing hormone as a function of level of exposure to three POPs known to interfere with hormone-regulated processes in different way: dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethene (DDE), polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congener 153, and chlordecone. Methods We collected fasting, morning serum samples from 277 healthy, non obese, middle-aged men from the French West Indies. Steroid hormones were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, except for dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, which was determined by immunological assay, as were the concentrations of sex-hormone binding globulin, follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone. Associations were assessed by multiple linear regression analysis, controlling for confounding factors, in a backward elimination procedure, in multiple bootstrap samples. Results DDE exposure was negatively associated to dihydrotestosterone level and positively associated to luteinizing hormone level. PCB 153 was positively associated to androstenedione and estrone levels. No association was found for chlordecone. Conclusions These results suggested that the endocrine response pattern, estimated by determining blood levels of steroid hormones, varies depending on the POPs studied, possibly reflecting differences in the modes of action generally attributed to these compounds. It remains to be investigated whether this response pattern

  2. Thyroid hormone influences muscle mechanics in carp (Cyprinus carpio) independently from SERCA activity.

    PubMed

    James, Rob S; Little, Alexander G; Tallis, Jason; Seebacher, Frank

    2016-09-15

    Thyroid hormone is a key regulator of metabolism, and in zebrafish, hypothyroidism decreases sustained and burst swimming performance. These effects are accompanied by decreases in both metabolic scope and the activity of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum ATPase (SERCA) in zebrafish. Our aim was to determine whether thyroid hormone affects skeletal muscle contractile function directly and whether these effects are mediated by influencing SERCA activity. We show that hypothyroidism reduces sustained locomotor performance but not sprint performance in carp (Cyprinus carpio). We accept our hypothesis that hypothyroidism reduces force production in isolated skeletal muscle, when compared with the thyroid hormone T2, but we reject the hypothesis that this effect is mediated by influencing SERCA activity. Blocking SERCA activity with thapsigargin reduced muscle fatigue resistance, but hypothyroidism had no effect on fatigue. Hence, thyroid hormone plays a role in determining isolated skeletal muscle mechanics, but its effects are more likely to be mediated by mechanisms other than affecting SERCA activity.

  3. How do sex hormones modify arrhythmogenesis in long QT syndrome? Sex hormone effects on arrhythmogenic substrate and triggered activity.

    PubMed

    Odening, Katja E; Koren, Gideon

    2014-11-01

    Gender differences in cardiac repolarization and the arrhythmogenic risk of patients with inherited and acquired long QT syndromes are well appreciated clinically. Enhancing our knowledge of the mechanisms underlying these differences is critical to improve our therapeutic strategies for preventing sudden cardiac death in such patients. This review summarizes the effects of sex hormones on the expression and function of ion channels that control cardiac cell excitation and repolarization as well as key proteins that regulate Ca(2+) dynamics at the cellular level. Moreover, it examines the role of sex hormones in modifying the dynamic spatiotemporal (regional and transmural) heterogeneities in action potential duration (eg, the arrhythmogenic substrate) and the susceptibility to (sympathetic) triggered activity at the tissue, organ, and whole animal levels. Finally, it explores the implications of these effects on the management of patients with LQTS.

  4. Physical Activity, Dietary Intake, and the Insulin Resistance Syndrome in Nondiabetic Adults with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draheim, Christopher C.; Williams, Daniel P.; McCubbin, Jeffrey A.

    2002-01-01

    A study identified 145 adults with mild mental retardation and hyperinsulinemia, borderline high triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hypertension, and abdominal obesity. Those who participated in more frequent bouts of physical activity or who consumed lower dietary fat intakes were one-third as likely to have hyperinsulinemia…

  5. 78 FR 64064 - Agency Information Collection (Principles of Excellence Complaint System Intake) Activity Under...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Principles of Excellence Complaint System Intake) Activity Under... collection of information abstracted below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and....Regulations.gov , or to Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget,...

  6. Do Negative Emotions Predict Alcohol Consumption, Saturated Fat Intake, and Physical Activity in Older Adults?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anton, Stephen D.; Miller, Peter M.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined anger, depression, and stress as related to alcohol consumption, saturated fat intake, and physical activity. Participants were 23 older adults enrolled in either an outpatient or in-residence executive health program. Participants completed (a) a health-risk appraisal assessing medical history and current health habits, (b)…

  7. Effect of supplementing activated charcoal on the intake of honey mesquite leaves by lambs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to determine if intake of honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa Torr.) leaves by sheep could be increased by supplementing four levels of activated charcoal supplemental (0.0, 0.33, 0.67 and 1.00 g/kg of BW). Twenty wether lambs (36.6 ± 0.6 kg) were randomly assigned to the 4 tre...

  8. Effect of supplementing activated charcoal on the intake of honey mesquite leaves by lambs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to determine if intake of honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa Torr.) leaves by sheep could be increased by supplementing activated charcoal at 0.0, 0.33, 0.67 or 1.00 g / kg of body weight. Twenty wether lambs (36.6 ± 0.6 kg) were randomly assigned to the 4 treatment levels. La...

  9. HUMAN ACTIVITIES THAT MAY LEAD TO HIGH INHALED INTAKE DOSES IN CHILDREN AGED 6-13

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper focuses on possible activities of children aged 6-13 that may make them susceptible to high hourly intake doses of ozone (O3) air pollution. Data from an O3 exposure modeling exercise indicates that a relatively few hours can account for a significant amount of the t...

  10. Fate of steroid hormones and endocrine activities in swine manure disposal and treatment facilities.

    PubMed

    Combalbert, Sarah; Bellet, Virginie; Dabert, Patrick; Bernet, Nicolas; Balaguer, Patrick; Hernandez-Raquet, Guillermina

    2012-03-01

    Manure may contain high concern endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) such as steroid hormones, naturally produced by pigs, which are present at μgL(-1) levels. Manure may also contain other EDCs such as nonylphenols (NP), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dioxins. Thus, once manure is applied to the land as soil fertilizer these compounds may reach aquifers and consequently living organisms, inducing abnormal endocrine responses. In France, manure is generally stored in anaerobic tanks prior spreading on land; when nitrogen removal is requested, manure is treated by aerobic processes before spreading. However, little is known about the fate of hormones and multiple endocrine-disrupting activities in such manure disposal and treatment systems. Here, we determined the fate of hormones and diverse endocrine activities during manure storage and treatment by combining chemical analysis and in vitro quantification of estrogen (ER), aryl hydrocarbon (AhR), androgen (AR), pregnane-X (PXR) and peroxysome proliferator-activated γ (PPARγ) receptor-mediated activities. Our results show that manure contains large quantities of hormones and activates ER and AhR, two of the nuclear receptors studied. Most of these endocrine activities were found in the solid fraction of manure and appeared to be induced mainly by hormones and other unidentified pollutants. Hormones, ER and AhR activities found in manure were poorly removed during manure storage but were efficiently removed by aerobic treatment of manure.

  11. Neuropeptide B in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus: molecular cloning and its effects on the regulation of food intake and mRNA expression of growth hormone and prolactin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu; Sun, Caiyun; Li, Wensheng

    2014-05-01

    Neuropeptide B (NPB) regulates food intake, energy homeostasis and hormone secretion in mammals via two G-protein coupled receptors, termed as GPR 7 and GPR 8. However, there is no study that reports the function of NPB in teleosts. In this study, the full-length cDNA of prepro-NPB with the size of 663bp was cloned from the hypothalamus of Nile tilapia. The CDS of the prepro-NPB is 387bp which encodes a precursor protein with the size of 128a.a. This precursor contains a mature peptide with the size of 29a.a, and it was named as NPB29. Tissue distribution study showed that this gene was mainly expressed in different parts of brain, especially in the diencephalon as well as hypothalamus, and the spinal cord in Nile tilapia. Fasting significantly stimulated the mRNA expression of NPB in the brain area without hypothalamus, and refeeding after fasting for 3 and 14days also showed similar effects on NPB expression. While, only short-term fasting (3days) and refeeding after fasting for 7 and 14days induced mRNA expression of NPB in the hypothalamus. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of NPB remarkably elevated the mRNA expression of hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY), cholecystokinin 1 (CCK1) and pituitary prolactin (PRL), whereas significantly inhibited growth hormone (GH) expression in pituitary. These observations in the present study suggested that NPB may participate in the regulation of feeding and gene expression of pituitary GH and PRL in Nile tilapia.

  12. The effects of dietary fibre type on satiety-related hormones and voluntary food intake in dogs.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Guido; Verbrugghe, Adronie; Hesta, Myriam; Holst, Jens J; van der Poel, Antonius F B; Janssens, Geert P J; Hendriks, Wouter H

    2009-07-01

    Depending on type and inclusion level, dietary fibre may increase and maintain satiety and postpone the onset of hunger. This 7-week study evaluated the effect of fibre fermentability on physiological satiety-related metabolites and voluntary food intake (VFI) in dogs. Sixteen healthy adult dogs were fed a low-fermentable fibre (LFF) diet containing 8.5 % cellulose or a high-fermentable fibre (HFF) diet containing 8.5 % sugarbeet pulp and 2 % inulin. Large intestinal fibre degradation was evaluated by apparent faecal digestibility of nutrients and faecal SCFA and NH3 concentrations. Postprandial blood samples were obtained to determine postprandial plasma glucose, insulin, total peptide tyrosine-tyrosine (PYY), total glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and total ghrelin concentrations. At the end of the study, the dogs were given a single meal of a dry dog food to determine VFI. Dogs fed the HFF diet had a significantly higher large intestinal fibre degradation and production of SCFA compared with the dogs fed the LFF diet. The HFF-fed dogs tended (P = 0.058) to show a lower VFI at the end of the study. No treatment effects were found for postprandial plasma glucose, PYY, GLP-1 and ghrelin responses. The concentrations of these metabolites could not be related to the observed difference in VFI. The inclusion of fermentable fibre in canine diets may contribute to the prevention or mitigation of obesity through its effects on satiety. The underlying mechanisms require further investigation.

  13. Alpha-interferon suppresses food intake and neuronal activity of the lateral hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Vázquez, C; Prieto-Gómez, B; Dafny, N

    1994-12-01

    Alpha-interferon (alpha-IFN) treatment in humans induces anorexic effects. However, the mechanisms and sites of action are unknown. Rats implanted with an intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) cannula for local injection, and semi-microelectrodes in the lateral hypothalamic (LH) area for neuronal recording were used. The animals were kept in metabolic cages, and food and water intake was measured daily at 7:00 and 19:00 hr for 35 days, including: 5 days before the experiment; 10 days during daily alpha-IFN application (either i.p. 1500 I.U./gbw, or i.c.v. 1500 and 150 I.U./animal) and/or a vehicle control group; and 20 days post drug treatment. The unitary activity recording from the LH area was made before (30 min), during (10 min) and after (200 min) the alpha-IFN applications. alpha-IFN elicited a reversible dose-related decrease of both food intake and body weight. This decrease in food intake following alpha-IFN injections was correlated with a depression of LH neuronal electrical activity. Since direct brain application (i.c.v.) and systemic (i.p.) alpha-IFN treatment elicited identical responses, it is possible to assume that alpha-IFN suppresses food intake by a direct action on CNS sites including the LH neurons.

  14. Food intake response to exercise and active video gaming in adolescents: effect of weight status.

    PubMed

    Chaput, J P; Tremblay, A; Pereira, B; Boirie, Y; Duclos, M; Thivel, D

    2016-02-14

    Although a few data are available regarding the impact of video games on energy intake (EI) in lean adolescents, there is no evidence on the effect of passive and active video gaming on food intake in both lean and obese youth. It is also unknown whether isoenergetic active video games and exercise differently affect food consumption in youth. In all, twelve lean and twelve obese adolescent boys (12-15 years old) had to complete four 1-h sessions in a cross-over design study: control (CON; sitting), passive video game (PVG; boxing game on Xbox 360), active video game (AVG; boxing game on Xbox Kinect 360) and exercise (EX; cycling). The exercise and active video game activities were designed to generate the same energy expenditure (EE). EE was measured using a K4b2 portable indirect calorimeter. Ad libitum food intake and appetite sensations were assessed following the sessions. AVG and EX-EE were significantly higher in obese participants and significantly higher compared with PVG and CON in both groups. Obese participants significantly ate more than lean ones in all four conditions (P<0·001). EI did not differ between conditions in obese participants (CON: 4935 (SD 1490) kJ; PVG: 4902 (SD 1307) kJ; AVG: 4728 (SD 1358) kJ; EX: 4643 (SD 1335) kJ), and was significantly lower in lean participants after EX (2847 (SD 577) kJ) compared with PVG (3580 (SD 863) kJ) and AVG (3485 (SD 643) kJ) (P<0·05). Macronutrient intake was not significantly different between the groups or conditions. Hunger was significantly higher and satiety was lower in obese participants but no condition effect was observed. Overall, moderate-intensity exercise provides better effect on energy balance than an isoenergetic hour of active video gaming in lean adolescent boys by dually affecting EE and EI.

  15. Transcriptional activation by the thyroid hormone receptor through ligand-dependent receptor recruitment and chromatin remodelling.

    PubMed

    Grøntved, Lars; Waterfall, Joshua J; Kim, Dong Wook; Baek, Songjoon; Sung, Myong-Hee; Zhao, Li; Park, Jeong Won; Nielsen, Ronni; Walker, Robert L; Zhu, Yuelin J; Meltzer, Paul S; Hager, Gordon L; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2015-04-28

    A bimodal switch model is widely used to describe transcriptional regulation by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR). In this model, the unliganded TR forms stable, chromatin-bound complexes with transcriptional co-repressors to repress transcription. Binding of hormone dissociates co-repressors and facilitates recruitment of co-activators to activate transcription. Here we show that in addition to hormone-independent TR occupancy, ChIP-seq against endogenous TR in mouse liver tissue demonstrates considerable hormone-induced TR recruitment to chromatin associated with chromatin remodelling and activated gene transcription. Genome-wide footprinting analysis using DNase-seq provides little evidence for TR footprints both in the absence and presence of hormone, suggesting that unliganded TR engagement with repressive complexes on chromatin is, similar to activating receptor complexes, a highly dynamic process. This dynamic and ligand-dependent interaction with chromatin is likely shared by all steroid hormone receptors regardless of their capacity to repress transcription in the absence of ligand.

  16. Role of calmodulin in thyroid hormone stimulation in vitro of human erythrocyte Ca2+-ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Davis, F B; Davis, P J; Blas, S D

    1983-03-01

    Because human erythrocyte membrane Ca2+-ATPase is a calmodulin-dependent enzyme, and because physiological levels of thyroid hormone stimulate this enzyme system in vitro, we have studied the role of calmodulin in this model of extranuclear thyroid hormone action. Ca2+-ATPase activity in the absence of thyroid hormone ("basal activity") was increased by inclusion in the preassay incubation mixture of purified calmodulin or hypothyroid erythrocyte hemolysate that contained calmodulin (39 micrograms calmodulin/ml packed cells, determined by radioimmunoassay); addition of L-thyroxine or 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (10(-10)M) significantly enhanced (P less than 0.001) enzyme activity in the presence of calmodulin or hemolysate. The stimulatory effects of thyroid hormone, calmodulin, and hemolysate were additive. At 5-10 microM, trifluoperazine, an antagonist of calmodulin, inhibited thyroid hormone stimulation of Ca2+-ATPase activity. Higher concentrations of trifluoperazine (50-100 microM) inhibited basal and hormone-stimulated enzyme activity, with or without added calmodulin. Anti-calmodulin antibody (10-50 micrograms antibody/mg membrane protein) inhibited basal, calmodulin-stimulated and thyroid hormone-stimulated Ca2+-ATPase activity. Membrane preparations were shown by radioimmunoassay to contain residual endogenous calmodulin (0.27 +/- 0.02 micrograms/mg membrane protein). The latter accounts for the effect of trifluoperazine and calmodulin antibody on membrane Ca2+-ATPase activity in the absence of added purified calmodulin. These results support the conclusion that the in vitro action of physiological levels of iodothyronines on human erythrocyte Ca2+-ATPase activity requires the presence of calmodulin.

  17. Influence of activating hormones on human platelet membrane Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Resink, T.J.; Dimitrov, D.; Stucki, S.; Buehler, F.R.

    1986-07-16

    Intact platelets were pretreated with hormones and thereafter membranes were prepared and Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity determined. Thrombin decreased the V/sub max/ of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase after pretreatment of intact platelets. Platelet activating factor, vasopressin and ADP also decreased Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) or A23187 or ionomycin alone had no effect, while the simultaneous pretreatment with TPA and Ca/sup 2 +/-ionophore decreased Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity. cAMP elevating agents prostaglandin E/sub 1/ (PGE/sub 1/) and forskolin had no influence per se on Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase, but antagonized the inhibitory effect of thrombin. The data suggest a close connection between phosphoinositide metabolism and the Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase system.

  18. Experimental Studies of Active and Passive Flow Control Techniques Applied in a Twin Air-Intake

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shrey; Jindal, Aman; Maurya, Shivam P.; Jain, Anuj

    2013-01-01

    The flow control in twin air-intakes is necessary to improve the performance characteristics, since the flow traveling through curved and diffused paths becomes complex, especially after merging. The paper presents a comparison between two well-known techniques of flow control: active and passive. It presents an effective design of a vortex generator jet (VGJ) and a vane-type passive vortex generator (VG) and uses them in twin air-intake duct in different combinations to establish their effectiveness in improving the performance characteristics. The VGJ is designed to insert flow from side wall at pitch angle of 90 degrees and 45 degrees. Corotating (parallel) and counterrotating (V-shape) are the configuration of vane type VG. It is observed that VGJ has the potential to change the flow pattern drastically as compared to vane-type VG. While the VGJ is directed perpendicular to the side walls of the air-intake at a pitch angle of 90 degree, static pressure recovery is increased by 7.8% and total pressure loss is reduced by 40.7%, which is the best among all other cases tested for VGJ. For bigger-sized VG attached to the side walls of the air-intake, static pressure recovery is increased by 5.3%, but total pressure loss is reduced by only 4.5% as compared to all other cases of VG. PMID:23935422

  19. Physical activity and hormonal regulation of appetite: sex differences and weight control.

    PubMed

    Hagobian, Todd A; Braun, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Physical activity is an important contributor to regulation of energy balance and body composition. In this article, we separate the impact of exercise from the confounding influence of energy imbalance and highlight sex differences in hormonal and appetite responses to physical activity. The evolving story may influence our thinking regarding the use of physical activity to manage body composition.

  20. Bone Mineral Density Changes after Physical Training and Calcium Intake in Students with Attention Deficit and Hyper Activity Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arab ameri, Elahe; Dehkhoda, Mohammad Reza; Hemayattalab, Rasool

    2012-01-01

    In this study we investigate the effects of weight bearing exercise and calcium intake on bone mineral density (BMD) of students with attention deficit and hyper activity (ADHD) disorder. For this reason 54 male students with ADHD (age 8-12 years old) were assigned to four groups with no differences in age, BMD, calcium intake, and physical…

  1. [Hypothyroidism Associated to TSH Hormone-Receptor Autoantibodies with Blocking Activity Assessed In Vitro].

    PubMed

    Marques, Pedro; Chikh, Karim; Charrié, Anne; Pina, Rosa; Bugalho, Maria João; Lopes, Lurdes

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid-stimulating hormone-receptor autoantibodies normally causes hyperthyroidism. However, they might have blocking activity causing hypothyroidism. A 11-year-old girl followed due to type 1 diabetes mellitus, celiac disease and euthyroid lymphocytic thyroiditis at diagnosis. Two years after the initial evaluation, thyroid-stimulating hormone was suppressed with normal free T4; nine months later, a biochemical evolution to hypothyroidism with thyroid-stimulating hormone-receptor autoantibodies elevation was seen; the patient remained always asymptomatic. Chinese hamster ovary cells were transfected with the recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone -receptor, and then exposed to the patient's serum; it was estimated a 'moderate' blocking activity of these thyroid-stimulating hormone-receptor autoantibodies, and concomitantly excluded stimulating action. In this case, the acknowledgment of the blocking activity of the serum thyroid-stimulating hormone-receptor autoantibodies, supported the hypothesis of a multifactorial aetiology of the hypothyroidism, which in the absence of the in vitro tests, we would consider only as a consequence of the destructive process associated to lymphocytic thyroiditis.

  2. Dietary regulation of adiponectin by direct and indirect lipid activators of nuclear hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Rühl, R; Landrier, J F

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipokine mainly secreted by adipocytes that presents antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherogenic functions. Therefore, modulation of adiponectin expression represents a promising target for prevention or treatment of several diseases including insulin resistance and type II diabetes. Pharmacological agents such as the nuclear hormone receptor synthetic agonists like peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ agonists are of particular interest in therapeutic strategies due to their ability to increase the plasma adiponectin concentration. Nutritional approaches are also of particular interest, especially in primary prevention, since some active compounds of our diet (notably vitamins, carotenoids, or other essential nutrients) are direct or indirect lipid-activators of nuclear hormone receptors and are modifiers of adiponectin expression and secretion. The aim of the present review is to summarize current knowledge about the nutritional regulation of adiponectin by derivatives of active compounds naturally present in the diet acting as indirect or direct activators of nuclear hormone receptors.

  3. Model for growth hormone receptor activation based on subunit rotation within a receptor dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Richard J.; Adams, Julian J.; Pelekanos, Rebecca A.; Wan, Yu; McKinstry, William J.; Palethorpe, Kathryn; Seeber, Ruth M.; Monks, Thea A.; Eidne, Karin A.; Parker, Michael W.; Waters, Michael J.

    2010-07-13

    Growth hormone is believed to activate the growth hormone receptor (GHR) by dimerizing two identical receptor subunits, leading to activation of JAK2 kinase associated with the cytoplasmic domain. However, we have reported previously that dimerization alone is insufficient to activate full-length GHR. By comparing the crystal structure of the liganded and unliganded human GHR extracellular domain, we show here that there is no substantial change in its conformation on ligand binding. However, the receptor can be activated by rotation without ligand by inserting a defined number of alanine residues within the transmembrane domain. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and coimmunoprecipitation studies suggest that receptor subunits undergo specific transmembrane interactions independent of hormone binding. We propose an activation mechanism involving a relative rotation of subunits within a dimeric receptor as a result of asymmetric placement of the receptor-binding sites on the ligand.

  4. Active immunization to luteinizing hormone releasing hormone to inhibit the induction of mammary tumors in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Ravdin, P.M.; Jordan, V.C.

    1988-01-01

    Immunization of female rats with a bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone releasing hormone conjugate results in suppression of dimethylbenzanthracene mammary tumor incidence. Tumor incidence was 1.3, and 1.29 tumors per rat in bovine serum albumin alone (n = 10) and unimmunized (n = 18) control groups, but no tumors were found in the bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone releasing hormone conjugate immunized animals (n = 10). In a second experiment immunization with bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone releasing hormone conjugates reduced tumor incidence to 0.3 tumors per rat (n = 10) from the 1.2 tumors per animal seen in the control animals (n = 10) immunized with bovine serum albumin alone. Bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone immunization caused the production of anti-LHRH antibodies, an interruption of estrous cycles, lowered serum estradiol and progesterone levels, and atrophy of the ovaries and uteri. Immunization BSA-hormone conjugates is a novel anti-tumor strategy.

  5. Intake of honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) leaves by lambs using different levels of activated charcoal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 24-day feeding trial was conducted to assess the effect of feeding four levels of activated charcoal (0.0, 0.33, 0.67 and 1.00 g/kg of body weight) on intake of honey mesquite leaves (Prosopis glandulosa Torr.) by 20 wether lambs (36.6 ± 0.6 kg) that were randomly assigned to treatments. Lambs wer...

  6. Physically active men show better semen parameters and hormone values than sedentary men.

    PubMed

    Vaamonde, Diana; Da Silva-Grigoletto, Marzo Edir; García-Manso, Juan Manuel; Barrera, Natalibeth; Vaamonde-Lemos, Ricardo

    2012-09-01

    Physical exercise promotes many health benefits. The present study was undertaken to assess possible semen and hormone differences among physically active (PA) subjects and sedentary subjects (SE). The analyzed qualitative sperm parameters were: volume, sperm count, motility, and morphology; where needed, additional testing was performed. The measured hormones were: follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone (T), cortisol (C), and the ratio between T and C (T/C). Maximum oxygen consumption was also assessed to check for differences in fitness level. Statistically significant differences were found for several semen parameters such as total progressive motility (PA: 60.94 ± 5.03; SE: 56.07 ± 4.55) and morphology (PA: 15.54 ± 1.38, SE: 14.40 ± 1.15). The seminological values observed were supported by differences in hormones, with FSH, LH, and T being higher in PA than in SE (5.68 ± 2.51 vs. 3.14 ± 1.84; 5.95 ± 1.11 vs. 5.08 ± 0.98; 7.68 ± 0.77 vs. 6.49 ± 0.80, respectively). Likewise, the T/C ratio, index of anabolic versus catabolic status, was also higher in PA (0.46 ± 0.11 vs. 0.32 ± 0.07), which further supports the possibility of an improved hormonal environment. The present study shows that there are differences in semen and hormone values of physically active subjects and sedentary subjects. Physically active subjects seem to have a more anabolic hormonal environment and a healthier semen production.

  7. Normal physical activity obliterates the deleterious effects of a high-caloric intake.

    PubMed

    Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Pedersen, Maria; Solomon, Thomas P J; Knudsen, Sine Haugaard; Hansen, Louise Seier; Karstoft, Kristian; Lehrskov-Schmidt, Louise; Pedersen, Karin Kaereby; Thomsen, Carsten; Holst, Jens Juul; Pedersen, Bente K

    2014-02-01

    A high-caloric intake combined with a sedentary lifestyle is an important player in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The present study was undertaken to examine if the level of physical activity has impact on the metabolic effects of a high-caloric (+2,000 kcal/day) intake. Therefore, healthy individuals on a high-caloric intake were randomized to either 10,000 or 1,500 steps/day for 14 days. Step number, total energy expenditure, dietary records, neuropsychological tests, maximal oxygen uptake (Vo2max), whole body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), and oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) with stable isotopes were performed before and after the intervention. Both study groups gained the same amount of body weight. However, the inactive group accumulated significantly more visceral fat compared with the active group. Following the 2-wk period, the inactive group also experienced a poorer glycemic control, increased endogenous glucose production, decreased hepatic insulin extraction, increased baseline plasma levels of total cholesterol and LDL, and a decreased cognitive function with regard to capacity of attention. In conclusion, we find evidence to support that habitual physical activity may prevent pathophysiological symptoms associated with diet-induced obesity.

  8. Correlates among Perceived Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Physical Activity, And Dietary Intake in Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fischetti, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    In the last two decades, the number of new cases of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) among U.S. adolescents has increased (Fagot-Campagna et al., 2000; SEARCH Study Group, 2006), which may be related to the lack of health-promoting behaviors, such as a balanced diet and adequate physical exercise. This descriptive correlational study examined the relationship between perceived risk for T2DM, dietary intake, and physical activity in adolescents (N = 80) 13 to 18 years of age. The Children's Health Belief Model (Bush & lannotti, 1990) was the conceptual framework used for testing the theoretical relationships. Participants completed the following instruments: 1) Knowledge of Risk Factors for T2DM, 2) Health Beliefs for T2DM, 3) Godin-Shepard Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire (Godin & Shepard, 1997), and 4) the Demographic/Medical Questionnaire. Significant relationships were found between perceived risk, a subset of the Health Beliefs for T2DM scale, and the health promoting behaviors of dietary intake and physical activity. Implications for health-promoting nursing practice related to adolescent perception of risk and health-promoting behaviors of dietary intake and physical activity are addressed.

  9. Effects of photoperiod on food intake, activity and metabolic rate in adult neutered male cats.

    PubMed

    Kappen, K L; Garner, L M; Kerr, K R; Swanson, K S

    2014-10-01

    With the continued rise in feline obesity, novel weight management strategies are needed. To date, strategies aimed at altering physical activity, an important factor in weight maintenance, have been lacking. Photoperiod is known to cause physiological changes in seasonal mammals, including changes in body weight (BW) and reproductive status. Thus, our objective was to determine the effect of increased photoperiod (longer days) on voluntary physical activity levels, resting metabolic rate (RMR), food intake required to maintain BW, and fasting serum leptin and ghrelin concentrations in adult cats. Eleven healthy, adult, neutered, male domestic shorthair cats were used in a randomized crossover design study. During two 12-week periods, cats were exposed to either a short-day (SD) photoperiod of 8 h light: 16 h dark or a long-day (LD) photoperiod of 16 h light: 8 h dark. Cats were fed a commercial diet to maintain baseline BW. In addition to daily food intake and twice-weekly BW, RMR (via indirect calorimetry), body composition [via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA)] and physical activity (via Actical activity monitors) were measured at week 0 and 12 of each period. Fasting serum leptin and ghrelin concentrations were measured at week 0, 6 and 12 of each period. Average hourly physical activity was greater (p = 0.008) in LD vs. SD cats (3770 vs. 3129 activity counts/h), which was primarily due to increased (p < 0.001) dark period activity (1188 vs. 710 activity counts/h). This corresponded to higher (p < 0.0001) daily metabolizable energy intake (mean over 12-week period: 196 vs. 187 kcal/day), and increased (p = 0.048) RMR in LD cats (9.02 vs. 8.37 kcal/h). Body composition, serum leptin and serum ghrelin were not altered by photoperiod. More research is needed to determine potential mechanisms by which these physiological changes occurred and how they may apply to weight management strategies.

  10. Hedgehog signaling activation induces stem cell proliferation and hormone release in the adult pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Pyczek, Joanna; Buslei, Rolf; Schult, David; Hölsken, Annett; Buchfelder, Michael; Heß, Ina; Hahn, Heidi; Uhmann, Anja

    2016-04-25

    Hedgehog (HH) signaling is known to be essential during the embryonal development of the pituitary gland but the knowledge about its role in the adult pituitary and in associated tumors is sparse. In this report we investigated the effect of excess Hh signaling activation in murine pituitary explants and analyzed the HH signaling status of human adenopituitary lobes and a large cohort of pituitary adenomas. Our data show that excess Hh signaling led to increased proliferation of Sox2(+) and Sox9(+) adult pituitary stem cells and to elevated expression levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (Acth), growth hormone (Gh) and prolactin (Prl) in the adult gland. Inhibition of the pathway by cyclopamine reversed these effects indicating that active Hh signaling positively regulates proliferative processes of adult pituitary stem cells and hormone production in the anterior pituitary. Since hormone producing cells of the adenohypophysis as well as ACTH-, GH- and PRL-immunopositive adenomas express SHH and its target GLI1, we furthermore propose that excess HH signaling is involved in the development/maintenance of hormone-producing pituitary adenomas. These findings advance the understanding of physiological hormone regulation and may open new treatment options for pituitary tumors.

  11. Hedgehog signaling activation induces stem cell proliferation and hormone release in the adult pituitary gland

    PubMed Central

    Pyczek, Joanna; Buslei, Rolf; Schult, David; Hölsken, Annett; Buchfelder, Michael; Heß, Ina; Hahn, Heidi; Uhmann, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog (HH) signaling is known to be essential during the embryonal development of the pituitary gland but the knowledge about its role in the adult pituitary and in associated tumors is sparse. In this report we investigated the effect of excess Hh signaling activation in murine pituitary explants and analyzed the HH signaling status of human adenopituitary lobes and a large cohort of pituitary adenomas. Our data show that excess Hh signaling led to increased proliferation of Sox2+ and Sox9+ adult pituitary stem cells and to elevated expression levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (Acth), growth hormone (Gh) and prolactin (Prl) in the adult gland. Inhibition of the pathway by cyclopamine reversed these effects indicating that active Hh signaling positively regulates proliferative processes of adult pituitary stem cells and hormone production in the anterior pituitary. Since hormone producing cells of the adenohypophysis as well as ACTH-, GH- and PRL-immunopositive adenomas express SHH and its target GLI1, we furthermore propose that excess HH signaling is involved in the development/maintenance of hormone-producing pituitary adenomas. These findings advance the understanding of physiological hormone regulation and may open new treatment options for pituitary tumors. PMID:27109116

  12. Activity changes in jaw motor neurons induced by egg-laying hormone contribute to the feeding suppression during egg-laying behavior in Aplysia kurodai.

    PubMed

    Narusuye, Kenji; Hamaguchi, Aya; Nagahama, Tatsumi

    2013-01-01

    Egg-laying behavior in Aplysia is accompanied by behavioral changes such as feeding suppression. We investigated the effects of the egg-laying hormone (ELH) on food intake, the activity patterns of jaw muscles, and the activity of buccal neurons (multi-action neuron [MA1] and jaw-closing motor neuron [JC2]), which are elements of the feeding neural circuits controlling jaw movements in Aplysia kurodai. Injection of ELH into the body cavity inhibited the intake of seaweed. After ELH application, the rhythmic activity of jaw muscles that was induced by preferred taste stimulation elicited fewer ingestion-like responses and increased the number of rejection-like responses. ELH applied to the buccal ganglia increased the firing activity of JC2 during spontaneous rhythmic responses and during the rhythmic feeding-like responses that were evoked by electrical stimulation of the esophageal nerves. In the 2 types of rhythmic responses, the Dn (normalized value of the delay time of JC2 firing onset) decreased after ELH application as compared with the control. Furthermore, ELH decreased the size of MA1-induced inhibitory postsynaptic currents in JC2. These results suggest that ELH changes the buccal motor program from ingestion to rejection on the basis of our previous results, and may contribute to a decrease in food intake during egg laying.

  13. Ethanol intake and motor sensitization: the role of brain catalase activity in mice with different genotypes.

    PubMed

    Correa, M; Sanchis-Segura, C; Pastor, R; Aragon, C M G

    2004-09-15

    The C57BL/6J strain of inbred mice shows a characteristic pattern of ethanol-induced behaviors: very weak acute locomotor stimulation, a lack of locomotor-sensitizing effect of ethanol, and a high level of ethanol intake. This strain has relatively low levels of activity of the ethanol metabolizing enzyme catalase, and it has been proposed that brain catalase plays a role in the modulation of some behavioral effects of ethanol. In the first study of the present paper, we investigated the effects of pharmacological manipulations of brain catalase activity on C57BL/6J mice in acute ethanol-induced locomotion and ethanol intake. Results indicated that the reduction in motor activity produced by ethanol was reversed by pretreatment with catalase potentiators and it was enhanced by catalase inhibitors. In addition, ethanol intake was highly correlated with brain catalase activity in mice treated with a catalase potentiator. In the second study, F1 hybrid mice (SWXB6) from the outbred Swiss-Webster mice and the inbred C57BL/6J mice were used. Basal brain catalase activity levels of F1 mice were intermediate between to those of the two progenitor genotypes. That profile of catalase activity was parallel to the acute-ethanol-induced locomotion and to repeated-ethanol-induced motor sensitization effects observed across the three types of mice. These data suggest that brain catalase activity modifications in the C57BL/6J strain change the pattern of several ethanol-related behaviors in this inbred mouse.

  14. Intake of Lutein-Rich Vegetables Is Associated with Higher Levels of Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Crichton, Georgina; Elias, Merrill; Alkerwi, Ala'a; Buckley, Jonathon

    2015-09-18

    Levels of physical inactivity, a major contributor to burden of disease, are high in many countries. Some preliminary research suggests that circulating lutein concentrations are associated with high levels of physical activity (PA). We aimed to assess whether the intake of lutein-containing foods, including vegetables and eggs, is associated with levels of PA in two studies conducted in different countries. Dietary data and PA data collected from participants in two cross-sectional studies: the Maine-Syracuse Longitudinal Study (MSLS), conducted in Central New York, USA (n = 972), and the Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg Study (ORISCAV-LUX) (n = 1331) were analyzed. Higher intakes of lutein containing foods, including green leafy vegetables, were associated with higher levels of PA in both study sites. Increasing the consumption of lutein-rich foods may have the potential to impact positively on levels of PA. This needs to be further explored in randomized controlled trials.

  15. A correlation of pregnancy term, disease activity, serum female hormones, and cytokines in uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, C-C; Reed, G F; Kim, Y; Agrón, E; Buggage, R R

    2004-01-01

    Background/aims: Pregnancy and the postpartum period are associated with the activity of autoimmune diseases including uveitis. Although the exact mechanism is unknown, hormones are reported to alter inflammatory cytokines and influence disease activity. The authors studied ocular inflammation, female hormones, and serum cytokine levels during and after pregnancy. Methods: A prospective, observational case study was conducted. Four pregnant women in their first trimester with chronic non-infectious uveitis were followed monthly until 6 months after delivery. Serum female hormones (oestrogen, progesterone, prolactin) and various cytokines (IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IFN-γ, and TGF-β) were measured by ELISA. Results: The four patients had five full term pregnancies. Uveitis activity decreased after the first trimester but flared in the early postpartum period. Serum female hormones, highly elevated during pregnancy, drastically dropped post partum. Cytokine levels except TGF-β were mostly undetectable. Conclusion: Female hormones and TGF-β may contribute to the activity of uveitis during pregnancy and the postpartum period. PMID:15548800

  16. Measurement of Ad Libitum Food Intake, Physical Activity, and Sedentary Time in Response to Overfeeding

    PubMed Central

    He, Jianying; Votruba, Susanne; Pomeroy, Jeremy; Bonfiglio, Susan; Krakoff, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Given the wide availability of highly palatable foods, overeating is common. Energy intake and metabolic responses to overfeeding may provide insights into weight gain prevention. We hypothesized a down-regulation in subsequent food intake and sedentary time, and up-regulation in non-exercise activity and core temperature in response to overfeeding in order to maintain body weight constant. In a monitored inpatient clinical research unit using a cross over study design, we investigated ad libitum energy intake (EI, using automated vending machines), core body temperature, and physical activity (using accelerometry) following a short term (3-day) weight maintaining (WM) vs overfeeding (OF) diet in healthy volunteers (n = 21, BMI, mean ± SD, 33.2±8.6 kg/m2, 73.6% male). During the ad libitum periods following the WM vs. OF diets, there was no significant difference in mean 3-d EI (4061±1084 vs. 3926±1284 kcal/day, p = 0.41), and there were also no differences either in core body temperature (37.0±0.2°C vs. 37.1±0.2°C, p = 0.75) or sedentary time (70.9±12.9 vs. 72.0±7.4%, p = 0.88). However, during OF (but not WM), sedentary time was positively associated with weight gain (r = 0.49, p = 0.05, adjusted for age, sex, and initial weight). In conclusion, short term overfeeding did not result in a decrease in subsequent ad libitum food intake or overall change in sedentary time although in secondary analysis sedentary time was associated with weight gain during OF. Beyond possible changes in sedentary time, there is minimal attempt to restore energy balance during or following short term overfeeding. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00342732 PMID:22629311

  17. Risperidone alters food intake, core body temperature, and locomotor activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Cope, Mark B; Li, Xingsheng; Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia; DiCostanzo, Catherine A; Jamison, Wendi G; Kesterson, Robert A; Allison, David B; Nagy, Tim R

    2009-03-02

    Risperidone induces significant weight gain in female mice; however, the underlying mechanisms related to this effect are unknown. We investigated the effects of risperidone on locomotor activity, core body temperature, and uncoupling protein (UCP) and hypothalamic orexin mRNA expression. Female C57BL/6J mice were acclimated to individual housing and randomly assigned to either risperidone (4 mg/kg BW day) or placebo (PLA). Activity and body temperature were measured over 48-hour periods twice a week for 3 weeks. Food intake and body weights were measured weekly. UCP1 (BAT), UCP3 (gastrocnemius), and orexin (hypothalamus) mRNA expressions were measured using RT-PCR. Risperidone-treated mice consumed more food (p=0.050) and gained more weight (p=0.0001) than PLA-treated mice after 3 weeks. During the initial 2 days of treatment, there was an acute effect of treatment on activity (p=0.046), but not body temperature (p=0.290). During 3 weeks of treatment, average core body temperatures were higher in risperidone-treated mice compared to controls during the light phase (p=0.0001), and tended to be higher during the dark phase (p=0.057). Risperidone-treated mice exhibited lower activity levels than controls during the dark phase (p=0.006); there were no differences in activity during the light phase (p=0.47). UCP1 (p<0.01) and UCP3 (p<0.05) mRNA expressions were greater in risperidone-treated mice compared to controls, whereas, orexin mRNA expression was lower in risperidone-treated mice (p<0.01). These results suggest that risperidone-induced weight gain in mice is a consequence of increased energy intake and reduced activity, while the elevation in body temperature may be a result of thermogenic effect of food intake and elevated UCP1, UCP3, and a reduced hypothalamic orexin expression.

  18. Chronic hyperammonemia alters the circadian rhythms of corticosteroid hormone levels and of motor activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Ahabrach, Hanan; Piedrafita, Blanca; Ayad, Abdelmalik; El Mlili, Nisrin; Errami, Mohammed; Felipo, Vicente; Llansola, Marta

    2010-05-15

    Patients with liver cirrhosis may present hepatic encephalopathy with a wide range of neurological disturbances and alterations in sleep quality and in the sleep-wake circadian rhythm. Hyperammonemia is a main contributor to the neurological alterations in hepatic encephalopathy. We have assessed, in an animal model of chronic hyperammonemia without liver failure, the effects of hyperammonemia per se on the circadian rhythms of motor activity, temperature, and plasma levels of adrenal corticosteroid hormones. Chronic hyperammonemia alters the circadian rhythms of locomotor activity and of cortisol and corticosterone levels in blood. Different types of motor activity are affected differentially. Hyperammonemia significantly alters the rhythm of spontaneous ambulatory activity, reducing strongly ambulatory counts and slightly average velocity during the night (the active phase) but not during the day, resulting in altered circadian rhythms. In contrast, hyperammonemia did not affect wheel running at all, indicating that it affects spontaneous but not voluntary activity. Vertical activity was affected only very slightly, indicating that hyperammonemia does not induce anxiety. Hyperammonemia abolished completely the circadian rhythm of corticosteroid hormones in plasma, completely eliminating the peaks of cortisol and corticosterone present in control rats at the start of the dark period. The data reported show that chronic hyperammonemia, similar to that present in patients with liver cirrhosis, alters the circadian rhythms of corticosteroid hormones and of motor activity. This suggests that hyperammonemia would be a relevant contributor to the alterations in corticosteroid hormones and in circadian rhythms in patients with liver cirrhosis.

  19. Aurora kinase B activity is modulated by thyroid hormone during transcriptional activation of pituitary genes.

    PubMed

    Tardáguila, Manuel; González-Gugel, Elena; Sánchez-Pacheco, Aurora

    2011-03-01

    Covalent histone modifications clearly play an essential role in ligand-dependent transcriptional regulation by nuclear receptors. One of the predominant mechanisms used by nuclear receptors to activate or repress target-gene transcription is the recruitment of coregulatory factors capable of covalently modify the amino terminal ends of histones. Here we show that the thyroid hormone (T3) produces a rapid increase in histone H3Ser10 phosphorylation (H3Ser10ph) concomitant to the rapid displacement of the heterochromatin protein 1β (HP1β) to the nuclear periphery. Moreover, we found that T3-mediated pituitary gene transcription is associated with an increase in H3Ser10ph. Interestingly, the Aurora kinase B inhibitor ZM443979 abolishes the effect of T3 on H3Ser10ph, blocks HP1β delocalization, and significantly reduces ligand-dependent transactivation. Similar effects were shown when Aurora kinase B expression was abrogated in small interfering RNA assays. In an effort to understand the underlying mechanism by which T3 increases H3Ser10ph, we demonstrate that liganded thyroid hormone receptor directly interacts with Aurora kinase B, increasing its kinase activity. Moreover, using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we have shown that Aurora kinase B participates of a mechanism that displaces HP1β from promoter region, thus preparing the chromatin for the transcriptional activation of T3 regulated genes. Our findings reveal a novel role for Aurora kinase B during transcriptional initiation in GO/G1, apart from its well-known mitotic activity.

  20. Transport of steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity across a swine lagoon/sprayfield system.

    PubMed

    Yost, Erin E; Meyer, Michael T; Dietze, Julie E; Williams, C Michael; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W

    2014-10-07

    The inflow, transformation, and attenuation of natural steroid hormones and phytoestrogens and estrogenic activity were assessed across the lagoon/sprayfield system of a prototypical commercial swine sow operation. Free and conjugated steroid hormones (estrogens, androgens, and progesterone) were detected in urine and feces of sows across reproductive stages, with progesterone being the most abundant steroid hormone. Excreta also contained phytoestrogens indicative of a soy-based diet, particularly, daidzein, genistein, and equol. During storage in barn pits and the anaerobic lagoon, conjugated hormones dissipated, and androgens and progesterone were attenuated. Estrone and equol persisted along the waste disposal route. Following application of lagoon slurry to agricultural soils, all analytes exhibited attenuation within 2 days. However, analytes including estrone, androstenedione, progesterone, and equol remained detectable in soil at 2 months postapplication. Estrogenic activity in the yeast estrogen screen and T47D-KBluc in vitro bioassays generally tracked well with analyte concentrations. Estrone was found to be the greatest contributor to estrogenic activity across all sample types. This investigation encompasses the most comprehensive suite of natural hormone and phytoestrogen analytes examined to date across a livestock lagoon/sprayfield and provides global insight into the fate of these analytes in this widely used waste management system.

  1. Corticotropin-releasing factor-overexpressing mice exhibit reduced neuronal activation in the arcuate nucleus and food intake in response to fasting.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Million, Mulugeta; Stenzel-Poore, Mary P; Kobelt, Peter; Mönnikes, Hubert; Taché, Yvette; Wang, Lixin

    2009-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) overexpressing (OE) mice are a genetic model that exhibits features of chronic stress. We investigated whether the adaptive feeding response to a hypocaloric challenge induced by food deprivation is impaired under conditions of chronic CRF overproduction. Food intake response to a 16-h overnight fast and ip injection of gut hormones regulating food intake were compared in CRF-OE and wild type (WT) littermate mice along with brain Fos expression, circulating ghrelin levels, and gastric emptying of a nonnutrient meal. CRF-OE mice injected ip with saline showed a 47 and 44% reduction of 30-min and 4-h cumulative food intake response to an overnight fast, respectively, compared with WT. However, the 30-min food intake decrease induced by ip cholecystokinin (3 microg/kg) and increase by ghrelin (300 microg/kg) were similar in CRF-OE and WT mice. Overnight fasting increased the plasma total ghrelin to similar levels in CRF-OE and WT mice, although CRF-OE mice had a 2-fold reduction of nonfasting ghrelin levels. The number of Fos-immunoreactive cells induced by fasting in the arcuate nucleus was reduced by 5.9-fold in CRF-OE compared with WT mice whereas no significant changes were observed in other hypothalamic nuclei. In contrast, fasted CRF-OE mice displayed a 5.6-fold increase in Fos-immunoreactive cell number in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve and a 34% increase in 20-min gastric emptying. These findings indicate that sustained overproduction of hypothalamic CRF in mice interferes with fasting-induced activation of arcuate nucleus neurons and the related hyperphagic response.

  2. Quipazine reduces food intake in the rat by activation of 5-HT2-receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Hewson, G.; Leighton, G. E.; Hill, R. G.; Hughes, J.

    1988-01-01

    1. To determine which subtype(s) of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor are involved in the anorectic action of quipazine, the ability of selective antagonists at 5-HT2- and 5-HT3-receptors, and an antagonist at 5-HT1-like receptors, to block this response were investigated in non-deprived rats, trained to eat a palatable diet. 2. Quipazine (0.5-8 mg kg-1, i.p.) produced a dose-related reduction in the intake of palatable diet. 3. The anorectic effect of 4 mg kg-1 quipazine was antagonized by the nonselective 5-HT-receptor antagonist methysergide (5 mg kg-1, i.p.) and by the selective 5-HT2-receptor antagonists ketanserin (1 mg kg-1 and 2.5 mg kg-1, i.p.) and ritanserin (0.5 mg kg-1 and 1 mg kg-1, i.p.). The selective 5-HT3-receptor antagonist GR38032F (1 mg kg-1, i.p.) and (-)-pindolol (4 mg kg-1, i.p.), which blocks some of the effects mediated at 5-HT1-like receptors, did not block the reduction in food intake produced by this dose of quipazine. 4. None of the 5-HT-receptor antagonists had any effect on food intake when they were administered alone, suggesting that endogenous 5-HT is not involved in the tonic control of food intake under the conditions of these experiments. 5. It is concluded that the anorectic action of quipazine is mediated, at least in part, by activation of 5-HT2-receptors. PMID:2906561

  3. Exercising in the Fasted State Reduced 24-Hour Energy Intake in Active Male Adults

    PubMed Central

    Deitrick, Ronald W.; Hillman, Angela R.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of fasting prior to morning exercise on 24-hour energy intake was examined using a randomized, counterbalanced design. Participants (12 active, white males, 20.8 ± 3.0 years old, VO2max: 59.1 ± 5.7 mL/kg/min) fasted (NoBK) or received breakfast (BK) and then ran for 60 minutes at 60%  VO2max. All food was weighed and measured for 24 hours. Measures of blood glucose and hunger were collected at 5 time points. Respiratory quotient (RQ) was measured during exercise. Generalized linear mixed models and paired sample t-tests examined differences between the conditions. Total 24-hour (BK: 19172 ± 4542 kJ versus NoBK: 15312 ± 4513 kJ; p < 0.001) and evening (BK: 12265 ± 4278 kJ versus NoBK: 10833 ± 4065; p = 0.039) energy intake and RQ (BK: 0.90 ± 0.03 versus NoBK: 0.86 ± 0.03; p < 0.001) were significantly higher in BK than NoBK. Blood glucose was significantly higher in BK than NoBK before exercise (5.2 ± 0.7 versus 4.5 ± 0.6 mmol/L; p = 0.025). Hunger was significantly lower for BK than NoBK before exercise, after exercise, and before lunch. Blood glucose and hunger were not associated with energy intake. Fasting before morning exercise decreased 24-hour energy intake and increased fat oxidation during exercise. Completing exercise in the morning in the fasted state may have implications for weight management. PMID:27738523

  4. mGluR1/5 activation in the lateral hypothalamus increases food intake via the endocannabinoid system.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Fuentes, Asai; Marichal-Cancino, Bruno A; Méndez-Díaz, Mónica; Becerril-Meléndez, Alline L; Ruiz-Contreras, Alejandra E; Prospéro-Garcia, Oscar

    2016-09-19

    Mounting evidence has shown that glutamatergic and endocannabinoid systems in the hypothalamus regulate mammalian food intake. Stimulation of hypothalamic mGluR1/5 and CB1 receptors induces hyperphagia suggesting a possible interaction between these systems to control food intake. In addition, synthesis of endocannabinoids has been reported after mGluR1/5 stimulation in the brain. The aim of this study was to examine the potential cannabinergic activity in the food intake induction by lateral hypothalamic stimulation of mGluR1/5. Wistar albino male rats received bilateral infusions in the lateral hypothalamus (LH) of: (i) vehicle; (ii) (RS)-2-Chloro-5-hidroxyphenylglycine (CHPG; mGluR1/5 agonist); (iii) 2-AG (CB1 endogenous agonist); (iv) AM251 (CB1 antagonist); (v) tetrahydrolipstatin (THL, 1.2μg; diacyl-glycerol lipase inhibitor); and (vi) combinations of CHPG + with the other aforementioned drugs. Food intake was evaluated the first two hours after drug administration. CHPG significantly increased food intake; whereas CHPG in combination with a dose of 2-AG (with no effects on food intake) greatly increased food ingestion compared to CHPG alone. The increase induced by CHPG in food intake was prevented with AM251 or THL. These results suggest that activation of mGluR1/5 in the lateral hypothalamus induces an orexigenic effect via activation of the endocannabinoid system.

  5. Nectar intake rate is modulated by changes in sucking pump activity according to colony starvation in carpenter ants.

    PubMed

    Falibene, Agustina; Josens, Roxana

    2008-05-01

    Dynamics of fluid feeding has been deeply studied in insects. However, the ability to vary the nectar-intake rate depending only on the carbohydrate deprivation has been clearly demonstrated only in Camponotus mus ants. When insect morphometry and fluid properties remain constant, changes in intake rate could only be attributed to variations in sucking pump activity. Previous records of the electrical activity generated during feeding in C. mus have revealed two different signal patterns: the regular (RP, frequencies: 2-5 Hz) and the irregular (IP, frequencies: 7-12 Hz). This work studies the mechanism underlying food intake-rate modulation in ants by analysing whether these patterns are involved. Behaviour and electrical activity generated by ants at different starvation levels were analysed during feeding on sucrose solutions. Ants were able to modulate the intake rate for a variety of sucrose concentrations (10, 40 and 60%w/w). The IP only occurred for 60% of solutions and its presence did not affect the intake rate. However, during the RP generated under the starved state, we found frequencies up to 7.5 Hz. RP frequencies positively correlated with the intake-rate for all sucrose concentrations. Hence, intake-rate modulation according to sugar deprivation is mainly achieved by the ant's ability to vary the pumping frequency.

  6. Vitamin D and Calcium Intakes, Physical Activity, and Calcaneus BMC among School-Going 13-Year Old Malaysian Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Suriawati, A. A.; Abdul Majid, Hazreen; Al-Sadat, Nabilla; Mohamed, Mohd Nahar Azmi; Jalaludin, Muhammad Yazid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dietary calcium and vitamin D are essential for bone development. Apart from diet, physical activity may potentially improve and sustain bone health. Objective: To investigate the relationship between the dietary intake of calcium and vitamin D, physical activity, and bone mineral content (BMC) in 13-year-old Malaysian adolescents. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Selected public secondary schools from the central and northern regions of Peninsular Malaysia. Participants: The subjects were from the Malaysian Health and Adolescents Longitudinal Research Team Cohort study (MyHeARTs). Methods: The data included seven-day diet histories, anthropometric measurements, and the BMC of calcaneal bone using a portable broadband ultrasound bone densitometer. Nutritionist Pro software was used to calculate the dietary calcium and vitamin D intakes from the diet histories, based on the Nutrient Composition of Malaysian Food Database guidance for the dietary calcium intake and the Singapore Energy and Nutrient Composition of Food Database for vitamin D intake. Results: A total of 289 adolescents (65.7% females) were recruited. The average dietary intakes of calcium and vitamin D were 377 ± 12 mg/day and 2.51 ± 0.12 µg/day, respectively, with the majority of subjects failing to meet the Recommended Nutrient Intake (RNI) of Malaysia for dietary calcium and vitamin D. All the subjects had a normal Z-score for the BMC (−2.00 or higher) with a mean of 0.55 ± 0.01. From the statistical analysis of the factors contributing to BMC, it was found that for those subjects with a higher intake of vitamin D, a higher combination of the intake of vitamin D and calcium resulted in significantly higher BMC quartiles. The regression analysis showed that the BMC might have been influenced by the vitamin D intake. Conclusions: A combination of the intake of vitamin D and calcium is positively associated with the BMC. PMID:27783041

  7. The glucocorticoid receptor hormone binding domain mediates transcriptional activation in vitro in the absence of ligand.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, J; Stunnenberg, H G

    1993-01-01

    We show that recombinant rat glucocorticoid receptor (vvGR) expressed using vaccinia virus is indistinguishable from authentic GR with respect to DNA and hormone binding. In the absence of hormone, vvGR is mainly found in the cytoplasm in a complex with heat shock protein 90. Upon incubation with ligand, vvGR is released from this complex and translocated to the nucleus. Thus, the ligand binding domain displays the known biochemical properties. However, in vitro, transcription from a synthetic promoter and from the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter is enhanced by recombinant GR in a ligand independent manner. Both transactivation domains contribute to the transcriptional activity, additively on a synthetic promoter and cooperatively on the MMTV promoter. We thus provide the first evidence that in vitro the hormone binding domain has a transcriptional activity even in the absence of ligand. Images PMID:8392705

  8. Estrogen receptor activation by tobacco smoke condensate in hormonal therapy-resistant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Toshifumi; Shinagawa, Yuri; Asari, Yosuke; Suzuki, Kanae; Takanobu, Junko; Gohno, Tatsuyuki; Yamaguchi, Yuri; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between tobacco smoke and breast cancer incidence has been studied for many years, but the effect of smoking on hormonal therapy has not been previously reported. We investigated the effect of smoking on hormonal therapy by performing in vitro experiments. We first prepared tobacco smoke condensate (TSC) and examined its effect on estrogen receptor (ER) activity. The ER activity was analyzed using MCF-7-E10 cells into which the estrogen-responsive element (ERE)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene had been stably introduced (GFP assay) and performing an ERE-luciferase assay. TSC significantly activated ERs, and upregulated its endogenous target genes. This activation was inhibited by fulvestrant but more weakly by tamoxifen. These results suggest that the activation mechanism may be different from that for estrogen. Furthermore, using E10 estrogen depletion-resistant cells (EDR cells) established as a hormonal therapy-resistant model showing estrogen-independent ER activity, ER activation and induction of ER target genes were significantly higher following TSC treatment than by estradiol (E2). These responses were much higher than those of the parental E10 cells. In addition, the phosphorylation status of signaling factors (ERK1/2, Akt) and ER in the E10-EDR cells treated with TSC increased. The gene expression profile induced by estrogenic effects of TSC was characterized by microarray analysis. The findings suggested that TSC activates ER by both ligand-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Although TSC constituents will be metabolized in vivo, breast cancer tissues might be exposed for a long period along with hormonal therapy. Tobacco smoke may have a possibility to interfere with hormonal therapy for breast cancer, which may have important implications for the management of therapy.

  9. Gastrointestinal growth factors and hormones have divergent effects on Akt activation

    PubMed Central

    Berna, Marc J.; Tapia, Jose A.; Sancho, Veronica; Thill, Michelle; Pace, Andrea; Hoffmann, K. Martin; Gonzalez-Fernandez, Lauro; Jensen, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    Akt is a central regulator of apoptosis, cell growth and survival. Growth factors and some G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) regulate Akt. Whereas growth-factor activation of Akt has been extensively studied, the regulation of Akt by GPCR's, especially gastrointestinal hormones/neurotransmitters, remains unclear. To address this area, in this study the effects of GI growth factors and hormones/neurotransmitters were investigate in rat pancreatic acinar cells which are high responsive to these agents. Pancreatic acini expressed Akt and 5 of 7 known pancreatic growth-factors stimulate Akt phosphorylation (T308, S473) and translocation. These effects are mediated by p85 phosphorylation and activation of PI3K. GI hormones increasing intracellular cAMP had similar effects. However, GI-hormones/neurotransmitters[CCK, bombesin,carbachol] activating phospholipase C (PLC) inhibited basal and growth-factor-stimulated Akt activation. Detailed studies with CCK, which has both physiological and pathophysiological effects on pancreatic acinar cells at different concentrations, demonstrated CCK has a biphasic effect: at low concentrations(pM) stimulating Akt by a Src-dependent mechanism and at higher concentrations(nM) inhibited basal and stimulated Akt translocation, phosphorylation and activation, by de-phosphorylating p85 resulting in decreasing PI3K activity. This effect required activation of both limbs of the PLC-pathway and a protein tyrosine phosphatase, but was not mediated by p44/42 MAPK, Src or activation of a serine phosphatase. Akt inhibition by CCK was also found in vivo and in Panc-1 cancer cells where it inhibited serum-mediated rescue from apoptosis. These results demonstrate that GI growth factors as well as gastrointestinal hormones/neurotransmitters with different cellular basis of action can all regulate Akt phosphorylation in pancreatic acinar cells. This regulation is complex with phospholipase C agents such as CCK, because both stimulatory and inhibitory

  10. High specific activity enantiomerically enriched juvenile hormones: synthesis and binding assay.

    PubMed Central

    Prestwich, G D; Wawrzeńczyk, C

    1985-01-01

    A stereoselective total synthesis of chiral juvenile hormone I is described that allows stoichiometric introduction of two tritium atoms in the final step. Both optical antipodes of the pivotal epoxy alcohol intermediate were prepared in 95% enantiomeric excess by the Sharpless epoxidation of a (Z)-allylic alcohol. Elaboration of the hydroxy-methyl group to a vinyl group followed by selective homogeneous tritiation affords optically active juvenile hormone I analogs at 58 Ci/mmol. Competitive binding of the labeled 10R, 11S and 10S,11R enantiomers with unlabeled enantiomers to the hemolymph binding protein of Manduca sexta larvae was determined by using a dextran-coated charcoal assay. The natural 10R,11S enantiomer has twice the relative binding affinity of the 10S,11R enantiomer. The availability of such high specific activity optically pure hormones will contribute substantially to the search for high-affinity receptors for juvenile hormones in the nuclei of cells. Moreover, the chiral 12-hydroxy-(10R,11S)-epoxy intermediate allows modification of juvenile hormone for solid-phase biochemical and radioimmunochemical work without altering either the biologically important carbomethoxy or epoxy recognition sites. PMID:3860862

  11. High specific activity enantiomerically enriched juvenile hormones: synthesis and binding assay.

    PubMed

    Prestwich, G D; Wawrzeńczyk, C

    1985-08-01

    A stereoselective total synthesis of chiral juvenile hormone I is described that allows stoichiometric introduction of two tritium atoms in the final step. Both optical antipodes of the pivotal epoxy alcohol intermediate were prepared in 95% enantiomeric excess by the Sharpless epoxidation of a (Z)-allylic alcohol. Elaboration of the hydroxy-methyl group to a vinyl group followed by selective homogeneous tritiation affords optically active juvenile hormone I analogs at 58 Ci/mmol. Competitive binding of the labeled 10R, 11S and 10S,11R enantiomers with unlabeled enantiomers to the hemolymph binding protein of Manduca sexta larvae was determined by using a dextran-coated charcoal assay. The natural 10R,11S enantiomer has twice the relative binding affinity of the 10S,11R enantiomer. The availability of such high specific activity optically pure hormones will contribute substantially to the search for high-affinity receptors for juvenile hormones in the nuclei of cells. Moreover, the chiral 12-hydroxy-(10R,11S)-epoxy intermediate allows modification of juvenile hormone for solid-phase biochemical and radioimmunochemical work without altering either the biologically important carbomethoxy or epoxy recognition sites.

  12. Thyroid hormone activation of retinoic acid synthesis in hypothalamic tanycytes

    PubMed Central

    Stoney, Patrick N.; Helfer, Gisela; Rodrigues, Diana; Morgan, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is essential for adult brain function and its actions include several key roles in the hypothalamus. Although TH controls gene expression via specific TH receptors of the nuclear receptor class, surprisingly few genes have been demonstrated to be directly regulated by TH in the hypothalamus, or the adult brain as a whole. This study explored the rapid induction by TH of retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (Raldh1), encoding a retinoic acid (RA)‐synthesizing enzyme, as a gene specifically expressed in hypothalamic tanycytes, cells that mediate a number of actions of TH in the hypothalamus. The resulting increase in RA may then regulate gene expression via the RA receptors, also of the nuclear receptor class. In vivo exposure of the rat to TH led to a significant and rapid increase in hypothalamic Raldh1 within 4 hours. That this may lead to an in vivo increase in RA is suggested by the later induction by TH of the RA‐responsive gene Cyp26b1. To explore the actions of RA in the hypothalamus as a potential mediator of TH control of gene regulation, an ex vivo hypothalamic rat slice culture method was developed in which the Raldh1‐expressing tanycytes were maintained. These slice cultures confirmed that TH did not act on genes regulating energy balance but could induce Raldh1. RA has the potential to upregulate expression of genes involved in growth and appetite, Ghrh and Agrp. This regulation is acutely sensitive to epigenetic changes, as has been shown for TH action in vivo. These results indicate that sequential triggering of two nuclear receptor signalling systems has the capability to mediate some of the functions of TH in the hypothalamus. GLIA 2016;64:425–439 PMID:26527258

  13. Physical activity in the prevention and amelioration of osteoporosis in women : interaction of mechanical, hormonal and dietary factors.

    PubMed

    Borer, Katarina T

    2005-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a serious health problem that diminishes quality of life and levies a financial burden on those who fear and experience bone fractures. Physical activity as a way to prevent osteoporosis is based on evidence that it can regulate bone maintenance and stimulate bone formation including the accumulation of mineral, in addition to strengthening muscles, improving balance, and thus reducing the overall risk of falls and fractures. Currently, our understanding of how to use exercise effectively in the prevention of osteoporosis is incomplete. It is uncertain whether exercise will help accumulate more overall peak bone mass during childhood, adolescence and young adulthood. Also, the consistent effectiveness of exercise to increase bone mass, or at least arrest the loss of bone mass after menopause, is also in question. Within this framework, section 1 introduces mechanical characteristics of bones to assist the reader in understanding their responses to physical activity. Section 2 reviews hormonal, nutritional and mechanical factors necessary for the growth of bones in length, width and mineral content that produce peak bone mass in the course of childhood and adolescence using a large sample of healthy Caucasian girls and female adolescents for reference. Effectiveness of exercise is evaluated throughout using absolute changes in bone with the underlying assumption that useful exercise should produce changes that approximate or exceed the absolute magnitude of bone parameters in a healthy reference population. Physical activity increases growth in width and mineral content of bones in girls and adolescent females, particularly when it is initiated before puberty, carried out in volumes and at intensities seen in athletes, and accompanied by adequate caloric and calcium intakes. Similar increases are seen in young women following the termination of statural growth in response to athletic training, but not to more limited levels of physical activity

  14. Hormone withdrawal triggers a premature and sustained gene activation from delayed secondary glucocorticoid response elements.

    PubMed

    Hess, P; Payvar, F

    1992-02-15

    Glucocorticoid regulatory elements, denoted GREs and delayed secondary GREs (sGREs), bind the purified glucocorticoid receptors via distinctive sequence motifs and confer a primary and delayed secondary hormone inducibility, respectively, upon a linked reporter construct in stably transfected mammalian cells. The delayed secondary responses, but not the primary responses, are preceded by a time lag of several hours and blocked by protein synthesis inhibitors. In this report, we further characterized and distinguished these hormonal inductions. A 206-base pair DNA fragment from the hepatic rat alpha 2u-globulin (RUG) gene, containing at least two delayed sGREs, was specifically activated by glucocorticoids in a dose-dependent manner via a process which is sensitive to receptor antagonist RU486. Delayed sGRE-stimulated production of correctly initiated transcripts was preceded by a time lag of 2 h, a time when the GRE-mediated induction had reached maximal levels. A pulse of glucocorticoids sustained maximal activation of the delayed secondary response but not the primary response. In fact, hormone withdrawal triggered a premature induction of this delayed secondary response, suggesting that delayed sGREs are under both negative and positive control of the hormone receptor. Two separable elements of the 206-base pair fragment, including the 29-base pair sequence of a single receptor binding site, activated the reporter expression as effectively with transient, pulsatile exposure to hormone as with continuous exposure. Our results suggest that the information content of a hormonal pulse is retained, or "memorized," more persistently by a receptor binding site of delayed sGREs than those of the prototypical GREs.

  15. Biochemical assays on plasminogen activators and hormones from kidney sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, Grant H.; Lewis, Marian L.; Morrison, Dennis R.

    1988-01-01

    Investigations were established for the purpose of analyzing the conditioned media from human embryonic kidney cell subpopulations separated in space by electrophoresis. This data is based on the experiments performed on STS-8 on the continuous flow electrophoresis system. The primary biological activity that was analyzed was plasminogen activator activity, but some assays for erythropoeitin and human granulocyte colony stimulating activity were also performed. It is concluded that a battery of assays are required to completely define the plasminogen activator profile of a conditioned media from cell culture. Each type of assay measures different parts of the mixture and are influenced by different parameters. The functional role of each assay is given along with an indication of which combination of assays are required to answer specific questions. With this type of information it is possible by combinations of assays with mathematical analysis to pinpoint a specific component of the system.

  16. Skipping breakfast reduces energy intake and physical activity in healthy women who are habitual breakfast eaters: A randomized crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Eiichi; Hatamoto, Yoichi; Yonekura, Satomi; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2017-03-09

    Many epidemiological studies indicate a positive relationship between skipping breakfast (SB) and obesity. However, it is unclear whether SB affects energy intake and physical activity during the day. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the acute effects of SB on energy intake and physical activity under free-living conditions. The present study used a randomized, crossover trial design comparing eating breakfast (EB) and SB days. Twenty lean, healthy women 21-25years old who were habitual breakfast eaters (≥5daysperweek) took part in this study. On EB days, participants were provided a standard breakfast (542kcal). The meals and physical activity after breakfast were under free-living conditions. The meals consisted of foods available at supermarkets, restaurants, and convenience stores. Dietary intake was evaluated by adding values from food labels. Physical activity was assessed using a tri-axial accelerometer. Energy intake at lunch was significantly increased after SB compared with EB (+131±188kcal; p=0.0057). Total energy intake per day was significantly lower after SB compared with EB (-262±428kcal, p=0.013). Physical activity energy expenditure was slightly lower after SB compared with EB (-41±75kcal in the morning, p=0.024; -56±129kcalperday, p=0.064). Step counts and time spent physically active over the whole day were not significantly different between conditions. Skipping breakfast reduced energy intake during the day and morning physical activity in healthy women who were habitual breakfast eaters. The decreased energy expenditure related to physical activity after SB did not exceed the decreased energy intake.

  17. SDR-type human hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases involved in steroid hormone activation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoqiu; Lukacik, Petra; Kavanagh, Kathryn L; Oppermann, Udo

    2007-02-01

    Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases catalyze the NAD(P)(H)-dependent oxidoreduction of hydroxyl and oxo-functions at distinct positions of steroid hormones. This reversible reaction constitutes an important pre-receptor control mechanism for nuclear receptor ligands of the androgen, estrogen and glucocorticoid classes, since the conversion "switches" between receptor ligands and their inactive metabolites. The major reversible activities found in mammals acting on steroid hormones comprise 3alpha-, 11beta- and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases, and for each group several distinct isozymes have been described. The enzymes differ in their expression pattern, nucleotide cofactor preference, steroid substrate specificity and subcellular localization, and thus constitute a complex system ensuring cell-specific adaptation and regulation of steroid hormone levels. Several isoforms constitute promising drug targets, of particular importance in cancer, metabolic diseases, neurodegeneration and immunity.

  18. Toxicity of chronic high alcohol intake on mouse natural killer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, R M; Starkey, J R; Meadows, G G

    1988-02-01

    The toxicity of chronic alcohol intake on natural killer (NK) cell activity of spleen cells from well-nourished, female C57BL/6 mice was studied in a 4-hour cytolytic chromium-release assay against YAC-1 lymphoma cells. Mice were fed a nutritionally complete crystalline amino acid diet and received 20% w/v alcohol solution for 12 weeks. Ad libitum and pair-fed control mice were given diet and either an isocaloric glucose solution or water. Decreased NK cell activity was observed in alcohol-consuming mice relative to all other control groups. NK cell activity was moderately decreased by feeding mice a high glucose diet, but more severely lowered in pair-fed groups compared to ad libitum control groups.

  19. Design and Control of a Proof-of-Concept Active Jet Engine Intake Using Shape Memory Alloy Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Gangbing; Ma, Ning; Penney, Nicholas; Barr, Todd; Lee, Ho-Jun; Arnold, Steven M.

    2004-01-01

    The design and control of a novel proof-of-concept active jet engine intake using Nickel-Titanium (Ni-Ti or Nitinol) shape memory alloy (SMA) wire actuators is used to demonstrate the potential of an adaptive intake to improve the fuel efficiency of a jet engine. The Nitinol SMA material is selected for this research due to the material's ability to generate large strains of up to 5 percent for repeated operations, a high power-to-weight ratio, electrical resistive actuation, and easy fabrication into a variety of shapes. The proof-of-concept engine intake employs an overlapping leaf design arranged in a concentric configuration. Each leaf is mounted on a supporting bar that rotates upon actuation by SMA wires electrical resistive heating. Feedback control is enabled through the use of a laser range sensor to detect the movement of a leaf and determine the radius of the intake area. Due to the hysteresis behavior inherent in SMAs, a nonlinear robust controller is used to direct the SMA wire actuation. The controller design utilizes the sliding-mode approach to compensate for the nonlinearities associated with the SMA actuator. Feedback control experiments conducted on a fabricated proof-of-concept model have demonstrated the capability to precisely control the intake area and achieve up to a 25 percent reduction in intake area. The experiments demonstrate the feasibility of engine intake area control using the proposed design.

  20. Intake of melatonin increases tryptophan hydroxylase type 1 activity in aged rats: Preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Moranta, D; Barceló, P; Aparicio, S; Garau, C; Sarubbo, F; Ramis, M; Nicolau, C; Esteban, S

    2014-01-01

    Pineal melatonin is important not only for synchronization of biological rhythms, but also in the ageing process as a potential drug to relieve oxidative damage. During ageing, the nocturnal melatonin production decreases resulting in an increased incidence of disorders. Present in vivo experiments were performed to study the effects of exogenous melatonin chronically administered to old rats on the pineal biosynthesis of melatonin and the precursor serotonin (5-HT) mediated by tryptophan hydroxylase type 1 (TPH-1). Accumulation of 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) after decarboxylase inhibition was used as a measure of the TPH-1 activity. 5-HT and its metabolite 5-HIAA were also quantified by HPLC-ED. As expected, ageing resulted in worsening of different neurochemical parameters. However, chronic intake of melatonin (1mg/kg/day, diluted in drinking water, 4 weeks) increased TPH-1 activity and significantly improved the age-induced deficits in nocturnal melatonin content in the pineal gland. Results suggest that melatonin intake (or melatonin rich foods) may contribute to recover the pineal function preventing the nocturnal descent of 5-HT and melatonin biosynthesis that normally occur in pineal gland as a consequence of ageing.

  1. Physical activity, energy requirements, and adequacy of dietary intakes of older persons in a rural Filipino community

    PubMed Central

    Risonar, Maria Grace D; Rayco-Solon, Pura; Ribaya-Mercado, Judy D; Solon, Juan Antonio A; Cabalda, Aegina B; Tengco, Lorena W; Solon, Florentino S

    2009-01-01

    Background Aging is a process associated with physiological changes such as in body composition, energy expenditure and physical activity. Data on energy and nutrient intake adequacy among elderly is important for disease prevention, health maintenance and program development. Methods This descriptive cross-sectional study was designed to determine the energy requirements and adequacy of energy and nutrient intakes of older persons living in private households in a rural Filipino community. Study participants were generally-healthy, ambulatory, and community living elderly aged 60–100 y (n = 98), 88 of whom provided dietary information in three nonconsecutive 24-hour food-recall interviews. Results There was a decrease in both physical activity and food intake with increasing years. Based on total energy expenditure and controlling for age, gender and socio-economic status, the average energy requirement for near-old (≥ 60 to < 65 y) males was 2074 kcal/d, with lower requirements, 1919 and 1699 kcal/d for the young-old (≥ 65 to < 75 y) and the old-old (≥ 75 y), respectively. Among females, the average energy requirements for the 3 age categories were 1712, 1662, and 1398 kcal/d, respectively. Actual energy intakes, however, were only ~65% adequate for all subjects as compared to energy expenditure. Protein, fat, and micronutrients (vitamins A and C, thiamin, riboflavin, iron and calcium) intakes were only ~24–51% of the recommended daily intake. Among this population, there was a weight decrease of 100 g (p = 0.012) and a BMI decrease of 0.04 kg/m2 (p = 0.003) for every 1% decrease in total caloric intake as percentage of the total energy expenditure requirements. Conclusion These community living elderly suffer from lack of both macronutrient intake as compared with energy requirements, and micronutrient intake as compared with the standard dietary recommendations. Their energy intakes are ~65% of the amounts required based on their total energy

  2. In Vitro, Ex Vivo, and In Vivo Determination of Thyroid Hormone Modulating Activity of Benzothiazoles.

    PubMed

    Hornung, Michael W; Kosian, Patricia A; Haselman, Jonathan T; Korte, Joseph J; Challis, Katie; Macherla, Chitralekha; Nevalainen, Erica; Degitz, Sigmund J

    2015-08-01

    As in vitro assays are increasingly used to screen chemicals for their potential to produce endocrine disrupting adverse effects, it is important to understand their predictive capacity. The potential for a set of 6 benzothiazoles to affect endpoints related to thyroid hormone synthesis inhibition were assessed using in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo assays. Inhibition of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) derived from pig thyroid glands was determined for benzothiazole (BTZ), 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT), 5-chloro-2-mercaptobenzothiazole (CMBT), 2-aminobenzothiazole (ABT), 2-hydroxybenzothiazole (HBT), and 2-methylthiobenzothiazole (MTBT). Their rank order potency for TPO inhibition was MBT=CMBT>ABT>BTZ, whereas HBT and MTBT exhibited no inhibitory activity. The benzothiazoles were tested further in a Xenopus laevis thyroid gland explant culture assay in which inhibition of thyroxine (T4) release was the measured endpoint. In this assay all 6 benzothiazoles inhibited T4 release. The activity of the benzothiazoles for disrupting thyroid hormone activity was verified in vivo using X. laevis tadpoles in a 7-day assay. The 2 most potent chemicals for TPO inhibition, MBT and CMBT, produced responses in vivo indicative of T4 synthesis inhibition including induction of sodium iodide symporter mRNA and decreases in glandular and circulating thyroid hormones. The capability to measure thyroid hormone levels in the glands and blood by ultrahigh performance LC-MS/MS methods optimized for small tissue samples was critical for effects interpretation. These results indicate that inhibition of TPO activity in vitro was a good indicator of a chemical's potential for thyroid hormone disruption in vivo and may be useful for prioritizing chemicals for further investigation.

  3. Acute Ethanol Intake Induces NAD(P)H Oxidase Activation and Rhoa Translocation in Resistance Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Simplicio, Janaina A.; Hipólito, Ulisses Vilela; do Vale, Gabriel Tavares; Callera, Glaucia Elena; Pereira, Camila André; Touyz, Rhian M; Tostes, Rita de Cássia; Tirapelli, Carlos R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The mechanism underlying the vascular dysfunction induced by ethanol is not totally understood. Identification of biochemical/molecular mechanisms that could explain such effects is warranted. Objective To investigate whether acute ethanol intake activates the vascular RhoA/Rho kinase pathway in resistance arteries and the role of NAD(P)H oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) on such response. We also evaluated the requirement of p47phox translocation for ethanol-induced NAD(P)H oxidase activation. Methods Male Wistar rats were orally treated with ethanol (1g/kg, p.o. gavage) or water (control). Some rats were treated with vitamin C (250 mg/kg, p.o. gavage, 5 days) before administration of water or ethanol. The mesenteric arterial bed (MAB) was collected 30 min after ethanol administration. Results Vitamin C prevented ethanol-induced increase in superoxide anion (O2-) generation and lipoperoxidation in the MAB. Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities and the reduced glutathione, nitrate and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels were not affected by ethanol. Vitamin C and 4-methylpyrazole prevented the increase on O2- generation induced by ethanol in cultured MAB vascular smooth muscle cells. Ethanol had no effect on phosphorylation levels of protein kinase B (Akt) and eNOS (Ser1177 or Thr495 residues) or MAB vascular reactivity. Vitamin C prevented ethanol-induced increase in the membrane: cytosol fraction ratio of p47phox and RhoA expression in the rat MAB. Conclusion Acute ethanol intake induces activation of the RhoA/Rho kinase pathway by a mechanism that involves ROS generation. In resistance arteries, ethanol activates NAD(P)H oxidase by inducing p47phox translocation by a redox-sensitive mechanism. PMID:27812679

  4. Developmental programming of energy balance regulation: is physical activity more 'programmable' than food intake?

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shaoyu; Eclarinal, Jesse; Baker, Maria S; Li, Ge; Waterland, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    Extensive human and animal model data show that environmental influences during critical periods of prenatal and early postnatal development can cause persistent alterations in energy balance regulation. Although a potentially important factor in the worldwide obesity epidemic, the fundamental mechanisms underlying such developmental programming of energy balance are poorly understood, limiting our ability to intervene. Most studies of developmental programming of energy balance have focused on persistent alterations in the regulation of energy intake; energy expenditure has been relatively underemphasised. In particular, very few studies have evaluated developmental programming of physical activity. The aim of this review is to summarise recent evidence that early environment may have a profound impact on establishment of individual propensity for physical activity. Recently, we characterised two different mouse models of developmental programming of obesity; one models fetal growth restriction followed by catch-up growth, and the other models early postnatal overnutrition. In both studies, we observed alterations in body-weight regulation that persisted to adulthood, but no group differences in food intake. Rather, in both cases, programming of energy balance appeared to be due to persistent alterations in energy expenditure and spontaneous physical activity (SPA). These effects were stronger in female offspring. We are currently exploring the hypothesis that developmental programming of SPA occurs via induced sex-specific alterations in epigenetic regulation in the hypothalamus and other regions of the central nervous system. We will summarise the current progress towards testing this hypothesis. Early environmental influences on establishment of physical activity are likely an important factor in developmental programming of energy balance. Understanding the fundamental underlying mechanisms in appropriate animal models will help determine whether early life

  5. Acute injection of ASP in the third ventricle inhibits food intake and locomotor activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Roy, Christian; Roy, Marie-Claude; Gauvreau, Danny; Poulin, Anne-Marie; Tom, Fun-Qun; Timofeeva, Elena; Richard, Denis; Cianflone, Katherine

    2011-07-01

    Acylation-stimulating protein (ASP; also known as C3adesArg) stimulates triglyceride synthesis and glucose transport via interaction with its receptor C5L2, which is expressed peripherally (adipose tissue, muscle) and centrally. Previous studies have shown that ASP-deficient mice (C3KO) and C5L2-deficient mice (C5L2KO) are hyperphagic (59 to 229% increase, P < 0.0001), which is counterbalanced by increased energy expenditure measured as oxygen consumption (Vo(2)) and a lower RQ. The aim of the present study was to evaluate ASP's effect on food intake, energy expenditure, and neuropeptide expression. Male rats were surgically implanted with intracerebroventricular (icv) cannulas directed toward the third ventricle. After a 5-h fast, rats were injected, and food intake was assessed at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 16, 24, and 48 h, with a 5- to 7-day washout period between each injection. Acute icv injections of ASP (0.3-1,065 pmol) had a time-dependent effect on decreasing food intake by 20 to 57% (P < 0.05). Decreases were detected by 30 min (maximum 57%, P < 0.01) and at the highest dose effects extended to 48 h (19%, P < 0.05, 24- to 48-h period). Daily body weight gain was decreased by 131% over the first 24 h and 29% over the second 24 h (P < 0.05). A conditioned taste aversion test indicated that there was no malaise. Furthermore, acute ASP injection affected energy substrate usage, demonstrated by decreased Vo(2) and RQ (P < 0.05; implicating greater fatty acid usage), with a 49% decrease in total activity over 24 h (P < 0.05). ASP administration also increased anorexic neuropeptide POMC expression (44%) in the arcuate nucleus, with no change in NPY. Altogether ASP may have central in addition to peripheral effects.

  6. Removal of olfactory bulbs in chickens: consequent changes in food intake and thyroid activity.

    PubMed

    Robinzon, B; Snapir, N; Perek, M

    1977-01-01

    Surgical removal of the olfactory bulbs (O.B) in the chicken caused a marked increase in food intake, which was not accompanied by development of obestiy. Oxygen consumption of the O.B. removed birds was significantly higher than that of the controls. Alcianophylic-thyrotropic cell population of the adenohypophysis and the percentage of active follicles in the thyroid gland were higher for the O.B. removed birds than for those of the controls. Feed supplementation of 0.1% propylthiouracil to the O.B removed birds abolished the previously exhibited hyperphagia and caused a significant decline in oxygen consumption. The possibility that the O.B removal caused a primary increase in thyrotropic axis activity follwoed by a secondary compensatory hyperphagia, is discussed.

  7. Changes in sleep, food intake, and activity levels during acute painful episodes in children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Eufemia; Miaskowski, Christine; Savedra, Marilyn; Beyer, Judith E; Treadwell, Marsha; Styles, Lori

    2006-02-01

    As part of a larger study that examined pain experience, pain management, and pain outcomes among children with sickle cell disease, functional status (sleep, food intake, and activity levels) was examined during hospitalization for acute painful episodes. Children were asked to rate the amount of pain they experienced as well as the amount of time they slept, the amount of food they ate, and the amount of activity they had everyday. Children reported high levels of pain, which showed only a small decrease throughout hospitalization, and had disrupted sleep and wake patterns, decreased food intake, and decreased activity levels. Nurses need to routinely monitor functional status during acute painful episodes so that strategies to promote adequate sleep, food intake, and activity may be incorporated to minimize long-term negative outcomes in children with sickle cell disease.

  8. Factors Associated with Low Water Intake among US High School Students—National Youth Physical Activity and Nutrition Study, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sohyun; Blanck, Heidi M.; Sherry, Bettylou; Brener, Nancy; O’Toole, Terrence

    2015-01-01

    Drinking plain water instead of sugar-sweetened beverages is one approach for reducing energy intake. Only a few studies have examined characteristics associated with plain water intake among US youth. The purpose of our cross-sectional study was to examine associations of demographic characteristics, weight status, dietary habits, and other behavior-related factors with plain water intake among a nationally representative sample of US high school students. The 2010 National Youth Physical Activity and Nutrition Study data for 11,049 students in grades 9 through 12 were used. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to calculate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs for variables associated with low water intake (<3 times/day). Nationwide, 54% of high school students reported drinking water <3 times/day. Variables significantly associated with a greater odds for low water intake were age ≤15 years (OR 1.1), consuming <2 glasses/day of milk (OR 1.5), nondiet soda ≥1 time/day (OR 1.6), other sugar-sweetened beverages ≥1 time/day (OR 1.4), fruits and 100% fruit juice <2 times/day (OR 1.7), vegetables <3 times/day (OR 2.3), eating at fast-food restaurants 1 to 2 days/week and ≥3 days/week (OR 1.3 and OR 1.4, respectively), and being physically active ≥60 minutes/ day on <5 days/week (OR 1.6). Being obese was significantly associated with reduced odds for low water intake (OR 0.7). The findings of these significant associations of low water intake with poor diet quality, frequent fast-food restaurant use, and physical inactivity may be used to tailor intervention efforts to increase plain water intake as a substitute for sugar-sweetened beverages and to promote healthy lifestyles. PMID:22749261

  9. Locomotor activity and body temperature in selected mouse lines differing greatly in feed intake.

    PubMed

    Sojka, P A; Griess, R S; Nielsen, M K

    2013-08-01

    Locomotor activity, body temperature, feed intake, and BW were measured on 382 mature male mice sampled from lines previously selected (25 generations) for either high (MH) or low (ML) heat loss and an unselected control (MC). Animals were from all 3 independent replicates of the 3 lines and across 4 generations (68 through 71). Locomotor activity and body temperatures were obtained using implanted transmitters with data collection over 4 d following a 3-d postsurgery recovery period. Data were collected every minute and then averaged into 30-min periods, thus providing 192 data points for each mouse. Least-squares means for feed intake adjusted for BW (Feed/BW, feed·BW(-1)·d(-1), g/g) were 0.1586, 0.1234, and 0.1125 (±0.0022) for MH, MC, and ML, respectively, with line being a highly significant source of variation (P < 0.0003). Line effects for locomotor activity counts, transformed to the 0.25 power for analysis, were significantly different, with MH mice being 2.1 times more active than ML mice (P < 0.003); MC mice were intermediate. Differences in body temperature were significant for both line (P < 0.03) and day effects (P < 0.001), with a 0.32°C difference between the MH and ML lines. Fourier series analysis used the combined significant periodicities of 24, 18, 12, 9, 6, and 3 h to describe circadian cycles for activity and body temperature. All 3 lines expressed daily peaks in body temperature and locomotor activity ∼3 h into darkness and ∼2 h after lights were turned on. There was a stronger relationship between locomotor activity and Feed/BW (P < 0.0001) than between body temperature and Feed/BW (P < 0.01); differences between lines in locomotor activity and body temperature explained 17% and 3%, respectively, of differences between lines in Feed/BW. Thus, line differences in locomotor activity contribute to line differences in maintenance, but approximately 80% of the differences between the MH and ML selection lines in Feed/BW remains

  10. Allosteric receptor activation by the plant peptide hormone phytosulfokine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jizong; Li, Hongju; Han, Zhifu; Zhang, Heqiao; Wang, Tong; Lin, Guangzhong; Chang, Junbiao; Yang, Weicai; Chai, Jijie

    2015-09-10

    Phytosulfokine (PSK) is a disulfated pentapeptide that has a ubiquitous role in plant growth and development. PSK is perceived by its receptor PSKR, a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase (LRR-RK). The mechanisms underlying the recognition of PSK, the activation of PSKR and the identity of the components downstream of the initial binding remain elusive. Here we report the crystal structures of the extracellular LRR domain of PSKR in free, PSK- and co-receptor-bound forms. The structures reveal that PSK interacts mainly with a β-strand from the island domain of PSKR, forming an anti-β-sheet. The two sulfate moieties of PSK interact directly with PSKR, sensitizing PSKR recognition of PSK. Supported by biochemical, structural and genetic evidence, PSK binding enhances PSKR heterodimerization with the somatic embryogenesis receptor-like kinases (SERKs). However, PSK is not directly involved in PSKR-SERK interaction but stabilizes PSKR island domain for recruitment of a SERK. Our data reveal the structural basis for PSKR recognition of PSK and allosteric activation of PSKR by PSK, opening up new avenues for the design of PSKR-specific small molecules.

  11. Activity-dependent modulation of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone neurone activity by acute oestradiol.

    PubMed

    Romanò, Nicola; Herbison, Allan E

    2012-10-01

    Oestradiol (E₂) exerts potent feedback actions upon gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurones and part of this feedback action may occur through the rapid action of E₂. Using a transgenic GnRH-Pericam mouse line that allows real-time intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca²⁺](i)) to be monitored in adult GnRH neurones in a brain slice preparation, we examined the acute effects of 100 pM-100 nM E₂ on [Ca²⁺](i) transients in spontaneously active GnRH neurones. Approximately 30% of GnRH neurones exhibit spontaneous [Ca²⁺](i) transients at a frequency greater than two transients/15 min in adult female mice. In these cells, treatment with an incremental 1, 10, 100 nM E₂ protocol or 100 pM E₂ alone resulted in the suppression or complete cessation of [Ca²⁺](i) transients in 15 of 18 (83%) GnRH neurones. This effect was mimicked by E₂ bound to albumin, suggesting a membrane site of action, and was maintained in oestrogen receptor β knockout mice, indicating that this receptor is not essential for the rapid suppression of [Ca²⁺](i) transients. These findings contrast with those GnRH neurones exhibiting very few or no [Ca²⁺](i) transients (< 2 transients/15 min) that exhibit the opposite response of being activated by acute E₂. A series of dual calcium-cell-attached electrical recordings showed that [Ca²⁺](i) transients were associated with GnRH neurone burst firing and that E₂ suppression or activation of [Ca²⁺](i) transients was mirrored by a depression or initiation of burst firing. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that the acute actions of E₂ on GnRH neurones are critically dependent upon their pattern of burst firing.

  12. Variability in HOMA-IR, Lipoprotein Profile and Selected Hormones in Young Active Men

    PubMed Central

    Lutoslawska, Grazyna; Czajkowska, Anna; Tkaczyk, Joanna; Mazurek, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to insulin actions is contributing to many metabolic disturbances. Such factors as age, sex, nutrition, body fat, and physical activity determine body insulin resistance. Present study attempted to asses insulin resistance and its metabolic effects with respect to energy intake in young, lean, and active men. A total of 87 men aged 18–23 participated in the study. Plasma levels of glucose, insulin, lipoproteins, cortisol, and TSH were determined. Insulin resistance was expressed as Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) and calculated using homeostatic model. The median value of HOMA-IR (1.344) was used to divide subjects into two groups. Men did not differ in anthropometric parameters, daily physical activity, and plasma TSH and cortisol levels. However, in men with higher HOMA-IR significantly lower daily energy intake was observed concomitantly with higher TG, TC, and HDL-C concentrations in plasma versus their counterparts with lower HOMA-IR. Exclusively in subjects with higher HOMA-IR significant and positive correlation was noted between HOMA-IR and TC and LDL-C. We concluded that despite a normal body weight and physical activity, a subset of young men displayed unfavorable changes in insulin sensitivity and lipid profile, probably due to insufficient energy intake. PMID:24348155

  13. Stress and Sucrose Intake Modulate Neuronal Activity in the Anterior Hypothalamic Area in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Arojit; Guèvremont, Geneviève; Timofeeva, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The anterior hypothalamic area (AHA) is an important integrative relay structure for a variety of autonomic, endocrine, and behavioral responses including feeding behavior and response to stress. However, changes in the activity of the AHA neurons during stress and feeding in freely moving rats are not clear. The present study investigated the firing rate and burst activity of neurons in the central nucleus of the AHA (cAHA) during sucrose intake in non-stressful conditions and after acute stress in freely behaving rats. Rats were implanted with micro-electrodes into the cAHA, and extracellular multi-unit activity was recorded during 1-h access to 10% sucrose in non-stressful conditions or after acute foot shock stress. Acute stress significantly reduced sucrose intake, total sucrose lick number, and lick frequency in licking clusters, and increased inter-lick intervals. At the cluster start (CS) of sucrose licking, the cAHA neurons increased (CS-excited, 20% of the recorded neurons), decreased (CS-inhibited, 42% of the neurons) or did not change (CS-nonresponsive, 38% of the neurons) their firing rate. Stress resulted in a significant increase in the firing rate of the CS-inhibited neurons by decreasing inter-spike intervals within the burst firing of these neurons. This increase in the stress-induced firing rate of the CS-inhibited neurons was accompanied by a disruption of the correlation between the firing rate of CS-inhibited and CS-nonresponsive neurons that was observed in non-stressful conditions. Stress did not affect the firing rate of the CS-excited and CS-nonresponsive neurons. However, stress changed the pattern of burst firing of the CS-excited and CS-nonresponsive neurons by decreasing and increasing the burst number in the CS-excited and CS-nonresponsive neurons, respectively. These results suggest that the cAHA neurons integrate the signals related to stress and intake of palatable food and play a role in the stress- and eating-related circuitry

  14. Predicting physical activity and fruit and vegetable intake in adolescents: a test of the information, motivation, behavioral skills model.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Stephanie; Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek; Belyea, Michael

    2012-04-01

    Most adolescents do not meet national recommendations regarding physical activity and/or the intake of fruits and vegetables. The purpose of this study was to explore whether variables in the information, motivation, behavioral skills (IMB) model of health promotion predicted physical activity and fruit and vegetable intake in 404 adolescents from 2 high schools in the Southwest United States using structural equation modeling (SEM). The SEM models included theoretical constructs, contextual variables, and moderators. The theoretical relationships in the IMB model were confirmed and were moderated by gender and race. Interventions that incorporate cognitive-behavioral skills building may be a key factor for promoting physical activity as well as fruit and vegetable intake in adolescents.

  15. HPA-axis hormone modulation of stress response circuitry activity in women with remitted major depression.

    PubMed

    Holsen, L M; Lancaster, K; Klibanski, A; Whitfield-Gabrieli, S; Cherkerzian, S; Buka, S; Goldstein, J M

    2013-10-10

    Decades of clinical and basic research indicate significant links between altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis hormone dynamics and major depressive disorder (MDD). Recent neuroimaging studies of MDD highlight abnormalities in stress response circuitry regions which play a role in the regulation of the HPA-axes. However, there is a dearth of research examining these systems in parallel, especially as related to potential trait characteristics. The current study addresses this gap by investigating neural responses to a mild visual stress challenge with real-time assessment of adrenal hormones in women with MDD in remission and controls. Fifteen women with recurrent MDD in remission (rMDD) and 15 healthy control women were scanned on a 3T Siemens MR scanner while viewing neutral and negative (stress-evoking) stimuli. Blood samples were obtained before, during, and after scanning for the measurement of HPA-axis hormone levels. Compared to controls, rMDD women demonstrated higher anxiety ratings, increased cortisol levels, and hyperactivation in the amygdala and hippocampus, p<0.05, family-wise error (FWE)-corrected in response to the stress challenge. Among rMDD women, amygdala activation was negatively related to cortisol changes and positively associated with the duration of remission. Findings presented here provide evidence for differential effects of altered HPA-axis hormone dynamics on hyperactivity in stress response circuitry regions elicited by a well-validated stress paradigm in women with recurrent MDD in remission.

  16. Identification of SRC3/AIB1 as a Preferred Coactivator for Hormone-activated Androgen Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X. Edward; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Li, Jun; He, Yuanzheng; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P.; Melcher, Karsten; Yong, Eu-Leong; Xu, H.Eric

    2010-09-17

    Transcription activation by androgen receptor (AR), which depends on recruitment of coactivators, is required for the initiation and progression of prostate cancer, yet the mechanisms of how hormone-activated AR interacts with coactivators remain unclear. This is because AR, unlike any other nuclear receptor, prefers its own N-terminal FXXLF motif to the canonical LXXLL motifs of coactivators. Through biochemical and crystallographic studies, we identify that steroid receptor coactivator-3 (SRC3) (also named as amplified in breast cancer-1 or AIB1) interacts strongly with AR via synergistic binding of its first and third LXXLL motifs. Mutagenesis and functional studies confirm that SRC3 is a preferred coactivator for hormone-activated AR. Importantly, AR mutations found in prostate cancer patients correlate with their binding potency to SRC3, corroborating with the emerging role of SRC3 as a prostate cancer oncogene. These results provide a molecular mechanism for the selective utilization of SRC3 by hormone-activated AR, and they link the functional relationship between AR and SRC3 to the development and growth of prostate cancer.

  17. Comprehensive assessment of hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity in an anaerobic swine waste lagoon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yost, Erin E.; Meyer, Michael T.; Dietze, Julie E.; Meissner, Benjamin M.; Williams, Mike; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the distribution of steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity was thoroughly characterized within the anaerobic waste lagoon of a typical commercial swine sow operation. Three independent rounds of sampling were conducted in June 2009, April 2010, and February 2011. Thirty-seven analytes in lagoon slurry and sludge were assessed using LC/MS-MS, and yeast estrogen screen was used to determine estrogenic activity. Of the hormone analytes, steroidal estrogens were more abundant than androgens or progesterone, with estrone being the predominant estrogen species. Conjugated hormones were detected only at low levels. The isoflavone metabolite equol was by far the predominant phytoestrogen species, with daidzein, genistein, formononetin, and coumestrol present at lower levels. Phytoestrogens were often more abundant than steroidal estrogens, but contributed minimally towards total estrogenic activity. Analytes were significantly elevated in the solid phases of the lagoon; although low observed log KOC values suggest enhanced solubility in the aqueous phase, perhaps due to dissolved or colloidal organic carbon. The association with the solid phase, as well as recalcitrance of analytes to anaerobic degradation, results in a markedly elevated load of analytes and estrogenic activity within lagoon sludge. Overall, findings emphasize the importance of adsorption and transformation processes in governing the fate of these compounds in lagoon waste, which is ultimately used for broadcast application as a fertilizer.

  18. Comprehensive Assessment of Hormones, Phytoestrogens, and Estrogenic Activity in an Anaerobic Swine Waste Lagoon

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the distribution of steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity was thoroughly characterized within the anaerobic waste lagoon of a typical commercial swine sow operation. Three independent rounds of sampling were conducted in June 2009, April 2010, and February 2011. Thirty-seven analytes in lagoon slurry and sludge were assessed using LC/MS-MS, and yeast estrogen screen was used to determine estrogenic activity. Of the hormone analytes, steroidal estrogens were more abundant than androgens or progesterone, with estrone being the predominant estrogen species. Conjugated hormones were detected only at low levels. The isoflavone metabolite equol was by far the predominant phytoestrogen species, with daidzein, genistein, formononetin, and coumestrol present at lower levels. Phytoestrogens were often more abundant than steroidal estrogens, but contributed minimally toward total estrogenic activity. Analytes were significantly elevated in the solid phases of the lagoon; although low observed log KOC values suggest enhanced solubility in the aqueous phase, perhaps due to dissolved or colloidal organic carbon. The association with the solid phase, as well as recalcitrance of analytes to anaerobic degradation, results in a markedly elevated load of analytes and estrogenic activity within lagoon sludge. Overall, findings emphasize the importance of adsorption and transformation processes in governing the fate of these compounds in lagoon waste, which is ultimately used for broadcast application as a fertilizer. PMID:24144340

  19. Lactose synthetase activity in mouse mammary glands is controlled by thyroid hormones

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Epithelial cells in explants from the mammary glands of euthyroid mature virgin mice are proliferatively dormant. They must undergo DNA synthesis and traverse the cell cycle in vitro before they are able to differentiate fully in response to insulin, hydrocortisone, and prolactin, and synthesize enzymatically active alpha-lactalbumin (measured as lactose synthetase activity). In contrast, glands from hyperthyroid mature virgin mice do not require DNA synthesis in vitro to differentiate. Explants from the euthyroid virgin tissue overcome their dependence on DNA synthesis when 10(-9) M 3,5,3'-triiodo-L- thyronine is added directly to the cultures in addition to the other three hormones. Explants from involuted mammary glands from euthyroid primiparous mice do not require DNA synthesis in vitro to make the milk protein even though they, like explants from mature euthyroid virgin tissue, are proliferatively dormant and do not contain detectable lactose synthetase activity in vivo. Glands from primiparous animals made mildly hypothyroid by ingestion of 0.1% thiouracil in drinking water during 7 wk of involution remain morphologically indistinguishable from glands of their euthyroid counterparts. However, explants from the glands of these hypothyroid animals revert to a state of dependence on DNA synthesis to differentiate functionally. These observations suggest that the dependence on DNA synthesis and cell cycle traversal for hormonal induction of lactose synthetase activity in the mouse mammary gland is controlled by thyroid hormones. PMID:117014

  20. Comprehensive assessment of hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity in an anaerobic swine waste lagoon.

    PubMed

    Yost, Erin E; Meyer, Michael T; Dietze, Julie E; Meissner, Benjamin M; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Williams, C Michael; Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W

    2013-12-03

    In this study, the distribution of steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity was thoroughly characterized within the anaerobic waste lagoon of a typical commercial swine sow operation. Three independent rounds of sampling were conducted in June 2009, April 2010, and February 2011. Thirty-seven analytes in lagoon slurry and sludge were assessed using LC/MS-MS, and yeast estrogen screen was used to determine estrogenic activity. Of the hormone analytes, steroidal estrogens were more abundant than androgens or progesterone, with estrone being the predominant estrogen species. Conjugated hormones were detected only at low levels. The isoflavone metabolite equol was by far the predominant phytoestrogen species, with daidzein, genistein, formononetin, and coumestrol present at lower levels. Phytoestrogens were often more abundant than steroidal estrogens, but contributed minimally toward total estrogenic activity. Analytes were significantly elevated in the solid phases of the lagoon; although low observed log KOC values suggest enhanced solubility in the aqueous phase, perhaps due to dissolved or colloidal organic carbon. The association with the solid phase, as well as recalcitrance of analytes to anaerobic degradation, results in a markedly elevated load of analytes and estrogenic activity within lagoon sludge. Overall, findings emphasize the importance of adsorption and transformation processes in governing the fate of these compounds in lagoon waste, which is ultimately used for broadcast application as a fertilizer.

  1. Increased resting energy expenditure, fat oxidation, and food intake in patients with highly active antiretroviral therapy-associated lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sutinen, Jussi; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele

    2007-03-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is associated with metabolic adverse events such as lipodystrophy in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of HAART-associated lipodystrophy on resting energy expenditure and caloric intake. In this cross-sectional study we compared resting energy expenditure (REE) and energy intake in 30 HAART-treated patients with lipodystrophy (HAART+LD+) with 13 HAART-treated patients without lipodystrophy (HAART+LD-). REE was measured using indirect calorimetry, and energy intake was recorded as a 3-day diary of food intake. REE (5,180+/-160 vs. 4,260+/-150 J/min, P<0.01) and also REE expressed per fat-free mass (86+/-1 vs. 78+/-2 J.kg fat-free mass-1.min-1, P<0.01) were significantly higher in the HAART+LD+ than the HAART+LD- group. Rate of lipid oxidation was significantly higher in the HAART+LD+ than the HAART+LD- group. Total energy and fat intakes were significantly increased in the HAART+LD+ compared with the HAART+LD- group. These results imply that HAART-associated lipodystrophy is associated with increased REE and lipid oxidation and with increased caloric and fat intake.

  2. Feeding Behaviour, Swimming Activity and Boldness Explain Variation in Feed Intake and Growth of Sole (Solea solea) Reared in Captivity

    PubMed Central

    Mas-Muñoz, Julia; Komen, Hans; Schneider, Oliver; Visch, Sander W.; Schrama, Johan W.

    2011-01-01

    The major economic constraint for culturing sole (Solea solea) is its slow and variable growth. The objective was to study the relationship between feed intake/efficiency, growth, and (non-) feeding behaviour of sole. Sixteen juveniles with an average (SD) growth of 2.7 (1.9) g/kg0.8/d were selected on their growth during a 4-week period in which they were housed communally with 84 other fish. Selected fish were housed individually during a second 4-week period to measure individual feed intake, growth, and behaviour. Fish were hand-fed three times a day during the dark phase of the day until apparent satiation. During six different days, behaviour was recorded twice daily during 3 minutes by direct observations. Total swimming activity, frequency of burying and of escapes were recorded. At the beginning and end of the growth period, two sequential behavioural tests were performed: “Novel Environment” and “Light Avoidance”. Fish housed individually still exhibited pronounced variation in feed intake (CV = 23%), growth (CV = 25%) and behavior (CV = 100%). Differences in feed intake account for 79% of the observed individual differences in growth of sole. Fish with higher variation in feed intake between days and between meals within days had significantly a lower total feed intake (r = −0.65 and r = −0.77) and growth. Active fish showed significantly higher feed intake (r = 0.66) and growth (r = 0.58). Boldness during both challenge tests was related to fast growth: (1) fish which reacted with a lower latency time to swim in a novel environment had significantly higher feed intake (r = −0.55) and growth (r = −0.66); (2) fish escaping during the light avoidance test tended to show higher feed intake (P<0.1) and had higher growth (P<0.05). In conclusion, feeding consistency, swimming activity in the tank, and boldness during behavioral tests are related to feed intake and growth of sole in captivity. PMID:21738651

  3. Platelet monoamine oxidase activity predicts alcohol sensitivity and voluntary alcohol intake in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wargelius, Hanna-Linn; Fahlke, Claudia; Suomi, Stephen J; Oreland, Lars; Higley, James Dee

    2010-02-01

    Platelet monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) has been proposed to be a biological marker for the properties of monoamine systems, with low activity being associated with vulnerability for high scores on personality traits such as sensation seeking, monotony avoidance, and impulsiveness, as well as for vulnerability for alcoholism. In the present study, platelet MAO-B activity was analysed in 78 rhesus macaques, and its relation to voluntary alcohol intake and behaviours after intravenous alcohol administration was observed. Monkeys with low platelet MAO-B activity had low levels of 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid in cerebrospinal fluid and showed excessive aggression after alcohol administration. A novel finding was that animals with low platelet MAO-B activity showed less intoxication following alcohol administration. As we have shown previously, they also voluntarily consumed more alcohol. We here replicate results from studies on both humans and non-human primates, showing the utility of platelet MAO as a marker for risk behaviours and alcohol abuse. Furthermore, we link platelet MAO activity to alcohol sensitivity.

  4. Activity of D1/2 Receptor Expressing Neurons in the Nucleus Accumbens Regulates Running, Locomotion, and Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xianglong; Ottenheimer, David; DiLeone, Ralph J.

    2016-01-01

    While weight gain is clearly promoted by excessive energy intake and reduced expenditure, the underlying neural mechanisms of energy balance remain unclear. The nucleus accumbens (NAc) is one brain region that has received attention for its role in the regulation of energy balance; its D1 and D2 receptor containing neurons have distinct functions in regulating reward behavior and require further examination. The goal of the present study is to investigate how activation and inhibition of D1 and D2 neurons in the NAc influences behaviors related to energy intake and expenditure. Specific manipulation of D1 vs. D2 neurons was done in both low expenditure and high expenditure (wheel running) conditions to assess behavioral effects in these different states. Direct control of neural activity was achieved using a designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADD) strategy. Activation of NAc D1 neurons increased food intake, wheel running and locomotor activity. In contrast, activation of D2 neurons in the NAc reduced running and locomotion while D2 neuron inhibition had opposite effects. These results highlight the importance of considering both intake and expenditure in the analysis of D1 and D2 neuronal manipulations. Moreover, the behavioral outcomes from NAc D1 neuronal manipulations depend upon the activity state of the animals (wheel running vs. non-running). The data support and complement the hypothesis of specific NAc dopamine pathways facilitating energy expenditure and suggest a potential strategy for human weight control. PMID:27147989

  5. Calorie restriction minimizes activation of insulin signaling in response to glucose: potential involvement of the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor 1 axis.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hiroko; Yamaza, Haruyoshi; Komatsu, Toshimitsu; Park, Seongjoon; Chiba, Takuya; Higami, Yoshikazu; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Shimokawa, Isao

    2008-09-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) may modulate insulin signaling in response to energy intake through suppression of the growth hormone (GH)-IGF-1 axis. We investigated the glucose-stimulated serum insulin response and subsequent alterations in insulin receptor (IR), Akt, and FoxO1 in the rat liver and quadriceps femoris muscle (QFM). Nine-month-old wild-type (W) male Wistar rats fed ad libitum (AL) or a 30% CR diet initiated at 6 weeks of age and GH-suppressed transgenic (Tg) rats fed AL were killed 15 min after intraperitoneal injection of glucose or saline. In W-AL rats, the serum insulin concentration was elevated by glucose injection. Concomitantly, the phosphorylated (p)-IR and p-Akt levels were increased in both tissues. The active FoxO1 level was decreased in the liver, but not significantly in the QFM. In W-CR and Tg-AL rats, the serum insulin response was lower, and no significant changes were noted for the p-IR, p-Akt, or active FoxO1 levels in the liver. In the QFM, the p-Akt level was increased in W-CR and Tg-AL rats with an insignificant elevation of p-IR levels. The phenotypic similarity of W-CR and Tg-AL rats suggest that CR minimizes activation of insulin signaling in response to energy intake mostly through the GH-IGF-1 axis.

  6. Modulation of the hormone setting by Rhodococcus fascians results in ectopic KNOX activation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Depuydt, Stephen; Dolezal, Karel; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke; Moritz, Thomas; Holsters, Marcelle; Vereecke, Danny

    2008-03-01

    The biotrophic actinomycete Rhodococcus fascians has a profound impact on plant development and a common aspect of the symptomatology is the deformation of infected leaves. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the serrated leaf margins formed upon infection resemble the leaf phenotype of transgenic plants with ectopic expression of KNOTTED-like homeobox (KNOX) genes. Through transcript profiling, we demonstrate that class-I KNOX genes are transcribed in symptomatic leaves. Functional analysis revealed that BREVIPEDICELLUS/KNOTTED-LIKE1 and mainly SHOOT MERISTEMLESS were essential for the observed leaf dissection. However, these results also positioned the KNOX genes downstream in the signaling cascade triggered by R. fascians infection. The much faster activation of ARABIDOPSIS RESPONSE REGULATOR5 and the establishment of homeostatic and feedback mechanisms to control cytokinin (CK) levels support the overrepresentation of this hormone in infected plants due to the secretion by the pathogen, thereby placing the CK response high up in the cascade. Hormone measurements show a net decrease of tested CKs, indicating either that secretion by the bacterium and degradation by the plant are in balance, or, as suggested by the strong reaction of 35S:CKX plants, that other CKs are at play. At early time points of the interaction, activation of gibberellin 2-oxidase presumably installs a local hormonal setting favorable for meristematic activity that provokes leaf serrations. The results are discussed in the context of symptom development, evasion of plant defense, and the establishment of a specific niche by R. fascians.

  7. Chronic ethanol intake modifies renin-angiotensin system-regulating aminopeptidase activities in mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Mayas, M D; Ramírez-Expósito, M J; García, M J; Carrera, M P; Cobo, M; Camacho, B; Martínez Martos, J M

    2005-04-01

    In developing cerebellum, where critical periods of vulnerability have been established for several basic substances, it has been extensively studied the wide array of abnormalities induced by exposure to ethanol (EtOH). However, little is known about the effects of EtOH consumption on cerebellar functions in adult individuals. Several studies show participation in cognitive activities to be concentrated in the lateral cerebellum (hemispheres), whereas basic motor functions such as balance and coordination are represented in the medial parts of the cerebellum (vermis and paravermis). In addition to the circulating renin angiotensin system (RAS), a local system has been postulated in brain. The effector peptides of the RAS are formed via the activity of several aminopeptidases (AP). The present work analyses the effect of chronic EtOH intake on the RAS-regulating AP activities in the soluble and membrane-bound fractions of two cerebellar locations: the hemispheres and the vermis. We hypothesize that cerebellar RAS is involved in basic motor functions rather than in cognitive activities.

  8. Passive and active roles of fat-free mass in the control of energy intake and body composition regulation.

    PubMed

    Dulloo, A G; Jacquet, J; Miles-Chan, J L; Schutz, Y

    2017-03-01

    While putative feedback signals arising from adipose tissue are commonly assumed to provide the molecular links between the body's long-term energy requirements and energy intake, the available evidence suggests that the lean body or fat-free mass (FFM) also plays a role in the drive to eat. A distinction must, however, be made between a 'passive' role of FFM in driving energy intake, which is likely to be mediated by 'energy-sensing' mechanisms that translate FFM-induced energy requirements to energy intake, and a more 'active' role of FFM in the drive to eat through feedback signaling between FFM deficit and energy intake. Consequently, a loss of FFM that results from dieting or sedentarity should be viewed as a risk factor for weight regain and increased fatness not only because of the impact of the FFM deficit in lowering the maintenance energy requirement but also because of the body's attempt to restore FFM by overeating-a phenomenon referred to as 'collateral fattening'. A better understanding of these passive and active roles of FFM in the control of energy intake will necessitate the elucidation of peripheral signals and energy-sensing mechanisms that drive hunger and appetite, with implications for both obesity prevention and its management.

  9. Thyrotropic activity of salmon pituitary glycoprotein hormones in the Hawaiian parrotfish thyroid in vitro.

    PubMed

    Swanson, P; Grau, E G; Helms, L M; Dickhoff, W W

    1988-02-01

    The thyrotropic activities of salmon pituitary extract, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), gonadotropins (GTH), and glycoprotein fractions obtained during purification of salmon TSH and GTH were measured using the parrotfish thyroid culture system. Purified salmon TSH was approximately 1,000 times more potent than bovine TSH in stimulating thyroxine release into the culture medium. Most of the forms of salmon GTH had no thyrotropic activity. One of the forms of salmon GTH (GTH-F) and three chromatofocusing fractions (CF-B, -C, and -E) that were devoid of activity in the coho salmon in vivo had some thyrotropic activity in the parrotfish thyroid culture. Whether the activity of these fractions was due to contamination with TSH, less potent forms of TSH, or inherent thyrotropic activity of a form of GTH is discussed. These results indicate that the parrotfish thyroid culture system can be used to detect thyrotropic activity of fractions obtained during the purification of teleost TSH.

  10. [Association between dietary intake, physical activity, socioeconomic factors and body fat percentage among schoolchildren].

    PubMed

    D'Avila, Gisele Liliam; Silva, Diego Augusto Santos; de Vasconcelos, Francisco de Assis Guedes

    2016-04-01

    The scope of this article was to assess the association between dietary intake, physical activity and socioeconomic factors associated with body fat percentage in 7 to 14-year-old schoolchildren. It is a cross-sectional study with a probability sample of 2,481 students from public and private schools in Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil. Body fat percentage was investigated by measuring triceps and subscapular skin folds. Poisson regression was performed to test the association between excess body fat and independent variables, estimating prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals. The prevalence of excess body fat was 23.9%, though there was no significant difference between sex (p = 0.359) and age (p = 0.202). Excess body fat was associated with different factors in 11 to 14-year-old schoolchildren, namely eating less than three meals a day (OR = 1.62, CI: 1.38 to 1.91) and consumption of high-risk food more than 3 times a day (OR = 0.61 CI: 0.47 to 0.79). No significant difference was observed with physical activity. The high prevalence of excess body fat detected reveals the need for fostering the adoption of healthier behavioral practices (in relation to nutrition and physical activity) by schoolchildren.

  11. Growth hormone from striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus): genomic organization, recombinant expression and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Poen, Sinothai; Pornbanlualap, Somchai

    2013-04-15

    Growth hormone is an essential polypeptide required for normal growth and development of vertebrates. In this report, striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) growth hormone gene and cDNA were isolated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The striped catfish growth hormone (scGH) encoding gene contains 5 exons and 4 introns. The cDNA sequence of the scGH gene contains a 603bp open reading frame and encodes for a 200-aa protein consisting of a putative 22-aa signal peptide and the mature 178-aa protein. The recombinant histidine-tagged scGH protein which expressed in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies was unfolded, refolded and purified to near-homogeneity by Ni(2+)-NTA chromatography. Analysis of the secondary structure content by CD spectroscopy showed that the α-helical content of the refolded scGH is 55%. Elucidation of the folding pathway of scGH by fluorescence spectroscopy showed that denaturation transition of scGH is coincident and cooperative, consistent with the two-state denaturation mechanism. The purified scGH was biologically active and exhibited growth-promoting activity in striped catfish, but not tilapia.

  12. Calcium-sensing receptor activation in chronic kidney disease: effects beyond parathyroid hormone control.

    PubMed

    Massy, Ziad A; Hénaut, Lucie; Larsson, Tobias E; Vervloet, Marc G

    2014-11-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) is an important complication of advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). Cinacalcet, an allosteric modulator of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) expressed in parathyroid glands, is the only calcimimetic approved to treat SHPT in patients on dialysis. By enhancing CaSR sensitivity for plasma extracellular calcium (Ca(2+)0), cinacalcet reduces serum parathyroid hormone, Ca(2+)0, and serum inorganic phosphorous concentrations, allowing better control of SHPT and CKD-mineral and bone disorders. Of interest, the CaSR also is expressed in a variety of tissues where its activation regulates diverse cellular processes, including secretion, apoptosis, and proliferation. Thus, the existence of potential off-target effects of cinacalcet cannot be neglected. This review summarizes our current knowledge concerning the potential role(s) of the CaSR expressed in various tissues in CKD-related disorders, independently of parathyroid hormone control.

  13. Oxidation of gonadotrophin (PMSG) by oxygen free radicals alters its structure and hormonal activity.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Camarillo, C; Guzmán-Grenfell, A M; Hicks, J J

    1999-03-01

    The effect of oxygen free radicals produced by the Fenton reaction was used to induce oxidation and other structural changes in pregnant mare serum gonadotrophin (PMSG). Modifications in the spectrophotometric scan, an increase in exposed carbonyl groups, and the ability to reduce nitroblue tetrazolium, was achieved by the oxidized hormone when compared to the control PMSG. PMSG loses its biological activity when coming in contact with the free-radical generating system. This lack of activity is manifested as a loss of ovulation and a decrease in the weight of the ovaries and uterus. It was demonstrated that oxygen free radicals can induce structural and biological changes in the gonadotrophin.

  14. Just Be It! Healthy and Fit Increases Fifth Graders' Fruit and Vegetable Intake, Physical Activity, and Nutrition Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DelCampo, Diana; Baca, Jacqueline S.; Jimenez, Desaree; Sanchez, Paula Roybal; DelCampo, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Just Be It! Healthy and Fit reduces the risk factors for childhood obesity for fifth graders using hands-on field trips, in-class lessons, and parent outreach efforts. Pre-test and post-test scores from the year-long classroom instruction showed a statistically significant increase in fruit and vegetable intake, physical activity, and nutrition…

  15. Effects of ostracism and social connection-related activities on adolescents’ motivation to eat and energy intake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: assess the effect of ostracism and social connection-related activities on adolescents’ motivation to eat and their energy intake. Methods Participants (n¼103; M age¼13.6 years) were either ostracized or included when playing a computer game, Cyberball. Next, they wrote about their friend...

  16. HIGH ETHANOL DOSE DURING EARLY ADOLESCENCE INDUCES LOCOMOTOR ACTIVATION AND INCREASES SUBSEQUENT ETHANOL INTAKE DURING LATE ADOLESCENCE

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, María Belén; Molina, Juan Carlos; Nizhnikov, Michael E.; Spear, Norman E.; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos

    2011-01-01

    Adolescent initiation of ethanol consumption is associated with subsequent heightened probability of ethanol-use disorders. The present study examined the relationship between motivational sensitivity to ethanol initiation in adolescent rats and later ethanol intake. Experiment 1 determined that ethanol induces locomotor activation shortly after administration but not if tested at a later post-administration interval. In Experiment 2, adolescents were assessed for ethanol-induced locomotor activation on postnatal day 28. These animals were then evaluated for ethanol-mediated conditioned taste aversion and underwent a 16-day-long ethanol intake protocol. Ethanol-mediated aversive effects were unrelated to ethanol locomotor stimulation or subsequent ethanol consumption patterns. Ethanol intake during late adolescence was greatest in animals initiated to ethanol earliest at postnatal day 28. Females that were more sensitive to ethanol’s locomotor-activating effects showed a transient increase in ethanol self-administration. Blood ethanol concentrations during initiation were not related to ethanol-induced locomotor activation. Adolescent rats appeared sensitive to the locomotor-stimulatory effects of ethanol. Even brief ethanol exposure during adolescence may promote later ethanol intake. PMID:20373327

  17. Fat/carbohydrate ratio but not energy density determines snack food intake and activates brain reward areas.

    PubMed

    Hoch, Tobias; Kreitz, Silke; Gaffling, Simone; Pischetsrieder, Monika; Hess, Andreas

    2015-05-14

    The snack food potato chips induces food intake in ad libitum fed rats, which is associated with modulation of the brain reward system and other circuits. Here, we show that food intake in satiated rats is triggered by an optimal fat/carbohydrate ratio. Like potato chips, an isocaloric fat/carbohydrate mixture influenced whole brain activity pattern of rats, affecting circuits related e.g. to reward/addiction, but the number of modulated areas and the extent of modulation was lower compared to the snack food itself.

  18. The effect of sex hormones on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma expression and activity in mature adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiromi; Sugai, Hana; Kurosaki, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Momoko; Funaki, Asami; Kimura, Yuki; Ueno, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ plays a major role in the regulation of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Pioglitazone is a PPARγ agonist that is widely used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, female patients have been reported to experience stronger efficacy and adverse effects than male patients. This study evaluated the effects of sex hormones on PPARγ expression and activity in adipocytes. Mouse 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were used after being grown into matured adipocytes. The sex hormones 17β-estradiol (E2), testosterone (T), or 5α-androstan-17β-ol-3-one (dihydrotestosterone; DHT) were added to the matured adipocytes and the cells were then maintained for short (24-72 h) or long (1- or 2-weeks) periods. E2 significantly upregulated PPARγ protein expression in a concentration-dependent manner after extended exposure, whereas T and DHT did not have such an effect. When cells were co-treated with pioglitazone and E2, PPARγ protein expression significantly increased in an E2-dependent manner, whereas this expression seemed to be reduced by pioglitazone mono-treatment and co-treatment with DHT at higher concentrations. The secretion levels of adiponectin protein, a major indicator of PPARγ activity, were significantly decreased by DHT, but were not affected by E2. Finally a luciferase assay was performed using a PPAR response element-Luk reporter gene. Transcriptional activity was not changed by any of single sex hormone treatment, but was significantly downregulated by co-treatment with pioglitazone and DHT. Taken together, our results suggest that sex hormones may influence PPARγ expression and function, which may explain the observed sex-specific different effect of pioglitazone.

  19. Activation of the renin-angiotensin system, specifically in the subfornical organ is sufficient to induce fluid intake.

    PubMed

    Coble, Jeffrey P; Cassell, Martin D; Davis, Deborah R; Grobe, Justin L; Sigmund, Curt D

    2014-08-15

    Increased activity of the renin-angiotensin system within the brain elevates fluid intake, blood pressure, and resting metabolic rate. Renin and angiotensinogen are coexpressed within the same cells of the subfornical organ, and the production and action of ANG II through the ANG II type 1 receptor in the subfornical organ (SFO) are necessary for fluid intake due to increased activity of the brain renin-angiotensin system. We generated an inducible model of ANG II production by breeding transgenic mice expressing human renin in neurons controlled by the synapsin promoter with transgenic mice containing a Cre-recombinase-inducible human angiotensinogen construct. Adenoviral delivery of Cre-recombinase causes SFO-selective induction of human angiotensinogen expression. Selective production of ANG II in the SFO results in increased water intake but did not change blood pressure or resting metabolic rate. The increase in water intake was ANG II type 1 receptor-dependent. When given a choice between water and 0.15 M NaCl, these mice increased total fluid and sodium, but not water, because of an increased preference for NaCl. When provided a choice between water and 0.3 M NaCl, the mice exhibited increased fluid, water, and sodium intake, but no change in preference for NaCl. The increase in fluid intake was blocked by an inhibitor of PKC, but not ERK, and was correlated with increased phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element binding protein in the subfornical organ. Thus, increased production and action of ANG II specifically in the subfornical organ are sufficient on their own to mediate an increase in drinking through PKC.

  20. Pharmacophore development for corticotropin-releasing hormone: new insights into inhibitor activity.

    PubMed

    Keller, P A; Bowman, M; Dang, K H; Garner, J; Leach, S P; Smith, R; McCluskey, A

    1999-07-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is an endogenous 41-amino acid peptide involved in a wide ranging series of systems including the brain, the coordination of the body's overall response to stress, and more recently as a crucial initiator in the onset of labor, also known as the placental clock. Although more physiological data on CRH is emerging shedding more light on the processes involved and their integration, the mode of action of the hormone and the postulated binding site(s) remain unknown. Recently, a number of small-molecular-weight ligands have emerged as potent antagonists but, as therapeutics, suffer from a lack of solubility. Additionally, despite a number of exhaustively large patents, the lack of structural diversity with these antagonists has enabled little scope for comprehensive and wide ranging studies into the structure of the binding sites of this hormone. As part of a program investigating new, structurally diverse antagonists and agonists of CRH, we have developed a preliminary pharmacophore based on the known small-molecular-weight ligands as an initial step in our program. This pharmacophore was validated by comparison with some of the compounds we postulated to be active.

  1. The endocrine and reproductive system: adverse effects of hormonally active substances?

    PubMed

    Greim, Helmut A

    2004-04-01

    Chemicals that have the intrinsic property to modulate or even disrupt the endocrine system are present in the human environment. Because it is the potency of such chemicals that determines the toxicologic relevance, assessment of the risk to human health must consider both the endocrine disrupting potential and the potency. Usually in vitro assays are applied to detect the potential of a hormone-like effect, and such data are considered useful to set priorities for additional testing and for mechanistic studies. However, such data allow only determination of relative potency of a chemical as compared with other xenobiotics, natural compounds, or endogenous hormones. Relevant information on the endocrine-disrupting potency can be taken only from in vivo assays, eg, the Hershberger (male reproductive organs) and uterotrophic (female reproductive organs) assays, the updated versions of the 28- and 90-day toxicity studies in rodents, and the 2-generation studies in rodents. With the use of this information and the concentration of these chemicals in humans, the potency of the effect as compared with endogenous hormone activity can be estimated. So far, the relative potencies of chemicals tested in in vitro systems as compared with estradiol are several orders of magnitude smaller, whereas potency of the phytoestrogen, eg, isoflavones such as genistein or daidzein, can even exceed that of estradiol, especially in infants who are fed soy-based formula as a sole source of nutrition. Although there are still open questions regarding in utero or early postnatal exposure, the low potencies and concentrations of manmade chemicals as compared with the endogenous hormones in humans make it unlikely that adverse effects occur at common exposure.

  2. Role of maternal thyroid hormones in the developing neocortex and during human evolution

    PubMed Central

    Stenzel, Denise; Huttner, Wieland B.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of thyroid hormones during brain development has been appreciated for many decades. In humans, low levels of circulating maternal thyroid hormones, e.g., caused by maternal hypothyroidism or lack of iodine in diet, results in a wide spectrum of severe neurological defects, including neurological cretinism characterized by profound neurologic impairment and mental retardation, underlining the importance of the maternal thyroid hormone contribution. In fact, iodine intake, which is essential for thyroid hormone production in the thyroid gland, has been related to the expansion of the brain, associated with the increased cognitive capacities during human evolution. Because thyroid hormones regulate transcriptional activity of target genes via their nuclear thyroid hormone receptors (THRs), even mild and transient changes in maternal thyroid hormone levels can directly affect and alter the gene expression profile, and thus disturb fetal brain development. Here we summarize how thyroid hormones may have influenced human brain evolution through the adaptation to new habitats, concomitant with changes in diet and, therefore, iodine intake. Further, we review the current picture we gained from experimental studies in rodents on the function of maternal thyroid hormones during developmental neurogenesis. We aim to evaluate the effects of maternal thyroid hormone deficiency as well as lack of THRs and transporters on brain development and function, shedding light on the cellular behavior conducted by thyroid hormones. PMID:23882187

  3. Stress hormone levels in a freshwater turtle from sites differing in human activity

    PubMed Central

    Polich, Rebecca L.

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids, such as corticosterone (CORT), commonly serve as a measure of stress levels in vertebrate populations. These hormones have been implicated in regulation of feeding behaviour, locomotor activity, body mass, lipid metabolism and other crucial behaviours and physiological processes. Thus, understanding how glucocorticoids fluctuate seasonally and in response to specific stressors can yield insight into organismal health and the overall health of populations. I compared circulating CORT concentrations between two similar populations of painted turtle, Chrysemys picta, which differed primarily in the level of exposure to human recreational activities. I measured basal CORT concentrations as well as the CORT stress response and did not find any substantive difference between the two populations. This similarity may indicate that painted turtles are not stressed by the presence of humans during the nesting season. The results of this study contribute to our understanding of CORT concentrations in freshwater reptiles, a group that is historically under-represented in studies of circulating hormone concentrations; specifically, studies that seek to use circulating concentrations of stress hormones, such as CORT, as a measure of the effect of human activities on wild populations. They also give insight into how these species as a whole may respond to human recreational activities during crucial life-history stages, such as the nesting season. Although there was no discernable difference between circulating CORT concentrations between the urban and rural populations studied, I did find a significant difference in circulating CORT concentrations between male and female C. picta. This important finding provides better understanding of the sex differences between male and female painted turtles and adds to our understanding of this species and other species of freshwater turtle. PMID:27293763

  4. FLASH interacts with p160 coactivator subtypes and differentially suppresses transcriptional activity of steroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Kino, Tomoshige; Ichijo, Takamasa; Chrousos, George P

    2004-12-01

    We previously reported that tumor necrosis factor alpha receptor- and Fas-associated FLASH interacts with one of the p160 nuclear receptor coactivators, glucocorticoid receptor-interacting protein (GRIP) 1, at its nuclear receptor-binding (NRB) domain, and that inhibits the transcriptional activity of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) by interfering with association of GR and GRIP1. Here, we further examined the specificity of FLASH suppressive effect and the physical/functional interactions between this protein and two other p160 family subtypes. The suppressive effect of FLASH on GR transactivation was observed in several cell lines and on the chromatin-integrated mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter. FLASH strongly interacted with the NRB domain of the thyroid hormone receptor activator molecule (TRAM) 1, a member of the steroid hormone receptor coactivator (SRC) 3/nuclear receptor coactivator (N-CoA) 3 subtypes, as well as with SRC2/N-CoA2 p160 coactivator GRIP1, while its interaction with SRC1a, one of the SRC1/N-CoA1 proteins, was faint in yeast two-hybrid assays. Accordingly, FLASH strongly suppressed TRAM1- and GRIP1-induced enhancement of GR-stimulated transactivation of the MMTV promoter in HCT116 cells, while it did not affect SRC1a-induced potentiation of transcription. Furthermore, FLASH suppressed androgen- and progesterone receptor-induced transcriptional activity, but did not influence estrogen receptor-induced transactivation, possibly due to their preferential use of p160 coactivators in HCT116 and HeLa cells. Thus, FLASH differentially suppresses steroid hormone receptor-induced transcriptional activity by interfering with their association with SRC2/N-CoA2 and SRC3/N-CoA3 but not with SRC1/N-CoA1.

  5. Web-enabled and improved software tools and data are needed to measure nutrient intakes and physical activity for personalized health research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food intake, physical activity and genetic make-up each impact health and each factor influences the impact of the other two factors. Nutrigenomics is a term used to describe interactions between food intake, physical activity and genomics. Knowledge about the interplay between environment and ge...

  6. Detection of hormone active chemicals using genetically engineered yeast cells and microfluidic devices with interdigitated array electrodes.

    PubMed

    Ino, Kosuke; Kitagawa, Yusuke; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Shiku, Hitoshi; Koide, Masahiro; Itayama, Tomoaki; Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2009-10-01

    Endocrine disruptors that act like hormones in the endocrine system might have toxic effects. Therefore, it is important to develop a portable device that can detect hormone active chemicals in samples rapidly and easily. In this study, a microfluidic device was developed for the detection of hormone active chemicals using genetically engineered yeast cells. The yeast cells were used as biosensors since they were genetically engineered to respond to the presence of hormone active chemicals by synthesizing beta-galactosidase (beta-gal). For achieving further sensitivity, we incorporated interdigitated array (IDA) electrodes (width, 1.2 microm; gap, 0.8 microm) with 40 electrode fingers into the analytical chamber of the microfluidic device. The yeast cells precultured with a hormone active chemical, 17beta-estradiol (E2), were trapped from the main channel of the device to the analytical camber by electrophoresis. After trapping in the analytical chamber, we performed electrochemical detection of beta-gal induced in the yeast cells with the IDA electrodes. Actually, electrochemical detection was performed on p-aminophenol that was converted from p-aminophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside with beta-gal. The electrochemical signals from the yeast cells precultured with 17beta-estradiol were successfully detected with the device. Furthermore, the inhibitory effects of antagonists such as tamoxifen were also detected electrochemically by using the device. Thus, the present microfluidic device can be used for highly sensitive detection of hormone active chemicals.

  7. Hormonal and metabolic regulation of tomato fruit sink activity and yield under salinity.

    PubMed

    Albacete, Alfonso; Cantero-Navarro, Elena; Balibrea, María E; Großkinsky, Dominik K; de la Cruz González, María; Martínez-Andújar, Cristina; Smigocki, Ann C; Roitsch, Thomas; Pérez-Alfocea, Francisco

    2014-11-01

    Salinization of water and soil has a negative impact on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) productivity by reducing growth of sink organs and by inducing senescence in source leaves. It has been hypothesized that yield stability implies the maintenance or increase of sink activity in the reproductive structures, thus contributing to the transport of assimilates from the source leaves through changes in sucrolytic enzymes and their regulation by phytohormones. In this study, classical and functional physiological approaches have been integrated to study the influence of metabolic and hormonal factors on tomato fruit sink activity, growth, and yield: (i) exogenous hormones were applied to plants, and (ii) transgenic plants overexpressing the cell wall invertase (cwInv) gene CIN1 in the fruits and de novo cytokinin (CK) biosynthesis gene IPT in the roots were constructed. Although salinity reduces fruit growth, sink activity, and trans-zeatin (tZ) concentrations, it increases the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) during the actively growing period (25 days after anthesis). Indeed, exogenous application of the CK analogue kinetin to salinized actively growing fruits recovered sucrolytic activities (mainly cwInv and sucrose synthase), sink strength, and fruit weight, whereas the ethylene-releasing compound ethephon had a negative effect in equivalent non-stressed fruits. Fruit yield was increased by both the constitutive expression of CIN1 in the fruits (up to 4-fold) or IPT in the root (up to 30%), owing to an increase in the fruit number (lower flower abortion) and in fruit weight. This is possibly related to a recovery of sink activity in reproductive tissues due to both (i) increase in sucrolytic activities (cwInv, sucrose synthase, and vacuolar and cytoplasmic invertases) and tZ concentration, and (ii) a decrease in the ACC levels and the activity of the invertase inhibitor. This study provides new functional evidences about the role of

  8. Modulation of NCC activity by low and high K(+) intake: insights into the signaling pathways involved.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Bueno, María; Cervantes-Perez, Luz Graciela; Rojas-Vega, Lorena; Arroyo-Garza, Isidora; Vázquez, Norma; Moreno, Erika; Gamba, Gerardo

    2014-06-15

    Modulation of Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC) activity is essential to adjust K(+) excretion in the face of changes in dietary K(+) intake. We used previously characterized genetic mouse models to assess the role of Ste20-related proline-alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) and with-no-lysine kinase (WNK)4 in the modulation of NCC by K(+) diets. SPAK knockin and WNK4 knockout mice were placed on normal-, low-, or high-K(+)-citrate diets for 4 days. The low-K(+) diet decreased and high-K(+) diet increased plasma aldosterone levels, but both diets were associated with increased phosphorylation of NCC (phospho-NCC, Thr(44)/Thr(48)/Thr(53)) and phosphorylation of SPAK/oxidative stress responsive kinase 1 (phospho-SPAK/OSR1, Ser(383)/Ser(325)). The effect of the low-K(+) diet on SPAK phosphorylation persisted in WNK4 knockout and SPAK knockin mice, whereas the effects of ANG II on NCC and SPAK were lost in both mouse colonies. This suggests that for NCC activation by ANG II, integrity of the WNK4/SPAK pathway is required, whereas for the low-K(+) diet, SPAK phosphorylation occurred despite the absence of WNK4, suggesting the involvement of another WNK (WNK1 or WNK3). Additionally, because NCC activation also occurred in SPAK knockin mice, it is possible that loss of SPAK was compensated by OSR1. The positive effect of the high-K(+) diet was observed when the accompanying anion was citrate, whereas the high-KCl diet reduced NCC phosphorylation. However, the effect of the high-K(+)-citrate diet was aldosterone dependent, and neither metabolic alkalosis induced by bicarbonate, nor citrate administration in the absence of K(+) increased NCC phosphorylation, suggesting that it was not due to citrate-induced metabolic alkalosis. Thus, the accompanying anion might modulate the NCC response to the high-K(+) diet.

  9. Modulation of NCC activity by low and high K+ intake: insights into the signaling pathways involved

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda-Bueno, María; Cervantes-Perez, Luz Graciela; Rojas-Vega, Lorena; Arroyo-Garza, Isidora; Vázquez, Norma; Moreno, Erika

    2014-01-01

    Modulation of Na+-Cl− cotransporter (NCC) activity is essential to adjust K+ excretion in the face of changes in dietary K+ intake. We used previously characterized genetic mouse models to assess the role of Ste20-related proline-alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) and with-no-lysine kinase (WNK)4 in the modulation of NCC by K+ diets. SPAK knockin and WNK4 knockout mice were placed on normal-, low-, or high-K+-citrate diets for 4 days. The low-K+ diet decreased and high-K+ diet increased plasma aldosterone levels, but both diets were associated with increased phosphorylation of NCC (phospho-NCC, Thr44/Thr48/Thr53) and phosphorylation of SPAK/oxidative stress responsive kinase 1 (phospho-SPAK/OSR1, Ser383/Ser325). The effect of the low-K+ diet on SPAK phosphorylation persisted in WNK4 knockout and SPAK knockin mice, whereas the effects of ANG II on NCC and SPAK were lost in both mouse colonies. This suggests that for NCC activation by ANG II, integrity of the WNK4/SPAK pathway is required, whereas for the low-K+ diet, SPAK phosphorylation occurred despite the absence of WNK4, suggesting the involvement of another WNK (WNK1 or WNK3). Additionally, because NCC activation also occurred in SPAK knockin mice, it is possible that loss of SPAK was compensated by OSR1. The positive effect of the high-K+ diet was observed when the accompanying anion was citrate, whereas the high-KCl diet reduced NCC phosphorylation. However, the effect of the high-K+-citrate diet was aldosterone dependent, and neither metabolic alkalosis induced by bicarbonate, nor citrate administration in the absence of K+ increased NCC phosphorylation, suggesting that it was not due to citrate-induced metabolic alkalosis. Thus, the accompanying anion might modulate the NCC response to the high-K+ diet. PMID:24761002

  10. Growth hormone (GH) activity is associated with increased serum oestradiol and reduced anti-Müllerian hormone in healthy male volunteers treated with GH and a GH antagonist.

    PubMed

    Andreassen, M; Frystyk, J; Faber, J; Kristensen, L Ø; Juul, A

    2013-07-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptors are present on pituitary gonadotrophs and on testicular Leydig and Sertoli cells. Thus, the GH/IGF-I system may modulate the pituitary-gonadal axis in males. This is a randomized cross-over study. Eight healthy male volunteers (mean age 35, range 29-46 years) were treated with GH for 3 weeks (1st week 0.01, 2nd week 0.02, 3rd week 0.03 mg/day/kg) or a GH receptor antagonist (Pegvisomant) (1st week 10, last 2 weeks 15 mg/day), separated by 8 weeks of washout. Before and after the two treatment periods, concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone, testosterone, oestradiol, sex hormone-binding globulin, inhibin B and Anti-Müllerian Hormone (AMH) were measured. During GH treatment, IGF-I increased [(median (IQR)] 166 (162-235) vs. 702 (572-875) μg/L, p < 0.001) together with oestradiol [(mean ± SD) 78 ± 23 vs. 111 ± 30 pm, p = 0.019], and the oestradiol/testosterone ratio (p = 0.003). By contrast, AMH (42 ± 14 vs. 32 ± 7 pm, p = 0.018), Inhibin B (211 (146-226) vs. 176 (129-204) ng/L, p = 0.059) and LH (3.8 ± 1.5 vs. 3.2 ± 1.2 U/L, p = 0.096) decreased. During pegvisomant treatment IGF-I (204 (160-290) vs. 106 (97-157) μg/L, p = 0.001) and oestradiol (86 ± 28 vs. 79 ± 25 pm, p = 0.060) decreased. No significant changes or trends in the other reproductive hormones occurred during the two treatment regimens. GH/IGF-I activity was positively associated with serum oestradiol, suggesting that GH/IGF-I stimulates aromatase activity in vivo. As a novel observation, we found that high GH activity was associated with reduced levels of the Sertoli cell marker AMH. Further studies are needed to evaluate possible effects of GH on Sertoli cell function and/or spermatogenesis.

  11. Activity related energy expenditure, appetite and energy intake: potential implications for weight management.

    PubMed

    Harrington, D M; Martin, C K; Ravussin, E; Katzmarzyk, P T

    2013-08-01

    The aim was to investigate relationships between activity related energy expenditure (AREE), appetite ratings and energy intake (EI) in a sample of 40 male (26.4years; BMI 23.5kg/m(2)) and 42 female (26.9years; BMI 22.4kg/m(2)) participants. AREE was expressed as the residual value of the regression between total daily EE (by doubly labeled water) and resting EE (by indirect calorimetry). EI was measured using an ad libitum buffet meal and visual analogue scales measured subjective appetite ratings before and after the meal. AREE was divided into low, middle and high sex-specific tertiles. General linear models were used to investigate differences in appetite ratings and EI across AREE tertiles. Before the meal, males in the high AREE tertile had significantly lower desire to eat and lower prospective food consumption and higher feelings of fullness compared to those in the low tertile. Males in the middle tertile had significantly higher satiety quotients after the meal and lower EI compared to the other tertiles. No significant differences across tertiles were found in females. Sex differences in relationships between AREE, appetite ratings and EI may lead to differing patterns of EI and subsequent weight maintenance.

  12. Novel pyrazole derivatives as neutral CB₁ antagonists with significant activity towards food intake.

    PubMed

    Manca, Ilaria; Mastinu, Andrea; Olimpieri, Francesca; Falzoi, Matteo; Sani, Monica; Ruiu, Stefania; Loriga, Giovanni; Volonterio, Alessandro; Tambaro, Simone; Bottazzi, Mirko Emilio Heiner; Zanda, Matteo; Pinna, Gérard Aimè; Lazzari, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    In spite of rimonabant's withdrawal from the European market due to its adverse effects, interest in the development of drugs based on CB1 antagonists is revamping on the basis of the peculiar properties of this class of compounds. In particular, new strategies have been proposed for the treatment of obesity and/or related risk factors through CB1 antagonists, i.e. by the development of selectively peripherally acting agents or by the identification of neutral CB1 antagonists. New compounds based on the lead CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant have been synthesized with focus on obtaining neutral CB1 antagonists. Amongst the new derivatives described in this paper, the mixture of the two enantiomers (±)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-3-(2-cyclohexyl-1-hydroxyethyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole ((±)-5), and compound 5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-3-[(Z)-2-cyclohexyl-1-fluorovinyl]-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole ((Z)-6), showed interesting pharmacological profiles. According to the preliminary pharmacological evaluation, these novel pyrazole derivatives showed in fact both neutral CB1 antagonism behaviour and significant in vivo activity towards food intake.

  13. Sex Differences in Stress Response Circuitry Activation Dependent on Female Hormonal Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Jill M.; Jerram, Matthew; Abbs, Brandon; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Makris, Nikos

    2010-01-01

    Understanding sex differences in stress regulation has important implications for understanding basic physiological differences in the male and female brain and their impact on vulnerability to sex differences in chronic medical disorders associated with stress response circuitry. In this fMRI study, we demonstrated that significant sex differences in brain activity in stress response circuitry were dependent on women's menstrual cycle phase. Twelve healthy Caucasian premenopausal women were compared to a group of healthy men from the same population, based on age, ethnicity, education, and right-handedness. Subjects were scanned using negative valence/high arousal versus neutral visual stimuli that we demonstrated activated stress response circuitry (amygdala, hypothalamus, hippocampus, brainstem, orbitofrontal and medial prefrontal cortices (OFC and mPFC), and anterior cingulate gyrus (ACG). Women were scanned twice based on normal variation in menstrual cycle hormones (i.e., early follicular (EF) compared with late follicular-midcycle menstrual phases (LF/MC)). Using SPM8b, there were few significant differences in BOLD signal changes in men compared to EF women, except ventromedial (VMN) and lateral (LHA) hypothalamus, left amygdala, and ACG. In contrast, men exhibited significantly greater BOLD signal changes compared to LF/MC women on bilateral ACG and OFC, mPFC, LHA, VMN, hippocampus, and periaqueductal gray, with largest effect sizes in mPFC and OFC. Findings suggest that sex differences in stress response circuitry are hormonally regulated via the impact of subcortical brain activity on the cortical control of arousal, and demonstrate that females have been endowed with a natural hormonal capacity to regulate the stress response that differs from males. PMID:20071507

  14. Growth hormone, but not insulin, activates STAT5 proteins in adipocytes in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zvonic, Sanjin; Story, David J; Stephens, Jacqueline M; Mynatt, Randall L

    2003-03-07

    STAT 5 proteins are latent transcription factors which have been shown to be activated by growth hormone (GH) in many cell types. However, some recent studies also suggest that STAT 5B is a physiological substrate of the insulin receptor. In our studies, we have shown that physiological levels of insulin do not induce STAT 5 tyrosine phosphorylation or affect the nuclear distribution of STATs 5A or 5B in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Moreover, we did not observe the activation of STAT 5 in the adipose tissue or skeletal muscle of mice following an acute intraperitoneal injection of insulin. However, acute GH administration, both in vitro and in vivo, resulted in the activation of STAT 5 proteins. In summary, our results indicate that STAT 5 proteins are not activated by physiological levels of insulin in adipose tissue.

  15. Third ventricular coinjection of subthreshold doses of NPY and AgRP stimulate food hoarding and intake and neural activation.

    PubMed

    Teubner, Brett J W; Keen-Rhinehart, Erin; Bartness, Timothy J

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that 3rd ventricular (3V) neuropeptide Y (NPY) or agouti-related protein (AgRP) injection potently stimulates food foraging/hoarding/intake in Siberian hamsters. Because NPY and AgRP are highly colocalized in arcuate nucleus neurons in this and other species, we tested whether subthreshold doses of NPY and AgRP coinjected into the 3V stimulates food foraging, hoarding, and intake, and/or neural activation [c-Fos immunoreactivity (c-Fos-ir)] in hamsters housed in a foraging/hoarding apparatus. In the behavioral experiment, each hamster received four 3V treatments by using subthreshold doses of NPY and AgRP for all behaviors: 1) NPY, 2) AgRP, 3) NPY+AgRP, and 4) saline with a 7-day washout period between treatments. Food foraging, intake, and hoarding were measured 1, 2, 4, and 24 h and 2 and 3 days postinjection. Only when NPY and AgRP were coinjected was food intake and hoarding increased. After identical treatment in separate animals, c-Fos-ir was assessed at 90 min and 14 h postinjection, times when food intake (0-1 h) and hoarding (4-24 h) were uniquely stimulated. c-Fos-ir was increased in several hypothalamic nuclei previously shown to be involved in ingestive behaviors and the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), but only in NPY+AgRP-treated animals (90 min and 14 h: magno- and parvocellular regions of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and perifornical area; 14 h only: CeA and sub-zona incerta). These results suggest that NPY and AgRP interact to stimulate food hoarding and intake at distinct times, perhaps released as a cocktail naturally with food deprivation to stimulate these behaviors.

  16. Dietary intake, physical activity, body mass index, and childhood asthma in the Third National Health And Nutrition Survey (NHANES III).

    PubMed

    Romieu, Isabelle; Mannino, David M; Redd, Stephen C; McGeehin, Michael A

    2004-07-01

    Childhood asthma may be affected by dietary changes and increased body mass related to a sedentary lifestyle, although the mechanisms are poorly understood. To test this hypothesis, we used data from the National Health and Nutrition Survey (NHANES III) from 1988-1994, including 7,904 children. We analyzed cross-sectional information on body mass index (BMI = weight/height2), physical activity (hr/day viewing television), dietary intake (24-hr recall), and vitamin C intake (60 mg/day). The probability of self-reported asthma or wheezing relating to risk factors was calculated by logistic regression. After controlling for dietary intake, physical activity, and sociodemographic variables, asthma risk was three times higher for children aged 6-16 years in the highest percentiles of BMI (>95th percentile) when compared to children in percentiles 25-49 (OR = 3.44; 95% CI, 1.49-7.96). No increase was observed in children aged 2-5 years. Low vitamin C intake was marginally related to self-reported current wheezing in children aged 6-16 years. Our results show that increased BMI may influence asthma prevalence in children, but further investigation is needed.

  17. Changes in hormone and stress-inducing activities of municipal wastewater in a conventional activated sludge wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Wojnarowicz, Pola; Yang, Wenbo; Zhou, Hongde; Parker, Wayne J; Helbing, Caren C

    2014-12-01

    Conventional municipal wastewater treatment plants do not efficiently remove contaminants of emerging concern, and so are primary sources for contaminant release into the aquatic environment. Although these contaminants are present in effluents at ng-μg/L concentrations (i.e. microcontaminants), many compounds can act as endocrine disrupting compounds or stress-inducing agents at these levels. Chemical fate analyses indicate that additional levels of wastewater treatment reduce but do not always completely remove all microcontaminants. The removal of microcontaminants from wastewater does not necessarily correspond to a reduction in biological activity, as contaminant metabolites or byproducts may still be biologically active. To evaluate the efficacy of conventional municipal wastewater treatment plants to remove biological activity, we examined the performance of a full scale conventional activated sludge municipal wastewater treatment plant located in Guelph, Ontario, Canada. We assessed reductions in levels of conventional wastewater parameters and thyroid hormone disrupting and stress-inducing activities in wastewater at three phases along the treatment train using a C-fin assay. Wastewater treatment was effective at reducing total suspended solids, chemical and biochemical oxygen demand, and stress-inducing bioactivity. However, only minimal reduction was observed in thyroid hormone disrupting activities. The present study underscores the importance of examining multiple chemical and biological endpoints in evaluating and monitoring the effectiveness of wastewater treatment for removal of microcontaminants.

  18. Leap of Faith: Does serum luteinizing hormone always accurately reflect central reproductive neuroendocrine activity?

    PubMed Central

    Moenter, Suzanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Function of the central aspects of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis has been assessed in a number of ways including direct measurements of hypothalamic output and indirect measures using gonadotropin release from the pituitary as a bioassay for reproductive neuroendocrine activity. Here, methods for monitoring these various parameters are briefly reviewed and then examples presented of both concordance and discrepancy between central and peripheral measurements, with a focus on situations in which elevated GnRH neurosecretion is not reflected accurately by pituitary luteinizing hormone release. Implications for interpretation of gonadotropin data are discussed. PMID:26278916

  19. Relation of Dietary Restraint Scores to Activation of Reward-Related Brain Regions in Response to Food Intake, Anticipated Intake, and Food Pictures

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Kyle S.; Stice, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Prospective studies indicate that individuals with elevated dietary restraint scores are at increased risk for future bulimic symptom onset, suggesting that these individuals may show hyper-responsivity of reward regions to food and food cues. Thus, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the relation of dietary restraint scores to activation of reward-related brain regions in response to receipt and anticipated receipt of chocolate milkshake and exposure to pictures of appetizing foods in 39 female adolescents (mean age = 15.5 ± 0.94). Dietary restraint scores were positively correlated with activation in the right orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in response to milkshake receipt. However, dietary restraint scores did not correlate with activation in response to anticipated milkshake receipt or exposure to food pictures. Results indicate that individuals who report high dietary restraint have a hyper-responsivity in reward-related brain regions when food intake is occurring, which may increase risk for overeating and binge eating. PMID:21147234

  20. Metabolic hormones in saliva: origins and functions

    PubMed Central

    Zolotukhin, S.

    2012-01-01

    The salivary proteome consists of thousands of proteins, which include, among others, hormonal modulators of energy intake and output. Although the functions of this prominent category of hormones in whole body energy metabolism are well characterized, their functions in the oral cavity, whether as a salivary component, or when expressed in taste cells, are less studied and poorly understood. The respective receptors for the majority of salivary metabolic hormones have been also shown to be expressed in salivary glands, taste cells, or other cells in the oral mucosa. This review provides a comprehensive account of the gastrointestinal hormones, adipokines, and neuropeptides identified in saliva, salivary glands, or lingual epithelium, as well as their respective cognate receptors expressed in the oral cavity. Surprisingly, few functions are assigned to salivary metabolic hormones, and these functions are mostly associated with the modulation of taste perception. Because of the well-characterized correlation between impaired oral nutrient sensing and increased energy intake and body mass index, a conceptually provocative point of view is introduced, whereupon it is argued that targeted changes in the composition of saliva could affect whole body metabolism in response to the activation of cognate receptors expressed locally in the oral mucosa. PMID:22994880

  1. Rat uterus renin-like activity: effect of stimuli and hormones.

    PubMed Central

    Gutman, Y; Mazur-Ruder, M

    1976-01-01

    1 The characteristics of renin-like activity in rat uterus were studied. The optimum temperature was 50 degrees C and optimum pH 4.0. Potassium (100 mM) enhanced this activity but sodium or calcium had no effect. 2 Uterine renin-like activity was unchanged 24 h after bilateral nephrectomy. 3 Renin-like activity in the uterus increased slowly from birth to 4 weeks of age and faster between the 4th and 8th week. 4 Ovariectomy caused a considerable fall in uterine renin-like activity. 5 The following factors, known to affect renin secretion in the kidney, i.e., hypovolaemia, sodium loading, adrenalectomy, administration of desoxycorticosterone acetate and injection of isoprenaline, had no effect on uterine renin-like activity. 6 Stilboestrol, an oestrogen, caused a significant increase of uterine renin-like activity. Progesterone and testosterone had no significant effect on this activity but blocked the increase caused by stilboestrol. 7 During pregnancy there was a small but significant fall of renin-like activity in the uterus in the first week and a continuous increase throughout the later period of pregnancy. 8 It is concluded that uterine renin-like activity is independent of kidney renin and does not respond to stimuli affecting kidney renin. Uterine renin activity is hormone-dependent and may be governed by the ratio, oestrogen : progesterone. PMID:1260172

  2. Controlled trial of a thymic hormone extract (Thymostimulin) in 'autoimmune' chronic active hepatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Hegarty, J E; Nouri Aria, K T; Eddleston, A L; Williams, R

    1984-01-01

    A randomised controlled trial of thymic hormone extracts (Thymostimulin) (1 mg/kg/day for seven days; 1 mg/kg/weekly thereafter) was undertaken in 30 patients (21 women, nine men) with treated, apparently inactive 'autoimmune' chronic active hepatitis during withdrawal of maintenance corticosteroid and azathioprine therapy. Reactivation of disease occurred in 26 patients (86%) during or after treatment withdrawal and was as frequent in the Thymostimulin treated (11 of 13; 84%) and untreated (15 of 17; 88%; p greater than 0.05) groups. Reactivation of disease was accompanied by a severe defect in concanavalin A induced suppressor cell activity, the magnitude of which was similar in the Thymostimulin treated and untreated groups (mean % suppression = 16.4 and 3.2 respectively; p greater than 0.05 vs 84.4 in control subjects). Further studies assessing the optimal dose, duration of treatment, and mode of administration are required to establish a therapeutic role for thymic hormone extracts in 'autoimmune' chronic active hepatitis. PMID:6230296

  3. Catechin induced modulation in the activities of thyroid hormone synthesizing enzymes leading to hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Amar K; De, Neela

    2013-02-01

    Catechins, the flavonoids found in abundance in green tea, have many beneficial health effects such as antioxidative, anticarcinogenic, anti-inflammatory, antiallergic, and hypotensive properties. However, flavonoids have antithyroid/goitrogenic effect, although less information is available about the effect of pure catechin on thyroid physiology. The present investigation has been undertaken to explore the effect of catechin administration on thyroid physiology in rat model. For the in vivo experiment catechin was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) at doses of 10, 20 and 30 mg/kg body to male albino rats for 15 and 30 days, respectively, and thyroid activities were evaluated with respect to determination of serum levels of thyroid hormones, thyroid peroxidase, 5'-deiodinase I (5'-DI), and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activities that are involved in the synthesis of thyroid hormone. Catechin decreased the activities of thyroid peroxidase and thyroidal 5'-deiodinase I, while Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity significantly increased in dose-dependent manner; substantial decrease in serum T3 and T4 levels coupled with significant elevation of serum TSH were also noted. Histological examinations of the thyroid gland revealed marked hypertrophy and/or hyperplasia of the thyroid follicles with depleted colloid content. In in vitro study, short-term exposure of rat thyroid tissue to catechin at the concentrations of 0.10, 0.20, and 0.30 mg/ml leads to decrease in the activities of thyroid peroxidase and 5'-deiodinase I, while the activity of thyroidal Na(+), K(+)-ATPase remains unaltered even at high concentration of catechin treatment. The present study reinforces the concept that catechin, tea flavonoids possess potent antithyroid activity as evidenced from in vivo and in vitro studies.

  4. Peripherally detectable hormones--their relation to the increased uterine activity during standing in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    von Mandach, U; Schneider, K T; Huch, A; Huch, R

    1987-01-01

    Two-thirds of women in late pregnancy in standing position show marked cyclic accelerations in heart rate with concomitant increase in the uterine activity. As the regulating mechanism of these contractions has not been investigated the aim of the present study is to see if variations in the concentrations of peripheral venous circulating hormones could account for the accelerations of the heart rate and the uterine contractions. In four healthy pregnant women, 25 to 27 years old and in the 33rd-38th weeks of gestation, and in three healthy nonpregnant women, 29 to 30 years old, venous blood was intermittently collected from a cubital vein. The women were investigated in the left lateral as well as in the standing postures. The plasma concentrations of norepinephrine (NE), prostaglandin E2(PGE2), prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha), 6-k-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-k-PGF1 alpha) thromboxane B2 (TxB2), aldosterone (A), and the plasma renin activity (PRA) were measured by specific and sensitive assays. Significant differences in level and dynamics of the various substances were found between pregnant and nonpregnant subjects. However, no correlation could be found between the fluctuations in the concentration of hormones and heart rate accelerations and the occurrence of uterine contractions, respectively. Local changes of these substances in the uterus may not be reflected in the peripheral venous blood. Therefore our measurements can neither prove nor disprove the hypothesis that these hormonal substances are involved in the regulatory mechanism of uterine contractions occurring in standing.

  5. [The role of thyroid hormones in prevention of disorders of myocardial contractile function and antioxidant activity during heat stress].

    PubMed

    Bozhko, A P; Gorodetskaia, I V

    1998-03-01

    The stress of heat under conditions of immobilisation induced an obvious depression of the cardiodynamic parameters. This correlated well with intensification of lipoperoxydation and a drop in the myocardial antioxydant activity. Small doses of thyroid hormones prevented the decline of the parameters, normalisied myocardial free-radical homeostasis in result of activation of superoxyddysmutase, catalase, and general antioxydant activity.

  6. QSAR models for predicting the activity of non-peptide luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) antagonists derived from erythromycin A using quantum chemical properties.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Michael; Caballero, Julio

    2007-04-01

    Multiple linear regression (MLR) combined with genetic algorithm (GA) and Bayesian-regularized Genetic Neural Networks (BRGNNs) were used to model the binding affinity (pK(I)) of 38 11,12-cyclic carbamate derivatives of 6-O-methylerythromycin A for the Human Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone (LHRH) receptor using quantum chemical descriptors. A multiparametric MLR equation with good statistical quality was obtained that describes the features relevant for antagonistic activity when the substituent at the position 3 of the erythronolide core was varied. In addition, four-descriptor linear and nonlinear models were established for the whole dataset. Such models showed high statistical quality. However, the BRGNN model was better than the linear model according to the external validation process. In general, our linear and nonlinear models reveal that the binding affinity of the compounds studied for the LHRH receptor is modulated by electron-related terms.

  7. Stressor-specific effects of sex on HPA axis hormones and activation of stress-related neurocircuitry.

    PubMed

    Babb, Jessica A; Masini, Cher V; Day, Heidi E W; Campeau, Serge

    2013-11-01

    Experiencing stress can be physically and psychologically debilitating to an organism. Women have a higher prevalence of some stress-related mental illnesses, the reasons for which are unknown. These experiments explore differential HPA axis hormone release in male and female rats following acute stress. Female rats had a similar threshold of HPA axis hormone release following low intensity noise stress as male rats. Sex did not affect the acute release, or the return of HPA axis hormones to baseline following moderate intensity noise stress. Sensitive indices of auditory functioning obtained by modulation of the acoustic startle reflex by weak pre-pulses did not reveal any sexual dimorphism. Furthermore, male and female rats exhibited similar c-fos mRNA expression in the brain following noise stress, including several sex-influenced stress-related regions. The HPA axis response to noise stress was not affected by stage of estrous cycle, and ovariectomy significantly increased hormone release. Direct comparison of HPA axis hormone release to two different stressors in the same animals revealed that although female rats exhibit robustly higher HPA axis hormone release after restraint stress, the same effect was not observed following moderate and high intensity loud noise stress. Finally, the differential effect of sex on HPA axis responses to noise and restraint stress cannot readily be explained by differential social cues or general pain processing. These studies suggest the effect of sex on acute stress-induced HPA axis hormone activity is highly dependent on the type of stressor.

  8. Intake port

    DOEpatents

    Mendler, Edward Charles

    2005-02-01

    The volumetric efficiency and power of internal combustion engines is improved with an intake port having an intake nozzle, a venturi, and a surge chamber. The venturi is located almost halfway upstream the intake port between the intake valves and the intake plenum enabling the venturi throat diameter to be exceptionally small for providing an exceptionally high ram velocity and an exceptionally long and in turn high efficiency diffuser flowing into the surge chamber. The intake port includes an exceptionally large surge chamber volume for blow down of the intake air into the working cylinder of the engine.

  9. Hormone levels

    MedlinePlus

    Blood or urine tests can determine the levels of various hormones in the body. This includes reproductive hormones, thyroid hormones, adrenal hormones, pituitary hormones, and many others. For more information, see: ...

  10. Absence of systemic hormonal effects in an oestradiol diether topically active on the vaginal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Wolff, J P; Cachelou, R; Guéritée, N

    1982-12-01

    The women in this study were either post-menopausal or ovariectomised for at least 1 yr prior to the study. They had also been treated for cancer of the cervix (27 women), endometrium (5), ovaries (5) or breast (1). All women presented with sexual troubles, mainly genital discomfort (dyspareunia or vaginism). In a double-blind fashion, gynaecological capsules containing either an oestradiol diether (ICD: promestriene) or only the excipient were administered for 40 consecutive days. At the end of the treatment, the FSH, LH, oestrone (E1) and oestradiol (E2) plasma levels were not found to be significantly different from the pre-therapeutic values. These results suggest that promestriene acts on the vaginal mucosa, therefore not being converted back into the hormone from which it was derived. Also, in its dietheroxide form, promestriene is incapable of crossing the malpighian (vaginal or epidermal) epithelium and of reaching the general blood circulation. This discrepancy between the local anti-atrophic effects and the inability to exert systemic oestrogen activities singles out promestriene and justifies its therapeutic use when hormonally active oestrogens are contra-indicated, as in patients who have an oestrogen-sensitive cancer in their medical history.

  11. Thyroid hormones increase Na -H exchange activity in renal brush border membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, J.; Sacktor, B.

    1985-06-01

    Na -H exchange activity, i.e., amiloride-sensitive Na and H flux, in renal proximal tubule brush border (luminal) membrane vesicles was increased in the hyperthyroid rat and decreased in the hypothyroid rat, relative to the euthyroid animal. A positive correlation was found between Na -H exchange activity and serum concentrations of thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). The thyroid status of the animal did not alter amiloride-insensitive Na uptake. The rate of passive pH gradient dissipation was higher in membrane vesicles from hyperthyroid rats compared to the rate in vesicles from hypothyroid animals, a result which would tend to limit the increase in Na uptake in vesicles from hyperthyroid animals. Na -dependent phosphate uptake was increased in membrane vesicles from hyperthyroid rats; Na -dependent D-glucose and L-proline uptakes were not changed by the thyroid status of the animal. The effect of thyroid hormones in increasing the uptake of Na in the brush border membrane vesicle is consistent with the action of the hormones in enhancing renal Na reabsorption.

  12. Fiber intake and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in type 2 diabetes: Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) Trial findings at baseline and 1 year

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) is elevated in obese individuals with type 2 diabetes and may contribute, independently of traditional factors, to increased cardiovascular disease risk. Fiber intake may decrease PAI-1 levels. We examined the associations of fiber intake and its changes wit...

  13. Plasma mineral profiles and hormonal activities of normal cycling and repeat breeding crossbred cows: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Barui, Abhijit; Batabyal, Subhasis; Ghosh, Sarbaswarup; Saha, Debjani; Chattopadhyay, Saibal

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was carried out to compare the associated role of micro minerals and hormones in repeat breeding animals with the normal crossbred cows. Materials and Methods: Blood samples were collected from 10 normal cycling and 10 repeat breeding crossbred cows of Ramakrishna Mission Ashram, Narendrapur to study the plasma mineral profile and hormonal activities. Results: Zn was found to be highly significant (p<0.01) between the two groups. Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and progesterone showed significant (p<0.05) difference in repeat breeding animal from the normal cyclic animal, whereas no significant differences were observed in Ca, P, Cu, Se, Co, luteinizing hormone and estradiol level. Conclusion: It may conclude that repeat breeding condition of crossbred cows in farm condition is mainly due to the low level of progesterone, FSH and zinc. PMID:27046994

  14. Germ-line activation of the luteinizing hormone receptor directly drives spermiogenesis in a nonmammalian vertebrate

    PubMed Central

    Chauvigné, François; Zapater, Cinta; Gasol, Josep M.; Cerdà, Joan

    2014-01-01

    In both mammals and teleosts, the differentiation of postmeiotic spermatids to spermatozoa (spermiogenesis) is thought to be indirectly controlled by the luteinizing hormone (LH) acting through the LH/choriogonadotropin receptor (LHCGR) to stimulate androgen secretion in the interstitial Leydig cells. However, a more direct, nonsteroidal role of LH mediating the spermiogenic pathway remains unclear. Using a flatfish with semicystic spermatogenesis, in which spermatids are released into the seminiferous lobule lumen (SLL), where they develop into spermatozoa without direct contact with the supporting Sertoli cells, we show that haploid spermatids express the homolog of the tetrapod LHCGR (Lhcgrba). Both native Lh and intramuscularly injected His-tagged recombinant Lh (rLh) are immunodetected bound to the Lhcgrba of free spermatids in the SLL, showing that circulating gonadotropin can reach the intratubular compartment. In vitro incubation of flatfish spermatids isolated from the SLL with rLh specifically promotes their differentiation into spermatozoa, whereas recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone and steroid hormones are ineffective. Using a repertoire of molecular markers and inhibitors, we find that the Lh-Lhcgrba induction of spermiogenesis is mediated through a cAMP/PKA signaling pathway that initiates the transcription of genes potentially involved in the function of spermatozoa. We further show that Lhcgrba expression in germ cells also occurs in distantly related fishes, suggesting this feature is likely conserved in teleosts regardless of the type of germ cell development. These data reveal a role of LH in vertebrate germ cells, whereby a Lhcgrba-activated signaling cascade in haploid spermatids directs gene expression and the progression of spermiogenesis. PMID:24474769

  15. Germ-line activation of the luteinizing hormone receptor directly drives spermiogenesis in a nonmammalian vertebrate.

    PubMed

    Chauvigné, François; Zapater, Cinta; Gasol, Josep M; Cerdà, Joan

    2014-01-28

    In both mammals and teleosts, the differentiation of postmeiotic spermatids to spermatozoa (spermiogenesis) is thought to be indirectly controlled by the luteinizing hormone (LH) acting through the LH/choriogonadotropin receptor (LHCGR) to stimulate androgen secretion in the interstitial Leydig cells. However, a more direct, nonsteroidal role of LH mediating the spermiogenic pathway remains unclear. Using a flatfish with semicystic spermatogenesis, in which spermatids are released into the seminiferous lobule lumen (SLL), where they develop into spermatozoa without direct contact with the supporting Sertoli cells, we show that haploid spermatids express the homolog of the tetrapod LHCGR (Lhcgrba). Both native Lh and intramuscularly injected His-tagged recombinant Lh (rLh) are immunodetected bound to the Lhcgrba of free spermatids in the SLL, showing that circulating gonadotropin can reach the intratubular compartment. In vitro incubation of flatfish spermatids isolated from the SLL with rLh specifically promotes their differentiation into spermatozoa, whereas recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone and steroid hormones are ineffective. Using a repertoire of molecular markers and inhibitors, we find that the Lh-Lhcgrba induction of spermiogenesis is mediated through a cAMP/PKA signaling pathway that initiates the transcription of genes potentially involved in the function of spermatozoa. We further show that Lhcgrba expression in germ cells also occurs in distantly related fishes, suggesting this feature is likely conserved in teleosts regardless of the type of germ cell development. These data reveal a role of LH in vertebrate germ cells, whereby a Lhcgrba-activated signaling cascade in haploid spermatids directs gene expression and the progression of spermiogenesis.

  16. Thyroid hormone receptor inhibits hepatoma cell migration through transcriptional activation of Dickkopf 4

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Hsiang-Cheng; Liao, Chen-Hsin; Huang, Ya-Hui; Wu, Sheng-Ming; Tsai, Chung-Ying; Liao, Chia-Jung; Tseng, Yi-Hsin; Lin, Yang-Hsiang; Chen, Cheng-Yi; Chung, I-Hsiao; Wu, Tzu-I; Chen, Wei-Jan; Lin, Kwang-Huei

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •T{sub 3} affects DKK4 mRNA and protein expression in HepG2-TR cells. •Regulation of DKK4 by T{sub 3} is at transcriptional level. •DKK4 overexpression suppresses hepatoma cell metastasis. -- Abstract: Triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) is a potent form of thyroid hormone mediates several physiological processes including cellular growth, development, and differentiation via binding to the nuclear thyroid hormone receptor (TR). Recent studies have demonstrated critical roles of T{sub 3}/TR in tumor progression. Moreover, long-term hypothyroidism appears to be associated with the incidence of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), independent of other major HCC risk factors. Dickkopf (DKK) 4, a secreted protein that antagonizes the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, is induced by T{sub 3} at both mRNA and protein levels in HCC cell lines. However, the mechanism underlying T{sub 3}-mediated regulation of DKK4 remains unknown. In the present study, the 5′ promoter region of DKK4 was serially deleted, and the reporter assay performed to localize the T{sub 3} response element (TRE). Consequently, we identified an atypical direct repeat TRE between nucleotides −1645 and −1629 conferring T{sub 3} responsiveness to the DKK4 gene. This region was further validated using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Stable DKK4 overexpression in SK-Hep-1 cells suppressed cell invasion and metastatic potential, both in vivo andin vitro, via reduction of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) expression. Our findings collectively suggest that DKK4 upregulated by T{sub 3}/TR antagonizes the Wnt signal pathway to suppress tumor cell progression, thus providing new insights into the molecular mechanism underlying thyroid hormone activity in HCC.

  17. 2-deoxy-D-glucose suppresses food intake through activation of hypothalamic histamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Sakata, T; Tamari, Y; Kang, M; Yoshimatsu, H

    1994-08-01

    The aim of this experiment was to demonstrate whether brain histamine contributes to delayed suppression of food intake after administration of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG). Food intake decreased significantly for 48 h after infusion of 2-DG into the rat third cerebroventricle. This delayed decrease in food intake was abolished by depletion of neuronal histamine by intraperitoneal pretreatment with alpha-fluoromethylhistidine (160 mumol/rat), a suicide inhibitor of a histamine-synthesizing enzyme. Intracerebroventricular infusion of 24 mumol 2-DG accelerated turnover rate of hypothalamic histamine. These results indicate that the delayed feeding suppression by 2-DG is modulated through histaminergic neurons in the hypothalamus. This histaminergic response may be related, at least in part, to homeostatic control of energy metabolism in the brain.

  18. Hepatic messenger ribonucleic acid activity profiles in experimental azotemia in the rat. Relationship to food intake and thyroid function.

    PubMed Central

    Kinlaw, W B; Schwartz, H L; Mariash, C N; Bingham, C; Carr, F E; Oppenheimer, J H

    1984-01-01

    We have studied the hepatic messenger RNA (mRNA) activity profile in chronically azotemic rats and sought to determine whether the observed changes could be mediated either by reduced food intake or diminished thyroid function at the tissue level. mRNA activity profiles were produced by two-dimensional gel electrophoretic separation of radioactively labeled products of an in vitro reticulocyte lysate system which had been programmed by hepatic RNA. Of the approximately 240 translational products identified in this system, seven sequences were consistently altered in azotemia. In pair-fed animals six of these also decreased, but the alterations in three were depressed to a significantly lesser extent in the pair-fed group. Moreover, analysis of covariance suggested that food intake could account for the differences in only one sequence. The possibility that the mRNA activity profile in azotemia could represent the effects of diminished thyroid function was minimized by the finding that the reductions in plasma thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) levels observed were due largely to reduced plasma protein binding, with maintenance of the mean free T4 and free T3 concentrations within the normal range. The changes in only one mRNA sequence could be related to free T3 levels alone. Our findings, therefore, indicate that although diminished food intake and reduced thyroid function may contribute to some of the observed changes in the mRNA activity profiles, the bulk of alterations in azotemia appear to be mediated by other mechanisms. The striking overlap between the sequences affected by azotemia and pair-feeding raises the speculation that altered gene expression in azotemia may reflect an impaired hepatic response at the pretranslational level to metabolic signals associated with food intake. Images PMID:6511910

  19. The effect of cold on serum thyroid hormones and hepatic 5 prime mono-deiodinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Hesslink, R.L. Jr.; Quesada, M.; D'Alesandro, M.; Homer, L.D.; Reed, J.L.; Christopherson, R.; Young, B.A. Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton )

    1991-03-11

    Cold exposed swine have an increases serum concentration of triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) and increased T{sub 3} production rate. It is thought that hepatic thyroxine (T{sub 4}) deiodination (5DI) contributes to circulating T{sub 3} concentrations. The authors investigated the effects of cold exposure (14 days) on energy intake, serum free T{sub 3} (FT{sub 3}) and free T{sub 4} (FT{sub 4}) levels; and 5DI in 5-month boars. Hepatic 5DI activity was determined by measuring the {sup 125}I generated from trace amounts of {sup 125}I T{sub 4}. FT{sub 3} and FT{sub 4} were assayed by RIA. Swine were housed in either 20C (control; n = 5) or 4C (cold; n = 7) chambers and given food ad libitum. Cold exposure increased energy intake by 42%. The increase (93%) in hepatic 5DI V{sub max} after cold exposure parallels the increase in whole animal T{sub 3} production and may account for FT{sub 3} values found after cold exposure.

  20. Extracellular production of an intact and biologically active human growth hormone by the Bacillus brevis system.

    PubMed

    Kajino, T; Saito, Y; Asami, O; Yamada, Y; Hirai, M; Udata, S

    1997-10-01

    The characteristic features of the Bacillus brevis system are very high productivity of heterologous proteins and very low extracellular protease activity. However, degradation of some heterologous proteins, especially mammalian proteins, can be observed and resulted in a lowering of protein productivity. By using a mutant expressing low levels of proteases and the addition of EDTA to the medium, intact human growth hormone (hGH) was successfully produced with the B. brevis system. Signal peptide modification with higher basicity in the amino terminal region and higher hydrophobicity in the middle region brought about a twelve-fold increase in hGH production. The hGH yield was further elevated to 240 mg L-1 by optimization of culture conditions. Thus, biologically active and mature hGH can be efficiently produced directly in the medium with the B. brevis system.

  1. Activation of the nuclear receptor LXR by oxysterols defines a new hormone response pathway.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, J M; Kliewer, S A; Moore, L B; Smith-Oliver, T A; Oliver, B B; Su, J L; Sundseth, S S; Winegar, D A; Blanchard, D E; Spencer, T A; Willson, T M

    1997-02-07

    Accumulation of cholesterol causes both repression of genes controlling cholesterol biosynthesis and cellular uptake and induction of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase, which leads to the removal of cholesterol by increased metabolism to bile acids. Here, we report that LXRalpha and LXRbeta, two orphan members of the nuclear receptor superfamily, are activated by 24(S), 25-epoxycholesterol and 24(S)-hydroxycholesterol at physiologic concentrations. In addition, we have identified an LXR response element in the promoter region of the rat cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase gene. Our data provide evidence for a new hormonal signaling pathway that activates transcription in response to oxysterols and suggest that LXRs play a critical role in the regulation of cholesterol homeostasis.

  2. [Diltiazem enhances food intake and gastrointestinal function in rats].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Na; Li, Sheng-Li; Li, Chuang-Hong; Zhang, Chen-Xu; Yuan, Hui; Li, Xin-Ping

    2012-04-25

    The present study was to investigate the effects of diltiazem, a ghrelin receptor agonist, on food intake and gastrointestinal functions in rats. Rats were intragastrically administered with diltiazem solution (daily 16 mg/kg, 30 mg/kg or 80 mg/kg, 30 d), and the rats with saline as control. To detect the effects of diltiazem on food intake and body weight, the average daily food intake and body weight were recorded, and the serum metabolic hormones of plasma growth hormone (GH) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) were tested by radioimmunoassay. By means of the spectrophotometer and the modified Mett's method, the effects of diltiazem on rat's gastrointestinal function and pepsin activity were tested, respectively. In addition, the gastric juice's acidity of rats was detected by titration and the secretion amount was calculated. The results showed that the food intake and body weight were maximally promoted by diltiazem at the dose of 30 mg/kg daily (30 d). The average daily food intake and body weight were significantly increased, and the serum concentrations of GH and NPY were also remarkably increased in diltiazem-treated groups compared with those in control group. The results also showed that the gastric emptying rate, gastric acid secretion and the activity of pepsin were significantly increased in diltiazem-treated group compared with those in control group. These results suggest that diltiazem induces enhancement of eating, in the same time, it can also stimulate the gastrointestinal function and regulate growth of rat.

  3. Thyroid hormone stimulates the renal Na/H exchanger NHE3 by transcriptional activation

    PubMed Central

    CANO, ADRIANA; BAUM, MICHEL; MOE, ORSON W.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone stimulates renal proximal tubule NaCl and NaHCO3 absorption in part by activating the apical membrane Na/H exchanger NHE3. We used a renal epithelial cell line, the opossum kidney (OK) cell, to define the mechanism by which 3,5,3′-triiodothyronine (T3) increases NHE3 activity. T3 stimulated NHE3 activity, an effect that was blocked by inhibition of cellular transcription or translation. The increase in activity was associated with increases in steady-state cell surface and total cellular NHE3 protein and NHE3 transcript abundance. T3 stimulated transcription of the NHE3 gene and had no effect on NHE3 transcript stability. The transcriptional activity of the 5′-flanking region of the rat NHE3 gene was stimulated by T3 when expressed in OK cells. When heterologously expressed rat NHE3 transcript levels were clamped constant with a constitutive promoter in OK cells, T3 has no effect on rat NHE3 protein abundance, suggesting the absence of regulation of NHE3 protein stability or translation. These studies demonstrate that T3 stimulates NHE3 activity by activating NHE3 gene transcription and increasing NHE3 transcript and protein abundance. PMID:9886925

  4. Growth hormone activity in mitochondria depends on GH receptor Box 1 and involves caveolar pathway targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Perret-Vivancos, Cecile; Abbate, Aude; Ardail, Dominique; Raccurt, Mireille; Usson, Yves; Lobie, Peter E.; Morel, Gerard . E-mail: gerard.morel@univ-lyon1.fr

    2006-02-01

    Growth hormone (GH) binding to its receptor (GHR) initiates GH-dependent signal transduction and internalization pathways to generate the biological effects. The precise role and way of action of GH on mitochondrial function are not yet fully understood. We show here that GH can stimulate cellular oxygen consumption in CHO cells transfected with cDNA coding for the full-length GHR. By using different GHR cDNA constructs, we succeeded in determining the different parts of the GHR implicated in the mitochondrial response to GH. Polarography and two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy analysis showed that the Box 1 of the GHR intracellular domain was required for an activation of the mitochondrial respiration in response to a GH exposure. However, confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that cells lacking the GHR Box 1 could efficiently internalize the hormone. We demonstrated that internalization mediated either by clathrin-coated pits or by caveolae was able to regulate GH mitochondrial effect: these two pathways are both essential to obtain the GH stimulatory action on mitochondrial function. Moreover, electron microscopic and biochemical approaches allowed us to identify the caveolar pathway as essential for targeting GH and GHR to mitochondria.

  5. Iron intakes of Australian infants and toddlers: findings from the Melbourne Infant Feeding, Activity and Nutrition Trial (InFANT) Program.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Linda A; McNaughton, Sarah A; Campbell, Karen J; Szymlek-Gay, Ewa A

    2016-01-28

    Fe deficiency remains the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide and young children are at particular risk. Preventative food-based strategies require knowledge of current intakes, sources of Fe, and factors associated with low Fe intakes; yet few data are available for Australian children under 2 years. This study's objectives were to determine intakes and food sources of Fe for Australian infants and toddlers and identify non-dietary factors associated with Fe intake. Dietary, anthropometric and socio-demographic data from the Melbourne Infant Feeding, Activity and Nutrition Trial Program were analysed for 485 infants (mean age: 9·1 (sd 1·2) months) and 423 toddlers (mean age: 19·6 (sd 2·6) months) and their mothers. Dietary intakes were assessed via 24-h recalls over 3 non-consecutive days. Prevalence of inadequate Fe intake was estimated using the full probability approach. Associations between potential non-dietary predictors (sex, breast-feeding status, age when introduced to solid foods, maternal age, maternal education, maternal employment status and mother's country of birth) and Fe intakes were assessed using linear regression. Mean Fe intakes were 9·1 (sd 4·3) mg/d for infants and 6·6 (sd 2·4) mg/d for toddlers. Our results showed that 32·6 % of infants and 18·6 % of toddlers had inadequate Fe intake. Main food sources of Fe were Fe-fortified infant formula and cereals for infants and toddlers, respectively. Female sex and current breast-feeding were negatively associated with infant Fe intakes. Introduction to solid foods at or later than 6 months was negatively associated with Fe intake in toddlers. These data may facilitate food-based interventions to improve Australian children's Fe intake levels.

  6. Bed rest suppresses bioassayable growth hormone release in response to muscle activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCall, G. E.; Goulet, C.; Grindeland, R. E.; Hodgson, J. A.; Bigbee, A. J.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1997-01-01

    Hormonal responses to muscle activity were studied in eight men before (-13 or -12 and -8 or -7 days), during (2 or 3, 8 or 9, and 13 or 14 days) and after (+2 or +3 and +10 or +11 days) 17 days of bed rest. Muscle activity consisted of a series of unilateral isometric plantar flexions, including 4 maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs), 48 contractions at 30% MVC, and 12 contractions at 80% MVC, all performed at a 4:1-s work-to-rest ratio. Blood was collected before and immediately after muscle activity to measure plasma growth hormone by radioimmunoassay (IGH) and by bioassay (BGH) of tibia epiphyseal cartilage growth in hypophysectomized rats. Plasma IGH was unchanged by muscle activity before, during, or after bed rest. Before bed rest, muscle activity increased (P < 0.05) BGH by 66% at -13 or -12 days (2,146 +/- 192 to 3,565 +/- 197 microg/l) and by 92% at -8 or -7 days (2,162 +/- 159 to 4,161 +/- 204 microg/l). After 2 or 3 days of bed rest, there was no response of BGH to the muscle activity, a pattern that persisted through 8 or 9 days of bed rest. However, after 13 or 14 days of bed rest, plasma concentration of BGH was significantly lower after than before muscle activity (2,594 +/- 211 to 2,085 +/- 109 microg/l). After completion of bed rest, muscle activity increased BGH by 31% at 2 or 3 days (1,807 +/- 117 to 2,379 +/- 473 microg/l; P < 0.05), and by 10 or 11 days the BGH response was similar to that before bed rest (1,881 +/- 75 to 4,160 +/- 315 microg/l; P < 0.05). These data demonstrate that the ambulatory state of an individual can have a major impact on the release of BGH, but not IGH, in response to a single bout of muscle activity.

  7. Direct thyroid hormone activation of mitochondria: identification of adenine nucleotide translocase (AdNT) as the hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Sterling, K

    1987-01-01

    Earlier we presented preliminary data suggesting that the thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3) is bound with an association constant (Ka) approximating 2 X 10(11) M-1 by the ADP/ATP carrier, adenine nucleotide translocase (AdNT) purified from beef heart mitochondria (Endocrinology 110: 292, 1986). We now report that [125I] T3 is capable of photoaffinity labeling not only purified AdNT but also the carrier in intact beef heart mitochondria. The identity of the covalently labeled AdNT was corroborated by two dimensional electrophoresis (O'Farrell) with pI approximately 10 on electrofocusing (first dimension) and Mr approximately 31,000 on SDS gel (second dimension). Further identification of the covalently labeled material as authentic AdNT was afforded by recognition by specific monoclonal antibodies. Moreover, we found that addition of excess nonradioactive T3 to intact mitochondria or to mitochondrial protein solution prior to photoaffinity labeling resulted in inhibition of formation of labeled AdNT, compatible with saturation of limited capacity binding sites rather than nonspecific labeling with the ligand [125I] T3. It was considered highly significant that labeling in intact mitochondria was at least an order of magnitude greater than that observed with purified AdNT. This finding is compatible with our concept of an important role of the lipid microenvironment in the intact mitochondrial membrane in T3 binding.

  8. Putative relationship between hormonal status and serum pyrrolidone carboxypeptidase activity in pre- and post- menopausal women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Carrera-González, María del Pilar; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús; Dueñas, Basilio; Martínez-Ferrol, Julia; Mayas, María Dolores; Martínez-Martos, José Manuel

    2012-12-01

    In breast cancer, hormonal changes are rather constant in post-menopausal women since they tend to vary only over long time spans. However, in pre-menopausal women, the development of breast cancer is associated with hormonal physiological variations. The aim of the present work was to analyse the changes in circulating levels of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) in pre- and post-menopausal women that were healthy or with breast cancer, and their connection to serum pyrrolidone carboxypeptidase (Pcp) activity. We observed significant changes in the hormonal profile in post-menopausal women with breast cancer compared to the control group. In pre-menopausal women, we found significant changes in circulating GnRH levels with respect to the healthy group. Our present results support the existence of neuroendocrine misregulation that could be involved in tumour progression, with Pcp being a potentially new pharmacological target in breast cancer treatments.

  9. Activation of μ opioid receptors in the LPBN facilitates sodium intake in rats.

    PubMed

    Pavan, Carolina G; Roncari, Camila F; Barbosa, Silas P; De Paula, Patrícia M; Colombari, Débora S A; De Luca, Laurival A; Colombari, Eduardo; Menani, José V

    2015-07-15

    Important inhibitory mechanisms for the control of water and sodium intake are present in the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN). Opioid receptors are expressed by LPBN neurons and injections of β-endorphin (nonspecific opioid receptor agonist) in this area induce 0.3M NaCl and water intake in satiated rats. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the injections of endomorphin-1 (μ opioid receptor agonist) alone or combined with the blockade of μ, κ or δ opioid receptors into the LPBN on 0.3M NaCl and water intake induced by subcutaneous injections of the diuretic furosemide (FURO) combined with low dose of the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor captopril (CAP). Male Holtzman rats with stainless steel cannulas implanted bilaterally in the LPBN were used. Bilateral injections of endomorphin-1 (0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0nmol/0.2μl) into the LPBN increased 0.3M NaCl and water intake induced by FURO+CAP. The previous blockade of μ opioid receptor with CTAP (1.0nmol/0.2μl) into the LPBN reduced the effect of endomorphin-1 on FURO+CAP-induced 0.3M NaCl. GNTI (κ opioid receptor antagonist; 2.0nmol/0.2μl) and naltrindole (δ opioid receptor antagonist; 2.0nmol/0.2μl) injected into the LPBN did not change the effects of endomorphin-1 on FURO+CAP-induced 0.3M NaCl. The results suggest that μ opioid receptors in the LPBN are involved in the control of sodium intake.

  10. Enhanced Anti-Tumoral Activity of Methotrexate-Human Serum Albumin Conjugated Nanoparticles by Targeting with Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone (LHRH) Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Azade; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Ahadi, Fatemeh; Nouri, Farank Salman; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Ostad, Seyed Nasser; Borougeni, Atefeh Taheri; Mansoori, Pooria

    2011-01-01

    Active targeting could increase the efficacy of anticancer drugs. Methotrexate-human serum albumin (MTX-HSA) conjugates, functionalized by luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) as targeting moieties, with the aim of specifically targeting the cancer cells, were prepared. Owing to the high expression of LHRH receptors in many cancer cells as compared to normal cells, LHRH was used as the targeting ligand in this study. LHRH was conjugated to MTX-HSA nanoparticles via a cross-linker. Three types of LHRH targeted nanoparticles with a mean particle size between 120–138 nm were prepared. The cytotoxicity of LHRH targeted and non-targeted nanoparticles were determined on the LHRH positive and negative cell lines. The internalization of the targeted and non-targeted nanoparticles in LHRH receptor positive and negative cells was investigated using flow cytometry analysis and fluorescence microscopy. The cytotoxicity of the LHRH targeted nanoparticles on the LHRH receptor positive cells were significantly more than non-targeted nanoparticles. LHRH targeted nanoparticles were also internalized by LHRH receptor positive cells significantly more than non-targeted nanoparticles. There were no significant differences between the uptake of targeted and non-targeted nanoparticles to the LHRH receptor negative cells. The active targeting procedure using LHRH targeted MTX-HSA nanoparticles could increase the anti-tumoral activity of MTX. PMID:21845098

  11. The Effect of a Dairy-Based Recovery Beverage on Post-Exercise Appetite and Energy Intake in Active Females

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Meghan A.; Green, Benjamin P.; James, Lewis J.; Stevenson, Emma J.; Rumbold, Penny L. S.

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the effect of a dairy-based recovery beverage on post-exercise appetite and energy intake in active females. Thirteen active females completed three trials in a crossover design. Participants completed 60 min of cycling at 65% V̇O2peak, before a 120 min recovery period. On completion of cycling, participants consumed a commercially available dairy-based beverage (DBB), a commercially available carbohydrate beverage (CHO), or a water control (H2O). Non-esterified fatty acids, glucose, and appetite-related peptides alongside measures of subjective appetite were sampled at baseline and at 30 min intervals during recovery. At 120 min, energy intake was assessed in the laboratory by ad libitum assessment, and in the free-living environment by weighed food record for the remainder of the study day. Energy intake at the ad libitum lunch was lower after DBB compared to H2O (4.43 ± 0.20, 5.58 ± 0.41 MJ, respectively; p = 0.046; (95% CI: −2.28, −0.20 MJ)), but was not different to CHO (5.21 ± 0.46 MJ), with no difference between trials thereafter. Insulin and GLP-17-36 were higher following DBB compared to H2O (p = 0.015 and p = 0.001, respectively) but not to CHO (p = 1.00 and p = 0.146, respectively). In addition, glucagon was higher following DBB compared to CHO (p = 0.008) but not to H2O (p = 0.074). The results demonstrate that where DBB consumption may manifest in accelerated recovery, this may be possible without significantly affecting total energy intake and subsequent appetite-related responses relative to a CHO beverage. PMID:27338460

  12. Dietary fortificant iron intake is negatively associated with quality of life in patients with mildly active inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency anaemia and oral iron supplementation have been associated negatively with quality of life, and with adverse effects, respectively, in subjects with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Hence, the risk-benefit ratio of oral iron is not understood in this patient group. The present case–control study investigated whether dietary iron intake impacts on quality of life in IBD patients. Methods Quality of life, habitual dietary iron intakes and iron requirements were assessed in 29 patients with inactive or mildly active IBD as well as in 28 healthy control subjects. Results As expected, quality of life was worse in IBD patients as a whole in comparison to healthy controls according to EuroQol score and EuroQol VAS percentage (6.9 ± 1.6 vs 5.3 ± 0.6; p< 0.0001 and 77 ± 14% vs 88 ± 12%; p=0.004 respectively). For IBD subjects, 21/29 were iron deplete based upon serum iron responses to oral iron but, overall, were non-anaemic with mean haemoglobin of 13.3 ± 1.5 g/dL, and there was no difference in their quality of life compared to 8/29 iron replete subjects (Hb 14.0 ± 0.8 g/dL). Interestingly, total dietary iron intake was significantly negatively associated with quality of life in IBD patients, specifically for non-haem iron and, more specifically, for fortificant iron. Moreover, for total non-haem iron the negative association disappeared when fortificant iron values were subtracted. Finally, further sub-analysis indicated that the negative association between (fortificant) dietary iron intake and quality of life in IBD patients is driven by findings in patients with mildly active disease rather than in patients with quiescent disease. Conclusions Iron deficiency per se (i.e. without concomitant anaemia) does not appear to further affect quality of life in IBD patients with inactive or mildly active disease. However, in this preliminary study, dietary iron intake, particularly fortificant iron, appears to be significantly negatively

  13. Occurrence of thyroid hormone activities in drinking water from eastern China: contributions of phthalate esters.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Hu, Xinxin; Zhang, Fengxian; Hu, Guanjiu; Hao, Yingqun; Zhang, Xiaowei; Liu, Hongling; Wei, Si; Wang, Xinru; Giesy, John P; Yu, Hongxia

    2012-02-07

    Thyroid hormone is essential for the development of humans. However, some synthetic chemicals with thyroid disrupting potentials are detectable in drinking water. This study investigated the presence of thyroid active chemicals and their toxicity potential in drinking water from five cities in eastern China by use of an in vitro CV-1 cell-based reporter gene assay. Waters were examined from several phases of drinking water processing, including source water, finished water from waterworks, tap water, and boiled tap water. To identify the responsible compounds, concentrations and toxic equivalents of a list of phthalate esters were quantitatively determined. None of the extracts exhibited thyroid receptor (TR) agonist activity. Most of the water samples exhibited TR antagonistic activities. None of the boiled water displayed the TR antagonistic activity. Dibutyl phthalate accounted for 84.0-98.1% of the antagonist equivalents in water sources, while diisobutyl phthalate, di-n-octyl phthalate and di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate also contributed. Approximately 90% of phthalate esters and TR antagonistic activities were removable by waterworks treatment processes, including filtration, coagulation, aerobic biodegradation, chlorination, and ozonation. Boiling water effectively removed phthalate esters from tap water. Thus, this process was recommended to local residents to reduce certain potential thyroid related risks through drinking water.

  14. Novel alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptide analogues with high candidacidal activity.

    PubMed

    Grieco, Paolo; Rossi, Claudia; Colombo, Gualtiero; Gatti, Stefano; Novellino, Ettore; Lipton, James M; Catania, Anna

    2003-02-27

    alpha-Melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) is an endogenous linear tridecapeptide with potent antiinflammatory effects. We recently demonstrated that alpha-MSH and its C-terminal sequence Lys-Pro-Val (alpha-MSH (11-13)) have antimicrobial effects against two major and representative pathogens: Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. In an attempt to improve the candidacidal activity of alpha-MSH and to better understand the peptide structure-antifungal activity relations, we designed and synthesized novel peptide analogues. Because previous data suggested that antimicrobial effects of alpha-MSH were receptor-mediated, we chose to focus on the sequence alpha-MSH (6-13), which contains the invariant core sequence His-Phe-Arg-Trp (6-9) that is important for binding to the known melanocortin receptors and also contains the sequence Lys-Pro-Val (11-13) that is known to be important for antimicrobial activity. In this structure-activity study, we discovered several compounds that have greater candidacidal activity than alpha-MSH. The peptide [d-Nal-7,Phe-12]-alpha-MSH (6-13) was the most potent of the analogues tested. The present results are very encouraging because they show the great potential of these peptides as a truly novel class of candidacidal compounds.

  15. Melanin-concentrating hormone is necessary for olanzapine-inhibited locomotor activity in male mice

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Melissa J. S.; Douris, Nicholas; Forrow, Avery B.; Monnard, Arnaud; Lu, Shuangyu; Flaherty, Stephen E.; Adams, Andrew C.; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria

    2015-01-01

    Olanzapine (OLZ), an atypical antipsychotic, can be effective in treating patients with restricting type anorexia nervosa who exercise excessively. Clinical improvements include weight gain and reduced pathological hyperactivity. However the neuronal populations and mechanisms underlying OLZ actions are not known. We studied the effects of OLZ on hyperactivity using male mice lacking the hypothalamic neuropeptide melanin-concentrating hormone (MCHKO) that are lean and hyperactive. We compared the in vivo effects of systemic or intra-accumbens nucleus (Acb) OLZ administration on locomotor activity in WT and MCHKO littermates. Acute systemic OLZ treatment in WT mice significantly reduced locomotor activity, an effect that is substantially attenuated in MCHKO mice. Furthermore, OLZ infusion directly into the Acb of WT mice reduced locomotor activity, but not in MCHKO mice. To identify contributing neuronal mechanisms, we assessed the effect of OLZ treatment on Acb synaptic transmission ex vivo and in vitro. Intraperitoneal OLZ treatment reduced Acb GABAergic activity in WT but not MCHKO neurons. This effect was also seen in vitro by applying OLZ to acute brain slices. OLZ reduced the frequency and amplitude of GABAergic activity that was more robust in WT than MCHKO Acb. These findings indicate that OLZ reduced Acb GABAergic transmission and that MCH is necessary for the hypolocomotor effects of OLZ. PMID:26092201

  16. Effect of ovarian hormones on promotion of bactericidal activity by uterine secretions of ovariectomized mares.

    PubMed

    Watson, E D; Stokes, C R; David, J S; Bourne, F J

    1987-03-01

    The bactericidal and phagocytic activities of blood neutrophils suspended in uterine washings and the mobilization of neutrophils into the uterine lumen were studied in ovariectomized mares receiving oestradiol benzoate (N = 4), progesterone (N = 4) or oily vehicle (N = 4). Uterine lavage was performed sequentially up to 144 h after induction of endometritis by intrauterine infusion of glycogen (1%). There was no significant difference between the 3 groups in speed of mobilization of neutrophils into the uterus in the first 6 h after infusion but there were significantly more uterine luminal neutrophils in progesterone-treated than in oestradiol-treated mares by 24 h after infusion (P less than 0.01). Uterine washings collected from progesterone-treated mares at 0, 24 and 144 h were significantly worse at promoting bactericidal activity by neutrophils than washings from oestradiol-treated and control mares (P less than 0.001). In oestrogen-treated and control mares bactericidal activity had increased by 144 h but in progesterone-treated mares bactericidal activity remained low. Neither treatment nor time affected the ability of washings to opsonize yeast blastospores. Elevated concentrations of progesterone in plasma were therefore associated with decreased bactericidal activity of neutrophils suspended in uterine washings but the generation of C3b in washings did not appear to be affected by hormone treatment.

  17. Synthesis of Mono-PEGylated Growth Hormone Releasing Peptide-2 and Investigation of its Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Xu, Beihua; Zhou, Ziniu

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate an efficient synthetic route to the mono-PEGylated growth hormone releasing peptide-2 (GHRP-2) and its biological activity in vivo. The commercially available key PEGylating reagent, mPEG-NHS ester, was successfully utilized to the synthesis of mono-PEGylated GHRP-2, during which the PEGylation profiles of GHRP-2 were monitored by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The product was purified by cation exchange chromatography, and its biological activity was conducted in rats. The desired mono-PEGylated GHRP-2 as the major product was readily obtained in anhydrous aprotic solvent, such as dimethyl formamide (DMF) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), when the molar ratio of mPEG-NHS ester to GHRP-2 was fixed to be 0.8:1. The products were characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. The evaluation of the biological activity for the products showed that the mono-PEGylated GHRP-2 gave a more stable activity than GHRP-2, suggesting that PEGylation led to the increase in the half-life of GHRP-2 in plasma without greatly impairing the biological activity. PEGylation of the GHRP-2 is a good choice for the development of the GHRP-2 applications.

  18. The relationship between habitual dietary phosphorus and calcium intake, and bone mineral density in young Japanese women: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Ito, Sanae; Ishida, Hiromi; Uenishi, Kazuhiro; Murakami, Kentaro; Sasaki, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorus and calcium are essential for bone health. There is a concern that a low calcium/phosphorus intake ratio resulting from low calcium intake coupled with high phosphorus intake may have a negative effect on bone mineral status, especially in Western countries. The objective of this study was to examine cross-sectionally the influence of habitual phosphorus and calcium intake and the calcium/phosphorus intake ratio on the bone mineral density (BMD) in 441 young Japanese women (aged 18-22) whose calcium/phosphorus intake ratio was assumed to be lower than young Western women. We also ascertained the relationship between dietary intake and serum or urinary measurements of phosphorus and calcium. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) and 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) were also examined for 214 of the 441 subjects. Phosphorus and calcium intake and the calcium/phosphorus intake ratio had significant positive correlations with urinary phosphorus. Calcium intake and the calcium/phosphorus intake ratio independently had positive and significant associations with BMD in the distal radius adjusted for postmenarcheal age, body mass index, and physical activity. There were no significant associations with BMD in the lumbar spine and femoral neck. These results indicate that in young Japanese women, phosphorus intake did not have a significantly negative effect on bone mineral density, and calcium intake and calcium/phosphorus intake ratio had a small but significant association only in a site-specific manner with BMD.

  19. Low levels of physical activity are associated with dysregulation of energy intake and fat mass gain over 1 year12

    PubMed Central

    Shook, Robin P; Hand, Gregory A; Drenowatz, Clemens; Hebert, James R; Paluch, Amanda E; Blundell, John E; Hill, James O; Katzmarzyk, Peter T; Church, Timothy S; Blair, Steven N

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous studies suggest that appetite may be dysregulated at low levels of activity, creating an energy imbalance that results in weight gain. Objective: The aim was to examine the relation between energy intake, physical activity, appetite, and weight gain during a 1-y follow-up period in a large sample of adults. Design: Participants included 421 individuals (mean ± SD age: 27.6 ± 3.8 y). Measurements included the following: energy intake with the use of interviewer-administered dietary recalls and calculated by using changes in body composition and energy expenditure, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) with the use of an arm-based monitor, body composition with the use of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and questionnaire-derived perceptions of dietary restraint, disinhibition, hunger, and control of eating. Participants were grouped at baseline into quintiles of MVPA (min/d) by sex. Measurements were repeated every 3 mo for 1 y. Results: At baseline, an inverse relation existed between body weight and activity groups, with the least-active group (15.7 ± 9.9 min MVPA/d, 6062 ± 1778 steps/d) having the highest body weight (86.3 ± 13.2 kg) and the most-active group (174.5 ± 60.5 min MVPA/d, 10260 ± 3087 steps/d) having the lowest body weight (67.5 ± 11.0 kg). A positive relation was observed between calculated energy intake and activity group, except in the lowest quintile of activity. The lowest physical activity group reported higher levels of disinhibition (P = 0.07) and cravings for savory foods (P = 0.03) compared with the group with the highest level of physical activity. Over 1 y of follow-up, the lowest activity group gained the largest amount of fat mass (1.7 ± 0.3 kg) after adjustment for change in MVPA and baseline fat mass. The odds of gaining >3% of fat mass were between 1.8 and 3.8 times as high for individuals in the least-active group as for those in the middle activity group. Conclusions: These results suggest

  20. Cortical activation during mental rotation in male-to-female and female-to-male transsexuals under hormonal treatment.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Beatriz; Gómez-Gil, Esther; Rametti, Giuseppina; Junque, Carme; Gomez, Angel; Karadi, Kazmer; Segovia, Santiago; Guillamon, Antonio

    2010-09-01

    There is strong evidence of sex differences in mental rotation tasks. Transsexualism is an extreme gender identity disorder in which individuals seek cross-gender treatment to change their sex. The aim of our study was to investigate if male-to-female (MF) and female-to-male (FM) transsexuals receiving cross-sex hormonal treatment have different patterns of cortical activation during a three-dimensional (3D) mental rotation task. An fMRI study was performed using a 3-T scan in a sample of 18 MF and 19 FM under chronic cross-sex hormonal treatment. Twenty-three males and 19 females served as controls. The general pattern of cerebral activation seen while visualizing the rotated and non-rotated figures was similar for all four groups showing strong occipito-parieto-frontal brain activation. However, compared to control males, the activation of MF transsexuals during the task was lower in the superior parietal lobe. Compared to control females, MF transsexuals showed higher activation in orbital and right dorsolateral prefrontal regions and lower activation in the left prefrontal gyrus. FM transsexuals did not differ from either the MF transsexual or control groups. Regression analyses between cerebral activation and the number of months of hormonal treatment showed a significant negative correlation in parietal, occipital and temporal regions in the MF transsexuals. No significant correlations with time were seen in the FM transsexuals. In conclusion, although we did not find a specific pattern of cerebral activation in the FM transsexuals, we have identified a specific pattern of cerebral activation during a mental 3D rotation task in MF transsexuals under cross-sex hormonal treatment that differed from control males in the parietal region and from control females in the orbital prefrontal region. The hypoactivation in MF transsexuals in the parietal region could be due to the hormonal treatment or could reflect a priori cerebral differences between MF transsexual

  1. Factors associated with low drinking water intake among adolescents: the Florida Youth Physical Activity and Nutrition Survey, 2007.

    PubMed

    Park, Sohyun; Sherry, Bettylou; O'Toole, Terrence; Huang, Youjie

    2011-08-01

    There is limited information on which characteristics are associated with water intake among adolescents. This cross-sectional study examined the association between demographic, dietary, and behavioral factors and low water intake as the outcome measure. Analyses were based on the 2007 Florida Youth Physical Activity and Nutrition Survey using a representative sample of 4,292 students in grades six through eight in 86 Florida public middle schools. Multivariable logistic regression was used to calculate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals for factors associated with low water intake (<3 glasses water per day). About 64% of students had low water intake. Factors significantly associated with low water intake were Hispanic ethnicity and non-Hispanic other (vs non-Hispanic white; ORs 0.79 and 0.76, respectively), drinking no 100% juice, drinking it <1 time/day, and drinking it 1 to 2 times/day (vs drinking it ≥3 times/day; ORs 1.83, 1.91, and 1.32, respectively), drinking no milk and drinking <2 glasses of milk/day (vs drinking ≥2 glasses/day; ORs 1.42 and 1.41, respectively), drinking <1 soda/day (vs drinking none; OR 1.40), drinking fruit-flavored drinks/sports drinks <1 time/day and drinking it ≥1 time/day (vs drinking none; ORs 1.49 and 1.41, respectively), eating at a fast-food restaurant ≥3 days/week (vs none; OR 1.38, respectively), not participating on team sports or participating on 1 to 2 team sports in previous 12 months (vs participating on ≥3 teams; ORs 1.77 and 1.24, respectively), and consuming snack/soda while watching television/movies "sometimes" and "most/every time" (vs never; ORs 1.65 and 2.20, respectively). The strongest factor associated with low water intake was frequent consumption of snacks/sodas while watching television/movies. Although study findings should be corroborated in other states and in a nationally representative sample, they may be useful in targeting adolescents for increased water consumption.

  2. Effect of Carissa opaca leaves extract on lipid peroxidation, antioxidant activity and reproductive hormones in male rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Carissa opaca leaves are traditionally used in the treatment of male dysfunction and hormonal disorder as well as in oxidative stress in Pakistan and Asia. The present study was designed to assess the protective effects of methanolic extract of Carissa opaca leaves (MLC) on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced reproductive stress in male rats and bioactive constituents responsible for the activity. Methods CCl4 was induced in 42 male rats for eight weeks and checked the protective efficacy of methanolic extract of Carissa opaca leaves at various hormonal imbalances, alteration of antioxidant enzymes, DNA fragmentation levels and lipid peroxidation caused testicular fibrosis in testis while High performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) was used for detection of bioactive components. Results HPLC characterization revealed the presence of isoquercitin , hyperoside , vitexin , myricetin and kaempherol. CCl4 caused significant alteration in the secretion of reproductive hormones. Activity of antioxidant enzymes viz; catalase, superoxide dimutase and phase II metabolizing enzymes including glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and reduced glutathione was decreased while DNA fragmentation, hydrogen per oxide contents and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were increased with CCl4 treatment. Co-administration of 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg b.w. MLC effectively ameliorated the alterations in the biochemical markers; hormonal and molecular levels. Conclusion Protective effects of methanolic extract of Carissa opaca against CCl4−induced antioxidant and hormonal dysfunction which might be due to bioactive compound present in extract. PMID:23786717

  3. A Co-Opted Hormonal Cascade Activates Dormant Adventitious Root Primordia upon Flooding in Solanum dulcamara.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Thikra; Yang, Xinping; Visser, Eric J W; Te Beek, Tim A H; Kensche, Philip R; Cristescu, Simona M; Lee, Sangseok; Floková, Kristýna; Nguyen, Duy; Mariani, Celestina; Rieu, Ivo

    2016-04-01

    Soil flooding is a common stress factor affecting plants. To sustain root function in the hypoxic environment, flooding-tolerant plants may form new, aerenchymatous adventitious roots (ARs), originating from preformed, dormant primordia on the stem. We investigated the signaling pathway behind AR primordium reactivation in the dicot species Solanum dulcamara Transcriptome analysis indicated that flooding imposes a state of quiescence on the stem tissue, while increasing cellular activity in the AR primordia. Flooding led to ethylene accumulation in the lower stem region and subsequently to a drop in abscisic acid (ABA) level in both stem and AR primordia tissue. Whereas ABA treatment prevented activation of AR primordia by flooding, inhibition of ABA synthesis was sufficient to activate them in absence of flooding. Together, this reveals that there is a highly tissue-specific response to reduced ABA levels. The central role for ABA in the response differentiates the pathway identified here from the AR emergence pathway known from rice (Oryza sativa). Flooding and ethylene treatment also induced expression of the polar auxin transporter PIN2, and silencing of this gene or chemical inhibition of auxin transport inhibited primordium activation, even though ABA levels were reduced. Auxin treatment, however, was not sufficient for AR emergence, indicating that the auxin pathway acts in parallel with the requirement for ABA reduction. In conclusion, adaptation of S. dulcamara to wet habitats involved co-option of a hormonal signaling cascade well known to regulate shoot growth responses, to direct a root developmental program upon soil flooding.

  4. Anti-diabetic activity of insulin-degrading enzyme inhibitors mediated by multiple hormones

    PubMed Central

    Maianti, Juan Pablo; McFedries, Amanda; Foda, Zachariah H.; Kleiner, Ralph E.; Du, Xiu Quan; Leissring, Malcolm A.; Tang, Wei-Jen; Charron, Maureen J.; Seeliger, Markus A.; Saghatelian, Alan; Liu, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of speculation that inhibiting endogenous insulin degradation might treat type-2 diabetes1, 2, and the identification of IDE (insulin-degrading enzyme) as a diabetes susceptibility gene3, 4, the relationship between the activity of the zinc metalloprotein IDE and glucose homeostasis remains unclear. Although Ide−/− mice have elevated insulin levels, they exhibit impaired, rather than improved, glucose tolerance that may arise from compensatory insulin signalling dysfunction5, 6. IDE inhibitors that are active in vivo are therefore needed to elucidate IDE’s physiological roles and to determine its potential to serve as a target for the treatment of diabetes. Here we report the discovery of a physiologically active IDE inhibitor identified from a DNA-templated macrocycle library. An X-ray structure of the macrocycle bound to IDE reveals that it engages a binding pocket away from the catalytic site, which explains its remarkable selectivity. Treatment of lean and obese mice with this inhibitor shows that IDE regulates the abundance and signalling of glucagon and amylin, in addition to that of insulin. Under physiological conditions that augment insulin and amylin levels, such as oral glucose administration, acute IDE inhibition leads to substantially improved glucose tolerance and slower gastric emptying. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of modulating IDE activity as a new therapeutic strategy to treat type-2 diabetes and expand our understanding of the roles of IDE in glucose and hormone regulation. PMID:24847884

  5. Anti-diabetic activity of insulin-degrading enzyme inhibitors mediated by multiple hormones.

    PubMed

    Maianti, Juan Pablo; McFedries, Amanda; Foda, Zachariah H; Kleiner, Ralph E; Du, Xiu Quan; Leissring, Malcolm A; Tang, Wei-Jen; Charron, Maureen J; Seeliger, Markus A; Saghatelian, Alan; Liu, David R

    2014-07-03

    Despite decades of speculation that inhibiting endogenous insulin degradation might treat type-2 diabetes, and the identification of IDE (insulin-degrading enzyme) as a diabetes susceptibility gene, the relationship between the activity of the zinc metalloprotein IDE and glucose homeostasis remains unclear. Although Ide(-/-) mice have elevated insulin levels, they exhibit impaired, rather than improved, glucose tolerance that may arise from compensatory insulin signalling dysfunction. IDE inhibitors that are active in vivo are therefore needed to elucidate IDE's physiological roles and to determine its potential to serve as a target for the treatment of diabetes. Here we report the discovery of a physiologically active IDE inhibitor identified from a DNA-templated macrocycle library. An X-ray structure of the macrocycle bound to IDE reveals that it engages a binding pocket away from the catalytic site, which explains its remarkable selectivity. Treatment of lean and obese mice with this inhibitor shows that IDE regulates the abundance and signalling of glucagon and amylin, in addition to that of insulin. Under physiological conditions that augment insulin and amylin levels, such as oral glucose administration, acute IDE inhibition leads to substantially improved glucose tolerance and slower gastric emptying. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of modulating IDE activity as a new therapeutic strategy to treat type-2 diabetes and expand our understanding of the roles of IDE in glucose and hormone regulation.

  6. The effects of exogenous hormones on rooting process and the activities of key enzymes of Malus hupehensis stem cuttings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wangxiang; Fan, Junjun; Tan, Qianqian; Zhao, Mingming; Zhou, Ting; Cao, Fuliang

    2017-01-01

    Malus hupehensis is an excellent Malus rootstock species, known for its strong adverse-resistance and apomixes. In the present study, stem cuttings of M. hupehensis were treated with three types of exogenous hormones, including indole acetic acid (IAA), naphthalene acetic acid (NAA), or green growth regulator (GGR). The effects and mechanisms of exogenous hormone treatment and antioxidant enzyme activity on adventitious root formation were investigated. The results showed that the apparent morphology of the adventitious root had four stages, including root pre-emergence stage (S0), early stage of root formation (S1), massive root formation stage (S2), and later stage of root formation (S3). The suitable concentrations of the three exogenous hormones, IAA, NAA and GGR, were 100 mg·L-1, 300 mg·L-1, and 300 mg·L-1, respectively. They shortened the rooting time by 25-47.4% and increased the rooting percentages of cuttings by 0.9-1.3 times, compared with that in the control. The dispersion in S0 stage was 3.6 times of that in the S1 stage after exogenous hormone application. The earlier the third critical point (P3) appeared, the shorter the rooting time and the greater the rooting percentage of the cuttings. During rhizogenesis, the activities of three antioxidant enzymes (POD, SOD, and PPO) showed an A-shaped trend. However, peak values of enzyme activity appeared at different points, which were 9 d before the P3, P3, and the fourth critical point (P4), respectively. Exogenous hormone treatment reduced the time to reach the peak value by 18 days, although the peak values of the enzymatic activities did not significantly changed. Our results suggested that exogenous hormone treatment mainly acted during the root pre-emergence stage, accelerated the synthesis of antioxidant enzymes, reduced the rooting time, and consequently promoted root formation. The three kinds of antioxidant enzymes acted on different stages of rooting.

  7. Effect of Dietary Fiber Intake on Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels Independent of Estradiol in Healthy Premenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Mumford, Sunni L.; Schisterman, Enrique F.; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Gaskins, Audrey J.; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; VanderWeele, Tyler J.

    2011-01-01

    High-fiber diets are associated with improved lipid profiles. However, pre- and postmenopausal women respond differently to fiber intake, suggesting that endogenous estradiol mediates the effect. The authors' objective was to determine the direct effect of fiber intake on lipoprotein cholesterol levels independent of estradiol among premenopausal women. The BioCycle Study, a prospective cohort study conducted at the State University of New York at Buffalo from 2005 to 2007, followed 259 healthy women for up to 2 complete menstrual cycles. Serum lipoprotein and hormone levels were measured at 16 visits timed using fertility monitors. Fiber intake was assessed by 8 24-hour recalls. Marginal structural models with inverse probability weights for both lipoprotein and estradiol levels were used to estimate controlled direct effects of the highest category of fiber intake (≥22 g/day vs. <22 g/day) while accounting for age, body mass index, total energy, vitamin E intake, physical activity, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and progesterone. Reductions were observed in total and low density lipoprotein cholesterol in women with higher fiber intakes. Direct effects were greater than total effects. These analyses suggested that estradiol mediates at least part of the association between fiber and cholesterol among premenopausal women. More research is needed to elucidate the biologic mechanisms driving these associations. PMID:21148240

  8. Hormones in meat: different approaches in the EU and in the USA.

    PubMed

    Stephany, R W

    2001-01-01

    The use of hormonal active growth promoters ("hormones") in farm animals can increase the production of veal and beef significantly up to 15%. However, in the different parts of the world the regulation regarding the use of such hormones differs sharply. In the European Union there exists a total ban on such use in contrast to the United States of American where the use of some hormones is authorized under strict conditions. An overview is given of the different opposing aspects and their consequences are discussed. It has to be concluded that in some EU Member States an extended black market exists. For the USA no experimental evidence is available for such a black market. In the EU the number of ascertained different illegal "hormones" ranges between about 35 and 55. In the USA the number of legal hormones in total is six. The levels of hormone residues found in beef originating from the USA are in the fast majority of cases below the Maximum Residue Limit as recommended by the FAO/WHO Joint Expert Committee of Food Additives. No comparable experimental data are available for the EU. Finally other food commodities have to be taken into account to assess potential risks of the dietary intake of "hormones". Eggs, example given, contribute more to the dietary intake of estradiol than beef, whether the animal is legally treated with hormones or not.

  9. Dietary intake, physical activity and nutritional status in adults: the French nutrition and health survey (ENNS, 2006-2007).

    PubMed

    Castetbon, Katia; Vernay, Michel; Malon, Aurélie; Salanave, Benoit; Deschamps, Valérie; Roudier, Candice; Oleko, Amivi; Szego, Emmanuelle; Hercberg, Serge

    2009-09-01

    The French National Programme on Nutrition and Health (Programme national nutrition santé (PNNS)), the aim of which is to reduce nutrition-related chronic diseases, necessitates monitoring of nutritional characteristics. Our objective was to describe dietary intake, physical activity and nutritional status in a national sample of adults, especially according to current French recommendations. The study is based on a cross-sectional population-based survey using a multistage sampling design (Etude nationale nutrition santé (ENNS)). Between February 2006 and March 2007, 3115 18-74-year-old adults were included (participation rate 59.7 %). Energy, macronutrient and food consumption were estimated through three randomly distributed 24 h recalls, and compared to PNNS recommendations; physical activity was described using International Physical Activity Questionnaire guidelines; anthropometry, blood pressure and biochemical measurements were assessed according to national and international references. When compared to current recommendations, intake of carbohydrates (>50 % energy intake without alcohol: 26.4 %), SFA ( < 35 % total lipids: 18.5 %) and total fibre (>25 g/d: 13.7 %) was frequently unsatisfactory. While overall consumption of 'meat, seafood and eggs' was satisfactory, that of fruits and vegetables ( > or = 400 g/d: 43.8 %) and seafood (two or more servings per week: 29.9 %) was frequently too low. The physical activity level was satisfactory at 63.2 %. Overweight was observed in 49.3 % of adults, while 30.9 % were hypertensive and 44.1 % had dyslipidaemia. Vitamin and iron-poor status was found to affect less than 10 % of the population. Based on the ENNS survey, overall nutrition remains a problem in France. Comparison of these data with those of other countries could contribute to a better understanding of variations in nutrition-related diseases.

  10. Synchronous activation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone gene transcription and secretion by pulsatile kisspeptin stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Han Kyoung; Kim, Hee-Dae; Park, Sung Ho; Lee, Han-Woong; Park, Jae-Yong; Seong, Jae Young; Lightman, Stafford L.; Son, Gi Hoon; Kim, Kyungjin

    2013-01-01

    Pulsatile release of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is essential for pituitary gonadotrope function. Although the importance of pulsatile GnRH secretion has been recognized for several decades, the mechanisms underlying GnRH pulse generation in hypothalamic neural networks remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate the ultradian rhythm of GnRH gene transcription in single GnRH neurons using cultured hypothalamic slices prepared from transgenic mice expressing a GnRH promoter-driven destabilized luciferase reporter. Although GnRH promoter activity in each GnRH neuron exhibited an ultradian pattern of oscillations with a period of ∼10 h, GnRH neuronal cultures exhibited partially synchronized bursts of GnRH transcriptional activity at ∼2-h intervals. Surprisingly, pulsatile administration of kisspeptin, a potent GnRH secretagogue, evoked dramatic synchronous activation of GnRH gene transcription with robust stimulation of pulsatile GnRH secretion. We also addressed the issue of hierarchical interaction between the circadian and ultradian rhythms by using Bmal1-deficient mice with defective circadian clocks. The circadian molecular oscillator barely affected basal ultradian oscillation of GnRH transcription but was heavily involved in kisspeptin-evoked responses of GnRH neurons. In conclusion, we have clearly shown synchronous bursts of GnRH gene transcription in the hypothalamic GnRH neuronal population in association with episodic neurohormone secretion, thereby providing insight into GnRH pulse generation. PMID:23509283

  11. Hormone therapy at early post-menopause increases cognitive control-related prefrontal activity

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Romuald; Météreau, Elise; Thomas, Julie; Pugeat, Michel; Qu, Chen; Dreher, Jean-Claude

    2017-01-01

    Clinical data have been equivocal and controversial as to the benefits to the brain and cognition of hormone therapy (HT) in postmenopausal women. Recent reevaluation of the role of estrogens proposed that HT may effectively prevent the deleterious effects of aging on cognition, and reduces the risks of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease, if initiated early at the beginning of menopause. Yet, little is known about the effects of HT on brain activation related to cognitive control, the ability to make flexible decisions in relation to internal goals. Here, we used fMRI to directly test for a modulation of sequential 17β estradiol (2 mg/day) plus oral progesterone (100 mg/day) on task switching-related brain activity in women at early postmenopause. The results showed that HT enhanced dorsolateral prefrontal cortex recruitment during task switching. Between-subjects correlation analyses revealed that women who engaged more the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex showed higher task switching performance after HT administration. These results suggest that HT, when taken early at the beginning of postmenopause, may have beneficial effect on cognitive control prefrontal mechanisms. Together, these findings demonstrate that HT can prevent the appearance of reduced prefrontal cortex activity, a neurophysiological measure observed both in healthy aging and early dementia. PMID:28322310

  12. Thyroid hormone status defines brown adipose tissue activity and browning of white adipose tissues in mice

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Juliane; Kranz, Mathias; Klöting, Nora; Kunath, Anne; Steinhoff, Karen; Rijntjes, Eddy; Köhrle, Josef; Zeisig, Vilia; Hankir, Mohammed; Gebhardt, Claudia; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Heiker, John T.; Kralisch, Susan; Stumvoll, Michael; Blüher, Matthias; Sabri, Osama; Hesse, Swen; Brust, Peter; Tönjes, Anke; Krause, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the effect of thyroid hormone dysfunction on brown adipose tissue activity and white adipose tissue browning in mice. Twenty randomized female C57BL/6NTac mice per treatment group housed at room temperature were rendered hypothyroid or hyperthyroid. In-vivo small animal 18F-FDG PET/MRI was performed to determine the effects of hypo- and hyperthyroidism on BAT mass and BAT activity. Ex-vivo14C-acetate loading assay and assessment of thermogenic gene and protein expression permitted analysis of oxidative and thermogenic capacities of WAT and BAT of eu-, hyper and hypothyroid mice. 18F-FDG PET/MRI revealed a lack of brown adipose tissue activity in hypothyroid mice, whereas hyperthyroid mice displayed increased BAT mass alongside enhanced 18F-FDG uptake. In white adipose tissue of both, hyper- and hypothyroid mice, we found a significant induction of thermogenic genes together with multilocular adipocytes expressing UCP1. Taken together, these results suggest that both the hyperthyroid and hypothyroid state stimulate WAT thermogenesis most likely as a consequence of enhanced adrenergic signaling or compensation for impaired BAT function, respectively. PMID:27941950

  13. Eccentric exercise activates novel transcriptional regulation of hypertrophic signaling pathways not affected by hormone changes.

    PubMed

    MacNeil, Lauren G; Melov, Simon; Hubbard, Alan E; Baker, Steven K; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2010-05-18

    Unaccustomed eccentric exercise damages skeletal muscle tissue, activating mechanisms of recovery and remodeling that may be influenced by the female sex hormone 17beta-estradiol (E2). Using high density oligonucleotide based microarrays, we screened for differences in mRNA expression caused by E2 and eccentric exercise. After random assignment to 8 days of either placebo (CON) or E2 (EXP), eighteen men performed 150 single-leg eccentric contractions. Muscle biopsies were collected at baseline (BL), following supplementation (PS), +3 hours (3H) and +48 hours (48H) after exercise. Serum E2 concentrations increased significantly with supplementation (P<0.001) but did not affect microarray results. Exercise led to early transcriptional changes in striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS), Rho family GTPase 3 (RND3), mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) regulation and the downstream transcription factor FOS. Targeted RT-PCR analysis identified concurrent induction of negative regulators of calcineurin signaling RCAN (P<0.001) and HMOX1 (P = 0.009). Protein contents were elevated for RND3 at 3H (P = 0.02) and FOS at 48H (P<0.05). These findings indicate that early RhoA and NFAT signaling and regulation are altered following exercise for muscle remodeling and repair, but are not affected by E2.

  14. Thyroid-stimulating hormone increases active transport of perchlorate into thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Tran, Neil; Valentín-Blasini, Liza; Blount, Benjamin C; McCuistion, Caroline Gibbs; Fenton, Mike S; Gin, Eric; Salem, Andrew; Hershman, Jerome M

    2008-04-01

    Perchlorate blocks thyroidal iodide transport in a dose-dependent manner. The human sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) has a 30-fold higher affinity for perchlorate than for iodide. However, active transport of perchlorate into thyroid cells has not previously been demonstrated by direct measurement techniques. To demonstrate intracellular perchlorate accumulation, we incubated NIS-expressing FRTL-5 rat thyroid cells in various concentrations of perchlorate, and we used a sensitive ion chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method to measure perchlorate accumulation in the cells. Perchlorate caused a dose-related inhibition of 125-iodide uptake at 1-10 microM. The perchlorate content from cell lysate was analyzed, showing a higher amount of perchlorate in cells that were incubated in medium with higher perchlorate concentration. Thyroid-stimulating hormone increased perchlorate uptake in a dose-related manner, thus supporting the hypothesis that perchlorate is actively transported into thyroid cells. Incubation with nonradiolabeled iodide led to a dose-related reduction of intracellular accumulation of perchlorate. To determine potential toxicity of perchlorate, the cells were incubated in 1 nM to 100 microM perchlorate and cell proliferation was measured. Even the highest concentration of perchlorate (100 microM) did not inhibit cell proliferation after 72 h of incubation. In conclusion, perchlorate is actively transported into thyroid cells and does not inhibit cell proliferation.

  15. Thyroid hormone status defines brown adipose tissue activity and browning of white adipose tissues in mice.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Juliane; Kranz, Mathias; Klöting, Nora; Kunath, Anne; Steinhoff, Karen; Rijntjes, Eddy; Köhrle, Josef; Zeisig, Vilia; Hankir, Mohammed; Gebhardt, Claudia; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Heiker, John T; Kralisch, Susan; Stumvoll, Michael; Blüher, Matthias; Sabri, Osama; Hesse, Swen; Brust, Peter; Tönjes, Anke; Krause, Kerstin

    2016-12-12

    The present study aimed to determine the effect of thyroid hormone dysfunction on brown adipose tissue activity and white adipose tissue browning in mice. Twenty randomized female C57BL/6NTac mice per treatment group housed at room temperature were rendered hypothyroid or hyperthyroid. In-vivo small animal (18)F-FDG PET/MRI was performed to determine the effects of hypo- and hyperthyroidism on BAT mass and BAT activity. Ex-vivo(14)C-acetate loading assay and assessment of thermogenic gene and protein expression permitted analysis of oxidative and thermogenic capacities of WAT and BAT of eu-, hyper and hypothyroid mice. (18)F-FDG PET/MRI revealed a lack of brown adipose tissue activity in hypothyroid mice, whereas hyperthyroid mice displayed increased BAT mass alongside enhanced (18)F-FDG uptake. In white adipose tissue of both, hyper- and hypothyroid mice, we found a significant induction of thermogenic genes together with multilocular adipocytes expressing UCP1. Taken together, these results suggest that both the hyperthyroid and hypothyroid state stimulate WAT thermogenesis most likely as a consequence of enhanced adrenergic signaling or compensation for impaired BAT function, respectively.

  16. Daily intake of bisphenol A and triclosan and their association with anthropometric data, thyroid hormones and weight loss in overweight and obese individuals.

    PubMed

    Geens, Tinne; Dirtu, Alin C; Dirinck, Eveline; Malarvannan, Govindan; Van Gaal, Luc; Jorens, Philippe G; Covaci, Adrian

    2015-03-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) and triclosan (TCS) were determined in urine of Belgian overweight and obese (n=151) and lean (n=43) individuals. After the first urine collection (0M), obese patients started a diet program or have undergone bariatric surgery. Hereafter, three additional urine samples from obese patients were collected after 3 (3M), 6 (6M) and 12 (12M) months. Both compounds were detected in >99% of the samples. BPA had median concentrations of 1.7 and 1.2ng/mL in obese and lean groups, respectively, while TCS had median concentrations of 1.5 and 0.9ng/mL in the obese and lean groups, respectively. The obese group had higher urinary concentrations (ng/mL) of BPA (p<0.5), while no significant differences were found for TCS between the obese and lean groups. No time trends between the different collection moments were observed. The BPA concentrations in the obese group were negatively associated with age, while no gender difference or relationship with body mass index was observed. For TCS, no relationships with gender, BMI, or age were found. The temporal variability of BPA and TCS was assessed with calculation of the intraclass correlation coefficient, Spearman rank correlation coefficients, and surrogate category analysis. We observed evidence that single spot urine samples might be predictive of exposure over a longer period of time. Dietary intakes of BPA and TCS did not differ significantly among the time points considered after obese individuals started losing weight (6 and 12months). Multiple linear regression analyses after adjusting for age and weight loss revealed negative associations between urinary TCS and serum FT4 in the 0M and 3M female obese individuals and positive associations between urinary BPA and serum TSH in the lean group.

  17. Effects of cysteamine on growth performance, digestive enzyme activities, and metabolic hormones in broilers.

    PubMed

    Yang, C M; Chen, A G; Hong, Q H; Liu, J X; Liu, J S

    2006-11-01

    A total of 600 avian male broilers at the age of 1 d were used to investigate the effects of cysteamine (CSH) on growth performance, digestive enzyme activities, and concentrations of serum hormones. The broilers received the same basal diets, with CSH added at 0 (control), 60, 90, 120, or 150 mg/kg. The feeding program consisted of a starter diet until 21 d and a grower diet until 42 d. The broilers with addition of CSH at 60 or 90 mg/kg had significantly higher growth rates during d 1 to 21 or d 21 to 42 compared with the control, respectively. However, adding 150 mg of CSH/kg significantly suppressed the growth of broilers. Adding 60 mg of CSH/kg significantly increased the activities of protease, amylase, and lipase in the pancreas and small intestinal contents during d 1 to 21, and the activities of protease and amylase in the small intestinal contents during d 21 to 42. Adding 90 mg of CSH/kg significantly increased the activities of lipase during d 1 to 21 and protease, amylase, and lipase during d 21 to 42 in small intestines. The activities of digestive enzymes during the whole period were suppressed by adding 150 mg of CSH/kg. The concentration of serum thyroxine was higher in the CSH-added birds during the whole period, whereas serum triiodothyronine was higher only during d 1 to 21 compared with the control. These findings indicate that low doses of dietary CSH may improve the growth performance and the activities of the digestive enzyme, but high doses of CSH appear to be detrimental to growth and digestion.

  18. Mild Thyroid Hormone Insufficiency During Development Compromises Activity-Dependent Neuroplasticity in the Hippocampus of Adult Male Rats

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    behavioral measures of learning and memory in adult offspring of rats treated with thyroid hormone synthesis inhibitor, propylthiouracil.Electrophysiological measures of 'memory' in form of plasticity model known as long term potentiation (LTP)Molecular changes induced by LTPThis dataset is associated with the following publication:Gilbert , M., K. Sanchez-Huerta, and C. Wood. Mild Thyroid Hormone Insufficiency During Development Compromises Activity-Dependent Neuroplasticity in the Hippocampus of Adult Make Rats. ENDOCRINOLOGY. Endocrine Society, 157(2): 774-87, (2016).

  19. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) affects hormone receptor activity, steroidogenesis, and expression of endocrine-related genes in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Du, Guizhen; Hu, Jialei; Huang, Hongyu; Qin, Yufeng; Han, Xiumei; Wu, Di; Song, Ling; Xia, Yankai; Wang, Xinru

    2013-02-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a widespread and persistent chemical in the environment. We investigated the endocrine-disrupting effects of PFOS using a combination of in vitro and in vivo assays. Reporter gene assays were used to detect receptor-mediated (anti-)estrogenic, (anti-)androgenic, and (anti-)thyroid hormone activities. The effect of PFOS on steroidogenesis was assessed both at hormone levels in the supernatant and at expression levels of hormone-induced genes in the H295R cell. A zebrafish-based short-term screening method was developed to detect the effect of PFOS on endocrine function in vivo. The results indicate that PFOS can act as an estrogen receptor agonist and thyroid hormone receptor antagonist. Exposure to PFOS decreased supernatant testosterone (T), increased estradiol (E2) concentrations in H295R cell medium and altered the expression of several genes involved in steroidogenesis. In addition, PFOS increased early thyroid development gene (hhex and pax8) expression in a concentration-dependent manner, decreased steroidogenic enzyme gene (CYP17, CYP19a, CYP19b) expression, and changed the expression pattern of estrogen receptor production genes (esr1, esr2b) after 500 µg/L PFOS treatment in zebrafish embryos. These results indicate that PFOS has the ability to act as an endocrine disruptor both in vitro and in vivo by disrupting the function of nuclear hormone receptors, interfering with steroidogenesis, and altering the expression of endocrine-related genes in zebrafish embryo.

  20. Activation of GABA B receptors in the anterior pituitary inhibits prolactin and luteinizing hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Lux-Lantos, V; Rey, E; Libertun, C

    1992-11-01

    Previous work from our laboratory showed that baclofen could lower serum prolactin (PRL) levels acting at the central nervous system. The present experiments were designed to evaluate whether the gamma-aminobutyric acid B agonist was also effective in inhibiting hormone release at the pituitary level. In monolayer cultures of adenohypophyseal dispersed cells, baclofen inhibited basal PRL secretion after 1 or 2 h of incubation. This inhibition was significantly abolished by three antagonists: phaclofen, 3-aminopropyl-phosphonic acid and 4-aminobutylphosphonic acid. Furthermore, baclofen inhibited the thyrotropin-releasing hormone-induced PRL release in a concentration-dependent manner. With regard to gonadotropin secretion, baclofen was unable to modify basal luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion, but significantly inhibited the LH-releasing hormone-induced LH release. These results show that baclofen, in addition to its central neuroendocrine effects, inhibits pituitary hormone secretion, under basal and/or stimulated conditions, by direct action at the pituitary level.

  1. Estrone Sulfate Transport and Steroid Sulfatase Activity in Colorectal Cancer: Implications for Hormone Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gilligan, Lorna C.; Gondal, Ali; Tang, Vivien; Hussain, Maryam T.; Arvaniti, Anastasia; Hewitt, Anne-Marie; Foster, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) affects the incidence and potential progression of colorectal cancer (CRC). As HRT primarily consists of estrone sulfate (E1S), understanding whether this conjugated estrogen is transported and metabolized in CRC will define its potential effect in this malignancy. Here, we show that a panel of CRC cell lines (Colo205, Caco2, HCT116, HT-29) have steroid sulfatase (STS) activity, and thus can hydrolyze E1S. STS activity is significantly higher in CRC cell lysate, suggesting the importance of E1S transport in intracellular STS substrate availability. As E1S transport is regulated by the expression pattern of certain solute carrier organic anion transporter polypeptides, we show that in CRC OATP4A1 is the most abundantly expressed transporter. All four CRC cell lines rapidly transported E1S into cells, with this effect significantly inhibited by the competitive OATP inhibitor BSP. Transient knockdown of OATP4A1 significantly disrupted E1S uptake. Examination of estrogen receptor status showed ERα was present in Colo205 and Caco2 cells. None of the cells expressed ERβ. Intriguingly, HCT116 and HT29 cells strongly expressed the G protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPER), and that stimulation of this receptor with estradiol (E2) and G1, a GPER agonist, significantly (p < 0.01) increased STS activity. Furthermore, tamoxifen and fulvestrant, known GPER agonist, also increased CRC STS activity, with this effect inhibited by the GPER antagonist G15. These results suggest that CRC can take up and hydrolyze E1S, and that subsequent GPER stimulation increases STS activity in a potentially novel positive feedback loop. As elevated STS expression is associated with poor prognosis in CRC, these results suggest HRT, tamoxifen and fulvestrant may negatively impact CRC patient outcomes. PMID:28326039

  2. NEURONAL ACTIVITY AND STRESS DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATE HIPPOCAMPAL AND HYPOTHALAMIC CORTICOTROPIN-RELEASING HORMONE EXPRESSION IN THE IMMATURE RAT

    PubMed Central

    HATALSKI, C. G.; BRUNSON, K. L.; TANTAYANUBUTR, B.; CHEN, Y.; BARAM, T. Z.

    2011-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone, a major neuromodulator of the neuroendocrine stress response, is expressed in the immature hippocampus, where it enhances glutamate receptor-mediated excitation of principal cells. Since the peptide influences hippocampal synaptic efficacy, its secretion from peptidergic interneuronal terminals may augment hippocampal-mediated functions such as learning and memory. However, whereas information regarding the regulation of corticotropin-releasing hormone’s abundance in CNS regions involved with the neuroendocrine responses to stress has been forthcoming, the mechanisms regulating the peptide’s levels in the hippocampus have not yet been determined. Here we tested the hypothesis that, in the immature rat hippocampus, neuronal stimulation, rather than neuroendocrine challenge, influences the peptide’s expression. Messenger RNA levels of corticotropin-releasing hormone in hippocampal CA1, CA3 and the dentate gyrus, as well as in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, were determined after cold, a physiological challenge that activates the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal system in immature rats, and after activation of hippocampal neurons by hyperthermia. These studies demonstrated that, while cold challenge enhanced corticotropin-releasing hormone messenger RNA levels in the hypothalamus, hippocampal expression of this neuropeptide was unchanged. Secondly, hyperthermia stimulated expression of hippocampal immediate-early genes, as well as of corticotropin-releasing hormone. Finally, the mechanism of hippocampal corticotropin-releasing hormone induction required neuronal stimulation and was abolished by barbiturate administration. Taken together, these results indicate that neuronal stimulation may regulate hippocampal corticotropin-releasing hormone expression in the immature rat, whereas the peptide’s expression in the hypothalamus is influenced by neuroendocrine challenges. PMID:11113306

  3. Physical activity, aerobic fitness, self-perception, and dietary intake in at risk of overweight and normal weight children.

    PubMed

    Ball, Geoff D C; Marshall, J Dru; McCargar, Linda J

    2005-01-01

    Differences in physical activity, aerobic fitness, self-perception, and dietary intake were examined in a sample of six- to ten-year-olds at risk of overweight, and in normal weight boys and girls. Participants (n=20 at risk of overweight [BMI > or =85th percentile]; n=115 normal weight [BMI <85th percentile]; n=68 boys; n=67 girls) had anthropometric, physical activity, aerobic fitness, self-perception, and dietary intake measurements at zero, three, six, and 12 months. Over the 12-month period, normal weight children were more physically active (F=4.1, p<0.05) and aerobically fit (F=14.3, p<0.001), and possessed higher self-perceptions of social acceptance (F=7.3, p<0.01) than their at risk of overweight peers. Fitness differences between the sexes were not apparent at baseline, but emerged over the long term (F=7.9, p<0.01). Overall, boys consumed more total energy, fat, carbohydrate, and protein than did girls, while the entire sample consumed diets low in vegetables and fruits and meat and alternatives, and high in "other" foods. These observations highlight key disparities in lifestyle-related behaviours and perceptions between groups of children according to overweight status and sex. The findings underscore the importance of longitudinal studies in youth because cross-sectional studies may reflect transient differences.

  4. Effects of intravenous administration of neurokinin receptor subtype-selective agonists on gonadotropin-releasing hormone pulse generator activity and luteinizing hormone secretion in goats

    PubMed Central

    YAMAMURA, Takashi; WAKABAYASHI, Yoshihiro; OHKURA, Satoshi; NAVARRO, Victor M.; OKAMURA, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that neurokinin B (NKB), a member of the neurokinin (tachykinin) peptide family, plays a pivotal role in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) pulse generation. Three types of neurokinin receptors (NKRs), NK1R, NK2R and NK3R, are found in the brain. Although NKB preferentially binds to NK3R, other NKRs are possibly also involved in NKB action. The present study examined the effects of intravenous administration of the NKR subtype-selective agonists GR73632 (NK1R), GR64349 (NK2R), and senktide (NK3R) on GnRH pulse generator activity and luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion. Multiple-unit activity (MUA) was monitored in ovariectomized goats (n = 5) implanted with recording electrodes. Characteristic increases in MUA (MUA volleys) were considered GnRH pulse generator activity. Although three NKR agonists dose-dependently induced an MUA volley and an accompanying increase in LH secretion, the efficacy in inducing the volley markedly differed. As little as 10 nmol of senktide induced an MUA volley in all goats, whereas a dose of 1000 nmol was only effective for the NK1R and NK2R agonists in two and four goats, respectively. When the treatment failed to evoke an MUA volley, no apparent change was observed in the MUA or LH secretion. Similar effects of the NK2R and NK3R agonists were observed in the presence of estradiol. The results demonstrated that NK3R plays a predominant role in GnRH pulse generation and suggested that the contributions of NK1R and NK2R to this mechanism may be few, if any, in goats. PMID:25345909

  5. [Synthesis of peptides with gastrinlike activity. Studies on the structure-activity relationship of the natural hormone human little gastrin I].

    PubMed

    Göhring, W; Moroder, L; Borin, G; Lobbia, A; Bali, J P; Wünsch, E

    1984-01-01

    To identify the role of the block of glutamic acid residues characteristic for the gastrin molecule, a series of shortened peptides related to the human little-gastrin-I sequence were synthesized. The biological activities of these gastrin peptides strongly suggest in the pentaglutamic acid sequence a specific information for a pronounced amplification of the hormonal activity.

  6. A rapid and simple assay for growth hormone-binding protein activity in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Baumann, G; Shaw, M A; Amburn, K

    1988-12-01

    The newly discovered circulating growth hormone binding proteins dictate a re-evaluation of the state of GH in plasma in health and disease as the binding proteins are known to affect GH metabolism and action. We describe a rapid and simple GH-binding assay that allows determination of free and complexed plasma GH, as well as GH-binding protein activity as an index of GH-binding protein levels, with relative ease. The method is based on incubation of plasma with 125I-GH and separation of bound from free GH on small DEAE-cellulose columns; it can be used on a large scale for routine determinations. The results obtained by this method are comparable to those obtained with the previously used slow and more cumbersome gel filtration technique. Initial data obtained in normal subjects and certain disease states show that the bound fraction of plasma GH is similar in men, women and children, is unaffected by pregnancy or acute infection, but is marginally decreased in liver cirrhosis. In acromegaly, binding protein activity also appears normal when allowance is made for partial saturation of the binding proteins by the high prevailing GH levels. The technique we describe should facilitate investigations of normal and abnormal regulation of the GH binding proteins.

  7. Structure-function relations of strigolactone analogs: activity as plant hormones and plant interactions.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Maja; Prandi, Cristina; Occhiato, Ernesto G; Tabasso, Silvia; Wininger, Smadar; Resnick, Nathalie; Steinberger, Yosef; Koltai, Hinanit; Kapulnik, Yoram

    2013-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) have several functions as signaling molecules in their interactions with symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and the parasitic weeds Orobanche and Striga. SLs are also a new class of plant hormone regulating plant development. In all three organisms, a specific and sensitive receptor-mediated perception system is suggested. By comparing the activity of synthetic SL analogs on Arabidopsis root-hair elongation, Orobanche aegyptiaca seed germination, and hyphal branching of the AM fungus Glomus intraradices, we found that each of the tested organisms differs in its response to the various examined synthetic SL analogs. Structure-function relations of the SL analogs suggest substitutions on the A-ring as the cause of this variation. Moreover, the description of competitive antagonistic analogs suggests that the A-ring of SL can affect not only affinity to the receptor, but also the molecule's ability to activate it. The results support the conclusion that Arabidopsis, Orobanche, and AM fungi possess variations in receptor sensitivity to SL analogs, probably due to variation in SL receptors among the different species.

  8. Active immunization against ghrelin decreases weight gain and alters plasma concentrations of growth hormone in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Vizcarra, J A; Kirby, J D; Kim, S K; Galyean, M L

    2007-08-01

    Ghrelin has been implicated in the control of food intake and in the long-term regulation of body weight. We theorize that preventing the ability of ghrelin to interact with its receptors, would eventually lead to decreased appetite and thereby decrease body weight gain. To test our hypothesis, pigs were actively immunized against ghrelin. Ghrelin((1-10)) was conjugated to BSA and emulsified in Freund's incomplete adjuvant and diethylaminoethyl-dextran. Primary immunization was given at 19 weeks of age (WOA), with booster immunizations given 20 and 40 days after primary immunization. Body weight (BW) and plasma samples were collected weekly beginning at 19 WOA, and feed intake was measured daily. Fourteen days after primary immunization, the percentage of bound (125)I-ghrelin in plasma from immunized pigs was increased compared with control animals (P<0.001). Voluntary feed intake was decreased more than 15% in animals that were actively immunized against ghrelin compared with controls. By the end of the experiment, immunized pigs weighed 10% less than control animals (P<0.1). Concentrations of GH were increased (P<0.05) in immunized pigs. Apoptosis was not observed in post-mortem samples obtained from the fundic region of the stomach. Our observations suggest that immunization against ghrelin induces mild anorexia. This procedure could potentially be used as a treatment to control caloric intake and obesity.

  9. Comparative aspects of steroid hormone metabolism and ovarian activity in felids, measured noninvasively in feces.

    PubMed

    Brown, J L; Wasser, S K; Wildt, D E; Graham, L H

    1994-10-01

    Noninvasive fecal assays were used to study steroid metabolism and ovarian activity in several felid species. Using the domestic cat (Felis catus) as model, the excretory products of injected [14C]estradiol (E2) and [14C]progesterone (P4) were determined. Within 2 days, 97.0 +/- 0.6% and 96.7 +/- 0.5% of recovered E2 and P4 radioactivity, respectively, was found in feces. E2 was excreted as unconjugated estradiol and estrone (40%) and as a non-enzyme-hydrolyzable conjugate (60%). P4 was excreted primarily as non-enzyme-hydrolyzable, conjugated metabolites (78%) and as unconjugated pregnenolone epimers. A simple method for extracting fecal steroid metabolites optimized extraction efficiencies of the E2 and P4 excretion products (90.1 +/- 0.8% and 87.2 +/- 1.4%, respectively). Analysis of HPLC fractions of extracted fecal samples from the radiolabel-injected domestic cats revealed that E2 immunoreactivity coincided primarily with the unconjugated metabolized [14C]E2 peak, whereas progestogen immunoreactivity coincided with a single conjugated epimer and multiple unconjugated pregnenolone epimers. After HPLC separation, similar immunoreactive E2 and P4 metabolite profiles were observed in the leopard cat (F. bengalensis), cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus), clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa), and snow leopard (Panthera uncia). Longitudinal analyses demonstrated that changes in fecal E2 and P4 metabolite concentrations reflected natural or artificially induced ovarian activity. For example, severalfold increases in E2 excretion were associated with overt estrus or exogenous gonadotropin treatment, and elevated fecal P4 metabolite concentrations occurred during pregnant and nonpregnant (pseudopregnant) luteal phases. Although overall concentrations were similar, the duration of elevated fecal P4 metabolites during pseudopregnancy was approximately half that observed during pregnancy. In summary, steroid metabolism mechanisms appear to be conserved among these physically

  10. Inhibition of thyroid hormone sulfotransferase activity by brominated flame retardants and halogenated phenolics.

    PubMed

    Butt, Craig M; Stapleton, Heather M

    2013-11-18

    Many halogenated organic contaminants (HOCs) are considered endocrine disruptors and affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, often by interfering with circulating levels of thyroid hormones (THs). We investigated one potential mechanism for TH disruption, inhibition of sulfotransferase activity. One of the primary roles of TH sulfation is to support the regulation of biologically active T3 through the formation of inactive THs. We investigated TH sulfotransferase inhibition by 14 hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH BDEs), BDE 47, triclosan, and fluorinated, chlorinated, brominated, and iodinated analogues of 2,4,6-trihalogenated phenol and bisphenol A (BPA). A new mass spectrometry-based method was also developed to measure the formation rates of 3,3'-T2 sulfate (3,3'-T2S). Using pooled human liver cytosol, we investigated the influence of these HOCs on the sulfation of 3,3'-T2, a major substrate for TH sulfation. For the formation of 3,3'-T2S, the Michaelis constant (Km) was 1070 ± 120 nM and the Vmax was 153 ± 6.6 pmol min(-1) (mg of protein)(-1). All chemicals investigated inhibited sulfotransferase activity with the exception of BDE 47. The 2,4,6-trihalogenated phenols were the most potent inhibitors followed by the OH BDEs and then halogenated BPAs. The IC50 values for the OH BDEs were primarily in the low nanomolar range, which may be environmentally relevant. In silico molecular modeling techniques were also used to simulate the binding of OH BDE to SULT1A1. This study suggests that some HOCs, including antimicrobial chemicals and metabolites of flame retardants, may interfere with TH regulation through inhibition of sulfotransferase activity.

  11. Synthesis and Activity of Dafachronic Acid Ligands for the C. elegans DAF-12 Nuclear Hormone Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Kamalesh K.; Wang, Zhu; Motola, Daniel L.; Cummins, Carolyn L.; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Auchus, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear hormone receptor DAF-12 from Caenorhabditis elegans is activated by dafachronic acids, which derive from sterols upon oxidation by DAF-9, a cytochrome P450. DAF-12 activation is a critical checkpoint in C. elegans for acquisition of reproductive competence and for entry into adulthood rather than dauer diapause. Previous studies implicated the (25S)-Δ7-dafachronic acid isomer as the most potent compound, but the (25S)-Δ4-isomer was also identified as an activator of DAF-12. To explore the tolerance of DAF-12 for structural variations in the ligand and to enable further studies requiring large amounts of ligands for DAF-12 and homologs in other nematodes, we synthesized (25R)- and (25S)-isomers of five dafachronic acids differing in A/B-ring configurations. Both the (25S)- and (25R)-Δ7-dafachronic acids are potent transcriptional activators in a Gal4-transactivation assay using HEK-293 cells, with EC50 values of 23 and 33 nm, respectively, as are (25S)- and (25R)-Δ4-dafachronic acids, with EC50 values of 23 and 66 nm, respectively. The (25S)- and (25R)-Δ5-isomers were much less potent, with EC50 values approaching 1000 nm, and saturated 5α- and 5β-dafachronic acids showed mostly intermediate potencies. Rescue assays using daf- 9-null mutants confirmed the results from transactivation experiments, but this in vivo assay accentuated the greater potencies of the (25S)-epimers, particularly for the (25S)-Δ7-isomer. We conclude that DAF-12 accommodates a large range of structural variation in ligand geometry, but (25S)-Δ7-dafachronic acid is the most potent and probably biologically relevant isomer. Potency derives more from the A/B-ring configuration than from the stereochemistry at C-25. PMID:19196833

  12. Structure-activity relationship of adipokinetic hormone analogs in the striped hawk moth, Hippotion eson.

    PubMed

    Marco, Heather G; Gäde, Gerd

    2015-06-01

    We showed previously that the sphingid moth Hippotion eson synthesizes the highest number of adipokinetic hormones (AKHs) ever recorded, viz. five, in its corpus cardiacum: two octa-, two nona- and one decapeptide. Further, the endogenous decapeptide (Manse-AKH-II) and the other four AKHs are all active in lipid mobilization, whereas a non-lepidopteran decapeptide (Lacsp-AKH, five amino acid substitutions compared with Manse-AKH-II), was inactive in H. eson. We tested the decapeptide, Lacol-AKH, from a noctuid moth for the first time in a bioassay and it shows a maximal AKH effect in H. eson. Lacol-AKH differs from Manse-AKH-II in three places and from Lacsp-AKH in four places. We, thus, used Lacol-AKH as a lead peptide on which a series of AKH analogs are based to represent: (a) single amino acid replacements (according to the substitutions in Lacsp-AKH), (b) shorter chain lengths, (c) modified termini, and (d) a replacement of Trp in position 8. These analogs, as well as a few naturally occurring AKHs from other lepidopterans were tested in in vivo adipokinetic assays to gain insight into the ligand-receptor interaction in H. eson. Our results show that the second and third amino acids are important for biological activity in the sphingid moth. Analogs with an N-[acetylated]Glu(1) (instead of a pyroGlu), or a free C-terminus, or Ala(8) were not active in the bioassays, while shortened Lacol-AKH analogs and the undecapeptide, non-amidated Vanca-AKH showed very reduced activity (below 25%). This information is important for the consideration of peptide mimetics to combat specific lepidopteran pest insects.

  13. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for mapping of whole brain activity patterns associated with the intake of snack food in ad libitum fed rats.

    PubMed

    Hoch, Tobias; Kreitz, Silke; Gaffling, Simone; Pischetsrieder, Monika; Hess, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Non-homeostatic hyperphagia, which is a major contributor to obesity-related hyperalimentation, is associated with the diet's molecular composition influencing, for example, the energy content. Thus, specific food items such as snack food may induce food intake independent from the state of satiety. To elucidate mechanisms how snack food may induce non-homeostatic food intake, it was tested if manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) was suitable for mapping the whole brain activity related to standard and snack food intake under normal behavioral situation. Application of the MnCl2 solution by osmotic pumps ensured that food intake was not significantly affected by the treatment. After z-score normalization and a non-affine three-dimensional registration to a rat brain atlas, significantly different grey values of 80 predefined brain structures were recorded in ad libitum fed rats after the intake of potato chips compared to standard chow at the group level. Ten of these areas had previously been connected to food intake, in particular to hyperphagia (e.g., dorsomedial hypothalamus or the anterior paraventricular thalamic nucleus) or to the satiety system (e.g., arcuate hypothalamic nucleus or solitary tract); 27 areas were related to reward/addiction including the core and shell of the nucleus accumbens, the ventral pallidum and the ventral striatum (caudate and putamen). Eleven areas associated to sleep displayed significantly reduced Mn2+ -accumulation and six areas related to locomotor activity showed significantly increased Mn2+ -accumulation after the intake of potato chips. The latter changes were associated with an observed significantly higher locomotor activity. Osmotic pump-assisted MEMRI proved to be a promising technique for functional mapping of whole brain activity patterns associated to nutritional intake under normal behavior.

  14. Expression of procaspase 3 and activated caspase 3 and its relevance in hormone-responsive gallbladder carcinoma chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Mallika; Sharma, Bechan; Shukla, Hari Shanker

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims The higher incidence of gallbladder cancer (GBC) in females has been accredited to the involvement of hormones. The clinical implications of sex hormone receptors in GBC are well established. Cysteine proteases (such as caspase-3-9, etc.) are known to play a central role in the apoptotic pathway. Of these, the downstream enzyme caspase-3 is often activated in the apoptotic pathway. The aim of this work was to examine the status of apoptosis (which directly correlated with the level of active caspase-3) in hormone-responsive GBC. Methods We used 10 androgen receptor (AR)-positive, 14 estrogen receptor (ER)-positive, 12 HER/neu-positive, eight triple positive, and 10 triple negative malignant GBC human tissue samples. We isolated the total cellular protein from tumor tissues and carried out Western blotting using antipro-caspase-3 and anti-activated caspase-3 antibodies. Results ER and HER/neu-positive GBC exhibited high caspase-3 activity and low procaspase-3 activity, whereas AR-positive GBC showed no significant level of apoptosis. We also evaluated the apoptosis status of triple positive GBC and triple negative GBC, and found significant apoptosis in triple positive GBC. Conclusions The results indicate that ER and HER/neu-positive GBCs had active apoptosis, whereas AR-positive GBC was highly resistant to apoptosis. PMID:24009453

  15. Blueberry intake alters skeletal muscle and adipose tissue peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor activity and reduces insulin resistance in obese rats.

    PubMed

    Seymour, E Mitchell; Tanone, Ignasia I; Urcuyo-Llanes, Daniel E; Lewis, Sarah K; Kirakosyan, Ara; Kondoleon, Michael G; Kaufman, Peter B; Bolling, Steven F

    2011-12-01

    Metabolic syndrome can precede the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease and includes phenotypes such as obesity, systemic inflammation, insulin resistance, and hyperlipidemia. A recent epidemiological study indicated that blueberry intake reduced cardiovascular mortality in humans, but the possible genetic mechanisms of this effect are unknown. Blueberries are a rich source of anthocyanins, and anthocyanins can alter the activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), which affect energy substrate metabolism. The effect of blueberry intake was assessed in obesity-prone rats. Zucker Fatty and Zucker Lean rats were fed a higher-fat diet (45% of kcal) or a lower-fat diet (10% of kcal) containing 2% (wt/wt) freeze-dried whole highbush blueberry powder or added sugars to match macronutrient and calorie content. In Zucker Fatty rats fed a high-fat diet, the addition of blueberry reduced triglycerides, fasting insulin, homeostasis model index of insulin resistance, and glucose area under the curve. Blueberry intake also reduced abdominal fat mass, increased adipose and skeletal muscle PPAR activity, and affected PPAR transcripts involved in fat oxidation and glucose uptake/oxidation. In Zucker Fatty rats fed a low-fat diet, the addition of blueberry also significantly reduced liver weight, body weight, and total fat mass. Finally, Zucker Lean rats fed blueberry had higher body weight and reduced triglycerides, but all other measures were unaffected. In conclusion, whole blueberry intake reduced phenotypes of metabolic syndrome in obesity-prone rats and affected PPAR gene transcripts in adipose and muscle tissue involved in fat and glucose metabolism.

  16. Development of an antifertility vaccine for pets based on active immunization against luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Ladd, A; Tsong, Y Y; Walfield, A M; Thau, R

    1994-12-01

    Male dogs and cats were immunized against LHRH in order to evaluate the feasibility of an immunological approach to pet contraception. In the first study, dogs were immunized with 100, 500, or 2500 micrograms of LHRH conjugated to tetanus toxoid. A significant decline in serum testosterone (T) levels was observed in all immunized dogs, reaching castration levels in some animals by Week 4 and remaining suppressed in all the immunized dogs through the course of the study. Testicular histology suggested arrest of spermatogenesis (infertility). The effects of "immunological castration" were reversible (study 2): steroidogenesis suppressed by "immunological castration" was restored as antibody titers declined. Effective antibodies were rapidly reinduced in dogs by a single injection of LHRH1-TT. In contrast, the level of antibodies induced in male cats (study 3) was not sufficient for "immunological castration." The conclusion was that active immunization against LHRH could provide a cost-effective, nonsurgical, reversible means to control the fertility of companion animals.

  17. Pro198Leu polymorphism affects the selenium status and GPx activity in response to Brazil nut intake.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Bárbara R; Busse, Alexandre L; Hare, Dominic J; Cominetti, Cristiane; Horst, Maria A; McColl, Gawain; Magaldi, Regina M; Jacob-Filho, Wilson; Cozzolino, Silvia M F

    2016-02-01

    Selenoproteins play important roles in antioxidant mechanisms, and are thus hypothesised to have some involvement in the pathology of certain types of dementia. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are both thought to involve impaired biological activity of certain selenoproteins. Previously, supplementation with a selenium-rich Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa) has shown potential in reducing cognitive decline in MCI patients, and could prove to be a safe and effective nutritional approach early in the disease process to slow decline. Here, we have conducted a pilot study that examined the effects of a range of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding the selenoproteins glutathione peroxidase (GPX1) and selenoprotein P (SEPP) in response to selenium supplementation via dietary Brazil nuts, including selenium status, oxidative stress parameters and GPX1 and SEPP gene expression. Our data suggest that GPX1 Pro198Leu rs1050450 genotypes may differentially affect the selenium status and GPx activity. Moreover, rs7579 and rs3877899 SNPs in SEPP gene, as well as GPX1 rs1050450 genotypes can influence the expression of GPX1 and SEPP mRNA in response to Brazil nuts intake. This small study gives cause for larger investigations into the role of these SNPs in both the selenium status and response to selenium dietary intake, especially in chronic degenerative conditions like MCI and AD.

  18. The UV filter benzophenone 3 (BP-3) activates hormonal genes mimicking the action of ecdysone and alters embryo development in the insect Chironomus riparius (Diptera).

    PubMed

    Ozáez, Irene; Martínez-Guitarte, José Luis; Morcillo, Gloria

    2014-09-01

    Numerous studies have evaluated the endocrine effects of UV filters in vertebrates, but little attention has been paid to their possible hormonal activity in invertebrates. We examined the effects of benzophenone-3 (BP-3), one of the most common sunscreen agents, in Chironomus riparius (Insecta), a reference organism in aquatic toxicology. Salivary glands from larvae were treated with either the hormone ecdysone or BP-3 to compare the response of endocrine genes. It was found that BP-3 elicits the same effects as the natural hormone activating the expression of a set of ecdysone responsive genes. BP-3 also activated the stress gene hsp70. Interestingly, similar effects have been confirmed in vivo in embryos. Moreover, BP-3 also altered embryogenesis delaying hatching. This is the first demonstration of hormonal activity of UV filters in invertebrates, showing a mode of action similar to ecdysteroid hormones. This finding highlights the potential endocrine disruptive effects of these emergent pollutants.

  19. Neural activation during anticipated peer evaluation and laboratory meal intake in overweight girls with and without loss of control eating.

    PubMed

    Jarcho, Johanna M; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Nelson, Eric E; Engel, Scott G; Vannucci, Anna; Field, Sara E; Romer, Adrienne L; Hannallah, Louise; Brady, Sheila M; Demidowich, Andrew P; Shomaker, Lauren B; Courville, Amber B; Pine, Daniel S; Yanovski, Jack A

    2015-03-01

    The interpersonal model of loss of control (LOC) eating proposes that socially distressing situations lead to anxious states that trigger excessive food consumption. Self-reports support these links, but the neurobiological underpinnings of these relationships remain unclear. We therefore examined brain regions associated with anxiety in relation to LOC eating and energy intake in the laboratory. Twenty-two overweight and obese (BMIz: 1.9±0.4) adolescent (15.8±1.6y) girls with LOC eating (LOC+, n=10) and without LOC eating (LOC-, n=12) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a simulated peer interaction chatroom paradigm. Immediately after the fMRI scan, girls consumed lunch ad libitum from a 10,934-kcal laboratory buffet meal with the instruction to "let yourself go and eat as much as you want." Pre-specified hypotheses regarding activation of five regions of interest were tested. Analysis of fMRI data revealed a significant group by peer feedback interaction in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), such that LOC+ had less activity following peer rejection (vs. acceptance), while LOC- had increased activity (p<.005). Moreover, functional coupling between vmPFC and striatum for peer rejection (vs. acceptance) interacted with LOC status: coupling was positive for LOC+, but negative in LOC- (p<.005). Activity of fusiform face area (FFA) during negative peer feedback from high-value peers also interacted with LOC status (p<.005). A positive association between FFA activation and intake during the meal was observed among only those with LOC eating. In conclusion, overweight and obese girls with LOC eating may be distinguished by a failure to engage regions of prefrontal cortex implicated in emotion regulation in response to social distress. The relationship between FFA activation and food intake supports the notion that heightened sensitivity to incoming interpersonal cues and perturbations in socio-emotional neural circuits may lead to

  20. Phase-dependent activity of neurons in the rostral part of the thalamic reticular nucleus with saccharin intake in a cue-guided lever-manipulation task.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Ryuhei; Kato, Risako; Fujita, Satoshi; Shimada, Jun; Koshikawa, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Masayuki

    2017-03-01

    Neurons in the rostral part of the thalamic reticular nucleus (rTRN) receive somatosensory and motor information and regulate neural activities of the thalamic nuclei. Previous studies showed that when activity in visual TRN neurons is suppressed prior to the visual stimuli in a visual detection task, the performance of the task improves. However, little is known about such changes in the rTRN preceding certain events. In the present study, we performed unit recordings in the rTRN in alert rats during a cue-guided lever-manipulation task in which saccharin was provided as a reward. Changes in neural activity during saccharin intake were observed in 56% (51 of 91) of the recorded neurons; the firing rates increased in 21 neurons and decreased in 23 neurons. Seven neurons both increased and decreased their firing rates during saccharin intake. Changes in firing rates during the reward-waiting stage between task termination and saccharin intake were also observed in 73% (37 of 51) of the neurons that responded to saccharin intake. Increased activity during saccharin intake did not correlate with increased activity during lever-manipulation or activity during the reward-waiting stage. However, decreased activity during saccharin intake was correlated with activity during the reward-waiting stage. These results suggest that rTRN neurons have phase-dependent changes in their activity and regulate the thalamic activities. Furthermore, the decreased activity of rTRN neurons before reward may contribute to refine somatosensory and motor information processing in the thalamic nuclei depending on the status of mind such as expectation and attention.

  1. Screening of hormone-like activities in bottled waters available in Southern Spain using receptor-specific bioassays.

    PubMed

    Real, Macarena; Molina-Molina, José-Manuel; Jiménez-Díaz, Inmaculada; Arrebola, Juan Pedro; Sáenz, José-María; Fernández, Mariana F; Olea, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Bottled water consumption is a putative source of human exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Research has been conducted on the presence of chemicals with estrogen-like activity in bottled waters and on their estrogenicity, but few data are available on the presence of hormonal activities associated with other nuclear receptors (NRs). The aim of this study was to determine the presence of endocrine activities dependent on the activation of human estrogen receptor alpha (hERa) and/or androgen receptor (hAR) in water in glass or plastic bottles sold to consumers in Southern Spain. Hormone-like activities were evaluated in 29 bottled waters using receptor-specific bioassays based on reporter gene expression in PALM cells [(anti-)androgenicity] and cell proliferation assessment in MCF-7 cells [(anti-)estrogenicity] after optimized solid phase extraction (SPE). All of the water samples analyzed showed hormonal activity. This was estrogenic in 79.3% and anti-estrogenic in 37.9% of samples and was androgenic in 27.5% and anti-androgenic in 41.3%, with mean concentrations per liter of 0.113pM 17β-estradiol (E2) equivalent units (E2Eq), 11.01pM anti-estrogen (ICI 182780) equivalent units (ICI 182780Eq), 0.33pM methyltrienolone (R1881) equivalent units (R1881Eq), and 0.18nM procymidone equivalent units (ProcEq). Bottled water consumption contributes to EDC exposure. Hormone-like activities observed in waters from both plastic and glass bottles suggest that plastic packaging is not the sole source of contamination and that the source of the water and bottling process may play a role, among other factors. Further research is warranted on the cumulative effects of long-term exposure to low doses of EDCs.

  2. Assessment of multiple hormone activities of a UV-filter (octocrylene) in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiuya Y; Ma, Xiaoyan Y; Wang, Xiaochang C; Ngo, Huu Hao

    2016-09-01

    In this study, zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to a UV-filter-octocrylene (OCT) with elevated concentrations for 28 d. The total body accumulation of OCT in zebrafish was found to reach 2321.01 ("L" level), 31,234.80 ("M" level), and 70,593.38 ng g(-1) ("H" level) when the average OCT exposure concentration was controlled at 28.61, 505.62, and 1248.70 μg L(-1), respectively. Gross and histological observations as well as RT-qPCR analysis were conducted to determine the effects of OCT accumulation on zebrafish. After exposure, the gonad-somatic index and percentage of vitellogenic oocytes were found to increase significantly in the ovaries of female zebrafish at the H accumulation level. Significant up-regulation of esr1 and cyp19b were observed in the gonads, as well as vtg1 in the livers for both female and male zebrafish. At M and H accumulation levels, apparent down-regulation of ar was observed in the ovaries and testis of the female and male zebrafish, respectively. Although the extent of the effects on zebrafish differed at different accumulation levels, the induction of vtg1 and histological changes in the ovaries are indications of estrogenic activity and the inhibition of esr1 and ar showed antiestrogenic and antiandrogenic activity, respectively. Thus, as OCT could easily accumulate in aquatic life such as zebrafish, one of its most of concern hazards would be the disturbance of the histological development and its multiple hormonal activities.

  3. [TV, overweight and nutritional surveillance. Ads content, food intake and physical activity].

    PubMed

    Spagnoli, T D; Bioletti, L; Bo, C; Formigatti, M

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between television viewing and obesity in children and adults was examined in a large number of cross-sectional epidemiological studies. Some randomised, controlled trials confirmed the evidence that television viewing is a cause of increased body fatness. It seems of utility in nutritional surveillance to esteem time spent by children and adults in television watching and to evaluate ads contents and food preferences suggested by them. This editorial shows a two-years long analysis of food commercials broadcasted by the main Italian TV networks; food ads targeted on children, housewives and sport fans were evaluated; the relationship between television viewing, commercials and food intake or global lifestyle was investigated in a Piedmont's population (from Northern Italy). School projects aimed to reduce television viewing represent a promising strategy for preventing childhood obesity.

  4. A-FABP mediates adaptive thermogenesis by promoting intracellular activation of thyroid hormones in brown adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Lingling; Hoo, Ruby L. C.; Wu, Xiaoping; Pan, Yong; Lee, Ida P. C.; Cheong, Lai Yee; Bornstein, Stefan R; Rong, Xianglu; Guo, Jiao; Xu, Aimin

    2017-01-01

    The adipokine adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (A-FABP) has been implicated in obesity-related cardio-metabolic complications. Here we show that A-FABP increases thermogenesis by promoting the conversion of T4 to T3 in brown adipocytes. We find that A-FABP levels are increased in both white (WAT) and brown (BAT) adipose tissues and the bloodstream in response to thermogenic stimuli. A-FABP knockout mice have reduced thermogenesis and whole-body energy expenditure after cold stress or after feeding a high-fat diet, which can be reversed by infusion of recombinant A-FABP. Mechanistically, A-FABP induces the expression of type-II iodothyronine deiodinase in BAT via inhibition of the nuclear receptor liver X receptor α, thereby leading to the conversion of thyroid hormone from its inactive form T4 to active T3. The thermogenic responses to T4 are abrogated in A-FABP KO mice, but enhanced by A-FABP. Thus, A-FABP acts as a physiological stimulator of BAT-mediated adaptive thermogenesis. PMID:28128199

  5. Gastrointestinal regulation of food intake

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, David E.; Overduin, Joost

    2007-01-01

    Despite substantial fluctuations in daily food intake, animals maintain a remarkably stable body weight, because overall caloric ingestion and expenditure are exquisitely matched over long periods of time, through the process of energy homeostasis. The brain receives hormonal, neural, and metabolic signals pertaining to body-energy status and, in response to these inputs, coordinates adaptive alterations of energy intake and expenditure. To regulate food consumption, the brain must modulate appetite, and the core of appetite regulation lies in the gut-brain axis. This Review summarizes current knowledge regarding the neuroendocrine regulation of food intake by the gastrointestinal system, focusing on gastric distention, intestinal and pancreatic satiation peptides, and the orexigenic gastric hormone ghrelin. We highlight mechanisms governing nutrient sensing and peptide secretion by enteroendocrine cells, including novel taste-like pathways. The increasingly nuanced understanding of the mechanisms mediating gut-peptide regulation and action provides promising targets for new strategies to combat obesity and diabetes. PMID:17200702

  6. Hypothalamic effects of thyroid hormones on metabolism.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sánchez, Noelia; Alvarez, Clara V; Fernø, Johan; Nogueiras, Rubén; Diéguez, Carlos; López, Miguel

    2014-10-01

    Over the past few decades, obesity and its related metabolic disorders have increased at an epidemic rate in the developed and developing world. New signals and factors involved in the modulation of energy balance and metabolism are continuously being discovered, providing potential novel drug targets for the treatment of metabolic disease. A parallel strategy is to better understand how hormonal signals, with an already established role in energy metabolism, work, and how manipulation of the pathways involved may lead to amelioration of metabolic dysfunction. The thyroid hormones belong to the latter category, with dysregulation of the thyroid axis leading to marked alterations in energy balance. The potential of thyroid hormones in the treatment of obesity has been known for decades, but their therapeutic use has been hampered because of side-effects. Data gleaned over the past few years, however, have uncovered new features at the mechanisms of action involved in thyroid hormones. Sophisticated neurobiological approaches have allowed the identification of specific energy sensors, such as AMP-activated protein kinase and mechanistic target of rapamycin, acting in specific groups of hypothalamic neurons, mediating many of the effects of thyroid hormones on food intake, energy expenditure, glucose, lipid metabolism, and cardiovascular function. More extensive knowledge about these molecular mechanisms will be of great relevance for the treatment of obesity and metabolic syndrome.

  7. Effects of complexation with in vivo enhancing monoclonal antibodies on activity of growth hormone in two responsive cell culture systems.

    PubMed

    Beattie, J; Borromeo, V; Bramani, S; Secchi, C; Baumbach, W R; Mockridge, J

    1999-12-01

    We describe the properties of three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to ovine GH, two of which have previously been shown to enhance, in vivo, the biological activity of bovine and ovine growth hormone. We have examined the effects of these MAbs on GH activity in two appropriate GH-responsive cell culture systems, investigating both acute signalling effects (Janus-activated kinase (Jak)-2 tyrosine phosphorylation -5 min) and longer-term (MTT-formazan production -24 h) effects of hormone-antibody complexes. In the 3T3-F442A pre-adipocyte cell line (which has been demonstrated to be GH responsive), we show that complexation of recombinant bovine (rb) GH with either of the two enhancing anti-ovine GH MAbs (OA11 and OA15) and the non-enhancing MAb, OA14, attenuates the ability of GH to stimulate tyrosine phosphorylation of Jak-2 at a 5-min time point. Using the mouse myeloid cell line, FDC-P1, stably transfected with the full-length ovine GH receptor (oGHR), we demonstrate that rbGH causes a dose-dependent increase in MTT-formazan production by these cells. Further, we demonstrate that OA11 and OA14, but not OA15, cause a decrease in this stimulatory activity of rbGH over a hormone concentration range of 5-50 ng/ml at both 24 and 48 h. We conclude that the different in vitro activities of the two in vivo enhancing MAbs are most probably related to the time-courses over which these two assays are performed, and also to the relative affinities between antibody, hormone and receptor. In addition, the in vitro inhibitory activity of the enhancing MAb OA11 in both short- and long-term bioassay lends further support to an exclusively in vivo model for MAb-mediated enhancement of GH action.

  8. Mercury inhibits rat liver and kidney glucocorticoid receptor hormone binding activity.

    PubMed

    Brkljacić, J; Vojnović Milutinović, D; Dundjerski, J; Matić, G

    2004-05-01

    The present study was focused on the influence of mercury on the rat liver and kidney glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binding properties. The time-course and dose-dependence of mercury effects, as well as possible involvement of thiol groups were examined after in vivo and in vitro administration of the metal in the form of HgCl2. Mercury led to reduction of the liver and kidney GR hormone binding capacity. In both examined tissues maximal reduction was noticed 4 h after administration of the metal at 2 and 3 mg Hg/kg bw, but the effect was more prominent in kidney as compared to liver. On the other hand, binding affinity in the two tissues was similar. The complete reversal of mercury effects on GR binding capacity by 10 mmol/L DTT was achieved in liver and partially in kidney. The reversal by DTT suggested that mercury caused the decrease of GR binding activity by interacting with thiol groups. The difference in the response of the two tissues reflected the fact that kidney contained a higher mercury concentration and a lower thiol content in comparison to liver. The implicated thiols probably belong to GR, since when applied in vitro at 0 degrees C, mercury produced reduction of the receptor binding activity similar to that observed in vivo. GR protein level examined by quantitative Western blot was either unchanged, when determined by polyclonal antibody, or reduced, when determined by BuGR2 antibody, suggesting that Hg might affect BuGR epitope availability.

  9. Direct activating effects of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) on brown adipose tissue are attenuated by corticosterone.

    PubMed

    van den Beukel, Johanna C; Grefhorst, Aldo; Quarta, Carmelo; Steenbergen, Jacobie; Mastroberardino, Pier G; Lombès, Marc; Delhanty, Patric J; Mazza, Roberta; Pagotto, Uberto; van der Lely, Aart Jan; Themmen, Axel P N

    2014-11-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) and brown-like cells in white adipose tissue (WAT) can dissipate energy through thermogenesis, a process mediated by uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1). We investigated whether stress hormones ACTH and corticosterone contribute to BAT activation and browning of WAT. ACTH and corticosterone were studied in male mice exposed to 4 or 23°C for 24 h. Direct effects were studied in T37i mouse brown adipocytes and primary cultured murine BAT and inguinal WAT (iWAT) cells. In vivo effects were studied using (18)F-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography. Cold exposure doubled serum ACTH concentrations (P=0.03) and fecal corticosterone excretion (P=0.008). In T37i cells, ACTH dose-dependently increased Ucp1 mRNA (EC50=1.8 nM) but also induced Ucp1 protein content 88% (P=0.02), glycerol release 32% (P=0.03) and uncoupled respiration 40% (P=0.003). In cultured BAT and iWAT, ACTH elevated Ucp1 mRNA by 3-fold (P=0.03) and 3.7-fold (P=0.01), respectively. In T37i cells, corticosterone prevented induction of Ucp1 mRNA and Ucp1 protein by both ACTH and norepinephrine in a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent fashion. ACTH and GR antagonist RU486 independently doubled BAT (18)F-deoxyglucose uptake (P=0.0003 and P=0.004, respectively) in vivo. Our results show that ACTH activates BAT and browning of WAT while corticosterone counteracts this.

  10. Effect of antibodies against distinctive rat liver estrogen-binding protein on hormone-binding activity of this protein and steroid hormone receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, A.N.; Shchelkunova, T.A.; Smirnova, O.V.; Rozen, V.B.

    1986-12-10

    The effect of rabbit polyclonal antibodies (AB) against a distinctive estrogen-binding protein (DEBP) of rat liver, isolated using an immunosorbent, on the interaction of (/sup 3/H)estradiol with the DEBP and estrogen receptors of the uterus and other tissues, as well as of (/sup 3/H)dihydrotestosterone with prostate androgen receptors, (/sup 3/H)progesterone with uterine progesterone receptors, and (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone with rat thymus glucocorticoid receptors was investigated. It was found that preincubation of the cytosol of the tissues under investigation with the antibodies decreases the capacity of the DEBP of the estrogen and androgen receptors to bind the corresponding ligand. The hormone-binding activity of progesterone and the glucocorticoid receptors does not change in the presence of AB. The binding activity of DEBP in the presence of AB decreases as a result of a decrease in the concentration of binding sites of the protein, while that of the estrogen and androgen receptors drops as a result of a decrease in affinity for the ligand, due to a drop in the association rate constant. A cross effect of AB on the activity of uterine estrogen receptors of the rabbit, guinea pig, and mouse was found. It was concluded that there is a definite similarity in the structure of DEBP and sex steroid receptors.

  11. Structure and activity of strigolactones: new plant hormones with a rich future.

    PubMed

    Zwanenburg, Binne; Pospísil, Tomás

    2013-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) constitute a new class of plant hormones which are active as germination stimulants for seeds of parasitic weeds of Striga, Orobanche, and Pelipanchi spp, in hyphal branching of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and as inhibitors of shoot branching. In this review, the focus is on molecular features of these SLs. The occurrence of SLs in root exudates of host plants is described. The naming protocol for SL according to the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) rules and the 'at a glance' method is explained. The total synthesis of some natural SLs is described with details for all eight stereoisomers of strigol. The problems encountered with assigning the correct structure of natural SLs are analyzed for orobanchol, alectrol, and solanacol. The structure-activity relationship of SLs as germination stimulants leads to the identification of the bioactiphore of SLs. Together with a tentative mechanism for the mode of action, a model has been derived that can be used to design and prepare active SL analogs. This working model has been used for the preparation of a series of new SL analogs such as Nijmegen-1, and analogs derived from simple ketones, keto enols, and saccharine. The serendipitous finding of SL mimics which are derived from the D-ring in SLs (appropriately substituted butenolides) is reported. For SL mimics, a mode of action is proposed as well. Recent new results support this proposal. The stability of SLs and SL analogs towards hydrolysis is described and some details of the mechanism of hydrolysis are discussed as well. The attempted isolation of the protein receptor for germination and the current status concerning the biosynthesis of natural SLs are briefly discussed. Some non-SLs as germinating agents are mentioned. The structure-activity relationship for SLs in hyphal branching of AM fungi and in repression of shoot branching is also analyzed. For each of the principle functions, a working model for the

  12. Perceptions of Food Intake, Physical Activity, and Obesity Among African-American Children in the Lower Mississippi Delta.

    PubMed

    McGee, Bernestine B; Richardson, Valerie; Johnson, Glenda; Johnson, Crystal

    2015-11-11

    Purpose . To explore the nutrition and physical activity perceptions of children for planning a healthy weight curriculum to address childhood obesity in African-American children living in the Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD). Design . Six children's focus group sessions. Setting . Two Louisiana parishes in the LMD. Subjects . Seventy 8- to 13-year-old African-American children, 46 (66%) females and 24 (44%) males, participated in the focus group sessions. Measures . Interview questions were based on personal and environmental determinants and content and strategies for a healthy lifestyle program for children. Analysis . Focus group discussions were audio recorded and transcribed, observer recorded, and analyzed to identify recurring trends and patterns among focus groups. Content analysis consisted of coding focus group transcripts for recurrent themes and review of data by an independent reviewer to confirm the themes. Results . Emerging themes were categorized as healthy lifestyle opinions within the social cognitive theory constructs of personal and environmental determinants and curriculum content. Conclusion . LMD youth recognized a healthy eating pattern and that overweight and obesity result from poor eating habits and physical inactivity. Children's food intake pattern did not reflect this understanding, suggesting a need for culturally tailoring an intervention to impact the poor food intake and physical inactivity in two low-income African-American Delta communities.

  13. Different effects of bifeprunox, aripiprazole, and haloperidol on body weight gain, food and water intake, and locomotor activity in rats.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Michael; Pan, Bo; Lian, Jiamei; Huang, Xu-Feng; Deng, Chao

    2014-09-01

    Following on the success of Aripiprazole with its high clinical efficacy and minimal side effects, further antipsychotic drugs (such as Bifeprunox) have been developed based on the same dopamine D2 partial agonist pharmacological profile as Aripiprazole. However clinical trials of Bifeprunox have found differing results to that of its predecessor, without the same significant clinical efficacy. This study has therefore investigated the different effects of 10 week treatment with Aripiprazole (0.75 mg/kg, 3 times per day), Bifeprunox (0.8 mg/kg, 3 times per day) and Haloperidol (0.1mg/kg, 3 times per day) on body weight gain, food and water intake, white fat mass, and 8 week treatment on locomotor activity. Treatment with Bifeprunox was found to significantly reduce all of the measured parameters except white fat mass compared to the control group. However, Aripiprazole and Haloperidol treatment reduced water intake compared to the control, without any significant effects on the other measured parameters. These findings further demonstrate the potential pharmacological differences between Aripiprazole and Bifeprunox, and identify potential weight loss side effects and increased anxiety behaviour with Bifeprunox treatment.

  14. Identification of SRC3/AIB1 as a Preferred Coactivator for Hormone-activated Androgen Receptor*♦

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, X. Edward; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Li, Jun; He, Yuanzheng; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P.; Melcher, Karsten; Yong, Eu-Leong; Xu, H. Eric

    2010-01-01

    Transcription activation by androgen receptor (AR), which depends on recruitment of coactivators, is required for the initiation and progression of prostate cancer, yet the mechanisms of how hormone-activated AR interacts with coactivators remain unclear. This is because AR, unlike any other nuclear receptor, prefers its own N-terminal FXXLF motif to the canonical LXXLL motifs of coactivators. Through biochemical and crystallographic studies, we identify that steroid receptor coactivator-3 (SRC3) (also named as amplified in breast cancer-1 or AIB1) interacts strongly with AR via synergistic binding of its first and third LXXLL motifs. Mutagenesis and functional studies confirm that SRC3 is a preferred coactivator for hormone-activated AR. Importantly, AR mutations found in prostate cancer patients correlate with their binding potency to SRC3, corroborating with the emerging role of SRC3 as a prostate cancer oncogene. These results provide a molecular mechanism for the selective utilization of SRC3 by hormone-activated AR, and they link the functional relationship between AR and SRC3 to the development and growth of prostate cancer. PMID:20086010

  15. The effects of exogenous hormones on rooting process and the activities of key enzymes of Malus hupehensis stem cuttings

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Qianqian; Zhao, Mingming; Zhou, Ting; Cao, Fuliang

    2017-01-01

    Malus hupehensis is an excellent Malus rootstock species, known for its strong adverse-resistance and apomixes. In the present study, stem cuttings of M. hupehensis were treated with three types of exogenous hormones, including indole acetic acid (IAA), naphthalene acetic acid (NAA), or green growth regulator (GGR). The effects and mechanisms of exogenous hormone treatment and antioxidant enzyme activity on adventitious root formation were investigated. The results showed that the apparent morphology of the adventitious root had four stages, including root pre-emergence stage (S0), early stage of root formation (S1), massive root formation stage (S2), and later stage of root formation (S3). The suitable concentrations of the three exogenous hormones, IAA, NAA and GGR, were 100 mg·L-1, 300 mg·L-1, and 300 mg·L-1, respectively. They shortened the rooting time by 25–47.4% and increased the rooting percentages of cuttings by 0.9–1.3 times, compared with that in the control. The dispersion in S0 stage was 3.6 times of that in the S1 stage after exogenous hormone application. The earlier the third critical point (P3) appeared, the shorter the rooting time and the greater the rooting percentage of the cuttings. During rhizogenesis, the activities of three antioxidant enzymes (POD, SOD, and PPO) showed an A-shaped trend. However, peak values of enzyme activity appeared at different points, which were 9 d before the P3, P3, and the fourth critical point (P4), respectively. Exogenous hormone treatment reduced the time to reach the peak value by 18 days, although the peak values of the enzymatic activities did not significantly changed. Our results suggested that exogenous hormone treatment mainly acted during the root pre-emergence stage, accelerated the synthesis of antioxidant enzymes, reduced the rooting time, and consequently promoted root formation. The three kinds of antioxidant enzymes acted on different stages of rooting. PMID:28231330

  16. Muscle triacylglycerol and hormone-sensitive lipase activity in untrained and trained human muscles.

    PubMed

    Helge, Jørn Wulff; Biba, Taus O; Galbo, Henrik; Gaster, Michael; Donsmark, Morten

    2006-07-01

    During exercise, triacylglycerol (TG) is recruited in skeletal muscles. We hypothesized that both muscle hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) activity and TG recruitment would be higher in trained than in untrained subjects in response to prolonged exercise. Healthy male subjects (26 +/- 1 years, body moss index 23.3 +/- 0.5 kg m(-2)), either untrained (N = 8, VO(2max) 3.8 +/- 0.2 l min(-1)) or trained (N = 8, VO(2max) 5.1 +/- 0.1 l min(-1)), were studied. Before and after 3-h exercise (58 +/- 1% VO(2max)), a biopsy was taken. Muscle citrate synthase (32 +/- 2 vs. 47 +/- 6 mumol g(-1) min(-1) d.w.) and beta-hydroxy-acyl-CoA-dehydrogenase (38 +/- 3 vs. 52 +/- 5 mumol g(-1) min(-1) d.w.) activities were lower in untrained than in trained subjects (p < 0.05). Throughout the exercise, fat oxidation was higher in trained than in untrained subjects (p < 0.05). Muscle HSL activity was similar at rest (0.72 +/- 0.08 and 0.74 +/- 0.03 mU mg(-1) protein) and after exercise (0.71 +/- 0.1 and 0.68 +/- 0.03 mU mg(-1) protein) in untrained and trained subjects. At rest, the chemically determined muscle TG content (37 +/- 8 and 26 +/- 5 mmol g(-1) d.w.) was similar (p > 0.05), and after exercise it was unchanged in untrained and lower (p < 0.05) in trained subjects (41 +/- 9 and 10 +/- 2 mmol g((1) d.w.). Determined histochemically, TG was decreased (p < 0.05) after exercise in type I and II fibres. Depletion of TG was not different between fibre types in untrained, but tended to be higher (p = 0.07) in type I compared with type II fibres in trained muscles. In conclusion, HSL activity is similar in untrained and trained skeletal muscles both before and after prolonged exercise. However, the tendency to higher muscle TG recruitment during exercise in the trained subjects suggests a difference in the regulation of HSL or other lipases during exercise in trained compared with untrained subjects.

  17. Multiple hormonal activities of UV filters and comparison of in vivo and in vitro estrogenic activity of ethyl-4-aminobenzoate in fish.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Petra Y; Fent, Karl

    2006-10-12

    UV filters have been detected in surface water, wastewater and fish, and some of them are estrogenic in fish. At present, little is known about their additional hormonal activities in different hormonal receptor systems despite their increasing use and environmental persistence. Besides estrogenic activity, UV filters may have additional activities, both agonistic and antagonistic in aquatic organisms. In our study, we investigate a series of UV filters for multiple hormonal activities in vitro in human receptor systems and evaluate the predictive value of these findings for the activity in fish in vitro and in vivo. First we systematically analysed the estrogenic, antiestrogenic, androgenic, and antiandrogenic activity of 18 UV filters and one metabolite in vitro at non-cytotoxic concentrations with recombinant yeast systems carrying either a human estrogen (hERalpha) or androgen receptor (hAR). All 19 compounds elicited hormonal activities, surprisingly most of them multiple activities. We found 10 UV-filters having agonistic effects towards the hERalpha. Surprisingly, we identified for the first time six UV filters with androgenic activities and many of them having pronounced antiestrogenic and antiandrogenic activities. As much as 17 compounds inhibited 4,5-dihydrotestosterone activity in the hAR assay, while 14 compounds inhibited estradiol activity in the hERalpha assay, indicating antiandrogenic and antiestrogenic activity, respectively. In particular, the antiandrogenic activities of phenyl- and benzyl salicylate, benzophenone-1 and -2, and of 4-hydroxybenzophenone were higher than that of flutamide, a known hAR antagonist. In a second series of experiments, we investigated the predictive power of the hERalpha assay for aquatic organisms by further investigating the estrogenic UV filter ethyl 4-aminobenzoate (Et-PABA) in vitro and in vivo in fish. Et-PABA showed estrogenic activity in a recombinant yeast system carrying the rainbow trout estrogen receptor

  18. Altered hyperlipidemia, hepatic steatosis, and hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in rats with intake of tart cherry.

    PubMed

    Seymour, E Mitchell; Singer, Andrew A M; Kirakosyan, Ara; Urcuyo-Llanes, Daniel E; Kaufman, Peter B; Bolling, Steven F

    2008-06-01

    Elevated plasma lipids, glucose, insulin, and fatty liver are among components of metabolic syndrome, a phenotypic pattern that typically precedes the development of Type 2 diabetes. Animal studies show that intake of anthocyanins reduces hyperlipidemia, obesity, and atherosclerosis and that anthocyanin-rich extracts may exert these effects in association with altered activity of tissue peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). However, studies are lacking to test this correlation using physiologically relevant, whole food sources of anthocyanins. Tart cherries are a rich source of anthocyanins, and whole cherry fruit intake may also affect hyperlipidemia and/or affect tissue PPARs. This hypothesis was tested in the Dahl Salt-Sensitive rat having insulin resistance and hyperlipidemia. For 90 days, Dahl rats were pair-fed AIN-76a-based diets supplemented with either 1% (wt:wt) freeze-dried whole tart cherry or with 0.85% additional carbohydrate to match macronutrient and calorie provision. After 90 days, the cherry-enriched diet was associated with reduced fasting blood glucose, hyperlipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, and reduced fatty liver. The cherry diet was also associated with significantly enhanced hepatic PPAR-alpha mRNA, enhanced hepatic PPAR-alpha target acyl-coenzyme A oxidase mRNA and activity, and increased plasma antioxidant capacity. In conclusion, physiologically relevant tart cherry consumption reduced several phenotypic risk factors that are associated with risk for metabolic syndrome and Type 2 diabetes. Tart cherries may represent a whole food research model of the health effects of anthocyanin-rich foods and may possess nutraceutical value against risk factors for metabolic syndrome and its clinical sequelae.

  19. Thyroid hormones directly activate the expression of the human and mouse uncoupling protein-3 genes through a thyroid response element in the proximal promoter region

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The transcription of the human UCP3 (uncoupling protein-3) gene in skeletal muscle is tightly regulated by metabolic signals related to fatty acid availability. However, changes in thyroid status also modulate UCP3 gene expression, albeit by unknown mechanisms. We created transgenic mice bearing the entire human UCP3 gene to investigate the effect of thyroid hormones on human UCP3 gene expression. Treatment of human UCP3 transgenic mice with thyroid hormones induced the expression of the human gene in skeletal muscle. In addition, transient transfection experiments demonstrate that thyroid hormones activate the transcription of the human UCP3 gene promoter when MyoD and the TR (thyroid hormone receptor) were co-transfected. The action of thyroid hormones on UCP3 gene transcription is mediated by the binding of the TR to a proximal region in the UCP3 gene promoter that contains a direct repeat structure. An intact DNA sequence of this site is required for thyroid hormone responsiveness and TR binding. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the TR binds this element in vivo. The murine Ucp3 gene promoter was also dependent on MyoD and responsive to thyroid hormone in transient transfection assays. However, it was much less sensitive to thyroid hormone than the human UCP3 promoter. In summary, UCP3 gene transcription is activated by thyroid hormone treatment in vivo, and this activation is mediated by a TRE (thyroid hormone response element) in the proximal promoter region. Such regulation suggests a link between UCP3 gene expression and the effects of thyroid hormone on mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle. PMID:15496137

  20. Acute ethanol intake induces superoxide anion generation and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in rat aorta: A role for angiotensin type 1 receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Yogi, Alvaro; Callera, Glaucia E.; Mecawi, André S.; Batalhão, Marcelo E.; Carnio, Evelin C.; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Queiroz, Regina H.; Touyz, Rhian M.; Tirapelli, Carlos R.

    2012-11-01

    Ethanol intake is associated with increase in blood pressure, through unknown mechanisms. We hypothesized that acute ethanol intake enhances vascular oxidative stress and induces vascular dysfunction through renin–angiotensin system (RAS) activation. Ethanol (1 g/kg; p.o. gavage) effects were assessed within 30 min in male Wistar rats. The transient decrease in blood pressure induced by ethanol was not affected by the previous administration of losartan (10 mg/kg; p.o. gavage), a selective AT{sub 1} receptor antagonist. Acute ethanol intake increased plasma renin activity (PRA), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity, plasma angiotensin I (ANG I) and angiotensin II (ANG II) levels. Ethanol induced systemic and vascular oxidative stress, evidenced by increased plasma thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances (TBARS) levels, NAD(P)H oxidase‐mediated vascular generation of superoxide anion and p47phox translocation (cytosol to membrane). These effects were prevented by losartan. Isolated aortas from ethanol-treated rats displayed increased p38MAPK and SAPK/JNK phosphorylation. Losartan inhibited ethanol-induced increase in the phosphorylation of these kinases. Ethanol intake decreased acetylcholine-induced relaxation and increased phenylephrine-induced contraction in endothelium-intact aortas. Ethanol significantly decreased plasma and aortic nitrate levels. These changes in vascular reactivity and in the end product of endogenous nitric oxide metabolism were not affected by losartan. Our study provides novel evidence that acute ethanol intake stimulates RAS activity and induces vascular oxidative stress and redox-signaling activation through AT{sub 1}-dependent mechanisms. These findings highlight the importance of RAS in acute ethanol-induced oxidative damage. -- Highlights: ► Acute ethanol intake stimulates RAS activity and vascular oxidative stress. ► RAS plays a role in acute ethanol-induced oxidative damage via AT{sub 1} receptor activation.

  1. Multiple effects of phorbol esters on hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity in S49 lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.D.; Brunton, L.L.

    1987-06-01

    In S49 lymphoma cells, 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) enhances adenylate cyclase activity and doubles cAMP accumulation in response to ..beta..-adrenergic stimulation at 37/sup 0/C, putatively via the action of protein kinase C. at 27/sup 0/C, TPA has the opposite effect, inhibiting cAMP production in response to isoproterenol by approx. 25%. TPA also inhibits the response to prostaglandin E/sub 1/ (PGE/sub 1/), another stimulant of hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase in these cells, by 30% at 37/sup 0/C and almost 50% at 27/sup 0/C. In contrast, TPA enhances responses to forskolin and cholera toxin at both 27 and 37/sup 0/C. In membranes from cells treated with TPA, PGE/sub 1/-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity is inhibited by 50%, whereas the catalytic activity stimulated by NaF or forskolin is enhanced. TPA reduces the potency of both PGE/sub 1/ and isoproterenol for cAMP generation by 50%. TPA causes a similar decrease in ..beta..-adrenergic agonist affinity with no reduction in the density of either antagonist of agonist binding sites in wild type cells and in cells lacking the ..cap alpha..-subunit of the stimulatory transducer protein (G/sub s/) (cyc/sup -/) or lacking functional receptor G/sub s/ coupling (UNC). Therefore, TPA has at least three functionally distinct effects on hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase in S49 cells. The authors conclude that multiple and opposing effects of TPA on hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase occur simultaneously within the same cell, affecting the responses to several agonists differently. In addition, the data offer a mechanism by which a cell can achieve heterogeneous efficacies to hormones that activate adenylate cyclase.

  2. Bisphenol S and F: A Systematic Review and Comparison of the Hormonal Activity of Bisphenol A Substitutes

    PubMed Central

    Bolden, Ashley L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Increasing concern over bisphenol A (BPA) as an endocrine-disrupting chemical and its possible effects on human health have prompted the removal of BPA from consumer products, often labeled “BPA-free.” Some of the chemical replacements, however, are also bisphenols and may have similar physiological effects in organisms. Bisphenol S (BPS) and bisphenol F (BPF) are two such BPA substitutes. Objectives This review was carried out to evaluate the physiological effects and endocrine activities of the BPA substitutes BPS and BPF. Further, we compared the hormonal potency of BPS and BPF to that of BPA. Methods We conducted a systematic review based on the Office of Health Assessment and Translation (OHAT) protocol. Results We identified the body of literature to date, consisting of 32 studies (25 in vitro only, and 7 in vivo). The majority of these studies examined the hormonal activities of BPS and BPF and found their potency to be in the same order of magnitude and of similar action as BPA (estrogenic, antiestrogenic, androgenic, and antiandrogenic) in vitro and in vivo. BPS also has potencies similar to that of estradiol in membrane-mediated pathways, which are important for cellular actions such as proliferation, differentiation, and death. BPS and BPF also showed other effects in vitro and in vivo, such as altered organ weights, reproductive end points, and enzyme expression. Conclusions Based on the current literature, BPS and BPF are as hormonally active as BPA, and they have endocrine-disrupting effects. Citation Rochester JR, Bolden AL. 2015. Bisphenol S and F: a systematic review and comparison of the hormonal activity of bisphenol A substitutes. Environ Health Perspect 123:643–650; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408989 PMID:25775505

  3. Detection of multiple hormonal activities in wastewater effluents and surface water, using a panel of steroid receptor CALUX bioassays.

    PubMed

    Van der Linden, Sander C; Heringa, Minne B; Man, Hai-Yen; Sonneveld, Edwin; Puijker, Leo M; Brouwer, Abraham; Van der Burg, Bart

    2008-08-01

    It is generally known that there are compounds present in the aquatic environment that can disturb endocrine processes, for example via interaction with the endogenous hormone receptors. Most research so far has focused on compounds that bind to the estrogen and/or androgen receptor, but ligands for other hormone receptors might also be present. In this study, a newly completed panel of human cell derived CALUX reporter gene bioassays was utilized to test water extracts for estrogen (ER), as well as androgen (AR), progesterone (PR), and glucocorticoid (GR) receptor mediated transactivation activity. Effluents from industry, hospital, and municipal sewage treatment plants, as well as tap water and different sources of surface water were tested. The CALUX reporter gene panel showed high sensitivity and specificity to known agonists, enabling discrimination between different receptor based endocrine responses present in the aquatic environment. Our results clearly showed the presence of agonistic activity on the ER, as well as on the AR, PR, and GR in the raw and wastewater and surface water extracts. However, no hormone receptor-mediated transactivation was detected in the drinking water or in the blank water. The levels of estrogenic activity were 0.2-0.5 ng E2-equiv/L for surface water and 0.4-1.0 ng E2-equiv/L for municipal effluents, which was consistent with previous studies. Surprisingly, the other hormonal activities were found to be present in similar or much higher levels. Most notably, glucocorticoid-like activity was detected in all samples, at surprisingly high levels ranging from 0.39-1.3 ng Dex-equiv/L in surface water and 11-243 ng Dex-equiv/L in effluents. When regarding the fact that dexamethasone in the GR CALUX bioassay is a factor 12 more potent than the natural hormone cortisol, results expressed as cortisol equivalents would range up to 2900 ng cortisol equiv/L. Further studies are needed to establish the identity of the active compounds and to

  4. Bioelectrical activity of porcine oviduct and uterus during spontaneous and induced estrus associated with cyclic hormone changes.

    PubMed

    Pawliński, Bartosz; Domino, Małgorzata; Aniołek, Olga; Ziecik, Adam; Gajewski, Zdzislaw

    2016-12-01

    It is widely accepted that uterine contraction is initiated by spontaneous generation of electrical activity at a cellular level in the form of action potentials. Such action potential events, when they involve many myometrial cells and occur in immediate succession, are described by their amplitude and duration. In an effort to improve clinical management of uterine contractions, research has focused on determination of the properties of the reproductive tract's electrical activity under hormonal stimulation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the myoelectric activity (amplitude and duration) of the oviduct and the uterus in relation to plasma concentration of LH, estradiol (E2), and progesterone (P4) during spontaneous and induced estrus in gilts. The course of the experiment was divided into eight periods defined by hormone concentrations (LH, P4, and E2) and time intervals before and after the start of the LH surge. Myoelectric signals were recorded, and the hormone levels were measured during proestrus and estrus in natural and hormone-induced estrus cycle. During the natural estrus, the LH surge was longer than after hormonal stimulation (28 vs. 20 hours) and suggested an inverse relationship between the LH concentration and the duration of myoelectric activity (SR = -0.68). Analyses of the records of the amplitudes and durations of the electromyography activity in uterine horns and oviducts showed significant differences between spontaneous and induced estrus (P < 0.05). During induced estrus, the LH surge began earlier (T1 vs. T2) and increased more (7.46 vs. 6.50 ng/mL) than during spontaneous estrus. This observation suggests a direct relationship between the LH concentration and the amplitude of the myoelectric activity (Spearman rank correlation = 0.71). The significantly higher duration and amplitude of the activity in the isthmus of the oviduct and the uterus during induced estrus shortly after the onset of standing heat (4-8 hours after

  5. Analysis of interaction of phenolic compounds with the cholecystokinin signaling pathway to explain effects on reducing food intake.

    PubMed

    Al Shukor, Nadin; Raes, Katleen; Van Camp, John; Smagghe, Guy

    2014-03-01

    Previous animal experiments demonstrated that phenolic compounds can reduce weight and food intake, but the exact mechanism(s) behind these effects remain unknown. For regulation of food intake, the cholecystokinin (CCK) hormone signaling pathway plays an important role as it induces satiety by binding on its specific receptor (CCK1R), hereby reducing food intake. In this study, we investigated the possible interactions of eight phenolic compounds of different classes (tannic acid, gallic acid, benzoic acid, hydroxybenzoic acid, protocatechuic acid, quercetin, kaempferol and resveratrol) with the CCK1R signaling pathway. As major results, the tested phenolic compounds could not activate the CCK1R in a specific cell-based bioassay. In contrast, we observed an anti-CCK1R activity. This antagonistic action might be explained by blocking of the functioning of the CCK1R receptor, although the exact mechanism of interaction remains unknown. For tannic acid, we also measured a sequestration activity of the CCK hormone in vitro. In conclusion, the reported activity of phenolic compounds against food intake and weight is not based on an activation of the CCK1R. Taking into account the complex regulation of food intake, further work is necessary to unravel other essential mechanisms involved to explain the reported effects of phenolic compounds against food intake.

  6. Neural Activation During Mental Rotation in Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome: The Influence of Sex Hormones and Sex Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    van Hemmen, Judy; Veltman, Dick J; Hoekzema, Elseline; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Dessens, Arianne B; Bakker, Julie

    2016-03-01

    Sex hormones, androgens in particular, are hypothesized to play a key role in the sexual differentiation of the human brain. However, possible direct effects of the sex chromosomes, that is, XX or XY, have not been well studied in humans. Individuals with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS), who have a 46,XY karyotype but a female phenotype due to a complete androgen resistance, enable us to study the separate effects of gonadal hormones versus sex chromosomes on neural sex differences. Therefore, in the present study, we compared 46,XY men (n = 30) and 46,XX women (n = 29) to 46,XY individuals with CAIS (n = 21) on a mental rotation task using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Previously reported sex differences in neural activation during mental rotation were replicated in the control groups, with control men showing more activation in the inferior parietal lobe than control women. Individuals with CAIS showed a female-like neural activation pattern in the parietal lobe, indicating feminization of the brain in CAIS. Furthermore, this first neuroimaging study in individuals with CAIS provides evidence that sex differences in regional brain function during mental rotation are most likely not directly driven by genetic sex, but rather reflect gonadal hormone exposure.

  7. Testicular Steroidogenesis and Locomotor Activity Are Regulated by Gonadotropin-Inhibitory Hormone in Male European Sea Bass

    PubMed Central

    Paullada-Salmerón, José A.; Cowan, Mairi; Aliaga-Guerrero, María; López-Olmeda, José F.; Mañanós, Evaristo L.; Zanuy, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) is a neurohormone that suppresses reproduction by acting at both the brain and pituitary levels. In addition to the brain, GnIH may also be produced in gonads and can regulate steroidogenesis and gametogenesis. However, the function of GnIH in gonadal physiology has received little attention in fish. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of peripheral sbGnih-1 and sbGnih-2 implants on gonadal development and steroidogenesis during the reproductive cycle of male sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). Both Gnihs decreased testosterone (T) and 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) plasma levels in November and December (early- and mid-spermatogenesis) but did not affect plasma levels of the progestin 17,20β-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (DHP). In February (spermiation), fish treated with sbGnih-1 and sbGnih-2 exhibited testicles with abundant type A spermatogonia and partial spermatogenesis. In addition, we determined the effects of peripheral Gnih implants on plasma follicle-stimulating hormone (Fsh) and luteinizing hormone (Lh) levels, as well as on brain and pituitary expression of the main reproductive hormone genes and their receptors during the spermiation period (February). Treatment with sbGnih-2 increased brain gnrh2, gnih, kiss1r and gnihr transcript levels. Whereas, both Gnihs decreased lhbeta expression and plasma Lh levels, and sbGnih-1 reduced plasmatic Fsh. Finally, through behavioral recording we showed that Gnih implanted animals exhibited a significant increase in diurnal activity from late spermatogenic to early spermiogenic stages. Our results indicate that Gnih may regulate the reproductive axis of sea bass acting not only on brain and pituitary hormones but also on gonadal physiology and behavior. PMID:27788270

  8. Intermittent parathyroid hormone administration converts quiescent lining cells to active osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Wan; Pajevic, Paola Divieti; Selig, Martin; Barry, Kevin J; Yang, Jae-Yeon; Shin, Chan Soo; Baek, Wook-Young; Kim, Jung-Eun; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2012-10-01

    Intermittent administration of parathyroid hormone (PTH) increases bone mass, at least in part, by increasing the number of osteoblasts. One possible source of osteoblasts might be conversion of inactive lining cells to osteoblasts, and indirect evidence is consistent with this hypothesis. To better understand the possible effect of PTH on lining cell activation, a lineage tracing study was conducted using an inducible gene system. Dmp1-CreERt2 mice were crossed with ROSA26R reporter mice to render targeted mature osteoblasts and their descendents, lining cells and osteocytes, detectable by 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-d-galactopyranoside (X-gal) staining. Dmp1-CreERt2(+):ROSA26R mice were injected with 0.25 mg 4-OH-tamoxifen (4-OHTam) on postnatal days 3, 5, 7, 14, and 21. The animals were euthanized on postnatal day 23, 33, or 43 (2, 12, or 22 days after the last 4-OHTam injection). On day 43, mice were challenged with a subcutaneous injection of human PTH (1-34, 80 µg/kg) or vehicle once daily for 3 days. By 22 days after the last 4-OHTam injection, most X-gal (+) cells on the periosteal surfaces of the calvaria and the tibia were flat. Moreover, bone formation rate and collagen I(α1) mRNA expression were decreased at day 43 compared to day 23. After 3 days of PTH injections, the thickness of X-gal (+) cells increased, as did their expression of osteocalcin and collagen I(α1) mRNA. Electron microscopy revealed X-gal-associated chromogen particles in thin cells prior to PTH administration and in cuboidal cells following PTH administration. These data support the hypothesis that intermittent PTH treatment can increase osteoblast number by converting lining cells to mature osteoblasts in vivo.

  9. Risks of hormonally active pharmaceuticals to amphibians: a growing concern regarding progestagens.

    PubMed

    Säfholm, Moa; Ribbenstedt, Anton; Fick, Jerker; Berg, Cecilia

    2014-11-19

    Most amphibians breed in water, including the terrestrial species, and may therefore be exposed to water-borne pharmaceuticals during critical phases of the reproductive cycle, i.e. sex differentiation and gamete maturation. The objectives of this paper were to (i) review available literature regarding adverse effects of hormonally active pharmaceuticals on amphibians, with special reference to environmentally relevant exposure levels and (ii) expand the knowledge on toxicity of progestagens in amphibians by determining effects of norethindrone (NET) and progesterone (P) exposure to 0, 1, 10 or 100 ng l(-1) (nominal) on oogenesis in the test species Xenopus tropicalis. Very little information was found on toxicity of environmentally relevant concentrations of pharmaceuticals on amphibians. Research has shown that environmental concentrations (1.8 ng l(-1)) of the pharmaceutical oestrogen ethinylestradiol (EE2) cause developmental reproductive toxicity involving impaired spermatogenesis in frogs. Recently, it was found that the progestagen levonorgestrel (LNG) inhibited oogenesis in frogs by interrupting the formation of vitellogenic oocytes at an environmentally relevant concentration (1.3 ng l(-1)). Results from the present study revealed that 1 ng NET l(-1) and 10 ng P l(-1) caused reduced proportions of vitellogenic oocytes and increased proportions of previtellogenic oocytes compared with the controls, thereby indicating inhibited vitellogenesis. Hence, the available literature shows that the oestrogen EE2 and the progestagens LNG, NET and P impair reproductive functions in amphibians at environmentally relevant exposure concentrations. The progestagens are of particular concern given their prevalence, the range of compounds and that several of them (LNG, NET and P) share the same target (oogenesis) at environmental exposure concentrations, indicating a risk for adverse effects on fertility in exposed wild amphibians.

  10. Methylated Cytokinins from the Phytopathogen Rhodococcus fascians Mimic Plant Hormone Activity.

    PubMed

    Radhika, Venkatesan; Ueda, Nanae; Tsuboi, Yuuri; Kojima, Mikiko; Kikuchi, Jun; Kudo, Takuji; Sakakibara, Hitoshi

    2015-10-01

    Cytokinins (CKs), a class of phytohormones that regulate plant growth and development, are also synthesized by some phytopathogens to disrupt the hormonal balance and to facilitate niche establishment in their hosts. Rhodococcus fascians harbors the fasciation (fas) locus, an operon encoding several genes homologous to CK biosynthesis and metabolism. This pathogen causes unique leafy gall symptoms reminiscent of CK overproduction; however, bacterial CKs have not been clearly correlated with the severe symptoms, and no virulence-associated unique CKs or analogs have been identified. Here, we report the identification of monomethylated N(6)-(∆(2)-isopentenyl)adenine and dimethylated N(6)-(∆(2)-isopentenyl)adenine (collectively, methylated cytokinins [MeCKs]) from R. fascians. MeCKs were recognized by a CK receptor and up-regulated type-A ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA RESPONSE REGULATOR genes. Treatment with MeCKs inhibited root growth, a hallmark of CK action, whereas the receptor mutant was insensitive. MeCKs were retained longer in planta than canonical CKs and were poor substrates for a CK oxidase/dehydrogenase, suggesting enhanced biological stability. MeCKs were synthesized by S-adenosyl methionine-dependent methyltransferases (MT1 and MT2) that are present upstream of the fas genes. The best substrate for methylation was isopentenyl diphosphate. MT1 and MT2 catalyzed distinct methylation reactions; only the MT2 product was used by FAS4 to synthesize monomethylated N(6)-(∆(2)-isopentenyl)adenine. The MT1 product was dimethylated by MT2 and used as a substrate by FAS4 to produce dimethylated N(6)-(∆(2)-isopentenyl)adenine. Chemically synthesized MeCKs were comparable in activity. Our results strongly suggest that MeCKs function as CK mimics and play a role in this plant-pathogen interaction.

  11. Methylated Cytokinins from the Phytopathogen Rhodococcus fascians Mimic Plant Hormone Activity1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Radhika, Venkatesan; Ueda, Nanae; Tsuboi, Yuuri; Kojima, Mikiko; Kikuchi, Jun; Kudo, Takuji; Sakakibara, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Cytokinins (CKs), a class of phytohormones that regulate plant growth and development, are also synthesized by some phytopathogens to disrupt the hormonal balance and to facilitate niche establishment in their hosts. Rhodococcus fascians harbors the fasciation (fas) locus, an operon encoding several genes homologous to CK biosynthesis and metabolism. This pathogen causes unique leafy gall symptoms reminiscent of CK overproduction; however, bacterial CKs have not been clearly correlated with the severe symptoms, and no virulence-associated unique CKs or analogs have been identified. Here, we report the identification of monomethylated N6-(∆2-isopentenyl)adenine and dimethylated N6-(∆2-isopentenyl)adenine (collectively, methylated cytokinins [MeCKs]) from R. fascians. MeCKs were recognized by a CK receptor and up-regulated type-A ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA RESPONSE REGULATOR genes. Treatment with MeCKs inhibited root growth, a hallmark of CK action, whereas the receptor mutant was insensitive. MeCKs were retained longer in planta than canonical CKs and were poor substrates for a CK oxidase/dehydrogenase, suggesting enhanced biological stability. MeCKs were synthesized by S-adenosyl methionine-dependent methyltransferases (MT1 and MT2) that are present upstream of the fas genes. The best substrate for methylation was isopentenyl diphosphate. MT1 and MT2 catalyzed distinct methylation reactions; only the MT2 product was used by FAS4 to synthesize monomethylated N6-(∆2-isopentenyl)adenine. The MT1 product was dimethylated by MT2 and used as a substrate by FAS4 to produce dimethylated N6-(∆2-isopentenyl)adenine. Chemically synthesized MeCKs were comparable in activity. Our results strongly suggest that MeCKs function as CK mimics and play a role in this plant-pathogen interaction. PMID:26251309

  12. Risks of hormonally active pharmaceuticals to amphibians: a growing concern regarding progestagens

    PubMed Central

    Säfholm, Moa; Ribbenstedt, Anton; Fick, Jerker; Berg, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Most amphibians breed in water, including the terrestrial species, and may therefore be exposed to water-borne pharmaceuticals during critical phases of the reproductive cycle, i.e. sex differentiation and gamete maturation. The objectives of this paper were to (i) review available literature regarding adverse effects of hormonally active pharmaceuticals on amphibians, with special reference to environmentally relevant exposure levels and (ii) expand the knowledge on toxicity of progestagens in amphibians by determining effects of norethindrone (NET) and progesterone (P) exposure to 0, 1, 10 or 100 ng l−1 (nominal) on oogenesis in the test species Xenopus tropicalis. Very little information was found on toxicity of environmentally relevant concentrations of pharmaceuticals on amphibians. Research has shown that environmental concentrations (1.8 ng l−1) of the pharmaceutical oestrogen ethinylestradiol (EE2) cause developmental reproductive toxicity involving impaired spermatogenesis in frogs. Recently, it was found that the progestagen levonorgestrel (LNG) inhibited oogenesis in frogs by interrupting the formation of vitellogenic oocytes at an environmentally relevant concentration (1.3 ng l−1). Results from the present study revealed that 1 ng NET l−1 and 10 ng P l−1 caused reduced proportions of vitellogenic oocytes and increased proportions of previtellogenic oocytes compared with the controls, thereby indicating inhibited vitellogenesis. Hence, the available literature shows that the oestrogen EE2 and the progestagens LNG, NET and P impair reproductive functions in amphibians at environmentally relevant exposure concentrations. The progestagens are of particular concern given their prevalence, the range of compounds and that several of them (LNG, NET and P) share the same target (oogenesis) at environmental exposure concentrations, indicating a risk for adverse effects on fertility in exposed wild amphibians. PMID:25405966

  13. Effects of alcohol on food and energy intake in human subjects: evidence for passive and active over-consumption of energy.

    PubMed

    Yeomans, Martin R

    2004-08-01

    The effects of alcohol on food and energy intake in human subjects have been the subject of a number of controlled studies recently. Unlike the evidence for other macronutrients, there is minimal evidence for any compensatory reduction in food intake in response to energy ingested as alcohol. In contrast, all studies testing intake within 1 h of preload ingestion report a higher intake of food following alcohol relative to energy-matched controls, although this short-term stimulatory effect is not evident if the test meal is delayed beyond 1 h. This time-course suggests that short-term stimulation of appetite may be mediated by the pharmacological action of alcohol on the appetite control system, either through enhanced orosensory reward or impaired satiety. In the long term, energy ingested as alcohol is additive to energy from other sources, suggesting that moderate alcohol consumption results in long-term passive over-consumption alongside short-term active over-consumption of energy through appetite stimulation. Despite the consistency of enhanced energy intake after moderate alcohol, evidence of an association between alcohol in the diet and obesity remains contentious, although the most recent results suggest that alcohol intake correlates with BMI. Future research needs to address this issue and clarify the mechanisms underlying appetite stimulation by alcohol.

  14. Dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channel activity related to prolactin, growth hormone, and luteinizing hormone release from anterior pituitary cells in culture: interactions with somatostatin, dopamine, and estrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Drouva, S.V.; Rerat, E.; Bihoreau, C.; Laplante, E.; Rasolonjanahary, R.; Clauser, H.; Kordon, C.

    1988-12-01

    In the present work, we determined the activity of voltage-dependent dihydropyridine (DHP)-sensitive Ca2+ channels related to PRL, GH, and LH secretion in primary cultures of pituitary cells from male or female rats. We investigated their modulation by 17 beta-estradiol (E2) and their involvement in dopamine (DA) and somatostatin (SRIF) inhibition of PRL and GH release. BAY-K-8644 (BAYK), a DHP agonist which increases the opening time of already activated channels, stimulated PRL and GH secretion in a dose-dependent manner. The effect was more pronounced on PRL than on GH release. BAYK-evoked hormone secretion was further amplified by simultaneous application of K+ (30 or 56 mM) to the cell cultures; in parallel, BAYK-induced 45Ca uptake by the cells was potentiated in the presence of depolarizing stimuli. In contrast, BAYK was unable to stimulate LH secretion from male pituitary cells, but it potentiated LHRH- as well as K+-induced LH release; it had only a weak effect on LH secretion from female cell cultures. Basal and BAYK-induced pituitary hormone release were blocked by the Ca2+ channel antagonist nitrendipine. Under no condition did BAYK affect the hydrolysis of phosphoinositides or cAMP formation. Pretreatment of female pituitary cell cultures with E2 (10(-9) M) for 72 h enhanced LH and PRL responses to BAYK, but was ineffective on GH secretion. DA (10(-7) M) inhibited basal and BAYK-induced PRL release from male or female pituitary cells treated or not treated with E2 (10(-9) M). SRIF (10(-9) and 10(-8) M) reversed BAYK-evoked GH release to the same extent in cell cultures derived from male or female animals. It was ineffective on BAYK-induced PRL secretion in the absence of E2, but antagonized it after E2 pretreatment. The effect was dependent upon the time of steroid treatment and was specific, since 17 alpha-estradiol was inactive.

  15. Effects of an acute bout of aerobic exercise on immediate and subsequent three-day food intake and energy expenditure in active and inactive men.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Joel; Paxman, Jenny; Dalton, Caroline; Winter, Edward; Broom, David

    2013-12-01

    This study examined the effects of an acute bout of low-intensity cycling on food intake and energy expenditure over four days. Thirty healthy, active (n=15) and inactive (n=15) men completed two conditions (exercise and control), in a randomised crossover fashion. The exercise experimental day involved cycling for one hour at an intensity equivalent to 50% of maximum oxygen uptake and two hours of rest. The control condition comprised three hours of rest. Participants arrived at the laboratory fasted overnight; breakfast was standardised and an ad libitum pasta lunch was consumed on each experimental day. Participants kept a food diary and wore an Actiheart to estimate energy intake and expenditure for the remainder of the experimental days and over the subsequent 3 days. Ad libitum lunch energy intake did not differ between conditions (p=0.32, d=0.18) or groups (p=0.43, d=0.27). Energy intake in the active group was greater on the exercise experimental day than on the control experimental day (mean difference=2070 kJ; 95% CI 397 to 3743 kJ, p=0.024, d=0.56) while in the inactive group it was increased on only the third day after exercise (mean difference=2225 kJ; 95% CI 414 to 4036 kJ, p=0.024, d=0.80). There was only a group effect (p=0.032, d=0.89) for free-living energy expenditure, indicating that active participants expended more energy than inactive over this period. Acute low-intensity exercise did not affect energy intake at the meal immediately after exercise, but induces an acute (within the experimental day) and delayed (third day after the experimental day) increase in energy intake in active and inactive participants, respectively with no compensatory changes to daily energy expenditure. These results suggest that active individuals compensate for an acute exercise-induced energy deficit quicker than inactive individuals.

  16. Control by Ethylene of Arginine Decarboxylase Activity in Pea Seedlings and Its Implication for Hormonal Regulation of Plant Growth 1

    PubMed Central

    Apelbaum, Akiva; Goldlust, Arie; Icekson, Isaac

    1985-01-01

    Activity of arginine decarboxylase in etiolated pea seedlings appears 24 hours after seed imbibition, reaches its highest level on the 4th day, and levels off until the 7th day. This activity was found in the apical and subapical tissue of the roots and shoots where intensive DNA synthesis occurs. Exposure of the seedlings to ethylene greatly reduced the specific activity of this enzyme. The inhibition was observed within 30 min of the hormone application, and maximal effect—90% inhibition—after 18 hours. Ethylene at physiological concentrations affected the enzyme activity; 50% inhibitory rate was recorded at 0.12 microliters per liter ethylene and maximal response at 1.2 microliters per liter. Ethylene provoked a 5-fold increase in the Kmapp of arginine decarboxylase for its substrate and reduced the Vmaxapp by 10-fold. However, the enzyme recovered from the inhibition and regained control activity 7 hours after transferral of the seedlings to ethylene-free atmosphere. Reducing the endogenous level of ethylene in the tissue by hypobaric pressure, or by exposure to light, as well as interfering with ethylene action by treatment with silver thiosulfate or 2,5-norbornadiene, caused a gradual increase in the specific activity of arginine decarboxylase in the apical tissue of the etiolated seedlings. On the basis of these findings, the possible control of arginine decarboxylase activity by endogenous ethylene, and its implication for the hormone effect on plant growth, are discussed. PMID:16664464

  17. Dietary intakes, physical activity, and predictors of child obesity among 4-6th graders in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Humeníkova, Lenka; Gates, Gail E

    2007-03-01

    The prevalence of child obesity in the Czech Republic has increased in the last several years, especially among school-aged children. While obesity trends are closely monitored in the Czech Republic, very little is known about the dietary habits and exercise behaviors of Czech children. The purpose of this study was to evaluate nutrient intakes and physical activity, as well as identify predictors of BMI-for-age in a sample of Czech school-aged children. Ninety-seven fourth, fifth and sixth graders and their parents from two large Czech cities participated in the study. Two 24-hour recalls provided total amount of energy, fat, percentage of energy derived from fat, dietary fiber, and servings of fruits and vegetables. Physical activity was measured by the Self-administered Physical Activity Checklist (SAPAC). Children consumed less energy and dietary fiber than suggested by Czech dietary recommendations. The proportion of energy that children consumed from fat was 28.5%. Children consumed 1.4 cups of fruit and 1.2 cups of vegetables. Children's physical activity levels fell within the current recommendations. Age was the only significant predictor of higher BMI-for-age. Poor dietary quality may be responsible for increasing rates of child obesity in the Czech Republic. Nutritional professionals in the Czech Republic should focus on increasing consumption of fruits, vegetables, and other high-fiber foods in order to reduce the risk for overweight among Czech children.

  18. Consequences of Lower Food Intake on the Digestive Enzymes Activities, the Energy Reserves and the Reproductive Outcome in Gammarus fossarum

    PubMed Central

    Charron, Laetitia; Geffard, Olivier; Chaumot, Arnaud; Coulaud, Romain; Jaffal, Ali; Gaillet, Véronique; Dedourge-Geffard, Odile; Geffard, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Digestive enzyme activity is often used as a sensitive response to environmental pollution. However, only little is known about the negative effects of stress on digestive capacities and their consequences on energy reserves and reproduction, although these parameters are important for the maintenance of populations. To highlight if changes in biochemical responses (digestive enzymes and reserves) led to impairments at an individual level (fertility), Gammarus fossarum were submitted to a lower food intake throughout a complete female reproductive cycle (i.e. from ovogenesis to offspring production). For both males and females, amylase activity was inhibited by the diet stress, whereas trypsin activity was not influenced. These results underline similar sensitivity of males and females concerning their digestive capacity. Energy reserves decreased with food starvation in females, and remained stable in males. The number of embryos per female decreased with food starvation. Lower digestive activity in males and females therefore appears as an early response. These results underline the ecological relevance of digestive markers, as they make it possible to anticipate upcoming consequences on reproduction in females, a key biological variable for population dynamics. PMID:25880985

  19. Sequence elements in the human osteocalcin gene confer basal activation and inducible response to hormonal vitamin D3.

    PubMed

    Kerner, S A; Scott, R A; Pike, J W

    1989-06-01

    Osteoblast-specific expression of the bone protein osteocalcin is controlled at the transcriptional level by the steroid hormone 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. As this protein may represent a marker for bone activity in human disease, we examined the regulation of its expression at the molecular level by evaluating human osteocalcin gene promoter function. We describe regions within the promoter that contribute to basal expression of the gene in osteoblast-like cells in culture. Further, we define a 21-base-pair DNA element with the sequence 5'-GTGACTCACCGGGTGAACGGG-3', which acts in cis to mediate 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 inducibility of the osteocalcin gene. This response element bears sequence similarity with other short DNA segments, particularly those for estrogen and thyroid hormone, which act together with their respective trans-acting receptors to modulate gene transcription.

  20. In vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo determination of thyroid hormone modulating activity of benzothiazoles

    EPA Science Inventory

    As in vitro assays are increasingly used to screen chemicals for their potential to produce endocrine disrupting adverse effects, it is important to understand their predictive capacity. The potential for a set of six benzothiazoles to affect endpoints related to thyroid hormone ...

  1. Mammographic parenchymal texture as an imaging marker of hormonal activity: a comparative study between pre- and post-menopausal women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daye, Dania; Bobo, Ezra; Baumann, Bethany; Ioannou, Antonios; Conant, Emily F.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Kontos, Despina

    2011-03-01

    Mammographic parenchymal texture patterns have been shown to be related to breast cancer risk. Yet, little is known about the biological basis underlying this association. Here, we investigate the potential of mammographic parenchymal texture patterns as an inherent phenotypic imaging marker of endogenous hormonal exposure of the breast tissue. Digital mammographic (DM) images in the cranio-caudal (CC) view of the unaffected breast from 138 women diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer were retrospectively analyzed. Menopause status was used as a surrogate marker of endogenous hormonal activity. Retroareolar 2.5cm2 ROIs were segmented from the post-processed DM images using an automated algorithm. Parenchymal texture features of skewness, coarseness, contrast, energy, homogeneity, grey-level spatial correlation, and fractal dimension were computed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to evaluate feature classification performance in distinguishing between 72 pre- and 66 post-menopausal women. Logistic regression was performed to assess the independent effect of each texture feature in predicting menopause status. ROC analysis showed that texture features have inherent capacity to distinguish between pre- and post-menopausal statuses (AUC>0.5, p<0.05). Logistic regression including all texture features yielded an ROC curve with an AUC of 0.76. Addition of age at menarche, ethnicity, contraception use and hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) use lead to a modest model improvement (AUC=0.78) while texture features maintained significant contribution (p<0.05). The observed differences in parenchymal texture features between pre- and post- menopausal women suggest that mammographic texture can potentially serve as a surrogate imaging marker of endogenous hormonal activity.

  2. Fruit/Vegetable Intake and Physical Activity among Adults with High Cholesterol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fang, Jing; Keenan, Nora L.; Dai, Shifan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether hypercholesterolemic adults followed healthy eating and appropriate physical activity. Methods: Using the 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, we measured greater than or equal to 5 servings of fruits and vegetables/day and "Healthy People 2010" recommended physical activity. Results: Of 363,667 adults…

  3. Differences in Overweight and Obesity among Children from Migrant and Native Origin: The Role of Physical Activity, Dietary Intake, and Sleep Duration.

    PubMed

    Labree, Wim; van de Mheen, Dike; Rutten, Frans; Rodenburg, Gerda; Koopmans, Gerrit; Foets, Marleen

    2015-01-01

    A cross-sectional survey was performed to examine to what degree differences in overweight and obesity between native Dutch and migrant primary school children could be explained by differences in physical activity, dietary intake, and sleep duration among these children. Subjects (n=1943) were primary school children around the age of 8-9 years old and their primary caregivers: native Dutch children (n=1546), Turkish children (n=93), Moroccan children (n=66), other non-western children (n=105), and other western children (n=133). Multivariate regressions and logistic regressions were used to examine the relationship between migrant status, child's behavior, and BMI or prevalence of overweight, including obesity (logistic). Main explanatory variables were physical activity, dietary intake, and sleep duration. We controlled for age, sex, parental educational level, and parental BMI. Although sleep duration, dietary intake of fruit, and dietary intake of energy-dense snacks were associated with BMI, ethnic differences in sleep duration and dietary intake did not have a large impact on ethnic differences in overweight and obesity among children from migrant and native origin. It is suggested that future preventive strategies to reduce overweight and obesity, in general, consider the role of sleep duration. Also, cross-cultural variation in preparation of food among specific migrant groups, focusing on fat, sugar, and salt, deserves more attention. In order to examine which other variables may clarify ethnic differences in overweight and obesity, future research is needed.

  4. Chronic central administration of apelin-13 over 10 days increases food intake, body weight, locomotor activity and body temperature in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Valle, A; Hoggard, N; Adams, A C; Roca, P; Speakman, J R

    2008-01-01

    The peptide apelin has been located in a wide range of tissues, including the gastrointestinal tract, stomach and adipose tissue. Apelin and its receptor has also been detected in the arcuate and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, which are involved in the control of feeding behaviour and energy expenditure. This distribution suggests apelin may play a role in energy homeostasis, but previous attempts to discern the effects of apelin by acute injection into the brain have yielded conflicting results. We examined the effect of a chronic 10-day intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion of apelin-13 into the third ventricle on food intake, body temperature and locomotor activity in C57BL/6 mice. Apelin-13 (1 microg/day) increased food intake significantly on days 3-7 of infusion; thereafter, food intake of treated and control individuals converged. This convergence was potentially because of progressive conversion of apelin-13 to [Pyr(1)]apelin-13 which has a four-fold lower receptor binding affinity at the orphan G protein-coupled receptor, APJ. Locomotor activity was also higher in the apelin-treated mice, especially during the nocturnal peak, when most feeding occurs, and the first hours of the light phase. Body temperature was also elevated during this increased period of activity, but was otherwise unaffected. Apelin-13-infused animals gained more weight than the saline-infused controls, suggesting the elevated locomotor activity did not offset the increased food intake. Elevated locomotion and the consequent increases in body temperature were probably secondary effects to the increased food intake. These results suggest that apelin-13 may play a central role in the control of feeding behaviour and is one of only two peripheral ligands known to stimulate rather than inhibit intake. As apelin production is elevated during obesity, this may provide an important feed-forward mechanism exacerbating the problem. Antagonists of the apelin receptor may

  5. Higher resting-state activity in reward-related brain circuits in obese versus normal-weight females independent of food intake

    PubMed Central

    Hogenkamp, P S; Zhou, W; Dahlberg, L S; Stark, J; Larsen, A L; Olivo, G; Wiemerslage, L; Larsson, E-M; Sundbom, M; Benedict, C; Schiöth, H B

    2016-01-01

    Background: In response to food cues, obese vs normal-weight individuals show greater activation in brain regions involved in the regulation of food intake under both fasted and sated conditions. Putative effects of obesity on task-independent low-frequency blood-oxygenation-level-dependent signals—that is, resting-state brain activity—in the context of food intake are, however, less well studied. Objective: To compare eyes closed, whole-brain low-frequency BOLD signals between severely obese and normal-weight females, as assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Methods: Fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations were measured in the morning following an overnight fast in 17 obese (age: 39±11 years, body mass index (BMI): 42.3±4.8 kg m−2) and 12 normal-weight females (age: 36±12 years, BMI: 22.7±1.8 kg m−2), both before and 30 min after consumption of a standardized meal (~260 kcal). Results: Compared with normal-weight controls, obese females had increased low-frequency activity in clusters located in the putamen, claustrum and insula (P<0.05). This group difference was not altered by food intake. Self-reported hunger dropped and plasma glucose concentrations increased after food intake (P<0.05); however, these changes did not differ between the BMI groups. Conclusion: Reward-related brain regions are more active under resting-state conditions in obese than in normal-weight females. This difference was independent of food intake under the experimental settings applied in the current study. Future studies involving males and females, as well as utilizing repeated post-prandial resting-state fMRI scans and various types of meals are needed to further investigate how food intake alters resting-state brain activity in obese humans. PMID:27349694

  6. In vitro assessment of thyroid hormone disrupting activities in drinking water sources along the Yangtze River.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinxin; Shi, Wei; Zhang, Fengxian; Cao, Fu; Hu, Guanjiu; Hao, Yingqun; Wei, Si; Wang, Xinru; Yu, Hongxia

    2013-02-01

    The thyroid hormone disrupting activities of drinking water sources from the lower reaches of Yangtze River were examined using a reporter gene assay based on African green monkey kidney fibroblast (CV-1) cells. None of the eleven tested samples showed thyroid receptor (TR) agonist activity. Nine water samples exhibited TR antagonist activities with the equivalents referring to Di-n-butyl phthalate (DNBP) (TR antagonist activity equivalents, ATR-EQ(50)s) ranging from 6.92 × 10(1) to 2.85 × 10(2) μg DNBP/L. The ATR-EQ(50)s and TR antagonist equivalent ranges (ATR-EQ(30-80) ranges) for TR antagonist activities indicated that the water sample from site WX-8 posed the greatest health risks. The ATR-EQ(80)s of the water samples ranging from 1.56 × 10(3) to 6.14 × 10(3) μg DNBP/L were higher than the NOEC of DNBP. The results from instrumental analysis showed that DNBP might be responsible for the TR antagonist activities in these water samples. Water sources along Yangtze River had thyroid hormone disrupting potential.

  7. Adrenergic stimulation and blocking of hormonal secretion activity of cultured cow granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Gajewski, Z; Faundez, R; Thun, R; Pawliński, B

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of alpha- and beta-stimulators (alpha-stimulator: detomidinum HCl) as well as blockers (alpha1-blocker: doxazosin, alpha2-blocker: yohimbinum HCL, beta-blocker: carazolol) on bovine granulosa cells culture from preovulatory follicles. The cell culture was passed in TCM 199 medium with 10% FCS and antibiotics. Tested substances were added to the culture medium in different concentrations. The experiment began when at least 80% of the wells were covered (in four well culture dish of NUNCK-DK). The culture medium was collected every 24 h for hormone analysis. Hormone levels of T, E2, and P4 were determined. The culture was used up to 120 hours. Our results showed a decrease in P-4 secretion after detomidinum addition for all tested concentrations. A slight testosterone level increase was seen in the first 24 hours and then its concentration remained at a constant low level. A slight increase in 17-beta estradiol secretion was also observed. After yohimbinum addition, a statistically significant decrease of progesterone was observed for all concentrations tested. No significant changes were observed at other hormones levels when compared with the control. Doxazosin, when added into the culture medium, did not cause any statistically significant changes in hormone secretions. The addition of carazolol caused a significant decrease in progesterone secretion after culturing for 48 hours. Changes observed in other hormones levels did not differ statistically from the control. These results seem to support the hypothesis that drugs stimulating and blocking adrenergic receptors may play some role in ovarian steroidogenesis in cows.

  8. Central neuropeptide B administration activates stress hormone secretion and stimulates feeding in male rats.

    PubMed

    Samson, W K; Baker, J R; Samson, C K; Samson, H W; Taylor, M M

    2004-10-01

    Neuropeptide B (NPB) was identified to be an endogenous, peptide ligand for the orphan receptors GPR7 and GPR8. Because GPR7 is expressed in rat brain and, in particular, in the hypothalamus, we hypothesized that NPB might interact with neuroendocrine systems that control hormone release from the anterior pituitary gland. No significant effects of NPB were observed on the in vitro releases of prolactin, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) or growth hormone (GH) when log molar concentrations ranging from 1 pM to 100 nM NPB were incubated with dispersed anterior pituitary cells harvested from male rats. In addition NPB (100 nM) did not alter the concentration response stimulation of prolactin secretion by thyrotropin-releasing hormone, ACTH secretion by corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and GH secretion by GH-releasing hormone. However, NPB, when injected into the lateral cerebroventricle (i.c.v.) of conscious, unrestrained male rats, elevated prolactin and corticosterone, and lowered GH levels in circulation. The threshold dose for the effect on corticosterone and prolactin levels was 1.0 nmol, while that for the effect on GH release was 3.0 nmol NPB. Pretreatment with a polyclonal anti-CRF antiserum completely blocked the ability of NPB to stimulate ACTH release and significantly inhibited the effect of NPB on plasma corticosterone levels. NPB administration i.c.v. did not significantly alter plasma vasopressin and oxytocin levels in conscious rats. It did stimulate feeding (minimum effective dose 1.0 nmol) in sated animals in a manner similar to that of the other endogenous ligand for GPR7, neuropeptide W. We conclude that NPB can act in the brain to modulate neuroendocrine signals accessing the anterior pituitary gland, but does not itself act as a releasing or inhibiting factor in the gland, at least with regard to prolactin, ACTH and GH secretion.

  9. Coincident frequencies and relative phases among brain activity and hormonal signals

    PubMed Central

    Solís-Ortíz, Silvia; Campos, Rafael G; Félix, Julián; Obregón, Octavio

    2009-01-01

    Background Fourier transform is a basic tool for analyzing biological signals and is computed for a finite sequence of data sample. The electroencephalographic (EEG) signals analyzed with this method provide only information based on the frequency range, for short periods. In some cases, for long periods it can be useful to know whether EEG signals coincide or have a relative phase between them or with other biological signals. Some studies have evidenced that sex hormones and EEG signals show oscillations in their frequencies across a period of 28 days; so it seems of relevance to seek after possible patterns relating EEG signals and endogenous sex hormones, assumed as long time-periodic functions to determine their typical periods, frequencies and relative phases. Methods In this work we propose a method that can be used to analyze brain signals and hormonal levels and obtain frequencies and relative phases among them. This method involves the application of a discrete Fourier Transform on previously reported datasets of absolute power of brain signals delta, theta, alpha1, alpha2, beta1 and beta2 and the endogenous estrogen and progesterone levels along 28 days. Results Applying the proposed method to exemplary datasets and comparing each brain signal with both sex hormones signals, we found a characteristic profile of coincident periods and typical relative phases. For the corresponding coincident periods the progesterone seems to be essentially in phase with theta, alpha1, alpha2 and beta1, while delta and beta2 go oppositely. For the relevant coincident periods, the estrogen goes in phase with delta and theta and goes oppositely with alpha2. Conclusion Findings suggest that the procedure applied here provides a method to analyze typical frequencies, or periods and phases between signals with the same period. It generates specific patterns for brain signals and hormones and relations among them. PMID:19284671

  10. Insulin, macronutrient intake, and physical activity: are potential indicators of insulin resistance associated with mortality from breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Borugian, Marilyn J; Sheps, Samuel B; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Van Patten, Cheri; Potter, John D; Dunn, Bruce; Gallagher, Richard P; Hislop, T Gregory

    2004-07-01

    High levels of insulin have been associated with increased risk of breast cancer, and poorer survival after diagnosis. Data and sera were collected from 603 breast cancer patients, including information on diet and physical activity, medical history, family history, demographic, and reproductive risk factors. These data were analyzed to test the hypothesis that excess insulin and related factors are directly related to mortality after a diagnosis of breast cancer. The cohort was recruited from breast cancer patients treated at the British Columbia Cancer Agency between July 1991 and December 1992. Questionnaire and medical record data were collected at enrollment and outcomes were ascertained by linkage to the BC Cancer Registry after 10 years of follow-up. The primary outcome of interest was breast cancer-specific mortality (n = 112). Lifestyle data were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression models to relate risk factors to outcomes, controlling for potential confounders, such as age and stage at diagnosis. Data for biological variables were analyzed as a nested case-control study due to limited serum volumes, with at least one survivor from the same cohort as a control for each breast cancer death, matched on stage and length of follow-up. High levels of insulin were associated with poorer survival for postmenopausal women [odds ratio, 1.9; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.7-6.6, comparing highest to lowest tertile, P trend = 0.10], while high dietary fat intake was associated with poorer survival for premenopausal women (relative risk, 4.8; 95% CI, 1.3-18.1, comparing highest to lowest quartile). Higher dietary protein intake was associated with better survival for all women (relative risk, 0.4; 95% CI, 0.2-0.8, comparing highest to lowest quartile).

  11. Effect of three day bed-rest on circulatory and hormonal responses to active orthostatic test in endurance trained athletes and untrained subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubala, P.; Smorawinski, J.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.; Nazar, K.; Bicz, B.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1996-01-01

    Circulatory and hormonal parameters were measured in endurance-trained athletes and control subjects during orthostatic tolerance tests conducted prior to and after three days of bed rest. Heart rate and blood pressure changes due to bed rest appeared to be the same in both groups. Hormonal changes, however, were different between the two groups, with the athletes having decreased sympathoadrenal activity and increased plasma renin activity. Untrained subjects had changes in cortisol secretion only.

  12. Nasal oxytocin administration reduces food intake without affecting locomotor activity and glycemia with c-Fos induction in limited brain areas.

    PubMed

    Maejima, Yuko; Rita, Rauza Sukma; Santoso, Putra; Aoyama, Masato; Hiraoka, Yuichi; Nishimori, Katsuhiko; Gantulga, Darambazar; Shimomura, Kenju; Yada, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have considered oxytocin (Oxt) as a possible medicine to treat obesity and hyperphagia. To find the effective and safe route for Oxt treatment, we compared the effects of its nasal and intraperitoneal (IP) administration on food intake, locomotor activity, and glucose tolerance in mice. Nasal Oxt administration decreased food intake without altering locomotor activity and increased the number of c-Fos-immunoreactive (ir) neurons in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus, the area postrema (AP), and the dorsal motor nucleus of vagus (DMNV) of the medulla. IP Oxt administration decreased food intake and locomotor activity and increased the number of c-Fos-ir neurons not only in the PVN, AP, and DMNV but also in the nucleus of solitary tract of the medulla and in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. In IP glucose tolerance tests, IP Oxt injection attenuated the rise of blood glucose, whereas neither nasal nor intracerebroventricular Oxt affected blood glucose. In isolated islets, Oxt administration potentiated glucose-induced insulin secretion. These results indicate that both nasal and IP Oxt injections reduce food intake to a similar extent and increase the number of c-Fos-ir neurons in common brain regions. IP Oxt administration, in addition, activates broader brain regions, reduces locomotor activity, and affects glucose tolerance possibly by promoting insulin secretion from pancreatic islets. In comparison with IP administration, the nasal route of Oxt administration could exert a similar anorexigenic effect with a lesser effect on peripheral organs.

  13. Hormonal regulation of energy partitioning.

    PubMed

    Rohner-Jeanrenaud, F

    2000-06-01

    A loop system exists between hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peripheral adipose tissue leptin to maintain normal body homeostasis. When hypothalamic NPY levels are increased by fasting or by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion, food intake and body weight increase. NPY has genuine hormono-metabolic effects. It increases insulin and corticosterone secretion relative to controls. These hormonal changes, acting singly or combined, favor adipose tissue lipogenic activity, while producing muscle insulin resistance. They also promote leptin release from adipose tissue. When infused i.c.v. to normal rats to mimic its central effects, leptin decreases NPY levels, thus food intake and body weight. Leptin i.c.v. has also genuine hormono-metabolic effects. It decreases insulinemia and adipose tissue storage ability, enhancing glucose disposal. Leptin increases the expression of uncoupling proteins (UCP-1, -2, -3) and thus energy dissipation. Leptin-induced changes favor oxidation at the expense of storage. Circadian fluctuations of NPY and leptin levels maintain normal body homeostasis. In animal obesity, defective hypothalamic leptin receptor activation prevent leptin from acting, with resulting obesity, insulin and leptin resistance.

  14. Prospective associations among cereal intake in childhood and adiposity, lipid levels, and physical activity during late adolescence.

    PubMed

    Albertson, Ann M; Thompson, Douglas; Franko, Debra L; Holschuh, Norton M; Bauserman, Robert; Barton, Bruce A

    2009-10-01

    Cereal consumption is a common dietary behavior that has been associated with positive health outcomes. The objective of this study was to examine prospective associations between cereal intake in childhood and percent body fat, waist-to-hip ratio, lipid levels, and physical activity during late adolescence. In this longitudinal investigation (data collected 1987-1997), data were analyzed for the 2,379 girls who participated in the 10-year National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study. The cumulative percent of days that each girl consumed cereal during childhood (based on 3-day food diaries collected during six study visits between ages 11.5 and 18.6 years) was examined in relation to percent body fat, waist-to-hip ratio, lipid levels, and physical activity measured at age 18.6 years. Results indicated that nearly all girls (90.1%) reported eating cereal and 18.7% reported eating cereal on half or more of the days reported in the food diaries. Girls who ate cereal on a greater percentage of days during childhood had lower percent body fat and total cholesterol, and were more likely to exhibit high levels of physical activity and less television viewing during Study Year 10 (P values<0.05). Further research should explore lifestyle issues related to cereal consumption.

  15. Hypothalamic roles of mTOR complex I: Integration of nutrient and hormone signals to regulate energy homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammalian or mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) senses nutrient, energy, and hormone signals to regulate metabolism and energy homeostasis. mTOR activity in the hypothalamus, which is associated with changes in energy status, plays a critical role in the regulation of food intake and body weight...

  16. [Effect of orexin-A and orexin-1 receptor antagonist injected into the fourth ventricle of rats on food-intake and spontaneous physical activity].

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiao-Yan; Guo, Fei-Fei; Sun, Xiang-Rong; Gong, Yan-Ling; Xu, Luo

    2015-08-25

    The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of orexin-A and orexin-1 receptor (OX1R) antagonist injected into the fourth ventricle of rats on food-intake and spontaneous physical activity (SPA). Obese rat model was induced by high fat diet. Different doses of orexin-A or SB334867, an OX1R antagonist, were injected into the fourth ventricle of obese and normal rats respectively. SPA and food intake were monitored for 4 h after injection in both light and dark environment. In the light measurement cycle, different doses of orexin-A significantly stimulated feeding and SPA in all injected rats, and the animals' responses showed a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05-0.01), and compared with those of normal rats, the orexin-A induced food intake and SPA were more pronounced in obese rats. In the dark measurement cycle, different doses of orexin-A had no obvious effect on food intake and SPA in both normal and obese rats (P > 0.05). In the light cycle, different doses of SB334867 significantly decreased food intake and SPA in all rats during 0-2 h and 2-4 h after injection (P < 0.05), but the food intake and SPA in obese rats were significantly greater than those of normal rats. In the dark cycle, different doses of SB334867 showed no obvious effect on food intake and SPA of normal and obese rats (P > 0.05). These results suggest that fourth cerebral ventricle nuclei may be one target for orexin-A and light condition may play an important role in orexin-A and OX1R physiological functional processes.

  17. Temperature dependent action of growth hormone on somatic growth and testicular activities of the catfish, Clarias batrachus.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Raj Naresh; Kumar, Pankaj; Lal, Bechan

    2014-01-01

    Effects of growth hormone on somatic growth and testicular activities were studied during late quiescence and early recrudescence phases of the reproductive cycle of the catfish, Clarias batrachus. The administration of exogenous growth hormone (GH) during the late quiescence phase (December-January; ambient water temperature-15.2±1°C) did not influence the somatic growth as well as the testicular activity, as no change in body weight, testis weight, plasma level of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and testicular morphology was detected following GH treatment, though the plasma testosterone was marginally increased. While during the early recrudescence phase (March-April; ambient water temperature-28.1±2°C), GH treatment promoted the production of insulin like growth factor-I and testicular steroidogenic activity in a dose dependent manner, as was evident from the significant increase in the circulating levels of testosterone and estradiol-17β. GH treatment also increased body weight, testicular weight and gonadosomatic index, suggesting its involvement in testicular development. The GH treatment promoted spermatogonial proliferation and accelerated the spermatogenic process in the present catfish. These results, thus, suggest that GH influences the somatic growth and testicular activities depending on the temperature of the rearing water; warmer temperature and longer photoperiod promote testicular steroidogenic and spermatogenic activities in fish. This study has immense practical use in fisheries science.

  18. Homeodomain transcription factor Hesx1/Rpx occupies Prop-1 activation sites in porcine follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) beta subunit promoter.

    PubMed

    Susa, Takao; Nakayama, Michie; Kitahara, Kousuke; Kimoto, Fuyuko; Kato, Takako; Kato, Yukio

    2007-06-08

    Homeodomain repressor factor Hesx1/Rpx plays a crucial role in the formation of Rathke's pouch at the start of pituitary organogenesis and represses the Prop-1-dependent expression of Pit-1 gene, which promotes the differentiation of Pit-1-dependent hormone producing cells. Recently, we discovered a novel function of Prop-1 by which it activates the porcine follicle stimulating hormone beta subunit (FSHbeta) gene through Fd2 region (-852/-746). The present study aimed to determine whether Hesx1 exerts its role in the Prop-1-dependent activation of FSHbeta gene. Transient transfection assay for the porcine FSHbeta promoter -985/+10, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and DNase I footprinting analysis for Fd2 region were carried out. Transfection assay in GH3 cells demonstrated that expression of Hesx1 alone does not change the promoter activity but the coexpression with Prop-1 represses the Prop-1-dependent activation of FSHbeta promoter. Similar results were obtained for the mutant reporter vector deleting the region -745/-104 indicating that Fd2 region is a target site of Hesx1 as well as Prop-1. EMSA and DNase I footprinting analysis using recombinant Hesx1 and Prop-1 protein demonstrated that Hesx1 and Prop-1 certainly bind to the AT-rich regions in a different manner. These results suggest that Hesx1 blocks the advanced expression of FSHbeta gene in the early stage of pituitary development, and Prop-1 thereafter appears and activates this gene.

  19. Radiosensitization by the investigational NEDD8-activating enzyme inhibitor MLN4924 (pevonedistat) in hormone-resistant prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofang; Zhang, Wenjuan; Yan, Zi; Liang, Yupei; Li, Lihui; Yu, Xiaoli; Feng, Yan; Fu, Shen; Zhang, Yanmei; Zhao, Hu; Yu, Jinha; Jeong, Lak Shin; Guo, Xiaomao; Jia, Lijun

    2016-06-21

    Salvage radiotherapy (SRT) is the first-line treatment for prostate cancer patients with biochemical recurrence following radical prostatectomy, and new specific radiosensitizers are in urgent need to enhance SRT effect. MLN4924 (also known as Pevonedistat), a specific inhibitor of NEDD8-activating enzyme, has recently entered phase I/II clinical trials in several malignancies. By inhibiting cullin neddylation, MLN4924 inactivates Cullin-RING ligases (CRL), which have been validated as an attractive radiosensitizing target. In our study, we demonstrate that MLN4924 can be used as a potent radiosensitizer in hormone-resistant prostate cancer cells. We found that MLN4924 inhibited cullin neddylation and sensitized prostate cancer cells to irradiation (IR). Mechanistically, MLN4924 enhanced IR-induced G2 cell-cycle arrest, by inducing accumulation of WEE1/p21/p27, three well-known CRL substrates. Importantly, siRNA knockdown of WEE1/p21/p27 partially abrogated MLN4924-induced G2 cell-cycle arrest, indicating a causal role of WEE1/p21/p27 in MLN4924-induced radiosensitization. Further mechanistic studies revealed that induction of DNA damage and apoptosis also contributed to MLN4924 radiosensitization in hormone-resistant prostate cancer cells. Our findings lay the foundation for future application of MLN4924 as a potential radiosensitizer in hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC).

  20. Rat liver c-erb A beta 1 thyroid hormone receptor is a constitutive activator in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae): essential role of domains D,E and F in hormone-independent transcription.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, H; Yang, Y F; Walfish, P G

    1991-08-15

    To assess thyroid hormone receptor (TR)-mediated activation of transcription in yeast in the presence or absence of thyroid hormone (T3), we developed a co-expression system using a TR-beta 1 expression vector and a reporter plasmid containing a 16 base pair palindromic thyroid hormone response element (TRE) upstream from a proximal CYC1 promoter that was fused to the beta-galactosidase lac Z gene of Escherichia coli. Although TR-beta 1 functions as a repressor in most mammalian systems, using our system we observed a unique thyroid hormone-independent transcriptional response indicating that wild TR-beta 1 acted as a constitutive activator in yeast; the addition of 1 microM T3 induced a moderate but significant (p less than 0.01) 25-40% further increase in transcriptional activity. Using a series of rat TR-beta 1 mutant constructs, we found that deletion of domain D and portions of E completely eliminated transcriptional activity, whereas truncations of domain F and E permitted a partial (20-40%) response compared to wild TR-beta 1 in the presence or absence of T3. These observations indicate that TR-beta 1 functions as an activator in yeast and that domains D,E and F play important interactive roles in its hormone-independent gene activation with the D domain likely being the most essential. Furthermore, our results suggest that the different transcriptional property of TR-beta 1 in yeast compared to mammalian cells i.e. activator vs repressor function, is likely determined by transcriptional factor differences which are dependent upon cellular origin.

  1. Obestatin, a peptide encoded by the ghrelin gene, opposes ghrelin's effects on food intake.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian V; Ren, Pei-Gen; Avsian-Kretchmer, Orna; Luo, Ching-Wei; Rauch, Rami; Klein, Cynthia; Hsueh, Aaron J W

    2005-11-11

    Ghrelin, a circulating appetite-inducing hormone, is derived from a prohormone by posttranslational processing. On the basis of the bioinformatic prediction that another peptide also derived from proghrelin exists, we isolated a hormone from rat stomach and named it obestatin-a contraction of obese, from the Latin "obedere," meaning to devour, and "statin," denoting suppression. Contrary to the appetite-stimulating effects of ghrelin, treatment of rats with obestatin suppressed food intake, inhibited jejunal contraction, and decreased body-weight gain. Obestatin bound to the orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR39. Thus, two peptide hormones with opposing action in weight regulation are derived from the same ghrelin gene. After differential modification, these hormones activate distinct receptors.

  2. Effects on operant learning and brain acetylcholine esterase activity in rats following chronic inorganic arsenic intake.

    PubMed

    Nagaraja, T N; Desiraju, T

    1994-05-01

    1. Very young and adult Wistar rats were given As5+, 5 mg arsenic kg-1 body weight day-1 (sodium arsenate). 2. Operant learning was tested in a Skinner box at the end of exposure and, in the case of developing animals, also after a recovery period. 3. Acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity was estimated in discrete brain regions of these animals. 4. The animals exposed to arsenic took longer to acquire the learned behaviour and to extinguish the operant. AChE activity was inhibited in some regions of the brain.

  3. The "Power Play! Campaign's School Idea & Resource Kits" Improve Determinants of Fruit and Vegetable Intake and Physical Activity among Fourth- and Fifth-Grade Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keihner, Angie Jo; Meigs, Reba; Sugerman, Sharon; Backman, Desiree; Garbolino, Tanya; Mitchell, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Examine the effect of the "California Children's Power Play! Campaign's School Idea & Resource Kits" for fourth/fifth grades on the psychosocial determinants of fruit and vegetable (FV) intake and physical activity (PA). Methods: Randomized, controlled trial (n = 31 low-resource public schools; 1,154 children). Ten…

  4. Examination of Attention Level in Nurses Working Night Shifts in terms of the Relationship between Electrodermal Activity and Sex Hormones

    PubMed Central

    DOLU, Nazan; ELALMIŞ, Derya Deniz; KELOĞLAN, Seval

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Electrodermal activity (EDA) is an electrical activity of eccrine sweat gland stimulated by the sympathetic nervous system. Skin conductance level (SCL) is measured with EDA. SCL and sweat gland activity increase in emotional situations, such as high activation, attention or stress. In this study, we investigated whether working in shifts affects attention level of nurses with EDA and explored the relationship between EDA and sex hormones. Method The study was carried out on nurses working night shifts (16.00–08.00 h) (n=22) and nurses working without a shift (08.00–16.00 h) (n=20). Firstly, The Epworth Sleepiness Scale which evaluates a person’s daytime sleepiness was applied to the subjects. For EDA measurement, Ag/AgCl electrodes were put on two fingers of their dominant hand. SCL was measured via MP30 system and GSR connection. The blood samples were analyzed for cortisol and ACTH hormone levels to investigate the changes in sleep and circadian rhythm. Result It was found that there was no statistically significant difference in skin conductance levels between the groups. Moreover, in the comparison of hormone values between the groups, the cortisol levels in night shift nurses were higher than in those working without a shift. Conclusion Night shift had no significant effect on the attention levels in the nurses. This situation is thought to be related to the fact that the nurses responsible for the night service raise their attention level to the highest point. The reason for higher level of cortisol in nurses working shifts may reflect that cortisol has no effect on the breadth of attention but reflects a high level of stress.

  5. Association of circulating active and total ghrelin concentrations with dry matter intake, growth, and carcass characteristics of finishing beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Foote, A P; Hales, K E; Lents, C A; Freetly, H C

    2014-12-01

    Ghrelin is a gut peptide that when acylated is thought to stimulate appetite. Circulating ghrelin concentrations could potentially be used as a predictor of DMI in cattle. The objective of this experiment was to determine the association of circulating ghrelin concentrations with DMI and other production traits. Steers and heifers were fed a finishing diet, and individual intake was recorded for 84 d. Blood samples were collected via jugular venipuncture following the DMI and ADG measurement period. Plasma active ghrelin and total ghrelin were quantified using commercial RIA. Active ghrelin was not correlated to DMI (P=0.36), but when DMI was modeled using a multivariate analysis including plasma metabolites and sex, active ghrelin was shown to be positively associated with DMI (P<0.01) and accounted for 6.2% of the variation accounted for by the regression model (R2=0.33). Total ghrelin was negatively correlated to DMI (P<0.01), but was not significant in a multivariate regression analysis (P=0.13). The ratio of active:total ghrelin was positively associated with DMI (P<0.01) and accounted for 10.2% of the variation in the model (R2=0.35). Active ghrelin was positively associated with ADG (P<0.05), while total ghrelin was negatively associated with ADG (P<0.01), and the ratio of active:total ghrelin was positively associated with ADG (P<0.01). Active ghrelin was not associated with G:F (P=0.88), but total ghrelin concentrations were negatively associated with G:F (P<0.01) and accounted for 10.24% of the variation (R2=0.25). Heifers consumed less feed than steers (P<0.01), tended to have greater active ghrelin concentrations (P=0.06), and had greater total ghrelin concentrations than steers (P=0.04). Total ghrelin concentrations were not different between sire breeds (P=0.80), but active ghrelin concentrations and the ratio of active:total ghrelin differed between breeds (P<0.01), indicating that genetics have an effect on the amount and form of circulating ghrelin

  6. Daily energy balance in children and adolescents. Does energy expenditure predict subsequent energy intake?

    PubMed

    Thivel, David; Aucouturier, Julien; Doucet, Éric; Saunders, Travis J; Chaput, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Both physical and sedentary activities primarily impact energy balance through energy expenditure, but they also have important implications in term of ingestive behavior. The literature provides scarce evidence on the relationship between daily activities and subsequent nutritional adaptations in children and adolescents. Sedentary activities and physical exercise are generally considered distinctly despite the fact that they represent the whole continuum of daily activity-induced energy expenditure. This brief review paper examines the impact of daily activities (from vigorous physical activity to imposed sedentary behaviors) on acute energy intake control of lean and obese children and adolescents, and whether energy expenditure is the main predictor of subsequent energy intake in this population. After an overview of the available literature, we conclude that both acute physical activity and sedentary behaviors induce food consumption modifications in children and adolescents but also that the important discrepancy between the methodologies used does not allow any clear conclusion so far. When considering energy intake responses according to the level of energy expenditure generated by those activities, it is clear that energy expenditure is not the main predictor of food consumption in both lean and obese children and adolescents. This suggests that other characteristics of those activities may have a greater impact on calorie intake (such as intensity, duration or induced mental stress) and that energy intake may be mainly determined by non-homeostatic pathways that could override the energetic and hormonal signals.

  7. Partnering with School Nutrition Professionals to Promote Fruit and Vegetable Intake through Taste-Testing Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirignano, Sherri M.; Hughes, Luanne J.; Wu-Jung, Corey J.; Morgan, Kathleen; Grenci, Alexandra; Savoca, LeeAnne

    2013-01-01

    The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act (HHFKA) of 2010 sets new nutrition standards for schools, requiring them to serve a greater variety and quantity of fruits and vegetables. Extension educators in New Jersey partnered with school nutrition professionals to implement a school wellness initiative that included taste-testing activities to support…

  8. Activation of the serotonergic 5-HT1A receptor in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus inhibits water intake and increases urinary excretion in water-deprived rats.

    PubMed

    de Souza Villa, Patrícia; Menani, José Vanderlei; de Arruda Camargo, Gabriela Maria Pavan; de Arruda Camargo, Luiz Antônio; Saad, Wilson Abrão

    2008-10-09

    The paraventricular nucleus (PVN) may be considered as a dynamic mosaic of chemically-specified subgroups of neurons. 5-HT(1A) is one of the prime receptors identified and there is expressed throughout all magnocellular regions of the PVN. Several reports have demonstrated that a subpopulation of the magnocellular neurons expressing 5-HT(1A) receptors are oxytocin (OT) neurons and activation of 5-HT(1A) receptors in the PVN increases the plasma OT. Increasing evidence shows that OT inhibits water intake and increases urinary excretion in rats. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of serotonergic 5-HT(1A) receptors in the lateral-medial posterior magnocellular region of the PVN in the water intake and diuresis induced by 24 h of water deprivation. Cannulae were implanted in the PVN of rats. 5-HT injections in the PVN reduced water intake and increased urinary excretion. 8-OH-DPAT (a 5-HT(1A) agonist) injections blocked the water intake and increased urinary output in all the periods of the observation. pMPPF (a 5-HT(1A) antagonist) injected bilaterally before the 8-OH-DPAT blocked its inhibitory effect on water intake and its diuretic effect. We suggest that antidipsogenic and diuretic responses seem to be mediated via 5-HT(1A) receptors of the lateral-medial posterior magnocellular region of the PVN in water-deprived rats.

  9. Puberty and gonadal hormones: role in adolescent-typical behavioral alterations.

    PubMed

    Varlinskaya, Elena I; Vetter-O'Hagen, Courtney S; Spear, Linda P

    2013-07-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Puberty and Adolescence". Adolescence is characterized by a variety of behavioral alterations, including elevations in novelty-seeking and experimentation with alcohol and other drugs of abuse. Some adolescent-typical neurobehavioral alterations may depend upon pubertal rises in gonadal hormones, whereas others may be unrelated to puberty. Using a variety of approaches, studies in laboratory animals have not revealed clear relationships between pubertal-related changes and adolescent- or adult-typical behaviors that are not strongly sexually dimorphic. Data reviewed suggest surprisingly modest influences of gonadal hormones on alcohol intake, alcohol preference and novelty-directed behaviors. Gonadectomy in males (but not females) increased ethanol intake in adulthood following surgery either pre-pubertally or in adulthood, with these increases in intake largely reversed by testosterone replacement in adulthood, supporting an activational role of androgens in moderating ethanol intake in males. In contrast, neither pre-pubertal nor adult gonadectomy influenced sensitivity to the social inhibitory or aversive effects of ethanol when indexed via conditioned taste aversions, although gonadectomy at either age altered the microstructure of social behavior of both males and females. Unexpectedly, the pre-pubertal surgical manipulation process itself was found to increase later ethanol intake, decrease sensitivity to ethanol's social inhibitory effects, attenuate novelty-directed behavior and lower social motivation, with gonadal hormones being necessary for these long-lasting effects of early surgical perturbations.

  10. Oral intake of curcumin markedly activated CYP 3A4: in vivo and ex-vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yow-Wen; Huang, Ching-Ya; Yang, Shih-Ying; Peng, Yu-Hsuan; Yu, Chung-Ping; Chao, Pei-Dawn Lee; Hou, Yu-Chi

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin, a specific secondary metabolite of Curcuma species, has potentials for a variety of beneficial health effects. It is nowadays used as a dietary supplement. Everolimus (EVL) is an immunosuppressant indicated for allograft rejection and cancer therapy, but with narrow therapeutic window. EVL is a substrate of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4). This study investigated the effect of coadministration of curcumin on the pharmacokinetics of EVL in rats and the underlying mechanisms. EVL (0.5 mg/kg) was orally administered without and with 50 and 100 mg/kg of curcumin, respectively, in rats. Blood samples were collected at specific time points and EVL concentrations in blood were determined by QMS® immunoassay. The underlying mechanisms were evaluated using cell model and recombinant CYP 3A4 isozyme. The results indicated that 50 and 100 mg/kg of curcumin significantly decreased the AUC0-540 of EVL by 70.6% and 71.5%, respectively, and both dosages reduced the Cmax of EVL by 76.7%. Mechanism studies revealed that CYP3A4 was markedly activated by curcumin metabolites, which apparently overrode the inhibition effects of curcumin on P-gp. In conclusion, oral intake of curcumin significantly decreased the bioavailability of EVL, a probe substrate of P-gp/CYP 3A4, mainly through marked activation on CYP 3A4. PMID:25300360

  11. Gastrointestinal hormones and the dialogue between gut and brain.

    PubMed

    Dockray, Graham J

    2014-07-15

    The landmark discovery by Bayliss and Starling in 1902 of the first hormone, secretin, emerged from earlier observations that a response (pancreatic secretion) following a stimulus (intestinal acidification) occurred after section of the relevant afferent nerve pathway. Nearly 80 years elapsed before it became clear that visceral afferent neurons could themselves also be targets for gut and other hormones. The action of gut hormones on vagal afferent neurons is now recognised to be an early step in controlling nutrient delivery to the intestine by regulating food intake and gastric emptying. Interest in these mechanisms has grown rapidly in view of the alarming global increase in obesity. Several of the gut hormones (cholecystokinin (CCK); peptide YY3-36 (PYY3-36); glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)) excite vagal afferent neurons to activate an ascending pathway leading to inhibition of food intake. Conversely others, e.g. ghrelin, that are released in the inter-digestive period, inhibit vagal afferent neurons leading to increased food intake. Nutrient status determines the neurochemical phenotype of vagal afferent neurons by regulating a switch between states that promote orexigenic or anorexigenic signalling through mechanisms mediated, at least partly, by CCK. Gut-brain signalling is also influenced by leptin, by gut inflammation and by shifts in the gut microbiota including those that occur in obesity. Moreover, there is emerging evidence that diet-induced obesity locks the phenotype of vagal afferent neurons in a state similar to that normally occurring during fasting. Vagal afferent neurons are therefore early integrators of peripheral signals underling homeostatic mechanisms controlling nutrient intake. They may also provide new targets in developing treatments for obesity and feeding disorders.

  12. Gastrointestinal hormones and the dialogue between gut and brain

    PubMed Central

    Dockray, Graham J

    2014-01-01

    The landmark discovery by Bayliss and Starling in 1902 of the first hormone, secretin, emerged from earlier observations that a response (pancreatic secretion) following a stimulus (intestinal acidification) occurred after section of the relevant afferent nerve pathway. Nearly 80 years elapsed before it became clear that visceral afferent neurons could themselves also be targets for gut and other hormones. The action of gut hormones on vagal afferent neurons is now recognised to be an early step in controlling nutrient delivery to the intestine by regulating food intake and gastric emptying. Interest in these mechanisms has grown rapidly in view of the alarming global increase in obesity. Several of the gut hormones (cholecystokinin (CCK); peptide YY3–36 (PYY3–36); glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)) excite vagal afferent neurons to activate an ascending pathway leading to inhibition of food intake. Conversely others, e.g. ghrelin, that are released in the inter-digestive period, inhibit vagal afferent neurons leading to increased food intake. Nutrient status determines the neurochemical phenotype of vagal afferent neurons by regulating a switch between states that promote orexigenic or anorexigenic signalling through mechanisms mediated, at least partly, by CCK. Gut–brain signalling is also influenced by leptin, by gut inflammation and by shifts in the gut microbiota including those that occur in obesity. Moreover, there is emerging evidence that diet-induced obesity locks the phenotype of vagal afferent neurons in a state similar to that normally occurring during fasting. Vagal afferent neurons are therefore early integrators of peripheral signals underling homeostatic mechanisms controlling nutrient intake. They may also provide new targets in developing treatments for obesity and feeding disorders. PMID:24566540

  13. Activation of the MKL1/actin signaling pathway induces hormonal escape in estrogen-responsive breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kerdivel, Gwenneg; Boudot, Antoine; Habauzit, Denis; Percevault, Frederic; Demay, Florence; Pakdel, Farzad; Flouriot, Gilles

    2014-06-05

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is generally considered to be a good prognostic marker because almost 70% of ERα-positive tumors respond to anti-hormone therapies. Unfortunately, during cancer progression, mammary tumors can escape from estrogen control, resulting in resistance to treatment. In this study, we demonstrate that activation of the actin/megakaryoblastic leukemia 1 (MKL1) signaling pathway promotes the hormonal escape of estrogen-sensitive breast cancer cell lines. The actin/MKL1 signaling pathway is silenced in differentiated ERα-positive breast cancer MCF-7 and T47D cell lines and active in ERα-negative HMT-3522 T4-2 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, which have undergone epithelial-mesenchymal transition. We showed that MKL1 activation in MCF-7 cells, either by modulating actin dynamics or using MKL1 mutants, down-regulates ERα expression and abolishes E2-dependent cell growth. Interestingly, the constitutively active form of MKL1 represses PR and HER2 expression in these cells and increases the expression of HB-EGF, TGFβ, and amphiregulin growth factors in an E2-independent manner. The resulting expression profile (ER-, PR-, HER2-) typically corresponds to the triple-negative breast cancer expression profile.

  14. New strigolactone analogs as plant hormones with low activities in the rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Boyer, François-Didier; de Saint Germain, Alexandre; Pouvreau, Jean-Bernard; Clavé, Guillaume; Pillot, Jean-Paul; Roux, Amélie; Rasmussen, Amanda; Depuydt, Stephen; Lauressergues, Dominique; Frei Dit Frey, Nicolas; Heugebaert, Thomas S A; Stevens, Christian V; Geelen, Danny; Goormachtig, Sofie; Rameau, Catherine

    2014-04-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) are known not only as plant hormones, but also as rhizosphere signals for establishing symbiotic and parasitic interactions. The design of new specific SL analogs is a challenging goal in understanding the basic plant biology and is also useful to control plant architectures without favoring the development of parasitic plants. Two different molecules (23 (3'-methyl-GR24), 31 (thia-3'-methyl-debranone-like molecule)) already described, and a new one (AR36), for which the synthesis is presented, are biologically compared with the well-known GR24 and the recently identified CISA-1. These different structures emphasize the wide range of parts attached to the D-ring for the bioactivity as a plant hormone. These new compounds possess a common dimethylbutenolide motif but their structure varies in the ABC part of the molecules: 23 has the same ABC part as GR24, while 31 and AR36 carry, respectively, an aromatic ring and an acyclic carbon chain. Detailed information is given for the bioactivity of such derivatives in strigolactone synthesis or in perception mutant plants (pea rms1 and rms4, Arabidopsis max2 and, max4) for different hormonal functions along with their action in the rhizosphere on arbuscular mycorrhizal hyphal growth and parasitic weed germination.

  15. Sex and stress hormone influences on the expression and activity of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Carbone, D L; Handa, R J

    2013-06-03

    The neurotrophin, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), is recognized as a key component in the regulation of CNS ontogeny, homeostasis and adult neuroplasticity. The importance of BDNF in CNS development and function is well documented by numerous reports from animal studies linking abnormal BDNF signaling to metabolic disturbances and anxiety or depressive-like behavior. Despite the diverse roles for BDNF in nearly all aspects of CNS physiology, the regulation of BDNF expression, as well as our understanding of the signaling mechanisms associated with this neurotrophin, remains incomplete. However, links between sex hormones such as estradiol and testosterone, as well as endogenous and synthetic glucocorticoids (GCs), have emerged as important mediators of BDNF expression and function. Examples of such regulation include brain region-specific induction of Bdnf mRNA in response to estradiol. Additional studies have also documented regulation of the expression of the high-affinity BDNF receptor Tropomyosin-Related Kinase B by estradiol, thus implicating sex steroids not only in the regulation of BDNF expression, but also in mechanisms of signaling associated with it. In addition to gonadal steroids, further evidence also suggests functional interaction between BDNF and GCs, such as in the regulation of corticotrophin-releasing hormone and other important neuropeptides. In this review, we provide an overview of the roles played by selected sex or stress hormones in the regulation of BDNF expression and signaling in the CNS.

  16. Activation of a cryptic splice site in the growth hormone receptor associated with growth hormone insensitivity syndrome in a genetic isolate of Laron Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Schiavi, A.; Bartlett, R.; Brown, M.

    1994-09-01

    Laron syndrome (LS) is a rare, autosomal recessive disease found worldwide. Despite various ethnic differences, all patients with LS described display classic dysmorphic features and extreme short stature due to defects in the growth hormone receptor (GHR). The vast majority of these patients are sporadic occurrences resulting from consanguineous matings; however, an Ecuadorian genetic isolate of LS has been reported. Our investigations have identified a genetic isolate of LS of Anglo Saxon origin. Seven individuals, by all clinical and biochemical criteria, have LS. As a result of extensive review of family and medical histories we have constructed a pedigree tracing the lineage of our affected patients through the 17th century. No GHR gross deletions were detected using an exon-specific PCR assay developed in our laboratory. Previous molecular analyses have identified mutations in exons 2-7 in numerous patients with classical LS. Single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis was performed on GHR exons 2-7, and a marked conformational shift was noted in exon 7. Cycle sequencing of exon 7 from three affected individuals, and from four first-degree relatives, revealed a C{r_arrow}T transition at position 766 of the cDNA, and a heterozygous C{r_arrow}T transition at the identical position in the obligate carriers studied. This mutation is predicted to activate a cryptic donor splice site 63 base pairs upstream from the 3{prime} end of exon 7, effectively truncating the GHR cDNA without changing the reading frame. The resultant GHR protein is shortened by a proposed 21 amino acids. The identification and conformation of this mutation not only identifies a novel mutation in the GHR, and the first to be described in LS patients of English descent, but also allows for comparisons between genotypes and phenotypes in an inbred population.

  17. Effects of follicle-stimulating hormone with and without luteinizing hormone on serum hormone concentrations, follicle growth, and intrafollicular estradiol and aromatase activity in gonadotropin-releasing hormone-immunized heifers.

    PubMed

    Crowe, M A; Kelly, P; Driancourt, M A; Boland, M P; Roche, J F

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the roles of FSH and LH in follicular growth, GnRH-immunized anestrous heifers (n = 17) were randomly assigned (Day 0) to one of three groups (n = 5 or 6). Group 1 received i.m. injections of 1.5 mg porcine FSH (pFSH) 4 times/day for 2 days; group 2 received i.v. injections of 150 microg pLH 6 times/day for 6 days; group 3 received both pFSH and pLH as described for groups 1 and 2. After slaughter on Day 6, measurements were made of follicle number and size, and follicular fluid concentrations of progesterone (P(4)), estradiol (E(2)), and aromatase activity. Injection of pFSH increased (P: < 0.01) the serum concentrations of FSH between 12 and 54 h. Infusion of pLH increased (P: < 0.05) mean and basal concentrations of LH and LH pulse frequency. Serum E(2) concentrations were higher (P: < 0.05) for heifers given pFSH + pLH than those given either pFSH or pLH alone. There was no difference (P: > or = 0.24) between treatments in the number of small follicles (<5 mm). Heifers given pFSH or pFSH + pLH had more (P: < or = 0.02) medium follicles (5.0-9.5 mm) than those that were given pLH alone (none present). Heifers given pFSH + pLH had more (P: = 0.04) large follicles (> or =10 mm) than those given either pLH or pFSH alone (none present). Overall, only 1 of 35 small follicles and 2 of 96 medium follicles were E(2)-active (i.e., E(2):P(4) >1.0), whereas 18 of 21 large follicles (all in the pFSH + pLH treatment) were E(2)-active; of these, 8 of 18 had aromatase activity. Concentrations of E(2) and E(2) activity in follicular fluid were correlated (r > or = 0.57; P: < 0.0001) with aromatase activity in heifers given pLH + pFSH. In conclusion, pLH failed to stimulate follicle growth greater than 5 mm; pFSH stimulated growth of medium follicles that were E(2)-inactive at slaughter and failed to increase serum E(2) concentrations; whereas pFSH + pLH stimulated growth of medium follicles and E(2)-active large follicles, and a 10- to 14-fold increase in serum E(2

  18. Improving the outcome of established therapies for osteoporosis by adding the active D-hormone analog alfacalcidol.

    PubMed

    Ringe, J D; Schacht, E

    2007-12-01

    While in other chronic diseases combined treatment regimens are the rule there is a lack of reported experience or study data on combining different specific drugs to treat osteoporosis. Significant differences in the mode of action (MOA) of the substances to be combined may be important for achieving optimal therapeutic results. Recognising that today bisphosphonates are the leading therapy for osteoporosis we suggest that the active D-hormone analog alfacalcidol with its completely different mechanisms of action could be an interesting combination to improve the therapeutic outcome of the pure antiresoptive action of bisphosphonates. Alfacalcidol is activated by the enzyme 25-hydroxylase in the liver for systemic and in osteoblasts for local D-hormone actions. It possesses a unique pattern of pleiotropic effects on, e.g. gut, bone, pararthyroids, muscle and brain. Alfacalcidol is superior to plain vitamin D (cholecalciferol) because the final kidney activation of the latter is regulated by a negative feedback mechanism. In vitamin D replete patients or patients with impaired kidney function no increased D-hormone action at the target tissues can be achieved. Animal studies and several trials in humans with alendronate plus calcitriol or alfacalcidol proved that the combination induced significantly higher increases of bone mineral density (BMD) than the respective mono-therapies. The results of the 2-year AAC-trial from our group indicate that the combination alendronate and alfacalcidol is also superior in terms of falls, fractures and back pain. From the review of the literature and the own new results we conclude that this combined therapeutic regimen is a very promising option for treating established osteoporosis and propose a differentiated use of alfacalcidol alone or the combination with alendronate in different stages and clinical situations of osteoporosis.

  19. A glasses-type wearable device for monitoring the patterns of food intake and facial activity

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jungman; Chung, Jungmin; Oh, Wonjun; Yoo, Yongkyu; Lee, Won Gu; Bang, Hyunwoo

    2017-01-01

    Here we present a new method for automatic and objective monitoring of ingestive behaviors in comparison with other facial activities through load cells embedded in a pair of glasses, named GlasSense. Typically, activated by subtle contraction and relaxation of a temporalis muscle, there is a cyclic movement of the temporomandibular joint during mastication. However, such muscular signals are, in general, too weak to sense without amplification or an electromyographic analysis. To detect these oscillatory facial signals without any use of obtrusive device, we incorporated a load cell into each hinge which was used as a lever mechanism on both sides of the glasses. Thus, the signal measured at the load cells can detect the force amplified mechanically by the hinge. We demonstrated a proof-of-concept validation of the amplification by differentiating the force signals between the hinge and the temple. A pattern recognition was applied to extract statistical features and classify featured behavioral patterns, such as natural head movement, chewing, talking, and wink. The overall results showed that the average F1 score of the classification was about 94.0% and the accuracy above 89%. We believe this approach will be helpful for designing a non-intrusive and un-obtrusive eyewear-based ingestive behavior monitoring system. PMID:28134303

  20. A glasses-type wearable device for monitoring the patterns of food intake and facial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jungman; Chung, Jungmin; Oh, Wonjun; Yoo, Yongkyu; Lee, Won Gu; Bang, Hyunwoo

    2017-01-01

    Here we present a new method for automatic and objective monitoring of ingestive behaviors in comparison with other facial activities through load cells embedded in a pair of glasses, named GlasSense. Typically, activated by subtle contraction and relaxation of a temporalis muscle, there is a cyclic movement of the temporomandibular joint during mastication. However, such muscular signals are, in general, too weak to sense without amplification or an electromyographic analysis. To detect these oscillatory facial signals without any use of obtrusive device, we incorporated a load cell into each hinge which was used as a lever mechanism on both sides of the glasses. Thus, the signal measured at the load cells can detect the force amplified mechanically by the hinge. We demonstrated a proof-of-concept validation of the amplification by differentiating the force signals between the hinge and the temple. A pattern recognition was applied to extract statistical features and classify featured behavioral patterns, such as natural head movement, chewing, talking, and wink. The overall results showed that the average F1 score of the classification was about 94.0% and the accuracy above 89%. We believe this approach will be helpful for designing a non-intrusive and un-obtrusive eyewear-based ingestive behavior monitoring system.

  1. Substrate Utilization is Influenced by Acute Dietary Carbohydrate Intake in Active, Healthy Females.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Sara; Wood, Richard; Matthews, Tracey; Vanlangen, Deborah; Sawyer, Jason; Headley, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    The present study compared the metabolic responses between a single low-carbohydrate (LC) and low-fat (LF) meal followed by an aerobic exercise bout in females. Subjects included 8 active, premenopausal females. Subjects completed a LC and LF testing session. Respiratory gas exchange (RER) measurements were taken for 20 min fasted, for 55 min postprandial (PP), and during 30 min of exercise. Blood was collected for assessment of glucose (G), insulin (IN), triglycerides (TG), and free fatty acids (FFA) during the final 10 min of each time period. The LF meal provided 396 kcal (78% carbohydrate, 7% fat, and 15% protein). The LC meal provided 392 kcal (15% carbohydrate, 68% fat, and 18% protein). No significant differences existed between test meals for fasting blood measurements. PP IN (μU·mL(-1)) levels were significantly lower following LC compared to LF [10.7 (6.1) vs. 26.0 (21.0)]. Postexercise (PE) FFA (mEq·L(-1)) levels were significantly greater following LC [1.1 (0.3) vs. 0.5 (0.3)]. PE TG (mg·dL(-1)) levels were significantly greater following LC [152.0 (53.1) vs. 114.4 (40.9)]. RER was significantly lower at all time points following LC compared to LF. In moderately active adult females, ingestion of a single LC meal resulted in greater lipid oxidation at rest and during exercise as compared to a single LF meal. Although macronutrient distribution appears to have dictated substrate utilization in the present study, more research is needed regarding the long-term effects of macronutrient redistribution with and without exercise on substrate utilization. Key pointsThe relative carbohydrate content of a single meal has a significant impact on postprandial metabolism and substrate utilization in healthy, active females.A single bout of aerobic exercise performed within an hour of meal ingestion has the potential to modify the postprandial response.Interventions aimed at improving body composition and preventing chronic disease should focus on dietary

  2. Di2-ethylhexyl phthalate disrupts thyroid hormone homeostasis through activating the Ras/Akt/TRHr pathway and inducing hepatic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hanfeng; Ha, Mei; Yang, Min; Yue, Ping; Xie, Zhengyuan; Liu, Changjiang

    2017-01-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), as a widespread environmental pollutant and an endocrine disruptor, can disturb the homeostasis of thyroid hormones (THs). In order to elucidate roles of the MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways and hepatic enzymes in thyroid-disrupting effects of DEHP, Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed with DEHP by gavage for 30 consecutive days; Nthy-ori 3-1 cells were treated with DEHP with NAC, k-Ras siRNA or inhibitors (U0126 and wortmannin). Results showed that DEHP led to histopathologic changes in rat thyroid and liver, such as the decrease in thyroid follicular cavity diameter, hepatocyte edema. Triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4) and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) were reduced. DEHP caused ROS production, oxidative stress and k-Ras upregulation, thereby activating the ERK and Akt pathways in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, TRH receptor (TRHr) level was elevated after the activation of the Akt pathway and was downregulated after the inhibition of the Akt pathway. However, TRHr was not modulated by the ERK pathway. Additionally, hepatic enzymes, including Ugt1a1, CYP2b1, Sult1e1, and Sult2b1, were significantly induced after DEHP exposure. Taken together, DEHP can perturb TH homeostasis and reduce TH levels. The activated Ras/Akt/TRHr pathway and induced hepatic enzymes play vital roles in thyroid-disrupting effects of DEHP. PMID:28065941

  3. Di2-ethylhexyl phthalate disrupts thyroid hormone homeostasis through activating the Ras/Akt/TRHr pathway and inducing hepatic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hanfeng; Ha, Mei; Yang, Min; Yue, Ping; Xie, Zhengyuan; Liu, Changjiang

    2017-01-09

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), as a widespread environmental pollutant and an endocrine disruptor, can disturb the homeostasis of thyroid hormones (THs). In order to elucidate roles of the MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways and hepatic enzymes in thyroid-disrupting effects of DEHP, Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed with DEHP by gavage for 30 consecutive days; Nthy-ori 3-1 cells were treated with DEHP with NAC, k-Ras siRNA or inhibitors (U0126 and wortmannin). Results showed that DEHP led to histopathologic changes in rat thyroid and liver, such as the decrease in thyroid follicular cavity diameter, hepatocyte edema. Triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4) and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) were reduced. DEHP caused ROS production, oxidative stress and k-Ras upregulation, thereby activating the ERK and Akt pathways in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, TRH receptor (TRHr) level was elevated after the activation of the Akt pathway and was downregulated after the inhibition of the Akt pathway. However, TRHr was not modulated by the ERK pathway. Additionally, hepatic enzymes, including Ugt1a1, CYP2b1, Sult1e1, and Sult2b1, were significantly induced after DEHP exposure. Taken together, DEHP can perturb TH homeostasis and reduce TH levels. The activated Ras/Akt/TRHr pathway and induced hepatic enzymes play vital roles in thyroid-disrupting effects of DEHP.

  4. [Vitamin D hormone system and diabetes mellitus: lessons from selective activators of vitamin D receptor and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Jódar-Gimeno, Esteban; Muñoz-Torres, Manuel

    2013-02-01

    The vitamin D hormone system has significant skeletal and extra-skeletal effects. Vitamin D receptor occurs in different tissues, and several cells other than renal cells are able to locally produce active vitamin D, which is responsible for transcriptional control of hundreds of genes related to its pleiotropic effects. There is increasing evidence relating vitamin D to development and course of type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus. Specifically, influence of vitamin D on the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, inflammatory response, and urinary albumin excretion could explain the relevant impact of vitamin D status on diabetic nephropathy. Selective vitamin D receptor activators are molecules able to reproduce agonistic or antagonistic effects of active vitamin D depending on the tissue or even on the cell type. Specifically, paricalcitol has a beneficial profile because of its potency to reduce parathyroid hormone, with lower effects on serum calcium or phosphate levels. Moreover, in patients with diabetes and renal disease, paricalcitol decreases microalbuminuria, hospitalization rates, and cardiovascular mortality. Therefore, these molecules represent an attractive new option to improve prognosis of renal disease in patients with diabetes.

  5. The Effect of Central Injection of Ghrelin and Bombesin on Mean Plasma Thyroid Hormones Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudi, Fariba; Mohsennezhad, Fatemeh; Khazali, Homayoun; Ehtesham, Haleh

    2011-01-01

    Ghrelin increases food intakes and body weight. Bombesin decreases food intakes and inhibits the stimulatory effect of Ghrelin on food intakes. Thyroid hormones have a crucial role in the regulation of body weight and yet the effect of bombesin on thyroid axis activity is not fully clear. Therefore, the goal of this study was to determine the effect of different doses of Ghrelin or bombesin on mean plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), Triiodothyronine (T3) and Thyroxin (T4) concentration and also, the effect of interaction between Ghrelin and bombesin on thyroid axis activity. Forty-nine rats in seven groups received saline or different doses of Ghrelin (4, 10 or 15 nmol) and bombesin ( 2.5, 5 or 10 nmol) and forty-two rats in six groups received simultaneous injection of Ghrelin (10 or 15 nmol) and different doses of bombesin (2.5, 5 or 10 nmol) via lateral cerebral ventricle. Blood samples were collected via decapitation 20 min after the injection and plasma was assayed for plasma TSH, T3 and T4 concentration by Radioimmunoassay (RIA). Ghrelin significantly decreased the concentration of mean plasma thyroid hormones compared to saline. Bombesin did not significantly increase thyroid hormones concentration compared to saline but bombesin blocked the inhibitory effect of Ghrelin on thyroid axis activity. Bombesin may be the antagonist of Ghrelin action. PMID:24250396

  6. Active and passive MDMA ('ecstasy') intake induces differential transcriptional changes in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Fernàndez-Castillo, N; Orejarena, M J; Ribasés, M; Blanco, E; Casas, M; Robledo, P; Maldonado, R; Cormand, B

    2012-02-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'ecstasy') is a recreational drug widely used by adolescents and young adults. Although its rewarding effects are well established, there is controversy on its addictive potential. We aimed to compare the consequences of active and passive MDMA administration on gene expression in the mouse brain since all previous studies were based on passive MDMA administration. We used a yoked-control operant intravenous self-administration paradigm combined with microarray technology. Transcriptomic profiles of ventral striatum, frontal cortex, dorsal raphe nucleus and hippocampus were analysed in mice divided in contingent MDMA, yoked MDMA and yoked saline groups, and several changes were validated by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The comparison of contingent MDMA and yoked MDMA vs. yoked saline mice allowed the identification of differential expression in several genes, most of them with immunological and inflammatory functions, but others being involved in neuroadaptation. In the comparison of contingent MDMA vs. yoked MDMA administration, hippocampus and the dorsal raphe nucleus showed statistically significant changes. The altered expression of several genes involved in neuroadaptative changes and synapse function, which may be related to learning self-administration behaviour, could be validated in these two brain structures. In conclusion, our study shows a strong effect of MDMA administration on the expression of immunological and inflammatory genes in all the four brain regions studied. In addition, experiments on MDMA self-administration suggest that the dorsal raphe nucleus and hippocampus may be involved in active MDMA-seeking behaviour, and show specific alterations on gene expression that support the addictive potential of this drug.

  7. Hormone Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... estrogen , a hormone that helps control the menstrual cycle . Changing estrogen levels can bring on symptoms such ... two hormones—estrogen and progesterone —control your menstrual cycle. These hormones are made by the ovaries . Estrogen ...

  8. Screening of multiple hormonal activities in water and sediment from the river Nile, Egypt, using in vitro bioassay and gonadal histology.

    PubMed

    Osman, Alaa G M; AbouelFadl, Khaled Y; Krüger, Angela; Kloas, Werner

    2015-06-01

    In Egypt, until yet no records are available regarding possible multiple hormonal activities in the aquatic systems and especially in the river Nile. In this paper, in vitro yeast estrogen screen (YES) and yeast androgen screen (YAS) were used to assess (for the first time) the multiple hormonal activities in surface waters and sediments of the river Nile. This study aimed to determine whether river Nile water can cause changes in gonadal histology of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus niloticus). All water samples exhibited extremely low levels of estrogenicity. Estrogenicity was nearly not detected in any of the sediment samples. Unlike the estrogenicity, significant androgenic activities were recorded in the water and sediment samples along the course of the river Nile. The present study reports for the first time quantification anti-estrogenic and anti-androgenic activities with high levels in both water and sediment of the river Nile. The greatest anti-estrogenic and anti-androgenic activities were observed in samples from downstream river Nile. These results indicated that the anti-estrogenic and anti-androgenic activities along the Nile course were great and the pollution of the sites at downstream was more serious than the upstream sites due to industrial and anthropogenic activities at these sites. Good correlations were observed among some hormonal activities, suggesting coexistence of these contaminants in the environmental matrices. There were no signs of sexual disruption in any of the gonads analyzed from either male or female Nile tilapia, demonstrating that no hormonal activity present along the Nile course was sufficient to induce adverse effects on reproductive development. Further investigation is necessary to identify the compounds responsible for the hormonal activities in the river Nile and to examine effects of very low levels of hormonally active compounds on gonadal histology, as well as in the development of more sensitive biomarkers.

  9. Circadian activity rhythms and voluntary ethanol intake in male and female ethanol-preferring rats: effects of long-term ethanol access.

    PubMed

    Rosenwasser, Alan M; McCulley, Walter D; Fecteau, Matthew

    2014-11-01

    Chronic alcohol (ethanol) intake alters fundamental properties of the circadian clock. While previous studies have reported significant alterations in free-running circadian period during chronic ethanol access, these effects are typically subtle and appear to require high levels of intake. In the present study we examined the effects of long-term voluntary ethanol intake on ethanol consumption and free-running circadian period in male and female, selectively bred ethanol-preferring P and HAD2 rats. In light of previous reports that intermittent access can result in escalated ethanol intake, an initial 2-week water-only baseline was followed by either continuous or intermittent ethanol access (i.e., alternating 15-day epochs of ethanol access and ethanol deprivation) in separate groups of rats. Thus, animals were exposed to either 135 days of continuous ethanol access or to five 15-day access periods alternating with four 15-day periods of ethanol deprivation. Animals were maintained individually in running-wheel cages under continuous darkness throughout the experiment to allow monitoring of free-running activity and drinking rhythms, and 10% (v/v) ethanol and plain water were available continuously via separate drinking tubes during ethanol access. While there were no initial sex differences in ethanol drinking, ethanol preference increased progressively in male P and HAD2 rats under both continuous and intermittent-access conditions, and eventually exceeded that seen in females. Free-running period shortened during the initial ethanol-access epoch in all groups, but the persistence of this effect showed complex dependence on sex, breeding line, and ethanol-access schedule. Finally, while females of both breeding lines displayed higher levels of locomotor activity than males, there was little evidence for modulation of activity level by ethanol access. These results are consistent with previous findings that chronic ethanol intake alters free-running circadian

  10. Influence of hormonal status on enkephalin-degrading aminopeptidase activity in the HPA axis of female mice.

    PubMed

    García-López, M J; Martínez-Martos, J M; Mayas, M D; Carrera, M P; Ramírez-Expósito, M J

    2005-04-01

    Opioids are involved in the regulation of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity under physiological conditions. In the present work, we analyzed the influence of ovariectomy and estradiol (E), progesterone (P) or estradiol plus progesterone (E+P) replacement on soluble (S) and membrane-bound (MB) enkephalin-degrading aminopeptidase activity (EDA) in the HPA axis. Female mice (Balb/C) were distributed in 15 groups of 10 animals each: sham-operated controls (C), ovariectomized controls (OV-C), and ovariectomized mice treated with increasing doses of E (10, 20 or 40 mg/kg), P (100, 200 or 400 mg/kg) or E+P (10+100, 20+200 or 40+400 mg/kg). In hypothalamus, ovariectomy increased both S and MB EDA activities, whereas E replacement returned them to control levels, although MB EDA activity increased again after the replacement with 40 mg/kg E. P replacement increased S EDA activity, but returned MB EDA activity to control levels. The replacement of E+P returned both S and MB EDA activities to control levels, although MB EDA activity was lower than control values after the replacement with 10+100 mg/kg E+P. In pituitary, neither ovariectomy nor the replacement of E or E+P changed S EDA, although the highest concentrations of P increased S EDA activity. However, ovariectomy increased MB EDA and E replacement returned the activity to control or below control levels, depending on the concentration used. However, P administration returned the activity to control or below control levels depending on the concentration used, although 200 mg/kg P had no effects on MB EDA. E+P replacement returned pituitary MB EDA activity to control levels. In adrenal glands, ovariectomy did change either S or MB EDA. However, E, P or E+P replacement decreased S EDA activity in different degrees, depending of the dose administrated. No changes were detected in MB EDA after hormone replacement. These results indicate that female steroid hormones influence EDA activity at different

  11. The Nuclear Hormone Receptor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor β/δ Potentiates Cell Chemotactism, Polarization, and Migration▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Nguan Soon; Icre, Guillaume; Montagner, Alexandra; Heggeler, Béatrice Bordier-ten; Wahli, Walter; Michalik, Liliane

    2007-01-01

    After an injury, keratinocytes acquire the plasticity necessary for the reepithelialization of the wound. Here, we identify a novel pathway by which a nuclear hormone receptor, until now better known for its metabolic functions, potentiates cell migration. We show that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ) enhances two phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent pathways, namely, the Akt and the Rho-GTPase pathways. This PPARβ/δ activity amplifies the response of keratinocytes to a chemotactic signal, promotes integrin recycling and remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton, and thereby favors cell migration. Using three-dimensional wound reconstructions, we demonstrate that these defects have a strong impact on in vivo skin healing, since PPARβ/δ−/− mice show an unexpected and rare epithelialization phenotype. Our findings demonstrate that nuclear hormone receptors not only regulate intercellular communication at the organism level but also participate in cell responses to a chemotactic signal. The implications of our findings may be far-reaching, considering that the mechanisms described here are important in many physiological and pathological situations. PMID:17682064

  12. A comparison of timed artificial insemination and automated activity monitoring with hormone intervention in 3 commercial dairy herds.

    PubMed

    Dolecheck, K A; Silvia, W J; Heersche, G; Wood, C L; McQuerry, K J; Bewley, J M

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the reproductive performance of cows inseminated based on automated activity monitoring with hormone intervention (AAM) to cows from the same herds inseminated using only an intensive timed artificial insemination (TAI) program. Cows (n=523) from 3 commercial dairy herds participated in this study. To be considered eligible for participation, cows must have been classified with a body condition score of at least 2.50, but no more than 3.50, passed a reproductive tract examination, and experienced no incidences of clinical, recorded metabolic diseases in the current lactation. Within each herd, cows were balanced for parity and predicted milk yield, then randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatments: TAI or AAM. Cows assigned to the TAI group were subjected to an ovulation synchronization protocol consisting of presynchronization, Ovsynch, and Resynch for up to 3 inseminations. Cows assigned to the AAM treatment were fitted with a leg-mounted accelerometer (AfiAct Pedometer Plus, Afimilk, Kibbutz Afikim, Israel) at least 10 d before the end of the herd voluntary waiting period (VWP). Cows in the AAM treatment were inseminated at times indicated by the automated alert system for up to 90 d after the VWP. If an open cow experienced no AAM alert for a 39±7-d period (beginning at the end of the VWP), hormone intervention in the form of a single injection of either PGF2α or GnRH (no TAI) was permitted as directed by the herd veterinarian. Subsequent to hormone intervention, cows were inseminated when alerted in estrus by the AAM system. Pregnancy was diagnosed by ultrasound 33 to 46 d after insemination. Pregnancy loss was determined via a second ultrasound after 60 d pregnant. Timed artificial insemination cows experienced a median 11.0 d shorter time to first service. Automated activity-monitored cows experienced a median 17.5-d shorter service interval. No treatment difference in probability of pregnancy to first AI, probability

  13. The effects of experimentally induced Escherichia coli mastitis and flunixin meglumine administration on activity measures, feed intake, and milk parameters.

    PubMed

    Yeiser, E E; Leslie, K E; McGilliard, M L; Petersson-Wolfe, C S

    2012-09-01

    The use of flunixin meglumine (FM), a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, during experimentally induced Escherichia coli mastitis was evaluated. Twenty-four primiparous and multiparous lactating dairy cows were challenged with 1×10(2) cfu of E. coli 727 in 1 uninfected quarter. Of the 24 E. coli-challenged animals, 12 were administered FM [ECF; 100mg (2 cc)/45.5 kg of body weight) at the onset of clinical mastitis signs. The remaining 12 challenged cows were untreated (EC). An additional 11 cows were infused with 1 mL of sterile phosphate-buffered saline and served as the nonchallenged control (CTL) group. Activity measures, dry matter intake (DMI), milk production, milk bacterial counts from challenged mammary glands, and somatic cell score (SCS) were collected on all animals. Activity measurements were collected using both a behavior-monitoring system and data loggers. Activity was summarized by day (behavior-monitoring system) and in 3-h time periods (data loggers). An examination of animal activity indicated that EC and ECF cows stood more and lay less as compared with the CTL animals in the first 6h after FM administration. When DMI was analyzed, CTL and ECF animals had greater DMI than the EC animals on d 1 postchallenge. However, by d 2 postchallenge, DMI for ECF and EC cows was significantly less than for the CTL cows. The ECF cows had greater milk yield than did EC animals by d 3 and 4 postchallenge, and no significant difference in yield was observed between the ECF and CTL animals. No differences in SCS were observed between the parity groups. Yet, bacterial counts in milk were greater in multiparous animals compared with the primiparous cows. Therefore, it can be concluded that E. coli mastitis does alter animal activity and may have a negative effect on animal well-being. However, the improvement in DMI and milk production for ECF animals provides evidence for using a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug as supportive therapy in alleviating the adverse

  14. Ramjet Intakes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Propulsion a vitesse elevee : Conception du moteur - integration et gestion thermique) 14. ABSTRACT Intake design for supersonic engines, in common...exhaust velocity to free stream velocity, with exhaust velocity calculated by assuming the captured air is expanded isentropicaly back to ambient ...2.1 [23] with the actual value probably determined by engine mass flow demand and therefore dependent on ambient temperature. The lowest

  15. Adipose tissue hormones and appetite and body weight regulators in insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Koleva, Daniela Iv; Orbetzova, Maria M; Atanassova, Pepa K

    2013-01-01

    Impaired sensitivity to insulin (the so called insulin resistance, IR) occurs in a number of genetic and acquired conditions, including obesity, non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and metabolic syndrome (MS). In this review we discuss the correlation between IR, the adipose tissue hormones and appetite and body weight regulators. Leptin acts as a major adipostat: it suppresses food intake and activates catabolic pathways associated with increased energy production. It improves the peripheral insulin sensitivity and affects beta-cell function. Adiponectin is the only adipocytokine discovered so far that has anti-atherogenic properties. There is a reverse correlation between the serum adiponectin levels and the degree of obesity, IR, impaired glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis. Ghrelin stimulates food intake; of all circulating orexigenic hormones ghrelin is the most thoroughly studied. Ghrelin levels are decreased in MS and PCOS patients as this hormone is negatively correlated with body mass. Resistin is a hormone secreted by adipose tissues; a growing body of evidence suggests that it might be implicated in the link between obesity and diabetes. It has been found that the hormone's levels are significantly higher in obese people than those in normal body mass people. The recently discovered adipose tissue hormones, vaspin, visfatin, omentin-1 and their effect on IR development, have been increasingly researched.

  16. [Changes of endogenous hormone contents and antioxidative enzyme activities in wheat leaves under low temperature stress at jointing stage].

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-yan; Xu, Wen; Liu, Li-wei; Yang, Jing; Zhu, Xin-kai; Guo, Wen-shan

    2015-07-01

    Low temperature stresses (-3 and -5 °C) were simulated using artificial temperature-controlled phytotrons to study the freezing rate, the contents of endogenous hormones, and the activities of antioxidative enzymes in the leaves of wheat plants of Yangmai 16 (YM 16) and Xumai 30 (XM 30) at jointing stage. The grade and index of freezing injury increased with lower temperature and longer stress. The freezing rate was at the 5th level and the main stems and tillers of both cultivars were finally dead under -5 °C lasting for 72 h. On the last day of stress initiation, the contents of abscisic acid (ABA) and zeatin riboside (ZR), and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxide dismutase (POD), and catalase (CAT) in leaves increased at the beginning and then declined as low temperature progressed. On the 3rd day after stress, the contents of ABA and ZR and the activities of antioxidative enzymes were higher than those on the last day of cold stress, and then reduced to the level of the control on the 6th day after stress. The content of gibberellins (GA3) was lowered by cold stress. For YM 16, GA3 content increased from the 3rd day to the 6th day after cold stress, whereas, for XM 30, it increased first and then decreased. For the treatment of -5 °C lasting for 72 h, the contents of hormones and the activities of antioxidative enzymes were significantly lower than those of the other treatments. Correlation analyses showed that higher ABA and ZR contents, and higher SOD, POD and CAT activities as well as lower GA3 content could alleviate the low-temperature injury in wheat plants under low temperature stress.

  17. Hormone-sensitive lipase activity and triacylglycerol hydrolysis are decreased in rat soleus muscle by cyclopiazonic acid.

    PubMed

    Watt, Matthew J; Steinberg, Gregory R; Heigenhauser, G J F; Spriet, Lawrence L; Dyck, David J

    2003-08-01

    Cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) is a sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor that increases intracellular calcium. The role of CPA in regulating the oxidation and esterification of palmitate, the hydrolysis of intramuscular lipids, and the activation of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) was examined in isolated rat soleus muscles at rest. CPA (40 micro M) was added to the incubation medium to levels that resulted in subcontraction increases in muscle tension, and lipid metabolism was monitored using the previously described pulse-chase procedure. CPA did not alter the cellular energy state, as reflected by similar muscle contents of ATP, phosphocreatine, free AMP, and free ADP. CPA increased total palmitate uptake into soleus muscle (11%, P < 0.05) and was without effect on palmitate oxidation. This resulted in greater esterification of exogenous palmitate into the triacylglycerol (18%, P < 0.05) and phospholipid (89%, P < 0.05) pools. CPA decreased (P < 0.05) intramuscular lipid hydrolysis, and this occurred as a result of reduced HSL activity (20%, P < 0.05). Incubation of muscles with 3 mM caffeine, which is also known to increase Ca2+ without affecting the cellular energy state, reduced HSL activity (24%, P < 0.05). KN-93, a calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CaMKII), blocked the effects of CPA and caffeine, and HSL activity returned to preincubation values. The results of the present study demonstrate that CPA simultaneously decreases intramuscular triacylglycerol (IMTG) hydrolysis and promotes lipid storage in isolated, intact soleus muscle. The decreased IMTG hydrolysis is likely mediated by reduced HSL activity, possibly via the CaMKII pathway. These responses are not consistent with the increased hydrolysis and decreased esterification observed in contracting muscle when substrate availability and the hormonal milieu are tightly controlled. It is possible that more powerful signals or a higher [Ca2+] may override the lipid-storage effect of the CPA

  18. Melanocortin receptor subtypes in interrenal cells and corticotropic activity of α-melanocyte-stimulating hormones in barfin flounder, Verasper moseri.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Chiba, Hiroaki; Yamanome, Takeshi; Schiöth, Helgi B; Takahashi, Akiyoshi

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the pituitary-interrenal axis in barfin flounder, a flatfish. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R) have been shown to be indispensable substances in pituitary and interrenal cells for cortisol release, respectively. We previously identified ACTH in the pars distalis of the barfin flounder pituitary gland, and detected transcripts of Mc1r, Mc4r, and Mc5r in the head kidney wherein interrenal cells are located. We have now demonstrated the presence of MC2R, which is a specific receptor for ACTH, in interrenal cells by molecular cloning of Mc2r cDNA and in situ hybridization, and confirmation of the in vitro cortisol-releasing activity of ACTH. These results show the presence of a classical pituitary-interrenal axis in this fish. We also evaluated the role of α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) and its related peptides. In situ hybridization was used to demonstrate the expression of Mc5r in interrenal cells; both desacetyl-α-MSH and diacetyl-α-MSH showed in vitro cortisol-releasing activities, while the activity of α-MSH was negligible. These findings indicate the presence of an additional pituitary-interrenal axis consisting of α-MSH-like peptides secreted from the neurointermediate lobe of the pituitary and MC5R in the interrenal cells. The cortisol-releasing activity of desacetyl-α-MSH and diacetyl-α-MSH, compared with the low activity of α-MSH, suggest a unique and specific functional role of these forms of MSH peptides. The interrenal co-expression of two subtypes of Mcrs may play a role in this specialization.

  19. Role of sex hormones in hypercapnia-induced activation of the locus coeruleus in female and male rats.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, D; Marques, D A; Bernuci, M P; Leite, C M; Araújo-Lopes, R; Anselmo-Franci, J; Bícego, K C; Szawka, R E; Gargaglioni, L H

    2016-01-28

    The locus coeruleus (LC) has been suggested as a CO2 chemoreceptor site in mammals. Most of the studies involving the role of the LC in hypercapnic ventilatory responses have been performed in males. Since ovarian steroids modulate the activity of LC neurons and females have a different respiratory response to CO2 than males, we evaluated the activity of LC noradrenergic neurons during normocapnia and hypercapnia in female and male rats with distinct sex hormone levels. Ovariectomized (OVX), estradiol (E2)-treated ovariectomized (OVX+E2) and female rats on the diestrous day of the estrous cycle were evaluated. Concurrently, males were investigated as gonad-intact, orchidectomized (ORX), testosterone (T)-treated ORX (ORX+T), and E2-treated ORX (ORX+E2). Activation of LC neurons was determined by double-label immunohistochemistry to c-Fos and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Hypercapnia induced by 7% CO2 increased the number of c-Fos/TH-immunoreactive (ir) neurons in the LC of all groups when compared to air exposure. Hypercapnia-induced c-Fos expression did not differ between diestrous females and intact male rats. In the OVX+E2 group, there was attenuation in the c-Fos expression during normocapnia compared with OVX rats, but CO2 responsiveness was not altered. Moreover, in ORX rats, neither T nor E2 treatments changed c-Fos expression in LC noradrenergic neurons. Thus, in female rats, E2 reduces activation of LC noradrenergic neurons, whereas in males, sex hormones do not influence the LC activity.

  20. Expression of active hormone and DNA-binding domains of the chicken progesterone receptor in E. coli.

    PubMed Central

    Eul, J; Meyer, M E; Tora, L; Bocquel, M T; Quirin-Stricker, C; Chambon, P; Gronemeyer, H

    1989-01-01

    Bacterially-expressed fusion proteins containing the DNA-(region C) or hormone-binding (region E) domains of the chicken progesterone receptor (cPR) fused to the C terminus of Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase were analysed for the specificity of interaction with natural and synthetic hormone-responsive elements (HREs) and progestins, respectively. The purified fusion protein containing the progestin-binding domain bound progesterone with an apparent Kd of 1.0-1.5 nM and was specifically photocross-linked with the synthetic progestin R5020 in crude bacterial lysates. Labelling of intact bacterial cells with [3H]R5020 revealed that the majority, if not all, of the bacterially produced hormone-binding domain was active. No differences in the binding to a synthetic palindromic glucocorticoid/progestin-responsive element (GRE/PRE) were found when the bacterially produced cPR DNA-binding domain was compared in methylation interference assays with the full-length chicken progesterone receptor form A expressed in eukaryotic cells. The study of dissociation kinetics, however, revealed differences in the half-life of the complexes formed between the palindromic GRE/PRE and either the receptor form A or the fusion protein containing the cPR DNA-binding domain. DNase I protection experiments demonstrated that the bacterially produced region C of the cPR generated specific 'footprints' on the mouse mammary tumour virus long terminal repeat (MMTV-LTR) which were nearly identical to those previously reported for the rat glucocorticoid receptor. Images PMID:2540961

  1. Altered circadian blood pressure profile in patients with active acromegaly. Relationship with left ventricular mass and hormonal values.

    PubMed

    Pietrobelli, D J; Akopian, M; Olivieri, A O; Renauld, A; Garrido, D; Artese, R; Feldstein, C A

    2001-09-01

    To determine the relationships between the circadian blood pressure profile and left ventricular mass, hormonal pattern and insulin sensitivity indices in patients with active acromegaly, ambulatory 24-h blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) was recorded in 25 subjects (47.0 +/- 15.1 years, range 23-72). Serum growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1, fasting and mean plasma glucose and insulin during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), insulinogenic index, the sum of the plasma insulin levels and the homeostasis model insulin resistance index (Homa's index) were determined. Left ventricular mass index (LVMI) was calculated from two-dimensional guided M-mode echocardiogram. The prevalence of hypertension was 56% (n = 14) and 40% (n = 10) according to sphygmomanometric measurements and ABPM, respectively. Non-dipping profile was observed in six of 10 hypertensives and in six of 15 normotensives. Serum growth hormone, fasting glucose, the area under the serum insulin curve and LVMI were higher for acromegalics with non-dipping profile than for dippers (all of them, P < 0.05). In non-dippers daytime heart rate was higher than night time (P < 0.001). In conclusion, the main observations in the present study suggested that both normotensive and hypertensive acromegalics had a highly prevalent non-dipping profile with a preserved circadian pattern of heart rate, that was associated with higher levels of serum GH. The disturbance in nocturnal blood fall in normotensives was associated with a decreased insulin sensitivity. The role of GH in blood pressure circadian rhythm regulation in essential hypertension deserves further studies.

  2. [Urinary excretion of steroid hormone and 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in normal young adult women].

    PubMed

    Takeyasu, M; Kato, T

    1999-01-01

    The urinary steroid hormone metabolites and the ratio of pregnenetriol (delta 5P3) to pregnanetriol (P3) as indicators of 3 beta HSD activity in the urine of healthy young female were measured by means of capillary gas chromatography. All of the subjects have finished the normal pubertal development, and their adrenal steroid hormone secretion had reached to the stable state. We analyzed the diurnal variation, fluctuation during menstrual cycle and seasonal variation of delta 5P3/P3. We found that the hormone excretion in the urine of the morning during the follicular phase of menstrual cycle was relatively stable, and that the ratio of delta 5P3/P3 correlated highly with that in the total daily urine. In the seasonal variation, the urinary delta 5P3/P3 ratio in the subjects of high urinary DHEA group was relatively high, and that of the low DHEA group was low. Although the difference of delta 5P3/P3 ratio of the both groups was small, but statistically significant. Individual difference in the delta 5P3/P3 ratio was relatively small in comparison with that of the urinary DHEA excretion. About 5% of the all subjects showed marked high value of delta 5P3/P3 ratio. About 80% of the high urinary excretion group showed higher value than the average delta 5P3/P3 ratio. These findings suggest that the normal young female subjects were divided into several groups with regard to the urinary DHEA excretion pattern and delta 5P3/P3 ratio in the urine. Both of them may be a specific individual marker.

  3. A new mechanism for growth hormone receptor activation of JAK2, and implications for related cytokine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Michael J; Brooks, Andrew J; Chhabra, Yash

    2014-01-01

    The growth hormone receptor was the first cytokine receptor to be cloned and crystallized, and provides a valuable exemplar for activation of its cognate kinase, JAK2. We review progress in understanding its activation mechanism, in particular the molecular movements made by this constitutively dimerized receptor in response to ligand binding, and how these lead to a separation of JAK-binding Box1 motifs. Such a separation leads to removal of the pseudokinase inhibitory domain from the kinase domain of a partner JAK2 bound to the receptor, and vice versa, leading to apposition of the kinase domains and transactivation. This may be a general mechanism for class I cytokine receptor action. PMID:25101218

  4. In vitro antifungal activity of allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) against Aspergillus parasiticus and Penicillium expansum and evaluation of the AITC estimated daily intake.

    PubMed

    Manyes, L; Luciano, F B; Mañes, J; Meca, G

    2015-09-01

    Isothiocyanates (ITCs) are natural compounds derived from cruciferous vegetables produced by enzymatic conversion of metabolites called glucosinolates. They are potentially useful antimicrobial compounds for food applications have been shown to be promising agents against cancer in human cell culture, animal models, and in epidemiological studies. In this study, the antifungal activity of the allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) was evaluated on two mycotoxigenic fungi as Aspergillus parasiticus and Penicillium expnsum, aflatoxins (AFs) and patulin (PAT) producers, employing an assay on solid medium. Also an approximation of the risk evaluation associated to the intake of food treated with the AITC to reduce the risk of fungi spoilage has been evaluated. On solid medium and after 20 days incubation the strain of Penicillium expansum was inhibited with AITC quantities highest than 50 mg, whereas the strain of A. parasiticus was sensible to AITC doses highest than 5 mg. The analysis of the risk assessment associated to the intake of several food classes treated with the bioactive compound AITC to prevent fungi spoilage evidenced that this product can be considered as safe due that the estimated daily intakes (EDIs) are always lower than the AITC Admissible Daily intake (ADI).

  5. Investigating Within-day and Longitudinal Effects of Maternal Stress on Children's Physical Activity, Dietary Intake, and Body Composition: Protocol for the MATCH Study

    PubMed Central

    Dunton, Genevieve F.; Liao, Yue; Dzubur, Eldin; Leventhal, Adam; Huh, Jimi; Gruenewald, Tara; Margolin, Gayla; Koprowski, Carol; Tate, Eleanor; Intille, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Parental stress is an understudied factor that may compromise parenting practices related to children's dietary intake, physical activity, and obesity. However, studies examining these associations have been subject to methodological limitations, including cross-sectional designs, retrospective measures, a lack of stress biomarkers, and the tendency to overlook momentary etiologic processes occurring within each day. This paper describes the recruitment, data collection, and data analytic protocols for the MATCH (Mothers And Their Children's Health) study, a longitudinal investigation using novel real-time data capture strategies to examine within-day associations of maternal stress with children's physical activity and dietary intake, and how these effects contribute to children's obesity risk. In the MATCH study, 200 mothers and their 8 to 12 year-old children are participating in 6 semi-annual assessment waves across 3 years. At each wave, measures for mother-child dyads include: (a) real-time Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) of self-reported daily psychosocial stressors (e.g., work at a job, family demands), feeling stressed, perceived stress, parenting practices, dietary intake, and physical activity with time and location stamps; (b) diurnal salivary cortisol patterns, accelerometer-monitored physical activity, and 24-hour dietary recalls; (c) retrospective questionnaires of sociodemographic, cultural, family, and neighborhood covariates; and (d) height, weight, and waist circumference. Putative within-day and longitudinal effects of maternal stress on children's dietary intake, physical activity, and body composition will be tested through multilevel modeling and latent growth curve models, respectively. The results will inform interventions that help mothers reduce the negative effects of stress on weight-related parenting practices and children's obesity risk. PMID:25987483

  6. Investigating within-day and longitudinal effects of maternal stress on children's physical activity, dietary intake, and body composition: Protocol for the MATCH study.

    PubMed

    Dunton, Genevieve F; Liao, Yue; Dzubur, Eldin; Leventhal, Adam M; Huh, Jimi; Gruenewald, Tara; Margolin, Gayla; Koprowski, Carol; Tate, Eleanor; Intille, Stephen

    2015-07-01

    Parental stress is an understudied factor that may compromise parenting practices related to children's dietary intake, physical activity, and obesity. However, studies examining these associations have been subject to methodological limitations, including cross-sectional designs, retrospective measures, a lack of stress biomarkers, and the tendency to overlook momentary etiologic processes occurring within each day. This paper describes the recruitment, data collection, and data analytic protocols for the MATCH (Mothers And Their Children's Health) study, a longitudinal investigation using novel real-time data capture strategies to examine within-day associations of maternal stress with children's physical activity and dietary intake, and how these effects contribute to children's obesity risk. In the MATCH study, 200 mothers and their 8 to 12 year-old children are participating in 6 semi-annual assessment waves across 3 years. At each wave, measures for mother-child dyads include: (a) real-time Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) of self-reported daily psychosocial stressors (e.g., work at a job, family demands), feeling stressed, perceived stress, parenting practices, dietary intake, and physical activity with time and location stamps; (b) diurnal salivary cortisol patterns, accelerometer-monitored physical activity, and 24-hour dietary recalls; (c) retrospective questionnaires of sociodemographic, cultural, family, and neighborhood covariates; and (d) height, weight, and waist circumference. Putative within-day and longitudinal effects of maternal stress on children's dietary intake, physical activity, and body composition will be tested through multilevel modeling and latent growth curve models, respectively. The results will inform interventions that help mothers reduce the negative effects of stress on weight-related parenting practices and children's obesity risk.

  7. Hydrogen-Rich Water Intake Accelerates Oral Palatal Wound Healing via Activation of the Nrf2/Antioxidant Defense Pathways in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Orihuela-Campos, Rita Cristina; Fukui, Makoto; Ito, Hiro-O

    2016-01-01

    The wound healing process attempts to restore the integrity and function of the injured tissue. Additionally, proinflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and oxidative stress play important roles in wound healing. The aim of this study was to determine whether hydrogen-rich water intake induces the activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway in rat palatal tissue, thereby reducing systemic oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoting healing-associated genes. A circular excisional wound was created in the oral palatal region, and the wound healing process was observed. The rats were divided into two experimental groups in which either hydrogen-rich water or distilled water was consumed. In the drinking hydrogen-rich water, the palatal wound healing process was accelerated compared to that in the control group. As molecular hydrogen upregulated the Nrf2 pathway, systemic oxidative stresses were decreased by the activation of antioxidant activity. Furthermore, hydrogen-rich water intake reduced proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoted the expression of healing-associated factors in rat palatal tissue. In conclusion, hydrogen-rich water intake exhibited multiple beneficial effects through activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway. The results of this study support the hypothesis that oral administration of hydrogen-rich water benefits the wound healing process by decreasing oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. PMID:26798423

  8. Hydrogen-Rich Water Intake Accelerates Oral Palatal Wound Healing via Activation of the Nrf2/Antioxidant Defense Pathways in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Naofumi; Orihuela-Campos, Rita Cristina; Fukui, Makoto; Ito, Hiro-O

    2016-01-01

    The wound healing process attempts to restore the integrity and function of the injured tissue. Additionally, proinflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and oxidative stress play important roles in wound healing. The aim of this study was to determine whether hydrogen-rich water intake induces the activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway in rat palatal tissue, thereby reducing systemic oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoting healing-associated genes. A circular excisional wound was created in the oral palatal region, and the wound healing process was observed. The rats were divided into two experimental groups in which either hydrogen-rich water or distilled water was consumed. In the drinking hydrogen-rich water, the palatal wound healing process was accelerated compared to that in the control group. As molecular hydrogen upregulated the Nrf2 pathway, systemic oxidative stresses were decreased by the activation of antioxidant activity. Furthermore, hydrogen-rich water intake reduced proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoted the expression of healing-associated factors in rat palatal tissue. In conclusion, hydrogen-rich water intake exhibited multiple beneficial effects through activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway. The results of this study support the hypothesis that oral administration of hydrogen-rich water benefits the wound healing process by decreasing oxidative stress and inflammatory responses.

  9. Steroid hormone regulation of the voltage-gated, calcium-activated potassium channel expression in developing muscular and neural systems.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Sheldon L; Witten, Jane L

    2010-11-01

    A precise organization of gene expression is required for developing neural and muscular systems. Steroid hormones can control the expression of genes that are critical for development. In this study we test the hypothesis that the steroid hormone ecdysone regulates gene expression of the voltage-gated calcium-activated potassium ion channel, Slowpoke or KCNMA1. Late in adult development of the tobacco hawkmoth Manduca sexta, slowpoke (msslo) levels increased contributing to the maturation of the dorsal longitudinal flight muscles (DLMs) and CNS. We show that critical components of ecdysteroid gene regulation were present during upreglation of msslo in late adult DLM and CNS development. Ecdysteroid receptor complex heterodimeric partner proteins, the ecdysteroid receptor (EcR) and ultraspiracle (USP), and the ecdysone-induced early gene, msE75B, were expressed at key developmental time points, suggesting that ecdysteroids direct aspects of gene expression in the DLMs during these late developmental stages. We provide evidence that ecdysteroids suppress msslo transcription in the DLMs; when titers decline msslo transcript levels increase. These results are consistent with msslo being a downstream gene in an ecdysteroid-mediated gene cascade during DLM development. We also show that the ecdysteroids regulate msslo transcript levels in the developing CNS. These results will contribute to our understanding of how the spatiotemporal regulation of slowpoke transcription contributes to tailoring cell excitability to the differing physiological and behavioral demands during development.

  10. Ricinus communis L. stem bark extracts regulate ovarian cell functions and secretory activity and their response to Luteinising hormone.

    PubMed

    Nath, S; Kadasi, A; Grossmann, R; Sirotkin, A V; Kolesarova, A; Talukdar, A D; Choudhury, M D

    2015-01-01

    Ricinus communis L. has ethnopharmacological contraceptive reputation but its stem bark has unexplored mechanisms of action in female reproductive system. In the present study, the effect of methanolic and aqueous extracts from the stem bark of the plant was examined on basic porcine ovarian granulosa cell functions and its response to Luteinising hormone (LH)-the upstream hormonal regulator. Systemic treatment of methanolic and aqueous extracts stimulated cell proliferation (proliferating cell nuclear antigen, PCNA) and also promoted cell apoptosis (caspase-3). Aqueous extract has inverted the stimulatory effect of LH on PCNA but not on caspase-3. Methanolic extract stimulated as well as inhibited progesterone release and stimulated testosterone secretion. Whereas aqueous extract inhibited both steroid releases and suppressed the stimulatory effect of LH on progesterone release and promoted the inhibitory effect of LH on testosterone release. In conclusion, the present study unveils the mechanism of action of R. communis stem bark in in vitro condition. These suggest its possible contraceptive efficacy by exerting its regulatory role over LH and on basic ovarian cell functions and secretion activity.

  11. The effects of dietary boron compounds in supplemented diet on hormonal activity and some biochemical parameters in rats.

    PubMed

    Kucukkurt, Ismail; Akbel, Erten; Karabag, Funda; Ince, Sinan

    2015-03-01

    The aims of this study were to clarify the effects of dietary boric acid or borax, as a boron (B) source, on hormonal status (leptin, insulin, triiodothyronine (T3), and thyroxine) and some biochemical parameter levels as glucose, carnitine, nonesterified fatty acids, and betahydroxybutyric acid in rats. A total of 30 Sprague-Dawley male rats were divided into three equal groups: the animals in the first group (control) were fed with a standard rodent diet containing 6.4 mg B/kg, and the animals in the experimental group were fed with a standard rodent diet added with boric acid and borax (100 mg B/kg) throughout the experimental period of 28 days. The B compounds especially borax decreased leptin, insulin, and glucose levels, whereas increased T3 and carnitine levels in plasma. In addition, body weight of rats was found to be low in the boric acid group at the end of 4 weeks. Consequently, our results demonstrate that B supplementation (100 mg/kg) in diet decreases body weight, leptin, and insulin, whereas increases T3 levels in plasma, so enhances the metabolic activity of rats. Between the B compounds used in this study, it was found that borax had a greater effect on hormonal status than boric acid.

  12. The human neuroendocrine thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor promoter is activated by the haematopoietic transcription factor c-Myb.

    PubMed Central

    Matre, Vilborg; Høvring, Per I; Fjeldheim, Ase-Karine; Helgeland, Lars; Orvain, Christophe; Andersson, Kristin B; Gautvik, Kaare M; Gabrielsen, Odd S

    2003-01-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) receptor (TRHR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor playing a crucial role in the anterior pituitary where it controls the synthesis and secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone and prolactin. Its widespread presence not only in the central nervous system, but also in peripheral tissues, including thymus, indicates other important, but unknown, functions. One hypothesis is that the neuropeptide TRH could play a role in the immune system. We report here that the human TRHR promoter contains 11 putative response elements for the haematopoietic transcription factor c-Myb and is highly Myb-responsive in transfection assays. Analysis of Myb binding to putative response elements revealed one preferred binding site in intron 1 of the receptor gene. Transfection studies of promoter deletions confirmed that this high-affinity element is necessary for efficient Myb-dependent transactivation of reporter plasmids in CV-1 cells. The Myb-dependent activation of the TRHR promoter was strongly suppressed by expression of a dominant negative Myb-Engrailed fusion. In line with these observations, reverse transcriptase PCR analysis of rat tissues showed that the TRHR gene is expressed both in thymocytes and bone marrow. Furthermore, specific, high-affinity TRH agonist binding to cell-surface receptors was demonstrated in thymocytes and a haematopoietic cell line. Our findings imply a novel functional link between the neuroendocrine and the immune systems at the level of promoter regulation. PMID:12628004

  13. Influence of season on plasma antidiuretic hormone, angiotensin II, aldosterone and plasma renin activity in young volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kanikowska, Dominika; Sugenoya, Junichi; Sato, Maki; Shimizu, Yuuki; Inukai, Yoko; Nishimura, Naoki; Iwase, Satoshi

    2010-05-01

    We investigated seasonal changes in hormonal and thermoregulatory responses. Eight volunteers were subjected to the experiment at four times of the year: around the vernal and autumnal equinoxes, and at the summer and winter solstices at latitude 35 degrees N. Plasma antidiuretic hormone (ADH), angiotensin II (ANG II), aldosterone (ALD) and plasma renin activity (PRA) were analyzed before and after water immersion. Seasonal changes in thermoregulatory responses were assessed by measuring core temperature and sweat rate during immersion of the leg in hot water (at 42 degrees C) for 30 min in a room maintained at 26 degrees C. The concentration of plasma ADH and ALD before water immersion was significantly higher in summer than in other seasons. The concentrations of ANG II and PRA did not show seasonal variations. Changes in tympanic temperature during water immersion showed significant differences between seasons, and were higher in winter than in other seasons. The sweat rate was significantly higher in summer than in other seasons. In summary, ADH and ALD concentrations displayed a seasonal rhythm with marked elevation in summer; this may be a compensative mechanism to prevent dehydration from increased sweat loss during summer due to heat acclimatization.

  14. Effect of anorexinergic peptides, cholecystokinin (CCK) and cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART) peptide, on the activity of neurons in hypothalamic structures of C57Bl/6 mice involved in the food intake regulation.

    PubMed

    Pirnik, Zdeno; Maixnerová, Jana; Matysková, Resha; Koutová, Darja; Zelezná, Blanka; Maletínská, Lenka; Kiss, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The hypothalamus plays an important role in food consumption, receiving information about energy balance via hormonal, metabolic, and neural inputs. Its neurons produce neuropeptides influencing energy balance. Especially important to regulation of