Science.gov

Sample records for active hurricane season

  1. Hurricane season could be active

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Storm activity during the 2003 Atlantic hurricane season likely will be above average, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration noted on 19 May.The outlook could include 11 to 15 tropical storms, as well as 6 to 9 hurricanes, of which 2 to 4 could be classified as major hurricanes rated as category 3 or higher on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale.

  2. Assessing hurricane season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-12-01

    With the official conclusion of the Atlantic hurricane season on 29 November, Irene was the only hurricane to strike the United States this year and the first one since Hurricane Ike made landfall in Texas in 2008, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Irene “broke the ‘hurricane amnesia’ that can develop when so much time lapses between landfalling storms,” indicated Jack Hayes, director of NOAA's National Weather Service. “This season is a reminder that storms can hit any part of our coast and that all regions need to be prepared each and every season.” During the season, there were 19 tropical storms, including 7 that became hurricanes; 3 of those were major hurricanes, of category 3 or above. The activity level was in line with NOAA predictions. The agency stated that Hurricane Irene was an example of improved accuracy in forecasting storm tracks: NOAA National Hurricane Center had accurately predicted the hurricane's landfall in North Carolina and its path northward more than 4 days in advance.

  3. Weatherwords: The Hurricane Season.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, Jim

    1991-01-01

    Information and anecdotes are provided for the following topics: the typical length of the hurricane season for the North Atlantic, Caribbean, and Gulf of Mexico; specifics related to the practice of naming hurricanes; and categorical details related to the Saffir/Simpson scale for rating hurricane magnitude. (JJK)

  4. An Estimate of the North Atlantic Basin Tropical Cyclone Activity for the 2011 Hurricane Season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Estimates are presented for the expected level of tropical cyclone activity for the 2011 North Atlantic Basin hurricane season. It is anticipated that the frequency of tropical cyclones for the North Atlantic Basin during the 2011 hurricane season will be near to above the post-1995 means. Based on the Poisson distribution of tropical cyclone frequencies for the current more active interval 1995-2010, one computes P(r) = 63.7% for the expected frequency of the number of tropical cyclones during the 2011 hurricane season to be 14 plus or minus 3; P(r) = 62.4% for the expected frequency of the number of hurricanes to be 8 plus or minus 2; P(r) = 79.3% for the expected frequency of the number of major hurricanes to be 3 plus or minus 2; and P(r) = 72.5% for the expected frequency of the number of strikes by a hurricane along the coastline of the United States to be 1 plus or minus 1. Because El Nino is not expected to recur during the 2011 hurricane season, clearly, the possibility exists that these seasonal frequencies could easily be exceeded. Also examined are the effects of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation phase and climatic change (global warming) on tropical cyclone seasonal frequencies, the variation of the seasonal centroid (latitude and longitude) location of tropical cyclone onsets, and the variation of the seasonal peak wind speed and lowest pressure for tropical cyclones.

  5. In Brief: NOAA predicts busy hurricane season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2007-06-01

    Scientists at NOAA's Climate Prediction Center estimate that there is a 75% chance that the 2007 Atlantic hurricane season will be more active than average, with 13-17 named storms, 7-10 hurricanes, and 3-5 hurricanes reaching Category 3 or higher. An average hurricane season has 11 named storms, 6 hurricanes, and 2 major hurricanes. According to Gerry Bell, NOAA's lead seasonal hurricane forecaster, the 2007 season could be in the higher range of predicted activity if a La Niña forms, or even higher if the La Niña is particularly strong. Last year, NOAA also predicted an above-normal Atlantic season; the actual season, however, was quiet, to which NOAA scientists credit an unexpected El Ni~o that developed rapidly and created an environment hostile to storm formation and strengthening.

  6. An Estimate of the North Atlantic Basin Tropical Cyclone Activity for the 2010 Hurricane Season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Estimates are presented for the tropical cyclone activity expected for the 2010 North Atlantic basin hurricane season. It is anticipated that the 2010 season will be more active than the 2009 season, reflecting increased frequencies more akin to that of the current more active phase that has been in vogue since 1995. Averages (+/- 1 sd) during the current more active phase are 14.5+/-4.7, 7.8+/-3.2, 3.7+/-1.8, and 2+/- 2, respectively, for the number of tropical cyclones (NTC), the number of hurricanes (NH), the number of major hurricanes (NMH), and the number of United States (U.S.) land-falling hurricanes (NUSLFH). Based on the "usual" behavior of the 10-yma parametric first differences, one expects NTC = 19+/-2, NH = 14+/-2, NMH = 7+/-2, and NUSLFH = 4+/-2 for the 2010 hurricane season; however, based on the "best guess" 10-yma values of surface-air temperature at the Armagh Observatory (Northern Ireland) and the Oceanic Nino Index, one expects NTC > or equals 16, NH > or equals 14, NMH > or equals 7, and NUSLFH > or equals 6.

  7. Forecast calls for continued period of active hurricane seasons in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    “I have been designated as a representative of Chicken Little to tell you the sky is falling with regard to hurricanes.” So said William Gray professor of atmospheric science at Colorado State University at a July 26 briefing on Capitol Hill. The briefing, sponsored by the Congressional Natural Hazards Caucus, the (U.S.) University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, and the American Meteorological Society highlighted a new report about the current active hurricane period in the North Atlantic, as well as funding needs for hurricane research. “It is amazing the threat we appear to be in for in the next two to three decades, and how little realization of this [there] is with the government and with the general public,” said Gray a long-time forecaster of seasonal hurricane activity and co-author of a July 19 article in Science, “The Recent Increase in Atlantic Hurricane Activity: Causes and Implications.”

  8. Predicting Atlantic seasonal hurricane activity using outgoing longwave radiation over Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnauskas, Kristopher B.; Li, Laifang

    2016-07-01

    Seasonal hurricane activity is a function of the amount of initial disturbances (e.g., easterly waves) and the background environment in which they develop into tropical storms (i.e., the main development region). Focusing on the former, a set of indices based solely upon the meridional structure of satellite-derived outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) over the African continent are shown to be capable of predicting Atlantic seasonal hurricane activity with very high rates of success. Predictions of named storms based on the July OLR field and trained only on the time period prior to the year being predicted yield a success rate of 87%, compared to the success rate of NOAA's August outlooks of 53% over the same period and with the same average uncertainty range (±2). The resulting OLR indices are statistically robust, highly detectable, physically linked to the predictand, and may account for longer-term observed trends.

  9. A predictive relationship between early season North Atlantic hurricane activity and the upcoming winter North Atlantic Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Jessica; Saunders, Mark

    2016-04-01

    The winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is linked strongly to European winter climate including windstorms. Predicting the winter NAO is key to making successful seasonal predictions of European winter climate. We observe that in recent decades there are many instances of an inverse relationship between the strength of the North Atlantic hurricane season and the strength of the subsequent European winter windstorm season. Stormy European winter seasons often follow quiet Atlantic hurricane seasons and calm European winters follow active hurricane seasons. We explore the strength and temporal stability of this inverse relationship, consider a facilitating physical mechanism, and briefly discuss the implications of our findings for end users, in particular global reinsurers. We find there is a statistically significant link between North Atlantic hurricane activity and the upcoming winter NAO. The relationship is established by the midway point of the hurricane season in early September. The link is strongest when hurricane activity is in the upper or lower tercile and when summer ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscillation) is neutral. The relationship works well going back 40 years to the mid 1970s. The early winter (October-November-December) NAO is predicted best but since the early 1980s the predictive link extends to the main winter (December-January-February) NAO. The inverse link can be facilitated by a persistence and slow evolution of atmospheric circulation patterns and sea surface temperature anomalies over the North Atlantic between the summer and the winter. This persistence is best when hurricane seasons are more extreme and when summer ENSO is neutral. Our findings offer the potential for predicting the early winter and winter NAO from early September. The implied inverse relationship between US hurricane activity and European windstorm activity may enable more effective offsetting of risks between territories.

  10. Seasonal prediction of hurricane activity reaching the coast of the United States.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Mark A; Lea, Adam S

    2005-04-21

    Much of the property damage from natural hazards in the United States is caused by landfalling hurricanes--strong tropical cyclones that reach the coast. For the southeastern Atlantic coast of the US, a statistical method for forecasting the occurrence of landfalling hurricanes for the season ahead has been reported, but the physical mechanisms linking the predictor variables to the frequency of hurricanes remain unclear. Here we present a statistical model that uses July wind anomalies between 1950 and 2003 to predict with significant and useful skill the wind energy of US landfalling hurricanes for the following main hurricane season (August to October). We have identified six regions over North America and over the east Pacific and North Atlantic oceans where July wind anomalies, averaged between heights of 925 and 400 mbar, exhibit a stationary and significant link to the energy of landfalling hurricanes during the subsequent hurricane season. The wind anomalies in these regions are indicative of atmospheric circulation patterns that either favour or hinder evolving hurricanes from reaching US shores.

  11. Increased Accuracy in Statistical Seasonal Hurricane Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nateghi, R.; Quiring, S. M.; Guikema, S. D.

    2012-12-01

    Hurricanes are among the costliest and most destructive natural hazards in the U.S. Accurate hurricane forecasts are crucial to optimal preparedness and mitigation decisions in the U.S. where 50 percent of the population lives within 50 miles of the coast. We developed a flexible statistical approach to forecast annual number of hurricanes in the Atlantic region during the hurricane season. Our model is based on the method of Random Forest and captures the complex relationship between hurricane activity and climatic conditions through careful variable selection, model testing and validation. We used the National Hurricane Center's Best Track hurricane data from 1949-2011 and sixty-one candidate climate descriptors to develop our model. The model includes information prior to the hurricane season, i.e., from the last three months of the previous year (Oct. through Dec.) and the first five months of the current year (January through May). Our forecast errors are substantially lower than other leading forecasts such as that of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  12. Danger and dementia: caregiver experiences and shifting social roles during a highly active hurricane season.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Janelle J; Castañeda, Heide

    2014-01-01

    This study examined disaster preparedness and decision-making by caregivers of community-dwelling persons diagnosed with Alzheimer's or a related dementia (ADRD). Interviews were conducted with 20 caregivers in South Florida. Twelve of these interviews include caregiving experiences during the highly active 2004-2005 hurricane seasons. Results indicate that persons in earlier stages of ADRD can, and often do, remain engaged in the disaster preparation and planning process. However, during the early stages, persons may also resist evacuation, even if the caregiver felt it was necessary. During later stages of the disease, caregivers reported less resistance to disaster-related decisions, however, with the tradeoff of less ability to assist with preparation.

  13. Hurricane Season 2005: Katrina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Seventeen days after Hurricane Katrina flooded New Orleans, much of the city is still under water. In this pair of images from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer on NASA's Terra satellite, the affected areas can clearly be seen. The top image mosaic was acquired in April and September 2000, and the bottom image was acquired September 13, 2005. The flooded parts of the city appear dark blue, such as the golf course in the northeast corner, where there is standing water. Areas that have dried out appear light blue gray, such as the city park in the left middle. On the left side of the image, the failed 17th street canal marks a sharp boundary between flooded city to the east, and dry land to the west.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 10.4 by 7.1 kilometers Location: 30 degrees North latitude, 90.1 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 1, 2, and 3 Original Data Resolution: 15 meters (49.2 feet) Dates Acquired: September 13, 2005

  14. In Brief: Atlantic seasonal hurricane forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2007-12-01

    Two hurricane forecasters are predicting that 2008 will be an above-average Atlantic basin tropical cyclone season with an above-average probability of a major hurricane making landfall in the United States. During 2008, there could be about seven hurricanes (the annual average is 5.9) and 13 named storms (the average is 9.6), according to a 7 December report by Philip Klotzbach, research scientist at Colorado State University in Fort Collins, and William Gray, university professor emeritus of atmospheric sciences. The forecasters indicate that they believe the Atlantic basin is in an active hurricane cycle that is associated with a strong thermohaline circulation and an active phase of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. The report notes that, ``real-time operational early December forecasts have not shown forecast skill over climatology during this 16-year period [1992-2007]. This has occurred despite the fact that the skill over the hindcast period...showed appreciable skill.'' For more information, visit the Web site: http://hurricane.atmos.colostate.edu/Forecasts/2007/dec2007/dec2007.pdf.

  15. Highlights of the 2009 Hurricane Season

    NASA Video Gallery

    Picture yourself sitting in space watching the highlights of the 2009's Atlantic Ocean hurricane season in fast-forward. This latest animation from NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adm...

  16. Statistical Aspects of Intense Hurricanes in the Atlantic Basin during the Past 49 Hurricane Seasons (1950-1998): Implications for the Current Season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1999-01-01

    Statistical aspects of intense hurricanes (those of category 3 or higher) in the Atlantic basin during the interval of 1950-1998 are investigated in relation to the ENSO cycle and to the postulated 'more versus less' activity modes for intense hurricane activity. Because the 1999 hurricane season likely will be classified as a 'non-El Nino-related' (NENR) season and that the more active mode appears to be in vogue, an above average seasonal rate of greater than or equal to 2 intense hurricanes is to be expected (probably, about 4 +/- 1, or higher). Based on Poisson statistics, when the hurricane season is classified as NENR the probability of greater than or equal to 2 events is about 77%, whereas when the season is classified as NENR and the more active mode is operative it is about 87%. The probability of greater than or equal to 4 events is about 31 % and 48 %, respectively, for these two activity classes.

  17. Statistical aspects of major (Intense) Hurricanes in the Atlantic Basin during the past 49 hurricane seasons (1950-1998): Implications for the current season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    Statistical aspects of major (intense) hurricanes, those of category 3 or higher on the Saffir-Simpson scale (e.g., having a maximum sustained wind speed of ≥50 m s-1), in the Atlantic basin during the interval of 1950-1998 are investigated in relation to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation cycle and to the postulated “more” versus “less” activity modes for intense hurricane activity. Based on Poisson statistics, when the hurricane season is simply classified as “non-El Niño-related” (NENR), the probability of having three or more intense hurricanes is ≈ 53%, while it is only ≈ 14% when it is classified as “El Niño-related” (ENR). Including the activity levels (“more” versus “less”), the probability of having three or more intense hurricanes is computed to be ≈ 71% for the “more-NENR” season, 30% for the “less-NENR” season, 17% for the “more-ENR” season, and 12% for the “less-ENR” season. Because the 1999 hurricane season is believed to be a “more-NENR” season, the number of intense hurricanes forming in the Atlantic basin should be above average in number, probably about 4±1 or higher.

  18. Statistical Aspects of Major (Intense) Hurricanes in the Atlantic Basin During the Past 49 Hurricane Seasons (1950-1998): Implications for the Current Season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1999-01-01

    Statistical aspects of major (intense) hurricanes, those of category 3 or higher on the Saffir-Simpson scale (e.g., having a maximum sustained wind speed of greater than or equal to 50 M s (exp -1)), in the Atlantic basin during the interval of 1950-1998 are investigated in relation to the El Nino-Southern Oscillation cycle and to the postulated "more" versus "less" activity modes for intense hurricane activity. Based on Poisson statistics, when the hurricane season is simply classified as "non-El Nino-related" (NENR), the probability of having three or more intense hurricanes is approx. 53%, while it is only approx. 14% when it is classified as "El Nino-related" (ENR). Including the activity levels ("more" versus "less"), the probability of having three or more intense hurricanes is computed to be approx. 71% for the "more-NENR" season, 30% for the "less-NENR" season, 17% for the "more-ENR" season, and 12% for the "less-ENR" season. Because the 1999 hurricane season is believed to be a "more-NENR" season, the number of intense hurricanes forming in the Atlantic basin should be above average in number, probably about 4 plus or minus 1 or higher.

  19. Statistical Aspects of Intense Hurricanes in the Atlantic Basin during the Past 49 Hurricane Seasons (1950-1998)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1998-01-01

    Statistical aspects of intense hurricanes (those of category 3 or higher) in the Atlantic basin for the interval of 1950-1998 are investigated with respect to the ENSC, cycle and the postulated 'more versus less' activity modes for intense hurricane activity. This is accomplished in order to evaluate the statistical basis for these specific groupings and to presage a forecast for the number of expected intense hurricanes during the forthcoming 1999 hurricane season. Statistically speaking, because the 1998-1999 La Nina (onset presumed to be September 1998) should persist longer than about a year - the average duration for La Nina events based on the 10 previously occurring La Nina, each having a duration in the range of 7-22 months - it seems likely that the 1999 season will be classified as a 'non-El Nino-related' (NENR) season. If true, then, greater than or equal to 2 intense hurricanes are to be expected. Based on Poisson statistics, the probability of greater than or equal to 2 events is about 77% when the season is classified as NENR, and it is about 87% when the season is classified as NENR and the 'more active' phase is in fashion; likewise, the probability of greater than or equal to 4 events is about 31% and 48%, respectively, for the two cases. Therefore, an above average rate (possibly, as many as 4 +/- 1, or higher) of intense hurricanes forming in the Atlantic basin seems a very distinct possibility during the 1999 season.

  20. Above-normal Atlantic basin hurricane season forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-05-01

    Between three and six major hurricanes with winds of 111 miles per hour and greater could whip across the Atlantic basin during what is forecast to be an above-normal 2011 hurricane season, according to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Climate Prediction Center (NOAA CPC). Including those, there could be a total of 6-10 hurricanes with winds of 74 miles per hour or greater and 12-18 named storms with winds of 39 miles per hour or greater during the hurricane season, which officially begins on 1 June and lasts for 6 months, NOAA administrator Jane Lubchenco said at a 19 May briefing. There is a 70% likelihood for these ranges occurring, according to NOAA.

  1. Evaluation of Real-time Hurricane Forecasts Using the Advanced Hurricane WRF Model for the 2007 Atlantic Hurricane Season.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Done, J. M.

    2007-12-01

    Real-time forecasts have been conducted with the Advanced Hurricane WRF Model (AHW) for named storms of the 2007 Atlantic hurricane season. Taking advantage of increased computational power over previous years, 5- day forecasts are conducted daily using three domains; two nests of 4km and 1.3km grid-spacing track the vortex within a fixed parent domain of 12km grid-spacing. In this presentation, forecast accuracy in terms of track and intensity will be presented. The quality of the forecast storm intensity can vary dramatically between storms, and sometimes between successive forecasts of a given storm. This variability in model performance is explored by analyzing the statistics of the observed and model storm intensities for the 2007 hurricane season. Conditions under which the model performs poorly are identified and a series of sensitivity simulations highlight aspects of the modeling system to which the forecast intensity is most sensitive.

  2. Comparative impacts of two major hurricane seasons on the Neuse River and western Pamlico Sound ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Burkholder, JoAnn; Eggleston, David; Glasgow, Howard; Brownie, Cavell; Reed, Robert; Janowitz, Gerald; Posey, Martin; Melia, Greg; Kinder, Carol; Corbett, Reide; Toms, David; Alphin, Troy; Deamer, Nora; Springer, Jeffrey

    2004-06-22

    Ecosystem-level impacts of two hurricane seasons were compared several years after the storms in the largest lagoonal estuary in the U.S., the Albemarle-Pamlico Estuarine System. A segmented linear regression flow model was developed to compare mass-water transport and nutrient loadings to a major artery, the Neuse River Estuary (NRE), and to estimate mean annual versus storm-related volume delivery to the NRE and Pamlico Sound. Significantly less water volume was delivered by Hurricane Fran (1996), but massive fish kills occurred in association with severe dissolved oxygen deficits and high contaminant loadings (total nitrogen, total phosphorus, suspended solids, and fecal bacteria). The high water volume of the second hurricane season (Hurricanes Dennis, Floyd, and Irene in 1999) delivered generally comparable but more dilute contaminant loads, and no major fish kills were reported. There were no discernable long-term adverse impacts on water quality. Populations of undesirable organisms, such as toxic dinoflagellates, were displaced down-estuary to habitats less conducive for growth. The response of fisheries was species-dependent: there was no apparent impact of the hurricanes on commercial landings of bivalve molluscs or shrimp. In contrast, interacting effects of hurricane floodwaters in 1999 and intensive fishing pressure led to striking reductions in blue crabs. Overall, the data support the premise that, in shallow estuaries frequently disturbed by hurricanes, there can be relatively rapid recovery in water quality and biota, and benefit from the scouring activity of these storms.

  3. Fleeing the storm(s): an examination of evacuation behavior during Florida's 2004 hurricane season.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stanley K; McCarty, Chris

    2009-02-01

    The 2004 hurricane season was the worst in Florida's history, with four hurricanes causing at least 47 deaths and some $45 billion in damages. To collect information on the demographic impact of those hurricanes, we surveyed households throughout the state and in the local areas that sustained the greatest damage. We estimate that one-quarter of Florida's population evacuated prior to at least one hurricane; in some areas, well over one-half of the residents evacuated at least once, and many evacuated several times. Most evacuees stayed with family or friends and were away from home for only a few days. Using logistic regression analysis, we found that the strength of the hurricane and the vulnerability of the housing unit had the greatest impact on evacuation behavior; additionally, several demographic variables had significant effects on the probability of evacuating and the choice of evacuation lodging (family/friends, public shelters, or hotels/motels). With continued population growth in coastal areas and the apparent increase in hurricane activity caused by global warming, threats posed by hurricanes are rising in the United States and throughout the world. We believe the present study will help government officials plan more effectively for future hurricane evacuations.

  4. Development of a Statistical Model for Seasonal Prediction of North Atlantic Hurricane Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, K.; Zeng, X.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical cyclones cause more financial distress to insurance companies than any other natural disaster. From 1970-2002, it is estimated that hurricanes caused 44 billion dollars in damage, greater than 2.5 times the the next costliest catastrophe. Theses damages do not go without effect. A string of major catastrophes from 1991-1994 caused nine property firms to bankrupt and caused serious financial strain on others. The public was not only affected by the loss of life and property, but the increase in tax dollars for disaster relief. Providing better seasonal predictions of North Atlantic hurricane activity farther in advance will help alleviate some of the financial strains these major catastrophes put on the nation. A statistical model was first developed by Bill Gray's team to predict the total number of hurricanes over the North Atlantic in 1984, followed by other statistical methods, dynamic modeling, and hybrid methods in recent years. However, all these methods showed little to no skill with forecasts made by June 1 in recent years. In contrast to the relatively small year-to-year change in seasonal hurricane numbers pre-1980, there has been much greater interannual changes since, especially since the year 2000. For instance, while there were very high hurricane numbers in 2005 and 2010, 2013 was one of the lowest in history. Recognizing these interdecadal changes in the dispersion of hurricane numbers, we have developed a new statistical model to more realistically predict (by June 1 each year) the seasonal hurricane number over the North Atlantic. It is based on the Multivariate ENSO Index (MEI) conditioned by the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) index, the zonal wind stress and sea surface temperature over the Atlantic. It provides both the deterministic number and the range of hurricane numbers. The details of the model and its performance from 1950-2014 in comparison with other methods will be presented in our presentation.

  5. In Brief: U.K. Met Office forecast for Atlantic hurricane season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-07-01

    GloSea, the U.K. Meteorological Office's computer model of the global atmosphere-ocean system, has predicted a cooling trend in sea surface temperatures in the tropical North Atlantic that will result in a less active hurricane season. The Met Office has predicted that there is a 70% chance of a less active hurricane season in the North Atlantic this year, with only 7-13 named storms occurring within the remaining five months of the season (July through November). There have already been two named storms this year-Andrea and Barry. From 1990-2005, there were an average of 12.4 storms during July-November. The U.K. Met Office forecast contrasts with NOAA's, which was released in May and predicted a busier season than average, with 13-17 named storms.

  6. Saharan Dust, Transport Processes, and Possible Impacts on Hurricane Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, K. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present observational evidence of significant relationships between Saharan dust outbreak, and African Easterly wave activities and hurricane activities. We found two dominant paths of transport of Saharan dust: a northern path, centered at 25degN associated with eastward propagating 6-19 days waves over northern Africa, and a southern path centered at 15degN, associated with the AEW, and the Atlantic ITCZ. Seasons with stronger dust outbreak from the southern path are associated with a drier atmosphere over the Maximum Development Region (MDR) and reduction in tropical cyclone and hurricane activities in the MDR. Seasons with stronger outbreak from the northern path are associated with a cooler N. Atlantic, and suppressed hurricane in the western Atlantic basin.

  7. Estimating the Length of the North Atlantic Basin Hurricane Season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    For the interval 1945-2011, the length of the hurricane season in the North Atlantic basin averages about 130 +/- 42 days (the +/-1 standard deviation interval), having a range of 47 to 235 days. Runs-testing reveals that the annual length of season varies nonrandomly at the 5% level of significance. In particular, its trend, as described using 10-yr moving averages, generally has been upward since about 1979, increasing from about 113 to 157 days (in 2003). Based on annual values, one finds a highly statistically important inverse correlation at the 0.1% level of significance between the length of season and the occurrence of the first storm day of the season. For the 2012 hurricane season, based on the reported first storm day of May 19, 2012 (i.e., DOY = 140), the inferred preferential regression predicts that the length of the current season likely will be about 173 +/- 23 days, suggesting that it will end about November 8 +/- 23 days, with only about a 5% chance that it will end either before about September 23, 2012 or after about December 24, 2012.

  8. Fleeing The Storm(s): An Examination of Evacuation Behavior During Florida’s 2004 Hurricane Season

    PubMed Central

    SMITH, STANLEY K.; MCCARTY, CHRIS

    2009-01-01

    The 2004 hurricane season was the worst in Florida’s history, with four hurricanes causing at least 47 deaths and some $45 billion in damages. To collect information on the demographic impact of those hurricanes, we surveyed households throughout the state and in the local areas that sustained the greatest damage. We estimate that one-quarter of Florida’s population evacuated prior to at least one hurricane; in some areas, well over one-half of the residents evacuated at least once, and many evacuated several times. Most evacuees stayed with family or friends and were away from home for only a few days. Using logistic regression analysis, we found that the strength of the hurricane and the vulnerability of the housing unit had the greatest impact on evacuation behavior; additionally, several demographic variables had significant effects on the probability of evacuating and the choice of evacuation lodging (family/friends, public shelters, or hotels/motels). With continued population growth in coastal areas and the apparent increase in hurricane activity caused by global warming, threats posed by hurricanes are rising in the United States and throughout the world. We believe the present study will help government officials plan more effectively for future hurricane evacuations. PMID:19348112

  9. Atlantic hurricane activity during the last millennium

    PubMed Central

    Burn, Michael J.; Palmer, Suzanne E.

    2015-01-01

    Hurricanes are a persistent socio-economic hazard for countries situated in and around the Main Development Region (MDR) of Atlantic tropical cyclones. Climate-model simulations have attributed their interdecadal variability to changes in solar and volcanic activity, Saharan dust flux, anthropogenic greenhouse gas and aerosol emissions and heat transport within the global ocean conveyor belt. However, the attribution of hurricane activity to specific forcing factors is hampered by the short observational record of Atlantic storms. Here, we present the Extended Hurricane Activity (EHA) index, the first empirical reconstruction of Atlantic tropical cyclone activity for the last millennium, derived from a high-resolution lake sediment geochemical record from Jamaica. The EHA correlates significantly with decadal changes in tropical Atlantic sea surface temperatures (SSTs; r = 0.68; 1854–2008), the Accumulated Cyclone Energy index (ACE; r = 0.90; 1851–2010), and two annually-resolved coral-based SST reconstructions (1773–2008) from within the MDR. Our results corroborate evidence for the increasing trend of hurricane activity during the Industrial Era; however, we show that contemporary activity has not exceeded the range of natural climate variability exhibited during the last millennium. PMID:26243340

  10. Atlantic hurricane activity during the last millennium.

    PubMed

    Burn, Michael J; Palmer, Suzanne E

    2015-01-01

    Hurricanes are a persistent socio-economic hazard for countries situated in and around the Main Development Region (MDR) of Atlantic tropical cyclones. Climate-model simulations have attributed their interdecadal variability to changes in solar and volcanic activity, Saharan dust flux, anthropogenic greenhouse gas and aerosol emissions and heat transport within the global ocean conveyor belt. However, the attribution of hurricane activity to specific forcing factors is hampered by the short observational record of Atlantic storms. Here, we present the Extended Hurricane Activity (EHA) index, the first empirical reconstruction of Atlantic tropical cyclone activity for the last millennium, derived from a high-resolution lake sediment geochemical record from Jamaica. The EHA correlates significantly with decadal changes in tropical Atlantic sea surface temperatures (SSTs; r = 0.68; 1854-2008), the Accumulated Cyclone Energy index (ACE; r = 0.90; 1851-2010), and two annually-resolved coral-based SST reconstructions (1773-2008) from within the MDR. Our results corroborate evidence for the increasing trend of hurricane activity during the Industrial Era; however, we show that contemporary activity has not exceeded the range of natural climate variability exhibited during the last millennium. PMID:26243340

  11. Atlantic hurricane activity during the last millennium.

    PubMed

    Burn, Michael J; Palmer, Suzanne E

    2015-08-05

    Hurricanes are a persistent socio-economic hazard for countries situated in and around the Main Development Region (MDR) of Atlantic tropical cyclones. Climate-model simulations have attributed their interdecadal variability to changes in solar and volcanic activity, Saharan dust flux, anthropogenic greenhouse gas and aerosol emissions and heat transport within the global ocean conveyor belt. However, the attribution of hurricane activity to specific forcing factors is hampered by the short observational record of Atlantic storms. Here, we present the Extended Hurricane Activity (EHA) index, the first empirical reconstruction of Atlantic tropical cyclone activity for the last millennium, derived from a high-resolution lake sediment geochemical record from Jamaica. The EHA correlates significantly with decadal changes in tropical Atlantic sea surface temperatures (SSTs; r = 0.68; 1854-2008), the Accumulated Cyclone Energy index (ACE; r = 0.90; 1851-2010), and two annually-resolved coral-based SST reconstructions (1773-2008) from within the MDR. Our results corroborate evidence for the increasing trend of hurricane activity during the Industrial Era; however, we show that contemporary activity has not exceeded the range of natural climate variability exhibited during the last millennium.

  12. Atlantic hurricane activity during the last millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burn, Michael J.; Palmer, Suzanne E.

    2015-08-01

    Hurricanes are a persistent socio-economic hazard for countries situated in and around the Main Development Region (MDR) of Atlantic tropical cyclones. Climate-model simulations have attributed their interdecadal variability to changes in solar and volcanic activity, Saharan dust flux, anthropogenic greenhouse gas and aerosol emissions and heat transport within the global ocean conveyor belt. However, the attribution of hurricane activity to specific forcing factors is hampered by the short observational record of Atlantic storms. Here, we present the Extended Hurricane Activity (EHA) index, the first empirical reconstruction of Atlantic tropical cyclone activity for the last millennium, derived from a high-resolution lake sediment geochemical record from Jamaica. The EHA correlates significantly with decadal changes in tropical Atlantic sea surface temperatures (SSTs; r = 0.68 1854-2008), the Accumulated Cyclone Energy index (ACE; r = 0.90 1851-2010), and two annually-resolved coral-based SST reconstructions (1773-2008) from within the MDR. Our results corroborate evidence for the increasing trend of hurricane activity during the Industrial Era; however, we show that contemporary activity has not exceeded the range of natural climate variability exhibited during the last millennium.

  13. Hurricane shuts down gulf activity

    SciTech Connect

    Koen, A.D.

    1992-08-31

    This paper reports that producers in the Gulf of Mexico and plant operators in South Louisiana last week were checking for damage wrought by Hurricane Andrew. In its wake Andrew left evacuated rigs and platforms in the gulf and shuttered plants across a wide swath of the Gulf Coast. Operations were beginning to return to normal late last week. Not all gulf operators, especially in the central gulf, expected to return to offshore facilities. And even producers able to book helicopters did not expect to be able to fully assess damage to all offshore installations before the weekend. MMS officials in Washington estimated that 37,500 offshore workers were evacuated from 700 oil and gas installations on the gulf's Outer Continental Shelf. Gulf oil and gas wells account for about 800,000 b/d of oil and one fourth of total U.S. gas production. MMS was awaiting an assessment of hurricane damage before estimating how soon and how much gulf oil and gas production would be restored.

  14. Hurricanes

    MedlinePlus

    ... suddenly reexperience all the emotions, fears, thoughts, and perceptions they experienced at the time of the hurricane. ... have about the hurricane, as you may share perceptions, feelings, and memories in ways that make children ...

  15. Using Three Global Climate Indices to Forecast Hurricane Activity in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannettone, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    one variable that provides a rough estimate of hurricane activity for the upcoming hurricane season.

  16. Statistical Aspects of ENSO Events (1950-1997) and the El Nino-Atlantic Intense Hurricane Activity Relationship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1998-01-01

    On the basis of Trenberth's quantitative definition for marking the occurrence of an El Nino (or La Nina), one can precisely identify by month and year the starts and ends of some 15 El Nino and 10 La Nina events during the interval of 1950-1997, an interval corresponding to the most reliable for cataloging intense hurricane activity in the Atlantic basin (i.e., those of category 3-5 on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane scale). The main purpose of this investigation is primarily two-fold: First, the statistical aspects of these identified extremes and the intervening periods between them (called "interludes") are examined and, second, the statistics of the seasonal frequency of intense hurricanes in comparison to the extremes and interludes are determined. This study clearly demonstrates that of the last 48 hurricane seasons, 20 (42 percent) can be described as being "El Nino-related" (i.e., an El Nino was in progress during all, or part, of the yearly hurricane season--June-November), 13 (27 percent) as "La Nina-related" (i.e., a La Nina was in progress during all, or part, of the yearly hurricane season), and 15 (31 percent) as "interlude-related" (i.e., neither an El Nino nor a La Nina was in progress during any portion of the yearly hurricane season). Combining the latter two subgroups into a single grouping called "non-El Nino-related" seasons, one finds that they have had a mean frequency of intense hurricanes measuring 2.8 events per season, while the El Nino-related seasons have had a mean frequency of intense hurricanes measuring 1.3 events per season, where the observed difference in the means is inferred to be statistically important at the 99.8-percent level of confidence. Therefore, as previously shown more than a decade ago using a different data set, there undeniably exists an El Nino-Atlantic hurricane activity relationship, one which also extends to the class of intense hurricanes. During the interval of 1950-1997, fewer intense hurricanes occurred

  17. What controls early or late onset of tropical North Atlantic hurricane season?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Heng; Li, Tim; Liu, Jia; Peng, Melinda

    2016-06-01

    The occurrence of first hurricane in early summer signifies the onset of an active Atlantic hurricane season. The interannual variation of this hurricane onset date is examined for the period 1979-2013. It is found that the onset date has a marked interannual variation. The standard deviation of the interannual variation of the onset day is 17.5 days, with the climatological mean onset happening on July 23. A diagnosis of tropical cyclone (TC) genesis potential index (GPI) indicates that the major difference between an early and a late onset group lies in the maximum potential intensity (MPI). A further diagnosis of the MPI shows that it is primarily controlled by the local SST anomaly (SSTA). Besides the SSTA, vertical shear and mid-tropospheric relative humidity anomalies also contribute significantly to the GPI difference between the early and late onset groups. It is found that the anomalous warm (cold) SST over the tropical Atlantic, while uncorrelated with the Niño3 index, persists from the preceding winter to concurrent summer in the early (late) onset group. The net surface heat flux anomaly always tends to damp the SSTA, which suggests that ocean dynamics may play a role in maintaining the SSTA in the tropical Atlantic. The SSTA pattern with a maximum center in northeastern tropical Atlantic appears responsible for generating the observed wind and moisture anomalies over the main TC development region. A further study is needed to understand the initiation mechanism of the SSTA in the Atlantic.

  18. The record-breaking 2015 hurricane season in the eastern North Pacific: An analysis of environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Jennifer M.; Klotzbach, Philip J.; Maue, Ryan N.; Roache, David R.; Blake, Eric S.; Paxton, Charles H.; Mehta, Christopher A.

    2016-09-01

    The presence of a near-record El Niño and a positive Pacific Meridional Mode provided an extraordinarily warm background state that fueled the 2015 eastern North Pacific hurricane season to near-record levels. We find that the western portion of the eastern North Pacific, referred to as the Western Development Region (WDR; 10°-20°N, 116°W-180°), set records for named storms, hurricane days, and Accumulated Cyclone Energy in 2015. When analyzing large-scale environmental conditions, we show that record warm sea surface temperatures, high midlevel relative humidity, high low-level relative vorticity, and record low vertical wind shear were among the environmental forcing factors contributing to the observed tropical cyclone activity. We assess how intraseasonal atmospheric variability may have contributed to active and inactive periods observed during the 2015 hurricane season. We document that, historically, active seasons are associated with May-June El Niño conditions, potentially allowing for predictability of future active WDR seasons.

  19. Variable ecological effects of hurricanes: the importance of seasonal timing for survival of lizards on Bahamian islands.

    PubMed

    Schoener, Thomas W; Spiller, David A; Losos, Jonathan B

    2004-01-01

    Two recent hurricanes passed directly over the northern Bahamas 2 years apart, allowing a comparison of their effects on lizard populations inhabiting exactly the same islands. The hurricanes differed in two ways: one struck during the reproductive season and was relatively severe; the other struck after most reproduction had taken place and was milder. The late-season hurricane produced a significant relation between population reduction and lowness of the island that lasted at least through two seasons; the earlier hurricane produced no such relationship. The late-season hurricane wiped out populations of lizards on two islands (two of the three lowest) that the earlier hurricane failed to exterminate even though it was stronger. We relate these effects to the fact that the study lizards regenerated from the earlier hurricane only via the egg stage, whereas eggs were unavailable when the later storm struck and regeneration was via hatched lizards. We discriminate and illustrate four kinds of hurricanes, cross-classified by two contrasts: earlier vs. later and stronger vs. weaker. A later, stronger hurricane completely exterminated lizard populations at a second Bahamian site, whereas an earlier, weaker hurricane had no detectable effect at a third Bahamian site. We suggest that, in addition to severity, the timing of a hurricane as it coincides with reproductive scheduling or other phenological aspects may determine the magnitude of its effect on a variety of organisms.

  20. Seasonal Simulation of Atlantic Hurricanes using the FSU/COAPS Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocke, S.; Shin, D.; Lim, Y.; Larow, T.

    2009-05-01

    We use the FSU/COAPS climate model to study cyclogenesis, evolution, intra- to interannual variability of tropical cyclone activity in the Atlantic Basin and possible changes in activity due to climate change. The first phase of this project involves the simulation of recent year climatic conditions using observed SSTs. The second phase, currently underway, will simulate future climate scenarios using SSTs from IPCC climate model projections. The climate model is run at moderately high resolution (T126 or approximately 1 degree) and with 27 vertical levels. The model generates hurricane-like vortices that bear remarkable resemblance to their real-world counterparts: a warm core with cyclonic inflow at lower levels, anticyclonic outflow aloft, deep central pressures and intense precipitation. The genesis location and tracks are consistent with climatological observations. While the model produces fewer very intense storms (Category 4-5 on the Saffir-Simpson scale) than observed, the total number of storms and interannual variability is very reasonable when compared to the historical record. In order assess the ability to simulate tropical cyclone activity on seasonal timescales, we run an ensemble of 4 6-month simulations for 20 years (1986-2005) using prescribed weekly sea surface temperatures. The simulation time period covers the North Atlantic hurricane season from June 1 to November 30. Each ensemble member was initialized with a different atmospheric initial condition (near June 1 of the respective year) from ECMWF analyses. We find that for the Atlantic Basin, the correlation between the simulated and observed number of storms was approximately 0.78. The seasonality of the storms was similar to the observed, with most storms occurring in August and September, though not as sharply peaked. We further found that there can be large sensitivity to cyclogenesis using different model parameterizations. Pending completion of the second phase of the project, and

  1. The Recent Increase in North Atlantic Hurricane Activity: Is it a Cycle or is it due to Global Warming?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelliah, M.; Bell, G.

    2006-12-01

    There has been a noticeable increase in North Atlantic hurricane activity since 1995. The devastating 2005 hurricane season broke many records with 27 tropical storms (TS), 15 hurricanes (H) and four category-5 major hurricanes (MH). This season also featured a record 15 landfalling storms in the Atlantic basin and four landfalling US major hurricanes (MH, defined as categories 3-5 on the Saffir-Simpson scale). Since 1995, North Atlantic hurricane seasons have averaged 13.1 TS, 7.4 H and 3.7 MH and according to NOAA, 9 of the 11 seasons have been termed above normal (active) seasons except for the two El Nino years 1997 and 2002. Prior to 1995, the North Atlantic basin experienced an overall inactive hurricane era from about 1971 to 1994 with an average 7.8 TS, 4.5H and 1.5 MH. But, prior to this inactive era (1971-1994) during the decades of the 1950's and 1960's (and in fact back to 1930's but with less reliable data) a typical season averaged about 8.0 TS, 5.4 H and 2.8 MH. As can be seen from these numbers, the seasonal averages for the number of TS, H, and MH during the recent active period since 1995 are overall higher than those during the earlier active decades of the 1950's and 1960's. These are no major disputes in these numbers. But there are differing views in the scientific community on the causal mechanisms (attribution) behind the recent increase in the North Atlantic hurricane activity. One view suggests that the recent increase is a return of the active hurricane cycle experienced in the past (such as the 1950's and 60's) and the other view suggesting that the increase could be due to global warming. This talk will focus on explaining, at least an attempt to explain, why there has been an increase in the overall hurricane activity since 1995. Based on recent published studies conducted at the Climate Prediction Center and elsewhere, it will be demonstrated that the answers to the ongoing debate, at least in the North Atlantic basin, is not as

  2. NOAA HRD's HEDAS Data Assimilation System's performance for the 2010 Atlantic Hurricane Season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellwood, K.; Aksoy, A.; Vukicevic, T.; Lorsolo, S.

    2010-12-01

    The Hurricane Ensemble Data Assimilation System (HEDAS) was developed at the Hurricane Research Division (HRD) of NOAA, in conjunction with an experimental version of the Hurricane Weather and Research Forecast model (HWRFx), in an effort to improve the initial representation of the hurricane vortex by utilizing high resolution in-situ data collected during NOAA’s Hurricane Field Program. HEDAS implements the “ensemble square root “ filter of Whitaker and Hamill (2002) using a 30 member ensemble obtained from NOAA/ESRL’s ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) system and the assimilation is performed on a 3-km nest centered on the hurricane vortex. As part of NOAA’s Hurricane Forecast Improvement Program (HFIP), HEDAS will be run in a semi-operational mode for the first time during the 2010 Atlantic hurricane season and will assimilate airborne Doppler radar winds, dropwindsonde and flight level wind, temperature, pressure and relative humidity, and Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer surface wind observations as they become available. HEDAS has been implemented in an experimental mode for the cases of Hurricane Bill, 2009 and Paloma, 2008 to confirm functionality and determine the optimal configuration of the system. This test case demonstrates the importance of assimilating thermodynamic data in addition to wind observations and the benefit of increasing the quantity and distribution of observations. Applying HEDAS to a larger sample of storm forecasts would provide further insight into the behavior of the model when inner core aircraft observations are assimilated. The main focus of this talk will be to present a summary of HEDAS performance in the HWRFx model for the inaugural season. The HEDAS analyses and the resulting HWRFx forecasts will be compared with HWRFx analyses and forecasts produced concurrently using the HRD modeling group’s vortex initialization which does not employ data assimilation. The initial vortex and subsequent forecasts will be

  3. Monitoring poison control center data to detect health hazards during hurricane season--Florida, 2003-2005.

    PubMed

    2006-04-21

    Eight hurricanes made landfall in Florida from August 13, 2004, through October 24, 2005. Each hurricane caused flooding and widespread power outages. In the fall of 2004, the Florida Department of Health (FDOH) began retrospectively reviewing data collected by the Florida Poison Information Center Network (FPICN) during the 2004 hurricane season. During the 2005 hurricane season, FDOH, in consultation with FPICN, initiated daily monitoring of FPICN records of exposures that might reflect storm-related health hazards. Analysis of these data determined that 28 carbon monoxide (CO) exposures were reported to FPICN in the 2 days after Hurricane Katrina made its August 25, 2005, landfall in Florida, en route to a second landfall on the Gulf Coast. Data on CO and other exposures were used to develop and distribute public health prevention messages to Florida communities affected by hurricanes.

  4. The recent increase in Atlantic hurricane activity: causes and implications.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, S B; Landsea, C W; Mestas-Nunez, A M; Gray, W M

    2001-07-20

    The years 1995 to 2000 experienced the highest level of North Atlantic hurricane activity in the reliable record. Compared with the generally low activity of the previous 24 years (1971 to 1994), the past 6 years have seen a doubling of overall activity for the whole basin, a 2.5-fold increase in major hurricanes (>/=50 meters per second), and a fivefold increase in hurricanes affecting the Caribbean. The greater activity results from simultaneous increases in North Atlantic sea-surface temperatures and decreases in vertical wind shear. Because these changes exhibit a multidecadal time scale, the present high level of hurricane activity is likely to persist for an additional approximately 10 to 40 years. The shift in climate calls for a reevaluation of preparedness and mitigation strategies.

  5. Reconstruction of Major Atlantic Hurricane Activity Back To 1750

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyberg, J.; Malmgren, B. A.

    A reconstruction is presented of major hurricane activity in the Atlantic region back to 1750. Almost all Atlantic major hurricanes (> 50 m/s; categories 3, 4, or 5 on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane scale) are developed in the area westward of Africa across the tropical Atlantic and Caribbean Sea at latitudes between 10N and 20N; an area termed the Main Development Region (MDR). They are developed through atmo- spheric easterly waves that propagate westward from Africa across the tropical North Atlantic. The magnitude of the vertical shear of the horizontal winds between the lower and upper troposphere |Vz| during August to October together with sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) in the MDR are the dominant factors controlling major hurricane activity. Local vertical wind shear |Vz| of > 8 m/s is unfavourable for development of major hurricanes due to prevention of the axisymmetric organisation of deep convec- tion. Local SSTs play a direct role in providing moist enthalpy to incipient hurricanes. Two proxies of tradewind variability from the Caribbean Sea derived from lumines- cence intensity in a coral core and abundance of the planktonic foraminifer Globige- rina bulloides in a sediment core, which are strongly correlated with |Vz| in MDR and major hurricane activity back to 1949 and 1944, respectively, are together with records of SSTs used to reconstruct major hurricane activity. The reconstruction indicates that the time interval from the late 1960s to early 1990s may have experienced strong |Vz| and few major hurricanes compared to other periods since 1750.

  6. Deciphering the Long-Term Trend of Atlantic Basin Intense Hurricanes: More Active Versus Less Active During the Present Epoch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1998-01-01

    During the interval of 1944-1997, 120 intense hurricanes (i.e., those of category 3 or higher on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane damage potential scale) were observed in the Atlantic basin, having an annual frequency of 0-7 events per year, being more active prior to the mid 1960's than thereafter (hence a possible two-state division: more active versus less active), and being preferentially lower during El Nino years as compared to non-El Nino years. Because decadal averages of the frequency of intense hurricanes closely resemble those of average temperature anomalies for northern hemispheric and global standards and of the average temperature at the Armagh Observatory (Northern Ireland), a proxy for climatic change, it is inferred that the long-term trends of the annual frequency of intense hurricanes and temperature may be statistically related. Indeed, on the basis of 4- and 10-yr moving averages, one finds that there exists strong linear associations between the annual frequency of intense hurricanes in the Atlantic basin and temperature (specially, when temperature slightly leads). Because the long-term leading trends of temperature are now decidedly upward, beginning about the mid 1980's, it is inferred that the long-term consequential trends of the annual frequency of intense hurricanes should now also be upward, having begun near 1990, suggesting that a return to the more active state probably has already occurred. However, because of the anomalous El Nino activity of the early to mid 1990's, the switch from the less active to the more active state essentially went unnoticed (a marked increase in the number of intense hurricanes was not observed until the 1995 and 1996 hurricane seasons, following the end of the anomalous El Nino activity). Presuming that a return to the more active state has, indeed, occurred, one expects the number of seasonal intense hurricanes during the present epoch (continuing through about 2012) to usually be higher than average (i

  7. Oceanic control of Northeast Pacific hurricane activity at interannual timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguru, Karthik; Leung, L. Ruby; Yoon, Jin-ho

    2013-12-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) is not the only oceanic parameter that can play a key role in the interannual variability of Northeast Pacific hurricane activity. Using several observational data sets and the statistical technique of multiple linear regression analysis, we show that, along with SST, the thermocline depth (TD) plays an important role in hurricane activity at interannual timescales in this basin. Based on the parameter that dominates, the ocean basin can be divided into two sub-regions. In the Southern sub-region, which includes the hurricane main development area, interannual variability of the upper-ocean heat content (OHC) is primarily controlled by TD variations. Consequently, the interannual variability in the hurricane power dissipation index (PDI), which is a measure of the intensity of hurricane activity, is driven by that of the TD. On the other hand, in the Northern sub-region, SST exerts the major control over the OHC variability and, in turn, the PDI. Our study suggests that both SST and TD have a significant influence on the Northeast Pacific hurricane activity at interannual timescales and that their respective roles are more clearly delineated when sub-regions along an approximate north-south demarcation are considered rather than the basin as a whole.

  8. Active Atlantic Basin Hurricane Forecast Adds to Concerns About Gulf Oil Spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2010-06-01

    During the 6-month Atlantic Basin hurricane season that began on 1 June, there could be between 14 and 23 named storms with top winds of at least 39 miles per hour (mph) in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea, according to a forecast issued in late May by the Climate Prediction Center of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Weather Service. The forecast indicates that the named storms could include eight to 14 hurricanes with top winds of at least 74 mph and three to seven major hurricanes with top winds of at least 111 mph. In comparison, the seasonal average is 11 named storms, six hurricanes, and two major hurricanes. The busiest hurricane season on record was 2005, with 28 named storms, including hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

  9. Continuous Estimates of Precipitable Water Vapor from Caribbean GPS Stations During the 2007 Atlantic Hurricane Season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, J. J.; Iwabuchi, T.; van Hove, T.

    2007-12-01

    Hurricanes derive their strength through water vapor that is both evaporated from warm ocean surfaces and the existing moisture in the surrounding atmospheric environment. Observationally, there are relatively few instruments that can accurately measure water vapor in the presence of clouds and rain. Retrievals of precipitable water vapor (PW) using Global Positioning System (GPS) stations may be the most reliable way to continuously monitor column integrated water vapor. We present PW estimates collected during the 2007 Atlantic hurricane season derived from a network of GPS stations recently installed in the Caribbean. This network produced 30-minute estimates of PW from more than 20 stations in the region. Preliminary results indicate a wet bias in the Global Forecast System (GFS) analysis fields of approximately 1 mm in PW, with root mean square differences greater than 3 mm. Both of these statistical comparisons are significantly larger than those derived from analysis fields over the continental United States, which suggests that there is significant room for improvement in the initial conditions used for numerical weather prediction forecasts. We present results in the temporal and spatial changes in PW as hurricanes Dean and Felix moved through the Caribbean. We also will show what impact these observations have on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model forecasts using various data assimilation strategies and methods.

  10. 'Hurricane Season' in the Inner Heliosphere: Observations of Coronal Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vourlidas, A.

    2013-09-01

    The current solar cycle, albeit low in sunspot numbers, is not lacking in coronal explosive activity. The solar corona has produced several spectacular Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) directed at Earth and other planets. In addition, this is the first time in human history that we are able to image continuously the full 360 degree corona and the full inner heliosphere from the Sun to Earth, and beyond. In addition, a host of inner heliospheric spacecraft can directly probe the quiescent and transient solar wind at several locations around Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars. These unprecedented observational capabilities offer us a unique opportunity to study the solar maximum activity and in particular CMEs and their impact on Earth and the other planets. The new field of Interplanetary Space Weather is being born. In this talk, I review our progress (sometimes) and befuddlement (more often) towards understanding the evolution of CMEs in the inner heliosphere. I discuss how this knowledge is shaping Space Weather efforts around the world, including a comprehensive approach from a large group of Greek solar and space physicists under the THALIS aegis. I will also present ideas for future missions and instrumentation to improve our Space Weather predictive capabilities.

  11. Water-level measurements in Dauphin Island, Alabama, from the 2013 Hurricane Season

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dickhudt, Patrick J.; Sherwood, Christopher R.; DeWitt, Nancy T.

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the instrumentation, field measurements, and processing methods used by the U.S. Geological Survey to measure atmospheric pressure, water levels, and waves on Dauphin Island, Alabama, in 2013 at part of the Barrier Island Evolution Research project. Simple, inexpensive pressure sensors mounted in shallow wells were buried in the beach and left throughout the hurricane season. Additionally, an atmospheric pressure sensor was mounted on the porch of a private residence to provide a local atmospheric pressure measurement for correcting the submerged pressure records.

  12. Assessing sedimentary records of paleohurricane activity using modeled hurricane climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, Jonathan D.; Donnelly, Jeffrey P.; Emanuel, Kerry; Lane, Philip

    2008-09-01

    Patterns of overwash deposition observed within back-barrier sediment archives can indicate past changes in tropical cyclone activity; however, it is necessary to evaluate the significance of observed trends in the context of the full range of variability under modern climate conditions. Here we present a method for assessing the statistical significance of patterns observed within a sedimentary hurricane-overwash reconstruction. To alleviate restrictions associated with the limited number of historical hurricanes affecting a specific site, we apply a recently published technique for generating a large number of synthetic storms using a coupled ocean-atmosphere hurricane model set to simulate modern climatology. Thousands of overwash records are generated for a site using a random draw of these synthetic hurricanes, a prescribed threshold for overwash, and a specified temporal resolution based on sedimentation rates observed at a particular site. As a test case we apply this Monte Carlo technique to a hurricane-induced overwash reconstruction developed from Laguna Playa Grande (LPG), a coastal lagoon located on the island of Vieques, Puerto Rico in the northeastern Caribbean. Apparent overwash rates in the LPG overwash record are observed to be four times lower between 2500 and 1000 years B.P. when compared to apparent overwash rates during the last 300 years. However, probability distributions based on Monte Carlo simulations indicate that as much as 65% of this drop can be explained by a reduction in the temporal resolution for older sediments due to a decrease in sedimentation rates. Periods of no apparent overwash activity at LPG between 2500 and 3600 years B.P. and 500-1000 years B.P. are exceptionally long and are unlikely to occur (above 99% confidence) under the current climate conditions. In addition, breaks in activity are difficult to produce even when the hurricane model is forced to a constant El Niño state. Results from this study continue to support

  13. A spatial correlation of the flow distribution on the outer continental shelf of Louisiana during the major hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico during the 2005 season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coor, J. L.; Li, C. Y.; Rouse, L. J.

    2007-12-01

    The 2005 hurricane season was unusually active, producing 31 named storms in the Atlantic, Caribbean, and Gulf of Mexico. Of these 31 storms, 11 entered the Gulf of Mexico, the most notable of which were Hurricanes Cindy, Dennis, Katrina, and Rita. Data were collected during these storms by acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) based on 58 oil and gas platforms scattered across the outer continental shelf (OCS) region of the northern Gulf of Mexico. Nine to 31 ADCPs were active and recording data during each major storm passage through the Gulf of Mexico. Data were recorded from depths of 60 to 70m down to 1100 to 1200m, with a few extending to depths around 2000m. From these data, the flow distribution of the OCS region was studied with the use of time series and spectrum analysis. Preliminary analysis has shown temporal variations in the vertical structure, increased diurnal oscillation current velocities (by a factor of approximately two), near-inertial oscillations, and variations in the overall direction of the flow before, during, and after the passage of the hurricanes. Methods of harmonic analysis and rotary spectra were implemented in this study. These data and results provide an estimate of the spatial extent to which a hurricane influences subsurface currents.

  14. Hurricane Recovery Report 2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Joseph P.

    2005-01-01

    During August and September 2004, four hurricanes tested the mettle of Space Coast residents and the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) leadership and workforce. These threats underscored two important points: the very real vulnerability of KSC and its valuable space program assets to the devastating power of a hurricane, and the planning required to effectively deal with such threats. The damage was significant even though KSC did not experience sustained hurricane-force winds. To better understand and appreciate these points, this report provides an overview of the meteorological history of the Space Coast and what is involved in the planning, preparation, and recovery activities, as well as addressing the impacts of the 2004 hurricane season.

  15. A review of multimodel superensemble forecasting for weather, seasonal climate, and hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurti, T. N.; Kumar, V.; Simon, A.; Bhardwaj, A.; Ghosh, T.; Ross, R.

    2016-06-01

    This review provides a summary of work in the area of ensemble forecasts for weather, climate, oceans, and hurricanes. This includes a combination of multiple forecast model results that does not dwell on the ensemble mean but uses a unique collective bias reduction procedure. A theoretical framework for this procedure is provided, utilizing a suite of models that is constructed from the well-known Lorenz low-order nonlinear system. A tutorial that includes a walk-through table and illustrates the inner workings of the multimodel superensemble's principle is provided. Systematic errors in a single deterministic model arise from a host of features that range from the model's initial state (data assimilation), resolution, representation of physics, dynamics, and ocean processes, local aspects of orography, water bodies, and details of the land surface. Models, in their diversity of representation of such features, end up leaving unique signatures of systematic errors. The multimodel superensemble utilizes as many as 10 million weights to take into account the bias errors arising from these diverse features of multimodels. The design of a single deterministic forecast models that utilizes multiple features from the use of the large volume of weights is provided here. This has led to a better understanding of the error growths and the collective bias reductions for several of the physical parameterizations within diverse models, such as cumulus convection, planetary boundary layer physics, and radiative transfer. A number of examples for weather, seasonal climate, hurricanes and sub surface oceanic forecast skills of member models, the ensemble mean, and the superensemble are provided.

  16. A 22-yrs Hurricane Cycle and its Relation to Geomagnetic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Blanca; Pazos, Marni

    Applying spectral analysis to the Atlantic and Pacific hurricane time series, we found period-icities that coincide with the main sunspot and magnetic solar cycles. To assess the possibility that these periodicities could be associated to solar activity, we obtain correlations between hurricane occurrence and several solar activity-related phenomena, such as the total solar irra-diance, the cosmic ray flux and the Dst index of geomagnetic activity. Our results indicate that the highest significant correlations are found between the Atlantic and Pacific hurricanes and the Dst index. Most importantly, both oceans present the highest hurricane-Dst correlations during the ascending part of odd solar cycles and the descending phase of even solar cycles. This shows not only the existence of a 22yrs cycle but also the nature of such periodicity. Fur-thermore, we found that the Atlantic hurricanes behave differently from the Pacific hurricanes in relation to the solar activity-related disturbances considered.

  17. Increased hurricane activity during the Early Toarcian extreme warmth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodin, Stephane; Krencker, Francois-Nicolas; Suan, Guillaume; Heimhofer, Ulrich; Immenhauser, Adrian

    2014-05-01

    Theoretical considerations led to the postulation that hurricane activity should increase on a warming planet. Finding physical proof for this relationship remains, however, a difficult task since no clear trend is yet emerging from records of present-day anthropogenic warming. The geological past offers the opportunity to test this hypothesis by assessing episodes of extreme warming events, such as the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE, Early Jurassic, ca. 180 Ma). The T-OAE is characterized by a rapid 4-5°C global warming likely induced by the massive release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere as a consequence of the activity of the Karoo-Ferrar large igneous province. Within the western Tethyan realm (Morocco, Portugal, France, England, etc.), a systematic increase in the occurrence of storm-related deposits is observed within the shallow-water sediments deposited during the T-OAE, notably at its onset. Increased tempestite occurrences can be observed in both siliciclastic- and carbonate-dominated environments. In the Moroccan High Atlas, hummocky cross-stratification (HCS) occurs ubiquitous within the T-OAE, but is otherwise rare in this tide-dominated basin. Interestingly, the palaeolatitude of the High Atlas Basin (10°N during the Early Jurassic) rules out winter storms as the driving mechanism behind the formation of the HCS, and suggests therefore a significant increase of tropical hurricane activity associated with the Early Toarcian global warming.

  18. NASA's Hurricane Hunters

    NASA Video Gallery

    During the 2010 hurricane season, NASA deployed its piloted DC-8 and WB-57, and unmanned Global Hawk aircraft in a massive effort to collect as much data as possible, arming hurricane researchers w...

  19. Heightened hurricane activity on the Little Bahama Bank from 1350 to 1650 AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hengstum, Peter J.; Donnelly, Jeffrey P.; Toomey, Michael R.; Albury, Nancy A.; Lane, Philip; Kakuk, Brian

    2014-09-01

    Deciphering how the climate system has controlled North Atlantic tropical cyclone activity through the Holocene will require a larger observational network of prehistoric hurricane activity. Problematically, the tropical North Atlantic is dominated by carbonate landscapes that typically preserve poorer quality coastal sediment records in comparison to their temperate-region counterparts (e.g., sedimentation continuity and rate). Coastal karst basins (CKBs), such as sinkholes, blueholes, and underwater caves, are widely distributed on carbonate platforms and contain overlooked sedimentary records. Here we present a millennium of hurricane deposits on the Little Bahama Bank archived in a 165 cm core that was extracted from 69 m below sea level in a bluehole on Great Abaco Island, The Bahamas. The coarse-grained overwash deposits associated with both hurricanes Jeanne (2004) and Floyd (1999) were identified using radioisotopes (137Cs, 14C, 210Pb), and indicate that the bluehole is sensitive to hurricane-induced sedimentation. Over the last millennium, the Little Bahama Bank experienced heightened hurricane activity from 1350 to 1650 AD. The simplest explanation for this active interval is that favorable climate conditions (El Niño, West African Monsoon, and sea surface temperatures) encouraged North Atlantic hurricane activity at that time. However, asynchronous hurricane activity at similar latitudes in the North Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico suggest that regional oceanography has modulated or amplified regional hurricane activity over the last millennium.

  20. Toward a unified system for understanding, predicting and projecting regional hurricane activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchi, G. A.; Delworth, T. L.; Yang, X.; Murakami, H.; Zhang, W.; Underwood, S.; Zeng, F. J.; Jia, L.; Kapnick, S. B.; Paffendorf, K.; Krishnamurthy, L.; Wittenberg, A. T.; Msadek, R.; Villarini, G.; Chen, J. H.; Lin, S. J.; Harris, L.; Gudgel, R.; Stern, B.; Zhang, S.

    2015-12-01

    A family of high-resolution (50km and 25km atmospheric/land resolution) global coupled climate models provide a unified framework towards the understanding, intraseasonal-to-decadal prediction and decadal to multi-decadal projection of regional and extreme climate, including tropical cyclones. Initialized predictions of global hurricane activity show skill on regional scales, comparable to the skill on basin-wide scales, suggesting that regional seasonal TC predictions may be a feasible forecast target. The 25km version of the model shows skill at seasonal predictions of the frequency of the most intense hurricanes (Cat. 3-4-5 and Cat. 4-5). It is shown that large-scale systematic errors in the mean-state are a key constraint on the simulation and prediction of variations of regional climate and extremes, and methodologies for overcoming model biases are explored. Improvements in predictions of regional climate are due both to improved representation of local processes, and to improvements in the large-scale climate and variability from improved process representation. These models are used to explore the the response of tropical cyclones, both globally and regionally, to increasing greenhouse gases and to internal climate variations. The 25km model in generally shows a more faithful representation of the impact of climate variability on hurricane activity than the 50km model. The response of the total number and the total power dissipation index of tropical cyclones to increasing greenhouse gases can differ substantially between models of two atmospheric resolutions, 50km and 25km - with the 25km version of the model showing a larger increase in power dissipation from increasing greenhouse gases, principally because - in contrast to that of the 50km model - its global hurricane frequency does not decrease with increasing CO2. Some thoughts on the reasons behind those differences will be offered. The 25km model shows an increase in the frequency of intense tropical

  1. Hurricane Erin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The first Atlantic hurricane of the 2001 season narrowly missed Bermuda yesterday (September 9) as it churned north-northwestward at a rate of 19 km per hour (12 miles per hour). Packing sustained winds of 195 km per hour (120 miles per hour), Hurricane Erin was located just east of Bermuda at the time NASA's Terra satellite acquired this image. The true-color image was produced using data from the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The U.S. National Hurricane Center predicts that tonight the storm will shift to a more northerly path. The Center says there is still the possibility that Hurricane Erin could impact Canada, somewhere along the coast of Newfoundland, within three to four days. Hurricane Erin was upgraded from a tropical storm to hurricane status on September 8, and was listed as a Category 3 hurricane on September 10 on the Saffir-Simpson scale. The storm's hurricane-force winds extend outward in a 75-km (45-mile) radius from its center, with tropical storm force winds extending to 280 km (175 miles) from center. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  2. Low Atlantic hurricane activity in the 1970s and 1980s compared to the past 270 years.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Johan; Malmgren, Björn A; Winter, Amos; Jury, Mark R; Kilbourne, K Halimeda; Quinn, Terrence M

    2007-06-01

    Hurricane activity in the North Atlantic Ocean has increased significantly since 1995 (refs 1, 2). This trend has been attributed to both anthropogenically induced climate change and natural variability, but the primary cause remains uncertain. Changes in the frequency and intensity of hurricanes in the past can provide insights into the factors that influence hurricane activity, but reliable observations of hurricane activity in the North Atlantic only cover the past few decades. Here we construct a record of the frequency of major Atlantic hurricanes over the past 270 years using proxy records of vertical wind shear and sea surface temperature (the main controls on the formation of major hurricanes in this region) from corals and a marine sediment core. The record indicates that the average frequency of major hurricanes decreased gradually from the 1760s until the early 1990s, reaching anomalously low values during the 1970s and 1980s. Furthermore, the phase of enhanced hurricane activity since 1995 is not unusual compared to other periods of high hurricane activity in the record and thus appears to represent a recovery to normal hurricane activity, rather than a direct response to increasing sea surface temperature. Comparison of the record with a reconstruction of vertical wind shear indicates that variability in this parameter primarily controlled the frequency of major hurricanes in the Atlantic over the past 270 years, suggesting that changes in the magnitude of vertical wind shear will have a significant influence on future hurricane activity.

  3. Posttraumatic stress disorder and use of psychiatric and alcohol related services: the effect of the 2004-2005 Florida hurricane seasons on veterans.

    PubMed

    Frahm, Kathryn A; Barnett, Scott D; Brown, Lisa M; Hickling, Edward J; Olney, Ron; Campbell, Robert R; Lapcevic, William A

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to document preliminary findings of the association between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), mental health service use, and alcohol related health visits among veterans following 2004-2005 Florida hurricane seasons. A retrospective review of the Veterans Health Administration Medical SAS Outpatient Dataset was conducted to identify veterans residing in Florida during the 2004-2005 hurricane seasons with a history of PTSD and/or PTSD and a substance use disorder. It was found that veterans with PTSD residing in counties affected by hurricanes demonstrated an immediate 28 % increase in use of mental health services following hurricane landfall versus veterans residing in non-hurricane affected counties (+28.0 vs. -6.5 %, p = 0.001). Additionally, veterans residing in affected counties were found to use more group psychotherapy treatment sessions overall (30.3 vs. 27.2 %, p = 0.001). Of note, veterans with PTSD experienced a -0.16 per month (p = 0.114) decrease in alcohol related visits following the 2004 hurricane season. These findings provide insight into the mental health needs of veterans with PTSD following a disaster and can inform delivery of services to veterans with PTSD and alcohol related issues in disaster prone areas.

  4. Large contribution of sea surface warming to recent increase in Atlantic hurricane activity.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Mark A; Lea, Adam S

    2008-01-31

    Atlantic hurricane activity has increased significantly since 1995 (refs 1-4), but the underlying causes of this increase remain uncertain. It is widely thought that rising Atlantic sea surface temperatures have had a role in this, but the magnitude of this contribution is not known. Here we quantify this contribution for storms that formed in the tropical North Atlantic, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico; these regions together account for most of the hurricanes that make landfall in the United States. We show that a statistical model based on two environmental variables--local sea surface temperature and an atmospheric wind field--can replicate a large proportion of the variance in tropical Atlantic hurricane frequency and activity between 1965 and 2005. We then remove the influence of the atmospheric wind field to assess the contribution of sea surface temperature. Our results indicate that the sensitivity of tropical Atlantic hurricane activity to August-September sea surface temperature over the period we consider is such that a 0.5 degrees C increase in sea surface temperature is associated with a approximately 40% increase in hurricane frequency and activity. The results also indicate that local sea surface warming was responsible for approximately 40% of the increase in hurricane activity relative to the 1950-2000 average between 1996 and 2005. Our analysis does not identify whether warming induced by greenhouse gases contributed to the increase in hurricane activity, but the ability of climate models to reproduce the observed relationship between hurricanes and sea surface temperature will serve as a useful means of assessing whether they are likely to provide reliable projections of future changes in Atlantic hurricane activity.

  5. Understanding and predicting the regional sun-hurricane count relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, Robert Edward

    North Atlantic hurricanes constitute a threat to both life and property. The warm seas found in tropical low-latitudes provide a breeding ground for hurricanes, with nearly continuous heat and moisture fluxes into near-surface air. Traditionally, the sun's role in hurricane climate studies is acknowledged as a time-marker for ocean heat content, with calendar date predicting hurricane frequency and intensity. However, a series of investigations into a different type of sun-hurricane relationship has uncovered a link between solar activity and hurricane intensity and frequency. High solar activity at a daily timescale is understood to weaken hurricanes in the southwest Atlantic yet correspond to increased hurricane intensity in the southeast Atlantic. At a seasonal timescale, high solar activity is shown to correspond with fewer U.S.-landfalling hurricanes. A gap in the knowledge exists on how and where solar activity influences seasonal hurricane frequency over and within the North Atlantic basin. This study is quantitative featuring exploratory analysis and inferential modeling, with diagnosis and prediction of the sun-hurricane count relationship over space being the primary contribution to science and society. It is carried out via exploratory data analysis and statistical modeling. Hurricane and climate data are binned in equal-area hexagon regions. Count differences for periods of high solar activity (i.e, high sunspot number) feature fewer hurricanes across the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and along the eastern seaboard of the United States when sunspots are numerous. In contrast, fewer hurricanes are observed in the central North Atlantic when sunspots are few. The sun-hurricane connection is as important as the El Nino Southern Oscillation toward statistically explaining regional hurricane occurrences. Regression results indicate a 30% reduction in probability of annual hurricane occurrence for southeastern Cuba, the southern Bahama islands, Haiti, and

  6. Hypersaline cyanobacterial mats as indicators of elevated tropical hurricane activity and associated climate change.

    PubMed

    Paerl, Hans W; Steppe, Timothy F; Buchan, Kenneth C; Potts, Malcolm

    2003-03-01

    The Atlantic hurricanes of 1999 caused widespread environmental damage throughout the Caribbean and US mid-Atlantic coastal regions. However, these storms also proved beneficial to certain microbial habitats; specifically, cyanobacteria-dominated mats. Modern mats represent the oldest known biological communities on earth, stromatolites. Contemporary mats are dominant biological communities in the hypersaline Bahamian lakes along the Atlantic hurricane track. We examined the impacts of varying levels of hypersalinity on 2 processes controlling mat growth, photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation, in Salt Pond, San Salvador Island, Bahamas. Hypersalinity (> 5 times seawater salinity) proved highly inhibitory to these processes. Freshwater input from Hurricane Floyd and other large storms alleviated this salt-inhibition. A predicted 10 to 40 year increase in Atlantic hurricane activity accompanied by more frequent "freshening" events will enhance mat productivity, CO2 sequestration and nutrient cycling. Cyanobacterial mats are sensitive short- and long-term indicators of climatic and ecological changes impacting these and other waterstressed environments.

  7. Direct and indirect mortality in Florida during the 2004 hurricane season.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Nathan; Houser, Chris; Meyer-Arendt, Klaus

    2011-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that natural disasters, and hurricanes in particular, have led to more deaths than those usually documented in short post-storm surveys. Such indirect deaths, thought to be related to dietary, stress or pre-existing medical conditions, can exceed the number of direct deaths and may persist for weeks or even months beyond the event itself. In the present study, cumulative sum of deviations plots are used to quantify the number of direct and indirect deaths resulting from Hurricanes Charley, Frances, Ivan and Jeanne that made landfall in Florida in 2004. Results suggest that there was an elevated mortality for up to 2 months following each storm, resulting in a total of 624 direct and indirect deaths attributable to the storm. Trauma-related deaths that can be associated directly with the storm account for only ∼4% of the total storm-related mortality, while indirect mortality accounts for most storm-related deaths. Specifically, a large percentage of the elevated mortality was associated with heart (34%) and cancer-related deaths (19%), while diabetes (5%) and accident-related deaths (9%) account for a smaller but still significant percentage of the elevated mortality. The results further suggest that the elevated mortality was the result of additional deaths that would not have otherwise occurred within that 5 month period, and not simply a clustering of deaths that were inevitable between 1 August and 31 December 2004. The elevated mortality identified in this study is significantly greater than the official count of 31 direct and 113 indirect deaths resulting from the four hurricanes combined. This suggests a need for improved mortality counts and surveillance in order to better evaluate and identify effective prevention policies, and to identify preventable deaths.

  8. Direct and indirect mortality in Florida during the 2004 hurricane season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, Nathan; Houser, Chris; Meyer-Arendt, Klaus

    2011-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that natural disasters, and hurricanes in particular, have led to more deaths than those usually documented in short post-storm surveys. Such indirect deaths, thought to be related to dietary, stress or pre-existing medical conditions, can exceed the number of direct deaths and may persist for weeks or even months beyond the event itself. In the present study, cumulative sum of deviations plots are used to quantify the number of direct and indirect deaths resulting from Hurricanes Charley, Frances, Ivan and Jeanne that made landfall in Florida in 2004. Results suggest that there was an elevated mortality for up to 2 months following each storm, resulting in a total of 624 direct and indirect deaths attributable to the storm. Trauma-related deaths that can be associated directly with the storm account for only ˜4% of the total storm-related mortality, while indirect mortality accounts for most storm-related deaths. Specifically, a large percentage of the elevated mortality was associated with heart (34%) and cancer-related deaths (19%), while diabetes (5%) and accident-related deaths (9%) account for a smaller but still significant percentage of the elevated mortality. The results further suggest that the elevated mortality was the result of additional deaths that would not have otherwise occurred within that 5 month period, and not simply a clustering of deaths that were inevitable between 1 August and 31 December 2004. The elevated mortality identified in this study is significantly greater than the official count of 31 direct and 113 indirect deaths resulting from the four hurricanes combined. This suggests a need for improved mortality counts and surveillance in order to better evaluate and identify effective prevention policies, and to identify preventable deaths.

  9. Remaining Uncertainties in the Causes of Past and Future Atlantic Hurricane Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossin, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    There is no debate that hurricane activity in the North Atlantic has increased substantially since the relatively quiescent period of the 1970s and 1980s, but there is still uncertainty in the dominant cause of the increase. Increases in anthropogenic greenhouse gases (aGHG) have contributed to the observed increase in tropical sea surface temperatures (SST) over the past century, while shorter-term decadal variability in regions where hurricanes form and track is generally dominated by 1) internal variability, 2) natural factors such as volcanic eruptions and mineral aerosol variability, and 3) changes in anthropogenic aerosols. Direct SST warming from globally well-mixed aGHG is understood to have a much smaller effect on hurricane formation and intensification compared to the effect of regional warming due to changes in the three factors noted above. While most recent papers implicate both internal and external anthropogenic causes for the presently heightened Atlantic hurricane activity, some show that internal variability dominates and others show that anthropogenic factors dominate. In the Atlantic, model projection-based consensus indicates no change in storm frequency over the next century but the uncertainty is large and spans -50% to +50%. Mean storm intensity and rainfall rates are projected to increase with continued warming, and the models tend to agree better when projecting these measures of activity. Models that are capable of producing very strong hurricanes usually project increases in the frequency of the most intense hurricanes. This measure is highly relevant to physical and societal impacts. In the Atlantic, model-based consensus indicates substantial increases in the strongest hurricanes, but the uncertainty is large and spans -100% to +200% change over the next century.

  10. Gulf Coast hurricane activity and climate variability during the last half of the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, P.; Donnelly, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    The dominant timescales of variability in a 4500-year sediment-based storm chronology from the northeastern Gulf of Mexico are identified, and relationships between storm frequency and climate are explored. Changes in the frequency of large storm surge deposits in the record likely represent variability in the intensity distribution of hurricanes impacting the site during the late Holocene. Significant variability at approximately 200 and 1000-year timescales that was detected in the storm record is shared by numerous Holocene climate records including reconstructions of Loop Current penetration into the Gulf of Mexico. Intense storm landfalls were most frequent around 3.7 ka, between 2.7 and 2.4 ka, and around 0.7 ka when foraminiferal proxies of mixed layer depth indicate a more permanent residence of the Loop Current within the northeastern Gulf. Migrations of the Loop Current would exercise control over regional hurricane activity by changing the thermal structure of the upper ocean and influencing the role of storm-induced upwelling on hurricane intensification. Other factors that influenced regional and Atlantic basin-wide hurricane activity include the El Niño/Southern Oscillation and the position of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone. Many authors have suggested that bicentennial and millennial-scale climate variability may have been driven ultimately by changes in solar irradiance. Thus, low-frequency variability in Atlantic hurricane activity may be an expression of the climate system's response to exogenous forcing.

  11. Climate forcing of unprecedented intense-hurricane activity in the last 2000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Jeffrey P.; Hawkes, Andrea D.; Lane, Philip; MacDonald, Dana; Shuman, Bryan N.; Toomey, Michael R.; van Hengstum, Peter J.; Woodruff, Jonathan D.

    2015-02-01

    How climate controls hurricane variability has critical implications for society is not well understood. In part, our understanding is hampered by the short and incomplete observational hurricane record. Here we present a synthesis of intense-hurricane activity from the western North Atlantic over the past two millennia, which is supported by a new, exceptionally well-resolved record from Salt Pond, Massachusetts (USA). At Salt Pond, three coarse grained event beds deposited in the historical interval are consistent with severe hurricanes in 1991 (Bob), 1675, and 1635 C.E., and provide modern analogs for 32 other prehistoric event beds. Two intervals of heightened frequency of event bed deposition between 1400 and 1675 C.E. (10 events) and 150 and 1150 C.E. (23 events), represent the local expression of coherent regional patterns in intense-hurricane-induced event beds. Our synthesis indicates that much of the western North Atlantic appears to have been active between 250 and 1150 C.E., with high levels of activity persisting in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico until 1400 C.E. This interval was one with relatively warm sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the main development region (MDR). A shift in activity to the North American east coast occurred ca. 1400 C.E., with more frequent severe hurricane strikes recorded from The Bahamas to New England between 1400 and 1675 C.E. A warm SST anomaly along the western North Atlantic, rather than within the MDR, likely contributed to the later active interval being restricted to the east coast.

  12. Hurricane Activity and the Large-Scale Pattern of Spread of an Invasive Plant Species

    PubMed Central

    Bhattarai, Ganesh P.; Cronin, James T.

    2014-01-01

    Disturbances are a primary facilitator of the growth and spread of invasive species. However, the effects of large-scale disturbances, such as hurricanes and tropical storms, on the broad geographic patterns of invasive species growth and spread have not been investigated. We used historical aerial imagery to determine the growth rate of invasive Phragmites australis patches in wetlands along the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States. These were relatively undisturbed wetlands where P. australis had room for unrestricted growth. Over the past several decades, invasive P. australis stands expanded in size by 6–35% per year. Based on tropical storm and hurricane activity over that same time period, we found that the frequency of hurricane-force winds explained 81% of the variation in P. australis growth over this broad geographic range. The expansion of P. australis stands was strongly and positively correlated with hurricane frequency. In light of the many climatic models that predict an increase in the frequency and intensity of hurricanes over the next century, these results suggest a strong link between climate change and species invasion and a challenging future ahead for the management of invasive species. PMID:24878928

  13. Hurricane activity and the large-scale pattern of spread of an invasive plant species.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Ganesh P; Cronin, James T

    2014-01-01

    Disturbances are a primary facilitator of the growth and spread of invasive species. However, the effects of large-scale disturbances, such as hurricanes and tropical storms, on the broad geographic patterns of invasive species growth and spread have not been investigated. We used historical aerial imagery to determine the growth rate of invasive Phragmites australis patches in wetlands along the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States. These were relatively undisturbed wetlands where P. australis had room for unrestricted growth. Over the past several decades, invasive P. australis stands expanded in size by 6-35% per year. Based on tropical storm and hurricane activity over that same time period, we found that the frequency of hurricane-force winds explained 81% of the variation in P. australis growth over this broad geographic range. The expansion of P. australis stands was strongly and positively correlated with hurricane frequency. In light of the many climatic models that predict an increase in the frequency and intensity of hurricanes over the next century, these results suggest a strong link between climate change and species invasion and a challenging future ahead for the management of invasive species.

  14. On the Relationship Between the Length of Season and Tropical Cyclone Activity in the North Atlantic Basin During the Weather Satellite Era, 1960-2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    later and with both being related to global warming. In this study, the relationship between the LOS and tropical cyclone activity and climate is examined for the weather satellite era, 1960-2013. Estimates are also given for the LOS and LSD, as well as for the expected number of tropical cyclones (NTC), the total number of storm days (NSD), the total accumulated cyclone energy (ACE), and the net tropical cyclone activity (NTCA) index for the 2014 hurricane season.

  15. Climatic Forcing of Intense North Atlantic Hurricane Activity over the Last Two Millennia (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, J. P.; Lane, P.; Toomey, M.; Rodysill, J. R.; Hawkes, A. D.; van Henstum, P. J.; Wallace, D. J.; MacDonald, D.

    2013-12-01

    With a series of high-resolution reconstructions of hurricane-induced overwash from across the western North Atlantic we document patterns of event occurrence dating back more than 2000 years. The records suggest that while the frequency of hurricane landfall has not changed dramatically, the frequency of intense hurricanes has varied considerably. The sedimentary evidence indicates that the entire western North Atlantic experienced historically unprecedented levels of intense hurricane activity between 500 and 900 AD. This was likely forced by the relatively northern position of the intertropical convergence zone at this time resulting in more tropical cyclone genesis in the deep tropics, similar to what is seen in the modern climate during a positive Atlantic Meridional Mode, and La Niña-like conditions in the eastern tropical Pacific. Intense hurricane activity along the eastern seaboard of the United States was significantly reduced between 900 and 1400 AD when sea surface temperatures decreased in the western North Atlantic and El Niño-like conditions persisted in the eastern tropical Pacific. However, elevated intense tropical cyclone activity in the Gulf of Mexico continued through this interval, perhaps as a result of continued Loop Current penetration into the Gulf resulting in a deeper reservoir of warm water to fuel intense tropical cyclones. Intense tropical cyclone activity in the Gulf abruptly declined at 1400 AD as Loop Current penetration was reduced. However, the eastern seaboard of the United States experienced a period of elevated intense hurricane activity from 1400 to 1675 AD. This interval of increased intense hurricane activity had significant impacts on coastal landforms and ecosystems, including more frequent and widespread inlet formation, erosion of coastal marshes, and forest disturbance. Warming sea surface temperatures along the eastern seaboard of the United States at this time, related to more Gulf Stream transport and a reduction

  16. Recovering from Hurricane Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Nadine

    2006-01-01

    The Gulf Coast region suffered an unusually severe hurricane season in 2005: Hurricane Katrina (August 28-29, 2005) devastated much of southern Mississippi and Louisiana. Approximately 2,700 licensed early care and education facilities in those states and in Alabama were affected by Katrina, in addition to an unknown number of family child care…

  17. Global Cosmic Ray Intensity Changes, Solar Activity Variations and Geomagnetic Disturbances as North Atlantic Hurricane Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavlakov, S. P.

    It was shown that specific changes of the sunspots (SS) number, cosmic ray (CR) intensity and geomagnetic activity indices AP and KP were statistically noticeable in the interval of 30 days before the appearance of a cyclonic rotational system over the North Atlantic, developing gradually in a major hurricane.

  18. University of Miami Hurricane Football Team Off-Season Strength Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganong, Ray

    The off-season football strength training and conditioning program at the University of Miami was developed to emphasize commitment and continued intensity of effort on the part of the individual player. The program emphasizes the intrinsic rewards of physical conditioning, positive reinforcement for effort, and individual responsibility for…

  19. Oceanic Control of Northeast Pacific Hurricane Activity at Interannual Timescales

    SciTech Connect

    Balaguru, Karthik; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2013-10-16

    Despite the strong dependence of the Power Dissipation Index (PDI), which is a measure of the intensity of Tropical Cyclone (TC) activity, on tropical sea-surface temperatures (SSTs), the variations in PDI are not completely explained by SST. Here we show, using an analysis of a string of observational data sets, that the variability of the thermocline depth (TD) in the east Pacific exerts a significant degree of control on the variability of PDI in that region. On average, a deep thermocline with a larger reservoir of heat favors TC intensification by reducing SST cooling while a shallow thermocline with a smaller heat reservoir promotes enhanced SST cooling that contributes to TC decay. At interannual time scales, the variability of basin-mean TD accounts for nearly 30% of the variability in the PDI during the TC season. Also, about 20% of the interannual variability in the east Pacific basin-mean TD is due to the El Niño and the Southern Oscillation (ENSO), a dominant climate signal in this region. This study suggests that a better understanding of the factors governing the interannual variability of the TD conditions in the east Pacific and how they may change over time, may lead to an improved projection of future east Pacific TC activity.

  20. Observation of the Young-Bedard Effect using Infrasonic Observations from the 2010 and 2011 Atlantic Hurricane Seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blom, P.; Waxler, R.; Frazier, W. G.; Talmadge, C. L.

    2012-12-01

    Infrasonic acoustic energy is known to be generated by collisions of counter propagating ocean surface waves of like periods. The acoustic signals produced by such collisions are known as microbaroms. One significant source of microbarom radiation is the interaction of ocean surface waves produced by large maritime storms with the background ocean swell. The region in which the microbaroms associated with a large storm are produced tends to be hundreds of kilometers from the eye of the storm. It has been suggested by Young and Bedard that, when observed along propagation paths that pass through the storm, the microbarom signal can be strongly refracted by the storm winds. Such refraction has been observed in data from the 2010 and 2011 Atlantic hurricane seasons. A data processing algorithm has been developed and implemented using the Multiple Signal Classification (MUSIC) spatial spectra and Akaike Information Criterion. The results of this analysis will be presented and compared with predictions of the refraction using a geometric acoustics propagation model.

  1. Climatology and Interannual Variability of North Atlantic Hurricane Tracks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Lian; Yan, Tingzhuang; Pietrafesa, Leonard J.; Morrison, John M.; Karl, Thomas

    2005-12-01

    The spatial and temporal variability of North Atlantic hurricane tracks and its possible association with the annual hurricane landfall frequency along the U.S. East Coast are studied using principal component analysis (PCA) of hurricane track density function (HTDF). The results show that, in addition to the well-documented effects of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and vertical wind shear (VWS), North Atlantic HTDF is strongly modulated by the dipole mode (DM) of Atlantic sea surface temperature (SST) as well as the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and Arctic Oscillation (AO). Specifically, it was found that Atlantic SST DM is the only index that is associated with all top three empirical orthogonal function (EOF) modes of the Atlantic HTDF. ENSO and tropical Atlantic VWS are significantly correlated with the first and the third EOF of the HTDF over the North Atlantic Ocean. The second EOF of North Atlantic HTDF, which represents the “zonal gradient” of North Atlantic hurricane track density, showed no significant correlation with ENSO or with tropical Atlantic VWS. Instead, it is associated with the Atlantic SST DM, and extratropical processes including NAO and AO. Since for a given hurricane season, the preferred hurricane track pattern, together with the overall basinwide hurricane activity, collectively determines the hurricane landfall frequency, the results provide a foundation for the construction of a statistical model that projects the annual number of hurricanes striking the eastern seaboard of the United States.

  2. Attitudinal Determinants of Local Public Health Workers' Participation in Hurricane Sandy Recovery Activities.

    PubMed

    Errett, Nicole A; Egan, Shannon; Garrity, Stephanie; Rutkow, Lainie; Walsh, Lauren; Thompson, Carol B; Strauss-Riggs, Kandra; Altman, Brian; Schor, Kenneth; Barnett, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Local health departments play a critical role in short-, intermediate-, and long-term recovery activities after a public health emergency. However, research has not explored attitudinal determinants of health department workers' participation in the recovery phase following a disaster. Accordingly, this qualitative investigation aims to understand perceived facilitators and barriers to performing recovery-related activities following Hurricane Sandy among local health department workers. In January 2014, 2 focus groups were conducted in geographically representative clusters of local health departments affected by Hurricane Sandy (1 cluster in Maryland and 1 cluster in New Jersey). Focus groups were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed to qualitatively assess attitudes toward Hurricane Sandy recovery activities. This analysis identified 5 major thematic categories as facilitators and barriers to participation in recovery activities: training, safety, family preparedness, policies and planning, and efficacy. Systems that support engagement of health department personnel in recovery activities may endeavor to develop and communicate intra- and interjurisdictional policies that minimize barriers in these areas. Development and implementation of evidence-informed curricular interventions that explain recovery roles may also increase local health department worker motivation to participate in recovery activities. PMID:26173013

  3. Attitudinal Determinants of Local Public Health Workers' Participation in Hurricane Sandy Recovery Activities.

    PubMed

    Errett, Nicole A; Egan, Shannon; Garrity, Stephanie; Rutkow, Lainie; Walsh, Lauren; Thompson, Carol B; Strauss-Riggs, Kandra; Altman, Brian; Schor, Kenneth; Barnett, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Local health departments play a critical role in short-, intermediate-, and long-term recovery activities after a public health emergency. However, research has not explored attitudinal determinants of health department workers' participation in the recovery phase following a disaster. Accordingly, this qualitative investigation aims to understand perceived facilitators and barriers to performing recovery-related activities following Hurricane Sandy among local health department workers. In January 2014, 2 focus groups were conducted in geographically representative clusters of local health departments affected by Hurricane Sandy (1 cluster in Maryland and 1 cluster in New Jersey). Focus groups were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed to qualitatively assess attitudes toward Hurricane Sandy recovery activities. This analysis identified 5 major thematic categories as facilitators and barriers to participation in recovery activities: training, safety, family preparedness, policies and planning, and efficacy. Systems that support engagement of health department personnel in recovery activities may endeavor to develop and communicate intra- and interjurisdictional policies that minimize barriers in these areas. Development and implementation of evidence-informed curricular interventions that explain recovery roles may also increase local health department worker motivation to participate in recovery activities.

  4. NASA Gets 'GRIP' on Hurricane Formation

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's GRIP 2010 hurricane mission is in full force. During this year's Atlantic hurricane season, researchers using powerful instruments onboard three aircraft will be able to "see"" below the clo...

  5. Seasonal variation in muscle sympathetic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Muller, Matthew D; Blaha, Cheryl; Kunselman, Allen R; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2015-08-01

    Epidemiologic data suggest there are seasonal variations in the incidence of severe cardiac events with peak levels being evident in the winter. Whether autonomic indices including muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) vary with season remains unclear. In this report, we tested the hypothesis that resting MSNA varies with the seasons of the year with peak levels evident in the winter. We analyzed the supine resting MSNA in 60 healthy subjects. Each subject was studied during two, three, or four seasons (total 237 visits). MSNA burst rate in the winter (21.0 ± 6.8 burst/min, mean ± SD) was significantly greater than in the summer (13.5 ± 5.8 burst/min, P < 0.001), the spring (17.1 ± 9.0 burst/min, P = 0.03), and the fall (17.9 ± 7.7 burst/min, P = 0.002). There was no significant difference in MSNA for other seasonal comparisons. The results suggest that resting sympathetic nerve activity varies along the seasons, with peak levels evident in the winter. We speculate that the seasonal changes in sympathetic activity may be a contribution to the previously observed seasonal variations in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:26265752

  6. Seasonal variation in muscle sympathetic nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jian; Muller, Matthew D; Blaha, Cheryl; Kunselman, Allen R; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiologic data suggest there are seasonal variations in the incidence of severe cardiac events with peak levels being evident in the winter. Whether autonomic indices including muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) vary with season remains unclear. In this report, we tested the hypothesis that resting MSNA varies with the seasons of the year with peak levels evident in the winter. We analyzed the supine resting MSNA in 60 healthy subjects. Each subject was studied during two, three, or four seasons (total 237 visits). MSNA burst rate in the winter (21.0 ± 6.8 burst/min, mean ± SD) was significantly greater than in the summer (13.5 ± 5.8 burst/min, P < 0.001), the spring (17.1 ± 9.0 burst/min, P = 0.03), and the fall (17.9 ± 7.7 burst/min, P = 0.002). There was no significant difference in MSNA for other seasonal comparisons. The results suggest that resting sympathetic nerve activity varies along the seasons, with peak levels evident in the winter. We speculate that the seasonal changes in sympathetic activity may be a contribution to the previously observed seasonal variations in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:26265752

  7. The Atlantic multidecadal oscillation and extreme daily precipitation over the US and Mexico during the hurricane season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Scott

    2008-03-01

    The tail of the distribution of daily precipitation for August-September-October was examined over the United States and Mexico in relation to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). As expected from previous studies linking the AMO to hurricane activity, Florida and the coastal Southeast US showed an increase in precipitation intensity when the Atlantic was in a warm phase (AMO+). Also during AMO+ Northwest Mexico was dry and exhibited a reduction of extreme events and the Mid-Atlantic Appalachian Mountains showed evidence of an increase in heavy precipitation compared to when the Atlantic was cool. It is proposed that the aforementioned decadal variations in extreme rainfall are forced by changes in the large-scale surface winds and air temperature in conjunction with the AMO. Namely, an anomalous cyclonic circulation is observed off the Southeast coast, leading to a reduction of moisture flux into the decaying North American monsoon, and an increase in moisture flux into the Mid-Atlantic. Further, the Mid-Atlantic shows a relatively strong increase in the mid-tropospheric lapse rate. Thus, the unique combination of low-level humidity, potential instability, and elevated topography are consistent with an enhanced risk of intense rainfall during AMO+.

  8. New Challenges in High-Resolution Modeling of Hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. S.

    2006-12-01

    The extreme active Atlantic hurricane seasons in recent years have highlighted the urgent need for a better understanding of the factors that contribute to hurricane intensity and for development of the corresponding advanced hurricane prediction models to improve intensity forecasts. The lack of skill in present forecasts of hurricane structure and intensity may be attributed in part to deficiencies in the current prediction models: insufficient grid resolution, inadequate surface and boundary layer formulations, and the lack of full coupling to a dynamic ocean. The extreme high winds, intense rainfall, large ocean waves, and copious sea spray in hurricanes push the surface-exchange parameters for temperature, water vapor, and momentum into untested regimes. The recent modeling effort is to develop and test a fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean modeling system that is capable of resolving the eye and eyewall in a hurricane at ~1 km grid resolution. The new challenges for these very high resolution models are the corresponding physical representations at 1-km scale, including microphysics, sub-grid turbulence parameterization, atmospheric boundary layer, physical processes at the air-sea interface with surface waves among others. The lack of accurate initial conditions for high-resolution hurricane modeling presents another major challenge. Improvements in initial conditions rest on the use of more airborne and remotely sensed observations in high-resolution assimilation systems and on the application of advanced assimilation schemes to hurricanes. This study aimed to provide an overview of these new challenges using high-resolution model simulations of Hurricanes Isabel (2003), Frances (2004), Katrina and Rita (2005) that were observed extensively by two recent field programs, namely, the Coupled Boundary Layer Air-Sea Transfer (CBLAST)-Hurricane in 2003-2004 and the Hurricane Rainbands and Intensity Change Experiment (RAINEX) in 2005.

  9. Late Holocene Hurricane Activity in the Gulf of Mexico from a Bayou Sediment Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodysill, J. R.; Donnelly, J. P.; Toomey, M.; Sullivan, R.; MacDonald, D.; Evans, R. L.; Ashton, A. D.

    2012-12-01

    Hurricanes pose a considerable threat to coastal communities along the Atlantic seaboard and in the Gulf of Mexico. The complex role of ocean and atmospheric dynamics in controlling storm frequency and intensity, and how these relationships could be affected by climate change, remains uncertain. To better predict how storms will impact coastal communities, it is vital to constrain their past behavior, in particular how storm frequency and intensity and the pattern of storm tracks have been influenced by past climate conditions. In an effort to characterize past storm behavior, our work contributes to the growing network of storm records along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts by reconstructing storm-induced deposits in the northern Gulf of Mexico during the Late Holocene. Previous work on the northern Gulf coast has shown considerable centennial-scale variability in the occurrence of intense hurricanes, much like the northern Atlantic coast and in the Caribbean Sea. The timing of active and quiet intervals during the last 1000 years amongst the Gulf Coast records appears to be anti-phased with stormy intervals along the North American east coast. The sparse spatial coverage of the existing intense hurricane reconstructions provides a limited view of the natural variability of intense hurricanes. A new, high resolution reconstruction of storms along the northern Gulf Coast would be beneficial in assembling the picture of the patterns of storminess during the Late Holocene. Our study site, Basin Bayou, is situated on the north side of Choctawhatchee Bay in northwest Florida. From 1851 to 2011, 68 storms have struck the coast within 75 miles of Basin Bayou, of which 10 were Category 3 or greater, making it a prime location to reconstruct intense hurricanes. Basin Bayou openly exchanges water with Choctawhatchee Bay through a narrow channel, which acts as a conduit for propagating storm surges, and potentially coarse-grained bay sediments, into the bayou. Our record is

  10. The Seasons Explained by Refutational Modeling Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frede, Valerie

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the principles and investigation of a small-group laboratory activity based on refutational modeling to teach the concept of seasons to preservice elementary teachers. The results show that these teachers improved significantly when they had to refute their initial misconceptions practically. (Contains 8 figures and 1 table.)

  11. A Hurricane!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pampe, William R.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the formation and development of hurricanes and discusses the disasters associated with them. Reviews the warning signals used for tropical storms and provides an overview of the hurricane naming process. (ML)

  12. Tracking 2012 Atlantic Hurricanes Using NASA's GEOS-5 AGCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero-Fuentes, M.; Partyka, G. S.; Smith, E. B.

    2014-12-01

    On average, the Atlantic Hurricane Season consists of 11 named storms, including six hurricanes. However, the 2012 hurricane season tied with the 1887, 1995, 2010, and 2011 seasons for having the third-most named storms on record, with 19 named storms, 10 of which were hurricanes. Seven of these systems made landfall in North America, including Hurricane Isaac and "Super-Storm" Sandy. This active season also included Hurricane Nadine, the fourth longest-lived Atlantic hurricane on record. The structure and life cycle of these severe storms can be viewed through the detailed meteorological analyses and forecasts that the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) conducts on a routine basis with our GEOS-5 Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) system. GMAO routinely produces five-day forecasts twice daily, at 0000 and 1200 UTC, using the GEOS-5 AGCM. The GEOS-5 atmospheric data assimilation system is used to generate near real-time analyses of the atmosphere over the globe every six hours. These analyses provide the initial conditions for the GEOS-5 forecasts. Following the abnormally active 2012 Atlantic hurricane season, one focus has been on the skill of the GEOS-5 forecasts of tropical storms in the Atlantic, East Pacific, and West Pacific. In this presentation it's shown the results for two of the most destructive storms of the Atlantic season: Hurricanes Isaac and Sandy, and the 2012 Season's Track Forecast Error. The primary impetus for investigating these two storms was the opportunity to test the ability of the model to reproduce their track and intensity forecast. We observe several features associated with the morphology and inner core of these storms indicative of the capability of the model to reproduce these tropical systems. GEOS-5 predicted Sandy's intensity to within a few hectopascals over much of the life of the storm. The model also predicted some of the finer details of Sandy's evolution. The forecast from 12z 26Oct2012 appeared to

  13. Geologic effects of hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coch, Nicholas K.

    1994-08-01

    Hurricanes are intense low pressure systems of tropical origin. Hurricane damage results from storm surge, wind, and inland flooding from heavy rainfall. Field observations and remote sensing of recent major hurricanes such as Hugo (1989), Andrew (1992) and Iniki (1992) are providing new insights into the mechanisms producing damage in these major storms. Velocities associated with hurricanes include the counterclockwise vortex winds flowing around the eye and the much slower regional winds that steer hurricane and move it forward. Vectorial addition of theseof these two winds on the higher effective wind speed than on the left side. Coast-parallel hurricane tracks keep the weaker left side of the storm against the coast, whereas coast-normal tracks produce a wide swath of destruction as the more powerful right side of the storm cuts a swath of destruction hundreds of kilometers inland. Storm surge is a function of the wind speed, central pressure, shelf slope, shoreline configuration, and anthropogenic alterations to the shoreline. Maximum surge heights are not under the eye of the hurricane, where the pressure is lowest, but on the right side of the eye at the radius of maximum winds, where the winds are strongest. Flood surge occurs as the hurricane approaches land and drives coastal waters, and superimposed waves, across the shore. Ebb surge occurs when impounded surface water flows seaward as the storm moves inland. Flood and ebb surge damage have been greatly increased in recent hurricanes as a result of anthropogenic changes along the shoreline. Hurricane wind damage occurs on three scales — megascale, mesoscale and microscale. Local wind damage is a function of wind speed, exposure and structural resistance to velocity pressure, wind drag and flying debris. Localized extreme damage is caused by gusts that can locally exceed sustained winds by a factor of two in areas where there is strong convective activity. Geologic changes occuring in hurricanes

  14. Case study on visualizing hurricanes using illustration-inspired techniques.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Alark; Caban, Jesus; Rheingans, Penny; Sparling, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    The devastating power of hurricanes was evident during the 2005 hurricane season, the most active season on record. This has prompted increased efforts by researchers to understand the physical processes that underlie the genesis, intensification, and tracks of hurricanes. This research aims at facilitating an improved understanding into the structure of hurricanes with the aid of visualization techniques. Our approach was developed by a mixed team of visualization and domain experts. To better understand these systems, and to explore their representation in NWP models, we use a variety of illustration-inspired techniques to visualize their structure and time evolution. Illustration-inspired techniques aid in the identification of the amount of vertical wind shear in a hurricane, which can help meteorologists predict dissipation. Illustration-style visualization, in combination with standard visualization techniques, helped explore the vortex rollup phenomena and the mesovortices contained within. We evaluated the effectiveness of our visualization with the help of six hurricane experts. The expert evaluation showed that the illustration-inspired techniques were preferred over existing tools. Visualization of the evolution of structural features is a prelude to a deeper visual analysis of the underlying dynamics.

  15. Coastal change from Hurricane Sandy and the 2012-13 winter storm season: Fire Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Brenner, Owen; Hehre, Rachel; Reynolds, B.J.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) mounted a substantial effort in response to Hurricane Sandy including an assessment of the morphological impacts to the beach and dune system at Fire Island, New York. Field surveys of the beach and dunes collected just prior to and after landfall were used to quantify change in several focus areas. In order to quantify morphologic change along the length of the island, pre-storm (May 2012) and post-storm (November 2012) lidar and aerial photography were used to assess changes to the shoreline and beach, and to measure volumetric changes. The extent and thicknesses of overwash deposits were mapped in the field, and measurements were used to determine volume, distribution, and characteristics of the deposits. The beaches and dunes on Fire Island were severely eroded during Hurricane Sandy, and the island breached in three locations on the eastern segment of the island. Landward shift of the upper portion of the beach averaged 19.7 meters (m) but varied substantially along the coast. Shoreline change was also highly variable, but the shoreline prograded during the storm by an average of 11.4 m, due to the deposition of material eroded from the upper beach and dunes onto the lower portion of the beach. The beaches and dunes lost 54.4 percent of their pre-storm volume, and the dunes experienced overwash along 46.6 percent of the island. The inland overwash deposits account for 14 percent of the volume lost from the beaches and dunes, indicating that the majority of material was moved offshore. In the winter months following Hurricane Sandy, seven storm events with significant wave heights greater than four m were recorded at a wave buoy 30 nautical miles south of Fire Island. Monthly shoreline and profile surveys indicate that the beach continued to erode dramatically. The shoreline, which exhibited a progradational trend immediately after Sandy, eroded an average of 21.4 m between November 2012 and mid-March 2013, with a maximum

  16. Global scale climate trends associated with variable Atlantic thermohaline transport as inferred from changes in intense hurricane activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, W.M.; Sheaffer, J.D.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a review of the most recent 100 years of data of hurricane activity in the tropical Atlantic, and proposes that decadal variations of hurricane activity are but one of a host of observed concurrent global climate trends which may all link to multi-decadal scale variations of the Atlantic thermohaline circulation. The data reviews shows that long term multi-decadal variations in hurricane activity appear to be linked (1) to mode-like variations of regional and global sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and (2) to concurrent trends in global air temperature, pressure anomalies, and atmospheric circulations. Many of these effects extend well beyond the tropical Atlantic. The pre-eminent effect which seems to dominate all others as a unifying process for these multi-decadal changes is variations in the Atlantic thermohaline circulation. A synthesis process is suggested for specifying physically consistent global interactions linking the Atlantic conveyor and decadal trend associations in global climate data. In this way, some of the global data may yield factors which are useful for forecasting the onset and termination of new decadal trends of hurricane activity. 30 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Strong association between west african rainfall and u.s. Landfall of intense hurricanes.

    PubMed

    Gray, W M

    1990-09-14

    Intense hurricanes occurred much more frequently during the period spanning the late 1940s through the late 1960s than during the 1970s and 1980s, except for 1988 and 1989. Seasonal and multidecadal variations of intense hurricane activity are closely linked to seasonal and multidecadal variations of summer rainfall amounts in the Western Sahel region of West Africa. The multidecadal nature of West African precipitation variations and their association with variations of intense Atlantic hurricane activity can be observed in data going back nearly a century. The apparent recent breaking of the 18-year Sahel drought during 1988 and 1989 suggests that the incidence of intense hurricanes making landfall on the U.S. coast and in the Caribbean basin will likely increase during the 1990s and early years of the 21st century to levels of activity notably greater than were observed during the 1970s and 1980s.

  18. TRMM Hurricane Heat Engine

    NASA Video Gallery

    TRMM provides a closer look at hurricanes using a unique combination of passive and active microwave instruments designed to peer inside cloud systems and measure rainfall. TRMM allows scientists t...

  19. New Challenges in High-Resolution Modeling and Data Assimilation of Hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. S.

    2007-12-01

    The extreme active Atlantic hurricane seasons in recent years have highlighted the urgent need for a better understanding of the factors that contribute to hurricane intensity and for development of the corresponding advanced hurricane prediction models to improve intensity forecasts. The lack of skill in present forecasts of hurricane structure and intensity may be attributed in part to deficiencies in the current prediction models: insufficient grid resolution, inadequate surface and boundary layer formulations, and the lack of full coupling to a dynamic ocean. The extreme high winds, intense rainfall, large ocean waves, and copious sea spray in hurricanes push the surface-exchange parameters for temperature, water vapor, and momentum into untested regimes. The recent modeling effort is to develop and test a fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean modeling system that is capable of resolving the eye and eyewall in a hurricane at ~1 km grid resolution. The new challenges for these very high resolution models are the corresponding physical representations at 1-km scale, including microphysics, sub-grid turbulence parameterization, atmospheric boundary layer, physical processes at the air-sea interface with surface waves among others. The lack of accurate initial conditions for high-resolution hurricane modeling presents another major challenge. Improvements in initial conditions rest on the use of more airborne and remotely sensed observations in high-resolution data assimilation systems and on the application of advanced assimilation schemes to hurricanes. This study aimed to provide an overview of these new challenges using high-resolution model simulations of Hurricanes Isabel (2003), Frances (2004), Katrina and Rita (2005) that were observed extensively by two recent field programs, namely, the Coupled Boundary Layer Air-Sea Transfer (CBLAST)-Hurricane in 2003-2004 and the Hurricane Rainbands and Intensity Change Experiment (RAINEX) in 2005. Data assimilation

  20. Tuberculosis control activities before and after Hurricane Sandy--northeast and mid-Atlantic states, 2012.

    PubMed

    2013-03-22

    On October 29, 2012, Hurricane Sandy struck the U.S. northeast and mid-Atlantic seaboard; the effects of the storm extended to southeastern and midwestern states and to eastern Canada. At the time, 1,899 residents in the most affected areas were undergoing treatment for tuberculosis (TB) disease or infection. To ascertain the operational abilities of state and local TB programs during and after the storm and to determine whether lessons learned from a previous hurricane were effective in ensuring continuity of TB patient care, CDC interviewed staff members at all of the affected state and city TB control programs, including those in areas with power outages and flooded streets, tunnels, and subway lines. The interviews determined that continuity of care for TB patients in programs affected by Hurricane Sandy was better preserved than it had been during and after Hurricane Katrina in August 2005. This improvement might be attributed to 1) preparedness measures learned from Hurricane Katrina (e.g., preparing line lists of patients, providing patients with as-needed medications, and making back-up copies of patient records in advance of the storm) and 2) less widespread displacement of persons after Hurricane Sandy than occurred after Hurricane Katrina. Maintaining readiness among clinicians and TB control programs to respond to natural disasters remains essential to protecting public health and preserving TB patients' continuity of care.

  1. Tuberculosis control activities before and after Hurricane Sandy--northeast and mid-Atlantic states, 2012.

    PubMed

    2013-03-22

    On October 29, 2012, Hurricane Sandy struck the U.S. northeast and mid-Atlantic seaboard; the effects of the storm extended to southeastern and midwestern states and to eastern Canada. At the time, 1,899 residents in the most affected areas were undergoing treatment for tuberculosis (TB) disease or infection. To ascertain the operational abilities of state and local TB programs during and after the storm and to determine whether lessons learned from a previous hurricane were effective in ensuring continuity of TB patient care, CDC interviewed staff members at all of the affected state and city TB control programs, including those in areas with power outages and flooded streets, tunnels, and subway lines. The interviews determined that continuity of care for TB patients in programs affected by Hurricane Sandy was better preserved than it had been during and after Hurricane Katrina in August 2005. This improvement might be attributed to 1) preparedness measures learned from Hurricane Katrina (e.g., preparing line lists of patients, providing patients with as-needed medications, and making back-up copies of patient records in advance of the storm) and 2) less widespread displacement of persons after Hurricane Sandy than occurred after Hurricane Katrina. Maintaining readiness among clinicians and TB control programs to respond to natural disasters remains essential to protecting public health and preserving TB patients' continuity of care. PMID:23515057

  2. Hurricane Earl

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... eye is just visible on the right edge of the MISR image swath. Winds at various altitudes were obtained by processing the data from five ... flow of air into the hurricane. This warm, moist air is the power source for the hurricane. Mid- and high-level clouds (green and ...

  3. Hurricane Sandy

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-03-05

    ... it shows much of the western half of the hurricane. The eye of the storm is to the right and outside of the observed area. ... it shows much of the western half of the hurricane. The eye of the storm is to the right and outside of the observed area. READ ...

  4. Hurricane Debby

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  Hurricane Debby     View Larger ... methods that depend on assumptions about the atmospheric temperature profile. Using data at more than two angles, hyper-stereo MISR ... Hurricane Debby location:  Atlantic Ocean thumbnail:  ...

  5. Geochemical and sedimentological evidence of varying intense hurricane activity and precipitation patterns from the Caribbean during the late Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, J. D.; Donnelly, J. P.; Tierney, J.; Scileppi, E.; Giosan, L.

    2005-12-01

    Coastal lagoons are relatively unique systems because they have the potential for recording both marine and terrestrial paleo-climate signals. An analysis of sediment cores collected from a backbarrier lagoon in the Northeastern Caribbean (Laguna Playa Grande, Vieques, Puerto Rico) reveal paleoclimatic records of intense hurricane activity, sea-level elevation, and shifts in regional precipitation and vegetation. Coarse-grain laminae preserved within the 5000 year fine-grained sedimentary record at the site consist of beach and nearshore sediments and provide evidence of past intense hurricane strikes. Sediment ages based on C-14 dating indicate a relatively constant long-term sedimentation rate in the basin appears to be in steady state with sea-level rise. X-ray fluorescences (XRF) analyses of surficial terrestrial and barrier-beach samples show that they are distinct in their elemental composition with terrestrial samples containing high concentrations of Fe, Ti and Mn, while Ca and Sr dominate the composition for samples collected from the barrier beach. XRF scans of cores collected from the lagoon indicate that the observed coarse-grain strata contain high concentrations of Ca and Sr confirming the seaward origin of this material, while fine-grained sediments are high in Fe, Ti and Mn indicating its terrestrial source. A transition from high to low intense hurricane activity occurred at the site approximately 1250 yr BP. XRF results reveal a dramatic increase in the concentration of terrestrial elements (Ti, Fe and Mn) throughout the basin after this 1250 yr BP horizon indicating an abrupt transition from a more arid to a more humid local climate. An additional increase in Ti, Fe and Mn concentrations is observed within sediments deposited in the 18th century A.D. and is most likely associated with anthropogenic land-use changes. The earlier 1250 yr BP transition from low to high precipitation is consistent with records from other sites within the Caribbean

  6. Seasonality in Children's Pedometer-Measured Physical Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beighle, Aaron; Alderman, Brandon; Morgan, Charles F.; Le Masurier, Guy

    2008-01-01

    Seasonality appears to have an impact on children's physical activity levels, but equivocal findings demand more study in this area. With the increased use of pedometers in both research and practice, collecting descriptive data in various seasons to examine the impact of seasonality on pedometer-measured physical activity among children is…

  7. Earth Science Week 2010 - Hurricane Energy

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA hurricane scientist Dr. Jeff Halverson explains how hurricanes draw energy from the ocean surface. The video also provides an example of a classroom activity that allows students to map the ch...

  8. Time to Replace the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantha, Lakshmi

    2006-01-01

    The 2005 hurricane season set many new records, including the most named storms (26) and the most hurricanes in a season (14). Of the four hurricanes that made landfall in the U.S., three (Katrina, Rita, and Wilma) reached Category 5, struck the Gulf Coast, and inflicted severe damage and loss of life. Hurricane Wilma had an observed sealevel center pressure of 882 millibar (mbar) at its peak and is the strongest hurricane ever recorded in the Atlantic Ocean. Katrina damaged vast areas along the Mississippi coast, flooded large parts of New Orleans, and is the most destructive hurricane on record. The 2004 Atlantic hurricane season was also busy, with 14 named storms, nine of which were hurricanes and four of which (Charley, Frances, Ivan, and Jeanne) brought heavy damage to the southeastern United States.

  9. Rapid Hurricane Intensity Change: Results using High-Resolution Fully Coupled Atmosphere-Wave-Ocean Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. S.

    2008-12-01

    The extreme active Atlantic hurricane seasons in recent years have highlighted the urgent need for a better understanding of the factors that contribute to rapid hurricane intensity and for development of the corresponding advanced hurricane prediction models to improve intensity forecasts. The lack of skill in present forecasts of hurricane structure and intensity may be attributed in part to deficiencies in the current prediction models: insufficient grid resolution, inadequate surface and boundary layer formulations, and the lack of full coupling to a dynamic ocean. The extreme high winds, intense rainfall, large ocean waves, and copious sea spray in hurricanes push the surface-exchange parameters for temperature, water vapor, and momentum into untested regimes. The recent modeling effort at the University of Miami is to develop and test a fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean modeling system (UMCM) that is capable of resolving the eye and eyewall in a hurricane at ~1 km grid resolution. The new challenges for these very high resolution models are the corresponding physical representations at 1-km scale, including microphysics, sub-grid turbulence parameterization, atmospheric boundary layer, physical processes at the air-sea interface with surface waves among others. The lack of accurate initial conditions for high-resolution hurricane modeling presents another major challenge. Improvements in initial conditions rest on the use of airborne and remotely sensed observations (e.g., QuikSCAT and other satellite data) in high-resolution assimilation systems and on the application of advanced assimilation schemes to hurricanes. This study aimed to provide an overview of these new challenges using high-resolution coupled model simulations of hurricanes in 2003-2008. Several cases were observed extensively by two recent field programs, namely, the Coupled Boundary Layer Air-Sea Transfer (CBLAST)-Hurricane in 2003-2004 and the Hurricane Rainbands and Intensity Change

  10. Disaster preparedness of dialysis patients for Hurricanes Gustav and Ike 2008.

    PubMed

    Kleinpeter, Myra A

    2009-01-01

    Hurricanes Katrina and Rita resulted in massive devastation of the Gulf Coast at Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas during 2005. Because of those disasters, dialysis providers, nephrologists, and dialysis patients used disaster planning activities to work to mitigate the morbidity and mortality associated with the 2005 hurricane season for future events affecting dialysis patients. As Hurricane Gustav approached, anniversary events for Hurricane Katrina were postponed because of evacuation orders for nearly the entire Louisiana Gulf Coast. As part of the hurricane preparation, dialysis units reviewed the disaster plans of patients, and patients made preparation for evacuation. Upon evacuation, many patients returned to the dialysis units that had provided services during their exile from Hurricane Katrina; other patients went to other locations as part of their evacuation plan. Patients uniformly reported positive experiences with dialysis providers in their temporary evacuation communities, provided that those communities did not experience the effects of Hurricane Gustav. With the exception of evacuees to Baton Rouge, patients continued to receive their treatments uninterrupted. Because of extensive damage in the Baton Rouge area, resulting in widespread power losses and delayed restoration of power to hospitals and other health care facilities, some patients missed one treatment. However, as a result of compliance with disaster fluid and dietary recommendations, no adverse outcomes occurred. In most instances, patients were able to return to their home dialysis unit or a nearby unit to continue dialysis treatments within 4 - 5 days of Hurricane Gustav. Hurricane Ike struck the Texas Gulf Coast near Galveston, resulting in devastation of that area similar to the devastation seen in New Orleans after Katrina. The storm surge along the Louisiana Gulf Coast resulted in flooding that temporarily closed coastal dialysis units. Patients were prepared and experienced

  11. Hurricane Ida

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-18

    article title:  Hurricane Ida Cross-Track Winds       View Larger ... central pressure of 983 millibars, with maximum sustained winds of 148 kilometers per hour/41 meters per second (92 miles per hour - ...

  12. Hurricane Jeanne

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... article title:  Hurricane Jeanne Cloud Height and Motion     View Larger Image ... field pictured here is uncorrected for the effects of cloud motion. Wind-corrected heights have higher accuracy but sparser spatial ...

  13. Hurricane Katrina

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-01-08

    ... Mississippi regions were acquired before and one day after Katrina made landfall along the Gulf of Mexico coast, and highlight many of the ... http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/HPDOCS/misr/misr_html/hurricane_katrina_flood.html ...

  14. Hurricane Katrina

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Flooding in the Aftermath of Hurricane Katrina   ... River that was not apparent before Katrina. The post-Katrina flooding along the edges of Lake Pontchartrain and the city of New Orleans is ...

  15. Hurricane Carlotta

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... near the hurricane's center, and are made up of individual cells that are typically less than 20 km in diameter. This image shows a number of these cells, some fairly isolated, and others connected together. Their ...

  16. Intense hurricane activity over the past 5,000 years controlled by El Niño and the West African monsoon.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Jeffrey P; Woodruff, Jonathan D

    2007-05-24

    The processes that control the formation, intensity and track of hurricanes are poorly understood. It has been proposed that an increase in sea surface temperatures caused by anthropogenic climate change has led to an increase in the frequency of intense tropical cyclones, but this proposal has been challenged on the basis that the instrumental record is too short and unreliable to reveal trends in intense tropical cyclone activity. Storm-induced deposits preserved in the sediments of coastal lagoons offer the opportunity to study the links between climatic conditions and hurricane activity on longer timescales, because they provide centennial- to millennial-scale records of past hurricane landfalls. Here we present a record of intense hurricane activity in the western North Atlantic Ocean over the past 5,000 years based on sediment cores from a Caribbean lagoon that contain coarse-grained deposits associated with intense hurricane landfalls. The record indicates that the frequency of intense hurricane landfalls has varied on centennial to millennial scales over this interval. Comparison of the sediment record with palaeo-climate records indicates that this variability was probably modulated by atmospheric dynamics associated with variations in the El Niño/Southern Oscillation and the strength of the West African monsoon, and suggests that sea surface temperatures as high as at present are not necessary to support intervals of frequent intense hurricanes. To accurately predict changes in intense hurricane activity, it is therefore important to understand how the El Niño/Southern Oscillation and the West African monsoon will respond to future climate change.

  17. Hurricane Lilli

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... (MISR), including a well-developed clearing at the hurricane eye. When these views were acquired on October 2, 2002, Lili was approaching ... red-blue glasses, with the red filter placed over your left eye. Information on ordering glasses can be found at  ... at JPL October 2, 2002 - Two views of the eye of the hurricane. project:  MISR category:  ...

  18. A Look Inside Hurricane Alma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Hurricane season in the eastern Pacific started off with a whimper late last month as Alma, a Category 2 hurricane, slowly made its way up the coast of Baja California, packing sustained winds of 110 miles per hour and gusts of 135 miles per hour. The above image of the hurricane was acquired on May 29, 2002, and displays the rainfall rates occurring within the storm. Click the image above to see an animated data visualization (3.8 MB) of the interior of Hurricane Alma. The images of the clouds seen at the beginning of the movie were retrieved from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association's (NOAA's) Geostationary Orbiting Environmental Satellite (GOES) network. As the movie continues, the clouds are peeled away to reveal an image of rainfall levels in the hurricane. The rainfall data were obtained by the Precipitation Radar aboard NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. The Precipitation Radar bounces radio waves off of clouds to retrieve a reading of the number of large, rain-sized droplets within the clouds. Using these data, scientists can tell how much precipitation is occurring within and beneath a hurricane. In the movie, yellow denotes areas where 0.5 inches of rain is falling per hour, green denotes 1 inch per hour, and red denotes over 2 inches per hour. (Please note that high resolution still images of Hurricane Alma are available in the NASA Visible Earth in TIFF format.) Image and animation courtesy Lori Perkins, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio

  19. Task Force Examines U.S. Hurricane Research Agenda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    While U.S. federal, state, and local governments continue to debate what should be done, following the devastating 2005 hurricane season, to rebuild the Gulf Coast and to prevent future disasters, a task force of the U.S. National Science Board (NSB) has begun an effort to construct a national agenda for federally-sponsored hurricane research. At a 24 January meeting at the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) headquarters in Arlington,Va., task force members and government representatives examined current hurricane-related research conducted and supported by several federal agencies, identified gaps in understanding and future priorities, and discussed how these agencies can better coordinate their activities.

  20. Hurricane intensity and eyewall replacement.

    PubMed

    Houze, Robert A; Chen, Shuyi S; Smull, Bradley F; Lee, Wen-Chau; Bell, Michael M

    2007-03-01

    Observations made during the historic 2005 hurricane season document a case of "eyewall replacement." Clouds outside the hurricane eyewall coalesce to form a new eyewall at a greater radius from the storm center, and the old eyewall dies. The winds in the new eyewall are initially weaker than those in the original eyewall, but as the new eyewall contracts, the storm reintensifies. Understanding this replacement mechanism is vital to forecasting variations in hurricane intensity. Processes in the "moat" region between the new and old eyewall have been particularly unclear. Aircraft data now show that the moat becomes dynamically similar to the eye and thus is converted into a region inimical to survival of the inner eyewall. We suggest that targeting aircraft to key parts of the storm to gain crucial input to high-resolution numerical models can lead to improvements in forecasting hurricane intensity.

  1. Biogeophysical Climate Feedbacks From Hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negron-Juarez, R.; Chambers, J.; Zeng, H.; Baker, D.

    2008-12-01

    Hurricanes can devastate thousands of hectares of forested area producing changes beyond simply vegetation damage and biomass loss. This study reports changes in regional climate associated with Hurricane Rita which made landfall on the Gulf Coastal Plain on September 24th, 2005. Our analyses suggest that over severely disturbed forested areas, the biogeophysical effects produced by Rita may have affected the precipitation pattern producing a decrease in precipitation the following winter and an increase the next summer season. The dominant biogeophysical effect was a change in albedo as ~14,000 km2 of forested area were disturbed (downed and dead, snapped and structurally damaged trees) by Rita, equivalent to a carbon release of 32 to 43% of the net annual U.S. sink in forest trees. As recent studies project a likely increase in hurricane intensity during the 21st century, understanding the relationship between natural events such as hurricanes and climate is critical.

  2. Overview of Proposal on High Resolution Climate Model Simulations of Recent Hurricane and Typhoon Activity: The Impact of SSTs and the Madden Julian Oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Siegfried; Kang, In-Sik; Reale, Oreste

    2009-01-01

    This talk gives an update on the progress and further plans for a coordinated project to carry out and analyze high-resolution simulations of tropical storm activity with a number of state-of-the-art global climate models. Issues addressed include, the mechanisms by which SSTs control tropical storm. activity on inter-annual and longer time scales, the modulation of that activity by the Madden Julian Oscillation on sub-seasonal time scales, as well as the sensitivity of the results to model formulation. The project also encourages companion coarser resolution runs to help assess resolution dependence, and. the ability of the models to capture the large-scale and long-terra changes in the parameters important for hurricane development. Addressing the above science questions is critical to understanding the nature of the variability of the Asian-Australian monsoon and its regional impacts, and thus CLIVAR RAMP fully endorses the proposed tropical storm simulation activity. The project is open to all interested organizations and investigators, and the results from the runs will be shared among the participants, as well as made available to the broader scientific community for analysis.

  3. Tropical cyclone wind speed constraints from resultant storm surge deposition: A 2500 year reconstruction of hurricane activity from St. Marks, FL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandon, Christine M.; Woodruff, Jonathan D.; Lane, D. Phil; Donnelly, Jeffrey P.

    2013-08-01

    Recent work suggests that the patterns of intense (≥category 3 on the Saffir-Simpson scale) hurricane strikes over the last few millennia might differ from that of overall hurricane activity during this period. Prior studies typically rely on assigning a threshold storm intensity required to produce a sedimentological overwash signal at a particular coastal site based on historical analogs. Here, we improve on this approach by presenting a new inverse-model technique that constrains the most likely wind speeds required to transport the maximum grain size within resultant storm deposits. As a case study, the technique is applied to event layers observed in sediments collected from a coastal sinkhole in northwestern Florida. We find that (1) simulated wind speeds for modern deposits are consistent with the intensities for historical hurricanes affecting the site, (2) all deposits throughout the ˜2500 year record are capable of being produced by hurricanes, and (3) a period of increased intense hurricane frequency is observed between ˜1700 and ˜600 years B.P. and decreased intense storm frequency is observed from ˜2500 to ˜1700 and ˜600 years B.P. to the present. This is consistent with prior reconstructions from nearby sites. Changes in the frequency of intense hurricane strikes may be related to the degree of penetration of the Loop Current in the Gulf of Mexico.

  4. Effects of Hurricane Georges on habitat use by captive-reared Hispaniolan Parrots (Amazona ventralis) released in the Dominican Republic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, T.H.; Collazo, J.A.; Vilella, F.J.; Guerrero, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    We radio-tagged and released 49 captive-reared Hispaniolan Parrots (Amazona ventralis) in Parque Nacional del Este (PNE), Dominican Republic, during 1997 and 1998. Our primary objective was to develop a restoration program centered on using aviary-reared birds to further the recovery of the critically endangered Puerto Rican Parrot (A. vittata). Hurricane Georges made landfall over the release area on 22 September 1998 with sustained winds of 224 km/h, providing us with a unique opportunity to quantify responses of parrots to such disturbances. Quantitative data on such responses by any avian species are scarce, particularly for Amazona species, many of which are in peril and occur in hurricane-prone areas throughout the Caribbean. Mean home ranges of 18 parrots monitored both before and after the hurricane increased (P = 0.08) from 864 ha (CI = 689-1039 ha) pre-hurricane to 1690 ha (CI = 1003-2377 ha) post-hurricane. The total area traversed by all parrots increased > 300%, from 4884 ha pre-hurricane to 15,490 ha post-hurricane. Before Hurricane Georges, parrot activity was concentrated in coastal scrub, tall broadleaf forest, and abandoned agriculture (conucos). After the hurricane, parrots concentrated their activities in areas of tall broadleaf forest and abandoned conucos. Topographic relief, primarily in the form of large sinkholes, resulted in "resource refugia" where parrots and other frugivores foraged after the hurricane. Habitat use and movement patterns exhibited by released birds highlight the importance of carefully considering effects of season, topography, and overall size of release areas when planning psittacine restorations in hurricane-prone areas. ?? The Neotropical Ornithological Society.

  5. GPM Satellite Video of Hurricane Joaquin's Movements

    NASA Video Gallery

    Joaquin became a tropical storm Monday evening (EDT) midway between the Bahamas and Bermuda and has now formed into a hurricane, the 3rd of the season--the difference is Joaquin could impact the US...

  6. Stable isotope ratios of rain and vapor in 1995 hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, James Robert; Gedzelman, Stanley David; Zhang, Xiaoping; Arnold, Robert

    1998-05-01

    Isotope ratios of rain and vapor samples collected at the surface from four tropical cyclones during the active 1995 Atlantic hurricane season were determined. A two-dimensional bulk microphysics isotope model was applied to steady symmetric tropical cyclones to explain the observed low mean values and inward decrease of isotope ratios of the rain and vapor. The low mean value is caused by the tropical cyclone's relatively large size, longevity, and deep clouds. The inward decrease is due to diffusive isotope exchange between falling rain and converging vapor in the atmospheric boundary layer. Dean, a minimal tropical storm, produced relatively high isotope ratios because of its small size and youth. Rains from the extreme outer edge of Felix, a category 3 hurricane, exhibited high isotope ratios similar to normal summer rain. Isotope ratios of rains and vapors from Hurricane Luis in Puerto Rico decreased as the storm approached. Isotope ratios of rain exhibited an abrupt jump from low values in the eastern half of Puerto Rico to high values farther west which is linked to the storm's rainbands. Isotope ratios of Hurricane Opal's rains reflected the storm's asymmetric structure, with lowest values west of the point of landfall. Record low isotope ratios from a squall line that struck eastern Texas two days before landfall are linked to low-level outflow from Opal and demonstrate that hurricanes can vent enormous quantities of vapor to the surroundings.

  7. Female hurricanes are deadlier than male hurricanes.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kiju; Shavitt, Sharon; Viswanathan, Madhu; Hilbe, Joseph M

    2014-06-17

    Do people judge hurricane risks in the context of gender-based expectations? We use more than six decades of death rates from US hurricanes to show that feminine-named hurricanes cause significantly more deaths than do masculine-named hurricanes. Laboratory experiments indicate that this is because hurricane names lead to gender-based expectations about severity and this, in turn, guides respondents' preparedness to take protective action. This finding indicates an unfortunate and unintended consequence of the gendered naming of hurricanes, with important implications for policymakers, media practitioners, and the general public concerning hurricane communication and preparedness. PMID:24889620

  8. Female hurricanes are deadlier than male hurricanes.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kiju; Shavitt, Sharon; Viswanathan, Madhu; Hilbe, Joseph M

    2014-06-17

    Do people judge hurricane risks in the context of gender-based expectations? We use more than six decades of death rates from US hurricanes to show that feminine-named hurricanes cause significantly more deaths than do masculine-named hurricanes. Laboratory experiments indicate that this is because hurricane names lead to gender-based expectations about severity and this, in turn, guides respondents' preparedness to take protective action. This finding indicates an unfortunate and unintended consequence of the gendered naming of hurricanes, with important implications for policymakers, media practitioners, and the general public concerning hurricane communication and preparedness.

  9. Female hurricanes are deadlier than male hurricanes

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kiju; Shavitt, Sharon; Viswanathan, Madhu; Hilbe, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Do people judge hurricane risks in the context of gender-based expectations? We use more than six decades of death rates from US hurricanes to show that feminine-named hurricanes cause significantly more deaths than do masculine-named hurricanes. Laboratory experiments indicate that this is because hurricane names lead to gender-based expectations about severity and this, in turn, guides respondents’ preparedness to take protective action. This finding indicates an unfortunate and unintended consequence of the gendered naming of hurricanes, with important implications for policymakers, media practitioners, and the general public concerning hurricane communication and preparedness. PMID:24889620

  10. Hurricane Isaac

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... hour (65 knots) from cloud motion observed outside Isaac's eye. The National Hurricane Center in Miami similarly reported maximum ... located in the Gulf of Mexico, southeast of Louisiana. The eye of the storm is just off the western edge of the image, while the coast of ...

  11. Hurricane Wilma

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... were posted for Cuba and Mexico. The central pair shows the eye of Hurricane Wilma just hours before the storm began to cross the Yucatan ... October 24. On the 18th, Wilma looked a bit ragged. Its eye is located at the center of the left edge, and its outer bands of clouds ...

  12. Hurricane Preparedness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Edit Zip Code Edit Zip Code Shop the Red Cross Store Home Get Help Types of Emergencies Hurricane Preparedness Download the FREE Emergency App Find our Emergency App in the Apple Store or Google Play Aplicación de Emergencias - ahora ...

  13. Hurricane Isadore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1: AIRS channel 2333 (2616 cm-1)Figure 2: HSB channel 2 (150 GHz)

    Three different Views of Hurricane Isidore from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounding System (AIRS) on Aqua.

    At the time Aqua passed over Isidore, it was classified as a Category 3 (possibly 4) hurricane, with minimum pressure of 934 mbar, maximum sustained wind speeds of 110 knots (gusting to 135) and an eye diameter of 20 nautical miles. Isidore was later downgraded to a Tropical Storm before gathering strength again.

    This is a visible/near-infrared image, made with the AIRS instrument. Its 2 km resolution shows fine details of the cloud structure, and can be used to help interpret the other images. For example, some relatively cloud-free regions in the eye of the hurricane can be distinguished. This image was made with wavelengths slightly different than those seen by the human eye, causing plants to appear very red.

    Figure 1 shows high and cold clouds in blue. Figure 2 shows heavy rain cells over Alabama in blue. This image shows the swirling clouds in white and the water of the Gulf of Mexico in blue. The eye of the hurricane is apparent in all three images.

    Figure 1 shows how the hurricane looks through an AIRS Infrared window channel. Window channels measure the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in clear regions. The lowest temperatures are over Alabama and are associated with high, cold cloud tops at the end of the cloud band streaming from the hurricane. Although the eye is visible, it does not appear to be completely cloud free.

    Figure 2 shows the hurricane as seen through a microwave channel of the Humidity Sounder for Brazil (HSB). This channel is sensitive to humidity, clouds and rain. Unlike the AIRS infrared channel, it can penetrate through cloud layers and therefore reveals some of the internal structure of the hurricane. In this

  14. Tropical North Atlantic ocean-atmosphere interactions synchronize forest carbon losses from hurricanes and Amazon fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Randerson, James T.; Morton, Douglas C.

    2015-08-01

    We describe a climate mode synchronizing forest carbon losses from North and South America by analyzing time series of tropical North Atlantic sea surface temperatures (SSTs), landfall hurricanes and tropical storms, and Amazon fires during 1995-2013. Years with anomalously high tropical North Atlantic SSTs during March-June were often followed by a more active hurricane season and a larger number of satellite-detected fires in the southern Amazon during June-November. The relationship between North Atlantic tropical cyclones and southern Amazon fires (r = 0.61, p < 0.003) was stronger than links between SSTs and either cyclones or fires alone, suggesting that fires and tropical cyclones were directly coupled to the same underlying atmospheric dynamics governing tropical moisture redistribution. These relationships help explain why seasonal outlook forecasts for hurricanes and Amazon fires both failed in 2013 and may enable the design of improved early warning systems for drought and fire in Amazon forests.

  15. Learning Activities for the Growth Season.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darby, Linda, Ed.

    This poster, illustrated with a graphic of a caterpillar changing to a cocoon and emerging as a butterfly, presents learning activities for 7 weeks based on the seven stages of growth in the President's "Call to Action." Each week includes 5 days of activities based on seven themes: (1) "Reading on Your Own"; (2) "Getting Ready for Algebra"; (3)…

  16. Daily and seasonal activity patterns in blackheaded munia.

    PubMed

    GuptA, Neelu Jain

    2014-05-01

    To test the circadian clock characteristics, activity behaviour of male blackheaded munia was recorded. Two experiments were performed. In experiment 1A, activity of munia was recorded under long days, LD (14L: 10D); and short days, SD (10L: 14D). Locomotor activity of two groups of munia exposed to equinox (12L: 12D) daylength followed by transfer of one group each to continuous dimlight (DD) and continuous bright light (LL) was recorded in experiment 1B. Experiment 2 aimed to describe seasonal trend in daily pattern of activity/rest cycle under natural illumination conditions (NDL). Hourly activity during daytime was more under SD than under LD. Munia did not exhibit bimodality in daily activity pattern; activity during morning, M (2h) was more than evening, E. A free-running activity rhythm was recorded in munia under DD; the same was arrhythmic under LL. The seasonal pattern in daily activity profiles under NDL corresponds to the seasonal changes in daylength. Daylength regulates daily and seasonal activity patterns in blackheaded munia. PMID:24851413

  17. Regulation of Seasonal Reproduction by Hypothalamic Activation of Thyroid Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Shinomiya, Ai; Shimmura, Tsuyoshi; Nishiwaki-Ohkawa, Taeko; Yoshimura, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Organisms living outside the tropics measure the changes in the length of the day to adapt to seasonal changes in the environment. Animals that breed during spring and summer are called long-day breeders, while those that breed during fall are called short-day breeders. Although the influence of thyroid hormone in the regulation of seasonal reproduction has been known for several decades, its precise mechanism remained unknown. Recent studies revealed that the activation of thyroid hormone within the mediobasal hypothalamus plays a key role in this phenomenon. This localized activation of the thyroid hormone is controlled by thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone) secreted from the pars tuberalis of the pituitary gland. Although seasonal reproduction is a rate-limiting factor in animal production, genes involved in photoperiodic signal transduction pathway could emerge as potential targets to facilitate domestication. PMID:24600435

  18. Teaching Writing. Three Seasonal Activities to Hone Kids' Observation Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Brenda

    1997-01-01

    The seasonal activities presented are: observing herbs to encourage use of the senses in writing; watching a jack-o'-lantern wither to learn skills in writing details; and building snowmen to learn to explain a string of events in writing. (SM)

  19. Investigating seasonal gravity wave activity in the summer polar mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Taylor, M. J.; Randall, C. E.; Lumpe, J. D.; Siskind, D. E.; Bailey, S. M.; Russell, J. M.

    2015-05-01

    The NASA Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite is the first spaceborne mission dedicated to studying high-altitude (~83 km) Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs). Since its launch in 2007, the Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) instrument onboard AIM has obtained large-field, high resolution (25 km2/pixel) images of the PMCs, enabling a unique investigation of mesospheric gravity wave activity in the summer polar mesosphere where previous measurements have been sparse. In this study, we have analyzed 12 consecutive seasons of AIM/CIPS PMC albedo data to determine the statistical properties of medium and large horizontal scale (>100 km) gravity waves present in the PMC data. Over 60,000 wave events with horizontal scale-sizes ranging up to >2000 km have been identified and measured, revealing a wealth of wave events particularly in the ~300-800 km range where our analysis sensitivity is largest. These data are ideal for investigating the intra-seasonal, inter-annual and hemispheric variability of these waves as observed over the whole summer polar cap regions. Throughout this 6 year study, the wave activity in the southern hemisphere was found to be consistently 10-15% higher than in the northern hemisphere and both the northern and southern hemisphere wave activity was determined to decrease systematically (by ~15%) during the course of each summer season. This decrease agrees well with previous seasonal stratospheric studies of variations in the wave energy, suggesting a direct influence of the lower atmospheric sources on polar mesospheric dynamics. Very similar and consistent results were also found from season to season in both hemispheres providing new information for gravity wave modeling and dynamical studies of the high-latitude summer-time mesosphere.

  20. Hurricane Imaging Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Daniel J.; James, Mark W.; Roberts, J. Brent; Bisawas, Sayak K.; Jones, W. Linwood; Johnson, James; Farrar, Spencer; Sahawneh, Saleem; Ruf, Christopher S.; Morris, Mary; Black, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is a synthetic thinned array passive microwave radiometer designed to allow retrieval of surface wind speed in hurricanes, up through category five intensity. The retrieval technology follows the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which measures surface wind speed in hurricanes along a narrow strip beneath the aircraft. HIRAD has flown in the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiement in 2010 on a WB-57 aircraft, and on a Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS) in 2012 and 2013 as part of NASA's Hurricane and Severe Storms Sentinel (HS3) program. The GRIP program included flights over Hurricanes Earl and Karl (2010). The 2012 HS3 deployment did not include any hurricane flights for the UAS carrying HIRAD. Hurricane flights are expected for HIRAD in 2013 during HS3. This presentation will describe the HIRAD instrument, its results from the 2010 hurricane flights, and hopefully results from hurricane flights in August and September 2013.

  1. Electrification in Hurricanes over the Tropical Americas: Implication for Stratospheric Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pittman, Jasna V.; Chronis, Themis G.; Robertson, Franklin R.; Miller, Timothy L.

    2007-01-01

    This study explores the relation between lightning activity and water vapor in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) over hurricane systems in the Tropical Americas. The hypothesis herein is that hurricanes that exhibit enhanced lightning activity are associated with stronger updrafts that can transport more moisture directly into the TTL (and subsequently into the tropical stratosphere) or even directly into the tropical stratosphere over this region. The TTL over the Tropical Americas, which includes the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico, is of particular interest, because summertime cold point tropopause is the lowest in height and thus the warmest in temperature over the tropics. The latter condition implies higher saturation values and thus potential for more water vapor to enter the stratosphere. Climate forecast is very sensitive to stratospheric water vapor abundance, because of the key role that water vapor plays in regulating the chemical and radiative properties of the stratosphere. Given the potential for increases in hurricane intensity and frequency under predicted warmer conditions, it becomes essential to understand the effect of hurricanes on stratospheric water vapor. In this study, we use a combination of ground and space-borne observations as well as trajectory calculations. The observations include: cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning data from the U.S. National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN), geostationary infrared observations from the National Climatic Data Center Hurricane Satellite (HURSAT) data set, cloud properties from Aqua-MODIS, and water vapor from Aura-MLS. We analyze hurricanes from the 2005 season when Aura-MLS data are available, namely: Dennis, Emily, Katrina, Rita, and Wilma. Our analysis consists of examining CG lightning, cloud-top properties, and TTL water vapor (i.e., 100 and 147 mb) over the hurricane while it remains over water in the Tropical Americas region. We investigate daily as well as diurnal statistical properties. The

  2. Seasonal variations in daily rhythms of activity in athletic horses.

    PubMed

    Bertolucci, C; Giannetto, C; Fazio, F; Piccione, G

    2008-07-01

    Circadian rhythms reflect extensive programming of biological activity that meets and exploits the challenges and opportunities offered by the periodic nature of the environment. In the present investigation, we recorded the total activity of athletic horses kept at four different times of the year (vernal equinox, summer solstice, autumn equinox and winter solstice), to evaluate the presence of seasonal variations of daily activity rhythms. Athletic Thoroughbred horses were kept in individual boxes with paddock. Digitally integrated measure of total activity of each mare was continuously recorded by actigraphy-based data loggers. Horse total activities were not evenly distributed over the day, but they were mainly diurnal during the year. Daily activity rhythms showed clear seasonal variations, with the highest daily amount of activity during the vernal equinox and the lowest during the winter solstice. Interestingly, the amount of activity during either photophase or scotophase changed significantly throughout the year. Circadian analysis of horse activities showed that the acrophase, the estimated time at which the peak of the rhythm occurs, did not change during the year, it always occurred in the middle of the photoperiod. Analysing the time structure of long-term and continuously measured activity and feeding could be a useful method to critically evaluate athletic horse management systems in which spontaneous locomotor activity and feeding are severely limited. Circadian rhythms are present in several elements of sensory motor and psychomotor functions and these would be taken into consideration to plan the training schedules and competitions in athletic horses. PMID:22443706

  3. Hurricane Isabel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1: AIRS infrared channel 2333 (2616 cm-1)

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 2: Total Water Vapor retrieved from AIRS infrared and AMSU-A microwave data

    September 18, 2003 These two false-color images show Hurricane Isabel viewed by the AIRS and AMSU-A instruments at 1:30 EDT in the morning of Thursday September 18, 2003. Isabel will be ashore within 12 hours, bringing widespread flooding and destructive winds. In figure 1 on the left, data retrieved by the AIRS infrared sensor shows the hurricane's eye as the small ring of pale blue near the upper left corner of the image. The dark blue band around the eye shows the cold tops of hundreds of powerful thunderstorms. These storms are embedded in the 120 mile per hour winds swirling counterclockwise around Isabel's eye. Cape Hatteras is the finger of land north-northwest of the eye. Isabel's winds will soon push ashore a 4- to 8-foot high mound of 'storm surge' and accompanying high surf, leading to flooding of Cape Hatteras and other islands of North Carolina's Outer Banks. Also seen in the image are several organized bands of cold, (blue) thunderstorm tops being pulled into the storm center. Other thunderstorm are forming north of the islands of Jamaica, Cuba, Hispaniola and Puerto Rico near the bottom of the picture.

    Figure 2 shows the geographical distribution and total amount of atmospheric water vapor associated with Isabel as inferred by AIRS and AMSU-A. Very humid areas appear deep red and surround the storm's eye in the ring of thunderstorms, as seen above. The enhancement of atmospheric water vapor in the storm is maintained by evaporation from the wind-churned sea surface. In turn, the water vapor powers the thunderstorms by condensing as rain and releasing the ocean's warmth into the atmosphere to drive strong convection. This makes Isabel and other hurricanes 'heat engines,' converting ocean water's warmth into

  4. Investigating Seasonal Gravity Wave Activity in the Summer Polar Mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Taylor, M. J.; Randall, C. E.; Lumpe, J. D., Jr.; Siskind, D. E.; Bailey, S. M.; Russell, J. M., III

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite is the first satellite mission dedicated to studying polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs). In particular, the Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) instrument onboard AIM obtains large-field PMC images enabling a unique investigation of the mesospheric gravity waves, as the satellite traverses over the summer polar regions. The high quality of CIPS data has provided an exceptional capability to investigate the gravity wave signatures in the summer polar mesosphere where previous measurements have been sparse. We have utilized 12 consecutive seasons of AIM/CIPS PMC albedo data to derive the statistical properties of a broad spectrum of gravity waves present in the PMC data. Over 60,000 waves with horizontal scale sizes ranging from ~50 to >2000 km were identified and measured, revealing a well-developed, consistent distribution for their horizontal wavelengths with a peak in occurrence frequency centered around 400 km. The same result was found from season to season and in both hemispheres. Throughout this study, the wave activity in the southern hemisphere was found to be 10-15% higher than in the northern hemisphere and both northern and southern wave activity was found to decrease systematically (average ~15%) during the course of each summer season. We present new results of the intra-seasonal, inter-annual and hemispheric variability of these waves observed over the whole summer polar cap regions. The systematic decrease in wave activity is consistent with background wind filtering in the northern hemisphere but is not apparently associated with the critical level filtering in the southern hemisphere.

  5. An Extended Forecast of the Frequencies of North Atlantic Basin Tropical Cyclone Activity for 2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    An extended forecast of the frequencies for the 2009 North Atlantic basin hurricane season is presented. Continued increased activity during the 2009 season with numbers of tropical cyclones, hurricanes, and major hurricanes exceeding long-term averages are indicated. Poisson statistics for the combined high-activity intervals (1950-1965 and 1995-2008) give the central 50% intervals to be 9-14, 5-8, and 2-4, respectively, for the number of tropical cyclones, hurricanes, and major hurricanes, with a 23.4% chance of exceeding 14 tropical cyclones, a 28% chance of exceeding 8 hurricanes, and a 31.9% chance of exceeding 4 major hurricanes. Based strictly on the statistics of the current high-activity interval (1995-2008), the central 50% intervals for the numbers of tropical cyclones, hurricanes, and major hurricanes are 12-18, 6-10, and 3-5, respectively, with only a 5% chance of exceeding 23, 13, or 7 storms, respectively. Also examined are the first differences in 10-yr moving averages and the effects of global warming and decadal-length oscillations on the frequencies of occurrence for North Atlantic basin tropical cyclones. In particular, temperature now appears to be the principal driver of increased activity and storm strength during the current high-activity interval, with near-record values possible during the 2009 season.

  6. GPM Captures Hurricane Odile

    NASA Video Gallery

    Animation revealing a swath of GPM/GMI precipitation rates over Hurricane Odile. The camera then moves down closer to the Hurricane to reveal DPR's volumetric view of Odile. As the camera rotates a...

  7. Hurricanes Frances and Ivan

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Cloud Height Maps for Hurricanes Frances and Ivan     ... predict the intensity and amount of rainfall associated with hurricanes still requires improvement, especially on the 24 to 48 hour ...

  8. Trends in the Annual Frequency of Atlantic Basin Intense Hurricanes: Implications for the Near-Term

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1998-01-01

    During the interval of 1944-1997, 120 intense hurricanes (category 3, 4, or 5 on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane scale) have been observed in the Atlantic basin. These intense hurricanes have had an observed annual frequency of 0-7 events per year (having a mean, mode, and median equal to about 2 events per year), being preferentially lower during El Ninio years and higher during non-El Ninio years. Also, it has recently been established that a long-term downward trend in the annual frequency of intense hurricanes, spanning about five decades, has taken place, although this trend can, alternatively, be explained as a shift from a more active state prior to the mid 1960's to a less active state thereafter (rather than as a simple linear decline). In this paper, on the basis of 10-yr moving averages, the long4erm trend of the frequency of intense hurricanes is compared against one for the annual mean temperature at Armagh Observatory, Northern Ireland (which serves as a proxy for climatic change). Interestingly, the two sets of 10-yr moving averages correlate extremely well, especially, when incorporating a slight 6-yr lag between them (with temperature leading; r = 0.90). This suggests that the current leading trend of temperature, which had been downward, but now is upward, may portend a return to the more active state for intense hurricanes. Thus, the 1998 season (presuming the abatement of El Ninio prior to the start of the hurricane season), and for several years thereafter (at least, into the early years of the next millennium), may have an annual frequency of intense hurricanes that is commensurate with the previously observed active state that was seen prior to the mid 1960's. If true, then, the shift to the more active state, probably, occurred in the mid-to-late 1980's, apparently, having gone undetected because of the masking, or modulating, effect of El Ninio, which has been rampant since the mid-to-late 1980's.

  9. Hurricane Katrina impact on water quality in the East Pearl River, Mississippi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiller, Alan M.; Shim, Moo-Joon; Guo, Laodong; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Smith, Richard W.; Duan, Shuiwang

    2012-01-01

    SummaryHurricanes and other intense storms have previously been reported to cause short-term changes in surface water quality. We examined the water quality of the East Pearl River in southern Mississippi both before and after Hurricane Katrina caused extensive damage to the watershed in 2005. Our post-storm sampling began two months after the hurricane, and thus we missed any immediate short-term consequences. However, sampling over the following two years allowed us to examine whether damage to the watershed resulted in significant longer-term effects on water quality. Interpretation of the time series data is complicated by the natural seasonal and climatic variability of the system. Thus, we utilized chemical property-property plots as well as semi-empirical relationships to compare pre- and post-storm water quality. Our analysis suggests that hurricane-induced vegetative destruction within this river basin has not substantially changed the concentrations of DOC, POC, SPM, pH, or dissolved Fe. However, lignin-phenol analysis of colloidal organic matter did show some significant changes in carbon-normalized concentration as well as in some degradation and source parameters. Nonetheless, even these changes were small and likely temporary. This lack of change may be partly due to the slow degradation of woody materials that occurs only over a period of a few years, even in the sub-tropical climate of this region. Also, transport of DOC material from the land, through the soils, and into the river is not always instantaneous because DOC may stay in soils for a long time. Our work can be examined in the context of other research focused on hurricane effects on different time scales. For instance, shorter term hurricane influences, such as immediate flooding, can cause concurrent, short-lived water quality changes. Likewise, if increased hurricane activity (as might result from climate change) results in permanent landscape or ecosystem changes, then significant long

  10. Land Area Change and Overview of Major Hurricane Impacts in Coastal Louisiana, 2004-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barras, John A.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessed changes in land and water coverage in coastal Louisiana within 2 months of Hurricane Gustav (September 1, 2008) and Hurricane Ike (September 13, 2008) by using Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) satellite imagery. The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) to provide preliminary information on land-water area changes in coastal Louisiana shortly after Hurricanes Ike and Gustav made landfall and (2) to contrast these changes with prior, widespread land area changes caused by Hurricane Katrina (August 29, 2005) and Hurricane Rita (September 24, 2005) 3 years earlier. Hurricane Gustav's physical surge impacts were not as severe as those observed from Hurricane Katrina. The largest observed changes were the reversion of recovery vegetation in Upper Breton Sound to an immediate post-Katrina appearance. Hurricane Ike's surge impacts were similar, although of somewhat lesser magnitude than Hurricane Rita's surge impacts. Major surge-removed marsh occurred in similar locations with similar morphologies from the two westward tracking storms. Although the net reduction in land from 2004 to 2008 (849.5 km2) exceeded that from 1978 to 2004 (743.3 km2), it is likely that the 2004-08 estimate will decrease, given time for the coast to recover from those hurricane seasons. Nevertheless, it is likely that the cumulative loss from these hurricane seasons will remain significant. Estimation of permanent losses cannot be made until several growing seasons have passed and the transitory impacts of the hurricanes are accounted for.

  11. Seasonal activity and morphological changes in martian gullies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dundas, Colin M.; Diniega, Serina; Hansen, Candice J.; Byrne, Shane; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies of martian dune and non-dune gullies have suggested a seasonal control on present-day gully activity. The timing of current gully activity, especially activity involving the formation or modification of channels (which commonly have been taken as evidence of fluvial processes), has important implications regarding likely gully formation processes and necessary environmental conditions. In this study, we describe the results of frequent meter-scale monitoring of several active gully sites by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). The aim is to better assess the scope and nature of current morphological changes and to provide improved constraints on timing of gully activity on both dune and non-dune slopes. Our observations indicate that (1) gully formation on Mars is ongoing today and (2) the most significant morphological changes are strongly associated with seasonal frost and defrosting activity. Observed changes include formation of all major components of typical gully landforms, although we have not observed alcove formation in coherent bedrock. These results reduce the need to invoke recent climate change or present-day groundwater seepage to explain the many martian gullies with pristine appearance.

  12. Response of Seasonal Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Activity to Suppression of African Easterly Waves in a Regional Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patricola, C. M.; Saravanan, R.; Chang, P.

    2014-12-01

    Atlantic tropical cyclones and African easterly waves (AEWs) are strongly linked on the synoptic timescale, with about 85% of observed major Atlantic hurricanes originating from AEWs (e.g., Landsea et al. 1993). However, the influence of variability in AEWs on seasonal Atlantic tropical cyclone activity is not fully understood; a positive correlation between AEW activity and Atlantic tropical cyclone activity exists on the interannual timescale during just some periods of the observational record (e.g., Thorncroft and Hodges, 2001; Hopsch et al. 2007). This study investigates the impact of AEWs on seasonal Atlantic tropical cyclone activity using regional climate model simulations in which AEWs were either prescribed or removed through the lateral boundary condition (LBC). The control simulation (10-member ensemble) was run at 27 km resolution and used 6-hourly LBCs from the NCEP CFS Reanalysis and daily NOAA Optimum Interpolation (OI) V2 sea surface temperature (SST) from the year 2005. In the experiment AEWs were suppressed by filtering 2-10 day variability over tropical latitudes from the eastern LBC, located along the west coast of the Sahel. The difference in Atlantic tropical cyclone frequency was insignificant between the simulations in which AEWs were prescribed versus suppressed, indicating that AEWs are not necessary to maintain climatological tropical cyclone frequency even though tropical cyclones readily originate from these features. This further implies that seasonal Atlantic tropical cyclone frequency is uninfluenced by variability in AEWs, and that the value of AEW variability as a predictor of Atlantic tropical cyclones is limited to the weekly timescale. However in response to filtering AEWs, accumulated cyclone energy significantly increased by about 15% of the control simulation mean and the spatial pattern of track density shifted in association with changes in steering winds. This suggests the importance of AEWs in impacting tropical cyclone

  13. Ideal free distribution of metabolic activity: Implications of seasonal metabolic-activity patterns on competitive coexistence.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Péter

    2016-10-01

    The seasonal distribution of metabolic activity determines how much individuals experience different aspects of a periodically changing environment. Seasonal metabolic-activity patterns of coexisting species may differ significantly despite their shared environmental conditions, suggesting that interspecific diversification of this trait has a major role in the coexistence of competing species. In the present study the effect of the seasonal distribution of metabolic activity on intra- and interspecific competition is investigated in a consumer-resource model. It is shown that, in a periodically changing environment, for each environmental preference pattern there is an ideal seasonal distribution of metabolic activity, which results in maximum resource utilisation efficiency and competitive superiority. Contrary to the common interpretation of temporal niche segregation, opposing species-specific seasonal preferences are not a sufficient condition for the coexistence of two species on a population dynamical time scale. A necessary and sufficient condition for coexistence is the temporal segregation of the species via different seasonal activity distributions. However, coexistence is evolutionarily stable only if seasonal metabolic activities and preferences are positively correlated. PMID:27189108

  14. Seasonal Pacing - Match Importance Affects Activity in Professional Soccer

    PubMed Central

    Link, Daniel; de Lorenzo, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    This research explores the influence of match importance on player activity in professional soccer. Therefore, we used an observational approach and analyzed 1,211 matches of German Bundesliga and 2nd Bundesliga. The importance measurement employed is based on post season consequences of teams involved in a match. This means, if a match result could potentially influence the final rank, and this rank would lead to different consequences for a team, such as qualification for Champions League opposed to qualification for Europe League, then this match is classified as important; otherwise not. Activity was quantified by TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED, SPRINTS, FAST RUNS, DUELS, FOULS and ATTEMPTS. Running parameters were recorded using a semi-automatic optical tracking system, while technical variables were collected by professional data loggers. Based on our importance classification, low important matches occurred at the beginning of round 29. A two-way ANOVA indicates significantly increased FAST RUNS (+4%, d = 0.3), DUELS (+16%, d = 1.0) and FOULS (+36%, d = 1.2) in important matches compared to low important ones. For FAST RUNS and FOULS, this effect only exists in Bundesliga. A comparison of the two leagues show that TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED (+3%, d = 0.9), SPRINTS (+25%, d = 1.4) and FAST RUNS (+15%, d = 1.4) are higher compared to 2nd Bundesliga, whilst FOULS is less in Bundesliga (-7%, d = 0.3). No difference in player activity was found between matches at the beginning of a season (round 1–6) and at the end of a season (round 29–34). We conclude that match importance influences player activity in German professional soccer. The most reasonable explanation is a conscious or unconscious pacing strategy, motivated by preserving abilities or preventing injury. Since this tendency mainly exists in Bundesliga, this may suggest that more skilled players show a higher awareness for the need of pacing. PMID:27281051

  15. Seasonal Pacing - Match Importance Affects Activity in Professional Soccer.

    PubMed

    Link, Daniel; de Lorenzo, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    This research explores the influence of match importance on player activity in professional soccer. Therefore, we used an observational approach and analyzed 1,211 matches of German Bundesliga and 2nd Bundesliga. The importance measurement employed is based on post season consequences of teams involved in a match. This means, if a match result could potentially influence the final rank, and this rank would lead to different consequences for a team, such as qualification for Champions League opposed to qualification for Europe League, then this match is classified as important; otherwise not. Activity was quantified by TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED, SPRINTS, FAST RUNS, DUELS, FOULS and ATTEMPTS. Running parameters were recorded using a semi-automatic optical tracking system, while technical variables were collected by professional data loggers. Based on our importance classification, low important matches occurred at the beginning of round 29. A two-way ANOVA indicates significantly increased FAST RUNS (+4%, d = 0.3), DUELS (+16%, d = 1.0) and FOULS (+36%, d = 1.2) in important matches compared to low important ones. For FAST RUNS and FOULS, this effect only exists in Bundesliga. A comparison of the two leagues show that TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED (+3%, d = 0.9), SPRINTS (+25%, d = 1.4) and FAST RUNS (+15%, d = 1.4) are higher compared to 2nd Bundesliga, whilst FOULS is less in Bundesliga (-7%, d = 0.3). No difference in player activity was found between matches at the beginning of a season (round 1-6) and at the end of a season (round 29-34). We conclude that match importance influences player activity in German professional soccer. The most reasonable explanation is a conscious or unconscious pacing strategy, motivated by preserving abilities or preventing injury. Since this tendency mainly exists in Bundesliga, this may suggest that more skilled players show a higher awareness for the need of pacing.

  16. Seasonal Pacing - Match Importance Affects Activity in Professional Soccer.

    PubMed

    Link, Daniel; de Lorenzo, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    This research explores the influence of match importance on player activity in professional soccer. Therefore, we used an observational approach and analyzed 1,211 matches of German Bundesliga and 2nd Bundesliga. The importance measurement employed is based on post season consequences of teams involved in a match. This means, if a match result could potentially influence the final rank, and this rank would lead to different consequences for a team, such as qualification for Champions League opposed to qualification for Europe League, then this match is classified as important; otherwise not. Activity was quantified by TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED, SPRINTS, FAST RUNS, DUELS, FOULS and ATTEMPTS. Running parameters were recorded using a semi-automatic optical tracking system, while technical variables were collected by professional data loggers. Based on our importance classification, low important matches occurred at the beginning of round 29. A two-way ANOVA indicates significantly increased FAST RUNS (+4%, d = 0.3), DUELS (+16%, d = 1.0) and FOULS (+36%, d = 1.2) in important matches compared to low important ones. For FAST RUNS and FOULS, this effect only exists in Bundesliga. A comparison of the two leagues show that TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED (+3%, d = 0.9), SPRINTS (+25%, d = 1.4) and FAST RUNS (+15%, d = 1.4) are higher compared to 2nd Bundesliga, whilst FOULS is less in Bundesliga (-7%, d = 0.3). No difference in player activity was found between matches at the beginning of a season (round 1-6) and at the end of a season (round 29-34). We conclude that match importance influences player activity in German professional soccer. The most reasonable explanation is a conscious or unconscious pacing strategy, motivated by preserving abilities or preventing injury. Since this tendency mainly exists in Bundesliga, this may suggest that more skilled players show a higher awareness for the need of pacing. PMID:27281051

  17. Communication, neighbourhood belonging and household hurricane preparedness.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Chan; Kang, Jinae

    2010-04-01

    This paper reports on an examination of data on how local residents in Tuscaloosa, a mid-sized city in the state of Alabama, United States, responded to Hurricane Ivan of September 2004. The evaluation revealed that an integrated connection to community-level communication resources-comprising local media, community organisations and interpersonal networks-has a direct impact on the likelihood of engaging in pre-hurricane preparedness activities and an indirect effect on during-hurricane preparedness activities. Neighbourhood belonging mediated the relation between an integrated connection to community-level communication resources and during-hurricane preparedness activities. Neighbourhood belonging was determined to increase the likelihood of taking preparedness actions during Hurricane Ivan, but not prior to it. In addition, we discovered an interesting pattern for two different types of risk perceptions: social and personal risk perceptions. Social risk perceptions increase the likelihood of taking preventative steps before a hurricane while personal risk perceptions are positively related to engaging in preventative action during a hurricane.

  18. NASA's Three Pronged Approach to Hurricane Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakar, R. K.

    2006-12-01

    The direct question: How can weather forecast duration and reliability be improved and guide research within NASA's Weather Focus Area? A mandate of the Weather Focus Area is to investigate high impact weather events, such as severe tropical storms, through a combination of new and improved space-based observations, high-altitude research aircraft and sophisticated numerical models. The field experiments involving the NASA research aircraft are vital components of this three-pronged approach. The Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX) - 3 studied inner core dynamics, synoptic flow environment, land falling intensity change and the genesis environment for several hurricanes in a field experiment carried out during the 1998 season. CAMEX-4 studied rapid intensification, storm structure and dynamics, scale interactions and intercomparison of remote sensing techniques during the 2001 hurricane season. Several state of the art remote sensing instruments were used in these studies from the NASA DC-8 and ER-2 aircraft. During July 2005, NASA conducted its Tropical Cloud Systems and Processes (TCSP) experiment from San Jose, Costa Rica. The purpose of TCSP was to investigate the genesis and intensification of tropical cyclones primarily in the eastern North Pacific. This ocean basin was chosen because climatologically it represents the most concentrated region of cyclone formation on the planet and is within range of research aircraft deploying from Costa Rica. In 2005, however, the Caribbean was particularly active instead. We were greeted by two of the strongest July hurricanes on record for the Caribbean. The NASA ER-2 high altitude research aircraft flew twelve separate missions, carrying a payload of several remote sensing instruments. Many of these missions were flown in coordination with the NOAA Hurricane Research Division (HRD) P-3 Orion research aircraft as part of NOAA's 2005 Intensity Forecast Experiment. TCSP's successor program, the NAMMA-06 (NASA African

  19. Nocturnal and seasonal activities of the pallid bat, Antrozous pallidus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Shea, Thomas J.; Vaughan, Terry A.

    1977-01-01

    Nocturnal and seasonal activities of pallid bats (Antrozous pallidus) were observed in central Arizona. The pallid bat night is characterized by two roaming periods with an intervening period of night roosting. Foraging pallid bats have a characteristic style of flight well suited to the taking of relatively large, substrate-roving or slow flying prey. After the initial foraging period pallid bats locate one another through vocal communication and gather in night roosting clusters where they enter torpor. Durations and scheduling of nocturnal activities vary seasonally. Cool months are characterized by smaller colonies of bats, greater fidelity to certain colony sites, slower and later emergence, briefer foraging periods and longer periods of night roosting. Up to 75 percent of the time spent away from diurnal retreats is devoted to night roosting in the autumn. Young are born in June, and during most of the summer adult males do not seem to occur sympatrically with females and young. Females and young appear to forage together in July and August, when little fidelity is shown to roosting sites, large colonies exist, emergence is faster and earlier, and more time is spent in foraging than in cooler months. In mid-August a postbreeding dispersal occurs. These activities and behaviors are discussed in terms of the energetic demands on the bats and the socialization of young.

  20. Hurricane Dean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Location: The coast of Mexico from Manzanillo to Mazatlan Categorization: Tropical Depression Sustained Winds: 35 mph (56 km/hr)

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Infrared ImageMicrowave Image

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image to access AIRS Weather Snapshot for Hurricane Dean

    Infrared Images Because infrared radiation does not penetrate through clouds, AIRS infrared images show either the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of the storm. In cloud-free areas the AIRS instrument will receive the infrared radiation from the surface of the Earth, resulting in the warmest temperatures (orange/red).

    Microwave Images In the AIRS microwave imagery, deep blue areas in storms show where the most precipitation occurs, or where ice crystals are present in the convective cloud tops. Outside of these storm regions, deep blue areas may also occur over the sea surface due to its low radiation emissivity. On the other hand, land appears much warmer due to its high radiation emissivity.

    Microwave radiation from Earth's surface and lower atmosphere penetrates most clouds to a greater or lesser extent depending upon their water vapor, liquid water and ice content. Precipitation, and ice crystals found at the cloud tops where strong convection is taking place, act as barriers to microwave radiation. Because of this barrier effect, the AIRS microwave sensor detects only the radiation arising at or above their location in the atmospheric column. Where these barriers are not present, the microwave sensor detects radiation arising throughout the air column and down to the surface. Liquid surfaces (oceans, lakes and rivers) have 'low emissivity' (the signal isn't as strong) and their radiation brightness temperature is

  1. Hurricane Felix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Microwave Image

    These infrared and microwave images were created with data retrieved by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua satellite, and show the remnants of the former Hurricane Felix over Central America.

    Infrared Images Because infrared radiation does not penetrate through clouds, AIRS infrared images show either the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of the storm. In cloud-free areas the AIRS instrument will receive the infrared radiation from the surface of the Earth, resulting in the warmest temperatures (orange/red).

    Microwave Images In the AIRS microwave imagery, deep blue areas in storms show where the most precipitation occurs, or where ice crystals are present in the convective cloud tops. Outside of these storm regions, deep blue areas may also occur over the sea surface due to its low radiation emissivity. On the other hand, land appears much warmer due to its high radiation emissivity.

    Microwave radiation from Earth's surface and lower atmosphere penetrates most clouds to a greater or lesser extent depending upon their water vapor, liquid water and ice content. Precipitation, and ice crystals found at the cloud tops where strong convection is taking place, act as barriers to microwave radiation. Because of this barrier effect, the AIRS microwave sensor detects only the radiation arising at or above their location in the atmospheric column. Where these barriers are not present, the microwave sensor detects radiation arising throughout the air column and down to the surface. Liquid surfaces (oceans, lakes and rivers) have 'low emissivity' (the signal isn't as strong) and their radiation brightness temperature is therefore low. Thus the ocean also appears 'low temperature' in the AIRS microwave images and is assigned

  2. Hurricane Scientist talks GRIP, Hurricane Earl

    NASA Video Gallery

    Hurricane Earl, currently a powerful category 4 storm, is barreling north with the potential to batter the East Coast and threaten Labor Day plans for beachgoers from North Carolina to Massachusett...

  3. Impacts of non-canonical El Niño patterns on Atlantic hurricane activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, S.; Lee, S.; Wang, C.; Chung, E.; Enfield, D. B.

    2012-12-01

    The impact of non-canonical El Niño patterns, typically characterized by warmer than normal sea surface tempera- tures (SSTs) in the central tropical Pacific, on Atlantic tropical cyclone (TC) is explored by using composites of key Atlantic TC indices and tropospheric vertical wind shear over the Atlantic main development region (MDR). The highlight of our major findings is that, while the canonical El Niño pattern has a strong suppressing influence on Atlantic TC activity, non-canonical El Niño patterns con- sidered in this study, namely central Pacific warming, El Niño Modoki, positive phase Trans-Niño, and positive phase Pacific meridional mode, all have insubstantial impact on Atlantic TC activity. This result becomes more conclu- sive when the impact of MDR SST is removed from the Atlantic TC indices and MDR wind shear by using the method of linear regression. Further analysis suggests that the tropical Pacific SST anomalies associated with the non- canonical El Niño patterns are not strong enough to cause a substantial warming of the tropical troposphere in the Atlantic region, which is the key factor that increases the wind shear and atmospheric static stability over the MDR. During the recent decades, the non-canonical El Niños have been more frequent while the canonical El Niño has been less frequent. If such a trend continues in the future, it is expected that the suppressing effect of El Niño on Atlantic TC activity will diminish and thus the MDR SST will play a more important role in controlling Atlantic TC activity in the coming decades.

  4. Impacts of non-canonical El Niño patterns on Atlantic hurricane activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Sarah; Lee, Sang-Ki; Wang, Chunzai; Chung, Eui-Seok; Enfield, David

    2012-07-01

    The impact of non-canonical El Niño patterns, typically characterized by warmer than normal sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the central tropical Pacific, on Atlantic tropical cyclone (TC) is explored by using composites of key Atlantic TC indices and tropospheric vertical wind shear over the Atlantic main development region (MDR). The highlight of our major findings is that, while the canonical El Niño pattern has a strong suppressing influence on Atlantic TC activity, non-canonical El Niño patterns considered in this study, namely central Pacific warming, El Niño Modoki, positive phase Trans-Niño, and positive phase Pacific meridional mode, all have insubstantial impact on Atlantic TC activity. This result becomes more conclusive when the impact of MDR SST is removed from the Atlantic TC indices and MDR wind shear by using the method of linear regression. Further analysis suggests that the tropical Pacific SST anomalies associated with the non-canonical El Niño patterns are not strong enough to cause a substantial warming of the tropical troposphere in the Atlantic region, which is the key factor that increases the wind shear and atmospheric static stability over the MDR. During the recent decades, the non-canonical El Niños have been more frequent while the canonical El Niño has been less frequent. If such a trend continues in the future, it is expected that the suppressing effect of El Niño on Atlantic TC activity will diminish and thus the MDR SST will play a more important role in controlling Atlantic TC activity in the coming decades.

  5. Predicting Hurricanes with Supercomputers

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Hurricane Emily, formed in the Atlantic Ocean on July 10, 2005, was the strongest hurricane ever to form before August. By checking computer models against the actual path of the storm, researchers can improve hurricane prediction. In 2010, NOAA researchers were awarded 25 million processor-hours on Argonne's BlueGene/P supercomputer for the project. Read more at http://go.usa.gov/OLh

  6. Landslides triggered by Hurricane Mitch in Guatemala -- inventory and discussion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bucknam, Robert C.; Coe, Jeffrey A.; Chavarria, Manuel Mota; Godt, Jonathan W.; Tarr, Arthur C.; Bradley, Lee-Ann; Rafferty, Sharon A.; Hancock, Dean; Dart, Richard L.; Johnson, Margo L.

    2001-01-01

    The torrential rains that accompanied Hurricane Mitch in October and November of 1998 triggered thousands of landslides in the moderate to steep terrain bordering the Motagua and Polochic Rivers in eastern Guatemala. Using aerial photographs taken between January and March 2000 we mapped all visible landslides larger than about 15 m in minimum dimension in a study area of 10,000 km2 encompassing twenty 1:50,000-scale topographic map quadrangles. Rainfall from Hurricane Mitch was exceptional because it was geographically widespread, prolonged over a period of about a week, moderate to heavy in intensity, and occurred at the end of the rainy season when the ground already had a high moisture content. As documented in this report, this type of rainfall, on saturated or nearly saturated ground, has the capability to trigger both shallow and deep-seated landslides over a large area. We mapped about 11,500 landslides in the study area. The mapped landslides were of two general types: relatively small, translational and rotational landslides that commonly mobilized into debris flows and covered less than several hectares in area (not including flow paths), and large, commonly translational, landslides that sometimes generated debris flows and covered between 15 ha and 25 ha (not including flow paths). The main concentrations of landslides are on moderate-to-steep hillslopes underlain by diverse geologic units. For the purpose of describing the mapped landslides, we divided the study area into five distinct regions based on differing geologic and geomorphic characteristics. These regions include the upper Polochic valley and surrounding highlands, the central Sierra de las Minas, the hills surrounding La Union and Zacapa, the eastern Sierra de las Minas, and the border region with Honduras. All of these areas received between 200 mm and 600 mm of rain over a 13-day period between October 25 and November 6. The highest rainfall amounts (400 mm to 600 mm) occurred in the

  7. Hurricanes : get prepared !

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauroy, Maëlle

    2013-04-01

    Living in France, near Paris, we have the chance not to be exposed to natural hazards. But on TV we can see, almost every year, geological disasters affecting people from all around the world. Sometimes it also affects us indirectly. For example, the Icelandic volcanic eruption of 2010 prevented some of my students to go on holidays because of the air travel disruption. Since then, every year, we study a natural disaster that has just made the headlines. This topic is of great interest for students because it is connected with their everyday life, with what they see on the news at that time. This year, they were amazed that a city as New York could be struck so violently by a hurricane. Understanding the formation of a hurricane and the consequences of such an event made them think about how to educate people and warn them in case of a hurricane. As a matter of fact, history teaches that a lack of hurricane awareness and preparation are common threads among all major hurricane disasters. By knowing the vulnerability and what actions people should take, it is possible to reduce the effects of a hurricane disaster. They designed posters, showing how a hurricane form, the risks and what to do in case of a hurricane alert. They used TV news broadcasts and educational videos as well as videos from the National Hurricane Center [of the United-States]. Later, they tried to model the formation of a hurricane and the consequences of storm surge, high winds and inland flooding on a coastal area. They filmed their experiments in order to create an interactive exhibition on hurricanes, to be displayed in the school library for other students.

  8. Altered resting-state activity in seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Abou Elseoud, Ahmed; Nissilä, Juuso; Liettu, Anu; Remes, Jukka; Jokelainen, Jari; Takala, Timo; Aunio, Antti; Starck, Tuomo; Nikkinen, Juha; Koponen, Hannu; Zang, Yu-Feng; Tervonen, Osmo; Timonen, Markku; Kiviniemi, Vesa

    2014-01-01

    At present, our knowledge about seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is based mainly up on clinical symptoms, epidemiology, behavioral characteristics and light therapy. Recently developed measures of resting-state functional brain activity might provide neurobiological markers of brain disorders. Studying functional brain activity in SAD could enhance our understanding of its nature and possible treatment strategies. Functional network connectivity (measured using ICA-dual regression), and amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) were measured in 45 antidepressant-free patients (39.78 ± 10.64, 30 ♀, 15 ♂) diagnosed with SAD and compared with age-, gender- and ethnicity-matched healthy controls (HCs) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. After correcting for Type 1 error at high model orders (inter-RSN correction), SAD patients showed significantly increased functional connectivity in 11 of the 47 identified RSNs. Increased functional connectivity involved RSNs such as visual, sensorimotor, and attentional networks. Moreover, our results revealed that SAD patients compared with HCs showed significant higher ALFF in the visual and right sensorimotor cortex. Abnormally altered functional activity detected in SAD supports previously reported attentional and psychomotor symptoms in patients suffering from SAD. Further studies, particularly under task conditions, are needed in order to specifically investigate cognitive deficits in SAD.

  9. Atlantic Hurricanes in Future Scenarios and Associated Insurance Losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleppek, S.; Wüest, M.; Raible, C. C.; Kitoh, A.; Murakami, H.; Stocker, T. F.; Muccione, V.; Bresch, D. N.

    2009-04-01

    The hurricane season 2005 in the Atlantic was the most intense season since the first records with 28 tropical storms of which 15 reached hurricane character (Trenberth and Shea, 2006). Although this year is considered to be an outlier, a substantial increase of the activity of tropical cyclones (TCs) in the tropical Atlantic over the last decades is documented (Sriver and Huber, 2006; Hoyos et al., 2006; Webster et al. 2005; Emanuel, 2005). The role of the sea surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic for the tropical storm activity was discussed already in Emanuel (2005) and Hoyos et al. (2006). Future changes of TC activity is currently under debate (e. g. Bengston et al., 2007). We contribute to this by applying our TC detection and tracking method which was developed for ERA-40 data (Kleppek et al., 2008) to time-slice experiments of two models: The ECHAM5 atmospheric model (MPI, Hamburg, Germany) and the 20 km-mesh, high resolution AGCM (MRI, Tsukuba-city, Japan). From each model two climate simulations are available: For the ECHAM5 a control run for the period 1960-90 and a SRES A2 scenario run for the period 2070-2100 and for the Mesh-AGCM a 20 years run with present day conditions and a 20 years run with end-of-21-century A2 conditions. To estimate losses of the ECHAM5- and Mesh-model hurricanes on the US coast, we have developed probabilistic hurricane event sets which are used as input for catXos, the loss model of the Swiss Reinsurance Company. Preliminary results show higher wind speeds of the ECHAM5 scenario run hurricanes than in the control run, but the numbers of the hurricanes of Saffir-Simpson-scale 2 to 4 show no clear difference between the control and scenario run of ECHAM5. Even though the resolution of the simulation is rather high no hurricanes of Saffir-Simpson-scale 5 are detected. The total number of TCs decreases for the scenario run. This applies as much to the TCs over the Atlantic as over the US-coast. References: Bengston L., K

  10. Track-pattern-based seasonal prediction model for intense tropical cyclone activities over the North Atlantic and the western North Pacific basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, W.; Ho, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    Intense tropical cyclones (TCs) accompanying heavy rainfall and destructive wind gusts sometimes cause incredible socio-economic damages in the regions near their landfall. This study aims to analyze intense TC activities in the North Atlantic (NA) and the western North Pacific (WNP) basins and develop their track propensity seasonal prediction model. Considering that the number of TCs in the NA basin is much smaller than that in the WNP basin, different intensity criteria are used; category 1 and above for NA and category 3 and above for WNP based on Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale. By using a fuzzy clustering method, intense TC tracks in the NA and the WNP basins are classified into two and three representative patterns, respectively. Each pattern shows empirical relationships with climate variabilities such as sea surface temperature distribution associated with El Niño/La Niña or Atlantic Meridional Mode, Pacific decadal oscillation, upper and low level zonal wind, and strength of subtropical high. The hybrid statistical-dynamical method has been used to develop the seasonal prediction model for each pattern based on statistical relationships between the intense TC activity and seasonal averaged key predictors. The model performance is statistically assessed by cross validation for the training period (1982-2013) and has been applied for the 2014 and 2015 prediction. This study suggests applicability of this model to real prediction work and provide bridgehead of attempt for intense TC prediction.

  11. Mangrove forest recovery in the Everglades following Hurricane Wilma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sarmiento, Daniel; Barr, Jordan; Engel, Vic; Fuentes, Jose D.; Smith, Thomas J.; Zieman, Jay C.

    2009-01-01

    On October 24th, 2005, Hurricane Wilma made landfall on the south western shore of the Florida peninsula. This major disturbance destroyed approximately 30 percent of the mangrove forests in the area. However, the damage to the ecosystem following the hurricane provided researchers at the Florida Coastal Everglades (FCE) LTER site with the rare opportunity to track the recovery process of the mangroves as determined by carbon dioxide (CO2) and energy exchanges, measured along daily and seasonal time scales.

  12. The strong association between western Sahelian monsoon rainfall and intense atlantic hurricanes

    SciTech Connect

    Landsea, C.W.; Gray, W.M. )

    1992-05-01

    Seasonal variability of Atlantic basin tropical cyclones is examined with respect to the monsoon rainfall over West Africa. Variations of intense hurricanes are of the most interest, as they are responsible for over three-quarters of United States tropical cyclone spawned destruction, though they account for only one-fifth of all landfalling cyclones. Intense hurricanes have also shown a strong downward trend during the last few decades. It is these storms that show the largest concurrent association with Africa's western Sahelian June-September rainfall for the years 1949-90. Though the Sahel is currently experiencing a multidecadal drought, the relationship between Atlantic tropical cyclones and western Sahelian rainfall is not dependent on the similar downward trends in both datasets. A detrended analysis confirms that a strong association still exists, though reduced somewhat in variance explained. Additionally, independent data from the years 1899 to 1948 substantiate the existence of the tropical cyclone-western Sahelian rainfall association. The fact that the Sahel periodically experiences multidecadal wet and dry regimes suggests that the current Sahelian drought, which began in the late 1960s, could be a temporary condition that may end in the near future. When this occurs, the Atlantic hurricane basin-especially the Caribbean islands and the United States East Coast-will likely see a large increase in intense hurricane activity associated with abundant Sahelian rainfall similar to the period of the late 1940s through the 1960s.

  13. Hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea and their relationship with sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojo-Garibaldi, Berenice; Salas-de-León, David Alberto; Sánchez, Norma Leticia; Monreal-Gómez, María Adela

    2016-10-01

    We present the results of a time series analysis of hurricanes and sunspots occurring from 1749 to 2010. Exploratory analysis shows that the total number of hurricanes is declining. This decline is related to an increase in sunspot activity. Spectral analysis shows a relationship between hurricane oscillation periods and sunspot activity. Several sunspot cycles were identified from the time series analysis.

  14. Hurricane! Coping With Disaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifland, Jonathan

    A new AGU book, Hurricane! Coping With Disaster, analyzes the progress made in hurricane science and recounts how advances in the field have affected the public's and the scientific community's understanding of these storms. The book explores the evolution of hurricane study, from the catastrophic strike in Galveston, Texas in 1900—still the worst natural disaster in United States history—to today's satellite and aircraft observations that track a storm's progress and monitor its strength. In this issue, Eos talks with Robert Simpson, the books' senior editor.Simpson has studied severe storms for more than 60 years, including conducting one of the first research flights through a hurricane in 1945. He was the founding director of the (U.S.) National Hurricane Research Project and has served as director of the National Hurricane Center. In collaboration with Herbert Saffir, Simpson helped design and implement the Saffir/Simpson damage potential scale that is widely used to identify potential damage from hurricanes.

  15. Hurricane Imaging Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Daniel J.; Biswas, Sayak K.; James, Mark W.; Roberts, J. Brent; Jones, W. Linwood; Johnson, James; Farrar, Spencer; Sahawneh, Saleem; Ruf, Christopher S.; Morris, Mary; Black, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is a synthetic thinned array passive microwave radiometer designed to allow retrieval of surface wind speed in hurricanes, up through category five intensity. The retrieval technology follows the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which measures surface wind speed in hurricanes along a narrow strip beneath the aircraft. HIRAD maps wind speeds in a swath below the aircraft, about 50-60 km wide when flown in the lower stratosphere. HIRAD has flown in the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment in 2010 on a WB-57 aircraft, and on a Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS) in 2012 and 2013 as part of NASA's Hurricane and Severe Storms Sentinel (HS3) program. The GRIP program included flights over Hurricanes Earl and Karl (2010). The 2012 HS3 deployment did not include any hurricane flights for the UAS carrying HIRAD. The 2013 HS3 flights included one flight over the predecessor to TS Gabrielle, and one flight over Hurricane Ingrid. This presentation will describe the HIRAD instrument, its results from the 2010 and 2013 flights, and potential future developments.

  16. New Hurricane Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A new exhibit in StenniSphere depicting NASA's role in hurricane prediction and research and SSC's role in helping the region recover from Hurricane Katrina. The cyclone-shaped exhibit focuses on the effects of the Aug. 29, 2005 storm and outlines how NASA is working to improve weather forecasting. Through photos, 3-D models and digital animations, the exhibit tells the story of what happened inside the storm and how NASA's scientific research can increase the accuracy of hurricane tracking and modeling.

  17. Deaths associated with Hurricanes Marilyn and Opal--United States, September-October 1995.

    PubMed

    1996-01-19

    The 1995 hurricane season was one of the most severe in U.S. history and included 11 hurricanes. During a 2-week period, the two most damaging storms--hurricanes Marilyn and Opal--made landfall in the United States. To characterize the deaths attributed to these storms, CDC contacted medical examiners/coroners (ME/Cs) in the affected areas. This report summarizes the findings of these investigations.

  18. Hurricane risk assessment: Rollback or ride out

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohlman, Richard A.

    1993-01-01

    Winds in excess of 74.5 knots could cause severe damage to a space shuttle on the launch pad. Current plans exist for rollback to the Vehicle Assembly Building, but require 48 hour leadtime to implement. Decisions based upon cost/loss are evaluated to ascertain whether predetermined forecast probabilities for rollback/rideout decisions can be made far in advance of hurricane seasons for use in decision making.

  19. Seasonal effects on intestinal enzyme activity in the Australian agamid lizard, Lophognathus temporalis.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Sebastian; Tracy, Christopher R; Bedford, Gavin S; McWhorter, Todd J; Christian, Keith A

    2009-05-01

    The tropical agamid lizard, Lophognathus temporalis, has higher metabolic and feeding rates during the wet season compared to the dry season. Also, lizards from urban sites tend to be larger than those from natural sites, partly due to site differences in food availability. Therefore, we hypothesized that activity of membrane-bound intestinal enzymes and masses of organs related to digestion would differ both seasonally and between urban and natural sites. To test this, we measured activities of aminopeptidase-N (APN), maltase, and sucrase, as well as organ masses. APN activity (micromol min(-1) g(-1)) was highest in the middle portion of the intestine (section 2), followed by the proximal portion (section 1) and then the distal portion (section 3). Maltase activity was highest in section 1 and decreased distally. We detected some sucrase activity in section 1 but none in sections 2 or 3. We found similar enzyme activities within each section irrespective of site or season. However, total enzyme activities were higher during the wet season compared to the dry season for both urban and bush L. temporalis. Total wet season enzyme activity in urban and bush L. temporalis was greatest for APN (25.4; 15.8 micromol min(-1); respectively), then maltase (3.9; 3.6 micromol min(-1); respectively) and then sucrase (0.3; 0.2 micromol min(-1); respectively). The higher total enzyme activities was the result of an increase in intestinal mass during the wet season.

  20. Hurricanes benefit bleached corals

    PubMed Central

    Manzello, Derek P.; Brandt, Marilyn; Smith, Tyler B.; Lirman, Diego; Hendee, James C.; Nemeth, Richard S.

    2007-01-01

    Recent, global mass-mortalities of reef corals due to record warm sea temperatures have led researchers to consider global warming as one of the most significant threats to the persistence of coral reef ecosystems. The passage of a hurricane can alleviate thermal stress on coral reefs, highlighting the potential for hurricane-associated cooling to mitigate climate change impacts. We provide evidence that hurricane-induced cooling was responsible for the documented differences in the extent and recovery time of coral bleaching between the Florida Reef Tract and the U.S. Virgin Islands during the Caribbean-wide 2005 bleaching event. These results are the only known scenario where the effects of a hurricane can benefit a stressed marine community. PMID:17606914

  1. Hurricane Irene Over Bahamas

    NASA Video Gallery

    Video of Hurricane Irene compiled from a series of Astronaut Photography still images taken from the International Space Station on Aug. 24, 2011 (2:12-2:15PM EST). These frames were taken as the I...

  2. Hurricanes benefit bleached corals.

    PubMed

    Manzello, Derek P; Brandt, Marilyn; Smith, Tyler B; Lirman, Diego; Hendee, James C; Nemeth, Richard S

    2007-07-17

    Recent, global mass-mortalities of reef corals due to record warm sea temperatures have led researchers to consider global warming as one of the most significant threats to the persistence of coral reef ecosystems. The passage of a hurricane can alleviate thermal stress on coral reefs, highlighting the potential for hurricane-associated cooling to mitigate climate change impacts. We provide evidence that hurricane-induced cooling was responsible for the documented differences in the extent and recovery time of coral bleaching between the Florida Reef Tract and the U.S. Virgin Islands during the Caribbean-wide 2005 bleaching event. These results are the only known scenario where the effects of a hurricane can benefit a stressed marine community.

  3. Analyzing Hurricane Sandy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Convertino, Angelyn; Meyer, Stephan; Edwards, Becca

    2015-03-01

    Post-tropical Storm Sandy underwent extratropical transition shortly before making landfall in southern New Jersey October 29 2012. Data from this system was compared with data from Hurricane Ike (2008) which represents a classic hurricane with a clear eye wall and symmetry after landfall. Storm Sandy collided with a low pressure system coming in from the north as the hurricane made landfall on the US East coast. This contributed to Storm Sandy acting as a non-typical hurricane when it made landfall. Time histories of wind speed and wind direction were generated from data provided by Texas Tech's StickNet probes for both storms. The NOAA Weather and Climate program were used to generate radar loops of reflectivity during the landfall for both storms; these loops were compared with time histories for both Ike and Sandy to identify a relationship between time series data and storm-scale features identified on radar.

  4. NASA Hurricane Mission - GRIP

    NASA Video Gallery

    This is an overview of NASA's hurricane research campaign called Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP). The six-week mission was conducted in coordination with NOAA and the National Sc...

  5. Mortality surveillance: 2004 to 2005 Florida hurricane-related deaths.

    PubMed

    Ragan, Patricia; Schulte, Joann; Nelson, Stephen J; Jones, Ken T

    2008-06-01

    During 2004 and 2005, Florida was struck by 8 hurricanes, resulting in 213 deaths. The Department of Health and Florida medical examiners monitor hurricane mortality surveillance. This study analyzed hurricane-related deaths reported by the Florida Medical Examiners Commission for 2004 to 2005. The objectives of this study were to (1) describe the Florida hurricane-related mortality for 2004 and 2005, (2) accurately characterize the hurricane-related deaths, and (3) identify strategies to prevent or reduce future hurricane deaths. For 2004, there were 144 total hurricane-related deaths. The majority (59%) occurred in the postimpact phase, with accidents accounting for 76% of deaths. Among these, over half were caused by trauma, followed by drowning, other injury, electrocution, and carbon monoxide poisoning. For 2005, there were 69 hurricane-related deaths. Sixty-one percent of deaths occurred in the postimpact phase, with accidents accounting for 86% of all deaths. Among these, over half were due to trauma, with drowning and carbon monoxide poisoning being the other major contributors. Most hurricane-related deaths are due to unintentional injury and therefore, preventable. Seventy-nine percent of deaths are in those aged 40 and older. Prevention messages should target high-risk, postimpact activities, especially in older adults.

  6. Cold Season Ground Validation Activities in support of GPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudak, D. R.; Petersen, W. A.

    2012-12-01

    A fundamental component of the next-generation global precipitation data products that will be addressed by the GPM mission is the hydrologic cycle at higher latitudes. In this respect, falling snow represents a primary contribution to regional atmospheric and terrestrial water budgets. The current study provides provide information on the precipitation microphysics and processes associated with cold season precipitation and precipitating cloud systems across multiple scales. It also addresses the ability of in-situ ground-based sensors as well as multi-frequency active and passive microwave sensors to detect and estimate falling snow, and more generally to contribute to our knowledge and understanding of the complete global water cycle. The work supports the incorporation of appropriate physics into GPM snowfall retrieval algorithms and the development of improved ground validation techniques for GPM product evaluation. Important information for developing GPM falling snow retrieval algorithms will be provided by a field campaign that took place in the winter of 2011/12 in the Great Lakes area of North America, termed the GPM Cold Season Precipitation Experiment (GCPEx). GCPEx represented a collaboration among the NASA, Environment Canada (EC), the Canadian Space Agency and several US, Canadian and European universities. The data collection strategy for GCPEx was coordinated, stacked high-altitude and in-situ cloud aircraft missions sampling within a broader network of ground-based volumetric observations and measurements. The NASA DSC-8 research aircraft provided a platform for the downward-viewing dual-frequency radar and multi-frequency radiometer observations. The University of North Dakota Citation and the Canadian NRC Convair-580 aircraft provided in-situ profiles of cloud and precipitation microphysics using a suite of optical array probes and bulk measurement instrumentation. Ground sampling was focused about a densely-instrumented central location that is

  7. Seasonal photosynthetic activity in evergreen conifer leaves monitored with spectral reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, C. Y.; Gamon, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Boreal evergreen conifers must maintain photosynthetic systems in environments where temperatures vary greatly across seasons from high temperatures in the summer to freezing levels in the winter. This involves seasonal downregulation and photoprotection during periods of extreme temperatures. To better understand this downregulation, seasonal dynamics of photosynthesis of lodgepole (Pinus contorta D.) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa D.) were monitored in Edmonton, Canada over two years. Spectral reflectance at the leaf and stand scales was measured weekly and the Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI), often used as a proxy for chlorophyll and carotenoid pigment levels and photosynthetic light-use efficiency (LUE), was used to track the seasonal dynamics of photosynthetic activity. Additional physiological measurements included leaf pigment content, chlorophyll fluorescence, and gas exchange. All the metrics indicate large seasonal changes in photosynthetic activity, with a sharp transition from winter downregulation to active photosynthesis in the spring and a more gradual fall transition into winter. The PRI was a good indicator of several other variables including seasonally changing photosynthetic activity, chlorophyll fluorescence, photosynthetic LUE, and pigment pool sizes. Over the two-year cycle, PRI was primarily driven by changes in constitutive (chlorophyll:carotenoid) pigment levels correlated with seasonal photosynthetic activity, with a much smaller variation caused by diurnal changes in xanthophyll cycle activity (conversion between violaxanthin & zeaxanthin). Leaf and canopy scale PRI measurements exhibited parallel responses during the winter-spring transition. Together, our findings indicate that evergreen conifers photosynthetic system possesses a remarkable degree of resilience in response to large temperature changes across seasons, and that optical remote sensing can be used to observe the seasonal effects on photosynthesis and

  8. On the Annual Frequency of Intense Hurricanes in Relation to the Extremes of ENSO and the Interludes Between Them

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1998-01-01

    On the basis of Trenberth's quantitative definition for marking the occurrence of an El Nino, one can precisely identify some 15 El Nino and 10 La Nina events during the interval of 1950-1997. The statistical aspects of these identified extremes and the intervening periods between them (interludes) are determined. Also, a comparison of the appearances of these extremes and interludes with yearly hurricane seasons shows that of the last 48 hurricane seasons, 20 (42%) are El Nino-related (i.e., an El Nino was in progress during all, or part, of the yearly hurricane season - June-November), 13 (27%) are La Nina-related, and 15 (31%) are interlude - related. Combining the two subgroups of La Nino- and interlude - related seasons into a single grouping called non-El Nino-related seasons, one finds that the non-El Nino-related seasons have a mean annual frequency of intense hurricanes measuring 2.8, while the El Nino-related seasons have a mean annual frequency of intense hurricanes measuring 1.3, and the observed difference in the means is inferred to be statistically important at the 99.8% level of confidence. Therefore, during El Nino-related seasons, fewer intense hurricanes (typically, less than or equal to 2) should be expected, while durin(y non-El Nino-related seasons, more (typically, greater than or equal to 2) should be expected. Implications for the upcoming 1998 and future hurricane seasons are discussed.

  9. Hurricane hazards: a national threat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2005-01-01

    Hurricanes bring destructive winds, storm surge, torrential rain, flooding, and tornadoes. A single storm can wreak havoc on coastal and inland communities and on natural areas over thousands of square miles. In 2005, Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Wilma demonstrated the devastation that hurricanes can inflict and the importance of hurricane hazards research and preparedness. More than half of the U.S. population lives within 50 miles of a coast, and this number is increasing. Many of these areas, especially the Atlantic and Gulf coasts, will be in the direct path of future hurricanes. Hawaii is also vulnerable to hurricanes.

  10. Lagrangian coherent structures in hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipinski, Doug; Mohseni, Kamran

    2011-11-01

    We present the results of a ``surface tracking'' algorithm for efficiently computing Lagrangian coherent structure (LCS) surfaces in three dimensions. The algorithm is applied to data from a Weather Research and Forecasting simulation of hurricane Rita. The highly complicated LCS surfaces reveal complex dynamics and transport in the hurricane, particularly in the lower atmosphere boundary layer and the upper level outflow. The lower level transport in the hurricane is of particular importance for accurate intensity prediction in hurricane forecasts due to the uncertainty in the ocean-atmosphere interaction. Understanding the lower level transport and mixing behavior in hurricanes could lead to significant advances in hurricane intensity prediction.

  11. A Microfossil-Based Approach to Estimate Hurricane Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkes, A. D.; Donnelly, J. P.; Lane, P.

    2010-12-01

    Currently efforts to estimate hurricane intensity (storm surge and wave magnitude) from sedimentary records of overwash have been speculative. We focus on examining the potential use of marine microfossil assemblages in overwash sediments as indicators of hurricane intensity in the Florida Panhandle and the Northeastern US using instrumental, historic and modeled data as validation. We have identified historic hurricane stratigraphies in coastal ponds and salt marshes which have a high sensitivity to hurricane overwash. A hurricane overwash record developed from radiocarbon dated sediment cores collected from Mullet Pond provides temporal resolution for as many as 177 hurricane deposits in the last 4500 years (3.9 events per century) with at least 8 storms occurring in the historic period since 1851. In New England, radiocarbon dated salt marsh stratigraphies provide temporal resolution for as many as 30 hurricane deposits over the past 2000 yrs with at least 7 storms occurring in the historic period since 1620. Preliminary data from Mullet Pond and several New England salt marshes suggests that offshore foraminifera preserved in some storm-induced layers may be a valuable proxy for differentiating more intense hurricane strikes. With further analysis of a series of offshore transects we will develop a distribution map of benthic foraminifera to determine the depth and distance of wave excavation for hurricane-induced overwash layers which circumvents uncertainty relating to changes in barrier height and position. If this approach proves to be viable it will provide essential data on past patterns of hurricane activity, providing a critical element for gaining understanding of the complex array of climate factors that modulate hurricane activity.

  12. The Unusual Evolution of Hurricane Arthur 2014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folmer, Michael; Line, William; Cangialosi, John; Halverson, Jeffery; Berndt, Emily; Sienkiewicz, Joseph; Goodman, Steve; Goldberg, Mitch

    2015-01-01

    Hurricane Arthur (2014) was an early season hurricane that had its roots in a convective complex in the Southern Plains of the U.S. As the complex moved into northern Texas, a Mesoscale Convective Vortex (MCV) formed and drifted towards the east of the southern U.S. for a few days before emerging over the southwest Atlantic near South Carolina. The MCV drifted south and slowly acquired tropical characteristics, eventually becoming a Category 2 hurricane that would affect much of eastern North Carolina prior to the 4th of July holiday weekend. Arthur continued up the coast, brushing portions of southeast New England and merged with an upper-level low, completing a full tropical to extratropical-transition in the process, producing damaging wind gusts in portions of the Canadian Maritimes. As part of the GOES-R and JPSS Satellite Proving Grounds, multiple proxy and operational products were available to analyze and forecast this complex evolution. The Storm Prediction Center had products available to monitor the initial severe thunderstorm aspect, while the National Hurricane Center and Ocean Prediction Center were able to monitor the tropical and extratropical transition of Arthur using various convective and red, green, blue (RGB) products that have been introduced in recent years. This paper will discuss Arthur's evolution through the eyes of the various Satellite Proving Ground demonstrations.

  13. Hurricane Data Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Zhong; Ostrenga, Dana; Leptoukh, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    In order to facilitate Earth science data access, the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data Information Services Center (GES DISC) has developed a web prototype, the Hurricane Data Analysis Tool (HDAT; URL: http://disc.gsfc.nasa.gov/HDAT), to allow users to conduct online visualization and analysis of several remote sensing and model datasets for educational activities and studies of tropical cyclones and other weather phenomena. With a web browser and few mouse clicks, users can have a full access to terabytes of data and generate 2-D or time-series plots and animation without downloading any software and data. HDAT includes data from the NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), the NASA Quick Scatterometer(QuikSCAT) and NECP Reanalysis, and the NCEP/CPC half-hourly, 4-km Global (60 N - 60 S) IR Dataset. The GES DISC archives TRMM data. The daily global rainfall product derived from the 3-hourly multi-satellite precipitation product (3B42 V6) is available in HDAT. The TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) sea surface temperature from the Remote Sensing Systems is in HDAT as well. The NASA QuikSCAT ocean surface wind and the NCEP Reanalysis provide ocean surface and atmospheric conditions, respectively. The global merged IR product, also known as, the NCEP/CPC half-hourly, 4-km Global (60 N -60 S) IR Dataset, is one of TRMM ancillary datasets. They are globally-merged pixel-resolution IR brightness temperature data (equivalent blackbody temperatures), merged from all available geostationary satellites (GOES-8/10, METEOSAT-7/5 & GMS). The GES DISC has collected over 10 years of the data beginning from February of 2000. This high temporal resolution (every 30 minutes) dataset not only provides additional background information to TRMM and other satellite missions, but also allows observing a wide range of meteorological phenomena from space, such as, hurricanes, typhoons, tropical cyclones, mesoscale convection system, etc. Basic functions include selection of area of

  14. Observations of the northern seasonal polar cap on Mars: I. Spring sublimation activity and processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, C.J.; Byrne, S.; Portyankina, G.; Bourke, M.; Dundas, C.; McEwen, A.; Mellon, M.; Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.

    2013-01-01

    Spring sublimation of the seasonal CO2 northern polar cap is a dynamic process in the current Mars climate. Phenomena include dark fans of dune material propelled out onto the seasonal ice layer, polygonal cracks in the seasonal ice, sand flow down slipfaces, and outbreaks of gas and sand around the dune margins. These phenomena are concentrated on the north polar erg that encircles the northern residual polar cap. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has been in orbit for three Mars years, allowing us to observe three northern spring seasons. Activity is consistent with and well described by the Kieffer model of basal sublimation of the seasonal layer of ice applied originally in the southern hemisphere. Three typical weak spots have been identified on the dunes for escape of gas sublimed from the bottom of the seasonal ice layer: the crest of the dune, the interface of the dune with the interdune substrate, and through polygonal cracks in the ice. Pressurized gas flows through these vents and carries out material entrained from the dune. Furrows in the dunes channel gas to outbreak points and may be the northern equivalent of southern radially-organized channels (“araneiform” terrain), albeit not permanent. Properties of the seasonal CO2 ice layer are derived from timing of seasonal events such as when final sublimation occurs. Modification of dune morphology shows that landscape evolution is occurring on Mars today, driven by seasonal activity associated with sublimation of the seasonal CO2 polar cap.

  15. Hurricane driven changes in land cover create biogeophysical climate feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juárez, Robinson I. Negrón; Chambers, Jeffrey Q.; Zeng, Hongcheng; Baker, David B.

    2008-12-01

    Hurricanes can devastate thousands of hectares of forested area producing changes beyond simply vegetation damage and biomass loss. This study reports changes in regional climate associated with Hurricane Rita which made landfall on the Gulf Coastal Plain on September 24th, 2005. Results demonstrate that over severely disturbed forested areas, biogeophysical effects produced by Rita created anomalous precipitation patterns, with a decrease in precipitation the following winter, and an increase during the subsequent summer season. The dominant biogeophysical effect was a change in albedo caused by ~14,000 km2 of disturbed forested area (downed and dead, snapped and structurally damaged trees) from Rita, equivalent to a committed carbon release of 32 to 43% of the net annual U.S. sink in forest trees. As recent studies project a likely increase in hurricane intensity during the 21st century, understanding the potential impact of forest damage from hurricanes on regional climate is important.

  16. Long-Term Variations of Western Sahelian Monsoon Rainfall and Intense U.S. Landfalling Hurricanes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landsea, Christopher W.; Gray, William M.; Mielke, Paul W., Jr.; Berry, Kenneth J.

    1992-12-01

    Western Sahelian rainfall during the primary rainy season of June through September is shown to he significantly associated with concurrent intense U.S. landfalling hurricanes during the last 92 years. The meet intense hurricanes (i.e., Saffir-Simpson Scale Category 3, 4, or 5) have an especially strong relationship with Sahelian rainfall, whereas weaker hurricanes show little or no association. The hurricane-Sahelian rainfall association is most evident along the U.S. East Coast but is negligible in the U.S. Gulf Coast region.

  17. Dual Hurricanes in the Atlantic

    NASA Video Gallery

    Cameras on the International Space Station show views of Hurricane Julia and Hurricane Igor, both moving west-northwest across the Atlantic on Sept. 14, 2010. At the time the video was captured, Ju...

  18. IMERG Video of Hurricane Sandra

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA IMERG Data Hurricane Sandra's Heavy Rainfall This IMERG rainfall analysis indicates that moisture flowing from Hurricane Sandra caused heavy rainfall totals of over 700 mm (28 inches) in an ar...

  19. Seasonal variation in metabolic rate, flight activity and body size of Anopheles gambiae in the Sahel

    PubMed Central

    Huestis, Diana L.; Yaro, Alpha S.; Traoré, Adama I.; Dieter, Kathryne L.; Nwagbara, Juliette I.; Bowie, Aleah C.; Adamou, Abdoulaye; Kassogué, Yaya; Diallo, Moussa; Timbiné, Seydou; Dao, Adama; Lehmann, Tovi

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Malaria in Africa is vectored primarily by the Anopheles gambiae complex. Although the mechanisms of population persistence during the dry season are not yet known, targeting dry season mosquitoes could provide opportunities for vector control. In the Sahel, it appears likely that M-form A. gambiae survive by aestivation (entering a dormant state). To assess the role of eco-physiological changes associated with dry season survival, we measured body size, flight activity and metabolic rate of wild-caught mosquitoes throughout 1 year in a Sahelian locality, far from permanent water sources, and at a riparian location adjacent to the Niger River. We found significant seasonal variation in body size at both the Sahelian and riparian sites, although the magnitude of the variation was greater in the Sahel. For flight activity, significant seasonality was only observed in the Sahel, with increased flight activity in the wet season when compared with that just prior to and throughout the dry season. Whole-organism metabolic rate was affected by numerous biotic and abiotic factors, and a significant seasonal component was found at both locations. However, assay temperature accounted completely for seasonality at the riparian location, while significant seasonal variation remained after accounting for all measured variables in the Sahel. Interestingly, we did not find that mean metabolic rate was lowest during the dry season at either location, contrary to our expectation that mosquitoes would conserve energy and increase longevity by reducing metabolism during this time. These results indicate that mosquitoes may use mechanisms besides reduced metabolic rate to enable survival during the Sahelian dry season. PMID:22623189

  20. Seasonal and Daily Variation in Physical Activity among Three-Year-Old Finnish Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soini, Anne; Tammelin, Tuija; Sääkslahti, Arja; Watt, Anthony; Villberg, Jari; Kettunen, Tarja; Mehtälä, Anette; Poskiparta, Marita

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to assess seasonal, daily, and gender variations in children's physical activity (PA). ActiGraph GT3X accelerometers were used to record the three-year-old children's PA levels for five consecutive days in autumn and winter. Complete data for both seasons were obtained for 47 children. Despite a…

  1. Public perceptions of hurricane modification.

    PubMed

    Klima, Kelly; Bruine de Bruin, Wändi; Morgan, M Granger; Grossmann, Iris

    2012-07-01

    If hurricane modification were to become a feasible strategy for potentially reducing hurricane damages, it would likely generate public discourse about whether to support its implementation. To facilitate an informed and constructive discourse, policymakers need to understand how people perceive hurricane modification. Here, we examine Florida residents' perceptions of hurricane modification techniques that aim to alter path and wind speed. Following the mental models approach, we conducted a survey study about public perceptions of hurricane modification that was guided by formative interviews on the topic. We report a set of four primary findings. First, hurricane modification was perceived as a relatively ineffective strategy for damage reduction, compared to other strategies for damage reduction. Second, hurricane modification was expected to lead to changes in projected hurricane path, but not necessarily to the successful reduction of projected hurricane strength. Third, more anger was evoked when a hurricane was described as having changed from the initially forecasted path or strength after an attempted modification. Fourth, unlike what we expected, participants who more strongly agreed with statements that recognized the uncertainty inherent in forecasts reported more rather than less anger at scientists across hurricane modification scenarios. If the efficacy of intensity-reduction techniques can be increased, people may be willing to support hurricane modification. However, such an effort would need to be combined with open and honest communications to members of the general public.

  2. Hurricane Katrina: A Teachable Moment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertrand, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    This article presents suggestions for integrating the phenomenon of hurricanes into the teaching of high school fluid mechanics. Students come to understand core science concepts in the context of their impact upon both the environment and human populations. Suggestions for using information about hurricanes, particularly Hurricane Katrina, in a…

  3. Ocean acoustic hurricane classification.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Joshua D; Makris, Nicholas C

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical evidence are combined to show that underwater acoustic sensing techniques may be valuable for measuring the wind speed and determining the destructive power of a hurricane. This is done by first developing a model for the acoustic intensity and mutual intensity in an ocean waveguide due to a hurricane and then determining the relationship between local wind speed and underwater acoustic intensity. From this it is shown that it should be feasible to accurately measure the local wind speed and classify the destructive power of a hurricane if its eye wall passes directly over a single underwater acoustic sensor. The potential advantages and disadvantages of the proposed acoustic method are weighed against those of currently employed techniques. PMID:16454274

  4. Ocean acoustic hurricane classification.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Joshua D; Makris, Nicholas C

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical evidence are combined to show that underwater acoustic sensing techniques may be valuable for measuring the wind speed and determining the destructive power of a hurricane. This is done by first developing a model for the acoustic intensity and mutual intensity in an ocean waveguide due to a hurricane and then determining the relationship between local wind speed and underwater acoustic intensity. From this it is shown that it should be feasible to accurately measure the local wind speed and classify the destructive power of a hurricane if its eye wall passes directly over a single underwater acoustic sensor. The potential advantages and disadvantages of the proposed acoustic method are weighed against those of currently employed techniques.

  5. Mortality from Hurricane Andrew.

    PubMed

    Lew, E O; Wetli, C V

    1996-05-01

    Hurricane Andrew, a category 4 storm, made landfall in South Florida on August 24, 1992, and caused extensive structural and environmental damage. The Dade County Medical Examiner Department investigated 15 deaths directly related to the storm and another 15 natural deaths indirectly related to the storm. The aftermath of the hurricane continued to create circumstances that lead to 32 accidental deaths, five suicides, and four homicides over the next six months. Traffic fatalities due to uncontrolled intersections accounted for one-third of the post-storm accidental deaths. Dyadic deaths (homicide-suicide) doubled in rate for the six months following the storm. The limited number of direct hurricane deaths is attributed to advance storm warnings, its occurrence on a weekend, the storm's passage through less populated areas of the county, and the relatively modest amount of accompanying rainfall.

  6. Understanding Severe Hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Greg J.

    2008-03-01

    Hurricanes are complex phenomena, whose understanding involves many facets, of which my presentation will provide an overall flavor and review. Understanding the physical hurricane involves a complex amalgam of fluid dynamics, thermodynamics and scale interactions. The basic structure is one of a fluid vortex, which dictates everything from the characteristic spiral shape to the clear eye region. Energetically, once formed a hurricane is a self sustaining heat engine, one that extracts energy from the enthalpy difference between the warm ocean surface and the cold upper atmosphere, and one that will continue its merry way until it is destroyed by some external influence (such as landfall). Hurricanes also are a response to the global climate in which they develop and can feed back to influence and perhaps even change that climate. For example a series of hurricanes moving into the higher latitudes in the Pacific can set off a train of events that are still affecting European weather a year later. From a societal perspective they are the most dangerous and deadly of all natural atmospheric systems, capable of causing widespread destruction and long-term disruptions to entire societies. The damage wreaked by Katrina in New Orleans provides a canonical example, but this was by no means the worse cyclone in history. Even lesser damage on a small island nation can be much more catastrophic and exceed their entire gross domestic product. This capacity for disruption arises from three main mechanisms: the high surface winds, the response of the ocean to these winds, and the intense rainfall. These have widely different contributions in different storms: the extended region of high winds and particularly the storm-surge response were dominant factors in Katrina; whereas the >10,000 deaths by Hurricane Mitch arose entirely from rainfall and the associated flooding and landslides. Societal response to this danger involves complex interplays of warning, communication culture

  7. Morbidity of Hurricane Frederic.

    PubMed

    Longmire, A W; Ten Eyck, R P

    1984-05-01

    On September 12, 1979, Hurricane Frederic struck the Gulf Coasts of Mississippi and Alabama. A retrospective review of emergency department logs for a three-week period surrounding the storm was conducted to determine the amount and type of back up needed for an emergency department to cope with the results of such a disaster. There was a significant increase in the number of patients presenting to the emergency department for at least two weeks after the storm, with the greatest demand being for professionals skilled in outpatient trauma management. The nature of hurricanes is discussed, as are specific items to be considered in disaster planning for areas subjected to these storms.

  8. Uncertainty Analysis of Historical Hurricane Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Lawrence L.

    2007-01-01

    An analysis of variance (ANOVA) study was conducted for historical hurricane data dating back to 1851 that was obtained from the U. S. Department of Commerce National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The data set was chosen because it is a large, publicly available collection of information, exhibiting great variability which has made the forecasting of future states, from current and previous states, difficult. The availability of substantial, high-fidelity validation data, however, made for an excellent uncertainty assessment study. Several factors (independent variables) were identified from the data set, which could potentially influence the track and intensity of the storms. The values of these factors, along with the values of responses of interest (dependent variables) were extracted from the data base, and provided to a commercial software package for processing via the ANOVA technique. The primary goal of the study was to document the ANOVA modeling uncertainty and predictive errors in making predictions about hurricane location and intensity 24 to 120 hours beyond known conditions, as reported by the data set. A secondary goal was to expose the ANOVA technique to a broader community within NASA. The independent factors considered to have an influence on the hurricane track included the current and starting longitudes and latitudes (measured in degrees), and current and starting maximum sustained wind speeds (measured in knots), and the storm starting date, its current duration from its first appearance, and the current year fraction of each reading, all measured in years. The year fraction and starting date were included in order to attempt to account for long duration cyclic behaviors, such as seasonal weather patterns, and years in which the sea or atmosphere were unusually warm or cold. The effect of short duration weather patterns and ocean conditions could not be examined with the current data set. The responses analyzed were the storm

  9. Detection of low frequency hurricane emissions using a ring laser interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Robert W.; Slaton, William V.; Kendall, Lauren M.

    2012-10-01

    Over the last decade, large horizontally mounted ring laser interferometers have demonstrated the capacity to measure numerous geophysical effects. In this paper, responses from large ring laser interferometers to low frequency hurricane emissions are presented. Hurricanes create a broad spectrum of noise that extends into the millihertz range. In addition to microseisms, hurricanes with established eyewalls were found to create distinct frequency peaks close to 7 mHz as they came ashore or moved over shallow water. Selected emissions from Hurricanes Katrina, Wilma, and Dean are presented. The exact coupling mechanism between the ˜7 mHz hurricane emissions and the ring lasers remains under active investigation.

  10. Environmental DNA (eDNA) Detection Probability Is Influenced by Seasonal Activity of Organisms

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Lesley S.; Godwin, James C.; Renshaw, Mark A.; Larson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) holds great promise for conservation applications like the monitoring of invasive or imperiled species, yet this emerging technique requires ongoing testing in order to determine the contexts over which it is effective. For example, little research to date has evaluated how seasonality of organism behavior or activity may influence detection probability of eDNA. We applied eDNA to survey for two highly imperiled species endemic to the upper Black Warrior River basin in Alabama, US: the Black Warrior Waterdog (Necturus alabamensis) and the Flattened Musk Turtle (Sternotherus depressus). Importantly, these species have contrasting patterns of seasonal activity, with N. alabamensis more active in the cool season (October-April) and S. depressus more active in the warm season (May-September). We surveyed sites historically occupied by these species across cool and warm seasons over two years with replicated eDNA water samples, which were analyzed in the laboratory using species-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays. We then used occupancy estimation with detection probability modeling to evaluate both the effects of landscape attributes on organism presence and season of sampling on detection probability of eDNA. Importantly, we found that season strongly affected eDNA detection probability for both species, with N. alabamensis having higher eDNA detection probabilities during the cool season and S. depressus have higher eDNA detection probabilities during the warm season. These results illustrate the influence of organismal behavior or activity on eDNA detection in the environment and identify an important role for basic natural history in designing eDNA monitoring programs. PMID:27776150

  11. On hurricane energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud, Louis M.

    2012-10-01

    Warm seawater is the energy source for hurricanes. Interfacial sea-to-air heat transfer without spray ranges from 100 W m-2 in light wind to 1,000 W m-2 in hurricane force wind. Spray can increase sea-to-air heat transfer by two orders of magnitude and result in heat transfers of up to 100,000 W m-2. Drops of spray falling back in the sea can be 2-4 °C colder than the drops leaving the sea, thus transferring a large quantity of heat from sea to air. The heat of evaporation is taken from the sensible heat of the remainder of the drop; evaporating approximately 0.3 % of a drop is sufficient to reduce its temperature to the wet bulb temperature of the air. The heat required to evaporate hurricane precipitation is roughly equal to the heat removed from the sea indicating that sea cooling is due to heat removal from above and not to the mixing of cold water from below. The paper shows how case studies of ideal thermodynamic processes can help explain hurricane intensity.

  12. Response to hurricane disasters.

    PubMed

    Shatz, David V; Wolcott, Katharine; Fairburn, Jennifer Bencie

    2006-06-01

    Unlike most natural and man-made disasters, preparation and planning for hurricanes is possible and effective. Medical needs can be disparate, given the large geographic area involved and the often-prolonged recovery phase. All aspects of medical response, from first responders to hospitals, can directly and negatively be affected by the storm. Planning and practice, however, can drastically improve the outcome.

  13. Hurricanes as teachers.

    PubMed

    Fore, Vickie E

    2002-01-01

    Hurricane Floyd came ashore and raced through eastern North Carolina on September 16, 1999. Even though Floyd's effects were devastating, some home care agencies in the affected area were up and running as soon as agency employees saw daylight. This article describes one agency's experience.

  14. Hurricane Proof This!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterling, Donna R.

    2010-01-01

    While learning about the types of weather events that occur in the local area, students in grades 4-6 were asked to consider how structures can be built to withstand extreme weather conditions. Teams of students designed, constructed, and tested buildings to withstand hurricanes and designed the tests they would use to evaluate their structures.…

  15. Sexually active males prevent the display of seasonal anestrus in female goats.

    PubMed

    Delgadillo, J A; Flores, J A; Hernández, H; Poindron, P; Keller, M; Fitz-Rodríguez, G; Duarte, G; Vielma, J; Fernández, I G; Chemineau, P

    2015-03-01

    A well-defined season of sexual rest controlled by photoperiod is observed in female sheep and goats during spring and summer, delineating their "anestrous season"; bucks also decrease sexual activity at about the same time. Nutrition and/or socio-sexual stimuli play only secondary roles. However, the presence of sexually active males can reduce the length of seasonal anestrus. Whether it can also completely suppress anestrus has not been investigated. Here we tested this in goats in 3 experiments, using bucks rendered sexually active out of season by exposure to long days. The continuous presence of these males prevented goats to display seasonal anestrus: 12/14 females cycled the year round, vs. 0/13 and 0/11 for females with un-treated bucks or without bucks (experiment 1). When active bucks were removed, females immediately entered anestrus (7/7 stopped ovulating vs. 1/7 if maintained with active bucks; experiment 2). Finally, 7/7 anestrous does with bucks in sexual rest since 1.5months commenced cycling rapidly during mid-anestrous, when these bucks became sexually active following a treatment with artificial long days, vs. 0/7 with un-treated bucks or no bucks (experiment 3). The presence/withdrawal of active bucks had a highly significant effect in the three experiments (P≤0.002). Therefore, the presence of a mating opportunity can completely override the photoperiodic inhibition of reproduction of females throughout the anestrous season. Results suggest that we must re-evaluate the relative contributions of photoperiod vs. other external cues in controlling seasonal reproduction, thus offering new non-pharmaceutical ways for controlling out-of-season reproduction in small ruminants.

  16. Seasonality of fertility measured by physical activity traits in Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Ismael, Ahmed; Strandberg, Erling; Berglund, Britt; Fogh, Anders; Løvendahl, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Seasonality of female fertility traits, including the interval from calving to first high activity (CFHA), duration of high activity episode (DHA), and strength of high activity episode (SHA) of first estrus, were studied. The physical activity traits were derived from electronic activity tags for 20,794 Holstein cows in 135 commercial Holstein herds in Denmark. Data were categorized in 3 ways: (1) into 4 seasons of calving: winter (January-March), spring (April-June), summer (July-September), and fall (October-December); (2) into 2 seasons: a cold season (October-March) and a warm season (April-September); and (3) into an increasing light season (IL; January-June), where daylight hours gradually increased, and a decreasing light season (DL; July-December), where daylight hours gradually decreased. At the phenotypic level, least squares means of CFHA were highest at 55d for cows calving in December and lowest at 31d for cows calving in September. The highest least squares means of DHA and SHA were recorded for cows calving in November and lowest for cows calving in May and June. Genetic parameters for all traits were estimated using average information-REML in a bivariate animal model that treated the same trait in different calving seasons as different traits. Heritability estimates for CFHA were highest for the winter season (0.13) and low for the other seasons (0.03-0.04), whereas heritability estimates for DHA and SHA were lowest for winter and highest for fall. Heritability estimates for CFHA for the cold season (0.17) was higher than that for the warm season (0.10). Heritability estimates of CFHA for the IL season (0.12) was higher than for the DL season (0.07), but the opposite pattern was found for DHA and SHA. Genetic correlations (rA) of CFHA between winter and summer (rA=0.34 ± 0.27), and winter and fall (rA=0.65 ± 0.20) were significantly lower than unity. The corresponding correlations of DHA and SHA between seasons were all close to unity, except

  17. Modeling and Analysis of the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauro, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRad) is a payload carried by an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) at altitudes up to 60,000 ft with the purpose of measuring ocean surface wind speeds and near ocean surface rain rates in hurricanes. The payload includes several components that must maintain steady temperatures throughout the flight. Minimizing the temperature drift of these components allows for accurate data collection and conclusions to be drawn concerning the behavior of hurricanes. HIRad has flown on several different UAVs over the past two years during the fall hurricane season. Based on the data from the 2011 flight, a Thermal Desktop model was created to simulate the payload and reproduce the temperatures. Using this model, recommendations were made to reduce the temperature drift through the use of heaters controlled by resistance temperature detector (RTD) sensors. The suggestions made were implemented for the 2012 hurricane season and further data was collected. The implementation of the heaters reduced the temperature drift for a portion of the flight, but after a period of time, the temperatures rose. With this new flight data, the thermal model was updated and correlated. Detailed analysis was conducted to determine a more effective way to reduce the temperature drift. The final recommendations made were to adjust the set temperatures of the heaters for 2013 flights and implement hardware changes for flights beyond 2013.

  18. Thermal Modeling and Analysis of the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRad)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauro, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRad) is a payload carried by an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) at altitudes up to 60,000 ft with the purpose of measuring ocean surface wind speeds and near ocean surface rain rates in hurricanes. The payload includes several components that must maintain steady temperatures throughout the flight. Minimizing the temperature drift of these components allows for accurate data collection and conclusions to be drawn concerning the behavior of hurricanes. HIRad has flown on several different UAVs over the past two years during the fall hurricane season. Based on the data from the 2011 flight, a Thermal Desktop model was created to simulate the payload and reproduce the temperatures. Using this model, recommendations were made to reduce the temperature drift through the use of heaters controlled by resistance temperature detector (RTD) sensors. The suggestions made were implemented for the 2012 hurricane season and further data was collected. The implementation of the heaters reduced the temperature drift for a portion of the flight, but after a period of time, the temperatures rose. With this new flight data, the thermal model was updated and correlated. Detailed analysis was conducted to determine a more effective way to reduce the temperature drift. The final recommendations made were to adjust the set temperatures of the heaters for 2013 flights and implement hardware changes for flights beyond 2013.

  19. 76 FR 63541 - Design-Basis Hurricane and Hurricane Missiles for Nuclear Power Plants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Parts 50 and 52 Design-Basis Hurricane and Hurricane Missiles for Nuclear Power Plants... Hurricane and Hurricane Missiles for Nuclear Power Plants.'' This regulatory guide provides licensees and...- basis hurricane and design-basis hurricane-generated missiles that a nuclear power plant should...

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS IN THE AFTERMATH OF HURRICANE KATRINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation describes the environmental sampling completed by EPA in southeastern Louisiana after Hurricane Katrina caused major catastrophic damage. Presentation also describes EPA's Environmental Unit activities in Baton Rouge and New Orleans, LA, and Dallas, TX.

  1. Kidney patient care in disasters: lessons from the hurricanes and earthquake of 2005.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Jeffrey B; Ball, Lynda K; Cohen, Andrew; Kenney, Robert J; Lempert, Kenneth D; Miller, Paul E; Muntner, Paul; Qureshi, Nauman; Yelton, Sarah A

    2007-07-01

    The active 2005 hurricane season alerted Americans to the pressing need for a more effective response to mass casualty incidents. The kidney patient community was particularly affected. Ninety-four dialysis facilities in the Gulf Coast states closed for at least 1 wk in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, and additional units were affected by evacuation of dialysis patients. Dialysis units along the Gulf Coast were also affected by Hurricanes Rita and Wilma. Existing emergency response plans were inadequate in providing continuity of care for kidney patients. The Kashmir, South Asia, earthquake of October 2005 killed 97,000 individuals. Building collapse was associated with widespread crush injury, and many patients required temporary hemodialysis. Several regions of the United States have the potential for catastrophic earthquakes. The Kidney Community Emergency Response Coalition has recently issued recommendations for patients, dialysis facilities, and providers, with a goal to improve care of kidney patients in future domestic disasters. With suitable planning, the nephrology community can do much to ensure the continuity of medical care for kidney patients in the face of a wide range of possible natural and human-made disasters.

  2. Language through the Seasons: Dramatic Play Activities for Early Childhood Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amdur, Judith

    This workbook brings together activities to aid in motivating children to concentrate, listen, respond, think, and learn. The activities rely upon play-like tasks involving drama, music, and other forms of creative expression. The activities are organized by the season in which they are appropriate and include songs, dramatic sequences, stories,…

  3. The persistence of equatorial spread F - an analysis on seasonal, solar activity and geomagnetic activity aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeja, V.; Devasia, C. V.; Ravindran, Sudha; Sridharan, R.

    2009-02-01

    The persistence (duration) of Equatorial Spread F (ESF), which has significant impact on communication systems, is addressed. Its behavior during different seasons and geomagnetic activity levels under the solar maximum (2001) and minimum (2006) conditions, is reported using the data from the magnetic equatorial location of Trivandrum (8.5° N; 77° E; dip 0.5° N) in India. The study reveals that the persistence of the irregularities can be estimated to a reasonable extent by knowing the post sunset F region vertical drift velocity (Vz) and the magnetic activity index Kp. Any sort of advance information on the possible persistence of the ionospheric irregularities responsible for ESF is important for understanding the scintillation morphology, and the results which form the first step in this direction are presented and discussed.

  4. The condition of neighborhood parks following hurricane katrina: development of a post-hurricane assessment instrument.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parks provide environments for physical activity, yet, little is known about how natural disasters affect them or how these disasters alter physical activity. Objectives: 1) describe the development of an instrument to assess park conditions following a hurricane; and 2) document the conditions of ...

  5. On the Current Trend of Tropical Cyclone Activity and the Lengthening of the Tropical Cyclone Season in the North Atlantic Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    In this TP, the trend in North Atlantic basin TC activity, especially as related to the determination of the length of season (LOS) and its possible association with warming surface-air and sea-surface temperature, is revisited. In particular, examined are: (1) the trend in TC activity for the yearly intervals 1945-1965, 1966-1994, and 1995-2012 for TCs having duration NSD greater or equal to 0.25 day, less than 2 days, greater than or equal to 2 days, greater than or equal to 4 days, and greater than or equal to 8 days; (2) the latitudinal and longitudinal genesis locations of the short-lived TC (defined herein as those TCs having duration NSD less than 2 days) for the three yearly intervals; (3) the first storm day (FSD), last storm day (LSD), and LOS based on TCs having duration NSD greater than or equal to 0.25 day and NSD greater than or equal to 2 days; (4) the relationship between FSD, LSD, and LOS for TCs having duration NSD greater than or equal to 0.25 day and NSD greater than or equal to 2 days; (5) the surface-air and sea-surface temperature, wind, and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) during the interval 1945-2012; (6) the relationship of FSD, LSD, and LOS against surface-air and sea-surface temperature, wind, and the NAO; (7) the relationship of TC activity against surface-air and sea-surface temperature, wind, and the NAO; and (8) the relationship of TC activity against FSD and LOS. This TP represents an update to an earlier study by Wilson concerning the length of the yearly hurricane season.

  6. MISR Views Hurricane Carlotta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    With winds reaching 155 mph, this year's Hurricane Carlotta became the second strongest eastern Pacific June hurricane on record. These images from MISR show the hurricane on June 21, the day of its peak intensity. The pictures are oriented so that the spacecraft's flight path is from left to right; north is at the left.

    The top image is a color view from MISR's vertical (nadir) camera, showing Carlotta's location in the eastern Pacific Ocean, about 500 km south of Puerto Vallarta, Mexico.

    The middle image is a stereoscopic 'anaglyph' created using MISR's nadir camera plus one of its aftward-viewing cameras, and shows a closer view of the area around the hurricane. Viewing with red/blue glasses (red filter over the left eye) is required to obtain a 3-D stereo effect.

    Near the center of the storm, the eye is about 25 km in diameter and partially obscured by a thin cloud. About 50 km to the left of the eye, the sharp drop-off from high-level to low-level cloud gives a sense of the vertical extent of the hidden eye wall. The low-level cloud is spiraling counterclockwise into the center of the cyclone. It then rises in the vicinity of the eye wall and emerges with a clockwise rotation at high altitude. Maximum surface winds are found near the eye wall.

    The bottom stereo image is a zoomed-in view of convective clouds in the hurricane's spiral arms. The arms are breeding grounds for severe thunderstorms, with associated heavy rain and flooding, frequent lightning, and tornadoes. Thunderstorms rise in dramatic fashion to about the same altitude as the high cloud near the hurricane's center, and are made up of individual cells that are typically less than 20 km in diameter. This image shows a number of these cells, some fairly isolated, and others connected together. Their three-dimensional structure is clearly apparent in this stereo view.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science

  7. Implications of climatic seasonality on activity patterns and resource use by sympatric peccaries in northern Pantanal.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Gabriel Selbach; Coelho, Igor Pfeifer; Bastazini, Vinicius Augusto Galvão; Cordeiro, José Luís Passos; de Oliveira, Luiz Flamarion Barbosa

    2016-03-01

    We evaluated the effects of climate seasonality from a thermal and water availability perspective on the activity patterns and resource use of Pecari tajacu and Tayassu pecari during wet and dry seasons in the northeastern Brazilian Pantanal. We used camera traps and temperature sensors to record species activity patterns in relation to temperature, established five habitat categories based on flooding intensity and local vegetation characteristics, assessed the activity patterns of each species in dry and wet periods and in artificial water bodies using circular statistical metrics, and calculated niche amplitude and overlap on three axes (temperature, time, and habitat) in both periods. Peccaries shared a strong resemblance in resource use and in their responses to seasonal variations in the tested gradients. The activity patterns of both species exhibited a significant correlation with air temperature on all the evaluated measures, and both species strongly reduced their activity when the air temperature exceeded 35 °C. High temperatures associated with low water availability were most likely responsible for the changes in species activity patterns, which resulted in an increased temporal overlap in habitat use throughout the dry season. However, the peccaries avoided intensively flooded habitats; therefore, the habitat gradient overlap was greater during the wet period. Our results show that an increase in niche overlap on the environmental gradient as a result of climatic seasonality may be partially compensated by a reduction in other niche dimensions. In this case, temporal partitioning appears to be an important, viable mechanism to reduce competition by potentially competing species.

  8. Implications of climatic seasonality on activity patterns and resource use by sympatric peccaries in northern Pantanal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Gabriel Selbach; Coelho, Igor Pfeifer; Bastazini, Vinicius Augusto Galvão; Cordeiro, José Luís Passos; de Oliveira, Luiz Flamarion Barbosa

    2016-03-01

    We evaluated the effects of climate seasonality from a thermal and water availability perspective on the activity patterns and resource use of Pecari tajacu and Tayassu pecari during wet and dry seasons in the northeastern Brazilian Pantanal. We used camera traps and temperature sensors to record species activity patterns in relation to temperature, established five habitat categories based on flooding intensity and local vegetation characteristics, assessed the activity patterns of each species in dry and wet periods and in artificial water bodies using circular statistical metrics, and calculated niche amplitude and overlap on three axes (temperature, time, and habitat) in both periods. Peccaries shared a strong resemblance in resource use and in their responses to seasonal variations in the tested gradients. The activity patterns of both species exhibited a significant correlation with air temperature on all the evaluated measures, and both species strongly reduced their activity when the air temperature exceeded 35 °C. High temperatures associated with low water availability were most likely responsible for the changes in species activity patterns, which resulted in an increased temporal overlap in habitat use throughout the dry season. However, the peccaries avoided intensively flooded habitats; therefore, the habitat gradient overlap was greater during the wet period. Our results show that an increase in niche overlap on the environmental gradient as a result of climatic seasonality may be partially compensated by a reduction in other niche dimensions. In this case, temporal partitioning appears to be an important, viable mechanism to reduce competition by potentially competing species.

  9. Geologic record of Hurricane impacts on the New Jersey coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitina, Daria; Horton, Benjamin; Khan, Nicole; Clear, Jennifer; Shaw, Timothy; Enache, Mihaela; Frizzera, Dorina; Procopio, Nick; Potapova, Marina

    2016-04-01

    Hurricanes along the US Atlantic coast have caused significant damage and loss of human life over the last century. Recent studies suggest that intense-hurricane activity is closely related to changes of sea surface temperatures and therefore the risk of hurricane strikes may increase in the future. A clear understanding of the role of recent warming on tropical cyclone activity is limited by the shortness of the instrumental record. However, the sediment preserved beneath coastal wetlands is an archive of when hurricanes impacted the coast. We present two complimenting approaches that help to extend pre-historic record and assess frequency and intensity of hurricane landfalls along the New Jersey cost; dating overwash deposits and hurricane-induced salt-marsh erosion documented at multiple sites. The stratigraphic investigation of estuarine salt marshes in the southern New Jersey documented seven distinctive erosion events that correlate among different sites. Radiocarbon dates suggest the prehistoric events occurred in AD 558-673, AD 429-966, AD 558-673, Ad 1278-1438, AD 1526-1558 or AD 1630-1643 (Nikitina et al., 2014). Younger sequences correspond with historical land-falling hurricanes in AD 1903 and AD 1821 or AD 1788. Four events correlate well with barrier overwash deposits documented along the New Jersey coast (Donnelley et al., 2001 and 2004). The stratigraphic sequence of salt High resolution sedimentary-based reconstructions of past intense-hurricane landfalls indicate that significant variability in the frequency of intense hurricanes occurred over the last 2000 years.

  10. The HFIP High Resolution Hurricane Forecast Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nance, L. B.; Bernardet, L.; Bao, S.; Brown, B.; Carson, L.; Fowler, T.; Halley Gotway, J.; Harrop, C.; Szoke, E.; Tollerud, E. I.; Wolff, J.; Yuan, H.

    2010-12-01

    Tropical cyclones are a serious concern for the nation, causing significant risk to life, property and economic vitality. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service has a mission of issuing tropical cyclone forecasts and warnings, aimed at protecting life and property and enhancing the national economy. In the last 10 years, the errors in hurricane track forecasts have been reduced by about 50% through improved model guidance, enhanced observations, and forecaster expertise. However, little progress has been made during this period toward reducing forecasted intensity errors. To address this shortcoming, NOAA established the Hurricane Forecast Improvement Project (HFIP) in 2007. HFIP is a 10-year plan to improve one to five day tropical cyclone forecasts, with a focus on rapid intensity change. Recent research suggests that prediction models with grid spacing less than 1 km in the inner core of the hurricane may provide a substantial improvement in intensity forecasts. The 2008-09 staging of the High Resolution Hurricane (HRH) Test focused on quantifying the impact of increased horizontal resolution in numerical models on hurricane intensity forecasts. The primary goal of this test was an evaluation of the effect of increasing horizontal resolution within a given model across a variety of storms with different intensity, location and structure. The test focused on 69 retrospectives cases from the 2005 and 2007 hurricane seasons. Six modeling groups participated in the HRH test utilizing a variety of models, including three configurations of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, the operational GFDL model, the Navy’s tropical cyclone model, and a model developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UWM). The Development Testbed Center (DTC) was tasked with providing objective verification statistics for a variety of metrics. This presentation provides an overview of the HRH Test and a summary of the standard

  11. Seasonal Drivers of Pneumococcal Disease Incidence: Impact of Bacterial Carriage and Viral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Weinberger, Daniel M.; Grant, Lindsay R.; Steiner, Claudia A.; Weatherholtz, Robert; Santosham, Mathuram; Viboud, Cécile; O'Brien, Katherine L.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Winter-seasonal epidemics of pneumococcal disease provide an opportunity to understand the drivers of incidence. We sought to determine whether seasonality of invasive pneumococcal disease is caused by increased nasopharyngeal transmission of the bacteria or increased susceptibility to invasive infections driven by cocirculating winter respiratory viruses. Methods. We analyzed pneumococcal carriage and invasive disease data collected from children <7 years old in the Navajo/White Mountain Apache populations between 1996 and 2012. Regression models were used to quantify seasonal variations in carriage prevalence, carriage density, and disease incidence. We also fit a multivariate model to determine the contribution of carriage prevalence and RSV activity to pneumococcal disease incidence while controlling for shared seasonal factors. Results. The seasonal patterns of invasive pneumococcal disease epidemics varied significantly by clinical presentation: bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia incidence peaked in late winter, whereas invasive nonpneumonia pneumococcal incidence peaked in autumn. Pneumococcal carriage prevalence and density also varied seasonally, with peak prevalence occurring in late autumn. In a multivariate model, RSV activity was associated with significant increases in bacteremic pneumonia cases (attributable percentage, 15.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.8%–26.1%) but was not associated with invasive nonpneumonia infections (8.0%; 95% CI, −4.8% to 19.3%). In contrast, seasonal variations in carriage prevalence were associated with significant increases in invasive nonpneumonia infections (31.4%; 95% CI, 8.8%–51.4%) but not with bacteremic pneumonia. Conclusions.The seasonality of invasive pneumococcal pneumonia could be due to increased susceptibility to invasive infection triggered by viral pathogens, whereas seasonality of other invasive pneumococcal infections might be primarily driven by increased nasopharyngeal

  12. Prognosis of Hurricanes CATEGORIE-5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Peraza, Jorge; Velasco Herrera, Victor Manuel; Zapotitla Roman, Julian; Juarez Zuñiga, Alan

    Category-5 Hurricanes are the most devastating from the standpoint of human and economic losses. Approximately 80 cyclones per year occurring worldwide, from which 8.8 per year occur on average in different regions of the Atlantic. However, category-5 Hurricanes do not follow a cyclic pattern but ar rather of quasi-stochastic nature. To assist in the alert processes o of hurricanes, we propose here a method to predict those kinds of hurricanes based on the Wavelet Analysis and applying techniques of Fuzzy Logic. For our study we consider North Atlantic category-5 hurricanes since 1920. Data was transformed into a series of Pulses with unitary value at the dates of hurricanes occurrence and 0 for dates of no occurrence. By means of the Wavelet transform we determine dominant oscillation periods. Under the hypothesis that the occurrence of hurricanes of this category can be described by the certain periodicities, we can define the dominant periods of oscillation and establish correspondence rules using fuzzy logic. The fuzzy logic searches for associations between the hurricanes occurrence and the behavior of the harmonics, and then delimits the occurrence of the next hurricane. The Wavelet Power Spectrum yields the following periodicities 2, 9, 14 and 24 years. According to the behavior of the harmonics we found that their combination restricts regions of possible Hurricane occurrence. Interpolation of this sinusoidal behavior allows for a good reconstruction of past Hurricanes dates as well as extrapolation to the future. In this way we conclude that there is a good probability that the next category-5 Hurricane in the north Atlantic occur of 2014-2015. Regarding categorie-5 typhoons in the pacific we delimitate the genesis regions of western of these kind of typhoons.

  13. Meteorology: hurricanes and global warming.

    PubMed

    Landsea, Christopher W

    2005-12-22

    Anthropogenic climate change has the potential for slightly increasing the intensity of tropical cyclones through warming of sea surface temperatures. Emanuel has shown a striking and surprising association between sea surface temperatures and destructiveness by tropical cyclones in the Atlantic and western North Pacific basins. However, I question his analysis on the following grounds: it does not properly represent the observations described; the use of his Atlantic bias-removal scheme may not be warranted; and further investigation of a substantially longer time series for tropical cyclones affecting the continental United States does not show a tendency for increasing destructiveness. These factors indicate that instead of "unprecedented" tropical cyclone activity having occurred in recent years, hurricane intensity was equal or even greater during the last active period in the mid-twentieth century.

  14. Lessons learned from Hurricane Ike.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Laurie; Anderle, Diane; Nastally, Kathleen; Sarver, Troy; Hafner-Burton, Tana; Owens, Sheron

    2009-06-01

    After the poorly planned evacuation for Hurricane Rita in 2005, many health care systems in the Houston area updated the disaster plans they would implement in the event of a major disaster. In September 2008, Texas health care systems in the Houston-Galveston area had the opportunity to execute those plans when Hurricane Ike made landfall. Despite hours of hurricane preparation at the Texas Orthopedic Hospital in Houston, TX, before the storm, we found that there were still lessons to be learned from Hurricane Ike that can be used by other health care systems to prepare for disaster.

  15. Seasonal Variations in Notification of Active Tuberculosis Cases in China, 2005–2012

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin-Xu; Wang, Li-Xia; Zhang, Hui; Du, Xin; Jiang, Shi-Wen; Shen, Tao; Zhang, Yan-Ping; Zeng, Guang

    2013-01-01

    Background Although seasonal variation in tuberculosis (TB) incidence has been described in many countries, it remains unknown in China. Methods A time series decomposition analysis (X-12-ARIMA) was performed to examine the seasonal variation in active TB cases nationwide from 2005 through 2012 in China. Seasonal amplitude was calculated for the evaluation of TB seasonal variation. Results A total of 7.78 million active TB cases were reported over a period of 8 years. A spring peak (April) was observed with seasonal amplitude of 46.3%, compared with the winter trough (February). Most cases in provinces with subtropical and tropical monsoon climate showed lower amplitudes than those in temperate continental, plateau and mountain climate regions. The magnitude of seasonality varied inversely with annual average temperature, r (95% CI) = -0.71 (-0.79, -0.61). The seasonal amplitudes were 56.7, 60.5, 40.6, 46.4 and 50.9% for patients aged ≤14, 15–24, 25–44, 45–64, and ≥65 years, respectively. Students demonstrated greater seasonal amplitude than peasants, migrant workers and workers (115.3% vs. 43.5, 41.6 and 48.1%). Patients with pulmonary TB had lower amplitude compared to patients with pleural and other extra-pulmonary TB (EPTB) (45.9% vs. 52.0 and 56.3%). Relapse cases with sputum smear positive TB (SS+ TB) had significantly higher seasonal amplitude compared to new cases with sputum smear positive TB (52.2% vs. 41.6%). Conclusions TB is a seasonal disease in China. The peak and trough of TB transmission actually are in winter and in autumn respectively after factors of delay are removed. Higher amplitudes of TB seasonality are more likely to happen in temperate continental, plateau and mountain climate regions and regions with lower annual average temperature, and young person, students, patients with EPTB and relapse cases with SS+ TB are more likely to be affected by TB seasonality. PMID:23874512

  16. An Oxygen-18 Proxy Record of Recent Hurricanes in Belize: Speleothems as a new Tool for Paleotempestology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frappier, A.; Sahagian, D.

    2004-05-01

    The high winds, storm surge, and extreme precipitation produced by landfalling tropical cyclones (hurricanes and tropical storms) generate some of the most deadly and destructive natural disasters faced by coastal populations. Stakeholders such as coastal planners and developers, property owners, emergency planners, and (re)insurers are concerned about future risk from the most devastating events, particularly because significant changes in climatic boundary conditions have been projected for this century. However, historical tropical cyclone records are not sufficient to address the sensitivity of hurricane intensity to projected changes, and modeling exercises have as yet been unable to settle the debate. Consequently, paleotempestologists have turned to the geologic record for more information about past hurricane activity that could be used to improve forward models. Toward that end, we have developed a new proxy for individual tropical cyclone rainfall events using very high-resolution δ 18O analyses of speleothem calcite. This proxy is based on the depleted isotopic signature of tropical cyclone rainfall compared to other summer season meteoric waters. We applied recent developments in microsampling techniques to a rapidly growing speleothem from Belize, Central America. The resulting record (20 micron sampling interval, yielding ~weekly temporal resolution) allowed us to detect individual, historical tropical cyclone events over the last three decades. The speleothem δ 18O paleotempestology proxy facilitates very accurate estimates of the time between tropical cyclone events: the proxy was able to resolve two hurricanes that struck Belize in the same year. The recurrence interval (RI) we estimated using the speleothem hurricane record agrees closely with the RI published for the same period by the Belize Meteorological Service. Preliminary work indicates that the δ 18O storm signal preserved in speleothem calcite carries some information about the local

  17. Using an active sensor to make in-season nitrogen recommendations for corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An active crop canopy reflectance sensor could increase N-use efficiency in corn (Zea mays L.), if temporal and spatial variability in soil N availability and plant demand are adequately accounted for with an in-season application. Our objective was to evaluate the success of using an active sensor ...

  18. Seasonal forecasting of lightning and thunderstorm activity in tropical and temperate regions of the world.

    PubMed

    Dowdy, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Thunderstorms are convective systems characterised by the occurrence of lightning. Lightning and thunderstorm activity has been increasingly studied in recent years in relation to the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and various other large-scale modes of atmospheric and oceanic variability. Large-scale modes of variability can sometimes be predictable several months in advance, suggesting potential for seasonal forecasting of lightning and thunderstorm activity in various regions throughout the world. To investigate this possibility, seasonal lightning activity in the world's tropical and temperate regions is examined here in relation to numerous different large-scale modes of variability. Of the seven modes of variability examined, ENSO has the strongest relationship with lightning activity during each individual season, with relatively little relationship for the other modes of variability. A measure of ENSO variability (the NINO3.4 index) is significantly correlated to local lightning activity at 53% of locations for one or more seasons throughout the year. Variations in atmospheric parameters commonly associated with thunderstorm activity are found to provide a plausible physical explanation for the variations in lightning activity associated with ENSO. It is demonstrated that there is potential for accurately predicting lightning and thunderstorm activity several months in advance in various regions throughout the world. PMID:26865431

  19. Seasonal forecasting of lightning and thunderstorm activity in tropical and temperate regions of the world

    PubMed Central

    Dowdy, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Thunderstorms are convective systems characterised by the occurrence of lightning. Lightning and thunderstorm activity has been increasingly studied in recent years in relation to the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and various other large-scale modes of atmospheric and oceanic variability. Large-scale modes of variability can sometimes be predictable several months in advance, suggesting potential for seasonal forecasting of lightning and thunderstorm activity in various regions throughout the world. To investigate this possibility, seasonal lightning activity in the world’s tropical and temperate regions is examined here in relation to numerous different large-scale modes of variability. Of the seven modes of variability examined, ENSO has the strongest relationship with lightning activity during each individual season, with relatively little relationship for the other modes of variability. A measure of ENSO variability (the NINO3.4 index) is significantly correlated to local lightning activity at 53% of locations for one or more seasons throughout the year. Variations in atmospheric parameters commonly associated with thunderstorm activity are found to provide a plausible physical explanation for the variations in lightning activity associated with ENSO. It is demonstrated that there is potential for accurately predicting lightning and thunderstorm activity several months in advance in various regions throughout the world. PMID:26865431

  20. Seasonal forecasting of lightning and thunderstorm activity in tropical and temperate regions of the world.

    PubMed

    Dowdy, Andrew J

    2016-02-11

    Thunderstorms are convective systems characterised by the occurrence of lightning. Lightning and thunderstorm activity has been increasingly studied in recent years in relation to the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and various other large-scale modes of atmospheric and oceanic variability. Large-scale modes of variability can sometimes be predictable several months in advance, suggesting potential for seasonal forecasting of lightning and thunderstorm activity in various regions throughout the world. To investigate this possibility, seasonal lightning activity in the world's tropical and temperate regions is examined here in relation to numerous different large-scale modes of variability. Of the seven modes of variability examined, ENSO has the strongest relationship with lightning activity during each individual season, with relatively little relationship for the other modes of variability. A measure of ENSO variability (the NINO3.4 index) is significantly correlated to local lightning activity at 53% of locations for one or more seasons throughout the year. Variations in atmospheric parameters commonly associated with thunderstorm activity are found to provide a plausible physical explanation for the variations in lightning activity associated with ENSO. It is demonstrated that there is potential for accurately predicting lightning and thunderstorm activity several months in advance in various regions throughout the world.

  1. The activity of recent anti-allergic drugs in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Clement, P; Smitz, J; De Waele, M

    1996-01-01

    Two experiments were performed during the pollen season to study the activity of different antiallergic drugs in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis. Nasal allergen challenge (NAC) was performed to mimic an acute attack of allergic rhinitis and to objectively evaluate the effect of the drugs on the early-phase reaction during the season. The first study assessed the effect of H1 (Cetirizine 10 mg a day) and of a combination of H1 (Cetirizine 10 mg) plus H2 (Cimetidine 800 mg a day) antagonists on nasal symptoms, mediator release and eosinophil count in a group of 16 patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis. During the same season a second study compared in a randomized way (2 parallel groups) the effect of Budesonide (Rhinocort Aqua) and Azelastine (Allergodil nasal spray) in a group of 14 patients. Results showed that both antihistamines, applied topically of dosed orally, reduced sneezing even when significant increases of histamine concentration in nasal secretions were evidenced immediately after NAC. When a combination of Cetirizine and Cimetidine was administered, a significant (p < 0.01) reduction of nasal airway resistance and increase of nasal airflow after NAC were demonstrated as well. In addition, topical application of Budesonide showed a strong (p < 0.01) effect on the infiltration and activation of eosinophils during the season, and on tryptase release after NAC. These effects lasted at least for one week after therapy. PMID:8669268

  2. The activity of recent anti-allergic drugs in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Clement, P; Smitz, J; De Waele, M

    1996-01-01

    Two experiments were performed during the pollen season to study the activity of different antiallergic drugs in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis. Nasal allergen challenge (NAC) was performed to mimic an acute attack of allergic rhinitis and to objectively evaluate the effect of the drugs on the early-phase reaction during the season. The first study assessed the effect of H1 (Cetirizine 10 mg a day) and of a combination of H1 (Cetirizine 10 mg) plus H2 (Cimetidine 800 mg a day) antagonists on nasal symptoms, mediator release and eosinophil count in a group of 16 patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis. During the same season a second study compared in a randomized way (2 parallel groups) the effect of Budesonide (Rhinocort Aqua) and Azelastine (Allergodil nasal spray) in a group of 14 patients. Results showed that both antihistamines, applied topically of dosed orally, reduced sneezing even when significant increases of histamine concentration in nasal secretions were evidenced immediately after NAC. When a combination of Cetirizine and Cimetidine was administered, a significant (p < 0.01) reduction of nasal airway resistance and increase of nasal airflow after NAC were demonstrated as well. In addition, topical application of Budesonide showed a strong (p < 0.01) effect on the infiltration and activation of eosinophils during the season, and on tryptase release after NAC. These effects lasted at least for one week after therapy.

  3. Dust loading in Gusev crater, Mars: Results from two active dust devil seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, D. A.; Greeley, R.; Neakrase, L. D.; Landis, G. A.; Whelley, P.; Thompson, S. D.

    2009-12-01

    Dust devils dominate the volcanic plains at the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) landing site within the Low Albedo Zone (LAZ) in Gusev Crater. Previous studies indicate that the inferred pressure drop within the dust devil core allows the vortex to lift large amounts of unconsolidated dust high into the atmosphere which contributes to the atmospheric haze. Previous laboratory results indicate that dust devils are efficient in lifting very fine-grained (<10 μm) material, even when boundary layer winds do not exceed previously predicted threshold wind speeds (~30-35 m/s at 1.5 m above the surface for Mars conditions). Since landing in Gusev crater in January 2004, MER Spirit has obtained data for two dust devil seasons (defined as the period of time when the first and last dust devils were imaged), with a third season currently being analyzed. These seasons typically correspond to southern spring and summer, when winds capable of lifting sediment are determined to be most frequent. All observations for Season One were taken as Spirit neared the summit of Husband Hill. During Season Two Spirit imaged dust devils in the plains as it traversed within the Inner Basin, a low-lying area in the Columbia Hills complex. All results were extrapolated so that they are representative of the entire LAZ. Season One lasted 270 sols (March 2005 to December 2005 corresponding to Ls 173.2 to 339.5 degrees), whereas Season Two lasted 153 sols (January 2007 to June 2007 corresponding to Ls 171.2 to 266.7 degrees) and ended suddenly on sol 1240 just after the dust devil frequency peaked for the season. This abrupt drop in dust devil activity corresponded to atmospheric opacity levels that exceeded 1.0 and the onset of a global dust storm that originated in the southern hemisphere that engulfed Gusev within weeks. Results show a large contrast in activity between the two seasons. An 81% decrease in dust devil frequency across the plains was found in Season Two. 533 dust devils were imaged

  4. Seasonal distribution of microbial activity in bioaerosols in the outdoor environment of the Qingdao coastal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xi; Qi, Jianhua; Li, Hongtao; Dong, Lijie; Gao, Dongmei

    2016-09-01

    Microbial activities in the atmosphere can indicate the physiological processes of microorganisms and can indirectly affect cloud formation and environmental health. In this study, the microbial activity in bioaerosols collected in the Qingdao coastal region was investigated using the fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolysis method to detect the enzyme activity of microorganisms. The results showed that the microbial activity ranged from 5.49 to 102 ng/m3 sodium fluorescein from March 2013 to February 2014; the average value was 34.4 ng/m3. Microbial activity has no statistical correlation with total microbial quantity. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that meteorological factors such as atmospheric temperature, relative humidity and wind speed accounted for approximately 35.7% of the variation of the microbial activity, although their individual impacts on microbial activity varied. According to the correlation analysis, atmospheric temperature and wind speed had a significant positive and negative influence on microbial activity, respectively, whereas relative humidity and wind direction had no significant influence. The seasonal distribution of microbial activity in bioaerosols was in the order of summer > autumn > winter > spring, with high fluctuations in the summer and autumn. Microbial activity in bioaerosols differed in different weather conditions such as the sunny, foggy, and hazy days of different seasons. Further in situ observations in different weather conditions at different times and places are needed to understand the seasonal distribution characteristics of microbial activity in bioaerosols and the influence factors of microbial activity.

  5. Injuries and illnesses related to Hurricane Andrew--Louisiana, 1992.

    PubMed

    1993-04-01

    On August 26, 1992, Hurricane Andrew struck Louisiana. On August 24, in anticipation of hurricane-related injuries and illnesses, the Office of Public Health (OPH), Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals, in cooperation with hospital emergency room (ER) and public utility personnel and coroners, established an active emergency surveillance system in 19 parishes to monitor these events. This report summarizes the findings from this emergency surveillance system.

  6. Monitoring Hurricane Effects on Aquifer Salinity Using ALSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, A.; Starek, M. J.

    2005-12-01

    During the Atlantic hurricane season of 2004, the Florida Pan Handle, Gulf Coast region, was impacted directly by three major hurricanes within approximately a one-month time period. The short temporal span between impacts coupled with the severity of the storms resulted in drastic changes to the littoral zone geomorphology including extensive shoreline erosion and accretion that directly affected the subsurface hydrogeologic environment. The most important direct physical effects of a hurricane are the following: coastal erosion, shoreline inundation owing to higher than normal tide levels plus increased temporary surge levels during storms, and saltwater intrusion primarily into estuaries and groundwater aquifers. Erosion and deposition during the hurricane change the elevation, which causes change in the position of shoreline. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of sea level inundation due to the hurricanes on the near shore subsurface freshwater-saltwater interface. By utilizing high-resolution Airborne Laser Swath Mapping (ALSM) altimetry data acquired shortly before and after the three major hurricane landfalls, the change in shoreline topography was estimated to determine both small-scale and large-scale horizontal encroachment and volumetric change in shoreline. This information was used to develop a before and after variable density groundwater flow model to determine the impact of the hurricanes on the subsurface saltwater-freshwater interface. SEAWAT (Langevin 2001; Guo and Langevin 2002), which simulates three-dimensional, variable-density groundwater flow following a modular structure similar to MODFLOW (McDonald and Harbaugh 1988), was selected to represent the saltwater-freshwater interface in this investigation.

  7. Effect of altitude and season on microbial activity, abundance and community structure in Alpine forest soils.

    PubMed

    Siles, José A; Cajthaml, Tomas; Minerbi, Stefano; Margesin, Rosa

    2016-03-01

    In the current context of climate change, the study of microbial communities along altitudinal gradients is especially useful. Only few studies considered altitude and season at the same time. We characterized four forest sites located in the Italian Alps, along an altitude gradient (545-2000 m a.s.l.), to evaluate the effect of altitude in spring and autumn on soil microbial properties. Each site in each season was characterized with regard to soil temperature, physicochemical properties, microbial activities (respiration, enzymes), community level physiological profiles (CLPP), microbial abundance and community structure (PLFA). Increased levels of soil organic matter (SOM) and nutrients were found at higher altitudes and in autumn, resulting in a significant increase of (soil dry-mass related) microbial activities and abundance at higher altitudes. Significant site- and season-specific effects were found for enzyme production. The significant interaction of the factors site and incubation temperature for soil microbial activities indicated differences in microbial communities and their responses to temperature among sites. CLPP revealed site-specific effects. Microbial community structure was influenced by altitudinal, seasonal and/or site-specific effects. Correlations demonstrated that altitude, and not season, was the main factor determining the changes in abiotic and biotic characteristics at the sites investigated.

  8. The occurrence and seasonal variation of accelerant-related burn injuries in central Florida.

    PubMed

    Rainey, Susan; Cruse, C Wayne; Smith, Jackie S; Smith, Kirk R; Jones, Dawn; Cobb, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Accidental burn injuries result in significant economic and public health burdens. The inappropriate use of gasoline and other accelerants has been identified in many studies as dangerous, yet it remains an all-too-common practice resulting in a significant number of injuries annually. Florida's unique climate permits outdoor recreational and maintenance activities, such as burning yard debris and other trash, throughout the year. Additionally, the hurricane season, lasting from June 1 though November 30, produces large amounts of waste in its wake. The purpose of this study was to examine the seasonal pattern of occurrence and develop an understanding of factors related to accelerant-related burn injuries with the goal of prevention. This nonexperimental research involved a retrospective quantitative observational study of data stored in the National Trauma Registry database. All burn patients admitted to the Tampa General Regional Burn Center as inpatients between January 1, 2001, and December 31, 2005, were included. As with previous studies on the occurrence of accelerant related injuries, young men were much more likely to suffer this type of injury. The hurricane season correlates with an increased number of accelerant related burn injuries, which differs somewhat from the seasonal variations in other regions. The size and severity of accelerant-related injuries varies significantly, as does the length of hospital stay. Accelerant use is frequently associated with trash/brush-related accidents. Hurricane seasons can produce an inordinately large amount of debris and therefore are related with an increased incident in this type of burn injury. The results of this study support the development of a community-based educational program directed at burn injury prevention, with special attention to the implications of the hurricane season. PMID:17667487

  9. Hurricanes in the Upper Midwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gravelle, John D.

    This document describes the procedures used by one group of Wisconsin high school students to compile data researched on all hurricanes in the Atlantic from 1886 through 1993. The students used data received on Internet to create a hypercard stack that would plot hurricanes. Students from Minnehaha Academy in Minnesota used the net to download…

  10. Hurricane Katrina as a "teachable moment"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glantz, M. H.

    2008-04-01

    By American standards, New Orleans is a very old, very popular city in the southern part of the United States. It is located in Louisiana at the mouth of the Mississippi River, a river which drains about 40% of the Continental United States, making New Orleans a major port city. It is also located in an area of major oil reserves onshore, as well as offshore, in the Gulf of Mexico. Most people know New Orleans as a tourist hotspot; especially well-known is the Mardi Gras season at the beginning of Lent. People refer to the city as the "Big Easy". A recent biography of the city refers to it as the place where the emergence of modern tourism began. A multicultural city with a heavy French influence, it was part of the Louisiana Purchase from France in early 1803, when the United States bought it, doubling the size of the United States at that time. Today, in the year 2007, New Orleans is now known for the devastating impacts it withstood during the onslaught of Hurricane Katrina in late August 2005. Eighty percent of the city was submerged under flood waters. Almost two years have passed, and many individuals and government agencies are still coping with the hurricane's consequences. And insurance companies have been withdrawing their coverage for the region. The 2005 hurricane season set a record, in the sense that there were 28 named storms that calendar year. For the first time in hurricane forecast history, hurricane forecasters had to resort to the use of Greek letters to name tropical storms in the Atlantic and Gulf (Fig.~1). Hurricane Katrina was a Category 5 hurricane when it was in the middle of the Gulf of Mexico, after having passed across southern Florida. At landfall, Katrina's winds decreased in speed and it was relabeled as a Category 4. It devolved into a Category 3 hurricane as it passed inland when it did most of its damage. Large expanses of the city were inundated, many parts under water on the order of 20 feet or so. The Ninth Ward, heavily

  11. Seasonal Modulation of Earthquake Swarm Activity Near Maupin, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braunmiller, J.; Nabelek, J.; Trehu, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    Between December 2006 and November 2011, the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network (PNSN) reported 464 earthquakes in a swarm about 60 km east-southeast of Mt. Hood near the town of Maupin, Oregon. Relocation of forty-five MD≥2.5 earthquakes and regional moment tensor analysis of nine 3.3≤Mw≤3.9 earthquakes reveals a north-northwest trending, less than 1 km2 sized active fault patch on a 70° west dipping fault. At about 17 km depth, the swarm occurred at or close to the bottom of the seismogenic crust. The swarm's cumulative seismic moment release, equivalent to an Mw=4.4 earthquake, is not dominated by a single shock; it is rather mainly due to 20 MD≥3.0 events, which occurred throughout the swarm. The swarm started at the southern end and, during the first 18 months of activity, migrated to the northwest at a rate of about 1-2 m/d until reaching its northern terminus. A 10° fault bend, inferred from locations and fault plane solutions, acted as geometrical barrier that temporarily halted event migration in mid-2007 before continuing north in early 2008. The slow event migration points to a pore pressure diffusion process suggesting the swarm onset was triggered by fluid inflow into the fault zone. At 17 km depth, triggering by meteoritic water seems unlikely for a normal crustal permeability. The double couple source mechanisms preclude a magmatic intrusion at the depth of the earthquakes. However, fluids (or gases) associated with a deeper, though undocumented, magma injection beneath the Cascade Mountains, could trigger seismicity in a pre-stressed region when they have migrated upward and reached the seismogenic crust. Superimposed on overall swarm evolution, we found a statistically significant annual seismicity variation, which is likely surface driven. The annual seismicity peak during spring (March-May) coincides with the maximum snow load on the near-by Cascades. The load corresponds to a surface pressure variation of about 6 kPa, which likely

  12. Seasonal divergence in the interannual responses of Northern Hemisphere vegetation activity to variations in diurnal climate

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiuchen; Liu, Hongyan; Li, Xiaoyan; Liang, Eryuan; Beck, Pieter S. A.; Huang, Yongmei

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal asymmetry in the interannual variations in the daytime and nighttime climate in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) is well documented, but its consequences for vegetation activity remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the interannual responses of vegetation activity to variations of seasonal mean daytime and nighttime climate in NH (>30 °N) during the past decades using remote sensing retrievals, FLUXNET and tree ring data. Despite a generally significant and positive response of vegetation activity to seasonal mean maximum temperature () in ~22–25% of the boreal (>50 °N) NH between spring and autumn, spring-summer progressive water limitations appear to decouple vegetation activity from the mean summer , particularly in climate zones with dry summers. Drought alleviation during autumn results in vegetation recovery from the marked warming-induced drought limitations observed in spring and summer across 24–26% of the temperate NH. Vegetation activity exhibits a pervasively negative correlation with the autumn mean minimum temperature, which is in contrast to the ambiguous patterns observed in spring and summer. Our findings provide new insights into how seasonal asymmetry in the interannual variations in the mean daytime and nighttime climate interacts with water limitations to produce spatiotemporally variable responses of vegetation growth. PMID:26751166

  13. Seasonal divergence in the interannual responses of Northern Hemisphere vegetation activity to variations in diurnal climate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiuchen; Liu, Hongyan; Li, Xiaoyan; Liang, Eryuan; Beck, Pieter S A; Huang, Yongmei

    2016-01-11

    Seasonal asymmetry in the interannual variations in the daytime and nighttime climate in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) is well documented, but its consequences for vegetation activity remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the interannual responses of vegetation activity to variations of seasonal mean daytime and nighttime climate in NH (>30 °N) during the past decades using remote sensing retrievals, FLUXNET and tree ring data. Despite a generally significant and positive response of vegetation activity to seasonal mean maximum temperature (Tmax) in ~22-25% of the boreal (>50 °N) NH between spring and autumn, spring-summer progressive water limitations appear to decouple vegetation activity from the mean summer Tmax, particularly in climate zones with dry summers. Drought alleviation during autumn results in vegetation recovery from the marked warming-induced drought limitations observed in spring and summer across 24-26% of the temperate NH. Vegetation activity exhibits a pervasively negative correlation with the autumn mean minimum temperature, which is in contrast to the ambiguous patterns observed in spring and summer. Our findings provide new insights into how seasonal asymmetry in the interannual variations in the mean daytime and nighttime climate interacts with water limitations to produce spatiotemporally variable responses of vegetation growth.

  14. Seasonal Variability in Boreal Wildfire Activity Associated with Landscape Patterns of Burned Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, K. M.; Kasischke, E. S.

    2012-12-01

    Wildfire is the most prominent disturbance in the boreal forest, effecting changes in stand age and vegetation composition often over thousands of square kilometers. The effect of wildfire on ecosystem structure and function depends heavily on the seasonality of the burn, and periods of seasonally high fire activity are highly sporadic. The majority of area in Alaska that burns in a fire season does so during relatively short periods of high fire activity. These periods, which can be determined from active fire detections or fire management agency data records, are caused by elevated air temperatures and low precipitation which decrease fuel moisture and encourage the spread of fire. While fire fronts dominate during periods of low fire activity, more active periods have a higher proportion of residual burning which remains after a front has passed through. Residual burning is likely responsible for the extensive combustion of surface organic materials in the boreal forest, which can lead to post-fire changes in dominant vegetation type. Seasonal variations in fire activity are therefore an important factor in the mosaic of severity conditions across large burned areas and shifts in land cover over successional time scales. The purpose of this study is to characterize the temporal and spatial variability in periods of seasonal high fire activity that influence patterns of burned area. In large burns, unburned areas within a fire scar may serve as an important seed stock during post-fire recruitment. These areas may also feedback to future fire regimes through the preservation of more fire-resistant vegetation in unburned "islands".

  15. Intense Southwest Florida hurricane landfalls over the past 1000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercolani, Christian; Muller, Joanne; Collins, Jennifer; Savarese, Michael; Squiccimara, Louis

    2015-10-01

    Recent research has proposed that human-induced sea surface temperature (SST) warming has led to an increase in the intensity of hurricanes over the past 30 years. However, this notion has been challenged on the basis that the instrumental record is too short and unreliable to reveal long-term trends in hurricane activity. This study addresses this limitation by investigating hurricane-induced overwash deposits (paleotempestites) behind a barrier island in Naples, FL, USA. Paleotempestologic proxies including grain size, percent calcium carbonate, and fossil shells species were used to distinguish overwash events in two sediment cores spanning the last one thousand years. Two prominent paleotempestites were observed in the top 20 cm of both cores: the first identified as Hurricane Donna in 1960 whereas an older paleotempestite (1900-1930) could represent one of three documented storms in the early 1900s. An active period of hurricane overwash from 1000 to 500 yrs. BP and an inactive period from 500 to 150 yrs. BP correlate with reconstructed SSTs from the Main Development Region (MDR) of the North Atlantic Ocean. We observe an increased number of paleotempestites when MDR SSTs are warmer, coinciding with the Medieval Warm Period, and very few paleotempestites when MDR SSTs are cooler, coinciding with the Little Ice Age. Results from this initial Southwest Florida study indicate that MDR SSTs have been a key long-term climate driver of intense Southwest Florida hurricane strikes.

  16. JLAB Hurricane recovery

    SciTech Connect

    A. Hutton; D. Arenius; J. Benesch; S. Chattopadhyay; E. F. Daly; O. Garza; R. Kazimi; R. Lauzi; L. Merminga; W. Merz; R. Nelson; W. Oren; M. Poelker; P. Powers; J. Preble; V. Ganni; C. R. Reece; R. Rimmer; M. Spata; S. Suhring

    2004-07-01

    Hurricane Isabel, originally a Category 5 storm, arrived at Jefferson Lab on September 18, 2003 with winds of only 75 mph, creating little direct damage to the infrastructure. However, electric power was lost for four days allowing the superconducting cryomodules to warm up and causing a total loss of the liquid helium. The subsequent recovery of the cryomodules and the impact of the considerable amount of opportunistic preventive maintenance provides important lessons for all accelerator complexes, not only those with superconducting elements. The details of how the recovery process was structured and the resulting improvement in accelerator availability will be discussed in detail.

  17. Impact of 1985 hurricanes on Isles Dernieres, Louisiana: Temporal and spatial analysis of coastal geomorphic changes

    SciTech Connect

    Debusshere, K.; Westphal, K.; Penland, S.; McBride, R. )

    1989-09-01

    Catastrophic geomorphic changes occurred in the Isles Dernieres barrier island arc as a result of the direct impact of three hurricanes in 1985. The severity of the impact of hurricanes Danny, Elena, and Juan had not been equaled since the landfall of hurricanes Betsy and Camille in the late 1960s. The Isles Dernieres had not been subjected to a direct hurricane landfall since hurricane Bob in 1979. The recent hurricane impacts provided the USGS/LGS Louisiana Cooperative Barrier Island and Land Loss Study the opportunity to examine the process-response characteristics of this low-profile transgressive barrier island arc to multiple hurricane impacts in a single hurricane season. The geomorphic changes along the Isles Dernieres were determined using four sequential airborne videotape surveys acquired in July 1984, July 1985 (pre-storm), August 1985 (post-Danny) and November 1985 (post-Juan) and mapped on 1:24,000 base maps produced from concurrent vertical aerial photography. A coastal geomorphic classification was developed to describe, quantify, and map the alongshore geomorphic, sedimentologic , and vegetative character of this barrier shoreline. The classification consists of three levels of descriptors: (1) primary morphology to define the predominant longshore morphology, (2) modifiers to depict the small-scale longshore features, and (3) variants to locate and quantify important coastal features, not mappable at the scale used.

  18. Seasonal variation in physical activity and sedentary time in different European regions. The HELENA study.

    PubMed

    Gracia-Marco, Luis; Ortega, Francisco B; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Williams, Craig A; Hagströmer, Maria; Manios, Yannis; Kafatos, Anthony; Béghin, Laurent; Polito, Angela; De Henauw, Stefaan; Valtueña, Jara; Widhalm, Kurt; Molnar, Denes; Alexy, Ute; Moreno, Luis A; Sjöström, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This report aims (1) to examine the association between seasonality and physical activity (PA) and sedentary time in European adolescents and (2) to investigate whether this association was influenced by geographical location (Central-North versus South of Europe), which implies more or less extreme weather and daylight hours. Valid data on PA, sedentary time and seasonality were obtained in 2173 adolescents (1175 females; 12.5-17.5 years) included in this study. Physical activity and sedentary time were measured by accelerometers. ANCOVA was conducted to analyse the differences in PA and sedentary time across seasons. Results showed that girls had lower levels of moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) and average PA, and spent more time in sedentary activities in winter compared with spring (all P < 0.05). Stratified analyses showed differences in PA and sedentary time between winter and spring in European girls from Central-North of Europe (P < 0.05 for sedentary time). There were no differences between PA and sedentary time across seasonality in boys. In conclusion, winter is related with less time spent in MVPA, lower average PA and higher time spent in sedentary activities in European adolescent girls, compared with spring. These differences seem to mainly occur in Central-North Europe.

  19. Improving in-season nitrogen recommendations for maize using an active sensor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An active crop canopy reflectance sensor could be used to increase N-use efficiency in corn (Zea mays L.), if temporal and spatial variability in soil N availability and plant demand are adequately accounted for with an in-season N application. Our objective was to evaluate the success of using an a...

  20. Seasonal Variation in Children’s Physical Activity and Sedentary Time

    PubMed Central

    Atkin, Andrew J; Sharp, Stephen J; Harrison, Flo; Brage, Søren; van Sluijs, Esther MF

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Understanding seasonal variation in physical activity is important for informing public health surveillance and intervention design. The aim of the current study was to describe seasonal variation in children’s objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time. Methods Data are from the UK Millennium Cohort Study. Participants were invited to wear an accelerometer for seven days on five occasions between November 2008 and January 2010. Outcome variables were sedentary time (<100 counts per minute; min/day) and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA; >2241 counts per min; min/day). Season was characterised using a categorical variable (spring, summer, autumn, winter) and a continuous function of day of year. Cross-classified linear regression models were used to estimate the association of each of these constructs with the outcome variables. Modification of the seasonal variation by sex, weight status, urban/rural location, parental income and day of the week (week/weekend) was examined using interaction terms in regression models. Results At least 1 wave of valid accelerometer data was obtained from 704 participants (47% male; baseline age 7.6(0.3) years). MVPA was lower in autumn and winter relative to spring, with the magnitude of this difference varying by week/weekend day, sex, weight status, urban/rural location and family income (p for interaction <0.05 in all cases). Total sedentary time was greater in autumn and winter compared to spring; the seasonal effect was stronger at the weekend than during the week (p for interaction <0.01). Conclusion Lower levels of MVPA and elevated sedentary time support the implementation of intervention programmes during autumn and winter. Evidence of greater seasonal variation in weekend behaviour and amongst certain socio-demographic subgroups highlights targets for tailored intervention programmes. PMID:26429733

  1. Seasonal variations in sexual activity and their implications for sexual health promotion.

    PubMed

    Wellings, K; Macdowall, W; Catchpole, M; Goodrich, J

    1999-02-01

    Although seasonal variations in births are observed in all human populations, the links between calendar events and sexual activity have received little attention in relation to health promotion and service provision. We have plotted various relevant data--routinely collected data for births within and outside of marriage, abortions, sexually transmitted infections, human immunodeficiency virus tests and condom sales figures--by calendar period. The trends point consistently to an increase in sexual activity and unsafe sex occurring at or around the Christmas period, and a longer but less pronounced subsidiary period of increased sexual activity and unsafe sex coinciding with the summer vacation. We conclude that seasonal patterns of sexual activity have implications for provision of sexual health services and for the timing and targeting of sexual health promotional interventions.

  2. Effects of seasonal variation in prey abundance on field metabolism, water flux, and activity of a tropical ambush foraging snake.

    PubMed

    Christian, Keith; Webb, Jonathan K; Schultz, Timothy; Green, Brian

    2007-01-01

    The responses of animals to seasonal food shortages can have important consequences for population dynamics and the structure and function of food webs. We investigated how an ambush foraging snake, the northern death adder Acanthophis praelongus, responds to seasonal fluctuations in prey availability in its tropical environment. In the dry season, field metabolic rates and water flux, as measured by doubly labeled water, were significantly lower than in the wet season. Unlike some other reptiles of the wet-dry tropics, death adders showed no seasonal difference in their resting metabolism. About 94% of the decrease in energy expended in the dry season was due to a decrease in activity and digestion, with lower body temperatures accounting for the remainder. In the dry season, death adders were less active and moved shorter distances between foraging sites than in the wet season. Analysis of energy expenditure suggested that adders fed no more than every 2-3 wk in the dry season but fed more frequently during the wet season. Unlike many lizards that cease feeding during the dry season, death adders remain active and attempt to maximize their energy intake year-round.

  3. Influence of harvest season on antioxidant activity and constituents of rabbiteye blueberry ( Vaccinium ashei ) leaves.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liancai; Liu, Xi; Tan, Jun; Wang, Bochu

    2013-11-27

    To select rabbiteye blueberry leaves from an appropriate harvest season to develop functional foods, this paper studied the bioactive secondary metabolites and the antioxidant capacity of rabbiteye blueberry leaves from May, September, and November. The results showed the leaves from May had the highest content of total flavonoids (114.21 mg/g) and the leaves from November had the highest content of total polyphenols and proanthocyanidins (425.24 and 243.29 mg/g, respectively). It was further found that blueberry leaves from different seasons have similar bioactive constituents, but their contents are obviously different by HPLC. The rabbiteye blueberry leaves from November had the highest antioxidant capacity, which was well correlated with their highest proanthocyanidin content. The results clarify that the blueberry leaves from different seasons have different contents of bioactive secondary metabolites and different antioxidant activities, which implied that leaves from November should be selected first for utilization in functional foods.

  4. Antileishmanial activity of the essential oil from Tetradenia riparia obtained in different seasons.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Bruna Muller; de Mello, Tatiane França Perles; Lopes, Sara Negrão; Demarchi, Izabel Galhardo; Lera, Daniele Stefani Lopes; Pedroso, Raíssa Bocchi; Cortez, Diogenes Aparício; Gazim, Zilda Cristiani; Aristides, Sandra Mara Alessi; Silveira, Thais Gomes Verzignassi; Lonardoni, Maria Valdrinez Campana

    2015-12-01

    The herbaceous shrub Tetradenia riparia has been traditionally used to treat inflammatory and infectious diseases. Recently, a study showed that T. riparia essential oil (TrEO) obtained in summer has antileishmanial effects, although these results could be influenced by seasonal variation. This study evaluated the activity of the TrEO obtained in different seasons against Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis, in vitro and in vivo. The compounds in the TrEO were analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; terpenoids were present and oxygenated sesquiterpenes were the majority compounds (55.28%). The cytotoxicity and nitric oxide (NO) production were also tested after TrEO treatment. The TrEO from all seasons showed a 50% growth inhibitory concentration for promastigotes of about 15 ng/mL; at 30 ng/mL and 3 ng/mL, the TrEO reduced intracellular amastigote infection, independently of season. The TrEO from plants harvested in summer had the highest 50% cytotoxic concentration, 1,476 ng/mL for J774.A1 macrophages, and in spring (90.94 ng/mL) for murine macrophages. NO production did not change in samples of the TrEO from different seasons. The antileishmanial effect in vivo consisted of a reduction of the parasite load in the spleen. These results suggest that the TrEO has potential effects on L. (L.) amazonensis, consonant with its traditional use to treat parasitic diseases.

  5. Antileishmanial activity of the essential oil from Tetradenia riparia obtained in different seasons.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Bruna Muller; de Mello, Tatiane França Perles; Lopes, Sara Negrão; Demarchi, Izabel Galhardo; Lera, Daniele Stefani Lopes; Pedroso, Raíssa Bocchi; Cortez, Diogenes Aparício; Gazim, Zilda Cristiani; Aristides, Sandra Mara Alessi; Silveira, Thais Gomes Verzignassi; Lonardoni, Maria Valdrinez Campana

    2015-12-01

    The herbaceous shrub Tetradenia riparia has been traditionally used to treat inflammatory and infectious diseases. Recently, a study showed that T. riparia essential oil (TrEO) obtained in summer has antileishmanial effects, although these results could be influenced by seasonal variation. This study evaluated the activity of the TrEO obtained in different seasons against Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis, in vitro and in vivo. The compounds in the TrEO were analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; terpenoids were present and oxygenated sesquiterpenes were the majority compounds (55.28%). The cytotoxicity and nitric oxide (NO) production were also tested after TrEO treatment. The TrEO from all seasons showed a 50% growth inhibitory concentration for promastigotes of about 15 ng/mL; at 30 ng/mL and 3 ng/mL, the TrEO reduced intracellular amastigote infection, independently of season. The TrEO from plants harvested in summer had the highest 50% cytotoxic concentration, 1,476 ng/mL for J774.A1 macrophages, and in spring (90.94 ng/mL) for murine macrophages. NO production did not change in samples of the TrEO from different seasons. The antileishmanial effect in vivo consisted of a reduction of the parasite load in the spleen. These results suggest that the TrEO has potential effects on L. (L.) amazonensis, consonant with its traditional use to treat parasitic diseases. PMID:26602873

  6. Antileishmanial activity of the essential oil from Tetradenia riparia obtained in different seasons

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Bruna Muller; de Mello, Tatiane França Perles; Lopes, Sara Negrão; Demarchi, Izabel Galhardo; Lera, Daniele Stefani Lopes; Pedroso, Raíssa Bocchi; Cortez, Diogenes Aparício; Gazim, Zilda Cristiani; Aristides, Sandra Mara Alessi; Silveira, Thais Gomes Verzignassi; Lonardoni, Maria Valdrinez Campana

    2015-01-01

    The herbaceous shrub Tetradenia riparia has been traditionally used to treat inflammatory and infectious diseases. Recently, a study showed that T. riparia essential oil (TrEO) obtained in summer has antileishmanial effects, although these results could be influenced by seasonal variation. This study evaluated the activity of the TrEO obtained in different seasons against Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis, in vitro and in vivo. The compounds in the TrEO were analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; terpenoids were present and oxygenated sesquiterpenes were the majority compounds (55.28%). The cytotoxicity and nitric oxide (NO) production were also tested after TrEO treatment. The TrEO from all seasons showed a 50% growth inhibitory concentration for promastigotes of about 15 ng/mL; at 30 ng/mL and 3 ng/mL, the TrEO reduced intracellular amastigote infection, independently of season. The TrEO from plants harvested in summer had the highest 50% cytotoxic concentration, 1,476 ng/mL for J774.A1 macrophages, and in spring (90.94 ng/mL) for murine macrophages. NO production did not change in samples of the TrEO from different seasons. The antileishmanial effect in vivo consisted of a reduction of the parasite load in the spleen. These results suggest that the TrEO has potential effects on L. (L.) amazonensis, consonant with its traditional use to treat parasitic diseases. PMID:26602873

  7. Numerical simulations of Hurricane Bertha using a mesoscale atmospheric model

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, R.L.

    1996-08-01

    The Regional Atmospheric Model System (RAMS) has been used to simulate Hurricane Bertha as it moved toward and onto shore during the period July 10--12, 1996. Using large-scale atmospheric data from 00 UTC, 11 July (Wednesday evening) to initialize the model, a 36-hour simulation was created for a domain centered over the Atlantic Ocean east of the Florida coast near Jacksonville. The simulated onshore impact time of the hurricane was much earlier than observed (due to the use of results from the large-scale model, which predicted early arrival). However, the movement of the hurricane center (eye) as it approached the North Carolina/South Carolina coast as simulated in RAMS was quite good. Observations revealed a northerly storm track off the South Carolina coast as it moved toward land. As it approached landfall, Hurricane Bertha turned to the north-northeast, roughly paralleling the North Carolina coast before moving inland near Wilmington. Large-scale model forecasts were unable to detect this change in advance and predicted landfall near Myrtle Beach, South Carolina; RAMS, however, correctly predicted the parallel coastal movement. For future hurricane activity in the southeast, RAMS is being configured to run in an operational model using input from the large-scale pressure data in hopes of providing more information on predicted hurricane movement and landfall location.

  8. The Connection Between Hurricanes and Precipitation in Maryland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Liu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Precipitation, though necessary, can affect humanity in disastrous ways. Droughts, floods and other related disasters can costly damage economy. In 2012, Hurricane Sandy, caused a total economic loss of about 65 billion and in the state of Maryland, approximately 13.55 million. The purpose of this study is to determine what, if any effect do hurricanes have on monthly and annual precipitation in Maryland. Furthermore, using this information, discussion can be made on hurricane activity in Maryland and the possible connection to global climate change. To achieve this goal, three objectives were developed to: 1) Gain a better understanding of Maryland's terrain and how that affects precipitation; 2) Calculate monthly and annual precipitation in the state; and 3) Calculate how much precipitation was contributed by each hurricane. The NASA TRMM Multi-Satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) precipitation products were used. Our results show that hurricanes do significantly affect both monthly and annual precipitation in Maryland, so much so that if removed, most monthly and annual precipitations would be below their averages. The methodology could be applied to other states or regions as well. Giving the global warming scenario, it is important to understand changes of hurricane size, track and intensity since both can have significant impacts on Maryland, which warrants further studies.

  9. Seasonal variation in American black bear Ursus americanus activity patterns: Quantification via remote photography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bridges, A.S.; Vaughan, M.R.; Klenzendorf, S.

    2004-01-01

    Activity pattern plasticity may serve as an evolutionary adaptation to optimize fitness in an inconstant environment, however, quantifying patterns and demonstrating variation can be problematic. For American black bears Ursus americanus, wariness and habitat inaccessibility further complicate quantification. Radio telemetry has been the primary technique used to examine activity, however, interpretation error and limitation on numbers of animals available to monitor prevent extrapolation to unmarked or untransmittered members of the population. We used remote cameras to quantify black bear activity patterns and examined differences by season, sex and reproductive class in the Alleghany Mountains of western Virginia, USA. We used 1,533 pictures of black bears taken during 1998-2002 for our analyses. Black bears generally were diurnal in summer and nocturnal in autumn with a vespertine activity peak during both seasons. Bear-hound training seasons occurred during September and may offer explanation for the observed shift towards nocturnal behaviour. We found no substantial differences in activity patterns between sex and reproductive classes. Use of remote cameras allowed us to efficiently sample larger numbers of individual animals and likely offered a better approximation of population-level activity patterns than individual-level, telemetry-based methodologies.

  10. Real-time Prescription Surveillance and its Application to Monitoring Seasonal Influenza Activity in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Ohkusa, Yasushi; Ibuka, Yoko; Kawanohara, Hirokazu; Taniguchi, Kiyosu; Okabe, Nobuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Background Real-time surveillance is fundamental for effective control of disease outbreaks, but the official sentinel surveillance in Japan collects information related to disease activity only weekly and updates it with a 1-week time lag. Objective To report on a prescription surveillance system using electronic records related to prescription drugs that was started in 2008 in Japan, and to evaluate the surveillance system for monitoring influenza activity during the 2009–2010 and 2010–2011 influenza seasons. Methods We developed an automatic surveillance system using electronic records of prescription drug purchases collected from 5275 pharmacies through the application service provider’s medical claims service. We then applied the system to monitoring influenza activity during the 2009–2010 and 2010–2011 influenza seasons. The surveillance system collected information related to drugs and patients directly and automatically from the electronic prescription record system, and estimated the number of influenza cases based on the number of prescriptions of anti-influenza virus medication. Then it shared the information related to influenza activity through the Internet with the public on a daily basis. Results During the 2009–2010 influenza season, the number of influenza patients estimated by the prescription surveillance system between the 28th week of 2009 and the 12th week of 2010 was 9,234,289. In the 2010–2011 influenza season, the number of influenza patients between the 36th week of 2010 and the 12th week of 2011 was 7,153,437. The estimated number of influenza cases was highly correlated with that predicted by the official sentinel surveillance (r = .992, P < .001 for 2009–2010; r = .972, P < .001 for 2010–2011), indicating that the prescription surveillance system produced a good approximation of activity patterns. Conclusions Our prescription surveillance system presents great potential for monitoring influenza activity and for

  11. Observed ocean thermal response to Hurricanes Gustav and Ike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Patrick C.; Shay, Lynn K.; Brewster, Jodi K.; Jaimes, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The 2008 Atlantic hurricane season featured two hurricanes, Gustav and Ike, crossing the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) within a 2 week period. Over 400 airborne expendable bathythermographs (AXBTs) were deployed in a GOM field campaign before, during, and after the passage of Gustav and Ike to measure the evolving upper ocean thermal structure. AXBT and drifter deployments specifically targeted the Loop Current (LC) complex, which was undergoing an eddy-shedding event during the field campaign. Hurricane Gustav forced a 50 m deepening of the ocean mixed layer (OML), dramatically altering the prestorm ocean conditions for Hurricane Ike. Wind-forced entrainment of colder thermocline water into the OML caused sea surface temperatures to cool by over 5°C in GOM common water, but only 1-2°C in the LC complex. Ekman pumping and a near-inertial wake were identified by fluctuations in the 20°C isotherm field observed by AXBTs and drifters following Hurricane Ike. Satellite estimates of the 20° and 26°C isotherm depths and ocean heat content were derived using a two-layer model driven by sea surface height anomalies. Generally, the satellite estimates correctly characterized prestorm conditions, but the two-layer model inherently could not resolve wind-forced mixing of the OML. This study highlights the importance of a coordinated satellite and in situ measurement strategy to accurately characterize the ocean state before, during, and after hurricane passage, particularly in the case of two consecutive storms traveling through the same domain.

  12. Hurricane slams gulf operations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-07

    This paper reports that reports of damage by Hurricane Andrew escalated last week as operators stepped up inspections of oil and gas installations in the Gulf of Mexico. By midweek, companies operating in the gulf and South Louisiana were beginning to agree that earlier assessments of damage only scratched the surface. Damage reports included scores of lost, toppled, or crippled platforms, pipeline ruptures, and oil slicks. By midweek the U.S. coast Guard had received reports of 79 oil spills. Even platforms capable of resuming production in some instances were begin curtailed because of damaged pipelines. Offshore service companies the another 2-4 weeks could be needed to fully assess Andrew's wrath. Lack of personnel and equipment was slowing damage assessment and repair.

  13. Exploring children's seasonal play to promote active lifestyles in Auckland, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Ergler, Christina R; Kearns, Robin; Witten, Karen

    2016-09-01

    Studies of seasonal barriers for outdoor activities seldom view families' play practices as grounded in the everyday experience of the natural elements. This paper brings 20 families' mundane outdoor play experiences in Auckland's temperate climate to the fore. Through drawings and interviews, families residing in both suburban detached houses and central city apartments revealed locally constituted beliefs about appropriate play spaces (e.g. garden, park). While the majority of participants retreated to indoor activities during winter, some children and their parents viewed the outdoors as the only opportunity for 'real fun'. We advocate the importance of a better understanding of children's seasonal outdoor play. In particular, we argue that in order to promote year-round healthy levels of outdoor activities it is necessary to understand variations in societal, neighbourhood and family values attributed to outdoor activities. Further, to develop a more nuanced understanding of the locational complexities of outdoor play it is important to understand the meanings of, and practices associated with, seasonal and weather conditions in different international locations. PMID:27572547

  14. Seasonal, daily activity, and habitat use by three sympatric pit vipers (Serpentes, Viperidae) from southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Marcelo C; Hartmann, Paulo A; Winck, Gisele R; Cechin, Sonia Z

    2014-04-25

    Viperid snakes are widely distributed in the South America and the greater distribution range of the family is found at the Crotalinae subfamily. Despite the abundance of this snakes along their geographic distribution, some ecological aspects remain unknown, principally at subtropical areas. In the present study, we evaluated the activity (daily and seasonal) and the use of the habitat by Bothrops diporus, B. jararaca and B. jararacussu, in an Atlantic Forest area at southern Brazil. We observed higher incidence of viperid snakes during the months with higher temperatures, while no snakes were found during the months with lower temperatures. The data suggest the minimum temperature as environmental variable with the greatest influence on the seasonal activity of this species. Considering the daily activity, we observed a tendency of snakes to avoid the warmest hours. Bothrops jararacussu tend to avoid open areas, being registered only inside and at the edges of the forest. We compared our results with previous studies realized at tropical areas and we suggest the observed seasonal activity as an evolutive response, despite the influence of the different environmental variables, according to the occurence region.

  15. Seasonal 7Be and 137Cs activities in surface air before and after the Chernobyl event.

    PubMed

    Kulan, A

    2006-01-01

    Seasonal fluctuations of cosmogenic (7)Be (T(1/2)=53.4 days) and anthropogenic (137)Cs (T(1/2)=30 years) activities in surface air (aerosols) have been extracted from a long data record (1972-2000) at high latitude (56 degrees N-68 degrees N, Sweden). Normalization to weekly average values was used to control long-term trends so that cyclical trends could be investigated. Enhanced (7)Be activity was observed in spring and summer seasons and likely relates to the seasonal thinning of the tropopause. Variations in the (137)Cs activity record seem to reflect how the isotope was injected in the atmosphere (stratospheric from bomb tests and tropospheric from the Chernobyl accident) and subsequent transport mechanisms. Accordingly, until 1986, the surface air (137)Cs activity was strongly related to nuclear weapons test fallout and exhibits temporal fluctuations resembling the (7)Be. Conversely, since 1986 the Chernobyl-produced (137)Cs dominates the long-term record that shows annual cycles that are strongly controlled by atmospheric boundary layer conditions. Additionally, short-term data within the post-Chernobyl period suggest subtle intrusion of air masses rich in (137)Cs that may occur throughout the year, and differences resulting from spatial occurrence at these latitudes. This is an important observation that may have to do with year-to-year variation and calls for caution when interpreting short-term data records. PMID:16876295

  16. Gordon Becomes a Hurricane, Weakens

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this animation of satellite observations from August 17-20, 2012, Tropical Storm Gordon strengthens into a hurricane as an eye became visible on Aug. 18 just before Gordon affected the Azores Is...

  17. GPM: Hurricanes Beyond the Tropics

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission, or GPM, a joint NASA/JAXA mission, will provide rainfall data on storms and hurricanes like Irene that move out of the tropics. The data will be ava...

  18. Climate change: Unattributed hurricane damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallegatte, Stéphane

    2015-11-01

    In the United States, hurricanes have been causing more and more economic damage. A reanalysis of the disaster database using a statistical method that accounts for improvements in resilience opens the possibility that climate change has played a role.

  19. Effects of a hurricane on fish parasites.

    PubMed

    Overstreet, R M

    2007-09-01

    Hurricanes, also called tropical cyclones, can dramatically affect life along their paths, including a temporary losing or reducing in number of parasites of fishes. Hurricane Katrina in the northern Gulf of Mexico in August 2005 provides many examples involving humans and both terrestrial and aquatic animals and plants. Fishes do not provide much of an indicator of hurricane activity because most species quickly repopulate the area. Fish parasites, however, serve as a good indicator of the overall biodiversity and environmental health. The reasons for the noted absence or reduction of parasites in fishes are many, and specific parasites provide indications of different processes. The powerful winds can produce perturbations of the sediments harboring intermediate hosts. The surge of high salinity water can kill or otherwise affect low salinity intermediate hosts or free-living stages. Both can introduce toxicants into the habitat and also interfere with the timing and processes involved with host-parasite interrelationships. All these have had a major influence on fish parasite populations of fishes in coastal Mississippi, especially for those parasites incorporating intermediate hosts in their life cycles. The length of time for a parasite to become re-established can vary considerably, depending on its life cycle as well as the associated biota, habitat, and environmental conditions, and each parasite provides a special indicator of environmental health. PMID:18410074

  20. Effects of a hurricane on fish parasites.

    PubMed

    Overstreet, R M

    2007-09-01

    Hurricanes, also called tropical cyclones, can dramatically affect life along their paths, including a temporary losing or reducing in number of parasites of fishes. Hurricane Katrina in the northern Gulf of Mexico in August 2005 provides many examples involving humans and both terrestrial and aquatic animals and plants. Fishes do not provide much of an indicator of hurricane activity because most species quickly repopulate the area. Fish parasites, however, serve as a good indicator of the overall biodiversity and environmental health. The reasons for the noted absence or reduction of parasites in fishes are many, and specific parasites provide indications of different processes. The powerful winds can produce perturbations of the sediments harboring intermediate hosts. The surge of high salinity water can kill or otherwise affect low salinity intermediate hosts or free-living stages. Both can introduce toxicants into the habitat and also interfere with the timing and processes involved with host-parasite interrelationships. All these have had a major influence on fish parasite populations of fishes in coastal Mississippi, especially for those parasites incorporating intermediate hosts in their life cycles. The length of time for a parasite to become re-established can vary considerably, depending on its life cycle as well as the associated biota, habitat, and environmental conditions, and each parasite provides a special indicator of environmental health.

  1. Influenza Activity - United States, 2015-16 Season and Composition of the 2016-17 Influenza Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Davlin, Stacy L; Blanton, Lenee; Kniss, Krista; Mustaquim, Desiree; Smith, Sophie; Kramer, Natalie; Cohen, Jessica; Cummings, Charisse Nitura; Garg, Shikha; Flannery, Brendan; Fry, Alicia M; Grohskopf, Lisa A; Bresee, Joseph; Wallis, Teresa; Sessions, Wendy; Garten, Rebecca; Xu, Xiyan; Elal, Anwar Isa Abd; Gubareva, Larisa; Barnes, John; Wentworth, David E; Burns, Erin; Katz, Jacqueline; Jernigan, Daniel; Brammer, Lynnette

    2016-01-01

    During the 2015-16 influenza season (October 4, 2015-May 21, 2016) in the United States, influenza activity* was lower and peaked later compared with the previous three seasons (2012-13, 2013-14, and 2014-15). Activity remained low from October 2015 until late December 2015 and peaked in mid-March 2016. During the most recent 18 influenza seasons (including this season), only two other seasons have peaked in March (2011-12 and 2005-06). Overall influenza activity was moderate this season, with a lower percentage of outpatient visits for influenza-like illness (ILI),(†) lower hospitalization rates, and a lower percentage of deaths attributed to pneumonia and influenza (P&I) compared with the preceding three seasons. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses predominated overall, but influenza A(H3N2) viruses were more commonly identified from October to early December, and influenza B viruses were more commonly identified from mid-April through mid-May. The majority of viruses characterized this season were antigenically similar to the reference viruses representing the recommended components of the 2015-16 Northern Hemisphere influenza vaccine (1). This report summarizes influenza activity in the United States during the 2015-16 influenza season (October 4, 2015-May 21, 2016)(§) and reports the vaccine virus components recommended for the 2016-17 Northern Hemisphere influenza vaccines. PMID:27281364

  2. Weekly antibiotic prescribing and influenza activity in Sweden: a study throughout five influenza seasons.

    PubMed

    Ganestam, Frida; Lundborg, Cecilia Stålsby; Grabowska, Katarzyna; Cars, Otto; Linde, Annika

    2003-01-01

    Influenza often leads to bacterial complications that require treatment. It may also be confused with bacterial respiratory infections, leading to unnecessary prescription of antibiotics. In this first study on the relationship between influenza and antibiotic utilization for a whole country, weekly data on verified influenza cases in Sweden were compared to weekly sales of antibiotics for 5 influenza seasons 1997-2002. The peak of influenza activity occurred during the winter. In 4 out of the 5 monitored influenza seasons it occurred in February-March. The fluctuation of antibiotic utilization was relatively constant over the years with peaks before Christmas and in February-March. There were no obvious differences in the total amount of antibiotics dispensed over the years that could be related to influenza activity, but a coincidental relationship between the peaks of diagnosed influenza cases and the peaks of antibiotic utilization was indicated, especially for older age groups.

  3. Seasonality and daily flight activity of stable flies (Diptera: Muscidae) on dairy farms in Saraburi Province, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Phasuk, Jumnongjit; Prabaripai, Atchariya; Chareonviriyaphap, Theeraphap

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of seasonal abundance and flight activity patterns are required to design effective management programs for insect pests of humans and livestock. In this study, the seasonality and daily flight activity of Stomoxys species were observed on two dairy farms in Saraburi Province, Thailand. Data were assessed throughout 1 year using Vavoua traps from September 2010 to August 2011. A total of 2,520 individuals belonging to four species were collected. Most Stomoxys species peaked in September (rainy season) and gradually decreased in number toward February (dry season); a second peak occurred between March and April (hot season). Stomoxys calcitrans was caught throughout the year and was the most abundant species in this study. The total number of males and females of S. calcitrans differed significantly among seasons and time intervals. The weather parameters of relative humidity and light intensity were significantly correlated with S. calcitrans abundance. PMID:23673316

  4. Factors Affecting Hurricane Evacuation Intentions.

    PubMed

    Lazo, Jeffrey K; Bostrom, Ann; Morss, Rebecca E; Demuth, Julie L; Lazrus, Heather

    2015-10-01

    Protective actions for hurricane threats are a function of the environmental and information context; individual and household characteristics, including cultural worldviews, past hurricane experiences, and risk perceptions; and motivations and barriers to actions. Using survey data from the Miami-Dade and Houston-Galveston areas, we regress individuals' stated evacuation intentions on these factors in two information conditions: (1) seeing a forecast that a hurricane will hit one's area, and (2) receiving an evacuation order. In both information conditions having an evacuation plan, wanting to keep one's family safe, and viewing one's home as vulnerable to wind damage predict increased evacuation intentions. Some predictors of evacuation intentions differ between locations; for example, Florida respondents with more egalitarian worldviews are more likely to evacuate under both information conditions, and Florida respondents with more individualist worldviews are less likely to evacuate under an evacuation order, but worldview was not significantly associated with evacuation intention for Texas respondents. Differences by information condition also emerge, including: (1) evacuation intentions decrease with age in the evacuation order condition but increase with age in the saw forecast condition, and (2) evacuation intention in the evacuation order condition increases among those who rely on public sources of information on hurricane threats, whereas in the saw forecast condition evacuation intention increases among those who rely on personal sources. Results reinforce the value of focusing hurricane information efforts on evacuation plans and residential vulnerability and suggest avenues for future research on how hurricane contexts shape decision making. PMID:26299597

  5. Factors Affecting Hurricane Evacuation Intentions.

    PubMed

    Lazo, Jeffrey K; Bostrom, Ann; Morss, Rebecca E; Demuth, Julie L; Lazrus, Heather

    2015-10-01

    Protective actions for hurricane threats are a function of the environmental and information context; individual and household characteristics, including cultural worldviews, past hurricane experiences, and risk perceptions; and motivations and barriers to actions. Using survey data from the Miami-Dade and Houston-Galveston areas, we regress individuals' stated evacuation intentions on these factors in two information conditions: (1) seeing a forecast that a hurricane will hit one's area, and (2) receiving an evacuation order. In both information conditions having an evacuation plan, wanting to keep one's family safe, and viewing one's home as vulnerable to wind damage predict increased evacuation intentions. Some predictors of evacuation intentions differ between locations; for example, Florida respondents with more egalitarian worldviews are more likely to evacuate under both information conditions, and Florida respondents with more individualist worldviews are less likely to evacuate under an evacuation order, but worldview was not significantly associated with evacuation intention for Texas respondents. Differences by information condition also emerge, including: (1) evacuation intentions decrease with age in the evacuation order condition but increase with age in the saw forecast condition, and (2) evacuation intention in the evacuation order condition increases among those who rely on public sources of information on hurricane threats, whereas in the saw forecast condition evacuation intention increases among those who rely on personal sources. Results reinforce the value of focusing hurricane information efforts on evacuation plans and residential vulnerability and suggest avenues for future research on how hurricane contexts shape decision making.

  6. Seasonal prediction of lightning activity in North Western Venezuela: Large-scale versus local drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Á. G.; Díaz-Lobatón, J.; Chourio, X.; Stock, M. J.

    2016-05-01

    The Lake Maracaibo Basin in North Western Venezuela has the highest annual lightning rate of any place in the world (~ 200 fl km- 2 yr- 1), whose electrical discharges occasionally impact human and animal lives (e.g., cattle) and frequently affect economic activities like oil and natural gas exploitation. Lightning activity is so common in this region that it has a proper name: Catatumbo Lightning (plural). Although short-term lightning forecasts are now common in different parts of the world, to the best of the authors' knowledge, seasonal prediction of lightning activity is still non-existent. This research discusses the relative role of both large-scale and local climate drivers as modulators of lightning activity in the region, and presents a formal predictability study at seasonal scale. Analysis of the Catatumbo Lightning Regional Mode, defined in terms of the second Empirical Orthogonal Function of monthly Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS-TRMM) and Optical Transient Detector (OTD) satellite data for North Western South America, permits the identification of potential predictors at seasonal scale via a Canonical Correlation Analysis. Lightning activity in North Western Venezuela responds to well defined sea-surface temperature patterns (e.g., El Niño-Southern Oscillation, Atlantic Meridional Mode) and changes in the low-level meridional wind field that are associated with the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone migrations, the Caribbean Low Level Jet and tropical cyclone activity, but it is also linked to local drivers like convection triggered by the topographic configuration and the effect of the Maracaibo Basin Nocturnal Low Level Jet. The analysis indicates that at seasonal scale the relative contribution of the large-scale drivers is more important than the local (basin-wide) ones, due to the synoptic control imposed by the former. Furthermore, meridional CAPE transport at 925 mb is identified as the best potential predictor for lightning activity in the Lake

  7. Storm activity in North Atlantic and precipitation anomalies in European region during winter seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyazilova, N. A.; Vyazilova, A. E.

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show the storm activity influence on the formation of wet and dry zone in North Atlantic and European region during winter seasons 1994/95, 2006/07 and 2007/08 years with positive mode of NAO, 1995/96, 2000/01 and 2005/06 years with negative mode of NAO. The study of storm activity includes the analyses of cyclonic intensity and cyclone track number. Analyses of cyclonic intensity based on calculation cyclone centers number (CCN) and sum of cyclone centers MSLP anomalies (CCMA). This analyses based on automated cyclone tracking algorithm and the 6-hourly MSLP from the NCEP/NCAR reanalyses 2 from 1979 to 2009. Precipitation anomalies were calculated from CMAP archive. Analyses had included the calculation of cyclone track number in all region [30°N-80°N, 50°W-70°E]and selected latitude zone for long cyclones (with lifetime more 2 day) and short cyclones (with lifetime less 2 day). The study had shown the special features of CCN and CCMA patterns in region for long and short cyclones. The study shows, that every winter season short cyclone track number twice as much long cyclone track number. However, the contribution of long cyclones in main determines the CCMA in region. Study had shown that winter seasons with positive NAO mode Nord Europe were outstanding by strong positive precipitation anomalies and strong cyclonic intensity, and during winter seasons with negative NAO mode in this region were observed negative precipitation anomalies and weak cyclonic activity. Standartizide anomalies of integral CCMA for selected latitude zone [55°N-80°N, 50°W-70°E] had shown the intensification of cyclonic activity over North Atlantic and North European region in last years.

  8. Seasonal brain acetylcholinesterase activity in three species of shorebirds overwintering in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitchell, C.A.; White, D.H.

    1982-01-01

    There was no seasonal variation in average brain AChE activity for the 3 species of wild birds collected between October and February. Further work needs to be done, however, covering an even broader time frame which includes the reproductive cycle. It appears that some birds feeding at the mouth of an agricultural drain, at some distance from the nearest pesticide applications, were affected by AChE inhibitors.

  9. Diagnosing United States hurricane landfall risk: An alternative to count-based methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staehling, Erica M.; Truchelut, Ryan E.

    2016-08-01

    Assessing hurricane landfall risk is of immense public utility, yet extant methods of diagnosing annual tropical cyclone (TC) activity demonstrate no skill in diagnosing U.S. hurricane landfalls. Atlantic TC count itself has limited skill, explaining less than 20% of interannual variance in landfall incidence. Using extended landfall activity and reanalysis data sets, we employed empirical Poisson modeling to produce a landfall diagnostic index (LDI), incorporating spatially and temporally averaged upper level divergence, relative sea surface temperature, meridional wind, and zonal shear vorticity. LDI captures 31% of interannual variability of U.S. hurricane landfalls and offers physical insight into why indices that successfully capture TC activity fail to diagnose landfalls: there is inherent tension between conditions likely to steer hurricanes toward the U.S. and conditions favorable for TC development. Given this tension, attempting to diagnose, predict, or understand TC count is inadequate for quantifying societal impacts due to landfalling hurricanes.

  10. Evaluation of public health response to hurricanes finds North Carolina better prepared for public health emergencies.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mary V; MacDonald, Pia D M; Cline, J Steven; Baker, Edward L

    2007-01-01

    Reviews of state public health preparedness improvements have been primarily limited to measuring funds expenditures and achievement of cooperative agreement benchmarks. Such reviews fail to assess states' actual capacity for meeting the challenges they may face during an emergency, as evidenced by activities undertaken during the various phases of a disaster. This article examines North Carolina's public health preparedness and response performance during two hurricanes, Hurricane Floyd in 1999 and Hurricane Isabel in 2003, as well as capacity building activities in the intervening years. North Carolina created new infrastructures, enhanced laboratory capacity, and strengthened communications after Hurricane Floyd. These activities facilitated implementation of functional capabilities through effective centralized communication, command and control incident management, and a rapid needs assessment and medical surveillance during Hurricane Isabel. North Carolina continues to implement these capabilities in public health emergencies. Measuring and implementing functional capabilities during exercises or real events facilitates achievement of preparedness performance standards, goals, and objectives.

  11. Public health response to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita--Louisiana, 2005.

    PubMed

    2006-01-20

    On August 24, 2005, Tropical Depression 12 became Tropical Storm Katrina, the 11th named storm of the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season. Late on August 25, Katrina made initial landfall in south Florida as a category 1 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. Katrina strengthened rapidly upon reaching the Gulf of Mexico, attaining category 5 intensity. On August 29, Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast near the Louisiana-Mississippi border as a category 3 hurricane. The effect of earlier category 5 wind speeds on Gulf waters and the massive size of the storm combined to create devastating storm-surge conditions for coastal Mississippi, Louisiana, and Alabama and damage as far east as the Florida panhandle. Storm-induced breeches in the New Orleans levee system resulted in the catastrophic flooding of approximately 80% of that city. Hurricane Katrina was the deadliest hurricane to strike the United States since 1928. Preliminary mortality reports indicate approximately 1,000 Katrina-related deaths in Louisiana, 200 in Mississippi, and 20 in Florida, Alabama, and Georgia. PMID:16424853

  12. Public health response to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita--Louisiana, 2005.

    PubMed

    2006-01-20

    On August 24, 2005, Tropical Depression 12 became Tropical Storm Katrina, the 11th named storm of the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season. Late on August 25, Katrina made initial landfall in south Florida as a category 1 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. Katrina strengthened rapidly upon reaching the Gulf of Mexico, attaining category 5 intensity. On August 29, Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast near the Louisiana-Mississippi border as a category 3 hurricane. The effect of earlier category 5 wind speeds on Gulf waters and the massive size of the storm combined to create devastating storm-surge conditions for coastal Mississippi, Louisiana, and Alabama and damage as far east as the Florida panhandle. Storm-induced breeches in the New Orleans levee system resulted in the catastrophic flooding of approximately 80% of that city. Hurricane Katrina was the deadliest hurricane to strike the United States since 1928. Preliminary mortality reports indicate approximately 1,000 Katrina-related deaths in Louisiana, 200 in Mississippi, and 20 in Florida, Alabama, and Georgia.

  13. Hurricane-induced failure of low salinity wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Howes, Nick C.; FitzGerald, Duncan M.; Hughes, Zoe J.; Georgiou, Ioannis Y.; Kulp, Mark A.; Miner, Michael D.; Smith, Jane M.; Barras, John A.

    2010-01-01

    During the 2005 hurricane season, the storm surge and wave field associated with Hurricanes Katrina and Rita eroded 527 km2 of wetlands within the Louisiana coastal plain. Low salinity wetlands were preferentially eroded, while higher salinity wetlands remained robust and largely unchanged. Here we highlight geotechnical differences between the soil profiles of high and low salinity regimes, which are controlled by vegetation and result in differential erosion. In low salinity wetlands, a weak zone (shear strength 500–1450 Pa) was observed ∼30 cm below the marsh surface, coinciding with the base of rooting. High salinity wetlands had no such zone (shear strengths > 4500 Pa) and contained deeper rooting. Storm waves during Hurricane Katrina produced shear stresses between 425–3600 Pa, sufficient to cause widespread erosion of the low salinity wetlands. Vegetation in low salinity marshes is subject to shallower rooting and is susceptible to erosion during large magnitude storms; these conditions may be exacerbated by low inorganic sediment content and high nutrient inputs. The dramatic difference in resiliency of fresh versus more saline marshes suggests that the introduction of freshwater to marshes as part of restoration efforts may therefore weaken existing wetlands rendering them vulnerable to hurricanes. PMID:20660777

  14. Hurricane-induced failure of low salinity wetlands.

    PubMed

    Howes, Nick C; FitzGerald, Duncan M; Hughes, Zoe J; Georgiou, Ioannis Y; Kulp, Mark A; Miner, Michael D; Smith, Jane M; Barras, John A

    2010-08-10

    During the 2005 hurricane season, the storm surge and wave field associated with Hurricanes Katrina and Rita eroded 527 km(2) of wetlands within the Louisiana coastal plain. Low salinity wetlands were preferentially eroded, while higher salinity wetlands remained robust and largely unchanged. Here we highlight geotechnical differences between the soil profiles of high and low salinity regimes, which are controlled by vegetation and result in differential erosion. In low salinity wetlands, a weak zone (shear strength 500-1450 Pa) was observed approximately 30 cm below the marsh surface, coinciding with the base of rooting. High salinity wetlands had no such zone (shear strengths > 4500 Pa) and contained deeper rooting. Storm waves during Hurricane Katrina produced shear stresses between 425-3600 Pa, sufficient to cause widespread erosion of the low salinity wetlands. Vegetation in low salinity marshes is subject to shallower rooting and is susceptible to erosion during large magnitude storms; these conditions may be exacerbated by low inorganic sediment content and high nutrient inputs. The dramatic difference in resiliency of fresh versus more saline marshes suggests that the introduction of freshwater to marshes as part of restoration efforts may therefore weaken existing wetlands rendering them vulnerable to hurricanes.

  15. Seasonal influenza activity in Hong Kong and its association with meteorological variations.

    PubMed

    Chan, Paul K S; Mok, H Y; Lee, T C; Chu, Ida M T; Lam, Wai-Yip; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2009-10-01

    Influenza seasons appear consistently in the temperate regions, but are more variable in tropical/subtropical regions. The determinant for such variation remains poorly understood. This study documented the activity of influenza over a 10-year period in Hong Kong; examining its association with changes in temperature and relative humidity. The two types of influenza exhibited different correlations with meteorological variations. Influenza A showed two seasonal peaks occurring respectively in winter/spring and summer months in most years. Influenza B showed a clear winter/spring peak, but its activity during summer months was more variable. Cold and humid conditions were associated with a higher activity of both influenza A and B. In contrast, hot and humid conditions were associated with a higher activity of influenza A, but were associated with only a moderate, less consistent increase in the activity of influenza B. A trend of increase in the magnitude of summer peaks of influenza A, but not influenza B, was observed. A hypothetical 2 degrees C rise in temperature would decrease the proportion of favorable days for influenza A in December-April from 78% to 57%, but an increase from 58% to 71% in May-November; with a similar effect (from 83% to 62%) for influenza B during December-April, but a modest change (from 17% to 18%) during May-November. The presence of two seasonal peaks of influenza annually emphasizes the need to evaluate the duration of protective immunity offered by vaccination. Further study on the effects of climate change and global warming on the activity of influenza is warranted.

  16. Monitoring seasonal bat activity on a coastal barrier island in Maryland, USA.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joshua B; Gates, J Edward; Zegre, Nicolas P

    2011-02-01

    Research on effects of wind turbines on bats has increased dramatically in recent years because of significant numbers of bats killed by rotating wind turbine blades. Whereas most research has focused on the Midwest and inland portions of eastern North America, bat activity and migration on the Atlantic Coast has largely been unexamined. We used three long-term acoustic monitoring stations to determine seasonal bat activity patterns on the Assateague Island National Seashore, a barrier island off the coast of Maryland, from 2005 to 2006. We recorded five species, including eastern red bats (Lasiurus borealis), big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus), tri-colored bats (Perimyotis subflavus), and silver-haired bats (Lasionycteris noctivagans). Seasonal bat activity (number of bat passes recorded) followed a cosine function and gradually increased beginning in April, peaked in August, and declined gradually until cessation in December. Based on autoregressive models, inter-night bat activity was autocorrelated for lags of seven nights or fewer but varied among acoustic monitoring stations. Higher nightly temperatures and lower wind speeds positively affected bat activity. When autoregressive model predictions were fitted to the observed nightly bat pass totals, model residuals>2 standard deviations from the mean existed only during migration periods, indicating that periodic increases in bat activity could not be accounted for by seasonal trends and weather variables alone. Rather, the additional bat passes were attributable to migrating bats. We conclude that bats, specifically eastern red, hoary, and silver-haired bats, use this barrier island during migration and that this phenomenon may have implications for the development of near and offshore wind energy.

  17. Monitoring seasonal bat activity on a coastal barrier island in Maryland, USA.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joshua B; Gates, J Edward; Zegre, Nicolas P

    2011-02-01

    Research on effects of wind turbines on bats has increased dramatically in recent years because of significant numbers of bats killed by rotating wind turbine blades. Whereas most research has focused on the Midwest and inland portions of eastern North America, bat activity and migration on the Atlantic Coast has largely been unexamined. We used three long-term acoustic monitoring stations to determine seasonal bat activity patterns on the Assateague Island National Seashore, a barrier island off the coast of Maryland, from 2005 to 2006. We recorded five species, including eastern red bats (Lasiurus borealis), big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus), tri-colored bats (Perimyotis subflavus), and silver-haired bats (Lasionycteris noctivagans). Seasonal bat activity (number of bat passes recorded) followed a cosine function and gradually increased beginning in April, peaked in August, and declined gradually until cessation in December. Based on autoregressive models, inter-night bat activity was autocorrelated for lags of seven nights or fewer but varied among acoustic monitoring stations. Higher nightly temperatures and lower wind speeds positively affected bat activity. When autoregressive model predictions were fitted to the observed nightly bat pass totals, model residuals>2 standard deviations from the mean existed only during migration periods, indicating that periodic increases in bat activity could not be accounted for by seasonal trends and weather variables alone. Rather, the additional bat passes were attributable to migrating bats. We conclude that bats, specifically eastern red, hoary, and silver-haired bats, use this barrier island during migration and that this phenomenon may have implications for the development of near and offshore wind energy. PMID:20364316

  18. Seasonal and Daily Activity Patterns of Mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) Vectors of Pathogens in Northeastern Italy.

    PubMed

    Montarsi, Fabrizio; Mazzon, Luca; Cazzin, Stefania; Ciocchetta, Silvia; Capelli, Gioia

    2015-01-01

    The seasonal and daily activity of mosquito vectors of pathogens affecting animals and humans were studied in northeastern Italy at a site within the Po River Delta Park. A CDC-CO2 trap and a gravid trap were operated at 2-h intervals for 24 h every 15 d from May to October 2010. Overall, 5,788 mosquitoes comprising six species were collected, namely Culex pipiens L. (75.1% of total), Aedes caspius (Pallas) (15.2%), Aedes vexans (Meigen) (6.9%), Anopheles maculipennis s.l. Meigen (2.6%), Culiseta annulata (Schrank) (0.2%), and Culex modestus Ficalbi (<0.1%). The relative abundance of these species increased from May until the beginning of July and then decreased, disappearing at the beginning of October. The diel host-seeking patterns and oviposition site-seeking patterns were species specific and were differentially affected by the ecological variables recorded at the day and hour of mosquito collection or two weeks before collection. Knowledge of the seasonal and daily host-seeking patterns of mosquitoes highlights the time periods of the day and the seasons of potential exposure for animals and humans to mosquito-borne pathogens, therefore delineating the best time for the application of preventive measures. Furthermore, knowledge of the oviposition site-seeking activity of the mosquitoes optimizes the capture of gravid females, thereby enhancing the likelihood of detecting pathogens.

  19. Emergency department syndromic surveillance providing early warning of seasonal respiratory activity in England.

    PubMed

    Hughes, H E; Morbey, R; Hughes, T C; Locker, T E; Pebody, R; Green, H K; Ellis, J; Smith, G E; Elliot, A J

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal respiratory infections place an increased burden on health services annually. We used a sentinel emergency department syndromic surveillance system to understand the factors driving respiratory attendances at emergency departments (EDs) in England. Trends in different respiratory indicators were observed to peak at different points during winter, with further variation observed in the distribution of attendances by age. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed acute respiratory infection and bronchitis/bronchiolitis ED attendances in patients aged 1-4 years were particularly sensitive indicators for increasing respiratory syncytial virus activity. Using near real-time surveillance of respiratory ED attendances may provide early warning of increased winter pressures in EDs, particularly driven by seasonal pathogens. This surveillance may provide additional intelligence about different categories of attendance, highlighting pressures in particular age groups, thereby aiding planning and preparation to respond to acute changes in EDs, and thus the health service in general.

  20. [Seasonal peculiarities of the ground squirrel (Spermophilus undulatus) and Wistar rats circadian activity].

    PubMed

    Semenova, T P; Spiridonova, L A; Zakharova, N M

    2014-09-01

    The seasonal peculiarities of the circadian activity of hibernator, Yakutian long tail ground squirrels (S. undulatus) (n = 35) and non hibernator, Wistar rats (n = 35), were studied. The locomotor activity was registered in each subject individually during 5-17 days by means of "Animex" in the different periods of annual cycle. It was shown that ground squirrels were animals with daily type of activity. On the contrary, the Wistar rats demonstrated nocturne type of locomotors activity. The active period in rats was longer than in ground squirrels. It included not only at night, but morning time in spring, and daytime--in summer. The circadian differences between hibernators and non-hibernators were kept during all annual cycle at night time, but in daytime--only in spring and summer time.

  1. Seasonal Short-Lived Radium Activity in the Venice Lagoon: The Role of Residence Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapaglia, J.; Ferrarin, C.; Zaggia, L.; Umgiesser, G.; Zuppi, G.; Manfe', G.

    2008-12-01

    Radium is considered to be an excellent tracer of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) and, therefore, has been used in many studies of this process in the past decade. Comprehensive surveys of excess 223,224Ra activity were completed in the surface waters of the Venice Lagoon over 6 seasons in order to quantify seasonal variation of SGD into the lagoon. The mass balance of radium found that SGD was 5-26 times greater than total river discharge (35.5 m3 s-1), and that total SGD could differ by almost an order of magnitude pending season. Several possible parameters, which may cause the seasonal variation, were tested. These included precipitation events, average tidal elevation, average tidal excursion, wind speed and direction, yet none provided a satisfactory explanation for the difference. Residence time based on a hydrodynamic model, however, was very strongly correlated with the observed variation. When the average residence time in the lagoon was low (5 days) the SGD was calculated to be 930 m3 s-1 and when the average residence time was high (9 days) the SGD was quantified as 160 m3 s-1. Radioactive decay is already accounted for in the mass balance model and therefore this correlation must be explained by another process. The Venice Lagoon is characterized by low residence time during periods of spring tides and bora or northerly winds, both of which create exceptionally strong currents in the Venice Lagoon. The currents as well as the large tidal excursion which occurs at spring tides drive a recirculation of seawater through the surface sediments, which greatly increases short-lived Ra activity in the surface waters. This evidence suggests, therefore, that short-lived Ra mass balance studies, which are based on a single survey, may under or overestimate the mean annual SGD pending the hydrodynamics of the investigated location.

  2. Melatonin concentrations in the two jugular veins, and relationship with the seasonal reproductive activity in goats.

    PubMed

    Zarazaga, L A; Celi, I; Guzmán, J L; Malpaux, B

    2010-07-15

    The authors investigated whether melatonin concentrations vary between the two jugular veins and whether absolute (nocturnal) or relative (nocturnal/diurnal ratio) plasma melatonin concentrations are associated with seasonal reproductive activity measured by oestrus or ovulatory activity in Payoya goats. Thirty-two adult Payoya goats were penned under natural photoperiod. Oestrus activity was tested daily using aproned males-twice a week plasma was sampled for progesterone. Melatonin plasma concentrations were studied at each equinox and solstice of the year in jugular samples taken simultaneously by venipuncture. Nocturnal and diurnal plasma melatonin concentrations from each jugular vein were assessed in 3 and 2 plasma samples per goat, respectively, taken at hourly intervals in each period. No differences in melatonin concentrations between the two veins were observed, but there was a significant interaction (P < 0.001) between jugular vein and animal in nocturnal melatonin concentrations. There was no effect of sampling period on melatonin concentrations and the coefficient of correlation between sampling periods was very high. The analyses performed indicated that neither absolute nor relative melatonin concentrations were related with the dates of onset or end of ovulatory/oestrus activity. Therefore, we concluded that in goats (1) melatonin concentrations are highly variable between jugular veins in the same individual but not in the general population, (2) melatonin concentrations are highly repeatable for each individual, and (3) absolute and relative amplitudes of melatonin concentrations are not linked to the seasonal breeding activity in Mediterranean goats. PMID:20451998

  3. Hurricane Isaac Moving Towards Northern Gulf Coast

    NASA Video Gallery

    This is an animation of GOES-13 satellite imagery from Aug. 26-28, 2012 of Hurricane Isaac's track through the Gulf of Mexico. Isaac is headed for New Orleans, exactly 7 years after hurricane Katri...

  4. Hurricane Katrina at Tulane.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Jim

    2008-03-01

    After hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans on August 29, 2005, Tulane University closed for the fall semester. Buildings on campus were closed and armed guards were hired to protect the campus. Faculty members were not allowed access to their offices and laboratories, except for exceptional cases when a Dean went with them. Many faculty members took their research groups to other universities accepting much welcomed invitations from colleagues. Undergraduates went to other colleges and universities, which accepted the without cost and a promise not to recruit them. The university email system went down for months. Collecting information on the welfare of faculty and students was difficult. The university was run from Houston by a small handful of senior administrators. Setting up the schedule of classes for the spring 2006 semester was done without records. Most faculty returned to New Orleans after several weeks. 80% of the city was flooded. Small trailers were provided. Some lived in the FEMA trailers for two years or more. When Tulane reopened, a wide reaching Renewal Plan, worked out by the upper administration, was implemented. A new emergency preparedness plan was also developed and put in place.

  5. Atlantic hurricane response to geoengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John; Grinsted, Aslak; Ji, Duoying; Yu, Xiaoyong; Guo, Xiaoran

    2015-04-01

    Devastating Atlantic hurricanes are relatively rare events. However their intensity and frequency in a warming world may rapidly increase - perhaps by a factor of 5 for a 2°C mean global warming. Geoengineering by sulphate aerosol injection preferentially cools the tropics relative to the polar regions, including the hurricane main development region in the Atlantic, suggesting that geoengineering may be an effective method of controlling hurricanes. We examine this hypothesis using 6 Earth System Model simulations of climate under the GeoMIP G3 and G4 schemes that use aerosols to reduce the radiative forcing under the RCP4.5 scenario. We find that although temperatures are ameliorated by geoengineering, the numbers of storm surge events as big as that caused the 2005 Katrina hurricane are only slightly reduced compared with no geoengineering. As higher levels of sulphate aerosol injection produce diminishing returns in terms of cooling, but cause undesirable effects in various regions, it seems that stratospheric aerosol geoengineering is not an effective method of controlling hurricane damage.

  6. Chemical composition, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of basil (Ocimum basilicum) essential oils depends on seasonal variations.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Abdullah Ijaz; Anwar, Farooq; Hussain Sherazi, Syed Tufail; Przybylski, Roman

    2008-06-01

    Chemical composition, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of the essential oils from aerial parts of basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) as affected by four seasonal, namely summer, autumn, winter and spring growing variation were investigated. The hydro-distilled essential oils content ranged from 0.5% to 0.8%, the maximum amounts were observed in winter while minimum in summer. The essential oils consisted of linalool as the most abundant component (56.7-60.6%), followed by epi-α-cadinol (8.6-11.4%), α-bergamotene (7.4-9.2%) and γ-cadinene (3.2-5.4%). Samples collected in winter were found to be richer in oxygenated monoterpenes (68.9%), while those of summer were higher in sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (24.3%). The contents of most of the chemical constituents varied significantly (p<0.05) with different seasons. The essential oils investigated, exhibited good antioxidant activity as measurements by DPPH free radical-scavenging ability, bleaching β-carotene in linoleic acid system and inhibition of linoleic acid oxidation. Evaluation of antimicrobial activity of the essential oils and linalool, the most abundant component, against bacterial strains: Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Pasteurella multocida and pathogenic fungi Aspergillus niger, Mucor mucedo, Fusarium solani, Botryodiplodia theobromae, Rhizopus solani was assessed by disc diffusion method and measurement of determination of minimum inhibitory concentration. The results of antimicrobial assays indicated that all the tested microorganisms were affected. Both the antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of the oils varied significantly (p<0.05), as seasons changed.

  7. Structure of the rare archaeal biosphere and seasonal dynamics of active ecotypes in surface coastal waters

    PubMed Central

    Hugoni, Mylène; Taib, Najwa; Debroas, Didier; Domaizon, Isabelle; Jouan Dufournel, Isabelle; Bronner, Gisèle; Salter, Ian; Agogué, Hélène; Mary, Isabelle; Galand, Pierre E.

    2013-01-01

    Marine Archaea are important players among microbial plankton and significantly contribute to biogeochemical cycles, but details regarding their community structure and long-term seasonal activity and dynamics remain largely unexplored. In this study, we monitored the interannual archaeal community composition of abundant and rare biospheres in northwestern Mediterranean Sea surface waters by pyrosequencing 16S rDNA and rRNA. A detailed analysis of the rare biosphere structure showed that the rare archaeal community was composed of three distinct fractions. One contained the rare Archaea that became abundant at different times within the same ecosystem; these cells were typically not dormant, and we hypothesize that they represent a local seed bank that is specific and essential for ecosystem functioning through cycling seasonal environmental conditions. The second fraction contained cells that were uncommon in public databases and not active, consisting of aliens to the studied ecosystem and representing a nonlocal seed bank of potential colonizers. The third fraction contained Archaea that were always rare but actively growing; their affiliation and seasonal dynamics were similar to the abundant microbes and could not be considered a seed bank. We also showed that the major archaeal groups, Thaumarchaeota marine group I and Euryarchaeota group II.B in winter and Euryarchaeota group II.A in summer, contained different ecotypes with varying activities. Our findings suggest that archaeal diversity could be associated with distinct metabolisms or life strategies, and that the rare archaeal biosphere is composed of a complex assortment of organisms with distinct histories that affect their potential for growth. PMID:23536290

  8. Structure of the rare archaeal biosphere and seasonal dynamics of active ecotypes in surface coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Hugoni, Mylène; Taib, Najwa; Debroas, Didier; Domaizon, Isabelle; Jouan Dufournel, Isabelle; Bronner, Gisèle; Salter, Ian; Agogué, Hélène; Mary, Isabelle; Galand, Pierre E

    2013-04-01

    Marine Archaea are important players among microbial plankton and significantly contribute to biogeochemical cycles, but details regarding their community structure and long-term seasonal activity and dynamics remain largely unexplored. In this study, we monitored the interannual archaeal community composition of abundant and rare biospheres in northwestern Mediterranean Sea surface waters by pyrosequencing 16S rDNA and rRNA. A detailed analysis of the rare biosphere structure showed that the rare archaeal community was composed of three distinct fractions. One contained the rare Archaea that became abundant at different times within the same ecosystem; these cells were typically not dormant, and we hypothesize that they represent a local seed bank that is specific and essential for ecosystem functioning through cycling seasonal environmental conditions. The second fraction contained cells that were uncommon in public databases and not active, consisting of aliens to the studied ecosystem and representing a nonlocal seed bank of potential colonizers. The third fraction contained Archaea that were always rare but actively growing; their affiliation and seasonal dynamics were similar to the abundant microbes and could not be considered a seed bank. We also showed that the major archaeal groups, Thaumarchaeota marine group I and Euryarchaeota group II.B in winter and Euryarchaeota group II.A in summer, contained different ecotypes with varying activities. Our findings suggest that archaeal diversity could be associated with distinct metabolisms or life strategies, and that the rare archaeal biosphere is composed of a complex assortment of organisms with distinct histories that affect their potential for growth.

  9. Hurricane Andrew-related injuries and illnesses, Louisiana, 1992.

    PubMed

    McNabb, S J; Kelso, K Y; Wilson, S A; McFarland, L; Farley, T A

    1995-06-01

    To determine the extent and types of injuries and illnesses in Louisiana associated with or related to Hurricane Andrew, we gathered data from hospital emergency departments and coroner's offices on demographic variables, institution, nature and cause of the injury or illness, body part affected, location, and date and time of the event. A hurricane-related injury or illness was defined as one that occurred from noon on August 24, 1992, through midnight on September 21, 1992, as a direct or indirect result of the preparation for (preimpact), the impact of, or the clean-up after the hurricane (postimpact). Nineteen parishes in south-central Louisiana that were most affected by Hurricane Andrew provided data from patients seen in emergency departments and reports from coroner's offices. Active, advance surveillance of this type promotes and facilitates the reporting of disaster-related health outcomes. Future planning for hurricanes should take into account the high rate of cuts, lacerations, and puncture wounds, particularly during the postimpact phase.

  10. Variety and Harvesting Season Effects on Antioxidant Activity and Vitamins Content of Citrus sinensis Macfad.

    PubMed

    Cardeñosa, Vanessa; Barreira, João C M; Barros, Lillian; Arenas-Arenas, Francisco J; Moreno-Rojas, José M; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2015-05-07

    Five sweet orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck) varieties cultivated in Huelva (Spain) and picked at two seasons during two consecutive years, were characterized for their antioxidant activity (free radicals scavenging activity, reducing power and lipid peroxidation inhibition) and vitamin content (vitamin E and vitamin C). The effects induced by sweet orange variety and stage of maturity were comprehensively compared by applying 2-way ANOVA and linear discriminant analysis. The results indicated higher differences in antioxidant activity and vitamin contents in response to the effect of the harvesting season, when compared to the effect of sweet orange variety. Nevertheless, the results observed in 2012 showed less marked differences among the assayed sweet orange varieties. Either way, it might be concluded that oranges sampled in January show the highest antioxidant activity and vitamin contents. Furthermore, concerning the properties evaluated in this work, all sweet orange varieties represent good alternatives, except for Rhode Summer, which would not be the preferable choice as a target to enhance sweet orange overall characteristics.

  11. Seasonal variations in Be-7 activity in the sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuel, E. A.; Martens, C. S.; Benninger, L. K.

    1990-01-01

    The short-term sediment-accumulation rates in the interior of the Cape Lookout Bight (North Caroline) were determined using data on Be-7 activity distribution in the surface of sediments of the bight. Lack of a significant bioturbation in this lagoon made it possible to interpret variations in depth-integrated activity profiles of Be-7 as short-term accumulation events. The accumulation rates calculated from Be-7 activity profiles indicate that the delivery of particulate matter to the sediments of Cape Lookout Bight is not constant throughout an annual cycle, with the highest monthly accumulation rates being associated with north/northeast storm activity. Inputs were found to be highest during the late winter/early spring season, when the storm frequency is greatest.

  12. Winter climate change affects growing-season soil microbial biomass and activity in northern hardwood forests.

    PubMed

    Durán, Jorge; Morse, Jennifer L; Groffman, Peter M; Campbell, John L; Christenson, Lynn M; Driscoll, Charles T; Fahey, Timothy J; Fisk, Melany C; Mitchell, Myron J; Templer, Pamela H

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the responses of terrestrial ecosystems to global change remains a major challenge of ecological research. We exploited a natural elevation gradient in a northern hardwood forest to determine how reductions in snow accumulation, expected with climate change, directly affect dynamics of soil winter frost, and indirectly soil microbial biomass and activity during the growing season. Soils from lower elevation plots, which accumulated less snow and experienced more soil temperature variability during the winter (and likely more freeze/thaw events), had less extractable inorganic nitrogen (N), lower rates of microbial N production via potential net N mineralization and nitrification, and higher potential microbial respiration during the growing season. Potential nitrate production rates during the growing season were particularly sensitive to changes in winter snow pack accumulation and winter soil temperature variability, especially in spring. Effects of elevation and winter conditions on N transformation rates differed from those on potential microbial respiration, suggesting that N-related processes might respond differently to winter climate change in northern hardwood forests than C-related processes. PMID:24796872

  13. Winter climate change affects growing-season soil microbial biomass and activity in northern hardwood forests.

    PubMed

    Durán, Jorge; Morse, Jennifer L; Groffman, Peter M; Campbell, John L; Christenson, Lynn M; Driscoll, Charles T; Fahey, Timothy J; Fisk, Melany C; Mitchell, Myron J; Templer, Pamela H

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the responses of terrestrial ecosystems to global change remains a major challenge of ecological research. We exploited a natural elevation gradient in a northern hardwood forest to determine how reductions in snow accumulation, expected with climate change, directly affect dynamics of soil winter frost, and indirectly soil microbial biomass and activity during the growing season. Soils from lower elevation plots, which accumulated less snow and experienced more soil temperature variability during the winter (and likely more freeze/thaw events), had less extractable inorganic nitrogen (N), lower rates of microbial N production via potential net N mineralization and nitrification, and higher potential microbial respiration during the growing season. Potential nitrate production rates during the growing season were particularly sensitive to changes in winter snow pack accumulation and winter soil temperature variability, especially in spring. Effects of elevation and winter conditions on N transformation rates differed from those on potential microbial respiration, suggesting that N-related processes might respond differently to winter climate change in northern hardwood forests than C-related processes.

  14. 7 CFR 701.150 - 2005 hurricanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false 2005 hurricanes. 701.150 Section 701.150 Agriculture... 2005 hurricanes. In addition benefits elsewhere allowed by this part, claims related to calendar year 2005 hurricane losses may be allowed to the extent provided for in §§ 701.150 through 701.157....

  15. 7 CFR 701.150 - 2005 hurricanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false 2005 hurricanes. 701.150 Section 701.150 Agriculture... 2005 hurricanes. In addition benefits elsewhere allowed by this part, claims related to calendar year 2005 hurricane losses may be allowed to the extent provided for in §§ 701.150 through 701.157....

  16. 7 CFR 701.150 - 2005 hurricanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false 2005 hurricanes. 701.150 Section 701.150 Agriculture... 2005 hurricanes. In addition benefits elsewhere allowed by this part, claims related to calendar year 2005 hurricane losses may be allowed to the extent provided for in §§ 701.150 through 701.157....

  17. 7 CFR 701.50 - 2005 hurricanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false 2005 hurricanes. 701.50 Section 701.50 Agriculture... ADMINISTERED UNDER THIS PART § 701.50 2005 hurricanes. In addition benefits elsewhere allowed by this part, claims related to calendar year 2005 hurricane losses may be allowed to the extent provided for in §§...

  18. 7 CFR 701.150 - 2005 hurricanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false 2005 hurricanes. 701.150 Section 701.150 Agriculture... 2005 hurricanes. In addition benefits elsewhere allowed by this part, claims related to calendar year 2005 hurricane losses may be allowed to the extent provided for in §§ 701.150 through 701.157....

  19. Seasonal variation in daily activity patterns of free-ranging European ground squirrels (Spermophilus citellus).

    PubMed

    Everts, Lammina G; Strijkstra, Arjen M; Hut, Roelof A; Hoffmann, Ilse E; Millesi, Eva

    2004-01-01

    Daily aboveground activity of European ground squirrels (Spermophilus citellus) in their natural habitat was recorded with a visual scanning procedure during the active seasons of 1992 and 1993. Activity patterns were analyzed with respect to time of year and to the animal's reproductive state. Aboveground activity started on average 3.9 h (SD 0.6 h, n = 37 days) after civil twilight at dawn and ended on average 3.2 h (SD 0.9 h, n = 37 days) before civil twilight at dusk. Between onset and offset of activity, 54% was spent aboveground, of which 73% was spent foraging. Activity patterns were influenced by photoperiod, rainfall, and by reproductive state. During mating, reproductively active males started activity earlier than females and reproductively inactive males. For females, time spent foraging was high during lactation. The midpoint of daily activity was at 12:16 h (SD 0.37 h, n = 37 days). Activity patterns of European ground squirrels thus appear robustly positioned in the middle of the photoperiod. PMID:15129824

  20. Hurricane Sandy beach response and recovery at Fire Island, New York: Shoreline and beach profile data, October 2012 to October 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hehre Henderson, Rachel; Hapke, Cheryl J.; Brenner, Owen T.; Reynolds, Billy J.

    2015-01-01

    Overall, Hurricane Sandy substantially altered the morphology of Fire Island. However, the coastal system rapidly began to recover after the 2012-13 winter storm season and continues to recover in the form of volume gains and shoreline adjustment.

  1. Variability of Physical Activity Patterns by Type of Day and Season in 8-10-Year-Old Boys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowlands, Ann V.; Hughes, Dylan R.

    2006-01-01

    The aims of this study were to: (a) compare physical activity across two seasons and, within those seasons, across school and vacation time, and (b) compare the proportion of children meeting the activity thresholds recommended by Tudor-Locke et al. (2004) at each time point. Thirty-six boys, between the ages of 8 and 10 years (M age = 8.8 years,…

  2. [Hurricanes and tropical coastal biodiversity].

    PubMed

    Salazar-Vallejo, Sergio I

    2002-06-01

    Tropical coastal biodiversity has been modulated by tropical storms during a long time and it is currently facing a heavy human impact. The purpose of this review is to compile the available information to improve our understanding of hurricane impacts and to promote the establishment of coastal landscape monitoring, because that is the best way to assess these impacts. Although generalizations on hurricane effects are elusive, some historical dynamics and temporal relationships are included and some details are presented on the impacts by resuspension and movement of sediments, storm waves, and breaking off of coral reef organisms. Some effects on marine turtles and coastal forests are also briefly pointed out.

  3. Antimycoplasmic activity and seasonal variation of essential oil of Eugenia hiemalis Cambess. (Myrtaceae).

    PubMed

    Zatelli, Gabriele Andressa; Zimath, Priscila; Tenfen, Adrielli; Mendes de Cordova, Caio Maurício; Scharf, Dilamara Riva; Simionatto, Edésio Luiz; Alberton, Michele Debiasi; Falkenberg, Miriam

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the chemical composition and antimycoplasmic and anticholinesterase activities of the essential oil of Eugenia hiemalis leaves collected throughout the year. A total of 42 compounds were identified by CG, and are present in almost every seasons. Sesquiterpenes were dominant (86.01-91.48%), and non-functionalised sesquiterpenes comprised the major fraction, which increased in the summer; monoterpenes were not identified. The major components were spathulenol (5.36-16.06%), δ-cadinene (7.50-15.93%), bicyclogermacrene (5.70-14.24%) and β-caryophyllene (4.80-9.43%). The highest oil yield was obtained in summer and autumn. Essential oils presented activity against three evaluated Mycoplasma strains, but no activity was observed in the anticholinesterase assay.

  4. Hurricane Influences on Vegetation Community Change in Coastal Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steyer, Gregory D.; Cretini, Kari Foster; Piazza, Sarai C.; Sharp, Leigh Anne; Snedden, Gregg A.; Sapkota, Sijan

    2010-01-01

    The impacts of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 on wetland vegetation were investigated in Louisiana coastal marshes. Vegetation cover, pore-water salinity, and nutrients data from 100 marsh sites covering the entire Louisiana coast were sampled for two consecutive growing seasons after the storms. A mixed-model nested ANOVA with Tukey's HSD test for post-ANOVA multiple comparisons was used to analyze the data. Significantly (p<0.05) lower vegetation cover was observed within brackish and fresh marshes in the west as compared to the east and central regions throughout 2006, but considerable increase in vegetation cover was noticed in fall 2007 data. Marshes in the west were stressed by prolonged saltwater logging and increased sulfide content. High salinity levels persisted throughout the study period for all marsh types, especially in the west. The marshes of coastal Louisiana are still recovering after the hurricanes; however, changes in the species composition have increased in these marshes.

  5. Seasonal, interannual, and long-term variabilities in biomass burning activity over South Asia.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, P; Naja, M; Kumar, R; Chandola, H C

    2016-03-01

    The seasonal, interannual, and long-term variations in biomass burning activity and related emissions are not well studied over South Asia. In this regard, active fire location retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the retrievals of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from MODIS Terra, and tropospheric column NO2 from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) are used to understand the effects of biomass burning on the tropospheric pollution loadings over South Asia during 2003-2013. Biomass burning emission estimates from Global Fire Emission Database (GFED) and Global Fire Assimilation System (GFAS) are also used to quantify uncertainties and regional discrepancies in the emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxide (NOx), and black carbon (BC) due to biomass burning in South Asia. In the Asian continent, the frequency of fire activity is highest over Southeast Asia, followed by South Asia and East Asia. The biomass burning activity in South Asia shows a distinct seasonal cycle that peaks during February-May with some differences among four (north, central, northeast, and south) regions in India. The annual biomass burning activity in north, central, and south regions shows an increasing tendency, particularly after 2008, while a decrease is seen in northeast region during 2003-2013. The increase in fire counts over the north and central regions contributes 24 % of the net enhancement in fire counts over South Asia. MODIS AOD and OMI tropospheric column NO2 retrievals are classified into high and low fire activity periods and show that biomass burning leads to significant enhancement in tropospheric pollution loading over both the cropland and forest regions. The enhancement is much higher (110-176 %) over the forest region compared to the cropland (34-62 %) region. Further efforts are required to understand the implications of biomass burning on the regional air quality and climate of South Asia.

  6. Latitudinal variation in seasonal activity and mortality in ratsnakes (Elaphe obsoleta).

    PubMed

    Sperry, Jinelle H; Blouin-Demers, Gabriel; Carfagno, Gerardo L F; Weatherhead, Patrick J

    2010-06-01

    The ecology of ectotherms should be particularly affected by latitude because so much of their biology is temperature dependent. Current latitudinal patterns should also be informative about how ectotherms will have to modify their behavior in response to climate change. We used data from a total of 175 adult black ratsnakes (Elaphe obsoleta) radio-tracked in Ontario, Illinois, and Texas, a latitudinal distance of >1500 km, to test predictions about how seasonal patterns of activity and mortality should vary with latitude. Despite pronounced differences in temperatures among study locations, and despite ratsnakes in Texas not hibernating and switching from diurnal to nocturnal activity in the summer, seasonal patterns of snake activity were remarkably similar during the months that snakes in all populations were active. Rather than being a function of temperature, activity may be driven by the timing of reproduction, which appears similar among populations. Contrary to the prediction that mortality should be highest in the most active population, overall mortality did not follow a clinal pattern. Winter mortality did increase with latitude, however, consistent with temperature limiting the northern distribution of ratsnakes. This result was opposite that found in the only previous study of latitudinal variation in winter mortality in reptiles, which may be a consequence of whether or not the animals exhibit true hibernation. Collectively, these results suggest that, at least in the northern part of their range, ratsnakes should be able to adjust easily to, and may benefit from, a warmer climate, although climate-based changes to the snakes' prey or habitat, for example, could alter that prediction. PMID:20583726

  7. Seasonal, interannual, and long-term variabilities in biomass burning activity over South Asia.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, P; Naja, M; Kumar, R; Chandola, H C

    2016-03-01

    The seasonal, interannual, and long-term variations in biomass burning activity and related emissions are not well studied over South Asia. In this regard, active fire location retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the retrievals of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from MODIS Terra, and tropospheric column NO2 from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) are used to understand the effects of biomass burning on the tropospheric pollution loadings over South Asia during 2003-2013. Biomass burning emission estimates from Global Fire Emission Database (GFED) and Global Fire Assimilation System (GFAS) are also used to quantify uncertainties and regional discrepancies in the emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxide (NOx), and black carbon (BC) due to biomass burning in South Asia. In the Asian continent, the frequency of fire activity is highest over Southeast Asia, followed by South Asia and East Asia. The biomass burning activity in South Asia shows a distinct seasonal cycle that peaks during February-May with some differences among four (north, central, northeast, and south) regions in India. The annual biomass burning activity in north, central, and south regions shows an increasing tendency, particularly after 2008, while a decrease is seen in northeast region during 2003-2013. The increase in fire counts over the north and central regions contributes 24 % of the net enhancement in fire counts over South Asia. MODIS AOD and OMI tropospheric column NO2 retrievals are classified into high and low fire activity periods and show that biomass burning leads to significant enhancement in tropospheric pollution loading over both the cropland and forest regions. The enhancement is much higher (110-176 %) over the forest region compared to the cropland (34-62 %) region. Further efforts are required to understand the implications of biomass burning on the regional air quality and climate of South Asia. PMID:26503008

  8. Using a Geographic Information System to Assess the Risk of Hurricane Hazards on the Maya Civilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, A. M.; Griffin, R.; Sever, T.

    2014-12-01

    The extent of the Maya civilization spanned across portions of modern day Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras. Paleoclimatic studies suggest this region has been affected by strong hurricanes for the past six thousand years, reinforced by archeological evidence from Mayan records indicating they experienced strong storms. It is theorized hurricanes aided in the collapse of the Maya, damaging building structures, agriculture, and ceasing industry activities. Today, this region is known for its active tropical climatology, being hit by numerous strong storms including Hurricane Dean, Iris, Keith, and Mitch. This research uses a geographic information system (GIS) to model hurricane hazards, and assess the risk posed on the Maya civilization. GIS has the ability to handle various layer components making it optimal for combining parameters necessary for assessing the risk of experiencing hurricane related hazards. For this analysis, high winds, storm surge flooding, non-storm surge related flooding, and rainfall triggered landslides were selected as the primary hurricane hazards. Data sets used in this analysis include the National Climatic Data Center International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardships (IBTrACS) hurricane tracks, Shuttle Radar Topography Mission Digital Elevation Model, WorldClim monthly accumulated precipitation, USGS HydroSHEDS river locations, Harmonized World Soil Database soil types, and known Maya site locations from the Electronic Atlas of Ancient Maya Sites. ArcGIS and ENVI software were utilized to process data and model hurricane hazards. To assess locations at risk of experiencing high winds, a model was created using ArcGIS Model Builder to map each storm's temporal wind profile, and adapted to simulate forward storm velocity, and storm frequency. Modeled results were then combined with physical land characteristics, meteorological, and hydrologic data to identify areas likely affected. Certain areas along the eastern

  9. Meteorology: are there trends in hurricane destruction?

    PubMed

    Pielke, Roger A

    2005-12-22

    Since the record impact of Hurricane Katrina, attention has focused on understanding trends in hurricanes and their destructive potential. Emanuel reports a marked increase in the potential destructiveness of hurricanes based on identification of a trend in an accumulated annual index of power dissipation in the North Atlantic and western North Pacific since the 1970s. If hurricanes are indeed becoming more destructive over time, then this trend should manifest itself in more destruction. However, my analysis of a long-term data set of hurricane losses in the United States shows no upward trend once the data are normalized to remove the effects of societal changes.

  10. Effect of age and season on the thyroid hormone activity of Mizoram strain female mithun (Bos frontalis)

    PubMed Central

    Lalsangpuii; Ali, M. Ayub; Devi, L. Inaotombi; Behera, Parthasarathi; Ralte, Lalsanglura

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to generate baseline data on the normal values of the thyroidhormone (TH) activity as well as their correlation with age and season. Materials and Methods: Blood samples (10 ml) were collected from jugular vein of 30 female mithun’s of three different age groups viz. Calves (6 months to 1 year), heifer (1-3 years) and adult (above 3 years) during the three season’s viz. Monsoon, winter and spring of a year. The serum was analyzed for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), triiodothyronine (T3), and thyroxine (T4) activity. Result: The result showed a significantly (p<0.05) a higher T3 level in heifers followed by adults and calves and higher T4 level in adults followed by heifers and calves in all the seasons. The TSH level was higher in heifers in all the seasons. The winter season recorded higher level of T3, T4, and TSH as compared to the other seasons of a year. Conclusion: The TSH and T3 level were the highest for aheifer, whereas T4 level was the highest for adults inall the season. Furthermore, the higher level of TH was observed in winter season. The increased level of the TH during the winter season signifies their calorigenic effect. Similarly in heifers, the increased T3 concentrations show its importance in reproductive physiology and its association with ovarian activity. This indicates that age and season have aprofound effect on TH activity of Mizoram strain female mithun. PMID:27047046

  11. Tornadoes & Hurricanes. The Natural Disaster Series. Grades 4-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deery, Ruth

    The topics of tornadoes and hurricanes are important to children but are often missing from elementary textbooks. This document is a part of "The Natural Disaster Series" and is an attempt to supplement elementary science and social studies programs with lessons and student activities. Reasoning skills are emphasized throughout the booklet. Three…

  12. Hurricane Sandy: An Educational Bibliography of Key Research Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piotrowski, Chris

    2013-01-01

    There, undoubtedly, will be a flurry of research activity in the "Superstorm" Sandy impact area on a myriad of disaster-related topics, across academic disciplines. The purpose of this study was to review the disaster research related specifically to hurricanes in the educational and social sciences that would best serve as a compendium…

  13. Fires, Floods, and Hurricanes: Is ENSO to Blame?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mjelde, James W.; Litzenberg, Kerry K.; Hoyle, Julie E.; Holochwost, Sharon R.; Funkhouser, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Scientists have associated the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon with extreme climate events such as flooding in California, droughts in Australia, fires in Indonesia, and increased hurricane activity in the Atlantic Ocean. The popular media is constantly attributing individual storms to the ENSO phenomenon. The reality is that a…

  14. Estimating Hurricane Rates in a Changing Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, K.; Laepple, T.; Rowlands, D.; Jewson, S.; Bellone, E.

    2009-04-01

    The estimation of hurricane risk is of life-and-death importance for millions of people living on the West Coast of the Atlantic. Risk Management Solutions (RMS) provides products and services for the quantification and management of many catastrophe risks, including the risks associated with Atlantic hurricanes. Of particular importance in the modeling of hurricane risk, is the estimation of future hurricane rates. We are interested in making accurate estimates over the next 5-years of the underlying rates associated with Atlantic Hurricanes that make landfall. This presentation discusses our methodology used in making these estimates. Specifically, we discuss the importance of estimating the changing environments, both local and global, that affect hurricane formation and development. Our methodology combines statistical modeling, physical insight and modeling and expert opinion to provide RMS with accurate estimates of the underlying rate associated with landfalling hurricanes in the Atlantic.

  15. Seasonal development of cambial activity in relation to xylem formation in Chinese fir.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongyang; Xu, Huimin; Li, Hanyin; Wei, Dongmei; Lin, Jinxing; Li, Xiaojuan

    2016-05-20

    The vascular cambium is a lateral meristem which can differentiate into secondary phloem and xylem. The secondary growth of woody plants resulting from vascular cambium activity has been a focus of considerable attention, but the quantitative relationships between cambial activity and secondary xylem formation have been little studied. Our analysis of cytological changes in the cambium of Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata), revealed a significant positive correlation between vascular cambium cell numbers and cambium zone width through the seasonal cycle. Cambium cell numbers and the cambium cell radial diameter were closely related to xylem formation. Immuno-labeling showed that de-esterified homogalacturonan and (1-4)-β-d-galactan epitopes were highly abundant in cell walls of dormant-stage cambium, whereas high methylesterified homogalacturonan was strongly labeled in the active stage. Raman spectroscopy detected significant changes in the chemical composition of cell walls during the active-dormant stage transition. More pectin and less monolignols occurred in radial cell walls than in tangential walls during the dormant stage, but no significant changes were found in other stages, indicating that pectin accumulation facilitates cell wall expansion, with cambium activity transition. Our quantitative analysis of the relationship between cambial activity and xylem formation, as well as the cell wall modification during the active stage provides useful information about cambial characteristics and xylogenesis.

  16. Isolating weather effects from seasonal activity patterns of a temperate North American Colubrid.

    PubMed

    George, Andrew D; Thompson, Frank R; Faaborg, John

    2015-08-01

    Forecasting the effects of climate change on threatened ecosystems and species will require an understanding of how weather influences processes that drive population dynamics. We have evaluated weather effects on activity patterns of western ratsnakes, a widespread predator of birds and small mammals in eastern North America. From 2010-2013 we radio-tracked 53 ratsnakes in the fragmented region of central Missouri. We relocated each snake 4× per week and used movement frequency as an index of activity. We used generalized linear mixed models within an information-theoretic approach to evaluate temporal and weather variables as potential predictors of snake activity. While snakes were generally sedentary, activity showed a linear response to relative humidity and a quadratic response to air temperature, peaking near 30 °C. Seasonal activity patterns differed between sexes and among years, but snakes were generally least active in mid-summer, regardless of weather. Our findings provide strong evidence that air temperature and relative humidity differentially affect activity patterns of an important predator and are the mechanism explaining increased nest predation rates with warmer temperatures.

  17. EarthLabs - Investigating Hurricanes: Earth's Meteorological Monsters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaris, J. R.; Dahlman, L.; Barstow, D.

    2007-12-01

    Earth science is one of the most important tools that the global community needs to address the pressing environmental, social, and economic issues of our time. While, at times considered a second-rate science at the high school level, it is currently undergoing a major revolution in the depth of content and pedagogical vitality. As part of this revolution, labs in Earth science courses need to shift their focus from cookbook-like activities with known outcomes to open-ended investigations that challenge students to think, explore and apply their learning. We need to establish a new model for Earth science as a rigorous lab science in policy, perception, and reality. As a concerted response to this need, five states, a coalition of scientists and educators, and an experienced curriculum team are creating a national model for a lab-based high school Earth science course named EarthLabs. This lab course will comply with the National Science Education Standards as well as the states' curriculum frameworks. The content will focus on Earth system science and environmental literacy. The lab experiences will feature a combination of field work, classroom experiments, and computer access to data and visualizations, and demonstrate the rigor and depth of a true lab course. The effort is being funded by NOAA's Environmental Literacy program. One of the prototype units of the course is Investigating Hurricanes. Hurricanes are phenomena which have tremendous impact on humanity and the resources we use. They are also the result of complex interacting Earth systems, making them perfect objects for rigorous investigation of many concepts commonly covered in Earth science courses, such as meteorology, climate, and global wind circulation. Students are able to use the same data sets, analysis tools, and research techniques that scientists employ in their research, yielding truly authentic learning opportunities. This month-long integrated unit uses hurricanes as the story line by

  18. Let Nature Be the Teacher: Seasonal Natural History Activities for Parents and Other Educators To Share with Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gertz, Lucille N.

    This book is designed to provide parents and other adult companions with activities to do with children on outdoor walks. The activities offer adults and children a shared learning experience and have been adapted from the children's education program at Habitat Institute for the Environment (Massachusetts). The activities are arranged seasonally,…

  19. SEASONAL EFFECTS ON COMET NUCLEI EVOLUTION: ACTIVITY, INTERNAL STRUCTURE, AND DUST MANTLE FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    De Sanctis, M. C.; Capria, M. T.; Lasue, J.

    2010-07-15

    Rotational properties can strongly influence a comet's evolution in terms of activity, dust mantling, and internal structure. In this paper, we investigate the effects of various rotation axis directions on the activity, internal structure, and dust mantling of cometary nuclei. The numerical code developed is able to reproduce different shapes and spin axis inclinations, taking into account both the latitudinal and the longitudinal variations of illumination, using a quasi-three-dimensional approach. The results obtained show that local variations in the dust and gas fluxes can be induced by the different spin axis directions and completely different behaviors of the comet evolution can result in the same cometary shape by using different obliquities of the models. The internal structures of cometary nuclei are also influenced by comet obliquity, as well as dust mantling. Gas and dust production rates show diversities related to the comet seasons.

  20. Influence of season on daytime behavioral activities of donkeys in the Northern Guinea Savanna zone of Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Zakari, Friday Ocheja; Ayo, Joseph Olusegun; Rekwot, Peter Ibrahim; Kawu, Mohammed Umar

    2015-01-01

    The present experiment was performed with the aim of investigating the effect of season on behavioral activities of donkeys during the rainy and harmattan seasons in the Northern Guinea zone of Nigeria. Sixteen apparently healthy donkeys were used as subjects and divided into four groups based on age. During each season, behavioral activities of each donkey were evaluated for three weeks using the focal animal sampling technique. The dry-bulb temperature (DBT), relative humidity (RH), and temperature-humidity index (THI) were obtained three times each day during the experimental period using standard procedures. In the rainy season, the mean DBT (31.65 ± 0.49°C), RH (73.63 ± 1.09%), and THI (84.39 ± 0.71) were significantly (P<0.0001) higher than the corresponding values of 24.00 ± 0.44°C, 36.80 ± 0.92%, and 64.80 ± 0.62 in the harmattan season. During the rainy season, the donkeys spent 60.00 ± 0.77%, 25.40 ± 0.69%, and 2.94 ± 0.21% on grazing, resting, and grooming, respectively. During the harmattan season, the donkeys spent the most time on grazing (76.76 ± 0.43%), less time on resting (11.97 ± 0.38%), and the least time on grooming (0.89 ± 0.05%). In conclusion, season and seasonal variations affect the daytime behavioral activities of donkeys in the zone, and this should be considered in husbandry practices for donkeys. PMID:26858575

  1. Influence of season on daytime behavioral activities of donkeys in the Northern Guinea Savanna zone of Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Zakari, Friday Ocheja; Ayo, Joseph Olusegun; Rekwot, Peter Ibrahim; Kawu, Mohammed Umar

    2015-01-01

    The present experiment was performed with the aim of investigating the effect of season on behavioral activities of donkeys during the rainy and harmattan seasons in the Northern Guinea zone of Nigeria. Sixteen apparently healthy donkeys were used as subjects and divided into four groups based on age. During each season, behavioral activities of each donkey were evaluated for three weeks using the focal animal sampling technique. The dry-bulb temperature (DBT), relative humidity (RH), and temperature-humidity index (THI) were obtained three times each day during the experimental period using standard procedures. In the rainy season, the mean DBT (31.65 ± 0.49°C), RH (73.63 ± 1.09%), and THI (84.39 ± 0.71) were significantly (P<0.0001) higher than the corresponding values of 24.00 ± 0.44°C, 36.80 ± 0.92%, and 64.80 ± 0.62 in the harmattan season. During the rainy season, the donkeys spent 60.00 ± 0.77%, 25.40 ± 0.69%, and 2.94 ± 0.21% on grazing, resting, and grooming, respectively. During the harmattan season, the donkeys spent the most time on grazing (76.76 ± 0.43%), less time on resting (11.97 ± 0.38%), and the least time on grooming (0.89 ± 0.05%). In conclusion, season and seasonal variations affect the daytime behavioral activities of donkeys in the zone, and this should be considered in husbandry practices for donkeys.

  2. Influence of season on daytime behavioral activities of donkeys in the Northern Guinea Savanna zone of Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    ZAKARI, Friday Ocheja; AYO, Joseph Olusegun; REKWOT, Peter Ibrahim; KAWU, Mohammed Umar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The present experiment was performed with the aim of investigating the effect of season on behavioral activities of donkeys during the rainy and harmattan seasons in the Northern Guinea zone of Nigeria. Sixteen apparently healthy donkeys were used as subjects and divided into four groups based on age. During each season, behavioral activities of each donkey were evaluated for three weeks using the focal animal sampling technique. The dry-bulb temperature (DBT), relative humidity (RH), and temperature-humidity index (THI) were obtained three times each day during the experimental period using standard procedures. In the rainy season, the mean DBT (31.65 ± 0.49°C), RH (73.63 ± 1.09%), and THI (84.39 ± 0.71) were significantly (P<0.0001) higher than the corresponding values of 24.00 ± 0.44°C, 36.80 ± 0.92%, and 64.80 ± 0.62 in the harmattan season. During the rainy season, the donkeys spent 60.00 ± 0.77%, 25.40 ± 0.69%, and 2.94 ± 0.21% on grazing, resting, and grooming, respectively. During the harmattan season, the donkeys spent the most time on grazing (76.76 ± 0.43%), less time on resting (11.97 ± 0.38%), and the least time on grooming (0.89 ± 0.05%). In conclusion, season and seasonal variations affect the daytime behavioral activities of donkeys in the zone, and this should be considered in husbandry practices for donkeys. PMID:26858575

  3. Hurricane Rina Headed to Mexico

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of NOAA GOES-13 satellite observations from October 23 at 2:45 p.m. EDT through Oct. 25 at 1:30 p.m. EDT shows a strengthening Hurricane Rina in the western Caribbean Sea and headed fo...

  4. Hurricane Irene on the Move

    NASA Video Gallery

    GOES-13 satellite imagery in 15 minute intervals from August 25, 2011, at 9:40 a.m. EDT to August 27 at 9:40 a.m. EDT. The animations show Hurricane Irene moving through the Bahamas and making land...

  5. A Hurricane for Physics Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Ned

    1994-01-01

    Describes how the study of a hurricane can be used to provide integrated basic mechanics in a first-year college course in engineering mechanics. Presents models that predict wind speed given surface eye pressure and several radial dimensions of the storm and calculate total kinetic energy once the wind speed is determined. (ZWH)

  6. Hurricane Irene at Category 3

    NASA Video Gallery

    Video sequence taken by the crew of the ISS on Aug. 23, 2011 at approximately 2:15PM EST. At that time, Hurricane Irene was a Category 3 storm with peak winds estimated at 115mph, moving west-north...

  7. Hurricane Katrina: more lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Stall, Robert S

    2010-11-01

    In August of 2007, the author testified as the medical expert witness on behalf of the State of Louisiana in the St. Rita's Nursing Home criminal case. Thirty-five residents drowned as floodwaters swept over the nursing home during Hurricane Katrina. For nursing home owners, administrators, and medical staff leadership, there are additional lessons to be learned from this catastrophe.

  8. Petroleum industry assists hurricane relief

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-14

    This paper reports that the petroleum industry is aiding victims of last month's Hurricane Andrew with cash, clothing, food, water, and other supplies. Cash contributions announced as of last week totaled more than $2.7 million for distribution in South Florida and South Louisiana. Petroleum industry employees were collecting relief items such as bottled water and diapers for distribution in those areas.

  9. Public health response to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita--United States, 2005.

    PubMed

    2006-03-10

    On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina struck the U.S. Gulf Coast, the eye making landfall at Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana . The events that followed made Katrina the deadliest hurricane since 1928 and likely the costliest natural disaster on record in the United States. Devastating storm surge, strong winds, and heavy rains caused widespread destruction in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida. Storm-induced breeches in the levee system surrounding New Orleans flooded 80% of the city. The disaster was compounded when Hurricane Rita made landfall 26 days later near the Texas-Louisiana border, forcing cessation of hurricane-response activities in New Orleans and evacuation of coastal regions of Louisiana and Texas. The economic and health consequences of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita extended beyond the Gulf region to affect states and communities throughout the United States. MMWR is highlighting the public health response to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita with two special issues. The first issue, published January 20, 2006, focused on public health activities in Louisiana. This second issue focuses on activities in other states directly or indirectly affected by the two hurricanes.

  10. Seasonal dynamics of active SAR11 ecotypes in the oligotrophic Northwest Mediterranean Sea

    PubMed Central

    Salter, Ian; Galand, Pierre E; Fagervold, Sonja K; Lebaron, Philippe; Obernosterer, Ingrid; Oliver, Matthew J; Suzuki, Marcelino T; Tricoire, Cyrielle

    2015-01-01

    A seven-year oceanographic time series in NW Mediterranean surface waters was combined with pyrosequencing of ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) and ribosomal RNA gene copies (16S rDNA) to examine the environmental controls on SAR11 ecotype dynamics and potential activity. SAR11 diversity exhibited pronounced seasonal cycles remarkably similar to total bacterial diversity. The timing of diversity maxima was similar across narrow and broad phylogenetic clades and strongly associated with deep winter mixing. Diversity minima were associated with periods of stratification that were low in nutrients and phytoplankton biomass and characterised by intense phosphate limitation (turnover time<5 h). We propose a conceptual framework in which physical mixing of the water column periodically resets SAR11 communities to a high diversity state and the seasonal evolution of phosphate limitation competitively excludes deeper-dwelling ecotypes to promote low diversity states dominated (>80%) by SAR11 Ia. A partial least squares (PLS) regression model was developed that could reliably predict sequence abundances of SAR11 ecotypes (Q2=0.70) from measured environmental variables, of which mixed layer depth was quantitatively the most important. Comparison of clade-level SAR11 rRNA:rDNA signals with leucine incorporation enabled us to partially validate the use of these ratios as an in-situ activity measure. However, temporal trends in the activity of SAR11 ecotypes and their relationship to environmental variables were unclear. The strong and predictable temporal patterns observed in SAR11 sequence abundance was not linked to metabolic activity of different ecotypes at the phylogenetic and temporal resolution of our study. PMID:25238399

  11. Seasonal changes in the synthesis of the neurosteroid 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone stimulating locomotor activity in newts.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Shogo; Matsunaga, Masahiro; Koyama, Teppei; Do Rego, Jean-Luc; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2009-04-01

    We recently found that the newt brain actively produces 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone, a novel amphibian neurosteroid stimulating locomotor activity. It is well known that locomotor activity of male newts increases during the breeding period. To understand the physiological role of 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone, we investigated seasonal changes in 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone synthesis in the brain of male newts. Interestingly, 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone synthesis in the brain showed marked changes during the annual breeding cycle, with a maximal level in the breeding period when locomotor activity of male newts increases. These results suggest that 7alpha-hydroxypregnenolone induces seasonal locomotor changes in male newts.

  12. Sunlight mediated seasonality in canopy structure and photosynthetic activity of Amazonian rainforests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Jian; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Choi, Sungho; Park, Taejin; Barichivich, Jonathan; Ciais, Philippe; Fu, Rong; Ganguly, Sangram; Hall, Forrest; Hilker, Thomas; Huete, Alfredo; Jones, Matthew; Kimball, John; Lyapustin, Alexei I.; Mõttus, Matti; Nemani, Ramakrishna R.; Piao, Shilong; Poulter, Benjamin; Saleska, Scott R.; Saatchi, Sassan S.; Xu, Liang; Zhou, Liming; Myneni, Ranga B.

    2015-06-01

    Resolving the debate surrounding the nature and controls of seasonal variation in the structure and metabolism of Amazonian rainforests is critical to understanding their response to climate change. In situ studies have observed higher photosynthetic and evapotranspiration rates, increased litterfall and leaf flushing during the Sunlight-rich dry season. Satellite data also indicated higher greenness level, a proven surrogate of photosynthetic carbon fixation, and leaf area during the dry season relative to the wet season. Some recent reports suggest that rainforests display no seasonal variations and the previous results were satellite measurement artefacts. Therefore, here we re-examine several years of data from three sensors on two satellites under a range of sun positions and satellite measurement geometries and document robust evidence for a seasonal cycle in structure and greenness of wet equatorial Amazonian rainforests. This seasonal cycle is concordant with independent observations of solar radiation. We attribute alternative conclusions to an incomplete study of the seasonal cycle, i.e. the dry season only, and to prognostications based on a biased radiative transfer model. Consequently, evidence of dry season greening in geometry corrected satellite data was ignored and the absence of evidence for seasonal variation in lidar data due to noisy and saturated signals was misinterpreted as evidence of the absence of changes during the dry season. Our results, grounded in the physics of radiative transfer, buttress previous reports of dry season increases in leaf flushing, litterfall, photosynthesis and evapotranspiration in well-hydrated Amazonian rainforests.

  13. Sunlight Mediated Seasonality in Canopy Structure and Photosynthetic Activity of Amazonian Rainforests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, J.; Knyazikhin, Y.; CHOI, S.; Park, T.; Barichivich, J.; Ciais, P.; Fu, R.; Ganguly, S.; Hall, F. G.; Hilker, T.; Huete, A. R.; Jones, M. O.; Kimball, J. S.; Lyapustin, A.; Mottus, M.; Nemani, R. R.; Piao, S.; Poulter, B.; Saleska, S. R.; Saatchi, S. S.; Xu, L.; Zhou, L.; Myneni, R.

    2015-12-01

    Resolving the debate about the nature and controls of seasonal variation in structure and metabolism of Amazonian rainforests is critical to understanding their response to climate change. In situ studies have observed higher photosynthetic and evapotranspiration rates, increased litterfall and leaf flushing during the sunlight-rich dry season. Satellite data also indicated higher greenness level, a proven surrogate of photosynthetic carbon fixation, and leaf area during the dry season relative to the wet season. Some recent reports suggest that rainforests display no seasonal variations and the previous results were satellite measurement artefacts. Therefore, we re-examine here several years of data from three sensors on two satellites under a range of sun positions and satellite measurement geometries and document robust evidence for a seasonal cycle in structure and greenness of wet equatorial Amazonian rainforests. This seasonal cycle is concordant with independent observations of solar radiation. We attribute alternative conclusions to an incomplete study of the seasonal cycle, i.e. the dry season only, and to prognostications based on a biased radiative transfer model. Consequently, evidence of dry season greening in geometry corrected satellite data was ignored and the absence of evidence for seasonal variation in lidar data due to noisy and saturated signals was misinterpreted as evidence of absence of changes during the dry season. Our results, grounded in the physics of radiative transfer, buttress previous reports of dry season increases in leaf flushing, litterfall, photosynthesis and evapotranspiration in well-hydrated Amazonian rainforests.

  14. 3 CFR 8523 - Proclamation 8523 of May 20, 2010. National Hurricane Preparedness Week, 2010

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... coastal and inland communities face the danger of these powerful storms. From high winds and storm surges... Preparedness Week, I urge individuals, families, communities, and businesses to take time to plan for the storm season before it begins. While hurricane forecasting has improved, storms may still develop with...

  15. Seasonal changes in the invertebrate community of granular activated carbon filters and control technologies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; You, Wei; Li, Xiaowei; Yang, Yufeng; Liu, Lijun

    2014-03-15

    Invertebrate colonization of granular activated carbon (GAC) filters in the waterworks is one of the most frequently occurring and least studied biological problems of water processing in China. A survey of invertebrate colonization of GAC filters was carried out weekly from October 2010 to December 2011 at a reservoir water treatment works in South China. Twenty-six kinds of invertebrates were observed. The abundance was as high as 5600ind.m(-3) with a mean of 860ind.m(-3). Large variations in abundance were observed among different seasons and before and after GAC filtration. The dominant organisms were rotifers and copepods. The average invertebrate abundance in the filtrate was 12-18.7 times of that in the pre-filtered water. Results showed that the GAC filters were colonized by invertebrates which may lead to a higher output of organisms in the filtrate than in the pre-filtered water. The invertebrate abundance in the GAC filters was statistically correlated with the water temperature. Seasonal patterns were observed. The invertebrate abundance grew faster in the spring and summer. Copepods were dominant in the summer while rotifers dominated in all other seasons of the year. There was a transition of small invertebrates (rotifers) gradually being substituted by larger invertebrates (copepods) from spring to summer. Control measures such as backwashing with chloric water, drying filter beds and soaking with saliferous water were implemented in the waterworks to reduce invertebrate abundances in the GAC filters. The results showed that soaking with saliferous water (99%, reduction in percent) was best but drying the filter beds (84%) was more economical. Soaking filter beds with 20g/L saliferous water for one day can be implemented in case of emergency. In order to keep invertebrate abundance in the acceptable range, some of these measures should be adopted.

  16. Seasonal and Solar Cycle Variation of the Martian Ionosphere from Nine Years of MARSIS Active Sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, David D.; Withers, Paul; Gurnett, Donald; Nemec, Frantisek

    This past June, we celebrated nine years of continuous operation by MARSIS, the radar sounder on the Mars Express spacecraft, in orbit around Mars since Christmas of 2003. The copious data from this instrument in its Active Ionospheric Sounding mode has been used in numerous scientific endeavors to generate empirical models of the Martian ionosphere. The full ionospheric profiles gleaned from analysis of these data are ideal for this kind of effort. Out of more than 170,000 traces collected, we have selected only about 10%, deemed to be of the best quality, and that can be fit to a Chapman layer function. We now have nine years, or 4-3/4 Mars years, worth of ionospheric traces. In addition to sampling nearly five years of seasonal variation, these nine years of data also represent 80% of a normal solar cycle. Therefore, in this work we shall analyze ionospheric traces with the objective of determining variation of atmospheric and ionospheric parameters such as the neutral atmospheric scale height, ionospheric peak altitude, and ionospheric peak density as they vary with the solar cycle and the change in season.

  17. Seasonal variation of pharmaceutically active compounds in surface (Tagus River) and tap water (Central Spain).

    PubMed

    Valcárcel, Y; Alonso, S González; Rodríguez-Gil, J L; Castaño, A; Montero, J C; Criado-Alvarez, J J; Mirón, I J; Catalá, M

    2013-03-01

    Numerous studies have shown the presence of pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) in different environmental compartments, for example, in surface water or wastewater ranging from nanograms per litre to micrograms per litre. Likewise, some recent studies have pointed to seasonal variability, thus indicating that PhAcs concentrations in the aquatic environment may depend on the time of year. This work intended to find out (1) whether Tagus fluvial and drinking water were polluted with different groups of PhACs and (2) if their concentrations differed between winter and summer seasons. From the 58 substances analysed, 41 were found belonging to the main therapeutic groups. Statistical differences were seen for antibacterials, antidepressants, anxiolytics, antiepileptics, and cardiovascular drugs, with higher concentrations being detected in winter than in summer. These results might indicate that the PhACs analysed in this study undergo lower environmental degradation in winter than in summer. In order to confirm these initial results, a continuous monitoring should be performed especially on those PhACs that either because of an elevated consumption or an intrinsic chemical persistence are poorly degraded during winter months due to low temperatures and solar irradiation. It is especially important to identify which of these specific PhACs are in order to recommend their substitution by equally effective and safe substances but also environmentally friendly. PMID:22847337

  18. The Modulation of Hurricanes by African Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco Herrera, Victor Manuel; Perez-Peraza, Jorge Alberto; Velasco Herrera, Graciela

    Here we apply cross-wavelet, the global wavelet spectra and a new wavelet coherency signal-noise method to theavailable data of African Dust for the period 1966-2004 and Database of hurricanes, from the National Weather Service (http:// weather.unisys. com/ hurricane/). Hurricane data was transformed into a series of Pulses Width modulation (PWM) of the type: n = number of hurricanes, 0 no hurricane. We apply the analysis to all categories of tropical cyclones. Results indicate that among the different periodicities common to both series, the more promi-nent is the decadal modulation of dust over hurricanes of category 5, and a annual modulation for all the other categories of Hurricanes. Hurricanes of category 5 develop in the minimums of the decadal variation of African dust, and preferable in areas of deep water of the Atlantic ocean, where the centre of the hurricane has the lowest pressure. If this tendency is sustained , tropical cyclones will not evolve to category 5 up to the next decadal minimum which will take place around the year 2015 2. This is an important result concerning the prediction of floods and for minimizing the human and economical lost provoked for hurricanes of category 5.

  19. 77 FR 64564 - Implementation of Regulatory Guide 1.221 on Design-Basis Hurricane and Hurricane Missiles

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... COMMISSION Implementation of Regulatory Guide 1.221 on Design-Basis Hurricane and Hurricane Missiles AGENCY....221 on Design-Basis Hurricane and Hurricane Missiles.'' The purpose of this ISG is to supplement the guidance regarding the application of Regulatory Guide 1.221, ``Design-Basis Hurricane and...

  20. Hurricane Katrina Wind Investigation Report

    SciTech Connect

    Desjarlais, A. O.

    2007-08-15

    This investigation of roof damage caused by Hurricane Katrina is a joint effort of the Roofing Industry Committee on Weather Issues, Inc. (RICOWI) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory/U.S. Department of Energy (ORNL/DOE). The Wind Investigation Program (WIP) was initiated in 1996. Hurricane damage that met the criteria of a major windstorm event did not materialize until Hurricanes Charley and Ivan occurred in August 2004. Hurricane Katrina presented a third opportunity for a wind damage investigation in August 29, 2005. The major objectives of the WIP are as follows: (1) to investigate the field performance of roofing assemblies after major wind events; (2) to factually describe roofing assembly performance and modes of failure; and (3) to formally report results of the investigations and damage modes for substantial wind speeds The goal of the WIP is to perform unbiased, detailed investigations by credible personnel from the roofing industry, the insurance industry, and academia. Data from these investigations will, it is hoped, lead to overall improvement in roofing products, systems, roofing application, and durability and a reduction in losses, which may lead to lower overall costs to the public. This report documents the results of an extensive and well-planned investigative effort. The following program changes were implemented as a result of the lessons learned during the Hurricane Charley and Ivan investigations: (1) A logistics team was deployed to damage areas immediately following landfall; (2) Aerial surveillance--imperative to target wind damage areas--was conducted; (3) Investigation teams were in place within 8 days; (4) Teams collected more detailed data; and (5) Teams took improved photographs and completed more detailed photo logs. Participating associations reviewed the results and lessons learned from the previous investigations and many have taken the following actions: (1) Moved forward with recommendations for new installation procedures

  1. Forecasting hurricane impact on coastal topography: Hurricane Ike

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plant, Nathaniel G.; Stockdon, Hilary F.; Sallenger,, Asbury H.; Turco, Michael J.; East, Jeffery W.; Taylor, Arthur A.; Shaffer, Wilson A.

    2010-01-01

    Extreme storms can have a profound impact on coastal topography and thus on ecosystems and human-built structures within coastal regions. For instance, landfalls of several recent major hurricanes have caused significant changes to the U.S. coastline, particularly along the Gulf of Mexico. Some of these hurricanes (e.g., Ivan in 2004, Katrina and Rita in 2005, and Gustav and Ike in 2008) led to shoreline position changes of about 100 meters. Sand dunes, which protect the coast from waves and surge, eroded, losing several meters of elevation in the course of a single storm. Observations during these events raise the question of how storm-related changes affect the future vulnerability of a coast.

  2. Seasonal trends in the composition and ROS activity of fine particulate matter in Baghdad, Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamad, Samera Hussein; Shafer, Martin Merrill; Kadhim, Ahmed K. H.; Al-Omran, Sabah M.; Schauer, James Jay

    2015-01-01

    Baghdad suffers from severe atmospheric particulate matter (PM) pollution and has limited infrastructure to monitor and control PM-pollution. To help better understand the nature of particulate matter in Baghdad, daily PM2.5 samples were collected every 6th day from September, 2012 to September, 2013. The samples were analyzed for chemical composition and cellular oxidative stress activity using a macrophage-based assay. The annual average PM2.5 concentration was 50 ± 19 μg m-3, and was comprised of approximately 28% crustal materials, 26% organic carbon (OC), 17% sulfate, 12% elemental carbon (EC), and 8.0% ammonium ion. No clear seasonal trend was observed for the total PM2.5 mass and PM2.5 OC, but EC exhibited higher concentrations in the warmer months, likely due to the extensive use of electric generators operated by diesel and gasoline for cooling. April showed the lowest levels of both EC and OC compared with other months due to both sand and rainstorm events which led to increased deposition and dispersion of local emissions. Concentrations of nitrate ion were low in all seasons due to the high temperatures and low humidity, but slightly higher levels were observed in the cooler months of winter. The oxidative stress (reactive oxygen species (ROS)) activity (59 ± 35 μg Zymosan equivalents m-3) of the PM was relatively lower than in other studied areas. Association between the water soluble PM constituents and the oxidative activity was investigated using a multi-linear regression model which showed no strong relationships between ROS activity and the water soluble components of PM2.5, but a moderate correlation of water soluble organic carbon from biomass burning (WSOC-BB) was observed (R2 = 0.52). Biomass burning PM has been shown to be an important contributor to ROS activity in other published studies, but additional work is needed to better understand the sources leading to the ROS activity in Baghdad.

  3. Hurricane Sandy science plan: coastal impact assessments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stronko, Jakob M.

    2013-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy devastated some of the most heavily populated eastern coastal areas of the Nation. With a storm surge peaking at more than 19 feet, the powerful landscape-altering destruction of Hurricane Sandy is a stark reminder of why the Nation must become more resilient to coastal hazards. In response to this natural disaster, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) received a total of $41.2 million in supplemental appropriations from the Department of the Interior (DOI) to support response, recovery, and rebuilding efforts. These funds support a science plan that will provide critical scientific information necessary to inform management decisions for recovery of coastal communities, and aid in preparation for future natural hazards. This science plan is designed to coordinate continuing USGS activities with stakeholders and other agencies to improve data collection and analysis that will guide recovery and restoration efforts. The science plan is split into five distinct themes: coastal topography and bathymetry, impacts to coastal beaches and barriers, impacts of storm surge, including disturbed estuarine and bay hydrology, impacts on environmental quality and persisting contaminant exposures, impacts to coastal ecosystems, habitats, and fish and wildlife. This fact sheet focuses assessing impacts to coastal beaches and barriers.

  4. Seasonal and nocturnal activities of the rhinoceros borer (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) in the north Saharan oases ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Ehsine, M'hammed; Belkadhi, Mohamed Sadok; Chaieb, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    The rhinoceros borer Oryctes agamemnon Burmeister (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) is a date palm insect pest that causes damage to trunk and roots of palm trees in several countries, including Tunisia, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Oman, and Saudi Arabia. The aim of this study was to monitor the seasonal and nocturnal activities of this beetle. Experiments were performed on a date palm of Rjim Maatoug during a 6-yr period (2004-2007, 2009-2010). Field survey using light traps shows that O. agamemnon is a univoltine, with a single population peak. Adults appear in the field around late May-early June and the population continued to build until maximum numbers are reached between the end of July and the beginning of August in the same year. No adults were found after first 10 d of November. This peak was characterized by female dominance in number. The monitoring of nocturnal activity showed that it starts its activities roughly 40 min after the sundown and continues until approximately 1 h before sunrise. The highest number of trapped beetles was remarked in the two first hours of flight activity, with a dominance of female in the first hour and a dominance of male in the second hour. We remarked that the sex ratio (female:male) of the cumulated number of trapped adults in the different years and nights of survey was in favor of females.

  5. Seasonal and nocturnal activities of the rhinoceros borer (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) in the north Saharan oases ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Ehsine, M'hammed; Belkadhi, Mohamed Sadok; Chaieb, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    The rhinoceros borer Oryctes agamemnon Burmeister (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) is a date palm insect pest that causes damage to trunk and roots of palm trees in several countries, including Tunisia, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Oman, and Saudi Arabia. The aim of this study was to monitor the seasonal and nocturnal activities of this beetle. Experiments were performed on a date palm of Rjim Maatoug during a 6-yr period (2004-2007, 2009-2010). Field survey using light traps shows that O. agamemnon is a univoltine, with a single population peak. Adults appear in the field around late May-early June and the population continued to build until maximum numbers are reached between the end of July and the beginning of August in the same year. No adults were found after first 10 d of November. This peak was characterized by female dominance in number. The monitoring of nocturnal activity showed that it starts its activities roughly 40 min after the sundown and continues until approximately 1 h before sunrise. The highest number of trapped beetles was remarked in the two first hours of flight activity, with a dominance of female in the first hour and a dominance of male in the second hour. We remarked that the sex ratio (female:male) of the cumulated number of trapped adults in the different years and nights of survey was in favor of females. PMID:25527574

  6. Chemical and microbial components of urban air PM cause seasonal variation of toxicological activity.

    PubMed

    Jalava, Pasi I; Happo, Mikko S; Huttunen, Kati; Sillanpää, Markus; Hillamo, Risto; Salonen, Raimo O; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta

    2015-09-01

    The chemical and microbial composition of urban air particulate matter (PM) displays seasonal variation that may affect its harmfulness on human health. We studied the in vitro inflammatory and cellular metabolic activity/cytotoxicity of urban air particulate samples collected in four size-ranges (PM10-2.5, PM2.5-1, PM1-0.2, PM0.2) during four seasons in relatively clean urban environment in Helsinki, Finland. The composition of the same samples were analyzed, including ions, elements, PAH compounds and endotoxins. In addition, microbial contribution on the detected responses was studied by inhibiting the endotoxin-induced responses with Polymyxin B both in the PM samples and by two different bacterial strains representing Gram-positive and -negative bacteria. Macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7) was exposed to the size segregated particulate samples as well as to microbe samples for 24h and markers of inflammation and cytotoxicity were analyzed. The toxicological responses were dependent on the dose as well as size range of the particles, PM10-2.5 being the most potent and smaller size ranges having significantly smaller responses. Samples collected during spring and autumn had in most cases the highest inflammatory activity. Soil components and other non-exhaust particulate emissions from road traffic correlated with inflammatory responses in coarse particles. Instead, PAH-compounds and K(+) had negative associations with the particle-induced inflammatory responses in fine particles, suggesting the role of incomplete biomass combustion. Endotoxin content was the highest in PM10-2.5 samples and correspondingly, the largest decrease in the responses by Polymyxin B was seen with the very same samples. We found also that inhibitory effect of Polymyxin B was not completely specific for Gram-negative bacteria. Thus, in addition to endotoxin, also other microbial components may have a significant effect on the toxicological responses by ambient particulate matter.

  7. Timeliness of Pediatric Influenza Vaccination Compared With Seasonal Influenza Activity in an Urban Community, 2004–2008

    PubMed Central

    Hofstetter, Annika M.; Natarajan, Karthik; Rabinowitz, Daniel; Martinez, Raquel Andres; Vawdrey, David; Arpadi, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed pediatric influenza vaccination in relation to community influenza activity. Methods. We examined seasonal influenza vaccination in 34 012 children aged 6 months through 18 years from 5 academically affiliated clinics in northern Manhattan, New York (an urban low-income community) during the 2004–2008 seasons using hospital and city immunization registries. We calculated the cumulative number of administered influenza vaccine doses and proportion of children with any (≥ 1 dose) or full (1–2 doses per age recommendations) vaccination at the onset and peak of community polymerase chain reaction–confirmed influenza activity according to state surveillance reports and by March 31 each season. Results. Influenza vaccine administration began before October 1, peaked before influenza activity onset, and declined gradually over each season. Coverage at influenza activity onset, peak, and by March 31 increased over the 5 seasons. However, most children lacked full vaccination at these time points, particularly adolescents, minorities, and those requiring 2 doses. Conclusions. Despite early initiation of influenza vaccination, few children were fully vaccinated when influenza began circulating. Interventions should address factors negatively affecting timely influenza vaccination, especially in high-risk populations. PMID:23678935

  8. Quantitative contribution of climate change and human activities on flood-season streamflow in the middle of Loess Plateau, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Yu, F.; Liu, J.; Zhang, W.; Li, L.; Wang, X.

    2015-12-01

    The Yanhe River Basin (YRB) is the first-order tributary of the Yellow River, which is located at the middle of the Loess Plateau, China. The Yanhe River is the main river that causes floods and damages to the Yanan city. The YRB contributes significantly to the total sediment yield in the Yellow River. A great number of water and soil conservation measures including terracing, afforestation, and construction of sediment-trapping dams have been implemented since the 1960s. It is important to investigate the contributions of climate change and human activities affecting the changes of flood-season streamflow and to provide a scientific basis for future flood prevention. The data from six hydrological stations and 22 meteorological stations of YRB are used in this study. Two nonparametric methods, the Mann-Kendall test and the Pettitt test, are used to detect change trend and change point in the flood-season streamflow for the period of 1952 to 2003. The lumped conceptual daily hydrological model SIMHYD and one kind of sensitivity-based method are used to assess the impact of climate change and human activities to flood-season streamflow. The results show that the change point in flood-season streamflow occurred in 1972. The flood-season streamflow has decreased by 34.2% from 1972 to 2003 compared with the period from 1952 to 1971. The flood-season streamflow becomes more sensitive to change in precipitation than change in potential evapotranspiration (PET) in 1972-2003. The impact of human activities is greater than climate change after 1972. The effects of climate change and human activities on flood-season streamflow account for about 36% and 64% respectively.

  9. Hazardous substances releases associated with Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in industrial settings, Louisiana and Texas.

    PubMed

    Ruckart, Perri Zeitz; Orr, Maureen F; Lanier, Kenneth; Koehler, Allison

    2008-11-15

    The scientific literature concerning the public health response to the unprecedented hurricanes striking the Gulf Coast in August and September 2005 has focused mainly on assessing health-related needs and surveillance of injuries, infectious diseases, and other illnesses. However, the hurricanes also resulted in unintended hazardous substances releases in the affected states. Data from two states (Louisiana and Texas) participating in the Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES) system were analyzed to describe the characteristics of hazardous substances releases in industrial settings associated with Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. HSEES is an active multi-state Web-based surveillance system maintained by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). In 2005, 166 hurricane-related hazardous substances events in industrial settings in Louisiana and Texas were reported. Most (72.3%) releases were due to emergency shut downs in preparation for the hurricanes and start-ups after the hurricanes. Emphasis is given to the contributing causal factors, hazardous substances released, and event scenarios. Recommendations are made to prevent or minimize acute releases of hazardous substances during future hurricanes, including installing backup power generation, securing equipment and piping to withstand high winds, establishing procedures to shutdown process operations safely, following established and up-to-date start-up procedures and checklists, and carefully performing pre-start-up safety reviews.

  10. Hurricanes, climate change and the cholera epidemic in Puerto Rico of 1855-1856.

    PubMed

    Christenson, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Hurricanes and global climate changes may affect the environmental factors of cholera dynamics in warm coastal areas, vulnerable to seasonal or sporadic outbreaks. The cholera epidemic of Puerto Rico in 1855-1856 had a profound effect on the Puerto Rican society; but it was not influenced by any climatic events, such as preceding hurricanes or storms based on past documentary sources. Particularly, the environmental non-toxigenic strains of Vibrio Cholerae in Puerto Rican water sources can maintain their pathogenic potential for sporadic or erratic toxigenic cholera outbreaks--if a "perfect storm" ever occurs.

  11. Seasonal and Diel Activity Patterns of Eight Sympatric Mammals in Northern Japan Revealed by an Intensive Camera-Trap Survey

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Takashi; Uchida, Kenta; Matsuura, Yukiko; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Tsuyoshi; Kaji, Koichi; Koizumi, Itsuro

    2016-01-01

    The activity patterns of mammals are generally categorized as nocturnal, diurnal, crepuscular (active at twilight), and cathemeral (active throughout the day). These patterns are highly variable across regions and seasons even within the same species. However, quantitative data is still lacking, particularly for sympatric species. We monitored the seasonal and diel activity patterns of terrestrial mammals in Hokkaido, Japan. Through an intensive camera-trap survey a total of 13,279 capture events were recorded from eight mammals over 20,344 camera-trap days, i.e., two years. Diel activity patterns were clearly divided into four categories: diurnal (Eurasian red squirrels), nocturnal (raccoon dogs and raccoons), crepuscular (sika deer and mountain hares), and cathemeral (Japanese martens, red foxes, and brown bears). Some crepuscular and cathemeral mammals shifted activity peaks across seasons. Particularly, sika deer changed peaks from twilight during spring–autumn to day-time in winter, possibly because of thermal constraints. Japanese martens were cathemeral during winter–summer, but nocturnal in autumn. We found no clear indication of predator-prey and competitive interactions, suggesting that animal densities are not very high or temporal niche partitioning is absent among the target species. This long-term camera-trap survey was highly cost-effective and provided one of the most detailed seasonal and diel activity patterns in multiple sympatric mammals under natural conditions. PMID:27732611

  12. Empowering Prospective Teachers to Become Active Sense-Makers: Multimodal Modeling of the Seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Mi Song

    2015-10-01

    Situating science concepts in concrete and authentic contexts, using information and communications technologies, including multimodal modeling tools, is important for promoting the development of higher-order thinking skills in learners. However, teachers often struggle to integrate emergent multimodal models into a technology-rich informal learning environment. Our design-based research co-designs and develops engaging, immersive, and interactive informal learning activities called "Embodied Modeling-Mediated Activities" (EMMA) to support not only Singaporean learners' deep learning of astronomy but also the capacity of teachers. As part of the research on EMMA, this case study describes two prospective teachers' co-design processes involving multimodal models for teaching and learning the concept of the seasons in a technology-rich informal learning setting. Our study uncovers four prominent themes emerging from our data concerning the contextualized nature of learning and teaching involving multimodal models in informal learning contexts: (1) promoting communication and emerging questions, (2) offering affordances through limitations, (3) explaining one concept involving multiple concepts, and (4) integrating teaching and learning experiences. This study has an implication for the development of a pedagogical framework for teaching and learning in technology-enhanced learning environments—that is empowering teachers to become active sense-makers using multimodal models.

  13. Seasonal Flight Activity of the Sugarcane Beetle (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) in North Carolina Using Black Light Traps.

    PubMed

    Billeisen, T L; Brandenburg, R L

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal flight activity, adult beetle sex count, and egg production were examined in sugarcane beetles Euetheola rugiceps (LeConte) caught in light traps in North Carolina from the fall of 2009 through the summer of 2014. A regression model using variable environmental conditions as predictive parameters was developed to examine the impact of these conditions on flight activity. Depending on flight trap location and sampling years, beetles exhibited an inconsistent flight pattern, with the majority of adults flying in the spring (April-June) and intermittently in the fall (September-October). Our model indicated that larger numbers of adults collected from traps coincided with an increase in average soil temperature. Sugarcane beetles also exhibit a synchronous emergence during both periods of flight activity. Eggs were detected in females collected from light traps every week throughout the entire sampling period. The majority of females produced 7-12 eggs, with most egg production occurring between 15 May and 1 August. The findings of this research provide adult sugarcane beetle emergence and flight behavior information necessary to determine optimal pesticide application timing.

  14. Characterization of Gulf sturgeon diel and seasonal activity in the Pensacola Bay system, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrege, Beth Marie

    2009-12-01

    We assess temporal and spatial distribution and diel variability in activity of Gulf of Mexico sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus desotoi in the Pensacola Bay system, Florida, using stationary ultrasonic telemetry. Gulf of Mexico sturgeon (n = 54) migrated through the bay system in fall to wintering areas in the Gulf of Mexico and Santa Rosa Sound. In spring, sturgeon migrated back through the bay system to summering habitats in rivers. Gulf of Mexico sturgeon use East Bay and Escambia Bay primarily as migration routes between riverine areas used in spring and summer and the Gulf of Mexico used in winter. North Central Pensacola Bay was not routinely frequented. Gulf of Mexico sturgeon used specific areas within the Pensacola Bay system in summer and winter not previously documented as essential sturgeon habitat. Areas in southeastern Pensacola were used heavily during winter by a portion of the population. Gulf of Mexico sturgeon also exhibited long-term winter residency in Santa Rosa Sound. Interestingly, an area in northeastern Escambia Bay supported Gulf of Mexico sturgeon in summer. This observation was unexpected; however, the identification of Gulf of Mexico sturgeon in this area at this time has important ecological and management implications. Gulf of Mexico sturgeon exhibited a strong diel activity pattern. Gulf of Mexico sturgeon were more active at night than during day in all seasons but summer. The use of prepositioned arrays of acoustic receivers not only provides continuous data within a defined area, but provides insights into nocturnal behavior not previously examined.

  15. The effect of proximity to hurricanes Katrina and Rita on subsequent hurricane outlook and optimistic bias.

    PubMed

    Trumbo, Craig; Lueck, Michelle; Marlatt, Holly; Peek, Lori

    2011-12-01

    This study evaluated how individuals living on the Gulf Coast perceived hurricane risk after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. It was hypothesized that hurricane outlook and optimistic bias for hurricane risk would be associated positively with distance from the Katrina-Rita landfall (more optimism at greater distance), controlling for historically based hurricane risk and county population density, demographics, individual hurricane experience, and dispositional optimism. Data were collected in January 2006 through a mail survey sent to 1,375 households in 41 counties on the coast (n = 824, 60% response). The analysis used hierarchal regression to test hypotheses. Hurricane history and population density had no effect on outlook; individuals who were male, older, and with higher household incomes were associated with lower risk perception; individual hurricane experience and personal impacts from Katrina and Rita predicted greater risk perception; greater dispositional optimism predicted more optimistic outlook; distance had a small effect but predicted less optimistic outlook at greater distance (model R(2) = 0.21). The model for optimistic bias had fewer effects: age and community tenure were significant; dispositional optimism had a positive effect on optimistic bias; distance variables were not significant (model R(2) = 0.05). The study shows that an existing measure of hurricane outlook has utility, hurricane outlook appears to be a unique concept from hurricane optimistic bias, and proximity has at most small effects. Future extension of this research will include improved conceptualization and measurement of hurricane risk perception and will bring to focus several concepts involving risk communication.

  16. Prestorm estimation of hurricane damage to electric power distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Guikema, Seth D; Quiring, Steven M; Han, Seung-Ryong

    2010-12-01

    Hurricanes frequently cause damage to electric power systems in the United States, leading to widespread and prolonged loss of electric service. Restoring service quickly requires the use of repair crews and materials that must be requested, at considerable cost, prior to the storm. U.S. utilities have struggled to strike a good balance between over- and underpreparation largely because of a lack of methods for rigorously estimating the impacts of an approaching hurricane on their systems. Previous work developed methods for estimating the risk of power outages and customer loss of power, with an outage defined as nontransitory activation of a protective device. In this article, we move beyond these previous approaches to directly estimate damage to the electric power system. Our approach is based on damage data from past storms together with regression and data mining techniques to estimate the number of utility poles that will need to be replaced. Because restoration times and resource needs are more closely tied to the number of poles and transformers that need to be replaced than to the number of outages, this pole-based assessment provides a much stronger basis for prestorm planning by utilities. Our results show that damage to poles during hurricanes can be assessed accurately, provided that adequate past damage data are available. However, the availability of data can, and currently often is, the limiting factor in developing these types of models in practice. Opportunities for further enhancing the damage data recorded during hurricanes are also discussed.

  17. Prestorm estimation of hurricane damage to electric power distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Guikema, Seth D; Quiring, Steven M; Han, Seung-Ryong

    2010-12-01

    Hurricanes frequently cause damage to electric power systems in the United States, leading to widespread and prolonged loss of electric service. Restoring service quickly requires the use of repair crews and materials that must be requested, at considerable cost, prior to the storm. U.S. utilities have struggled to strike a good balance between over- and underpreparation largely because of a lack of methods for rigorously estimating the impacts of an approaching hurricane on their systems. Previous work developed methods for estimating the risk of power outages and customer loss of power, with an outage defined as nontransitory activation of a protective device. In this article, we move beyond these previous approaches to directly estimate damage to the electric power system. Our approach is based on damage data from past storms together with regression and data mining techniques to estimate the number of utility poles that will need to be replaced. Because restoration times and resource needs are more closely tied to the number of poles and transformers that need to be replaced than to the number of outages, this pole-based assessment provides a much stronger basis for prestorm planning by utilities. Our results show that damage to poles during hurricanes can be assessed accurately, provided that adequate past damage data are available. However, the availability of data can, and currently often is, the limiting factor in developing these types of models in practice. Opportunities for further enhancing the damage data recorded during hurricanes are also discussed. PMID:21039701

  18. Quantifying the hurricane catastrophe risk to offshore wind power.

    PubMed

    Rose, Stephen; Jaramillo, Paulina; Small, Mitchell J; Apt, Jay

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has estimated that over 50 GW of offshore wind power will be required for the United States to generate 20% of its electricity from wind. Developers are actively planning offshore wind farms along the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf coasts and several leases have been signed for offshore sites. These planned projects are in areas that are sometimes struck by hurricanes. We present a method to estimate the catastrophe risk to offshore wind power using simulated hurricanes. Using this method, we estimate the fraction of offshore wind power simultaneously offline and the cumulative damage in a region. In Texas, the most vulnerable region we studied, 10% of offshore wind power could be offline simultaneously because of hurricane damage with a 100-year return period and 6% could be destroyed in any 10-year period. We also estimate the risks to single wind farms in four representative locations; we find the risks are significant but lower than those estimated in previously published results. Much of the hurricane risk to offshore wind turbines can be mitigated by designing turbines for higher maximum wind speeds, ensuring that turbine nacelles can turn quickly to track the wind direction even when grid power is lost, and building in areas with lower risk.

  19. Forest fires and lightning activity during the outstanding 2003 and 2005 fire seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Ana; Ramos, Alexandre; Trigo, Ricardo

    2013-04-01

    Wildfires in southern Europe cause frequent extensive economical and ecological losses and, even human casualties. Comparatively to other Mediterranean countries, Portugal is the country with more burnt area and fires per unit area in the last decade, mainly during the summer season (Pereira et al., 2011). According to the fire records available, between 1980 and 2009, wildfires have affected over 3 million hectares in Portugal (JRC, 2011), which corresponds to approximately a third of the Portuguese Continental territory. The main factors that influence fire ignition and propagation are: (1) the presence of fuel (i.e. vegetation); (2) climate and weather; (3) socioeconomic conditions that affect land use/land cover patterns, fire-prevention and fire-fighting capacity and (4) topography. Specifically, weather (e.g. wind, temperature, precipitation, humidity, and lightning occurrence) plays an important role in fire behavior, affecting both ignition and spread of wildfires. Some countries have a relatively large fraction of fires caused by lightning, e.g. northwestern USA, Canada, Russia (). In contrast, Portugal has only a small percentage of fire records caused by lightning. Although significant doubts remain for the majority of fires in the catalog since they were cataloged without a likely cause. The recent years of 2003 and 2005 were particularly outstanding for fire activity in Portugal, registering, respectively, total burned areas of 425 726 ha and 338 262 ha. However, while the 2003 was triggered by an exceptional heatwave that struck the entire western Europe, the 2005 fire season registered was coincident with one of the most severe droughts of the 20th century. In this work we have used mainly two different databases: 1) the Portuguese Rural Fire Database (PRFD) which is representative of rural fires that have occurred in Continental Portugal, 2001-2011, with the original data provided by the Autoridade Florestal Nacional (AFN, 2011); 2) lightning

  20. Lessons Learnt From Hurricane Katrina.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akundi, Murty

    2008-03-01

    Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans and its suburbs on Monday August 29^th, 2005. The previous Friday morning, August 26, the National Hurricane Center indicated that Katrina was a Category One Hurricane, which was expected to hit Florida. By Friday afternoon, it had changed its course, and neither the city nor Xavier University was prepared for this unexpected turn in the hurricane's path. The university had 6 to 7 ft of water in every building and Xavier was closed for four months. Students and university personnel that were unable to evacuate were trapped on campus and transportation out of the city became a logistical nightmare. Email and all electronic systems were unavailable for at least a month, and all cell phones with a 504 area code stopped working. For the Department, the most immediate problem was locating faculty and students. Xavier created a list of faculty and their new email addresses and began coordinating with faculty. Xavier created a web page with advice for students, and the chair of the department created a separate blog with contact information for students. The early lack of a clear method of communication made worse the confusion and dismay among the faculty on such issues as when the university would reopen, whether the faculty would be retained, whether they should seek temporary (or permanent) employment elsewhere, etc. With the vision and determination of President Dr. Francis, Xavier was able to reopen the university in January and ran a full academic year from January through August. Since Katrina, the university has asked every department and unit to prepare emergency preparedness plans. Each department has been asked to collect e-mail addresses (non-Xavier), cell phone numbers and out of town contact information. The University also established an emergency website to communicate. All faculty have been asked to prepare to teach classes electronically via Black board or the web. Questions remain about the longer term issues of

  1. Hurricane Preparedness and Control Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This plan establishes policy and sets forth guidance, responsibilities and procedures utilized by Federal Electric Corp., communications department in support of the KSC Emergency Preparedness Plan, Annex A, Hurricane Control Plan (GP-355) dated 27 May 1971. This plan covers all FEC communications department personnel, facilities, and equipment situated at the Kennedy Space Center that are the responsibility of FEC contract NAS 10-4967.

  2. Lightning and radar observations of hurricane Rita landfall

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Bradley G; Suszcynsky, David M; Hamlin, Timothy E; Jeffery, C A; Wiens, Kyle C; Orville, R E

    2009-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) owns and operates an array of Very-Low Frequency (VLF) sensors that measure the Radio-Frequency (RF) waveforms emitted by Cloud-to-Ground (CG) and InCloud (IC) lightning. This array, the Los Alamos Sferic Array (LASA), has approximately 15 sensors concentrated in the Great Plains and Florida, which detect electric field changes in a bandwidth from 200 Hz to 500 kHz (Smith et al., 2002). Recently, LANL has begun development of a new dual-band RF sensor array that includes the Very-High Frequency (VHF) band as well as the VLF. Whereas VLF lightning emissions can be used to deduce physical parameters such as lightning type and peak current, VHF emissions can be used to perform precise 3d mapping of individual radiation sources, which can number in the thousands for a typical CG flash. These new dual-band sensors will be used to monitor lightning activity in hurricanes in an effort to better predict intensification cycles. Although the new LANL dual-band array is not yet operational, we have begun initial work utilizing both VLF and VHF lightning data to monitor hurricane evolution. In this paper, we present the temporal evolution of Rita's landfall using VLF and VHF lightning data, and also WSR-88D radar. At landfall, Rita's northern eyewall experienced strong updrafts and significant lightning activity that appear to mark a transition between oceanic hurricane dynamics and continental thunderstorm dynamics. In section 2, we give a brief overview of Hurricane Rita, including its development as a hurricane and its lightning history. In the following section, we present WSR-88D data of Rita's landfall, including reflectivity images and temporal variation. In section 4, we present both VHF and VLF lightning data, overplotted on radar reflectivity images. Finally, we discuss our observations, including a comparison to previous studies and a brief conclusion.

  3. Seasonal changes in mood and creative activity among eminent Italian writers.

    PubMed

    Barbato, Giuseppe; Piemontese, Simona; Pastorello, Greta

    2007-12-01

    A sample of 33 eminent Italian writers was studied. They were nominees of three of the most important literary Italian awards (Strega, Campiello, and Viareggio). The Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire was mailed to 105 writers during the period October 2003 and January 2004, of whom 39 replied. 33 (M age=54.5 yr., SD= 12.5; 8 women and 25 men) completed the questionnaire. Among respondents, spring and summer months showed highest ratings of "feel best." During the summer a decline in creativity was not significant; respondents also reported sleeping least. Scores on the Global Seasonality Score suggested writers appeared to show higher seasonal sensitivity than the general population. Seasonal changes were considered as a problem by a majority of them. Although writers showed high seasonal sensitivity, no significant relationship was found between the seasonal pattern of mood and self-reported creativity.

  4. Preparation, experience, and aftermath of hurricane Floyd.

    PubMed

    Campese, C

    2000-07-01

    In September 1999, Hurricane Floyd threatened the southeastern coast of the United States, causing the largest peacetime evacuation in history. The hurricane moved onto land when it curved northward and slammed into southeastern North Carolina near Wilmington and Cape Fear. This region already had experienced three hurricanes in recent years and had been brushed by Hurricane Dennis one month earlier. This article describes actions taken by the New Hanover Regional Medical Center surgical services department in Wilmington, NC, to prepare for and weather the storm. The aftermath and cleanup also are discussed.

  5. Seasonal profiles of ovarian activity in Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) based on urinary hormone metabolite analyses.

    PubMed

    Jewgenow, K; Göritz, F; Vargas, A; Dehnhard, M

    2009-07-01

    The Iberian Lynx Ex-Situ Conservation Programme is an essential part of a co-ordinated action plan to conserve the most endangered felid species of the world. Successful captive breeding demands reliable methods for reproduction monitoring including reliable non-invasive pregnancy diagnosis. During a 3-year study, urine samples from six captive Iberian lynx females were obtained (one non-pregnant, one pseudo-pregnant and 11 pregnant cycles). Progesterone, pregnanediol and oestradiol were determined in urinary extracts and relevant urinary oestrogen metabolites were characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Urinary progestins did not follow the typical pregnancy-related course of felids. In the lynx, we failed to demonstrate an urinary progestin elevation during pregnancy. In contrast, urinary oestrogens increased from 3.8 +/- 0.6 to 8.6 +/- 0.5 ng/mg creatinine (p < 0.001) during the pregnancy. A comparison of pseudo-pregnant with pregnant cycles revealed a further increase of oestrogens caused by implantation (p < 0.05). In one female, which refused to mate, no difference was estimated between oestrogens levels during the breeding and non-breeding seasons. Almost 10-fold higher oestrogen concentrations were measured in urines of females that shared enclosures with males. HPLC analysis of oestrogens in urine samples collected from Iberian lynx during the pregnancy revealed that lynx urine is composed of two polar oestrogen metabolites in addition to oestrone and minor amounts of oestradiol. Oestrone was detectable in all urinary extracts (8-12% of metabolites), whereas oestradiol was elevated only during late pregnancy (18%). Thus, seasonal luteal activity in Iberian lynx can be monitored by urinary oestrogens. The increase of urinary oestradiol during late pregnancy might indicate an oestradiol secretion by the lynx placenta.

  6. One Typhoon and Two Hurricanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The powerful super Typhoon Bilis hit Taiwan with 161 mph (260 kmh) winds on August 22, 2000. At times, the winds were strong enough to shake concrete buildings. In addition to the wind, heavy rains may bring flooding and mudslides to the island. Mudslides particularly threaten areas hit by 1999's powerful earthquake. This image (above) shows Bilis as the outer arms of the storm swept over Taiwan near noon local time on August 22, 2000. The true color image was captured by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS). Meanwhile, in the Atlantic ... On the other side of the globe there were two relatively small hurricanes. Hurricane Alberto sat in the center of the North Atlantic, hanging on in its third week of life. Hurricane Debby was approaching Puerto Rico with sustained winds of only 75 mph (120 kph). NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) acquired this image (below) of the Western Hemisphere, showing both Alberto and Debby, at 2:30 PM EDT August 22, 2000. Typhoon Bilis provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE. GOES imagery courtesy GOES Project Science Office, NASA GSFC.

  7. Dynamic Hurricane Data Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knosp, Brian W.; Li, Peggy; Vu, Quoc A.

    2009-01-01

    A dynamic hurricane data analysis tool allows users of the JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) to analyze data over a Web medium. The TCIS software is described in the previous article, Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) (NPO-45748). This tool interfaces with the TCIS database to pull in data from several different atmospheric and oceanic data sets, both observed by instruments. Users can use this information to generate histograms, maps, and profile plots for specific storms. The tool also displays statistical values for the user-selected parameter for the mean, standard deviation, median, minimum, and maximum values. There is little wait time, allowing for fast data plots over date and spatial ranges. Users may also zoom-in for a closer look at a particular spatial range. This is version 1 of the software. Researchers will use the data and tools on the TCIS to understand hurricane processes, improve hurricane forecast models and identify what types of measurements the next generation of instruments will need to collect.

  8. Possible seasonal activity of gullies on an sand dune (Russell crater, Mars)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouannic, Gwénaël.; Gargani, Julien; Costard, François

    2010-05-01

    Recent work has shown that gullies are among the most youthful features on Mars (Malin and Edgett, 2000; Costard et al., 2002; Reiss and Jaumann, 2003, Malin et al., 2006). Here we show that the gullies located on the Russell Crater dune are not only extremely youthful but also seem to be still actives. Various geomorphological features consistent with a seasonal activity suggest reactivated flows over the last three terrestrial years. Moreover, using an assemblage of 26 HiRISE images over a 31 month period (November 2006-May 2009) and superposed with MOLA tracks, we performed a quantitative analysis of the sinuosity and branching of the gullies on the shallow slope of the Russell crater. These geomorphologicals features suggest that debris flow have been formed by a fluid flow. As pure water generally is not thought to be stable on the surface of Mars under current conditions, these gullies could be indicative of a highly localized zone of meta-stability heretofore unidentified in the literature or by a highly mineralized water. Equally, the occurrence of the gullies on a dune may point to a near-surface source, i.e. near surface permafrost (Vedie et al. 2008), that could have been emplaced under conditions associated with late Amazonian obliquity excursions (Costard et al., 2002). Nevertheless, the precise composition of the fluid (CO2, mineralized water,…) is still unknown. Costard, F., Forget, F., Mangold, N., Peulvast, J.P., 2002. Formation of recent martian debris flow by melting of near-surface ground ice at high obliquity. Science, 295, 110-113. Malin, M.C., Edgett, K.E., 2000. Evidence for recent groundwater seepage and surface runoff on Mars. Science, 288, 2330-2335. Malin, M.C., Edgett, K.E., Posiolova, L.V., McColley, S.M., Dobrea, E.Z., 2006. Present day impact crater rate and contemporary gully activity on Mars. Science, 314, 1573-1577. Reiss, D., Jaumann, R., 2003. Recent debris flows on Mars : Seasonal observations of the Russell Crater dune field

  9. Photo series for estimating post-hurricane residues and fire behavior in southern pine. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, D.D.; Forbus, J.K.; Saveland, J.M.

    1993-08-01

    Following Hurricane Hugo, fuels were sampled on nine 2-acre blocks which were then burned during the spring wildfire season. The study was superimposed on dormant-season fire-interval research plots established in 1958 on the Francis Marion National Forest near Charleston, SC. Photographs of preburn fuel loads, fire behavior, and postburn fuel loads were taken to visually depict the fire intensity associated with differing hurricane-generated fuel loads. These photo sequences enable the reader to compare actual fire behavior and consumption with preconceived mental images.

  10. Seasonal and spatial oviposition activity of Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) in Adriatic Croatia.

    PubMed

    Zitko, Toni; Merdić, Enrih

    2014-07-01

    Seasonal and spatial ovipositional activity of Aedes albopictus (Skuse, 1894) was investigated in Split, South Croatia. During 2009 and 2010, 35 oviposition traps were used in this research. For studying oviposition behavior, mean egg density and Lloyd's mean crowding were used to define the dispersion of eggs into ovitraps and, together with Taylor's power law, to show aggregation degree. To show monthly distribution of egg density, Kriging interpolation was used. Oviposition activity started in April (week 13) and was completed at the beginning December (week 48). Mean egg density reaches the highest values from June to early September (week 25-35). Slope of regressions (mean crowding on mean density and log variance and log mean density) indicated a clumped distribution of eggs. Sampling sites were divided in four groups based on quartiles of median and maximum of mean density. There was no significant difference in measured abiotic factors (temperature, humidity, and rainfall) and measured mean egg density, total amount of eggs, and percentage of positive ovitraps between investigated years, except in mean egg density in some localities.

  11. Display activity and seasonality of faecal sexual steroids in male great bustard (Otis tarda L.).

    PubMed

    Biczó, A; Péczely, P

    2007-03-01

    The non-invasive faecal sampling and RIA was used to measure faecal equivalents of testosterone (T), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), oestradiol-17beta (E2) and progesterone (P4) in juvenile and adult great bustard males. Possible connections of diurnal and seasonal changes of sexual steroid levels and display activity were studied. Correlations were found between sexual steroid equivalent levels of faeces and display activity and agonistic behaviour in the different phases of annual cycle of adult males. In early display period increasing levels of androgens were measured, during main display period very high androgen dominance was observable against E2 and P4. During postnuptial moult strong T decrease and DHEA and P4 increase were detected. Elevation of E2 was measured during wintering. In juveniles level of DHEA was higher than level of T suggesting its importance in immature males. Decrease of T was detected between reproductive period and postnuptial moult and DHEA between reproduction and wintering, accompanying with E2 elevation. The inhibiting effect of inclement weather on gonad functions also was detected in our study. We suppose that the unexpected cold weather with strong wind depressed the levels of androgens both in juveniles and adults and the increase of faecal E2 was also detected. PMID:17385541

  12. Display activity and seasonality of faecal sexual steroids in male great bustard (Otis tarda L.).

    PubMed

    Biczó, A; Péczely, P

    2007-03-01

    The non-invasive faecal sampling and RIA was used to measure faecal equivalents of testosterone (T), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), oestradiol-17beta (E2) and progesterone (P4) in juvenile and adult great bustard males. Possible connections of diurnal and seasonal changes of sexual steroid levels and display activity were studied. Correlations were found between sexual steroid equivalent levels of faeces and display activity and agonistic behaviour in the different phases of annual cycle of adult males. In early display period increasing levels of androgens were measured, during main display period very high androgen dominance was observable against E2 and P4. During postnuptial moult strong T decrease and DHEA and P4 increase were detected. Elevation of E2 was measured during wintering. In juveniles level of DHEA was higher than level of T suggesting its importance in immature males. Decrease of T was detected between reproductive period and postnuptial moult and DHEA between reproduction and wintering, accompanying with E2 elevation. The inhibiting effect of inclement weather on gonad functions also was detected in our study. We suppose that the unexpected cold weather with strong wind depressed the levels of androgens both in juveniles and adults and the increase of faecal E2 was also detected.

  13. Seasonally-Active Water on Mars: Vapour, Ice, Adsorbate, and the Possibility of Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, M. I.

    2002-12-01

    Seasonally-active water can be defined to include any water reservoir that communicates with other reservoirs on time scales of a year or shorter. It is the interaction of these water reservoirs, under the influence of varying solar radiation and in conjunction with surface and atmospheric temperatures, that determines the phase-stability field for water at the surface, and the distribution of water in various forms below, on, and above the surface. The atmosphere is the critical, dynamical link in this cycling system, and also (fortunately) one of the easiest to observe. Viking and Mars Global Surveyor observations paint a strongly asymmetric picture of the global seasonal water cycle, tied proximately to planetary eccentricity, and the existence of residual ice caps of different composition at the two poles. The northern summer experiences the largest water vapour columns, and is associated with sublimation from the northern residual water ice cap. The southern summer residual carbon dioxide ice cap is cold trap for water. Asymmetry in the water cycle is an unsolved problem. Possible solutions may involve the current timing of perihelion (the water cap resides at the pole experiencing the longer but cooler summer), the trapping of water ice in the northern hemisphere by tropical water ice clouds, and the bias in the annual-average, zonal-mean atmospheric circulation resulting from the zonal-mean difference in the elevation of the northern and southern hemispheres. Adsorbed and frozen water have proven harder to constrain. Recent Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer results suggest substantial ground ice in the mid- and high-latitudes, but this water is likely below the seasonal skin depth for two reasons: the GRS results are best fit with such a model, and GCM models of the water cycle produce dramatically unrealistic atmospheric vapour distributions when such a very near surface, GRS-like distribution is initialized - ultimately removing the water to the northern and

  14. Evaluation of the impacts of the Madden-Julian Oscillation on rainfall and hurricanes in Central and South America and the Atlantic Ocean using ICI-RAFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannettone, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    in Australia (Wheeler et al., 2009). The current study found that similar strong relationships between MJO activity over Africa and the western Indian Ocean and rainfall totals in central Argentina, Nicaragua, and northwestern Venezuela. For example, in Nicaragua, the 20-year event almost doubles depending on the phase of the MJO. A fourth case study attempts to develop a relationship between the annual number of hurricanes in the Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean during the hurricane season (July - October) and the average value of the Madden-Julian Oscillation over Africa during a period 3 - 4 months prior to the hurricane season. Similar work has been performed in the northern Atlantic by Villarini et al. (2010), except the authors focused on other indices, including tropical mean sea-surface temperatures (SST's), the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), and the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI). Even though the NAO and SOI show some correlation with hurricane activity, the results of the current study show that there is a stronger link between the MJO prior to hurricane season and the total number of hurricanes that form. The greatest correlation again comes from MJO activity over Africa.

  15. A new insight into the nature of seasonal variations in coordinate time series of GPS sites located near active faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimenko, Sergey V.; Bykov, Victor G.; Shestakov, Nikolay V.; Grib, Nikolay N.; Takahashi, Hiroaki

    2016-09-01

    This study provides new insights into the nature of seasonal variations in coordinate time series of GPS sites located near active faults and methods of their modeling. Monthly averaged coordinate time series were analyzed for several pairs of collocated GPS sites situated near the active fault intersection area, in close proximity to the central part of the northern boundary of the Amurian plate and the vicinity of the San Andreas Fault zone. It is concluded that the observed seasonal variations are best described by a breather function which is one of the solutions of the well-known sine-Gordon equation. The obtained results suggest that, in this case, the source of seasonal variations may be caused by the appearance of solitary strain waves in the fault intersection system, which may be qualitatively treated as standing waves of compression-extension of the geological medium. Based on statistical testing, the limits of applicability of the suggested model have been established.

  16. Hurricane Rita: an unwelcome visitor to PPG industries in Lake Charles, Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Roy E

    2008-11-15

    This paper intends to provide a glimpse of the within-the-fence activity of a major chlorine, caustic soda and chlorinated hydrocarbons manufacturing complex, immediately before and during the 2 weeks following Hurricane Rita. The paper touches on the basics, covering "preparation," "perseverance" and "powering up again" as this chemical complex began to return to normal. There are expected and unexpected things that a significant hurricane can impact, and you may wonder how your organization would fare.

  17. Titan's cloud seasonal activity from winter to spring with Cassini/VIMS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, S.; Le, Mouelic S.; Rannou, P.; Sotin, C.; Brown, R.H.; Barnes, J.W.; Griffith, C.A.; Burgalat, J.; Baines, K.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    Since Saturn orbital insertion in July 2004, the Cassini orbiter has been observing Titan throughout most of the northern winter season (October 2002-August 2009) and the beginning of spring, allowing a detailed monitoring of Titan's cloud coverage at high spatial resolution with close flybys on a monthly basis. This study reports on the analysis of all the near-infrared images of Titan's clouds acquired by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) during 67 targeted flybys of Titan between July 2004 and April 2010.The VIMS observations show numerous sporadic clouds at southern high and mid-latitudes, rare clouds in the equatorial region, and reveal a long-lived cloud cap above the north pole, ubiquitous poleward of 60??N. These observations allow us to follow the evolution of the cloud coverage during almost a 6-year period including the equinox, and greatly help to further constrain global circulation models (GCMs). After 4. years of regular outbursts observed by Cassini between 2004 and 2008, southern polar cloud activity started declining, and completely ceased 1. year before spring equinox. The extensive cloud system over the north pole, stable between 2004 and 2008, progressively fractionated and vanished as Titan entered into northern spring. At southern mid-latitudes, clouds were continuously observed throughout the VIMS observing period, even after equinox, in a latitude band between 30??S and 60??S. During the whole period of observation, only a dozen clouds were observed closer to the equator, though they were slightly more frequent as equinox approached. We also investigated the distribution of clouds with longitude. We found that southern polar clouds, before disappearing in mid-2008, were systematically concentrated in the leading hemisphere of Titan, in particular above and to the east of Ontario Lacus, the largest reservoir of hydrocarbons in the area. Clouds are also non-homogeneously distributed with longitude at southern mid

  18. An Ensemble Numerical Modeling Study of Atlantic Basin Hurricane Intensification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Bonnie R.

    Rapid intensification of tropical cyclones is an active area of research in the atmospheric sciences due to the difficulty of forecasting cyclone intensity and the unclear mechanism by which a hurricane my undergo explosive deepening. Ensemble numerical modeling studies of six tropical cyclones from 2009, 2010 and 2011 which underwent periods of strong intensification are conducted here. The goal is to identify common storm structures in intensifying hurricanes while filling a gap in the current research between case studies of rapid intensification and climatological/statistical type studies of hurricane intensification rates by using a compositing method. A 96-member ensemble is run for a 24 hour forecast using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model for hurricanes Bill (2009), Earl (2010), Igor (2010), Julia (2010), Katia (2011), and Ophelia (2011). Ensemble sensitivity analysis is used to investigate which patterns in the analysis have a strong influence on the forecast intensity and then a novel sensitivity compositing is used to identify common patterns which affect the forecast intensity. It is found that these hurricanes are all predicted to respond to an increased primary and secondary circulation, an increased warm core, a raised tropopause and moistening of rain bands with an increased forecast intensity. Perturbed initial conditions show a linear model response for small perturbations but also signs of non-linearity at large perturbations, indicating that these sensitivity patterns are robust for limited additional strengthening of the hurricane. When perturbations are partitioned into dry and moist variables, it is seen that most of the model response is achieved by the dry dynamics. Further investigation is conducted into the rapid intensification of Earl (2010) and Igor (2010) but creating ensemble forecasts with additional, high-resolution nested domains which allow explicit convection. When the ensemble sensitivity analysis is repeated

  19. 2005 hurricane surveillance: measures to reduce carbon monoxide poisoning in all Floridians.

    PubMed

    Becker, A; Dark, T; Mason, T; Goodwin, B

    2012-05-01

    The 2005 Florida hurricanes caused widespread power outages, increasing generator use that directly resulted in a surge in carbon monoxide (CO) poisonings. Of the 126 CO poisonings documented, 77% were related to generator use and 43% of these generators were placed outside but near a window. African-Americans and Latinos had a higher incidence of CO poisoning. The strength of the authors' study described here was the inclusion of the first responder network in one surveillance system for hurricane response. Notable advances have occurred since the authors' study, including CO poisoning listed as a reportable condition, regulation requiring CO detectors, CO generator warning labeling, and the development of a local surveillance and classification program for the county health departments. To prepare for future multiple hurricane seasons, comprehensive outreach should be focused at the local level through the first responder network and community groups to reduce CO poisonings in all populations.

  20. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in response to temperature elevation shows seasonal variation in the zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Jost, Jennifer A; Keshwani, Sarah S; Abou-Hanna, Jacob J

    2015-04-01

    Global climate change is affecting ectothermic species, and a variety of studies are needed on thermal tolerances, especially from cellular and physiological perspectives. This study utilized AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key regulator of cellular energy levels, to examine the effects of high water temperatures on zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) physiology. During heating, AMPK activity increased as water temperature increased to a point, and maximum AMPK activity was detected at high, but sublethal, water temperatures. This pattern varied with season, suggesting that cellular mechanisms of seasonal thermal acclimatization affect basic metabolic processes during sublethal heat stress. There was a greater seasonal variation in the water temperature at which maximum AMPK activity was measured than in lethal water temperature. Furthermore, baseline AMPK activity varied significantly across seasons, most likely reflecting altered metabolic states during times of growth and reproduction. In addition, when summer-collected mussels were lab-acclimated to winter and spring water temperatures, patterns of heat stress mirrored those of field-collected animals. These data suggest that water temperature is the main driver of the seasonal variation in physiology. This study concluded that AMPK activity, which reflects changes in energy supply and demand during heat stress, can serve as a sensitive and early indicator of temperature stress in mussels.

  1. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in response to temperature elevation shows seasonal variation in the zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Jost, Jennifer A; Keshwani, Sarah S; Abou-Hanna, Jacob J

    2015-04-01

    Global climate change is affecting ectothermic species, and a variety of studies are needed on thermal tolerances, especially from cellular and physiological perspectives. This study utilized AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key regulator of cellular energy levels, to examine the effects of high water temperatures on zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) physiology. During heating, AMPK activity increased as water temperature increased to a point, and maximum AMPK activity was detected at high, but sublethal, water temperatures. This pattern varied with season, suggesting that cellular mechanisms of seasonal thermal acclimatization affect basic metabolic processes during sublethal heat stress. There was a greater seasonal variation in the water temperature at which maximum AMPK activity was measured than in lethal water temperature. Furthermore, baseline AMPK activity varied significantly across seasons, most likely reflecting altered metabolic states during times of growth and reproduction. In addition, when summer-collected mussels were lab-acclimated to winter and spring water temperatures, patterns of heat stress mirrored those of field-collected animals. These data suggest that water temperature is the main driver of the seasonal variation in physiology. This study concluded that AMPK activity, which reflects changes in energy supply and demand during heat stress, can serve as a sensitive and early indicator of temperature stress in mussels. PMID:25498351

  2. Newton's Apple Teachers Guides. Seasons 9-10-11-12: A Collection of Lessons and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twin Cities Public Television, St. Paul, MN.

    Newton's Apple is a PBS family science program that explores basic science through high-energy, hands-on demonstrations. This volume is a collection of the teacher's guides from four seasons of Newton's Apple which were originally broadcast from 1991 through 1994. Each of the four seasons in the volume contains 26 lessons and a combination of…

  3. An assessment of change in risk perception and optimistic bias for hurricanes among Gulf Coast residents.

    PubMed

    Trumbo, Craig; Meyer, Michelle A; Marlatt, Holly; Peek, Lori; Morrissey, Bridget

    2014-06-01

    This study focuses on levels of concern for hurricanes among individuals living along the Gulf Coast during the quiescent two-year period following the exceptionally destructive 2005 hurricane season. A small study of risk perception and optimistic bias was conducted immediately following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Two years later, a follow-up was done in which respondents were recontacted. This provided an opportunity to examine changes, and potential causal ordering, in risk perception and optimistic bias. The analysis uses 201 panel respondents who were matched across the two mail surveys. Measures included hurricane risk perception, optimistic bias for hurricane evacuation, past hurricane experience, and a small set of demographic variables (age, sex, income, and education). Paired t-tests were used to compare scores across time. Hurricane risk perception declined and optimistic bias increased. Cross-lagged correlations were used to test the potential causal ordering between risk perception and optimistic bias, with a weak effect suggesting the former affects the latter. Additional cross-lagged analysis using structural equation modeling was used to look more closely at the components of optimistic bias (risk to self vs. risk to others). A significant and stronger potentially causal effect from risk perception to optimistic bias was found. Analysis of the experience and demographic variables' effects on risk perception and optimistic bias, and their change, provided mixed results. The lessening of risk perception and increase in optimistic bias over the period of quiescence suggest that risk communicators and emergency managers should direct attention toward reversing these trends to increase disaster preparedness. PMID:24286290

  4. An assessment of change in risk perception and optimistic bias for hurricanes among Gulf Coast residents.

    PubMed

    Trumbo, Craig; Meyer, Michelle A; Marlatt, Holly; Peek, Lori; Morrissey, Bridget

    2014-06-01

    This study focuses on levels of concern for hurricanes among individuals living along the Gulf Coast during the quiescent two-year period following the exceptionally destructive 2005 hurricane season. A small study of risk perception and optimistic bias was conducted immediately following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Two years later, a follow-up was done in which respondents were recontacted. This provided an opportunity to examine changes, and potential causal ordering, in risk perception and optimistic bias. The analysis uses 201 panel respondents who were matched across the two mail surveys. Measures included hurricane risk perception, optimistic bias for hurricane evacuation, past hurricane experience, and a small set of demographic variables (age, sex, income, and education). Paired t-tests were used to compare scores across time. Hurricane risk perception declined and optimistic bias increased. Cross-lagged correlations were used to test the potential causal ordering between risk perception and optimistic bias, with a weak effect suggesting the former affects the latter. Additional cross-lagged analysis using structural equation modeling was used to look more closely at the components of optimistic bias (risk to self vs. risk to others). A significant and stronger potentially causal effect from risk perception to optimistic bias was found. Analysis of the experience and demographic variables' effects on risk perception and optimistic bias, and their change, provided mixed results. The lessening of risk perception and increase in optimistic bias over the period of quiescence suggest that risk communicators and emergency managers should direct attention toward reversing these trends to increase disaster preparedness.

  5. The intertropical convergence zone modulates intense hurricane strikes on the western North Atlantic margin

    PubMed Central

    van Hengstum, Peter J.; Donnelly, Jeffrey P.; Fall, Patricia L.; Toomey, Michael R.; Albury, Nancy A.; Kakuk, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Most Atlantic hurricanes form in the Main Development Region between 9°N to 20°N along the northern edge of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Previous research has suggested that meridional shifts in the ITCZ position on geologic timescales can modulate hurricane activity, but continuous and long-term storm records are needed from multiple sites to assess this hypothesis. Here we present a 3000 year record of intense hurricane strikes in the northern Bahamas (Abaco Island) based on overwash deposits in a coastal sinkhole, which indicates that the ITCZ has likely helped modulate intense hurricane strikes on the western North Atlantic margin on millennial to centennial-scales. The new reconstruction closely matches a previous reconstruction from Puerto Rico, and documents a period of elevated intense hurricane activity on the western North Atlantic margin from 2500 to 1000 years ago when paleo precipitation proxies suggest that the ITCZ occupied a more northern position. Considering that anthropogenic warming is predicted to be focused in the northern hemisphere in the coming century, these results provide a prehistoric analog that an attendant northern ITCZ shift in the future may again return the western North Atlantic margin to an active hurricane interval. PMID:26906670

  6. The intertropical convergence zone modulates intense hurricane strikes on the western North Atlantic margin.

    PubMed

    van Hengstum, Peter J; Donnelly, Jeffrey P; Fall, Patricia L; Toomey, Michael R; Albury, Nancy A; Kakuk, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Most Atlantic hurricanes form in the Main Development Region between 9°N to 20°N along the northern edge of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Previous research has suggested that meridional shifts in the ITCZ position on geologic timescales can modulate hurricane activity, but continuous and long-term storm records are needed from multiple sites to assess this hypothesis. Here we present a 3000 year record of intense hurricane strikes in the northern Bahamas (Abaco Island) based on overwash deposits in a coastal sinkhole, which indicates that the ITCZ has likely helped modulate intense hurricane strikes on the western North Atlantic margin on millennial to centennial-scales. The new reconstruction closely matches a previous reconstruction from Puerto Rico, and documents a period of elevated intense hurricane activity on the western North Atlantic margin from 2500 to 1000 years ago when paleo precipitation proxies suggest that the ITCZ occupied a more northern position. Considering that anthropogenic warming is predicted to be focused in the northern hemisphere in the coming century, these results provide a prehistoric analog that an attendant northern ITCZ shift in the future may again return the western North Atlantic margin to an active hurricane interval. PMID:26906670

  7. The intertropical convergence zone modulates intense hurricane strikes on the western North Atlantic margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hengstum, Peter J.; Donnelly, Jeffrey P.; Fall, Patricia L.; Toomey, Michael R.; Albury, Nancy A.; Kakuk, Brian

    2016-02-01

    Most Atlantic hurricanes form in the Main Development Region between 9°N to 20°N along the northern edge of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Previous research has suggested that meridional shifts in the ITCZ position on geologic timescales can modulate hurricane activity, but continuous and long-term storm records are needed from multiple sites to assess this hypothesis. Here we present a 3000 year record of intense hurricane strikes in the northern Bahamas (Abaco Island) based on overwash deposits in a coastal sinkhole, which indicates that the ITCZ has likely helped modulate intense hurricane strikes on the western North Atlantic margin on millennial to centennial-scales. The new reconstruction closely matches a previous reconstruction from Puerto Rico, and documents a period of elevated intense hurricane activity on the western North Atlantic margin from 2500 to 1000 years ago when paleo precipitation proxies suggest that the ITCZ occupied a more northern position. Considering that anthropogenic warming is predicted to be focused in the northern hemisphere in the coming century, these results provide a prehistoric analog that an attendant northern ITCZ shift in the future may again return the western North Atlantic margin to an active hurricane interval.

  8. The intertropical convergence zone modulates intense hurricane strikes on the western North Atlantic margin.

    PubMed

    van Hengstum, Peter J; Donnelly, Jeffrey P; Fall, Patricia L; Toomey, Michael R; Albury, Nancy A; Kakuk, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Most Atlantic hurricanes form in the Main Development Region between 9°N to 20°N along the northern edge of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Previous research has suggested that meridional shifts in the ITCZ position on geologic timescales can modulate hurricane activity, but continuous and long-term storm records are needed from multiple sites to assess this hypothesis. Here we present a 3000 year record of intense hurricane strikes in the northern Bahamas (Abaco Island) based on overwash deposits in a coastal sinkhole, which indicates that the ITCZ has likely helped modulate intense hurricane strikes on the western North Atlantic margin on millennial to centennial-scales. The new reconstruction closely matches a previous reconstruction from Puerto Rico, and documents a period of elevated intense hurricane activity on the western North Atlantic margin from 2500 to 1000 years ago when paleo precipitation proxies suggest that the ITCZ occupied a more northern position. Considering that anthropogenic warming is predicted to be focused in the northern hemisphere in the coming century, these results provide a prehistoric analog that an attendant northern ITCZ shift in the future may again return the western North Atlantic margin to an active hurricane interval.

  9. Airborne Laser Scanning Quantification of Disturbances from Hurricanes and Lightning Strikes to Mangrove Forests in Everglades National Park, USA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Keqi; Simard, Marc; Ross, Michael; Rivera-Monroy, Victor H.; Houle, Patricia; Ruiz, Pablo; Twilley, Robert R.; Whelan, Kevin R. T.

    2008-01-01

    Airborne light detection and ranging (LIDAR) measurements derived before and after Hurricanes Katrina and Wilma (2005) were used to quantify the impact of hurricanes and lightning strikes on the mangrove forest at two sites in Everglades National Park (ENP). Analysis of LIDAR measurements covering 61 and 68 ha areas of mangrove forest at the Shark River and Broad River sites showed that the proportion of high tree canopy detected by the LIDAR after the 2005 hurricane season decreased significantly due to defoliation and breakage of branches and trunks, while the proportion of low canopy and the ground increased drastically. Tall mangrove forests distant from tidal creeks suffered more damage than lower mangrove forests adjacent to the tidal creeks. The hurricanes created numerous canopy gaps, and the number of gaps per square kilometer increased from about 400∼500 to 4000 after Katrina and Wilma. The total area of gaps in the forest increased from about 1∼2% of the total forest area to 12%. The relative contribution of hurricanes to mangrove forest disturbance in ENP is at least 2 times more than that from lightning strikes. However, hurricanes and lightning strikes disturb the mangrove forest in a related way. Most seedlings in lightning gaps survived the hurricane impact due to the protection of trees surrounding the gaps, and therefore provide an important resource for forest recovery after the hurricane. This research demonstrated that LIDAR is an effective remote sensing tool to quantify the effects of disturbances such as hurricanes and lightning strikes in the mangrove forest.

  10. Biomarker versus environmental factors: seasonal variations and modelling multixenobiotic defence (MXD) transport activity in transplanted zebra mussels.

    PubMed

    Pain, Sandrine; Devin, Simon; Parant, Marc

    2007-02-01

    The occurrence of biomarker temporal variations linked to environmental factors makes it difficult to distinguish the specific effect of pollution. The present work aims to investigate the seasonal variations of the transport activity of the multixenobiotic defence (MXD), which is used as a biological tool for the monitoring of pollution in aquatic ecosystems. The MXD transport activity was monitored monthly from August 2001 to October 2002 in zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) transplanted to three sites in the Moselle River. The 'efflux method' was used to evaluate functional activity of MXD by assessing rhodamine B efflux with or without an inhibitor (verapamil). Environmental parameters were provided by a French regulatory agency (Water Agency) that monitors river water quality. The results of a principal components analysis describe the seasonal cycle of water characteristics and demonstrate that MXD activity is subjected to significant temporal variations. These data were described with a generalised linear model that enables it to link MXD variability to the seasonal variations of environmental parameters such as temperature or levels of organic contamination. This work proposes a modelling approach and highlights that the occurrence of seasonal variations in MXD response has to be taken into account in the interpretation of in situ monitoring studies. PMID:17210171

  11. Biomarker versus environmental factors: seasonal variations and modelling multixenobiotic defence (MXD) transport activity in transplanted zebra mussels.

    PubMed

    Pain, Sandrine; Devin, Simon; Parant, Marc

    2007-02-01

    The occurrence of biomarker temporal variations linked to environmental factors makes it difficult to distinguish the specific effect of pollution. The present work aims to investigate the seasonal variations of the transport activity of the multixenobiotic defence (MXD), which is used as a biological tool for the monitoring of pollution in aquatic ecosystems. The MXD transport activity was monitored monthly from August 2001 to October 2002 in zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) transplanted to three sites in the Moselle River. The 'efflux method' was used to evaluate functional activity of MXD by assessing rhodamine B efflux with or without an inhibitor (verapamil). Environmental parameters were provided by a French regulatory agency (Water Agency) that monitors river water quality. The results of a principal components analysis describe the seasonal cycle of water characteristics and demonstrate that MXD activity is subjected to significant temporal variations. These data were described with a generalised linear model that enables it to link MXD variability to the seasonal variations of environmental parameters such as temperature or levels of organic contamination. This work proposes a modelling approach and highlights that the occurrence of seasonal variations in MXD response has to be taken into account in the interpretation of in situ monitoring studies.

  12. Capabilities and Impact on Wind Analyses of the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy L.; Amarin, Ruba; Atlas, Robert; Bailey, M. C.; Black, Peter; Buckley, Courtney; James, Mark; Johnson, James; Jones, Linwood; Ruf, Christopher; Simmons, David; Uhlhorn, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is a new airborne microwave remote sensor for hurricane observations that is currently under development by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in partnership with the NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/Hurricane Research Division, the University of Central Florida, the University of Michigan, and the University of Alabama in Huntsville. The instrument is being test flown in January and is expected to participate in or collaborate with the tropical cyclone experiment GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes) in the 2010 season. HIRAD is designed to study the wind field in some detail within strong hurricanes and to enhance the real-time airborne ocean surface winds observation capabilities of NOAA and USAF Weather Squadron hurricane hunter aircraft currently using the operational Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR). Unlike SFMR, which measures wind speed and rain rate along the ground track at a single point directly beneath the aircraft, HIRAD will provide images of the surface wind and rain field over a wide swath (approx.3 x the aircraft altitude) with approx.2 km resolution. See Figure 1, which depicts a simulated HIRAD swath versus the line of data obtained by SFMR.

  13. A Reanalysis of Hurricane Andrew's Intensity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landsea, Christopher W.; Franklin, James L.; McAdie, Colin J.; Beven, John L., II; Gross, James M.; Jarvinen, Brian R.; Pasch, Richard J.; Rappaport, Edward N.; Dunion, Jason P.; Dodge, Peter P.

    2004-11-01

    Hurricane Andrew of 1992 caused unprecedented economic devastation along its path through the Bahamas, southeastern Florida, and Louisiana. Damage in the United States was estimated to be $26 billion (in 1992 dollars), making Andrew one of the most expensive natural disasters in U.S. history. This hurricane struck southeastern Florida with maximum 1-min surface winds estimated in a 1992 poststorm analysis at 125 kt (64 m s-1). This original assessment was primarily based on an adjustment of aircraft reconnaissance flight-level winds to the surface.Based on recent advancements in the understanding of the eyewall wind structure of major hurricanes, the official intensity of Andrew was adjusted upward for five days during its track across the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico by the National Hurricane Center Best Track Change Committee. In particular, Andrew is now assessed by the National Hurricane Center to be a Saffir Simpson Hurricane Scale category-5 hurricane (the highest intensity category possible) at its landfall in southeastern Florida, with maximum 1-min winds of 145 kt (75 m s-1). This makes Andrew only the third category-5 hurricane to strike the United States since at least 1900. Implications for how this change impacts society's planning for such extreme events are discussed.

  14. The Greatest Storm on Earth: Hurricane.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC), Rockville, MD.

    This publication, produced by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is an illustrated non-technical description of the meteorology of hurricanes and their effects on the land areas they hit. As an information source for students and teachers alike, this publication also describes the damage done in the past by hurricanes, the…

  15. Hurricane Emilia Chases Tropical Storm Daniel

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of satellite observations from July 8 (6:00 p.m. EDT) to July 11 (1:30 p.m. EDT), 2012, shows Hurricane Daniel as it loses its hurricane eye and become a tropical storm as it heads tow...

  16. Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Hurricane Tracking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Maria L.; Schoen, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    Mathematics teachers can tap into students' curiosity about hurricanes to develop their understanding of mathematical ideas within a real-life context. This article discusses hurricane-based mathematics tasks involving cooperative learning that were found to help students enhance their understanding of patterns, graphs, and rates of change. For…

  17. Gulf Coast Hurricanes Situation Report #39

    SciTech Connect

    2005-11-09

    There are 49,300 customers without power in Florida as of 7:00 AM EST 11/9 due to Hurricane Wilma, down from a peak of about 3.6 million customers. Currently, less than 1 percent of the customers are without power in the state. This is the last report we will due on outages due to Hurricane Wilma.

  18. Hurricane Katrina. The disaster after the disaster.

    PubMed

    Colias, Mike

    2005-10-01

    More than a decade after Hurricane Andrew devastated much of South Florida and a year after a series of killer storms battered the state, hospitals there offer stark lessons--as well as inspiration and hope--for their counterparts reeling from Hurricane Katrina.

  19. Schooling the Forgotten Kids of Hurricane Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Glenn

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about students being taking in public schools in Houston and Dallas, as well as other states, after evacuating from New Orleans which was struck by Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita. For students displaced by the storm, mobility is as constant as stability is elusive. Already traumatized and faced with the loss…

  20. Seasonal activity of nymphal Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) in different habitats in New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Lord, C C

    1995-01-01

    Activity patterns of nymphal Ixodes scapularis Say were compared between habitat types (dominant tree types: mixed deciduous, oak, white pine, red cedar, sassafras, and spicebush). Both the time of peak abundance and the relative abundance of questing nymphs at the peak were compared. Several smoothing algorithms were tested with the data to determine if they could be used to estimate the time of peak abundance more accurately. Determination of the time of peak abundance using the raw data or simple moving averages was susceptible to outliers. Weighted averages were less susceptible to outliers. The seasonal pattern of nymphal abundance was similar in all habitat types. Variation in the time of peak abundance between habitats was low. Peak densities were lower in deciduous habitats (0.24 +/- 0.05 nymphs per square meter) than in nondeciduous habitats (0.85 +/- 0.15 nymphs per square meter); this could have resulted from higher host use of the nondeciduous areas. These data suggest that there are differences in the population dynamics of nymphs found in different habitats.

  1. Seasonal variations of the activity of antioxidant defense enzymes in the red mullet (Mullus barbatus l.) from the Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Pavlović, Sladjan Z; Borković Mitić, Slavica S; Radovanović, Tijana B; Perendija, Branka R; Despotović, Svetlana G; Gavrić, Jelena P; Saicić, Zorica S

    2010-02-26

    This study investigated seasonal variations of antioxidant defense enzyme activities: total, manganese, copper zinc containing superoxide dismutase (Tot SOD, Mn SOD, CuZn SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione reductase (GR) and biotransformation phase II enzyme glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity in the liver and white muscle of red mullet (Mullus barbatus). The investigations were performed in winter and spring at two localities: Near Bar (NB) and Estuary of the River Bojana (EB) in the Southern Adriatic Sea. At both sites, Mn SOD, GSH-Px, GR and GST activities decreased in the liver in spring. In the white muscle, activities of Mn SOD, GSH-Px, GR and GST in NB decreased in spring. GR decreased in spring in EB, while CAT activity was higher in spring at both sites. The results of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) based on correlations indicated a clear separation of various sampling periods for both investigated tissues and a marked difference between two seasons. Our study is the first report on antioxidant defense enzyme activities in the red mullet in the Southern Adriatic Sea. It indicates that seasonal variations of antioxidant defense enzyme activities should be used in further biomonitoring studies in fish species.

  2. [GLUCOSE CONTENT FLUCTUATION IN BLOOD OF NEWBORN RATS DEPENDING ON SEASON AND PATTERN OF SPONTANEOUS MOTOR ACTIVITY].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, N N; Selina, E N

    2015-01-01

    Earlier we have shown that in newborn rats the glucose level in blood serum changes depending on the pattern of spontaneous periodic motor activity (SPMA). During rest periods, both under dominant decasecond rhythm and under dominant minute rhythm, the glucose level in blood serum is higher than during activity periods. We have also shown that the glucose level in the blood serum rises with age reaching the level of adult animals by day 10. In the present study carried out on 3-10-day-old rats under conditions of free behavior the blood glucose content was investigated in different periods of <activity-rest> cycle during different seasons. It is found that in newborn rats of all ages studied (3-, 5-, 7-, and 10-day-old ones) the lowest glucose concentration in the blood is observed in the winter period. In spring its level increases and in summer reaches the maximum different significantly from the winter and spring levels in all age groups except day 5. In autumn the glucose level decreases and approaches the spring values but it is still different from the winter indices. In 5-day-old rats statistically significant differences of glucose levels in different seasons were not observed. The data obtained provide evidence of seasonal fluctuations of the glucose level in blood serum of newborn rats. At the same time during all seasons except spring the dependence of glucose level on the pattern of motor activity persists. In spring these differences are smoothed. Key words: ontogenesis, motor activity, metabolic factors, glucose, seasonal variations. PMID:26856074

  3. Model estimates hurricane wind speed probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumane, Richard J.; Barton, Chris; Collins, Eric; Donnelly, Jeffrey; Eisner, James; Emanuel, Kerry; Ginis, Isaac; Howard, Susan; Landsea, Chris; Liu, Kam-biu; Malmquist, David; McKay, Megan; Michaels, Anthony; Nelson, Norm; O Brien, James; Scott, David; Webb, Thompson, III

    In the United States, intense hurricanes (category 3, 4, and 5 on the Saffir/Simpson scale) with winds greater than 50 m s -1 have caused more damage than any other natural disaster [Pielke and Pielke, 1997]. Accurate estimates of wind speed exceedance probabilities (WSEP) due to intense hurricanes are therefore of great interest to (re)insurers, emergency planners, government officials, and populations in vulnerable coastal areas.The historical record of U.S. hurricane landfall is relatively complete only from about 1900, and most model estimates of WSEP are derived from this record. During the 1899-1998 period, only two category-5 and 16 category-4 hurricanes made landfall in the United States. The historical record therefore provides only a limited sample of the most intense hurricanes.

  4. Genesis of tornadoes associated with hurricanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    The climatological history of hurricane-tornadoes is brought up to date through 1982. Most of the tornadoes either form near the center of the hurricane, from the outer edge of the eyewall outward, or in an area between north and east-southeast of the hurricane center. The blackbody temperatures of the cloud tops which were analyzed for several hurricane-tornadoes that formed in the years 1974, 1975, and 1979, did not furnish strong precursor signals of tornado formation, but followed one of two patterns: either the temperatures were very low, or the tornado formed in areas of strong temperature gradients. Tornadoes with tropical cyclones most frequently occur at 1200-1800 LST, and although most are relatively weak, they can reach the F3 intensity level. Most form in association with the outer rainbands of the hurricane.

  5. Gust Factors Applied to Hurricane Winds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krayer, William R.; Marshall, Richard D.

    1992-05-01

    An important consideration in the design of structures is their response to extreme winds. This is especially true in regions affected by hurricanes. In this research, gust factors derived from hurricane wind-speed records are compared with those derived by Durst and others from open-scale records obtained in well-developed, extratropical storms. Based on records obtained from tour hurricanes and 11 different recording stations, it is concluded that an upward adjustment of the Durst gust factors for the estimation of hurricane gust speeds may be in order. Anomalously high gust factors observed for hurricane winds in inland areas suggest the need for additional study. Also, it is concluded that a reexamination of the statistics of guest factors obtained from extratropical storm data would be useful in clearly identifying the appropriate probability distribution function.

  6. Effect of Changes in Seasonal Rain Regime on Coastal Ecosystem Structure and Aquaculture Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosimo, S.; Melaku Canu, D.; Libralato, S.; Cossarini, G.; Giorgi, F.

    2008-12-01

    A downscaling experiment linked climate forcing produced by a Regional Climate Model for Europe to a 3D high resolution coupled transport biogeochemical model for the Lagoon of Venice, which in turn forced: a) a food web model for evaluation of cascading effects on ecosystem structure and b) a population dynamic bioenergetic filter feeders bivalvae model for evaluation of effects on aquaculture activities. The hierarchy of models was used to compare result for a reference situation (RF, 1961-1990) with results for two future IPCC scenarios (2071-2100), representing market oriented and local sustainability policies (scenarios A2 and B2, respectively). Future climate projections suggest that, locally, annual mean rain will not change much but the seasonal patterns will likely do so. Summer and spring will be more dry and winter and autumn more rainy. This will potentially increase winter nutrient concentrations but -because of unfavourable timing - primary and secondary productions will decrease, and nutrient surplus will be exported from the Lagoon of Venice to the Adriatic Sea. The impacts on higher trophic levels could be softened thanks to presence of alternative energy pathways and role of omnivory. However, in our future scenario of the lagoon food web the suitability for higher trophic level organisms seems lower. A more detailed analysis on clam aquaculture indicates that this activity will suffer the decrease of primary productivity, and point to the need of implementation of proper aquaculture management policies. In the light of adaptive management. These policies cannot be a straightfoward extrapolation of present practises, but need to be defined basing on future conditions.

  7. Are Patterns in Paleo-Hurricane Landfalls Significant? Statistical Comparisons with Modeled Hurricane Climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, J. D.; Donnelly, J. P.; Emanuel, K.

    2007-12-01

    Coastal overwash deposits preserved within backbarrier sediments extend the documented record of tropical cyclone strikes back several millennia, providing valuable new data that help to elucidate links between tropical cyclone activity and climate variability. Certain caveats should be considered, however, when assessing trends observed within these paleo-storm records. For instance, gaps in overwash activity at a particular site could simply be artifacts produced by the random nature of these episodic events. Recently, a 5000 year record of intense hurricane strikes has been developed using coarse-grained overwash deposits from Laguna Playa Grande (LPG), a coastal lagoon located on the island of Vieques, Puerto Rico. The LPG record exhibits periods of frequent and infrequent hurricane-induced overwash activity spanning many centuries. These trends are consistent with overwash reconstructions from western Long Island, NY, and have been linked in part to variability in the El Niño/Southern Oscillation and the West African monsoon. Here we assess the statistical significance for active and inactive periods at LPG by creating thousands of synthetic overwash records for the site using storm tracks generated by a coupled ocean-atmosphere hurricane model set to mimic modern climatology. Results show that periods of infrequent overwash activity at the LPG site between 3600 and 1500 yrs BP and 1000 and 250 yrs BP are extremely unlikely to occur under modern climate conditions (above 99 percent confidence). This suggests that the variability observed in the Vieques record is consistent with changing climatic boundary conditions. Overwash frequency is greatest over the last 300 years, with 2 to 3 deposits/century compared to 0.6 deposits/century for earlier active regimes from 2500 to 1000 yrs BP and 5000 to 3600 yrs BP. While this may reflect an unprecedented level of activity over the last 5000 years, it may also in part be due to an undercounting of events in older

  8. Do seasonal patterns of rat snake (Pantherophis obsoletus) and black racer (Coluber constrictor) activity predict avian nest predation?

    PubMed

    DeGregorio, Brett A; Weatherhead, Patrick J; Ward, Michael P; Sperry, Jinelle H

    2016-04-01

    Avian nest success often varies seasonally and because predation is the primary cause of nest failure, seasonal variation in predator activity has been hypothesized to explain seasonal variation in nest success. Despite the fact that nest predator communities are often diverse, recent evidence from studies of snakes that are nest predators has lent some support to the link between snake activity and nest predation. However, the strength of the relationship has varied among studies. Explaining this variation is difficult, because none of these studies directly identified nest predators, the link between predator activity and nest survival was inferred. To address this knowledge gap, we examined seasonal variation in daily survival rates of 463 bird nests (of 17 bird species) and used cameras to document predator identity at 137 nests. We simultaneously quantified seasonal activity patterns of two local snake species (N = 30 individuals) using manual (2136 snake locations) and automated (89,165 movements detected) radiotelemetry. Rat snakes (Pantherophis obsoletus), the dominant snake predator at the site (~28% of observed nest predations), were most active in late May and early June, a pattern reported elsewhere for this species. When analyzing all monitored nests, we found no link between nest predation and seasonal activity of rat snakes. When analyzing only nests with known predator identities (filmed nests), however, we found that rat snakes were more likely to prey on nests during periods when they were moving the greatest distances. Similarly, analyses of all monitored nests indicated that nest survival was not linked to racer activity patterns, but racer-specific predation (N = 17 nests) of filmed nests was higher when racers were moving the greatest distances. Our results suggest that the activity of predators may be associated with higher predation rates by those predators, but that those effects can be difficult to detect when nest predator communities

  9. Reproductive phenology of the American Bullfrog in subtropical Brazil: photoperiod as a main determinant of seasonal activity.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Camila I; Both, Camila; Kaefer, Igor L; Cechin, Sonia Z

    2016-07-11

    The North American bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus continues to invade ecosystems worldwide, potentially causing population declines and even extinctions. Within its native distribution, bullfrogs show prolonged reproductive seasons and high fertility. However, data on breeding biology of bullfrogs ex-situ in invaded localities mainly comes from anecdotal reports. Understanding how invasive species are adjusting their life histories to new colonized environments is important for conservation purposes. Here we describe temporal and spatial abundance, calling activity, spawning and tadpole distribution of bullfrogs in southern Brazil. Eighteen samplings occurred during one year. The abundance of individuals was positively related to longer photoperiods and higher temperatures. Reproductive activity was also positively associated with longer photoperiods. Calling sites, spawning and tadpoles were associated with microhabitats presenting hydrophytes, which may provide shelter and thermal stability to bullfrogs. The reproductive seasonal activity of bullfrogs can be highly variable across its growing geographical range, but in subtropical Brazil it is associated with photoperiod, a highly predictable abiotic determinant. In our study area, bullfrogs presented a breeding season twice as long as that observed in some native localities. We suggest that management strategies directed to bullfrog populations must consider the habitat structures and seasonal regimes determined by each invaded environment. PMID:27411069

  10. Reproductive phenology of the American Bullfrog in subtropical Brazil: photoperiod as a main determinant of seasonal activity.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Camila I; Both, Camila; Kaefer, Igor L; Cechin, Sonia Z

    2016-07-11

    The North American bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus continues to invade ecosystems worldwide, potentially causing population declines and even extinctions. Within its native distribution, bullfrogs show prolonged reproductive seasons and high fertility. However, data on breeding biology of bullfrogs ex-situ in invaded localities mainly comes from anecdotal reports. Understanding how invasive species are adjusting their life histories to new colonized environments is important for conservation purposes. Here we describe temporal and spatial abundance, calling activity, spawning and tadpole distribution of bullfrogs in southern Brazil. Eighteen samplings occurred during one year. The abundance of individuals was positively related to longer photoperiods and higher temperatures. Reproductive activity was also positively associated with longer photoperiods. Calling sites, spawning and tadpoles were associated with microhabitats presenting hydrophytes, which may provide shelter and thermal stability to bullfrogs. The reproductive seasonal activity of bullfrogs can be highly variable across its growing geographical range, but in subtropical Brazil it is associated with photoperiod, a highly predictable abiotic determinant. In our study area, bullfrogs presented a breeding season twice as long as that observed in some native localities. We suggest that management strategies directed to bullfrog populations must consider the habitat structures and seasonal regimes determined by each invaded environment.

  11. Seasonal Variation in Population Density and Heterotrophic Activity of Attached and Free-Living Bacteria in Coastal Waters

    PubMed Central

    Iriberri, Juan; Unanue, Marian; Barcina, Isabel; Egea, Luis

    1987-01-01

    The abundance and heterotrophic activity of attached and free-living bacteria were examined seasonally in coastal water. Heterotrophic activity was determined by the uptake of [14C]glucose. The density of attached bacteria was always minor, not showing a seasonal variation, whereas the free-living bacteria were more numerous and showed a marked seasonal variation, their density being higher under warmer conditions. The contribution of the attached bacteria to the total assimilation of [14C]glucose (from 10 to 38%) was lower than that of the free-living bacteria, neither of them showing a seasonal variation. On a cellular basis, attached bacteria were more active, since they assimilated more [14C]glucose and showed, under warmer conditions, a higher cellular volume (0.102 versus 0.047 μm3). We consider that the factors responsible for these observations were the amount and quality of the particulate material, the different availability of organic matter for the two types of bacteria, and in a fundamental way, the variation in water temperature. PMID:16347451

  12. Global-scale pattern of peatland Sphagnum growth driven by photosynthetically active radiation and growing season length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loisel, J.; Gallego-Sala, A. V.; Yu, Z.

    2012-02-01

    High-latitude peatlands contain about one third of the world's soil organic carbon, most of which is derived from partly decomposed Sphagnum (peat moss) plants. We conducted a meta-analysis based on a global dataset of Sphagnum growth measurements collected from published literature to investigate the effects of bioclimatic variables on Sphagnum growth. Analysis of variance and general linear models were used to relate Sphagnum magellanicum and S. fuscum growth rates to photosynthetically active radiation integrated over the growing season (PAR0) and a moisture index. We found that PAR0 was the main predictor of Sphagnum growth for the global dataset, and effective moisture was only correlated with moss growth at continental sites. The strong correlation between Sphagnum growth and PAR0 suggests the existence of a global pattern of growth, with slow rates under cool climate and short growing seasons, highlighting the important role of temperature and growing season length in explaining peatland biomass production. Large-scale patterns of cloudiness during the growing season might also limit moss growth. Although considerable uncertainty remains over the carbon balance of peatlands under a changing climate, our results suggest that increasing PAR0 as a result of global warming and lengthening growing seasons could promote Sphagnum growth. Assuming that production and decomposition have the same sensitivity to temperature, this enhanced growth could lead to greater peat-carbon sequestration, inducing a negative feedback to climate change.

  13. Global-scale pattern of peatland Sphagnum growth driven by photosynthetically active radiation and growing season length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loisel, J.; Gallego-Sala, A. V.; Yu, Z.

    2012-07-01

    High-latitude peatlands contain about one third of the world's soil organic carbon, most of which is derived from partly decomposed Sphagnum (peat moss) plants. We conducted a meta-analysis based on a global data set of Sphagnum growth measurements collected from published literature to investigate the effects of bioclimatic variables on Sphagnum growth. Analysis of variance and general linear models were used to relate Sphagnum magellanicum and S. fuscum growth rates to photosynthetically active radiation integrated over the growing season (PAR0) and a moisture index. We found that PAR0 was the main predictor of Sphagnum growth for the global data set, and effective moisture was only correlated with moss growth at continental sites. The strong correlation between Sphagnum growth and PAR0 suggests the existence of a global pattern of growth, with slow rates under cool climate and short growing seasons, highlighting the important role of growing season length in explaining peatland biomass production. Large-scale patterns of cloudiness during the growing season might also limit moss growth. Although considerable uncertainty remains over the carbon balance of peatlands under a changing climate, our results suggest that increasing PAR0 as a result of global warming and lengthening growing seasons, without major change in cloudiness, could promote Sphagnum growth. Assuming that production and decomposition have the same sensitivity to temperature, this enhanced growth could lead to greater peat-carbon sequestration, inducing a negative feedback to climate change.

  14. Performance of convection-permitting hurricane initialization and prediction during 2008-2010 with ensemble data assimilation of inner-core airborne Doppler radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fuqing; Weng, Yonghui; Gamache, John F.; Marks, Frank D.

    2011-08-01

    This study examines a hurricane prediction system that uses an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) to assimilate high-resolution airborne radar observations for convection-permitting hurricane initialization and forecasting. This system demonstrated very promising performance, especially on hurricane intensity forecasts, through experiments over all 61 applicable NOAA P-3 airborne Doppler missions during the 2008-2010 Atlantic hurricane seasons. The mean absolute intensity forecast errors initialized with the EnKF-analysis of the airborne Doppler observations at the 24- to 120-h lead forecast times were 20-40% lower than the National Hurricane Center's official forecasts issued at similar times. This prototype system was first implemented in real-time for Hurricane Ike (2008). It represents the first time that airborne Doppler radar observations were successfully assimilated in real-time into a hurricane prediction model. It also represents the first time that the convection-permitting ensemble analyses and forecasts for hurricanes were performed in real-time. Also unprecedented was the on-demand usage of more than 23,000 computer cluster processors simultaneously in real-time.

  15. Effects of seasonal variations on antioxidant activity of pink guava fruits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Haniza; Abdullah, Aminah

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of seasonal variations during rainy and hot season on antioxidant activity of pink guava fruits in approximately one year duration specifically on November 2012, December 2012, January 2013, March 2013, April 2013, May 2013, July 2013, August 2013 and November 2013. Fruit samples (Sungkai and Semenyih variants) were collected from Sime Darby Beverages plantation located in Sitiawan. The fruits were samples for 9 times from Nov 2012 to Nov 2013 except Feb 2013, Jun 2013, Sept 2013 and Oct 2013. Fruits were peeled, seeded and blended into uniform puree. Samples were then extracted for its antioxidant activity determination using 50% acetone. Antioxidant activity was evaluated using total phenolic compounds (TPC) assay, ferric-reducing antioxidant power assay (FRAP) and 1,1-diphenyl1-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical-scavenging capacity (DPPH). Analysis was conducted using 96-well microplate spectrophotometer UV. The highest TPC result was Semenyih var recorded 2192.80 mg GAE/100g FW whilst Sungkai var 1595.98 mg GAE/100g FW both on July 2013 with rainfall was at the least (45mm) and the lowest for Sungkai var was 792.75 mg GAE/100g FW and 1032.41 mg GAE/100g FW for Semenyih var, both on Nov 2012 with 185mm rainfall. There were significant negative correlation between TPC and rainfall (mm) for both Semenyih var (r = - 0.699, p<0.005, r2 = 0.489) and Sungkai var (r = -0.72, p<0.05, r2 = 0.531). The highest FRAP result (mg TE/100g FW) was 1677.74 for Semenyih var (Aug 2013, rainfall = 160.5mm) and the highest FRAP for Sungkai var was 1104.60 (Jul 2013, rainfall = 45.0mm) whereas the lowest for Semenyih and Sungkai var was 1090.22 (Mar 2013, rainfall = 97.5mm) and 767.88 (Nov 2012, rainfall = 185.50) respectively. There was weak negative correlation between FRAP and rainfall(mm) for both Sungkai var (r = - 0.324, p<0.05, r2 = 0.105) and Semenyih var (r = - 0.362, p<0.05, r2 = 0.132). The highest DPPH for Semenyih var was 88.40% (Aug

  16. 48 CFR 1852.236-73 - Hurricane plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hurricane plan. 1852.236... 1852.236-73 Hurricane plan. As prescribed in 1836.570(c), insert the following clause: Hurricane Plan (DEC 1988) In the event of a hurricane warning, the Contractor shall— (a) Inspect the area and...

  17. 48 CFR 1852.236-73 - Hurricane plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hurricane plan. 1852.236... 1852.236-73 Hurricane plan. As prescribed in 1836.570(c), insert the following clause: Hurricane Plan (DEC 1988) In the event of a hurricane warning, the Contractor shall— (a) Inspect the area and...

  18. 48 CFR 1852.236-73 - Hurricane plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hurricane plan. 1852.236... 1852.236-73 Hurricane plan. As prescribed in 1836.570(c), insert the following clause: Hurricane Plan (DEC 1988) In the event of a hurricane warning, the Contractor shall— (a) Inspect the area and...

  19. 48 CFR 1852.236-73 - Hurricane plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Hurricane plan. 1852.236-73... Hurricane plan. As prescribed in 1836.570(c), insert the following clause: Hurricane Plan (DEC 1988) In the event of a hurricane warning, the Contractor shall— (a) Inspect the area and place all...

  20. 48 CFR 1852.236-73 - Hurricane plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hurricane plan. 1852.236... 1852.236-73 Hurricane plan. As prescribed in 1836.570(c), insert the following clause: Hurricane Plan (DEC 1988) In the event of a hurricane warning, the Contractor shall— (a) Inspect the area and...

  1. Land Area Changes in Coastal Louisiana After the 2005 Hurricanes: A Series of Three Maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barras, John A.

    2006-01-01

    This report includes three posters with analyses of net land area changes in coastal Louisiana after the 2005 hurricanes (Katrina and Rita). The first poster presents a basic analysis of net changes from 2004 to 2005; the second presents net changes within marsh communities from 2004 to 2005; and the third presents net changes from 2004 to 2005 within the historical perspective of change in coastal Louisiana from 1956 to 2004. The purpose of this analysis was to provide preliminary information on land area changes shortly after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita and to serve as a regional baseline for monitoring wetland recovery following the 2005 hurricane season. Estimation of permanent losses cannot be made until several growing seasons have passed and the transitory impacts of the hurricanes are minimized, but this preliminary analysis indicates an approximate 217-mi2 (562.03-km2) decrease in land/increase in water across coastal Louisiana. These posters are presented in high-resolution PDF format that is not Section 508 compliant. For ease in accessibility, viewing, and printing, each poster is accompanied by PDF files that contain the corresponding methodology, tables, and figures. Funding for this project was provided by the Louisiana Coastal Area (LCA) Science & Technology Office.

  2. Respiratory gas transport, metabolic status, and locomotor capacity of the Christmas Island red crab Gecarcoidea natalis assessed in the field with respect to dichotomous seasonal activity levels.

    PubMed

    Adamczewska, A M; Morris, S

    2000-05-01

    Red crabs, Gecarcoidea natalis, exhibit seasonal activity patterns: low activity during the dry season when they shelter in burrows to avoid dehydration, and high activity during the wet season. Red crabs were examined in situ in the rainforest of Christmas Island to determine if there were underlying seasonal differences in the capacity for exercise and associated metabolism. During both seasons, free-ranging (FR) crabs engaged in their normal activities and, together with crabs induced to exercise for 5 min, were sampled for haemolymph and muscle tissue. Respiratory gases in the haemolymph and key metabolites were measured to assess differences in metabolic status of FR and exercised crabs. Actively foraging FR crabs during the wet season exhibited a relative haemolymph hypoxia (2.9 kPa) and accumulated an extra 3 mmol. litre(-1) of CO(2) compared to the relatively inactive FR crabs during the dry season. Wet-season crabs appeared to be in a state of relative respiratory acidosis compared to dry-season animals. This hypercapnia may arise as a consequence of a relative hypoventilation in animals with a relatively higher metabolic rate during the wet season. Oxygenation of pulmonary and arterial haemolymph was similar and remained high after 5 min of exercise, indicating that the gills and lungs functioned similarly in gas exchange in both FR and exercised crabs. During exercise, venous O(2) reserves decreased and red crabs experienced a mixed respiratory/metabolic acidosis. Similar changes, after 5 min of enforced exercise, in metabolite concentrations, pH and respiratory gas status in the haemolymph during both sampling seasons suggest that the crabs maintain similar capacity to increase exercise during the wet and the dry seasons, despite the differences in underlying physiological status. This is important since after prolonged inactivity during the dry season, with the arrival of moonsoonal rains, red crabs must engage in their annual breeding migration.

  3. Triggering of the 2010 Haiti earthquake by hurricanes and possibly deforestation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wdowinski, S.; Tsukanov, I.; Hong, S.; Amelung, F.

    2010-12-01

    The January 12th, 2010, M = 7.0 Haiti earthquake was one of the worst natural disasters of the past century. This devastating earthquake caused the death of more than 200,000 people, the injury of about 300,000 people, and left about two million people homeless. Just a year and a half prior to the earthquake, Haiti was subjected to another severe disaster, flooding induced by two hurricanes and two tropical storms (Fay, Gustav, Hanna and Ike). Both natural disasters results in death and destruction, but because their origins are very different, they are generally considered to be unrelated phenomena. We suggest a physical link between these two destructive events, in which the 2010 Haiti earthquake was triggered by rapid erosion induced by hurricane activity. The suggested denudation triggering mechanism is consistent with seismic and geodetic analysis on the earthquake rupture, indicating an initial oblique motion on a southward dipping fault followed by intense reverse faulting on a northward dipping fault (Hayes et al., 2010). Our triggering analysis is based on interdisciplinary research using satellite imagery, bathymetric charts, detailed DEM, and 3-D mesh-free finite element modeling. Remote sensing analysis of the nearby Leogane Delta’s growth over the past 35 years indicates a rapid delta build up due to a mean erosion rate of 6 mm/yr. Theoretical calculations based on finite element modeling and Coulomb failure stress criterion suggest that denudation-induced stress changes at the hypocenter reached the earthquake’s triggering threshold (3 kPa) after 60-80 years at the present day erosion rate. Our results also suggest that the rapid sediment deposition in the delta kept clamping the northward dipping fault allowing a continuous stress build up on the fault, which explains the large amount of seismic energy released by this fault during the earthquake. Haiti’s massive deforestation most likely contributed to the rapid erosion in the past several

  4. Seasonal variations in the activity budget of Japanese macaques in the coniferous forest of Yakushima: effects of food and temperature.

    PubMed

    Hanya, Goro

    2004-07-01

    Seasonal variations in the activity budget of Japanese macaques in the coniferous forest of Yakushima were studied over the course of 1 year. On an annual basis, they spent 38% of the daytime feeding, 16% traveling, 14% in social interactions, and 32% engaged in resting. The effects of temperature and food-related factors (i.e., food distribution, feeding speed, and food abundance) on the seasonal variations of activity budget were examined by stepwise multiple regression analysis. When the temperature was low, the macaques decreased traveling and feeding time, in accordance with the prediction that endothermal animals save energy under severe thermoregulatory cost. When the feeding speed of available foods was slow, they spent more time feeding. When high-quality foods were abundant, they decreased feeding time. These macaques did not respond to fluctuations in food distribution. The present results indicate the importance of temperature, in addition to food-related factors, as a determinant of activity budgets.

  5. Seasonal variations in the activity budget of Japanese macaques in the coniferous forest of Yakushima: effects of food and temperature.

    PubMed

    Hanya, Goro

    2004-07-01

    Seasonal variations in the activity budget of Japanese macaques in the coniferous forest of Yakushima were studied over the course of 1 year. On an annual basis, they spent 38% of the daytime feeding, 16% traveling, 14% in social interactions, and 32% engaged in resting. The effects of temperature and food-related factors (i.e., food distribution, feeding speed, and food abundance) on the seasonal variations of activity budget were examined by stepwise multiple regression analysis. When the temperature was low, the macaques decreased traveling and feeding time, in accordance with the prediction that endothermal animals save energy under severe thermoregulatory cost. When the feeding speed of available foods was slow, they spent more time feeding. When high-quality foods were abundant, they decreased feeding time. These macaques did not respond to fluctuations in food distribution. The present results indicate the importance of temperature, in addition to food-related factors, as a determinant of activity budgets. PMID:15258960

  6. Seasonal activity patterns of Ixodes pacificus nymphs in relation to climatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Eisen, L; Eisen, R J; Lane, R S

    2002-09-01

    In western North America, the tick Ixodes pacificus Cooley & Kohls (Acari: Ixodidae) is the primary vector to humans and domestic animals of the disease agents causing Lyme disease and granulocytic ehrlichiosis. We examined the seasonal activity patterns of I. pacificus nymphs over a 4-year period, including the wet and cold El Niño winter/spring of 1998, in a dry oak/madrone woodland, and for one year in a cooler and moister redwood/tanoak woodland in Mendocino County, California. Linear regressions were used to estimate when nymphal densities first exceeded and then fell below 25, 50 and 75% of the recorded yearly peak densities. In oak/madrone woodland, nymphs typically were active by mid-March, reached 50% of their yearly peak densities in early to mid-April, peaked by early May, fell below 50% of their peak densities by early to mid-June, and were absent by late July to mid-August. The lengths of the periods with nymphal densities exceeding 50 and 75% of the recorded yearly peaks in oak/madrone woodland were associated positively with rainfall and negatively with maximum air temperatures during April-May. Moreover, nymphal numbers typically reached 50% of their peak 10-15 days later, remained at levels above 50% of the peak 1.3-1.5 times longer, and started declining 4-6 weeks later under cooler, moister climatic conditions (oak/madrone woodland in 1998 and redwood/tanoak woodland in 2000) relative to warmer, drier conditions (oak/madrone woodland in 2000-2001). In oak/madrone woodland, nymphal densities typically started to decline when mean maximum daily air temperatures exceeded 23 degrees C. Nymphal densities were higher in dry oak/madrone relative to moist redwood/tanoak woodland from mid-March to late May 2000, similar in both habitat types in early June, but higher in redwood/tanoak woodland from late June onwards. We conclude that large-scale studies of the density of I. pacificus nymphs in California need to consider spatial variation in the length

  7. Hurricane Sandy science plan: coastal topographic and bathymetric data to support hurricane impact assessment and response

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stronko, Jakob M.

    2013-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy devastated some of the most heavily populated eastern coastal areas of the Nation. With a storm surge peaking at more than 19 feet, the powerful landscape-altering destruction of Hurricane Sandy is a stark reminder of why the Nation must become more resilient to coastal hazards. In response to this natural disaster, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) received a total of $41.2 million in supplemental appropriations from the Department of the Interior (DOI) to support response, recovery, and rebuilding efforts. These funds support a science plan that will provide critical scientific information necessary to inform management decisions for recovery of coastal communities, and aid in preparation for future natural hazards. This science plan is designed to coordinate continuing USGS activities with stakeholders and other agencies to improve data collection and analysis that will guide recovery and restoration efforts. The science plan is split into five distinct themes: • Coastal topography and bathymetry • Impacts to coastal beaches and barriers • Impacts of storm surge, including disturbed estuarine and bay hydrology • Impacts on environmental quality and persisting contaminant exposures • Impacts to coastal ecosystems, habitats, and fish and wildlife This fact sheet focuses on coastal topography and bathymetry. This fact sheet focuses on coastal topography and bathymetry.

  8. Hurricane Katrina and perinatal health.

    PubMed

    Harville, Emily W; Xiong, Xu; Buekens, Pierre

    2009-12-01

    We review the literature on the effects of Hurricane Katrina on perinatal health, and providing data from our own research on pregnant and postpartum women. After Katrina, obstetric, prenatal, and neonatal care was compromised in the short term, but increases in adverse birth outcomes such as preterm birth, low birthweight, and maternal complications were mostly limited to highly exposed women. Both pregnant and postpartum women had rates of post-traumatic stress disorder similar to, or lower than, others exposed to Katrina, and rates of depression similar to other pregnant and postpartum populations. Health behaviors, such as smoking and breastfeeding, may have been somewhat negatively affected by the disaster, whereas effects on nutrition were likely associated with limited time, money, and food choices, and indicated by both weight gain and loss. We conclude that, with a few specific exceptions, postdisaster concerns and health outcomes for pregnant and postpartum women were similar to those of other people exposed to Hurricane Katrina. In such situations, disaster planners and researchers should focus on providing care and support for the normal concerns of the peripartum period, such as breastfeeding, depression, and smoking cessation. Contraception needs to be available for those who do not want to become pregnant. Although additional physical and mental health care needs to be provided for the most severely exposed women and their babies, many women are capable of surviving and thriving in postdisaster environments.

  9. Analysis of the influence of solar activity and atmospheric factors on 7Be air concentration by seasonal-trend decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bas, M. C.; Ortiz, J.; Ballesteros, L.; Martorell, S.

    2016-11-01

    7Be air concentrations were measured at the Universitat Politècnica de Valencia campus (in the east of Spain) during the period 2007-2014. The mean values of monthly 7Be concentrations ranged from 2.65 to 8.11 mBq/m3, showing significant intra and interannual variability. A seasonal-trend decomposition methodology was applied to identify the trend-cycle, seasonal and irregular components of the 7Be time series. The decomposition model makes it possible to estimate the influence of solar activity and atmospheric factors on the independent components, in order to find the different sources of 7Be variability. The results show that solar activity is a factor with a high inverse influence on the trend-cycle pattern of 7Be variability. Solar radiation, temperature and relative humidity are positive influential factors on the seasonal 7Be variation with a regular pattern over the years. Finally, the irregular component presents a significant negative correlation with precipitation and wind speed parameters, which have an irregular behavior over the years and seasons.

  10. Photometry of Pluto 2008–2014: Evidence of Ongoing Seasonal Volatile Transport and Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buratti, B. J.; Hicks, M. D.; Dalba, P. A.; Chu, Devin; O’Neill, Ariel; Hillier, J. K.; Masiero, J.; Banholzer, Sophianna; Rhoades, H.

    2015-05-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft will encounter Pluto in 2015 July. As this fast flyby will yield a picture of Pluto frozen in time, ground-based observations are key to understanding this dwarf ice planet, especially with regard to the seasonal transport of surface volatiles. This paper reports on changes in Pluto's rotational light curve as evidence for this transport. Historical observations are consistent with a stable frost pattern, but since 2002, changes began to appear in both light curves and Hubble Space Telescope maps. Our BVR observations at Table Mountain Observatory from 2008 to 2014 show evidence for sustained and continued albedo and color changes on Pluto. The B and V albedos are stable, but Pluto is becoming redder in color, particularly on its low-albedo side. This view is consistent with the transport of a bright volatile (nitrogen) with the uncovering of a substrate of red material such as photolyzed methane. As Buie et al. reported a B – V of 0.96 in 2002–2003, and our B – V was higher in 2008–2012, Pluto may have experienced a transient reddening in the 1999–2012 period. We also discovered an opposition supersurge in all three colors at very small solar phase angles (∼0.°10). Explosive geysers have been observed on Triton and Mars, the two other celestial bodies with receding polar caps. Because the physical conditions existing on Pluto are similar to those on Triton, we predict that plume deposits and possibly active plumes will be found on its surface.

  11. Seasonal activity and tick-borne pathogen infection rates of Ixodes ricinus ticks in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Egyed, László; Elő, Péter; Sréter-Lancz, Zsuzsanna; Széll, Zoltán; Balogh, Zsuzsanna; Sréter, Tamás

    2012-04-01

    Ixodes ricinus is the most important tick species in Europe as it is most widely distributed and transmits the majority of tick-borne zoonotic pathogens. As limited data are available for Hungary, the aim of the present study was to investigate the seasonal timing of questing by I. ricinus and the infection rate of this tick species with all major tick-borne zoonotic pathogens. Monthly collections of I. ricinus were carried out over 3 consecutive years by dragging a blanket in 6 biotopes representing different areas of Hungary. Altogether, 1800 nymphs (300 per collection point) were screened as pooled samples (each of 5 specimens) by PCR-based methods for tick-borne pathogens. I. ricinus larvae, nymphs, and adults had bimodal activity patterns with a major peak in the spring. As newly moulted ticks of all stages are thought to emerge in the autumn of each year, it appears that most newly emerged ticks delayed their questing until the following spring. The minimum prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato was 2.5%. Borr. afzelii, Borr. burgdorferi sensu stricto, Borr. garinii, Borr. lusitaniae, and Borr. valaisiana were identified by hybridization. The minimum infection rate with spotted fever group rickettsiae was 1.9%. Rickettsia helvetica was identified in all biotopes. The minimum prevalence of Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Babesia divergens and Bab. microti was low (0.3-0.5%). Bartonella spp.-, Francisella tularensis-, and TBE virus-specific amplification products were not detected. Relative to the results of comparable studies carried out in the Carpathian Basin, the prevalence of tick-borne pathogens was low in Hungary. This might be attributed to the climatic difference between the lowland areas of Hungary and submountain areas of the surrounding countries involved in the studies.

  12. Photometry of Pluto 2008-2014: Evidence of Ongoing Seasonal Volatile Transport and Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buratti, B. J.; Hicks, M. D.; Dalba, P. A.; Chu, Devin; O'Neill, Ariel; Hillier, J. K.; Masiero, J.; Banholzer, Sophianna; Rhoades, H.

    2015-05-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft will encounter Pluto in 2015 July. As this fast flyby will yield a picture of Pluto frozen in time, ground-based observations are key to understanding this dwarf ice planet, especially with regard to the seasonal transport of surface volatiles. This paper reports on changes in Pluto's rotational light curve as evidence for this transport. Historical observations are consistent with a stable frost pattern, but since 2002, changes began to appear in both light curves and Hubble Space Telescope maps. Our BVR observations at Table Mountain Observatory from 2008 to 2014 show evidence for sustained and continued albedo and color changes on Pluto. The B and V albedos are stable, but Pluto is becoming redder in color, particularly on its low-albedo side. This view is consistent with the transport of a bright volatile (nitrogen) with the uncovering of a substrate of red material such as photolyzed methane. As Buie et al. reported a B - V of 0.96 in 2002-2003, and our B - V was higher in 2008-2012, Pluto may have experienced a transient reddening in the 1999-2012 period. We also discovered an opposition supersurge in all three colors at very small solar phase angles (˜0.°10). Explosive geysers have been observed on Triton and Mars, the two other celestial bodies with receding polar caps. Because the physical conditions existing on Pluto are similar to those on Triton, we predict that plume deposits and possibly active plumes will be found on its surface.

  13. 78 FR 31614 - Implementation of Regulatory Guide 1.221 on Design-Basis Hurricane and Hurricane Missiles

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... 2007 (ML070630003). On October 22, 2012 (77 FR 64564), the staff issued the proposed DC/COL-ISG-024... COMMISSION Implementation of Regulatory Guide 1.221 on Design-Basis Hurricane and Hurricane Missiles AGENCY....221, ``Design-Basis Hurricane and Hurricane Missiles for Nuclear Power Plants,'' in support of...

  14. An Examination of Hurricane Emergency Preparedness Planning at Institutions of Higher Learning of the Gulf South Region Post Hurricane Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ventura, Caterina Gulli

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine hurricane emergency preparedness planning at institutions of higher learning of the Gulf South region following Hurricane Katrina. The problem addressed the impact of Hurricane Katrina on decision-making and policy planning processes. The focus was on individuals that administer the hurricane emergency…

  15. New data and capabilities in the NASA Goddard Hurricane Data Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Leptoukh, G.; Ostrenga, D.; Savtchenko, C.; Kempler, S.

    2007-12-01

    .ecs.nasa.gov/OPS/mirador/) is another in-house developed tool that offers a simplified interface for searching, browsing, and ordering Earth science data at NASA GES DICS. Users can do event based (e.g., entering a hurricane name) search and order data. · Hurricane viewer: provides users with a view of the hurricane track that overlays TRMM 3-hourly precipitation data. The interface provides users with the storm track, wind speeds, pressure, intensity and view of the data of the lifespan of the storm in an animated series. The Hurricane Viewer will be enhanced to allow users to select from multiple data parameters to view in the background of the track. · There are a number of other resources for hurricane related activities at the DISC, such as, viewing and exploring NASA 2-D and 3-D data (TRMM, CloudSat, AIRS, etc.) via Google Earth. Details and examples will be presented.

  16. Life of a Six-Hour Hurricane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, Kay L.; Molinari, John

    2009-01-01

    Hurricane Claudette developed from a weak vortex in 6 h as deep convection shifted from downshear into the vortex center, despite ambient vertical wind shear exceeding 10 m/s. Six hours later it weakened to a tropical storm, and 12 h after the hurricane stage a circulation center could not be found at 850 hPa by aircraft reconnaissance. At hurricane strength the vortex contained classic structure seen in intensifying hurricanes, with the exception of 7-12 C dewpoint depressions in the lower troposphere upshear of the center. These extended from the 100-km radius to immediately adjacent to the eyewall, where equivalent potential temperature gradients reached 6 K/km. The dry air was not present prior to intensification, suggesting that it was associated with vertical shear-induced subsidence upshear of the developing storm. It is argued that weakening of the vortex was driven by cooling associated with the mixing of dry air into the core, and subsequent evaporation and cold downdrafts. Evidence suggests that this mixing might have been enhanced by eyewall instabilities after the period of rapid deepening. The existence of a fragile, small, but genuinely hurricane-strength vortex at the surface for 6 h presents difficult problems for forecasters. Such a "temporary hurricane" in strongly sheared flow might require a different warning protocol than longer-lasting hurricane vortices in weaker shear.

  17. Maternal hurricane exposure and fetal distress risk.

    PubMed

    Zahran, Sammy; Snodgrass, Jeffrey G; Peek, Lori; Weiler, Stephan

    2010-10-01

    Logistic regression and spatial analytic techniques are used to model fetal distress risk as a function of maternal exposure to Hurricane Andrew. First, monthly time series compare the proportion of infants born distressed in hurricane affected and unaffected areas. Second, resident births are analyzed in Miami-Dade and Broward counties, before, during, and after Hurricane Andrew. Third, resident births are analyzed in all Florida locales with 100,000 or more persons, comparing exposed and unexposed gravid females. Fourth, resident births are analyzed along Hurricane Andrew's path from southern Florida to northeast Mississippi. Results show that fetal distress risk increases significantly with maternal exposure to Hurricane Andrew in second and third trimesters, adjusting for known risk factors. Distress risk also correlates with the destructive path of Hurricane Andrew, with higher incidences of fetal distress found in areas of highest exposure intensity. Hurricane exposed African-American mothers were more likely to birth distressed infants. The policy implications of in utero costs of natural disaster exposure are discussed.

  18. LGP2 Downregulates Interferon Production during Infection with Seasonal Human Influenza A Viruses That Activate Interferon Regulatory Factor 3

    PubMed Central

    Malur, Meghana; Gale, Michael

    2012-01-01

    LGP2, a member of the RIG-I-like receptor family, lacks the amino-terminal caspase activation recruitment domains (CARDs) required for initiating the activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and interferon (IFN) transcription. The role of LGP2 in virus infection is controversial, and the only LGP2 experiments previously carried out with mammalian influenza A viruses employed an attenuated, mouse-adapted H1N1 A/PR/8/34 (PR8) virus that does not encode the NS1 protein. Here we determine whether LGP2 has a role during infection with wild-type, nonattenuated influenza A viruses that have circulated in the human population, specifically two types of seasonal influenza A viruses: (i) H3N2 and H1N1 viruses that activate IRF3 and IFN transcription and (ii) recent H1N1 viruses that block these two activations. In human cells infected with an H3N2 virus that activates IRF3, overexpression of LGP2 or its repressor domain decreased STAT1 activation and IFN-β transcription approximately 10-fold. Overexpression of LGP2 also caused a 10-fold decrease of STAT1 activation during infection with other seasonal influenza A viruses that activate IRF3. Using LGP2+/+ and LGP2−/− mouse cells, we show that endogenous LGP2 decreased IFN production during H3N2 virus infection 3- to 4-fold. In contrast, in both mouse and human cells infected with H1N1 viruses that do not activate IRF3, LGP2 had no detectable role. These results demonstrate that LGP2 downregulates IFN production during infection by seasonal influenza A viruses that activate IRF3 and IFN transcription. It is intriguing that LGP2, a host protein induced during influenza A virus infection, downregulates the host antiviral IFN response. PMID:22837208

  19. LGP2 downregulates interferon production during infection with seasonal human influenza A viruses that activate interferon regulatory factor 3.

    PubMed

    Malur, Meghana; Gale, Michael; Krug, Robert M

    2012-10-01

    LGP2, a member of the RIG-I-like receptor family, lacks the amino-terminal caspase activation recruitment domains (CARDs) required for initiating the activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and interferon (IFN) transcription. The role of LGP2 in virus infection is controversial, and the only LGP2 experiments previously carried out with mammalian influenza A viruses employed an attenuated, mouse-adapted H1N1 A/PR/8/34 (PR8) virus that does not encode the NS1 protein. Here we determine whether LGP2 has a role during infection with wild-type, nonattenuated influenza A viruses that have circulated in the human population, specifically two types of seasonal influenza A viruses: (i) H3N2 and H1N1 viruses that activate IRF3 and IFN transcription and (ii) recent H1N1 viruses that block these two activations. In human cells infected with an H3N2 virus that activates IRF3, overexpression of LGP2 or its repressor domain decreased STAT1 activation and IFN-β transcription approximately 10-fold. Overexpression of LGP2 also caused a 10-fold decrease of STAT1 activation during infection with other seasonal influenza A viruses that activate IRF3. Using LGP2(+/+) and LGP2(-/-) mouse cells, we show that endogenous LGP2 decreased IFN production during H3N2 virus infection 3- to 4-fold. In contrast, in both mouse and human cells infected with H1N1 viruses that do not activate IRF3, LGP2 had no detectable role. These results demonstrate that LGP2 downregulates IFN production during infection by seasonal influenza A viruses that activate IRF3 and IFN transcription. It is intriguing that LGP2, a host protein induced during influenza A virus infection, downregulates the host antiviral IFN response.

  20. Suggested hurricane operational scenario for GOES I-M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzel, W. P.; Merrill, R. T.; Shenk, W. E.

    1987-01-01

    Improvements in tropical cyclone forecasts require optimum use of remote sensing capabilities, because conventional data sources cannot provide the necessary spatial and temporal data density over tropical and subtropical oceanic regions. In 1989, the first of a series of geostationary weather satellites, GOES 1-M, will be launched with the capability for simultaneous imaging and sounding. Careful scheduling of the GOES 1-M will enable measurements of both the wind and mass fields over the entire tropical cyclone activity area. The document briefly describes the GOES 1-M imager and sounder, surveys the data needs for hurricane forecasting, discusses how geostationary satellite observations help to meet them, and proposes a GOES 1-M schedule of observations and hurricane relevant derived products.

  1. Effect of previous experience of a hurricane on preparedness for future hurricanes.

    PubMed

    Rincon, E; Linares, M Y; Greenberg, B

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the hypothesis that having experienced a major hurricane will promote better preparedness for future ones. A survey was conducted in November 1999 at Miami children's Hospital. No statistical differences were found between the population that was present in Dade County during hurricane Andrew and the one that was not; in regard of the possession of a generator at home, the obtaining of material to secure their home, the presence of hurricane shutters, the willingness to evacuate their home in case of advise. Only 37% of the families that experienced hurricane Andrew would go to a shelter versus 49% for the families that did not ( P<.05). It was concluded that we can safely reject the hypothesis that having experienced a major hurricane will promote better preparedness for future ones. Those who experienced hurricane Andrew were less willing to go to a shelter compared with the group that did not.

  2. Effect of seasonality on chemical composition and antibacterial and anticandida activities of Argentine propolis. Design of a topical formulation.

    PubMed

    Isla, María Inés; Dantur, Yanina; Salas, Ana; Danert, Carolina; Zampini, Catiana; Arias, Myriam; Ordóñez, Roxana; Maldonado, Luis; Bedascarrasbure, Enrique; Nieva Moreno, María Inés

    2012-10-01

    The effect of seasonality on Argentine propolis collected during one year on its phenolic and flavonoid content and on the growth of Gram-positive and Gram-negative antibiotic resistant bacteria and Candida species was evaluated. Extracts of propolis samples collected in the summer and spring showed higher phenolic and flavonoid contents than the samples collected in other seasons (5.86 to 6.06 mg GAE/mL and 3.77 to 4.23 mg QE/mL, respectively). The propolis collected in summer and autumn showed higher antibacterial activity (30 microg/mL) than the other samples (MIC values between 30 and 120 microg/mL). No antibacterial activity was detected against Gram-negative bacteria. Also, these extracts were able to inhibit the development of five Candida species, with MFC values of 15-120 microg/mL. Pharmaceutical formulations containing the more active propolis extract were prepared. The hydrogel of acrylic acid polymer containing summer propolis extract as an antimicrobial agent showed microbiological, physical and functional stability during storage for 180 days. The pharmaceutical preparation, as well as the propolis extracts, was active against Candida sp. and antibiotic-multi-resistant Gram-positive bacteria. These results reveal that propolis samples collected by scraping in four seasons, especially in summer in Calingasta, San Juan, Argentina, can be used to obtain tinctures and hydrogels with antibacterial and antimycotic potential for topical use.

  3. Hurricanes vs. Humans: Their Comparative Long-Term Effects on Tropical Landscapes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugo, A. E.

    2002-12-01

    Puerto Rico experiences about 50 hurricanes per century. These large-scale events last for hours, but have significant short, medium, and long-term effects on vegetation and landscape processes as shown in studies in the Long-Term Ecological Research program. Forest canopy characteristics, tree mortality rates, life history characteristics of both plants and animals, successional rates, landslide occurrence, and sediment erosion and transport are examples of ecological and landscape attributes that exhibit strong responses to hurricane frequency and intensity. However, Puerto Rico has also undergone dramatic land cover change due to human activity. The island as a whole has experienced a cycle of deforestation, agricultural use, land abandonment, forest recovery, and urbanization. These anthropogenic events leave a long-term legacy on both individual ecosystems and the landscape as a whole. Species composition, structure, and age of forests are significantly influenced by human activity, as are rates of sediment erosion and transport, and frequency and size of landslides. I will present comparative data on the effects of hurricanes and human activity on Puerto Rico's forests and landscape. I address the following questions: which of these two forces that jointly shape the island's biota and landscape has a greater influence on functioning at the ecosystem level and what are the management implications? It appears that human impact on sediment erosion and transport events is greater than that of hurricanes and that humans change species composition of forests more than do hurricanes. However, regardless of the nature of the new ecosystems formed due to human activity, these systems must cope with the forces (rain and winds) of hurricanes in order to persist on the landscape. Regardless of the power of hurricanes, they don't appear to reset the human legacy on the island's landscape.

  4. Performance of active solar space-heating systems, 1980-1981 heating season

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, K.; Kendall, P.; Pakkala, P.; Cramer, M.

    1981-01-01

    Data are provided on 32 solar heating sites in the National Solar Data Network (NSDN). Of these, comprehensive data are included for 14 sites which cover a range of system types and solar applications. A brief description of the remaining sites is included along with system problems experienced which prevented comprehensive seasonal analyses. Tables and discussions of individual site parameters such as collector areas, storage tank sizes, manufacturers, building dimensions, etc. are provided. Tables and summaries of 1980-1981 heating season data are also provided. Analysis results are presented in graphic form to highlight key summary information. Performance indices are graphed for two major groups of collectors - liquid and air. Comparative results of multiple NSDN systems' operation for the 1980-1981 heating season are summarized with discussions of specific cases and conclusions which may be drawn from the data. (LEW)

  5. Wetland sedimentation from hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

    PubMed

    Turner, R Eugene; Baustian, Joseph J; Swenson, Erick M; Spicer, Jennifer S

    2006-10-20

    More than 131 x 10(6) metric tons (MT) of inorganic sediments accumulated in coastal wetlands when Hurricanes Katrina and Rita crossed the Louisiana coast in 2005, plus another 281 x 10(6) MT when accumulation was prorated for open water area. The annualized combined amount of inorganic sediments per hurricane equals (i) 12% of the Mississippi River's suspended load, (ii) 5.5 times the inorganic load delivered by overbank flooding before flood protection levees were constructed, and (iii) 227 times the amount introduced by a river diversion built for wetland restoration. The accumulation from hurricanes is sufficient to account for all the inorganic sediments in healthy saltmarsh wetlands.

  6. Downscaling tropical cyclone activity using regional models: Impact of air-sea coupling on the frequency and intensity of Atlantic hurricanes Authors: Jen-shan Hsieh, Mingkui Li, R. Saravanan, and Ping Chang Texas A & M University, College Station, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, J.; Li, M.; Saravanan, R.; Chang, P.

    2009-12-01

    Tropical cyclones are an important component of climate variability in the tropics and the subtropics. Unfortunately, these cyclones are poorly represented in coarse-resolution global general circulation models. Fine-resolution regional atmospheric models can be used to better simulate the properties of tropical cyclones, typically using specified sea surface temperature as the lower boundary condition. Such a boundary condition cannot simulate the cold wake associated with a tropical cyclone, which arises due to the enhanced vertical mixing and entrainment below the oceanic mixed layer. This cold wake has potential implications for the intensity of the tropical cyclone itself, because it can act as a negative air-sea feedback and lead to a weakening of the storm. Therefore, proper representation of this air-sea feedback is important when assessing the sensitivity of tropical cyclone frequency and intensity to climate change. We address this issue using a coupled regional climate model, where a regional atmospheric model is coupled to a regional ocean model. The model domain encompasses the Atlantic Ocean and adjoining continental regions. The atmospheric component is the NCAR WRF model running at 30 km horizontal resolution. The oceanic component is the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) running at 0.25 degree resolution. The atmospheric and oceanic models exchange fluxes of momentum, heat, and freshwater. The control coupled integration using this model simulates fairly realistic tropical variability, including a number of hurricane-like tropical vortices. To assess the sensitivity of tropical cyclone activity to air-sea coupling, we have also carried out a companion uncoupled integration, where the time-evolving sea surface temperature from the control coupled integration is used as the lower boundary condition for the uncoupled atmospheric model. We analyze the frequency and intensity of the tropical cyclones, as well as the associated precipitation, in both

  7. The effects of season and sand mining activities on thermal regime and water quality in a large shallow tropical lake.

    PubMed

    Sharip, Zati; Zaki, Ahmad Taqiyuddin Ahmad

    2014-08-01

    Thermal structure and water quality in a large and shallow lake in Malaysia were studied between January 2012 and June 2013 in order to understand variations in relation to water level fluctuations and in-stream mining activities. Environmental variables, namely temperature, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, pH, electrical conductivity, chlorophyll-A and transparency, were measured using a multi-parameter probe and a Secchi disk. Measurements of environmental variables were performed at 0.1 m intervals from the surface to the bottom of the lake during the dry and wet seasons. High water level and strong solar radiation increased temperature stratification. River discharges during the wet season, and unsustainable sand mining activities led to an increased turbidity exceeding 100 NTU, and reduced transparency, which changed the temperature variation and subsequently altered the water quality pattern.

  8. Effect of Season and High Ambient Temperature on Activity Levels and Patterns of Grizzly Bears (Ursus arctos)

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, Michelle L.; McLellan, Bruce N.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding factors that influence daily and annual activity patterns of a species provides insights to challenges facing individuals, particularly when climate shifts, and thus is important in conservation. Using GPS collars with dual-axis motion sensors that recorded the number of switches every 5 minutes we tested the hypotheses: 1. Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) increase daily activity levels and active bout lengths when they forage on berries, the major high-energy food in this ecosystem, and 2. Grizzly bears become less active and more nocturnal when ambient temperature exceeds 20°C. We found support for hypothesis 1 with both male and female bears being active from 0.7 to 2.8 h longer in the berry season than in other seasons. Our prediction under hypothesis 2 was not supported. When bears foraged on berries on a dry, open mountainside, there was no relationship between daily maximum temperature (which varied from 20.4 to 40.1°C) and the total amount of time bears were active, and no difference in activity levels during day or night between warm (20.4–27.3°C) and hot (27.9–40.1°C) days. Our results highlight the strong influence that food acquisition has on activity levels and patterns of grizzly bears and is a challenge to the heat dissipation limitation theory. PMID:25692979

  9. Effect of season and high ambient temperature on activity levels and patterns of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos).

    PubMed

    McLellan, Michelle L; McLellan, Bruce N

    2015-01-01

    Understanding factors that influence daily and annual activity patterns of a species provides insights to challenges facing individuals, particularly when climate shifts, and thus is important in conservation. Using GPS collars with dual-axis motion sensors that recorded the number of switches every 5 minutes we tested the hypotheses: 1. Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) increase daily activity levels and active bout lengths when they forage on berries, the major high-energy food in this ecosystem, and 2. Grizzly bears become less active and more nocturnal when ambient temperature exceeds 20°C. We found support for hypothesis 1 with both male and female bears being active from 0.7 to 2.8 h longer in the berry season than in other seasons. Our prediction under hypothesis 2 was not supported. When bears foraged on berries on a dry, open mountainside, there was no relationship between daily maximum temperature (which varied from 20.4 to 40.1°C) and the total amount of time bears were active, and no difference in activity levels during day or night between warm (20.4-27.3°C) and hot (27.9-40.1°C) days. Our results highlight the strong influence that food acquisition has on activity levels and patterns of grizzly bears and is a challenge to the heat dissipation limitation theory.

  10. Effect of season and high ambient temperature on activity levels and patterns of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos).

    PubMed

    McLellan, Michelle L; McLellan, Bruce N

    2015-01-01

    Understanding factors that influence daily and annual activity patterns of a species provides insights to challenges facing individuals, particularly when climate shifts, and thus is important in conservation. Using GPS collars with dual-axis motion sensors that recorded the number of switches every 5 minutes we tested the hypotheses: 1. Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) increase daily activity levels and active bout lengths when they forage on berries, the major high-energy food in this ecosystem, and 2. Grizzly bears become less active and more nocturnal when ambient temperature exceeds 20°C. We found support for hypothesis 1 with both male and female bears being active from 0.7 to 2.8 h longer in the berry season than in other seasons. Our prediction under hypothesis 2 was not supported. When bears foraged on berries on a dry, open mountainside, there was no relationship between daily maximum temperature (which varied from 20.4 to 40.1°C) and the total amount of time bears were active, and no difference in activity levels during day or night between warm (20.4-27.3°C) and hot (27.9-40.1°C) days. Our results highlight the strong influence that food acquisition has on activity levels and patterns of grizzly bears and is a challenge to the heat dissipation limitation theory. PMID:25692979

  11. Hurricanes

    MedlinePlus

    ... spawn tornadoes and lead to flooding. The high winds and heavy rains can destroy buildings, roads and bridges, and knock down power lines and trees. In coastal areas, very high tides called storm ...

  12. CloudSat measurements of landfalling hurricanes Gustav and Ike (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrosov, Sergey Y.

    2011-01-01

    The spaceborne 94 GHz radar onboard the CloudSat polar orbiting satellite offers new opportunities in estimating parameters of precipitating cloud systems including hurricanes. CloudSat measurements can resolve the vertical extent of storms and hurricanes, thus providing a view of their complex structure. These measurements can be used to retrieve with high spatial resolution rainfall and ice content parameters in an atmospheric vertical column as the satellite moves over the precipitating systems. Two major Atlantic hurricanes of the 2008 season, Gustav and Ike, were observed by CloudSat near their landfalls on the coast of the Gulf of Mexico. CloudSat measurements indicated cloud top heights at around 14-16 km above the ground and extended areas of startiform-like precipitation with estimated rain rates in a range of about 3-12 mm h-1. The radar bright band features observed just below the freezing level were identifiable for most measured reflectivity profiles. Maximum retrieved ice water path values reached about 20,000 g m-2. CloudSat rain rate retrievals over land and water agreed reasonably well with approximately coincident estimates from surface precipitation radars in the areas where measurements from these radars were available and were not contaminated by melting layer returns. Hurricane Gustav remnants observed by CloudSat several days after the landfall were characterized by smaller values of rain rate and ice water path (˜2-3 mm h-1 and 1000-10,000 g m-2, correspondingly). The hurricane parameters retrieved from CloudSat measurements may complement data from other satellite sources, which are traditionally used for hurricane observations.

  13. Development, Capabilities, and Impact on Wind Analyses of the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, T.; Uhlhorn, E.; Amarin, R.; Atlas, R.; Black, P. G.; Jones, W. L.; Ruf, C. S.

    2010-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is a new airborne microwave remote sensor for hurricane observations that is currently under development by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in partnership with the NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory/Hurricane Research Division, the University of Central Florida, the University of Michigan, and the University of Alabama in Huntsville. The instrument is being test flown in January and is expected to participate in the tropical cyclone experiment GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes) in the 2010 season. HIRAD is being designed to study the wind field in some detail within strong hurricanes and to enhance the real-time airborne ocean surface winds observation capabilities of NOAA and USAF Weather Squadron hurricane hunter aircraft currently using the operational Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR). Unlike SFMR, which measures wind speed and rain rate along the ground track at a single point directly beneath the aircraft, HIRAD will provide images of the surface wind and rain field over a wide swath (approximately 3 x the aircraft altitude) with approximately 2 km resolution. This paper describes the HIRAD instrument and the physical basis for its operations, including chamber test data from the instrument. The potential value of future HIRAD observations will be illustrated with a summary of Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) in which measurements from the new instrument as well as those from existing instruments (air, surface, and space-based) are simulated from the output of a detailed numerical model, and those results are used to construct simulated H*Wind analyses. Evaluations will be presented on the impact on H*Wind analyses of using the HIRAD instrument observations to replace those of the SFMR instrument, and also on the impact of a future satellite-based HIRAD in comparison to instruments with more limited capabilities for observing strong winds through heavy

  14. Macroscopic and molecular-scale assessment of soil lead contamination impacted by seasonal dove hunting activities

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Y.; Tappero, R.; Rick, A.R.; Saylor, T.; Faas, E. & Lanzirotti, A.

    2011-05-24

    Environmental contamination of lead (Pb) in soils and sediments poses serious threats to human and ecological health. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of seasonal dove sports hunting activities on Pb contamination in acid forest soils. A grid sampling method was used to investigate the spatial distribution of Pb contamination in surface soils. Soils were analyzed for total metal(loid) concentration and characterized for physicochemical properties and mineralogy. Adsorption isotherm experiments were also conducted to understand the reactivity and retention capacity of Pb(II) in soils. Finally, synchrotron-based X-ray microprobe and X-ray absorption spectroscopy were used to understand the chemical speciation of Pb that controls the retention/release mechanisms of Pb in soils. There was no excessive accumulation of Pb at the site. However, the concentration of Pb in surface soils was greater than the background level (<16 mg kg{sup -1}). The contamination level of Pb was as high as 67 mg kg{sup -1} near a patch of corn field where lime was frequently applied. A microfocused X-ray microprobe analysis showed the presence of Pb pellet fragments that predominantly contain oxidized Pb(II), suggesting that oxidative dissolution was occurring in soils. Dissolved Pb(II) can be readily retained in soils up to {approx}3,600 mg kg{sup -1} via inner-sphere and outer-sphere surface complexation on carbon and aluminol functional groups of soil components, suggesting that partitioning reactions control the concentration of Pb in soil solution. The fate of Pb is likely to be controlled by (1) oxidative dissolution process of Pb(0) pellets and (2) the release of outer-sphere and/or inner-sphere Pb surface complexes in humic substances and aluminosilicate/Al oxyhydroxides. Although no remedial actions are immediately required, the long-term accumulation of Pb in soils should be carefully monitored in protecting ecosystem and water quality at the dove hunting

  15. A Coordinated USGS Science Response to Hurricane Sandy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S.; Buxton, H. T.; Andersen, M.; Dean, T.; Focazio, M. J.; Haines, J.; Hainly, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    In late October 2012, Hurricane Sandy came ashore during a spring high tide on the New Jersey coastline, delivering hurricane-force winds, storm tides exceeding 19 feet, driving rain, and plummeting temperatures. Hurricane Sandy resulted in 72 direct fatalities in the mid-Atlantic and northeastern United States, and widespread and substantial physical, environmental, ecological, social, and economic impacts estimated at near $50 billion. Before the landfall of Hurricane Sandy, the USGS provided forecasts of potential coastal change; collected oblique aerial photography of pre-storm coastal morphology; deployed storm-surge sensors, rapid-deployment streamgages, wave sensors, and barometric pressure sensors; conducted Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) aerial topographic surveys of coastal areas; and issued a landslide alert for landslide prone areas. During the storm, Tidal Telemetry Networks provided real-time water-level information along the coast. Long-term networks and rapid-deployment real-time streamgages and water-quality monitors tracked river levels and changes in water quality. Immediately after the storm, the USGS serviced real-time instrumentation, retrieved data from over 140 storm-surge sensors, and collected other essential environmental data, including more than 830 high-water marks mapping the extent and elevation of the storm surge. Post-storm lidar surveys documented storm impacts to coastal barriers informing response and recovery and providing a new baseline to assess vulnerability of the reconfigured coast. The USGS Hazard Data Distribution System served storm-related information from many agencies on the Internet on a daily basis. Immediately following Hurricane Sandy the USGS developed a science plan, 'Meeting the Science Needs of the Nation in the Wake of Hurricane Sandy-A U.S. Geological Survey Science Plan for Support of Restoration and Recovery'. The plan will ensure continuing coordination of internal USGS activities as well as

  16. Psychiatric morbidity following Hurricane Andrew.

    PubMed

    David, D; Mellman, T A; Mendoza, L M; Kulick-Bell, R; Ironson, G; Schneiderman, N

    1996-07-01

    The nature of psychiatric morbidity in previously non-ill subjects from the area most affected by Hurricane Andrew was investigated at 6-12 months posthurricane. Preliminary associations of morbidity with personal and event-related risk factors were also determined. Fifty one percent (31/61) met criteria for a new-onset disorder, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in 36%, major depression (MD) in 30%, and other anxiety disorders in 20%. Thirty four subjects (56%) had significant symptoms persisting beyond 6 months. Having sustained "severe damage" was the risk factor most strongly associated with outcome. Our data underscore the range of psychiatric morbidity related to a natural disaster, and suggest a relationship to chronic stressors.

  17. [Seasonal dynamics of soil active carbon pool in a purple paddy soil in southwest China].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan; Jiang, Chang-sheng; Hao, Qing-ju

    2012-08-01

    The seasonal dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC), readily oxidized carbon (ROC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) in a purple paddy soil were studied in a long-term field experimental station in Chongqing, China. The results showed that the seasonal variations of the contents of SOC, ROC and MBC had similar trends in the rape growing season. The contents were much higher in the early and late stages than in the middle stage of the rape growth. SOC, ROC and MBC all achieved the highest values of 16.20 g x kg(-1), 3.58 g x kg(-1) and 309.70 mg x kg(-1) at the end of the growing period, respectively. The seasonal change of DOC content presented as a single peak and reached to the highest value of 37.64 mg x kg(-1) at the middle stage of the rape growth. The temporal dynamics of the allocation ratios of ROC, MBC and DOC were similar to that of their contents. The allocation ratios of ROC, MBC and DOC were 15.49%-23.93%, 1.44%-2.06% and 0.11%-0.32% during the rape growing season, respectively. The influencing factors of SOC and ROC contents were the soil temperature at 5 cm soil depth, soil total nitrogen content and pH. MBC content was jointly impacted by the soil temperature at 5 cm soil depth, root biomass and its C and N contents. DOC content was mainly affected by soil moisture. PMID:23213908

  18. Hurricane Sandy From the International Space Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    The International Space Station flew high above Hurricane Sandy just before 12 p.m. CDT Thursday. The storm was located about 85 miles south-southeast of Great Exuma Island. The storm’s maximum s...

  19. Hurricane Sandy Prowls the Eastern Seaboard

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of satellite observations from Oct. 26-29, 2012, shows Hurricane Sandy move along the U.S. East coast and into the Mid-Atlantic and northeastern U.S. Sandy had still not made landfall ...

  20. StenniSphere reopens after Hurricane Katrina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    StenniSphere reopened Jan. 18, 2006, almost five months after Hurricane Katrina damaged the basement of the building that houses the visitor center. Thanks to the staff's careful preparations before the storm, no artifacts or exhibits were harmed.

  1. GPM Captures Hurricane Matthew Over Haiti

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation starts with an overview of North America, Central America, and the Caribbean. As the camera slowly pushes in, Hurricane Matthew begins to form. By the morning of October 2nd, 2016 Ma...

  2. Hurricane Sandy science plan: New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ransom, Clarice N.

    2013-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy is a stark reminder of why the Nation must become more resilient to coastal hazards. More than one-half of the U.S. population lives within 50 miles of a coast, and this number is increasing. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is one of the largest providers of geologic and hydrologic information in the world. Federal, State, and local partners depend on the USGS science to know how to prepare for hurricane hazards and reduce losses from future hurricanes. The USGS works closely with other bureaus within the Department of the Interior, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Environmental Protection Agency, and many State and local agencies to identify their information needs before, during, and after hurricanes.

  3. Hurricane Prediction: Progress and Problem Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    Describes progress made in recent decades in predicting the track and landfall of hurricanes. Examines the problems of detecting, tracking, and describing tropical cyclones, and the difficulties which continue to complicate the matter of warning and evacuating coastal residents. (JR)

  4. International Space Station Footage of Hurricane Patricia

    NASA Video Gallery

    Outside the International Space Station, cameras captured dramatic views of Hurricane Patricia at 12:15 p.m. EDT on October 23, 2015 as the mammoth system moved north at about 10 mph, heading for a...

  5. Satellite Tracks Double Eastern Pacific Hurricanes

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of NOAA's GOES-West satellite imagery from Aug. 27 to Aug. 30, 2016, shows the movement of Category 4 Hurricane Madeline approaching Hawaii in the Central Pacific Ocean and Category ...

  6. NASA's GRIP Mission Flies Through Hurricane Earl

    NASA Video Gallery

    The eye of Hurricane Earl in the Atlantic Ocean is captured by a videographer aboard NASA’s DC-8 research aircraft on Monday, Aug. 30, 2010. The DC-8 passed through the eye of the storm six times j...

  7. Estimated return periods for Hurricane Katrina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsner, J. B.; Jagger, T. H.; Tsonis, A. A.

    2006-04-01

    Hurricane Katrina is one of the most destructive natural disaster in U.S. history. The infrequency of severe coastal hurricanes implies that empirical probability estimates of the next big one will be unreliable. Here we use an extreme-value model together with interpolated best-track (HURDAT) records to show that a hurricane of Katrina's intensity or stronger can be expected to occur, on average, once every 21 years somewhere along the Gulf coast from Texas through Alabama and once every 14 years somewhere along the entire coast from Texas through Maine. The model predicts a 100-year return level of 83 ms-1 (186 mph) during globally warm years and 75 ms-1 (168 mph) during globally cool years. This difference is consistent with models predicting an increase in hurricane intensity with increasing greenhouse warming.

  8. Hurricane Sandy -- Pass 1, Oct. 29, 2012

    NASA Video Gallery

    Hurricane Sandy was viewed Monday morning from the International Space Station as it orbited 260 miles above the Atlantic Ocean. Sandy had sustained winds of 90 miles an hour as the station passed ...

  9. Hurricane Sandy -- Pass 2, Oct. 29, 2012

    NASA Video Gallery

    Hurricane Sandy was viewed Monday morning from the International Space Station as it orbited 260 miles above the Atlantic Ocean. Sandy had sustained winds of 90 miles an hour as the station passed ...

  10. GPM Captures Hurricane Matthew Before Haiti Landfall

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation starts with an overview of North America, Central America, and the Caribbean. As the camera slowly pushes in, Hurricane Matthew begins to form. By the morning of Oct. 2, 2016, Matthe...

  11. 3-D TRMM Flyby of Hurricane Amanda

    NASA Video Gallery

    The TRMM satellite flew over Hurricane Amanda on Tuesday, May 27 at 1049 UTC (6:49 a.m. EDT) and captured rainfall rates and cloud height data that was used to create this 3-D simulated flyby. Cred...

  12. Hurricanes, sea level rise, and coastal change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger,, Asbury H.; Wang, Ping; Rosati, Julie D.; Roberts, Tiffany M.

    2011-01-01

    Sixteen hurricanes have made landfall along the U.S. east and Gulf coasts over the past decade. For most of these storms, the USGS with our partners in NASA and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have flown before and after lidar missions to detect changes in beaches and dunes. The most dramatic changes occurred when the coasts were completely submerged in an inundation regime. Where this occurred locally, a new breach was cut, like during Hurricane Isabel in North Carolina. Where surge inundated an entire island, the sand was stripped off leaving marshy outcrops behind, like during Hurricane Katrina in Louisiana. Sea level rise together with sand starvation and repeated hurricane impacts could increase the probabilities of inundation and degrade coasts more than sea level rise alone.

  13. View of Hurricane Igor From Space Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    Cameras mounted on the International Space Station captured new views of Hurricane Igor heading westward over the Atlantic Ocean the morning of Sept. 13. Igor was at Category 4 strength with maximu...

  14. Final Gulf Coast Hurricanes Situation Report #46

    SciTech Connect

    2006-01-26

    According to Entergy New Orleans, electricity has been restored to the vast majority of residents and businesses in the city, except in a few isolated areas that sustained severe devastation from Hurricane Katrina.

  15. 27: The Death of a Hurricane

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video explains what happens as a hurricane’s life cycle nears itsfinish. Here we learn about an important concept known as the BermudaHigh. This atmospheric phenomenon has a big effect on ...

  16. GOES-West Movie of Hurricane Newton

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of infrared and visible images from NOAA's GOES-West satellite shows the development and movement of Hurricane Newton from Sept. 4 through Sept. 6 at 10 a.m. EDT (1400 UTC) toward Ba...

  17. GPM Sees Hurricane Matthew's Life Cycle

    NASA Video Gallery

    Hurricane Matthew dropped a lot of rain, caused flooding and deaths in the state of North Carolina. Flooding is still widespread in North Carolina. Some rivers in North Carolina such as the Tar and...

  18. GPM Monitors Hurricane Matthew Nearing Florida

    NASA Video Gallery

    This data visualization resumes where the visualization "GPM Captures Hurricane Matthew Over Haiti" leaves off. After dissolving away GPM's DPR and GPROF data over Haiti on October 3rd, 2016, we fo...

  19. Seasonal variation in energy expenditure is not related to activity level or water temperature in a large diving bird.

    PubMed

    Guillemette, Magella; Butler, Patrick J

    2012-09-15

    There is considerable interest in understanding how the energy budget of an endotherm is modulated from a physiological and ecological point of view. In this paper, we used daily (24 h) heart rate (f(H24)), as a proxy of daily energy expenditure (DEE) across seasons, to test the effect of locomotion activity and water temperature on the energy budget of a large diving bird. f(H24) was monitored continuously in common eiders (Somateria mollissima) during 7 months together with measures of time spent flying and time spent feeding. f(H24) varied substantially during the recording period, with numerous increases and decreases that occurred across seasons, although we did not find any relationship between f(H24) and the time spent active (feeding and flying). However, inactive heart rate (f(H,inactive)) decreased as locomotion activity increased, suggesting that common eiders were using some form of compensation when under a high work load. We were also unable to detect a negative relationship between water temperature and resting heart rate, a proxy of resting metabolic rate. This was unexpected, based on the assumption that high thermoregulation costs would be associated with cold waters. We showed instead that a high level of energy expenditure coincided with feather moult and warm waters, which suggests that the observed variable pattern of seasonal DEE was driven by these two factors. Nevertheless, our results indicate that compensation and possibly the timing of moult may be used as mechanisms to reduce seasonal variation in energy expenditure. PMID:22660783

  20. Seasonal changes in the body size of two rotifer species living in activated sludge follow the Temperature-Size Rule

    PubMed Central

    Kiełbasa, Anna; Walczyńska, Aleksandra; Fiałkowska, Edyta; Pajdak-Stós, Agnieszka; Kozłowski, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Temperature-Size Rule (TSR) is a phenotypic body size response of ectotherms to changing temperature. It is known from the laboratory studies, but seasonal patterns in the field were not studied so far. We examined the body size changes in time of rotifers inhabiting activated sludge. We hypothesize that temperature is the most influencing parameter in sludge environment, leading sludge rotifers to seasonally change their body size according to TSR, and that oxygen content also induces the size response. The presence of TSR in Lecane inermis rotifer was tested in a laboratory study with two temperature and two food-type treatments. The effect of interaction between temperature and food was significant; L. inermis followed TSR in one food type only. The seasonal variability in the body sizes of the rotifers L. inermis and Cephalodella gracilis was estimated by monthly sampling and analyzed by multiple regression, in relation to the sludge parameters selected as the most influential by multivariate analysis, and predicted to alter rotifer body size (temperature and oxygen). L. inermis varied significantly in size throughout the year, and this variability is explained by temperature as predicted by the TSR, but not by oxygen availability. C. gracilis also varied in size, though this variability was explained by both temperature and oxygen. We suggest that sludge age acts as a mortality factor in activated sludge. It may have a seasonal effect on the body size of L. inermis and modify a possible effect of oxygen. Activated sludge habitat is driven by both biological processes and human regulation, yet its resident organisms follow general evolutionary rule as they do in other biological systems. The interspecific response patterns differ, revealing the importance of taking species-specific properties into account. Our findings are applicable to sludge properties enhancement through optimizing the conditions for its biological component. PMID:25558362